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Sample records for asymptomatic brca2 mutation

  1. BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutations

    MedlinePlus

    ... mutation. Should You Be Tested? If you answer “yes” to any of the following questions, genetic risk assessment is ... known BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation? If you answer “yes” to any of the following questions, genetic risk assessment may ...

  2. Clinical outcomes in pancreatic adenocarcinoma associated with BRCA-2 mutation.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Ojas; Leung, Keith; Ledbetter, Leslie; Kaley, Kristin; Rodriguez, Teresa; Garcon, Marie C; Saif, Muhammad W

    2015-02-01

    Patients with BRCA-1 and BRCA-2 germ line mutations are at an increased risk of developing pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PAC). In particular, the BRCA-2 mutation has been associated with a relative risk of developing PAC of 3.51. The BRCA-2 protein is involved in repair of double-stranded DNA breaks. Recent reports have suggested that in the setting of impaired DNA repair, chemotherapeutic agents that induce DNA damage, such as platinum-based antineoplastic drugs (platins) and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitors (PARP inhibitors), have improved efficacy. However, because of the relative rarity of BRCA-related PAC, studies evaluating such agents in this setting are scarce. Patients with a known BRCA-2 mutation and PAC were retrospectively reviewed. Ten patients with PAC and BRCA-2 mutation were identified. Four patients (40%) were of Ashkenazi Jewish descent. Seven patients (70%) received platinum agents, two (20%) received mitomycin-C, one (10%) received a PARP inhibitor, and seven (70%) received a topoisomerase-I inhibitor. Overall, chemotherapy was well tolerated with expected side effects. Patients with a BRCA-2 mutation and PAC represent a group with a unique biology underlying their cancer. Chemotherapies such as platinum derivatives, mitomycin-C, topoisomerase-I inhibitors, and PARP inhibitors targeting DNA require further investigation in this population. Genetic testing may guide therapy in the future.

  3. Inherited BRCA2 mutation associated with high grade breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Agnarsson, B A; Jonasson, J G; Björnsdottir, I B; Barkardottir, R B; Egilsson, V; Sigurdsson, H

    1998-01-01

    Inheritance is believed to play a major role in 5-10% of breast cancer. The breast cancer susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 are estimated to account for more than half of these cases. Recent studies have suggested that breast cancers associated with BRCA1 germline mutations are of higher grade than sporadic cases. The purpose of this investigation was to determine if there are significant pathologic and biologic differences between hereditary BRCA2 related breast carcinomas and non-hereditary breast cancers. Forty cases of hereditary breast cancer from families associated with a specific 999del5 BRCA2 mutation were compared with regard to histologic and biologic factors to an age matched control group. Thirty-four patients (85%) had ductal carcinoma, two had lobular carcinoma, and one patient had medullary carcinoma. Compared to the control group, the BRCA2 tumors had less tubule formation (p = 0.02), more nuclear pleomorphism (p = 0.02), and higher mitotic rates (p = 0.002), and were thus of higher histologic grade (p = 0.003). By flow cytometry the BRCA2 tumors also had significantly higher S-phase fractions than the control tumors (p = 0.02). Significant differences in axillary lymph-node involvement or ploidy status were not detected. According to the results of this study, hereditary breast cancers associated with the 999del5 BRCA2 mutation are high grade tumors with a rapid proliferation rate. Other or additional factors than the defining BRCA2 mutation are involved in determining the tumor type.

  4. BRCA2 mutation carriers, reproductive factors and breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Tryggvadottir, Laufey; Olafsdottir, Elinborg J; Gudlaugsdottir, Sigfridur; Thorlacius, Steinunn; Jonasson, Jon G; Tulinius, Hrafn; Eyfjord, Jorunn E

    2003-01-01

    Germline mutations in the BRCA genes dramatically increase the risk of breast cancer. In the general population, breast cancer risk is affected by age at menarche, by age at first birth, by the number of births and by the duration of breast feeding. Whether this is true for mutation carriers is not clear. In a case-control study, nested in a population-based cohort of the Icelandic Cancer Detection Clinic, two groups of cases were defined, matched on year of birth, on age at diagnosis and on age when giving information on reproductive factors: 100 carriers of the Icelandic founder BRCA2 mutation 999del5, and 361 BRCA2-negative cases. The mean age at diagnosis was 48 years. There were 1000 women in a matched group of unaffected controls. Conditional logistic regression was used for the analysis. An increased number of births was associated with a decreased risk of breast cancer in BRCA2-negative cases but not in BRCA2-positive cases. A negative association between risk and duration of breast feeding was observed only in the mutation carriers. These associations were not statistically significant, but the effects of the two variables differed significantly according to mutation status (P = 0.007 and P = 0.045 for interaction with number of births and with duration of breast feeding, respectively). This was maintained when limiting the analysis to women diagnosed older than the age of 40 years. The association between breast cancer and the number of pregnancies and between breast cancer and the duration of breast feeding was not the same for carriers and noncarriers of a detrimental BRCA2 mutation. In the context of other epidemiological and laboratory studies, this may indicate that the product of the BRCA2 gene has a function relating to the differentiation of epithelial tissue in the breast.

  5. BRCA2 mutation carriers, reproductive factors and breast cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Tryggvadottir, Laufey; Olafsdottir, Elinborg J; Gudlaugsdottir, Sigfridur; Thorlacius, Steinunn; Jonasson, Jon G; Tulinius, Hrafn; Eyfjord, Jorunn E

    2003-01-01

    Background Germline mutations in the BRCA genes dramatically increase the risk of breast cancer. In the general population, breast cancer risk is affected by age at menarche, by age at first birth, by the number of births and by the duration of breast feeding. Whether this is true for mutation carriers is not clear. Methods In a case–control study, nested in a population-based cohort of the Icelandic Cancer Detection Clinic, two groups of cases were defined, matched on year of birth, on age at diagnosis and on age when giving information on reproductive factors: 100 carriers of the Icelandic founder BRCA2 mutation 999del5, and 361 BRCA2-negative cases. The mean age at diagnosis was 48 years. There were 1000 women in a matched group of unaffected controls. Conditional logistic regression was used for the analysis. Results An increased number of births was associated with a decreased risk of breast cancer in BRCA2-negative cases but not in BRCA2-positive cases. A negative association between risk and duration of breast feeding was observed only in the mutation carriers. These associations were not statistically significant, but the effects of the two variables differed significantly according to mutation status (P = 0.007 and P = 0.045 for interaction with number of births and with duration of breast feeding, respectively). This was maintained when limiting the analysis to women diagnosed older than the age of 40 years. Conclusion The association between breast cancer and the number of pregnancies and between breast cancer and the duration of breast feeding was not the same for carriers and noncarriers of a detrimental BRCA2 mutation. In the context of other epidemiological and laboratory studies, this may indicate that the product of the BRCA2 gene has a function relating to the differentiation of epithelial tissue in the breast. PMID:12927042

  6. Comprehensive BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutational profile in Lithuania.

    PubMed

    Janavičius, Ramūnas; Rudaitis, Vilius; Mickys, Ugnius; Elsakov, Pavel; Griškevičius, Laimonas

    2014-05-01

    There is limited knowledge about the BRCA1/2 mutational profile in Lithuania. We aimed to define the full BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutational spectrum and the clinically relevant prevalence of these gene mutations in Lithuania. A data set of 753 unrelated probands, recruited through a clinical setting, was used and consisted of 380 female breast cancer cases, 213 epithelial ovarian cancer cases, 20 breast and ovarian cancer cases, and 140 probands with positive family history of breast or ovarian cancer. A comprehensive mutation analysis of the BRCA1/2 genes by high resolution melting analysis coupled with Sanger sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification analysis was performed. Genetic analysis revealed 32 different pathogenic germline BRCA1/2 mutations: 20 in the BRCA1 gene and 12 in the BRCA2 gene, including four different large genomic rearrangements in the BRCA1 gene. In all, 10 novel BRCA1/2 mutations were found. Nine different recurrent BRCA1 mutations and two recurrent BRCA2 mutations were identified, which comprised 90.4% of all BRCA1/2 mutations. BRCA1 exon 1-3 deletion and BRCA2 c.658_659del are reported for the first time as recurrent mutations, pointing to a possible Baltic founder effect. Approximately 7% of breast cancer and 22% of ovarian cancer patients without family history and an estimated 0.5-0.6% of all Lithuanian women were found to be carriers of mutations in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene.

  7. Identification of a founder BRCA2 mutation in Sardinia

    PubMed Central

    Pisano, M; Cossu, A; Persico, I; Palmieri, G; Angius, A; Casu, G; Palomba, G; Sarobba, M G; Rocca, P C Ossu; Dedola, M F; Olmeo, N; Pasca, A; Budroni, M; Marras, V; Pisano, A; Farris, A; Massarelli, G; Pirastu, M; Tanda, Francesco

    2000-01-01

    Sardinian population can be instrumental in defining the molecular basis of cancer, using the identity-by-descent method. We selected seven Sardinian breast cancer families originating from the northern-central part of the island with multiple affected members in different generations. We genotyped 106 members of the seven families and 20 control nuclear families with markers flanking BRCA2 locus at 13q12–q13. The detection of a common haplotype shared by four out of seven families (60%) suggests the presence of a founder BRCA2 mutation. Direct sequencing of BRCA2 coding exons of patients carrying the shared haplotype, allowed the identification of a ‘frame-shift’ mutation at codon 2867 (8765delAG), causing a premature termination-codon. This mutation was found in breast cancer patients as well as one prostate and one bladder cancer patient with shared haplotype. We then investigated the frequency of 8765delAG in the Sardinian breast cancer population by analysing 270 paraffin-embedded normal tissue samples from breast cancer patients. Five patients (1.7%) were found to be positive for the 8765delAG mutation. Discovery of a founder mutation in Sardinia through the identity-by-descent method demonstrates that this approach can be applied successfully to find mutations either for breast cancer or for other types of tumours. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10682665

  8. BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutations

    MedlinePlus

    ... testing may be offered. Genetic testing requires a DNA sample from blood or saliva. There are several ... specific BRCA mutation is present. This is called DNA sequencing. Your DNA then can be tested to ...

  9. BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutations in African Americans

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-04-01

    this report are those of the author( s ) and should not be construed as an official Department of the Army position, policy or decision unless so...02) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutations in African Americans DAMD17-98-1-8106 6. AUTHOR( S ) : Carolyn W. Broome, Ph.D...7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME( S ) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION Howard University REPORT NUMBER Washington DC 20059 E-Mail:cbroome

  10. Founder mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes.

    PubMed

    Ferla, R; Calò, V; Cascio, S; Rinaldi, G; Badalamenti, G; Carreca, I; Surmacz, E; Colucci, G; Bazan, V; Russo, A

    2007-06-01

    BRCA1 and BRCA2 germline mutations contribute to a significant number of familial and hereditary breast and/or ovarian cancers. The proportion of high-risk families with breast and/or ovarian cancer cases due to mutations in these tumor suppressor genes varies widely among populations. In some population, a wide spectrum of different mutations in both genes are present, whereas in other groups specific mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 have been reported with high frequency. Most of these mutations are prevalent in restricted populations as consequence of a founder effect. The comparison of haplotypes between families with the same mutation can distinguish whether high-frequency alleles derive from an older or more recent single mutational event or whether they have arisen independently more than once. Here, we review some of the most well-known and significant examples of founder mutations in BRCA genes found in European and non-European populations. In conclusion, the identification of the ethnic group of families undergoing genetic counseling enables the geneticist and oncologist to make more specific choices, leading to simplify the clinical approach to genetic testing carried out on members of high-risk families. Futhermore, the high frequency of founder mutations, allowing to analyze a large number of cases, might provide accurate information regarding their penetrance.

  11. Aurora-A amplification associated with BRCA2 mutation in breast tumours.

    PubMed

    Bodvarsdottir, Sigridur K; Hilmarsdottir, Holmfridur; Birgisdottir, Valgerdur; Steinarsdottir, Margret; Jonasson, Jon G; Eyfjord, Jorunn E

    2007-04-08

    Potential interaction of Aurora-A amplification and BRCA2 mutation was examined in breast tumours from BRCA2 999del5 mutation carriers (n=20) and non-carriers (n=41). Aurora-A amplification studied by FISH was significantly more common in breast tumours from BRCA2 mutation carriers (p=0.0005). Extensive Aurora-A amplification was also detected on metaphase chromosomes in three breast epithelial cell lines with the same BRCA2 mutation. In addition, significant association was found between Aurora-A amplification and TP53 mutations in non-BRCA2 mutation carrier tumours (p=0.007). These results suggest that breast tumours with mutations in BRCA2 or TP53 could be promising candidates for Aurora-A targeted treatment.

  12. Effects of BRCA2 cis-regulation in normal breast and cancer risk amongst BRCA2 mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Maia, Ana-Teresa; Antoniou, Antonis C; O'Reilly, Martin; Samarajiwa, Shamith; Dunning, Mark; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Chin, Suet-Feung; Curtis, Christina N; McGuffog, Lesley; Domchek, Susan M; Easton, Douglas F; Peock, Susan; Frost, Debra; Evans, D Gareth; Eeles, Ros; Izatt, Louise; Adlard, Julian; Eccles, Diana; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Faivre, Laurence; Venat-Bouvet, Laurence; Delnatte, Capucine; Nevanlinna, Heli; Couch, Fergus J; Godwin, Andrew K; Caligo, Maria Adelaide; Barkardottir, Rosa B; Chen, Xiaoqing; Beesley, Jonathan; Healey, Sue; Caldas, Carlos; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Ponder, Bruce A J

    2012-04-18

    Cis-acting regulatory single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at specific loci may modulate penetrance of germline mutations at the same loci by introducing different levels of expression of the wild-type allele. We have previously reported that BRCA2 shows differential allelic expression and we hypothesize that the known variable penetrance of BRCA2 mutations might be associated with this mechanism. We combined haplotype analysis and differential allelic expression of BRCA2 in breast tissue to identify expression haplotypes and candidate cis-regulatory variants. These candidate variants underwent selection based on in silico predictions for regulatory potential and disruption of transcription factor binding, and were functionally analyzed in vitro and in vivo in normal and breast cancer cell lines. SNPs tagging the expression haplotypes were correlated with the total expression of several genes in breast tissue measured by Taqman and microarray technologies. The effect of the expression haplotypes on breast cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers was investigated in 2,754 carriers. We identified common haplotypes associated with differences in the levels of BRCA2 expression in human breast cells. We characterized three cis-regulatory SNPs located at the promoter and two intronic regulatory elements which affect the binding of the transcription factors C/EBPα, HMGA1, D-binding protein (DBP) and ZF5. We showed that the expression haplotypes also correlated with changes in the expression of other genes in normal breast. Furthermore, there was suggestive evidence that the minor allele of SNP rs4942440, which is associated with higher BRCA2 expression, is also associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer (per-allele hazard ratio (HR) = 0.85, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.72 to 1.00, P-trend = 0.048). Our work provides further insights into the role of cis-regulatory variation in the penetrance of disease-causing mutations. We identified small-effect genetic

  13. Screening for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in Eastern Finnish breast/ovarian cancer families.

    PubMed

    Hartikainen, J M; Kataja, V; Pirskanen, M; Arffman, A; Ristonmaa, U; Vahteristo, P; Ryynänen, M; Heinonen, S; Kosma, V-M; Mannermaa, A

    2007-10-01

    Familial aggregation is thought to account for 5-10% of all breast cancer cases, and high penetrance breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 explain < or =20% of these. Hundreds of mutations among breast/ovarian cancer families have been found in these two genes. The mutation spectrum and prevalence, however, varies widely among populations. Thirty-six breast/ovarian cancer families were identified from a population sample of breast and ovarian cancer cases among a relatively isolated population in Eastern Finland, and the frequency of BRCA1/BRCA2 germline mutations were screened using heteroduplex analysis, protein truncation test and sequencing. Five different mutations were detected in seven families (19.4%). Two mutations were found in BRCA1 and three in BRCA2. One of the mutations (BRCA2 4088insA) has not been detected elsewhere in Finland while the other four, 4216-2nt A-->G and 5370 C-->T in BRCA1 and 999del5 and 6503delTT in BRCA2, are recurrent Finnish founder mutations. These results add to the evidence of the geographical differences in distribution of Finnish BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations. This screen also provides further evidence for the presumption that the majority of Finnish BRCA1/BRCA2 founder mutations have been found and that the proportion of BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations in Finnish breast/ovarian cancer families is around 20%.

  14. Prostate cancer in BRCA2 germline mutation carriers is associated with poorer prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, S M; Evans, D G R; Hope, Q; Norman, A R; Barbachano, Y; Bullock, S; Kote-Jarai, Z; Meitz, J; Falconer, A; Osin, P; Fisher, C; Guy, M; Jhavar, S G; Hall, A L; O'Brien, L T; Gehr-Swain, B N; Wilkinson, R A; Forrest, M S; Dearnaley, D P; Ardern-Jones, A T; Page, E C; Easton, D F; Eeles, R A

    2010-01-01

    Background: The germline BRCA2 mutation is associated with increased prostate cancer (PrCa) risk. We have assessed survival in young PrCa cases with a germline mutation in BRCA2 and investigated loss of heterozygosity at BRCA2 in their tumours. Methods: Two cohorts were compared: one was a group with young-onset PrCa, tested for germline BRCA2 mutations (6 of 263 cases had a germline BRAC2 mutation), and the second was a validation set consisting of a clinical set from Manchester of known BRCA2 mutuation carriers (15 cases) with PrCa. Survival data were compared with a control series of patients in a single clinic as determined by Kaplan–Meier estimates. Loss of heterozygosity was tested for in the DNA of tumour tissue of the young-onset group by typing four microsatellite markers that flanked the BRCA2 gene, followed by sequencing. Results: Median survival of all PrCa cases with a germline BRCA2 mutation was shorter at 4.8 years than was survival in controls at 8.5 years (P=0.002). Loss of heterozygosity was found in the majority of tumours of BRCA2 mutation carriers. Multivariate analysis confirmed that the poorer survival of PrCa in BRCA2 mutation carriers is associated with the germline BRCA2 mutation per se. Conclusion: BRCA2 germline mutation is an independent prognostic factor for survival in PrCa. Such patients should not be managed with active surveillance as they have more aggressive disease. PMID:20736950

  15. Novel BRCA1 and BRCA2 pathogenic mutations in Slovene hereditary breast and ovarian cancer families

    PubMed Central

    NOVAKOVIĆ, SRDJAN; MILATOVIĆ, MAŠA; CERKOVNIK, PETRA; STEGEL, VIDA; KRAJC, MATEJA; HOČEVAR, MARKO; ŽGAJNAR, JANEZ; VAKSELJ, ALEŠ

    2012-01-01

    The estimated proportion of hereditary breast and ovarian cancers among all breast and ovarian cancer cases is 5–10%. According to the literature, inherited mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 tumour-suppressor genes, account for the majority of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer cases. The aim of this report is to present novel mutations that have not yet been described in the literature and pathogenic BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations which have been detected in HBOC families for the first time in the last three years. In the period between January 2009 and December 2011, 559 individuals from 379 families affected with breast and/or ovarian cancer were screened for mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. Three novel mutations were detected: one in BRCA1 - c.1193C>A (p.Ser398*) and two in BRCA2 - c.5101C>T (p.Gln1701*) and c.5433_5436delGGAA (p.Glu1811Aspfs*3). These novel mutations are located in the exons 11 of BRCA1 or BRCA2 and encode truncated proteins. Two of them are nonsense while one is a frameshift mutation. Also, 11 previously known pathogenic mutations were detected for the first time in the HBOC families studied here (three in BRCA1 and eight in BRCA2). All, except one cause premature formation of stop codons leading to truncation of the respective BRCA1 or BRCA2 proteins. PMID:22923021

  16. The spectrum of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in breast cancer patients in the Bahamas.

    PubMed

    Akbari, M R; Donenberg, T; Lunn, J; Curling, D; Turnquest, T; Krill-Jackson, E; Zhang, S; Narod, S A; Hurley, J

    2014-01-01

    We sought to identify the full range of founder mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 in the Bahamas and to estimate the proportion of all BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations that are accounted for by founder mutations. We studied 214 Bahamian women with invasive breast cancer, unselected for age or family history. A founder mutation had previously been identified in 49 patients. We conducted full sequencing of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) for 156 patients. A novel founder mutation in BRCA2 (exon 17 818delA) was seen in four different patients and five other unique mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2, including a large deletion (exons 8-9) in BRCA1. In total, a mutation was seen in 58 of the 214 patients (27%); 92% of carriers carried one of the seven founder mutations. Approximately 27% of unselected cases of breast cancer in the Bahamian population are attributable to a mutation in BRCA1 or BRCA2, a prevalence which far exceeds that of any other country. The majority of women who carry a mutation in the Bahamas, carry one of the seven founder mutations, making it possible to offer genetic testing to all women at risk for breast cancer in the Bahamas.

  17. Comprehensive spectrum of BRCA1 and BRCA2 deleterious mutations in breast cancer in Asian countries

    PubMed Central

    Kwong, Ava; Shin, Vivian Y; Ho, John C W; Kang, Eunyoung; Nakamura, Seigo; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Lee, Ann S G; Sng, Jen-Hwei; Ginsburg, Ophira M; Kurian, Allison W; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Siu, Man-Ting; Law, Fian B F; Chan, Tsun-Leung; Narod, Steven A; Ford, James M; Ma, Edmond S K; Kim, Sung-Won

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 5%–10% of breast cancers are due to genetic predisposition caused by germline mutations; the most commonly tested genes are BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations. Some mutations are unique to one family and others are recurrent; the spectrum of BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations varies depending on the geographical origins, populations or ethnic groups. In this review, we compiled data from 11 participating Asian countries (Bangladesh, Mainland China, Hong Kong SAR, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand and Vietnam), and from ethnic Asians residing in Canada and the USA. We have additionally conducted a literature review to include other Asian countries mainly in Central and Western Asia. We present the current pathogenic mutation spectrum of BRCA1/BRCA2 genes in patients with breast cancer in various Asian populations. Understanding BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations in Asians will help provide better risk assessment and clinical management of breast cancer. PMID:26187060

  18. Comprehensive spectrum of BRCA1 and BRCA2 deleterious mutations in breast cancer in Asian countries.

    PubMed

    Kwong, Ava; Shin, Vivian Y; Ho, John C W; Kang, Eunyoung; Nakamura, Seigo; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Lee, Ann S G; Sng, Jen-Hwei; Ginsburg, Ophira M; Kurian, Allison W; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Siu, Man-Ting; Law, Fian B F; Chan, Tsun-Leung; Narod, Steven A; Ford, James M; Ma, Edmond S K; Kim, Sung-Won

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 5%-10% of breast cancers are due to genetic predisposition caused by germline mutations; the most commonly tested genes are BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations. Some mutations are unique to one family and others are recurrent; the spectrum of BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations varies depending on the geographical origins, populations or ethnic groups. In this review, we compiled data from 11 participating Asian countries (Bangladesh, Mainland China, Hong Kong SAR, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand and Vietnam), and from ethnic Asians residing in Canada and the USA. We have additionally conducted a literature review to include other Asian countries mainly in Central and Western Asia. We present the current pathogenic mutation spectrum of BRCA1/BRCA2 genes in patients with breast cancer in various Asian populations. Understanding BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations in Asians will help provide better risk assessment and clinical management of breast cancer.

  19. Mutations of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes in patients with bilateral breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Steinmann, D; Bremer, M; Rades, D; Skawran, B; Siebrands, C; Karstens, J H; Dörk, T

    2001-01-01

    Mutations of the BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes have been shown to strongly predispose towards the development of contralateral breast cancer in patients from large multi-case families. In order to test the hypothesis that BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations are more frequent in patients with bilateral breast cancer, we have investigated a hospital-based series of 75 consecutive patients with bilateral breast cancer and a comparison group of 75 patients with unilateral breast cancer, pairwise matched by age and family history, for mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. Five frameshift deletions (517delGT in BRCA1; 4772delA, 5946delCT, 6174delT and 8138del5 in BRCA2) were identified in patients with bilateral disease. No further mutations, apart from polymorphisms and 3 rare unclassified variants, were found after scanning the whole BRCA1 and BRCA2 coding sequence. Three pathogenic BRCA1 mutations (Cys61Gly, 3814del5, 5382insC) were identified in the group of patients with unilateral breast cancer. The frequencies of common BRCA1 and BRCA2 missense variants were not different between the 2 groups. In summary, we did not find a significantly increased prevalence of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in a hospital-based cohort of German patients with bilateral breast cancer. We conclude that bilaterality of breast cancer on its own is not strongly associated with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations when adjusted for age and family history. The high frequency of bilateral disease in multi-case breast cancer families may be due to a familial aggregation of additional susceptibility factors modifying the penetrance of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaignhttp://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11556836

  20. Mutations of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes in patients with bilateral breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Steinmann, D; Bremer, M; Rades, D; Skawran, B; Siebrands, C; Karstens, J H; Dörk, T

    2001-09-14

    Mutations of the BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes have been shown to strongly predispose towards the development of contralateral breast cancer in patients from large multi-case families. In order to test the hypothesis that BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations are more frequent in patients with bilateral breast cancer, we have investigated a hospital-based series of 75 consecutive patients with bilateral breast cancer and a comparison group of 75 patients with unilateral breast cancer, pairwise matched by age and family history, for mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. Five frameshift deletions (517delGT in BRCA1; 4772delA, 5946delCT, 6174delT and 8138del5 in BRCA2) were identified in patients with bilateral disease. No further mutations, apart from polymorphisms and 3 rare unclassified variants, were found after scanning the whole BRCA1 and BRCA2 coding sequence. Three pathogenic BRCA1 mutations (Cys61Gly, 3814del5, 5382insC) were identified in the group of patients with unilateral breast cancer. The frequencies of common BRCA1 and BRCA2 missense variants were not different between the 2 groups. In summary, we did not find a significantly increased prevalence of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in a hospital-based cohort of German patients with bilateral breast cancer. We conclude that bilaterality of breast cancer on its own is not strongly associated with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations when adjusted for age and family history. The high frequency of bilateral disease in multi-case breast cancer families may be due to a familial aggregation of additional susceptibility factors modifying the penetrance of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations.

  1. Modeling Impact of BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutations in Mammary Epithelial Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Mutations in the breast cancer susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 are estimated to...account for over 10% of the breast cancer burden in the US. The current standard of care for BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers is based on limited...understanding of the effects of specific mutations, and thus treats all carriers as if they have the same relative risk for development of breast cancer

  2. Aurora A is a prognostic marker for breast cancer arising in BRCA2 mutation carriers

    PubMed Central

    Aradottir, Margret; Reynisdottir, Sigridur T; Stefansson, Olafur A; Jonasson, Jon G; Sverrisdottir, Asgerdur; Tryggvadottir, Laufey; Eyfjord, Jorunn E

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Overexpression of the Aurora A kinase has been shown to have prognostic value in breast cancer. Previously, we showed a significant association between AURKA gene amplification and BRCA2 mutation in breast cancer. The aim of this study was to assess the prognostic impact of Aurora A overexpression on breast cancer arising in BRCA2 mutation carriers. Aurora A expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry on breast tumour tissue microarrays from 107 BRCA2 999del5 mutation carriers and 284 of sporadic origin. Prognostic value of Aurora A nuclear staining was estimated in relation to clinical markers and adjuvant treatment, using multivariate Cox's proportional hazards ratio regression model. BRCA2 wild‐type allele loss was measured by TaqMan in BRCA2 mutated tumour samples. All statistical tests were two sided. Multivariate analysis of breast cancer‐specific survival, including proliferative markers and treatment, indicated independent prognostic value of Aurora A nuclear staining for BRCA2 mutation carriers (hazards ratio = 7.06; 95% confidence interval = 1.23–40.6; p = 0.028). Poor breast cancer‐specific survival of BRCA2 mutation carriers was found to be significantly associated with combined Aurora A nuclear expression and BRCA2 wild type allele loss in tumours (p < 0.001). Multivariate analysis indicated independent prognostic value of both positive Aurora A nuclear staining (hazards ratio = 10.09; 95% confidence interval = 1.19–85.4, p = 0.034) and BRCA2 wild type allele loss (hazards ratio = 9.63; 95% confidence interval = 1.81–51.0, p = 0.008) for BRCA2 mutation carriers. Aurora A nuclear expression was found to be a significant prognostic marker for BRCA2 mutation carriers, independent of clinical parameters and adjuvant treatment. Our conclusion is that treatment benefits for BRCA2 mutation carriers and sporadic breast cancer patients with Aurora A positive tumours may be enhanced by giving

  3. Aurora A is a prognostic marker for breast cancer arising in BRCA2 mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Aradottir, Margret; Reynisdottir, Sigridur T; Stefansson, Olafur A; Jonasson, Jon G; Sverrisdottir, Asgerdur; Tryggvadottir, Laufey; Eyfjord, Jorunn E; Bodvarsdottir, Sigridur K

    2015-01-01

    Overexpression of the Aurora A kinase has been shown to have prognostic value in breast cancer. Previously, we showed a significant association between AURKA gene amplification and BRCA2 mutation in breast cancer. The aim of this study was to assess the prognostic impact of Aurora A overexpression on breast cancer arising in BRCA2 mutation carriers. Aurora A expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry on breast tumour tissue microarrays from 107 BRCA2 999del5 mutation carriers and 284 of sporadic origin. Prognostic value of Aurora A nuclear staining was estimated in relation to clinical markers and adjuvant treatment, using multivariate Cox's proportional hazards ratio regression model. BRCA2 wild-type allele loss was measured by TaqMan in BRCA2 mutated tumour samples. All statistical tests were two sided. Multivariate analysis of breast cancer-specific survival, including proliferative markers and treatment, indicated independent prognostic value of Aurora A nuclear staining for BRCA2 mutation carriers (hazards ratio = 7.06; 95% confidence interval = 1.23-40.6; p = 0.028). Poor breast cancer-specific survival of BRCA2 mutation carriers was found to be significantly associated with combined Aurora A nuclear expression and BRCA2 wild type allele loss in tumours (p < 0.001). Multivariate analysis indicated independent prognostic value of both positive Aurora A nuclear staining (hazards ratio = 10.09; 95% confidence interval = 1.19-85.4, p = 0.034) and BRCA2 wild type allele loss (hazards ratio = 9.63; 95% confidence interval = 1.81-51.0, p = 0.008) for BRCA2 mutation carriers. Aurora A nuclear expression was found to be a significant prognostic marker for BRCA2 mutation carriers, independent of clinical parameters and adjuvant treatment. Our conclusion is that treatment benefits for BRCA2 mutation carriers and sporadic breast cancer patients with Aurora A positive tumours may be enhanced by giving attention to Aurora A

  4. The Icelandic founder mutation BRCA2 999del5: analysis of expression

    PubMed Central

    Mikaelsdottir, Evgenia K; Valgeirsdottir, Sigridur; Eyfjord, Jorunn E; Rafnar, Thorunn

    2004-01-01

    Introduction A founder mutation in the BRCA2 gene (BRCA2 999del5) accounts for 7–8% of female breast cancers and for 40% of male breast cancers in Iceland. If expressed, the mutant gene would encode a protein consisting of the first 256 amino acids of the BRCA2 protein. The purpose of this study was to determine whether this mutant protein is produced in heterozygous individuals and, if so, what might be the functional consequences of mutant protein production. Methods The presence of BRCA2 999del5 transcripts in fibroblasts from heterozygous individuals was assayed by cDNA synthesis and sequencing. The potential protein-coding portion of BRCA2 999del5 was cloned into the pIND(SP1)/V5-His vector and expressed in COS7 cells. The presence of the mutant protein in cell lysates from heterozygous fibroblasts and from COS7 cells was tested by a number of methods including immunoprecipitation, affinity purification with nickel-coated agarose beads, Western blotting and ELISA, using antibodies to the N-terminal end of BRCA2, antiserum specific for the 16 nonrelevant amino acids at the carboxyl end and antibodies to fusion partners of recombinant proteins. Results The frequency of the BRCA2 999del5 transcript in heterozygous fibroblasts was about one-fifth of the wild-type transcript; however, no mutant protein could be detected. Overexpression of BRCA2 999del5 mRNA in COS7 cells failed to produce a mutant protein unless degradation by proteasomes was blocked. Conclusion Our results show that the protein product of BRCA2 999del5 is extremely unstable. Therefore, an increase in breast cancer risk in BRCA2 999del5 carriers is due to haploinsufficiency at the BRCA2 locus. PMID:15217494

  5. The Icelandic founder mutation BRCA2 999del5: analysis of expression.

    PubMed

    Mikaelsdottir, Evgenia K; Valgeirsdottir, Sigridur; Eyfjord, Jorunn E; Rafnar, Thorunn

    2004-01-01

    A founder mutation in the BRCA2 gene (BRCA2 999del5) accounts for 7-8% of female breast cancers and for 40% of male breast cancers in Iceland. If expressed, the mutant gene would encode a protein consisting of the first 256 amino acids of the BRCA2 protein. The purpose of this study was to determine whether this mutant protein is produced in heterozygous individuals and, if so, what might be the functional consequences of mutant protein production. The presence of BRCA2 999del5 transcripts in fibroblasts from heterozygous individuals was assayed by cDNA synthesis and sequencing. The potential protein-coding portion of BRCA2 999del5 was cloned into the pIND(SP1)/V5-His vector and expressed in COS7 cells. The presence of the mutant protein in cell lysates from heterozygous fibroblasts and from COS7 cells was tested by a number of methods including immunoprecipitation, affinity purification with nickel-coated agarose beads, Western blotting and ELISA, using antibodies to the N-terminal end of BRCA2, antiserum specific for the 16 nonrelevant amino acids at the carboxyl end and antibodies to fusion partners of recombinant proteins. The frequency of the BRCA2 999del5 transcript in heterozygous fibroblasts was about one-fifth of the wild-type transcript; however, no mutant protein could be detected. Overexpression of BRCA2 999del5 mRNA in COS7 cells failed to produce a mutant protein unless degradation by proteasomes was blocked. Our results show that the protein product of BRCA2 999del5 is extremely unstable. Therefore, an increase in breast cancer risk in BRCA2 999del5 carriers is due to haploinsufficiency at the BRCA2 locus.

  6. A brother and sister with breast cancer, BRCA2 mutations and bilateral supernumerary nipples

    PubMed Central

    Coad, Ryan

    2017-01-01

    We describe a 54-year-old man with breast cancer and a BRCA2 mutation who was also found to have bilateral supernumerary nipples. His sister, also with a BRCA2 mutation, was diagnosed with breast cancer in her late forties; she also had bilateral supernumerary nipples. We address the significance of breast cancer arising in breast tissue underlying supernumerary nipples; the known association between supernumerary nipples and genitourinary malignancies/malformations and the possible link between BRCA2 and supernumerary nipple development. We believe that this is the first described case of the latter. We then outline an approach to further management for supernumerary nipple cases. PMID:28361071

  7. Women with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations survive ovarian cancer at higher rates

    Cancer.gov

    Results from a National Cancer Institute (NCI) sponsored multicenter study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association on January 25, 2012, provides strong evidence that BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutation carriers with ovarian cancer were more

  8. Germline BRCA2 mutations drive prostate cancers with distinct evolutionary trajectories.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Renea A; Fraser, Michael; Livingstone, Julie; Espiritu, Shadrielle Melijah G; Thorne, Heather; Huang, Vincent; Lo, Winnie; Shiah, Yu-Jia; Yamaguchi, Takafumi N; Sliwinski, Ania; Horsburgh, Sheri; Meng, Alice; Heisler, Lawrence E; Yu, Nancy; Yousif, Fouad; Papargiris, Melissa; Lawrence, Mitchell G; Timms, Lee; Murphy, Declan G; Frydenberg, Mark; Hopkins, Julia F; Bolton, Damien; Clouston, David; McPherson, John D; van der Kwast, Theodorus; Boutros, Paul C; Risbridger, Gail P; Bristow, Robert G

    2017-01-09

    Germline mutations in the BRCA2 tumour suppressor are associated with both an increased lifetime risk of developing prostate cancer (PCa) and increased risk of aggressive disease. To understand this aggression, here we profile the genomes and methylomes of localized PCa from 14 carriers of deleterious germline BRCA2 mutations (BRCA2-mutant PCa). We show that BRCA2-mutant PCa harbour increased genomic instability and a mutational profile that more closely resembles metastastic than localized disease. BRCA2-mutant PCa shows genomic and epigenomic dysregulation of the MED12L/MED12 axis, which is frequently dysregulated in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). This dysregulation is enriched in BRCA2-mutant PCa harbouring intraductal carcinoma (IDC). Microdissection and sequencing of IDC and juxtaposed adjacent non-IDC invasive carcinoma in 10 patients demonstrates a common ancestor to both histopathologies. Overall we show that localized castration-sensitive BRCA2-mutant tumours are uniquely aggressive, due to de novo aberration in genes usually associated with metastatic disease, justifying aggressive initial treatment.

  9. Germline BRCA2 mutations drive prostate cancers with distinct evolutionary trajectories

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Renea A.; Fraser, Michael; Livingstone, Julie; Espiritu, Shadrielle Melijah G.; Thorne, Heather; Huang, Vincent; Lo, Winnie; Shiah, Yu-Jia; Yamaguchi, Takafumi N.; Sliwinski, Ania; Horsburgh, Sheri; Meng, Alice; Heisler, Lawrence E.; Yu, Nancy; Yousif, Fouad; Papargiris, Melissa; Lawrence, Mitchell G.; Timms, Lee; Murphy, Declan G.; Frydenberg, Mark; Hopkins, Julia F.; Bolton, Damien; Clouston, David; McPherson, John D.; van der Kwast, Theodorus; Boutros, Paul C.; Risbridger, Gail P.; Bristow, Robert G.

    2017-01-01

    Germline mutations in the BRCA2 tumour suppressor are associated with both an increased lifetime risk of developing prostate cancer (PCa) and increased risk of aggressive disease. To understand this aggression, here we profile the genomes and methylomes of localized PCa from 14 carriers of deleterious germline BRCA2 mutations (BRCA2-mutant PCa). We show that BRCA2-mutant PCa harbour increased genomic instability and a mutational profile that more closely resembles metastastic than localized disease. BRCA2-mutant PCa shows genomic and epigenomic dysregulation of the MED12L/MED12 axis, which is frequently dysregulated in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). This dysregulation is enriched in BRCA2-mutant PCa harbouring intraductal carcinoma (IDC). Microdissection and sequencing of IDC and juxtaposed adjacent non-IDC invasive carcinoma in 10 patients demonstrates a common ancestor to both histopathologies. Overall we show that localized castration-sensitive BRCA2-mutant tumours are uniquely aggressive, due to de novo aberration in genes usually associated with metastatic disease, justifying aggressive initial treatment. PMID:28067867

  10. Evidence for SMAD3 as a modifier of breast cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Current attempts to identify genetic modifiers of BRCA1 and BRCA2 associated risk have focused on a candidate gene approach, based on knowledge of gene functions, or the development of large genome-wide association studies. In this study, we evaluated 24 SNPs tagged to 14 candidate genes derived through a novel approach that analysed gene expression differences to prioritise candidate modifier genes for association studies. Methods We successfully genotyped 24 SNPs in a cohort of up to 4,724 BRCA1 and 2,693 BRCA2 female mutation carriers from 15 study groups and assessed whether these variants were associated with risk of breast cancer in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Results SNPs in five of the 14 candidate genes showed evidence of association with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 or BRCA2 carriers (P < 0.05). Notably, the minor alleles of two SNPs (rs7166081 and rs3825977) in high linkage disequilibrium (r2 = 0.77), located at the SMAD3 locus (15q22), were each associated with increased breast cancer risk for BRCA2 mutation carriers (relative risk = 1.25, 95% confidence interval = 1.07 to 1.45, Ptrend = 0.004; and relative risk = 1.20, 95% confidence interval = 1.03 to 1.40, Ptrend = 0.018). Conclusions This study provides evidence that the SMAD3 gene, which encodes a key regulatory protein in the transforming growth factor beta signalling pathway and is known to interact directly with BRCA2, may contribute to increased risk of breast cancer in BRCA2 mutation carriers. This finding suggests that genes with expression associated with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation status are enriched for the presence of common genetic modifiers of breast cancer risk in these populations. PMID:21114847

  11. Evidence for SMAD3 as a modifier of breast cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Walker, Logan C; Fredericksen, Zachary S; Wang, Xianshu; Tarrell, Robert; Pankratz, Vernon S; Lindor, Noralane M; Beesley, Jonathan; Healey, Sue; Chen, Xiaoqing; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Tirapo, Carole; Giraud, Sophie; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Muller, Danièle; Fricker, Jean-Pierre; Delnatte, Capucine; Schmutzler, Rita K; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Engel, Christoph; Schönbuchner, Ines; Deissler, Helmut; Meindl, Alfons; Hogervorst, Frans B; Verheus, Martijn; Hooning, Maartje J; van den Ouweland, Ans Mw; Nelen, Marcel R; Ausems, Margreet Gem; Aalfs, Cora M; van Asperen, Christi J; Devilee, Peter; Gerrits, Monique M; Waisfisz, Quinten; Szabo, Csilla I; Easton, Douglas F; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare T; Frost, Debra; Harrington, Patricia; Evans, D Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Eeles, Ros; Izatt, Louise; Chu, Carol; Davidson, Rosemarie; Eccles, Diana; Ong, Kai-Ren; Cook, Jackie; Rebbeck, Tim; Nathanson, Katherine L; Domchek, Susan M; Singer, Christian F; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Dressler, Anne-Catharina; Pfeiler, Georg; Godwin, Andrew K; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Nevanlinna, Heli; Agnarsson, Bjarni A; Caligo, Maria Adelaide; Olsson, Håkan; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Liljegren, Annelie; Arver, Brita; Karlsson, Per; Melin, Beatrice; Sinilnikova, Olga M; McGuffog, Lesley; Antoniou, Antonis C; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Spurdle, Amanda B; Couch, Fergus J

    2010-01-01

    Current attempts to identify genetic modifiers of BRCA1 and BRCA2 associated risk have focused on a candidate gene approach, based on knowledge of gene functions, or the development of large genome-wide association studies. In this study, we evaluated 24 SNPs tagged to 14 candidate genes derived through a novel approach that analysed gene expression differences to prioritise candidate modifier genes for association studies. We successfully genotyped 24 SNPs in a cohort of up to 4,724 BRCA1 and 2,693 BRCA2 female mutation carriers from 15 study groups and assessed whether these variants were associated with risk of breast cancer in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. SNPs in five of the 14 candidate genes showed evidence of association with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 or BRCA2 carriers (P < 0.05). Notably, the minor alleles of two SNPs (rs7166081 and rs3825977) in high linkage disequilibrium (r² = 0.77), located at the SMAD3 locus (15q22), were each associated with increased breast cancer risk for BRCA2 mutation carriers (relative risk = 1.25, 95% confidence interval = 1.07 to 1.45, P(trend) = 0.004; and relative risk = 1.20, 95% confidence interval = 1.03 to 1.40, P(trend) = 0.018). This study provides evidence that the SMAD3 gene, which encodes a key regulatory protein in the transforming growth factor beta signalling pathway and is known to interact directly with BRCA2, may contribute to increased risk of breast cancer in BRCA2 mutation carriers. This finding suggests that genes with expression associated with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation status are enriched for the presence of common genetic modifiers of breast cancer risk in these populations.

  12. First case report of an adrenocortical carcinoma caused by a BRCA2 mutation

    PubMed Central

    El Ghorayeb, Nada; Grunenwald, Solange; Nolet, Serge; Primeau, Vanessa; Côté, Stéphanie; Maugard, Christine M.; Lacroix, André; Gaboury, Louis; Bourdeau, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) may rarely be a component of inherited cancer syndromes such as Li-Fraumeni syndrome and Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome. ACC caused by a BRCA2 mutation has never been reported. Methods: Nucleotide sequencing of BRCA2 in lymphocyte and tumoral DNA of a 50-year-old male who presented with an androgen-secreting ACC and a strong family history of breast, ovarian, and pancreatic cancers. Results: A germline BRCA2 2 bp heterozygous deletion at nucleotide 8765 (8765delAG) leading to a frameshift mutation (p.Glu2846GlyfsX23) was detected. Only the BRCA2 deleted allele was retained in the ACC tumoral DNA compared with the control DNA supporting a loss of heterozygosity in the tumor. Conclusion: This is the first reported case of a patient with ACC associated with a BRCA2 germline mutation. Loss of heterozygosity in ACC DNA suggests a causal link with the BRCA2 8765delAG mutation. PMID:27603373

  13. BRCA1/BRCA2 founder mutations and cancer risks: impact in the western Danish population.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Henriette Roed; Nilbert, Mef; Petersen, Janne; Ladelund, Steen; Thomassen, Mads; Pedersen, Inge Søkilde; Hansen, Thomas V O; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Borg, Åke; Therkildsen, Christina

    2016-10-01

    Mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes significantly contribute to hereditary breast cancer and ovarian cancer, but the phenotypic effect from different mutations is insufficiently recognized. We used a western Danish clinic-based cohort of 299 BRCA families to study the female cancer risk in mutation carriers and their untested first-degree relatives. Founder mutations were characterized and the risk of cancer was assessed in relation to the specific mutations. In BRCA1, the cumulative cancer risk at age 70 was 35 % for breast cancer and 29 % for ovarian cancer. In BRCA2, the cumulative risk was 44 % for breast cancer and 15 % for ovarian cancer. We identified 47 distinct BRCA1 mutations and 48 distinct mutations in BRCA2. Among these, 8 founder mutations [BRCA1 c.81-?_4986+?del, c.3319G>T (p.Glu1107*), c.3874delT and c.5213G>A (p.Gly1738Glu) and BRCA2 c.6373delA, c.7008-1G>A, c.7617+1G>A and c.8474delC] were found to account for 23 % of the BRCA1 mutations and for 32 % of the BRCA2 mutations. The BRCA1 mutation c.3319G>T was, compared to other BRCA1 mutations, associated with a higher risk for ovarian cancer. In conclusion, founder mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 contribute to up to one-third of the families in western Denmark and among these the BRCA1 c.3319G>T mutation is potentially linked to an increased risk of ovarian cancer.

  14. Founder BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in French Canadian breast and ovarian cancer families.

    PubMed Central

    Tonin, P N; Mes-Masson, A M; Futreal, P A; Morgan, K; Mahon, M; Foulkes, W D; Cole, D E; Provencher, D; Ghadirian, P; Narod, S A

    1998-01-01

    We have identified four mutations in each of the breast cancer-susceptibility genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2, in French Canadian breast cancer and breast/ovarian cancer families from Quebec. To identify founder effects, we examined independently ascertained French Canadian cancer families for the distribution of these eight mutations. Mutations were found in 41 of 97 families. Six of eight mutations were observed at least twice. The BRCA1 C4446T mutation was the most common mutation found, followed by the BRCA2 8765delAG mutation. Together, these mutations were found in 28 of 41 families identified to have a mutation. The odds of detection of any of the four BRCA1 mutations was 18.7x greater if one or more cases of ovarian cancer were also present in the family. The odds of detection of any of the four BRCA2 mutations was 5.3x greater if there were at least five cases of breast cancer in the family. Interestingly, the presence of a breast cancer case <36 years of age was strongly predictive of the presence of any of the eight mutations screened. Carriers of the same mutation, from different families, shared similar haplotypes, indicating that the mutant alleles were likely to be identical by descent for a mutation in the founder population. The identification of common BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations will facilitate carrier detection in French Canadian breast cancer and breast/ovarian cancer families. PMID:9792861

  15. BRCA2, EGFR, and NTRK mutations in mismatch repair-deficient colorectal cancers with MSH2 or MLH1 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Deihimi, Safoora; Lev, Avital; Slifker, Michael; Shagisultanova, Elena; Xu, Qifang; Jung, Kyungsuk; Vijayvergia, Namrata; Ross, Eric A.; Xiu, Joanne; Swensen, Jeffrey; Gatalica, Zoran; Andrake, Mark; Dunbrack, Roland L.; El-Deiry, Wafik S.

    2017-01-01

    Deficient mismatch repair (MMR) and microsatellite instability (MSI) contribute to ~15% of colorectal cancer (CRCs). We hypothesized MSI leads to mutations in DNA repair proteins including BRCA2 and cancer drivers including EGFR. We analyzed mutations among a discovery cohort of 26 MSI-High (MSI-H) and 558 non-MSI-H CRCs profiled at Caris Life Sciences. Caris-profiled MSI-H CRCs had high mutation rates (50% vs 14% in non-MSI-H, P < 0.0001) in BRCA2. Of 1104 profiled CRCs from a second cohort (COSMIC), MSH2/MLH1-mutant CRCs showed higher mutation rates in BRCA2 compared to non-MSH2/MLH1-mutant tumors (38% vs 6%, P < 0.0000001). BRCA2 mutations in MSH2/MLH1-mutant CRCs included 75 unique mutations not known to occur in breast or pancreatic cancer per COSMIC v73. Only 5 deleterious BRCA2 mutations in CRC were previously reported in the BIC database as germ-line mutations in breast cancer. Some BRCA2 mutations were predicted to disrupt interactions with partner proteins DSS1 and RAD51. Some CRCs harbored multiple BRCA2 mutations. EGFR was mutated in 45.5% of MSH2/MLH1-mutant and 6.5% of non-MSH2/MLH1-mutant tumors (P < 0.0000001). Approximately 15% of EGFR mutations found may be actionable through TKI therapy, including N700D, G719D, T725M, T790M, and E884K. NTRK gene mutations were identified in MSH2/MLH1-mutant CRC including NTRK1 I699V, NTRK2 P716S, and NTRK3 R745L. Our findings have clinical relevance regarding therapeutic targeting of BRCA2 vulnerabilities, EGFR mutations or other identified oncogenic drivers such as NTRK in MSH2/MLH1-mutant CRCs or other tumors with mismatch repair deficiency. PMID:28591715

  16. Tamoxifen and risk of contralateral breast cancer for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Milne, Roger L; Rookus, Matti A; Daly, Mary B; Antoniou, Antonis C; Peock, Susan; Frost, Debra; Easton, Douglas F; Ellis, Steve; Friedlander, Michael L; Buys, Saundra S; Andrieu, Nadine; Noguès, Catherine; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Bonadona, Valérie; Pujol, Pascal; McLachlan, Sue Anne; John, Esther M; Hooning, Maartje J; Seynaeve, Caroline; Tollenaar, Rob A E M; Goldgar, David E; Terry, Mary Beth; Caldes, Trinidad; Weideman, Prue C; Andrulis, Irene L; Singer, Christian F; Birch, Kate; Simard, Jacques; Southey, Melissa C; Olsson, Håkan L; Jakubowska, Anna; Olah, Edith; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Foretova, Lenka; Hopper, John L

    2013-09-01

    To determine whether adjuvant tamoxifen treatment for breast cancer (BC) is associated with reduced contralateral breast cancer (CBC) risk for BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 mutation carriers. Analysis of pooled observational cohort data, self-reported at enrollment and at follow-up from the International BRCA1, and BRCA2 Carrier Cohort Study, Kathleen Cuningham Foundation Consortium for Research into Familial Breast Cancer, and Breast Cancer Family Registry. Eligible women were BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers diagnosed with unilateral BC since 1970 and no other invasive cancer or tamoxifen use before first BC. Hazard ratios (HRs) for CBC associated with tamoxifen use were estimated using Cox regression, adjusting for year and age of diagnosis, country, and bilateral oophorectomy and censoring at contralateral mastectomy, death, or loss to follow-up. Of 1,583 BRCA1 and 881 BRCA2 mutation carriers, 383 (24%) and 454 (52%), respectively, took tamoxifen after first BC diagnosis. There were 520 CBCs over 20,104 person-years of observation. The adjusted HR estimates were 0.38 (95% CI, 0.27 to 0.55) and 0.33 (95% CI, 0.22 to 0.50) for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, respectively. After left truncating at recruitment to the cohort, adjusted HR estimates were 0.58 (95% CI, 0.29 to 1.13) and 0.48 (95% CI, 0.22 to 1.05) based on 657 BRCA1 and 426 BRCA2 mutation carriers with 100 CBCs over 4,392 person-years of prospective follow-up. HRs did not differ by estrogen receptor status of the first BC (missing for 56% of cases). This study provides evidence that tamoxifen use is associated with a reduction in CBC risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Further follow-up of these cohorts will provide increased statistical power for future prospective analyses.

  17. Recurrent BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in Mexican women with breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Mejía, Gabriela; Royer, Robert; Llacuachaqui, Marcia; Akbari, Mohammad R.; Giuliano, Anna R.; Martínez-Matsushita, Louis; Angeles-Llerenas, Angélica; Ortega-Olvera, Carolina; Ziv, Elad; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Phelan, Catherine M.; Narod, Steven A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Germline mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes confer an estimated 58–80% lifetime risk of breast cancer. In general, screening is done for cancer patients if a relative has been diagnosed with breast or ovarian cancer. There are few data on the prevalence of mutations in these genes in Mexican women with breast cancer and this hampers efforts to develop screening policies in Mexico. Methods We screened 810 unselected women with breast cancer from three cities in Mexico (Mexico City, Veracruz and Monterrey) for mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2, including a panel of 26 previously reported mutations. Results Thirty-five mutations were identified in 34 women (4.3% of total) including 20 BRCA1 mutations and 15 BRCA2 mutations. Twenty-two of the 35 mutations were recurrent mutations (62.8%). Only five of the 34 mutation carriers had a first-degree relative with breast cancer (three with BRCA1 and two with BRCA2 mutations). Conclusion These results support the rationale for a strategy of screening for recurrent mutations in all women with breast cancer in Mexico, as opposed to restricting screening to those with a sister or mother with breast or ovarian cancer. Impact These results will impact cancer genetic testing in Mexico and the identification of at-risk individuals who will benefit from increased surveillance. PMID:25371446

  18. Study of a single BRCA2 mutation with high carrier frequency in a small population.

    PubMed Central

    Thorlacius, S; Sigurdsson, S; Bjarnadottir, H; Olafsdottir, G; Jonasson, J G; Tryggvadottir, L; Tulinius, H; Eyfjörd, J E

    1997-01-01

    Germ-line changes in the cancer-predisposition gene BRCA2 are found in a small proportion of breast cancers. Mutations in the BRCA2 gene have been studied mainly in families with high risk of breast cancer in females, and male breast cancer also has been associated with BRCA2 mutations. The importance of germ-line BRCA2 mutations in individuals without a family history of breast cancer is unknown. The same BRCA2 mutation has been found in 16/21 Icelandic breast cancer families, indicating a founder effect. We determined the frequency of this mutation, 999del5, in 1,182 Icelanders, comprising 520 randomly selected individuals from the population and a series of 632 female breast cancer patients (61.4% of patients diagnosed during the study period) and all male breast cancer patients diagnosed during the past 40 years. We detected the 999del5 germ-line mutation in 0.6% of the population, in 7.7% of female breast cancer patients, and in 40% of males with breast cancer. The mutation was strongly associated with onset of female breast cancer at age <50 years, but its penetrance and expression are varied. A number of cancers other than breast cancer were found to be increased in relatives of mutation carriers, including those with prostate and pancreatic cancer. Furthermore, germ-line BRCA2 mutation can be present without a strong family history of breast cancer. Comparison of the age at onset for mother/daughter pairs with the 999del5 mutation and breast cancer indicates that age at onset is decreasing in the younger generation. Increase in breast cancer incidence and lower age at onset suggest a possible contributing environmental factor. PMID:9150155

  19. Study of a single BRCA2 mutation with high carrier frequency in a small population.

    PubMed

    Thorlacius, S; Sigurdsson, S; Bjarnadottir, H; Olafsdottir, G; Jonasson, J G; Tryggvadottir, L; Tulinius, H; Eyfjörd, J E

    1997-05-01

    Germ-line changes in the cancer-predisposition gene BRCA2 are found in a small proportion of breast cancers. Mutations in the BRCA2 gene have been studied mainly in families with high risk of breast cancer in females, and male breast cancer also has been associated with BRCA2 mutations. The importance of germ-line BRCA2 mutations in individuals without a family history of breast cancer is unknown. The same BRCA2 mutation has been found in 16/21 Icelandic breast cancer families, indicating a founder effect. We determined the frequency of this mutation, 999del5, in 1,182 Icelanders, comprising 520 randomly selected individuals from the population and a series of 632 female breast cancer patients (61.4% of patients diagnosed during the study period) and all male breast cancer patients diagnosed during the past 40 years. We detected the 999del5 germ-line mutation in 0.6% of the population, in 7.7% of female breast cancer patients, and in 40% of males with breast cancer. The mutation was strongly associated with onset of female breast cancer at age <50 years, but its penetrance and expression are varied. A number of cancers other than breast cancer were found to be increased in relatives of mutation carriers, including those with prostate and pancreatic cancer. Furthermore, germ-line BRCA2 mutation can be present without a strong family history of breast cancer. Comparison of the age at onset for mother/daughter pairs with the 999del5 mutation and breast cancer indicates that age at onset is decreasing in the younger generation. Increase in breast cancer incidence and lower age at onset suggest a possible contributing environmental factor.

  20. Implications of High Rates of Metastatic Prostate Cancer in BRCA2 Mutation Carriers.

    PubMed

    Gleicher, Stephanie; Kauffman, Eric C; Kotula, Leszek; Bratslavsky, Gennady; Vourganti, Srinivas

    2016-09-01

    Patients with germline BRCA2 gene mutations (BRCA2mut) have more aggressive prostate cancer. Analysis of all reported germline BRCA2mut prostate cancer cases allows better understanding of the clinicopathologic features and survival outcomes of these men. A systematic review was performed with the MEDLINE database to capture articles evaluating clinicopathologic characteristics of men with BRCA2mut associated prostate cancer. Inclusion criteria were at least five subjects, confirmation of BRCA2mut status, and data for at least 2 clinical parameters of disease. Meta-analysis was performed on outcomes data. Chi-squared tests were used to compare disease features among men undergoing formal versus ad hoc screening, as well as an age of diagnosis less than versus greater than 65 years. Rates of metastatic disease among BRCA2mut cases were compared to rates among non-carrier control subjects and the general population using the SEER database. Twelve out of 289 studies met our inclusion criteria, representing 261 BRCA2mut men. Among carriers, the median age at diagnosis was 62 years and median PSA was 15 ng/dl with 95% of men having a PSA>3. Over 40% of BRCA2mut patients had T3/T4 disease and over 25% were metastatic at presentation. Survival was worse in BRCA2mut men with prostate cancer when compared to non-BRCA2mut subjects. BRCA2mut carriers had significantly higher rates of metastatic disease (18%) versus non-carrier controls (8%) and the SEER population (4%). BRCA2mut carriers are more likely to have poor risk of prostate cancer at presentation and exhibit worse oncologic outcomes relative to non-carriers, including a fourfold increase in metastatic disease. Younger men and those undergoing formal screening present with less advanced disease which supports a need for earlier identification and screening protocols. Additionally, this population may benefit from alternative therapeutic paradigms. Prostate 76:1135-1145, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016

  1. BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in breast cancer patients from Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Lara, Karlena; Consigliere, Nigmet; Pérez, Jorge; Porco, Antonietta

    2012-01-01

    A sample of 58 familial breast cancer patients from Venezuela were screened for germline mutations in the coding sequences and exon-intron boundaries of BRCA1 (MIM no. 113705) and BRCA2 (MIM no. 600185) genes by using conformation-sensitive gel electrophoresis. Ashkenazi Jewish founder mutations were not found in any of the samples. We identified 6 (10.3%) and 4 (6.9%) patients carrying germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2, respectively. Four pathogenic mutations were found in BRCA1, one is a novel mutation (c.951_952insA), while the other three had been previously reported (c.1129_1135insA, c.4603G>T and IVS20+1G>A). We also found 4 pathogenic mutations in BRCA2, two novel mutations (c.2732_2733insA and c.3870_3873delG) and two that have been already reported (c.3036_3039delACAA and c.6024_6025_delTA). In addition, 17 variants of unknown significance (6 BRCA1 variants and 11 BRCA2 variants), 5 BRCA2 variants with no clinical importance and 22 polymorphisms (12 in BRCA1 and 10 in BRCA2) were also identified. This is the first genetic study on BRCA gene mutations conducted in breast cancer patients from Venezuela. The ethnicity of our population, as well as the heterogeneous and broad spectrum of BRCA genes mutations, must be considered to optimize genetic counseling and disease prevention in affected families.

  2. A Comprehensive Focus on Global Spectrum of BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutations in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Karami, Fatemeh; Mehdipour, Parvin

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer (BC) is the most common cancer of women all over the world. BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutations comprise the most important genetic susceptibility of BC. Except for few common mutations, the spectrum of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations is heterogeneous in diverse populations. 185AGdel and 5382insC are the most important BRCA1 and BRCA2 alterations which have been encountered in most of the populations. After those Ashkenazi founder mutations, 300T>G also demonstrated sparse frequency in African American and European populations. This review affords quick access to the most frequent alterations among various populations which could be helpful in BRCA screening programs. PMID:24312913

  3. Oestrogen receptor status, treatment and breast cancer prognosis in Icelandic BRCA2 mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Jonasson, Jon G; Stefansson, Olafur A; Johannsson, Oskar T; Sigurdsson, Helgi; Agnarsson, Bjarni A; Olafsdottir, Gudridur H; Alexiusdottir, Kristin K; Stefansdottir, Hrefna; Munoz Mitev, Rodrigo; Olafsdottir, Katrin; Olafsdottir, Kristrun; Arason, Adalgeir; Stefansdottir, Vigdis; Olafsdottir, Elinborg J; Barkardottir, Rosa B; Eyfjord, Jorunn E; Narod, Steven A; Tryggvadóttir, Laufey

    2016-09-27

    The impact of an inherited BRCA2 mutation on the prognosis of women with breast cancer has not been well documented. We studied the effects of oestrogen receptor (ER) status, other prognostic factors and treatments on survival in a large cohort of BRCA2 mutation carriers. We identified 285 breast cancer patients with a 999del5 BRCA2 mutation and matched them with 570 non-carrier patients. Clinical information was abstracted from patient charts and pathology records and supplemented by evaluation of tumour grade and ER status using archived tissue specimens. Univariate and multivariate hazard ratios (HR) were estimated for breast cancer-specific survival using Cox regression. The effects of various therapies were studied in patients treated from 1980 to 2012. Among mutation carriers, positive ER status was associated with higher risk of death than negative ER status (HR=1.94; 95% CI=1.22-3.07, P=0.005). The reverse association was seen for non-carriers (HR=0.71; 95% CI: 0.51-0.97; P=0.03). Among BRCA2 carriers, ER-positive status is an adverse prognostic factor. BRCA2 carrier status should be known at the time when treatment decisions are made.

  4. BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations and the risk for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Sopik, V; Phelan, C; Cybulski, C; Narod, S A

    2015-05-01

    Women who carry a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation are at high risk of breast and ovarian cancer, and may be at moderately increased risk of other cancer types. This review examines studies to date that have evaluated the risk of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations for colorectal cancer. Accurate knowledge of colorectal cancer risk in BRCA1/2 carriers is important, because colonoscopy screening can prevent colorectal cancer through the removal of adenomatous polyps. Most studies that have identified an increased risk for colorectal cancer in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers were in high-risk cancer families, while studies that found no association were conducted in specific populations and involved the analysis of founder mutations. A recent prospective study of 7015 women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation identified significant fivefold increased risk of colorectal cancer among BRCA1 mutation carriers younger than 50 years [standardized incidence ratio (SIR): 4.8; 95% CI: 2.2-9], but not in women with a BRCA2 mutation or in older women. Based on this evidence, women with BRCA1 mutations should be counseled about their increased risk for early-onset colorectal cancer, and offered colonoscopy at 3- to 5-year intervals between the ages of 40 and 50 years, and should follow population guidelines thereafter. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. The Role of BRCA2 Mutation Status as Diagnostic, Predictive, and Prognosis Biomarker for Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Foncillas, Jesus

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the deadliest cancers worldwide, and life expectancy after diagnosis is often short. Most pancreatic tumours appear sporadically and have been highly related to habits such as cigarette smoking, high alcohol intake, high carbohydrate, and sugar consumption. Other observational studies have suggested the association between pancreatic cancer and exposure to arsenic, lead, or cadmium. Aside from these factors, chronic pancreatitis and diabetes have also come to be considered as risk factors for these kinds of tumours. Studies have found that 10% of pancreatic cancer cases arise from an inherited syndrome related to some genetic alterations. One of these alterations includes mutation in BRCA2 gene. BRCA2 mutations impair DNA damage response and homologous recombination by direct regulation of RAD51. In light of these findings that link genetic factors to tumour development, DNA damage agents have been proposed as target therapies for pancreatic cancer patients carrying BRCA2 mutations. Some of these drugs include platinum-based agents and PARP inhibitors. However, the acquired resistance to PARP inhibitors has created a need for new chemotherapeutic strategies to target BRCA2. The present systematic review collects and analyses the role of BRCA2 alterations to be used in early diagnosis of an inherited syndrome associated with familiar cancer and as a prognostic and predictive biomarker for the management of pancreatic cancer patients. PMID:28078281

  6. BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in a South American population.

    PubMed

    Jara, Lilian; Ampuero, Sandra; Santibáñez, Eudocia; Seccia, Lorena; Rodríguez, Juan; Bustamante, Mario; Martínez, Víctor; Catenaccio, Alejandra; Lay-Son, Guillermo; Blanco, Rafael; Reyes, José Miguel

    2006-04-01

    A sample of 64 high-risk breast and/or ovarian cancer families from Chile were screened for germline mutations in the coding sequences and exon-intron boundaries of BRCA1 (MIN no. 113705) and BRCA2 (MIN no. 600185) genes using conformation-sensitive gel electrophoresis, and the mutations found were confirmed with direct sequencing. Seven families (10.9%) were found to carry BRCA1 mutations and three families (4.7%) had BRCA2 mutations. Six different pathogenic mutations were detected in BRCA1, four that had been reported previously (c.187_188delAG; c.300T-->G, c.3450_3453delCAAG and IVS17-1G-->A) and two novel mutations (c.2605_2606delTT and c.4185_4188delCAAG). In BRCA2, we found three different pathogenic mutations, two previously described (c.6174delT and c.6503_6504delTT) and one novel mutation (c.5667delT). We also identified nine variants of unknown significance (five in BRCA1 and four in BRCA2). These findings indicate that the Chilean population has a heterogeneous spectrum of prevalent BRCA mutations. Given the results obtained in our study, the screening of the entire BRCA1 and BRCA2 coding regions is necessary for the molecular genetic testing of Chilean high-risk breast/ovarian cancer patients. To our knowledge, this is the first genetic study of BRCA gene mutations conducted in Chile. The Chilean population has a well-known admixed Amerindian-Caucasian ratio and, therefore, our findings are not only important per se, but they constitute the basis for improved and more specific genetic counselling, as well as to support for preventive campaigns geared toward the Chilean population.

  7. Germline Mutations of BRCA1 and BRCA2 in Korean Ovarian Cancer Patients: Finding Founder Mutations.

    PubMed

    Choi, Min Chul; Heo, Jin-Hyung; Jang, Ja-Hyun; Jung, Sang Geun; Park, Hyun; Joo, Won Duk; Lee, Chan; Lee, Je Ho; Lee, Jun Mo; Hwang, Yoon Young; Kim, Seung Jo

    2015-10-01

    To investigate and analyze the BRCA mutations in Korean ovarian cancer patients with or without family history and to find founder mutations in this group. One hundred two patients who underwent a staging operation for pathologically proven epithelial cancer between January 2013 and December 2014 were enrolled. Thirty-two patients declined to analyze BRCA1/2 gene alterations after genetic counseling and pedigree analysis. Lymphocyte specimens from peripheral blood were assessed for BRCA1/2 by direct sequencing. BRCA genetic test results of 70 patients were available. Eighteen BRCA1/2 mutations and 17 unclassified variations (UVs) were found. Five of the BRCA1/2 mutations and 4 of the UVs were not reported in the Breast Cancer Information Core database. One BRCA2 UV (8665_8667delGGA) was strongly suspicious to be a deleterious mutation. BRCA1/2 mutations were identified in 11 (61.1%) of 18 patients with a family history and in 7 (13.5%) of 52 patients without a family history.Candidates for founder mutations in Korean ovarian cancer patients were assessed among 39 BRCA1/2 mutations from the present study and from literature reviews. The analysis showed that 1041_1043delAGCinsT (n = 4; 10.2%) and 3746insA (n = 4; 10.2%) were possible BRCA1 founder mutations. Only one of the BRCA2 mutations (5804_5807delTTAA) was repeated twice (n = 2; 5.1%). The prevalence of BRCA1/2 mutations in Korean ovarian cancer patients irrespective of the family history was significantly higher than previously reported. Possible founder mutations in Korean ovarian cancer patients were identified.

  8. BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation analysis in breast-ovarian cancer families from northeastern Poland.

    PubMed

    Perkowska, Magdalena; BroZek, Izabela; Wysocka, Barbara; Haraldsson, Karin; Sandberg, Therese; Johansson, Ulla; Sellberg, Gunilla; Borg, Ake; Limon, Janusz

    2003-05-01

    Sixty high-risk breast and/or ovarian cancer families from North-Eastern Poland were screened for germline mutations in BRCA1 (MIM# 113705) and BRCA2 (MIM# 600185), using a combination of protein truncation test, denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography and direct sequencing. Sixteen (27%) of the families were found to carry nine different BRCA mutations, including 14 families with BRCA1 mutation and two families with BRCA2 mutation. The results suggest the presence of two strong BRCA1 founder mutations in the Polish population - 5382insC (6 families) and 300T>G (Cys61Gly; 3 families). The remaining seven mutations were found in single families and included three previously reported BRCA1 mutations (185delAG, 2682C>T [Gln855Ter] and 3819del5), a novel BRCA1 mutation (IVS14+1G>A), as well as two BRCA2 mutations (4088delA and 7985G>A [Trp2586Ter]) not previously observed in Polish families. We confirm the strong influence of two Central-Eastern European BRCA1 founder mutations in familial breast and/or ovarian cancer in Poland. We also conclude that the Polish population has a more dispersed BRCA mutation spectrum than had been earlier thought. This warrants further careful BRCA mutation screening in order to optimise genetic counselling and disease prevention in affected families.

  9. Mutation analysis of BRCA1 and BRCA2 in a male breast cancer population

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, L.S.; Gayther, S.A.; Ponder, B.A.J.

    1997-02-01

    A population-based series of 54 male breast cancer cases from Southern California were analyzed for germ-line mutations in the inherited breast/ovarian cancer genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2. Nine (17%) of the patients had a family history of breast and/or ovarian cancer in at least one first-degree relative. A further seven (13%) of the patients reported breast/ovarian cancer in at least one second-degree relative and in no first-degree relatives. No germ-line BRCA1 mutations were found. Two male breast cancer patients (4% of the total) were found to carry novel truncating mutations in the BRCA2 gene. Only one of the two male breast cancer patients carrying a BRCA2 mutation had a family history of cancer, with one case of ovarian cancer in a first-degree relative. The remaining eight cases (89%) of male breast cancer with a family history of breast/ovarian cancer in first-degree relatives remain unaccounted for by mutations in either the BRCA1 gene or the BRCA2 gene. 23 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  10. Tumour diploidy and survival in breast cancer patients with BRCA2 mutations.

    PubMed

    Tryggvadottir, Laufey; Olafsdottir, Elinborg J; Olafsdottir, Gudridur H; Sigurdsson, Helgi; Johannsson, Oskar T; Bjorgvinsson, Einar; Alexiusdottir, Kristin; Stefansson, Olafur A; Agnarsson, Bjarni A; Narod, Steven A; Eyfjord, Jorunn E; Jonasson, Jon G

    2013-07-01

    It is not well known to what extent carrying a BRCA2 mutation affects the survival of women with breast cancer and prognostic factors among BRCA2-positive women warrant investigation. Using a record linkage approach we compared the long-term survival in carriers and noncarriers of an inherited BRCA2 founder mutation (999del5), and sought to identify prognostic factors among the BRCA2 mutation-positive subset, including markers of genetic instability (aneuploidy) and mitotic activity (S-phase fraction). We established the genetic status of 2,967 Icelandic breast cancer patients (215 mutation carriers and 2,752 noncarriers) diagnosed from 1955 to 2004, representing 72 % of all cases diagnosed in the country during this period. Tumour ploidy and S-phase fraction were assessed on tumour cells by DNA flow cytometry. Prognostic factors were assessed blindly with respect to mutation status. Univariate and multivariate hazard ratios (HR) were estimated for breast cancer-specific survival by BRCA2 status, using Cox regression. After a median follow-up of 9.5 years, BRCA2 mutation carriers had a higher risk of death from breast cancer than noncarriers (HR 1.64, 95 % CI 1.24-2.16, p < 0.001). The risk increase was restricted to women with diploid tumours (HR 3.03, 95 % CI 1.91-4.79, p < 0.001). Among breast cancer patients with aneuploid tumours, survival of carriers was similar to that of noncarriers (HR 0.76, 95 % CI 0.41-1.41, p = 0.38). Increased tumour size and a positive nodal status predicted worse prognosis in all patients, whereas the highly correlated prognostic factors diploidy, low proliferative activity and a positive estrogen receptor status had reverse effects in mutation carriers and noncarriers. Breast cancer patients who carry the Icelandic founder BRCA2 mutation have inferior long-term survival than noncarriers, but the adverse prognosis is restricted to mutation carriers with diploid, slowly proliferating tumours.

  11. Recurrent germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes in high risk families in Israel.

    PubMed

    Laitman, Yael; Simeonov, Monica; Herskovitz, Liron; Kushnir, Anya; Shimon-Paluch, Shani; Kaufman, Bella; Zidan, Jamal; Friedman, Eitan

    2012-06-01

    The spectrum of germline mutations among Jewish non Ashkenazi high risk breast/ovarian cancer families includes a few predominant mutations in BRCA1 (185delAG and Tyr978X) and BRCA2 (8765delAG). A few additional recurring mutations [A1708E, 981delAT, C61G (BRCA1) R2336P, and IVS2 + 1G > A (BRCA2)] have been reported in Jewish non Ashkenazi families. The 4153delA*BRCA1 C61G*BRCA1 and the 4075delGT*BRCA2 has been reported to recur in Russian/Polish non Jews and Ashkenazim, respectively. The rate of these recurring mutations has not been reported in Israeli high risk families. Genotyping for these recurring mutations by restriction enzyme digest and sequencing method was applied to high risk, predominantly cancer affected, unrelated Israeli individuals of Ashkenazi (n = 827), non Ashkenazi (n = 2,777), non Jewish Caucasians (n = 193), and 395 of mixed ethnicity. Jewish participants included 827 Ashkenazi, 804 Balkans, 847 North Africans, 234 Yemenites, and 892 Asians (Iraq and Iran). Age at diagnosis of breast cancer (median ± SD) (n = 2,484) was 47.2 ± 9.6 for all women participants. Males (n = 236) were also included, of whom 24 had breast cancer and 35 had pancreatic cancer. Overall, 8/282 (2.8%) of the Balkan cases carried the BRCA1*A1708E mutation, 4/180 (2.2%) the R2336P mutation, and 0/270 the IVS2 + 1G > A BRCA2 mutations, respectively. Of North Africans, 7/264 (2.65%) carried the BRCA1*981delAT mutation. The BRCA1*C61G mutation was detected in 3/269 Ashkenazi, non Ashkenazi, and non Jewish Russians; the BRCA1*Tyr978X mutation was detected in 23/3220 individuals of non Ashkenazi origin, exclusively of Asian ethnicity (23/892, 2.6% of the Asians tested). The BRCA1*4153delA mutation was noted in 2/285 non Jewish Caucasians, and none of the Ashkenazim (n = 500) carried the BRCA2*4075delGT mutation. Jewish high risk families of North African, Asian, and Balkan descent should be screened for the 981delAT, Tyr978X, A1708E BRCA1, and the R2336P BRCA2 mutations

  12. Detection of BRCA1 and BRCA2 germline mutations in Japanese population using next-generation sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Hirotsu, Yosuke; Nakagomi, Hiroshi; Sakamoto, Ikuko; Amemiya, Kenji; Mochizuki, Hitoshi; Omata, Masao

    2015-01-01

    Tumor suppressor genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 are the two main breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility genes, and their genetic testing has been used to evaluate the risk of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC). While several studies have reported the prevalence of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in Japanese populations, there is insufficient information about deleterious mutations compared with western countries. Moreover, because many rare variants are found in BRCA1 and BRCA2, both of which encode large proteins, it is difficult to sequence all coding regions using the Sanger method for mutation detection. In this study, therefore, we performed next-generation sequencing (NGS) analysis of the entire coding regions of BRCA1 and BRCA2 in 135 breast and/or ovarian cancer patients. Deleterious BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations were detected in 10 patients (7.4%) by NGS analysis. Of these, one mutation in BRCA1 and two in BRCA2 had not been reported previously. Furthermore, a BRCA2 mutation found in a proband was also identified in two unaffected relatives. These data suggest the utility of screening BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations by NGS in clinical diagnosis. PMID:25802882

  13. Variation in Cancer Risks, by Mutation Position, in BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Deborah; Easton, Douglas

    2001-01-01

    Cancer occurrence in 164 families with breast/ovarian cancer and germline BRCA2 mutations was studied to evaluate the evidence for genotype-phenotype correlations. Mutations in a central portion of the gene (the “ovarian cancer cluster region” [OCCR]) were associated with a significantly higher ratio of cases of ovarian:breast cancer in female carriers than were mutations 5′ or 3′ of this region (P<.0001), extending previous observations. The optimal definition of the OCCR, as judged on the basis of deviance statistics, was bounded by nucleotides 3059–4075 and 6503–6629. The relative and absolute risks of breast and ovarian cancer associated with OCCR and non-OCCR mutations were estimated by a conditional likelihood approach, conditioning on the set of mutations observed in the families. OCCR mutations were associated both with a highly significantly lower risk of breast cancer (relative risk [RR] 0.63; 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.46–0.84; P=.0012) and with a significantly higher risk of ovarian cancer (RR = 1.88; 95% CI = 1.08–3.33; P=.026). No other differences in breast or ovarian cancer risk, by mutation position, were apparent. There was some evidence for a lower risk of prostate cancer in carriers of an OCCR mutation (RR = 0.52; 95% CI = 0.24–1.00; P=.05), but there was no evidence of a difference in breast cancer risk in males. By age 80 years, the cumulative risk of breast cancer in male carriers of a BRCA2 mutation was estimated as 6.92% (95% CI = 1.20%–38.57%). Possible mechanisms for the variation in cancer risk are suggested by the coincidence of the OCCR with the RAD51-binding domain. PMID:11170890

  14. Variation in cancer risks, by mutation position, in BRCA2 mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Thompson, D; Easton, D

    2001-02-01

    Cancer occurrence in 164 families with breast/ovarian cancer and germline BRCA2 mutations was studied to evaluate the evidence for genotype-phenotype correlations. Mutations in a central portion of the gene (the "ovarian cancer cluster region" [OCCR]) were associated with a significantly higher ratio of cases of ovarian:breast cancer in female carriers than were mutations 5' or 3' of this region (P<.0001), extending previous observations. The optimal definition of the OCCR, as judged on the basis of deviance statistics, was bounded by nucleotides 3059-4075 and 6503-6629. The relative and absolute risks of breast and ovarian cancer associated with OCCR and non-OCCR mutations were estimated by a conditional likelihood approach, conditioning on the set of mutations observed in the families. OCCR mutations were associated both with a highly significantly lower risk of breast cancer (relative risk [RR] 0.63; 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.46-0.84; P=.0012) and with a significantly higher risk of ovarian cancer (RR = 1.88; 95% CI = 1.08-3.33; P=.026). No other differences in breast or ovarian cancer risk, by mutation position, were apparent. There was some evidence for a lower risk of prostate cancer in carriers of an OCCR mutation (RR = 0.52; 95% CI = 0.24-1.00; P=.05), but there was no evidence of a difference in breast cancer risk in males. By age 80 years, the cumulative risk of breast cancer in male carriers of a BRCA2 mutation was estimated as 6.92% (95% CI = 1.20%-38.57%). Possible mechanisms for the variation in cancer risk are suggested by the coincidence of the OCCR with the RAD51-binding domain.

  15. Prevalence of BRCA1 and BRCA2 Jewish mutations in Spanish breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Díez, O; Osorio, A; Robledo, M; Barroso, A; Domènech, M; Cortés, J; Albertos, J; Sanz, J; Brunet, J; SanRoḿn, J M; Alonso, M C; Baiget, M; Benítez, J

    1999-01-01

    We screened the 185delAG and 5382insC (BRCA1) and the 6174delT (BRCA2) mutation in 298 Spanish women with breast cancer. Two women (one with Sephardic ancestors) presented the 185delAG mutation and the same haplotype reported in Ashkenazim with this mutation. This suggests a common origin of the 185delAG in both Sephardic and Ashkenazi populations. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10098775

  16. Cancer risks for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers: results from prospective analysis of EMBRACE.

