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Sample records for asymptomatic aortic stenosis

  1. Diagnosis and management of patients with asymptomatic severe aortic stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Katayama, Minako; Chaliki, Hari P

    2016-01-01

    Aortic stenosis (AS) is a disease that progresses slowly for years without symptoms, so patients need to be carefully managed with appropriate follow up and referred for aortic valve replacement in a timely manner. Development of symptoms is a clear indication for aortic valve intervention in patients with severe AS. The decision for early surgery in patients with asymptomatic severe AS is more complex. In this review, we discuss how to identify high-risk patients with asymptomatic severe AS who may benefit from early surgery. PMID:26981214

  2. Aortic Valve Stenosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... By Mayo Clinic Staff Aortic valve stenosis — or aortic stenosis — occurs when the heart's aortic valve narrows. This ... pressure may prevent or slow the development of aortic stenosis. Ask your doctor if you need to lower ...

  3. Aortic Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Bakaeen, Faisal G; Rosengart, Todd K; Carabello, Blase A

    2017-01-03

    This issue provides a clinical overview of aortic stenosis, focusing on screening, diagnosis, treatment, and practice improvement. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of additional science writers and physician writers.

  4. [Congenital aortic stenosis].

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, M

    2001-08-01

    Recent advances in and controversies concerning the management of children with congenital valvular aortic stenosis are discussed. In neonates with critical aortic stenosis, improved survival has recently been reported after surgical open valvotomy and balloon valvuloplasty, although it is difficult at this point to compare the results of the two procedures and determine their differential indications. Good results have also been achieved after extended aortic valvuloplasty for recurrent aortic stenosis and/or insufficiency, but the length of follow-up in these patients is still short. The technique first reported in 1991 for bilateral enlargement fo a small annulus permits the insertion of an aortic valve 3-4 sizes larger than the native annulus. It entails no risk of distorting the mitral valve, damaging the conduction system or important branches of the coronary arteries, or resulting in left ventricular dysfunction. The Ross procedure is now widely applied in the West, with reports of early mortality rates of less than 5% and event-free survival rates of 80-90% during follow-up of 4-8 years. Longer follow-up and continued careful evaluation are required to resolve the issue of possible dilatation and subsequent neoaortic valve dysfunction and pulmonary stenosis due to allograft degeneration after pulmonary autograft root replacement in children.

  5. Genetics Home Reference: supravalvular aortic stenosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions supravalvular aortic stenosis supravalvular aortic stenosis Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS) is a heart defect that develops before ...

  6. Aortic Stenosis: Changing Disease Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Rashedi, Nina

    2015-01-01

    Aortic stenosis (AS) occurs in almost 10% of adults over age 80 years with a mortality about 50% at 2 years unless outflow obstruction is relieved by aortic valve replacement (AVR). Development of AS is associated with anatomic, clinical and genetic risk factors including a bicuspid valve in 50%; clinical factors that include older age, hypertension, smoking, diabetes and elevated serum lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] levels; and genetic factors such as a polymorphism in the Lp(a) locus. Early stages of AS are characterized by focal areas of leaflet thickening and calcification. The rate of hemodynamic progression is variable but eventual severe AS is inevitable once even mild valve obstruction is present. There is no specific medical therapy to prevent leaflet calcification. Basic principles of medical therapy for asymptomatic AS are patient education, periodic echocardiographic and clinical monitoring, standard cardiac risk factor evaluation and modification and treatment of hypertension or other comorbid conditions. When severe AS is present, a careful evaluation for symptoms is needed, often with an exercise test to document symptom status and cardiac reserve. In symptomatic patients with severe AS, AVR improves survival and relieves symptoms. In asymptomatic patients with severe AS, AVR also is appropriate if ejection fraction is < 50%, disease progression is rapid or AS is very severe (aortic velocity > 5 m/s). The choice of surgical or transcatheter AVR depends on the estimated surgical risk plus other factors such as frailty, other organ system disease and procedural specific impediments. PMID:26140146

  7. Coronary Ostial Stenosis after Aortic Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Ziakas, Antonios G.; Economou, Fotios I.; Charokopos, Nicholas A.; Pitsis, Antonios A.; Parharidou, Despina G.; Papadopoulos, Thomas I.; Parharidis, Georgios E.

    2010-01-01

    Coronary ostial stenosis is a rare but potentially serious sequela after aortic valve replacement. It occurs in the left main or right coronary artery after 1% to 5% of aortic valve replacement procedures. The clinical symptoms are usually severe and may appear from 1 to 6 months postoperatively. Although the typical treatment is coronary artery bypass grafting, patients have been successfully treated by means of percutaneous coronary intervention. Herein, we present the cases of 2 patients in whom coronary ostial stenosis developed after aortic valve replacement. In the 1st case, a 72-year-old man underwent aortic valve replacement and bypass grafting of the saphenous vein to the left anterior descending coronary artery. Six months later, he experienced a non-ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction. Coronary angiography revealed a critical stenosis of the right coronary artery ostium. In the 2nd case, a 78-year-old woman underwent aortic valve replacement and grafting of the saphenous vein to an occluded right coronary artery. Four months later, she experienced unstable angina. Coronary angiography showed a critical left main coronary artery ostial stenosis and occlusion of the right coronary artery venous graft. In each patient, we performed percutaneous coronary intervention and deployed a drug-eluting stent. Both patients were asymptomatic on 6-to 12-month follow-up. We attribute the coronary ostial stenosis to the selective ostial administration of cardioplegic solution during surgery. We conclude that retrograde administration of cardioplegic solution through the coronary sinus may reduce the incidence of postoperative coronary ostial stenosis, and that stenting may be an efficient treatment option. PMID:20844624

  8. Severe aortic stenosis: forgotten associations.

    PubMed

    Godinho, Ana Rita; Amorim, Sandra; Campelo, Manuel; Martins, Elisabete; Lopez Rodriguez, Elisa; Coelho, Rosa; Macedo, Guilherme; Maciel, Maria Júlia

    2014-09-01

    The authors present the case of a 68-year-old man with predominantly right heart failure in the context of severe aortic stenosis associated with pulmonary hypertension. Anemia was diagnosed which, after endoscopic study, was considered to be secondary to angiodysplasia and a diagnosis of Heyde syndrome was made. After valve replacement surgery the patient's heart failure improved and hemoglobin levels stabilized. We present this case to show the need to recognize less common associations of severe aortic stenosis, in order to provide immediate and appropriate treatment.

  9. Specific changes in circulating cytokines and growth factors induced by exercise stress testing in asymptomatic aortic valve stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Kolasa-Trela, Renata; Konieczynska, Malgorzata; Bazanek, Marta; Undas, Anetta

    2017-01-01

    Background We evaluated exercise-induced changes in the profile of circulating cytokines and growth factors in patients with AS. Methods We studied 32 consecutive asymptomatic moderate-to-severe AS patients and 32 age and sex-matched controls. Plasma levels of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-10, hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β were measured at 4 time points, i.e. at rest, at peak bicycle exercise, one hour and 24 hours after a symptom-limited exercise. Results Exercise increased all the 5 markers in both groups (all p<0.0001). The maximum levels of all tested cytokines were higher in the AS group (all p<0.05) compared with controls. In AS patients the highest levels of VEGF, IL-6, and IL-10 were observed one hour after exercise, while in the control group at peak exercise. In both groups maximum TGF- β levels were observed one hour after exercise. HGF levels were higher at peak and one hour after test in the AS group (p = 0.0001), however the maximum value in AS was observed at peak while in controls after test. In both groups TGF-β was the only marker that remained increased 24 hours after exercise compared with the value at rest (p = 0.0001). The cytokines and growth factors showed no association with heart rate and the workload. Conclusion In asymptomatic patients with moderate-to-severe AS, exercise produces a different pattern of changes in circulating cytokines and growth factors, and maximum levels of all tested cytokines were significantly higher in AS patients compared with the control group. PMID:28291817

  10. Bovine aortic arch with supravalvular aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Idhrees, Mohammed; Cherian, Vijay Thomas; Menon, Sabarinath; Mathew, Thomas; Dharan, Baiju S; Jayakumar, K

    2016-09-01

    A 5-year-old boy was diagnosed to have supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS). On evaluation of CT angiogram, there was associated bovine aortic arch (BAA). Association of BAA with SVAS has not been previously reported in literature, and to best of our knowledge, this is the first case report of SVAS with BAA. Recent studies show BAA as a marker for aortopathy. SVAS is also an arteriopathy. In light of this, SVAS can also possibly be a manifestation of aortopathy associated with BAA.

  11. Low-gradient aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Clavel, Marie-Annick; Magne, Julien; Pibarot, Philippe

    2016-09-07

    An important proportion of patients with aortic stenosis (AS) have a 'low-gradient' AS, i.e. a small aortic valve area (AVA <1.0 cm(2)) consistent with severe AS but a low mean transvalvular gradient (<40 mmHg) consistent with non-severe AS. The management of this subset of patients is particularly challenging because the AVA-gradient discrepancy raises uncertainty about the actual stenosis severity and thus about the indication for aortic valve replacement (AVR) if the patient has symptoms and/or left ventricular (LV) systolic dysfunction. The most frequent cause of low-gradient (LG) AS is the presence of a low LV outflow state, which may occur with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), i.e. classical low-flow, low-gradient (LF-LG), or preserved LVEF, i.e. paradoxical LF-LG. Furthermore, a substantial proportion of patients with AS may have a normal-flow, low-gradient (NF-LG) AS: i.e. a small AVA-low-gradient combination but with a normal flow. One of the most important clinical challenges in these three categories of patients with LG AS (classical LF-LG, paradoxical LF-LG, and NF-LG) is to differentiate a true-severe AS that generally benefits from AVR vs. a pseudo-severe AS that should be managed conservatively. A low-dose dobutamine stress echocardiography may be used for this purpose in patients with classical LF-LG AS, whereas aortic valve calcium scoring by multi-detector computed tomography is the preferred modality in those with paradoxical LF-LG or NF-LG AS. Although patients with LF-LG severe AS have worse outcomes than those with high-gradient AS following AVR, they nonetheless display an important survival benefit with this intervention. Some studies suggest that transcatheter AVR may be superior to surgical AVR in patients with LF-LG AS.

  12. Supravalvular aortic stenosis in adult with anomalies of aortic arch vessels and aortic regurgitation

    PubMed Central

    Valente, Acrisio Sales; Alencar, Polyanna; Santos, Alana Neiva; Lobo, Roberto Augusto de Mesquita; de Mesquita, Fernando Antônio; Guimarães, Aloyra Guedis

    2013-01-01

    The supravalvular aortic stenosis is a rare congenital heart defect being very uncommon in adults. We present a case of supravalvular aortic stenosis in adult associated with anomalies of the aortic arch vessels and aortic regurgitation, which was submitted to aortic valve replacement and arterioplasty of the ascending aorta with a good postoperative course. PMID:24598962

  13. Aortic Stenosis: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, and Therapy.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Jessica; Naqvi, Syed Yaseen; Giri, Jay; Goldberg, Sheldon

    2017-03-01

    The incidence of aortic stenosis increases with age, affecting up to 10% of the population by the eighth decade. Once symptoms develop, aortic stenosis is rapidly fatal. Proper management requires an understanding of the physiology and criteria used to define disease severity. There is no effective pharmacologic treatment. Surgical aortic valve replacement has been the gold standard treatment for decades. However, over the last 10 years transcatheter aortic valve replacement has emerged as an attractive, less-invasive option for appropriately selected patients. Refinements in valve design and delivery systems have led to widespread use of this breakthrough technology in selected patients. We review the pathophysiology, criteria for valve replacement, and the results of the trials comparing transcatheter aortic valve replacement with surgical aortic valve replacement.

  14. Supravalvular aortic stenosis after arterial switch operation.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Takuya; Koide, Masaaki; Kunii, Yoshifumi; Watanabe, Kazumasa; Kanzaki, Tomohito; Ohashi, Yuko

    2016-07-01

    Supravalvular aortic stenosis as a late complication of transposition of the great arteries is very rare, and only a few cases have been reported. We describe the case of a 14-year-old girl who developed supravalvular aortic stenosis as a late complication of the arterial switch operation for transposition of the great arteries. The narrowed ascending aorta was replaced with a graft. The right pulmonary artery was transected to approach the ascending aorta which adhered severely to the main pulmonary trunk, and we obtained a good operative field.

  15. [Management of aortic stenosis in patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery].

    PubMed

    Labbé, Vincent; Ederhy, Stéphane; Szymkiewicz, Olga; Cohen, Ariel

    2015-01-01

    There is a significant risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients with severe aortic stenosis (valve area <1cm(2) or 0.6cm(2)/m(2) body surface area, and maximum jet velocity ≥4m/sec, and mean aortic pressure gradient ≥40mmHg) undergoing non-cardiac surgery, especially in patients with symptoms (dyspnoea, angina, syncope, or heart failure). Before any surgery, clinical assessment should search for signs of aortic stenosis which justifies echocardiographic examination, particularly in the elderly. A systematic rest echocardiography with searching aortic stenosis should be considered in patients undergoing high risk surgery. The key points of pre-operative cardiac risk assessment are: assessment of the severity of aortic stenosis, measurement of the functional capacity, evaluation of the left ventricular systolic function, search of associated coronary artery disease, estimate of the surgical risk of cardiac events, and achievement of risk indices. In symptomatic patients with severe aortic stenosis, only urgent non-cardiac surgery should be performed under careful haemodynamic monitoring. Aortic valve replacement should be considered before elective non-cardiac surgery. In asymptomatic patients with severe aortic stenosis, aortic valve replacement should be considered before non-cardiac high risk surgery. Non-cardiac surgery at low/intermediate risk can be performed provided an adapted anaesthetic technique.

  16. Asymptomatic Pulmonary Vein Stenosis: Hemodynamic Adaptation and Successful Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, Denis

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary vein stenosis is a well-established possible complication following an atrial fibrillation ablation of pulmonary veins. Symptoms of pulmonary vein stenosis range from asymptomatic to severe exertional dyspnea. The number of asymptomatic patients with pulmonary vein stenosis is greater than originally estimated; moreover, only about 22% of severe pulmonary vein stenosis requires intervention. We present a patient with severe postatrial fibrillation (AF) ablation pulmonary vein (PV) stenosis, which was seen on multiple imaging modalities including cardiac computed tomography (CT) angiogram, lung perfusion scan, and pulmonary angiogram. This patient did not have any pulmonary symptoms. Hemodynamic changes within a stenosed pulmonary vein might not reflect the clinical severity of the obstruction if redistribution of pulmonary artery flow occurs. Our patient had an abnormal lung perfusion and ventilation (V/Q) scan, suggesting pulmonary artery blood flow redistribution. The patient ultimately underwent safe repeat atrial fibrillation ablation with successful elimination of arrhythmia. PMID:28105376

  17. Fluid dynamics of aortic valve stenosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keshavarz-Motamed, Zahra; Maftoon, Nima

    2009-11-01

    Aortic valve stenosis, which causes considerable constriction of the flow passage, is one of the most frequent cardiovascular diseases and is the most common cause of the valvular replacements which take place for around 100,000 per year in North America. Furthermore, it is considered as the most frequent cardiac disease after arterial hypertension and coronary artery disease. The objective of this study is to develop an analytical model considering the coupling effect between fluid flow and elastic deformation with reasonable boundary conditions to describe the effect of AS on the left ventricle and the aorta. The pulsatile and Newtonian blood flow through aortic stenosis with vascular wall deformability is analyzed and its effects are discussed in terms of flow parameters such as velocity, resistance to flow, shear stress distribution and pressure loss. Meanwhile we developed analytical expressions to improve the comprehension of the transvalvular hemodynamics and the aortic stenosis hemodynamics which is of great interest because of one main reason. To medical scientists, an accurate knowledge of the mechanical properties of whole blood flow in the aorta can suggest a new diagnostic tool.

  18. Normal rate of ventricular emptying in valvular aortic stenosis.

    PubMed Central

    Lederman, S M; Gash, A K; Bove, A A; Spann, J F

    1981-01-01

    The delayed upstroke of the arterial pulse in valvular aortic stenosis has been attributed, in part, to prolonged left ventricular emptying. Left ventricular emptying rate, however, has not been measured in aortic stenosis. We assessed the rate of left ventricular emptying by computer analysis of biplane cineangiograms in seven normal subjects, six patients with mild to moderate aortic stenosis, and 12 patients with severe aortic stenosis. As an indicator of delayed arterial pulse rise, T time index (time to half maximum aortic pressure corrected for heart rate) was measured in each group. T time index averaged 0.07 +/- 0.01 units in normal subjects, 0.14 +/- 0.04 units in the patients with mild to moderate aortic stenosis, and 0.13 +/- 0.05 units in those with severe aortic stenosis. Patients with mild to moderate and severe aortic stenosis differed significantly from normal subjects. Relative emptying rates were defined as the percentage of initial systolic volume ejected divided by the percentage of systole elapsed. These relative emptying rates were determined during the first, second, and third thirds of systole in all three groups. No significant decrease in the relative rate of left ventricular emptying was noted when each group of patients with aortic stenosis was compared with the normal subjects. Neither was there slowing in the actual rate of ejection of blood in ml per second throughout systole. We conclude that the rate of ventricular emptying is normal in aortic stenosis and does not explain the arterial pulse delay in this disease. PMID:7295438

  19. Subcoronary versus supracoronary aortic stenosis. an experimental evaluation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Valvular aortic stenosis is the most common cause of left ventricular hypertrophy due to gradually increasing pressure work. As the stenosis develop the left ventricular hypertrophy may lead to congestive heart failure, increased risk of perioperative complications and also increased risk of sudden death. A functional porcine model imitating the pathophysiological nature of valvular aortic stenosis is very much sought after in order to study the geometrical and pathophysiological changes of the left ventricle, timing of surgery and also pharmacological therapy in this patient group. Earlier we developed a porcine model for aortic stenosis based on supracoronary aortic banding, this model may not completely imitate the pathophysiological changes that occurs when valvular aortic stenosis is present including the coronary blood flow. It would therefore be desirable to optimize this model according to the localization of the stenosis. Methods In 20 kg pigs subcoronary (n = 8), supracoronary aortic banding (n = 8) or sham operation (n = 4) was preformed via a left lateral thoracotomy. The primary endpoint was left ventricular wall thickness; secondary endpoints were heart/body weight ratio and the systolic/diastolic blood flow ratio in the left anterior descending coronary. Statistical evaluation by oneway anova and unpaired t-test. Results Sub- and supracoronary banding induce an equal degree of left ventricular hypertrophy compared with the control group. The coronary blood flow ratio was slightly but not significantly higher in the supracoronary group (ratio = 0.45) compared with the two other groups (subcoronary ratio = 0.36, control ratio = 0.34). Conclusions A human pathophysiologically compatible porcine model for valvular aortic stenosis was developed by performing subcoronary aortic banding. Sub- and supracoronary aortic banding induce an equal degree of left ventricular hypertrophy. This model may be valid for experimental investigations of aortic

  20. The relation between transaortic pressure difference and flow during dobutamine stress echocardiography in patients with aortic stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, S; Rimington, H; Chambers, J

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To investigate the relation between transaortic pressure difference and flow in patients with aortic stenosis.
METHODS—50 asymptomatic patients with all grades of aortic stenosis were studied using dobutamine stress echocardiography. Individual plots of mean pressure drop against flow were drawn. Comparisons were made between grades of aortic stenosis as defined by the continuity equation.
RESULTS—A significant linear relation between pressure difference and flow was found in 34 patients (68%). There was a significant curvilinear relation in four (8%), while no significant regression line could be fitted in 12 (24%). In the 34 patients with linear fits, the slopes (mean (SD)) were 0.08 (0.07) in mild, 0.10 (0.04) in moderate, and 0.22 (0.16) in severe aortic stenosis (p = 0.0055).
CONCLUSIONS—Transaortic pressure difference can be related directly to flow in many patients with all grades of aortic stenosis. However, there are individual differences in slope and intercept suggesting that resistance calculated at rest may not always be representative. Raw pressure drop/flow plots may be an alternative method of describing valve function.


Keywords: aortic stenosis; continuity equation; resistance; Doppler echocardiography PMID:10377300

  1. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement for bicuspid aortic stenosis 13years post heart transplant.

    PubMed

    Julien, Maureen B; Desai, Nimesh; Brozena, Susan; Herrmann, Howard C

    2016-12-16

    Despite the widespread use of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) for moderate and high-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis, it is utilized less frequently in patients with bicuspid aortic valves (BAV). Orthotopic heart transplant (OHT) donors tend to be younger and may have undiagnosed BAV. We present a case of successful TAVR in a patient with BAV thirteen years after OHT.

  2. Management of concomitant large aortic aneurysm and severe stenosis of aortic arc.

    PubMed

    Ren, Shiyan; Sun, Guang; Yang, Yuguang; Liu, Peng

    2014-01-01

    Primary large saccular aortic aneurysm with high grade stenosis of aortic arc is rare, and no standard therapy is available. We have encountered one case and successfully treated using a hybrid interventional approach. A 59-year-old woman with a 7-day history of headache, dizziness and chest pain, and a 5-year history of hypertension admitted and was diagnosed with transverse aortic aneurysm with sever aortic stenosis, the huge saccular aneurysm was located behind the transverse aortic arc. During surgery, a bypass with graft from ascending aorta to left external iliac artery was made initially in order to ensure the blood supply to the left leg, afterward, a 40 mm × 160 mm covered stent was implanted to cover the orifice of aneurysm and was used as a supporting anchorage in the descending aorta, a second covered stent (20 mm × 100 mm) was implanted to expand the stenosis of aortic arc. Follow-up at 1.5-year after surgery, the patient has been doing well without any surgical complication. A collateral pathway between internal mammary artery and inferior epigastric artery via the superior epigastric artery was found on3-dimensional reconstruction before surgery. Interruption of the compensatory arterial collateral pathway in the patient with severe stenosis of aortic arc should be prevented if possible in order to ensure the satisfactory perfusion of the lower limbs of the body.In conclusion, a patient with transverse aortic aneurysm accompanied with severe aortic stenosis can be treated by hybrid surgery.

  3. Severe Aortic Stenosis Associated with Unicommissural Unicuspid Aortic Valve in a Middle Aged Male

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Hee-Jin; Kim, Song Soo; Sun, Byung Joo; Jin, Sun Ah; Kim, Jun-Hyung; Lee, Jae-Hwan; Choi, Siwan; Jeong, Jin-Ok; Seong, In-Whan

    2016-01-01

    Unicuspid aortic valve (UAV) is an extremely rare form of congenital aortic valvular abnormality. Although UAV shows similar clinical characteristics to bicuspid aortic valve, the clinical symptoms develop at earlier age and progress at a faster pace in UAV. In this report, we are presenting a 42-year-old male with severe aortic stenosis associated with unicommissural UAV. The patients underwent a successful Bentall operation. PMID:27721957

  4. Serum and tissue biomarkers in aortic stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Kapelouzou, Alkistis; Tsourelis, Loukas; Kaklamanis, Loukas; Degiannis, Dimitrios; Kogerakis, Nektarios; Cokkinos, Dennis V.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Calcific aortic valve stenosis (CAVS) is seen in a large proportion of individuals over 60 years. It is an active process, influenced by lipid accumulation, mechanical stress, inflammation, and abnormal extracellular matrix turnover. Various biomarkers (BMs) are studied, as regards mechanisms, diagnosis and prognosis. Methods: In the calcified valves calcium deposition, elastin fragmentation and disorganization of cellular matrix were assessed, together with expression of OPN, OPG, osteocalcin (OCN) and RL2. We prospectively studied the following serum BMs in 60 patients with CAVS and compared them to 20 healthy controls, free from any cardiac disease: Matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) 2 and 9 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP1), which regulate collagen turnover, inflammatory factors, i.e. tumor necrosis factor a (TNFa), interleukin 2 (IL2), transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) which regulates fibrosis, fetuin-A (fet-A), osteopontin (OPN), osteoprotegerin (OPG), sclerostin (SOST), and relaxin-2 (RL2) which positively or negatively regulate calcification. Monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) which regulates migration and infiltration of monocytes/macrophages was also studied as well as malondialdehyde (MDA) an oxidative marker. Results: Extent of tissue valve calcification (Alizarin Red stain) was negatively correlated with tissue elastin, and RL2, and positively correlated with tissue OCN and serum TIMP1 and MCP-1 and negatively with MMP9. Tissue OCN was positively correlated with OPN and negatively with the elastin. Tissue OPN was negatively correlated with elastin and OPG. Tissue OPN OPG and RL2 were not correlated with serum levels In the serum we found in patients statistically lower TIMP1, fet-A and RL2 levels, while all other BMs were higher compared to the healthy group. Positive correlations between SOST and IL2, OPG and MDA but negative with TNFa and OPN were found; also MMP9 was negatively correlated with TNFa and MCP-1

  5. Critical aortic stenosis and acute ascending aortic penetrating ulcer managed utilizing transapical TAVR and TEVAR.

    PubMed

    Allen, Keith B; Davis, J Russell; Cohen, David J

    2015-10-01

    Thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) of acute ascending aortic pathology is feasible; however, the unique features of this aortic segment in addition to access challenges restricts its use to a select, high-risk subset of patients. With the advent of TAVR, large device delivery using transapical access has become a well-defined technique. We report a patient with critical aortic stenosis and an acute ascending aortic penetrating ulcer with tamponade managed successfully utilizing transapical TAVR and TEVAR. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a hybrid single-stage TAVR and ascending aortic TEVAR using transapical access.

  6. Patch annulo-aortoplasty in an adult patient with congenital supravalvular aortic stenosis and a small aortic annulus.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Naoto; Morimoto, Keisuke; Morimoto, Yoshihisa; Tanaka, Akiko; Sakamoto, Toshihito; Okada, Kenji; Okita, Yutaka

    2011-08-01

    A 39-year-old woman with familial homozygous hypercholesterolemia had supravalvular and valvular aortic stenosis. Modified Nick's procedure and aortic valve replacement was performed to relieve both the supravalvular and annular stenoses. At surgery, the ascending aorta was found to be narrowing at the level of the sinotubular junction, which was compatible with congenital supravalvular aortic stenosis. Histological examination of the aortic cusps showed sclerotic change due to hypercholesterolemia. These findings indicated that familial homozygous hypercholesterolemia caused valvular aortic stenosis and exacerbated congenital supravalvular aortic stenosis.

  7. Surgery for supravalvular aortic stenosis - the three-patch technique.

    PubMed

    Arnáiz, Elena; Koolbergen, Dave; Adsuar, Alejandro; Hazekamp, Mark G

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to describe the three-patch technique for repair of supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS). Supravalvular aortic stenosis is a rare malformation as a result of an abnormal thickening of the aortic wall. SVAS may present in two forms: a localized form (affecting only the aortic sinotubular junction) and a diffuse form, where the aortic arch and its side branches are also affected. Since 1960, multiple surgical techniques have been described with the aim of relieving the aortic narrowing and restoring the aortic root. We present the three-patch technique as originally developed by Brom. After transection of the aorta at the sinotubular junction, three longitudinal incisions are made into the three sinuses. The aortic root geometry is then restored by placement of three separate patches of autologous pericardium in the opened sinuses. Brom's technique provides a complete and symmetric restoration of the aortic anatomy. The technique is illustrated by angiographies, surgical drawings, videos and a review of the literature. The results of the three-patch technique are good and our long-term experience will be described.

  8. [Unicuspid Aortic Valve Stenosis Combined with Aortic Coarctation;Report of a Case].

    PubMed

    Kubota, Takehiro; Wakasa, Satoru; Shingu, Yasushige; Matsui, Yoshiro

    2016-06-01

    Unicuspid aortic valve in an adult is extremely rare. In addition, 90% of the patients with aortic coarctation are reported to die before the age 50. A 60-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital for further examination of exertional dyspnea which had begun one year before. She had been under medical treatment for hypertension since early thirties, and had been also diagnosed with moderate aortic stenosis at 50 years of age. She was at 1st diagnosed with aortic coarctation combined with bicuspid aortic valve stenosis. The aortic valve was then found unicuspid and was replaced under cardiopulmonary bypass with perfusion to both the ascending aorta and the femoral artery. Repair of aortic coarctation was performed 3 months later through left thoracotomy without extracorporeal circulation due to the rich collateral circulation. She had no postoperative complications, and hypertension as well as ankle-brachial index improved to the normal levels.

  9. Aortic coarctation, aneurysm, and ventricular dysfunction in an asymptomatic infant.

    PubMed

    García, Ana I; Aguilar, Juan M; García, Enrique

    2016-06-01

    Aortic arch coarctation with post-coarctation aneurysm is rare in infants. We present the case of an asymptomatic 3-month-old infant with severe left ventricular dysfunction in this setting. The patient underwent surgical repair, and the left ventricular ejection fraction improved to recovery the 4th post-operative month.

  10. [Asymptomatic carotid stenosis at high risk of ipsilateral cerebro-vascular events].

    PubMed

    Becker, F; Loppinet, A

    2004-01-01

    The management of asymptomatic carotid stenosis remains unclear in terms of screening as well as of treatment. The degree of carotid stenosis is not enough to clarify the debate. It seems useful to search among severe carotid stenosis parameters indicating higher ipsilateral stroke risk. Duplex ultrasound and transcranial Doppler offer this opportunity with a diagnostic battery allowing to evaluate hemodynamical risk (degree of stenosis, common carotid flow, MCA signal, cerebral vasoreactivity), thrombo-embolic risk (echostructure of the stenosis, micro-embolic signals, HITS) and progression of the stenosis.

  11. Supravalvular aortic stenosis. Long-term results of surgical treatment.

    PubMed

    van Son, J A; Danielson, G K; Puga, F J; Schaff, H V; Rastogi, A; Edwards, W D; Feldt, R H

    1994-01-01

    To determine long-term outcome after operation for supravalvular aortic stenosis, we reviewed the case histories of 80 patients who had repair of the localized form (group A) (n = 67) or diffuse form (group B) (n = 13) from 1956 to 1992, including 31 patients with the Williams-Beuren syndrome. Ages ranged from 7 months to 54 years (mean = 12.6 years). Forty-six patients had one or more associated cardiovascular anomalies; the most common was aortic valve stenosis (33.8%). Eighteen patients had 22 previous cardiovascular operations, and 28 patients had one or more additional anomalies repaired during their initial procedure at our institution. In group A, the aortic root was enlarged with a teardrop-shaped patch (n = 61) or a pantaloon-shaped patch (n = 6). In group B, patch enlargement of the aorta was confined to the root (n = 4) or extended into the ascending aorta or aortic arch (n = 7); one patient had a graft placed between the ascending and descending thoracic aorta and one patient had a left ventricular-aortic conduit. There were no deaths in group A; two patients in group B in whom patch enlargement was confined to the aortic root died during the operation (2.5%). Follow-up extended to 33.4 years (mean = 14.2 years); there were five late deaths in group A and one in group B. Survival excluding operative mortality was 94% at 10 years and 91% at 20 years. All patients were in functional class I or II. There was no significant difference between patients with a teardrop-shaped or pantaloon-shaped patch in terms of late gradient, survival, or aortic insufficiency. By Cox multivariate model, the only independent predictor of late death for all patients was associated aortic valve disease (p = 0.02), which was also a risk factor for late reoperation (p = 0.02). In group B, overall survival was better in patients who received an extended patch versus aortic root patch only (p = 0.02). We reached the following conclusions: (1) Associated aortic valve disease was

  12. Bicuspid aortic valve and severe aortic stenosis in a newborn exposed to carbamazapine during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Karataş, Zehra; Karataş, Ahmet; Özlü, Tülay; Goksugur, Sevil B.; Varan, Birgül

    2014-01-01

    The use of antiepileptic drugs increases the risk of major congenital malformations during pregnancy. Here, we report an infant who had a history of in-utero carbamazepine exposure and who was born with a cardiac malformation. The infant was born at 39 weeks of gestation vaginally to an epileptic mother who had been treated with carbamazepine throughout her pregnancy. He was referred due to cardiac murmur in the second week of his life. The mother had not received folic acid supplementation. Transthoracic echocardiography revealed bicuspid aortic valve, mild aortic stenosis, patent ductus arteriosus, patent foramen ovale and the renal ultrasound revealed mild left hydronephrosis. Follow-up echocardiography performed 14 weeks later showed increased severity of aortic stenosis and percutaneous balloon aortic valvuloplasty was performed. To our knowledge, there is only one case report in the literature mentioning the association of a bicuspid aortic valve and aortic stenosis with oxcarbazepine exposure, which is a structural derivative of carbamazepine. However, there are no reports for association with carbamazepine itself. Bicuspid aorta and aortic stenosis may be among the cardiac malformations that result from the teratogenic effect of carbamazepine. PMID:25584038

  13. Aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis with a small aortic annulus in a patient having Werner's syndrome and liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Sogawa, M; Kasuya, S; Yamamoto, K; Koshika, M; Oguma, F; Hayashi, J

    2001-12-01

    Werner's syndrome is a rare genetic disease characterized by premature aging and scleroderma-like involvement of the skin. We report a case of aortic valve replacement for severely calcified aortic valve stenosis with a small annulus in a patient suffering from Werner's syndrome and liver cirrhosis

  14. Balloon aortic valvuloplasty as a bridge to aortic valve replacement in a patient with severe calcific aortic stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Swinkels, B.M.; Jaarsma, W.; Wely, L. Relik-van; van Swieten, H.A.; Ernst, J.M.P.G.; Plokker, H.W.M.

    2003-01-01

    This case report describes a patient with severe calcific aortic stenosis who was initially considered inoperable because of a very poor left ventricular function and severe pulmonary hypertension. After balloon aortic valvuloplasty, the clinical and haemodynamic status of the patient improved to such an extent that subsequent aortic valve replacement was considered possible and eventually proved to be successful. Balloon aortic valvuloplasty has value as a potential bridge to aortic valve replacement when the risks for surgery are considered to be too high. ImagesFigure 1 PMID:25696195

  15. Problem: Heart Valve Stenosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... valve . Learn about the different types of stenosis: Aortic stenosis Tricuspid stenosis Pulmonary stenosis Mitral stenosis Outlook for ... Disease "Innocent" Heart Murmur Problem: Valve Stenosis - Problem: Aortic Valve Stenosis - Problem: Mitral Valve Stenosis - Problem: Tricuspid Valve Stenosis - ...

  16. [Supravalvular aortic stenosis. Report of clinical findings in 5 patients].

    PubMed

    Dumont, C R; Gil, M; Mispireta, J; Attié, F

    1975-01-01

    Five cases of supravalvular aortic stenosis (SAS) diagnosed by heart catheterization were studied in the Instituto Nacional de Cardiologia of Mexico. The clinic and laboratory data of interest of the differential diagnosis with other forms of obstruction of the left ventricle as follows: 1. Three cases had mental retardation and "elfin" face (SAS with specific psychophysical syndrome), the rest had a normal psyco-physical state without family antecedents (sporadic SAS). 2. The aortic focus was the epicenter of the expulsion murmur. In the phoncarodiographic study, two patients had protosistolic click and another had, in addition, a descending protodiastolic murmur (Int. I-IV). In the radial sphigmograms, one case had an amplitude difference in favor of the right side. 3. All had serum calcium figures within normal limits. 4. A chromosomatic analysis of preperipheral blood was performed on two patients, with normal results. 5. In the electrocardiogram, one case had right ventricular enlargement secondary to pulmonary arterial hypertension, due to stenosis of the main pulmonary arteries. 6. The radiologic study did not show dilatation of the ascending aorta and aortic bud in any case. 7. The angiocardiography showed: stenosis directly above the Valsalva sinuses; absence of dilatation or hypoplasia of the aorta above the stenosis; and the coronary network, indirectly opaqued, showed no abnormalities. One case had aortic coarctation and abnormal implantation of the right sublaviar artery, and another, stenosis of the right and left branch of its origen of the truncus of the pulmonary artery. The literature up to the present is reviewed and an anatomo-functional classification is proposed with the objective of including new varieties.

  17. Regional aortic distensibility and its relationship with age and aortic stenosis: a computed tomography study.

    PubMed

    Wong, Dennis T L; Narayan, Om; Leong, Darryl P; Bertaso, Angela G; Maia, Murilo G; Ko, Brian S H; Baillie, Timothy; Seneviratne, Sujith K; Worthley, Matthew I; Meredith, Ian T; Cameron, James D

    2015-06-01

    Aortic distensibility (AD) decreases with age and increased aortic stiffness is independently associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes. The association of severe aortic stenosis (AS) with AD in different aortic regions has not been evaluated. Elderly subjects with severe AS and a cohort of patients without AS of similar age were studied. Proximal aortic cross-sectional-area changes during the cardiac cycle were determined using retrospective-ECG-gating on 128-detector row computed-tomography. Using oscillometric-brachial-blood-pressure measurements, the AD at the ascending-aorta (AA), proximal-descending-aorta (PDA) and distal-descending-aorta (DDA) was determined. Linear mixed effects modelling was used to determine the association of age and aortic stenosis on regional AD. 102 patients were evaluated: 36 AS patients (70-85 years), 24 AS patients (>85 years) and 42 patients without AS (9 patients <50 years, 20 patients between 51-70 years and 13 patients 70-85 years). When comparing patients 70-85 years, AA distensibility was significantly lower in those with AS compared to those without AS (0.9 ± 0.9 vs. 1.4 ± 1.1, P = 0.03) while there was no difference in the PDA (1.0 ± 1.1 vs. 1.0 ± 1.2, P = 0.26) and DDA (1.1 ± 1.2 vs. 1.2 ± 0.8, P = 0.97). In patients without AS, AD decreased with age in all aortic regions (P < 0.001). The AA in patients <50 years were the most distensible compared to other aortic regions. There is regional variation in aortic distensibility with aging. Patients with aortic stenosis demonstrated regional differences in aortic distensibility with lower distensibility demonstrated in the proximal ascending aorta compared to an age-matched cohort.

  18. Relation between symptoms and profiles of coronary artery blood flow velocities in patients with aortic valve stenosis: a study using transoesophageal Doppler echocardiography.

    PubMed Central

    Omran, H.; Fehske, W.; Rabahieh, R.; Hagendorff, A.; Lüderitz, B.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyse profiles of coronary artery flow velocity at rest in patients with aortic stenosis and to determine whether changes of the coronary artery flow velocities are related to symptoms in patients with aortic stenosis. DESIGN: A prospective study investigating the significance of aortic valve area, pressure gradient across the aortic valve, systolic left ventricular wall stress index, ejection fraction, and left ventricular mass index in the coronary flow velocity profile of aortic stenosis; and comparing flow velocity profiles between symptomatic and asymptomatic patients with aortic stenosis using transoesophageal Doppler echocardiography to obtain coronary artery flow velocities of the left anterior descending coronary artery. SETTING: Tertiary referral cardiac centre. PATIENTS: Fifty eight patients with aortic stenosis and 15 controls with normal coronary arteries. RESULTS: Adequate recordings of the profile of coronary artery flow velocities were obtained in 46 patients (79%). Left ventricular wall stress was the only significant haemodynamic variable for determining peak systolic velocity (r = -0.83, F = 88.5, P < 0.001). The pressure gradient across the aortic valve was the only contributor for explaining peak diastolic velocity (r = 0.56, F = 20.9, P < 0.001). Controls and asymptomatic patients with aortic stenosis (n = 12) did not differ for peak systolic velocity [32.8 (SEM 9.7) v 27.0 (8.7) cm/s, NS] and peak diastolic velocity [58.3 (18.7) v 61.9 (13.5) cm/s, NS]. In contrast, patients with angina (n = 12) or syncope (n = 8) had lower peak systolic velocities and higher peak diastolic velocities than asymptomatic patients (P < 0.01). Peak systolic and diastolic velocities were -7.7 (22.5) cm/s and 81.7 (17.6) cm/s for patients with angina, and -19.5 (22.3) cm/s and 94.0 (20.9) cm/s for patients with syncope. Asymptomatic patients and patients with dyspnoea (n = 14) did not differ. CONCLUSIONS: Increased pressure gradient across the

  19. Aortic angiography

    MedlinePlus

    ... to: Abdominal aortic aneurysm Aortic dissection Aortic regurgitation Aortic stenosis Congenital (present from birth) problems Double aortic arch ... Aortic aneurysm repair - endovascular Aortic dissection Aortic insufficiency Aortic stenosis Magnetic resonance ... Patient Instructions Abdominal ...

  20. Genetic predisposition to calcific aortic stenosis and mitral annular calcification.

    PubMed

    Kutikhin, Anton G; Yuzhalin, Arseniy E; Brusina, Elena B; Ponasenko, Anastasia V; Golovkin, Alexey S; Barbarash, Olga L

    2014-09-01

    Valvular calcification precedes the development of valvular stenosis and may represent an important early phenotype for valvular heart disease. It is known that development of valvular calcification is likely to occur among members of a family. However, the knowledge about the role of genomic predictive markers in valvular calcification is still elusive. Aims of this review are to assess the impact of gene polymorphisms on risk and severity of aortic stenosis and mitral annular calcification. According to the results of the investigations carried out, all polymorphisms may be divided into the three groups conferring the level of evidence of their association with valvular stenosis. It is possible to conclude that apoB (XbaI, rs1042031, and rs6725189), ACE (rs4340), IL10 (rs1800896 and rs1800872), and LPA (rs10455872) gene polymorphisms may be associated with valvular calcific stenosis with a relatively high level of evidence. A number of other polymorphisms, such as PvuII polymorphism within the ORα gene, rs1042636 polymorphism within the CaSR gene, rs3024491, rs3021094, rs1554286, and rs3024498 polymorphisms within the IL10 gene, rs662 polymorphism within the PON1 gene, rs2276288 polymorphism within the MYO7A gene, rs5194 polymorphism within the AGTR1 gene, rs2071307 polymorphism within the ELN gene, rs17659543 and rs13415097 polymorphisms within the IL1F9 gene may correlate with a risk of calcific valve stenosis with moderate level of evidence. Finally, rs1544410 polymorphism within the VDR gene, E2 and E4 alleles within the apoE gene, rs6254 polymorphism within the PTH gene, and rs1800871 polymorphism within the IL10 gene may be associated with aortic stenosis with low level of evidence.

  1. Unicuspid Aortic Stenosis in a Patient with Turner Syndrome: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Essandoh, Michael; Castellon-Larios, Karina; Zuleta-Alarcon, Alix; Portillo, Juan Guillermo; Crestanello, Juan A

    2014-01-01

    Congenital aortic valve anomalies are the cause of premature aortic stenosis in pediatric and younger adult populations. Despite being very rare, unicuspid aortic valves account for approximately 5% of isolated aortic valve replacements. Patients with aortic stenosis, present with the same symptomatology independent of leaflet morphology. However, the presence of bicuspid and unicuspid aortic stenosis is associated with a higher incidence of aortopathy, especially in Turner syndrome patients. Turner syndrome, an X monosomy, is associated with aortic valve anomalies, aortopathy, and hypertension. These risk factors lead to a higher incidence of aortic dissection in this population. Patients with Turner syndrome and aortic stenosis that present for aortic valve replacement should therefore undergo extensive aortic imaging prior to surgery. Transthoracic echocardiography is the diagnostic tool of choice for valvular pathology, yet it can misdiagnose unicuspid aortic valves as bicuspid valves due to certain similarities on imaging. Transesophageal echocardiography is a better tool for distinguishing between the two valvular abnormalities, although diagnostic errors can still occur. We present a case of a 50-year-old female with history of Turner syndrome and bicuspid aortic stenosis presenting for aortic valve replacement and ascending aorta replacement. Intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography revealed a stenotic unicommissural unicuspid aortic valve with an eccentric orifice, which was missed on preoperative imaging. This case highlights the importance of intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography in confirming preoperative findings, diagnosing further cardiac pathology, and ensuring adequate surgical repair.

  2. Recent advances in aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Al-Adhami, Ahmed; Al-Attar, Nawwar

    2016-01-01

    Aortic valve replacement is no longer an operation that is approached solely through a median sternotomy. Recent advances in the fields of transcatheter valves have expanded the proportion of patients eligible for intervention. Comparisons between transcatheter valves and conventional surgery have shown non-inferiority of transcatheter valve implants in patients with a high or intermediate pre-operative predictive risk. With advances in our understanding of sutureless valves and their applicability to minimally invasive surgery, the invasiveness and trauma of surgery can be reduced with potential improvements in outcome. The strategy of care has radically changed over the last decade. PMID:27803800

  3. Genetic Associations with Valvular Calcification and Aortic Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Thanassoulis, George; Campbell, Catherine Y.; Owens, David S.; Smith, J. Gustav; Smith, Albert V.; Peloso, Gina M.; Kerr, Kathleen F.; Pechlivanis, Sonali; Budoff, Matthew J.; Harris, Tamara B.; Malhotra, Rajeev; O’Brien, Kevin D.; Kamstrup, Pia R.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Allison, Matthew A.; Aspelund, Thor; Criqui, Michael H.; Heckbert, Susan R.; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Liu, Yongmei; Sjogren, Marketa; van der Pals, Jesper; Kälsch, Hagen; Mühleisen, Thomas W.; Nöthen, Markus M.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Caslake, Muriel; Di Angelantonio, Emanuele; Danesh, John; Rotter, Jerome I.; Sigurdsson, Sigurdur; Wong, Quenna; Erbel, Raimund; Kathiresan, Sekar; Melander, Olle; Gudnason, Vilmundur; O’Donnell, Christopher J.; Post, Wendy S.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Limited information is available regarding genetic contributions to valvular calcification, which is an important precursor of clinical valve disease. METHODS We determined genomewide associations with the presence of aorticvalve calcification (among 6942 participants) and mitral annular calcification (among 3795 participants), as detected by computed tomographic (CT) scanning; the study population for this analysis included persons of white European ancestry from three cohorts participating in the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology consortium (discovery population). Findings were replicated in independent cohorts of persons with either CT-detected valvular calcification or clinical aortic stenosis. RESULTS One SNP in the lipoprotein(a) (LPA) locus (rs10455872) reached genomewide significance for the presence of aorticvalve calcification (odds ratio per allele, 2.05; P = 9.0×10−10), a finding that was replicated in additional white European, African-American, and Hispanic-American cohorts (P<0.05 for all comparisons). Genetically determined Lp(a) levels, as predicted by LPA genotype, were also associated with aorticvalve calcification, supporting a causal role for Lp(a). In prospective analyses, LPA genotype was associated with incident aortic stenosis (hazard ratio per allele, 1.68; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.32 to 2.15) and aortic-valve replacement (hazard ratio, 1.54; 95% CI, 1.05 to 2.27) in a large Swedish cohort; the association with incident aortic stenosis was also replicated in an independent Danish cohort. Two SNPs (rs17659543 and rs13415097) near the proinflammatory gene IL1F9 achieved genomewide significance for mitral annular calcification (P = 1.5×10−8 and P = 1.8×10−8, respectively), but the findings were not replicated consistently. CONCLUSIONS Genetic variation in the LPA locus, mediated by Lp(a) levels, is associated with aorticvalve calcification across multiple ethnic groups and with incident

  4. Severe Aortic Coarctation in a 75-Year-Old Woman: Total Simultaneous Repair of Aortic Coarctation and Severe Aortic Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ju Hyun; Song, Sung Gook; Kim, Jeong Su; Park, Yong Hyun; Kim, Jun; Choo, Ki Seuk; Kim, June Hong; Lee, Sang Kwon

    2012-01-01

    Aortic coarctation is usually diagnosed and repaired in childhood and early adulthood. Survival of a patient with an uncorrected coarctation to more than 70 years of age is extremely unusual, and management strategies for these cases remain controversial. We present a case of a 75-year-old woman who was first diagnosed with aortic coarctation and severe aortic valve stenosis 5 years ago and who underwent a successful one-stage repair involving valve replacement and insertion of an extra-anatomical bypass graft from the ascending to the descending aorta. PMID:22363387

  5. Incidence and prognosis of congenital aortic valve stenosis in Liverpool (1960-1990).

    PubMed Central

    Kitchiner, D J; Jackson, M; Walsh, K; Peart, I; Arnold, R

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine the incidence and prognosis of congenital aortic valve stenosis in the five Health Districts of Liverpool that make up the Merseyside area. DESIGN--The records of the Liverpool Congenital Malformations Registry and the Royal Liverpool Children's Hospital identified 239 patients (155 male, 84 female) born with aortic valve stenosis between 1960 and 1990. Patients were traced to assess the severity of stenosis at follow up. Information on the severity at presentation and all subsequent events was obtained. RESULTS--Congenital aortic valve stenosis occurred in 5.7% of patients with congenital heart disease born in the Merseyside area. The median age at presentation was 16 months (range 0-20 years). Stenosis was mild at presentation in 145 patients, moderate in 33, severe in one and critical in 21 and 39 had a bicuspid valve without stenosis. Additional cardiac lesions were significantly more common in children presenting under one year of age and in those with critical stenosis. The median duration of follow up was 9.2 years (range 1-28 years) and seven patients were lost to follow up. 81 operations were performed in 60 patients. The reoperation rate was 28.3% after a median duration of 8.7 years (range 2.5-18 years). 15% of patients who presented with mild stenosis subsequently required operation compared with 67% of those with moderate stenosis. There were no sudden unexpected deaths and no deaths after aortic valvotomy, except in those presenting with critical stenosis. Mortality was 16.7% but patients presenting with critical aortic stenosis had a much worse prognosis. Actuarial and hazard analysis showed that the survival and absence of serious events (aortic valve surgery or balloon dilatation, endocarditis, or death) were significantly better in patients who presented with mild aortic stenosis than in those who presented with moderate aortic stenosis. 75% of patients presenting with mild stenosis had not progressed to moderate stenosis

  6. Cardiac Imaging for Assessing Low-Gradient Severe Aortic Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Clavel, Marie-Annick; Burwash, Ian G; Pibarot, Philippe

    2017-02-01

    Up to 40% of patients with aortic stenosis (AS) harbor discordant Doppler-echocardiographic findings, the most common of which is the presence of a small aortic valve area (≤1.0 cm(2)) suggesting severe AS, but a low gradient (<40 mm Hg) suggesting nonsevere AS. The purpose of this paper is to present the role of multimodality imaging in the diagnostic and therapeutic management of this challenging entity referred to as low-gradient AS. Doppler-echocardiography is critical to determine the subtype of low-gradient AS: that is, classical low-flow, paradoxical low-flow, or normal-flow. Patients with low-flow, low-gradient AS generally have a worse prognosis compared with patients with high-gradient or with normal-flow, low-gradient AS. Patients with low-gradient AS and evidence of severe AS benefit from aortic valve replacement (AVR). However, confirmation of the presence of severe AS is particularly challenging in these patients and requires a multimodality imaging approach including low-dose dobutamine stress echocardiography and aortic valve calcium scoring by multidetector computed tomography. Transcatheter AVR using a transfemoral approach may be superior to surgical AVR in patients with low-flow, low-gradient AS. Further studies are needed to confirm the best valve replacement procedure and prosthetic valve for each category of low-gradient AS and to identify patients with low-gradient AS in whom AVR is likely to be futile.

  7. Diffuse supravalvular aortic stenosis with multiple stenoses of the branches of arcus aorta in a child.

    PubMed

    Uçar, Tayfun; Tutar, Ercan; Atalay, Semra

    2008-01-01

    We give details of a sporadic case with congenital supravalvular aortic stenosis associated with critical stenosis of the left carotid artery, and severe stenosis of the innominate artery at their origins as well as excessive dilatations of both the right and the left coronary arteries.

  8. Patient-prosthesis mismatch: surgical aortic valve replacement versus transcatheter aortic valve replacement in high risk patients with aortic stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Kron, Irving L.

    2016-01-01

    Patient prosthesis mismatch (PPM) can occur when a prosthetic aortic valve has an effective orifice area (EOA) less than that of a native valve. A recent study by Zorn and colleagues evaluated the incidence and significance of PPM in high risk patients with severe aortic stenosis who were randomized to transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) or surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR). TAVR is associated with decreased incidence of severe PPM compared to traditional SAVR valves. Severe PPM increases risk for death at 1 year postoperatively in high risk patients. The increased incidence of PPM is largely due to differences in valve design and should encourage development of newer SAVR valves to reduce risk for PPM. In addition more vigorous approaches to root enlargement in small annulus should be performed with SAVR to prevent PPM. PMID:27867654

  9. Patient-prosthesis mismatch: surgical aortic valve replacement versus transcatheter aortic valve replacement in high risk patients with aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Ghanta, Ravi K; Kron, Irving L

    2016-10-01

    Patient prosthesis mismatch (PPM) can occur when a prosthetic aortic valve has an effective orifice area (EOA) less than that of a native valve. A recent study by Zorn and colleagues evaluated the incidence and significance of PPM in high risk patients with severe aortic stenosis who were randomized to transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) or surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR). TAVR is associated with decreased incidence of severe PPM compared to traditional SAVR valves. Severe PPM increases risk for death at 1 year postoperatively in high risk patients. The increased incidence of PPM is largely due to differences in valve design and should encourage development of newer SAVR valves to reduce risk for PPM. In addition more vigorous approaches to root enlargement in small annulus should be performed with SAVR to prevent PPM.

  10. Assessing the risk of aortic valve replacement for severe aortic stenosis in the transcatheter valve era.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Verghese; Greason, Kevin L; Suri, Rakesh M; Leon, Martin B; Nkomo, Vuyisile T; Mack, Michael J; Rihal, Charanjit S; Holmes, David R

    2014-10-01

    Surgical aortic valve replacement had been the only definitive treatment of severe aortic stenosis before the availability of transcatheter valve technology. Historically, many patients with severe aortic stenosis had not been offered surgery, largely related to professional and patient perception regarding the risks of operation relative to anticipated benefits. Such patients have been labeled as "high risk" or "inoperable" with respect to their suitability for surgery. The availability of transcatheter aortic valve replacement affords a new treatment option for patients previously not felt to be optimal candidates for surgical valve replacement and allows for the opportunity to reexamine the methods for assessing operative risk in the context of more than 1 available treatment. Standardized risk assessment can be challenging because of both the imprecision of current risk scoring methods and the variability in ascertaining risk related to operator experience as well as local factors and practice patterns at treating facilities. Operative risk in actuality is not an absolute but represents a spectrum from very low to extreme, and the conventional labels of high risk and inoperable are incomplete with respect to their utility in clinical decision making. Moving forward, the emphasis should be on developing an individual assessment that takes into account procedure risk as well as long-term outcomes evaluated in a multidisciplinary fashion, and incorporating patient preferences and goals in a model of shared decision making.

  11. Do all Critical Aortic Stenosis with Chest Pain Need Aortic Valve Replacement? A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Munish; Mascarenhas, Daniel A.N.

    2016-01-01

    Aortic valve replacement (AVR) remains the cornerstone of treatment for symptomatic critical aortic stenosis (AS). It is a Class I indication that symptomatic patients with critical AS undergo either surgical or transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). We present a patient with critical AS and new angina that was managed successfully with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) of the Right coronary artery. Physicians should consider that not all patients with critical AS and angina necessarily require AVR. Concomitant pathology leading to the symptoms should be carefully ruled out. This leads to a less invasive, cost effective care plan especially in patients with advanced age and comorbidities for which any type of surgical valvular intervention may pose high risk. PMID:27994841

  12. Association of Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol–Related Genetic Variants With Aortic Valve Calcium and Incident Aortic Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Smith, J. Gustav; Luk, Kevin; Schulz, Christina-Alexandra; Engert, James C.; Do, Ron; Hindy, George; Rukh, Gull; Dufresne, Line; Almgren, Peter; Owens, David S.; Harris, Tamara B.; Peloso, Gina M.; Kerr, Kathleen F.; Wong, Quenna; Smith, Albert V.; Budoff, Matthew J.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Rich, Stephen; Kathiresan, Sekar; Orho-Melander, Marju; Gudnason, Vilmundur; O’Donnell, Christopher J.; Post, Wendy S.; Thanassoulis, George

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Plasma low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) has been associated with aortic stenosis in observational studies; however, randomized trials with cholesterol-lowering therapies in individuals with established valve disease have failed to demonstrate reduced disease progression. OBJECTIVE To evaluate whether genetic data are consistent with an association between LDL-C, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), or triglycerides (TG) and aortic valve disease. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Using a Mendelian randomization study design, we evaluated whether weighted genetic risk scores (GRSs), a measure of the genetic predisposition to elevations in plasma lipids, constructed using single-nucleotide polymorphisms identified in genome-wide association studies for plasma lipids, were associated with aortic valve disease. We included community-based cohorts participating in the CHARGE consortium (n = 6942), including the Framingham Heart Study (cohort inception to last follow-up: 1971-2013; n = 1295), Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (2000-2012; n = 2527), Age Gene/Environment Study-Reykjavik (2000-2012; n = 3120), and the Malmö Diet and Cancer Study (MDCS, 1991-2010; n = 28 461). MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Aortic valve calcium quantified by computed tomography in CHARGE and incident aortic stenosis in the MDCS. RESULTS The prevalence of aortic valve calcium across the 3 CHARGE cohorts was 32% (n = 2245). In the MDCS, over a median follow-up time of 16.1 years, aortic stenosis developed in 17 per 1000 participants (n = 473) and aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis occurred in 7 per 1000 (n = 205). Plasma LDL-C, but not HDL-C or TG, was significantly associated with incident aortic stenosis (hazard ratio [HR] per mmol/L, 1.28; 95% CI, 1.04-1.57; P = .02; aortic stenosis incidence: 1.3% and 2.4% in lowest and highest LDL-C quartiles, respectively). The LDL-C GRS, but not HDL-C or TG GRS, was significantly associated with presence of

  13. Asymptomatic Strut Fracture in DeBakey-Surgitool Aortic Valves

    PubMed Central

    Von Der Emde, Jürgen; Eberlein, Ulrich; Breme, Jürgen

    1990-01-01

    From August 1971 through November 1972, we implanted 62 Model 2 DeBakey-Surgitool aortic valve prostheses in 62 patients, 4 of whom later had clinically asymptomatic strut fractures. In 1 case, the patient died suddenly, and autopsy revealed detachment of the ball-cage; in each of the other 3 cases, fractures of 2 struts close to the base of the prosthesis were diagnosed fluoroscopically, and the patients underwent successful reoperation. The interval between implantation and reoperation ranged from 11 months to 16 years, 9 months. In 1 patient, retrospective study of chest radiographs revealed that the fracture had been present for 2½ years. Larger valves (≥ A6) were affected significantly more often than smaller ones. We performed metallurgic analysis of 1 prosthesis: results revealed strut wear from fatigue cracking and secondary abrasion. Strut fracture was also promoted by suspension of the cage at right angles to the prosthetic ring and by use of a pyrolytic carbon ball in a titanium cage (i.e., an occluder harder than its holder). Patients with DeBakey-Surgitool aortic valve prostheses should undergo annual radiologic examinations to enable early detection of strut fractures. Prophylactic valve replacement is not indicated. (Texas Heart Institute Journal 1990;17:223-7) Images PMID:15227175

  14. Circulating CD14+ monocytes in patients with aortic stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Shimoni, Sara; Meledin, Valery; Bar, Iris; Fabricant, Jacob; Gandelman, Gera; George, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Background Calcific aortic stenosis (AS) is an active process sharing similarities with atherosclerosis and chronic inflammation. The pathophysiology of AS is notable for three cardinal components: inflammation, fibrosis and calcification. Monocytes play a role in each of these processes. The role of circulating monocytes in AS is not clear. The aim of the present study was to study an association between circulating apoptotic and non apoptotic CD14+ monocytes and AS features. Methods We assessed the number of CD14+ monocytes and apoptotic monocytes in 54 patients with significant AS (aortic valve area 0.74 ± 0.27 cm2) and compared them to 33 patients with similar risk factors and no valvular disease. The level of CD14+ monocytes and apoptotic monocytes was assessed by flow cytometry. Results There was no difference in the risk factor profile and known coronary or peripheral vascular diseases between patients with AS and controls. Patients with AS exhibited increased numbers of CD14+ monocytes as compared to controls (9.9% ± 4.9% vs. 7.7% ± 3.9%, P = 0.03). CD14+ monocyte number was related to age and the presence and severity of AS. In patients with AS, both CD14+ monocytes and apoptotic monocytes were inversely related to aortic valve area. Conclusions Patients with significant AS have increased number of circulating CD14+ monocytes and there is an inverse correlation between monocyte count and aortic valve area. These findings may suggest that inflammation is operative not only in early valve injury phase, but also at later developed stages such as calcification when AS is severe. PMID:26918018

  15. QT dispersion is reduced after valve replacement in patients with aortic stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Darbar, D; Cherry, C; Kerins, D

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To investigate whether QT dispersion is a reliable index of the severity of aortic stenosis and left ventricular hypertrophy in the setting of aortic stenosis.
DESIGN—A retrospective analysis of the results of echocardiography and electrocardiography before and after aortic valve replacement.
SETTING—Tertiary centre.
PATIENTS—36 men (30 white and six black) with symptomatic aortic stenosis requiring valve replacement.
RESULTS—All patients had significant aortic stenosis (mean (SD) aortic valve area 0.68 (0.18) cm2) and evidence of left ventricular hypertrophy (left ventricular mass index (LVMI): 267 (90) g/m2). Before aortic valve replacement, QT dispersion was correlated with mean aortic valve area and LVMI (r = 0.697, p < 0.001, and r = 0.59, p < 2.4 × 10−6, respectively). QT dispersion and QT corrected for heart rate dispersion decreased from 133 (54) to 71 (33) ms and from 151 (64) to 94 (76) ms, respectively (p < 0.001 for both). LVMI regressed after aortic valve replacement to 190 (79) g/m2, p < 0.01.
CONCLUSIONS—QT dispersion is increased in association with LVMI in patients with significant symptomatic aortic stenosis. Aortic valve replacement reduces QT dispersion and LVMI. QT dispersion could be a useful indicator of risk and risk reduction in patients with significant symptomatic aortic stenosis.


Keywords: QT dispersion; left ventricular hypertrophy; aortic valve replacement PMID:10377301

  16. Acquired supravalvular aortic stenosis: a late complication of replacement of the ascending aorta.

    PubMed

    Turley, Andrew J; Dark, John; Adams, Philip C

    2008-09-01

    Aortic syndromes are an increasing cause of morbidity and mortality. Ascending aortic dissection is a clinical emergency with most patients requiring open surgery to replace the ascending aorta. Detection through clinical suspicion, improved non-invasive imaging and refined surgical techniques have resulted in an improved survival rate. Acquired supravalvular aortic stenosis is an extremely rare complication of cardiac surgery. We present the case of a patient who, 15 years after undergoing elective replacement of the ascending aorta for aortic dissection, required repeat surgery for symptomatic supravalvular aortic stenosis. This case elegantly highlights the need for a detailed focused assessment in patients where the clinical presentation does not correlate with initial investigations. To our knowledge this is the first reported case of late symptomatic supravalvular aortic stenosis following replacement of the ascending aorta.

  17. A stepwise aortic clamp procedure to treat porcelain aorta associated with aortic valve stenosis and hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Isoda, Susumu; Osako, Motohiko; Kimura, Tamizo; Nishimura, Kenji; Yamanaka, Nozomu; Nakamura, Shingo; Maehara, Tadaaki

    2014-01-01

    A 62-year-old man was referred for an aortic-valve surgery because of severe aortic stenosis. Thirty years ago, he had undergone a mitral valve commissurotomy and after 9 years, the valve had been replaced by a mechanical valve. He had been undergoing hemodialysis for the past 8 years. A computed tomographic (CT) scan of the chest and abdomen showed a dense circumferential calcification in the wall of the entire thoracic and abdominal aorta, pulmonary artery, and left and right atrium. A conventional aortic-valve replacement was performed. To avoid an embolic event, a "stepwise aortic clamp" procedure was attempted and involved the following: (1) brief circulatory arrest and aortotomy during moderate hypothermia; (2) balloon occlusion at the ascending aorta during low-flow cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB); (3) endoarterectomy by using an ultrasonic surgical aspirator to enable aortic cross-clamping; and (4) a cross-clamp reinforced with felt and full-flow CPB. The patient recovered without any thromboembolic events. Using this procedure to treat a porcelain aorta seemed to reduce the time limit and reduced the risk of brain injury during cardiac surgery.

  18. A Prospective Study of Asymptomatic Intracranial Atherosclerotic Stenosis in Neurologically Normal Volunteers in a Japanese Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, Ryukichi; Nakagawa, Tomonori; Takayoshi, Hiroyuki; Onoda, Keiichi; Oguro, Hiroaki; Nagai, Atsushi; Yamaguchi, Shuhei

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerotic stenosis of major intracranial arteries is a leading cause of ischemic stroke in Asia. However, the long-term prognosis of asymptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic stenosis (ICAS) in healthy volunteers has not been fully examined. Here, we conducted a longitudinal study to examine the prognosis of healthy volunteers with asymptomatic ICAS and to determine the risk factors for ICAS, including asymptomatic brain parenchymal lesions. We studied 2,807 healthy Japanese volunteers with no history of stroke (mean age, 62.0 years). They were followed for a mean interval of 64.5 months. The degree of ICAS and the presence of asymptomatic brain lesions were assessed by using magnetic resonance imaging. Asymptomatic ICAS was detected in 166 volunteers (5.9%) at the initial examination. Moderate and mild stenoses were observed in 1.5 and 4.4% of patients, respectively. Significant risk factors for ICAS were older age and a history of hypertension and/or dyslipidemia. During follow-up, ischemic stroke developed in 32 volunteers. Seven strokes occurred in the ICAS group, whose stroke incidence rate was higher than that in the non-ICAS group (0.78 vs. 0.18% per year). According to a Cox regression analysis, asymptomatic ICAS was an independent risk factor for future ischemic stroke after adjustment for age. Furthermore, after asymptomatic brain lesions were taken into account, ICAS was still a significant risk factor for stroke onset. In conclusion, even mild to moderate asymptomatic ICAS was a significant risk factor for future stroke, independent of asymptomatic brain lesions, in a healthy Japanese population. Mild to moderate ICAS might be a therapeutic target for stroke prevention. PMID:27047445

  19. Relation of circulating C-reactive protein to progression of aortic valve stenosis.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Pedro L; Santos, Jose L; Kaski, Juan Carlos; Cruz, Ignacio; Arribas, Antonio; Villacorta, Eduardo; Cascon, Manuel; Palacios, Igor F; Martin-Luengo, Candido

    2006-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is a marker of inflammation and predicts outcome in apparently healthy subjects and patients with coronary artery disease. Systemic inflammation is present in patients with aortic valve stenosis (AS). The aim of this prospective study was to assess whether CRP levels predict the progression of AS severity. Blood samples for high-sensitivity CRP measurements and echocardiographic data were obtained in 43 patients (70% men; mean age 73 +/- 8 years) with asymptomatic degenerative AS at study entry. On the basis of repeat echocardiographic assessment at 6 months, patients were grouped as (1) slow progressors (a decrease in aortic valve area [AVA] <0.05 cm2 and/or an increase in aortic peak velocity <0.15 m/s) and (2) rapid progressors (a decrease in AVA > or =0.05 cm2 and/or an increase in aortic peak velocity > or =0.15 m/s). Plasma CRP levels were significantly higher in rapid progressors than slow progressors (median 5.1 [range 2.3 to 11.3] vs 2.1 [range 1.0 to 3.1] mg/L, p = 0.007). In multivariate analysis, CRP levels >3 mg/L were independently associated with rapid AS progression (odds ratio 9.1, 95% confidence interval 2.2 to 37.3). In conclusion, CRP levels are higher in patients with degenerative AS who show rapid valve disease progression. These findings suggest that inflammation may have a pathogenic role in degenerative AS.

  20. Replication of genetic association studies in aortic stenosis in adults.

    PubMed

    Gaudreault, Nathalie; Ducharme, Valérie; Lamontagne, Maxime; Guauque-Olarte, Sandra; Mathieu, Patrick; Pibarot, Philippe; Bossé, Yohan

    2011-11-01

    Only a handful of studies have attempted to unravel the genetic architecture of calcific aortic valve stenosis (AS). The goal of this study was to validate genes previously associated with AS. Seven genes were assessed: APOB, APOE, CTGF, IL10, PTH, TGFB1, and VDR. Each gene was tested for a comprehensive set of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). SNPs were genotyped in 457 patients who underwent surgical aortic valve replacement, and allele frequencies were compared to 3,294 controls. A missense mutation in the APOB gene was significantly associated with AS (rs1042031, E4181K, p = 0.00001). A second SNP located 5.6 kilobases downstream of the APOB stop codon was also associated with the disease (rs6725189, p = 0.000013). Six SNPs surrounding the IL10 locus were strongly associated with AS (0.02 > p > 6.2 × 10⁻¹¹). The most compelling association for IL10 was found with a promoter polymorphism (rs1800872) well known to regulate the production of the encoded anti-inflammatory cytokine. The frequency of the low-producing allele was greater in cases compared to controls (30% vs 20%, p = 6.2 × 10⁻¹¹). SNPs in PTH, TGFB1, and VDR had nominal p values <0.05 but did not resist Bonferroni correction. In conclusion, this study suggests that subjects carrying specific polymorphisms in the IL10 and APOB genes are at higher risk for developing AS.

  1. Severe Aortic Stenosis and Severe Coarctation of the Aorta: A Hybrid Approach to Treatment.

    PubMed

    McLennan, Daniel; Caputo, Massimo; Taliotis, Demetris

    2017-01-01

    Hybrid surgery is becoming more popular in the treatment of children with congenital heart disease, particularly small infants and neonates. We report a case of a patient with aortic stenosis (AS) and coarctation of the aorta (CoA).

  2. Aortic valve stenosis after previous coronary bypass: Transcatheter valve implantation or aortic valve replacement?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We report a prospective comparison between transcatheter valve implantation (TAVI, n = 13) and surgical aortic valve replacement (AVR, n = 10) in patients with severe aortic valve stenosis and previous coronary bypass surgery (CABG). All patients had at least bilateral patent internal thoracic arteries bypass without indication of repeat revascularization. After a similar post-procedure outcome, despite one early death in TAVI group, the 1-year survival was 100% in surgical group and in transfemoral TAVI group, and 73% in transapical TAVI group. When previous CABG is the lone surgical risk factor, indications for a TAVI procedure have to be cautious, specially if transfemoral approach is not possible. PMID:22642844

  3. Planimetry of aortic valve area using multiplane transoesophageal echocardiography is not a reliable method for assessing severity of aortic stenosis.

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, Y.; Meneveau, N.; Vuillemenot, A.; Magnin, D.; Anguenot, T.; Schiele, F.; Bassand, J. P.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the reliability of aortic valve area planimetry by multiplane transoesophageal echocardiography (TOE) in aortic stenosis. DESIGN: Study of the diagnostic value of aortic valve area planimetry using multiplane TOE, compared with catheterisation and the continuity equation, both being considered as criterion standards. SETTING: University hospital. PATIENTS: 49 consecutive patients (29 male, 20 female, aged 44 to 82 years, average 66.6 (SD 8.5)), referred for haemodynamic evaluation of an aortic stenosis, were enrolled in a prospective study. From this sample, 37 patients were eligible for the final analysis. METHODS: Transthoracic and multiplane transoesophageal echocardiograms were performed within 24 hours before catheterisation. At transthoracic echo, aortic valve area was calculated by the continuity equation. At TOE, the image of the aortic valve opening was obtained with a 30-65 degrees rotation of the transducer. Numerical dynamic images were stored on optical discs for off-line analysis and were reviewed by two blinded observers. Catheterisation was performed in all cases and aortic valve area was calculated by the Gorlin formula. RESULTS: Feasibility of the method was 92% (48/52). The agreement between aortic valve area measured at TOE (mean 0.88 (SD 0.35) cm2) and at catheterisation (0.79 (0.24) cm2) was very poor. The same discrepancies were found between TOE and the continuity equation (0.72 (0.26) cm2). TOE planimetry overestimated aortic valve area determined by the two other methods. Predictive positive and negative values of planimetry to detect aortic valve area < 0.75 cm2 were 62% (10/16) and 43% (9/21) respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Planimetry of aortic valve area by TOE is difficult and less accurate than the continuity equation for assessing the severity of aortic stenosis. Images PMID:9290405

  4. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation with Core Valve: First Indian experience of three high surgical risk patients with severe aortic stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Seth, Ashok; Rastogi, Vishal; Kumar, Vijay; Maqbool, Syed; Mustaqueem, Arif; Sekar, V. Ravi

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of aortic stenosis is increasing with aging population. However with multiple co-morbidities and prior procedures in this aging population, more and more patients are being declared unfit for the ‘Gold Standard’ treatment i.e. surgical aortic valve replacement (AVR). Among the patients who are unfit or high risk for aortic valve replacement (AVR) by open heart surgery, transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has been proven to be a valuable alternative improving survival and quality of life. We report first Indian experience of Core Valve (Medtronic Inc.) implantation in three high surgical risk patients performed on 22nd and 23rd February 2012. PMID:23993000

  5. Relation of left ventricular free wall rupture and/or aneurysm with acute myocardial infarction in patients with aortic stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Sheikh, Irtiza N.

    2017-01-01

    This minireview describes 6 previously reported patients with left ventricular free wall rupture and/or aneurysm complicating acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in patients with aortic stenosis. The findings suggest that left ventricular rupture and/or aneurysm is more frequent in patients with AMI associated with aortic stenosis than in patients with AMI unassociated with aortic stenosis, presumably because of retained elevation of the left ventricular peak systolic pressure after the appearance of the AMI.

