Science.gov

Sample records for asymptomatic hiv-infected individuals

  1. Asymptomatic HIV infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... infection URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000682.htm Asymptomatic HIV infection To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Asymptomatic HIV infection is a phase of HIV/AIDS during which there are no symptoms of HIV ...

  2. CD4+ T cell counts in initiation of antiretroviral therapy in HIV infected asymptomatic individuals; controversies and inconsistencies.

    PubMed

    Maina, E K; Bonney, E Y; Bukusi, E A; Sedegah, M; Lartey, M; Ampofo, W K

    2015-12-01

    The primary goal when devising strategies to define the start of therapy in HIV infected individuals is to avoid HIV disease progression and toxicity from antiretroviral therapy (ART). Intermediate goals includes, avoiding resistance by suppressing HIV replication, reducing transmission, limiting spread and diversity of HIV within the body and protecting the immune system from harm. The question of how early or late to start ART and achieve both primary and intermediate goals has dominated HIV research. The distinction between early and late treatment of HIV infection is currently a matter of CD4+ T cells count, a marker of immune status, rather than on viral load, a marker of virus replication. Discussions about respective benefits of early or delayed therapy, as well as the best CD4+ T cell threshold during the course of HIV infection at which ART is initiated remains inconclusive. Guidelines issued by various agencies, provide different initiation recommendations. This can be confusing for clinicians and policy-makers when determining the best time to initiate therapy. Optimizing ART initiation strategies are clearly complex and must be balanced between individual and broader public health needs. This review assesses available data that contributes to the debate on optimal time to initiate therapy in HIV-infected asymptomatic individuals. We also review reports on CD4+ T cell threshold to guide initiation of ART and finally discuss arguments for and against early or late initiation of ART.

  3. Asymptomatic Tuberculosis-Induced Ileal Perforation in an HIV- Infected Individual; A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Tahmasebi, Sedigheh; Moslemi, Sam; Tahamtan, Maryam; Taheri, Lohrasb; Davarpanah, Mohammad Ali

    2013-01-01

    The co-existence of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and tuberculosis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality because of a widespread organ involvement. The gastrointestinal tract is a common site for localization of opportunistic microorganisms in AIDS. However, surgical abdominal emergencies such as intestinal perforation resulted from tuberculosis are uncommon in these patients. The asymptomatic occurrence of such intestinal perforation has not been reported our knowledge. We represent an HIV and HCV co-infected man with miliary tuberculosis and an incidentally detected free air under  diaphragm in the chest X-ray eventually resulting in exploratory laparotomy which then revealed two tubercular-induced intestinal perforations. It seems that as the tuberculosis is increasing in incidence, mostly due to reactivation in HIV-infected patients especially in developing countries, we should not underestimate its acute abdominal emergencies such as bowel perforation. PMID:27162854

  4. Dental management of HIV-infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Aldous, J A

    1990-11-01

    In 1981, a group of male homosexuals was found to have an immunological defect resulting in opportunistic infections. The pattern of symptoms became known as acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Much time and expense have been invested to study the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), prevent its spread, and find a cure for HIV infection. Fear of HIV infection has resulted in implementation of stricter infection control practices. Intervention by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has mandated procedures for infection control and waste disposal. Ethical questions and social problems have surfaced concerning the treatment of HIV-infected patients. Despite reports on infection control, literature concerning management of HIV-infected dental patients is limited. Misinformation has prevented the application of reliable information about the care of HIV-infected individuals. An accurate general knowledge of HIV infection is essential for optimal care of these patients.

  5. The Initial Months of Antiretroviral Therapy and Its Influence on AGEs, HMGB1, and sRAGE Levels in Asymptomatic HIV-Infected Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Caleffi, Juliana Trindade; Gatto, Mariana; de Camargo, Caio Cavassan; Mendes, Monica Bannwart; Golim, Marjorie de Assis; Biasin, Mara; de Souza, Lenice do Rosário

    2016-01-01

    The development of the typical comorbidities of aging which currently affects people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) can be partially ascribed to the persistent immune activation and chronic inflammation characterizing these individuals. The aim of this study was to analyze the effect exerted by combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) administration on plasma levels of HMGB1 (high mobility group box protein-1), AGEs (advanced glycation end products), their soluble receptor sRAGE, cytokines, C-reactive protein (CRP), and some metabolic markers in asymptomatic PLWHA. Analyses were performed longitudinally in 30 PLWHA, before and about 6–12 months after cART initiation. We observed that lower levels of AGEs in post-cART group were accompanied by an increase of CRP and triglyceride levels already in the early months of therapy. Because of the current ever-earlier recommendations to start cART and its prolonged use, these and other markers should be investigated in order to monitor and postpone the appearance of non-AIDS comorbidities in PLWHA. PMID:28042203

  6. 6-month evaluation of JinHuang Chinese herbal medicine study in asymptomatic HIV infected Thais.

    PubMed

    Maek-a-nantawat, Wirach; Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Bussaratid, Valai; Chamnachanan, Supat; Naksrisook, Supa; Peonim, Wantanee; Thantamnu, Narumon; Muanaum, Rungrapat; Ngamdee, Vatcharachai

    2003-06-01

    Good results of in vitro study of anti-HIV effects of JinHuang, a Chinese herbal medicine led to in vivo study of safety and efficacy among asymptomatic HIV infected individuals. It was a prospective open study of 21 asymptomatic HIV infected Thai volunteers. Twelve and 9 were female and male, respectively, with mean age of 29.24 +/- 3.94 years. JinHuang preparation, 6 capsules and 2 bottles of liquid formula orally three times a day, was given on an outpatient basis initially for 6 months. Regular close monitoring and follow-up were done. The side effects reported included : increased bowel movements (81%), vague taste, and smell of drug after initiation (52%). No serious adverse event related to JinHuang was detected during study. No significant changes in terms of log viral load and CD4 count were observed after 6-months' duration. Most of the patients felt that the quality of life was better in terms of better appetite, good sleep and healthy during study participation, however, these were subjective.

  7. Positive correlation of HIV infection with Giardia intestinalis assemblage B but not with assemblage A in asymptomatic Kenyan children.

    PubMed

    Matey, Elizabeth J; Tokoro, Masaharu; Mizuno, Tetsushi; Matsumura, Takahiro; Nagamoto, Takehiro; Bi, Xiuqiong; Oyombra, Jane A; Sang, Willie K; Songok, Elijah M; Ichimura, Hiroshi

    2016-09-24

    A cross-sectional molecular epidemiological study of Giardia intestinalis infection was conducted among asymptomatic Kenyan children with (n = 123) and without (n = 111) HIV infection. G. intestinalis assemblage B infection was positively correlated with HIV infection [HIV (+), 18.7% vs. HIV (-), 11.7%; P = 0.013], whereas assemblage A infection was not [HIV (+), 4.1% vs. HIV (-), 6.3%; P = 0.510]. Thus, HIV infection is a risk factor for G. intestinalis assemblage B infection but not for assemblage A infection.

  8. Replication of CMV in the gut of HIV-infected individuals and epithelial barrier dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Somsouk, Ma; Hunt, Peter W.

    2017-01-01

    Although invasive cytomegalovirus (CMV) disease is uncommon in the era of antiretroviral therapy (ART), asymptomatic CMV coinfection is nearly ubiquitous in HIV infected individuals. While microbial translocation and gut epithelial barrier dysfunction may promote persistent immune activation in treated HIV infection, potentially contributing to morbidity and mortality, it has been unclear whether CMV replication in individuals with no symptoms of CMV disease might play a role in this process. We hypothesized that persistent CMV replication in the intestinal epithelium of HIV/CMV-coinfected individuals impairs gut epithelial barrier function. Using a combination of state-of-the-art in situ hybridization technology (RNAscope) and immunohistochemistry, we detected CMV DNA and proteins and evidence of intestinal damage in rectosigmoid samples from CMV-positive individuals with both untreated and ART-suppressed HIV infection. Two different model systems, primary human intestinal cells differentiated in vitro to form polarized monolayers and a humanized mouse model of human gut, together demonstrated that intestinal epithelial cells are fully permissive to CMV replication. Independent of HIV, CMV disrupted tight junctions of polarized intestinal cells, significantly reducing transepithelial electrical resistance, a measure of monolayer integrity, and enhancing transepithelial permeability. The effect of CMV infection on the intestinal epithelium is mediated, at least in part, by the CMV-induced proinflammatory cytokine IL-6. Furthermore, letermovir, a novel anti-CMV drug, dampened the effects of CMV on the epithelium. Together, our data strongly suggest that CMV can disrupt epithelial junctions, leading to bacterial translocation and chronic inflammation in the gut and that CMV could serve as a target for therapeutic intervention to prevent or treat gut epithelial barrier dysfunction during HIV infection. PMID:28241080

  9. Serotonin-Related Gene Polymorphisms and Asymptomatic Neurocognitive Impairment in HIV-Infected Alcohol Abusers

    PubMed Central

    Villalba, Karina; Dévieux, Jessy G.; Rosenberg, Rhonda; Cadet, Jean Lud

    2016-01-01

    HIV-infected individuals continue to experience neurocognitive deterioration despite virologically successful treatments. While the cause remains unclear, evidence suggests that HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) may be associated with neurobehavioral dysfunction. Genetic variants have been explored to identify risk markers to determine neuropathogenesis of neurocognitive deterioration. Memory deficits and executive dysfunction are highly prevalent among HIV-infected adults. These conditions can affect their quality of life and HIV risk-taking behaviors. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in the SLC6A4, TPH2, and GALM genes may affect the activity of serotonin and increase the risk of HAND. The present study explored the relationship between SLC6A4, TPH2, and GALM genes and neurocognitive impairment in HIV-infected alcohol abusers. A total of 267 individuals were genotyped for polymorphisms in SLC6A4 5-HTTLPR, TPH2 rs4570625, and GALM rs6741892. To assess neurocognitive functions, the Short Category and the Auditory Verbal Learning Tests were used. TPH2 SNP rs4570625 showed a significant association with executive function in African American males (odds ratio 4.8, 95% CI, 1.5–14.8; P = 0.005). Similarly, GALM SNP rs6741892 showed an increased risk with African American males (odds ratio 2.4, 95% CI, 1.2–4.9; P = 0.02). This study suggests that TPH2 rs4570625 and GALM rs6741892 polymorphisms may be risk factors for HAND. PMID:27069689

  10. [Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) in patients with symptomatic and asymptomatic HIV infection].