    PubMed

    Mavaddat, Nasim; Peock, Susan; Frost, Debra; Ellis, Steve; Platte, Radka; Fineberg, Elena; Evans, D Gareth; Izatt, Louise; Eeles, Rosalind A; Adlard, Julian; Davidson, Rosemarie; Eccles, Diana; Cole, Trevor; Cook, Jackie; Brewer, Carole; Tischkowitz, Marc; Douglas, Fiona; Hodgson, Shirley; Walker, Lisa; Porteous, Mary E; Morrison, Patrick J; Side, Lucy E; Kennedy, M John; Houghton, Catherine; Donaldson, Alan; Rogers, Mark T; Dorkins, Huw; Miedzybrodzka, Zosia; Gregory, Helen; Eason, Jacqueline; Barwell, Julian; McCann, Emma; Murray, Alex; Antoniou, Antonis C; Easton, Douglas F

    2013-06-05

    Reliable estimates of cancer risk are critical for guiding management of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. The aims of this study were to derive penetrance estimates for breast cancer, ovarian cancer, and contralateral breast cancer in a prospective series of mutation carriers and to assess how these risks are modified by common breast cancer susceptibility alleles. Prospective cancer risks were estimated using a cohort of 978 BRCA1 and 909 BRCA2 carriers from the United Kingdom. Nine hundred eighty-eight women had no breast or ovarian cancer diagnosis at baseline, 1509 women were unaffected by ovarian cancer, and 651 had been diagnosed with unilateral breast cancer. Cumulative risks were obtained using Kaplan-Meier estimates. Associations between cancer risk and covariables of interest were evaluated using Cox regression. All statistical tests were two-sided. The average cumulative risks by age 70 years for BRCA1 carriers were estimated to be 60% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 44% to 75%) for breast cancer, 59% (95% CI = 43% to 76%) for ovarian cancer, and 83% (95% CI = 69% to 94%) for contralateral breast cancer. For BRCA2 carriers, the corresponding risks were 55% (95% CI = 41% to 70%) for breast cancer, 16.5% (95% CI = 7.5% to 34%) for ovarian cancer, and 62% (95% CI = 44% to 79.5%) for contralateral breast cancer. BRCA2 carriers in the highest tertile of risk, defined by the joint genotype distribution of seven single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with breast cancer risk, were at statistically significantly higher risk of developing breast cancer than those in the lowest tertile (hazard ratio = 4.1, 95% CI = 1.2 to 14.5; P = .02). Prospective risk estimates confirm that BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers are at high risk of developing breast, ovarian, and contralateral breast cancer. Our results confirm findings from retrospective studies that common breast cancer susceptibility alleles in combination are predictive of breast cancer risk for BRCA2 carriers.

  17. A low proportion of BRCA2 mutations in Finnish breast cancer families.

    PubMed

    Vehmanen, P; Friedman, L S; Eerola, H; Sarantaus, L; Pyrhönen, S; Ponder, B A; Muhonen, T; Nevanlinna, H

    1997-05-01

    One hundred breast cancer families were identified at the Helsinki University Central Hospital in Finland and were screened for germ-line mutations in the coding regions and splice boundaries of the BRCA2 gene. Eight families (8%) were found to carry five different mutations, all of which are predicted to prematurely truncate the protein product. These BRCA2 families have early-onset breast cancer (mean and median age = 49 years), with four of the eight families including ovarian cancer but with no families including male breast cancer. A wide spectrum of other cancers also is seen in these families. Three mutations were identified in more than one family, and haplotype analysis in the families suggested a common founder for each recurrent mutation. One recurrent mutation, 999del5, previously has been noted as a common mutation in Iceland. The relationship between the Icelandic 999del5 mutation and the Finnish 999del5 mutation was explored by comparison of families from both countries. A common haplotype covering a minimal region intragenic to the BRCA2 gene was shared between the Icelandic and the Finnish mutation carriers.

  18. A low proportion of BRCA2 mutations in Finnish breast cancer families.

    PubMed Central

    Vehmanen, P; Friedman, L S; Eerola, H; Sarantaus, L; Pyrhönen, S; Ponder, B A; Muhonen, T; Nevanlinna, H

    1997-01-01

    One hundred breast cancer families were identified at the Helsinki University Central Hospital in Finland and were screened for germ-line mutations in the coding regions and splice boundaries of the BRCA2 gene. Eight families (8%) were found to carry five different mutations, all of which are predicted to prematurely truncate the protein product. These BRCA2 families have early-onset breast cancer (mean and median age = 49 years), with four of the eight families including ovarian cancer but with no families including male breast cancer. A wide spectrum of other cancers also is seen in these families. Three mutations were identified in more than one family, and haplotype analysis in the families suggested a common founder for each recurrent mutation. One recurrent mutation, 999del5, previously has been noted as a common mutation in Iceland. The relationship between the Icelandic 999del5 mutation and the Finnish 999del5 mutation was explored by comparison of families from both countries. A common haplotype covering a minimal region intragenic to the BRCA2 gene was shared between the Icelandic and the Finnish mutation carriers. Images Figure 2 PMID:9150152

  19. Breast cancer risk in Chinese women with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations.

    PubMed

    Yao, Lu; Sun, Jie; Zhang, Juan; He, Yingjian; Ouyang, Tao; Li, Jinfeng; Wang, Tianfeng; Fan, Zhaoqing; Fan, Tie; Lin, Benyao; Xie, Yuntao

    2016-04-01

    BRCA1/2 mutations represent approximately 5 % of unselected Chinese women with breast cancer. However, the breast cancer risk of Chinese women with BRCA1/2 mutations is unknown. Therefore, the aim of this study was to estimate the age-specific cumulative risk of breast cancer in Chinese women who carry a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation. Our study included 1816 unselected Chinese women with breast cancer and 5549 female first-degree relatives of these probands. All probands were screened for BRCA1/2 mutation. The age-specific cumulative risks of BRCA1/2 carriers were estimated using the kin-cohort study by comparing the history of breast cancer in first-degree female relatives of BRCA1/2 carriers and non-carriers. Among the 1816 probands, 125 BRCA1/2 pathogenic mutations were identified (70 in the BRCA1 gene and 55 in the BRCA2 gene). The incidence of breast cancer in the first-degree female relatives of BRCA1/2 mutation carriers was significantly higher (3.7-fold and 4.4-fold for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, respectively) than in non-carriers. The estimated cumulative risks of breast cancer by age 70 years were 37.9 % [95 % confidence interval (CI) 24.1-54.4 %] for BRCA1 mutation carriers and 36.5 % (95 % CI 26.7-51.8 %) for BRCA2 mutation carriers, respectively. Our study suggests that the breast cancer risk of Chinese women with BRCA1/2 mutations appears to be relatively high by the age of 70. Therefore, genetic counseling, enhanced surveillance, and individual preventive strategies should be provided for Chinese women who carry a BRCA1/2 mutation.

  20. Tamoxifen and Risk of Contralateral Breast Cancer for BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Milne, Roger L.; Rookus, Matti A.; Daly, Mary B.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Peock, Susan; Frost, Debra; Easton, Douglas F.; Ellis, Steve; Friedlander, Michael L.; Buys, Saundra S.; Andrieu, Nadine; Noguès, Catherine; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Bonadona, Valérie; Pujol, Pascal; McLachlan, Sue Anne; John, Esther M.; Hooning, Maartje J.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Tollenaar, Rob A.E.M.; Goldgar, David E.; Beth Terry, Mary; Caldes, Trinidad; Weideman, Prue C.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Singer, Christian F.; Birch, Kate; Simard, Jacques; Southey, Melissa C.; Olsson, Håkan L.; Jakubowska, Anna; Olah, Edith; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Foretova, Lenka; Hopper, John L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether adjuvant tamoxifen treatment for breast cancer (BC) is associated with reduced contralateral breast cancer (CBC) risk for BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 mutation carriers. Methods Analysis of pooled observational cohort data, self-reported at enrollment and at follow-up from the International BRCA1, and BRCA2 Carrier Cohort Study, Kathleen Cuningham Foundation Consortium for Research into Familial Breast Cancer, and Breast Cancer Family Registry. Eligible women were BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers diagnosed with unilateral BC since 1970 and no other invasive cancer or tamoxifen use before first BC. Hazard ratios (HRs) for CBC associated with tamoxifen use were estimated using Cox regression, adjusting for year and age of diagnosis, country, and bilateral oophorectomy and censoring at contralateral mastectomy, death, or loss to follow-up. Results Of 1,583 BRCA1 and 881 BRCA2 mutation carriers, 383 (24%) and 454 (52%), respectively, took tamoxifen after first BC diagnosis. There were 520 CBCs over 20,104 person-years of observation. The adjusted HR estimates were 0.38 (95% CI, 0.27 to 0.55) and 0.33 (95% CI, 0.22 to 0.50) for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, respectively. After left truncating at recruitment to the cohort, adjusted HR estimates were 0.58 (95% CI, 0.29 to 1.13) and 0.48 (95% CI, 0.22 to 1.05) based on 657 BRCA1 and 426 BRCA2 mutation carriers with 100 CBCs over 4,392 person-years of prospective follow-up. HRs did not differ by estrogen receptor status of the first BC (missing for 56% of cases). Conclusion This study provides evidence that tamoxifen use is associated with a reduction in CBC risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Further follow-up of these cohorts will provide increased statistical power for future prospective analyses. PMID:23918944

  1. Breast cancer in a male-to-female transsexual patient with a BRCA2 mutation.

    PubMed

    Corman, Vinciane; Potorac, Iulia; Manto, Florence; Dassy, Sarah; Segers, Karin; Thiry, Albert; Bours, Vincent; Daly, Adrian F; Beckers, Albert

    2016-05-01

    Breast cancer is rare in male patients. Certain predisposing factors, be they genetic (e.g., BRCA2 gene mutations) or hormonal (imbalance between estrogen and androgen levels), have been implicated in male breast cancer pathophysiology. Male-to-female (MtF) transsexualism is a condition that generally involves cross-sex hormone therapy. Anti-androgens and estrogens are used to mimic the female hormonal environment and induce the cross-sex secondary characteristics. In certain situations, the change in the hormonal milieu can be disadvantageous and favor the development of hormone-dependent pathologies, such as cancer. We report a case of a MtF transgender patient who developed breast cancer after 7 years of cross-sex hormonal therapy. The patient was found to be BRCA2 positive, and suffered recurrent disease. The patient was unaware of being a member of an established BRCA2 mutation-positive kindred. This represents the first case of a BRCA2 mutation predisposing to breast cancer in a MtF transgender patient. © 2016 Society for Endocrinology.

  2. Risks of Breast, Ovarian, and Contralateral Breast Cancer for BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers.

    PubMed

    Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Hopper, John L; Barnes, Daniel R; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Mooij, Thea M; Roos-Blom, Marie-José; Jervis, Sarah; van Leeuwen, Flora E; Milne, Roger L; Andrieu, Nadine; Goldgar, David E; Terry, Mary Beth; Rookus, Matti A; Easton, Douglas F; Antoniou, Antonis C; BRCA1 and BRCA2 Cohort Consortium; McGuffog, Lesley; Evans, D Gareth; Barrowdale, Daniel; Frost, Debra; Adlard, Julian; Ong, Kai-Ren; Izatt, Louise; Tischkowitz, Marc; Eeles, Ros; Davidson, Rosemarie; Hodgson, Shirley; Ellis, Steve; Nogues, Catherine; Lasset, Christine; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Fricker, Jean-Pierre; Faivre, Laurence; Berthet, Pascaline; Hooning, Maartje J; van der Kolk, Lizet E; Kets, Carolien M; Adank, Muriel A; John, Esther M; Chung, Wendy K; Andrulis, Irene L; Southey, Melissa; Daly, Mary B; Buys, Saundra S; Osorio, Ana; Engel, Christoph; Kast, Karin; Schmutzler, Rita K; Caldes, Trinidad; Jakubowska, Anna; Simard, Jacques; Friedlander, Michael L; McLachlan, Sue-Anne; Machackova, Eva; Foretova, Lenka; Tan, Yen Y; Singer, Christian F; Olah, Edith; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Arver, Brita; Olsson, Håkan

    2017-06-20

    The clinical management of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers requires accurate, prospective cancer risk estimates. To estimate age-specific risks of breast, ovarian, and contralateral breast cancer for mutation carriers and to evaluate risk modification by family cancer history and mutation location. Prospective cohort study of 6036 BRCA1 and 3820 BRCA2 female carriers (5046 unaffected and 4810 with breast or ovarian cancer or both at baseline) recruited in 1997-2011 through the International BRCA1/2 Carrier Cohort Study, the Breast Cancer Family Registry and the Kathleen Cuningham Foundation Consortium for Research into Familial Breast Cancer, with ascertainment through family clinics (94%) and population-based studies (6%). The majority were from large national studies in the United Kingdom (EMBRACE), the Netherlands (HEBON), and France (GENEPSO). Follow-up ended December 2013; median follow-up was 5 years. BRCA1/2 mutations, family cancer history, and mutation location. Annual incidences, standardized incidence ratios, and cumulative risks of breast, ovarian, and contralateral breast cancer. Among 3886 women (median age, 38 years; interquartile range [IQR], 30-46 years) eligible for the breast cancer analysis, 5066 women (median age, 38 years; IQR, 31-47 years) eligible for the ovarian cancer analysis, and 2213 women (median age, 47 years; IQR, 40-55 years) eligible for the contralateral breast cancer analysis, 426 were diagnosed with breast cancer, 109 with ovarian cancer, and 245 with contralateral breast cancer during follow-up. The cumulative breast cancer risk to age 80 years was 72% (95% CI, 65%-79%) for BRCA1 and 69% (95% CI, 61%-77%) for BRCA2 carriers. Breast cancer incidences increased rapidly in early adulthood until ages 30 to 40 years for BRCA1 and until ages 40 to 50 years for BRCA2 carriers, then remained at a similar, constant incidence (20-30 per 1000 person-years) until age 80 years. The cumulative ovarian cancer risk to age 80 years was 44

  3. Double germline mutations in APC and BRCA2 in an individual with a pancreatic tumor.

    PubMed

    Goehringer, Caroline; Sutter, Christian; Kloor, Matthias; Gebert, Johannes; Slater, Emily P; Keller, Monika; Treiber, Irmgard; Ganschow, Petra; Kadmon, Martina; Moog, Ute

    2017-04-01

    We report on three brothers affected by pancreatic tumors, all due to different causes, including mutations associated with two different cancer predisposition syndromes in the same individual. In the index patient a germline mutation both in the APC and BRCA2 gene was identified while one affected brother showed the BRCA2 mutation only and another brother is supposed to have developed pancreatic cancer due to multiple non-genetic risk factors. We outline the impact of a double germline mutation in two tumor predisposition genes in one individual and proven heterogeneity of multiple cases of pancreatic tumors in one family. With the growing implementation of next generation sequence based panel testing for multiple genes involved in tumor predisposition syndromes, relevant variants in two (or more) genes will be found more frequently. This family illustrates the importance of family studies, especially when using gene panel tests.

  4. Population-based study of risk of breast cancer in carriers of BRCA2 mutation.

    PubMed

    Thorlacius, S; Struewing, J P; Hartge, P; Olafsdottir, G H; Sigvaldason, H; Tryggvadottir, L; Wacholder, S; Tulinius, H; Eyfjörd, J E

    1998-10-24

    Estimates of an 80-90% risk of breast cancer for carriers of germline mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are based on studies of families at high risk of breast cancer. Risk estimates for a population are possible if the mutation status of a representative sample of that population can be assessed. In Iceland, one common founder BRCA2 mutation occurs in 0.6% of the population. Iceland has a population-based cancer registry and a large collection of pedigrees, and estimation of cancer risk in mutation carriers is therefore possible. We studied 575 breast-cancer patients, 541 women and 34 men unselected for family history of breast cancer. Data on cancer in first-degree relatives were available from the cancer registry. Risk of cancer was estimated by comparing the history of cancer in first-degree relatives of carriers and non-carriers. 56 (10.4%) of the 541 women and 13 (38%) of the 34 men carried the 999del5 mutation. The estimated risk of breast cancer at age 50 for all female carriers of the 999del5 mutation was 17.0% (95% CI 9.1-25.9) and 37.2% (22.4-53.9) at age 70. The results of our population-based study show that the mean risk of breast cancer in carriers of mutation in BRCA2 is lower than previously suggested. Individual risk assessment will, however, have to take account of family history.

  5. Prevalence of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in unselected breast cancer patients from Peru

    PubMed Central

    Abugattas, Julio; Llacuachaqui, Marcia; Allende, Yasser Sullcahuaman; Velásquez, Abelardo Arias; Velarde, Raúl; Cotrina, José; Garcés, Milko; León, Mauricio; Calderón, Gabriela; de la Cruz, Miguel; Mora, Pamela; Royer, Robert; Herzog, Josef; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Narod, Steven A

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations among breast cancer patients in Peru has not yet been explored. We enrolled 266 women with breast cancer from a National cancer hospital in Lima, Peru, unselected for age or family history. DNA was screened with a panel of 114 recurrent Hispanic BRCA mutations (HISPANEL). Among the 266 cases, thirteen deleterious mutations were identified (eleven in BRCA1 and two in BRCA2), representing 5% of the total. The average age of breast cancer in the mutation-positive cases was 44 years. BRCA1 185delAG represented seven of the eleven mutations in BRCA1. Other mutations detected in BRCA1 included: two 2080delA, one 943ins10, and one 3878delTA. The BRCA2 3036del4 mutation was seen in two patients. Given the relatively low cost of the HISPANEL test, one should consider offering this test to all Peruvian women with breast or ovarian cancer. PMID:25256238

  6. Prevalence of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in unselected breast cancer patients from Peru.

    PubMed

    Abugattas, J; Llacuachaqui, M; Allende, Y Sullcahuaman; Velásquez, A Arias; Velarde, R; Cotrina, J; Garcés, M; León, M; Calderón, G; de la Cruz, M; Mora, P; Royer, R; Herzog, J; Weitzel, J N; Narod, S A

    2015-10-01

    The prevalence of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations among breast cancer patients in Peru has not yet been explored. We enrolled 266 women with breast cancer from a National cancer hospital in Lima, Peru, unselected for age or family history. DNA was screened with a panel of 114 recurrent Hispanic BRCA mutations (HISPANEL). Among the 266 cases, 13 deleterious mutations were identified (11 in BRCA1 and 2 in BRCA2), representing 5% of the total. The average age of breast cancer in the mutation-positive cases was 44 years. BRCA1 185delAG represented 7 of 11 mutations in BRCA1. Other mutations detected in BRCA1 included: two 2080delA, one 943ins10, and one 3878delTA. The BRCA2 3036del4 mutation was seen in two patients. Given the relatively low cost of the HISPANEL test, one should consider offering this test to all Peruvian women with breast or ovarian cancer.

  7. Robust homology-directed repair within mouse mammary tissue is not specifically affected by Brca2 mutation

    PubMed Central

    Kass, Elizabeth M.; Lim, Pei Xin; Helgadottir, Hildur R.; Moynahan, Mary Ellen; Jasin, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The mammary gland undergoes significant proliferative stages after birth, but little is known about how the developmental changes impact DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. Mutations in multiple genes involved in homology-directed repair (HDR), considered a particularly accurate pathway for repairing DSBs, are linked to breast cancer susceptibility, including BRCA2. Using reporter mice that express an inducible endonuclease, we find that HDR is particularly robust in mammary tissue during puberty and pregnancy, accounting for 34–40% of detected repair events, more than in other tissues examined. Brca2 hypomorphic mutation leads to HDR defects in mammary epithelium during puberty and pregnancy, including in different epithelial lineages. Notably, a similar dependence on Brca2 is observed in other proliferative tissues, including small intestine epithelium. Our results suggest that the greater reliance on HDR in the proliferating mammary gland, rather than a specific dependence on BRCA2, may increase its susceptibility to tumorigenesis incurred by BRCA2 mutation. PMID:27779185

  8. Predictive Factors for BRCA1/BRCA2 Mutations in Women With Ductal Carcinoma In Situ

    PubMed Central

    Bayraktar, Soley; Elsayegh, Nisreen; Gutierrez Barrera, Angelica M.; Lin, Heather; Kuerer, Henry; Tasbas, Tunc; Muse, Kimberly I.; Ready, Kaylene; Litton, Jennifer; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N.; Albarracin, Constance T.; Arun, Banu

    2015-01-01

    Background It is unclear whether women with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), like their counterparts with invasive breast cancer, warrant genetic risk assessment and testing on the basis of high-risk variables. The authors of this report identified predictive factors for mutations in the breast cancer-susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 in women who were diagnosed with DCIS. Methods One hundred eighteen women with DCIS who were referred for genetic counseling and underwent genetic testing for BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations between 2003 and 2010 were included in the study. Logistic regression models were fit to determine the associations between potential predictive factors and BRCA status. Results Of 118 high-risk women with DCIS, 27% (n = 32) tested positive for BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations. Of those, 10% (n = 12) and 17% (n = 20) had BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations, respectively. Age, race, and tumor characteristics did not differ between BRCA noncarriers and carriers. In a multivariate logistic model, ≥2 relatives with ovarian cancer (OC) (odds ratio [OR], 8.81; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.38-56.29; P = .034), and a score ≥10% according to the BRCAPRO mathematical model for calculating the probability that a particular family member carries a germline BRCA mutation (OR, 6.37; 95% CI, 2.23-18.22; P = .0005) remained as independent significant predictors for a BRCA mutation. Fifty-seven percent of mutation carriers but only 25% of noncarriers underwent prophylactic mastectomy (P = .0037). This difference remained significant for patients aged ≤40 years (P = .025). Conclusions Women who had DCIS and a family history of OC or who had BRCAPRO scores ≥10% had a high rate of BRCA positivity regardless of age at diagnosis. These findings suggest that high-risk patients with DCIS are appropriate candidates for genetic testing for BRCA mutations in the presence of predictive factors even if they do not have invasive breast cancer. PMID:22009639

  9. The incidence of leukaemia in women with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations: an International Prospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Javaid; Nussenzweig, Andre; Lubinski, Jan; Byrski, Tomasz; Eisen, Andrea; Bordeleau, Louise; Tung, Nadine M; Manoukian, Siranoush; Phelan, Catherine M; Sun, Ping; Narod, Steven A

    2016-05-10

    Germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 increase the susceptibility to develop breast and ovarian cancers as well as increase the risk of some other cancers. Primary objective was to estimate the risk of leukaemia in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. We followed 7243 women with a BRCA1 or a BRCA2 mutation for incident cases of leukaemia. We used the standardised incidence ratio (SIR) to estimate the relative risk of leukaemia, according to mutation and history of breast cancer. We identified five incident cases of leukaemia (two BRCA1, three BRCA2). All five women had a prior history of breast cancer and four had received chemotherapy. The mean time from breast cancer diagnosis to the development of leukaemia was 10.2 years (range 3-18 years). The SIR for BRCA1 carriers was 0.66 (95% CI: 0.11-2.19, P=0.61) and the SIR for BRCA2 carriers was 2.42 (95% CI: 0.61-6.58, P=0.17). The SIR was significantly higher than expected for women with a BRCA2 mutation and breast cancer (SIR=4.76, 95% CI:1.21-12.96, P=0.03), in particular for women who received chemotherapy (SIR=8.11, 2.06-22.07, P=0.007). We observed an increased risk of leukaemia in women with a BRCA2 mutation who receive chemotherapy for breast cancer.

  10. Clinical and molecular features associated with biallelic mutations in FANCD1/BRCA2

    PubMed Central

    Alter, Blanche P; Rosenberg, Philip S; Brody, Lawrence C

    2007-01-01

    Patients with biallelic mutations in BRCA2 are in Fanconi anaemia group D1. We analysed the severity of the mutations in 27 cases, classified according to their association with breast cancer in heterozygotes, and their predicted functional effect. Twenty mutations were frameshifts or truncations, three involved splice sites, five were missense variants of unknown severity and two were benign polymorphisms. Five patients had VACTERL‐H association. Leukaemia was reported in 13 patients, and solid tumours in 15; 6 patients had two or more malignancies. The cumulative probability of any malignancy was 97% by age 5.2 years. IVS7+1G→A and IVS7+2T→G were associated with AML, and 886delGT and 6174delT with brain tumours. However, patients with other alleles remained at very high risk of these events. Missense mutations formed a distinct cluster in a highly conserved region of the BRCA2 protein. The small group of patients with biallelic mutations in BRCA2 is distinctive in the severity of the phenotype, and early onset and high rates of leukaemia and specific solid tumours, and may comprise an extreme variant of Fanconi anaemia. Several of the alleles were not associated with cancer in presumed carriers, and thus counselling presents more uncertainties than usual. PMID:16825431

  11. No evidence for a role of BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations in Ashkenazi Jewish families with hereditary prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Wilkens, E P; Freije, D; Xu, J; Nusskern, D R; Suzuki, H; Isaacs, S D; Wiley, K; Bujnovsky, P; Meyers, D A; Walsh, P C; Isaacs, W B

    1999-06-01

    Two genes responsible for hereditary breast cancer (BRCA1 and BRCA2) have been identified, and predisposing mutations identified. Several studies have provided evidence that germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 confer an increased risk of prostate cancer. Based on these findings, one might expect to find an increased frequency of mutations in these genes in family clusters of prostate cancer. The Ashkenazi Jewish population is unique in that it has an approximate 2% incidence of specific founder BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations (i.e., 185delAG and 5382insC in BRCA1, and 6174delT in BRCA2). To address the question of whether or not mutations in either of these genes were overrepresented in prostate cancer families, we searched for these mutations in germline DNA samples collected from affected and unaffected members of 18 Ashkenazi Jewish families, each having at least 3 first-degree relatives affected with prostate cancer. No mutations were found in the BRCA1 gene in any of the 47 individuals tested. One individual possessed a BRCA2 mutation (6174delT). This individual was unaffected at the time of analysis, but had an affected paternal uncle, and an affected first cousin, neither of whom harbored the mutant gene. In this sample of Ashkenazi prostate cancer families, the frequency of founder BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations was not elevated, suggesting that such mutations will account for only a small, perhaps minimal, fraction of familial prostate cancer.

  12. Deletion of Chromosomes 13q and 14q Is a Common Feature of Tumors with BRCA2 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Rouault, Audrey; Banneau, Guillaume; MacGrogan, Gaëtan; Jones, Natalie; Elarouci, Nabila; Barouk-Simonet, Emmanuelle; Venat, Laurence; Coupier, Isabelle; Letouzé, Eric; de Reyniès, Aurélien; Bonnet, Françoise; Iggo, Richard; Sévenet, Nicolas; Longy, Michel

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Germline BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations account for 20–30% of familial clustering of breast cancer. The main indication for BRCA2 screening is currently the family history but the yield of mutations identified in patients selected this way is low. Methods To develop more efficient approaches to screening we have compared the gene expression and genomic profiles of BRCA2-mutant breast tumors with those of breast tumors lacking BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations. Results We identified a group of 66 genes showing differential expression in our training set of 7 BRCA2-mutant tumors and in an independent validation set of 19 BRCA2-mutant tumors. The differentially expressed genes include a prominent cluster of genes from chromosomes 13 and 14 whose expression is reduced. Gene set enrichment analysis confirmed that genes in specific bands on 13q and 14q showed significantly reduced expression, suggesting that the affected bands may be preferentially deleted in BRCA2-mutant tumors. Genomic profiling showed that the BRCA2-mutant tumors indeed harbor deletions on chromosomes 13q and 14q. To exploit this information we have created a simple fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) test and shown that it detects tumors with deletions on chromosomes 13q and 14q. Conclusion Together with previous reports, this establishes that deletions on chromosomes 13q and 14q are a hallmark of BRCA2-mutant tumors. We propose that FISH to detect these deletions would be an efficient and cost-effective first screening step to identify potential BRCA2-mutation carriers among breast cancer patients without a family history of breast cancer. PMID:23284877

  13. Haplotype structure in Ashkenazi Jewish BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    PubMed Central

    Im, Kate M.; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Wang, Xianshu; Green, Todd; Chow, Clement Y.; Vijai, Joseph; Korn, Joshua; Gaudet, Mia M.; Fredericksen, Zachary; Pankratz, V. Shane; Guiducci, Candace; Crenshaw, Andrew; McGuffog, Lesley; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Morrison, Jonathan; Healey, Sue; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Mai, Phuong L.; Greene, Mark H.; Piedmonte, Marion; Rubinstein, Wendy S.; Hogervorst, Frans B.; Rookus, Matti A.; Collée, J. Margriet; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; van Asperen, Christi J.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; Van Roozendaal, Cees E.; Caldes, Trinidad; Perez-Segura, Pedro; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Huzarski, Tomasz; Blecharz, Paweł; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Barkardottir, Rosa B.; Montagna, Marco; D'Andrea, Emma; Devilee, Peter; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Peissel, Bernard; Bonanni, Bernardo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Singer, Christian F.; Rennert, Gad; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Caligo, Maria Adelaide; Beattie, Mary S.; Chan, Salina; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Phelan, Catherine; Narod, Steven; John, Esther M.; Hopper, John L.; Buys, Saundra S.; Daly, Mary B.; Southey, Melissa C.; Terry, Mary-Beth; Tung, Nadine; Hansen, Thomas v. O.; Osorio, Ana; Benitez, Javier; Durán, Mercedes; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Garber, Judy; Hamann, Ute; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare T.; Frost, Debra; Platte, Radka; Evans, D. Gareth; Eeles, Ros; Izatt, Louise; Paterson, Joan; Brewer, Carole; Hodgson, Shirley; Morrison, Patrick J.; Porteous, Mary; Walker, Lisa; Rogers, Mark T.; Side, Lucy E.; Godwin, Andrew K.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Laitman, Yael; Meindl, Alfons; Deissler, Helmut; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Kast, Karin; Venat-Bouvet, Laurence; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.; Klein, Robert J.; Daly, Mark J.; Friedman, Eitan; Dean, Michael; Clark, Andrew G.; Altshuler, David M.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Couch, Fergus J.; Offit, Kenneth; Gold, Bert

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Three founder mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 contribute to the risk of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer in Ashkenazi Jews (AJ). They are observed at increased frequency in the AJ compared to other BRCA mutations in Caucasian non-Jews (CNJ). Several authors have proposed that elevated allele frequencies in the surrounding genomic regions reflect adaptive or balancing selection. Such proposals predict long-range linkage dis-equilibrium (LD) resulting from a selective sweep, although genetic drift in a founder population may also act to create long-distance LD. To date, few studies have used the tools of statistical genomics to examine the likelihood of long-range LD at a deleterious locus in a population that faced a genetic bottleneck. We studied the genotypes of hundreds of women from a large international consortium of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers and found that AJ women exhibited long-range haplotypes compared to CNJ women. More than 50% of the AJ chromosomes with the BRCA1 185delAG mutation share an identical 2.1 Mb haplotype and nearly 16% of AJ chromosomes carrying the BRCA2 6174delT mutation share a 1.4 Mb haplotype. Simulations based on the best inference of Ashkenazi population demography indicate that long-range haplotypes are expected in the context of a genome-wide survey. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that a local bottleneck effect from population size constriction events could by chance have resulted in the large haplotype blocks observed at high frequency in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 regions of Ashkenazi Jews. PMID:21597964

  14. Haplotype structure in Ashkenazi Jewish BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Im, Kate M; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Wang, Xianshu; Green, Todd; Chow, Clement Y; Vijai, Joseph; Korn, Joshua; Gaudet, Mia M; Fredericksen, Zachary; Shane Pankratz, V; Guiducci, Candace; Crenshaw, Andrew; McGuffog, Lesley; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Morrison, Jonathan; Healey, Sue; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Mai, Phuong L; Greene, Mark H; Piedmonte, Marion; Rubinstein, Wendy S; Hogervorst, Frans B; Rookus, Matti A; Collée, J Margriet; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; van Asperen, Christi J; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E J; Van Roozendaal, Cees E; Caldes, Trinidad; Perez-Segura, Pedro; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Huzarski, Tomasz; Blecharz, Paweł; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Barkardottir, Rosa B; Montagna, Marco; D'Andrea, Emma; Devilee, Peter; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Neuhausen, Susan L; Peissel, Bernard; Bonanni, Bernardo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Singer, Christian F; Rennert, Gad; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Andrulis, Irene L; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Caligo, Maria Adelaide; Beattie, Mary S; Chan, Salina; Domchek, Susan M; Nathanson, Katherine L; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Phelan, Catherine; Narod, Steven; John, Esther M; Hopper, John L; Buys, Saundra S; Daly, Mary B; Southey, Melissa C; Terry, Mary-Beth; Tung, Nadine; Hansen, Thomas V O; Osorio, Ana; Benitez, Javier; Durán, Mercedes; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Garber, Judy; Hamann, Ute; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare T; Frost, Debra; Platte, Radka; Evans, D Gareth; Eeles, Ros; Izatt, Louise; Paterson, Joan; Brewer, Carole; Hodgson, Shirley; Morrison, Patrick J; Porteous, Mary; Walker, Lisa; Rogers, Mark T; Side, Lucy E; Godwin, Andrew K; Schmutzler, Rita K; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Laitman, Yael; Meindl, Alfons; Deissler, Helmut; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Kast, Karin; Venat-Bouvet, Laurence; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F; Klein, Robert J; Daly, Mark J; Friedman, Eitan; Dean, Michael; Clark, Andrew G; Altshuler, David M; Antoniou, Antonis C; Couch, Fergus J; Offit, Kenneth; Gold, Bert

    2011-11-01

    Three founder mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 contribute to the risk of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer in Ashkenazi Jews (AJ). They are observed at increased frequency in the AJ compared to other BRCA mutations in Caucasian non-Jews (CNJ). Several authors have proposed that elevated allele frequencies in the surrounding genomic regions reflect adaptive or balancing selection. Such proposals predict long-range linkage disequilibrium (LD) resulting from a selective sweep, although genetic drift in a founder population may also act to create long-distance LD. To date, few studies have used the tools of statistical genomics to examine the likelihood of long-range LD at a deleterious locus in a population that faced a genetic bottleneck. We studied the genotypes of hundreds of women from a large international consortium of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers and found that AJ women exhibited long-range haplotypes compared to CNJ women. More than 50% of the AJ chromosomes with the BRCA1 185delAG mutation share an identical 2.1 Mb haplotype and nearly 16% of AJ chromosomes carrying the BRCA2 6174delT mutation share a 1.4 Mb haplotype. Simulations based on the best inference of Ashkenazi population demography indicate that long-range haplotypes are expected in the context of a genome-wide survey. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that a local bottleneck effect from population size constriction events could by chance have resulted in the large haplotype blocks observed at high frequency in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 regions of Ashkenazi Jews.

  15. No evidence of BRCA2 mutations in chromosome 13q-linked Utah high-risk prostate cancer pedigrees

    PubMed Central

    Allen-Brady, Kristina; Farnham, James M; Camp, Nicola J; Karlins, Eric; Ostrander, Elaine A; Cannon-Albright, Lisa A

    2009-01-01

    Background Germline mutations in the BRCA2 gene have been suggested to account for about 5% of familial prostate cancer; mutations have been reported in 2% of early onset (i.e., ≤ 55 years) prostate cancer cases and a segregating founder mutation has been identified in Iceland (999del5). However, the role of BRCA2 in high risk prostate cancer pedigrees remains unclear. Findings We examined the potential involvement of BRCA2 in a set offive high-risk prostate cancer pedigrees in which all prostate cases were no more distantly related than two meioses from another case, and the resulting cluster contained at least four prostate cancer cases. We selected these five pedigrees from a larger dataset of 59 high-risk prostate cancer pedigrees analyzed in a genome-wide linkage screen. Selected pedigrees showed at least nominal linkage evidence to the BRCA2 region on chromosome 13q. We mutation screened all coding regions and intron/exon boundaries of the BRCA2 gene in the youngest prostate cancer case who carried the linked 13q segregating haplotype, as well as in a distantly related haplotype carrier to confirm any segregation. We observed no known protein truncating BRCA2 deleterious mutations. We identified one non-segregating BRCA2 variant of uncertain significance, one non-segregating intronic variant not previously reported, and a number of polymorphisms. Conclusion In this set of high-risk prostate cancer pedigrees with at least nominal linkage evidence to BRCA2, we saw no evidence for segregating BRCA2 protein truncating mutations in heritable prostate cancer. PMID:19476645

  16. No evidence of BRCA2 mutations in chromosome 13q-linked Utah high-risk prostate cancer pedigrees.

    PubMed

    Allen-Brady, Kristina; Farnham, James M; Camp, Nicola J; Karlins, Eric; Ostrander, Elaine A; Cannon-Albright, Lisa A

    2009-05-28

    Germline mutations in the BRCA2 gene have been suggested to account for about 5% of familial prostate cancer; mutations have been reported in 2% of early onset (i.e., mutation has been identified in Iceland (999del5). However, the role of BRCA2 in high risk prostate cancer pedigrees remains unclear. We examined the potential involvement of BRCA2 in a set offive high-risk prostate cancer pedigrees in which all prostate cases were no more distantly related than two meioses from another case, and the resulting cluster contained at least four prostate cancer cases. We selected these five pedigrees from a larger dataset of 59 high-risk prostate cancer pedigrees analyzed in a genome-wide linkage screen. Selected pedigrees showed at least nominal linkage evidence to the BRCA2 region on chromosome 13q. We mutation screened all coding regions and intron/exon boundaries of the BRCA2 gene in the youngest prostate cancer case who carried the linked 13q segregating haplotype, as well as in a distantly related haplotype carrier to confirm any segregation. We observed no known protein truncating BRCA2 deleterious mutations. We identified one non-segregating BRCA2 variant of uncertain significance, one non-segregating intronic variant not previously reported, and a number of polymorphisms. In this set of high-risk prostate cancer pedigrees with at least nominal linkage evidence to BRCA2, we saw no evidence for segregating BRCA2 protein truncating mutations in heritable prostate cancer.

  17. The effect of a single BRCA2 mutation on cancer in Iceland

    PubMed Central

    Tulinius, H; Olafsdottir, G; Sigvaldason, H; Arason, A; Barkardottir, R; Egilsson, V; Ogmundsdottir, H; Tryggvadottir, L; Gudlaugsdottir, S; Eyfjord, J

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To estimate the risk of malignant diseases in families of probands with the same mutation in the BRCA2 gene. Design: A cohort study using record linkage of a breast cancer family resource and the Icelandic Cancer Registry. Setting: Iceland. Subjects: Families of 995 breast cancer patients, from which 887 were tested for a single founder 999del5 mutation; 90 had the mutation and 797 did not. Results: Relatives of probands with the mutation had significantly increased relative risk (RR) of breast cancer. For first degree relatives, the RR was 7.55 (95% CI 6.04 to 9.03) but was 1.72 (95% CI 1.49 to 1.96) in first degree relatives of probands without the mutation. For prostate and ovarian cancer, the first and second degree relatives of probands with the mutation had a significantly increased RR, but in families of probands without the mutation no significant familial risk was found. Conclusions: The 999del5 mutation in the BRCA2 gene explains a substantial proportion of familial risk of breast cancer in Iceland, but significant familial risk remains in relatives of probands without the mutation. For prostate and ovarian cancer, the mutation accounts for most of the familiality observed in families of breast cancer patients. PMID:12114473

  18. Clinical implications of genetic testing for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in Austria.

    PubMed

    Singer, C F; Muhr, D; Rappaport, C; Tea, M-K; Gschwantler-Kaulich, D; Fink-Retter, A; Pfeiler, G; Berger, A; Sun, P; Narod, S A

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the experience of genetic testing in Austrian women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation in terms of preventive measures taken and incident cancers diagnosed. We collected clinical information on 246 Austrian women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation tested between 1995 and 2012 and followed 182 of them for an average of 6.5 years. Of the 90 women who were cancer-free at baseline, 21.4% underwent preventive bilateral mastectomy, 46.1% had preventive bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, and 1 took tamoxifen; 58.8% of the at-risk women underwent at least one screening breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Of the 85 women with breast cancer, 69.4% had a unilateral mastectomy or lumpectomy and 30.6% had a contralateral mastectomy. In the follow-up period, 14 new invasive breast cancers (6 first primary and 8 contralateral), 1 ductal carcinoma in situ case, 2 incident ovarian cancer cases, and 1 peritoneal cancer were diagnosed. In Austria, the majority of healthy women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation opt for preventive oophorectomy and MRI screening to manage their breast cancer risk; few have preventive mastectomy or take tamoxifen. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Prostate cancer in a man with a BRCA2 mutation and a personal history of bilateral breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Singer, C F; Rappaport-Fuerhauser, C; Sopik, V; Narod, S A

    2015-08-01

    Men with a BRCA2 mutation face substantial lifetime risks for the development of both breast and prostate cancer. A male who was initially diagnosed with breast cancer at the age of 32 was subsequently diagnosed at age 77 with both contralateral breast cancer and prostate cancer. He was found to be BRCA2 mutation carrier. The patient was treated with contralateral mastectomy, breast irradiation, prostate irradiation and adjuvant endocrine therapy. At age 83 he died of metastatic prostate cancer. Our case underscores the observation that BRCA2 mutation carriers are at risk for multiple cancers, including contralateral breast cancer, and illustrates the need for current practice recommendations for the early detection of breast and prostate cancer in men with BRCA2 mutations.

  20. Bilateral Triple-Negative Invasive Breast Cancer with a BRCA2 Mutation, and Glioblastoma: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Alsharedi, Mohamed; Khelfa, Yousef; Tirona, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer is the second leading cause of death among women in North America. Glioblastoma is the most common primary malignant central nervous system tumor in adults. The majority of hereditary breast cancers are associated with deleterious mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. Although few case reports have described the incidence of glioblastoma in patients previously diagnosed with breast cancer, any association between BRCA2 mutations and glioblastoma has not been demonstrated to date. Herein, we report a woman who is a carrier of a familial BRCA2 mutation, and was previously diagnosed with triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) and subsequently with a second primary TNBC and glioblastoma. Further investigation is required to define the possible relationship between these two aggressive malignances and the BRCA2 mutation, which might be critical for the proper management and treatment of this disease. PMID:28382102

  1. Frequent somatic loss of BRCA1 in breast tumours from BRCA2 germ-line mutation carriers and vice versa

    PubMed Central

    Staff, S; Isola, J J; Johannsson, O; Borg, Å; Tanner, M M

    2001-01-01

    Breast cancer susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 are tumour suppressor genes the alleles of which have to be inactivated before tumour development occurs. Hereditary breast cancers linked to germ-line mutations of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes almost invariably show allelic imbalance (AI) at the respective loci. BRCA1 and BRCA2 are believed to take part in a common pathway in maintenance of genomic integrity in cells. We carried out AI and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analyses of BRCA2 in breast tumours from germ-line BRCA1 mutation carriers and vice versa. For comparison, 14 sporadic breast tumours were also studied. 8 of the 11 (73%) informative BRCA1 mutation tumours showed AI at the BRCA2 locus. 53% of these tumours showed a copy number loss of the BRCA2 gene by FISH. 5 of the 6 (83%) informative BRCA2 mutation tumours showed AI at the BRCA1 locus. Half of the tumours (4/8) showed a physical deletion of the BRCA1 gene by FISH. Combined allelic loss of both BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene was seen in 12 of the 17 (71%) informative hereditary tumours, whereas copy number losses of both BRCA genes was seen in only 4/14 (29%) sporadic control tumours studied by FISH. In conclusion, the high prevalence of AI at BRCA1 in BRCA2 mutation tumours and vice versa suggests that somatic events occurring at the other breast cancer susceptibility gene locus may be selected in the cancer development. The mechanism resulting in AI at these loci seems more complex than a physical deletion.   http://www.bjcancer.com © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:11710835

  2. BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutations in African Americans

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-10-01

    cancer syndromes that are prevalent among African Americans? Little information exists about other familial cancer syndromes unique to African...Americans but two African-American families with Cowden’s syndrome have been reported (Fackenthal et al, 2000). The same germline p53 coding mutation and...familial syndromes based on pedigree analysis, calculation of risk estimates, and effective communication of risk status at a level that the patient can

  3. Common Mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Do Not Contribute to Early Prostate Cancer in Jewish Men

    PubMed Central

    Nastiuk, Kent L.; Mansukhani, Mahesh; Terry, Mary Beth; Kularatne, Piyumika; Rubin, Mark A.; Melamed, Jonathan; Gammon, Marilie D.; Ittmann, Michael; Krolewski, John J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Families with a high incidence of hereditary breast cancer, and subsequently shown to have terminating mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 appear to have a higher incidence of prostate cancer among the male relatives. We aimed to determine whether the common germline mutations of BRCA1 or BRCA2 in Ashkenazi Jewish men predisposed them to prostate cancer. Methods We examined genomic DNA from 83 (for BRCA1 185delAG) or 82 (for BRCA2 6174delT) Ashkenazi Jewish prostate cancer patients, most of whom were treated at a relatively young age, for the most common germline mutation in each gene seen in the Ashkenazi population. Results Our study should be able to detect a four to five fold increase in the risk of prostate cancer due to mutation of BRCA1 or BRCA2. However, only one (1.15%, 95% CI 0-3.6%) of the patients was heterozygous for the BRCA1 mutant allele, and only two were heterozygous for the BRCA2 mutation (2.4%, 95% CI 0-6.2%). Conclusions The incidence of each of the germline mutations in these prostate cancer patients closely matched their incidence (about 1%) in the general Ashkenazi Jewish population. This suggests that unlike the cases of breast and ovarian cancers, mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 do not significantly predispose men to prostate cancer. PMID:10398279

  4. Mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 in breast cancer families: Are there more breast cancer-susceptibility genes?

    SciTech Connect

    Serova, O.M.; Mazoyer, S.; Putet, N.

    1997-03-01

    To estimate the proportion of breast cancer families due to BRCA1 or BRCA2, we performed mutation screening of the entire coding regions of both genes supplemented with linkage analysis of 31 families, 8 containing male breast cancers and 23 site-specific female breast cancer. A combination of protein-truncation test and SSCP or heteroduplex analyses was used for mutation screening complemented, where possible, by the analysis of expression level of BRCA1 and BRCA2 alleles. Six of the eight families with male breast cancer revealed frameshift mutations, two in BRCA1 and four in BRCA2. Although most families with female site-specific breast cancers were thought to be due to mutations in either BRCA1 or BRCA2, we identified only eight mutations in our series of 23 site-specific female breast cancer families (34%), four in BRCA1 and four in BRCA2. According to the posterior probabilities calculated for mutation-negative families, based on linkage data and mutation screening results, we would expect 8-10 site-specific female breast cancer families of our series to be due to neither BRCA1 nor BRCA2. Thus, our results suggest the existence of at least one more major breast cancer-susceptibility gene. 24 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  5. Breast and ovarian cancer predisposition due to de novo BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations.

    PubMed

    Golmard, L; Delnatte, C; Laugé, A; Moncoutier, V; Lefol, C; Abidallah, K; Tenreiro, H; Copigny, F; Giraudeau, M; Guy, C; Barbaroux, C; Amorim, G; Briaux, A; Guibert, V; Tarabeux, J; Caputo, S; Collet, A; Gesta, P; Ingster, O; Stern, M-H; Rouleau, E; de Pauw, A; Gauthier-Villars, M; Buecher, B; Bézieau, S; Stoppa-Lyonnet, D; Houdayer, C

    2016-03-10

    BRCA1 and BRCA2 are the two major genes predisposing to breast and ovarian cancer. Whereas high de novo mutation rates have been demonstrated for several genes, only 11 cases of de novo BRCA1/2 mutations have been reported to date and the BRCA1/2 de novo mutation rate remains unknown. The present study was designed to fill this gap based on a series of 12 805 consecutive unrelated patients diagnosed with breast and/or ovarian cancer who met the inclusion criteria for BRCA1/2 gene analysis according to French guidelines. BRCA1/2 mutations were detected in 1527 (12%) patients, and three BRCA1 mutations and one BRCA2 mutation were de novo. The BRCA1/2 de novo mutation rate was estimated to be 0.3% (0.1%; 0.7%). Although rare, it may be useful to take the possibility of de novo BRCA1/2 mutation into account in genetic counseling of relatives and to improve the understanding of complex family histories of breast and ovarian cancers.

  6. Common Breast Cancer-Predisposition Alleles Are Associated with Breast Cancer Risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Antoniou, Antonis C.; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Healey, Sue; Pooley, Karen A.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Versmold, Beatrix; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Arnold, Norbert; Hofmann, Wera; Sutter, Christian; Niederacher, Dieter; Deissler, Helmut; Caldes, Trinidad; Kämpjärvi, Kati; Nevanlinna, Heli; Simard, Jacques; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Wagner, Theresa; Lynch, Henry T.; Isaacs, Claudine; Weitzel, Jeffrey; Ganz, Patricia A.; Daly, Mary B.; Tomlinson, Gail; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Blum, Joanne L.; Couch, Fergus J.; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Barile, Monica; Radice, Paolo; Szabo, Csilla I.; Pereira, Lutecia H. Mateus; Greene, Mark H.; Rennert, Gad; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Barnett-Griness, Ofra; Andrulis, Irene L.; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Caligo, Maria A.; Laitman, Yael; Kaufman, Bella; Milgrom, Roni; Friedman, Eitan; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Osorio, Ana; Llort, Gemma; Milne, Roger L.; Benítez, Javier; Hamann, Ute; Hogervorst, Frans B.L.; Manders, Peggy; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J.L.; van den Ouweland, Ans M.W.; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Platte, Radka; Evans, D. Gareth; Eeles, Rosalind; Pichert, Gabriella; Chu, Carol; Eccles, Diana; Davidson, Rosemarie; Douglas, Fiona; Godwin, Andrew K.; Barjhoux, Laure; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Sobol, Hagay; Bourdon, Violaine; Eisinger, François; Chompret, Agnès; Capoulade, Corinne; Bressac-de Paillerets, Brigitte; Lenoir, Gilbert M.; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Houdayer, Claude; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.

    2008-01-01

    Germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 confer high risks of breast cancer. However, evidence suggests that these risks are modified by other genetic or environmental factors that cluster in families. A recent genome-wide association study has shown that common alleles at single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in FGFR2 (rs2981582), TNRC9 (rs3803662), and MAP3K1 (rs889312) are associated with increased breast cancer risks in the general population. To investigate whether these loci are also associated with breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, we genotyped these SNPs in a sample of 10,358 mutation carriers from 23 studies. The minor alleles of SNP rs2981582 and rs889312 were each associated with increased breast cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers (per-allele hazard ratio [HR] = 1.32, 95% CI: 1.20–1.45, ptrend = 1.7 × 10−8 and HR = 1.12, 95% CI: 1.02–1.24, ptrend = 0.02) but not in BRCA1 carriers. rs3803662 was associated with increased breast cancer risk in both BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers (per-allele HR = 1.13, 95% CI: 1.06–1.20, ptrend = 5 × 10−5 in BRCA1 and BRCA2 combined). These loci appear to interact multiplicatively on breast cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers. The differences in the effects of the FGFR2 and MAP3K1 SNPs between BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers point to differences in the biology of BRCA1 and BRCA2 breast cancer tumors and confirm the distinct nature of breast cancer in BRCA1 mutation carriers. PMID:18355772

  7. Genomic and phenotypic analysis of BRCA2 mutated breast cancers reveals co-occurring changes linked to progression.

    PubMed

    Stefansson, Olafur A; Jonasson, Jon G; Olafsdottir, Kristrun; Bjarnason, Hordur; Th Johannsson, Oskar; Bodvarsdottir, Sigridur K; Valgeirsdottir, Sigridur; Eyfjord, Jorunn E

    2011-09-29

    Inherited mutations in the BRCA2 gene greatly increase the risk of developing breast cancer. Consistent with an important role for BRCA2 in error-free DNA repair, complex genomic changes are frequently observed in tumors derived from BRCA2 mutation carriers. Here, we explore the impact of DNA copy-number changes in BRCA2 tumors with respect to phenotype and clinical staging of the disease. Breast tumors (n = 33) derived from BRCA2 999del5 mutation carriers were examined in terms of copy-number changes with high-resolution aCGH (array comparative genomic hybridization) containing 385 thousand probes (about one for each 7 kbp) and expression of phenotypic markers on TMAs (tissue microarrays). The data were examined with respect to clinical parameters including TNM staging, histologic grade, S phase, and ploidy. Tumors from BRCA2 carriers of luminal and basal/triple-negative phenotypes (TNPs) differ with respect to patterns of DNA copy-number changes. The basal/TNP subtype was characterized by lack of pRb (RB1) coupled with high/intense expression of p16 (CDKN2A) gene products. We found increased proportions of Ki-67-positive cells to be significantly associated with loss of the wild-type (wt) BRCA2 allele in luminal types, whereas BRCA2wt loss was less frequent in BRCA2 tumors displaying basal/TNP phenotypes. Furthermore, we show that deletions at 13q13.1, involving the BRCA2wt allele, represents a part of a larger network of co-occurring genetic changes, including deletions at 6q22.32-q22.33, 11q14.2-q24.1, and gains at 17q24.1. Importantly, copy-number changes at these BRCA2-linked networking regions coincide with those associated with advanced progression, involving the capacity to metastasize to the nodes or more-distant sites at diagnosis. The results presented here demonstrate divergent paths of tumor evolution in BRCA2 carriers and that deletion of the wild-type BRCA2 allele, together with co-occurring changes at 6 q, 11 q, and 17 q, are important events in

  8. Genomic and phenotypic analysis of BRCA2 mutated breast cancers reveals co-occurring changes linked to progression

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Inherited mutations in the BRCA2 gene greatly increase the risk of developing breast cancer. Consistent with an important role for BRCA2 in error-free DNA repair, complex genomic changes are frequently observed in tumors derived from BRCA2 mutation carriers. Here, we explore the impact of DNA copy-number changes in BRCA2 tumors with respect to phenotype and clinical staging of the disease. Methods Breast tumors (n = 33) derived from BRCA2 999del5 mutation carriers were examined in terms of copy-number changes with high-resolution aCGH (array comparative genomic hybridization) containing 385 thousand probes (about one for each 7 kbp) and expression of phenotypic markers on TMAs (tissue microarrays). The data were examined with respect to clinical parameters including TNM staging, histologic grade, S phase, and ploidy. Results Tumors from BRCA2 carriers of luminal and basal/triple-negative phenotypes (TNPs) differ with respect to patterns of DNA copy-number changes. The basal/TNP subtype was characterized by lack of pRb (RB1) coupled with high/intense expression of p16 (CDKN2A) gene products. We found increased proportions of Ki-67-positive cells to be significantly associated with loss of the wild-type (wt) BRCA2 allele in luminal types, whereas BRCA2wt loss was less frequent in BRCA2 tumors displaying basal/TNP phenotypes. Furthermore, we show that deletions at 13q13.1, involving the BRCA2wt allele, represents a part of a larger network of co-occurring genetic changes, including deletions at 6q22.32-q22.33, 11q14.2-q24.1, and gains at 17q24.1. Importantly, copy-number changes at these BRCA2-linked networking regions coincide with those associated with advanced progression, involving the capacity to metastasize to the nodes or more-distant sites at diagnosis. Conclusions The results presented here demonstrate divergent paths of tumor evolution in BRCA2 carriers and that deletion of the wild-type BRCA2 allele, together with co-occurring changes at 6 q, 11

  9. Contribution of BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutations to Breast and Ovarian Cancer in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Liede, Alexander; Malik, Imtiaz A.; Aziz, Zeba; Rios, Patricia de los; Kwan, Elaine; Narod, Steven A.

    2002-01-01

    The population of Pakistan has been reported to have the highest rate of breast cancer of any Asian population (excluding Jews in Israel) and one of the highest rates of ovarian cancer worldwide. To explore the contribution that genetic factors make to these high rates, we have conducted a case-control study of 341 case subjects with breast cancer, 120 case subjects with ovarian cancer, and 200 female control subjects from two major cities of Pakistan (Karachi and Lahore). The prevalence of BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations among case subjects with breast cancer was 6.7% (95% confidence interval [CI] 4.1%–9.4%), and that among case subjects with ovarian cancer was 15.8% (95% CI 9.2%–22.4%). Mutations of the BRCA1 gene accounted for 84% of the mutations among case subjects with ovarian cancer and 65% of mutations among case subjects with breast cancer. The majority of detected mutations are unique to Pakistan. Five BRCA1 mutations (2080insA, 3889delAG, 4184del4, 4284delAG, and IVS14-1A→G) and one BRCA2 mutation (3337C→T) were found in multiple case subjects and represent candidate founder mutations. The penetrance of deleterious mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 is comparable to that of Western populations. The cumulative risk of cancer to age 85 years in female first-degree relatives of BRCA1-mutation–positive case subjects was 48% and was 37% for first-degree relatives of the BRCA2-mutation–positive case subjects. A higher proportion of case subjects with breast cancer than of control subjects were the progeny of first-cousin marriages (odds ratio [OR] 2.1; 95% CI 1.4–3.3; P=.001). The effects of consanguinity were significant for case subjects with early-onset breast cancer (age <40 years) (OR=2.7; 95% CI 1.5–4.9; P=.0008) and case subjects with ovarian cancer (OR=2.4; 95% CI 1.4–4.2; P=.002). These results suggest that recessively inherited genes may contribute to breast and ovarian cancer risk in Pakistan. PMID:12181777

  10. Sequence analysis of BRCA1 and BRCA2: correlation of mutations with family history and ovarian cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Frank, T S; Manley, S A; Olopade, O I; Cummings, S; Garber, J E; Bernhardt, B; Antman, K; Russo, D; Wood, M E; Mullineau, L; Isaacs, C; Peshkin, B; Buys, S; Venne, V; Rowley, P T; Loader, S; Offit, K; Robson, M; Hampel, H; Brener, D; Winer, E P; Clark, S; Weber, B; Strong, L C; Thomas, A

    1998-07-01

    Previous studies of mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 have used detection methods that may underestimate the actual frequency of mutations and have analyzed women using heterogeneous criteria for risk of hereditary cancer. A total of 238 women with breast cancer before age 50 or ovarian cancer at any age and at least one first- or second-degree relative with either diagnosis underwent sequence analysis of BRCA1 followed by analysis of BRCA2 (except for 27 women who declined analysis of BRCA2 after a deleterious mutation was discovered in BRCA1). Results were correlated with personal and family history of malignancy. Deleterious mutations were identified in 94 (39%) women, including 59 of 117 (50%) from families with ovarian cancer and 35 of 121 (29%) from families without ovarian cancer. Mutations were identified in 14 of 70 (20%) women with just one other relative who developed breast cancer before age 50. In women with breast cancer, mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 were associated with a 10-fold increased risk of subsequent ovarian carcinoma (P = .005). Because mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 in women with breast cancer are associated with an increased risk of ovarian cancer, analysis of these genes should be considered for women diagnosed with breast cancer who have a high probability of carrying a mutation according to the statistical model developed with these data.

  11. Prostate cancer in male BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers has a more aggressive phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, A; Fisher, C; Foster, C S; Jameson, C; Barbachanno, Y; Bartlett, J; Bancroft, E; Doherty, R; Kote-Jarai, Z; Peock, S; Easton, D; Eeles, R

    2008-01-01

    There is a high and rising prevalence of prostate cancer (PRCA) within the male population of the United Kingdom. Although the relative risk of PRCA is higher in male BRCA2 and BRCA1 mutation carriers, the histological characteristics of this malignancy in these groups have not been clearly defined. We present the histopathological findings in the first UK series of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers with PRCA. The archived histopathological tissue sections of 20 BRCA1/2 mutation carriers with PRCA were collected from histopathology laboratories in England, Ireland and Scotland. The cases were matched to a control group by age, stage and serum PSA level of PRCA cases diagnosed in the general population. Following histopathological evaluation and re-grading according to current conventional criteria, Gleason scores of PRCA developed by BRCA1/2 mutation carriers were identified to be significantly higher (Gleason scores 8, 9 or 10, P=0.012) than those in the control group. Since BRCA1/2 mutation carrier status is associated with more aggressive disease, it is a prognostic factor for PRCA outcome. Targeting screening to this population may detect disease at an earlier clinical stage which may therefore be beneficial. PMID:18182994

  12. Telomere length shows no association with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation status.

    PubMed

    Killick, Emma; Tymrakiewicz, Malgorzata; Cieza-Borrella, Clara; Smith, Paula; Thompson, Deborah J; Pooley, Karen A; Easton, Doug F; Bancroft, Elizabeth; Page, Elizabeth; Leongamornlert, Daniel; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Eeles, Rosalind A

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to determine whether telomere length (TL) is a marker of cancer risk or genetic status amongst two cohorts of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers and controls. The first group was a prospective set of 665 male BRCA1/2 mutation carriers and controls (mean age 53 years), all healthy at time of enrollment and blood donation, 21 of whom have developed prostate cancer whilst on study. The second group consisted of 283 female BRCA1/2 mutation carriers and controls (mean age 48 years), half of whom had been diagnosed with breast cancer prior to enrollment. TL was quantified by qPCR from DNA extracted from peripheral blood lymphocytes. Weighted and unweighted Cox regressions and linear regression analyses were used to assess whether TL was associated with BRCA1/2 mutation status or cancer risk. We found no evidence for association between developing cancer or being a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carrier and telomere length. It is the first study investigating TL in a cohort of genetically predisposed males and although TL and BRCA status was previously studied in females our results don't support the previous finding of association between hereditary breast cancer and shorter TL.

  13. A role of BRCA1 and BRCA2 germline mutations in breast cancer susceptibility within Sardinian population

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background In recent years, numerous studies have assessed the prevalence of germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes in various cohorts. We here extensively investigated the prevalence and geographical distribution of BRCA1-2 mutations in the entire genetically-homogeneous Sardinian population. The occurrence of phenotypic characteristics which may be predictive for the presence of BRCA1-2 germline mutations was also evaluated. Methods Three hundred and forty-eight breast cancer patients presenting a familial recurrence of invasive breast or ovarian carcinoma with at least two affected family members were screened for BRCA1-2 mutations by DHPLC analysis and DNA sequencing. Association of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutational status with clinical and pathological parameters was evaluated by Pearson's Chi-Squared test. Results and Conclusion Overall, 8 BRCA1 and 5 BRCA2 deleterious mutations were detected in 35/348 (10%) families; majority (23/35;66%) of mutations was found in BRCA2 gene. The geographical distribution of BRCA1-2 mutations was related to three specific large areas of Sardinia, reflecting its ancient history: a) the Northern area, linguistically different from the rest of the island (where a BRCA2 c.8764_8765delAG mutation with founder effect was predominant); b) the Middle area, land of the ancient Sardinian population (where BRCA2 mutations are still more common than BRCA1 mutations); and c) the South-Western area, with many Phoenician and Carthaginian locations (where BRCA1 mutations are prevalent). We also found that phenotypic features such as high tumor grading and lack of expression of estrogen/progesterone receptors together with age at diagnosis and presence of ovarian cancer in the family may be predictive for the presence of BRCA1-2 germline mutations. PMID:19619314

  14. Effect of BRCA2 mutation on familial breast cancer survival: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Shao, Jun; Yang, Jie; Wang, Jun-nai; Qiao, Long; Fan, Wei; Gao, Qing-lei; Feng, Yao-jun

    2015-10-01

    Reports of BRCA2 genetic mutations on the prognosis of familial breast cancer (BC) patients have been contradictory. True difference in survival, if it exists, would have important implications for genetic counseling and in treatment of hereditary BC. The purpose of this study was to compare overall survival rate (OSR) among BRCA2 mutation carriers, non-carriers and sporadic BC patients. We searched the PUBMED and EMBASE databases and retrieved 4529 articles using keywords that included breast cancer, BRCA, prognosis and survival. Nine articles were selected for systematic review and among them 6 were included in our meta-analysis. We used the fixed and random effect models to calculate the summary odds ratio (OR) and corresponding 95% confidence interval (CI). BRCA2 mutation carriers had significantly higher long-term OSR than non-carriers (OR=0.69 [95% CI=0.5-0.95]), while both short-term and long-term OSR of BRCA2 mutation carriers did not differ from those of patients with sporadic disease (OR=1.11 [95% CI=0.74-1.65]; 0.85 [95% CI=0.38-1.94], respectively). For BC-specific survival rate (BCSSR), BRCA2 mutation carriers had a similar BCSSR to the non-carriers (OR=0.61 [95% CI=0.28-1.34]). There was no significant difference in disease-free survival (DFS) between BRCA2 mutation carriers and patients with sporadic disease. Our results suggest that BRCA2 mutation increases long-term OSR in hereditary BC, which reminds us a new prospect of management of the disease.

  15. Two Percent of Men with Early-Onset Prostate Cancer Harbor Germline Mutations in the BRCA2 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Stephen M.; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Meitz, Julia; Hamoudi, Rifat; Hope, Questa; Osin, Peter; Jackson, Rachel; Southgate, Christine; Singh, Rashmi; Falconer, Alison; Dearnaley, David P.; Ardern-Jones, Audrey; Murkin, Annette; Dowe, Anna; Kelly, Jo; Williams, Sue; Oram, Richard; Stevens, Margaret; Teare, Dawn M.; Ponder, Bruce A. J.; Gayther, Simon A.; Easton, Doug F.; Eeles, Rosalind A.

    2003-01-01

    Studies of families with breast cancer have indicated that male carriers of BRCA2 mutations are at increased risk of prostate cancer, particularly at an early age. To evaluate the contribution of BRCA2 mutations to early-onset prostate cancer, we screened the complete coding sequence of BRCA2 for germline mutations, in 263 men with diagnoses of prostate cancer who were ⩽55 years of age. Protein-truncating mutations were found in six men (2.3%; 95% confidence interval 0.8%–5.0%), and all of these mutations were clustered outside the ovarian-cancer cluster region. The relative risk of developing prostate cancer by age 56 years from a deleterious germline BRCA2 mutation was 23-fold. Four of the patients with mutations did not have a family history of breast or ovarian cancer. Twenty-two variants of uncertain significance were also identified. These results confirm that BRCA2 is a high-risk prostate-cancer–susceptibility gene and have potential implications for the management of early-onset prostate cancer, in both patients and their relatives. PMID:12474142

  16. Prospective study of breast cancer risk for mutation negative women from BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation positive families.

    PubMed

    Harvey, S L; Milne, R L; McLachlan, S A; Friedlander, M L; Birch, K E; Weideman, P; Goldgar, D; Hopper, J L; Phillips, K A

    2011-12-01

    Published studies have reached contradictory conclusions regarding breast cancer risk for women from families segregating a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation who do not carry the family-specific mutation. Accurate estimation of breast cancer risk is crucial for appropriate counselling regarding risk management. The aim of this study is to prospectively assess whether breast cancer risk for mutation negative women from families segregating BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations is greater than for women in the general population. Eligible women were 722 first-, second- and third-degree relatives of a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carrier from 224 mutation positive (128 BRCA1, 96 BRCA2) families, had no personal cancer history at baseline, and had been tested and found not to carry the family-specific mutation. Self-reported family history of cancer, preventive interventions and verified cancer diagnoses were collected at baseline, and every 3 years thereafter. Median follow-up was 6.1 years (range 0.1-12.4 years). Time at risk of breast cancer was censored at cancer diagnosis or risk-reducing surgery. Standardised incidence ratios (SIR) were estimated by comparing observed to population incidences of invasive breast cancer using Australian Cancer Incidence and Mortality Books. Six cases of invasive breast cancer were observed. The estimated SIRs were 1.14 (95% CI: 0.51-2.53) overall (n = 722), 1.29 (95% CI: 0.58-2.88) when restricted to first- and second-degree relatives of an affected mutation carrier (n = 442) and 0.48 (95% CI: 0.12-1.93) when restricted to those with no family history of breast cancer in the non-mutation carrying parental lineage (n = 424). There was no evidence that mutation negative women from families segregating BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations are at increased risk of breast cancer. Despite this being the largest prospective cohort to assess this issue, moderately increased breast cancer risk (2-fold) cannot be ruled out.

  17. Genetic variation at 9p22.2 and ovarian cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Ramus, Susan J; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Gayther, Simon A; Pharoah, Paul D P; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Couch, Fergus J; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Roversi, Gaia; Barile, Monica; Viel, Alessandra; Allavena, Anna; Ottini, Laura; Papi, Laura; Gismondi, Viviana; Capra, Fabio; Radice, Paolo; Greene, Mark H; Mai, Phuong L; Andrulis, Irene L; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Kruse, Torben A; Cruger, Dorthe; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Caligo, Maria Adelaide; Olsson, Håkan; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Lindblom, Annika; Arver, Brita; Karlsson, Per; Stenmark Askmalm, Marie; Borg, Ake; Neuhausen, Susan L; Ding, Yuan Chun; Nathanson, Katherine L; Domchek, Susan M; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubiński, Jan; Huzarski, Tomasz; Byrski, Tomasz; Gronwald, Jacek; Górski, Bohdan; Cybulski, Cezary; Dębniak, Tadeusz; Osorio, Ana; Durán, Mercedes; Tejada, Maria-Isabel; Benítez, Javier; Hamann, Ute; Rookus, Matti A; Verhoef, Senno; Tilanus-Linthorst, Madeleine A; Vreeswijk, Maaike P; Bodmer, Danielle; Ausems, Margreet G E M; van Os, Theo A; Asperen, Christi J; Blok, Marinus J; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E J; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare; Frost, Debra; Dunning, Alison M; Evans, D Gareth; Eeles, Ros; Pichert, Gabriella; Cole, Trevor; Hodgson, Shirley; Brewer, Carole; Morrison, Patrick J; Porteous, Mary; Kennedy, M John; Rogers, Mark T; Side, Lucy E; Donaldson, Alan; Gregory, Helen; Godwin, Andrew; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Moncoutier, Virginie; Castera, Laurent; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Barjhoux, Laure; Bonadona, Valérie; Leroux, Dominique; Faivre, Laurence; Lidereau, Rosette; Nogues, Catherine; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Prieur, Fabienne; Collonge-Rame, Marie-Agnès; Venat-Bouvet, Laurence; Fert-Ferrer, Sandra; Miron, Alex; Buys, Saundra S; Hopper, John L; Daly, Mary B; John, Esther M; Terry, Mary Beth; Goldgar, David; Hansen, Thomas v O; Jønson, Lars; Ejlertsen, Bent; Agnarsson, Bjarni A; Offit, Kenneth; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Vijai, Joseph; Dutra-Clarke, Ana V C; Przybylo, Jennifer A; Montagna, Marco; Casella, Cinzia; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Janavicius, Ramunas; Blanco, Ignacio; Lázaro, Conxi; Moysich, Kirsten B; Karlan, Beth Y; Gross, Jenny; Beattie, Mary S; Schmutzler, Rita; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Meindl, Alfons; Ruehl, Ina; Fiebig, Britta; Sutter, Christian; Arnold, Norbert; Deissler, Helmut; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Kast, Karin; Niederacher, Dieter; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Simard, Jacques; Soucy, Penny; Spurdle, Amanda B; Holland, Helene; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F; Antoniou, Antonis C

    2011-01-19

    Germline mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are associated with increased risks of breast and ovarian cancers. Although several common variants have been associated with breast cancer susceptibility in mutation carriers, none have been associated with ovarian cancer susceptibility. A genome-wide association study recently identified an association between the rare allele of the single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs3814113 (ie, the C allele) at 9p22.2 and decreased risk of ovarian cancer for women in the general population. We evaluated the association of this SNP with ovarian cancer risk among BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers by use of data from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2. We genotyped rs3814113 in 10,029 BRCA1 mutation carriers and 5837 BRCA2 mutation carriers. Associations with ovarian and breast cancer were assessed with a retrospective likelihood approach. All statistical tests were two-sided. The minor allele of rs3814113 was associated with a reduced risk of ovarian cancer among BRCA1 mutation carriers (per-allele hazard ratio of ovarian cancer = 0.78, 95% confidence interval = 0.72 to 0.85; P = 4.8 × 10(-9)) and BRCA2 mutation carriers (hazard ratio of ovarian cancer = 0.78, 95% confidence interval = 0.67 to 0.90; P = 5.5 × 10(-4)). This SNP was not associated with breast cancer risk among either BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. BRCA1 mutation carriers with the TT genotype at SNP rs3814113 were predicted to have an ovarian cancer risk to age 80 years of 48%, and those with the CC genotype were predicted to have a risk of 33%. Common genetic variation at the 9p22.2 locus was associated with decreased risk of ovarian cancer for carriers of a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation.

  18. Genetic Variation at 9p22.2 and Ovarian Cancer Risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Kartsonaki, Christiana; Gayther, Simon A.; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Couch, Fergus J.; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Roversi, Gaia; Barile, Monica; Viel, Alessandra; Allavena, Anna; Ottini, Laura; Papi, Laura; Gismondi, Viviana; Capra, Fabio; Radice, Paolo; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Kruse, Torben A.; Cruger, Dorthe; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Caligo, Maria Adelaide; Olsson, Håkan; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Lindblom, Annika; Arver, Brita; Karlsson, Per; Stenmark Askmalm, Marie; Borg, Ake; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Domchek, Susan M.; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubiński, Jan; Huzarski, Tomasz; Byrski, Tomasz; Gronwald, Jacek; Górski, Bohdan; Cybulski, Cezary; Dębniak, Tadeusz; Osorio, Ana; Durán, Mercedes; Tejada, Maria-Isabel; Benítez, Javier; Hamann, Ute; Rookus, Matti A.; Verhoef, Senno; Tilanus-Linthorst, Madeleine A.; Vreeswijk, Maaike P.; Bodmer, Danielle; Ausems, Margreet G. E. M.; van Os, Theo A.; Asperen, Christi J.; Blok, Marinus J.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare; Frost, Debra; Dunning, Alison M.; Evans, D. Gareth; Eeles, Ros; Pichert, Gabriella; Cole, Trevor; Hodgson, Shirley; Brewer, Carole; Morrison, Patrick J.; Porteous, Mary; Kennedy, M. John; Rogers, Mark T.; Side, Lucy E.; Donaldson, Alan; Gregory, Helen; Godwin, Andrew; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Moncoutier, Virginie; Castera, Laurent; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Barjhoux, Laure; Bonadona, Valérie; Leroux, Dominique; Faivre, Laurence; Lidereau, Rosette; Nogues, Catherine; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Prieur, Fabienne; Collonge-Rame, Marie-Agnès; Venat-Bouvet, Laurence; Fert-Ferrer, Sandra; Miron, Alex; Buys, Saundra S.; Hopper, John L.; Daly, Mary B.; John, Esther M.; Terry, Mary Beth; Goldgar, David; Hansen, Thomas v. O.; Jønson, Lars; Ejlertsen, Bent; Agnarsson, Bjarni A.; Offit, Kenneth; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Vijai, Joseph; Dutra-Clarke, Ana V. C.; Przybylo, Jennifer A.; Montagna, Marco; Casella, Cinzia; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Janavicius, Ramunas; Blanco, Ignacio; Lázaro, Conxi; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Gross, Jenny; Beattie, Mary S.; Schmutzler, Rita; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Meindl, Alfons; Ruehl, Ina; Fiebig, Britta; Sutter, Christian; Arnold, Norbert; Deissler, Helmut; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Kast, Karin; Niederacher, Dieter; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Simard, Jacques; Soucy, Penny; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Holland, Helene; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.; Antoniou, Antonis C.

    2011-01-01

    Background Germline mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are associated with increased risks of breast and ovarian cancers. Although several common variants have been associated with breast cancer susceptibility in mutation carriers, none have been associated with ovarian cancer susceptibility. A genome-wide association study recently identified an association between the rare allele of the single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs3814113 (ie, the C allele) at 9p22.2 and decreased risk of ovarian cancer for women in the general population. We evaluated the association of this SNP with ovarian cancer risk among BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers by use of data from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2. Methods We genotyped rs3814113 in 10 029 BRCA1 mutation carriers and 5837 BRCA2 mutation carriers. Associations with ovarian and breast cancer were assessed with a retrospective likelihood approach. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results The minor allele of rs3814113 was associated with a reduced risk of ovarian cancer among BRCA1 mutation carriers (per-allele hazard ratio of ovarian cancer = 0.78, 95% confidence interval = 0.72 to 0.85; P = 4.8 × 10-9) and BRCA2 mutation carriers (hazard ratio of ovarian cancer = 0.78, 95% confidence interval = 0.67 to 0.90; P = 5.5 × 10-4). This SNP was not associated with breast cancer risk among either BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. BRCA1 mutation carriers with the TT genotype at SNP rs3814113 were predicted to have an ovarian cancer risk to age 80 years of 48%, and those with the CC genotype were predicted to have a risk of 33%. Conclusion Common genetic variation at the 9p22.2 locus was associated with decreased risk of ovarian cancer for carriers of a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation. PMID:21169536

  19. [Haplotype of the BRCA2 6857delAA mutation in 4 families with breast/ovarian cancer].

    PubMed

    Campos, Berta; Díez, Orland; Alvarez, Carolina; Palma, Lorena; Domènech, Montserrat; Balmaña, Judith; Sanz, Judit; Ramírez, Amaya; Alonso, Carmen; Carvallo, Pilar; Baiget, Montserrat

    2004-10-23

    It is estimated that 5-10% of all breast cancers are hereditary, mainly are due to germline mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. A BRCA2 screening was carried out in familial breast/ovarian cancer at two centres in Spain and Chile. The 6857delAA mutation was identified in 3 Spanish families and one Chilean, all of them with Spanish ancestors. The BRCA2 haplotype of the 6857delAA carriers was analyzed using five microsatellite markers flanking the BRCA2 gene, spanning a region of 6 cM: cen-D13S260, D13S1698, (BRCA2), D13S171, D13S310 and D13S267-tel. Two families shared the allelic variants of the 5 microsatellites studied. Markers D13S260 and D13S267 differed in one allele in two families, respectively. The defined haplotype was absent in non-carriers from these families, and was not detected in 100 control chromosomes without the mutation. Our results suggest the existence of a common ancestry with the mutation originating in the Northeast of Spain. Given the migratory movements from Spain to Latin America, the screening of recurrent Spanish mutations can be useful in establishing a more rational and cost-effective analysis in such populations.

  20. Development of primary early-onset colorectal cancers due to biallelic mutations of the FANCD1/BRCA2 gene.

    PubMed

    Degrolard-Courcet, Emilie; Sokolowska, Joanna; Padeano, Marie-Martine; Guiu, Séverine; Bronner, Myriam; Chery, Carole; Coron, Fanny; Lepage, Côme; Chapusot, Caroline; Loustalot, Catherine; Jouve, Jean-Louis; Hatem, Cyril; Ferrant, Emmanuelle; Martin, Laurent; Coutant, Charles; Baurand, Amandine; Couillault, Gérard; Delignette, Alexandra; El Chehadeh, Salima; Lizard, Sarab; Arnould, Laurent; Fumoleau, Pierre; Callier, Patrick; Mugneret, Francine; Philippe, Christophe; Frebourg, Thierry; Jonveaux, Philippe; Faivre, Laurence

    2014-08-01

    Fanconi anaemia (FA) is characterized by progressive bone marrow failure, congenital anomalies, and predisposition to malignancy. In a minority of cases, FA results from biallelic FANCD1/BRCA2 mutations that are associated with early-onset leukaemia and solid tumours. Here, we describe the clinical and molecular features of a remarkable family presenting with multiple primary colorectal cancers (CRCs) without detectable mutations in genes involved in the Mendelian predisposition to CRCs. We unexpectedly identified, despite the absence of clinical cardinal features of FA, a biallelic mutation of the FANCD1/BRCA2 corresponding to a frameshift alteration (c.1845_1846delCT, p.Asn615Lysfs*6) and a missense mutation (c.7802A>G, p.Tyr2601Cys). The diagnosis of FA was confirmed by the chromosomal analysis of lymphocytes. Reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR analysis revealed that the c.7802A>G BRCA2 variation was in fact a splicing mutation that creates an aberrant splicing donor site and results partly into an aberrant transcript encoding a truncated protein (p.Tyr2601Trpfs*46). The atypical FA phenotype observed within this family was probably explained by the residual amount of BRCA2 with the point mutation c.7802A>G in the patients harbouring the biallelic FANCD1/BRCA2 mutations. Although this report is based in a single family, it suggests that CRCs may be part of the tumour spectrum associated with FANCD1/BRCA2 biallelic mutations and that the presence of such mutations should be considered in families with CRCs, even in the absence of cardinal features of FA.

  1. Risk of uterine cancer for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Y C; Milne, R L; Lheureux, S; Friedlander, M; McLachlan, S A; Martin, K L; Bernardini, M Q; Smith, C; Picken, S; Nesci, S; Hopper, J L; Phillips, K A

    2017-10-01

    Whether BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers have a clinically relevant elevated risk of uterine cancer has implications for risk-reducing surgery. This multicentre, prospective cohort study assessed uterine cancer risk for mutation carriers compared with the general population. Eligible mutation carriers were enrolled in the Kathleen Cuningham Foundation Consortium for Research into Familial Breast Cancer (kConFab) cohort study, had a uterus present and no history of uterine cancer at cohort entry. Epidemiological, lifestyle and clinical data were collected at cohort entry and updated three-yearly. Cancer events were verified using pathology reports. Follow-up was censored at death or last contact. Relative risk of uterine cancer was estimated using the standardised incidence ratio (SIR), with the expected number of cases determined using population-based data for Australia. Of 1,111 mutation carriers in kConFab, 283 were excluded due to prior hysterectomy (N = 278), prior uterine cancer (N = 2) or being non-residents (N = 3). After a median follow-up of 9.0 years, five incident uterine cancers were reported in the 828 eligible women (419 had prior breast cancer and 160 had prior tamoxifen use), compared to 2.04 expected (SIR = 2.45; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.80-5.72; P = 0.11). In 438 BRCA1 mutation carriers and 390 BRCA2 mutation carriers, three and two incident cases of uterine cancer were reported, respectively, compared to 1.04 expected (SIR = 2.87; 95% CI: 0.59-8.43; P = 0.18) and 0.99 expected (SIR = 2.01; 95% CI: 0.24-7.30; P = 0.52), respectively. All cases were endometrioid subtype, International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics stage I-II disease. No serous uterine cancers were reported. Our findings are consistent with those from most other reports and do not support routine risk-reducing hysterectomy for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The role of targeted BRCA1/BRCA2 mutation analysis in hereditary breast/ovarian cancer families of Portuguese ancestry.