  6. Mitral annular calcification in patients undergoing aortic valve replacement for aortic valve stenosis.

    PubMed

    Takami, Yoshiyuki; Tajima, Kazuyoshi

    2016-02-01

    Limited data exis t on clinical relevance of aortic valve stenosis (AVS) and mitral annular calcification (MAC), although with similar pathophysiologic basis. We sought to reveal the prevalence of MAC and its clinical features in the patients undergoing aortic valve replacement (AVR) for AVS. We reviewed 106 consecutive patients who underwent isolated AVR from 2004 to 2010. Before AVR, CT scans were performed to identify MAC, whose severity was graded on a scale of 0-4, with grade 0 denoting no MAC and grade 4 indicating severe MAC. Echocardiography was performed before AVR and at follow-up over 2 years after AVR. MAC was identified in 56 patients with grade 1 (30 %), 2 (39 %), 3 (18 %), and 4 (13 %), respectively. Patients with MAC presented older age (72 ± 8 versus 66 ± 11 years), higher rate of dialysis-dependent renal failure (43 versus 4 %), and less frequency of bicuspid aortic valve (9 versus 36 %), when compared to those without MAC. No significant differences were seen in short- and mid-term mortality after AVR between the groups. In patients with MAC, progression of neither mitral regurgitation nor stenosis was observed at follow-up of 53 ± 23 months for 102 survivors, although the transmitral flow velocities were higher than in those without MAC. In conclusion, MAC represented 53 % of the patients undergoing isolated AVR for AVS, usually appeared in dialysis-dependent elder patients with tricuspid AVS. MAC does not affect adversely upon the survival, without progression of mitral valve disease, at least within 2 years after AVR.

  7. Long-term outcome of large artificial patch aortic repair for diffuse stenosis in Williams syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sughimoto, Koichi; Takahara, Yoshiharu; Mogi, Kenji; Sakurai, Manabu; Aoki, Chikashi

    2010-10-01

    There have been only a few reports concerning the long-term results of a surgical procedure using a large artificial patch for patients with Williams syndrome. Twelve years have passed since a patient with William's syndrome underwent a surgery with a patch angioplasty for the diffuse supravalvular aortic stenosis and deformities of the neck branch arteries. The patient had a well-balanced aortic growth without stenotic or aneurysmal changes, which was confirmed during the time of the second surgery when replacing the mitral valve. This technique of using a large patch has proven to be safe for Williams syndrome patients with diffuse supravalvular aortic stenosis in the long term.

  8. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation for Treatment of Aortic Valve Stenosis: A Health Technology Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Sehatzadeh, Shayan; Tu, Hong-Anh; Holubowich, Corinne; Higgins, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Background Surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) is the gold standard for treating aortic valve stenosis. It is a major operation that requires sternotomy and the use of a heart-lung bypass machine, but in appropriately selected patients with symptomatic, severe aortic valve stenosis, the benefits of SAVR usually outweigh the harms. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is a less invasive procedure that allows an artificial valve to be implanted over the poorly functioning valve. Methods We identified and analyzed randomized controlled trials that evaluated the effectiveness and safety of TAVI compared with SAVR or balloon aortic valvuloplasty and were published before September 2015. The quality of the body of evidence for each outcome was examined according to the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) Working Group criteria. The overall quality was determined to be high, moderate, low, or very low using a step-wise, structural methodology. We also developed a Markov decision-analytic model to assess the cost-effectiveness of TAVI compared with SAVR over a 5-year time horizon, and we conducted a 5-year budget impact analysis. Results Rates of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality were similar for the TAVI and SAVR groups in all studies except one, which reported significantly lower all-cause mortality in the TAVI group and a higher rate of stroke in the SAVR group. Trials of high-risk patients who were not suitable candidates for SAVR showed significantly better survival with TAVI than with balloon aortic valvuloplasty. Median survival in the TAVI group was 31 months, compared with 11.7 months in the balloon aortic valvuloplasty group. Compared with SAVR, TAVI was associated with a significantly higher risk of stroke, major vascular complications, paravalvular aortic regurgitation, and the need for a permanent pacemaker. SAVR was associated with a higher risk of bleeding. Transapical TAVI was associated with higher

  9. Aortic stenosis: insights on pathogenesis and clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Carità, Patrizia; Coppola, Giuseppe; Novo, Giuseppina; Caccamo, Giuseppa; Guglielmo, Marco; Balasus, Fabio; Novo, Salvatore; Castrovinci, Sebastiano; Moscarelli, Marco; Fattouch, Khalil; Corrado, Egle

    2016-01-01

    Aortic stenosis (AS) is a common valvular heart disease in the Western populations, with an estimated overall prevalence of 3% in adults over 75 years. To understand its patho-biological processes represents a priority. In elderly patients, AS usually involves trileaflet valves and is referred to as degenerative calcific processes. Scientific evidence suggests the involvement of an active “atherosclerosis-like” pathogenesis in the initiation phase of degenerative AS. To the contrary, the progression could be driven by different forces (such as mechanical stress, genetic factors and interaction between inflammation and calcification). The improved understanding presents potentially new therapeutic targets for preventing and inhibiting the development and progression of the disease. Furthermore, in clinical practice the management of AS patients implies the evaluation of generalized atherosclerotic manifestations (i.e., in the coronary and carotid arteries) even for prognostic reasons. In counselling elderly patients, the risk stratification should address individual frailty beyond the generic risk scores. In these regard, the co-morbidities, and in particular those linked to the global atherosclerotic burden, should be carefully investigated in order to define the risk/benefit ratio for invasive treatment strategies. We present a detailed overview of insights in pathogenesis of AS with possible practical implications. PMID:27582763

  10. MicroRNA Expression Signature in Degenerative Aortic Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Degenerative aortic stenosis, characterized by narrowing of the exit of the left ventricle of the heart, has become the most common valvular heart disease in the elderly. The aim of this study was to investigate the microRNA (miRNA) signature in degenerative AS. Through microarray analysis, we identified the miRNA expression signature in the tissue samples from healthy individuals (n = 4) and patients with degenerative AS (n = 4). Six miRNAs (hsa-miR-193a-3p, hsa-miR-29b-1-5p, hsa-miR-505-5p, hsa-miR-194-5p, hsa-miR-99b-3p, and hsa-miR-200b-3p) were overexpressed and 14 (hsa-miR-3663-3p, hsa-miR-513a-5p, hsa-miR-146b-5p, hsa-miR-1972, hsa-miR-718, hsa-miR-3138, hsa-miR-21-5p, hsa-miR-630, hsa-miR-575, hsa-miR-301a-3p, hsa-miR-636, hsa-miR-34a-3p, hsa-miR-21-3p, and hsa-miR-516a-5p) were downregulated in aortic tissue from AS patients. GeneSpring 13.1 was used to identify potential human miRNA target genes by comparing a 3-way comparison of predictions from TargetScan, PITA, and microRNAorg databases. Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) analysis were performed to identify potential pathways and functional annotations associated with AS. Twenty miRNAs were significantly differentially expressed between patients with AS samples and normal controls and identified potential miRNA targets and molecular pathways associated with this morbidity. This study describes the miRNA expression signature in degenerative AS and provides an improved understanding of the molecular pathobiology of this disease. PMID:27579316

  11. MicroRNA Expression Signature in Degenerative Aortic Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jing; Liu, Hui; Wang, Hui; Kong, Xiangqing

    2016-01-01

    Degenerative aortic stenosis, characterized by narrowing of the exit of the left ventricle of the heart, has become the most common valvular heart disease in the elderly. The aim of this study was to investigate the microRNA (miRNA) signature in degenerative AS. Through microarray analysis, we identified the miRNA expression signature in the tissue samples from healthy individuals (n = 4) and patients with degenerative AS (n = 4). Six miRNAs (hsa-miR-193a-3p, hsa-miR-29b-1-5p, hsa-miR-505-5p, hsa-miR-194-5p, hsa-miR-99b-3p, and hsa-miR-200b-3p) were overexpressed and 14 (hsa-miR-3663-3p, hsa-miR-513a-5p, hsa-miR-146b-5p, hsa-miR-1972, hsa-miR-718, hsa-miR-3138, hsa-miR-21-5p, hsa-miR-630, hsa-miR-575, hsa-miR-301a-3p, hsa-miR-636, hsa-miR-34a-3p, hsa-miR-21-3p, and hsa-miR-516a-5p) were downregulated in aortic tissue from AS patients. GeneSpring 13.1 was used to identify potential human miRNA target genes by comparing a 3-way comparison of predictions from TargetScan, PITA, and microRNAorg databases. Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) analysis were performed to identify potential pathways and functional annotations associated with AS. Twenty miRNAs were significantly differentially expressed between patients with AS samples and normal controls and identified potential miRNA targets and molecular pathways associated with this morbidity. This study describes the miRNA expression signature in degenerative AS and provides an improved understanding of the molecular pathobiology of this disease.

  12. Internal mammary artery dilatation in a patient with aortic coarctation, aortic stenosis, and coronary disease. Case report.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Jose Rubio; Lopez, Laura Reija; Quiroga, Juan Sierra; Martinez Comendador, Jose M; Martinez-de-Alegria, Anxo; Martinez Cereijo, Jose M; Dominguez, Cristian Delgado

    2011-04-17

    The ideal surgical approach is unclear in adult patients with coarctation of the aorta that is associated with other cardiovascular pathologies that require intervention. Standard median sternotomy allows simultaneous, coronary revascularization surgery, valve replacement and repair of aortic coarctation. However the collateral circulation and the anatomy of the mammary arteries must be determined, to avoid possible complications. We report a case of a 69 year-old man with aortic coarctation, aortic stenosis, coronary artery disease and internal mammary artery dilatation who underwent concomitant surgical procedures through a median sternotomy.

  13. Patient values and preferences on transcatheter or surgical aortic valve replacement therapy for aortic stenosis: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Lytvyn, Lyubov; Guyatt, Gordon H; Manja, Veena; Siemieniuk, Reed A; Zhang, Yuan; Agoritsas, Thomas; Vandvik, Per O

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate patients' values and preferences regarding aortic valve replacement therapy for aortic stenosis. Setting Studies published after transcatheter aortic valve insertion (TAVI) became available (2002). Participants Adults with aortic stenosis who are considering or have had valve replacement, either TAVI or via surgery (surgical aortic valve replacement, SAVR). Outcome measures We sought quantitative measurements, or qualitative descriptions, of values and preferences. When reported, we examined correlations between preferences and objective (eg, ejection fraction) or subjective (eg, health-related quality of life) measures of health. Results We reviewed 1348 unique citations, of which 2 studies proved eligible. One study of patients with severe aortic stenosis used a standard gamble study to ascertain that the median hypothetical mortality risk patients were willing to tolerate to achieve full health was 25% (IQR 25–50%). However, there was considerable variability; for mortality risk levels defined by current guidelines, 130 participants (30%) were willing to accept low-to-intermediate risk (≤8%), 224 (51%) high risk (>8–50%) and 85 (19%) a risk that guidelines would consider prohibitive (>50%). Study authors did not, however, assess participants' understanding of the exercise, resulting in a potential risk of bias. A second qualitative study of 15 patients identified the following factors that influence patients to undergo assessment for TAVI: symptom burden; expectations; information support; logistical barriers; facilitators; obligations and responsibilities. The study was limited by serious risk of bias due to authors' conflict of interest (5/9 authors industry-funded). Conclusions Current evidence on patient values and preferences of adults with aortic stenosis is very limited, and no studies have enrolled patients deciding between TAVI and SAVR. On the basis of the data available, there is evidence of variability in individual

  14. Paradoxical low flow aortic valve stenosis: incidence, evaluation, and clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Clavel, Marie-Annick; Pibarot, Philippe; Dumesnil, Jean G

    2014-01-01

    Paradoxical low-flow (PLF) aortic stenosis is defined by a stroke volume index <35 ml/m(2) despite the presence of preserved LV ejection fraction (≥ 50 %). This entity is typically characterized by pronounced LV concentric remodeling with small LV cavity, impaired LV filling, increased arterial load, and reduced LV longitudinal shortening. Patients with PLF also have a worse prognosis compared to patients with normal flow. Because of the low flow state, these patients often have a low gradient despite the presence of severe stenosis, thus leading to discordant AS grading (i.e., aortic valve area < 1.0 cm(2) but mean gradient < 40 mmHg) and thus uncertainty about the indication of aortic valve replacement. Stress echocardiography and aortic valve calcium score by computed tomography may be helpful to differentiate true from pseudo severe stenosis and thereby guide therapeutic management in these patients. Aortic valve replacement improves outcomes in patients with PLF low gradient AS having evidence of severe stenosis. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement may provide an interesting alternative to surgery in these patients.

  15. PET evaluation of cerebral blood flow reactivity in symptomatic and asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, H.M.; Brass, L.; Rich, D.

    1994-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to use acetazolamide (AZ) enhanced O-15 water PET to evaluate cerebral perfusion reserve in symptomatic and asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis. We hypothesized that impaired vasoreactivity would be associated with symptomatic disease and a higher likelihood of future ischemic events. Twenty-two patients with significant (>75%) carotid artery occlusion underwent cerebral blood flow imaging at baseline and following AZ infusion. Paired O-15 data sets were coregistered and globally normalized. Regions of interest were drawn on baseline blood flow images and superimposed upon (AZ - baseline) difference images to derive a % change in regional blood flow after AZ administration. The results showed a significant difference in cerebral perfusion reserve between symptomatic (n=19) and asymptomatic (n=3) carotid artery disease.

  16. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation: a revolution in the therapy of elderly and high-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Kilic, Teoman; Yilmaz, Irem

    2017-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) represents a real revolution in the field of interventional cardiology for the treatment of elderly or high-risk surgical patients with severe symptomatic aortic valve stenosis. Today, TAVI seems to play a key and a reliable role in the treatment of intermediate and maybe low-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis. TAVI has also evolved from a complex and hazardous procedure into an effective and safe therapy by the development of new generation devices. This article aims to review the background and future of TAVI, clinical trials and registries with old and new generation TAVI devices and to focus on some open issues related to post-procedural outcomes.

  17. Congenital Aortic Stenosis: Some Observations on the Natural History and Clinical Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Peckham, Gerald B.; Keith, John D.; Evans, John R.

    1964-01-01

    Three hundred patients, 30 years of age or under, with the clinical diagnosis of aortic stenosis were reviewed to provide information on the accuracy of clinical assessment and the natural history of the condition when left untreated. Sudden death was uncommon and occurred only in patients with clinical evidence of severe obstruction. In infants, the early presentation and lethal nature of aortic stenosis appeared to result from the presence of additional cardiac lesions. Correlation of clinical assessment with hemodynamic data in 83 patients indicated that important stenosis was present if the systolic murmur was accompanied by a thrill and associated with an increased left ventricular impulse, decreased brachial artery pulse pressure, or left ventricular hypertrophy on the electrocardiogram. The site of obstruction could not be established with certainty by clinical examination, but an early systolic ejection click was strong evidence against subvalvular stenosis. PMID:14201251

  18. Silent ischemic lesion laterality in asymptomatic internal carotid artery stenosis relates to reduced cerebral vasoreactivity

    PubMed Central

    Isozaki, Makoto; Kataoka, Hiroharu; Fukushima, Kazuhito; Ishibashi-Ueda, Hatsue; Yamada, Naoaki; Iida, Hidehiro; Iihara, Koji

    2017-01-01

    Background: We investigated the relationship between silent ischemic lesions, defined as hyperintense lesions on T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging scans of brain white matter and cerebral hemodynamics (baseline cerebral blood flow and cerebral vasoreactivity). Methods: Between January 2007 and December 2012, 61 patients with asymptomatic internal carotid artery stenosis were evaluated for asymptomatic silent ischemic lesions, acute infarction, and cerebral hemodynamics. Patients were divided into 2 groups based on silent ischemic lesion distribution; the Symmetry group (n = 34) included patients who showed symmetrical distribution of lesions (or had no lesions), and the Asymmetry group (n = 27) included patients with a greater number of lesions in the ipsilateral than that in the contralateral hemisphere. The Asymmetry group was further divided into Internal (n = 15) and External (n = 12) types. Results: Two External-type patients (17%) showed spotty asymptomatic acute infarction in the ipsilateral hemisphere. There were no significant differences in patient characteristics, histopathological findings, vascular risk factors, or cerebral blood flow values between the groups. The mean cerebral vasoreactivity value in the ipsilateral hemisphere for the Internal type was 13.0 ± 15.2% (range: −11.4% to 41.6%), which was significantly lower than values of the contralateral hemisphere (36.7 ± 20.8%; range: 3.9% to 75.7%; P <.01) and ipsilateral hemispheres of the other groups (P <.01). Conclusions: The finding that increased ipsilateral asymmetrical silent ischemic lesions correlated with cerebral vasoreactivity reduction may help predict the risk of cerebral infarction in patients with asymptomatic internal carotid artery stenosis. PMID:28217385

  19. Evaluation of Intravascular Hemolysis With Erythrocyte Creatine in Patients With Aortic Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Sugiura, Tetsuro; Okumiya, Toshika; Kubo, Toru; Takeuchi, Hiroaki; Matsumura, Yoshihisa

    2016-07-27

    Chronic intravascular hemolysis has been identified in patients with cardiac valve prostheses, but only a few case reports have evaluated intravascular hemolysis in patients with native valvular heart disease. To detect intravascular hemolysis in patients with aortic stenosis, erythrocyte creatine was evaluated with hemodynamic indices obtained by echocardiography.Erythrocyte creatine, a marker of erythrocyte age, was assayed in 30 patients with aortic stenosis and 10 aged matched healthy volunteers. Peak flow velocity of the aortic valve was determined by continuous-wave Doppler echocardiography. Twenty of 30 patients with aortic stenosis had high erythrocyte creatine levels (> 1.8 µmol/g Hb) and erythrocyte creatine was significantly higher as compared with control subjects (1.98 ± 0.49 versus 1.52 ± 0.19 µmol/g Hb, P = 0.007). Peak transvalvular pressure gradient ranged from 46 to 142 mmHg and peak flow velocity ranged from 3.40 to 5.95 m/second. Patients with aortic stenosis had a significantly lower erythrocyte count (387 ± 40 versus 436 ± 42 × 10(4) µL, P = 0.002) and hemoglobin (119 ± 11 versus 135 ± 11 g/L, P < 0.001) as compared with control subjects. Erythrocyte creatine had a fair correlation with peak flow velocity (r = 0.55, P = 0.002).In conclusion, intravascular hemolysis due to destruction of erythrocytes was detected in patients with moderate to severe aortic stenosis and the severity of intravascular hemolysis was related to valvular flow velocity of the aortic valve.

  20. Stress Echocardiography in Aortic Stenosis: Insights into Valve Mechanics and Hemodynamics.

    PubMed

    Bermejo, Javier; García-Fernández, Miguel A.; Antoranz, J. Carlos; Moreno, M. Mar; Delcán, Juan Luis

    1999-10-01

    Stress interventions have been classically combined with cardiac catheterization recordings to understand the hemodynamic principles of valvular stenosis. Indices of aortic stenosis such as pressure gradient and valve area were based on simple hydraulic principles and have proved to be clinically useful for patient management during a number of decades. With the advent of Doppler echocardiography, these hemodynamic indices can be readily obtained noninvasively. Abundant evidence obtained using exercise and pharmacological stress echocardiography has demonstrated that the assumptions of classic hemodynamic models of aortic stenosis were wrong. Consequently, it is recognized that conventional indices may be misleading indicators of aortic stenosis significance in particular clinical situations. To improve diagnostic accuracy, several alternative hemodynamic models have been developed in the past few years, including valve resistance and left ventricular stroke work loss, among others. Nevertheless, these more-accurate indices should be obtainable noninvasively and need to demonstrate greater diagnostic and prognostic power than conventional indices; preliminary data suggest such superiority. Stress echocardiography is well established as the tool of choice for testing hypothesis and physical models of cardiac valve function. Although the final role of alternative indices is not yet well established, the new insights into valvular hemodynamics provided by this technique may change the clinical assessment of aortic stenosis.

  1. Congenital supravalvular aortic stenosis and sudden death associated with anesthesia: what's the mystery?

    PubMed

    Burch, Thomas M; McGowan, Francis X; Kussman, Barry D; Powell, Andrew J; DiNardo, James A

    2008-12-01

    Patients with congenital supravalvular aortic stenosis and associated peripheral pulmonary artery stenoses, the majority of whom have Williams-Beuren syndrome, are inherently at risk for development of myocardial ischemia. This is particularly true in the setting of procedural sedation and anesthesia. The biventricular hypertrophy that accompanies these lesions increases myocardial oxygen consumption and compromises oxygen delivery. In addition, these patients often have direct, multifactorial compromise of coronary blood flow. In this article, we review both the pathophysiology of congenital supravalvular aortic stenosis and the literature regarding sudden death in association with sedation and anesthesia. Recommendations as to preoperative assessment and management of these patients are made based on the best available evidence.

  2. Brachioradial delay: a new clinical indicator of the severity of aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Leach, R M; McBrien, D J

    1990-05-19

    During the assessment of patients with severe or symptomatic aortic stenosis, a clinically detectable delay between the brachial and radial pulses was observed. This delay was not present in normal subjects. The timed delay of 53.5 (SE 2.6) ms in severe aortic stenosis was significantly longer than that in normal volunteers 22.6 [1.3] ms) or in patients with low cardiac output. This increased delay was clinically detectable before the occurrence of left ventricular failure and often before the onset of symptoms.

  3. Symptomatic obstruction of the brachiocephalic and left subclavian arteries obscured by aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Hashim, Peter W; Assi, Roland; Grecu, Loreta; Dardik, Alan

    2014-04-01

    Stenosis or occlusion of the brachiocephalic artery represents an uncommon cause of cerebrovascular insufficiency. We report a patient with combined brachiocephalic and left subclavian obstruction with clinical manifestations of lightheadedness, syncope, and left-sided weakness who remained misdiagnosed essentially because of symmetrical pressures in the upper extremities. Aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis failed to provide symptomatic relief. Eventual stenting of the brachiocephalic trunk resolved the patient's symptoms. Our report highlights the diagnostic challenges in this case of bilateral supraaortic vessel disease and shows that equal upper extremity pressures do not rule out brachiocephalic artery obstruction.

  4. [The thickness/radius ratio of the left ventricle in aortic stenosis. Prognostic and therapeutic implications].

    PubMed

    Guadalajara, J F; Martínez, C; Huerta, D

    1990-01-01

    Using two-D echocardiography and cardiac catheterization we studied the performance of left ventricle in severe aortic stenosis with normal ventricular function (10 patients), and with heart failure (11 patients). With appropriate hypertrophy increased ventricular function, is found resulting in systolic wall stress normalization. When hypertrophic mechanism is unable to normalize the systolic wall stress; afterload increases with ensuing heart failure (inadequate hypertrophy). Surgical treatment in those cases reduces the afterload and increases de ventricular function. Normalization of systolic wall stress in patients with severe aortic stenosis and heart failure means irreversible myocardial damage.

  5. [Correlation of the transaortic gradient determined with doppler echocardiography versus catheterization in patients with aortic stenosis].

    PubMed

    Illescas, J; Enciso, R; Vidrio, M; de la Torre, N; Baduí, E

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to evaluate the reliability of a non-invasive estimation of a transaortic gradient in patients with valvular aortic stenosis by doppler echocardiography. We compared the transvalvular gradients obtained by cardiac catheterization (invasive) versus the estimation by non-invasive technique such as continuous-wave doppler in 30 consecutive patients with valvular aortic stenosis. When compared the peak velocity (Vmax) of the aortic jet versus the gradient obtained by cardiac catheterization we found a correlation coefficient (r) of 0.83 and when compared the gradient obtained by both methods we found an r value of 0.85. These results show that the calculations of aortic gradient by echo-doppler, are reliable. Besides this method allowed us to establish the correct diagnosis and to follow up these patients.

  6. In-Graft Endovascular Stenting Repair for Supravalvular Stenosis From Aortic Rupture After Balloon-Expanding Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Nobuyuki; Scholtz, Werner; Haas, Nikolaus; Ensminger, Stephan; Gummert, Jan; Börgermann, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    An 81-year-old man with high-grade aortic valve stenosis and status post-coronary artery bypass grafting and supracoronary replacement of the ascending aorta was referred for transcatheter aortic valve implantation. He was in New York Heart Association class III and had dyspnea. After appropriate screening, we implanted a 29-mm SAPIEN XT valve (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, CA USA) through a transapical approach because of severe peripheral arterial occlusive disease. Postinterventional aortography revealed correct positioning and function of the valve and free coronary ostia but contrast extravasation in the vicinity of the interposed vascular prosthesis, resulting in severe luminal narrowing. We chose to manage the stenosis with an endovascular stent. After stenting, extravascular compression was markedly reduced, and the pressure gradient disappeared. The patient was discharged home on the 20th postoperative day. Three months later, computed tomography depicted correct positioning of both grafts. The patient's general health is good, and he is now in New York Heart Association class II. This case illustrates a complication of transcatheter aortic valve implantation specific for patients with an ascending aortic graft. Although stenting may be a good solution, as depicted by this case, self-expanding transcatheter aortic valves should be preferred in patients with ascending aortic grafts to avoid the described complication.

  7. Singleton Merten Syndrome: A Rare Cause of Early Onset Aortic Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Mungee, Sudhir

    2017-01-01

    Singleton Merten syndrome (SMS) is a rare autosomal dominant genetic disorder with variable expression. Its characteristic features include abnormal aortic calcification, abnormal ossification of extremities, and dental anomalies. We present a young man with dyspnea who was noted to have aortic stenosis in the background of glaucoma, psoriasis, dental anomalies, hand and foot deformities, Achilles tendinitis, osteopenia, and nephrolithiasis. The conglomeration of features led to the diagnosis of SMS. His mother had a very similar phenotype. PMID:28321341

  8. Integrin β3 inhibition is a therapeutic strategy for supravalvular aortic stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Ashish; Sheikh, Abdul Q.; Kumar, Abhishek; Luo, Jiesi; Zhang, Jiasheng; Hinton, Robert B.; Smoot, Leslie; Kaplan, Paige; Urban, Zsolt; Qyang, Yibing; Tellides, George

    2016-01-01

    The aorta is the largest artery in the body, yet processes underlying aortic pathology are poorly understood. The arterial media consists of circumferential layers of elastic lamellae and smooth muscle cells (SMCs), and many arterial diseases are characterized by defective lamellae and excess SMCs; however, a mechanism linking these pathological features is lacking. In this study, we use lineage and genetic analysis, pharmacological inhibition, explant cultures, and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) to investigate supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS) patients and/or elastin mutant mice that model SVAS. These experiments demonstrate that multiple preexisting SMCs give rise to excess aortic SMCs in elastin mutants, and these SMCs are hyperproliferative and dedifferentiated. In addition, SVAS iPSC-derived SMCs and the aortic media of elastin mutant mice and SVAS patients have enhanced integrin β3 levels, activation, and downstream signaling, resulting in SMC misalignment and hyperproliferation. Reduced β3 gene dosage in elastin-null mice mitigates pathological aortic muscularization, SMC misorientation, and lumen loss and extends survival, which is unprecedented. Finally, pharmacological β3 inhibition in elastin mutant mice and explants attenuates aortic hypermuscularization and stenosis. Thus, integrin β3–mediated signaling in SMCs links elastin deficiency and pathological stenosis, and inhibiting this pathway is an attractive therapeutic strategy for SVAS. PMID:26858344

  9. Should patients with asymptomatic significant carotid stenosis undergo simultaneous carotid and cardiac surgery?

    PubMed Central

    Ogutu, Peter; Werner, Raphael; Oertel, Frank; Beyer, Michael

    2014-01-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiovascular surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was whether patients with severe asymptomatic carotid and coronary artery diseases should undergo simultaneous carotid endarterectomy (CEA) and coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). A total of 624 papers were found using the reported search, of which 20 represent the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The author, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes, results and study results of these papers are tabulated. Previous cohort studies showed mixed results, while advocating for the necessity of a randomized controlled trial (RCT). A recent RCT showed that patients undergoing prophylactic or simultaneous CEA + CABG had lower rates of stroke (0%) compared with delayed CEA 1–3 months after CABG (7.7%), without significant perioperative mortality difference. This study included patients with unilateral severe (>70%) asymptomatic carotid stenosis requiring CABG. An earlier partly randomized trial also showed better outcomes for patients undergoing simultaneous procedures (P = 0.045). Interestingly, systematic reviews previously failed to show compelling evidence supporting prophylactic CEA. This could be partly due to the fact that these reviews collectively analyse different cohort qualities. Neurological studies have, however, shown reduced cognitive and phonetic quality and function in patients with unilateral and bilateral asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis. Twenty-one RCTs comparing lone carotid artery stenting (CAS) and CEA informed the American Heart Association guidelines, which declared CAS comparable with CEA for symptomatic and asymptomatic carotid stenosis (CS). However, the risk of death/stroke for CAS alone is double that for CEA alone in the acute phase following onset of symptoms, while CEA alone is associated with a doubled risk of myocardial infarction. There is

  10. The effect of statins therapy in aortic stenosis: Meta-analysis comparison data of RCTs and observationals

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ying; Nicoll, Rachel; He, Yi hua; Henein, Michael Y.

    2016-01-01

    Aortic stenosis has been shown to share the same risk factors as atherosclerosis which suggested a potential benefit from statins therapy. Fourteen studies which provided the effect of statins treatment on aortic stenosis (AS) were meta-analyzed, including 5 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and 9 observational studies. In the RCTs, statins did not have any influence on peak aortic valve velocity, peak valve gradient, mean valve gradient, aortic valve area and aortic calcification compared to controls. In the observational studies, the peak valve velocity, peak gradient and aortic valve area showed less progression in the statins group compared to controls. This article describes data related article title “The effect of statins on valve function and calcification in aortic stenosis: a meta-analysis” (Zhao et al., 2016) [1]. PMID:26977437

  11. Extended replacement of a calcified ascending aorta in adulthood sporadic, diffuse type, supravalvular aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Borghetti, Valentino; D'Addario, Giancarlo; Bravi, Ilaria; Pardinia, Alessandro

    2011-08-01

    The diffuse variant of supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS) is one of the most rare congenital vascular pathological conditions of adulthood. Due to its rarity, surgical treatment of this clinical entity is still a matter of debate because of the variable degree of aortic narrowing, presence of multilevel obstruction, and age at presentation, all factors that strongly influence the disease prognosis. We report a case of an adult patient with an extremely calcified diffuse SVAS who underwent successful replacement of the ascending aorta through the interposition of a tubular prosthesis. Six months' follow-up showed complete relief of the aortic gradient and an improvement in clinical performance.

  12. Surgery for congenital aortic stenosis in children with left ventricular noncompaction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Miao, Qi; Liu, Xingrong; Li, Xiaofeng

    2013-07-01

    Left ventricular noncompaction (LVNC) is an uncommon genetic disorder of endocardial morphogenesis, which carries a high mortality from heart failure or sudden cardiac death. This condition is often first diagnosed in adults, but it has also been described in children with other cardiac anomalies. We discuss the management of a 10-year-old female with congenital aortic stenosis associated with LVNC.

  13. Correlation of echocardiographic wall stress and left ventricular pressure and function in aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    DePace, N L; Ren, J F; Iskandrian, A S; Kotler, M N; Hakki, A H; Segal, B L

    1983-04-01

    Previous studies have suggested that left ventricular pressure (P) can be predicted in patients with aortic stenosis by the equation P = 235 h/r, where 235 is a constant peak wall stress (sigma), h is end-systolic wall thickness, and r is end-systolic dimension/2; h and r are measured by M-mode echocardiography. In 73 patients with aortic stenosis (valve area less than 0.7 cm2), measured and predicted left ventricular pressure correlated poorly (r = 0.17). The measured wall stress in our patients varied from 120 to 250 mm Hg in patients with normal left ventricular function and from 250 to 550 mm Hg in patients with abnormal function. The correlation between sigma and h was only fair (r = 0.53), because many patients had inappropriate left ventricular hypertrophy. There was a statistically significant correlation between ejection fraction and sigma (r = 0.62) and between ejection fraction and end-systolic dimension (r = -0.70), but there was considerable scatter of ejection fractions for any given end-systolic dimension. We conclude that sigma is not constant in aortic stenosis, and the use of a constant sigma to predict left ventricular pressure is unreliable; inappropriate left ventricular hypertrophy may explain why sigma is not constant. M-mode echocardiography is not reliable in assessing the severity of aortic stenosis in adults; such assessment requires precise measurements of pressure gradients and flow by cardiac catheterization.

  14. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (TAVI) for Treatment of Aortic Valve Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Sehatzadeh, S; Doble, B; Xie, F; Blackhouse, G; Campbell, K; Kaulback, K; Chandra, K; Goeree, R

    2013-01-01

    , but varied widely for operable patients. Conclusions The findings of the 2-year follow-up with respect to mortality and adverse events were consistent with those of the 1-year follow-up. TAVI was also associated with improvement in quality of life, although results varied by cohort. Consistent with the 2012 report, TAVI may be cost-effective for patients who are not candidates for surgery. Plain Language Summary Narrowing of 1 of the heart valves (called aortic valve stenosis) makes it difficult for the heart to work properly. Often, patients have surgery to replace the narrowed valve, but surgery is too risky for some. In 2012, Health Quality Ontario published a report on a less invasive treatment option called transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). This report reviews information published since the 2012 report: the results of a 2-year follow-up of TAVI patients, and studies exploring patients’ quality of life. PMID:23837106

  15. Optimization and Reproducibility of Aortic Valve 18F-Fluoride Positron Emission Tomography in Patients With Aortic Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Cartlidge, Timothy R.G.; Jenkins, William S.A.; Adamson, Philip D.; Robson, Phillip; Lucatelli, Christophe; Van Beek, Edwin J.R.; Prendergast, Bernard; Denison, Alan R.; Forsyth, Laura; Rudd, James H.F.; Fayad, Zahi A.; Fletcher, Alison; Tuck, Sharon; Newby, David E.; Dweck, Marc R.

    2016-01-01

    Background— 18F-Fluoride positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) can measure disease activity and progression in aortic stenosis. Our objectives were to optimize the methodology, analysis, and scan–rescan reproducibility of aortic valve 18F-fluoride PET-CT imaging. Methods and Results— Fifteen patients with aortic stenosis underwent repeated 18F-fluoride PET-CT. We compared nongated PET and noncontrast CT, with a modified approach that incorporated contrast CT and ECG-gated PET. We explored a range of image analysis techniques, including estimation of blood-pool activity at differing vascular sites and a most diseased segment approach. Contrast-enhanced ECG-gated PET-CT permitted localization of 18F-fluoride uptake to individual valve leaflets. Uptake was most commonly observed at sites of maximal mechanical stress: the leaflet tips and the commissures. Scan–rescan reproducibility was markedly improved using enhanced analysis techniques leading to a reduction in percentage error from ±63% to ±10% (tissue to background ratio MDS mean of 1.55, bias −0.05, limits of agreement −0·20 to +0·11). Conclusions— Optimized 18F-fluoride PET-CT allows reproducible localization of calcification activity to different regions of the aortic valve leaflet and commonly to areas of increased mechanical stress. This technique holds major promise in improving our understanding of the pathophysiology of aortic stenosis and as a biomarker end point in clinical trials of novel therapies. Clinical Trial Registration— URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT02132026. PMID:27733431

  16. [A case report of aortic valvuloplasty by rasping technique for aortic stenosis with small annulus simultaneously performed with mitral valve replacement].

    PubMed

    Taniyasu, N; Kou, E; Hiramatsu, T; Yokoyama, S; Takenaka, A; Ikawa, O

    1997-02-01

    The patient was a 48-year-old woman with aortic stenosis and regurgitation and mitral stenosis. Preoperative cardiac catheterization revealed LV-Ao pressure gradient of 30 mmHg and regurgitation of Sellers III. The aortic annulus was measured less than 19 mm. As operative findings, the aortic annulus seemed to be too small to be replaced with 19 mm prosthetic valve. Aortic valvuloplasty (AVP) with rasping technique was performed for the aortic valve and valve replacement was carried out for the mitral valve. After aortic declamping and occurring her beat, the transesophageal echocardiographic evaluation for AVP was effective. Postoperative course was uneventful. Postoperative cardiac catheterization have shown decreased transvalvular pressure gradient up to 10 mmHg and aortic regurgitation of Sellers I.

  17. Prevalence and outcome of asymptomatic carotid stenosis: a population-based ultrasonographic study.

    PubMed

    Mineva, P P; Manchev, I C; Hadjiev, D I

    2002-07-01

    The aims of this epidemiological population-based cohort study were to examine the prevalence and outcomes of asymptomatic carotid stenosis (ACS) detected by duplex scanning and its relations to other vascular risk factors. A total of 500 volunteers, 200 men and 300 women, without signs and symptoms of cerebrovascular disease, aged 50-79 years, were enrolled in the study. The prevalence of ACS of 50% or greater was 6.4%. Only severe carotid stenosis was detected in 0.4% of the subjects examined. Significant relationships between ACS and coronary heart disease (CHD) [odds ratio (OR)=8.00], peripheral arterial disease (PAD) (OR=3.66), cigarette smoking in men (OR=4.39) and obesity in women (OR=0.31) were found. The biennial incidence rate of cerebral ischaemic events was 9.4%. A progression of ACS was revealed in 14% and a regression in 6.25% of the subjects. The patients with progressing ACS to more than 70% diameter reduction reached the end-points. Follow-up with repeated duplex scans in patients with advancing ACS of 50% or greater, especially smokers with CHD and PAD, is recommended.

  18. Microparticle-Induced Coagulation Relates to Coronary Artery Atherosclerosis in Severe Aortic Valve Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Patrick; Erkilet, Gülsüm; Veulemans, Verena; Kröpil, Patric; Schurgers, Leon; Zeus, Tobias; Heiss, Christian; Kelm, Malte; Westenfeld, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Background Circulating microparticles (MPs) derived from endothelial cells and blood cells bear procoagulant activity and promote thrombin generation. Thrombin exerts proinflammatory effects mediating the progression of atherosclerosis. Aortic valve stenosis may represent an atherosclerosis-like process involving both the aortic valve and the vascular system. The aim of this study was to investigate whether MP-induced thrombin generation is related to coronary atherosclerosis and aortic valve calcification. Methods In a cross-sectional study of 55 patients with severe aortic valve stenosis, we assessed the coronary calcification score (CAC) as indicator of total coronary atherosclerosis burden, and aortic valve calcification (AVC) by computed tomography. Thrombin-antithrombin complex (TATc) levels were measured as a marker for thrombin formation. Circulating MPs were characterized by flow cytometry according to the expression of established surface antigens and by measuring MP-induced thrombin generation. Results Patients with CAC score below the median were classified as patients with low CAC, patients with CAC Score above the median as high CAC. In patients with high CAC compared to patients with low CAC we detected higher levels of TATc, platelet-derived MPs (PMPs), endothelial-derived MPs (EMPs) and MP-induced thrombin generation. Increased level of PMPs and MP-induced thrombin generation were independent predictors for the severity of CAC. In contrast, AVC Score did not differ between patients with high and low CAC and did neither correlate with MPs levels nor with MP-induced thrombin generation. Conclusion In patients with severe aortic valve stenosis MP-induced thrombin generation was independently associated with the severity of CAC but not AVC indicating different pathomechanisms involved in coronary artery and aortic valve calcification. PMID:27010400

  19. At sea with SEAS: the first clinical endpoint trial for ezetimibe, treatment of patients with mild to moderate aortic stenosis, ends with mixed results and more controversy.

    PubMed

    Hamilton-Craig, Ian; Kostner, Karam; Colquhoun, David; Woodhouse, Stan

    2009-10-01

    SEAS (Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis) hypothesised that aggressive lipid lowering with simvastatin/ezetimibe reduced cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk and the need for aortic valve replacement (AVR) in patients with asymptomatic aortic stenosis (AS). The study enrolled from 173 centres in seven European countries 1873 elderly non-diabetics with mild to moderate AS (mean aortic-valve area 1.28+/-0.47 cm(2)), who had no indication for lipid-lowering therapy. Patients were randomised to treatment with either simvastatin/ezetimibe 40/10mg daily or matching placebo after a four-week diet/placebo run-in period. Compared with placebo, LDL cholesterol was reduced by 61% (2.0 mmol/l). There was no difference in the primary endpoint (a combination of AVR, CV death, non-fatal MI, congestive heart failure from AS progression, coronary revascularisation, hospitalised unstable angina and non-haemorrhagic stroke). Compared with placebo, CVD events were reduced by 4.4% from 20.1% to 15.7% in the simvastatin/ezetimibe group (p=0.02). Cancer incidence and cancer deaths were more frequent in the simvastatin/ezetimibe group (9.9% vs. 7.0%, p=0.03 and 4.1% vs. 2.5%, p=0.05, respectively). These differences were not related to any form of cancer and did not increase with increased duration of therapy.

  20. The role of routine pre-operative bedside echocardiography in detecting aortic stenosis in patients with a hip fracture.

    PubMed

    Loxdale, S J; Sneyd, J R; Donovan, A; Werrett, G; Viira, D J

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence and severity of aortic stenosis in unselected patients admitted with a hip fracture is unknown. Derriford Hospital operates a routine weekday, pre-operative, targeted bedside echocardiography examination on all patients admitted with a hip fracture. We carried out a prospective service evaluation for 13 months from October 2007 on all 501 admissions, of which 374 (75%) underwent pre-operative echocardiography. Of those patients investigated, 8 (2%) had severe, 24 (6%) moderate and 113 (30%) had mild aortic stenosis or aortic sclerosis. Eighty-seven of 278 (31%) patients with no murmur detected clinically on admission had aortic stenosis on echocardiography and of the 96 patients in whom a murmur was heard pre-operatively, 30 (31%) had a normal echocardiogram. Detection of a murmur does not necessarily reflect the presence of underling aortic valve disease. However, if a murmur is heard then the likelihood of the lesion's being moderate or severe aortic stenosis is increased (OR 8.5; 95% CI 3.8-19.5). Forty-four (12%) of our unselected patients with fractured femur had either moderate or severe aortic stenosis (with or without moderate or severe left ventricular failure), or mild stenosis with moderately or severely impaired left ventricular function.

  1. Asymptomatic Extracranial Artery Stenosis and the Risk of Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dandan; Wang, Jing; Jin, Cheng; Ji, Ruijun; Wang, Anxin; Li, Xin; Gao, Xiang; Wu, Shouling; Zhou, Yong; Zhao, Xingquan

    2016-01-01

    Asymptomatic extracranial artery stenosis (ECAS) is a well-known risk factor for stroke events, but it remains unclear whether it has the same role in predicting cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases, especially in China. We investigated the potential associations between ECAS, carotid plaque and carotid intima-media thickness and the new occurrence of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases in the study. Out of 5440 study participants, 364 showed an asymptomatic ECAS at baseline, and 185 had come up to the final vascular events (brain infarction, intracerebral hemorrhage, subarachnoid hemorrhage, coronary heart disease and death due to the vascular diseases). During the follow- up. ECAS, carotid plaque and its instability and increased CIMT have associated with vascular events significantly (P < 0.05). After adjusting relevant vascular risk factors, ECAS still has a strong relationship with the new occurrence of vascular events, especially the brain infarction (HR: 2.101; 95% CI: 1.027–4.298; P = 0.042). We observed a clear relationship between ECAS and the new occurrence of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease, especially the brain infarction event. Carotid plaque and its instability and increased CIMT have all relevant with the occurrence of vascular events. Our findings provide direct evidence for the importance of ECAS in vascular events occurrence. PMID:27650877

  2. Concomitant Lumbar Stenosis and Aortic Pseudoaneurysm: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Christoph; Niemeier, Thomas E; Neway, William E

    2016-01-01

    Aortic pseudoaneurysm can create a constellation of symptoms that can mimic lumbar back pain. There are rare but well-documented reports of aortic pathology (aneurysms, pseudoaneurysms, and chronic contained aneurysm ruptures) eroding into the vertebral column causing neural compression. We report a case of a rapidly progressive aortic pseudoaneurysm in a patient with pre-existing lumbar spine pathology which had the potential for catastrophic intraoperative bleeding during a minimally invasive surgery (MIS) using the transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) technique. Postoperatively, the patient’s radicular pain resolved but her back pain remained. Further workup identified the pseudoaneurysm and the patient subsequently underwent open vascular repair. In this report, we highlight a lesser known mimicker of lumbar back pain. PMID:27882269

  3. Factors affecting left ventricular remodeling after valve replacement for aortic stenosis. An overview

    PubMed Central

    Villa, Emmanuel; Troise, Giovanni; Cirillo, Marco; Brunelli, Federico; Tomba, Margherita Dalla; Mhagna, Zen; Tasca, Giordano; Quaini, Eugenio

    2006-01-01

    Although a small percentage of patients with critical aortic stenosis do not develop left ventricle hypertrophy, increased ventricular mass is widely observed in conditions of increased afterload. There is growing epidemiological evidence that hypertrophy is associated with excess cardiac mortality and morbidity not only in patients with arterial hypertension, but also in those undergoing aortic valve replacement. Valve replacement surgery relieves the aortic obstruction and prolongs the life of many patients, but favorable or adverse left ventricular remodeling is affected by a large number of factors whose specific roles are still a subject of debate. Age, gender, hemodynamic factors, prosthetic valve types, myocyte alterations, interstitial structures, blood pressure control and ethnicity can all influence the process of left ventricle mass regression, and myocardial metabolism and coronary artery circulation are also involved in the changes occurring after aortic valve replacement. The aim of this overview is to analyze these factors in the light of our experience, elucidate the important question of prosthesis-patient mismatch by considering the method of effective orifice area, and discuss surgical timings and techniques that can improve the management of patients with aortic valve stenosis and maximize the probability of mass regression. PMID:16803632

  4. Simultaneous transapical transcatheter aortic valve replacement and transcatheter mitral valve replacement for native valvular stenosis.

    PubMed

    Elkharbotly, Ali; Delago, Augustin; El-Hajjar, Mohammad

    2016-06-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is well established for patients who cannot undergo surgery (Leon et al., N Engl J Med 2010;363:1597) or are high risk for surgery (Smith et al., N Engl J Med 2011;364:2187-2198). Experience with the TAVR procedure has led to recent reports of successful transcatheter mitral valve replacement (TMVR) procedures (Cheung et al., J Am Coll Cardiol 2014;64:1814; Seiffert et al., J Am Coll Cardiol Interv 2012;5:341-349) separately or simultaneously with the TAVR. However, these reports were of simultaneous valve-in-valve procedures (Cheung Anson, et al. J Am Coll Cardiol 2013;61:1759-1766). A recent report from Portugal also reported simultaneous transpical implantation of an inverted transcatheter aortic valve-in-ring in the mitral position and transcatheter aortic valve (Hasan et al., Circulation 2013;128:e74-e76). There has been an experience of TMVR only in native mitral valve for mitral valve stenosis, but none in both aortic and mitral valves. We report the first in human case of simultaneous transapical TAVR and TMVR in native valves secondary to valvular stenosis. Our patient was not a candidate for percutaneous balloon mitral valvuloplasty secondary to a high Wilkins Score. Sizing of the aortic valve was based on the transesophageal echocardiogram (TEE), whereas sizing of the mitral valve was based on TEE measurements and balloon inflation during left ventriculography. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Decision analysis in clinical cardiology: When is coronary angiography required in aortic stenosis

    SciTech Connect

    Georgeson, S.; Meyer, K.B.; Pauker, S.G. )

    1990-03-15

    Decision analysis offers a reproducible, explicit approach to complex clinical decisions. It consists of developing a model, typically a decision tree, that separates choices from chances and that specifies and assigns relative values to outcomes. Sensitivity analysis allows exploration of alternative assumptions. Cost-effectiveness analysis shows the relation between dollars spent and improved health outcomes achieved. In a tutorial format, this approach is applied to the decision whether to perform coronary angiography in a patient who requires aortic valve replacement for critical aortic stenosis.

  6. Severe Aortic Stenosis and Severe Coarctation of the Aorta: A Hybrid Approach to Treatment

    PubMed Central

    McLennan, Daniel; Caputo, Massimo; Taliotis, Demetris

    2017-01-01

    Hybrid surgery is becoming more popular in the treatment of children with congenital heart disease, particularly small infants and neonates. We report a case of a patient with aortic stenosis (AS) and coarctation of the aorta (CoA). Case: a 1-month-old baby presented with severe AS and CoA. The decision was made to perform a hybrid surgical procedure. The patient underwent a lateral thoracotomy for repair of the CoA and carotid cutdown for aortic balloon valvuloplasty (AoVP). PMID:28367436

  7. Endothelial adaptations in aortic stenosis. Correlation with flow parameters.

    PubMed Central

    Zand, T.; Nunnari, J. J.; Hoffman, A. H.; Savilonis, B. J.; MacWilliams, B.; Majno, G.; Joris, I.

    1988-01-01

    A 69 +/- 5% stenosis was produced in the rat aorta, with the purpose of correlating endothelial changes with local flow patterns and with levels of shear stress; the hydrodynamic data were obtained from a scaled-up model of the stenosed aorta. In the throat of the stenosis, where shear stress values were 15-25 times normal, the endothelium was stripped off within 1 hour. It regenerated at half the rate of controls but modulated into a cell type that could withstand the increased shear stress. Adaptations included changes in cell orientation, number, length, width, thickness, stress fibers, and anchoring structures, as well as changes in the length, argyrophilia, and permeability of the junctions. Areas of either elongated or "polygonal" cells consistently developed at the same sites in relation to the stenosis, but the hydrodynamic data showed that they did not always correspond (as had been anticipated) to high and low shear, respectively. It is concluded that endothelial cell shape in the living artery must be determined by some other factor(s) in addition to shear stress. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:3189514

  8. [New aspects in aortic valve disease].

    PubMed

    Tornos, P

    2001-01-01

    Renewed interest for aortic valve disease has evolved in recent years. Aortic valve replacement has become the second most frequent cause of cardiac surgery, following coronary bypass surgery. In addition, the etiologic and physiopathologic knowledge of this disorder has improved. In the present paper we analyze three aspects of the disease which are, at present, the subject of study and controversy: first, we discuss the possible relationship between degenerative aortic stenosis and atherosclerosis; second, the involvement of the aortic root in cases of bicuspid aortic valve; and third, the surgical indications in asymptomatic patients with either aortic stenosis or regurgitation.

  9. Asymptomatic aortic aneurysm causing right vocal cord palsy and hoarseness: A rare presentation.

    PubMed

    Rizvi, M M; Singh, Raj Bahadur; Jain, Anuj; Sarkar, Arindam

    2014-01-01

    Vocal cord palsy (VCP) presenting as hoarseness of voice can be the first symptom of very serious and sinister common pathologies. But vocal cord palsy resulting from aortic aneurysm is a rare entity and still rarer is the right cord palsy due to aortic aneurysm. We are reporting a rare case in which a 52-year old male smoking for last 30 years having asymptomatic aortic aneurysm presented to us with hoarseness of voice. On Panendoscopy, no local pathology was found and CECT from base of skull to T12 was advised. CECT showed a large aneurysm involving ascending aorta and extending upto abdominal aorta with compression of the bilateral bronchi. CTVS consultation was sought and they advised for regular follow-up only. We are reporting this case to warn both the anaesthetist and the surgeon about the catastrophic complications if they are not alert in handling such cases.

  10. Computational Modeling of Aortic Valvular Stenosis to Asses the Range of Validity of Gorlin Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okpara, Emanuel; Agarwal, Ramesh; Rifkin, Robert; Wendl, Mike

    2003-11-01

    It is well known from clinical observations that the underestimation errors occur with the use of Gorlin formula (1) for the calculation of valve area of the stenotic aortic valve in patients with low cardiac output, that is in low flow states. Since 1951, empirical modifications to Gorlin formula have been proposed in the literaure by many researchers. In this paper, we study the mild to severe aortic valve stenosis for low to high flow rates by employing a simplified model of aortic valve. The aortic valve stenosis is modeled by a circular orifice in a flat plate embedded in the cross-section of a rigid tube (aorta). Experimental results are available for this configuration for the validation of a CFD solver "FLUENT". The numerical data base generated for this model for various degrees of stenoses and flow rates is employed to asses the range of validity of Gorlin's equation. Modifications to Gorlin formula are suggested to make it valid for all flow rates to determine the valve area for clinical use. (1) R. Gorlin and S. Gorlin," Hydraulic Formula for Calculation of the Area of Stenotic Mitral Valve, Other Cardiac Valves and Central Circulatory Shunts," Am. Heart Journal, Vol. 41, 1951, pp. 1-29.

  11. [Wild-type transthyretin-related cardiac amyloidosis and degenerative aortic stenosis: Two inter-related pathologies in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Calero Núñez, Sofía; Tercero Martínez, Antonia; García López, Juan Carlos; Jiménez-Mazuecos, Jesús

    2016-06-09

    Wild-type transthyretin-related cardiac amyloidosis (ATTRwt) and degenerative aortic stenosis share a common demographic and clinical profile. It was recently suggested that some of the complications arising during and after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) could be due to a co-existing cardiac amyloidosis. In a series of autopsies of patients who had undergone TAVR, researchers found ATTR amyloidosis in one third of the cases. A report is presented on two patients with aortic stenosis who were diagnosed with ATTRwt when they were about to undergo a TAVI. ATTRwt is a slowly progressing disease so we need to review the decisions on the therapeutic approach in these patients.

  12. The hemodynamic effects of acute aortic regurgitation into a stiffened left ventricle resulting from chronic aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Okafor, Ikechukwu; Raghav, Vrishank; Midha, Prem; Kumar, Gautam; Yoganathan, Ajit

    2016-06-01

    Acute aortic regurgitation (AR) post-chronic aortic stenosis is a prevalent phenomenon occurring in patients who undergo transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) surgery. The objective of this work was to characterize the effects of left ventricular diastolic stiffness (LVDS) and AR severity on LV performance. Three LVDS models were inserted into a physiological left heart simulator. AR severity was parametrically varied through four levels (ranging from trace to moderate) and compared with a competent aortic valve. Hemodynamic metrics such as average diastolic pressures (DP) and reduction in transmitral flow were measured. AR index was calculated as a function of AR severity and LVDS, and the work required to make up for lost volume due to AR was estimated. In the presence of trace AR, higher LVDS had up to a threefold reduction in transmitral flow (13% compared with 3.5%) and a significant increase in DP (2-fold). The AR index ranged from ∼42 to 16 (no AR to moderate AR), with stiffer LVs having lower values. To compensate for lost volume due to AR, the low, medium, and high LVDS models were found to require 5.1, 5.5, and 6.6 times more work, respectively. This work shows that the LVDS has a significant effect on the LV performance in the presence of AR. Therefore, the LVDS of potential TAVR patients should be assessed to gain an initial indication of their ability to tolerate post-procedural AR.

  13. Aortic coarctation associated with aortic valve stenosis and mitral regurgitation in an adult patient: a two-stage approach using a large-diameter stent graft.

    PubMed

    Novosel, Luka; Perkov, Dražen; Dobrota, Savko; Ćorić, Vedran; Štern Padovan, Ranka

    2014-02-01

    We report a case of a staged surgical and endovascular management in a 62-year-old woman with aortic coarctation associated with aortic valve stenosis and mitral regurgitation. The patient was admitted for severe aortic valve stenosis and mitral valve incompetence. During hospitalization and preoperative imaging, a previously undiagnosed aortic coarctation was discovered. The patient underwent a 2-stage approach that combined a Bentall procedure and mitral valve replacement in the first stage, followed by correction of the aortic coarctation by percutaneous placement of an Advanta V12 large-diameter stent graft (Atrium, Mijdrecht, The Netherlands) which to our knowledge has not been used in an adult patient with this combination of additional cardiac comorbidities. A staged approach combining surgical treatment first and endovascular placement of an Advanta V12 stent graft in the second stage can be effective and safe in adult patients with coarctation of the aorta and additional cardiac comorbidities.

  14. Use of the Konno procedure in an 80-year-old woman with aortic stenosis, a narrow left ventricular outflow tract, and a small aortic annulus.

    PubMed

    Misumi, Hiroyasu; Katayama, Yukihiro; Takaji, Kentaro; Oshitomi, Takashi; Uesugi, Hideyuki; Hirayama, Touitsu; Takeuchi, Takamasa

    2014-01-01

    This report describes a technique for repairing an aortic stenosis in an elderly patient with a small aortic annulus and a narrow left ventricular outflow tract. Preoperative echocardiography in an 80-year-old woman showed severe aortic stenosis with a narrow outflow tract: the aortic valve area was 0.48 cm(2), the aortic annular diameter was 14 mm, and the left ventricular outflow tract diameter was 14 mm. The Konno procedure was used to enlarge both the small aortic annulus and the left ventricular outflow tract, and a 19-mm Carpentier-Edwards bioprosthetic valve was implanted. The patient's postoperative course was uneventful. The left ventricular mass decreased from a preoperative value of 236 g to 96 g, 3 years after surgery. Only a few reports have described the use of the Konno operation in adult patients. In the present case, the Konno operation was demonstrated to be a good option for aortic stenosis accompanied by a small aortic annulus and a narrow left ventricular outflow tract, even in an elderly patient.

  15. Impairments in Brain Perfusion, Metabolites, Functional Connectivity, and Cognition in Severe Asymptomatic Carotid Stenosis Patients: An Integrated MRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao

    2017-01-01

    Carotid artery stenosis without transient ischemic attack (TIA) or stroke is considered as “asymptomatic.” However, recent studies have demonstrated that these asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis (aCAS) patients had cognitive impairment in tests of executive function, psychomotor speed, and memory, indicating that “asymptomatic” carotid stenosis may not be truly asymptomatic. In this study, when 19 aCAS patients compared with 24 healthy controls, aCAS patients showed significantly poorer performance on global cognition, memory, and executive function. By utilizing an integrated MRI including pulsed arterial spin labeling (pASL) MRI, Proton MR Spectroscopy (MRS), and resting-state functional MRI (R-fMRI), we also found that aCAS patients suffered decreased cerebral blood flow (CBF) mainly in the Left Frontal Gyrus and had decreased NAA/Cr ratio in the left hippocampus and decreased connectivity to the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) in the anterior part of default mode network (DMN). PMID:28255464

  16. Aortic Valve Replacement for Moderate Aortic Stenosis with Severe Calcification and Left Ventricualr Dysfunction—A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Narang, Nikhil; Lang, Roberto M.; Liarski, Vladimir M.; Jeevanandam, Valluvan; Hofmann Bowman, Marion A.

    2017-01-01

    A 55-year-old man with a history of erosive, seropositive rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and interstitial lung disease presented with shortness of breath. Echocardiography showed new-onset severe left ventricular (LV) dysfunction with an ejection fraction (EF) of 15% and moderately increased mean aortic valve gradient of 20 mmHg in a trileaflet aortic valve with severe sclero-calcific degeneration. Coronary angiography revealed no significant obstructive coronary disease. Invasive hemodynamic studies and dobutamine stress echocardiography were consistent with moderate aortic stenosis. Guideline directed medical therapy for heart failure with reduced EF was initiated; however, diuretics and neurohormonal blockade (beta-blocker and angiotensin receptor blocker) provided minimal improvement, and the patient remained functionally limited. Of interest, echocardiography performed 1 year prior to his presentation showed normal LV EF and mild aortic leaflet calcification with moderate stenosis, suggesting a rapid progressing of calcific aortic valve disease. Subsequently, the patient underwent surgical aortic valve replacement and demonstrated excellent postsurgical recovery of LV EF (55%). Calcific aortic valve disease is commonly associated with aging, bicuspid aortic valve, and chronic kidney disease. Pathophysiological mechanism for valvular calcification is incompletely understood but include osteogenic transformation of valvular interstitial cells mediated by local and systemic inflammatory processes. Several rheumatologic diseases including RA are associated with premature atherosclerosis and arterial calcification, and we speculated a similar role of RA accelerating calcific aortic valve disease. We present a case of accelerated aortic valve calcification with (only) moderate stenosis, complicated by a rapid decline in LV systolic performance. Guidelines for AVR in moderate stenosis without concomitant cardiac surgery are not well established, although it should be

  17. Evaluation of Aortic Blood Flow and Wall Shear Stress in Aortic Stenosis and Its Association With Left Ventricular Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    von Knobelsdorff-Brenkenhoff, Florian; Karunaharamoorthy, Achudhan; Trauzeddel, Ralf Felix; Barker, Alex J; Blaszczyk, Edyta; Markl, Michael; Schulz-Menger, Jeanette

    2016-01-01

    Background Aortic stenosis (AS) leads to variable stress for the left ventricle (LV) and consequently a broad range of LV remodeling. Study aim was to describe blood flow patterns in the ascending aorta of AS patients and determine their association with remodeling. Methods and Results Thirty-seven patients with AS (14 mild, 8 moderate, 15 severe; age 63±13 years) and 37 healthy controls (age 60±10 years) underwent 4D-flow MRI. Helical and vortical flow formations and flow eccentricity were assessed in the ascending aorta. Normalized flow displacement from the vessel center and peak systolic wall shear stress (WSSpeak) in the ascending aorta were quantified. LV remodeling was assessed based on LV mass index (LVMI-I) and the ratio of LV mass to enddiastolic volume (relative wall mass; RWM). Marked helical and vortical flow formation and eccentricity were more prevalent in patients with AS than in healthy subjects, and AS patients exhibited an asymmetric and elevated distribution of WSSpeak. In AS, aortic orifice area was strongly negatively associated with vortical flow formation (p=0.0274), eccentricity (p=0.0070) and flow displacement (p=0.0021). Bicuspid aortic valve was associated with more intense helical (p=0.0098) and vortical flow formation (p=0.0536), higher flow displacement (p=0.11) and higher WSSpeak (p=0.0926). LVM-I and RWM were significantly associated with aortic orifice area (p=0.0611, p=0.0058) and flow displacement (p=0.0058, p=0.0283). Conclusions In this pilot study, AS leads to abnormal blood flow pattern and WSSpeak in the ascending aorta. In addition to aortic orifice area, normalized flow displacement was significantly associated with LV remodeling. PMID:26917824

  18. Quantification of Aortic Valve Calcifications Detected During Lung Cancer-Screening CT Helps Stratify Subjects Necessitating Echocardiography for Aortic Stenosis Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hee Young; Kim, Sung Mok; Lee, Kyung Soo; Park, Seung Woo; Chung, Myung Jin; Cho, Hyoun; Jung, Jung Im; Jang, Hye Won; Jung, Sin-Ho; Goo, Juna

    2016-05-01

    No study has been published on aortic valve calcification (AVC) extent at lung cancer screening low-dose CT (LDCT) and its relationship with aortic stenosis (AS). The purpose of this study was to estimate the cutoff value of AVC on LDCT for detecting AS in asymptomatic Asian subjects. Six thousand three hundred thirty-eight subjects (mean age, 55.9 years ± 8.6) self-referred to health-promotion center underwent LDCT, coronary calcium scoring CT (CSCT), and echocardiography. AVC was quantified using Agatston methods on CT. AVC extent on LDCT was compared with that on CSCT, and AVC threshold for diagnosing AS was calculated. Clinical factors associated with AS and AVC were sought.AVC was observed in 403 subjects (64.9 years ± 8.7) on LDCT (6.4%), and AVC score measured from LDCT showed strong positive correlation with that from CSCT (r = 0.83, P < 0.0001). Of 403 subjects, 40 (10%) were identified to have AS on echocardiography. Cutoff value of AVC score for detecting AS was 138.37 with sensitivity of 90.0% and specificity 83.2%. On multivariate analysis, age (odds ratio [OR] = 1.10, 95% CI: 1.09-1.12) and hypertension (OR = 1.39, 95% CI: 1.10-1.76) were associated with the presence of AVC, whereas AVC extent at LDCT (OR = 104.32, 95% CI: 16.16-673.70) was the only significant clinical factor associated with AS; AVC extent on LDCT (OR = 104.32, 95% CI: 16.16-673.70) was the significant clinical factor associated with AS.The AVC extent on LDCT is significantly related to the presence of AS, and we recommend echocardiography for screening AS based on quantified AVC values on LDCT.

  19. The role of cardiovascular magnetic resonance in the assessment of severe aortic stenosis and in post-procedural evaluation following transcatheter aortic valve implantation and surgical aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Musa, Tarique Al; Plein, Sven; Greenwood, John P

    2016-06-01

    Degenerative aortic stenosis (AS) is the most common valvular disease in the western world with a prevalence expected to double within the next 50 years. International guidelines advocate the use of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) as an investigative tool, both to guide diagnosis and to direct optimal treatment. CMR is the reference standard for quantifying both left and right ventricular volumes and mass, which is essential to assess the impact of AS upon global cardiac function. Given the ability to image any structure in any plane, CMR offers many other diagnostic strengths including full visualisation of valvular morphology, direct planimetry of orifice area, the quantification of stenotic jets and in particular, accurate quantification of valvular regurgitation. In addition, CMR permits reliable and accurate measurements of the aortic root and arch which can be fundamental to appropriate patient management. There is a growing evidence base to indicate tissue characterisation using CMR provides prognostic information, both in asymptomatic AS patients and those undergoing intervention. Furthermore, a number of current clinical trials will likely raise the importance of CMR in routine patient management. This article will focus on the incremental value of CMR in the assessment of severe AS and the insights it offers following valve replacement.

  20. The role of cardiovascular magnetic resonance in the assessment of severe aortic stenosis and in post-procedural evaluation following transcatheter aortic valve implantation and surgical aortic valve replacement

    PubMed Central

    Musa, Tarique Al; Plein, Sven

    2016-01-01

    Degenerative aortic stenosis (AS) is the most common valvular disease in the western world with a prevalence expected to double within the next 50 years. International guidelines advocate the use of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) as an investigative tool, both to guide diagnosis and to direct optimal treatment. CMR is the reference standard for quantifying both left and right ventricular volumes and mass, which is essential to assess the impact of AS upon global cardiac function. Given the ability to image any structure in any plane, CMR offers many other diagnostic strengths including full visualisation of valvular morphology, direct planimetry of orifice area, the quantification of stenotic jets and in particular, accurate quantification of valvular regurgitation. In addition, CMR permits reliable and accurate measurements of the aortic root and arch which can be fundamental to appropriate patient management. There is a growing evidence base to indicate tissue characterisation using CMR provides prognostic information, both in asymptomatic AS patients and those undergoing intervention. Furthermore, a number of current clinical trials will likely raise the importance of CMR in routine patient management. This article will focus on the incremental value of CMR in the assessment of severe AS and the insights it offers following valve replacement. PMID:27429910

  1. Exercise Hemodynamics and Quality of Life after Aortic Valve Replacement for Aortic Stenosis in the Elderly Using the Hancock II Bioprosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Long, Theodore; Lopez, Becky M.; Berberian, Christopher; Cunningham, Mark J.; Starnes, Vaughn A.; Cohen, Robbin G.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aim. While aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis can be performed safely in elderly patients, there is a need for hemodynamic and quality of life evaluation to determine the value of aortic valve replacement in older patients who may have age-related activity limitation. Materials and Methods. We conducted a prospective evaluation of patients who underwent aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis with the Hancock II porcine bioprosthesis. All patients underwent transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) and completed the RAND 36-Item Health Survey (SF-36) preoperatively and six months postoperatively. Results. From 2004 to 2007, 33 patients were enrolled with an average age of 75.3 ± 5.3 years (24 men and 9 women). Preoperatively, 27/33 (82%) were New York Heart Association (NYHA) Functional Classification 3, and postoperatively 27/33 (82%) were NYHA Functional Classification 1. Patients had a mean predicted maximum VO2 (mL/kg/min) of 19.5 ± 4.3 and an actual max VO2 of 15.5 ± 3.9, which was 80% of the predicted VO2. Patients were found to have significant improvements (P ≤ 0.01) in six of the nine SF-36 health parameters. Conclusions. In our sample of elderly patients with aortic stenosis, replacing the aortic valve with a Hancock II bioprosthesis resulted in improved hemodynamics and quality of life. PMID:25544931

  2. Aortic Valve Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ventricle Normal Heart Select Disease To Learn More Aortic Stenosis Aortic Insufficiency Aorta The aorta is the main ... the rest of your body. Aortic Valve In aortic stenosis, the aortic valve becomes narrowed and does not ...

  3. Dilation of the ascending aorta after balloon valvuloplasty for aortic stenosis during infancy and childhood.

    PubMed

    McElhinney, Doff B; Lacro, Ronald V; Gauvreau, Kimberlee; O'Brien, Cheryl M; Yaroglu Kazanci, Selcen; Vogel, Melanie; Emani, Sitaram; Brown, David W

    2012-09-01

    Dilation of the ascending aorta (AA) is common in patients with a bicuspid aortic valve. The natural history of the aortic root and AA and the risk factors for dilation have not been characterized in patients with congenital aortic stenosis (AS) treated with balloon valvuloplasty during childhood. The present study was performed to determine the prevalence of aortic dilation in patients with congenital AS before and up to 20 years after balloon valvuloplasty performed during childhood. In patients who underwent balloon valvuloplasty for AS at age ≤ 18 years from 1984 to 2005, the aortic diameter measurements before intervention and at 5-year intervals afterward were recorded and the Z scores calculated. Among 156 patients (median age 1.5 years at valvuloplasty), the AA Z scores were significantly larger than normal before intervention (median Z score 1.5) and at all follow-up points (all p <0.001). Using mixed modeling, with time as a categorical variable (before intervention, 5-year window, 10-year window, and so forth), the mean AA Z score was greater at all postvalvuloplasty points than before the intervention, with mean Z score increases of 1.20 at 5 years and 2.11 at 20 years (p <0.001). Moderate or greater aortic regurgitation early after valvuloplasty was associated with greater AA Z scores than mild or less aortic regurgitation, with a progressive difference over time. More significant residual AS after valvuloplasty was associated with lower AA Z scores over time. In conclusion, AA dilation is common in children with congenital AS and continues to progress over many years after balloon valvuloplasty.

  4. Survival after aortic valve replacement for severe aortic stenosis with low transvalvular gradients and severe left ventricular dysfunction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pereira, Jeremy J.; Lauer, Michael S.; Bashir, Mohammad; Afridi, Imran; Blackstone, Eugene H.; Stewart, William J.; McCarthy, Patrick M.; Thomas, James D.; Asher, Craig R.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We sought to assess whether aortic valve replacement (AVR) among patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS), severe left ventricular (LV) dysfunction and a low transvalvular gradient (TVG) is associated with improved survival. BACKGROUND: The optimal management of patients with severe AS with severe LV dysfunction and a low TVG remains controversial. METHODS: Between 1990 and 1998, we evaluated 68 patients who underwent AVR at our institution (AVR group) and 89 patients who did not undergo AVR (control group), with an aortic valve area < or = 0.75 cm(2), LV ejection fraction < or = 35% and mean gradient < or = 30 mm Hg. Using propensity analysis, survival was compared between a cohort of 39 patients in the AVR group and 56 patients in the control group. RESULTS: Despite well-matched baseline characteristics among propensity-matched patients, the one- and four-year survival rates were markedly improved in patients in the AVR group (82% and 78%), as compared with patients in the control group (41% and 15%; p < 0.0001). By multivariable analysis, the main predictor of improved survival was AVR (adjusted risk ratio 0.19, 95% confidence interval 0.09 to 0.39; p < 0.0001). The only other predictors of mortality were age and the serum creatinine level. CONCLUSIONS: Among select patients with severe AS, severe LV dysfunction and a low TVG, AVR was associated with significantly improved survival.

  5. Cardioprotection of exogenous erythropoietin in mice with ligature-induced aortic stenosis: effects on maladaptive cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Zheng, L; Xu, J; Qiu, W; Liu, X; Zhao, C-M; Chen, D; Chen, Y

    2010-02-01

    Pre-operative treatment with recombinant human erythropoietin may improve aortic stenosis patients' condition, including anemia and/or cardiac dysfunction, for subjecting to aortic valve replacement. In this study, we tested this hypothesis in a mouse model of aortic stenosis. Adult male mice were subjected to either aortic stenosis created by aortic ligature or sham operation. Aortic stenosis for 4 weeks caused cardiac hypertrophy, pulmonary congestion and left ventricular dysfunction. It was associated with increased levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha in serum and myocardium, and reduced levels of interleukin-10 in myocardium but not in serum. Myocyte apoptosis rate, level of cleaved caspase 3, activity of nuclear factor-kappaB and expression of p38-MAPK pathway were also elevated. Erythropoietin treatment increased hematocrit but did not prevent the development of cardiac hypertrophy. It, however, reduced the apoptosis, prevented the increases in tumor necrosis factor-alpha, nuclear factor-kappaB activation and phosphorylation of p38, and attenuated the increases in lung weight, the decreases in LVEF and LVFS, and the increases in LVDd and LVDs. In conclusion recombinant human erythropoietin has cardioprotective effects in maladaptive cardiac hypertrophy by inhibiting nuclear factor-kappaB activation, phosphorylation of p38-MAPK pathway, and production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha, together leading to a reduced apoptosis.

  6. Myocardial oxygen supply/demand ratio in aortic stenosis: hemodynamic and echocardiographic evaluation of patients with and without angina pectoris.