    PubMed

    Habegger de Sorrentino, A; Motta, P; Iliovich, E; Sorrentino, A P

    1997-01-01

    The cytopathic effect of HIV on CD4 T cells, as well as the active autoimmune mechanism occurring during infection, have been documented. Of the cytokines involved in the pathogenesis of AIDS, the main one produced by the monocyte-macrophage series is tumor necrosis factor alfa (TNF alpha). This cytokine induces antigens such as proteinase 3 (Pr 3) or mieloperoxidase (MPO). Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) are directed against this type of PMN antigens. In the present paper, the role of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) in HIV infected patients as responsible for autoimmune phenomena in relation to opportunistic infections, was studied. A total of 88 serum samples belonging to 49 asymptomatic and 39 symptomatic HIV infected patients were tested for ANCA by an indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) test over a neutrophil substrate. ANCA were detected in 53.8% of symptomatic patients as compared to 4.1% in asymptomatic cases (p < 0.0001). A 95.9% correlation was observed between ANCA-positive samples and pulmonary infection (n = 20). In those ANCA (+) samples 95.9% correlation was found with pulmonary infection (n = 20). Pulmonary infection due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a frequent finding in HIV infected patients from Northeastern Argentina. When the presence of ANCA in TB(+) HIV(+) and TB(+) HIV(-) patients was studied, it was seen that positive-ANCA significantly correlated with the first group (p < 0.001). The presence of ANCA was not related to viral infections, toxoplasmosis, neurological features of AIDS, vasculitis or malignant diseases. ANCA during pulmonary infection, mostly caused by TB, as well as PMN infiltration in pulmonary parenchyma, and the deregulated immune reaction elicited by HIV, may contribute to the onset of autoimmune phenomena. The presence of human T lymphocytes reactive to heat stress proteins (Hsp), an important target of immune response against certain intracellular auto-antigens such as MPO from PMN, added to

  11. Auditory impairments in HIV-infected individuals in Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Maro, Isaac I.; Moshi, Ndeserua; Clavier, Odile H.; MacKenzie, Todd A.; Kline-Schoder, Robert J.; Wilbur, Jed C.; Chambers, Robert D.; Fellows, Abigail M.; Jastrzembski, Benjamin G.; Mascari, John E.; Bakari, Muhammad; Matee, Mecky; Musiek, Frank E.; Waddell, Richard D.; von Reyn, C. Fordham; Buckey, Jay C.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Abnormal hearing tests have been noted in HIV-infected patients in several studies, but the nature of the hearing deficit has not been clearly defined. We performed a cross-sectional study of both HIV+ and HIV− individuals in Tanzania using an audiological test battery. We hypothesized that HIV+ adults would have a higher prevalence of abnormal central and peripheral hearing test results compared to HIV− controls. Additionally, we anticipated that the prevalence of abnormal hearing assessments would increase with anti-retroviral therapy (ART) use, and treatment for tuberculosis (TB). Design Pure-tone thresholds, distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs), tympanometry, and a gap detection test were performed using a laptop-based hearing testing system on 751 subjects (100 HIV− in the U.S., plus 651 in Dar es Salaam Tanzania including 449 HIV+ [130 ART− and 319 ART+], and 202 HIV−, subjects. No U.S. subjects had a history of TB treatment. In Tanzania, 204 of the HIV+, and 23 of the HIV−, subjects had a history of TB treatment. Subjects completed a video and audio questionnaire about their hearing as well as a health history questionnaire. Results HIV+ subjects had reduced DPOAE levels compared to HIV− subjects, but their hearing thresholds, tympanometry results, and gap detection thresholds were similar. Within the HIV+ group, those on ART reported significantly greater difficulties understanding speech-in-noise, and were significantly more likely to report that they had difficulty understanding speech than the ART− group. The ART+ group had a significantly higher mean gap detection threshold compared to the ART− group. No effects of TB treatment were seen. Conclusions The fact that the ART+/ART− groups did not differ in measures of peripheral hearing ability (DPOAEs, thresholds), or middle ear measures (tympanometry), but that the ART+ group had significantly more trouble understanding speech and higher gap detection thresholds

  12. Cerebrovascular disease in HIV-infected individuals in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Cruse, Belinda; Cysique, Lucette A; Markus, Romesh; Brew, Bruce J

    2012-08-01

    The widespread use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in HIV-infected individuals mostly in developed countries has dramatically improved their prognosis. In such advantaged regions of the world, therefore, many patients are now transitioning from middle into older age, with altered patterns of disease. While previously a rare complication of HIV infection, cerebrovascular disease (particularly that associated with atherosclerosis) is becoming relatively more important in this treated group of individuals. This review summarises the evidence regarding the shifting epidemiology of cerebrovascular diseases affecting HIV-infected individuals. While outlining the association between HIV infection and AIDS and cerebrovascular disease, as well as opportunistic diseases and HIV-associated vasculopathies, the current evidence supporting an increase in atherosclerotic disease in treated HIV-infected individuals is emphasised and a management approach to ischaemic stroke in HIV-infected individuals is presented. Evidence supporting the important role of HAART and HIV infection itself in the pathogenesis of atherosclerotic disease is discussed, together with preventative approaches to this increasingly important disease process as the population ages. Finally, a discussion regarding the significant association between cerebrovascular disease and HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder is presented, together with possible mechanisms behind this relationship.

  13. Asymptomatic oral carriage of Candida species in HIV-infected patients in the highly active antiretroviral therapy era.

    PubMed

    Costa, Carolina Rodrigues; Cohen, Ana Joaquina; Fernandes, Orionalda Fátima Lisboa; Miranda, Karla Carvalho; Passos, Xisto Sena; Souza, Lúcia Kioko Hasimoto; do Rosário Rodrigues Silva, Maria

    2006-01-01

    Oropharyngeal candidiasis is the most common opportunistic fungal infection in individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus. CD4+ lymphocytes count and the quantification of viral RNA in blood plasma have been found to be the main markers of HIV disease progression. The present study was conducted to evaluate Candida sp. diversity in the oral cavity of HIV-infected patients and to determine whether there was association of CD4+ cell count and viral load with asymptomatic oral Candida carriage. Out of 99 HIV-positive patients studied, 62 (62.6%) had positive culture for Candida (oral carriage) and 37 patients (37.4%) had Candida negative culture (no oral carriage). The etiologic agents most common were C. albicans and C. tropicalis. The range of CD4+ was 6-2305 cells/mm3 in colonized patients and 3-839 cells/mm3 for non-colonized patients, while the viral load was 60-90016 copies/mL for colonized patients and 75-110488 copies/mL for non colonized patients. The viral load was undetectable in 15 colonized patients and in 12 non colonized patients. Our results showed that there was no significant difference of the variables CD4+ cell count and viral load between oral candida carriage and no oral candida carriage patients.

  14. Nutritional status of persons with HIV infection, persons with HIV infection and tuberculosis, and HIV-negative individuals from southern India.

    PubMed

    Swaminathan, Soumya; Padmapriyadarsini, C; Sukumar, B; Iliayas, Sheikh; Kumar, S Ramesh; Triveni, C; Gomathy, P; Thomas, Beena; Mathew, Minnie; Narayanan, P R

    2008-03-15

    We compared the nutritional status of individuals with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection alone, individuals with HIV infection and tuberculosis (after completion of antituberculosis treatment), and HIV-negative individuals and found that malnutrition, anemia, and hypoalbuminemia were most pronounced among HIV-positive patients with tuberculosis. Weight loss was associated with loss of fat in female patients and with loss of body cell mass in male patients.

  15. Seroprevalence of acquired toxoplasmosis in HIV-infected and apparently healthy individuals in Jos, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Uneke, C J; Duhlinska, D D; Njoku, M O; Ngwu, B A F

    2005-06-01

    Toxoplasma gondii IgG antibody seroprevalence was studied in two different populations of 219 HIV-infected patients and 144 apparently healthy individuals (AHIs). Clinical toxoplasmosis was assessed among the HIV-infected patients. Antibodies to T. gondii were detected in 85 (38.8%, 95% CI: 32.36%-45.26%) of the HIV-infected patients and in 30 (20.8%, 95% CI: 14.20%-27.46%) of the AHIs. Among the AIHs, males represented 22.0% of infections compared to females (20.0%) and individuals within age group 21-30 years accounted for the highest prevalence of 33.3% (95% CI: 11.56%-55.10%). There was no significant difference in the trend (Chi-square, P < or = 0.05). Assessment of epidemiological factors showed higher seroprevalence of Toxoplasma antibodies among those who eat rodents (29.6%) and those who constantly have contact with the soil (21.2%). Among the HIV-infected, individuals 31-40-years-old had the highest T. gondii seroprevalence (36.5%). Evaluation of the clinical findings of patients with concomitant toxoplasmosis and HIV infection greatly implicated fever (63.5%), headache (44.7%), rashes (41.2%) and anorexia (34.1%). This study contributes to the development of guidelines for the prevention and management of toxoplasmosis in HIV-infected patients and in apparently healthy individuals in a resource scarce setting.

