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Sample records for asymptomatic brca2 mutation

  1. BRCA1 and BRCA2 germline mutations in lymphoma patients.

    PubMed

    Yossepowitch, Orit; Olvera, Narciso; Satagopan, Jaya M; Huang, Helen; Jhanwar, Sabrina; Rapaport, Beth; Boyd, Jeff; Offit, Kenneth

    2003-01-01

    Mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 tumor suppressor genes are associated with an increased risk for breast and ovarian cancers as well as other types of malignancies. The observation of a germline BRCA1 mutation in an index case with a lymphoid neoplasm in the setting of a family history of breast cancer prompted us to explore the role of BRCA germline mutations as lymphoma susceptibility alleles. A panel of 286 DNA samples from Jewish lymphoma patients was analyzed for the three most frequent BRCA1 and BRCA2 germline mutations in those of Ashkenazi Jewish heritage, and compared to a cohort of 5010 DNA samples from healthy controls. Of the 286 cases, 2 patients carried a germline BRCA mutation; both were diagnosed at an early age with an intermediate grade non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. This data indicate that germline BRCA mutations are not associated with an increased risk for lymphoid malignancies.

  2. Characterization of BRCA2 Mutation in a Series of Functional Assays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    9 Appendices .................................................................................... 10 Abstract Mutations in the BRCA2 gene account for...approximately 20% of all hereditary breast cancer. Many individuals undergo expensive clinical testing for mutations in the BRCA2 gene in order to...BRCA2 breast and ovarian cancer predisposition gene was identified in 1995. Mutations in the gene account for approximately 20% of all hereditary breast

  3. BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutations

    MedlinePlus

    ... tested for this mutation. Should You Be Tested? Genetic testing is only recommended for people with a high risk of having a BRCA mutation. To help determine if you should have test- ing, some of the questions your ob-gyn or other health care profes- sional may ask you include the ...

  4. BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutations in African Americans

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-10-01

    BRCA2 Mutations in African Americans PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Carolyn W. Broome, Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Howard University Washington, DC 20059...DAMD17-98-1-8106 6. AUTHOR(S) Carolyn W. Broome, Ph.D. 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION Howard University REPORT... Howard University Women’s Health Institute, Washington DC, April, 1999. The Proceedings of Health Issues and Concerns of Women of Color: A Call to

  5. Comprehensive spectrum of BRCA1 and BRCA2 deleterious mutations in breast cancer in Asian countries

    PubMed Central

    Kwong, Ava; Shin, Vivian Y; Ho, John C W; Kang, Eunyoung; Nakamura, Seigo; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Lee, Ann S G; Sng, Jen-Hwei; Ginsburg, Ophira M; Kurian, Allison W; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Siu, Man-Ting; Law, Fian B F; Chan, Tsun-Leung; Narod, Steven A; Ford, James M; Ma, Edmond S K; Kim, Sung-Won

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 5%–10% of breast cancers are due to genetic predisposition caused by germline mutations; the most commonly tested genes are BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations. Some mutations are unique to one family and others are recurrent; the spectrum of BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations varies depending on the geographical origins, populations or ethnic groups. In this review, we compiled data from 11 participating Asian countries (Bangladesh, Mainland China, Hong Kong SAR, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand and Vietnam), and from ethnic Asians residing in Canada and the USA. We have additionally conducted a literature review to include other Asian countries mainly in Central and Western Asia. We present the current pathogenic mutation spectrum of BRCA1/BRCA2 genes in patients with breast cancer in various Asian populations. Understanding BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations in Asians will help provide better risk assessment and clinical management of breast cancer. PMID:26187060

  6. Endometrial cancer occurence five years after breast cancer in BRCA2 mutation patient

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Sang Eun; Kim, Soo Hyun; Kim, Mee Seon

    2015-01-01

    We recently experienced a case of endometrial cancer 5 years after the diagnosis of breast cancer in a patient with a mutation in the BRCA2 gene. A 55-year-old Korean woman who had a past history of breast cancer in her 50s underwent an operation for endometrial cancer. Final pathology confirmed stage Ia, and no adjuvant treatment was performed. After surgery, considering her history of sequential cancer occurrence, genetic counseling was offered. The result showed the BRCA2 variation of unknown significance mutation. This is the first case report of sequential cancers (endometrial and breast) in a patient with a BRCA2 mutation among a Korean population. PMID:25798433

  7. A brother and sister with breast cancer, BRCA2 mutations and bilateral supernumerary nipples

    PubMed Central

    Coad, Ryan

    2017-01-01

    We describe a 54-year-old man with breast cancer and a BRCA2 mutation who was also found to have bilateral supernumerary nipples. His sister, also with a BRCA2 mutation, was diagnosed with breast cancer in her late forties; she also had bilateral supernumerary nipples. We address the significance of breast cancer arising in breast tissue underlying supernumerary nipples; the known association between supernumerary nipples and genitourinary malignancies/malformations and the possible link between BRCA2 and supernumerary nipple development. We believe that this is the first described case of the latter. We then outline an approach to further management for supernumerary nipple cases. PMID:28361071

  8. Women with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations survive ovarian cancer at higher rates

    Cancer.gov

    Results from a National Cancer Institute (NCI) sponsored multicenter study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association on January 25, 2012, provides strong evidence that BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutation carriers with ovarian cancer were more

  9. Screening for Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma in BRCA2 Mutation Carriers: Results of a Disease Simulation Model.

    PubMed

    Pandharipande, Pari V; Jeon, Alvin; Heberle, Curtis R; Dowling, Emily C; Kong, Chung Yin; Chung, Daniel C; Brugge, William R; Hur, Chin

    2015-12-01

    BRCA2 mutation carriers are at increased risk for multiple cancers including pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PAC). Our goal was to compare the effectiveness of different PAC screening strategies in BRCA2 mutation carriers, from the standpoint of life expectancy. A previously published Markov model of PAC was updated and extended to incorporate key aspects of BRCA2 mutation carrier status, including competing risks of breast- and ovarian-cancer specific mortality. BRCA2 mutation carriers were modeled and analyzed as the primary cohort for the analysis. Additional higher risk BRCA2 cohorts that were stratified according to the number of first-degree relatives (FDRs) with PAC were also analyzed. For each cohort, one-time screening and annual screening were evaluated, with screening starting at age 50 in both strategies. The primary outcome was net gain in life expectancy (LE) compared to no screening. Sensitivity analysis was performed on key model parameters, including surgical mortality and MRI test performance. One-time screening at age 50 resulted in a LE gain of 3.9 days for the primary BRCA2 cohort, and a gain of 5.8 days for those with BRCA2 and one FDR. Annual screening resulted in LE loss of 12.9 days for the primary cohort and 1.3 days for BRCA2 carriers with 1 FDR, but resulted in 20.6 days gained for carriers with 2 FDRs and 260 days gained for those with 3 FDRs. For patients with ≥ 3 FDRs, annual screening starting at an earlier age (i.e. 35-40) was optimal. Among BRCA2 mutation carriers, aggressive screening regimens may be ineffective unless additional indicators of elevated risk (e.g., 2 or more FDRs) are present. More clinical studies are needed to confirm these findings. American Cancer Society - New England Division - Ellison Foundation Research Scholar Grant (RSG-15-129-01-CPHPS).

  10. BRCA2, EGFR, and NTRK mutations in mismatch repair-deficient colorectal cancers with MSH2 or MLH1 mutations.

    PubMed

    Deihimi, Safoora; Lev, Avital; Slifker, Michael; Shagisultanova, Elena; Xu, Qifang; Jung, Kyungsuk; Vijayvergia, Namrata; Ross, Eric A; Xiu, Joanne; Swensen, Jeffrey; Gatalica, Zoran; Andrake, Mark; Dunbrack, Roland L; El-Deiry, Wafik S

    2017-06-20

    Deficient mismatch repair (MMR) and microsatellite instability (MSI) contribute to ~15% of colorectal cancer (CRCs). We hypothesized MSI leads to mutations in DNA repair proteins including BRCA2 and cancer drivers including EGFR. We analyzed mutations among a discovery cohort of 26 MSI-High (MSI-H) and 558 non-MSI-H CRCs profiled at Caris Life Sciences. Caris-profiled MSI-H CRCs had high mutation rates (50% vs 14% in non-MSI-H, P < 0.0001) in BRCA2. Of 1104 profiled CRCs from a second cohort (COSMIC), MSH2/MLH1-mutant CRCs showed higher mutation rates in BRCA2 compared to non-MSH2/MLH1-mutant tumors (38% vs 6%, P < 0.0000001). BRCA2 mutations in MSH2/MLH1-mutant CRCs included 75 unique mutations not known to occur in breast or pancreatic cancer per COSMIC v73. Only 5 deleterious BRCA2 mutations in CRC were previously reported in the BIC database as germ-line mutations in breast cancer. Some BRCA2 mutations were predicted to disrupt interactions with partner proteins DSS1 and RAD51. Some CRCs harbored multiple BRCA2 mutations. EGFR was mutated in 45.5% of MSH2/MLH1-mutant and 6.5% of non-MSH2/MLH1-mutant tumors (P < 0.0000001). Approximately 15% of EGFR mutations found may be actionable through TKI therapy, including N700D, G719D, T725M, T790M, and E884K. NTRK gene mutations were identified in MSH2/MLH1-mutant CRC including NTRK1 I699V, NTRK2 P716S, and NTRK3 R745L. Our findings have clinical relevance regarding therapeutic targeting of BRCA2 vulnerabilities, EGFR mutations or other identified oncogenic drivers such as NTRK in MSH2/MLH1-mutant CRCs or other tumors with mismatch repair deficiency.

  11. Mutational spectrum in breast cancer associated BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Gutiérrez, Alberto; Díaz-Dussán, Natalia Andrea; Noguera-Santamaría, María Claudia; Díaz-Rincón, Diego; Casas-Gómez, María Consuelo

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: The risk of developing breast and ovarian cancer is higher in families that carry mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes, and timely mutation detection is critical. Objective: To identify the presence of mutations in the Colombian population and evaluate two testing strategies. Methods: From a total universe of 853 individual blood samples referred for BRCA1 and BRCA2 typing, 256 cases were analyzed by complete direct sequencing of both genes in Myriad Genetics, and the remaining 597 cases were studied by partial sequencing based on founder mutations in a PCR test designed by ourselves ("Profile Colombia"). Results: We found 107 patients carrying deleterious mutations in this group of patients, 69 (64.5%) located in BRCA1, and 38 (35.5%) in BRCA2. Overall, we detected 39 previously unreported mutations in Colombia (22 in BRCA1 and 17 in BRCA2) and only 4 out of the 6 previously reported founder mutations. Sixty four out of 597 patients (10.7%) studied by "Profile Colombia" showed mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2, and 41/256 patients (16%) showed mutations by complete BRCA1-BRCA2 sequencing. Conclusions: The spectrum of 44 different mutations in Colombia as detected in our study is broader than the one previously reported for this country. "Profile Colombia" is a useful screening test to establish both founder and new mutations (detection rate of 10.7%) in cases with family history of breast cancer. Complete sequencing shows a detection rate of 16.0%, and should complement the study of the genetic basis of this disease. PMID:29021639

  12. Recurrent BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in Mexican women with breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Mejía, Gabriela; Royer, Robert; Llacuachaqui, Marcia; Akbari, Mohammad R.; Giuliano, Anna R.; Martínez-Matsushita, Louis; Angeles-Llerenas, Angélica; Ortega-Olvera, Carolina; Ziv, Elad; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Phelan, Catherine M.; Narod, Steven A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Germline mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes confer an estimated 58–80% lifetime risk of breast cancer. In general, screening is done for cancer patients if a relative has been diagnosed with breast or ovarian cancer. There are few data on the prevalence of mutations in these genes in Mexican women with breast cancer and this hampers efforts to develop screening policies in Mexico. Methods We screened 810 unselected women with breast cancer from three cities in Mexico (Mexico City, Veracruz and Monterrey) for mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2, including a panel of 26 previously reported mutations. Results Thirty-five mutations were identified in 34 women (4.3% of total) including 20 BRCA1 mutations and 15 BRCA2 mutations. Twenty-two of the 35 mutations were recurrent mutations (62.8%). Only five of the 34 mutation carriers had a first-degree relative with breast cancer (three with BRCA1 and two with BRCA2 mutations). Conclusion These results support the rationale for a strategy of screening for recurrent mutations in all women with breast cancer in Mexico, as opposed to restricting screening to those with a sister or mother with breast or ovarian cancer. Impact These results will impact cancer genetic testing in Mexico and the identification of at-risk individuals who will benefit from increased surveillance. PMID:25371446

  13. Oestrogen receptor status, treatment and breast cancer prognosis in Icelandic BRCA2 mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Jonasson, Jon G; Stefansson, Olafur A; Johannsson, Oskar T; Sigurdsson, Helgi; Agnarsson, Bjarni A; Olafsdottir, Gudridur H; Alexiusdottir, Kristin K; Stefansdottir, Hrefna; Munoz Mitev, Rodrigo; Olafsdottir, Katrin; Olafsdottir, Kristrun; Arason, Adalgeir; Stefansdottir, Vigdis; Olafsdottir, Elinborg J; Barkardottir, Rosa B; Eyfjord, Jorunn E; Narod, Steven A; Tryggvadóttir, Laufey

    2016-09-27

    The impact of an inherited BRCA2 mutation on the prognosis of women with breast cancer has not been well documented. We studied the effects of oestrogen receptor (ER) status, other prognostic factors and treatments on survival in a large cohort of BRCA2 mutation carriers. We identified 285 breast cancer patients with a 999del5 BRCA2 mutation and matched them with 570 non-carrier patients. Clinical information was abstracted from patient charts and pathology records and supplemented by evaluation of tumour grade and ER status using archived tissue specimens. Univariate and multivariate hazard ratios (HR) were estimated for breast cancer-specific survival using Cox regression. The effects of various therapies were studied in patients treated from 1980 to 2012. Among mutation carriers, positive ER status was associated with higher risk of death than negative ER status (HR=1.94; 95% CI=1.22-3.07, P=0.005). The reverse association was seen for non-carriers (HR=0.71; 95% CI: 0.51-0.97; P=0.03). Among BRCA2 carriers, ER-positive status is an adverse prognostic factor. BRCA2 carrier status should be known at the time when treatment decisions are made.

  14. Germline Mutations of BRCA1 and BRCA2 in Korean Ovarian Cancer Patients: Finding Founder Mutations.

    PubMed

    Choi, Min Chul; Heo, Jin-Hyung; Jang, Ja-Hyun; Jung, Sang Geun; Park, Hyun; Joo, Won Duk; Lee, Chan; Lee, Je Ho; Lee, Jun Mo; Hwang, Yoon Young; Kim, Seung Jo

    2015-10-01

    To investigate and analyze the BRCA mutations in Korean ovarian cancer patients with or without family history and to find founder mutations in this group. One hundred two patients who underwent a staging operation for pathologically proven epithelial cancer between January 2013 and December 2014 were enrolled. Thirty-two patients declined to analyze BRCA1/2 gene alterations after genetic counseling and pedigree analysis. Lymphocyte specimens from peripheral blood were assessed for BRCA1/2 by direct sequencing. BRCA genetic test results of 70 patients were available. Eighteen BRCA1/2 mutations and 17 unclassified variations (UVs) were found. Five of the BRCA1/2 mutations and 4 of the UVs were not reported in the Breast Cancer Information Core database. One BRCA2 UV (8665_8667delGGA) was strongly suspicious to be a deleterious mutation. BRCA1/2 mutations were identified in 11 (61.1%) of 18 patients with a family history and in 7 (13.5%) of 52 patients without a family history.Candidates for founder mutations in Korean ovarian cancer patients were assessed among 39 BRCA1/2 mutations from the present study and from literature reviews. The analysis showed that 1041_1043delAGCinsT (n = 4; 10.2%) and 3746insA (n = 4; 10.2%) were possible BRCA1 founder mutations. Only one of the BRCA2 mutations (5804_5807delTTAA) was repeated twice (n = 2; 5.1%). The prevalence of BRCA1/2 mutations in Korean ovarian cancer patients irrespective of the family history was significantly higher than previously reported. Possible founder mutations in Korean ovarian cancer patients were identified.

  15. Comprehensive spectrum of BRCA1 and BRCA2 deleterious mutations in breast cancer in Asian countries.

    PubMed

    Kwong, Ava; Shin, Vivian Y; Ho, John C W; Kang, Eunyoung; Nakamura, Seigo; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Lee, Ann S G; Sng, Jen-Hwei; Ginsburg, Ophira M; Kurian, Allison W; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Siu, Man-Ting; Law, Fian B F; Chan, Tsun-Leung; Narod, Steven A; Ford, James M; Ma, Edmond S K; Kim, Sung-Won

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 5%-10% of breast cancers are due to genetic predisposition caused by germline mutations; the most commonly tested genes are BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations. Some mutations are unique to one family and others are recurrent; the spectrum of BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations varies depending on the geographical origins, populations or ethnic groups. In this review, we compiled data from 11 participating Asian countries (Bangladesh, Mainland China, Hong Kong SAR, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand and Vietnam), and from ethnic Asians residing in Canada and the USA. We have additionally conducted a literature review to include other Asian countries mainly in Central and Western Asia. We present the current pathogenic mutation spectrum of BRCA1/BRCA2 genes in patients with breast cancer in various Asian populations. Understanding BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations in Asians will help provide better risk assessment and clinical management of breast cancer. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  16. Distribution of BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutations in Asian Patients with Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Haeyoung

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most prevalent cancer in Asian females, and the incidence of breast cancer has been increasing in Asia. Because Asian patients develop breast cancer at a younger age than their Caucasian counterparts, the contributions of BRCA1 and BRCA2 (BRCA1/2) mutations in Asians are expected to be different than in Caucasians. The prevalence of BRCA1/2 mutations in the Asian population varies among countries and studies. Most Asian studies have reported more frequent mutations in BRCA2 than in BRCA1, with the exception of studies from India and Pakistan. In addition, the contribution of large genomic rearrangements of BRCA1/2 genes is relatively small in Asian populations in comparison to other ethnic populations. Various statistical models for the prediction of BRCA1/2 mutations have underestimated the risk of having these genetic mutations in Asians, especially in predicting BRCA2 gene mutation. Until recently, BRCA1/2 mutation analyses in Asia were mostly conducted by independent single institutions with different patient selection criteria and using various genotyping methods. However, a couple of Asian groups have initiated nationwide studies collecting BRCA1/2 mutational data. These national collaborative studies will help a comprehensive understanding of the prevalence of BRCA1/2 mutations in the Asian population. PMID:24454456

  17. Cancer risks for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers: results from prospective analysis of EMBRACE.

    PubMed

    Mavaddat, Nasim; Peock, Susan; Frost, Debra; Ellis, Steve; Platte, Radka; Fineberg, Elena; Evans, D Gareth; Izatt, Louise; Eeles, Rosalind A; Adlard, Julian; Davidson, Rosemarie; Eccles, Diana; Cole, Trevor; Cook, Jackie; Brewer, Carole; Tischkowitz, Marc; Douglas, Fiona; Hodgson, Shirley; Walker, Lisa; Porteous, Mary E; Morrison, Patrick J; Side, Lucy E; Kennedy, M John; Houghton, Catherine; Donaldson, Alan; Rogers, Mark T; Dorkins, Huw; Miedzybrodzka, Zosia; Gregory, Helen; Eason, Jacqueline; Barwell, Julian; McCann, Emma; Murray, Alex; Antoniou, Antonis C; Easton, Douglas F

    2013-06-05

    Reliable estimates of cancer risk are critical for guiding management of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. The aims of this study were to derive penetrance estimates for breast cancer, ovarian cancer, and contralateral breast cancer in a prospective series of mutation carriers and to assess how these risks are modified by common breast cancer susceptibility alleles. Prospective cancer risks were estimated using a cohort of 978 BRCA1 and 909 BRCA2 carriers from the United Kingdom. Nine hundred eighty-eight women had no breast or ovarian cancer diagnosis at baseline, 1509 women were unaffected by ovarian cancer, and 651 had been diagnosed with unilateral breast cancer. Cumulative risks were obtained using Kaplan-Meier estimates. Associations between cancer risk and covariables of interest were evaluated using Cox regression. All statistical tests were two-sided. The average cumulative risks by age 70 years for BRCA1 carriers were estimated to be 60% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 44% to 75%) for breast cancer, 59% (95% CI = 43% to 76%) for ovarian cancer, and 83% (95% CI = 69% to 94%) for contralateral breast cancer. For BRCA2 carriers, the corresponding risks were 55% (95% CI = 41% to 70%) for breast cancer, 16.5% (95% CI = 7.5% to 34%) for ovarian cancer, and 62% (95% CI = 44% to 79.5%) for contralateral breast cancer. BRCA2 carriers in the highest tertile of risk, defined by the joint genotype distribution of seven single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with breast cancer risk, were at statistically significantly higher risk of developing breast cancer than those in the lowest tertile (hazard ratio = 4.1, 95% CI = 1.2 to 14.5; P = .02). Prospective risk estimates confirm that BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers are at high risk of developing breast, ovarian, and contralateral breast cancer. Our results confirm findings from retrospective studies that common breast cancer susceptibility alleles in combination are predictive of breast cancer risk for BRCA2 carriers.

  18. Tamoxifen and Risk of Contralateral Breast Cancer for BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Milne, Roger L.; Rookus, Matti A.; Daly, Mary B.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Peock, Susan; Frost, Debra; Easton, Douglas F.; Ellis, Steve; Friedlander, Michael L.; Buys, Saundra S.; Andrieu, Nadine; Noguès, Catherine; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Bonadona, Valérie; Pujol, Pascal; McLachlan, Sue Anne; John, Esther M.; Hooning, Maartje J.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Tollenaar, Rob A.E.M.; Goldgar, David E.; Beth Terry, Mary; Caldes, Trinidad; Weideman, Prue C.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Singer, Christian F.; Birch, Kate; Simard, Jacques; Southey, Melissa C.; Olsson, Håkan L.; Jakubowska, Anna; Olah, Edith; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Foretova, Lenka; Hopper, John L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether adjuvant tamoxifen treatment for breast cancer (BC) is associated with reduced contralateral breast cancer (CBC) risk for BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 mutation carriers. Methods Analysis of pooled observational cohort data, self-reported at enrollment and at follow-up from the International BRCA1, and BRCA2 Carrier Cohort Study, Kathleen Cuningham Foundation Consortium for Research into Familial Breast Cancer, and Breast Cancer Family Registry. Eligible women were BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers diagnosed with unilateral BC since 1970 and no other invasive cancer or tamoxifen use before first BC. Hazard ratios (HRs) for CBC associated with tamoxifen use were estimated using Cox regression, adjusting for year and age of diagnosis, country, and bilateral oophorectomy and censoring at contralateral mastectomy, death, or loss to follow-up. Results Of 1,583 BRCA1 and 881 BRCA2 mutation carriers, 383 (24%) and 454 (52%), respectively, took tamoxifen after first BC diagnosis. There were 520 CBCs over 20,104 person-years of observation. The adjusted HR estimates were 0.38 (95% CI, 0.27 to 0.55) and 0.33 (95% CI, 0.22 to 0.50) for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, respectively. After left truncating at recruitment to the cohort, adjusted HR estimates were 0.58 (95% CI, 0.29 to 1.13) and 0.48 (95% CI, 0.22 to 1.05) based on 657 BRCA1 and 426 BRCA2 mutation carriers with 100 CBCs over 4,392 person-years of prospective follow-up. HRs did not differ by estrogen receptor status of the first BC (missing for 56% of cases). Conclusion This study provides evidence that tamoxifen use is associated with a reduction in CBC risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Further follow-up of these cohorts will provide increased statistical power for future prospective analyses. PMID:23918944

  19. Risks of Breast, Ovarian, and Contralateral Breast Cancer for BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers.

    PubMed

    Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Hopper, John L; Barnes, Daniel R; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Mooij, Thea M; Roos-Blom, Marie-José; Jervis, Sarah; van Leeuwen, Flora E; Milne, Roger L; Andrieu, Nadine; Goldgar, David E; Terry, Mary Beth; Rookus, Matti A; Easton, Douglas F; Antoniou, Antonis C; McGuffog, Lesley; Evans, D Gareth; Barrowdale, Daniel; Frost, Debra; Adlard, Julian; Ong, Kai-Ren; Izatt, Louise; Tischkowitz, Marc; Eeles, Ros; Davidson, Rosemarie; Hodgson, Shirley; Ellis, Steve; Nogues, Catherine; Lasset, Christine; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Fricker, Jean-Pierre; Faivre, Laurence; Berthet, Pascaline; Hooning, Maartje J; van der Kolk, Lizet E; Kets, Carolien M; Adank, Muriel A; John, Esther M; Chung, Wendy K; Andrulis, Irene L; Southey, Melissa; Daly, Mary B; Buys, Saundra S; Osorio, Ana; Engel, Christoph; Kast, Karin; Schmutzler, Rita K; Caldes, Trinidad; Jakubowska, Anna; Simard, Jacques; Friedlander, Michael L; McLachlan, Sue-Anne; Machackova, Eva; Foretova, Lenka; Tan, Yen Y; Singer, Christian F; Olah, Edith; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Arver, Brita; Olsson, Håkan

    2017-06-20

    The clinical management of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers requires accurate, prospective cancer risk estimates. To estimate age-specific risks of breast, ovarian, and contralateral breast cancer for mutation carriers and to evaluate risk modification by family cancer history and mutation location. Prospective cohort study of 6036 BRCA1 and 3820 BRCA2 female carriers (5046 unaffected and 4810 with breast or ovarian cancer or both at baseline) recruited in 1997-2011 through the International BRCA1/2 Carrier Cohort Study, the Breast Cancer Family Registry and the Kathleen Cuningham Foundation Consortium for Research into Familial Breast Cancer, with ascertainment through family clinics (94%) and population-based studies (6%). The majority were from large national studies in the United Kingdom (EMBRACE), the Netherlands (HEBON), and France (GENEPSO). Follow-up ended December 2013; median follow-up was 5 years. BRCA1/2 mutations, family cancer history, and mutation location. Annual incidences, standardized incidence ratios, and cumulative risks of breast, ovarian, and contralateral breast cancer. Among 3886 women (median age, 38 years; interquartile range [IQR], 30-46 years) eligible for the breast cancer analysis, 5066 women (median age, 38 years; IQR, 31-47 years) eligible for the ovarian cancer analysis, and 2213 women (median age, 47 years; IQR, 40-55 years) eligible for the contralateral breast cancer analysis, 426 were diagnosed with breast cancer, 109 with ovarian cancer, and 245 with contralateral breast cancer during follow-up. The cumulative breast cancer risk to age 80 years was 72% (95% CI, 65%-79%) for BRCA1 and 69% (95% CI, 61%-77%) for BRCA2 carriers. Breast cancer incidences increased rapidly in early adulthood until ages 30 to 40 years for BRCA1 and until ages 40 to 50 years for BRCA2 carriers, then remained at a similar, constant incidence (20-30 per 1000 person-years) until age 80 years. The cumulative ovarian cancer risk to age 80 years was 44

  20. Prevalence of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in unselected breast cancer patients from Peru.

    PubMed

    Abugattas, J; Llacuachaqui, M; Allende, Y Sullcahuaman; Velásquez, A Arias; Velarde, R; Cotrina, J; Garcés, M; León, M; Calderón, G; de la Cruz, M; Mora, P; Royer, R; Herzog, J; Weitzel, J N; Narod, S A

    2015-10-01

    The prevalence of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations among breast cancer patients in Peru has not yet been explored. We enrolled 266 women with breast cancer from a National cancer hospital in Lima, Peru, unselected for age or family history. DNA was screened with a panel of 114 recurrent Hispanic BRCA mutations (HISPANEL). Among the 266 cases, 13 deleterious mutations were identified (11 in BRCA1 and 2 in BRCA2), representing 5% of the total. The average age of breast cancer in the mutation-positive cases was 44 years. BRCA1 185delAG represented 7 of 11 mutations in BRCA1. Other mutations detected in BRCA1 included: two 2080delA, one 943ins10, and one 3878delTA. The BRCA2 3036del4 mutation was seen in two patients. Given the relatively low cost of the HISPANEL test, one should consider offering this test to all Peruvian women with breast or ovarian cancer. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. AURKA F31I Polymorphism and Breast Cancer Risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers: A CIMBA study

    PubMed Central

    Couch, Fergus J.; Sinilnikova, Olga; Vierkant, Robert A; Pankratz, V. Shane; Fredericksen, Zachary S.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Coupier, Isabelle; Hughes, David; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Baynes, Caroline; Hodgson, Shirley; Morrison, Patrick J.; Porteous, Mary E.; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Gronwald, Jacek; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Schmutzler, Rita; Versmold, Beatrix; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Sutter, Christian; Horst, Jurgen; Schaefer, Dieter; Offit, Kenneth; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Andrulis, Irene L.; Ilyushik, Eduard; Glendon, Gordon; Devilee, Peter; Vreeswijk, Maaike P.G.; Vasen, Hans F.A.; Borg, Ake; Backenhorn, Katja; Struewing, Jeffery P.; Greene, Mark H.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Nathanson, Katherine; Domchek, Susan; Wagner, Theresa; Garber, Judy E.; Szabo, Csilla; Zikan, Michal; Foretova, Lenka; Olson, Janet E.; Sellers, Thomas A.; Lindor, Noralane; Nevanlinna, Heli; Tommiska, Johanna; Aittomaki, Kristiina; Hamann, Ute; Rashid, Muhammad U.; Torres, Diana; Simard, Jacques; Durocher, Francine; Guenard, Frederic; Lynch, Henry T.; Isaacs, Claudine; Weitzel, Jeffrey; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Narod, Steven; Daly, Mary B.; Godwin, Andrew K.; Tomlinson, Gail; Easton, Douglas F.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniouon, Antonis C.

    2009-01-01

    The AURKA oncogene is associated with abnormal chromosome segregation and aneuploidy and predisposition to cancer. Amplification of AURKA has been detected at higher frequency in tumors from BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers than in sporadic breast tumors, suggesting that overexpression of AURKA and inactivation of BRCA1 and BRCA2 co-operate during tumor development and progression. The F31I polymorphism in AURKA has been associated with breast cancer risk in the homozygous state in prior studies. We evaluated whether the AURKA F31I polymorphism modifies breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA). CIMBA was established to provide sufficient statistical power through increased numbers of mutation carriers to identify polymorphisms that act as modifiers of cancer risk and can refine breast cancer risk estimates in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. A total of 4935 BRCA1 and 2241 BRCA2 mutation carriers and 11 individuals carrying both BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations were genotyped for F31I. Overall, homozygosity for the 31I allele was not significantly associated with breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers combined (HR = 0.91; 95% CI 0.77-1.06). Similarly, no significant association was seen in BRCA1 (HR = 0.90; 95% CI 0.75-1.08) or BRCA2 carriers (HR = 0.93; 95% CI 0.67-1.29) or when assessing the modifying effects of either bilateral prophylactic oophorectomy or menopausal status of BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers. In summary, the F31I polymorphism in AURKA is not associated with a modified risk of breast cancer in BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers. PMID:17627006

  2. Validity of Models for Predicting BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Parmigiani, Giovanni; Chen, Sining; Iversen, Edwin S.; Friebel, Tara M.; Finkelstein, Dianne M.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Weber, Barbara L.; Eisen, Andrea; Malone, Kathleen E.; Daling, Janet R.; Hsu, Li; Ostrander, Elaine A.; Peterson, Leif E.; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Isaacs, Claudine; Corio, Camille; Leondaridis, Leoni; Tomlinson, Gail; Amos, Christopher I.; Strong, Louise C.; Berry, Donald A.; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Sand, Sharon; Dutson, Debra; Kerber, Rich; Peshkin, Beth N.; Euhus, David M.

    2008-01-01

    Background Deleterious mutations of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes confer susceptibility to breast and ovarian cancer. At least 7 models for estimating the probabilities of having a mutation are used widely in clinical and scientific activities; however, the merits and limitations of these models are not fully understood. Objective To systematically quantify the accuracy of the following publicly available models to predict mutation carrier status: BRCAPRO, family history assessment tool, Finnish, Myriad, National Cancer Institute, University of Pennsylvania, and Yale University. Design Cross-sectional validation study, using model predictions and BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation status of patients different from those used to develop the models. Setting Multicenter study across Cancer Genetics Network participating centers. Patients 3 population-based samples of participants in research studies and 8 samples from genetic counseling clinics. Measurements Discrimination between individuals testing positive for a mutation in BRCA1 or BRCA2 from those testing negative, as measured by the c-statistic, and sensitivity and specificity of model predictions. Results The 7 models differ in their predictions. The better-performing models have a c-statistic around 80%. BRCAPRO has the largest c-statistic overall and in all but 2 patient subgroups, although the margin over other models is narrow in many strata. Outside of high-risk populations, all models have high false-negative and false-positive rates across a range of probability thresholds used to refer for mutation testing. Limitation Three recently published models were not included. Conclusions All models identify women who probably carry a deleterious mutation of BRCA1 or BRCA2 with adequate discrimination to support individualized genetic counseling, although discrimination varies across models and populations. PMID:17909205

  3. Mutational spectrum in a worldwide study of 29,700 families with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations.

    PubMed

    Rebbeck, Timothy R; Friebel, Tara M; Friedman, Eitan; Hamann, Ute; Huo, Dezheng; Kwong, Ava; Olah, Edith; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Solano, Angela R; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Thomassen, Mads; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Chan, T L; Couch, Fergus J; Goldgar, David E; Kruse, Torben A; Palmero, Edenir Inêz; Park, Sue Kyung; Torres, Diana; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; McGuffog, Lesley; Parsons, Michael T; Leslie, Goska; Aalfs, Cora M; Abugattas, Julio; Adlard, Julian; Agata, Simona; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Andrews, Lesley; Andrulis, Irene L; Arason, Adalgeir; Arnold, Norbert; Arun, Banu K; Asseryanis, Ella; Auerbach, Leo; Azzollini, Jacopo; Balmaña, Judith; Barile, Monica; Barkardottir, Rosa B; Barrowdale, Daniel; Benitez, Javier; Berger, Andreas; Berger, Raanan; Blanco, Amie M; Blazer, Kathleen R; Blok, Marinus J; Bonadona, Valérie; Bonanni, Bernardo; Bradbury, Angela R; Brewer, Carole; Buecher, Bruno; Buys, Saundra S; Caldes, Trinidad; Caliebe, Almuth; Caligo, Maria A; Campbell, Ian; Caputo, Sandrine M; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Chung, Wendy K; Claes, Kathleen B M; Collée, J Margriet; Cook, Jackie; Davidson, Rosemarie; de la Hoya, Miguel; De Leeneer, Kim; de Pauw, Antoine; Delnatte, Capucine; Diez, Orland; Ding, Yuan Chun; Ditsch, Nina; Domchek, Susan M; Dorfling, Cecilia M; Velazquez, Carolina; Dworniczak, Bernd; Eason, Jacqueline; Easton, Douglas F; Eeles, Ros; Ehrencrona, Hans; Ejlertsen, Bent; Engel, Christoph; Engert, Stefanie; Evans, D Gareth; Faivre, Laurence; Feliubadaló, Lidia; Ferrer, Sandra Fert; Foretova, Lenka; Fowler, Jeffrey; Frost, Debra; Galvão, Henrique C R; Ganz, Patricia A; Garber, Judy; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Gehrig, Andrea; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Gesta, Paul; Giannini, Giuseppe; Giraud, Sophie; Glendon, Gord; Godwin, Andrew K; Greene, Mark H; Gronwald, Jacek; Gutierrez-Barrera, Angelica; Hahnen, Eric; Hauke, Jan; Henderson, Alex; Hentschel, Julia; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Honisch, Ellen; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Isaacs, Claudine; Izatt, Louise; Izquierdo, Angel; Jakubowska, Anna; James, Paul; Janavicius, Ramunas; Jensen, Uffe Birk; John, Esther M; Vijai, Joseph; Kaczmarek, Katarzyna; Karlan, Beth Y; Kast, Karin; Investigators, KConFab; Kim, Sung-Won; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Korach, Jacob; Laitman, Yael; Lasa, Adriana; Lasset, Christine; Lázaro, Conxi; Lee, Annette; Lee, Min Hyuk; Lester, Jenny; Lesueur, Fabienne; Liljegren, Annelie; Lindor, Noralane M; Longy, Michel; Loud, Jennifer T; Lu, Karen H; Lubinski, Jan; Machackova, Eva; Manoukian, Siranoush; Mari, Véronique; Martínez-Bouzas, Cristina; Matrai, Zoltan; Mebirouk, Noura; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E J; Meindl, Alfons; Mensenkamp, Arjen R; Mickys, Ugnius; Miller, Austin; Montagna, Marco; Moysich, Kirsten B; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Musinsky, Jacob; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Ngeow, Joanne; Nguyen, Huu Phuc; Niederacher, Dieter; Nielsen, Henriette Roed; Nielsen, Finn Cilius; Nussbaum, Robert L; Offit, Kenneth; Öfverholm, Anna; Ong, Kai-Ren; Osorio, Ana; Papi, Laura; Papp, Janos; Pasini, Barbara; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Peixoto, Ana; Peruga, Nina; Peterlongo, Paolo; Pohl, Esther; Pradhan, Nisha; Prajzendanc, Karolina; Prieur, Fabienne; Pujol, Pascal; Radice, Paolo; Ramus, Susan J; Rantala, Johanna; Rashid, Muhammad Usman; Rhiem, Kerstin; Robson, Mark; Rodriguez, Gustavo C; Rogers, Mark T; Rudaitis, Vilius; Schmidt, Ane Y; Schmutzler, Rita Katharina; Senter, Leigha; Shah, Payal D; Sharma, Priyanka; Side, Lucy E; Simard, Jacques; Singer, Christian F; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Slavin, Thomas P; Snape, Katie; Sobol, Hagay; Southey, Melissa; Steele, Linda; Steinemann, Doris; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Sutter, Christian; Szabo, Csilla I; Tan, Yen Y; Teixeira, Manuel R; Terry, Mary Beth; Teulé, Alex; Thomas, Abigail; Thull, Darcy L; Tischkowitz, Marc; Tognazzo, Silvia; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Topka, Sabine; Trainer, Alison H; Tung, Nadine; van Asperen, Christi J; van der Hout, Annemieke H; van der Kolk, Lizet E; van der Luijt, Rob B; Van Heetvelde, Mattias; Varesco, Liliana; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Vega, Ana; Villarreal-Garza, Cynthia; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Walker, Lisa; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Weber, Bernhard H F; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Yoon, Sook-Yee; Zanzottera, Cristina; Zidan, Jamal; Zorn, Kristin K; Hutten Selkirk, Christina G; Hulick, Peter J; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Spurdle, Amanda B; Antoniou, Antonis C; Nathanson, Katherine L

    2018-05-01

    The prevalence and spectrum of germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 have been reported in single populations, with the majority of reports focused on White in Europe and North America. The Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA) has assembled data on 18,435 families with BRCA1 mutations and 11,351 families with BRCA2 mutations ascertained from 69 centers in 49 countries on six continents. This study comprehensively describes the characteristics of the 1,650 unique BRCA1 and 1,731 unique BRCA2 deleterious (disease-associated) mutations identified in the CIMBA database. We observed substantial variation in mutation type and frequency by geographical region and race/ethnicity. In addition to known founder mutations, mutations of relatively high frequency were identified in specific racial/ethnic or geographic groups that may reflect founder mutations and which could be used in targeted (panel) first pass genotyping for specific populations. Knowledge of the population-specific mutational spectrum in BRCA1 and BRCA2 could inform efficient strategies for genetic testing and may justify a more broad-based oncogenetic testing in some populations. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Whole exome sequencing reveals recurrent mutations in BRCA2 and FAT genes in acinar cell carcinomas of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Toru; Sakamoto, Hitomi; Takeuchi, Shoko; Ameri, Mitra; Kuboki, Yuko; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki; Hatori, Takashi; Yamamoto, Masakazu; Sugiyama, Masanori; Ohike, Nobuyuki; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Michio; Shibata, Noriyuki; Shimizu, Kyoko; Shiratori, Keiko

    2015-03-06

    Acinar cell carcinoma of the pancreas is a rare tumor with a poor prognosis. Compared to pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, its molecular features are poorly known. We studied a total of 11 acinar cell carcinomas, including 3 by exome and 4 by target sequencing. Exome sequencing revealed 65 nonsynonymous mutations and 22 indels with a mutation rate of 3.4 mutations/Mb per tumor, on average. By accounting for not only somatic but also germline mutations with loss of the wild-type allele, we identified recurrent mutations of BRCA2 and FAT genes. BRCA2 showed somatic or germline premature termination mutations, with loss of the wild-type allele in 3 of 7 tumors. FAT1, FAT3, and FAT4 showed somatic or germline missense mutations in 4 of 7 tumors. The germline FAT mutations were with loss of the wild-type allele. Loss of BRCA2 expression was observed in 5 of 11 tumors. One patient with a BRCA2-mutated tumor experienced complete remission of liver metastasis following cisplatinum chemotherapy. In conclusion, acinar cell carcinomas show a distinct mutation pattern and often harbor somatic or germline mutations of BRCA2 and FAT genes. This result may warrant assessment of BRCA2 abrogation in patients with the carcinoma to determine their sensitivity to chemotherapy.

  5. Modifiers of breast and ovarian cancer risks for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Milne, Roger L; Antoniou, Antonis C

    2016-10-01

    Pathogenic mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 are associated with high risks of breast and ovarian cancer. However, penetrance estimates for mutation carriers have been found to vary substantially between studies, and the observed differences in risk are consistent with the hypothesis that genetic and environmental factors modify cancer risks for women with these mutations. Direct evidence that this is the case has emerged in the past decade, through large-scale international collaborative efforts. Here, we describe the methodological challenges in the identification and characterisation of these risk-modifying factors, review the latest evidence on genetic and lifestyle/hormonal risk factors that modify breast and ovarian cancer risks for women with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations and outline the implications of these findings for cancer risk prediction. We also review the unresolved issues in this area of research and identify strategies of clinical implementation so that women with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations are no longer counselled on the basis of 'average' risk estimates. © 2016 Society for Endocrinology.

  6. The incidence of leukaemia in women with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations: an International Prospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Javaid; Nussenzweig, Andre; Lubinski, Jan; Byrski, Tomasz; Eisen, Andrea; Bordeleau, Louise; Tung, Nadine M; Manoukian, Siranoush; Phelan, Catherine M; Sun, Ping; Narod, Steven A

    2016-05-10

    Germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 increase the susceptibility to develop breast and ovarian cancers as well as increase the risk of some other cancers. Primary objective was to estimate the risk of leukaemia in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. We followed 7243 women with a BRCA1 or a BRCA2 mutation for incident cases of leukaemia. We used the standardised incidence ratio (SIR) to estimate the relative risk of leukaemia, according to mutation and history of breast cancer. We identified five incident cases of leukaemia (two BRCA1, three BRCA2). All five women had a prior history of breast cancer and four had received chemotherapy. The mean time from breast cancer diagnosis to the development of leukaemia was 10.2 years (range 3-18 years). The SIR for BRCA1 carriers was 0.66 (95% CI: 0.11-2.19, P=0.61) and the SIR for BRCA2 carriers was 2.42 (95% CI: 0.61-6.58, P=0.17). The SIR was significantly higher than expected for women with a BRCA2 mutation and breast cancer (SIR=4.76, 95% CI:1.21-12.96, P=0.03), in particular for women who received chemotherapy (SIR=8.11, 2.06-22.07, P=0.007). We observed an increased risk of leukaemia in women with a BRCA2 mutation who receive chemotherapy for breast cancer.

  7. Haplotype structure in Ashkenazi Jewish BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    PubMed Central

    Im, Kate M.; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Wang, Xianshu; Green, Todd; Chow, Clement Y.; Vijai, Joseph; Korn, Joshua; Gaudet, Mia M.; Fredericksen, Zachary; Pankratz, V. Shane; Guiducci, Candace; Crenshaw, Andrew; McGuffog, Lesley; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Morrison, Jonathan; Healey, Sue; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Mai, Phuong L.; Greene, Mark H.; Piedmonte, Marion; Rubinstein, Wendy S.; Hogervorst, Frans B.; Rookus, Matti A.; Collée, J. Margriet; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; van Asperen, Christi J.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; Van Roozendaal, Cees E.; Caldes, Trinidad; Perez-Segura, Pedro; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Huzarski, Tomasz; Blecharz, Paweł; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Barkardottir, Rosa B.; Montagna, Marco; D'Andrea, Emma; Devilee, Peter; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Peissel, Bernard; Bonanni, Bernardo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Singer, Christian F.; Rennert, Gad; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Caligo, Maria Adelaide; Beattie, Mary S.; Chan, Salina; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Phelan, Catherine; Narod, Steven; John, Esther M.; Hopper, John L.; Buys, Saundra S.; Daly, Mary B.; Southey, Melissa C.; Terry, Mary-Beth; Tung, Nadine; Hansen, Thomas v. O.; Osorio, Ana; Benitez, Javier; Durán, Mercedes; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Garber, Judy; Hamann, Ute; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare T.; Frost, Debra; Platte, Radka; Evans, D. Gareth; Eeles, Ros; Izatt, Louise; Paterson, Joan; Brewer, Carole; Hodgson, Shirley; Morrison, Patrick J.; Porteous, Mary; Walker, Lisa; Rogers, Mark T.; Side, Lucy E.; Godwin, Andrew K.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Laitman, Yael; Meindl, Alfons; Deissler, Helmut; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Kast, Karin; Venat-Bouvet, Laurence; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.; Klein, Robert J.; Daly, Mark J.; Friedman, Eitan; Dean, Michael; Clark, Andrew G.; Altshuler, David M.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Couch, Fergus J.; Offit, Kenneth; Gold, Bert

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Three founder mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 contribute to the risk of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer in Ashkenazi Jews (AJ). They are observed at increased frequency in the AJ compared to other BRCA mutations in Caucasian non-Jews (CNJ). Several authors have proposed that elevated allele frequencies in the surrounding genomic regions reflect adaptive or balancing selection. Such proposals predict long-range linkage dis-equilibrium (LD) resulting from a selective sweep, although genetic drift in a founder population may also act to create long-distance LD. To date, few studies have used the tools of statistical genomics to examine the likelihood of long-range LD at a deleterious locus in a population that faced a genetic bottleneck. We studied the genotypes of hundreds of women from a large international consortium of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers and found that AJ women exhibited long-range haplotypes compared to CNJ women. More than 50% of the AJ chromosomes with the BRCA1 185delAG mutation share an identical 2.1 Mb haplotype and nearly 16% of AJ chromosomes carrying the BRCA2 6174delT mutation share a 1.4 Mb haplotype. Simulations based on the best inference of Ashkenazi population demography indicate that long-range haplotypes are expected in the context of a genome-wide survey. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that a local bottleneck effect from population size constriction events could by chance have resulted in the large haplotype blocks observed at high frequency in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 regions of Ashkenazi Jews. PMID:21597964

  8. BRCA2 Mutation as a Possible Cause of Poor Response to 177Lu-PSMA Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ahmadzadehfar, Hojjat; Gaertner, Florian; Lossin, Philipp S; Schwarz, Bettina; Essler, Markus

    2018-05-14

    We present the case of a 66-year-old man with castration-resistant prostate cancer, with an increasing prostate-specific antigen level, and a progressive disease during Lu-PSMA radionuclide therapy. Because the patient had a BRCA2 mutation, poly-ADP ribose polymerase inhibitor therapy was started. The patient showed a dramatic subjective and biological response to this therapy with a progression-free survival of 5 months.

  9. Psychosocial impact of undergoing prostate cancer screening for men with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations.

    PubMed

    Bancroft, Elizabeth K; Saya, Sibel; Page, Elizabeth C; Myhill, Kathryn; Thomas, Sarah; Pope, Jennifer; Chamberlain, Anthony; Hart, Rachel; Glover, Wayne; Cook, Jackie; Rosario, Derek J; Helfand, Brian T; Hutten Selkirk, Christina; Davidson, Rosemarie; Longmuir, Mark; Eccles, Diana M; Gadea, Neus; Brewer, Carole; Barwell, Julian; Salinas, Monica; Greenhalgh, Lynn; Tischkowitz, Marc; Henderson, Alex; Evans, David Gareth; Buys, Saundra S; Eeles, Rosalind A; Aaronson, Neil K

    2018-05-26

    To report the baseline results of a longitudinal psychosocial study that forms part of the IMPACT study, a multi-national investigation of targeted prostate cancer (PCa) screening among men with a known pathogenic germline mutation in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes. Men enrolled in the IMPACT study were invited to complete a questionnaire at collaborating sites prior to each annual screening visit. The questionnaire included sociodemographic characteristics and the following measures: the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), Impact of Event Scale (IES), 36-item short-form health survey (SF-36), Memorial Anxiety Scale for Prostate Cancer, Cancer Worry Scale-Revised, risk perception and knowledge. The results of the baseline questionnaire are presented. A total of 432 men completed questionnaires: 98 and 160 had mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes, respectively, and 174 were controls (familial mutation negative). Participants' perception of PCa risk was influenced by genetic status. Knowledge levels were high and unrelated to genetic status. Mean scores for the HADS and SF-36 were within reported general population norms and mean IES scores were within normal range. IES mean intrusion and avoidance scores were significantly higher in BRCA1/BRCA2 carriers than in controls and were higher in men with increased PCa risk perception. At the multivariate level, risk perception contributed more significantly to variance in IES scores than genetic status. This is the first study to report the psychosocial profile of men with BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations undergoing PCa screening. No clinically concerning levels of general or cancer-specific distress or poor quality of life were detected in the cohort as a whole. A small subset of participants reported higher levels of distress, suggesting the need for healthcare professionals offering PCa screening to identify these risk factors and offer additional information and support to men seeking PCa screening. © 2018 The Authors BJU

  10. Biallelic BRCA2 mutations in two black South African children with Fanconi anaemia.

    PubMed

    Feben, Candice; Spencer, Careni; Lochan, Anneline; Laing, Nakita; Fieggen, Karen; Honey, Engela; Wainstein, Tasha; Krause, Amanda

    2017-07-01

    Fanconi anaemia (FA) is a genotypically and phenotypically heterogeneous genetic condition, characterized cytogenetically by chromosomal instability and breakage secondary to impaired DNA repair mechanisms. Affected individuals typically manifest growth restriction and congenital physical abnormalities and most progress to hematological disease including bone marrow aplasia. A rare genetic subtype of FA (FA-D1) is caused by biallelic mutations in the BRCA2 gene. Affected individuals manifest severe congenital anomalies and significant pigmentary changes and are additionally at risk for early onset leukemia and certain solid organ malignancies, including Wilms tumors and brain tumors. Parents of affected individuals are obligate carriers for heterozygous BRCA2 mutations and are thus potentially at risk for adult onset cancers which fall within the hereditary breast and ovarian cancer spectrum. We present two cases of black South African patients with FA diagnosed with biallelic BRCA2 mutations and discuss the phenotypic consequences and implications for them and their families. Recognition of this severe end of the phenotypic spectrum of FA is critical in allowing for confirmation of the diagnosis as well as cascade screening and appropriate care of family members.

  11. BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutations in African Americans

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-04-01

    Mutations in African Americans PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Carolyn W. Broome, Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Howard University Washington DC 20059 REPORT DATE...OR SELL ANY PATENTED INVENTION THAT MAY RELATE TO THEM. LIMITED RIGHTS LEGEND Award Number: DAMD17-98-1-8106 Organization: Howard University Those...7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION Howard University REPORT NUMBER Washington DC 20059 E-Mail:cbroome

  12. Common Breast Cancer-Predisposition Alleles Are Associated with Breast Cancer Risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Antoniou, Antonis C.; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Healey, Sue; Pooley, Karen A.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Versmold, Beatrix; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Arnold, Norbert; Hofmann, Wera; Sutter, Christian; Niederacher, Dieter; Deissler, Helmut; Caldes, Trinidad; Kämpjärvi, Kati; Nevanlinna, Heli; Simard, Jacques; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Wagner, Theresa; Lynch, Henry T.; Isaacs, Claudine; Weitzel, Jeffrey; Ganz, Patricia A.; Daly, Mary B.; Tomlinson, Gail; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Blum, Joanne L.; Couch, Fergus J.; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Barile, Monica; Radice, Paolo; Szabo, Csilla I.; Pereira, Lutecia H. Mateus; Greene, Mark H.; Rennert, Gad; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Barnett-Griness, Ofra; Andrulis, Irene L.; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Caligo, Maria A.; Laitman, Yael; Kaufman, Bella; Milgrom, Roni; Friedman, Eitan; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Osorio, Ana; Llort, Gemma; Milne, Roger L.; Benítez, Javier; Hamann, Ute; Hogervorst, Frans B.L.; Manders, Peggy; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J.L.; van den Ouweland, Ans M.W.; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Platte, Radka; Evans, D. Gareth; Eeles, Rosalind; Pichert, Gabriella; Chu, Carol; Eccles, Diana; Davidson, Rosemarie; Douglas, Fiona; Godwin, Andrew K.; Barjhoux, Laure; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Sobol, Hagay; Bourdon, Violaine; Eisinger, François; Chompret, Agnès; Capoulade, Corinne; Bressac-de Paillerets, Brigitte; Lenoir, Gilbert M.; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Houdayer, Claude; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.

    2008-01-01

    Germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 confer high risks of breast cancer. However, evidence suggests that these risks are modified by other genetic or environmental factors that cluster in families. A recent genome-wide association study has shown that common alleles at single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in FGFR2 (rs2981582), TNRC9 (rs3803662), and MAP3K1 (rs889312) are associated with increased breast cancer risks in the general population. To investigate whether these loci are also associated with breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, we genotyped these SNPs in a sample of 10,358 mutation carriers from 23 studies. The minor alleles of SNP rs2981582 and rs889312 were each associated with increased breast cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers (per-allele hazard ratio [HR] = 1.32, 95% CI: 1.20–1.45, ptrend = 1.7 × 10−8 and HR = 1.12, 95% CI: 1.02–1.24, ptrend = 0.02) but not in BRCA1 carriers. rs3803662 was associated with increased breast cancer risk in both BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers (per-allele HR = 1.13, 95% CI: 1.06–1.20, ptrend = 5 × 10−5 in BRCA1 and BRCA2 combined). These loci appear to interact multiplicatively on breast cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers. The differences in the effects of the FGFR2 and MAP3K1 SNPs between BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers point to differences in the biology of BRCA1 and BRCA2 breast cancer tumors and confirm the distinct nature of breast cancer in BRCA1 mutation carriers. PMID:18355772

  13. BRCA1 and BRCA2 founder mutations account for 78% of germline carriers among hereditary breast cancer families in Chile

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Carolina; Tapia, Teresa; Perez-Moreno, Elisa; Gajardo-Meneses, Patricia; Ruiz, Catalina; Rios, Mabel; Missarelli, Claudio; Silva, Mariela; Cruz, Adolfo; Matamala, Luis; Carvajal-Carmona, Luis; Camus, Mauricio; Carvallo, Pilar

    2017-01-01

    Identifying founder mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 in specific populations constitute a valuable opportunity for genetic screening. Several studies from different populations have reported recurrent and/or founder mutations representing a relevant proportion of BRCA mutation carriers. In Latin America, only few founder mutations have been described. We screened 453 Chilean patients with hereditary breast cancer for mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2. For recurrent mutations, we genotyped 11 microsatellite markers in BRCA1 and BRCA2 in order to determine a founder effect through haplotype analysis. We found a total of 25 mutations (6 novel) in 71 index patients among which, nine are present exclusively in Chilean patients. Our analysis revealed the presence of nine founder mutations, 4 in BRCA1 and 5 in BRCA2, shared by 2 to 10 unrelated families and spread in different regions of Chile. Our panel contains the highest amount of founder mutations until today and represents the highest percentage (78%) of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. We suggest that the dramatic reduction of Amerindian population due to smallpox and wars with Spanish conquerors, a scarce population increase during 300 years, and the geographic position of Chile constituted a favorable scenario to establish founder genetic markers in our population. PMID:29088781

  14. Bilateral Oophorectomy and Breast Cancer Risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers.

    PubMed

    Kotsopoulos, Joanne; Huzarski, Tomasz; Gronwald, Jacek; Singer, Christian F; Moller, Pal; Lynch, Henry T; Armel, Susan; Karlan, Beth; Foulkes, William D; Neuhausen, Susan L; Senter, Leigha; Tung, Nadine; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Eisen, Andrea; Metcalfe, Kelly; Eng, Charis; Pal, Tuya; Evans, Gareth; Sun, Ping; Lubinski, Jan; Narod, Steven A

    2017-01-01

    Whether oophorectomy reduces breast cancer risk among BRCA mutation carriers is a matter of debate. We undertook a prospective analysis of bilateral oophorectomy and breast cancer risk in BRCA mutation carriers. Subjects had no history of cancer, had both breasts intact, and had information on oophorectomy status (n = 3722). Women were followed until breast cancer diagnosis, prophylactic bilateral mastectomy, or death. A Cox regression model was used to estimate the hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of breast cancer associated with oophorectomy (coded as a time-dependent variable). All statistical tests were two-sided. Over a mean follow-up of 5.6 years, 350 new breast cancers were diagnosed. Among women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation, oophorectomy was not associated with breast cancer risk compared with women who did not undergo an oophorectomy. The age-adjusted hazard ratio associated with oophorectomy was 0.96 (95% CI = 0.73 to 1.26, P = 76) for BRCA1 and was 0.65 (95% CI = 0.37 to 1.16, P = 14) for BRCA2 mutation carriers. In stratified analyses, the effect of oophorectomy was statistically significant for breast cancer in BRCA2 mutation carriers diagnosed prior to age 50 years (age-adjusted HR = 0.18, 95% CI = 0.05 to 0.63, P = 007). Oophorectomy was not associated with risk of breast cancer prior to age 50 years among BRCA1 mutation carriers (age-adjusted HR = 0.79, 95% CI = 0.55 to 1.13, P = 51). Findings from this large prospective study support a role of oophorectomy for the prevention of premenopausal breast cancer in BRCA2, but not BRCA1 mutation carriers. These findings warrant further evaluation. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Genetic Variation at 9p22.2 and Ovarian Cancer Risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Kartsonaki, Christiana; Gayther, Simon A.; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Couch, Fergus J.; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Roversi, Gaia; Barile, Monica; Viel, Alessandra; Allavena, Anna; Ottini, Laura; Papi, Laura; Gismondi, Viviana; Capra, Fabio; Radice, Paolo; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Kruse, Torben A.; Cruger, Dorthe; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Caligo, Maria Adelaide; Olsson, Håkan; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Lindblom, Annika; Arver, Brita; Karlsson, Per; Stenmark Askmalm, Marie; Borg, Ake; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Domchek, Susan M.; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubiński, Jan; Huzarski, Tomasz; Byrski, Tomasz; Gronwald, Jacek; Górski, Bohdan; Cybulski, Cezary; Dębniak, Tadeusz; Osorio, Ana; Durán, Mercedes; Tejada, Maria-Isabel; Benítez, Javier; Hamann, Ute; Rookus, Matti A.; Verhoef, Senno; Tilanus-Linthorst, Madeleine A.; Vreeswijk, Maaike P.; Bodmer, Danielle; Ausems, Margreet G. E. M.; van Os, Theo A.; Asperen, Christi J.; Blok, Marinus J.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare; Frost, Debra; Dunning, Alison M.; Evans, D. Gareth; Eeles, Ros; Pichert, Gabriella; Cole, Trevor; Hodgson, Shirley; Brewer, Carole; Morrison, Patrick J.; Porteous, Mary; Kennedy, M. John; Rogers, Mark T.; Side, Lucy E.; Donaldson, Alan; Gregory, Helen; Godwin, Andrew; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Moncoutier, Virginie; Castera, Laurent; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Barjhoux, Laure; Bonadona, Valérie; Leroux, Dominique; Faivre, Laurence; Lidereau, Rosette; Nogues, Catherine; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Prieur, Fabienne; Collonge-Rame, Marie-Agnès; Venat-Bouvet, Laurence; Fert-Ferrer, Sandra; Miron, Alex; Buys, Saundra S.; Hopper, John L.; Daly, Mary B.; John, Esther M.; Terry, Mary Beth; Goldgar, David; Hansen, Thomas v. O.; Jønson, Lars; Ejlertsen, Bent; Agnarsson, Bjarni A.; Offit, Kenneth; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Vijai, Joseph; Dutra-Clarke, Ana V. C.; Przybylo, Jennifer A.; Montagna, Marco; Casella, Cinzia; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Janavicius, Ramunas; Blanco, Ignacio; Lázaro, Conxi; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Gross, Jenny; Beattie, Mary S.; Schmutzler, Rita; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Meindl, Alfons; Ruehl, Ina; Fiebig, Britta; Sutter, Christian; Arnold, Norbert; Deissler, Helmut; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Kast, Karin; Niederacher, Dieter; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Simard, Jacques; Soucy, Penny; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Holland, Helene; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.; Antoniou, Antonis C.

    2011-01-01

    Background Germline mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are associated with increased risks of breast and ovarian cancers. Although several common variants have been associated with breast cancer susceptibility in mutation carriers, none have been associated with ovarian cancer susceptibility. A genome-wide association study recently identified an association between the rare allele of the single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs3814113 (ie, the C allele) at 9p22.2 and decreased risk of ovarian cancer for women in the general population. We evaluated the association of this SNP with ovarian cancer risk among BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers by use of data from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2. Methods We genotyped rs3814113 in 10 029 BRCA1 mutation carriers and 5837 BRCA2 mutation carriers. Associations with ovarian and breast cancer were assessed with a retrospective likelihood approach. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results The minor allele of rs3814113 was associated with a reduced risk of ovarian cancer among BRCA1 mutation carriers (per-allele hazard ratio of ovarian cancer = 0.78, 95% confidence interval = 0.72 to 0.85; P = 4.8 × 10-9) and BRCA2 mutation carriers (hazard ratio of ovarian cancer = 0.78, 95% confidence interval = 0.67 to 0.90; P = 5.5 × 10-4). This SNP was not associated with breast cancer risk among either BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. BRCA1 mutation carriers with the TT genotype at SNP rs3814113 were predicted to have an ovarian cancer risk to age 80 years of 48%, and those with the CC genotype were predicted to have a risk of 33%. Conclusion Common genetic variation at the 9p22.2 locus was associated with decreased risk of ovarian cancer for carriers of a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation. PMID:21169536

  16. Annual Screening Strategies in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Gene Mutation Carriers: A Comparative Effectiveness Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lowry, Kathryn P.; Lee, Janie M.; Kong, Chung Y.; McMahon, Pamela M.; Gilmore, Michael E.; Cott Chubiz, Jessica E.; Pisano, Etta D.; Gatsonis, Constantine; Ryan, Paula D.; Ozanne, Elissa M.; Gazelle, G. Scott

    2011-01-01

    Background While breast cancer screening with mammography and MRI is recommended for BRCA mutation carriers, there is no current consensus on the optimal screening regimen. Methods We used a computer simulation model to compare six annual screening strategies [film mammography (FM), digital mammography (DM), FM and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or DM and MRI contemporaneously, and alternating FM/MRI or DM/MRI at six-month intervals] beginning at ages 25, 30, 35, and 40, and two strategies of annual MRI with delayed alternating DM/FM to clinical surveillance alone. Strategies were evaluated without and with mammography-induced breast cancer risk, using two models of excess relative risk. Input parameters were obtained from the medical literature, publicly available databases, and calibration. Results Without radiation risk effects, alternating DM/MRI starting at age 25 provided the highest life expectancy (BRCA1: 72.52 years, BRCA2: 77.63 years). When radiation risk was included, a small proportion of diagnosed cancers were attributable to radiation exposure (BRCA1: <2%, BRCA2: <4%). With radiation risk, alternating DM/MRI at age 25 or annual MRI at age 25/delayed alternating DM at age 30 were most effective, depending on the radiation risk model used. Alternating DM/MRI starting at age 25 also had the highest number of false-positive screens/person (BRCA1: 4.5, BRCA2: 8.1). Conclusions Annual MRI at 25/delayed alternating DM at age 30 is likely the most effective screening strategy in BRCA mutation carriers. Screening benefits, associated risks and personal acceptance of false-positive results, should be considered in choosing the optimal screening strategy for individual women. PMID:21935911

  17. Risk of uterine cancer for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Y C; Milne, R L; Lheureux, S; Friedlander, M; McLachlan, S A; Martin, K L; Bernardini, M Q; Smith, C; Picken, S; Nesci, S; Hopper, J L; Phillips, K A

    2017-10-01

    Whether BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers have a clinically relevant elevated risk of uterine cancer has implications for risk-reducing surgery. This multicentre, prospective cohort study assessed uterine cancer risk for mutation carriers compared with the general population. Eligible mutation carriers were enrolled in the Kathleen Cuningham Foundation Consortium for Research into Familial Breast Cancer (kConFab) cohort study, had a uterus present and no history of uterine cancer at cohort entry. Epidemiological, lifestyle and clinical data were collected at cohort entry and updated three-yearly. Cancer events were verified using pathology reports. Follow-up was censored at death or last contact. Relative risk of uterine cancer was estimated using the standardised incidence ratio (SIR), with the expected number of cases determined using population-based data for Australia. Of 1,111 mutation carriers in kConFab, 283 were excluded due to prior hysterectomy (N = 278), prior uterine cancer (N = 2) or being non-residents (N = 3). After a median follow-up of 9.0 years, five incident uterine cancers were reported in the 828 eligible women (419 had prior breast cancer and 160 had prior tamoxifen use), compared to 2.04 expected (SIR = 2.45; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.80-5.72; P = 0.11). In 438 BRCA1 mutation carriers and 390 BRCA2 mutation carriers, three and two incident cases of uterine cancer were reported, respectively, compared to 1.04 expected (SIR = 2.87; 95% CI: 0.59-8.43; P = 0.18) and 0.99 expected (SIR = 2.01; 95% CI: 0.24-7.30; P = 0.52), respectively. All cases were endometrioid subtype, International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics stage I-II disease. No serous uterine cancers were reported. Our findings are consistent with those from most other reports and do not support routine risk-reducing hysterectomy for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The association between smoking and cancer incidence in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Ko, Kwang-Pil; Kim, Shana J; Huzarski, Tomasz; Gronwald, Jacek; Lubinski, Jan; Lynch, Henry T; Armel, Susan; Park, Sue K; Karlan, Beth; Singer, Christian F; Neuhausen, Susan L; Narod, Steven A; Kotsopoulos, Joanne

    2018-06-01

    Tobacco smoke is an established carcinogen, but the association between tobacco smoking and cancer risk in BRCA mutation carriers is not clear. The aim of this study was to evaluate prospectively the association between tobacco smoking and cancer incidence in a cohort of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. The study population consisted of unaffected BRCA mutation carriers. Information on lifestyle including smoking histories, reproductive factors, and past medical histories was obtained through questionnaires. Incident cancers were updated biennially via follow-up questionnaires. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using time-dependent Cox regression models. There were 700 incident cancers diagnosed over 26,711 person-years of follow-up. The most frequent cancers seen in BRCA mutation carriers were breast (n = 428; 61%) and ovarian (n = 109; 15%) cancer. Compared to nonsmokers, (ever) smoking was associated with a modest increased risk of all cancers combined (HR = 1.17; 95%CI 1.01-1.37). Women in the highest group of total pack-years (4.3-9.8) had an increased risk of developing any cancer (HR = 1.27; 95%CI 1.04-1.56), breast cancer (HR = 1.33, 95%CI 1.02-1.75), and ovarian cancer (HR = 1.68; 95%CI 1.06-2.67) compared to never smokers. The associations between tobacco smoking and cancer did not differ by BRCA mutation type or by age at diagnosis. This prospective study suggests that tobacco smoking is associated with a modest increase in the risks of breast and ovarian cancer among women with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation. © 2018 UICC.

  19. BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in women of different ethnicities undergoing testing for hereditary breast-ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Hall, Michael J; Reid, Julia E; Burbidge, Lynn A; Pruss, Dmitry; Deffenbaugh, Amie M; Frye, Cynthia; Wenstrup, Richard J; Ward, Brian E; Scholl, Thomas A; Noll, Walter W

    2009-05-15

    In women at increased risk for breast and ovarian cancer, the identification of a mutation in breast cancer gene 1 (BRCA1) and BRCA2 has important implications for screening and prevention counseling. Uncertainty regarding the role of BRCA1 and BRCA2 testing in high-risk women from diverse ancestral backgrounds exists because of variability in prevalence estimates of deleterious (disease-associated) mutations in non-white populations. In this study, the authors examined the prevalence of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in an ethnically diverse group of women who were referred for genetic testing. In this cross-sectional analysis, the prevalence of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations was assessed in a group of non-Ashkenazi Jewish women who underwent genetic testing. From 1996 to 2006, 46,276 women who met study criteria underwent DNA full-sequence analysis of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. Deleterious mutations were identified in 12.5% of women, and recurrent deleterious mutations (prevalence >2%) were identified in all ancestral groups. Women of non-European descent were younger (mean age, 45.9 years; standard deviation [SD], 11.6 years) than European women (mean age, 50 years; SD, 11.9 years; P < .001). Women of African (15.6%; odds ratio [OR], 1.3 [95% confidence interval (95% CI), 1.1-1.5]) and Latin American (14.8%; OR, 1.2 [95% CI, 1.1-1.4]) ancestries had a significantly higher prevalence of deleterious BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations compared with women of Western European ancestry (12.1%), primarily because of an increased prevalence of BRCA1 mutations in those 2 groups. Non-European ethnicity was associated strongly with having a variant of uncertain significance; however, reclassification decreased variant reporting (from 12.8%-->5.9%), and women of African ancestry experienced the largest decline (58%). Mutation prevalence was found to be high among women who were referred for clinical BRCA1 and BRCA2 testing, and the risk was similar across diverse ethnicities. BRCA1 and BRCA2

  20. Evaluation of germline BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in a multi-ethnic Asian cohort of ovarian cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Hasmad, Hanis Nazihah; Lai, Kah Nyin; Wen, Wei Xiong; Park, Daniel Jonathan; Nguyen-Dumont, Tú; Kang, Peter Choon Eng; Thirthagiri, Eswary; Ma'som, Mahirah; Lim, Boon Kiong; Southey, Melissa; Woo, Yin Ling; Teo, Soo-Hwang

    2016-05-01

    Despite the discovery of breast and ovarian cancer predisposition genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 more than two decades ago, almost all the available data relate to women of European ancestry, with only a handful of studies in Asian populations. In this study, we determined the frequency of germline alterations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 in ovarian cancer patients from a multi-ethnic cross-sectional cohort of Asian ovarian cancer patients from Malaysia. From October 2008 to February 2015, we established a hospital-based cohort of ovarian cancer patients and the germline status of all 218 women with invasive epithelial ovarian cancer was tested using targeted amplification and sequencing of the intron-exon junctions and exonic sequences of BRCA1, BRCA2, PALB2 and TP53. BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations were found in 8% (17 cases) and 3% (7 cases) of the ovarian cancer patients, respectively. Mutation carriers were diagnosed at a similar age to non-carriers, but were more likely to be Indian, have serous ovarian cancer, and have more relatives with breast or ovarian cancer. Nonetheless, 42% (10/24) of mutation carriers did not have any family history of breast or ovarian cancer and offering genetic counselling and genetic testing only to women with family history would mean that 35% (6/17) of BRCA1 mutation carriers and 57% (4/7) of BRCA2 mutation carriers would not be offered genetic testing. Our data suggest that, similar to Caucasians, a significant proportion of Asian ovarian cancer was attributed to germline mutations in BRCA1 and to a lesser extent in BRCA2. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in ethnic Lebanese Arab women with high hereditary risk breast cancer.

    PubMed

    El Saghir, Nagi S; Zgheib, Nathalie K; Assi, Hussein A; Khoury, Katia E; Bidet, Yannick; Jaber, Sara M; Charara, Raghid N; Farhat, Rania A; Kreidieh, Firas Y; Decousus, Stephanie; Romero, Pierre; Nemer, Georges M; Salem, Ziad; Shamseddine, Ali; Tfayli, Arafat; Abbas, Jaber; Jamali, Faek; Seoud, Muhieddine; Armstrong, Deborah K; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Uhrhammer, Nancy

    2015-04-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy among women in Lebanon and in Arab countries, with 50% of cases presenting before the age of 50 years. Between 2009 and 2012, 250 Lebanese women with breast cancer who were considered to be at high risk of carrying BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations because of presentation at young age and/or positive family history (FH) of breast or ovarian cancer were recruited. Clinical data were analyzed statistically. Coding exons and intron-exon boundaries of BRCA1 and BRCA2 were sequenced from peripheral blood DNA. All patients were tested for BRCA1 rearrangements using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA). BRCA2 MLPA was done in selected cases. Overall, 14 of 250 patients (5.6%) carried a deleterious BRCA mutation (7 BRCA1, 7 BRCA2) and 31 (12.4%) carried a variant of uncertain significance. Eight of 74 patients (10.8%) aged ≤40 years with positive FH and only 1 of 74 patients (1.4%) aged ≤40 years without FH had a mutated BRCA. Four of 75 patients (5.3%) aged 41-50 years with FH had a deleterious mutation. Only 1 of 27 patients aged >50 years at diagnosis had a BRCA mutation. All seven patients with BRCA1 mutations had grade 3 infiltrating ductal carcinoma and triple-negative breast cancer. Nine BRCA1 and 17 BRCA2 common haplotypes were observed. Prevalence of deleterious BRCA mutations is lower than expected and does not support the hypothesis that BRCA mutations alone cause the observed high percentage of breast cancer in young women of Lebanese and Arab descent. Studies to search for other genetic mutations are recommended. ©AlphaMed Press.

  2. Candidate genetic modifiers for breast and ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    PubMed Central

    Peterlongo, Paolo; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Rudolph, Anja; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Simard, Jacques; Soucy, Penny; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Easton, Douglas F.; Hamann, Ute; Wilkening, Stefan; Chen, Bowang; Rookus, Matti A.; Schmidt, Marjanka K; van der Baan, Frederieke H.; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Walker, Logan C.; Lose, Felicity; Maia, Ana-Teresa; Montagna, Marco; Matricardi, Laura; Lubinski, Jan; Jakubowska, Anna; Gómez Garcia, Encarna B.; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Nussbaum, Robert L.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Domchek, Susan M.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Arun, Banu K.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Orsulic, Sandra; Lester, Jenny; Chung, Wendy K.; Miron, Alex; Southey, Melissa C.; Goldgar, David E.; Buys, Saundra S.; Janavicius, Ramunas; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ejlertsen, Bent; Jønson, Lars; Osorio, Ana; Martínez-Bouzas, Cristina; Benitez, Javier; Conway, Edye E.; Blazer, Kathleen R.; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Scuvera, Giulietta; Barile, Monica; Ficarazzi, Filomena; Mariette, Frederique; Fortuzzi, Stefano; Viel, Alessandra; Giannini, Giuseppe; Papi, Laura; Martayan, Aline; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Radice, Paolo; Vratimos, Athanassios; Fostira, Florentia; Garber, Judy E.; Donaldson, Alan; Brewer, Carole; Foo, Claire; Evans, D. Gareth R.; Frost, Debra; Eccles, Diana; Brady, Angela; Cook, Jackie; Tischkowitz, Marc; Adlard, Julian; Barwell, Julian; Walker, Lisa; Izatt, Louise; Side, Lucy E.; Kennedy, M. John; Rogers, Mark T.; Porteous, Mary E.; Morrison, Patrick J.; Platte, Radka; Davidson, Rosemarie; Hodgson, Shirley V.; Ellis, Steve; Cole, Trevor; Godwin, Andrew K.; Claes, Kathleen; Van Maerken, Tom; Meindl, Alfons; Gehrig, Andrea; Sutter, Christian; Engel, Christoph; Niederacher, Dieter; Steinemann, Doris; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Kast, Karin; Rhiem, Kerstin; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Bressac-de Paillerets, Brigitte; Buecher, Bruno; Delnatte, Capucine; Houdayer, Claude; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Damiola, Francesca; Coupier, Isabelle; Barjhoux, Laure; Venat-Bouvet, Laurence; Golmard, Lisa; Boutry-Kryza, Nadia; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Caron, Olivier; Pujol, Pascal; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Belotti, Muriel; Piedmonte, Marion; Friedlander, Michael L.; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Copeland, Larry J; de la Hoya, Miguel; Segura, Pedro Perez; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; van Os, Theo A.M.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E.J.; van der Hout, Annemarie H.; Vreeswijk, Maaike P.G.; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Ausems, Margreet G.E.M.; van Doorn, Helena C.; Collée, J. Margriet; Olah, Edith; Diez, Orland; Blanco, Ignacio; Lazaro, Conxi; Brunet, Joan; Feliubadalo, Lidia; Cybulski, Cezary; Gronwald, Jacek; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Arason, Adalgeir; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Olswold, Curtis; Couch, Fergus J.; Lindor, Noralane M.; Wang, Xianshu; Szabo, Csilla I.; Offit, Kenneth; Corines, Marina; Jacobs, Lauren; Robson, Mark E.; Zhang, Liying; Joseph, Vijai; Berger, Andreas; Singer, Christian F.; Rappaport, Christine; Kaulich, Daphne Geschwantler; Pfeiler, Georg; Tea, Muy-Kheng M.; Phelan, Catherine M.; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Rennert, Gad; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Andrulis, Irene L.; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Bojesen, Anders; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Thomassen, Mads; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Laitman, Yael; Rantala, Johanna; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Ehrencrona, Hans; Askmalm, Marie Stenmark; Borg, Åke; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; McGuffog, Lesley; Barrowdale, Daniel; Healey, Sue; Lee, Andrew; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Friedman, Eitan

    2014-01-01

    Background BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers are at substantially increased risk for developing breast and ovarian cancer. The incomplete penetrance coupled with the variable age at diagnosis in carriers of the same mutation suggests the existence of genetic and non-genetic modifying factors. In this study we evaluated the putative role of variants in many candidate modifier genes. Methods Genotyping data from 15,252 BRCA1 and 8,211 BRCA2 mutation carriers, for known variants (n=3,248) located within or around 445 candidate genes, were available through the iCOGS custom-designed array. Breast and ovarian cancer association analysis was performed within a retrospective cohort approach. Results The observed p-values of association ranged between 0.005-1.000. None of the variants was significantly associated with breast or ovarian cancer risk in either BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers, after multiple testing adjustments. Conclusion There is little evidence that any of the evaluated candidate variants act as modifiers of breast and/or ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. Impact Genome-wide association studies have been more successful at identifying genetic modifiers of BRCA1/2 penetrance than candidate gene studies. PMID:25336561

  3. BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation analysis of early-onset and familial breast cancer cases in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Flores, Pablo; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Badzioch, Michael; Calderon-Garcidueñas, A L; Chopin, Sandrine; Fabrice, Odefrey; González-Guerrero, J F; Szabo, Csilla; Lenoir, Gilbert; Goldgar, David E; Barrera-Saldaña, Hugo A

    2002-12-01

    The entire coding regions of BRCA1 and BRCA2 were screened for mutations by heteroduplex analysis in 51 Mexican breast cancer patients. One BRCA1 and one BRCA2 truncating mutation each was identified in the group of 32 (6%) early-onset breast cancer patients (< or =35 years). Besides these two likely deleterious mutations, eight rare variants of unknown significance, mostly in the BRCA2 gene, were detected in six of 32 (19%) early-onset breast cancer cases and in three of 17 (18%) site-specific breast cancer families, one containing a male breast cancer case. No mutations or rare sequence variants have been identified in two additional families including each an early-onset breast cancer case and an ovarian cancer patient. The two truncating mutations (BRCA1 3857delT; BRCA2 2663-2664insA) and six of the rare variants have never been reported before and may be of country-specific origin. The majority of the alterations appeared to be distinct, with only one of them being observed in more than one family. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Candidate genetic modifiers for breast and ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Peterlongo, Paolo; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Moysich, Kirsten B; Rudolph, Anja; Schmutzler, Rita K; Simard, Jacques; Soucy, Penny; Eeles, Rosalind A; Easton, Douglas F; Hamann, Ute; Wilkening, Stefan; Chen, Bowang; Rookus, Matti A; Schmidt, Marjanka K; van der Baan, Frederieke H; Spurdle, Amanda B; Walker, Logan C; Lose, Felicity; Maia, Ana-Teresa; Montagna, Marco; Matricardi, Laura; Lubinski, Jan; Jakubowska, Anna; Gómez Garcia, Encarna B; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Nussbaum, Robert L; Nathanson, Katherine L; Domchek, Susan M; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Arun, Banu K; Karlan, Beth Y; Orsulic, Sandra; Lester, Jenny; Chung, Wendy K; Miron, Alex; Southey, Melissa C; Goldgar, David E; Buys, Saundra S; Janavicius, Ramunas; Dorfling, Cecilia M; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Ding, Yuan Chun; Neuhausen, Susan L; Hansen, Thomas V O; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ejlertsen, Bent; Jønson, Lars; Osorio, Ana; Martínez-Bouzas, Cristina; Benitez, Javier; Conway, Edye E; Blazer, Kathleen R; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Scuvera, Giulietta; Barile, Monica; Ficarazzi, Filomena; Mariette, Frederique; Fortuzzi, Stefano; Viel, Alessandra; Giannini, Giuseppe; Papi, Laura; Martayan, Aline; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Radice, Paolo; Vratimos, Athanassios; Fostira, Florentia; Garber, Judy E; Donaldson, Alan; Brewer, Carole; Foo, Claire; Evans, D Gareth R; Frost, Debra; Eccles, Diana; Brady, Angela; Cook, Jackie; Tischkowitz, Marc; Adlard, Julian; Barwell, Julian; Walker, Lisa; Izatt, Louise; Side, Lucy E; Kennedy, M John; Rogers, Mark T; Porteous, Mary E; Morrison, Patrick J; Platte, Radka; Davidson, Rosemarie; Hodgson, Shirley V; Ellis, Steve; Cole, Trevor; Godwin, Andrew K; Claes, Kathleen; Van Maerken, Tom; Meindl, Alfons; Gehrig, Andrea; Sutter, Christian; Engel, Christoph; Niederacher, Dieter; Steinemann, Doris; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Kast, Karin; Rhiem, Kerstin; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Bressac-de Paillerets, Brigitte; Buecher, Bruno; Delnatte, Capucine; Houdayer, Claude; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Damiola, Francesca; Coupier, Isabelle; Barjhoux, Laure; Venat-Bouvet, Laurence; Golmard, Lisa; Boutry-Kryza, Nadia; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Caron, Olivier; Pujol, Pascal; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Belotti, Muriel; Piedmonte, Marion; Friedlander, Michael L; Rodriguez, Gustavo C; Copeland, Larry J; de la Hoya, Miguel; Segura, Pedro Perez; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; van Os, Theo A M; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E J; van der Hout, Annemarie H; Vreeswijk, Maaike P G; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Ausems, Margreet G E M; van Doorn, Helena C; Collée, J Margriet; Olah, Edith; Diez, Orland; Blanco, Ignacio; Lazaro, Conxi; Brunet, Joan; Feliubadalo, Lidia; Cybulski, Cezary; Gronwald, Jacek; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Arason, Adalgeir; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Teixeira, Manuel R; Olswold, Curtis; Couch, Fergus J; Lindor, Noralane M; Wang, Xianshu; Szabo, Csilla I; Offit, Kenneth; Corines, Marina; Jacobs, Lauren; Robson, Mark E; Zhang, Liying; Joseph, Vijai; Berger, Andreas; Singer, Christian F; Rappaport, Christine; Kaulich, Daphne Geschwantler; Pfeiler, Georg; Tea, Muy-Kheng M; Phelan, Catherine M; Greene, Mark H; Mai, Phuong L; Rennert, Gad; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Andrulis, Irene L; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Bojesen, Anders; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Thomassen, Mads; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Laitman, Yael; Rantala, Johanna; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Ehrencrona, Hans; Askmalm, Marie Stenmark; Borg, Åke; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; McGuffog, Lesley; Barrowdale, Daniel; Healey, Sue; Lee, Andrew; Pharoah, Paul D P; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C; Friedman, Eitan

    2015-01-01

    BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers are at substantially increased risk for developing breast and ovarian cancer. The incomplete penetrance coupled with the variable age at diagnosis in carriers of the same mutation suggests the existence of genetic and nongenetic modifying factors. In this study, we evaluated the putative role of variants in many candidate modifier genes. Genotyping data from 15,252 BRCA1 and 8,211 BRCA2 mutation carriers, for known variants (n = 3,248) located within or around 445 candidate genes, were available through the iCOGS custom-designed array. Breast and ovarian cancer association analysis was performed within a retrospective cohort approach. The observed P values of association ranged between 0.005 and 1.000. None of the variants was significantly associated with breast or ovarian cancer risk in either BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers, after multiple testing adjustments. There is little evidence that any of the evaluated candidate variants act as modifiers of breast and/or ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. Genome-wide association studies have been more successful at identifying genetic modifiers of BRCA1/2 penetrance than candidate gene studies. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  5. Significant clinical impact of recurrent BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Villarreal-Garza, Cynthia; Alvarez-Gómez, Rosa María; Pérez-Plasencia, Carlos; Herrera, Luis A; Herzog, Josef; Castillo, Danielle; Mohar, Alejandro; Castro, Clementina; Gallardo, Lenny N; Gallardo, Dolores; Santibáñez, Miguel; Blazer, Kathleen R; Weitzel, Jeffrey N

    2015-02-01

    Frequent recurrent mutations in the breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility (BRCA) genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 among Hispanics, including a large rearrangement Mexican founder mutation (BRCA1 exon 9-12 deletion [ex9-12del]), suggest that an ancestry-informed BRCA-testing strategy could reduce disparities and promote cancer prevention by enabling economic screening for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer in Mexico. In a multistage approach, 188 patients with cancer who were unselected for family cancer history (92 with ovarian cancer and 96 with breast cancer) were screened for BRCA mutations using a Hispanic mutation panel (HISPANEL) of 115 recurrent mutations in a multiplex assay (114 were screened on a mass spectroscopy platform, and a polymerase chain reaction assay was used to screen for the BRCA1 ex9-12del mutation). This was followed by sequencing of all BRCA exons and adjacent intronic regions and a BRCA1 multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification assay (MLPA) for HISPANEL-negative patients. BRCA mutation prevalence was calculated and correlated with histology and tumor receptor status, and HISPANEL sensitivity was estimated. BRCA mutations were detected in 26 of 92 patients (28%) with ovarian cancer, in 14 of 96 patients (15%) with breast cancer overall, and in 9 of 33 patients (27%) who had tumors that were negative for estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and human epithelial growth factor 2 (triple-negative breast cancer). Most patients with breast cancer were diagnosed with locally advanced disease. The Mexican founder mutation (BRCA1 ex9-12del) accounted for 35% of BRCA-associated ovarian cancers and 29% of BRCA-associated breast cancers. At 2% of the sequencing and MLPA cost, HISPANEL detected 68% of all BRCA mutations. In this study, a remarkably high prevalence of BRCA mutations was observed among patients with ovarian cancer and breast cancer who were not selected for family history, and the BRCA1 ex9-12del mutation explained 33% of the

  6. Germline BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations among high risk breast cancer patients in Jordan.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Razeq, Hikmat; Al-Omari, Amal; Zahran, Farah; Arun, Banu

    2018-02-06

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy and the leading cause of cancer-related deaths among Jordanian women. With a median age of 50 years at diagnosis, a higher prevalence of hereditary breast cancer may be expected. The objective of this pilot study is to evaluate, for the first time, the contribution of germline mutations in BRCA1/2 to breast cancer among Jordanian patients. Jordanian breast cancer women with a selected high risk profile were invited to participate. Peripheral blood samples were obtained for DNA extraction. A detailed 3-generation family history was also collected. BRCA sequencing was performed at a reference laboratory. Mutations were classified as deleterious, suspected deleterious, variant of uncertain significance or favor polymorphisms. Patients' medical records were reviewed for extraction of clinical and tumor pathology data. One hundred patients were enrolled to the study. Median age was 40 (22-75) years. In total, 20 patients had deleterious and 7 suspected deleterious mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes. Seven variants of uncertain significance were also detected. After excluding patients tested subsequent to the index case in their families, highest mutation rates were observed among triple negatives (9/16, 56.3%) especially among those with positive family history of breast and/or ovarian cancer (9/13, 69.2%), patients with bilateral or second primary breast cancer (10/15, 66.7%) and those with family history of male breast cancer (2/5, 40.0%). BRCA1/2 mutations are not uncommon among selected Jordanian females with breast cancer. The contribution of these findings to much younger age at diagnosis is debatable. Although small, our selected patient cohort shows an important incidence of deleterious and suspected deleterious BRCA1/2 mutations suggesting that genetic testing should be offered to patients with certain high risk features.