    PubMed

    Nadell, R; DePace, N L; Ren, J F; Hakki, A H; Iskandrian, A S; Morganroth, J

    1983-08-01

    Angina pectoris is a common symptom in patients with aortic stenosis without coronary artery disease. To investigate the correlates of angina pectoris, echocardiographic and hemodynamic data from 44 patients with aortic stenosis and no coronary artery disease (mean age 56 +/- 10 years) were analyzed. Twenty-three patients had no angina pectoris and 21 patients had angina pectoris. The ratio of the diastolic pressure-time index (area between the aortic and left ventricular pressure curves during diastole) to the systolic pressure-time index (area under the left ventricular pressure curve during systole), an index of the oxygen supply/demand ratio, was not different in patients with or without angina pectoris. There were no differences between patients with and without angina pectoris in echocardiographically determined wall thickness, chamber size, systolic and diastolic wall stress and left ventricular mass; in electrocardiographically defined voltage; and in hemodynamically defined aortic valve area, transaortic gradient and stroke work index. Thus, echocardiographic and hemodynamic measurements at rest are not significantly different in the presence or absence of angina pectoris in patients with aortic stenosis. Dynamic data appear to be essential for evaluation of the mechanisms of angina pectoris in patients with aortic stenosis.

  7. Lipid deposition and intimal stress and strain. A study in rats with aortic stenosis.

    PubMed Central

    Zand, T.; Majno, G.; Nunnari, J. J.; Hoffman, A. H.; Savilonis, B. J.; MacWilliams, B.; Joris, I.

    1991-01-01

    These experiments were designed to study the topography of lipid deposition in the stenotic aorta of hypercholesterolemic rats, and to correlate it with flow conditions and intimal stresses and strains studied in a scale biophysical model and in a computer model. A 69% +/- 5% stenosis was produced with a U-shaped metal clip. One month to 8 months later, the aorta was studied en face by light microscopy after fixation and lipid staining. The intima in the throat of the stenosis was almost completely free of lipid, whereas symmetric lipid deposits occurred as bands just above and especially just below the stenosis; elsewhere lipid deposits appeared to be random. The flow data obtained from the scale model showed that the intima in the throat of the stenosis was subjected to an increase of as much as 20 times in shear stress, whereas the lipid deposits just above and just below the stenosis were associated with asymmetric flow conditions: the proximal area corresponded to a region of rapidly increasing shear stress, the distal area to a region of low to normal shear stress and separated flow. A finite element computer model based on the aortic deformations indicated that the endothelium at the inlet and outlet of the stenosis is subjected to a symmetric pattern of elevated stresses and strains. These results indicate that 1) the pattern of lipid deposition can not be adequately explained by a hypothesis based solely on flow conditions, and 2) lipid deposits can develop in areas of increased fluid shear stress, decreased fluid shear stress, and increased intimal strains. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:1853927

  8. High-pressure balloon dilation in a dog with supravalvular aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Pinkos, A; Stauthammer, C; Rittenberg, R; Barncord, K

    2017-02-01

    A 6-month-old female intact Goldendoodle was presented for diagnostic work up of a grade IV/VI left basilar systolic heart murmur. An echocardiogram was performed and revealed a ridge of tissue distal to the aortic valve leaflets at the sinotubular junction causing an instantaneous pressure gradient of 62 mmHg across the supravalvular aortic stenosis and moderate concentric hypertrophy of the left ventricle. Intervention with a high-pressure balloon dilation catheter was pursued and significantly decreased the pressure gradient to 34 mmHg. No complications were encountered. The patient returned in 5 months for re-evaluation and static long-term reduction in the pressure gradient was noted.

  9. [Measurement of fractional flow reserve in patients with severe aortic stenosis: A valid test?

    PubMed

    Kikoïne, J; Lebon, M; Gouffran, G; Millischer, D; Cattan, S; Nallet, O

    2016-11-01

    A 54-year-old woman was hospitalized for an acute pulmonary oedema revealing a severe aortic stenosis (AS) associated with an aortic aneurysm and a left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). The coronary angiography found an equivocal left main lesion. Fractional flow reserve (FFR) showed hemodynamic significance (FFR=0.78) and optical coherence tomography confirmed this result with a minimal lumen area of 4.9mm(2). FFR-guided percutaneous intervention is reported to improve outcome in patients with stable coronary disease. However, only few data are available in cases of AS. In this condition, secondary LVH is associated with microcirculatory dysfunction, which interferes with optimal hyperemia. An elevated right atrial pressure could also modify FFR measurement. This risk of underestimation of a coronary lesion in patients with severe AS has to be taken into consideration in clinical practice.

  10. [Non-cardiac aspects of aortic stenosis in the elderly: A review].

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Fernández, Baldomero; Formiga, Francesç; de Mora-Martín, Manuel; Calleja, Fernando; Gómez-Huelgas, Ricardo

    Aortic stenosis (AS) is the most frequent valve disease in the elderly population Treatment is valve replacement either by open surgery, or in the case of patients at high surgical risk, by TAVI (Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation). However, almost 40% of patients who have undergone TAVI show poor health outcomes, either due to death or because their clinical status does not improved. This review examines the non-cardiac aspects of patients with AS, which may help answer three key questions in order to evaluate this condition pre-surgically: 1) Are the symptoms presented by the patient exclusively explained by the AS, or are there other factors or comorbidities that could justify or increase them?, 2) What possibilities for improvement of health status and quality of life has the patient after the valve replacement?, and 3) How can we reduce the risk of a futile valve replacement?

  11. First-in-man transcatheter aortic valve implantation of a 20-mm Edwards SAPIEN XT valve: one step forward for the treatment of patients with severe aortic stenosis and small aortic annulus.

    PubMed

    Rodés-Cabau, Josep; DeLarochellière, Robert; Dumont, Eric

    2012-04-01

    We present the case of an 85-year-old woman diagnosed with severe aortic stenosis, porcelain aorta, and a small aortic annulus (17.3 mm), who underwent successful transfemoral transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) with a 20-mm Edwards SAPIEN XT valve using the NovaFlex+ delivery system. At 1-month follow-up the patient was in NYHA functional class I, and Doppler echocardiography showed a mean residual gradient of 15 mm Hg and trivial paravalvular aortic regurgitation. This case, which shows for the first time the feasibility of TAVI with a 20-mm valve, opens a new avenue for the challenging treatment of patients with aortic stenosis and a small aortic annulus.

  12. Magnetic Resonance Measurement of Turbulent Kinetic Energy for the Estimation of Irreversible Pressure Loss in Aortic Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Dyverfeldt, Petter; Hope, Michael D.; Tseng, Elaine E.; Saloner, David

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The authors sought to measure the turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) in the ascending aorta of patients with aortic stenosis and to assess its relationship to irreversible pressure loss. BACKGROUND Irreversible pressure loss caused by energy dissipation in post-stenotic flow is an important determinant of the hemodynamic significance of aortic stenosis. The simplified Bernoulli equation used to estimate pressure gradients often misclassifies the ventricular overload caused by aortic stenosis. The current gold standard for estimation of irreversible pressure loss is catheterization, but this method is rarely used due to its invasiveness. Post-stenotic pressure loss is largely caused by dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy into heat. Recent developments in magnetic resonance flow imaging permit noninvasive estimation of TKE. METHODS The study was approved by the local ethics review board and all subjects gave written informed consent. Three-dimensional cine magnetic resonance flow imaging was used to measure TKE in 18 subjects (4 normal volunteers, 14 patients with aortic stenosis with and without dilation). For each subject, the peak total TKE in the ascending aorta was compared with a pressure loss index. The pressure loss index was based on a previously validated theory relating pressure loss to measures obtainable by echocardiography. RESULTS The total TKE did not appear to be related to global flow patterns visualized based on magnetic resonance–measured velocity fields. The TKE was significantly higher in patients with aortic stenosis than in normal volunteers (p < 0.001). The peak total TKE in the ascending aorta was strongly correlated to index pressure loss (R2 = 0.91). CONCLUSIONS Peak total TKE in the ascending aorta correlated strongly with irreversible pressure loss estimated by a well-established method. Direct measurement of TKE by magnetic resonance flow imaging may, with further validation, be used to estimate irreversible pressure loss

  13. NOTCH1 Mutations in Aortic Stenosis: Association with Osteoprotegerin/RANK/RANKL

    PubMed Central

    Zhiduleva, Ekaterina; Freylikhman, Olga; Rotar, Oxana; Tarnovskaya, Svetlana; Kostareva, Anna; Moiseeva, Olga

    2017-01-01

    Background. The NOTCH pathway is known to be important in the pathogenesis of calcific aortic valve disease, possibly through regulators of osteoprotegerin (OPG), receptor activator of nuclear factor κB (RANK), and its ligand (RANKL) system. The purpose of the present study was to search for possible associations between NOTCH1 gene mutations and circulating levels of OPG and soluble RANKL (sRANKL) in patients with aortic stenosis (AS). Methods. The study was performed on 61 patients with AS including 31 with bicuspid and 30 with tricuspid aortic valves. We applied a strategy of targeted mutation screening for 10 out of 34 exons of the NOTCH1 gene by direct sequencing. Serum OPG and sRANKL levels were assessed. Results. In total, 6 genetic variants of the NOTCH1 gene including two new mutations were identified in the study group. In an age- and arterial hypertension-adjusted multivariable regression analysis, the serum OPG levels and the OPG/sRANKL ratio were correlated with NOTCH1 missense variants. All studied missense variants in NOTCH1 gene were found in Ca(2+)-binding EGF motif of the NOTCH extracellular domain bound to Delta-like 4. Conclusion. Our results suggest that the OPG/RANKL/RANK system might be directly influenced by genetic variants of NOTCH1 in aortic valve calcification. PMID:28246602

  14. Mid-term outcome after surgical repair of congenital supravalvular aortic stenosis by extended aortoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Bakhtiary, Farhad; Amer, Mohammed; Etz, Christian D.; Dähnert, Ingo; Wilhelm Mohr, Friedrich; Bellinghausen, Wilfried; Kostelka, Martin

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Congenital supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS) is a rare arteriopathy associated with the Williams–Beuren syndrome (WBS) and other elastin gene deletions. Our objective was to review the mid-term outcomes of SVAS repair with extended aortoplasty. METHODS Congenital SVAS repairs from 2001 to 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. The follow-up records, reintervention and reoperation data and most recent echocardiograms were obtained. RESULTS From 2001 to 2010, 21 patients (15 males) underwent surgical repair of SVAS by extended aortoplasty with autologous pretreated pericardium, which is a modification of the Doty technique. The mean age was 3.1 ± 4.2 years. WBS was diagnosed in 14 of the patients. There was no early mortality, but one late death was observed. At the latest follow-up (mean follow-up, 4.3 ± 2.9 years; range, 1–108 months), echocardiograms revealed a peak Doppler gradient across the aortic outflow tract of 15 ± 8 mmHg. The majority of the patients had minimal to mild aortic insufficiency. No reoperation or reintervention was required. CONCLUSIONS Extended aortoplasty provides excellent mid-term relief of SVAS and, in addition, reshapes the aortic root geometry to a much more favourable anatomical configuration. It can be performed without any increase in operative risks. The mid-term results are excellent. PMID:23793710

  15. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) versus sutureless aortic valve replacement (SUAVR) for aortic stenosis: a systematic review and meta-analysis of matched studies

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Yi-Chin; Niles, Natasha; Tchantchaleishvili, Vakhtang; Di Eusanio, Marco; Yan, Tristan D.; Phan, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Background With improving technologies and an increasingly elderly populations, there have been an increasing number of therapeutic options available for patients requiring aortic valve replacement. Recent evidence suggests that transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is one suitable option for high risk inoperable patients, as well as high risk operable patients. Sutureless valve technology has also been developed concurrently, with facilitates surgical aortic valve replacement (SUAVR) by allow resection and replacement of the native aortic valve with minimal sutures and prosthesis anchoring required. For patients amenable for both TAVI and SUAVR, the evidence is unclear with regards to the benefits and risks of either approach. The objectives are to compare the perioperative outcomes and intermediate-term survival rates of TAVI and SUAVR in matched or propensity score matched studies. Methods A systematic literature search was performed to include all matched or propensity score matched studies comparing SUAVR versus TAVI for severe aortic stenosis. A meta-analysis with odds ratios (OR) and mean differences were performed to compare key outcomes including paravalvular regurgitation and short and intermediate term mortality. Results Six studies met our inclusion criteria giving a total of 741 patients in both the SUAVR and TAVI arm of the study. Compared to TAVI, SUAVR had a lower incidence of paravalvular leak (OR =0.06; 95% CI: 0.03–0.12, P<0.01). There was no difference in perioperative mortality, however SUAVR patients had significantly better survival rates at 1 (OR =2.40; 95% CI: 1.40–4.11, P<0.01) and 2 years (OR =4.62; 95% CI: 2.62–8.12, P<0.01). Conclusions The present study supports the use of minimally invasive SUAVR as an alternative to TAVI in high risk patients requiring aortic replacement. The presented results require further validation in prospective, randomized controlled studies. PMID:28066608

  16. Autoradiography screening of potential positron emission tomography tracers for asymptomatic abdominal aortic aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Estrada, Sergio; Hall, Håkan; Wanhainen, Anders; Björck, Martin; Sörensen, Jens; Antoni, Gunnar

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aetiology and early pathophysiological mechanisms of aortic aneurysm formation are still unknown and challenging to study in vivo. Positron emission tomography (PET) is a potentially valuable instrument for non-invasive in vivo pathophysiological studies. No specific tracer to identify the pathophysiological process of aneurysmal dilatation is yet available, however. The aim of this study was to explore if different PET tracers could be useful to image aneurysmal disease. Methods and results Human aneurysmal aortic tissue, collected during elective resection of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) of asymptomatic patients, was investigated in vitro by means of autoradiography with [68Ga]CRP-binder targeting C-reactive protein, [11C]DAA1106 targeting translocator protein (18 kDa), [11C]D-deprenyl with unknown target receptor, [11C]deuterium-L-deprenyl targeting astrocytes, [18F]fluciclatide targeting integrin αVβ3, [68Ga]IMP461 and bi-specific antibody TF2 052107 targeting carcinoembryonic antigen, [18F]F-metomidate targeting mitochondrial cytochrome P-450 species in the adrenal cortex, and [18F]vorozole targeting aromatase. Of the investigated tracers, only [18F]fluciclatide exhibited specific binding, whereas the other PET tracers failed to show specific uptake in the investigated tissue and are probably not useful for the intended purpose. Conclusion It seems likely that αVβ3 integrin expression in AAA can be visualized with PET and that the αVβ3 selective tracer, [18F]fluciclatide, may be suitable for in vivo molecular imaging of asymptomatic AAA. Additional evaluation of [18F]fluciclatide and αVβ3 integrin expression in AAA will be performed in vitro as well as in vivo. PMID:24555564

  17. Effects of increasing flow rate on aortic stenotic indices: evidence from percutaneous transvenous balloon dilatation of the mitral valve in patients with combined aortic and mitral stenosis.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, T. M.; Su, S. F.; Chen, M. F.; Liau, C. S.; Lee, Y. T.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the effects of transvalvar flow rate on aortic valve resistance and valve area after percutaneous transvenous balloon dilatation of the mitral valve in a homogeneous group of patients with rheumatic heart disease. DESIGN: Retrospective analysis of 12 patients with combined aortic and mitral stenosis who had undergone balloon dilatation of the mitral valve over a period of 9 years. SETTING: Tertiary referral centre. PATIENTS: Twelve (8 women, 4 men; mean (SD) age 37 (9) of 227 consecutive patients with critical mitral stenosis undergoing transvenous balloon dilation of the mitral valve in the centre also had aortic stenosis, defined as a transaortic pressure gradient of more than 25 mm Hg measured at a catheterisation study before valvuloplasty. INTERVENTIONS: Echocardiographic variables (mitral valve area measured by the pressure half-time method and planimetry, and the aortic valve area derived from the continuity equation) and haemodynamic measurements (cardiac output, left ventricular mean systolic pressure, aortic mean pressure, transaortic valve pressure gradient, mitral valve and aortic valve areas derived from the Gorlin formula, and aortic valve resistance) were assessed before and after transvenous balloon dilatation of the mitral valve. Follow up catheterisation to measure haemodynamic variables was performed one week after mitral valvuloplasty. RESULTS: Mean transaortic flow rate increased 33% after mitral valvuloplasty (from 198 (68) to 254 (41) ml/s, P = 0.002). Aortic valve areas derived from the Gorlin formula were significantly increased from 0.57 (0.12) to 0.73 (0.14) cm2 (P = 0.006) after mitral valvuloplasty. However, aortic valve area and valve resistance derived from the continuity equation were independent of the increase in flow rate after mitral valvuloplasty (from 1.29 (0.35) to 1.30 (0.29) cm2 and from 317 (65) to 259 (75) dyn.s.cm-5, both P = NS). CONCLUSION: The Gorlin-derived aortic valve area tends to be flow

  18. Single-Stage Repair of Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm through a Median Sternotomy in a Patient with Pseudocoarctation of the Aorta and Severe Aortic Valve Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Yamane, Yoshitaka; Morimoto, Hironobu; Mukai, Shogo

    2015-01-01

    Pseudocoarctation of the aorta is a rare anomaly and considered a benign condition. Pseudocoarctation of the aorta has been associated with aneurysm formation in the thoracic aorta, which may cause sudden rupture or dissection. Thus, the presence of an aneurysm in combination with pseudocoarctation of the aorta is thought to be an indication for surgery. We present a case of pseudocoarctation of the aorta associated with thoracic aortic aneurysm and severe aortic valve stenosis with a bicuspid aortic valve. In our case, single-stage repair was performed through a median sternotomy using our "pleural-window approach."

  19. Exertional dyspnea as a symptom of infrarenal aortic occlusive disease.

    PubMed

    Schott, Stacey L; Carreiro, Fernanda Porto; Harkness, James R; Malas, Mahmoud B; Sozio, Stephen M; Zakaria, Sammy

    2014-06-01

    Advanced atherosclerosis of the aorta can cause severe ischemia in the kidneys, refractory hypertension, and claudication. However, no previous reports have clearly associated infrarenal aortic stenosis with shortness of breath. A 77-year-old woman with hypertension and hyperlipidemia presented with exertional dyspnea. Despite extensive testing and observation, no apparent cause for this patient's dyspnea was found. Images revealed severe infrarenal aortic stenosis. After the patient underwent stenting of the aortic occlusion, she had immediate symptomatic improvement and complete resolution of her dyspnea within one month. Twelve months after vascular intervention, the patient remained asymptomatic. In view of the distinct and lasting elimination of dyspnea after angioplasty and stenting of a nearly occluded infrarenal aortic lesion, we hypothesize that infrarenal aortic stenosis might be a treatable cause of exertional dyspnea. Clinicians should consider infrarenal aortic stenosis as a possible cause of dyspnea. Treatment of the stenosis might relieve symptoms.

  20. Progression of isolated aortic stenosis: analysis of 29 patients having more than 1 cardiac catheterization.

    PubMed

    Nestico, P F; DePace, N L; Kimbiris, D; Hakki, A H; Khanderia, B; Iskandrian, A S; Segal, B

    1983-11-01

    Factors related to progression of nonrheumatic aortic stenosis (AS) were analyzed in 29 adult patients who underwent serial hemodynamic studies over a mean of 71 months. AS was congenital in 8 patients and degenerative in 21. The patients were divided into 2 groups on the basis of the change in aortic valve area between the 2 studies. Twelve patients had a greater than or equal to 25% reduction in aortic valve area (Group I) and 17 patients had less than 25% decrease in aortic valve area (Group II). There were no significant differences between the 2 groups in age, interval between studies, cardiac output, left ventricular end-diastolic pressure, left ventricular peak systolic pressure and origin of AS (congenital or degenerative). Group I patients had significantly larger initial aortic valve areas than did Group II patients (1.3 +/- 0.9 cm2 versus 0.8 +/- 0.4 cm2, p = 0.02). Also, the initial peak transaortic pressure gradients were lower in Group I than in Group II (27 +/- 19 versus 58 +/- 38 mm Hg, p = 0.01). Group I patients had a significantly greater increase in pressure gradient and a greater reduction in cardiac output than did Group II patients (24 +/- 21 mm Hg in Group I versus -0.1 +/- 24.5 mm Hg in Group II, p = 0.01, and -1.0 +/- 1.3 liters/min in Group I versus 0.10 +/- 1.4 liters/min in Group II, p = 0.03). Thus, AS progressed in 41% of a selected group of patients who underwent repeated cardiac catheterization.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Percutaneous Implantation of the self-expanding valve Prosthesis a patient with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia severe aortic stenosis and porcelain aorta.

    PubMed

    Sahiner, Levent; Asil, Serkan; Kaya, Ergün Baris; Ozer, Necla; Aytemir, Kudret

    2016-10-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has shown favorable outcomes in patients with severe symptomatic aortic valve stenosis who are at high surgical risk or inappropriate for open heart surgery. However, concerns exist over treating patients who have porcelain aorta and familial hypercholesterolemia, due to the potential complications of aortic root and aortic annulus. In this case report, we present a patient with familial hypercholesterolemia, symptomatic severe aortic stenosis, previous coronary artery bypass grafting and porcelain aorta, who was successfully treated with TAVI using a CoreValve.

  2. Impact of Valvuloarterial Impedance on Concentric Remodeling in Aortic Stenosis and Its Regression after Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Jeong Yoon; Seo, Jeong-Sook; Sun, Byung Joo; Kim, Dae-Hee; Song, Jong-Min; Kang, Duk-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Background Left ventricle (LV) in patients with aortic stenosis (AS) faces a double hemodynamic load incorporating both valvular stenosis and reduced systemic arterial compliance (SAC). This study aimed to evaluate the impact of global LV afterload on LV hypertrophy (LVH) before and after aortic valve replacement (AVR). Methods The study cohort included 453 patients (247 males; mean age, 64 ± 11 years) who underwent AVR. Pre- and post-AVR echocardiographic examinations were retrospectively analyzed including an index of valvuloarterial impedance (ZVA) and LV mass index/LV end-diastolic volume index (LVMI/LVEDVI) as a parameter of LVH. Results Pre-AVR LVMI/LVEDVI was 2.7 ± 0.9 g/mL with an aortic valve area (AVA) of 0.6 ± 0.2 cm2. ZVA was 5.9 ± 1.9 mm Hg/mL/m2 and showed a stronger correlation (β = 0.601, p < 0.001) with pre-AVR LVMI/LVEDVI than indexed AVA (β = 0.061, p = 0.19), transvalvular peak velocity (β = 0.211, p < 0.001). During a median follow-up of 3.5 years, patients had a 18.8 ± 10.4% decrease in the LV geometry index with a decrease in SAC from 1.20 ± 0.48 to 1.00 ± 0.38 mL/m2/mm Hg (p < 0.001). Pre-AVR LV ejection fraction (r = 0.284, p < 0.001) and ZVA (r = 0.523, p < 0.001) were independent factors associated with LVH regression in 322 patients with follow-up duration >1 year after AVR. Conclusion ZVA is a major determinant of concentric remodeling in AS before AVR and LVH regression after AVR, which should be incorporated in routine evaluation of AS. PMID:27721950

  3. Blood coagulation and fibrinolysis in aortic valve stenosis: links with inflammation and calcification.

    PubMed

    Natorska, J; Undas, A

    2015-08-01

    Aortic valve stenosis (AS) increasingly afflicts our aging population. However, the pathobiology of the disease is still poorly understood and there is no effective pharmacotherapy for treating those at risk for clinical progression. The progression of AS involves complex inflammatory and fibroproliferative processes that resemble to some extent atherosclerosis. Accumulating evidence indicates that several coagulation proteins and its inhibitors, including tissue factor, tissue factor pathway inhibitor, prothrombin, factor XIII, von Willebrand factor, display increased expression within aortic stenotic valves, predominantly on macrophages and myofibroblasts around calcified areas. Systemic impaired fibrinolysis, along with increased plasma and valvular expression of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, has also been observed in patients with AS in association with the severity of the disease. There is an extensive cross-talk between inflammation and coagulation in stenotic valve tissue which contributes to the calcification and mineralisation of the aortic valve leaflets. This review summarises the available data on blood coagulation and fibrinolysis in AS with the emphasis on their interactions with inflammation and calcification.

  4. A single codon insertion in PICALM is associated with development of familial subvalvular aortic stenosis in Newfoundland dogs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Familial subvalvular aortic stenosis (SAS) is one of the most common congenital heart defects in dogs and is an inherited defect of Newfoundlands, golden retrievers and human children. Although SAS is known to be inherited, specific genes involved in Newfoundlands with SAS have not been defined. We ...

  5. Aortic stenosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... DL, Zipes DP, Libby P, Bonow RO, Braunwald E, eds. Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine . 10th ed. Philadelphia, ... Updated by: Michael A. Chen, MD, PhD, Associate Professor of Medicine, ...

  6. Hemodynamics of the Aortic Jet and Implications for Detection of Aortic Stenosis Murmurs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Chi; Seo, Junghee; Bakhshaee, Hani; Mittal, Rajat

    2016-11-01

    Cardiac auscultation with a stethoscope has served as the primary method for qualitative screening of cardiovascular conditions for over a hundred years. However, a lack of quantitative understanding of the flow mechanism(s) responsible for the generation of the murmurs, as well as the effect of intervening tissue on the propagation of these murmurs has been a significant limiting factor in the advancement of automated cardiac auscultation. In this study, a multiphysics computational modeling approach is used to investigate these issues. Direct numerical simulation (DNS) is used to explore the fluid dynamics of the jets formed at the aortic valve and the pressure fluctuations generated by the interaction of this jet with the aortic wall. Subsequently, structural wave propagation in the tissue is resolved by a high-order, linear viscoelastic wave solver in order to explore the propagation of the murmurs through a tissue-like material. The implications of these results for cardiac auscultation are discussed. The authors would like to acknowledge the financial support from NSF Grants IIS-1344772, CBET-1511200, and computational resource by XSEDE NSF Grant TG-CTS100002.

  7. Stress echocardiography to assess stenosis severity and predict outcome in patients with paradoxical low-flow, low-gradient aortic stenosis and preserved LVEF.

    PubMed

    Clavel, Marie-Annick; Ennezat, Pierre Vladimir; Maréchaux, Sylvestre; Dumesnil, Jean G; Capoulade, Romain; Hachicha, Zeineb; Mathieu, Patrick; Bellouin, Annaïk; Bergeron, Sébastien; Meimoun, Patrick; Arsenault, Marie; Le Tourneau, Thierry; Pasquet, Agnès; Couture, Christian; Pibarot, Philippe

    2013-02-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the value of stress-echocardiography in patients with paradoxical low-flow, low-gradient (PLFLG) aortic stenosis (AS). The projected aortic valve area (AVAProj) at a normal flow rate was calculated in 55 patients with PLFLG AS. In the subset of patients (n = 13) who underwent an aortic valve replacement within 3 months after stress echocardiography, AVA(Proj) correlated better with the valve weight compared to traditional resting and stress echocardiographic parameters of AS severity (AVA(Proj): r = -0.78 vs. other parameters: r = 0.46 to 0.56). In the whole group (N = 55), 18 (33%) patients had an AVA(Proj) >1.0 cm(2), being consistent with the presence of pseudo severe AS. The AVA(Proj) was also superior to traditional parameters of stenosis severity for predicting outcomes (hazard ratio: 1.32/0.1 cm(2) decrease in AVA(Proj)). In patients with PLFLG AS, the measurement of AVA(proj) derived from stress echocardiography is helpful to determine the actual severity of the stenosis and predict risk of adverse events.

  8. Recurrent discrete subaortic stenosis and small aortic annulus successfully repaired by the Konno procedure in a young woman.

    PubMed

    Kashima, Ichiro; Ueda, Toshihiko; Katogi, Toshiyuki; Taguchi, Shinichi; Inoue, Yoshito; Koizumi, Kiyoshi

    2006-10-01

    A 24-year-old woman who had undergone excision of the membrane for discrete subaortic stenosis when 6 years old displayed recurrent subaortic stenosis and had a small aortic annulus, with a peak pressure gradient of 60mmHg. We chose to perform the Konno operation with a mechanical valve. This released the left ventricular outflow tract obstruction adequately, and she recovered uneventfully with New York Heart Association functional class I. In our experience, an aggressive strategy such as myectomy is an appropriate initial procedure for preventing recurrence when the geometry of the problem may lead to recurrence in the left ventricular outflow tract. The Konno operation is a good option for recurrent subaortic stenosis with small aortic annulus.

  9. Comparison of 1-Year Outcome in Patients With Severe Aorta Stenosis Treated Conservatively or by Aortic Valve Replacement or by Percutaneous Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (Data from a Multicenter Spanish Registry).

    PubMed

    González-Saldivar, Hugo; Rodriguez-Pascual, Carlos; de la Morena, Gonzalo; Fernández-Golfín, Covadonga; Amorós, Carmen; Alonso, Mario Baquero; Dolz, Luis Martínez; Solé, Albert Ariza; Guzmán-Martínez, Gabriela; Gómez-Doblas, Juan José; Jiménez, Antonio Arribas; Fuentes, María Eugenia; Gay, Laura Galian; Ortiz, Martin Ruiz; Avanzas, Pablo; Abu-Assi, Emad; Ripoll-Vera, Tomás; Díaz-Castro, Oscar; Osinalde, Eduardo P; Martínez-Sellés, Manuel

    2016-07-15

    The factors that influence decision making in severe aortic stenosis (AS) are unknown. Our aim was to assess, in patients with severe AS, the determinants of management and prognosis in a multicenter registry that enrolled all consecutive adults with severe AS during a 1-month period. One-year follow-up was obtained in all patients and included vital status and aortic valve intervention (aortic valve replacement [AVR] and transcatheter aortic valve implantation [TAVI]). A total of 726 patients were included, mean age was 77.3 ± 10.6 years, and 377 were women (51.8%). The most common management was conservative therapy in 468 (64.5%) followed by AVR in 199 (27.4%) and TAVI in 59 (8.1%). The strongest association with aortic valve intervention was patient management in a tertiary hospital with cardiac surgery (odds ratio 2.7, 95% confidence interval 1.8 to 4.1, p <0.001). The 2 main reasons to choose conservative management were the absence of significant symptoms (136% to 29.1%) and the presence of co-morbidity (128% to 27.4%). During 1-year follow-up, 132 patients died (18.2%). The main causes of death were heart failure (60% to 45.5%) and noncardiac diseases (46% to 34.9%). One-year survival for patients treated conservatively, with TAVI, and with AVR was 76.3%, 94.9%, and 92.5%, respectively, p <0.001. One-year survival of patients treated conservatively in the absence of significant symptoms was 97.1%. In conclusion, most patients with severe AS are treated conservatively. The outcome in asymptomatic patients managed conservatively was acceptable. Management in tertiary hospitals is associated with valve intervention. One-year survival was similar with both interventional strategies.

  10. Mast Cells Might Have a Protective Role against the Development of Calcification and Hyalinisation in Severe Aortic Valve Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Milutinovic, A; Petrovič, D; Zorc, M; Vraspir Porenta, O; Arko, M; Pleskovič, A; Alibegovic, A; Zorc-Pleskovic, R

    2016-01-01

    Aortic valve stenosis is characterized by inflammation and extracellular matrix remodelling. The aim of this study was to analyse the impact of mast cells on the occurrence of histopathological changes of aortic valves in patients with severe grade, non-rheumatic degenerative aortic valve stenosis. Valve specimens were obtained from 38 patients undergoing valve replacement. The role of mast cells was analysed by dividing the specimens into two groups, characterized by the presence (group A, N = 13) or absence of mast cells (group B, N = 25). There were no significant differences in clinical data between the two groups. In group A, T cells and macrophages were present in all aortic valves, as compared to a significantly lower proportion of valves with T cells and macrophages in group B. Valves in group A were less often calcified and hyaline-degenerated than valves in group B. There were no changes in fibrosis between the two groups. We found a positive correlation between the presence of mast cells and macrophages/T cells, a negative correlation between the presence of mast cells and calcification/ hyaline degeneration, and no correlation between the presence of mast cells and fibrosis. There was also a negative correlation between the presence of macrophages/T cells and calcification. The linear regression model identified only the presence of mast cells as an independent negative prediction value for calcification. In conclusion, mast cells might have a protective role against the development of calcification and hyaline degeneration in severe grade, non-rheumatic aortic valve stenosis.

  11. Experimental Animal Models Evaluating the Causal Role of Lipoprotein(a) in Atherosclerosis and Aortic Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Yeang, Calvin; Cotter, Bruno; Tsimikas, Sotirios

    2016-02-01

    Lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)], comprised of apolipoprotein(a) [apo(a)] and a low-density lipoprotein-like particle, is a genetically determined, causal risk factor for cardiovascular disease and calcific aortic valve stenosis. Lp(a) is the major plasma lipoprotein carrier of oxidized phospholipids, is pro-inflammatory, inhibits plasminogen activation, and promotes smooth muscle cell proliferation, as defined mostly through in vitro studies. Although Lp(a) is not expressed in commonly studied laboratory animals, mouse and rabbit models transgenic for Lp(a) and apo(a) have been developed to address their pathogenicity in vivo. These models have provided significant insights into the pathophysiology of Lp(a), particularly in understanding the mechanisms of Lp(a) in mediating atherosclerosis. Studies in Lp(a)-transgenic mouse models have demonstrated that apo(a) is retained in atheromas and suggest that it promotes fatty streak formation. Furthermore, rabbit models have shown that Lp(a) promotes atherosclerosis and vascular calcification. However, many of these models have limitations. Mouse models need to be transgenic for both apo(a) and human apolipoprotein B-100 since apo(a) does not covalently associated with mouse apoB to form Lp(a). In established mouse and rabbit models of atherosclerosis, Lp(a) levels are low, generally < 20 mg/dL, which is considered to be within the normal range in humans. Furthermore, only one apo(a) isoform can be expressed in a given model whereas over 40 isoforms exist in humans. Mouse models should also ideally be studied in an LDL receptor negative background for atherosclerosis studies, as mice don't develop sufficiently elevated plasma cholesterol to study atherosclerosis in detail. With recent data that cardiovascular disease and calcific aortic valve stenosis is causally mediated by the LPA gene, development of optimized Lp(a)-transgenic animal models will provide an opportunity to further understand the mechanistic role of Lp(a) in

  12. Balloon valvuloplasty as destination therapy in elderly with severe aortic stenosis: a cardiac catheterization study

    PubMed Central

    Kamperidis, Vasileios; Hadjimiltiades, Stavros; Ziakas, Antonios; Sianos, Georgios; Kazinakis, Georgios; Giannakoulas, George; Mouratoglou, Sophia-Anastasia; Sarafidou, Athanasia; Ventoulis, Ioannis; Efthimiadis, Georgios K; Parcharidis, Georgios; Karvounis, Haralambos

    2015-01-01

    Background In the current era of transcatheter aortic valve replacement, there is renewed interest in balloon aortic valvuloplasty (BAV) and invasive hemodynamic evaluation of aortic stenosis (AS). The current report aimed to study the invasive hemodynamics of severe AS patients treated with BAV as destination therapy and to identify factors associated with better hemodynamic outcome and prognosis. Methods From 2009 to 2012, 63 high risk elderly patients were treated with BAV as destination therapy for symptomatic severe AS and were all prospectively included in the study. Their hemodynamics were invasively evaluated during catheterization, pre- and post-BAV at the same session. All Post-BAV patients were regularly followed-up. Results The patients (82 ± 6 years, 52% male) had post-BAV aortic valve area index (AVAi) significantly increased and mean pressure gradient (MPG) significantly reduced. During the follow-up of 0.9 (maximum 3.3) years, those with post-BAV AVAi < 0.6 cm2/m2 compared with the AVAi ≥ 0.6 cm2/m2 group had significantly higher mortality (60% vs. 28%, log-rank P = 0.02), even after adjusting for age, gender, atrial fibrillation, chronic kidney disease, diabetes mellitus, coronary artery disease and EuroSCORE [HR: 5.58, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.62−19.20, P = 0.006]. The only independent predictor of moderate AS post-BAV was the pre-BAV AVAi increase by 0.1cm2/m2 (OR: 3.81, 95% CI: 1.33−10.89, P = 0.01). Pre-BAV AVAi ≥ 0.39 cm2/m2 could predict with sensitivity 84% and specificity 70% the post-BAV hemodynamic outcome. Conclusions BAV as destination therapy for severe AS offered immediate and significant hemodynamic improvement. The survival was significantly better when a moderate degree of AS was present. PMID:26089844

  13. Fetal critical aortic stenosis with natural improvement of hydrops fetalis due to spontaneous relief of severe restrictive atrial communication.

    PubMed

    Ide, Tetsuya; Miyoshi, Takekazu; Kitano, Masataka; Kurosaki, Ken-ichi; Yoshimatsu, Jun

    2015-07-01

    We describe a rare case of fetal critical aortic stenosis with spontaneous relief of severe restrictive atrial communication, resulting in complete resolution of hydrops fetalis in utero. Fetal ultrasonography showed hydrops fetalis caused by critical aortic stenosis with a severely restrictive foramen ovale and severe mitral regurgitation at 23 weeks of gestation. Hydrops fetalis, however, spontaneously resolved, showing an obvious increase of flow through the foramen ovale and pulmonary vein at 26 weeks of gestation. The neonate required balloon dilation of the aortic valve and balloon atrioseptostomy immediately after birth and also received bilateral pulmonary artery banding and arterial duct stenting 1 week later. The patient was in good condition after conversion to biventricular circulation via Ross procedure at 8 months old. The present case suggests that atrioseptostomy as a fetal intervention may improve outcome in even a hydropic condition.

  14. Quantification of Aortic Valve Calcifications Detected During Lung Cancer-Screening CT Helps Stratify Subjects Necessitating Echocardiography for Aortic Stenosis Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hee Young; Kim, Sung Mok; Lee, Kyung Soo; Park, Seung Woo; Chung, Myung Jin; Cho, Hyoun; Jung, Jung Im; Jang, Hye Won; Jung, Sin-Ho; Goo, Juna

    2016-01-01

    Abstract No study has been published on aortic valve calcification (AVC) extent at lung cancer screening low-dose CT (LDCT) and its relationship with aortic stenosis (AS). The purpose of this study was to estimate the cutoff value of AVC on LDCT for detecting AS in asymptomatic Asian subjects. Six thousand three hundred thirty-eight subjects (mean age, 55.9 years ± 8.6) self-referred to health-promotion center underwent LDCT, coronary calcium scoring CT (CSCT), and echocardiography. AVC was quantified using Agatston methods on CT. AVC extent on LDCT was compared with that on CSCT, and AVC threshold for diagnosing AS was calculated. Clinical factors associated with AS and AVC were sought. AVC was observed in 403 subjects (64.9 years ± 8.7) on LDCT (6.4%), and AVC score measured from LDCT showed strong positive correlation with that from CSCT (r = 0.83, P < 0.0001). Of 403 subjects, 40 (10%) were identified to have AS on echocardiography. Cutoff value of AVC score for detecting AS was 138.37 with sensitivity of 90.0% and specificity 83.2%. On multivariate analysis, age (odds ratio [OR] = 1.10, 95% CI: 1.09–1.12) and hypertension (OR = 1.39, 95% CI: 1.10–1.76) were associated with the presence of AVC, whereas AVC extent at LDCT (OR = 104.32, 95% CI: 16.16–673.70) was the only significant clinical factor associated with AS; AVC extent on LDCT (OR = 104.32, 95% CI: 16.16–673.70) was the significant clinical factor associated with AS. The AVC extent on LDCT is significantly related to the presence of AS, and we recommend echocardiography for screening AS based on quantified AVC values on LDCT. PMID:27175713

  15. Homocysteine and Its Relationship to Asymptomatic Carotid Stenosis in a Chinese Community Population

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Jiaokun; Wang, Anxin; Wang, Jing; Wu, Jianwei; Yan, Xiujuan; Zhou, Yong; Chen, Shengyun; Zhao, Xingquan

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the association between homocysteine (Hcy) and asymptomatic CAS in the healthy population. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between Hcy levels and asymptomatic CAS in a Chinese community population. The current study included 5393 participants who were age of 40 years or older, and free of stroke, transient ischemic attack, and coronary artery disease. Demographic and clinical variables were investigated, and the presence of CAS was assessed by Color Doppler Ultrasound. A multivariate logistic regression was used to examine the association between Hcy levels and asymptomatic CAS. 361 (6.69%) participants were diagnosed with asymptomatic CAS, who had higher Hcy levels compared with those without (p-value for trend = 0.0001). After adjusting other possible risk factors, Hcy > 19.3μmol/L was considered as an independent indicator of asymptomatic CAS (OR 1.53, 95%CI 1.05–2.23; p-value for trend = 0.0265), but with a difference between participants with diabetes and without [OR (95%CI): 2.89(1.02–8.22) vs. 1.42(0.95–2.12); P interaction < 0.05]. In this large-population, community-based study, Hcy is an independent indicator of asymptomatic CAS, especially in patients with diabetes. PMID:27869211

  16. [Angiodysplasia of the right colon and aortic stenosis. A case report].

    PubMed

    Arcidiacono, G; De Domenico, C; Battaglia, E; Bordignon, E; Asmundo, G O; Zingali, C; Longhitano, A; Cuscunà, S; Gurgone, E; Vigo, G; Ossino, A M; Di Mauro, C

    1996-04-01

    We report the case of a female patient who came to our observation for a severe enterorrhage. Following colonoscopic examination and color-Doppler M-B Mode echocardiography we made the following diagnosis: "angiodysplasia of the right colon in females with aortic stenosis". It was possible to ascertain whether there were similar lesions in other parts of the gastro-intestinal tract because the patient opposed firmly. In agreement with other authors, we believe that colonoscopic examination is the appropriate method to diagnose gastro-intestinal angiodysplasia. The advanced age and the clinical conditions of the patient did not allow surgical treatment, so we treated her with antihaemorrhagic drugs and elevated doses of ascorbic acid (4 g/die). The disappearance of enterorrhagies, the rapid clinical recovery and the normalization of red blood cell (RBC) count allowed us to discontinue antihaemorrhagic treatment and to continue the administration of elevated doses of ascorbic acid. Eight days later, the patient was discharged in good clinical condition and ascorbic acid was prescribed to be continued at home. A good clinical and haemodynamic balance was observed at the six-month follow-up. In conclusion we think that the clinical case we observed, characterized by the association angiodysplasia of the right colon-aortic stenosis, may be included in the diction Heyde's syndrome. In aging patients with severe concomitant diseases, ineligible for surgical interventions, the enterorrhage caused by a non complicated angiodysplastic lesion of the gastro-intestinal tract may benefit from the acute administration of ascorbic acid as the therapeutic agent of first choice capable to loose and/or stop the haemorragic complication and, in chronic administration, to reduce the number of relapses.

  17. [Anesthesia for total and descending aorta replacement and aortic valve replacement for post-repair aneurysm of coarctation of aorta and aortic stenosis].

    PubMed

    Furuichi, Yuko; Shimizu, Jun; Sakamoto, Atsuhiro

    2012-04-01

    We experienced anesthesia for total arch and descending aorta replacement and aortic valve replacement for post-repair aneurysm of coarctation of aorta and aortic stenosis. Because there was possibility that post coarctectomy syndrome would occur after repair of coarctation of aorta, administration of depressor that acts on renin-angiotensin-aldosterone and careful observation were needed postoperatively. In consideration of the development of collateral vessels, preoperative imaging evaluation was added and operative method in cardiopulmonary bypass was adjusted. Careful preoperative evaluation is very important in cardiac anesthesia.

  18. The Homeostatic Chemokine CCL21 Predicts Mortality in Aortic Stenosis Patients and Modulates Left Ventricular Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Finsen, Alexandra Vanessa; Ueland, Thor; Sjaastad, Ivar; Ranheim, Trine; Ahmed, Mohammed S.; Dahl, Christen P.; Askevold, Erik T.; Aakhus, Svend; Husberg, Cathrine; Fiane, Arnt E.; Lipp, Martin; Gullestad, Lars; Christensen, Geir; Aukrust, Pål; Yndestad, Arne

    2014-01-01

    Background CCL21 acting through CCR7, is termed a homeostatic chemokine. Based on its role in concerting immunological responses and its proposed involvement in tissue remodeling, we hypothesized that this chemokine could play a role in myocardial remodeling during left ventricular (LV) pressure overload. Methods and Results Our main findings were: (i) Serum levels of CCL21 were markedly raised in patients with symptomatic aortic stenosis (AS, n = 136) as compared with healthy controls (n = 20). (ii) A CCL21 level in the highest tertile was independently associated with all-cause mortality in these patients. (iii) Immunostaining suggested the presence of CCR7 on macrophages, endothelial cells and fibroblasts within calcified human aortic valves. (iv). Mice exposed to LV pressure overload showed enhanced myocardial expression of CCL21 and CCR7 mRNA, and increased CCL21 protein levels. (v) CCR7−/− mice subjected to three weeks of LV pressure overload had similar heart weights compared to wild type mice, but increased LV dilatation and reduced wall thickness. Conclusions Our studies, combining experiments in clinical and experimental LV pressure overload, suggest that CCL21/CCR7 interactions might be involved in the response to pressure overload secondary to AS. PMID:25398010

  19. Potential Molecular Mechanism of Retrograde Aortic Arch Stenosis in the Hybrid Approach to Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hibino, Narutoshi; Cismowski, Mary J.; Lilly, Brenda J.; McConnell, Patrick I.; Shinoka, Toshiharu; Cheatham, John P.; Lucchesi, Pamela A.; Galantowicz, Mark E.; Trask, Aaron J.

    2015-01-01

    Background The hybrid palliation for hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS) has emerged as an alternative approach to the Norwood procedure. The development of patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) in-stent stenosis can cause retrograde aortic arch stenosis (RAAS), leading to significant morbidity. This study aimed to identify potential mechanisms of PDA in-stent stenosis contributing to RAAS. METHODS Tissues from stented PDA were collected from 17 patients undergoing comprehensive stage 2 repair between 2009 and 2014. Patients requiring RAAS intervention based on cardiology–surgery consensus were defined as RAAS (+) (n=10), whereas patients without any RAAS intervention were defined as RAAS (−) (n=7). Tissues were examined by qPCR analysis for vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) differentiation and proliferation markers. RESULTS Patient characteristics were: HLHS with aortic atresia: 6; HLHS with aortic stenosis: 3; unbalanced AVC: 3; DILV/TGA: 3; DORV: 2. VSMC differentiation markers (β–actin, SM22, and calponin) and signaling pathways for VSMC modulation (TGFβ1, Notch, and PDGF-BB) were significantly higher in the RAAS (+) than in RAAS (−). The proliferation marker Ki67 was increased in RAAS (+). Cell cycle markers were comparable in both groups. CONCLUSION Increased VSMC differentiation and proliferation markers suggest a mechanism for inward neointima formation of the PDA in RAAS. The apparent lack of change in cell cycle markers is contrary to coronary artery in-stent stenosis, suggesting further targets should be examined. Combined primary in vitro PDA cell culture and proteomics can be strong tools to elucidate targets to reduce PDA in-stent stenosis for RAAS in the future. PMID:26163359

  20. Increased plant sterol deposition in vascular tissue characterizes patients with severe aortic stenosis and concomitant coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Luister, Alexandra; Schött, Hans Frieder; Husche, Constanze; Schäfers, Hans-Joachim; Böhm, Michael; Plat, Jogchum; Gräber, Stefan; Lütjohann, Dieter; Laufs, Ulrich; Weingärtner, Oliver

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the relationship between phytosterols, oxyphytosterols, and other markers of cholesterol metabolism and concomitant coronary artery disease (CAD) in patients with severe aortic stenosis who were scheduled for elective aortic valve replacement. Markers of cholesterol metabolism (plant sterols and cholestanol as markers of cholesterol absorption and lathosterol as an indicator of cholesterol synthesis) and oxyphytosterols were determined in plasma and aortic valve tissue from 104 consecutive patients with severe aortic stenosis (n=68 statin treatment; n=36 no statin treatment) using gas chromatography-flame ionization and mass spectrometry. The extent of CAD was determined by coronary angiography prior to aortic valve replacement. Patients treated with statins were characterized by lower plasma cholesterol, cholestanol, and lathosterol concentrations. However, statin treatment did not affect the sterol concentrations in cardiovascular tissue. The ratio of campesterol-to-cholesterol was increased by 0.46±0.34μg/mg (26.0%) in plasma of patients with CAD. The absolute values for the cholesterol absorption markers sitosterol and campesterol were increased by 18.18±11.59ng/mg (38.8%) and 11.40±8.69ng/mg (30.4%) in the tissues from patients with documented CAD compared to those without concomitant CAD. Campesterol oxides were increased by 0.06±0.02ng/mg (17.1%) in the aortic valve cusps and oxidized sitosterol-to-cholesterol ratios were up-regulated by 0.35±0.2ng/mg (22.7%) in the plasma of patients with CAD. Of note, neither cholestanol nor the ratio of cholestanol-to-cholesterol was associated with CAD. Patients with concomitant CAD are characterized by increased deposition of plant sterols, but not cholestanol in aortic valve tissue. Moreover, patients with concomitant CAD were characterized by increased oxyphytosterol concentrations in plasma and aortic valve cusps.

  1. Intraoperative Treatment of Fetal Asystole After Endovascular Repair of Aortic Coarctation in a Pregnant Woman with Mitral Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Jalilian, Laleh; Delgado Upegui, Carlos; Ferreira, Renata; Simmons, Lavonne; Ciliberto, Christopher

    2016-03-15

    A G1P0 woman with aortic coarctation and mitral valve stenosis underwent endovascular aortic repair with continuous fetal monitoring during the 20th week of pregnancy. On tracheal extubation, an episode of fetal asystole followed by fetal bradycardia was identified. Ephedrine, nitroglycerin, and terbutaline were administered for intrauterine fetal resuscitation. Subsequently, the patient developed hypertension and pulmonary edema, which were treated with furosemide and noninvasive positive pressure ventilation. The fetal heart rate normalized. We conclude that intraoperative monitoring of a previable fetus may aid in optimizing maternal hemodynamics. Before performing interventional procedures in pregnant women, a multidisciplinary team should discuss the goals of neonatal care should adverse fetal events be detected.

  2. Comparison of Frequency of Ischemic Cardiovascular Events in Patients With Aortic Stenosis With Versus Without Asymmetric Septal Hypertrophy (from the SEAS Trial).

    PubMed

    Einarsen, Eigir; Cramariuc, Dana; Lønnebakken, Mai T; Boman, Kurt; Gohlke-Bärwolf, Christa; Chambers, John B; Gerdts, Eva

    2017-04-01

    Asymmetric interventricular septum hypertrophy (ASH) has been associated with increased perioperative morbidity and mortality in patients with severe, symptomatic aortic valve stenosis (AS). Less is known about the prognostic impact of ASH during progression of AS. Clinical, echocardiographic, and outcome data from 1,691 patients with initially asymptomatic, mostly moderate AS, participating in the Simvastatin Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis (SEAS) study was used. ASH was considered present if interventricular septum/posterior wall thickness ratio in end-diastole ≥1.5. The associations of ASH with hazard rate of ischemic cardiovascular events were tested in time-dependent Cox regression analyses. Based on the presence of ASH at study echocardiograms, the study population was grouped in to a no-ASH, nonpersistent ASH, persistent ASH, and new-onset ASH groups. During a median of 4.3 years of follow-up, ASH persisted or developed in 17% of patients. Persistent or new-onset ASH was characterized by higher left ventricular mass index and ejection fraction at baseline (both p <0.05) but not with female gender or hypertension. In time-varying Cox regression analyses adjusting for these confounders, persistent or new-onset ASH was associated with higher hazard rate of ischemic cardiovascular events (hazard rate 1.45; 95% confidence interval 1.09 to 1.91, p = 0.01), in particular coronary artery bypass grafting (hazard rate 1.69; 95% confidence interval 1.17 to 2.47; p = 0.006), whereas no association with increased mortality was found. In conclusion, in patients with AS without diabetes or known renal or cardiovascular disease participating in the SEAS study, persistent or new-onset ASH during progression of AS was associated with higher rate of ischemic cardiovascular events.

  3. The Roberts syndrome: a case report of an infant with valvular aortic stenosis and mutation in ESCO2.

    PubMed

    Dogan, Mustafa; Firinci, Fatih; Balci, Yasemin Isik; Zeybek, Selcan; Ozgürler, Funda; Erdogan, Ilkay; Varan, Birgül; Semerci, Cavidan Nur

    2014-04-01

    Roberts syndrome, which is inherited as an autosomal recessive group of disorders, is a rare syndrome characterized with symmetrical extremity defects, craniofacial abnormalities, and prenatal and postnatal growth retardation. Here, we present a case of Roberts Syndrome brought to the clinic with diarrhoea and multiple abnormalities, that had tetra phocomelia, growth and developmental retardation, abnormality of complete cleft lip-palate accompanied with Aortic stenosis and PDA, and in which cytogenetic analysis identified premature centromere separation. Mutation analysis of ESCO2 revealed a splice site mutation [c.1131+1G>A] in intron 6 in homozygous status in the patient and heterozygous status in the parents. Our case is the first Robert- Syndrome with valvular aortic stenosis in the literature, to the best of our knowledge.

  4. Left ventricular mass index as a prognostic factor in patients with severe aortic stenosis and ventricular dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Fuster, Rafael García; Montero Argudo, José A; Albarova, Oscar Gil; Hornero Sos, Fernando; Cánovas López, Sergio; Bueno Codoñer, María; Buendía Miñano, José A; Rodríguez Albarran, Ignacio

    2005-06-01

    Ventricular dysfunction and high hypertrophy may influence surgical outcome in aortic stenosis. Our aim was to determine whether an excessive left ventricular mass index (LVMI) discriminates different risk profiles in aortic stenosis with low ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). Three hundred and thirty-nine patients with severe aortic stenosis underwent valve replacement (Mar-1994 and Nov-2001). LVMI values over the superior quartile were considered increased. Mortality models were constructed in global and LVEFaortic stenosis and low LVEF might discern two different situations: an advanced cardiomyopathy with excessive hypertrophy (high LVMI-low LVEF) with poor prognosis, and an inadequate adaptive hypertrophy (low LVMI-low LVEF) in patients with afterload mismatch and more favorable outcome.

  5. Balloon aortic valvuloplasty as a bridge-to-decision in high risk patients with aortic stenosis: a new paradigm for the heart team decision making

    PubMed Central

    Saia, Francesco; Moretti, Carolina; Dall'Ara, Gianni; Ciuca, Cristina; Taglieri, Nevio; Berardini, Alessandra; Gallo, Pamela; Cannizzo, Marina; Chiarabelli, Matteo; Ramponi, Niccolò; Taffani, Linda; Bacchi-Reggiani, Maria Letizia; Marrozzini, Cinzia; Rapezzi, Claudio; Marzocchi, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Background Whilst the majority of the patients with severe aortic stenosis can be directly addressed to surgical aortic valve replacement (AVR) or transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI), in some instances additional information may be needed to complete the diagnostic workout. We evaluated the role of balloon aortic valvuloplasty (BAV) as a bridge-to-decision (BTD) in selected high-risk patients. Methods Between 2007 and 2012, the heart team in our Institution required BTD BAV in 202 patients. Very low left ventricular ejection fraction, mitral regurgitation grade ≥ 3, frailty, hemodynamic instability, serious comorbidity, or a combination of these factors were the main drivers for this strategy. We evaluated how BAV influenced the final treatment strategy in the whole patient group and in each specific subgroup. Results Mean logistic European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation (EuroSCORE) was 23.5% ± 15.3%, age 81 ± 7 years. In-hospital mortality was 4.5%, cerebrovascular accident 1% and overall vascular complications 4% (0.5% major; 3.5% minor). Of the 193 patients with BTD BAV who survived and received a second heart team evaluation, 72.6% were finally deemed eligible for definitive treatment (25.4% for AVR; 47.2% for TAVI): 96.7% of patients with left ventricular ejection fraction recovery; 70.5% of patients with mitral regurgitation reduction; 75.7% of patients who underwent BAV in clinical hemodynamic instability; 69.2% of frail patients and 68% of patients who presented serious comorbidities. Conclusions Balloon aortic valvuloplasty can be considered as bridge-to-decision in high-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis who cannot be immediate candidates for definitive transcatheter or surgical treatment. PMID:27582761

  6. Role of Transesophageal Echocardiography in the Diagnosis of Paradoxical Low Flow, Low Gradient Severe Aortic Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Abudiab, Muaz M.; Pandit, Anil

    2017-01-01

    Background and Objectives Prior studies indicate that up to 35% of cases of severe aortic stenosis (AS) have paradoxical low flow, low gradient despite preserved left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). However, error in left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) diameter may lead to misclassification. Herein, we determined whether measurement of LVOT diameter by transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) results in reclassification of cases to non-severe AS. Subjects and Methods Patients with severe AS with aortic valve area (AVA) <1 cm2 by transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) within 6 months were studied. Paradoxical low flow, low gradient was defined as mean Doppler gradient (MG) <40 mm Hg and stroke volume index (SVI) ≤35 mL/m2. Preserved LVEF was defined as ≥0.50. Results Among 108 patients, 12 (15%) had paradoxical low flow, low gradient severe AS despite preserved LVEF based on TTE measurement. When LVOT diameter by TEE in 2D was used, only 5 (6.3%) patients had low flow, low gradient severe AS (p<0.001). Coefficients of variability for intraobserver and interobserver measurement of LVOT were <10%. However, the limits of agreement between TTE and TEE measurement of LVOT ranged from 0.43 cm (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.36 to 0.5) to -0.31 cm (95% CI: -0.38 to -0.23). Conclusion TEE measured LVOT diameter may result in reclassification to moderate AS in some patients due to low prevalence of true paradoxical low flow, low gradient (PLFLG) severe AS. PMID:28154595

  7. Integrated microRNA and messenger RNA analysis in aortic stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Coffey, Sean; Williams, Michael J. A.; Phillips, L. Vicky; Galvin, Ivor F.; Bunton, Richard W.; Jones, Gregory T.

    2016-01-01

    Aortic valve stenosis (AS) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality, with no effective medical therapies. Investigation into the underlying biology of AS in humans is limited by difficulties in obtaining healthy valvular tissue for use as a control group. However, micro-ribonucleic acids (miRNAs) are stable in post-mortem tissue. We compared valve specimens from patients undergoing aortic valve replacement for AS to non-diseased cadaveric valves. We found 106 differentially expressed miRNAs (p < 0.05, adjusted for multiple comparisons) on microarray analysis, with highly correlated expression among up- and down-regulated miRNAs. Integrated miRNA/gene expression analysis validated the microarray results as a whole, while quantitative polymerase chain reaction confirmed downregulation of miR-122-5p, miR-625-5p, miR-30e-5p and upregulation of miR-21-5p and miR-221-3p. Pathway analysis of the integrated miRNA/mRNA network identified pathways predominantly involved in extracellular matrix function. A number of currently available therapies target products of upregulated genes in the integrated miRNA/mRNA network, with these genes being predominantly more peripheral members of the network. The identification of a group of tissue miRNA associated with AS may contribute to the development of new therapeutic approaches to AS. This study highlights the importance of systems biology-based approaches to complex diseases. PMID:27876829

  8. Integrated microRNA and messenger RNA analysis in aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Coffey, Sean; Williams, Michael J A; Phillips, L Vicky; Galvin, Ivor F; Bunton, Richard W; Jones, Gregory T

    2016-11-23

    Aortic valve stenosis (AS) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality, with no effective medical therapies. Investigation into the underlying biology of AS in humans is limited by difficulties in obtaining healthy valvular tissue for use as a control group. However, micro-ribonucleic acids (miRNAs) are stable in post-mortem tissue. We compared valve specimens from patients undergoing aortic valve replacement for AS to non-diseased cadaveric valves. We found 106 differentially expressed miRNAs (p < 0.05, adjusted for multiple comparisons) on microarray analysis, with highly correlated expression among up- and down-regulated miRNAs. Integrated miRNA/gene expression analysis validated the microarray results as a whole, while quantitative polymerase chain reaction confirmed downregulation of miR-122-5p, miR-625-5p, miR-30e-5p and upregulation of miR-21-5p and miR-221-3p. Pathway analysis of the integrated miRNA/mRNA network identified pathways predominantly involved in extracellular matrix function. A number of currently available therapies target products of upregulated genes in the integrated miRNA/mRNA network, with these genes being predominantly more peripheral members of the network. The identification of a group of tissue miRNA associated with AS may contribute to the development of new therapeutic approaches to AS. This study highlights the importance of systems biology-based approaches to complex diseases.

  9. Invasive assessment of doubtful aortic stenosis by measuring simultaneous transaortic gradient with a pressure wire.

    PubMed

    Chopard, Romain; Meneveau, Nicolas; Plastaras, Philoktimon; Janin, Sebastien; Seronde, Marie-France; Ecarnot, Fiona; Schiele, Francois

    2013-06-15

    Two-dimensional transthoracic echocardiography (2D-TTE) is the reference technique for evaluating aortic stenosis (AS) but may be unreliable in some cases. We aimed to assess whether the use of a pressure wire to measure simultaneous transaortic gradient and aortic valve area (AVA) could be helpful in patients in whom initial noninvasive evaluations were considered doubtful for AS. Fifty-seven patients (mean age 76 years; 39 men) underwent cardiac catheterization with single arterial access for assessment of AVA with the Gorlin and Gorlin formula. Transaortic pressure was obtained by 2 invasive methods: (1) conventional pullback method (PM) from the left ventricle toward the aorta and (2) simultaneous method (SM) with transaortic pressure simultaneously recorded with a 0.014-inch pressure wire introduced into the left ventricle and with a diagnostic catheter placed in the ascending aorta. Reasons for inaccurate assessment by 2D-TTE were low flow states (88%) and/or atrial fibrillation (79%). Agreement for severe AS defined by AVA <0.6 cm²/m² between SM and 2D-TTE and between SM and PM was fair, with kappa coefficients of 0.38 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.14-0.75) and 0.36 (95% CI 0.22-0.7) respectively; agreement was poor between 2D-TTE and PM (kappa: 0.23; 95% CI 0.002-0.36). SM led to a reclassification of the severity of AS in 9 patients (15.8%) compared with 2D-TTE and in 11 patients (19.3%) compared with PM. In conclusion, invasive evaluation of doubtful AS by measuring simultaneous transaortic gradient using a pressure wire may provide an attractive method that can lead to a change in therapeutic strategy in a substantial proportion of patients.

  10. Differences in Aortic Valve and Left Ventricular Parameters Related to the Severity of Myocardial Fibrosis in Patients with Severe Aortic Valve Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Song, Inyoung; Ko, Sung Min; Yi, Jeong Geun; Chee, Hyun Keun; Kim, Jun Seok

    2017-01-01

    Objective This study investigated the morphological and functional characteristics of the aortic valve and the left ventricular (LV) systolic functional parameters and myocardial mass related to the severity of myocardial fibrosis (MF) in patients with severe aortic valve stenosis (AS). Materials and Methods We retrospectively enrolled 81 patients (48 men; mean age: 59±12 years) with severe AS who underwent transthoracic echocardiography (TTE), cardiac computed tomography (CCT), and cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) within 1 month and subsequent aortic valve surgery. Degree of MF was determined on delayed contrast-enhanced CMR with visual sub-segmental analysis-based quantification and was classified into three groups (no, mild, and severe) for identifying the differences in LV function and characteristics of the aortic valve. One-way ANOVA, Chi-square test or Fisher’s exact test were used to compare variables of the three groups. Univariate multinomial logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the association between the severity of MF and variables on imaging modalities. Results Of 81 patients, 34 (42%) had MF (mild, n = 18; severe, n = 16). Aortic valve calcium volume score on CCT, aortic valve area, LV mass index, LV end-diastolic volume index on CMR, presence of mild aortic regurgitation (AR), transaortic mean pressure gradient, and peak velocity on TTE were significantly different among the three groups and were associated with severity of MF on a univariate multinomial logistic regression analysis. Aortic valve calcium grade was different (p = 0.008) among the three groups but not associated with severity of MF (p = 0.375). Conclusions A multi-imaging approach shows that severe AS with MF is significantly associated with more severe calcific AS, higher LV end-diastolic volume, higher LV mass, and higher prevalence of mild AR. PMID:28129367

  11. Platelet-to-Lymphocyte Ratio May Predict the Severity of Calcific Aortic Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Akdag, Serkan; Akyol, Aytac; Asker, Muntecep; Duz, Ramazan; Gumrukcuoglu, Hasan Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background Platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio (PLR) is an emerging inflammatory indicator which is closely associated with adverse cardiovascular events. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the relationship between PLR and the severity of calcific aortic stenosis (AS). Material/Methods The study was designed as a retrospective study. A total of 86 consecutive patients with calcific AS were divided into two groups as mild-to-moderate AS and severe AS according to the transaortic mean pressure gradient. PLR levels were calculated from the complete blood count (CBC). Results Platelet to lymphocyte ratio was significantly higher in severe and mild-to-moderate AS groups when compared to the control subjects (151±31.2, p<0.001, 138±28.8 vs. 126±26.5, p=0.008, respectively). In the subgroup analysis of AS patients, PLR was found to be higher in the severe AS group compared to mild-to-moderate group (p<0.001). A significant correlation was found between PLR and transaortic mean pressure gradient in patients with AS (r=0.421, p<0.001). Conclusions Our study results demonstrated that increased PLR correlates with the severity of calcific AS. PMID:26544152

  12. Molecular genetic analysis of individuals with Williams syndrome and supravalvar aortic stenosis

    SciTech Connect

    Smoot, L.B.; Lacro, R.V.; Kunkel, L.M.; Pober, B.

    1994-09-01

    Mutations at the elastin locus (chromosome 7q11.23) have been demonstrated in individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) and familial supravalvar aortic stenosis (SVAS). Relationships between elastin mutations and vascular and/or neurodevelopmental pathology have yet to be defined. In determining phenotype-genotype correlations in WS/SVAS, we examined 35 individuals with sporadic WS, families with SVAS affecting multiple members, and sporadic cases of isolated obstructive vascular disease. Full length elastin cDNA was used to probe a human genomic library from which multiple elastin genomic clones have been isolated and ordered relative to the elastin gene, covering a minimum of 35 kb. (Additional genomic clones are being obtained by {open_quote}walking{close_quote} 5{prime} and 3{prime} to elastin.) Elastin genomic clones were used as probes in fluorescent in situ hybridization of metaphase chromosomes from WS/SVAS patients. Preliminary analysis confirms elastin deletions in WS patients, but have not yet been demonstrated in patients with isolated vascular disease using this technique. Results of deletional analysis in individuals representing a wide spectrum of phenotypes will be presented.

  13. Genome-Wide DNA Methylation Analysis and Epigenetic Variations Associated with Congenital Aortic Valve Stenosis (AVS)

    PubMed Central

    Radhakrishna, Uppala; Albayrak, Samet; Alpay-Savasan, Zeynep; Zeb, Amna; Turkoglu, Onur; Sobolewski, Paul; Bahado-Singh, Ray O.

    2016-01-01

    Congenital heart defect (CHD) is the most common cause of death from congenital anomaly. Among several candidate epigenetic mechanisms, DNA methylation may play an important role in the etiology of CHDs. We conducted a genome-wide DNA methylation analysis using an Illumina Infinium 450k human methylation assay in a cohort of 24 newborns who had aortic valve stenosis (AVS), with gestational-age matched controls. The study identified significantly-altered CpG methylation at 59 sites in 52 genes in AVS subjects as compared to controls (either hypermethylated or demethylated). Gene Ontology analysis identified biological processes and functions for these genes including positive regulation of receptor-mediated endocytosis. Consistent with prior clinical data, the molecular function categories as determined using DAVID identified low-density lipoprotein receptor binding, lipoprotein receptor binding and identical protein binding to be over-represented in the AVS group. A significant epigenetic change in the APOA5 and PCSK9 genes known to be involved in AVS was also observed. A large number CpG methylation sites individually demonstrated good to excellent diagnostic accuracy for the prediction of AVS status, thus raising possibility of molecular screening markers for this disorder. Using epigenetic analysis we were able to identify genes significantly involved in the pathogenesis of AVS. PMID:27152866

  14. Structural and Histochemical Alterations in the Aortic Valves of Elderly Patients: A Comparative Study of Aortic Stenosis, Aortic Regurgitation, and Normal Valves

    PubMed Central

    Katoh, Hideki

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to reveal the pathogenesis of aortic stenosis (AS) and regurgitation (AR) by comparing differences in mechanical and biochemical alterations. We applied scanning acoustic microscopy (SAM) to measure the speed of sound (SOS) through valves to estimate the elasticity and monitor sensitivity to protease treatment, as the SOS is correlated with the stiffness of materials, which is reduced after digestion by proteases. The fibrosa of both the AS and AR groups were stiffer than the fibrosa of the normal group. The AR group displayed significantly stiffer fibrosa than the AS group, with the exception of calcified areas. The AS group showed significantly decreased SOS values following protease digestion, whereas the AR showed little reduction. The AS group presented type III collagen in the fibrosa and the ventricularis. In the AR group, both type I collagen and type III collagen coexisted in the fibrosa and the ventricularis. Upon immunostaining for advanced glycation end-products, the AS group showed sparse, weak staining, whereas the AR group presented a strong, band-like positive reaction in the fibrosa. In conclusion, tissue remodelling associated with damage and repair is associated with AS pathogenesis, whereas static chemical alterations with slow collagen turnover induce AR. PMID:27747234

  15. Transcatheter aortic valve-in-valve implantation for severe bioprosthetic stenosis after Bentall operation using a homograft in a patient with Behçet's disease.

    PubMed

    Joo, Hyung Joon; Hong, Soon Jun; Yu, Cheol Woong

    2015-03-01

    A 43-year-old man presented with severe aortic stenosis. Eight years previously, he had undergone primary surgical aortic valve replacement (AVR) for severe aortic regurgitation, but one year later developed cardiac arrest and complete atrioventricular block as a result of non-bacterial thrombotic endocarditis with severe valvular dehiscence. Following the diagnosis of prosthetic valve failure caused by Behçet's disease, the patient underwent a Bentall operation using 23 mm aortic homograft with permanent pacemaker implantation and coronary artery bypass grafting. Subsequently, he was stable with steroid administration and azathioprine for seven years after the second operation, but recently suffered from severe dyspnea and chest pain. Echocardiography revealed the development of severe aortic stenosis. A preprocedural evaluation demonstrated a porcelain aorta with severe calcification in the previous homograft valve on computed tomography, and critical stenosis at the ostium of the left circumflex artery on coronary angiography. After percutaneous coronary intervention for the ostium of the left circumflex artery, a transcatheter AVR was successfully performed using a 26 mm Edwards SAPIEN XT valve. The patient recovered without any complications after the procedure. This is the first report of a successful transcatheter aortic valve-in valve implantation for severe homograft aortic stenosis after a Bentall operation, using a homograft, in a patient with Behçet's disease.

  16. Aortic or Mitral Valve Replacement With the Biocor and Biocor Supra

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-09

    Aortic Valve Insufficiency; Aortic Valve Regurgitation; Aortic Valve Stenosis; Aortic Valve Incompetence; Mitral Valve Insufficiency; Mitral Valve Regurgitation; Mitral Valve Stenosis; Mitral Valve Incompetence

  17. Myocardial strain and symptom severity in severe aortic stenosis: insights from cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    PubMed Central

    Al Musa, Tarique; Uddin, Akhlaque; Swoboda, Peter P.; Garg, Pankaj; Fairbairn, Timothy A.; Dobson, Laura E.; Steadman, Christopher D.; Singh, Anvesha; Erhayiem, Bara; Plein, Sven; McCann, Gerald P.