  16. Virulence of Candida albicans isolated from HIV infected and non infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Wibawa, Tri; Praseno; Aman, Abu Tholib

    2015-01-01

    Candida sp contributes 33.1 % of fungal infections among HIV patients. Among the species of the genus Candida, Candida albicans is the most frequently isolated from HIV patients. This study aimed to analyze putative virulence factors of C. albicans isolated from oral cavities of HIV infected patients and healthy individuals. Twenty isolates from HIV infected patients and fourteen from healthy individuals were analyzed for phenotypic switching, cell growth rate, hyphae formation, hemolytic activity and biofilm formation characteristics. The frequency of phenotypic switching was low in both groups. The cell growth rate of C. albicans from HIV infected patients were significantly higher than those from healthy individuals (p < 0.001). After 48 h incubation, the concentration of C. albicans isolated from HIV infected patients was 8.6 × 10(6) cells/ml while the concentration of C. albicans isolated from healthy individuals was 7.8 × 10(6) cells/ml. After 72 h incubation, the concentration of C. albicans isolated from HIV infected patients was 9.5 × 10(6) cells/ml while the concentration of C. albicans isolated from healthy individuals was 8.2 × 10(6) cells/ml. In contrast, the hemolytic activity of C. albicans isolated from healthy individuals were significantly higher compared to those from HIV infected patients (p < 0.001) at both aerobic (6 vs. 3.5 mm) and anaerobic (3.8 vs. 1.3 mm) conditions. The percentages of hyphae forming cells were higher in C. albicans collected from HIV infected patients (27.5 %) compared to the healthy individual group (14.7 %). However, this trend was not statistically significant (p = 0.1). Candida albicans isolated from HIV infected patients have similar ability to develop biofilms compared to those from healthy individuals. (OR = 4.2; 95 % CI 0.724-26.559). The virulence factors of C. albicans isolated from HIV infected patients were not significantly different from those of healthy individuals. The results

  17. Determinants of Smoking and Quitting in HIV-Infected Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Regan, Susan; Meigs, James B.; Grinspoon, Steven K.; Triant, Virginia A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Cigarette smoking is widespread among HIV-infected patients, who confront increased risk of smoking-related co-morbidities. The effects of HIV infection and HIV-related variables on smoking and smoking cessation are incompletely understood. We investigated the correlates of smoking and quitting in an HIV-infected cohort using a validated natural language processor to determine smoking status. Method We developed and validated an algorithm using natural language processing (NLP) to ascertain smoking status from electronic health record data. The algorithm was applied to records for a cohort of 3487 HIV-infected from a large health care system in Boston, USA, and 9446 uninfected control patients matched 3:1 on age, gender, race and clinical encounters. NLP was used to identify and classify smoking-related portions of free-text notes. These classifications were combined into patient-year smoking status and used to classify patients as ever versus never smokers and current smokers versus non-smokers. Generalized linear models were used to assess associations of HIV with 3 outcomes, ever smoking, current smoking, and current smoking in analyses limited to ever smokers (persistent smoking), while adjusting for demographics, cardiovascular risk factors, and psychiatric illness. Analyses were repeated within the HIV cohort, with the addition of CD4 cell count and HIV viral load to assess associations of these HIV-related factors with the smoking outcomes. Results Using the natural language processing algorithm to assign annual smoking status yielded sensitivity of 92.4, specificity of 86.2, and AUC of 0.89 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.88–0.91). Ever and current smoking were more common in HIV-infected patients than controls (54% vs. 44% and 42% vs. 30%, respectively, both P<0.001). In multivariate models HIV was independently associated with ever smoking (adjusted rate ratio [ARR] 1.18, 95% CI 1.13–1.24, P <0.001), current smoking (ARR 1.33, 95% CI 1.25

  18. Parasitic infections in HIV infected individuals: Diagnostic & therapeutic challenges

    PubMed Central

    Nissapatorn, Veeranoot; Sawangjaroen, Nongyao

    2011-01-01

    After 30 years of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic, parasites have been one of the most common opportunistic infections (OIs) and one of the most frequent causes of morbidity and mortality associated with HIV-infected patients. Due to severe immunosuppression, enteric parasitic pathogens in general are emerging and are OIs capable of causing diarrhoeal disease associated with HIV. Of these, Cryptosporidium parvum and Isospora belli are the two most common intestinal protozoan parasites and pose a public health problem in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients. These are the only two enteric protozoan parasites that remain in the case definition of AIDS till today. Leismaniasis, strongyloidiasis and toxoplasmosis are the three main opportunistic causes of systemic involvements reported in HIV-infected patients. Of these, toxoplasmosis is the most important parasitic infection associated with the central nervous system. Due to its complexity in nature, toxoplasmosis is the only parasitic disease capable of not only causing focal but also disseminated forms and it has been included in AIDS-defining illnesses (ADI) ever since. With the introduction of highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART), cryptosporidiosis, leishmaniasis, schistosomiasis, strongyloidiasis, and toxoplasmosis are among parasitic diseases reported in association with immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). This review addresses various aspects of parasitic infections in term of clinical, diagnostic and therapeutic challenges associated with HIV-infection. PMID:22310820

  19. Antibody to hepatitis E virus in HIV-infected individuals and AIDS patients.

    PubMed

    Balayan, M S; Fedorova, O E; Mikhailov, M I; Rytick, P G; Eremin, V F; Danilova, T I; Shevelev, B I; Gorbacheva, E C; Pankova, G Y

    1997-07-01

    Antibody to hepatitis E virus of IgG class (anti-HEV IgG) is regularly detected in industrialized countries, where HEV is non-endemic, at levels not exceeding 2-3%; seropositive individuals are often found in certain groups of patients and professionals exposed to an increased risk of blood-borne infections. The present study was aimed at the identification of anti-HEV IgG in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, including acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), living in Russia and Belarus, an area of low anti-HEV prevalence with a moderate spread of HIV infection and AIDS. In Russia, 13 out of 117 HIV-infected patients (11.1%) were found to be anti-HEV seropositive. This differed significantly from the frequency observed in the normal population (1.7%) but not from the frequency in a matching control, high-risk group consisting of male prisoners (8.0%). No difference in the frequency of anti-HEV IgG seropositivity was found between groups of HIV-infected men subdivided by sexual orientation. The rate of anti-HEV seropositivity increased with the progression of HIV infection, reaching 43.3% in AIDS patients and 38.1% in those who died from AIDS. In Belarus, anti-HEV IgG seropositivity was not found among 20 HIV-infected subjects nor among individuals from the control risk group, which consisted of 25 intravenous drug users. In conclusion, HEV infection may have common transmission mechanisms (risk factors) with HIV infection rather than represent an additional opportunistic infection in AIDS.

  20. Risk of Anal Cancer in HIV-Infected and HIV-Uninfected Individuals in North America

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Bryan; Justice, Amy C.; Engels, Eric; Gill, M. John; Goedert, James J.; Kirk, Gregory D.; D’Souza, Gypsyamber; Bosch, Ronald J.; Brooks, John T.; Napravnik, Sonia; Hessol, Nancy A.; Jacobson, Lisa P.; Kitahata, Mari M.; Klein, Marina B.; Moore, Richard D.; Rodriguez, Benigno; Rourke, Sean B.; Saag, Michael S.; Sterling, Timothy R.; Gebo, Kelly A.; Press, Natasha; Martin, Jeffrey N.; Dubrow, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Background. Anal cancer is one of the most common cancers affecting individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), although few have evaluated rates separately for men who have sex with men (MSM), other men, and women. There are also conflicting data regarding calendar trends. Methods. In a study involving 13 cohorts from North America with follow-up between 1996 and 2007, we compared anal cancer incidence rates among 34 189 HIV-infected (55% MSM, 19% other men, 26% women) and 114 260 HIV-uninfected individuals (90% men). Results. Among men, the unadjusted anal cancer incidence rates per 100 000 person-years were 131 for HIV-infected MSM, 46 for other HIV-infected men, and 2 for HIV-uninfected men, corresponding to demographically adjusted rate ratios (RRs) of 80.3 (95% confidence interval [CI], 42.7–151.1) for HIV-infected MSM and 26.7 (95% CI, 11.5–61.7) for other HIV-infected men compared with HIV-uninfected men. HIV-infected women had an anal cancer rate of 30/100 000 person-years, and no cases were observed for HIV-uninfected women. In a multivariable Poisson regression model, among HIV-infected individuals, the risk was higher for MSM compared with other men (RR, 3.3; 95% CI, 1.8–6.0), but no difference was observed comparing women with other men (RR, 1.0; 95% CI, 0.5–2.2). In comparison with the period 2000–2003, HIV-infected individuals had an adjusted RR of 0.5 (95% CI, .3–.9) in 1996–1999 and 0.9 (95% CI, .6–1.2) in 2004–2007. Conclusions. Anal cancer rates were substantially higher for HIV-infected MSM, other men, and women compared with HIV-uninfected individuals, suggesting a need for universal prevention efforts. Rates increased after the early antiretroviral therapy era and then plateaued. PMID:22291097

  1. [Direct cost related to management and care provision for HIV-infected children in the asymptomatic stage in Abidjan, Cote d'Ivoire].

    PubMed

    Djohan, G; Kouakoussui, A; Msellati, P

    2005-12-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate the direct cost of medical and psychological care provided to asymptomatic HIV-infected children in Abidjan, Cote d'Ivoire. For this purpose, a retrospective study was carried out among a group of asymptomatic HIV-infected children in Abidjan who were part of the "projet enfant Yopougon" (ANRS 1244/1278). The study reviewed these childrens' hospital records and files dating between October 2000 and March 2003. The follow up period for a total of 46 children represented a cumulative of 83.4 children years and showed that 8 potentially death-threatening medical events were recorded on average per child per year. The mean annual cost for the management and delivery of medical and psychological care per asymptomatic HIV-infected child was 132, 730 FCFA per year, or rather 11,000 FCFA (16.63 Euros) per month. This relatively low cost should be used to advocate for more financial support from governments and the international community to contribute to more effective management of care and services for HIV-infected children.