    PubMed

    Peixoto, A; Santos, C; Pinto, P; Pinheiro, M; Rocha, P; Pinto, C; Bizarro, S; Veiga, I; Principe, A S; Maia, S; Castro, F; Couto, R; Gouveia, A; Teixeira, M R

    2015-07-01

    We report the analysis of altogether 1050 suspected hereditary breast/ovarian cancer (HBOC) families, 524 fully screened for BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations and 526 tested only for the most common mutations. Of the 119 families with pathogenic mutations, 40 (33.6%) had the BRCA2 c.156_157insAlu rearrangement and 15 (12.6%) the BRCA1 c.3331_3334del mutation, the former being specific of Portuguese ancestry and the latter showing a founder effect in Portugal. Interestingly, the two most common mutations were found in a significant proportion of the HBOC families with an a priori BRCAPRO mutation probability <10%. We recommend that all suspected HBOC families from Portugal or with Portuguese ancestry, even those fulfilling moderately stringent clinical-criteria for genetic testing, should be specifically analyzed for the two most common BRCA1/BRCA2 founder mutations, and we here present a simple method for this first tier test. Screening of the entire coding regions of BRCA1 and BRCA2 should subsequently be offered to those families with a mutation probability ≥10% if none of those founder mutations are found.

  3. Effects of BRCA1- and BRCA2-related mutations on ovarian and breast cancer survival: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Qian; Peng, Hong-Ling; Zhao, Xia; Zhang, Lin; Hwang, Wei-Ting

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To estimate the effects of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations on ovarian cancer and breast cancer survival. Experimental Design We searched PUBMED and EMBASE for studies that evaluated the associations between BRCA mutations and ovarian or breast cancer survival. Meta-analysis was conducted to generate combined hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for overall survival (OS) and progression free survival (PFS). Results From 1201 unique citations, we identified 27 articles that compared prognosis between BRCA mutation carriers and non-carriers in ovarian or breast cancer patients. Fourteen studies examined ovarian cancer survival and 13 studies examined breast cancer survival. For ovarian cancer, meta-analysis demonstrated that both BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers had better OS (HR: 0.76, 95% CI: 0.70-0.83 for BRCA1 mutation carriers; HR: 0.58, 95% CI: 0.50-0.66 for BRCA2 mutation carriers) and PFS (HR: 0.65, 95% CI: 0.52-0.81 for BRCA1 mutation carriers; HR: 0.61, 95% CI: 0.47-0.80 for BRCA2 mutation carriers) compared to non-carriers, regardless of tumor stage, grade, or histologic subtype. Among breast cancer patients, BRCA1 mutation carriers had worse OS (HR: 1.50, 95%CI: 1.11-2.04) than non-carriers, but were not significantly different from non-carriers in PFS. BRCA2 mutation was not associated with breast cancer prognosis. Conclusions Our analyses suggest that BRCA mutations are robust predictors of outcomes in both ovarian and breast cancer and these mutations should be taken into account when devising appropriate therapeutic strategies. PMID:25348513

  4. Effects of BRCA1- and BRCA2-related mutations on ovarian and breast cancer survival: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Qian; Peng, Hong-Ling; Zhao, Xia; Zhang, Lin; Hwang, Wei-Ting

    2015-01-01

    To estimate the effects of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations on ovarian cancer and breast cancer survival. We searched PubMed and EMBASE for studies that evaluated the associations between BRCA mutations and ovarian or breast cancer survival. Meta-analysis was conducted to generate combined HRs with 95% confidence intervals (CI) for overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS). From 1,201 unique citations, we identified 27 articles that compared prognosis between BRCA mutation carriers and noncarriers in patients with ovarian or breast cancer. Fourteen studies examined ovarian cancer survival and 13 studies examined breast cancer survival. For ovarian cancer, meta-analysis demonstrated that both BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers had better OS (HR, 0.76; 95% CI, 0.70-0.83 for BRCA1 mutation carriers; HR, 0.58; 95% CI, 0.50-0.66 for BRCA2 mutation carriers) and PFS (HR, 0.65; 95% CI, 0.52-0.81 for BRCA1 mutation carriers; HR, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.47-0.80 for BRCA2 mutation carriers) than noncarriers, regardless of tumor stage, grade, or histologic subtype. Among patients with breast cancer, BRCA1 mutation carriers had worse OS (HR, 1.50; 95% CI, 1.11-2.04) than noncarriers but were not significantly different from noncarriers in PFS. BRCA2 mutation was not associated with breast cancer prognosis. Our analyses suggest that BRCA mutations are robust predictors of outcomes in both ovarian and breast cancers and these mutations should be taken into account when devising appropriate therapeutic strategies. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  5. Breast Cancer Incidence After Risk-Reducing Salpingo-Oophorectomy in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers.

    PubMed

    Fakkert, Ingrid E; Mourits, Marian J E; Jansen, Liesbeth; van der Kolk, Dorina M; Meijer, Kees; Oosterwijk, Jan C; van der Vegt, Bert; Greuter, Marcel J W; de Bock, Geertruida H

    2012-11-01

    Premenopausal risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy (RRSO) in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers effectively reduces ovarian cancer risk, but also reduces breast cancer risk. Breast cancer risk reductions up to 50% have been reported for both BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, but recent prospective studies were not able to reproduce this finding for BRCA1 mutation carriers. Breast cancer incidence after RRSO was assessed in a consecutive series of 104 BRCA1 and 58 BRCA2 mutation carriers. On the basis of data from our own centre, and assuming a 50% risk reduction through RRSO at premenopausal age, we expected to find 8 breast cancers (range 6-10) in this population for the reported screening period (532 women-years). In 162 carriers with a median age of 41 years at RRSO, 13 incident breast cancers were diagnosed. In BRCA1 mutation carriers, 12 incident breast cancers were found compared with 5 (range 3-6) expected and in BRCA2 mutation carriers 1 breast cancer was found compared with 3 (range 2-5) expected. Breast cancer incidence after premenopausal RRSO is still high, especially in BRCA1 mutation carriers. Previously reported breast cancer risk reductions up to 50% were not confirmed. As a consequence, continued intensive screening for breast cancer is warranted in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers after RRSO.

  6. The AIB1 polyglutamine repeat does not modify breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Spurdle, Amanda B; Antoniou, Antonis C; Kelemen, Livia; Holland, Helene; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret R; Smith, Paula L; Greene, Mark H; Simard, Jacques; Plourde, Marie; Southey, Melissa C; Godwin, Andrew K; Beck, Jeanne; Miron, Alexander; Daly, Mary B; Santella, Regina M; Hopper, John L; John, Esther M; Andrulis, Irene L; Durocher, Francine; Struewing, Jeffery P; Easton, Douglas F; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia

    2006-01-01

    This is by far the largest study of its kind to date, and further suggests that AIB1 does not play a substantial role in modifying the phenotype of BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers. The AIB1 gene encodes the AIB1/SRC-3 steroid hormone receptor coactivator, and amplification of the gene and/or protein occurs in breast and ovarian tumors. A CAG/CAA repeat length polymorphism encodes a stretch of 17 to 29 glutamines in the HR-interacting carboxyl-terminal region of the protein which is somatically unstable in tumor tissues and cell lines. There is conflicting evidence regarding the role of this polymorphism as a modifier of breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers. To further evaluate the evidence for an association between AIB1 glutamine repeat length and breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, we have genotyped this polymorphism in 1,090 BRCA1 and 661 BRCA2 mutation carriers from Australia, Europe, and North America. There was no evidence for an increased risk associated with AIB1 glutamine repeat length. Given the large sample size, with more than adequate power to detect previously reported effects, we conclude that the AIB1 glutamine repeat does not substantially modify risk of breast cancer in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. (Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2006;15(1):76-9).

  7. High incidence of loss of heterozygosity in breast tumors from carriers of the BRCA2 999del5 mutation.

    PubMed

    Ingvarsson, S; Geirsdottir, E K; Johannesdottir, G; Sigbjörnsdóttir, B I; Eiriksdottir, G; Ragnarsson, G; Agnarsson, B A; Gudmundsson, J; Jonasson, J G; Sigurdsson, A; Egilsson, V; Barkardottir, R B

    1998-10-01

    Germ-line mutation in the BRCA2 gene confers an increased risk of breast cancer. An elevation of additional genetic defects in tumors of patients with germ-line mutation in the BRCA2 gene compared with sporadic breast tumors has been reported. To evaluate the nature of the difference, we did detailed mapping of chromosomes 1p, 3p, 6q, 11, 13q, 16q, 17, and 20q, using microsatellite markers. We found that the frequency of loss of heterozygosity was similar at some chromosomal regions in the BRCA2 999del5 and sporadic tumors but significantly different at others. These others include chromosomal arms 3p, 6q, 11p, 11q, 13q, and 17p. Loss of heterozygosity mapping suggests that the same chromosome regions are involved in both tumor groups but at elevated frequencies in BRCA2 999del5 tumors. This higher frequency of genetic aberrations could pinpoint genes that selectively promote tumor progression in individuals predisposed to breast cancer due to the BRCA2 999del5 germ-line mutation. Accumulation of somatic genetic changes during tumor progression may follow a specific and more aggressive pathway of chromosome damage in these individuals.

  8. BRCA2 in American families with four or more cases of breast or ovarian cancer: recurrent and novel mutations, variable expression, penetrance, and the possibility of families whose cancer is not attributable to BRCA1 or BRCA2.

    PubMed Central

    Schubert, E L; Lee, M K; Mefford, H C; Argonza, R H; Morrow, J E; Hull, J; Dann, J L; King, M C

    1997-01-01

    In order to evaluate the role of inherited BRCA2 mutations in American families--particularly the appearance in America of European founder mutations--the BRCA2 coding sequence, 5' UTR, and 3' UTR were screened in 22 Caucasian American kindreds with four or more cases of breast or ovarian cancer. Six mutations were found that cause a premature-termination codon; four of them have been reported elsewhere, and two are novel. In the four families with previously seen mutations, the distinct lineages at high risk of cancer were of Dutch, German, Irish, and Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry; mutations in Europe reflect these ancestries. The families with novel mutations were Puerto Rican Hispanic (exon 9 deletion 995delCAAAT) and Ashkenazi Jewish (exon 11 deletion 6425delTT). Among female BRCA2-mutation carriers, risks of breast cancer were 32% by age 50 years, 67% by age 70 years, and 80% by age 90 years, yielding a lifetime risk similar to that for BRCA1 but an older distribution of ages at onset. BRCA2 families also included multiple cases of cancers of the male breast (six cases), ovary (three cases), fallopian tube (two cases), pancreas (three cases), bladder (two cases), and prostate (two cases). Among 17 Ashkenazi Jewish families with four or more breast or ovarian cancers, 9 families (including 3 with ovarian cancer and 1 with male breast cancer) carried none of the three ancient mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2. To date, both BRCA2 and BRCA1 have been screened by SSCA, supplemented by the protein-truncation test, in 48 families with four or more breast or ovarian cancers. Mutations have been detected in BRCA1 in 33 families, in BRCA2 in 6 families, and in neither gene in 9 families, suggesting both the probable cryptic nature of some mutations and the likelihood of at least one other BRCA gene. PMID:9150150

  9. Mutational analysis of BRCA1 and BRCA2 in hereditary breast and ovarian cancer families from Asturias (Northern Spain)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The prevalence of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in Spain is heterogeneous and varies according to geographical origin of studied families. The contribution of these mutations to hereditary breast and ovarian cancer has not been previously investigated in Asturian populations (Northern Spain). Methods In the present work, 256 unrelated high-risk probands with breast and/or ovarian cancer from families living in Asturias were analyzed for the presence of a BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene mutation from October 2007 to May 2012. The entire coding sequences and each intron/exon boundaries of BRCA1/2 genes were screened both by direct sequencing and Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA). Results A total of 59 families (23%) were found to carry a pathogenic germ line mutation, 39 in BRCA1 and 20 in BRCA2. Twenty nine additional families (12%) carried an unknown significance variant. We detected 28 distinct pathogenic mutations (16 in BRCA1 and 12 in BRCA2), of which 3 mutations in BRCA1 (c.1674delA, c.1965C>A and c.2900_2901dupCT) and 5 in BRCA2 (c.262_263delCT, c.2095C>T, c.3263dupC, c.4030_4035delinsC, c.8042_8043delCA) had not been previously described. The novel mutations c.2900_2901dupCT in BRCA1 and c.4030_4035delinsC in BRCA2 occurred in 8 and 6 families respectively and clustered in two separated small geographically isolated areas suggesting a founder effect. These 2 mutations, together with the Galician BRCA1 mutation c.211A>G (9 families), and the common BRCA1 mutation c.3331_3334delCAAG (6 families), account for approximately 50% of all affected families. By contrast, very frequent mutations in other Spanish series such as the BRCA1 Ashkenazi founder mutation c.68_69delAG, was found in only one family. Conclusions In this study we report the BRCA1 and BRCA2 spectrum of mutations and their geographical distribution in Asturias, which largely differ from other areas of Spain. Our findings may help design a first step recurrent mutation panel for

  10. Increased Chromosomal Radiosensitivity in Women Carrying BRCA1/BRCA2 Mutations Assessed With the G2 Assay

    SciTech Connect

    Ernestos, Beroukas; Nikolaos, Pandis; Koulis, Giannoukakos; Eleni, Rizou; Konstantinos, Beroukas; Alexandra, Giatromanolaki; Michael, Koukourakis

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: Several in vitro studies suggest that BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers present increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation. Different assays for the assessment of deoxyribonucleic acid double-strand break repair capacity have been used, but results are rather inconsistent. Given the concerns about the possible risks of breast screening with mammography in mutation carrier women and the potentially damaging effects of radiotherapy, the purpose of this study was to further investigate the radiosensitivity of this population. Methods and Materials: The G2 chromosomal radiosensitivity assay was used to assess chromosomal breaks in lymphocyte cultures after exposure to 1 Gy. A group of familiar breast cancer patients carrying a mutation in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene (n = 15) and a group of healthy mutation carriers (n = 5) were investigated and compared with a reference group of healthy women carrying no mutation (n = 21). Results: BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers had a significantly higher number of mean chromatid breaks per cell (p = 0.006) and a higher maximum number of breaks (p = 0.0001) as compared with their matched controls. Both healthy carriers and carriers with a cancer history were more radiosensitive than controls (p = 0.002 and p = 0.025, respectively). Age was not associated with increased radiosensitivity (p = 0.868). Conclusions: Our results indicate that BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers show enhanced radiosensitivity, presumably because of the involvement of the BRCA genes in deoxyribonucleic acid repair and cell cycle control mechanisms.

  11. Contralateral breast cancer after radiotherapy among BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers: a WECARE study report.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Jonine L; Thomas, Duncan C; Shore, Roy E; Robson, Mark; Boice, John D; Stovall, Marilyn; Andersson, Michael; Bernstein, Leslie; Malone, Kathleen E; Reiner, Anne S; Lynch, Charles F; Capanu, Marinela; Smith, Susan A; Tellhed, Lina; Teraoka, Sharon N; Begg, Colin B; Olsen, Jorgen H; Mellemkjaer, Lene; Liang, Xiaolin; Diep, Anh T; Borg, Ake; Concannon, Patrick; Haile, Robert W

    2013-09-01

    Women with germline BRCA1 or BRCA2 (BRCA1/BRCA2) mutations are at very high risk of developing breast cancer, including asynchronous contralateral breast cancer (CBC). BRCA1/BRCA2 genes help maintain genome stability and assist in DNA repair. We examined whether the risk of CBC associated with radiation treatment was higher among women with germline BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations than among non-carriers. A population-based, nested case-control study was conducted within a cohort of 52,536 survivors of unilateral breast cancer (UBC). Cases were 603 women with CBC and controls were 1199 women with UBC individually matched on age at diagnosis, race, year of first diagnosis and cancer registry. All women were tested for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations. Radiation absorbed dose from the initial radiotherapy (RT) to the CBC location within the contralateral breast was reconstructed from measurements in a tissue-equivalent phantom and details available in the therapy records. Among women treated with radiation, the mean radiation dose was 1.1 Gy (range = 0.02-6.2 Gy). Risk of developing CBC was elevated among women who carried a deleterious BRCA1/BRCA2 mutation (rate ratio, RR = 4.5, confidence interval, CI = 3.0-6.8), and also among those treated with RT (RR = 1.2, CI = 1.0-1.6). However, among mutation carriers, an incremental increase in risk associated with radiation dose was not statistically significant. Multiplicative interaction of RT with mutation status would be reflected by a larger association of RT with CBC among carriers than among non-carriers, but this was not apparent. Accordingly, there was no clear indication that carriers of deleterious BRCA/BRCA2 mutations were more susceptible to the carcinogenic effects of radiation than non-carriers. These findings are reassuring and have important clinical implications for treatment decisions and the clinical management of patients harbouring deleterious BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations. All work associated with this study was supported by

  12. BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutations in Ethnic Lebanese Arab Women With High Hereditary Risk Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zgheib, Nathalie K.; Assi, Hussein A.; Khoury, Katia E.; Bidet, Yannick; Jaber, Sara M.; Charara, Raghid N.; Farhat, Rania A.; Kreidieh, Firas Y.; Decousus, Stephanie; Romero, Pierre; Nemer, Georges M.; Salem, Ziad; Shamseddine, Ali; Tfayli, Arafat; Abbas, Jaber; Jamali, Faek; Seoud, Muhieddine; Armstrong, Deborah K.; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Uhrhammer, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Breast cancer is the most common malignancy among women in Lebanon and in Arab countries, with 50% of cases presenting before the age of 50 years. Methods. Between 2009 and 2012, 250 Lebanese women with breast cancer who were considered to be at high risk of carrying BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations because of presentation at young age and/or positive family history (FH) of breast or ovarian cancer were recruited. Clinical data were analyzed statistically. Coding exons and intron-exon boundaries of BRCA1 and BRCA2 were sequenced from peripheral blood DNA. All patients were tested for BRCA1 rearrangements using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA). BRCA2 MLPA was done in selected cases. Results. Overall, 14 of 250 patients (5.6%) carried a deleterious BRCA mutation (7 BRCA1, 7 BRCA2) and 31 (12.4%) carried a variant of uncertain significance. Eight of 74 patients (10.8%) aged ≤40 years with positive FH and only 1 of 74 patients (1.4%) aged ≤40 years without FH had a mutated BRCA. Four of 75 patients (5.3%) aged 41–50 years with FH had a deleterious mutation. Only 1 of 27 patients aged >50 years at diagnosis had a BRCA mutation. All seven patients with BRCA1 mutations had grade 3 infiltrating ductal carcinoma and triple-negative breast cancer. Nine BRCA1 and 17 BRCA2 common haplotypes were observed. Conclusion. Prevalence of deleterious BRCA mutations is lower than expected and does not support the hypothesis that BRCA mutations alone cause the observed high percentage of breast cancer in young women of Lebanese and Arab descent. Studies to search for other genetic mutations are recommended. PMID:25777348

  13. Disseminated Medulloblastoma in a Child with Germline BRCA2 6174delT Mutation and without Fanconi Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jingying; Margol, Ashley Sloane; Shukla, Anju; Ren, Xiuhai; Finlay, Jonathan L.; Krieger, Mark D.; Gilles, Floyd H.; Couch, Fergus J.; Aziz, Meraj; Fung, Eric T.; Asgharzadeh, Shahab; Barrett, Michael T.; Erdreich-Epstein, Anat

    2015-01-01

    Medulloblastoma, the most common malignant brain tumor in children, occurs with increased frequency in individuals with Fanconi anemia who have biallelic germline mutations in BRCA2. We describe an 8-year-old child who had disseminated anaplastic medulloblastoma and a deleterious heterozygous BRCA2 6174delT germline mutation. Molecular profiling was consistent with Group 4 medulloblastoma. The posterior fossa mass was resected and the patient received intensive chemotherapy and craniospinal irradiation. Despite this, the patient succumbed to a second recurrence of his medulloblastoma, which presented 8 months after diagnosis as malignant pleural and peritoneal effusions. Continuous medulloblastoma cell lines were isolated from the original tumor (CHLA-01-MED) and the malignant pleural effusion (CHLA-01R-MED). Here, we provide their analyses, including in vitro and in vivo growth, drug sensitivity, comparative genomic hybridization, and next generation sequencing analysis. In addition to the BRCA2 6174delT, the medulloblastoma cells had amplification of MYC, deletion at Xp11.2, and isochromosome 17, but no structural variations or overexpression of GFI1 or GFI1B. To our knowledge, this is the first pair of diagnosis/recurrence medulloblastoma cell lines, the only medulloblastoma cell lines with BRCA2 6174delT described to date, and the first reported case of a child with medulloblastoma associated with a germline BRCA2 6174delT who did not also have Fanconi anemia. PMID:26380221

  14. Association Between BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutations and Survival in Women with Invasive Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bolton, Kelly L.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Goh, Cindy; Sadetzki, Siegal; Ramus, Susan J.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Lambrechts, Diether; Despierre, Evelyn; Barrowdale, Daniel; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Easton, Douglas F.; Sinilnikova, Olga; Benitez, Javier; García, María J.; Neuhausen, Susan; Gail, Mitchell H.; Hartge, Patricia; Peock, Susan; Frost, Debra; Evans, D. Gareth; Eeles, Ros; Godwin, Andrew K.; Daly, Mary B.; Kwong, Ava; Ma, Edmond SK; Lázaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Montagna, Marco; D’Andrea, Emma; Nicoletto, Ornella; Investigators, kConFab; Johnatty, Sharon E.; Kjær, Susanne Krüger; Jensen, Allan; Høgdall, Estrid; Goode, Ellen L.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Loud, Jennifer T.; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Chetrit, Angela; Lubin, Flora; Hirsh-Yechezkel, Galit; Glendon, Gord; Andrulis, Irene L.; Toland, Amanda E.; Senter, Leigha; Gore, Martin E.; Gourley, Charlie; Michie, Caroline O; Song, Honglin; Tyrer, Jonathan; Whittemore, Alice S.; McGuire, Valerie; Sieh, Weiva; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Olsson, Håkan; Borg, Åke; Levine, Douglas A.; Steele, Linda; Beattie, Mary S.; Chan, Salina; Nussbaum, Robert; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Gross, Jenny; Cass, Ilana; Walsh, Christine; Li, Andrew J.; Leuchter, Ronald; Gordon, Ora; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Gayther, Simon A.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Pharoah, Paul D.P.

    2013-01-01

    Context Approximately 10 percent of women with invasive epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) carry deleterious germline mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2. A recent report suggested that BRCA2 related EOC was associated with an improved prognosis, but the effect of BRCA1 remains unclear. Objective To characterize the survival of BRCA carriers with EOC compared to non-carriers and to determine whether BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers show similar survival patterns. Design, Setting, and Participants We pooled data from 26 studies on the survival of women with ovarian cancer. This included data on 1,213 EOC cases with pathogenic germline mutations in BRCA1 (909) or BRCA2 (304) and 2,666 non-carriers recruited and followed for variable times between 1987 and 2010; the median year of diagnosis was 1998. Main Outcome Measures Five year overall mortality. Results The five-year overall survival was 36 percent (95% CI: 34–38) for non-carriers, 44 percent (95% CI: 40–48) for BRCA1 carriers and 52 percent (95% CI: 46–58) for BRCA2 carriers. After adjusting for study and year of diagnosis, BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers showed a more favorable survival than non-carriers (BRCA1, HR=0.78; 95% CI=0.68–0.89, P=2×10−4; BRCA2, HR = 0.61; 95% CI=0.50–0.76, P=6×10−6). These survival differences remained after additional adjustment for stage, grade, histology and age at diagnosis (BRCA1, HR=0.73, 95% CI=0.64–0.84, P=2×10−5; BRCA2, HR = 0.49, 95% CI=0.39–0.61, P=3×10−10). Conclusions Among patients with invasive epithelial ovarian cancer, having a germline mutation in BRCA1 or BRCA2 was associated with improved 5-year overall survival. PMID:22274685

  15. Prevalence of BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutations in Korean Breast Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Sei Hyun; Hwang, Ui Kang; Kwak, Beom Seok; Yoon, Ho Sung; Ku, Bo Kyung; Kang, Hee Jun; Kim, Ji Su; Ko, Byung Kyun; Ko, Chang Dae; Yoon, Kyung Sik; Cho, Dae-Yeon; Kim, Jun Suk

    2004-01-01

    The incidence of breast cancer in Korea has been increasing in recent years, such that it is now the most common female cancer. Breast cancer in Korea is characterized by an earlier age of onset than in Western countries, suggesting that it would be related with genetic background. We assayed germline mutations in the BRCA genes to evaluate their genetic pathology in Korean breast cancer patients. The study subjects consisted of 173 patients at clinically higher risk and 109 unselected patients. Germline mutations in the entire coding sequences of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes were analyzed by Conformation-Sensitive Gel Electrophoresis (CSGE), and any aberrantly-sized band was sequenced. BRCA mutations were present in 12.7% of the high risk patients, compared with 2.8% of the unselected patients. Among high risk patients, mutations were most prevalent in patients with a family history of breast or first-degree ovarian cancer (22.1%), followed by those with male breast cancer (20%), bilateral breast cancer (20%), multiple organ cancer including breast (13%) and younger breast cancer patients (aged <35 yr) (8.1%). Moreover, BRCA mutations were detected in 34.8% of patients having two high-risk factors. These findings suggest that BRCA gene mutation analysis should be performed on Korean patients with high-risk factors for breast cancer. PMID:15082902

  16. Candidate genetic modifiers for breast and ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    PubMed Central

    Peterlongo, Paolo; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Rudolph, Anja; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Simard, Jacques; Soucy, Penny; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Easton, Douglas F.; Hamann, Ute; Wilkening, Stefan; Chen, Bowang; Rookus, Matti A.; Schmidt, Marjanka K; van der Baan, Frederieke H.; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Walker, Logan C.; Lose, Felicity; Maia, Ana-Teresa; Montagna, Marco; Matricardi, Laura; Lubinski, Jan; Jakubowska, Anna; Gómez Garcia, Encarna B.; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Nussbaum, Robert L.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Domchek, Susan M.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Arun, Banu K.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Orsulic, Sandra; Lester, Jenny; Chung, Wendy K.; Miron, Alex; Southey, Melissa C.; Goldgar, David E.; Buys, Saundra S.; Janavicius, Ramunas; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ejlertsen, Bent; Jønson, Lars; Osorio, Ana; Martínez-Bouzas, Cristina; Benitez, Javier; Conway, Edye E.; Blazer, Kathleen R.; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Scuvera, Giulietta; Barile, Monica; Ficarazzi, Filomena; Mariette, Frederique; Fortuzzi, Stefano; Viel, Alessandra; Giannini, Giuseppe; Papi, Laura; Martayan, Aline; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Radice, Paolo; Vratimos, Athanassios; Fostira, Florentia; Garber, Judy E.; Donaldson, Alan; Brewer, Carole; Foo, Claire; Evans, D. Gareth R.; Frost, Debra; Eccles, Diana; Brady, Angela; Cook, Jackie; Tischkowitz, Marc; Adlard, Julian; Barwell, Julian; Walker, Lisa; Izatt, Louise; Side, Lucy E.; Kennedy, M. John; Rogers, Mark T.; Porteous, Mary E.; Morrison, Patrick J.; Platte, Radka; Davidson, Rosemarie; Hodgson, Shirley V.; Ellis, Steve; Cole, Trevor; Godwin, Andrew K.; Claes, Kathleen; Van Maerken, Tom; Meindl, Alfons; Gehrig, Andrea; Sutter, Christian; Engel, Christoph; Niederacher, Dieter; Steinemann, Doris; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Kast, Karin; Rhiem, Kerstin; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Bressac-de Paillerets, Brigitte; Buecher, Bruno; Delnatte, Capucine; Houdayer, Claude; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Damiola, Francesca; Coupier, Isabelle; Barjhoux, Laure; Venat-Bouvet, Laurence; Golmard, Lisa; Boutry-Kryza, Nadia; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Caron, Olivier; Pujol, Pascal; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Belotti, Muriel; Piedmonte, Marion; Friedlander, Michael L.; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Copeland, Larry J; de la Hoya, Miguel; Segura, Pedro Perez; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; van Os, Theo A.M.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E.J.; van der Hout, Annemarie H.; Vreeswijk, Maaike P.G.; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Ausems, Margreet G.E.M.; van Doorn, Helena C.; Collée, J. Margriet; Olah, Edith; Diez, Orland; Blanco, Ignacio; Lazaro, Conxi; Brunet, Joan; Feliubadalo, Lidia; Cybulski, Cezary; Gronwald, Jacek; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Arason, Adalgeir; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Olswold, Curtis; Couch, Fergus J.; Lindor, Noralane M.; Wang, Xianshu; Szabo, Csilla I.; Offit, Kenneth; Corines, Marina; Jacobs, Lauren; Robson, Mark E.; Zhang, Liying; Joseph, Vijai; Berger, Andreas; Singer, Christian F.; Rappaport, Christine; Kaulich, Daphne Geschwantler; Pfeiler, Georg; Tea, Muy-Kheng M.; Phelan, Catherine M.; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Rennert, Gad; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Andrulis, Irene L.; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Bojesen, Anders; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Thomassen, Mads; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Laitman, Yael; Rantala, Johanna; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Ehrencrona, Hans; Askmalm, Marie Stenmark; Borg, Åke; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; McGuffog, Lesley; Barrowdale, Daniel; Healey, Sue; Lee, Andrew; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Friedman, Eitan

    2014-01-01

    Background BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers are at substantially increased risk for developing breast and ovarian cancer. The incomplete penetrance coupled with the variable age at diagnosis in carriers of the same mutation suggests the existence of genetic and non-genetic modifying factors. In this study we evaluated the putative role of variants in many candidate modifier genes. Methods Genotyping data from 15,252 BRCA1 and 8,211 BRCA2 mutation carriers, for known variants (n=3,248) located within or around 445 candidate genes, were available through the iCOGS custom-designed array. Breast and ovarian cancer association analysis was performed within a retrospective cohort approach. Results The observed p-values of association ranged between 0.005-1.000. None of the variants was significantly associated with breast or ovarian cancer risk in either BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers, after multiple testing adjustments. Conclusion There is little evidence that any of the evaluated candidate variants act as modifiers of breast and/or ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. Impact Genome-wide association studies have been more successful at identifying genetic modifiers of BRCA1/2 penetrance than candidate gene studies. PMID:25336561

  17. Candidate genetic modifiers for breast and ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Peterlongo, Paolo; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Moysich, Kirsten B; Rudolph, Anja; Schmutzler, Rita K; Simard, Jacques; Soucy, Penny; Eeles, Rosalind A; Easton, Douglas F; Hamann, Ute; Wilkening, Stefan; Chen, Bowang; Rookus, Matti A; Schmidt, Marjanka K; van der Baan, Frederieke H; Spurdle, Amanda B; Walker, Logan C; Lose, Felicity; Maia, Ana-Teresa; Montagna, Marco; Matricardi, Laura; Lubinski, Jan; Jakubowska, Anna; Gómez Garcia, Encarna B; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Nussbaum, Robert L; Nathanson, Katherine L; Domchek, Susan M; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Arun, Banu K; Karlan, Beth Y; Orsulic, Sandra; Lester, Jenny; Chung, Wendy K; Miron, Alex; Southey, Melissa C; Goldgar, David E; Buys, Saundra S; Janavicius, Ramunas; Dorfling, Cecilia M; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Ding, Yuan Chun; Neuhausen, Susan L; Hansen, Thomas V O; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ejlertsen, Bent; Jønson, Lars; Osorio, Ana; Martínez-Bouzas, Cristina; Benitez, Javier; Conway, Edye E; Blazer, Kathleen R; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Scuvera, Giulietta; Barile, Monica; Ficarazzi, Filomena; Mariette, Frederique; Fortuzzi, Stefano; Viel, Alessandra; Giannini, Giuseppe; Papi, Laura; Martayan, Aline; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Radice, Paolo; Vratimos, Athanassios; Fostira, Florentia; Garber, Judy E; Donaldson, Alan; Brewer, Carole; Foo, Claire; Evans, D Gareth R; Frost, Debra; Eccles, Diana; Brady, Angela; Cook, Jackie; Tischkowitz, Marc; Adlard, Julian; Barwell, Julian; Walker, Lisa; Izatt, Louise; Side, Lucy E; Kennedy, M John; Rogers, Mark T; Porteous, Mary E; Morrison, Patrick J; Platte, Radka; Davidson, Rosemarie; Hodgson, Shirley V; Ellis, Steve; Cole, Trevor; Godwin, Andrew K; Claes, Kathleen; Van Maerken, Tom; Meindl, Alfons; Gehrig, Andrea; Sutter, Christian; Engel, Christoph; Niederacher, Dieter; Steinemann, Doris; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Kast, Karin; Rhiem, Kerstin; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Bressac-de Paillerets, Brigitte; Buecher, Bruno; Delnatte, Capucine; Houdayer, Claude; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Damiola, Francesca; Coupier, Isabelle; Barjhoux, Laure; Venat-Bouvet, Laurence; Golmard, Lisa; Boutry-Kryza, Nadia; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Caron, Olivier; Pujol, Pascal; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Belotti, Muriel; Piedmonte, Marion; Friedlander, Michael L; Rodriguez, Gustavo C; Copeland, Larry J; de la Hoya, Miguel; Segura, Pedro Perez; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; van Os, Theo A M; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E J; van der Hout, Annemarie H; Vreeswijk, Maaike P G; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Ausems, Margreet G E M; van Doorn, Helena C; Collée, J Margriet; Olah, Edith; Diez, Orland; Blanco, Ignacio; Lazaro, Conxi; Brunet, Joan; Feliubadalo, Lidia; Cybulski, Cezary; Gronwald, Jacek; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Arason, Adalgeir; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Teixeira, Manuel R; Olswold, Curtis; Couch, Fergus J; Lindor, Noralane M; Wang, Xianshu; Szabo, Csilla I; Offit, Kenneth; Corines, Marina; Jacobs, Lauren; Robson, Mark E; Zhang, Liying; Joseph, Vijai; Berger, Andreas; Singer, Christian F; Rappaport, Christine; Kaulich, Daphne Geschwantler; Pfeiler, Georg; Tea, Muy-Kheng M; Phelan, Catherine M; Greene, Mark H; Mai, Phuong L; Rennert, Gad; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Andrulis, Irene L; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Bojesen, Anders; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Thomassen, Mads; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Laitman, Yael; Rantala, Johanna; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Ehrencrona, Hans; Askmalm, Marie Stenmark; Borg, Åke; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; McGuffog, Lesley; Barrowdale, Daniel; Healey, Sue; Lee, Andrew; Pharoah, Paul D P; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C; Friedman, Eitan

    2015-01-01

    BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers are at substantially increased risk for developing breast and ovarian cancer. The incomplete penetrance coupled with the variable age at diagnosis in carriers of the same mutation suggests the existence of genetic and nongenetic modifying factors. In this study, we evaluated the putative role of variants in many candidate modifier genes. Genotyping data from 15,252 BRCA1 and 8,211 BRCA2 mutation carriers, for known variants (n = 3,248) located within or around 445 candidate genes, were available through the iCOGS custom-designed array. Breast and ovarian cancer association analysis was performed within a retrospective cohort approach. The observed P values of association ranged between 0.005 and 1.000. None of the variants was significantly associated with breast or ovarian cancer risk in either BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers, after multiple testing adjustments. There is little evidence that any of the evaluated candidate variants act as modifiers of breast and/or ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. Genome-wide association studies have been more successful at identifying genetic modifiers of BRCA1/2 penetrance than candidate gene studies. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  18. Analysis of several BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in a hospital-based series of unselected breast cancer cases.

    PubMed

    Burcoş, T; Cimponeriu, D; Ion, D A; Spandole, S; Apostol, P; Toma, M; Radu, I; Popa, I; Stanilescu, S; Popa, E

    2013-01-01

    The distribution of BRCA mutations varies significantly between populations. The spectrum of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in breast cancers in the Romanian population is incompletely known. The aim of the present study is to investigate the presence of nine BRCA mutations in patients with breast cancer identified in a surgical clinic from Bucharest. Unrelated women diagnosed with breast cancer from Coltea Hospital (n=114) and healthy controls (n = 150) were selected for this study. Seven mutations in BRCA1 (185delAG, 5382insC, 943ins10, E1250X, 1294del40, E1373X, R1443X) and two in BRCA2 (IVS16-2A4G and 6174delT) were tested using PCR based protocols. In addition, the presence of BRCA1 185delAG, BRCA1 5382insC, BRCA2 6174delT mutations were tested with a post amplification mutation detection system, based on the ELISA method. Two patients with sporadic breast cancer (2%) and one patient with family history of the disease (7.14%) have the BRCA1 5382insC mutation. No other mutation was detected in patient and control groups. The mutations were not present in the control lot. Our results indicate that BRCA1 5382insC is a common mutation in Romanian women with breast cancer (3 114). Celsius.

  19. Low prevalence of HER2 positivity amongst BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers and in primary BRCA screens.

    PubMed

    Evans, D G; Lalloo, F; Howell, S; Verhoef, S; Woodward, E R; Howell, A

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study is to delineate more clearly the prevalence of HER2+ breast cancer in women with germline BRCA1/2 mutations. For this purpose, we analysed primary mutation screens on women with breast cancer with unequivocal HER2 amplification and assessed the proportion of BRCA1 and BRCA2 breast cancers that were HER2+ comparing this with the existing literature. The results are that 1063 primary BRCA screens had confirmed tumour HER2 status. If HER2+ only 2.5 % (4/156) and 3.2 % (5/156) of women had a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation identified respectively; compared to 27.7 % (115/415) and 8.2 % (34/415) with triple negative tumours. Only 2.1 % (4/195) women with BRCA1-related breast cancer had HER2 amplified breast cancers rising to 6.8 % (n = 12, p = 0.04) in BRCA2. These rates are in keeping with most of the existing literature except a recent large multicenter report which documented higher rates but with no control group. The study concluded that true HER2-amplified breast cancers are rare amongst BRCA1 mutation carriers and are less common in BRCA2 than background rates.

  20. Mammography screening and the risk of breast cancer in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Giannakeas, Vasily; Lubinski, Jan; Gronwald, Jacek; Moller, Pal; Armel, Susan; Lynch, Henry T; Foulkes, William D; Kim-Sing, Charmaine; Singer, Christian; Neuhausen, Susan L; Friedman, Eitan; Tung, Nadine; Senter, Leigha; Sun, Ping; Narod, Steven A

    2014-08-01

    Women with a genetic predisposition to breast cancer may be at increased risk of cancer after exposure to ionizing radiation. It is unclear whether mammography screening increases the risk of breast cancer among BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers. We identified 2,346 women with a BRCA1 (n = 1844) or BRCA2 (n = 502) mutation and no breast cancer, and we reviewed their history of mammography exposure. These women were followed for an average of 5.3 years and were observed for new breast cancer diagnoses. At study entry, 1808 women (77.1 %) reported ever having had a mammogram; of these, 204 women (11.2 %) reported having had a mammogram before age 30. We estimated the hazard ratios for the development of invasive breast cancer, conditional on the number of prior mammograms and on the age at first mammogram. Hazard ratios were estimated and stratified by gene (BRCA1 or BRCA2), relative to women with no exposure. We observed no significant association between prior mammography exposure and breast cancer risk for BRCA1 carriers (HR 0.79; 95 % CI 0.53-1.19; P = 0.26) or for BRCA2 carriers (HR 0.90; 95 % CI 0.35-2.34; P = 0.83). An early age at first mammogram (<30 years) did not increase breast cancer risk among BRCA1 carriers (HR 0.75; 95 % CI 0.41-1.37; P = 0.35) or among BRCA2 carriers (HR 0.69; 95 % CI 0.19-2.48; P = 0.57). Exposure to mammography in women with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations is not associated with an increased risk of breast cancer.

  1. Chromosomal instability induced by mammography X-rays in primary human fibroblasts from BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Frankenberg-Schwager, Marlis; Gregus, Anke

    2012-11-01

    Mammography X-rays are known to induce DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) whose error-free recombinational repair requires the function of the tumour repressor genes BRCA1 (breast-cancer-associated gene 1) and BRCA2 (breast-cancer-associated gene 2). Since un- or misrepaired DSB lead to chromosomal anomalies which may promote the development of breast cancer, we have studied the potential of mammography X-rays for immediate and delayed induction of chromosomal anomalies in human primary fibroblasts from BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Primary human fibroblasts from three BRCA1, three BRCA2 mutation carriers, one BRCA2-deficient fanconi anemia (FA) patient and three normal individuals were exposed to various doses of mammography X-rays. Chromosomal anomalies at first mitosis and at several population doublings post-irradiation were assayed (Giemsa staining and Fish [fluorescence in situ hybridization]). No effect of the BRCA mutation status was observed on survival curves after exposure to mammography X-rays and on the dose-dependent increase of chromosomal anomalies at first mitosis post-irradiation. In contrast, several population doublings after exposure to a low dose of only 0.5 Gy chromosomal instability, manifested as gross chromosomal rearrangements and aneuploidy, had developed in BRCA2-deficient FA fibroblasts and in some - but not all - BRCA heterozygous fibroblasts. Low doses of mammography X-rays have the potential to induce chromosomal instability in fibroblasts from BRCA mutation carriers: Cells exhibit gross chromosomal rearrangements and aneuploidy similar to those observed in breast cancer cells. These results suggest that for women carrying a BRCA mutation early and frequent screening with mammography X-rays may not be the method of choice to detect breast cancer.

  2. Prevalence of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in unselected breast cancer patients from medellín, Colombia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Approximately 5% of all breast cancers can be attributed to a mutation in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene. The genetic component of breast cancer in Colombia has been, for the most part, studied on cases from the Bogota region. Five different founder mutations were in two studies of breast cancer patients in the Bogota region. It is important that the frequency of mutations be established among unselected cases of breast cancer of other regions of Colombia in order to estimate the genetic burden of this cancer in Colombia and to plan genetic services. The aim of this study was to establish the mutation frequencies of the BRCA genes in breast cancer patients unselected for family history or age, from Medellin, Colombia. Methods We enrolled 280 unselected women with breast cancer from a large public hospital in Medellin, Colombia. A detailed family history from each patient and a blood sample was obtained and processed for DNA analysis. Mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 were sought using a combination of techniques including a panel of recurrent Hispanic BRCA mutations which consists of fifty BRCA1 mutations and forty-six BRCA2 mutations, including the five recurrent Colombian BRCA mutations. All mutations were confirmed by direct sequencing. Results Genetic testing was successfully completed for 244 of the 280 cases (87%). Among the 244 cases, three deleterious mutations were identified (two in BRCA1 and one in BRCA2) representing 1.2% of the total. The average age of breast cancer in the mutation-positive cases was 34 years. The two BRCA1 mutations were known founder mutations (3450del4 in exon 11 and A1708E in exon 18). The BRCA2 mutation was in exon 11 (5844del5) and has not been previously reported in individuals of Colombian descent. Among the three mutation-positive families was a breast cancer family and two families with no history of breast or ovarian cancer. Conclusion The frequency of BRCA mutations in unselected breast cancer cases from the Medellin region

  3. Germline mutation in BRCA1 or BRCA2 and ten-year survival for women diagnosed with epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Candido-dos-Reis, Francisco J; Song, Honglin; Goode, Ellen L; Cunningham, Julie M; Fridley, Brooke L; Larson, Melissa C; Alsop, Kathryn; Dicks, Ed; Harrington, Patricia; Ramus, Susan J; de Fazio, Anna; Mitchell, Gillian; Fereday, Sian; Bolton, Kelly L; Gourley, Charlie; Michie, Caroline; Karlan, Beth; Lester, Jenny; Walsh, Christine; Cass, Ilana; Olsson, Håkan; Gore, Martin; Benitez, Javier J; Garcia, Maria J; Andrulis, Irene; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Blanco, Ignacio; Lazaro, Conxi; Whittemore, Alice S; McGuire, Valerie; Sieh, Weiva; Montagna, Marco; Alducci, Elisa; Sadetzki, Siegal; Chetrit, Angela; Kwong, Ava; Kjaer, Susanne K; Jensen, Allan; Høgdall, Estrid; Neuhausen, Susan; Nussbaum, Robert; Daly, Mary; Greene, Mark H; Mai, Phuong L; Loud, Jennifer T; Moysich, Kirsten; Toland, Amanda E; Lambrechts, Diether; Ellis, Steve; Frost, Debra; Brenton, James D; Tischkowitz, Marc; Easton, Douglas F; Antoniou, Antonis; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Gayther, Simon A; Bowtell, David; Pharoah, Paul D P

    2015-02-01

    To analyze the effect of germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 on mortality in patients with ovarian cancer up to 10 years after diagnosis. We used unpublished survival time data for 2,242 patients from two case-control studies and extended survival time data for 4,314 patients from previously reported studies. All participants had been screened for deleterious germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2. Survival time was analyzed for the combined data using Cox proportional hazard models with BRCA1 and BRCA2 as time-varying covariates. Competing risks were analyzed using Fine and Gray model. The combined 10-year overall survival rate was 30% [95% confidence interval (CI), 28%-31%] for non-carriers, 25% (95% CI, 22%-28%) for BRCA1 carriers, and 35% (95% CI, 30%-41%) for BRCA2 carriers. The HR for BRCA1 was 0.53 at time zero and increased over time becoming greater than one at 4.8 years. For BRCA2, the HR was 0.42 at time zero and increased over time (predicted to become greater than 1 at 10.5 years). The results were similar when restricted to 3,202 patients with high-grade serous tumors and to ovarian cancer-specific mortality. BRCA1/2 mutations are associated with better short-term survival, but this advantage decreases over time and in BRCA1 carriers is eventually reversed. This may have important implications for therapy of both primary and relapsed disease and for analysis of long-term survival in clinical trials of new agents, particularly those that are effective in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  4. Germline mutation in BRCA1 or BRCA2 and ten-year survival for women diagnosed with epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Candido-dos-Reis, Francisco J.; Song, Honglin; Goode, Ellen L.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Larson, Melissa C.; Alsop, Kathryn; Dicks, Ed; Harrington, Patricia; Ramus, Susan J.; de Fazio, Anna; Mitchell, Gillian; Fereday, Sian; Bolton, Kelly L.; Gourley, Charlie; Michie, Caroline; Karlan, Beth; Lester, Jenny; Walsh, Christine; Cass, Ilana; Olsson, Håkan; Gore, Martin; Benitez, Javier J.; Garcia, Maria J.; Andrulis, Irene; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Blanco, Ignacio; Lazaro, Conxi; Whittemore, Alice S.; McGuire, Valerie; Sieh, Weiva; Montagna, Marco; Alducci, Elisa; Sadetzki, Siegal; Chetrit, Angela; Kwong, Ava; Kjaer, Susanne K.; Jensen, Allan; Høgdall, Estrid; Neuhausen, Susan; Nussbaum, Robert; Daly, Mary; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Loud, Jennifer T.; Moysich, Kirsten; Toland, Amanda E.; Lambrechts, Diether; Ellis, Steve; Frost, Debra; Brenton, James D.; Tischkowitz, Marc; Easton, Douglas F.; Antoniou, Antonis; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Gayther, Simon A.; Bowtell, David; Pharoah, Paul D. P.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To analyse the effect of germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 on mortality in ovarian cancer patients up to ten years after diagnosis. Experimental Design We used unpublished survival time data for 2,242 patients from two case-control studies and extended survival-time data for 4,314 patients from previously reported studies. All participants had been screened for deleterious germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2. Survival time was analysed for the combined data using Cox proportional hazard models with BRCA1 and BRCA2 as time-varying covariates. Competing risks were analysed using Fine and Gray model. Results The combined 10-year overall survival was 30% (95% CI, 28%-31%) for non-carriers, 25% (95% CI, 22%-28%) for BRCA1 carriers, and 35% (95% CI, 30%-41%) for BRCA2 carriers. The hazard ratio for BRCA1 was 0.53 at time zero and increased over time becoming greater than one at ·4.8 years. For BRCA2, the hazard ratio was 0.42 at time zero and increased over time (predicted to become greater than one at 10.5 years). The results were similar when restricted to 3,202 patients with high-grade serous tumors, and to ovarian cancer specific mortality. Conclusions BRCA1/2 mutations are associated with better short-term survival, but this advantage decreases over time and, in BRCA1 carriers is eventually reversed. This may have important implications for therapy of both primary and relapsed disease and for analysis of long-term survival in clinical trials of new agents, particularly those that are effective in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. PMID:25398451

  5. Analysis of chromosomal radiosensitivity of healthy BRCA2 mutation carriers and non-carriers in BRCA families with the G2 micronucleus assay.

    PubMed

    Baert, Annelot; Depuydt, Julie; Van Maerken, Tom; Poppe, Bruce; Malfait, Fransiska; Van Damme, Tim; De Nobele, Sylvia; Perletti, Gianpaolo; De Leeneer, Kim; Claes, Kathleen B M; Vral, Anne

    2017-03-01

    Breast cancer risk drastically increases in individuals with a heterozygous germline BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation, while it is estimated to equal the population risk for relatives without the familial mutation (non-carriers). The aim of the present study was to use a G2 phase-specific micronucleus assay to investigate whether lymphocytes of healthy BRCA2 mutation carriers are characterized by increased radiosensitivity compared to controls without a family history of breast/ovarian cancer and how this relates to healthy non-carrier relatives. BRCA2 is active in homologous recombination, a DNA damage repair pathway, specifically active in the late S/G2 phase of the cell cycle. We found a significantly increased radiosensitivity in a cohort of healthy BRCA2 mutation carriers compared to individuals without a familial history of breast cancer (P=0.046; Mann-Whitney U test). At the individual level, 50% of healthy BRCA2 mutation carriers showed a radiosensitive phenotype (radiosensitivity score of 1 or 2), whereas 83% of the controls showed no radiosensitivity (P=0.038; one-tailed Fisher's exact test). An odds ratio of 5 (95% CI, 1.07-23.47) indicated an association between the BRCA2 mutation and radiosensitivity in healthy mutation carriers. These results indicate the need for the gentle use of ionizing radiation for either diagnostic or therapeutic use in BRCA2 mutation carriers. We detected no increased radiosensitivity in the non-carrier relatives.

  6. Analysis of chromosomal radiosensitivity of healthy BRCA2 mutation carriers and non-carriers in BRCA families with the G2 micronucleus assay

    PubMed Central

    Baert, Annelot; Depuydt, Julie; Van Maerken, Tom; Poppe, Bruce; Malfait, Fransiska; Van Damme, Tim; De Nobele, Sylvia; Perletti, Gianpaolo; De Leeneer, Kim; Claes, Kathleen B.M.; Vral, Anne

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer risk drastically increases in individuals with a heterozygous germline BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation, while it is estimated to equal the population risk for relatives without the familial mutation (non-carriers). The aim of the present study was to use a G2 phase-specific micronucleus assay to investigate whether lymphocytes of healthy BRCA2 mutation carriers are characterized by increased radiosensitivity compared to controls without a family history of breast/ovarian cancer and how this relates to healthy non-carrier relatives. BRCA2 is active in homologous recombination, a DNA damage repair pathway, specifically active in the late S/G2 phase of the cell cycle. We found a significantly increased radiosensitivity in a cohort of healthy BRCA2 mutation carriers compared to individuals without a familial history of breast cancer (P=0.046; Mann-Whitney U test). At the individual level, 50% of healthy BRCA2 mutation carriers showed a radiosensitive phenotype (radiosensitivity score of 1 or 2), whereas 83% of the controls showed no radiosensitivity (P=0.038; one-tailed Fishers exact test). An odds ratio of 5 (95% CI, 1.07–23.47) indicated an association between the BRCA2 mutation and radiosensitivity in healthy mutation carriers. These results indicate the need for the gentle use of ionizing radiation for either diagnostic or therapeutic use in BRCA2 mutation carriers. We detected no increased radiosensitivity in the non-carrier relatives. PMID:28184943

  7. Analysis of Founder Mutations in Rare Tumors Associated With Hereditary Breast/Ovarian Cancer Reveals a Novel Association of BRCA2 Mutations with Ampulla of Vater Carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Pedro; Peixoto, Ana; Santos, Catarina; Rocha, Patrícia; Pinto, Carla; Pinheiro, Manuela; Leça, Luís; Martins, Ana Teresa; Ferreira, Verónica; Bartosch, Carla; Teixeira, Manuel R

    2016-01-01

    BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations are responsible for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer, but they also confer an increased risk for the development of rarer cancers associated with this syndrome, namely, cancer of the pancreas, male breast, peritoneum, and fallopian tube. The objective of this work was to quantify the contribution of the founder mutations BRCA2 c.156_157insAlu and BRCA1 c.3331_3334del for cancer etiology in unselected hospital-based cohorts of Portuguese patients diagnosed with these rarer cancers, by using a strategy that included testing of archival tumor tissue. A total of 102 male breast, 68 pancreatic and 33 peritoneal/fallopian tube carcinoma cases were included in the study. The BRCA2 c.156_157insAlu mutation was observed with a frequency of 7.8% in male breast cancers, 3.0% in peritoneal/fallopian tube cancers, and 1.6% in pancreatic cancers, with estimated total contributions of germline BRCA2 mutations of 14.3%, 5.5%, and 2.8%, respectively. No carriers of the BRCA1 c.3331_3334del mutation were identified. During our study, a patient with an ampulla of Vater carcinoma was incidentally found to carry the BRCA2 c.156_157insAlu mutation, so we decided to test a consecutive series of additional 15 ampullary carcinomas for BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations using a combination of direct founder mutation testing and full gene analysis with next generation sequencing. BRCA2 mutations were observed with a frequency of 14.3% in ampulla of Vater carcinomas. In conclusion, taking into account the implications for both the individuals and their family members, we recommend that patients with these neoplasias should be offered BRCA1/BRCA2 genetic testing and we here show that it is feasible to test for founder mutations in archival tumor tissue. Furthermore, we identified for the first time a high frequency of germline BRCA2 mutations in ampullary cancers.

  8. Analysis of Founder Mutations in Rare Tumors Associated With Hereditary Breast/Ovarian Cancer Reveals a Novel Association of BRCA2 Mutations with Ampulla of Vater Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Pedro; Peixoto, Ana; Santos, Catarina; Rocha, Patrícia; Pinto, Carla; Pinheiro, Manuela; Leça, Luís; Martins, Ana Teresa; Ferreira, Verónica; Bartosch, Carla

    2016-01-01

    BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations are responsible for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer, but they also confer an increased risk for the development of rarer cancers associated with this syndrome, namely, cancer of the pancreas, male breast, peritoneum, and fallopian tube. The objective of this work was to quantify the contribution of the founder mutations BRCA2 c.156_157insAlu and BRCA1 c.3331_3334del for cancer etiology in unselected hospital-based cohorts of Portuguese patients diagnosed with these rarer cancers, by using a strategy that included testing of archival tumor tissue. A total of 102 male breast, 68 pancreatic and 33 peritoneal/fallopian tube carcinoma cases were included in the study. The BRCA2 c.156_157insAlu mutation was observed with a frequency of 7.8% in male breast cancers, 3.0% in peritoneal/fallopian tube cancers, and 1.6% in pancreatic cancers, with estimated total contributions of germline BRCA2 mutations of 14.3%, 5.5%, and 2.8%, respectively. No carriers of the BRCA1 c.3331_3334del mutation were identified. During our study, a patient with an ampulla of Vater carcinoma was incidentally found to carry the BRCA2 c.156_157insAlu mutation, so we decided to test a consecutive series of additional 15 ampullary carcinomas for BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations using a combination of direct founder mutation testing and full gene analysis with next generation sequencing. BRCA2 mutations were observed with a frequency of 14.3% in ampulla of Vater carcinomas. In conclusion, taking into account the implications for both the individuals and their family members, we recommend that patients with these neoplasias should be offered BRCA1/BRCA2 genetic testing and we here show that it is feasible to test for founder mutations in archival tumor tissue. Furthermore, we identified for the first time a high frequency of germline BRCA2 mutations in ampullary cancers. PMID:27532258

  9. Cancers Associated with BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutations other than Breast and Ovarian

    PubMed Central

    Mersch, Jacqueline; Jackson, Michelle; Park, Minjeong; Nebgen, Denise; Peterson, Susan K.; Singletary, Claire; Arun, Banu K.; Litton, Jennifer K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous studies have reported additional cancers associated with BRCA mutations; however, type, magnitude of risk, and gender differences remain to be clarified. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the incidence of cancers other than breast and ovarian cancer in known mutation carriers. Methods An institutional review board approved study identified 1072 patients who had genetic counseling at our institution and tested positive for a deleterious BRCA mutation. The expected number of cancer cases was calculated from the number of individuals in the study sample multiplied by the general population cancer incidence rates. The expected and observed number of cases were calculated in 5 year intervals to accommodate different age-related incidence rates. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) for each cancer type were calculated. Results We identified 1177 cancers in the 1072 mutation carriers comprising 30 different cancer types. Individuals with a BRCA1 mutation did not have a significant increase in cancers other than breast and ovarian; however, a trend in melanoma was observed. Individuals with a BRCA2 mutation had a significantly higher number of observed cases compared to expected cases for pancreatic cancer (SIR = 21.7, 95%CI = 13.1–34.0, p value <0.001) in both men and women and prostate cancer in men (SIR = 4.9, 95%CI = 2.0–10.1, p value =0.002). Conclusions The results of this study uphold the current recommendations for HBOC screening of cancers other than breast and ovarian by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network. Larger cohorts and collaborations are needed to further verify these findings. PMID:25224030

  10. Family history predictors of BRCA1/BRCA2 mutation status among Tunisian breast/ovarian cancer families.

    PubMed

    Riahi, Aouatef; Ghourabi, Mohamel El; Fourati, Asma; Chaabouni-Bouhamed, Habiba

    2017-03-01

    With the increasing request for BRCA1/BRCA2 mutation tests, several risk models have been developed to predict the presence of mutation in these genes; in this study, we have developed an efficient BRCA genetic testing strategy. As first step, to identify predictor variables associated with BRCA status, we have undertaken a cumulative mutation analysis including data from three Tunisian studies. Then, we have developed a logistic regression model for predicting the likelihood of harboring a BRCA mutation. Using receiver operating characteristic curves (ROC), an effective evaluation was performed. A total of 92 Tunisian families were included. Overall, 27 women were positive for BRCA1/BRCA2 deleterious mutations. Tow recurrent mutations (c.211dupA and c.5266dupC) explained 76 % of BRCA1-related families and three recurrent mutations (c.1310_1313del, c.1542_1547delAAGA and c.7887_7888insA) explained 90 % of BRCA2-related families. Early age at diagnosis of breast cancer, ovarian cancer, bilateral breast cancer were associated with BRCA1, whereas male breast cancer and four or more breast cancer cases in the family were associated with BRCA2. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of the risk score was 0.802 (95 % confidence interval = 0.0699-0. 905). Logistic regression reported particular profiles related to BRCA germline mutation carriers in our population, as well as an efficient prediction model that may be a useful tool for increasing the cost-effectiveness of genetic testing strategy.

  11. Ovarian cancer susceptibility alleles and risk of ovarian cancer in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Ramus, Susan J; Antoniou, Antonis C; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Soucy, Penny; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; McGuffog, Lesley; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Healey, Sue; Barrowdale, Daniel; Lee, Andrew; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Kruse, Torben A; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Caligo, Maria A; Liljegren, Annelie; Lindblom, Annika; Olsson, Håkan; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Melin, Beatrice; Domchek, Susan M; Nathanson, Katherine L; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Złowocka, Elżbieta; Gronwald, Jacek; Huzarski, Tomasz; Byrski, Tomasz; Cybulski, Cezary; Toloczko-Grabarek, Aleksandra; Osorio, Ana; Benitez, Javier; Duran, Mercedes; Tejada, Maria-Isabel; Hamann, Ute; Rookus, Matti; van Leeuwen, Flora E; Aalfs, Cora M; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E J; van Asperen, Christi J; van Roozendaal, K E P; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Collée, J Margriet; Kriege, Mieke; van der Luijt, Rob B; Peock, Susan; Frost, Debra; Ellis, Steve D; Platte, Radka; Fineberg, Elena; Evans, D Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Jacobs, Chris; Eeles, Ros; Adlard, Julian; Davidson, Rosemarie; Eccles, Diana; Cole, Trevor; Cook, Jackie; Paterson, Joan; Douglas, Fiona; Brewer, Carole; Hodgson, Shirley; Morrison, Patrick J; Walker, Lisa; Porteous, Mary E; Kennedy, M John; Pathak, Harsh; Godwin, Andrew K; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Caux-Moncoutier, Virginie; de Pauw, Antoine; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Léoné, Mélanie; Calender, Alain; Lasset, Christine; Bonadona, Valérie; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Faivre, Laurence; Loustalot, Catherine; Buys, Saundra; Daly, Mary; Miron, Alex; Terry, Mary Beth; Chung, Wendy K; John, Esther M; Southey, Melissa; Goldgar, David; Singer, Christian F; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Pfeiler, Georg; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Hansen, Thomas v O; Ejlertsen, Bent; Johannsson, Oskar Th; Offit, Kenneth; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Gaudet, Mia M; Vijai, Joseph; Robson, Mark; Piedmonte, Marion; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Van Le, Linda; Hoffman, James S; Ewart Toland, Amanda; Montagna, Marco; Tognazzo, Silvia; Imyanitov, Evgeny; Issacs, Claudine; Janavicius, Ramunas; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Iganacio; Tornero, Eva; Navarro, Matilde; Moysich, Kirsten B; Karlan, Beth Y; Gross, Jenny; Olah, Edith; Vaszko, Tibor; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Ganz, Patricia A; Beattie, Mary S; Dorfling, Cecelia M; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Diez, Orland; Kwong, Ava; Schmutzler, Rita K; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Heidemann, Simone; Niederacher, Dieter; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Gadzicki, Dorotehea; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Deissler, Helmut; Gehrig, Andrea; Sutter, Christian; Kast, Karin; Fiebig, Britta; Schäfer, Dieter; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Plante, Marie; Spurdle, Amanda B; Neuhausen, Susan L; Ding, Yuan Chun; Wang, Xianshu; Lindor, Noralane; Fredericksen, Zachary; Pankratz, V Shane; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Bonanni, Bernardo; Bernard, Loris; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Papi, Laura; Ottini, Laura; Radice, Paolo; Greene, Mark H; Mai, Phuong L; Andrulis, Irene L; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Pharoah, Paul D P; Gayther, Simon A; Simard, Jacques; Easton, Douglas F; Couch, Fergus J; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia

    2012-04-01

    Germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 are associated with increased risks of breast and ovarian cancer. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) identified six alleles associated with risk of ovarian cancer for women in the general population. We evaluated four of these loci as potential modifiers of ovarian cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Four single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs10088218 (at 8q24), rs2665390 (at 3q25), rs717852 (at 2q31), and rs9303542 (at 17q21), were genotyped in 12,599 BRCA1 and 7,132 BRCA2 carriers, including 2,678 ovarian cancer cases. Associations were evaluated within a retrospective cohort approach. All four loci were associated with ovarian cancer risk in BRCA2 carriers; rs10088218 per-allele hazard ratio (HR) = 0.81 (95% CI: 0.67-0.98) P-trend = 0.033, rs2665390 HR = 1.48 (95% CI: 1.21-1.83) P-trend = 1.8 × 10(-4), rs717852 HR = 1.25 (95% CI: 1.10-1.42) P-trend = 6.6 × 10(-4), rs9303542 HR = 1.16 (95% CI: 1.02-1.33) P-trend = 0.026. Two loci were associated with ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 carriers; rs10088218 per-allele HR = 0.89 (95% CI: 0.81-0.99) P-trend = 0.029, rs2665390 HR = 1.25 (95% CI: 1.10-1.42) P-trend = 6.1 × 10(-4). The HR estimates for the remaining loci were consistent with odds ratio estimates for the general population. The identification of multiple loci modifying ovarian cancer risk may be useful for counseling women with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations regarding their risk of ovarian cancer. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Significant clinical impact of recurrent BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Villarreal-Garza, Cynthia; Alvarez-Gómez, Rosa María; Pérez-Plasencia, Carlos; Herrera, Luis A.; Herzog, Josef; Castillo, Danielle; Mohar, Alejandro; Castro, Clementina; Gallardo, Lenny N.; Gallardo, Dolores; Santibáñez, Miguel; Blazer, Kathleen R.; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.

    2014-01-01

    Background Frequent recurrent BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene (BRCA) mutations among Hispanics, including a large rearrangement Mexican founder mutation (BRCA1 ex9-12del), suggest that an ancestry-informed BRCA-testing strategy could reduce disparities and promote cancer prevention by enabling economical screening for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer in Mexico. Methods In a multistage approach, 188 cancer cases unselected for family cancer history (92 ovarian cancer and 96 breast cancer) were screened for BRCA mutations using a Hispanic mutation panel (HISPANEL®) of 115 recurrent mutations in a multiplex assay (114 on a mass spectroscopy platform, and a PCR assay for the BRCA1 ex9-12del mutation), followed by sequencing of all BRCA exons and adjacent intronic regions, and BRCA1 multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification assay (MLPA) for HISPANEL negative cases. BRCA mutation prevalence was calculated and correlated with histology and tumor receptor status, and HISPANEL sensitivity was estimated. Results BRCA mutations were detected in 28% (26/92) of ovarian cancer cases and 15% (14/96) of breast cancer cases overall and 27% (9/33) of triple negative breast cancer. Most breast cancer cases were diagnosed with locally advanced disease. The Mexican founder mutation (BRCA1 ex9-12del) accounted for 35% of the BRCA-associated ovarian cancer cases and 29% of the BRCA-associated breast cancer cases. At 2% of the sequencing and MLPA cost, the HISPANEL detected 68% of all BRCA mutations. Conclusion In this study, we found a remarkably high prevalence of BRCA mutations among ovarian and breast cases not selected for family history, and BRCA1 ex9-12del explained one third of the total. The remarkable frequency of BRCA1 ex9-12del in Mexico City supports a nearby origin of this Mexican founder mutation and may constitute a regional public health problem. The HISPANEL presents a translational opportunity for cost-effective genetic testing to enable breast and ovarian cancer

  13. Tumor growth inhibition by olaparib in BRCA2 germline-mutated patient-derived ovarian cancer tissue xenografts.

    PubMed

    Kortmann, Ursula; McAlpine, Jessica N; Xue, Hui; Guan, Jun; Ha, Gavin; Tully, Sophie; Shafait, Sharaz; Lau, Alan; Cranston, Aaron N; O'Connor, Mark J; Huntsman, David G; Wang, Yuzhuo; Gilks, C Blake

    2011-02-15

    Most patients with ovarian carcinomas succumb to their disease and there is a critical need for improved therapeutic approaches. Carcinomas arising in BRCA mutation carriers display defective DNA double-strand break repair that can be therapeutically exploited by inhibition of PARP-1, a key enzyme in the repair of DNA single-strand breaks, creating synthetic lethality in tumor cells. To investigate synthetic lethality in vivo, we established a BRCA2 germline-mutated xenograft model that was developed directly from human ovarian cancer tissue, treated with the PARP inhibitor olaparib (AZD2281) alone and in combination with carboplatin. We show that olaparib alone and in combination with carboplatin greatly inhibit growth in BRCA2-mutated ovarian serous carcinoma. This effect was not observed in a serous carcinoma with normal BRCA function, showing a specific antitumor effect of olaparib in mutation carriers. Immunohistochemistry (cleaved caspase-3 and Ki-67 stains) of remnant tissue after olaparib treatment revealed significantly decreased proliferation and increased apoptotic indices in these tumors compared with untreated controls. Furthermore, olaparib-treated tumors showed highly reduced PARP-1 activity that correlated with olaparib levels. We established a BRCA2-mutated human ovarian cancer xenograft model suitable for experimental drug testing. The demonstrated in vivo efficacy of olaparib extends on the preclinical rationale for further clinical trials targeting ovarian cancer patients with BRCA mutations. ©2010 AACR.

  14. Association of Type and Location of BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutations With Risk of Breast and Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Mitra, Nandita; Wan, Fei; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Healey, Sue; McGuffog, Lesley; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Nathanson, Katherine L.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Limited information about the relationship between specific mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 (BRCA1/2) and cancer risk exists. OBJECTIVE To identify mutation-specific cancer risks for carriers of BRCA1/2. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Observational study of women who were ascertained between 1937 and 2011 (median, 1999) and found to carry disease-associated BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations. The international sample comprised 19 581 carriers of BRCA1 mutations and 11 900 carriers of BRCA2 mutations from 55 centers in 33 countries on 6 continents. We estimated hazard ratios for breast and ovarian cancer based on mutation type, function, and nucleotide position. We also estimated RHR, the ratio of breast vs ovarian cancer hazard ratios. A value of RHR greater than 1 indicated elevated breast cancer risk; a value of RHR less than 1 indicated elevated ovarian cancer risk. EXPOSURES Mutations of BRCA1 or BRCA2. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Breast and ovarian cancer risks. RESULTS Among BRCA1 mutation carriers, 9052 women (46%) were diagnosed with breast cancer, 2317 (12%) with ovarian cancer, 1041 (5%) with breast and ovarian cancer, and 7171 (37%) without cancer. Among BRCA2 mutation carriers, 6180 women (52%) were diagnosed with breast cancer, 682 (6%) with ovarian cancer, 272 (2%) with breast and ovarian cancer, and 4766 (40%) without cancer. In BRCA1, we identified 3 breast cancer cluster regions (BCCRs) located at c.179 to c.505 (BCCR1; RHR = 1.46; 95% CI, 1.22–1.74; P = 2 × 10−6), c.4328 to c.4945 (BCCR2; RHR = 1.34; 95% CI, 1.01–1.78; P = .04), and c. 5261 to c.5563 (BCCR23, RHR = 1.38; 95% CI, 1.22–1.55; P = 6 × 10−9). We also identified an ovarian cancer cluster region (OCCR) from c.1380 to c.4062 (approximately exon 11) with RHR = 0.62 (95% CI, 0.56–0.70; P = 9 × 10−17). In BRCA2, we observed multiple BCCRs spanning c.1 to c.596 (BCCR1; RHR = 1.71; 95% CI, 1.06–2.78; P = .03), c.772 to c.1806 (BCCR13; RHR = 1.63; 95% CI, 1.10–2.40; P = .01

  15. Association of type and location of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations with risk of breast and ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Rebbeck, Timothy R; Mitra, Nandita; Wan, Fei; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Healey, Sue; McGuffog, Lesley; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F; Antoniou, Antonis C; Nathanson, Katherine L; Laitman, Yael; Kushnir, Anya; Paluch-Shimon, Shani; Berger, Raanan; Zidan, Jamal; Friedman, Eitan; Ehrencrona, Hans; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Loman, Niklas; Harbst, Katja; Rantala, Johanna; Melin, Beatrice; Huo, Dezheng; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Seldon, Joyce; Ganz, Patricia A; Nussbaum, Robert L; Chan, Salina B; Odunsi, Kunle; Gayther, Simon A; Domchek, Susan M; Arun, Banu K; Lu, Karen H; Mitchell, Gillian; Karlan, Beth Y; Walsh, Christine; Lester, Jenny; Godwin, Andrew K; Pathak, Harsh; Ross, Eric; Daly, Mary B; Whittemore, Alice S; John, Esther M; Miron, Alexander; Terry, Mary Beth; Chung, Wendy K; Goldgar, David E; Buys, Saundra S; Janavicius, Ramunas; Tihomirova, Laima; Tung, Nadine; Dorfling, Cecilia M; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Steele, Linda; Neuhausen, Susan L; Ding, Yuan Chun; Ejlertsen, Bent; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Hansen, Thomas v O; Ramón y Cajal, Teresa; Osorio, Ana; Benitez, Javier; Godino, Javier; Tejada, Maria-Isabel; Duran, Mercedes; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Bobolis, Kristie A; Sand, Sharon R; Fontaine, Annette; Savarese, Antonella; Pasini, Barbara; Peissel, Bernard; Bonanni, Bernardo; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Vignolo-Lutati, Francesca; Scuvera, Giulietta; Giannini, Giuseppe; Bernard, Loris; Genuardi, Maurizio; Radice, Paolo; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Pensotti, Valeria; Gismondi, Viviana; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Fostira, Florentia; Garber, Judy; Torres, Diana; Rashid, Muhammad Usman; Hamann, Ute; Peock, Susan; Frost, Debra; Platte, Radka; Evans, D Gareth; Eeles, Rosalind; Davidson, Rosemarie; Eccles, Diana; Cole, Trevor; Cook, Jackie; Brewer, Carole; Hodgson, Shirley; Morrison, Patrick J; Walker, Lisa; Porteous, Mary E; Kennedy, M John; Izatt, Louise; Adlard, Julian; Donaldson, Alan; Ellis, Steve; Sharma, Priyanka; Schmutzler, Rita Katharina; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Becker, Alexandra; Rhiem, Kerstin; Hahnen, Eric; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Engert, Stefanie; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Plendl, Hans Jörg; Mundhenke, Christoph; Niederacher, Dieter; Fleisch, Markus; Sutter, Christian; Bartram, C R; Dikow, Nicola; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Steinemann, Doris; Kast, Karin; Beer, Marit; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Gehrig, Andrea; Weber, Bernhard H; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Houdayer, Claude; Belotti, Muriel; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Damiola, Francesca; Boutry-Kryza, Nadia; Lasset, Christine; Sobol, Hagay; Peyrat, Jean-Philippe; Muller, Danièle; Fricker, Jean-Pierre; Collonge-Rame, Marie-Agnès; Mortemousque, Isabelle; Nogues, Catherine; Rouleau, Etienne; Isaacs, Claudine; De Paepe, Anne; Poppe, Bruce; Claes, Kathleen; De Leeneer, Kim; Piedmonte, Marion; Rodriguez, Gustavo; Wakely, Katie; Boggess, John; Blank, Stephanie V; Basil, Jack; Azodi, Masoud; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Romero, Atocha; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; van der Hout, Annemarie H; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Verhoef, Senno; Collée, J Margriet; Seynaeve, Caroline; Oosterwijk, Jan C; Gille, Johannes J P; Wijnen, Juul T; Gómez Garcia, Encarna B; Kets, Carolien M; Ausems, Margreet G E M; Aalfs, Cora M; Devilee, Peter; Mensenkamp, Arjen R; Kwong, Ava; Olah, Edith; Papp, Janos; Diez, Orland; Lazaro, Conxi; Darder, Esther; Blanco, Ignacio; Salinas, Mónica; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Gronwald, Jacek; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Huzarski, Tomasz; Byrski, Tomasz; Cybulski, Cezary; Toloczko-Grabarek, Aleksandra; Złowocka-Perłowska, Elżbieta; Menkiszak, Janusz; Arason, Adalgeir; Barkardottir, Rosa B; Simard, Jacques; Laframboise, Rachel; Montagna, Marco; Agata, Simona; Alducci, Elisa; Peixoto, Ana; Teixeira, Manuel R; Spurdle, Amanda B; Lee, Min Hyuk; Park, Sue K; Kim, Sung-Won; Friebel, Tara M; Couch, Fergus J; Lindor, Noralane M; Pankratz, Vernon S; Guidugli, Lucia; Wang, Xianshu; Tischkowitz, Marc; Foretova, Lenka; Vijai, Joseph; Offit, Kenneth; Robson, Mark; Rau-Murthy, Rohini; Kauff, Noah; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Singer, Christian F; Rappaport, Christine; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Pfeiler, Georg; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Berger, Andreas; Greene, Mark H; Mai, Phuong L; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Senter, Leigha; Bojesen, Anders; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Sunde, Lone; Thomassen, Mads; Moeller, Sanne Traasdahl; Kruse, Torben A; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Caligo, Maria Adelaide; Aretini, Paolo; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Selkirk, Christina G; Hulick, Peter J; Andrulis, Irene

    2015-04-07

    Limited information about the relationship between specific mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 (BRCA1/2) and cancer risk exists. To identify mutation-specific cancer risks for carriers of BRCA1/2. Observational study of women who were ascertained between 1937 and 2011 (median, 1999) and found to carry disease-associated BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations. The international sample comprised 19,581 carriers of BRCA1 mutations and 11,900 carriers of BRCA2 mutations from 55 centers in 33 countries on 6 continents. We estimated hazard ratios for breast and ovarian cancer based on mutation type, function, and nucleotide position. We also estimated RHR, the ratio of breast vs ovarian cancer hazard ratios. A value of RHR greater than 1 indicated elevated breast cancer risk; a value of RHR less than 1 indicated elevated ovarian cancer risk. Mutations of BRCA1 or BRCA2. Breast and ovarian cancer risks. Among BRCA1 mutation carriers, 9052 women (46%) were diagnosed with breast cancer, 2317 (12%) with ovarian cancer, 1041 (5%) with breast and ovarian cancer, and 7171 (37%) without cancer. Among BRCA2 mutation carriers, 6180 women (52%) were diagnosed with breast cancer, 682 (6%) with ovarian cancer, 272 (2%) with breast and ovarian cancer, and 4766 (40%) without cancer. In BRCA1, we identified 3 breast cancer cluster regions (BCCRs) located at c.179 to c.505 (BCCR1; RHR = 1.46; 95% CI, 1.22-1.74; P = 2 × 10(-6)), c.4328 to c.4945 (BCCR2; RHR = 1.34; 95% CI, 1.01-1.78; P = .04), and c. 5261 to c.5563 (BCCR2', RHR = 1.38; 95% CI, 1.22-1.55; P = 6 × 10(-9)). We also identified an ovarian cancer cluster region (OCCR) from c.1380 to c.4062 (approximately exon 11) with RHR = 0.62 (95% CI, 0.56-0.70; P = 9 × 10(-17)). In BRCA2, we observed multiple BCCRs spanning c.1 to c.596 (BCCR1; RHR = 1.71; 95% CI, 1.06-2.78; P = .03), c.772 to c.1806 (BCCR1'; RHR = 1.63; 95% CI, 1.10-2.40; P = .01), and c.7394 to c.8904 (BCCR2; RHR = 2.31; 95

  16. Cost of genetic counseling and testing for BRCA1 and BRCA2 breast cancer susceptibility mutations.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, W F; Peshkin, B N; Liang, W; Isaacs, C; Lerman, C; Mandelblatt, J S

    2001-05-01

    Counseling and predictive testing are now available for the recently isolated BRCA1 and BRCA2 breast cancer susceptibility genes. We examined the societal costs of providing this counseling and testing to women at risk of having a breast cancer susceptibility mutation. Genetic counselors in a research program prospectively monitored the time necessary to provide counseling and results disclosure. A time-motion study was used to determine time spent on phone calls, preparation, and documentation for counseling. Study participants were surveyed to determine travel time and need for dependent care during counseling. The test cost was calculated using the charge for full BRCA1/2 gene sequencing (Myriad Genetics, Inc.) multiplied by a Medicare-based cost-to-charge ratio. Counselors spent an average of 4.2 h providing genetic counseling for women at risk of having a susceptibility mutation. Genetic counseling without testing cost on average $213, whereas counseling, testing, and disclosure of results totaled $2057. A brief physician-based counseling instead of genetic counselor-based counseling would produce only small reductions in total costs. Providing counseling and testing to the study population averaged $8034 per mutation found. The cost of testing and counseling exceeded $2000. The counseling portion of the cost comprised only 16% of the total cost, with the remainder representing costs associated with testing; thus, alternatives to full genetic counseling that shorten counseling time are unlikely to have a large impact on the overall cost of counseling and testing. The cost of detecting a mutation within a population of women is highly dependent on the prevalence of the mutation in the population.

  17. Predictors of cognitive appraisals following genetic testing for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations.

    PubMed

    Halbert, Chanita Hughes; Schwartz, Marc D; Wenzel, Lari; Narod, Steven; Peshkin, Beth N; Cella, David; Lerman, Caryn

    2004-08-01

    The objectives of this study were (1) to describe perceptions of stress and confidence following genetic testing for BRCA1 and BRCA2 (BRCA1/2) mutations and (2) to identify predictors of these processes. Participants were 130 high-risk women affected with cancer who received BRCA1/2 test results. Individual difference characteristics and interpersonal factors were measured by self-report before genetic counseling and perceptions of stress and confidence were evaluated by self-report 1 month following disclosure of test results. BRCA1/2 test results had a significant effect only on perceptions of stress (beta = 0.38, p = 0.0001), while trait anxiety had a significant effect on both perceptions of stress (beta = 0.44, p = 0.0001) and confidence (beta = -0.41, p = 0.001). These results suggest that interventions designed to address perceptions of stress related to medical decision-making and familial concerns may need to be targeted to BRCA1/2 mutation carriers and individuals who are highly anxious.

  18. The prevalence of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations among young Mexican women with triple-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Villarreal-Garza, C.; Weitzel, J. N.; Llacuachaqui, M.; Sifuentes, E.; Magallanes-Hoyos, M. C.; Gallardo, L.; Alvarez-Gómez, R. M.; Herzog, J.; Castillo, D.; Royer, R.; Akbari, Mohammad; Lara-Medina, F.; Herrera, L. A.; Mohar, A.