    2017-01-01

    Background Symptomatic severe aortic stenosis (AS) is a class I indication for replacement in patients when left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) is preserved. However, symptom reporting is often equivocal and decision making can be challenging. We aimed to quantify myocardial deformation using cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) in patients classified by symptom severity. Methods Forty-two patients with severe AS referred to heart valve clinic were studied using tagged CMR imaging. All had preserved LVEF. Patients were grouped by symptoms as either “none/mild” (n=21, NYHA class I, II) or “significant” (n=21, NYHA class III, IV, angina, syncope) but were comparable for age (72.8±5.4 vs. 71.0±6.8 years old, P=0.345), surgical risk (EuroSCORE II: 1.90±1.7 vs. 1.31±0.4, P=0.302) and haemodynamics (peak aortic gradient: 55.1±20.8 vs. 50.4±15.6, P=0.450). Thirteen controls matched in age and LVEF were also studied. LV circumferential strain was calculated using inTag© software and longitudinal strain using feature tracking analysis. Results Compared to healthy controls, patients with severe AS had significantly worse longitudinal and circumferential strain, regardless of symptom status. Patients with “significant” symptoms had significantly worse peak longitudinal systolic strain rates (−83.352±24.802%/s vs. −106.301±43.276%/s, P=0.048) than those with “no/mild” symptoms, with comparable peak longitudinal strain (PLS), peak circumferential strain and systolic and diastolic strain rates. Conclusions Patients with severe AS who have no or only mild symptoms exhibit comparable reduction in circumferential and longitudinal fibre function to those with significant symptoms, in whom AVR is clearly indicated. Given these findings of equivalent subclinical dysfunction, reportedly borderline symptoms should be handled cautiously to avoid potentially adverse delays in intervention. PMID:28275558

  18. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance evaluation of aortic stenosis severity using single plane measurement of effective orifice area

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) is the standard method for the evaluation of the severity of aortic stenosis (AS). Valve effective orifice area (EOA) measured by the continuity equation is one of the most frequently used stenotic indices. However, TTE measurement of aortic valve EOA is not feasible or not reliable in a significant proportion of patients. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) has emerged as a non-invasive alternative to evaluate EOA using velocity measurements. The objectives of this study were: 1) to validate a new CMR method using jet shear layer detection (JSLD) based on acoustical source term (AST) concept to estimate the valve EOA; 2) to introduce a simplified JSLD method not requiring vorticity field derivation. Methods and results We performed an in vitro study where EOA was measured by CMR in 4 fixed stenoses (EOA = 0.48, 1.00, 1.38 and 2.11 cm2) under the same steady flow conditions (4-20 L/min). The in vivo study included eight (8) healthy subjects and 37 patients with mild to severe AS (0.72 cm2 ≤ EOA ≤ 1.71 cm2). All subjects underwent TTE and CMR examinations. EOA was determinated by TTE with the use of continuity equation method (TTECONT). For CMR estimation of EOA, we used 3 methods: 1) Continuity equation (CMRCONT); 2) Shear layer detection (CMRJSLD), which was computed from the velocity field of a single CMR velocity profile at the peak systolic phase; 3) Single plane velocity truncation (CMRSPVT), which is a simplified version of CMRJSLD method. There was a good agreement between the EOAs obtained in vitro by the different CMR methods and the EOA predicted from the potential flow theory. In the in vivo study, there was good correlation and concordance between the EOA measured by the TTECONT method versus those measured by each of the CMR methods: CMRCONT (r = 0.88), CMRJSLD (r = 0.93) and CMRSPVT (r = 0.93). The intra- and inter- observer variability of EOA measurements was 5 ± 5% and 9 ± 5% for TTECONT, 2

  19. Echocardiographic and Histologic Correlations in Patients with Severe Aortic Stenosis: Influence of Overweight and Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Fritche-Salazar, Juan Francisco; Vázquez-Castro, Nelva Marina; Rivera-Lara, Pedro; Pérez-Méndez, Oscar; Martínez-Herrera, Humberto; Gómez-Sánchez, Mario; Aranda-Frausto, Alberto; Herrera-Bello, Héctor; Luna-Luna, María; Arias Godínez, José Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Background Severe aortic stenosis (AS), leads to pathological left ventricular remodeling that may worsen with concomitant overweight and obesity (OW/O). Methods We aimed to prospectively analyze the impact of OW/O on ventricular remodeling in severe AS, by evaluating the percentage of intraendomyocardial fibrosis (PIEF) and the percentage of infiltrating intraendocardial lipid vacuoles (PIELV) and its relationship to global longitudinal strain (GLS) in patients with OW/O. Results 44 patients with severe AS were included, 13 non-obese (29%) and 31 OW/O (71%), all of them with left ventricular ejection fraction ≥ 55%. GLS was evaluated with 2D speckle tracking. During valve replacement, an endocardial biopsy was obtained, where PIEF and PIELV were analyzed. Patients with higher PIEF and PIELV had greater body mass index (p < 0.0001) and worse GLS (p < 0.0053). A GLS cut-off point < -14% had a sensitivity of 75%, and a specificity of 92.8% to detect important PIEF (AUC: 0.928, 95% confidence interval: 0.798–1.00). On multivariate analysis, OW/O and PIELV were independently associated to the PIEF, and OW/O and PIEF were independently associated to GLS. A high correlation between the amount of PIELV and PIEF were found. Conclusion Patients with severe AS and OW/O have greater PIEF and PIELV, suggesting more pathological remodeling. GLS is useful to detect subclinical myocardial injury and is potentially useful for endomyocardial fibrosis detection. The presence of higher PIELF may be a trigger factor for the development of intraendomyocardial fibrosis. PMID:28090258

  20. Left ventricular hypertrophy in ascending aortic stenosis mice: anoikis and the progression to early failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, B.; Price, R. L.; Goldsmith, E. C.; Borg, T. K.; Yan, X.; Douglas, P. S.; Weinberg, E. O.; Bartunek, J.; Thielen, T.; Didenko, V. V.; Lorell, B. H.; Schneider, M. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To determine potential mechanisms of the transition from hypertrophy to very early failure, we examined apoptosis in a model of ascending aortic stenosis (AS) in male FVB/n mice. METHODS AND RESULTS: Compared with age-matched controls, 4-week and 7-week AS animals (n=12 to 16 per group) had increased ratios of left ventricular weight to body weight (4.7+/-0.7 versus 3.1+/-0.2 and 5. 7+/-0.4 versus 2.7+/-0.1 mg/g, respectively, P<0.05) with similar body weights. Myocyte width was also increased in 4-week and 7-week AS mice compared with controls (19.0+/-0.8 and 25.2+/-1.8 versus 14. 1+/-0.5 microm, respectively, P<0.01). By 7 weeks, AS myocytes displayed branching with distinct differences in intercalated disk size and staining for beta(1)-integrin on both cell surface and adjacent extracellular matrix. In vivo left ventricular systolic developed pressure per gram as well as endocardial fractional shortening were similar in 4-week AS and controls but depressed in 7-week AS mice. Myocyte apoptosis estimated by in situ nick end-labeling (TUNEL) was extremely rare in 4-week AS and control mice; however, a low prevalence of TUNEL-positive myocytes and DNA laddering were detected in 7-week AS mice. The specificity of TUNEL labeling was confirmed by in situ ligation of hairpin oligonucleotides. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings indicate that myocyte apoptosis develops during the transition from hypertrophy to early failure in mice with chronic biomechanical stress and support the hypothesis that the disruption of normal myocyte anchorage to adjacent extracellular matrix and cells, a process called anoikis, may signal apoptosis.

  1. Bicuspid Aortic Valve

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    severe aortic stenosis . Figure 1F. Oblique axial cine bright blood imaging through the valve plane of the aorta, demonstrates the aortic valve to...the ascending aorta. This moderate to large jet is consistent with moderate to severe aortic stenosis . No diastolic jet to suggest aortic ...conditions. Functional impairment of the aortic valve—namely aortic stenosis and aortic regurgitation—is the most common complication (in up to 68-85% of

  2. Collagen mineralization in human aortic valve stenosis: a field emission scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis.

    PubMed

    Perrotta, Ida; Davoli, Mariano

    2014-08-01

    Abstract Calcific aortic stenosis is a slowly progressive disorder characterized by an important extracellular matrix remodeling with fibrosis and massive deposition of minerals (primarily calcium) in the valve leaflet. The main structural components of human aortic valve are the large, thick collagen bundles that withstand the diastolic loading. Collagen has been studied in a number of reports that aim to clarify the mechanisms underlying the structural deterioration of heart valve substitutes, however to date, little is known regarding the morphological interaction between collagen and mineral crystals in the calcifying tissue of native aortic valve. Here, we have analyzed a total of 12 calcified native aortic valves by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with Energy Dispersive X-Ray Analysis (EDX) to depict the morphological appearance of mineralized collagen and to determine the location of calcium phosphate minerals in the collagen matrix of the valve cusp. Our results demonstrate that crystals probably nucleate and grow in the interior of the collagen fibers in the absence of surface events.

  3. Prognosis after surgical replacement with a bioprosthetic aortic valve in patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis: systematic review of observational studies

    PubMed Central

    Guyatt, Gordon H; O’Brien, Kathleen; Bain, Eva; Stein, Madeleine; Bhagra, Sai; Sit, Daegan; Kamran, Rakhshan; Chang, Yaping; Devji, Tahira; Mir, Hassan; Manja, Veena; Schofield, Toni; Siemieniuk, Reed A; Agoritsas, Thomas; Bagur, Rodrigo; Otto, Catherine M; Vandvik, Per O

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the frequency of survival, stroke, atrial fibrillation, structural valve deterioration, and length of hospital stay after surgical replacement of an aortic valve (SAVR) with a bioprosthetic valve in patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies. Data sources Medline, Embase, PubMed (non-Medline records only), Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and Cochrane CENTRAL from 2002 to June 2016. Study selection Eligible observational studies followed patients after SAVR with a bioprosthetic valve for at least two years. Methods Reviewers, independently and in duplicate, evaluated study eligibility, extracted data, and assessed risk of bias for patient important outcomes. We used the GRADE system to quantify absolute effects and quality of evidence. Published survival curves provided data for survival and freedom from structural valve deterioration, and random effect models provided the framework for estimates of pooled incidence rates of stroke, atrial fibrillation, and length of hospital stay. Results In patients undergoing SAVR with a bioprosthetic valve, median survival was 16 years in those aged 65 or less, 12 years in those aged 65 to 75, seven years in those aged 75 to 85, and six years in those aged more than 85. The incidence rate of stroke was 0.25 per 100 patient years (95% confidence interval 0.06 to 0.54) and atrial fibrillation 2.90 per 100 patient years (1.78 to 4.79). Post-SAVR, freedom from structural valve deterioration was 94.0% at 10 years, 81.7% at 15 years, and 52% at 20 years, and mean length of hospital stay was 12 days (95% confidence interval 9 to 15). Conclusion Patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis undergoing SAVR with a bioprosthetic valve can expect only slightly lower survival than those without aortic stenosis, and a low incidence of stroke and, up to 10 years, of structural valve deterioration. The rate of deterioration

  4. Influence of St. Jude medical valve in patients with aortic stenosis and small aortic annulus on cardiac function and late survival result.

    PubMed

    Natsuaki, Masafumi; Itoh, Tsuyoshi; Okazaki, Yukio; Takarabe, Kyoumi; Furukawa, Koujirou; Rikitake, Kazuhisa; Ohtubo, Satoshi

    2002-10-01

    This clinical study analyzes our experience of postoperative cardiac function and long-term survival rate in patients with aortic stenosis and small-size St. Jude Medical (SJM) valve. Sixty-eight patients who underwent aortic valve replacement by SJM valve were divided into two groups by preoperative aortic annulus diameter. Group 1 consisted of 44 patients with small aortic annulus and small-size SJM valve (19 mm or 21 mm). In Group 1, small SJM standard valves were implanted in 16 patients, and small SJM Hemodynamic Plus (HP) valves were implanted in 28 patients. Group 2 consisted of 24 patients with large-size SJM standard valve (23 mm or larger). Preoperative left ventricular mass index, left ventricular dimension, the dimension of ascending aorta, and body surface area were significantly smaller in Group 1 than in Group 2. Average age at surgery was older in Group 1 than in Group 2. Effective orifice area index of the SJM valve measured by the manufacturer's data was smaller in Group 1 than in Group 2. Postoperative left ventricular mass indexes of Group 1 (standard valve or HP valve) and Group 2 significantly decreased in comparison with the preoperative mass indexes. Postoperative left ventricular ejection fraction and the peak ejection rate of Group 1 were not different from those of Group 2. The 10 year survival rate of Group 1 was 79%, and the rate of Group 2 was 77%. At 10 years after surgery, freedom from valve-related complication of Group 1 was 80%, and freedom from complication of Group 2 was 81%. Our results demonstrated that small-size SJM valve afforded satisfactory long-term survival rate and valve-related event-free rate for elderly patients with small body surface area and small aortic annulus.

  5. Comparison of Transcatheter and Surgical Aortic Valve Replacement in Severe Aortic Stenosis: A Longitudinal Study of Echo Parameters in Cohort A of the PARTNER Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Rebecca T.; Pibarot, Philippe; Stewart, William J.; Weissman, Neil J.; Gopalakrishnan, Deepika; Keane, Martin G.; Anwaruddin, Saif; Wang, Zueyue; Bilsker, Martin; Lindman, Brian R.; Herrmann, Howard C.; Kodali, Susheel K.; Thourani, Vinod H.; Svensson, Lars G.; Akin, Jodi J.; Anderson, William N.; Leon, Martin; Douglas, Pamela S.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To compare echocardiographic findings in patients with critical aortic stenosis following surgical (SAVR) or transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR Background The Placement of Aortic Transcatheter Valves trial randomized patients 1:1 to SAVR or TAVR Methods Echocardiograms were obtained at baseline, discharge, 30 days, 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years post procedure and analyzed in a core laboratory. For the analysis of post-implant variables, the first interpretable study (≤ 6 mos) was used. Results Both groups showed a decrease in aortic valve gradients and increase in effective orifice area (EOA) (p < 0.0001) which remained stable over 2 years. Compared to SAVR, TAVR resulted in: larger indexed EOA (p = 0.038), less prosthesis-patient mismatch (p = 0.019), and more total and paravalvular aortic regurgitation (AR) (p < 0.0001). Baseline echocardiographic univariate predictors of death were: lower peak transaortic gradient in TAVR patients; low left ventricular diastolic volume (LVDV), low stroke volume, and greater severity of mitral regurgitation in SAVR patients. Post-implantation echocardiographic univariate predictors of death were: larger LVDV, systolic volume (LVSV) and EOA, decreased ejection fraction, and greater AR in TAVR patients; smaller LVSV and LVDV, low stroke volume, smaller EOA and prosthesis-patient mismatch in SAVR patients. Conclusions Patients randomized to either SAVR or TAVR experience enduring, significant reductions in transaortic gradients and increase in EOA. Compared to SAVR, TAVR patients had higher indexed EOA, lower prosthesis-patient mismatch and more AR. Univariate predictors of death for the TAVR group and SAVR groups differed and may allow future refinement in patient selection. PMID:23623915

  6. Change in amplitude distributions of Doppler spectrograms recorded below the aortic valve in patients with a valvular aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Cloutier, G; Lemire, F; Durand, L G; Latour, Y; Jarry, M; Solignac, A; Langlois, Y E

    1991-01-01

    Amplitude distributions of Doppler spectrograms were characterized in a group of 22 patients having no aortic pressure gradient and another group of 26 patients having a stenotic aortic valve. Specifically, for each patient, the ratios of the mean amplitude in three normalized frequency bands (low, middle and high) to the mean amplitude of the Doppler spectrogram computed in selected portions of the systolic period were considered. Pulsed-wave Doppler spectrograms were recorded by positioning the sample volume in the left ventricular outflow tract, approximately 1 cm below the aortic valve. Statistically significant differences were found between the middle (p = 0.041) and high (p = 0.028) frequency bands of Doppler signals recorded from the two groups of patients. The differences observed are believed to be attributed to blood flow eddies generated below the stenotic aortic heart valve and to changes in blood flow orientation.

  7. Mathematical, numerical and experimental study in the human aorta with coexisting models of bicuspid aortic stenosis and coarctation of the aorta.

    PubMed

    Keshavarz-Motamed, Z; Garcia, J; Kadem, L

    2011-01-01

    Coarctation of the aorta is an obstruction of the aorta and is usually associated with other concomitant cardiovascular abnormalities especially with bicuspid aortic valve stenosis. The objectives of this study are, (1) to investigate the effects of coarctation on the hemodynamics in the aorta to gain a better understanding of the cause of certain post-surgical coarctation problems, (2) to develop and introduce a new lumped parameter model, mainly based on non-invasive data, allowing the description of the interaction between left ventricle, coarctation of the aorta, aortic valve stenosis, and the arterial system.

  8. Effect of Randomized Lipid Lowering With Simvastatin and Ezetimibe on Cataract Development (from the Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis Study).

    PubMed

    Bang, Casper N; Greve, Anders M; La Cour, Morten; Boman, Kurt; Gohlke-Bärwolf, Christa; Ray, Simon; Pedersen, Terje; Rossebø, Anne; Okin, Peter M; Devereux, Richard B; Wachtell, Kristian

    2015-12-15

    Recent American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines on statin initiation on the basis of total atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease risk argue that the preventive effect of statins on cardiovascular events outweigh the side effects, although this is controversial. Studies indicate a possible effect of statin therapy on reducing risk of lens opacities. However, the results are conflicting. The Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis study (NCT00092677) enrolled 1,873 patients with asymptomatic aortic stenosis and no history of diabetes, coronary heart disease, or other serious co-morbidities were randomized (1:1) to double-blind 40 mg simvastatin plus 10 mg ezetimibe versus placebo. The primary end point in this substudy was incident cataract. Univariate and multivariate Cox models were used to analyze: (1) if the active treatment reduced the risk of the primary end point and (2) if time-varying low-density lipoproteins (LDL) cholesterol lowering (annually assessed) was associated with less incident cataract per se. During an average follow-up of 4.3 years, 65 patients (3.5%) developed cataract. Mean age at baseline was 68 years and 39% were women. In Cox multivariate analysis adjusted for age, gender, prednisolone treatment, smoking, baseline LDL cholesterol and high sensitivity C-reactive protein; simvastatin plus ezetimibe versus placebo was associated with 44% lower risk of cataract development (hazard ratio 0.56, 95% confidence interval 0.33 to 0.96, p = 0.034). In a parallel analysis substituting time-varying LDL-cholesterol with randomized treatment, lower intreatment LDL-cholesterol was in itself associated with lower risk of incident cataract (hazard ratio 0.78 per 1 mmol/ml lower total cholesterol, 95% confidence interval 0.64 to 0.93, p = 0.008). In conclusion, randomized treatment with simvastatin plus ezetimibe was associated with a 44% lower risk of incident cataract development. This effect should perhaps be considered

  9. Co-existence of severe coarctation of the aorta and aortic valve stenosis in a 65-year-old woman: a case report.

    PubMed

    Onohara, Daisuke; Sato, Aiko; Tasaki, Yuichi; Yamada, Takafumi

    2014-01-01

    Coarctation of the aorta is usually diagnosed and corrected early in life. Survival to more than 60 years of age of a patient with unrepaired coarctation of the aorta is extremely unusual, and the optimal management strategies for such patients are controversial. We describe the case of a woman who was first diagnosed as having coarctation of the aorta and aortic valve stenosis at the age of 65 years and underwent successful aortic valve replacement.

  10. Association of the C-Reactive Protein Gene (CRP) rs1205 C>T Polymorphism with Aortic Valve Calcification in Patients with Aortic Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Wypasek, Ewa; Potaczek, Daniel P.; Undas, Anetta

    2015-01-01

    Elevation in C-reactive protein (CRP) levels have been shown in patients with aortic valve stenosis (AS). Minor allele of the CRP gene (CRP) rs1205 C>T polymorphism has been associated with lower plasma CRP concentrations in cohorts of healthy and atherosclerotic patients. Considering the existing similarities between atherosclerosis and AS, we examined the effect of CRP rs1205 C>T polymorphism on the AS severity. Three hundred consecutive Caucasian patients diagnosed with AS were genotyped for the rs1205 C>T polymorphism using the TaqMan assay. Severity of the AS was assessed using transthoracic echocardiography. The degree of calcification was analyzed semi-quantitatively. Carriers of the rs1205 T allele were characterized by elevated serum CRP levels (2.53 (1.51–3.96) vs. 1.68 (0.98–2.90) mg/L, p < 0.001) and a higher proportion of the severe aortic valve calcification (70.4% vs. 55.1%, p = 0.01) compared with major homozygotes. The effect of CRP rs1205 polymorphism on CRP levels is opposite in AS-affected than in unaffected subjects, suggesting existence of a disease-specific molecular regulatory mechanism. Furthermore, rs1205 variant allele predisposes to larger aortic valve calcification, potentially being a novel genetic risk marker of disease progression. PMID:26473826

  11. Early detection of subclinical ventricular deterioration in aortic stenosis with cardiovascular magnetic resonance and echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Severe aortic stenosis (AS) patients with late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) on cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) or left ventricular (LV) systolic dysfunction are known to have worse outcome. We aimed to investigate whether LGE on CMR would be useful in early detection of subclinical LV structural and functional derangements in AS patients. Methods 118 patients with moderate to severe AS were prospectively enrolled. Echocardiography and CMR images were taken and the patients were divided into groups according to the presence/absence of LGE and of LV systolic dysfunction (LV ejection fraction (EF) <50%). The stiffness of LV was calculated based on Doppler and CMR measurements. Results Patients were grouped into either group 1, no LGE and normal LVEF, group 2, LGE but normal LVEF and group 3, LGE with depressed LVEF. There was a significant trend towards increasing LV volumes, worsening of LV diastolic function (E/e’, diastolic elastance), systolic function (end-systolic elastance) and LV hypertrophy between the three groups, which coincided with worsening functional capacity (all p-value < 0.001 for trend). Also, significant differences in the above parameters were noted between group 1 and 2 (E/e’, 14.6 ± 4.3 (mean ± standard deviation) in group 1 vs. 18.2 ± 9.4 in group 2; end-systolic elastance, 3.24 ± 2.31 in group 1 vs. 2.38 ± 1.16 in group 2, all p-value < 0.05). The amount of myocardial fibrosis on CMR correlated with parameters of diastolic (diastolic elastance, Spearman’s ρ = 0.256, p-value = 0.005) and systolic function (end-systolic elastance, Spearman’s ρ = -0.359, p-value < 0.001). Conclusions These findings demonstrate the usefulness of CMR for early detection of subclinical LV structural and functional deterioration in AS patients. PMID:23984681

  12. Quantification of aortic valve stenosis in MRI-comparison of steady-state free precession and fast low-angle shot sequences.

    PubMed

    Schlosser, Thomas; Malyar, Nasser; Jochims, Markus; Breuckmann, Frank; Hunold, Peter; Bruder, Oliver; Erbel, Raimund; Barkhausen, Jörg

    2007-05-01

    We compared two different magnetic resonance (MR) sequences [steady-state free precession (SSFP) and gradient echo fast low-angle shot (FLASH)] for the assessment of aortic valve areas in aortic stenosis using transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) as the standard of reference. Thirty-two patients with known aortic stenosis underwent MR (1.5 T) using a cine SSFP sequence and a cine FLASH sequence. Planimetry was performed in cross-sectional images and compared to the results of the TEE. In seven patients the grade of stenosis was additionally assessed by invasive cardiac catheterization (ICC). The mean aortic valve area measured by TEE was 0.97+/-0.19 mm(2), 1.00+/-0.25 mm(2) for SSFP and 1.25+/-0.23 mm(2) based on FLASH images. The mean difference between the valve areas assessed based on SSFP and TEE images was 0.15+/-0.13 cm(2) (FLASH vs TEE: 0.29+/-0.17 cm(2)). Bland-Altman analysis demonstrated that measurements using FLASH images overestimated the aortic valve area compared to TEE. Comparing ICC with MRI and TEE, only a weak to moderate correlation was found (ICC vs TEE: R=0.52, p=0.22; ICC vs SSFP: R=0.20, p=0.65; ICC vs FLASH: R=0.16, p=0.70). Measurements of the aortic valve area based on SSFP images correlate better with TEE compared to FLASH images.

  13. Dysregulation of ossification-related miRNAs in circulating osteogenic progenitor cells obtained from patients with aortic stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Kan; Takahashi, Yuji; Osaki, Takuya; Nasu, Takahito; Tamada, Makiko; Okabayashi, Hitoshi; Nakamura, Motoyuki; Morino, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    CAVD (calcific aortic valve disease) is the defining feature of AS (aortic stenosis). The present study aimed to determine whether expression of ossification-related miRNAs is related to differentiation intro COPCs (circulating osteogenic progenitor cells) in patients with CAVD. The present study included 46 patients with AS and 46 controls. Twenty-nine patients underwent surgical AVR (aortic valve replacement) and 17 underwent TAVI (transcatheter aortic valve implantation). The number of COPCs was higher in the AS group than in the controls (P<0.01). Levels of miR-30c were higher in the AS group than in the controls (P<0.01), whereas levels of miR-106a, miR-148a, miR-204, miR-211, miR-31 and miR-424 were lower in the AS group than in the controls (P<0.01). The number of COPCs and levels of osteocalcin protein in COPCs were positively correlated with levels of miR-30a and negatively correlated with levels of the remaining miRNAs (all P<0.05). The degree of aortic valve calcification was weakly positively correlated with the number of COPCs and miR-30c levels. The number of COPCs and miR-30c levels were decreased after surgery, whereas levels of the remaining miRNAs were increased (all P<0.05). Changes in these levels were greater after AVR than after TAVI (all P<0.05). In vitro study using cultured peripheral blood mononuclear cells transfected with each ossification-related miRNA showed that these miRNAs controlled levels of osteocalcin protein. In conclusion, dysregulation of ossification-related miRNAs may be related to the differentiation into COPCs and may play a significant role in the pathogenesis of CAVD. PMID:27129184

  14. Increased transcript level of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP-1) in human tricuspid compared with bicuspid aortic valves correlates with the stenosis severity

    SciTech Connect

    Nagy, Edit; Caidahl, Kenneth; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Baeck, Magnus

    2012-04-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oxidative stress has been implicated in the pathomechanism of calcific aortic valve stenosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We assessed the transcript levels for PARP-1 (poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase), acts as a DNA damage nick sensor in stenotic valves. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Early stage of diseased tricuspid valves exhibited higher mRNA levels for PARP-1 compared to bicuspid valves. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The mRNA levels for PARP-1 inversely correlated with the clinical stenosis severity in tricuspid valves. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Our data demonstrated that DNA damage pathways might be associated with stenosis severity only in tricuspid valves. -- Abstract: Oxidative stress may contribute to the hemodynamic progression of aortic valve stenosis, and is associated with activation of the nuclear enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) 1. The aim of the present study was to assess the transcriptional profile and the topological distribution of PARP-1 in human aortic valves, and its relation to the stenosis severity. Human stenotic aortic valves were obtained from 46 patients undergoing aortic valve replacement surgery and used for mRNA extraction followed by quantitative real-time PCR to correlate the PARP-1 expression levels with the non invasive hemodynamic parameters quantifying the stenosis severity. Primary isolated valvular interstitial cells (VICs) were used to explore the effects of cytokines and leukotriene C{sub 4} (LTC{sub 4}) on valvular PARP-1 expression. The thickened areas of stenotic valves with tricuspid morphology expressed significantly higher levels of PARP-1 mRNA compared with the corresponding part of bicuspid valves (0.501 vs 0.243, P = 0.01). Furthermore, the quantitative gene expression levels of PARP-1 were inversely correlated with the aortic valve area (AVA) (r = -0.46, P = 0.0469) and AVA indexed for body surface area (BSA) (r = -0.498; P = 0.0298) only in tricuspid aortic valves

  15. Observed and predicted reduction of ischemic cardiovascular events in the Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis trial.

    PubMed

    Holme, Ingar; Boman, Kurt; Brudi, Philippe; Egstrup, Kenneth; Gohlke-Baerwolf, Christa; Kesäniemi, Y Antero; Malbecq, William; Rossebø, Anne B; Wachtell, Kristian; Willenheimer, Ronnie; Pedersen, Terje R

    2010-06-15

    In the Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis (SEAS) trial, combined ezetimibe (10 mg) and simvastatin (40 mg) decreased low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels by 50% and ischemic cardiovascular event (ICE) risk by 22% compared to placebo. A larger decrease in ICE risk might have been expected for the degree of lipid-lowering observed. This analysis investigated relations between changes in lipoprotein components (LCs), and ICE risk decrease in the SEAS trial in all patients, by severity of aortic stenosis (AS), and compared to results of other clinical trials. A total of 1,570 patients with baseline aortic jet velocity (JV) data, baseline and 1-year low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and apolipoprotein B, and no ICEs during the first year were included in the analysis. Relations between on-treatment measurements of 1-year LCs and time-to-ICE occurrence were assessed in all patients and in JV tertiles (<2.8, 2.8 to 3.3, and >3.3 m/s). Observed and predicted ICE risk decreases were compared by Cox model. Decreases in LCs after 1 year of ezetimibe plus simvastatin were associated with decreased ICE risk in all patients and in the 2 lower JV tertiles (p <0.05 to <0.001) but not in tertile 3. In JV tertiles 1 and 2, ICE risk decreased by 47% and 36%, respectively, was reasonably well predicted by all LCs, and was consistent with findings from meta-regression analyses in other populations. In conclusion, the degree of lipid lowering by ezetimibe plus simvastatin may predict the extent of ICE risk decrease in patients with mild AS, but ICE risk prediction in patients with more severe AS is confounded by AS-associated cardiovascular events and a shorter interval of exposure to lipid lowering.

  16. Aortic valve surgery - minimally invasive

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the heart is reduced. This is called aortic stenosis. The aortic valve can be replaced using: Minimally ... RN, Wang A. Percutaneous heart valve replacement for aortic stenosis: state of the evidence. Ann Intern Med . 2010; ...

  17. Inclusion cylinder method for aortic valve replacement utilising the Ross operation in adults with predominant aortic stenosis – 99% freedom from re-operation on the aortic valve at 15 years

    PubMed Central

    Skillington, Peter D.; Mokhles, M. Mostafa; Wilson, William; Grigg, Leeanne; Larobina, Marco; O'Keefe, Michael; Takkenberg, Johanna

    2013-01-01

    Background: To report our experience with the Ross operation in patients with predominant aortic stenosis (AS) using an inclusion cylinder (IC) method. Methods: Out of 324 adults undergoing a Ross operation, 204 patients of mean age of 41.3 years (limits 16–62) underwent this procedure for either AS or mixed AS and regurgitation (AS/AR) between October, 1992 and February, 2012, implanting the PA with an IC method. Clinical follow up and serial echo data for this group is 97% complete with late mortality follow up 99% complete. Results: There has been zero (0%) early mortality, and late survival at 15 years is 98% (96%, 100%). Only one re-operation on the aortic valve for progressive aortic regurgitation (AR) has been required with freedom from re-operation on the aortic valve at 15 years being 99% (96%, 100%). The freedom from all re-operations on the aortic and pulmonary valves at 15 years is 97% (94%, 100%). Echo analysis at the most recent study shows that 98% have nil, trivial or mild AR. Aortic root size has remained stable, shown by long-term (15 year) echo follow up. Conclusions: In an experience spanning 19 years, the Ross operation used for predominant AS using the IC method described, results in 99% freedom from re-operation on the aortic valve at 15 years, better than any other tissue or mechanical valve. For adults under 65 years without significant co-morbidities who present with predominant AS, the pulmonary autograft inserted with this technique gives excellent results. PMID:24749112

  18. Analysis of geographic variations in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with aortic stenosis in North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Vavalle, John P; Phillips, Harry R; Holleran, Sara A; Wang, Andrew; O'Connor, Christopher M; Smith, Peter K; Hughes, G Chad; Harrison, J Kevin; Patel, Manesh R

    2014-06-01

    Despite advances in the treatment of aortic stenosis (AS), many patients with AS remain untreated. Barriers to accessing cardiovascular surgical care may play a role in this undertreatment. We sought to examine whether there are geographic variations in the treatment of AS within North Carolina that may reflect differential access to care. Hospital discharge data from North Carolina hospitals during federal fiscal year 2010 were analyzed from the Thomson Reuters database. Patients hospitalized with AS were identified using International Classification of Diseases, ninth revision (ICD-9) diagnosis codes. ICD-9 procedure codes were used to identify patients who had aortic valve replacement and other cardiac procedures. The rates of hospitalizations for AS and aortic valve replacement were calculated per county in North Carolina. In fiscal year 2010, there were 12,111 patients who were discharged from a North Carolina hospital with AS listed as one of the ICD-9 discharge diagnosis codes. The median age for this population was 79 (twenty-fifth to seventy-fifth), with approximately 1/3 patients (28.9%) being at least 85 years of age and >1/2 being female (53.8%). Of them, 1,608 patients underwent valvular surgery with an in-hospital mortality rate of 3.3%. The highest rates, corrected for county population, of hospitalizations where AS was listed as the primary diagnosis were in the most rural segments of North Carolina while those same areas had the lowest rates of valvular surgery. In conclusion, there are significant geographic variations in the rates of hospitalization for AS and for valvular surgery within North Carolina. The most rural segments of the state have the highest rates of hospitalization while also having the lowest rates of surgery. This suggests geographic treatment disparities as a result of access to surgical care that must be considered as new therapies for AS, such as transcatheter aortic valve replacement, are deployed.

  19. Health Status after Transcatheter or Surgical Aortic Valve Replacement in Patients with Severe Aortic Stenosis at Increased Surgical Risk. Results from the CoreValve US Pivotal Trial

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Suzanne V.; Reynolds, Matthew R.; Wang, Kaijun; Magnuson, Elizabeth A.; Baron, Suzanne J.; Chinnakondepalli, Khaja M.; Reardon, Michael J.; Tadros, Peter N.; Zorn, George L.; Maini, Brij; Mumtaz, Mubashir A.; Brown, John M.; Kipperman, Robert M.; Adams, David H.; Popma, Jeffrey J.; Cohen, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Background In patients at increased surgical risk, TAVR with a self-expanding bioprosthesis is associated with improved 1-year survival compared with AVR. However, elderly patients may be just as concerned with quality of life improvement as with prolonged survival as a goal of treatment. Objectives To compare the health status outcomes for patients treated with either self-expanding transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) or surgical aortic valve replacement (AVR). Methods Between 2011 and 2012, 795 patients with severe aortic stenosis at increased surgical risk were randomized to TAVR or AVR in the CoreValve US Pivotal Trial. Health status was assessed at baseline, 1 month, 6 months, and 1 year using the Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire (KCCQ), SF-12, and EQ-5D; growth curve models were used to examine changes over time. Results Over the 1-year follow-up period, disease-specific and generic health status improved substantially for both treatment groups. At 1-month, there was a significant interaction between the benefit of TAVR over AVR and access site. Among surviving patients eligible for iliofemoral (IF) access, there was a clinically relevant early benefit with TAVR across all disease-specific and generic health status measures. Among the non-IF cohort; however, most health status measures were similar for TAVR and AVR, although there was a trend toward early benefit with TAVR on the SF-12 physical health scale. There were no consistent differences in health status between TAVR and AVR at the later time points. Conclusions Health status improved substantially in surviving patients with increased surgical risk who were treated with either self-expanding TAVR or AVR. TAVR via the IF route was associated with better early health status compared with AVR, but there was no early health status benefit with non-IF TAVR compared with AVR. PMID:26292584

  20. Biological features (inflammation and neoangiogenesis) and atherosclerotic risk factors in carotid plaques and calcified aortic valve stenosis: two different sites of the same disease?

    PubMed

    Mazzone, Annamaria; Epistolato, Maria Carmela; Gianetti, Jacopo; Castagnini, Marta; Sassi, Carlo; Ceravolo, Roberto; Bevilacqua, Stefano; Glauber, Mattia; Biagini, Andrea; Tanganelli, Piero

    2006-10-01

    Neoangiogenesis and inflammation have a pivotal role in atherosclerosis. Observations support the hypothesis that calcified aortic valve stenosis is an inflammatory process, similar to atherosclerosis in tissue features and risk factors. We studied 2 groups of cases: 47 were affected by hemodynamic atherosclerotic carotid plaque (group 1) and 35 by severe calcified aortic valve stenosis (group 2). We compared the groups for atherosclerosis risk factors, morphologic features, and immunohistochemical phenotypes. In both groups, men, smokers, and hypertensive subjects prevailed, and histologic analysis showed an elevated score for T-lymphocyte infiltrates, neoangiogenesis, calcium, and sclerosis. Adhesion molecule expression was present in both lesions. Expression of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 correlated with inflammatory infiltrates (group 1, P = .0007; group 2, P = .06). Neoangiogenesis also correlated with inflammatory infiltrates (group 1, P = .035; group 2, P = .045). In valves, neoangiogenesis correlated with calcium (P = .048). Carotid plaque and calcified valve stenosis showed common risk factors and biologic hallmarks of a chronic inflammatory process. Inflammation and neoangiogenesis have a crucial role in plaque evolution and in the progression of aortic valve stenosis.

  1. Morphological and Chemical Study of Pathological Deposits in Human Aortic and Mitral Valve Stenosis: A Biomineralogical Contribution

    PubMed Central

    Cottignoli, Valentina; Salvador, Loris; Valfré, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Aim of this study was to investigate heart valve calcification process by different biomineralogical techniques to provide morphological and chemical features of the ectopic deposit extracted from patients with severe mitral and aortic valve stenosis, to better evaluate this pathological process. Polarized light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy analyses brought to light the presence of nodular and massive mineralization forms characterized by different levels of calcification, as well as the presence of submicrometric calcified globular cluster, micrometric cavities containing disorganized tissue structures, and submillimeter pockets formed by organic fibers very similar to amyloid formations. Electron microprobe analyses showed variable concentrations of Ca and P within each deposit and the highest content of Ca and P within calcified tricuspid aortic valves, while powder X-ray diffraction analyses indicated in the nanometer range the dimension of the pathological bioapatite crystals. These findings indicated the presence of highly heterogeneous deposits within heart valve tissues and suggested a progressive maturation process with continuous changes in the composition of the valvular tissue, similar to the multistep formation process of bone tissue. Moreover the micrometric cavities represent structural stages of the valve tissue that immediately precedes the formation of heavily mineralized deposits such as bone-like nodules. PMID:25685595

  2. Assessment of low-flow, low-gradient aortic stenosis: multimodality imaging is the key to success.

    PubMed

    Clavel, Marie-Annick; Pibarot, Philippe

    2014-09-01

    In patients with aortic stenosis (AS), a low-flow state may occur with reduced LV ejection fraction (LVEF) (i.e., classic low flow) or with preserved LVEF (i.e., paradoxical low flow) and it is often associated with low gradient because the gradient is highly flow-dependent. Low-flow, low-gradient (LF-LG) AS is a frequent clinical entity generally associated with worse outcomes. A multimodality imaging approach, including comprehensive resting echocardiography, dobutamine stress echocardiography (DSE), and multidetector computed tomography (MDCT), is the key to successful management of patients with LF-LG AS, who represent a highly challenging subset from both a diagnostic and a therapeutic standpoint. DSE and quantification of aortic valve calcification by MDCT provide important information that is crucial to differentiate true-severe from pseudo-severe AS and therefore select the most appropriate therapy (i.e., AVR vs. medical). The assessment of LV flow reserve by DSE is useful to stratify the operative risk and guide decision making between surgical and transcatheter AVR. Other imaging biomarkers, such as the global LV longitudinal strain measured during DSE or the amount of myocardial fibrosis assessed by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, may provide incremental information for risk stratification and therapeutic management in LF-LG AS, but additional studies are needed to validate and refine these emerging biomarkers further.

  3. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... fully will restrict blood flow. This is called aortic stenosis. If there is also a leak, it is ... TAVR is used for people with severe aortic stenosis who aren't ... valve . In adults, aortic stenosis usually occurs due to calcium ...

  4. Transcatheter versus surgical aortic valve replacement in patients with severe aortic stenosis at low and intermediate risk: systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Agoritsas, Thomas; Manja, Veena; Devji, Tahira; Chang, Yaping; Bala, Malgorzata M; Thabane, Lehana; Guyatt, Gordon H

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine the effect of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) versus surgical replacement of an aortic valve (SAVR) in patients with severe aortic stenosis at low and intermediate risk of perioperative death. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis Data sources Medline, Embase, and Cochrane CENTRAL. Study selection Randomized trials of TAVI compared with SAVR in patients with a mean perioperative risk of death <8%. Review methods Two reviewers independently extracted data and assessed risk of bias for outcomes important to patients that were selected a priori by a parallel guideline committee, including patient advisors. We used the GRADE system was used to quantify absolute effects and quality of evidence. Results 4 trials with 3179 patients and a median follow-up of two years were included. Compared with SAVR, transfemoral TAVI was associated with reduced mortality (risk difference per 1000 patients: −30, 95% confidence interval −49 to −8, moderate certainty), stroke (−20, −37 to 1, moderate certainty), life threatening bleeding (−252, −293 to −190, high certainty), atrial fibrillation (−178, −150 to −203, moderate certainty), and acute kidney injury (−53, −39 to −62, high certainty) but increased short term aortic valve reintervention (7, 1 to 21, moderate certainty), permanent pacemaker insertion (134, 16 to 382, moderate certainty), and moderate or severe symptoms of heart failure (18, 5 to 34, moderate certainty). Compared with SAVR, transapical TAVI was associated higher mortality (57, −16 to 153, moderate certainty, P=0.015 for interaction between transfemoral versus transapical TAVI) and stroke (45, −2 to 125, moderate certainty, interaction P=0.012). No study reported long term follow-up, which is particularly important for structural valve deterioration. Conclusions Many patients, particularly those who have a shorter life expectancy or place a lower value on the risk of long term valve

  5. Measurement of the ascending aorta diameter in patients with severe bicuspid and tricuspid aortic valve stenosis using dual-source computed tomography coronary angiography.

    PubMed

    Son, Jee Young; Ko, Sung Min; Choi, Jin Woo; Song, Meong Gun; Hwang, Hweung Kon; Lee, Sook Jin; Kang, Joon-Won

    2011-12-01

    We aimed to evaluate the diagnostic performance of dual-source computed tomography coronary angiography (DSCT-CA) in the measurement of the ascending aorta (AA) diameter and compare the AA diameter in patients with severe bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) and tricuspid aortic valve (TAV) stenosis. Eighty-eight consecutive patients (50 men, mean age 60.3 ± 13 year) with severe aortic stenosis (AS) underwent DSCT-CA before aortic valve surgery. Seventy-four of the 88 patients underwent cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR). The internal diameter of AA was measured from early-systole with DSCT-CA and CMR by 2 radiologists independently at 4 levels (aortic annulus, sinuses of Valsalva, sinotubular junction, and tubular portion at the right pulmonary artery). The patients were divided in to 2 groups (BAV [n = 53]; TAV [n = 35]) according to operative findings. Patients with BAV were significantly younger than those with TAV (P = 0.0035). Inter-observer agreement of AA diameters at 4 levels with DSCT-CA and CMR was excellent (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.89-0.97). Also, the DSCT-CA and CMR measurements of the AA diameter strongly correlated (r = 0.871-0.976). Mean diameter of the AA by DSCT-CA was significantly larger in patients with BAV (34.4 ± 8.2 mm) as compared to those with TAV (30.6 ± 5.5 mm). The diameters at the sinuses of Valsalva, sinotubular junction, and tubular portion were significantly larger in BAV than in TAV. Twenty-two of 53 (41.5%) patients with BAV and 2 of 35 (5.7%) patients with TAV had AA dilatation > 45 mm. DSCT-CA allows accurate assessment of the AA diameters in patients with severe AS. Patients with severe BAV stenosis had larger AA diameters and higher prevalence of AA dilatation > 45 mm as compared to those with severe TAV stenosis.

  6. Comparison of Outcomes of Balloon-Expandable Versus Self-Expandable Transcatheter Heart Valves for Severe Aortic Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Wijeysundera, Harindra C; Qiu, Feng; Koh, Maria; Prasad, Treesa J; Cantor, Warren J; Cheema, Asim; Chu, Michael W A; Czarnecki, Andrew; Feindel, Christopher; Fremes, Stephen E; Kingsbury, Kori J; Natarajan, Madhu K; Peterson, Mark; Ruel, Marc; Strauss, Bradley; Ko, Dennis T

    2017-04-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is the treatment of choice for inoperable and high-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis. Our objectives were to elucidate potential differences in clinical outcomes and safety between balloon-expandable versus self-expandable transcatheter heart valves (THV). We performed a retrospective cohort study of all transfemoral TAVI procedures in Ontario, Canada, from 2007 to 2013. Patients were categorized into either balloon-expandable or self-expandable THV groups. The primary outcomes were 30-day and 1-year death, with secondary outcomes of all-cause readmission. Safety outcomes included bleeding, permanent pacemaker implantation, need for a second THV device, postprocedural paravalvular aortic regurgitation, stroke, vascular access complication, and intensive care unit length of stay. Inverse probability of treatment-weighted regression analyses using a propensity score were used to account for differences in baseline confounders. Our cohort consisted of 714 patients, of whom 397 received a self-expandable THV, whereas 317 had a balloon-expandable THV system. There were no differences in death or all-cause readmission. In terms of safety, the self-expandable group was associated with significantly higher rates of inhospital stroke (p value <0.05), need for a second THV device (5.3% vs 2.7%; p value = 0.013), and permanent pacemaker (22.6% vs 8.9%; p value <0.001), whereas the balloon-expandable group had more vascular access site complications (23.1% vs 16.7%; p value = 0.002). Thus, we found similar clinical outcomes of death or readmission for patients who underwent transfemoral TAVI with either balloon-expandable or self-expandable THV systems. However, there were important differences in their safety profiles.

  7. Comparison between cardiovascular magnetic resonance and transthoracic doppler echocardiography for the estimation of effective orifice area in aortic stenosis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The effective orifice area (EOA) estimated by transthoracic Doppler echocardiography (TTE) via the continuity equation is commonly used to determine the severity of aortic stenosis (AS). However, there are often discrepancies between TTE-derived EOA and invasive indices of stenosis, thus raising uncertainty about actual definite severity. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) has emerged as an alternative method for non-invasive estimation of valve EOA. The objective of this study was to assess the concordance between TTE and CMR for the estimation of valve EOA. Methods and results 31 patients with mild to severe AS (EOA range: 0.72 to 1.73 cm2) and seven (7) healthy control subjects with normal transvalvular flow rate underwent TTE and velocity-encoded CMR. Valve EOA was calculated by the continuity equation. CMR revealed that the left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) cross-section is typically oval and not circular. As a consequence, TTE underestimated the LVOT cross-sectional area (ALVOT, 3.84 ± 0.80 cm2) compared to CMR (4.78 ± 1.05 cm2). On the other hand, TTE overestimated the LVOT velocity-time integral (VTILVOT: 21 ± 4 vs. 15 ± 4 cm). Good concordance was observed between TTE and CMR for estimation of aortic jet VTI (61 ± 22 vs. 57 ± 20 cm). Overall, there was a good correlation and concordance between TTE-derived and CMR-derived EOAs (1.53 ± 0.67 vs. 1.59 ± 0.73 cm2, r = 0.92, bias = 0.06 ± 0.29 cm2). The intra- and inter- observer variability of TTE-derived EOA was 5 ± 5% and 9 ± 5%, respectively, compared to 2 ± 1% and 7 ± 5% for CMR-derived EOA. Conclusion Underestimation of ALVOT by TTE is compensated by overestimation of VTILVOT, thereby resulting in a good concordance between TTE and CMR for estimation of aortic valve EOA. CMR was associated with less intra- and inter- observer measurement variability compared to TTE. CMR provides a non-invasive and reliable alternative to Doppler-echocardiography for the quantification of

  8. Comparison in Men Versus Women of Co-morbidities, Complications, and Outcomes After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation for Severe Aortic Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Gaglia, Michael A; Lipinski, Michael J; Torguson, Rebecca; Gai, Jiaxiang; Ben-Dor, Itsik; Bernardo, Nelson L; Satler, Lowell F; Pichard, Augusto D; Waksman, Ron

    2016-12-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) decreases mortality in high-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis, but it remains unclear if female gender is associated with more favorable outcomes after TAVI. All patients who underwent TAVI at a single institution were retrospectively analyzed and stratified by gender. Procedural, in-hospital, 30-day, and 1-year outcomes were defined according to the second Valve Academic Research Consortium. The primary end point was all-cause mortality at 1 year. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression were conducted. Overall, 755 patients underwent TAVI and were included in the study; 50.7% were women. Average age was 83.0 ± 7.7 years, with a mean Society of Thoracic Surgeons score of 8.9 ± 4.6. Women were older than men and more likely to be black. Most co-morbidities were less common among women, and they were more likely than men to suffer both in-hospital (8.4% vs 4.3%, p = 0.021) and 30-day (9.4% vs 5.4%, p = 0.035) all-cause mortality. Life-threatening bleeding, transfusion, and iliofemoral dissection or perforation were more common among women. There was no difference in mortality between women and men at 1 year (20.6% vs 21.5%, log-rank p = 0.87). After multivariable adjustment, however, female gender was independently associated with lower mortality at 1 year after TAVI. In conclusion, despite higher rates of major bleeding, vascular complications, and 30-day mortality, female gender was independently associated with improved survival at 1 year after TAVI.

  9. Aortic valve orifice equation independent of valvular flow intervals: application to aortic valve area computation in aortic stenosis and comparison with the Gorlin formula.

    PubMed

    Seitz, W; Oppenheimer, L; McIlroy, M; Nelson, D; Operschall, J

    1986-12-01

    An orifice equation is derived relating the effective aortic valve area, A, the average aortic valve pressure gradient, dP, the stroke volume, SV, and the heart frequency, FH, through considerations of momentum conservation across the aortic valve. This leads to a formula consistent with Newton's second law of motion. The form of the new equation is A = (7.5 X 10(-5)) SV FH2/Pd, where A, VS, FH and Pd are expressed in cm2, ml, s-1 and mmHg, respectively. Aortic valve areas computed with the new orifice equation are found to correlate with those computed by the Gorlin formula in conditions of resting haemodynamic states at a level of r = 0.86, SE = 0.25 cm2, N = 120. The results suggest that the new formula may be considered as an independent orifice equation having a similar domain of validity as the Gorlin formula. The new equation offers the possibility of deriving additional useful haemodynamic relationships through combination with established cardiological formulas and applying it in a noninvasive Doppler ultrasonic or echocardiographic context.

  10. The relationships of phytosterols and oxyphytosterols in plasma and aortic valve cusps in patients with severe aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Schött, Hans-Frieder; Luister, Alexandra; Husche, Constanze; Schäfers, Hans-Joachim; Böhm, Michael; Plat, Jogchum; Lütjohann, Dieter; Laufs, Ulrich; Weingärtner, Oliver

    2014-04-11

    Phytosterols such as campesterol and sitosterol are susceptible to oxidation by reactive oxygen species. We hypothesize that the plant sterols (PS) campesterol and sitosterol and their 7-oxygenated metabolites (POPs) correlate within and between human plasma and aortic valve cusps tissues. Plasma and tissue concentrations of PS and POPs were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-selected ion monitoring. Prior to analysis valve cusps tissue was mechanically separated from the calcified parts. PS and POP levels per dry cusps tissue weight were significantly higher compared with the concentrations in the calcified part. Against our hypothesis we found that despite the fact that there is a high correlation between plant sterols in and between plasma and valves cusps tissue, as well as a high correlation between plant sterols and oxyphytosterols and oxyphytosterols themselves within the valve cusps tissue, there was hardly any correlation in the amount of oxyphytosterols in plasma and between plasma and valves. Because plasma samples are easily accessible for large scale population based studies, we have to understand in more detail what the analysis of POPs implies in terms of CVD risk for the future.

  11. Aortic Valve Regurgitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... valve. Also, a narrowing of the aortic valve (aortic stenosis) can be associated with leaking. High blood pressure (hypertension). High blood pressure may stretch the root of the aorta where the aortic valve sits. The valve flaps ( ...

  12. The impact of nutritional status and appetite on the hospital length of stay and postoperative complications in elderly patients with severe aortic stenosis before aortic valve replacement

    PubMed Central

    Jagielak, Dariusz; Wernio, Edyta; Bramlage, Peter; Gruchała-Niedoszytko, Marta; Rogowski, Jan; Małgorzewicz, Sylwia

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Severe aortic stenosis (AS) is associated with the reduction of physical activity and muscle mass and may be associated with decreased appetite. Aim To assess the nutritional status and the impact of nutritional status and appetite on the hospital length of stay and postoperative complications in elderly patients with severe AS before aortic valve replacement. Material and methods Ninety-nine patients (55 male, 44 female; 74.3 ±5.2 years old) with severe AS and an indication for aortic valve replacement (AVR) were included. The nutritional status was assessed by different questionnaires (7-point Subjective Global Assessment Score – 7-SGA, full-Mini Nutritional Assessment – full-MNA) and anthropometric measurements (body mass index (BMI) kg/m2). Body composition was estimated using multi-frequency bioelectrical impedance analysis. Appetite was assessed by the Simplified Nutrition Assessment Questionnaire (SNAQ). Results The average BMI of patients was 28.8 ±5.8 kg/m2. Results of the 7-SGA and f-MNA questionnaires revealed that 39 patients (39.4%) were at risk of malnutrition. The mean SNAQ score was 15.8 ±1.8. The average length of hospital stay was 10 ±5.8 days. There was a positive correlation of LOS with age (r = 0.26, p = 0.03) and a negative correlation with fat mass (kg) (r = –0.28, p = 0.04) and BMI (r = –0.22, p = 0.03). Postoperative complications were observed in 37 patients (37.4%). Patients who developed complications were older and had poorer nutritional status according to the results of the 7-SGA. Conclusions Despite many patients undergoing AVR being overweight and obese, a considerable proportion displayed clinical signs of malnutrition. The results suggest that an assessment of nutritional status and appetite in this group of patients should be conducted regularly and that the 7-SGA scale could represent a reliable tool to assess malnutrition. PMID:27516781

  13. Echocardiography as a Predicting Method in Diagnosis, Evaluation and Assessment of Children with Subvalvar Aortic Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Bejiqi, Ramush; Bejiqi, Hana; Retkoceri, Ragip

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Obstruction to the left ventricular outflow of the heart may be above the aortic valve (5%), at the valve (74%), or in the subvalvar region (23%). These anomalies represent 3 to 6% of all patients with congenital heart defects (CHD), and it occurs more often in males (male-female ratio of 4:1). AIM: The purpose of this study was to determine the sensitivity and specificity of transthoracic echocardiography in diagnosis of discrete subaortic membrane, to determine convenient time for surgical intervention, and for identifying involvement of the aortic valve by subaortic shelf. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A retrospective review of the medical records and echocardiograms of 18 patients [14 male (77%) and 4 female (23%)] with discrete subaortic membrane, aged 11 month to 12 years, with mean age of 5 years and 3 month, diagnosed at the Pediatric Clinic in Prishtina, during the period September, 1999 and December, 2010 were done. RESULTS: Four patients, in neonatal age were operated from critical coarctation of the aorta and, initial signs of congestive heart failure were presented. 2 of them were operated in Belgrade, Serbia and 2 in Lausanne, Switzerland. CONCLUSION: In all presented patients bicuspid aortic valve was noted, but none of them subaortic membrane was registered. PMID:27275334

  14. Design and development of a decision aid to enhance shared decision making by patients with an asymptomatic abdominal aortic aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Ubbink, Dirk T; Knops, Anouk M; Molenaar, Sjaak; Goossens, Astrid

    2008-01-01

    Objective To design, develop, and evaluate an evidence-based decision aid (DA) for patients with an asymptomatic abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) to inform them about the pros and cons of their treatment options (ie, surgery or watchful observation) and to help them make a shared decision. Methods A multidisciplinary team defined criteria for the desired DA as to design, medical content and functionality, particularly for elderly users. Development was according to the international standard (IPDAS). Fifteen patients with an AAA, who were either treated or not yet treated, evaluated the tool. Results A DA was developed to offer information about the disease, the risks and benefits of surgical treatment and watchful observation, and the individual possibilities and threats based on the patient’s aneurysm diameter and risk profile. The DA was improved and judged favorably by physicians and patients. Conclusion This evidence-based DA for AAA patients, developed according to IPDAS criteria, is likely to be a simple, user-friendly tool to offer patients evidence-based information about the pros and cons of treatment options for AAA, to improve patients’ understanding of the disease and treatment options, and may support decision making based on individual values. PMID:19920978

  15. Prognostic Utility of Neutrophil-to-Lymphocyte Ratio on Adverse Clinical Outcomes in Patients with Severe Calcific Aortic Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Kyoung Im; Cho, Sang Hoon; Her, Ae-Young; Singh, Gillian Balbir; Shin, Eun-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Background Inflammation is an important factor in the pathogenesis of calcific aortic stenosis (AS). We aimed to evaluate the association between an inflammatory marker, neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) in patients with severe calcific AS. Methods A total of 336 patients with isolated severe calcific AS newly diagnosed between 2010 and 2015 were enrolled in this study. Using Cox proportional hazards (PH) regression models, we investigated the prognostic value of NLR adjusted for baseline covariates including logistic European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation score (EuroSCORE-I) and undergoing aortic valve replacement (AVR). We also evaluated the clinical relevance of NLR risk groups (divided into low, intermediate, high risk) as categorized by NLR cutoff values. MACE was defined as a composite of all-cause mortality, cardiac death and non-fatal myocardial infarction during the follow-up period. Results The inflammatory marker NLR was an independent prognostic factor most significantly associated with MACE [hazard ratio (HR), 1.06; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.04–1.09; p-value <0.001]. The goodness-of-fit and discriminability of the model including EuroSCORE-I and AVR (loglikelihood difference, 15.49; p-value <0.001; c-index difference, 0.035; p-value = 0.03) were significantly improved when NLR was incorporated into the model. The estimated Kaplan-Meier survival rates at 5 years for the NLR risk groups were 84.6% for the low risk group (NLR ≤ 2), 67.7% for the intermediate risk group (2 < NLR ≤ 9), and 42.6% for the high risk group (NLR > 9), respectively. Conclusion The findings of the present study demonstrate the potential utility of NLR in risk stratification of patients with severe calcific AS. PMID:27548384

  16. Fluid Dynamics of the Generation and Transmission of Heart Sounds: (1) A Cardiothoracic Phantom Based Study of Aortic Stenosis Murmurs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhshaee, Hani; Seo, Jung-Hee; Zhu, Chi; Welsh, Nathaniel; Garreau, Guillaume; Tognetti, Gaspar; Andreou, Andreas; Mittal, Rajat

    2015-11-01

    A novel and versatile cardiothoracic phantom has been designed to study the biophysics of heart murmurs associated with aortic stenosis. The key features of the cardiothoracic phantom include the use of tissue-mimetic gel to model the sound transmission through the thorax and the embedded fluid circuit that is designed to mimic the heart sound mechanisms in large vessels with obstructions. The effect of the lungs on heart murmur propagation can also be studied through the insertion of lung-mimicking material into gel. Sounds on the surface of the phantom are measured using a variety of sensors and the spectrum of the recorded signal and the streamwise variation in total signal strength is recorded. Based on these results, we provide insights into the biophysics of heart murmurs and the effect of lungs on sound propagation through the thorax. Data from these experiments is also used to validate the results of a companion computational study. Authors want to acknowledge the financial supports for this study by SCH grant (IIS 1344772) from National Science Foundation.

  17. Association of Inter-arm Blood Pressure Difference with Asymptomatic Intracranial and Extracranial Arterial Stenosis in Hypertension Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Zhang, Jin; Qian, Yuesheng; Tang, Xiaofeng; Ling, Huawei; Chen, Kemin; Li, Yan; Gao, Pingjin; Zhu, Dingliang

    2016-01-01

    Inter-arm blood pressure (BP) difference has been associated with ischemic stroke. Local atherosclerosis of stroke differ among vulnerable individuals, whereas intracranial arterial stenosis (ICAS) is more frequently affected Asians, and extracranial arterial stenosis (ECAS) is more prevalent among whites. We hereby sought to explore the association of inter-arm BP difference with ICAS and ECAS in stroke-free hypertensive patients in Chinese population. All the 885 subjects were evaluated of ICAS and ECAS through computerized tomographic angiography. Both arm BP was measured simultaneously by Vascular Profiler-1000 device. In the continuous study, ICAS was significantly associated with age, male, average brachial SBP, diabetes, anti-hypertensive treatment and inter-arm DBP difference. ECAS was associated with age, inter-arm SBP and LDL. In the categorical study, subjects with the top quartile of inter-arm DBP difference (≥4 mmHg) showed significantly higher risk of ICAS (OR = 2.109; 95% CI, 1.24–3.587). And the participants with the top quartile of inter-arm SBP difference (≥6 mmHg) showed significantly higher risk of ECAS (OR = 2.288; 95% CI, 1.309–3.998). In conclusion, we reported a diverse association of inter-arm SBP/DBP difference with the ICAS/ECAS. Inter-arm DBP difference might be the early symbol of ICAS in Chinese population, which need further verification in long-term cohort study. PMID:27412818

  18. Non-invasive determination of left ventricular workload in patients with aortic stenosis using magnetic resonance imaging and Doppler echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Keshavarz-Motamed, Zahra; Garcia, Julio; Gaillard, Emmanuel; Capoulade, Romain; Le Ven, Florent; Cloutier, Guy; Kadem, Lyes; Pibarot, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Early detection and accurate estimation of aortic stenosis (AS) severity are the most important predictors of successful long-term outcomes in patients. Current clinical parameters used for evaluation of the AS severity have several limitations including flow dependency. Estimation of AS severity is specifically challenging in patients with low-flow and low transvalvular pressure gradient conditions. A proper diagnosis in these patients needs a comprehensive evaluation of the left ventricle (LV) hemodynamic loads. This study has two objectives: (1) developing a lumped-parameter model to describe the ventricular-valvular-arterial interaction and to estimate the LV stroke work (SW); (2) introducing and validating a new index, the normalized stroke work (N-SW), to assess the global hemodynamic load imposed on the LV. N-SW represents the global hemodynamic load that the LV faces for each unit volume of blood ejected. The model uses a limited number of parameters which all can be measured non-invasively using current clinical imaging modalities. The model was first validated by comparing its calculated flow waveforms with the ones measured using Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (CMR) in 49 patients and 8 controls. A very good correlation and concordance were found throughout the cycle (median root mean square: 12.21 mL/s) and between the peak values (r = 0.98; SEE = 0.001, p<0.001). The model was then used to determine SW using the parameters measured with transthoracic Doppler-echocardiography (TTE) and CMR. N-SW showed very good correlations with a previously-validated index of global hemodynamic load, the valvular arterial impedance ([Formula: see text]), using data from both imaging modalities (TTE: r = 0.82, SEE = 0.01, p<0.001; CMR: r = 0.74, SEE = 0.01, p<0.001). Furthermore, unlike , N-SW was almost independent from variations in the flow rate. This study suggests that considering N-SW may provide incremental diagnostic and prognostic information, beyond what

  19. 10-year stroke prevention after successful carotid endarterectomy for asymptomatic stenosis (ACST-1): a multicentre randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    Halliday, Alison; Harrison, Michael; Hayter, Elizabeth; Kong, Xiangling; Mansfield, Averil; Marro, Joanna; Pan, Hongchao; Peto, Richard; Potter, John; Rahimi, Kazem; Rau, Angela; Robertson, Steven; Streifler, Jonathan; Thomas, Dafydd

    2010-01-01

    Summary Background If carotid artery narrowing remains asymptomatic (ie, has caused no recent stroke or other neurological symptoms), successful carotid endarterectomy (CEA) reduces stroke incidence for some years. We assessed the long-term effects of successful CEA. Methods Between 1993 and 2003, 3120 asymptomatic patients from 126 centres in 30 countries were allocated equally, by blinded minimised randomisation, to immediate CEA (median delay 1 month, IQR 0·3–2·5) or to indefinite deferral of any carotid procedure, and were followed up until death or for a median among survivors of 9 years (IQR 6–11). The primary outcomes were perioperative mortality and morbidity (death or stroke within 30 days) and non-perioperative stroke. Kaplan-Meier percentages and logrank p values are from intention-to-treat analyses. This study is registered, number ISRCTN26156392. Findings 1560 patients were allocated immediate CEA versus 1560 allocated deferral of any carotid procedure. The proportions operated on while still asymptomatic were 89·7% versus 4·8% at 1 year (and 92·1% vs 16·5% at 5 years). Perioperative risk of stroke or death within 30 days was 3·0% (95% CI 2·4–3·9; 26 non-disabling strokes plus 34 disabling or fatal perioperative events in 1979 CEAs). Excluding perioperative events and non-stroke mortality, stroke risks (immediate vs deferred CEA) were 4·1% versus 10·0% at 5 years (gain 5·9%, 95% CI 4·0–7·8) and 10·8% versus 16·9% at 10 years (gain 6·1%, 2·7–9·4); ratio of stroke incidence rates 0·54, 95% CI 0·43–0·68, p<0·0001. 62 versus 104 had a disabling or fatal stroke, and 37 versus 84 others had a non-disabling stroke. Combining perioperative events and strokes, net risks were 6·9% versus 10·9% at 5 years (gain 4·1%, 2·0–6·2) and 13·4% versus 17·9% at 10 years (gain 4·6%, 1·2–7·9). Medication was similar in both groups; throughout the study, most were on antithrombotic and antihypertensive therapy. Net benefits

  20. Acute large bowel obstruction secondary to stage 4 colonic carcinoma in an elderly man with severe aortic stenosis: a therapeutic challenge

    PubMed Central

    Prabhu, Raghunath; Kumar, Neha; Sadhu, Sakshi; Natarajan, Arjun

    2014-01-01

    Colonic adenocarcinoma is a common gastrointestinal malignancy affecting the elderly, and has a multifactorial aetiology. Depending on the individual circumstances, surgical resection is the treatment of choice for colon cancer even for oligometastasis. Metastatic evidence as well as presence of comorbidities, particularly in the elderly, make surgical management difficult and often present a clinical challenge for clinicians. This is a case report exploring the treatment options for an 80-year-old male patient presenting with acute large bowel obstruction secondary to colonic adenocarcinoma with disseminated metastases and severe aortic stenosis. PMID:24557473

  1. Inter-individual variance and cardiac cycle dependency of aortic root dimensions and shape as assessed by ECG-gated multi-slice computed tomography in patients with severe aortic stenosis prior to transcatheter aortic valve implantation: is it crucial for correct sizing?

    PubMed

    Lehmkuhl, Lukas; Foldyna, Borek; Von Aspern, Konstantin; Lücke, Christian; Grothoff, Matthias; Nitzsche, Stefan; Kempfert, Jörg; Haensig, Martin; Rastan, Ardawan; Walther, Thomas; Mohr, Friedrich-Wilhelm; Gutberlet, Matthias

    2013-03-01

    To evaluate the inter-individual variance and the variability of the aortic root dimensions during the cardiac cycle by computed tomography (CT) in patients with severe aortic stenosis prior to transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). Fifty-six patients (m/w = 16/40, 81 ± 6.8 years), scheduled for a transapical aortic valve implantation with available preprocedural ECG-gated CT were retrospectively included. The evaluation included sizing of the aortic annulus and the aortic sinus, measurements of the coronary topography, aortic valve planimetry and scoring of calcification. The new defined aortic annulus sphericity ratio revealed a mostly elliptical shape with increasing diastolic deformation. The calculated effective diameter (ED), determined from the annulus' lumen area, turned out to be the parameter least affected from cardiac cycle changes while systolic and diastolic annulus dimensions and shape (diameter and area) differed significantly (p < 0.001). In about 70 % of the patients with relevant paravalvular leaks the finally implanted prosthesis was too small according to the CT based calculated ED. The ostial height of the coronaries showed a high variability with a critical minimum range <5 mm. The degree of the aortic calcification did not have an influence on the aortic annulus deformation during the cardiac cycle, but on the occurrence of paravalvular leaks. The aortic root anatomy demonstrated a high inter-individual variability and cardiac cycle dependency. These results must be strongly considered during the patient evaluation prior to TAVI to avoid complications. The systolic effective diameter, as measured by ECG-gated CT, represents an appropriate parameter for sizing the aortic annulus.

  2. Evaluation of Aortic Stenosis Severity using 4D Flow Jet Shear Layer Detection for the Measurement of Valve Effective Orifice Area

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Julio; Markl, Michael; Schnell, Susanne; Allen, Bradley; Entezari, Pegah; Mahadevia, Riti; Malaisrie, S Chris; Pibarot, Philippe; Carr, James; Barker, Alex J

    2014-01-01

    Aims The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential of 4D flow MRI to assess valve effective orifice area (EOA) in patients with aortic stenosis as determined by the jet shear layer detection (JSLD) method. Methods and Results An in-vitro stenosis phantom was used for validation and in-vivo imaging was performed in 10 healthy controls and 40 patients with aortic stenosis. EOA was calculated by the JSLD method using standard 2D phase contrast MRI (PC-MRI) and 4D flow MRI measurements (EOAJSLD-2D and EOAJSLD-4D, respectively). As a reference standard, the continuity equation was used to calculate EOA (EOACE) with the 2D PC-MRI velocity field and compared to the EOAJSLD measurements. The in-vitro results exhibited excellent agreement between flow theory (EOA=0.78 cm2) and experimental measurement (EOAJSLD-4D=0.78±0.01 cm2) for peak velocities ranging from 0.9 to 3.7 m/s. In-vivo results showed good correlation and agreement between EOAJSLD-2D and EOACE (r=0.91, p<0.001; bias: −0.01±0.38cm2; agreement limits: 0.75 to −0.77cm2), and between EOAJSLD-4D and EOACE (r=0.95, p<0.001; bias: −0.09±0.26cm2; limits: 0.43 to −0.62cm2). Conclusion This study demonstrates the feasibility of measuring EOAJSLD using 4D flow MRI. The technique allows for optimization of the EOA measurement position by visualizing the 3D vena contracta, and avoids potential sources of EOACE measurement variability. PMID:24865143

  3. [POL-TAVI First--Polish report on transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) of Edwards-Sapien prosthesis in the first 19 high risk patients with severe aortic stenosis and comorbidities].

    PubMed

    Zembala, Marian; Wilczek, Krzysztof; Przybylski, Roman; Chodór, Piotr; Nadziakiewicz, Paweł; Krasoń, Marcin; Sadowski, Jerzy; Dudek, Dariusz; Kapelak, Bogusław; Forysz, Danuta; Witkowski, Adam; Demkow, Marcin; Chmielak, Zbigniew; Kuśmierski, Krzysztof; Juraszyński, Zbigniew; Bochenek, Andrzej; Cisowski, Marek; Trusz-Gluza, Maria; Buszman, Paweł; Woś, Stanisław; Kalarus, Zbigniew; Poloński, Lech; Gasior, Mariusz; Opolski, Grzegorz; Ruzyłło, Witold

    2009-08-01

    Patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis, who from November 2008 to March 2009 were treated with Edwards-Sapien transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) within the POL-TAVI First Polish Registry, were included in the analysis. Nineteen patients aged 78+/-4.8 years with high operation risk and Logistic EuroSCORE 25+/-7.6% were reported (74% were females). In 15 (79%) patients the valve was implanted transapically (TA), in the other four (21%)--via the femoral arterial access (TF). The valve was successfully implanted in 16 (84%) patients, in one patient aortic valvuloplasty alone was performed. During in-hospital period two patients died (one during periprocedural period and another one--two months after the implantation). During the mean follow-up of 5+/-1.5 months (except for one patient who is still in hospital) all patients are in NYHA class I or II. Results of the initial series of 19 TAVI patients in Poland are satisfactory, and the trial will be continued with careful medical and economical analysis.

  4. MDCT and 3D evaluation of type 2 hypoplastic pulmonary artery sling associated with right lung agenesis, hypoplastic aortic arch, and long segment tracheal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Edward Y

    2007-11-01

    The early diagnosis and complete anatomic evaluation of pulmonary artery sling, a congenital vascular anomaly in which left pulmonary artery arises from the right pulmonary artery, is paramount for proper patient management, because patients with this disorder frequently have other congenital anomalies resulting in high morbidity and mortality. Until recently, pulmonary artery sling in the neonate has been established with standard radiologic imaging studies such as plain radiographs, barium swallow studies, fluoroscopy-guided airway studies, and echocardiograms. However, with the development and widespread availability of multidetector computed tomography, pulmonary artery sling is increasingly evaluated with this newer technology. This case report presents a rare incidence of type 2 hypoplastic pulmonary artery sling in a neonate associated with right lung agenesis, hypoplastic aortic arch, and long segment tracheal stenosis. Multidetector computed tomography combined with 3-dimensional evaluation was particularly helpful in making a correct diagnosis of the complicated anatomic anomalies found in this case.

  5. Rapid Restoration of Thrombus Formation and High-Molecular-Weight von Willebrand Factor Multimers in Patients with Severe Aortic Stenosis After Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Keigo; Yagi, Hideo; Hayakawa, Masaki; Abe, Takehisa; Hayata, Yoshihiro; Yamaguchi, Naoko; Sugimoto, Mitsuhiko; Fujimura, Yoshihiro; Taniguchi, Shigeki

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS) may have bleeding episodes due to the loss of high-molecular-weight (HMW) von Willebrand factor multimers (VWFMs). The absence of HMW-VWFMs and bleeding tendency are usually corrected after aortic valve replacement (AVR). To investigate the process of VWFM recovery and symptoms in patients with severe AS, we analyzed changes in VWF antigen (VWF:Ag), ADAMTS13 activity (ADAMTS13:AC), and platelet thrombus formation under high shear stress conditions. Methods: Nine patients with severe AS undergoing AVR were analyzed. Results: Evident deficiency of HMW-VWFMs was observed in six patients before surgery, which was rapidly restored within 8 days after AVR. Median levels of VWF:Ag before surgery, on postoperative days (PODs) 1, 8, 15, and 22, and one year after AVR were 78.1%, 130%, 224%, 155%, 134%, and 142%, respectively. In contrast, ADAMTS13:AC was 50.5%, 35.5%, 25.5%, 25.1%, 30.3%, and 84.6%, respectively. Preoperative thrombus formation but not surface coverage was significantly lower than that on POD 22, which was considered as normal level in each patient. Compared with preoperative levels, thrombus volume was significantly lower on POD 1, but rapidly increased by POD 8. Conclusion: Bleeding tendency and loss of HMW-VWFMs observed in patients with severe AS before surgery was rapidly corrected after AVR. Instead, patients were in a VWF-predominant state between POD 8 and 22. PMID:27052664

  6. Single coronary artery with bicuspid aortic valve stenosis and aneurysm of the ascending aorta: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Narihiro; Shimabukuro, Katsuya; Matsuno, Yukihiro; Ogura, Hiroki; Takemura, Hirofumi

    2014-03-01

    A 73-year-old man with a severely stenosed bicuspid valve and an aneurysm of the ascending aorta underwent valve and aortic surgery. Preoperative imaging revealed a single coronary artery arising from the right side of the sinus of Valsalva and a branch that perfused into the left side of the heart to pass through the front of the pulmonary artery. We replaced the aortic valve and ascending aorta, painstakingly avoiding damage to the coronary artery and obstruction of the sole coronary ostium.