  2. Autoantibodies against peripheral blood cells appear early in HIV infection and their prevalence increases with disease progression.

    PubMed Central

    Klaassen, R J; Mulder, J W; Vlekke, A B; Eeftinck Schattenkerk, J K; Weigel, H M; Lange, J M; von dem Borne, A E

    1990-01-01

    The presence of platelet- and neutrophil-bound immunoglobulin (PBIg and NBIg) in thrombocytopenic or neutropenic HIV-infected individuals has led to the concept that in HIV infection thrombocytopenia and neutropenia are mediated by autoimmunity. However, PBIg and NBIg were also demonstrated in non-cytopenic HIV-infected individuals. We determined the prevalence of autoantibodies against neutrophils and platelets by immunofluorescence in randomly chosen persons in different stages of asymptomatic and symptomatic HIV infection. Platelet and neutrophil autoantibodies already appeared in the asymptomatic stage and their prevalence further increased in the symptomatic stages. No correlation was found between the presence of either platelet or neutrophil antibodies and the occurrence of circulating immune complexes in the blood or the serum immunoglobulin level. There was no significant difference in neutrophil counts in HIV-infected persons with or without neutrophil autoantibodies. In addition, no significant difference in neutrophil count was found between HIV-infected and non-HIV-infected persons. HIV-infected individuals with platelet autoantibodies tended to have a lower platelet count than HIV-infected individuals without these antibodies. However, the platelet count in HIV-infected individuals without platelet antibodies was significantly lower than in the non-HIV infected persons. Thus, autoantibodies against platelets and neutrophils occur early in HIV infection and their prevalence is correlated with disease progression. Their presence is associated with cytopenia only in a limited number of persons. Non-immune mechanisms also mediate thrombocytopenia in HIV infection. PMID:1974174

  3. Alcohol Drinking Pattern: A Comparison between HIV-Infected Patients and Individuals from the General Population

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Maria Leticia R.; Barcellos, Nemora T.; Alencastro, Paulo R.; Wolff, Fernando H.; Moreira, Leila B.; Gus, Miguel; Brandão, Ajacio B. M.; Fuchs, Flavio D.; Fuchs, Sandra C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Alcohol consumption is highly prevalent in the general population and among HIV-infected population. This study aimed to compare the pattern of alcohol consumption and to describe characteristics associated with heavy alcohol consumption in individuals from the general population with patients infected with HIV. Methods Participants for this analysis came from a population-based cross-sectional study and from a consecutive sampling of patients infected with HIV. Participants aged 18 years or older were interviewed using similar questionnaires with questions pertaining to socio-demographic characteristics, alcohol consumption, smoking, physical activity, and HIV-related characteristics, among others. Blood pressure and anthropometric measures were measured using standardized procedures. Results Weekly alcohol consumption was more prevalent among individuals from the general population than HIV-infected patients: 57.0 vs. 31.1%, P<0.001. The prevalence of heavy episodic drinking was higher in the population sample as well: 46.1 vs. 17.0%, P<0.001. In the general population, heavy alcohol consumption was more prevalent in men. Cigarette smoking was independently associated with heavy alcohol consumption among HIV infected (Prevalence Ratio; PR = 5.9; 95%CI 2.6–13.9; P<0,001) and general population (PR = 2.6; 95%CI 1.9–3.0; P<0.001). Years at school were inversely associated with heavy alcohol consumption among HIV-infected patients and directly associated among participants from the general population, even after controlling for sex, age, skin color, and smoking. Conclusions Heavy alcohol consumption is more prevalent in the general population than among HIV-infected patients. Individuals aware about their disease may reduce the amount of alcoholic beverages consumption comparatively to healthy individuals from the general population. PMID:27362541

  4. Individual, Social, and Environmental Influences Associated With HIV Infection Among Injection Drug Users in Tijuana, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Strathdee, Steffanie A.; Lozada, Remedios; Pollini, Robin A.; Brouwer, Kimberly C.; Mantsios, Andrea; Abramovitz, Daniela A.; Rhodes, Tim; Latkin, Carl A.; Loza, Oralia; Alvelais, Jorge; Magis-Rodriguez, Carlos; Patterson, Thomas L.

    2009-01-01

    Objective We examined correlates of HIV infection among injection drug users (IDUs) in Tijuana, Mexico, a city bordering the United States, which is situated on major migration and drug trafficking routes. Methods IDUs aged ≥18 years were recruited using respondent-driven sampling. Participants underwent antibody testing for HIV and syphilis and structured interviews. Weighted logistic regression identified correlates of HIV infection. Results Of 1056 IDUs, the median age was 37 years, 86% were male, and 76% were migrants. HIV prevalence was higher in female participants than in male participants (8% vs. 3%; P = 0.01). Most IDUs testing HIV-positive were previously unaware of their serostatus (93%). IDUs reported injecting with a median of 2 people in the prior 6 months and had been arrested for having injection stigmata (ie, “track-marks”) a median of 3 times. Factors independently associated with HIV infection were being female, syphilis titers consistent with active infection, larger numbers of recent injection partners, living in Tijuana for a shorter duration, and being arrested for having track-marks. Conclusions Individual, social, and environmental factors were independently associated with HIV infection among IDUs in Tijuana. These findings suggest the need to intervene not solely on individual risk behaviors but on social processes that drive these behaviors, including problematic policing practices. PMID:18176320

  5. Failure to Identify HIV-Infected Individuals in a Clinical Trial Using a Single HIV Rapid Test for Screening

    PubMed Central

    Piwowar-Manning, Estelle; Fogel, Jessica M.; Laeyendecker, Oliver; Wolf, Shauna; Cummings, Vanessa; Marzinke, Mark A.; Clarke, William; Breaud, Autumn; Wendel, Sarah; Wang, Lei; Swanson, Priscilla; Hackett, John; Mannheimer, Sharon; del Rio, Carlos; Kuo, Irene; Harawa, Nina T.; Koblin, Beryl A.; Moore, Richard; Blankson, Joel N.; Eshleman, Susan H.

    2014-01-01

    Background In the HIV Prevention Trials Network (HPTN) 061 study, 8 (2.3%) of 348 HIV-infected participants identified as HIV uninfected at study enrollment using a single HIV rapid test for screening were found to be HIV infected after additional testing. Objectives To evaluate the performance of different HIV assays for detection of HIV infection in HPTN 061 participants with missed infection and individuals with viral suppression. Methods Plasma samples from 8 HPTN 061 participants, 17 elite controllers, and 101 individuals on antiretroviral treatment (ART) were tested for HIV with 3 rapid tests, 2 laboratory-based immunoassays, and a Western blot assay. The HPTN 061 samples were also tested with 2 HIV RNA assays and an antiretroviral drug assay. Results Of the 8 HPTN 061 participants with missed infection, 1 was an elite controller, 1 was taking ART, 2 were missed because of testing or clerical errors, 1 had recent HIV infection (identified using a multi-assay algorithm), and 3 had acute HIV infection. Two (1.7%) of 118 individuals with viral suppression (both taking ART) had at least 1 false-negative test. Conclusions In clinical trials, HIV infections can be missed for a variety of reasons. Using more than one assay to screen for HIV infection may reduce the number of missed infections. PMID:24710920

  6. Fecal Bacterial Communities in treated HIV infected individuals on two antiretroviral regimens

    PubMed Central

    Pinto-Cardoso, Sandra; Lozupone, Catherine; Briceño, Olivia; Alva-Hernández, Selma; Téllez, Norma; Adriana, Aguilar; Murakami-Ogasawara, Akio; Reyes-Terán, Gustavo

    2017-01-01

    Intestinal microbiome changes that occur in HIV positive individuals on different antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimens are important to understand, as they are potentially linked with chronic inflammation and microbiome-linked comorbidities that occur at increased incidence in this population. We conducted a cross-sectional study comparing the fecal microbiomes of HIV-uninfected (HIV SN) to HIV-infected individuals on long-term ART (HIV+ LTART) from Mexico using 16S ribosomal RNA (16sRNA) targeted sequencing. These individuals were on two ART regimens based on either Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors (EFV) or ritonavir-boosted Protease Inhibitors (PI) with the same backbone of Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors. Microbiome diversity was reduced in treated HIV infection compared to HIV SN (p < 0.05). Several operational taxonomic units (OTUs) related to the Ruminococcaceae family including Faecalibacterium prausnitzii were depleted in EFV and PI compared to HIV SN and negatively correlated with intestinal gut dysfunction as measured by the intestinal fatty binding protein (p < 0.05). This is the first report to address the fecal bacterial communities in HIV-infected individuals on two ARV regimens from Mexico. PMID:28262770

  7. Fecal Bacterial Communities in treated HIV infected individuals on two antiretroviral regimens.

    PubMed

    Pinto-Cardoso, Sandra; Lozupone, Catherine; Briceño, Olivia; Alva-Hernández, Selma; Téllez, Norma; Adriana, Aguilar; Murakami-Ogasawara, Akio; Reyes-Terán, Gustavo

    2017-03-06

    Intestinal microbiome changes that occur in HIV positive individuals on different antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimens are important to understand, as they are potentially linked with chronic inflammation and microbiome-linked comorbidities that occur at increased incidence in this population. We conducted a cross-sectional study comparing the fecal microbiomes of HIV-uninfected (HIV SN) to HIV-infected individuals on long-term ART (HIV+ LTART) from Mexico using 16S ribosomal RNA (16sRNA) targeted sequencing. These individuals were on two ART regimens based on either Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors (EFV) or ritonavir-boosted Protease Inhibitors (PI) with the same backbone of Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors. Microbiome diversity was reduced in treated HIV infection compared to HIV SN (p < 0.05). Several operational taxonomic units (OTUs) related to the Ruminococcaceae family including Faecalibacterium prausnitzii were depleted in EFV and PI compared to HIV SN and negatively correlated with intestinal gut dysfunction as measured by the intestinal fatty binding protein (p < 0.05). This is the first report to address the fecal bacterial communities in HIV-infected individuals on two ARV regimens from Mexico.