  7. Significant clinical impact of recurrent BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Villarreal-Garza, Cynthia; Alvarez-Gómez, Rosa María; Pérez-Plasencia, Carlos; Herrera, Luis A.; Herzog, Josef; Castillo, Danielle; Mohar, Alejandro; Castro, Clementina; Gallardo, Lenny N.; Gallardo, Dolores; Santibáñez, Miguel; Blazer, Kathleen R.; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.

    2014-01-01

    Background Frequent recurrent BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene (BRCA) mutations among Hispanics, including a large rearrangement Mexican founder mutation (BRCA1 ex9-12del), suggest that an ancestry-informed BRCA-testing strategy could reduce disparities and promote cancer prevention by enabling economical screening for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer in Mexico. Methods In a multistage approach, 188 cancer cases unselected for family cancer history (92 ovarian cancer and 96 breast cancer) were screened for BRCA mutations using a Hispanic mutation panel (HISPANEL®) of 115 recurrent mutations in a multiplex assay (114 on a mass spectroscopy platform, and a PCR assay for the BRCA1 ex9-12del mutation), followed by sequencing of all BRCA exons and adjacent intronic regions, and BRCA1 multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification assay (MLPA) for HISPANEL negative cases. BRCA mutation prevalence was calculated and correlated with histology and tumor receptor status, and HISPANEL sensitivity was estimated. Results BRCA mutations were detected in 28% (26/92) of ovarian cancer cases and 15% (14/96) of breast cancer cases overall and 27% (9/33) of triple negative breast cancer. Most breast cancer cases were diagnosed with locally advanced disease. The Mexican founder mutation (BRCA1 ex9-12del) accounted for 35% of the BRCA-associated ovarian cancer cases and 29% of the BRCA-associated breast cancer cases. At 2% of the sequencing and MLPA cost, the HISPANEL detected 68% of all BRCA mutations. Conclusion In this study, we found a remarkably high prevalence of BRCA mutations among ovarian and breast cases not selected for family history, and BRCA1 ex9-12del explained one third of the total. The remarkable frequency of BRCA1 ex9-12del in Mexico City supports a nearby origin of this Mexican founder mutation and may constitute a regional public health problem. The HISPANEL presents a translational opportunity for cost-effective genetic testing to enable breast and ovarian cancer

  8. Ovarian cancer susceptibility alleles and risk of ovarian cancer in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Ramus, Susan J; Antoniou, Antonis C; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Soucy, Penny; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; McGuffog, Lesley; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Healey, Sue; Barrowdale, Daniel; Lee, Andrew; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Kruse, Torben A; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Caligo, Maria A; Liljegren, Annelie; Lindblom, Annika; Olsson, Håkan; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Melin, Beatrice; Domchek, Susan M; Nathanson, Katherine L; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Złowocka, Elżbieta; Gronwald, Jacek; Huzarski, Tomasz; Byrski, Tomasz; Cybulski, Cezary; Toloczko-Grabarek, Aleksandra; Osorio, Ana; Benitez, Javier; Duran, Mercedes; Tejada, Maria-Isabel; Hamann, Ute; Rookus, Matti; van Leeuwen, Flora E; Aalfs, Cora M; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E J; van Asperen, Christi J; van Roozendaal, K E P; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Collée, J Margriet; Kriege, Mieke; van der Luijt, Rob B; Peock, Susan; Frost, Debra; Ellis, Steve D; Platte, Radka; Fineberg, Elena; Evans, D Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Jacobs, Chris; Eeles, Ros; Adlard, Julian; Davidson, Rosemarie; Eccles, Diana; Cole, Trevor; Cook, Jackie; Paterson, Joan; Douglas, Fiona; Brewer, Carole; Hodgson, Shirley; Morrison, Patrick J; Walker, Lisa; Porteous, Mary E; Kennedy, M John; Pathak, Harsh; Godwin, Andrew K; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Caux-Moncoutier, Virginie; de Pauw, Antoine; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Léoné, Mélanie; Calender, Alain; Lasset, Christine; Bonadona, Valérie; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Faivre, Laurence; Loustalot, Catherine; Buys, Saundra; Daly, Mary; Miron, Alex; Terry, Mary Beth; Chung, Wendy K; John, Esther M; Southey, Melissa; Goldgar, David; Singer, Christian F; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Pfeiler, Georg; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Hansen, Thomas v O; Ejlertsen, Bent; Johannsson, Oskar Th; Offit, Kenneth; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Gaudet, Mia M; Vijai, Joseph; Robson, Mark; Piedmonte, Marion; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Van Le, Linda; Hoffman, James S; Ewart Toland, Amanda; Montagna, Marco; Tognazzo, Silvia; Imyanitov, Evgeny; Issacs, Claudine; Janavicius, Ramunas; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Iganacio; Tornero, Eva; Navarro, Matilde; Moysich, Kirsten B; Karlan, Beth Y; Gross, Jenny; Olah, Edith; Vaszko, Tibor; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Ganz, Patricia A; Beattie, Mary S; Dorfling, Cecelia M; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Diez, Orland; Kwong, Ava; Schmutzler, Rita K; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Heidemann, Simone; Niederacher, Dieter; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Gadzicki, Dorotehea; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Deissler, Helmut; Gehrig, Andrea; Sutter, Christian; Kast, Karin; Fiebig, Britta; Schäfer, Dieter; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Plante, Marie; Spurdle, Amanda B; Neuhausen, Susan L; Ding, Yuan Chun; Wang, Xianshu; Lindor, Noralane; Fredericksen, Zachary; Pankratz, V Shane; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Bonanni, Bernardo; Bernard, Loris; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Papi, Laura; Ottini, Laura; Radice, Paolo; Greene, Mark H; Mai, Phuong L; Andrulis, Irene L; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Pharoah, Paul D P; Gayther, Simon A; Simard, Jacques; Easton, Douglas F; Couch, Fergus J; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia

    2012-04-01

    Germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 are associated with increased risks of breast and ovarian cancer. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) identified six alleles associated with risk of ovarian cancer for women in the general population. We evaluated four of these loci as potential modifiers of ovarian cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Four single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs10088218 (at 8q24), rs2665390 (at 3q25), rs717852 (at 2q31), and rs9303542 (at 17q21), were genotyped in 12,599 BRCA1 and 7,132 BRCA2 carriers, including 2,678 ovarian cancer cases. Associations were evaluated within a retrospective cohort approach. All four loci were associated with ovarian cancer risk in BRCA2 carriers; rs10088218 per-allele hazard ratio (HR) = 0.81 (95% CI: 0.67-0.98) P-trend = 0.033, rs2665390 HR = 1.48 (95% CI: 1.21-1.83) P-trend = 1.8 × 10(-4), rs717852 HR = 1.25 (95% CI: 1.10-1.42) P-trend = 6.6 × 10(-4), rs9303542 HR = 1.16 (95% CI: 1.02-1.33) P-trend = 0.026. Two loci were associated with ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 carriers; rs10088218 per-allele HR = 0.89 (95% CI: 0.81-0.99) P-trend = 0.029, rs2665390 HR = 1.25 (95% CI: 1.10-1.42) P-trend = 6.1 × 10(-4). The HR estimates for the remaining loci were consistent with odds ratio estimates for the general population. The identification of multiple loci modifying ovarian cancer risk may be useful for counseling women with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations regarding their risk of ovarian cancer. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. The prevalence of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations among young Mexican women with triple-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Villarreal-Garza, C.; Weitzel, J. N.; Llacuachaqui, M.; Sifuentes, E.; Magallanes-Hoyos, M. C.; Gallardo, L.; Alvarez-Gómez, R. M.; Herzog, J.; Castillo, D.; Royer, R.; Akbari, Mohammad; Lara-Medina, F.; Herrera, L. A.; Mohar, A.

    2015-01-01

    Various guidelines recommend that women with triple-negative breast cancer should be tested for BRCA1 mutations, but the prevalence of mutations may vary with ethnic group and with geographic region, and the optimal cutoff age for testing has not been established. We estimated the frequencies of BRCA1 and BRCA2 (BRCA) mutations among 190 women with triple-negative breast cancer, unselected for family history, diagnosed at age 50 or less at a single hospital in Mexico City. Patients were screened for 115 recurrent BRCA mutations, which have been reported previously in women of Hispanic origin, including a common large rearrangement Mexican founder mutation (BRCA1 ex9-12del). A BRCA mutation was detected in 44 of 190 patients with triple-negative breast cancer (23 %). Forty-three mutations were found in BRCA1 and one mutation was found in BRCA2. Seven different mutations accounted for 39 patients (89 % of the total mutations). The Mexican founder mutation (BRCA1 ex9-12del) was found 18 times and accounted for 41 % of all mutations detected. There is a high prevalence of BRCA1 mutations among young triple-negative breast cancer patients in Mexico. Women with triple-negative breast cancer in Mexico should be screened for mutations in BRCA1. PMID:25716084

  10. Association of type and location of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations with risk of breast and ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Rebbeck, Timothy R; Mitra, Nandita; Wan, Fei; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Healey, Sue; McGuffog, Lesley; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F; Antoniou, Antonis C; Nathanson, Katherine L; Laitman, Yael; Kushnir, Anya; Paluch-Shimon, Shani; Berger, Raanan; Zidan, Jamal; Friedman, Eitan; Ehrencrona, Hans; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Loman, Niklas; Harbst, Katja; Rantala, Johanna; Melin, Beatrice; Huo, Dezheng; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Seldon, Joyce; Ganz, Patricia A; Nussbaum, Robert L; Chan, Salina B; Odunsi, Kunle; Gayther, Simon A; Domchek, Susan M; Arun, Banu K; Lu, Karen H; Mitchell, Gillian; Karlan, Beth Y; Walsh, Christine; Lester, Jenny; Godwin, Andrew K; Pathak, Harsh; Ross, Eric; Daly, Mary B; Whittemore, Alice S; John, Esther M; Miron, Alexander; Terry, Mary Beth; Chung, Wendy K; Goldgar, David E; Buys, Saundra S; Janavicius, Ramunas; Tihomirova, Laima; Tung, Nadine; Dorfling, Cecilia M; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Steele, Linda; Neuhausen, Susan L; Ding, Yuan Chun; Ejlertsen, Bent; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Hansen, Thomas v O; Ramón y Cajal, Teresa; Osorio, Ana; Benitez, Javier; Godino, Javier; Tejada, Maria-Isabel; Duran, Mercedes; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Bobolis, Kristie A; Sand, Sharon R; Fontaine, Annette; Savarese, Antonella; Pasini, Barbara; Peissel, Bernard; Bonanni, Bernardo; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Vignolo-Lutati, Francesca; Scuvera, Giulietta; Giannini, Giuseppe; Bernard, Loris; Genuardi, Maurizio; Radice, Paolo; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Pensotti, Valeria; Gismondi, Viviana; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Fostira, Florentia; Garber, Judy; Torres, Diana; Rashid, Muhammad Usman; Hamann, Ute; Peock, Susan; Frost, Debra; Platte, Radka; Evans, D Gareth; Eeles, Rosalind; Davidson, Rosemarie; Eccles, Diana; Cole, Trevor; Cook, Jackie; Brewer, Carole; Hodgson, Shirley; Morrison, Patrick J; Walker, Lisa; Porteous, Mary E; Kennedy, M John; Izatt, Louise; Adlard, Julian; Donaldson, Alan; Ellis, Steve; Sharma, Priyanka; Schmutzler, Rita Katharina; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Becker, Alexandra; Rhiem, Kerstin; Hahnen, Eric; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Engert, Stefanie; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Plendl, Hans Jörg; Mundhenke, Christoph; Niederacher, Dieter; Fleisch, Markus; Sutter, Christian; Bartram, C R; Dikow, Nicola; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Steinemann, Doris; Kast, Karin; Beer, Marit; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Gehrig, Andrea; Weber, Bernhard H; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Houdayer, Claude; Belotti, Muriel; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Damiola, Francesca; Boutry-Kryza, Nadia; Lasset, Christine; Sobol, Hagay; Peyrat, Jean-Philippe; Muller, Danièle; Fricker, Jean-Pierre; Collonge-Rame, Marie-Agnès; Mortemousque, Isabelle; Nogues, Catherine; Rouleau, Etienne; Isaacs, Claudine; De Paepe, Anne; Poppe, Bruce; Claes, Kathleen; De Leeneer, Kim; Piedmonte, Marion; Rodriguez, Gustavo; Wakely, Katie; Boggess, John; Blank, Stephanie V; Basil, Jack; Azodi, Masoud; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Romero, Atocha; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; van der Hout, Annemarie H; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Verhoef, Senno; Collée, J Margriet; Seynaeve, Caroline; Oosterwijk, Jan C; Gille, Johannes J P; Wijnen, Juul T; Gómez Garcia, Encarna B; Kets, Carolien M; Ausems, Margreet G E M; Aalfs, Cora M; Devilee, Peter; Mensenkamp, Arjen R; Kwong, Ava; Olah, Edith; Papp, Janos; Diez, Orland; Lazaro, Conxi; Darder, Esther; Blanco, Ignacio; Salinas, Mónica; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Gronwald, Jacek; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Huzarski, Tomasz; Byrski, Tomasz; Cybulski, Cezary; Toloczko-Grabarek, Aleksandra; Złowocka-Perłowska, Elżbieta; Menkiszak, Janusz; Arason, Adalgeir; Barkardottir, Rosa B; Simard, Jacques; Laframboise, Rachel; Montagna, Marco; Agata, Simona; Alducci, Elisa; Peixoto, Ana; Teixeira, Manuel R; Spurdle, Amanda B; Lee, Min Hyuk; Park, Sue K; Kim, Sung-Won; Friebel, Tara M; Couch, Fergus J; Lindor, Noralane M; Pankratz, Vernon S; Guidugli, Lucia; Wang, Xianshu; Tischkowitz, Marc; Foretova, Lenka; Vijai, Joseph; Offit, Kenneth; Robson, Mark; Rau-Murthy, Rohini; Kauff, Noah; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Singer, Christian F; Rappaport, Christine; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Pfeiler, Georg; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Berger, Andreas; Greene, Mark H; Mai, Phuong L; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Senter, Leigha; Bojesen, Anders; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Sunde, Lone; Thomassen, Mads; Moeller, Sanne Traasdahl; Kruse, Torben A; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Caligo, Maria Adelaide; Aretini, Paolo; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Selkirk, Christina G; Hulick, Peter J; Andrulis, Irene

    2015-04-07

    Limited information about the relationship between specific mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 (BRCA1/2) and cancer risk exists. To identify mutation-specific cancer risks for carriers of BRCA1/2. Observational study of women who were ascertained between 1937 and 2011 (median, 1999) and found to carry disease-associated BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations. The international sample comprised 19,581 carriers of BRCA1 mutations and 11,900 carriers of BRCA2 mutations from 55 centers in 33 countries on 6 continents. We estimated hazard ratios for breast and ovarian cancer based on mutation type, function, and nucleotide position. We also estimated RHR, the ratio of breast vs ovarian cancer hazard ratios. A value of RHR greater than 1 indicated elevated breast cancer risk; a value of RHR less than 1 indicated elevated ovarian cancer risk. Mutations of BRCA1 or BRCA2. Breast and ovarian cancer risks. Among BRCA1 mutation carriers, 9052 women (46%) were diagnosed with breast cancer, 2317 (12%) with ovarian cancer, 1041 (5%) with breast and ovarian cancer, and 7171 (37%) without cancer. Among BRCA2 mutation carriers, 6180 women (52%) were diagnosed with breast cancer, 682 (6%) with ovarian cancer, 272 (2%) with breast and ovarian cancer, and 4766 (40%) without cancer. In BRCA1, we identified 3 breast cancer cluster regions (BCCRs) located at c.179 to c.505 (BCCR1; RHR = 1.46; 95% CI, 1.22-1.74; P = 2 × 10(-6)), c.4328 to c.4945 (BCCR2; RHR = 1.34; 95% CI, 1.01-1.78; P = .04), and c. 5261 to c.5563 (BCCR2', RHR = 1.38; 95% CI, 1.22-1.55; P = 6 × 10(-9)). We also identified an ovarian cancer cluster region (OCCR) from c.1380 to c.4062 (approximately exon 11) with RHR = 0.62 (95% CI, 0.56-0.70; P = 9 × 10(-17)). In BRCA2, we observed multiple BCCRs spanning c.1 to c.596 (BCCR1; RHR = 1.71; 95% CI, 1.06-2.78; P = .03), c.772 to c.1806 (BCCR1'; RHR = 1.63; 95% CI, 1.10-2.40; P = .01), and c.7394 to c.8904 (BCCR2; RHR = 2.31; 95

  11. Tracking of the origin of recurrent mutations of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes in the North-East of Italy and improved mutation analysis strategy.

    PubMed

    Cini, Giulia; Mezzavilla, Massimo; Della Puppa, Lara; Cupelli, Elisa; Fornasin, Alessio; D'Elia, Angela Valentina; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Damante, Giuseppe; Bertok, Sara; Miolo, Gianmaria; Maestro, Roberta; de Paoli, Paolo; Amoroso, Antonio; Viel, Alessandra

    2016-02-06

    About 20 % of hereditary breast cancers are caused by mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. Since BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations may be spread throughout the gene, genetic testing is usually performed by direct sequencing of entire coding regions. In some populations, especially if relatively isolated, a few number of recurrent mutations is reported, sometimes caused by founder effect. BRCA1 and BRCA2 screening for mutations was carried out on 1114 breast and/or ovarian cancer patients complying with the eligibility criteria for BRCA testing. Haplotype analysis was performed on the probands carrying recurrent mutations and their relatives, using two sets of microsatellite markers covering the BRCA1 (D17S588, D17S806, D17S902, D17S1325, D17S855, D17S1328, D17S800, and D17S250) and BRCA2 (D13S220, D13S267, D13S171, D13S1701, D13S1698, D13S260, D13S290, D13S1246) loci. The DMLE + 2.2 software was used to estimate the age of BRCA1 c.676delT and BRCA2 c.7806-2A > G. A multiplex PCR and two different primer extension assays were optimized and used for genotyping the recurrent mutations of the two genes. In the time frame of almost 20 years of genetic testing, we have found that five BRCA1 and three BRCA2 mutations are recurrent in a substantial subset of carriers from North-East Italy and neighboring Istria, where they represent more than 50 % of all mutations. Microsatellite analyses identified a common haplotype of different length for each mutation. Age estimation of BRCA1 c.676delT and BRCA2 c.7806-2A > G mutations revealed that they arose in the Friuli Venezia Giulia area about 86 and 94 generations ago, respectively. Suggestion of an association between BRCA2 c.7806-2A > G and risk of breast cancer in males has emerged. Finally, we developed a simple and efficient pre-screening test, performing an in-house primer extension SNaPshot® assay for the rapid identification of the eight recurrent mutations. Proofs of common ancestry has been obtained for the eight recurrent

  12. BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene testing

    MedlinePlus

    ... east ca ncer. What is the BRCA Gene Mutation? BRCA1 and BRCA2 are genes that suppress malignant ... should. So people with BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutations are at a higher risk of getting cancer. ...

  13. Evaluation of Polygenic Risk Scores for Breast and Ovarian Cancer Risk Prediction in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers.

    PubMed

    Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; McGuffog, Lesley; Barrowdale, Daniel; Lee, Andrew; Soucy, Penny; Dennis, Joe; Domchek, Susan M; Robson, Mark; Spurdle, Amanda B; Ramus, Susan J; Mavaddat, Nasim; Terry, Mary Beth; Neuhausen, Susan L; Schmutzler, Rita Katharina; Simard, Jacques; Pharoah, Paul D P; Offit, Kenneth; Couch, Fergus J; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F; Antoniou, Antonis C

    2017-07-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 94 common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with breast cancer (BC) risk and 18 associated with ovarian cancer (OC) risk. Several of these are also associated with risk of BC or OC for women who carry a pathogenic mutation in the high-risk BC and OC genes BRCA1 or BRCA2. The combined effects of these variants on BC or OC risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers have not yet been assessed while their clinical management could benefit from improved personalized risk estimates. We constructed polygenic risk scores (PRS) using BC and OC susceptibility SNPs identified through population-based GWAS: for BC (overall, estrogen receptor [ER]-positive, and ER-negative) and for OC. Using data from 15 252 female BRCA1 and 8211 BRCA2 carriers, the association of each PRS with BC or OC risk was evaluated using a weighted cohort approach, with time to diagnosis as the outcome and estimation of the hazard ratios (HRs) per standard deviation increase in the PRS. The PRS for ER-negative BC displayed the strongest association with BC risk in BRCA1 carriers (HR = 1.27, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.23 to 1.31, P =  8.2×10 -53 ). In BRCA2 carriers, the strongest association with BC risk was seen for the overall BC PRS (HR = 1.22, 95% CI = 1.17 to 1.28, P =  7.2×10 -20 ). The OC PRS was strongly associated with OC risk for both BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers. These translate to differences in absolute risks (more than 10% in each case) between the top and bottom deciles of the PRS distribution; for example, the OC risk was 6% by age 80 years for BRCA2 carriers at the 10th percentile of the OC PRS compared with 19% risk for those at the 90th percentile of PRS. BC and OC PRS are predictive of cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers. Incorporation of the PRS into risk prediction models has promise to better inform decisions on cancer risk management. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford

  14. Evaluation of Polygenic Risk Scores for Breast and Ovarian Cancer Risk Prediction in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; McGuffog, Lesley; Barrowdale, Daniel; Lee, Andrew; Soucy, Penny; Healey, Sue; Dennis, Joe; Lush, Michael; Robson, Mark; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Ramus, Susan J.; Mavaddat, Nasim; Terry, Mary Beth; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Hamann, Ute; Southey, Melissa; John, Esther M.; Chung, Wendy K.; Daly, Mary B.; Buys, Saundra S.; Goldgar, David E.; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Ejlertsen, Bent; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Slager, Susan; Hallberg, Emily; Benitez, Javier; Osorio, Ana; Cohen, Nancy; Lawler, William; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Peterlongo, Paolo; Pensotti, Valeria; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Barile, Monica; Bonanni, Bernardo; Azzollini, Jacopo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Radice, Paolo; Savarese, Antonella; Papi, Laura; Giannini, Giuseppe; Fostira, Florentia; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Adlard, Julian; Brewer, Carole; Cook, Jackie; Davidson, Rosemarie; Eccles, Diana; Eeles, Ros; Ellis, Steve; Frost, Debra; Hodgson, Shirley; Izatt, Louise; Lalloo, Fiona; Ong, Kai-ren; Godwin, Andrew K.; Arnold, Norbert; Dworniczak, Bernd; Engel, Christoph; Gehrig, Andrea; Hahnen, Eric; Hauke, Jan; Kast, Karin; Meindl, Alfons; Niederacher, Dieter; Schmutzler, Rita Katharina; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Barjhoux, Laure; Collonge-Rame, Marie-Agnès; Elan, Camille; Golmard, Lisa; Barouk-Simonet, Emmanuelle; Lesueur, Fabienne; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Sokolowska, Joanna; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Isaacs, Claudine; Claes, Kathleen B. M.; Poppe, Bruce; de la Hoya, Miguel; Garcia-Barberan, Vanesa; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Nevanlinna, Heli; Ausems, Margreet G. E. M.; de Lange, J. L.; Gómez Garcia, Encarna B.; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Kets, Carolien M.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; Oosterwijk, Jan C.; Rookus, Matti A.; van Asperen, Christi J.; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; van Doorn, Helena C.; van Os, Theo A. M.; Kwong, Ava; Olah, Edith; Diez, Orland; Brunet, Joan; Lazaro, Conxi; Teulé, Alex; Gronwald, Jacek; Jakubowska, Anna; Kaczmarek, Katarzyna; Lubinski, Jan; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Barkardottir, Rosa B.; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Agata, Simona; Montagna, Marco; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Park, Sue Kyung; Olswold, Curtis; Tischkowitz, Marc; Foretova, Lenka; Gaddam, Pragna; Vijai, Joseph; Pfeiler, Georg; Rappaport-Fuerhauser, Christine; Singer, Christian F.; Tea, Muy-Kheng M.; Greene, Mark H.; Loud, Jennifer T.; Rennert, Gad; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Hulick, Peter J.; Hays, John L.; Piedmonte, Marion; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Martyn, Julie; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Andrulis, Irene L.; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Kruse, Torben A.; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Thomassen, Mads; Caligo, Maria A.; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Berger, Raanan; Friedman, Eitan; Laitman, Yael; Arver, Brita; Borg, Ake; Ehrencrona, Hans; Rantala, Johanna; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Ganz, Patricia A.; Nussbaum, Robert L.; Bradbury, Angela R.; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Arun, Banu K.; James, Paul; Karlan, Beth Y.; Lester, Jenny; Simard, Jacques; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Offit, Kenneth; Couch, Fergus J.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 94 common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with breast cancer (BC) risk and 18 associated with ovarian cancer (OC) risk. Several of these are also associated with risk of BC or OC for women who carry a pathogenic mutation in the high-risk BC and OC genes BRCA1 or BRCA2. The combined effects of these variants on BC or OC risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers have not yet been assessed while their clinical management could benefit from improved personalized risk estimates. Methods: We constructed polygenic risk scores (PRS) using BC and OC susceptibility SNPs identified through population-based GWAS: for BC (overall, estrogen receptor [ER]–positive, and ER-negative) and for OC. Using data from 15 252 female BRCA1 and 8211 BRCA2 carriers, the association of each PRS with BC or OC risk was evaluated using a weighted cohort approach, with time to diagnosis as the outcome and estimation of the hazard ratios (HRs) per standard deviation increase in the PRS. Results: The PRS for ER-negative BC displayed the strongest association with BC risk in BRCA1 carriers (HR = 1.27, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.23 to 1.31, P = 8.2×10−53). In BRCA2 carriers, the strongest association with BC risk was seen for the overall BC PRS (HR = 1.22, 95% CI = 1.17 to 1.28, P = 7.2×10−20). The OC PRS was strongly associated with OC risk for both BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers. These translate to differences in absolute risks (more than 10% in each case) between the top and bottom deciles of the PRS distribution; for example, the OC risk was 6% by age 80 years for BRCA2 carriers at the 10th percentile of the OC PRS compared with 19% risk for those at the 90th percentile of PRS. Conclusions: BC and OC PRS are predictive of cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers. Incorporation of the PRS into risk prediction models has promise to better inform decisions on cancer risk management. PMID

  15. Inheritance of deleterious mutations at both BRCA1 and BRCA2 in an international sample of 32,295 women.

    PubMed

    Rebbeck, Timothy R; Friebel, Tara M; Mitra, Nandita; Wan, Fei; Chen, Stephanie; Andrulis, Irene L; Apostolou, Paraskevi; Arnold, Norbert; Arun, Banu K; Barrowdale, Daniel; Benitez, Javier; Berger, Raanan; Berthet, Pascaline; Borg, Ake; Buys, Saundra S; Caldes, Trinidad; Carter, Jonathan; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Claes, Kathleen B M; Couch, Fergus J; Cybulski, Cezary; Daly, Mary B; de la Hoya, Miguel; Diez, Orland; Domchek, Susan M; Nathanson, Katherine L; Durda, Katarzyna; Ellis, Steve; Evans, D Gareth; Foretova, Lenka; Friedman, Eitan; Frost, Debra; Ganz, Patricia A; Garber, Judy; Glendon, Gord; Godwin, Andrew K; Greene, Mark H; Gronwald, Jacek; Hahnen, Eric; Hallberg, Emily; Hamann, Ute; Hansen, Thomas V O; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Isaacs, Claudine; Jakubowska, Anna; Janavicius, Ramunas; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; John, Esther M; Karlan, Beth Y; Kaufman, Bella; Investigators, KConFab; Kwong, Ava; Laitman, Yael; Lasset, Christine; Lazaro, Conxi; Lester, Jenny; Loman, Niklas; Lubinski, Jan; Manoukian, Siranoush; Mitchell, Gillian; Montagna, Marco; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Niederacher, Dieter; Nussbaum, Robert L; Offit, Kenneth; Olah, Edith; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Park, Sue Kyung; Piedmonte, Marion; Radice, Paolo; Rappaport-Fuerhauser, Christine; Rookus, Matti A; Seynaeve, Caroline; Simard, Jacques; Singer, Christian F; Soucy, Penny; Southey, Melissa; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Szabo, Csilla I; Tancredi, Mariella; Teixeira, Manuel R; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Mary Beth; Thomassen, Mads; Tihomirova, Laima; Tischkowitz, Marc; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Toloczko-Grabarek, Aleksandra; Tung, Nadine; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Villano, Danylo; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Zidan, Jamal; Zorn, Kristin K; McGuffog, Lesley; Easton, Douglas; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C; Ramus, Susan J

    2016-11-11

    Most BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers have inherited a single (heterozygous) mutation. Transheterozygotes (TH) who have inherited deleterious mutations in both BRCA1 and BRCA2 are rare, and the consequences of transheterozygosity are poorly understood. From 32,295 female BRCA1/2 mutation carriers, we identified 93 TH (0.3 %). "Cases" were defined as TH, and "controls" were single mutations at BRCA1 (SH1) or BRCA2 (SH2). Matched SH1 "controls" carried a BRCA1 mutation found in the TH "case". Matched SH2 "controls" carried a BRCA2 mutation found in the TH "case". After matching the TH carriers with SH1 or SH2, 91 TH were matched to 9316 SH1, and 89 TH were matched to 3370 SH2. The majority of TH (45.2 %) involved the three common Jewish mutations. TH were more likely than SH1 and SH2 women to have been ever diagnosed with breast cancer (BC; p = 0.002). TH were more likely to be diagnosed with ovarian cancer (OC) than SH2 (p = 0.017), but not SH1. Age at BC diagnosis was the same in TH vs. SH1 (p = 0.231), but was on average 4.5 years younger in TH than in SH2 (p < 0.001). BC in TH was more likely to be estrogen receptor (ER) positive (p = 0.010) or progesterone receptor (PR) positive (p = 0.013) than in SH1, but less likely to be ER positive (p < 0.001) or PR positive (p = 0.012) than SH2. Among 15 tumors from TH patients, there was no clear pattern of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) for BRCA1 or BRCA2 in either BC or OC. Our observations suggest that clinical TH phenotypes resemble SH1. However, TH breast tumor marker characteristics are phenotypically intermediate to SH1 and SH2.

  16. Cancer Risks Associated with Inherited Mutations in Ovarian Cancer Susceptibility Genes Beyond BRCA1 and BRCA2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-01

    PALB2 (FANCO),MSH2, MLH1, MSH6, PMS2 , 9 other known breast cancer genes: ATM, CHEK2, FAM175A (abraxas), FAMCM, NBN, PTEN, RECQL, TP53 and XRCC2) and...patients were enrolled with a known mutation in a gene of interest including 1 each with a mutation in RAD51D, RAD51C, PALB2, BARD1, one with PMS2 ...BRCA2, PMS2 , BLM, RAD51C and 1 with mutations in MSH6 and RAD51D. Of the 48 patients with a second cancer, most had an invasive breast cancer, but

  17. Recurrent mutation testing of BRCA1 and BRCA2 in Asian breast cancer patients identify carriers in those with presumed low risk by family history.

    PubMed

    Kang, Peter Choon Eng; Phuah, Sze Yee; Sivanandan, Kavitta; Kang, In Nee; Thirthagiri, Eswary; Liu, Jian Jun; Hassan, Norhashimah; Yoon, Sook-Yee; Thong, Meow Keong; Hui, Miao; Hartman, Mikael; Yip, Cheng Har; Mohd Taib, Nur Aishah; Teo, Soo Hwang

    2014-04-01

    Although the breast cancer predisposition genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 were discovered more than 20 years ago, there remains a gap in the availability of genetic counselling and genetic testing in Asian countries because of cost, access and inaccurate reporting of family history of cancer. In order to improve access to testing, we developed a rapid test for recurrent mutations in our Asian populations. In this study, we designed a genotyping assay with 55 BRCA1 and 44 BRCA2 mutations previously identified in Asian studies, and validated this assay in 267 individuals who had previously been tested by full sequencing. We tested the prevalence of these mutations in additional breast cancer cases. Using this genotyping approach, we analysed recurrent mutations in 533 Malaysian breast cancer cases with <10 % a priori risk, and found 1 BRCA1 (0.2 %) and 5 BRCA2 (0.9 %) carriers. Testing in a hospital-based unselected cohort of 532 Singaporean breast cancer cases revealed 6 BRCA1 (1.1 %) and 3 BRCA2 (0.6 %) carriers. Overall, 2 recurrent BRCA1 and 1 BRCA2 mutations in Malays, 3 BRCA1 and 2 BRCA2 mutations in Chinese and 1 BRCA1 mutation in Indians account for 60, 24 and 20 % of carrier families, respectively. By contrast, haplotype analyses suggest that a recurrent BRCA2 mutation (c.262_263delCT) found in 5 unrelated Malay families has at least 3 distinct haplotypes. Taken together, our data suggests that panel testing may help to identify carriers, particularly Asian BRCA2 carriers, who do not present with a priori strong family history characteristics.

  18. A founder BRCA2 mutation in non-Afrikaner breast cancer patients of the Western Cape of South Africa.

    PubMed

    van der Merwe, N C; Hamel, N; Schneider, S-R; Apffelstaedt, J P; Wijnen, J T; Foulkes, W D

    2012-02-01

    Founder mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 have been reported in many different populations. We studied 105 Coloured and 16 Black Xhosa women residing in the Western Cape of South Africa diagnosed with breast cancer. We screened these patients using our standard panel of six previously reported SA Afrikaner and Ashkenazi Jewish BRCA1/2 mutations and identified only two Afrikaner mutations. Further screening by the protein truncation test (BRCA1 exon 11, and BRCA2 exons 10 and 11) revealed an additional four deleterious mutations (BRCA1 c.1504_ 1508del,p.Leu502AlafsX2, BRCA2 c.2826_2829del,p.Ile943LysfsX16, c.6447_6448dup,p.Lys2150IlefsX19 and c.5771_5774del,p.Ile1924Argfs X38). The latter, also known in Breast Cancer Information Core nomenclature as 5999del4, was identified in 4 of 105 (3.8%) Coloureds and 4 of 16 (25%) Xhosa women, which makes it a frequent founder mutation in the Western Cape Province. Although this mutation was previously reported to occur in the Netherlands, haplotype analysis indicated two distinct origins for the Dutch and South African mutations, excluding the possibility of a common Dutch ancestor and suggesting gene flow from the indigenous tribes such as the Xhosa to the Coloured population instead. Further studies to determine the carrier rate of this variant in the Xhosa and other SA populations are warranted. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  19. BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in Japanese patients with ovarian, fallopian tube, and primary peritoneal cancer.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Ikuko; Hirotsu, Yosuke; Nakagomi, Hiroshi; Ouchi, Hidetaka; Ikegami, Atsushi; Teramoto, Katsuhiro; Amemiya, Kenji; Mochizuki, Hitoshi; Omata, Masao

    2016-01-01

    The contribution of BRCA1 and BRCA2 to ovarian cancer in Japanese patients is still unclear. This study investigated the frequency of germline mutations in BRCA1/2 in Japanese patients with ovarian, peritoneal, or fallopian tube cancer, regardless of their family histories, which were suggestive of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer. Ninety-five unselected women with ovarian cancer who were seen from 2013 to 2015 at Yamanashi Prefectural Central Hospital were enrolled. Analyses of BRCA1/2 gene mutations were performed with next-generation sequencing. Twelve of the 95 patients (12.6%), including 5 in the BRCA1 (5.3%) and 7 in the BRCA2 (7.4%), had deleterious mutations. Among the 36 cases with a family history, 6 (16.7%) were found to carry mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2. Notably, 6 of the 59 cases (10.2%) without a family history also had BRCA1/2 germline mutations. There was no statistical difference between the 2 groups (P = .36). The presence of mutations and their clinical relevance were studied. Mutation carriers were diagnosed at advanced stages (100% of positive cases among stage III or IV cases) and had poor prognostic histological subtypes (100% of positive cases had high-grade serous adenocarcinomas). In this unselected Japanese population, approximately 13% of the cases with ovarian cancer appeared to be associated with an inherited risk, regardless of a family history. This finding indicates that BRCA1/2 genetic testing should be performed for all patients with ovarian cancers. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  20. Pathology of breast and ovarian cancers among BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers: results from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA)

    PubMed Central

    Mavaddat, Nasim; Barrowdale, Daniel; Andrulis, Irene L.; Domchek, Susan M.; Eccles, Diana; Nevanlinna, Heli; Ramus, Susan J.; Spurdle, Amanda; Robson, Mark; Sherman, Mark; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Couch, Fergus J.; Engel, Christoph; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Southey, Melissa C.; Terry, Mary Beth; Goldgar, David; O’Malley, Frances; John, Esther M.; Janavicius, Ramunas; Tihomirova, Laima; Hansen, Thomas v O; Nielsen, Finn C.; Osorio, Ana; Stavropoulou, Alexandra; Benítez, Javier; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Barile, Monica; Volorio, Sara; Pasini, Barbara; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Putignano, Anna Laura; Ottini, Laura; Radice, Paolo; Hamann, Ute; Rashid, Muhammad U.; Hogervorst, Frans B.; Kriege, Mieke; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Peock, Susan; Frost, Debra; Evans, D. Gareth; Brewer, Carole; Walker, Lisa; Rogers, Mark T.; Side, Lucy E.; Houghton, Catherine; Weaver, JoEllen; Godwin, Andrew K.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Meindl, Alfons; Kast, Karin; Arnold, Norbert; Niederacher, Dieter; Sutter, Christian; Deissler, Helmut; Gadzicki, Doroteha; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Schönbuchner, Ines; Gevensleben, Heidrun; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Belotti, Muriel; Barjhoux, Laure; Isaacs, Claudine; Peshkin, Beth N.; Caldes, Trinidad; de al Hoya, Miguel; Cañadas, Carmen; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Heikkilä, Päivi; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blanco, Ignacio; Lazaro, Conxi; Brunet, Joan; Agnarsson, Bjarni A.; Arason, Adalgeir; Barkardottir, Rosa B.; Dumont, Martine; Simard, Jacques; Montagna, Marco; Agata, Simona; D’Andrea, Emma; Yan, Max; Fox, Stephen; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Rubinstein, Wendy; Tung, Nadine; Garber, Judy E.; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Lindor, Noralane M.; Szabo, Csilla; Offit, Kenneth; Sakr, Rita; Gaudet, Mia M.; Singer, Christian F.; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Rappaport, Christine; Mai, Phuong L.; Greene, Mark H.; Sokolenko, Anna; Imyanitov, Evgeny; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Senter, Leigha; Sweet, Kevin; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Kruse, Torben; Caligo, Maria; Aretini, Paolo; Rantala, Johanna; von Wachenfeld, Anna; Henriksson, Karin; Steele, Linda; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Nussbaum, Bob; Beattie, Mary; Odunsi, Kunle; Sucheston, Lara; Gayther, Simon A; Nathanson, Kate; Gross, Jenny; Walsh, Christine; Karlan, Beth; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.; Antoniou, Antonis C.

    2011-01-01

    Background Previous small studies found that BRCA1 and BRCA2 breast tumors differ in their pathology. Analysis of larger datasets of mutation carriers should allow further tumor characterization. Methods We used data from 4,325 BRCA1 and 2,568 BRCA2 mutation carriers to analyze the pathology of invasive breast, ovarian and contralateral breast cancers. Results There was strong evidence that the proportion of estrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast tumors decreased with age at diagnosis among BRCA1 (p-trend=1.2×10−5) but increased with age at diagnosis among BRCA2 carriers (p-trend=6.8×10−6). The proportion of triple negative tumors decreased with age at diagnosis in BRCA1 carriers but increased with age at diagnosis of BRCA2 carriers. In both BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers, ER-negative tumors were of higher histological grade than ER-positive tumors (Grade 3 vs. Grade 1, p=1.2×10−13 for BRCA1 and p=0.001 for BRCA2). ER and progesterone receptor (PR) expression were independently associated with mutation carrier status (ER-positive odds ratio (OR) for BRCA2=9.4, 95%CI:7.0-12.6 and PR-positive OR=1.7, 95%CI:1.3-2.3, under joint analysis). Lobular tumors were more likely to be BRCA2-related (OR for BRCA2=3.3, 95%CI:2.4-4.4, p=4.4×10−14), and medullary tumors BRCA1-related (OR for BRCA2=0.25, 95%CI:0.18-0.35, p=2.3×10−15). ER-status of the first breast cancer was predictive of ER-status of asynchronous contralateral breast cancer (p=0.0004 for BRCA1; p=0.002 for BRCA2). There were no significant differences in ovarian cancer morphology between BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers (serous:67%; mucinous:1%; endometriod:12%; clear-cell:2%). Conclusions/Impact Pathology characteristics of BRCA1 and BRCA2 tumors may be useful for improving risk prediction algorithms and informing clinical strategies for screening and prophylaxis. PMID:22144499

  1. Ovarian Cancer Susceptibility Alleles and Risk of Ovarian Cancer in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Ramus, Susan J.; Antoniou, Antonis C; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Soucy, Penny; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; McGuffog, Lesley; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Healey, Sue; Barrowdale, Daniel; Lee, Andrew; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Kruse, Torben A.; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Caligo, Maria A.; Liljegren, Annelie; Lindblom, Annika; Olsson, Håkan; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Melin, Beatrice; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Złowocka, Elżbieta; Gronwald, Jacek; Huzarski, Tomasz; Byrski, Tomasz; Cybulski, Cezary; Toloczko-Grabarek, Aleksandra; Osorio, Ana; Benitez, Javier; Duran, Mercedes; Tejada, Maria-Isabel; Hamann, Ute; Rookus, Matti; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Aalfs, Cora M.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E.J.; van Asperen, Christi J.; van Roozendaal, K.E.P.; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Collée, J. Margriet; Kriege, Mieke; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Peock, Susan; Frost, Debra; Ellis, Steve D.; Platte, Radka; Fineberg, Elena; Evans, D. Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Jacobs, Chris; Eeles, Ros; Adlard, Julian; Davidson, Rosemarie; Eccles, Diana; Cole, Trevor; Cook, Jackie; Paterson, Joan; Douglas, Fiona; Brewer, Carole; Hodgson, Shirley; Morrison, Patrick J.; Walker, Lisa; Porteous, Mary E.; Kennedy, M. John; Pathak, Harsh; Godwin, Andrew K.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Caux-Moncoutier, Virginie; de Pauw, Antoine; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Léoné, Mélanie; Calender, Alain; Lasset, Christine; Bonadona, Valérie; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Faivre, Laurence; Loustalot, Catherine; Buys, Saundra; Daly, Mary; Miron, Alex; Terry, Mary Beth; Chung, Wendy K.; John, Esther M; Southey, Melissa; Goldgar, David; Singer, Christian F; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Pfeiler, Georg; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Hansen, Thomas v. O.; Ejlertsen, Bent; Johannsson, Oskar Th.; Offit, Kenneth; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Gaudet, Mia M.; Vijai, Joseph; Robson, Mark; Piedmonte, Marion; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Van Le, Linda; Hoffman, James S; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Montagna, Marco; Tognazzo, Silvia; Imyanitov, Evgeny; Isaacs, Claudine; Janavicius, Ramunas; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Tornero, Eva; Navarro, Matilde; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Gross, Jenny; Olah, Edith; Vaszko, Tibor; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Ganz, Patricia A.; Beattie, Mary S.; Dorfling, Cecelia M; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Diez, Orland; Kwong, Ava; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Heidemann, Simone; Niederacher, Dieter; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Gadzicki, Dorotehea; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Deissler, Helmut; Gehrig, Andrea; Sutter, Christian; Kast, Karin; Fiebig, Britta; Schäfer, Dieter; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Plante, Marie; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Wang, Xianshu; Lindor, Noralane; Fredericksen, Zachary; Pankratz, V. Shane; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Bonanni, Bernardo; Bernard, Loris; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Papi, Laura; Ottini, Laura; Radice, Paolo; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Gayther, Simon A.; Simard, Jacques; Easton, Douglas F.; Couch, Fergus J.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia

    2012-01-01

    Germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 are associated with increased risks of breast and ovarian cancer. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) identified six alleles associated with risk of ovarian cancer for women in the general population. We evaluated four of these loci as potential modifiers of ovarian cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Four single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs10088218 (at 8q24), rs2665390 (at 3q25), rs717852 (at 2q31), and rs9303542 (at 17q21), were genotyped in 12,599 BRCA1 and 7,132 BRCA2 carriers, including 2,678 ovarian cancer cases. Associations were evaluated within a retrospective cohort approach. All four loci were associated with ovarian cancer risk in BRCA2 carriers; rs10088218 per-allele hazard ratio (HR) = 0.81 (95% CI: 0.67–0.98) P-trend = 0.033, rs2665390 HR = 1.48 (95% CI: 1.21–1.83) P-trend = 1.8 × 10−4, rs717852 HR = 1.25 (95% CI: 1.10–1.42) P-trend = 6.6 × 10−4, rs9303542 HR = 1.16 (95% CI: 1.02–1.33) P-trend = 0.026. Two loci were associated with ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 carriers; rs10088218 per-allele HR = 0.89 (95% CI: 0.81–0.99) P-trend = 0.029, rs2665390 HR = 1.25 (95% CI: 1.10–1.42) P-trend = 6.1 × 10−4. The HR estimates for the remaining loci were consistent with odds ratio estimates for the general population. The identification of multiple loci modifying ovarian cancer risk may be useful for counseling women with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations regarding their risk of ovarian cancer. PMID:22253144

  2. High-resolution melting (HRM) assay for the detection of recurrent BRCA1/BRCA2 germline mutations in Tunisian breast/ovarian cancer families.

    PubMed

    Riahi, Aouatef; Kharrat, Maher; Lariani, Imen; Chaabouni-Bouhamed, Habiba

    2014-12-01

    Germline deleterious mutations in the BRCA1/BRCA2 genes are associated with an increased risk for the development of breast and ovarian cancer. Given the large size of these genes the detection of such mutations represents a considerable technical challenge. Therefore, the development of cost-effective and rapid methods to identify these mutations became a necessity. High resolution melting analysis (HRM) is a rapid and efficient technique extensively employed as high-throughput mutation scanning method. The purpose of our study was to assess the specificity and sensitivity of HRM for BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes scanning. As a first step we estimate the ability of HRM for detection mutations in a set of 21 heterozygous samples harboring 8 different known BRCA1/BRCA2 variations, all samples had been preliminarily investigated by direct sequencing, and then we performed a blinded analysis by HRM in a set of 68 further sporadic samples of unknown genotype. All tested heterozygous BRCA1/BRCA2 variants were easily identified. However the HRM assay revealed further alteration that we initially had not searched (one unclassified variant). Furthermore, sequencing confirmed all the HRM detected mutations in the set of unknown samples, including homozygous changes, indicating that in this cohort, with the optimized assays, the mutations detections sensitivity and specificity were 100 %. HRM is a simple, rapid and efficient scanning method for known and unknown BRCA1/BRCA2 germline mutations. Consequently the method will allow for the economical screening of recurrent mutations in Tunisian population.

  3. Chemotherapy-induced amenorrhea in patients with breast cancer with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation.

    PubMed

    Valentini, Adriana; Finch, Amy; Lubinski, Jan; Byrski, Tomasz; Ghadirian, Parviz; Kim-Sing, Charmaine; Lynch, Henry T; Ainsworth, Peter J; Neuhausen, Susan L; Greenblatt, Ellen; Singer, Christian; Sun, Ping; Narod, Steven A

    2013-11-01

    To determine the likelihood of long-term amenorrhea after treatment with chemotherapy in women with breast cancer who carry a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation. We conducted a multicenter survey of 1,954 young women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation who were treated for breast cancer. We included premenopausal women who were diagnosed with invasive breast cancer between 26 and 47 years of age. We determined the age of onset of amenorrhea after breast cancer for women who were and were not treated with chemotherapy, alone or with tamoxifen. We considered chemotherapy-induced amenorrhea to have occurred when the patient experienced ≥ 2 years of amenorrhea, commencing within 2 years of initiating chemotherapy, with no resumption of menses. Of the 1,426 women who received chemotherapy, 35% experienced long-term amenorrhea. Of the 528 women who did not receive chemotherapy, 5.3% developed long-term amenorrhea. The probabilities of chemotherapy-induced amenorrhea were 7.2% for women diagnosed before age 30 years, 33% for women age 31 to 44 years, and 79% for women diagnosed after age 45 years (P trend < .001). The probability of induced amenorrhea was higher for women who received tamoxifen than for those who did not (52% v 29%; P < .001). Age at treatment and use of tamoxifen are important predictors of chemotherapy-induced amenorrhea in women who carry a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation. The risk of induced long-term amenorrhea does not seem to be greater among mutation carriers than among women who do not carry a mutation.

  4. Chemotherapy-Induced Amenorrhea in Patients With Breast Cancer With a BRCA1 or BRCA2 Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Valentini, Adriana; Finch, Amy; Lubiński, Jan; Byrski, Tomasz; Ghadirian, Parviz; Kim-Sing, Charmaine; Lynch, Henry T.; Ainsworth, Peter J.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Greenblatt, Ellen; Singer, Christian; Sun, Ping; Narod, Steven A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To determine the likelihood of long-term amenorrhea after treatment with chemotherapy in women with breast cancer who carry a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation. Patients and Methods We conducted a multicenter survey of 1,954 young women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation who were treated for breast cancer. We included premenopausal women who were diagnosed with invasive breast cancer between 26 and 47 years of age. We determined the age of onset of amenorrhea after breast cancer for women who were and were not treated with chemotherapy, alone or with tamoxifen. We considered chemotherapy-induced amenorrhea to have occurred when the patient experienced ≥ 2 years of amenorrhea, commencing within 2 years of initiating chemotherapy, with no resumption of menses. Results Of the 1,426 women who received chemotherapy, 35% experienced long-term amenorrhea. Of the 528 women who did not receive chemotherapy, 5.3% developed long-term amenorrhea. The probabilities of chemotherapy-induced amenorrhea were 7.2% for women diagnosed before age 30 years, 33% for women age 31 to 44 years, and 79% for women diagnosed after age 45 years (P trend < .001). The probability of induced amenorrhea was higher for women who received tamoxifen than for those who did not (52% v 29%; P < .001). Conclusion Age at treatment and use of tamoxifen are important predictors of chemotherapy-induced amenorrhea in women who carry a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation. The risk of induced long-term amenorrhea does not seem to be greater among mutation carriers than among women who do not carry a mutation. PMID:23980083

  5. Predicting BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutation carriers: comparison of LAMBDA, BRCAPRO, Myriad II, and modified Couch models.

    PubMed

    Lindor, Noralane M; Lindor, Rachel A; Apicella, Carmel; Dowty, James G; Ashley, Amanda; Hunt, Katherine; Mincey, Betty A; Wilson, Marcia; Smith, M Cathie; Hopper, John L

    2007-01-01

    Models have been developed to predict the probability that a person carries a detectable germline mutation in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes. Their relative performance in a clinical setting is unclear. To compare the performance characteristics of four BRCA1/BRCA2 gene mutation prediction models: LAMBDA, based on a checklist and scores developed from data on Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ) women; BRCAPRO, a Bayesian computer program; modified Couch tables based on regression analyses; and Myriad II tables collated by Myriad Genetics Laboratories. Family cancer history data were analyzed from 200 probands from the Mayo Clinic Familial Cancer Program, in a multispecialty tertiary care group practice. All probands had clinical testing for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations conducted in a single laboratory. For each model, performance was assessed by the area under the receiver operator characteristic curve (ROC) and by tests of accuracy and dispersion. Cases "missed" by one or more models (model predicted less than 10% probability of mutation when a mutation was actually found) were compared across models. All models gave similar areas under the ROC curve of 0.71 to 0.76. All models except LAMBDA substantially under-predicted the numbers of carriers. All models were too dispersed. In terms of ranking, all prediction models performed reasonably well with similar performance characteristics. Model predictions were widely discrepant for some families. Review of cancer family histories by an experienced clinician continues to be vital to ensure that critical elements are not missed and that the most appropriate risk prediction figures are provided.

  6. Evaluation of chromosome 6p22 as a breast cancer risk modifier locus in a follow-up study of BRCA2 mutation carriers

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Kristen N.; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Greene, Mark H.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Thomassen, Mads; Caligo, Maria; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Jakubowska, Anna; Osorio, Ana; Hamann, Ute; Godwin, Andrew K.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Southey, Melissa; Buys, Saundra S.; Singer, Christian F.; Hansen, Thomas V.O.; Arason, Adalgeir; Offit, Kenneth; Piedmonte, Marion; Montagna, Marco; Imyanitov, Evgeny; Tihomirova, Laima; Sucheston, Lara; Beattie, Mary; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Szabo, Csilla I.; Simard, Jacques; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Healey, Sue; Chen, Xiaoqing; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Easton, Douglas F.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C; Couch, Fergus J.

    2012-01-01

    Several common germline variants identified through genome-wide association studies of breast cancer risk in the general population have recently been shown to be associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 mutation carriers. When combined, these variants can identify marked differences in the absolute risk of developing breast cancer for mutation carriers, suggesting that additional modifier loci may further enhance individual risk assessment for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Recently, a common variant on 6p22 (rs9393597) was found to be associated with increased breast cancer risk for BRCA2 mutation carriers [Hazard ratio (HR)=1.55, 95% CI 1.25–1.92, p=6.0×10−5]. This observation was based on data from GWAS studies in which, despite statistical correction for multiple comparisons, the possibility of false discovery remains a concern. Here we report on an analysis of this variant in an additional 6,165 BRCA1 and 3,900 BRCA2 mutation carriers from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA). In this replication analysis, rs9393597 was not associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA2 mutation carriers [HR=1.09, 95% CI 0.96–1.24, p=0.18]. No association with ovarian cancer risk for BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers or with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 mutation carriers was observed. This follow-up study suggests that, contrary to our initial report, this variant is not associated with breast cancer risk among individuals with germline BRCA2 mutations. PMID:23011509

  7. Breast-feeding and the risk of breast cancer in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Jernström, H; Lubinski, J; Lynch, H T; Ghadirian, P; Neuhausen, S; Isaacs, C; Weber, B L; Horsman, D; Rosen, B; Foulkes, W D; Friedman, E; Gershoni-Baruch, R; Ainsworth, P; Daly, M; Garber, J; Olsson, H; Sun, P; Narod, S A

    2004-07-21

    Several studies have reported that the risk of breast cancer decreases with increasing duration of breast-feeding. Whether breast-feeding is associated with a reduced risk of hereditary breast cancer in women who carry deleterious BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations is currently unknown. We conducted a case-control study of women with deleterious mutations in either the BRCA1 or the BRCA2 gene. Study participants, drawn from an international cohort, were matched on the basis of BRCA mutation (BRCA1 [n = 685] or BRCA2 [n = 280]), year of birth (+/-2 years), and country of residence. The study involved 965 case subjects diagnosed with breast cancer and 965 control subjects who had no history of breast or ovarian cancer. Information on pregnancies and breast-feeding practices was derived from a questionnaire administered to the women during the course of genetic counseling. Conditional logistic regression analyses were used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) for the risk of breast cancer. All statistical tests were two-sided. Among women with BRCA1 mutations, the mean total duration of breast-feeding was statistically significantly shorter for case subjects than for control subjects (6.0 versus 8.7 months, respectively; mean difference = 2.7 months, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.4 to 4.0; P<.001). The total duration of breast-feeding was associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer (for each month of breast-feeding, OR = 0.98, 95% CI = 0.97 to 0.99; P(trend)<.001). Women with BRCA1 mutations who breast-fed for more than 1 year were less likely to have breast cancer than those who never breast-fed (OR = 0.55, 95% CI = 0.38 to 0.80; P =.001), although no such association was seen for BRCA2 (OR = 0.95, 95% CI = 0.56 to 1.59; P =.83). Women with deleterious BRCA1 mutations who breast-fed for a cumulative total of more than 1 year had a statistically significantly reduced risk of breast cancer.

  8. Four new cases of double heterozygosity for BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutations: clinical, pathological, and family characteristics.

    PubMed

    Zuradelli, Monica; Peissel, Bernard; Manoukian, Siranoush; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Barile, Monica; Pensotti, Valeria; Cavallari, Ugo; Masci, Giovanna; Mariette, Frederique; Benski, Anne Caroline; Santoro, Armando; Radice, Paolo

    2010-11-01

    Double heterozygosity (DH) for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations is a very rare finding, particularly in non-Ashkenazi individuals, and only a few cases have been reported to date. In addition, little is known on the pathological features of the tumors that occur in DH cases and on their family history of cancer. Four carriers of pathogenic mutations in both BRCA1 and BRCA2 were identified among women who underwent genetic counseling for hereditary susceptibility to breast and ovarian carcinoma at three different Italian institutions. Clinical, pathological, and family history data were collected from medical records and during genetic counseling sessions. All identified DH cases developed breast carcinoma and three of them were also diagnosed with ovarian carcinoma. Mean ages of breast and ovarian cancer diagnosis were 42.7 and 48.6 years, respectively. The majority of breast cancers showed a BRCA1-related phenotype, being negative for hormone receptors and HER2. Two cases reported different gastrointestinal tumors among relatives. Although the individuals described in this study show more severe clinical features in comparison to previously reported BRCA1 and BRCA2 DH cases, our observations support the hypothesis of a non specific phenotype of DH cases in terms of age of disease onset. In addition, our observations indicate that in DH patients breast carcinogenesis appears to be driven mainly by the mutations in BRCA1. The possible association of DH for BRCA gene mutations with gastrointestinal tumors is in keeping with previous reports, but needs to be confirmed by further analyses.

  9. Modifiers of the Efficacy of Risk-Reducing Salpingo-Oophorectomy for the Prevention of Breast and Ovarian Cancer in Carriers of BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-01

    Reducing Salpingo-Oophorectomy for the Prevention of Breast and Ovarian Cancer in Carriers of BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutations PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...Reducing Salpingo-Oophorectomy for the Prevention of Breast and Ovarian Cancer in Carriers of BRCA1 and BRCA2 5b. GRANT NUMBER DAMD17-03-1-0375...comprehensive training plan to foster the transition to independent clinical breast cancer researcher. This plan included: 1) conduct of a prospective

  10. Association of BRCA Mutation Types, Imaging Features, and Pathologic Findings in Patients With Breast Cancer With BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutations.

    PubMed

    Ha, Su Min; Chae, Eun Young; Cha, Joo Hee; Kim, Hak Hee; Shin, Hee Jung; Choi, Woo Jung

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to retrospectively evaluate the relationships between the BRCA mutation types, imaging features, and pathologic findings of breast cancers in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. We identified patients with breast cancer with BRCA gene mutations from January 2000 to December 2014. After excluding patients who underwent lesion excision before MRI, 99 BRCA1 and 103 BRCA2 lesions in 187 women (mean age, 39.7 and 40.4 years, respectively) were enrolled. Mammographic, sonographic, and MRI scans were reviewed according to the BI-RADS lexicon (5th edition). Pathologic data were reviewed, including the immunohistochemistry findings. The relationships between the BRCA mutations and both imaging and pathologic findings were analyzed. The distribution of molecular subtypes of tumors significantly differed by the mutation type. BRCA1 tumors were associated with the triple-negative subtype, whereas BRCA2 tumors were associated with the luminal B subtype (p = 0.002). At MRI, breast cancers with BRCA1 mutations exhibited a circumscribed margin (p = 0.032) and rim enhancement (p = 0.013). No significant differences in mass shape or kinetic features were observed at MRI. Cancers in BRCA1 mutation carriers tended to develop in the posterior location in the breast (p = 0.034). At mammography, no significant difference in the prevalence of calcifications was observed according to the mutation type. At sonography, BRCA1 lesions were found to be associated with posterior acoustic enhancement (p < 0.0001). Breast cancers with BRCA1 mutations tend to exhibit benign morphologic features at MRI, mammography, and sonography, compared with BRCA2 mutations. Lesion location may represent another difference on imaging among various genetic phenotypes.

  11. Evaluation of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations and risk-prediction models in a typical Asian country (Malaysia) with a relatively low incidence of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Thirthagiri, E; Lee, S Y; Kang, P; Lee, D S; Toh, G T; Selamat, S; Yoon, S-Y; Taib, N A Mohd; Thong, M K; Yip, C H; Teo, S H

    2008-01-01

    The cost of genetic testing and the limited knowledge about the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes in different ethnic groups has limited its availability in medium- and low-resource countries, including Malaysia. In addition, the applicability of many risk-assessment tools, such as the Manchester Scoring System and BOADICEA (Breast and Ovarian Analysis of Disease Incidence and Carrier Estimation Algorithm) which were developed based on mutation rates observed primarily in Caucasian populations using data from multiplex families, and in populations where the rate of breast cancer is higher, has not been widely tested in Asia or in Asians living elsewhere. Here, we report the results of genetic testing for mutations in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes in a series of families with breast cancer in the multi-ethnic population (Malay, Chinese and Indian) of Malaysia. A total of 187 breast cancer patients with either early-onset breast cancer (at age BRCA2. Two algorithms to predict the presence of mutations, the Manchester Scoring System and BOADICEA, were evaluated. Twenty-seven deleterious mutations were detected (14 in BRCA1 and 13 in BRCA2), only one of which was found in two unrelated individuals (BRCA2 490 delCT). In addition, 47 variants of uncertain clinical significance were identified (16 in BRCA1 and 31 in BRCA2). Notably, many mutations are novel (13 of the 30 BRCA1 mutations and 24 of the 44 BRCA2). We report that while there were an equal proportion of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in the Chinese population in our study, there were significantly more BRCA2 mutations among the Malays. In addition, we show that the predictive power of the BOADICEA risk-prediction model and the Manchester Scoring System was significantly better for BRCA1 than BRCA2, but that the overall sensitivity, specificity and positive-predictive value was lower in this

  12. Double PALB2 and BRCA1/BRCA2 mutation carriers are rare in breast cancer and breast-ovarian cancer syndrome families from the French Canadian founder population.

    PubMed

    Ancot, Frédéric; Arcand, Suzanna L; Mes-Masson, Anne-Marie; Provencher, Diane M; Tonin, Patricia N

    2015-06-01

    French Canadian families with breast cancer and breast-ovarian cancer syndrome harbor specific BRCA1, BRCA2 and PALB2 germline mutations, which have been attributed to common founders. Mutations in these genes confer an increased risk to breast and ovarian cancers, and have been identified to play a role in and directly interact with the common homologous recombination DNA repair pathways. Our previous study described the case of a female diagnosed with breast cancer at 45 years old, who harbored the PALB2:c.2323C>T [p.Q775X] and BRCA2:c.9004G>A [p.E3002K] germline mutations, which have been found to recur in the French Canadian cancer families. As the frequency of double heterozygous carriers of breast-ovarian cancer susceptibility alleles is unknown, and due to the possibility that there may be implications for genetic counseling and management for these carriers, the present study investigated the co-occurrence of BRCA1/BRCA2 and PALB2 mutations in the French Canadian cancer families. The PALB2:c.2323C>T [p.Q775X] mutation, which is the only PALB2 mutation to have been identified in French Canadian cancer families, was screened in 214 breast cancer cases and 22 breast-ovarian cancer cases from 114 BRCA1/BRCA2 mutation-positive French Canadian breast cancer (n=61) and breast-ovarian cancer (n=53) families using a tailored polymerase chain reaction-based TaqMan® SNP Genotyping Assay. No additional PALB2:c.2323C>T [p.Q775X] mutation carriers were identified among the BRCA1/BRCA2 mutation carriers. The results suggest that carriers of the PALB2:c.2323C>T [p.Q775X] mutation rarely co-occur in French Canadian breast cancer and breast-ovarian cancer families harboring BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations.

  13. Impact of Oophorectomy on Cancer Incidence and Mortality in Women With a BRCA1 or BRCA2 Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Finch, Amy P.M.; Lubinski, Jan; Møller, Pål; Singer, Christian F.; Karlan, Beth; Senter, Leigha; Rosen, Barry; Maehle, Lovise; Ghadirian, Parviz; Cybulski, Cezary; Huzarski, Tomasz; Eisen, Andrea; Foulkes, William D.; Kim-Sing, Charmaine; Ainsworth, Peter; Tung, Nadine; Lynch, Henry T.; Neuhausen, Susan; Metcalfe, Kelly A.; Thompson, Islay; Murphy, Joan; Sun, Ping; Narod, Steven A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purposes of this study were to estimate the reduction in risk of ovarian, fallopian tube, or peritoneal cancer in women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation after oophorectomy, by age of oophorectomy; to estimate the impact of prophylactic oophorectomy on all-cause mortality; and to estimate 5-year survival associated with clinically detected ovarian, occult, and peritoneal cancers diagnosed in the cohort. Patients and Methods Women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation were identified from an international registry; 5,783 women completed a baseline questionnaire and ≥ one follow-up questionnaires. Women were observed until either diagnosis of ovarian, fallopian tube, or peritoneal cancer, death, or date of most recent follow-up. Hazard ratios (HRs) for cancer incidence and all-cause mortality associated with oophorectomy were evaluated using time-dependent survival analyses. Results After an average follow-up period of 5.6 years, 186 women developed either ovarian (n = 132), fallopian (n = 22), or peritoneal (n = 32) cancer, of whom 68 have died. HR for ovarian, fallopian, or peritoneal cancer associated with bilateral oophorectomy was 0.20 (95% CI, 0.13 to 0.30; P < .001). Among women who had no history of cancer at baseline, HR for all-cause mortality to age 70 years associated with an oophorectomy was 0.23 (95% CI, 0.13 to 0.39; P < .001). Conclusion Preventive oophorectomy was associated with an 80% reduction in the risk of ovarian, fallopian tube, or peritoneal cancer in BRCA1 or BRCA2 carriers and a 77% reduction in all-cause mortality. PMID:24567435

  14. Impact of oophorectomy on cancer incidence and mortality in women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation.

    PubMed

    Finch, Amy P M; Lubinski, Jan; Møller, Pål; Singer, Christian F; Karlan, Beth; Senter, Leigha; Rosen, Barry; Maehle, Lovise; Ghadirian, Parviz; Cybulski, Cezary; Huzarski, Tomasz; Eisen, Andrea; Foulkes, William D; Kim-Sing, Charmaine; Ainsworth, Peter; Tung, Nadine; Lynch, Henry T; Neuhausen, Susan; Metcalfe, Kelly A; Thompson, Islay; Murphy, Joan; Sun, Ping; Narod, Steven A

    2014-05-20

    The purposes of this study were to estimate the reduction in risk of ovarian, fallopian tube, or peritoneal cancer in women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation after oophorectomy, by age of oophorectomy; to estimate the impact of prophylactic oophorectomy on all-cause mortality; and to estimate 5-year survival associated with clinically detected ovarian, occult, and peritoneal cancers diagnosed in the cohort. Women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation were identified from an international registry; 5,783 women completed a baseline questionnaire and ≥ one follow-up questionnaires. Women were observed until either diagnosis of ovarian, fallopian tube, or peritoneal cancer, death, or date of most recent follow-up. Hazard ratios (HRs) for cancer incidence and all-cause mortality associated with oophorectomy were evaluated using time-dependent survival analyses. After an average follow-up period of 5.6 years, 186 women developed either ovarian (n = 132), fallopian (n = 22), or peritoneal (n = 32) cancer, of whom 68 have died. HR for ovarian, fallopian, or peritoneal cancer associated with bilateral oophorectomy was 0.20 (95% CI, 0.13 to 0.30; P < .001). Among women who had no history of cancer at baseline, HR for all-cause mortality to age 70 years associated with an oophorectomy was 0.23 (95% CI, 0.13 to 0.39; P < .001). Preventive oophorectomy was associated with an 80% reduction in the risk of ovarian, fallopian tube, or peritoneal cancer in BRCA1 or BRCA2 carriers and a 77% reduction in all-cause mortality. © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  15. No association of TGFB1 L10P genotypes and breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers: a multi-center cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Antoniou, Antonis C.; Llopis, Trinidad Caldes; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Simard, Jacques; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Couch, Fergus J.; Pereira, Lutecia H. Mateus; Greene, Mark H.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Pasche, Boris; Kaklamani, Virginia; Hamann, Ute; Szabo, Csilla; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Harrington, Patricia A.; Donaldson, Alan; Male, Allison M.; Gardiner, Carol Anne; Gregory, Helen; Side, Lucy E.; Robinson, Anne C.; Emmerson, Louise; Ellis, Ian; Peyrat, Jean-Philippe; Fournier, Joëlle; Vennin, Philippe; Adenis, Claude; Muller, Danièle; Fricker, Jean-Pierre; Longy, Michel; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Versmold, Beatrix; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Kast, Karin; Schaefer, Dieter; Froster, Ursula G.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.

    2008-01-01

    Background The transforming growth factor β-1 gene (TGFB1) is a plausible candidate for breast cancer susceptibility. The L10P variant of TGFB1 is associated with higher circulating levels and secretion of TGF-β, and recent large-scale studies suggest strongly that this variant is associated with breast cancer risk in the general population. Methods To evaluate whether TGFB1 L10P also modifies the risk of breast cancer in BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers, we undertook a multi-center study of 3,442 BRCA1 and 2,095 BRCA2 mutation carriers. Results We found no evidence of association between TGFB1 L10P and breast cancer risk in either BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. The per-allele HR for the L10P variant was 1.01 (95%CI: 0.92–1.11) in BRCA1 carriers and 0.92 (95%CI: 0.81–1.04) in BRCA2 mutation carriers. Conclusions These results do not support the hypothesis that TGFB1 L10P genotypes modify the risk of breast cancer in BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. PMID:18523885

  16. Cancer Incidence in First- and Second-Degree Relatives of BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers.

    PubMed

    Streff, Haley; Profato, Jessica; Ye, Yuanqing; Nebgen, Denise; Peterson, Susan K; Singletary, Claire; Arun, Banu K; Litton, Jennifer K

    2016-07-01

    Mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are associated with increased risk of breast, ovarian, and several other cancers. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the incidence of cancer in first- and second-degree relatives of BRCA mutation carriers compared with the general population. A total of 1,086 pedigrees of BRCA mutation carriers was obtained from a prospectively maintained, internal review board-approved study of persons referred for clinical genetic counseling at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. We identified 9,032 first- and second-degree relatives from 784 pedigrees that had demonstrated a clear indication of parental origin of mutation. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were used to compare the observed incidence of 20 primary cancer sites to the expected incidence of each cancer based on the calculated risk estimates according to each subject's age, sex, and ethnicity. BRCA1 families had increased SIRs for breast and ovarian cancer (p < .001) and decreased SIRs for kidney, lung, prostate, and thyroid cancer and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (p < .001). BRCA2 families had increased SIRs for breast, ovarian, and pancreatic cancer (p < .001) and decreased SIRs for kidney, lung, thyroid, and uterine cancer and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (p < .0025). Analysis of only first-degree relatives (n = 4,099) identified no decreased SIRs and agreed with the increased SIRs observed in the overall study population. We have confirmed previous reports of an association between breast, ovarian, and pancreatic cancers with BRCA mutations. Additional research to quantify the relative risks of these cancers for BRCA mutation carriers can help tailor recommendations for risk reduction and enhance genetic counseling. BRCA gene mutations have been well described to carry an increased risk of both breast and ovarian cancer. However, the implications and risks of other cancers continues to be investigated. Evaluating the risks for other cancers further is

  17. Prevalence of BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations in a Brazilian population sample at-risk for hereditary breast cancer and characterization of its genetic ancestry

    PubMed Central

    Paula, André E.; Pereira, Rui; Andrade, Carlos E.; Felicio, Paula S.; Souza, Cristiano P.; Mendes, Deise R.P.; Volc, Sahlua; Berardinelli, Gustavo N.; Grasel, Rebeca S.; Sabato, Cristina S.; Viana, Danilo V.; Machado, José Carlos; Costa, José Luis; Mauad, Edmundo C.; Scapulatempo-Neto, Cristovam; Arun, Banu; Reis, Rui M.; Palmero, Edenir I.

    2016-01-01

    Background There are very few data about the mutational profile of families at-risk for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) from Latin America (LA) and especially from Brazil, the largest and most populated country in LA. Results Of the 349 probands analyzed, 21.5% were BRCA1/BRCA2 mutated, 65.3% at BRCA1 and 34.7% at BRCA2 gene. The mutation c.5266dupC (former 5382insC) was the most frequent alteration, representing 36.7% of the BRCA1 mutations and 24.0% of all mutations identified. Together with the BRCA1 c.3331_3334delCAAG mutation, these mutations constitutes about 35% of the identified mutations and more than 50% of the BRCA1 pathogenic mutations. Interestingly, six new mutations were identified. Additionally, 39 out of the 44 pathogenic mutations identified were not previously reported in the Brazilian population. Besides, 36 different variants of unknown significance (VUS) were identified. Regarding ancestry, average ancestry proportions were 70.6% European, 14.5% African, 8.0% Native American and 6.8% East Asian. Materials and methods This study characterized 349 Brazilian families at-risk for HBOC regarding their germline BRCA1/BRCA2 status and genetic ancestry. Conclusions This is the largest report of BRCA1/BRCA2 assessment in an at-risk HBOC Brazilian population. We identified 21.5% of patients harboring BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations and characterized the genetic ancestry of a sample group at-risk for hereditary breast cancer showing once again how admixed is the Brazilian population. No association was found between genetic ancestry and mutational status. The knowledge of the mutational profile in a population can contribute to the definition of more cost-effective strategies for the identification of HBOC families. PMID:27741520

  18. A non-synonymous polymorphism in IRS1 modifies risk of developing breast and ovarian cancers in BRCA1 and ovarian cancer in BRCA2 mutation carriers

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yuan C.; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Friedman, Eitan; Laitman, Yael; Shani-Shimon–Paluch; Kaufman, Bella; Liljegren, Annelie; Lindblom, Annika; Olsson, Håkan; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Melin, Beatrice; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Gronwald, Jacek; Huzarski, Tomasz; Cybulski, Cezary; Byrski, Tomasz; Osorio, Ana; Cajal, Teresa Ramóny; Stavropoulou, Alexandra V; Benítez, Javier; Hamann, Ute; Rookus, Matti; Aalfs, Cora M.; de Lange, Judith L.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E.J.; Oosterwijk, Jan C.; van Asperen, Christi J.; García, Encarna B. Gómez; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Jager, Agnes; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Easton, Douglas F.; Peock, Susan; Frost, Debra; Ellis, Steve D.; Platte, Radka; Fineberg, Elena; Evans, D. Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Izatt, Louise; Eeles, Ros; Adlard, Julian; Davidson, Rosemarie; Eccles, Diana; Cole, Trevor; Cook, Jackie; Brewer, Carole; Tischkowitz, Marc; Godwin, Andrew K.; Pathak, Harsh; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Barjhoux, Laure; Léoné, Mélanie; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Caux-Moncoutier, Virginie; de Pauw, Antoine; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Dreyfus, Hélène; Ferrer, Sandra Fert; Collonge-Rame, Marie-Agnès; Sokolowska, Johanna; Buys, Saundra; Daly, Mary; Miron, Alex; Terry, Mary Beth; Chung, Wendy; John, Esther M; Southey, Melissa; Goldgar, David; Singer, Christian F; Maria, Muy-Kheng Tea; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Hansen, Thomas v. O.; Ejlertsen, Bent; Johannsson, Oskar Th.; Offit, Kenneth; Sarrel, Kara; Gaudet, Mia M.; Vijai, Joseph; Robson, Mark; Piedmonte, Marion R; Andrews, Lesley; Cohn, David; DeMars, Leslie R.; DiSilvestro, Paul; Rodriguez, Gustavo; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Montagna, Marco; Agata, Simona; Imyanitov, Evgeny; Isaacs, Claudine; Janavicius, Ramunas; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Ramus, Susan J; Sucheston, Lara; Karlan, Beth Y.; Gross, Jenny; Ganz, Patricia A.; Beattie, Mary S.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Meindl, Alfons; Arnold, Norbert; Niederacher, Dieter; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Gadzicki, Dorotehea; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Deissler, Helmut; Gehrig, Andrea; Sutter, Christian; Kast, Karin; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Simard, Jacques; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Tomlinson, Gail E.; Weitzel, Jeffrey; Garber, Judy E.; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Rubinstein, Wendy S.; Tung, Nadine; Blum, Joanne L.; Narod, Steven A.; Brummel, Sean; Gillen, Daniel L.; Lindor, Noralane; Fredericksen, Zachary; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Couch, Fergus J.; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Greene, Mark H.; Loud, Jennifer T.; Mai, Phuong L.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Thomassen, Mads; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Caligo, Maria A.; Lee, Andrew; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C; Neuhausen, Susan L.