  7. Spinal stenosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... stenosis; Foraminal spinal stenosis; Degenerative spine disease; Back pain - spinal stenosis; Low back pain - stenosis; LBP - stenosis ... involve both legs. Symptoms include: Numbness , cramping, or pain in the back, buttocks, thighs, or calves, or ...

  8. Beyond Adding Years to Life: Health-related Quality-of-life and Functional Outcomes in Patients with Severe Aortic Valve Stenosis at High Surgical Risk Undergoing Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Deutsch, Marcus-André; Bleiziffer, Sabine; Elhmidi, Yacine; Piazza, Nicolo; Voss, Bernhard; Lange, Ruediger; Krane, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Aortic valve stenosis (AVS) is the most frequent acquired valvular heart disease in western industrialized countries and its prevalence considerably increases with age. Once becoming symptomatic severe AVS has a very poor prognosis. Progressive and rapid symptom deterioration leads to an impairment of functional status and compromised healthrelated quality-of-life (HrQoL) simultaneously. Until recently, surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) has been the only effective treatment option for improving symptoms and prolonging survival. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) emerged as an alternative treatment modality for those patients with severe symptomatic AVS in whom the risk for SAVR is considered prohibitive or too high. TAVR has gained clinical acceptance with almost startling rapidity and has even quickly become the standard of care for the treatment of appropriately selected individuals with inoperable AVS during recent years. Typically, patients currently referred for and treated by TAVR are elderly with a concomitant variable spectrum of multiple comorbidities, disabilities and limited life expectancy. Beyond mortality and morbidity, the assessment of HrQoL is of paramount importance not only to guide patient-centered clinical decision-making but also to judge this new treatment modality. As per current evidence, TAVR significantly improves HrQoL in high-surgical risk patients with severe AVS with sustained effects up to two years when compared with optimal medical care and demonstrates comparable benefits relative to SAVR. Along with a provision of a detailed overview of the current literature regarding functional and HrQoL outcomes in patients undergoing TAVR, this review article addresses specific considerations of the HrQoL aspect in the elderly patient and finally outlines the implications of HrQoL outcomes for medico-economic deliberations. PMID:24313648

  9. A prospective, non-randomized comparison of SAPIEN XT and CoreValve implantation in two sequential cohorts of patients with severe aortic stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Kasel, Albert Markus; Cassese, Salvatore; Ischinger, Thomas; Leber, Alexander; Antoni, Diethmar; Riess, Gotthard; Vogel, Jayshree; Kastrati, Adnan; Eichinger, Walter; Hoffmann, Ellen

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Few data is available comparing Edwards SAPIEN XT - SXT (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, California) with Medtronic CoreValve - CoV (Medtronic Inc., Minneapolis, Minnesota) in patients with severe aortic stenosis undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). Methods: We selected consecutive patients undergoing transfemoral TAVR with SXT or CoV at our Institution. Main outcomes were Valve Academic Research Consortium (VARC)-combined safety endpoints. Results: A total of 100 patients (SXT, n=50 versus CoV, n=50) were analyzed. Both SXT and CoV showed good device success rates (98% versus 90%, p=0.20). SXT versus CoV reduced the occurrence of paravalvular regurgitation after TAVR (26% versus 90%, p<0.0001) though not affecting the rate of moderate/severe regurgitation (p=0.20). SXT versus CoV required less frequently a permanent pacemaker after TAVR (8% versus 38%, p<0.0001). In-hospital major vascular complications (8% versus 4%, p>0.99), life-threatening bleedings (2% versus 4%, p>0.99), stroke (4% versus 6%, p>0.99) and death (6% versus 2%, p>0.99) did not differ between SXT and CoV. However, safety endpoints favored SXT (17% versus 34.6%, p=0.01), due to a numerically higher incidence of ischemic stroke and Acute Kidney Injury Stage 3 after CoV. At multivariate analysis, TAVR with SXT (odds ratio=0.21, 95% confidence intervals [0.05-0.84], p=0.03) was predictive of fewer adverse events. Conclusions: Transcatheter valve implantation with Edwards SAPIEN XT was associated with lower VARC-combined safety endpoints as compared with Medtronic CoreValve. More extensive cohorts are needed to confirm these results. PMID:25006536

  10. Engineered Zinc-Finger Proteins Can Compensate Genetic Haploinsufficiency by Transcriptional Activation of the Wild-Type Allele: Application to Willams-Beuren Syndrome and Supravalvular Aortic Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Pei; Huang, Angela; Morales-Ruiz, Manuel; Starcher, Barry C.; Huang, Yan; Sessa, William C.; Niklason, Laura E.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS) and supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS) are genetic syndromes marked by the propensity to develop severe vascular stenoses. Vascular lesions in both syndromes are caused by haploinsufficiency of the elastin gene. We used these distinct genetic syndromes as models to evaluate the feasibility of using engineered zinc-finger protein transcription factors (ZFPs) to achieve compensatory expression of haploinsufficient genes by inducing augmented expression from the remaining wild-type allele. For complex genes with multiple splice variants, this approach could have distinct advantages over cDNA-based gene replacement strategies. Targeting the elastin gene, we show that transcriptional activation by engineered ZFPs can induce compensatory expression from the wild-type allele in the setting of classic WBS and SVAS genetic mutations, increase elastin expression in wild-type cells, induce expression of the major elastin splice variants, and recapitulate their natural stoichiometry. Further, we establish that transcriptional activation of the mutant allele in SVAS does not overcome nonsense-mediated decay, and thus ZFP-mediated transcriptional activation is not likely to induce production of a mutant protein, a crucial consideration. Finally, we show in bioengineered blood vessels that ZFP-mediated induction of elastin expression is capable of stimulating functional elastogenesis. Haploinsufficiency is a common mechanism of genetic disease. These findings have significant implications for WBS and SVAS, and establish that haploinsufficiency can be overcome by targeted transcriptional activation without inducing protein expression from the mutant allele. PMID:22891920

  11. Beneficial Effects of Physical Exercise on Functional Capacity and Skeletal Muscle Oxidative Stress in Rats with Aortic Stenosis-Induced Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Mariana Janini; Martinez, Paula Felippe; Campos, Dijon Henrique Salomé; Pagan, Luana Urbano; Bonomo, Camila; Lima, Aline Regina Ruiz; Damatto, Ricardo Luiz; Cezar, Marcelo D M; Damatto, Felipe Cezar; Rosa, Camila Moreno; Garcia, Camila Marchiolli; Reyes, David Rafael Abreu; Fernandes, Ana Angélica Henrique; Fernandes, Denise Castro; Laurindo, Francisco Rafael; Okoshi, Katashi; Okoshi, Marina Politi

    2016-01-01

    Objective. We evaluated the influence of exercise on functional capacity, cardiac remodeling, and skeletal muscle oxidative stress, MAPK, and NF-κB pathway in rats with aortic stenosis- (AS-) induced heart failure (HF). Methods and Results. Eighteen weeks after AS induction, rats were assigned into sedentary control (C-Sed), exercised control (C-Ex), sedentary AS (AS-Sed), and exercised AS (AS-Ex) groups. Exercise was performed on treadmill for eight weeks. Statistical analyses were performed with Goodman and ANOVA or Mann-Whitney. HF features frequency and mortality did not differ between AS groups. Exercise improved functional capacity, assessed by maximal exercise test on treadmill, without changing echocardiographic parameters. Soleus cross-sectional areas did not differ between groups. Lipid hydroperoxide concentration was higher in AS-Sed than C-Sed and AS-Ex. Activity of antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase was changed in AS-Sed and restored in AS-Ex. NADPH oxidase activity and gene expression of its subunits did not differ between AS groups. Total ROS generation was lower in AS-Ex than C-Ex. Exercise modulated MAPK in AS-Ex and did not change NF-κB pathway proteins. Conclusion. Exercise improves functional capacity in rats with AS-induced HF regardless of echocardiographic parameter changes. In soleus, exercise reduces oxidative stress, preserves antioxidant enzyme activity, and modulates MAPK expression.

  12. Bundle-branch reentry ventricular tachycardia after transcatheter aortic valve replacement

    PubMed Central

    de la Rosa Riestra, Adriana; Rubio Caballero, José Amador; Freites Estévez, Alfonso; Alonso Belló, Javier; Botas Rodríguez, Javier

    2016-01-01

    An 83-year-old male suffering from severe symptomatic aortic valve stenosis received an implant of a biological aortic prosthesis through the femoral artery without complications. Seven days after dischargement he experienced a syncope. The patient was wearing an ECG holter monitor that day, which showed a wide QRS complex tachycardia of 300 beats per minute. The electrophysiological study revealed a bundle-branch reentry ventricular tachycardia as the cause of the syncope. Radio-frequency was applied on the right-bundle branch. Twelve months later, the patient has remained asymptomatic. PMID:27134443

  13. Preoperative quantification of aortic valve stenosis: comparison of 64-slice computed tomography with transesophageal and transthoracic echocardiography and size of implanted prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Mizia-Stec, Katarzyna; Pysz, Piotr; Jasiński, Marek; Adamczyk, Tomasz; Drzewiecka-Gerber, Agnieszka; Chmiel, Artur; Krejca, Michał; Bochenek, Andrzej; Woś, Stanisław; Sosnowski, Maciej; Gąsior, Zbigniew; Trusz-Gluza, Maria; Tendera, Michał

    2012-02-01

    Precise measurements of aortic complex diameters are essential for preoperative examinations of patients with aortic stenosis (AS) scheduled for aortic valve (AV) replacement. We aimed to prospectively compare the accuracy of transthoracic echocardiography (TTE), transoesophageal echocardiography (TEE) and multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT) measurements of the AV complex and to analyze the role of the multi-modality aortic annulus diameter (AAd) assessment in the selection of the optimal prosthesis to be implanted in patients surgically treated for degenerative AS. 20 patients (F/M: 3/17; age: 69 ± 6.5 years) with severe degenerative AS were enrolled into the study. TTE, TEE and MSCT including AV calcium score (AVCS) assessment were performed in all patients. The values of AAd obtained in the long AV complex axis (TTE, TEE, MSCT) and in multiplanar perpendicular imaging (MSCT) were compared to the size of implanted prosthesis. The mean AAd was 24 ± 3.6 mm using TTE, 26 ± 4.2 mm using TEE, and 26.9 ± 3.2 in MSCT (P = 0.04 vs. TTE). The mean diameter of the left ventricle out-flow tract in TTE (19.9 ± 2.7 mm) and TEE (19.5 ± 2.7 mm) were smaller than in MSCT (24.9 ± 3.3 mm, P < 0.001 for both). The mean size of implanted prosthesis (22.2 ± 2.3 mm) was significantly smaller than the mean AAd measured by TTE (P = 0.0039), TEE (P = 0.0004), and MSCT (P < 0.0001). The implanted prosthesis size correlated significantly to the AAd: r = 0.603, P = 0.005 for TTE, r = 0.592, P = 0.006 for TEE, and r = 0.791, P < 0.001 for MSCT. Obesity and extensive valve calcification (AV calcium score ≥ 3177Ag.U.) were identified as potent factors that caused a deterioration of both TTE and MSCT performance. The accuracy of AAd measurements in TEE was only limited by AV calcification. In multivariate regression analysis the mean value of the minimum and maximum AAd obtained in MSCT-multiplanar perpendicular imaging was an

  14. Bicuspid aortic valve

    MedlinePlus

    ... stiff and not open up. This is called aortic stenosis , which causes the heart to pump harder than usual to get blood through the valve. The aorta may become enlarged with this condition. BAV is ...

  15. MicroRNA-19b is a potential biomarker of increased myocardial collagen cross-linking in patients with aortic stenosis and heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Beaumont, Javier; López, Begoña; Ravassa, Susana; Hermida, Nerea; José, Gorka San; Gallego, Idoia; Valencia, Félix; Gómez-Doblas, Juan José; de Teresa, Eduardo; Díez, Javier; González, Arantxa

    2017-01-01

    This study analyzed the potential associations of 7 myocardial fibrosis-related microRNAs with the quality of the collagen network (e.g., the degree of collagen fibril cross-linking or CCL) and the enzyme lysyl oxidase (LOX) responsible for CCL in 28 patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS) of whom 46% had a diagnosis of chronic heart failure (HF). MicroRNA expression was analyzed in myocardial and blood samples. From the studied microRNAs only miR-19b presented a direct correlation (p < 0.05) between serum and myocardium. Compared to controls both myocardial and serum miR-19b were reduced (p < 0.01) in AS patients. In addition, miR-19b was reduced in the myocardium (p < 0.01) and serum (p < 0.05) of patients with HF compared to patients without HF. Myocardial and serum miR-19b were inversely correlated (p < 0.05) with LOX, CCL and LV stiffness in AS patients. In in vitro studies miR-19b inhibition increased (p < 0.05) connective tissue growth factor protein and LOX protein expression in human fibroblasts. In conclusion, decreased miR-19b may be involved in myocardial LOX up-regulation and excessive CCL, and consequently increased LV stiffness in AS patients, namely in those with HF. Serum miR-19b can be a biomarker of these alterations of the myocardial collagen network in AS patients, particularly in patients with HF. PMID:28091585

  16. Discrepancies between cardiovascular magnetic resonance and Doppler echocardiography in the measurement of transvalvular gradient in aortic stenosis: the effect of flow vorticity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Valve effective orifice area EOA and transvalvular mean pressure gradient (MPG) are the most frequently used parameters to assess aortic stenosis (AS) severity. However, MPG measured by cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) may differ from the one measured by transthoracic Doppler-echocardiography (TTE). The objectives of this study were: 1) to identify the factors responsible for the MPG measurement discrepancies by CMR versus TTE in AS patients; 2) to investigate the effect of flow vorticity on AS severity assessment by CMR; and 3) to evaluate two models reconciling MPG discrepancies between CMR/TTE measurements. Methods Eight healthy subjects and 60 patients with AS underwent TTE and CMR. Strouhal number (St), energy loss (EL), and vorticity were computed from CMR. Two correction models were evaluated: 1) based on the Gorlin equation (MPGCMR-Gorlin); 2) based on a multivariate regression model (MPGCMR-Predicted). Results MPGCMR underestimated MPGTTE (bias = −6.5 mmHg, limits of agreement from −18.3 to 5.2 mmHg). On multivariate regression analysis, St (p = 0.002), EL (p = 0.001), and mean systolic vorticity (p < 0.001) were independently associated with larger MPG discrepancies between CMR and TTE. MPGCMR-Gorlin and MPGTTE correlation and agreement were r = 0.7; bias = −2.8 mmHg, limits of agreement from −18.4 to 12.9 mmHg. MPGCMR-Predicted model showed better correlation and agreement with MPGTTE (r = 0.82; bias = 0.5 mmHg, limits of agreement from −9.1 to 10.2 mmHg) than measured MPGCMR and MPGCMR-Gorlin. Conclusion Flow vorticity is one of the main factors responsible for MPG discrepancies between CMR and TTE. PMID:24053194

  17. Homograft and prosthetic aortic valve replacement: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Pine, M; Hahn, G; Paton, B; Pappas, G; Davies, H; Steele, P; Pryor, R; Blount, S G

    1976-12-01

    Homograft aortic valve replacement was done in 103 patients and prosthetic aortic valve replacement in 106 between January 1962 and December 1973. Patients who received homograft and prosthetic valves were compared with respect to age, sex, preoperative functional impairment, infection, dyspnea, angina, hemodynamics, chest X-ray, electrocardiogram, associated operations, early and late mortality, and valve failure. Combined total mortality was 28% (12% operative, 8% first postoperative year, 8% late). Ten percent of valve required replacement. One year after operation, 70% of survivors were asymptomatic, 27% were improved, and 3% were unchanged or between homograft and prosthetic valve replacement. Valve-related failure and infections were more common after homograft aortic valve replacement. Emboli, hemorrhage, and hemolysis were commoner after prosthetic valve replacement. Fungal infections occurred in five homograft patients but in no patient with a prosthetic aortic valve. Severe properative symptoms or recent endocarditis was associated with greater mortality and valve failure in both the homograft and the prosthetic series. Increased mortality and failure was also seen in patients with either preoperative aortic regurgitation with high left ventricular end-diastolic pressure and low cardiac index, or aortic stenosis with cardiomegaly or roentgenographic evidence of congestive heart failure. Therefore, in two series of patients at equal risk, mortality and valve failure were similar for homograft and prosthetic aortic valve replacement.

  18. Infundibulopelvic stenosis in children

    SciTech Connect

    Lucaya, J.; Enriquez, G.; Delgado, R.; Castellote, A.

    1984-03-01

    Of 11,500 children who underwent excretory urography during a 17-year period, three were found to have the rare renal malformation infundibulopelvic stenosis, characterized by caliceal dilatation, infundibular stenosis, and hypoplasia or stenosis of the renal pelvis. The contralateral kidney was absent in two cases and normal in the other. Voiding cystourethrograms were normal in all three. Renal sonography showed a variable degree of caliceal dilatation without associated pelvic dilatation. The diagnosis was confirmed by retrograde ureteropyelography in one case. Two patients were followed for 12 and 18 months, respectively; both remained asymptomatic with normal renal function, and sequential sonographic examinations of their kidneys have shown no significant changes. The third patient died of an unrelated condition. Infundibulopelvic stenosis has highly characteristic radiographic features, and prognosis is good for most affected patients.

  19. Percutaneous implantation of CoreValve aortic prostheses in patients with a mechanical mitral valve.

    PubMed

    Bruschi, Giuseppe; De Marco, Federico; Oreglia, Jacopo; Colombo, Paola; Fratto, Pasquale; Lullo, Francesca; Paino, Roberto; Frigerio, Maria; Martinelli, Luigi; Klugmann, Silvio

    2009-11-01

    Concerns exist in the field of transcatheter aortic valve implantation regarding the treatment of patients with mechanical mitral valve for possible interference between the percutaneous aortic valve and the mechanical mitral prosthesis. We report our experience with percutaneous aortic valve implantation in 4 patients with severe aortic stenosis, previously operated on for mitral valve replacement with a mechanical prosthesis. All patients underwent uneventful percutaneous retrograde CoreValve implantation (CoreValve Inc, Irvine, CA). No deformation of the nitinol tubing of the prostheses (ie, neither distortion nor malfunction of the mechanical valve in the mitral position) occurred in any of the patients. All patients are alive and asymptomatic at a mean follow-up of 171 days.

  20. Pentacuspid aortic valve diagnosed by transoesophageal echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Cemri, M; Cengel, A; Timurkaynak, T

    2000-01-01

    Congenital aortic valve anomalies are quite a rare finding in echocardiographic examinations. A case of a 19 year old man with a pentacuspid aortic valve without aortic stenosis and regurgitation, detected by transoesophageal echocardiography, is presented.


Keywords: pentacuspid aortic valve; echocardiography PMID:10995427

  1. Incidence and Sequelae of Prosthesis-Patient Mismatch in Transcatheter Vs Surgical Valve Replacement in High-Risk Patients with Severe Aortic Stenosis – A PARTNER Trial Cohort A Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pibarot, Philippe; Weissman, Neil J.; Stewart, William J.; Hahn, Rebecca T.; Lindman, Brian R.; McAndrew, Thomas; Kodali, Susheel K.; Mack, Michael J.; Thourani, Vinod H.; Miller, D. Craig; Svensson, Lars G.; Herrmann, Howard C.; Smith, Craig R.; Rodés-Cabau, Josep; Webb, John; Lim, Scott; Xu, Ke; Hueter, Irene; Douglas, Pamela S.; Leon, Martin B.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Little is known about the incidence of prosthesis-patient mismatch (PPM) and its impact on outcomes after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). OBJECTIVES The objectives of this study were: 1) to compare the incidence of PPM in the transcatheter and surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) randomized (RCT) arms of the PARTNER-I trial Cohort A; and 2) to assess the impact of PPM on regression of left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy and mortality in these 2 arms and in the TAVR nonrandomized continued access (NRCA) Registry cohort. METHODS The PARTNER trial Cohort A randomized patients 1:1 to TAVR or bioprosthetic SAVR. Postoperative PPM was defined as absent if indexed effective orifice area >0.85, moderate ≥0.65 but ≤0.85, or severe <0.65 cm2/m2. LV mass regression and mortality were analyzed using the SAVR-RCT (n = 270), TAVR-RCT (n = 304) and TAVR-NRCA (n = 1637) cohorts. RESULTS Incidence of PPM was 60.0% (severe: 28.1%) in SAVR-RCT versus 46.4% (severe: 19.7%) in TAVR-RCT (p < 0.001) and 43.8% (severe: 13.6%) in TAVR-NRCA. In patients with aortic annulus diameter < 20 mm, severe PPM developed in 33.7% undergoing SAVR compared to 19.0% undergoing TAVR (p = 0.002). PPM was an independent predictor of less LV mass regression at 1 year in SAVR-RCT (p = 0.017) and TAVR-NRCA (p = 0.012) but not in TAVRRCT (p = 0.35). Severe PPM was an independent predictor of 2-year mortality in SAVR-RCT (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.78; p = 0.041) but not in TAVR-RCT (HR: 0.58; p = 0.11). In the TAVRNRCA, severe PPM was not a predictor of 1-year mortality in the whole cohort (HR: 1.05; p = 0.60) but did independently predict mortality in the subset of patients with no post-procedural aortic regurgitation (HR: 1.88; p = 0.02). CONCLUSIONS In patients with severe aortic stenosis and high surgical risk, PPM is more frequent and more often severe following SAVR than TAVR. Patients with PPM after SAVR have worse survival and less LV mass regression than those without PPM

  2. [Middle aortic syndrome: a report of three pediatric cases].

    PubMed

    Martínez León, M I; Alcaide Martín, D; García-Herrera Taillefer, P; Ramos Rodríguez, R

    2013-09-01

    The middle aortic syndrome (MAS) is caused by stenosis of the abdominal aorta, often accompanied by concomitant stenosis of the renal or visceral arteries. Although MAS is uncommon (0.5-2%), it is an important cause of hypertension in children and adolescents. It is thought to originate in a failure of the two dorsal aortas to fuse during embryological development, and a high percentage of cases are idiopathic. MAS affects the segment of the aorta between the renal arteries in 54% of cases. Clinically, it courses with symptomatic or asymptomatic arterial hypertension. On physical examination, findings include an abdominal bruit, diminished or absent femoral pulses, and a difference between the arterial pressure of the upper and lower limbs. Angiography is the technique of choice, although noninvasive MR angiography and CT angiography have similar diagnostic accuracy. Ultrasonography is the primary screening technique. Medical treatment consists of a combination of different antihypertensives. Surgical treatment can be curative.

  3. Aortic Calcification: An Early Sign of Heart Valve Problems?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rekha Mankad, M.D. References AskMayoExpert. Valvular disease – aortic stenosis. Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and ... Original article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/aortic-stenosis/expert-answers/aortic-valve-calcification/FAQ-20058525 . Mayo ...

  4. Spinal Stenosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Spinal stenosis is a narrowing of the open spaces within your spine, which can put pressure on ... stenosis, doctors may recommend surgery to create additional space for the spinal cord or nerves. Many people ...

  5. Successful transfemoral aortic valve implantation through aortic stent graft after endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Hideyuki; Watanabe, Yusuke; Kozuma, Ken

    2017-04-01

    The patient was a 91-year-old woman presenting with severe aortic valve stenosis. Pre-procedural computed tomography scan revealed a 45-mm abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Transfemoral transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TF-TAVI) was performed after endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) of the AAA. The 23-mm Edwards Sapien XT system passed through the aortic stent graft smoothly. This is the first case report showing that successful TF-TAVI can be performed through a prior abdominal aortic stent graft. TF-TAVI after EVAR of AAA is a feasible option for patients with extremely poor access.

  6. [Stable fibrous subaortic stenosis].

    PubMed

    Attié, F; Dumont, C; Mispireta, J; Kuri, J; Mata, L A

    1975-01-01

    The authors studied 37 patients belonging to the Pediatric Cardiology Service of the Institute National of Cardiology who were carriers of fixed fibrinous subaortic stenosis. The diagnosis was established by surgery or autopsy. Isolated subvalvular obstruction was found in 24 patients (63%), which represents the most important number of cases in the literature. The analysis of the 24 cases permitted important conclusions: 1. All the patients had systolic thrills in the suprasternal hollow and carotidinous pathways. 2. No case had protosystolic click. In all, the murmur's epicenter was in the 3rd and 4th IIS in the parasternal line, a fact which can lead to a mistaken diagnosis of interventricular septal defect. 66.6% of the patients had a diastolic murmur heard in the aortic focus, a secondary accompaniement to secondary valvular aortic insufficiency. The intensity of the second aortic sound held an inverse relationship to the magnitude of the gradient. The presence of paradoxic splitting of the second heart sound as well as prolongation of the expulsion period in the carotidogram are indexes for the severity of the obstruction. 3. A relationship between the severity of the lesion and the dilatation of the left atrium was found. The cardiomegaly had no relationship to the severity of the obstruction with the increase in ventricular telediastolic pressure or to the evolution time. 4. An adequate hemodynamic study permits evaluating and locating the site of the obstruction. Likewise, precise ventriculography appraises the nature of the narrowing. 5. Aortic regurgitation is located at the valvular level. Aortography permits its affirmation. Probably the stream coming from subvalvular stenosis produces fibrosis or asynchronism in the closing of the aortic valves. 6. Surgical treatment offers excelent perspectives in mortality as well as reducing the gradient. None of our patients operated on had hospital or later death. 7. Postoperatory evaluation was performed on six

  7. [The assessment of mechanical heart valves stenosis in adults after aortic valve replacement: the advantage of full-flow design of mechanical valve].

    PubMed

    Bokeria, L A; Bokeria, O L; Fadeev, A A; Makhachev, O A; Kosareva, T I; Averina, I I

    2013-01-01

    The analysis of transprosthetic hemodynamics in adults after aortic valve replacement in the Bakoulev Center for Cardiovascular Surgery in 2007-2010 demonstrated the hemodynamic advantage of the concept of new full-flow mechanical aortic valve prosthesis "CorBeat". Having the same size of internal orifice and tissue annulus diameters, the values of transprosthetic parameters (peak and mean gradients, blood flow velocities) through "CorBeat" were close to physiological values of transvalvular native aortic parameters and had a tendency to be not dependent on the size of prosthesis (p = 0.63). In the article for the first time a morphometric database of geometric values of internal orifice area of normal native aortic valves in adults was used taking into account both the gender and the body surface area's of a patient. There was also used the standardized prosthesis size Z-score which represents the number of SDs by which the internal prosthesis area differs from the mean normal native aortic valve area for the patient's body surface area. The article emphasizes the need of the personal selection of the size and the type of prosthesis for any patient as well as the need for new design development of prosthetic heart valves.

  8. Role of Cardiac CT Before Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (TAVI).

    PubMed

    Marwan, Mohamed; Achenbach, Stephan

    2016-02-01

    Catheter-based aortic valve implantation is increasingly being performed in high-risk patients with symptomatic aortic valve stenosis. For successful planning of the procedure, CT has been shown to provide crucial information concerning the aortic root as well as the peripheral access vessels. This article illustrates the increasing role of CT before transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

  9. Asymptomatic bacteriuria

    MedlinePlus

    ... you have these symptoms, you may have a urinary tract infection but you DO NOT have asymptomatic bacteriuria. Burning ... the future. However, for some people getting a urinary tract infection is more likely or may cause more severe ...

  10. The surgical treatment of fixed subaortic stenosis: a clinical experience in Japan.

    PubMed

    Aeba, R; Katogi, T; Ito, T; Goto, T; Cho, Y; Inoue, Y; Omoto, T; Moro, K; Nakao, Y; Yozu, R; Takeuchi, S; Kawada, S

    1999-01-01

    We report herein the results of a retrospective study conducted on ten consecutive Japanese patients who underwent successful surgical relief of fixed subaortic stenosis between 1972 and 1994 at ages ranging from 8 months to 21 years, and followed for 3.6 years and 26 years. Associated cardiovascular defects were present in six patients, two had a history of infective endocarditis, a discrete fibrous ring was found in nine patients, and a redundant abnormal sheet was found in one. A stenotic structure was removed in nine patients and incised in one, while myotomy was additionally performed in one. There were no early complications or deaths. Cardiac catheterization revealed a significant decrease in the peak systolic pressure gradient from 84+/-22 mm Hg preoperatively to 32+/-22 mm Hg postoperatively (P = 0.0017). Reoperation of an aortic valve replacement with or without valvular annulus enlargement was required in four patients because of a small annulus with aortic insufficiency or infective endocarditis. Infective endocarditis was a major cause of late mortality (n = 1) and morbidity (n = 1), but the remaining eight patients have been asymptomatic. Thus, although this lesion is relatively rare in Japan, the typical discrete type may be more common than previously believed. While a relief operation is associated with low early mortality, the palliative aspect regarding pathology of the aortic valve should not be underestimated, including poor growth of the valve annulus, deterioration of aortic insufficiency, and infective endocarditis. The most appropriate operative procedure for reoperation remains to be evolved.

  11. Suture-induced right coronary artery stenosis.

    PubMed

    Seltmann, Martin; Achenbach, Stephan; Muschiol, Gerd; Feyrer, Richard

    2010-01-01

    An 82-year-old patient developed right heart failure in the days after surgical aortic valve replacement. Coronary CT angiography showed a high-grade stenosis of the mid-right coronary artery. Adjacent suture material seen on noncontrast CT suggested that the lesion was related to surgical closure of the right atrial cannulation site. Invasive angiography confirmed the stenosis, and percutaneous intervention was successfully performed.

  12. Cervical Stenosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Interest (Quiz) Breast Cancer (Video) Overview of the Female Reproductive System (News) Study: Plenty of IV Fluids May Make Childbirth Safer, Easier (News) Zejula Approved for Certain Female Cancers Additional Content Medical News Cervical Stenosis By S. ...

  13. Determinants and Prognostic Significance of Symptomatic Status in Patients with Moderately Dysfunctional Bicuspid Aortic Valves

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Soo Youn; Shim, Chi Young; Hong, Geu-Ru; Cho, In Jeong; Chang, Hyuk-Jae; Ha, Jong-Won; Chung, Namsik

    2017-01-01

    Background We aimed to identify the clinical and echocardiographic determinants of symptoms and their prognostic implications in patients with moderately dysfunctional bicuspid aortic valves (BAVs). Methods Among 1,019 subjects in the BAV registry treated in a single tertiary care center, the records of 127 patients (85 men, age 58±13 years) with moderately dysfunctional BAVs were comprehensively reviewed. The patients were divided into two groups based on symptom status: asymptomatic (n = 80) vs. symptomatic (n = 47). The primary end-point was defined as a composite of aortic valve surgery, hospitalization for heart failure, and any cause of death. Results The symptomatic group had a higher proportion of females, hypertension, aortic stenosis, and aortopathy than did the asymptomatic group. The symptomatic group showed lower e′ (5.5±1.7 vs. 6.5±2.2 cm/s, p = 0.003), higher E/e′ (13.3 ± 4.9 vs. 10.9±3.7, p = 0.002), and larger left atrial volume index (29.9±11.4 vs. 24.6±9.1 ml/m2, p = 0.006) than did the asymptomatic group. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, female gender (odds ratio [OR] 2.84, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.10–7.36, p = 0.031), hypertension (OR 3.07, 95% CI 1.20–7.82, p = 0.019), moderate aortic stenosis (OR 5.33 5.78, 95% CI 1.99–16.83, p = 0.001), E/e′ >15 (OR 3.82, 95% CI 1.03–11.19, p = 0.015), and aortopathy (OR 2.76, 95% CI 1.07–7.10, p = 0.035) were independently correlated with symptom status. The symptomatic group showed a significantly lower rate of event-free survival during the 8-year follow-up period (54±9% vs. 68±10%, p = 0.001). Conclusions In patients with moderately dysfunctional BAVs, the presence of moderate aortic stenosis, aortopathy, and diastolic dysfunction determines symptom status, along with female gender and hypertension. Symptom status was associated with clinical outcomes. PMID:28060855

  14. Dynamics of collateral circulation in progressive asymptomatic carotid disease.

    PubMed

    Moll, F L; Eikelboom, B C; Vermeulen, F E; van Lier, H J; Schulte, B P

    1986-03-01

    Inadequacy of collateral arterial flow is the major risk factor for hemispheric infarction in association with spontaneous occlusion of the ipsilateral carotid artery. This prospective study was designed to measure the adaptation of collateral cerebral circulation through the circle of Willis in patients in whom a unilateral carotid stenosis of hemodynamic consequence develops asymptomatically. The collateral cerebral potential is assessed by ocular pneumoplethysmography (OPG) during proximal common carotid artery compression, measuring the collateral ophthalmic artery pressure (COAP). During an average follow-up of almost 3 years (maximum more than 7 years), 45 patients showed asymptomatic development of a unilateral hemodynamically significant carotid stenosis according to OPG evidence. In these patients the mean index COAP/brachial artery pressure did not change on the side of stenosis progression (p greater than 0.05). The developed carotid stenosis had only reduced collateral circulation to the contralateral hemisphere. The risk of inadequate collateral cerebral circulation remained during progression of asymptomatic extracranial arterial obstructive disease.

  15. Difficult to treat recurrent stenosis of the aorta.

    PubMed

    Pawelec-Wojtalik, Małgorzata; Qureshi, Shakeel Ahmed; Weil, Jochen; Mrówczyński, Wojciech; Wojtalik, Michał; Siwińska, Aldona; Surmacz, Rafał; Smoczyk, Wiesław; Kukawczyńska, Elzbieta; Raś, Małgorzata

    2007-01-01

    The risk associated with repeated treatment of aortic stenosis is as high as 5% and increases to as much as 25% in complex heart diseases. Among the methods that are commonly accepted and used in the treatment of recurrent aortic stenosis are balloon dilatation and stent implantation. In this study we describe five patients with recurrent stenosis of the aorta treated with stent implantation. The short-term results of such treatment are promising. However, in some cases it is only palliative in character and does not completely resolve the problems arising from congenital heart disease. (Cardiol J 2007; 14: 186-192).

  16. Portico Sheathless Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation via Distal Axillary Artery.

    PubMed

    Bruschi, Giuseppe; Colombo, Paola; Botta, Luca; Nava, Stefano; Merlanti, Bruno; Belli, Oriana; Musca, Francesco; Soriano, Francesco; Russo, Claudio F; Oliva, Fabrizio

    2017-02-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation has been designed to treat older patients affected by severe aortic stenosis who are considered high-risk surgical candidates because of multiple comorbidities. The least invasive approach for transcatheter aortic valves implantation should be considered the transfemoral retrograde route, because it is minimally invasive and is feasible with local anesthesia and mild sedation. Despite significant technical improvements in recent years, the transfemoral approach is contraindicated in cases of severe peripheral artery disease. We describe the first case of a Portico transcatheter aortic valve implantation system (St. Jude Medical, Minneapolis, MN) made through the distal axillary artery in a 90-year-old patient affected by severe aortic stenosis.

  17. First reported case of fetal aortic valvuloplasty in Asia

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Sun-Young; Lee, Mi-Young; Cho, Min Kyong; Jung, Euiseok; Kim, Ki-Soo; Kim, Young-Hwue

    2017-01-01

    Prenatal intervention of severe fetal aortic valve stenosis by ultrasound-guided percutaneous balloon valvuloplasty has been performed to prevent the progression to hypoplastic left heart syndrome, and achieve biventricular circulation in neonates. Here we report a case of fetal aortic valvuloplasty prenatally diagnosed with aortic stenosis at 24 weeks of gestation and showed worsening features on a follow-up echocardiography. Prenatal aortic valvuloplasty was performed at 29 weeks of gestation, and was a technical success. However, fetal bradycardia sustained, and an emergency cesarean delivery was performed. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of fetal aortic valvuloplasty which was performed in Asia. PMID:28217680

  18. Computed tomography evaluation for transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI): imaging of the aortic root and iliac arteries.

    PubMed

    Schoenhagen, Paul; Kapadia, Samir R; Halliburton, Sandra S; Svensson, Lars G; Tuzcu, E Murat

    2011-01-01

    For patients with severe aortic stenosis, open-heart surgical valve replacement remains the current clinical standard with documented, excellent long-term outcome. Over the past few years, transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has developed into a treatment alternative for high-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis. Because transcatheter valvular procedures are characterized by lack of exposure of the operative field, image guidance is critical. This Pictorial Essay describes the role of 3-dimensional imaging with multidetector row computed tomography for detailed reconstructions of the aortic valve, aortic root, and iliac arteries in the context of TAVI.

  19. Asymptomatic dystrophinopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Morrone, A. |; Hoffman, E.P.; Hoop, R.C.

    1997-03-31

    A 4-year-old girl was referred for evaluation for a mild but persistent serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST) elevation detected incidentally during routine blood screening for a skin infection. Serum creatine kinase activity was found to be increased. Immuno-histochemical study for dystrophin in her muscle biopsy showed results consistent with a carrier state for muscular dystrophy. Molecular work-up showed the proposita to be a carrier of a deletion mutation of exon 48 of the dystrophin gene. Four male relatives also had the deletion mutation, yet showed no clinical symptoms of muscular dystrophy (age range 8-58 yrs). Linkage analysis of the dystrophin gene in the family showed a spontaneous change of an STR45 allele, which could be due to either an intragenic double recombination event, or CA repeat length mutation leading to identical size alleles. To our knowledge, this is the first documentation of an asymptomatic dystrophinopathy in multiple males of advanced age. Based on molecular findings, this family would be given a diagnosis of Becker muscular dystrophy. This diagnosis implies the development of clinical symptoms, even though this family is clearly asymptomatic. This report underscores the caution which must be exercised when giving presymptomatic diagnoses based on molecular studies. 28 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Sutureless aortic valve replacement

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    The increasing incidence of aortic stenosis and greater co-morbidities and risk profiles of the contemporary patient population has driven the development of minimally invasive aortic valve surgery and percutaneous transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) techniques to reduce surgical trauma. Recent technological developments have led to an alternative minimally invasive option which avoids the placement and tying of sutures, known as “sutureless” or rapid deployment aortic valves. Potential advantages for sutureless aortic prostheses include reducing cross-clamp and cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) duration, facilitating minimally invasive surgery and complex cardiac interventions, whilst maintaining satisfactory hemodynamic outcomes and low paravalvular leak rates. However, given its recent developments, the majority of evidence regarding sutureless aortic valve replacement (SU-AVR) is limited to observational studies and there is a paucity of adequately-powered randomized studies. Recently, the International Valvular Surgery Study Group (IVSSG) has formulated to conduct the Sutureless Projects, set to be the largest international collaborative group to investigate this technology. This keynote lecture will overview the use, the potential advantages, the caveats, and current evidence of sutureless and rapid deployment aortic valve replacement (AVR). PMID:25870807

  1. Acquired von Willebrand syndrome in children with aorticand pulmonary stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Binnetoğlu, Fatih Köksal; Babaoğlu, Kadir; Filiz, Şayegan Güven; Zengin, Emine; Sarper, Nazan; Altun, Gürkan; Kılıç, Suar Çakı

    2016-01-01

    Summary Introduction: This prospective study was planned to investigate the frequency and relationship of acquired von Willebrand syndrome (AVWS) with aortic and pulmonary stenosis in patients. Methods: A total of 84 children, ranging from two to 18 years of age, were enrolled in this study. Of these, 28 had isolated aortic stenosis, 32 had isolated pulmonary stenosis and 24 were healthy. Children with aortic and pulmonary stenosis associated with other congenital heart diseases were excluded. Children with hypothyroidism, renal or liver disease, malignancy or autoimmune disease were also excluded. Wholeblood count, blood group, factor VIII level, prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), von Willebrand factor antigen (VWF:Ag), ristocetin co-factor (VWF:RCo), and bleeding time using a platelet-function analyser (PFA-100) were performed in all patients. All of the children in the study underwent a detailed physical examination and echocardiographic evaluation. Results: A history of bleeding was positive in 18% of the aortic stenosis group, 9% of the pulmonary stenosis group, and 4% of the control group. Seven of 60 (12%) patients had laboratory findings that implied a diagnosis of AVWS, and two of these (28%) had a history of bleeding. The frequency of AVWS was 14% in patients with aortic stenosis and 9% in those with pulmonary stenosis. Conclusion: AVWS is not rare in stenotic obstructive cardiac diseases. A detailed history of bleeding should be taken from patients with valvular disease. Even if the history is negative, whole blood count, PT and aPTT should be performed. If necessary, PFA-100 closure time and further tests should be planned for the diagnosis of AVWS. PMID:27841910

  2. [Surgical technique of aortic valve replacement for small aortic annulus in elderly patients].

    PubMed

    Hata, T; Fujiwara, K; Furukawa, H; Tsushima, Y; Yoshitaka, H; Kuinose, M; Minami, H; Ishida, A; Tamura, K; Totsugawa, T; Kanemitsu, H; Ozawa, M

    2006-04-01

    Recent reports have shown that aortic valve replacement in elderly patients over 65 years with atherosclerotic aortic stenosis and a small aortic annulus is possible by using a small sized bioprosthesis (Carpentier-Edwards pericardial valve). Here we present out surgical technique. Firstly, the native calcified aortic valve was removed completely to gain total exposure of the surrounding aortic root and sinus of Valsalva like Bentall procedure. Secondly, a small sized bioprosthesis was implanted with intermittent noneverting mattress 2-0 sutures with spaghetti and small polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) felt. Aortic annulus is the dilated by inserting Hegar dilator sizing from 25 to 27 mm. Therefore, aortic valve replacement for small aortic annulus in intra- or supra-annular position should be easily accomplished. Good surgical results and hemodynamic state were achieved in 25 consecutive cases using this technique.

  3. Frequency of abdominal aortic aneurysm in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting.

    PubMed

    Dupont, Annabelle; Elkalioubie, Ahmed; Juthier, Francis; Tagzirt, Madjid; Vincentelli, André; Le Tourneau, Thierry; Haulon, Stéphan; Deklunder, Ghislaine; Breyne, Joke; Susen, Sophie; Marechaux, Sylvestre; Pinet, Florence; Jude, Brigitte

    2010-06-01

    The aims of this study were to clarify the prevalence and the risk factors for unsuspected abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) in patients who underwent coronary artery bypass grafting for severe coronary artery disease and to identify the most at risk patients for AAA. Among 217 patients (189 men, mean age 64 +/- 11 years), asymptomatic AAAs, as prospectively identified by echocardiography, were found in 15 patients (6.9%). All patients with AAAs were men and smokers or past smokers. Factors significantly associated by univariate analysis with asymptomatic AAA presence were smoking (p = 0.003), symptomatic peripheral artery disease (p = 0.006), significant carotid artery stenosis (p = 0.007), and larger femoral and popliteal diameters (p = 0.008 and p = 0.0012, respectively). The other classic demographic, clinical, and biologic features were equally distributed among patients. In conclusion, in patients who underwent coronary artery bypass grafting who were men and aged <75 years with smoking histories, the prevalence of AAA was as high as 24% when they had concomitant peripheral arterial disease and/or carotid artery stenosis (vs 4.4% in the absence of either condition, p = 0.007), justifying consideration of AAA screening in this subgroup of in-hospital patients.

  4. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement: Comprehensive Review and Present Status

    PubMed Central

    Misenheimer, Jacob A.; Ramaraj, Radhakrishnan

    2017-01-01

    Aortic stenosis is the most common valvular heart disease in the developed world. About 7% of the population over age 65 years suffers from degenerative aortic stenosis. The prognosis of patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis is dismal without valve replacement. Even though the American College of Cardiology recommends aortic valve replacement to treat this condition as a class I recommendation, approximately one third of these patients over the age of 75 years are not referred for surgery. Typically, this is from concern about prohibitive surgical risk associated with patient frailty, comorbidities, age, and severe left ventricular dysfunction. The advent in France of transcatheter aortic valve replacement has raised the hope in the United States for an alternative, less invasive treatment for aortic stenosis. Two recent trials—the Placement of AoRTic TraNscathetER Valve Trial Edwards SAPIEN Transcatheter Heart Valve (Partner) and the CoreValve US Pivotal—have established transcatheter aortic valve replacement as the preferred approach in patients who are at high or prohibitive surgical risk. The more recently published Partner 2 trial has shown the feasibility of transcatheter aortic valve replacement in intermediate-surgical-risk patients as well. With a profile that promises easier use and better valve performance and delivery, newer-generation valves have shown their potential for further improvement in safety profile and overall outcomes. We review the history and status of this topic. PMID:28265210

  5. Comparative Review of the Treatment Methodologies of Carotid Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Coney; Szuchmacher, Mauricio; Chang, John B.

    2015-01-01

    The treatment of carotid stenosis entails three methodologies, namely, medical management, carotid angioplasty and stenting (CAS), as well as carotid endarterectomy (CEA). The North American Symptomatic Carotid Endarterectomy Trial (NASCET) and European Carotid Surgery Trial (ECST) have shown that symptomatic carotid stenosis greater than 70% is best treated with CEA. In asymptomatic patients with carotid stenosis greater than 60%, CEA was more beneficial than treatment with aspirin alone according to the Asymptomatic Carotid Atherosclerosis (ACAS) and Asymptomatic Carotid Stenosis Trial (ACST) trials. When CAS is compared with CEA, the CREST resulted in similar rates of ipsilateral stroke and death rates regardless of symptoms. However, CAS not only increased adverse effects in women, it also amplified stroke rates and death in elderly patients compared with CEA. CAS can maximize its utility in treating focal restenosis after CEA and patients with overwhelming cardiac risk or prior neck irradiation. When performing CEA, using a patch was equated to a more durable result than primary closure, whereas eversion technique is a new methodology deserving a spotlight. Comparing the three major treatment strategies of carotid stenosis has intrinsic drawbacks, as most trials are outdated and they vary in their premises, definitions, and study designs. With the newly codified best medical management including antiplatelet therapies with aspirin and clopidogrel, statin, antihypertensive agents, strict diabetes control, smoking cessation, and life style change, the current trials may demonstrate that asymptomatic carotid stenosis is best treated with best medical therapy. The ongoing trials will illuminate and reshape the treatment paradigm for symptomatic and asymptomatic carotid stenosis. PMID:26417191

  6. MMP-2 Isoforms in Aortic Tissue and Serum of Patients with Ascending Aortic Aneurysms and Aortic Root Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Tscheuschler, Anke; Meffert, Philipp; Beyersdorf, Friedhelm; Heilmann, Claudia; Kocher, Nadja; Uffelmann, Xenia; Discher, Philipp; Siepe, Matthias; Kari, Fabian A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The need for biological markers of aortic wall stress and risk of rupture or dissection of ascending aortic aneurysms is obvious. To date, wall stress cannot be related to a certain biological marker. We analyzed aortic tissue and serum for the presence of different MMP-2 isoforms to find a connection between serum and tissue MMP-2 and to evaluate the potential of different MMP-2 isoforms as markers of high wall stress. Methods Serum and aortic tissue from n = 24 patients and serum from n = 19 healthy controls was analyzed by ELISA and gelatin zymography. 24 patients had ascending aortic aneurysms, 10 of them also had aortic root aneurysms. Three patients had normally functioning valves, 12 had regurgitation alone, eight had regurgitation and stenosis and one had only stenosis. Patients had bicuspid and tricuspid aortic valves (9/15). Serum samples were taken preoperatively, and the aortic wall specimen collected during surgical aortic repair. Results Pro-MMP-2 was identified in all serum and tissue samples. Pro-MMP-2 was detected in all tissue and serum samples from patients with ascending aortic/aortic root aneurysms, irrespective of valve morphology or other clinical parameters and in serum from healthy controls. We also identified active MMP-2 in all tissue samples from patients with ascending aortic/aortic root aneurysms. None of the analyzed serum samples revealed signals relatable to active MMP-2. No correlation between aortic tissue total MMP-2 or tissue pro-MMP-2 or tissue active MMP-2 and serum MMP-2 was found and tissue MMP-2/pro-MMP-2/active MMP-2 did not correlate with aortic diameter. This evidence shows that pro-MMP-2 is the predominant MMP-2 species in serum of patients and healthy individuals and in aneurysmatic aortic tissue, irrespective of aortic valve configuration. Active MMP-2 species are either not released into systemic circulation or not detectable in serum. There is no reliable connection between aortic tissue—and serum MMP-2

  7. Implantation of the CoreValve percutaneous aortic valve.

    PubMed

    Lamarche, Yoan; Cartier, Raymond; Denault, André Y; Basmadjian, Arsène; Berry, Colin; Laborde, Jean-Claude; Bonan, Raoul

    2007-01-01

    Surgical aortic valve replacement is the only recommended treatment for significant aortic valve stenosis. Percutaneous aortic valve replacement appears to be a novel option for high-risk patients. We report the implantation of the ReValving system (CoreValve, Paris, France) in a 64-year-old woman who was refused aortic valve replacement surgery for critical aortic stenosis and left ventricular dysfunction because of severe pulmonary fibrosis. After anesthesia, the patient was put on femorofemoral cardiopulmonary bypass, and underwent a balloon valvuloplasty with subsequent retrograde aortic valve replacement by the ReValving system. Transesophageal echocardiographic monitoring of the patient's hemodynamics showed immediate improvements of the valvular area and left ventricular ejection fraction and only traces of paravalvular leaks. The patient was easily weaned from ventilation and resumed activity soon after the surgery. A multidisciplinary approach is presently necessary to offer a reliable and safe procedure.

  8. Implantation of a SAPIEN 3 Valve in a Patient with Pure Aortic Regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Minol, Jan-Philipp; Veulemans, Verena; Zeus, Tobias; Blehm, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is an emerging treatment for high-risk patients with aortic stenosis. Aortic regurgitation is considered to be a relative contraindication for transcatheter procedures, as a non-calcified aortic annulus poses the risk of an insufficient anchoring of the transcatheter aortic valve prosthesis. Herein is described the case of a patient who suffered from recurrent aortic valve regurgitation after valve-sparing repair, and which was successfully treated by the transcatheter implantation of an Edwards SAPIEN 3™ prosthesis. This case report demonstrated the suitability of this prosthesis to treat pure aortic valve regurgitation, without excessive oversizing of the valve.

  9. Carotid Stenosis in Cardiac Surgery-No Difference in Postoperative Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Schultheis, Molly; Saadat, Siavash; Dombrovskiy, Victor; Frenchu, Kiersten; Kanduri, Jaya; Romero, Joseph; Lemaire, Anthony; Ghaly, Aziz; Bastides, George; Rahimi, Saum; Lee, Leonard

    2016-02-23

    Background Debate over revascularization of asymptomatic carotid stenosis before cardiac surgery is ongoing. In this study, we analyze cardiac surgery outcomes in patients with asymptomatic carotid stenosis at a single hospital. Methods In this study, 1,781 patients underwent cardiac surgery from January 2012 to June 2013; 1,357 with preoperative screening carotid duplex were included. Patient demographics, comorbidities, degree of stenosis, postoperative complications, and mortality were evaluated. Chi-square test and logistic regression analysis were performed. Results Asymptomatic stenosis was found in 403/1,357 patients (29.7%; 355 moderate and 48 severe). Patients with stenosis, compared with those without, were older (71.7 ± 11 vs. 66.3 ± 12 years; p < 0.01). Females were more likely to have stenosis (odd ratio, = 1.7; 95% confidence interval, 1.4-2.2); however, patients were predominantly male in both groups. There were no significant differences in the rates of mortality and postoperative complications, including stroke and transient ischemic attack (TIA). Postoperative TIA occurred in 3/1,357(0.2%); only one had moderate stenosis. Inhospital stroke occurred in 21/1,357 (1.5%) patients; stroke rates were 2.3% (8/355) with moderate stenosis and 2.1% (1/48) severe stenosis. There were 59/1,357 (4.3%) deaths; patients with stenosis had a mortality rate of 4.2% (17/403); however, no postoperative stroke lead to death. Multivariable logistic regression analysis with adjustment for age, gender, race, comorbidities, and postoperative complications did not show an impact of carotid stenosis on postoperative mortality and development of stroke after cardiac surgery. Conclusion This study suggests that patients with asymptomatic carotid stenosis undergoing cardiac surgery are not at increased risk of postoperative complications and mortality; thus, prophylactic carotid revascularization may not be indicated.

  10. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement: techniques, complications, and bailout strategies.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vikas; Macon, Conrad J; Scot Shaw, Eric; Londoño, Juan C; Martinez, Claudia A

    2013-09-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement has emerged as an alternative option for inoperable or very high-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis-however, there are serious complications associated with the procedure, such as patient mortality, stroke, conduction disturbances, paravalvular regurgitation, and vascular concerns. Our review focuses on the most common complications related to transcatheter aortic valve replacement procedures and potential bailout strategies and techniques.

  11. Apicoaortic conduit for severe hemolytic anemia after aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Hatori, Kyohei; Ohki, Satoshi; Obayashi, Tamiyuki; Koyano, Tetsuya; Yasuhara, Kiyomitsu; Hirai, Hanako

    2015-06-01

    We describe the case of an 82-year-old woman who had undergone aortic mechanical valve replacement for aortic stenosis with a small annulus, and coronary artery bypass grafting. Four years after the operation, she began to experience hemolysis. Prosthetic valve obstruction was observed but there was no paravalvular leakage or aortic regurgitation through the mechanical valve. We elected to perform apicoaortic bypass in this patient with severe hemolytic anemia secondary to a mechanical valve malfunction.

  12. Asymptomatic embolisation for prediction of stroke in the Asymptomatic Carotid Emboli Study (ACES): a prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    Markus, Hugh S; King, Alice; Shipley, Martin; Topakian, Raffi; Cullinane, Marisa; Reihill, Sheila; Bornstein, Natan M; Schaafsma, Arjen

    2010-01-01

    Summary Background Whether surgery is beneficial for patients with asymptomatic carotid stenosis is controversial. Better methods of identifying patients who are likely to develop stroke would improve the risk–benefit ratio for carotid endarterectomy. We aimed to investigate whether detection of asymptomatic embolic signals by use of transcranial doppler (TCD) could predict stroke risk in patients with asymptomatic carotid stenosis. Methods The Asymptomatic Carotid Emboli Study (ACES) was a prospective observational study in patients with asymptomatic carotid stenosis of at least 70% from 26 centres worldwide. To detect the presence of embolic signals, patients had two 1 h TCD recordings from the ipsilateral middle cerebral artery at baseline and one 1 h recording at 6, 12, and 18 months. Patients were followed up for 2 years. The primary endpoint was ipsilateral stroke and transient ischaemic attack. All recordings were analysed centrally by investigators masked to patient identity. Findings 482 patients were recruited, of whom 467 had evaluable recordings. Embolic signals were present in 77 of 467 patients at baseline. The hazard ratio for the risk of ipsilateral stroke and transient ischaemic attack from baseline to 2 years in patients with embolic signals compared with those without was 2·54 (95% CI 1·20–5·36; p=0·015). For ipsilateral stroke alone, the hazard ratio was 5·57 (1·61–19·32; p=0·007). The absolute annual risk of ipsilateral stroke or transient ischaemic attack between baseline and 2 years was 7·13% in patients with embolic signals and 3·04% in those without, and for ipsilateral stroke was 3·62% in patients with embolic signals and 0·70% in those without. The hazard ratio for the risk of ipsilateral stroke and transient ischaemic attack for patients who had embolic signals on the recording preceding the next 6-month follow-up compared with those who did not was 2·63 (95% CI 1·01–6·88; p=0·049), and for ipsilateral stroke

  13. Aortic Valve Calcification is Mediated by a Differential Response of Aortic Valve Interstitial Cells to Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Venardos, Neil; Nadlonek, Nicole A.; Zhan, Qiong; Weyant, Michael J.; Reece, T. Brett; Meng, Xianzhong; Fullerton, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Background While calcific aortic stenosis is common, calcification of the other three heart valves is not. The aortic valve interstitial cell (VIC) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of aortic stenosis. Pro-inflammatory stimulation of aortic VICs induces an osteogenic and inflammatory phenotypic change. We hypothesized that the VICs of the other heart valves do not undergo these changes. Using isolated human VICs from normal aortic, mitral, pulmonary and tricuspid valves, our purpose was to compare the osteogenic response to pro-inflammatory stimulation via TLR-4. Materials And Methods Aortic, pulmonic, mitral, and tricuspid (n=4 for each valve type) VICs were isolated from hearts valves explanted from patients undergoing cardiac transplantation. Cells were cultured and grown to confluence in passage 2-6 before treatment with LPS (100-200ng/mL) for 24 or 48 hours. Cells were characterized by immunofluorescent staining. TLR-4 expression was analyzed (immunoblotting, flow cytometry). BMP-2 and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) production were determined (immunoblotting). Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) levels were determined by ELISA. Statistics were by Mann-Whitney U test. Results TLR-4 stimulation induced BMP-2 production only in aortic VICs (p<0.05). ICAM-1 production and MCP-1 secretion increased in a similar fashion among TLR4-stimulated VICs from all four valves. Conclusions Pro-inflammatory stimulation induces an osteogenic phenotype in aortic VICs but not mitral, pulmonic, or tricuspid VICs. We conclude that this differential osteogenic response of aortic VICs contributes to the pathogenesis of calcific aortic stenosis. PMID:24746950

  14. Lipid Interventions in Aortic Valvular Disease.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kwang Jin; Tsomidou, Christiana; Lerakis, Stamatios; Madanieh, Raef; Vittorio, Timothy J; Kosmas, Constantine E

    2015-10-01

    Aortic valve stenosis is the most common valvular disease in the elderly population. Presently, there is increasing evidence that aortic stenosis (AS) is an active process of lipid deposition, inflammation, fibrosis and calcium deposition. The pathogenesis of AS shares many similarities to that of atherosclerosis; therefore, it was hypothesized that certain lipid interventions could prevent or slow the progression of aortic valve stenosis. Despite the early enthusiasm that statins may slow the progression of AS, recent large clinical trials did not consistently demonstrate a decrease in the progression of AS. However, some researchers believe that statins may have a benefit early on in the disease process, where inflammation (and not calcification) is the predominant process, in contrast to severe or advanced AS, where calcification (and not inflammation) predominates. Positron emission tomography using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose and 18F-sodium fluoride can demonstrate the relative contributions of valvular calcification and inflammation in AS, and thus this method might potentially be useful in providing the answer as to whether lipid interventions at the earlier stages of AS would be more effective in slowing the progression of the disease. Currently, there is a strong interest in recombinant apolipoprotein A-1 Milano and in the development of new pharmacological agents, targeting reduction of lipoprotein (a) levels and possibly reduction of the expression of lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2, as potential means to slow the progression of aortic valvular stenosis.

  15. Evolut R Implantation to Treat Severe Pure Aortic Regurgitation in a Patient With Mitral Bioprosthesis.

    PubMed

    Bruschi, Giuseppe; Colombo, Paola; Nava, Stefano; Musca, Francesco; Merlanti, Bruno; Belli, Oriana; Soriano, Francesco; Botta, Luca; De Caria, Danile; Giannattasio, Cristina; Russo, Claudio F

    2016-12-01

    Transcatheter aortic valves have been designed to treat high-risk surgical candidates affected by severe aortic stenosis, but little is known about the use of transcatheter valves in patients with severe pure aortic regurgitation. We describe the implantation of Medtronic CoreValve Evolut R (Medtronic, Minneapolis, MN) to treat an 82-year-old patient affected by severe pure aortic regurgitation who underwent prior mitral valve replacement with a biological valve protruding into the left ventricular outflow tract.

  16. [Nocardia endocarditis in aortic and tricuspid native valves].

    PubMed

    Chain, Sergio; Luciardi, Hector; Feldman, Gabriela; Berman, Sofia; Estrella, Cristina

    2007-01-01

    Nocardia endocarditis in native valve is an uncommon infection that usually arises in immunodepressed patients. We report a 51-year-old man diagnosed as having Nocardia endocarditis in aortic and tricuspid native valves, which received antimicrobial therapy and required aortic valve replacement. In 6 month follow up the patient remained asymptomatic with good clinical evolution.

  17. Adventitial vasa vasorum arteriosclerosis in abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Hiroki; Zaima, Nobuhiro; Sasaki, Takeshi; Hayasaka, Takahiro; Goto-Inoue, Naoko; Onoue, Kenji; Ikegami, Koji; Morita, Yoshifumi; Yamamoto, Naoto; Mano, Yuuki; Sano, Masaki; Saito, Takaaki; Sato, Kohji; Konno, Hiroyuki; Setou, Mitsutoshi; Unno, Naoki

    2013-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a common disease among elderly individuals. However, the precise pathophysiology of AAA remains unknown. In AAA, an intraluminal thrombus prevents luminal perfusion of oxygen, allowing only the adventitial vaso vasorum (VV) to deliver oxygen and nutrients to the aortic wall. In this study, we examined changes in the adventitial VV wall in AAA to clarify the histopathological mechanisms underlying AAA. We found marked intimal hyperplasia of the adventitial VV in the AAA sac; further, immunohistological studies revealed proliferation of smooth muscle cells, which caused luminal stenosis of the VV. We also found decreased HemeB signals in the aortic wall of the sac as compared with those in the aortic wall of the neck region in AAA. The stenosis of adventitial VV in the AAA sac and the malperfusion of the aortic wall observed in the present study are new aspects of AAA pathology that are expected to enhance our understanding of this disease.

  18. Changes in platelet indices in children with bicuspid aortic valve.

    PubMed

    Ayhan, Aylin Canbolat; Ayhan, Yusuf Izzet; Kalaycık, Ozlem; Timur, Cetin; Yoruk, Asım

    2015-03-01

    Mean platelet volume (MPV) and platelet distribution width (PDW) can help diagnose cardiovascular pathologies. In this study, we aimed to demonstrate the changes in platelet (PLT) indices in children diagnosed with bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) with mild stenosis and without stenosis to compare patients with mild stenosis with those without stenosis. A total of 73 children diagnosed with BAV (30 patients with mild stenosis and 43 without stenosis) with a mean age 9.73 ± 5.01 years and a control group were included in the study. Mean MPV value was significantly lower in the control group compared with patients with BAV with mild stenosis and patients without stenosis (p = 0.001, and p < 0.01, respectively). MPV was significantly greater in patients with mild stenosis than in patients without stenosis (p = 0.049 and p < 0.05, respectively). Patients with mild stenosis had a significantly greater mean PDW value compared with patients without stenosis and the control group (p = 0.024 and p < 0.05, respectively). There was no significant difference between patients without stenosis and the control group with respect to mean PDW value (p > 0.05). In conclusion, the results of this study demonsrate that children with BAV either with or without stenosis have increased MPV; the ones with mild stenosis have even greater values than the ones without stenosis. It emphasizes the risk of thrombosis in children with BAV.

  19. Asymptomatic HIV infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... infection URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000682.htm Asymptomatic HIV infection To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Asymptomatic HIV infection is a phase of HIV/AIDS during which there are no symptoms of HIV ...

  20. Cognitive Deficits in Symptomatic and Asymptomatic Carotid Endarterectomy Surgical Candidates

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Daren C.; Sandoval-Garcia, Carolina; Rocque, Brandon G.; Wilbrand, Stephanie M.; Mitchell, Carol C.; Hermann, Bruce P.; Dempsey, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    The role played by vessel disease in stroke-related cognition dysfunction is unclear. We assessed the impact of significant atherosclerotic disease on cognition—even in patients asymptomatic for stroke. We hypothesized that patients would perform poorly relative to controls, but that symptomatic/asymptomatic status (history of stroke/transient ischemic attack) would have no effect. Fifty-two carotid endarterectomy candidates with >60% carotid stenosis and 17 controls underwent a 60-min neuropsychological test protocol. Symptomatic and asymptomatic patients showed deficits in executive function, delayed verbal recall, and general knowledge. Patients symptomatic for stroke also performed worse on tests of language and motor/visuomotor ability. Symptomatic and asymptomatic patients differed in working memory and language task performance. Although all patients showed deficits in executive function and memory, only symptomatic patients showed additional deficits in language and motor function. Cognitive abnormalities in patients viewed as “asymptomatic” for stroke underscore the need for early identification and treatment. PMID:26663810

  1. Intermittent stuck valve after aortic valve replacement with a mechanical valve

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Wenzong; Wang, Xinxin; Li, Jing; Mu, Yun; Ni, Yiming

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Intermittent stuck valve after mechanical valve replacement surgery is a very rare and severe complication. Case summary: We present 1 case of a 53-year-old woman after aortic valve replacement for severe aortic valve stenosis combined with hypertrophy septum. She was diagnosed with intermittent stuck valve only 1 day after surgery by clinical symptoms, intraoperative transoesophageal echocardiogram, and intraoperative findings. Conclusions: Although indications for concomitant myectomy during aortic valve replacement are not clear, we recommend myectomy to prevent stuck valve after St Jude Medical Regent prosthesis replacement for severe aortic valve stenosis combined with hypertrophy septum. PMID:28248877

  2. Long-Term Risk of Cardiovascular Disease among Type 2 Diabetic Patients with Asymptomatic Intracranial Atherosclerosis: A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Jian Gang; Chen, Xiang Yan; Lau, Alex; Wong, Adrian; Thomas, G. Neil; Tomlinson, Brian; Liu, Roxanna; Chan, Juliana C. N.; Leung, Thomas W.; Mok, Vincent; Wong, Ka Sing

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether asymptomatic middle cerebral artery (MCA) stenosis is associated with risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in Chinese with type 2 diabetes. Methods In this prospective cohort study, 2,144 Hong Kong Chinese with type 2 diabetes and without history of stroke or atrial fibrillation were recruited in 1994–1996 and followed up for a median of 14.51 years. Participants were assessed at baseline for MCA stenosis using transcranial Doppler. We performed survival analysis to assess the association between asymptomatic MCA stenosis and first CVD event, defined as ischemic stroke, acute coronary syndrome (ACS) or cardiovascular death. Results Of the 2,144 subjects, MCA stenosis at baseline was detected in 264 (12.3%). Rates of stroke, ACS and cardiovascular death per 100 were, respectively, 2.24, 2.92 and 1.11 among participants with stenosis, higher than among those without stenosis. Ten-year cumulative occurrence of stroke, ACS and cardiovascular death in subjects with MCA stenosis was 20%, 24% and 10%, respectively, higher than the corresponding values for subjects without stenosis(all P<0.001). After adjusting for covariates, MCA stenosis was found to be an independent predictor of stroke [hazard ratio (HR) 1.40, 95%CI 1.05–1.86; P = 0.02], ACS (HR 1.35, 95%CI 1.04–1.75; P = 0.02) and cardiovascular death(HR 1.56, 95%CI 1.04–2.33; P = 0.03). Conclusions Asymptomatic MCA stenosis is a risk factor for CVD in Chinese with type 2 diabetes, and detection of asymptomatic MCA stenosis by transcranial Doppler can identify diabetic individuals at high risk of future CVD. This finding is particularly important for diabetic individuals in Asia, where intracranial atherosclerosis is common. PMID:25192283

  3. Percutaneous balloon aortic valvuloplasty in the era of transcatheter aortic valve implantation: a narrative review

    PubMed Central

    Keeble, Thomas R; Khokhar, Arif; Akhtar, Mohammed Majid; Mathur, Anthony; Weerackody, Roshan; Kennon, Simon

    2016-01-01

    The role of percutaneous balloon aortic valvuloplasty (BAV) in the management of severe symptomatic aortic stenosis has come under the spotlight following the development of the transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) technique. Previous indications for BAV were limited to symptom palliation and as a bridge to definitive therapy for patients undergoing conventional surgical aortic valve replacement (AVR). In the TAVI era, BAV may also be undertaken to assess the ‘therapeutic response’ of a reduction in aortic gradient in borderline patients often with multiple comorbidities, to assess symptomatic improvement prior to consideration of definitive TAVI intervention. This narrative review aims to update the reader on the current indications and practical techniques involved in undertaking a BAV procedure. In addition, a summary of the haemodynamic and clinical outcomes, as well as the frequently encountered procedural complications is presented for BAV procedures conducted during both the pre-TAVI and post-TAVI era. PMID:28008354

  4. Septoplasty for left ventricular outflow obstruction without aortic valve replacement: a new technique.

    PubMed

    Cooley, D A; Garrett, J R

    1986-10-01

    A new technique is described for relief of diffuse obstruction in the left ventricular outflow tract without aortic valve replacement. Left ventricular septoplasty was performed, preserving the aortic valve. The supra-valve stenosis was repaired using a Y-shaped extension of the aortotomy proximally and a pantaloon-shaped patch of woven Dacron fabric. A 10-year-old girl with "tunnel" or diffuse stenosis obtained striking relief of left ventricular hypertension by this technique.

  5. [New technique of concomitant replacement of the aortic valve and the ascending aorta with enlargement of the aortic annulus for congenital bicuspid aortic valve].

    PubMed

    Takahara, Shingo; Fukasawa, Manabu; Kawahara, Yu; Suzuki, Kotaro; Kobayashi, Yuriko

    2012-12-01

    Congenital bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is one of the most common congenital heart diseases, with a high incidence of associated valvular lesions and aortic abnormalities including aortic stenosis( AS), aortic regurgitation, aortic dilatation, and aortic dissection. Patients with BAV and AS often have a small aortic annulus. We encountered a case of BAV in which a 51-year-old woman with severe AS having a small aortic annulus and a dilated ascending aorta required surgical intervention. We performed the surgery using new technique that involved concomitant replacement of the aortic valve and the ascending aorta with enlargement of the aortic annulus using a single uniquely-shaped graft to avoid prosthesis patient mismatch. We trimmed the proximal end of the straight graft in shape of 2 teardrops hanging on it to fit the cut annulus. It requires only a single suture line to replace the ascending aorta and enlarge the aortic annulus, which entails a decreased risk of bleeding during surgery. We believe that it could be applicable to many cases requiring concomitant surgery.

  6. Transcatheter aortic valve-in-valve implantation of a CoreValve in a degenerated aortic bioprosthesis.

    PubMed

    Bruschi, Giuseppe; DeMarco, Federico; Oreglia, Jacopo; Colombo, Paola; Fratto, Pasquale; Lullo, Francesca; Paino, Roberto; Martinelli, Luigi; Klugmann, Silvio

    2010-03-01

    In recent years percutaneous aortic valve implantation has emerged as an alternative therapy to treat patients with symptomatic aortic stenosis considered to be high-risk surgical candidates. We report our experience of a percutaneous retrograde CoreValve implantation in a 77-year-old female with aortic bioprosthesis structural degeneration. The patient underwent aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis in 1999 with the implantation of a 23 mm Carpentier-Edwards; her last echocardiography showed a severe bioprosthesis stenosis. After evaluation by cardiac surgeons and cardiologist, considering the high risk re-do surgical procedure (Logistic Euroscore 30%) and severe comorbidities (severe pulmonary hypertension, hepatocellular carcinoma and severe osteoporosis), a percutaneous aortic valve-in-valve replacement was preferred. A successful percutaneous 26 mm CoreValve prosthesis implantation was performed with the patient awake with local anesthesia and mild sedation. The patient was discharged after 10 days of hospitalization and she is in NYHA functional class I at follow-up. Our experience, characterized by a multidisciplinary approach, necessary to offer the safest conditions and care for patients, demonstrates the feasibility of a new, promising indication for the use of a transcatheter valve implantation: percutaneous treatment of a degenerated aortic bioprosthesis.

  7. Computational analysis of an aortic valve jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shadden, Shawn C.; Astorino, Matteo; Gerbeau, Jean-Frédéric

    2009-11-01

    In this work we employ a coupled FSI scheme using an immersed boundary method to simulate flow through a realistic deformable, 3D aortic valve model. This data was used to compute Lagrangian coherent structures, which revealed flow separation from the valve leaflets during systole, and correspondingly, the boundary between the jet of ejected fluid and the regions of separated, recirculating flow. Advantages of computing LCS in multi-dimensional FSI models of the aortic valve are twofold. For one, the quality and effectiveness of existing clinical indices used to measure aortic jet size can be tested by taking advantage of the accurate measure of the jet area derived from LCS. Secondly, as an ultimate goal, a reliable computational framework for the assessment of the aortic valve stenosis could be developed.

  8. Causes and histopathology of ascending aortic disease in children and young adults

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Deepali; Dietz, Harry C.; Oswald, Gretchen L.; Maleszewski, Joseph J.; Halushka, Marc K.

    2011-01-01

    Background Ascending aortic diseases (aneurysms, dissections, and stenosis) and associated aortic valve disease are rare but important causes of morbidity and mortality in children and young adults. Certain genetic causes, such as Marfan syndrome and congenital bicuspid aortic valve disease, are well known. However, other rarer genetic and nongenetic causes of aortic disease exist. Methods We performed an extensive literature search to identify known causes of ascending aortic pathology in children and young adults. We catalogued both aortic pathologies and other defining systemic features of these diseases. Results We describe 17 predominantly genetic entities that have been associated with thoracic aortic disease in this age group. Conclusions While extensive literature on the common causes of ascending aortic disease exists, there is a need for better histologic documentation of aortic pathology in rarer diseases. PMID:19926309

  9. The expanding indications of transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Chiam, Paul T L; Ewe, See Hooi

    2016-03-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI), also known as transcatheter aortic valve replacement, is increasingly performed worldwide and is a technology that is here to stay. It has become the treatment of choice for inoperable patients and an alternative option for patients at high surgical risk with severe aortic stenosis. Early results of TAVI in intermediate-risk patients appear promising although larger randomized trial results are awaited before the widespread adoption of this technology in this big pool of patients. In patients with bicuspid aortic stenosis and degenerated surgical bioprostheses, TAVI has been shown to be feasible and relatively safe, though certain important considerations remain. Indications for TAVI are likely to grow as newer generation and improved devices and delivery systems become available.