    2015-01-01

    Various guidelines recommend that women with triple-negative breast cancer should be tested for BRCA1 mutations, but the prevalence of mutations may vary with ethnic group and with geographic region, and the optimal cutoff age for testing has not been established. We estimated the frequencies of BRCA1 and BRCA2 (BRCA) mutations among 190 women with triple-negative breast cancer, unselected for family history, diagnosed at age 50 or less at a single hospital in Mexico City. Patients were screened for 115 recurrent BRCA mutations, which have been reported previously in women of Hispanic origin, including a common large rearrangement Mexican founder mutation (BRCA1 ex9-12del). A BRCA mutation was detected in 44 of 190 patients with triple-negative breast cancer (23 %). Forty-three mutations were found in BRCA1 and one mutation was found in BRCA2. Seven different mutations accounted for 39 patients (89 % of the total mutations). The Mexican founder mutation (BRCA1 ex9-12del) was found 18 times and accounted for 41 % of all mutations detected. There is a high prevalence of BRCA1 mutations among young triple-negative breast cancer patients in Mexico. Women with triple-negative breast cancer in Mexico should be screened for mutations in BRCA1. PMID:25716084

  19. The prevalence of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations among young Mexican women with triple-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Villarreal-Garza, C; Weitzel, J N; Llacuachaqui, M; Sifuentes, E; Magallanes-Hoyos, M C; Gallardo, L; Alvarez-Gómez, R M; Herzog, J; Castillo, D; Royer, R; Akbari, Mohammad; Lara-Medina, F; Herrera, L A; Mohar, A; Narod, S A

    2015-04-01

    Various guidelines recommend that women with triple-negative breast cancer should be tested for BRCA1 mutations, but the prevalence of mutations may vary with ethnic group and with geographic region, and the optimal cutoff age for testing has not been established. We estimated the frequencies of BRCA1 and BRCA2 (BRCA) mutations among 190 women with triple-negative breast cancer, unselected for family history, diagnosed at age 50 or less at a single hospital in Mexico City. Patients were screened for 115 recurrent BRCA mutations, which have been reported previously in women of Hispanic origin, including a common large rearrangement Mexican founder mutation (BRCA1 ex9-12del). A BRCA mutation was detected in 44 of 190 patients with triple-negative breast cancer (23 %). Forty-three mutations were found in BRCA1 and one mutation was found in BRCA2. Seven different mutations accounted for 39 patients (89 % of the total mutations). The Mexican founder mutation (BRCA1 ex9-12del) was found 18 times and accounted for 41 % of all mutations detected. There is a high prevalence of BRCA1 mutations among young triple-negative breast cancer patients in Mexico. Women with triple-negative breast cancer in Mexico should be screened for mutations in BRCA1.

  20. BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene testing

    MedlinePlus

    ... east ca ncer. What is the BRCA Gene Mutation? BRCA1 and BRCA2 are genes that suppress malignant ... should. So people with BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutations are at a higher risk of getting cancer. ...

  1. BRCA1 and BRCA2 germ-line mutations and oral contraceptives: to use or not to use.

    PubMed

    Grenader, Tal; Peretz, Tamar; Lifchitz, Meyer; Shavit, Linda

    2005-08-01

    Approximately 10% of the cases of breast cancer and invasive ovarian cancer are hereditary, occurring predominantly in women with germ-line mutations in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene. In deciding whether women with germ-line mutations in the BRCA1 gene should use oral contraceptives a possible increase in the risk of breast cancer needs to be weighed against the convenience of this means of birth control and its potential to reduce the risk of ovarian cancer. In women with BRCA2 mutations, oral contraceptive use has not been associated with an increased risk of breast cancer and does have the potential to reduce the risk of ovarian cancer. Prophylactic surgical options and intensified surveillance should, of course, be discussed with these patients.

  2. The KL-VS sequence variant of Klotho and cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    PubMed Central

    Laitman, Yael; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Rantala, Johanna; Hogervorst, Frans; Peock, Susan; Godwin, Andrew K.; Arason, Adalgeir; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Offit, Kenneth; Isaacs, Claudine; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Nevanlinna, Heli; Chen, Xiaoqing; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Healey, Sue; Couch, Fergus; Peterlongo, Paolo; Radice, Paolo; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Caligo, Maria Adelaide; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Ganz, Patricia; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; McGuffog, Lesley; Easton, Douglas F.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Wolf, Ido

    2012-01-01

    Klotho (KL) is a putative tumor suppressor gene in breast and pancreatic cancers located at chromosome 13q12. A functional sequence variant of Klotho (KL-VS) was previously reported to modify breast cancer risk in Jewish BRCA1 mutation carriers. The effect of this variant on breast and ovarian cancer risks in non-Jewish BRCA1/BRCA2 mutation carriers has not been reported. The KL-VS variant was genotyped in women of European ancestry carrying a BRCA mutation: 5,741 BRCA1 mutation carriers (2,997 with breast cancer, 705 with ovarian cancer, and 2,039 cancer free women) and 3,339 BRCA2 mutation carriers (1,846 with breast cancer, 207 with ovarian cancer, and 1,286 cancer free women) from 16 centers. Genotyping was accomplished using TaqMan® allelic discrimination or matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Data were analyzed within a retrospective cohort approach, stratified by country of origin and Ashkenazi Jewish origin. The per-allele hazard ratio (HR) for breast cancer was 1.02 (95% CI 0.93–1.12, P = 0.66) for BRCA1 mutation carriers and 0.92 (95% CI 0.82–1.04, P = 0.17) for BRCA2 mutation carriers. Results remained unaltered when analysis excluded prevalent breast cancer cases. Similarly, the per-allele HR for ovarian cancer was 1.01 (95% CI 0.84–1.20, P = 0.95) for BRCA1 mutation carriers and 0.9 (95% CI 0.66–1.22, P = 0.45) for BRCA2 mutation carriers. The risk did not change when carriers of the 6174delT mutation were excluded. There was a lack of association of the KL-VS Klotho variant with either breast or ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. PMID:22212556

  3. High incidence of loss of heterozygosity at chromosome 17p13 in breast tumours from BRCA2 mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Eiriksdottir, G; Barkardottir, R B; Agnarsson, B A; Johannesdottir, G; Olafsdottir, K; Egilsson, V; Ingvarsson, S

    1998-01-08

    Breast tumours from BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers are genetically instable and display specific patterns of chromosomal aberrations, suggestive of distinct genetic pathways in tumour progression. The frequency of abnormalities affecting chromosome 17p and the TP53 gene was determined in 27 breast tumours from 26 female patients carrying the Icelandic BRCA2 founder mutation (999del5). Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) was detected in 23 of the 27 tumours (85%). The majority of tumours manifesting LOH had lost a large region on 17p, although a more restricted loss, including the TP53 locus was seen in a few tumours. Positive p53 immunostaining was observed in 18 of 26 tumours (69%). However, mutations in the TP53 gene were detected in only three tumours (11%), including a missense (codon 139) and a nonsense mutation (codon 306) in two tumours with moderate p53 expression and a frameshift deletion (codon 182) in a tumour with no detectable p53 expression. Positive p53 immunostaining, mainly weak, was observed in 16 of the 24 tumours (66%) without TP53 mutation. The high frequency of LOH at chromosome 17p13 suggests that one or more genes from this region are involved in the development of BRCA2-induced breast cancer. The frequent finding of weak overexpression of, presumably wild type p53 protein, suggests an alternative mechanism of TP53 involvement specific to these tumours.

  4. Evaluation of Polygenic Risk Scores for Breast and Ovarian Cancer Risk Prediction in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; McGuffog, Lesley; Barrowdale, Daniel; Lee, Andrew; Soucy, Penny; Healey, Sue; Dennis, Joe; Lush, Michael; Robson, Mark; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Ramus, Susan J.; Mavaddat, Nasim; Terry, Mary Beth; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Hamann, Ute; Southey, Melissa; John, Esther M.; Chung, Wendy K.; Daly, Mary B.; Buys, Saundra S.; Goldgar, David E.; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Ejlertsen, Bent; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Slager, Susan; Hallberg, Emily; Benitez, Javier; Osorio, Ana; Cohen, Nancy; Lawler, William; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Peterlongo, Paolo; Pensotti, Valeria; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Barile, Monica; Bonanni, Bernardo; Azzollini, Jacopo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Radice, Paolo; Savarese, Antonella; Papi, Laura; Giannini, Giuseppe; Fostira, Florentia; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Adlard, Julian; Brewer, Carole; Cook, Jackie; Davidson, Rosemarie; Eccles, Diana; Eeles, Ros; Ellis, Steve; Frost, Debra; Hodgson, Shirley; Izatt, Louise; Lalloo, Fiona; Ong, Kai-ren; Godwin, Andrew K.; Arnold, Norbert; Dworniczak, Bernd; Engel, Christoph; Gehrig, Andrea; Hahnen, Eric; Hauke, Jan; Kast, Karin; Meindl, Alfons; Niederacher, Dieter; Schmutzler, Rita Katharina; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Barjhoux, Laure; Collonge-Rame, Marie-Agnès; Elan, Camille; Golmard, Lisa; Barouk-Simonet, Emmanuelle; Lesueur, Fabienne; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Sokolowska, Joanna; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Isaacs, Claudine; Claes, Kathleen B. M.; Poppe, Bruce; de la Hoya, Miguel; Garcia-Barberan, Vanesa; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Nevanlinna, Heli; Ausems, Margreet G. E. M.; de Lange, J. L.; Gómez Garcia, Encarna B.; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Kets, Carolien M.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; Oosterwijk, Jan C.; Rookus, Matti A.; van Asperen, Christi J.; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; van Doorn, Helena C.; van Os, Theo A. M.; Kwong, Ava; Olah, Edith; Diez, Orland; Brunet, Joan; Lazaro, Conxi; Teulé, Alex; Gronwald, Jacek; Jakubowska, Anna; Kaczmarek, Katarzyna; Lubinski, Jan; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Barkardottir, Rosa B.; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Agata, Simona; Montagna, Marco; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Park, Sue Kyung; Olswold, Curtis; Tischkowitz, Marc; Foretova, Lenka; Gaddam, Pragna; Vijai, Joseph; Pfeiler, Georg; Rappaport-Fuerhauser, Christine; Singer, Christian F.; Tea, Muy-Kheng M.; Greene, Mark H.; Loud, Jennifer T.; Rennert, Gad; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Hulick, Peter J.; Hays, John L.; Piedmonte, Marion; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Martyn, Julie; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Andrulis, Irene L.; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Kruse, Torben A.; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Thomassen, Mads; Caligo, Maria A.; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Berger, Raanan; Friedman, Eitan; Laitman, Yael; Arver, Brita; Borg, Ake; Ehrencrona, Hans; Rantala, Johanna; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Ganz, Patricia A.; Nussbaum, Robert L.; Bradbury, Angela R.; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Arun, Banu K.; James, Paul; Karlan, Beth Y.; Lester, Jenny; Simard, Jacques; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Offit, Kenneth; Couch, Fergus J.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 94 common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with breast cancer (BC) risk and 18 associated with ovarian cancer (OC) risk. Several of these are also associated with risk of BC or OC for women who carry a pathogenic mutation in the high-risk BC and OC genes BRCA1 or BRCA2. The combined effects of these variants on BC or OC risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers have not yet been assessed while their clinical management could benefit from improved personalized risk estimates. Methods: We constructed polygenic risk scores (PRS) using BC and OC susceptibility SNPs identified through population-based GWAS: for BC (overall, estrogen receptor [ER]–positive, and ER-negative) and for OC. Using data from 15 252 female BRCA1 and 8211 BRCA2 carriers, the association of each PRS with BC or OC risk was evaluated using a weighted cohort approach, with time to diagnosis as the outcome and estimation of the hazard ratios (HRs) per standard deviation increase in the PRS. Results: The PRS for ER-negative BC displayed the strongest association with BC risk in BRCA1 carriers (HR = 1.27, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.23 to 1.31, P = 8.2×10−53). In BRCA2 carriers, the strongest association with BC risk was seen for the overall BC PRS (HR = 1.22, 95% CI = 1.17 to 1.28, P = 7.2×10−20). The OC PRS was strongly associated with OC risk for both BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers. These translate to differences in absolute risks (more than 10% in each case) between the top and bottom deciles of the PRS distribution; for example, the OC risk was 6% by age 80 years for BRCA2 carriers at the 10th percentile of the OC PRS compared with 19% risk for those at the 90th percentile of PRS. Conclusions: BC and OC PRS are predictive of cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers. Incorporation of the PRS into risk prediction models has promise to better inform decisions on cancer risk management. PMID

  5. Rapid and cost-effective high-throughput sequencing for identification of germline mutations of BRCA1 and BRCA2.

    PubMed

    Ahmadloo, Somayeh; Nakaoka, Hirofumi; Hayano, Takahide; Hosomichi, Kazuyoshi; You, Hua; Utsuno, Emi; Sangai, Takafumi; Nishimura, Motoi; Matsushita, Kazuyuki; Hata, Akira; Nomura, Fumio; Inoue, Ituro

    2017-02-09

    Genetic testing for breast cancer predisposing genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2, can take advantage for early identification of carriers with pathogenic germline mutations. However, conventional approaches based on Sanger sequencing are laborious and expensive. Next-generation sequencing technology has a great impact on investigation of medical genomics and now applied clinical genetics. We provide a protocol based on a pool and capture method followed by high-throughput sequencing, which realizes a rapid, high-quality, high-accuracy and low-cost testing for mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 by using small amounts of input DNA. Custom capture probes were designed for 195 kb regions encompassing the entire BRCA1 and BRCA2. DNA libraries of 96 samples with distinct indices were pooled before hybridizing to the capture probes, which largely reduced labor and cost. The captured library was run on the Illumina MiSeq sequencer. We applied the method to 384 Japanese individuals including 11 patients with breast cancer whose mutation statuses had been determined by standard clinical testing and 373 individuals from a general population. 99.99% of coding exons and their 20 bp flanking regions were covered with a minimum of 20 reads and the average depth was 179.5, supporting confident variant detection. The sequencing method rendered concordant results for 11 patients with breast cancer compared with the standard clinical testing including nine mutations in eight patients. Among 373 individuals from the general population, novel stop gain and frameshift deletion in BRCA2 were identified, which led to truncated protein and were most likely to be pathogenic. The result suggests the importance of a large-scale population-wide screening for carriers of mutations in these genes.Journal of Human Genetics advance online publication, 9 February 2017; doi:10.1038/jhg.2017.5.

  6. [Relationship of clinicopathological features and chemotherapeutic outcomes in women with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation-negative familial breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Sun, J; Ouyang, T; Li, J F; Wang, T F; Fan, Z Q; Fan, T; Lin, B Y; Xie, Y T

    2016-03-23

    To explore the relationship of clinicopathological features and response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in women with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation-negative familial breast cancer. A total of 6 200 women with breast cancer were treated at our hospital from October 2003 to December 2012. All subjects underwent genetic testing for BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. Patients with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations were excluded. This cohort of 5 842 patients with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation-negative breast cancer was classified as two groups: familial breast cancer patients (n=480) and sporadic breast cancer patients (n=5 362). The clinicalpathological data and response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy of the 480 patients with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation-negative familial breast cancer and the 5 362 patients with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation-negative sporadic breast cancer were compared retrospectively. Then the influencing factors of response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy were analyzed. Among the BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation-negative breast cancer patients, 4.4% of the patients were diagnosed before 30 years of age in the familial breast cancer group, significantly higher than that of 2.6% in the sporadic breast cancer group(P=0.020). 5.0% of the patients in the familial breast cancer group had bilateral breast cancer, significantly higher than that of 2.7% in the sporadic breast cancer group (P=0.004). Compared with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation-negative sporadic breast cancer patients, the relative risk of early-onset breast cancer (≤ 30 years) and bilateral breast cancer were 1.73 and 1.91, respectively, significantly higher than that in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation-negative familial breast cancer cases (P=0.020 and P=0.004). 2 964 patients in this cohort of 5 842 case sreceived neoadjuvant chemotherapy.The pathologic complete response (pCR) rate was significantly higher in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation-negative familial breast cancer group than in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation-negative sporadic breast cancer group

  7. Inheritance of deleterious mutations at both BRCA1 and BRCA2 in an international sample of 32,295 women.

    PubMed

    Rebbeck, Timothy R; Friebel, Tara M; Mitra, Nandita; Wan, Fei; Chen, Stephanie; Andrulis, Irene L; Apostolou, Paraskevi; Arnold, Norbert; Arun, Banu K; Barrowdale, Daniel; Benitez, Javier; Berger, Raanan; Berthet, Pascaline; Borg, Ake; Buys, Saundra S; Caldes, Trinidad; Carter, Jonathan; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Claes, Kathleen B M; Couch, Fergus J; Cybulski, Cezary; Daly, Mary B; de la Hoya, Miguel; Diez, Orland; Domchek, Susan M; Nathanson, Katherine L; Durda, Katarzyna; Ellis, Steve; Evans, D Gareth; Foretova, Lenka; Friedman, Eitan; Frost, Debra; Ganz, Patricia A; Garber, Judy; Glendon, Gord; Godwin, Andrew K; Greene, Mark H; Gronwald, Jacek; Hahnen, Eric; Hallberg, Emily; Hamann, Ute; Hansen, Thomas V O; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Isaacs, Claudine; Jakubowska, Anna; Janavicius, Ramunas; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; John, Esther M; Karlan, Beth Y; Kaufman, Bella; Investigators, KConFab; Kwong, Ava; Laitman, Yael; Lasset, Christine; Lazaro, Conxi; Lester, Jenny; Loman, Niklas; Lubinski, Jan; Manoukian, Siranoush; Mitchell, Gillian; Montagna, Marco; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Niederacher, Dieter; Nussbaum, Robert L; Offit, Kenneth; Olah, Edith; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Park, Sue Kyung; Piedmonte, Marion; Radice, Paolo; Rappaport-Fuerhauser, Christine; Rookus, Matti A; Seynaeve, Caroline; Simard, Jacques; Singer, Christian F; Soucy, Penny; Southey, Melissa; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Szabo, Csilla I; Tancredi, Mariella; Teixeira, Manuel R; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Mary Beth; Thomassen, Mads; Tihomirova, Laima; Tischkowitz, Marc; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Toloczko-Grabarek, Aleksandra; Tung, Nadine; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Villano, Danylo; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Zidan, Jamal; Zorn, Kristin K; McGuffog, Lesley; Easton, Douglas; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C; Ramus, Susan J

    2016-11-11

    Most BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers have inherited a single (heterozygous) mutation. Transheterozygotes (TH) who have inherited deleterious mutations in both BRCA1 and BRCA2 are rare, and the consequences of transheterozygosity are poorly understood. From 32,295 female BRCA1/2 mutation carriers, we identified 93 TH (0.3 %). "Cases" were defined as TH, and "controls" were single mutations at BRCA1 (SH1) or BRCA2 (SH2). Matched SH1 "controls" carried a BRCA1 mutation found in the TH "case". Matched SH2 "controls" carried a BRCA2 mutation found in the TH "case". After matching the TH carriers with SH1 or SH2, 91 TH were matched to 9316 SH1, and 89 TH were matched to 3370 SH2. The majority of TH (45.2 %) involved the three common Jewish mutations. TH were more likely than SH1 and SH2 women to have been ever diagnosed with breast cancer (BC; p = 0.002). TH were more likely to be diagnosed with ovarian cancer (OC) than SH2 (p = 0.017), but not SH1. Age at BC diagnosis was the same in TH vs. SH1 (p = 0.231), but was on average 4.5 years younger in TH than in SH2 (p < 0.001). BC in TH was more likely to be estrogen receptor (ER) positive (p = 0.010) or progesterone receptor (PR) positive (p = 0.013) than in SH1, but less likely to be ER positive (p < 0.001) or PR positive (p = 0.012) than SH2. Among 15 tumors from TH patients, there was no clear pattern of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) for BRCA1 or BRCA2 in either BC or OC. Our observations suggest that clinical TH phenotypes resemble SH1. However, TH breast tumor marker characteristics are phenotypically intermediate to SH1 and SH2.

  8. Recurrent mutation testing of BRCA1 and BRCA2 in Asian breast cancer patients identify carriers in those with presumed low risk by family history.

    PubMed

    Kang, Peter Choon Eng; Phuah, Sze Yee; Sivanandan, Kavitta; Kang, In Nee; Thirthagiri, Eswary; Liu, Jian Jun; Hassan, Norhashimah; Yoon, Sook-Yee; Thong, Meow Keong; Hui, Miao; Hartman, Mikael; Yip, Cheng Har; Mohd Taib, Nur Aishah; Teo, Soo Hwang

    2014-04-01

    Although the breast cancer predisposition genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 were discovered more than 20 years ago, there remains a gap in the availability of genetic counselling and genetic testing in Asian countries because of cost, access and inaccurate reporting of family history of cancer. In order to improve access to testing, we developed a rapid test for recurrent mutations in our Asian populations. In this study, we designed a genotyping assay with 55 BRCA1 and 44 BRCA2 mutations previously identified in Asian studies, and validated this assay in 267 individuals who had previously been tested by full sequencing. We tested the prevalence of these mutations in additional breast cancer cases. Using this genotyping approach, we analysed recurrent mutations in 533 Malaysian breast cancer cases with <10 % a priori risk, and found 1 BRCA1 (0.2 %) and 5 BRCA2 (0.9 %) carriers. Testing in a hospital-based unselected cohort of 532 Singaporean breast cancer cases revealed 6 BRCA1 (1.1 %) and 3 BRCA2 (0.6 %) carriers. Overall, 2 recurrent BRCA1 and 1 BRCA2 mutations in Malays, 3 BRCA1 and 2 BRCA2 mutations in Chinese and 1 BRCA1 mutation in Indians account for 60, 24 and 20 % of carrier families, respectively. By contrast, haplotype analyses suggest that a recurrent BRCA2 mutation (c.262_263delCT) found in 5 unrelated Malay families has at least 3 distinct haplotypes. Taken together, our data suggests that panel testing may help to identify carriers, particularly Asian BRCA2 carriers, who do not present with a priori strong family history characteristics.

  9. Parental origin of mutation and the risk of breast cancer in a prospective study of women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation.

    PubMed

    Senst, N; Llacuachaqui, M; Lubinski, J; Lynch, H; Armel, S; Neuhausen, S; Ghadirian, P; Sun, P; Narod, S A

    2013-07-01

    The objective is to estimate the risk of breast cancer in women who carry a deleterious BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation, according to parental origin of mutation. We conducted a cohort study of women with a BRCA1 mutation (n = 1523) or BRCA2 mutation (n = 369) who had not been diagnosed with breast or ovarian cancer. For each woman, the pedigree was reviewed and the origin of the mutation was assigned as probable paternal or maternal. The hazard ratio (HR) for developing breast cancer in the follow-up period was estimated for women with a paternal mutation compared to a maternal mutation. The risk of breast cancer was modestly higher in women with a paternal BRCA1 mutation compared to women with a maternal BRCA1 mutation (HR = 1.46; 95% CI = 0.99-2.16) but the difference was not significant (p = 0.06). The parental mutation origin did not affect the risk in women with a BRCA2 mutation. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that there is an increased risk of breast cancer among women with a paternally inherited BRCA1 mutation compared to a maternally inherited mutation. However, the data are not sufficiently compelling to justify different screening recommendations for the two subgroups.

  10. Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Pancreas in a Patient with Germline BRCA2 Mutation-Response to Neoadjuvant Radiochemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Schultheis, Anne M.; Nguyen, Gia Phuong; Ortmann, Monika; Kruis, Wolfgang; Büttner, Reinhard; Schildhaus, Hans-Ulrich; Markiefka, Birgid

    2014-01-01

    Primary squamous cell carcinoma of the pancreas is a rare malignant neoplasia, accounting for approximately 0.5–2% of all malignant pancreatic tumors. These lesions are characterized by poor prognosis. Here we report on a case of a 57-year-old female patient with known BRCA2 germline mutation presenting with primary squamous cell carcinoma of the pancreas as the only malignancy. The tumor was locally advanced at the first presentation but responded almost completely to neoadjuvant radio-chemotherapy. Our case highlights the facts (i) that pancreatic carcinomas belong to the tumor spectrum of patients with the BRCA2-associated hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome (HBOC) and (ii) that tumors of the pancreas can represent the first or even the only manifestation of HBOC. Furthermore, this case of a nonkeratinizing squamous cell carcinoma indicates that HBOC-associated carcinomas of the pancreas might be characterized by a broader morphological spectrum than was previously thought. Since BRCA mutations cause deficiency of DNA double-strand breakage repair in tumors, neoadjuvant treatment regimens might become a reasonable option in HBOC-associated pancreatic carcinomas. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a primary pancreatic squamous cell carcinoma in a patient with this particular genetic background of BRCA2-associated HBOC. PMID:24959366

  11. BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in Japanese patients with ovarian, fallopian tube, and primary peritoneal cancer.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Ikuko; Hirotsu, Yosuke; Nakagomi, Hiroshi; Ouchi, Hidetaka; Ikegami, Atsushi; Teramoto, Katsuhiro; Amemiya, Kenji; Mochizuki, Hitoshi; Omata, Masao

    2016-01-01

    The contribution of BRCA1 and BRCA2 to ovarian cancer in Japanese patients is still unclear. This study investigated the frequency of germline mutations in BRCA1/2 in Japanese patients with ovarian, peritoneal, or fallopian tube cancer, regardless of their family histories, which were suggestive of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer. Ninety-five unselected women with ovarian cancer who were seen from 2013 to 2015 at Yamanashi Prefectural Central Hospital were enrolled. Analyses of BRCA1/2 gene mutations were performed with next-generation sequencing. Twelve of the 95 patients (12.6%), including 5 in the BRCA1 (5.3%) and 7 in the BRCA2 (7.4%), had deleterious mutations. Among the 36 cases with a family history, 6 (16.7%) were found to carry mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2. Notably, 6 of the 59 cases (10.2%) without a family history also had BRCA1/2 germline mutations. There was no statistical difference between the 2 groups (P = .36). The presence of mutations and their clinical relevance were studied. Mutation carriers were diagnosed at advanced stages (100% of positive cases among stage III or IV cases) and had poor prognostic histological subtypes (100% of positive cases had high-grade serous adenocarcinomas). In this unselected Japanese population, approximately 13% of the cases with ovarian cancer appeared to be associated with an inherited risk, regardless of a family history. This finding indicates that BRCA1/2 genetic testing should be performed for all patients with ovarian cancers. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  12. BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Testing in Young Women With Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Shoshana M; Ruddy, Kathryn J; Tamimi, Rulla M; Gelber, Shari; Schapira, Lidia; Come, Steven; Borges, Virginia F; Larsen, Bryce; Garber, Judy E; Partridge, Ann H

    2016-06-01

    these women, 76 (86.4%) of 88 mutation carriers and 82 (51.2%) of 160 noncarriers chose bilateral mastectomy (P < .001). Fewer women reported that systemic treatment decisions were influenced by genetic risk concern. Rates of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation testing are increasing in young women with breast cancer. Given that knowledge and concern about genetic risk influence surgical decisions and may affect systemic therapy trial eligibility, all young women with breast cancer should be counseled and offered genetic testing, consistent with the National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines.

  13. Pathology of breast and ovarian cancers among BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers: results from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA).

    PubMed

    Mavaddat, Nasim; Barrowdale, Daniel; Andrulis, Irene L; Domchek, Susan M; Eccles, Diana; Nevanlinna, Heli; Ramus, Susan J; Spurdle, Amanda; Robson, Mark; Sherman, Mark; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Couch, Fergus J; Engel, Christoph; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Southey, Melissa C; Terry, Mary Beth; Goldgar, David; O'Malley, Frances; John, Esther M; Janavicius, Ramunas; Tihomirova, Laima; Hansen, Thomas V O; Nielsen, Finn C; Osorio, Ana; Stavropoulou, Alexandra; Benítez, Javier; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Barile, Monica; Volorio, Sara; Pasini, Barbara; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Putignano, Anna Laura; Ottini, Laura; Radice, Paolo; Hamann, Ute; Rashid, Muhammad U; Hogervorst, Frans B; Kriege, Mieke; van der Luijt, Rob B; Peock, Susan; Frost, Debra; Evans, D Gareth; Brewer, Carole; Walker, Lisa; Rogers, Mark T; Side, Lucy E; Houghton, Catherine; Weaver, JoEllen; Godwin, Andrew K; Schmutzler, Rita K; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Meindl, Alfons; Kast, Karin; Arnold, Norbert; Niederacher, Dieter; Sutter, Christian; Deissler, Helmut; Gadzicki, Doroteha; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Schönbuchner, Ines; Gevensleben, Heidrun; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Belotti, Muriel; Barjhoux, Laure; Isaacs, Claudine; Peshkin, Beth N; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Cañadas, Carmen; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Heikkilä, Päivi; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blanco, Ignacio; Lazaro, Conxi; Brunet, Joan; Agnarsson, Bjarni A; Arason, Adalgeir; Barkardottir, Rosa B; Dumont, Martine; Simard, Jacques; Montagna, Marco; Agata, Simona; D'Andrea, Emma; Yan, Max; Fox, Stephen; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Rubinstein, Wendy; Tung, Nadine; Garber, Judy E; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary; Pankratz, Vernon S; Lindor, Noralane M; Szabo, Csilla; Offit, Kenneth; Sakr, Rita; Gaudet, Mia M; Singer, Christian F; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Rappaport, Christine; Mai, Phuong L; Greene, Mark H; Sokolenko, Anna; Imyanitov, Evgeny; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Senter, Leigha; Sweet, Kevin; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Kruse, Torben; Caligo, Maria; Aretini, Paolo; Rantala, Johanna; von Wachenfeld, Anna; Henriksson, Karin; Steele, Linda; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nussbaum, Robert; Beattie, Mary; Odunsi, Kunle; Sucheston, Lara; Gayther, Simon A; Nathanson, Kate; Gross, Jenny; Walsh, Christine; Karlan, Beth; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F; Antoniou, Antonis C

    2012-01-01

    Previously, small studies have found that BRCA1 and BRCA2 breast tumors differ in their pathology. Analysis of larger datasets of mutation carriers should allow further tumor characterization. We used data from 4,325 BRCA1 and 2,568 BRCA2 mutation carriers to analyze the pathology of invasive breast, ovarian, and contralateral breast cancers. There was strong evidence that the proportion of estrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast tumors decreased with age at diagnosis among BRCA1 (P-trend = 1.2 × 10(-5)), but increased with age at diagnosis among BRCA2, carriers (P-trend = 6.8 × 10(-6)). The proportion of triple-negative tumors decreased with age at diagnosis in BRCA1 carriers but increased with age at diagnosis of BRCA2 carriers. In both BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers, ER-negative tumors were of higher histologic grade than ER-positive tumors (grade 3 vs. grade 1; P = 1.2 × 10(-13) for BRCA1 and P = 0.001 for BRCA2). ER and progesterone receptor (PR) expression were independently associated with mutation carrier status [ER-positive odds ratio (OR) for BRCA2 = 9.4, 95% CI: 7.0-12.6 and PR-positive OR = 1.7, 95% CI: 1.3-2.3, under joint analysis]. Lobular tumors were more likely to be BRCA2-related (OR for BRCA2 = 3.3, 95% CI: 2.4-4.4; P = 4.4 × 10(-14)), and medullary tumors BRCA1-related (OR for BRCA2 = 0.25, 95% CI: 0.18-0.35; P = 2.3 × 10(-15)). ER-status of the first breast cancer was predictive of ER-status of asynchronous contralateral breast cancer (P = 0.0004 for BRCA1; P = 0.002 for BRCA2). There were no significant differences in ovarian cancer morphology between BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers (serous: 67%; mucinous: 1%; endometrioid: 12%; clear-cell: 2%). CONCLUSIONS/IMPACT: Pathologic characteristics of BRCA1 and BRCA2 tumors may be useful for improving risk-prediction algorithms and informing clinical strategies for screening and prophylaxis.

  14. Pathology of breast and ovarian cancers among BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers: results from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA)

    PubMed Central

    Mavaddat, Nasim; Barrowdale, Daniel; Andrulis, Irene L.; Domchek, Susan M.; Eccles, Diana; Nevanlinna, Heli; Ramus, Susan J.; Spurdle, Amanda; Robson, Mark; Sherman, Mark; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Couch, Fergus J.; Engel, Christoph; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Southey, Melissa C.; Terry, Mary Beth; Goldgar, David; O’Malley, Frances; John, Esther M.; Janavicius, Ramunas; Tihomirova, Laima; Hansen, Thomas v O; Nielsen, Finn C.; Osorio, Ana; Stavropoulou, Alexandra; Benítez, Javier; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Barile, Monica; Volorio, Sara; Pasini, Barbara; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Putignano, Anna Laura; Ottini, Laura; Radice, Paolo; Hamann, Ute; Rashid, Muhammad U.; Hogervorst, Frans B.; Kriege, Mieke; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Peock, Susan; Frost, Debra; Evans, D. Gareth; Brewer, Carole; Walker, Lisa; Rogers, Mark T.; Side, Lucy E.; Houghton, Catherine; Weaver, JoEllen; Godwin, Andrew K.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Meindl, Alfons; Kast, Karin; Arnold, Norbert; Niederacher, Dieter; Sutter, Christian; Deissler, Helmut; Gadzicki, Doroteha; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Schönbuchner, Ines; Gevensleben, Heidrun; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Belotti, Muriel; Barjhoux, Laure; Isaacs, Claudine; Peshkin, Beth N.; Caldes, Trinidad; de al Hoya, Miguel; Cañadas, Carmen; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Heikkilä, Päivi; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blanco, Ignacio; Lazaro, Conxi; Brunet, Joan; Agnarsson, Bjarni A.; Arason, Adalgeir; Barkardottir, Rosa B.; Dumont, Martine; Simard, Jacques; Montagna, Marco; Agata, Simona; D’Andrea, Emma; Yan, Max; Fox, Stephen; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Rubinstein, Wendy; Tung, Nadine; Garber, Judy E.; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Lindor, Noralane M.; Szabo, Csilla; Offit, Kenneth; Sakr, Rita; Gaudet, Mia M.; Singer, Christian F.; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Rappaport, Christine; Mai, Phuong L.; Greene, Mark H.; Sokolenko, Anna; Imyanitov, Evgeny; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Senter, Leigha; Sweet, Kevin; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Kruse, Torben; Caligo, Maria; Aretini, Paolo; Rantala, Johanna; von Wachenfeld, Anna; Henriksson, Karin; Steele, Linda; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Nussbaum, Bob; Beattie, Mary; Odunsi, Kunle; Sucheston, Lara; Gayther, Simon A; Nathanson, Kate; Gross, Jenny; Walsh, Christine; Karlan, Beth; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.; Antoniou, Antonis C.

    2011-01-01

    Background Previous small studies found that BRCA1 and BRCA2 breast tumors differ in their pathology. Analysis of larger datasets of mutation carriers should allow further tumor characterization. Methods We used data from 4,325 BRCA1 and 2,568 BRCA2 mutation carriers to analyze the pathology of invasive breast, ovarian and contralateral breast cancers. Results There was strong evidence that the proportion of estrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast tumors decreased with age at diagnosis among BRCA1 (p-trend=1.2×10−5) but increased with age at diagnosis among BRCA2 carriers (p-trend=6.8×10−6). The proportion of triple negative tumors decreased with age at diagnosis in BRCA1 carriers but increased with age at diagnosis of BRCA2 carriers. In both BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers, ER-negative tumors were of higher histological grade than ER-positive tumors (Grade 3 vs. Grade 1, p=1.2×10−13 for BRCA1 and p=0.001 for BRCA2). ER and progesterone receptor (PR) expression were independently associated with mutation carrier status (ER-positive odds ratio (OR) for BRCA2=9.4, 95%CI:7.0-12.6 and PR-positive OR=1.7, 95%CI:1.3-2.3, under joint analysis). Lobular tumors were more likely to be BRCA2-related (OR for BRCA2=3.3, 95%CI:2.4-4.4, p=4.4×10−14), and medullary tumors BRCA1-related (OR for BRCA2=0.25, 95%CI:0.18-0.35, p=2.3×10−15). ER-status of the first breast cancer was predictive of ER-status of asynchronous contralateral breast cancer (p=0.0004 for BRCA1; p=0.002 for BRCA2). There were no significant differences in ovarian cancer morphology between BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers (serous:67%; mucinous:1%; endometriod:12%; clear-cell:2%). Conclusions/Impact Pathology characteristics of BRCA1 and BRCA2 tumors may be useful for improving risk prediction algorithms and informing clinical strategies for screening and prophylaxis. PMID:22144499

  15. Refined histopathological predictors of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation status: a large-scale analysis of breast cancer characteristics from the BCAC, CIMBA, and ENIGMA consortia.

    PubMed

    Spurdle, Amanda B; Couch, Fergus J; Parsons, Michael T; McGuffog, Lesley; Barrowdale, Daniel; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Healey, Sue; Schmutzler, Rita; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Rhiem, Kerstin; Hahnen, Eric; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Niederacher, Dieter; Sutter, Christian; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Steinemann, Doris; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Kast, Karin; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Ellis, Steve; Frost, Debra; Platte, Radka; Perkins, Jo; Evans, D Gareth; Izatt, Louise; Eeles, Ros; Adlard, Julian; Davidson, Rosemarie; Cole, Trevor; Scuvera, Giulietta; Manoukian, Siranoush; Bonanni, Bernardo; Mariette, Frederique; Fortuzzi, Stefano; Viel, Alessandra; Pasini, Barbara; Papi, Laura; Varesco, Liliana; Balleine, Rosemary; Nathanson, Katherine L; Domchek, Susan M; Offitt, Kenneth; Jakubowska, Anna; Lindor, Noralane; Thomassen, Mads; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Rantala, Johanna; Borg, Åke; Andrulis, Irene L; Miron, Alexander; Hansen, Thomas V O; Caldes, Trinidad; Neuhausen, Susan L; Toland, Amanda E; Nevanlinna, Heli; Montagna, Marco; Garber, Judy; Godwin, Andrew K; Osorio, Ana; Factor, Rachel E; Terry, Mary B; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Karlan, Beth Y; Southey, Melissa; Rashid, Muhammad Usman; Tung, Nadine; Pharoah, Paul D P; Blows, Fiona M; Dunning, Alison M; Provenzano, Elena; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Broeks, Annegien; Cornelissen, Sten; Verhoef, Senno; Fasching, Peter A; Beckmann, Matthias W; Ekici, Arif B; Slamon, Dennis J; Bojesen, Stig E; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Nielsen, Sune F; Flyger, Henrik; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Muranen, Taru A; Heikkilä, Päivi; Blomqvist, Carl; Figueroa, Jonine; Chanock, Stephen J; Brinton, Louise; Lissowska, Jolanta; Olson, Janet E; Pankratz, Vernon S; John, Esther M; Whittemore, Alice S; West, Dee W; Hamann, Ute; Torres, Diana; Ulmer, Hans Ulrich; Rüdiger, Thomas; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Robert A E M; Seynaeve, Caroline; Van Asperen, Christi J; Eccles, Diana M; Tapper, William J; Durcan, Lorraine; Jones, Louise; Peto, Julian; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; Dwek, Miriam; Swann, Ruth; Bane, Anita L; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna M; Giles, Graham G; Milne, Roger L; Baglietto, Laura; McLean, Catriona; Carpenter, Jane; Clarke, Christine; Scott, Rodney; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brüning, Thomas; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Reed, Malcolm W R; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Gronwald, Jacek; Dörk, Thilo; Bogdanova, Natalia; Park-Simon, Tjoung-Won; Hillemanns, Peter; Haiman, Christopher A; Henderson, Brian E; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Surovy, Harald; Yang, Rongxi; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Hooning, Maartje J; Collée, J Margriet; Martens, John W M; Tilanus-Linthorst, Madeleine M A; Brenner, Hermann; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Arndt, Volke; Stegmaier, Christa; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Joseph, Vijai; Robson, Mark; Rau-Murthy, Rohini; González-Neira, Anna; Arias, José Ignacio; Zamora, Pilar; Benítez, Javier; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Peterlongo, Paolo; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Barile, Monica; Capra, Fabio; Radice, Paolo; Teo, Soo H; Easton, Douglas F; Antoniou, Antonis C; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Goldgar, David E

    2014-12-23

    The distribution of histopathological features of invasive breast tumors in BRCA1 or BRCA2 germline mutation carriers differs from that of individuals with no known mutation. Histopathological features thus have utility for mutation prediction, including statistical modeling to assess pathogenicity of BRCA1 or BRCA2 variants of uncertain clinical significance. We analyzed large pathology datasets accrued by the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA) and the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) to reassess histopathological predictors of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation status, and provide robust likelihood ratio (LR) estimates for statistical modeling. Selection criteria for study/center inclusion were estrogen receptor (ER) status or grade data available for invasive breast cancer diagnosed younger than 70 years. The dataset included 4,477 BRCA1 mutation carriers, 2,565 BRCA2 mutation carriers, and 47,565 BCAC breast cancer cases. Country-stratified estimates of the likelihood of mutation status by histopathological markers were derived using a Mantel-Haenszel approach. ER-positive phenotype negatively predicted BRCA1 mutation status, irrespective of grade (LRs from 0.08 to 0.90). ER-negative grade 3 histopathology was more predictive of positive BRCA1 mutation status in women 50 years or older (LR = 4.13 (3.70 to 4.62)) versus younger than 50 years (LR = 3.16 (2.96 to 3.37)). For BRCA2, ER-positive grade 3 phenotype modestly predicted positive mutation status irrespective of age (LR = 1.7-fold), whereas ER-negative grade 3 features modestly predicted positive mutation status at 50 years or older (LR = 1.54 (1.27 to 1.88)). Triple-negative tumor status was highly predictive of BRCA1 mutation status for women younger than 50 years (LR = 3.73 (3.43 to 4.05)) and 50 years or older (LR = 4.41 (3.86 to 5.04)), and modestly predictive of positive BRCA2 mutation status in women 50 years or older (LR = 1.79 (1.42 to 2

  16. Molecular insights into the OGG1 gene, a cancer risk modifier in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations carriers

    PubMed Central

    Benitez-Buelga, Carlos; Vaclová, Tereza; Ferreira, Sofia; Urioste, Miguel; Inglada-Perez, Lucia; Soberón, Nora; Blasco, Maria A.; Osorio, Ana; Benitez, Javier

    2016-01-01

    We have recently shown that rs2304277 variant in the OGG1 glycosidase gene of the Base Excision Repair pathway can increase ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 mutation carriers. In the present study, we aimed to explore the role of this genetic variant on different genome instability hallmarks to explain its association with cancer risk. We have evaluated the effect of this polymorphism on OGG1 transcriptional regulation and its contribution to telomere shortening and DNA damage accumulation. For that, we have used a series of 89 BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, 74 BRCAX cases, 60 non-carrier controls and 23 lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCL) derived from BRCA1 mutation carriers and non-carriers. We have identified that this SNP is associated to a significant OGG1 transcriptional down regulation independently of the BRCA mutational status and that the variant may exert a synergistic effect together with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations on DNA damage and telomere shortening. These results suggest that this variant, could be associated to a higher cancer risk in BRCA1 mutation carriers, due to an OGG1 transcriptional down regulation and its effect on genome instability. PMID:27015555

  17. Ovarian Cancer Susceptibility Alleles and Risk of Ovarian Cancer in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Ramus, Susan J.; Antoniou, Antonis C; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Soucy, Penny; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; McGuffog, Lesley; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Healey, Sue; Barrowdale, Daniel; Lee, Andrew; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Kruse, Torben A.; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Caligo, Maria A.; Liljegren, Annelie; Lindblom, Annika; Olsson, Håkan; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Melin, Beatrice; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Złowocka, Elżbieta; Gronwald, Jacek; Huzarski, Tomasz; Byrski, Tomasz; Cybulski, Cezary; Toloczko-Grabarek, Aleksandra; Osorio, Ana; Benitez, Javier; Duran, Mercedes; Tejada, Maria-Isabel; Hamann, Ute; Rookus, Matti; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Aalfs, Cora M.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E.J.; van Asperen, Christi J.; van Roozendaal, K.E.P.; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Collée, J. Margriet; Kriege, Mieke; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Peock, Susan; Frost, Debra; Ellis, Steve D.; Platte, Radka; Fineberg, Elena; Evans, D. Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Jacobs, Chris; Eeles, Ros; Adlard, Julian; Davidson, Rosemarie; Eccles, Diana; Cole, Trevor; Cook, Jackie; Paterson, Joan; Douglas, Fiona; Brewer, Carole; Hodgson, Shirley; Morrison, Patrick J.; Walker, Lisa; Porteous, Mary E.; Kennedy, M. John; Pathak, Harsh; Godwin, Andrew K.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Caux-Moncoutier, Virginie; de Pauw, Antoine; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Léoné, Mélanie; Calender, Alain; Lasset, Christine; Bonadona, Valérie; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Faivre, Laurence; Loustalot, Catherine; Buys, Saundra; Daly, Mary; Miron, Alex; Terry, Mary Beth; Chung, Wendy K.; John, Esther M; Southey, Melissa; Goldgar, David; Singer, Christian F; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Pfeiler, Georg; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Hansen, Thomas v. O.; Ejlertsen, Bent; Johannsson, Oskar Th.; Offit, Kenneth; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Gaudet, Mia M.; Vijai, Joseph; Robson, Mark; Piedmonte, Marion; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Van Le, Linda; Hoffman, James S; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Montagna, Marco; Tognazzo, Silvia; Imyanitov, Evgeny; Isaacs, Claudine; Janavicius, Ramunas; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Tornero, Eva; Navarro, Matilde; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Gross, Jenny; Olah, Edith; Vaszko, Tibor; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Ganz, Patricia A.; Beattie, Mary S.; Dorfling, Cecelia M; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Diez, Orland; Kwong, Ava; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Heidemann, Simone; Niederacher, Dieter; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Gadzicki, Dorotehea; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Deissler, Helmut; Gehrig, Andrea; Sutter, Christian; Kast, Karin; Fiebig, Britta; Schäfer, Dieter; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Plante, Marie; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Wang, Xianshu; Lindor, Noralane; Fredericksen, Zachary; Pankratz, V. Shane; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Bonanni, Bernardo; Bernard, Loris; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Papi, Laura; Ottini, Laura; Radice, Paolo; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Gayther, Simon A.; Simard, Jacques; Easton, Douglas F.; Couch, Fergus J.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia

    2012-01-01

    Germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 are associated with increased risks of breast and ovarian cancer. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) identified six alleles associated with risk of ovarian cancer for women in the general population. We evaluated four of these loci as potential modifiers of ovarian cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Four single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs10088218 (at 8q24), rs2665390 (at 3q25), rs717852 (at 2q31), and rs9303542 (at 17q21), were genotyped in 12,599 BRCA1 and 7,132 BRCA2 carriers, including 2,678 ovarian cancer cases. Associations were evaluated within a retrospective cohort approach. All four loci were associated with ovarian cancer risk in BRCA2 carriers; rs10088218 per-allele hazard ratio (HR) = 0.81 (95% CI: 0.67–0.98) P-trend = 0.033, rs2665390 HR = 1.48 (95% CI: 1.21–1.83) P-trend = 1.8 × 10−4, rs717852 HR = 1.25 (95% CI: 1.10–1.42) P-trend = 6.6 × 10−4, rs9303542 HR = 1.16 (95% CI: 1.02–1.33) P-trend = 0.026. Two loci were associated with ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 carriers; rs10088218 per-allele HR = 0.89 (95% CI: 0.81–0.99) P-trend = 0.029, rs2665390 HR = 1.25 (95% CI: 1.10–1.42) P-trend = 6.1 × 10−4. The HR estimates for the remaining loci were consistent with odds ratio estimates for the general population. The identification of multiple loci modifying ovarian cancer risk may be useful for counseling women with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations regarding their risk of ovarian cancer. PMID:22253144

  18. Use of Risk-Reducing Surgeries in a Prospective Cohort of 1,499 BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Xinglei; Friebel, Tara M.; Singer, Christian F.; Evans, D. Gareth; Lynch, Henry T.; Isaacs, Claudine; Garber, Judy E.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Matloff, Ellen; Eeles, Rosalind; Tung, Nadine; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Couch, Fergus J.; Hulick, Peter J.; Ganz, Patricia A.; Daly, Mary B.; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Tomlinson, Gail; Blum, Joanne L.; Domchek, Susan M.; Chen, Jinbo; Rebecck, Timothy R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Inherited mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 (BRCA1/2) confer very high risk of breast and ovarian cancers. Genetic testing and counseling can reduce risk and death from these cancers if appropriate preventive strategies are applied, including risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy (RRSO) or risk-reducing mastectomy (RRM). However, some women who might benefit from these interventions do not take full advantage of them. Methods We evaluated RRSO and RRM use in a prospective cohort of 1,499 women with inherited BRCA1/2 mutations from 20 centers who enrolled in the study without prior cancer or RRSO or RRM, and were followed forward for the occurrence of these events. We estimated the age-specific usage of RRSO/RRM in this cohort using Kaplan-Meier analyses. Results Use of RRSO was 45% for BRCA1 and 34% for BRCA2 by age 40, and 86% for BRCA1 and 71% for BRCA2 by age 50. RRM usage was estimated to be 46% by age 70 in both BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers. BRCA1 mutation carriers used RRSO more frequently than BRCA2 mutation carriers overall, but the uptake of RRSO in BRCA2 was similar after mutation testing and in women born since 1960. RRM uptake was similar for both BRCA1 and BRCA2. Childbearing influenced use of RRSO and RRM in both BRCA1 and BRCA2. Conclusions Uptake of RRSO is high, but some women are still diagnosed with ovarian cancer before undergoing RRSO. This suggests that research is needed to understand the optimal timing of RRSO to maximize risk reduction and limit potential adverse consequences of RRSO. PMID:25311111

  19. Evaluation of chromosome 6p22 as a breast cancer risk modifier locus in a follow-up study of BRCA2 mutation carriers

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Kristen N.; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Greene, Mark H.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Thomassen, Mads; Caligo, Maria; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Jakubowska, Anna; Osorio, Ana; Hamann, Ute; Godwin, Andrew K.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Southey, Melissa; Buys, Saundra S.; Singer, Christian F.; Hansen, Thomas V.O.; Arason, Adalgeir; Offit, Kenneth; Piedmonte, Marion; Montagna, Marco; Imyanitov, Evgeny; Tihomirova, Laima; Sucheston, Lara; Beattie, Mary; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Szabo, Csilla I.; Simard, Jacques; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Healey, Sue; Chen, Xiaoqing; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Easton, Douglas F.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C; Couch, Fergus J.

    2012-01-01

    Several common germline variants identified through genome-wide association studies of breast cancer risk in the general population have recently been shown to be associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 mutation carriers. When combined, these variants can identify marked differences in the absolute risk of developing breast cancer for mutation carriers, suggesting that additional modifier loci may further enhance individual risk assessment for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Recently, a common variant on 6p22 (rs9393597) was found to be associated with increased breast cancer risk for BRCA2 mutation carriers [Hazard ratio (HR)=1.55, 95% CI 1.25–1.92, p=6.0×10−5]. This observation was based on data from GWAS studies in which, despite statistical correction for multiple comparisons, the possibility of false discovery remains a concern. Here we report on an analysis of this variant in an additional 6,165 BRCA1 and 3,900 BRCA2 mutation carriers from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA). In this replication analysis, rs9393597 was not associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA2 mutation carriers [HR=1.09, 95% CI 0.96–1.24, p=0.18]. No association with ovarian cancer risk for BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers or with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 mutation carriers was observed. This follow-up study suggests that, contrary to our initial report, this variant is not associated with breast cancer risk among individuals with germline BRCA2 mutations. PMID:23011509

  20. Breast Cancer Risk for Noncarriers of Family-Specific BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutations: Findings From the Breast Cancer Family Registry

    PubMed Central

    Kurian, Allison W.; Gong, Gail D.; John, Esther M.; Johnston, David A.; Felberg, Anna; West, Dee W.; Miron, Alexander; Andrulis, Irene L.; Hopper, John L.; Knight, Julia A.; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Dite, Gillian S.; Apicella, Carmel; Southey, Melissa C.; Whittemore, Alice S.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Women with germline BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations have five- to 20-fold increased risks of developing breast and ovarian cancer. A recent study claimed that women testing negative for their family-specific BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation (noncarriers) have a five-fold increased risk of breast cancer. We estimated breast cancer risks for noncarriers by using a population-based sample of patients with breast cancer and their female first-degree relatives (FDRs). Patients and Methods Patients were women with breast cancer and their FDRs enrolled in the population-based component of the Breast Cancer Family Registry; patients with breast cancer were tested for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations, as were FDRs of identified mutation carriers. We used segregation analysis to fit a model that accommodates familial correlation in breast cancer risk due to unobserved shared risk factors. Results We studied 3,047 families; 160 had BRCA1 and 132 had BRCA2 mutations. There was no evidence of increased breast cancer risk for noncarriers of identified mutations compared with FDRs from families without BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations: relative risk was 0.39 (95% CI, 0.04 to 3.81). Residual breast cancer correlation within families was strong, suggesting substantial risk heterogeneity in women without BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations, with some 3.4% of them accounting for roughly one third of breast cancer cases. Conclusion These results support the practice of advising noncarriers that they do not have any increase in breast cancer risk attributable to the family-specific BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation. PMID:22042950

  1. Breast cancer risk for noncarriers of family-specific BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations: findings from the Breast Cancer Family Registry.

    PubMed

    Kurian, Allison W; Gong, Gail D; John, Esther M; Johnston, David A; Felberg, Anna; West, Dee W; Miron, Alexander; Andrulis, Irene L; Hopper, John L; Knight, Julia A; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Dite, Gillian S; Apicella, Carmel; Southey, Melissa C; Whittemore, Alice S

    2011-12-01

    Women with germline BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations have five- to 20-fold increased risks of developing breast and ovarian cancer. A recent study claimed that women testing negative for their family-specific BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation (noncarriers) have a five-fold increased risk of breast cancer. We estimated breast cancer risks for noncarriers by using a population-based sample of patients with breast cancer and their female first-degree relatives (FDRs). Patients were women with breast cancer and their FDRs enrolled in the population-based component of the Breast Cancer Family Registry; patients with breast cancer were tested for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations, as were FDRs of identified mutation carriers. We used segregation analysis to fit a model that accommodates familial correlation in breast cancer risk due to unobserved shared risk factors. We studied 3,047 families; 160 had BRCA1 and 132 had BRCA2 mutations. There was no evidence of increased breast cancer risk for noncarriers of identified mutations compared with FDRs from families without BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations: relative risk was 0.39 (95% CI, 0.04 to 3.81). Residual breast cancer correlation within families was strong, suggesting substantial risk heterogeneity in women without BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations, with some 3.4% of them accounting for roughly one third of breast cancer cases. These results support the practice of advising noncarriers that they do not have any increase in breast cancer risk attributable to the family-specific BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation.

  2. Chemotherapy-Induced Amenorrhea in Patients With Breast Cancer With a BRCA1 or BRCA2 Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Valentini, Adriana; Finch, Amy; Lubiński, Jan; Byrski, Tomasz; Ghadirian, Parviz; Kim-Sing, Charmaine; Lynch, Henry T.; Ainsworth, Peter J.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Greenblatt, Ellen; Singer, Christian; Sun, Ping; Narod, Steven A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To determine the likelihood of long-term amenorrhea after treatment with chemotherapy in women with breast cancer who carry a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation. Patients and Methods We conducted a multicenter survey of 1,954 young women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation who were treated for breast cancer. We included premenopausal women who were diagnosed with invasive breast cancer between 26 and 47 years of age. We determined the age of onset of amenorrhea after breast cancer for women who were and were not treated with chemotherapy, alone or with tamoxifen. We considered chemotherapy-induced amenorrhea to have occurred when the patient experienced ≥ 2 years of amenorrhea, commencing within 2 years of initiating chemotherapy, with no resumption of menses. Results Of the 1,426 women who received chemotherapy, 35% experienced long-term amenorrhea. Of the 528 women who did not receive chemotherapy, 5.3% developed long-term amenorrhea. The probabilities of chemotherapy-induced amenorrhea were 7.2% for women diagnosed before age 30 years, 33% for women age 31 to 44 years, and 79% for women diagnosed after age 45 years (P trend < .001). The probability of induced amenorrhea was higher for women who received tamoxifen than for those who did not (52% v 29%; P < .001). Conclusion Age at treatment and use of tamoxifen are important predictors of chemotherapy-induced amenorrhea in women who carry a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation. The risk of induced long-term amenorrhea does not seem to be greater among mutation carriers than among women who do not carry a mutation. PMID:23980083

  3. Chemotherapy-induced amenorrhea in patients with breast cancer with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation.

    PubMed

    Valentini, Adriana; Finch, Amy; Lubinski, Jan; Byrski, Tomasz; Ghadirian, Parviz; Kim-Sing, Charmaine; Lynch, Henry T; Ainsworth, Peter J; Neuhausen, Susan L; Greenblatt, Ellen; Singer, Christian; Sun, Ping; Narod, Steven A

    2013-11-01

    To determine the likelihood of long-term amenorrhea after treatment with chemotherapy in women with breast cancer who carry a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation. We conducted a multicenter survey of 1,954 young women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation who were treated for breast cancer. We included premenopausal women who were diagnosed with invasive breast cancer between 26 and 47 years of age. We determined the age of onset of amenorrhea after breast cancer for women who were and were not treated with chemotherapy, alone or with tamoxifen. We considered chemotherapy-induced amenorrhea to have occurred when the patient experienced ≥ 2 years of amenorrhea, commencing within 2 years of initiating chemotherapy, with no resumption of menses. Of the 1,426 women who received chemotherapy, 35% experienced long-term amenorrhea. Of the 528 women who did not receive chemotherapy, 5.3% developed long-term amenorrhea. The probabilities of chemotherapy-induced amenorrhea were 7.2% for women diagnosed before age 30 years, 33% for women age 31 to 44 years, and 79% for women diagnosed after age 45 years (P trend < .001). The probability of induced amenorrhea was higher for women who received tamoxifen than for those who did not (52% v 29%; P < .001). Age at treatment and use of tamoxifen are important predictors of chemotherapy-induced amenorrhea in women who carry a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation. The risk of induced long-term amenorrhea does not seem to be greater among mutation carriers than among women who do not carry a mutation.

  4. Reproductive factors and breast cancer risk among BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers: results from ten studies.

    PubMed

    Pan, Hong; He, Zhongyuan; Ling, Lijun; Ding, Qiang; Chen, Lin; Zha, Xiaoming; Zhou, Wenbin; Liu, Xiaoan; Wang, Shui

    2014-02-01

    Although reproductive factors are among the most well-established risk factors for breast cancer in the general population, it is still a matter for debate whether these factors act as risk modifiers among BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. This meta-analysis is the first to be performed to determine the relationship between reproductive factors and breast cancer risk among BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. We searched the PubMed database up to February 2013. A total of ten studies met the inclusion criteria. The results showed that the reproductive factors may be associated with breast cancer risk only among BRCA1 mutation carriers. No association was found between parity and breast cancer risk. Compared with women at the youngest age in the first-birth category, women in the oldest age category were at a 38% lower risk of breast cancer (RR=0.62, 95%CI=0.45-0.85). Breastfeeding for at least 1 or 2 years was associated with a 37% reduction in breast cancer risk (RR=0.63, 95%CI=0.46-0.86). Women at the oldest age in the menarche category were at a 34% lower risk of breast cancer (RR=0.66, 95%CI=0.53-0.81) than women in the youngest age category. However, none of the reproductive factors were associated with breast cancer risk among BRCA2 mutation carriers. In conclusion, late age at first birth, breastfeeding, and late age at menarche protect against breast cancer in BRCA1 mutation carriers only. Further studies are needed to explore the mechanisms.

  5. Low prevalence of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in the sporadic breast cancer of Spanish population.

    PubMed

    de Juan Jiménez, Inmaculada; Esteban Cardeñosa, Eva; Palanca Suela, Sarai; Barragán González, Eva; Aznar Carretero, Ismael; Munárriz Gandía, Blanca; Santaballa Bertran, Ana; Torregrosa Maicas, María Dolores; Guillén Ponce, Carmen; Sánchez Heras, Ana Beatriz; Bayón Lara, Ana; Fuster Lluch, Oscar; Bolufer Gilabert, Pascual

    2012-03-01

    The true prevalence of BRCA1/BRCA2 (BRCAs) germline mutations in sporadic breast or ovarian cancer (SBC/SOC) in Caucasian population is not well established. The aim of the study is to establish the prevalence of BRCAs mutations in SBC to ponder its relevance in the programs of genetic counseling in cancer and to explore the genotype-phenotype relationship of these particular breast cancers. The study was performed in 495 SBC. We sought 46 BRCA1 and 53 BRCA2 pathogenic mutations reported in the Spanish population. We followed a high resolution melting method performed in the LightCycler 480 (Roche Diagnostics) for the screening of these Spanish mutations using 49 primer pairs. Eight different deleterious mutations, one of them novel, were detected in nine patients, five without family history of BC/OC, what yields a true prevalence of 1.05% for BRCAs mutations in SBC. Furthermore, we found 18 unknown variants. Larger tumour size (T > 1) and earlier presentation are the independent parameters associated with the presence of BRCAs pathogenic mutations in SBC (P < 0.01) and the BRCA1 mutations carriers develop steroid-receptors negative tumors. Our results indicate that the true prevalence of BRCAs germline deleterious mutations in SBC of Spaniards is low. However, this does not lessens its relevance since the presence of BRCAs mutations in SBC could represent circa 16% of total BRCAs mutations detected in BC. SBCs of BRCAs mutation carriers have phenotype more aggressiveness than SBC without BRCAs mutation.

  6. A population study of mutations and LOH at breast cancer gene loci in tumours from sister pairs: two recurrent mutations seem to account for all BRCA1/BRCA2 linked breast cancer in Iceland.

    PubMed Central

    Arason, A; Jonasdottir, A; Barkardottir, R B; Bergthorsson, J T; Teare, M D; Easton, D F; Egilsson, V

    1998-01-01

    The majority of breast cancer in high risk families is believed to result from a mutation in either of two genes named BRCA1 and BRCA2. A germline defect in either gene is usually followed by chromosomal deletion of the normal allele in the tumour. In Iceland two recurrent mutations have been identified, 999del5 BRCA2 and G5193A BRCA1. In this study, randomly selected pairs of sisters diagnosed with breast cancer at the age of 60 years or younger were analysed to evaluate the proportion of breast cancer resulting from BRCA1 and BRCA2. Genotypes and allele loss in tumour tissue from 42 sister pairs were compared using markers within and around the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. Eleven sister pairs were highly suggestive of BRCA2 linkage, and no obvious BRCA1 linkage was seen. Screening for the G5193A BRCA1 and 999del5 BRCA2 mutations showed the 999del5 mutation in the 11 BRCA2 suggestive pairs plus three pairs less indicative of linkage, and the G5193A BRCA1 mutation in one pair. When known mutation carriers are removed from the group, no indication of further linkage to BRCA1 or BRCA2 is seen. The results of our studies suggest that a large proportion of familial breast cancer in Iceland is the result of the 999del5 BRCA2 mutation, and it is unlikely that BRCA1 and BRCA2 germline mutations other than 999del5 and G5193A play a significant role in hereditary breast cancer in Iceland. Furthermore it can be concluded that most families with BRCA1 or BRCA2 linkage are easily identified by studying LOH around the defective gene in as few as two affected relatives. PMID:9643283

  7. A population study of mutations and LOH at breast cancer gene loci in tumours from sister pairs: two recurrent mutations seem to account for all BRCA1/BRCA2 linked breast cancer in Iceland.

    PubMed

    Arason, A; Jonasdottir, A; Barkardottir, R B; Bergthorsson, J T; Teare, M D; Easton, D F; Egilsson, V

    1998-06-01

    The majority of breast cancer in high risk families is believed to result from a mutation in either of two genes named BRCA1 and BRCA2. A germline defect in either gene is usually followed by chromosomal deletion of the normal allele in the tumour. In Iceland two recurrent mutations have been identified, 999del5 BRCA2 and G5193A BRCA1. In this study, randomly selected pairs of sisters diagnosed with breast cancer at the age of 60 years or younger were analysed to evaluate the proportion of breast cancer resulting from BRCA1 and BRCA2. Genotypes and allele loss in tumour tissue from 42 sister pairs were compared using markers within and around the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. Eleven sister pairs were highly suggestive of BRCA2 linkage, and no obvious BRCA1 linkage was seen. Screening for the G5193A BRCA1 and 999del5 BRCA2 mutations showed the 999del5 mutation in the 11 BRCA2 suggestive pairs plus three pairs less indicative of linkage, and the G5193A BRCA1 mutation in one pair. When known mutation carriers are removed from the group, no indication of further linkage to BRCA1 or BRCA2 is seen. The results of our studies suggest that a large proportion of familial breast cancer in Iceland is the result of the 999del5 BRCA2 mutation, and it is unlikely that BRCA1 and BRCA2 germline mutations other than 999del5 and G5193A play a significant role in hereditary breast cancer in Iceland. Furthermore it can be concluded that most families with BRCA1 or BRCA2 linkage are easily identified by studying LOH around the defective gene in as few as two affected relatives.

  8. Breast-feeding and the risk of breast cancer in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Jernström, H; Lubinski, J; Lynch, H T; Ghadirian, P; Neuhausen, S; Isaacs, C; Weber, B L; Horsman, D; Rosen, B; Foulkes, W D; Friedman, E; Gershoni-Baruch, R; Ainsworth, P; Daly, M; Garber, J; Olsson, H; Sun, P; Narod, S A

    2004-07-21

    Several studies have reported that the risk of breast cancer decreases with increasing duration of breast-feeding. Whether breast-feeding is associated with a reduced risk of hereditary breast cancer in women who carry deleterious BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations is currently unknown. We conducted a case-control study of women with deleterious mutations in either the BRCA1 or the BRCA2 gene. Study participants, drawn from an international cohort, were matched on the basis of BRCA mutation (BRCA1 [n = 685] or BRCA2 [n = 280]), year of birth (+/-2 years), and country of residence. The study involved 965 case subjects diagnosed with breast cancer and 965 control subjects who had no history of breast or ovarian cancer. Information on pregnancies and breast-feeding practices was derived from a questionnaire administered to the women during the course of genetic counseling. Conditional logistic regression analyses were used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) for the risk of breast cancer. All statistical tests were two-sided. Among women with BRCA1 mutations, the mean total duration of breast-feeding was statistically significantly shorter for case subjects than for control subjects (6.0 versus 8.7 months, respectively; mean difference = 2.7 months, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.4 to 4.0; P<.001). The total duration of breast-feeding was associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer (for each month of breast-feeding, OR = 0.98, 95% CI = 0.97 to 0.99; P(trend)<.001). Women with BRCA1 mutations who breast-fed for more than 1 year were less likely to have breast cancer than those who never breast-fed (OR = 0.55, 95% CI = 0.38 to 0.80; P =.001), although no such association was seen for BRCA2 (OR = 0.95, 95% CI = 0.56 to 1.59; P =.83). Women with deleterious BRCA1 mutations who breast-fed for a cumulative total of more than 1 year had a statistically significantly reduced risk of breast cancer.

  9. An Exploratory Study to Determine Whether BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers Have Higher Risk of Cardiac Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Sajjad, Monique; Fradley, Michael; Sun, Weihong; Kim, Jongphil; Zhao, Xiuhua; Pal, Tuya; Ismail-Khan, Roohi

    2017-01-01

    Anthracycline-based cardiotoxicity is concerning for women with breast cancer and portends a dose-dependent risk of developing left ventricular dysfunction. Overall, the prevalence of heart failure (HF) is ≈2% of the total US population; however, BRCA-deficient mice have shown increased HF. We evaluated for the inherent risk of HF in women with BRCA mutations to determine whether treatment with anthracycline-based therapy increased this risk. We obtained results on BRCA mutation carriers regarding cancer treatment and HF, identified through the BRCA patient advocacy organization Facing Our Risk for Cancer Empowered (FORCE) and the Moffitt-based Inherited Cancer Registry. In our patient group (232 BRCA1 and 159 BRCA2 patients; 10 with both mutations), 7.7% reported HF, with similar proportions in BRCA1 versus BRCA2 carriers (7.4% and 8.2%, respectively). These proportions are significantly higher than published rates (p < 0.001). There was no statistically significant difference in HF rates comparing anthracycline-treated versus anthracycline-naïve patients however (7.1% vs. 8.3%; p = 0.67). In addition, 9.1% of BRCA1 carriers and 8.2% of BRCA2 carriers reported arrhythmias. BRCA mutation carriers showed increased risk of cardiotoxicity versus the general population and an overall increased risk of cardiotoxicity from anthracycline-based therapy. Our study supports data that BRCA carriers have increased non-cancer mortality from cardiotoxicity. A prospective trial to determine HF and conduction abnormalities in this population is warranted. PMID:28157161

  10. Evaluation of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations and risk-prediction models in a typical Asian country (Malaysia) with a relatively low incidence of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Thirthagiri, E; Lee, S Y; Kang, P; Lee, D S; Toh, G T; Selamat, S; Yoon, S-Y; Taib, N A Mohd; Thong, M K; Yip, C H; Teo, S H

    2008-01-01

    The cost of genetic testing and the limited knowledge about the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes in different ethnic groups has limited its availability in medium- and low-resource countries, including Malaysia. In addition, the applicability of many risk-assessment tools, such as the Manchester Scoring System and BOADICEA (Breast and Ovarian Analysis of Disease Incidence and Carrier Estimation Algorithm) which were developed based on mutation rates observed primarily in Caucasian populations using data from multiplex families, and in populations where the rate of breast cancer is higher, has not been widely tested in Asia or in Asians living elsewhere. Here, we report the results of genetic testing for mutations in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes in a series of families with breast cancer in the multi-ethnic population (Malay, Chinese and Indian) of Malaysia. A total of 187 breast cancer patients with either early-onset breast cancer (at age BRCA2. Two algorithms to predict the presence of mutations, the Manchester Scoring System and BOADICEA, were evaluated. Twenty-seven deleterious mutations were detected (14 in BRCA1 and 13 in BRCA2), only one of which was found in two unrelated individuals (BRCA2 490 delCT). In addition, 47 variants of uncertain clinical significance were identified (16 in BRCA1 and 31 in BRCA2). Notably, many mutations are novel (13 of the 30 BRCA1 mutations and 24 of the 44 BRCA2). We report that while there were an equal proportion of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in the Chinese population in our study, there were significantly more BRCA2 mutations among the Malays. In addition, we show that the predictive power of the BOADICEA risk-prediction model and the Manchester Scoring System was significantly better for BRCA1 than BRCA2, but that the overall sensitivity, specificity and positive-predictive value was lower in this

  11. Spontaneous and irradiation-induced tumor susceptibility in BRCA2 germline mutant mice and cooperative effects with a p53 germline mutation.

    PubMed

    McAllister, Kimberly A; Houle, Christopher D; Malphurs, Jason; Ward, Toni; Collins, N Keith; Gersch, William; Wharey, Laura; Seely, John C; Betz, Laura; Bennett, L Michelle; Wiseman, Roger W; Davis, Barbara J

    2006-01-01

    Mutations in both p53 and BRCA2 are commonly seen together in human tumors suggesting that the loss of both genes enhances tumor development. To elucidate this interaction in an animal model, mice lacking the carboxy terminal domain of Brca2 were crossed with p53 heterozygous mice. Females from this intercross were then irradiated with an acute dose of 5 Gy ionizing radiation at 5 weeks of age and compared to nonirradiated controls. We found decreased survival and timing of tumor onsets, and significantly higher overall tumor incidences and prevalence of particular tumors, including stomach tumors and squamous cell carcinomas, associated with the homozygous loss of Brca2, independent of p53 status. The addition of a p53 mutation had a further impact on overall survival, incidence of osteosarcomas and stomach tumors, and tumor latency. The spectrum of tumors observed for this Brca2 germline mouse model suggest that it faithfully recapitulates some human disease phenotypes associated with BRCA2 loss. In addition, these findings include extensive in vivo data demonstrating that germline Brca2 and p53 mutations cooperatively affect animal survivals, tumor susceptibilities, and tumor onsets.

  12. Altered BRCA1 and BRCA2 responses and mutation of BRCA1 gene in mice exposed chronically and transgenerationally to aqueous extract of betel nut (AEBN).

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Yashmin; Sharan, Rajeshwar N

    2011-01-01

    The Brca1 and Brca2 tumor suppressor genes are involved in the maintenance of genomic integrity as they facilitate error free DNA repair. This study was designed to understand the role of Brca1 and Brca2 in betel nut (BN) induced chronic and transgenerational carcinogenesis in mice. Young male and female Swiss Albino mice were chronically as well as transgenerationally exposed to aqueous extract of betel nut (AEBN) in drinking water (2 mg ml(-1)) for up to 24 weeks. In chronically exposed mice, the levels of Brca1 and Brca2 proteins were elevated to approximately 1.4-fold over the age matched controls after 2 weeks of exposure to AEBN, followed by a decline below the controls. In transgenerationally exposed mice, both Brca1 and Brca2 proteins remained below the controls from the onset of AEBN exposure and rapidly declined further, indicating a loss of tumor suppressor protection. Nucleotide sequencing of exon 11 of Brca1 and exon 27 of Brca2 did not reveal mutation in liver nodules of chronically exposed mice, while a G → C mutation Brca1 was observed in liver nodules as well as in solid tumors developing in transgenerationally exposed mice. Thus, the genomic instability arising due to the lowering in the levels of Brca1 and Brca2 proteins and mutation in exon 11 of Brca1 gene contributed to the increased risk of cancer in mice exposed transgenerationally to AEBN.

  13. Anti-Müllerian hormone serum concentrations of women with germline BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Collins, Ian M; Milne, Roger L; McLachlan, Sue Anne; Friedlander, Michael; Hickey, Martha; Stern, Catharyn; Hopper, John L; Fisher, Richard; Kannemeyer, Gordon; Picken, Sandra; Smith, Charmaine D; Kelsey, Thomas W; Anderson, Richard A

    2016-05-01

    Do women with ITALIC! BRCA1 or ITALIC! BRCA2 mutations have reduced ovarian reserve, as measured by circulating anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) concentration? Women with a germline mutation in ITALIC! BRCA1 have reduced ovarian reserve as measured by AMH. The DNA repair enzymes encoded by ITALIC! BRCA1 and ITALIC! BRCA2 are implicated in reproductive aging. Circulating AMH is a biomarker of ovarian reserve and hence reproductive lifespan. This was a cross-sectional study of AMH concentrations of 693 women at the time of enrolment into the Kathleen Cuningham Foundation Consortium for research in the Familial Breast Cancer (kConFab) cohort study (recruitment from 19 August 1997 until 18 September 2012). AMH was measured on stored plasma samples between November 2014 and January 2015 using an electrochemiluminescence immunoassay platform. Eligible women were from families segregating ITALIC! BRCA1 or ITALIC! BRCA2 mutations and had known mutation status. Participants were aged 25-45 years, had no personal history of cancer, retained both ovaries and were not pregnant or breastfeeding at the time of plasma storage. Circulating AMH was measured for 172 carriers and 216 non-carriers from families carrying ITALIC! BRCA1 mutations, and 147 carriers and 158 non-carriers from families carrying ITALIC! BRCA2 mutations. Associations between plasma AMH concentration and carrier status were tested by linear regression, adjusted for age at plasma storage, oral contraceptive use, body mass index and cigarette smoking. Mean AMH concentration was negatively associated with age ( ITALIC! P < 0.001). Mutation carriers were younger at blood draw than non-carriers ( ITALIC! P ≤ 0.031). ITALIC! BRCA1 mutation carriers had, on average, 25% (95% CI: 5%-41%, ITALIC! P = 0.02) lower AMH concentrations than non-carriers and were more likely to have AMH concentrations in the lowest quartile for age (OR 1.84, 95% CI: 1.11-303, ITALIC! P = 0.02). There was no evidence of an association between

  14. Anti-Müllerian hormone serum concentrations of women with germline BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Collins, Ian M.; Milne, Roger L.; McLachlan, Sue Anne; Friedlander, Michael; Hickey, Martha; Stern, Catharyn; Hopper, John L.; Fisher, Richard; Kannemeyer, Gordon; Picken, Sandra; Smith, Charmaine D.; Kelsey, Thomas W.; Anderson, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Do women with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations have reduced ovarian reserve, as measured by circulating anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) concentration? SUMMARY ANSWER Women with a germline mutation in BRCA1 have reduced ovarian reserve as measured by AMH. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY The DNA repair enzymes encoded by BRCA1 and BRCA2 are implicated in reproductive aging. Circulating AMH is a biomarker of ovarian reserve and hence reproductive lifespan. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION This was a cross-sectional study of AMH concentrations of 693 women at the time of enrolment into the Kathleen Cuningham Foundation Consortium for research in the Familial Breast Cancer (kConFab) cohort study (recruitment from 19 August 1997 until 18 September 2012). AMH was measured on stored plasma samples between November 2014 and January 2015 using an electrochemiluminescence immunoassay platform. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS Eligible women were from families segregating BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations and had known mutation status. Participants were aged 25–45 years, had no personal history of cancer, retained both ovaries and were not pregnant or breastfeeding at the time of plasma storage. Circulating AMH was measured for 172 carriers and 216 non-carriers from families carrying BRCA1 mutations, and 147 carriers and 158 non-carriers from families carrying BRCA2 mutations. Associations between plasma AMH concentration and carrier status were tested by linear regression, adjusted for age at plasma storage, oral contraceptive use, body mass index and cigarette smoking. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE Mean AMH concentration was negatively associated with age (P < 0.001). Mutation carriers were younger at blood draw than non-carriers (P ≤ 0.031). BRCA1 mutation carriers had, on average, 25% (95% CI: 5%–41%, P = 0.02) lower AMH concentrations than non-carriers and were more likely to have AMH concentrations in the lowest quartile for age (OR 1.84, 95% CI: 1.11–303, P = 0

  15. Evaluation of a candidate breast cancer associated SNP in ERCC4 as a risk modifier in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Results from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/BRCA2 (CIMBA)

    PubMed Central

    Osorio, A; Milne, R L; Pita, G; Peterlongo, P; Heikkinen, T; Simard, J; Chenevix-Trench, G; Spurdle, A B; Beesley, J; Chen, X; Healey, S; Neuhausen, S L; Ding, Y C; Couch, F J; Wang, X; Lindor, N; Manoukian, S; Barile, M; Viel, A; Tizzoni, L; Szabo, C I; Foretova, L; Zikan, M; Claes, K; Greene, M H; Mai, P; Rennert, G; Lejbkowicz, F; Barnett-Griness, O; Andrulis, I L; Ozcelik, H; Weerasooriya, N; Gerdes, A-M; Thomassen, M; Cruger, D G; Caligo, M A; Friedman, E; Kaufman, B; Laitman, Y; Cohen, S; Kontorovich, T; Gershoni-Baruch, R; Dagan, E; Jernström, H; Askmalm, M S; Arver, B; Malmer, B; Domchek, S M; Nathanson, K L; Brunet, J; Ramón y Cajal, T; Yannoukakos, D; Hamann, U; Hogervorst, F B L; Verhoef, S; García, EB Gómez; Wijnen, J T; van den Ouweland, A; Easton, D F; Peock, S; Cook, M; Oliver, C T; Frost, D; Luccarini, C; Evans, D G; Lalloo, F; Eeles, R; Pichert, G; Cook, J; Hodgson, S; Morrison, P J; Douglas, F; Godwin, A K; Sinilnikova, O M; Barjhoux, L; Stoppa-Lyonnet, D; Moncoutier, V; Giraud, S; Cassini, C; Olivier-Faivre, L; Révillion, F; Peyrat, J-P; Muller, D; Fricker, J-P; Lynch, H T; John, E M; Buys, S; Daly, M; Hopper, J L; Terry, M B; Miron, A; Yassin, Y; Goldgar, D; Singer, C F; Gschwantler-Kaulich, D; Pfeiler, G; Spiess, A-C; Hansen, Thomas v O; Johannsson, O T; Kirchhoff, T; Offit, K; Kosarin, K; Piedmonte, M; Rodriguez, G C; Wakeley, K; Boggess, J F; Basil, J; Schwartz, P E; Blank, S V; Toland, A E; Montagna, M; Casella, C; Imyanitov, E N; Allavena, A; Schmutzler, R K; Versmold, B; Engel, C; Meindl, A; Ditsch, N; Arnold, N; Niederacher, D; Deißler, H; Fiebig, B; Varon-Mateeva, R; Schaefer, D; Froster, U G; Caldes, T; de la Hoya, M; McGuffog, L; Antoniou, A C; Nevanlinna, H; Radice, P; Benítez, J

    2009-01-01

    Background: In this study we aimed to evaluate the role of a SNP in intron 1 of the ERCC4 gene (rs744154), previously reported to be associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer in the general population, as a breast cancer risk modifier in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Methods: We have genotyped rs744154 in 9408 BRCA1 and 5632 BRCA2 mutation carriers from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA) and assessed its association with breast cancer risk using a retrospective weighted cohort approach. Results: We found no evidence of association with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 (per-allele HR: 0.98, 95% CI: 0.93–1.04, P=0.5) or BRCA2 (per-allele HR: 0.97, 95% CI: 0.89–1.06, P=0.5) mutation carriers. Conclusion: This SNP is not a significant modifier of breast cancer risk for mutation carriers, though weak associations cannot be ruled out. PMID:19920816

  16. Evaluation of a candidate breast cancer associated SNP in ERCC4 as a risk modifier in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Results from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/BRCA2 (CIMBA).