    2012-01-01

    Background We previously reported significant associations between genetic variants in insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1) and breast cancer risk in women carrying BRCA1 mutations. The objectives of this study were to investigate whether the IRS1 variants modified ovarian cancer risk and were associated with breast cancer risk in a larger cohort of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Methods IRS1 rs1801123, rs1330645, and rs1801278 were genotyped in samples from 36 centers in the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA). Data were analyzed by a retrospective cohort approach modeling the associations with breast and ovarian cancer risks simultaneously. Analyses were stratified by BRCA1 and BRCA2 status and mutation class in BRCA1 carriers. Results Rs1801278 (Gly972Arg) was associated with ovarian cancer risk for both BRCA1 [Hazard ratio (HR) = 1.43; 95% CI: 1.06–1.92; p = 0.019] and BRCA2 mutation carriers (HR=2.21; 95% CI: 1.39–3.52, p=0.0008). For BRCA1 mutation carriers, the breast cancer risk was higher in carriers with class 2 mutations than class 1 (mutations (class 2 HR=1.86, 95% CI: 1.28–2.70; class 1 HR=0.86, 95%CI:0.69–1.09; p-for difference=0.0006). Rs13306465 was associated with ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 class 2 mutation carriers (HR = 2.42; p = 0.03). Conclusion The IRS1 Gly972Arg SNP, which affects insulin-like growth factor and insulin signaling, modifies ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers and breast cancer risk in BRCA1 class 2 mutation carriers. Impact These findings may prove useful for risk prediction for breast and ovarian cancers in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. PMID:22729394

  19. A nonsynonymous polymorphism in IRS1 modifies risk of developing breast and ovarian cancers in BRCA1 and ovarian cancer in BRCA2 mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yuan C; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Friedman, Eitan; Laitman, Yael; Paluch-Shimon, Shani-; Kaufman, Bella; Liljegren, Annelie; Lindblom, Annika; Olsson, Håkan; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Melin, Beatrice; Domchek, Susan M; Nathanson, Katherine L; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Gronwald, Jacek; Huzarski, Tomasz; Cybulski, Cezary; Byrski, Tomasz; Osorio, Ana; Cajal, Teresa Ramóny; Stavropoulou, Alexandra V; Benítez, Javier; Hamann, Ute; Rookus, Matti; Aalfs, Cora M; de Lange, Judith L; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E J; Oosterwijk, Jan C; van Asperen, Christi J; Gómez García, Encarna B; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Jager, Agnes; van der Luijt, Rob B; Easton, Douglas F; Peock, Susan; Frost, Debra; Ellis, Steve D; Platte, Radka; Fineberg, Elena; Evans, D Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Izatt, Louise; Eeles, Ros; Adlard, Julian; Davidson, Rosemarie; Eccles, Diana; Cole, Trevor; Cook, Jackie; Brewer, Carole; Tischkowitz, Marc; Godwin, Andrew K; Pathak, Harsh; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Barjhoux, Laure; Léoné, Mélanie; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Caux-Moncoutier, Virginie; de Pauw, Antoine; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Dreyfus, Hélène; Ferrer, Sandra Fert; Collonge-Rame, Marie-Agnès; Sokolowska, Johanna; Buys, Saundra; Daly, Mary; Miron, Alex; Terry, Mary Beth; Chung, Wendy; John, Esther M; Southey, Melissa; Goldgar, David; Singer, Christian F; Tea, Muy-Kheng Maria; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Hansen, Thomas V O; Ejlertsen, Bent; Johannsson, Oskar T; Offit, Kenneth; Sarrel, Kara; Gaudet, Mia M; Vijai, Joseph; Robson, Mark; Piedmonte, Marion R; Andrews, Lesley; Cohn, David; DeMars, Leslie R; DiSilvestro, Paul; Rodriguez, Gustavo; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Montagna, Marco; Agata, Simona; Imyanitov, Evgeny; Isaacs, Claudine; Janavicius, Ramunas; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Ramus, Susan J; Sucheston, Lara; Karlan, Beth Y; Gross, Jenny; Ganz, Patricia A; Beattie, Mary S; Schmutzler, Rita K; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Meindl, Alfons; Arnold, Norbert; Niederacher, Dieter; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Gadzicki, Dorotehea; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Deissler, Helmut; Gehrig, Andrea; Sutter, Christian; Kast, Karin; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Simard, Jacques; Spurdle, Amanda B; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Tomlinson, Gail E; Weitzel, Jeffrey; Garber, Judy E; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Rubinstein, Wendy S; Tung, Nadine; Blum, Joanne L; Narod, Steven A; Brummel, Sean; Gillen, Daniel L; Lindor, Noralane; Fredericksen, Zachary; Pankratz, Vernon S; Couch, Fergus J; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Greene, Mark H; Loud, Jennifer T; Mai, Phuong L; Andrulis, Irene L; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Thomassen, Mads; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Caligo, Maria A; Lee, Andrew; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C; Neuhausen, Susan L

    2012-08-01

    We previously reported significant associations between genetic variants in insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1) and breast cancer risk in women carrying BRCA1 mutations. The objectives of this study were to investigate whether the IRS1 variants modified ovarian cancer risk and were associated with breast cancer risk in a larger cohort of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. IRS1 rs1801123, rs1330645, and rs1801278 were genotyped in samples from 36 centers in the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA). Data were analyzed by a retrospective cohort approach modeling the associations with breast and ovarian cancer risks simultaneously. Analyses were stratified by BRCA1 and BRCA2 status and mutation class in BRCA1 carriers. Rs1801278 (Gly972Arg) was associated with ovarian cancer risk for both BRCA1 (HR, 1.43; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.06-1.92; P = 0.019) and BRCA2 mutation carriers (HR, 2.21; 95% CI, 1.39-3.52, P = 0.0008). For BRCA1 mutation carriers, the breast cancer risk was higher in carriers with class II mutations than class I mutations (class II HR, 1.86; 95% CI, 1.28-2.70; class I HR, 0.86; 95%CI, 0.69-1.09; P(difference), 0.0006). Rs13306465 was associated with ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 class II mutation carriers (HR, 2.42; P = 0.03). The IRS1 Gly972Arg single-nucleotide polymorphism, which affects insulin-like growth factor and insulin signaling, modifies ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers and breast cancer risk in BRCA1 class II mutation carriers. These findings may prove useful for risk prediction for breast and ovarian cancers in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. ©2012 AACR.

  20. [Genotyping of BRCA1, BRCA2 and CHEK2 germline mutations in Russian breast cancer patients using diagnostic biochips].

    PubMed

    Nasedkina, T V; Gromyko, O E; Emel'ianova, M A; Ignatova, E O; Kazubskaia, T P; Portnoĭ, S M; Zasedatelev, A S; Liubchenko, L N

    2014-01-01

    Germline mutations of BRCA1/2 genes cause the predisposition of their carriers to breast or/and ovary cancers (BC or/and OC) during the lifetime. Identification of these mutations is a basis of molecular diagnosis for BC susceptibility. Rapid genotyping technique using microarrays for identification of BRCA1 185delAG, 300T>G, 4153delA, 5382insC mutations and 4158 A>G sequence variant; BRCA2 695insT and 6174delT mutations; 1100delC mutation in CHEK2 gene was applied for 412 randomly collected breast cancer samples from the central region of European area of Russia. In 25 (6.0%) patients (6.0%) BC was associated with other tumours: OC, cervical cancer, colorectal cancer etc. BRCA1/2 and CHEK2 mutations were found in 33 (8.0%) BC patients. The most frequent mutation was BRCA1 5382insC, occurred in 16 (3.9%) BC patients, and CHEK2 1100delC, revealed in 7 (1.7%) BC patients. An application of diagnostic BC-microarray for genetic testing of BRCA1/2 and CHEK2 founder mutations has been discussed.

  1. Interpersonal Responses Among Sibling Dyads Tested for BRCA1/BRCA2 Gene Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Hamann, Heidi A.; Croyle, Robert T.; Smith, Timothy W.; Smith, Ken R.; Ruiz, John M.; Kircher, John C.; Botkin, Jeffrey R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The familial context plays an important role in psychosocial responses to genetic testing. The purpose of this study was to compare sibling pairs with different combinations of BRCA1/BRCA2 test results on measures of affect, interpersonal responses, and physiological reactions. Design Forty-nine sibling dyads with different combinations of BRCA1/BRCA2 test results (i.e., mixed, positive, negative) completed a questionnaire, and 35 of the dyads also participated in a laboratory-based discussion of genetic testing. Main Outcome Measures The primary outcome variables included participant reports of supportive actions toward their sibling, state anger and anxiety, perceptions of sibling behavior, and electrodermal responses. Results Compared to positive and negative dyads, mixed pairs reported less friendly general support actions, noted more anger, and perceived their sibling to be less friendly and more dominant during the interactions. In comparisons between same-result (i.e., positive, negative) pairs, positive dyads reported more dominant support behaviors and perceived their sibling to be friendlier during the interactions. Conclusion Data suggest that siblings who have different test results may experience more interpersonal strain than siblings who have the same test result. Future research on genetic testing and family relationships can expand upon these findings. PMID:18230020

  2. Decision-making process of women carrying a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation who have chosen prophylactic mastectomy.

    PubMed

    McQuirter, Megan; Castiglia, Luisa Luciani; Loiselle, Carmen G; Wong, Nora

    2010-05-01

    To explore the decision-making process of women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene mutation who have chosen to undergo prophylactic mastectomy. Cross-sectional, qualitative, descriptive design. Participants were recruited from an outpatient cancer prevention center in the oncology and medical genetics departments of a large university-affiliated hospital in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. 10 women carrying a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation; 8 previously had had a prophylactic mastectomy and 2 were scheduled for surgery at the time of study. Semistructured, in-depth interviews were conducted. Field notes were written and audiotapes were transcribed verbatim. The textual data were coded and analyzed. Decision-making process for prophylactic mastectomy. Two broad findings emerged. First, several intrapersonal and contextual factors interacted throughout the process to move women either closer to choosing a prophylactic mastectomy or further from the decision. Second, all women reported experiencing a "pivotal point," an emotionally charged event when the decision to have a prophylactic mastectomy became definitive. Pivotal points for patients included either receiving a positive result for a genetic mutation or a breast cancer diagnosis for herself or a family member in the context of positive mutation status. Decision making about prophylactic mastectomy was an affective and intuitive process incorporating contexts and their relations rather than a rational, straight-forward process of weighing pros and cons. Supportive interventions for women in this population should explicitly address the individual and the inter-relationships of contextual factors that shape decision making about prophylactic mastectomy while recognizing important affective components involved.

  3. A case of gastric cancer metastasis to the breast in a female with BRCA2 germline mutation and literature review.

    PubMed

    Dulskas, Audrius; Al Bandar, Mahdi; Choi, Yoon Young; Shin, Su-Jin; Beom, Seung-Hoon; Son, Taeil; Kim, Hyung-Il; Cheong, Jae-Ho; Hyung, Woo Jin; Noh, Sung Hoon

    2017-12-05

    Gastric cancer is a deadly disease. Common sites of distant metastasis of gastric cancer are the peritoneum, liver, lymph nodes, and lung. The breast is a rare site of metastasis in gastric cancer which occurs in males dominantly. Here, we report the first case of metastatic gastric cancer to the breast in a patient with the breast cancer 2 (BRCA2) germline mutation. A 34-year-old female was admitted to the hospital with dyspepsia and a palpable mass in the left breast. Gastric cancer was confirmed to be signet ring cell adenocarcinoma. The breast mass exhibited histological properties consistent with gastric cancer. Immunohistochemistry results showed the breast tumor was CDX-2 and CK20-positive, but ER-, CK7-, and GATA3-negative. The BRCA1 gene had a wild-type sequence, but a heterozygous variant was discovered in BRCA2 in exon 10 (c.1744A > C, p.T582P); the significance of this variant is unknown. The patient received palliative XELOX (capecitabine + oxaliplatin) with radiation therapy to the stomach. The breast tumor resolved completely, but the overall response was partial. Gastric cancer metastasis to the breast is rare, but should be considered in young female patients with signet ring cell type gastric cancer.

  4. Fine-Scale Mapping at 9p22.2 Identifies Candidate Causal Variants That Modify Ovarian Cancer Risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers.

    PubMed

    Vigorito, Elena; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Beesley, Jonathan; Adlard, Julian; Agnarsson, Bjarni A; Andrulis, Irene L; Arun, Banu K; Barjhoux, Laure; Belotti, Muriel; Benitez, Javier; Berger, Andreas; Bojesen, Anders; Bonanni, Bernardo; Brewer, Carole; Caldes, Trinidad; Caligo, Maria A; Campbell, Ian; Chan, Salina B; Claes, Kathleen B M; Cohn, David E; Cook, Jackie; Daly, Mary B; Damiola, Francesca; Davidson, Rosemarie; Pauw, Antoine de; Delnatte, Capucine; Diez, Orland; Domchek, Susan M; Dumont, Martine; Durda, Katarzyna; Dworniczak, Bernd; Easton, Douglas F; Eccles, Diana; Edwinsdotter Ardnor, Christina; Eeles, Ros; Ejlertsen, Bent; Ellis, Steve; Evans, D Gareth; Feliubadalo, Lidia; Fostira, Florentia; Foulkes, William D; Friedman, Eitan; Frost, Debra; Gaddam, Pragna; Ganz, Patricia A; Garber, Judy; Garcia-Barberan, Vanesa; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Gehrig, Andrea; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Giraud, Sophie; Godwin, Andrew K; Goldgar, David E; Hake, Christopher R; Hansen, Thomas V O; Healey, Sue; Hodgson, Shirley; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Houdayer, Claude; Hulick, Peter J; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Isaacs, Claudine; Izatt, Louise; Izquierdo, Angel; Jacobs, Lauren; Jakubowska, Anna; Janavicius, Ramunas; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Jensen, Uffe Birk; John, Esther M; Vijai, Joseph; Karlan, Beth Y; Kast, Karin; Investigators, KConFab; Khan, Sofia; Kwong, Ava; Laitman, Yael; Lester, Jenny; Lesueur, Fabienne; Liljegren, Annelie; Lubinski, Jan; Mai, Phuong L; Manoukian, Siranoush; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Meindl, Alfons; Mensenkamp, Arjen R; Montagna, Marco; Nathanson, Katherine L; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Niederacher, Dieter; Olah, Edith; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Ong, Kai-Ren; Osorio, Ana; Park, Sue Kyung; Paulsson-Karlsson, Ylva; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Peissel, Bernard; Peterlongo, Paolo; Pfeiler, Georg; Phelan, Catherine M; Piedmonte, Marion; Poppe, Bruce; Pujana, Miquel Angel; Radice, Paolo; Rennert, Gad; Rodriguez, Gustavo C; Rookus, Matti A; Ross, Eric A; Schmutzler, Rita Katharina; Simard, Jacques; Singer, Christian F; Slavin, Thomas P; Soucy, Penny; Southey, Melissa; Steinemann, Doris; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Sutter, Christian; Szabo, Csilla I; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Teixeira, Manuel R; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Mary Beth; Thomassen, Mads; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Tihomirova, Laima; Tognazzo, Silvia; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Varesco, Liliana; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Vratimos, Athanassios; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; McGuffog, Lesley; Kirk, Judy; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Hamann, Ute; Lindor, Noralane; Ramus, Susan J; Greene, Mark H; Couch, Fergus J; Offit, Kenneth; Pharoah, Paul D P; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C

    2016-01-01

    Population-based genome wide association studies have identified a locus at 9p22.2 associated with ovarian cancer risk, which also modifies ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. We conducted fine-scale mapping at 9p22.2 to identify potential causal variants in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Genotype data were available for 15,252 (2,462 ovarian cancer cases) BRCA1 and 8,211 (631 ovarian cancer cases) BRCA2 mutation carriers. Following genotype imputation, ovarian cancer associations were assessed for 4,873 and 5,020 SNPs in BRCA1 and BRCA 2 mutation carriers respectively, within a retrospective cohort analytical framework. In BRCA1 mutation carriers one set of eight correlated candidate causal variants for ovarian cancer risk modification was identified (top SNP rs10124837, HR: 0.73, 95%CI: 0.68 to 0.79, p-value 2× 10-16). These variants were located up to 20 kb upstream of BNC2. In BRCA2 mutation carriers one region, up to 45 kb upstream of BNC2, and containing 100 correlated SNPs was identified as candidate causal (top SNP rs62543585, HR: 0.69, 95%CI: 0.59 to 0.80, p-value 1.0 × 10-6). The candidate causal in BRCA1 mutation carriers did not include the strongest associated variant at this locus in the general population. In sum, we identified a set of candidate causal variants in a region that encompasses the BNC2 transcription start site. The ovarian cancer association at 9p22.2 may be mediated by different variants in BRCA1 mutation carriers and in the general population. Thus, potentially different mechanisms may underlie ovarian cancer risk for mutation carriers and the general population.

  5. Fine-Scale Mapping at 9p22.2 Identifies Candidate Causal Variants That Modify Ovarian Cancer Risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Vigorito, Elena; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Beesley, Jonathan; Adlard, Julian; Agnarsson, Bjarni A.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Arun, Banu K.; Barjhoux, Laure; Belotti, Muriel; Benitez, Javier; Berger, Andreas; Bojesen, Anders; Bonanni, Bernardo; Brewer, Carole; Caldes, Trinidad; Caligo, Maria A.; Campbell, Ian; Chan, Salina B.; Claes, Kathleen B. M.; Cohn, David E.; Cook, Jackie; Daly, Mary B.; Damiola, Francesca; Davidson, Rosemarie; de Pauw, Antoine; Delnatte, Capucine; Diez, Orland; Domchek, Susan M.; Dumont, Martine; Durda, Katarzyna; Dworniczak, Bernd; Easton, Douglas F.; Eccles, Diana; Edwinsdotter Ardnor, Christina; Eeles, Ros; Ejlertsen, Bent; Ellis, Steve; Evans, D. Gareth; Feliubadalo, Lidia; Fostira, Florentia; Foulkes, William D.; Friedman, Eitan; Frost, Debra; Gaddam, Pragna; Ganz, Patricia A.; Garber, Judy; Garcia-Barberan, Vanesa; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Gehrig, Andrea; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Giraud, Sophie; Godwin, Andrew K.; Goldgar, David E.; Hake, Christopher R.; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Healey, Sue; Hodgson, Shirley; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Houdayer, Claude; Hulick, Peter J.; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Isaacs, Claudine; Izatt, Louise; Izquierdo, Angel; Jacobs, Lauren; Jakubowska, Anna; Janavicius, Ramunas; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Jensen, Uffe Birk; John, Esther M.; Vijai, Joseph; Karlan, Beth Y.; Kast, Karin; Investigators, KConFab; Khan, Sofia; Kwong, Ava; Laitman, Yael; Lester, Jenny; Lesueur, Fabienne; Liljegren, Annelie; Lubinski, Jan; Mai, Phuong L.; Manoukian, Siranoush; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Meindl, Alfons; Mensenkamp, Arjen R.; Montagna, Marco; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Niederacher, Dieter; Olah, Edith; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Ong, Kai-ren; Osorio, Ana; Park, Sue Kyung; Paulsson-Karlsson, Ylva; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Peissel, Bernard; Peterlongo, Paolo; Pfeiler, Georg; Phelan, Catherine M.; Piedmonte, Marion; Poppe, Bruce; Pujana, Miquel Angel; Radice, Paolo; Rennert, Gad; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Rookus, Matti A.; Ross, Eric A.; Schmutzler, Rita Katharina; Simard, Jacques; Singer, Christian F.; Slavin, Thomas P.; Soucy, Penny; Southey, Melissa; Steinemann, Doris; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Sutter, Christian; Szabo, Csilla I.; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Mary Beth; Thomassen, Mads; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Tihomirova, Laima; Tognazzo, Silvia; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Varesco, Liliana; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Vratimos, Athanassios; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; McGuffog, Lesley; Kirk, Judy; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Hamann, Ute; Lindor, Noralane; Ramus, Susan J.; Greene, Mark H.; Couch, Fergus J.; Offit, Kenneth; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C.

    2016-01-01

    Population-based genome wide association studies have identified a locus at 9p22.2 associated with ovarian cancer risk, which also modifies ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. We conducted fine-scale mapping at 9p22.2 to identify potential causal variants in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Genotype data were available for 15,252 (2,462 ovarian cancer cases) BRCA1 and 8,211 (631 ovarian cancer cases) BRCA2 mutation carriers. Following genotype imputation, ovarian cancer associations were assessed for 4,873 and 5,020 SNPs in BRCA1 and BRCA 2 mutation carriers respectively, within a retrospective cohort analytical framework. In BRCA1 mutation carriers one set of eight correlated candidate causal variants for ovarian cancer risk modification was identified (top SNP rs10124837, HR: 0.73, 95%CI: 0.68 to 0.79, p-value 2× 10−16). These variants were located up to 20 kb upstream of BNC2. In BRCA2 mutation carriers one region, up to 45 kb upstream of BNC2, and containing 100 correlated SNPs was identified as candidate causal (top SNP rs62543585, HR: 0.69, 95%CI: 0.59 to 0.80, p-value 1.0 × 10−6). The candidate causal in BRCA1 mutation carriers did not include the strongest associated variant at this locus in the general population. In sum, we identified a set of candidate causal variants in a region that encompasses the BNC2 transcription start site. The ovarian cancer association at 9p22.2 may be mediated by different variants in BRCA1 mutation carriers and in the general population. Thus, potentially different mechanisms may underlie ovarian cancer risk for mutation carriers and the general population. PMID:27463617

  6. Targeted prostate cancer screening in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers: results from the initial screening round of the IMPACT study.

    PubMed

    Bancroft, Elizabeth K; Page, Elizabeth C; Castro, Elena; Lilja, Hans; Vickers, Andrew; Sjoberg, Daniel; Assel, Melissa; Foster, Christopher S; Mitchell, Gillian; Drew, Kate; Mæhle, Lovise; Axcrona, Karol; Evans, D Gareth; Bulman, Barbara; Eccles, Diana; McBride, Donna; van Asperen, Christi; Vasen, Hans; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Ringelberg, Janneke; Cybulski, Cezary; Wokolorczyk, Dominika; Selkirk, Christina; Hulick, Peter J; Bojesen, Anders; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Lam, Jimmy; Taylor, Louise; Oldenburg, Rogier; Cremers, Ruben; Verhaegh, Gerald; van Zelst-Stams, Wendy A; Oosterwijk, Jan C; Blanco, Ignacio; Salinas, Monica; Cook, Jackie; Rosario, Derek J; Buys, Saundra; Conner, Tom; Ausems, Margreet G; Ong, Kai-ren; Hoffman, Jonathan; Domchek, Susan; Powers, Jacquelyn; Teixeira, Manuel R; Maia, Sofia; Foulkes, William D; Taherian, Nassim; Ruijs, Marielle; Helderman-van den Enden, Apollonia T; Izatt, Louise; Davidson, Rosemarie; Adank, Muriel A; Walker, Lisa; Schmutzler, Rita; Tucker, Kathy; Kirk, Judy; Hodgson, Shirley; Harris, Marion; Douglas, Fiona; Lindeman, Geoffrey J; Zgajnar, Janez; Tischkowitz, Marc; Clowes, Virginia E; Susman, Rachel; Ramón y Cajal, Teresa; Patcher, Nicholas; Gadea, Neus; Spigelman, Allan; van Os, Theo; Liljegren, Annelie; Side, Lucy; Brewer, Carole; Brady, Angela F; Donaldson, Alan; Stefansdottir, Vigdis; Friedman, Eitan; Chen-Shtoyerman, Rakefet; Amor, David J; Copakova, Lucia; Barwell, Julian; Giri, Veda N; Murthy, Vedang; Nicolai, Nicola; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Greenhalgh, Lynn; Strom, Sara; Henderson, Alex; McGrath, John; Gallagher, David; Aaronson, Neil; Ardern-Jones, Audrey; Bangma, Chris; Dearnaley, David; Costello, Philandra; Eyfjord, Jorunn; Rothwell, Jeanette; Falconer, Alison; Gronberg, Henrik; Hamdy, Freddie C; Johannsson, Oskar; Khoo, Vincent; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Lubinski, Jan; Axcrona, Ulrika; Melia, Jane; McKinley, Joanne; Mitra, Anita V; Moynihan, Clare; Rennert, Gad; Suri, Mohnish; Wilson, Penny; Killick, Emma; Moss, Sue; Eeles, Rosalind A

    2014-09-01

    Men with germline breast cancer 1, early onset (BRCA1) or breast cancer 2, early onset (BRCA2) gene mutations have a higher risk of developing prostate cancer (PCa) than noncarriers. IMPACT (Identification of Men with a genetic predisposition to ProstAte Cancer: Targeted screening in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers and controls) is an international consortium of 62 centres in 20 countries evaluating the use of targeted PCa screening in men with BRCA1/2 mutations. To report the first year's screening results for all men at enrollment in the study. We recruited men aged 40-69 yr with germline BRCA1/2 mutations and a control group of men who have tested negative for a pathogenic BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation known to be present in their families. All men underwent prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing at enrollment, and those men with PSA >3 ng/ml were offered prostate biopsy. PSA levels, PCa incidence, and tumour characteristics were evaluated. The Fisher exact test was used to compare the number of PCa cases among groups and the differences among disease types. We recruited 2481 men (791 BRCA1 carriers, 531 BRCA1 controls; 731 BRCA2 carriers, 428 BRCA2 controls). A total of 199 men (8%) presented with PSA >3.0 ng/ml, 162 biopsies were performed, and 59 PCas were diagnosed (18 BRCA1 carriers, 10 BRCA1 controls; 24 BRCA2 carriers, 7 BRCA2 controls); 66% of the tumours were classified as intermediate- or high-risk disease. The positive predictive value (PPV) for biopsy using a PSA threshold of 3.0 ng/ml in BRCA2 mutation carriers was 48%-double the PPV reported in population screening studies. A significant difference in detecting intermediate- or high-risk disease was observed in BRCA2 carriers. Ninety-five percent of the men were white, thus the results cannot be generalised to all ethnic groups. The IMPACT screening network will be useful for targeted PCa screening studies in men with germline genetic risk variants as they are discovered. These preliminary results support the

  7. Targeted Prostate Cancer Screening in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers: Results from the Initial Screening Round of the IMPACT Study

    PubMed Central

    Bancroft, Elizabeth K.; Page, Elizabeth C.; Castro, Elena; Lilja, Hans; Vickers, Andrew; Sjoberg, Daniel; Assel, Melissa; Foster, Christopher S.; Mitchell, Gillian; Drew, Kate; Mæhle, Lovise; Axcrona, Karol; Evans, D. Gareth; Bulman, Barbara; Eccles, Diana; McBride, Donna; van Asperen, Christi; Vasen, Hans; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Ringelberg, Janneke; Cybulski, Cezary; Wokolorczyk, Dominika; Selkirk, Christina; Hulick, Peter J.; Bojesen, Anders; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Lam, Jimmy; Taylor, Louise; Oldenburg, Rogier; Cremers, Ruben; Verhaegh, Gerald; van Zelst-Stams, Wendy A.; Oosterwijk, Jan C.; Blanco, Ignacio; Salinas, Monica; Cook, Jackie; Rosario, Derek J.; Buys, Saundra; Conner, Tom; Ausems, Margreet G.; Ong, Kai-ren; Hoffman, Jonathan; Domchek, Susan; Powers, Jacquelyn; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Maia, Sofia; Foulkes, William D.; Taherian, Nassim; Ruijs, Marielle; den Enden, Apollonia T. Helderman-van; Izatt, Louise; Davidson, Rosemarie; Adank, Muriel A.; Walker, Lisa; Schmutzler, Rita; Tucker, Kathy; Kirk, Judy; Hodgson, Shirley; Harris, Marion; Douglas, Fiona; Lindeman, Geoffrey J.; Zgajnar, Janez; Tischkowitz, Marc; Clowes, Virginia E.; Susman, Rachel; Ramón y Cajal, Teresa; Patcher, Nicholas; Gadea, Neus; Spigelman, Allan; van Os, Theo; Liljegren, Annelie; Side, Lucy; Brewer, Carole; Brady, Angela F.; Donaldson, Alan; Stefansdottir, Vigdis; Friedman, Eitan; Chen-Shtoyerman, Rakefet; Amor, David J.; Copakova, Lucia; Barwell, Julian; Giri, Veda N.; Murthy, Vedang; Nicolai, Nicola; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Greenhalgh, Lynn; Strom, Sara; Henderson, Alex; McGrath, John; Gallagher, David; Aaronson, Neil; Ardern-Jones, Audrey; Bangma, Chris; Dearnaley, David; Costello, Philandra; Eyfjord, Jorunn; Rothwell, Jeanette; Falconer, Alison; Gronberg, Henrik; Hamdy, Freddie C.; Johannsson, Oskar; Khoo, Vincent; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Lubinski, Jan; Axcrona, Ulrika; Melia, Jane; McKinley, Joanne; Mitra, Anita V.; Moynihan, Clare; Rennert, Gad; Suri, Mohnish; Wilson, Penny; Killick, Emma; Moss, Sue; Eeles, Rosalind A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Men with germline breast cancer 1, early onset (BRCA1) or breast cancer 2, early onset (BRCA2) gene mutations have a higher risk of developing prostate cancer (PCa) than noncarriers. IMPACT (Identification of Men with a genetic predisposition to ProstAte Cancer: Targeted screening in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers and controls) is an international consortium of 62 centres in 20 countries evaluating the use of targeted PCa screening in men with BRCA1/2 mutations. Objective To report the first year's screening results for all men at enrolment in the study. Design, setting and participants We recruited men aged 40–69 yr with germline BRCA1/2 mutations and a control group of men who have tested negative for a pathogenic BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation known to be present in their families. All men underwent prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing at enrolment, and those men with PSA >3 ng/ml were offered prostate biopsy. Outcome measurements and statistical analysis PSA levels, PCa incidence, and tumour characteristics were evaluated. The Fisher exact test was used to compare the number of PCa cases among groups and the differences among disease types. Results and limitations We recruited 2481 men (791 BRCA1 carriers, 531 BRCA1 controls; 731 BRCA2 carriers, 428 BRCA2 controls). A total of 199 men (8%) presented with PSA >3.0 ng/ml, 162 biopsies were performed, and 59 PCas were diagnosed (18 BRCA1 carriers, 10 BRCA1 controls; 24 BRCA2 carriers, 7 BRCA2 controls); 66% of the tumours were classified as intermediate- or high-risk disease. The positive predictive value (PPV) for biopsy using a PSA threshold of 3.0 ng/ml in BRCA2 mutation carriers was 48%—double the PPV reported in population screening studies. A significant difference in detecting intermediate- or high-risk disease was observed in BRCA2 carriers. Ninety-five percent of the men were white, thus the results cannot be generalised to all ethnic groups. Conclusions The IMPACT screening network will be useful

  8. The average cumulative risks of breast and ovarian cancer for carriers of mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 attending genetic counseling units in Spain.

    PubMed

    Milne, Roger L; Osorio, Ana; Cajal, Teresa Ramón Y; Vega, Ana; Llort, Gemma; de la Hoya, Miguel; Díez, Orland; Alonso, M Carmen; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Sánchez-de-Abajo, Ana; Caldés, Trinidad; Blanco, Ana; Graña, Begoña; Durán, Mercedes; Velasco, Eladio; Chirivella, Isabel; Cardeñosa, Eva Esteban; Tejada, María-Isabel; Beristain, Elena; Miramar, María-Dolores; Calvo, María-Teresa; Martínez, Eduardo; Guillén, Carmen; Salazar, Raquel; San Román, Carlos; Antoniou, Antonis C; Urioste, Miguel; Benítez, Javier

    2008-05-01

    It is not clear that the published estimates of the breast and ovarian cancer penetrances of mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 can be used in genetic counseling in countries such as Spain, where the incidence of breast cancer in the general population is considerably lower, the prevalence of BRCA2 mutations seems to be higher, and a distinct spectrum of recurrent mutations exists for both genes. We aimed to estimate these penetrances for women attending genetic counseling units in Spain. We collected phenotype and genotype data on 155 BRCA1 and 164 BRCA2 mutation carrier families from 12 centers across the country. Average age-specific cumulative risks of breast cancer and ovarian cancer were estimated using a modified segregation analysis method. The estimated average cumulative risk of breast cancer to age 70 years was estimated to be 52% [95% confidence interval (95% CI), 26-69%] for BRCA1 mutation carriers and 47% (95% CI, 29-60%) for BRCA2 mutation carriers. The corresponding estimates for ovarian cancer were 22% (95% CI, 0-40%) and 18% (95% CI, 0-35%), respectively. There was some evidence (two-sided P = 0.09) that 330A>G (R71G) in BRCA1 may have lower breast cancer penetrance. These results are consistent with those from a recent meta-analysis of practically all previous penetrance studies, suggesting that women with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations attending genetic counseling services in Spain have similar risks of breast and ovarian cancer to those published for other Caucasian populations. Carriers should be fully informed of their mutation- and age-specific risks to make appropriate decisions regarding prophylactic interventions such as oophorectomy.

  9. Prevalence and penetrance of germline BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in a population series of 649 women with ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Risch, H A; McLaughlin, J R; Cole, D E; Rosen, B; Bradley, L; Kwan, E; Jack, E; Vesprini, D J; Kuperstein, G; Abrahamson, J L; Fan, I; Wong, B; Narod, S A

    2001-03-01

    A population-based series of 649 unselected incident cases of ovarian cancer diagnosed in Ontario, Canada, during 1995-96 was screened for germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2. We specifically tested for 11 of the most commonly reported mutations in the two genes. Then, cases were assessed with the protein-truncation test (PTT) for exon 11 of BRCA1, with denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis for the remainder of BRCA1, and with PTT for exons 10 and 11 of BRCA2. No mutations were found in all 134 women with tumors of borderline histology. Among the 515 women with invasive cancers, we identified 60 mutations, 39 in BRCA1 and 21 in BRCA2. The total mutation frequency among women with invasive cancers, 11.7% (95% confidence interval [95%CI] 9.2%-14.8%), is higher than previous estimates. Hereditary ovarian cancers diagnosed at age <50 years were mostly (83%) due to BRCA1, whereas the majority (60%) of those diagnosed at age >60 years were due to BRCA2. Mutations were found in 19% of women reporting first-degree relatives with breast or ovarian cancer and in 6.5% of women with no affected first-degree relatives. Risks of ovarian, breast, and stomach cancers and leukemias/lymphomas were increased nine-, five-, six- and threefold, respectively, among first-degree relatives of cases carrying BRCA1 mutations, compared with relatives of noncarriers, and risk of colorectal cancer was increased threefold for relatives of cases carrying BRCA2 mutations. For carriers of BRCA1 mutations, the estimated penetrance by age 80 years was 36% for ovarian cancer and 68% for breast cancer. In breast-cancer risk for first-degree relatives, there was a strong trend according to mutation location along the coding sequence of BRCA1, with little evidence of increased risk for mutations in the 5' fifth, but 8.8-fold increased risk for mutations in the 3' fifth (95%CI 3.6-22.0), corresponding to a carrier penetrance of essentially 100%. Ovarian, colorectal, stomach, pancreatic, and prostate

  10. Challenges in managing genetic cancer risk: a long-term qualitative study of unaffected women carrying BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations.

    PubMed

    Caiata-Zufferey, Maria; Pagani, Olivia; Cina, Viviane; Membrez, Véronique; Taborelli, Monica; Unger, Sheila; Murphy, Anne; Monnerat, Christian; Chappuis, Pierre O

    2015-09-01

    Women carrying BRCA1/BRCA2 germ-line mutations have an increased risk of developing breast/ovarian cancer. To minimize this risk, international guidelines recommend lifelong surveillance and preventive measures. This study explores the challenges that unaffected women genetically predisposed to breast/ovarian cancer face in managing their risk over time and the psychosocial processes behind these challenges. Between 2011 and 2013, biographical qualitative interviews were conducted in Switzerland with 32 unaffected French- and Italian-speaking women carrying BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations. Their mutation status had been known for at least 3 years (mean, 6 years). Data were analyzed through constant comparative analysis using software for qualitative analysis. From the time these women received their positive genetic test results, they were encouraged to follow medical guidelines. Meanwhile, their adherence to these guidelines was constantly questioned by their social and medical environments. As a result of these contradictory pressures, BRCA1/BRCA2 mutation carriers experienced a sense of disorientation about the most appropriate way of dealing with genetic risk. Given the contradictory attitudes of health-care professionals in caring for unaffected BRCA1/BRCA2 mutation carriers, there is an urgent need to educate physicians in dealing with genetically at-risk women and to promote a shared representation of this condition among them.Genet Med 17 9, 726-732.

  11. Clinical follow up of mexican women with early onset of breast cancer and mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes.

    PubMed

    Calderón-Garcidueñas, Ana Laura; Ruiz-Flores, Pablo; Cerda-Flores, Ricardo M; Barrera-Saldaña, Hugo A

    2005-01-01

    This study describes the presence of mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes in a group of Mexican women and the clinical evolution of early onset breast cancer (EOBC). A prospective hospital-based study was performed in a sample of 22 women with EOBC (7 in clinical stage IIA, 8 in IIB, and 7 in IIIA). The patients attended a tertiary care hospital in northeastern Mexico in 1997 and were followed up over a 5-year period. Molecular analysis included: 1) a mutation screening by heteroduplex analysis (HA) of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes and 2) a sequence analysis. Of 22 patients, 14 (63.6%) showed a variant band detected by heteroduplex analysis of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes: 8 polymorphisms, 4 mutations of uncertain significance, and 2 novel truncated protein mutations, one in BRCAI (exon 11, 3587delT) and the other in the BRCA2 gene (exon 11, 2664InsA). These findings support future studies to determine the significance and impact of the genetic factor in this Mexican women population.

  12. RAD51 135G→C Modifies Breast Cancer Risk among BRCA2 Mutation Carriers: Results from a Combined Analysis of 19 Studies

    PubMed Central

    Antoniou, Antonis C. ; Sinilnikova, Olga M. ; Simard, Jacques ; Léoné, Mélanie ; Dumont, Martine ; Neuhausen, Susan L. ; Struewing, Jeffery P. ; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique ; Barjhoux, Laure ; Hughes, David J. ; Coupier, Isabelle ; Belotti, Muriel ; Lasset, Christine ; Bonadona, Valérie ; Bignon, Yves-Jean ; Rebbeck, Timothy R. ; Wagner, Theresa ; Lynch, Henry T. ; Domchek, Susan M. ; Nathanson, Katherine L. ; Garber, Judy E. ; Weitzel, Jeffrey ; Narod, Steven A. ; Tomlinson, Gail ; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I. ; Godwin, Andrew ; Isaacs, Claudine ; Jakubowska, Anna ; Lubinski, Jan ; Gronwald, Jacek ; Górski, Bohdan ; Byrski, Tomasz ; Huzarski, Tomasz ; Peock, Susan ; Cook, Margaret ; Baynes, Caroline ; Murray, Alexandra ; Rogers, Mark ; Daly, Peter A. ; Dorkins, Huw ; Schmutzler, Rita K. ; Versmold, Beatrix ; Engel, Christoph ; Meindl, Alfons ; Arnold, Norbert ; Niederacher, Dieter ; Deissler, Helmut ; Spurdle, Amanda B. ; Chen, Xiaoqing ; Waddell, Nicola ; Cloonan, Nicole ; Kirchhoff, Tomas ; Offit, Kenneth ; Friedman, Eitan ; Kaufmann, Bella ; Laitman, Yael ; Galore, Gilli ; Rennert, Gad ; Lejbkowicz, Flavio ; Raskin, Leon ; Andrulis, Irene L. ; Ilyushik, Eduard ; Ozcelik, Hilmi ; Devilee, Peter ; Vreeswijk, Maaike P. G. ; Greene, Mark H. ; Prindiville, Sheila A. ; Osorio, Ana ; Benítez, Javier ; Zikan, Michal ; Szabo, Csilla I. ; Kilpivaara, Outi ; Nevanlinna, Heli ; Hamann, Ute ; Durocher, Francine ; Arason, Adalgeir ; Couch, Fergus J. ; Easton, Douglas F. ; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia 

    2007-01-01

    RAD51 is an important component of double-stranded DNA–repair mechanisms that interacts with both BRCA1 and BRCA2. A single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the 5′ untranslated region (UTR) of RAD51, 135G→C, has been suggested as a possible modifier of breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. We pooled genotype data for 8,512 female mutation carriers from 19 studies for the RAD51 135G→C SNP. We found evidence of an increased breast cancer risk in CC homozygotes (hazard ratio [HR] 1.92 [95% confidence interval {CI} 1.25–2.94) but not in heterozygotes (HR 0.95 [95% CI 0.83–1.07]; P=.002, by heterogeneity test with 2 degrees of freedom [df]). When BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers were analyzed separately, the increased risk was statistically significant only among BRCA2 mutation carriers, in whom we observed HRs of 1.17 (95% CI 0.91–1.51) among heterozygotes and 3.18 (95% CI 1.39–7.27) among rare homozygotes (P=.0007, by heterogeneity test with 2 df). In addition, we determined that the 135G→C variant affects RAD51 splicing within the 5′ UTR. Thus, 135G→C may modify the risk of breast cancer in BRCA2 mutation carriers by altering the expression of RAD51. RAD51 is the first gene to be reliably identified as a modifier of risk among BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. PMID:17999359

  13. Mutations in BRCA1, BRCA2 and other breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility genes in Central and South American populations.

    PubMed

    Jara, Lilian; Morales, Sebastian; de Mayo, Tomas; Gonzalez-Hormazabal, Patricio; Carrasco, Valentina; Godoy, Raul

    2017-10-06

    Breast cancer (BC) is the most common malignancy among women worldwide. A major advance in the understanding of the genetic etiology of BC was the discovery of BRCA1 and BRCA2 (BRCA1/2) genes, which are considered high-penetrance BC genes. In non-carriers of BRCA1/2 mutations, disease susceptibility may be explained of a small number of mutations in BRCA1/2 and a much higher proportion of mutations in ethnicity-specific moderate- and/or low-penetrance genes. In Central and South American populations, studied have focused on analyzing the distribution and prevalence of BRCA1/2 mutations and other susceptibility genes that are scarce in Latin America as compared to North America, Europe, Australia, and Israel. Thus, the aim of this review is to present the current state of knowledge regarding pathogenic BRCA variants and other BC susceptibility genes. We conducted a comprehensive review of 47 studies from 12 countries in Central and South America published between 2002 and 2017 reporting the prevalence and/or spectrum of mutations and pathogenic variants in BRCA1/2 and other BC susceptibility genes. The studies on BRCA1/2 mutations screened a total of 5956 individuals, and studies on susceptibility genes analyzed a combined sample size of 11,578 individuals. To date, a total of 190 different BRCA1/2 pathogenic mutations in Central and South American populations have been reported in the literature. Pathogenic mutations or variants that increase BC risk have been reported in the following genes or genomic regions: ATM, BARD1, CHECK2, FGFR2, GSTM1, MAP3K1, MTHFR, PALB2, RAD51, TOX3, TP53, XRCC1, and 2q35.

  14. DNA Glycosylases Involved in Base Excision Repair May Be Associated with Cancer Risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Osorio, Ana; Milne, Roger L.; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline; Vaclová, Tereza; Pita, Guillermo; Alonso, Rosario; Peterlongo, Paolo; Blanco, Ignacio; de la Hoya, Miguel; Duran, Mercedes; Díez, Orland; Ramón y Cajal, Teresa; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Martínez-Bouzas, Cristina; Andrés Conejero, Raquel; Soucy, Penny; McGuffog, Lesley; Barrowdale, Daniel; Lee, Andrew; SWE-BRCA; Arver, Brita; Rantala, Johanna; Loman, Niklas; Ehrencrona, Hans; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Beattie, Mary S.; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Arun, Banu K.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Walsh, Christine; Lester, Jenny; John, Esther M.; Whittemore, Alice S.; Daly, Mary B.; Southey, Melissa; Hopper, John; Terry, Mary B.; Buys, Saundra S.; Janavicius, Ramunas; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Steele, Linda; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Hansen, Thomas v. O.; Jønson, Lars; Ejlertsen, Bent; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Infante, Mar; Herráez, Belén; Moreno, Leticia Thais; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Herzog, Josef; Weeman, Kisa; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Scuvera, Giulietta; Bonanni, Bernardo; Mariette, Frederique; Volorio, Sara; Viel, Alessandra; Varesco, Liliana; Papi, Laura; Ottini, Laura; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Radice, Paolo; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Garber, Judy; Ellis, Steve; Frost, Debra; Platte, Radka; Fineberg, Elena; Evans, Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Izatt, Louise; Eeles, Ros; Adlard, Julian; Davidson, Rosemarie; Cole, Trevor; Eccles, Diana; Cook, Jackie; Hodgson, Shirley; Brewer, Carole; Tischkowitz, Marc; Douglas, Fiona; Porteous, Mary; Side, Lucy; Walker, Lisa; Morrison, Patrick; Donaldson, Alan; Kennedy, John; Foo, Claire; Godwin, Andrew K.; Schmutzler, Rita Katharina; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Rhiem, Kerstin; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Plendl, Hans Jörg; Niederacher, Dieter; Sutter, Christian; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Steinemann, Doris; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Kast, Karin; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Gehrig, Andrea; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Damiola, Francesca; Poppe, Bruce; Claes, Kathleen; Piedmonte, Marion; Tucker, Kathy; Backes, Floor; Rodríguez, Gustavo; Brewster, Wendy; Wakeley, Katie; Rutherford, Thomas; Caldés, Trinidad; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Rookus, Matti A.; van Os, Theo A. M.; van der Kolk, Lizet; de Lange, J. L.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; van der Hout, A. H.; van Asperen, Christi J.; Gómez Garcia, Encarna B.; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Collée, J. Margriet; van Deurzen, Carolien H. M.; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Devilee, Peter; HEBON; Olah, Edith; Lázaro, Conxi; Teulé, Alex; Menéndez, Mireia; Jakubowska, Anna; Cybulski, Cezary; Gronwald, Jacek; Lubinski, Jan; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Johannsson, Oskar Th.; Maugard, Christine; Montagna, Marco; Tognazzo, Silvia; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Healey, Sue; Investigators, kConFab; Olswold, Curtis; Guidugli, Lucia; Lindor, Noralane; Slager, Susan; Szabo, Csilla I.; Vijai, Joseph; Robson, Mark; Kauff, Noah; Zhang, Liying; Rau-Murthy, Rohini; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Singer, Christian F.; Rappaport, Christine; Geschwantler Kaulich, Daphne; Pfeiler, Georg; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Berger, Andreas; Phelan, Catherine M.; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Andrulis, Irene; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Bojesen, Anders; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Sunde, Lone; Thomassen, Mads; Kruse, Torben A.; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Friedman, Eitan; Laitman, Yael; Shimon, Shani Paluch; Simard, Jacques; Easton, Douglas F.; Offit, Kenneth; Couch, Fergus J.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Benitez, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes involved in the DNA Base Excision Repair (BER) pathway could be associated with cancer risk in carriers of mutations in the high-penetrance susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2, given the relation of synthetic lethality that exists between one of the components of the BER pathway, PARP1 (poly ADP ribose polymerase), and both BRCA1 and BRCA2. In the present study, we have performed a comprehensive analysis of 18 genes involved in BER using a tagging SNP approach in a large series of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. 144 SNPs were analyzed in a two stage study involving 23,463 carriers from the CIMBA consortium (the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1 and BRCA2). Eleven SNPs showed evidence of association with breast and/or ovarian cancer at p<0.05 in the combined analysis. Four of the five genes for which strongest evidence of association was observed were DNA glycosylases. The strongest evidence was for rs1466785 in the NEIL2 (endonuclease VIII-like 2) gene (HR: 1.09, 95% CI (1.03–1.16), p = 2.7×10−3) for association with breast cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers, and rs2304277 in the OGG1 (8-guanine DNA glycosylase) gene, with ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 mutation carriers (HR: 1.12 95%CI: 1.03–1.21, p = 4.8×10−3). DNA glycosylases involved in the first steps of the BER pathway may be associated with cancer risk in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers and should be more comprehensively studied. PMID:24698998

  15. Common alleles at 6q25.1 and 1p11.2 are associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    PubMed Central

    Antoniou, Antonis C; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Soucy, Penny; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Lee, Andrew; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Cattaneo, Elisa; Barile, Monica; Pensotti, Valeria; Pasini, Barbara; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Giannini, Giuseppe; Laura Putignano, Anna; Varesco, Liliana; Radice, Paolo; Mai, Phuong L.; Greene, Mark H.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Kruse, Torben A.; Birk Jensen, Uffe; Crüger, Dorthe G.; Caligo, Maria A.; Laitman, Yael; Milgrom, Roni; Kaufman, Bella; Paluch-Shimon, Shani; Friedman, Eitan; Loman, Niklas; Harbst, Katja; Lindblom, Annika; Arver, Brita; Ehrencrona, Hans; Melin, Beatrice; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Domchek, Susan M.; Rebbeck, Timothy; Jakubowska, Ania; Lubinski, Jan; Gronwald, Jacek; Huzarski, Tomasz; Byrski, Tomasz; Cybulski, Cezary; Gorski, Bohdan; Osorio, Ana; Ramón y Cajal, Teresa; Fostira, Florentia; Andrés, Raquel; Benitez, Javier; Hamann, Ute; Hogervorst, Frans B.; Rookus, Matti A.; Hooning, Maartje J.; Nelen, Marcel R.; van der Luijt, Rob B.; van Os, Theo A.M.; van Asperen, Christi J.; Devilee, Peter; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E.J.; Gómez Garcia, Encarna B.; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Frost, Debra; Platte, Radka; Leyland, Jean; Gareth Evans, D.; Lalloo, Fiona; Eeles, Ros; Izatt, Louise; Adlard, Julian; Davidson, Rosemarie; Eccles, Diana; Ong, Kai-ren; Cook, Jackie; Douglas, Fiona; Paterson, Joan; John Kennedy, M.; Miedzybrodzka, Zosia; Godwin, Andrew; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Buecher, Bruno; Belotti, Muriel; Tirapo, Carole; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Barjhoux, Laure; Lasset, Christine; Leroux, Dominique; Faivre, Laurence; Bronner, Myriam; Prieur, Fabienne; Nogues, Catherine; Rouleau, Etienne; Pujol, Pascal; Coupier, Isabelle; Frénay, Marc; Hopper, John L.; Daly, Mary B.; Terry, Mary B.; John, Esther M.; Buys, Saundra S.; Yassin, Yosuf; Miron, Alexander; Goldgar, David; Singer, Christian F.; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Pfeiler, Georg; Catharina Dressler, Anne; Hansen, Thomas v.O.; Jønson, Lars; Ejlertsen, Bent; Bjork Barkardottir, Rosa; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Offit, Kenneth; Piedmonte, Marion; Rodriguez, Gustavo; Small, Laurie; Boggess, John; Blank, Stephanie; Basil, Jack; Azodi, Masoud; Ewart Toland, Amanda; Montagna, Marco; Tognazzo, Silvia; Agata, Simona; Imyanitov, Evgeny; Janavicius, Ramunas; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Sucheston, Lara; Karlan, Beth Y.; Walsh, Christine S.; Olah, Edith; Bozsik, Aniko; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Seldon, Joyce L.; Beattie, Mary S.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Sluiter, Michelle D.; Diez, Orland; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Ruehl, Ina; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Kast, Karin; Deissler, Helmut; Niederacher, Dieter; Arnold, Norbert; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Schönbuchner, Ines; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Dumont, Martine; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Tischkowitz, Marc; Chen, Xiaoqing; Beesley, Jonathan; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Chun Ding, Yuan; Fredericksen, Zachary; Wang, Xianshu; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Couch, Fergus; Simard, Jacques; Easton, Douglas F.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia

    2011-01-01

    Two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at 6q25.1, near the ESR1 gene, have been implicated in the susceptibility to breast cancer for Asian (rs2046210) and European women (rs9397435). A genome-wide association study in Europeans identified two further breast cancer susceptibility variants: rs11249433 at 1p11.2 and rs999737 in RAD51L1 at 14q24.1. Although previously identified breast cancer susceptibility variants have been shown to be associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, the involvement of these SNPs to breast cancer susceptibility in mutation carriers is currently unknown. To address this, we genotyped these SNPs in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers from 42 studies from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2. In the analysis of 14 123 BRCA1 and 8053 BRCA2 mutation carriers of European ancestry, the 6q25.1 SNPs (r2 = 0.14) were independently associated with the risk of breast cancer for BRCA1 mutation carriers [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.17, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.11–1.23, P-trend = 4.5 × 10−9 for rs2046210; HR = 1.28, 95% CI: 1.18–1.40, P-trend = 1.3 × 10−8 for rs9397435], but only rs9397435 was associated with the risk for BRCA2 carriers (HR = 1.14, 95% CI: 1.01–1.28, P-trend = 0.031). SNP rs11249433 (1p11.2) was associated with the risk of breast cancer for BRCA2 mutation carriers (HR = 1.09, 95% CI: 1.02–1.17, P-trend = 0.015), but was not associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 mutation carriers (HR = 0.97, 95% CI: 0.92–1.02, P-trend = 0.20). SNP rs999737 (RAD51L1) was not associated with breast cancer risk for either BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers (P-trend = 0.27 and 0.30, respectively). The identification of SNPs at 6q25.1 associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 mutation carriers will lead to a better understanding of the biology of tumour development in these women. PMID:21593217

  16. Prediction of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation status using post-irradiation assays of lymphoblastoid cell lines is compromised by inter-cell-line phenotypic variability.

    PubMed

    Lovelock, Paul K; Wong, Ee Ming; Sprung, Carl N; Marsh, Anna; Hobson, Karen; French, Juliet D; Southey, Melissa; Sculley, Tom; Pandeya, Nirmala; Brown, Melissa A; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Spurdle, Amanda B; McKay, Michael J

    2007-09-01

    Assays to determine the pathogenicity of unclassified sequence variants in disease-associated genes include the analysis of lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs). We assessed the ability of several assays of LCLs to distinguish carriers of germline BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutations from mutation-negative controls to determine their utility for use in a diagnostic setting. Post-ionising radiation cell viability and micronucleus formation, and telomere length were assayed in LCLs carrying BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations, and in unaffected mutation-negative controls. Post-irradiation cell viability and micronucleus induction assays of LCLs from individuals carrying pathogenic BRCA1 mutations, unclassified BRCA1 sequence variants or wildtype BRCA1 sequence showed significant phenotypic heterogeneity within each group. Responses were not consistent with predicted functional consequences of known pathogenic or normal sequences. Telomere length was also highly heterogeneous within groups of LCLs carrying pathogenic BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations, and normal BRCA1 sequences, and was not predictive of mutation status. Given the significant degree of phenotypic heterogeneity of LCLs after gamma-irradiation, and the lack of association with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation status, we conclude that the assays evaluated in this study should not be used as a means of differentiating pathogenic and non-pathogenic sequence variants for clinical application. We suggest that a range of normal controls must be included in any functional assays of LCLs to ensure that any observed differences between samples reflect the genotype under investigation rather than generic inter-individual variation.

  17. A novel loss-of-function heterozygous BRCA2 c.8946_8947delAG mutation found in a Chinese woman with family history of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jing; Yang, Jichun; Jian, Wenjing; Wang, Xianming; Xiao, Deyong; Xia, Wenjun; Xiong, Likuan; Ma, Duan

    2017-04-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequent female malignancy worldwide. Among them, some cases have hereditary susceptibility in two leading genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2. Heterozygous germ line mutations in them are related with increased risk of breast, ovarian and other cancer, following autosomal dominant inheritance mode. For purpose of early finding, early diagnosis and early treatment, mutation detecting of BRCA1/2 genes was performed in unselected 300 breast or ovarian patients and unaffected women using next-generation sequencing and then confirmed by Sanger sequencing. A non-previously reported heterozygous mutation c.8946_8947delAG (p.D2983FfsX34) of BRCA2 gene was identified in an unaffected Chinese woman with family history of breast cancer (her breast cancer mother, also carrying this mutation). The BRCA2-truncated protein resulted from the frame shift mutation was found to lose two putative nuclear localization signals and a Rad51-binding motif in the extreme C-terminal region by bioinformatic prediction. And then in vitro experiments showed that nearly all the mutant protein was unable to translocate to the nucleus to perform DNA repair activity. This novel mutant BRCA2 protein is dysfunction. We classify the mutation into disease causing and conclude that it is the risk factor for breast cancer in this family. So, conducting the same mutation test and providing genetic counseling for this family is practically meaningful and significant. Meanwhile, the identification of this new mutation enriches the Breast Cancer Information Core database, especially in China.

  18. Common breast cancer susceptibility alleles and the risk of breast cancer for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers: implications for risk prediction

    PubMed Central

    Antoniou, Antonis C; Beesley, Jonathan; McGuffog, Lesley; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Healey, Sue; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Lynch, Henry T.; Isaacs, Claudine; Ganz, Patricia A.; Tomlinson, Gail; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Couch, Fergus J.; Wang, Xianshu; Lindor, Noralane M.; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Radice, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Barile, Monica; Viel, Alessandra; Allavena, Anna; Dall’Olio, Valentina; Peterlongo, Paolo; Szabo, Csilla I.; Zikan, Michal; Claes, Kathleen; Poppe, Bruce; Foretova, Lenka; Mai, Phuong L.; Greene, Mark H.; Rennert, Gad; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Andrulis, Irene L.; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Sunde, Lone; Cruger, Dorthe; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Caligo, Maria; Friedman, Eitan; Kaufman, Bella; Laitman, Yael; Milgrom, Roni; Dubrovsky, Maya; Cohen, Shimrit; Borg, Ake; Jernström, Helena; Lindblom, Annika; Rantala, Johanna; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Melin, Beatrice; Nathanson, Kate; Domchek, Susan; Jakubowska, Ania; Lubinski, Jan; Huzarski, Tomasz; Osorio, Ana; Lasa, Adriana; Durán, Mercedes; Tejada, Maria-Isabel; Godino, Javier; Benitez, Javier; Hamann, Ute; Kriege, Mieke; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; van der Luijt, Rob B; van Asperen, Christi J; Devilee, Peter; Meijers-Heijboer, E.J.; Blok, Marinus J; Aalfs, Cora M.; Hogervorst, Frans; Rookus, Matti; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare; Frost, Debra; Conroy, Don; Evans, D. Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Pichert, Gabriella; Davidson, Rosemarie; Cole, Trevor; Cook, Jackie; Paterson, Joan; Hodgson, Shirley; Morrison, Patrick J.; Porteous, Mary E.; Walker, Lisa; Kennedy, M. John; Dorkins, Huw; Peock, Susan; Godwin, Andrew K.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; de Pauw, Antoine; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Bonadona, Valérie; Lasset, Christine; Dreyfus, Hélène; Leroux, Dominique; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Faivre, Laurence; Loustalot, Catherine; Noguchi, Tetsuro; Sobol, Hagay; Rouleau, Etienne; Nogues, Catherine; Frénay, Marc; Vénat-Bouvet, Laurence; Hopper, John L.; Daly, Mary B.; Terry, Mary B.; John, Esther M.; Buys, Saundra S.; Yassin, Yosuf; Miron, Alex; Goldgar, David; Singer, Christian F.; Dressler, Anne Catharina; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Pfeiler, Georg; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Jønson, Lars; Agnarsson, Bjarni A.; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Offit, Kenneth; Devlin, Vincent; Dutra-Clarke, Ana; Piedmonte, Marion; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Wakeley, Katie; Boggess, John F.; Basil, Jack; Schwartz, Peter E.; Blank, Stephanie V.; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Montagna, Marco; Casella, Cinzia; Imyanitov, Evgeny; Tihomirova, Laima; Blanco, Ignacio; Lazaro, Conxi; Ramus, Susan J.; Sucheston, Lara; Karlan, Beth Y.; Gross, Jenny; Schmutzler, Rita; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Lochmann, Magdalena; Arnold, Norbert; Heidemann, Simone; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Niederacher, Dieter; Sutter, Christian; Deissler, Helmut; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Kast, Karin; Schönbuchner, Ines; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Nevanlinna, Heli; Simard, Jacques; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Holland, Helene; Chen, Xiaoqing; Platte, Radka; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.

    2010-01-01

    The known breast cancer (BC) susceptibility polymorphisms in FGFR2, TNRC9/TOX3, MAP3K1,LSP1 and 2q35 confer increased risks of BC for BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. We evaluated the associations of three additional SNPs, rs4973768 in SLC4A7/NEK10, rs6504950 in STXBP4/COX11 and rs10941679 at 5p12 and reanalyzed the previous associations using additional carriers in a sample of 12,525 BRCA1 and 7,409 BRCA2 carriers. Additionally, we investigated potential interactions between SNPs and assessed the implications for risk prediction. The minor alleles of rs4973768 and rs10941679 were associated with increased BC risk for BRCA2 carriers (per-allele Hazard Ratio (HR)=1.10, 95%CI:1.03-1.18, p=0.006 and HR=1.09, 95%CI:1.01-1.19, p=0.03, respectively). Neither SNP was associated with BC risk for BRCA1 carriers and rs6504950 was not associated with BC for either BRCA1 or BRCA2 carriers. Of the nine polymorphisms investigated, seven were associated with BC for BRCA2 carriers (FGFR2, TOX3, MAP3K1, LSP1, 2q35, SLC4A7, 5p12, p-values:7×10−11-0.03), but only TOX3 and 2q35 were associated with the risk for BRCA1 carriers (p=0.0049, 0.03 respectively). All risk associated polymorphisms appear to interact multiplicatively on BC risk for mutation carriers. Based on the joint genotype distribution of the seven risk associated SNPs in BRCA2 mutation carriers, the 5% of BRCA2 carriers at highest risk (i.e. between 95th and 100th percentiles) were predicted to have a probability between 80% and 96% of developing BC by age 80, compared with 42-50% for the 5% of carriers at lowest risk. Our findings indicated that these risk differences may be sufficient to influence the clinical management of mutation carriers. PMID:21118973

  19. Common breast cancer susceptibility alleles and the risk of breast cancer for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers: implications for risk prediction.

    PubMed

    Antoniou, Antonis C; Beesley, Jonathan; McGuffog, Lesley; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Healey, Sue; Neuhausen, Susan L; Ding, Yuan Chun; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Lynch, Henry T; Isaacs, Claudine; Ganz, Patricia A; Tomlinson, Gail; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Couch, Fergus J; Wang, Xianshu; Lindor, Noralane M; Pankratz, Vernon S; Radice, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Barile, Monica; Viel, Alessandra; Allavena, Anna; Dall'Olio, Valentina; Peterlongo, Paolo; Szabo, Csilla I; Zikan, Michal; Claes, Kathleen; Poppe, Bruce; Foretova, Lenka; Mai, Phuong L; Greene, Mark H; Rennert, Gad; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Andrulis, Irene L; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Sunde, Lone; Cruger, Dorthe; Birk Jensen, Uffe; Caligo, Maria; Friedman, Eitan; Kaufman, Bella; Laitman, Yael; Milgrom, Roni; Dubrovsky, Maya; Cohen, Shimrit; Borg, Ake; Jernström, Helena; Lindblom, Annika; Rantala, Johanna; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Melin, Beatrice; Nathanson, Kate; Domchek, Susan; Jakubowska, Ania; Lubinski, Jan; Huzarski, Tomasz; Osorio, Ana; Lasa, Adriana; Durán, Mercedes; Tejada, Maria-Isabel; Godino, Javier; Benitez, Javier; Hamann, Ute; Kriege, Mieke; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; van der Luijt, Rob B; van Asperen, Christi J; Devilee, Peter; Meijers-Heijboer, E J; Blok, Marinus J; Aalfs, Cora M; Hogervorst, Frans; Rookus, Matti; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare; Frost, Debra; Conroy, Don; Evans, D Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Pichert, Gabriella; Davidson, Rosemarie; Cole, Trevor; Cook, Jackie; Paterson, Joan; Hodgson, Shirley; Morrison, Patrick J; Porteous, Mary E; Walker, Lisa; Kennedy, M John; Dorkins, Huw; Peock, Susan; Godwin, Andrew K; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; de Pauw, Antoine; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Bonadona, Valérie; Lasset, Christine; Dreyfus, Hélène; Leroux, Dominique; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Faivre, Laurence; Loustalot, Catherine; Noguchi, Tetsuro; Sobol, Hagay; Rouleau, Etienne; Nogues, Catherine; Frénay, Marc; Vénat-Bouvet, Laurence; Hopper, John L; Daly, Mary B; Terry, Mary B; John, Esther M; Buys, Saundra S; Yassin, Yosuf; Miron, Alexander; Goldgar, David; Singer, Christian F; Dressler, Anne Catharina; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Pfeiler, Georg; Hansen, Thomas V O; Jønson, Lars; Agnarsson, Bjarni A; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Offit, Kenneth; Devlin, Vincent; Dutra-Clarke, Ana; Piedmonte, Marion; Rodriguez, Gustavo C; Wakeley, Katie; Boggess, John F; Basil, Jack; Schwartz, Peter E; Blank, Stephanie V; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Montagna, Marco; Casella, Cinzia; Imyanitov, Evgeny; Tihomirova, Laima; Blanco, Ignacio; Lazaro, Conxi; Ramus, Susan J; Sucheston, Lara; Karlan, Beth Y; Gross, Jenny; Schmutzler, Rita; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Lochmann, Magdalena; Arnold, Norbert; Heidemann, Simone; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Niederacher, Dieter; Sutter, Christian; Deissler, Helmut; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Kast, Karin; Schönbuchner, Ines; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Nevanlinna, Heli; Simard, Jacques; Spurdle, Amanda B; Holland, Helene; Chen, Xiaoqing; Platte, Radka; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F

    2010-12-01

    The known breast cancer susceptibility polymorphisms in FGFR2, TNRC9/TOX3, MAP3K1, LSP1, and 2q35 confer increased risks of breast cancer for BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. We evaluated the associations of 3 additional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs4973768 in SLC4A7/NEK10, rs6504950 in STXBP4/COX11, and rs10941679 at 5p12, and reanalyzed the previous associations using additional carriers in a sample of 12,525 BRCA1 and 7,409 BRCA2 carriers. Additionally, we investigated potential interactions between SNPs and assessed the implications for risk prediction. The minor alleles of rs4973768 and rs10941679 were associated with increased breast cancer risk for BRCA2 carriers (per-allele HR = 1.10, 95% CI: 1.03-1.18, P = 0.006 and HR = 1.09, 95% CI: 1.01-1.19, P = 0.03, respectively). Neither SNP was associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 carriers, and rs6504950 was not associated with breast cancer for either BRCA1 or BRCA2 carriers. Of the 9 polymorphisms investigated, 7 were associated with breast cancer for BRCA2 carriers (FGFR2, TOX3, MAP3K1, LSP1, 2q35, SLC4A7, 5p12, P = 7 × 10(-11) - 0.03), but only TOX3 and 2q35 were associated with the risk for BRCA1 carriers (P = 0.0049, 0.03, respectively). All risk-associated polymorphisms appear to interact multiplicatively on breast cancer risk for mutation carriers. Based on the joint genotype distribution of the 7 risk-associated SNPs in BRCA2 mutation carriers, the 5% of BRCA2 carriers at highest risk (i.e., between 95th and 100th percentiles) were predicted to have a probability between 80% and 96% of developing breast cancer by age 80, compared with 42% to 50% for the 5% of carriers at lowest risk. Our findings indicated that these risk differences might be sufficient to influence the clinical management of mutation carriers.

  20. Effects of oestrogens and anti-oestrogens on normal breast tissue from women bearing BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Bramley, M; Clarke, R B; Howell, A; Evans, D G R; Armer, T; Baildam, A D; Anderson, E

    2006-01-01

    There is considerable interest in whether anti-oestrogens can be used to prevent breast cancer in women bearing mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. The effects of oestradiol (E2), tamoxifen (TAM) and fulvestrant (FUL) on proliferation and steroid receptor expression were assessed in normal breast epithelium taken from women at varying risks of breast cancer and implanted into athymic nude mice, which were treated with E2 in the presence and absence of TAM or FUL. Tissue samples were taken at various time points thereafter for assessment of proliferative activity and expression of oestrogen and progesterone receptors (ERα and PgR) by immunohistochemistry. Oestradiol increased proliferation in the breast epithelium from women carrying mutations in the BRCA1/2 genes, those otherwise at increased risk and those at population risk of breast cancer. This increase was reduced by both TAM and FUL in all risk groups. In the absence of E2, PgR expression was reduced in all risk groups but significantly more so in the BRCA-mutated groups. Subsequent E2 treatment caused a rapid, complete induction of PgR expression in the population-risk group but not in the high-risk or BRCA-mutated groups in which PgR induction was significantly delayed. These data suggest that the mechanisms by which E2 induces breast epithelial PgR expression are impaired in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers, whereas those regulating proliferation remain intact. We conclude that early anti-oestrogen treatment should prevent breast cancer in very high-risk women. PMID:16538216

  1. Preferences for breast cancer risk reduction among BRCA1/BRCA2 mutation carriers: a discrete-choice experiment.

    PubMed

    Liede, Alexander; Mansfield, Carol A; Metcalfe, Kelly A; Price, Melanie A; Snyder, Carrie; Lynch, Henry T; Friedman, Sue; Amelio, Justyna; Posner, Joshua; Narod, Steven A; Lindeman, Geoffrey J; Evans, D Gareth

    2017-09-01

    Unaffected women who carry BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations face difficult choices about reducing their breast cancer risk. Understanding their treatment preferences could help us improve patient counseling and inform drug trials. The objective was to explore preferences for various risk-reducing options among women with germline BRCA1/2 mutations using a discrete-choice experiment survey and to compare expressed preferences with actual behaviors. A discrete-choice experiment survey was designed wherein women choose between hypothetical treatments to reduce breast cancer risk. The hypothetical treatments were characterized by the extent of breast cancer risk reduction, treatment duration, impact on fertility, hormone levels, risk of uterine cancer, and ease and mode of administration. Data were analyzed using a random-parameters logit model. Women were also asked to express their preference between surgical and chemoprevention options and to report on their actual risk-reduction actions. Women aged 25-55 years with germline BRCA1/2 mutations who were unaffected with breast or ovarian cancer were recruited through research registries at five clinics and a patient advocacy group. Between January 2015 and March 2016, 622 women completed the survey. Breast cancer risk reduction was the most important consideration expressed, followed by maintaining fertility. Among the subset of women who wished to have children in future, the ability to maintain fertility was the most important factor, followed by the extent of risk reduction. Many more women said they would take a chemoprevention drug than had actually taken chemoprevention. Women with BRCA1/2 mutations indicated strong preferences for breast cancer risk reduction and maintaining fertility. The expressed desire to have a safe chemoprevention drug available to them was not met by current chemoprevention options.

  2. Prediction of Breast and Prostate Cancer Risks in Male BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers Using Polygenic Risk Scores

    PubMed Central

    Lecarpentier, Julie; Silvestri, Valentina; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Barrowdale, Daniel; Dennis, Joe; McGuffog, Lesley; Soucy, Penny; Leslie, Goska; Rizzolo, Piera; Navazio, Anna Sara; Valentini, Virginia; Zelli, Veronica; Lee, Andrew; Amin Al Olama, Ali; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; Southey, Melissa; John, Esther M.; Conner, Thomas A.; Goldgar, David E.; Buys, Saundra S.; Janavicius, Ramunas; Steele, Linda; Ding, Yuan Chun; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Hansen, Thomas V.O.; Osorio, Ana; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Toss, Angela; Medici, Veronica; Cortesi, Laura; Zanna, Ines; Palli, Domenico; Radice, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Azzollini, Jacopo; Viel, Alessandra; Cini, Giulia; Damante, Giuseppe; Tommasi, Stefania; Peterlongo, Paolo; Fostira, Florentia; Hamann, Ute; Evans, D. Gareth; Henderson, Alex; Brewer, Carole; Eccles, Diana; Cook, Jackie; Ong, Kai-ren; Walker, Lisa; Side, Lucy E.; Porteous, Mary E.; Davidson, Rosemarie; Hodgson, Shirley; Frost, Debra; Adlard, Julian; Izatt, Louise; Eeles, Ros; Ellis, Steve; Tischkowitz, Marc; Godwin, Andrew K.; Meindl, Alfons; Gehrig, Andrea; Dworniczak, Bernd; Sutter, Christian; Engel, Christoph; Niederacher, Dieter; Steinemann, Doris; Hahnen, Eric; Hauke, Jan; Rhiem, Kerstin; Kast, Karin; Arnold, Norbert; Ditsch, Nina; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Wand, Dorothea; Lasset, Christine; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Belotti, Muriel; Damiola, Francesca; Barjhoux, Laure; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Van Heetvelde, Mattias; Poppe, Bruce; De Leeneer, Kim; Claes, Kathleen B.M.; de la Hoya, Miguel; Garcia-Barberan, Vanesa; Caldes, Trinidad; Perez Segura, Pedro; Kiiski, Johanna I.; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Khan, Sofia; Nevanlinna, Heli; van Asperen, Christi J.; Vaszko, Tibor; Kasler, Miklos; Olah, Edith; Balmaña, Judith; Gutiérrez-Enríquez, Sara; Diez, Orland; Teulé, Alex; Izquierdo, Angel; Darder, Esther; Brunet, Joan; Del Valle, Jesús; Feliubadalo, Lidia; Pujana, Miquel Angel; Lazaro, Conxi; Arason, Adalgeir; Agnarsson, Bjarni A.; Johannsson, Oskar Th.; Barkardottir, Rosa B.; Alducci, Elisa; Tognazzo, Silvia; Montagna, Marco; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Pinto, Pedro; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Holland, Helene; Lee, Jong Won; Lee, Min Hyuk; Lee, Jihyoun; Kim, Sung-Won; Kang, Eunyoung; Kim, Zisun; Sharma, Priyanka; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Vijai, Joseph; Robson, Mark; Lincoln, Anne; Musinsky, Jacob; Gaddam, Pragna; Tan, Yen Y.; Berger, Andreas; Singer, Christian F.; Loud, Jennifer T.; Greene, Mark H.; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Andrulis, Irene L.; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Senter, Leigha; Bojesen, Anders; Nielsen, Henriette Roed; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Sunde, Lone; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Krogh, Lotte; Kruse, Torben A.; Caligo, Maria A.; Yoon, Sook-Yee; Teo, Soo-Hwang; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Huo, Dezheng; Nielsen, Sarah M.; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Domchek, Susan M.; Lorenchick, Christa; Jankowitz, Rachel C.; Campbell, Ian; James, Paul; Mitchell, Gillian; Orr, Nick; Park, Sue Kyung; Thomassen, Mads; Offit, Kenneth; Couch, Fergus J.; Simard, Jacques; Easton, Douglas F.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Ottini, Laura

    2017-01-01

    Purpose BRCA1/2 mutations increase the risk of breast and prostate cancer in men. Common genetic variants modify cancer risks for female carriers of BRCA1/2 mutations. We investigated—for the first time to our knowledge—associations of common genetic variants with breast and prostate cancer risks for male carriers of BRCA1/2 mutations and implications for cancer risk prediction. Materials and Methods We genotyped 1,802 male carriers of BRCA1/2 mutations from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 by using the custom Illumina OncoArray. We investigated the combined effects of established breast and prostate cancer susceptibility variants on cancer risks for male carriers of BRCA1/2 mutations by constructing weighted polygenic risk scores (PRSs) using published effect estimates as weights. Results In male carriers of BRCA1/2 mutations, PRS that was based on 88 female breast cancer susceptibility variants was associated with breast cancer risk (odds ratio per standard deviation of PRS, 1.36; 95% CI, 1.19 to 1.56; P = 8.6 × 10−6). Similarly, PRS that was based on 103 prostate cancer susceptibility variants was associated with prostate cancer risk (odds ratio per SD of PRS, 1.56; 95% CI, 1.35 to 1.81; P = 3.2 × 10−9). Large differences in absolute cancer risks were observed at the extremes of the PRS distribution. For example, prostate cancer risk by age 80 years at the 5th and 95th percentiles of the PRS varies from 7% to 26% for carriers of BRCA1 mutations and from 19% to 61% for carriers of BRCA2 mutations, respectively. Conclusion PRSs may provide informative cancer risk stratification for male carriers of BRCA1/2 mutations that might enable these men and their physicians to make informed decisions on the type and timing of breast and prostate cancer risk management. PMID:28448241

  3. BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in women of different ethnicities undergoing testing for hereditary breast-ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Michael J.; Reid, Julia E.; Burbidge, Lynn A.; Pruss, Dmitry; Deffenbaugh, Amie M.; Frye, Cynthia; Wenstrup, Richard J.; Ward, Brian E.; Scholl, Thomas A.; Noll, Walter W.

    2009-01-01

    Background In women at increased risk for breast and ovarian cancer, the identification of a BRCA1/2 mutation has important implications for screening and prevention counseling. Uncertainty regarding the role of BRCA1/2 testing in high-risk women from diverse ancestral backgrounds exists due to variability in prevalence estimates of deleterious (disease-associated) mutations in non-White populations. We examined the prevalence of BRCA1/2 mutations in an ethnically diverse group of women referred for genetic testing. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional analysis to assess the prevalence of BRCA1/2 mutations in a group of non-Ashkenazi Jewish women undergoing genetic testing. Results From 1996-2006, 46,276 women meeting study criteria underwent DNA full-sequence analysis of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. Deleterious mutations were identified in 12.5% of subjects, and recurrent deleterious mutations (prevalence > 2%) were identified in all ancestral groups. Women of non-European descent were younger (45.9 yrs, SD11.6) than European (50.0 yrs, SD11.9)(p<0.001). Women of African (15.6%)[OR 1.3(1.1-1.5)] and Latin American (14.8%)[OR 1.2(1.1-1.4)] ancestries had a significantly higher prevalence of deleterious BRCA1/2 mutations compared to women of Western European ancestry (12.1%), primarily due to an increased prevalence of BRCA1 mutations in these two groups. Non-European ethnicity was strongly associated with having a variant of uncertain significance; however, re-classification decreased variant reporting (12.8%→5.9%), with women of African ancestry experiencing the largest decline (58%). Conclusions Mutation prevalence is high among women referred for clinical BRCA1/2 testing, and risk is similar across diverse ethnicities. BRCA1/2 testing is integral to cancer risk assessment in all high-risk women. PMID:19241424

  4. Prediction of Breast and Prostate Cancer Risks in Male BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers Using Polygenic Risk Scores.

    PubMed

    Lecarpentier, Julie; Silvestri, Valentina; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Barrowdale, Daniel; Dennis, Joe; McGuffog, Lesley; Soucy, Penny; Leslie, Goska; Rizzolo, Piera; Navazio, Anna Sara; Valentini, Virginia; Zelli, Veronica; Lee, Andrew; Amin Al Olama, Ali; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Southey, Melissa; John, Esther M; Conner, Thomas A; Goldgar, David E; Buys, Saundra S; Janavicius, Ramunas; Steele, Linda; Ding, Yuan Chun; Neuhausen, Susan L; Hansen, Thomas V O; Osorio, Ana; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Toss, Angela; Medici, Veronica; Cortesi, Laura; Zanna, Ines; Palli, Domenico; Radice, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Azzollini, Jacopo; Viel, Alessandra; Cini, Giulia; Damante, Giuseppe; Tommasi, Stefania; Peterlongo, Paolo; Fostira, Florentia; Hamann, Ute; Evans, D Gareth; Henderson, Alex; Brewer, Carole; Eccles, Diana; Cook, Jackie; Ong, Kai-Ren; Walker, Lisa; Side, Lucy E; Porteous, Mary E; Davidson, Rosemarie; Hodgson, Shirley; Frost, Debra; Adlard, Julian; Izatt, Louise; Eeles, Ros; Ellis, Steve; Tischkowitz, Marc; Godwin, Andrew K; Meindl, Alfons; Gehrig, Andrea; Dworniczak, Bernd; Sutter, Christian; Engel, Christoph; Niederacher, Dieter; Steinemann, Doris; Hahnen, Eric; Hauke, Jan; Rhiem, Kerstin; Kast, Karin; Arnold, Norbert; Ditsch, Nina; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Wand, Dorothea; Lasset, Christine; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Belotti, Muriel; Damiola, Francesca; Barjhoux, Laure; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Van Heetvelde, Mattias; Poppe, Bruce; De Leeneer, Kim; Claes, Kathleen B M; de la Hoya, Miguel; Garcia-Barberan, Vanesa; Caldes, Trinidad; Perez Segura, Pedro; Kiiski, Johanna I; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Khan, Sofia; Nevanlinna, Heli; van Asperen, Christi J; Vaszko, Tibor; Kasler, Miklos; Olah, Edith; Balmaña, Judith; Gutiérrez-Enríquez, Sara; Diez, Orland; Teulé, Alex; Izquierdo, Angel; Darder, Esther; Brunet, Joan; Del Valle, Jesús; Feliubadalo, Lidia; Pujana, Miquel Angel; Lazaro, Conxi; Arason, Adalgeir; Agnarsson, Bjarni A; Johannsson, Oskar Th; Barkardottir, Rosa B; Alducci, Elisa; Tognazzo, Silvia; Montagna, Marco; Teixeira, Manuel R; Pinto, Pedro; Spurdle, Amanda B; Holland, Helene; Lee, Jong Won; Lee, Min Hyuk; Lee, Jihyoun; Kim, Sung-Won; Kang, Eunyoung; Kim, Zisun; Sharma, Priyanka; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Vijai, Joseph; Robson, Mark; Lincoln, Anne; Musinsky, Jacob; Gaddam, Pragna; Tan, Yen Y; Berger, Andreas; Singer, Christian F; Loud, Jennifer T; Greene, Mark H; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Andrulis, Irene L; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Senter, Leigha; Bojesen, Anders; Nielsen, Henriette Roed; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Sunde, Lone; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Krogh, Lotte; Kruse, Torben A; Caligo, Maria A; Yoon, Sook-Yee; Teo, Soo-Hwang; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Huo, Dezheng; Nielsen, Sarah M; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Nathanson, Katherine L; Domchek, Susan M; Lorenchick, Christa; Jankowitz, Rachel C; Campbell, Ian; James, Paul; Mitchell, Gillian; Orr, Nick; Park, Sue Kyung; Thomassen, Mads; Offit, Kenneth; Couch, Fergus J; Simard, Jacques; Easton, Douglas F; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Schmutzler, Rita K; Antoniou, Antonis C; Ottini, Laura

    2017-07-10

    Purpose BRCA1/2 mutations increase the risk of breast and prostate cancer in men. Common genetic variants modify cancer risks for female carriers of BRCA1/2 mutations. We investigated-for the first time to our knowledge-associations of common genetic variants with breast and prostate cancer risks for male carriers of BRCA1/ 2 mutations and implications for cancer risk prediction. Materials and Methods We genotyped 1,802 male carriers of BRCA1/2 mutations from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 by using the custom Illumina OncoArray. We investigated the combined effects of established breast and prostate cancer susceptibility variants on cancer risks for male carriers of BRCA1/2 mutations by constructing weighted polygenic risk scores (PRSs) using published effect estimates as weights. Results In male carriers of BRCA1/2 mutations, PRS that was based on 88 female breast cancer susceptibility variants was associated with breast cancer risk (odds ratio per standard deviation of PRS, 1.36; 95% CI, 1.19 to 1.56; P = 8.6 × 10 -6 ). Similarly, PRS that was based on 103 prostate cancer susceptibility variants was associated with prostate cancer risk (odds ratio per SD of PRS, 1.56; 95% CI, 1.35 to 1.81; P = 3.2 × 10 -9 ). Large differences in absolute cancer risks were observed at the extremes of the PRS distribution. For example, prostate cancer risk by age 80 years at the 5th and 95th percentiles of the PRS varies from 7% to 26% for carriers of BRCA1 mutations and from 19% to 61% for carriers of BRCA2 mutations, respectively. Conclusion PRSs may provide informative cancer risk stratification for male carriers of BRCA1/2 mutations that might enable these men and their physicians to make informed decisions on the type and timing of breast and prostate cancer risk management.