  10. Aortic valve replacement in familial hypercholesterolemia: not an ordinary procedure.

    PubMed

    Muretti, Mirko; Massi, Francesco; Coradduzza, Enrico; Portoghese, Michele

    2015-04-28

    Familial hypercholesterolemia is an inherited disorder with incidences of approximately 1:500 and 1:1,000,000 in heterozygous and homozygous form respectively. Affected patients usually show early coronary artery disease and severe aortic root calcification, despite optimization of therapy. We report a case of a 64-year-old woman affected by heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia which presented dyspnea and anginal symptoms due to a severely calcified aortic root causing valve stenosis and narrowed sinotubular junction. Aortic valve replacement and aortic root enlargement were performed using the Manougian procedure. Even for experiences surgeons, this surgery could prove challenging for this group of patients due to aggressive degenerative tissue calcification of the aortic root, which often presents an extremely calcified aortic valve with a small annulus associated to a narrowed sinotubular junction.

  11. Advances in Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Kleiman, Neal S.; Reardon, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is becoming widely used for the treatment of symptomatic severe aortic stenosis in patients with high surgical risk. Data from The PARTNER Trial (Placement of AoRtic TraNscathetER Valves) and the Medtronic CoreValve® U.S. Pivotal Investigational Device Exemption trial indicate that survival for extreme-risk patients is superior to best medical therapy and equivalent or superior to surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR), although long-term durability remains unknown. Paravalvular leak remains higher in TAVR than SAVR, as does permanent pacemaker implantation in self-expanding valves. New-generation valves are addressing these issues, especially for paravalvular leak. There is strong evidence that TAVR is appropriate for both extreme-risk and high-risk patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis, and the continued development of new valves are making implantation more reliable. This review discusses the studies supporting the use of TAVR and explores current advances in the field. PMID:27127560

  12. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation: status and challenges.

    PubMed

    Fishbein, Gregory A; Schoen, Frederick J; Fishbein, Michael C

    2014-01-01

    Calcific aortic valve disease of the elderly is the most prevalent hemodynamically-significant valvular disease, and the most common lesion requiring valve replacement in industrialized countries. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation is a less invasive alternative to classical aortic valve replacement that can provide a therapeutic option for high-risk or inoperable patients with aortic stenosis. These devices must be biocompatible, have excellent hemodynamic performance, be easy to insert, be securely anchored without sutures, and be durable, without increased risk of thrombosis or infection. To date, complications are related to the site of entry for insertion, the site of implantation (aorta, coronary ostia, base of left ventricle), and to the structure and design of the inserted device. However, as with any novel technology unanticipated complications will develop. Goals for future development will be to make the devices more effective, more durable, safer, and easier to implant, so as to further improve outcome for patients with severe aortic stenosis. The pathologist participating in research and development, and examination of excised devices will have a critical role in improving outcome for these patients.

  13. What Is Spinal Stenosis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... To order the Sports Injuries Handout on Health full-text version, please contact NIAMS using the contact information ... publication. To order the Spinal Stenosis Q&A full-text version, please contact NIAMS using the contact information ...

  14. Aqueduct stenosis-?Benign.

    PubMed

    Allan, Rodney; Chaseling, Raymond; Graf, Nicole; Dexter, Mark

    2005-02-01

    'Benign' aqueduct stenosis is a common cause of hydrocephalus in the paediatric population and is frequently treated by endoscopic third ventriculostomy. Occasionally, aqueduct stenosis can be a prelude to the development of other pathology, as is seen in these two cases of pineal tumours developing in patients whose hydrocephalus was successfully treated with endoscopic third ventriculostomy. The case histories are presented, along with the recommendation for increased radiological screening of patients with this usually 'benign' presentation.

  15. Aortic valve replacement with the Nicks annulus enlargement procedure 12 years after mitral valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Kazama, S; Kurata, A; Yamashita, Y

    1999-10-01

    An aortic valve replacement was successfully performed employing the Nicks annulus enlargement procedure in a case of aortic valve stenosis with small annulus 12 years after mitral valve replacement. Previous mitral valve replacement does not preclude feasibility of the Nicks procedure.

  16. Salvage Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Prior to "Bridge" Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Peter; Fearon, William F; Raleigh, Lindsay A; Burdon, Grayson; Rao, Vidya; Boyd, Jack H; Yeung, Alan C; Miller, David Craig; Fischbein, Michael P

    2016-06-01

    We describe a patient who presented in profound cardiogenic shock due to bioprosthetic aortic valve stenosis requiring salvage Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation followed by a "bridge" valve-in-valve transcatheter aortic valve replacement. doi: 10.1111/jocs.12750 (J Card Surg 2016;31:403-405).

  17. Aortic Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... these occur in the part of the aorta running through the chest Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) - these occur in the part of the aorta running through the abdomen Most aneurysms are found during ...

  18. Repair for acquired aortic valve disease.

    PubMed

    Antunes, M J

    1996-10-01

    The favorable results of mitral valvuloplasty when compared with valve replacement have renewed the interest of many surgeons in aortic valve repair. However, these efforts have, for the most part, been unsuccessful. Also, the results of aortic valve replacement are usually better than those of mitral valve replacement. Yet, some patients appear to derive benefit from a conservative aortic valve procedure. The best examples are mild or moderate aortic valve disease associated with mitral valve or coronary artery disease, which constitute the primary indication for operation, where "prophylactic" aortic valve replacement does not appear justifiable. Other possible indications for aortic valvuloplasty includes patient's lack of compliance or contraindication to anticoagulation in young patients. Senile aortic stenosis, in very old patients with a small annulus, preserved leaflet morphology and nonsignificant commissural fusion should be considered for repair. However, since the procedure is not easily reproducible and the results not uniformly predictable, it cannot be recommended for generalized use. Nonetheless, experienced surgeons should be encouraged to continue these efforts.

  19. Congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries in an 83-year-old asymptomatic patient: description and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Placci, Angelo; Lovato, Luigi; Bonvicini, Marco

    2014-01-01

    We describe the case of an 83-year-old asymptomatic man followed in our centre. Transoesophageal echocardiography disclosed congenitally corrected transposition of great arteries (CCTGA) with no associated anomalies and only mild aortic regurgitation. Cardiac MR confirmed the diagnosis and revealed preserved systemic ventricle systolic function with a normal perfusional pathway. This report is a demonstration that CCTGA without associated anomalies can reach older life in an asymptomatic condition. This is the oldest asymptomatic living patient with CCTGA ever described. PMID:25336547

  20. Subclavian artery stenosis treated by transluminal angioplasty: Six cases

    SciTech Connect

    Galichia, J.P.; Bajaj, A.K.; Vine, D.L.; Roberts, R.W.

    1983-06-01

    Transluminal angioplasty (TLA) has been used in six patients with subclavian artery stenosis admitted to a large community hospital. Five patients had lesions proximal to the origin of the left vertebral artery, three of whom had angiographic evidence of subclavian steal syndrome. In all six, arteries were successfully dilated with only one complication of a hematoma at an arteriotomy site. In a 10 to 24-month follow-up, all six patients have remained totally asymptomatic without any further complications.

  1. Paraplegia after aortic and superior mesenteric artery stenting for occlusive disease.

    PubMed

    Hans, Sachinder S; Ngo, William; McAllister, Michael

    2014-02-01

    Paraplegia after endovascular therapy for aortic and visceral artery occlusive disease is an extremely uncommon occurrence. Two cases of paraplegia after placement of an aortic covered stent for infrarenal aortic stenosis and a superior mesenteric artery stent for chronic visceral ischemia are presented. In both patients, embolization of the arterial supply to the spinal cord was the presumed cause. One patient had a slight recovery after intense physical therapy and rehabilitation. The second patient did not have any recovery from her paraplegia.

  2. Aortic valve replacement within an unexpected porcelain aorta: the sutureless valve option.

    PubMed

    Gatti, Giuseppe; Benussi, Bernardo; Camerini, Fulvio; Pappalardo, Aniello

    2014-03-01

    Four patients referred for surgical treatment of aortic stenosis presented an unexpected extremely calcified (porcelain) ascending aorta at the intraoperative epiaortic ultrasonography scanning. In each patient, replacement of the aortic valve was successfully performed using a sutureless implantable bioprosthesis during a short period of hypothermic circulatory arrest. In the era of transcatheter aortic valve implantation procedures, the sutureless valve may be a valuable option for surgical units that do not dispose of transcatheter technology or a hybrid operative theatre.

  3. Endovascular Treatment of Late Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms after Surgical Repair of Congenital Aortic Coarctation in Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Juszkat, Robert; Perek, Bartlomiej; Zabicki, Bartosz; Trojnarska, Olga; Jemielity, Marek; Staniszewski, Ryszard; Smoczyk, Wiesław; Pukacki, Fryderyk

    2013-01-01

    Background In some patients, local surgery-related complications are diagnosed many years after surgery for aortic coarctation. The purposes of this study were: (1) to systematically evaluate asymptomatic adults after Dacron patch repair in childhood, (2) to estimate the formation rate of secondary thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAAs) and (3) to assess outcomes after intravascular treatment for TAAs. Methods This study involved 37 asymptomatic patients (26 female and 11 male) who underwent surgical repair of aortic coarctation in the childhood. After they had reached adolescence, patients with secondary TAAs were referred to endovascular repair. Results Follow-up studies revealed TAA in seven cases (19%) (including six with the gothic type of the aortic arch) and mild recoarctation in other six (16%). Six of the TAA patients were treated with stentgrafts, but one refused to undergo an endovascular procedure. In three cases, stengrafts covered the left subclavian artery (LSA), in another the graft was implanted distally to the LSA. In two individuals, elective hybrid procedures were performed with surgical bypass to the supraaortic arteries followed by stengraft implantation. All subjects survived the secondary procedures. One patient developed type Ia endoleak after stentgraft implantation that was eventually treated with a debranching procedure. Conclusions The long-term course of clinically asymptomatic patients after coarctation patch repair is not uncommonly complicated by formation of TAAs (particularly in individuals with the gothic pattern of the aortic arch) that can be treated effectively with stentgrafts. However, in some patients hybrid procedures may be necessary. PMID:24386233

  4. Asymptomatic post-rheumatic giant left atrium

    PubMed Central

    Özkartal, Tardu; Tanner, Felix C; Niemann, Markus

    2016-01-01

    A 78-year-old asymptomatic woman was referred to our clinic for a second opinion regarding indication for mitral valve surgery. An echocardiogram showed a moderate mitral stenosis with a concomitant severe regurgitation. The most striking feature, however, was a giant left atrium with a parasternal anteroposterior diameter of 79 mm and a left atrial volume index of 364 mL/m². There are various echocardiographic definitions of a giant left atrium, which are mainly based on measurements of the anteroposterior diameter of the left atrium using M-mode in the parasternal long axis view. Since the commonly accepted method for echocardiographic evaluation of left atrial size is left atrial volume index, we propose a cut-off value of 140 mL/m2 for the definition of a “giant left atrium”. PMID:27354895

  5. [Surgical prevention of stroke in patients with carotid stenosis].

    PubMed

    Pyshkina, L I; Khatagova, D T; Kabanov, A A; Darvish, N A; Alibekova, Zh M

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To study the cerebral and central hemodynamics in patients with stenotic lesions of inner carotid arteries (ICA) before and after reconstructive surgery. Material and methods. Fifty-nine patients, aged from 46 to 78 years, with >50% atherosclerotic stenosis of ICA who underwent preventive carotid endarterectomy (CEAE) were examined. The isolate stenosis of ICA was identified in 13.6% of patients, concomitant lesions of brachiocephalic arteries in 86.4%. Atherosclerotic lesions of coronary arteries were found in 91.1% of patients and those of arteries of lower extremities in 45.8%. In 25.5% of patients, the heart surgery was performed before the current hospitalization. Heterogeneous atherosclerotic plaques with dense or hyperdense components were more frequents in symptomatic stenosis (63.3%). The maximal stenosis was identified in heterogeneous hyperechogenic plaques, the minimal ones in homogenous hypoechogenic plaques. Parameters of central hemodynamics were better in patients with 2nd stage of reconstructive surgeries. The emission fraction decreased proportionally to the degree of stenosis. The parameters of cerebral hemodynamics were significantly decreased in ICA stenosis and improved in the early post-surgery period. Results. CEAE promoted the improvement of cognitive functions and the recovery of motor functions. The best positive dynamics was recorded in asymptomatic ICA stenosis. Poor outcome (transitory ischemic attacks, urgent surgery, restenosis) was found in patients with low levels of central and cerebral hemodynamics 12-24 months after the discharge. Moreover, smoking and the degree of stenosis predicted poor outcome. Conclusions. Surgical treatment in combination with the complex pharmacotherapy (hypotensive drugs, antiaggregants and statins) had the maximal effect, including the remote period.

  6. Echocardiographic evaluation of mitral stenosis using diastolic posterior left ventricular wall motion.

    PubMed

    Wise, J R

    1980-05-01

    The slope of the posterior left ventricular wall motion in diastole (LVDS) was determined by echocardiography in 25 normal subjects and 21 patients with mitral stenosis. Patients with mitral stenosis had reduced LVDS that was related to the degree of mitral stenosis determined by calculated mitral valve area (r = 0.92). The mitral valve area correlated more closely with the LVDS than with the left atrial emptying index derived from the posterior aortic wall motion. Three patients with mitral stenosis had an increased LVDS after mitral valvotomy or mitral valve replacement. One patient with a stenotic mitral valve prosthesis had reduced LVDS. The results of this study suggest that analysis of the LVDS would be useful in predicting the severity of mitral stenosis and may be beneficial in evaluating patients with suspected prosthetic mitral valve malfunction.

  7. Aortic arch aneurysm, pseudocoarctation, and coronary artery disease in a patient with Behçet's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bardakci, Hasmet; Kervan, Umit; Boysan, Emre; Birincioglu, Levent; Cobanoglu, Adnan

    2007-01-01

    Aortic arch aneurysm, pseudocoarctation, and coronary artery stenosis are extremely rare in Behçet's syndrome. We present the case of a 25-year-old man with Behçet's syndrome who underwent coronary artery bypass grafting for severe stenosis in the proximal left anterior descending coronary artery and concomitant surgical correction of a saccular aneurysm that was causing pseudocoarctation of the aortic arch. The surgery was successful.

  8. Vascular Adaptations to Transverse Aortic Banding in Mice

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    traces of Fig 7. Then the stenosis was added by increasing the resistance at the aortic arch (R ) by a factor of 30 (loose band) oraa 60 (tight band...Fig. 1. Drawing of a mouse heart and great vessels (A) showing the placement of a 0.4 mm constricting band around the aortic arch to produce cardiac...hypertrophy (B-C) via pressure overload. A Doppler probe (D) was used to measure flow velocity at the aortic valve (1), the mitral valve (2), the

  9. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation in the Elderly: Who to Refer?

    PubMed Central

    Finn, Matthew; Green, Philip

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, experience with transcatheter aortic valve implantation has led to improved outcomes in elderly patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS) who may not have previously been considered for intervention. These patients are often frail with significant comorbid conditions. As the prevalence of AS increases, there is a need for improved assessment parameters to determine the patients most likely to benefit from this novel procedure. This review discusses the diagnostic criteria for severe AS and the trials available to aid in the decision to refer for aortic valve procedures in the elderly. PMID:25216621

  10. [The effect of carotid endarterectomy on cognitive disturbances in patients with atherosclerotic stenosis of carotid arteries].

    PubMed

    Iakhno, N N; Fedorova, T S; Damulin, I V; Shcherbiuk, A N; Vinogradov, O A; Lavrent'ev, A V

    2011-01-01

    Clinical and neuropsychological features of non-dementia cognitive disturbances were studied in 102 patients with atherosclerotic carotid stenosis. Cognitive disturbances were assessed after the carotid endarterectomy (CEAE). Mild cognitive impairment was found in 37 (36,3%) of patients, moderate cognitive impairment was diagnosed in 36 (35,3%)patients. Moderate cognitive impairment was found more often in patients with symptomatic carotid stenosis with structural brain changes confirmed by neuroimaging data and with instable atherosclerotic plaques with the predomination of hypodensity component. It allows to suggest that both the reduction of perfusion and arterio-arterial microemboli may cause cognitive dysfunction in patients with atherosclerotic carotid stenosis. The data on the positive effect of CEAE on cognitive functions have been obtained. The positive changes were more distinct in patients with asymptomatic course of carotid stenosis. However CEAE may have a negative effect on cognitive functions in patients with moderate cognitive impairment of dysmnestic character and symptomatic carotid stenosis.

  11. Primary infundibular stenosis and pedigree analysis in three Golden Retriever littermates.

    PubMed

    Arndt, Jason; Werner, Petra; Sleeper, Meg

    2012-01-01

    Three eight-week-old Golden Retriever puppy littermates were evaluated because of left basilar systolic murmurs and were diagnosed with primary infundibular stenosis. Pedigree analysis in this line was also performed to identify a mode of inheritance. All dogs were asymptomatic at the time of diagnosis; two of the three had congenital lesions in addition to primary infundibular stenosis. Two additional affected dogs were identified in the line, and pedigree analysis suggested an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. Another, unrelated golden retriever was also identified with isolated infundibular stenosis in the record database. Primary infundibular stenosis should be considered in the differential diagnoses for golden retriever dogs with a left basilar systolic murmur, and is often associated with complex congenital cardiac disease. Primary infundibular stenosis may worsen in severity with time, and in this line of dogs an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance is likely.

  12. Lumbar spinal stenosis.

    PubMed Central

    Ciricillo, S F; Weinstein, P R

    1993-01-01

    Lumbar spinal stenosis, the results of congenital and degenerative constriction of the neural canal and foramina leading to lumbosacral nerve root or cauda equina compression, is a common cause of disability in middle-aged and elderly patients. Advanced neuroradiologic imaging techniques have improved our ability to localize the site of nerve root entrapment in patients presenting with neurogenic claudication or painful radiculopathy. Although conservative medical management may be successful initially, surgical decompression by wide laminectomy or an intralaminar approach should be done in patients with serious or progressive pain or neurologic dysfunction. Because the early diagnosis and treatment of lumbar spinal stenosis may prevent intractable pain and the permanent neurologic sequelae of chronic nerve root entrapment, all physicians should be aware of the different neurologic presentations and the treatment options for patients with spinal stenosis. Images PMID:8434469

  13. Risk factors and management for pyloric stenosis occurred after endoscopic submucosal dissection adjacent to pylorus

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Un; Park, Moon Sik; Yun, So Hee; Yang, Min A.; Han, Shang Hoon; Lee, Young Jae; Jung, Gum Mo; Kim, Ji Woong; Cho, Yong Keun; Cho, Jin Woong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) has been widely accepted as a curative treatment for gastric neoplasm. Pyloric stenosis is a chronic complication that can be caused by ESD. The aim of this study is to clarify the risk factors and management for pyloric stenosis. From January 2004 to January 2014, a total of 126 patients who underwent ESD adjacent to pylorus were reviewed retrospectively. Pyloric mucosal defect was defined as when any resection margin of ESD was involved in the pyloric ring. Pyloric stenosis was defined as when a conventional endoscope could not be passed to the duodenum. Among the 126 patients, pyloric stenosis was identified in 9. In a univariate analysis, pyloric stenosis was more common in older patients (P < 0.05) and in lesions with resections over 75% of the pyloric ring circumference (P < 0.001). In a multivariate analysis, the factor that was associated with pyloric stenosis was the extent of the pyloric ring dissection (P < 0.001). Four of the 9 patients with pyloric stenosis had mild dyspepsia, and the others had gastric outlet obstruction symptoms. The 5 symptomatic patients underwent endoscopic balloon dilation (EBD), and the frequency of EBD was 1 to 8 times. The asymptomatic patients were treated conservatively. The incidence of pyloric stenosis was higher in lesions with resections over 75% of the pyloric ring circumference. Although EBD was an effective treatment for pyloric stenosis, conservative management was also helpful in patients who had mild symptoms. PMID:27977608

  14. [Aortic dissection].

    PubMed

    Ogino, Hitoshi

    2011-07-01

    Acute aortic dissection suddenly occurrs and results in a variety of catastrophic sequelae including cardiac tamponade, rupture, and organ malperfusion. In acute stage (< 2 weeks), according to the classifications on the region of aortic dissection, the condition of the false channel and the onset, appropriate medical, surgical, or endovascular treatments including endovascular aneurysm repair followed by the rapid and accurate diagnosis of aortic dissection using computed tomography and ultrasound should be performed without delay. In the chronic stage (> 2 weeks), the behavior of the chronic dissection or residual distal dissection after the initial treatment should be followed-up carefully with best medical treatment at the regular intervals. If necessary, appropriate surgical and endovascular treatment should be carried out in the proper timing before rupture.

  15. Clinical and morphologic observations after simultaneous replacement of the tricuspid, mitral and aortic valves.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, M F; Roberts, W C

    1986-10-01

    Clinical and morphologic observations are described in 12 patients who underwent simultaneous replacement of the tricuspid, mitral and aortic valves. All 12 patients had mitral stenosis, 10 aortic valve stenosis and 2 pure aortic valve regurgitation; 5 had tricuspid valve stenosis and 7 pure tricuspid valve regurgitation. Of the 10 patients who died within 60 days of triple valve replacement, 7 had the low cardiac output syndrome, which in 4, and possibly 5, of the 7 was attributed to prosthetic aortic valve stenosis. In none of the 12 patients was the ascending aorta dilated, and in the 4 (possibly 5) patients with low cardiac output, the space between the surface of the caged poppet (4 patients) or margins of the tilting disc (1 patient) in the aortic valve position and the aortic endothelium appeared inadequate to allow unobstructed flow despite small-sized prostheses in all but 1 patient. Thus, aortic valve replacement in the setting of triple valve dysfunction is hazardous or potentially so. The relative small sizes of the hearts in these patients also make valve replacement more difficult (and hazardous) compared to hearts with larger ventricles and aortas.

  16. Screening for Carotid Artery Stenosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Task Force learned about the potential benefits and harms of screening for carotid artery stenosis: Health professionals ... blood flow through the arteries. Potential Benefits and Harms of Carotid Artery Stenosis Screening and Treatment The ...

  17. Aortic root and left atrial wall motion. An echocardiographic study.

    PubMed Central

    Akgün, G; Layton, C

    1977-01-01

    The echocardiographically recorded movement of the aortic root was studied by analysing the relation between posterior aortic wall motion and other intracardiac events. The systolic anterior movement of the aortic root continued beyond aortic valve closure and in cases with mitral regurgitation began significantly earlier than in normal subjects. The diastolic rapid posterior movement began after mitral valve opening but did not occur in patients with mitral stenosis. The total amplitude of aortic root motion was increased in patients with mitral regurgitation, diminished in cases of mitral stenosis, and was normal with aortic regurgitation. In patients with atrioventricular block an abrupt posterior movement followed the P wave of the electrocardiogram irrespective of its timing in diastole. These observations correlate with the expected changes in left atrial volume during the cardiac cycle both in the normal subjects and patients with heart disease. The results support the hypothesis that phasic changes in left atrial dimension are largely responsible for the echocardiographically observed movement of the aortic root and indicate a potential role for echocardiography in the analysis of left atrial events. Images PMID:911559

  18. Lusoria flap for the management of aortic coarctation in an eight-year-old child.

    PubMed

    Arrigoni, Sara C; Willems, Tineke P; Mungroop, Hubert E; van den Heuvel, Freek; Ebels, Tjark

    2013-07-01

    Anomalous origin of right subclavian artery arising from the descending aorta is known as "arteria lusoria." The diagnosis in asymptomatic children is usually the by-product of other symptomatic-associated anomalies, such as aortic coarctation. We describe a case of an eight-year-old boy with juxtaductal aortic coarctation and rare origin of the arteria lusoria proximal to the aortic coarctation. The anomalous arteria lusoria was used as a flap to repair the aortic coarctation. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported application of lusoria flap in a young child (not newborn) with ductal aortic coarctation.

  19. Clinical and necropsy observations early after simultaneous replacement of the mitral and aortic valves.

    PubMed

    Roberts, W C; Sullivan, M F

    1986-11-15

    Clinical and necropsy findings are described in 54 patients, aged 25 to 83 years (mean 53), who died within 60 days of simultaneous replacements of both mitral and aortic valves. The patients were separated into 4 groups on the basis of the presence of stenosis (with or without associated regurgitation) or pure regurgitation of each valve: 30 patients (56%) had combined mitral and aortic valve stenosis; 12 patients (22%) had mitral stenosis and pure aortic regurgitation; 8 patients (15%) had pure regurgitation of both valves; and 4 patients (7%) had pure aortic regurgitation and mitral stenosis. Necropsy examination in the 54 patients disclosed a high frequency (48%) of anatomic evidence of interference to poppet or disc movement in either the mitral or aortic valve position or both. Anatomic evidence of interference to movement of a poppet or disc in the aortic valve position was twice as common as anatomic evidence of interference to poppet or disc movement in the mitral position. Interference to poppet movement is attributable to the prosthesis's being too large for the ascending aorta or left ventricular cavity in which it resided. The ascending aorta is infrequently enlarged in patients with combined mitral and aortic valve dysfunction irrespective of whether the aortic valve is stenotic or purely regurgitant. Likewise, the left ventricular cavity is usually not dilated in patients with combined mitral and aortic valve stenosis, the most common indication for replacement of both left-sided cardiac valves. Of the 54 patients, 12 (22%) had 1 mechanical and 1 bioprosthesis inserted. It is recommended that both substitute valves should be mechanical prostheses or both should be bioprostheses.

  20. What Is Spinal Stenosis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and problems with joints. Rheumatoid arthritis:  Affects most people at a younger age than osteoarthritis.  Causes the soft tissues of the joints to swell and can affect the internal organs and systems.  Is not a common cause of spinal ... Conditions Some people are born with conditions that cause spinal stenosis. ...

  1. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement: design, clinical application, and future challenges.

    PubMed

    Forrest, John K

    2012-06-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is a new technology that recently has been shown to improve survival and quality of life in patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis who are not surgical candidates. The development and design of transcatheter valves has been ongoing for the past 20 years, and TAVR has now been approved by the FDA as a treatment for aortic stenosis in patients who are not surgical candidates. In the United States, there are currently two transcatheter valves available: the Edwards Sapien Valve and the Medtronic CoreValve. While similar in some design elements, they also have characteristic differences that affect both the mechanism of delivery as well as performance in patients. This review aims to take a closer look at the development of this new technology, review the published clinical results, and look toward the future of transcatheter valve therapeutics and the challenges therein.

  2. Left main coronary artery obstruction by dislodged native-valve calculus after transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Durmaz, Tahir; Ayhan, Huseyin; Keles, Telat; Aslan, Abdullah Nabi; Erdogan, Kemal Esref; Sari, Cenk; Bilen, Emine; Akcay, Murat; Bozkurt, Engin

    2014-08-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement can be an effective, reliable treatment for severe aortic stenosis in surgically high-risk or ineligible patients. However, various sequelae like coronary artery obstruction can occur, not only in the long term, but also immediately after the procedure. We present the case of a 78-year-old woman whose left main coronary artery became obstructed with calculus 2 hours after the transfemoral implantation of an Edwards Sapien XT aortic valve. Despite percutaneous coronary intervention in that artery, the patient died. This case reminds us that early recognition of acute coronary obstruction and prompt intervention are crucial in patients with aortic stenosis who have undergone transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

  3. [Single coronary artery and right aortic arch].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Quintana, Efrén; Rodríguez-González, Fayna

    2015-01-01

    Coronary anomalies are mostly asymptomatic and diagnosed incidentally during coronary angiography or echocardiography. However, they must be taken into account in the differential diagnosis of angina, dyspnea, syncope, acute myocardial infarction or sudden death in young patients. The case is presented of two rare anomalies, single coronary artery originating from right sinus of Valsalva and right aortic arch, in a 65 year-old patient with atherosclerotic coronary artery disease treated percutaneously.

  4. [Aortic arch and valve replacement in a hemodialysis patient with a porcelain aorta;report of a case].

    PubMed

    Ban, Tetsuaki; Aizawa, Kei; Oki, Shin-ichi; Misawa, Yoshio

    2012-06-01

    We report a case of thoracic aortic aneurysm and aortic valve stenosis with chronic renal failure requiring hemodialysis. A 75-year-old man complained of back pain and hoarseness. He had been on dialysis for 15 years. A computed tomography scan of the chest showed marked calcification in the thoracic aortic arch, which is known as a porcelain aorta, and a distal arch aneurysm. Echocardiographic examination showed moderate aortic valve stenosis with calcification. An operation was scheduled, and both the aortic valve and the aortic arch aneurysm were successfully replaced with a mechanical valve and a prosthetic graft. Cardiovascular surgery for patients complicated by a porcelain aorta requires extra cares for the establishment of cardiopulmonary bypass and anastomoses of the aorta.

  5. Acute Aortic Syndromes and Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Ramanath, Vijay S.; Oh, Jae K.; Sundt, Thoralf M.; Eagle, Kim A.

    2009-01-01

    Acute and chronic aortic diseases have been diagnosed and studied by physicians for centuries. Both the diagnosis and treatment of aortic diseases have been steadily improving over time, largely because of increased physician awareness and improvements in diagnostic modalities. This comprehensive review discusses the pathophysiology and risk factors, classification schemes, epidemiology, clinical presentations, diagnostic modalities, management options, and outcomes of various aortic conditions, including acute aortic dissection (and its variants intramural hematoma and penetrating aortic ulcers) and thoracic aortic aneurysms. Literature searches of the PubMed database were conducted using the following keywords: aortic dissection, intramural hematoma, aortic ulcer, and thoracic aortic aneurysm. Retrospective and prospective studies performed within the past 20 years were included in the review; however, most data are from the past 15 years. PMID:19411444

  6. Thoracic aortic aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... common cause of a thoracic aortic aneurysm is hardening of the arteries . This condition is more common ... aortic aneurysm repair - open Aortic aneurysm repair - endovascular Hardening of the arteries High blood pressure Marfan syndrome ...

  7. Investigation of cerebral hemodynamics and collateralization in asymptomatic carotid stenoses.

    PubMed

    AlMuhanna, Khalid; Zhao, Limin; Kowalewski, Gregory; Beach, Kirk W; Lal, Brajesh K; Sikdar, Siddhartha

    2012-01-01

    Stroke is the second leading cause of death in the world, and one of the major causes of disability. Approximately 30% of ischemic strokes are due to plaque rupture in the carotid arteries. The most popular diagnostic method uses Doppler ultrasound to find the percent stenosis. However, other factors, such as the hemodynamics around the plaque may play a larger role in identifying the risk of plaque rupture. It has been shown previously in simulations that non-collateral flow in the circle of Willis (COW) could cause an increase of the intraluminal velocity around carotid plaque. This added strain may increase the vulnerability of the plaque to rupture. We investigated asymmetries in flow waveforms in the middle cerebral artery (MCA) in asymptomatic patients with carotid artery stenosis. We compared clinical results of velocity waveforms in the MCA, acquired using transcranial Doppler (TCD), with a simple linear simulation model of the intra- and extracranial arterial network to investigate the relationship between contralateral and ipsilateral flow profiles in the MCA for patients with asymptomatic carotid stenosis. In 17 out of 23 patients we found waveforms consistent with those predicted for a collateralized COW, with minimal differences in delay, velocity magnitude and resistivity index. In 6 cases, some unexpected findings were noted, such as large delays for 2 patients ≤ 50% stenosis, and a large velocity difference with low delay for 4 patients. More studies are needed to elucidate the role of incomplete intracranial collateralization on the hemodynamics around carotid plaque and to use imaging of the COW to corroborate our results.

  8. Patient selection for transcatheter aortic valve replacement: A combined clinical and multimodality imaging approach

    PubMed Central

    Cocchia, Rosangela; D’Andrea, Antonello; Conte, Marianna; Cavallaro, Massimo; Riegler, Lucia; Citro, Rodolfo; Sirignano, Cesare; Imbriaco, Massimo; Cappelli, Maurizio; Gregorio, Giovanni; Calabrò, Raffaele; Bossone, Eduardo

    2017-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has been validated as a new therapy for patients affected by severe symptomatic aortic stenosis who are not eligible for surgical intervention because of major contraindication or high operative risk. Patient selection for TAVR should be based not only on accurate assessment of aortic stenosis morphology, but also on several clinical and functional data. Multi-Imaging modalities should be preferred for assessing the anatomy and the dimensions of the aortic valve and annulus before TAVR. Ultrasounds represent the first line tool in evaluation of this patients giving detailed anatomic description of aortic valve complex and allowing estimating with enough reliability the hemodynamic entity of valvular stenosis. Angiography should be used to assess coronary involvement and plan a revascularization strategy before the implant. Multislice computed tomography play a central role as it can give anatomical details in order to choice the best fitting prosthesis, evaluate the morphology of the access path and detect other relevant comorbidities. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance and positron emission tomography are emergent modality helpful in aortic stenosis evaluation. The aim of this review is to give an overview on TAVR clinical and technical aspects essential for adequate selection.

  9. Arch Reconstruction with Autologous Pulmonary Artery Patch in Interrupted Aortic Arch

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Won-Young

    2014-01-01

    Various surgical techniques have been developed for the repair of an interrupted aortic arch. However, tension and Gothic arch formation at the anastomotic site have remained major problems for these techniques: Excessive tension causes arch stenosis and left main bronchus compression, and Gothic arch configuration is related to cardiovascular complications. To resolve these problems, we adopted a modified surgical technique of distal aortic arch augmentation using an autologous main pulmonary artery patch. The descending aorta was then anastomosed to the augmented aortic arch in an end-to-side manner. Here, we report two cases of interrupted aortic arch that were repaired using this technique. PMID:24782962

  10. Aortic embolization of an Edwards SAPIEN prosthesis due to sigmoid left ventricular hypertrophy: Case report.

    PubMed

    Yuksel, Isa Öner; Koklu, Erkan; Arslan, Sakir; Cagirci, Goksel; Kucukseymen, Selcuk

    2016-06-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is considered an alternative therapy in high-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis. Although a minimally invasive procedure, it is not free from complications, one of which is valve embolization at the time of TAVI. We present a case of embolization of a balloon-expandable aortic valve due to sigmoid left ventricular hypertrophy and managed with a second valve without surgery. The embolized valve was repositioned in the aortic arch between the left common carotid artery and the brachiocephalic trunk.

  11. The Perceval S Aortic Valve Implantation in Patients with Porcelain Aorta; is this Ideal Option?

    PubMed Central

    Baikoussis, Nikolaos G; Dedeilias, Panagiotis; Prappa, Efstathia; Argiriou, Michalis

    2017-01-01

    We would like to present in this paper a patient with severe aortic valve stenosis referred to our department for surgical aortic valve replacement. In this patient, it was intraoperatively detected an unexpected heavily calcified porcelain ascending aorta. We present the treatment options in this situation, the difficulties affronted intraoperatively, the significance of the preoperative chest computed tomography scan and the use of the Perceval S aortic valve as ideal bioprosthesis implantation. This is a self-expanding, self-anchoring, and sutureless valve with a wide indication in all patients requiring aortic bioprosthesis. PMID:28074827

  12. The perceval S aortic valve implantation in patients with porcelain aorta; is this ideal option?

    PubMed

    Baikoussis, Nikolaos G; Dedeilias, Panagiotis; Prappa, Efstathia; Argiriou, Michalis

    2017-01-01

    We would like to present in this paper a patient with severe aortic valve stenosis referred to our department for surgical aortic valve replacement. In this patient, it was intraoperatively detected an unexpected heavily calcified porcelain ascending aorta. We present the treatment options in this situation, the difficulties affronted intraoperatively, the significance of the preoperative chest computed tomography scan and the use of the Perceval S aortic valve as ideal bioprosthesis implantation. This is a self-expanding, self-anchoring, and sutureless valve with a wide indication in all patients requiring aortic bioprosthesis.

  13. Arch reconstruction with autologous pulmonary artery patch in interrupted aortic arch.

    PubMed

    Lee, Won-Young; Park, Jeong-Jun

    2014-04-01

    Various surgical techniques have been developed for the repair of an interrupted aortic arch. However, tension and Gothic arch formation at the anastomotic site have remained major problems for these techniques: Excessive tension causes arch stenosis and left main bronchus compression, and Gothic arch configuration is related to cardiovascular complications. To resolve these problems, we adopted a modified surgical technique of distal aortic arch augmentation using an autologous main pulmonary artery patch. The descending aorta was then anastomosed to the augmented aortic arch in an end-to-side manner. Here, we report two cases of interrupted aortic arch that were repaired using this technique.

  14. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation Despite Challenging Vascular Access

    PubMed Central

    Nascimbene, Angelo; Azpurua, Federico; Livesay, James J.; Fish, R. David

    2015-01-01

    We describe transcatheter aortic valve implantation in a patient who had severe peripheral artery disease. The patient's vascular condition required additional preliminary peripheral intervention to enable adequate vascular access. A 78-year-old man with severe aortic stenosis, substantial comorbidities, and severe heart failure symptoms was referred for aortic valve replacement. The patient's 20-mm aortic annulus necessitated the use of a 23-mm Edwards Sapien valve inserted through a 22F sheath, which itself needed a vessel diameter of at least 7 mm for percutaneous delivery. The left common femoral artery was selected for valve delivery. The left iliac artery and infrarenal aorta underwent extensive intervention to achieve an intraluminal diameter larger than 7 mm. After aortic valvuloplasty, valve deployment was successful, and the transaortic gradient decreased from 40 mmHg to less than 5 mmHg. The patient was discharged from the hospital 4 days postoperatively. We conclude that transcatheter aortic valve implantation can be successfully performed in patients with obstructed vascular access, including stenosis of the infrarenal aorta and the subclavian and coronary arteries. PMID:25873826

  15. Multimodality management of carotid artery stenosis: reviewing the class-I evidence.

    PubMed Central

    McClelland, Shearwood

    2007-01-01

    Stroke is the third leading cause of mortality in the United States; approximately every three minutes a person will die from a stroke. Extracranial internal carotid artery stenosis (EICAS) accounts for approximately 25% of ischemic strokes, with an incidence as high as 10% in people aged > 80 years. Clinically, EICAS can manifest as a transient ischemic attack, although the vast majority of EICAS patients are asymptomatic. Symptomatic EICAS patients are at high risk for ischemic stroke if left untreated, and previous literature has shown that even patients with asymptomatic EICAS require treatment because the natural history of the disease precipitates an overall mortality rate of 4-7%. The three major treatment modalities for EICAS presently are medical management, carotid endarterectomy and carotid angioplasty with stenting. This review examines the class-I evidence (prospective randomized controlled trials) regarding optimal treatment modalities for management of symptomatic and asymptomatic carotid stenosis. PMID:18020098

  16. Aortic valve replacement with sutureless and rapid deployment aortic valve prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Berretta, Paolo; Di Eusanio, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Aortic valve stenosis is the most common valve disease in the western world. Over the past few years the number of aortic valve replacement (AVR) interventions has increased with outcomes that have been improved despite increasing age of patients and increasing burden of comorbidities. However, despite such excellent results and its well-established position, conventional AVR has undergone great development over the previous two decades. Such progress, by way of less invasive incisions and use of new technologies, including transcatheter aortic valve implantation and sutureless valve prostheses, is intended to reduce the traumatic impact of the surgical procedure, thus fulfilling lower risk patients' expectations on the one hand, and extending the operability toward increasingly high-risk patients on the other. Sutureless and rapid deployment aortic valves are biological, pericardial prostheses that anchor within the aortic annulus with no more than three sutures. The sutureless prostheses, by avoiding the passage and the tying of the sutures, significantly reduce operative times and may improve outcomes. However, there is still a paucity of robust, evidence-based data on the role and performance of sutureless AVR. Therefore, strongest long-term data, randomized studies and registry data are required to adequately assess the durability and long-term outcomes of sutureless aortic valve replacement. PMID:27582765

  17. Aortic valve leaflet replacement with bovine pericardium to preserve native dynamic capabilities of the aortic annulus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung Hwa; Choi, Jong Bum; Kim, Min Ho; Kim, Won Ho; Lee, Mi Kyung; Lee, Sam Youn

    2014-02-01

    Valve replacement is typically the most appropriate option for treating aortic valve stenotic insufficiency. However, neither mechanical nor bioprosthetic replacement components preserve the circumferential expansion and contraction of a native aortic annulus during the cardiac cycle, because the prosthetic ring is affixed to the annulus. A 64-year-old man presented with a bicuspid and stenotic aortic valve, and the native annulus was too small to accommodate a porcine replacement valve. We fashioned new aortic leaflets from bovine pericardium with use of a template, and we affixed the sinotubular junction with use of inner and outer stabilization rings. Postoperative echocardiograms revealed coaptation of the 3 new leaflets with no regurgitation. At the patient's 5.5-year follow-up examination, echocardiograms showed flexible leaflet movement with a coaptation height of 7 mm, and expansion and contraction of the aortic annulus similar to that of a normal native annulus. The transvalvular pressure gradient was insignificant. If long-term durability of the new leaflets is confirmed, this method of leaflet replacement and fixation of the sinotubular junction might serve as an acceptable alternative to valve replacement in the treatment of aortic valve stenosis. We describe the patient's case and present our methods and observations.

  18. Aortic Valve Leaflet Replacement with Bovine Pericardium to Preserve Native Dynamic Capabilities of the Aortic Annulus

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung Hwa; Kim, Min Ho; Kim, Won Ho; Lee, Mi Kyung; Lee, Sam Youn

    2014-01-01

    Valve replacement is typically the most appropriate option for treating aortic valve stenotic insufficiency. However, neither mechanical nor bioprosthetic replacement components preserve the circumferential expansion and contraction of a native aortic annulus during the cardiac cycle, because the prosthetic ring is affixed to the annulus. A 64-year-old man presented with a bicuspid and stenotic aortic valve, and the native annulus was too small to accommodate a porcine replacement valve. We fashioned new aortic leaflets from bovine pericardium with use of a template, and we affixed the sinotubular junction with use of inner and outer stabilization rings. Postoperative echocardiograms revealed coaptation of the 3 new leaflets with no regurgitation. At the patient's 5.5-year follow-up examination, echocardiograms showed flexible leaflet movement with a coaptation height of 7 mm, and expansion and contraction of the aortic annulus similar to that of a normal native annulus. The transvalvular pressure gradient was insignificant. If long-term durability of the new leaflets is confirmed, this method of leaflet replacement and fixation of the sinotubular junction might serve as an acceptable alternative to valve replacement in the treatment of aortic valve stenosis. We describe the patient's case and present our methods and observations. PMID:24512414

  19. Aortic valve replacement with concomitant annular enlargement for small aortic annulus of less than 19 mm.

    PubMed

    Takakura, H; Sasaki, T; Hashimoto, K; Hachiya, T; Onoguchi, K; Oshiumi, M; Takeuchi, S

    2000-06-01

    Three female patients with aortic stenosis associated with a severely small annulus underwent aortic valve replacement. In intraoperative measurements, a 19-mm obtulator could not pass through the aortic annulus in each case. We therefore concluded that it would be difficult to implant an appropriate-sized prosthesis in a routine fashion, so we performed an annular enlargement in a modified Nicks procedure. By using a wide teardrop-shaped patch for enlargement and slightly tilting insertion of a prosthesis, a 21 mm bileaflet mechanical prosthesis could be inserted into the enlarged annulus. Despite being a simpler method than other enlarging procedures, a two- or three-sizes larger prosthesis than the native annulus can be inserted with relative ease. Thus, the use of a 19 mm mechanical prosthesis may be avoidable in most adult cases.

  20. Significance of microalbuminuria in relation to subclinical coronary atherosclerosis in asymptomatic nonhypertensive, nondiabetic subjects.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyo Eun; Heo, Nam Ju; Kim, Minkyung; Choi, Su-Yeon

    2013-03-01

    We aimed to investigate the significance of microalbuminuria and its relationship with subclinical atherosclerosis in nonhypertensive and nondiabetic patients, by using coronary artery computed tomography (CT). A total of 1,318 nonhypertensive and nondiabetic subjects who had taken coronary artery CT and measured spot urine albumin to creatinine ratio (UACR) were evaluated. The atherosclerotic changes of coronary arteries were greater in subjects with microalbuminuria, reflected by coronary artery calcium score (CACS) and significant coronary artery stenosis (CACS ≥ 100 in 15.3% vs 7.6% and stenosis ≥ 50% in 11.5% vs 4.9% of patients with vs without microalbuminuria, P = 0.008 and P = 0.011, respectively). Among various parameters that are known as a risk factor or possible biomarkers of coronary artery disease, presence of microalbuminuria, age and Framingham risk score were significantly related to coronary artery stenosis. Among them the presence of microalbuminuria showed stronger correlation than others to the coronary artery stenosis detected by CT, even after adjusting confounding factors (OR 3.397, 95% confidence interval 1.138 to 10.140, P = 0.028). The presence of microalbuminuria by UACR was significantly associated with presence of coronary artery stenosis ≥ 50% in asymptomatic, nonhypertensive and nondiabetic general population. Our study suggests that the presence of microalbuminuria may imply subclinical coronary artery disease, even in asymptomatic population.

  1. Coexistence of osteopoikilosis with seronegative spondyloarthritis and spinal stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Demir, Saliha Eroglu; Özaras, Nihal; Poyraz, Emine; Toprak, Hüseyin; Güler, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] Osteopoikilosis is a rare hereditary bone disease that is usually asymptomatic. It is generally diagnosed incidentally on plain radiography. The coexistence of osteopoikilosis with seronegative spondyloarthritis or spinal stenosis is rarely reported. Here, we report the case of a 27-year-old male patient with osteopoikilosis, seronegative spondyloarthritis, and spinal stenosis. [Subject] A 27-year-old male patient with buttock pain and back pain radiating to the legs. [Methods] A plain anteroposterior radiograph of the pelvis revealed numerous round and oval sclerotic bone areas of varying size. Investigation of the knee joints showed similar findings, and the patient was diagnosed with osteopoikilosis. Lumbar magnetic resonance images showed spinal stenosis and degenerative changes in his lumbar facet joints. Magnetic resonance images of the sacroiliac joints showed bilateral involvement with narrowing of both sacroiliac joints, nodular multiple sclerotic foci, and contrast enhancement in both joint spaces and periarticular areas. HLA B-27 test was negative. [Results] The patient was diagnosed with osteopoikilosis, seronegative spondyloarthritis, and spinal stenosis. Treatment included asemetasin twice daily and exercise therapy. [Conclusion] Symptomatic patients with osteopoikilosis should be investigated for other possible coexisting medical conditions; this will shorten the times to diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26157277

  2. Percutaneous transcatheter aortic valve replacement: first transfemoral implant in Asia.

    PubMed

    Chiam, P T; Koh, T H; Chao, V T; Lee, C Y; See Tho, V Y; Tan, S Y; Lim, S T; Hwang, N C; Sin, Y K; Chua, Y L

    2009-05-01

    Surgical aortic valve replacement (AVR) is the standard of care for patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis (AS), providing relief of symptoms and prolonging survival. However, many patients are either denied or not offered surgery due to high surgical risk or non-operability for open AVR. The technology of percutaneous aortic valve implantation emerged in 2002, and has since evolved rapidly with satisfactory results. Currently, almost all the procedures are performed predominantly in Europe and North America. The first-in-Asia percutaneous transcatheter aortic valve implantation via the transfemoral route is described. A 77-year-old man with symptomatic severe AS and at high surgical risk was successfully treated, with sustained clinical improvement and satisfactory haemodynamic results at 30-day follow-up.

  3. Behcet’s disease and cardiovascular involvement: our experience of asymptomatic Behcet’s patients

    PubMed Central

    Ulusan, Zeynep; Karadag, Ayse Serap; Tasar, Mehmet; Kalender, Mehmet; Tansel Darcin, Osman

    2014-01-01

    Summary Abstract Behcet’s syndrome is a systemic inflammatory disease associated with vasculitis, and arterial, venous and cardiac disorders. Thirty-eight Behcet’s disease patients were examined prospectively with echocardiography, ultrasonography and computed tomography, and coagulation parameters were determined. Deep venous insufficiency was found in 16 patients, venous thrombosis in seven, one patient had iliac artery stenosis, three had carotid arterial intimal proliferation, two patients had aortic annulus dilatation, six had aortic valve insufficiency, and three had mitral valve insufficiency. None had coagulation defects. To decrease morbidity and mortality rates, a multidisciplinary approach is important for early diagnosis of cardiovascular involvement in Behcet’s disease. PMID:24844550

  4. Natural History of Asymptomatic and Unrepaired Vascular Rings: Is Watchful Waiting a Viable Option? A New Case and Review of Previously Reported Cases

    PubMed Central

    Loomba, Rohit S.

    2016-01-01

    Vascular rings are a rare form of congenital heart disease in which abnormal aortic arch anatomy leads to encircling of the esophagus and/or trachea by the aortic vasculature. Symptoms can develop from this and prompt the need for surgery. A natural history study has been done on mildly symptomatic patients but no such study has been done on asymptomatic patients. We present a case report of three children with asymptomatic vascular rings who continue to receive follow-up without intervention and review all published cases of asymptomatic or unrepaired vascular rings. Clinical observation of asymptomatic and mildly symptomatic vascular rings, regardless of aortic arch anatomy, seems to be a safe approach. Children with mild symptoms almost invariably seem to have resolution of their symptoms by four years of age. PMID:28009833

  5. Subglottic tracheal stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Venuta, Federico; Rendina, Erino Angelo

    2016-01-01

    Benign subglottic stenosis represents a major therapeutic challenge. Interventional bronchoscopic treatment has a limited role in this setting due to anatomical and technical reasons. The benefit with these techniques is generally temporary, due to frequent recurrences, need for repeated procedures and risk of extending the area of damage. Laryngotracheal resection is at present the curative treatment of choice. Literature data show that surgical treatment may allow very high success rates at long term with low perioperative morbidity and mortality. Technical aspects and results are reported and discussed. PMID:26981264

  6. An Autopsy Case of Aortic Intimal Sarcoma Initially Diagnosed as Polyarteritis Nodosa

    PubMed Central

    Toyoda, Yuko; Ozaki, Ryohiko; Kishi, Jun; Hanibuchi, Masaki; Kinoshita, Katsuhiro; Tezuka, Toshifumi; Goto, Hisatsugu; Ono, Hiroyuki; Nagai, Kojiro; Bando, Yoshimi; Doi, Toshio; Nishioka, Yasuhiko

    2016-01-01

    A 61-year-old man had hypertension with stenosis in the left renal artery. When his fever, abdominal pain, and renal dysfunction progressed, he was admitted to our hospital. He was diagnosed with polyarthritis nodosa. His renal function rapidly deteriorated despite immunosuppressive therapy. His digestive tract perforated twice, and he subsequently died. An autopsy revealed that aortic intimal sarcoma caused stenosis in multiple arteries. Both polyarteritis nodosa and aortic intimal sarcoma are very rare diseases and the diagnoses are very difficult. It is very important to consider these entities when making a differential diagnosis of vasculitis. PMID:27803418

  7. Current Indications for Surgical Repair in Patients with Bicuspid Aortic Valve and Ascending Aortic Ectasia

    PubMed Central

    Etz, Christian D.; Misfeld, Martin; Borger, Michael A.; Luehr, Maximilian; Strotdrees, Elfriede; Mohr, Friedrich-Wilhelm

    2012-01-01

    Preventive surgical repair of the moderately dilated ascending aorta/aortic root in patients with bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is controversial. Most international reference centers are currently proposing a proactive approach for BAV patients with a maximum ascending aortic/root diameter of 45 mm since the risk of dissection/rupture raises significantly with an aneurysm diameter >50 mm. Current guidelines of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) and the joint guidelines of the American College of Cardiology (ACC)/American Heart Association (AHA) recommend elective repair in symptomatic patients with dysfunctional BAV (aortic diameter ≥45 mm). In asymptomatic patients with a well-functioning BAV, elective repair is recommended for diameters ≥50 mm, or if the aneurysm is rapidly progressing (rate of 5 mm/year), or in case of a strong family history of dissection/rupture/sudden death, or with planned pregnancy. As diameter is likely not the most reliable predictor of rupture and dissection and the majority of BAV patients may never experience an aortic catastrophe at small diameters, an overly aggressive approach almost certainly will put some patients with BAV unnecessarily at risk of operative and early mortality. This paper discusses the indications for preventive, elective repair of the aortic root, and ascending aorta in patients with a BAV and a moderately dilated—or ectatic—ascending aorta. PMID:23050195

  8. Aortic valve debridement by ultrasonic surgical aspirator: a word of caution.

    PubMed

    Craver, J M

    1990-05-01

    Aortic stenosis was relieved in 11 patients by ultrasonic debridement of the valve and annulus, while 102 other patients underwent valve replacement for aortic stenosis during 1988. Debridement was selectively applied based on findings of small annulus size (19 mm or less) and extensive calcification. Additional patient characteristics were mean transvalvular gradient of 78 mm Hg, advanced age, and marked left ventricular hypertrophy. Six patients had no residual gradient and 5 others a mean gradient less than 10 mm Hg. There were no complications related to the debridement process. Intraoperative transesophageal Doppler echocardiography demonstrated improved leaflet mobility and elimination of the gradient in all patients and elimination of associated valvular insufficiency in 2 patients. Follow-up echocardiography demonstrated late onset of new valvular regurgitation in 5 patients that was progressive and required reoperation in 3. Thickened, hardened, and retracted valve leaflets with loss of central coaptation were found in all 3 patients who underwent reoperation. Ultrasonic debridement can effectively relieve aortic stenosis, provide an excellent immediate hemodynamic result, and decrease operative time. However, the early occurrence of aortic insufficiency in a high percentage of patients makes it an unacceptable alternative to valve replacement, and the technique should be abandoned as a treatment for severe calcific aortic stenosis.

  9. Assessment of Carotid Artery Stenosis and the Use of Statins

    PubMed Central

    Whayne, Thomas F.

    2015-01-01

    General thinking has previously centered on managing carotid artery stenosis (CAS) by carotid endarterectomy and subsequently, stenting for higher risk patients. However for CAS and other forms of vascular disease, especially when asymptomatic, there is new emphasis on defining underlying mechanisms. Knowledge of these mechanisms can lead to medical treatments that result in possible atherosclerotic plaque stabilization, and even plaque regression, including in the patient with CAS. For now, the key medication class for a medical approach are the statins. Their use is supported by good cardiovascular clinical trial evidence including some directed carotid artery studies, especially with a demonstrated decrease in carotid intima-media thickness. Procedural controversy still exists but the current era in medicine offers significant support for medical management of asymptomatic CAS while techniques to recognize the vulnerable plaque evolve. If CAS converts to a symptomatic status, early referral for endarterectomy or stenting is indicated. PMID:26417184

  10. [Aortic valve replacement and hemiarch replacement in a patient with a porcelain aorta].

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Y; Sakakibara, K; Inoue, H; Suzuki, S; Shindo, S; Matsumoto, M

    2009-07-01

    We report a case of aortic valve replacement and hemiarch replacement with reconstruction of the brachiocephalic artery in a patient with a porcelain aorta. A 65-year-old man was admitted to the hospital for aortic stenosis. Computed tomography demonstrated severe aortic calcification and extensive calcification covering a wide area of the aorta. The echocardiography showed a highly calcified aortic valve and a pressure gradient of 109 mmHg across the aortic valve. At surgery, calcification of the ascending aorta was severe and involved its entire circumference. Therefore, 2 cannulae were inserted to the right axillary and right femoral arteries for extracorporeal circulation. We performed replacement of the ascending aorta and hemiarch with reconstruction of the brachiocephalic artery under circulatory arrest and antegrade cerebral perfusion, as well as aortic valve replacement with a 21 mm St. Jude Medical mechanical valve. He had no major cardiac complications during the postoperative course, and was discharged on postoperative day 33.

  11. [Diagnosis and differential therapy of mitral stenosis].

    PubMed

    Fassbender, D; Schmidt, H K; Seggewiss, H; Mannebach, H; Bogunovic, N

    1998-11-01

    less significantly changed valves, the results were correspondingly more favorable than in older patients (Figure 3). Provided valve morphology is suitable, a relapse following previous surgical commissurotomy is not a contraindication for MVP. The MVP complication rate is very low in skilled hands: mortality is below 1%; mitral insufficiency occurs in 3 to 10% of interventions; we observed a severe mitral insufficiency in 5% of our patient group. Thromboembolic complications may be prevented after exclusion of atrial thrombi by transesophageal echocardiography. The occurrence of a hemodynamically significant atrial septum defect is a very rare event. The mid-term results (5 to 10 years) and the low restenosis rate following MVP in patients with suitable valves are comparable with those of surgical commissurotomy. In older patients with considerably changed, calcified and fibrotic valves, restenosis may be expected within 1 to 5 years. In these patients MVP represents no more than a palliative intervention in order to prolong the point of surgery, for example in patients where a concomitant aortic valve disease in itself is not yet an indication for surgery. Special indications are to be found in young patients with severe mitral stenosis yet few symptoms, in pregnant females and in emergency situations, as well as in patients with Grade II mitral stenosis with intermittent atrial fibrillation. Catheter therapy is much less invasive than surgery. In case of failure the patient still has the option of surgical therapy. Patients with morphologically significantly altered valves usually receive a valve replacement since an unsuccessful reconstruction would lead to a second operation within a very short time interval. Contraindications for MVP are thrombi in the left atrium, a previously existing > Grade II mitral regurgitation and marked, degenerative destruction of the subvalvular apparatus or extensive calcification of the valves. MVP thus represents a significant addi

  12. Particle Image Velocimetry studies of bicuspid aortic valve hemodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saikrishnan, Neelakantan; Yap, Choon-Hwai; Yoganathan, Ajit P.

    2010-11-01

    Bicuspid aortic valves (BAVs) are a congenital anomaly of the aortic valve with two fused leaflets, affecting about 1-2% of the population. BAV patients have much higher incidence of valve calcification & aortic dilatation, which may be related to altered mechanical forces from BAV hemodynamics. This study aims to characterize BAV hemodynamics using Particle Image Velocimetry(PIV). BAV models are constructed from normal explanted porcine aortic valves by suturing two leaflets together. The valves are mounted in an acrylic chamber with two sinuses & tested in a pulsatile flow loop at physiological conditions. 2D PIV is performed to obtain flow fields in three planes downstream of the valve. The stenosed BAV causes an eccentric jet, resulting in a very strong vortex in the normal sinus. The bicuspid sinus vortex appears much weaker, but more unstable. Unsteady oscillatory shear stresses are also observed, which have been associated with adverse biological response; characterization of the hemodynamics of BAVs will provide the first step to understanding these processes better. Results from multiple BAV models of varying levels of stenosis will be presented & higher stenosis corresponded to stronger jets & increased aortic wall shear stresses.

  13. Early severe coronary artery disease and aortic coarctation in a child with familial hypercholesterolaemia.

    PubMed

    Labib, Dina; Soliman, Haytham; Said, Kareem; Sorour, Khaled

    2016-11-30

    An 11-year-old boy presented with easy fatigability, multiple xanthomas, and absent pedal pulsations. Laboratory workup showed severe hypercholesterolaemia and non-invasive imaging revealed 'normally functioning' bicuspid aortic valve and tight aortic coarctation. Coronary angiography showed severe right coronary artery (RCA) stenosis. Medical treatment resulted in significant improvement of dyslipidaemia. We successfully performed balloon dilation and stenting of his coarctation, as well as percutaneous coronary intervention for RCA lesion.

  14. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation in an Extremely Tortuous S-Shaped Aorta

    PubMed Central

    Toleva, Olga; Pozeg, Zlatko; Menkis, Alan

    2017-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has emerged as an alternative technique to treating aortic stenosis in patients with high surgical risk. We present a case of a successful transfemoral TAVI in a high-risk patient with an extremely tortuous iliofemoral system and a significant S-type bend in the descending aorta. With careful preprocedure planning and using all the techniques available, TAVI can be performed in the most challenging patients. PMID:28352480

  15. [Aortic valve replacement in a patient with antiphospholipid syndrome; report of a case].

    PubMed

    Makita, Satoru; Maruyama, Toshiyuki

    2014-08-01

    A 76-year-old woman with primary antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) was referred to our hospital due to severe aortic valve stenosis. We performed aortic valve replacement using a bioprosthetic valve. Her postoperative course was uneventful. She was discharged in good health on postoperative day 33. As for cardiovascular operations in APS patients, high rates have been reported of perioperative mortality and thromboembolic and bleeding events. Perioperative management of anticoagulation must be strict.

  16. Enlargement of the aortic annulus during aortic valve replacement: a review.

    PubMed

    Bortolotti, Uberto; Celiento, Michele; Milano, Aldo D

    2014-01-01

    The main goal of aortic valve replacement (AVR) is to obtain relief from the fixed left ventricular (LV) obstruction by replacing the aortic valve with a prosthesis, either mechanical or biological, of adequate size. Most currently available prostheses provide satisfactory hemodynamic performance, but small-sized prostheses may be associated with high transvalvular gradients and suboptimal effective orifice area that result in prosthesis-patient mismatch (PPM), and thus are far from ideal for use in young, active patients. The avoidance of PPM is advisable as it has been repeatedly associated with increased mortality, decreased exercise tolerance and an impaired regression of LV hypertrophy after AVR for severe aortic stenosis. Enlargement of the aortic annulus (EAA) has proved to be a valuable method to prevent PPM in the presence of a diminutive aortic root. This review outlines the various techniques described for EAA, presenting technical details, long-term results and major procedure-related complications, and discussing the current role of EAA in patients requiring AVR.

  17. Asymptomatic gall stones--revisited.

    PubMed

    Supe, Avinash

    2011-01-01

    India has a large burden of individuals harboring asymptomatic gallstones. Based on Markov model decision and cost analysis, selective and concomitant cholecystectomy is recommended for special indications like hemolytic disorders and stones in endemic areas. Expectant management should be adopted in all others. The evolution of laparoscopy should not alter the indications of cholecystectomy. Since more than 90% patients with asymptomatic gallstones remain clinically "silent", routine laparoscopic cholecystectomy is not indicated for the vast majority of subjects with asymptomatic cholelithiasis. Although laparoscopic cholecystectomy has become much safer, there remains associated morbidity and mortality. The risks of the operation outweigh the complications if stones are left in-situ. Patients should be counseled about the natural history and available management options, their advantages and disadvantages, and should be part of the decision making process. Prophylactic routine cholecystectomy for asymptomatic stones is not recommended. However, laparoscopic cholecystectomy should be performed selectively or concomitantly in a specific subgroup of patients.

  18. Migration of the Zenith Flex Device during Endovascular Aortic Repair of an Infrarenal Aortic Aneurysm with a Severely Angulated Neck

    PubMed Central

    Nishimaki, Hiroshi; Chiba, Kiyoshi; Murakami, Kenji; Sakurai, Yuka; Fujiwara, Keishi; Miyairi, Takeshi; Nakajima, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    A woman in her 80s with an infrarenal aortic aneurysm was scheduled for endovascular aortic repair (EVAR). The aneurysm had a severely angulated neck (SAN), and the Zenith Flex device was selected. Completion angiography showed migration of the main body resulting in right renal artery stenosis. A Palmaz genesis was placed across the renal orifice. The patient had no renal dysfunction and was discharged 7 days after EVAR. If Zenith Flex devices are used for a SAN, it is necessary to consider not only the position of the renal artery but also the appropriate position of the stent-graft. PMID:27738470

  19. Occult lumbar spinal stenosis.

    PubMed Central

    Choudhury, A R; Taylor, J C

    1977-01-01

    Twenty-eight patients presenting with low back pain, associated with sciatic or femoral neuropathy, were found to have lateral recess stenosis occurring as a result of hypertrophy of the facet joints, with preservation within normal limits of the sagittal AP diameter of the lumbar canal. Pathology was believed to be traumatic in origin, and the variable nature of the adhesions suggested recurrent inflammation; the hypertrophy of the facet joints may have been the result of traumatic inflammatory hyperaemia. Radiological investigations were unhelpful. The diagnosis of the condition was made at the time of surgical exploration by the findings of alteration of the facet joints, adhesions and fixity of the nerve roots, normal sagittal AP diameter of the canal, and absence of other significant lesions. Gratifying results were obtained with decompression by wide laminectomy with excision of overhanging facet joints and release of adhesions. PMID:894321

  20. Transfemoral Aortic Valve Implantation with the New Edwards Sapien 3 Valve for Treatment of Severe Aortic Stenosis—Impact of Valve Size in a Single Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Wöhrle, Jochen; Gonska, Birgid; Rodewald, Christoph; Seeger, Julia; Scharnbeck, Dominik; Rottbauer, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Aims The third generation Edwards Sapien 3 (Edwards Lifesciences Inc., Irvine, California) system was optimized to reduce residual aortic regurgitation and vascular complications. Methods and Results 235 patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis were prospectively enrolled. Transcatheter aortic valve implantations (TAVI) were performed without general anesthesia by transfemoral approach. Patients were followed for 30 days. Patients received 23mm (N = 77), 26mm (N = 91) or 29mm (N = 67) valve based on pre-procedural 256 multislice computer tomography. Mean oversizing did not differ between the 3 valves. There was no residual moderate or severe aortic regurgitation. Rate of mild aortic regurgitation and regurgitation index did not differ between groups. There was no switch to general anesthesia or conversion to surgery. Rate of major vascular complication was 3.0% with no difference between valve and delivery sheath sizes. Within 30 days rates of all cause mortality (2.6%) and stroke (2.1%) were low. Conclusions In patients with severe aortic stenosis transfemoral TAVI with the Edwards Sapien 3 valve without general anesthesia was associated with a high rate of device success, no moderate or severe residual aortic regurgitation, low rates of major vascular complication, mortality and stroke within 30 days with no difference between the 3 valve sizes. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02162069 PMID:27003573

  1. Triple-barrel aorta: dissection of a healed aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Lie, J T

    1982-08-01

    An unusual case of a triple-barrel aorta in a 51-year-old woman is described. The patient first had a spontaneous type I dissection of the aorta and acute aortic insufficiency, for which she underwent aortic valve replacement and Dacron graft replacement of the ascending aorta. She remained asymptomatic for five years with a healed aortic dissection (double-barrel aorta) distal to the graft. She then underwent a second operation for repair and poppet replacement of the malfunctioned prosthesis. Postoperative cardiac failure necessitated the use of a counterpulsation intra-aortic balloon catheter, which entered and dissected the wall of the false lumen, thus creating a triple-lumen aorta.

  2. Delayed complications after flow-diverter stenting: reactive in-stent stenosis and creeping stents.

    PubMed

    Cohen, José E; Gomori, John Moshe; Moscovici, Samuel; Leker, Ronen R; Itshayek, Eyal

    2014-07-01

    We assessed the frequency and severity of changes in stent configuration and location after the treatment of intracranial aneurysms, and patterns of in-stent stenosis. We retrospectively reviewed data for consecutive aneurysm patients managed with endovascular implantation of flow-diverter stents (Silk Flow Diverter [Balt Extrusion, Montmorency, France] and Pipeline Embolization Device [ev3/Coviden, Minneapolis, MN, USA]) from October 2011 to July 2012. Routine 2, 6, 9-12, and 16-20 month follow-up angiograms were compared, with a focus on changes in stent configuration and location from immediately after deployment to angiographic follow-up, and the incidence and development of in-stent stenosis. Thirty-four patients with 42 aneurysms met inclusion criteria. The Silk device was implanted in 16 patients (47%, single device in 15), the Pipeline device in 18 (53%, single device in 16). On first follow-up angiography, in-stent stenosis was observed in 38% of Silk devices and 39% of Pipeline devices. In-stent stenosis was asymptomatic in 12 of 13 patients. One woman presented with transient ischemic attacks and required stent angioplasty due to end tapering and mild, diffuse in-stent stenosis. Configuration and location changes, including stent creeping and end tapering were seen in 2/16 patients (13%) with Silk devices, and 0/18 patients with Pipeline devices. We describe stent creeping and end tapering as unusual findings with the potential for delayed clinical complications. In-stent stenosis, with a unique behavior, is a frequent angiographic finding observed after flow-diverter stent implant. The stenosis is usually asymptomatic; however, close clinical and angiographic monitoring is mandatory for individualized management.

  3. [Benign stenosis of the esophagus].

    PubMed

    Salis, G; Lazaroni, F; Chiocca, J C; Mazure, P A; Sferco, A

    1978-09-01

    In the present study 39 patients with benign esphageal stenosis were studied (average age 59,9 years). The most common etiology was refux esofagitis, and the most common associated pathology was esophageal hiatus hernia. Thirty one patients received medical treatment (diet. antireflux drugs and dilatations.) Twenty four were dilated with the slow continuous method, six with metalic bougies. One patient was not dilated. Seven patients were not treated since the stenosis was due to extrinsec compression. One patient was surgically treated from the onset. Seventy percent of the patients had goods results with esophageal dilatation. We propose that patients with benign esophageal stenosis should be treated by the slow continuous dilatation method.

  4. Clinical outcome, valve dysfunction, and progressive aortic dilation in a pediatric population with isolated bicuspid aortic valve.

    PubMed

    Spaziani, Gaia; Ballo, Piercarlo; Favilli, Silvia; Fibbi, Veronica; Buonincontri, Lorenzo; Pollini, Iva; Zuppiroli, Alfredo; Chiappa, Enrico

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the medium-term clinical outcome and the risk of progression of aortic valve disease and aortic dilation in pediatric patients with isolated bicuspid aortic valve (BAV). 179 pediatric patients with isolated BAV were prospectively followed from January 1995 to December 2010. Patients with severe valve dysfunction at baseline were excluded. Clinical outcome included cardiac death, infective endocarditis, aortic complications, cardiac surgery and percutaneous valvuloplasty. Echocardiographic endpoints were: progression of aortic stenosis (AS) or regurgitation (AR) and progressive aortic enlargement at different levels of the aortic root, evaluated as z-score. The median age at diagnosis was 7.8 [2.7-12.0] years. After a median followup of 5.4 [2.3-9.2] years, all patients were alive. The clinical endpoint occurred in 4 (2.2 %) patients (0.41 events per 100 patient-years). A progression of AS and AR was observed in 9 (5.0 %) and 29 (16.2 %) patients, respectively. The z-scores at the end of follow-up were not significantly different from baseline at the annulus, Valsalva sinuses and sinotubular junction, whereas a slight increase was observed at the level of the ascending aorta (1.9 vs 1.5, p = 0.046). Significant progressive aortic dilation occurred in a minority of patients (10.6, 5.6, 9.5, and 19.0 % respectively). The clinical outcome in pediatric patients with isolated BAV is favourable and the progression of aortic valve dysfunction and aortic dilation is relatively slow. These findings may be taken into account to better guide risk assessment and clinical follow-up in these patients.

  5. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professions Site Index A-Z Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) occurs when atherosclerosis or plaque buildup causes the ... weak and bulge outward like a balloon. An AAA develops slowly over time and has few noticeable ...

  6. Abdominal aortic aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000162.htm Abdominal aortic aneurysm To use the sharing features on this page, ... blood to the abdomen, pelvis, and legs. An abdominal aortic aneurysm occurs when an area of the aorta becomes ...

  7. Contemporary carotid imaging: from degree of stenosis to plaque vulnerability.

    PubMed

    Brinjikji, Waleed; Huston, John; Rabinstein, Alejandro A; Kim, Gyeong-Moon; Lerman, Amir; Lanzino, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Carotid artery stenosis is a well-established risk factor of ischemic stroke, contributing to up to 10%-20% of strokes or transient ischemic attacks. Many clinical trials over the last 20 years have used measurements of carotid artery stenosis as a means to risk stratify patients. However, with improvements in vascular imaging techniques such as CT angiography and MR angiography, ultrasonography, and PET/CT, it is now possible to risk stratify patients, not just on the degree of carotid artery stenosis but also on how vulnerable the plaque is to rupture, resulting in ischemic stroke. These imaging techniques are ushering in an emerging paradigm shift that allows for risk stratifications based on the presence of imaging features such as intraplaque hemorrhage (IPH), plaque ulceration, plaque neovascularity, fibrous cap thickness, and presence of a lipid-rich necrotic core (LRNC). It is important for the neurosurgeon to be aware of these new imaging techniques that allow for improved patient risk stratification and outcomes. For example, a patient with a low-grade stenosis but an ulcerated plaque may benefit more from a revascularization procedure than a patient with a stable 70% asymptomatic stenosis with a thick fibrous cap. This review summarizes the current state-of-the-art advances in carotid plaque imaging. Currently, MRI is the gold standard in carotid plaque imaging, with its high resolution and high sensitivity for identifying IPH, ulceration, LRNC, and inflammation. However, MRI is limited due to time constraints. CT also allows for high-resolution imaging and can accurately detect ulceration and calcification, but cannot reliably differentiate LRNC from IPH. PET/CT is an effective technique to identify active inflammation within the plaque, but it does not allow for assessment of anatomy, ulceration, IPH, or LRNC. Ultrasonography, with the aid of contrast enhancement, is a cost-effective technique to assess plaque morphology and characteristics, but it is

  8. Simultaneous extraction of centerlines, stenosis, and thrombus detection in renal CT angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanyan, Krishna; Durgan, Jacob; Hodgkiss, Thomas D.; Chandra, Shalabh

    2004-05-01

    The Renal Artery Stenosis (RAS) is the major cause of renovascular hypertension and CT angiography has shown tremendous promise as a noninvasive method for reliably detecting renal artery stenosis. The purpose of this study was to validate the semi-automated methods to assist in extraction of renal branches and characterizing the associated renal artery stenosis. Automatically computed diagnostic images such as straight MIP, curved MPR, cross-sections, and diameters from multi-slice CT are presented and evaluated for its acceptance. We used vessel-tracking image processing methods to extract the aortic-renal vessel tree in a CT data in axial slice images. Next, from the topology and anatomy of the aortic vessel tree, the stenosis, and thrombus section and branching of the renal arteries are extracted. The results are presented in curved MPR and continuously variable MIP images. In this study, 15 patients were scanned with contrast on Mx8000 CT scanner (Philips Medical Systems), with 1.0 mm thickness, 0.5mm slice spacing, and 120kVp and a stack of 512x512x150 volume sets were reconstructed. The automated image processing took less than 50 seconds to compute the centerline and borders of the aortic/renal vessel tree. The overall assessment of manual and automatically generated stenosis yielded a weighted kappa statistic of 0.97 at right renal arteries, 0.94 at the left renal branches. The thrombus region contoured manually and semi-automatically agreed upon at 0.93. The manual time to process each case is approximately 25 to 30 minutes.