    PubMed

    Osorio, A; Milne, R L; Pita, G; Peterlongo, P; Heikkinen, T; Simard, J; Chenevix-Trench, G; Spurdle, A B; Beesley, J; Chen, X; Healey, S; Neuhausen, S L; Ding, Y C; Couch, F J; Wang, X; Lindor, N; Manoukian, S; Barile, M; Viel, A; Tizzoni, L; Szabo, C I; Foretova, L; Zikan, M; Claes, K; Greene, M H; Mai, P; Rennert, G; Lejbkowicz, F; Barnett-Griness, O; Andrulis, I L; Ozcelik, H; Weerasooriya, N; Gerdes, A-M; Thomassen, M; Cruger, D G; Caligo, M A; Friedman, E; Kaufman, B; Laitman, Y; Cohen, S; Kontorovich, T; Gershoni-Baruch, R; Dagan, E; Jernström, H; Askmalm, M S; Arver, B; Malmer, B; Domchek, S M; Nathanson, K L; Brunet, J; Ramón Y Cajal, T; Yannoukakos, D; Hamann, U; Hogervorst, F B L; Verhoef, S; Gómez García, E B; Wijnen, J T; van den Ouweland, A; Easton, D F; Peock, S; Cook, M; Oliver, C T; Frost, D; Luccarini, C; Evans, D G; Lalloo, F; Eeles, R; Pichert, G; Cook, J; Hodgson, S; Morrison, P J; Douglas, F; Godwin, A K; Sinilnikova, O M; Barjhoux, L; Stoppa-Lyonnet, D; Moncoutier, V; Giraud, S; Cassini, C; Olivier-Faivre, L; Révillion, F; Peyrat, J-P; Muller, D; Fricker, J-P; Lynch, H T; John, E M; Buys, S; Daly, M; Hopper, J L; Terry, M B; Miron, A; Yassin, Y; Goldgar, D; Singer, C F; Gschwantler-Kaulich, D; Pfeiler, G; Spiess, A-C; Hansen, Thomas V O; Johannsson, O T; Kirchhoff, T; Offit, K; Kosarin, K; Piedmonte, M; Rodriguez, G C; Wakeley, K; Boggess, J F; Basil, J; Schwartz, P E; Blank, S V; Toland, A E; Montagna, M; Casella, C; Imyanitov, E N; Allavena, A; Schmutzler, R K; Versmold, B; Engel, C; Meindl, A; Ditsch, N; Arnold, N; Niederacher, D; Deissler, H; Fiebig, B; Varon-Mateeva, R; Schaefer, D; Froster, U G; Caldes, T; de la Hoya, M; McGuffog, L; Antoniou, A C; Nevanlinna, H; Radice, P; Benítez, J

    2009-12-15

    In this study we aimed to evaluate the role of a SNP in intron 1 of the ERCC4 gene (rs744154), previously reported to be associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer in the general population, as a breast cancer risk modifier in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. We have genotyped rs744154 in 9408 BRCA1 and 5632 BRCA2 mutation carriers from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA) and assessed its association with breast cancer risk using a retrospective weighted cohort approach. We found no evidence of association with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 (per-allele HR: 0.98, 95% CI: 0.93-1.04, P = 0.5) or BRCA2 (per-allele HR: 0.97, 95% CI: 0.89-1.06, P = 0.5) mutation carriers. This SNP is not a significant modifier of breast cancer risk for mutation carriers, though weak associations cannot be ruled out.

  17. Duration of tamoxifen use and the risk of contralateral breast cancer in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Gronwald, Jacek; Robidoux, Andre; Kim-Sing, Charmaine; Tung, Nadine; Lynch, Henry T; Foulkes, William D; Manoukian, Siranoush; Ainsworth, Peter; Neuhausen, Susan L; Demsky, Rochelle; Eisen, Andrea; Singer, Christian F; Saal, Howard; Senter, Leigha; Eng, Charis; Weitzel, Jeffrey; Moller, Pal; Gilchrist, Dawna M; Olopade, Olufunmilayo; Ginsburg, Ophira; Sun, Ping; Huzarski, Tomasz; Lubinski, Jan; Narod, Steven A

    2014-07-01

    Women with a mutation in BRCA1 or BRCA2 face a lifetime risk of breast cancer of approximately 80 %. Tamoxifen treatment of the first cancer has been associated with a reduction in the risk of a subsequent contralateral cancer. We studied 1,504 women with a known BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation, 411 women with bilateral breast cancer (cases) and 1,093 women with unilateral breast cancer (controls) in a matched case-control study. Control women were of similar age and had a similar age of diagnosis of first breast cancer as the cases. For each woman who used tamoxifen, the starting and stopping dates were abstracted and the duration of tamoxifen use was calculated. Three hundred and thirty-one women had used tamoxifen (22 %); of these 84 (25 %) had completed four or more years of tamoxifen, the remainder stopped prematurely or were current users. For women with up to 1 year of tamoxifen use, the odds ratio for contralateral breast cancer was 0.37 (95 % CI 0.20-0.69; p = 0.001) compared to women with no tamoxifen use. Among women with 1-4 years of tamoxifen use the odds ratio was 0.53 (95 % CI 0.32-0.87; p = 0.01). Among women with four or more years of tamoxifen use the odds ratio was 0.83 (95 % CI 0.44-1.55; p = 0.55). Short-term use of tamoxifen for chemoprevention in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers may be as effective as a conventional 5-year course of treatment.

  18. BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation status and cancer family history of Danish women affected with multifocal or bilateral breast cancer at a young age

    PubMed Central

    Bergthorsson, J; Ejlertsen, B; Olsen, J; Borg, A; Nielsen, K; Barkardottir, R; Klausen, S; Mouridsen, H; Winther, K; Fenger, K; Niebuhr, A; Harboe, T; Niebuhr, E

    2001-01-01

    INTRODUCTION—A small fraction of breast cancer is the result of germline mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 cancer susceptibility genes. Mutation carriers frequently have a positive family history of breast and ovarian cancer, are often diagnosed at a young age, and may have a higher incidence of double or multiple primary breast tumours than breast cancer patients in general.
OBJECTIVES—To estimate the prevalence and spectrum of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in young Danish patients affected with bilateral or multifocal breast cancer and to determine the relationship of mutation status to family history of cancer.
SUBJECTS—From the files of the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group (DBCG), we selected 119 breast cancer patients diagnosed before the age of 46 years with either bilateral (n=59) or multifocal (n=61) disease.
METHODS—DNA from the subjects was screened for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations using single strand conformation analysis (SSCA) and the protein truncation test (PTT). Observed and expected cancer incidence in first degree relatives of the patients was estimated using data from the Danish Cancer Registry.
RESULTS—Twenty four mutation carriers were identified (20%), of whom 13 had a BRCA1 mutation and 11 carried a BRCA2 mutation. Two mutations in BRCA1 were found repeatedly in the material and accounted for seven of the 24 (29%) mutation carriers. The mutation frequency was about equal in patients with bilateral (22%) and multifocal breast cancer (18%). The incidence of breast and ovarian cancer was greatly increased in first degree relatives of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, but to a much lesser degree in relatives of non-carriers. An increased risk of cancer was also noted in brothers of non-carriers.
CONCLUSIONS—A relatively broad spectrum of germline mutations was observed in BRCA1 and BRCA2 and most of the mutations are present in other populations. Our results indicate that a diagnosis of bilateral and multifocal breast

  19. Double PALB2 and BRCA1/BRCA2 mutation carriers are rare in breast cancer and breast-ovarian cancer syndrome families from the French Canadian founder population.

    PubMed

    Ancot, Frédéric; Arcand, Suzanna L; Mes-Masson, Anne-Marie; Provencher, Diane M; Tonin, Patricia N

    2015-06-01

    French Canadian families with breast cancer and breast-ovarian cancer syndrome harbor specific BRCA1, BRCA2 and PALB2 germline mutations, which have been attributed to common founders. Mutations in these genes confer an increased risk to breast and ovarian cancers, and have been identified to play a role in and directly interact with the common homologous recombination DNA repair pathways. Our previous study described the case of a female diagnosed with breast cancer at 45 years old, who harbored the PALB2:c.2323C>T [p.Q775X] and BRCA2:c.9004G>A [p.E3002K] germline mutations, which have been found to recur in the French Canadian cancer families. As the frequency of double heterozygous carriers of breast-ovarian cancer susceptibility alleles is unknown, and due to the possibility that there may be implications for genetic counseling and management for these carriers, the present study investigated the co-occurrence of BRCA1/BRCA2 and PALB2 mutations in the French Canadian cancer families. The PALB2:c.2323C>T [p.Q775X] mutation, which is the only PALB2 mutation to have been identified in French Canadian cancer families, was screened in 214 breast cancer cases and 22 breast-ovarian cancer cases from 114 BRCA1/BRCA2 mutation-positive French Canadian breast cancer (n=61) and breast-ovarian cancer (n=53) families using a tailored polymerase chain reaction-based TaqMan® SNP Genotyping Assay. No additional PALB2:c.2323C>T [p.Q775X] mutation carriers were identified among the BRCA1/BRCA2 mutation carriers. The results suggest that carriers of the PALB2:c.2323C>T [p.Q775X] mutation rarely co-occur in French Canadian breast cancer and breast-ovarian cancer families harboring BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations.

  20. Double PALB2 and BRCA1/BRCA2 mutation carriers are rare in breast cancer and breast-ovarian cancer syndrome families from the French Canadian founder population

    PubMed Central

    ANCOT, FRÉDÉRIC; ARCAND, SUZANNA L.; MES-MASSON, ANNE-MARIE; PROVENCHER, DIANE M.; TONIN, PATRICIA N.

    2015-01-01

    French Canadian families with breast cancer and breast-ovarian cancer syndrome harbor specific BRCA1, BRCA2 and PALB2 germline mutations, which have been attributed to common founders. Mutations in these genes confer an increased risk to breast and ovarian cancers, and have been identified to play a role in and directly interact with the common homologous recombination DNA repair pathways. Our previous study described the case of a female diagnosed with breast cancer at 45 years old, who harbored the PALB2:c.2323C>T [p.Q775X] and BRCA2:c.9004G>A [p.E3002K] germline mutations, which have been found to recur in the French Canadian cancer families. As the frequency of double heterozygous carriers of breast-ovarian cancer susceptibility alleles is unknown, and due to the possibility that there may be implications for genetic counseling and management for these carriers, the present study investigated the co-occurrence of BRCA1/BRCA2 and PALB2 mutations in the French Canadian cancer families. The PALB2:c.2323C>T [p.Q775X] mutation, which is the only PALB2 mutation to have been identified in French Canadian cancer families, was screened in 214 breast cancer cases and 22 breast-ovarian cancer cases from 114 BRCA1/BRCA2 mutation-positive French Canadian breast cancer (n=61) and breast-ovarian cancer (n=53) families using a tailored polymerase chain reaction-based TaqMan® SNP Genotyping Assay. No additional PALB2:c.2323C>T [p.Q775X] mutation carriers were identified among the BRCA1/BRCA2 mutation carriers. The results suggest that carriers of the PALB2:c.2323C>T [p.Q775X] mutation rarely co-occur in French Canadian breast cancer and breast-ovarian cancer families harboring BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations. PMID:26137147

  1. [Analysis of mutations in genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 among patients with breast and ovarian cancer in northern Portugal and Galicia].

    PubMed

    Duarte, F; Cameselle-Teijeiro, J F; Soares, R; Seixas, C; Cortizo-Torres, M E; Pérez-Villanueva, J; Schmitt, F C

    2002-05-01

    To detect mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes by means of the protein truncation test (PTT) in a population in northern Portugal and Galicia with breast and ovarian cancer. Prospective study. Patients in northern Portugal and Galicia with family history of breast and/or ovarian cancer.Patients. A total of 76 women with family history of breast cancer according to the BCLC criteria (Breast Cancer Linkage Consortium) were studied at IPATIMUP. Five cases (6.5%) with changes in the normal sequence in genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 were identified; three of these mutations occurred in the gene BRCA1 and the other two in the gene BRCA2. Two out of the three mutations found in the gene BRCA1 were de novo mutations. Changes detected in the normal sequence in the gene BRCA2 were mutations reported for the first time among the study population, according to the information obtained through the BCIC database (Breast Cancer Information Core). This was the first study in detecting individuals carrying mutations in the susceptibility breast cancer genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 among the population of northern Portugal and Galicia.

  2. Prospective evaluation of alcohol consumption and the risk of breast cancer in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Cybulski, Cezary; Lubinski, Jan; Huzarski, Tomasz; Lynch, Henry T; Randall, Susan Armel; Neuhausen, Susan L; Senter, Leigha; Friedman, Susan; Ainsworth, Peter; Singer, Christian; Foulkes, William D; Narod, Steven A; Sun, Ping; Kotsopoulos, Joanne

    2015-06-01

    Given the adverse effect of alcohol in the development of breast cancer among women in the general population, we evaluated whether a similar association exists among women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation. Information regarding baseline daily alcohol consumption was abstracted from a research questionnaire for 3067 BRCA mutation carriers enrolled in a prospective cohort study. Women were followed biennially until the date of the last follow-up questionnaire, date of breast cancer diagnosis, date of prophylactic bilateral mastectomy, or date of death. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate relative risks (RRs) and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) for invasive breast cancer associated with alcohol consumed at or prior to completion of the baseline questionnaire. After a mean of 5.4 years of follow-up, we observed 259 incident cases of primary invasive breast cancer. Compared with non-users, the adjusted RRs were 1.06 (95 % CI 0.78-1.44) for ever use and 1.08 (0.79-1.47) for current alcohol use. For women in the highest versus lowest quintile of cumulative alcohol consumption, the RR was 0.94 (95 % CI 0.63-1.40; P trend = 0.65). Our findings suggest that alcohol consumption is not a risk factor for breast cancer among women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation.

  3. Impact of oophorectomy on cancer incidence and mortality in women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation.

    PubMed

    Finch, Amy P M; Lubinski, Jan; Møller, Pål; Singer, Christian F; Karlan, Beth; Senter, Leigha; Rosen, Barry; Maehle, Lovise; Ghadirian, Parviz; Cybulski, Cezary; Huzarski, Tomasz; Eisen, Andrea; Foulkes, William D; Kim-Sing, Charmaine; Ainsworth, Peter; Tung, Nadine; Lynch, Henry T; Neuhausen, Susan; Metcalfe, Kelly A; Thompson, Islay; Murphy, Joan; Sun, Ping; Narod, Steven A

    2014-05-20

    The purposes of this study were to estimate the reduction in risk of ovarian, fallopian tube, or peritoneal cancer in women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation after oophorectomy, by age of oophorectomy; to estimate the impact of prophylactic oophorectomy on all-cause mortality; and to estimate 5-year survival associated with clinically detected ovarian, occult, and peritoneal cancers diagnosed in the cohort. Women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation were identified from an international registry; 5,783 women completed a baseline questionnaire and ≥ one follow-up questionnaires. Women were observed until either diagnosis of ovarian, fallopian tube, or peritoneal cancer, death, or date of most recent follow-up. Hazard ratios (HRs) for cancer incidence and all-cause mortality associated with oophorectomy were evaluated using time-dependent survival analyses. After an average follow-up period of 5.6 years, 186 women developed either ovarian (n = 132), fallopian (n = 22), or peritoneal (n = 32) cancer, of whom 68 have died. HR for ovarian, fallopian, or peritoneal cancer associated with bilateral oophorectomy was 0.20 (95% CI, 0.13 to 0.30; P < .001). Among women who had no history of cancer at baseline, HR for all-cause mortality to age 70 years associated with an oophorectomy was 0.23 (95% CI, 0.13 to 0.39; P < .001). Preventive oophorectomy was associated with an 80% reduction in the risk of ovarian, fallopian tube, or peritoneal cancer in BRCA1 or BRCA2 carriers and a 77% reduction in all-cause mortality. © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  4. Impact of Oophorectomy on Cancer Incidence and Mortality in Women With a BRCA1 or BRCA2 Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Finch, Amy P.M.; Lubinski, Jan; Møller, Pål; Singer, Christian F.; Karlan, Beth; Senter, Leigha; Rosen, Barry; Maehle, Lovise; Ghadirian, Parviz; Cybulski, Cezary; Huzarski, Tomasz; Eisen, Andrea; Foulkes, William D.; Kim-Sing, Charmaine; Ainsworth, Peter; Tung, Nadine; Lynch, Henry T.; Neuhausen, Susan; Metcalfe, Kelly A.; Thompson, Islay; Murphy, Joan; Sun, Ping; Narod, Steven A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purposes of this study were to estimate the reduction in risk of ovarian, fallopian tube, or peritoneal cancer in women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation after oophorectomy, by age of oophorectomy; to estimate the impact of prophylactic oophorectomy on all-cause mortality; and to estimate 5-year survival associated with clinically detected ovarian, occult, and peritoneal cancers diagnosed in the cohort. Patients and Methods Women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation were identified from an international registry; 5,783 women completed a baseline questionnaire and ≥ one follow-up questionnaires. Women were observed until either diagnosis of ovarian, fallopian tube, or peritoneal cancer, death, or date of most recent follow-up. Hazard ratios (HRs) for cancer incidence and all-cause mortality associated with oophorectomy were evaluated using time-dependent survival analyses. Results After an average follow-up period of 5.6 years, 186 women developed either ovarian (n = 132), fallopian (n = 22), or peritoneal (n = 32) cancer, of whom 68 have died. HR for ovarian, fallopian, or peritoneal cancer associated with bilateral oophorectomy was 0.20 (95% CI, 0.13 to 0.30; P < .001). Among women who had no history of cancer at baseline, HR for all-cause mortality to age 70 years associated with an oophorectomy was 0.23 (95% CI, 0.13 to 0.39; P < .001). Conclusion Preventive oophorectomy was associated with an 80% reduction in the risk of ovarian, fallopian tube, or peritoneal cancer in BRCA1 or BRCA2 carriers and a 77% reduction in all-cause mortality. PMID:24567435

  5. No association of TGFB1 L10P genotypes and breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers: a multi-center cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Antoniou, Antonis C.; Llopis, Trinidad Caldes; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Simard, Jacques; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Couch, Fergus J.; Pereira, Lutecia H. Mateus; Greene, Mark H.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Pasche, Boris; Kaklamani, Virginia; Hamann, Ute; Szabo, Csilla; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Harrington, Patricia A.; Donaldson, Alan; Male, Allison M.; Gardiner, Carol Anne; Gregory, Helen; Side, Lucy E.; Robinson, Anne C.; Emmerson, Louise; Ellis, Ian; Peyrat, Jean-Philippe; Fournier, Joëlle; Vennin, Philippe; Adenis, Claude; Muller, Danièle; Fricker, Jean-Pierre; Longy, Michel; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Versmold, Beatrix; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Kast, Karin; Schaefer, Dieter; Froster, Ursula G.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.

    2008-01-01

    Background The transforming growth factor β-1 gene (TGFB1) is a plausible candidate for breast cancer susceptibility. The L10P variant of TGFB1 is associated with higher circulating levels and secretion of TGF-β, and recent large-scale studies suggest strongly that this variant is associated with breast cancer risk in the general population. Methods To evaluate whether TGFB1 L10P also modifies the risk of breast cancer in BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers, we undertook a multi-center study of 3,442 BRCA1 and 2,095 BRCA2 mutation carriers. Results We found no evidence of association between TGFB1 L10P and breast cancer risk in either BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. The per-allele HR for the L10P variant was 1.01 (95%CI: 0.92–1.11) in BRCA1 carriers and 0.92 (95%CI: 0.81–1.04) in BRCA2 mutation carriers. Conclusions These results do not support the hypothesis that TGFB1 L10P genotypes modify the risk of breast cancer in BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. PMID:18523885

  6. Modifiers of Cancer Risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Friebel, Tara M.; Domchek, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    Background There is substantial variability in cancer risk in women who have inherited a BRCA1 or BRCA2 (BRCA1/2) mutation. Numerous factors have been hypothesized to modify these risks, but studies are of variable quality, and it remains unclear which of these may be of value in clinical risk assessment. Methods PubMed and Web of Science databases were searched for articles published through September 2013. Fixed effects meta-analysis was done using the hazard ratios and/or odds ratios to estimate the pooled effect estimates (ES) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) to identify factors that are associated with cancer risk modification in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. Results We identified 44 nonoverlapping studies that met predefined quality criteria. Sufficient evidence is available to make clinically relevant inferences about a number of cancer risk modifiers. The only variable examined that produced a probable association was late age at first live birth, a meta-analysis showed a decrease in the risk of breast cancer in BRCA1 mutation carriers with women aged 30 years or older vs. women younger than 30 years (ES = 0.65; 95% CI =0.42 to 0.99). The same was shown for women aged 25 to 29 years versus those aged less than 25 years (ES = 0.69; 95% CI = 0.48 to 0.99). Breastfeeding and tubal ligation were associated with reduced ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 mutation carriers; oral contraceptives were associated with reduced risk among BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. Smoking was associated with increased breast cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers only. Conclusions Data assessing many potential risk modifiers are inadequate, and many have not been externally validated. Although additional studies are required to confirm some associations, sufficient information is available for some risk factors to be used in risk counseling or lifestyle modification to minimize cancer risk in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. PMID:24824314

  7. Prevalence of BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations in a Brazilian population sample at-risk for hereditary breast cancer and characterization of its genetic ancestry

    PubMed Central

    Paula, André E.; Pereira, Rui; Andrade, Carlos E.; Felicio, Paula S.; Souza, Cristiano P.; Mendes, Deise R.P.; Volc, Sahlua; Berardinelli, Gustavo N.; Grasel, Rebeca S.; Sabato, Cristina S.; Viana, Danilo V.; Machado, José Carlos; Costa, José Luis; Mauad, Edmundo C.; Scapulatempo-Neto, Cristovam; Arun, Banu; Reis, Rui M.; Palmero, Edenir I.

    2016-01-01

    Background There are very few data about the mutational profile of families at-risk for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) from Latin America (LA) and especially from Brazil, the largest and most populated country in LA. Results Of the 349 probands analyzed, 21.5% were BRCA1/BRCA2 mutated, 65.3% at BRCA1 and 34.7% at BRCA2 gene. The mutation c.5266dupC (former 5382insC) was the most frequent alteration, representing 36.7% of the BRCA1 mutations and 24.0% of all mutations identified. Together with the BRCA1 c.3331_3334delCAAG mutation, these mutations constitutes about 35% of the identified mutations and more than 50% of the BRCA1 pathogenic mutations. Interestingly, six new mutations were identified. Additionally, 39 out of the 44 pathogenic mutations identified were not previously reported in the Brazilian population. Besides, 36 different variants of unknown significance (VUS) were identified. Regarding ancestry, average ancestry proportions were 70.6% European, 14.5% African, 8.0% Native American and 6.8% East Asian. Materials and methods This study characterized 349 Brazilian families at-risk for HBOC regarding their germline BRCA1/BRCA2 status and genetic ancestry. Conclusions This is the largest report of BRCA1/BRCA2 assessment in an at-risk HBOC Brazilian population. We identified 21.5% of patients harboring BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations and characterized the genetic ancestry of a sample group at-risk for hereditary breast cancer showing once again how admixed is the Brazilian population. No association was found between genetic ancestry and mutational status. The knowledge of the mutational profile in a population can contribute to the definition of more cost-effective strategies for the identification of HBOC families. PMID:27741520

  8. Factors Influencing Ovulation and the Risk of Ovarian Cancer in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Kotsopoulos, Joanne; Lubinski, Jan; Gronwald, Jacek; Cybulski, Cezary; Demsky, Rochelle; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Kim-Sing, Charmaine; Tung, Nadine; Friedman, Susan; Senter, Leigha; Weitzel, Jeffrey; Karlan, Beth; Moller, Pal; Sun, Ping; Narod, Steven A.

    2015-01-01

    The role of the lifetime number of ovulatory cycles has not been evaluated in the context of BRCA – associated ovarian cancer. Thus, we conducted a matched case-control study to evaluate the relationship between the cumulative number of ovulatory cycles (and contributing components) and risk of developing ovarian cancer in BRCA mutation carriers (1,329 cases and 5,267 controls). Information regarding reproductive and hormonal factors was collected from a routinely administered questionnaire. Conditional logistic regression was used to evaluate all associations. We observed a 45% reduction in the risk of developing ovarian cancer among women in the lowest vs. highest quartile of ovulatory cycles (OR = 0.55; 95%CI 0.41–0.75 P=0.0001). Breastfeeding for more than 12 months was associated with a 38% (95%CI 0.48–0.79) and 50% (95%CI 0.29–0.84) reduction in risk among BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, respectively. For oral contraceptive use, maximum benefit was seen with five or more years of use among BRCA1 mutation carriers (OR = 0.50; 95%CI 0.40–0.63) and three or more years for BRCA2 mutation carriers (OR = 0.42; 95%CI 0.22–0.83). Increasing parity was associated with a significant inverse trend among BRCA1 (OR = 0.87; 95%CI 0.79–0.96; P-trend=0.005) but not BRCA2 mutation carriers (OR 0.98; 95%CI 0.81–1.19; P-trend=0.85). A later age at menopause was associated with an increased risk in women with a BRCA1 mutation (OR trend = 1.18; 95%CI 1.03–1.35; P =0.02). These findings support an important role of breastfeeding and oral contraceptive use for the primary prevention of ovarian cancer among women carrying BRCA mutations. PMID:25482078

  9. Comprehensive analysis of BRCA1 and BRCA2 germline mutations in a large cohort of 5931 Chinese women with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Juan; Sun, Jie; Chen, Jiuan; Yao, Lu; Ouyang, Tao; Li, Jinfeng; Wang, Tianfeng; Fan, Zhaoqing; Fan, Tie; Lin, Benyao; Xie, Yuntao

    2016-08-01

    We determined the prevalence and characteristics of BRCA1/2 germline mutations in a large cohort of Chinese women with breast cancer. A total of 5931 unselected Chinese women with breast cancer were enrolled in this study and underwent testing for BRCA1/2 mutations. Of these, 543 patients were familial breast cancer, 1033 were early-onset disease (≤40 years) without family history of breast cancer, and 4355 were sporadic breast cancer. In total, 232 patients (3.9 %) carried a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation (110 in BRCA1and 122 in BRCA2) in this cohort of 5931 patients. BRCA1/2 mutation rate was 16.9 % (92/543) in familial breast cancers, 5.2 % (54/1033) in early-onset breast cancers (≤40 years), and 2.0 % in sporadic breast cancers (>40 years), respectively. The BRCA1/2 mutation rate was 27.0 % in 111 familial breast cancers diagnosed at and before the age of 40. 41.4 % of mutations in this cohort were specific for Chinese population. Recurrent mutations accounted for 44.8 % of the entire mutations in 2382 cases that BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes were fully sequenced in this study. Both BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers were significantly more likely to be early-onset and bilateral breast cancers, high-grade cancer, and to have a family history of breast cancer compared with non-carriers. BRCA1 mutation carriers were more likely to be triple-negative cancer than BRCA2 mutation carriers and non-carriers. Our data provide guidelines for Chinese women with breast cancer who should undergo BRCA1/2 genetic testing; additionally, recurrent mutations account for nearly half of the mutations and some of them are specific for Chinese women.

  10. BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in males with familial breast and ovarian cancer syndrome. Results of a Spanish multicenter study.

    PubMed

    de Juan, Inmaculada; Palanca, Sarai; Domenech, Asunción; Feliubadaló, Lidia; Segura, Ángel; Osorio, Ana; Chirivella, Isabel; de la Hoya, Miguel; Sánchez, Ana Beatriz; Infante, Mar; Tena, Isabel; Díez, Orland; Garcia-Casado, Zaida; Vega, Ana; Teulé, Àlex; Barroso, Alicia; Pérez, Pedro; Durán, Mercedes; Carrasco, Estela; Juan-Fita, M José; Murria, Rosa; Llop, Marta; Barragan, Eva; Izquierdo, Ángel; Benítez, Javier; Caldés, Trinidad; Salas, Dolores; Bolufer, Pascual

    2015-12-01

    Male breast cancer (MBC) is a rare disease that represents <1% of all breast cancers (BCs). We analyze the results of a multicenter study performed in Spanish familial MBC including family history of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome (HBOCS) and clinicopathological features. We also study the relationship between BRCA1/BRCA2 mutational status in male relatives affected with cancer (MAC) and, family history and tumor types. The study included 312 men index cases with family history of HBOCS and 61 MAC BRCA1/2 mutation-carriers. Family history, histological grade (HG), clinicopathological and immunohistochemistry data were collected. BRCA1/2 mutation analyses were performed by direct sequencing or screening methods and the large rearrangements by multiplex ligation dependent probe amplification. We found 49 mutation-carriers (15.7%), 95.9% with BRCA2 mutations. BRCA2 mutation-carriers were associated with families with at least one MBC and one BC in female (type II; p = 0.05). Strong association were found between the presence of pathogenic mutations in MBCs and the advanced HG (p = 0.003). c.658_659delTG, c.2808_2811delACAA, c.6275_6276delTT and c.9026_9030delATCAT were the most prevalent mutations. In 61 MAC we found 20 mutations in BRCA1 and 41 in BRCA2. For MAC we show that mutational status was differentially associated with family history (p = 0.018) and tumor type, being BRCA2 mutations linked with BC and prostatic cancer (p = 0.018). MBC caused by BRCA1/2 mutations define two types of MBCs. The most frequent caused by BRCA2 mutation linked to type II families and the rarest one attributed to BRCA1 mutation. Tumor associated with MAC suggest that only BRCA2 mutations have to do with a specific type of cancer (BC and prostatic cancer); but the linkage to tumors is questionable for BRCA1 mutations .

  11. Breast Cancer Survival of BRCA1/BRCA2 Mutation Carriers in a Hospital-Based Cohort of Young Women.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Marjanka K; van den Broek, Alexandra J; Tollenaar, Rob A E M; Smit, Vincent T H B M; Westenend, Pieter J; Brinkhuis, Mariël; Oosterhuis, Wolter J W; Wesseling, Jelle; Janssen-Heijnen, Maryska L; Jobsen, Jan J; Jager, Agnes; Voogd, Adri C; van Leeuwen, Flora E; van 't Veer, Laura J

    2017-08-01

    The primary aim of the study was to investigate prognosis and long-term survival in young breast cancer patients with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 germline mutation compared with noncarriers. The secondary aim was to investigate whether differences in survival originate from associations with tumor characteristics, second cancers, and/or treatment response. We established a cohort of invasive breast cancer patients diagnosed younger than age 50 years in 10 Dutch hospitals between 1970 and 2003. BRCA1/2 testing of most prevalent mutations was mainly done using DNA isolate from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded nontumor tissue. Survival estimates were derived using Cox regression and competing risk models. In 6478 breast cancer patients, we identified 3.2% BRCA1 and 1.2% BRCA2 mutation carriers. BRCA1 mutation carriers had a worse overall survival independent of clinico-pathological/treatment characteristics, compared with noncarriers (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] = 1.20, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.97 to 1.47), though only statistically significant in the first five years of follow-up (adjusted HR = 1.40, 95% CI = 1.07 to 1.84). A large part of the worse survival was explained by incidence of ovarian cancers. Breast cancer-specific, disease-free, and metastasis-free survival results were less pronounced and mostly statistically nonsignificant but in the same direction with those of overall survival. Overall survival was worse, although not statistically significantly, within the ER-negative or ER-positive, grade 3, and small tumor subgroups. The worse survival was most pronounced in non-chemotherapy-treated patients (adjusted HR = 1.54, 95% CI = 1.08 to 2.19). Power for BRCA2 mutation carriers was limited; only after five years' follow-up overall survival was worse (adjusted HR = 1.47, 95% CI = 1.00 to 2.17). BRCA1/2 mutation carriers diagnosed with breast cancer before age 50 years are prone to a worse survival, which is partly explained by

  12. Establishment of three human breast epithelial cell lines derived from carriers of the 999del5 BRCA2 Icelandic founder mutation.

    PubMed

    Rubner Fridriksdottir, Agla J; Gudjonsson, Thorarinn; Halldorsson, Thorhallur; Björnsson, Johannes; Steinarsdottir, Margret; Johannsson, Oskar Thor; Ogmundsdottir, Helga M

    2005-01-01

    Germ line mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 account for a large proportion of inherited breast and ovarian cancer. Both genes are involved in DNA repair by homologous recombination and are thought to play a vital role in maintaining genomic stability. A major drawback for long-term functional studies of BRCA in general and BRCA2 in particular has been a lack of representative human breast epithelial cell lines. In the present study, we have established three cell lines from two patients harboring the 999del5 germ line founder mutation in the BRCA2 gene. Primary cultures were established from cellular outgrowth of explanted tissue and subsequently transfected with a retroviral construct containing the HPV-16 E6 and E7 oncogenes. Paired cancer-derived and normal-derived cell lines were established from one patient referred to as BRCA2-999del5-2T and BRCA2-999del5-2N, respectively. In addition, one cell line was derived from cancer-associated normal tissue from another patient referred to as BRCA2-999del5-1N. All three cell lines showed characteristics of breast epithelial cells as evidenced by expression of breast epithelial specific cytokeratins. Cytogenetic analysis showed marked chromosomal instability with tetraploidy and frequent telomeric associations. In conclusion, we have established three breast epithelial cell lines from two patients carrying the BRCA2 Icelandic 999del5 founder mutation. These cell lines form the basis for further studies on carcinogenesis and malignant progression of breast cancer on a defined genetic background.

  13. Common variants in LSP1, 2q35 and 8q24 and breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    PubMed Central

    Antoniou, Antonis C.; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Nevanlinna, Heli; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Simard, Jacques; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Ding, Yuan C.; Couch, Fergus J.; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peissel, Bernard; Bonanni, Bernardo; Viel, Alessandra; Bernard, Loris; Radice, Paolo; Szabo, Csilla I.; Foretova, Lenka; Zikan, Michal; Claes, Kathleen; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Rennert, Gad; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Andrulis, Irene L.; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Glendon, Gord; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Thomassen, Mads; Sunde, Lone; Caligo, Maria A.; Laitman, Yael; Kontorovich, Tair; Cohen, Shimrit; Kaufman, Bella; Dagan, Efrat; Baruch, Ruth Gershoni; Friedman, Eitan; Harbst, Katja; Barbany-Bustinza, Gisela; Rantala, Johanna; Ehrencrona, Hans; Karlsson, Per; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Osorio, Ana; Blanco, Ignacio; Lasa, Adriana; Benítez, Javier; Hamann, Ute; Hogervorst, Frans B.L.; Rookus, Matti A.; Collee, J. Margriet; Devilee, Peter; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J.; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Aalfs, Cora M.; Waisfisz, Quinten; Wijnen, Juul; van Roozendaal, Cornelis E.P.; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Frost, Debra; Oliver, Clare; Platte, Radka; Evans, D. Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Eeles, Rosalind; Izatt, Louise; Davidson, Rosemarie; Chu, Carol; Eccles, Diana; Cole, Trevor; Hodgson, Shirley; Godwin, Andrew K.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Buecher, Bruno; Léoné, Mélanie; Bressac-de Paillerets, Brigitte; Remenieras, Audrey; Caron, Olivier; Lenoir, Gilbert M.; Sevenet, Nicolas; Longy, Michel; Ferrer, Sandra Fert; Prieur, Fabienne; Goldgar, David; Miron, Alexander; John, Esther M.; Buys, Saundra S.; Daly, Mary B.; Hopper, John L.; Terry, Mary Beth; Yassin, Yosuf; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Staudigl, Christine; Hansen, Thomas v. O.; Barkardottir, Rosa Bjork; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Pal, Prodipto; Kosarin, Kristi; Offit, Kenneth; Piedmonte, Marion; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Wakeley, Katie; Boggess, John F.; Basil, Jack; Schwartz, Peter E.; Blank, Stephanie V.; Toland, Amanda E.; Montagna, Marco; Casella, Cinzia; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Allavena, Anna; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Versmold, Beatrix; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Niederacher, Dieter; Deißler, Helmut; Fiebig, Britta; Suttner, Christian; Schönbuchner, Ines; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Pooley, Karen A.; Easton, Douglas F.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia

    2009-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies of breast cancer have identified multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are associated with increased breast cancer risks in the general population. In a previous study, we demonstrated that the minor alleles at three of these SNPs, in FGFR2, TNRC9 and MAP3K1, also confer increased risks of breast cancer for BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. Three additional SNPs rs3817198 at LSP1, rs13387042 at 2q35 and rs13281615 at 8q24 have since been reported to be associated with breast cancer in the general population, and in this study we evaluated their association with breast cancer risk in 9442 BRCA1 and 5665 BRCA2 mutation carriers from 33 study centres. The minor allele of rs3817198 was associated with increased breast cancer risk only for BRCA2 mutation carriers [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.16, 95% CI: 1.07–1.25, P-trend = 2.8 × 10−4]. The best fit for the association of SNP rs13387042 at 2q35 with breast cancer risk was a dominant model for both BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers (BRCA1: HR = 1.14, 95% CI: 1.04–1.25, P = 0.0047; BRCA2: HR = 1.18 95% CI: 1.04–1.33, P = 0.0079). SNP rs13281615 at 8q24 was not associated with breast cancer for either BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers, but the estimated association for BRCA2 mutation carriers (per-allele HR = 1.06, 95% CI: 0.98–1.14) was consistent with odds ratio estimates derived from population-based case–control studies. The LSP1 and 2q35 SNPs appear to interact multiplicatively on breast cancer risk for BRCA2 mutation carriers. There was no evidence that the associations vary by mutation type depending on whether the mutated protein is predicted to be stable or not. PMID:19656774

  14. Common variants in LSP1, 2q35 and 8q24 and breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Antoniou, Antonis C; Sinilnikova, Olga M; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Nevanlinna, Heli; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Simard, Jacques; Spurdle, Amanda B; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Neuhausen, Susan L; Ding, Yuan C; Couch, Fergus J; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peissel, Bernard; Bonanni, Bernardo; Viel, Alessandra; Bernard, Loris; Radice, Paolo; Szabo, Csilla I; Foretova, Lenka; Zikan, Michal; Claes, Kathleen; Greene, Mark H; Mai, Phuong L; Rennert, Gad; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Andrulis, Irene L; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Glendon, Gord; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Thomassen, Mads; Sunde, Lone; Caligo, Maria A; Laitman, Yael; Kontorovich, Tair; Cohen, Shimrit; Kaufman, Bella; Dagan, Efrat; Baruch, Ruth Gershoni; Friedman, Eitan; Harbst, Katja; Barbany-Bustinza, Gisela; Rantala, Johanna; Ehrencrona, Hans; Karlsson, Per; Domchek, Susan M; Nathanson, Katherine L; Osorio, Ana; Blanco, Ignacio; Lasa, Adriana; Benítez, Javier; Hamann, Ute; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Rookus, Matti A; Collee, J Margriet; Devilee, Peter; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J; van der Luijt, Rob B; Aalfs, Cora M; Waisfisz, Quinten; Wijnen, Juul; van Roozendaal, Cornelis E P; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Frost, Debra; Oliver, Clare; Platte, Radka; Evans, D Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Eeles, Rosalind; Izatt, Louise; Davidson, Rosemarie; Chu, Carol; Eccles, Diana; Cole, Trevor; Hodgson, Shirley; Godwin, Andrew K; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Buecher, Bruno; Léoné, Mélanie; Bressac-de Paillerets, Brigitte; Remenieras, Audrey; Caron, Olivier; Lenoir, Gilbert M; Sevenet, Nicolas; Longy, Michel; Ferrer, Sandra Fert; Prieur, Fabienne; Goldgar, David; Miron, Alexander; John, Esther M; Buys, Saundra S; Daly, Mary B; Hopper, John L; Terry, Mary Beth; Yassin, Yosuf; Singer, Christian; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Staudigl, Christine; Hansen, Thomas v O; Barkardottir, Rosa Bjork; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Pal, Prodipto; Kosarin, Kristi; Offit, Kenneth; Piedmonte, Marion; Rodriguez, Gustavo C; Wakeley, Katie; Boggess, John F; Basil, Jack; Schwartz, Peter E; Blank, Stephanie V; Toland, Amanda E; Montagna, Marco; Casella, Cinzia; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Allavena, Anna; Schmutzler, Rita K; Versmold, Beatrix; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Niederacher, Dieter; Deissler, Helmut; Fiebig, Britta; Suttner, Christian; Schönbuchner, Ines; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Pooley, Karen A; Easton, Douglas F; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia

    2009-11-15

    Genome-wide association studies of breast cancer have identified multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are associated with increased breast cancer risks in the general population. In a previous study, we demonstrated that the minor alleles at three of these SNPs, in FGFR2, TNRC9 and MAP3K1, also confer increased risks of breast cancer for BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. Three additional SNPs rs3817198 at LSP1, rs13387042 at 2q35 and rs13281615 at 8q24 have since been reported to be associated with breast cancer in the general population, and in this study we evaluated their association with breast cancer risk in 9442 BRCA1 and 5665 BRCA2 mutation carriers from 33 study centres. The minor allele of rs3817198 was associated with increased breast cancer risk only for BRCA2 mutation carriers [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.16, 95% CI: 1.07-1.25, P-trend = 2.8 x 10(-4)]. The best fit for the association of SNP rs13387042 at 2q35 with breast cancer risk was a dominant model for both BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers (BRCA1: HR = 1.14, 95% CI: 1.04-1.25, P = 0.0047; BRCA2: HR = 1.18 95% CI: 1.04-1.33, P = 0.0079). SNP rs13281615 at 8q24 was not associated with breast cancer for either BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers, but the estimated association for BRCA2 mutation carriers (per-allele HR = 1.06, 95% CI: 0.98-1.14) was consistent with odds ratio estimates derived from population-based case-control studies. The LSP1 and 2q35 SNPs appear to interact multiplicatively on breast cancer risk for BRCA2 mutation carriers. There was no evidence that the associations vary by mutation type depending on whether the mutated protein is predicted to be stable or not.

  15. A non-synonymous polymorphism in IRS1 modifies risk of developing breast and ovarian cancers in BRCA1 and ovarian cancer in BRCA2 mutation carriers

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yuan C.; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Friedman, Eitan; Laitman, Yael; Shani-Shimon–Paluch; Kaufman, Bella; Liljegren, Annelie; Lindblom, Annika; Olsson, Håkan; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Melin, Beatrice; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Gronwald, Jacek; Huzarski, Tomasz; Cybulski, Cezary; Byrski, Tomasz; Osorio, Ana; Cajal, Teresa Ramóny; Stavropoulou, Alexandra V; Benítez, Javier; Hamann, Ute; Rookus, Matti; Aalfs, Cora M.; de Lange, Judith L.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E.J.; Oosterwijk, Jan C.; van Asperen, Christi J.; García, Encarna B. Gómez; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Jager, Agnes; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Easton, Douglas F.; Peock, Susan; Frost, Debra; Ellis, Steve D.; Platte, Radka; Fineberg, Elena; Evans, D. Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Izatt, Louise; Eeles, Ros; Adlard, Julian; Davidson, Rosemarie; Eccles, Diana; Cole, Trevor; Cook, Jackie; Brewer, Carole; Tischkowitz, Marc; Godwin, Andrew K.; Pathak, Harsh; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Barjhoux, Laure; Léoné, Mélanie; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Caux-Moncoutier, Virginie; de Pauw, Antoine; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Dreyfus, Hélène; Ferrer, Sandra Fert; Collonge-Rame, Marie-Agnès; Sokolowska, Johanna; Buys, Saundra; Daly, Mary; Miron, Alex; Terry, Mary Beth; Chung, Wendy; John, Esther M; Southey, Melissa; Goldgar, David; Singer, Christian F; Maria, Muy-Kheng Tea; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Hansen, Thomas v. O.; Ejlertsen, Bent; Johannsson, Oskar Th.; Offit, Kenneth; Sarrel, Kara; Gaudet, Mia M.; Vijai, Joseph; Robson, Mark; Piedmonte, Marion R; Andrews, Lesley; Cohn, David; DeMars, Leslie R.; DiSilvestro, Paul; Rodriguez, Gustavo; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Montagna, Marco; Agata, Simona; Imyanitov, Evgeny; Isaacs, Claudine; Janavicius, Ramunas; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Ramus, Susan J; Sucheston, Lara; Karlan, Beth Y.; Gross, Jenny; Ganz, Patricia A.; Beattie, Mary S.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Meindl, Alfons; Arnold, Norbert; Niederacher, Dieter; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Gadzicki, Dorotehea; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Deissler, Helmut; Gehrig, Andrea; Sutter, Christian; Kast, Karin; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Simard, Jacques; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Tomlinson, Gail E.; Weitzel, Jeffrey; Garber, Judy E.; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Rubinstein, Wendy S.; Tung, Nadine; Blum, Joanne L.; Narod, Steven A.; Brummel, Sean; Gillen, Daniel L.; Lindor, Noralane; Fredericksen, Zachary; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Couch, Fergus J.; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Greene, Mark H.; Loud, Jennifer T.; Mai, Phuong L.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Thomassen, Mads; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Caligo, Maria A.; Lee, Andrew; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C; Neuhausen, Susan L.

    2012-01-01

    Background We previously reported significant associations between genetic variants in insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1) and breast cancer risk in women carrying BRCA1 mutations. The objectives of this study were to investigate whether the IRS1 variants modified ovarian cancer risk and were associated with breast cancer risk in a larger cohort of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Methods IRS1 rs1801123, rs1330645, and rs1801278 were genotyped in samples from 36 centers in the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA). Data were analyzed by a retrospective cohort approach modeling the associations with breast and ovarian cancer risks simultaneously. Analyses were stratified by BRCA1 and BRCA2 status and mutation class in BRCA1 carriers. Results Rs1801278 (Gly972Arg) was associated with ovarian cancer risk for both BRCA1 [Hazard ratio (HR) = 1.43; 95% CI: 1.06–1.92; p = 0.019] and BRCA2 mutation carriers (HR=2.21; 95% CI: 1.39–3.52, p=0.0008). For BRCA1 mutation carriers, the breast cancer risk was higher in carriers with class 2 mutations than class 1 (mutations (class 2 HR=1.86, 95% CI: 1.28–2.70; class 1 HR=0.86, 95%CI:0.69–1.09; p-for difference=0.0006). Rs13306465 was associated with ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 class 2 mutation carriers (HR = 2.42; p = 0.03). Conclusion The IRS1 Gly972Arg SNP, which affects insulin-like growth factor and insulin signaling, modifies ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers and breast cancer risk in BRCA1 class 2 mutation carriers. Impact These findings may prove useful for risk prediction for breast and ovarian cancers in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. PMID:22729394

  16. Interpersonal Responses Among Sibling Dyads Tested for BRCA1/BRCA2 Gene Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Hamann, Heidi A.; Croyle, Robert T.; Smith, Timothy W.; Smith, Ken R.; Ruiz, John M.; Kircher, John C.; Botkin, Jeffrey R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The familial context plays an important role in psychosocial responses to genetic testing. The purpose of this study was to compare sibling pairs with different combinations of BRCA1/BRCA2 test results on measures of affect, interpersonal responses, and physiological reactions. Design Forty-nine sibling dyads with different combinations of BRCA1/BRCA2 test results (i.e., mixed, positive, negative) completed a questionnaire, and 35 of the dyads also participated in a laboratory-based discussion of genetic testing. Main Outcome Measures The primary outcome variables included participant reports of supportive actions toward their sibling, state anger and anxiety, perceptions of sibling behavior, and electrodermal responses. Results Compared to positive and negative dyads, mixed pairs reported less friendly general support actions, noted more anger, and perceived their sibling to be less friendly and more dominant during the interactions. In comparisons between same-result (i.e., positive, negative) pairs, positive dyads reported more dominant support behaviors and perceived their sibling to be friendlier during the interactions. Conclusion Data suggest that siblings who have different test results may experience more interpersonal strain than siblings who have the same test result. Future research on genetic testing and family relationships can expand upon these findings. PMID:18230020

  17. BRCA1 and BRCA2 point mutations and large rearrangements in breast and ovarian cancer families in Northern Poland.

    PubMed

    Ratajska, Magdalena; Brozek, Izabela; Senkus-Konefka, Elzbieta; Jassem, Jacek; Stepnowska, Magdalena; Palomba, Grazia; Pisano, Marina; Casula, Milena; Palmieri, Giuseppe; Borg, Ake; Limon, Janusz

    2008-01-01

    Sixty-four Polish families with a history of breast and/or ovarian cancer were screened for mutations in the BRCA1/2 genes using a combination of denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) and sequencing. Two thirds (43/64; 67%) of the families were found to carry deleterious mutations, of which the most frequent were BRCA1 5382insC (n=22/43; 51%) and Cys61Gly (n=9/43; 20%). Two other recurrent mutations were BRCA1 185delAG (n=3) and 3819del5 (n=4), together accounting for 16% of the 43 mutation-positive cases. We also found three novel mutations (BRCA1 2991del5, BRCA2 6238ins2del21 and 8876delC) which combined with findings from our earlier study of 60 Northern Polish families. Moreover, screening of 43 BRCA1/2 negative families for the presence of large rearrangements by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) resulted in the finding of two additional BRCA1 mutations: a deletion of exons 1A, 1B and 2, and a deletion of exons 17-19, both present in single families. We conclude that the Polish population has a diverse mutation spectrum influenced by strong founder effects. However, families with strong breast/ovarian cancer history who are negative for these common mutations should be offered a complete BRCA gene screening, including MLPA analysis.

  18. Efficacy versus effectiveness of clinical genetic testing criteria for BRCA1 and BRCA2 hereditary mutations in incident breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Martin P; Winter, Christof; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Rehn, Martin; Larsson, Christer; Saal, Lao H; Loman, Niklas

    2017-01-24

    Increasing evidence supports the benefit of identifying BRCA1 and BRCA2 germline mutations in early breast cancer. Selection of patients for genetic testing is based on defined criteria taking individual and family history related factors into account. It is important to make a distinction between efficacy and effectiveness of BRCA testing criteria. Efficacy can be defined as the performance under ideal circumstances, whereas effectiveness refers to its real life performance. To allow for an unbiased and detailed evaluation of efficacy and effectiveness of the Swedish BRCA testing criteria, we retrospectively analyzed a prospectively collected cohort of 273 breast cancer patients from the well-characterized, population-based, single-site All Breast Cancer in Malmö (ABiM) study. The patients were diagnosed with breast cancer during the years 2007 through 2009. Out of 20 mutation carriers identified, 13 fulfilled Swedish criteria at time of diagnosis. Thus, the efficacy of these criteria was 65%. Excluding three patients in whom a mutation was already known at time of diagnosis, only 3/17 had been identified in the clinical routine, corresponding to an effectiveness of 18%. Here we detail the reasons why mutation carriers in our cohort were not detected though routine health care. In conclusion, effectiveness of BRCA testing criteria was much lower than efficacy. Our results indicate that current testing criteria and procedures associated with BRCA1 and BRCA2 testing are insufficient. There is room for improvement of their efficacy, but even more so regarding effectiveness. Clinical BRCA testing routines need to be critically revised.

  19. Oophorectomy after Menopause and the Risk of Breast Cancer in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Kotsopoulos, Joanne; Lubinski, Jan; Lynch, Henry T.; Kim-Sing, Charmaine; Neuhausen, Susan; Demsky, Rochelle; Foulkes, William D.; Ghadirian, Parviz; Tung, Nadine; Ainsworth, Peter; Senter, Leigha; Karlan, Beth; Eisen, Andrea; Eng, Charis; Weitzel, Jeffrey; Gilchrist, Dawna M.; Blum, Joanne L.; Zakalik, Dana; Singer, Christian; Fallen, Taya; Ginsburg, Ophira; Huzarski, Tomasz; Sun, Ping; Narod, Steven A.

    2013-01-01

    Background To evaluate the effect of the cumulative number of ovulatory cycles and its contributing components on the risk of breast cancer among BRCA mutation carriers. Methods We conducted a matched case-control study on 2,854 pairs of women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate the association between the number of ovulatory cycles and various exposures and the risk of breast cancer. Information from a subset of these women enrolled in a prospective cohort study was used to calculate age-specific breast cancer rates. Results The annual risk of breast cancer decreased with the number of ovulatory cycles experienced (ρ = −0.69; P = 0.03). Age at menarche and duration of breastfeeding were inversely related with risk of breast cancer among BRCA1 (P-trend < 0.0001) but not among BRCA2 (P-trend ≥ 0.28) mutation carriers. The reduction in breast cancer risk associated with surgical menopause (OR = 0.52; 95%CI 0.40–0.66; P-trend < 0.0001) was greater than that associated with natural menopause (OR = 0.81; 95%CI 0.62–1.07; P-trend = 0.14). There was a highly significant reduction in breast cancer risk among women who had an oophorectomy after natural menopause (OR = 0.13; 95%CI 0.02–0.54; P = 0.006). Conclusions These data challenge the hypothesis that breast cancer risk can be predicted by the lifetime number of ovulatory cycles in women with a BRCA mutation. Both pre- and post-menopausal oophorectomy protect against breast cancer. Impact Understanding the basis for the protective effect of oophorectomy has important implications for chemoprevention. PMID:22564871

  20. Germline ATM mutational analysis in BRCA1/BRCA2 negative hereditary breast cancer families by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Graña, B; Fachal, L; Darder, E; Balmaña, J; Ramón Y Cajal, T; Blanco, I; Torres, A; Lázaro, C; Diez, O; Alonso, C; Santamariña, M; Velasco, A; Teulé, A; Lasa, A; Blanco, A; Izquierdo, A; Borràs, J; Gutiérrez-Enríquez, S; Vega, A; Brunet, J

    2011-07-01

    Biallelic inactivation of ATM gene causes the rare autosomal recessive disorder Ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T). Female relatives of A-T patients have a two-fold higher risk of developing breast cancer (BC) compared with the general population. ATM mutation carrier identification is laborious and expensive, therefore, a more rapid and directed strategy for ATM mutation profiling is needed. We designed a case-control study to determine the prevalence of 32 known ATM mutations causing A-T in Spanish population in 323 BRCA1/BRCA2 negative hereditary breast cancer (HBC) cases and 625 matched Spanish controls. For the detection of the 32 ATM mutations we used the matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry technique. We identified one patient carrier of the c.8264_8268delATAAG ATM mutation. This mutation was not found in the 625 controls. These results suggest a low frequency of these 32 A-T causing mutations in the HBC cases in our population. Further case-control studies analyzing the entire coding and flanking sequences of the ATM gene are warranted in Spanish BC patients to know its implication in BC predisposition.

  1. The rate of recurrent BRCA1, BRCA2, and TP53 mutations in the general population, and unselected ovarian cancer cases, in Belo Horizonte, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Schayek, Hagit; De Marco, Luiz; Starinsky-Elbaz, Sigal; Rossette, Mariana; Laitman, Yael; Bastos-Rodrigues, Luciana; da Silva Filho, Agnaldo Lopes; Friedman, Eitan

    2016-01-01

    In Brazil, several recurring mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 and a TP53 mutation (R337H) have been reported in high risk breast cancer cases. We hypothesized that these recurring mutations may also be detected in the general population and ovarian cancer cases in the state of Minas Gerais. To test this notion, participants were recruited from the outpatient and the Gynecological clinic in the UFMG Medical Center in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil. BRCA1 (c.68_69delAG, c.5266dupC, c.181T>G, c.4034delA, c.5123C>A), BRCA2 (c.5946delT, c.8537_8538delAG, 4936_4939delGAAA), the c.156_157insAlu* BRCA2 and the c.1010G>A *TP53 mutation were genotyped using validated techniques. Overall, 513 cancer free participants (273 men) (mean age 47.7 ± 15.1 years) and 103 ovarian cancer cases (mean age at diagnosis 58.7 ± 9.6 years) were studied. None of the participants were found to carry any of the genotyped mutations. We conclude that the recurring mutations in BRCA1, BRCA2 and TP53 cannot be detected in the general population or consecutive ovarian cancer cases in this geographical region in Brazil.

  2. Fine-Scale Mapping at 9p22.2 Identifies Candidate Causal Variants That Modify Ovarian Cancer Risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers.

    PubMed

    Vigorito, Elena; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Beesley, Jonathan; Adlard, Julian; Agnarsson, Bjarni A; Andrulis, Irene L; Arun, Banu K; Barjhoux, Laure; Belotti, Muriel; Benitez, Javier; Berger, Andreas; Bojesen, Anders; Bonanni, Bernardo; Brewer, Carole; Caldes, Trinidad; Caligo, Maria A; Campbell, Ian; Chan, Salina B; Claes, Kathleen B M; Cohn, David E; Cook, Jackie; Daly, Mary B; Damiola, Francesca; Davidson, Rosemarie; Pauw, Antoine de; Delnatte, Capucine; Diez, Orland; Domchek, Susan M; Dumont, Martine; Durda, Katarzyna; Dworniczak, Bernd; Easton, Douglas F; Eccles, Diana; Edwinsdotter Ardnor, Christina; Eeles, Ros; Ejlertsen, Bent; Ellis, Steve; Evans, D Gareth; Feliubadalo, Lidia; Fostira, Florentia; Foulkes, William D; Friedman, Eitan; Frost, Debra; Gaddam, Pragna; Ganz, Patricia A; Garber, Judy; Garcia-Barberan, Vanesa; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Gehrig, Andrea; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Giraud, Sophie; Godwin, Andrew K; Goldgar, David E; Hake, Christopher R; Hansen, Thomas V O; Healey, Sue; Hodgson, Shirley; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Houdayer, Claude; Hulick, Peter J; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Isaacs, Claudine; Izatt, Louise; Izquierdo, Angel; Jacobs, Lauren; Jakubowska, Anna; Janavicius, Ramunas; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Jensen, Uffe Birk; John, Esther M; Vijai, Joseph; Karlan, Beth Y; Kast, Karin; Investigators, KConFab; Khan, Sofia; Kwong, Ava; Laitman, Yael; Lester, Jenny; Lesueur, Fabienne; Liljegren, Annelie; Lubinski, Jan; Mai, Phuong L; Manoukian, Siranoush; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Meindl, Alfons; Mensenkamp, Arjen R; Montagna, Marco; Nathanson, Katherine L; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Niederacher, Dieter; Olah, Edith; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Ong, Kai-Ren; Osorio, Ana; Park, Sue Kyung; Paulsson-Karlsson, Ylva; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Peissel, Bernard; Peterlongo, Paolo; Pfeiler, Georg; Phelan, Catherine M; Piedmonte, Marion; Poppe, Bruce; Pujana, Miquel Angel; Radice, Paolo; Rennert, Gad; Rodriguez, Gustavo C; Rookus, Matti A; Ross, Eric A; Schmutzler, Rita Katharina; Simard, Jacques; Singer, Christian F; Slavin, Thomas P; Soucy, Penny; Southey, Melissa; Steinemann, Doris; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Sutter, Christian; Szabo, Csilla I; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Teixeira, Manuel R; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Mary Beth; Thomassen, Mads; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Tihomirova, Laima; Tognazzo, Silvia; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Varesco, Liliana; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Vratimos, Athanassios; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; McGuffog, Lesley; Kirk, Judy; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Hamann, Ute; Lindor, Noralane; Ramus, Susan J; Greene, Mark H; Couch, Fergus J; Offit, Kenneth; Pharoah, Paul D P; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C

    2016-01-01

    Population-based genome wide association studies have identified a locus at 9p22.2 associated with ovarian cancer risk, which also modifies ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. We conducted fine-scale mapping at 9p22.2 to identify potential causal variants in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Genotype data were available for 15,252 (2,462 ovarian cancer cases) BRCA1 and 8,211 (631 ovarian cancer cases) BRCA2 mutation carriers. Following genotype imputation, ovarian cancer associations were assessed for 4,873 and 5,020 SNPs in BRCA1 and BRCA 2 mutation carriers respectively, within a retrospective cohort analytical framework. In BRCA1 mutation carriers one set of eight correlated candidate causal variants for ovarian cancer risk modification was identified (top SNP rs10124837, HR: 0.73, 95%CI: 0.68 to 0.79, p-value 2× 10-16). These variants were located up to 20 kb upstream of BNC2. In BRCA2 mutation carriers one region, up to 45 kb upstream of BNC2, and containing 100 correlated SNPs was identified as candidate causal (top SNP rs62543585, HR: 0.69, 95%CI: 0.59 to 0.80, p-value 1.0 × 10-6). The candidate causal in BRCA1 mutation carriers did not include the strongest associated variant at this locus in the general population. In sum, we identified a set of candidate causal variants in a region that encompasses the BNC2 transcription start site. The ovarian cancer association at 9p22.2 may be mediated by different variants in BRCA1 mutation carriers and in the general population. Thus, potentially different mechanisms may underlie ovarian cancer risk for mutation carriers and the general population.

  3. Fine-Scale Mapping at 9p22.2 Identifies Candidate Causal Variants That Modify Ovarian Cancer Risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Vigorito, Elena; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Beesley, Jonathan; Adlard, Julian; Agnarsson, Bjarni A.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Arun, Banu K.; Barjhoux, Laure; Belotti, Muriel; Benitez, Javier; Berger, Andreas; Bojesen, Anders; Bonanni, Bernardo; Brewer, Carole; Caldes, Trinidad; Caligo, Maria A.; Campbell, Ian; Chan, Salina B.; Claes, Kathleen B. M.; Cohn, David E.; Cook, Jackie; Daly, Mary B.; Damiola, Francesca; Davidson, Rosemarie; de Pauw, Antoine; Delnatte, Capucine; Diez, Orland; Domchek, Susan M.; Dumont, Martine; Durda, Katarzyna; Dworniczak, Bernd; Easton, Douglas F.; Eccles, Diana; Edwinsdotter Ardnor, Christina; Eeles, Ros; Ejlertsen, Bent; Ellis, Steve; Evans, D. Gareth; Feliubadalo, Lidia; Fostira, Florentia; Foulkes, William D.; Friedman, Eitan; Frost, Debra; Gaddam, Pragna; Ganz, Patricia A.; Garber, Judy; Garcia-Barberan, Vanesa; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Gehrig, Andrea; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Giraud, Sophie; Godwin, Andrew K.; Goldgar, David E.; Hake, Christopher R.; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Healey, Sue; Hodgson, Shirley; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Houdayer, Claude; Hulick, Peter J.; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Isaacs, Claudine; Izatt, Louise; Izquierdo, Angel; Jacobs, Lauren; Jakubowska, Anna; Janavicius, Ramunas; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Jensen, Uffe Birk; John, Esther M.; Vijai, Joseph; Karlan, Beth Y.; Kast, Karin; Investigators, KConFab; Khan, Sofia; Kwong, Ava; Laitman, Yael; Lester, Jenny; Lesueur, Fabienne; Liljegren, Annelie; Lubinski, Jan; Mai, Phuong L.; Manoukian, Siranoush; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Meindl, Alfons; Mensenkamp, Arjen R.; Montagna, Marco; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Niederacher, Dieter; Olah, Edith; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Ong, Kai-ren; Osorio, Ana; Park, Sue Kyung; Paulsson-Karlsson, Ylva; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Peissel, Bernard; Peterlongo, Paolo; Pfeiler, Georg; Phelan, Catherine M.; Piedmonte, Marion; Poppe, Bruce; Pujana, Miquel Angel; Radice, Paolo; Rennert, Gad; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Rookus, Matti A.; Ross, Eric A.; Schmutzler, Rita Katharina; Simard, Jacques; Singer, Christian F.; Slavin, Thomas P.; Soucy, Penny; Southey, Melissa; Steinemann, Doris; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Sutter, Christian; Szabo, Csilla I.; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Mary Beth; Thomassen, Mads; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Tihomirova, Laima; Tognazzo, Silvia; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Varesco, Liliana; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Vratimos, Athanassios; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; McGuffog, Lesley; Kirk, Judy; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Hamann, Ute; Lindor, Noralane; Ramus, Susan J.; Greene, Mark H.; Couch, Fergus J.; Offit, Kenneth; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C.

    2016-01-01

    Population-based genome wide association studies have identified a locus at 9p22.2 associated with ovarian cancer risk, which also modifies ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. We conducted fine-scale mapping at 9p22.2 to identify potential causal variants in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Genotype data were available for 15,252 (2,462 ovarian cancer cases) BRCA1 and 8,211 (631 ovarian cancer cases) BRCA2 mutation carriers. Following genotype imputation, ovarian cancer associations were assessed for 4,873 and 5,020 SNPs in BRCA1 and BRCA 2 mutation carriers respectively, within a retrospective cohort analytical framework. In BRCA1 mutation carriers one set of eight correlated candidate causal variants for ovarian cancer risk modification was identified (top SNP rs10124837, HR: 0.73, 95%CI: 0.68 to 0.79, p-value 2× 10−16). These variants were located up to 20 kb upstream of BNC2. In BRCA2 mutation carriers one region, up to 45 kb upstream of BNC2, and containing 100 correlated SNPs was identified as candidate causal (top SNP rs62543585, HR: 0.69, 95%CI: 0.59 to 0.80, p-value 1.0 × 10−6). The candidate causal in BRCA1 mutation carriers did not include the strongest associated variant at this locus in the general population. In sum, we identified a set of candidate causal variants in a region that encompasses the BNC2 transcription start site. The ovarian cancer association at 9p22.2 may be mediated by different variants in BRCA1 mutation carriers and in the general population. Thus, potentially different mechanisms may underlie ovarian cancer risk for mutation carriers and the general population. PMID:27463617

  4. Targeted Prostate Cancer Screening in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers: Results from the Initial Screening Round of the IMPACT Study

    PubMed Central

    Bancroft, Elizabeth K.; Page, Elizabeth C.; Castro, Elena; Lilja, Hans; Vickers, Andrew; Sjoberg, Daniel; Assel, Melissa; Foster, Christopher S.; Mitchell, Gillian; Drew, Kate; Mæhle, Lovise; Axcrona, Karol; Evans, D. Gareth; Bulman, Barbara; Eccles, Diana; McBride, Donna; van Asperen, Christi; Vasen, Hans; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Ringelberg, Janneke; Cybulski, Cezary; Wokolorczyk, Dominika; Selkirk, Christina; Hulick, Peter J.; Bojesen, Anders; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Lam, Jimmy; Taylor, Louise; Oldenburg, Rogier; Cremers, Ruben; Verhaegh, Gerald; van Zelst-Stams, Wendy A.; Oosterwijk, Jan C.; Blanco, Ignacio; Salinas, Monica; Cook, Jackie; Rosario, Derek J.; Buys, Saundra; Conner, Tom; Ausems, Margreet G.; Ong, Kai-ren; Hoffman, Jonathan; Domchek, Susan; Powers, Jacquelyn; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Maia, Sofia; Foulkes, William D.; Taherian, Nassim; Ruijs, Marielle; den Enden, Apollonia T. Helderman-van; Izatt, Louise; Davidson, Rosemarie; Adank, Muriel A.; Walker, Lisa; Schmutzler, Rita; Tucker, Kathy; Kirk, Judy; Hodgson, Shirley; Harris, Marion; Douglas, Fiona; Lindeman, Geoffrey J.; Zgajnar, Janez; Tischkowitz, Marc; Clowes, Virginia E.; Susman, Rachel; Ramón y Cajal, Teresa; Patcher, Nicholas; Gadea, Neus; Spigelman, Allan; van Os, Theo; Liljegren, Annelie; Side, Lucy; Brewer, Carole; Brady, Angela F.; Donaldson, Alan; Stefansdottir, Vigdis; Friedman, Eitan; Chen-Shtoyerman, Rakefet; Amor, David J.; Copakova, Lucia; Barwell, Julian; Giri, Veda N.; Murthy, Vedang; Nicolai, Nicola; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Greenhalgh, Lynn; Strom, Sara; Henderson, Alex; McGrath, John; Gallagher, David; Aaronson, Neil; Ardern-Jones, Audrey; Bangma, Chris; Dearnaley, David; Costello, Philandra; Eyfjord, Jorunn; Rothwell, Jeanette; Falconer, Alison; Gronberg, Henrik; Hamdy, Freddie C.; Johannsson, Oskar; Khoo, Vincent; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Lubinski, Jan; Axcrona, Ulrika; Melia, Jane; McKinley, Joanne; Mitra, Anita V.; Moynihan, Clare; Rennert, Gad; Suri, Mohnish; Wilson, Penny; Killick, Emma; Moss, Sue; Eeles, Rosalind A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Men with germline breast cancer 1, early onset (BRCA1) or breast cancer 2, early onset (BRCA2) gene mutations have a higher risk of developing prostate cancer (PCa) than noncarriers. IMPACT (Identification of Men with a genetic predisposition to ProstAte Cancer: Targeted screening in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers and controls) is an international consortium of 62 centres in 20 countries evaluating the use of targeted PCa screening in men with BRCA1/2 mutations. Objective To report the first year's screening results for all men at enrolment in the study. Design, setting and participants We recruited men aged 40–69 yr with germline BRCA1/2 mutations and a control group of men who have tested negative for a pathogenic BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation known to be present in their families. All men underwent prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing at enrolment, and those men with PSA >3 ng/ml were offered prostate biopsy. Outcome measurements and statistical analysis PSA levels, PCa incidence, and tumour characteristics were evaluated. The Fisher exact test was used to compare the number of PCa cases among groups and the differences among disease types. Results and limitations We recruited 2481 men (791 BRCA1 carriers, 531 BRCA1 controls; 731 BRCA2 carriers, 428 BRCA2 controls). A total of 199 men (8%) presented with PSA >3.0 ng/ml, 162 biopsies were performed, and 59 PCas were diagnosed (18 BRCA1 carriers, 10 BRCA1 controls; 24 BRCA2 carriers, 7 BRCA2 controls); 66% of the tumours were classified as intermediate- or high-risk disease. The positive predictive value (PPV) for biopsy using a PSA threshold of 3.0 ng/ml in BRCA2 mutation carriers was 48%—double the PPV reported in population screening studies. A significant difference in detecting intermediate- or high-risk disease was observed in BRCA2 carriers. Ninety-five percent of the men were white, thus the results cannot be generalised to all ethnic groups. Conclusions The IMPACT screening network will be useful

  5. Targeted prostate cancer screening in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers: results from the initial screening round of the IMPACT study.

    PubMed

    Bancroft, Elizabeth K; Page, Elizabeth C; Castro, Elena; Lilja, Hans; Vickers, Andrew; Sjoberg, Daniel; Assel, Melissa; Foster, Christopher S; Mitchell, Gillian; Drew, Kate; Mæhle, Lovise; Axcrona, Karol; Evans, D Gareth; Bulman, Barbara; Eccles, Diana; McBride, Donna; van Asperen, Christi; Vasen, Hans; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Ringelberg, Janneke; Cybulski, Cezary; Wokolorczyk, Dominika; Selkirk, Christina; Hulick, Peter J; Bojesen, Anders; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Lam, Jimmy; Taylor, Louise; Oldenburg, Rogier; Cremers, Ruben; Verhaegh, Gerald; van Zelst-Stams, Wendy A; Oosterwijk, Jan C; Blanco, Ignacio; Salinas, Monica; Cook, Jackie; Rosario, Derek J; Buys, Saundra; Conner, Tom; Ausems, Margreet G; Ong, Kai-ren; Hoffman, Jonathan; Domchek, Susan; Powers, Jacquelyn; Teixeira, Manuel R; Maia, Sofia; Foulkes, William D; Taherian, Nassim; Ruijs, Marielle; Helderman-van den Enden, Apollonia T; Izatt, Louise; Davidson, Rosemarie; Adank, Muriel A; Walker, Lisa; Schmutzler, Rita; Tucker, Kathy; Kirk, Judy; Hodgson, Shirley; Harris, Marion; Douglas, Fiona; Lindeman, Geoffrey J; Zgajnar, Janez; Tischkowitz, Marc; Clowes, Virginia E; Susman, Rachel; Ramón y Cajal, Teresa; Patcher, Nicholas; Gadea, Neus; Spigelman, Allan; van Os, Theo; Liljegren, Annelie; Side, Lucy; Brewer, Carole; Brady, Angela F; Donaldson, Alan; Stefansdottir, Vigdis; Friedman, Eitan; Chen-Shtoyerman, Rakefet; Amor, David J; Copakova, Lucia; Barwell, Julian; Giri, Veda N; Murthy, Vedang; Nicolai, Nicola; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Greenhalgh, Lynn; Strom, Sara; Henderson, Alex; McGrath, John; Gallagher, David; Aaronson, Neil; Ardern-Jones, Audrey; Bangma, Chris; Dearnaley, David; Costello, Philandra; Eyfjord, Jorunn; Rothwell, Jeanette; Falconer, Alison; Gronberg, Henrik; Hamdy, Freddie C; Johannsson, Oskar; Khoo, Vincent; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Lubinski, Jan; Axcrona, Ulrika; Melia, Jane; McKinley, Joanne; Mitra, Anita V; Moynihan, Clare; Rennert, Gad; Suri, Mohnish; Wilson, Penny; Killick, Emma; Moss, Sue; Eeles, Rosalind A

    2014-09-01

    Men with germline breast cancer 1, early onset (BRCA1) or breast cancer 2, early onset (BRCA2) gene mutations have a higher risk of developing prostate cancer (PCa) than noncarriers. IMPACT (Identification of Men with a genetic predisposition to ProstAte Cancer: Targeted screening in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers and controls) is an international consortium of 62 centres in 20 countries evaluating the use of targeted PCa screening in men with BRCA1/2 mutations. To report the first year's screening results for all men at enrollment in the study. We recruited men aged 40-69 yr with germline BRCA1/2 mutations and a control group of men who have tested negative for a pathogenic BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation known to be present in their families. All men underwent prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing at enrollment, and those men with PSA >3 ng/ml were offered prostate biopsy. PSA levels, PCa incidence, and tumour characteristics were evaluated. The Fisher exact test was used to compare the number of PCa cases among groups and the differences among disease types. We recruited 2481 men (791 BRCA1 carriers, 531 BRCA1 controls; 731 BRCA2 carriers, 428 BRCA2 controls). A total of 199 men (8%) presented with PSA >3.0 ng/ml, 162 biopsies were performed, and 59 PCas were diagnosed (18 BRCA1 carriers, 10 BRCA1 controls; 24 BRCA2 carriers, 7 BRCA2 controls); 66% of the tumours were classified as intermediate- or high-risk disease. The positive predictive value (PPV) for biopsy using a PSA threshold of 3.0 ng/ml in BRCA2 mutation carriers was 48%-double the PPV reported in population screening studies. A significant difference in detecting intermediate- or high-risk disease was observed in BRCA2 carriers. Ninety-five percent of the men were white, thus the results cannot be generalised to all ethnic groups. The IMPACT screening network will be useful for targeted PCa screening studies in men with germline genetic risk variants as they are discovered. These preliminary results support the

  6. Incidence of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in 54 Chilean families with breast/ovarian cancer, genotype-phenotype correlations.

    PubMed

    Gallardo, Marcela; Silva, Antonia; Rubio, Lorena; Alvarez, Carolina; Torrealba, Carolina; Salinas, Mauricio; Tapia, Teresa; Faundez, Paola; Palma, Lorena; Riccio, María Eugenia; Paredes, Hernando; Rodriguez, Mario; Cruz, Adolfo; Rousseau, Christine; King, Mary Claire; Camus, Mauricio; Alvarez, Manuel; Carvallo, Pilar

    2006-01-01

    Our aim was to analyze the incidence of mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes in 54 families with breast/ovarian cancer. Families were selected from three Institutions following the standard criteria for hereditary breast/ovarian cancer. PCR amplification of all exons was performed, followed by SSCP, heteroduplex, PTT and sequencing analysis. We identified eight truncation mutations, three in the BRCA1 gene and five in the BRCA2 gene. Three of these mutations have not been reported previously by other groups: 308insA in one family, 3936 C>T in two families, for BRCA1, and 4970insTG in one family for BRCA2. In addition two families having Ashkenazi Jewish ancestors present the well known mutations 185delAG and 6174delT. Interestingly, 5 out of 11 families have mutations recurrent in Spanish families. Among the 54 families selected, seven have breast and ovary cancer cases, and only two presented a mutation in BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes. Other cancers as prostate and stomach are frequent among relatives carrying the mutation. Five cases of very early onset (<31 years old) breast cancer were detected. The frequencies of BRCA1 (0.074) and BRCA2 (0.13) mutations in our families is low but similar to the incidence found in other populations, like in Spain. Since is widely known that risk factors that modulate the development of breast cancer such as lifestyle risk factors, geographic location, country of origin and socioeconomic status, besides a familial history of breast cancer our findings suggest that the history of colonization and immigrations is very relevant when studying hereditary factors associated to breast cancer.

  7. Diagnostic chest x-rays and breast cancer risk before age 50 years for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    PubMed Central

    John, Esther M.; McGuire, Valerie; Thomas, Duncan; Haile, Robert; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Milne, Roger L.; Felberg, Anna; West, Dee W.; Miron, Alexander; Knight, Julia A.; Terry, Mary Beth; Daly, Mary; Buys, Saundra S.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Hopper, John L.; Southey, Melissa C.; Giles, Graham G.; Apicella, Carmel; Thorne, Heather; Whittemore, Alice S.

    2013-01-01

    Background The effects of low-dose medical radiation on breast cancer risk are uncertain, and few studies have included genetically susceptible women, such as those who carry germline BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations. Methods We studied 454 BRCA1 and 273 BRCA2 mutation carriers aged <50 years from three breast cancer family registries in the USA, Canada, and Australia/New Zealand. We estimated breast cancer risk associated with diagnostic chest x-rays by comparing mutation carriers with breast cancer (cases) with those without breast cancer (controls). Exposure to chest x-rays was self-reported. Mammograms were not considered in the analysis. Results After adjusting for known risk factors for breast cancer, the odds ratio (OR) for a history of diagnostic chest x-rays, excluding those for tuberculosis or pneumonia, was 1.16 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.64–2.11) for BRCA1 mutations carriers and 1.22 (95% CI=0.62–2.42) for BRCA2 mutations carriers. The OR was statistically elevated for BRCA2 mutation carriers with 3–5 diagnostic chest x-rays (p = 0.01), but not for those with 6 or more chest x-rays. Few women reported chest fluoroscopy for tuberculosis or chest x-rays for pneumonia; the OR estimates were elevated, but not statistically significant, for BRCA1 mutation carriers. Conclusions Our findings do not support a positive association between diagnostic chest x-rays and breast cancer risk before age 50 years for BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. Impact Given the increasing use of diagnostic imaging involving higher ionizing radiation doses, further studies of genetically predisposed women are warranted. PMID:23853209

  8. The highly prevalent BRCA2 mutation c.2808_2811del (3036delACAA) is located in a mutational hotspot and has multiple origins.

    PubMed

    Infante, Mar; Durán, Mercedes; Acedo, Alberto; Sánchez-Tapia, Eva María; Díez-Gómez, Beatriz; Barroso, Alicia; García-González, María; Feliubadaló, Lídia; Lasa, Adriana; de la Hoya, Miguel; Esteban-Cardeñosa, Eva; Díez, Orland; Martínez-Bouzas, Cristina; Godino, Javier; Teulé, Alexandre; Osorio, Ana; Lastra, Enrique; González-Sarmiento, Rogelio; Miner, Cristina; Velasco, Eladio A

    2013-11-01

    BRCA2-c.2808_2811del (3036delACAA) is one of the most reported germ line mutations in non-Ashkenazi breast cancer patients. We investigated its genetic origin in 51 Spanish carrier families that were genotyped with 11 13q polymorphic markers. Three independent associated haplotypes were clearly distinguished accounting for 23 [west Castilla y León (WCL)], 20 [east Castilla y León (ECL)] and 6 (South of Spain) families. Mutation age was estimated with the Disequilibrium Mapping using Likelihood Estimation software in a range of 45-68 and 45-71 generations for WCL and ECL haplotypes, respectively. The most prevalent variants, c.2808_2811del and c.2803G > A, were located in a double-hairpin loop structure (c.2794-c.2825) predicted by Quikfold that was proposed as a mutational hotspot. To check this hypothesis, random mutagenesis was performed over a 923 bp fragment of BRCA2, and 86 DNA variants were characterized. Interestingly, three mutations reported in the mutation databases (c.2680G > A, c.2944del and c.2957dup) were replicated and 20 affected the same position with different nucleotide changes. Moreover, five variants were placed in the same hairpin loop of c.2808_2811del, and one affected the same position (c.2808A > G). In conclusion, our results support that at least three different mutational events occurred to generate c.2808_2811del. Other highly prevalent DNA variants, such as BRCA1-c.68_69delAG, BRCA2-c.5946delT and c.8537delAG, are concentrated in hairpin loops, suggesting that these structures may represent mutational hotspots.

  9. The impact of contralateral mastectomy on mortality in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Narod, Steven A

    2011-07-01

    Among women with breast cancer and a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation, the lifetime risk of breast cancer may be as high as 40%. Many physicians recommend prophylactic contralateral mastectomy, which is an effective measure of minimising the risk of contralateral cancer. The benefits of preventive contralateral mastectomy are apparent within 10 years, in terms of preventing cancer, but a much longer time period is required in order to demonstrate a reduction in mortality. Under the simple model presented here, among women who retain the contralateral breast, 0.4% of women are expected to die of contralateral breast cancer within 5 years, but 6.8% are expected to die at 20 years from diagnosis. These unnecessary deaths can be prevented by bilateral mastectomy.