  8. Older individuals with HIV infection have greater memory deficits than younger individuals

    PubMed Central

    Tan, IL; Smith, BR; Hammond, E; Vronbrock-Roosa, H; Creighton, JA; Selnes, OA; McArthur, JC; Sacktor, N

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The prevalence of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND) remains persistently high in the era of combination anti-retroviral therapy (cART). We aimed to characterize the pattern of neurocognitive dysfunction in older subjects with HAND, in particular amnestic versus non-amnestic impairment. Methods 106 subjects from the Johns Hopkins University NIMH Clinical Outcomes cohort underwent standardized neuropsychological (NP) testing between November 2006 and June 2010. We examined performance in seven cognitive domains (memory, attention, speed of processing, visuospatial, language, motor and executive). Older subjects were defined as age > 50 years at the time of NP testing. Subjects were diagnosed with HAND according to established criteria, and dichotomized into amnestic cognitive impairment or non-amnestic cognitive impairment, with deficit defined as z-scores < −1.5 for the verbal and non-verbal memory domains. Results There were 32 older subjects with a mean age (SD) of 54.2 (2.8) years, and 74 younger subjects, 43.7 (4.3) years. Older age was associated with a 4.8 fold higher odds of memory deficits, adjusted for potential confounders (p=0.035) identified a priori. With age modeled as a continuous covariate, every 1-year increase in age was associated with a 1.11 fold higher odds of memory deficit (p=0.05). Conclusion There was a higher proportion of amnestic cognitive impairment among older subjects than younger subjects with HIV infection. Neurodegenerative processes other than those directly due to HIV may be increasingly important as individuals with chronic HIV infection and HAND survive into older age. PMID:24078559

  9. Cerebrovascular risk factors and brain microstructural abnormalities on diffusion tensor images in HIV-infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Nakamoto, Beau K; Jahanshad, Neda; McMurtray, Aaron; Kallianpur, Kalpana J; Chow, Dominic C; Valcour, Victor G; Paul, Robert H; Marotz, Liron; Thompson, Paul M; Shikuma, Cecilia M

    2012-08-01

    HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder remains prevalent in HIV-infected individuals despite effective antiretroviral therapy. As these individuals age, comorbid cerebrovascular disease will likely impact cognitive function. Effective tools to study this impact are needed. This study used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to characterize brain microstructural changes in HIV-infected individuals with and without cerebrovascular risk factors. Diffusion-weighted MRIs were obtained in 22 HIV-infected subjects aged 50 years or older (mean age = 58 years, standard deviation = 6 years; 19 males, three females). Tensors were calculated to obtain fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) maps. Statistical comparisons accounting for multiple comparisons were made between groups with and without cerebrovascular risk factors. Abnormal glucose metabolism (i.e., impaired fasting glucose, impaired glucose tolerance, or diabetes mellitus) was associated with significantly higher MD (false discovery rate (FDR) critical p value = 0.008) and lower FA (FDR critical p value = 0.002) in the caudate and lower FA in the hippocampus (FDR critical p value = 0.004). Pearson correlations were performed between DTI measures in the caudate and hippocampus and age- and education-adjusted composite scores of global cognitive function, memory, and psychomotor speed. There were no detectable correlations between the neuroimaging measures and measures of cognition. In summary, we demonstrate that brain microstructural abnormalities are associated with abnormal glucose metabolism in the caudate and hippocampus of HIV-infected individuals. Deep gray matter structures and the hippocampus may be vulnerable in subjects with comorbid abnormal glucose metabolism, but our results should be confirmed in further studies.

  10. Immunological abnormalities in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected asymptomatic homosexual men. HIV affects the immune system before CD4+ T helper cell depletion occurs.

    PubMed Central

    Miedema, F; Petit, A J; Terpstra, F G; Schattenkerk, J K; de Wolf, F; Al, B J; Roos, M; Lange, J M; Danner, S A; Goudsmit, J

    1988-01-01

    To investigate the effect of persistent HIV infection on the immune system, we studied leukocyte functions in 14 asymptomatic homosexual men (CDC group II/III) who were at least two years seropositive, but who still had normal numbers of circulating CD4+ T cells. Compared with age-matched heterosexual men and HIV-negative homosexual men, the CD4+ and CD8+ T cells from seropositive men showed decreased proliferation to anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody and decreased CD4+ T-helper activity on PWM-driven differentiation of normal donor B cells. Monocytes of HIV-infected homosexual men showed decreased accessory function on normal T cell proliferation induced by CD3 monoclonal antibody. The most striking defect in leukocyte functional activities was observed in the B cells of HIV-infected men. B cells of 13 out of 14 seropositive men failed to produce Ig in response to PWM in the presence of adequate allogeneic T-helper activity. These findings suggest that HIV induces severe immunological abnormalities in T cells, B cells, and antigen-presenting cells early in infection before CD4+ T cell numbers start to decline. Impaired immunological function in subclinically HIV-infected patients may have clinical implications for vaccination strategies, in particular the use of live vaccines in groups with a high prevalence of HIV seropositivity. PMID:2974045

  11. Does "asymptomatic" mean without symptoms for those living with HIV infection?

    PubMed

    Willard, Suzanne; Holzemer, William L; Wantland, Dean J; Cuca, Yvette P; Kirksey, Kenn M; Portillo, Carmen J; Corless, Inge B; Rivero-Méndez, Marta; Rosa, María E; Nicholas, Patrice K; Hamilton, Mary Jane; Sefcik, Elizabeth; Kemppainen, Jeanne; Canaval, Gladys; Robinson, Linda; Moezzi, Shahnaz; Human, Sarie; Arudo, John; Eller, Lucille Sanzero; Bunch, Eli; Dole, Pamela J; Coleman, Christopher; Nokes, Kathleen; Reynolds, Nancy R; Tsai, Yun-Fang; Maryland, Mary; Voss, Joachim; Lindgren, Teri

    2009-03-01

    Throughout the history of the HIV epidemic, HIV-positive patients with relatively high CD4 counts and no clinical features of opportunistic infections have been classified as "asymptomatic" by definition and treatment guidelines. This classification, however, does not take into consideration the array of symptoms that an HIV-positive person can experience long before progressing to AIDS. This short report describes two international multi-site studies conducted in 2003-2005 and 2005-2007. The results from the studies show that HIV-positive people may experience symptoms throughout the trajectory of their disease, regardless of CD4 count or classification. Providers should discuss symptoms and symptom management with their clients at all stages of the disease.

  12. SPIRITUALITY AND RELIGION AMONG HIV-INFECTED INDIVIDUALS

    PubMed Central

    Szaflarski, Magdalena

    2017-01-01

    Spirituality and religion are important to many people living with HIV (PLWH). Recent research has focused on special populations (ethnic-minorities, women, and youth), spirituality/religion measurement, mediating/moderating mechanisms, and individual and community-level interventions. Spirituality/religion in PLWH has been refined as a multidimensional phenomenon which improves health/quality of life directly and through mediating factors (healthy behaviors, optimism, social support). Spirituality/religion helps people to cope with stressors, especially stigma/discrimination. Spiritual interventions utilizing the power of prayer and meditation and addressing spiritual struggle are under way. Faith-based community interventions have focused on stigma and could improve individual outcomes through access to spiritual/social support and care/treatment for PLWA. Community engagement is necessary to design/implement effective and sustainable programs. Future efforts should focus on vulnerable populations; utilize state-of the art methods (randomized clinical trials, community-based participatory research); and, address population-specific interventions at individual and community levels. Clinical and policy implications across geographic settings also need attention. PMID:23996649

  13. Spirituality and religion among HIV-infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Szaflarski, Magdalena

    2013-12-01

    Spirituality and religion are important to many people living with HIV (PLWH). Recent research has focused on special populations (ethnic-minorities, women, and youth), spirituality/religion measurement, mediating/moderating mechanisms, and individual and community-level interventions. Spirituality/religion in PLWH has been refined as a multidimensional phenomenon, which improves health/quality of life directly and through mediating factors (healthy behaviors, optimism, social support). Spirituality/religion helps people to cope with stressors, especially stigma/discrimination. Spiritual interventions utilizing the power of prayer and meditation and addressing spiritual struggle are under way. Faith-based community interventions have focused on stigma and could improve individual outcomes through access to spiritual/social support and care/treatment for PLWA. Community engagement is necessary to design/implement effective and sustainable programs. Future efforts should focus on vulnerable populations; utilize state-of-the-art methods (randomized clinical trials, community-based participatory research); and, address population-specific interventions at individual and community levels. Clinical and policy implications across geographic settings also need attention.

  14. Gut Bacteria Metabolism Impacts Immune Recovery in HIV-infected Individuals.

    PubMed

    Serrano-Villar, Sergio; Rojo, David; Martínez-Martínez, Mónica; Deusch, Simon; Vázquez-Castellanos, Jorge F; Bargiela, Rafael; Sainz, Talía; Vera, Mar; Moreno, Santiago; Estrada, Vicente; Gosalbes, María José; Latorre, Amparo; Seifert, Jana; Barbas, Coral; Moya, Andrés; Ferrer, Manuel

    2016-06-01

    While changes in gut microbial populations have been described in human immuno-deficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients undergoing antiretroviral therapy (ART), the mechanisms underlying the contributions of gut bacteria and their molecular agents (metabolites and proteins) to immune recovery remain unexplored. To study this, we examined the active fraction of the gut microbiome, through examining protein synthesis and accumulation of metabolites inside gut bacteria and in the bloodstream, in 8 healthy controls and 29 HIV-infected individuals (6 being longitudinally studied). We found that HIV infection is associated to dramatic changes in the active set of gut bacteria simultaneously altering the metabolic outcomes. Effects were accentuated among immunological ART responders, regardless diet, subject characteristics, clinical variables other than immune recovery, the duration and type of ART and sexual preferences. The effect was found at quantitative levels of several molecular agents and active bacteria which were herein identified and whose abundance correlated with HIV immune pathogenesis markers. Although, we cannot rule out the possibility that some changes are partially a random consequence of the disease status, our data suggest that most likely reduced inflammation and immune recovery is a joint solution orchestrated by both the active fraction of the gut microbiota and the host.