  5. Inherited mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 in an unselected multiethnic cohort of Asian patients with breast cancer and healthy controls from Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Wen, Wei Xiong; Allen, Jamie; Lai, Kah Nyin; Mariapun, Shivaani; Hasan, Siti Norhidayu; Ng, Pei Sze; Lee, Daphne Shin-Chi; Lee, Sheau Yee; Yoon, Sook-Yee; Lim, Joanna; Lau, Shao Yan; Decker, Brennan; Pooley, Karen; Dorling, Leila; Luccarini, Craig; Baynes, Caroline; Conroy, Don M; Harrington, Patricia; Simard, Jacques; Yip, Cheng Har; Mohd Taib, Nur Aishah; Ho, Weang Kee; Antoniou, Antonis C; Dunning, Alison M; Easton, Douglas F; Teo, Soo Hwang

    2018-02-01

    Genetic testing for BRCA1 and BRCA2 is offered typically to selected women based on age of onset and family history of cancer. However, current internationally accepted genetic testing referral guidelines are built mostly on data from cancer genetics clinics in women of European descent. To evaluate the appropriateness of such guidelines in Asians, we have determined the prevalence of germ line variants in an unselected cohort of Asian patients with breast cancer and healthy controls. Germ line DNA from a hospital-based study of 2575 unselected patients with breast cancer and 2809 healthy controls were subjected to amplicon-based targeted sequencing of exonic and proximal splice site junction regions of BRCA1 and BRCA2 using the Fluidigm Access Array system, with sequencing conducted on a Illumina HiSeq2500 platform. Variant calling was performed with GATK UnifiedGenotyper and were validated by Sanger sequencing. Fifty-five (2.1%) BRCA1 and 66 (2.6%) BRCA2 deleterious mutations were identified among patients with breast cancer and five (0.18%) BRCA1 and six (0.21%) BRCA2 mutations among controls. One thousand one hundred and eighty-six (46%) patients and 97 (80%) carriers fulfilled the National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines for genetic testing. Five per cent of unselected Asian patients with breast cancer carry deleterious variants in BRCA1 or BRCA2 . While current referral guidelines identified the majority of carriers, one in two patients would be referred for genetic services. Given that such services are largely unavailable in majority of low-resource settings in Asia, our study highlights the need for more efficient guidelines to identify at-risk individuals in Asia. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  6. Inherited mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 in an unselected multiethnic cohort of Asian patients with breast cancer and healthy controls from Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Wei Xiong; Allen, Jamie; Lai, Kah Nyin; Mariapun, Shivaani; Hasan, Siti Norhidayu; Ng, Pei Sze; Lee, Daphne Shin-Chi; Lee, Sheau Yee; Yoon, Sook-Yee; Lim, Joanna; Lau, Shao Yan; Decker, Brennan; Pooley, Karen; Dorling, Leila; Luccarini, Craig; Baynes, Caroline; Conroy, Don M; Harrington, Patricia; Simard, Jacques; Yip, Cheng Har; Mohd Taib, Nur Aishah; Ho, Weang Kee; Antoniou, Antonis C; Dunning, Alison M; Easton, Douglas F

    2018-01-01

    Background Genetic testing for BRCA1 and BRCA2 is offered typically to selected women based on age of onset and family history of cancer. However, current internationally accepted genetic testing referral guidelines are built mostly on data from cancer genetics clinics in women of European descent. To evaluate the appropriateness of such guidelines in Asians, we have determined the prevalence of germ line variants in an unselected cohort of Asian patients with breast cancer and healthy controls. Methods Germ line DNA from a hospital-based study of 2575 unselected patients with breast cancer and 2809 healthy controls were subjected to amplicon-based targeted sequencing of exonic and proximal splice site junction regions of BRCA1 and BRCA2 using the Fluidigm Access Array system, with sequencing conducted on a Illumina HiSeq2500 platform. Variant calling was performed with GATK UnifiedGenotyper and were validated by Sanger sequencing. Results Fifty-five (2.1%) BRCA1 and 66 (2.6%) BRCA2 deleterious mutations were identified among patients with breast cancer and five (0.18%) BRCA1 and six (0.21%) BRCA2 mutations among controls. One thousand one hundred and eighty-six (46%) patients and 97 (80%) carriers fulfilled the National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines for genetic testing. Conclusion Five per cent of unselected Asian patients with breast cancer carry deleterious variants in BRCA1 or BRCA2. While current referral guidelines identified the majority of carriers, one in two patients would be referred for genetic services. Given that such services are largely unavailable in majority of low-resource settings in Asia, our study highlights the need for more efficient guidelines to identify at-risk individuals in Asia. PMID:28993434

  7. Cross-species comparison of aCGH data from mouse and human BRCA1- and BRCA2-mutated breast cancers

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Genomic gains and losses are a result of genomic instability in many types of cancers. BRCA1- and BRCA2-mutated breast cancers are associated with increased amounts of chromosomal aberrations, presumably due their functions in genome repair. Some of these genomic aberrations may harbor genes whose absence or overexpression may give rise to cellular growth advantage. So far, it has not been easy to identify the driver genes underlying gains and losses. A powerful approach to identify these driver genes could be a cross-species comparison of array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) data from cognate mouse and human tumors. Orthologous regions of mouse and human tumors that are commonly gained or lost might represent essential genomic regions selected for gain or loss during tumor development. Methods To identify genomic regions that are associated with BRCA1- and BRCA2-mutated breast cancers we compared aCGH data from 130 mouse Brca1Δ/Δ;p53Δ/Δ, Brca2Δ/Δ;p53Δ/Δ and p53Δ/Δ mammary tumor groups with 103 human BRCA1-mutated, BRCA2-mutated and non-hereditary breast cancers. Results Our genome-wide cross-species analysis yielded a complete collection of loci and genes that are commonly gained or lost in mouse and human breast cancer. Principal common CNAs were the well known MYC-associated gain and RB1/INTS6-associated loss that occurred in all mouse and human tumor groups, and the AURKA-associated gain occurred in BRCA2-related tumors from both species. However, there were also important differences between tumor profiles of both species, such as the prominent gain on chromosome 10 in mouse Brca2Δ/Δ;p53Δ/Δ tumors and the PIK3CA associated 3q gain in human BRCA1-mutated tumors, which occurred in tumors from one species but not in tumors from the other species. This disparity in recurrent aberrations in mouse and human tumors might be due to differences in tumor cell type or genomic organization between both species. Conclusions The selection

  8. Common variants associated with breast cancer in genome-wide association studies are modifiers of breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xianshu; Pankratz, V Shane; Fredericksen, Zachary; Tarrell, Robert; Karaus, Mary; McGuffog, Lesley; Pharaoh, Paul D P; Ponder, Bruce A J; Dunning, Alison M; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare; Frost, Debra; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Houdayer, Claude; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Hooning, Maartje J; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J; Spurdle, Amanda; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Schmutzler, Rita K; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Domchek, Susan M; Nathanson, Katherine L; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Singer, Christian F; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Dressler, Catherina; Fink, Anneliese; Szabo, Csilla I; Zikan, Michal; Foretova, Lenka; Claes, Kathleen; Thomas, Gilles; Hoover, Robert N; Hunter, David J; Chanock, Stephen J; Easton, Douglas F; Antoniou, Antonis C; Couch, Fergus J

    2010-07-15

    Recent studies have identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that significantly modify breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Since these risk modifiers were originally identified as genetic risk factors for breast cancer in genome-wide association studies (GWASs), additional risk modifiers for BRCA1 and BRCA2 may be identified from promising signals discovered in breast cancer GWAS. A total of 350 SNPs identified as candidate breast cancer risk factors (P < 1 x 10(-3)) in two breast cancer GWAS studies were genotyped in 3451 BRCA1 and 2006 BRCA2 mutation carriers from nine centers. Associations with breast cancer risk were assessed using Cox models weighted for penetrance. Eight SNPs in BRCA1 carriers and 12 SNPs in BRCA2 carriers, representing an enrichment over the number expected, were significantly associated with breast cancer risk (P(trend) < 0.01). The minor alleles of rs6138178 in SNRPB and rs6602595 in CAMK1D displayed the strongest associations in BRCA1 carriers (HR = 0.78, 95% CI: 0.69-0.90, P(trend) = 3.6 x 10(-4) and HR = 1.25, 95% CI: 1.10-1.41, P(trend) = 4.2 x 10(-4)), whereas rs9393597 in LOC134997 and rs12652447 in FBXL7 showed the strongest associations in BRCA2 carriers (HR = 1.55, 95% CI: 1.25-1.92, P(trend) = 6 x 10(-5) and HR = 1.37, 95% CI: 1.16-1.62, P(trend) = 1.7 x 10(-4)). The magnitude and direction of the associations were consistent with the original GWAS. In subsequent risk assessment studies, the loci appeared to interact multiplicatively for breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers. Promising candidate SNPs from GWAS were identified as modifiers of breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers. Upon further validation, these SNPs together with other genetic and environmental factors may improve breast cancer risk assessment in these populations.

  9. Common genetic variation at BARD1 is not associated with Breast cancer risk in BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers

    PubMed Central

    Spurdle, Amanda B.; Marquart, Louise; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Sinilnikova, Olga; Wan, Fei; Chen, Xiaoqing; Beesley, Jonathan; Singer, Christian F; Dressler, Anne-Catharine; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Blum, Joanne L.; Tung, Nadine; Weitzel, Jeff; Lynch, Henry; Garber, Judy; Easton, Douglas F.; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare T.; Frost, Debra; Conroy, Don; Evans, D. Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Eeles, Ros; Izatt, Louise; Davidson, Rosemarie; Chu, Carol; Eccles, Diana; Selkirk, Christina G.; Daly, Mary; Isaacs, Claudine; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Buecher, Bruno; Belotti, Muriel; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Barjhoux, Laure; Verny-Pierre, Carole; Lasset, Christine; Dreyfus, Hélène; Pujol, Pascal; Collonge-Rame, Marie-Agnès; Rookus, Matti A.; Verhoef, Senno; Kriege, Mieke; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Ausems, Margreet G.E.M.; van Os, Theo A.; Wijnen, Juul; Devilee, Peter; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E.J.; Blok, Marinus J.; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Nevanlinna, Heli; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubiński, Jan; Huzarski, Tomasz; Byrski, Tomasz; Durocher, Francine; Couch, Fergus J.; Lindor, Noralane M.; Wang, Xianshu; Thomassen, Mads; Domchek, Susan; Nathanson, Kate; Caligo, MA; Jernström, Helena; Liljegren, Annelie; Ehrencrona, Hans; Karlsson, Per; Ganz, Patricia A.; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Tomlinson, Gail; Neuhausen, Susan; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Rebbeck, Timothy R.

    2011-01-01

    Background Inherited BRCA1 and BRCA2 (BRCA1/2) mutations confer elevated breast cancer risk. Knowledge of factors that can improve breast cancer risk assessment in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers may improve personalized cancer prevention strategies. Methods A cohort of 5,546 BRCA1 and 2,865 BRCA2 mutation carriers was used to evaluate risk of breast cancer associated with BARD1 Cys557Ser. In a second non-independent cohort of 1,537 of BRCA1 and 839 BRCA2 mutation carriers, BARD1 haplotypes were also evaluated. Results The BARD1 Cys557Ser variant was not significantly associated with risk of breast cancer from single SNP analysis, with a pooled effect estimate of 0.90 (95%CI: 0.71-1.15) in BRCA1 carriers and 0.87 (95%CI: 0.59-1.29) in BRCA2 carriers. Further analysis of haplotypes at BARD1 also revealed no evidence that additional common genetic variation not captured by Cys557Ser was associated with breast cancer risk. Conclusion Evidence to date does not support a role for BARD1 variation, including the Cy557Ser variant, as a modifier of risk in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. Impact Interactors of BRCA1/2 have been implicated as modifiers of BRCA1/2-associated cancer risk. Our finding that BARD1 does not contribute to this risk modification may focus research on other genes that do modify BRCA1/2-associated cancer risk. PMID:21393566

  10. [Views of Icelandic women towards genetic counseling - and testing of BRCA2 mutations].

    PubMed

    Jonsdottir, Thordis; Valdimarsdottir, Heiddis; Tryggvadottir, Laufey; Lund, Sigrun Helga; Thordardottir, Marianna; Magnusson, Magnus Karl; Valdimarsdottir, Unnur

    2018-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to explore the attitudes of Icelandic women towards existing genetic information, genetic counseling and genetic testing for BRCA mutations which dramatically increase risk for aggressive cancers. Materials and methods Women attending the cancer prevention clinic in Reykjavik, capital of Iceland, from October 12th until November 20th 2015 received an invitation to participate. Participation involved answering a short online questionnaire about background, family history of cancer as well as attitudes towards genetic counseling, BRCA testing and preventive use of such information. Descriptive statistics and chi-square tests were used to describe differences in attitudes towards those questions between subgroups of women. Results 1129 women (69% response rate) answered the questionnaire. Mean age was 47 years (span 21-76 years). Around half (47%) had heard fairly much about the mutations. Independent of family history of cancer, the majority of women were positive towards receiving genetic counseling (79%) and to undergo genetic testing (83%) for BRCA mutation with younger women being more interested than older women. On the other hand, only 4% of the women had already received genetic counseling and 7% undergone genetic testing. Women with family history of cancer were more knowledgeable about BRCA mutations (p<0.0001) and were less afraid of the consequence of being a mutation carrier (p<0.0001) compared to those with little or no family history. Regardless of family history, half (49%) worried that results from genetic testing could influence their health insurance. Almost all, or 97% of the women, were positive or very positive toward using existing genetic information obtained through scientific work, to inform affected indi-viduals of their mutation status. Conclusion Icelandic women are positive towards genetic counseling and testing for BRCA mutations although half of them worry that a positive result might affect their

  11. Fanconi anemia with biallelic FANCD1/BRCA2 mutations - Case report of a family with three affected children.

    PubMed

    Svojgr, Karel; Sumerauer, David; Puchmajerova, Alena; Vicha, Ales; Hrusak, Ondrej; Michalova, Kyra; Malis, Josef; Smisek, Petr; Kyncl, Martin; Novotna, Drahuse; Machackova, Eva; Jencik, Jan; Pycha, Karel; Vaculik, Miroslav; Kodet, Roman; Stary, Jan

    2016-03-01

    Fanconi anemia, complementation group D1 with bi-allelic FANCD1 (BRCA2) mutations, is a very rare genetic disorder characterized by early onset of childhood malignancies, including acute leukemia, brain cancer and nephroblastoma. Here, we present a case report of a family with 3 affected children in terms of treatment outcome, toxicity and characterization of the malignancies using comprehensive cytogenetic analysis. The first child was diagnosed with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia when he was 11 months old. During chemotherapy, he suffered from repeated pancytopenia, sepsis and severe vincristine polyneuropathy, and 18 months after primary diagnosis, he succumbed to secondary acute monocytic leukemia. The second child was diagnosed with stage 2 triphasic nephroblastoma (Wilms tumor), when he was 3 years and 11 months old. During chemotherapy, he suffered from vincristine polyneuropathy. Currently, he is in complete remission, 29 months following the initial diagnosis. The third child was diagnosed with medulloblastoma with classical histology, when she was 4 years and 5 months old. After the first cycle of chemotherapy, she suffered from prolonged pancytopenia, sepsis and severe skin and mucosal toxicity. Six weeks after primary diagnosis, a first relapse in the posterior fossa was diagnosed, and at 7 and half months after primary diagnosis, a second relapse was diagnosed that led to the patient's death. Our case report underscores tumor heterogeneity, treatment toxicity and poor outcome in Fanconi anemia patients of complementation group D1. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Ileal metastasis of breast cancer in a patient with a BRCA2 gene mutation: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Cho, Dong Hui; Jeon, Young San; Choi, Min-Young; Lee, Se Kyung; Kim, Sang Min; Hur, Sung Mo; Koo, Min Young; Bae, Soo Youn; Choe, Jun-Ho; Kim, Jung-Han; Kim, Jee Soo; Nam, Seok Jin; Yang, Jung-Hyun; Lee, Jeong Eon

    2011-12-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in females. Common sites of metastases include the liver, lung, bone, and brain, while metastases to the extrahepatic digestive system are very rare. This report presents a patient diagnosed with breast carcinoma metastasis in the terminal ileum. The patient underwent breast-conserving surgery on both breasts because of breast cancer at the age of 46 years. Both breast cancers were consistent with stage I invasive ductal carcinomas. Colonoscopy during an investigation for hematochezia revealed a 2-cm ulceration in the terminal ileum 22 months later, and microscopic examination of a biopsy specimen of the ulceration revealed a poorly differentiated mass that was strongly suggestive of metastatic adenocarcinoma with endolymphatic tumor emboli. She underwent hand-assisted laparoscopic ileocecectomy because of ileal metastasis. She had a family history of breast cancer (sister) and colon cancer (brother). She exhibited HER2/neu discordance and carried the BRCA2 gene mutation. Surgeons should remain aware that breast cancer can metastasize to the gastrointestinal tract.

  13. Comparing Coordinated Versus Sequential Salpingo-Oophorectomy for BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers With Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    S Chapman, Jocelyn; Roddy, Erika; Panighetti, Anna; Hwang, Shelley; Crawford, Beth; Powell, Bethan; Chen, Lee-May

    2016-12-01

    Women with breast cancer who carry BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations must also consider risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy (RRSO) and how to coordinate this procedure with their breast surgery. We report the factors associated with coordinated versus sequential surgery and compare the outcomes of each. Patients in our cancer risk database who had breast cancer and a known deleterious BRCA1/2 mutation before undergoing breast surgery were included. Women who chose concurrent RRSO at the time of breast surgery were compared to those who did not. Sixty-two patients knew their mutation carrier status before undergoing breast cancer surgery. Forty-three patients (69%) opted for coordinated surgeries, and 19 (31%) underwent sequential surgeries at a median follow-up of 4.4 years. Women who underwent coordinated surgery were significantly older than those who chose sequential surgery (median age of 45 vs. 39 years; P = .025). There were no differences in comorbidities between groups. Patients who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy were more likely to undergo coordinated surgery (65% vs. 37%; P = .038). Sequential surgery patients had longer hospital stays (4.79 vs. 3.44 days, P = .01) and longer operating times (8.25 vs. 6.38 hours, P = .006) than patients who elected combined surgery. Postoperative complications were minor and were no more likely in either group (odds ratio, 4.76; 95% confidence interval, 0.56-40.6). Coordinating RRSO with breast surgery is associated with receipt of neoadjuvant chemotherapy, longer operating times, and hospital stays without an observed increase in complications. In the absence of risk, surgical options can be personalized. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. When to Consider Risk-Reducing Mastectomy in BRCA1/BRCA2 Mutation Carriers with Advanced Stage Ovarian Cancer: a Case Study Illustrating the Genetic Counseling Challenges.

    PubMed

    Speight, Beverley; Tischkowitz, Marc

    2017-12-01

    Germline mutations in BRCA1/BRCA2 significantly increase the risk of breast and ovarian cancer in women. This case report describes a BRCA1 germline mutation identified in a woman with stage IV epithelial ovarian cancer and the provision of genetic counseling about BRCA1-associated breast cancer risk in the three years following diagnosis. The report centers on the patient's enquiry about risk-reducing breast surgery. We focus on the challenges for health professionals and patients in understanding and balancing the risks and benefits of major prophylactic surgery in the context of a potentially life-limiting cancer diagnosis. Breast cancer risk management in BRCA1/BRCA2 carriers with advanced ovarian cancer is an under-explored area of genetic counseling research. This article includes a case report, a review of the relevant literature and considers some implications for practice.

  15. Male breast cancer in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers: pathology data from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2.

    PubMed

    Silvestri, Valentina; Barrowdale, Daniel; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Neuhausen, Susan L; Fox, Stephen; Karlan, Beth Y; Mitchell, Gillian; James, Paul; Thull, Darcy L; Zorn, Kristin K; Carter, Natalie J; Nathanson, Katherine L; Domchek, Susan M; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Ramus, Susan J; Nussbaum, Robert L; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Rantala, Johanna; Yoon, Sook-Yee; Caligo, Maria A; Spugnesi, Laura; Bojesen, Anders; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Thomassen, Mads; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Senter, Leigha; Andrulis, Irene L; Glendon, Gord; Hulick, Peter J; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Greene, Mark H; Mai, Phuong L; Singer, Christian F; Rappaport-Fuerhauser, Christine; Kramer, Gero; Vijai, Joseph; Offit, Kenneth; Robson, Mark; Lincoln, Anne; Jacobs, Lauren; Machackova, Eva; Foretova, Lenka; Navratilova, Marie; Vasickova, Petra; Couch, Fergus J; Hallberg, Emily; Ruddy, Kathryn J; Sharma, Priyanka; Kim, Sung-Won; Teixeira, Manuel R; Pinto, Pedro; Montagna, Marco; Matricardi, Laura; Arason, Adalgeir; Johannsson, Oskar Th; Barkardottir, Rosa B; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Izquierdo, Angel; Pujana, Miguel Angel; Balmaña, Judith; Diez, Orland; Ivady, Gabriella; Papp, Janos; Olah, Edith; Kwong, Ava; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Perez Segura, Pedro; Caldes, Trinidad; Van Maerken, Tom; Poppe, Bruce; Claes, Kathleen B M; Isaacs, Claudine; Elan, Camille; Lasset, Christine; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Barjhoux, Laure; Belotti, Muriel; Meindl, Alfons; Gehrig, Andrea; Sutter, Christian; Engel, Christoph; Niederacher, Dieter; Steinemann, Doris; Hahnen, Eric; Kast, Karin; Arnold, Norbert; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wand, Dorothea; Godwin, Andrew K; Evans, D Gareth; Frost, Debra; Perkins, Jo; Adlard, Julian; Izatt, Louise; Platte, Radka; Eeles, Ros; Ellis, Steve; Hamann, Ute; Garber, Judy; Fostira, Florentia; Fountzilas, George; Pasini, Barbara; Giannini, Giuseppe; Rizzolo, Piera; Russo, Antonio; Cortesi, Laura; Papi, Laura; Varesco, Liliana; Palli, Domenico; Zanna, Ines; Savarese, Antonella; Radice, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Barile, Monica; Bonanni, Bernardo; Viel, Alessandra; Pensotti, Valeria; Tommasi, Stefania; Peterlongo, Paolo; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Osorio, Ana; Benitez, Javier; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ejlertsen, Bent; Hansen, Thomas V O; Steele, Linda; Ding, Yuan Chun; Tung, Nadine; Janavicius, Ramunas; Goldgar, David E; Buys, Saundra S; Daly, Mary B; Bane, Anita; Terry, Mary Beth; John, Esther M; Southey, Melissa; Easton, Douglas F; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C; Ottini, Laura

    2016-02-09

    BRCA1 and, more commonly, BRCA2 mutations are associated with increased risk of male breast cancer (MBC). However, only a paucity of data exists on the pathology of breast cancers (BCs) in men with BRCA1/2 mutations. Using the largest available dataset, we determined whether MBCs arising in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers display specific pathologic features and whether these features differ from those of BRCA1/2 female BCs (FBCs). We characterised the pathologic features of 419 BRCA1/2 MBCs and, using logistic regression analysis, contrasted those with data from 9675 BRCA1/2 FBCs and with population-based data from 6351 MBCs in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database. Among BRCA2 MBCs, grade significantly decreased with increasing age at diagnosis (P = 0.005). Compared with BRCA2 FBCs, BRCA2 MBCs were of significantly higher stage (P for trend = 2 × 10(-5)) and higher grade (P for trend = 0.005) and were more likely to be oestrogen receptor-positive [odds ratio (OR) 10.59; 95 % confidence interval (CI) 5.15-21.80] and progesterone receptor-positive (OR 5.04; 95 % CI 3.17-8.04). With the exception of grade, similar patterns of associations emerged when we compared BRCA1 MBCs and FBCs. BRCA2 MBCs also presented with higher grade than MBCs from the SEER database (P for trend = 4 × 10(-12)). On the basis of the largest series analysed to date, our results show that BRCA1/2 MBCs display distinct pathologic characteristics compared with BRCA1/2 FBCs, and we identified a specific BRCA2-associated MBC phenotype characterised by a variable suggesting greater biological aggressiveness (i.e., high histologic grade). These findings could lead to the development of gender-specific risk prediction models and guide clinical strategies appropriate for MBC management.

  16. BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in ovarian cancer patients from China: ethnic-related mutations in BRCA1 associated with an increased risk of ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Shi, Tingyan; Wang, Pan; Xie, Caixia; Yin, Sheng; Shi, Di; Wei, Congchong; Tang, Wenbin; Jiang, Rong; Cheng, Xi; Wei, Qingyi; Wang, Qing; Zang, Rongyu

    2017-05-01

    BRCA1/2 are cancer predisposition genes involved in hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC). Mutation carriers display an increased sensitivity to inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). Despite a number of small-size hospital-based studies being previously reported, there is not yet, to our knowledge, precise data of BRCA1/2 mutations among Chinese ovarian cancer patients. We performed a multicenter cohort study including 916 unselected consecutive epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) patients from eastern China to screen for BRCA1/2 mutations using the next-generation sequencing approach. A total of 153 EOC patients were found to carry pathogenic germline mutations in BRCA1/2, accounting for an overall mutation incidence of 16.7% with the predominance in BRCA1 (13.1%) compared with BRCA2 (3.9%). We identified 53 novel pathogenic mutations, among which the c.283_286delCTTG and the c.4573C > T of BRCA1 were both found in two unrelated patients. More importantly, the most common mutation found in this study, c.5470_5477del8 was most likely to be Chinese population-related without an apparent founder origin. This hot-spot mutation was presumably associated with an increased risk of ovarian cancer. Taken together, germline BRCA1/2 mutations were common in Chinese EOC patients with distinct mutational spectrum compared to Western populations. Our study contributes to the current understanding of BRCA1/2 mutation prevalence worldwide. We recommend BRCA1/2 genetic testing to all Chinese women diagnosed with EOC to identify HBOC families, to provide genetic counseling and clinical management for at-risk relatives. Mutation carriers may also benefit from PARP-targeted therapies. © 2017 UICC.

  17. Associations of common breast cancer susceptibility alleles with risk of breast cancer subtypes in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Neuhausen, Susan L; Robson, Mark; Barrowdale, Daniel; McGuffog, Lesley; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Andrulis, Irene L; Spurdle, Amanda B; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Schmutzler, Rita K; Engel, Christoph; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Nevanlinna, Heli; Thomassen, Mads; Southey, Melissa; Radice, Paolo; Ramus, Susan J; Domchek, Susan M; Nathanson, Katherine L; Lee, Andrew; Healey, Sue; Nussbaum, Robert L; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Arun, Banu K; James, Paul; Karlan, Beth Y; Lester, Jenny; Cass, Ilana; Terry, Mary Beth; Daly, Mary B; Goldgar, David E; Buys, Saundra S; Janavicius, Ramunas; Tihomirova, Laima; Tung, Nadine; Dorfling, Cecilia M; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Steele, Linda; v O Hansen, Thomas; Ejlertsen, Bent; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Nielsen, Finn C; Dennis, Joe; Cunningham, Julie; Hart, Steven; Slager, Susan; Osorio, Ana; Benitez, Javier; Duran, Mercedes; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Tafur, Isaac; Hander, Mary; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Roversi, Gaia; Scuvera, Giulietta; Bonanni, Bernardo; Mariani, Paolo; Volorio, Sara; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Varesco, Liliana; Papi, Laura; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Giannini, Giuseppe; Fostira, Florentia; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Garber, Judy; Hamann, Ute; Donaldson, Alan; Brewer, Carole; Foo, Claire; Evans, D Gareth; Frost, Debra; Eccles, Diana; Douglas, Fiona; Brady, Angela; Cook, Jackie; Tischkowitz, Marc; Adlard, Julian; Barwell, Julian; Ong, Kai-ren; Walker, Lisa; Izatt, Louise; Side, Lucy E; Kennedy, M John; Rogers, Mark T; Porteous, Mary E; Morrison, Patrick J; Platte, Radka; Eeles, Ros; Davidson, Rosemarie; Hodgson, Shirley; Ellis, Steve; Godwin, Andrew K; Rhiem, Kerstin; Meindl, Alfons; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Niederacher, Dieter; Sutter, Christian; Steinemann, Doris; Bogdanova-Markov, Nadja; Kast, Karin; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Gehrig, Andrea; Markiefka, Birgid; Buecher, Bruno; Lefol, Cédrick; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Rouleau, Etienne; Prieur, Fabienne; Damiola, Francesca; Barjhoux, Laure; Faivre, Laurence; Longy, Michel; Sevenet, Nicolas; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Bonadona, Valérie; Caux-Moncoutier, Virginie; Isaacs, Claudine; Van Maerken, Tom; Claes, Kathleen; Piedmonte, Marion; Andrews, Lesley; Hays, John; Rodriguez, Gustavo C; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Khan, Sofia; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Aalfs, Cora M; de Lange, J L; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E J; van der Hout, Annemarie H; Wijnen, Juul T; van Roozendaal, K E P; Mensenkamp, Arjen R; van den Ouweland, Ans M W; van Deurzen, Carolien H M; van der Luijt, Rob B; Olah, Edith; Diez, Orland; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Teulé, Alex; Menendez, Mireia; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Cybulski, Cezary; Gronwald, Jacek; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Arason, Adalgeir; Maugard, Christine; Soucy, Penny; Montagna, Marco; Agata, Simona; Teixeira, Manuel R; Olswold, Curtis; Lindor, Noralane; Pankratz, Vernon S; Hallberg, Emily; Wang, Xianshu; Szabo, Csilla I; Vijai, Joseph; Jacobs, Lauren; Corines, Marina; Lincoln, Anne; Berger, Andreas; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Singer, Christian F; Rappaport, Christine; Kaulich, Daphne Gschwantler; Pfeiler, Georg; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Phelan, Catherine M; Mai, Phuong L; Greene, Mark H; Rennert, Gad; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Glendon, Gord; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Bojesen, Anders; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Caligo, Maria A; Friedman, Eitan; Berger, Raanan; Laitman, Yael; Rantala, Johanna; Arver, Brita; Loman, Niklas; Borg, Ake; Ehrencrona, Hans; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Simard, Jacques; Easton, Douglas F; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Offit, Kenneth; Couch, Fergus J; Antoniou, Antonis C

    2014-12-31

    More than 70 common alleles are known to be involved in breast cancer (BC) susceptibility, and several exhibit significant heterogeneity in their associations with different BC subtypes. Although there are differences in the association patterns between BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers and the general population for several loci, no study has comprehensively evaluated the associations of all known BC susceptibility alleles with risk of BC subtypes in BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers. We used data from 15,252 BRCA1 and 8,211 BRCA2 carriers to analyze the associations between approximately 200,000 genetic variants on the iCOGS array and risk of BC subtypes defined by estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) and triple-negative- (TN) status; morphologic subtypes; histological grade; and nodal involvement. The estimated BC hazard ratios (HRs) for the 74 known BC alleles in BRCA1 carriers exhibited moderate correlations with the corresponding odds ratios from the general population. However, their associations with ER-positive BC in BRCA1 carriers were more consistent with the ER-positive associations in the general population (intraclass correlation (ICC) = 0.61, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.45 to 0.74), and the same was true when considering ER-negative associations in both groups (ICC = 0.59, 95% CI: 0.42 to 0.72). Similarly, there was strong correlation between the ER-positive associations for BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers (ICC = 0.67, 95% CI: 0.52 to 0.78), whereas ER-positive associations in any one of the groups were generally inconsistent with ER-negative associations in any of the others. After stratifying by ER status in mutation carriers, additional significant associations were observed. Several previously unreported variants exhibited associations at P <10(-6) in the analyses by PR status, HER2 status, TN phenotype, morphologic subtypes, histological grade and nodal involvement. Differences in

  18. An original phylogenetic approach identified mitochondrial haplogroup T1a1 as inversely associated with breast cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Blein, Sophie; Bardel, Claire; Danjean, Vincent; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Barrowdale, Daniel; Lee, Andrew; Dennis, Joe; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Soucy, Penny; Terry, Mary Beth; Chung, Wendy K; Goldgar, David E; Buys, Saundra S; Janavicius, Ramunas; Tihomirova, Laima; Tung, Nadine; Dorfling, Cecilia M; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Neuhausen, Susan L; Ding, Yuan Chun; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ejlertsen, Bent; Nielsen, Finn C; Hansen, Thomas Vo; Osorio, Ana; Benitez, Javier; Conejero, Raquel Andrés; Segota, Ena; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Thelander, Margo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Radice, Paolo; Pensotti, Valeria; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Bonanni, Bernardo; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Scuvera, Giulietta; Manoukian, Siranoush; Varesco, Liliana; Capone, Gabriele L; Papi, Laura; Ottini, Laura; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Garber, Judy; Hamann, Ute; Donaldson, Alan; Brady, Angela; Brewer, Carole; Foo, Claire; Evans, D Gareth; Frost, Debra; Eccles, Diana; Douglas, Fiona; Cook, Jackie; Adlard, Julian; Barwell, Julian; Walker, Lisa; Izatt, Louise; Side, Lucy E; Kennedy, M John; Tischkowitz, Marc; Rogers, Mark T; Porteous, Mary E; Morrison, Patrick J; Platte, Radka; Eeles, Ros; Davidson, Rosemarie; Hodgson, Shirley; Cole, Trevor; Godwin, Andrew K; Isaacs, Claudine; Claes, Kathleen; De Leeneer, Kim; Meindl, Alfons; Gehrig, Andrea; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Sutter, Christian; Engel, Christoph; Niederacher, Dieter; Steinemann, Doris; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Kast, Karin; Rhiem, Kerstin; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Schmutzler, Rita K; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Markov, Nadja Bogdanova; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; de Pauw, Antoine; Lefol, Cédrick; Lasset, Christine; Leroux, Dominique; Rouleau, Etienne; Damiola, Francesca; Dreyfus, Hélène; Barjhoux, Laure; Golmard, Lisa; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Bonadona, Valérie; Sornin, Valérie; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Carter, Jonathan; Van Le, Linda; Piedmonte, Marion; DiSilvestro, Paul A; de la Hoya, Miguel; Caldes, Trinidad; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Jager, Agnes; van den Ouweland, Ans Mw; Kets, Carolien M; Aalfs, Cora M; van Leeuwen, Flora E; Hogervorst, Frans Bl; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne Ej; Oosterwijk, Jan C; van Roozendaal, Kees Ep; Rookus, Matti A; Devilee, Peter; van der Luijt, Rob B; Olah, Edith; Diez, Orland; Teulé, Alex; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Del Valle, Jesús; Jakubowska, Anna; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Gronwald, Jacek; Lubinski, Jan; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Agnarsson, Bjarni A; Maugard, Christine; Amadori, Alberto; Montagna, Marco; Teixeira, Manuel R; Spurdle, Amanda B; Foulkes, William; Olswold, Curtis; Lindor, Noralane M; Pankratz, Vernon S; Szabo, Csilla I; Lincoln, Anne; Jacobs, Lauren; Corines, Marina; Robson, Mark; Vijai, Joseph; Berger, Andreas; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Singer, Christian F; Rappaport, Christine; Kaulich, Daphne Geschwantler; Pfeiler, Georg; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Greene, Mark H; Mai, Phuong L; Rennert, Gad; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Andrulis, Irene L; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Thomassen, Mads; Kruse, Torben A; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Caligo, Maria A; Friedman, Eitan; Zidan, Jamal; Laitman, Yael; Lindblom, Annika; Melin, Beatrice; Arver, Brita; Loman, Niklas; Rosenquist, Richard; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Nussbaum, Robert L; Ramus, Susan J; Nathanson, Katherine L; Domchek, Susan M; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Arun, Banu K; Mitchell, Gillian; Karlan, Beth Y; Lester, Jenny; Orsulic, Sandra; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Thomas, Gilles; Simard, Jacques; Couch, Fergus J; Offit, Kenneth; Easton, Douglas F; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Phelan, Catherine M; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Cox, David G

    2015-04-25

    Individuals carrying pathogenic mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes have a high lifetime risk of breast cancer. BRCA1 and BRCA2 are involved in DNA double-strand break repair, DNA alterations that can be caused by exposure to reactive oxygen species, a main source of which are mitochondria. Mitochondrial genome variations affect electron transport chain efficiency and reactive oxygen species production. Individuals with different mitochondrial haplogroups differ in their metabolism and sensitivity to oxidative stress. Variability in mitochondrial genetic background can alter reactive oxygen species production, leading to cancer risk. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that mitochondrial haplogroups modify breast cancer risk in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. We genotyped 22,214 (11,421 affected, 10,793 unaffected) mutation carriers belonging to the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 for 129 mitochondrial polymorphisms using the iCOGS array. Haplogroup inference and association detection were performed using a phylogenetic approach. ALTree was applied to explore the reference mitochondrial evolutionary tree and detect subclades enriched in affected or unaffected individuals. We discovered that subclade T1a1 was depleted in affected BRCA2 mutation carriers compared with the rest of clade T (hazard ratio (HR) = 0.55; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.34 to 0.88; P = 0.01). Compared with the most frequent haplogroup in the general population (that is, H and T clades), the T1a1 haplogroup has a HR of 0.62 (95% CI, 0.40 to 0.95; P = 0.03). We also identified three potential susceptibility loci, including G13708A/rs28359178, which has demonstrated an inverse association with familial breast cancer risk. This study illustrates how original approaches such as the phylogeny-based method we used can empower classical molecular epidemiological studies aimed at identifying association or risk modification effects.

  19. Founder and Recurrent Mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Genes in Latin American Countries: State of the Art and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Background. Numerous epidemiological factors affect the probability of developing breast or ovarian cancer, but no predictor is as determinant as inheriting a mutation in BRCA1 or BRCA2. The concept of the founder effect explains the reduced genetic variability in some populations, according to the theory that new populations can be formed from a reduced number of individuals, so the new population would carry only a small fraction of the genetic variability of the original population. The main purpose of this review is to provide an update on the state of the art in founder mutations and some recurrent mutations that have recently been described in Latin America. Methods. A literature search was performed in the electronic databases of PUBMED, EMBASE, LILACS, and BIREME using the terms BRCA1, BRCA2, founder mutation, Latin American population, and Hispanic. Sixty-two papers were identified, of which 38 were considered relevant for this review. Each result is shown per country. Results. In Latin America, clear founder effects have been reported in Mexico (BRCA1 del exons 9–12), Brazil (BRCA1 5382insC and BRCA2 c.156_157insAlu), and Colombia (BRCA1 3450del4, A1708E, and BRCA2 3034del4) and in Latinas residing in Southern California (BRCA1 185delAG, IVS5+1G>A, S955x, and R1443x). Of these, mutation BRCA1 3450del4 has also been reported in Brazil and Chile, whereas mutation BRCA2 3034del4 has been reported in Argentina and Peru. These data support the idea that although most Hispanic populations are the result of a mixture between Europeans, Africans, and Amerindians, the relative proportion of each genetic component varies throughout the Hispanic populations, making it necessary to identify the mutations characteristic of each population to generate mutation profiles adjusted to each one of them. Conclusion. In Latin American countries, and even among regions of the same country, there is great heterogeneity of ancestors. Therefore, Latinas should not be analyzed

  20. Founder and Recurrent Mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Genes in Latin American Countries: State of the Art and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Ossa, Carlos Andrés; Torres, Diana

    2016-07-01

    Numerous epidemiological factors affect the probability of developing breast or ovarian cancer, but no predictor is as determinant as inheriting a mutation in BRCA1 or BRCA2. The concept of the founder effect explains the reduced genetic variability in some populations, according to the theory that new populations can be formed from a reduced number of individuals, so the new population would carry only a small fraction of the genetic variability of the original population. The main purpose of this review is to provide an update on the state of the art in founder mutations and some recurrent mutations that have recently been described in Latin America. A literature search was performed in the electronic databases of PUBMED, EMBASE, LILACS, and BIREME using the terms BRCA1, BRCA2, founder mutation, Latin American population, and Hispanic. Sixty-two papers were identified, of which 38 were considered relevant for this review. Each result is shown per country. In Latin America, clear founder effects have been reported in Mexico (BRCA1 del exons 9-12), Brazil (BRCA1 5382insC and BRCA2 c.156_157insAlu), and Colombia (BRCA1 3450del4, A1708E, and BRCA2 3034del4) and in Latinas residing in Southern California (BRCA1 185delAG, IVS5+1G>A, S955x, and R1443x). Of these, mutation BRCA1 3450del4 has also been reported in Brazil and Chile, whereas mutation BRCA2 3034del4 has been reported in Argentina and Peru. These data support the idea that although most Hispanic populations are the result of a mixture between Europeans, Africans, and Amerindians, the relative proportion of each genetic component varies throughout the Hispanic populations, making it necessary to identify the mutations characteristic of each population to generate mutation profiles adjusted to each one of them. In Latin American countries, and even among regions of the same country, there is great heterogeneity of ancestors. Therefore, Latinas should not be analyzed like other population groups without taking

  1. Underestimation of Risk of a BRCA1 or BRCA2 Mutation in Women With High-Grade Serous Ovarian Cancer by BRCAPRO: A Multi-Institution Study

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Molly S.; Babb, Sheri A.; King, Robin H.; Urbauer, Diana L.; Batte, Brittany A.L.; Brandt, Amanda C.; Amos, Christopher I.; Buchanan, Adam H.; Mutch, David G.; Lu, Karen H.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Identification of the 10% to 15% of patients with ovarian cancer who have germline BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations is important for management of both patients and relatives. The BRCAPRO model, which estimates mutation likelihood based on personal and family cancer history, can inform genetic testing decisions. This study's purpose was to assess the accuracy of BRCAPRO in women with ovarian cancer. Methods BRCAPRO scores were calculated for 589 patients with ovarian cancer referred for genetic counseling at three institutions. Observed mutations were compared with those predicted by BRCAPRO. Analysis of variance was used to assess factors impacting BRCAPRO accuracy. Results One hundred eighty (31%) of 589 patients with ovarian cancer tested positive. At BRCAPRO scores less than 40%, more mutations were observed than expected (93 mutations observed v 34.1 mutations expected; P < .001). If patients with BRCAPRO scores less than 10% had not been tested, 51 (28%) of 180 mutations would have been missed. BRCAPRO underestimated the risk for high-grade serous ovarian cancers but overestimated the risk for other histologies (P < .001), underestimation increased as age at diagnosis decreased (P = .02), and model performance varied by institution (P = .02). Conclusion Patients with ovarian cancer classified as low risk by BRCAPRO are more likely to test positive than predicted. The risk of a mutation in patients with low BRCAPRO scores is high enough to warrant genetic testing. This study demonstrates that assessment of family history by a validated model cannot effectively target testing to a high-risk ovarian cancer patient population, which strongly supports the recommendation to offer BRCA1/BRCA2 genetic testing to all patients with high-grade serous ovarian cancer regardless of family history. PMID:24638001

  2. Effect of decision aid for breast cancer prevention on decisional conflict in women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation: a multisite, randomized, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Metcalfe, Kelly A; Dennis, Cindy-Lee; Poll, Aletta; Armel, Susan; Demsky, Rochelle; Carlsson, Lindsay; Nanda, Sonia; Kiss, Alexander; Narod, Steven A

    2017-03-01

    Women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation are at high risk for breast cancer and must make important decisions about breast cancer prevention and screening. In the current study, we report a multisite, randomized, controlled trial evaluating the effectiveness of a decision aid for breast cancer prevention in women with a BRCA mutation with no previous diagnosis of cancer. Within 1 month of receiving a positive BRCA result, women were randomized to receive either usual care (control group) or decision aid (intervention group). Participants were followed at 3, 6, and 12 months; were asked about preventive measures; and completed standardized questionnaires assessing decision making and psychosocial functioning. One hundred fifty women were randomized. Mean cancer-related distress scores were significantly lower in the intervention group compared with the control group at 6 months (P = 0.01) and at 12 months postrandomization (P = 0.05). Decisional conflict scores declined over time for both groups and at no time were there statistical differences between the two groups. The decision aid for breast cancer prevention in women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation is effective in significantly decreasing cancer-related distress within the year following receipt of positive genetic test results.Genet Med 19 3, 330-336.

  3. Treatment of infertility does not increase the risk of ovarian cancer among women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation.

    PubMed

    Gronwald, Jacek; Glass, Karen; Rosen, Barry; Karlan, Beth; Tung, Nadine; Neuhausen, Susan L; Moller, Pal; Ainsworth, Peter; Sun, Ping; Narod, Steven A; Lubinski, Jan; Kotsopoulos, Joanne

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate the relationship between use of fertility medication (i.e., selective estrogen receptor [ER] modulator, gonadotropin, or other) or infertility treatment (i.e., IVF or IUI) and the risk of ovarian cancer among women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation. A matched case-control study of 941 pairs of BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers with and without a diagnosis of ovarian cancer. Genetic clinics. Detailed information regarding treatment of infertility was collected from a routinely administered questionnaire. None. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals associated with fertility treatment. There was no significant relationship between the use of any fertility medication or IVF treatment (odds ratio, 0.66; 95% confidence interval 0.18-2.33) and the subsequent risk of ovarian cancer. Our findings suggest that treatment for infertility does not significantly increase the risk of ovarian cancer among women with a BRCA mutation. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. All rights reserved.

  4. Compensatory functions and interdependency of the DNA-binding domain of BRCA2 with the BRCA1-PALB2-BRCA2 complex.

    PubMed

    Al Abo, Muthana; Dejsuphong, Donniphat; Hirota, Kouji; Yonetani, Yasukazu; Yamazoe, Mitsuyoshi; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi; Takeda, Shunichi

    2014-02-01

    BRCA1, BRCA2, and PALB2 are key players in cellular tolerance to chemotherapeutic agents, including camptothecin, cisplatin, and PARP inhibitor. The N-terminal segment of BRCA2 interacts with PALB2, thus contributing to the formation of the BRCA1-PALB2-BRCA2 complex. To understand the role played by BRCA2 in this complex, we deleted its N-terminal segment and generated BRCA2(Δ)(N) mutant cells. Although previous studies have suggested that BRCA1-PALB2 plays a role in the recruitment of BRCA2 to DNA-damage sites, BRCA2(Δ)(N) mutant cells displayed a considerably milder phenotype than did BRCA2(-/-) null-deficient cells. We hypothesized that the DNA-binding domain (DBD) of BRCA2 might compensate for a defect in BRCA2(ΔN) that prevented stable interaction with PALB2. To test this hypothesis, we disrupted the DBD of BRCA2 in wild-type and BRCA2(Δ)(N) cells. Remarkably, although the resulting BRCA2(Δ)(DBD) cells displayed a moderate phenotype, the BRCA2(Δ)(N+ΔDBD) cells displayed a very severe phenotype, as did the BRCA2(-/-) cells, suggesting that the N-terminal segment and the DBD play a substantially overlapping role in the functionality of BRCA2. We also showed that the formation of both the BRCA1-PALB2-BRCA2 complex and the DBD is required for efficient recruitment of BRCA2 to DNA-damage sites. Our study revealed the essential role played by both the BRCA1-PALB2-BRCA2 complex and the DBD in the functionality of BRCA2, as each can compensate for the other in the recruitment of BRCA2 to DNA-damage sites. This knowledge adds to our ability to accurately predict the efficacy of antimalignant therapies for patients carrying mutations in the BRCA2 gene.

  5. Variation in breast cancer risk associated with factors related to pregnancies according to truncating mutation location, in the French National BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations carrier cohort (GENEPSO)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 confer a high risk of breast cancer (BC), but the magnitude of this risk seems to vary according to the study and various factors. Although controversial, there are data to support the hypothesis of allelic risk heterogeneity. Methods We assessed variation in BC risk according to factors related to pregnancies by location of mutation in the homogeneous risk region of BRCA1 and BRCA2 in 990 women in the French study GENEPSO by using a weighted Cox regression model. Results Our results confirm the existence of the protective effect of an increasing number of full-term pregnancies (FTPs) toward BC among BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers (≥3 versus 0 FTPs: hazard ratio (HR) = 0.51, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.33 to 0.81). Additionally, the HR shows an association between incomplete pregnancies and a higher BC risk, which reached 2.39 (95% CI = 1.28 to 4.45) among women who had at least three incomplete pregnancies when compared with women with zero incomplete pregnancies. This increased risk appeared to be restricted to incomplete pregnancies occurring before the first FTP (HR = 1.77, 95% CI = 1.19 to 2.63). We defined the TMAP score (defined as the Time of Breast Mitotic Activity during Pregnancies) to take into account simultaneously the opposite effect of full-term and interrupted pregnancies. Compared with women with a TMAP score of less than 0.35, an increasing TMAP score was associated with a statistically significant increase in the risk of BC (P trend = 0.02) which reached 1.97 (95% CI = 1.19 to 3.29) for a TMAP score >0.5 (versus TMAP ≤0.35). All these results appeared to be similar in BRCA1 and BRCA2. Nevertheless, our results suggest a variation in BC risk associated with parity according to the location of the mutation in BRCA1. Indeed, parity seems to be associated with a significantly decreased risk of BC only among women with a mutation in the central region of BRCA1 (low-risk region) (≥1 versus 0 FTP

  6. Variation in breast cancer risk associated with factors related to pregnancies according to truncating mutation location, in the French National BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations carrier cohort (GENEPSO).

    PubMed

    Lecarpentier, Julie; Noguès, Catherine; Mouret-Fourme, Emmanuelle; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Lasset, Christine; Fricker, Jean-Pierre; Caron, Olivier; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Berthet, Pascaline; Faivre, Laurence; Bonadona, Valérie; Buecher, Bruno; Coupier, Isabelle; Gladieff, Laurence; Gesta, Paul; Eisinger, François; Frénay, Marc; Luporsi, Elisabeth; Lortholary, Alain; Colas, Chrystelle; Dugast, Catherine; Longy, Michel; Pujol, Pascal; Tinat, Julie; Lidereau, Rosette; Andrieu, Nadine

    2012-07-03

    Mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 confer a high risk of breast cancer (BC), but the magnitude of this risk seems to vary according to the study and various factors. Although controversial, there are data to support the hypothesis of allelic risk heterogeneity. We assessed variation in BC risk according to factors related to pregnancies by location of mutation in the homogeneous risk region of BRCA1 and BRCA2 in 990 women in the French study GENEPSO by using a weighted Cox regression model. Our results confirm the existence of the protective effect of an increasing number of full-term pregnancies (FTPs) toward BC among BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers (≥3 versus 0 FTPs: hazard ratio (HR) = 0.51, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.33 to 0.81). Additionally, the HR shows an association between incomplete pregnancies and a higher BC risk, which reached 2.39 (95% CI = 1.28 to 4.45) among women who had at least three incomplete pregnancies when compared with women with zero incomplete pregnancies. This increased risk appeared to be restricted to incomplete pregnancies occurring before the first FTP (HR = 1.77, 95% CI = 1.19 to 2.63). We defined the TMAP score (defined as the Time of Breast Mitotic Activity during Pregnancies) to take into account simultaneously the opposite effect of full-term and interrupted pregnancies. Compared with women with a TMAP score of less than 0.35, an increasing TMAP score was associated with a statistically significant increase in the risk of BC (P trend = 0.02) which reached 1.97 (95% CI = 1.19 to 3.29) for a TMAP score >0.5 (versus TMAP ≤0.35). All these results appeared to be similar in BRCA1 and BRCA2. Nevertheless, our results suggest a variation in BC risk associated with parity according to the location of the mutation in BRCA1. Indeed, parity seems to be associated with a significantly decreased risk of BC only among women with a mutation in the central region of BRCA1 (low-risk region) (≥1 versus 0 FTP: HR = 0.27, 95% CI = 0.13 to

  7. Common variants at the 19p13.1 and ZNF365 loci are associated with ER subtypes of breast cancer and ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    PubMed Central

    Couch, Fergus J.; Gaudet, Mia M.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Ramus, Susan J.; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Soucy, Penny; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Wang, Xianshu; Kirchhoff, Tomas; McGuffog, Lesley; Barrowdale, Daniel; Lee, Andrew; Healey, Sue; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Kruse, Torben A.; Caligo, Maria A.; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Barbany-Bustinza, Gisela; Loman, Niklas; Soller, Maria; Ehrencrona, Hans; Karlsson, Per; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Domchek, Susan M.; Jakubowska, Ania; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Złowocka, Elżbieta; Huzarski, Tomasz; Byrski, Tomasz; Gronwald, Jacek; Cybulski, Cezary; Górski, Bohdan; Osorio, Ana; Durán, Mercedes; Tejada, María Isabel; Benitez, Javier; Hamann, Ute; Hogervorst, Frans B.L.; van Os, Theo A.; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E.J.; Wijnen, Juul; Blok, Marinus J.; Kets, Marleen; Hooning, Maartje J.; Oldenburg, Rogier A.; Ausems, Margreet G.E.M.; Peock, Susan; Frost, Debra; Ellis, Steve D.; Platte, Radka; Fineberg, Elena; Evans, D. Gareth; Jacobs, Chris; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Adlard, Julian; Davidson, Rosemarie; Eccles, Diana M.; Cole, Trevor; Cook, Jackie; Paterson, Joan; Brewer, Carole; Douglas, Fiona; Hodgson, Shirley V.; Morrison, Patrick J.; Walker, Lisa; Porteous, Mary E.; Kennedy, M. John; Side, Lucy E.; Bove, Betsy; Godwin, Andrew K.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Fassy-Colcombet, Marion; Castera, Laurent; Cornelis, François; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Léoné, Mélanie; Boutry-Kryza, Nadia; Bressac-de Paillerets, Brigitte; Caron, Olivier; Pujol, Pascal; Coupier, Isabelle; Delnatte, Capucine; Akloul, Linda; Lynch, Henry T.; Snyder, Carrie L.; Buys, Saundra S.; Daly, Mary B.; Terry, MaryBeth; Chung, Wendy K.; John, Esther M.; Miron, Alexander; Southey, Melissa C.; Hopper, John L.; Goldgar, David E.; Singer, Christian F.; Rappaport, Christine; Tea, Muy-Kheng M.; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Nielsen, Finn C.; Arason, Aðalgeir; Vijai, Joseph; Shah, Sohela; Sarrel, Kara; Robson, Mark E.; Piedmonte, Marion; Phillips, Kelly; Basil, Jack; Rubinstein, Wendy S.; Boggess, John; Wakeley, Katie; Ewart-Toland, Amanda; Montagna, Marco; Agata, Simona; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Isaacs, Claudine; Janavicius, Ramunas; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Feliubadalo, Lidia; Brunet, Joan; Gayther, Simon A; Pharoah, Paul PD; Odunsi, Kunle O.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Walsh, Christine S.; Olah, Edith; Teo, Soo Hwang; Ganz, Patricia A.; Beattie, Mary S.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Dorfling, Cecelia M.; Diez, Orland; Kwong, Ava; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Heidemann, Simone; Niederacher, Dieter; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Deissler, Helmut; Gehrig, Andrea; Sutter, Christian; Kast, Karin; Fiebig, Britta; Heinritz, Wolfram; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Muranen, Taru A.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Tischkowitz, Marc D.; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Lindor, Noralane M.; Fredericksen, Zachary; Pankratz, V. Shane; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Barile, Monica; Bernard, Loris; Viel, Alessandra; Giannini, Giuseppe; Varesco, Liliana; Radice, Paolo; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Easton, Douglas F.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Offit, Kenneth; Simard, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    Background Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) identified variants at 19p13.1 and ZNF365 (10q21.2) as risk factors for breast cancer among BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, respectively. We explored associations with ovarian cancer and with breast cancer by tumor histopathology for these variants in mutation carriers from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA). Methods Genotyping data for 12,599 BRCA1 and 7,132 BRCA2 mutation carriers from 40 studies were combined. Results We confirmed associations between rs8170 at 19p13.1 and breast cancer risk for BRCA1 mutation carriers (hazard ratio (HR)=1.17; 95%CI 1.07–1.27; p=7.42×10−4) and between rs16917302 at ZNF365 (HR=0.84; 95%CI 0.73–0.97; p=0.017) but not rs311499 at 20q13.3 (HR=1.11; 95%CI 0.94–1.31; p=0.22) and breast cancer risk for BRCA2 mutation carriers. Analyses based on tumor histopathology showed that 19p13 variants were predominantly associated with estrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer for both BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, whereas rs16917302 at ZNF365 was mainly associated with ER-positive breast cancer for both BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. We also found for the first time that rs67397200 at 19p13.1 was associated with an increased risk of ovarian cancer for BRCA1 (HR=1.16; 95%CI 1.05–1.29; p=3.8×10−4) and BRCA2 mutation carriers (HR=1.30; 95%CI 1.10–1.52; p=1.8×10−3). Conclusions 19p13.1 and ZNF365 are susceptibility loci for ovarian cancer and ER subtypes of breast cancer among BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Impact These findings can lead to an improved understanding of tumor development and may prove useful for breast and ovarian cancer risk prediction for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. PMID:22351618

  8. Gynecologic surgeries and risk of ovarian cancer in women with BRCA1 and BRCA2 Ashkenazi founder mutations: an Israeli population-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Rutter, Joni L; Wacholder, Sholom; Chetrit, Angela; Lubin, Flora; Menczer, Joseph; Ebbers, Sarah; Tucker, Margaret A; Struewing, Jeffery P; Hartge, Patricia

    2003-07-16

    In the general population, the risk of developing ovarian cancer is reduced in women who have undergone tubal ligation, hysterectomy, or oophorectomy, although peritoneal cancer can arise after bilateral oophorectomy. In studies from genetic screening clinics, women with mutations in the breast and ovarian susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 have been found to have a low risk of peritoneal carcinoma in the first years after bilateral oophorectomy. We assessed the level and persistence of reduction of ovarian (including peritoneal) cancer risk after gynecologic surgeries for women who carry BRCA1/2 mutations but were not selected from high-risk clinics. We identified 1124 Israeli women with incident ovarian cancer or primary peritoneal cancer and tested 847 of them for the three Ashkenazi founder mutations. We compared gynecologic surgery history among all case patients, BRCA1 (n = 187) and BRCA2 (n = 64) carrier case patients, and the non-carrier case patients (n = 598) with that in control subjects drawn from a population registry (n = 2396). We estimated ovarian cancer risk (odds ratios [ORs] with 95% confidence intervals [CIs]) after gynecologic surgery in mutation carriers and non-carriers with logistic regression models. Eight women with primary peritoneal cancer and 128 control subjects reported a previous bilateral oophorectomy (OR = 0.12, 95% CI = 0.06 to 0.24). Other gynecologic surgeries were associated with a 30%-50% reduced risk of ovarian cancer, depending on the type of surgery, with surgery to remove some ovarian tissue associated with the most risk reduction (OR = 0.34, 95% CI = 0.16 to 0.74). Reduced risks were seen in BRCA1/2 carriers and non-carriers. Age at surgery and years since surgery did not affect risk reductions. Both BRCA1/2 mutation carriers and non-carriers have reduced risk of ovarian or peritoneal cancer after gynecologic surgery. The magnitude of the reduction depends upon the type and extent of surgery.

  9. High frequency of the recurrent c.1310_1313delAAGA BRCA2 mutation in the North-East of Morocco and implication for hereditary breast-ovarian cancer prevention and control.

    PubMed

    Laarabi, Fatima-Zahra; Ratbi, Ilham; Elalaoui, Siham Chafai; Mezzouar, Loubna; Doubaj, Yassamine; Bouguenouch, Laila; Ouldim, Karim; Benjaafar, Noureddine; Sefiani, Abdelaziz

    2017-06-02

    To date, a limited number of BRCA1/2 germline mutations have been reported in hereditary breast and/or ovarian cancer in the Moroccan population. Less than 20 different mutations of these two genes have been identified in Moroccan patients, and recently we reported a further BRCA2 mutation (c.1310_1313delAAGA; p.Lys437IlefsX22) in three unrelated patients, all from the North-East of the country. We aimed in this study to evaluate the frequency and geographic distribution of this BRCA2 frameshift mutation, in order to access its use as the first-line BRCA genetic testing strategy for Moroccan patients. We enrolled in this study 122 patients from different regions of Morocco, with suggestive inherited predisposition to breast and ovarian cancers. All subjects gave written informed consent to BRCA1/2 genetic testing. According to available resources of our lab and enrolled families, 51 patients were analyzed by the conventional individual exon-by-exon Sanger sequencing, 23 patients were able to benefit from a BRCA next generation sequencing and a target screening for exon 10 of BRCA2 gene was performed in 48 patients. Overall, and among the 122 patients analyzed for at least the exon 10 of the BRCA2 gene, the c.1310_1313delAAGA frameshift mutation was found in 14 patients. Genealogic investigation revealed that all carriers of this mutation shared the same geographic origin and were descendants of the North-East of Morocco. In this study, we highlighted that c.1310_1313delAAGA mutation of BRCA2 gene is recurrent with high frequency in patients from the North-East region of Morocco. Therefore, we propose to use, in public health strategies, the detection of this mutation as the first-line screening tests in patients with breast and ovarian cancer originated from this region.

  10. Surveillance of Women with the BRCA1 or BRCA2 Mutation by Using Biannual Automated Breast US, MR Imaging, and Mammography.

    PubMed

    van Zelst, Jan C M; Mus, Roel D M; Woldringh, Gwendolyn; Rutten, Matthieu J C M; Bult, Peter; Vreemann, Suzan; de Jong, Mathijn; Karssemeijer, Nico; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Mann, Ritse M

    2017-11-01

    Purpose To evaluate a multimodal surveillance regimen including yearly full-field digital (FFD) mammography, dynamic contrast agent-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, and biannual automated breast (AB) ultrasonography (US) in women with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations. Materials and Methods This prospective multicenter trial enrolled 296 carriers of the BRCA mutation (153 BRCA1 and 128 BRCA2 carriers, and 15 women with first-degree untested relatives) between September 2010 and November 2012, with follow-up until November 2015. Participants underwent 2 years of intensified surveillance including biannual AB US, and routine yearly DCE MR imaging and FFD mammography. The surveillance performance for each modality and possible combinations were determined. Results Breast cancer was screening-detected in 16 women (age range, 33-58 years). Three interval cancers were detected by self-examination, all in carriers of the BRCA1 mutation under age 43 years. One cancer was detected in a carrier of the BRCA1 mutation with a palpable abnormality in the contralateral breast. One incidental breast cancer was detected in a prophylactic mastectomy specimen. Respectively, sensitivity of DCE MR imaging, FFD mammography, and AB US was 68.1% (14 of 21; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 42.9%, 85.8%), 37.2% (eight of 21; 95% CI: 19.8%, 58.7%), and 32.1% (seven of 21; 95% CI: 16.1%, 53.8%); specificity was 95.0% (643 of 682; 95% CI: 92.7%, 96.5%), 98.1% (638 of 652; 95% CI: 96.7%, 98.9%), and 95.1% (1030 of 1088; 95% CI: 93.5%, 96.3%); cancer detection rate was 2.0% (14 of 702), 1.2% (eight of 671), and 1.0% (seven of 711) per 100 women-years; and positive predictive value was 25.2% (14 of 54), 33.7% (nine of 23), and 9.5% (seven of 68). DCE MR imaging and FFD mammography combined yielded the highest sensitivity of 76.3% (16 of 21; 95% CI: 53.8%, 89.9%) and specificity of 93.6% (643 of 691; 95% CI: 91.3%, 95.3%). AB US did not depict additional cancers. FFD mammography yielded no

  11. Breast and ovarian cancer risks to carriers of the BRCA1 5382insC and 185delAG and BRCA2 6174delT mutations: a combined analysis of 22 population based studies

    PubMed Central

    Antoniou, A; Pharoah, P; Narod, S; Risch, H; Eyfjord, J; Hopper, J; Olsson, H; Johannsson, O; Borg, A; Pasini, B; Radice, P; Manoukian, S; Eccles, D; Tang, N; Olah, E; Anton-Culver, H; Warner, E; Lubinski, J; Gronwald, J; Gorski, B; Tulinius, H; Thorlacius, S; Eerola, H; Nevanlinna, H; Syrjakoski, K; Kallioniemi, O; Thompson, D; Evans, C; Peto, J; Lalloo, F; Evans, D; Easton, D

    2005-01-01

    A recent report estimated the breast cancer risks in carriers of the three Ashkenazi founder mutations to be higher than previously published estimates derived from population based studies. In an attempt to confirm this, the breast and ovarian cancer risks associated with the three Ashkenazi founder mutations were estimated using families included in a previous meta-analysis of populatrion based studies. The estimated breast cancer risks for each of the founder BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations were similar to the corresponding estimates based on all BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations in the meta-analysis. These estimates appear to be consistent with the observed prevalence of the mutations in the Ashkenazi Jewish population. PMID:15994883

  12. Smoking and physical inactivity increase cancer prevalence in BRCA-1 and BRCA-2 mutation carriers: results from a retrospective observational analysis.

    PubMed

    Grill, Sabine; Yahiaoui-Doktor, Maryam; Dukatz, Ricarda; Lammert, Jacqueline; Ullrich, Mirjam; Engel, Christoph; Pfeifer, Katharina; Basrai, Maryam; Siniatchkin, Michael; Schmidt, Thorsten; Weisser, Burkhard; Rhiem, Kerstin; Ditsch, Nina; Schmutzler, Rita; Bischoff, Stephan C; Halle, Martin; Kiechle, Marion

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this analysis in a pilot study population was to investigate whether we can verify seemingly harmful lifestyle factors such as nicotine and alcohol indulgence, obesity, and physical inactivity, as well as a low socioeconomic status for increased cancer prevalence in a cohort of BRCA 1 and 2 mutation carriers. The analysis data are derived from 68 participants of the lifestyle intervention study LIBRE-1, a randomized, prospective trial that aimed to test the feasibility of a lifestyle modification in BRCA 1 and 2 mutation carriers. At study entry, factors such as medical history, lifestyle behavior, and socioeconomic status were retrospectively documented by interview and the current BMI was determined by clinical examination. The baseline measurements were compared within the cohort, and presented alongside reference values for the German population. Study participants indicating a higher physical activity during their adolescence showed a significantly lower cancer prevalence (p = 0.019). A significant difference in cancer occurrence was observed in those who smoked prior to the disease, and those who did not smoke (p < 0.001). Diseased mutation carriers tended to have a lower BMI compared to non-diseased mutation carriers (p = 0.079), whereas non-diseased revealed a significantly higher physical activity level than diseased mutation carriers (p = 0.046). The present data in this small cohort of 68 mutation carriers suggest that smoking and low physical activity during adolescence are risk factors for developing breast cancer in women with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation. Further data of the ongoing LIBRE 2 study are necessary to confirm these findings in a larger cohort of 600 mutation carriers.

  13. Common breast cancer susceptibility alleles are associated with tumour subtypes in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers: results from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Previous studies have demonstrated that common breast cancer susceptibility alleles are differentially associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 mutation carriers. It is currently unknown how these alleles are associated with different breast cancer subtypes in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers defined by estrogen (ER) or progesterone receptor (PR) status of the tumour. Methods We used genotype data on up to 11,421 BRCA1 and 7,080 BRCA2 carriers, of whom 4,310 had been affected with breast cancer and had information on either ER or PR status of the tumour, to assess the associations of 12 loci with breast cancer tumour characteristics. Associations were evaluated using a retrospective cohort approach. Results The results suggested stronger associations with ER-positive breast cancer than ER-negative for 11 loci in both BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers. Among BRCA1 carriers, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs2981582 (FGFR2) exhibited the biggest difference based on ER status (per-allele hazard ratio (HR) for ER-positive = 1.35, 95% CI: 1.17 to 1.56 vs HR = 0.91, 95% CI: 0.85 to 0.98 for ER-negative, P-heterogeneity = 6.5 × 10-6). In contrast, SNP rs2046210 at 6q25.1 near ESR1 was primarily associated with ER-negative breast cancer risk for both BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers. In BRCA2 carriers, SNPs in FGFR2, TOX3, LSP1, SLC4A7/NEK10, 5p12, 2q35, and 1p11.2 were significantly associated with ER-positive but not ER-negative disease. Similar results were observed when differentiating breast cancer cases by PR status. Conclusions The associations of the 12 SNPs with risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers differ by ER-positive or ER-negative breast cancer status. The apparent differences in SNP associations between BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers, and non-carriers, may be explicable by differences in the prevalence of tumour subtypes. As more risk modifying variants are identified, incorporating these associations into breast cancer subtype-specific risk models

  14. Common breast cancer susceptibility alleles are associated with tumour subtypes in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers: results from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2.

    PubMed

    Mulligan, Anna Marie; Couch, Fergus J; Barrowdale, Daniel; Domchek, Susan M; Eccles, Diana; Nevanlinna, Heli; Ramus, Susan J; Robson, Mark; Sherman, Mark; Spurdle, Amanda B; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Lee, Andrew; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Janavicius, Ramunas; Hansen, Thomas vO; Nielsen, Finn C; Ejlertsen, Bent; Osorio, Ana; Muñoz-Repeto, Iván; Durán, Mercedes; Godino, Javier; Pertesi, Maroulio; Benítez, Javier; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Cattaneo, Elisa; Bonanni, Bernardo; Viel, Alessandra; Pasini, Barbara; Papi, Laura; Ottini, Laura; Savarese, Antonella; Bernard, Loris; Radice, Paolo; Hamann, Ute; Verheus, Martijn; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E J; Wijnen, Juul; Gómez García, Encarna B; Nelen, Marcel R; Kets, C Marleen; Seynaeve, Caroline; Tilanus-Linthorst, Madeleine M A; van der Luijt, Rob B; van Os, Theo; Rookus, Matti; Frost, Debra; Jones, J Louise; Evans, D Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Eeles, Ros; Izatt, Louise; Adlard, Julian; Davidson, Rosemarie; Cook, Jackie; Donaldson, Alan; Dorkins, Huw; Gregory, Helen; Eason, Jacqueline; Houghton, Catherine; Barwell, Julian; Side, Lucy E; McCann, Emma; Murray, Alex; Peock, Susan; Godwin, Andrew K; Schmutzler, Rita K; Rhiem, Kerstin; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Ruehl, Ina; Arnold, Norbert; Niederacher, Dieter; Sutter, Christian; Deissler, Helmut; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Kast, Karin; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Schoenbuchner, Ines; Fiebig, Britta; Heinritz, Wolfram; Schäfer, Dieter; Gevensleben, Heidrun; Caux-Moncoutier, Virginie; Fassy-Colcombet, Marion; Cornelis, François; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Léoné, Mélanie; Boutry-Kryza, Nadia; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Muller, Danièle; Fricker, Jean-Pierre; Mortemousque, Isabelle; Pujol, Pascal; Coupier, Isabelle; Lebrun, Marine; Kientz, Caroline; Longy, Michel; Sevenet, Nicolas; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Isaacs, Claudine; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blanco, Ignacio; Lazaro, Conxi; Barkardottir, Rosa B; Soucy, Penny; Dumont, Martine; Simard, Jacques; Montagna, Marco; Tognazzo, Silvia; D'Andrea, Emma; Fox, Stephen; Yan, Max; Rebbeck, Tim; Olopade, Olufunmilayo; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Lynch, Henry T; Ganz, Patricia A; Tomlinson, Gail E; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary; Pankratz, Vernon S; Lindor, Noralane M; Szabo, Csilla; Offit, Kenneth; Sakr, Rita; Gaudet, Mia; Bhatia, Jasmine; Kauff, Noah; Singer, Christian F; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Mai, Phuong L; Greene, Mark H; Imyanitov, Evgeny; O'Malley, Frances P; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Glendon, Gordon; Toland, Amanda E; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Thomassen, Mads; Kruse, Torben A; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Caligo, Maria A; Soller, Maria; Henriksson, Karin; Wachenfeldt, von Anna; Arver, Brita; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Karlsson, Per; Ding, Yuan Chun; Neuhausen, Susan L; Beattie, Mary; Pharoah, Paul D P; Moysich, Kirsten B; Nathanson, Katherine L; Karlan, Beth Y; Gross, Jenny; John, Esther M; Daly, Mary B; Buys, Saundra M; Southey, Melissa C; Hopper, John L; Terry, Mary Beth; Chung, Wendy; Miron, Alexander F; Goldgar, David; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F; Andrulis, Irene L; Antoniou, Antonis C

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that common breast cancer susceptibility alleles are differentially associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 mutation carriers. It is currently unknown how these alleles are associated with different breast cancer subtypes in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers defined by estrogen (ER) or progesterone receptor (PR) status of the tumour. We used genotype data on up to 11,421 BRCA1 and 7,080 BRCA2 carriers, of whom 4,310 had been affected with breast cancer and had information on either ER or PR status of the tumour, to assess the associations of 12 loci with breast cancer tumour characteristics. Associations were evaluated using a retrospective cohort approach. The results suggested stronger associations with ER-positive breast cancer than ER-negative for 11 loci in both BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers. Among BRCA1 carriers, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs2981582 (FGFR2) exhibited the biggest difference based on ER status (per-allele hazard ratio (HR) for ER-positive = 1.35, 95% CI: 1.17 to 1.56 vs HR = 0.91, 95% CI: 0.85 to 0.98 for ER-negative, P-heterogeneity = 6.5 × 10-6). In contrast, SNP rs2046210 at 6q25.1 near ESR1 was primarily associated with ER-negative breast cancer risk for both BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers. In BRCA2 carriers, SNPs in FGFR2, TOX3, LSP1, SLC4A7/NEK10, 5p12, 2q35, and 1p11.2 were significantly associated with ER-positive but not ER-negative disease. Similar results were observed when differentiating breast cancer cases by PR status. The associations of the 12 SNPs with risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers differ by ER-positive or ER-negative breast cancer status. The apparent differences in SNP associations between BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers, and non-carriers, may be explicable by differences in the prevalence of tumour subtypes. As more risk modifying variants are identified, incorporating these associations into breast cancer subtype-specific risk models may improve clinical management for

  15. Prevalence of 185delAG and 5382insC mutations in BRCA1, and 6174delT in BRCA2 in women of Ashkenazi Jewish origin in southern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Dillenburg, Crisle Vignol; Bandeira, Isabel Cristina; Tubino, Taiana Valente; Rossato, Luciana Grazziotin; Dias, Eleonora Souza; Bittelbrunn, Ana Cristina; Leistner-Segal, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    Certain mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are frequent in the Ashkenazi Jewish population. Several factors contribute to this increased frequency, including consanguineous marriages and an event known as a “bottleneck”, which occurred in the past and caused a drastic reduction in the genetic variability of this population. Several studies were performed over the years in an attempt to elucidate the role of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes in susceptibility to breast cancer. The aim of this study was to estimate the carrier frequency of certain common mutations in the BRCA1 (185delAG and 5382insC) and BRCA2 (6174delT) genes in an Ashkenazi Jewish population from Porto Alegre, Brazil. Molecular analyses were done by PCR followed by RFLP (ACRS). The carrier frequencies for BRCA1 185delAG and 5382insC were 0.78 and 0 respectively, and 0.4 for the BRCA2 6174deT mutation. These findings are similar to those of some prior studies but differ from others, possibly due to excluding individuals with a personal or family history of cancer. Our sample was drawn from the community group and included individuals with or without a family or personal history of cancer. Furthermore, increased dispersion among Ashkenazi subpopulations may be the result of strong genetic drift and/or admixture. It is therefore necessary to consider the effects of local admixture on the mismatch distributions of various Jewish populations. PMID:23055798

  16. Prevalence of 185delAG and 5382insC mutations in BRCA1, and 6174delT in BRCA2 in women of Ashkenazi Jewish origin in southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Dillenburg, Crisle Vignol; Bandeira, Isabel Cristina; Tubino, Taiana Valente; Rossato, Luciana Grazziotin; Dias, Eleonora Souza; Bittelbrunn, Ana Cristina; Leistner-Segal, Sandra

    2012-07-01

    Certain mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are frequent in the Ashkenazi Jewish population. Several factors contribute to this increased frequency, including consanguineous marriages and an event known as a "bottleneck", which occurred in the past and caused a drastic reduction in the genetic variability of this population. Several studies were performed over the years in an attempt to elucidate the role of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes in susceptibility to breast cancer. The aim of this study was to estimate the carrier frequency of certain common mutations in the BRCA1 (185delAG and 5382insC) and BRCA2 (6174delT) genes in an Ashkenazi Jewish population from Porto Alegre, Brazil. Molecular analyses were done by PCR followed by RFLP (ACRS). The carrier frequencies for BRCA1 185delAG and 5382insC were 0.78 and 0 respectively, and 0.4 for the BRCA2 6174deT mutation. These findings are similar to those of some prior studies but differ from others, possibly due to excluding individuals with a personal or family history of cancer. Our sample was drawn from the community group and included individuals with or without a family or personal history of cancer. Furthermore, increased dispersion among Ashkenazi subpopulations may be the result of strong genetic drift and/or admixture. It is therefore necessary to consider the effects of local admixture on the mismatch distributions of various Jewish populations.

  17. Two new CHEK2 germ-line variants detected in breast cancer/sarcoma families negative for BRCA1, BRCA2, and TP53 gene mutations.

    PubMed

    Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Frigerio, Simona; Lecis, Daniele; Bartkova, Jirina; Roversi, Gaia; Radice, Paolo; Bartek, Jiri; Delia, Domenico

    2011-11-01

    CHEK2 gene mutations occur in a subset of patients with familial breast cancer, acting as moderate/low penetrance cancer susceptibility alleles. Although CHEK2 is no longer recognized as a major determinant of the Li-Fraumeni syndrome, a hereditary condition predisposing to cancer at multiple sites, it cannot be ruled out that mutations of this gene play a role in malignancies arising in peculiar multi-cancer families. To assess the contribution of CHEK2 to the breast cancer/sarcoma phenotype, we screened for germ-line sequence variations of the gene among 12 probands from hereditary breast/ovarian cancer families with one case of sarcoma that tested wild-type for mutations in the BRCA1, BRCA2, and TP53 genes. Two cases harbored previously unreported mutations in CHEK2, the c.507delT and c.38A>G, leading to protein truncation (p.Phe169LeufsX2) and amino acid substitution (p.His13Arg), respectively. These mutations were not considered common polymorphic variants, as they were undetected in 230 healthy controls of the same ethnic origin. While the c.38A>G encodes a mutant protein that behaves in biochemical assays as the wild-type form, the c.507delT is a loss-of-function mutation. The identification of two previously unreported CHEK2 variants, including a truncating mutation leading to constitutional haploinsufficiency, in individuals belonging to families selected for breast cancer/sarcoma phenotype, supports the hypothesis that the CHEK2 gene may act as a factor contributing to individual tumor development in peculiar familial backgrounds.

  18. Common variants at 12p11, 12q24, 9p21, 9q31.2 and in ZNF365 are associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 mutation carriers

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Several common alleles have been shown to be associated with breast and/or ovarian cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Recent genome-wide association studies of breast cancer have identified eight additional breast cancer susceptibility loci: rs1011970 (9p21, CDKN2A/B), rs10995190 (ZNF365), rs704010 (ZMIZ1), rs2380205 (10p15), rs614367 (11q13), rs1292011 (12q24), rs10771399 (12p11 near PTHLH) and rs865686 (9q31.2). Methods To evaluate whether these single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers, we genotyped these SNPs in 12,599 BRCA1 and 7,132 BRCA2 mutation carriers and analysed the associations with breast cancer risk within a retrospective likelihood framework. Results Only SNP rs10771399 near PTHLH was associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 mutation carriers (per-allele hazard ratio (HR) = 0.87, 95% CI: 0.81 to 0.94, P-trend = 3 × 10-4). The association was restricted to mutations proven or predicted to lead to absence of protein expression (HR = 0.82, 95% CI: 0.74 to 0.90, P-trend = 3.1 × 10-5, P-difference = 0.03). Four SNPs were associated with the risk of breast cancer for BRCA2 mutation carriers: rs10995190, P-trend = 0.015; rs1011970, P-trend = 0.048; rs865686, 2df-P = 0.007; rs1292011 2df-P = 0.03. rs10771399 (PTHLH) was predominantly associated with estrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer for BRCA1 mutation carriers (HR = 0.81, 95% CI: 0.74 to 0.90, P-trend = 4 × 10-5) and there was marginal evidence of association with ER-negative breast cancer for BRCA2 mutation carriers (HR = 0.78, 95% CI: 0.62 to 1.00, P-trend = 0.049). Conclusions The present findings, in combination with previously identified modifiers of risk, will ultimately lead to more accurate risk prediction and an improved understanding of the disease etiology in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. PMID:22348646

  19. Prevalence of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in women with breast carcinoma In Situ and referred for genetic testing.

    PubMed

    Hall, Michael J; Reid, Julia E; Wenstrup, Richard J

    2010-12-01

    Ductal and lobular carcinoma in situ (CIS) accounted for 62,280 (24.5%) of all new breast cancer diagnoses in 2009. BRCA1/2 mutations confer an extremely high risk of breast cancer, and management guidelines for BRCA1/2 mutation carriers advise close follow-up, intensive screening, and consideration of prophylactic surgery to lower this risk. The limited relevant previous data are not definitive in establishing the prevalence of BRCA1/2 mutations in breast CIS patients, creating uncertainty as to whether referral for cancer risk assessment and genetic testing is appropriate for this group. Therefore, we conducted a cross-sectional analysis of the Myriad Genetics BRCA1/2 database to determine the prevalence of these mutations in breast CIS patients. All statistical tests were 2-sided, and confidence intervals (CI) are reported at the 95% level (α = 0.05). The source population was 64,717 consecutive women who were not Ashkenazi Jewish, underwent BRCA1/2 testing, and provided a personal and family history of invasive breast and ovarian cancer; 7,295 (11.3%) reported a diagnosis of CIS (ductal or lobular) and had an overall 5.9% prevalence of mutated BRCA1/2 (mBRCA). Subgrouped by history (personal or family) of invasive breast and/or ovarian cancer, these CIS patients had the following prevalences of mBRCA: (1) no personal or family history, 2.3%; (2) personal history, 5.2%; (3) family history, 5%; and (4) personal and family history, 10.3%. mBRCA risk was significantly higher in women with early-onset (<50 years old) CIS than with late-onset (≥ 50 years old) CIS [odds ratio (OR) = 1.5; 95% CI = 1.1-2.1). Disease onset at less than 40 years age was associated with an even higher mBRCA risk (OR = 1.8; 95% CI = 1.3-2.3). By far the largest analysis of BRCA1/2 mutation prevalence in non-Ashkenazi Jewish breast CIS patients, this study shows that early-onset CIS is associated with mBRCA1/2 in patients referred for genetic testing. When a family history of breast and

  20. Screening for germline BRCA1, BRCA2, TP53 and CHEK2 mutations in families at-risk for hereditary breast cancer identified in a population-based study from Southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Palmero, Edenir Inêz; Alemar, Bárbara; Schüler-Faccini, Lavínia; Hainaut, Pierre; Moreira-Filho, Carlos Alberto; Ewald, Ingrid Petroni; Santos, Patricia Koehler Dos; Ribeiro, Patricia Lisbôa Izetti; Oliveira, Cristina Brinkmann de Netto; Calvez-Kelm, Florence Le; Tavtigian, Sean; Cossio, Silvia Liliana; Giugliani, Roberto; Caleffi, Maira; Ashton-Prolla, Patricia

    2016-05-24

    In Brazil, breast cancer is a public health care problem due to its high incidence and mortality rates. In this study, we investigated the prevalence of hereditary breast cancer syndromes (HBCS) in a population-based cohort in Brazils southernmost capital, Porto Alegre. All participants answered a questionnaire about family history (FH) of breast, ovarian and colorectal cancer and those with a positive FH were invited for genetic cancer risk assessment (GCRA). If pedigree analysis was suggestive of HBCS, genetic testing of the BRCA1, BRCA2, TP53, and CHEK2 genes was offered. Of 902 women submitted to GCRA, 214 had pedigrees suggestive of HBCS. Fifty of them underwent genetic testing: 18 and 40 for BRCA1/BRCA2 and TP53 mutation screening, respectively, and 7 for CHEK2 1100delC testing. A deleterious BRCA2 mutation was identified in one of the HBOC probands and the CHEK2 1100delC mutation occurred in one of the HBCC families. No deleterious germline alterations were identified in BRCA1 or TP53. Although strict inclusion criteria and a comprehensive testing approach were used, the suspected genetic risk in these families remains unexplained. Further studies in a larger cohort are necessary to better understand the genetic component of hereditary breast cancer in Southern Brazil.

  1. Screening for germline BRCA1, BRCA2, TP53 and CHEK2 mutations in families at-risk for hereditary breast cancer identified in a population-based study from Southern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Palmero, Edenir Inêz; Alemar, Bárbara; Schüler-Faccini, Lavínia; Hainaut, Pierre; Moreira-Filho, Carlos Alberto; Ewald, Ingrid Petroni; dos Santos, Patricia Koehler; Ribeiro, Patricia Lisbôa Izetti; de Oliveira, Cristina Brinkmann; Kelm, Florence Le Calvez; Tavtigian, Sean; Cossio, Silvia Liliana; Giugliani, Roberto; Caleffi, Maira; Ashton-Prolla, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In Brazil, breast cancer is a public health care problem due to its high incidence and mortality rates. In this study, we investigated the prevalence of hereditary breast cancer syndromes (HBCS) in a population-based cohort in Brazils southernmost capital, Porto Alegre. All participants answered a questionnaire about family history (FH) of breast, ovarian and colorectal cancer and those with a positive FH were invited for genetic cancer risk assessment (GCRA). If pedigree analysis was suggestive of HBCS, genetic testing of the BRCA1, BRCA2, TP53, and CHEK2 genes was offered. Of 902 women submitted to GCRA, 214 had pedigrees suggestive of HBCS. Fifty of them underwent genetic testing: 18 and 40 for BRCA1/BRCA2 and TP53 mutation screening, respectively, and 7 for CHEK2 1100delC testing. A deleterious BRCA2 mutation was identified in one of the HBOC probands and the CHEK2 1100delC mutation occurred in one of the HBCC families. No deleterious germline alterations were identified in BRCA1 or TP53. Although strict inclusion criteria and a comprehensive testing approach were used, the suspected genetic risk in these families remains unexplained. Further studies in a larger cohort are necessary to better understand the genetic component of hereditary breast cancer in Southern Brazil. PMID:27223485

  2. Screening for BRCA1, BRCA2, CHEK2, PALB2, BRIP1, RAD50, and CDH1 mutations in high-risk Finnish BRCA1/2-founder mutation-negative breast and/or ovarian cancer individuals.