  10. The Contribution of Germline BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutations to Familial Ovarian Cancer: No Evidence for Other Ovarian Cancer–Susceptibility Genes

    PubMed Central

    Gayther, Simon A.; Russell, Paul; Harrington, Patricia; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Easton, Douglas F.; Ponder, Bruce A. J.

    1999-01-01

    Summary To establish the contribution of germline BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations to familial ovarian cancer, we have analyzed both genes in DNA samples obtained from an affected individual in each of 112 families containing at least two cases of epithelial ovarian cancer. Germline mutations were found in 43% of the families; BRCA1 mutations were approximately four times more common than BRCA2 mutations. The extent of family history of ovarian and breast cancers was strongly predictive of BRCA1-mutation status. Segregation analysis suggests that a combination of chance clustering of sporadic cases and insensitivity of mutation detection may account for the remaining families; however, the contribution of other genes cannot be excluded. We discuss the implications for genetic testing and clinical management of familial ovarian cancer arising from the data presented in these studies. PMID:10486320

  11. Invasive breast cancer following bilateral subcutaneous mastectomy in a BRCA2 mutation carrier: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Kasprzak, Lidia; Mesurolle, Benoit; Tremblay, Francine; Galvez, Maria; Halwani, Fawaz; Foulkes, William D

    2005-01-01

    Background Primary prevention of breast cancer through prophylactic mastectomy can reduce the risk of malignancy in high-risk individuals. No type of mastectomy completely removes all breast tissue, but a subcutaneous mastectomy leaves more tissue in situ than does a simple mastectomy. Case presentation We report a case of invasive breast cancer in a BRCA2-positive woman 33 years after bilateral subcutaneous mastectomy. To our knowledge, only one case of primary breast cancer after prophylactic mastectomy in a BRCA1-positive patient has been reported in the literature and none in BRCA2-positive individuals. Conclusion Careful documentation and long follow-up is essential to fully assess the benefits and risks of preventive surgical procedures in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. PMID:16079000

  12. RAD51 135G→C Modifies Breast Cancer Risk among BRCA2 Mutation Carriers: Results from a Combined Analysis of 19 Studies

    PubMed Central

    Antoniou, Antonis C. ; Sinilnikova, Olga M. ; Simard, Jacques ; Léoné, Mélanie ; Dumont, Martine ; Neuhausen, Susan L. ; Struewing, Jeffery P. ; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique ; Barjhoux, Laure ; Hughes, David J. ; Coupier, Isabelle ; Belotti, Muriel ; Lasset, Christine ; Bonadona, Valérie ; Bignon, Yves-Jean ; Rebbeck, Timothy R. ; Wagner, Theresa ; Lynch, Henry T. ; Domchek, Susan M. ; Nathanson, Katherine L. ; Garber, Judy E. ; Weitzel, Jeffrey ; Narod, Steven A. ; Tomlinson, Gail ; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I. ; Godwin, Andrew ; Isaacs, Claudine ; Jakubowska, Anna ; Lubinski, Jan ; Gronwald, Jacek ; Górski, Bohdan ; Byrski, Tomasz ; Huzarski, Tomasz ; Peock, Susan ; Cook, Margaret ; Baynes, Caroline ; Murray, Alexandra ; Rogers, Mark ; Daly, Peter A. ; Dorkins, Huw ; Schmutzler, Rita K. ; Versmold, Beatrix ; Engel, Christoph ; Meindl, Alfons ; Arnold, Norbert ; Niederacher, Dieter ; Deissler, Helmut ; Spurdle, Amanda B. ; Chen, Xiaoqing ; Waddell, Nicola ; Cloonan, Nicole ; Kirchhoff, Tomas ; Offit, Kenneth ; Friedman, Eitan ; Kaufmann, Bella ; Laitman, Yael ; Galore, Gilli ; Rennert, Gad ; Lejbkowicz, Flavio ; Raskin, Leon ; Andrulis, Irene L. ; Ilyushik, Eduard ; Ozcelik, Hilmi ; Devilee, Peter ; Vreeswijk, Maaike P. G. ; Greene, Mark H. ; Prindiville, Sheila A. ; Osorio, Ana ; Benítez, Javier ; Zikan, Michal ; Szabo, Csilla I. ; Kilpivaara, Outi ; Nevanlinna, Heli ; Hamann, Ute ; Durocher, Francine ; Arason, Adalgeir ; Couch, Fergus J. ; Easton, Douglas F. ; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia 

    2007-01-01

    RAD51 is an important component of double-stranded DNA–repair mechanisms that interacts with both BRCA1 and BRCA2. A single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the 5′ untranslated region (UTR) of RAD51, 135G→C, has been suggested as a possible modifier of breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. We pooled genotype data for 8,512 female mutation carriers from 19 studies for the RAD51 135G→C SNP. We found evidence of an increased breast cancer risk in CC homozygotes (hazard ratio [HR] 1.92 [95% confidence interval {CI} 1.25–2.94) but not in heterozygotes (HR 0.95 [95% CI 0.83–1.07]; P=.002, by heterogeneity test with 2 degrees of freedom [df]). When BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers were analyzed separately, the increased risk was statistically significant only among BRCA2 mutation carriers, in whom we observed HRs of 1.17 (95% CI 0.91–1.51) among heterozygotes and 3.18 (95% CI 1.39–7.27) among rare homozygotes (P=.0007, by heterogeneity test with 2 df). In addition, we determined that the 135G→C variant affects RAD51 splicing within the 5′ UTR. Thus, 135G→C may modify the risk of breast cancer in BRCA2 mutation carriers by altering the expression of RAD51. RAD51 is the first gene to be reliably identified as a modifier of risk among BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. PMID:17999359

  13. Targeted sequencing of BRCA1 and BRCA2 across a large unselected breast cancer cohort suggests that one-third of mutations are somatic

    PubMed Central

    Winter, C.; Nilsson, M. P.; Olsson, E.; George, A. M.; Chen, Y.; Kvist, A.; Törngren, T.; Vallon-Christersson, J.; Hegardt, C.; Häkkinen, J.; Jönsson, G.; Grabau, D.; Malmberg, M.; Kristoffersson, U.; Rehn, M.; Gruvberger-Saal, S. K.; Larsson, C.; Borg, Å.; Loman, N.; Saal, L. H.

    2016-01-01

    Background A mutation found in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene of a breast tumor could be either germline or somatically acquired. The prevalence of somatic BRCA1/2 mutations and the ratio between somatic and germline BRCA1/2 mutations in unselected breast cancer patients are currently unclear. Patients and methods Paired normal and tumor DNA was analyzed for BRCA1/2 mutations by massively parallel sequencing in an unselected cohort of 273 breast cancer patients from south Sweden. Results Deleterious germline mutations in BRCA1 (n = 10) or BRCA2 (n = 10) were detected in 20 patients (7%). Deleterious somatic mutations in BRCA1 (n = 4) or BRCA2 (n = 5) were detected in 9 patients (3%). Accordingly, about 1 in 9 breast carcinomas (11%) in our cohort harbor a BRCA1/2 mutation. For each gene, the tumor phenotypes were very similar regardless of the mutation being germline or somatically acquired, whereas the tumor phenotypes differed significantly between wild-type and mutated cases. For age at diagnosis, the patients with somatic BRCA1/2 mutations resembled the wild-type patients (median age at diagnosis, germline BRCA1: 41.5 years; germline BRCA2: 49.5 years; somatic BRCA1/2: 65 years; wild-type BRCA1/2: 62.5 years). Conclusions In a population without strong germline founder mutations, the likelihood of a BRCA1/2 mutation found in a breast carcinoma being somatic was ∼1/3 and germline 2/3. This may have implications for treatment and genetic counseling. PMID:27194814

  14. DNA glycosylases involved in base excision repair may be associated with cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Osorio, Ana; Milne, Roger L; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline; Vaclová, Tereza; Pita, Guillermo; Alonso, Rosario; Peterlongo, Paolo; Blanco, Ignacio; de la Hoya, Miguel; Duran, Mercedes; Díez, Orland; Ramón Y Cajal, Teresa; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Martínez-Bouzas, Cristina; Andrés Conejero, Raquel; Soucy, Penny; McGuffog, Lesley; Barrowdale, Daniel; Lee, Andrew; Swe-Brca; Arver, Brita; Rantala, Johanna; Loman, Niklas; Ehrencrona, Hans; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Beattie, Mary S; Domchek, Susan M; Nathanson, Katherine; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Arun, Banu K; Karlan, Beth Y; Walsh, Christine; Lester, Jenny; John, Esther M; Whittemore, Alice S; Daly, Mary B; Southey, Melissa; Hopper, John; Terry, Mary B; Buys, Saundra S; Janavicius, Ramunas; Dorfling, Cecilia M; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Steele, Linda; Neuhausen, Susan L; Ding, Yuan Chun; Hansen, Thomas V O; Jønson, Lars; Ejlertsen, Bent; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Infante, Mar; Herráez, Belén; Moreno, Leticia Thais; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Herzog, Josef; Weeman, Kisa; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Scuvera, Giulietta; Bonanni, Bernardo; Mariette, Frederique; Volorio, Sara; Viel, Alessandra; Varesco, Liliana; Papi, Laura; Ottini, Laura; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Radice, Paolo; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Garber, Judy; Ellis, Steve; Frost, Debra; Platte, Radka; Fineberg, Elena; Evans, Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Izatt, Louise; Eeles, Ros; Adlard, Julian; Davidson, Rosemarie; Cole, Trevor; Eccles, Diana; Cook, Jackie; Hodgson, Shirley; Brewer, Carole; Tischkowitz, Marc; Douglas, Fiona; Porteous, Mary; Side, Lucy; Walker, Lisa; Morrison, Patrick; Donaldson, Alan; Kennedy, John; Foo, Claire; Godwin, Andrew K; Schmutzler, Rita Katharina; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Rhiem, Kerstin; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Plendl, Hans Jörg; Niederacher, Dieter; Sutter, Christian; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Steinemann, Doris; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Kast, Karin; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Gehrig, Andrea; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Damiola, Francesca; Poppe, Bruce; Claes, Kathleen; Piedmonte, Marion; Tucker, Kathy; Backes, Floor; Rodríguez, Gustavo; Brewster, Wendy; Wakeley, Katie; Rutherford, Thomas; Caldés, Trinidad; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Rookus, Matti A; van Os, Theo A M; van der Kolk, Lizet; de Lange, J L; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E J; van der Hout, A H; van Asperen, Christi J; Gómez Garcia, Encarna B; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Collée, J Margriet; van Deurzen, Carolien H M; van der Luijt, Rob B; Devilee, Peter; Hebon; Olah, Edith; Lázaro, Conxi; Teulé, Alex; Menéndez, Mireia; Jakubowska, Anna; Cybulski, Cezary; Gronwald, Jacek; Lubinski, Jan; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Johannsson, Oskar Th; Maugard, Christine; Montagna, Marco; Tognazzo, Silvia; Teixeira, Manuel R; Healey, Sue; Investigators, Kconfab; Olswold, Curtis; Guidugli, Lucia; Lindor, Noralane; Slager, Susan; Szabo, Csilla I; Vijai, Joseph; Robson, Mark; Kauff, Noah; Zhang, Liying; Rau-Murthy, Rohini; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Singer, Christian F; Rappaport, Christine; Geschwantler Kaulich, Daphne; Pfeiler, Georg; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Berger, Andreas; Phelan, Catherine M; Greene, Mark H; Mai, Phuong L; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Andrulis, Irene; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Bojesen, Anders; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Sunde, Lone; Thomassen, Mads; Kruse, Torben A; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Friedman, Eitan; Laitman, Yael; Shimon, Shani Paluch; Simard, Jacques; Easton, Douglas F; Offit, Kenneth; Couch, Fergus J; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C; Benitez, Javier

    2014-04-01

    Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes involved in the DNA Base Excision Repair (BER) pathway could be associated with cancer risk in carriers of mutations in the high-penetrance susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2, given the relation of synthetic lethality that exists between one of the components of the BER pathway, PARP1 (poly ADP ribose polymerase), and both BRCA1 and BRCA2. In the present study, we have performed a comprehensive analysis of 18 genes involved in BER using a tagging SNP approach in a large series of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. 144 SNPs were analyzed in a two stage study involving 23,463 carriers from the CIMBA consortium (the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1 and BRCA2). Eleven SNPs showed evidence of association with breast and/or ovarian cancer at p<0.05 in the combined analysis. Four of the five genes for which strongest evidence of association was observed were DNA glycosylases. The strongest evidence was for rs1466785 in the NEIL2 (endonuclease VIII-like 2) gene (HR: 1.09, 95% CI (1.03-1.16), p = 2.7 × 10(-3)) for association with breast cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers, and rs2304277 in the OGG1 (8-guanine DNA glycosylase) gene, with ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 mutation carriers (HR: 1.12 95%CI: 1.03-1.21, p = 4.8 × 10(-3)). DNA glycosylases involved in the first steps of the BER pathway may be associated with cancer risk in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers and should be more comprehensively studied.

  15. DNA Glycosylases Involved in Base Excision Repair May Be Associated with Cancer Risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Osorio, Ana; Milne, Roger L.; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline; Vaclová, Tereza; Pita, Guillermo; Alonso, Rosario; Peterlongo, Paolo; Blanco, Ignacio; de la Hoya, Miguel; Duran, Mercedes; Díez, Orland; Ramón y Cajal, Teresa; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Martínez-Bouzas, Cristina; Andrés Conejero, Raquel; Soucy, Penny; McGuffog, Lesley; Barrowdale, Daniel; Lee, Andrew; SWE-BRCA; Arver, Brita; Rantala, Johanna; Loman, Niklas; Ehrencrona, Hans; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Beattie, Mary S.; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Arun, Banu K.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Walsh, Christine; Lester, Jenny; John, Esther M.; Whittemore, Alice S.; Daly, Mary B.; Southey, Melissa; Hopper, John; Terry, Mary B.; Buys, Saundra S.; Janavicius, Ramunas; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Steele, Linda; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Hansen, Thomas v. O.; Jønson, Lars; Ejlertsen, Bent; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Infante, Mar; Herráez, Belén; Moreno, Leticia Thais; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Herzog, Josef; Weeman, Kisa; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Scuvera, Giulietta; Bonanni, Bernardo; Mariette, Frederique; Volorio, Sara; Viel, Alessandra; Varesco, Liliana; Papi, Laura; Ottini, Laura; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Radice, Paolo; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Garber, Judy; Ellis, Steve; Frost, Debra; Platte, Radka; Fineberg, Elena; Evans, Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Izatt, Louise; Eeles, Ros; Adlard, Julian; Davidson, Rosemarie; Cole, Trevor; Eccles, Diana; Cook, Jackie; Hodgson, Shirley; Brewer, Carole; Tischkowitz, Marc; Douglas, Fiona; Porteous, Mary; Side, Lucy; Walker, Lisa; Morrison, Patrick; Donaldson, Alan; Kennedy, John; Foo, Claire; Godwin, Andrew K.; Schmutzler, Rita Katharina; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Rhiem, Kerstin; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Plendl, Hans Jörg; Niederacher, Dieter; Sutter, Christian; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Steinemann, Doris; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Kast, Karin; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Gehrig, Andrea; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Damiola, Francesca; Poppe, Bruce; Claes, Kathleen; Piedmonte, Marion; Tucker, Kathy; Backes, Floor; Rodríguez, Gustavo; Brewster, Wendy; Wakeley, Katie; Rutherford, Thomas; Caldés, Trinidad; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Rookus, Matti A.; van Os, Theo A. M.; van der Kolk, Lizet; de Lange, J. L.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; van der Hout, A. H.; van Asperen, Christi J.; Gómez Garcia, Encarna B.; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Collée, J. Margriet; van Deurzen, Carolien H. M.; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Devilee, Peter; HEBON; Olah, Edith; Lázaro, Conxi; Teulé, Alex; Menéndez, Mireia; Jakubowska, Anna; Cybulski, Cezary; Gronwald, Jacek; Lubinski, Jan; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Johannsson, Oskar Th.; Maugard, Christine; Montagna, Marco; Tognazzo, Silvia; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Healey, Sue; Investigators, kConFab; Olswold, Curtis; Guidugli, Lucia; Lindor, Noralane; Slager, Susan; Szabo, Csilla I.; Vijai, Joseph; Robson, Mark; Kauff, Noah; Zhang, Liying; Rau-Murthy, Rohini; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Singer, Christian F.; Rappaport, Christine; Geschwantler Kaulich, Daphne; Pfeiler, Georg; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Berger, Andreas; Phelan, Catherine M.; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Andrulis, Irene; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Bojesen, Anders; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Sunde, Lone; Thomassen, Mads; Kruse, Torben A.; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Friedman, Eitan; Laitman, Yael; Shimon, Shani Paluch; Simard, Jacques; Easton, Douglas F.; Offit, Kenneth; Couch, Fergus J.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Benitez, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes involved in the DNA Base Excision Repair (BER) pathway could be associated with cancer risk in carriers of mutations in the high-penetrance susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2, given the relation of synthetic lethality that exists between one of the components of the BER pathway, PARP1 (poly ADP ribose polymerase), and both BRCA1 and BRCA2. In the present study, we have performed a comprehensive analysis of 18 genes involved in BER using a tagging SNP approach in a large series of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. 144 SNPs were analyzed in a two stage study involving 23,463 carriers from the CIMBA consortium (the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1 and BRCA2). Eleven SNPs showed evidence of association with breast and/or ovarian cancer at p<0.05 in the combined analysis. Four of the five genes for which strongest evidence of association was observed were DNA glycosylases. The strongest evidence was for rs1466785 in the NEIL2 (endonuclease VIII-like 2) gene (HR: 1.09, 95% CI (1.03–1.16), p = 2.7×10−3) for association with breast cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers, and rs2304277 in the OGG1 (8-guanine DNA glycosylase) gene, with ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 mutation carriers (HR: 1.12 95%CI: 1.03–1.21, p = 4.8×10−3). DNA glycosylases involved in the first steps of the BER pathway may be associated with cancer risk in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers and should be more comprehensively studied. PMID:24698998

  16. Mutations in BRCA1, BRCA2 and other breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility genes in Central and South American populations.

    PubMed

    Jara, Lilian; Morales, Sebastian; de Mayo, Tomas; Gonzalez-Hormazabal, Patricio; Carrasco, Valentina; Godoy, Raul

    2017-10-06

    Breast cancer (BC) is the most common malignancy among women worldwide. A major advance in the understanding of the genetic etiology of BC was the discovery of BRCA1 and BRCA2 (BRCA1/2) genes, which are considered high-penetrance BC genes. In non-carriers of BRCA1/2 mutations, disease susceptibility may be explained of a small number of mutations in BRCA1/2 and a much higher proportion of mutations in ethnicity-specific moderate- and/or low-penetrance genes. In Central and South American populations, studied have focused on analyzing the distribution and prevalence of BRCA1/2 mutations and other susceptibility genes that are scarce in Latin America as compared to North America, Europe, Australia, and Israel. Thus, the aim of this review is to present the current state of knowledge regarding pathogenic BRCA variants and other BC susceptibility genes. We conducted a comprehensive review of 47 studies from 12 countries in Central and South America published between 2002 and 2017 reporting the prevalence and/or spectrum of mutations and pathogenic variants in BRCA1/2 and other BC susceptibility genes. The studies on BRCA1/2 mutations screened a total of 5956 individuals, and studies on susceptibility genes analyzed a combined sample size of 11,578 individuals. To date, a total of 190 different BRCA1/2 pathogenic mutations in Central and South American populations have been reported in the literature. Pathogenic mutations or variants that increase BC risk have been reported in the following genes or genomic regions: ATM, BARD1, CHECK2, FGFR2, GSTM1, MAP3K1, MTHFR, PALB2, RAD51, TOX3, TP53, XRCC1, and 2q35.

  17. DHPLC/SURVEYOR nuclease: a sensitive, rapid and affordable method to analyze BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in breast cancer families.

    PubMed

    Pilato, Brunella; De Summa, Simona; Danza, Katia; Papadimitriou, Stavros; Zaccagna, Paolo; Paradiso, Angelo; Tommasi, Stefania

    2012-09-01

    Hereditary breast cancer accounts for about 10% of all breast cancers and BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes have been identified as validated susceptibility genes for this pathology. Testing for BRCA gene mutations is usually based on a pre-screening approach, such as the partial denaturation DHPLC method, and capillary direct sequencing. However, this approach is time consuming due to the large size of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. Recently, a new low cost and time saving DHPLC protocol has been developed to analyze gene mutations by using SURVEYOR(®) Nuclease digestion and DHPLC analysis. A subset of 90 patients, enrolled in the Genetic Counseling Program of the National Cancer Centre of Bari (Italy), was performed to validate this approach. Previous retrospective analysis showed that 9/90 patients (10%) were mutated in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes and these data were confirmed by the present approach. DNA samples underwent touchdown PCR and, subsequently, SURVEYOR(®) nuclease digestion. BRCA1 and BRCA2 amplicons were divided into groups depending on amplicon size to allow multiamplicon digestion. The product of this reaction were analyzed on Transgenomic WAVE Nucleic Acid High Sensitivity Fragment Analysis System. The operator who performed the DHPLC surveyor approach did not know the sequencing results at that time. The SURVEYOR(®) Nuclease DHPLC approach was able to detect all alterations with a sensitivity of 95%. Furthermore, in order to save time and reagents, a multiamplicon setting preparation was validated.

  18. Tetraploidy in BRCA2 breast tumours.

    PubMed

    Jonsdottir, Asta Bjork; Stefansson, Olafur Andri; Bjornsson, Johannes; Jonasson, Jon G; Ogmundsdottir, Helga M; Eyfjord, Jorunn E

    2012-02-01

    Tetraploidy and aneuploidy can be caused by cell division errors and are frequently observed in many human carcinomas. We have recently reported delayed cytokinesis in primary human fibroblasts from BRCA2 mutation carriers, implying a function for the BRCA2 tumour suppressor in completion of cell division. Here, we address ploidy aberrations in breast tumours derived from BRCA2 germline mutation carriers. Ploidy aberrations were evaluated from flow cytometry histograms on selected breast tumour samples (n=236), previously screened for local BRCA mutations. The ploidy between BRCA2-mutated (n=71) and matched sporadic (n=165) cancers was compared. Differences in ploidy distribution were examined with respect to molecular tumour subtypes, previously defined by immunohistochemistry on tissue microarray sections. Tetraploidy was significantly 3 times more common in BRCA2 breast cancers than sporadic. However, no differences were found in the overall ploidy distribution between BRCA2-mutation carriers and non-carriers. In BRCA2 cancers, tetraploidy was associated with luminal characteristics. The increased frequency of tetraploidy in BRCA2 associated cancers may be linked to cell division errors, particularly cytokinesis. Additionally, tetraploidy emerges predominantly in BRCA2 breast cancers displaying luminal rather than triple-negative phenotypes.

  19. Novel and recurrent BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations in early onset and familial breast and ovarian cancer detected in the Program of Genetic Counseling in Cancer of Valencian Community (eastern Spain). Relationship of family phenotypes with mutation prevalence.

    PubMed

    de Juan Jiménez, Inmaculada; García Casado, Zaida; Palanca Suela, Sarai; Esteban Cardeñosa, Eva; López Guerrero, José Antonio; Segura Huerta, Ángel; Chirivella González, Isabel; Sánchez Heras, Ana Beatriz; Juan Fita, Ma José; Tena García, Isabel; Guillen Ponce, Carmen; Martínez de Dueñas, Eduardo; Romero Noguera, Ignacio; Salas Trejo, Dolores; Goicoechea Sáez, Mercedes; Bolufer Gilabert, Pascual

    2013-12-01

    During the first 6 years of the Program of Genetic Counselling in Cancer of Valencia (eastern Spain), 310 mutations (155 in BRCA1 and 155 in BRCA2) in 1,763 hereditary breast (BC) and ovarian cancer (OC) families were identified. Of the mutations found 105 were distinct (53 in BRCA1 and 52 in BRCA2), eight new and 37 recurrent. Two of the novel mutations were frame-shift placed in exons 2 and 11 of BRCA1 and the remaining six were placed in BRCA2; four frame-shift (three in exon 11 and one in exon 23), one deletion of the entire exon 19 and one in the intervening sequence of exon 22. The BRCA1 mutations with higher recurrence were c.66_68delAG, c.5123C > A, c.1961delA, c.3770_3771delAG and c.5152+5G > A that covered 45.2% of mutations of this gene. The age of onset of BCs of c.68_69delAG mutation carriers occurs later than for the other recurrent mutations of this gene (45 vs. 37 years; p = 0.008). The BRCA2 mutations with higher recurrence were c.9026_9030delATCAT, c.3264insT and c.8978_8991del14 which represented 43.2% of all mutations in this gene, being the most recurrent mutation by far c.9026_9030delATCAT that represents 21.3% of BRCA2 mutations and 10.6% of all mutations. Probands with family histories of BC and OC, or OC and/or BC in at least two first degree relatives, were the more likely to have BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations (35.2% of the total mutations). And that most BRCA1mutations (73.19% mutations) occurred in probands with early-onset BC or with family history of OC.

  20. Common alleles at 6q25.1 and 1p11.2 are associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    PubMed Central

    Antoniou, Antonis C; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Soucy, Penny; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Lee, Andrew; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Cattaneo, Elisa; Barile, Monica; Pensotti, Valeria; Pasini, Barbara; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Giannini, Giuseppe; Laura Putignano, Anna; Varesco, Liliana; Radice, Paolo; Mai, Phuong L.; Greene, Mark H.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Kruse, Torben A.; Birk Jensen, Uffe; Crüger, Dorthe G.; Caligo, Maria A.; Laitman, Yael; Milgrom, Roni; Kaufman, Bella; Paluch-Shimon, Shani; Friedman, Eitan; Loman, Niklas; Harbst, Katja; Lindblom, Annika; Arver, Brita; Ehrencrona, Hans; Melin, Beatrice; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Domchek, Susan M.; Rebbeck, Timothy; Jakubowska, Ania; Lubinski, Jan; Gronwald, Jacek; Huzarski, Tomasz; Byrski, Tomasz; Cybulski, Cezary; Gorski, Bohdan; Osorio, Ana; Ramón y Cajal, Teresa; Fostira, Florentia; Andrés, Raquel; Benitez, Javier; Hamann, Ute; Hogervorst, Frans B.; Rookus, Matti A.; Hooning, Maartje J.; Nelen, Marcel R.; van der Luijt, Rob B.; van Os, Theo A.M.; van Asperen, Christi J.; Devilee, Peter; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E.J.; Gómez Garcia, Encarna B.; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Frost, Debra; Platte, Radka; Leyland, Jean; Gareth Evans, D.; Lalloo, Fiona; Eeles, Ros; Izatt, Louise; Adlard, Julian; Davidson, Rosemarie; Eccles, Diana; Ong, Kai-ren; Cook, Jackie; Douglas, Fiona; Paterson, Joan; John Kennedy, M.; Miedzybrodzka, Zosia; Godwin, Andrew; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Buecher, Bruno; Belotti, Muriel; Tirapo, Carole; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Barjhoux, Laure; Lasset, Christine; Leroux, Dominique; Faivre, Laurence; Bronner, Myriam; Prieur, Fabienne; Nogues, Catherine; Rouleau, Etienne; Pujol, Pascal; Coupier, Isabelle; Frénay, Marc; Hopper, John L.; Daly, Mary B.; Terry, Mary B.; John, Esther M.; Buys, Saundra S.; Yassin, Yosuf; Miron, Alexander; Goldgar, David; Singer, Christian F.; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Pfeiler, Georg; Catharina Dressler, Anne; Hansen, Thomas v.O.; Jønson, Lars; Ejlertsen, Bent; Bjork Barkardottir, Rosa; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Offit, Kenneth; Piedmonte, Marion; Rodriguez, Gustavo; Small, Laurie; Boggess, John; Blank, Stephanie; Basil, Jack; Azodi, Masoud; Ewart Toland, Amanda; Montagna, Marco; Tognazzo, Silvia; Agata, Simona; Imyanitov, Evgeny; Janavicius, Ramunas; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Sucheston, Lara; Karlan, Beth Y.; Walsh, Christine S.; Olah, Edith; Bozsik, Aniko; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Seldon, Joyce L.; Beattie, Mary S.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Sluiter, Michelle D.; Diez, Orland; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Ruehl, Ina; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Kast, Karin; Deissler, Helmut; Niederacher, Dieter; Arnold, Norbert; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Schönbuchner, Ines; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Dumont, Martine; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Tischkowitz, Marc; Chen, Xiaoqing; Beesley, Jonathan; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Chun Ding, Yuan; Fredericksen, Zachary; Wang, Xianshu; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Couch, Fergus; Simard, Jacques; Easton, Douglas F.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia

    2011-01-01

    Two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at 6q25.1, near the ESR1 gene, have been implicated in the susceptibility to breast cancer for Asian (rs2046210) and European women (rs9397435). A genome-wide association study in Europeans identified two further breast cancer susceptibility variants: rs11249433 at 1p11.2 and rs999737 in RAD51L1 at 14q24.1. Although previously identified breast cancer susceptibility variants have been shown to be associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, the involvement of these SNPs to breast cancer susceptibility in mutation carriers is currently unknown. To address this, we genotyped these SNPs in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers from 42 studies from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2. In the analysis of 14 123 BRCA1 and 8053 BRCA2 mutation carriers of European ancestry, the 6q25.1 SNPs (r2 = 0.14) were independently associated with the risk of breast cancer for BRCA1 mutation carriers [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.17, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.11–1.23, P-trend = 4.5 × 10−9 for rs2046210; HR = 1.28, 95% CI: 1.18–1.40, P-trend = 1.3 × 10−8 for rs9397435], but only rs9397435 was associated with the risk for BRCA2 carriers (HR = 1.14, 95% CI: 1.01–1.28, P-trend = 0.031). SNP rs11249433 (1p11.2) was associated with the risk of breast cancer for BRCA2 mutation carriers (HR = 1.09, 95% CI: 1.02–1.17, P-trend = 0.015), but was not associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 mutation carriers (HR = 0.97, 95% CI: 0.92–1.02, P-trend = 0.20). SNP rs999737 (RAD51L1) was not associated with breast cancer risk for either BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers (P-trend = 0.27 and 0.30, respectively). The identification of SNPs at 6q25.1 associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 mutation carriers will lead to a better understanding of the biology of tumour development in these women. PMID:21593217

  1. Common alleles at 6q25.1 and 1p11.2 are associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Antoniou, Antonis C; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Soucy, Penny; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Lee, Andrew; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Cattaneo, Elisa; Barile, Monica; Pensotti, Valeria; Pasini, Barbara; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Giannini, Giuseppe; Putignano, Anna Laura; Varesco, Liliana; Radice, Paolo; Mai, Phuong L; Greene, Mark H; Andrulis, Irene L; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Kruse, Torben A; Birk Jensen, Uffe; Crüger, Dorthe G; Caligo, Maria A; Laitman, Yael; Milgrom, Roni; Kaufman, Bella; Paluch-Shimon, Shani; Friedman, Eitan; Loman, Niklas; Harbst, Katja; Lindblom, Annika; Arver, Brita; Ehrencrona, Hans; Melin, Beatrice; Nathanson, Katherine L; Domchek, Susan M; Rebbeck, Timothy; Jakubowska, Ania; Lubinski, Jan; Gronwald, Jacek; Huzarski, Tomasz; Byrski, Tomasz; Cybulski, Cezary; Gorski, Bohdan; Osorio, Ana; Ramón y Cajal, Teresa; Fostira, Florentia; Andrés, Raquel; Benitez, Javier; Hamann, Ute; Hogervorst, Frans B; Rookus, Matti A; Hooning, Maartje J; Nelen, Marcel R; van der Luijt, Rob B; van Os, Theo A M; van Asperen, Christi J; Devilee, Peter; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E J; Gómez Garcia, Encarna B; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Frost, Debra; Platte, Radka; Leyland, Jean; Evans, D Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Eeles, Ros; Izatt, Louise; Adlard, Julian; Davidson, Rosemarie; Eccles, Diana; Ong, Kai-ren; Cook, Jackie; Douglas, Fiona; Paterson, Joan; Kennedy, M John; Miedzybrodzka, Zosia; Godwin, Andrew; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Buecher, Bruno; Belotti, Muriel; Tirapo, Carole; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Barjhoux, Laure; Lasset, Christine; Leroux, Dominique; Faivre, Laurence; Bronner, Myriam; Prieur, Fabienne; Nogues, Catherine; Rouleau, Etienne; Pujol, Pascal; Coupier, Isabelle; Frénay, Marc; Hopper, John L; Daly, Mary B; Terry, Mary B; John, Esther M; Buys, Saundra S; Yassin, Yosuf; Miron, Alexander; Goldgar, David; Singer, Christian F; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Pfeiler, Georg; Dressler, Anne Catharina; Hansen, Thomas v O; Jønson, Lars; Ejlertsen, Bent; Barkardottir, Rosa Bjork; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Offit, Kenneth; Piedmonte, Marion; Rodriguez, Gustavo; Small, Laurie; Boggess, John; Blank, Stephanie; Basil, Jack; Azodi, Masoud; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Montagna, Marco; Tognazzo, Silvia; Agata, Simona; Imyanitov, Evgeny; Janavicius, Ramunas; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Pharoah, Paul D P; Sucheston, Lara; Karlan, Beth Y; Walsh, Christine S; Olah, Edith; Bozsik, Aniko; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Seldon, Joyce L; Beattie, Mary S; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Sluiter, Michelle D; Diez, Orland; Schmutzler, Rita K; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Ruehl, Ina; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Kast, Karin; Deissler, Helmut; Niederacher, Dieter; Arnold, Norbert; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Schönbuchner, Ines; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Dumont, Martine; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Tischkowitz, Marc; Chen, Xiaoqing; Beesley, Jonathan; Spurdle, Amanda B; Neuhausen, Susan L; Chun Ding, Yuan; Fredericksen, Zachary; Wang, Xianshu; Pankratz, Vernon S; Couch, Fergus; Simard, Jacques; Easton, Douglas F; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia

    2011-08-15

    Two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at 6q25.1, near the ESR1 gene, have been implicated in the susceptibility to breast cancer for Asian (rs2046210) and European women (rs9397435). A genome-wide association study in Europeans identified two further breast cancer susceptibility variants: rs11249433 at 1p11.2 and rs999737 in RAD51L1 at 14q24.1. Although previously identified breast cancer susceptibility variants have been shown to be associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, the involvement of these SNPs to breast cancer susceptibility in mutation carriers is currently unknown. To address this, we genotyped these SNPs in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers from 42 studies from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2. In the analysis of 14 123 BRCA1 and 8053 BRCA2 mutation carriers of European ancestry, the 6q25.1 SNPs (r(2) = 0.14) were independently associated with the risk of breast cancer for BRCA1 mutation carriers [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.17, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.11-1.23, P-trend = 4.5 × 10(-9) for rs2046210; HR = 1.28, 95% CI: 1.18-1.40, P-trend = 1.3 × 10(-8) for rs9397435], but only rs9397435 was associated with the risk for BRCA2 carriers (HR = 1.14, 95% CI: 1.01-1.28, P-trend = 0.031). SNP rs11249433 (1p11.2) was associated with the risk of breast cancer for BRCA2 mutation carriers (HR = 1.09, 95% CI: 1.02-1.17, P-trend = 0.015), but was not associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 mutation carriers (HR = 0.97, 95% CI: 0.92-1.02, P-trend = 0.20). SNP rs999737 (RAD51L1) was not associated with breast cancer risk for either BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers (P-trend = 0.27 and 0.30, respectively). The identification of SNPs at 6q25.1 associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 mutation carriers will lead to a better understanding of the biology of tumour development in these women.

  2. Does the age of breast cancer diagnosis in first-degree relatives impact on the risk of breast cancer in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers?

    PubMed

    Semple, John; Metcalfe, Kelly A; Lubinski, Jan; Huzarski, Tomasz; Gronwald, Jacek; Armel, Susan; Lynch, Henry T; Karlan, Beth; Foulkes, William; Singer, Christian F; Neuhausen, Susan L; Eng, Charis; Iqbal, Javaid; Narod, Steven A

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to estimate the age-specific annual risks of breast cancer in a woman with a germline BRCA mutation and an affected first-degree relative according to the age of breast cancer diagnosis in the relative. Women with BRCA mutations with no previous diagnosis of breast cancer and with one first-degree relative with breast cancer were followed for breast cancers for a mean of 5.9 years (minimum 2 years). Age-specific annual breast cancer risks were calculated, according to the age of breast cancer diagnosis in the proband and the first-degree relative. 1114 cancer-free women with a BRCA mutation with a single first-degree relative with breast cancer were eligible for the study. 122 women (11.0 %) were diagnosed with incident breast cancer. The annual risk of breast cancer was 2.0 % for women with BRCA1 mutations and was 1.6 % for women with BRCA2 mutations. The age of breast cancer diagnosis in the first-degree relative did not affect the annual breast cancer risks for BRCA1 mutation carriers. For BRCA2 mutation carriers, the annual breast cancer risk was 4.5 % for women with a first-degree relative diagnosed with breast cancer under the age of 30 years and was 0.7 % for women with a relative diagnosed over the age of 60. Among women with BRCA2 mutations, a family history of early-onset breast cancer is a risk factor for developing breast cancer. Risk assessment for healthy BRCA2 mutation carriers should consider the ages of breast cancers diagnosed in first-degree relatives.

  3. Common breast cancer susceptibility alleles and the risk of breast cancer for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers: implications for risk prediction.

    PubMed

    Antoniou, Antonis C; Beesley, Jonathan; McGuffog, Lesley; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Healey, Sue; Neuhausen, Susan L; Ding, Yuan Chun; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Lynch, Henry T; Isaacs, Claudine; Ganz, Patricia A; Tomlinson, Gail; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Couch, Fergus J; Wang, Xianshu; Lindor, Noralane M; Pankratz, Vernon S; Radice, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Barile, Monica; Viel, Alessandra; Allavena, Anna; Dall'Olio, Valentina; Peterlongo, Paolo; Szabo, Csilla I; Zikan, Michal; Claes, Kathleen; Poppe, Bruce; Foretova, Lenka; Mai, Phuong L; Greene, Mark H; Rennert, Gad; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Andrulis, Irene L; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Sunde, Lone; Cruger, Dorthe; Birk Jensen, Uffe; Caligo, Maria; Friedman, Eitan; Kaufman, Bella; Laitman, Yael; Milgrom, Roni; Dubrovsky, Maya; Cohen, Shimrit; Borg, Ake; Jernström, Helena; Lindblom, Annika; Rantala, Johanna; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Melin, Beatrice; Nathanson, Kate; Domchek, Susan; Jakubowska, Ania; Lubinski, Jan; Huzarski, Tomasz; Osorio, Ana; Lasa, Adriana; Durán, Mercedes; Tejada, Maria-Isabel; Godino, Javier; Benitez, Javier; Hamann, Ute; Kriege, Mieke; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; van der Luijt, Rob B; van Asperen, Christi J; Devilee, Peter; Meijers-Heijboer, E J; Blok, Marinus J; Aalfs, Cora M; Hogervorst, Frans; Rookus, Matti; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare; Frost, Debra; Conroy, Don; Evans, D Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Pichert, Gabriella; Davidson, Rosemarie; Cole, Trevor; Cook, Jackie; Paterson, Joan; Hodgson, Shirley; Morrison, Patrick J; Porteous, Mary E; Walker, Lisa; Kennedy, M John; Dorkins, Huw; Peock, Susan; Godwin, Andrew K; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; de Pauw, Antoine; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Bonadona, Valérie; Lasset, Christine; Dreyfus, Hélène; Leroux, Dominique; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Faivre, Laurence; Loustalot, Catherine; Noguchi, Tetsuro; Sobol, Hagay; Rouleau, Etienne; Nogues, Catherine; Frénay, Marc; Vénat-Bouvet, Laurence; Hopper, John L; Daly, Mary B; Terry, Mary B; John, Esther M; Buys, Saundra S; Yassin, Yosuf; Miron, Alexander; Goldgar, David; Singer, Christian F; Dressler, Anne Catharina; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Pfeiler, Georg; Hansen, Thomas V O; Jønson, Lars; Agnarsson, Bjarni A; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Offit, Kenneth; Devlin, Vincent; Dutra-Clarke, Ana; Piedmonte, Marion; Rodriguez, Gustavo C; Wakeley, Katie; Boggess, John F; Basil, Jack; Schwartz, Peter E; Blank, Stephanie V; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Montagna, Marco; Casella, Cinzia; Imyanitov, Evgeny; Tihomirova, Laima; Blanco, Ignacio; Lazaro, Conxi; Ramus, Susan J; Sucheston, Lara; Karlan, Beth Y; Gross, Jenny; Schmutzler, Rita; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Lochmann, Magdalena; Arnold, Norbert; Heidemann, Simone; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Niederacher, Dieter; Sutter, Christian; Deissler, Helmut; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Kast, Karin; Schönbuchner, Ines; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Nevanlinna, Heli; Simard, Jacques; Spurdle, Amanda B; Holland, Helene; Chen, Xiaoqing; Platte, Radka; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F

    2010-12-01

    The known breast cancer susceptibility polymorphisms in FGFR2, TNRC9/TOX3, MAP3K1, LSP1, and 2q35 confer increased risks of breast cancer for BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. We evaluated the associations of 3 additional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs4973768 in SLC4A7/NEK10, rs6504950 in STXBP4/COX11, and rs10941679 at 5p12, and reanalyzed the previous associations using additional carriers in a sample of 12,525 BRCA1 and 7,409 BRCA2 carriers. Additionally, we investigated potential interactions between SNPs and assessed the implications for risk prediction. The minor alleles of rs4973768 and rs10941679 were associated with increased breast cancer risk for BRCA2 carriers (per-allele HR = 1.10, 95% CI: 1.03-1.18, P = 0.006 and HR = 1.09, 95% CI: 1.01-1.19, P = 0.03, respectively). Neither SNP was associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 carriers, and rs6504950 was not associated with breast cancer for either BRCA1 or BRCA2 carriers. Of the 9 polymorphisms investigated, 7 were associated with breast cancer for BRCA2 carriers (FGFR2, TOX3, MAP3K1, LSP1, 2q35, SLC4A7, 5p12, P = 7 × 10(-11) - 0.03), but only TOX3 and 2q35 were associated with the risk for BRCA1 carriers (P = 0.0049, 0.03, respectively). All risk-associated polymorphisms appear to interact multiplicatively on breast cancer risk for mutation carriers. Based on the joint genotype distribution of the 7 risk-associated SNPs in BRCA2 mutation carriers, the 5% of BRCA2 carriers at highest risk (i.e., between 95th and 100th percentiles) were predicted to have a probability between 80% and 96% of developing breast cancer by age 80, compared with 42% to 50% for the 5% of carriers at lowest risk. Our findings indicated that these risk differences might be sufficient to influence the clinical management of mutation carriers.

  4. Common breast cancer susceptibility alleles and the risk of breast cancer for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers: implications for risk prediction

    PubMed Central

    Antoniou, Antonis C; Beesley, Jonathan; McGuffog, Lesley; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Healey, Sue; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Lynch, Henry T.; Isaacs, Claudine; Ganz, Patricia A.; Tomlinson, Gail; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Couch, Fergus J.; Wang, Xianshu; Lindor, Noralane M.; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Radice, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Barile, Monica; Viel, Alessandra; Allavena, Anna; Dall’Olio, Valentina; Peterlongo, Paolo; Szabo, Csilla I.; Zikan, Michal; Claes, Kathleen; Poppe, Bruce; Foretova, Lenka; Mai, Phuong L.; Greene, Mark H.; Rennert, Gad; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Andrulis, Irene L.; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Sunde, Lone; Cruger, Dorthe; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Caligo, Maria; Friedman, Eitan; Kaufman, Bella; Laitman, Yael; Milgrom, Roni; Dubrovsky, Maya; Cohen, Shimrit; Borg, Ake; Jernström, Helena; Lindblom, Annika; Rantala, Johanna; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Melin, Beatrice; Nathanson, Kate; Domchek, Susan; Jakubowska, Ania; Lubinski, Jan; Huzarski, Tomasz; Osorio, Ana; Lasa, Adriana; Durán, Mercedes; Tejada, Maria-Isabel; Godino, Javier; Benitez, Javier; Hamann, Ute; Kriege, Mieke; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; van der Luijt, Rob B; van Asperen, Christi J; Devilee, Peter; Meijers-Heijboer, E.J.; Blok, Marinus J; Aalfs, Cora M.; Hogervorst, Frans; Rookus, Matti; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare; Frost, Debra; Conroy, Don; Evans, D. Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Pichert, Gabriella; Davidson, Rosemarie; Cole, Trevor; Cook, Jackie; Paterson, Joan; Hodgson, Shirley; Morrison, Patrick J.; Porteous, Mary E.; Walker, Lisa; Kennedy, M. John; Dorkins, Huw; Peock, Susan; Godwin, Andrew K.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; de Pauw, Antoine; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Bonadona, Valérie; Lasset, Christine; Dreyfus, Hélène; Leroux, Dominique; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Faivre, Laurence; Loustalot, Catherine; Noguchi, Tetsuro; Sobol, Hagay; Rouleau, Etienne; Nogues, Catherine; Frénay, Marc; Vénat-Bouvet, Laurence; Hopper, John L.; Daly, Mary B.; Terry, Mary B.; John, Esther M.; Buys, Saundra S.; Yassin, Yosuf; Miron, Alex; Goldgar, David; Singer, Christian F.; Dressler, Anne Catharina; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Pfeiler, Georg; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Jønson, Lars; Agnarsson, Bjarni A.; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Offit, Kenneth; Devlin, Vincent; Dutra-Clarke, Ana; Piedmonte, Marion; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Wakeley, Katie; Boggess, John F.; Basil, Jack; Schwartz, Peter E.; Blank, Stephanie V.; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Montagna, Marco; Casella, Cinzia; Imyanitov, Evgeny; Tihomirova, Laima; Blanco, Ignacio; Lazaro, Conxi; Ramus, Susan J.; Sucheston, Lara; Karlan, Beth Y.; Gross, Jenny; Schmutzler, Rita; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Lochmann, Magdalena; Arnold, Norbert; Heidemann, Simone; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Niederacher, Dieter; Sutter, Christian; Deissler, Helmut; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Kast, Karin; Schönbuchner, Ines; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Nevanlinna, Heli; Simard, Jacques; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Holland, Helene; Chen, Xiaoqing; Platte, Radka; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.

    2010-01-01

    The known breast cancer (BC) susceptibility polymorphisms in FGFR2, TNRC9/TOX3, MAP3K1,LSP1 and 2q35 confer increased risks of BC for BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. We evaluated the associations of three additional SNPs, rs4973768 in SLC4A7/NEK10, rs6504950 in STXBP4/COX11 and rs10941679 at 5p12 and reanalyzed the previous associations using additional carriers in a sample of 12,525 BRCA1 and 7,409 BRCA2 carriers. Additionally, we investigated potential interactions between SNPs and assessed the implications for risk prediction. The minor alleles of rs4973768 and rs10941679 were associated with increased BC risk for BRCA2 carriers (per-allele Hazard Ratio (HR)=1.10, 95%CI:1.03-1.18, p=0.006 and HR=1.09, 95%CI:1.01-1.19, p=0.03, respectively). Neither SNP was associated with BC risk for BRCA1 carriers and rs6504950 was not associated with BC for either BRCA1 or BRCA2 carriers. Of the nine polymorphisms investigated, seven were associated with BC for BRCA2 carriers (FGFR2, TOX3, MAP3K1, LSP1, 2q35, SLC4A7, 5p12, p-values:7×10−11-0.03), but only TOX3 and 2q35 were associated with the risk for BRCA1 carriers (p=0.0049, 0.03 respectively). All risk associated polymorphisms appear to interact multiplicatively on BC risk for mutation carriers. Based on the joint genotype distribution of the seven risk associated SNPs in BRCA2 mutation carriers, the 5% of BRCA2 carriers at highest risk (i.e. between 95th and 100th percentiles) were predicted to have a probability between 80% and 96% of developing BC by age 80, compared with 42-50% for the 5% of carriers at lowest risk. Our findings indicated that these risk differences may be sufficient to influence the clinical management of mutation carriers. PMID:21118973

  5. Germline mutations of DICER1 in Chinese women with BRCA1/BRCA2-negative familial breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Cao, W-M; Gao, Y; Yang, H-J; Xie, S-N; Meng, X-L; Pan, Z-W; Chen, Z-H; Huang, J; Ye, W-W; Shao, X-Y; Wang, X-J

    2014-12-18

    Germline mutations in identified breast cancer susceptibility genes account for less than 20% of Chinese familial breast cancers. Dicer is an essential component of the microRNA-producing machinery; germline mutations of DICER1 have been confirmed in familial pleuropulmonary blastoma, ovarian sex cord-stromal tumors, and other cancers. Low expression of DICER1 is frequently detected in breast cancer. However, whether germline mutations of DICER1 occur in familial breast cancers remain unknown. Sixty-five breast cancer probands from BRCA1/BRCA2-negative Chinese breast cancer families were screened for germline mutations in DICER1. In addition, 100 unrelated healthy females were enrolled as controls. A polymerase chain reaction sequencing assay was used to screen for mutations in coding regions and at the exon-intron boundaries of DICER1. All variants in introns were evaluated using the NNSplice software to determine the potential splicing effect. A total of 12 germline variants were found, including 11 variants in introns and 1 variant in the 3'-non-coding region. Four variants (IVS8-205 C>T, IVS11+131 delGAAA, IVS16+42 delTA, and IVS19+160 T>C) were novel. Three variants (IVS11+105 C>T, IVS16+42 delTA, and 6095 T>A) may affect splice sites. None of the observed variants appeared to be disease-related, suggesting that germline mutations in DICER1 are rare or absent in familial breast cancer patients.

  6. A novel loss-of-function heterozygous BRCA2 c.8946_8947delAG mutation found in a Chinese woman with family history of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jing; Yang, Jichun; Jian, Wenjing; Wang, Xianming; Xiao, Deyong; Xia, Wenjun; Xiong, Likuan; Ma, Duan

    2017-04-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequent female malignancy worldwide. Among them, some cases have hereditary susceptibility in two leading genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2. Heterozygous germ line mutations in them are related with increased risk of breast, ovarian and other cancer, following autosomal dominant inheritance mode. For purpose of early finding, early diagnosis and early treatment, mutation detecting of BRCA1/2 genes was performed in unselected 300 breast or ovarian patients and unaffected women using next-generation sequencing and then confirmed by Sanger sequencing. A non-previously reported heterozygous mutation c.8946_8947delAG (p.D2983FfsX34) of BRCA2 gene was identified in an unaffected Chinese woman with family history of breast cancer (her breast cancer mother, also carrying this mutation). The BRCA2-truncated protein resulted from the frame shift mutation was found to lose two putative nuclear localization signals and a Rad51-binding motif in the extreme C-terminal region by bioinformatic prediction. And then in vitro experiments showed that nearly all the mutant protein was unable to translocate to the nucleus to perform DNA repair activity. This novel mutant BRCA2 protein is dysfunction. We classify the mutation into disease causing and conclude that it is the risk factor for breast cancer in this family. So, conducting the same mutation test and providing genetic counseling for this family is practically meaningful and significant. Meanwhile, the identification of this new mutation enriches the Breast Cancer Information Core database, especially in China.

  7. Haplotype analysis of TP53 polymorphisms, Arg72Pro and Ins16, in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers of French Canadian descent

    PubMed Central

    Cavallone, Luca; Arcand, Suzanna L; Maugard, Christine; Ghadirian, Parviz; Mes-Masson, Anne-Marie; Provencher, Diane; Tonin, Patricia N

    2008-01-01

    Background The TP53 polymorphisms Arg72Pro (Ex4+199 G>C) and Ins16 (IVS3+24 ins16) have been proposed to modify risk of breast cancer associated with germline BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations. Allele frequencies of these polymorphisms were investigated to determine if they modify risk in BRCA mutation carriers in breast cancer cases drawn from French Canadian cancer families, a population shown to exhibit strong founder effects. Methods The frequencies of the TP53 alleles, genotypes and haplotypes of 157 index breast cancer cases comprised of 42 BRCA1 mutation carriers, 57 BRCA2 mutation carriers, and 58 BRCA mutation-negative cases, where each case was drawn from independently ascertained families were compared. The effect of TP53 variants on the age of diagnosis was also investigated for these groups. The TP53 polymorphisms were also investigated in 112 women of French Canadian descent with no personal history of cancer. Results The BRCA mutation-positive groups had the highest frequency of homozygous carriers of the 72Pro allele compared with mutation-negative group. The TP53 polymorphisms exhibited linkage disequilibrium (p < 0.001), where the 72Arg and Ins16minus alleles occurred in strong disequilibrium. The highest frequency of carriers of Ins16minus-72Arg haplotype occurred in the BRCA mutation-negative groups. The BRCA1 mutation carriers homozygous for the 72Pro allele had the youngest ages of diagnosis of breast cancer. However none of these observations were statistically significant. In contrast, the BRCA2 mutation carriers homozygous for the 72Pro allele had a significantly older age of diagnosis of breast cancer (p = 0.018). Moreover, in this group, the mean age of diagnosis of breast cancer in carriers of the Ins16minus-72Arg haplotype was significantly younger than that of the individuals who did not this carry this haplotype (p = 0.009). Conclusion We observed no significant association of breast cancer risk with TP53 genetic variants based on BRCA1

  8. The impact of pregnancy on breast cancer survival in women who carry a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation.

    PubMed

    Valentini, Adriana; Lubinski, Jan; Byrski, Tomasz; Ghadirian, Parviz; Moller, Pal; Lynch, Henry T; Ainsworth, Peter; Neuhausen, Susan L; Weitzel, Jeffrey; Singer, Christian F; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Saal, Howard; Lyonnet, Dominique Stoppa; Foulkes, William D; Kim-Sing, Charmaine; Manoukian, Siranoush; Zakalik, Dana; Armel, Susan; Senter, Leigha; Eng, Charis; Grunfeld, Eva; Chiarelli, Anna M; Poll, Aletta; Sun, Ping; Narod, Steven A

    2013-11-01

    Physicians are often approached by young women with a BRCA mutation and a recent history of breast cancer who wish to have a baby. They wish to know if pregnancy impacts upon their future risks of cancer recurrence and survival. To date, there is little information on the survival experience of women who carry a mutation in one of the BRCA genes and who become pregnant. From an international multi-center cohort study of 12,084 women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation, we identified 128 case subjects who were diagnosed with breast cancer while pregnant or who became pregnant after a diagnosis of breast cancer. These women were age-matched to 269 mutation carriers with breast cancer who did not become pregnant (controls). Subjects were followed from the date of breast cancer diagnosis until the date of last follow-up or death from breast cancer. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate 15-year survival rates. The hazard ratio for survival associated with pregnancy was calculated using a left-truncated Cox proportional hazard model, adjusting for other prognostic factors. Among women who were diagnosed with breast cancer when pregnant or who became pregnant thereafter, the 15-year survival rate was 91.5 %, compared to a survival of 88.6 % for women who did not become pregnant (adjusted hazard ratio = 0.76; 95 % CI 0.31-1.91; p = 0.56). Pregnancy concurrent with or after a diagnosis of breast cancer does not appear to adversely affect survival among BRCA1/2 mutation carriers.

  9. Effects of oestrogens and anti-oestrogens on normal breast tissue from women bearing BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Bramley, M; Clarke, R B; Howell, A; Evans, D G R; Armer, T; Baildam, A D; Anderson, E

    2006-01-01

    There is considerable interest in whether anti-oestrogens can be used to prevent breast cancer in women bearing mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. The effects of oestradiol (E2), tamoxifen (TAM) and fulvestrant (FUL) on proliferation and steroid receptor expression were assessed in normal breast epithelium taken from women at varying risks of breast cancer and implanted into athymic nude mice, which were treated with E2 in the presence and absence of TAM or FUL. Tissue samples were taken at various time points thereafter for assessment of proliferative activity and expression of oestrogen and progesterone receptors (ERα and PgR) by immunohistochemistry. Oestradiol increased proliferation in the breast epithelium from women carrying mutations in the BRCA1/2 genes, those otherwise at increased risk and those at population risk of breast cancer. This increase was reduced by both TAM and FUL in all risk groups. In the absence of E2, PgR expression was reduced in all risk groups but significantly more so in the BRCA-mutated groups. Subsequent E2 treatment caused a rapid, complete induction of PgR expression in the population-risk group but not in the high-risk or BRCA-mutated groups in which PgR induction was significantly delayed. These data suggest that the mechanisms by which E2 induces breast epithelial PgR expression are impaired in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers, whereas those regulating proliferation remain intact. We conclude that early anti-oestrogen treatment should prevent breast cancer in very high-risk women. PMID:16538216

  10. The impact of pregnancy on breast cancer survival in women who carry a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation

    PubMed Central

    Valentini, Adriana; Lubinski, Jan; Byrski, Tomasz; Ghadirian, Parviz; Moller, Pal; Lynch, Henry T.; Ainsworth, Peter; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Weitzel, Jeffrey; Singer, Christian F.; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Saal, Howard; Lyonnet, Dominique Stoppa; Foulkes, William D.; Kim-Sing, Charmaine; Manoukian, Siranoush; Zakalik, Dana; Armel, Susan; Senter, Leigha; Eng, Charis; Grunfeld, Eva; Chiarelli, Anna M.; Poll, Aletta; Sun, Ping

    2014-01-01

    Physicians are often approached by young women with a BRCA mutation and a recent history of breast cancer who wish to have a baby. They wish to know if pregnancy impacts upon their future risks of cancer recurrence and survival. To date, there is little information on the survival experience of women who carry a mutation in one of the BRCA genes and who become pregnant. From an international multi-center cohort study of 12,084 women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation, we identified 128 case subjects who were diagnosed with breast cancer while pregnant or who became pregnant after a diagnosis of breast cancer. These women were age-matched to 269 mutation carriers with breast cancer who did not become pregnant (controls). Subjects were followed from the date of breast cancer diagnosis until the date of last follow-up or death from breast cancer. The Kaplan–Meier method was used to estimate 15-year survival rates. The hazard ratio for survival associated with pregnancy was calculated using a left-truncated Cox proportional hazard model, adjusting for other prognostic factors. Among women who were diagnosed with breast cancer when pregnant or who became pregnant thereafter, the 15-year survival rate was 91.5 %, compared to a survival of 88.6 % for women who did not become pregnant (adjusted hazard ratio = 0.76; 95 % CI 0.31–1.91; p = 0.56). Pregnancy concurrent with or after a diagnosis of breast cancer does not appear to adversely affect survival among BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. PMID:24136669

  11. Comprehensive analysis of BRCA1, BRCA2 and TP53 germline mutation and tumor characterization: a portrait of early-onset breast cancer in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Carraro, Dirce Maria; Koike Folgueira, Maria Aparecida Azevedo; Garcia Lisboa, Bianca Cristina; Ribeiro Olivieri, Eloisa Helena; Vitorino Krepischi, Ana Cristina; de Carvalho, Alex Fiorini; de Carvalho Mota, Louise Danielle; Puga, Renato David; do Socorro Maciel, Maria; Michelli, Rodrigo Augusto Depieri; de Lyra, Eduardo Carneiro; Grosso, Stana Helena Giorgi; Soares, Fernando Augusto; Achatz, Maria Isabel Alves de Souza Waddington; Brentani, Helena; Moreira-Filho, Carlos Alberto; Brentani, Maria Mitzi

    2013-01-01

    Germline mutations in BRCA1, BRCA2 and TP53 genes have been identified as one of the most important disease-causing issues in young breast cancer patients worldwide. The specific defective biological processes that trigger germline mutation-associated and -negative tumors remain unclear. To delineate an initial portrait of Brazilian early-onset breast cancer, we performed an investigation combining both germline and tumor analysis. Germline screening of the BRCA1, BRCA2, CHEK2 (c.1100delC) and TP53 genes was performed in 54 unrelated patients <35 y; their tumors were investigated with respect to transcriptional and genomic profiles as well as hormonal receptors and HER2 expression/amplification. Germline mutations were detected in 12 out of 54 patients (22%) [7 in BRCA1 (13%), 4 in BRCA2 (7%) and one in TP53 (2%) gene]. A cancer familial history was present in 31.4% of the unrelated patients, from them 43.7% were carriers for germline mutation (37.5% in BRCA1 and in 6.2% in the BRCA2 genes). Fifty percent of the unrelated patients with hormone receptor-negative tumors carried BRCA1 mutations, percentage increasing to 83% in cases with familial history of cancer. Over-representation of DNA damage-, cellular and cell cycle-related processes was detected in the up-regulated genes of BRCA1/2-associated tumors, whereas cell and embryo development-related processes were over-represented in the up-regulated genes of BRCA1/2-negative tumors, suggesting distinct mechanisms driving the tumorigenesis. An initial portrait of the early-onset breast cancer patients in Brazil was generated pointing out that hormone receptor-negative tumors and positive familial history are two major risk factors for detection of a BRCA1 germline mutation. Additionally, the data revealed molecular factors that potentially trigger the tumor development in young patients.

  12. Second primary breast cancer in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers: 10-year cumulative incidence in the Breast Cancer Family Registry.

    PubMed

    Menes, Tehillah S; Terry, Mary Beth; Goldgar, David; Andrulis, Irene L; Knight, Julia A; John, Esther M; Liao, Yuyan; Southey, Melissa; Miron, Alexander; Chung, Wendy; Buys, Saundra S

    2015-06-01

    BReast CAncer genes 1 and 2 (BRCA1 and BRCA2) mutation carriers diagnosed with breast cancer are at increased risk of developing a second primary breast cancer. Data from high-risk clinics may be subject to different biases which can cause both over and underestimation of this risk. Using data from a large multi-institutional family registry we estimated the 10-year cumulative risk of second primary breast cancer including more complete testing information on family members. We prospectively followed 800 women diagnosed with breast cancer from the Breast Cancer Family Registry (BCFR) who were carriers of a BRCA1 or BRCA2 pathogenic mutation or a variant of unknown clinical significance. In order to limit survival and ascertainment bias, cases were limited to those diagnosed with a first primary breast cancer from 1994 to 2001 and enrolled in the BCFR within 3 years after their cancer diagnosis. We excluded women enrolled after being diagnosed with a second breast cancer. We calculated 10-year incidence of second primary breast cancers. The 10-year incidence of a second primary breast cancer was highest in BRCA1 mutation carriers (17 %; 95 % CI 11-25 %), with even higher estimates in those first diagnosed under the age of 40 (21 %; 95 % CI 13-34 %). Lower rates were found in BRCA2 mutation carriers (7 %; 95 % CI 3-15 %) and women with a variant of unknown clinical significance (6 %; 95 % CI 4-9 %). Whereas the cumulative 10-year incidence of second primary breast cancer is high in BRCA1 mutation carriers, the estimates in BRCA2 mutation carriers and women with variants of unknown clinical significance are similar to those reported in women with sporadic breast cancer.

  13. Performance of multiplicom's BRCA MASTR Dx kit on the detection of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in fresh frozen ovarian and breast tumor samples

    PubMed Central

    Badoer, Cindy; Garrec, Céline; Goossens, Dirk; Ellison, Gillian; Mills, John; Dzial, Mélina; Housni, Hakim El; Berwouts, Sarah; Concolino, Paola; Guevellou, Virginie Guibert-Le; Delnatte, Capucine; Favero, Jurgen Del

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has enabled new approaches for detection of mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes responsible for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC). The search for germline mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes is of importance with respect to oncogenetic and surgical (bilateral mastectomy, ovariectomy) counselling. Testing tumor material for BRCA mutations is of increasing importance for therapeutic decision making as the poly ADP ribose polymerase (PARP) inhibitor, olaparib, is now available to treat patients with specific forms of ovarian cancer and BRCA mutations. Molecular genetics laboratories should develop reliable and sensitive techniques for the complete analysis of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. This is a challenge due to the size of the coding sequence of the BRCA1/2 genes, the absence of hot spot mutations, and particularly by the lower DNA quality obtained from Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded (FFPE) tissue. As a result, a number of analyses are uninterpretable and do not always provide a result to the clinician, limiting the optimal therapeutic management of patients. The availability of Fresh Frozen Tissue (FFT) for some laboratories and the excellent quality of the DNA extracted from it offers an alternative. For this reason, we evaluated Multiplicom's BRCA MASTR Dx assay on a set of 97 FFT derived DNA samples, in combination with the MID for Illumina MiSeq for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation detection. We obtained interpretable NGS results for all tested samples and showed > 99,7% sensitivity, specificity and accuracy. PMID:27793035

  14. Phenocopy breast cancer rates in Israeli BRCA1 BRCA2 mutation carrier families: is the risk increased in non-carriers?

    PubMed

    Bernholtz, Shiri; Laitman, Yael; Kaufman, Bella; Shimon-Paluch, Shnai; Friedman, Eitan

    2012-04-01

    BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers have an increased risk for developing breast (and ovarian) cancer. Non-carriers from within such families (=true negatives) are counseled that their risk for developing breast cancer is similar to that of the average-risk population. Breast cancer diagnosed in a non-carrier from a family with a known mutation is coined phenocopy. The rate of breast cancer phenocopy and the risk for breast cancer in true negatives are unsettled. The rate of phenocopy breast cancer was assessed in non-carriers from Jewish families with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation, identified at the Sheba medical center. Analysis was performed by t test for comparison of mean age at counseling or breast cancer diagnosis, and by calculating a standardized incidence ratio (SIR). Overall, 1318 females from 884 mutation carrying families (620 with BRCA1 264 with BRCA2 mutations) were genotyped, of whom 307 women from 245 families were assigned a true negative status (mean age at counseling 43.01 ± 13.03 years (range 19.7-92.8 years). Of these true negatives, 20 women (6.51-2.26% of families) developed breast cancer at a mean age of 54.1 ± 12.9 years (range 48.1 -60.1 years). The SIR for breast cancer in true negatives was not significantly different than the expected in the average-risk Israeli population [observed 20-expected 23.8 cases SIR = 0.84, 95% CI (0.51, 1.30)]. The rate of phenocopy breast cancer in non-carriers from Israeli BRCA1 BRCA2 mutation carrier families is 2.26% with no increased breast cancer risk over the average-risk population.

  15. Inherited mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 in an unselected multiethnic cohort of Asian patients with breast cancer and healthy controls from Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Wen, Wei Xiong; Allen, Jamie; Lai, Kah Nyin; Mariapun, Shivaani; Hasan, Siti Norhidayu; Ng, Pei Sze; Lee, Daphne Shin-Chi; Lee, Sheau Yee; Yoon, Sook-Yee; Lim, Joanna; Lau, Shao Yan; Decker, Brennan; Pooley, Karen; Dorling, Leila; Luccarini, Craig; Baynes, Caroline; Conroy, Don M; Harrington, Patricia; Simard, Jacques; Yip, Cheng Har; Mohd Taib, Nur Aishah; Ho, Weang Kee; Antoniou, Antonis C; Dunning, Alison M; Easton, Douglas F; Teo, Soo Hwang

    2017-10-09

    Genetic testing for BRCA1 and BRCA2 is offered typically to selected women based on age of onset and family history of cancer. However, current internationally accepted genetic testing referral guidelines are built mostly on data from cancer genetics clinics in women of European descent. To evaluate the appropriateness of such guidelines in Asians, we have determined the prevalence of germ line variants in an unselected cohort of Asian patients with breast cancer and healthy controls. Germ line DNA from a hospital-based study of 2575 unselected patients with breast cancer and 2809 healthy controls were subjected to amplicon-based targeted sequencing of exonic and proximal splice site junction regions of BRCA1 and BRCA2 using the Fluidigm Access Array system, with sequencing conducted on a Illumina HiSeq2500 platform. Variant calling was performed with GATK UnifiedGenotyper and were validated by Sanger sequencing. Fifty-five (2.1%) BRCA1 and 66 (2.6%) BRCA2 deleterious mutations were identified among patients with breast cancer and five (0.18%) BRCA1 and six (0.21%) BRCA2 mutations among controls. One thousand one hundred and eighty-six (46%) patients and 97 (80%) carriers fulfilled the National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines for genetic testing. Five per cent of unselected Asian patients with breast cancer carry deleterious variants in BRCA1 or BRCA2. While current referral guidelines identified the majority of carriers, one in two patients would be referred for genetic services. Given that such services are largely unavailable in majority of low-resource settings in Asia, our study highlights the need for more efficient guidelines to identify at-risk individuals in Asia. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  16. Surgically treated ovarian endometriosis association with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations.

    PubMed

    Aviel-Ronen, Sarit; Soriano, David; Shmuel, Elyasaf; Schonman, Ron; Rosenblatt, Kinneret; Zadok, Oranit; Vituri, Aya; Seidman, Daniel; Barshack, Iris; Cohen, Yoram

    2014-04-01

    Endometriosis is associated with an increased risk of ovarian cancer. Few studies have also shown increased risk of breast cancer. BRCA1/2 mutations are linked to an increased risk of breast and ovarian cancers but their relation to endometriosis is unknown. The objective of this study was to examine the mutation rate of BRCA1/2 among women with surgically treated ovarian endometriosis. We collected 126 specimens from Jewish Ashkenazi women with endometriotic (76) and control non-endometriotic (50) ovarian cysts, reviewed the pathological diagnoses and extracted DNA from all samples. Using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), samples were examined for the founder germline mutations of BRCA1/2, most common among Ashkenazi Jews. The rate of mutations in each group was calculated and compared. BRCA1/2 mutation rate was 1/76 (1.3%) in the endometriotic cyst study group and 1/50 (2%) in the control non-endometriotic cysts, showing no statistically significant difference between the groups (p=0.84). BRCA1/2 mutation rate was similar to the previously reported rate among Jewish Ashkenazi women. BRCA1/2 mutation rates in patients with endometriotic ovarian cysts and with non-endometriotic ovarian cysts are similar. A larger cohort is required to completely exclude the possibility of an association between BRCA1/2 mutations and surgically treated endometriosis.

  17. Preferences for breast cancer risk reduction among BRCA1/BRCA2 mutation carriers: a discrete-choice experiment.

    PubMed

    Liede, Alexander; Mansfield, Carol A; Metcalfe, Kelly A; Price, Melanie A; Snyder, Carrie; Lynch, Henry T; Friedman, Sue; Amelio, Justyna; Posner, Joshua; Narod, Steven A; Lindeman, Geoffrey J; Evans, D Gareth

    2017-09-01

    Unaffected women who carry BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations face difficult choices about reducing their breast cancer risk. Understanding their treatment preferences could help us improve patient counseling and inform drug trials. The objective was to explore preferences for various risk-reducing options among women with germline BRCA1/2 mutations using a discrete-choice experiment survey and to compare expressed preferences with actual behaviors. A discrete-choice experiment survey was designed wherein women choose between hypothetical treatments to reduce breast cancer risk. The hypothetical treatments were characterized by the extent of breast cancer risk reduction, treatment duration, impact on fertility, hormone levels, risk of uterine cancer, and ease and mode of administration. Data were analyzed using a random-parameters logit model. Women were also asked to express their preference between surgical and chemoprevention options and to report on their actual risk-reduction actions. Women aged 25-55 years with germline BRCA1/2 mutations who were unaffected with breast or ovarian cancer were recruited through research registries at five clinics and a patient advocacy group. Between January 2015 and March 2016, 622 women completed the survey. Breast cancer risk reduction was the most important consideration expressed, followed by maintaining fertility. Among the subset of women who wished to have children in future, the ability to maintain fertility was the most important factor, followed by the extent of risk reduction. Many more women said they would take a chemoprevention drug than had actually taken chemoprevention. Women with BRCA1/2 mutations indicated strong preferences for breast cancer risk reduction and maintaining fertility. The expressed desire to have a safe chemoprevention drug available to them was not met by current chemoprevention options.

  18. Local Therapy in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers with Operable Breast Cancer: Comparison of Breast Conservation and Mastectomy

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, Lori J.; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Griffith, Kent A.; Buys, Saundra; Gaffney, David K.; Moran, Meena S.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Ben-David, Merav; Kaufman, Bella; Garber, Judy E.; Merajver, Sofia D.; Balmaña, Judith; Meirovitz, Amichay; Domchek, Susan M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Women with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations have an elevated risk of breast cancer and ovarian cancer, but also of developing second primary breast cancer. BRCA1/2 mutation carriers with breast cancer must choose between breast conservation (BCT) and mastectomy (M) yet data on outcomes are limited. The purpose of this study is to compare BCT to M in BRCA1/2 carriers. Methods 655 women with BRCA1/2 mutations diagnosed with breast cancer and treated with BCT (n=302) or M (n=353) were identified and underwent follow up to assess local, regional and systemic recurrence. Results Local failure as first failure was significantly more likely in those treated with BCT compared to M, with a cumulative estimated risk of 23.5% vs. 5.5%, respectively, at 15 years (p<0.0001); 15-year estimates in carriers treated with BCT and chemotherapy was 11.9% (p=0.08 when compared to M). Most events appeared to be second primary cancers rather than failure to control the primary tumor. The risk of contralateral breast cancer was high in all groups, exceeding 40%, but was not statistically significantly different by use of adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) or not, suggesting no added risk from scatter RT at 10 and 15 years. There were no differences seen in regional or systemic recurrences between the BCT and M groups, and no difference in overall survival. Conclusions BRCA1/2 mutation carriers with breast cancer have similar survivals whether treated with M or BCT. However, women undergoing BCT have an elevated risk of a second in-breast event that is significantly reduced in the presence of chemotherapy. Contralateral breast cancer events are very common. PMID:20411323

  19. Common variants associated with breast cancer in genome-wide association studies are modifiers of breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xianshu; Pankratz, V. Shane; Fredericksen, Zachary; Tarrell, Robert; Karaus, Mary; McGuffog, Lesley; Pharaoh, Paul D.P.; Ponder, Bruce A.J.; Dunning, Alison M.; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare; Frost, Debra; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Houdayer, Claude; Hogervorst, Frans B.L.; Hooning, Maartje J.; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J.; Spurdle, Amanda; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Singer, Christian F.; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Dressler, Catherina; Fink, Anneliese; Szabo, Csilla I.; Zikan, Michal; Foretova, Lenka; Claes, Kathleen; Thomas, Gilles; Hoover, Robert N.; Hunter, David J.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Easton, Douglas F.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Couch, Fergus J.

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies have identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that significantly modify breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Since these risk modifiers were originally identified as genetic risk factors for breast cancer in genome-wide association studies (GWASs), additional risk modifiers for BRCA1 and BRCA2 may be identified from promising signals discovered in breast cancer GWAS. A total of 350 SNPs identified as candidate breast cancer risk factors (P < 1 × 10−3) in two breast cancer GWAS studies were genotyped in 3451 BRCA1 and 2006 BRCA2 mutation carriers from nine centers. Associations with breast cancer risk were assessed using Cox models weighted for penetrance. Eight SNPs in BRCA1 carriers and 12 SNPs in BRCA2 carriers, representing an enrichment over the number expected, were significantly associated with breast cancer risk (Ptrend < 0.01). The minor alleles of rs6138178 in SNRPB and rs6602595 in CAMK1D displayed the strongest associations in BRCA1 carriers (HR = 0.78, 95% CI: 0.69–0.90, Ptrend = 3.6 × 10−4 and HR = 1.25, 95% CI: 1.10–1.41, Ptrend = 4.2 × 10−4), whereas rs9393597 in LOC134997 and rs12652447 in FBXL7 showed the strongest associations in BRCA2 carriers (HR = 1.55, 95% CI: 1.25–1.92, Ptrend = 6 × 10−5 and HR = 1.37, 95% CI: 1.16–1.62, Ptrend = 1.7 × 10−4). The magnitude and direction of the associations were consistent with the original GWAS. In subsequent risk assessment studies, the loci appeared to interact multiplicatively for breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers. Promising candidate SNPs from GWAS were identified as modifiers of breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers. Upon further validation, these SNPs together with other genetic and environmental factors may improve breast cancer risk assessment in these populations. PMID:20418484

  20. Common variants associated with breast cancer in genome-wide association studies are modifiers of breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xianshu; Pankratz, V Shane; Fredericksen, Zachary; Tarrell, Robert; Karaus, Mary; McGuffog, Lesley; Pharaoh, Paul D P; Ponder, Bruce A J; Dunning, Alison M; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare; Frost, Debra; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Houdayer, Claude; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Hooning, Maartje J; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J; Spurdle, Amanda; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Schmutzler, Rita K; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Domchek, Susan M; Nathanson, Katherine L; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Singer, Christian F; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Dressler, Catherina; Fink, Anneliese; Szabo, Csilla I; Zikan, Michal; Foretova, Lenka; Claes, Kathleen; Thomas, Gilles; Hoover, Robert N; Hunter, David J; Chanock, Stephen J; Easton, Douglas F; Antoniou, Antonis C; Couch, Fergus J

    2010-07-15

    Recent studies have identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that significantly modify breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Since these risk modifiers were originally identified as genetic risk factors for breast cancer in genome-wide association studies (GWASs), additional risk modifiers for BRCA1 and BRCA2 may be identified from promising signals discovered in breast cancer GWAS. A total of 350 SNPs identified as candidate breast cancer risk factors (P < 1 x 10(-3)) in two breast cancer GWAS studies were genotyped in 3451 BRCA1 and 2006 BRCA2 mutation carriers from nine centers. Associations with breast cancer risk were assessed using Cox models weighted for penetrance. Eight SNPs in BRCA1 carriers and 12 SNPs in BRCA2 carriers, representing an enrichment over the number expected, were significantly associated with breast cancer risk (P(trend) < 0.01). The minor alleles of rs6138178 in SNRPB and rs6602595 in CAMK1D displayed the strongest associations in BRCA1 carriers (HR = 0.78, 95% CI: 0.69-0.90, P(trend) = 3.6 x 10(-4) and HR = 1.25, 95% CI: 1.10-1.41, P(trend) = 4.2 x 10(-4)), whereas rs9393597 in LOC134997 and rs12652447 in FBXL7 showed the strongest associations in BRCA2 carriers (HR = 1.55, 95% CI: 1.25-1.92, P(trend) = 6 x 10(-5) and HR = 1.37, 95% CI: 1.16-1.62, P(trend) = 1.7 x 10(-4)). The magnitude and direction of the associations were consistent with the original GWAS. In subsequent risk assessment studies, the loci appeared to interact multiplicatively for breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers. Promising candidate SNPs from GWAS were identified as modifiers of breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers. Upon further validation, these SNPs together with other genetic and environmental factors may improve breast cancer risk assessment in these populations.

  1. Spectrum and characterisation of BRCA1 and BRCA2 deleterious mutations in high-risk Czech patients with breast and/or ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Machackova, Eva; Foretova, Lenka; Lukesova, Mirka; Vasickova, Petra; Navratilova, Marie; Coene, Ilse; Pavlu, Hana; Kosinova, Veronika; Kuklova, Jitka; Claes, Kathleen

    2008-01-01

    Background The incidence of breast cancer has doubled over the past 20 years in the Czech Republic. Hereditary factors may be a cause of young onset, bilateral breast or ovarian cancer, and familial accumulation of the disease. BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations account for an important fraction of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer cases. One thousand and ten unrelated high-risk probands with breast and/or ovarian cancer were analysed for the presence of a BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene mutation at the Masaryk Memorial Cancer Institute (Czech Republic) during 1999–2006. Methods The complete coding sequences and splice sites of both genes were screened, and the presence of large intragenic rearrangements in BRCA1 was verified. Putative splice-site variants were analysed at the cDNA level for their potential to alter mRNA splicing. Results In 294 unrelated families (29.1% of the 1,010 probands) pathogenic mutations were identified, with 44 different BRCA1 mutations and 41 different BRCA2 mutations being detected in 204 and 90 unrelated families, respectively. In total, three BRCA1 founder mutations (c.5266dupC; c.3700_3704del5; p.Cys61Gly) and two BRCA2 founder mutations (c.7913_7917del5; c.8537_8538del2) represent 52% of all detected mutations in Czech high-risk probands. Nine putative splice-site variants were evaluated at the cDNA level. Three splice-site variants in BRCA1 (c.302-3C>G; c.4185G>A and c.4675+1G>A) and six splice-site variants in BRCA2 (c.475G>A; c.476-2>G; c.7007G>A; c.8755-1G>A; c.9117+2T>A and c.9118-2A>G) were demonstrated to result in aberrant transcripts and are considered as deleterious mutations. Conclusion This study represents an evaluation of deleterious genetic variants in the BRCA1 and 2 genes in the Czech population. The classification of several splice-site variants as true pathogenic mutations may prove useful for genetic counselling of families with high risk of breast and ovarian cancer. PMID:18489799

  2. Prediction of Breast and Prostate Cancer Risks in Male BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers Using Polygenic Risk Scores.