  15. Serum antibodies to viral pathogens and Toxoplasma gondii in HIV-infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Flø, R W; Nilsen, A; Voltersvik, P; Haukenes, G

    1993-12-01

    Sera from 38 HIV-infected individuals were examined longitudinally for antibodies to viruses that may increase morbidity in HIV infection, as well as commensal viruses and Toxoplasma gondii. HTLV infection was seen in Norway for the first time as four patients had antibodies to HTLV-II and one had antibodies to HTLV-I. Antibodies to hepatitis B virus (HBV) were found in 47.2%, while 21.6% of the patients had antibodies to hepatitis C virus (HCV). There was no evidence of acquisition of HBV or HVC during the mean observation period of 2 years. A titre increase in CMV antibody with time was observed for 7 out of 21 patients and a decrease for 2 patients. For Epstein-Barr virus, herpes simplex, varicella-zoster, rubella and measles viruses, human polyomavirus BK as well as for Toxoplasma gondii, antibody prevalences and titres were within the range seen in normal populations. Also, no longitudinal changes were observed in titres of these antibodies, indicating that humoral immunity remained intact during the study period. The high prevalences of HTLV-I/II, HBV and HCV antibodies in HIV-infected patients reflect common modes of virus transmission, and the fluctuations in CMV antibody titre are indicative of reactivations. Such coinfections may influence disease progression.

  16. HIV infection duration, social support and the level of trauma symptoms in a sample of HIV-positive Polish individuals.

    PubMed

    Rzeszutek, Marcin; Oniszczenko, Włodzimierz; Żebrowska, Magdalena; Firląg-Burkacka, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between the average HIV infection duration and the level of quantitatively rated post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms and social support dimensions in a sample of 562 Polish HIV+ adults. Possible moderating effects of social support on the relationship between the average HIV infection duration and the level of PTSD symptoms were also analysed. The results of this study suggest that the average HIV infection duration may intensify PTSD symptoms and deteriorate the perceived availability of social support in HIV+ individuals. However, a positive relationship between HIV infection duration and the level of trauma symptoms was observed only in the group of HIV+ individuals with low perceived available social support, but not in the group of HIV-infected individuals with high perceived available social support. This research provided some new insight into the psychological and social aspects of living with HIV. In particular, our results suggest that although HIV infection duration may intensify trauma symptoms and deteriorate social support, perceived available social support may act as a buffer against HIV-related trauma symptoms.

  17. Psychosocial Syndemics are Additively Associated with Worse ART Adherence in HIV-infected Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Blashill, Aaron J.; Bedoya, C. Andres; Mayer, Kenneth H.; O’Cleirigh, Conall; Pinkston, Megan; Remmert, Jocelyn E.; Mimiaga, Matthew J.; Safren, Steven A.

    2014-01-01

    Adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) among HIV-infected individuals is necessary to both individual and public health, and psychosocial problems have independently been associated with poor adherence. To date, studies have not systematically examined the effect of multiple, co-occurring psychosocial problems (i.e., “syndemics”) on ART adherence. Participants included 333 HIV-infected individuals who completed a comprehensive baseline evaluation, as part of a clinical trial to evaluate an intervention to treat depression and optimize medication adherence. Participants completed self-report questionnaires, and trained clinicians completed semi-structured diagnostic interviews. ART non-adherence was objectively measured via an electronic pill cap (i.e., MEMS). As individuals reported a greater number of syndemic indicators, their odds of non-adherence increased. Co-occurring psychosocial problems have an additive effect on the risk for poor ART adherence. Future behavioral medicine interventions are needed that address these problems comprehensively, and/or the core mechanisms that they share. PMID:25331267

  18. Psychosocial Syndemics are Additively Associated with Worse ART Adherence in HIV-Infected Individuals.

    PubMed

    Blashill, Aaron J; Bedoya, C Andres; Mayer, Kenneth H; O'Cleirigh, Conall; Pinkston, Megan M; Remmert, Jocelyn E; Mimiaga, Matthew J; Safren, Steven A

    2015-06-01

    Adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) among HIV-infected individuals is necessary to both individual and public health, and psychosocial problems have independently been associated with poor adherence. To date, studies have not systematically examined the effect of multiple, co-occurring psychosocial problems (i.e., "syndemics") on ART adherence. Participants included 333 HIV-infected individuals who completed a comprehensive baseline evaluation, as part of a clinical trial to evaluate an intervention to treat depression and optimize medication adherence. Participants completed self-report questionnaires, and trained clinicians completed semi-structured diagnostic interviews. ART non-adherence was objectively measured via an electronic pill cap (i.e., MEMS). As individuals reported a greater number of syndemic indicators, their odds of non-adherence increased. Co-occurring psychosocial problems have an additive effect on the risk for poor ART adherence. Future behavioral medicine interventions are needed that address these problems comprehensively, and/or the core mechanisms that they share.

  19. Heavy alcohol consumption in individuals with HIV infection: Effects on neuropsychological performance

    PubMed Central

    ROTHLIND, JOHANNES C.; GREENFIELD, TANYA M.; BRUCE, ANNE V.; MEYERHOFF, DIETER J.; FLENNIKEN, DEREK L.; LINDGREN, JOSELYN A.; WEINER, MICHAEL W.

    2008-01-01

    Higher rates of alcohol use have been reported in HIV+ individuals compared to the general population. Both heavy alcohol use and HIV infection are associated with increased risk of neuropsychological (NP) impairment. We examined effects of heavy active alcohol use and HIV on NP functioning in a large sample of community-residing HIV+ individuals and HIV− controls. The four main study groups included 72 HIV− light/non-drinkers, 70 HIV− heavy drinkers (>100 drinks per month), 70 HIV+ light/non-drinkers, and 56 HIV+ heavy drinkers. The heavy drinking group was further subdivided to assess effects of the heaviest levels of active alcohol use (>6 drinks per day) on NP functioning. A comprehensive NP battery was administered. Multivariate analysis of covariance was employed to examine the effect of HIV and alcohol on NP functioning after adjusting for group differences in age and estimated premorbid verbal intellectual functioning. The analyses identified main effects of heavy drinking and HIV on NP function, with greatest effects involving the contrast of HIV+ heavy drinkers and the HIV− light drinkers. Synergistic effects of heaviest current drinking and HIV infection were identified in analyses of motor and visuomotor speed. Supplementary analyses also revealed better NP function in the HIV+ group with antiretroviral treatment (ART) and lower level of viral burden, a finding that was consistent across levels of alcohol consumption. Finally, heavy alcohol use and executive functioning difficulties were associated with lower levels of self-reported medication adherence in the HIV+ group. The findings suggest that active heavy alcohol use and HIV infection have additive adverse effects on NP function, that they may show synergistic effects in circumstances of very heavy active alcohol use, and that heavy drinking and executive functioning may mediate health-related behaviors in HIV disease. PMID:15686610

  20. Chronic Tobacco-Smoking on Psychopathological Symptoms, Impulsivity and Cognitive Deficits in HIV-Infected Individuals.

    PubMed

    Chang, Linda; Lim, Ahnate; Lau, Eric; Alicata, Daniel

    2017-03-16

    HIV-infected individuals (HIV+) has 2-3 times the rate of tobacco smoking than the general population, and whether smoking may lead to greater psychiatric symptoms or cognitive deficits remains unclear. We evaluated the independent and combined effects of being HIV+ and chronic tobacco-smoking on impulsivity, psychopathological symptoms and cognition. 104 participants [27 seronegative (SN)-non-Smokers, 26 SN-Smokers, 29 HIV+ non-Smokers, 22 HIV+ Smokers] were assessed for psychopathology symptoms (Symptom Checklist-90, SCL-90), depressive symptoms (Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression Scale, CES-D), impulsivity (Barratt Impulsiveness Scale, BIS), decision-making (The Iowa Gambling Task, IGT, and Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, WCST), and cognition (seven neurocognitive domains). Both HIV+ and Smoker groups had higher SCL-90 and CES-D scores, with highest scores in HIV+ Smokers. On BIS, both HIV+ and Smokers had higher Total Impulsiveness scores, with higher behavioral impulsivity in Smokers, highest in HIV+ Smokers. Furthermore, across the four groups, HIV+ Smokers lost most money and made fewest advantageous choices on the IGT, and had highest percent errors on WCST. Lastly, HIV+ had lower z-scores on all cognitive domains, with the lowest scores in HIV+ Smokers. These findings suggest that HIV-infection and chronic tobacco smoking may lead to additive deleterious effects on impulsivity, psychopathological (especially depressive) symptoms and cognitive dysfunction. Although greater impulsivity may be premorbid in HIV+ and Smokers, the lack of benefits of nicotine in chronic Smokers on attention and psychopathology, especially those with HIV-infection, may be due to the negative effects of chronic smoking on dopaminergic and cardio-neurovascular systems. Tobacco smoking may contribute to psychopathology and neurocognitive disorders in HIV+ individuals.