    PubMed

    Kuusisto, Kirsi M; Bebel, Aleksandra; Vihinen, Mauno; Schleutker, Johanna; Sallinen, Satu-Leena

    2011-02-28

    Two major high-penetrance breast cancer genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2, are responsible for approximately 20% of hereditary breast cancer (HBC) cases in Finland. Additionally, rare mutations in several other genes that interact with BRCA1 and BRCA2 increase the risk of HBC. Still, a majority of HBC cases remain unexplained which is challenging for genetic counseling. We aimed to analyze additional mutations in HBC-associated genes and to define the sensitivity of our current BRCA1/2 mutation analysis protocol used in genetic counseling. Eighty-two well-characterized, high-risk hereditary breast and/or ovarian cancer (HBOC) BRCA1/2-founder mutation-negative Finnish individuals, were screened for germline alterations in seven breast cancer susceptibility genes, BRCA1, BRCA2, CHEK2, PALB2, BRIP1, RAD50, and CDH1. BRCA1/2 were analyzed by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) and direct sequencing. CHEK2 was analyzed by the high resolution melt (HRM) method and PALB2, RAD50, BRIP1 and CDH1 were analyzed by direct sequencing. Carrier frequencies between 82 (HBOC) BRCA1/2-founder mutation-negative Finnish individuals and 384 healthy Finnish population controls were compared by using Fisher's exact test. In silico prediction for novel missense variants effects was carried out by using Pathogenic-Or-Not -Pipeline (PON-P). Three previously reported breast cancer-associated variants, BRCA1 c.5095C > T, CHEK2 c.470T > C, and CHEK2 c.1100delC, were observed in eleven (13.4%) individuals. Ten of these individuals (12.2%) had CHEK2 variants, c.470T > C and/or c.1100delC. Fourteen novel sequence alterations and nine individuals with more than one non-synonymous variant were identified. One of the novel variants, BRCA2 c.72A > T (Leu24Phe) was predicted to be likely pathogenic in silico. No large genomic rearrangements were detected in BRCA1/2 by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA). In this study, mutations in previously known breast cancer

  3. Screening for BRCA1, BRCA2, CHEK2, PALB2, BRIP1, RAD50, and CDH1 mutations in high-risk Finnish BRCA1/2-founder mutation-negative breast and/or ovarian cancer individuals

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Two major high-penetrance breast cancer genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2, are responsible for approximately 20% of hereditary breast cancer (HBC) cases in Finland. Additionally, rare mutations in several other genes that interact with BRCA1 and BRCA2 increase the risk of HBC. Still, a majority of HBC cases remain unexplained which is challenging for genetic counseling. We aimed to analyze additional mutations in HBC-associated genes and to define the sensitivity of our current BRCA1/2 mutation analysis protocol used in genetic counseling. Methods Eighty-two well-characterized, high-risk hereditary breast and/or ovarian cancer (HBOC) BRCA1/2-founder mutation-negative Finnish individuals, were screened for germline alterations in seven breast cancer susceptibility genes, BRCA1, BRCA2, CHEK2, PALB2, BRIP1, RAD50, and CDH1. BRCA1/2 were analyzed by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) and direct sequencing. CHEK2 was analyzed by the high resolution melt (HRM) method and PALB2, RAD50, BRIP1 and CDH1 were analyzed by direct sequencing. Carrier frequencies between 82 (HBOC) BRCA1/2-founder mutation-negative Finnish individuals and 384 healthy Finnish population controls were compared by using Fisher's exact test. In silico prediction for novel missense variants effects was carried out by using Pathogenic-Or-Not -Pipeline (PON-P). Results Three previously reported breast cancer-associated variants, BRCA1 c.5095C > T, CHEK2 c.470T > C, and CHEK2 c.1100delC, were observed in eleven (13.4%) individuals. Ten of these individuals (12.2%) had CHEK2 variants, c.470T > C and/or c.1100delC. Fourteen novel sequence alterations and nine individuals with more than one non-synonymous variant were identified. One of the novel variants, BRCA2 c.72A > T (Leu24Phe) was predicted to be likely pathogenic in silico. No large genomic rearrangements were detected in BRCA1/2 by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA). Conclusions In this study, mutations in

  4. [Fanconi Anemia, Complementation Group D1 Caused by Biallelic Mutations of BRCA2 Gene--Case Report].

    PubMed

    Puchmajerová, A; Švojgr, K; Novotná, D; Macháčková, E; Sumerauer, D; Smíšek, P; Kodet, R; Kynčl, M; Křepelová, A; Foretová, L

    2016-01-01

    Fanconi anemia is a rare autosomal recessive disorder, clinically and genetically heterogeneous, characterized by typical clinical features, such as short stature, microcephaly, skeletal abnormalities, abnormal skin pigmentations, developmental delay and congenital heart, kidney anomalies etc. Pancytopenia leading to bone marrow failure occurs in the first decade. Patients with Fanconi anemia have a high risk of hematologic malignancies and solid tumors. The diagnosis of Fanconi anemia is based on cytogenetic testing for increased rates of spontaneous chromosomal breakage and increased sensitivity to diepoxybutane or mitomycin C. Fanconi anemia is a heterogeneous disorder, at least 15 complementation groups are described, and 15 genes in which mutations are responsible for all of the 15 Fanconi anemia complementation groups have been identified. Unlike other Fanconi anemia complementation groups, for complementation group D1 (FANCD1), the bone marrow failure is not a typical feature, but early-onset leukemia and specific solid tumors, most often medulloblastoma and Wilms tumor, are typical for this complementation group.

  5. BRCA1 And BRCA2 analysis of Argentinean breast/ovarian cancer patients selected for age and family history highlights a role for novel mutations of putative south-American origin.

    PubMed

    Solano, Angela Rosaria; Aceto, Gitana Maria; Delettieres, Dreanina; Veschi, Serena; Neuman, Maria Isabel; Alonso, Eduardo; Chialina, Sergio; Chacón, Reinaldo Daniel; Renato, Mariani-Costantini; Podestá, Ernesto Jorge

    2012-01-01

    The spectrum of BRCA1/2 genetic variation in breast-ovarian cancer patients has been scarcely investigated outside Europe and North America, with few reports for South America, where Amerindian founder effects and recent multiracial immigration are predicted to result in high genetic diversity. We describe here the results of BRCA1/BRCA2 germline analysis in an Argentinean series of breast/ovarian cancer patients selected for young age at diagnosis or breast/ovarian cancer family history. The study series (134 patients) included 37 cases diagnosed within 40 years of age and no family history (any ethnicity, fully-sequenced), and 97 cases with at least 2 affected relatives (any age), of which 57 were non-Ashkenazi (fully-sequenced) and 40 Ashkenazi (tested only for the founder mutations c.66_67delAG and c.5263insC in BRCA1 and c.5946delT in BRCA2). We found 24 deleterious mutations (BRCA1:16; BRCA2: 8) in 38/134 (28.3%) patients, of which 6/37 (16.2%) within the young age group, 15/57 (26.3%) within the non-Ahkenazi positive for family history; and 17/40 (42.5%) within the Ashkenazi. Seven pathogenetic mutations were novel, five in BRCA1: c.1502_1505delAATT, c.2626_2627delAA c.2686delA, c.2728 C > T, c.3758_3759delCT, two in BRCA2: c.7105insA, c.793 + 1delG. We also detected 72 variants of which 54 previously reported and 17 novel, 33 detected in an individual patient. Four missense variants of unknown clinical significance, identified in 5 patients, are predicted to affect protein function. While global and European variants contributed near 45% of the detected BRCA1/2 variation, the significant fraction of new variants (25/96, 26%) suggests the presence of a South American genetic component. This study, the first conducted in Argentinean patients, highlights a significant impact of novel BRCA1/2 mutations and genetic variants, which may be regarded as putatively South American, and confirms the important role of founder BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in

  6. Evaluation of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation prevalence, risk prediction models and a multistep testing approach in French‐Canadian families with high risk of breast and ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Simard, Jacques; Dumont, Martine; Moisan, Anne‐Marie; Gaborieau, Valérie; Vézina, Hélène; Durocher, Francine; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Plante, Marie; Avard, Denise; Bessette, Paul; Brousseau, Claire; Dorval, Michel; Godard, Béatrice; Houde, Louis; Joly, Yann; Lajoie, Marie‐Andrée; Leblanc, Gilles; Lépine, Jean; Lespérance, Bernard; Malouin, Hélène; Parboosingh, Jillian; Pichette, Roxane; Provencher, Louise; Rhéaume, Josée; Sinnett, Daniel; Samson, Carolle; Simard, Jean‐Claude; Tranchant, Martine; Voyer, Patricia; BRCAs, INHERIT; Easton, Douglas; Tavtigian, Sean V; Knoppers, Bartha‐Maria; Laframboise, Rachel; Bridge, Peter; Goldgar, David

    2007-01-01

    Background and objective In clinical settings with fixed resources allocated to predictive genetic testing for high‐risk cancer predisposition genes, optimal strategies for mutation screening programmes are critically important. These depend on the mutation spectrum found in the population under consideration and the frequency of mutations detected as a function of the personal and family history of cancer, which are both affected by the presence of founder mutations and demographic characteristics of the underlying population. The results of multistep genetic testing for mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 in a large series of families with breast cancer in the French‐Canadian population of Quebec, Canada are reported. Methods A total of 256 high‐risk families were ascertained from regional familial cancer clinics throughout the province of Quebec. Initially, families were tested for a panel of specific mutations known to occur in this population. Families in which no mutation was identified were then comprehensively tested. Three algorithms to predict the presence of mutations were evaluated, including the prevalence tables provided by Myriad Genetics Laboratories, the Manchester Scoring System and a logistic regression approach based on the data from this study. Results 8 of the 15 distinct mutations found in 62 BRCA1/BRCA2‐positive families had never been previously reported in this population, whereas 82% carried 1 of the 4 mutations currently observed in ⩾2 families. In the subset of 191 families in which at least 1 affected individual was tested, 29% carried a mutation. Of these 27 BRCA1‐positive and 29 BRCA2‐positive families, 48 (86%) were found to harbour a mutation detected by the initial test. Among the remaining 143 inconclusive families, all 8 families found to have a mutation after complete sequencing had Manchester Scores ⩾18. The logistic regression and Manchester Scores provided equal predictive power, and both were significantly better

  7. Association of breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers with genetic variants showing differential allelic expression: identification of a modifier of breast cancer risk at locus 11q22.3.

    PubMed

    Hamdi, Yosr; Soucy, Penny; Kuchenbaeker, Karoline B; Pastinen, Tomi; Droit, Arnaud; Lemaçon, Audrey; Adlard, Julian; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Andrulis, Irene L; Arason, Adalgeir; Arnold, Norbert; Arun, Banu K; Azzollini, Jacopo; Bane, Anita; Barjhoux, Laure; Barrowdale, Daniel; Benitez, Javier; Berthet, Pascaline; Blok, Marinus J; Bobolis, Kristie; Bonadona, Valérie; Bonanni, Bernardo; Bradbury, Angela R; Brewer, Carole; Buecher, Bruno; Buys, Saundra S; Caligo, Maria A; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Chung, Wendy K; Claes, Kathleen B M; Daly, Mary B; Damiola, Francesca; Davidson, Rosemarie; De la Hoya, Miguel; De Leeneer, Kim; Diez, Orland; Ding, Yuan Chun; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Domchek, Susan M; Dorfling, Cecilia M; Eccles, Diana; Eeles, Ros; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Ejlertsen, Bent; Engel, Christoph; Gareth Evans, D; Feliubadalo, Lidia; Foretova, Lenka; Fostira, Florentia; Foulkes, William D; Fountzilas, George; Friedman, Eitan; Frost, Debra; Ganschow, Pamela; Ganz, Patricia A; Garber, Judy; Gayther, Simon A; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Glendon, Gord; Godwin, Andrew K; Goldgar, David E; Greene, Mark H; Gronwald, Jacek; Hahnen, Eric; Hamann, Ute; Hansen, Thomas V O; Hart, Steven; Hays, John L; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Hulick, Peter J; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Isaacs, Claudine; Izatt, Louise; Jakubowska, Anna; James, Paul; Janavicius, Ramunas; Jensen, Uffe Birk; John, Esther M; Joseph, Vijai; Just, Walter; Kaczmarek, Katarzyna; Karlan, Beth Y; Kets, Carolien M; Kirk, Judy; Kriege, Mieke; Laitman, Yael; Laurent, Maïté; Lazaro, Conxi; Leslie, Goska; Lester, Jenny; Lesueur, Fabienne; Liljegren, Annelie; Loman, Niklas; Loud, Jennifer T; Manoukian, Siranoush; Mariani, Milena; Mazoyer, Sylvie; McGuffog, Lesley; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E J; Meindl, Alfons; Miller, Austin; Montagna, Marco; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Nathanson, Katherine L; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Nussbaum, Robert L; Olah, Edith; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Ong, Kai-Ren; Oosterwijk, Jan C; Osorio, Ana; Papi, Laura; Park, Sue Kyung; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Peissel, Bernard; Segura, Pedro Perez; Peterlongo, Paolo; Phelan, Catherine M; Radice, Paolo; Rantala, Johanna; Rappaport-Fuerhauser, Christine; Rennert, Gad; Richardson, Andrea; Robson, Mark; Rodriguez, Gustavo C; Rookus, Matti A; Schmutzler, Rita Katharina; Sevenet, Nicolas; Shah, Payal D; Singer, Christian F; Slavin, Thomas P; Snape, Katie; Sokolowska, Johanna; Sønderstrup, Ida Marie Heeholm; Southey, Melissa; Spurdle, Amanda B; Stadler, Zsofia; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Sutter, Christian; Tan, Yen; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Teixeira, Manuel R; Teulé, Alex; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Mary Beth; Thomassen, Mads; Tihomirova, Laima; Tischkowitz, Marc; Tognazzo, Silvia; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Tung, Nadine; van den Ouweland, Ans M W; van der Luijt, Rob B; van Engelen, Klaartje; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Wijnen, Juul T; Rebbeck, Timothy; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Offit, Kenneth; Couch, Fergus J; Nord, Silje; Easton, Douglas F; Antoniou, Antonis C; Simard, Jacques

    2017-01-01

    Cis-acting regulatory SNPs resulting in differential allelic expression (DAE) may, in part, explain the underlying phenotypic variation associated with many complex diseases. To investigate whether common variants associated with DAE were involved in breast cancer susceptibility among BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, a list of 175 genes was developed based of their involvement in cancer-related pathways. Using data from a genome-wide map of SNPs associated with allelic expression, we assessed the association of ~320 SNPs located in the vicinity of these genes with breast and ovarian cancer risks in 15,252 BRCA1 and 8211 BRCA2 mutation carriers ascertained from 54 studies participating in the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2. We identified a region on 11q22.3 that is significantly associated with breast cancer risk in BRCA1 mutation carriers (most significant SNP rs228595 p = 7 × 10 -6 ). This association was absent in BRCA2 carriers (p = 0.57). The 11q22.3 region notably encompasses genes such as ACAT1, NPAT, and ATM. Expression quantitative trait loci associations were observed in both normal breast and tumors across this region, namely for ACAT1, ATM, and other genes. In silico analysis revealed some overlap between top risk-associated SNPs and relevant biological features in mammary cell data, which suggests potential functional significance. We identified 11q22.3 as a new modifier locus in BRCA1 carriers. Replication in larger studies using estrogen receptor (ER)-negative or triple-negative (i.e., ER-, progesterone receptor-, and HER2-negative) cases could therefore be helpful to confirm the association of this locus with breast cancer risk.

  8. The importance of proper bioinformatics analysis and clinical interpretation of tumor genomic profiling: a case study of undifferentiated sarcoma and a constitutional pathogenic BRCA2 mutation and an MLH1 variant of uncertain significance.

    PubMed

    Varga, Elizabeth; Chao, Elizabeth C; Yeager, Nicholas D

    2015-09-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology is increasingly utilized to identify therapeutic targets for patients with malignancy. This technology also has the capability to reveal the presence of constitutional genetic alterations, which may have significant implications for patients and their family members. Here we present the case of a 23 year old Caucasian patient with recurrent undifferentiated sarcoma who had NGS-based tumor analysis using an assay which simultaneously analyzed the entire coding sequence of 236 cancer-related genes (3769 exons) plus 47 introns from 19 genes often rearranged or altered in cancer. Pathogenic alterations were reported in tumor as the predicted protein alterations, BRCA2 "R645fs*15″ and MLH1 "E694*". Because constitutional BRCA2 and MLH1 gene mutations are associated with Hereditary Breast Ovarian Cancer Syndrome (HBOCS) and Lynch syndrome respectively, sequence analysis of DNA isolated from peripheral blood was performed. The presence of the alterations, BRCA2 c.1929delG and MLH1 c.2080G>T, corresponding to the previously reported predicted protein alterations, were confirmed by Sanger sequencing in the constitutional DNA. An additional DNA finding was reported in this analysis, MLH1 c.2081A>C at the neighboring nucleotide. Further evaluation of the family revealed that all alterations were paternally inherited and the two MLH1 substitutions were in cis, more appropriately referred to as MLH1 c.2080_2081delGAinsTC, which is classified as a variant of uncertain significance. This case illustrates important considerations related to appropriate interpretation of NGS tumor results and follow-up of patients with potentially deleterious constitutional alterations.

  9. Multifactorial Likelihood Assessment of BRCA1 and BRCA2 Missense Variants Confirms That BRCA1:c.122A>G(p.His41Arg) Is a Pathogenic Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Whiley, Phillip J.; Parsons, Michael T.; Leary, Jennifer; Tucker, Kathy; Warwick, Linda; Dopita, Belinda; Thorne, Heather; Lakhani, Sunil R.; Goldgar, David E.; Brown, Melissa A.; Spurdle, Amanda B.

    2014-01-01

    Rare exonic, non-truncating variants in known cancer susceptibility genes such as BRCA1 and BRCA2 are problematic for genetic counseling and clinical management of relevant families. This study used multifactorial likelihood analysis and/or bioinformatically-directed mRNA assays to assess pathogenicity of 19 BRCA1 or BRCA2 variants identified following patient referral to clinical genetic services. Two variants were considered to be pathogenic (Class 5). BRCA1:c.4484G> C(p.Arg1495Thr) was shown to result in aberrant mRNA transcripts predicted to encode truncated proteins. The BRCA1:c.122A>G(p.His41Arg) RING-domain variant was found from multifactorial likelihood analysis to have a posterior probability of pathogenicity of 0.995, a result consistent with existing protein functional assay data indicating lost BARD1 binding and ubiquitin ligase activity. Of the remaining variants, seven were determined to be not clinically significant (Class 1), nine were likely not pathogenic (Class 2), and one was uncertain (Class 3).These results have implications for genetic counseling and medical management of families carrying these specific variants. They also provide additional multifactorial likelihood variant classifications as reference to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of bioinformatic prediction tools and/or functional assay data in future studies. PMID:24489791

  10. Identification of a Novel BRCA1 Pathogenic Mutation in Korean Patients Following Reclassification of BRCA1 and BRCA2 Variants According to the ACMG Standards and Guidelines Using Relevant Ethnic Controls.

    PubMed

    Park, Ji Soo; Nam, Eun Ji; Park, Hyung Seok; Han, Jung Woo; Lee, Jung-Yun; Kim, Jieun; Kim, Tae Il; Lee, Seung-Tae

    2017-10-01

    Comparison of variant frequencies in the general population has become an essential part of the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics (ACMG) standards and guidelines for interpreting sequence variants. We determined the optimal number of relevant ethnic controls that should be used to accurately calculate the odds ratio (OR) of genetic variants. Using the ACMG guidelines, we reclassified BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations and variants of unknown significance in 745 Korean patients susceptible to hereditary breast and ovarian cancer compared with 1,314 Korean population controls. We observed that the ORs were falsely inflated when we analyzed several variants using non-Korean population data. Our simulation indicated that the number of controls needed for the lower limit of a 95% confidence interval to exceed 1.0 varied according to the frequency of the variant in each patient group, with more than 820 controls needed for a variant existing in 1% of cases. Using a sufficient number of relevant population data, we could efficiently classify variants and identified the BRCA1 p.Leu1780Pro mutation as a possible pathogenic founder mutation in Korean patients. Our study suggests that BRCA1 p.Leu1780Pro is a novel pathogenic mutation found in Korean patients. We also determined the optimal number of relevant ethnic controls needed for accurate variant classification according to the ACMG guidelines.

  11. Roles of brca2 (fancd1) in oocyte nuclear architecture, gametogenesis, gonad tumors, and genome stability in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Marí, Adriana; Wilson, Catherine; Titus, Tom A; Cañestro, Cristian; BreMiller, Ruth A; Yan, Yi-Lin; Nanda, Indrajit; Johnston, Adam; Kanki, John P; Gray, Erin M; He, Xinjun; Spitsbergen, Jan; Schindler, Detlev; Postlethwait, John H

    2011-03-01

    Mild mutations in BRCA2 (FANCD1) cause Fanconi anemia (FA) when homozygous, while severe mutations cause common cancers including breast, ovarian, and prostate cancers when heterozygous. Here we report a zebrafish brca2 insertional mutant that shares phenotypes with human patients and identifies a novel brca2 function in oogenesis. Experiments showed that mutant embryos and mutant cells in culture experienced genome instability, as do cells in FA patients. In wild-type zebrafish, meiotic cells expressed brca2; and, unexpectedly, transcripts in oocytes localized asymmetrically to the animal pole. In juvenile brca2 mutants, oocytes failed to progress through meiosis, leading to female-to-male sex reversal. Adult mutants became sterile males due to the meiotic arrest of spermatocytes, which then died by apoptosis, followed by neoplastic proliferation of gonad somatic cells that was similar to neoplasia observed in ageing dead end (dnd)-knockdown males, which lack germ cells. The construction of animals doubly mutant for brca2 and the apoptotic gene tp53 (p53) rescued brca2-dependent sex reversal. Double mutants developed oocytes and became sterile females that produced only aberrant embryos and showed elevated risk for invasive ovarian tumors. Oocytes in double-mutant females showed normal localization of brca2 and pou5f1 transcripts to the animal pole and vasa transcripts to the vegetal pole, but had a polarized rather than symmetrical nucleus with the distribution of nucleoli and chromosomes to opposite nuclear poles; this result revealed a novel role for Brca2 in establishing or maintaining oocyte nuclear architecture. Mutating tp53 did not rescue the infertility phenotype in brca2 mutant males, suggesting that brca2 plays an essential role in zebrafish spermatogenesis. Overall, this work verified zebrafish as a model for the role of Brca2 in human disease and uncovered a novel function of Brca2 in vertebrate oocyte nuclear architecture.

  12. Roles of brca2 (fancd1) in Oocyte Nuclear Architecture, Gametogenesis, Gonad Tumors, and Genome Stability in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Marí, Adriana; Wilson, Catherine; Titus, Tom A.; Cañestro, Cristian; BreMiller, Ruth A.; Yan, Yi-Lin; Nanda, Indrajit; Johnston, Adam; Kanki, John P.; Gray, Erin M.; He, Xinjun; Spitsbergen, Jan; Schindler, Detlev; Postlethwait, John H.

    2011-01-01

    Mild mutations in BRCA2 (FANCD1) cause Fanconi anemia (FA) when homozygous, while severe mutations cause common cancers including breast, ovarian, and prostate cancers when heterozygous. Here we report a zebrafish brca2 insertional mutant that shares phenotypes with human patients and identifies a novel brca2 function in oogenesis. Experiments showed that mutant embryos and mutant cells in culture experienced genome instability, as do cells in FA patients. In wild-type zebrafish, meiotic cells expressed brca2; and, unexpectedly, transcripts in oocytes localized asymmetrically to the animal pole. In juvenile brca2 mutants, oocytes failed to progress through meiosis, leading to female-to-male sex reversal. Adult mutants became sterile males due to the meiotic arrest of spermatocytes, which then died by apoptosis, followed by neoplastic proliferation of gonad somatic cells that was similar to neoplasia observed in ageing dead end (dnd)-knockdown males, which lack germ cells. The construction of animals doubly mutant for brca2 and the apoptotic gene tp53 (p53) rescued brca2-dependent sex reversal. Double mutants developed oocytes and became sterile females that produced only aberrant embryos and showed elevated risk for invasive ovarian tumors. Oocytes in double-mutant females showed normal localization of brca2 and pou5f1 transcripts to the animal pole and vasa transcripts to the vegetal pole, but had a polarized rather than symmetrical nucleus with the distribution of nucleoli and chromosomes to opposite nuclear poles; this result revealed a novel role for Brca2 in establishing or maintaining oocyte nuclear architecture. Mutating tp53 did not rescue the infertility phenotype in brca2 mutant males, suggesting that brca2 plays an essential role in zebrafish spermatogenesis. Overall, this work verified zebrafish as a model for the role of Brca2 in human disease and uncovered a novel function of Brca2 in vertebrate oocyte nuclear architecture. PMID:21483806

  13. Antitumor activity and safety of the PARP inhibitor rucaparib in patients with high-grade ovarian carcinoma and a germline or somatic BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation: Integrated analysis of data from Study 10 and ARIEL2.

    PubMed

    Oza, Amit M; Tinker, Anna V; Oaknin, Ana; Shapira-Frommer, Ronnie; McNeish, Iain A; Swisher, Elizabeth M; Ray-Coquard, Isabelle; Bell-McGuinn, Katherine; Coleman, Robert L; O'Malley, David M; Leary, Alexandra; Chen, Lee-May; Provencher, Diane; Ma, Ling; Brenton, James D; Konecny, Gottfried E; Castro, Cesar M; Giordano, Heidi; Maloney, Lara; Goble, Sandra; Lin, Kevin K; Sun, James; Raponi, Mitch; Rolfe, Lindsey; Kristeleit, Rebecca S

    2017-11-01

    An integrated analysis was undertaken to characterize the antitumor activity and safety profile of the oral poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitor rucaparib in patients with relapsed high-grade ovarian carcinoma (HGOC). Eligible patients from Study 10 (NCT01482715) and ARIEL2 (NCT01891344) who received a starting dose of oral rucaparib 600mg twice daily (BID) with or without food were included in these analyses. The integrated efficacy population included patients with HGOC and a deleterious germline or somatic BRCA1 or BRCA2 (BRCA1/2) mutation who received at least two prior chemotherapies and were sensitive, resistant, or refractory to platinum-based chemotherapy. The primary endpoint was investigator-assessed confirmed objective response rate (ORR). Secondary endpoints included duration of response (DOR) and progression-free survival (PFS). The integrated safety population included patients with HGOC who received at least one dose of rucaparib 600mg BID, irrespective of BRCA1/2 mutation status and prior treatments. In the efficacy population (n=106), ORR was 53.8% (95% confidence interval [CI], 43.8-63.5); 8.5% and 45.3% of patients achieved complete and partial responses, respectively. Median DOR was 9.2months (95% CI, 6.6-11.6). In the safety population (n=377), the most frequent treatment-emergent adverse events (AEs) were nausea, asthenia/fatigue, vomiting, and anemia/hemoglobin decreased. The most common grade ≥3 treatment-emergent AE was anemia/hemoglobin decreased. Treatment-emergent AEs led to treatment interruption, dose reduction, and treatment discontinuation in 58.6%, 45.9%, and 9.8% of patients, respectively. No treatment-related deaths occurred. Rucaparib has antitumor activity in advanced BRCA1/2-mutated HGOC and a manageable safety profile. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Prevalence of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in women with carcinoma in situ of the breast referred for genetic testing

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Michael J.; Reid, Julia E.; Wenstrup, Richard J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Carcinoma in situ (CIS) of the breast will account for 62,280 (24.5%) of new breast cancer diagnoses in 2009. Management guidelines for BRCA1/2 mutation carriers advise close follow-up, intensive screening, and consideration of prophylactic surgeries to lower cancer risk. The prevalence of BRCA1/2 mutations in women with a history of CIS using comprehensive DNA sequencing and rearrangement testing has not been definitively documented. Methods The prevalence of mutations in non-Ashkenazi Jewish women with CIS was assessed by way of a cross-sectional analysis of the Myriad Genetic Laboratories, Inc. BRCA1/2 database. Women reporting any diagnosis of CIS were included. All statistical tests are two-sided, and confidence intervals are reported at the 95% level (α =0.05). Results Among the test population (N=64717), 11.3%(n=7295) reported a history of CIS (any reported CIS). For women without personal history of invasive cancer (CIS alone+CIS and any family history subgroups), those with early-onset CIS had a significantly increased risk of a BRCA1/2 mutation compared to women with late-onset disease (≥50 years)(OR 1.5, 95% CI 1.1–2.1). Among women reporting only a history of CIS and no personal or family history (CIS alone), mutation prevalence was 2.3% (17/738). Conclusions In patients referred for genetic testing, early-onset CIS is associated with BRCA1/2. When a family history of breast and/or ovarian cancer are also present, testing women with early-onset CIS may increase the likelihood of BRCA1/2 mutation detection, and the opportunity for carriers to consider additional cancer prevention strategies. PMID:21149333

  15. Structure and Mechanism of Action of the BRCA2 Breast Cancer Tumor Suppressor

    PubMed Central

    Malivert, Laurent; McIlwraith, Michael J.; Pape, Tillman; West, Stephen C.; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in BRCA2 increase susceptibility to breast, ovarian and prostate cancers. The product of human BRCA2, BRCA2 protein, plays a key role in the repair of DNA double strand breaks and interstrand crosslinks by RAD51-mediated homologous recombination. Here, we present a biochemical and structural characterization of full length (3,418 amino acid) BRCA2, alone and in complex with RAD51. We show that BRCA2 facilitates nucleation of RAD51 filaments at multiple sites on single-stranded DNA. Three-dimensional electron microscopy reconstructions revealed that BRCA2 exists as a dimer and that two oppositely-oriented sets of RAD51 molecules bind the dimer. Single stranded DNA binds along the long axis of BRCA2, such that only one set of RAD51 monomers can form a productive complex with DNA and establish filament formation. Our data define the molecular mechanism by which this tumor suppressor facilitates RAD51-mediated homologous recombinational repair. PMID:25282148

  16. Characterization of BRCA2 Transcriptional Regulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-12-01

    tig of BRCA2 promoter construct and 0.1 and we verify the role of USF in regulation of basal activity of jig of pRL-TK Renilla luciferase vector...Promega) with 4 1 l of Fugene-6 the promoter. was used for each transfection. The pRL-TK Renilla luciferase activity was used to control for transfection...pCMV-CREB, pCMV-Myc, BRCA2 Reporter Constructs-A BAC clone (B489G) containing the 5’ and pCMV-Max. Firefly luciferase and Renilla luciferase assays

  17. Cycling with BRCA2 from DNA repair to mitosis

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hyunsook, E-mail: HL212@snu.ac.kr

    Genetic integrity in proliferating cells is guaranteed by the harmony of DNA replication, appropriate DNA repair, and segregation of the duplicated genome. Breast cancer susceptibility gene BRCA2 is a unique tumor suppressor that is involved in all three processes. Hence, it is critical in genome maintenance. The functions of BRCA2 in DNA repair and homology-directed recombination (HDR) have been reviewed numerous times. Here, I will briefly go through the functions of BRCA2 in HDR and focus on the emerging roles of BRCA2 in telomere homeostasis and mitosis, then discuss how BRCA2 exerts distinct functions in a cell-cycle specific manner inmore » the maintenance of genomic integrity. - Highlights: • BRCA2 is a multifaceted tumor suppressor and is crucial in genetic integrity. • BRCA2 exerts distinct functions in cell cycle-specific manner. • Mitotic kinases regulate diverse functions of BRCA2 in mitosis and cytokinesis.« less

  18. Plasticity of BRCA2 Function in Homologous Recombination: Genetic Interactions of the PALB2 and DNA Binding Domains

    PubMed Central

    Siaud, Nicolas; Lam, Isabel; Christ, Nicole; Schlacher, Katharina; Xia, Bing; Jasin, Maria

    2011-01-01

    The breast cancer suppressor BRCA2 is essential for the maintenance of genomic integrity in mammalian cells through its role in DNA repair by homologous recombination (HR). Human BRCA2 is 3,418 amino acids and is comprised of multiple domains that interact with the RAD51 recombinase and other proteins as well as with DNA. To gain insight into the cellular function of BRCA2 in HR, we created fusions consisting of various BRCA2 domains and also introduced mutations into these domains to disrupt specific protein and DNA interactions. We find that a BRCA2 fusion peptide deleted for the DNA binding domain and active in HR is completely dependent on interaction with the PALB2 tumor suppressor for activity. Conversely, a BRCA2 fusion peptide deleted for the PALB2 binding domain is dependent on an intact DNA binding domain, providing a role for this conserved domain in vivo; mutagenesis suggests that both single-stranded and double-stranded DNA binding activities in the DNA binding domain are required for its activity. Given that PALB2 itself binds DNA, these results suggest alternative mechanisms to deliver RAD51 to DNA. In addition, the BRCA2 C terminus contains both RAD51-dependent and -independent activities which are essential to HR in some contexts. Finally, binding the small peptide DSS1 is essential for activity when its binding domain is present, but not when it is absent. Our results reveal functional redundancy within the BRCA2 protein and emphasize the plasticity of this large protein built for optimal HR function in mammalian cells. The occurrence of disease-causing mutations throughout BRCA2 suggests sub-optimal HR from a variety of domain modulations. PMID:22194698

  19. In vivo therapeutic responses contingent on Fanconi anemia/BRCA2 status of the tumor.

    PubMed

    van der Heijden, Michiel S; Brody, Jonathan R; Dezentje, David A; Gallmeier, Eike; Cunningham, Steven C; Swartz, Michael J; DeMarzo, Angelo M; Offerhaus, G Johan A; Isacoff, William H; Hruban, Ralph H; Kern, Scott E

    2005-10-15

    BRCA2, FANCC, and FANCG gene mutations are present in a subset of pancreatic cancer. Defects in these genes could lead to hypersensitivity to interstrand cross-linkers in vivo and a more optimal treatment of pancreatic cancer patients based on the genetic profile of the tumor. Two retrovirally complemented pancreatic cancer cell lines having defects in the Fanconi anemia pathway, PL11 (FANCC-mutated) and Hs766T (FANCG-mutated), as well as several parental pancreatic cancer cell lines with or without mutations in the Fanconi anemia/BRCA2 pathway, were assayed for in vitro and in vivo sensitivities to various chemotherapeutic agents. A distinct dichotomy of drug responses was observed. Fanconi anemia-defective cancer cells were hypersensitive to the cross-linking agents mitomycin C (MMC), cisplatin, chlorambucil, and melphalan but not to 5-fluorouracil, gemcitabine, doxorubicin, etoposide, vinblastine, or paclitaxel. Hypersensitivity to cross-linking agents was confirmed in vivo; FANCC-deficient xenografts of PL11 and BRCA2-deficient xenografts of CAPAN1 regressed on treatment with two different regimens of MMC whereas Fanconi anemia-proficient xenografts did not. The MMC response comprised cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and necrosis. Xenografts of PL11 also regressed after a single dose of cyclophosphamide whereas xenografts of genetically complemented PL11(FANCC) did not. MMC or other cross-linking agents as a clinical therapy for pancreatic cancer patients with tumors harboring defects in the Fanconi anemia/BRCA2 pathway should be specifically investigated.

  20. Deletion of Brca2 exon 27 causes hypersensitivity to DNA crosslinks, chromosomal instability, and reduced life span in mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donoho, Greg; Brenneman, Mark A.; Cui, Tracy X.; Donoviel, Dorit; Vogel, Hannes; Goodwin, Edwin H.; Chen, David J.; Hasty, Paul

    2003-01-01

    The Brca2 tumor-suppressor gene contributes to genomic stability, at least in part by a role in homologous recombinational repair. BRCA2 protein is presumed to function in homologous recombination through interactions with RAD51. Both exons 11 and 27 of Brca2 code for domains that interact with RAD51; exon 11 encodes eight BRC motifs, whereas exon 27 encodes a single, distinct interaction domain. Deletion of all RAD51-interacting domains causes embryonic lethality in mice. A less severe phenotype is seen with BRAC2 truncations that preserve some, but not all, of the BRC motifs. These mice can survive beyond weaning, but are runted and infertile, and die very young from cancer. Cells from such mice show hypersensitivity to some genotoxic agents and chromosomal instability. Here, we have analyzed mice and cells with a deletion of only the RAD51-interacting region encoded by exon 27. Mice homozygous for this mutation (called brca2(lex1)) have a shorter life span than that of control littermates, possibly because of early onsets of cancer and sepsis. No other phenotype was observed in these animals; therefore, the brca2(lex1) mutation is less severe than truncations that delete some BRC motifs. However, at the cellular level, the brca2(lex1) mutation causes reduced viability, hypersensitivity to the DNA interstrand crosslinking agent mitomycin C, and gross chromosomal instability, much like more severe truncations. Thus, the extreme carboxy-terminal region encoded by exon 27 is important for BRCA2 function, probably because it is required for a fully functional interaction between BRCA2 and RAD51. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Involvement and Influence of Healthcare Providers, Family Members, and Other Mutation Carriers in the Cancer Risk Management Decision-Making Process of BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers.

    PubMed

    Puski, Athena; Hovick, Shelly; Senter, Leigha; Toland, Amanda Ewart

    2018-03-29

    Deciding between increased cancer screening or prophylactic surgery and the timing of such procedures can be a difficult and complex process for women with BRCA mutations. There are gaps in our understanding of involvement of others in the decision-making process for women with BRCA mutations. This study evaluated the management decision-making process of women with BRCA mutations, focusing on the involvement of others. Grounded theory was used to analyze and code risk management decision-making information from interviews with 20 BRCA mutation carriers. Unaffected at-risk participants with a BRCA mutation, those under age 40, and those with no children described having a difficult time making risk management decisions. Physicians were an integral part of the decision-making process by providing decisional support and management recommendations. Family members and other mutation carriers filled similar yet distinct roles by providing experiential information as well as decisional and emotional support for carriers. Participants described genetic counselors as short-term providers of risk information and management recommendations. The study findings suggest that unaffected at-risk women, women under 40, and those who do not have children may benefit from additional support and information during the decision-making process. Genetic counselors are well trained to help women through this process and connect them with resources, and may be under-utilized in long-term follow-up for women with a BRCA mutation.

  2. Tetratricopeptide-motif-mediated interaction of FANCG with recombination proteins XRCC3 and BRCA2.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Shobbir; Wilson, James B; Blom, Eric; Thompson, Larry H; Sung, Patrick; Gordon, Susan M; Kupfer, Gary M; Joenje, Hans; Mathew, Christopher G; Jones, Nigel J

    2006-05-10

    Fanconi anaemia is an inherited chromosomal instability disorder characterised by cellular sensitivity to DNA interstrand crosslinkers, bone-marrow failure and a high risk of cancer. Eleven FA genes have been identified, one of which, FANCD1, is the breast cancer susceptibility gene BRCA2. At least eight FA proteins form a nuclear core complex required for monoubiquitination of FANCD2. The BRCA2/FANCD1 protein is connected to the FA pathway by interactions with the FANCG and FANCD2 proteins, both of which co-localise with the RAD51 recombinase, which is regulated by BRCA2. These connections raise the question of whether any of the FANC proteins of the core complex might also participate in other complexes involved in homologous recombination repair. We therefore tested known FA proteins for direct interaction with RAD51 and its paralogs XRCC2 and XRCC3. FANCG was found to interact with XRCC3, and this interaction was disrupted by the FA-G patient derived mutation L71P. FANCG was co-immunoprecipitated with both XRCC3 and BRCA2 from extracts of human and hamster cells. The FANCG-XRCC3 and FANCG-BRCA2 interactions did not require the presence of other FA proteins from the core complex, suggesting that FANCG also participates in a DNA repair complex that is downstream and independent of FANCD2 monoubiquitination. Additionally, XRCC3 and BRCA2 proteins co-precipitate in both human and hamster cells and this interaction requires FANCG. The FANCG protein contains multiple tetratricopeptide repeat motifs (TPRs), which function as scaffolds to mediate protein-protein interactions. Mutation of one or more of these motifs disrupted all of the known interactions of FANCG. We propose that FANCG, in addition to stabilising the FA core complex, may have a role in building multiprotein complexes that facilitate homologous recombination repair.

  3. Brca2 (XRCC11) Deficiency Results in Radioresistant DNA Synthesis and a Higher Frequency of Spontaneous Deletions

    PubMed Central

    Kraakman-van der Zwet, Maria; Overkamp, Wilhelmina J. I.; van Lange, Rebecca E. E.; Essers, Jeroen; van Duijn-Goedhart, Annemarie; Wiggers, Ingrid; Swaminathan, Srividya; van Buul, Paul P. W.; Errami, Abdellatif; Tan, Raoul T. L.; Jaspers, Nicolaas G. J.; Sharan, Shyam K.; Kanaar, Roland; Zdzienicka, Małgorzata Z.

    2002-01-01

    We show here that the radiosensitive Chinese hamster cell mutant (V-C8) of group XRCC11 is defective in the breast cancer susceptibility gene Brca2. The very complex phenotype of V-C8 cells is complemented by a single human chromosome 13 providing the BRCA2 gene, as well as by the murine Brca2 gene. The Brca2 deficiency in V-C8 cells causes hypersensitivity to various DNA-damaging agents with an extreme sensitivity toward interstrand DNA cross-linking agents. Furthermore, V-C8 cells show radioresistant DNA synthesis after ionizing radiation, suggesting that Brca2 deficiency affects cell cycle checkpoint regulation. In addition, V-C8 cells display tremendous chromosomal instability and a high frequency of abnormal centrosomes. The mutation spectrum at the hprt locus showed that the majority of spontaneous mutations in V-C8 cells are deletions, in contrast to wild-type V79 cells. A mechanistic explanation for the genome instability phenotype of Brca2-deficient cells is provided by the observation that the nuclear localization of the central DNA repair protein in homologous recombination, Rad51, is reduced in V-C8 cells. PMID:11756561

  4. Common Genetic Variants and Modification of Penetrance of BRCA2-Associated Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Guiducci, Candace; Segrè, Ayellet V.; McGee, Kate; McGuffog, Lesley; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Morrison, Jonathan; Healey, Sue; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Sobol, Hagay; Longy, Michel; Frenay, Marc; GEMO Study Collaborators; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Rookus, Matti A.; Collée, J. Margriet; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; van Roozendaal, Kees E. P.; Piedmonte, Marion; Rubinstein, Wendy; Nerenstone, Stacy; Van Le, Linda; Blank, Stephanie V.; Caldés, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Arason, Adalgeir; Johannsson, Oskar T.; Barkardottir, Rosa B.; Devilee, Peter; Olopade, Olofunmilayo I.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary S.; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Barile, Monica; Viel, Alessandra; Radice, Paolo; Phelan, Catherine M.; Narod, Steven; Rennert, Gad; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Flugelman, Anath; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Toland, Amanda E.; Montagna, Marco; D'Andrea, Emma; Friedman, Eitan; Laitman, Yael; Borg, Ake; Beattie, Mary; Ramus, Susan J.; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Tim; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Chen, Xiaoqing; Holland, Helene; John, Esther M.; Hopper, John L.; Buys, Saundra S.; Daly, Mary B.; Southey, Melissa C.; Terry, Mary Beth; Tung, Nadine; Overeem Hansen, Thomas V.; Nielsen, Finn C.; Greene, Mark I.; Mai, Phuong L.; Osorio, Ana; Durán, Mercedes; Andres, Raquel; Benítez, Javier; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Garber, Judy; Hamann, Ute; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare; Frost, Debra; Platte, Radka; Evans, D. Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Eeles, Ros; Izatt, Louise; Walker, Lisa; Eason, Jacqueline; Barwell, Julian; Godwin, Andrew K.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Engert, Stefanie; Arnold, Norbert; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Dean, Michael; Gold, Bert; Klein, Robert J.; Couch, Fergus J.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.; Daly, Mark J.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Altshuler, David M.; Offit, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    The considerable uncertainty regarding cancer risks associated with inherited mutations of BRCA2 is due to unknown factors. To investigate whether common genetic variants modify penetrance for BRCA2 mutation carriers, we undertook a two-staged genome-wide association study in BRCA2 mutation carriers. In stage 1 using the Affymetrix 6.0 platform, 592,163 filtered SNPs genotyped were available on 899 young (<40 years) affected and 804 unaffected carriers of European ancestry. Associations were evaluated using a survival-based score test adjusted for familial correlations and stratified by country of the study and BRCA2*6174delT mutation status. The genomic inflation factor (λ) was 1.011. The stage 1 association analysis revealed multiple variants associated with breast cancer risk: 3 SNPs had p-values<10−5 and 39 SNPs had p-values<10−4. These variants included several previously associated with sporadic breast cancer risk and two novel loci on chromosome 20 (rs311499) and chromosome 10 (rs16917302). The chromosome 10 locus was in ZNF365, which contains another variant that has recently been associated with breast cancer in an independent study of unselected cases. In stage 2, the top 85 loci from stage 1 were genotyped in 1,264 cases and 1,222 controls. Hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for stage 1 and 2 were combined and estimated using a retrospective likelihood approach, stratified by country of residence and the most common mutation, BRCA2*6174delT. The combined per allele HR of the minor allele for the novel loci rs16917302 was 0.75 (95% CI 0.66–0.86, ) and for rs311499 was 0.72 (95% CI 0.61–0.85, ). FGFR2 rs2981575 had the strongest association with breast cancer risk (per allele HR = 1.28, 95% CI 1.18–1.39, ). These results indicate that SNPs that modify BRCA2 penetrance identified by an agnostic approach thus far are limited to variants that also modify risk of sporadic BRCA2 wild-type breast cancer. PMID:21060860

  5. Population-based screening for breast and ovarian cancer risk due to BRCA1 and BRCA2

    PubMed Central

    Gabai-Kapara, Efrat; Lahad, Amnon; Kaufman, Bella; Friedman, Eitan; Segev, Shlomo; Renbaum, Paul; Beeri, Rachel; Gal, Moran; Grinshpun-Cohen, Julia; Djemal, Karen; Mandell, Jessica B.; Lee, Ming K.; Beller, Uziel; Catane, Raphael; King, Mary-Claire; Levy-Lahad, Ephrat

    2014-01-01

    In the Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ) population of Israel, 11% of breast cancer and 40% of ovarian cancer are due to three inherited founder mutations in the cancer predisposition genes BRCA1 and BRCA2. For carriers of these mutations, risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy significantly reduces morbidity and mortality. Population screening for these mutations among AJ women may be justifiable if accurate estimates of cancer risk for mutation carriers can be obtained. We therefore undertook to determine risks of breast and ovarian cancer for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers ascertained irrespective of personal or family history of cancer. Families harboring mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 were ascertained by identifying mutation carriers among healthy AJ males recruited from health screening centers and outpatient clinics. Female relatives of the carriers were then enrolled and genotyped. Among the female relatives with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations, cumulative risk of developing either breast or ovarian cancer by age 60 and 80, respectively, were 0.60 (± 0.07) and 0.83 (± 0.07) for BRCA1 carriers and 0.33 (± 0.09) and 0.76 (± 0.13) for BRCA2 carriers. Risks were higher in recent vs. earlier birth cohorts (P = 0.006). High cancer risks in BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers identified through healthy males provide an evidence base for initiating a general screening program in the AJ population. General screening would identify many carriers who are not evaluated by genetic testing based on family history criteria. Such a program could serve as a model to investigate implementation and outcomes of population screening for genetic predisposition to cancer in other populations. PMID:25192939

  6. Inhibition of BRCA2 and Thymidylate Synthase Creates Multidrug Sensitive Tumor Cells via the Induction of Combined "Complementary Lethality".

    PubMed

    Rytelewski, Mateusz; Ferguson, Peter J; Maleki Vareki, Saman; Figueredo, Rene; Vincent, Mark; Koropatnick, James

    2013-03-12

    A high mutation rate leading to tumor cell heterogeneity is a driver of malignancy in human cancers. Paradoxically, however, genomic instability can also render tumors vulnerable to therapeutic attack. Thus, targeting DNA repair may induce an intolerable level of DNA damage in tumor cells. BRCA2 mediates homologous recombination repair, and BRCA2 polymorphisms increase cancer risk. However, tumors with BRCA2 mutations respond better to chemotherapy and are associated with improved patient prognosis. Thymidylate synthase (TS) is also involved in DNA maintenance and generates cellular thymidylate. We determined that antisense downregulation of BRCA2 synergistically potentiated drugs with mechanisms of action related to BRCA2 function (cisplatin, melphalan), a phenomenon we named "complementary lethality." TS knockdown induced complementary lethality to TS-targeting drugs (5-FUdR and pemetrexed) but not DNA cross-linking agents. Combined targeting of BRCA2 and TS induced complementary lethality to both DNA-damaging and TS-targeting agents, thus creating multidrug sensitive tumors. In addition, we demonstrated for the first time that simultaneous downregulation of both targets induced combined complementary lethality to multiple mechanistically different drugs in the same cell population. In this study, we propose and define the concept of "complementary lethality" and show that actively targeting BRCA2 and TS is of potential therapeutic benefit in multidrug treatment of human tumors. This work has contributed to the development of a BRCA2-targeting antisense oligdeoxynucleotide (ASO) "BR-1" which we will test in vivo in combination with our TS-targeting ASO "SARI 83" and attempt early clinical trials in the future.Molecular Therapy - Nucleic Acids (2013) 2, e78; doi:10.1038/mtna.2013.7 published online 12 March 2013.

  7. Spectrum of genetic variants of BRCA1 and BRCA2 in a German single center study.

    PubMed

    Meisel, Cornelia; Sadowski, Carolin Eva; Kohlstedt, Daniela; Keller, Katja; Stäritz, Franziska; Grübling, Nannette; Becker, Kerstin; Mackenroth, Luisa; Rump, Andreas; Schröck, Evelin; Arnold, Norbert; Wimberger, Pauline; Kast, Karin

    2017-05-01

    Determination of mutation status of BRCA1 and BRCA2 has become part of the clinical routine. However, the spectrum of genetic variants differs between populations. The aim of this study was to deliver a comprehensive description of all detected variants. In families fulfilling one of the German Consortium for Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer (GC-HBOC) criteria for genetic testing, one affected was chosen for analysis. DNA of blood lymphocytes was amplified by PCR and prescreened by DHPLC. Aberrant fragments were sequenced. All coding exons and splice sites of BRCA1 and BRCA2 were analyzed. Screening for large rearrangements in both genes was performed by MLPA. Of 523 index patients, 121 (23.1%) were found to carry a pathogenic or likely pathogenic (class 4/5) mutation. A variant of unknown significance (VUS) was detected in 73/523 patients (13.9%). Two mutations p.Gln1756Profs*74 and p.Cys61Gly comprised 42.3% (n = 33/78) of all detected pathogenic mutations in BRCA1. Most of the other mutations were unique mutations. The most frequently detected mutation in BRCA2 was p.Val1283Lys (13.9%; n = 6/43). Altogether, 101 different neutral genetic variants were counted in BRCA1 (n = 35) and in BRCA2 (n = 66). The two most frequently detected mutations are founder mutations in Poland and Czech Republic. More similarities seem to be shared with our direct neighbor countries compared to other European countries. For comparison of the extended genotype, a shared database is needed.

  8. Characterization of BRCA2 Transcriptional Regulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-08-01

    Renilla luciferase vector (Promega) with 4 ll of Fugene-6 was used for each transfection. The pRL-TK Renilla luciferase activity was used to control for...experiments, cells received 0.5 jig of BRCA2 promoter construct, 0.1 jig of pRL-TK Renilla luciferase vector, and 0.5 jig of the indicated expression...Myc, and pCMV-Max. Firefly lucifer- ase and renilla luciferase assays were performed using the Dual-Luciferase Reporter Assay Sys- tem (Promega

  9. Identification of a BRCA2-Specific Modifier Locus at 6p24 Related to Breast Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Vijai, Joseph; Klein, Robert J.; Kirchhoff, Tomas; McGuffog, Lesley; Barrowdale, Daniel; Dunning, Alison M.; Lee, Andrew; Dennis, Joe; Healey, Sue; Dicks, Ed; Soucy, Penny; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Wang, Xianshu; Eldridge, Ronald C.; Tessier, Daniel C.; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, Francois; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Peock, Susan; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Peterlongo, Paolo; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Piedmonte, Marion; Singer, Christian F.; Thomassen, Mads; Hansen, Thomas v. O.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Blanco, Ignacio; Greene, Mark H.; Garber, Judith; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Goldgar, David E.; D'Andrea, Emma; Caldes, Trinidad; Nevanlinna, Heli; Osorio, Ana; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Arason, Adalgeir; Rennert, Gad; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; van der Hout, Annemarie H.; Kets, Carolien M.; Aalfs, Cora M.; Wijnen, Juul T.; Ausems, Margreet G. E. M.; Frost, Debra; Ellis, Steve; Fineberg, Elena; Platte, Radka; Evans, D. Gareth; Jacobs, Chris; Adlard, Julian; Tischkowitz, Marc; Porteous, Mary E.; Damiola, Francesca; Golmard, Lisa; Barjhoux, Laure; Longy, Michel; Belotti, Muriel; Ferrer, Sandra Fert; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Manoukian, Siranoush; Barile, Monica; Genuardi, Maurizio; Arnold, Norbert; Meindl, Alfons; Sutter, Christian; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Domchek, Susan M.; Pfeiler, Georg; Friedman, Eitan; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Robson, Mark; Shah, Sohela; Lazaro, Conxi; Mai, Phuong L.; Benitez, Javier; Southey, Melissa C.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Fasching, Peter A.; Peto, Julian; Humphreys, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Burwinkel, Barbara; Guénel, Pascal; Bojesen, Stig E.; Milne, Roger L.; Brenner, Hermann; Lochmann, Magdalena; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Dörk, Thilo; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Lambrechts, Diether; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Radice, Paolo; Giles, Graham G.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Winqvist, Robert; Devillee, Peter; García-Closas, Montserrat; Schoof, Nils; Hooning, Maartje J.; Cox, Angela; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Jakubowska, Anna; Orr, Nick; González-Neira, Anna; Pita, Guillermo; Alonso, M. Rosario; Hall, Per; Couch, Fergus J.; Simard, Jacques; Altshuler, David; Easton, Douglas F.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Offit, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Common genetic variants contribute to the observed variation in breast cancer risk for BRCA2 mutation carriers; those known to date have all been found through population-based genome-wide association studies (GWAS). To comprehensively identify breast cancer risk modifying loci for BRCA2 mutation carriers, we conducted a deep replication of an ongoing GWAS discovery study. Using the ranked P-values of the breast cancer associations with the imputed genotype of 1.4 M SNPs, 19,029 SNPs were selected and designed for inclusion on a custom Illumina array that included a total of 211,155 SNPs as part of a multi-consortial project. DNA samples from 3,881 breast cancer affected and 4,330 unaffected BRCA2 mutation carriers from 47 studies belonging to the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 were genotyped and available for analysis. We replicated previously reported breast cancer susceptibility alleles in these BRCA2 mutation carriers and for several regions (including FGFR2, MAP3K1, CDKN2A/B, and PTHLH) identified SNPs that have stronger evidence of association than those previously published. We also identified a novel susceptibility allele at 6p24 that was inversely associated with risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers (rs9348512; per allele HR = 0.85, 95% CI 0.80–0.90, P = 3.9×10−8). This SNP was not associated with breast cancer risk either in the general population or in BRCA1 mutation carriers. The locus lies within a region containing TFAP2A, which encodes a transcriptional activation protein that interacts with several tumor suppressor genes. This report identifies the first breast cancer risk locus specific to a BRCA2 mutation background. This comprehensive update of novel and previously reported breast cancer susceptibility loci contributes to the establishment of a panel of SNPs that modify breast cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers. This panel may have clinical utility for women with BRCA2 mutations weighing options for medical

  10. [Breast cancer genetics. BRCA1 and BRCA2: the main genes for disease predisposition].

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Flores, P; Calderón-Garcidueñas, A L; Barrera-Saldaña, H A

    2001-01-01

    Breast cancer is among the most common world cancers. In Mexico this neoplasm has been progressively increasing since 1990 and is expected to continue. The risk factors for this disease are age, some reproductive factors, ionizing radiation, contraceptives, obesity and high fat diets, among other factors. The main risk factor for BC is a positive family history. Several families, in which clustering but no mendelian inheritance exists, the BC is due probably to mutations in low penetrance genes and/or environmental factors. In families with autosomal dominant trait, the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are frequently mutated. These genes are the two main BC susceptibility genes. BRCA1 predispose to BC and ovarian cancer, while BRCA2 mutations predispose to BC in men and women. Both are long genes, tumor suppressors, functioning in a cell cycle dependent manner, and it is believed that both switch on the transcription of several genes, and participate in DNA repair. The mutations profile of these genes is known in developed countries, while in Latin America their search has just began. A multidisciplinary group most be responsible of the clinical management of patients with mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2, and the risk assignment and Genetic counseling most be done carefully.

  11. Promotion of BRCA2-Dependent Homologous Recombination by DSS1 via RPA Targeting and DNA Mimicry.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Weixing; Vaithiyalingam, Sivaraja; San Filippo, Joseph; Maranon, David G; Jimenez-Sainz, Judit; Fontenay, Gerald V; Kwon, Youngho; Leung, Stanley G; Lu, Lucy; Jensen, Ryan B; Chazin, Walter J; Wiese, Claudia; Sung, Patrick

    2015-07-16

    The tumor suppressor BRCA2 is thought to facilitate the handoff of ssDNA from replication protein A (RPA) to the RAD51 recombinase during DNA break and replication fork repair by homologous recombination. However, we find that RPA-RAD51 exchange requires the BRCA2 partner DSS1. Biochemical, structural, and in vivo analyses reveal that DSS1 allows the BRCA2-DSS1 complex to physically and functionally interact with RPA. Mechanistically, DSS1 acts as a DNA mimic to attenuate the affinity of RPA for ssDNA. A mutation in the solvent-exposed acidic domain of DSS1 compromises the efficacy of RPA-RAD51 exchange. Thus, by targeting RPA and mimicking DNA, DSS1 functions with BRCA2 in a two-component homologous recombination mediator complex in genome maintenance and tumor suppression. Our findings may provide a paradigm for understanding the roles of DSS1 in other biological processes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Cooperation of breast cancer proteins PALB2 and piccolo BRCA2 in stimulating homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Buisson, Rémi; Dion-Côté, Anne-Marie; Coulombe, Yan; Launay, Hélène; Cai, Hong; Stasiak, Alicja Z; Stasiak, Andrzej; Xia, Bing; Masson, Jean-Yves

    2010-10-01

    Inherited mutations in human PALB2 are associated with a predisposition to breast and pancreatic cancers. PALB2's tumor-suppressing effect is thought to be based on its ability to facilitate BRCA2's function in homologous recombination. However, the biochemical properties of PALB2 are unknown. Here we show that human PALB2 binds DNA, preferentially D-loop structures, and directly interacts with the RAD51 recombinase to stimulate strand invasion, a vital step of homologous recombination. This stimulation occurs through reinforcing biochemical mechanisms, as PALB2 alleviates inhibition by RPA and stabilizes the RAD51 filament. Moreover, PALB2 can function synergistically with a BRCA2 chimera (termed piccolo, or piBRCA2) to further promote strand invasion. Finally, we show that PALB2-deficient cells are sensitive to PARP inhibitors. Our studies provide the first biochemical insights into PALB2's function with piBRCA2 as a mediator of homologous recombination in DNA double-strand break repair.

  13. Mosaicism of an ELANE mutation in an asymptomatic mother in a familial case of cyclic neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Osamu; Okada, Satoshi; Tsumura, Miyuki; Karakawa, Shuhei; Matsumura, Itaru; Kimura, Yujiro; Maihara, Toshiro; Yasunaga, Shin'ichiro; Takihara, Yoshihiro; Ohara, Osamu; Kobayashi, Masao

    2015-07-01

    To confirm and characterize mosaicism of the cyclic neutropenia (CyN)-related mutation in the ELANE gene identified in the asymptomatic mother of patients with CyN. We identified sibling cases with CyN due to a novel heterozygous splicing site mutation, IVS4 +5SD G>T, in the ELANE gene, resulting in an internal in-frame deletion of 30 nucleotides (corresponding to a ten amino acid deletion, V161-F170). The mutated allele was also detected in their asymptomatic mother but at low frequency. We measured the frequency of the mutant allele from peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs) by subcloning, and confirmed the allelic frequency of mosaicism in various cell types by massively parallel DNA sequencing (MPS) analysis. In the subcloning analysis, the mutant allele was identified in 21.36 % of PBLs from the asymptomatic mother, compared with 54.72 % of PBLs from the CyN patient. In the MPS analysis, the mutant allele was observed in approximately 30 % of mononuclear cells, CD3(+) T cells, CD14(+) monocytes and the buccal mucosa. Conversely, it was detected in low frequency in polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PLMLs) (3-4 %) and CD16(+) granulocytes (2-3 %). Mosaicism of the ELANE mutation has only previously been identified in one confirmed and one unconfirmed case of SCN. This is the first report of mosaicism of the ELANE mutation in a case of CyN. The MPS results suggest that this de novo mutation occurred during the two-cell stage of embryogenesis. PLMLs expressing the ELANE mutation were found to be actively undergoing apoptosis.

  14. Comprehensive splicing functional analysis of DNA variants of the BRCA2 gene by hybrid minigenes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The underlying pathogenic mechanism of a large fraction of DNA variants of disease-causing genes is the disruption of the splicing process. We aimed to investigate the effect on splicing of the BRCA2 variants c.8488-1G > A (exon 20) and c.9026_9030del (exon 23), as well as 41 BRCA2 variants reported in the Breast Cancer Information Core (BIC) mutation database. Methods DNA variants were analyzed with the splicing prediction programs NNSPLICE and Human Splicing Finder. Functional analyses of candidate variants were performed by lymphocyte RT-PCR and/or hybrid minigene assays. Forty-one BIC variants of exons 19, 20, 23 and 24 were bioinformatically selected and generated by PCR-mutagenesis of the wild type minigenes. Results Lymphocyte RT-PCR of c.8488-1G > A showed intron 19 retention and a 12-nucleotide deletion in exon 20, whereas c.9026_9030del did not show any splicing anomaly. Minigene analysis of c.8488-1G > A displayed the aforementioned aberrant isoforms but also exon 20 skipping. We further evaluated the splicing outcomes of 41 variants of four BRCA2 exons by minigene analysis. Eighteen variants presented splicing aberrations. Most variants (78.9%) disrupted the natural splice sites, whereas four altered putative enhancers/silencers and had a weak effect. Fluorescent RT-PCR of minigenes accurately detected 14 RNA isoforms generated by cryptic site usage, exon skipping and intron retention events. Fourteen variants showed total splicing disruptions and were predicted to truncate or eliminate essential domains of BRCA2. Conclusions A relevant proportion of BRCA2 variants are correlated with splicing disruptions, indicating that RNA analysis is a valuable tool to assess the pathogenicity of a particular DNA change. The minigene system is a straightforward and robust approach to detect variants with an impact on splicing and contributes to a better knowledge of this gene expression step. PMID:22632462

  15. Polymorphisms in BRCA1 and BRCA2 and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Wenham, Robert M; Schildkraut, Joellen M; McLean, Kia; Calingaert, Brian; Bentley, Rex C; Marks, Jeffrey; Berchuck, Andrew

    2003-10-01

    Because inherited BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations strikingly increase ovarian cancer risk, polymorphisms in these genes could represent low penetrance susceptibility alleles. Previous studies of the BRCA2 N372H polymorphism suggested that HH homozygotes have a modestly increased risk of both breast and ovarian cancer. We have examined whether BRCA2 N372H or common amino acid-changing polymorphisms in BRCA1 predispose to ovarian cancer. A population-based, case control study of ovarian cancer was performed in North Carolina. Cases included 312 women with ovarian cancer (76% invasive and 24% borderline) and 401 age- and race-matched controls. Blood DNA from subjects was genotyped for BRCA2 N372H and BRCA1 Q356R and P871L. There was no association between BRCA2 N372H and risk of borderline or invasive epithelial ovarian cancer. The overall odds ratio (OR) for HH homozygotes was 0.8 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.4-1.5] and was similar in all subsets, including invasive serous cases. In addition, neither the BRCA1 Q356R (OR = 0.9, 95% CI 0.5-1.4) nor P871L (OR = 0.9, 95% CI 0.6-1.9) polymorphisms were associated with ovarian cancer risk. There was a significant racial difference in allele frequencies of the P871L polymorphism (P = 0.64 in Caucasians, L = 0.76 in African-Americans, P < 0.0001). In this population-based, case control study, common amino acid changing BRCA1 and 2 polymorphisms were not found to affect the risk of developing ovarian cancer.

  16. Clinical and pathologic differences between BRCA1-, BRCA2-, and non-BRCA-associated breast cancers in a multiracial developing country.

    PubMed

    Yip, Cheng-Har; Taib, N A; Choo, W Y; Rampal, S; Thong, M K; Teo, S H

    2009-10-01

    Mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 confer an increased risk to breast and other cancers, but to date there have only been limited numbers of studies of BRCA1- and BRCA2-associated cancers among Asians. Malaysia is a multiracial country with three main races: Malays, Chinese, Indians. We determined whether tumor pathologic features and clinical features differ in patients with and without BRCA mutations in this Asian population. We conducted a retrospective review of the medical records of 152 women with breast cancer who underwent genetic testing for BRCA mutations. The patients self-reported ethnicity, age at onset, and clinical stage at diagnosis and tumor pathology were reviewed. A total of 31 patients carried germline deleterious mutations (16 BRCA1, 15 BRCA2). We found that tumors in BRCA1 carriers were more likely to be estrogen receptor (ER)-negative and progesterone receptor (PR)-negative. HER2 was more likely to be negative in both BRCA1 and BRCA2 subjects compared with non-BRCA subjects. We found a strong association between triple-negative status and BRCA1 carriers. In addition, tumors in BRCA1 carriers were more likely to be higher grade than those in BRCA2 and non-BRCA carriers; but the difference was not statistically significant. These results suggest that tumors associated with BRCA1 mutations are distinct from those of BRCA2-associated and non-BRCA-associated breast cancers, and that the tumors associated with BRCA2 mutations are similar to the non-BRCA-associated breast cancers. Further studies are required to determine if the prognosis is different in each of these groups and the best management strategy for each group.

  17. Identification of a novel BRCA2 and CHEK2 A-C-G-C haplotype in Turkish patients affected with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Haytural, Hazal; Yalcinkaya, Nazli; Akan, Gokce; Arikan, Soykan; Ozkok, Elif; Cakmakoglu, Bedia; Yaylim, Ilhan; Aydin, Makbule; Atalar, Fatmahan

    2013-01-01

    Many breast cancers are caused by certain rare and familial mutations in the high or moderate penetrance genes BRCA1, BRCA2 and CHEK2. The aim of this study was to examine the allele and genotype frequencies of seven mutations in BRCA1, BRCA2 and CHEK2 genes in breast cancer patients and to investigate their isolated and combined associations with breast cancer risk. We genotyped seven mutations in BRCA1, BRCA2 and CHEK2 genes and then analyzed single variations and haplotype associations in 106 breast cancer patients and 80 healthy controls. We found significant associations in the analyses of CHEK2- 1100delC (p=0.001) and BRCA1-5382insC (p=0.021) mutations in breast cancer patients compared to controls. The highest risk was observed among breast cancer patients carrying both CHEK2-1100delC and BRCA2- Met784Val mutations (OR=0.093; 95%CI 0.021-0.423; p=0.001). We identified one previously undescribed BRCA2 and a CHEK2 four-marker haplotype of A-C-G-C which was overrepresented (?2=7.655; p=0.0057) in the patient group compared to controls. In this study, we identified a previously undescribed BRCA2 and CHEK2 A-C-G-C haplotype in association with the breast cancer in our population. Our results further suggest that the CHEK2-1100delC mutation in combination with BRCA2-Met784Val may lead to an unexpected high risk which needs to be confirmed in larger cohorts in order to better understand their role in the development and prognosis of breast cancer.

  18. Penetrance estimates for BRCA1, BRCA2 (also applied to Lynch syndrome) based on presymptomatic testing: a new unbiased method to assess risk?

    PubMed

    Evans, D Gareth; Woodward, Emma; Harkness, Elaine F; Howell, Anthony; Plaskocinska, Inga; Maher, Eamonn R; Tischkowitz, Marc D; Lalloo, Fiona

    2018-02-26

    The identification of BRCA1 , BRCA2 or mismatch repair (MMR) pathogenic gene variants in familial breast/ovarian/colorectal cancer families facilitates predictive genetic testing of at-risk relatives. However, controversy still exists regarding overall lifetime risks of cancer in individuals testing positive. We assessed the penetrance of BRCA1 , BRCA2, MLH1 and MSH2 mutations in men and women using Bayesian calculations based on ratios of positive to negative presymptomatic testing by 10-year age cohorts. Mutation position was also assessed for BRCA1 / BRCA2. RESULTS: Using results from 2264 presymptomatic tests in first-degree relatives (FDRs) of mutation carriers in BRCA1 and BRCA2 and 646 FDRs of patients with MMR mutations, we assessed overall associated cancer penetrance to age of 68 years as 73% (95% CI 61% to 82%) for BRCA1 , 60% (95% CI 49% to 71%) for BRCA2 , 95% (95% CI 76% to 99%) for MLH1% and 61% (95% CI 49% to 76%) for MSH2 . There was no evidence for significant penetrance for males in BRCA1 or BRCA2 families and males had equivalent penetrance to females with Lynch syndrome. Mutation position and degree of family history influenced penetrance in BRCA2 but not BRCA1. CONCLUSION: We describe a new method for assessing penetrance in cancer-prone syndromes. Results are in keeping with published prospective series and present modern-day estimates for overall disease penetrance that bypasses retrospective series biases. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  19. Phenotypic analysis of familial breast cancer: comparison of BRCAx tumors with BRCA1-, BRCA2-carriers and non-familial breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Aloraifi, F; Alshehhi, M; McDevitt, T; Cody, N; Meany, M; O'Doherty, A; Quinn, C M; Green, A J; Bracken, A; Geraghty, J G

    2015-05-01

    Women with inherited pathogenic mutations in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes have up to an 85% risk of developing breast cancer in their lifetime. However, only about 20% of familial breast cancer is attributed to mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2, while a further 5-10% are attributed to mutations in other rare susceptibility genes such as TP53, STK11, PTEN, ATM and CHEK2. Despite extensive efforts to explain the missing heritability of this disease, the majority of familial clustering in breast cancer remains largely unexplained. We aim to analyze the pathology of familial cases of which no pathogenic mutation is yet identified. We compared the pathological phenotype of BRCA1/BRCA2 negative familial breast cancer (BRCAx) to BRCA1-positive, BRCA2-positive and sporadic cases without a family history. Age-adjusted analysis is summarized in odd's ratios and confidence intervals for tumor type, grade, lymph node, ER and HER2 status. We found non-familial cases to be more likely to be ER positive (P = 0.041) as compared with BRCAx tumors. More cases of lobular carcinoma were found with BRCAx as compared to BRCA1 tumors (P = 0.05). After multivariate logistic regression analysis, BRCAx tumors are more likely ER positive (P = 0.001) and HER2 positive (P = 0.047) in comparison to BRCA1. Conversely, BRCAx cases are less likely to be ER positive (P = 0.02) but more likely to be HER2 positive (P = 0.021) as compared with BRCA2 tumors. Our findings suggest that BRCA1, BRCA2 and BRCAx tumors differ in phenotype from non-familial and familial BRCA1-positive and BRCA2-positive tumors. Further studies will need to be performed in this important population in order to develop strategies for early detection and prevention. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Next-generation sequencing of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes for the genetic diagnostics of hereditary breast and/or ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Trujillano, Daniel; Weiss, Maximilian E R; Schneider, Juliane; Köster, Julia; Papachristos, Efstathios B; Saviouk, Viatcheslav; Zakharkina, Tetyana; Nahavandi, Nahid; Kovacevic, Lejla; Rolfs, Arndt

    2015-03-01

    Genetic testing for hereditary breast and/or ovarian cancer mostly relies on laborious molecular tools that use Sanger sequencing to scan for mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. We explored a more efficient genetic screening strategy based on next-generation sequencing of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes in 210 hereditary breast and/or ovarian cancer patients. We first validated this approach in a cohort of 115 samples with previously known BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations and polymorphisms. Genomic DNA was amplified using the Ion AmpliSeq BRCA1 and BRCA2 panel. The DNA Libraries were pooled, barcoded, and sequenced using an Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine sequencer. The combination of different robust bioinformatics tools allowed detection of all previously known pathogenic mutations and polymorphisms in the 115 samples, without detecting spurious pathogenic calls. We then used the same assay in a discovery cohort of 95 uncharacterized hereditary breast and/or ovarian cancer patients for BRCA1 and BRCA2. In addition, we describe the allelic frequencies across 210 hereditary breast and/or ovarian cancer patients of 74 unique definitely and likely pathogenic and uncertain BRCA1 and BRCA2 variants, some of which have not been previously annotated in the public databases. Targeted next-generation sequencing is ready to substitute classic molecular methods to perform genetic testing on the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes and provides a greater opportunity for more comprehensive testing of at-risk patients. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Investigative Pathology and the Association for Molecular Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Evidence That BRCA1- or BRCA2-Associated Cancers Are Not Inevitable

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Bess; Lech, Denise; Friedenson, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    Inheriting a BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene mutation can cause a deficiency in repairing complex DNA damage. This step leads to genomic instability and probably contributes to an inherited predisposition to breast and ovarian cancer. Complex DNA damage has been viewed as an integral part of DNA replication before cell division. It causes temporary replication blocks, replication fork collapse, chromosome breaks and sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs). Chemical modification of DNA may also occur spontaneously as a byproduct of normal processes. Pathways containing BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene products are essential to repair spontaneous complex DNA damage or to carry out SCEs if repair is not possible. This scenario creates a theoretical limit that effectively means there are spontaneous BRCA1/2-associated cancers that cannot be prevented or delayed. However, much evidence for high rates of spontaneous DNA mutation is based on measuring SCEs by using bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU). Here we find that the routine use of BrdU has probably led to overestimating spontaneous DNA damage and SCEs because BrdU is itself a mutagen. Evidence based on spontaneous chromosome abnormalities and epidemiologic data indicates strong effects from exogenous mutagens and does not support the inevitability of cancer in all BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. We therefore remove a theoretical argument that has limited efforts to develop chemoprevention strategies to delay or prevent cancers in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. PMID:22972572

  2. Analysis of the gene coding for the BRCA2-interacting protein PALB2 in hereditary prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Tischkowitz, Marc; Sabbaghian, Nelly; Ray, Anna M; Lange, Ethan M; Foulkes, William D; Cooney, Kathleen A

    2008-05-01

    The genetic basis of susceptibility to prostate cancer (PRCA) remains elusive. Mutations in BRCA2 have been associated with increased prostate cancer risk and account for around 2% of young onset (<56 years) prostate cancer cases. PALB2 is a recently identified breast cancer susceptibility gene whose protein is closely associated with BRCA2 and is essential for BRCA2 anchorage to nuclear structures. This functional relationship made PALB2 a candidate PRCA susceptibility gene. We sequenced PALB2 in probands from 95 PRCA families, 77 of which had two or more cases of early onset PRCA (age at diagnosis <55 years), and the remaining 18 had one case of early onset PRCA and five or more total cases of PRCA. Two previously unreported variants, K18R and V925L were identified, neither of which is in a known PALB2 functional domain and both of which are unlikely to be pathogenic. No truncating mutations were identified. These results indicate that deleterious PALB2 mutations are unlikely to play a significant role in hereditary prostate cancer.

  3. BRCA 1 and BRCA2 Mutations in African Americans

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-10-01

    W. Broome, Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Howard University Washington, DC 20059 REPORT DATE: October 1999 TYPE OF REPORT: Annual PREPARED FOR: U.S...THEM. LIMITED RIGHTS LEGEND Award Number: DAMD17-98-1-8106 Organization: Howard University Those portions of the technical data contained in this...PERFORMING Howard University ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER Washington, DC 20059 E-MAIL: cbroome@fac.howard.edu 9. SPONSORING / MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S

  4. Description of a novel missense mutation of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase gene associated with asymptomatic high enzyme deficiency.

    PubMed

    Minucci, Angelo; Concolino, Paola; Antenucci, Mirca; Santonocito, Concetta; Ameglio, Franco; Zuppi, Cecilia; Giardina, Bruno; Capoluongo, Ettore

    2007-08-01

    We report a case of an asymptomatic young subject affected by severe deficiency of Glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) activity. A novel genetic mutation (G130A) in the third exon was found. We named this novel mutation the "G6PD RIGNANO variant". These findings may contribute to a better knowledge of molecular epidemiology of the G6PD mutation and may represent an additional variant to be studied for a deep comprehension of in vivo compensation mechanisms of G6PD deficiency.

  5. Functional Analysis of Variants of Unknown Significance in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Using Complementation of a Synthetic Lethal Interaction with PARP Inhibition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    general population3-5. A pathogenic mutation in BRCA1 or BRCA2 is an important genetic biomarker for a high ovarian cancer risk in breast cancer patients...doxycycline induces cytological signs of synthetic lethality with Parp inhibitor by RAD51 and RH2AX focus formation. REPORTABLE OUTCOMES None RH2AX... genetics . Mar 2001;68(3):700-710. 3. Chen S, Parmigiani G. Meta-analysis of BRCA1 and BRCA2 penetrance. Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of

  6. Language Deficits as a Preclinical Window into Parkinson's Disease: Evidence from Asymptomatic Parkin and Dardarin Mutation Carriers.

    PubMed

    García, Adolfo M; Sedeño, Lucas; Trujillo, Natalia; Bocanegra, Yamile; Gomez, Diana; Pineda, David; Villegas, Andrés; Muñoz, Edinson; Arias, William; Ibáñez, Agustín

    2017-02-01

    The worldwide spread of Parkinson's disease (PD) calls for sensitive and specific measures enabling its early (or, ideally, preclinical) detection. Here, we use language measures revealing deficits in PD to explore whether similar disturbances are present in asymptomatic individuals at risk for the disease. We administered executive, semantic, verb-production, and syntactic tasks to sporadic PD patients, genetic PD patients with PARK2 (parkin) or LRRK2 (dardarin) mutation, asymptomatic first-degree relatives of the latter with similar mutations, and socio-demographically matched controls. Moreover, to detect sui generis language disturbances, we ran analysis of covariance tests using executive functions as covariate. The two clinical groups showed impairments in all measures, most of which survived covariation with executive functions. However, the key finding concerned asymptomatic mutation carriers. While these subjects showed intact executive, semantic, and action-verb production skills, they evinced deficits in a syntactic test with minimal working memory load. We propose that this sui generis disturbance may constitute a prodromal sign anticipating eventual development of PD. Moreover, our results suggest that mutations on specific genes (PARK2 and LRRK2) compromising basal ganglia functioning may be subtly related to language-processing mechanisms. (JINS, 2017, 23, 150-158).

  7. BRCA2 Arg372Hispolymorphism and epithelial ovarian cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Auranen, Annika; Spurdle, Amanda B; Chen, Xiaoqing; Lipscombe, Julian; Purdie, David M; Hopper, John L; Green, Adele; Healey, Catherine S; Redman, Karen; Dunning, Alison M; Pharoah, Paul D; Easton, Douglas F; Ponder, Bruce A J; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Novik, Karen L

    2003-01-20

    The BRCA2 372 HH genotype defined by the BRCA2 N372H nonconservative amino acid substitution polymorphism was recently reported to be associated with a small increased risk of breast cancer. We investigated whether this polymorphism was associated with ovarian cancer risk by conducting British and Australian case-control comparisons in parallel, including a total sample of 1,121 ovarian cancer cases and 2,643 controls. There was no difference in genotype frequency between control groups from the 2 studies (p = 0.9). The HH genotype was associated with an increased risk of ovarian cancer in both studies, and the risk estimate for the pooled studies was 1.36 (95% CI 1.04-1.77, p = 0.03). There was also a suggestion that this risk may be greater for ovarian cancers of the serous subtype for both studies, with an OR (95% CI) of 1.66 (1.17-2.54) for the 2 studies combined (p = 0.005). The BRCA2 372 HH genotype appears to be associated with an increased risk of ovarian cancer of a similar magnitude to that reported for breast cancer. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. The BRCA2 c.68-7T > A variant is not pathogenic: A model for clinical calibration of spliceogenicity.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Mara; Lòpez-Perolio, Irene; Meeks, Huong D; Caleca, Laura; Parsons, Michael T; Li, Hongyan; De Vecchi, Giovanna; Tudini, Emma; Foglia, Claudia; Mondini, Patrizia; Manoukian, Siranoush; Behar, Raquel; Garcia, Encarna B Gómez; Meindl, Alfons; Montagna, Marco; Niederacher, Dieter; Schmidt, Ane Y; Varesco, Liliana; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Bolla, Manjeet K; Dennis, Joe; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Wang, Qin; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Andrulis, Irene L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Arndt, Volker; Beckmann, Matthias W; Beeghly-Fadel, Alicia; Benitez, Javier; Boeckx, Bram; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Bojesen, Stig E; Bonanni, Bernardo; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Burwinkel, Barbara; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Conroy, Don M; Couch, Fergus J; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Czene, Kamila; Devilee, Peter; Dörk, Thilo; Eriksson, Mikael; Fasching, Peter A; Figueroa, Jonine; Fletcher, Olivia; Flyger, Henrik; Gabrielson, Marike; García-Closas, Montserrat; Giles, Graham G; González-Neira, Anna; Guénel, Pascal; Haiman, Christopher A; Hall, Per; Hamann, Ute; Hartman, Mikael; Hauke, Jan; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Hopper, John L; Jakubowska, Anna; Jung, Audrey; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Lambrechts, Diether; Le Marchand, Loid; Lindblom, Annika; Lubinski, Jan; Mannermaa, Arto; Margolin, Sara; Miao, Hui; Milne, Roger L; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Olson, Janet E; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peto, Julian; Pylkäs, Katri; Sawyer, Elinor J; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Schmutzler, Rita K; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Schoemaker, Minouk J; See, Mee Hoong; Southey, Melissa C; Swerdlow, Anthony; Teo, Soo H; Toland, Amanda E; Tomlinson, Ian; Truong, Thérèse; van Asperen, Christi J; van den Ouweland, Ans M W; van der Kolk, Lizet E; Winqvist, Robert; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Zheng, Wei; Dunning, Alison M; Easton, Douglas F; Henderson, Alex; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Izatt, Louise; Offitt, Kenneth; Side, Lucy E; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Embrace, Study; Hebon, Study; McGuffog, Lesley; Antoniou, Antonis C; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Spurdle, Amanda B; Goldgar, David E; Hoya, Miguel de la; Radice, Paolo

    2018-05-01

    Although the spliceogenic nature of the BRCA2 c.68-7T > A variant has been demonstrated, its association with cancer risk remains controversial. In this study, we accurately quantified by real-time PCR and digital PCR (dPCR), the BRCA2 isoforms retaining or missing exon 3. In addition, the combined odds ratio for causality of the variant was estimated using genetic and clinical data, and its associated cancer risk was estimated by case-control analysis in 83,636 individuals. Co-occurrence in trans with pathogenic BRCA2 variants was assessed in 5,382 families. Exon 3 exclusion rate was 4.5-fold higher in variant carriers (13%) than controls (3%), indicating an exclusion rate for the c.68-7T > A allele of approximately 20%. The posterior probability of pathogenicity was 7.44 × 10 -115 . There was neither evidence for increased risk of breast cancer (OR 1.03; 95% CI 0.86-1.24) nor for a deleterious effect of the variant when co-occurring with pathogenic variants. Our data provide for the first time robust evidence of the nonpathogenicity of the BRCA2 c.68-7T > A. Genetic and quantitative transcript analyses together inform the threshold for the ratio between functional and altered BRCA2 isoforms compatible with normal cell function. These findings might be exploited to assess the relevance for cancer risk of other BRCA2 spliceogenic variants. © 2018 The Authors. Human Mutation published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Genetic anticipation in BRCA1/BRCA2 families after controlling for ascertainment bias and cohort effect.