    PubMed

    Lecarpentier, Julie; Silvestri, Valentina; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Barrowdale, Daniel; Dennis, Joe; McGuffog, Lesley; Soucy, Penny; Leslie, Goska; Rizzolo, Piera; Navazio, Anna Sara; Valentini, Virginia; Zelli, Veronica; Lee, Andrew; Amin Al Olama, Ali; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Southey, Melissa; John, Esther M; Conner, Thomas A; Goldgar, David E; Buys, Saundra S; Janavicius, Ramunas; Steele, Linda; Ding, Yuan Chun; Neuhausen, Susan L; Hansen, Thomas V O; Osorio, Ana; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Toss, Angela; Medici, Veronica; Cortesi, Laura; Zanna, Ines; Palli, Domenico; Radice, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Azzollini, Jacopo; Viel, Alessandra; Cini, Giulia; Damante, Giuseppe; Tommasi, Stefania; Peterlongo, Paolo; Fostira, Florentia; Hamann, Ute; Evans, D Gareth; Henderson, Alex; Brewer, Carole; Eccles, Diana; Cook, Jackie; Ong, Kai-Ren; Walker, Lisa; Side, Lucy E; Porteous, Mary E; Davidson, Rosemarie; Hodgson, Shirley; Frost, Debra; Adlard, Julian; Izatt, Louise; Eeles, Ros; Ellis, Steve; Tischkowitz, Marc; Godwin, Andrew K; Meindl, Alfons; Gehrig, Andrea; Dworniczak, Bernd; Sutter, Christian; Engel, Christoph; Niederacher, Dieter; Steinemann, Doris; Hahnen, Eric; Hauke, Jan; Rhiem, Kerstin; Kast, Karin; Arnold, Norbert; Ditsch, Nina; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Wand, Dorothea; Lasset, Christine; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Belotti, Muriel; Damiola, Francesca; Barjhoux, Laure; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Van Heetvelde, Mattias; Poppe, Bruce; De Leeneer, Kim; Claes, Kathleen B M; de la Hoya, Miguel; Garcia-Barberan, Vanesa; Caldes, Trinidad; Perez Segura, Pedro; Kiiski, Johanna I; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Khan, Sofia; Nevanlinna, Heli; van Asperen, Christi J; Vaszko, Tibor; Kasler, Miklos; Olah, Edith; Balmaña, Judith; Gutiérrez-Enríquez, Sara; Diez, Orland; Teulé, Alex; Izquierdo, Angel; Darder, Esther; Brunet, Joan; Del Valle, Jesús; Feliubadalo, Lidia; Pujana, Miquel Angel; Lazaro, Conxi; Arason, Adalgeir; Agnarsson, Bjarni A; Johannsson, Oskar Th; Barkardottir, Rosa B; Alducci, Elisa; Tognazzo, Silvia; Montagna, Marco; Teixeira, Manuel R; Pinto, Pedro; Spurdle, Amanda B; Holland, Helene; Lee, Jong Won; Lee, Min Hyuk; Lee, Jihyoun; Kim, Sung-Won; Kang, Eunyoung; Kim, Zisun; Sharma, Priyanka; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Vijai, Joseph; Robson, Mark; Lincoln, Anne; Musinsky, Jacob; Gaddam, Pragna; Tan, Yen Y; Berger, Andreas; Singer, Christian F; Loud, Jennifer T; Greene, Mark H; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Andrulis, Irene L; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Senter, Leigha; Bojesen, Anders; Nielsen, Henriette Roed; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Sunde, Lone; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Krogh, Lotte; Kruse, Torben A; Caligo, Maria A; Yoon, Sook-Yee; Teo, Soo-Hwang; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Huo, Dezheng; Nielsen, Sarah M; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Nathanson, Katherine L; Domchek, Susan M; Lorenchick, Christa; Jankowitz, Rachel C; Campbell, Ian; James, Paul; Mitchell, Gillian; Orr, Nick; Park, Sue Kyung; Thomassen, Mads; Offit, Kenneth; Couch, Fergus J; Simard, Jacques; Easton, Douglas F; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Schmutzler, Rita K; Antoniou, Antonis C; Ottini, Laura

    2017-07-10

    Purpose BRCA1/2 mutations increase the risk of breast and prostate cancer in men. Common genetic variants modify cancer risks for female carriers of BRCA1/2 mutations. We investigated-for the first time to our knowledge-associations of common genetic variants with breast and prostate cancer risks for male carriers of BRCA1/ 2 mutations and implications for cancer risk prediction. Materials and Methods We genotyped 1,802 male carriers of BRCA1/2 mutations from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 by using the custom Illumina OncoArray. We investigated the combined effects of established breast and prostate cancer susceptibility variants on cancer risks for male carriers of BRCA1/2 mutations by constructing weighted polygenic risk scores (PRSs) using published effect estimates as weights. Results In male carriers of BRCA1/2 mutations, PRS that was based on 88 female breast cancer susceptibility variants was associated with breast cancer risk (odds ratio per standard deviation of PRS, 1.36; 95% CI, 1.19 to 1.56; P = 8.6 × 10(-6)). Similarly, PRS that was based on 103 prostate cancer susceptibility variants was associated with prostate cancer risk (odds ratio per SD of PRS, 1.56; 95% CI, 1.35 to 1.81; P = 3.2 × 10(-9)). Large differences in absolute cancer risks were observed at the extremes of the PRS distribution. For example, prostate cancer risk by age 80 years at the 5th and 95th percentiles of the PRS varies from 7% to 26% for carriers of BRCA1 mutations and from 19% to 61% for carriers of BRCA2 mutations, respectively. Conclusion PRSs may provide informative cancer risk stratification for male carriers of BRCA1/2 mutations that might enable these men and their physicians to make informed decisions on the type and timing of breast and prostate cancer risk management.

  3. A common mutation in BRCA2 that predisposes to a variety of cancers is found in both Jewish Ashkenazi and non-Jewish individuals.

    PubMed

    Berman, D B; Costalas, J; Schultz, D C; Grana, G; Daly, M; Godwin, A K

    1996-08-01

    Recent studies have identified mutations in the breast and (ovarian cancer susceptibility gene 2 (BRCA2), one which has been found in the germline of several males and one female affected with breast cancer. To establish the carrier frequency of this mutation in a large population of individuals affected with cancer, we evaluated constitutional DNA isolated from 83 individuals diagnosed with breast cancer and 93 diagnosed with ovarian cancer at any age, 42 of whom reported a family history of cancer. Using a simple allele-specific PCR-based nonradioactive method, we detected a total of eight individuals (4.5%) carrying a 1-bp deletion at nucleotide 6174 of the BRCA2 gene (6174delT). The age of disease onset in the mutant allele carriers was highly variable and typically late onset (41-72 years for breast cancer and 48-73 years for ovarian cancer). Evaluation of family histories for the eight mutant allele carriers revealed that several individuals had significant cancer histories that included, in addition to breast and/or ovarian cancer, an increased incidence of colon, esophageal, pancreatic, stomach, and hematopoietic cancers. Interestingly, seven of the eight individuals were of Ashkenazi Jewish descent. Haplotype data for the mutant allele carriers using markers spanning the region of the BRCA2 gene on chromosome 13ql2-ql3 suggest that only two of the confirmed Jewish Ashkenazi individuals share a single common ancestry, indicating several independent origins for this mutation. These data provide evidence for the presence of a specific BRCA2 mutation which has its origins in both Jewish Ashkenazi and non-Jewish populations. The observed overrepresentation of specific mutations within a subgroup of the general population may eventually help contribute to the development of inexpensive and routine tests such as the one described in our study.

  4. Common genetic variation at BARD1 is not associated with Breast cancer risk in BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers

    PubMed Central

    Spurdle, Amanda B.; Marquart, Louise; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Sinilnikova, Olga; Wan, Fei; Chen, Xiaoqing; Beesley, Jonathan; Singer, Christian F; Dressler, Anne-Catharine; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Blum, Joanne L.; Tung, Nadine; Weitzel, Jeff; Lynch, Henry; Garber, Judy; Easton, Douglas F.; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare T.; Frost, Debra; Conroy, Don; Evans, D. Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Eeles, Ros; Izatt, Louise; Davidson, Rosemarie; Chu, Carol; Eccles, Diana; Selkirk, Christina G.; Daly, Mary; Isaacs, Claudine; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Buecher, Bruno; Belotti, Muriel; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Barjhoux, Laure; Verny-Pierre, Carole; Lasset, Christine; Dreyfus, Hélène; Pujol, Pascal; Collonge-Rame, Marie-Agnès; Rookus, Matti A.; Verhoef, Senno; Kriege, Mieke; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Ausems, Margreet G.E.M.; van Os, Theo A.; Wijnen, Juul; Devilee, Peter; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E.J.; Blok, Marinus J.; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Nevanlinna, Heli; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubiński, Jan; Huzarski, Tomasz; Byrski, Tomasz; Durocher, Francine; Couch, Fergus J.; Lindor, Noralane M.; Wang, Xianshu; Thomassen, Mads; Domchek, Susan; Nathanson, Kate; Caligo, MA; Jernström, Helena; Liljegren, Annelie; Ehrencrona, Hans; Karlsson, Per; Ganz, Patricia A.; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Tomlinson, Gail; Neuhausen, Susan; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Rebbeck, Timothy R.

    2011-01-01

    Background Inherited BRCA1 and BRCA2 (BRCA1/2) mutations confer elevated breast cancer risk. Knowledge of factors that can improve breast cancer risk assessment in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers may improve personalized cancer prevention strategies. Methods A cohort of 5,546 BRCA1 and 2,865 BRCA2 mutation carriers was used to evaluate risk of breast cancer associated with BARD1 Cys557Ser. In a second non-independent cohort of 1,537 of BRCA1 and 839 BRCA2 mutation carriers, BARD1 haplotypes were also evaluated. Results The BARD1 Cys557Ser variant was not significantly associated with risk of breast cancer from single SNP analysis, with a pooled effect estimate of 0.90 (95%CI: 0.71-1.15) in BRCA1 carriers and 0.87 (95%CI: 0.59-1.29) in BRCA2 carriers. Further analysis of haplotypes at BARD1 also revealed no evidence that additional common genetic variation not captured by Cys557Ser was associated with breast cancer risk. Conclusion Evidence to date does not support a role for BARD1 variation, including the Cy557Ser variant, as a modifier of risk in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. Impact Interactors of BRCA1/2 have been implicated as modifiers of BRCA1/2-associated cancer risk. Our finding that BARD1 does not contribute to this risk modification may focus research on other genes that do modify BRCA1/2-associated cancer risk. PMID:21393566

  5. Risk Factors for Endometrial Cancer among Women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 Mutation: A Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Segev, Yakir; Rosen, Barry; Lubinski, Jan; Gronwald, Jacek; Lynch, Henry T.; Moller, Pal; Kim-Sing, Charmaine; Ghadirian, Parviz; Karlan, Beth; Eng, Charis; Gilchrist, Dawna; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Eisen, Andrea; Friedman, Eitan; Euhus, David; Ping, Sun; Narod, Steven A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose BRCA mutation carriers may use tamoxifen for breast cancer prevention or treatment. Hormone replacement therapy is often prescribed after surgical menopause and oral contraceptives are recommended for ovarian cancer prevention. The objective of this study was to assess the impact of these medications and other risk factors on endometrial cancer risk in BRCA carriers. Methods Women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation were identified from a registry of mutation carriers. Cases were 83 women who had a diagnosis of endometrial cancer. Controls were 1027 matched women who did not develop endometrial cancer and who had an intact uterus. All women completed a baseline questionnaire, which included questions about ages at menarche and menopause, oral contraceptive use, hormone replacement therapy use, hysterectomy, oophorectomy, breast cancer history and tamoxifen use. We estimated the odds ratio associated with each risk factor in a multivariate analysis. Results No differences were found between cases and controls in terms of age at menarche, BMI, smoking, or oral contraceptive use. In a multivariate analysis, for women taking estrogen-only hormone replacement therapy, the odds ratio was 0.23 (95% CI 0.03–1.78, p = 0.16), and for women taking progesterone-only hormone replacement therapy the odds ratio was 6.91 (95% CI 0.99–98.1, p = 0.05). The adjusted odds ratio for endometrial cancer associated with a history of tamoxifen use was 3.50 (95% CI 1.51 to 8.10; p = 0.003). Conclusions The observed increased risk of associated with progesterone-only therapy merits further study. PMID:25838159

  6. Male breast cancer in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers: pathology data from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2.

    PubMed

    Silvestri, Valentina; Barrowdale, Daniel; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Neuhausen, Susan L; Fox, Stephen; Karlan, Beth Y; Mitchell, Gillian; James, Paul; Thull, Darcy L; Zorn, Kristin K; Carter, Natalie J; Nathanson, Katherine L; Domchek, Susan M; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Ramus, Susan J; Nussbaum, Robert L; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Rantala, Johanna; Yoon, Sook-Yee; Caligo, Maria A; Spugnesi, Laura; Bojesen, Anders; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Thomassen, Mads; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Senter, Leigha; Andrulis, Irene L; Glendon, Gord; Hulick, Peter J; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Greene, Mark H; Mai, Phuong L; Singer, Christian F; Rappaport-Fuerhauser, Christine; Kramer, Gero; Vijai, Joseph; Offit, Kenneth; Robson, Mark; Lincoln, Anne; Jacobs, Lauren; Machackova, Eva; Foretova, Lenka; Navratilova, Marie; Vasickova, Petra; Couch, Fergus J; Hallberg, Emily; Ruddy, Kathryn J; Sharma, Priyanka; Kim, Sung-Won; Teixeira, Manuel R; Pinto, Pedro; Montagna, Marco; Matricardi, Laura; Arason, Adalgeir; Johannsson, Oskar Th; Barkardottir, Rosa B; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Izquierdo, Angel; Pujana, Miguel Angel; Balmaña, Judith; Diez, Orland; Ivady, Gabriella; Papp, Janos; Olah, Edith; Kwong, Ava; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Perez Segura, Pedro; Caldes, Trinidad; Van Maerken, Tom; Poppe, Bruce; Claes, Kathleen B M; Isaacs, Claudine; Elan, Camille; Lasset, Christine; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Barjhoux, Laure; Belotti, Muriel; Meindl, Alfons; Gehrig, Andrea; Sutter, Christian; Engel, Christoph; Niederacher, Dieter; Steinemann, Doris; Hahnen, Eric; Kast, Karin; Arnold, Norbert; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wand, Dorothea; Godwin, Andrew K; Evans, D Gareth; Frost, Debra; Perkins, Jo; Adlard, Julian; Izatt, Louise; Platte, Radka; Eeles, Ros; Ellis, Steve; Hamann, Ute; Garber, Judy; Fostira, Florentia; Fountzilas, George; Pasini, Barbara; Giannini, Giuseppe; Rizzolo, Piera; Russo, Antonio; Cortesi, Laura; Papi, Laura; Varesco, Liliana; Palli, Domenico; Zanna, Ines; Savarese, Antonella; Radice, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Barile, Monica; Bonanni, Bernardo; Viel, Alessandra; Pensotti, Valeria; Tommasi, Stefania; Peterlongo, Paolo; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Osorio, Ana; Benitez, Javier; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ejlertsen, Bent; Hansen, Thomas V O; Steele, Linda; Ding, Yuan Chun; Tung, Nadine; Janavicius, Ramunas; Goldgar, David E; Buys, Saundra S; Daly, Mary B; Bane, Anita; Terry, Mary Beth; John, Esther M; Southey, Melissa; Easton, Douglas F; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C; Ottini, Laura

    2016-02-09

    BRCA1 and, more commonly, BRCA2 mutations are associated with increased risk of male breast cancer (MBC). However, only a paucity of data exists on the pathology of breast cancers (BCs) in men with BRCA1/2 mutations. Using the largest available dataset, we determined whether MBCs arising in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers display specific pathologic features and whether these features differ from those of BRCA1/2 female BCs (FBCs). We characterised the pathologic features of 419 BRCA1/2 MBCs and, using logistic regression analysis, contrasted those with data from 9675 BRCA1/2 FBCs and with population-based data from 6351 MBCs in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database. Among BRCA2 MBCs, grade significantly decreased with increasing age at diagnosis (P = 0.005). Compared with BRCA2 FBCs, BRCA2 MBCs were of significantly higher stage (P for trend = 2 × 10(-5)) and higher grade (P for trend = 0.005) and were more likely to be oestrogen receptor-positive [odds ratio (OR) 10.59; 95 % confidence interval (CI) 5.15-21.80] and progesterone receptor-positive (OR 5.04; 95 % CI 3.17-8.04). With the exception of grade, similar patterns of associations emerged when we compared BRCA1 MBCs and FBCs. BRCA2 MBCs also presented with higher grade than MBCs from the SEER database (P for trend = 4 × 10(-12)). On the basis of the largest series analysed to date, our results show that BRCA1/2 MBCs display distinct pathologic characteristics compared with BRCA1/2 FBCs, and we identified a specific BRCA2-associated MBC phenotype characterised by a variable suggesting greater biological aggressiveness (i.e., high histologic grade). These findings could lead to the development of gender-specific risk prediction models and guide clinical strategies appropriate for MBC management.

  7. BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation testing in young women with breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Shoshana M.; Ruddy, Kathryn J.; M.Tamimi, Rulla; Gelber, Shari; Schapira, Lidia; Come, Steven; Borges, Virginia F.; Larsen, Bryce; Garber, Judy E.; Partridge, Ann H.

    2016-01-01

    Importance BRCA testing is recommended for young women diagnosed with breast cancer, but little is known about decisions surrounding testing and how results may influence treatment decisions in young patients. Objective To characterize genetic testing patterns of utilization and the impact on treatment decision-making among young women with breast cancer. Design Cross-sectional analysis of data collected between November 2006 and December 2014 as part of the Young Women's Breast Cancer Study, an ongoing prospective cohort study. Setting Eleven academic and community medical centers. Participants 897 women, age 40 and younger at breast cancer diagnosis. Main outcome measures 1) Frequency and trends in the utilization of BRCA testing; 2) how genetic information is used to make treatment decisions among women who test positive vs. test negative for a BRCA mutation. Results 87% of women reported BRCA testing by one year post-diagnosis, with the frequency of testing increasing among women diagnosed between 2006 and 2013 from 77% to 95%. Among untested women, 27% (32/117) did not report discussion of the possibility that they might have a mutation with a provider, and 37% (43 /117) were thinking of testing in the future. Approximately 30% (248/831) of women said that knowledge or concern about genetic risk influenced treatment decisions; among these women, 86% of mutation carriers, and 51% of non-carriers chose bilateral mastectomy. Fewer women reported that adjuvant treatment decisions were influenced by genetic risk concern. Conclusions and relevance Rates of BRCA1 and 2 mutation testing are increasing in young women with breast cancer. Given that knowledge/concern about genetic risk influences surgical decisions and may affect systemic therapy trial eligibility, all young breast cancer patients should be counseled and offered genetic testing, consistent with NCCN guidelines. PMID:26867710

  8. Plasma osteoprotegerin and breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    PubMed Central

    Odén, Lovisa; Akbari, Mohammad; Zaman, Tasnim; Singer, Christian F.; Sun, Ping; Narod, Steven A.; Salmena, Leonardo; Kotsopoulos, Joanne

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests a role of receptor activator of nuclear factor κB (RANK)/RANK ligand (RANKL) signaling in breast cancer development. Lower osteoprotegerin (OPG) levels, the endogenous decoy receptor for RANKL which competes with RANK for binding of RANKL, has been reported among BRCA mutation carriers. Whether low OPG levels contribute to the high breast cancer risk in this population is unknown. OPG concentrations were measured in plasma of 206 cancer-free BRCA mutation carriers using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Subjects were categorized as high vs. low based on the median of the entire cohort (95 ng/mL) and followed for a new diagnosis of breast cancer. Cumulative incidence by baseline plasma OPG concentration was estimated using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate the adjusted hazard ratios for the association between plasma OPG and breast cancer risk. Over a mean follow-up period of 6.5 years (range 0.1–18.8 years), 18 incident breast cancer cases were observed. After ten years of follow-up, the cumulative incidence of breast cancer among women with low OPG was 21%, compared to 9% among women with high OPG (P-log rank = 0.046). After multivariate adjustment, women with high plasma OPG had a significantly decreased risk of developing breast cancer, compared to women with low OPG (HR = 0.25; 95%CI 0.08–0.78; P = 0.02). These data suggest that low OPG levels are associated with an increased risk of BRCA-associated breast cancer. Targeting RANK signalling may represent a plausible, non-surgical prevention option for BRCA mutation carriers. PMID:27893411

  9. Endometrium is not the primary site of origin of pelvic high-grade serous carcinoma in BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Reitsma, Welmoed; Mourits, Marian J E; de Bock, Geertruida H; Hollema, Harry

    2013-04-01

    Serous endometrial intraepithelial carcinoma has been proposed to be a potential precursor lesion of pelvic high-grade serous carcinoma. If true, an increased incidence of uterine papillary serous carcinomas would be expected in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, who are at high-risk of developing pelvic high-grade serous carcinoma. This study explored particularly the occurrence of uterine papillary serous carcinoma, as well as other endometrial cancers, following risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy in women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 germline mutation attending a tertiary multidisciplinary clinic. A consecutive series of women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation who had undergone risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy without hysterectomy at the University Medical Center Groningen from January 1996 until March 2012 were followed prospectively. They were crossed with the histopathology list of endometrial cancer diagnoses reported by the Dutch nationwide pathology database PALGA. To assess the risk of endometrial cancer, a standardized incidence ratio was calculated comparing the observed with the expected number of endometrial cancer cases. Overall, 201 BRCA1 and 144 BRCA2 mutation carriers at a median age of 50 years (range, 32-78) were analyzed. After a median follow-up period of 6 years, after risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy, two cases of endometrial cancer were diagnosed, whereas the expected number was 0.94 cases (standardized incidence ratio 2.13; 95% confidence interval 0.24-7.69; P=0.27). Both endometrial cancer cases were of the endometrioid histological subtype. We showed that the incidence of endometrial cancer following risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy, especially uterine papillary serous carcinoma, in women at high-risk of developing pelvic high-grade serous carcinoma is not increased. On the basis of our data, the hypothesis of serous endometrial intraepithelial carcinoma being an important precursor lesion of pelvic high-grade serous carcinoma seems

  10. Durable Clinical Benefit of Pertuzumab in a Young Patient with BRCA2 Mutation and HER2-Overexpressing Breast Cancer Involving the Brain.

    PubMed

    Koumarianou, Anna; Kontopoulou, Christina; Kouloulias, Vassilis; Tsionou, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Patients with HER2-positive breast cancer and brain metastases have limited treatment options, and, as a result of their poor performance status and worse prognosis, they are underrepresented in clinical trials. Not surprisingly, these patients may not be fit enough to receive any active treatment and are offered supportive therapy. BRCA2 mutations are reported to be rarely associated with HER2-overexpressing advanced breast cancer and even more rarely with brain metastases at diagnosis. We report on a BRCA2-positive breast cancer patient with metastatic disease in multiple sites, including the brain, and poor performance status who exhibited an extraordinary clinical and imaging response to the novel anti-HER2 therapy pertuzumab after multiple lines of therapy including anti-HER2 targeting. To our knowledge, the clinicopathologic and therapeutic characteristics of this patient point to a unique case and an urgent need for further investigation of pertuzumab in patients with brain metastases.

  11. Durable Clinical Benefit of Pertuzumab in a Young Patient with BRCA2 Mutation and HER2-Overexpressing Breast Cancer Involving the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Koumarianou, Anna; Kontopoulou, Christina; Kouloulias, Vassilis; Tsionou, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Patients with HER2-positive breast cancer and brain metastases have limited treatment options, and, as a result of their poor performance status and worse prognosis, they are underrepresented in clinical trials. Not surprisingly, these patients may not be fit enough to receive any active treatment and are offered supportive therapy. BRCA2 mutations are reported to be rarely associated with HER2-overexpressing advanced breast cancer and even more rarely with brain metastases at diagnosis. We report on a BRCA2-positive breast cancer patient with metastatic disease in multiple sites, including the brain, and poor performance status who exhibited an extraordinary clinical and imaging response to the novel anti-HER2 therapy pertuzumab after multiple lines of therapy including anti-HER2 targeting. To our knowledge, the clinicopathologic and therapeutic characteristics of this patient point to a unique case and an urgent need for further investigation of pertuzumab in patients with brain metastases. PMID:27195161

  12. BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in ovarian cancer patients from China: ethnic-related mutations in BRCA1 associated with an increased risk of ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Shi, Tingyan; Wang, Pan; Xie, Caixia; Yin, Sheng; Shi, Di; Wei, Congchong; Tang, Wenbin; Jiang, Rong; Cheng, Xi; Wei, Qingyi; Wang, Qing; Zang, Rongyu

    2017-05-01

    BRCA1/2 are cancer predisposition genes involved in hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC). Mutation carriers display an increased sensitivity to inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). Despite a number of small-size hospital-based studies being previously reported, there is not yet, to our knowledge, precise data of BRCA1/2 mutations among Chinese ovarian cancer patients. We performed a multicenter cohort study including 916 unselected consecutive epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) patients from eastern China to screen for BRCA1/2 mutations using the next-generation sequencing approach. A total of 153 EOC patients were found to carry pathogenic germline mutations in BRCA1/2, accounting for an overall mutation incidence of 16.7% with the predominance in BRCA1 (13.1%) compared with BRCA2 (3.9%). We identified 53 novel pathogenic mutations, among which the c.283_286delCTTG and the c.4573C > T of BRCA1 were both found in two unrelated patients. More importantly, the most common mutation found in this study, c.5470_5477del8 was most likely to be Chinese population-related without an apparent founder origin. This hot-spot mutation was presumably associated with an increased risk of ovarian cancer. Taken together, germline BRCA1/2 mutations were common in Chinese EOC patients with distinct mutational spectrum compared to Western populations. Our study contributes to the current understanding of BRCA1/2 mutation prevalence worldwide. We recommend BRCA1/2 genetic testing to all Chinese women diagnosed with EOC to identify HBOC families, to provide genetic counseling and clinical management for at-risk relatives. Mutation carriers may also benefit from PARP-targeted therapies. © 2017 UICC.

  13. BRCA2 minor transcript lacking exons 4–7 supports viability in mice and may account for survival of humans with a pathogenic biallelic mutation

    PubMed Central

    Thirthagiri, Eswary; Klarmann, Kimberly D.; Shukla, Anil K.; Southon, Eileen; Biswas, Kajal; Martin, Betty K.; North, Susan Lynn; Magidson, Valentin; Burkett, Sandra; Haines, Diana C.; Noer, Kathleen; Matthai, Roberta; Tessarollo, Lino; Loncarek, Jadranka; Keller, Jonathan R.; Sharan, Shyam K.

    2016-01-01

    The breast cancer gene, BRCA2, is essential for viability, yet patients with Fanconi anemia-D1 subtype are born alive with biallelic mutations in this gene. The hypomorphic nature of the mutations is believed to support viability, but this is not always apparent. One such mutation is IVS7+2T>G, which causes premature protein truncation due to skipping of exon 7. We previously identified a transcript lacking exons 4–7, which restores the open-reading frame, encodes a DNA repair proficient protein and is expressed in IVS7+2T>G carriers. However, because the exons 4–7 encoded region contains several residues required for normal cell-cycle regulation and cytokinesis, this transcript's ability to support viability can be argued. To address this, we generated a Brca2 knock-in mouse model lacking exons 4–7 and demonstrated that these exons are dispensable for viability as well as tumor-free survival. This study provides the first in vivo evidence of the functional significance of a minor transcript of BRCA2 that can play a major role in the survival of humans who are homozygous for a clearly pathogenic mutation. Our results highlight the importance of assessing protein function restoration by premature truncating codon bypass by alternative splicing when evaluating the functional significance of variants such as nonsense and frame-shift mutations that are assumed to be clearly pathogenic. Our findings will impact not only the assessment of variants that map to this region, but also influence counseling paradigms and treatment options for such mutation carriers. PMID:26920070

  14. BRCA2 minor transcript lacking exons 4-7 supports viability in mice and may account for survival of humans with a pathogenic biallelic mutation.

    PubMed

    Thirthagiri, Eswary; Klarmann, Kimberly D; Shukla, Anil K; Southon, Eileen; Biswas, Kajal; Martin, Betty K; North, Susan Lynn; Magidson, Valentin; Burkett, Sandra; Haines, Diana C; Noer, Kathleen; Matthai, Roberta; Tessarollo, Lino; Loncarek, Jadranka; Keller, Jonathan R; Sharan, Shyam K

    2016-05-15

    The breast cancer gene, BRCA2, is essential for viability, yet patients with Fanconi anemia-D1 subtype are born alive with biallelic mutations in this gene. The hypomorphic nature of the mutations is believed to support viability, but this is not always apparent. One such mutation is IVS7+2T>G, which causes premature protein truncation due to skipping of exon 7. We previously identified a transcript lacking exons 4-7, which restores the open-reading frame, encodes a DNA repair proficient protein and is expressed in IVS7+2T>G carriers. However, because the exons 4-7 encoded region contains several residues required for normal cell-cycle regulation and cytokinesis, this transcript's ability to support viability can be argued. To address this, we generated a Brca2 knock-in mouse model lacking exons 4-7 and demonstrated that these exons are dispensable for viability as well as tumor-free survival. This study provides the first in vivo evidence of the functional significance of a minor transcript of BRCA2 that can play a major role in the survival of humans who are homozygous for a clearly pathogenic mutation. Our results highlight the importance of assessing protein function restoration by premature truncating codon bypass by alternative splicing when evaluating the functional significance of variants such as nonsense and frame-shift mutations that are assumed to be clearly pathogenic. Our findings will impact not only the assessment of variants that map to this region, but also influence counseling paradigms and treatment options for such mutation carriers. Published by Oxford University Press 2016. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  15. Associations of common breast cancer susceptibility alleles with risk of breast cancer subtypes in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Neuhausen, Susan L; Robson, Mark; Barrowdale, Daniel; McGuffog, Lesley; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Andrulis, Irene L; Spurdle, Amanda B; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Schmutzler, Rita K; Engel, Christoph; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Nevanlinna, Heli; Thomassen, Mads; Southey, Melissa; Radice, Paolo; Ramus, Susan J; Domchek, Susan M; Nathanson, Katherine L; Lee, Andrew; Healey, Sue; Nussbaum, Robert L; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Arun, Banu K; James, Paul; Karlan, Beth Y; Lester, Jenny; Cass, Ilana; Terry, Mary Beth; Daly, Mary B; Goldgar, David E; Buys, Saundra S; Janavicius, Ramunas; Tihomirova, Laima; Tung, Nadine; Dorfling, Cecilia M; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Steele, Linda; v O Hansen, Thomas; Ejlertsen, Bent; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Nielsen, Finn C; Dennis, Joe; Cunningham, Julie; Hart, Steven; Slager, Susan; Osorio, Ana; Benitez, Javier; Duran, Mercedes; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Tafur, Isaac; Hander, Mary; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Roversi, Gaia; Scuvera, Giulietta; Bonanni, Bernardo; Mariani, Paolo; Volorio, Sara; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Varesco, Liliana; Papi, Laura; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Giannini, Giuseppe; Fostira, Florentia; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Garber, Judy; Hamann, Ute; Donaldson, Alan; Brewer, Carole; Foo, Claire; Evans, D Gareth; Frost, Debra; Eccles, Diana; Douglas, Fiona; Brady, Angela; Cook, Jackie; Tischkowitz, Marc; Adlard, Julian; Barwell, Julian; Ong, Kai-ren; Walker, Lisa; Izatt, Louise; Side, Lucy E; Kennedy, M John; Rogers, Mark T; Porteous, Mary E; Morrison, Patrick J; Platte, Radka; Eeles, Ros; Davidson, Rosemarie; Hodgson, Shirley; Ellis, Steve; Godwin, Andrew K; Rhiem, Kerstin; Meindl, Alfons; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Niederacher, Dieter; Sutter, Christian; Steinemann, Doris; Bogdanova-Markov, Nadja; Kast, Karin; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Gehrig, Andrea; Markiefka, Birgid; Buecher, Bruno; Lefol, Cédrick; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Rouleau, Etienne; Prieur, Fabienne; Damiola, Francesca; Barjhoux, Laure; Faivre, Laurence; Longy, Michel; Sevenet, Nicolas; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Bonadona, Valérie; Caux-Moncoutier, Virginie; Isaacs, Claudine; Van Maerken, Tom; Claes, Kathleen; Piedmonte, Marion; Andrews, Lesley; Hays, John; Rodriguez, Gustavo C; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Khan, Sofia; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Aalfs, Cora M; de Lange, J L; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E J; van der Hout, Annemarie H; Wijnen, Juul T; van Roozendaal, K E P; Mensenkamp, Arjen R; van den Ouweland, Ans M W; van Deurzen, Carolien H M; van der Luijt, Rob B; Olah, Edith; Diez, Orland; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Teulé, Alex; Menendez, Mireia; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Cybulski, Cezary; Gronwald, Jacek; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Arason, Adalgeir; Maugard, Christine; Soucy, Penny; Montagna, Marco; Agata, Simona; Teixeira, Manuel R; Olswold, Curtis; Lindor, Noralane; Pankratz, Vernon S; Hallberg, Emily; Wang, Xianshu; Szabo, Csilla I; Vijai, Joseph; Jacobs, Lauren; Corines, Marina; Lincoln, Anne; Berger, Andreas; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Singer, Christian F; Rappaport, Christine; Kaulich, Daphne Gschwantler; Pfeiler, Georg; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Phelan, Catherine M; Mai, Phuong L; Greene, Mark H; Rennert, Gad; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Glendon, Gord; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Bojesen, Anders; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Caligo, Maria A; Friedman, Eitan; Berger, Raanan; Laitman, Yael; Rantala, Johanna; Arver, Brita; Loman, Niklas; Borg, Ake; Ehrencrona, Hans; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Simard, Jacques; Easton, Douglas F; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Offit, Kenneth; Couch, Fergus J; Antoniou, Antonis C

    2014-12-31

    More than 70 common alleles are known to be involved in breast cancer (BC) susceptibility, and several exhibit significant heterogeneity in their associations with different BC subtypes. Although there are differences in the association patterns between BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers and the general population for several loci, no study has comprehensively evaluated the associations of all known BC susceptibility alleles with risk of BC subtypes in BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers. We used data from 15,252 BRCA1 and 8,211 BRCA2 carriers to analyze the associations between approximately 200,000 genetic variants on the iCOGS array and risk of BC subtypes defined by estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) and triple-negative- (TN) status; morphologic subtypes; histological grade; and nodal involvement. The estimated BC hazard ratios (HRs) for the 74 known BC alleles in BRCA1 carriers exhibited moderate correlations with the corresponding odds ratios from the general population. However, their associations with ER-positive BC in BRCA1 carriers were more consistent with the ER-positive associations in the general population (intraclass correlation (ICC) = 0.61, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.45 to 0.74), and the same was true when considering ER-negative associations in both groups (ICC = 0.59, 95% CI: 0.42 to 0.72). Similarly, there was strong correlation between the ER-positive associations for BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers (ICC = 0.67, 95% CI: 0.52 to 0.78), whereas ER-positive associations in any one of the groups were generally inconsistent with ER-negative associations in any of the others. After stratifying by ER status in mutation carriers, additional significant associations were observed. Several previously unreported variants exhibited associations at P <10(-6) in the analyses by PR status, HER2 status, TN phenotype, morphologic subtypes, histological grade and nodal involvement. Differences in

  16. Analysis of cancer risk and BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation prevalence in the kConFab familial breast cancer resource

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Graham J; Thorne, Heather; Balleine, Rosemary L; Butow, Phyllis N; Clarke, Christine L; Edkins, Edward; Evans, Gerda M; Fereday, Sián; Haan, Eric; Gattas, Michael; Giles, Graham G; Goldblatt, Jack; Hopper, John L; Kirk, Judy; Leary, Jennifer A; Lindeman, Geoffrey; Niedermayr, Eveline; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Picken, Sandra; Pupo, Gulietta M; Saunders, Christobel; Scott, Clare L; Spurdle, Amanda B; Suthers, Graeme; Tucker, Kathy; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia

    2006-01-01

    Introduction The Kathleen Cuningham Foundation Consortium for Research into Familial Breast Cancer (kConFab) is a multidisciplinary, collaborative framework for the investigation of familial breast cancer. Based in Australia, the primary aim of kConFab is to facilitate high-quality research by amassing a large and comprehensive resource of epidemiological and clinical data with biospecimens from individuals at high risk of breast and/or ovarian cancer, and from their close relatives. Methods Epidemiological, family history and lifestyle data, as well as biospecimens, are collected from multiple-case breast cancer families ascertained through family cancer clinics in Australia and New Zealand. We used the Tyrer-Cuzick algorithms to assess the prospective risk of breast cancer in women in the kConFab cohort who were unaffected with breast cancer at the time of enrolment in the study. Results Of kConFab's first 822 families, 518 families had multiple cases of female breast cancer alone, 239 had cases of female breast and ovarian cancer, 37 had cases of female and male breast cancer, and 14 had both ovarian cancer as well as male and female breast cancer. Data are currently held for 11,422 people and germline DNAs for 7,389. Among the 812 families with at least one germline sample collected, the mean number of germline DNA samples collected per family is nine. Of the 747 families that have undergone some form of mutation screening, 229 (31%) carry a pathogenic or splice-site mutation in BRCA1 or BRCA2. Germline DNAs and data are stored from 773 proven carriers of BRCA1 or BRCA1 mutations. kConFab's fresh tissue bank includes 253 specimens of breast or ovarian tissue – both normal and malignant – including 126 from carriers of BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations. Conclusion These kConFab resources are available to researchers anywhere in the world, who may apply to kConFab for biospecimens and data for use in ethically approved, peer-reviewed projects. A high calculated risk

  17. An original phylogenetic approach identified mitochondrial haplogroup T1a1 as inversely associated with breast cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Blein, Sophie; Bardel, Claire; Danjean, Vincent; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Barrowdale, Daniel; Lee, Andrew; Dennis, Joe; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Soucy, Penny; Terry, Mary Beth; Chung, Wendy K; Goldgar, David E; Buys, Saundra S; Janavicius, Ramunas; Tihomirova, Laima; Tung, Nadine; Dorfling, Cecilia M; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Neuhausen, Susan L; Ding, Yuan Chun; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ejlertsen, Bent; Nielsen, Finn C; Hansen, Thomas Vo; Osorio, Ana; Benitez, Javier; Conejero, Raquel Andrés; Segota, Ena; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Thelander, Margo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Radice, Paolo; Pensotti, Valeria; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Bonanni, Bernardo; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Scuvera, Giulietta; Manoukian, Siranoush; Varesco, Liliana; Capone, Gabriele L; Papi, Laura; Ottini, Laura; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Garber, Judy; Hamann, Ute; Donaldson, Alan; Brady, Angela; Brewer, Carole; Foo, Claire; Evans, D Gareth; Frost, Debra; Eccles, Diana; Douglas, Fiona; Cook, Jackie; Adlard, Julian; Barwell, Julian; Walker, Lisa; Izatt, Louise; Side, Lucy E; Kennedy, M John; Tischkowitz, Marc; Rogers, Mark T; Porteous, Mary E; Morrison, Patrick J; Platte, Radka; Eeles, Ros; Davidson, Rosemarie; Hodgson, Shirley; Cole, Trevor; Godwin, Andrew K; Isaacs, Claudine; Claes, Kathleen; De Leeneer, Kim; Meindl, Alfons; Gehrig, Andrea; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Sutter, Christian; Engel, Christoph; Niederacher, Dieter; Steinemann, Doris; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Kast, Karin; Rhiem, Kerstin; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Schmutzler, Rita K; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Markov, Nadja Bogdanova; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; de Pauw, Antoine; Lefol, Cédrick; Lasset, Christine; Leroux, Dominique; Rouleau, Etienne; Damiola, Francesca; Dreyfus, Hélène; Barjhoux, Laure; Golmard, Lisa; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Bonadona, Valérie; Sornin, Valérie; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Carter, Jonathan; Van Le, Linda; Piedmonte, Marion; DiSilvestro, Paul A; de la Hoya, Miguel; Caldes, Trinidad; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Jager, Agnes; van den Ouweland, Ans Mw; Kets, Carolien M; Aalfs, Cora M; van Leeuwen, Flora E; Hogervorst, Frans Bl; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne Ej; Oosterwijk, Jan C; van Roozendaal, Kees Ep; Rookus, Matti A; Devilee, Peter; van der Luijt, Rob B; Olah, Edith; Diez, Orland; Teulé, Alex; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Del Valle, Jesús; Jakubowska, Anna; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Gronwald, Jacek; Lubinski, Jan; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Agnarsson, Bjarni A; Maugard, Christine; Amadori, Alberto; Montagna, Marco; Teixeira, Manuel R; Spurdle, Amanda B; Foulkes, William; Olswold, Curtis; Lindor, Noralane M; Pankratz, Vernon S; Szabo, Csilla I; Lincoln, Anne; Jacobs, Lauren; Corines, Marina; Robson, Mark; Vijai, Joseph; Berger, Andreas; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Singer, Christian F; Rappaport, Christine; Kaulich, Daphne Geschwantler; Pfeiler, Georg; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Greene, Mark H; Mai, Phuong L; Rennert, Gad; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Andrulis, Irene L; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Thomassen, Mads; Kruse, Torben A; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Caligo, Maria A; Friedman, Eitan; Zidan, Jamal; Laitman, Yael; Lindblom, Annika; Melin, Beatrice; Arver, Brita; Loman, Niklas; Rosenquist, Richard; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Nussbaum, Robert L; Ramus, Susan J; Nathanson, Katherine L; Domchek, Susan M; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Arun, Banu K; Mitchell, Gillian; Karlan, Beth Y; Lester, Jenny; Orsulic, Sandra; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Thomas, Gilles; Simard, Jacques; Couch, Fergus J; Offit, Kenneth; Easton, Douglas F; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Phelan, Catherine M; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Cox, David G

    2015-04-25

    Individuals carrying pathogenic mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes have a high lifetime risk of breast cancer. BRCA1 and BRCA2 are involved in DNA double-strand break repair, DNA alterations that can be caused by exposure to reactive oxygen species, a main source of which are mitochondria. Mitochondrial genome variations affect electron transport chain efficiency and reactive oxygen species production. Individuals with different mitochondrial haplogroups differ in their metabolism and sensitivity to oxidative stress. Variability in mitochondrial genetic background can alter reactive oxygen species production, leading to cancer risk. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that mitochondrial haplogroups modify breast cancer risk in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. We genotyped 22,214 (11,421 affected, 10,793 unaffected) mutation carriers belonging to the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 for 129 mitochondrial polymorphisms using the iCOGS array. Haplogroup inference and association detection were performed using a phylogenetic approach. ALTree was applied to explore the reference mitochondrial evolutionary tree and detect subclades enriched in affected or unaffected individuals. We discovered that subclade T1a1 was depleted in affected BRCA2 mutation carriers compared with the rest of clade T (hazard ratio (HR) = 0.55; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.34 to 0.88; P = 0.01). Compared with the most frequent haplogroup in the general population (that is, H and T clades), the T1a1 haplogroup has a HR of 0.62 (95% CI, 0.40 to 0.95; P = 0.03). We also identified three potential susceptibility loci, including G13708A/rs28359178, which has demonstrated an inverse association with familial breast cancer risk. This study illustrates how original approaches such as the phylogeny-based method we used can empower classical molecular epidemiological studies aimed at identifying association or risk modification effects.

  18. Management of the asymptomatic BRCA mutation carrier

    PubMed Central

    Teller, Paige; Kramer, Rita K

    2010-01-01

    Current management of an asymptomatic BRCA mutation carrier includes early initiation and intensive cancer screening in combination with risk reduction strategies. The primary objectives of these interventions are earlier detection and cancer prevention to increase quality of life and prolonged survival. Existing recommendations are often based on the consensus of experts as there are few, supportive, randomized control trials. Management strategies for unaffected patients with BRCA mutations are continually redefined and customized as more evidence-based knowledge is acquired with regard to current intervention efficacy, mutation-related histology, and new treatment modalities. This review provides an outline of current, supported management principles, and interventions in the care of the asymptomatic BRCA mutation carrier. Topics covered include surveillance modalities and risk reduction achieved through behavioral modification, chemoprevention, and prophylactic surgery. PMID:23776357

  19. Founder and Recurrent Mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Genes in Latin American Countries: State of the Art and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Ossa, Carlos Andrés; Torres, Diana

    2016-07-01

    Numerous epidemiological factors affect the probability of developing breast or ovarian cancer, but no predictor is as determinant as inheriting a mutation in BRCA1 or BRCA2. The concept of the founder effect explains the reduced genetic variability in some populations, according to the theory that new populations can be formed from a reduced number of individuals, so the new population would carry only a small fraction of the genetic variability of the original population. The main purpose of this review is to provide an update on the state of the art in founder mutations and some recurrent mutations that have recently been described in Latin America. A literature search was performed in the electronic databases of PUBMED, EMBASE, LILACS, and BIREME using the terms BRCA1, BRCA2, founder mutation, Latin American population, and Hispanic. Sixty-two papers were identified, of which 38 were considered relevant for this review. Each result is shown per country. In Latin America, clear founder effects have been reported in Mexico (BRCA1 del exons 9-12), Brazil (BRCA1 5382insC and BRCA2 c.156_157insAlu), and Colombia (BRCA1 3450del4, A1708E, and BRCA2 3034del4) and in Latinas residing in Southern California (BRCA1 185delAG, IVS5+1G>A, S955x, and R1443x). Of these, mutation BRCA1 3450del4 has also been reported in Brazil and Chile, whereas mutation BRCA2 3034del4 has been reported in Argentina and Peru. These data support the idea that although most Hispanic populations are the result of a mixture between Europeans, Africans, and Amerindians, the relative proportion of each genetic component varies throughout the Hispanic populations, making it necessary to identify the mutations characteristic of each population to generate mutation profiles adjusted to each one of them. In Latin American countries, and even among regions of the same country, there is great heterogeneity of ancestors. Therefore, Latinas should not be analyzed like other population groups without taking

  20. Founder and Recurrent Mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Genes in Latin American Countries: State of the Art and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Background. Numerous epidemiological factors affect the probability of developing breast or ovarian cancer, but no predictor is as determinant as inheriting a mutation in BRCA1 or BRCA2. The concept of the founder effect explains the reduced genetic variability in some populations, according to the theory that new populations can be formed from a reduced number of individuals, so the new population would carry only a small fraction of the genetic variability of the original population. The main purpose of this review is to provide an update on the state of the art in founder mutations and some recurrent mutations that have recently been described in Latin America. Methods. A literature search was performed in the electronic databases of PUBMED, EMBASE, LILACS, and BIREME using the terms BRCA1, BRCA2, founder mutation, Latin American population, and Hispanic. Sixty-two papers were identified, of which 38 were considered relevant for this review. Each result is shown per country. Results. In Latin America, clear founder effects have been reported in Mexico (BRCA1 del exons 9–12), Brazil (BRCA1 5382insC and BRCA2 c.156_157insAlu), and Colombia (BRCA1 3450del4, A1708E, and BRCA2 3034del4) and in Latinas residing in Southern California (BRCA1 185delAG, IVS5+1G>A, S955x, and R1443x). Of these, mutation BRCA1 3450del4 has also been reported in Brazil and Chile, whereas mutation BRCA2 3034del4 has been reported in Argentina and Peru. These data support the idea that although most Hispanic populations are the result of a mixture between Europeans, Africans, and Amerindians, the relative proportion of each genetic component varies throughout the Hispanic populations, making it necessary to identify the mutations characteristic of each population to generate mutation profiles adjusted to each one of them. Conclusion. In Latin American countries, and even among regions of the same country, there is great heterogeneity of ancestors. Therefore, Latinas should not be analyzed

  1. Efficacy of anthracycline/taxane-based neo-adjuvant chemotherapy on triple-negative breast cancer in BRCA1/BRCA2 mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Bignon, Lucie; Fricker, Jean-Pierre; Nogues, Catherine; Mouret-Fourme, Emmanuelle; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Caron, Olivier; Lortholary, Alain; Faivre, Laurence; Lasset, Christine; Mari, Veronique; Gesta, Paul; Gladieff, Laurence; Hamimi, Akila; Petit, Thierry; Velten, Michel

    2017-09-19

    This study aims to estimate the pathologic complete response (pCR) rate after neo-adjuvant chemotherapy and to compare disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) between pCR and non-pCR groups of patients with triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) and deleterious BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation. We carried out a retrospective analysis of 53 patients including 46 BRCA1, 6 BRCA2, and 1 combined BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation. All patients had been diagnosed with triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) between 1997 and 2014. Neo-adjuvant therapy consisted of regimens that were based on anthracycline or an anthracycline-taxane doublet. DFS included any relapse or second cancer. The Kaplan-Meier method and the log-rank test were used to compare pCR and non-pCR groups. A pCR was observed in 23 (42.6% [95% CI, 29.2%-56.8%]) of the TNBC included. The pCR rate was 38.3% [95% CI, 26%-55%] among BRCA1 mutation carriers, and 66% among the 6 BRCA2 mutation carriers. Median follow-up was 4.4 years (range 0.62-16.2 years) and did not differ between the groups (P = .25). Fifteen relapses and six second cancers were recorded during the follow-up period. Eleven deaths occurred, all of which were in the non-pCR group. DFS (P < .01) and OS (P < .01) were significantly better in the pCR group than the non-pCR group. This study shows a high pCR rate after neo-adjuvant therapy in BRCA-mutated triple-negative breast cancer, and the survival results confirm the prognostic value of pCR in this group. These outcomes should be considered as a basis of comparison to be used by future studies about new therapies in this domain. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Prevalence of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in non-familial breast cancer patients with high risks in Korea: the Korean Hereditary Breast Cancer (KOHBRA) Study.

    PubMed

    Son, Byung Ho; Ahn, Sei Hyun; Kim, Sung-Won; Kang, Eunyoung; Park, Sue K; Lee, Min Hyuk; Noh, Woo-Chul; Kim, Lee Su; Jung, Yongsik; Kim, Ku Sang; Noh, Dong-Young; Moon, Byung-In; Suh, Young Jin; Lee, Jeong Eon; Choi, Doo Ho; Kim, Sung Yong; Jung, Sung Hoo; Yom, Cha Kyong; Lee, Hyde; Yang, Jung-Hyun

    2012-06-01

    Prevalence and phenotype of BRCA mutation can vary by race. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the prevalence of BRCA1/2 mutations in non-familial breast cancer patients with high risks in Korea. A subset of 758 patients was selected for this study from the KOHBRA nationwide multicenter prospective cohort study. Mutations in BRCA1/2 genes were tested using fluorescent-conformation sensitive gel electrophoresis, denaturing high performance liquid chromatography or direct sequencing. Mutation of BRCA1/2 genes were identified in 65 (8.6%) patients among total 758 patients [BRCA1 mutation: 25 (3.3%), BRCA2 mutation: 40 (5.3%)]. According to risk groups, mutation of BRCA1/2 genes were identified in 53 (8.5%) of 625 early onset patients (age ≤ 40), in 22 (17.7%) of 124 bilateral breast cancer patients, in 3 (50.0%) of 6 breast and ovarian cancer patients, in one (5.9%) of 17 male breast cancer patients, in 5 cases (7.6%) of 66 multiple organ cancer patients. The most common mutation was 509C>A for BRCA1 and 7708C>T for BRCA2. The prevalence of BRCA1/2 mutations by age in early onset patients was significantly different (age <35 vs age ≥35; 10.0 vs 2.9%, p = 0.0007). BRCA1/2 mutations for non-familial Korean breast cancer patients were detected at a high rate, particularly, in patients with early onset of less than 35 years of age, bilateral breast cancer, and breast and ovarian cancer. Individualized genetic counseling should be offered for non-familial breast cancer patients with these risk factors.

  3. The prevalence and spectrum of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in Korean population: recent update of the Korean Hereditary Breast Cancer (KOHBRA) study.

    PubMed

    Kang, Eunyoung; Seong, Moon-Woo; Park, Sue K; Lee, Jong Won; Lee, Jihyoun; Kim, Lee Su; Lee, Jeong Eon; Kim, Sung Yong; Jeong, Joon; Han, Sang Ah; Kim, Sung-Won

    2015-05-01

    The Korean Hereditary Breast Cancer (KOHBRA) study was established to evaluate the prevalence and spectrum of BRCA1/2 mutations in Korean breast cancer patients at risk for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer. A total of 2953 subjects (2403 index patients and 550 family members of affected carriers) from 36 centers participated in this study between May 2007 and December 2013. All participants received genetic counseling and BRCA genetic testing. In total, 378 mutation carriers among 2403 index patients were identified. The prevalence of BRCA mutations in specific subgroups was as follows: 22.3 % (274/1228) for breast cancer patients with a family history of breast/ovarian cancers, 8.8 % (39/441) for patients with early-onset (<35 years) breast cancer without a family history, 16.3 % (34/209) for patients with bilateral breast cancer, 4.8 % (1/21) for male patients with breast cancer, and 37.5 % (3/8) for patients with both breast and ovarian cancer. From an analysis of the mutation spectrum, 63 BRCA1 and 90 BRCA2 different mutations, including 44 novel mutations, were identified. The c.7480 (p.Arg2494Ter) mutation in BRCA2 (10.1 %) was the most commonly identified in this cohort. The KOHBRA study is the largest cohort to identify BRCA mutation carriers in Asia. The results suggest that the prevalence of BRCA mutations in familial breast cancer patients is similar to that among Western cohorts. However, some single risk factors without family histories (early-onset breast cancer, male breast cancer, or multiple organ cancers) may limit the utility of BRCA gene testing in the Korean population.

  4. Compensatory functions and interdependency of the DNA-binding domain of BRCA2 with the BRCA1-PALB2-BRCA2 complex.

    PubMed

    Al Abo, Muthana; Dejsuphong, Donniphat; Hirota, Kouji; Yonetani, Yasukazu; Yamazoe, Mitsuyoshi; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi; Takeda, Shunichi

    2014-02-01

    BRCA1, BRCA2, and PALB2 are key players in cellular tolerance to chemotherapeutic agents, including camptothecin, cisplatin, and PARP inhibitor. The N-terminal segment of BRCA2 interacts with PALB2, thus contributing to the formation of the BRCA1-PALB2-BRCA2 complex. To understand the role played by BRCA2 in this complex, we deleted its N-terminal segment and generated BRCA2(Δ)(N) mutant cells. Although previous studies have suggested that BRCA1-PALB2 plays a role in the recruitment of BRCA2 to DNA-damage sites, BRCA2(Δ)(N) mutant cells displayed a considerably milder phenotype than did BRCA2(-/-) null-deficient cells. We hypothesized that the DNA-binding domain (DBD) of BRCA2 might compensate for a defect in BRCA2(ΔN) that prevented stable interaction with PALB2. To test this hypothesis, we disrupted the DBD of BRCA2 in wild-type and BRCA2(Δ)(N) cells. Remarkably, although the resulting BRCA2(Δ)(DBD) cells displayed a moderate phenotype, the BRCA2(Δ)(N+ΔDBD) cells displayed a very severe phenotype, as did the BRCA2(-/-) cells, suggesting that the N-terminal segment and the DBD play a substantially overlapping role in the functionality of BRCA2. We also showed that the formation of both the BRCA1-PALB2-BRCA2 complex and the DBD is required for efficient recruitment of BRCA2 to DNA-damage sites. Our study revealed the essential role played by both the BRCA1-PALB2-BRCA2 complex and the DBD in the functionality of BRCA2, as each can compensate for the other in the recruitment of BRCA2 to DNA-damage sites. This knowledge adds to our ability to accurately predict the efficacy of antimalignant therapies for patients carrying mutations in the BRCA2 gene.

  5. Cancer Risks Associated with Inherited Mutations in Ovarian Cancer Susceptibility Genes Beyond BRCA1 and BRCA2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-01

    increased use of universal testing for all OC patients including AA women . Centers are more motivated to refer patients who cannot otherwise get genetic...BRCA2 PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Elizabeth Swisher CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: University of Washington Seattle, WA 98195-6460 REPORT DATE: May 2016...ADDRESS(ES) University of Washington 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 4333 Brooklyn Ave NE Box 359472 Seattle, Wa 98195 9. SPONSORING

  6. Treatment of infertility does not increase the risk of ovarian cancer among women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation.

    PubMed

    Gronwald, Jacek; Glass, Karen; Rosen, Barry; Karlan, Beth; Tung, Nadine; Neuhausen, Susan L; Moller, Pal; Ainsworth, Peter; Sun, Ping; Narod, Steven A; Lubinski, Jan; Kotsopoulos, Joanne

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate the relationship between use of fertility medication (i.e., selective estrogen receptor [ER] modulator, gonadotropin, or other) or infertility treatment (i.e., IVF or IUI) and the risk of ovarian cancer among women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation. A matched case-control study of 941 pairs of BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers with and without a diagnosis of ovarian cancer. Genetic clinics. Detailed information regarding treatment of infertility was collected from a routinely administered questionnaire. None. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals associated with fertility treatment. There was no significant relationship between the use of any fertility medication or IVF treatment (odds ratio, 0.66; 95% confidence interval 0.18-2.33) and the subsequent risk of ovarian cancer. Our findings suggest that treatment for infertility does not significantly increase the risk of ovarian cancer among women with a BRCA mutation. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. All rights reserved.

  7. Prospective Study of Breast Cancer Incidence in Women With a BRCA1 or BRCA2 Mutation Under Surveillance With and Without Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Warner, Ellen; Hill, Kimberley; Causer, Petrina; Plewes, Donald; Jong, Roberta; Yaffe, Martin; Foulkes, William D.; Ghadirian, Parviz; Lynch, Henry; Couch, Fergus; Wong, John; Wright, Frances; Sun, Ping; Narod, Steven A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The sensitivity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for breast cancer screening exceeds that of mammography. If MRI screening reduces mortality in women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation, it is expected that the incidence of advanced-stage breast cancers should be reduced in women undergoing MRI screening compared with those undergoing conventional screening. Patients and Methods We followed 1,275 women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation for a mean of 3.2 years. In total, 445 women were enrolled in an MRI screening trial in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, and 830 were in the comparison group. The cumulative incidences of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), early-stage, and late-stage breast cancers were estimated at 6 years in the cohorts. Results There were 41 cases of breast cancer in the MRI-screened cohort (9.2%) and 76 cases in the comparison group (9.2%). The cumulative incidence of DCIS or stage I breast cancer at 6 years was 13.8% (95% CI, 9.1% to 18.5%) in the MRI-screened cohort and 7.2% (95% CI, 4.5% to 9.9%) in the comparison group (P = .01). The cumulative incidence of stages II to IV breast cancers was 1.9% (95% CI, 0.2% to 3.7%) in the MRI-screened cohort and 6.6% (95% CI, 3.8% to 9.3%) in the comparison group (P = .02). The adjusted hazard ratio for the development of stages II to IV breast cancer associated with MRI screening was 0.30 (95% CI, 0.12 to 0.72; P = .008). Conclusion Annual surveillance with MRI is associated with a significant reduction in the incidence of advanced-stage breast cancer in BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers. PMID:21444874

  8. Which screening strategy should be offered to women with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations? A simulation of comparative cost-effectiveness.

    PubMed

    de Bock, G H; Vermeulen, K M; Jansen, L; Oosterwijk, J C; Siesling, S; Dorrius, M D; Feenstra, T; Houssami, N; Greuter, M J W

    2013-04-30

    There is no consensus on the most effective strategy (mammography or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)) for screening women with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations. The effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of the Dutch, UK and US screening strategies, which involve mammography and MRI at different ages and intervals were evaluated in high-risk women with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations. Into a validated simulation screening model, outcomes and cost parameters were integrated from published and cancer registry data. Main outcomes were life-years gained and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios. The simulation was situated in the Netherlands as well as in the United Kingdom, comparing the Dutch, UK and US strategies with the population screening as a reference. A discount rate of 3% was applied to both costs and health benefits. In terms of life-years gained, the strategies from least to most cost-effective were the UK, Dutch and US screening strategy, respectively. However, the differences were small. Applying the US strategy in the Netherlands, the costs were €43 800 and 68 800 for an additional life-year gained for BRCA1 and BRCA2, respectively. At a threshold of €20 000 per life-year gained, implementing the US strategy in the Netherlands has a very low probability of being cost-effective. Stepping back to the less-effective UK strategy would save relatively little in costs and results in life-years lost. When implementing the screening strategies in the United Kingdom, the Dutch, as well as the US screening strategy have a high probability of being cost-effective. From a cost-effectiveness perspective, the Dutch screening strategy is preferred for screening high-risk women in the Netherlands as well as in the United Kingdom.

  9. Variation in breast cancer risk associated with factors related to pregnancies according to truncating mutation location, in the French National BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations carrier cohort (GENEPSO)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 confer a high risk of breast cancer (BC), but the magnitude of this risk seems to vary according to the study and various factors. Although controversial, there are data to support the hypothesis of allelic risk heterogeneity. Methods We assessed variation in BC risk according to factors related to pregnancies by location of mutation in the homogeneous risk region of BRCA1 and BRCA2 in 990 women in the French study GENEPSO by using a weighted Cox regression model. Results Our results confirm the existence of the protective effect of an increasing number of full-term pregnancies (FTPs) toward BC among BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers (≥3 versus 0 FTPs: hazard ratio (HR) = 0.51, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.33 to 0.81). Additionally, the HR shows an association between incomplete pregnancies and a higher BC risk, which reached 2.39 (95% CI = 1.28 to 4.45) among women who had at least three incomplete pregnancies when compared with women with zero incomplete pregnancies. This increased risk appeared to be restricted to incomplete pregnancies occurring before the first FTP (HR = 1.77, 95% CI = 1.19 to 2.63). We defined the TMAP score (defined as the Time of Breast Mitotic Activity during Pregnancies) to take into account simultaneously the opposite effect of full-term and interrupted pregnancies. Compared with women with a TMAP score of less than 0.35, an increasing TMAP score was associated with a statistically significant increase in the risk of BC (P trend = 0.02) which reached 1.97 (95% CI = 1.19 to 3.29) for a TMAP score >0.5 (versus TMAP ≤0.35). All these results appeared to be similar in BRCA1 and BRCA2. Nevertheless, our results suggest a variation in BC risk associated with parity according to the location of the mutation in BRCA1. Indeed, parity seems to be associated with a significantly decreased risk of BC only among women with a mutation in the central region of BRCA1 (low-risk region) (≥1 versus 0 FTP

  10. Common variants at the 19p13.1 and ZNF365 loci are associated with ER subtypes of breast cancer and ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Couch, Fergus J; Gaudet, Mia M; Antoniou, Antonis C; Ramus, Susan J; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Soucy, Penny; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Wang, Xianshu; Kirchhoff, Tomas; McGuffog, Lesley; Barrowdale, Daniel; Lee, Andrew; Healey, Sue; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Andrulis, Irene L; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Kruse, Torben A; Caligo, Maria A; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Barbany-Bustinza, Gisela; Loman, Niklas; Soller, Maria; Ehrencrona, Hans; Karlsson, Per; Nathanson, Katherine L; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Domchek, Susan M; Jakubowska, Ania; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Zlowocka, Elzbieta; Huzarski, Tomasz; Byrski, Tomasz; Gronwald, Jacek; Cybulski, Cezary; Górski, Bohdan; Osorio, Ana; Durán, Mercedes; Tejada, María Isabel; Benitez, Javier; Hamann, Ute; Hogervorst, Frans B L; van Os, Theo A; van Leeuwen, Flora E; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E J; Wijnen, Juul; Blok, Marinus J; Kets, Marleen; Hooning, Maartje J; Oldenburg, Rogier A; Ausems, Margreet G E M; Peock, Susan; Frost, Debra; Ellis, Steve D; Platte, Radka; Fineberg, Elena; Evans, D Gareth; Jacobs, Chris; Eeles, Rosalind A; Adlard, Julian; Davidson, Rosemarie; Eccles, Diana M; Cole, Trevor; Cook, Jackie; Paterson, Joan; Brewer, Carole; Douglas, Fiona; Hodgson, Shirley V; Morrison, Patrick J; Walker, Lisa; Porteous, Mary E; Kennedy, M John; Side, Lucy E; Bove, Betsy; Godwin, Andrew K; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Fassy-Colcombet, Marion; Castera, Laurent; Cornelis, François; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Léoné, Mélanie; Boutry-Kryza, Nadia; Bressac-de Paillerets, Brigitte; Caron, Olivier; Pujol, Pascal; Coupier, Isabelle; Delnatte, Capucine; Akloul, Linda; Lynch, Henry T; Snyder, Carrie L; Buys, Saundra S; Daly, Mary B; Terry, Marybeth; Chung, Wendy K; John, Esther M; Miron, Alexander; Southey, Melissa C; Hopper, John L; Goldgar, David E; Singer, Christian F; Rappaport, Christine; Tea, Muy-Kheng M; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Hansen, Thomas V O; Nielsen, Finn C; Arason, Aðalgeir; Vijai, Joseph; Shah, Sohela; Sarrel, Kara; Robson, Mark E; Piedmonte, Marion; Phillips, Kelly; Basil, Jack; Rubinstein, Wendy S; Boggess, John; Wakeley, Katie; Ewart-Toland, Amanda; Montagna, Marco; Agata, Simona; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Isaacs, Claudine; Janavicius, Ramunas; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Feliubadalo, Lidia; Brunet, Joan; Gayther, Simon A; Pharoah, Paul P D; Odunsi, Kunle O; Karlan, Beth Y; Walsh, Christine S; Olah, Edith; Teo, Soo Hwang; Ganz, Patricia A; Beattie, Mary S; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Dorfling, Cecelia M; Diez, Orland; Kwong, Ava; Schmutzler, Rita K; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Heidemann, Simone; Niederacher, Dieter; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Deissler, Helmut; Gehrig, Andrea; Sutter, Christian; Kast, Karin; Fiebig, Britta; Heinritz, Wolfram; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Muranen, Taru A; Nevanlinna, Heli; Tischkowitz, Marc D; Spurdle, Amanda B; Neuhausen, Susan L; Ding, Yuan Chun; Lindor, Noralane M; Fredericksen, Zachary; Pankratz, V Shane; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Barile, Monica; Bernard, Loris; Viel, Alessandra; Giannini, Giuseppe; Varesco, Liliana; Radice, Paolo; Greene, Mark H; Mai, Phuong L; Easton, Douglas F; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Offit, Kenneth; Simard, Jacques

    2012-04-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) identified variants at 19p13.1 and ZNF365 (10q21.2) as risk factors for breast cancer among BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, respectively. We explored associations with ovarian cancer and with breast cancer by tumor histopathology for these variants in mutation carriers from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA). Genotyping data for 12,599 BRCA1 and 7,132 BRCA2 mutation carriers from 40 studies were combined. We confirmed associations between rs8170 at 19p13.1 and breast cancer risk for BRCA1 mutation carriers [HR, 1.17; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.07-1.27; P = 7.42 × 10(-4)] and between rs16917302 at ZNF365 (HR, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.73-0.97; P = 0.017) but not rs311499 at 20q13.3 (HR, 1.11; 95% CI, 0.94-1.31; P = 0.22) and breast cancer risk for BRCA2 mutation carriers. Analyses based on tumor histopathology showed that 19p13 variants were predominantly associated with estrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer for both BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, whereas rs16917302 at ZNF365 was mainly associated with ER-positive breast cancer for both BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. We also found for the first time that rs67397200 at 19p13.1 was associated with an increased risk of ovarian cancer for BRCA1 (HR, 1.16; 95% CI, 1.05-1.29; P = 3.8 × 10(-4)) and BRCA2 mutation carriers (HR, 1.30; 95% CI, 1.10-1.52; P = 1.8 × 10(-3)). 19p13.1 and ZNF365 are susceptibility loci for ovarian cancer and ER subtypes of breast cancer among BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. These findings can lead to an improved understanding of tumor development and may prove useful for breast and ovarian cancer risk prediction for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. ©2012 AACR.

  11. Common variants at the 19p13.1 and ZNF365 loci are associated with ER subtypes of breast cancer and ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    PubMed Central

    Couch, Fergus J.; Gaudet, Mia M.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Ramus, Susan J.; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Soucy, Penny; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Wang, Xianshu; Kirchhoff, Tomas; McGuffog, Lesley; Barrowdale, Daniel; Lee, Andrew; Healey, Sue; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Kruse, Torben A.; Caligo, Maria A.; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Barbany-Bustinza, Gisela; Loman, Niklas; Soller, Maria; Ehrencrona, Hans; Karlsson, Per; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Domchek, Susan M.; Jakubowska, Ania; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Złowocka, Elżbieta; Huzarski, Tomasz; Byrski, Tomasz; Gronwald, Jacek; Cybulski, Cezary; Górski, Bohdan; Osorio, Ana; Durán, Mercedes; Tejada, María Isabel; Benitez, Javier; Hamann, Ute; Hogervorst, Frans B.L.; van Os, Theo A.; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E.J.; Wijnen, Juul; Blok, Marinus J.; Kets, Marleen; Hooning, Maartje J.; Oldenburg, Rogier A.; Ausems, Margreet G.E.M.; Peock, Susan; Frost, Debra; Ellis, Steve D.; Platte, Radka; Fineberg, Elena; Evans, D. Gareth; Jacobs, Chris; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Adlard, Julian; Davidson, Rosemarie; Eccles, Diana M.; Cole, Trevor; Cook, Jackie; Paterson, Joan; Brewer, Carole; Douglas, Fiona; Hodgson, Shirley V.; Morrison, Patrick J.; Walker, Lisa; Porteous, Mary E.; Kennedy, M. John; Side, Lucy E.; Bove, Betsy; Godwin, Andrew K.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Fassy-Colcombet, Marion; Castera, Laurent; Cornelis, François; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Léoné, Mélanie; Boutry-Kryza, Nadia; Bressac-de Paillerets, Brigitte; Caron, Olivier; Pujol, Pascal; Coupier, Isabelle; Delnatte, Capucine; Akloul, Linda; Lynch, Henry T.; Snyder, Carrie L.; Buys, Saundra S.; Daly, Mary B.; Terry, MaryBeth; Chung, Wendy K.; John, Esther M.; Miron, Alexander; Southey, Melissa C.; Hopper, John L.; Goldgar, David E.; Singer, Christian F.; Rappaport, Christine; Tea, Muy-Kheng M.; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Nielsen, Finn C.; Arason, Aðalgeir; Vijai, Joseph; Shah, Sohela; Sarrel, Kara; Robson, Mark E.; Piedmonte, Marion; Phillips, Kelly; Basil, Jack; Rubinstein, Wendy S.; Boggess, John; Wakeley, Katie; Ewart-Toland, Amanda; Montagna, Marco; Agata, Simona; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Isaacs, Claudine; Janavicius, Ramunas; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Feliubadalo, Lidia; Brunet, Joan; Gayther, Simon A; Pharoah, Paul PD; Odunsi, Kunle O.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Walsh, Christine S.; Olah, Edith; Teo, Soo Hwang; Ganz, Patricia A.; Beattie, Mary S.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Dorfling, Cecelia M.; Diez, Orland; Kwong, Ava; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Heidemann, Simone; Niederacher, Dieter; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Deissler, Helmut; Gehrig, Andrea; Sutter, Christian; Kast, Karin; Fiebig, Britta; Heinritz, Wolfram; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Muranen, Taru A.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Tischkowitz, Marc D.; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Lindor, Noralane M.; Fredericksen, Zachary; Pankratz, V. Shane; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Barile, Monica; Bernard, Loris; Viel, Alessandra; Giannini, Giuseppe; Varesco, Liliana; Radice, Paolo; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Easton, Douglas F.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Offit, Kenneth; Simard, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    Background Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) identified variants at 19p13.1 and ZNF365 (10q21.2) as risk factors for breast cancer among BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, respectively. We explored associations with ovarian cancer and with breast cancer by tumor histopathology for these variants in mutation carriers from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA). Methods Genotyping data for 12,599 BRCA1 and 7,132 BRCA2 mutation carriers from 40 studies were combined. Results We confirmed associations between rs8170 at 19p13.1 and breast cancer risk for BRCA1 mutation carriers (hazard ratio (HR)=1.17; 95%CI 1.07–1.27; p=7.42×10−4) and between rs16917302 at ZNF365 (HR=0.84; 95%CI 0.73–0.97; p=0.017) but not rs311499 at 20q13.3 (HR=1.11; 95%CI 0.94–1.31; p=0.22) and breast cancer risk for BRCA2 mutation carriers. Analyses based on tumor histopathology showed that 19p13 variants were predominantly associated with estrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer for both BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, whereas rs16917302 at ZNF365 was mainly associated with ER-positive breast cancer for both BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. We also found for the first time that rs67397200 at 19p13.1 was associated with an increased risk of ovarian cancer for BRCA1 (HR=1.16; 95%CI 1.05–1.29; p=3.8×10−4) and BRCA2 mutation carriers (HR=1.30; 95%CI 1.10–1.52; p=1.8×10−3). Conclusions 19p13.1 and ZNF365 are susceptibility loci for ovarian cancer and ER subtypes of breast cancer among BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Impact These findings can lead to an improved understanding of tumor development and may prove useful for breast and ovarian cancer risk prediction for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. PMID:22351618

  12. Traceback: A Proposed Framework to Increase Identification and Genetic Counseling of BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers Through Family-Based Outreach.

    PubMed

    Samimi, Goli; Bernardini, Marcus Q; Brody, Lawrence C; Caga-Anan, Charlisse F; Campbell, Ian G; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Couch, Fergus J; Dean, Michael; de Hullu, Joanne A; Domchek, Susan M; Drapkin, Ronny; Spencer Feigelson, Heather; Friedlander, Michael; Gaudet, Mia M; Harmsen, Marline G; Hurley, Karen; James, Paul A; Kwon, Janice S; Lacbawan, Felicitas; Lheureux, Stephanie; Mai, Phuong L; Mechanic, Leah E; Minasian, Lori M; Myers, Evan R; Robson, Mark E; Ramus, Susan J; Rezende, Lisa F; Shaw, Patricia A; Slavin, Thomas P; Swisher, Elizabeth M; Takenaka, Masataka; Bowtell, David D; Sherman, Mark E

    2017-04-11

    In May 2016, the Division of Cancer Prevention and the Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, convened a workshop to discuss a conceptual framework for identifying and genetically testing previously diagnosed but unreferred patients with ovarian cancer and other unrecognized BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers to improve the detection of families at risk for breast or ovarian cancer. The concept, designated Traceback, was prompted by the recognition that although BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations are frequent in women with ovarian cancer, many such women have not been tested, especially if their diagnosis predated changes in testing guidelines. The failure to identify mutation carriers among probands represents a lost opportunity to prevent cancer in unsuspecting relatives through risk-reduction intervention in mutation carriers and to provide appropriate reassurances to noncarriers. The Traceback program could provide an important opportunity to reach families from racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic groups who historically have not sought or been offered genetic counseling and testing and thereby contribute to a reduction in health disparities in women with germline BRCA mutations. To achieve an interdisciplinary perspective, the workshop assembled international experts in genetics, medical and gynecologic oncology, clinical psychology, epidemiology, genomics, cost-effectiveness modeling, pathology, bioethics, and patient advocacy to identify factors to consider when undertaking a Traceback program. This report highlights the workshop deliberations with the goal of stimulating research and providing a framework for pilot studies to assess the feasibility and ethical and logistical considerations related to the development of best practices for implementation of Traceback studies.

  13. Do BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers have earlier natural menopause than their noncarrier relatives? Results from the Kathleen Cuningham Foundation Consortium for Research into Familial Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Collins, Ian M; Milne, Roger L; McLachlan, Sue Anne; Friedlander, Michael; Hickey, Martha; Weideman, Prue C; Birch, Kate E; Hopper, John L; Phillips, Kelly-Anne

    2013-11-01

    Limited data suggest that germline BRCA1 mutations are associated with occult primary ovarian insufficiency and that BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers might have earlier natural menopause (NM) than their noncarrier relatives. Eligible women were mutation carriers and noncarriers from families segregating a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation. Data were self-reported using uniform questionnaires at cohort entry and every 3 years thereafter. NM was defined as the cessation of menses for 12 months without another cause. Cox proportional hazards analysis modeled time from birth to NM, adjusting for multiple potential confounders. Analysis time was censored at the earliest of the following: last follow-up, bilateral oophorectomy, hysterectomy, commencement of hormone therapy, insertion of intrauterine device, or any cancer diagnosis. Hazard ratios (HRs) were estimated as a measure of how likely mutation carriers are, relative to noncarriers, to reach NM at a given age. A total of 1,840 women were eligible for analysis. Overall only 19% reached NM. A lower proportion of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers reached NM compared with noncarriers. Conversely, a higher proportion of mutation carriers were censored at cancer diagnosis or oophorectomy than noncarriers. The adjusted HR estimates for NM were 1.03 (95% CI, 0.75 to 1.40; P = .9) for 445 BRCA1 mutation carriers and 559 noncarrier relatives and 1.01 (95% CI, 0.71 to 1.42; P = .9) for 374 BRCA2 mutation carriers and 462 noncarrier relatives. We found no evidence that BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers are at higher risk of NM at a given age than their noncarrier relatives.

  14. Average Risks of Breast and Ovarian Cancer Associated with BRCA1 or BRCA2 Mutations Detected in Case Series Unselected for Family History: A Combined Analysis of 22 Studies

    PubMed Central

    Antoniou, A.; Pharoah, P. D. P.; Narod, S.; Risch, H. A.; Eyfjord, J. E.; Hopper, J. L.; Loman, N.; Olsson, H.; Johannsson, O.; Borg, Å.; Pasini, B.; Radice, P.; Manoukian, S.; Eccles, D. M.; Tang, N.; Olah, E.; Anton-Culver, H.; Warner, E.; Lubinski, J.; Gronwald, J.; Gorski, B.; Tulinius, H.; Thorlacius, S.; Eerola, H.; Nevanlinna, H.; Syrjäkoski, K.; Kallioniemi, O.-P.; Thompson, D.; Evans, C.; Peto, J.; Lalloo, F.; Evans, D. G.; Easton, D. F.

    2003-01-01

    Germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 confer high risks of breast and ovarian cancer, but the average magnitude of these risks is uncertain and may depend on the context. Estimates based on multiple-case families may be enriched for mutations of higher risk and/or other familial risk factors, whereas risk estimates from studies based on cases unselected for family history have been imprecise. We pooled pedigree data from 22 studies involving 8,139 index case patients unselected for family history with female (86%) or male (2%) breast cancer or epithelial ovarian cancer (12%), 500 of whom had been found to carry a germline mutation in BRCA1 or BRCA2. Breast and ovarian cancer incidence rates for mutation carriers were estimated using a modified segregation analysis, based on the occurrence of these cancers in the relatives of mutation-carrying index case patients. The average cumulative risks in BRCA1-mutation carriers by age 70 years were 65% (95% confidence interval 44%–78%) for breast cancer and 39% (18%–54%) for ovarian cancer. The corresponding estimates for BRCA2 were 45% (31%–56%) and 11% (2.4%–19%). Relative risks of breast cancer declined significantly with age for BRCA1-mutation carriers (P trend .0012) but not for BRCA2-mutation carriers. Risks in carriers were higher when based on index breast cancer cases diagnosed at <35 years of age. We found some evidence for a reduction in risk in women from earlier birth cohorts and for variation in risk by mutation position for both genes. The pattern of cancer risks was similar to those found in multiple-case families, but their absolute magnitudes were lower, particularly for BRCA2. The variation in risk by age at diagnosis of index case is consistent with the effects of other genes modifying cancer risk in carriers. PMID:12677558

  15. Breast MRI fibroglandular volume and parenchymal enhancement in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers before and immediately after risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy.

    PubMed

    DeLeo, Michael J; Domchek, Susan M; Kontos, Despina; Conant, Emily; Chen, Jinbo; Weinstein, Susan

    2015-03-01

    OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this article is to assess the difference in fibroglandular volume and background parenchymal enhancement in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers on contrast-enhanced breast MRI (CE-MRI) performed before and immediately after risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy (RRSO). MATERIALS AND METHODS. We retrospectively compared fibroglandular volume and background parenchymal enhancement in 55 female BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers before and after RRSO using standard BI-RADS categories and a paired Wilcoxon and Mann-Whitney U test. A two-sample Wilcoxon test was performed to compare fibroglandular volume and background parenchymal enhancement in women with and without subsequent breast cancer diagnosis on follow-up. RESULTS. The median time to post-RRSO CE-MRI was 8 months (range, 1-40 months). There was no difference in fibroglandular volume before and after RRSO (p = 0.65). The mean background parenchymal enhancement was 2.5 (range, 1-4) before and 1.5 (range, 1-4) after RRSO (overall range, -2.5 to 1.5; p = 0.0001). Breast cancer was detected in nine women at a median time of 4.8 years (range, 1.8-13.3 years) after RRSO. For women who received a diagnosis of breast cancer after RRSO compared with those who did not, mean background parenchymal enhancement before RRSO was 3 (range, 2-4) versus 2.5 (range, 1-4; p = 0.001), and mean background parenchymal enhancement after RRSO was 2.5 (range, 1.5-4) versus 1.5 (range 2-4; p = 0.0018). There was no difference in fibroglandular volume before and after RRSO. CONCLUSION. In BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, we observed a significant reduction in background parenchymal enhancement on the first CE-MRI after RRSO and no significant change in fibroglandular volume. Higher background parenchymal enhancement before and after RRSO was observed in women who subsequently received a diagnosis of breast cancer. This suggests that background parenchymal enhancement, rather than fibro-glandular volume, may be a

  16. Infertility, treatment of infertility, and the risk of breast cancer among women with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Kotsopoulos, Joanne; Librach, Clifford L; Lubinski, Jan; Gronwald, Jacek; Kim-Sing, Charmaine; Ghadirian, Parviz; Lynch, Henry T; Moller, Pal; Foulkes, William D; Randall, Susan; Manoukian, Siranoush; Pasini, Barbara; Tung, Nadine; Ainsworth, Peter J; Cummings, Shelly; Sun, Ping; Narod, Steven A

    2008-12-01

    Women with a breast cancer susceptibility gene 1 (BRCA1) or breast cancer susceptibility gene 2 (BRCA2) mutation are at increased risk for developing breast and ovarian cancer. Various reproductive and hormonal factors have been shown to modify the risk of breast cancer. These studies suggest that estrogen exposure and deprivation are important in the etiology of hereditary cancer. Many patients are interested in the possibility of an adverse effect of fertility treatment on breast cancer risk. It is important to evaluate whether or not infertility per se or exposure to fertility medications increase the risk of breast cancer in genetically predisposed women. We conducted a matched case-control study of 1,380 pairs of women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation to determine if a history of infertility, the use of fertility medications, or undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF) were associated with and increased the risk of breast cancer. Sixteen percent of the study subjects reported having experienced a fertility problem and 4% had used a fertility medication. Women who had used a fertility medication were not at significantly increased risk of breast cancer (odds ratio [OR] = 1.21; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.81-1.82) compared to non-users. Furthermore, there was no risk associated with a history of use of a fertility medication when the subjects were stratified by parity: (OR = 1.29; 95% CI = 0.83-2.01 for nulliparous women and OR = 0.81; 95% CI = 0.30-2.22 for parous women). The results of this study suggest that the use of fertility medications does not adversely affect the risk of breast cancer among BRCA mutation carriers. Given the small sizes of the exposed subgroups, these findings should be interpreted with caution and confirmatory studies are required.