  1. Heavy alcohol consumption in individuals with HIV infection: effects on neuropsychological performance.

    PubMed

    Rothlind, Johannes C; Greenfield, Tanya M; Bruce, Anne V; Meyerhoff, Dieter J; Flenniken, Derek L; Lindgren, Joselyn A; Weiner, Michael W

    2005-01-01

    Higher rates of alcohol use have been reported in HIV+ individuals compared to the general population. Both heavy alcohol use and HIV infection are associated with increased risk of neuropsychological (NP) impairment. We examined effects of heavy active alcohol use and HIV on NP functioning in a large sample of community-residing HIV+ individuals and HIV- controls. The four main study groups included 72 HIV- light/non-drinkers, 70 HIV- heavy drinkers (>100 drinks per month), 70 HIV+ light/non-drinkers, and 56 HIV+ heavy drinkers. The heavy drinking group was further subdivided to assess effects of the heaviest levels of active alcohol use (>6 drinks per day) on NP functioning. A comprehensive NP battery was administered. Multivariate analysis of covariance was employed to examine the effect of HIV and alcohol on NP functioning after adjusting for group differences in age and estimated premorbid verbal intellectual functioning. The analyses identified main effects of heavy drinking and HIV on NP function, with greatest effects involving the contrast of HIV+ heavy drinkers and the HIV- light drinkers. Synergistic effects of heaviest current drinking and HIV infection were identified in analyses of motor and visuomotor speed. Supplementary analyses also revealed better NP function in the HIV+ group with antiretroviral treatment (ART) and lower level of viral burden, a finding that was consistent across levels of alcohol consumption. Finally, heavy alcohol use and executive functioning difficulties were associated with lower levels of self-reported medication adherence in the HIV+ group. The findings suggest that active heavy alcohol use and HIV infection have additive adverse effects on NP function, that they may show synergistic effects in circumstances of very heavy active alcohol use, and that heavy drinking and executive functioning may mediate health-related behaviors in HIV disease.

  2. Combination of Antiretroviral Drugs and Radioimmunotherapy Specifically Kills Infected Cells from HIV-Infected Individuals.

    PubMed

    Tsukrov, Dina; McFarren, Alicia; Morgenstern, Alfred; Bruchertseifer, Frank; Dolce, Eugene; Gorny, Miroslaw K; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Berman, Joan W; Schoenbaum, Ellie; Zingman, Barry S; Casadevall, Arturo; Dadachova, Ekaterina

    2016-01-01

    Eliminating virally infected cells is an essential component of any HIV eradication strategy. Radioimmunotherapy (RIT), a clinically established method for killing cells using radiolabeled antibodies, was recently applied to target HIV-1 gp41 antigen expressed on the surface of infected cells. Since gp41 expression by infected cells is likely downregulated in patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART), we evaluated the ability of RIT to kill ART-treated infected cells using both in vitro models and lymphocytes isolated from HIV-infected subjects. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were infected with HIV and cultured in the presence of two clinically relevant ART combinations. Scatchard analysis of the 2556 human monoclonal antibody to HIV gp41 binding to the infected and ART-treated cells demonstrated sufficient residual expression of gp41 on the cell surface to warrant subsequent RIT. This is the first time the quantification of gp41 post-ART is being reported. Cells were then treated with Bismuth-213-labeled 2556 antibody. Cell survival was quantified by Trypan blue and residual viremia by p24 ELISA. Cell surface gp41 expression was assessed by Scatchard analysis. The experiments were repeated using PBMCs isolated from blood specimens obtained from 15 HIV-infected individuals: 10 on ART and 5 ART-naïve. We found that (213)Bi-2556 killed ART-treated infected PBMCs and reduced viral production to undetectable levels. ART and RIT co-treatment was more effective at reducing viral load in vitro than either therapy alone, indicating that gp41 expression under ART was sufficient to allow (213)Bi-2556 to deliver cytocidal doses of radiation to infected cells. This study provides proof of concept that (213)Bi-2556 may represent an innovative and effective targeting method for killing HIV-infected cells treated with ART and supports continued development of (213)Bi-2556 for co-administration with ART toward an HIV eradication strategy.

  3. Combination of Antiretroviral Drugs and Radioimmunotherapy Specifically Kills Infected Cells from HIV-Infected Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Tsukrov, Dina; McFarren, Alicia; Morgenstern, Alfred; Bruchertseifer, Frank; Dolce, Eugene; Gorny, Miroslaw K.; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Berman, Joan W.; Schoenbaum, Ellie; Zingman, Barry S.; Casadevall, Arturo; Dadachova, Ekaterina

    2016-01-01

    Eliminating virally infected cells is an essential component of any HIV eradication strategy. Radioimmunotherapy (RIT), a clinically established method for killing cells using radiolabeled antibodies, was recently applied to target HIV-1 gp41 antigen expressed on the surface of infected cells. Since gp41 expression by infected cells is likely downregulated in patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART), we evaluated the ability of RIT to kill ART-treated infected cells using both in vitro models and lymphocytes isolated from HIV-infected subjects. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were infected with HIV and cultured in the presence of two clinically relevant ART combinations. Scatchard analysis of the 2556 human monoclonal antibody to HIV gp41 binding to the infected and ART-treated cells demonstrated sufficient residual expression of gp41 on the cell surface to warrant subsequent RIT. This is the first time the quantification of gp41 post-ART is being reported. Cells were then treated with Bismuth-213-labeled 2556 antibody. Cell survival was quantified by Trypan blue and residual viremia by p24 ELISA. Cell surface gp41 expression was assessed by Scatchard analysis. The experiments were repeated using PBMCs isolated from blood specimens obtained from 15 HIV-infected individuals: 10 on ART and 5 ART-naïve. We found that 213Bi-2556 killed ART-treated infected PBMCs and reduced viral production to undetectable levels. ART and RIT co-treatment was more effective at reducing viral load in vitro than either therapy alone, indicating that gp41 expression under ART was sufficient to allow 213Bi-2556 to deliver cytocidal doses of radiation to infected cells. This study provides proof of concept that 213Bi-2556 may represent an innovative and effective targeting method for killing HIV-infected cells treated with ART and supports continued development of 213Bi-2556 for co-administration with ART toward an HIV eradication strategy. PMID:27725930

  4. Metabolic syndrome in HIV-infected individuals: underlying mechanisms and epidemiological aspects

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The success of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has determined a dramatic decline in AIDS- and immunodeficiency-related causes of death in the HIV-infected population. As life-expectancy increases, such individuals have become gradually exposed not only to the effects of aging itself, but also to the influence of environmental risk factors, which are known to act in the general population. These features can lead to obesity, diabetes mellitus and ultimately cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Metabolic complications and abnormal fat distribution were frequently observed after a few years of antiretroviral therapy and, as the array of antiretroviral drugs became broader, long term metabolic alterations are becoming far more common worldwide. Nevertheless, the risk of not being on HAART is overwhelmingly greater than the metabolic adverse events in terms of morbidity and mortality events. HIV/HAART-induced metabolic unbalances overlap in some extent the components of Metabolic Syndrome (MetS) and its high rates in the HIV population place infected individuals in an elevated CVD risk category. MetS can explain at least in part the emergence of CVD as the major morbidity and mortality conditions in the HIV population. In this review we convey information on the underlying aspects of MetS during HIV infection, highlighting some physiopathological and epidemiological features of this comorbidity along with the role played by HIV itself and the synergy action of some antiretroviral drugs. Considerations on MetS management in the HIV population are also depicted. PMID:24330597

  5. Food insecurity, depression, and social support in HIV-infected Hispanic individuals.

    PubMed

    Kapulsky, Leonid; Tang, Alice M; Forrester, Janet E

    2015-04-01

    Previous research has identified an association between food insecurity and depression in a variety of world regions in both healthy and HIV-infected individuals. We examined this association in 183 HIV-infected Hispanic adults from the greater Boston area. We measured depression with the Burnam depression screen and food insecurity with the Radimer/Cornell Questionnaire. Dietary intake was assessed with an adapted version of the Block Food Frequency Questionnaire. Logistic regression models were created with depression as the outcome variable and food insecurity as the main predictor. In bivariate analyses, food insecurity was significantly associated with depression [odds ratio (OR) 2.5; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.1, 5.5; p = 0.03]. When we accounted for social support, food insecurity was no longer significant. We found no differences in the quality or quantity of dietary intake between the food insecure and food secure groups. Our findings highlight the importance of social support in the association between food insecurity and depression. Food insecurity may reflect social support more than actual dietary intake in this population.

  6. Food Insecurity, Depression, and Social Support in HIV-infected Hispanic Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Kapulsky, Leonid; Tang, Alice M

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous research has identified an association between food insecurity and depression in a variety of world regions in both healthy and HIV-infected individuals. We examined this association in 183 HIV-infected Hispanic adults from the Greater Boston area. Methods We measured depression with the Burnam Depression Screen and food insecurity with the Radimer/Cornell Questionnaire. Dietary intake was assessed with an adapted version of the Block Food Frequency Questionnaire. Logistic regression models were created with depression as the outcome variable and food insecurity as the main predictor. Results In bivariate analyses, food insecurity was significantly associated with depression (odds ratio [OR] = 2.5; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.1, 5.5; P = 0.03). When we accounted for social support, food insecurity was no longer significant. We found no differences in the quality or quantity of dietary intake between the food insecure and food secure groups. Discussion Our findings highlight the importance of social support in the association between food insecurity and depression. Food insecurity may reflect social support more than actual dietary intake in this population. PMID:25047405

  7. Serological Response to Treatment of Syphilis with Doxycycline Compared with Penicillin in HIV-infected Individuals.

    PubMed

    Salado-Rasmussen, Kirsten; Hoffmann, Steen; Cowan, Susan; Jensen, Jørgen Skov; Benfield, Thomas; Gerstoft, Jan; Katzenstein, Terese Lea

    2016-08-23

    Serological response to treatment of syphilis with orally administered doxycycline or intramuscularly administered penicillin was assessed in patients with concurrent HIV. All HIV-infected individuals diagnosed with syphilis attending 3 hospitals in Copenhagen, Denmark were included. Odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) associated with serological outcome were modelled using propensity-score-adjusted logistic regression analysis. In total, 202 cases were treated with doxycycline or intramuscular penicillin. At 12 months, serological failure was observed in 12 cases (15%) treated with doxycycline and in 8 cases (17%) treated with penicillin (OR 0.78 (95% CI 0.16-3.88), p = 0.76). The serological cure rate at 12 months was highest in patients with primary syphilis (100%), followed by patients with secondary (89%), early latent (71%) and late latent (67%) syphilis (p = 0.006). In conclusion, this study provides evidence for the use of doxycycline as a treatment option when treating a HIV-infected population for syphilis.