  9. Giant fibroelastoma of the aortic valve.

    PubMed

    di Summa, Michele; Iezzi, Federica

    2013-01-01

    Fibroelastomas account for less than 10% of all cardiac tumours, representing the most common valvular and the second most common cardiac benign tumour, following myxomas. Fibroelastomas are histologically benign; they can result in life-threatening complications such as stroke, acute valvular dysfunction, embolism, ventricular fibrillation, and sudden death. Surgical resection should be offered to all patients who have symptoms and to asymptomatic patients who have pedunculated lesions or tumors larger than 1 cm in diameter. Valve-sparing excision produces good long-term results in most instances. We report our surgical experience of a giant fibroelastoma in the aortic valve.

  10. Thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm in an infant treated by thromboexclusion with thoracoabdominal aortic bypass. A case report.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, R; Hada, M; Kamiya, K; Tada, Y; Ueno, A; Yanai, J; Komai, T

    1996-12-01

    A case of a huge thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm in an eighteen-month-old boy is reported. Surgical treatment was successfully performed by thromboexclusion of the aneurysm with thoracoabdominal aortic bypass using a low-porosity woven Dacron graft 10 mm in diameter and of sufficient surplus length. During the early postoperative period, he developed moderate hydronephrosis, owing to compression of the left ureter by the graft, but no further deterioration was seen. Follow-up angiographies performed four and six years after surgery revealed straightening of the graft and slight stretching of the aorta at the distal anastomosis, but no stenosis was found. Now, seven and a half years after surgery, he has no pressure gradient between upper and lower extremities.

  11. Aortic annulus dimension assessment by computed tomography for transcatheter aortic valve implantation: differences between systole and diastole.

    PubMed

    Bertaso, Angela G; Wong, Dennis T L; Liew, Gary Y H; Cunnington, Michael S; Richardson, James D; Thomson, Viji S; Lorraine, Brett; Kourlis, George; Leech, Diana; Worthley, Matthew I; Worthley, Stephen G

    2012-12-01

    Accurate assessment of aortic annular dimensions is essential for successful transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). Annular dimensions are conventionally measured in mid-systole by multidetector computed tomography (MDCT), echocardiography and angiography. Significant differences in systolic and diastolic aortic annular dimensions have been demonstrated in cohorts without aortic stenosis (AS), but it is unknown whether similar dynamic variation in annular dimensions exists in patients with severe calcific AS in whom aortic compliance is likely to be substantially reduced. We investigated the variation in aortic annular dimensions between systole and diastole in patients with severe calcific AS. Patients with severe calcific AS referred for TAVI were evaluated by 128-slice MDCT. Aortic annular diameter was measured during diastole and systole in the modified coronal, modified sagittal, and basal ring planes (maximal, minimal and mean diameters). Differences between systole and diastole were analysed by paired t test. Fifty-nine patients were included in the analysis. Three of the five aortic dimensions measured increased significantly during systole. The largest change was a 0.75 mm (3.4%) mean increase in the minimal diameter of the basal ring during systole (p = 0.004). This corresponds closely to the modified sagittal view, which also increased by mean 0.42 mm (1.9%) during systole (p = 0.008). There was no significant change in the maximal diameter of the basal ring or the modified coronal view during systole (p > 0.05). There is a small magnitude but statistically significant difference in aortic annulus dimensions of patients with severe AS referred for TAVI when measured in diastole and systole. This small difference is unlikely to alter clinical decisions regarding prosthesis size or suitability for TAVI.

  12. Lumbar vertebral hemangioma mimicking lateral spinal canal stenosis: case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Syrimpeis, Vasileios; Vitsas, Vasileios; Korovessis, Panagiotis

    2014-03-01

    Context Hemangiomas are the commonest benign tumors of the spine. Most occur in the thoracolumbar spine and the majority are asymptomatic. Rarely, hemangiomas cause symptoms through epidural expansion of the involved vertebra, resulting in spinal canal stenosis, spontaneous epidural hemorrhage, and pathological burst fracture. Findings We report a rare case of a 73-year-old woman, who had been treated for two months for degenerative neurogenic claudication. On admission, magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomographic scans revealed a hemangioma of the third lumbar vertebra protruding to the epidural space producing lateral spinal stenosis and ipsilateral nerve root compression. The patient underwent successful right hemilaminectomy for decompression of the nerve root, balloon kyphoplasty with poly-methyl methacrylate (PMMA) and pedicle screw segmental stabilization. Postoperative course was uneventful. Conclusion In the elderly, this rare presentation of spinal stenosis due to hemangiomas may be encountered. Decompression and vertebral augmentation by means balloon kyphoplasty with PMMA plus segmental pedicle screw fixation is recommended.

  13. Endovascular treatment of acute type B dissection complicating aortic coarctation.

    PubMed

    Kassaian, Seyed Ebrahim; Abbasi, Kyomars; Mousavi, Mehdi; Sahebjam, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Surgical treatment poses a high risk to patients with concomitant aortic coarctation and dissection, and an interventional approach could be an alternative. We describe the case of a 52-year-old man with a long history of untreated hypertension and aortic coarctation who emergently presented at our institution with an acute Stanford type B dissection. The patient's elevated serum creatinine level, perfusion deficit in the right lower limb, and hypertension did not respond to medical therapy, and he did not consent to surgery. By endovascular means, we used a self-expandable stent-graft to cover the entry point of the dissection; then, we deployed a balloon-expandable bare-metal stent to correct residual stenosis. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the endovascular treatment of aortic coarctation complicated by type B dissection.

  14. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR): access planning and strategies.

    PubMed

    Ramlawi, Basel; Anaya-Ayala, Javier E; Reardon, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has proven to be a viable tool for the high-surgical-risk population with severe aortic valve stenosis. Vascular access complications are not uncommon with TAVR and may increase early and late mortality. Avoiding these serious complications is the goal. With experience and careful screening, we are now able to risk-stratify patients who may be at increased risk of vascular complications. While the traditional iliofemoral access site remains the most common for TAVR, alternate access sites that have proven to be viable and safe alternatives include the transapical, direct-aortic, and subclavian techniques. TAVR teams should be familiar and comfortable with these approaches as each of them has its own advantages and weaknesses. The best option is usually one in which the procedure is tailored to the patient. The present review examines our current access planning and strategies for TAVR.

  15. Morphology of aortic arch obstruction with patent ductus arteriosus

    PubMed Central

    Marino, Bruno; Chiariello, Luigi; Mercanti, Corrado; Bosman, Cesare; Colloridi, Vicenzo; Reale, Attilio; Marino, Benedetto

    1981-01-01

    Thirty-one hearts with aortic arch obstruction and patent ductus arteriosus were examined with special reference to associated cardiac anomalies. Six presented with complete interruption of the aortic arch, four with atretic isthmus, twelve with coarctation, and three with tubular hypoplasia. Associated cardiac anomalies were divided into two main groups: (1) septal defect with left-to-right shunt, and (2) left ventricular inflow and/or outflow obstruction. A high incidence (9/19=47.4%) of ventriculo-infundibular malalignment type of ventricular septal defect with subaortic stenosis was observed. Associated cardiac lesions that reduce blood flow in the aortic arch during fetal life may be responsible for poor development of this structure. Images PMID:15216214

  16. Fulminant diffuse systemic sclerosis following aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Marasovic-Krstulovic, Daniela; Jurisic, Zrinka; Perkovic, Dijana; Aljinovic, Jure; Martinovic-Kaliterna, Dusanka

    2014-06-01

    We present a case of fulminant diffuse systemic sclerosis (dSSc) developed after the aortic valve replacement followed by fatal congestive heart failure within the 6 months from the initial symptoms. A 61-year-old male developed rapidly progressive diffuse systemic sclerosis following aortic valve replacement due to stenosis of bicuspid aortic valve. He presented with diarrhoea, weight loss, mialgia and arthralgia after cardiac surgery. Heart failure, due to myocardial fibrosis, was noted as a cause of death. We hypothesize that artificial materials like the ones used in mechanical valves or silicon materials in breast implants may induce fulminant course of pre-existing systemic sclerosis or create a new onset in predisposed individual.

  17. Reversed L-type Upper Partial Sternotomy in Aortic Valve Replacement: an Initial Experience

    PubMed Central

    Karic, Alen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Degenerative aortic stenosis (AS) is the most frequent cause among aortic valve stenotic changes. Mini Sternotomy Aortic Valve Replacement is a replacement of aortic valve through upper partial sternotomy. Aim: The aim of this approach is to improve postoperative convalescence by leaving pleural spaces closed and do not compromise respiratory function, to decrease bleeding, and reduce post op ventilation time and ICU stay. All these advantages decrease cost during hospital stay by reducing ICU stay, respiration time, bleeding and using blood products, pain killers and shortening hospital stay. Esthetic effect is also considerable result of this method. Case report: This case report presents an initial experience with Reversed L-Type Upper Partial Sternotomy in Aortic Valve Replacement. The goal is to demonstrate that minimally invasive advanced cardiac surgery procedures can be performed in our country. PMID:27594754

  18. Radionuclide angiography in evaluation of left ventricular function following aortic valve replacement

    SciTech Connect

    Santinga, J.T.; Kirsh, M.M.; Brady, T.J.; Thrall, J.; Pitt, B.

    1981-05-01

    Congestive heart failure in patients surviving aortic valve replacement has been associated with a high late mortality. To determine whether myocardial dysfunction in these patients occurred preoperatively, perioperatively, or during the early postoperative period, 19 consecutive patients undergoing aortic valve replacement using cardioplegia and hypothermia were studied by multiple-gated cardiac blood pool imaging. The resting ejection fractions for 8 patients with aortic stenosis did not show significant changes following operation. The 11 patients with aortic insufficiency has resting preoperative values of 58 +/- 15%, which fell to 38 +/- 18% immediately postoperatively (p less than 0.01), with the late values being 51 +/- 16%. Eight of 18 patients (44%) showed deterioration of regional wall motion immediately after operation, which persisted in 3 during the late evaluation. The occurrence of new perioperative regional wall motion abnormalities and persistent perioperative depression in left ventricular function in some patients suggest the need for further improvement in myocardial protection during cardiopulmonary bypass for aortic valve replacement.

  19. [Long-term results of conventional aortic valve replacement for small aortic annulus].

    PubMed

    Miura, Y; Miyairi, T; Kitamura, T; Kigawa, I; Fukuda, S

    2006-04-01

    We studied cardiac function, clinical outcome and quality of life (QOL) long after aortic valve replacement for pure aortic stenosis. Forty-four patients in small group [St. Jude Medical (SJM) 17 HP, 19 A], and 69 patients in non-small group (19 HP, 21 A, 23 A) operated on from 1984 to 2004 were enrolled in this study. We assessed the clinical data, aortic pressure gradient, left ventricular mass index (LVMI), and ejection fraction (EF) by preoperative and postoperative echocardiography. Moreover to evaluate QOL after the operation, we performed SF-36 used for the evaluation of health and QOL worldwide. Mean follow-up is 7.1 +/- 4.8 years in small group, and 6.8 +/- 4.6 years in non-small group. There were 2 hospital deaths in small group, and 1 in non-small group. The actual survival rate at 10-year were 89.2% in small group, and 85.6% in non-small group. There was no significant difference in hospital mortality, LVMI, long-term survival rate, and the scores of SF-36 between the 2 groups. The use of small sized prosthetic valves in patients with small aortic annulus might be justified when there is no patient-prosthesis mismatch.

  20. [CABG performed for LMT orifice stenosis 15 years after AVR in a case of aortitis syndrome].

    PubMed

    Chikazawa, G; Nakajima, M; Hirayama, T; Misumi, H; Shimokawa, Y; Uemura, S; Iwata, Y

    1997-05-01

    The case is a 54-year-old female at age 39 years, she underwent aortic valve replacement (AVR) for aortic valve regurgitation (AR) due to aortitis syndrome at a certain hospital. At the 15th year after AVR she was diagnosed with unstable angina due to LMT orifice stenosis and underwent CABG at this hospital. A distal side of anastomosis was performed on the LAD branch seg 6, an artificial vascular patch was placed for the proximal side of anastomosis to prevent inflammation of the aortic wall from spreading to the proximal side of anastomosis. On the postoperative cardiac catheter examination, the graft was found to be patent well. In the case of CABG complicated with aortitis syndrome, stenosis and obstruction of the proximal side of anastomosis long time after surgery pose a problem. However, the method so as to perform a proximal anastomosis by placing an artificial vascular patch on the aortic wall is considered to be one of the useful means which can avoid such a problem.

  1. [Combined surgical treatment for coronary heart disease as well as heart valve diseases and carotid artery stenosis].

    PubMed

    Reichart, B; Kemkes, B M; Klinner, W; Kreuzer, E; Becker, H M; Harrington, O B; Crosby, V G; Wolf, R Y

    1979-04-26

    This is an account on combined procedures in 124 patients suffering from arteriosclerotic vessel disease. In order to judge the proceedings and the results the patients were divided up into two groups. in 15 patients (group I) a carotid endarterectomy combined with an aorto-coronary bypass operation was performed; once a subclavian artery stenosis was resected at the same time. One patient of that group died after 31 days (7%). In group II 108 heart valve operations were performed together with a coronary artery revascularisation. Early and late mortality divided up as follows: aortic stenosis 6/44 (14%) respectively 2/44 (5%); aortic insufficiency 1/14 (7%) resp. 0; combined aortic disease 1/8 )13%) resp. 0; mitral stenosis 1/11 (9%) resp. 0; mitral insufficiency 6/26 (23%) resp. 2/26 (8%); combined mitral valve disease 1/2 (50%) resp. 0; three times both valves (aorta, mitral) were replaced without mortality. In our opinion combined procedures, resection of supraaortic artery stenosis respectively cardiac valve operations and aorto-coronary bypass are indicated especially since the functional long-term results are excellent. Though one should consider the high operative risk in patients with mitral insufficiency and combined mitral valve disease.

  2. Correlation of ascending aorta elasticity and the severity of coronary artery stenosis in hypertensive patients with coronary heart disease assessed by M-mode and tissue Doppler echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qixiu; Liu, Houlin

    2015-03-01

    The main objective of this study is to investigate the relationship between ascending aorta elasticity and the severity of coronary artery stenosis in essential hypertensive patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) using M-mode and tissue Doppler echocardiography. A total of 184 hypertensive patients with CHD were enrolled. Patients were divided into three groups based on the severity of coronary stenosis measured by coronary arteriography (CAG): slight stenosis (group 1), moderate stenosis (group 2) and serious stenosis (group 3). M-mode and tissue Doppler echocardiography were performed, and elasticity indexes of ascending aorta including stiffness index, distensibility index, and S wave speed of anterior wall were calculated and correlated with the severity of coronary stenosis. Ascending aorta stiffness index was increased, whereas distensibility index and S wave speed of anterior wall were decreased in moderate and severe stenosis groups compared with slight stenosis group (P < 0.01). Elasticity indexes change in a stepwise pattern with the narrowness of coronary artery, and there was a significant correlation between aortic elasticity and severity of coronary artery by Pearson correlation analysis (P < 0.01). Elasticity indexes of ascending aorta correlate well with severity of coronary stenosis. Elasticity indexes of ascending aorta can serve as predictors for coronary arterial lesion in hypertensive patients.

  3. Dynamic Energy Loss Characteristics in the Native Aortic Valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwai Yap, Choon; Dasi, Laksmi P.; Yoganathan, Ajit P.

    2009-11-01

    Aortic Valve (AV) stenosis if untreated leads to heart failure. From a mechanics standpoint, heart failure implies failure to generate sufficient mechanical power to overcome energy losses in the circulation. Thus energy efficiency-based measures are direct measures of AV disease severity, which unfortunately is not used in current clinical measures of stenosis severity. We present an analysis of the dynamic rate of energy dissipation through the AV from direct high temporal resolution measurements of flow and pressure drop across the AV in a pulsatile left heart setup. Porcine AV was used and measurements at various conditions were acquired: varying stroke volumes; heart rates; and stenosis levels. Energy dissipation waveform has a distinctive pattern of being skewed towards late systole, attributed to the explosive growth of flow instabilities from adverse pressure gradient. Increasing heart rate and stroke volume increases energy dissipation, but does not alter the normalized shape of the dissipation temporal profile. Stenosis increases energy dissipation and also alters the normalized shape of dissipation waveform with significantly more losses during late acceleration phase. Since stenosis produces a departure from the signature dissipation waveform shape, dynamic energy dissipation analysis can be extended into a clinical tool for AV evaluation.

  4. [Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI): Current perspectives].

    PubMed

    Gaede, Luise; Möllmann, Helge

    2015-08-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has evolved as the treatment modality of choice for elderly patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis who are at high risk for surgery. More than 10,000 TAVI procedures were undertaken in Germany during 2014.A mortality benefit has been shown for TAVI compared with conservative treatment in patients deemed inoperable, and the procedure was proven to be at least non-inferior to surgical aortic valve replacement in high-risk patients. Through improvements in preprocedural imaging and in valve technology as well as increasing operator and surgical team experience, TAVI has developed rapidly in the past few years. Complication rates declinded considerably and the latest study results even suggest a superiority of TAVI to surgical valve replacement in patients at intermediate operative risk. Nevertheless, the challenge to avoid procedure-specific complications influencing the outcome still remains. Therefore, making an individual decision about the approach and the valve prosthesis in an interdisciplinary heart team consisting of a cardiologist and a cardiac surgeon is indispensable for guaranteeing the best therapy for the patient.Considering the rapid developments and procedural improvements in this field, randomized trials are required to assess whether the indication for TAVI may be extended to patients at lower perioperative risk in the future.

  5. Cardiac rehabilitation programme after transcatheter aortic valve implantation versus surgical aortic valve replacement: Systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Gustavo S; Melo, Rosangela D; Deresz, Luís F; Dal Lago, Pedro; Pontes, Mauro Rn; Karsten, Marlus

    2017-05-01

    Background Aortic stenosis is a valvular heart disease characterised by fixed obstruction of the left ventricular outflow. It can be managed by surgical aortic valve replacement (sAVR) or transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). This review aimed to describe the evidence supporting a cardiac rehabilitation programme on functional capacity and quality of life in aortic stenosis patients after sAVR or TAVI. Methods The search was conducted on multiple databases from January to March 2016. All studies were eligible that evaluated the effects of a post-interventional cardiac rehabilitation programme in aortic stenosis patients. The methodological quality was assessed using the PEDro scale. Meta-analysis was performed separately by procedure and between procedures. The walked distance during the six-minute walk test (6MWD) and Barthel index were evaluated. The analysis was conducted in Review Manager. Results Five studies were included (292 TAVI and 570 sAVR patients). The meta-analysis showed that a cardiac rehabilitation programme was associated with a significant improvement in 6MWD (0.69 (0.47, 0.91); P < 0.001) and Barthel index (0.80 (0.29, 1.30); P = 0.002) after TAVI and 6MWD (0.79 (0.43, 1.15); P < 0.001) and Barthel index (0.93 (0.67, 1.18); P < 0.001) after sAVR. In addition, the meta-analysis showed that the cardiac rehabilitation programme promoted a similar gain in 6MWD (4.28% (-12.73, 21.29); P = 0.62) and Barthel index (-1.52 points (-4.81, 1.76); P = 0.36) after sAVR or TAVI. Conclusions The cardiac rehabilitation programme improved the functional capacity and quality of life in aortic stenosis patients. Patients who underwent TAVI benefitted with a cardiac rehabilitation programme similar to sAVR patients.

  6. Prevalence of coronary atherosclerosis in patients with aortic valve replacement

    PubMed Central

    Ottervanger, J.P.; Thomas, K.; Sie, T.H.; Haalebos, M.M.P.; Zijlstra, F.

    2002-01-01

    Background Because of a high prevalence of coronary artery disease in patients with aortic valve disease, coronary angiography is recommended before aortic valve replacement. However, during the last three decades, a decline in mortality due to coronary heart disease has been observed in the general population in both Western Europe and the United States. It is unknown whether preoperative angiography is still mandatory in all patients. Aim To assess the prevalence of angiographically defined coronary artery disease in patients with aortic valve replacement and trends during a ten-year period. Methods We performed a retrospective cross-sectional study of patients undergoing aortic valve replacement between 1988 and 1998 in our institution. Patients with a history of coronary artery disease and patients younger than 25 years were excluded. Coronary atherosclerosis was defined as one or more coronary artery luminal stenosis of 50% or more on preoperative coronary angiography. Results During the study period 1339 patients had aortic valve replacement in our institution, data on 1322 (98%) were available for analysis. Previous coronary artery disease was documented in 124 patients (10%). After exclusion of 17 patients (no angiography), data on a total of 1181 patients were analysed. Coronary atherosclerosis was present in 472 patients (40%) on preoperative coronary angiography. Several well-known risk factors of ischaemic heart disease were associated with coronary atherosclerosis. The prevalence of angiographically defined coronary atherosclerosis varied between 30% and 50% per year. There was, however, no significant trend during the study period. Multivariate analyses, to adjust for potential differences in risk factors during the observation period, did not change this conclusion. Conclusions The prevalence of angiographically defined coronary artery disease in patients scheduled for aortic valve replacement is still high. From 1988 to 1998, no significant change

  7. Reappraisal of primary balloon angioplasty without stenting for patients with symptomatic middle cerebral artery stenosis.

    PubMed

    Okada, Hideo; Terada, Tomoaki; Tanaka, Yuko; Tomura, Nagatsuki; Kono, Kenichi; Yoshimura, Ryo; Shintani, Aki

    2015-01-01

    There is a controversy regarding the safety and efficacy of intracranial stenting. We describe our experience with primary balloon angioplasty without stenting for symptomatic middle cerebral artery (MCA) stenosis. All patients who underwent balloon angioplasty without stenting for MCA stenosis between 1996 and 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. We evaluated technical success rates, degrees of stenosis, and stroke or death within 30 days. Among patients who were followed-up for > 1 year we evaluated latest functional outcomes, stroke recurrence at 1 year, and restenosis. In total 45/47 patients (95.7%) were successfully treated. Average pre- and postprocedure stenosis rates were 79.9% and 39.5%, respectively. Three neurological complications occurred within 30 days: one thromboembolism during the procedure; one lacunar infarction; and one fatal intraparenchymal hemorrhage after the procedure. Stroke or death rate within 30 days was 6.4%. Thirty-three patients were available for follow-up analysis with a mean period of 51.5 months. The combined rate of stroke or death within 30 days and ipsilateral ischemic stroke of the followed-up patients within 1 year beyond 30 days was 9.4%. Restenosis was observed in 26.9% of patients and all remained asymptomatic. In our retrospective series, balloon angioplasty without stenting was a safe, effective modality for symptomatic MCA stenosis. For patients refractory to medical therapy, primary balloon angioplasty may offer a better supplemental treatment option.

  8. Reappraisal of Primary Balloon Angioplasty without Stenting for Patients with Symptomatic Middle Cerebral Artery Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    OKADA, Hideo; TERADA, Tomoaki; TANAKA, Yuko; TOMURA, Nagatsuki; KONO, Kenichi; YOSHIMURA, Ryo; SHINTANI, Aki

    2015-01-01

    There is a controversy regarding the safety and efficacy of intracranial stenting. We describe our experience with primary balloon angioplasty without stenting for symptomatic middle cerebral artery (MCA) stenosis. All patients who underwent balloon angioplasty without stenting for MCA stenosis between 1996 and 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. We evaluated technical success rates, degrees of stenosis, and stroke or death within 30 days. Among patients who were followed-up for > 1 year we evaluated latest functional outcomes, stroke recurrence at 1 year, and restenosis. In total 45/47 patients (95.7%) were successfully treated. Average pre- and postprocedure stenosis rates were 79.9% and 39.5%, respectively. Three neurological complications occurred within 30 days: one thromboembolism during the procedure; one lacunar infarction; and one fatal intraparenchymal hemorrhage after the procedure. Stroke or death rate within 30 days was 6.4%. Thirty-three patients were available for follow-up analysis with a mean period of 51.5 months. The combined rate of stroke or death within 30 days and ipsilateral ischemic stroke of the followed-up patients within 1 year beyond 30 days was 9.4%. Restenosis was observed in 26.9% of patients and all remained asymptomatic. In our retrospective series, balloon angioplasty without stenting was a safe, effective modality for symptomatic MCA stenosis. For patients refractory to medical therapy, primary balloon angioplasty may offer a better supplemental treatment option. PMID:25746307

  9. iTRAQ proteomic analysis of extracellular matrix remodeling in aortic valve disease

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Rojas, Tatiana; Mourino-Alvarez, Laura; Alonso-Orgaz, Sergio; Rosello-Lleti, Esther; Calvo, Enrique; Lopez-Almodovar, Luis Fernando; Rivera, Miguel; Padial, Luis R.; Lopez, Juan Antonio; Cuesta, Fernando de la; Barderas, Maria G.

    2015-01-01

    Degenerative aortic stenosis (AS) is the most common worldwide cause of valve replacement. The aortic valve is a thin, complex, layered connective tissue with compartmentalized extracellular matrix (ECM) produced by specialized cell types, which directs blood flow in one direction through the heart. There is evidence suggesting remodeling of such ECM during aortic stenosis development. Thus, a better characterization of the role of ECM proteins in this disease would increase our understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms. Aortic valve samples were collected from 18 patients which underwent aortic valve replacement (50% males, mean age of 74 years) and 18 normal control valves were obtained from necropsies (40% males, mean age of 69 years). The proteome of the samples was analyzed by 2D-LC MS/MS iTRAQ methodology. The results showed an altered expression of 13 ECM proteins of which 3 (biglycan, periostin, prolargin) were validated by Western blotting and/or SRM analyses. These findings are substantiated by our previous results demonstrating differential ECM protein expression. The present study has demonstrated a differential ECM protein pattern in individuals with AS, therefore supporting previous evidence of a dynamic ECM remodeling in human aortic valves during AS development. PMID:26620461

  10. Guilt by association: a paradigm for detection of silent aortic disease

    PubMed Central

    Ziganshin, Bulat A.

    2016-01-01

    Detection of clinically silent thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA) is challenging due to the lack of symptoms (until aortic rupture or dissection occurs). A large proportion of TAA are identified incidentally while imaging a patient for other reasons. However, recently several clinical “associates” of TAA have been described that can aid in identification of silent TAA. These “associates” include intracranial aneurysm, aortic arch anomalies, abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), simple renal cysts (SRC), bicuspid aortic valve, temporal arteritis, a positive family history of aneurysm disease, and a positive thumb-palm sign. In this article we examine these associates of TAA and the data supporting their involvement with asymptomatic TAA. PMID:27386404

  11. Malignant Rheumatic Heart Disease Presenting as Quadrivalvular Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Santosh Kumar; Thakur, Ramesh; Krishna, Vinay; Varma, Chandra Mohan; Goel, Amit; Jha, Mukesh Jitendra; Kumar, Ashutosh; Mishra, Vikas; Tiwari, Pradyot; Sinha, Rupesh

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatic disease may involve the pulmonary valve, but is exceedingly rare. Simultaneous involvement of all four valves is more likely to be the result of combination of causes, such as congenital, rheumatic, infective or degenerative disease. A unitary cause for quadrivalvular involvement would be either rheumatic or myxomatous degeneration. A 16-year-old young boy presented with progressive exertional dyspnea for the past 3 years. On evaluation, he was in atrial fibrillation with congestive heart failure. On examination, evidence of stenosis of the mitral, aortic and tricuspid valves with a history of rheumatic fever in childhood was revealed. Transthoracic echocardiography showed the quadrivalvular involvement. Only few reports are available in the literature describing rheumatic quadrivalvar damage and that too in third and fourth decade. This is probably first to be reported in juvenile age group. PMID:28197258

  12. Temporal trends in safety of carotid endarterectomy in asymptomatic patients

    PubMed Central

    Munster, Alex B.; Franchini, Angelo J.; Qureshi, Mahim I.; Thapar, Ankur

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To systematically review temporal changes in perioperative safety of carotid endarterectomy (CEA) in asymptomatic individuals in trial and registry studies. Methods: The MEDLINE and EMBASE databases were searched using the terms “carotid” and “endarterectomy” and “asymptomatic” from 1947 to August 23, 2014. Articles dealing with 50%–99% stenosis in asymptomatic individuals were included and low-volume studies were excluded. The primary endpoint was 30-day stroke or death and the secondary endpoint was 30-day all-cause mortality. Statistical analysis was performed using random-effects meta-regression for registry data and for trial data graphical interpretation alone was used. Results: Six trials (n = 4,431 procedures) and 47 community registries (n = 204,622 procedures) reported data between 1983 and 2013. Registry data showed a significant decrease in postoperative stroke or death incidence over the period 1991–2010, equivalent to a 6% average proportional annual reduction (95% credible interval [CrI] 4%–7%; p < 0.001). Considering postoperative all-cause mortality, registry data showed a significant 5% average proportional annual reduction (95% CrI 3%–9%; p < 0.001). Trial data showed a similar visual trend. Conclusions: CEA is safer than ever before and high-volume registry results closely mirror the results of trials. New benchmarks for CEA are a stroke or death risk of 1.2% and a mortality risk of 0.4%. This information will prove useful for quality improvement programs, for health care funders, and for those re-examining the long-term benefits of asymptomatic revascularization in future trials. PMID:26115734

  13. Total Percutaneous Aortic Repair: Midterm Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Bent, Clare L. Fotiadis, Nikolas; Renfrew, Ian; Walsh, Michael; Brohi, Karim; Kyriakides, Constantinos; Matson, Matthew

    2009-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to examine the immediate and midterm outcomes of percutaneous endovascular repair of thoracic and abdominal aortic pathology. Between December 2003 and June 2005, 21 patients (mean age: 60.4 {+-} 17.1 years; 15 males, 6 females) underwent endovascular stent-graft insertion for thoracic (n = 13) or abdominal aortic (n = 8) pathology. Preprocedural computed tomographic angiography (CTA) was performed to assess the suitability of aorto-iliac and common femoral artery (CFA) anatomy, including the degree of CFA calcification, for total percutaneous aortic stent-graft repair. Percutaneous access was used for the introduction of 18- to 26-Fr delivery devices. A 'preclose' closure technique using two Perclose suture devices (Perclose A-T; Abbott Vascular) was used in all cases. Data were prospectively collected. Each CFA puncture site was assessed via clinical examination and CTA at 1, 6, and 12 months, followed by annual review thereafter. Minimum follow-up was 36 months. Outcome measures evaluated were rates of technical success, conversion to open surgical repair, complications, and late incidence of arterial stenosis at the site of Perclose suture deployment. A total of 58 Perclose devices were used to close 29 femoral arteriotomies. Outer diameters of stent-graft delivery devices used were 18 Fr (n = 5), 20 Fr (n = 3), 22 Fr (n = 4), 24 Fr (n = 15), and 26 Fr (n = 2). Percutaneous closure was successful in 96.6% (28/29) of arteriotomies. Conversion to surgical repair was required at one access site (3.4%). Mean follow-up was 50 {+-} 8 months. No late complications were observed. By CT criteria, no patient developed a >50% reduction in CFA caliber at the site of Perclose deployment during the study period. In conclusion, percutaneous aortic stent-graft insertion can be safely performed, with a low risk of both immediate and midterm access-related complications.

  14. Treatment of mechanical aortic valve thrombosis with heparin and eptifibatide.

    PubMed

    Vora, Amit N; Gehrig, Thomas; Bashore, Thomas M; Kiefer, Todd L

    2014-07-01

    A 75-year old woman with a history of coronary disease status post 3-vessel coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) 8 years ago and a repeat one-vessel CABG 2 years ago in the setting of aortic valve replacement with a #19 mm St. Jude bileaflet mechanical valve for severe aortic stenosis presented with two to three weeks of progressive dyspnea and increasing substernal chest discomfort. Echocardiography revealed a gradient to 31 mmHg across her aortic valve, increased from a baseline of 13 mmHg five months previously. Fluoroscopy revealed thrombosis of her mechanical aortic valve. She was not a candidate for surgery given her multiple comorbidities, and fibrinolysis was contraindicated given a recent subdural hematoma 1 year prior to presentation. She was treated with heparin and eptifibatide and subsequently demonstrated resolution of her aortic valve thrombosis. We report the first described successful use of eptifibatide in addition to unfractionated heparin for the management of subacute valve thrombosis in a patient at high risk for repeat surgery or fibrinolysis.

  15. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation: a Canadian Cardiovascular Society position statement.

    PubMed

    Webb, John; Rodés-Cabau, Josep; Fremes, Stephen; Pibarot, Philippe; Ruel, Marc; Ibrahim, Reda; Welsh, Robert; Feindel, Christopher; Lichtenstein, Samuel

    2012-01-01

    Patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis have a poor prognosis with medical management alone, and balloon aortic valvuloplasty has failed to provide durable clinical benefit. Open surgical replacement of the aortic valve can improve symptoms and survival. Recently, transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has been demonstrated to improve survival, quality of life, and functional status in nonoperable patients and to be a viable option for patients in whom the risk of open surgical morbidity or mortality is high. This Canadian Cardiovascular Society position statement represents the consensus of a representative group of cardiologists and cardiac surgeons as to the current, but evolving, role of this less-invasive new therapy. Specific recommendations are provided for selection of patients for TAVI vs surgical aortic valve replacement for native valves and for bioprostheses, approaches to patient evaluation for TAVI, appropriate constitution of multidisciplinary teams involved in performing TAVI, essential facilities that are needed to perform TAVI safely and effectively, and training/qualifications for TAVI operators. Cost considerations, complication rates, and the quality of the available evidence are also discussed. It is hoped that this consensus document will prove to be a useful resource for health professionals, institutions, departments, and decision-making bodies dealing with this important and rapidly evolving therapy.

  16. Prediction of paravalvular leakage after transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Di Martino, Luigi F M; Vletter, Wim B; Ren, Ben; Schultz, Carl; Van Mieghem, Nicolas M; Soliman, Osama I I; Di Biase, Matteo; de Jaegere, Peter P; Geleijnse, Marcel L

    2015-10-01

    Significant paravalvular leakage (PVL) after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is related to patient mortality. Predicting the development of PVL has focused on computed tomography (CT) derived variables but literature targeting CoreValve devices is limited, controversial, and did not make use of standardized echocardiographic methods. The study included 164 consecutive patients with severe aortic stenosis that underwent TAVI with a Medtronic CoreValve system©, with available pre-TAVI CT and pre-discharge transthoracic echocardiography. The predictive value for significant PVL of the CT-derived Agatston score, aortic annulus size and eccentricity, and "cover index" was assessed, according to both echocardiographic Valve Academic Research Consortium (VARC) criteria and angiographic Sellers criteria. Univariate predictors for more than mild PVL were the maximal diameter of the aortic annulus size (for both angiographic and echocardiographic assessment of PVL), cover index (for echocardiographic assessment of PVL only), and Agatston score (for both angiographic and echocardiographic assessment of PVL). The aortic annulus eccentricity index was not predicting PVL. At multivariate analysis, Agatston score was the only independent predictor for both angiographic and echocardiographic assessment of PVL. Agatston score is the only independent predictor of PVL regardless of the used imaging technique for the definition of PVL.

  17. A planning system for transapical aortic valve implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gessat, Michael; Merk, Denis R.; Falk, Volkmar; Walther, Thomas; Jacobs, Stefan; Nöttling, Alois; Burgert, Oliver

    2009-02-01

    Stenosis of the aortic valve is a common cardiac disease. It is usually corrected surgically by replacing the valve with a mechanical or biological prosthesis. Transapical aortic valve implantation is an experimental minimally invasive surgical technique that is applied to patients with high operative risk to avoid pulmonary arrest. A stented biological prosthesis is mounted on a catheter. Through small incisions in the fifth intercostal space and the apex of the heart, the catheter is positioned under flouroscopy in the aortic root. The stent is expanded and unfolds the valve which is thereby implanted into the aortic root. Exact targeting is crucial, since major complications can arise from a misplaced valve. Planning software for the perioperative use is presented that allows for selection of the best fitting implant and calculation of the safe target area for that implant. The software uses contrast enhanced perioperative DynaCT images acquired under rapid pacing. In a semiautomatic process, a surface segmentation of the aortic root is created. User selected anatomical landmarks are used to calculate the geometric constraints for the size and position of the implant. The software is integrated into a PACS network based on DICOM communication to query and receive the images and implants templates from a PACS server. The planning results can be exported to the same server and from there can be rertieved by an intraoperative catheter guidance device.

  18. Percutaneous treatment of severe diffuse stenosis in heavily calcified infrarenal abdominal aorta using iliac extender endoprosthesis: a case series.

    PubMed

    Chehab, Bassem; Vamanan, Karthik; Gupta, Kamal

    2012-02-15

    Severe, concentric calcific stenosis of the infrarenal abdominal aorta (IAA) is an uncommon but technically challenging problem. In diffuse, heavily calcific lesions are generally not treated with balloon expandable or self-expanding stents. There is concern of aortic rupture, incomplete apposition, and underexpansion. Such lesions are mostly treated with aortobifemoral or extra-anatomic bypass surgery. Using three case examples, we describe the feasibility of endovascular treatment for severely calcific IAA with use of iliac extender limbs of commercially available aortic stent grafts and discuss the role of preprocedural CT scan in case planning.

  19. Adult aortic coarctation discovered incidentally after the rupture of sinus of Valsalva aneurysm: combined surgical and interventional approach.

    PubMed

    Ouali, Sana; Kortas, Chokri; Brockmeier, Konrad; Boughzela, Essia

    2011-12-01

    Combination of ruptured sinus of Valsalva aneurysm (SVA), and a coexisting asymptomatic adult aortic isthmic coarctation is extremely rare. The timing and sequence of surgical and/or interventional repair of these two pathologies are controversial. We present a case of a 37-year-old male who was admitted to our department because of severe acute congestive heart failure and signs of ruptured aneurysm of the SV into the right ventricle. Transthoracic and transoesophageal echocardiography confirmed the communication between an important right coronary SVA and right ventricle, bicuspid aortic valve, mild aortic regurgitation, and revealed severe aortic coarctation. Because of the severe dilation of right sinus of Valsalva a surgical repair of the ruptured aneurysm was performed. Aortic coarctation was treated four weeks later by a percutaneous stent-graft implantation. This case report supports the concept that hybrid approach is feasible in patients with ruptured SVA and aortic coarctation in adulthood.

  20. Asymptomatic anomalous origin of left anterior descending artery from the pulmonary artery and multiple atherosclerotic stenoses revealed by silent ischaemia.

    PubMed

    Murat, Gurbuz; Cellier, François; Leobon, Bertand; Boudou, Nicolas

    2015-02-01

    Anomalous origin of the left coronary artery from the pulmonary artery is a rare congenital disease responsible for a high mortality rate in childhood. Here, we report for the first time the case of an asymptomatic 61-year old patient showing a combination of anomalous origin of the left anterior descending artery from pulmonary artery and atherosclerotic stenosis in both the right coronary artery and the left circumflex artery without anomalous origin.

  1. Abdominal aortic aneurysm: A comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Sourabh; Qamar, Arman; Sharma, Vishal; Sharma, Alka

    2011-01-01

    An arterial aneurysm is defined as a focal dilation of a blood vessel with respect to the original artery. The risk of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) increases dramatically in the presence of the following factors: age older than 60 years, smoking, hypertension and Caucasian ethnicity. The likelihood that an aneurysm will rupture is influenced by the aneurysm size, expansion rate, continued smoking and persistent hypertension. The majority of AAAs are asymptomatic and are detected as an incidental finding on ultrasonography, abdominal computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging performed for other purposes. It can also present with abdominal pain or complications such as thrombosis, embolization and rupture. Approximately 30% of asymptomatic AAAs are discovered as a pulsatile abdominal mass on routine physical examination. Abdominal ultrasonography is considered the screening modality of choice for detecting AAAs because of its high sensitivity and specificity, as well as its safety and relatively lower cost. The decision to screen for AAAs is challenging. The United States Preventive Services Task Force recommended that men between the age of 65 to 75 years who have ever smoked should be screened at least once for AAAs by abdominal ultrasonography. Management options for patients with an asymptomatic AAA include reduction of risk factors such as smoking, hypertension and dyslipidemia; medical therapy with beta-blockers; watchful waiting; endovascular stenting; and surgical repair depending on the size and expansion rate of the aneurysm and underlying comorbidities. PMID:21523201

  2. Association of ficolin-3 with abdominal aortic aneurysm presence and progression.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-García, C-E; Burillo, E; Lindholt, J S; Martinez-Lopez, D; Pilely, K; Mazzeo, C; Michel, J-B; Egido, J; Garred, P; Blanco-Colio, L M; Martin-Ventura, J L

    2017-03-01

    Essentials Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is asymptomatic and its evolution unpredictable. To find novel potential biomarkers of AAA, microvesicles are an excellent source of biomarkers. Ficolin-3 is increased in microvesicles obtained from activated platelets and AAA tissue. Increased ficolin-3 plasma levels are associated with AAA presence and progression.

  3. Bicuspid aortic valve: theoretical and clinical aspects of concomitant ascending aorta replacement.

    PubMed

    De Sá, Mauro Paes Leme; Bastos, Eduardo Sergio; Murad, Henrique

    2009-01-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is associated with annuloaortic ectasia, dissection and ascending aortic aneurysm. The high incidence of this congenital malformation and aortic disease suggests a close correlation between the two phenomena. Abnormalities in different phases of cell migration of the neural crest might be responsible for the occurrence of abnormalities in the aortic valve, media layer of the ascending aorta and vessels of the aortic arch. Previous studies have shown that patients with normal BAV or slight dysfunction may present with dilation of the aortic root. The hemodynamic changes caused by BAV without stenosis or insufficiency seem to be an insufficient explanation for these findings. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain the molecular and hystological aspects of this disease. We found a reduced fibrillin-1 content in both ascending aorta and pulmonary trunk as a possible cause. Histologically, the ascending aorta can present cystic medial necrosis and elastic fragmentation, similar to Marfan's disease. Some authors concluded that many patients, mainly those with aortic regurgitation, should have the aortic valve and the ascending aorta replaced at the same procedure, even if a mild dilatation (45 mm) is present in patients with BAV if life expectancy is anticipated to be greater than 10 years to prevent further aneurysms or ruptures.

  4. Current Clinical Evidence on Rapid Deployment Aortic Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Barnhart, Glenn R.; Shrestha, Malakh Lal

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aortic stenosis is the most common valvular heart disease in the Western world. It is caused primarily by age-related degeneration and progressive calcification typically detected in patients 65 years and older. In patients presenting with symptoms of heart failure, the average survival rate is only 2 years without appropriate treatment. Approximately one half of all patients die within the first 2 to 3 years of symptom onset. In addition, the age of the patients presenting for aortic valve replacement (AVR) is increased along with the demographic changes. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) database shows that the number of patients older than 80 years has increased from 12% to 24% during the past 20 years. At the same time, the percentage of candidates requiring AVR as well as concomitant coronary bypass surgery has increased from 5% to 25%. Surgical AVR continues to be the criterion standard for treatment of aortic stenosis, improving survival and quality of life. Recent advances in prosthetic valve technology, such as transcatheter AVR, have expanded the indication for AVR to the extreme high-risk population, and the most recent surgical innovation, rapid deployment AVR, provides an additional tool to the surgeons’ armamentarium. PMID:26918310

  5. Percutaneous Aortic Balloon Valvuloplasty and Intracardiac Adrenaline in Electromechanical Dissociation as Bridge to Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation.

    PubMed

    Chaara, Jawad; Meier, Pascal; Ellenberger, Christophe; Gasche, Yvan; Bendjelid, Karim; Noble, Stephane; Roffi, Marco

    2015-07-01

    This report describes an emergent balloon aortic valvuloplasty (BAV) procedure performed under cardiopulmonary resuscitation in a 79-year-old man with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis (mean gradient 78 mm Hg, valve area 0.71 cm, and left ventricular ejection fraction 40%) awaiting surgery and who was admitted for heart failure rapidly evolving to cardiogenic shock and multiorgan failure. Decision was made to perform emergent BAV. After crossing the valve with a 6 French catheter, the patient developed an electromechanical dissociation confirmed at transesophageal echocardiography and cardiac arrest. Manual chest compressions were initiated along with the application of high doses of intravenous adrenaline, and BAV was performed under ongoing resuscitation. Despite BAV, transoesophageal echocardiography demonstrated no cardiac activity. At this point, it was decided to advance a pigtail catheter over the wire already in place in the left ventricle and to inject intracardiac adrenaline (1 mg, followed by 5 mg). Left ventricular contraction progressively resumed and, in the absence of aortic regurgitation, an intraaortic balloon pump was inserted. The patient could be weaned from intraaortic balloon pump and vasopressors on day 1, extubated on day 6, and recovered from multiorgan failure. In the absence of neurologic deficits, he underwent uneventful transcatheter aortic valve implantation on day 12 and was discharged to a cardiac rehabilitation program on day 30. At 3-month follow-up, he reported dyspnea NYHA class II as the only symptom.This case shows that severe aortic stenosis leading to electromechanical dissociation may be treated by emergent BAV and intracardiac administration of high-dose adrenaline. Intracardiac adrenaline may be considered in case of refractory electromechanical dissociation occurring in the cardiac catheterization laboratory.

  6. Fenestrated Endovascular Grafts for the Repair of Juxtarenal Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    occlusion in early follow-up. Mesenteric Events during Follow-up During follow-up, five (1.8%) SMA occlusions/partial occlusions and one SMA stenosis were noted. Three of the five patients with SMA occlusion/partial occlusion remained asymptomatic and no further intervention was necessary. One patient underwent SMA bypass surgery and in two patients, the problem solved by SMA stenting. A summary of the outcomes reported in the f—EVAR and OSR studies is shown in Table ES-2. ES-2. Summary of Outcomes: Fenestrated Endovascular Graft Versus Open Surgical Repair for Treatment of Juxtarenal Aortic Aneurysm Outcome f–EVAR OSR Pooled Estimate (Rate) 30-day mortality 1.8 3.1 Late mortality 12.8 23.7 Permanent dialysis 0−2.5 0−3.5 Loss of kidney 1.5 No report of kidney loss Incidence of post-op renal insufficiency: 14.4% Mesentric ischemia 3.3 2.9 Aortic rupture 0 0 Post-op cardiac complications 1.5 10.7 Post-op pulmonary complications 0.7 13.4 Post-op GI complications 0.7 5.9 Aneurysm expansion 1.4 0 Secondary intervention (Non-endoleak) 8.8 7.8 Endoleak Type I: 4Type 2: 16.8Type III: 1.8 N/A Endoleak required treatment Type I: 2.9Type 2: 3.3Type III: 1.1 Graft migration 1.5 N/A Graft separation 0.7 Duration (Mean) Operation time (min) 240 287 Hospital stay (days) 6 13 Summary Short- and medium-term results (up to 2 years) of f—EVAR for the repair of JRA showed that outcomes in f—EVAR series compare favourably with the figures for the OSR series; however, uncertainty remains regarding the long-term results. The following observations are based on low quality evidence. F—EVAR has lower 30-day mortality than OSR (1.8% vs. 3.1%) and a lower late-mortality over the period of time that patients have been followed (12.8% vs. 23.7%). There is a potential for the loss of target vessels during or after f—EVAR procedures. Loss of a target vessel may lead to loss of its respective end organ. The risk associated with this technique is mainly due to branch vessel ischemia or

  7. A tetrad of bicuspid aortic valve association: A single-stage repair

    PubMed Central

    Barik, Ramachandra; Patnaik, A. N.; Mishra, Ramesh C.; Kumari, N. Rama; Gulati, A. S.

    2012-01-01

    We report a 27 years old male who presented with a combination of both congenital and acquired cardiac defects. This syndrome complex includes congenital bicuspid aortic valve, Seller's grade II aortic regurgitation, juxta- subclavian coarctation, stenosis of ostium of left subclavian artery and ruptured sinus of Valsalva aneurysm without any evidence of infective endocarditis. This type of constellation is extremely rare. Neither coarctation of aorta with left subclavian artery stenosis nor the rupture of sinus Valsalva had a favorable pathology for percutaneus intervention. Taking account into morbidity associated with repeated surgery and anesthesia patient underwent a single stage surgical repair of both the defects by two surgical incisions. The approaches include median sternotomy for rupture of sinus of Valsalva and lateral thoracotomy for coarctation with left subclavian artery stenosis. The surgery was uneventful. After three months follow up echocardiography showed mild residual gradient across the repaired coarctation segment, mild aortic regurgitation and no residual left to right shunt. This patient is under follow up. This is an extremely rare case of single stage successful repair of coarctation and rupture of sinus of Valsalva associated with congenital bicuspid aortic valve. PMID:22629035

  8. Morphological and Functional Evaluation of Quadricuspid Aortic Valves Using Cardiac Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Song, Inyoung; Park, Jung Ah; Choi, Bo Hwa; Shin, Je Kyoun; Chee, Hyun Keun; Kim, Jun Seok

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to identify the morphological and functional characteristics of quadricuspid aortic valves (QAV) on cardiac computed tomography (CCT). Materials and Methods We retrospectively enrolled 11 patients with QAV. All patients underwent CCT and transthoracic echocardiography (TTE), and 7 patients underwent cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR). The presence and classification of QAV assessed by CCT was compared with that of TTE and intraoperative findings. The regurgitant orifice area (ROA) measured by CCT was compared with severity of aortic regurgitation (AR) by TTE and the regurgitant fraction (RF) by CMR. Results All of the patients had AR; 9 had pure AR, 1 had combined aortic stenosis and regurgitation, and 1 had combined subaortic stenosis and regurgitation. Two patients had a subaortic fibrotic membrane and 1 of them showed a subaortic stenosis. One QAV was misdiagnosed as tricuspid aortic valve on TTE. In accordance with the Hurwitz and Robert's classification, consensus was reached on the QAV classification between the CCT and TTE findings in 7 of 10 patients. The patients were classified as type A (n = 1), type B (n = 3), type C (n = 1), type D (n = 4), and type F (n = 2) on CCT. A very high correlation existed between ROA by CCT and RF by CMR (r = 0.99) but a good correlation existed between ROA by CCT and regurgitant severity by TTE (r = 0.62). Conclusion Cardiac computed tomography provides comprehensive anatomical and functional information about the QAV. PMID:27390538

  9. CT predictors of post-procedural aortic regurgitation in patients referred for transcatheter aortic valve implantation: an analysis of 105 patients.

    PubMed

    Marwan, Mohamed; Achenbach, Stephan; Ensminger, Stefan M; Pflederer, Tobias; Ropers, Dieter; Ludwig, Josef; Weyand, Michael; Daniel, Werner G; Arnold, Martin

    2013-06-01

    Cardiac computed tomography (CT) allows accurate and detailed analysis of the anatomy of the aortic root and valve, including quantification of calcium. We evaluated the correlation between different CT parameters and the degree of post-procedural aortic regurgitation (AR) after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) using the balloon-expandable Edwards Sapien prosthesis. Pre-intervention contrast-enhanced dual source CT data sets of 105 consecutive patients (48 males, mean age 81 ± 6 years, mean logEuroSCORE 34 ± 13%) with symptomatic severe aortic valve stenosis referred for TAVI using the Edwards Sapien prosthesis (Edwards lifesciences, Inc., CA, USA) were analysed. The degrees of aortic valve commissural calcification and annular calcification were visually assessed on a scale from 0 to 3. Furthermore, the degree of aortic valve calcification as quantified by the Agatston score, aortic annulus eccentricity, aortic diameter at the level of the sinus of valsalva and at the sinotubular junction were assessed. Early post-procedural AR was assessed using aortography. Significant AR was defined as angiographic AR of at least moderate degree (AR ≥ 2). Visual assessment of the degree of aortic annular calcification as well as the Agatston score of aortic valve calcium correlated weakly, yet significantly with the degree of post-procedural AR (r = 0.31 and 0.24, p = 0.001 and 0.013, respectively). Compared to patients with AR < 2, patients with AR ≥ 2 showed more severe calcification of the aortic annulus (mean visual scores 1.9 ± 0.6 vs. 1.5 ± 0.6, p = 0.003) as well as higher aortic valve Agatston scores (1,517 ± 861 vs. 1,062 ± 688, p = 0.005). Visual score for commissural calcification did not differ significantly between both groups (mean scores 2.4 ± 0.5 vs. 2.5 ± 0.5, respectively, p = 0.117). No significant correlation was observed between the degree of AR and commissural calcification, aortic annulus eccentricity index or aortic diameters

  10. TAVI for aortic regurgitation - India's first case with Corevalve Evolut R.

    PubMed

    Gopalamurugan, A B; Murali, K; Jyotsana, B; Jacob, A; Bashi, V V

    2016-09-01

    Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (TAVI) is a well-described treatment for symptomatic calcific severe aortic stenosis. However, TAVI technology is being increasingly used around the world to treat selected cases of severe aortic regurgitation (AR). One of the main limitations of using TAVI technology for AR is the lack of calcification, which is common in such cases. This makes anchoring of a TAVI prosthesis to the aortic annulus difficult and risks displacement or embolization. However, with the availability of recapturable and repositionable TAVI technologies, these limitations have been overcome to a large extent. This is the first Corevalve Evolut R device that was used in India and the first TAVI to treat AR in India.

  11. Transapical aortic valve and mitral valve in ring prosthesis implantation - a new advance in transcatheter procedures.

    PubMed

    Neves, Paulo C; Paulo, Nelson Santos; Gama, Vasco; Vouga, Luís

    2014-08-01

    Transcatheter valve implantation offers a new treatment modality to those patients whose general condition makes conventional surgery very risky. However, the transcatheter option has only been available for the aortic valve. We describe a case of a successful implantation of two Edwards SAPIEN(®) 26 and 29 mm transapical valves, respectively, in aortic and mitral positions, on a 74-year-old patient with severe aortic and mitral stenosis. The procedure progressed uneventfully. Predischarge echocardiogram showed a peak aortic gradient of 20 mmHg, mild periprosthetic regurgitation, peak and mean mitral gradients of 12 and 4, respectively, and moderate (II/IV) periprosthetic regurgitation. Indications for transapical valve implantation will rapidly increase in the near future. It is essential to individualize the treatment be applied for each patient, in order to optimize the success of the procedure.

  12. A Review of Most Relevant Complications of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Michler, Robert E.

    2013-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has emerged for treating aortic stenosis in patients who are poor candidates for surgical aortic valve replacement. Currently, the balloon-expandable Edwards Sapien valve—which is usually implanted via a transfemoral or transapical approach—and the self-expanding CoreValve ReValving system—which is designed for retrograde application—are the most widely implanted valves worldwide. Although a promising approach for high-risk patients, the indication may be expanded to intermediate- and eventually low-risk patients in the future; however, doing so will require a better understanding of potential complications, risk factors for these complications, and strategies to individualize each patient to a different access route and a specific valve. This paper reviews the most relevant complications that may occur in patients who undergo catheter-based aortic valve implantation. PMID:23844292

  13. Evaluation of plaques and stenosis.

    PubMed

    Arnoldi, Elisabeth; Henzler, Thomas; Bastarrika, Gorka; Thilo, Christian; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Schoepf, U Joseph

    2010-07-01

    Cardiac CT scan has emerged from a research tool to a widely used clinical modality in the diagnostic management of coronary artery disease. Based on evidence of numerous clinical studies coronary CT angiography (cCTA) has emerged as a fast, accurate, and noninvasive alternative to conventional angiography in selected patient populations. A major strength of cCTA is its ability to combine information on the coronary artery anatomy, the vessel lumen, and atherosclerotic lesions. Recent investigations on the application of cCTA in myocardial perfusion imaging suggest that cCTA may allow analysis of the hemodynamic relevance of detected stenosis. Data is accumulating that supports its relevance for patient management and outcome. This article examines the role of cCTA for the evaluation of plaques and stenosis.

  14. Descending aorta-external iliac artery bypass for middle aortic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Yuki; Yamamoto, Kazuo; Sugimoto, Tsutomu; Asami, Fuyuki; Nagasawa, Ayako; Shiraiwa, Satoru; Nakamura, Norihito; Yoshii, Shinpei

    2014-11-01

    We encountered a surgical case of middle aortic syndrome (MAS) in a 56-year-old man who had resistant hypertension. Computed tomography showed severe stenosis of the abdominal aorta from below the superior mesenteric artery to above the inferior mesenteric artery. Although bilateral renal artery stenosis was confirmed, renal function was within normal limits. A 10-mm vascular prosthetic graft was used to perform a descending aorta to left external iliac artery bypass. His hypertension was well controlled without medication. This extra-anatomic bypass may be a simple and useful approach for treating MAS if it is not necessary to reconstruct the renal artery or visceral artery.

  15. Recommendations for Management of Patients with Carotid Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Lovrencic-Huzjan, Arijana; Rundek, Tatjana; Katsnelson, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Stroke is a one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in the world. Carotid atherosclerosis is recognized as an important factor in stroke pathophysiology and represents a key target in stroke prevention; multiple treatment modalities have been developed to battle this disease. Multiple randomized trials have shown the efficacy of carotid endarterectomy in secondary stroke prevention. Carotid stenting, a newer treatment option, presents a less invasive alternative to the surgical intervention on carotid arteries. Advances in medical therapy have also enabled further risk reduction in the overall incidence of stroke. Despite numerous trials and decades of clinical research, the optimal management of symptomatic and asymptomatic carotid disease remains controversial. We will attempt to highlight some of the pivotal trials already completed, discuss the current controversies and complexities in the treatment decision-making, and postulate on what likely lies ahead. This paper will highlight the complexities of decision-making optimal treatment recommendations for patients with symptomatic and asymptomatic carotid stenosis. PMID:22645702

  16. Prevalence and significance of reversible radionuclide ischemic perfusion defects in symptomatic aortic valve disease patients with or without concomitant coronary disease

    SciTech Connect

    Pfisterer, M.; Mueller-Brand, J.; Bruendler, H.; Cueni, T.

    1982-01-01

    To determine the prevalence and significance of exercise-induced localized perfusion defects in symptomatic patients with aortic valve disease, thallium-201 rest and exercise studies were performed in a consecutive series of 29 such patients prior to left heart catheterization with coronary arteriography. Eight patients had repeat studies after aortic valve replacement. Twelve of 17 patients with predominant aortic regurgitation (AR) had distinct LV apical defects during exercise despite normal coronary arteries, while 10 of 12 patients with aortic valve disease and associated coronary artery disease (CAD) had localized perfusion defects in LV areas other than the apex. In patients with AR, reversible apical perfusion defects can occur without CAD; these apical defects are probably a reflection of severe LV volume overload in AR. LV perfusion defects in areas other than the apex are specific for CAD in aortic valve disease, and concomitant CAD may not provoke regional LV perfusion deficits in aortic stenosis patients with severe LV hypertrophy.

  17. Practical considerations for optimizing cardiac computed tomography protocols for comprehensive acquisition prior to transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Khalique, Omar K; Pulerwitz, Todd C; Halliburton, Sandra S; Kodali, Susheel K; Hahn, Rebecca T; Nazif, Tamim M; Vahl, Torsten P; George, Isaac; Leon, Martin B; D'Souza, Belinda; Einstein, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is performed frequently in patients with severe, symptomatic aortic stenosis who are at high risk or inoperable for open surgical aortic valve replacement. Computed tomography angiography (CTA) has become the gold standard imaging modality for pre-TAVR cardiac anatomic and vascular access assessment. Traditionally, cardiac CTA has been most frequently used for assessment of coronary artery stenosis, and scanning protocols have generally been tailored for this purpose. Pre-TAVR CTA has different goals than coronary CTA and the high prevalence of chronic kidney disease in the TAVR patient population creates a particular need to optimize protocols for a reduction in iodinated contrast volume. This document reviews details which allow the physician to tailor CTA examinations to maximize image quality and minimize harm, while factoring in multiple patient and scanner variables which must be considered in customizing a pre-TAVR protocol.

  18. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation in a patient with mechanical mitral prosthesis: a lesson learned from an intraventricular clash.

    PubMed

    Testa, Luca; Gelpi, Guido; Bedogni, Francesco

    2013-10-01

    We hereby present the case of a patient with severe aortic stenosis who underwent in her previous medical history a mitral valve replacement with a mechanical valve (Omnicarbon 27), and progressively developed a severe aortic stenosis. This patient was judged inoperable and then scheduled for CoreValve Revalving System implantation. Despite a good positioning of the CoreValve, an acute, severe mitral regurgitation developed soon after implantation as a consequence of the impaired movement of the mitral prosthesis leaflet. A condition of cardiogenic shock quickly developed. A good mitral prosthesis function was restored disengaging the CoreValve from the aortic annulus. After few months, the patients underwent successful Edwards-Sapien valve implantation through the Corevalve. This case strongly demonstrates how much a careful evaluation of the features of the mitral prosthesis and patient anatomy is crucial to select which specific transcatheter bioprosthesis would better perform.

  19. The Emerging Roles of Coronary Computed Tomographic Angiography: Acute Chest Pain Evaluation and Screening for Asymptomatic Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Chien, Ning; Wang, Tzung-Dau; Chang, Yeun-Chung; Lin, Po-Chih; Tseng, Yao-Hui; Lee, Yee-Fan; Ko, Wei-Chun; Lee, Bai-Chin; Lee, Wen-Jeng

    2016-01-01

    Coronary computed tomographic angiography (CCTA) has been widely available since 2004. After that, the diagnostic accuracy of CCTA has been extensively validated with invasive coronary angiography for detection of coronary arterial stenosis. In this paper, we reviewed the updated evidence of the role of CCTA in both scenarios including acute chest pain and screening in asymptomatic adults. Several large-scale studies have been conducted to evaluate the diagnostic value of CCTA in the context of acute chest pain patients. CCTA could play a role in delivering more efficient care. For risk stratification of asymptomatic patients using CCTA, latest studies have revealed incremental benefits. Future studies evaluating the totality of plaque characteristics may be useful for determining the role of noncalcified plaque for risk stratification in asymptomatic individuals. PMID:27122947

  20. Carotid Stenosis and Ocular Blood Pressure Modelling

    PubMed Central

    Jullian, M.; Kinsner, W.

    1984-01-01

    A model of the human carotid vascular system was developed to study the effects of carotid stenosis on ocular blood pressure and ocular pulse waveform. The model incorporates a non-linear element representing a stenosis. A state variable representation of a reduced model is used in a computer simulation. Results show that carotid stenosis as low as 20% are detectable in the ocular blood pressure waveform.

  1. Left ventricular function in patients with ventricular arrhythmias and aortic valve disease

    SciTech Connect

    Santinga, J.T.; Kirsh, M.M.; Brady, T.J.; Thrall, J.; Pitt, B.

    1983-02-01

    Forty patients having aortic valve replacement were evaluated preoperatively for ventricular arrhythmia and left ventricular ejection fraction. Arrhythmias were classified as complex or simple using the Lown criteria on the 24-hour ambulatory electrocardiogram; ejection fractions were determined by radionuclide gated blood pool analysis and contrast angiography. The ejection fractions determined by radionuclide angiography were 59.1 +/- 13.1% for 26 patients with simple or no ventricular arrhythmias, and 43.9 +/- 20.3% for 14 patients with complex ventricular arrhythmias (p less than 0.01). Ejection fractions determined by angiography, available for 31 patients, were also lower in patients with complex ventricular arrhythmias (61.1 +/- 16.3% versus 51.4 +/- 13.4%; p less than 0.05). Seven of 9 patients showing conduction abnormalities on the electrocardiogram had complex ventricular arrhythmias. Eight of 20 patients with aortic stenosis had complex ventricular arrhythmias, while 2 of 13 patients with aortic insufficiency had such arrhythmias. It is concluded that decreased left ventricular ejection fraction, intraventricular conduction abnormalities, and aortic stenosis are associated with an increased frequency of complex ventricular arrhythmias in patients with aortic valve disease.

  2. Functional assessment of cerebral artery stenosis: A pilot study based on computational fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Yan, Zhengzheng; Pu, Yuehua; Shiu, Wen-Shin; Wu, Jianhuang; Chen, Rongliang; Leng, Xinyi; Qin, Haiqiang; Liu, Xin; Jia, Baixue; Song, Ligang; Wang, Yilong; Miao, Zhongrong; Wang, Yongjun; Liu, Liping; Cai, Xiao-Chuan

    2016-10-04

    The fractional pressure ratio is introduced to quantitatively assess the hemodynamic significance of severe intracranial stenosis. A computational fluid dynamics-based method is proposed to non-invasively compute the FPRCFD and compared against fractional pressure ratio measured by an invasive technique. Eleven patients with severe intracranial stenosis considered for endovascular intervention were recruited and an invasive procedure was performed to measure the distal and the aortic pressure (Pd and Pa). The fractional pressure ratio was calculated as [Formula: see text] The computed tomography angiography was used to reconstruct three-dimensional (3D) arteries for each patient. Cerebral hemodynamics was then computed for the arteries using a mathematical model governed by Navier-Stokes equations and with the outflow conditions imposed by a model of distal resistance and compliance. The non-invasive [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], and FPRCFD were then obtained from the computational fluid dynamics calculation using a 16-core parallel computer. The invasive and non-invasive parameters were tested by statistical analysis. For this group of patients, the computational fluid dynamics method achieved comparable results with the invasive measurements. The fractional pressure ratio and FPRCFD are very close and highly correlated, but not linearly proportional, with the percentage of stenosis. The proposed computational fluid dynamics method can potentially be useful in assessing the functional alteration of cerebral stenosis.

  3. A smart method of intraoperative explantation of an aortic bioprosthesis.

    PubMed

    Erdem, Can C; Park, Soon J

    2009-01-01

    Structural prosthetic valve deterioration and nonstructural dysfunction are two common causes of nonfatal valve events following implantation of a bioprosthetic valve. Using caution and skill, implantation of a bioprosthesis is relatively easy. On the other hand, explantation of a bioprosthesis is a challenging and time-consuming procedure. We have developed a surgical technique by which we were able to ameliorate this troublesome situation in a 79-year-old man with aortic stenosis in whom we had to intraoperatively explant the bioprosthesis that we have put in initially. Another bioprosthesis of the same kind was used to replace the old prosthesis with the rest of his postoperative course until dismissal being eventless.

  4. Patient selection for transcatheter aortic valve implantation: An interventional cardiology perspective.

    PubMed

    Mylotte, Darrren; Martucci, Giuseppe; Piazza, Nicolo

    2012-07-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has emerged as a highly effective minimally invasive treatment symptomatic for severe calcific aortic stenosis in patients at high or prohibitive surgical risk. The success of TAVI has been determined by a number of factors, but in particular by appropriate patient selection. Appropriate patient selection involves identifying patients with the potential to benefit most from TAVI and individualizing the bioprosthesis type and size, and the vascular access site for each case. We present herein, our critical appraisal on patient selection for TAVI: an interventional cardiology perspective.

  5. Sutureless Aortic Prosthesis Implantation: the First Brazilian Experience with Perceval Device

    PubMed Central

    Tagliari, Ana Paula; de Moura, Leandro; Dussin, Luiz Henrique; Saadi, Eduardo Keller

    2016-01-01

    This is a report of the first Brazilian experience with the Perceval sutureless aortic prosthesis in two patients with severe aortic stenosis. Transesophageal echocardiography was used during the procedure. The aortotomy was performed 1 cm above the sinotubular junction, followed by leaflets removal and decalcification. Correct valve size was selected, device released and an accommodation balloon used. The cardiopulmonary bypass times were 47 and 38 min and the cross-clamp times were 38 and 30 min. There was a significant decrease in mean gradients (41 and 75 mmHg preoperatively; 7 and 8 mmHg postoperatively). There was no major complication or paravalvular leak. PMID:27849308

  6. A Quantitative Study of Simulated Bicuspid Aortic Valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szeto, Kai; Nguyen, Tran; Rodriguez, Javier; Pastuszko, Peter; Nigam, Vishal; Lasheras, Juan

    2010-11-01

    Previous studies have shown that congentially bicuspid aortic valves develop degenerative diseases earlier than the standard trileaflet, but the causes are not well understood. It has been hypothesized that the asymmetrical flow patterns and turbulence found in the bileaflet valves together with abnormally high levels of strain may result in an early thickening and eventually calcification and stenosis. Central to this hypothesis is the need for a precise quantification of the differences in the strain rate levels between bileaflets and trileaflet valves. We present here some in-vitro dynamic measurements of the spatial variation of the strain rate in pig aortic vales conducted in a left ventricular heart flow simulator device. We measure the strain rate of each leaflet during the whole cardiac cycle using phase-locked stereoscopic three-dimensional image surface reconstruction techniques. The bicuspid case is simulated by surgically stitching two of the leaflets in a normal valve.

  7. Perceval S aortic valve implantation in an achondroplastic Dwarf

    PubMed Central

    Baikoussis, Nikolaos G.; Argiriou, Michalis; Argiriou, Orestis; Dedeilias, Panagiotis

    2016-01-01

    Despite cardiovascular disease in patients with dwarfism is not rare; there is a lack of reports referring to cardiac interventions in such patients. Dwarfism may be due to achondroplasia or hormonal growth disorders. We present a 58-year-old woman with episodes of dyspnea for several months. She underwent on transthoracic echocardiography, and she diagnosed with severe aortic valve stenosis. She referred to our department for surgical treatment of this finding. In accordance of her anthropometric characteristics and her very small aortic annulus, we had the dilemma of prosthesis selection. We decided to implant a stentless valve to optimize her effective orifice area. Our aim is to present the successful Perceval S valve implantation and the descriptions of the problems coming across in operating on these special patients. To our knowledge, this is the first case patient in which a Perceval S valve is implanted according to the international bibliography. PMID:26750695

  8. Aortic Aneurysm Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Heart Disease Stroke High Blood Pressure Salt ... to Prevent and Control Chronic Diseases Million Hearts® Web Sites with More Information About Aortic Aneurysm For ...

  9. Long-term results after aortic root replacement using self-assembled valve composite grafts in patients with small aortic annulus

    PubMed Central

    Urbanski, Paul P.; Dinstak, Witold; Rents, Wilko; Heinz, Nicolas; Diegeler, Anno

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The study was aimed to evaluate operative and long-term results after complete root replacement using self-assembled valve composite grafts in patients with a small aortic annulus. METHODS Among 547 consecutive patients who received the Bentall procedure between 2000 and 2012, a total of 29 patients (61 ± 10; range 42–79 years) had an annulus of ≤20 mm (mean 19.0 ± 0.9). Patients with a native aortic valve (22) suffered from stenosis, insufficiency or mixed defect in 10, 10 and 2 cases, respectively. Among the remaining 7 patients with an artificial aortic valve, there were 3 symptomatic prosthesis–patient mismatches, 3 valve prosthesis deteriorations (1 structural and 2 none-structural) and 1 paravalvular leak. Indication for aortic root replacement was true or false aneurysm, porcelain aorta and intraoperative aortic wall injury in 17, 6 and 6 patients, respectively. RESULTS The composite graft for complete aortic root replacement was assembled using a mechanical (26) or biological (3) valve prosthesis placed inside a vascular graft with a median size of 24 (range 22–26) mm. The margin of the tube beneath the valve was anastomosed to the aortic annulus, and coronary ostia were implanted in the usual manner. The mean transvalvular gradient at discharge was 10.8 ± 3.9 mmHg and remained virtually unchanged at the follow-up completed for all patients. Early mortality was 0. During the mean follow-up of 95.8 ± 43.7 months, 2 patients died (54 and 146 months after surgery) due to pulmonary embolism and myocardial infarction, respectively. CONCLUSIONS In patients with a small aortic annulus who need complete aortic root replacement, an oversizing of the valve can be easily achieved using modified, self-assembled composite grafts. Offering excellent haemodynamic characteristics, these grafts lead to prevention of prosthesis–patient mismatch and result in very good and durable functional and clinical results. PMID:24179177

  10. [Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Ziaja, K; Sedlak, L; Urbanek, T; Kostyra, J; Ludyga, T

    2000-01-01

    The reported incidence of inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm (IAAA) is from 2% to 14% of patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm and the etiology of this disease is still discussed--according to the literature several pathogenic theories have been proposed. From 1992 to 1997 32 patients with IAAA were operated on. The patients were mostly symptomatic--abdominal pain was present in 68.75% cases, back pain in 31.25%, fever in 12.5% and weight loss in 6.25% of the operated patients. In all the patients ultrasound examination was performed, in 4 patients CT and in 3 cases urography. All the patients were operated on and characteristic signs of inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm like: thickened aortic wall, perianeurysmal infiltration or retroperitoneal fibrosis with involvement of retroperitoneal structures were found. In all cases surgery was performed using transperitoneal approach; in three cases intraoperatively contiguous abdominal organs were injured, which was connected with their involvement into periaortic inflammation. In 4 cases clamping of the aorta was done at the level of the diaphragmatic hiatus. 3 patients (9.37%) died (one patient with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm). Authors present diagnostic procedures and the differences in the surgical tactic, emphasizing the necessity of the surgical therapy in patients with inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm.