  17. New perspective on maintenance therapies for platinum- sensitive recurrent ovarian cancer in women with germline and somatic mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes.

    PubMed

    Vergote, I; Bours, V; Blaumeiser, B; Baurain, J-F

    2016-09-01

    Ovarian cancer (OC) is the seventh most common cancer in women. Although women diagnosed with OC are usually treated frontline with platinum-based chemotherapy, most of them relapse once treatment is halted. Therefore, maintenance therapies have been developed to secure the response and delay further chemotherapy. There are two established maintenance therapies for women affected by platinum-sensitive recurrent OC: bevacizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody targeting vascular endothelial growth factor, and olaparib, an inhibitor of poly (adenosine diphosphate [ADP]-ribose) polymerase (PARPi). Loss-of-function mutations in genes in the homologous recombination pathway, especially BRCA1 and BRCA2, predict higher rates of platinum sensitivity, better overall survival (OS), and better response to PARPi in women with OC. Among patients with platinum-sensitive recurrent OC, a BRCA mutation is the first genetically defined predictive marker for targeted therapy, since these patients are most likely to benefit from treatment with a PARPi, such as olaparib. In patients with platinum-sensitive recurrent OC without a BRCA mutation, bevacizumab currently seems to be the best maintenance option. Women with OC are progressively more routinely screened for germline BRCA mutations, and the implication of somatic BRCA mutations is increasingly being recognized in OC. Therefore, the recommendations should be updated to reflect the importance of both types of mutations. Together, these data highlight the fact that treatment of recurrent OC can be optimized using genomic contributions to individualize therapy and to improve treatment response.

  18. New perspective on maintenance therapies for platinum- sensitive recurrent ovarian cancer in women with germline and somatic mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes

    PubMed Central

    Vergote, I; Bours, V; Blaumeiser, B; Baurain, J-F

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer (OC) is the seventh most common cancer in women. Although women diagnosed with OC are usually treated frontline with platinum-based chemotherapy, most of them relapse once treatment is halted. Therefore, maintenance therapies have been developed to secure the response and delay further chemotherapy. There are two established maintenance therapies for women affected by platinum-sensitive recurrent OC: bevacizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody targeting vascular endothelial growth factor, and olaparib, an inhibitor of poly (adenosine diphosphate [ADP]-ribose) polymerase (PARPi). Loss-of-function mutations in genes in the homologous recombination pathway, especially BRCA1 and BRCA2, predict higher rates of platinum sensitivity, better overall survival (OS), and better response to PARPi in women with OC. Among patients with platinum-sensitive recurrent OC, a BRCA mutation is the first genetically defined predictive marker for targeted therapy, since these patients are most likely to benefit from treatment with a PARPi, such as olaparib. In patients with platinum-sensitive recurrent OC without a BRCA mutation, bevacizumab currently seems to be the best maintenance option. Women with OC are progressively more routinely screened for germline BRCA mutations, and the implication of somatic BRCA mutations is increasingly being recognized in OC. Therefore, the recommendations should be updated to reflect the importance of both types of mutations. Together, these data highlight the fact that treatment of recurrent OC can be optimized using genomic contributions to individualize therapy and to improve treatment response. PMID:28003870

  19. Common breast cancer susceptibility alleles are associated with tumour subtypes in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers: results from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Previous studies have demonstrated that common breast cancer susceptibility alleles are differentially associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 mutation carriers. It is currently unknown how these alleles are associated with different breast cancer subtypes in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers defined by estrogen (ER) or progesterone receptor (PR) status of the tumour. Methods We used genotype data on up to 11,421 BRCA1 and 7,080 BRCA2 carriers, of whom 4,310 had been affected with breast cancer and had information on either ER or PR status of the tumour, to assess the associations of 12 loci with breast cancer tumour characteristics. Associations were evaluated using a retrospective cohort approach. Results The results suggested stronger associations with ER-positive breast cancer than ER-negative for 11 loci in both BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers. Among BRCA1 carriers, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs2981582 (FGFR2) exhibited the biggest difference based on ER status (per-allele hazard ratio (HR) for ER-positive = 1.35, 95% CI: 1.17 to 1.56 vs HR = 0.91, 95% CI: 0.85 to 0.98 for ER-negative, P-heterogeneity = 6.5 × 10-6). In contrast, SNP rs2046210 at 6q25.1 near ESR1 was primarily associated with ER-negative breast cancer risk for both BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers. In BRCA2 carriers, SNPs in FGFR2, TOX3, LSP1, SLC4A7/NEK10, 5p12, 2q35, and 1p11.2 were significantly associated with ER-positive but not ER-negative disease. Similar results were observed when differentiating breast cancer cases by PR status. Conclusions The associations of the 12 SNPs with risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers differ by ER-positive or ER-negative breast cancer status. The apparent differences in SNP associations between BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers, and non-carriers, may be explicable by differences in the prevalence of tumour subtypes. As more risk modifying variants are identified, incorporating these associations into breast cancer subtype-specific risk models

  20. Worse Breast Cancer Prognosis of BRCA1/BRCA2 Mutation Carriers: What's the Evidence? A Systematic Review with Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    van den Broek, Alexandra J.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; van ‘t Veer, Laura J.; Tollenaar, Rob A. E. M.; van Leeuwen, Flora E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Conflicting conclusions have been published regarding breast cancer survival of BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. Here we provide an evidence-based systematic literature review. Methods Eligible publications were observational studies assessing the survival of breast cancer patients carrying a BRCA1/2 mutation compared to non-carriers or the general breast cancer population. We performed meta-analyses and best-evidence syntheses for survival outcomes taking into account study quality assessed by selection bias, misclassification bias and confounding. Results Sixty-six relevant studies were identified. Moderate evidence for a worse unadjusted recurrence-free survival for BRCA1 mutation carriers was found. For BRCA1 and BRCA2 there was a tendency towards a worse breast cancer-specific and overall survival, however, results were heterogeneous and the evidence was judged to be indecisive. Surprisingly, only 8 studies considered adjuvant treatment as a confounder or effect modifier while only two studies took prophylactic surgery into account. Adjustment for tumour characteristics tended to shift the observed risk estimates towards a relatively more favourable survival. Conclusions In contrast to currently held beliefs of some oncologists, current evidence does not support worse breast cancer survival of BRCA1/2 mutation carriers in the adjuvant setting; differences if any are likely to be small. More well-designed studies are awaited. PMID:25816289

  1. Relevance and efficacy of breast cancer screening in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers above 60 years: a national cohort study.

    PubMed

    Saadatmand, Sepideh; Vos, Janet R; Hooning, Maartje J; Oosterwijk, Jan C; Koppert, Linetta B; de Bock, Geertruida H; Ausems, Margreet G; van Asperen, Christi J; Aalfs, Cora M; Gómez Garcia, Encarna B; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Piek, Marianne; Seynaeve, Caroline; Verhoef, Cornelis; Rookus, Matti; Tilanus-Linthorst, Madeleine M

    2014-12-15

    Annual MRI and mammography is recommended for BRCA1/2 mutation carriers to reduce breast cancer mortality. Less intensive screening is advised ≥60 years, although effectiveness is unknown. We identified BRCA1/2 mutation carriers without bilateral mastectomy before age 60 to determine for whom screening ≥60 is relevant, in the Rotterdam Family Cancer Clinic and HEBON: a nationwide prospective cohort study. Furthermore, we compared tumour stage at breast cancer diagnosis between different screening strategies in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers ≥60. Tumours >2 cm, positive lymph nodes, or distant metastases at detection were defined as "unfavourable." Of 548 BRCA1/2 mutation carriers ≥60 years in 2012, 395 (72%) did not have bilateral mastectomy before the age of 60. Of these 395, 224 (57%) had a history of breast or other invasive carcinoma. In 136 BRCA1/2 mutation carriers, we compared 148 breast cancers (including interval cancers) detected ≥60, of which 84 (57%) were first breast cancers. With biennial mammography 53% (30/57) of carcinomas were detected in unfavourable stage, compared to 21% (12/56) with annual mammography (adjusted odds ratio: 4·07, 95% confidence interval [1.79-9.28], p = 0.001). With biennial screening 40% of breast cancers were interval cancers, compared to 20% with annual screening (p = 0.016). Results remained significant for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, and first breast cancers separately. Over 70% of 60-year old BRCA1/2 mutation carriers remain at risk for breast cancer, of which half has prior cancers. When life expectancy is good, continuation of annual breast cancer screening of BRCA1/2 mutation carriers ≥60 is worthwhile.

  2. Sanger Sequencing for BRCA1 c.68_69del, BRCA1 c.5266dup and BRCA2 c.5946del Mutation Screen on Pap Smear Cytology Samples.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sin Hang; Zhou, Shaoxia; Zhou, Tianjun; Hong, Guofan

    2016-02-08

    Three sets of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers were designed for heminested PCR amplification of the target DNA fragments in the human genome which include the site of BRCA1 c.68_69del, BRCA1 c.5266dup and BRCA2 c.5946del respectively, to prepare the templates for direct Sanger sequencing screen of these three founder mutations. With a robust PCR mixture, crude proteinase K digestate of the fixed cervicovaginal cells in the liquid-based Papanicolaou (Pap) cytology specimens can be used as the sample for target DNA amplification without pre-PCR DNA extraction, purification and quantitation. The post-PCR products can be used directly as the sequencing templates without further purification or quantitation. By simplifying the frontend procedures for template preparation, the cost for screening these three founder mutations can be reduced to about US $200 per test when performed in conjunction with human papillomavirus (HPV) assays now routinely ordered for cervical cancer prevention. With this projected price structure, selective patients in a high-risk population can be tested and each provided with a set of DNA sequencing electropherograms to document the absence or presence of these founder mutations in her genome to help assess inherited susceptibility to breast and ovarian cancer in this era of precision molecular personalized medicine.

  3. Screening BRCA1 and BRCA2 unclassified variants for splicing mutations using reverse transcription PCR on patient RNA and an ex vivo assay based on a splicing reporter minigene.

    PubMed

    Bonnet, C; Krieger, S; Vezain, M; Rousselin, A; Tournier, I; Martins, A; Berthet, P; Chevrier, A; Dugast, C; Layet, V; Rossi, A; Lidereau, R; Frébourg, T; Hardouin, A; Tosi, M

    2008-07-01

    Many unclassified variants (UV) of BRCA1 or BRCA2 may have an effect on pre-mRNA splicing. Patient blood samples suitable for RNA extraction are not always available for testing UVs at the RNA level. Analyses of RNA from patient peripheral blood were performed, using a one-step reverse transcriptase-PCR (RT-PCR) protocol, and were compared with an ex vivo splicing assay based on PCR-amplified patient DNA inserted into a splicing reporter minigene. Using both methods 20 variants found in 17 patients were examined. Data from patient RNA and from the minigene assay were fully concordant, but the ex vivo splicing assay, which is monoallelic, clarified several ambiguities in the patient RNA data. Two intronic variants induced strong splicing defects: BRCA1 c.4987-5T-->A (IVS16-5T-->A) induced exon 17 skipping and BRCA2 c.316+5G-->C (IVS3+5G-->C) induced complete skipping of exon 3. Of the exonic variants, BRCA2 c.7805G-->C (p.Arg2602Thr), at the last base of exon 16, induced both exon skipping and activation of a cryptic exonic donor site, and BRCA2 c.8023A-->G (p.Ile2675Val) generated a strong donor site within exon 18. These four variants were thus classified as pathogenic, because of the total absence of a normal transcript from the corresponding allele. Variant BRCA2 c.9501+3A-->T (IVS25+3A-->T) induced incomplete skipping of exon 25, suggesting a mutation with incomplete penetrance, and BRCA2 c.8257_8259del (p.Leu2753del) modified the alternative splicing of exons 17 and 18. We show that functional analysis using a splicing reporter minigene is sensitive and specific, and should be used for initial screening of potential splicing defects, especially when patient RNA is not readily available.

  4. Common variants at 12p11, 12q24, 9p21, 9q31.2 and in ZNF365 are associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 mutation carriers

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Several common alleles have been shown to be associated with breast and/or ovarian cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Recent genome-wide association studies of breast cancer have identified eight additional breast cancer susceptibility loci: rs1011970 (9p21, CDKN2A/B), rs10995190 (ZNF365), rs704010 (ZMIZ1), rs2380205 (10p15), rs614367 (11q13), rs1292011 (12q24), rs10771399 (12p11 near PTHLH) and rs865686 (9q31.2). Methods To evaluate whether these single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers, we genotyped these SNPs in 12,599 BRCA1 and 7,132 BRCA2 mutation carriers and analysed the associations with breast cancer risk within a retrospective likelihood framework. Results Only SNP rs10771399 near PTHLH was associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 mutation carriers (per-allele hazard ratio (HR) = 0.87, 95% CI: 0.81 to 0.94, P-trend = 3 × 10-4). The association was restricted to mutations proven or predicted to lead to absence of protein expression (HR = 0.82, 95% CI: 0.74 to 0.90, P-trend = 3.1 × 10-5, P-difference = 0.03). Four SNPs were associated with the risk of breast cancer for BRCA2 mutation carriers: rs10995190, P-trend = 0.015; rs1011970, P-trend = 0.048; rs865686, 2df-P = 0.007; rs1292011 2df-P = 0.03. rs10771399 (PTHLH) was predominantly associated with estrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer for BRCA1 mutation carriers (HR = 0.81, 95% CI: 0.74 to 0.90, P-trend = 4 × 10-5) and there was marginal evidence of association with ER-negative breast cancer for BRCA2 mutation carriers (HR = 0.78, 95% CI: 0.62 to 1.00, P-trend = 0.049). Conclusions The present findings, in combination with previously identified modifiers of risk, will ultimately lead to more accurate risk prediction and an improved understanding of the disease etiology in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. PMID:22348646

  5. Reproductive factors and risk of contralateral breast cancer by BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation status: results from the WECARE study.

    PubMed

    Poynter, Jenny N; Langholz, Bryan; Largent, Joan; Mellemkjaer, Lene; Bernstein, Leslie; Malone, Kathleen E; Lynch, Charles F; Borg, Ake; Concannon, Patrick; Teraoka, Sharon N; Xue, Shanyan; Diep, Anh T; Törngren, Therese; Begg, Colin B; Capanu, Marinela; Haile, Robert W; Bernstein, Jonine L

    2010-06-01

    Reproductive factors, such as early age at menarche, late age at menopause, and nulliparity are known risk factors for breast cancer. Previously, we reported these factors to be associated with risk of developing contralateral breast cancer (CBC). In this study, we evaluated the association between these factors and CBC risk among BRCA1 and BRCA2 (BRCA1/2) mutation carriers and non-carriers. The WECARE Study is a population-based multi-center case-control study of 705 women with CBC (cases) and 1,397 women with unilateral breast cancer (controls). All participants were screened for BRCA1/2 mutations and 181 carriers were identified. Conditional logistic regression models were used to evaluate associations between reproductive factors and CBC for mutation carriers and non-carriers. None of the associations between reproductive factors and CBC risk differed between mutation carriers and non-carriers. The increase in risk with younger age at menarche and decrease in risk in women with more than two full-term pregnancies seen in non-carriers were not significantly different in carriers (adjusted RRs = 1.31, 95% CI 0.65-2.65 and 0.53, 95% CI 0.19-1.51, respectively). No significant associations between the other reproductive factors and CBC risk were observed in mutation carriers or non-carriers. For two reproductive factors previously shown to be associated with CBC risk, we observed similar associations for BRCA1/2 carriers. This suggests that reproductive variables that affect CBC risk may have similar effects in mutation carriers and non-carriers.

  6. Oral poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitor olaparib in patients with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations and recurrent ovarian cancer: a proof-of-concept trial.

    PubMed

    Audeh, M William; Carmichael, James; Penson, Richard T; Friedlander, Michael; Powell, Bethan; Bell-McGuinn, Katherine M; Scott, Clare; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Oaknin, Ana; Loman, Niklas; Lu, Karen; Schmutzler, Rita K; Matulonis, Ursula; Wickens, Mark; Tutt, Andrew

    2010-07-24

    Olaparib is a novel, orally active poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitor that induces synthetic lethality in homozygous BRCA-deficient cells. We aimed to assess the efficacy and safety of olaparib for treatment of advanced ovarian cancer in patients with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations. In this international, multicentre, phase 2 study, we enrolled two sequential cohorts of women (aged >or=18 years) with confirmed genetic BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations, and recurrent, measurable disease. The study was undertaken in 12 centres in Australia, Germany, Spain, Sweden, and the USA. The first cohort (n=33) was given continuous oral olaparib at the maximum tolerated dose of 400 mg twice daily, and the second cohort (n=24) was given continuous oral olaparib at 100 mg twice daily. The primary efficacy endpoint was objective response rate (ORR). This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00494442. Patients had been given a median of three (range 1-16) previous chemotherapy regimens. ORR was 11 (33%) of 33 patients (95% CI 20-51) in the cohort assigned to olaparib 400 mg twice daily, and three (13%) of 24 (4-31) in the cohort assigned to 100 mg twice daily. In patients given olaparib 400 mg twice daily, the most frequent causally related adverse events were nausea (grade 1 or 2, 14 [42%]; grade 3 or 4, two [6%]), fatigue (grade 1 or 2, ten [30%]; grade 3 or 4, one [3%]), and anaemia (grade 1 or two, five [15%]; grade 3 or 4, one [3%]). The most frequent causally related adverse events in the cohort given 100 mg twice daily were nausea (grade 1 or 2, seven [29%]; grade 3 or 4, two [8%]) and fatigue (grade 1 or 2, nine [38%]; none grade 3 or 4). Findings from this phase 2 study provide positive proof of concept of the efficacy and tolerability of genetically targeted treatment with olaparib in BRCA-mutated advanced ovarian cancer. AstraZeneca. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Cumulative risk of second primary contralateral breast cancer in BRCA1/BRCA2 mutation carriers with a first breast cancer: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Molina-Montes, Esther; Pérez-Nevot, Beatriz; Pollán, Marina; Sánchez-Cantalejo, Emilio; Espín, Jaime; Sánchez, María-José

    2014-12-01

    BRCA1/2 mutation carriers are at a higher risk of breast cancer and of subsequent contralateral breast cancer (CBC). This study aims to evaluate the evidence of the effect of the BRCA1/2-carriership on CBC cumulative risk in female breast cancer patients. The literature was searched in Pubmed and Embase up to June 2013 for studies on CBC risk after a first primary invasive breast cancer in female BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. A qualitative synthesis was carried out and the methodological quality of the studies evaluated. Cumulative risks of CBC after 5, 10 and 15 years since the first breast cancer diagnosis were pooled by BRCA1/2 mutation status. A total number of 20 articles, out of 1324 retrieved through the search, met the inclusion criteria: 18 retrospective and 2 prospective cohort studies. Cumulative risks of up to five studies were pooled. The cumulative 5-years risk of CBC for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers was 15% (95% CI: 9.5%-20%) and 9% (95% CI: 5%-14%), respectively. This risk increases with time since diagnosis of the first breast cancer; the 10-years risk increased up to 27% and 19%, respectively. The 5-years cumulative risk was remarkably lower in non-BRCA carriers (3%; 95% CI: 2%-5%) and remained so over subsequent years (5%; 95% CI: 3%-7%). In conclusion, risk of CBC increases with length of time after the first breast cancer diagnosis in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. Studies addressing the impact of treatment-related factors and clinical characteristics of the first breast cancer on this risk are warranted.

  8. Association of the variants CASP8 D302H and CASP10 V410I with breast and ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Engel, Christoph; Versmold, Beatrix; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Simard, Jacques; Easton, Douglas F; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare; Frost, Debra; Mayes, Rebecca; Evans, D Gareth; Eeles, Rosalind; Paterson, Joan; Brewer, Carole; McGuffog, Lesley; Antoniou, Antonis C; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Barjhoux, Laure; Frenay, Marc; Michel, Cécile; Leroux, Dominique; Dreyfus, Helene; Toulas, Christine; Gladieff, Laurence; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Meindl, Alfons; Arnold, Norbert; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Niederacher, Dieter; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Kast, Karin; Deissler, Helmut; Sutter, Christian; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Spurdle, Amanda B; Chen, Xiaoqing; Beesley, Jonathan; Olsson, Håkan; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Ehrencrona, Hans; Liljegren, Annelie; van der Luijt, Rob B; van Os, Theo A; van Leeuwen, Flora E; Domchek, Susan M; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Nathanson, Katherine L; Osorio, Ana; Ramón y Cajal, Teresa; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Benítez, Javier; Friedman, Eitan; Kaufman, Bella; Laitman, Yael; Mai, Phuong L; Greene, Mark H; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Szabo, Csilla I; Caldes, Trinidad; Couch, Fergus J; Andrulis, Irene L; Godwin, Andrew K; Hamann, Ute; Schmutzler, Rita K

    2010-11-01

    The genes caspase-8 (CASP8) and caspase-10 (CASP10) functionally cooperate and play a key role in the initiation of apoptosis. Suppression of apoptosis is one of the major mechanisms underlying the origin and progression of cancer. Previous case-control studies have indicated that the polymorphisms CASP8 D302H and CASP10 V410I are associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer in the general population. To evaluate whether the CASP8 D302H (CASP10 V410I) polymorphisms modify breast or ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, we analyzed 7,353 (7,227) subjects of white European origin provided by 19 (18) study groups that participate in the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA). A weighted cohort approach was used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). The minor allele of CASP8 D302H was significantly associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer (per-allele HR, 0.85; 95% CI, 0.76-0.97; P(trend) = 0.011) and ovarian cancer (per-allele HR, 0.69; 95% CI, 0.53-0.89; P(trend) = 0.004) for BRCA1 but not for BRCA2 mutation carriers. The CASP10 V410I polymorphism was not associated with breast or ovarian cancer risk for BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. CASP8 D302H decreases breast and ovarian cancer risk for BRCA1 mutation carriers but not for BRCA2 mutation carriers. The combined application of these and other recently identified genetic risk modifiers could in the future allow better individual risk calculation and could aid in the individualized counseling and decision making with respect to preventive options in BRCA1 mutation carriers. ©2010 AACR.

  9. Association of the Variants CASP8 D302H and CASP10 V410I with Breast and Ovarian Cancer Risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Engel, Christoph; Versmold, Beatrix; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Simard, Jacques; Easton, Douglas F.; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare; Frost, Debra; Mayes, Rebecca; Evans, D. Gareth; Eeles, Rosalind; Paterson, Joan; Brewer, Carole; McGuffog, Lesley; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Barjhoux, Laure; Frenay, Marc; Michel, Cécile; Leroux, Dominique; Dreyfus, Helene; Toulas, Christine; Gladieff, Laurence; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Meindl, Alfons; Arnold, Norbert; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Niederacher, Dieter; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Kast, Karin; Deissler, Helmut; Sutter, Christian; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Chen, Xiaoqing; Beesley, Jonathan; Olsson, Håkan; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Ehrencrona, Hans; Liljegren, Annelie; van der Luijt, Rob B.; van Os, Theo A.; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Domchek, Susan M.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Osorio, Ana; Cajal, Teresa Ramón y; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Benítez, Javier; Friedman, Eitan; Kaufman, Bella; Laitman, Yael; Mai, Phuong L.; Greene, Mark H.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Szabo, Csilla I.; Caldes, Trinidad; Couch, Fergus J.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Godwin, Andrew K.; Hamann, Ute; Schmutzler, Rita K.

    2011-01-01

    Background The genes caspase-8 (CASP8) and caspase-10 (CASP10) functionally cooperate and play a key role in the initiation of apoptosis. Suppression of apoptosis is one of the major mechanisms underlying the origin and progression of cancer. Previous case-control studies have indicated that the polymorphisms CASP8 D302H and CASP10 V410I are associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer in the general population. Methods To evaluate whether the CASP8 D302H (CASP10 V410I) polymorphisms modify breast or ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, we analyzed 7,353 (7,227) subjects of white European origin provided by 19 (18) study groups that participate in the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIM-BA). A weighted cohort approach was used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). Results The minor allele of CASP8 D302H was significantly associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer (per-allele HR, 0.85; 95% CI, 0.76–0.97; Ptrend = 0.011) and ovarian cancer (per-allele HR, 0.69; 95% CI, 0.53–0.89; Ptrend = 0.004) for BRCA1 but not for BRCA2 mutation carriers. The CASP10 V410I polymorphism was not associated with breast or ovarian cancer risk for BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. Conclusions CASP8 D302H decreases breast and ovarian cancer risk for BRCA1 mutation carriers but not for BRCA2 mutation carriers. Impact The combined application of these and other recently identified genetic risk modifiers could in the future allow better individual risk calculation and could aid in the individualized counseling and decision making with respect to preventive options in BRCA1 mutation carriers. PMID:20978178

  10. The Leu33Pro polymorphism in the ITGB3 gene does not modify BRCA1/2-associated breast or ovarian cancer risks: results from a multicenter study among 15,542 BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Jakubowska, Anna; Rozkrut, Dominik; Antoniou, Antonis; Hamann, Ute; Lubinski, Jan

    2010-06-01

    Integrins containing the beta(3) subunit are key players in tumor growth and metastasis. A functional Leu33Pro polymorphism (rs5918) in the beta(3) subunit of the integrin gene (ITGB3) has previously been suggested to act as a modifier of ovarian cancer risk in Polish BRCA1 mutation carriers. To investigate the association further, we genotyped 9,998 BRCA1 and 5,544 BRCA2 mutation carriers from 34 studies from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 for the ITGB3 Leu33Pro polymorphism. Data were analysed within a Cox-proportional hazards framework using a retrospective likelihood approach. There was marginal evidence that the ITGB3 polymorphism was associated with an increased risk of ovarian cancer for BRCA1 mutation carriers (per-allele Hazard Ratio (HR) 1.11, 95% CI 1.00-1.23, p-trend 0.05). However, when the original Polish study was excluded from the analysis, the polymorphism was no longer significantly associated with ovarian cancer risk (HR 1.07, 95% CI 0.96-1.19, p-trend 0.25). There was no evidence of an association with ovarian cancer risk for BRCA2 mutation carriers (HR 1.09, 95% CI 0.89-1.32). The polymorphism was not associated with breast cancer risk for either BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. The ITGB3 Leu33Pro polymorphism does not modify breast or ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers.

  11. Differences in the frequency and distribution of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in breast/ovarian cancer cases from the Basque country with respect to the Spanish population: implications for genetic counselling.

    PubMed

    Beristain, E; Martínez-Bouzas, C; Guerra, I; Viguera, N; Moreno, J; Ibañez, E; Díez, J; Rodríguez, F; Mallabiabarrena, G; Luján, S; Gorostiaga, J; De Pablo, J L; Mendizabal, J L; Tejada, M I

    2007-12-01

    The prevalence of unique and recurrent BRCA1 and BRCA2 pathogenic mutations and unclassified variants varies among different populations. Two hundred and thirty-six breast and/or ovarian cancer patients were analysed to clarify the role of these genes in the Basque Country. We also studied 130 healthy women from the general population from the same region. Fifteen different pathological mutations were found in 16 index cases: 10 truncating mutations, 4 missense mutations and 1 splicing mutation. c.3002_3003insT and c.5788_5789delGT, both in exon 11 of BRCA2 have not previously been described. No pathological mutations were found in cases of sporadic juvenile breast cancer. There are no recurrent mutations in our population; apart from the mutation c.9254_9258del5, which appears in only two index cases. We have also found a lot of variants whose effect is unknown. From these variants, 17 have not previously been described: 6 missenses, 6 synonymous and 5 alterations in intronic regions. We would like to highlight the fact that 14.3% of patients with 3 or more cases of breast cancer in the family, and 16.7% of patients with family history of breast and ovarian cancer, present a pathological mutation in BRCA1 or BRCA2. This manuscript demonstrates that each population can have different mutations and due to this, Genetic Counselling and selection criteria must be different for each population. Furthermore, this article describes for the first time some new mutations and unclassified variants found in our population.

  12. Uptake and timing of bilateral prophylactic salpingo-oophorectomy among BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    PubMed Central

    Dignam, James J.; Cummings, Shelly A.; Verp, Marion; White, Melody A.; Artioli, Grazia; Dudlicek, Laura; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate prophylactic salpingo-oophorectomy uptake and timing among BRCA1/2 mutation carriers in a cancer risk assessment program. Methods Clinical records of female BRCA1/2 mutation carriers who received cancer genetic counseling between 1996 and 2003 were reviewed to determine the completion and the timing of prophylactic salpingo-oophorectomy. Logistic regression models evaluated associations between subject characteristics and surgery. Survival analysis methods were used to estimate the distribution of time to surgery. Results Among 88 women, 70% underwent prophylactic salpingo-oophorectomy. Prophylactic salpingo-oophorectomy was associated with older age, white race, having children, and a family history of ovarian cancer. Many women waited more than 12 months to undergo surgery and some delayed by several years. Younger age and not having children were associated with delays to surgery. Conclusion Prophylactic salpingo-ooporectomy is an acceptable risk reduction measure for many BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. Some women make this decision many years after genetic testing. Continued discussion of the risks and benefits of risk reduction options may facilitate the uptake of recommended risk reduction interventions among BRCA mutation carriers. PMID:18344704

  13. Screening for germline BRCA1, BRCA2, TP53 and CHEK2 mutations in families at-risk for hereditary breast cancer identified in a population-based study from Southern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Palmero, Edenir Inêz; Alemar, Bárbara; Schüler-Faccini, Lavínia; Hainaut, Pierre; Moreira-Filho, Carlos Alberto; Ewald, Ingrid Petroni; dos Santos, Patricia Koehler; Ribeiro, Patricia Lisbôa Izetti; de Oliveira, Cristina Brinkmann; Kelm, Florence Le Calvez; Tavtigian, Sean; Cossio, Silvia Liliana; Giugliani, Roberto; Caleffi, Maira; Ashton-Prolla, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In Brazil, breast cancer is a public health care problem due to its high incidence and mortality rates. In this study, we investigated the prevalence of hereditary breast cancer syndromes (HBCS) in a population-based cohort in Brazils southernmost capital, Porto Alegre. All participants answered a questionnaire about family history (FH) of breast, ovarian and colorectal cancer and those with a positive FH were invited for genetic cancer risk assessment (GCRA). If pedigree analysis was suggestive of HBCS, genetic testing of the BRCA1, BRCA2, TP53, and CHEK2 genes was offered. Of 902 women submitted to GCRA, 214 had pedigrees suggestive of HBCS. Fifty of them underwent genetic testing: 18 and 40 for BRCA1/BRCA2 and TP53 mutation screening, respectively, and 7 for CHEK2 1100delC testing. A deleterious BRCA2 mutation was identified in one of the HBOC probands and the CHEK2 1100delC mutation occurred in one of the HBCC families. No deleterious germline alterations were identified in BRCA1 or TP53. Although strict inclusion criteria and a comprehensive testing approach were used, the suspected genetic risk in these families remains unexplained. Further studies in a larger cohort are necessary to better understand the genetic component of hereditary breast cancer in Southern Brazil. PMID:27223485

  14. A cross-linker-sensitive myeloid leukemia cell line from a 2-year-old boy with severe Fanconi anemia and biallelic FANCD1/BRCA2 mutations.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Stefan; Fergusson, William D; Oostra, Anneke B; Medhurst, Annette L; Waisfisz, Quinten; de Winter, Johan P; Chen, Fei; Carr, Trevor F; Clayton-Smith, Jill; Clancy, Tara; Green, Mike; Barber, Lisa; Eden, Osborn B; Will, Andrew M; Joenje, Hans; Taylor, G Malcolm

    2005-04-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by congenital and developmental abnormalities, hypersensitivity to DNA cross-linking agents such as mitomycin C (MMC), and strong predisposition to acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In this article, we describe clinical and molecular findings in a boy with a severe FA phenotype who developed AML by the age of 2. Although he lacked a strong family history of cancer, he was subsequently shown to carry biallelic mutations in the FANCD1/BRCA2 gene. These included an IVS7 splice-site mutation, which is strongly associated with early AML in homozygous or compound heterozygous carrier status in FA-D1 patients. Myeloid leukemia cells from this patient have been maintained in culture for more than 1 year and have been designated as the SB1690CB cell line. Growth of SB1690CB is dependent on granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor or interleukin-3. This cell line has retained its MMC sensitivity and has undergone further spontaneous changes in the spectrum of cytogenetic aberrations compared with the primary leukemia. This is the second AML cell line derived from an FA-D1 patient and the first proof that malignant clones arising in FA patients can retain inherited MMC sensitivity. As FA-derived malignancies are normally not very responsive to treatment, this implies there are important mechanisms of acquiring correction of the cellular FA phenotype that would explain the poor chemoresponsiveness observed in FA-associated malignancies and might also play a role in the initiation and progression of cancer in the general population.

  15. "Social separation" among women under 40 years of age diagnosed with breast cancer and carrying a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation.

    PubMed

    Kenen, Regina; Ardern-Jones, Audrey; Eeles, Rosalind

    2006-06-01

    We conducted an exploratory, qualitative study investigating experiences of women who had developed breast cancer under the age of 40 and who were identified as BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. These germline mutation carriers face an increased lifetime risk of a second primary breast cancer and an increased risk for a primary ovarian cancer. Thirteen women who fit this criteria participated in three focus groups conducted at a major cancer center in the UK during Spring 2003. We asked broad, open-ended questions that allowed for a wide range of responses about their cancer and genetic testing experiences, physical and psycho-social concerns, family and partner reactions and their need for social support. The women expressed feelings of devastation, loneliness, feeling different and isolation, ambivalence about having to support family members, worries about partner's anxiety and depression, and anxiety about talking to family members, especially children. These feelings were stronger after the cancer diagnosis and compounded by the genetic test results that occurred at a later time. We also found that, at least temporarily, the women experienced what we call "social separation"--emotional distance from, or dissonance with groups they interact with or are part of, e.g., family and friends, frequently leading to a reduction in communication or a change in previously unstated, but accepted normal interaction. We concentrate on a few characteristics of social separation-feelings of aloneness, isolation and separation, use of silence and verbal discretion, the relationship between estrangement and kinship interaction and norm disruption, and are looking at social patterns of interpersonal relationships that may occur when risk and illness statuses are new and framing and feeling rules have not as yet been clearly developed due to a cultural lag.

  16. Screening for BRCA1, BRCA2, CHEK2, PALB2, BRIP1, RAD50, and CDH1 mutations in high-risk Finnish BRCA1/2-founder mutation-negative breast and/or ovarian cancer individuals.

    PubMed

    Kuusisto, Kirsi M; Bebel, Aleksandra; Vihinen, Mauno; Schleutker, Johanna; Sallinen, Satu-Leena

    2011-02-28

    Two major high-penetrance breast cancer genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2, are responsible for approximately 20% of hereditary breast cancer (HBC) cases in Finland. Additionally, rare mutations in several other genes that interact with BRCA1 and BRCA2 increase the risk of HBC. Still, a majority of HBC cases remain unexplained which is challenging for genetic counseling. We aimed to analyze additional mutations in HBC-associated genes and to define the sensitivity of our current BRCA1/2 mutation analysis protocol used in genetic counseling. Eighty-two well-characterized, high-risk hereditary breast and/or ovarian cancer (HBOC) BRCA1/2-founder mutation-negative Finnish individuals, were screened for germline alterations in seven breast cancer susceptibility genes, BRCA1, BRCA2, CHEK2, PALB2, BRIP1, RAD50, and CDH1. BRCA1/2 were analyzed by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) and direct sequencing. CHEK2 was analyzed by the high resolution melt (HRM) method and PALB2, RAD50, BRIP1 and CDH1 were analyzed by direct sequencing. Carrier frequencies between 82 (HBOC) BRCA1/2-founder mutation-negative Finnish individuals and 384 healthy Finnish population controls were compared by using Fisher's exact test. In silico prediction for novel missense variants effects was carried out by using Pathogenic-Or-Not -Pipeline (PON-P). Three previously reported breast cancer-associated variants, BRCA1 c.5095C > T, CHEK2 c.470T > C, and CHEK2 c.1100delC, were observed in eleven (13.4%) individuals. Ten of these individuals (12.2%) had CHEK2 variants, c.470T > C and/or c.1100delC. Fourteen novel sequence alterations and nine individuals with more than one non-synonymous variant were identified. One of the novel variants, BRCA2 c.72A > T (Leu24Phe) was predicted to be likely pathogenic in silico. No large genomic rearrangements were detected in BRCA1/2 by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA). In this study, mutations in previously known breast cancer

  17. Evaluation of the needs of spouses of female carriers of mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2.

    PubMed

    Metcalfe, K A; Liede, A; Trinkaus, M; Hanna, D; Narod, S A

    2002-12-01

    The process of genetic testing involves the entire family, including spouses. The objective of this study was to measure the specific needs and to describe the experiences of spouses of women who received genetic counseling for a positive BRCA1/2 result. We surveyed 59 spouses of female mutation carriers. The mean length of relationships was 26 years (range: 2.5-50 years). All were supportive of their spouses' decision to undergo genetic testing and counselling. Four respondents stated that they wished that they had received additional support at the time of test disclosure and 20% felt that their wives had received inadequate support. One-quarter of the spouses believed that their relationship had changed because of genetic testing; most felt that they had become closer to their wives. Husbands were most concerned about the risk of their wife dying of cancer (43%), followed by the risk of their spouse developing cancer (19%) and the risk that their children would test positive for the BRCA mutation (14%). Distress levels, measured by the Impact of Event scale, suggest that few spouses were experiencing clinical levels of distress.

  18. The BRCA2 polymorphic stop codon: stuff or nonsense?

    PubMed

    Higgs, J E; Harkness, E F; Bowers, N L; Howard, E; Wallace, A J; Lalloo, F; Newman, W G; Evans, D G

    2015-09-01

    Despite classification of the BRCA2c.9976A>T, p.(Lys3326Ter) variant as a polymorphism, it has been associated with increased risks of pancreatic, lung, oesophageal and breast cancer. We have noticed multiple co-occurrences of the BRCA2 c.9976A>T variant with the pathogenic BRCA2c.6275_6276delTT frameshift mutation p.(Leu2092ProfsTer7) and using a cohort study have assessed if this might account for these tumour risk associations. We identified 52 families with BRCA2c.6275_6276delTT, all of which occur in cis with the BRCA2c.9976A>T variant allele as demonstrated by co-segregation in all family members tested. Of 3245 breast/ovarian cancer samples sequenced for BRCA2, only 43/3245 (1.3%) carried BRCA2 c.9976A>T alone, after excluding individuals with BRCA2c.6275_6276delTT (n=22) or other BRCA1 (n=3) or BRCA2 (n=2) pathogenic mutations. The resultant frequency (1.3%) after removal of co-occurring mutations is lower than the 1.7% and 1.67% frequencies from two control populations for BRCA2 c.9976A>T, but similar to the 1.39% seen in the Exome Aggregation Consortium database. We did not identify increased frequencies of oesophageal, pancreatic or lung cancer in families with just BRCA2 c.9976A>T using person-years at risk analysis. It is likely that the previous associations of increased cancer risks due to BRCA2c.9976A>T represent reporting bias and are contributed to because the variant is in LD with BRCA2c.6275_6276delTT. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  19. Randomized Controlled Trial of a Psychosocial Telephone Counseling Intervention in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Graves, Kristi D.; Wenzel, Lari; Schwartz, Marc D.; Luta, George; Wileyto, Paul; Narod, Steven; Peshkin, Beth N.; Marcus, Alfred; Cella, David; Emsbo, Susan Powell; Barnes, Denise; Halbert, Chanita Hughes

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Responses following BRCA1/2 genetic testing are relevant for comprehension of risk status and may play a role in risk management decision making. The objective of this study was to evaluate a Psychosocial Telephone Counseling (PTC) intervention delivered to BRCA1/2 mutation carriers following standard genetic counseling (SGC). We examined the impact of the intervention on distress and concerns related to genetic testing. Patients and Methods This prospective randomized clinical trial included 90 BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. We measured anxiety, depression, and genetic testing distress outcomes at intervention baseline and 6- and 12-months following disclosure. We evaluated the effects of SGC versus SGC plus PTC on psychological outcomes using intention-to-treat analyses through Generalized Estimating Equations. Results At 6 months, PTC reduced depressive symptoms (Z = −2.25, P = .02) and genetic testing distress (Z = 2.18, P = .02) compared to standard genetic counseling. Further, women in the intervention condition reported less clinically-significant anxiety at 6 months (χ21 = 4.11, P = .04) than women who received SGC. We found no differences in outcomes between the intervention groups at the 12-month follow-up. Conclusions As an adjunct to SGC, psychosocial telephone counseling delivered following disclosure of positive BRCA1/2 test results appears to offer modest benefits for distress and anxiety. These results build upon a growing literature of psychosocial interventions for BRCA1/2 carriers and, given the potential impact of affect on risk management decision making, suggest that some carriers may derive benefits from adjuncts to traditional genetic counseling. PMID:20200423

  20. BRCA1, BRCA2 and PALB2 mutations and CHEK2 c.1100delC in different South African ethnic groups diagnosed with premenopausal and/or triple negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Francies, F Z; Wainstein, T; De Leeneer, K; Cairns, A; Murdoch, M; Nietz, S; Cubasch, H; Poppe, B; Van Maerken, T; Crombez, B; Coene, I; Kerr, R; Slabbert, J P; Vral, A; Krause, A; Baeyens, A; Claes, K B M

    2015-11-17

    Current knowledge of the aetiology of hereditary breast cancer in the four main South African population groups (black, coloured, Indian and white) is limited. Risk assessments in the black, coloured and Indian population groups are challenging because of restricted information regarding the underlying genetic contributions to inherited breast cancer in these populations. We focused this study on premenopausal patients (diagnosed with breast cancer before the age of 50; n = 78) and triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) patients (n = 30) from the four South African ethnic groups. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency and spectrum of germline mutations in BRCA1, BRCA2 and PALB2 and to evaluate the presence of the CHEK2 c.1100delC allele in these patients. In total, 108 South African breast cancer patients underwent mutation screening using a Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) approach in combination with Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA) to detect large rearrangements in BRCA1 and BRCA2. In 13 (12 %) patients a deleterious mutation in BRCA1/2 was detected, three of which were novel mutations in black patients. None of the study participants was found to have an unequivocal pathogenic mutation in PALB2. Two (white) patients tested positive for the CHEK2 c.1100delC mutation, however, one of these also carried a deleterious BRCA2 mutation. Additionally, six variants of unknown clinical significance were identified (4 in BRCA2, 2 in PALB2), all in black patients. Within the group of TNBC patients, a higher mutation frequency was obtained (23.3 %; 7/30) than in the group of patients diagnosed before the age of 50 (7.7 %; 6/78). This study highlights the importance of evaluating germline mutations in major breast cancer genes in all of the South African population groups. This NGS study shows that mutation analysis is warranted in South African patients with triple negative and/or in premenopausal breast cancer.

  1. Population Testing for Cancer Predisposing BRCA1/BRCA2 Mutations in the Ashkenazi-Jewish Community: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Manchanda, Ranjit; Loggenberg, Kelly; Sanderson, Saskia; Burnell, Matthew; Wardle, Jane; Gessler, Sue; Side, Lucy; Balogun, Nyala; Desai, Rakshit; Kumar, Ajith; Dorkins, Huw; Wallis, Yvonne; Chapman, Cyril; Taylor, Rohan; Jacobs, Chris; Tomlinson, Ian; McGuire, Alistair; Beller, Uziel; Menon, Usha

    2015-01-01

    Background: Technological advances raise the possibility of systematic population-based genetic testing for cancer-predisposing mutations, but it is uncertain whether benefits outweigh disadvantages. We directly compared the psychological/quality-of-life consequences of such an approach to family history (FH)–based testing. Methods: In a randomized controlled trial of BRCA1/2 gene-mutation testing in the Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ) population, we compared testing all participants in the population screening (PS) arm with testing those fulfilling standard FH-based clinical criteria (FH arm). Following a targeted community campaign, AJ participants older than 18 years were recruited by self-referral after pretest genetic counseling. The effects of BRCA1/2 genetic testing on acceptability, psychological impact, and quality-of-life measures were assessed by random effects regression analysis. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: One thousand, one hundred sixty-eight AJ individuals were counseled, 1042 consented, 1034 were randomly assigned (691 women, 343 men), and 1017 were eligible for analysis. Mean age was 54.3 (SD = 14.66) years. Thirteen BRCA1/2 carriers were identified in the PS arm, nine in the FH arm. Five more carriers were detected among FH-negative FH-arm participants following study completion. There were no statistically significant differences between the FH and PS arms at seven days or three months on measures of anxiety, depression, health anxiety, distress, uncertainty, and quality-of-life. Contrast tests indicated that overall anxiety (P = .0001) and uncertainty (P = .005) associated with genetic testing decreased; positive experience scores increased (P = .0001); quality-of-life and health anxiety did not change with time. Overall, 56% of carriers did not fulfill clinical criteria for genetic testing, and the BRCA1/2 prevalence was 2.45%. Conclusion: Compared with FH-based testing, population-based genetic testing in Ashkenazi Jews doesn

  2. Ovarian cancer in BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutation carriers: analysis of prognostic factors and survival

    PubMed Central

    Biglia, Nicoletta; Sgandurra, Paola; Bounous, Valentina Elisabetta; Maggiorotto, Furio; Piva, Eleonora; Pivetta, Emanuele; Ponzone, Riccardo; Pasini, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To compare clinical–pathological characteristics and outcome between sporadic ovarian cancer and ovarian cancer in patents with hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome (HBOC). Methods Twenty-four patients with ovarian cancer treated between 2000 and 2009 who tested positive for BRCA1/2 mutation (BRCA+) and a control group of 64 age-matched patients with no family history of breast/ovarian cancer (controls) were enrolled. Clinical–pathological characteristics, surgical outcome, overall (OS), and progression-free survival (PFS) were compared between the two groups. Results The high-grade serous histotype was more represented in BRCA+ than in controls (70.8% versus 53.1%) (p > 0.05). BRCA+ cancers were more frequently diagnosed at stage II than controls (20.83% versus 4.69%) (p = 0.024). Radical primary surgery was performed in 70% of women in both groups, with no difference in debulking results. In patients undergoing surgery after neoadjuvant chemotherapy, in all BRCA+ patients, optimal cytoreduction was achieved (versus 70% of the controls). PFS was significantly longer for BRCA+ patients compared to controls (60 months versus 22 months; p = 0.039). No significant difference was observed in OS between BRCA+ patients and controls. Conclusions At a median follow-up time of 46 months, BRCA+ patients have a better prognosis than controls in terms of PFS. Higher chemosensitivity of BRCA+ tumours was observed. PMID:27350785

  3. Evaluation of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation prevalence, risk prediction models and a multistep testing approach in French‐Canadian families with high risk of breast and ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Simard, Jacques; Dumont, Martine; Moisan, Anne‐Marie; Gaborieau, Valérie; Vézina, Hélène; Durocher, Francine; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Plante, Marie; Avard, Denise; Bessette, Paul; Brousseau, Claire; Dorval, Michel; Godard, Béatrice; Houde, Louis; Joly, Yann; Lajoie, Marie‐Andrée; Leblanc, Gilles; Lépine, Jean; Lespérance, Bernard; Malouin, Hélène; Parboosingh, Jillian; Pichette, Roxane; Provencher, Louise; Rhéaume, Josée; Sinnett, Daniel; Samson, Carolle; Simard, Jean‐Claude; Tranchant, Martine; Voyer, Patricia; BRCAs, INHERIT; Easton, Douglas; Tavtigian, Sean V; Knoppers, Bartha‐Maria; Laframboise, Rachel; Bridge, Peter; Goldgar, David

    2007-01-01

    Background and objective In clinical settings with fixed resources allocated to predictive genetic testing for high‐risk cancer predisposition genes, optimal strategies for mutation screening programmes are critically important. These depend on the mutation spectrum found in the population under consideration and the frequency of mutations detected as a function of the personal and family history of cancer, which are both affected by the presence of founder mutations and demographic characteristics of the underlying population. The results of multistep genetic testing for mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 in a large series of families with breast cancer in the French‐Canadian population of Quebec, Canada are reported. Methods A total of 256 high‐risk families were ascertained from regional familial cancer clinics throughout the province of Quebec. Initially, families were tested for a panel of specific mutations known to occur in this population. Families in which no mutation was identified were then comprehensively tested. Three algorithms to predict the presence of mutations were evaluated, including the prevalence tables provided by Myriad Genetics Laboratories, the Manchester Scoring System and a logistic regression approach based on the data from this study. Results 8 of the 15 distinct mutations found in 62 BRCA1/BRCA2‐positive families had never been previously reported in this population, whereas 82% carried 1 of the 4 mutations currently observed in ⩾2 families. In the subset of 191 families in which at least 1 affected individual was tested, 29% carried a mutation. Of these 27 BRCA1‐positive and 29 BRCA2‐positive families, 48 (86%) were found to harbour a mutation detected by the initial test. Among the remaining 143 inconclusive families, all 8 families found to have a mutation after complete sequencing had Manchester Scores ⩾18. The logistic regression and Manchester Scores provided equal predictive power, and both were significantly better

  4. EMMA, a cost- and time-effective diagnostic method for simultaneous detection of point mutations and large-scale genomic rearrangements: application to BRCA1 and BRCA2 in 1,525 patients.

    PubMed

    Caux-Moncoutier, Virginie; Castéra, Laurent; Tirapo, Carole; Michaux, Dorothée; Rémon, Marie-Alice; Laugé, Anthony; Rouleau, Etienne; De Pauw, Antoine; Buecher, Bruno; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Viovy, Jean-Louis; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Houdayer, Claude

    2011-03-01

    The detection of unknown mutations remains a serious challenge and, despite the expected benefits for the patient's health, a large number of genes are not screened on a routine basis. We present the diagnostic application of EMMA (Enhanced Mismatch Mutation Analysis(®) , Fluigent, Paris, France), a novel method based on heteroduplex analysis by capillary electrophoresis using innovative matrices. BRCA1 and BRCA2 were screened for point mutations and large rearrangements in 1,525 unrelated patients (372 for the validation step and 1,153 in routine diagnosis) using a single analytical condition. Seven working days were needed for complete BRCA1/2 screening in 30 patients by one technician (excluding DNA extraction and sequencing). A total of 137 mutations were found, including a BRCA2 duplication of exons 19 and 20, previously missed by Comprehensive BRACAnalysis(®) . The mutation detection rate was 11.9%, which is consistent with patient inclusions. This study therefore suggests that EMMA represents a valuable short-term and midterm option for many diagnostic laboratories looking for an easy, reliable, and affordable strategy, enabling fast and sensitive analysis for a large number of genes. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Risk of Asynchronous Contralateral Breast Cancer in Noncarriers of BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutations With a Family History of Breast Cancer: A Report From the Women's Environmental Cancer and Radiation Epidemiology Study

    PubMed Central

    Reiner, Anne S.; John, Esther M.; Brooks, Jennifer D.; Lynch, Charles F.; Bernstein, Leslie; Mellemkjær, Lene; Malone, Kathleen E.; Knight, Julia A.; Capanu, Marinela; Teraoka, Sharon N.; Concannon, Patrick; Liang, Xiaolin; Figueiredo, Jane C.; Smith, Susan A.; Stovall, Marilyn; Pike, Malcolm C.; Haile, Robert W.; Thomas, Duncan C.; Begg, Colin B.; Bernstein, Jonine L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To fully characterize the risk of contralateral breast cancer (CBC) in patients with breast cancer with a family history who test negative for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations. Patients and Methods From our population-based case-control study comparing women with CBC to women with unilateral breast cancer (UBC), we selected women who tested negative for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations (594 patients with CBC/1,119 control patients with UBC). Rate ratios (RRs) and 95% CIs were estimated to examine the association between family history of breast cancer and risk of asynchronous CBC. Age- and family history–specific 10-year cumulative absolute risks of CBC were estimated. Results Family history of breast cancer was associated with increased CBC risk; risk was highest among young women (< 45 years) with first-degree relatives affected at young ages (< 45 years; RR, 2.5; 95% CI, 1.1 to 5.3) or women with first-degree relatives with bilateral disease (RR, 3.6; 95% CI, 2.0 to 6.4). Women diagnosed with UBC before age 55 years with a first-degree family history of CBC had a 10-year risk of CBC of 15.6%. Conclusion Young women with breast cancer who have a family history of breast cancer and who test negative for deleterious mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 are at significantly greater risk of CBC than other breast cancer survivors. This risk varies with diagnosis age, family history of CBC, and degree of relationship to an affected relative. Women with a first-degree family history of bilateral disease have risks of CBC similar to mutation carriers. This has important implications for the clinical management of patients with breast cancer with family history of the disease. PMID:23269995

  6. Risk of asynchronous contralateral breast cancer in noncarriers of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations with a family history of breast cancer: a report from the Women's Environmental Cancer and Radiation Epidemiology Study.

    PubMed

    Reiner, Anne S; John, Esther M; Brooks, Jennifer D; Lynch, Charles F; Bernstein, Leslie; Mellemkjær, Lene; Malone, Kathleen E; Knight, Julia A; Capanu, Marinela; Teraoka, Sharon N; Concannon, Patrick; Liang, Xiaolin; Figueiredo, Jane C; Smith, Susan A; Stovall, Marilyn; Pike, Malcolm C; Haile, Robert W; Thomas, Duncan C; Begg, Colin B; Bernstein, Jonine L

    2013-02-01

    To fully characterize the risk of contralateral breast cancer (CBC) in patients with breast cancer with a family history who test negative for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations. From our population-based case-control study comparing women with CBC to women with unilateral breast cancer (UBC), we selected women who tested negative for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations (594 patients with CBC/1,119 control patients with UBC). Rate ratios (RRs) and 95% CIs were estimated to examine the association between family history of breast cancer and risk of asynchronous CBC. Age- and family history-specific 10-year cumulative absolute risks of CBC were estimated. Family history of breast cancer was associated with increased CBC risk; risk was highest among young women (< 45 years) with first-degree relatives affected at young ages (< 45 years; RR, 2.5; 95% CI, 1.1 to 5.3) or women with first-degree relatives with bilateral disease (RR, 3.6; 95% CI, 2.0 to 6.4). Women diagnosed with UBC before age 55 years with a first-degree family history of CBC had a 10-year risk of CBC of 15.6%. Young women with breast cancer who have a family history of breast cancer and who test negative for deleterious mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 are at significantly greater risk of CBC than other breast cancer survivors. This risk varies with diagnosis age, family history of CBC, and degree of relationship to an affected relative. Women with a first-degree family history of bilateral disease have risks of CBC similar to mutation carriers. This has important implications for the clinical management of patients with breast cancer with family history of the disease.

  7. BRCA2 function in DNA binding and recombination from a BRCA2-DSS1-ssDNA structure.

    PubMed

    Yang, Haijuan; Jeffrey, Philip D; Miller, Julie; Kinnucan, Elspeth; Sun, Yutong; Thoma, Nicolas H; Zheng, Ning; Chen, Phang-Lang; Lee, Wen-Hwa; Pavletich, Nikola P

    2002-09-13

    Mutations in the BRCA2 (breast cancer susceptibility gene 2) tumor suppressor lead to chromosomal instability due to defects in the repair of double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs) by homologous recombination, but BRCA2's role in this process has been unclear. Here, we present the 3.1 angstrom crystal structure of a approximately 90-kilodalton BRCA2 domain bound to DSS1, which reveals three oligonucleotide-binding (OB) folds and a helix-turn-helix (HTH) motif. We also (i) demonstrate that this BRCA2 domain binds single-stranded DNA, (ii) present its 3.5 angstrom structure bound to oligo(dT)9, (iii) provide data that implicate the HTH motif in dsDNA binding, and (iv) show that BRCA2 stimulates RAD51-mediated recombination in vitro. These findings establish that BRCA2 functions directly in homologous recombination and provide a structural and biochemical basis for understanding the loss of recombination-mediated DSB repair in BRCA2-associated cancers.

  8. Phase I/Ib study of olaparib and carboplatin in BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation-associated breast or ovarian cancer with biomarker analyses.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung-Min; Hays, John L; Annunziata, Christina M; Noonan, Anne M; Minasian, Lori; Zujewski, Jo Anne; Yu, Minshu; Gordon, Nicolas; Ji, Jiuping; Sissung, Tristan M; Figg, William D; Azad, Nilofer; Wood, Bradford J; Doroshow, James; Kohn, Elise C

    2014-06-01

    Olaparib has single-agent activity against breast/ovarian cancer (BrCa/OvCa) in germline BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers (gBRCAm). We hypothesized addition of olaparib to carboplatin can be administered safely and yield preliminary clinical activity. Eligible patients had measurable or evaluable disease, gBRCAm, and good end-organ function. A 3 + 3 dose escalation tested daily oral capsule olaparib (100 or 200mg every 12 hours; dose level1 or 2) with carboplatin area under the curve (AUC) on day 8 (AUC3 day 8), then every 21 days. For dose levels 3 to 6, patients were given olaparib days 1 to 7 at 200 and 400 mg every 12 hours, with carboplatin AUC3 to 5 on day 1 or 2 every 21 days; a maximum of eight combination cycles were permitted, after which daily maintenance of olaparib 400mg every12 hours continued until progression. Dose-limiting toxicity was defined in the first two cycles. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were collected for polymorphism analysis and polyADP-ribose incorporation. Paired tumor biopsies (before/after cycle 1) were obtained for biomarker proteomics and apoptosis endpoints. Forty-five women (37 OvCa/8 BrCa) were treated. Dose-limiting toxicity was not reached on the intermittent schedule. Expansion proceeded with olaparib 400mg every 12 hours on days 1 to 7/carboplatin AUC5. Grade 3/4 adverse events included neutropenia (42.2%), thrombocytopenia (20.0%), and anemia (15.6%). Responses included 1 complete response (1 BrCa; 23 months) and 21 partial responses (50.0%; 15 OvCa; 6 BrCa; median = 16 [4 to >45] in OvCa and 10 [6 to >40] months in BrCa). Proteomic analysis suggests high pretreatment pS209-eIF4E and FOXO3a correlated with duration of response (two-sided P < .001; Pearson's R (2) = 0.94). Olaparib capsules 400mg every 12 hours on days 1 to 7/carboplatin AUC5 is safe and has activity in gBRCAm BrCa/OvCa patients. Exploratory translational studies indicate pretreatment tissue FOXO3a expression may be predictive for response to therapy

  9. Association of breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers with genetic variants showing differential allelic expression: identification of a modifier of breast cancer risk at locus 11q22.3.

    PubMed

    Hamdi, Yosr; Soucy, Penny; Kuchenbaeker, Karoline B; Pastinen, Tomi; Droit, Arnaud; Lemaçon, Audrey; Adlard, Julian; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Andrulis, Irene L; Arason, Adalgeir; Arnold, Norbert; Arun, Banu K; Azzollini, Jacopo; Bane, Anita; Barjhoux, Laure; Barrowdale, Daniel; Benitez, Javier; Berthet, Pascaline; Blok, Marinus J; Bobolis, Kristie; Bonadona, Valérie; Bonanni, Bernardo; Bradbury, Angela R; Brewer, Carole; Buecher, Bruno; Buys, Saundra S; Caligo, Maria A; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Chung, Wendy K; Claes, Kathleen B M; Daly, Mary B; Damiola, Francesca; Davidson, Rosemarie; De la Hoya, Miguel; De Leeneer, Kim; Diez, Orland; Ding, Yuan Chun; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Domchek, Susan M; Dorfling, Cecilia M; Eccles, Diana; Eeles, Ros; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Ejlertsen, Bent; Engel, Christoph; Gareth Evans, D; Feliubadalo, Lidia; Foretova, Lenka; Fostira, Florentia; Foulkes, William D; Fountzilas, George; Friedman, Eitan; Frost, Debra; Ganschow, Pamela; Ganz, Patricia A; Garber, Judy; Gayther, Simon A; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Glendon, Gord; Godwin, Andrew K; Goldgar, David E; Greene, Mark H; Gronwald, Jacek; Hahnen, Eric; Hamann, Ute; Hansen, Thomas V O; Hart, Steven; Hays, John L; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Hulick, Peter J; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Isaacs, Claudine; Izatt, Louise; Jakubowska, Anna; James, Paul; Janavicius, Ramunas; Jensen, Uffe Birk; John, Esther M; Joseph, Vijai; Just, Walter; Kaczmarek, Katarzyna; Karlan, Beth Y; Kets, Carolien M; Kirk, Judy; Kriege, Mieke; Laitman, Yael; Laurent, Maïté; Lazaro, Conxi; Leslie, Goska; Lester, Jenny; Lesueur, Fabienne; Liljegren, Annelie; Loman, Niklas; Loud, Jennifer T; Manoukian, Siranoush; Mariani, Milena; Mazoyer, Sylvie; McGuffog, Lesley; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E J; Meindl, Alfons; Miller, Austin; Montagna, Marco; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Nathanson, Katherine L; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Nussbaum, Robert L; Olah, Edith; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Ong, Kai-Ren; Oosterwijk, Jan C; Osorio, Ana; Papi, Laura; Park, Sue Kyung; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Peissel, Bernard; Segura, Pedro Perez; Peterlongo, Paolo; Phelan, Catherine M; Radice, Paolo; Rantala, Johanna; Rappaport-Fuerhauser, Christine; Rennert, Gad; Richardson, Andrea; Robson, Mark; Rodriguez, Gustavo C; Rookus, Matti A; Schmutzler, Rita Katharina; Sevenet, Nicolas; Shah, Payal D; Singer, Christian F; Slavin, Thomas P; Snape, Katie; Sokolowska, Johanna; Sønderstrup, Ida Marie Heeholm; Southey, Melissa; Spurdle, Amanda B; Stadler, Zsofia; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Sutter, Christian; Tan, Yen; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Teixeira, Manuel R; Teulé, Alex; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Mary Beth; Thomassen, Mads; Tihomirova, Laima; Tischkowitz, Marc; Tognazzo, Silvia; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Tung, Nadine; van den Ouweland, Ans M W; van der Luijt, Rob B; van Engelen, Klaartje; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Wijnen, Juul T; Rebbeck, Timothy; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Offit, Kenneth; Couch, Fergus J; Nord, Silje; Easton, Douglas F; Antoniou, Antonis C; Simard, Jacques

    2017-01-01

    Cis-acting regulatory SNPs resulting in differential allelic expression (DAE) may, in part, explain the underlying phenotypic variation associated with many complex diseases. To investigate whether common variants associated with DAE were involved in breast cancer susceptibility among BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, a list of 175 genes was developed based of their involvement in cancer-related pathways. Using data from a genome-wide map of SNPs associated with allelic expression, we assessed the association of ~320 SNPs located in the vicinity of these genes with breast and ovarian cancer risks in 15,252 BRCA1 and 8211 BRCA2 mutation carriers ascertained from 54 studies participating in the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2. We identified a region on 11q22.3 that is significantly associated with breast cancer risk in BRCA1 mutation carriers (most significant SNP rs228595 p = 7 × 10(-6)). This association was absent in BRCA2 carriers (p = 0.57). The 11q22.3 region notably encompasses genes such as ACAT1, NPAT, and ATM. Expression quantitative trait loci associations were observed in both normal breast and tumors across this region, namely for ACAT1, ATM, and other genes. In silico analysis revealed some overlap between top risk-associated SNPs and relevant biological features in mammary cell data, which suggests potential functional significance. We identified 11q22.3 as a new modifier locus in BRCA1 carriers. Replication in larger studies using estrogen receptor (ER)-negative or triple-negative (i.e., ER-, progesterone receptor-, and HER2-negative) cases could therefore be helpful to confirm the association of this locus with breast cancer risk.

  10. Murine Brca2: Sequence, map position, and expression pattern

    SciTech Connect

    Sharan, S.K.; Bradley, A.

    1997-03-01

    Mutations in the human BRCA2 gene are responsible for about 45% of hereditary early onset breast cancer. Recently, the human BRCA2 gene was cloned, and several germline mutations were identified. Here we describe the cloning of the mouse homologue of BRCA2. The mouse cDNA sequence predicts a 3328-amino-acid Brca2 protein, 90 amino acids shorter than the human protein. The overall identity between the mouse and the human proteins is 59%, while the similarity is 72%. At the nucleotide level the homology is 74%. By comparing the amino acid sequences of the two homologues we have identified five highly conserved novel domains that may be functionally significant. Brca2 has been mapped to the distal end of mouse chromosome 5, a region of the mouse genome that contains other genes that also map to human chromosome 13q12-q13, confirming the conservation of this linkage group between the two species. Expression of Brca2 was detected in midgestation embryos and adult testis, thymus, and ovary. 21 refs., 5 figs.

  11. Quantitative analysis of γ-H2AX and p53 nuclear expression levels in ovarian and fallopian tube epithelium from risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomies in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Staff, Synnöve; Tolonen, Teemu; Laasanen, Satu-Leena; Mecklin, Jukka-Pekka; Isola, Jorma; Mäenpää, Johanna

    2014-05-01

    Mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes confer an increased lifetime risk for breast and ovarian cancer. Increased lifetime ovarian cancer risk among BRCA1/BRCA2 mutation carriers can be substantially decreased by risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy (RRSO), which also provides material for molecular research on early pathogenesis of serous ovarian cancer. RRSO studies have suggested fallopian tube as a primary site of serous high-grade ovarian cancer. In this study, the nuclear expression levels of γ-H2AX and p53 using immunohistochemical (IHC) study was quantitatively assessed in ovarian and fallopian tube epithelium derived from RRSOs in 29 BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers and in 1 patient with a strong family history of breast and ovarian cancer but showing an unknown BRCA status. Both p53 and γ-H2AX nuclear staining levels were significantly higher in BRCA1/2 mutation-positive fallopian tube epithelium compared with the control fallopian tube epithelium (P<0.006 and P=0.011, respectively). Nuclear expression levels of p53 and γ-H2AX were similar between the BRCA1/2 mutation-positive ovarian epithelium and controls. Both γ-H2AX and p53 showed significantly higher nuclear expression levels in BRCA1/2 mutation-positive fallopian tube epithelium compared with BRCA1/2 mutation-positive ovarian epithelium (P<0.0001 and P<0.0001, respectively). BRCA1/2 mutation-positive fallopian tube epithelium showed a positive correlation between the γ-H2AX and p53 nuclear expression levels (Pearson r=0.508, P=0.003). Our results of quantitative nuclear p53 and γ-H2AX expression levels in ovarian and fallopian tube epithelium derived from RRSO in high-risk patients support the previously suggested role of fallopian tube epithelium serving as a possible site of initial serous ovarian carcinogenesis.

  12. Synthetic viability by BRCA2 and PARP1/ARTD1 deficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Xia; Chaudhuri, Arnab Ray; Callen, Elsa; Pang, Yan; Biswas, Kajal; Klarmann, Kimberly D.; Martin, Betty K.; Burkett, Sandra; Cleveland, Linda; Stauffer, Stacey; Sullivan, Teresa; Dewan, Aashish; Marks, Hanna; Tubbs, Anthony T.; Wong, Nancy; Buehler, Eugen; Akagi, Keiko; Martin, Scott E.; Keller, Jonathan R.; Nussenzweig, André; Sharan, Shyam K.

    2016-01-01

    Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitor (PARPi) olaparib has been approved for treatment of advanced ovarian cancer associated with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations. BRCA1- and BRCA2-mutated cells, which are homologous recombination (HR) deficient, are hypersensitive to PARPi through the mechanism of synthetic lethality. Here we examine the effect of PARPi on HR-proficient cells. Olaparib pretreatment, PARP1 knockdown or Parp1 heterozygosity of Brca2cko/ko mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs), carrying a null (ko) and a conditional (cko) allele of Brca2, results in viable Brca2ko/ko cells. PARP1 deficiency does not restore HR in Brca2ko/ko cells, but protects stalled replication forks from MRE11-mediated degradation through its impaired recruitment. The functional consequence of Parp1 heterozygosity on BRCA2 loss is demonstrated by a significant increase in tumorigenesis in Brca2cko/cko mice. Thus, while olaparib efficiently kills BRCA2-deficient cells, we demonstrate that it can also contribute to the synthetic viability if PARP is inhibited before BRCA2 loss. PMID:27498558

  13. The occurrence of germline BRCA1 and BRCA2 sequence alterations in Slovenian population

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation spectrum and mutation detection rates according to different family histories were investigated in 521 subjects from 322 unrelated Slovenian cancer families with breast and/or ovarian cancer. Methods The BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes were screened using DGGE, PTT, HRM, MLPA and direct sequencing. Results Eighteen different mutations were found in BRCA1 and 13 in BRCA2 gene. Mutations in one or other gene were found in 96 unrelated families. The mutation detection rates were the highest in the families with at least one breast and at least one ovarian cancer - 42% for BRCA1 and 8% for BRCA2. The mutation detection rate observed in the families with at least two breast cancers with disease onset before the age of 50 years and no ovarian cancer was 23% for BRCA1 and 13% for BRCA2. The mutation detection rate in the families with at least two breast cancers and only one with the disease onset before the age of 50 years was 11% for BRCA1 and 8% for BRCA2. In the families with at least two breast cancers, all of them with disease onset over the age of 50 years, the detection rate was 5% for BRCA2 and 0% for BRCA1. Conclusion Among the mutations detected in Slovenian population, 5 mutations in BRCA1 and 4 mutations in BRCA2 have not been described in other populations until now. The most frequent mutations in our population were c.181T > G, c.1687C > T, c.5266dupC and c.844_850dupTCATTAC in BRCA1 gene and c.7806-2A > G, c.5291C > G and c.3978insTGCT in BRCA2 gene (detected in 69% of BRCA1 and BRCA2 positive families). PMID:21232165

  14. Phase II, open-label, randomized, multicenter study comparing the efficacy and safety of olaparib, a poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitor, and pegylated liposomal doxorubicin in patients with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations and recurrent ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Kaye, Stan B; Lubinski, Jan; Matulonis, Ursula; Ang, Joo Ern; Gourley, Charlie; Karlan, Beth Y; Amnon, Amit; Bell-McGuinn, Katherine M; Chen, Lee-May; Friedlander, Michael; Safra, Tamar; Vergote, Ignace; Wickens, Mark; Lowe, Elizabeth S; Carmichael, James; Kaufman, Bella

    2012-02-01

    Olaparib (AZD2281), an orally active poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitor that induces synthetic lethality in BRCA1- or BRCA2-deficient cells, has shown promising clinical efficacy in nonrandomized phase II trials in patients with ovarian cancer with BRCA1 or BRCA2 deficiency. We assessed the comparative efficacy and safety of olaparib and pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) in this patient population. In this multicenter, open-label, randomized, phase II study, patients with ovarian cancer that recurred within 12 months of prior platinum therapy and with confirmed germline BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations were enrolled. Patients were assigned in a 1:1:1 ratio to olaparib 200 mg twice per day or 400 mg twice per day continuously or PLD 50 mg/m(2) intravenously every 28 days. The primary efficacy end point was Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) -assessed progression-free survival (PFS). Secondary end points included objective response rate (ORR) and safety. Ninety-seven patients were randomly assigned. Median PFS was 6.5 months (95% CI, 5.5 to 10.1 months), 8.8 months (95% CI, 5.4 to 9.2 months), and 7.1 months (95% CI, 3.7 to 10.7 months) for the olaparib 200 mg, olaparib 400 mg, and PLD groups, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference in PFS (hazard ratio, 0.88; 95% CI, 0.51 to 1.56; P = .66) for combined olaparib doses versus PLD. RECIST-assessed ORRs were 25%, 31%, and 18% for olaparib 200 mg, olaparib 400 mg, and PLD, respectively; differences were not statistically significant. Tolerability of both treatments was as expected based on previous trials. The efficacy of olaparib was consistent with previous studies. However, the efficacy of PLD was greater than expected. Olaparib 400 mg twice per day is a suitable dose to explore in further studies in this patient population.

  15. Prognosis of probability of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations carriage in women with compromised family history of breast and/or ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Rybchenko, L A; Bychkova, A M; Skyban, G V; Klymenko, S V

    2013-01-01

    Obtjazhenist' simejnogo anamnezu shhodo raku molochnoi' zalozy ta/abo raku jajechnykiv mozhe svidchyty pro nosijstvo mutacii' v BRCA1 ta BRCA2 genah. Meta: ocinyty ta porivnjaty mozhlyvosti Manchesters'koi' bal'noi' systemy, algorytmu Penn II ta Myriad na indyvidual'nomu rivni vidriznjaty pacijentiv z mutacijeju BRCA1/2 ta osib bez mutantnyh alelej sered ukrai'ns'kyh zhinok z rannim rozvytkom raku molochnoi' zalozy ta/abo obtjazhenym simejnym anamnezom shhodo raku molochnoi' zalozy ta/abo raku jajechnykiv. Material ta metody doslidzhennja. Materialom doslidzhennja sluguvaly rezul'taty genealogichnogo, molekuljarno-genetychnogo ta kliniko-morfologichnogo obstezhennja 44 osib, hvoryh na rak molochnoi' zalozy, z rannim rozvytkom zahvorjuvannja abo z obtjazhenym simejnym anamnezom shhodo onkologichnoi' patologii' molochnoi' zalozy ta/abo jajechnykiv. Vyznachennja najbil'sh imovirnyh nosii'v mutacij BRCA1 i BRCA2 sered obstezhenyh zhinok provodyly za dopomogoju tr'oh vyshhezgadanyh algorytmiv. Rezul'taty ta vysnovky. Manchesters'ka bal'na systema maje krashhu zdatnist' na indyvidual'nomu rivni vidriznjaty pacijentiv z mutacijeju ta osib bez mutantnyh alelej. Ploshha pid kryvoju Manchesters'koi' bal'noi' systemy skladaje 0,84, Penn II – 0,66, Myriad – 0,68.

  16. Multifactorial Likelihood Assessment of BRCA1 and BRCA2 Missense Variants Confirms That BRCA1:c.122A>G(p.His41Arg) Is a Pathogenic Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Whiley, Phillip J.; Parsons, Michael T.; Leary, Jennifer; Tucker, Kathy; Warwick, Linda; Dopita, Belinda; Thorne, Heather; Lakhani, Sunil R.; Goldgar, David E.; Brown, Melissa A.; Spurdle, Amanda B.

    2014-01-01

    Rare exonic, non-truncating variants in known cancer susceptibility genes such as BRCA1 and BRCA2 are problematic for genetic counseling and clinical management of relevant families. This study used multifactorial likelihood analysis and/or bioinformatically-directed mRNA assays to assess pathogenicity of 19 BRCA1 or BRCA2 variants identified following patient referral to clinical genetic services. Two variants were considered to be pathogenic (Class 5). BRCA1:c.4484G> C(p.Arg1495Thr) was shown to result in aberrant mRNA transcripts predicted to encode truncated proteins. The BRCA1:c.122A>G(p.His41Arg) RING-domain variant was found from multifactorial likelihood analysis to have a posterior probability of pathogenicity of 0.995, a result consistent with existing protein functional assay data indicating lost BARD1 binding and ubiquitin ligase activity. Of the remaining variants, seven were determined to be not clinically significant (Class 1), nine were likely not pathogenic (Class 2), and one was uncertain (Class 3).These results have implications for genetic counseling and medical management of families carrying these specific variants. They also provide additional multifactorial likelihood variant classifications as reference to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of bioinformatic prediction tools and/or functional assay data in future studies. PMID:24489791

  17. Biological and clinical evidence for somatic mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 as predictive markers for olaparib response in high-grade serous ovarian cancers in the maintenance setting.

    PubMed

    Dougherty, Brian A; Lai, Zhongwu; Hodgson, Darren R; Orr, Maria C M; Hawryluk, Matthew; Sun, James; Yelensky, Roman; Spencer, Stuart K; Robertson, Jane D; Ho, Tony W; Fielding, Anitra; Ledermann, Jonathan A; Barrett, J Carl

    2017-07-04

    To gain a better understanding of the role of somatic mutations in olaparib response, next-generation sequencing (NGS) of BRCA1 and BRCA2 was performed as part of a planned retrospective analysis of tumors from a randomized, double-blind, Phase II trial (Study 19; D0810C00019; NCT00753545) in 265 patients with platinum-sensitive high-grade serous ovarian cancer. BRCA1/2 loss-of-function mutations were found in 55% (114/209) of tumors, were mutually exclusive, and demonstrated high concordance with Sanger-sequenced germline mutations in matched blood samples, confirming the accuracy (97%) of tumor BRCA1/2 NGS testing. Additionally, NGS identified somatic mutations absent from germline testing in 10% (20/209) of the patients. Somatic mutations had >80% biallelic inactivation frequency and were predominantly clonal, suggesting that BRCA1/2 loss occurs early in the development of these cancers. Clinical outcomes between placebo- and olaparib-treated patients with somatic BRCA1/2 mutations were similar to those with germline BRCA1/2 mutations, indicating that patients with somatic BRCA1/2 mutations benefit from treatment with olaparib.

  18. Characterization of BRCA2 Transcriptional Regulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-12-01

    transcription factor can induce the BRCA2 promoter. In contrast, we found that adriamycin (ADR) treatment down- regulates the BRCA2 promoter 10 fold in a...agents that regulate the expression of BRCA2 it may be possible to design methods to induce or repress the expression of this tumor suppressor gene...leading to enhanced DNA repair and/or apoptosis . Thus, agents that regulate BRCA2 expression may eventually be useful as forms of therapy for breast cancer

  19. Mutational analysis of FANCL, FANCM and the recently identified FANCI suggests that among the 13 known Fanconi Anemia genes, only FANCD1/BRCA2 plays a major role in high-risk breast cancer predisposition.

    PubMed

    García, María J; Fernández, Victoria; Osorio, Ana; Barroso, Alicia; Fernández, Fernando; Urioste, Miguel; Benítez, Javier

    2009-11-01

    Fanconi Anemia (FA) is a rare recessive syndrome characterized by cellular hypersensitivity to DNA-cross-linking agents. To date, 13 FA complementation groups have been described and all 13 genes associated to each of these groups have been currently identified. Three of the known FA genes are also high-risk (FANCD1/BRCA2) or moderate-risk (FANCN/PALB2 and FANCJ/BRIP1) breast cancer susceptibility genes, which makes all members of the FA pathway particularly attractive breast cancer candidate genes. Most FA genes have been screened for mutations in breast cancer families negative for BRCA1/2 mutations but the role of FANCL, FANCM and the recently identified FANCI has not been evaluated to date. This fact and novel data sustaining greater functional relevance of the three genes within the FA pathway prompted us to scrutinize all coding sequences and splicing sites of FANCI, FANCL and FANCM in 95 BRCA1/2-negative index cases from Spanish high-risk breast cancer families. We identified 68 sequence variants of which 24 were coding and 44 non-coding. Six exonic and 26 non-coding variants had not been described previously. None of the coding changes caused clearly pathogenic changes and computational analysis of all non-described intronic variants did not revealed major impact in splicing. With the present study, all known FA genes have been evaluated within the context of breast cancer high-risk predisposition. Our results rule out a major role of FANCI, FANCL and FANCM in familial breast cancer susceptibility, suggesting that among the 13 known FA genes, only FANCD1/BRCA2 plays a major role in high-risk breast cancer predisposition.

  20. Germline Brca2 heterozygosity promotes Kras(G12D) -driven carcinogenesis in a murine model of familial pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Skoulidis, Ferdinandos; Cassidy, Liam D; Pisupati, Venkat; Jonasson, Jon G; Bjarnason, Hordur; Eyfjord, Jorunn E; Karreth, Florian A; Lim, Michael; Barber, Lorraine M; Clatworthy, Susan A; Davies, Susan E; Olive, Kenneth P; Tuveson, David A; Venkitaraman, Ashok R

    2010-11-16

    Inherited heterozygous BRCA2 mutations predispose carriers to tissue-specific cancers, but somatic deletion of the wild-type allele is considered essential for carcinogenesis. We find in a murine model of familial pancreatic cancer that germline heterozygos