    PubMed

    Guindalini, Rodrigo Santa Cruz; Song, Andrew; Fackenthal, James D; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Huo, Dezheng

    2016-06-15

    Genetic anticipation, the earlier onset of disease in successive generations, has been reported in hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome (HBOC), but little is known about its underlying mechanisms. Ascertainment bias has been suggested as a reason in previous studies. Likewise, cohort effect, which may be caused by environmental factors, can be misinterpreted as genetic anticipation. The authors reviewed the pedigrees of 176 kindreds, segregating those with deleterious mutations in breast cancer genes 1 and 2 (BRCA1/BRCA2) who had at least 2 consecutive generations of the same cancer (breast or ovarian). By using mutation probabilities as analytical weights in weighted random-effect models, generational differences in the age at onset of breast/ovarian cancer were calculated. The analyses were further controlled for ascertainment bias by excluding probands and adjusting for birth-cohort effect in the anticipation models. The mean age at the onset of breast cancer for the probands' generation was 41.9 years, which was 6.8 years and 9.8 years earlier than the parents' and grandparents' generations, respectively. The anticipation effect for breast cancer remained significant after excluding the probands. There was a birth-cohort effect: patients who were born in 1930s and 1940s had breast cancer 5.0 years and 7.6 years earlier than patients who were born before 1920. The difference in breast cancer age of onset across generations was no longer significant after adjusting for birth-cohort effect. The observed anticipation effect was driven mainly by a decrease in age of onset across birth cohorts, underscoring the need for risk-reducing interventions that target changing environmental/lifestyle factors in BRCA1/BRCA2 carriers. Cancer 2016;122:1913-20. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  10. FANCD2 limits replication stress and genome instability in cells lacking BRCA2

    PubMed Central

    Buffa, Francesca M.; McDermott, Ultan; Tarsounas, Madalena

    2016-01-01

    The tumor suppressor BRCA2 plays a key role in genome integrity by promoting replication fork stability and homologous recombination (HR) DNA repair. Here we report that human cancer cells lacking BRCA2 rely on the Fanconi anemia protein FANCD2 to limit replication fork progression and genomic instability. Our results identify a novel role for FANCD2 in limiting constitutive replication stress in BRCA2-deficient cells, which impacts on cell survival and treatment responses. PMID:27322732

  11. Replication fork reversal triggers fork degradation in BRCA2-defective cells.

    PubMed

    Mijic, Sofija; Zellweger, Ralph; Chappidi, Nagaraja; Berti, Matteo; Jacobs, Kurt; Mutreja, Karun; Ursich, Sebastian; Ray Chaudhuri, Arnab; Nussenzweig, Andre; Janscak, Pavel; Lopes, Massimo

    2017-10-16

    Besides its role in homologous recombination, the tumor suppressor BRCA2 protects stalled replication forks from nucleolytic degradation. Defective fork stability contributes to chemotherapeutic sensitivity of BRCA2-defective tumors by yet-elusive mechanisms. Using DNA fiber spreading and direct visualization of replication intermediates, we report that reversed replication forks are entry points for fork degradation in BRCA2-defective cells. Besides MRE11 and PTIP, we show that RAD52 promotes stalled fork degradation and chromosomal breakage in BRCA2-defective cells. Inactivation of these factors restores reversed fork frequency and chromosome integrity in BRCA2-defective cells. Conversely, impairing fork reversal prevents fork degradation, but increases chromosomal breakage, uncoupling fork protection, and chromosome stability. We propose that BRCA2 is dispensable for RAD51-mediated fork reversal, but assembles stable RAD51 nucleofilaments on regressed arms, to protect them from degradation. Our data uncover the physiopathological relevance of fork reversal and illuminate a complex interplay of homologous recombination factors in fork remodeling and stability.BRCA2 is involved in both homologous recombination (HR) and the protection of stalled replication forks from degradation. Here the authors reveal how HR factors cooperate in fork remodeling, showing that BRCA2 supports RAD51 loading on the regressed arms of reversed replication forks to protect them from degradation.

  12. Breast Stem Cell Markers and Tumor Stem Cells in BRCA1, BRCA2 and Non-BRCA 1/2 Women

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    gene mutation often exhibit a basal phenotype that may reflect their origin in the breast stem cell . We therefore hypothesized that the breast stem ...expression of putative stem cell markers and investigated means to derive short-term in vitro cultures. Our preliminary findings indicate that it is... cell pool is aberrant in breast tissue of BRCA1 (or BRCA2)carriers versus noncarriers and that it becomes progressively and distinctively expanded in

  13. BRCA2 Polymorphic Stop Codon K3326X and the Risk of Breast, Prostate, and Ovarian Cancers.

    PubMed

    Meeks, Huong D; Song, Honglin; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Bolla, Manjeet K; Dennis, Joe; Wang, Qin; Barrowdale, Daniel; Frost, Debra; McGuffog, Lesley; Ellis, Steve; Feng, Bingjian; Buys, Saundra S; Hopper, John L; Southey, Melissa C; Tesoriero, Andrea; James, Paul A; Bruinsma, Fiona; Campbell, Ian G; Broeks, Annegien; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Beckman, Matthias W; Fasching, Peter A; Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; Sawyer, Elinor J; Riboli, Elio; Banerjee, Susana; Menon, Usha; Tomlinson, Ian; Burwinkel, Barbara; Hamann, Ute; Marme, Frederik; Rudolph, Anja; Janavicius, Ramunas; Tihomirova, Laima; Tung, Nadine; Garber, Judy; Cramer, Daniel; Terry, Kathryn L; Poole, Elizabeth M; Tworoger, Shelley S; Dorfling, Cecilia M; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Godwin, Andrew K; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Damiola, Francesca; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Isaacs, Claudine; Maugard, Christine; Bojesen, Stig E; Flyger, Henrik; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Hansen, Thomas V O; Jensen, Allen; Kjaer, Susanne K; Hogdall, Claus; Hogdall, Estrid; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Thomassen, Mads; Benitez, Javier; González-Neira, Anna; Osorio, Ana; Hoya, Miguel de la; Segura, Pedro Perez; Diez, Orland; Lazaro, Conxi; Brunet, Joan; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Eunjung, Lee; John, Esther M; Neuhausen, Susan L; Ding, Yuan Chun; Castillo, Danielle; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Ganz, Patricia A; Nussbaum, Robert L; Chan, Salina B; Karlan, Beth Y; Lester, Jenny; Wu, Anna; Gayther, Simon; Ramus, Susan J; Sieh, Weiva; Whittermore, Alice S; Monteiro, Alvaro N A; Phelan, Catherine M; Terry, Mary Beth; Piedmonte, Marion; Offit, Kenneth; Robson, Mark; Levine, Douglas; Moysich, Kirsten B; Cannioto, Rikki; Olson, Sara H; Daly, Mary B; Nathanson, Katherine L; Domchek, Susan M; Lu, Karen H; Liang, Dong; Hildebrant, Michelle A T; Ness, Roberta; Modugno, Francesmary; Pearce, Leigh; Goodman, Marc T; Thompson, Pamela J; Brenner, Hermann; Butterbach, Katja; Meindl, Alfons; Hahnen, Eric; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brüning, Thomas; Blomqvist, Carl; Khan, Sofia; Nevanlinna, Heli; Pelttari, Liisa M; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Butzow, Ralf; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Dörk, Thilo; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Rantala, Johanna; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Mannermaa, Arto; Lambrechts, Diether; Neven, Patrick; Claes, Kathleen B M; Maerken, Tom Van; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Heitz, Florian; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Peterlongo, Paolo; Radice, Paolo; Viel, Alessandra; Barile, Monica; Peissel, Bernard; Manoukian, Siranoush; Montagna, Marco; Oliani, Cristina; Peixoto, Ana; Teixeira, Manuel R; Collavoli, Anita; Hallberg, Emily; Olson, Janet E; Goode, Ellen L; Hart, Steven N; Shimelis, Hermela; Cunningham, Julie M; Giles, Graham G; Milne, Roger L; Healey, Sue; Tucker, Kathy; Haiman, Christopher A; Henderson, Brian E; Goldberg, Mark S; Tischkowitz, Marc; Simard, Jacques; Soucy, Penny; Eccles, Diana M; Le, Nhu; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Kristensen, Vessela; Salvesen, Helga B; Bjorge, Line; Bandera, Elisa V; Risch, Harvey; Zheng, Wei; Beeghly-Fadiel, Alicia; Cai, Hui; Pylkäs, Katri; Tollenaar, Robert A E M; Ouweland, Ans M W van der; Andrulis, Irene L; Knight, Julia A; Narod, Steven; Devilee, Peter; Winqvist, Robert; Figueroa, Jonine; Greene, Mark H; Mai, Phuong L; Loud, Jennifer T; García-Closas, Montserrat; Schoemaker, Minouk J; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; McNeish, Iain; Siddiquil, Nadeem; Glasspool, Rosalind; Kwong, Ava; Park, Sue K; Teo, Soo Hwang; Yoon, Sook-Yee; Matsuo, Keitaro; Hosono, Satoyo; Woo, Yin Ling; Gao, Yu-Tang; Foretova, Lenka; Singer, Christian F; Rappaport-Feurhauser, Christine; Friedman, Eitan; Laitman, Yael; Rennert, Gad; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Hulick, Peter J; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Senter, Leigha; Olah, Edith; Doherty, Jennifer A; Schildkraut, Joellen; Koppert, Linetta B; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Massuger, Leon F A G; Cook, Linda S; Pejovic, Tanja; Li, Jingmei; Borg, Ake; Öfverholm, Anna; Rossing, Mary Anne; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Henriksson, Karin; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Pasini, Barbara J; Shah, Mitul; Kabisch, Maria; Torres, Diana; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Gronwald, Jacek; Agnarsson, Bjarni A; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Moes-Sosnowska, Joanna; Fostira, Florentia; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Slager, Susan; Jones, Michael; Antoniou, Antonis C; Berchuck, Andrew; Swerdlow, Anthony; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Dunning, Alison M; Pharoah, Paul D P; Hall, Per; Easton, Douglas F; Couch, Fergus J; Spurdle, Amanda B; Goldgar, David E

    2016-02-01

    The K3326X variant in BRCA2 (BRCA2*c.9976A>T; p.Lys3326*; rs11571833) has been found to be associated with small increased risks of breast cancer. However, it is not clear to what extent linkage disequilibrium with fully pathogenic mutations might account for this association. There is scant information about the effect of K3326X in other hormone-related cancers. Using weighted logistic regression, we analyzed data from the large iCOGS study including 76 637 cancer case patients and 83 796 control patients to estimate odds ratios (ORw) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for K3326X variant carriers in relation to breast, ovarian, and prostate cancer risks, with weights defined as probability of not having a pathogenic BRCA2 variant. Using Cox proportional hazards modeling, we also examined the associations of K3326X with breast and ovarian cancer risks among 7183 BRCA1 variant carriers. All statistical tests were two-sided. The K3326X variant was associated with breast (ORw = 1.28, 95% CI = 1.17 to 1.40, P = 5.9x10(-) (6)) and invasive ovarian cancer (ORw = 1.26, 95% CI = 1.10 to 1.43, P = 3.8x10(-3)). These associations were stronger for serous ovarian cancer and for estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer (ORw = 1.46, 95% CI = 1.2 to 1.70, P = 3.4x10(-5) and ORw = 1.50, 95% CI = 1.28 to 1.76, P = 4.1x10(-5), respectively). For BRCA1 mutation carriers, there was a statistically significant inverse association of the K3326X variant with risk of ovarian cancer (HR = 0.43, 95% CI = 0.22 to 0.84, P = .013) but no association with breast cancer. No association with prostate cancer was observed. Our study provides evidence that the K3326X variant is associated with risk of developing breast and ovarian cancers independent of other pathogenic variants in BRCA2. Further studies are needed to determine the biological mechanism of action responsible for these associations. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please

  14. BRCA2 Polymorphic Stop Codon K3326X and the Risk of Breast, Prostate, and Ovarian Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Meeks, Huong D.; Song, Honglin; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Dennis, Joe; Wang, Qin; Barrowdale, Daniel; Frost, Debra; McGuffog, Lesley; Ellis, Steve; Feng, Bingjian; Buys, Saundra S.; Hopper, John L.; Southey, Melissa C.; Tesoriero, Andrea; James, Paul A.; Bruinsma, Fiona; Campbell, Ian G.; Broeks, Annegien; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Beckman, Matthias W.; Fasching, Peter A.; Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Riboli, Elio; Banerjee, Susana; Menon, Usha; Tomlinson, Ian; Burwinkel, Barbara; Hamann, Ute; Marme, Frederik; Rudolph, Anja; Janavicius, Ramunas; Tihomirova, Laima; Tung, Nadine; Garber, Judy; Cramer, Daniel; Terry, Kathryn L.; Poole, Elizabeth M.; Tworoger, Shelley S.; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Godwin, Andrew K.; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Damiola, Francesca; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Isaacs, Claudine; Maugard, Christine; Bojesen, Stig E.; Flyger, Henrik; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Jensen, Allen; Kjaer, Susanne K.; Hogdall, Claus; Hogdall, Estrid; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Thomassen, Mads; Benitez, Javier; González-Neira, Anna; Osorio, Ana; de la Hoya, Miguel; Segura, Pedro Perez; Diez, Orland; Lazaro, Conxi; Brunet, Joan; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Eunjung, Lee; John, Esther M.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Castillo, Danielle; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Ganz, Patricia A.; Nussbaum, Robert L.; Chan, Salina B.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Lester, Jenny; Wu, Anna; Gayther, Simon; Ramus, Susan J.; Sieh, Weiva; Whittermore, Alice S.; Monteiro, Alvaro N. A.; Phelan, Catherine M.; Terry, Mary Beth; Piedmonte, Marion; Offit, Kenneth; Robson, Mark; Levine, Douglas; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Cannioto, Rikki; Olson, Sara H.; Daly, Mary B.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Domchek, Susan M.; Lu, Karen H.; Liang, Dong; Hildebrant, Michelle A. T.; Ness, Roberta; Modugno, Francesmary; Pearce, Leigh; Goodman, Marc T.; Thompson, Pamela J.; Brenner, Hermann; Butterbach, Katja; Meindl, Alfons; Hahnen, Eric; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brüning, Thomas; Blomqvist, Carl; Khan, Sofia; Nevanlinna, Heli; Pelttari, Liisa M.; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Butzow, Ralf; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Dörk, Thilo; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Rantala, Johanna; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Mannermaa, Arto; Lambrechts, Diether; Neven, Patrick; Claes, Kathleen B. M.; Maerken, Tom Van; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Heitz, Florian; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Peterlongo, Paolo; Radice, Paolo; Viel, Alessandra; Barile, Monica; Peissel, Bernard; Manoukian, Siranoush; Montagna, Marco; Oliani, Cristina; Peixoto, Ana; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Collavoli, Anita; Hallberg, Emily; Olson, Janet E.; Goode, Ellen L.; Hart, Steven N.; Shimelis, Hermela; Cunningham, Julie M.; Giles, Graham G.; Milne, Roger L.; Healey, Sue; Tucker, Kathy; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Goldberg, Mark S.; Tischkowitz, Marc; Simard, Jacques; Soucy, Penny; Eccles, Diana M.; Le, Nhu; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Kristensen, Vessela; Salvesen, Helga B.; Bjorge, Line; Bandera, Elisa V.; Risch, Harvey; Zheng, Wei; Beeghly-Fadiel, Alicia; Cai, Hui; Pylkäs, Katri; Tollenaar, Robert A. E. M.; van der Ouweland, Ans M. W.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Knight, Julia A.; Narod, Steven; Devilee, Peter; Winqvist, Robert; Figueroa, Jonine; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Loud, Jennifer T.; García-Closas, Montserrat; Schoemaker, Minouk J.; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; McNeish, Iain; Siddiquil, Nadeem; Glasspool, Rosalind; Kwong, Ava; Park, Sue K.; Teo, Soo Hwang; Yoon, Sook-Yee; Matsuo, Keitaro; Hosono, Satoyo; Woo, Yin Ling; Gao, Yu-Tang; Foretova, Lenka; Singer, Christian F.; Rappaport-Feurhauser, Christine; Friedman, Eitan; Laitman, Yael; Rennert, Gad; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Hulick, Peter J.; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Senter, Leigha; Olah, Edith; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Schildkraut, Joellen; Koppert, Linetta B.; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Massuger, Leon F. A. G.; Cook, Linda S.; Pejovic, Tanja; Li, Jingmei; Borg, Ake; Öfverholm, Anna; Rossing, Mary Anne; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Henriksson, Karin; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Pasini, Barbara J.; Shah, Mitul; Kabisch, Maria; Torres, Diana; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Gronwald, Jacek; Agnarsson, Bjarni A.; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Moes-Sosnowska, Joanna; Fostira, Florentia; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Slager, Susan; Jones, Michael; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Berchuck, Andrew; Swerdlow, Anthony; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Dunning, Alison M.; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Hall, Per; Easton, Douglas F.; Couch, Fergus J.; Spurdle, Amanda B.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The K3326X variant in BRCA2 (BRCA2*c.9976A>T; p.Lys3326*; rs11571833) has been found to be associated with small increased risks of breast cancer. However, it is not clear to what extent linkage disequilibrium with fully pathogenic mutations might account for this association. There is scant information about the effect of K3326X in other hormone-related cancers. Methods: Using weighted logistic regression, we analyzed data from the large iCOGS study including 76 637 cancer case patients and 83 796 control patients to estimate odds ratios (ORw) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for K3326X variant carriers in relation to breast, ovarian, and prostate cancer risks, with weights defined as probability of not having a pathogenic BRCA2 variant. Using Cox proportional hazards modeling, we also examined the associations of K3326X with breast and ovarian cancer risks among 7183 BRCA1 variant carriers. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: The K3326X variant was associated with breast (ORw = 1.28, 95% CI = 1.17 to 1.40, P = 5.9x10- 6) and invasive ovarian cancer (ORw = 1.26, 95% CI = 1.10 to 1.43, P = 3.8x10-3). These associations were stronger for serous ovarian cancer and for estrogen receptor–negative breast cancer (ORw = 1.46, 95% CI = 1.2 to 1.70, P = 3.4x10-5 and ORw = 1.50, 95% CI = 1.28 to 1.76, P = 4.1x10-5, respectively). For BRCA1 mutation carriers, there was a statistically significant inverse association of the K3326X variant with risk of ovarian cancer (HR = 0.43, 95% CI = 0.22 to 0.84, P = .013) but no association with breast cancer. No association with prostate cancer was observed. Conclusions: Our study provides evidence that the K3326X variant is associated with risk of developing breast and ovarian cancers independent of other pathogenic variants in BRCA2. Further studies are needed to determine the biological mechanism of action responsible for these associations. PMID:26586665

  15. Non-catalytic Roles for XPG with BRCA1 and BRCA2 in Homologous Recombination and Genome Stability

    SciTech Connect

    Trego, Kelly S.; Groesser, Torsten; Davalos, Albert R.

    XPG is a structure-specific endonuclease required for nucleotide excision repair, and incision-defective XPG mutations cause the skin cancer-prone syndrome xeroderma pigmentosum. Truncating mutations instead cause the neurodevelopmental progeroid disorder Cockayne syndrome, but little is known about how XPG loss results in this devastating disease. In this paper, we identify XPG as a partner of BRCA1 and BRCA2 in maintaining genomic stability through homologous recombination (HRR). XPG depletion causes DNA double-strand breaks, chromosomal abnormalities, cell-cycle delays, defective HRR, inability to overcome replication fork stalling, and replication stress. XPG directly interacts with BRCA2, RAD51, and PALB2, and XPG depletion reduces their chromatinmore » binding and subsequent RAD51 foci formation. Upstream in HRR, XPG interacts directly with BRCA1. Its depletion causes BRCA1 hyper-phosphorylation and persistent chromatin binding. Finally, these unexpected findings establish XPG as an HRR protein with important roles in genome stability and suggest how XPG defects produce severe clinical consequences including cancer and accelerated aging.« less

  16. Non-catalytic Roles for XPG with BRCA1 and BRCA2 in Homologous Recombination and Genome Stability

    DOE PAGES

    Trego, Kelly S.; Groesser, Torsten; Davalos, Albert R.; ...

    2016-01-28

    XPG is a structure-specific endonuclease required for nucleotide excision repair, and incision-defective XPG mutations cause the skin cancer-prone syndrome xeroderma pigmentosum. Truncating mutations instead cause the neurodevelopmental progeroid disorder Cockayne syndrome, but little is known about how XPG loss results in this devastating disease. In this paper, we identify XPG as a partner of BRCA1 and BRCA2 in maintaining genomic stability through homologous recombination (HRR). XPG depletion causes DNA double-strand breaks, chromosomal abnormalities, cell-cycle delays, defective HRR, inability to overcome replication fork stalling, and replication stress. XPG directly interacts with BRCA2, RAD51, and PALB2, and XPG depletion reduces their chromatinmore » binding and subsequent RAD51 foci formation. Upstream in HRR, XPG interacts directly with BRCA1. Its depletion causes BRCA1 hyper-phosphorylation and persistent chromatin binding. Finally, these unexpected findings establish XPG as an HRR protein with important roles in genome stability and suggest how XPG defects produce severe clinical consequences including cancer and accelerated aging.« less

  17. BRCA2 and RAD51 promote double-strand break formation and cell death in response to gemcitabine.

    PubMed

    Jones, Rebecca M; Kotsantis, Panagiotis; Stewart, Grant S; Groth, Petra; Petermann, Eva

    2014-10-01

    Replication inhibitors cause replication fork stalling and double-strand breaks (DSB) that result from processing of stalled forks. During recovery from replication blocks, the homologous recombination (HR) factor RAD51 mediates fork restart and DSB repair. HR defects therefore sensitize cells to replication inhibitors, with clear implications for cancer therapy. Gemcitabine is a potent replication inhibitor used to treat cancers with mutations in HR genes such as BRCA2. Here, we investigate why, paradoxically, mutations in HR genes protect cells from killing by gemcitabine. Using DNA replication and DNA damage assays in mammalian cells, we show that even short gemcitabine treatments cause persistent replication inhibition. BRCA2 and RAD51 are recruited to chromatin early after removal of the drug, actively inhibit replication fork progression, and promote the formation of MUS81- and XPF-dependent DSBs that remain unrepaired. Our data suggest that HR intermediates formed at gemcitabine-stalled forks are converted into DSBs and thus contribute to gemcitabine-induced cell death, which could have implications for the treatment response of HR-deficient tumors. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  18. BRCA2 and RAD51 promote double-strand break formation and cell death in response to Gemcitabine

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Rebecca M.; Kotsantis, Panagiotis; Stewart, Grant S.; Groth, Petra; Petermann, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Replication inhibitors cause replication fork stalling and double-strand breaks (DSBs) that result from processing of stalled forks. During recovery from replication blocks, the homologous recombination (HR) factor RAD51 mediates fork restart and DSB repair. HR defects therefore sensitise cells to replication inhibitors, with clear implications for cancer therapy. Gemcitabine is a potent replication inhibitor used to treat cancers with mutations in HR genes such as BRCA2. Here we investigate why, paradoxically, mutations in HR genes protect cells from killing by Gemcitabine. Using DNA replication and -damage assays in mammalian cells, we show that even short Gemcitabine treatments cause persistent replication inhibition. BRCA2 and RAD51 are recruited to chromatin early after removal of the drug, actively inhibit replication fork progression and promote the formation of MUS81- and XPF-dependent DSBs that remain unrepaired. Our data suggest that HR intermediates formed at Gemcitabine-stalled forks are converted into DSBs and thus contribute to Gemcitabine-induced cell death, which could have implications for the treatment response of HR-deficient tumours. PMID:25053826

  19. Role of BRCA2 in the Expressions of IRF9-Regulated Genes in Human Breast Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-01

    interactions of BRCA2 with the members of the ISGF3 complex (STAT1, STAT2 and IRF9) in the human breast cells. (B) To evaluate the antiproliferative effects...The classic pathway induced by type I IFNs involves the interaction 5 of the IFN with two-receptor subunits, IFNAR-1 and -2, which are associated...against human breast tumor cells. Specific aims to verify the hypothesis are: (A) To evaluate further the structural and functional interactions of BRCA2

  20. BRCA1 and BRCA2 expression patterns and prognostic significance in digestive system cancers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gui-Hua; Zhao, Chun-Mei; Huang, Ying; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Shu; Wang, Xudong

    2018-01-01

    The role of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes is mainly to maintain genome integrity in response to DNA damage through different mechanisms. Deregulation of BRCA1 and BRCA2 is associated with the development of tumor and altered sensitivity to chemotherapeutic agents. In this study, we determined protein expression of BRCA1 and BRCA2 in 4 digestive system cancers (gastric cancer, colorectal cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma, and pancreatic cancer) by immunohistochemistry on tissue microarrays. A total of 1546 samples of 4 types of cancer tissues, their matched adjacent nontumor tissues, and corresponding benign tissues were studied, respectively. Immunohistochemistry expression patterns of the 2 proteins and their correlation with patients' clinical parameters and overall survival were analyzed. The results showed that low expression of cytoplasmic BRCA1 and BRCA2 was commonly associated with advanced tumor-lymph node-metastasis stage, whereas high expression of nuclear BRCA1 was generally correlated with advanced tumor stages in these cancers. High expression of cytoplasmic BRCA1 and BRCA2 had significantly favorable overall survival in digestive system cancers; in contrast, BRCA1 nuclear expression usually predicted poor outcomes. We conclude that BRCA1 and BRCA2 could be used as clinicopathological biomarkers to evaluate the prognosis of digestive system cancers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Autoimmune response to PARP and BRCA1/BRCA2 in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Qing; Han, Su-Xia; Zhou, Cong-Ya; Cai, Meng-Jiao; Dai, Li-Ping; Zhang, Jian-Ying

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine the role of autoantibodies to PARP1 and BRCA1/BRCA2 which were involved in the synthetic lethal interaction in cancer. Methods Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) was used to detect autoantibodies to PARP1 and BRCA1/BRCA2 in 618 serum samples including 131 from breast cancer, 94 from lung cancer, 34 from ovarian cancer, 107 from prostate cancer, 76 from liver cancer, 41 from pancreatic cancer and 135 from normal individuals. The positive sera with ELISA were confirmed by Western blot. Immunohistochemistry was used to examine the expression of PARP1 and BRCA1/BRCA2 in breast cancer. Results Autoantibody frequency to PARP1, BRCA1, and BRCA2 in cancer varied from 0% to 50%. When the sera from cancer patients were tested for the presence of autoantibodies to PARP1 and BRCA1/BRCA2, the autoantibody responses slightly decreased and the positive autoantibody reactions varied from 0% to 50.0%. This was significantly higher autoantibody responses to PARP1 and BRCA1/BRCA2 (especially to PARP1 and BRCA1) in ovarian cancer and breast cancer compared to normal control sera (P < 0.001 and P < 0.01). Immunohistochemistry indicated that Pathology Grade at diagnosis to PARP1 expression in breast cancer was different (P < 0.05). Conclusions Different cancers have different profiles of autoantibodies. The autoantibodies to proteins involving the synthetic lethal interactions would be novel serological biomarker in some selective cancers. PMID:25865228

  2. Description and analysis of genetic variants in French hereditary breast and ovarian cancer families recorded in the UMD-BRCA1/BRCA2 databases.

    PubMed

    Caputo, Sandrine; Benboudjema, Louisa; Sinilnikova, Olga; Rouleau, Etienne; Béroud, Christophe; Lidereau, Rosette

    2012-01-01

    BRCA1 and BRCA2 are the two main genes responsible for predisposition to breast and ovarian cancers, as a result of protein-inactivating monoallelic mutations. It remains to be established whether many of the variants identified in these two genes, so-called unclassified/unknown variants (UVs), contribute to the disease phenotype or are simply neutral variants (or polymorphisms). Given the clinical importance of establishing their status, a nationwide effort to annotate these UVs was launched by laboratories belonging to the French GGC consortium (Groupe Génétique et Cancer), leading to the creation of the UMD-BRCA1/BRCA2 databases (http://www.umd.be/BRCA1/ and http://www.umd.be/BRCA2/). These databases have been endorsed by the French National Cancer Institute (INCa) and are designed to collect all variants detected in France, whether causal, neutral or UV. They differ from other BRCA databases in that they contain co-occurrence data for all variants. Using these data, the GGC French consortium has been able to classify certain UVs also contained in other databases. In this article, we report some novel UVs not contained in the BIC database and explore their impact in cancer predisposition based on a structural approach.

  3. Asymptomatic dystrophinopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Morrone, A.; Hoffman, E.P.; Hoop, R.C.

    1997-03-31

    A 4-year-old girl was referred for evaluation for a mild but persistent serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST) elevation detected incidentally during routine blood screening for a skin infection. Serum creatine kinase activity was found to be increased. Immuno-histochemical study for dystrophin in her muscle biopsy showed results consistent with a carrier state for muscular dystrophy. Molecular work-up showed the proposita to be a carrier of a deletion mutation of exon 48 of the dystrophin gene. Four male relatives also had the deletion mutation, yet showed no clinical symptoms of muscular dystrophy (age range 8-58 yrs). Linkage analysis of the dystrophin genemore » in the family showed a spontaneous change of an STR45 allele, which could be due to either an intragenic double recombination event, or CA repeat length mutation leading to identical size alleles. To our knowledge, this is the first documentation of an asymptomatic dystrophinopathy in multiple males of advanced age. Based on molecular findings, this family would be given a diagnosis of Becker muscular dystrophy. This diagnosis implies the development of clinical symptoms, even though this family is clearly asymptomatic. This report underscores the caution which must be exercised when giving presymptomatic diagnoses based on molecular studies. 28 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.« less

  4. BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene variants and nonsyndromic cleft lip/palate.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Nicholas; Maili, Lorena; Chiquet, Brett T; Blanton, Susan H; Hecht, Jacqueline T; Letra, Ariadne

    2018-06-19

    Nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (NSCL/P) is a debilitating condition that not only affects the individual, but the entire family. The purpose of this study was to investigate the association of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes with NSCL/P. Twelve polymorphisms in/nearby BRCA1 and BRCA2 were genotyped using Taqman chemistry. Our data set consisted of 3,473 individuals including 2,191 nonHispanic white (NHW) individuals (from 151 multiplex and 348 simplex families) and 1,282 Hispanic individuals (from 92 multiplex and 216 simplex families). Data analysis was performed using Family-Based Association Test (FBAT), stratified by ethnicity and family history of NSCL/P. Nominal associations were found between NSCL/P and BRCA1 in Hispanics and BRCA2 in NHW and Hispanics (p < .05). Significant haplotype associations were found between NSCL/P and both BRCA1 and BRCA2 (p ≤ .004). Our results suggest a modest association between BRCA1 and BRCA2 and NSCL/P. Further studies in additional populations and functional studies are needed to elucidate the role of these genes in developmental processes and signaling pathways contributing to NSCL/P. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Progranulin plasma levels predict the presence of GRN mutations in asymptomatic subjects and do not correlate with brain atrophy: results from the GENFI study.

    PubMed

    Galimberti, Daniela; Fumagalli, Giorgio G; Fenoglio, Chiara; Cioffi, Sara M G; Arighi, Andrea; Serpente, Maria; Borroni, Barbara; Padovani, Alessandro; Tagliavini, Fabrizio; Masellis, Mario; Tartaglia, Maria Carmela; van Swieten, John; Meeter, Lieke; Graff, Caroline; de Mendonça, Alexandre; Bocchetta, Martina; Rohrer, Jonathan D; Scarpini, Elio

    2018-02-01

    We investigated whether progranulin plasma levels are predictors of the presence of progranulin gene (GRN) null mutations or of the development of symptoms in asymptomatic at risk members participating in the Genetic Frontotemporal Dementia Initiative, including 19 patients, 64 asymptomatic carriers, and 77 noncarriers. In addition, we evaluated a possible role of TMEM106B rs1990622 as a genetic modifier and correlated progranulin plasma levels and gray-matter atrophy. Plasma progranulin mean ± SD plasma levels in patients and asymptomatic carriers were significantly decreased compared with noncarriers (30.5 ± 13.0 and 27.7 ± 7.5 versus 99.6 ± 24.8 ng/mL, p < 0.00001). Considering the threshold of >61.55 ng/mL, the test had a sensitivity of 98.8% and a specificity of 97.5% in predicting the presence of a mutation, independent of symptoms. No correlations were found between progranulin plasma levels and age, years from average age at onset in each family, or TMEM106B rs1990622 genotype (p > 0.05). Plasma progranulin levels did not correlate with brain atrophy. Plasma progranulin levels predict the presence of GRN null mutations independent of proximity to symptoms and brain atrophy. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Assessment of the Clinical Relevance of BRCA2 Missense Variants by Functional and Computational Approaches.

    PubMed

    Guidugli, Lucia; Shimelis, Hermela; Masica, David L; Pankratz, Vernon S; Lipton, Gary B; Singh, Namit; Hu, Chunling; Monteiro, Alvaro N A; Lindor, Noralane M; Goldgar, David E; Karchin, Rachel; Iversen, Edwin S; Couch, Fergus J

    2018-01-17

    Many variants of uncertain significance (VUS) have been identified in BRCA2 through clinical genetic testing. VUS pose a significant clinical challenge because the contribution of these variants to cancer risk has not been determined. We conducted a comprehensive assessment of VUS in the BRCA2 C-terminal DNA binding domain (DBD) by using a validated functional assay of BRCA2 homologous recombination (HR) DNA-repair activity and defined a classifier of variant pathogenicity. Among 139 variants evaluated, 54 had ≥99% probability of pathogenicity, and 73 had ≥95% probability of neutrality. Functional assay results were compared with predictions of variant pathogenicity from the Align-GVGD protein-sequence-based prediction algorithm, which has been used for variant classification. Relative to the HR assay, Align-GVGD significantly (p < 0.05) over-predicted pathogenic variants. We subsequently combined functional and Align-GVGD prediction results in a Bayesian hierarchical model (VarCall) to estimate the overall probability of pathogenicity for each VUS. In addition, to predict the effects of all other BRCA2 DBD variants and to prioritize variants for functional studies, we used the endoPhenotype-Optimized Sequence Ensemble (ePOSE) algorithm to train classifiers for BRCA2 variants by using data from the HR functional assay. Together, the results show that systematic functional assays in combination with in silico predictors of pathogenicity provide robust tools for clinical annotation of BRCA2 VUS. Copyright © 2017 American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Recovery of deficient homologous recombination in Brca2-depleted mouse cells by wild-type Rad51 expression.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shauna A; Roques, Céline; Magwood, Alissa C; Masson, Jean-Yves; Baker, Mark D

    2009-02-01

    The BRCA2 tumor suppressor is important in maintaining genomic stability. BRCA2 is proposed to control the availability, cellular localization and DNA binding activity of the central homologous recombination protein, RAD51, with loss of BRCA2 resulting in defective homologous recombination. Nevertheless, the roles of BRCA2 in regulating RAD51 and how other proteins implicated in RAD51 regulation, such as RAD52 and RAD54 function relative to BRCA2 is not known. In this study, we tested whether defective homologous recombination in Brca2-depleted mouse hybridoma cells could be rectified by expression of mouse Rad51 or the Rad51-interacting mouse proteins, Rad52 and Rad54. In the Brca2-depleted cells, defective homologous recombination can be restored by over-expression of wild-type mouse Rad51, but not mouse Rad52 or Rad54. Correction of the homologous recombination defect requires Rad51 ATPase activity. A sizeable fraction ( approximately 50%) of over-expressed wild-type Rad51 is nuclear localized. The restoration of homologous recombination in the presence of a low (i.e., non-functional) level of Brca2 by wild-type Rad51 over-expression is unexpected. We suggest that Rad51 may access the nuclear compartment in a Brca2-independent manner and when Rad51 is over-expressed, the normal requirement for Brca2 control over Rad51 function in homologous recombination is dispensable. Our studies support loss of Rad51 function as a critical underlying factor in the homologous recombination defect in the Brca2-depleted cells.

  8. Deletion of exons 3-9 encompassing a mutational hot spot in the DMD gene presents an asymptomatic phenotype, indicating a target region for multiexon skipping therapy.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Akinori; Fueki, Noboru; Shiba, Naoko; Motoki, Hirohiko; Miyazaki, Daigo; Nishizawa, Hitomi; Echigoya, Yusuke; Yokota, Toshifumi; Aoki, Yoshitsugu; Takeda, Shin'ichi

    2016-07-01

    Few cases of dystrophinopathy show an asymptomatic phenotype with mutations in the 5' (exons 3-7) hot spot in the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene. Our patient showed increased serum creatine kinase levels at 12 years of age. A muscle biopsy at 15 years of age led to a diagnosis of Becker muscular dystrophy. The patient showed a slight decrease in cardiac function at the age of 21 years and was administered a β-blocker, but there was no muscle involvement even at the age of 27 years. A deletion of exons 3-9 encompassing a mutational hot spot in the DMD gene was detected, and dystrophin protein expression was ∼15% that of control level. We propose that in-frame deletion of exons 3-9 may produce a functional protein, and that multiexon skipping therapy targeting these exons may be feasible for severe dystrophic patients with a mutation in the 5' hot spot of the DMD gene.

  9. Functional analysis of a large set of BRCA2 exon 7 variants highlights the predictive value of hexamer scores in detecting alterations of exonic splicing regulatory elements.

    PubMed

    Di Giacomo, Daniela; Gaildrat, Pascaline; Abuli, Anna; Abdat, Julie; Frébourg, Thierry; Tosi, Mario; Martins, Alexandra

    2013-11-01

    Exonic variants can alter pre-mRNA splicing either by changing splice sites or by modifying splicing regulatory elements. Often these effects are difficult to predict and are only detected by performing RNA analyses. Here, we analyzed, in a minigene assay, 26 variants identified in the exon 7 of BRCA2, a cancer predisposition gene. Our results revealed eight new exon skipping mutations in this exon: one directly altering the 5' splice site and seven affecting potential regulatory elements. This brings the number of splicing regulatory mutations detected in BRCA2 exon 7 to a total of 11, a remarkably high number considering the total number of variants reported in this exon (n = 36), all tested in our minigene assay. We then exploited this large set of splicing data to test the predictive value of splicing regulator hexamers' scores recently established by Ke et al. (). Comparisons of hexamer-based predictions with our experimental data revealed high sensitivity in detecting variants that increased exon skipping, an important feature for prescreening variants before RNA analysis. In conclusion, hexamer scores represent a promising tool for predicting the biological consequences of exonic variants and may have important applications for the interpretation of variants detected by high-throughput sequencing. © 2013 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  10. A Cost-Effectiveness Evaluation of Germline BRCA1 and BRCA2 Testing in UK Women with Ovarian Cancer.

    PubMed

    Eccleston, Anthony; Bentley, Anthony; Dyer, Matthew; Strydom, Ann; Vereecken, Wim; George, Angela; Rahman, Nazneen

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate the long-term cost-effectiveness of germline BRCA1 and BRCA2 (collectively termed "BRCA") testing in women with epithelial ovarian cancer, and testing for the relevant mutation in first- and second-degree relatives of BRCA mutation-positive individuals, compared with no testing. Female BRCA mutation-positive relatives of patients with ovarian cancer could undergo risk-reducing mastectomy and/or bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy. A cost-effectiveness model was developed that included the risks of breast and ovarian cancer; the costs, utilities, and effects of risk-reducing surgery on cancer rates; and the costs, utilities, and mortality rates associated with cancer. BRCA testing of all women with epithelial ovarian cancer each year is cost-effective at a UK willingness-to-pay threshold of £20,000/quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) compared with no testing, with an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of £4,339/QALY. The result was primarily driven by fewer cases of breast cancer (142) and ovarian cancer (141) and associated reductions in mortality (77 fewer deaths) in relatives over the subsequent 50 years. Sensitivity analyses showed that the results were robust to variations in the input parameters. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis showed that the probability of germline BRCA mutation testing being cost-effective at a threshold of £20,000/QALY was 99.9%. Implementing germline BRCA testing in all patients with ovarian cancer would be cost-effective in the United Kingdom. The consequent reduction in future cases of breast and ovarian cancer in relatives of mutation-positive individuals would ease the burden of cancer treatments in subsequent years and result in significantly better outcomes and reduced mortality rates for these individuals. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. New paradigms for BRCA1/BRCA2 testing in women with ovarian cancer: results of the Genetic Testing in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer (GTEOC) study

    PubMed Central

    Plaskocinska, Inga; Shipman, Hannah; Drummond, James; Thompson, Edward; Buchanan, Vanessa; Newcombe, Barbara; Hodgkin, Charlotte; Barter, Elisa; Ridley, Paul; Ng, Rita; Miller, Suzanne; Dann, Adela; Licence, Victoria; Webb, Hayley; Tan, Li Tee; Daly, Margaret; Ayers, Sarah; Rufford, Barnaby; Earl, Helena; Parkinson, Christine; Duncan, Timothy; Jimenez-Linan, Mercedes; Sagoo, Gurdeep S; Abbs, Stephen; Hulbert-Williams, Nicholas; Pharoah, Paul; Crawford, Robin; Brenton, James D; Tischkowitz, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Background Over recent years genetic testing for germline mutations in BRCA1/BRCA2 has become more readily available because of technological advances and reducing costs. Objective To explore the feasibility and acceptability of offering genetic testing to all women recently diagnosed with epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). Methods Between 1 July 2013 and 30 June 2015 women newly diagnosed with EOC were recruited through six sites in East Anglia, UK into the Genetic Testing in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer (GTEOC) study. Eligibility was irrespective of patient age and family history of cancer. The psychosocial arm of the study used self-report, psychometrically validated questionnaires (Depression Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS-21); Impact of Event Scale (IES)) and cost analysis was performed. Results 232 women were recruited and 18 mutations were detected (12 in BRCA1, 6 in BRCA2), giving a mutation yield of 8%, which increased to 12% in unselected women aged <70 years (17/146) but was only 1% in unselected women aged ≥70 years (1/86). IES and DASS-21 scores in response to genetic testing were significantly lower than equivalent scores in response to cancer diagnosis (p<0.001). Correlation tests indicated that although older age is a protective factor against any traumatic impacts of genetic testing, no significant correlation exists between age and distress outcomes. Conclusions The mutation yield in unselected women diagnosed with EOC from a heterogeneous population with no founder mutations was 8% in all ages and 12% in women under 70. Unselected genetic testing in women with EOC was acceptable to patients and is potentially less resource-intensive than current standard practice. PMID:27208206

  12. New paradigms for BRCA1/BRCA2 testing in women with ovarian cancer: results of the Genetic Testing in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer (GTEOC) study.

    PubMed

    Plaskocinska, Inga; Shipman, Hannah; Drummond, James; Thompson, Edward; Buchanan, Vanessa; Newcombe, Barbara; Hodgkin, Charlotte; Barter, Elisa; Ridley, Paul; Ng, Rita; Miller, Suzanne; Dann, Adela; Licence, Victoria; Webb, Hayley; Tan, Li Tee; Daly, Margaret; Ayers, Sarah; Rufford, Barnaby; Earl, Helena; Parkinson, Christine; Duncan, Timothy; Jimenez-Linan, Mercedes; Sagoo, Gurdeep S; Abbs, Stephen; Hulbert-Williams, Nicholas; Pharoah, Paul; Crawford, Robin; Brenton, James D; Tischkowitz, Marc

    2016-10-01

    Over recent years genetic testing for germline mutations in BRCA1/BRCA2 has become more readily available because of technological advances and reducing costs. To explore the feasibility and acceptability of offering genetic testing to all women recently diagnosed with epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). Between 1 July 2013 and 30 June 2015 women newly diagnosed with EOC were recruited through six sites in East Anglia, UK into the Genetic Testing in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer (GTEOC) study. Eligibility was irrespective of patient age and family history of cancer. The psychosocial arm of the study used self-report, psychometrically validated questionnaires (Depression Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS-21); Impact of Event Scale (IES)) and cost analysis was performed. 232 women were recruited and 18 mutations were detected (12 in BRCA1, 6 in BRCA2), giving a mutation yield of 8%, which increased to 12% in unselected women aged <70 years (17/146) but was only 1% in unselected women aged ≥70 years (1/86). IES and DASS-21 scores in response to genetic testing were significantly lower than equivalent scores in response to cancer diagnosis (p<0.001). Correlation tests indicated that although older age is a protective factor against any traumatic impacts of genetic testing, no significant correlation exists between age and distress outcomes. The mutation yield in unselected women diagnosed with EOC from a heterogeneous population with no founder mutations was 8% in all ages and 12% in women under 70. Unselected genetic testing in women with EOC was acceptable to patients and is potentially less resource-intensive than current standard practice. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  13. Evaluation of genetic variations in miRNA-binding sites of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes as risk factors for the development of early-onset and/or familial breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Erturk, Elif; Cecener, Gulsah; Polatkan, Volkan; Gokgoz, Sehsuvar; Egeli, Unal; Tunca, Berrin; Tezcan, Gulcin; Demirdogen, Elif; Ak, Secil; Tasdelen, Ismet

    2014-01-01

    Although genetic markers identifying women at an increased risk of developing breast cancer exist, the majority of inherited risk factors remain elusive. Mutations in the BRCA1/BRCA2 gene confer a substantial increase in breast cancer risk, yet routine clinical genetic screening is limited to the coding regions and intron- exon boundaries, precluding the identification of mutations in noncoding and untranslated regions. Because 3' untranslated region (3'UTR) polymorphisms disrupting microRNA (miRNA) binding can be functional and can act as genetic markers of cancer risk, we aimed to determine genetic variation in the 3'UTR of BRCA1/BRCA2 in familial and early-onset breast cancer patients with and without mutations in the coding regions of BRCA1/ BRCA2 and to identify specific 3'UTR variants that may be risk factors for cancer development. The 3'UTRs of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes were screened by heteroduplex analysis and DNA sequencing in 100 patients from 46 BRCA1/2 families, 54 non-BRCA1/2 families, and 47 geographically matched controls. Two polymorphisms were identified. SNPs c.*1287C>T (rs12516) (BRCA1) and c.*105A>C (rs15869) (BRCA2) were identified in 27% and 24% of patients, respectively. These 2 variants were also identified in controls with no family history of cancer (23.4% and 23.4%, respectively). In comparison to variations in the 3'UTR region of the BRCA1/2 genes and the BRCA1/2 mutational status in patients, there was a statistically significant relationship between the BRCA1 gene polymorphism c.*1287C>T (rs12516) and BRCA1 mutations (p=0.035) by Fisher's Exact Test. SNP c.*1287C>T (rs12516) of the BRCA1 gene may have potential use as a genetic marker of an increased risk of developing breast cancer and likely represents a non-coding sequence variation in BRCA1 that impacts BRCA1 function and leads to increased early-onset and/or familial breast cancer risk in the Turkish population.

  14. Clinical testing of BRCA1 and BRCA2: a worldwide snapshot of technological practices.

    PubMed

    Toland, Amanda Ewart; Forman, Andrea; Couch, Fergus J; Culver, Julie O; Eccles, Diana M; Foulkes, William D; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Houdayer, Claude; Levy-Lahad, Ephrat; Monteiro, Alvaro N; Neuhausen, Susan L; Plon, Sharon E; Sharan, Shyam K; Spurdle, Amanda B; Szabo, Csilla; Brody, Lawrence C

    2018-01-01

    Clinical testing of BRCA1 and BRCA2 began over 20 years ago. With the expiration and overturning of the BRCA patents, limitations on which laboratories could offer commercial testing were lifted. These legal changes occurred approximately the same time as the widespread adoption of massively parallel sequencing (MPS) technologies. Little is known about how these changes impacted laboratory practices for detecting genetic alterations in hereditary breast and ovarian cancer genes. Therefore, we sought to examine current laboratory genetic testing practices for BRCA1 / BRCA2 . We employed an online survey of 65 questions covering four areas: laboratory characteristics, details on technological methods, variant classification, and client-support information. Eight United States (US) laboratories and 78 non-US laboratories completed the survey. Most laboratories (93%; 80/86) used MPS platforms to identify variants. Laboratories differed widely on: (1) technologies used for large rearrangement detection; (2) criteria for minimum read depths; (3) non-coding regions sequenced; (4) variant classification criteria and approaches; (5) testing volume ranging from 2 to 2.5 × 10 5 tests annually; and (6) deposition of variants into public databases. These data may be useful for national and international agencies to set recommendations for quality standards for BRCA1/BRCA2 clinical testing. These standards could also be applied to testing of other disease genes.

  15. Activation of BRCA1/BRCA2-Associated Helicase BACH1 Is Required for Timely Progression through S Phase▿

    PubMed Central

    Kumaraswamy, Easwari; Shiekhattar, Ramin

    2007-01-01

    BACH1 (also known as FANCJ and BRIP1) is a DNA helicase that directly interacts with the C-terminal BRCT repeat of the breast cancer susceptibility protein BRCA1. Previous biochemical and functional analyses have suggested a role for the BACH1 homolog in Caenorhabditis elegans during DNA replication. Here, we report the association of BACH1 with a distinct BRCA1/BRCA2-containing complex during the S phase of the cell cycle. Depletion of BACH1 or BRCA1 using small interfering RNAs results in delayed entry into the S phase of the cell cycle. Such timely progression through S phase requires the helicase activity of BACH1. Importantly, cells expressing a dominant negative mutation in BACH1 that results in a defective helicase displayed increased activation of DNA damage checkpoints and genomic instability. BACH1 helicase is silenced during the G1 phase of the cell cycle and is activated through a dephosphorylation event as cells enter S phase. These results point to a critical role for BACH1 helicase activity not only in the timely progression through the S phase but also in maintaining genomic stability. PMID:17664283

  16. FANCG promotes formation of a newly identified protein complex containing BRCA2, FANCD2 and XRCC3.

    PubMed

    Wilson, J B; Yamamoto, K; Marriott, A S; Hussain, S; Sung, P; Hoatlin, M E; Mathew, C G; Takata, M; Thompson, L H; Kupfer, G M; Jones, N J

    2008-06-12

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a human disorder characterized by cancer susceptibility and cellular sensitivity to DNA crosslinks and other damages. Thirteen complementation groups and genes are identified, including BRCA2, which is defective in the FA-D1 group. Eight of the FA proteins, including FANCG, participate in a nuclear core complex that is required for the monoubiquitylation of FANCD2 and FANCI. FANCD2, like FANCD1/BRCA2, is not part of the core complex, and we previously showed direct BRCA2-FANCD2 interaction using yeast two-hybrid analysis. We now show in human and hamster cells that expression of FANCG protein, but not the other core complex proteins, is required for co-precipitation of BRCA2 and FANCD2. We also show that phosphorylation of FANCG serine 7 is required for its co-precipitation with BRCA2, XRCC3 and FANCD2, as well as the direct interaction of BRCA2-FANCD2. These results argue that FANCG has a role independent of the FA core complex, and we propose that phosphorylation of serine 7 is the signalling event required for forming a discrete complex comprising FANCD1/BRCA2-FANCD2-FANCG-XRCC3 (D1-D2-G-X3). Cells that fail to express either phospho-Ser7-FANCG, or full length BRCA2 protein, lack the interactions amongst the four component proteins. A role for D1-D2-G-X3 in homologous recombination repair (HRR) is supported by our finding that FANCG and the RAD51-paralog XRCC3 are epistatic for sensitivity to DNA crosslinking compounds in DT40 chicken cells. Our findings further define the intricate interface between FANC and HRR proteins in maintaining chromosome stability.

  17. Evaluation and optimisation of indel detection workflows for ion torrent sequencing of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Zhen Xuan; Wong, Joshua Chee Leong; Rozen, Steven G; Lee, Ann Siew Gek

    2014-06-24

    The Ion Torrent PGM is a popular benchtop sequencer that shows promise in replacing conventional Sanger sequencing as the gold standard for mutation detection. Despite the PGM's reported high accuracy in calling single nucleotide variations, it tends to generate many false positive calls in detecting insertions and deletions (indels), which may hinder its utility for clinical genetic testing. Recently, the proprietary analytical workflow for the Ion Torrent sequencer, Torrent Suite (TS), underwent a series of upgrades. We evaluated three major upgrades of TS by calling indels in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. Our analysis revealed that false negative indels could be generated by TS under both default calling parameters and parameters adjusted for maximum sensitivity. However, indel calling with the same data using the open source variant callers, GATK and SAMtools showed that false negatives could be minimised with the use of appropriate bioinformatics analysis. Furthermore, we identified two variant calling measures, Quality-by-Depth (QD) and VARiation of the Width of gaps and inserts (VARW), which substantially reduced false positive indels, including non-homopolymer associated errors without compromising sensitivity. In our best case scenario that involved the TMAP aligner and SAMtools, we achieved 100% sensitivity, 99.99% specificity and 29% False Discovery Rate (FDR) in indel calling from all 23 samples, which is a good performance for mutation screening using PGM. New versions of TS, BWA and GATK have shown improvements in indel calling sensitivity and specificity over their older counterpart. However, the variant caller of TS exhibits a lower sensitivity than GATK and SAMtools. Our findings demonstrate that although indel calling from PGM sequences may appear to be noisy at first glance, proper computational indel calling analysis is able to maximize both the sensitivity and specificity at the single base level, paving the way for the usage of this technology

  18. Modeling Impact of BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutations in Mammary Epithelial Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    remaining tissue was lacerated and minced with opposing scalpels. Minced pieces were placed into a 50mL Erlenmeyer flask, containing 10mL digestion medium...Ham’s F- 12 containing insulin, penicillin, streptomycin, polymyxin B, Fungizone, 10% fetal bovine serum, collagenase, and hyaluronidase) for one

  19. Association between the BRCA2 rs144848 polymorphism and cancer susceptibility: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiuyan; Guan, Rongwei; Qiao, Yuandong; Liu, Chang; He, Ning; Zhang, Xuelong; Jia, Xueyuan; Sun, Haiming; Yu, Jingcui; Xu, Lidan

    2017-06-13

    The BRCA2 gene plays an important role in cancer carcinogenesis, and polymorphisms in this gene have been associated with cancer risk. The BRCA2 rs144848 polymorphism has been associated with several cancers, but results have been inconsistent. In the present study, a meta-analysis was performed to assess the association between the rs144848 polymorphism and cancer risk. Literature was searched from the databases of PubMed, Embase and Google Scholar before April 2016. The fixed or random effects model was used to calculate pooled odd ratios on the basis of heterogeneity. Meta-regression, sensitivity analysis, subgroup analysis and publication bias assessment were also performed using STATA 11.0 software according to Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses 2009. A total of 40 relevant studies from 30 publications including 34,911 cases and 48,329 controls were included in the final meta-analysis. Among them, 22 studies focused on breast cancer, seven on ovarian cancer, five on non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and the remaining six studies examined various other cancers. The meta-analysis results showed that there were significant associations between the rs144848 polymorphism and cancer risk in all genetic models. Stratified by cancer type, the rs144848 polymorphism was associated with non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Stratified by study design, the allele model was associated with breast cancer risk in population-based studies. The meta-analysis suggests that the BRCA2 rs144848 polymorphism may play a role in cancer risk. Further well-designed studies are warranted to confirm these results.

  20. Whole exome sequencing identifies driver mutations in asymptomatic computed tomography-detected lung cancers with normal karyotype.

    PubMed

    Belloni, Elena; Veronesi, Giulia; Rotta, Luca; Volorio, Sara; Sardella, Domenico; Bernard, Loris; Pece, Salvatore; Di Fiore, Pier Paolo; Fumagalli, Caterina; Barberis, Massimo; Spaggiari, Lorenzo; Pelicci, Pier Giuseppe; Riva, Laura

    2015-04-01

    The efficacy of curative surgery for lung cancer could be largely improved by non-invasive screening programs, which can detect the disease at early stages. We previously showed that 18% of screening-identified lung cancers demonstrate a normal karyotype and, following high-density genome scanning, can be subdivided into samples with 1) numerous; 2) none; and 3) few copy number alterations. Whole exome sequencing was applied to the two normal karyotype, screening-detected lung cancers, constituting group 2, as well as normal controls. We identified mutations in both tumors, including KEAP1 (commonly mutated in lung cancers) in one, and TP53, PMS1, and MSH3 (well-characterized DNA-repair genes) in the other. The two normal karyotype screening-detected lung tumors displayed a typical lung cancer mutational profile that only next generation sequencing could reveal, which offered an additional contribution to the over-diagnosis bias concept hypothesized within lung cancer screening programs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Expression profile of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes in premenopausal Mexican women with breast cancer: clinical and immunohistochemical correlates.

    PubMed

    Loredo-Pozos, Gloria; Chiquete, Erwin; Oceguera-Villanueva, Antonio; Panduro, Arturo; Siller-López, Fernando; Ramos-Márquez, Martha E

    2009-01-01

    Low BRCA1 gene expression is associated with increased invasiveness and influences the response of breast carcinoma (BC) to chemotherapeutics. However, expression of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes has not been completely characterized in premenopausal BC. We analyzed the clinical and immunohistochemical correlates of BRCA1 and BRCA2 expression in young BC women. We studied 62 women (mean age 38.8 years) who developed BC before the age of 45 years. BRCA1 and BRCA2 mRNA expression was assessed by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and that of HER-2 and p53 proteins by immunohistochemistry. Body mass index (BMI) > or = 27 (52%) and a declared family history of BC (26%) were the main risk factors. Ductal infiltrative adenocarcinoma was found in 86% of the cases (tumor size >5 cm in 48%). Disease stages I-IV occurred in 2, 40, 55, and 3%, respectively (73% implicating lymph nodes). Women aged < or = 35 years (24%) had more family history of cervical cancer, stage III/IV disease, HER-2 positivity, and lower BRCA1 expression than older women (P < 0.05). BRCA1 and BRCA2 expression correlated in healthy, but not in tumor tissues (TT). Neither BRCA1 nor BRCA2 expression was associated with tumor histology, differentiation, nodal metastasis or p53 and HER-2 expression. After multivariate analysis, only disease stage explained BRCA1 mRNA levels in the lowest quartile. Premenopausal BC has aggressive clinical and molecular characteristics. Low BRCA1 mRNA expression is associated mainly with younger ages and advanced clinical stage of premenopausal BC. BRCA2 expression is not associated with disease severity in young BC women.

  2. Asymptomatic bacteriuria.

    PubMed

    Nicolle, Lindsay E

    2014-02-01

    Asymptomatic bacteriuria is a common finding. Inappropriate antimicrobial treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria has been identified as a major issue for antimicrobial stewardship programs. This review summarizes and evaluates recent studies which extend our knowledge of the occurrence, management, and outcomes of bacteriuria. The reported prevalence of bacteriuria is higher in some developing countries than generally reported for developed countries, but reasons for this remain unclear. Clinical studies of young women, renal transplant patients, and patients undergoing minor nontraumatic urologic procedures confirm that treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria for these populations is not beneficial, and may be harmful. There is also no benefit for treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria prior to orthopedic surgery to decrease postoperative surgical site infection. Studies continue to report substantial inappropriate antimicrobial use for treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria. Recent publications confirm that asymptomatic bacteriuria is benign in most patients. Management strategies for pregnant women with recurrent bacteriuria require further clarification. There is a continuing problem with inappropriate treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria, and sustainable strategies to optimize antimicrobial use for this problem are needed.

  3. Prophylactic thyroidectomy for asymptomatic 3-year-old boy with positive multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A mutation (codon 634).

    PubMed

    Jesić, Maja D; Tancić-Gajić, Milina; Jesić, Milos M; Zivaljević, Vladan; Sajić, Silvija; Vujović, Svetlana; Damjanović, Svetozar

    2014-01-01

    The multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A (MEN 2A) syndrome, comprising medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC), pheochromocytoma and primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) is most frequently caused by codon 634 activating mutations of the RET (rearranged during transfection) proto-oncogene on chromosome 10. For this codon-mutation carriers, earlier thyroidectomy (before the age of 5 years) would be advantageous in limiting the potential for the development of MTC as well as parathyroid adenomas. This is a case report of 3-year-old boy from the MEN 2A family (the boy's father and grandmother and paternal aunt) in which cysteine substitutes for phenylalanine at codon 634 in exon 11 of the RET proto-oncogene, who underwent thyroidectomy solely on the basis of genetic information. A boy had no thyromegaly, thyroidal irregularities or lymphadenopathy and no abnormality on the neck ultrasound examination. The pathology finding of thyroid gland was negative for MTC. Two years after total thyroidectomy, 5-year-old boy is healthy with permanent thyroxine replacement. His serum calcitonin level is < 2 pg/ml (normal < 13 pg/ml), has normal serum calcium and parathyroid hormone levels and negative urinary catecholamines. Long-term follow-up of this patient is required to determine whether very early thyroidectomy improves the long-term outcome of PHPT. Children with familial antecedents of MEN 2A should be genetically studied for the purpose of determining the risk of MTC and assessing the possibilities of making prophylactic thyroidectomy before the age of 5 years.

  4. Asymptomatic bacteriuria

    MedlinePlus

    Dull RB, Friedman SK, Risoldi ZM, Rice EC, Starlin RC, Destache CJ. Antimicrobial treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria in noncatheterized adults: a systematic review. Pharmacotherapy . 2014;34(9):941-960. PMID: 24807583 ...

  5. Variation in mutation spectrum partly explains regional differences in the breast cancer risk of female BRCA mutation carriers in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Vos, Janet R; Teixeira, Natalia; van der Kolk, Dorina M; Mourits, Marian J E; Rookus, Matti A; van Leeuwen, Flora E; Collée, Margriet; van Asperen, Christi J; Mensenkamp, Arjen R; Ausems, Margreet G E M; van Os, Theo A M; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E J; Gómez-Garcia, Encarna B; Vasen, Hans F; Brohet, Richard M; van der Hout, Annemarie H; Jansen, Liesbeth; Oosterwijk, Jan C; de Bock, Geertruida H

    2014-11-01

    We aimed to quantify previously observed relatively high cancer risks in BRCA2 mutation carriers (BRCA2 carriers) older than 60 in the Northern Netherlands, and to analyze whether these could be explained by mutation spectrum or population background risk. This consecutive cohort study included all known pathogenic BRCA1/2 carriers in the Northern Netherlands (N = 1,050). Carrier and general reference populations were: BRCA1/2 carriers in the rest of the Netherlands (N = 2,013) and the general population in both regions. Regional differences were assessed with HRs and ORs. HRs were adjusted for birth year and mutation spectrum. All BRCA1 carriers and BRCA2 carriers younger than 60 had a significantly lower breast cancer risk in the Northern Netherlands; HRs were 0.66 and 0.64, respectively. Above age 60, the breast cancer risk in BRCA2 carriers in the Northern Netherlands was higher than in the rest of the Netherlands [HR, 3.99; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.11-14.35]. Adjustment for mutational spectrum changed the HRs for BRCA1, BRCA2 <60, and BRCA2 ≥60 years by -3%, +32%, and +11% to 0.75, 0.50, and 2.61, respectively. There was no difference in background breast cancer incidence between the two regions (OR, 1.03; 95% CI, 0.97-1.09). Differences in mutation spectrum only partly explain the regional differences in breast cancer risk in BRCA2 carriers, and for an even smaller part in BRCA1 carriers. The increased risk in BRCA2 carriers older than 60 may warrant extension of intensive breast screening beyond age 60. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  6. Changes in classification of genetic variants in BRCA1 and BRCA2.

    PubMed

    Kast, Karin; Wimberger, Pauline; Arnold, Norbert

    2018-02-01

    Classification of variants of unknown significance (VUS) in the breast cancer genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 changes with accumulating evidence for clinical relevance. In most cases down-staging towards neutral variants without clinical significance is possible. We searched the database of the German Consortium for Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer (GC-HBOC) for changes in classification of genetic variants as an update to our earlier publication on genetic variants in the Centre of Dresden. Changes between 2015 and 2017 were recorded. In the group of variants of unclassified significance (VUS, Class 3, uncertain), only changes of classification towards neutral genetic variants were noted. In BRCA1, 25% of the Class 3 variants (n = 2/8) changed to Class 2 (likely benign) and Class 1 (benign). In BRCA2, in 50% of the Class 3 variants (n = 16/32), a change to Class 2 (n = 10/16) or Class 1 (n = 6/16) was observed. No change in classification was noted in Class 4 (likely pathogenic) and Class 5 (pathogenic) genetic variants in both genes. No up-staging from Class 1, Class 2 or Class 3 to more clinical significance was observed. All variants with a change in classification in our cohort were down-staged towards no clinical significance by a panel of experts of the German Consortium for Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer (GC-HBOC). Prevention in families with Class 3 variants should be based on pedigree based risks and should not be guided by the presence of a VUS.

  7. Characterization of Brca2-Deficient Plants Excludes the Role of NHEJ and SSA in the Meiotic Chromosomal Defect Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Dumont, Marilyn; Massot, Sophie; Doutriaux, Marie-Pascale; Gratias, Ariane

    2011-01-01

    In somatic cells, three major pathways are involved in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DBS): Non-Homologous End Joining (NHEJ), Single-Strand Annealing (SSA) and Homologous Recombination (HR). In somatic and meiotic HR, DNA DSB are 5′ to 3′ resected, producing long 3′ single-stranded DNA extensions. Brca2 is essential to load the Rad51 recombinase onto these 3′ overhangs. The resulting nucleofilament can thus invade a homologous DNA sequence to copy and restore the original genetic information. In Arabidopsis, the inactivation of Brca2 specifically during meiosis by an RNAi approach results in aberrant chromosome aggregates, chromosomal fragmentation and missegregation leading to a sterility phenotype. We had previously suggested that such chromosomal behaviour could be due to NHEJ. In this study, we show that knock-out plants affected in both BRCA2 genes show the same meiotic phenotype as the RNAi-inactivated plants. Moreover, it is demonstrated that during meiosis, neither NHEJ nor SSA compensate for HR deficiency in BRCA2-inactivated plants. The role of the plant-specific DNA Ligase6 is also excluded. The possible mechanism(s) involved in the formation of these aberrant chromosomal bridges in the absence of HR during meiosis are discussed. PMID:22039535

  8. Rotating night work, lifestyle factors, obesity and promoter methylation in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes among nurses and midwives

    PubMed Central

    Bukowska, Agnieszka; Wieczorek, Edyta; Przybek, Monika; Zienolddiny, Shanbeh; Reszka, Edyta

    2017-01-01

    Some recent evidence suggests that environmental and lifestyle factors may modify DNA methylation. We hypothesized that rotating night work and several modifiable factors may be associated with the methylation of the promoter regions within two tumor suppressor and DNA repair genes: BRCA1 and BRCA2. The methylation status of BRCA1 and BRCA2 was determined via qMSP reactions using DNA samples derived from blood leucocytes of 347 nurses and midwives working rotating nights and 363 working during the days. The subjects were classified into unmethylated vs methylated BRCA1 and BRCA2 when the methylation index was 0% or >0%, respectively. The adjusted odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals were calculated for night work status, smoking, obesity, physical activity and alcohol drinking. Current night shift work or night work history was not associated with methylation status of the promoter sites within BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. We observed weak associations between smoking and the methylation status of BRCA1 with OR = 1.50 (95%CI: 0.98–2.29) for current smoking, OR = 1.83, 95CI: 1.08–3.13 for smoking longer than 31 years, and 0.1>p>0.05 for trends for the number of cigarettes per day, smoking duration and packyears. In conclusion, no links between night shift work and methylation of the promoter region within the BRCA1, and BRCA2 genes were observed in this exploratory analysis. The findings of our study weakly support the hypothesis that smoking may contribute to epigenetic events. PMID:28594926

  9. Next-generation sequencing meets genetic diagnostics: development of a comprehensive workflow for the analysis of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes

    PubMed Central

    Feliubadaló, Lídia; Lopez-Doriga, Adriana; Castellsagué, Ester; del Valle, Jesús; Menéndez, Mireia; Tornero, Eva; Montes, Eva; Cuesta, Raquel; Gómez, Carolina; Campos, Olga; Pineda, Marta; González, Sara; Moreno, Victor; Brunet, Joan; Blanco, Ignacio; Serra, Eduard; Capellá, Gabriel; Lázaro, Conxi

    2013-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) is changing genetic diagnosis due to its huge sequencing capacity and cost-effectiveness. The aim of this study was to develop an NGS-based workflow for routine diagnostics for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome (HBOCS), to improve genetic testing for BRCA1 and BRCA2. A NGS-based workflow was designed using BRCA MASTR kit amplicon libraries followed by GS Junior pyrosequencing. Data analysis combined Variant Identification Pipeline freely available software and ad hoc R scripts, including a cascade of filters to generate coverage and variant calling reports. A BRCA homopolymer assay was performed in parallel. A research scheme was designed in two parts. A Training Set of 28 DNA samples containing 23 unique pathogenic mutations and 213 other variants (33 unique) was used. The workflow was validated in a set of 14 samples from HBOCS families in parallel with the current diagnostic workflow (Validation Set). The NGS-based workflow developed permitted the identification of all pathogenic mutations and genetic variants, including those located in or close to homopolymers. The use of NGS for detecting copy-number alterations was also investigated. The workflow meets the sensitivity and specificity requirements for the genetic diagnosis of HBOCS and improves on the cost-effectiveness of current approaches. PMID:23249957

  10. Identification of Germline Genetic Mutations in Pancreatic Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Salo-Mullen, Erin E.; O’Reilly, Eileen; Kelsen, David; Ashraf, Asad M.; Lowery, Maeve; Yu, Kenneth; Reidy, Diane; Epstein, Andrew S.; Lincoln, Anne; Saldia, Amethyst; Jacobs, Lauren M.; Rau-Murthy, Rohini; Zhang, Liying; Kurtz, Robert; Saltz, Leonard; Offit, Kenneth; Robson, Mark; Stadler, Zsofia K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PAC) is part of several cancer predisposition syndromes; however, indications for genetic counseling/testing are not well-defined. We sought to determine mutation prevalence and characteristics that predict for inherited predisposition to PAC. Methods We identified 175 consecutive PAC patients who underwent clinical genetics assessment at Memorial Sloan Kettering between 2011–2014. Clinical data, family history, and germline results were evaluated. Results Among 159 PAC patients who pursued genetic testing, 24 pathogenic mutations were identified (15.1%; 95%CI, 9.5%–20.7%), including BRCA2(n=13), BRCA1(n=4), p16(n=2), PALB2(n=1), and Lynch syndrome(n=4). BRCA1/BRCA2 prevalence was 13.7% in Ashkenazi Jewish(AJ) (n=95) and 7.1% in non-AJ(n=56) patients. In AJ patients with strong, weak, or absent family history of BRCA-associated cancers, mutation prevalence was 16.7%, 15.8%, and 7.4%, respectively. Mean age at diagnosis in all mutation carriers was 58.5y(range 45–75y) compared to 64y(range 27–87y) in non-mutation carriers(P=0.02). Although BRCA2 was the most common mutation identified, no patients with early-onset PAC(≤50y) harbored a BRCA2 mutation and the mean age at diagnosis in BRCA2 carriers was equivalent to non-mutation carriers(P=0.34). Mutation prevalence in early-onset patients(n=21) was 28.6%, including BRCA1(n=2), p16(n=2), MSH2(n=1) and MLH1(n=1). Conclusion Mutations in BRCA2 account for over 50% of PAC patients with an identified susceptibility syndrome. AJ patients had high BRCA1/BRCA2 prevalence regardless of personal/family history, suggesting that ancestry alone indicates a need for genetic evaluation. With the exception of BRCA2-associated PAC, inherited predisposition to PAC is associated with earlier age at PAC diagnosis suggesting that this subset of patients may also represent a population warranting further evaluation. PMID:26440929

  11. Genetic variants in Fanconi Anemia Pathway Genes BRCA2 and FANCA Predict Melanoma Survival

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhensheng; Wang, Li-E; Chen, Wei V.; Zhu, Dakai; Amos, Christopher I.; Fang, Shenying; Lee, Jeffrey E.; Wei, Qingyi

    2014-01-01

    Cutaneous melanoma (CM) is the most lethal skin cancer. The Fanconi Anemia (FA) pathway involved in DNA crosslinks repair may affect CM susceptibility and prognosis. Using data derived from published genome-wide association study, we comprehensively analyzed the associations of 2339 common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 14 autosomal FA genes with overall survival (OS) in 858 CM patients. By performing false-positive report probability corrections and stepwise Cox proportional hazards regression analyses, we identified significant associations between CM OS and four putatively functional SNPs: BRCA2 rs10492396 [AG vs. GG: adjusted hazard ratio (adjHR)=1.85, 95% confident interval (CI)=1.16-2.95, P=0.010], rs206118 (CC vs. TT+TC: adjHR=2.44, 95% CI=1.27-4.67, P=0.007), rs3752447 (CC vs. TT+TC: adjHR=2.10, 95% CI=1.38-3.18, P=0.0005), and FANCA rs62068372 (TT vs. CC+CT: adjHR=1.85, 95% CI=1.27-2.69, P=0.001). Moreover, patients with an increasing number of unfavorable genotypes (NUG) of these loci had markedly reduced OS and melanoma-specific survival (MSS). The final model incorporating with NUG, tumor stage and Breslow thickness showed an improved discriminatory ability to classify both 5-year OS and 5-year MSS. Additional investigations, preferably prospective studies, are needed to validate our findings. PMID:25243787

  12. Genetic variants in fanconi anemia pathway genes BRCA2 and FANCA predict melanoma survival.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jieyun; Liu, Hongliang; Liu, Zhensheng; Wang, Li-E; Chen, Wei V; Zhu, Dakai; Amos, Christopher I; Fang, Shenying; Lee, Jeffrey E; Wei, Qingyi

    2015-02-01

    Cutaneous melanoma (CM) is the most lethal skin cancer. The Fanconi anemia (FA) pathway involved in DNA crosslink repair may affect CM susceptibility and prognosis. Using data derived from published genome-wide association study, we comprehensively analyzed the associations of 2,339 common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 14 autosomal FA genes with overall survival (OS) in 858 CM patients. By performing false-positive report probability corrections and stepwise Cox proportional hazards regression analyses, we identified significant associations between CM OS and four putatively functional SNPs: BRCA2 rs10492396 (AG vs. GG: adjusted hazard ratio (adjHR)=1.85, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.16-2.95, P=0.010), rs206118 (CC vs. TT+TC: adjHR=2.44, 95% CI=1.27-4.67, P=0.007), rs3752447 (CC vs. TT+TC: adjHR=2.10, 95% CI=1.38-3.18, P=0.0005), and FANCA rs62068372 (TT vs. CC+CT: adjHR=1.85, 95% CI=1.27-2.69, P=0.001). Moreover, patients with an increasing number of unfavorable genotypes (NUG) of these loci had markedly reduced OS and melanoma-specific survival (MSS). The final model incorporating with NUG, tumor stage, and Breslow thickness showed an improved discriminatory ability to classify both 5-year OS and 5-year MSS. Additional investigations, preferably prospective studies, are needed to validate our findings.

  13. Intention to communicate BRCA1/BRCA2 genetic test results to the family.

    PubMed

    Barsevick, Andrea M; Montgomery, Susan V; Ruth, Karen; Ross, Eric A; Egleston, Brian L; Bingler, Ruth; Malick, John; Miller, Suzanne M; Cescon, Terrence P; Daly, Mary B

    2008-04-01

    Guided by the theory of planned behavior, this analysis explores the communication skills of women who had genetic testing for BRCA1 and BRCA2. The key outcome was intention to tell test results to adult first-degree relatives. The theory predicts that global and specific attitudes, global and specific perceived social norms, and perceived control will influence the communication of genetic test results. A logistic regression model revealed that global attitude (p < .05), specific social influence (p < .01), and perceived control (p < .05) were significant predictors of intention to tell. When gender and generation of relatives were added to the regression, participants were more likely to convey genetic test results to female than to male relatives (p < .05) and were also more likely to communicate test results to children (p < .01) or siblings (p < .05) than to parents. However, this association depended on knowing the relative's opinion of genetic testing. Intention to tell was lowest among participants who did not know their relative's opinion. These results extend the theory of planned behavior by showing that gender and generation influence intention when the relative's opinion is unknown. (c) 2008 APA, all rights reserved.

  14. Rare variants of large effect in BRCA2 and CHEK2 affect risk of lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yufei; McKay, James D.; Rafnar, Thorunn; Wang, Zhaoming; Timofeeva, Maria; Broderick, Peter; Zong, Xuchen; Laplana, Marina; Wei, Yongyue; Han, Younghun; Lloyd, Amy; Delahaye-Sourdeix, Manon; Chubb, Daniel; Gaborieau, Valerie; Wheeler, William; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Sulem, Patrick; Liu, Geoffrey; Kaaks, Rudolf; Henrion, Marc; Kinnersley, Ben; Vallée, Maxime; LeCalvez-Kelm, Florence; Stevens, Victoria L.; Gapstur, Susan M.; Chen, Wei V.; Zaridze, David; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonilia; Lissowska, Jolanta; Rudnai, Peter; Fabianova, Eleonora; Mates, Dana; Bencko, Vladimir; Foretova, Lenka; Janout, Vladimir; Krokan, Hans E.; Gabrielsen, Maiken Elvestad; Skorpen, Frank; Vatten, Lars; Njølstad, Inger; Chen, Chu; Goodman, Gary; Benhamou, Simone; Vooder, Tonu; Valk, Kristjan; Nelis, Mari; Metspalu, Andres; Lener, Marcin; Lubiński, Jan; Johansson, Mattias; Vineis, Paolo; Agudo, Antonio; Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H.Bas; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Johansson, Mikael; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Tjønneland, Anne; Riboli, Elio; Lathrop, Mark; Scelo, Ghislaine; Albanes, Demetrius; Caporaso, Neil E.; Ye, Yuanqing; Gu, Jian; Wu, Xifeng; Spitz, Margaret R.; Dienemann, Hendrik; Rosenberger, Albert; Su, Li; Matakidou, Athena; Eisen, Timothy; Stefansson, Kari; Risch, Angela; Chanock, Stephen J.; Christiani, David C.; Hung, Rayjean J.; Brennan, Paul; Landi, Maria Teresa; Houlston, Richard S.; Amos, Christopher I.

    2014-01-01

    We conducted imputation to the 1000 Genomes Project of four genome-wide association studies of lung cancer in populations of European ancestry (11,348 cases and 15,861 controls) and genotyped an additional 10,246 cases and 38,295 controls for follow-up. We identified large-effect genome-wide associations for squamous lung cancer with the rare variants of BRCA2-K3326X (rs11571833; odds ratio [OR]=2.47, P=4.74×10−20) and of CHEK2-I157T (rs17879961; OR=0.38 P=1.27×10−13). We also showed an association between common variation at 3q28 (TP63; rs13314271; OR=1.13, P=7.22×10−10) and lung adenocarcinoma previously only reported in Asians. These findings provide further evidence for inherited genetic susceptibility to lung cancer and its biological basis. Additionally, our analysis demonstrates that imputation can identify rare disease-causing variants having substantive effects on cancer risk from pre-existing GWAS data. PMID:24880342

  15. Universal BRCA1/BRCA2 Testing for Ovarian Cancer Patients is Welcomed, but with Care: How Women and Staff Contextualize Experiences of Expanded Access.

    PubMed

    Shipman, Hannah; Flynn, Samantha; MacDonald-Smith, Carey F; Brenton, James; Crawford, Robin; Tischkowitz, Marc; Hulbert-Williams, Nicholas J

    2017-12-01

    Decreasing costs of genetic testing and advances in treatment for women with cancer with germline BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations have heralded more inclusive genetic testing programs. The Genetic Testing in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer (GTEOC) Study, investigates the feasibility and acceptability of offering genetic testing to all women recently diagnosed with epithelial ovarian cancer (universal genetic testing or UGT). Study participants and staff were interviewed to: (i) assess the impact of UGT (ii) integrate patients' and staff perspectives in the development of new UGT programs. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with twelve GTEOC Study participants and five members of staff involved in recruiting them. The transcripts were transcribed verbatim and analyzed using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis. There are two super-ordinate themes: motivations and influences around offers of genetic testing and impacts of genetic testing in ovarian cancer patients. A major finding is that genetic testing is contextualized within the broader experiences of the women; the impact of UGT was minimized in comparison with the ovarian cancer diagnosis. Women who consent to UGT are motivated by altruism and by their relatives' influence, whilst those who decline are often considered overwhelmed or fearful. Those without a genetic mutation are usually reassured by this result, whilst those with a genetic mutation must negotiate new uncertainties and responsibilities towards their families. Our findings suggest that UGT in this context is generally acceptable to women. However, the period shortly after diagnosis is a sensitive time and some women are emotionally overburdened. UGT is considered a 'family affair' and staff must acknowledge this.

  16. Smarcal1-Mediated Fork Reversal Triggers Mre11-Dependent Degradation of Nascent DNA in the Absence of Brca2 and Stable Rad51 Nucleofilaments.

    PubMed

    Kolinjivadi, Arun Mouli; Sannino, Vincenzo; De Antoni, Anna; Zadorozhny, Karina; Kilkenny, Mairi; Técher, Hervé; Baldi, Giorgio; Shen, Rong; Ciccia, Alberto; Pellegrini, Luca; Krejci, Lumir; Costanzo, Vincenzo

    2017-09-07

    Brca2 deficiency causes Mre11-dependent degradation of nascent DNA at stalled forks, leading to cell lethality. To understand the molecular mechanisms underlying this process, we isolated Xenopus laevis Brca2. We demonstrated that Brca2 protein prevents single-stranded DNA gap accumulation at replication fork junctions and behind them by promoting Rad51 binding to replicating DNA. Without Brca2, forks with persistent gaps are converted by Smarcal1 into reversed forks, triggering extensive Mre11-dependent nascent DNA degradation. Stable Rad51 nucleofilaments, but not RPA or Rad51 T131P mutant proteins, directly prevent Mre11-dependent DNA degradation. Mre11 inhibition instead promotes reversed fork accumulation in the absence of Brca2. Rad51 directly interacts with the Pol α N-terminal domain, promoting Pol α and δ binding to stalled replication forks. This interaction likely promotes replication fork restart and gap avoidance. These results indicate that Brca2 and Rad51 prevent formation of abnormal DNA replication intermediates, whose processing by Smarcal1 and Mre11 predisposes to genome instability. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Contribution of mammography to MRI screening in BRCA mutation carriers by BRCA status and age: individual patient data meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Phi, Xuan-Anh; Saadatmand, Sepideh; De Bock, Geertruida H; Warner, Ellen; Sardanelli, Francesco; Leach, Martin O; Riedl, Christopher C; Trop, Isabelle; Hooning, Maartje J; Mandel, Rodica; Santoro, Filippo; Kwan-Lim, Gek; Helbich, Thomas H; Tilanus-Linthorst, Madeleine MA; van den Heuvel, Edwin R; Houssami, Nehmat

    2016-01-01

    Background: We investigated the additional contribution of mammography to screening accuracy in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers screened with MRI at different ages using individual patient data from six high-risk screening trials. Methods: Sensitivity and specificity of MRI, mammography and the combination of these tests were compared stratified for BRCA mutation and age using generalised linear mixed models with random effect for studies. Number of screens needed (NSN) for additional mammography-only detected cancer was estimated. Results: In BRCA1/2 mutation carriers of all ages (BRCA1=1219 and BRCA2=732), adding mammography to MRI did not significantly increase screening sensitivity (increased by 3.9% in BRCA1 and 12.6% in BRCA2 mutation carriers, P>0.05). However, in women with BRCA2 mutation younger than 40 years, one-third of breast cancers were detected by mammography only. Number of screens needed for mammography to detect one breast cancer not detected by MRI was much higher for BRCA1 compared with BRCA2 mutation carriers at initial and repeat screening. Conclusions: Additional screening sensitivity from mammography above that from MRI is limited in BRCA1 mutation carriers, whereas mammography contributes to screening sensitivity in BRCA2 mutation carriers, especially those ⩽40 years. The evidence from our work highlights that a differential screening schedule by BRCA status is worth considering. PMID:26908327

  18. Contribution of mammography to MRI screening in BRCA mutation carriers by BRCA status and age: individual patient data meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Phi, Xuan-Anh; Saadatmand, Sepideh; De Bock, Geertruida H; Warner, Ellen; Sardanelli, Francesco; Leach, Martin O; Riedl, Christopher C; Trop, Isabelle; Hooning, Maartje J; Mandel, Rodica; Santoro, Filippo; Kwan-Lim, Gek; Helbich, Thomas H; Tilanus-Linthorst, Madeleine M A; van den Heuvel, Edwin R; Houssami, Nehmat

    2016-03-15

    We investigated the additional contribution of mammography to screening accuracy in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers screened with MRI at different ages using individual patient data from six high-risk screening trials. Sensitivity and specificity of MRI, mammography and the combination of these tests were compared stratified for BRCA mutation and age using generalised linear mixed models with random effect for studies. Number of screens needed (NSN) for additional mammography-only detected cancer was estimated. In BRCA1/2 mutation carriers of all ages (BRCA1 = 1,219 and BRCA2 = 732), adding mammography to MRI did not significantly increase screening sensitivity (increased by 3.9% in BRCA1 and 12.6% in BRCA2 mutation carriers, P > 0.05). However, in women with BRCA2 mutation younger than 40 years, one-third of breast cancers were detected by mammography only. Number of screens needed for mammography to detect one breast cancer not detected by MRI was much higher for BRCA1 compared with BRCA2 mutation carriers at initial and repeat screening. Additional screening sensitivity from mammography above that from MRI is limited in BRCA1 mutation carriers, whereas mammography contributes to screening sensitivity in BRCA2 mutation carriers, especially those ⩽ 40 years. The evidence from our work highlights that a differential screening schedule by BRCA status is worth considering.