  11. A rare case of persistent hypoglossal artery associated with contralateral proximal subclavian stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Napolitano, Giuseppina; Leone, Giuseppe; Aiello, Alessandra; La porta, Antonietta; Tedeschi, Enrico; Briganti, Francesco; Caranci, Ferdinando

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The persistent hypoglossal artery is rare vascular anomalies. We report the case of a 50-year old man with right hypoglossal artery, ipsilateral hypoplasic internal carotid artery, associated with left proximal subclavian stenosis with subclavian steal syndrome. Power-Doppler-Ultra-Sonography spectral images obtained after the patient exercised the left arm showed mid-systolic deceleration with retrograde late-systolic velocities. A Computed Tomography Angiography demonstrated a proximal stenosis of the left SA, a mild right ICA hypoplasia and an anomalous artery arising from right ICA at C2–C3 level, entering the cranium via the hypoglossal canal and joining the basilar artery. Usually the presence of PHA may be completely asymptomatic, and detected as an incidental finding by CTA or MRA, but in our case its diagnosis is extremely important because it is often the only vessel supplying blood to the basilar trunk and posterior circulation. PMID:28352804

  12. Phonocardiographic Assessment of Hemodynamic Response to Balloon Aortic Valvuloplasty

    PubMed Central

    Bush, Howard S.; Ferguson, James J.

    1990-01-01

    The time to systolic murmur peak is a clinical index that is useful in assessing the severity of valvular aortic stenosis. To determine whether phonocardiography could be used to detect a change in the timing of the murmur and thus to measure hemodynamic improvements in elderly balloon aortic valvuloplasty patients, we retrospectively reviewed phonocardiographic tracings of 18 patients taken before and after the procedure. Ten men and 8 women were included in the study; the mean age was 80.7 ± 11.2 years (range, 64 to 90). Phonocardiographic signals were digitized, and the R-wave to murmur peak interval (R-MP) was measured. In 11 patients, the R-MP decreased (mean decrease, 16% ± 11%): of these, 10 had a significant (> 25%) decrease in mean gradient; 10 had a significant (> 25%) decrease in peak-to-peak gradient; and the average increase in aortic valve area was 38%. Seven patients had an increase in R-MP (mean increase, 10% ± 9%): of these, 6 had a decrease in mean gradient of less than 25%; 6 had a decrease in peak-to-peak gradient of less than 25%; and the average increase in aortic valve area was 21%. Pre- and post-balloon aortic valvuloplasty heart rates were not significantly different (71 ± 8 beats/min versus 73 ± 5 beats/min). In this study, hemodynamic improvements after valvuloplasty were manifested by a reduction in the R-MP interval. We conclude that phonocardiography may be a practical, noninvasive method of assessing the hemodynamic response to balloon aortic valvuloplasty. (Texas Heart Institute Journal 1990;17:42-7) PMID:15227188

  13. Automatic aortic root segmentation in CTA whole-body dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xinpei; Kitslaar, Pieter H.; Scholte, Arthur J. H. A.; Lelieveldt, Boudewijn P. F.; Dijkstra, Jouke; Reiber, Johan H. C.

    2016-03-01

    Trans-catheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is an evolving technique for patients with serious aortic stenosis disease. Typically, in this application a CTA data set is obtained of the patient's arterial system from the subclavian artery to the femoral arteries, to evaluate the quality of the vascular access route and analyze the aortic root to determine if and which prosthesis should be used. In this paper, we concentrate on the automated segmentation of the aortic root. The purpose of this study was to automatically segment the aortic root in computed tomography angiography (CTA) datasets to support TAVR procedures. The method in this study includes 4 major steps. First, the patient's cardiac CTA image was resampled to reduce the computation time. Next, the cardiac CTA image was segmented using an atlas-based approach. The most similar atlas was selected from a total of 8 atlases based on its image similarity to the input CTA image. Third, the aortic root segmentation from the previous step was transferred to the patient's whole-body CTA image by affine registration and refined in the fourth step using a deformable subdivision surface model fitting procedure based on image intensity. The pipeline was applied to 20 patients. The ground truth was created by an analyst who semi-automatically corrected the contours of the automatic method, where necessary. The average Dice similarity index between the segmentations of the automatic method and the ground truth was found to be 0.965±0.024. In conclusion, the current results are very promising.

  14. In vitro study of the aortic interleaflet triangle reshaping.

    PubMed

    Vismara, R; Leopaldi, A M; Mangini, A; Romagnoni, C; Contino, M; Antona, C; Fiore, G B

    2014-01-22

    Aortic interleaflet triangle reshaping (AITR) is a surgical approach to aortic valve incontinence that involves placing three stitches at half of the interleaflet triangles height. In this work, the relationship between the actual stitch height and valve functioning, and the safety margin that the surgeon can rely on in applying the stitches were systematically investigated in vitro. AITR surgery was applied to six swine aortic roots placing the stitches empirically at 50%, 60% and 75% of the triangle heights. Then the actual stitch heights were measured and the hydrodynamic performances were evaluated with a pulsatile hydrodynamic mock loop. Actual stitch heights were 45±2%, 61±4% and 79±6%. As compared to untreated conditions, the 50% configuration induced a significant variation in the effective orifice area. With stitches placed at 60%, the mean systolic pressure drop increased significantly with respect to the untreated case, but no significant changes were recorded with respect to the 50% configuration. At 75%, all the hydrodynamic parameters of systolic valve functioning worsened significantly. Summarizing, the AITR technique, when performed in a conservative manner did not induce significant alterations in the hydrodynamics of the aortic root in vitro, while more aggressive configurations did. The absence of a statistically significant difference between the 50% and 60% configurations suggests that there is a reasonably limited risk of inducing valve stenosis in the post-op scenario due to stitch misplacement.

  15. Bicuspid aortic valve hemodynamics: a fluid-structure interaction study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Santanu; Seaman, Clara; Sucosky, Philippe

    2011-11-01

    The bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is a congenital defect in which the aortic valve forms with two leaflets instead of three. While calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD) also develops in the normal tricuspid aortic valve (TAV), its progression in the BAV is more rapid. Although studies have suggested a mechano-potential root for the disease, the native BAV hemodynamics remains largely unknown. This study aimed at characterizing BAV hemodynamics and quantifying the degree of wall-shear stress (WSS) abnormality on BAV leaflets. Fluid-structure interaction models validated with particle-image velocimetry were designed to predict the flow and leaflet dynamics in idealized TAV and BAV anatomies. Valvular function was quantified in terms of the effective orifice area. The regional leaflet WSS was characterized in terms of oscillatory shear index, temporal shear magnitude and temporal shear gradient. The predictions indicate the intrinsic degree of stenosis of the BAV anatomy, reveal drastic differences in shear stress magnitude and pulsatility on BAV and TAV leaflets and confirm the side- and site-specificity of the leaflet WSS. Given the ability of abnormal fluid shear stress to trigger valvular inflammation, these results support the existence of a mechano-etiology of CAVD in the BAV.

  16. Compassionate use of the self-expandable medtronic CoreValve prosthesis for the treatment of pure aortic regurgitation in a patient at prohibitive risk for surgical valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Hildebrandt, H A; Erbel, R; Kahlert, P

    2013-12-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is a viable treatment option for high- and prohibitive-risk patients with severe, calcified pure or predominant aortic valve stenosis, but not for pure aortic valve regurgitation. In fact, the use of TAVI for this indication is even considered unlikely due to the lack of calcium which appears essential for anchoring the stent-valve and prevents dislocation. We report a case of a patient with severe, symptomatic pure aortic regurgitation, and a history of two previous open-heart surgeries who was successfully treated by compassionate use implantation of an oversized Medtronic CoreValve prosthesis as an ultima ratio treatment option.

  17. Comparison of extracranial artery stenosis and cerebral blood flow, assessed by quantitative magnetic resonance, using digital subtraction angiography as the reference standard

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Jingjing; Wu, Dan; Mo, Yongqian; Wang, Anxin; Hu, Shiyu; Ren, Lijie

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Extracranial arteriosclerosis usually indicates a high risk of ischemic stroke. In the past, a clinical decision following diagnosis was dependent on the percentage of vessel stenosis determined by an invasive technique. We aimed to develop a quantitative magnetic resonance (QMR) technique to evaluate artery structure and cerebral hemodynamics noninvasively. QMR and digital subtraction angiography (DSA) were performed in 67 patients with suspected cerebral vascular disease at our hospital. Accuracy, sensitivity, positive predictive values (PPVs), negative predictive values (NPVs), and Pearson correlation coefficient of QMR were calculated and compared for the detection and measurement of vascular stenoses using DSA as a gold standard. For patients with unilateral artery stenosis, quantitative cerebral blood flow (CBF) was measured by QMR in ipsilateral and contralateral hemispheres. Among 67 subjects (male 54, female 12), 201 stenoses were detected by QMR and DSA. QMR measuring the degree of stenosis and lesion length was in good correlation with the results obtained by DSA (r2 = 0.845, 0.721, respectively). As for artery stenosis, PPV and NPV of QMR were 89.55% and 95.71%, respectively. As for severe stenosis, sensitivity and specificity of QMR were 82.3% and 86.0% with DSA as a reference. For subjects with unilateral carotid stenosis, CBF in basal ganglia decreased significantly (P < 0.001) compared with the contralateral one in symptomatic and asymptomatic groups. For subjects with moderate stenosis (50–79%), CBF of temporal and basal ganglia was decreased compared with the contralateral ganglia. However, CBF in subjects with severe stenosis or occlusion in the basal ganglia was mildly elevated compared with the contralateral ganglia (P < 0.001). In our study, a good correlation was found between QMR and DSA when measuring artery stenosis and CBF. QMR may become an important method for measuring artery stenosis and cerebral hemodynamics in

  18. Are Aortic Stent Grafts Safe in Pregnancy?

    PubMed Central

    Khandanpour, Nader; Mehta, Tapan A.; Adiseshiah, M.; Meyer, Felicity J.

    2015-01-01

    Aortic stent grafts are increasingly used to treat aortic aneurysms and also other aortic pathologies. The safety of aortic stent grafts in pregnancy has never been studied or reported. We report on two cases of aortic stent grafts in pregnant women and discuss the effect of pregnancy on these aortic stent grafts. PMID:26229702

  19. Recurred Post-intubation Tracheal Stenosis Treated with Bronchoscopic Cryotherapy.

    PubMed

    Jung, Ye-Ryung; Taek Jeong, Joon; Kyu Lee, Myoung; Kim, Sang-Ha; Joong Yong, Suk; Jeong Lee, Seok; Lee, Won-Yeon

    Post-intubation tracheal stenosis accounts for the greatest proportion of whole-cause tracheal stenosis. Treatment of post-intubation tracheal stenosis requires a multidisciplinary approach. Surgery or an endoscopic procedure can be used, depending on the type of stenosis. However, the efficacy of cryotherapy in post-intubation tracheal stenosis has not been validated. Here, we report a case of recurring post-intubation tracheal stenosis successfully treated with bronchoscopic cryotherapy that had previously been treated with surgery. In this case, cryotherapy was effective in treating web-like fibrous stenosis, without requiring more surgery. Cryotherapy can be considered as an alternative or primary treatment for post-intubation tracheal stenosis.

  20. Successful Angioplasty of a Superficial Femoral Artery Stenosis Caused by a Suture-Mediated Closure Device

    SciTech Connect

    Gemmete, Joseph J. Dasika, Narasimham; Forauer, Andrew R.; Cho, Kyung; Williams, David M.

    2003-08-15

    We report the successful angioplasty of an acute arterial narrowing after suture-mediated closure (SMC) of a femoral arterial puncture. A 75-year-old woman underwent a cerebral arteriogramvia a right common femoral artery puncture. The arteriotomy site was closed with a SMC device. Four days after placement the patient complained of pain in her right calf after walking. An arteriogram 7 days after SMC showed a severe focal stenosis at the origin of the superficial femoral artery involving the presumed puncture site. The lesion was successfully treated with balloon angioplasty. The patient at 6 months was asymptomatic.

  1. Study of normal, fibrous and calcified aortic valve tissue by Raman and reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Kátia Calligaris; Munin, Egberto; Alves, Leandro P.; Silveira, Fabrício L.; Junior, Landulfo S.; De Lima, Carlos J.; Lázzaro, João C.; De Souza, Genivaldo C.; Piotto, José A. B.; Pacheco, Marcos T. T.; Zângaro, Renato A.

    2007-02-01

    Several studies have identified the degree of aortic valve calcification as a strong predictor both for the progression and outcome of aortic stenosis. In industrialized countries, aortic valve stenosis is most frequently caused by progressive calcification and degeneration of aortic cusps. However, there are no accurate methods to quantify the extent of aortic valve calcification. To provide a non-invasive alternative to biopsy, a range of optical methods have been investigated, including Raman and reflectance spectroscopy. A Raman spectrum can be used to access the molecular constitution of a particular tissue and classify it. Raman spectroscopy is largely used in the quantification and evaluation of human atherosclerosis, being a powerful technique for performing biochemical analysis without tissue removal. Nevertheless, increased thickness and disorganization of the collagen fibre network and extracellular matrix are known to affect the diffuse spectral reflectance of the tissue. A catheter with the "6 around 1" configuration, the central fiber transmit laser radiation to the sample and the scattered light is collected by the other six surrounding fibers, was used both for Raman and reflectance spectroscopy. A white light (krypton lamp, flashtube Model FX 1160 Perkin Elmer, USA) excitation was used for reflectance measurements. A Ti-sapphire (785nm, Spectra Physics, model 3900S, USA) laser, pumped by an argon laser (Spectra Physics, model Stabilite 2017, USA) was used as the near infrared Raman set up. Several ex-vivo spectra of aortic valve samples were analyzed. The results show a promising way to differentiate normal, fibrous and calcified tissue in aortic valve.

  2. Anomalous right coronary artery from pulmonary artery discovered incidentally in an asymptomatic young infant

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyu Seon; Jo, Eun Young; Yu, Jae Hyeon

    2016-01-01

    Isolated anomalous right coronary artery originating from the pulmonary artery (ARCAPA) is a rare congenital coronary anomaly that is asymptomatic and discovered incidentally in most cases. ARCAPA is generally not considered a fatal defect in infancy or childhood, although cases of sudden death have been reported. Here, we report a 2-month-old female infant who presented with a prolonged fever that was determined to be caused by rhinovirus infection. Myocardial ischemia of the left ventricular posterior wall was already seen on echocardiography, and ARCAPA was discovered incidentally. The patient underwent successful surgical reimplantation of the right coronary artery to the aortic root to re-establish dual ostial circulation. PMID:28018453

  3. Aortic Endoprosthesis for the Treatment of Native Aortic Coarctation and Concomitant Aneurysm in an Octogenarian Patient.

    PubMed

    Rabellino, Martín; Kotowicz, Vadim; Kenny, Alberto; Kohan, Andres Alejandro; García-Mónaco, Ricardo

    2015-11-01

    We report a case of an 82-year-old female patient with native coarctation of the aorta and poststenotic aneurysm of the descending thoracic aorta. On consultation, she was receiving 4 antihypertensive drugs, and physical examination revealed nonpalpable lower-limb pulses with intermittent claudication at 50 min. Because of her age, high surgical risk and combination of lesions, endovascular treatment was suggested. Placement of a Valiant thoracic aorta endoprosthesis followed by coarctation angioplasty was performed. At 48 hr, the patient was discharged on 1 antihypertensive drug, palpable pulses on both limbs and a normal ankle-brachial index. At 1 month follow-up, the patient remained as discharged and multislice computed tomography angiography depicted complete coarctation expansion without residual stenosis, exclusion of the aortic aneurysm, and no signs of endoleaks.

  4. Aortic aneurysm repair - endovascular- discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... MRI scan Aortic aneurysm repair - endovascular Aortic angiography Hardening of ... Center-Shreveport, Shreveport, LA. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla ...

  5. Antimicrobial Treatment of Asymptomatic Bacteriuria in Healthy Ambulatory Subjects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhanel, George G.

    1990-01-01

    The treatment of urinary tract infections is discussed. Specific issues considered include the definition of asymptomatic bacteriuria, the prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria, the controversies of who should be treated, and antimicrobial treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria. (MLW)

  6. [Aortic inflammatory lesions in Behçet's disease].

    PubMed

    Desbois, A-C; Wechsler, B; Cacoub, P; Saadoun, D

    2016-04-01

    The arterial lesions affect about 10% of patients with Behçet's disease (BD). Aortic inflammatory involvement includes predominantly aortic aneurysmal lesions affecting most often the abdominal aorta. They account for the severity of the disease and are a leading cause of death when they hit the aorta or pulmonary arteries. Within the arterial lesions of BD, aortic involvement is, with femoral lesions, the most common site involved (18-28% of patients with vascular disease). Unlike other large vessels vasculitis (i.e. giant cell arteritis and Takayasu's arteritis) diffuse aortitis is observed in less than 5% of patients with BD. Aortic lesions of BD may be asymptomatic (systematic imaging or occasionally associated with other vascular event) or be revealed by the occurrence of abdominal, thoracic or lumbar pain, or an aortic valve insufficiency. Fever is frequently associated. Increase in acute phase reactants is common in these patients. Histological analysis may show infiltration by lymphocytes, neutrophils and plasma cells in the media and adventitia and a proliferation of the vasa vasorum in the media as well as a fibroblastic proliferation. In the later phase, a fibrous thickening of the media and adventitia is observed as well as a proliferation and thickening of the vasa vasorum. The therapeutic management should always include a medical treatment for the control of inflammation (corticosteroids, immunosuppressive drugs and/or biotherapy) and often an endovascular or surgical treatment if the aneurysm is threatening. The choice between endovascular or surgical treatment is considered case by case, depending on the experience of the team, anatomical conditions and of the clinical presentation. In this review, we provide a detailed and updated review of the literature to describe the aortic inflammatory damage associated with Behçet's disease.

  7. Prevalence of asymptomatic cardiac valve anomalies in idiopathic scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Colomina, M J; Puig, L; Godet, C; Villanueva, C; Bago, J

    2002-01-01

    The prevalence of asymptomatic cardiac valve anomalies was determined in 82 patients (69 females and 13 males) diagnosed as having idiopathic scoliosis and scheduled for corrective surgery (mean age at surgery 16.3 years). The preoperative study in each patient included echocardiography and ultrasound Doppler. Twenty-three valvular anomalies were found in 20 patients (24.4%). The most frequent was mitral valve prolapse. The occurrence of valvular anomalies did not correlate with sex, curve magnitude, or age at diagnosis. Eighteen patients presented a total of 20 comorbid conditions: positive family history of scoliosis (five cases), isthmic spondylolisthesis (five cases), nervous anorexia (two cases), hereditary exostosis, cystic fibrosis, ureteral stenosis, mammary hypoplasia, slipped capital femoral epiphysis, psoriasis, celiac disease, and lactose intolerance. A significant relationship was found between valvular anomalies and comorbidity. Valvular anomalies were detected in 11 out of 64 patients (17.2%) with no comorbidity and in nine out of 18 patients (50%) with a comorbid condition (Chi-square 8.2, p = 0.004). In this latter group of patients, routine echocardiographic study seems advisable in the preoperative evaluation.

  8. Echocardiographic findings in asymptomatic systemic lupus erythematosus patients.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Abdel GaffarA; Alghamdi, Abdulaziz A; ALjahlan, Mohammad A; Al-Homood, Ibrahim A

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study is to use transthoracic echocardiographic (TTE) imaging methods to identify cardiac dysfunction in asymptomatic systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients and to determine the association between echocardiographic findings and serology. This is a prospective cross-sectional study where 50 patients with confirmed diagnoses of SLE were recruited from rheumatology outpatient clinics. Clinical and serological evaluation to confirm the diagnosis of lupus was done in all patients. Fifty SLE patients, 46 (92%) females and 4 (8%) males, were recruited. Anti-double-stranded DNA (Anti-dsDNA), anticardiolipin, lupus anticoagulant, and anti-β2-glycoproteins were positive in 52.1, 32.6, 13.3, and 15.6%, respectively. Transthoracic echocardiogram revealed mitral regurgitation in 16 patients (32%), pericardial effusion in16 patients (32%), aortic regurgitation in five patients (10%), and tricuspid regurgitation in 10 patients (20%). Eleven patients had left ventricular hypertrophy (22%), and eight patients had ventricular systolic dysfunction (16%). Only four patients had ventricular diastolic dysfunction (8%). A significant association between mitral and tricuspid valve regurgitation and positive anti-dsDNA (p < 0.018, p < 0.006, respectively) was found. Positive anticardiolipin antibodies, lupus anticoagulant, and anti-β 2 glycoprotein antibodies were also associated with mitral valve regurgitation (p values 0.044, 0.006, and 0.023), respectively. Active disease assessed by Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI) was found to be associated with increased risk of mitral valvular leaflet thickening (p value 0.028). Performing regular transthoracic echocardiogram in asymptomatic SLE patients is important for early detection and appropriate treatment of cardiac lesions. Clinically quiescent but serologically active disease and presence of antiphospholipid antibodies were associated with structural heart abnormalities.

  9. Asymptomatic carotid disease--a new tool for assessing neurological risk.

    PubMed

    Pedro, Luís M; Sanches, J Miguel; Seabra, José; Suri, Jasjit S; Fernandes E Fernandes, José

    2014-03-01

    Active carotid plaques are associated with atheroembolism and neurological events; its identification is crucial for stroke prevention. High-definition ultrasound (HDU) can be used to recognize plaque structure in carotid bifurcation stenosis associated with plaque vulnerability and occurrence of brain ischemic events. A new computer-assisted HDU method to study the echomorphology of the carotid plaque and to determine a risk score for developing appropriate symptoms is proposed in this study. Plaque echomorphology characteristics such as presence of ulceration at the plaque surface, juxta-luminal location of echolucent areas, echoheterogeneity were obtained from B-mode ultrasound scans using several image processing algorithms and were combined with measurement of severity of stenosis to obtain a clinical score--enhanced activity index (EAI)--which was correlated with the presence or absence of ipsilateral appropriate ischemic symptoms. An optimal cutoff value of EAI was determined to obtain the best separation between symptomatic (active) from asymptomatic (inactive) plaques and its diagnostic yield was compared to other 2 reference methods by means of receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Classification performance was evaluated by leave-one-patient-out cross-validation applied to a cohort of 146 carotid plaques from 99 patients. The proposed method was benchmarked against (a) degree of stenosis criteria and (b) earlier proposed activity index (AI) and demonstrated that EAI yielded the highest accuracy up to an accuracy of 77% to predict asymptomatic plaques that developed symptoms in a prospective cross-sectional study. Enhanced activity index is a noninvasive, easy to obtain parameter, which provided accurate estimation of neurological risk of carotid plaques.

  10. [Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Mikami, Y; Kyogoku, M

    1994-08-01

    Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm (IAAA) is a distinct clinicopathological entity, characterized by: (1) clinical presentation, such as back pain, weight loss, and increased ESR, (2) patchy and/or diffuse lymphoplasmacytic infiltration, and (3) marked periaortic fibrosis resulting in thickening of the aneurysmal wall and occasional retroperitoneal fibrosis. Its pathogenesis is unknown, but some authors support the theory that IAAA is a subtype of atherosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysm because of close relationship between IAAA and atherosclerotic change. In this article, we describe clinical and histological features of IAAA on the basis of the literature and our review of 6 cases of IAAA, emphasizing the similarity and difference between IAAA and atherosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysm. Our review supports that marked lamellar fibrosis completely replacing the media and adventitia, patchy lymphocytic infiltration (mostly B cells) and endarteritis obliterans are characteristic features of IAAA.

  11. Robotic aortic surgery.

    PubMed

    Duran, Cassidy; Kashef, Elika; El-Sayed, Hosam F; Bismuth, Jean

    2011-01-01

    Surgical robotics was first utilized to facilitate neurosurgical biopsies in 1985, and it has since found application in orthopedics, urology, gynecology, and cardiothoracic, general, and vascular surgery. Surgical assistance systems provide intelligent, versatile tools that augment the physician's ability to treat patients by eliminating hand tremor and enabling dexterous operation inside the patient's body. Surgical robotics systems have enabled surgeons to treat otherwise untreatable conditions while also reducing morbidity and error rates, shortening operative times, reducing radiation exposure, and improving overall workflow. These capabilities have begun to be realized in two important realms of aortic vascular surgery, namely, flexible robotics for exclusion of complex aortic aneurysms using branched endografts, and robot-assisted laparoscopic aortic surgery for occlusive and aneurysmal disease.

  12. Chronic Type A Aortic Dissection and Giant Aortic Root Aneurysm After Aortic Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Puga, Andrés Enríquez; Rodríguez, Sara Castaño; Pañero, Blanca Mateos; Moreira, Beatriz Castaño; López Almodóvar, Luis Fernando

    2016-01-01

    We describe the case of a 61-year-old male with a giant aortic root aneurysm associated with chronic aortic Type A dissection. The patient had been operated on 16 years before due to aortic annuloectasia with mechanical valve replacement. The patient underwent revision aortic surgery with a Bentall-De Bono operation with Svensson modification, using a #21 On-X Valsalva mechanical valve conduit. The postoperative course was uneventful. PMID:28097190

  13. Relief of Mesenteric Ischemia by Z-Stent Placement into the Superior Mesenteric Artery Compressed by the False Lumen of an Aortic Dissection

    SciTech Connect

    Yamakado, Koichiro; Takeda, Kan; Nomura, Yoshiyuki; Kato, Noriyuki; Hirano, Tadanori; Matsumura, Kaname; Nakagawa, Tsuyoshi; Yuasa, Hiroshi; Yada, Isao

    1998-01-15

    In a 58-year-old man acute aortic dissection compromised the origin of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA), resulting in mesenteric ischemia. After failed balloon angioplasty a Gianturco Z-stent was placed. The stenosis improved immediately, followed by resolution of the clinical signs of mesenteric ischemia. SMA flow was well preserved 1 year after stenting.

  14. Embolisation of a Proximal Type I Endoleak Post-Nellix Aortic Aneurysm Repair Complicated by Reflux of Onyx into the Nellix Endograft Limb

    SciTech Connect

    Ameli-Renani, S. Das, R. Weller, A. Chung, R. Morgan, R. A.

    2015-06-15

    We report the first case of intervention for a proximal type 1 endoleak following Nellix endovascular aneurysm sealing repair of an aortic aneurysm. This was complicated by migration of Onyx into one of the Nellix graft limbs causing significant stenosis. Subsequent placement of a covered stent to affix the Onyx between the stent and the wall of the Nellix endograft successfully restored stent patency.

  15. TEVAR for Flash Pulmonary Edema Secondary to Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm to Pulmonary Artery Fistula.

    PubMed

    Bornak, Arash; Baqai, Atif; Li, Xiaoyi; Rey, Jorge; Tashiro, Jun; Velazquez, Omaida C

    2016-01-01

    Enlarging aneurysms in the thoracic aorta frequently remain asymptomatic. Fistulization of thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAA) to adjacent structures or the presence of a patent ductus arteriosus and TAA may lead to irreversible cardiopulmonary sequelae. This article reports on a large aneurysm of the thoracic aorta with communication to the pulmonary artery causing pulmonary edema and cardiorespiratory failure. The communication was ultimately closed after thoracic endovascular aortic aneurysm repair allowing rapid symptom resolution. Early diagnosis and closure of such communication in the presence of TAA are critical for prevention of permanent cardiopulmonary damage.

  16. Gallstone ileus in an 'asymptomatic' parastomal hernia.

    PubMed

    Jayamanne, H; Brown, J; Stephenson, B M

    2016-09-01

    Parastomal hernias are common and often asymptomatic. We report the first known case in which later, acute symptoms developed owing to gallstone ileus in a sac containing both omentum and small bowel. Urgent computed tomography established the diagnosis.

  17. 4D optical coherence tomography of aortic valve dynamics in a murine mouse model ex vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnabel, Christian; Jannasch, Anett; Faak, Saskia; Waldow, Thomas; Koch, Edmund

    2015-07-01

    The heart and its mechanical components, especially the heart valves and leaflets, are under enormous strain during lifetime. Like all highly stressed materials, also these biological components undergo fatigue and signs of wear, which impinge upon cardiac output and in the end on health and living comfort of affected patients. Thereby pathophysiological changes of the aortic valve leading to calcific aortic valve stenosis (AVS) as most frequent heart valve disease in humans are of particular interest. The knowledge about changes of the dynamic behavior during the course of this disease and the possibility of early stage diagnosis could lead to the development of new treatment strategies and drug-based options of prevention or therapy. ApoE-/- mice as established model of AVS versus wildtype mice were introduced in an ex vivo artificially stimulated heart model. 4D optical coherence tomography (OCT) in combination with high-speed video microscopy were applied to characterize dynamic behavior of the murine aortic valve and to characterize dynamic properties during artificial stimulation. OCT and high-speed video microscopy with high spatial and temporal resolution represent promising tools for the investigation of dynamic behavior and their changes in calcific aortic stenosis disease models in mice.

  18. Does concomitant aortic bypass and renal artery revascularization using the retroperitoneal approach increase perioperative risk?

    PubMed

    Darling, R C; Shah, D M; Chang, B B; Leather, R P

    1995-08-01

    While elective repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms and aortoiliac occlusive disease is associated with an acceptable (3%) mortality rate, combined aortic and renal revascularization has usually been reported to have a higher perioperative mortality. Over the past 5 years, 785 elective aortic procedures have been performed at the authors' medical center. During the same period, 77 renal artery reconstructions have been performed in 73 patients in conjunction with aortic procedures. All were done using the retroperitoneal approach to the aorta and renal arteries. Indication for concomitant renal artery revascularization included 79% (61 of 77 patients) for either significant stenosis or anatomic involvement, 18% for renovascular hypertension (14 of 73) and 3% (two of 73) for renal impairment. The demographics and risk factors were similar in both groups. Operative mortality rate was 2.9% (23 of 785) in the aortic group and 3% (two of 73) in the combined group. Complications in the combined group were one stroke (1.4%), one re-exploration for bleeding (1.4%), two pulmonary pneumonia (2.7%) and five patients had elevated serum creatinine (> 350 mumol/l) after operation. Of these patients two died, one had an occluded graft and two eventually improved. There was one early graft thrombosis and one late thrombosis. In the authors' experience, concomitant aortic bypass and renal artery revascularization can be performed with an acceptable mortality and morbidity using the retroperitoneal approach.

  19. Flow Behavior in the Left Heart Ventricle Following Apico-Aortic Bypass Surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahriari, Shahrokh; Jeyhani, Morteza; Labrosse, Michel; Kadem, Lyes

    2013-11-01

    Apico-aortic bypass (AAB) surgery is an alternative for transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) to reduce left ventricle (LV) overload in patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS). It consists in connecting the apex of the LV to the descending thoracic aorta with a valved conduit. Postoperative flow assessments show that two thirds of the outflow is conducted from the LV apex to the conduit, while only one third crosses the native aortic valve. In this study, we performed high speed particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements of flow pattern within an in vitro elastic model of LV in the presence of a very severe AS, before and after AAB. Results indicate that AAB effectively relieves the LV outflow obstruction; however, it also leads to abnormal ventricular flow patterns. Normal LV flow dynamics is characterized by an emerging mitral jet flow followed by the development of a vortical flow with velocities directed towards the aortic valve, while measurements in the presence of AAB show systolic flow bifurcating to the apical conduit and to the aortic valve outflow tract. This study provides the first insight into the LV flow structure after AAB including outflow jets and disturbed stagnation regions.

  20. The influence of the aortic valve angle on the hemodynamic features of the thoracic aorta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Hojin; Kim, Guk Bae; Kweon, Jihoon; Lee, Sang Joon; Kim, Young-Hak; Kim, Namkug; Yang, Dong Hyun

    2016-08-01

    Since the first observation of a helical flow pattern in aortic blood flow, the existence of helical blood flow has been found to be associated with various pathological conditions such as bicuspid aortic valve, aortic stenosis, and aortic dilatation. However, an understanding of the development of helical blood flow and its clinical implications are still lacking. In our present study, we hypothesized that the direction and angle of aortic inflow can influence helical flow patterns and related hemodynamic features in the thoracic aorta. Therefore, we investigated the hemodynamic features in the thoracic aorta and various aortic inflow angles using patient-specific vascular phantoms that were generated using a 3D printer and time-resolved, 3D, phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI). The results show that the rotational direction and strength of helical blood flow in the thoracic aorta largely vary according to the inflow direction of the aorta, and a higher helical velocity results in higher wall shear stress distributions. In addition, right-handed rotational flow conditions with higher rotational velocities imply a larger total kinetic energy than left-handed rotational flow conditions with lower rotational velocities.

  1. The influence of the aortic valve angle on the hemodynamic features of the thoracic aorta

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Hojin; Kim, Guk Bae; Kweon, Jihoon; Lee, Sang Joon; Kim, Young-Hak; Kim, Namkug; Yang, Dong Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Since the first observation of a helical flow pattern in aortic blood flow, the existence of helical blood flow has been found to be associated with various pathological conditions such as bicuspid aortic valve, aortic stenosis, and aortic dilatation. However, an understanding of the development of helical blood flow and its clinical implications are still lacking. In our present study, we hypothesized that the direction and angle of aortic inflow can influence helical flow patterns and related hemodynamic features in the thoracic aorta. Therefore, we investigated the hemodynamic features in the thoracic aorta and various aortic inflow angles using patient-specific vascular phantoms that were generated using a 3D printer and time-resolved, 3D, phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI). The results show that the rotational direction and strength of helical blood flow in the thoracic aorta largely vary according to the inflow direction of the aorta, and a higher helical velocity results in higher wall shear stress distributions. In addition, right-handed rotational flow conditions with higher rotational velocities imply a larger total kinetic energy than left-handed rotational flow conditions with lower rotational velocities. PMID:27561388

  2. Asymptomatic Norovirus Infection in Mexican Children

    PubMed Central

    García, Coralith; DuPont, Herbert L.; Long, Kurt Z.; Santos, Jose I.; Ko, GwangPyo

    2006-01-01

    Sixty-three children in periurban Mexico City were examined for the occurrence of asymptomatic norovirus (NoV) infection from June to August 1998. NoV was detected in 48 of 161 stool specimens (29.8%), with 31 children (49.2%) having at least one positive stool. Asymptomatic NoV infection occurred commonly during summertime in a Mexican pediatric population. PMID:16891526

  3. Carcinoid Tumor in Accidental, Asymptomatic Meckel's Diverticulum.

    PubMed

    Baranyai, Zsolt; Jósa, Valeria; Merkel, Keresztely; Zolnai, Zsofia

    2013-01-01

    Although Meckel's diverticulum is the most common congenital gastrointestinal disorder, it is controversial whether asymptomatic diverticula in adults should be respected. The authors report the case of a patient who was operated due to ileus caused by adhesions and a Meckel's diverticulum without any sign of inflammation was accidentally noted and removed. As a surprise, the pathological examination of the diverticulum proved carcinoid tumor, a neuroendocrine malignant tumor. The case raises the importance of the removal of asymptomatic Meckel's diverticulum.

  4. Carcinoid Tumor in Accidental, Asymptomatic Meckel's Diverticulum

    PubMed Central

    Baranyai, Zsolt; Jósa, Valeria; Merkel, Keresztely; Zolnai, Zsofia

    2013-01-01

    Although Meckel's diverticulum is the most common congenital gastrointestinal disorder, it is controversial whether asymptomatic diverticula in adults should be respected. The authors report the case of a patient who was operated due to ileus caused by adhesions and a Meckel's diverticulum without any sign of inflammation was accidentally noted and removed. As a surprise, the pathological examination of the diverticulum proved carcinoid tumor, a neuroendocrine malignant tumor. The case raises the importance of the removal of asymptomatic Meckel's diverticulum. PMID:24470856

  5. Incremental prognostic value of coronary computed tomographic angiography over coronary artery calcium score for risk prediction of major adverse cardiac events in asymptomatic diabetic individuals

    PubMed Central

    Min, James K.; Labounty, Troy M.; Gomez, Millie J.; Achenbach, Stephan; Al-Mallah, Mouaz; Budoff, Matthew J.; Cademartiri, Filippo; Callister, Tracy Q.; Chang, Hyuk-Jae; Cheng, Victor; Chinnaiyan, Kavitha M.; Chow, Benjamin; Cury, Ricardo; Delago, Augustin; Dunning, Allison; Feuchtner, Gudrun; Hadamitzky, Martin; Hausleiter, Jorg; Kaufmann, Philipp; Kim, Yong-Jin; Leipsic, Jonathon; Lin, Fay Y.; Maffei, Erica; Raff, Gilbert; Shaw, Leslee J.; Villines, Todd C.; Berman, Daniel S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Coronary artery disease (CAD) diagnosis by coronary computed tomographic angiography (CCTA) is useful for identification of symptomatic diabetic individuals at heightened risk for death. Whether CCTA-detected CAD enables improved risk assessment of asymptomatic diabetic individuals beyond clinical risk factors and coronary artery calcium scoring (CACS) remains unexplored. Methods From a prospective 12-center international registry of 27,125 individuals undergoing CCTA, we identified 400 asymptomatic diabetic individuals without known CAD. Coronary stenosis by CCTA was graded as 0%, 1–49%, 50–69%, and ≥70%. CAD was judged on a per-patient, per-vessel and per-segment basis as maximal stenosis severity, number of vessels with ≥50% stenosis, and coronary segments weighted for stenosis severity (segment stenosis score), respectively. We assessed major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) – inclusive of mortality, nonfatal myocardial infarction (MI), and late target vessel revascularization ≥90 days (REV) – and evaluated the incremental utility of CCTA for risk prediction, discrimination and reclassification. Results Mean age was 60.4 ± 9.9 years; 65.0% were male. At a mean follow-up 2.4 ± 1.1 years, 33 MACE occurred (13 deaths, 8 MI, 12 REV) [8.25%; annualized rate 3.4%]. By univariate analysis, per-patient maximal stenosis [hazards ratio (HR) 2.24 per stenosis grade, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.61–3.10, p < 0.001], increasing numbers of obstructive vessels (HR 2.30 per vessel, 95% CI 1.75–3.03, p < 0.001) and segment stenosis score (HR 1.14 per segment, 95% CI 1.09–1.19, p < 0.001) were associated with increased MACE. After adjustment for CAD risk factors and CACS, maximal stenosis (HR 1.80 per grade, 95% CI 1.18–2.75, p = 0.006), number of obstructive vessels (HR 1.85 per vessel, 95% CI 1.29–2.65, p < 0.001) and segment stenosis score (HR 1.11 per segment, 95% CI 1.05–1.18, p < 0.001) were associated with increased risk of

  6. Combined aortic valve replacement and coronary artery bypass grafting for a calcified ascending aorta.

    PubMed

    Baba, Hironori; Umesue, Masayoshi; Matsui, Kanzi

    2012-04-01

    Although a severely calcified ascending aorta is encountered infrequently, it presents formidable problems during cardiac surgery. We describe a case of severe aortic valve stenosis and coronary artery disease combined with a severely calcified ascending aorta. The patient was an 80-year-old man with a calcified ascending aorta. He successfully underwent an aortic valve replacement and a single coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) using a saphenous vein graft with the proximal end connected on a Dacron patch, which was used for aortoplasty of the calcified plate along the aortotomy. These procedures were performed under moderate hypothermia with aortic clamping. This patch aortoplasty can be a useful alternative in cases that require aortotomy and proximal anastomoses of a CABG on a calcified ascending aorta.

  7. Alternative transarterial access for CoreValve transcatheter aortic bioprosthesis implantation.

    PubMed

    Bruschi, Giuseppe; De Marco, Federico; Modine, Thomas; Botta, Luca; Colombo, Paola; Mauri, Silvia; Cannata, Aldo; Fratto, Pasquale; Klugmann, Silvio

    2015-05-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is used to treat elderly patients with severe aortic stenosis who are considered extremely high-risk surgical candidates. The safety and effectiveness of TAVI have been demonstrated in numerous studies. The self-expanding CoreValve bioprosthesis (Medtronic Inc., Minneapolis, MN, USA) was the first transcatheter aortic valve to be granted the Conformité Européene (CE) mark in May 2007 for retrograde transfemoral implantation. However, TAVI patients are also often affected by severe iliofemoral arteriopathy. In these patients, the retrograde transfemoral approach carries a high risk of vascular injury, making this approach unusable. Alternative arterial access sites, such as the subclavian artery, the ascending aorta, and the carotid artery, have been used for retrograde implantation of the CoreValve bioprosthesis. In the present report, we present the procedural considerations, risks, and benefits of the different types of arterial access used to implant the CoreValve bioprosthesis.

  8. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation and cerebrovascular events: the current state of the art.

    PubMed

    Hynes, Brian G; Rodés-Cabau, Josep

    2012-04-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has revolutionized the care of high-risk patients with severe calcific aortic stenosis. Those considered at high or prohibitive risk of major adverse outcomes with open surgical aortic valve replacement may now be offered an alternative less-invasive therapy. Despite the rapid evolution and clinical application of this new technology, recent studies have raised concerns about adverse cerebrovascular event rates in patients undergoing TAVI. In this review, we explore the current data both in relation to procedure-related silent cerebrovascular ischemic events, as well as clinically apparent stroke. The timing of neurological events and their prognostic implications are also examined. Finally, potential mechanisms of TAVI-related cerebrovascular injury are described, in addition to efforts to minimize their occurrence.

  9. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infective Endocarditis Following Aortic Valve Implantation: A Note of Caution

    PubMed Central

    Dapás, Juan Ignacio; Rivero, Cynthia; Burgos, Pablo; Vila, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is an alternative treatment for severe aortic valve stenosis (AS) in patients with prohibitive risk for surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR). Prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) is a rare complication of this relatively novel procedure and current guidelines do not include specific recommendations for its treatment. We report a case of PVE due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa after TAVI that required SAVR, with successful outcome. PVE usually occurs during the first year after TAVI and entails a high mortality risk because patients eligible for this min-imally invasive procedure are fragile (i.e. advanced age and/or severe comorbidities). Additionally, clinical presentation may be atypical or subtle and transesophageal echocardiogram (TEE) may not be conclusive, which delays diagnosis and treatment worsening the prognosis. This case highlights that open SAVR might be ultimately indicated as part of treatment for TAVI-PVE despite a high-risk surgery score. PMID:27014375

  10. Patient evaluation and selection for transcatheter aortic valve replacement: the heart team approach.

    PubMed

    Sintek, Marc; Zajarias, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has been shown to significantly impact mortality and quality of life in patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS) who are deemed high risk for surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR). Essential to these outcomes is proper patient selection. The multidisciplinary TAVR heart team was created to provide comprehensive patient evaluation and aid in proper selection. This review with outline the history and components of the heart team, and delineate the team's role in risk and frailty assessment, evaluation of common co-morbidities that impact outcomes, and the complex multi-modality imaging necessary for procedural planning and patient selection. The heart team is critical in determining patient eligibility and benefit and the optimal operative approach for TAVR. The future of structural heart disease will certainly require a team approach, and the TAVR heart team will serve as the successful model.

  11. Impact of Ejection Fraction and Aortic Valve Gradient on Outcomes of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Baron, Suzanne J.; Arnold, Suzanne V.; Herrmann, Howard C.; Holmes, David; Szeto, Wilson Y.; Allen, Keith B.; Chhatriwalla, Adnan K.; Vemulapali, Sreekaanth; O’Brien, Sean; Dai, Dadi; Cohen, David J.

    2017-01-01

    Background In patients with aortic stenosis undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR), prior studies have suggested that reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and low aortic valve gradient (AVG) are associated with worse long-term outcomes. Since these conditions commonly coexist, the extent to which they are independently associated with outcomes after TAVR is unknown. Objectives To evaluate the impact of LVEF and AVG on clinical outcomes after TAVR and to determine whether the effect of AVG on outcomes is modified by LVEF. Methods Using data from 11,292 patients who underwent TAVR as part of the TVT Registry, we examined rates of 1-year mortality and recurrent heart failure in patients with varying levels of LV dysfunction (LVEF < 30% vs. 30–50% vs. > 50%) and AVG (< 40mmHg vs. ≥ 40mmHg). Multivariable models were used to estimate the independent effect of AVG and LVEF on outcomes. Results Over the first year of follow-up after TAVR, patients with LV dysfunction and low AVG had higher rates of death and recurrent heart failure. After adjustment for other clinical factors, only low AVG was associated with higher mortality (HR 1.21, 95% CI 1.11–1.32; p < 0.001) and higher rates of heart failure (HR 1.52; 95% CI 1.36–1.69; p < 0.001), whereas the effect of LVEF was no longer significant. There was no evidence of effect modification between AVG and LVEF with respect to either endpoint. Conclusion In this large series of real world patients undergoing TAVR, low AVG, but not LV dysfunction, was associated with higher rates of mortality and recurrent heart failure. Although these findings suggest that AVG should be considered when evaluating the risks and benefits of TAVR for individual patients, neither severe LV dysfunction nor low AVG alone or in combination provide sufficient prognostic discrimination to preclude treatment with TAVR. PMID:27199058

  12. Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Savarese, R P; Rosenfeld, J C; DeLaurentis, D A

    1986-05-01

    Between January 1976 and December 1982, 181 patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms were treated surgically, and in 13 patients the aneurysms were found to be inflammatory. Inflammatory aneurysms of the abdominal aorta (IAAA) share important characteristics with typical atherosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysms. Diagnosis and surgical management of IAAA are distinctive which suggests that IAAA should be considered separately, as a varient of typical abdominal aortic aneurysms. IAAA occur predominantly in males. The presenting symptoms are often idiosyncratic and include severe abdominal or back pain, or both, and ureteral obstruction; the diagnosis of IAAA should be considered when these symptoms are present. Although grossly and microscopically, the perianeurysmal fibrosis resembles idiopathic retroperitoneal fibrosis, the two conditions can be differentiated. At the present time, ultrasonography and computed tomography appear to offer reliable means for diagnosing IAAA. The presence of IAAA, whether established preoperatively or discovered unexpectedly at operation, necessitate certain modifications in the surgical approach, in order to avoid injuring the duodenum and the venous structures. Most patients can be successfully treated by resection and graft replacement. Rupture of the aneurysm in IAAA appears to be less frequent than in typical atherosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysm.

  13. Evaluation of cardiovascular anomalies in patients with asymptomatic turner syndrome using multidetector computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun Hee; Jung, Ji Mi; Song, Min Seob; Choi, Seok jin; Chung, Woo Yeong

    2013-08-01

    Turner syndrome is well known to be associated with significant cardiovascular abnormalities. This paper studied the incidence of cardiovascular abnormalities in asymptomatic adolescent patients with Turner syndrome using multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) instead of echocardiography. Twenty subjects diagnosed with Turner syndrome who had no cardiac symptoms were included. Blood pressure and electrocardiography (ECG) was checked. Cardiovascular abnormalities were checked by MDCT. According to the ECG results, 11 had a prolonged QTc interval, 5 had a posterior fascicular block, 3 had a ventricular conduction disorder. MDCT revealed vascular abnormalities in 13 patients (65%). Three patients had an aberrant right subclavian artery, 2 had dilatation of left subclavian artery, and others had an aortic root dilatation, aortic diverticulum, and abnormal left vertebral artery. As for venous abnormalities, 3 patients had partial anomalous pulmonary venous return and 2 had a persistent left superior vena cava. This study found cardiovascular abnormalities in 65% of asymptomatic Turner syndrome patients using MDCT. Even though, there are no cardiac symptoms in Turner syndrome patients, a complete evaluation of the heart with echocardiography or MDCT at transition period to adults must be performed.

  14. Arteriovenous Access Failure, Stenosis, and Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    MacRae, Jennifer M.; Dipchand, Christine; Oliver, Matthew; Moist, Louise; Lok, Charmaine; Clark, Edward; Hiremath, Swapnil; Kappel, Joanne; Kiaii, Mercedeh; Luscombe, Rick; Miller, Lisa M.

    2016-01-01

    Vascular access–related complications can lead to patient morbidity and reduced patient quality of life. Some of the common arteriovenous access complications include failure to mature, stenosis formation, and thrombosis. PMID:28270918

  15. Arteriovenous Access Failure, Stenosis, and Thrombosis.

    PubMed

    MacRae, Jennifer M; Dipchand, Christine; Oliver, Matthew; Moist, Louise; Lok, Charmaine; Clark, Edward; Hiremath, Swapnil; Kappel, Joanne; Kiaii, Mercedeh; Luscombe, Rick; Miller, Lisa M

    2016-01-01

    Vascular access-related complications can lead to patient morbidity and reduced patient quality of life. Some of the common arteriovenous access complications include failure to mature, stenosis formation, and thrombosis.

  16. Congenital esophageal stenosis owing to tracheobronchial remnants

    PubMed Central

    Rebelo, Priscila Guyt; Ormonde, João Victor C.; Ormonde, João Baptista C.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To emphasize the need of an accurate diagnosis of congenital esophageal stenosis due to tracheobronchial remnants, since its treatment differs from other types of congenital narrowing. CASE DESCRIPTION Four cases of lower congenital esophageal stenosis due to tracheobronchial remnants, whose definitive diagnosis was made by histopathology. Except for the last case, in which a concomitant anti-reflux surgery was not performed, all had a favorable outcome after resection and anastomosis of the esophagus. COMMENTS The congenital esophageal stenosis is an intrinsic narrowing of the organâ€(tm)s wall associated with its structural malformation. The condition can be caused by tracheobronchial remnants, fibromuscular stenosis or membranous diaphragm and the first symptom is dysphagia after the introduction of solid food in the diet. The first-choice treatment to tracheobronchial remnants cases is the surgical resection and end-to-end anastomosis of the esophagus. PMID:24142326

  17. 'Isolated' pulmonary valve stenosis as part of more widespread cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed Central

    Beçu, L; Somerville, J; Gallo, A

    1976-01-01

    In 25 patients aged 6 days to 9 years presenting as 'isolated' pulmonary valve stenosis, histology of the myocardium of right and left ventricles, coronary arteries, and ascending aorta has shown abnormality in one or all these areas. Myocardial necrosis, old and recent, unrelated to coronary occlusion was frequent. Myocardial 'dysplasia' involving both ventricles, and resembling hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HOCM, ASH) was found in 10 and a relation of this to myocardial injury in the fetus is postulated. Varying degrees of coronary occlusion were frequently seen in both right and left coronary arteries. The histology of the ascending aorta was abnormal showing 'higgledy-piggledy' disorder of smooth muscle components in 12 (48%). In a different series of 53 patients who had pulmonary valvotomy for apparent 'isolated' pulmonary valve stenosis there were 14 with clinical evidence of left ventricular abnormality consistent with the pathological changes described, 2 with the same aortic histological changes, and 2 with macroscopical left ventricular hypertrophy. Two of them developed classical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy years later. It is suggested that when pulmonary valve stenosis presents with a thick tricuspid poorly mobile valve, particularly in infants or in patients with evidence of other congenital stigmata, it may be part of a more widespread cardiovascular abnormality. This should be recognized and considered in the evaluation of surgical patients and late survivors who may show unexpected clinical features. Images PMID:944584

  18. Cerebral oxygenation monitoring in patients with bilateral carotid stenosis undergoing urgent cardiac surgery: Observational case series

    PubMed Central

    Aktuerk, Dincer; Mishra, Pankaj Kumar; Luckraz, Heyman; Garnham, Andrew; Khazi, Fayaz Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patients with significant bilateral carotid artery stenosis requiring urgent cardiac surgery have an increased risk of stroke and death. The optimal management strategy remains inconclusive, and the available evidence does not support the superiority of one strategy over another. Materials and Methods: A number of noninvasive strategies have been developed for minimizing perioperative stroke including continuous real-time monitoring of cerebral oxygenation with near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). The number of patients presenting with this combination (bilateral significant carotid stenosis requiring urgent cardiac surgery) in any single institution will be small and hence there is a lack of large randomized studies. Results: This case series describes our early experience with NIRS in a select group of patients with significant bilateral carotid stenosis undergoing urgent cardiac surgery (n = 8). In contrast to other studies, this series is a single surgeon, single center study, where the entire surgery (both distal ends and proximal ends) was performed during single aortic clamp technique, which effectively removes several confounding variables. NIRS monitoring led to the early recognition of decreased cerebral oxygenation, and corrective steps (increased cardiopulmonary bypass flow, increased pCO2, etc.,) were taken. Conclusion: The study shows good clinical outcome with the use of NIRS. This is our “work in progress,” and we aim to conduct a larger study. PMID:26750675

  19. Noninvasively assessed pulsatility of ascending aortic pressure waveform is associated with the presence of coronary artery narrowing.

    PubMed

    Wykretowicz, Andrzej; Metzler, Lidia; Milewska, Agata; Balinski, Marek; Rutkowska, Agnieszka; Adamska, Karolina; Krauze, Tomasz; Guzik, Przemysław; Dziarmaga, Mieczysław; Wysocki, Henryk

    2008-01-01

    Several hemodynamic indices, measured invasively in the ascending aorta during routine angiography, are related to the presence and severity of coronary atherosclerosis. Radial artery tonometry, when combined with a validated transfer function, offers the possibility of noninvasive assessment of central arterial pressure. We aim to evaluate the association between noninvasive indices of aortic or radial pressure waveforms and the presence of a significant coronary stenosis. Patients who underwent elective coronary angiography were studied (110 men, 91 women, mean age 53 +/- 0.9 years). Noninvasive measurement of their central hemodynamics was performed by analysis of the aortic pressure waveform derived from the radial artery. An increase in aortic fractional pulse pressure was associated with coronary artery narrowing or previous myocardial infarction. After multivariate adjustment, the odds ratio and confidence intervals (CI) of having a significant coronary aortic stenosis was 1.72 (95% CI, 1.1-2.7) and of previous myocardial infarction 1.6 (95% CI, 1.1-2.2). An increase in noninvasively assessed aortic fractional pulse pressure, but not of the peripheral index is significantly associated with the presence of coronary artery disease.

  20. Hemodynamics of Curved Vessels with Stenosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boghosian, Michael E.; Cassel, Kevin W.

    2007-11-01

    In hemodialysis access, the brachiocephalic or upper-arm fistula has less than optimal functional rates. The cause of this reduced patency is stenosis due to intimal hyperplasia in the cephalic vein. Stenosis typically leads to thrombosis and ultimately failure of the fistula. To increase our understanding of this process, numerical simulations of the unsteady, two-dimensional, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved for the flow in an infinite channel having curvature and stenosis. Physiologically relevant Reynolds numbers ranging from 300 to 1500 and stenosis percentages of 0, 25, 50, and 75 are modeled. The post-stenotic flow is characterized by strong shear layers and recirculation regions. The largest shear stresses are found just upstream of the stenosis apex. The maximum shear stress increases with increasing Reynolds number and percent stenosis. The results indicate that hemodynamic conditions in the vein after fistula creation combined with curvature of the cephalic arch lead to shear stresses that exceed normal physiological values (both minimum and maximum). In some cases, the shear stresses are sufficiently large to cause damage to the endothelium and possibly denudation.

  1. Insidious strut fractures in a DeBakey-Surgitool aortic valve prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Scott, S M; Sethi, G K; Paulson, D M; Takaro, T

    1978-04-01

    Recent reports of cage wear occurring in DeBakey-Surgitool aortic valve prostheses prompted us to examine with image intensification all our patients who have had this type of prosthesis implanted. One patient, who was asymptomatic, was discovered to have a prosthesis with two fractured struts. This patient's prosthetic valve was replaced successfully with a stented porcine heterograft prosthesis. Including the valve removed from this patient, 8 DeBakey-Surgitool aortic valves with structural defects have been reported to the manufacturer. In the absence of a catastrophic event, patients with valves having fractured or worn struts may be totally asymptomatic, and routine periodic roentgenographic examination may be the only way of detecting strut wear or fracture.

  2. Interrupted aortic arch with isolated persistent left superior vena cava in patient with Turners syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kattea, M. Obadah; Smettei, Osama A.; Kattea, Abdulrahman; Abazid, Rami M.

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of 13-year-old female with Turner syndrome (TS), who presented with unexplained lower limbs swelling and ejection systolic murmur at the left second intercostal space. Suspicion of mild aortic coarctation was made by echocardiography. Computed tomography angiography (CTA) showed a complete interruption of the aortic arch (IAA) below the left subclavian artery with persistent left superior vena cava (PLSVC) and absent right SVC, defined as an isolated PLSVC. The patient underwent successful surgical correction after unsuccessful trial of transcatheter stent placement. We present this case of asymptomatic IAA to draw attention to the importance of CTA in diagnosing such rare anomalies and ruling out asymptomatic major cardiovascular abnormalities in patient with TS. PMID:27843801

  3. Prosthetic aortic valves. Indications for and results of reoperation.

    PubMed

    Shemin, R J; Guadiani, V A; Conkle, D M; Morrow, A G

    1979-01-01

    During a 15-year period from January 1962 through December 1976, 42 patients who had undergone a previous aortic valve replacement underwent reoperation. The mean interval between operations was 4.4 years. The indications for reoperation were aortic regurgitation resulting from mechanical malfunction (12 patients), ball variance (15 patients), perivalvular leaks (five patients), prosthetic stenosis (eight patients), anemia (one patient), and recurrent emboli (one patient). The indications were characteristic of a specific valve series. The most common reoperation was aortic valve replacement (29/42), which had a 10.3% operative mortality. Poppet change (10/42) carried a 10% operative mortality and no operative deaths followed suture closure of perivalvular leaks. Eighty-eight percent of patients alive six months after reoperation were New York Heart Association functional class 1 or 2. At last follow-up, 95% of surviving patients were still functional class 1 or 2, with a mean cumulative survival of 4.7 years after reoperation. This experience demonstrates that those patients surviving long enough to undergo reoperation can expect a reasonable operative risk, long-term survival, and excellent clinical improvement.

  4. [Revascularization with the branched graft in middle aortic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Urayama, H; Fujioka, S; Katada, S; Kawabe, K; Watanabe, Y; Iwa, T; Horimoto, T

    1989-01-01

    A case of middle aortic syndrome which was thought to be the thoracoabdominal type of Takayasu's disease was successfully treated with the branched graft bypass. Patient was a 23 year-old woman with hypertension and abdominal pain. The preoperative angiography revealed aortic stenosis from the celiac axis to the left renal artery. The operative procedures were as follows; patient was positioned in supine with her left shoulder and arm raised. Eighth intercostal thoracotomy and midline laparotomy was performed with the thoracoabdominal incision. The branched graft was made previously with woven Dacron (phi 18 mm) and three EPTFEs (phi 8mm). The woven Dacron of the graft was used for the bypass from the descending thoracic aorta to the infrarenal abdominal aorta, and the branched EPTFEs of the graft were used for the bypasses to the common hepatic artery, the superior mesenteric artery and the right renal artery in this order. The bypasses were placed along the anatomical courses in the retroperitoneal space. Postoperatively, the blood pressure dropped and the abdominal pain disappeared. The plasma renin activity decreased and the renal function improved. Two months after operation the bypasses were patent by the angiography and now six months after operation she has returned to her social life healthily. The approach to the aorta and its abdominal branches by thoracotomy and laparotomy and bypass with the three branched graft was useful for middle aortic syndrome.

  5. COX2 Inhibition Reduces Aortic Valve Calcification In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Wirrig, Elaine E.; Gomez, M. Victoria; Hinton, Robert B.; Yutzey, Katherine E.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality, which affects approximately 1% of the US population and is characterized by calcific nodule formation and stenosis of the valve. Klotho-deficient mice were used to study the molecular mechanisms of CAVD as they develop robust aortic valve (AoV) calcification. Through microarray analysis of AoV tissues from klotho-deficient and wild type mice, increased expression of the gene encoding cyclooxygenase 2/COX2 (Ptgs2) was found. COX2 activity contributes to bone differentiation and homeostasis, thus the contribution of COX2 activity to AoV calcification was assessed. Approach and Results In klotho-deficient mice, COX2 expression is increased throughout regions of valve calcification and is induced in the valvular interstitial cells (VICs) prior to calcification formation. Similarly, COX2 expression is increased in human diseased AoVs. Treatment of cultured porcine aortic VICs with osteogenic media induces bone marker gene expression and calcification in vitro, which is blocked by inhibition of COX2 activity. In vivo, genetic loss of function of COX2 cyclooxygenase activity partially rescues AoV calcification in klotho-deficient mice. Moreover, pharmacologic inhibition of COX2 activity in klotho-deficient mice via celecoxib-containing diet reduces AoV calcification and blocks osteogenic gene expression. Conclusions COX2 expression is upregulated in CAVD and its activity contributes to osteogenic gene induction and valve calcification in vitro and in vivo. PMID:25722432

  6. Deformation Differences between Tricuspid and Bicuspid Aortic Valves in Vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szeto, Kai; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Javier; Pastuszko, Peter; Nigam, Vishal; Lasheras, Juan C.

    2011-11-01

    It has been shown in clinical studies that patients with congenital bicuspid aortic valves (CBAVs) develop degenerative calcification of the leaflets at young ages compared to patients with the normal tricuspid aortic valves (TAVs). It has been hypothesized that the asymmetrical geometry of the leaflets in CBAVs, flow shear stresses (SS), disturbed flow, and excessive strain rate levels are possible causes for the early calcification and stenosis. Central to the validation of this hypothesis is the need to quantify the differences in strain rate levels between the BAVs and TAVs. We simulate the CBAVs by surgically stitching two of the leaflets of a porcine aortic valve together. To quantify strain differences, we performed in-vitro experiments in both trileaflet and bileaflet valves by tracking the motion of small ink dots marked on each leaflet surface. We then used phase-locked stereo photogrammetry to reconstruct at each instant of time the 3D surface of the leaflets and measure the strain rates in both radial and circumferential directions during the whole cardiac cycle. Our results indicate that the total strain rate of the simulated BAVs is about 15 to 20% higher than the normal leaflets of TAVs at systole. In the BAVs' case, the fused leaflet stretches radially up to 25% higher than the reference length. The excessive stretching in both directions in the fused leaflet results in large changes in the flow patterns and associated wall SS.

  7. Recently patented transcatheter aortic valves in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Neragi-Miandoab, Siyamek; Skripochnik, Edvard; Salemi, Arash; Girardi, Leonard

    2013-12-01

    The most widely used heart valve worldwide is the Edwards Sapien, which currently has 60% of the worldwide transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) market. The CoreValve is next in line in popularity, encompassing 35% of the worldwide TAVI market. Although these two valves dominate the TAVI market, a number of newer transcatheter valves have been introduced and others are in early clinical evaluation. The new valves are designed to reduce catheter delivery diameter, improve ease of positioning and sealing, and facilitate repositioning or removal. The most recent transcatheter valves for transapical use include Acurate TA (Symetis), Engager (Medtronic), and JenaValve the Portico (St Jude), Sadra Lotus Medical (Boston Scientific), and the Direct Flow Medical. These new inventions may introduce more effective treatment options for high-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis. Improvements in transcatheter valves and the developing variability among them may allow for more tailored approaches with respect to patient's anatomy, while giving operators the opportunity to choose devices they feel more comfortable with. Moreover, introducing new devices to the market will create a competitive environment among producers that will reduce high prices and expand availability. The present review article includes a discussion of recent patents related to Transcatheter Aortic Valves.

  8. Hemodynamic Changes following Aortic Valve Bypass: A Mathematical Approach

    PubMed Central

    Benevento, Emilia; Djebbari, Abdelghani; Keshavarz-Motamed, Zahra; Cecere, Renzo; Kadem, Lyes

    2015-01-01

    Aortic valve bypass (AVB) has been shown to be a viable solution for patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS). Under this circumstance, the left ventricle (LV) has a double outlet. The objective was to develop a mathematical model capable of evaluating the hemodynamic performance following the AVB surgery. A mathematical model that captures the interaction between LV, AS, arterial system, and AVB was developed. This model uses a limited number of parameters that all can be non-invasively measured using patient data. The model was validated using in vivo data from the literature. The model was used to determine the effect of different AVB and AS configurations on flow proportion and pressure of the aortic valve and the AVB. Results showed that the AVB leads to a significant reduction in transvalvular pressure gradient. The percentage of flow through the AVB can range from 55.47% to 69.43% following AVB with a severe AS. LV stroke work was also significantly reduced following the AVB surgery and reached a value of around 1.2 J for several AS severities. Findings of this study suggest: 1) the AVB leads to a significant reduction in transvalvular pressure gradients; 2) flow distribution between the AS and the AVB is significantly affected by the conduit valve size; 3) the AVB leads to a significant reduction in LV stroke work; and 4) hemodynamic performance variations can be estimated using the model. PMID:25881082

  9. Radiation bronchitis and stenosis secondary to high dose rate endobronchial irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Speiser, B.L. ); Spratling, L.

    1993-03-15

    The purpose of the study was to describe a new clinical entity observed in follow-up bronchoscopies in patients who were treated with high dose rate and medium dose rate remote afterloading brachytherapy of the tracheobronchial tree. Patients were treated by protocol with medium dose rate, 47 patients receiving 1000 cGy at a 5 mm depth times three fractions, high dose rate 144 patients receiving 1000 cGy at a 10 mm depth for three fractions and high dose rate 151 patients receiving cGy at a 10 mm depth for three fractions followed by bronchoscopy. Incidence of this entity was 9% for the first group, 12% for the second, and 13% for the third group. Reactions were grade 1 consisting of mild inflammatory response with a partial whitish circumferential membrane in an asymptomatic patient; grade 2, thicker complete white circumferential membrane with cough and/or obstructive problems requiring intervention; grade 3, severe inflammatory response with marked membranous exudate and mild fibrotic reaction; and grade 4 a predominant fibrotic reaction with progressive stenosis. Variables associated with a slightly increased incidence of radiation bronchitis and stenosis included: large cell carcinoma histology, curative intent, prior laser photoresection, and/or concurrent external radiation. Survival was the strongest predictor of the reaction. Radiation bronchitis and stenosis is a new clinical entity that must be identified in bronchial brachytherapy patients and treated appropriately. 23 refs., 3 figs., 7 tabs.

  10. Aortic coarctation with persistent fifth left aortic arch.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Giuseppe; Caianiello, Giuseppe; Palladino, Maria Teresa; Iacono, Carola; Russo, Maria Giovanna; Calabrò, Raffaele

    2009-08-14

    A neonate with severe aortic coarctation showed a double lumen transverse aorta (persistent fifth aortic arch) with both channels joining at the isthmus where the obstruction was confirmed by echocardiography and cardiac catheterization. Surgical repair was performed with a pantaloon-shaped patch. Persistent fifth aortic arch does not result in a vascular ring and, per se, is not hemodynamically significant unless associated with other cardiac malformations.

  11. Deletion of CD73 in mice leads to Aortic Valve Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Zukowska, P; Kutryb-Zajac, B; Jasztal, A; Toczek, M; Zabielska, M; Borkowski, T; Khalpey, Z; Smolenski, R T; Slominska, E M

    2017-02-10

    Aortic stenosis is known to involve inflammation and thrombosis. Changes in activity of extracellular enzyme - ecto-5'-nucleotidase (referred also as CD73) can alter inflammatory and thrombotic responses. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of CD73 deletion in mice on development of aortic valve dysfunction and to compare it to the effect of high-fat diet. Four groups of mice (normal-diet Wild Type (WT), high-fat diet WT, normal diet CD73-/-, high-fat diet CD73-/-) were maintained for 15weeks followed by echocardiographic analysis of aortic valve function, measurement of aortic surface activities of nucleotide catabolism enzymes as well as alkaline phosphatase activity, mineral composition and histology of aortic valve leaflets. CD73-/- knock out led to an increase in peak aortic flow (1.06±0.26m/s) compared to WT (0.79±0.26m/s) indicating obstruction. Highest values of peak aortic flow (1.26±0.31m/s) were observed in high-fat diet CD73-/- mice. Histological analysis showed morphological changes in CD73-/- including thickening and accumulation of dark deposits, proved to be melanin. Concentrations of Ca(2+), Mg(2+) and PO4(3-) in valve leaflets were elevated in CD73-/- mice. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity was enhanced after ATP treatment and reduced after adenosine treatment in aortas incubated in osteogenic medium. AMP hydrolysis in CD73-/- was below 10% of WT. Activity of ecto-adenosine deaminase (eADA), responsible for adenosine deamination, in the CD73-/- was 40% lower when compared to WT. Deletion of CD73 in mice leads to aortic valve dysfunction similar to that induced by high-fat diet suggesting important role of this surface protein in maintaining heart valve integrity.

  12. One-stage hybrid procedure without sternotomy for treating thoracic aortic pathologies that involve distal aortic arch: a single-center preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Changwei; Guo, Xi; Sun, Lizhong; Huang, Lianjun; Lai, Yongqiang

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aims to evaluate the initial results of a hybrid procedure without sternotomy for treating descending thoracic aortic disease that involves distal aortic arch. It also intends to report our initial experience in performing this procedure. Methods A total of 45 patients (35 males and 10 females) with descending thoracic aortic disease underwent a hybrid procedure, namely, thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) combined with supra-arch branch vessel bypass, in our center from April 2009 to August 2014. Right axillary artery to left axillary artery bypass (n=20) or right axillary artery to left common carotid artery (LCCA) and left axillary artery bypass (n=25) were performed. The conditions of all patients were followed up from the 2nd month to the 65th month postoperative (mean, 26.0±17.1). Mortality within 30 days, complications such as endoleak after the hybrid procedure, and stenosis or blockage of the bypass graft during the follow-up period was assessed. Results All the patients underwent a one-stage procedure. One case of death and one case of cerebral infarction were reported within 30 days. One patient died of the sudden drop in blood pressure during the 2nd day of operation. Meanwhile, another patient suffered from cerebral infarction. Two patients underwent open surgery, and one of them had to undergo a second TEVAR during the follow-up period. Moreover, endoleak occurred in two patients and a newly formed intimal tear was observed in one patient. Overall, 93.2% of the patients survived without any complication related to the hybrid procedure. Conclusions Initial results suggest that the one-stage hybrid procedure is a suitable therapeutic option for thoracic aortic pathologies that involve distal aortic arch. However, this procedure is not recommended for type-B aortic dissection, in which a tear is located in the greater curvature or near the left subclavian artery (LSA), because of the high possibility of endoleak occurrence

  13. Doppler ultrasound and renal artery stenosis: An overview.

    PubMed

    Granata, A; Fiorini, F; Andrulli, S; Logias, F; Gallieni, M; Romano, G; Sicurezza, E; Fiore, C E

    2009-12-01

    Renovascular disease is a complex disorder, most commonly caused by fibromuscular dysplasia and atherosclerotic diseases. It can be found in one of three forms: asymptomatic renal artery stenosis (RAS), renovascular hypertension, and ischemic nephropathy. Particularly, the atherosclerotic form is a progressive disease that may lead to gradual and silent loss of renal function. Thus, early diagnosis of RAS is an important clinical objective since interventional therapy may improve or cure hypertension and preserve renal function. Screening for RAS is indicated in suspected renovascular hypertension or ischemic nephropathy, in order to identify patients in whom an endoluminal or surgical revascularization is advisable. Screening tests for RAS have improved considerably over the last decade. While captopril renography was widely used in the past, Doppler ultrasound (US) of the renal arteries (RAs), angio-CT, or magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) have replaced other modalities and they are now considered the screening tests of choice. An arteriogram is rarely needed for diagnostic purposes only. Color-Doppler US (CDUS) is a noninvasive, repeatable, relatively inexpensive diagnostic procedure which can accurately screen for renovascular diseases if performed by an expert. Moreover, the evaluation of the resistive index (RI) at Doppler US may be very useful in RAS affected patients for predicting the response to revascularization. However, when a discrepancy exists between clinical data and the results of Doppler US, additional tests are mandatory.

  14. [Stent Grafting for Aortic Dissection].

    PubMed

    Uchida, Naomichi

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of stent graft for aortic dissection is to terminate antegrade blood flow into the false lumen through primary entry. Early intervention for primary entry makes excellent aortic remodeling and emergent stent grafting for complicated acute type B aortic dissection is supported as a class I. On the other hand stent grafting for chronic aortic dissection is controversial. Early stent grafting is considered with in 6 months after on-set if the diameter of the descending aorta is more than 40 mm. Additional interventions for residual false lumen on the downstream aorta are still required. Stent graft for re-entry, candy-plug technique, and double stenting, other effective re-interventions were reported. Best treatment on the basis of each anatomical and physical characteristics should be selected in each institution. Frozen elephant trunk is alternative procedure for aortic dissection without the need to take account of proximal anatomical limitation and effective for acute type A aortic dissection.

  15. Abdominal aortic aneurysms: how can we improve their treatment?

    PubMed Central

    Scobie, T K

    1980-01-01

    Arteriosclerotic abdominal