  19. Olaparib Approved for Breast Cancers with BRCA Gene Mutations

    Cancer.gov

    The Food and Drug Administration has approved olaparib (Lynparza®) to treat metastatic breast cancers that have inherited mutations in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes as well as a companion diagnostic test for selecting candidates for the therapy.

  20. Characterization of BRCA1 and BRCA2 variants in multi-ethnic Asian cohort from a Malaysian case-control study.

    PubMed

    Lai, Kah Nyin; Ho, Weang Kee; Kang, In Nee; Kang, Peter Choon Eng; Phuah, Sze Yee; Mariapun, Shivaani; Yip, Cheng-Har; Mohd Taib, Nur Aishah; Teo, Soo-Hwang

    2017-02-22

    Genetic testing for BRCA1 and BRCA2 has led to the accurate identification of individuals at higher risk of cancer and the development of new therapies. Approximately 10-20% of the genetic testing for BRCA1 and BRCA2 leads to the identification of variants of uncertain significance (VUS), with higher proportions in Asians. We investigated the functional significance of 7 BRCA1 and 25 BRCA2 variants in a multi-ethnic Asian cohort using a case-control approach. The MassARRAY genotyping was conducted in 1,394 Chinese, 406 Malay and 310 Indian breast cancer cases and 1,071 Chinese, 167 Malay and 255 Indian healthy controls. The association of individual variant with breast cancer risk was analyzed using logistic regression model adjusted for ethnicity, age and family history. Our study confirmed BRCA2 p.Ile3412Val is presented in >2% of unaffected women and is likely benign, and BRCA2 p.Ala1996Thr which is predicted to be likely pathogenic by in-silico models is presented in 2% of healthy Indian women suggesting that it may not be associated with breast cancer risk. Single-variant analysis suggests that BRCA1 p.Arg762Ser may be associated with breast cancer risk (OR = 7.4; 95% CI, 0.9-62.3; p = 0.06). Our study shows that BRCA2 p.Ile3412Val and p.Ala1996Thr are likely benign and highlights the need for population-specific studies to determine the likely functional significance of population-specific variants. Our study also suggests that BRCA1 p.Arg762Ser may be associated with increased risk of breast cancer but other methods or larger studies are required to determine a more precise estimate of breast cancer risk.

  1. The Potential Contribution of BRCA Mutations to Early Onset and Familial Breast Cancer in Uzbekistan.

    PubMed

    Abdikhakimov, Abdulla; Tukhtaboeva, Mukaddas; Adilov, Bakhtiyar; Turdikulova, Shahlo

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women and affects approximately 1 out of 8 females in the US. Risk of developing breast cancer is strongly influenced by genetic factors. Germ-line mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are associated with 5-10% of breast cancer incidence. To reduce the risk of developing cancer and to increase the likelihood of early detection, carriers of BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations are offered surveillance programs and effective preventive medical interventions. Identification of founder mutations of BRCA1/2 in high risk communities can have a significant impact on the management of hereditary cancer at the level of the national healthcare systems, making genetic testing more affordable and cost-effective. BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in breast cancer patients have not been characterized in the Uzbek population. This pilot study aimed to investigate the contribution of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation to early onset and familial cases of breast cancer in Uzbekistan. A total of 67 patients with breast cancer and 103 age-matched disease free controls were included in this study. Utilizing SYBR Green based real-time allele-specific PCR, we have analyzed DNA samples of patients with breast cancer and disease free controls to identify the following BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations: BRCA1 5382insC, BRCA1 4153delA, BRCA1 185delAG, BRCA1 300T>G, BRCA2 6174delT. Three unrelated samples (4.5%) were found to be positive for the heterozygous 5382insCBRCA1 mutation, representing a possible founder mutation in the Uzbek population, supporting the need for larger studies examining the contribution of this mutation to breast cancer incidence in Uzbekistan. We did not find BRCA1 4153delA, BRCA1 185delAG, BRCA1 300T>G, and BRCA2 6174delT mutations. This preliminary evidence suggests a potential contribution of BRCA1 5382insC mutation to breast cancer development in Uzbek population. Taking into account a high disease penetrance in carriers of BRCA1 mutation, it seems

  2. Consequences of germline variation disrupting the constitutional translational initiation codon start sites of MLH1 and BRCA2: use of potential alternative start sites and implications for predicting variant pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Michael T.; Whiley, Phillip J.; Beesley, Jonathan; Drost, Mark; de Wind, Niels; Thompson, Bryony A.; Marquart, Louise; Hopper, John L.; Jenkins, Mark A.; Brown, Melissa A.; Tucker, Kathy; Warwick, Linda; Buchanan, Daniel D.; Spurdle, Amanda B.

    2014-01-01

    Variants that disrupt the translation initiation sequences in cancer predisposition genes are generally assumed to be deleterious. However few studies have validated these assumptions with functional and clinical data. Two cancer syndrome gene variants likely to affect native translation initiation were identified by clinical genetic testing: MLH1:c.1A>G p.(Met1?) and BRCA2:c.67+3A>G. In vitro GFP-reporter assays were conducted to assess the consequences of translation initiation disruption on alternative downstream initiation codon usage. Analysis of MLH1:c.1A>G p.(Met1?) showed that translation was mostly initiated at an in-frame position 103 nucleotides downstream, but also at two ATG sequences downstream. The protein product encoded by the in-frame transcript initiating from position c.103 showed loss of in vitro mismatch repair activity comparable to known pathogenic mutations. BRCA2:c.67+3A>G was shown by mRNA analysis to result in an aberrantly spliced transcript deleting exon 2 and the consensus ATG site. In the absence of exon 2, translation initiated mostly at an out-of-frame ATG 323 nucleotides downstream, and to a lesser extent at an in-frame ATG 370 nucleotides downstream. Initiation from any of the downstream alternative sites tested in both genes would lead to loss of protein function, but further clinical data is required to confirm if these variants are associated with a high cancer risk. Importantly, our results highlight the need for caution in interpreting the functional and clinical consequences of variation that leads to disruption of the initiation codon, since translation may not necessarily occur from the first downstream alternative start site, or from a single alternative start site. PMID:24302565

  3. Cancer Risks Associated With Inherited Mutations in Ovarian Cancer Susceptibility Genes Beyond BRCA1 and BRCA2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-05-01

    TERMS Ovarian cancer, drug resistance, rucaparib, phase 2, DNA repair, homologous recombination, nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ), poly(ADP-ribose...tissues from AA patients with OC. This should add 50 AA OC patients. We are also requesting anonymized DNA from AA OC patients who participated on...extracts DNA and creates library pretps for DNA sequencing. He performs Sanger sequencing validations. Funding Support: Has there been a change

  4. Clinical and Functional Analyses of p73R1 Mutations in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-02-01

    mutations in several genes (BRCA 1, BRCA2, and CHEK2) whose products are involved in this pathway have been associated with increased risk for this...screened this gene for mutations in prostate cancer. Two germline truncating mutations were identified. Genotyping of 403 men with sporadic prostate...based on mutation screening of candidate genes involved in the DNA damage- signaling pathway. Genomic instability is a common feature of all human

  5. Comparison of Ion Personal Genome Machine Platforms for the Detection of Variants in BRCA1 and BRCA2.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Sang Mee; Lee, Ki Chan; Lee, Min Seob; Park, Kyoung Un

    2018-01-01

    Transition to next generation sequencing (NGS) for BRCA1 / BRCA2 analysis in clinical laboratories is ongoing but different platforms and/or data analysis pipelines give different results resulting in difficulties in implementation. We have evaluated the Ion Personal Genome Machine (PGM) Platforms (Ion PGM, Ion PGM Dx, Thermo Fisher Scientific) for the analysis of BRCA1 /2. The results of Ion PGM with OTG-snpcaller, a pipeline based on Torrent mapping alignment program and Genome Analysis Toolkit, from 75 clinical samples and 14 reference DNA samples were compared with Sanger sequencing for BRCA1 / BRCA2 . Ten clinical samples and 14 reference DNA samples were additionally sequenced by Ion PGM Dx with Torrent Suite. Fifty types of variants including 18 pathogenic or variants of unknown significance were identified from 75 clinical samples and known variants of the reference samples were confirmed by Sanger sequencing and/or NGS. One false-negative results were present for Ion PGM/OTG-snpcaller for an indel variant misidentified as a single nucleotide variant. However, eight discordant results were present for Ion PGM Dx/Torrent Suite with both false-positive and -negative results. A 40-bp deletion, a 4-bp deletion and a 1-bp deletion variant was not called and a false-positive deletion was identified. Four other variants were misidentified as another variant. Ion PGM/OTG-snpcaller showed acceptable performance with good concordance with Sanger sequencing. However, Ion PGM Dx/Torrent Suite showed many discrepant results not suitable for use in a clinical laboratory, requiring further optimization of the data analysis for calling variants.

  6. Frequency of pathogenic germline mutations in cancer susceptibility genes in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Raman Preet; Shafi, Gowhar; Benipal, Raja Paramjeet Singh; Munshi, Anjana

    2018-04-26

    In this study, we evaluated the incidence of pathogenic germline mutations in 30 breast cancer susceptibility genes in breast cancer patients. Our aim was to understand the involvement of the inherited mutations in these genes in a breast cancer cohort. Two hundred ninety-six female breast cancer patients including 4.5% of familial breast cancer cases were included in the study. 200 ng of genomic DNA was used to evaluate the pathogenic mutations, detected using Global Screening Array (GSA) microchip (Illumina Inc.) according to the manufacturer's instructions. The pathogenic frameshift and nonsense mutations were observed in BRCA2 (10.9%), MLH1 (58.6%), MTHFR (50%), MSH2 (14.2%), and CYTB (52%) genes. Familial breast cancer patients (4.5%) had variations in BRCA2, MLH1, MSH2, and CYTB genes. 28% of patients with metastasis, recurrence, and death harbored mono/biallelic alterations in MSH2, MLH1, and BRCA2 genes. The results of this study can guide to develop a panel to test the breast cancer patients for pathogenic mutations, from Malwa region of Punjab. The screening of MSH2, MLH1, and BRCA2 should be carried in individuals with or without family history of breast cancer as these genes have been reported to increase the cancer risk by tenfold.

  7. Asymptomatic bacteriuria in adults.

    PubMed

    Colgan, Richard; Nicolle, Lindsay E; McGlone, Andrew; Hooton, Thomas M

    2006-09-15

    A common dilemma in clinical medicine is whether to treat asymptomatic patients who present with bacteria in their urine. There are few scenarios in which antibiotic treatment of asymptomatic bacteruria has been shown to improve patient outcomes. Because of increasing antimicrobial resistance, it is important not to treat patients with asymptomatic bacteriuria unless there is evidence of potential benefit. Women who are pregnant should be screened for asymptomatic bacteriuria in the first trimester and treated, if positive. Treating asymptomatic bacteriuria in patients with diabetes, older persons, patients with or without indwelling catheters, or patients with spinal cord injuries has not been found to improve outcomes.

  8. A mutational signature in gastric cancer suggests therapeutic strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Nik-Zainal, Serena; Siu, Hoi Cheong

    Targeting defects in the DNA repair machinery of neoplastic cells, for example, those due to inactivating BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 mutations, has been used for developing new therapies in certain types of breast, ovarian and pancreatic cancers. Recently, a mutational signature was associated with failure of double-strand DNA break repair by homologous recombination based on its high mutational burden in samples harbouring BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations. In pancreatic cancer, all responders to platinum therapy exhibit this mutational signature including a sample that lacked any defects in BRCA1 or BRCA2. Here, we examine 10,250 cancer genomes across 36 types of cancer andmore » demonstrate that, in addition to breast, ovarian and pancreatic cancers, gastric cancer is another cancer type that exhibits this mutational signature. Furthermore, our results suggest that 7–12% of gastric cancers have defective double-strand DNA break repair by homologous recombination and may benefit from either platinum therapy or PARP inhibitors.« less

  9. A mutational signature in gastric cancer suggests therapeutic strategies

    DOE PAGES

    Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Nik-Zainal, Serena; Siu, Hoi Cheong; ...

    2015-10-29

    Targeting defects in the DNA repair machinery of neoplastic cells, for example, those due to inactivating BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 mutations, has been used for developing new therapies in certain types of breast, ovarian and pancreatic cancers. Recently, a mutational signature was associated with failure of double-strand DNA break repair by homologous recombination based on its high mutational burden in samples harbouring BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations. In pancreatic cancer, all responders to platinum therapy exhibit this mutational signature including a sample that lacked any defects in BRCA1 or BRCA2. Here, we examine 10,250 cancer genomes across 36 types of cancer andmore » demonstrate that, in addition to breast, ovarian and pancreatic cancers, gastric cancer is another cancer type that exhibits this mutational signature. Furthermore, our results suggest that 7–12% of gastric cancers have defective double-strand DNA break repair by homologous recombination and may benefit from either platinum therapy or PARP inhibitors.« less

  10. Asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Smaill, Fiona

    2007-06-01

    Screening for asymptomatic bacteriuria is a standard of obstetrical care and is included in most antenatal guidelines. There is good evidence that treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria will decrease the incidence of pyelonephritis. All pregnant women should be screened for asymptomatic bacteriuria, and there are no new data that would indicate otherwise. Antibiotic treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria is associated with a decrease in the incidence of preterm delivery or low birth weight, but the methodological quality of the studies means any conclusion about the strength of this association needs to be drawn cautiously. A better understanding of the mechanism by which treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria could prevent preterm delivery is needed. While several rapid screening tests have been evaluated, none perform adequately to replace urine culture for detecting asymptomatic bacteriuria. Until there are data from well-designed trials that establish the optimal duration of therapy for asymptomatic bacteriuria, standard treatment courses are recommended.

  11. Mutation analysis of BRCA1/2 mutations with special reference to polymorphic SNPs in Indian breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Shah, Nidhi D; Shah, Parth S; Panchal, Yash Y; Katudia, Kalpesh H; Khatri, Nikunj B; Ray, Hari Shankar P; Bhatiya, Upti R; Shah, Sandip C; Shah, Bhavini S; Rao, Mandava V

    2018-01-01

    Germline mutations BRCA1 and BRCA2 contribute almost equally in the causation of breast cancer (BC). The type of mutations in the Indian population that cause this condition is largely unknown. In this cohort, 79 randomized BC patients were screened for various types of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations including frameshift, nonsense, missense, in-frame and splice site types. The purified extracted DNA of each referral patient was subjected to Sanger gene sequencing using Codon Code Analyzer and Mutation Surveyor and next-generation sequencing (NGS) methods with Ion torrent software, after appropriate care. The data revealed that 35 cases were positive for BRCA1 or BRCA2 (35/79: 44.3%). BRCA2 mutations were higher (52.4%) than BRCA1 mutations (47.6%). Five novel mutations detected in this study were p.pro163 frameshift, p.asn997 frameshift, p.ser148 frameshift and two splice site single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Additionally, four nonsense and one in-frame deletion were identified, which all seemed to be pathogenic. Polymorphic SNPs contributed the highest percentage of mutations (72/82: 87.8%) and contributed to pathogenic, likely pathogenic, likely benign, benign and variant of unknown significance (VUS). Young age groups (20-60 years) had a high frequency of germline mutations (62/82;75.6%) in the Indian population. This study suggested that polymorphic SNPs contributed a high percentage of mutations along with five novel types. Younger age groups are prone to having BC with a higher mutational rate. Furthermore, the SNPs detected in exons 10, 11 and 16 of BRCA1 and BRCA2 were higher than those in other exons 2, 3 and 9 polymorphic sites in two germline genes. These may be contributory for BC although missense types are known to be susceptible for cancer depending on the type of amino acid replaced in the protein and associated with pathologic events. Accordingly, appropriate counseling and treatment may be suggested.

  12. Comparison of locus-specific databases for BRCA1 and BRCA2 variants reveals disparity in variant classification within and among databases.

    PubMed

    Vail, Paris J; Morris, Brian; van Kan, Aric; Burdett, Brianna C; Moyes, Kelsey; Theisen, Aaron; Kerr, Iain D; Wenstrup, Richard J; Eggington, Julie M

    2015-10-01

    Genetic variants of uncertain clinical significance (VUSs) are a common outcome of clinical genetic testing. Locus-specific variant databases (LSDBs) have been established for numerous disease-associated genes as a research tool for the interpretation of genetic sequence variants to facilitate variant interpretation via aggregated data. If LSDBs are to be used for clinical practice, consistent and transparent criteria regarding the deposition and interpretation of variants are vital, as variant classifications are often used to make important and irreversible clinical decisions. In this study, we performed a retrospective analysis of 2017 consecutive BRCA1 and BRCA2 genetic variants identified from 24,650 consecutive patient samples referred to our laboratory to establish an unbiased dataset representative of the types of variants seen in the US patient population, submitted by clinicians and researchers for BRCA1 and BRCA2 testing. We compared the clinical classifications of these variants among five publicly accessible BRCA1 and BRCA2 variant databases: BIC, ClinVar, HGMD (paid version), LOVD, and the UMD databases. Our results show substantial disparity of variant classifications among publicly accessible databases. Furthermore, it appears that discrepant classifications are not the result of a single outlier but widespread disagreement among databases. This study also shows that databases sometimes favor a clinical classification when current best practice guidelines (ACMG/AMP/CAP) would suggest an uncertain classification. Although LSDBs have been well established for research applications, our results suggest several challenges preclude their wider use in clinical practice.

  13. Spontaneous asymptomatic gallbladder perforation

    PubMed Central

    Seçil, Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    Gallstone disease is common. However, a proportion of patients are asymptomatic and remain undiagnosed until the occurrence of complications. Common complications include acute cholecystitis, biliary obstruction, acute pancreatitis and cholangitis. Severe complications include gallbladder perforation, Mirizzi syndrome and fistula formation are usually associated with significant morbidity and mortality. We report a case of asymptomatic spotaneous gallbladder perforation due to acute cholecystitis. PMID:24914424

  14. Cisplatin With or Without Veliparib in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Triple-Negative and/or BRCA Mutation-Associated Breast Cancer With or Without Brain Metastases

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2018-06-26

    Breast Carcinoma Metastatic in the Brain; Deleterious BRCA1 Gene Mutation; Deleterious BRCA2 Gene Mutation; Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IV Breast Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  15. [Asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Caputo, S; Ciardo, A

    2001-01-01

    Pregnancy is a predisposing factor for urinary tract infection and pregnant women suffering from this pathology are exposed to dangerous risks which may condition maternal wellbeing and fetal prognosis. Asymptomatic bacteriuria is the common bacterial infection requiring medical treatment in pregnancy. Diagnosis and treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria is important as approximately 20-40% of these women, if untreated during pregnancy, will develop a symptomatic urinary tract infection.

  16. Asymptomatic bacteriuria during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Sheiner, Eyal; Mazor-Drey, Efrat; Levy, Amalia

    2009-05-01

    The present study was aimed to test the association between asymptomatic bacteriuria during pregnancy, among patients in whom antibiotic treatment was recommended, and perinatal outcome. Our study was also designed to characterize common bacteria and risk factors associated with asymptomatic bacteriuria during pregnancy. A retrospective population-based study comparing all singleton pregnancies of women with and asymptomatic bacteriuria was conducted. Patients with urinary tract infection were excluded from the analysis. Multiple logistic regression model was used to control for confounders. Out of 199,093 deliveries, 2.5% (n = 4890) were in patients with asymptomatic bacteriuria. E. coli was the most common pathogen associated with asymptomatic bacteriuria, representing 78.6% of the cultures with specified growth. Patients with asymptomatic bacteriuria were more likely to deliver preterm (PTD, 13.3%vs. 7.6%, odd ratio (OR) = 1.9, 95% confidence interval CI 1.7-2.0; P < 0.001) and deliver low birth-weight neonates (<2500 g, 13.3%vs. 7.9%, OR = 1.8; 95% CI 1.6-2.0; P < 0.001). Asymptomatic bacteriuria was independently associated with PTD (adjusted OR = 1.6; 95% CI 1.5-1.7; P < 0.001), fertility treatments, hypertensive disorders, recurrent abortions, diabetes mellitus, intrauterine growth restriction, polyhydramnion and oligohydramnion, premature rupture of membranes and labour induction, in a multivariable analysis with backwards elimination. Perinatal mortality rates (1.5%vs. 1.4%; P = 0.707) as well as low 5 min Apgar scores (0.8%vs. 0.6%; P = 0.065) were comparable between the groups. Asymptomatic bacteriuria is an independent risk factor for preterm delivery.

  17. Influence of tumour suppressor gene (TP53, BRCA1 and BRCA2) polymorphisms on polycystic ovary syndrome in South Indian women.

    PubMed

    Siddamalla, Swapna; Reddy, Tumu Venkat; Govatati, Suresh; Guruvaiah, Praveen; Deenadayal, Mamata; Shivaji, Sisinthy; Bhanoori, Manjula

    2018-05-24

    Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) is a heterogeneous multifactorial endocrine metabolic disorder. In addition to hyperandrogenism, acne, hirsutism, obesity, oligoanovulation and infertility, insulin resistance is also a common feature in women of PCOS. Tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) perform essential function in the maintenance of genomic stability and regulatory pathways influencing the activity of several replication and transcription factors. The main aim of this study was to investigate the association of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms of TP53, BRCA1and BRCA2 genes with the susceptibility to PCOS in South Indian women. Present study investigated association between TP53 gene (rs1042522 G/C), BRCA1 (rs71361504 -/GTT, rs3092986 T/C) and BRCA2 (rs206118 A/G) and, SNPs and PCOS risk. Genotyping of TSGs was carried out on DNA from PCOS patients (n = 110) and controls (n = 130) of South Indian origin by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and confirmed by sequencing analysis. The genotype frequency and allele distributions of cases and controls were analyzed using Fisher's exact test. Haplotype frequencies for multiple loci and the standardized disequilibrium coefficient (D') for pair wise linkage disequilibrium (LD) were assessed by Haploview Software. Significant increase in frequencies ofTP53 (rs1042522 G/C), BRCA1 (rs71361504 -/GTT, rs3092986 T/C) genotypes and alleles in patients compared to controls. In addition, the frequency of the C/T (P = 0.002) and A/C (P = 0.012) haplotype was also significantly elevated in patients. But BRCA2 (rs206118 A/G) did not show significant association with PCOS. The TP53 and BRCA1 may constitute an inheritable risk factor for PCOS in South Indian women. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Key messages for communicating information about BRCA1 and BRCA2 to women with breast or ovarian cancer: Consensus across health professionals and service users.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Chris; Pichert, Gabriella; Harris, Jackie; Tucker, Kathy; Michie, Susan

    2017-11-01

    Genetic testing of cancer predisposing genes will increasingly be needed in oncology clinics to target cancer treatment. This Delphi study aimed to identify areas of agreement and disagreement between genetics and oncology health professionals and service users about the key messages required by women with breast/ovarian cancer who undergo BRCA1/BRCA2 genetic testing and the optimal timing of communicating key messages. Participants were 16 expert health professionals specialising in oncology/genetics and 16 service users with breast/ovarian cancer and a pathogenic BRCA1/BRCA2 variant. Online questionnaires containing 53 inductively developed information messages were circulated to the groups separately. Participants rated each message as key/not key on a Likert scale and suggested additional messages. Questionnaires were modified according to the feedback and up to 3 rounds were circulated. Consensus was reached when there was ≥75% agreement. Thirty key messages were agreed by both groups with 7 of the key messages agreed by ≥95% of participants: dominant inheritance, the availability of predictive testing, the importance of pretest discussion, increased risk of breast and ovarian cancer, and the option of risk-reducing mastectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy. Both groups agreed that key messages should be communicated before genetic testing and once a pathogenic variant has been identified. There was a high level of agreement within and between the groups about the information requirements of women with breast/ovarian cancer about BRCA1/BRCA2. These key messages will be helpful in developing new approaches to the delivery of information as genetic testing becomes further integrated into mainstream oncology services. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. BRCA 1 & 2 mutations in Sudanese secondary school girls with known breast cancer in their families

    PubMed Central

    Elnour, Ahmed M; Elderdery, Abozer Y; Mills, Jeremy; Mohammed, Babiker A; ElbietAbdelaal, Daw; Mohamed, Abdelraheem Osman; Elhassan, Kamal Eldin H; A, Abdel Hady; Wahab, Abdel; Cooper, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Objective Breast cancer is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in women worldwide. In Sudan, it is the most commonly diagnosed cancer. This study assesses the prevalence of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations among female students with a family history of breast cancer, in secondary schools of Marawi Locality, Northern State, Sudan. Methods From a survey of 2370 students, 67 cases (47 with family history and 20 controls) were analyzed for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations with a single-stranded conformation polymorphism (SSCP) mutation detection method applied to peripheral blood. Eighteen subjects knew of first degree female relatives with breast cancer, 23 with second degree female family members affected and 6 with related male sufferers. Twenty randomly selected girls from the remainder of the survey population with no known family history were also tested. Results The breast cancer susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 accounted, respectively, for 1.21% of responders or 51% of those claiming a family history. Mutations were found in 20% of the group selected with no family history. Only 2 BRCA 2 mutations were found, both in girls with no known afflicted relatives. Six girls knew of male relatives with breast cancer; five of these girls carried mutant BRCA 1. Most of the BRCA1- mutations located to exon 11 fragments 11.9 and 11.1. Conclusion The study indicates a high prevalence of genetically associated breast cancer in the Marawi locality suggesting a need to focus on the two mutation sites in developing screening protocols for at least this area of Sudan. PMID:23267305

  20. Data sharing as a national quality improvement program: reporting on BRCA1 and BRCA2 variant-interpretation comparisons through the Canadian Open Genetics Repository (COGR).

    PubMed

    Lebo, Matthew S; Zakoor, Kathleen-Rose; Chun, Kathy; Speevak, Marsha D; Waye, John S; McCready, Elizabeth; Parboosingh, Jillian S; Lamont, Ryan E; Feilotter, Harriet; Bosdet, Ian; Tucker, Tracy; Young, Sean; Karsan, Aly; Charames, George S; Agatep, Ronald; Spriggs, Elizabeth L; Chisholm, Caitlin; Vasli, Nasim; Daoud, Hussein; Jarinova, Olga; Tomaszewski, Robert; Hume, Stacey; Taylor, Sherryl; Akbari, Mohammad R; Lerner-Ellis, Jordan

    2018-03-01

    PurposeThe purpose of this study was to develop a national program for Canadian diagnostic laboratories to compare DNA-variant interpretations and resolve discordant-variant classifications using the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes as a case study.MethodsBRCA1 and BRCA2 variant data were uploaded and shared through the Canadian Open Genetics Repository (COGR; http://www.opengenetics.ca). A total of 5,554 variant observations were submitted; classification differences were identified and comparison reports were sent to participating laboratories. Each site had the opportunity to reclassify variants. The data were analyzed before and after the comparison report process to track concordant- or discordant-variant classifications by three different models.ResultsVariant-discordance rates varied by classification model: 38.9% of variants were discordant when using a five-tier model, 26.7% with a three-tier model, and 5.0% with a two-tier model. After the comparison report process, the proportion of discordant variants dropped to 30.7% with the five-tier model, to 14.2% with the three-tier model, and to 0.9% using the two-tier model.ConclusionWe present a Canadian interinstitutional quality improvement program for DNA-variant interpretations. Sharing of variant knowledge by clinical diagnostic laboratories will allow clinicians and patients to make more informed decisions and lead to better patient outcomes.

  1. BRCA Mutations, DNA Repair Deficiency, and Ovarian Aging1

    PubMed Central

    Oktay, Kutluk; Turan, Volkan; Titus, Shiny; Stobezki, Robert; Liu, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Oocyte aging has a significant impact on reproductive outcomes both quantitatively and qualitatively. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the age-related decline in reproductive success have not been fully addressed. BRCA is known to be involved in homologous DNA recombination and plays an essential role in double-strand DNA break repair. Given the growing body of laboratory and clinical evidence, we performed a systematic review on the current understanding of the role of DNA repair in human reproduction. We find that BRCA mutations negatively affect ovarian reserve based on convincing evidence from in vitro and in vivo results and prospective studies. Because decline in the function of the intact gene occurs at an earlier age, women with BRCA1 mutations exhibit accelerated ovarian aging, unlike those with BRCA2 mutations. However, because of the still robust function of the intact allele in younger women and because of the masking of most severe cases by prophylactic oophorectomy or cancer, it is less likely one would see an effect of BRCA mutations on fertility until later in reproductive age. The impact of BRCA2 mutations on reproductive function may be less visible because of the delayed decline in the function of normal BRCA2 allele. BRCA1 function and ataxia-telangiectasia-mutated (ATM)-mediated DNA repair may also be important in the pathogenesis of age-induced increase in aneuploidy. BRCA1 is required for meiotic spindle assembly, and cohesion function between sister chromatids is also regulated by ATM family member proteins. Taken together, these findings strongly suggest the implication of BRCA and DNA repair malfunction in ovarian aging. PMID:26224004

  2. Detection of inherited mutations for breast and ovarian cancer using genomic capture and massively parallel sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Tom; Lee, Ming K.; Casadei, Silvia; Thornton, Anne M.; Stray, Sunday M.; Pennil, Christopher; Nord, Alex S.; Mandell, Jessica B.; Swisher, Elizabeth M.; King, Mary-Claire

    2010-01-01

    Inherited loss-of-function mutations in the tumor suppressor genes BRCA1, BRCA2, and multiple other genes predispose to high risks of breast and/or ovarian cancer. Cancer-associated inherited mutations in these genes are collectively quite common, but individually rare or even private. Genetic testing for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations has become an integral part of clinical practice, but testing is generally limited to these two genes and to women with severe family histories of breast or ovarian cancer. To determine whether massively parallel, “next-generation” sequencing would enable accurate, thorough, and cost-effective identification of inherited mutations for breast and ovarian cancer, we developed a genomic assay to capture, sequence, and detect all mutations in 21 genes, including BRCA1 and BRCA2, with inherited mutations that predispose to breast or ovarian cancer. Constitutional genomic DNA from subjects with known inherited mutations, ranging in size from 1 to >100,000 bp, was hybridized to custom oligonucleotides and then sequenced using a genome analyzer. Analysis was carried out blind to the mutation in each sample. Average coverage was >1200 reads per base pair. After filtering sequences for quality and number of reads, all single-nucleotide substitutions, small insertion and deletion mutations, and large genomic duplications and deletions were detected. There were zero false-positive calls of nonsense mutations, frameshift mutations, or genomic rearrangements for any gene in any of the test samples. This approach enables widespread genetic testing and personalized risk assessment for breast and ovarian cancer. PMID:20616022

  3. BRCA1 mutation carriers have a lower number of mature oocytes after ovarian stimulation for IVF/PGD.

    PubMed

    Derks-Smeets, I A P; van Tilborg, T C; van Montfoort, A; Smits, L; Torrance, H L; Meijer-Hoogeveen, M; Broekmans, F; Dreesen, J C F M; Paulussen, A D C; Tjan-Heijnen, V C G; Homminga, I; van den Berg, M M J; Ausems, M G E M; de Rycke, M; de Die-Smulders, C E M; Verpoest, W; van Golde, R

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether BRCA1/2 mutation carriers produce fewer mature oocytes after ovarian stimulation for in vitro fertilization (IVF) with preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD), in comparison to a PGD control group. A retrospective, international, multicenter cohort study was performed on data of first PGD cycles performed between January 2006 and September 2015. Data were extracted from medical files. The study was performed in one PGD center and three affiliated IVF centers in the Netherlands and one PGD center in Belgium. Exposed couples underwent PGD because of a pathogenic BRCA1/2 mutation, controls for other monogenic conditions. Only couples treated in a long gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist-suppressive protocol, stimulated with at least 150 IU follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), were included. Women suspected to have a diminished ovarian reserve status due to chemotherapy, auto-immune disorders, or genetic conditions (other than BRCA1/2 mutations) were excluded. A total of 106 BRCA1/2 mutation carriers underwent PGD in this period, of which 43 (20 BRCA1 and 23 BRCA2 mutation carriers) met the inclusion criteria. They were compared to 174 controls selected by frequency matching. Thirty-eight BRCA1/2 mutation carriers (18 BRCA1 and 20 BRCA2 mutation carriers) and 154 controls proceeded to oocyte pickup. The median number of mature oocytes was 7.0 (interquartile range (IQR) 4.0-9.0) in the BRCA group as a whole, 6.5 (IQR 4.0-8.0) in BRCA1 mutation carriers, 7.5 (IQR 5.5-9.0) in BRCA2 mutation carriers, and 8.0 (IQR 6.0-11.0) in controls. Multiple linear regression analysis with the number of mature oocytes as a dependent variable and adjustment for treatment center, female age, female body mass index (BMI), type of gonadotropin used, and the total dose of gonadotropins administered revealed a significantly lower yield of mature oocytes in the BRCA group as compared to controls (p = 0.04). This finding could be fully

  4. Landscape of somatic mutations in 560 breast cancer whole genome sequences

    PubMed Central

    Nik-Zainal, Serena; Davies, Helen; Staaf, Johan; Ramakrishna, Manasa; Glodzik, Dominik; Zou, Xueqing; Martincorena, Inigo; Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Martin, Sancha; Wedge, David C.; Van Loo, Peter; Ju, Young Seok; Smid, Marcel; Brinkman, Arie B; Morganella, Sandro; Aure, Miriam R.; Lingjærde, Ole Christian; Langerød, Anita; Ringnér, Markus; Ahn, Sung-Min; Boyault, Sandrine; Brock, Jane E.; Broeks, Annegien; Butler, Adam; Desmedt, Christine; Dirix, Luc; Dronov, Serge; Fatima, Aquila; Foekens, John A.; Gerstung, Moritz; Hooijer, Gerrit KJ; Jang, Se Jin; Jones, David R.; Kim, Hyung-Yong; King, Tari A.; Krishnamurthy, Savitri; Lee, Hee Jin; Lee, Jeong-Yeon; Li, Yilong; McLaren, Stuart; Menzies, Andrew; Mustonen, Ville; O’Meara, Sarah; Pauporté, Iris; Pivot, Xavier; Purdie, Colin A.; Raine, Keiran; Ramakrishnan, Kamna; Rodríguez-González, F. Germán; Romieu, Gilles; Sieuwerts, Anieta M.; Simpson, Peter T; Shepherd, Rebecca; Stebbings, Lucy; Stefansson, Olafur A; Teague, Jon; Tommasi, Stefania; Treilleux, Isabelle; Van den Eynden, Gert G.; Vermeulen, Peter; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Yates, Lucy; Caldas, Carlos; van’t Veer, Laura; Tutt, Andrew; Knappskog, Stian; Tan, Benita Kiat Tee; Jonkers, Jos; Borg, Åke; Ueno, Naoto T; Sotiriou, Christos; Viari, Alain; Futreal, P. Andrew; Campbell, Peter J; Span, Paul N.; Van Laere, Steven; Lakhani, Sunil R; Eyfjord, Jorunn E.; Thompson, Alastair M.; Birney, Ewan; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G; van de Vijver, Marc J; Martens, John W.M.; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Richardson, Andrea L.; Kong, Gu; Thomas, Gilles; Stratton, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    We analysed whole genome sequences of 560 breast cancers to advance understanding of the driver mutations conferring clonal advantage and the mutational processes generating somatic mutations. 93 protein-coding cancer genes carried likely driver mutations. Some non-coding regions exhibited high mutation frequencies but most have distinctive structural features probably causing elevated mutation rates and do not harbour driver mutations. Mutational signature analysis was extended to genome rearrangements and revealed 12 base substitution and six rearrangement signatures. Three rearrangement signatures, characterised by tandem duplications or deletions, appear associated with defective homologous recombination based DNA repair: one with deficient BRCA1 function; another with deficient BRCA1 or BRCA2 function; the cause of the third is unknown. This analysis of all classes of somatic mutation across exons, introns and intergenic regions highlights the repertoire of cancer genes and mutational processes operative, and progresses towards a comprehensive account of the somatic genetic basis of breast cancer. PMID:27135926

  5. Asymptomatic proteinuria. Clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Papper, S

    1977-09-01

    Patients with asymptomatic proteinuria have varied reasons for the proteinuria and travel diverse courses. In the individual with normal renal function and no systemic cause, ie, idiopathic asymptomatic proteinuria, the outlook is generally favorable. Microscopic hematuria probably raises some degree of question about prognosis. The kidney shows normal glomeruli, subtle changes, or an identifiable lesion. The initial approach includes a clinical and laboratory search for systemic disease, repeated urinalyses, quantitative measurements of proteinuria, determination of creatinine clearance, protein electrophoresis where indicated, and intravenous pyelography. The need for regularly scheduled follow-up evaluation is emphasized. Although the initial approach need not include renal biopsy, a decline in creatinine clearance, an increase in proteinuria, or both are indications for biopsy and consideration of drug therapy.

  6. BRCA1 Mutation Status and Follicular Fluid Exposure Alters NFκB Signaling and ISGylation in Human Fallopian Tube Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Hollingsworth, Julia; Lau, Angela; Tone, Alicia; Kollara, Alexandra; Allen, Lisa; Colgan, Terence J; Dube, Valerie; Rosen, Barry; Murphy, K Joan; Greenblatt, Ellen M; Feigenberg, Tomer; Virtanen, Carl; Brown, Theodore J

    2018-05-28

    Germline BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations (mtBRCA1 and mtBRCA2) increase risk for high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC), the most commonly diagnosed epithelial ovarian cancer histotype. Other identified risk factors for this cancer, which originates primarily in the distal fallopian tube epithelium (FTE), implicate ovulation, during which the FTE cells become transiently exposed to follicular fluid (FF). To test whether mtBRCA1 or mtBRCA2 nonmalignant FTE cells respond differently to periovulatory FF exposure than control patient FTE cells, gene expression profiles from primary FTE cultures derived from BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers or control patients were compared at baseline, 24 hours after FF exposure, and 24 hours after FF replacement with culture medium. Hierarchical clustering revealed both FF exposure and BRCA mutation status affect gene expression, with BRCA1 mutation having the greatest impact. Gene set enrichment analysis revealed increased NFκB and EGFR signaling at baseline in mtBRCA1 samples, with increased interferon target gene expression, including members of the ISGylation pathway, observed after recovery from FF exposure. Gene set enrichment analysis did not identify altered pathway signaling in mtBRCA2 samples. An inverse relationship between EGFR signaling and ISGylation with BRCA1 protein levels was verified in an immortalized FTE cell line, OE-E6/E7, stably transfected with BRCA1 cDNA. Suppression of ISG15 and ISGylated protein levels by increased BRCA1 expression was found to be mediated by decreased NFκB signaling. These studies indicate that increased NFκB signaling associated with decreased BRCA1 expression results in increased ISG15 and protein ISGylation following FF exposure, which may be involved in predisposition to HGSOC. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Identification of novel BRCA founder mutations in Middle Eastern breast cancer patients using capture and Sanger sequencing analysis.

    PubMed

    Bu, Rong; Siraj, Abdul K; Al-Obaisi, Khadija A S; Beg, Shaham; Al Hazmi, Mohsen; Ajarim, Dahish; Tulbah, Asma; Al-Dayel, Fouad; Al-Kuraya, Khawla S

    2016-09-01

    Ethnic differences of breast cancer genomics have prompted us to investigate the spectra of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in different populations. The prevalence and effect of BRCA 1 and BRCA 2 mutations in Middle Eastern population is not fully explored. To characterize the prevalence of BRCA mutations in Middle Eastern breast cancer patients, BRCA mutation screening was performed in 818 unselected breast cancer patients using Capture and/or Sanger sequencing. 19 short tandem repeat (STR) markers were used for founder mutation analysis. In our study, nine different types of deleterious mutation were identified in 28 (3.4%) cases, 25 (89.3%) cases in BRCA 1 and 3 (10.7%) cases in BRCA 2. Seven recurrent mutations identified accounted for 92.9% (26/28) of all the mutant cases. Haplotype analysis was performed to confirm c.1140 dupG and c.4136_4137delCT mutations as novel putative founder mutation, accounting for 46.4% (13/28) of all BRCA mutant cases and 1.6% (13/818) of all the breast cancer cases, respectively. Moreover, BRCA 1 mutation was significantly associated with BRCA 1 protein expression loss (p = 0.0005). Our finding revealed that a substantial number of BRCA mutations were identified in clinically high risk breast cancer from Middle East region. Identification of the mutation spectrum, prevalence and founder effect in Middle Eastern population facilitates genetic counseling, risk assessment and development of cost-effective screening strategy. © 2016 UICC.

  8. Assessing Associations between the AURKA-HMMR-TPX2-TUBG1 Functional Module and Breast Cancer Risk in BRCA1/2 Mutation Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Blanco, Ignacio; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline; Cuadras, Daniel; Wang, Xianshu; Barrowdale, Daniel; de Garibay, Gorka Ruiz; Librado, Pablo; Sánchez-Gracia, Alejandro; Rozas, Julio; Bonifaci, Núria; McGuffog, Lesley; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Islam, Abul; Mateo, Francesca; Berenguer, Antoni; Petit, Anna; Català, Isabel; Brunet, Joan; Feliubadaló, Lidia; Tornero, Eva; Benítez, Javier; Osorio, Ana; Cajal, Teresa Ramón y; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Arun, Banu K.; Toland, Amanda E.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Walsh, Christine; Lester, Jenny; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Nussbaum, Robert L.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Barkardottir, Rosa B.; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Claes, Kathleen; Van Maerken, Tom; Díez, Orland; Hansen, Thomas V.; Jønson, Lars; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ejlertsen, Bent; de la Hoya, Miguel; Caldés, Trinidad; Dunning, Alison M.; Oliver, Clare; Fineberg, Elena; Cook, Margaret; Peock, Susan; McCann, Emma; Murray, Alex; Jacobs, Chris; Pichert, Gabriella; Lalloo, Fiona; Chu, Carol; Dorkins, Huw; Paterson, Joan; Ong, Kai-Ren; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; van der Hout, Annemarie H.; Seynaeve, Caroline; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J. L.; Devilee, Peter; Wijnen, Juul T.; Rookus, Matti A.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; Blok, Marinus J.; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; Aalfs, Cora M.; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Phillips, Kelly-Anne A.; Piedmonte, Marion; Nerenstone, Stacy R.; Bae-Jump, Victoria L.; O'Malley, David M.; Ratner, Elena S.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Rhiem, Kerstin; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Plendl, Hansjoerg J.; Niederacher, Dieter; Sutter, Christian; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Steinemann, Doris; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Kast, Karin; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Gehrig, Andrea; Bojesen, Anders; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Sunde, Lone; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Thomassen, Mads; Kruse, Torben A.; Foretova, Lenka; Peterlongo, Paolo; Bernard, Loris; Peissel, Bernard; Scuvera, Giulietta; Manoukian, Siranoush; Radice, Paolo; Ottini, Laura; Montagna, Marco; Agata, Simona; Maugard, Christine; Simard, Jacques; Soucy, Penny; Berger, Andreas; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Singer, Christian F.; Rappaport, Christine; Geschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Pfeiler, Georg; John, Esther M.; Miron, Alex; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Terry, Mary Beth; Chung, Wendy K.; Daly, Mary B.; Goldgar, David E.; Janavicius, Ramunas; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; van Rensburg, Elisabeth J.; Fostira, Florentia; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Garber, Judy; Godwin, Andrew K.; Olah, Edith; Narod, Steven A.; Rennert, Gad; Paluch, Shani Shimon; Laitman, Yael; Friedman, Eitan; Liljegren, Annelie; Rantala, Johanna; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Loman, Niklas; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Hamann, Ute; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Healey, Sue; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Herzog, Josef; Margileth, David; Gorrini, Chiara; Esteller, Manel; Gómez, Antonio; Sayols, Sergi; Vidal, Enrique; Heyn, Holger; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Léoné, Melanie; Barjhoux, Laure; Fassy-Colcombet, Marion; de Pauw, Antoine; Lasset, Christine; Ferrer, Sandra Fert; Castera, Laurent; Berthet, Pascaline; Cornelis, François; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Damiola, Francesca; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Maxwell, Christopher A.; Vijai, Joseph; Robson, Mark; Kauff, Noah; Corines, Marina J.; Villano, Danylko; Cunningham, Julie; Lee, Adam; Lindor, Noralane; Lázaro, Conxi; Easton, Douglas F.; Offit, Kenneth; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Couch, Fergus J.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Pujana, Miguel Angel

    2015-01-01

    While interplay between BRCA1 and AURKA-RHAMM-TPX2-TUBG1 regulates mammary epithelial polarization, common genetic variation in HMMR (gene product RHAMM) may be associated with risk of breast cancer in BRCA1 mutation carriers. Following on these observations, we further assessed the link between the AURKA-HMMR-TPX2-TUBG1 functional module and risk of breast cancer in BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. Forty-one single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped in 15,252 BRCA1 and 8,211 BRCA2 mutation carriers and subsequently analyzed using a retrospective likelihood approach. The association of HMMR rs299290 with breast cancer risk in BRCA1 mutation carriers was confirmed: per-allele hazard ratio (HR) = 1.10, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.04 – 1.15, p = 1.9 x 10−4 (false discovery rate (FDR)-adjusted p = 0.043). Variation in CSTF1, located next to AURKA, was also found to be associated with breast cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers: rs2426618 per-allele HR = 1.10, 95% CI 1.03 – 1.16, p = 0.005 (FDR-adjusted p = 0.045). Assessment of pairwise interactions provided suggestions (FDR-adjusted pinteraction values > 0.05) for deviations from the multiplicative model for rs299290 and CSTF1 rs6064391, and rs299290 and TUBG1 rs11649877 in both BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Following these suggestions, the expression of HMMR and AURKA or TUBG1 in sporadic breast tumors was found to potentially interact, influencing patients’ survival. Together, the results of this study support the hypothesis of a causative link between altered function of AURKA-HMMR-TPX2-TUBG1 and breast carcinogenesis in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. PMID:25830658

  9. Assessing associations between the AURKA-HMMR-TPX2-TUBG1 functional module and breast cancer risk in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Ignacio; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline; Cuadras, Daniel; Wang, Xianshu; Barrowdale, Daniel; de Garibay, Gorka Ruiz; Librado, Pablo; Sánchez-Gracia, Alejandro; Rozas, Julio; Bonifaci, Núria; McGuffog, Lesley; Pankratz, Vernon S; Islam, Abul; Mateo, Francesca; Berenguer, Antoni; Petit, Anna; Català, Isabel; Brunet, Joan; Feliubadaló, Lidia; Tornero, Eva; Benítez, Javier; Osorio, Ana; Ramón y Cajal, Teresa; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Arun, Banu K; Toland, Amanda E; Karlan, Beth Y; Walsh, Christine; Lester, Jenny; Greene, Mark H; Mai, Phuong L; Nussbaum, Robert L; Andrulis, Irene L; Domchek, Susan M; Nathanson, Katherine L; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Barkardottir, Rosa B; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Claes, Kathleen; Van Maerken, Tom; Díez, Orland; Hansen, Thomas V; Jønson, Lars; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ejlertsen, Bent; de la Hoya, Miguel; Caldés, Trinidad; Dunning, Alison M; Oliver, Clare; Fineberg, Elena; Cook, Margaret; Peock, Susan; McCann, Emma; Murray, Alex; Jacobs, Chris; Pichert, Gabriella; Lalloo, Fiona; Chu, Carol; Dorkins, Huw; Paterson, Joan; Ong, Kai-Ren; Teixeira, Manuel R; Hogervorst, Frans B L; van der Hout, Annemarie H; Seynaeve, Caroline; van der Luijt, Rob B; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J L; Devilee, Peter; Wijnen, Juul T; Rookus, Matti A; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E J; Blok, Marinus J; van den Ouweland, Ans M W; Aalfs, Cora M; Rodriguez, Gustavo C; Phillips, Kelly-Anne A; Piedmonte, Marion; Nerenstone, Stacy R; Bae-Jump, Victoria L; O'Malley, David M; Ratner, Elena S; Schmutzler, Rita K; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Rhiem, Kerstin; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Plendl, Hansjoerg J; Niederacher, Dieter; Sutter, Christian; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Steinemann, Doris; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Kast, Karin; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Gehrig, Andrea; Bojesen, Anders; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Sunde, Lone; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Thomassen, Mads; Kruse, Torben A; Foretova, Lenka; Peterlongo, Paolo; Bernard, Loris; Peissel, Bernard; Scuvera, Giulietta; Manoukian, Siranoush; Radice, Paolo; Ottini, Laura; Montagna, Marco; Agata, Simona; Maugard, Christine; Simard, Jacques; Soucy, Penny; Berger, Andreas; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Singer, Christian F; Rappaport, Christine; Geschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Pfeiler, Georg; John, Esther M; Miron, Alex; Neuhausen, Susan L; Terry, Mary Beth; Chung, Wendy K; Daly, Mary B; Goldgar, David E; Janavicius, Ramunas; Dorfling, Cecilia M; van Rensburg, Elisabeth J; Fostira, Florentia; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Garber, Judy; Godwin, Andrew K; Olah, Edith; Narod, Steven A; Rennert, Gad; Paluch, Shani Shimon; Laitman, Yael; Friedman, Eitan; Liljegren, Annelie; Rantala, Johanna; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Loman, Niklas; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Hamann, Ute; Spurdle, Amanda B; Healey, Sue; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Herzog, Josef; Margileth, David; Gorrini, Chiara; Esteller, Manel; Gómez, Antonio; Sayols, Sergi; Vidal, Enrique; Heyn, Holger; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Léoné, Melanie; Barjhoux, Laure; Fassy-Colcombet, Marion; de Pauw, Antoine; Lasset, Christine; Ferrer, Sandra Fert; Castera, Laurent; Berthet, Pascaline; Cornelis, François; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Damiola, Francesca; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Maxwell, Christopher A; Vijai, Joseph; Robson, Mark; Kauff, Noah; Corines, Marina J; Villano, Danylko; Cunningham, Julie; Lee, Adam; Lindor, Noralane; Lázaro, Conxi; Easton, Douglas F; Offit, Kenneth; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Couch, Fergus J; Antoniou, Antonis C; Pujana, Miguel Angel

    2015-01-01

    While interplay between BRCA1 and AURKA-RHAMM-TPX2-TUBG1 regulates mammary epithelial polarization, common genetic variation in HMMR (gene product RHAMM) may be associated with risk of breast cancer in BRCA1 mutation carriers. Following on these observations, we further assessed the link between the AURKA-HMMR-TPX2-TUBG1 functional module and risk of breast cancer in BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. Forty-one single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped in 15,252 BRCA1 and 8,211 BRCA2 mutation carriers and subsequently analyzed using a retrospective likelihood approach. The association of HMMR rs299290 with breast cancer risk in BRCA1 mutation carriers was confirmed: per-allele hazard ratio (HR) = 1.10, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.04-1.15, p = 1.9 x 10(-4) (false discovery rate (FDR)-adjusted p = 0.043). Variation in CSTF1, located next to AURKA, was also found to be associated with breast cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers: rs2426618 per-allele HR = 1.10, 95% CI 1.03-1.16, p = 0.005 (FDR-adjusted p = 0.045). Assessment of pairwise interactions provided suggestions (FDR-adjusted pinteraction values > 0.05) for deviations from the multiplicative model for rs299290 and CSTF1 rs6064391, and rs299290 and TUBG1 rs11649877 in both BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Following these suggestions, the expression of HMMR and AURKA or TUBG1 in sporadic breast tumors was found to potentially interact, influencing patients' survival. Together, the results of this study support the hypothesis of a causative link between altered function of AURKA-HMMR-TPX2-TUBG1 and breast carcinogenesis in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers.

  10. Survival analysis of cancer risk reduction strategies for BRCA1/2 mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Kurian, Allison W; Sigal, Bronislava M; Plevritis, Sylvia K

    2010-01-10

    Women with BRCA1/2 mutations inherit high risks of breast and ovarian cancer; options to reduce cancer mortality include prophylactic surgery or breast screening, but their efficacy has never been empirically compared. We used decision analysis to simulate risk-reducing strategies in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers and to compare resulting survival probability and causes of death. We developed a Monte Carlo model of breast screening with annual mammography plus magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) from ages 25 to 69 years, prophylactic mastectomy (PM) at various ages, and/or prophylactic oophorectomy (PO) at ages 40 or 50 years in 25-year-old BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. With no intervention, survival probability by age 70 is 53% for BRCA1 and 71% for BRCA2 mutation carriers. The most effective single intervention for BRCA1 mutation carriers is PO at age 40, yielding a 15% absolute survival gain; for BRCA2 mutation carriers, the most effective single intervention is PM, yielding a 7% survival gain if performed at age 40 years. The combination of PM and PO at age 40 improves survival more than any single intervention, yielding 24% survival gain for BRCA1 and 11% for BRCA2 mutation carriers. PM at age 25 instead of age 40 offers minimal incremental benefit (1% to 2%); substituting screening for PM yields a similarly minimal decrement in survival (2% to 3%). Although PM at age 25 plus PO at age 40 years maximizes survival probability, substituting mammography plus MRI screening for PM seems to offer comparable survival. These results may guide women with BRCA1/2 mutations in their choices between prophylactic surgery and breast screening.

  11. BRCA1 and BRCA2 genetic testing-pitfalls and recommendations for managing variants of uncertain clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Eccles, D M; Mitchell, G; Monteiro, A N A; Schmutzler, R; Couch, F J; Spurdle, A B; Gómez-García, E B

    2015-10-01

    Increasing use of BRCA1/2 testing for tailoring cancer treatment and extension of testing to tumour tissue for somatic mutation is moving BRCA1/2 mutation screening from a primarily prevention arena delivered by specialist genetic services into mainstream oncology practice. A considerable number of gene tests will identify rare variants where clinical significance cannot be inferred from sequence information alone. The proportion of variants of uncertain clinical significance (VUS) is likely to grow with lower thresholds for testing and laboratory providers with less experience of BRCA. Most VUS will not be associated with a high risk of cancer but a misinterpreted VUS has the potential to lead to mismanagement of both the patient and their relatives. Members of the Clinical Working Group of ENIGMA (Evidence-based Network for the Interpretation of Germline Mutant Alleles) global consortium (www.enigmaconsortium.org) observed wide variation in practices in reporting, disclosure and clinical management of patients with a VUS. Examples from current clinical practice are presented and discussed to illustrate potential pitfalls, explore factors contributing to misinterpretation, and propose approaches to improving clarity. Clinicians, patients and their relatives would all benefit from an improved level of genetic literacy. Genetic laboratories working with clinical geneticists need to agree on a clinically clear and uniform format for reporting BRCA test results to non-geneticists. An international consortium of experts, collecting and integrating all available lines of evidence and classifying variants according to an internationally recognized system, will facilitate reclassification of variants for clinical use. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. BRCA1 and BRCA2 genetic testing—pitfalls and recommendations for managing variants of uncertain clinical significance

    PubMed Central

    Eccles, D. M.; Mitchell, G.; Monteiro, A. N. A.; Schmutzler, R.; Couch, F. J.; Spurdle, A. B.; Gómez-García, E. B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Increasing use of BRCA1/2 testing for tailoring cancer treatment and extension of testing to tumour tissue for somatic mutation is moving BRCA1/2 mutation screening from a primarily prevention arena delivered by specialist genetic services into mainstream oncology practice. A considerable number of gene tests will identify rare variants where clinical significance cannot be inferred from sequence information alone. The proportion of variants of uncertain clinical significance (VUS) is likely to grow with lower thresholds for testing and laboratory providers with less experience of BRCA. Most VUS will not be associated with a high risk of cancer but a misinterpreted VUS has the potential to lead to mismanagement of both the patient and their relatives. Design Members of the Clinical Working Group of ENIGMA (Evidence-based Network for the Interpretation of Germline Mutant Alleles) global consortium (www.enigmaconsortium.org) observed wide variation in practices in reporting, disclosure and clinical management of patients with a VUS. Examples from current clinical practice are presented and discussed to illustrate potential pitfalls, explore factors contributing to misinterpretation, and propose approaches to improving clarity. Results and conclusion Clinicians, patients and their relatives would all benefit from an improved level of genetic literacy. Genetic laboratories working with clinical geneticists need to agree on a clinically clear and uniform format for reporting BRCA test results to non-geneticists. An international consortium of experts, collecting and integrating all available lines of evidence and classifying variants according to an internationally recognized system, will facilitate reclassification of variants for clinical use. PMID:26153499

  13. A new rapid methodological strategy to assess BRCA mutational status.

    PubMed

    Vuttariello, Emilia; Borra, Marco; Calise, Celeste; Mauriello, Elvira; Greggi, Stefano; Vecchione, Aldo; Biffali, Elio; Chiappetta, Gennaro

    2013-07-01

    Hereditary cancers account for approximately 10 % of breast and ovarian cancers. Mutations of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes, encoding two proteins involved in DNA repair, underlie most cases of such hereditary cancers. Women with BRCA mutations develop breast cancer in 50-80 % of cases and ovarian cancer in 10-40 % of cases. Assessing BRCA mutational status is needed to direct the clinical management of women with predisposition to these hereditary cancers. However, BRCA screening constitutes a bottleneck in terms of costs and time to deliver results. We developed a PCR-based assay using 73 primer pairs covering the entire coding regions of BRCA1 and BRCA2. PCR primers, containing at the 5' end the universal M13 primer sequences, were pre-spotted in 96-well plates. Following PCR, direct sequencing was performed using M13 primers, allowing to standardize the conditions. PCR amplification and sequencing were successful for each amplicon. We tested and validated the assay on 10 known gDNAs from patients with Hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC). Our strategy is a promising time and cost-effective method to detect BRCA mutations in the clinical setting, which is essential to formulate a personalized therapy for patients with HBOC.

  14. Law-medicine interfacing: patenting of human genes and mutations.

    PubMed

    Fialho, Arsenio M; Chakrabarty, Ananda M

    2011-08-01

    Mutations, Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs), deletions and genetic rearrangements in specific genes in the human genome account for not only our physical characteristics and behavior, but can lead to many in-born and acquired diseases. Such changes in the genome can also predispose people to cancers, as well as significantly affect the metabolism and efficacy of many drugs, resulting in some cases in acute toxicity to the drug. The testing of the presence of such genetic mutations and rearrangements is of great practical and commercial value, leading many of these genes and their mutations/deletions and genetic rearrangements to be patented. A recent decision by a judge in the Federal District Court in the Southern District of New York, has created major uncertainties, based on the revocation of BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene patents, in the eligibility of all human and presumably other gene patents. This article argues that while patents on BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes could be challenged based on a lack of utility, the patenting of the mutations and genetic rearrangements is of great importance to further development and commercialization of genetic tests that can save human lives and prevent suffering, and should be allowed.

  15. Patients' Views of Treatment-Focused Genetic Testing (TFGT): Some Lessons for the Mainstreaming of BRCA1 and BRCA2 Testing.

    PubMed

    Wright, Sarah; Porteous, Mary; Stirling, Diane; Lawton, Julia; Young, Oliver; Gourley, Charlie; Hallowell, Nina

    2018-05-11

    This paper explores patients' views and experiences of undergoing treatment-focused BRCA1 and BRCA2 genetic testing (TFGT), either offered following triaging to clinical genetics (breast cancer) or as part of a mainstreamed care pathway in oncology (ovarian cancer). Drawing on 26 in-depth interviews with patients with breast or ovarian cancer who had undergone TFGT, this retrospective study examines patients' views of genetic testing at this point in their care pathway, focusing on issues, such as initial response to the offer of testing, motivations for undergoing testing, and views on care pathways. Patients were amenable to the incorporation of TFGT at an early stage in their cancer care irrespective of (any) prior anticipation of having a genetic test or family history. While patients were glad to have been offered TFGT as part of their care, some questioned the logic of the test's timing in relation to their cancer treatment. Crucially, patients appeared unable to disentangle the treatment role of TFGT from its preventative function for self and other family members, suggesting that some may undergo TFGT to obtain information for others rather than for self.

  16. Associations between relationship support and psychological reactions of participants and partners to BRCA1 and BRCA2 testing in a clinic-based sample.

    PubMed

    Manne, Sharon; Audrain, Janet; Schwartz, Marc; Main, David; Finch, Clinton; Lerman, Caryn

    2004-12-01

    Despite the potential importance of communication about genetic testing between test participants and their significant others, little is known about social support and communication between women undergoing BRCA1 and BRCA2 testing and their partners. The aims of this longitudinal study were to examine communication about genetic testing during and following testing and to evaluate whether communication is associated with psychological distress reported by test participants and their partners. Participants were 153 women who were undergoing genetic testing and 118 partners of women undergoing testing. Relationship communication and distress were evaluated at the time of pretest education and 6 months postdisclosure. Overall, the decision to undergo testing was discussed by the majority of test participants and partners, and most couples felt their partners were supportive. Most women disclosed their results to their partners. Longitudinal analyses suggested that less support and protective buffering were associated with greater distress 6 months postdisclosure among test participants, whereas lower comfort in sharing concerns and partner support were associated with lower distress 6 months postdisclosure among partners. The results of this study suggest that the majority of couples respond supportively during the test experience, but for a small subset of couples the process can strain the relationship. Partner support during this process is important, particularly for test participants dealing with an uninformative test result.

  17. A mutational signature reveals alterations underlying deficient homologous recombination repair in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Polak, Paz; Kim, Jaegil; Braunstein, Lior Z; Karlic, Rosa; Haradhavala, Nicholas J; Tiao, Grace; Rosebrock, Daniel; Livitz, Dimitri; Kübler, Kirsten; Mouw, Kent W; Kamburov, Atanas; Maruvka, Yosef E; Leshchiner, Ignaty; Lander, Eric S; Golub, Todd R; Zick, Aviad; Orthwein, Alexandre; Lawrence, Michael S; Batra, Rajbir N; Caldas, Carlos; Haber, Daniel A; Laird, Peter W; Shen, Hui; Ellisen, Leif W; D'Andrea, Alan D; Chanock, Stephen J; Foulkes, William D; Getz, Gad

    2017-10-01

    Biallelic inactivation of BRCA1 or BRCA2 is associated with a pattern of genome-wide mutations known as signature 3. By analyzing ∼1,000 breast cancer samples, we confirmed this association and established that germline nonsense and frameshift variants in PALB2, but not in ATM or CHEK2, can also give rise to the same signature. We were able to accurately classify missense BRCA1 or BRCA2 variants known to impair homologous recombination (HR) on the basis of this signature. Finally, we show that epigenetic silencing of RAD51C and BRCA1 by promoter methylation is strongly associated with signature 3 and, in our data set, was highly enriched in basal-like breast cancers in young individuals of African descent.

  18. Identification of a founder BRCA1 mutation in the Moroccan population.

    PubMed

    Quiles, F; Teulé, À; Martinussen Tandstad, N; Feliubadaló, L; Tornero, E; Del Valle, J; Menéndez, M; Salinas, M; Wethe Rognlien, V; Velasco, A; Izquierdo, A; Capellá, G; Brunet, J; Lázaro, C

    2016-10-01

    Breast cancer (BC) is the most frequent cancer among women in Morocco. However, the role of the most prevalent BC-predisposing genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2, has been largely unexplored. To help define the role of BRCA1 in BC in Morocco, we characterized the first potential BRCA1 founder mutation in this population. Genetic testing of BRCA1 and BRCA2 in BC high-risk families identified mutation BRCA1 c.5309G>T, p.(Gly1770Val) or G1770V in five independent families from Morocco, suggesting a founder effect. To confirm this hypothesis, haplotype construction was performed using seven intragenic and flanking BRCA1 microsatellite markers. Clinical data were also compiled. Clinical data from carriers of mutation G1770V correspond to data from carriers of BRCA1 pathogenic mutations. Microsatellite analysis showed a common haplotype for the five families in a region comprising 1.54 Mb, confirming G1770V as the first specific founder BRCA1 mutation in the Moroccan population. Our findings contribute to a better understanding of BC genetics in the Moroccan population. Nevertheless, comprehensive studies of mutation G1770V in large series of BC patients from Morocco are needed to assess the real prevalence of this mutation and to improve genetic testing and risk assessment in this population. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Prevalence of PALB2 mutations in breast cancer patients in multi-ethnic Asian population in Malaysia and Singapore.

    PubMed

    Phuah, Sze Yee; Lee, Sheau Yee; Kang, Peter; Kang, In Nee; Yoon, Sook-Yee; Thong, Meow Keong; Hartman, Mikael; Sng, Jen-Hwei; Yip, Cheng Har; Taib, Nur Aishah Mohd; Teo, Soo-Hwang

    2013-01-01

    The partner and localizer of breast cancer 2 (PALB2) is responsible for facilitating BRCA2-mediated DNA repair by serving as a bridging molecule, acting as the physical and functional link between the breast cancer 1 (BRCA1) and breast cancer 2 (BRCA2) proteins. Truncating mutations in the PALB2 gene are rare but are thought to be associated with increased risks of developing breast cancer in various populations. We evaluated the contribution of PALB2 germline mutations in 122 Asian women with breast cancer, all of whom had significant family history of breast and other cancers. Further screening for nine PALB2 mutations was conducted in 874 Malaysian and 532 Singaporean breast cancer patients, and in 1342 unaffected Malaysian and 541 unaffected Singaporean women. By analyzing the entire coding region of PALB2, we found two novel truncating mutations and ten missense mutations in families tested negative for BRCA1/2-mutations. One additional novel truncating PALB2 mutation was identified in one patient through genotyping analysis. Our results indicate a low prevalence of deleterious PALB2 mutations and a specific mutation profile within the Malaysian and Singaporean populations.

  20. Prevalence of PALB2 Mutations in Breast Cancer Patients in Multi-Ethnic Asian Population in Malaysia and Singapore

    PubMed Central

    Phuah, Sze Yee; Lee, Sheau Yee; Kang, Peter; Kang, In Nee; Yoon, Sook-Yee; Thong, Meow Keong; Hartman, Mikael; Sng, Jen-Hwei; Yip, Cheng Har; Taib, Nur Aishah Mohd; Teo, Soo-Hwang

    2013-01-01

    Background The partner and localizer of breast cancer 2 (PALB2) is responsible for facilitating BRCA2-mediated DNA repair by serving as a bridging molecule, acting as the physical and functional link between the breast cancer 1 (BRCA1) and breast cancer 2 (BRCA2) proteins. Truncating mutations in the PALB2 gene are rare but are thought to be associated with increased risks of developing breast cancer in various populations. Methods We evaluated the contribution of PALB2 germline mutations in 122 Asian women with breast cancer, all of whom had significant family history of breast and other cancers. Further screening for nine PALB2 mutations was conducted in 874 Malaysian and 532 Singaporean breast cancer patients, and in 1342 unaffected Malaysian and 541 unaffected Singaporean women. Results By analyzing the entire coding region of PALB2, we found two novel truncating mutations and ten missense mutations in families tested negative for BRCA1/2-mutations. One additional novel truncating PALB2 mutation was identified in one patient through genotyping analysis. Our results indicate a low prevalence of deleterious PALB2 mutations and a specific mutation profile within the Malaysian and Singaporean populations. PMID:23977390

  1. Factors predicting the occurrence of germline mutations in candidate genes among patients with cutaneous malignant melanoma from South Italy.

    PubMed

    Casula, Milena; Colombino, Maria; Satta, Maria P; Cossu, Antonio; Lissia, Amelia; Budroni, Mario; Simeone, Ester; Calemma, Rosa; Loddo, Cinzia; Caracò, Corrado; Mozzillo, Nicola; Daponte, Antonio; Comella, Giuseppe; Canzanella, Sergio; Guida, Michele; Castello, Giuseppe; Ascierto, Paolo A; Palmieri, Giuseppe

    2007-01-01

    Clinical predictors for germline mutations of candidate genes in large clinic based population of patients with cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM) are widely awaited. Using denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) analysis and DNA sequencing, 557 consecutively-collected CMM patients originating from South Italy were screened for CDKN2A germline mutations; subsets of them were screened for mutations in the BRAF and BRCA2 genes. Seven CDKN2A mutations were detected in 14 (2.5%) CMM patients. Relative risk of carrying a CDKN2A mutation for CMM patients was demonstrated to significantly increase with the presence of familial recurrence of melanoma (risk ratio (RR)=6.31; p=0.0009), multiple primary melanomas (RR=3.43; p=0.0014), and early onset age (RR=4.56; p=0.0026). All CDKN2A mutations were observed in non-Sardinian patients (14/441; 3.2%), whereas BRAF and BRCA2 genes were found mutated in Sardinian patients (3/116; 2.6%). Such indicators of the presence of CDKN2A mutations will be useful in counselling patients about undergoing genetic testing. Our findings strongly suggest that mutation rates of candidate cancer genes may deeply vary among CMM patients from different geographical areas.

  2. Inherited mutations in 17 breast cancer susceptibility genes among a large triple-negative breast cancer cohort unselected for family history of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Couch, Fergus J; Hart, Steven N; Sharma, Priyanka; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Wang, Xianshu; Miron, Penelope; Olson, Janet E; Godwin, Andrew K; Pankratz, V Shane; Olswold, Curtis; Slettedahl, Seth; Hallberg, Emily; Guidugli, Lucia; Davila, Jaime I; Beckmann, Matthias W; Janni, Wolfgang; Rack, Brigitte; Ekici, Arif B; Slamon, Dennis J; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Fostira, Florentia; Vratimos, Athanassios; Fountzilas, George; Pelttari, Liisa M; Tapper, William J; Durcan, Lorraine; Cross, Simon S; Pilarski, Robert; Shapiro, Charles L; Klemp, Jennifer; Yao, Song; Garber, Judy; Cox, Angela; Brauch, Hiltrud; Ambrosone, Christine; Nevanlinna, Heli; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Slager, Susan L; Vachon, Celine M; Eccles, Diana M; Fasching, Peter A

    2015-02-01

    Recent advances in DNA sequencing have led to the development of breast cancer susceptibility gene panels for germline genetic testing of patients. We assessed the frequency of mutations in 17 predisposition genes, including BRCA1 and BRCA2, in a large cohort of patients with triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) unselected for family history of breast or ovarian cancer to determine the utility of germline genetic testing for those with TNBC. Patients with TNBC (N = 1,824) unselected for family history of breast or ovarian cancer were recruited through 12 studies, and germline DNA was sequenced to identify mutations. Deleterious mutations were identified in 14.6% of all patients. Of these, 11.2% had mutations in the BRCA1 (8.5%) and BRCA2 (2.7%) genes. Deleterious mutations in 15 other predisposition genes were detected in 3.7% of patients, with the majority observed in genes involved in homologous recombination, including PALB2 (1.2%) and BARD1, RAD51D, RAD51C, and BRIP1 (0.3% to 0.5%). Patients with TNBC with mutations were diagnosed at an earlier age (P < .001) and had higher-grade tumors (P = .01) than those without mutations. Deleterious mutations in predisposition genes are present at high frequency in patients with TNBC unselected for family history of cancer. Mutation prevalence estimates suggest that patients with TNBC, regardless of age at diagnosis or family history of cancer, should be considered for germline genetic testing of BRCA1 and BRCA2. Although mutations in other predisposition genes are observed among patients with TNBC, better cancer risk estimates are needed before these mutations are used for clinical risk assessment in relatives. © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  3. Inherited Mutations in 17 Breast Cancer Susceptibility Genes Among a Large Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Cohort Unselected for Family History of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Couch, Fergus J.; Hart, Steven N.; Sharma, Priyanka; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Wang, Xianshu; Miron, Penelope; Olson, Janet E.; Godwin, Andrew K.; Pankratz, V. Shane; Olswold, Curtis; Slettedahl, Seth; Hallberg, Emily; Guidugli, Lucia; Davila, Jaime I.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Janni, Wolfgang; Rack, Brigitte; Ekici, Arif B.; Slamon, Dennis J.; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Fostira, Florentia; Vratimos, Athanassios; Fountzilas, George; Pelttari, Liisa M.; Tapper, William J.; Durcan, Lorraine; Cross, Simon S.; Pilarski, Robert; Shapiro, Charles L.; Klemp, Jennifer; Yao, Song; Garber, Judy; Cox, Angela; Brauch, Hiltrud; Ambrosone, Christine; Nevanlinna, Heli; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Slager, Susan L.; Vachon, Celine M.; Eccles, Diana M.; Fasching, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Recent advances in DNA sequencing have led to the development of breast cancer susceptibility gene panels for germline genetic testing of patients. We assessed the frequency of mutations in 17 predisposition genes, including BRCA1 and BRCA2, in a large cohort of patients with triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) unselected for family history of breast or ovarian cancer to determine the utility of germline genetic testing for those with TNBC. Patients and Methods Patients with TNBC (N = 1,824) unselected for family history of breast or ovarian cancer were recruited through 12 studies, and germline DNA was sequenced to identify mutations. Results Deleterious mutations were identified in 14.6% of all patients. Of these, 11.2% had mutations in the BRCA1 (8.5%) and BRCA2 (2.7%) genes. Deleterious mutations in 15 other predisposition genes were detected in 3.7% of patients, with the majority observed in genes involved in homologous recombination, including PALB2 (1.2%) and BARD1, RAD51D, RAD51C, and BRIP1 (0.3% to 0.5%). Patients with TNBC with mutations were diagnosed at an earlier age (P < .001) and had higher-grade tumors (P = .01) than those without mutations. Conclusion Deleterious mutations in predisposition genes are present at high frequency in patients with TNBC unselected for family history of cancer. Mutation prevalence estimates suggest that patients with TNBC, regardless of age at diagnosis or family history of cancer, should be considered for germline genetic testing of BRCA1 and BRCA2. Although mutations in other predisposition genes are observed among patients with TNBC, better cancer risk estimates are needed before these mutations are used for clinical risk assessment in relatives. PMID:25452441

  4. Screening for Novel Germline Rare Mutations Associated with Aggressive Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    Schmidt S., Peshkin L., et al. A method and server for predicting damaging missense mutations. Nat Methods. 7, 248-249 (2010). Akbari MR, Trachtenberg...Inst. 2012 Aug 1;104(16):1260-2. Epub 2012 Jul 9. Castro E. G.C.L., Olmos D., et al. Correlation of germ-line BRCA2 mutations with aggressive...prostate cancer. Clin Cancer Res. 16, 2115-2121 (2010). 20    Hammer GE, Gonzalez F, Champsaur M, Cado D, Shastri N. The aminopeptidase ERAAP shapes the

  5. Novel germline PALB2 truncating mutations in African-American breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yonglan; Zhang, Jing; Niu, Qun; Huo, Dezheng; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.

    2011-01-01

    Background It has been demonstrated that PALB2 acts as a bridging molecule between the BRCA1 and BRCA2 proteins and is responsible for facilitating BRCA2-mediated DNA repair. Truncating mutations in the PALB2 gene have been reported to be enriched in Fanconi anemia and breast cancer patients in various populations. Methods We evaluated the contribution of PALB2 germline mutations in 279 African-American breast cancer patients including 29 patients with a strong family history, 29 patients with a moderate family history, 75 patients with a weak family history, and 146 non-familial or sporadic breast cancer cases. Results After direct sequencing of all the coding exons, exon/intron boundaries, 5′UTR and 3′UTR of PALB2, three (1.08%; 3 in 279) novel monoallelic truncating mutations were identified: c.758dupT (exon4), c.1479delC (exon4) and c.3048delT (exon 10); together with 50 sequence variants, 27 of which are novel. None of the truncating mutations were found in 262 controls from the same population. Conclusions PALB2 mutations are present in both familial and non-familial breast cancer among African-Americans. Rare PALB2 mutations account for a small but substantial proportion of breast cancer patients. PMID:21932393

  6. Association of PHB 1630 C>T and MTHFR 677 C>T polymorphisms with breast and ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers: results from a multicenter study

    PubMed Central

    Jakubowska, A; Rozkrut, D; Antoniou, A; Hamann, U; Scott, R J; McGuffog, L; Healy, S; Sinilnikova, O M; Rennert, G; Lejbkowicz, F; Flugelman, A; Andrulis, I L; Glendon, G; Ozcelik, H; Thomassen, M; Paligo, M; Aretini, P; Kantala, J; Aroer, B; von Wachenfeldt, A; Liljegren, A; Loman, N; Herbst, K; Kristoffersson, U; Rosenquist, R; Karlsson, P; Stenmark-Askmalm, M; Melin, B; Nathanson, K L; Domchek, S M; Byrski, T; Huzarski, T; Gronwald, J; Menkiszak, J; Cybulski, C; Serrano, P; Osorio, A; Cajal, T R; Tsitlaidou, M; Benítez, J; Gilbert, M; Rookus, M; Aalfs, C M; Kluijt, I; Boessenkool-Pape, J L; Meijers-Heijboer, H E J; Oosterwijk, J C; van Asperen, C J; Blok, M J; Nelen, M R; van den Ouweland, A M W; Seynaeve, C; van der Luijt, R B; Devilee, P; Easton, D F; Peock, S; Frost, D; Platte, R; Ellis, S D; Fineberg, E; Evans, D G; Lalloo, F; Eeles, R; Jacobs, C; Adlard, J; Davidson, R; Eccles, D; Cole, T; Cook, J; Godwin, A; Bove, B; Stoppa-Lyonnet, D; Caux-Moncoutier, V; Belotti, M; Tirapo, C; Mazoyer, S; Barjhoux, L; Boutry-Kryza, N; Pujol, P; Coupier, I; Peyrat, J-P; Vennin, P; Muller, D; Fricker, J-P; Venat-Bouvet, L; Johannsson, O Th; Isaacs, C; Schmutzler, R; Wappenschmidt, B; Meindl, A; Arnold, N; Varon-Mateeva, R; Niederacher, D; Sutter, C; Deissler, H; Preisler-Adams, S; Simard, J; Soucy, P; Durocher, F; Chenevix-Trench, G; Beesley, J; Chen, X; Rebbeck, T; Couch, F; Wang, X; Lindor, N; Fredericksen, Z; Pankratz, V S; Peterlongo, P; Bonanni, B; Fortuzzi, S; Peissel, B; Szabo, C; Mai, P L; Loud, J T; Lubinski, J

    2012-01-01

    Background: The variable penetrance of breast cancer in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers suggests that other genetic or environmental factors modify breast cancer risk. Two genes of special interest are prohibitin (PHB) and methylene-tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), both of which are important either directly or indirectly in maintaining genomic integrity. Methods: To evaluate the potential role of genetic variants within PHB and MTHFR in breast and ovarian cancer risk, 4102 BRCA1 and 2093 BRCA2 mutation carriers, and 6211 BRCA1 and 2902 BRCA2 carriers from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1 and BRCA2 (CIMBA) were genotyped for the PHB 1630 C>T (rs6917) polymorphism and the MTHFR 677 C>T (rs1801133) polymorphism, respectively. Results: There was no evidence of association between the PHB 1630 C>T and MTHFR 677 C>T polymorphisms with either disease for BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers when breast and ovarian cancer associations were evaluated separately. Analysis that evaluated associations for breast and ovarian cancer simultaneously showed some evidence that BRCA1 mutation carriers who had the rare homozygote genotype (TT) of the PHB 1630 C>T polymorphism were at increased risk of both breast and ovarian cancer (HR 1.50, 95%CI 1.10–2.04 and HR 2.16, 95%CI 1.24–3.76, respectively). However, there was no evidence of association under a multiplicative model for the effect of each minor allele. Conclusion: The PHB 1630TT genotype may modify breast and ovarian cancer risks in BRCA1 mutation carriers. This association need to be evaluated in larger series of BRCA1 mutation carriers. PMID:22669161

  7. BRCA1, TP53, and CHEK2 germline mutations in uterine serous carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Pennington, Kathryn P; Walsh, Tom; Lee, Ming; Pennil, Christopher; Novetsky, Akiva P; Agnew, Kathy J; Thornton, Anne; Garcia, Rochelle; Mutch, David; King, Mary-Claire; Goodfellow, Paul; Swisher, Elizabeth M

    2013-01-15

    Uterine serous carcinoma (USC) is not recognized as part of any defined hereditary cancer syndrome, and its association with hereditary breast and ovarian carcinoma and Lynch syndrome are uncertain. Using targeted capture and massively parallel genomic sequencing, 151 subjects with USC were assessed for germline mutations in 30 tumor suppressor genes, including BRCA1 (breast cancer 1, early onset), BRCA2, the DNA mismatch repair genes (MLH1 [mutL homolog 1], MSH2 [mutS homolog 2], MSH6, PMS2 [postmeiotic segregation increased 2]), TP53 (tumor protein p53), and 10 other genes in the Fanconi anemia-BRCA pathway. Ten cases with < 10% serous histology were also assessed. Seven subjects (4.6%) carried germline loss-of-function mutations: 3 subjects (2.0%) with mutations in BRCA1, 2 subjects (1.3%) with mutations in TP53, and 2 subjects (1.3%) with mutations in CHEK2 (checkpoint kinase 2). One subject with < 10% serous histology had an MSH6 mutation. Subjects with MSH6 and TP53 mutations had neither personal nor family histories suggestive of Lynch or Li-Fraumeni syndromes. Of the 22 women with USC and a personal history of breast carcinoma, the frequency of BRCA1 mutations was 9%, compared to 0.9% in 119 women with no such history. Approximately 5% of women with USC have germline mutations in 3 different tumor suppressor genes: BRCA1, CHEK2, and TP53. Mutations in DNA mismatch repair genes that cause Lynch syndrome are rare in USC. The germline BRCA1 mutation rate in USC subjects of 2% is higher than expected in a nonfounder population, suggesting that USC is associated with hereditary breast and ovarian carcinoma in a small proportion of cases. Women with USC and breast cancer should be offered genetic testing for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations. Copyright © 2012 American Cancer Society.

  8. Asymptomatic Bacteriuria and Bacterial Interference.

    PubMed

    Nicolle, Lindsay E

    2015-10-01

    Asymptomatic bacteriuria is very common. In healthy women, asymptomatic bacteriuria increases with age, from <1% in newborns to 10% to 20% of women age 80 years, but is uncommon in men until after age 50 years. Individuals with underlying genitourinary abnormalities, including indwelling devices, may also have a high frequency of asymptomatic bacteriuria, irrespective of age or gender. The prevalence is very high in residents of long-term-care facilities, from 25% to 50% of women and 15% to 40% of men. Escherichia coli is the most frequent organism isolated, but a wide variety of other organisms may occur. Bacteriuria may be transient or persist for a prolonged period. Pregnant women with asymptomatic bacteriuria identified in early pregnancy and who are untreated have a risk of pyelonephritis later in pregnancy of 20% to 30%. Bacteremia is frequent in bacteriuric subjects following mucosal trauma with bleeding, with 5% to 10% of patients developing severe sepsis or septic shock. These two groups with clear evidence of negative outcomes should be screened for bacteriuria and appropriately treated. Asymptomatic bacteriuria in other populations is benign and screening and treatment are not indicated. Antimicrobial treatment has no benefits but is associated with negative outcomes including reinfection with antimicrobial resistant organisms and a short-term increased frequency of symptomatic infection post-treatment. The observation of increased symptomatic infection post-treatment, however, has led to active investigation of bacterial interference as a strategy to prevent symptomatic episodes in selected high risk patients.

  9. Asymptomatic myotonia congenita unmasked by severe hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Passeri, Elena; Sansone, Valeria A; Verdelli, Chiara; Mendola, Marco; Corbetta, Sabrina

    2014-04-01

    Myotonia congenita is an inherited muscle disorder sustained by mutations in the skeletal muscle chloride channel gene CLCN1. Symptoms vary from mild to severe and generalized myotonia and worsen with cold, stressful events and hormonal fluctuations. Here we report the case of a young woman who sought medical attention because of subacute onset of diffuse and severe limb myotonia. CLCN1 gene sequencing showed a heterozygous transversion (T550M), two polymorphisms and one silent mutation. Thyroid function screening revealed severe hypothyroidism. She was placed on l-thyroxine replacement therapy which dramatically improved myotonia. We conclude that hypothyroidism unmasked a genetically determined, clinically asymptomatic chloride channelopathy. Diagnostic work-up in patients with clinically isolated myotonia should not be limited to genetic screening of non-dystrophic or dystrophic myotonias. Considering the high prevalence of hypothyroidism in females, systematic thyroid function screening by looking for additional hypothyroid symptoms and serum TSH levels measurement is mandatory in these patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Asymptomatic myelolipoma of the adrenal.

    PubMed

    Hadjigeorgi, C; Lafoyianni, S; Pontikis, Y; Van Vliet-Constantinidou, C

    1992-01-01

    Myelolipoma of the adrenal gland is a rare benign tumour which seldom produces symptoms unless it attains considerable size or hemorrhages into itself. Histologically the tumor is composed of varying proportions of fat and bone marrow elements. We present a case of a male child, with homozygous beta thalassemia and asymptomatic myelolipoma.

  11. Ten-year survival after epithelial ovarian cancer is not associated with BRCA mutation status.

    PubMed

    Kotsopoulos, Joanne; Rosen, Barry; Fan, Isabel; Moody, Joel; McLaughlin, John R; Risch, Harvey; May, Taymaa; Sun, Ping; Narod, Steven A

    2016-01-01

    After a diagnosis of ovarian cancer, positive BRCA mutation status confers a transient mortality benefit that diminishes with time. The majority of women who survive for 10-12 years are effectively cured of their disease. Thus, it is important to estimate the probability of long-term survival by BRCA mutation status and treatment-related factors. We included unselected epithelial ovarian cancers diagnosed in Ontario, Canada from 1995 to 1999 and from 2002 to 2004. Clinical information was obtained from medical records. Survival status was determined by linkage to the Ontario Cancer Registry. We estimated the annual mortality for these patients. We compared women who did and did not survive 10 years for a range of factors including BRCA mutation status and extent of residual disease post-surgery. Of the 1421 patients, 109 (7.7%) had BRCA1 mutations and 68 (4.8%) had BRCA2 mutations. A status of no residual disease was achieved by 39% of non-carriers and 19% of mutation carriers (P<0.0001). By 10-years of follow-up, 43% of non-carriers, 57% of BRCA1 mutation carriers and 69% of BRCA2 mutation carriers had died from ovarian cancer. Among women with stage III/IV serous cancers and no residual disease, the 10-year actuarial survival was 42% for non-carriers and 29% for mutation carriers (P=0.40). The initial survival advantage among women with BRCA mutations may reflect a higher initial sensitivity of BRCA carriers to chemotherapy, but this response does not predict long-term survival. The strongest predictor of long-term survival is status of no residual disease at resection. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Germline BRCA mutations are associated with higher risk of nodal involvement, distant metastasis, and poor survival outcomes in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Castro, Elena; Goh, Chee; Olmos, David; Saunders, Ed; Leongamornlert, Daniel; Tymrakiewicz, Malgorzata; Mahmud, Nadiya; Dadaev, Tokhir; Govindasami, Koveela; Guy, Michelle; Sawyer, Emma; Wilkinson, Rosemary; Ardern-Jones, Audrey; Ellis, Steve; Frost, Debra; Peock, Susan; Evans, D Gareth; Tischkowitz, Marc; Cole, Trevor; Davidson, Rosemarie; Eccles, Diana; Brewer, Carole; Douglas, Fiona; Porteous, Mary E; Donaldson, Alan; Dorkins, Huw; Izatt, Louise; Cook, Jackie; Hodgson, Shirley; Kennedy, M John; Side, Lucy E; Eason, Jacqueline; Murray, Alex; Antoniou, Antonis C; Easton, Douglas F; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Eeles, Rosalind

    2013-05-10

    To analyze the baseline clinicopathologic characteristics of prostate tumors with germline BRCA1 and BRCA2 (BRCA1/2) mutations and the prognostic value of those mutations on prostate cancer (PCa) outcomes. This study analyzed the tumor features and outcomes of 2,019 patients with PCa (18 BRCA1 carriers, 61 BRCA2 carriers, and 1,940 noncarriers). The Kaplan-Meier method and Cox regression analysis were used to evaluate the associations between BRCA1/2 status and other PCa prognostic factors with overall survival (OS), cause-specific OS (CSS), CSS in localized PCa (CSS_M0), metastasis-free survival (MFS), and CSS from metastasis (CSS_M1). PCa with germline BRCA1/2 mutations were more frequently associated with Gleason ≥ 8 (P = .00003), T3/T4 stage (P = .003), nodal involvement (P = .00005), and metastases at diagnosis (P = .005) than PCa in noncarriers. CSS was significantly longer in noncarriers than in carriers (15.7 v 8.6 years, multivariable analyses [MVA] P = .015; hazard ratio [HR] = 1.8). For localized PCa, 5-year CSS and MFS were significantly higher in noncarriers (96% v 82%; MVA P = .01; HR = 2.6%; and 93% v 77%; MVA P = .009; HR = 2.7, respectively). Subgroup analyses confirmed the poor outcomes in BRCA2 patients, whereas the role of BRCA1 was not well defined due to the limited size and follow-up in this subgroup. Our results confirm that BRCA1/2 mutations confer a more aggressive PCa phenotype with a higher probability of nodal involvement and distant metastasis. BRCA mutations are associated with poor survival outcomes and this should be considered for tailoring clinical management of these patients.

  13. Germline BRCA Mutations Are Associated With Higher Risk of Nodal Involvement, Distant Metastasis, and Poor Survival Outcomes in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Elena; Goh, Chee; Olmos, David; Saunders, Ed; Leongamornlert, Daniel; Tymrakiewicz, Malgorzata; Mahmud, Nadiya; Dadaev, Tokhir; Govindasami, Koveela; Guy, Michelle; Sawyer, Emma; Wilkinson, Rosemary; Ardern-Jones, Audrey; Ellis, Steve; Frost, Debra; Peock, Susan; Evans, D. Gareth; Tischkowitz, Marc; Cole, Trevor; Davidson, Rosemarie; Eccles, Diana; Brewer, Carole; Douglas, Fiona; Porteous, Mary E.; Donaldson, Alan; Dorkins, Huw; Izatt, Louise; Cook, Jackie; Hodgson, Shirley; Kennedy, M. John; Side, Lucy E.; Eason, Jacqueline; Murray, Alex; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Easton, Douglas F.; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Eeles, Rosalind

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To analyze the baseline clinicopathologic characteristics of prostate tumors with germline BRCA1 and BRCA2 (BRCA1/2) mutations and the prognostic value of those mutations on prostate cancer (PCa) outcomes. Patients and Methods This study analyzed the tumor features and outcomes of 2,019 patients with PCa (18 BRCA1 carriers, 61 BRCA2 carriers, and 1,940 noncarriers). The Kaplan-Meier method and Cox regression analysis were used to evaluate the associations between BRCA1/2 status and other PCa prognostic factors with overall survival (OS), cause-specific OS (CSS), CSS in localized PCa (CSS_M0), metastasis-free survival (MFS), and CSS from metastasis (CSS_M1). Results PCa with germline BRCA1/2 mutations were more frequently associated with Gleason ≥ 8 (P = .00003), T3/T4 stage (P = .003), nodal involvement (P = .00005), and metastases at diagnosis (P = .005) than PCa in noncarriers. CSS was significantly longer in noncarriers than in carriers (15.7 v 8.6 years, multivariable analyses [MVA] P = .015; hazard ratio [HR] = 1.8). For localized PCa, 5-year CSS and MFS were significantly higher in noncarriers (96% v 82%; MVA P = .01; HR = 2.6%; and 93% v 77%; MVA P = .009; HR = 2.7, respectively). Subgroup analyses confirmed the poor outcomes in BRCA2 patients, whereas the role of BRCA1 was not well defined due to the limited size and follow-up in this subgroup. Conclusion Our results confirm that BRCA1/2 mutations confer a more aggressive PCa phenotype with a higher probability of nodal involvement and distant metastasis. BRCA mutations are associated with poor survival outcomes and this should be considered for tailoring clinical management of these patients. PMID:23569316

  14. Comprehensive mutation profiling of mucinous gastric carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Rokutan, Hirofumi; Hosoda, Fumie; Hama, Natsuko; Nakamura, Hiromi; Totoki, Yasushi; Furukawa, Eisaku; Arakawa, Erika; Ohashi, Shoko; Urushidate, Tomoko; Satoh, Hironori; Shimizu, Hiroko; Igarashi, Keiko; Yachida, Shinichi; Katai, Hitoshi; Taniguchi, Hirokazu; Fukayama, Masashi; Shibata, Tatsuhiro

    2016-10-01

    Mucinous gastric carcinoma (MGC) is a unique subtype of gastric cancer with a poor survival outcome. Comprehensive molecular profiles and putative therapeutic targets of MGC remain undetermined. We subjected 16 tumour-normal tissue pairs to whole-exome sequencing (WES) and an expanded set of 52 tumour-normal tissue pairs to subsequent targeted sequencing. The latter focused on 114 genes identified by WES. Twenty-two histologically differentiated MGCs (D-MGCs) and 46 undifferentiated MGCs (U-MGCs) were analysed. Chromatin modifier genes, including ARID1A (21%), MLL2 (19%), MLL3 (15%), and KDM6A (7%), were frequently mutated (47%) in MGC. We also identified mutations in potential therapeutic target genes, including MTOR (9%), BRCA2 (9%), BRCA1 (7%), and ERBB3 (6%). RHOA mutation was detected only in 4% of U-MGCs and in no D-MGCs. MYH9 was recurrently (13%) mutated in MGC, with all these being of the U-MGC subtype (p = 0.023). Three U-MGCs harboured MYH9 nonsense mutations. MYH9 knockdown enhanced cell migration and induced intracytoplasmic mucin and cellular elongation. BCOR mutation was associated with improved survival. In U-MGCs, the MLH1 expression status and combined mutation status (TP53/BCL11B or TP53/MLL2) were prognostic factors. A comparative analysis of driver genes revealed that the mutation profile of D-MGC was similar to that of intestinal-type gastric cancer, whereas U-MGC was a distinct entity, harbouring a different mutational profile to intestinal- and diffuse-type gastric cancers. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Asymptomatic Congenital Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt.

    PubMed

    Brown, Karen M; Hal, Hassan

    2009-01-01

    Congenital (spontaneous) intrahepatic portosystemic shunt is rare in the English literature. Most cases of portosystemic shunt occur after trauma, surgery, liver biopsy or as a result of chronic portal hypertension. Chronic shunting may result in encephalopathy, bleeding or hyperinsulinism. We report a case of an asymptomatic adult female with a presumed congenital intrahepatic portosystemic shunt and discuss the pertinent imaging findings and important key concepts related to this condition.

  16. Prevalence of the BRCA1 founder mutation c.5266dupin Brazilian individuals at-risk for the hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    About 5-10% of breast and ovarian carcinomas are hereditary and most of these result from germline mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. In women of Ashkenazi Jewish ascendance, up to 30% of breast and ovarian carcinomas may be attributable to mutations in these genes, where 3 founder mutations, c.68_69del (185delAG) and c.5266dup (5382insC) in BRCA1 and c.5946del (6174delT) in BRCA2, are commonly encountered. It has been suggested by some authors that screening for founder mutations should be undertaken in all Brazilian women with breast cancer. Thus, the goal of this study was to determine the prevalence of three founder mutations, commonly identified in Ashkenazi individuals in a sample of non-Ashkenazi cancer-affected Brazilian women with clearly defined risk factors for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) syndrome. Among 137 unrelated Brazilian women from HBOC families, the BRCA1c.5266dup mutation was identified in seven individuals (5%). This prevalence is similar to that encountered in non-Ashkenazi HBOC families in other populations. However, among patients with bilateral breast cancer, the frequency of c.5266dup was significantly higher when compared to patients with unilateral breast tumors (12.1% vs 1.2%, p = 0.023). The BRCA1 c.68_69del and BRCA2 c.5946del mutations did not occur in this sample. We conclude that screening non-Ashkenazi breast cancer-affected women from the ethnically heterogeneous Brazilian populations for the BRCA1 c.68_69del and BRCA2 c.5946del is not justified, and that screening for BRCA1c.5266dup should be considered in high risk patients, given its prevalence as a single mutation. In high-risk patients, a negative screening result should always be followed by comprehensive BRCA gene testing. The finding of a significantly higher frequency of BRCA1 c.5266dup in women with bilateral breast cancer, as well as existence of other as yet unidentified founder mutations in this population, should be further assessed in a larger

  17. An Emerging Entity: Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Associated with a Known BRCA Mutation: Clinical Descriptors, Treatment Implications, and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Lowery, Maeve A.; Kelsen, David P.; Stadler, Zsofia K.; Yu, Kenneth H.; Janjigian, Yelena Y.; Ludwig, Emmy; D'Adamo, David R.; Salo-Mullen, Erin; Robson, Mark E.; Allen, Peter J.; Kurtz, Robert C.

    2011-01-01

    Background. BRCA1 and BRCA2 germline mutations are associated with an elevated risk for pancreas adenocarcinoma (PAC). Other BRCA-associated cancers have been shown to have greater sensitivity to platinum and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors with better clinical outcomes than in sporadic cases; however, outcomes in BRCA-associated PAC have not been reported. Methods. Patients with a known BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation and a diagnosis of PAC were identified from the Gastrointestinal Oncology Service, Familial Pancreas Cancer Registry, and Clinical Genetics Service at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. Results. Fifteen patients, five male, with a BRCA1 (n = 4) or BRCA2 (n = 11) mutation and PAC and one patient with a BRCA1 mutation and acinar cell carcinoma of the pancreas were identified. Seven female patients (70%) had a prior history of breast cancer. Four patients received a PARP inhibitor alone or in combination with chemotherapy; three demonstrated an initial radiographic partial response by Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors whereas one patient had stable disease for 6 months. Six patients received platinum-based chemotherapy first line for metastatic disease; five of those patients had a radiographic partial response. Conclusion. BRCA mutation–associated PAC represents an underidentified, but clinically important, subgroup of patients. This is of particular relevance given the ongoing development of therapeutic agents targeting DNA repair, which may potentially offer a significant benefit to a genetically selected population. We anticipate that further study and understanding of the clinical and biologic features of BRCA-mutant PAC will aid in the identification of tissue biomarkers indicating defective tumor DNA repair pathways in sporadic PAC. PMID:21934105

  18. The prevalence of BRCA mutations among familial breast cancer patients in Korea: results of the Korean Hereditary Breast Cancer study.

    PubMed

    Han, Sang-Ah; Kim, Sung-Won; Kang, Eunyoung; Park, Sue K; Ahn, Sei-Hyun; Lee, Min Hyuk; Nam, Seok-Jin; Han, Wonshik; Bae, Young Tae; Kim, Hyun-Ah; Cho, Young Up; Chang, Myung Chul; Paik, Nam Sun; Hwang, Ki-Tae; Kim, Sei Joong; Noh, Dong-Young; Choi, Doo Ho; Noh, Woo-Chul; Kim, Lee Su; Kim, Ku Sang; Suh, Young Jin; Lee, Jeong Eon; Jung, Yongsik; Moon, Byung-In; Yang, Jung-Hyun; Son, Byung Ho; Yom, Cha Kyong; Kim, Sung Yong; Lee, Hyde; Jung, Sung Hoo

    2013-03-01

    The primary aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of BRCA1/2 mutations among familial breast cancer (BC) patients in Korea. We analyzed 775 familial BC patients who were enrolled in the Korean Hereditary Breast Cancer (KOHBRA) study and treated at 36 institutions between May 2007 and May 2010. Patients with familial BC were defined as BC patients with family histories of BC or ovarian cancer (OC) in any relatives. All probands received genetic counseling and BRCA genetic testing was performed after obtaining informed consent. The mean age of BC diagnosis was 43.6 years. The numbers of probands with family histories of BC only and OC only were 682 and 93, respectively. The overall prevalence of the BRCA mutation among familial BC patients was 21.7 % (BRCA1 9.3 % and BRCA2 12.4 %). Subgroup analyses observed prevalences of the BRCA mutation as follows: 19.6 % among patients with BC family history only (BRCA1 7.6 % and BRCA2 12.0 %) and 36.6 % among patients with OC family history only (BRCA1 21.5 % and BRCA2 15.1 %). Most of the subgroups satisfied the 10 % probability criteria to undergo BRCA testing. However, the prevalence of the BRCA mutations among subgroups that had 2 BC patients in a family with both age at diagnosis of more than 50 years old did not reach the 10 % criteria (4.1 %). Korean familial BC patients are good candidates for BRCA testing even when they have family histories of single breast cancers. However, proband age at diagnosis should be carefully considered when selecting patients for testing.

  19. Gene panel sequencing in familial breast/ovarian cancer patients identifies multiple novel mutations also in genes others than BRCA1/2.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Cornelia; Hoyer, Juliane; Vasileiou, Georgia; Wunderle, Marius; Lux, Michael P; Fasching, Peter A; Krumbiegel, Mandy; Uebe, Steffen; Reuter, Miriam; Beckmann, Matthias W; Reis, André

    2017-01-01

    Breast and ovarian cancer (BC/OC) predisposition has been attributed to a number of high- and moderate to low-penetrance susceptibility genes. With the advent of next generation sequencing (NGS) simultaneous testing of these genes has become feasible. In this monocentric study, we report results of panel-based screening of 14 BC/OC susceptibility genes (BRCA1, BRCA2, RAD51C, RAD51D, CHEK2, PALB2, ATM, NBN, CDH1, TP53, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2) in a group of 581 consecutive individuals from a German population with BC and/or OC fulfilling diagnostic criteria for BRCA1 and BRCA2 testing including 179 with a triple-negative tumor. Altogether we identified 106 deleterious mutations in 105 (18%) patients in 10 different genes, including seven different exon deletions. Of these 106 mutations, 16 (15%) were novel and only six were found in BRCA1/2. To further characterize mutations located in or nearby splicing consensus sites we performed RT-PCR analysis which allowed confirmation of pathogenicity in 7 of 9 mutations analyzed. In PALB2, we identified a deleterious variant in six cases. All but one were associated with early onset BC and a positive family history indicating that penetrance for PALB2 mutations is comparable to BRCA2. Overall, extended testing beyond BRCA1/2 identified a deleterious mutation in further 6% of patients. As a downside, 89 variants of uncertain significance were identified highlighting the need for comprehensive variant databases. In conclusion, panel testing yields more accurate information on genetic cancer risk than assessing BRCA1/2 alone and wide-spread testing will help improve penetrance assessment of variants in these risk genes. © 2016 UICC.

  20. Breast cancer risk factors differ between Asian and white women with BRCA1/2 mutations.

    PubMed

    de Bruin, Monique A; Kwong, Ava; Goldstein, Benjamin A; Lipson, Jafi A; Ikeda, Debra M; McPherson, Lisa; Sharma, Bhavna; Kardashian, Ani; Schackmann, Elizabeth; Kingham, Kerry E; Mills, Meredith A; West, Dee W; Ford, James M; Kurian, Allison W

    2012-09-01

    The prevalence and penetrance of BRCA1 and BRCA2 (BRCA1/2) mutations may differ between Asians and whites. We investigated BRCA1/2 mutations and cancer risk factors in a clinic-based sample. BRCA1/2 mutation carriers were enrolled from cancer genetics clinics in Hong Kong and California according to standardized entry criteria. We compared BRCA mutation position, cancer history, hormonal and reproductive exposures. We analyzed DNA samples for single-nucleotide polymorphisms reported to modify breast cancer risk. We performed logistic regression to identify independent predictors of breast cancer. Fifty Asian women and forty-nine white American women were enrolled. BRCA1 mutations were more common among whites (67 vs. 42 %, p = 0.02), and BRCA2 mutations among Asians (58 vs. 37 %, p = 0.04). More Asians had breast cancer (76 vs. 53 %, p = 0.03); more whites had relatives with breast cancer (86 vs. 50 %, p = 0.0003). More whites than Asians had breastfed (71 vs. 42 %, p = 0.005), had high BMI (median 24.3 vs. 21.2, p = 0.04), consumed alcohol (2 drinks/week vs. 0, p < 0.001), and had oophorectomy (61 vs. 34 %, p = 0.01). Asians had a higher frequency of risk-associated alleles in MAP3K1 (88 vs. 59 %, p = 0.005) and TOX3/TNRC9 (88 vs. 55 %, p = 0.0002). On logistic regression, MAP3K1 was associated with increased breast cancer risk for BRCA2, but not BRCA1 mutation carriers; breast density was associated with increased risk among Asians but not whites. We found significant differences in breast cancer risk factors between Asian and white BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. Further investigation of racial differences in BRCA1/2 mutation epidemiology could inform targeted cancer risk-reduction strategies.

  1. Co-existence of breast and ovarian cancers in BRCA germ-line mutation carriers

    PubMed Central

    Dilawari, A; Cangiarella, J; Smith, J; Huang, A; Downey, A; Muggia, F

    2008-01-01

    The co-existence of breast and ovarian cancers in the same individual should raise suspicion of a hereditary process. Patients with either BRCA1 or BRCA2 germ-line mutations have an average risk of 39% and 11% respectively of developing ovarian cancer by the age of 70; they have a risk of 35–85% of developing breast cancer in their lifetime. We report here unusual pathologic features in a BRCA2 germ-line mutation carrier recently diagnosed with synchronous breast and ovarian cancers, and summarize the findings in six other women who were diagnosed with ovarian cancer either simultaneously with the diagnosis of breast cancer or at varying times after the diagnosis. While in most instances this may be a coincidental occurrence in highly susceptible individuals, the patient we highlight raises the provocative hypothesis that at times breast cancer metastasizes to the ovaries of mutation carriers and stimulates the development of an ovarian cancer as well as other cancers. In addition, these ovarian cancers may have different mechanisms of metastases predisposing them to travel to unusual sites. PMID:22275985

  2. gDNA enrichment by a transposase-based technology for NGS analysis of the whole sequence of BRCA1, BRCA2, and 9 genes involved in DNA damage repair.

    PubMed

    Chevrier, Sandy; Boidot, Romain

    2014-10-06

    The widespread use of Next Generation Sequencing has opened up new avenues for cancer research and diagnosis. NGS will bring huge amounts of new data on cancer, and especially cancer genetics. Current knowledge and future discoveries will make it necessary to study a huge number of genes that could be involved in a genetic predisposition to cancer. In this regard, we developed a Nextera design to study 11 complete genes involved in DNA damage repair. This protocol was developed to safely study 11 genes (ATM, BARD1, BRCA1, BRCA2, BRIP1, CHEK2, PALB2, RAD50, RAD51C, RAD80, and TP53) from promoter to 3'-UTR in 24 patients simultaneously. This protocol, based on transposase technology and gDNA enrichment, gives a great advantage in terms of time for the genetic diagnosis thanks to sample multiplexing. This protocol can be safely used with blood gDNA.

  3. Germline BRCA mutation in male carriers-ripe for precision oncology?

    PubMed

    Leão, Ricardo Romão Nazário; Price, Aryeh Joshua; James Hamilton, Robert

    2018-04-01

    Prostate cancer (PC) is one of the known heritable cancers with individual variations attributed to genetic factors. BRCA1 and BRCA2 are tumour suppressor genes with crucial roles in repairing DNA and thereby maintaining genomic integrity. Germline BRCA mutations predispose to multiple familial tumour types including PC. We performed a Pubmed database search along with review of reference lists from prominent articles to capture papers exploring the association between BRCA mtuations and prostate cancer risk and prognosis. Articles were retrieved until May 2017 and filtered for relevance, and publication type. We explored familial PC genetics; discussed the discovery and magnitude of the association between BRCA mutations and PC risk and outcome; examined implications of factoring BRCA mutations into PC screening; and discussed the rationale for chemoprevention in this high-risk population. We confirmed that BRCA1/2 mutations confer an up to 4.5-fold and 8.3-fold increased risk of PC, respectively. BRCA2 mutations are associated with an increased risk of high-grade disease, progression to metastatic castration-resistant disease, and 5-year cancer-specific survival rates of 50 to 60%. Despite the growing body of research on DNA repair genes, deeper analysis is needed to understand the aetiological role of germline BRCA mutations in the natural history of PC. There is a need for awareness to screen for this marker of PC risk. There is similarly an opportunity for structured PC screening programs for BRCA mutation carriers. Finally, further research is required to identify potential chemopreventive strategies for this high-risk subgroup.

  4. Chemosensitivity of BRCA1-Mutated Ovarian Cancer Cells and Established Cytotoxic Agents.

    PubMed

    van Haaften, Caroline; van Eendenburg, Jaap; Boot, Arnoud; Corver, Willem E; Haans, Lucien; van Wezel, Tom; Trimbos, J Baptist

    2017-10-01

    Serous adenocarcinomas that arise in patients with inherited mutations in the tumor suppressor genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 are initially well treatable with platinum/paclitaxel. For recurrent disease in patients with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations, olaparib treatment is available. To study additional therapeutic regimens, a better understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of the tumors in in vitro models is important. From a high-grade serous ovarian tumor of a BRCA1 mutation carrier, we established 3 distinct cell line subclones, OVCA-TR3.1, -2, and -3. Immunohistochemical characterization, flow cytometric analyses, chemosensitivity, and somatic mutation profiling were performed. The cell lines expressed AE1/AE3, Pax8, WT-1, OC125, estrogen receptor (ER), and p53, comparable to the primary tumor. Synergism could be shown in the combination treatment eremophila-1-(10)-11(13)-dien-12,8β-olide (EPD), with cisplatin, whereas combination with olaparib did not show synergism. Eremophila-1-(10)-11(13)-dien-12,8β-olide, a sesquiterpene lactone, is a novel chemotherapeutic agent. The inherited BRCA1 c.2989_2990dupAA mutation was confirmed in the cell lines. Loss of heterozygosity of BRCA1 was detected in each cell line, as well as a homozygous TP53 c.722C>A mutation. Flow cytometry showed that all cell lines had a distinct DNA index. Three new isogenic ovarian cancer cell lines were developed from a patient with a germ line BRCA1 mutation. Chemosensitivity profiling of the cell lines showed high tolerance for olaparib. Treatment with EPD proved synergistic with cisplatin. The effects of EPD will be further investigated for future clinical efficacy.

  5. Dealing with the unexpected: consumer responses to direct-access BRCA mutation testing

    PubMed Central

    Dijamco, Cheri; Kiefer, Amy K.; Eriksson, Nicholas; Moiseff, Bianca; Tung, Joyce Y.; Mountain, Joanna L.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Inherited BRCA gene mutations convey a high risk for breast and ovarian cancer, but current guidelines limit BRCA mutation testing to women with early-onset cancer and relatives of mutation-positive cases. Benefits and risks of providing this information directly to consumers are unknown. Methods. To assess and quantify emotional and behavioral reactions of consumers to their 23andMe Personal Genome Service® report of three BRCA mutations that are common in Ashkenazi Jews, we invited all 136 BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation-positive individuals in the 23andMe customer database who had chosen to view their BRCA reports to participate in this IRB-approved study. We also invited 160 mutation-negative customers who were matched for age, sex and ancestry. Semi-structured phone interviews were completed for 32 mutation carriers, 16 women and 16 men, and 31 non-carriers. Questions addressed personal and family history of cancer, decision and timing of viewing the BRCA report, recollection of the result, emotional responses, perception of personal cancer risk, information sharing, and actions taken or planned. Results. Eleven women and 14 men had received the unexpected result that they are carriers of a BRCA1 185delAG or 5382insC, or BRCA2 6174delT mutation. None of them reported extreme anxiety and four experienced moderate anxiety that was transitory. Remarkably, five women and six men described their response as neutral. Most carrier women sought medical advice and four underwent risk-reducing procedures after confirmatory mutation testing. Male carriers realized that their test results implied genetic risk for female relatives, and several of them felt considerably burdened by this fact. Sharing mutation information with family members led to screening of at least 30 relatives and identification of 13 additional carriers. Non-carriers did not report inappropriate actions, such as foregoing cancer screening. All but one of the 32 mutation-positive participants

  6. Within-host evolution of Staphylococcus aureus during asymptomatic carriage.

    PubMed

    Golubchik, Tanya; Batty, Elizabeth M; Miller, Ruth R; Farr, Helen; Young, Bernadette C; Larner-Svensson, Hanna; Fung, Rowena; Godwin, Heather; Knox, Kyle; Votintseva, Antonina; Everitt, Richard G; Street, Teresa; Cule, Madeleine; Ip, Camilla L C; Didelot, Xavier; Peto, Timothy E A; Harding, Rosalind M; Wilson, Daniel J; Crook, Derrick W; Bowden, Rory

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major cause of healthcare associated mortality, but like many important bacterial pathogens, it is a common constituent of the normal human body flora. Around a third of healthy adults are carriers. Recent evidence suggests that evolution of S. aureus during nasal carriage may be associated with progression to invasive disease. However, a more detailed understanding of within-host evolution under natural conditions is required to appreciate the evolutionary and mechanistic reasons why commensal bacteria such as S. aureus cause disease. Therefore we examined in detail the evolutionary dynamics of normal, asymptomatic carriage. Sequencing a total of 131 genomes across 13 singly colonized hosts using the Illumina platform, we investigated diversity, selection, population dynamics and transmission during the short-term evolution of S. aureus. We characterized the processes by which the raw material for evolution is generated: micro-mutation (point mutation and small insertions/deletions), macro-mutation (large insertions/deletions) and the loss or acquisition of mobile elements (plasmids and bacteriophages). Through an analysis of synonymous, non-synonymous and intergenic mutations we discovered a fitness landscape dominated by purifying selection, with rare examples of adaptive change in genes encoding surface-anchored proteins and an enterotoxin. We found evidence for dramatic, hundred-fold fluctuations in the size of the within-host population over time, which we related to the cycle of colonization and clearance. Using a newly-developed population genetics approach to detect recent transmission among hosts, we revealed evidence for recent transmission between some of our subjects, including a husband and wife both carrying populations of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). This investigation begins to paint a picture of the within-host evolution of an important bacterial pathogen during its prevailing natural state, asymptomatic

  7. Prevalence and Type of BRCA Mutations in Hispanics Undergoing Genetic Cancer Risk Assessment in the Southwestern United States: A Report From the Clinical Cancer Genetics Community Research Network

    PubMed Central

    Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Clague, Jessica; Martir-Negron, Arelis; Ogaz, Raquel; Herzog, Josef; Ricker, Charité; Jungbluth, Chelsy; Cina, Cheryl; Duncan, Paul; Unzeitig, Gary; Saldivar, J. Salvador; Beattie, Mary; Feldman, Nancy; Sand, Sharon; Port, Danielle; Barragan, Deborah I.; John, Esther M.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Larson, Garrett P.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To determine the prevalence and type of BRCA1 and BRCA2 (BRCA) mutations among Hispanics in the Southwestern United States and their potential impact on genetic cancer risk assessment (GCRA). Patients and Methods Hispanics (n = 746) with a personal or family history of breast and/or ovarian cancer were enrolled in an institutional review board–approved registry and received GCRA and BRCA testing within a consortium of 14 clinics. Population-based Hispanic breast cancer cases (n = 492) enrolled in the Northern California Breast Cancer Family Registry, negative by sequencing for BRCA mutations, were analyzed for the presence of the BRCA1 ex9-12del large rearrangement. Results Deleterious BRCA mutations were detected in 189 (25%) of 746 familial clinic patients (124 BRCA1, 65 BRCA2); 21 (11%) of 189 were large rearrangement mutations, of which 62% (13 of 21) were BRCA1 ex9-12del. Nine recurrent mutations accounted for 53% of the total. Among these, BRCA1 ex9-12del seems to be a Mexican founder mutation and represents 10% to 12% of all BRCA1 mutations in clinic- and population-based cohorts in the United States. Conclusion BRCA mutations were prevalent in the largest study of Hispanic breast and/or ovarian cancer families in the United States to date, and a significant proportion were large rearrangement mutations. The high frequency of large rearrangement mutations warrants screening in every case. We document the first Mexican founder mutation (BRCA1 ex9-12del), which, along with other recurrent mutations, suggests the potential for a cost-effective panel approach to ancestry-informed GCRA. PMID:23233716

  8. Endometrial cancers in mutation carriers from hereditary breast ovarian cancer syndrome kindreds: report from the Creighton University Hereditary Cancer Registry with review of the implications.

    PubMed

    Casey, Murray Joseph; Bewtra, Chhanda; Lynch, Henry T; Snyder, Carrie L; Stacey, Mark

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to categorize and report endometrial cancers in mutation carriers from hereditary breast ovarian cancer families. Our Hereditary Cancer Registry was searched for gynecologic and peritoneal cancers linked to mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2. Invasive cancers were registered in 101 mutation carriers with complete pathology reports. Efforts were made to secure diagnostic surgical pathology tissues for review. All records and available diagnostic slides were meticulously studied, and primary cancers were classified. Eight malignancies were classified as primary endometrial cancers. Five of these were low- or intermediate-grade endometrioid carcinomas, and 3 were pure serous carcinomas or contained serous carcinoma elements mixed with high-grade endometrioid carcinoma. Breast cancers were diagnosed in 5 patients before and in 1 patient after endometrial carcinoma. Three endometrioid carcinomas were preceded by estrogen treatment, 2 for many years and the other for only 2 months, and 2 of the patients with serous carcinoma had been treated with tamoxifen. The finding that 8 of gynecologic and peritoneal cancers in 101 mutation carriers were endometrial cancers with a smaller proportion of endometrioid carcinomas than reported in general populations is added to the current controversial literature on endometrial cancer, particularly regarding serous carcinomas, in hereditary breast ovarian cancer syndrome. Well-designed prospective programs for standardized surgical and pathologic handling, processing, and reporting are essential for working out the pathogenesis, true risks, and best management of this disease in carriers of deleterious BRCA1 and BRCA2 germline mutations.

  9. Landscape of somatic mutations in 560 breast cancer whole-genome sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Nik-Zainal, Serena; Davies, Helen; Staaf, Johan

    Here, we analysed whole-genome sequences of 560 breast cancers to advance understanding of the driver mutations conferring clonal advantage and the mutational processes generating somatic mutations. We found that 93 protein-coding cancer genes carried probable driver mutations. Some non-coding regions exhibited high mutation frequencies, but most have distinctive structural features probably causing elevated mutation rates and do not contain driver mutations. Mutational signature analysis was extended to genome rearrangements and revealed twelve base substitution and six rearrangement signatures. Three rearrangement signatures, characterized by tandem duplications or deletions, appear associated with defective homologous-recombination-based DNA repair: one with deficient BRCA1 function, anothermore » with deficient BRCA1 or BRCA2 function, the cause of the third is unknown. This analysis of all classes of somatic mutation across exons, introns and intergenic regions highlights the repertoire of cancer genes and mutational processes operating, and progresses towards a comprehensive account of the somatic genetic basis of breast cancer.« less

  10. Landscape of somatic mutations in 560 breast cancer whole-genome sequences

    DOE PAGES

    Nik-Zainal, Serena; Davies, Helen; Staaf, Johan; ...

    2016-05-02

    Here, we analysed whole-genome sequences of 560 breast cancers to advance understanding of the driver mutations conferring clonal advantage and the mutational processes generating somatic mutations. We found that 93 protein-coding cancer genes carried probable driver mutations. Some non-coding regions exhibited high mutation frequencies, but most have distinctive structural features probably causing elevated mutation rates and do not contain driver mutations. Mutational signature analysis was extended to genome rearrangements and revealed twelve base substitution and six rearrangement signatures. Three rearrangement signatures, characterized by tandem duplications or deletions, appear associated with defective homologous-recombination-based DNA repair: one with deficient BRCA1 function, anothermore » with deficient BRCA1 or BRCA2 function, the cause of the third is unknown. This analysis of all classes of somatic mutation across exons, introns and intergenic regions highlights the repertoire of cancer genes and mutational processes operating, and progresses towards a comprehensive account of the somatic genetic basis of breast cancer.« less

  11. Research progress of asymptomatic bacteriuria before arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qingyu; Liu, Lihua; Sun, Wei; Gao, Fuqiang; Cheng, Liming; Li, Zirong

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Background: A high prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria exists in patients prior to arthroplasty, and urinary tract infection is considered to be a source of postoperative superficial wound and prosthetic joint infections. There is no consensus whether to screen for and treat asymptomatic bacteriuria before arthroplasty. Objective: To summarize the association between asymptomatic bacteriuria and complications after arthroplasty and to evaluate the clinical benefits of treating asymptomatic bacteriuria prior to arthroplasty. Method: We systematically searched PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library to retrieve potentially eligible articles. By screening the titles and abstracts of retrieved records and then reading the full texts of the remaining papers, we finally included 8 English-language articles in this systematic review. Results: Asymptomatic bacteriuria prior to arthroplasty is significantly associated with an increased occurrence of postoperative prosthetic joint and superficial wound infections. However, there is little evidence for direct or hematogenous seeding of urinary infections, and treating asymptomatic bacteriuria before arthroplasty did not decrease the incidence of postoperative infectious complications. Conclusion: Asymptomatic bacteriuria is not a contraindication for arthroplasty, and the practice of routine preoperative screening for and treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria should not be continued. PMID:29443741

  12. Antimicrobial Treatment of Asymptomatic Bacteriuria in Healthy Ambulatory Subjects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhanel, George G.

    1990-01-01

    The treatment of urinary tract infections is discussed. Specific issues considered include the definition of asymptomatic bacteriuria, the prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria, the controversies of who should be treated, and antimicrobial treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria. (MLW)

  13. A Novel Germline Mutation in BRCA1 Causes Exon 20 Skipping in a Korean Family with a History of Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Kyong-Ah; Kong, Sun-Young; Lee, Eun Ji; Cho, Jeong Nam; Chang, Suhwan; Lee, Eun Sook

    2017-09-01

    Germline mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are strong genetic factors for predispositions to breast, ovarian, and other related cancers. This report describes a family with a history of breast and ovarian cancers that harbored a novel BRCA1 germline mutation. A single nucleotide deletion in intron 20, namely c.5332+4delA, was detected in a 43-year-old patient with breast cancer. This mutation led to the skipping of exon 20, which in turn resulted in the production of a truncated BRCA1 protein that was 1773 amino acids in length. The mother of the proband had died due to ovarian cancer and had harbored the same germline mutation. Ectopically expressed mutant BRCA1 protein interacted with the BARD1 protein, but showed a reduced transcriptional function, as demonstrated by the expression of cyclin B1 . This novel germline mutation in the BRCA1 gene caused familial breast and ovarian cancers.

  14. Distinct Brca1 Mutations Differentially Reduce Hematopoietic Stem Cell Function.

    PubMed

    Mgbemena, Victoria E; Signer, Robert A J; Wijayatunge, Ranjula; Laxson, Travis; Morrison, Sean J; Ross, Theodora S

    2017-01-24

    BRCA1 is a well-known DNA repair pathway component and a tissue-specific tumor suppressor. However, its role in hematopoiesis is uncertain. Here, we report that a cohort of patients heterozygous for BRCA1 mutations experienced more hematopoietic toxicity from chemotherapy than those with BRCA2 mutations. To test whether this reflects a requirement for BRCA1 in hematopoiesis, we generated mice with Brca1 mutations in hematopoietic cells. Mice homozygous for a null Brca1 mutation in the embryonic hematopoietic system (Vav1-iCre;Brca1 F22-24/F22-24 ) developed hematopoietic defects in early adulthood that included reduced hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Although mice homozygous for a huBRCA1 knockin allele (Brca1 BRCA1/BRCA1 ) were normal, mice with a mutant huBRCA1/5382insC allele and a null allele (Mx1-Cre;Brca1 F22-24/5382insC ) had severe hematopoietic defects marked by a complete loss of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Our data show that Brca1 is necessary for HSC maintenance and normal hematopoiesis and that distinct mutations lead to different degrees of hematopoietic dysfunction. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. [Prolonged leucopenia in asymptomatic children].

    PubMed

    Kaczorowska-Hać, Barbara; Maciejka-Kapuścińska, Lucyna; Reszczyńska, Iwona; Wiśniewski, Jakub; Buchowiecki, Lech; Kozłowska, Marta; Adamkiewicz-Drożyńska, Elżbieta

    2014-01-01

    The term leucopenia is still a challenge for clinicists in cases of unknown reasons. There are two main groups of leucopenia: 1. Severe, chronic leucopenia (cyclic, inborn, and idiopathic); 2. Acquired or secondary (reasons: some drugs, infections, viral mainly, autoimmune diseases, haematological abnormalities, neoplasms, hiperspleenism and metabolic diseases). The aim of this investigation was an analysis of asymptomatic, lasting over three months leucopenia myelograms of childhood. 21 children (6 girls and 15 boys, aged 10-17 years, mean 13.6, median 12 years) were analysed. The children were referred to our clinic by family physicians to investigate the reason of asymptomatic, lasting over three months leucopenia. These children are still under our observation from one till four years. Despite the fact of lasting over three months leucopenia, the general condition of the patients is good. In all the patients the myelogram analysis was performed after May-Grumwald-Giemsa dying, three slides of one hundred cells were counted. Statistical analysis was made using STATISTICA (Stat Soft Polska) programme. Mean number of leucocytes was 3.06x109/ l (median 2.75x109/l, values from 2.46x109/l to 3.53x109/l), mean number of neutrocytes was 1.15x109/l (median 1.07 x 109/l, values from 0.62x109/l to 1470x109/l). Hemoglobin concentration and platelets number were normal. Mean number of marrow cells were within references. However mean number of myelocytes, metamyelocytes, bands and eosynophils were lower than mean number of general population marrow cells (p<0.05). Mean values of myeloblasts, neutrophils, and monocytes were statistically higher than in general population (p<0.05). 1. Hypothesis of obtained differencess in numer of marrow cells would need to be investigated in broad population of patients. 2. Considering that three children presented with positive familial leucopenia history (in one of them grandmother, in two anothers fathers) genetic predisposition can be

  16. Should asymptomatic bacteriuria be screened in pregnancy?

    PubMed

    Uncu, Y; Uncu, G; Esmer, A; Bilgel, N

    2002-01-01

    The incidence of asymptomatic bacteriuria is reported as 2-14% during pregnancy. Fetal and maternal complications like acute pyelonephritis, hypertension, anemia, preterm labor, low-birth-weight infants and intrauterine growth retardation can be expected. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of asymptomatic bacteriuria during pregnancy and its relation to pregnancy complications. The study involved 270 pregnant women up to 32 gestational weeks during a 9-month period. At the initial visit, they were screened with urine culture in order to detect asymptomatic bacteriuria. A control group was formed in a retrospective manner from the first day of the study with 186 pregnant women who delivered in our clinic and who were not screened for asymptomatic bacteriuria. The incidence of asymptomatic bacteriuria was 9.31%. Escherichia coli accounted for 79%, which was the most frequent of the isolates. We observed recurrence and had to apply treatment again to 21.7% of the women. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive and negative predictive values of leucocyturia as a screening test for asymptomatic bacteriuria were 91.3%, 83.6%, 45.6% and 98.5%, respectively. We diagnosed preterm labor in six of 23 (26%) with asymptomatic bacteriuria and 16 in 163 (9.3%) women in the urine culture negative group. The ratio acute pyelonephritis in the group which was routinely screened and treated for asymtomatic bacteriuria was 0.5% while the prevalence was 2.1% in the nonscreened group. Considering the relatively high incidence of asymptomatic bacteriuria during pregnancy and the relevant complications, we propose to screen and treat asymptomatic bacteriuria routinely in all pregnant women.

  17. Peripheral immunophenotype and viral promoter variants during the asymptomatic phase of feline immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Murphy, B; Hillman, C; McDonnel, S

    2014-01-22

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV)-infected cats enter a clinically asymptomatic phase during chronic infection. Despite the lack of overt clinical disease, the asymptomatic phase is characterized by persistent immunologic impairment. In the peripheral blood obtained from cats experimentally infected with FIV-C for approximately 5 years, we identified a persistent inversion of the CD4/CD8 ratio. We cloned and sequenced the FIV-C long terminal repeat containing the viral promoter from cells infected with the inoculating virus and from in vivo-derived peripheral blood mononuclear cells and CD4 T cells isolated at multiple time points throughout the asymptomatic phase. Relative to the inoculating virus, viral sequences amplified from cells isolated from all of the infected animals demonstrated multiple single nucleotide mutations and a short deletion within the viral U3, R and U5 regions. A transcriptionally inactivating proviral mutation in the U3 promoter AP-1 site was identified at multiple time points from all of the infected animals but not within cell-associated viral RNA. In contrast, no mutations were identified within the sequence of the viral dUTPase gene amplified from PBMC isolated at approximately 5 years post-infection relative to the inoculating sequence. The possible implications of these mutations to viral pathogenesis are discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Systematic review of the empirical investigation of resources to support decision-making regarding BRCA1 and BRCA2 genetic testing in women with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Grimmett, Chloe; Pickett, Karen; Shepherd, Jonathan; Welch, Karen; Recio-Saucedo, Alejandra; Streit, Elke; Seers, Helen; Armstrong, Anne; Cutress, Ramsey I; Evans, D Gareth; Copson, Ellen; Meiser, Bettina; Eccles, Diana; Foster, Claire

    2018-05-01

    Identify existing resources developed and/or evaluated empirically in the published literature designed to support women with breast cancer making decisions regarding genetic testing for BRCA1/2 mutations. Systematic review of seven electronic databases. Studies were included if they described or evaluated resources that were designed to support women with breast cancer in making a decision to have genetic counselling or testing for familial breast cancer. Outcome and process evaluations, using any type of study design, as well as articles reporting the development of decision aids, were eligible for inclusion. Total of 9 publications, describing 6 resources were identified. Resources were effective at increasing knowledge or understanding of hereditary breast cancer. Satisfaction with resources was high. There was no evidence that any resource increased distress, worry or decisional conflict. Few resources included active functionalities for example, values-based exercises, to support decision-making. Tailored resources supporting decision-making may be helpful and valued by patients and increase knowledge of hereditary breast cancer, without causing additional distress. Clinicians should provide supportive written information to patients where it is available. However, there is a need for robustly developed decision tools to support decision-making around genetic testing in women with breast cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. [Asymptomatic kidney stones: active surveillance vs. treatment].

    PubMed

    Neisius, A; Thomas, C; Roos, F C; Hampel, C; Fritsche, H-M; Bach, T; Thüroff, J W; Knoll, T

    2015-09-01

    The prevalence of kidney stones is increasing worldwide. Asymptomatic non-obstructing kidney stones are increasingly detected as an incidental finding on radiologic imaging, which has been performed more frequently over the last decades. Beside the current interventional treatment modalities such as extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL), ureterorenoscopy (URS) and percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL), active surveillance of asymptomatic kidney stones has been a focus of discussion lately, not only for attending physicians, but even more so for patients. The current German and European guidelines recommend active surveillance for patients with asymptomatic kidney stones if no interventional therapy is mandatory because of pain or medical factors. Herein we review the current literature on risks and benefits of active surveillance of asymptomatic non-obstructing kidney stones. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. Health survey and assessment of the polymorphisms BRCA1/P871L, BRCA1/Q356R, and BRCA2/N372H in female gas station workers in Rio de Janeiro.

    PubMed

    Silvestre, Rafaele T; Delmonico, Lucas; Bravo, Maryah; Santiago, Fábio; Scherrer, Luciano R; Moreira, Aline Dos Santos; Tabalipa, Marianne; Otero, Ubirani; Ornellas, Maria Helena F; Alves, Gilda

    2017-12-01

    Gas station workers are exposed to chemicals known to be carcinogenic, especially benzene. The objective was to analyze the health problems of female gas station workers by means of sociodemographic and clinical questionnaires, and laboratorial exams. We performed the genotyping of the polymorphisms BRCA1/P871L and BRCA1/Q356R by Polymerase Chain Reaction-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism, and of variant allele BRCA2/N372H through direct sequencing. The female workers showed a higher concentration of monocytes (P = 0.039); a greater number of spontaneous abortions (P = 0.025, OR = 4.977, 95% CI = 1.135-30.669); higher tobacco consumption (P = 0.013); and higher alcohol consumption (P = 0.05). The statistical analysis of the polymorphisms associated with the variables monocyte concentration and miscarriage number did not reveal a significant relationship, and smoking and spontaneous abortion were not statistically associated either. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 58:730-734, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Finnish Fanconi anemia mutations and hereditary predisposition to breast and prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Mantere, T; Haanpää, M; Hanenberg, H; Schleutker, J; Kallioniemi, A; Kähkönen, M; Parto, K; Avela, K; Aittomäki, K; von Koskull, H; Hartikainen, J M; Kosma, V-M; Laasanen, S-L; Mannermaa, A; Pylkäs, K; Winqvist, R

    2015-07-01

    Mutations in downstream Fanconi anemia (FA) pathway genes, BRCA2, PALB2, BRIP1 and RAD51C, explain part of the hereditary breast cancer susceptibility, but the contribution of other FA genes has remained questionable. Due to FA's rarity, the finding of recurrent deleterious FA mutations among breast cancer families is challenging. The use of founder populations, such as the Finns, could provide some advantage in this. Here, we have resolved complementation groups and causative mutations of five FA patients, representing the first mutation confirmed FA cases in Finland. These patients belonged to complementation groups FA-A (n = 3), FA-G (n = 1) and FA-I (n = 1). The prevalence of the six FA causing mutations was then studied in breast (n = 1840) and prostate (n = 565) cancer cohorts, and in matched controls (n = 1176 females, n = 469 males). All mutations were recurrent, but no significant association with cancer susceptibility was observed for any: the prevalence of FANCI c.2957_2969del and c.3041G>A mutations was even highest in healthy males (1.7%). This strengthens the exclusive role of downstream genes in cancer predisposition. From a clinical point of view, current results provide fundamental information of the mutations to be tested first in all suspected FA cases in Finland. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Evaluation of the need for routine clinical testing of PALB2 c.1592delT mutation in BRCA negative Northern Finnish breast cancer families.

    PubMed

    Haanpää, Maria; Pylkäs, Katri; Moilanen, Jukka S; Winqvist, Robert

    2013-08-13

    Testing for mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes among high-risk breast cancer patients has become a routine practice among clinical geneticists. Unfortunately, however, the genetic background of a majority of the cases coming to the clinics remains currently unexplained, making genetic counseling rather challenging. In recent years it has become evident world-wide that also women carrying a heterozygous germline mutation in PALB2 are at significantly increased risk of getting breast cancer. We have previously studied the clinical as well as biological impact of the PALB2 c.1592delT founder mutation occurring in about 1% of Finnish breast cancer patients unselected for their family history of disease, and our results demonstrated a 40% increased breast cancer risk by age 70 for female mutation carriers. Thus, this relatively common mutation in PALB2 is associated with a high risk of developing breast cancer. The aim of the current study was to analyze whether female index individuals of breast cancer families who had tested negative for germline mutations in BRCA1/BRCA2 as part of genetic counseling services should be offered mutation testing for PALB2 c.1592delT. The study cohort consisted of altogether 223 individuals who had contacted the Department of Clinical Genetics at the Oulu University Hospital in Finland between the years 1997 and 2011 for counseling on hereditary breast and/or ovarian cancer risk. 101 of them met our inclusion criteria. Of these, 10 persons were now deceased, but 6 of them had participated in one of our previous studies on PALB2. Seventy (77%) of the remaining 91 persons responded positively to our study invitation. Chart review of updated pedigree data led to the exclusion of 14 further individuals not meeting the selection criteria. Of the 56 alive affected female individuals screened for PALB2 c.1592delT, altogether two (3.6%) tested positive for this mutation. In addition, of the previously tested but now deceased 6 persons

  3. BRCA mutations and their influence on pathological complete response and prognosis in a clinical cohort of neoadjuvantly treated breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Wunderle, Marius; Gass, Paul; Häberle, Lothar; Flesch, Vivien M; Rauh, Claudia; Bani, Mayada R; Hack, Carolin C; Schrauder, Michael G; Jud, Sebastian M; Emons, Julius; Erber, Ramona; Ekici, Arif B; Hoyer, Juliane; Vasileiou, Georgia; Kraus, Cornelia; Reis, Andre; Hartmann, Arndt; Lux, Michael P; Beckmann, Matthias W; Fasching, Peter A; Hein, Alexander

    2018-05-03

    BRCA1/2 mutations influence the molecular characteristics and the effects of systemic treatment of breast cancer. This study investigates the impact of germline BRCA1/2 mutations on pathological complete response and prognosis in patients receiving neoadjuvant systemic chemotherapy. Breast cancer patients were tested for a BRCA1/2 mutation in clinical routine work and were treated with anthracycline-based or platinum-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy between 1997 and 2015. These patients were identified in the tumor registry of the Breast Center of the University of Erlangen (Germany). Logistic regression and Cox regression analyses were performed to investigate the associations between BRCA1/2 mutation status, pathological complete response, disease-free survival, and overall survival. Among 355 patients, 59 had a mutation in BRCA1 or in BRCA2 (16.6%), 43 in BRCA1 (12.1%), and 16 in BRCA2 (4.5%). Pathological complete response defined as "ypT0; ypN0" was observed in 54.3% of BRCA1/2 mutation carriers, but only in 22.6% of non-carriers. The adjusted odds ratio was 2.48 (95% CI 1.26-4.91) for BRCA1/2 carriers versus non-carriers. Patients who achieved a pathological complete response had better disease-free survival and overall survival rates compared with those who did not achieve a pathological complete response, regardless of BRCA1/2 mutation status. BRCA1/2 mutation status leads to better responses to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer. Pathological complete response is the main predictor of disease-free survival and overall survival, independently of BRCA1/2 mutation status.

  4. Germline truncating-mutations in BRCA1 and MSH6 in a patient with early onset endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Kast, Karin; Neuhann, Teresa M; Görgens, Heike; Becker, Kerstin; Keller, Katja; Klink, Barbara; Aust, Daniela; Distler, Wolfgang; Schröck, Evelin; Schackert, Hans K

    2012-11-20

    Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer Syndrome (HBOCS) and Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal Cancer Syndrome (HNPCC, Lynch Syndrome) are two tumor predisposition syndromes responsible for the majority of hereditary breast and colorectal cancers. Carriers of both germline mutations in breast cancer genes BRCA1 or BRCA2 and in mismatch repair (MMR) genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 or PMS2 are very rare. We identified germline mutations in BRCA1 and in MSH6 in a patient with increased risk for HBOC diagnosed with endometrial cancer at the age of 46 years. Although carriers of mutations in both MMR and BRCA genes are rare in Caucasian populations and anamnestical and histopathological findings may guide clinicians to identify these families, both syndromes can only be diagnosed through a complete gene analysis of the respective genes.

  5. [Clinical-genetic care of BRCA-mutation carrier women: prevention, diagnosis and therapy].

    PubMed

    Nagy, Zsolt; Csanád, Mónika; Tóth, Katalin; Máté, Szabolcs; Joó, József Gábor

    2011-06-05

    Predictive genetics opens a considerable perspective in the diagnostics as well as the treatment of breast and ovarian cancer. Current recommendations and guidelines for the management of BRCA 1 and BRCA 2 mutation carriers are not based on controlled randomized trials, but on expert opinions. The existing options of prevention, early diagnosis and treatment must be clearly interpreted to the patient. In the context of a dedicated genetic counseling the participation of all involved professionals (geneticist, oncologist, surgeon, gynecologist) is required. The decision-making process concerning the possibilities of prevention, diagnosis and treatment is always deeply influenced by the patient's own experience with the cancer occurred in the family, as well as by her values and expectations of life. The focused multidisciplinary approach, with the application of results from prospective studies in cohorts of BRCA mutation carriers allow the concerned individuals to benefit from this kind of approach of medical treatment.

  6. Management of asymptomatic gene carriers of transthyretin familial amyloid polyneuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Barroso, Fabio; González‐Duarte, Alejandra; Conceição, Isabel; Obici, Laura; Keohane, Denis; Amass, Leslie

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Transthyretin familial amyloid polyneuropathy (TTR‐FAP) is a rare, severe, and irreversible, adult‐onset, hereditary disorder caused by autosomal‐dominant mutations in the TTR gene that increase the intrinsic propensity of transthyretin protein to misfold and deposit systemically as insoluble amyloid fibrils in nerve tissues, the heart, and other organs. TTR‐FAP is characterized by relentless, progressively debilitating polyneuropathy, and leads to death, on average, within 10 years of symptom onset without treatment. With increased availability of disease‐modifying treatment options for a wider spectrum of patients with TTR‐FAP, timely detection of the disease may offer substantial clinical benefits. This review discusses mutation‐specific predictive genetic testing in first‐degree relatives of index patients diagnosed with TTR‐FAP and the structured clinical follow‐up of asymptomatic gene carriers for prompt diagnosis and early therapeutic intervention before accumulation of substantial damage. Muscle Nerve 54: 353–360, 2016 PMID:27273296

  7. Immune response in asymptomatic smokers.

    PubMed

    Zeidel, A; Beilin, B; Yardeni, I; Mayburd, E; Smirnov, G; Bessler, H

    2002-09-01

    It has been demonstrated that cigarette smoking affects the immune system. Impairment of alveolar mononuclear cell function, described previously, may contribute to the higher rate of postoperative respiratory infections. However, increased susceptibility of smokers to infections of other origin (e.g. wound-related) implies that tobacco effect is not restricted to the respiratory immune competent cells. The present study was designed to investigate the systemic effect of tobacco smoking as it exerted on blood-derived immune cells. We measured systemic cytotoxic activity of natural killer cells, production of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines by blood mononuclear cells and their proliferation in response to mitogens. To minimize the immunosuppressive effect of other smoke-related factors, the smokers with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) were excluded from this study. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from 24 chronic asymptomatic smokers, and 28 controls, age and gender matched, were isolated and incubated in vitro with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or phytohemagglutinin (PHA) to induce secretion of IL-1beta, IL-1ra, IL-6, IL-10, TNFalpha and IL-2, respectively, from mononuclear cells. The level of the cytokines in the supernatants was measured using ELISA kits. The proliferative response to the mitogens PHA and concanavalin A (ConA) was evaluated by 3H-thymidine incorporation and NK cell cytotoxicity by 51Cr release assay. Mononuclear cells from smokers showed increased production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1beta, IL-6 and TNFalpha and enhanced proliferative response to mitogens as compared to non-smoking population. The secretion of IL-2 and the anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-1ra and IL-10 was similar in both groups. NK cell cytotoxic activity was suppressed in the smokers. Cigarette smokers without chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exhibit impaired NK cytotoxic activity in peripheral blood and unbalanced systemic production

  8. Asymptomatic Child Heterozygous for Hemoglobin S and Hemoglobin Pôrto Alegre

    PubMed Central

    Lojo, Liliana; Santiago-Borrero, Pedro; Rivera, Enid; Renta, Jessicca; Cadilla, Carmen L

    2013-01-01

    Hemoglobin Pôrto Alegre (PA) is a rare hemoglobin resulting from a mutation in β9(A6)Ser→Cys. We describe an asymptomatic Puerto Rican female with combined heterozygosity for Hb PA and Hb S. Since birth, she has maintained normal hemoglobin, bilirubin, LDH levels, and reticulocyte count. Peripheral smear evaluation has revealed normal erythrocyte morphology with no changes suggestive of hemolysis. We conclude that the presence of Hb PA does not increase the risk of red blood cell sickling in patients who carry the Hb S mutation. PMID:21225927

  9. Asymptomatic child heterozygous for hemoglobin S and hemoglobin Pôrto Alegre.

    PubMed

    Lojo, Liliana; Santiago-Borrero, Pedro; Rivera, Enid; Renta, Jessicca; Cadilla, Carmen L

    2011-03-01

    Hemoglobin Pôrto Alegre (PA) is a rare hemoglobin resulting from a mutation in β9(A6)Ser → Cys. We describe an asymptomatic Puerto Rican female with combined heterozygosity for Hb PA and Hb S. Since birth, she has maintained normal hemoglobin, bilirubin, LDH levels, and reticulocyte count. Peripheral smear evaluation has revealed normal erythrocyte morphology with no changes suggestive of hemolysis. We conclude that the presence of Hb PA does not increase the risk of red blood cell sickling in patients who carry the Hb S mutation. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Antibiotics for asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Smaill, F

    2000-01-01

    Up to 30% of mothers develop acute pyelonephritis if asymptomatic bacteriuria is untreated. Asymptomatic bacteriuria may have a role in preterm birth, or it may be a marker for low socioeconomic status and thus, low birth weight. The objective of this review was to assess the effect of antibiotic treatment for asymptomatic bacteriuria on persistent bacteriuria during pregnancy, the risk of preterm delivery and the development of pyelonephritis after delivery. I searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group trials register. Randomised trials comparing antibiotic treatment with placebo or no treatment in pregnant women with asymptomatic bacteriuria found on antenatal screening. Trial quality was assessed. Thirteen studies were included. Overall the study quality was not strong. Antibiotic treatment compared to placebo or no treatment was effective in clearing asymptomatic bacteriuria (odds ratio 0.07, 95% confidence interval 0.05 to 0.10). The incidence of pyelonephritis was reduced (odds ratio 0.25, 95% confidence interval 0.19 to 0.32). Antibiotic treatment was also associated with a reduction in the incidence of preterm delivery or low birth weight babies (odds ratio 0.60, 95% confidence interval 0.45 to 0.80). Antibiotic treatment appears to be effective in reducing the risk of pyelonephritis in pregnancy. An apparent reduction in preterm delivery is consistent with current theories about the role of infection in preterm birth, but this association should be interpreted with caution.

  11. Antibiotics for asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Smaill, F

    2001-01-01

    Up to 30% of mothers develop acute pyelonephritis if asymptomatic bacteriuria is untreated. Asymptomatic bacteriuria may have a role in preterm birth or it may be a marker for low socioeconomic status which is associated with low birth weight. The objective of this review was to assess the effect of antibiotic treatment for asymptomatic bacteriuria on persistent bacteriuria during pregnancy, the risk of preterm delivery, and the development of pyelonephritis. I searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group trials register. Date of last search: December 2000. Randomised trials comparing antibiotic treatment with placebo or no treatment in pregnant women with asymptomatic bacteriuria found on antenatal screening. Trial quality was assessed. Fourteen studies were included. Overall the study quality was not strong. Antibiotic treatment compared to placebo or no treatment was effective in clearing asymptomatic bacteriuria (odds ratio 0.07, 95% confidence interval 0.05 to 0.10). The incidence of pyelonephritis was reduced (odds ratio 0.24, 95% confidence interval 0.19 to 0.32). Antibiotic treatment was also associated with a reduction in the incidence of preterm delivery or low birth weight babies (odds ratio 0.60, 95% confidence interval 0.45 to 0.80). Antibiotic treatment is effective in reducing the risk of pyelonephritis in pregnancy. An apparent reduction in preterm delivery is consistent with current theories about the role of infection in preterm birth, but this association should be interpreted with caution.

  12. Antibiotics for asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Smaill, F; Vazquez, J C

    2007-04-18

    Asymptomatic bacteriuria occurs in 2% to 10% of pregnancies and, if not treated, up to 30% of mothers will develop acute pyelonephritis. Asymptomatic bacteriuria has been associated with low birthweight and preterm delivery. To assess the effect of antibiotic treatment for asymptomatic bacteriuria on persistent bacteriuria during pregnancy, the development of pyelonephritis and the risk of low birthweight and preterm delivery. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (January 2007). Randomized trials comparing antibiotic treatment with placebo or no treatment in pregnant women with asymptomatic bacteriuria found on antenatal screening. We assessed trial quality. Fourteen studies were included. Overall the study quality was poor. Antibiotic treatment compared to placebo or no treatment was effective in clearing asymptomatic bacteriuria (risk ratio (RR) 0.25, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.14 to 0.48). The incidence of pyelonephritis was reduced (RR 0.23, 95% CI 0.13 to 0.41). Antibiotic treatment was also associated with a reduction in the incidence of low birthweight babies (RR 0.66, 95% CI 0.49 to 0.89) but a difference in preterm delivery was not seen. Antibiotic treatment is effective in reducing the risk of pyelonephritis in pregnancy. A reduction in low birthweight is consistent with current theories about the role of infection in adverse pregnancy outcomes, but this association should be interpreted with caution given the poor quality of the included studies.

  13. Asymptomatic plasmodial infection in Colombian pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Carmona-Fonseca, Jaime; Agudelo, Olga M; Arango, Eliana M

    2017-08-01

    Information about asymptomatic plasmodial infection is scarce in the world, and the current antimalarial program goals (control, elimination, and eradication) demand this evidence to be well documented in different populations and malaria transmission settings. This study aimed to measure the prevalence of API in Colombian pregnant women at delivery. A retrospective prevalence survey was used. Women were recruited at hospital obstetric facility in each of the municipalities of Turbo, Necoclí in Antioquia department, and Puerto Libertador in Córdoba department. Malaria infection was tested by thick blood smear (TBS) and real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR). Ninety-six pregnant women at delivery were studied: 95% were asymptomatic (91/96), 45% had asymptomatic plasmodial infection (API) by qPCR (41/91), and only 8% (7/91) had API by microscopy. The prevalence of submicroscopic infections (TBS negative and qPCR positive) was very high, 37% (34/91) in asymptomatic women and 41% (39/96) in total women studied (91 asymptomatic and 5 symptomatic). The prevalence of API in Colombian pregnant women is much higher than which is expected for a country that does not have the level of malaria transmission as Sub-Saharan African countries. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Deleterious BRCA1/2 mutations in an urban population of Black women

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Karen Lisa; Stein, Julie; DeMarco, Tiffani; Wang, Yiru; Wang, Hongkun; Fries, Melissa; Peshkin, Beth N.; Isaacs, Claudine

    2018-01-01

    Information on the prevalence of deleterious BRCA1 and BRCA2 (BRCA1/2) mutations in clinic-based populations of Black women is limited. In order to address this gap, we performed a retrospective study to determine the prevalence of deleterious BRCA1/2 mutations, predictors of having a mutation, and acceptance of risk-reducing surgeries in Black women. In an urban unselected clinic-based population, we evaluated 211 self-identified Black women who underwent genetic counseling for hereditary breast–ovarian cancer syndrome. BRCA1/2 mutations were identified in 13.4 % of the participants who received genetic testing. Younger age at diagnosis, higher BRCA-PRO score, significant family history, and diagnosis of triple-negative breast cancer were associated with identification of a BRCA1/2 mutation. Of the affected patients found to have a deleterious mutation, almost half underwent prophylactic measures. In our study population, 1 in 7 Black women who underwent genetic testing harbored a deleterious BRCA1/2 mutation independent of age at diagnosis or family history. PMID:26250392

  15. Breast cancer in high-risk Afrikaner families: Is BRCA founder mutation testing sufficient?

    PubMed

    Seymour, Heather Jessica; Wainstein, Tasha; Macaulay, Shelley; Haw, Tabitha; Krause, Amanda

    2016-02-03

    Germline pathogenic mutations in cancer susceptibility genes result in inherited cancer syndromes. In the Afrikaner population of South Africa (SA), three founder mutations in the BRCA genes that lead to hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome (HBOCS) have been identified. To investigate the uptake and type of molecular testing performed on patients for HBOCS, to determine the prevalence of the three Afrikaner founder BRCA mutations as well as non-founder BRCA mutations in the study population, and to analyse the utility of two mutation prediction models (Breast and Ovarian Analysis of Disease Incidence and Carrier Estimation Algorithm (BOADICEA) and Manchester scoring method) in assisting with the decision for the most cost-effective testing option. A retrospective file review was performed on counsellees of self-reported Afrikaner ancestry from Johannesburg, SA (2001 - 2014), with a personal or family history of breast and/or ovarian cancer. Demographic and family history information was recorded and Manchester and BOADICEA scores were calculated for each patient. Of 86 unrelated counsellees whose files were reviewed, 54 (62.8%) underwent BRCA genetic testing; 18 (33.3%) tested positive for a mutation, and 14 of these (77.8%) for an Afrikaner founder mutation. Twelve counsellees had the BRCA2 c.7934delG mutation. Four non-founder mutations were identified. BOADICEA scores were significantly higher in counsellees who tested positive for a mutation than in those who tested negative. Founder mutation testing should be performed as a first-line option. BOADICEA is very useful in identifying counsellees at high risk for a BRCA mutation and also assists with the decision to pursue further testing following a negative founder mutation result. These findings assist in guiding an informed genetic counselling service for at-risk individuals with an Afrikaner background.

  16. Inherited DNA-Repair Gene Mutations in Men with Metastatic Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Pritchard, Colin C; Mateo, Joaquin; Walsh, Michael F; De Sarkar, Navonil; Abida, Wassim; Beltran, Himisha; Garofalo, Andrea; Gulati, Roman; Carreira, Suzanne; Eeles, Rosalind; Elemento, Olivier; Rubin, Mark A; Robinson, Dan; Lonigro, Robert; Hussain, Maha; Chinnaiyan, Arul; Vinson, Jake; Filipenko, Julie; Garraway, Levi; Taplin, Mary-Ellen; AlDubayan, Saud; Han, G Celine; Beightol, Mallory; Morrissey, Colm; Nghiem, Belinda; Cheng, Heather H; Montgomery, Bruce; Walsh, Tom; Casadei, Silvia; Berger, Michael; Zhang, Liying; Zehir, Ahmet; Vijai, Joseph; Scher, Howard I; Sawyers, Charles; Schultz, Nikolaus; Kantoff, Philip W; Solit, David; Robson, Mark; Van Allen, Eliezer M; Offit, Kenneth; de Bono, Johann; Nelson, Peter S

    2016-08-04

    Inherited mutations in DNA-repair genes such as BRCA2 are associated with increased risks of lethal prostate cancer. Although the prevalence of germline mutations in DNA-repair genes among men with localized prostate cancer who are unselected for family predisposition is insufficient to warrant routine testing, the frequency of such mutations in patients with metastatic prostate cancer has not been established. We recruited 692 men with documented metastatic prostate cancer who were unselected for family history of cancer or age at diagnosis. We isolated germline DNA and used multiplex sequencing assays to assess mutations in 20 DNA-repair genes associated with autosomal dominant cancer-predisposition syndromes. A total of 84 germline DNA-repair gene mutations that were presumed to be deleterious were identified in 82 men (11.8%); mutations were found in 16 genes, including BRCA2 (37 men [5.3%]), ATM (11 [1.6%]), CHEK2 (10 [1.9% of 534 men with data]), BRCA1 (6 [0.9%]), RAD51D (3 [0.4%]), and PALB2 (3 [0.4%]). Mutation frequencies did not differ according to whether a family history of prostate cancer was present or according to age at diagnosis. Overall, the frequency of germline mutations in DNA-repair genes among men with metastatic prostate cancer significantly exceeded the prevalence of 4.6% among 499 men with localized prostate cancer (P<0.001), including men with high-risk disease, and the prevalence of 2.7% in the Exome Aggregation Consortium, which includes 53,105 persons without a known cancer diagnosis (P<0.001). In our multicenter study, the incidence of germline mutations in genes mediating DNA-repair processes among men with metastatic prostate cancer was 11.8%, which was significantly higher than the incidence among men with localized prostate cancer. The frequencies of germline mutations in DNA-repair genes among men with metastatic disease did not differ significantly according to age at diagnosis or family history of prostate cancer. (Funded by

  17. Identification of a Variety of Mutations in Cancer Predisposition Genes in Patients With Suspected Lynch Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yurgelun, Matthew B; Allen, Brian; Kaldate, Rajesh R; Bowles, Karla R; Judkins, Thaddeus; Kaushik, Praveen; Roa, Benjamin B; Wenstrup, Richard J; Hartman, Anne-Renee; Syngal, Sapna

    2015-09-01

    Multigene panels are commercially available tools for hereditary cancer risk assessment that allow for next-generation sequencing of numerous genes in parallel. However, it is not clear if these panels offer advantages over traditional genetic testing. We investigated the number of cancer predisposition gene mutations identified by parallel sequencing in individuals with suspected Lynch syndrome. We performed germline analysis with a 25-gene, next-generation sequencing panel using DNA from 1260 individuals who underwent clinical genetic testing for Lynch syndrome from 2012 through 2013. All patients had a history of Lynch syndrome-associated cancer and/or polyps. We classified all identified germline alterations for pathogenicity and calculated the frequencies of pathogenic mutations and variants of uncertain clinical significance (VUS). We also analyzed data on patients' personal and family history of cancer, including fulfillment of clinical guidelines for genetic testing. Of the 1260 patients, 1112 met National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) criteria for Lynch syndrome testing (88%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 86%-90%). Multigene panel testing identified 114 probands with Lynch syndrome mutations (9.0%; 95% CI, 7.6%-10.8%) and 71 with mutations in other cancer predisposition genes (5.6%; 95% CI, 4.4%-7.1%). Fifteen individuals had mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2; 93% of these met the NCCN criteria for Lynch syndrome testing and 33% met NCCN criteria for BRCA1 and BRCA2 analysis (P = .0017). An additional 9 individuals carried mutations in other genes linked to high lifetime risks of cancer (5 had mutations in APC, 3 had bi-allelic mutations in MUTYH, and 1 had a mutation in STK11); all of these patients met NCCN criteria for Lynch syndrome testing. A total of 479 individuals had 1 or more VUS (38%; 95% CI, 35%-41%). In individuals with suspected Lynch syndrome, multigene panel testing identified high-penetrance mutations in cancer predisposition genes, many

  18. Asymptomatic petechial eruption on the lower legs.

    PubMed

    Mendese, Gary; Grande, Donald

    2013-09-01

    The authors report an unusual case of Rocky Mountain spotted fever that presented as an asymptomatic petechial eruption on the lower legs. Rocky Mountain spotted fever is rare in New England and, as such, is typically not on the differential diagnosis when presented with such patients. What began as an asymptomatic eruption progressed to more classic signs of the disease, including a positive Rocky Mountain spotted fever titer. The patient was successfully treated with doxycydine and within a short period of time, was completely back at baseline.

  19. Asymptomatic Petechial Eruption on the Lower Legs

    PubMed Central

    Grande, Donald

    2013-01-01

    The authors report an unusual case of Rocky Mountain spotted fever that presented as an asymptomatic petechial eruption on the lower legs. Rocky Mountain spotted fever is rare in New England and, as such, is typically not on the differential diagnosis when presented with such patients. What began as an asymptomatic eruption progressed to more classic signs of the disease, including a positive Rocky Mountain spotted fever titer. The patient was successfully treated with doxycydine and within a short period of time, was completely back at baseline. PMID:24062875

  20. Talazoparib, Carboplatin, and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Solid Tumors That Are Metastatic or Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-11-06

    Advanced Malignant Solid Neoplasm; BRCA Rearrangement; BRCA1 Gene Mutation; BRCA2 Gene Mutation; Deleterious BRCA1 Gene Mutation; Deleterious BRCA2 Gene Mutation; Metastatic Malignant Solid Neoplasm; Unresectable Solid Neoplasm

  1. Management of asymptomatic gene carriers of transthyretin familial amyloid polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Hartmut H-J; Barroso, Fabio; González-Duarte, Alejandra; Conceição, Isabel; Obici, Laura; Keohane, Denis; Amass, Leslie

    2016-09-01

    Transthyretin familial amyloid polyneuropathy (TTR-FAP) is a rare, severe, and irreversible, adult-onset, hereditary disorder caused by autosomal-dominant mutations in the TTR gene that increase the intrinsic propensity of transthyretin protein to misfold and deposit systemically as insoluble amyloid fibrils in nerve tissues, the heart, and other organs. TTR-FAP is characterized by relentless, progressively debilitating polyneuropathy, and leads to death, on average, within 10 years of symptom onset without treatment. With increased availability of disease-modifying treatment options for a wider spectrum of patients with TTR-FAP, timely detection of the disease may offer substantial clinical benefits. This review discusses mutation-specific predictive genetic testing in first-degree relatives of index patients diagnosed with TTR-FAP and the structured clinical follow-up of asymptomatic gene carriers for prompt diagnosis and early therapeutic intervention before accumulation of substantial damage. Muscle Nerve 54: 353-360, 2016. © 2016 The Authors Muscle & Nerve Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Is RNASEL:p.Glu265* a modifier of early-onset breast cancer risk for carriers of high-risk mutations?

    PubMed

    Nguyen-Dumont, Tú; Teo, Zhi L; Hammet, Fleur; Roberge, Alexis; Mahmoodi, Maryam; Tsimiklis, Helen; Park, Daniel J; Pope, Bernard J; Lonie, Andrew; Kapuscinski, Miroslav K; Mahmood, Khalid; Goldgar, David E; Giles, Graham G; Winship, Ingrid; Hopper, John L; Southey, Melissa C

    2018-02-08

    Breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 pathogenic mutation carriers is modified by risk factors that cluster in families, including genetic modifiers of risk. We considered genetic modifiers of risk for carriers of high-risk mutations in other breast cancer susceptibility genes. In a family known to carry the high-risk mutation PALB2:c.3113G>A (p.Trp1038*), whole-exome sequencing was performed on germline DNA from four affected women, three of whom were mutation carriers. RNASEL:p.Glu265* was identified in one of the PALB2 carriers who had two primary invasive breast cancer diagnoses before 50 years. Gene-panel testing of BRCA1, BRCA2, PALB2 and RNASEL in the Australian Breast Cancer Family Registry identified five carriers of RNASEL:p.Glu265* in 591 early onset breast cancer cases. Three of the five women (60%) carrying RNASEL:p.Glu265* also carried a pathogenic mutation in a breast cancer susceptibility gene compared with 30 carriers of pathogenic mutations in the 586 non-carriers of RNASEL:p.Glu265* (5%) (p < 0.002). Taqman genotyping demonstrated that the allele frequency of RNASEL:p.Glu265* was similar in affected and unaffected Australian women, consistent with other populations. Our study suggests that RNASEL:p.Glu265* may be a genetic modifier of risk for early-onset breast cancer predisposition in carriers of high-risk mutations. Much larger case-case and case-control studies are warranted to test the association observed in this report.

  3. Cryptic and Asymptomatic Opisthorchis felineus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Armignacco, Orlando; Ferri, Fabrizio; Gomez-Morales, Maria Angeles; Caterini, Luciano; Pozio, Edoardo

    2013-01-01

    We describe the diagnostic difficulties experienced during an opisthorchiasis outbreak. Of 31 infected individuals, 61.3% were asymptomatic, and in the 12 symptomatic individuals, the duration of non-pathognomonic symptoms was shorter than 4 weeks. Serology by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and polymerase chain reaction fecal analysis were shown to be the most sensitive diagnostic tools. PMID:23249682

  4. [CHEK2-mutation in Dutch breast cancer families: expanding genetic testing for breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Adank, Muriel A; Hes, Frederik J; van Zelst-Stams, Wendy A G; van den Tol, M Petrousjka; Seynaeve, Caroline; Oosterwijk, Jan C

    2015-01-01

    In the majority of breast cancer families, DNA testing does not show BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations and the genetic cause of breast cancer remains unexplained. Routine testing for the CHEK2*1100delC mutation has recently been introduced in breast cancer families in the Netherlands. The 1100delC mutation in the CHEK2-gene may explain the occurrence of breast cancer in about 5% of non-BRCA1/2 families in the Netherlands. In the general population the CHEK2*1100delC mutation confers a slightly increased breast cancer risk, but in a familial breast cancer setting this risk is between 35-55% for first degree female carriers. Female breast cancer patients with the CHEK2*1100delC mutation are at increased risk of contralateral breast cancer and may have a less favourable prognosis. Female heterozygous CHEK2*1100delC mutation carriers are offered annual mammography and specialist breast surveillance between the ages of 35-60 years. Prospective research in CHEK2-positive families is essential in order to develop more specific treatment and screening strategies.

  5. Almost 2% of Spanish breast cancer families are associated to germline pathogenic mutations in the ATM gene.

    PubMed

    Tavera-Tapia, A; Pérez-Cabornero, L; Macías, J A; Ceballos, M I; Roncador, G; de la Hoya, M; Barroso, A; Felipe-Ponce, V; Serrano-Blanch, R; Hinojo, C; Miramar-Gallart, M D; Urioste, M; Caldés, T; Santillan-Garzón, S; Benitez, J; Osorio, A

    2017-02-01

    There is still a considerable percentage of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) cases not explained by BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. In this report, next-generation sequencing (NGS) techniques were applied to identify novel variants and/or genes involved in HBOC susceptibility. Using whole exome sequencing, we identified a novel germline mutation in the moderate-risk gene ATM (c.5441delT; p.Leu1814Trpfs*14) in a family negative for mutations in BRCA1/2 (BRCAX). A case-control association study was performed to establish its prevalence in Spanish population, in a series of 1477 BRCAX families and 589 controls further screened, and NGS panels were used for ATM mutational screening in a cohort of 392 HBOC Spanish BRCAX families and 350 patients affected with diseases not related to breast cancer. Although the interrogated mutation was not prevalent in case-control association study, a comprehensive mutational analysis of the ATM gene revealed 1.78% prevalence of mutations in the ATM gene in HBOC and 1.94% in breast cancer-only BRCAX families in Spanish population, where data about ATM mutations were very limited. ATM mutation prevalence in Spanish population highlights the importance of considering ATM pathogenic variants linked to breast cancer susceptibility.

  6. Exercise testing in asymptomatic severe aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Magne, Julien; Lancellotti, Patrizio; Piérard, Luc A

    2014-02-01

    The management and the clinical decision making in asymptomatic patients with aortic stenosis are challenging. An "aggressive" management, including early aortic valve replacement, is debated in these patients. However, the optimal timing for surgery remains controversial due to the lack of prospective data on the determinants of aortic stenosis progression, multicenter studies on risk stratification, and randomized studies on patient management. Exercise stress testing with or without imaging is strictly contraindicated in symptomatic patients with severe aortic stenosis. Exercise stress test is now recommended by current guidelines in asymptomatic patients and may provide incremental prognostic value. Indeed, the development of symptoms during exercise or an abnormal blood pressure response are associated with poor outcome and should be considered as an indication for surgery, as suggested by the most recently updated European Society of Cardiology 2012 guidelines. Exercise stress echocardiography may also improve the risk stratification and identify asymptomatic patients at higher risk of a cardiac event. When the test is combined with imaging, echocardiography during exercise should be recommended rather than post-exercise echocardiography. During exercise, an increase >18 to 20 mm Hg in mean pressure gradient, absence of improvement in left ventricular ejection fraction (i.e., absence of contractile reserve), and/or a systolic pulmonary arterial pressure >60 mm Hg (i.e., exercise pulmonary hypertension) are suggestive signs of advanced stages of the disease and impaired prognosis. Hence, exercise stress test may identify resting asymptomatic patients who develop exercise abnormalities and in whom surgery is recommended according to current guidelines. Exercise stress echocardiography may further unmask a subset of asymptomatic patients (i.e., without exercise stress test abnormalities) who are at high risk of reduced cardiac event free survival. In these

  7. Airway hyperreactivity in asymptomatic military personnel.

    PubMed

    Morris, Michael J; Schwartz, Darin S; Nohrenberg, Jana L; Dooley, Sean N

    2007-11-01

    Asthma is frequently diagnosed in military personnel despite strict guidelines that disqualify persons with active disease or a recent history of asthma. It is generally considered incompatible with military service, because of the regular physical training, outdoor training exercises, and deployments to remote locations. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of airway hyperreactivity in asymptomatic military personnel, as an estimate of subclinical reactive airway disease. A prospective study of healthy, asymptomatic, military personnel with no previous history of