  8. Quantitative Evaluation of an Instrument to Identify Chronic Pain in HIV-Infected Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Westfall, Andrew O.; Chamot, Eric; Saag, Michael; Walcott, Melonie; Ritchie, Christine; Kertesz, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A method to rapidly identify the presence of chronic pain would enhance the care of HIV-infected individuals, but such an instrument has not been assessed in this population to date. We assessed the construct validity of the two-question Brief Chronic Pain Questionnaire (BCPQ) in HIV-infected patients by assessing the association between BCPQ responses and known correlates of chronic pain. Participants in the University of Alabama Center for AIDS Research Network of Integrated Clinical Systems cohort completed the BCPQ, along with the EuroQOL to assess physical function, the PHQ-9 to assess depression, and the PHQ-anxiety module to assess anxiety. Among 100 participants, 25% were female, the mean age was 45 (SD 12), 63% were African American, 27% were publicly insured, the median CD4+ T cell count was 572 cells/mm3 (IQR 307–788), and 82% had an undetectable viral load. Participants with chronic pain were more likely to have impaired mobility (43% vs. 12%, p=0.001), difficulty with usual activities (47% vs. 12%, p<0.001), lower overall health state (70 vs. 84, p=0.002), pain today (80% vs. 27%, p<0.001), depression (30% vs. 15%, p=0.10), and anxiety (43% vs. 10%, p<0.001) than those without chronic pain. This study provides preliminary evidence for the BCPQ as a brief questionnaire to identify the presence of chronic pain in HIV care settings. PMID:25693683

  9. Depressive Symptoms, Lifestyle Structure, and ART Adherence Among HIV-Infected Individuals: A Longitudinal Mediation Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Blashill, Aaron J.; Safren, Steven A.; Wagner, Glenn J.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the well-documented relationship between depression and antiretroviral therapy (ART) non-adherence, few studies have identified explanatory pathways through which depression affects adherence. The current study tested lifestyle structure—the degree of organization and routinization of daily activities—as a mediator of this relationship, given previous evidence of lifestyle structure being associated with both depression and ART nonadherence. HIV-infected individuals starting or re-starting ART in the California Collaborative Treatment Group 578 study (n = 199) were assessed over 48 weeks. Adherence was measured using electronic monitoring caps to determine dose timing and doses taken, and viral load was assessed. The mediating role of lifestyle structure was tested using generalized linear mixed-effects modeling and bootstrapping. Lifestyle significantly mediated the relationship between depression and both measures of ART adherence behavior. Interventions that minimize disruptions to lifestyle structure and link adherence to daily activities may be useful for individuals with depression and ART nonadherence. PMID:24874725

  10. Depressive symptoms, lifestyle structure, and ART adherence among HIV-infected individuals: a longitudinal mediation analysis.

    PubMed

    Magidson, Jessica F; Blashill, Aaron J; Safren, Steven A; Wagner, Glenn J

    2015-01-01

    Despite the well-documented relationship between depression and antiretroviral therapy (ART) nonadherence, few studies have identified explanatory pathways through which depression affects adherence. The current study tested lifestyle structure-the degree of organization and routinization of daily activities-as a mediator of this relationship, given previous evidence of lifestyle structure being associated with both depression and ART nonadherence. HIV-infected individuals starting or re-starting ART in the California Collaborative Treatment Group 578 study (n = 199) were assessed over 48 weeks. Adherence was measured using electronic monitoring caps to determine dose timing and doses taken, and viral load was assessed. The mediating role of lifestyle structure was tested using generalized linear mixed-effects modeling and bootstrapping. Lifestyle significantly mediated the relationship between depression and both measures of ART adherence behavior. Interventions that minimize disruptions to lifestyle structure and link adherence to daily activities may be useful for individuals with depression and ART nonadherence.

  11. The Wide Range Achievement Test-4 Reading Subtest “Holds” in HIV-infected Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Casaletto, K. B.; Cattie, J.; Franklin, D. R.; Moore, D. J.; Woods, S. P.; Grant, I.; Heaton, R. K.

    2014-01-01

    Background In order to detect HIV-associated neurocognitive decline, it is important to accurately estimate individuals’ premorbid levels of cognitive functioning. Although previous studies have operated under the assumption that word reading tests are valid and stable indicators of premorbid abilities in HIV infection, studies of other populations have found this is not always the case. Therefore, it is important to empirically examine the validity of word reading tests as estimates of premorbid functioning specifically within the HIV population. Methods The Wide Range Achievement Test-4 Reading subtest (WRAT-4 Reading) was administered along with comprehensive neurocognitive assessments to 150 HIV seropositive (HIV+) and 76 HIV seronegative (HIV-) age-, education-, and sex-matched participants at baseline; a subset of 48 HIV+ individuals completed a second study visit (M=14.4 months), in which the alternate version of the WRAT-4 was administered. Results Although HIV+ individuals evidenced worse current neurocognitive functioning than HIV- participants, WRAT-4 Reading performance was comparable between groups. Longitudinally, HIV+ participants evidenced improved disease and neuropsychological functioning, yet WRAT-4 Reading demonstrated strong test-retest reliability, no practice effect, and did not differ between the initial and follow-up assessments. Test-retest differences in reading performance were minor and not associated with changes in neurocognitive performance or changes in HIV disease. Conclusions We found no evidence of WRAT-4 Reading performance decline in HIV infection, despite HIV+/HIV- group differences in neurocognitive functioning. Additionally, reading performances among HIV+ individuals demonstrated consistency across study visits. These results begin to support the validity of the WRAT-4 Reading subtest as an indicator of premorbid cognitive functioning in HIV+ individuals. PMID:25283135

  12. Interventions to Address Chronic Disease and HIV: Strategies to Promote Exercise and Nutrition Among HIV-Infected Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Botros, Diana; Somarriba, Gabriel; Neri, Daniela; Miller, Tracie L.

    2012-01-01

    Food insecurity, micronutrient deficits, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, obesity, cardiovascular disease, and bone disorders complicate the treatment of HIV infection. Nutrition and exercise interventions can be effective in ameliorating these symptoms that are associated with HIV and antiretroviral therapy (ART). In this literature review, we examine the most recent nutrition and exercise interventions for HIV-infected patients. Macronutrient supplementation can be useful in treating malnutrition and wasting. Multivitamin (vitamin B complex, vitamin C, and vitamin E) supplements and vitamin D may improve quality of life and decrease morbidity and mortality. Nutritional counseling and exercise interventions are effective for treating obesity, fat redistribution, and metabolic abnormalities. Physical activity interventions improve body composition, strength, and fitness in HIV-infected individuals. Taken collectively, the evidence suggests that a proactive approach to nutrition and physical activity guidance and interventions can improve outcomes and help abrogate the adverse metabolic, cardiovascular, and psychological consequences of HIV and its treatments. PMID:22933247

  13. Interventions to address chronic disease and HIV: strategies to promote exercise and nutrition among HIV-infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Botros, Diana; Somarriba, Gabriel; Neri, Daniela; Miller, Tracie L

    2012-12-01

    Food insecurity, micronutrient deficits, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, obesity, cardiovascular disease, and bone disorders complicate the treatment of HIV infection. Nutrition and exercise interventions can be effective in ameliorating these symptoms that are associated with HIV and antiretroviral therapy (ART). In this literature review, we examine the most recent nutrition and exercise interventions for HIV-infected patients. Macronutrient supplementation can be useful in treating malnutrition and wasting. Multivitamin (vitamin B complex, vitamin C, and vitamin E) supplements and vitamin D may improve quality of life and decrease morbidity and mortality. Nutritional counseling and exercise interventions are effective for treating obesity, fat redistribution, and metabolic abnormalities. Physical activity interventions improve body composition, strength, and fitness in HIV-infected individuals. Taken collectively, the evidence suggests that a proactive approach to nutrition and physical activity guidance and interventions can improve outcomes and help abrogate the adverse metabolic, cardiovascular, and psychological consequences of HIV and its treatments.

  14. Phylogenetic reconstruction of transmission events from individuals with acute HIV infection: toward more-rigorous epidemiological definitions.

    PubMed

    Brown, Alison E; Gifford, Robert J; Clewley, Jonathan P; Kucherer, Claudia; Masquelier, Bernard; Porter, Kholoud; Balotta, Claudia; Back, Nicole K T; Jorgensen, Louise Bruun; de Mendoza, Carmen; Bhaskaran, Krishnan; Gill, O Noel; Johnson, Anne M; Pillay, Deenan

    2009-02-01

    Phylogenetic reconstructions of transmission events from individuals with acute human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection are conducted to illustrate this group's heightened infectivity. Varied definitions of acute infection and assumptions about observed phylogenetic clusters may produce misleading results. We conducted a phylogenetic analysis of HIV pol sequences from 165 European patients with estimated infection dates and calculated the difference between dates within clusters. Nine phylogenetic clusters were observed. Comparison of dates within clusters revealed that only 2 could have been generated during acute infection. Previous analyses may have incorrectly assigned transmission events to the acutely HIV infected when they were more likely to have occurred during chronic infection.

  15. Is diabetes prevalence higher among HIV-infected individuals compared with the general population? Evidence from MMP and NHANES 2009–2010

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Romieu, Alfonso C; Garg, Shikha; Rosenberg, Eli S; Thompson-Paul, Angela M; Skarbinski, Jacek

    2017-01-01

    Background Nationally representative estimates of diabetes mellitus (DM) prevalence among HIV-infected adults in the USA are lacking, and whether HIV-infected adults are at increased risk of DM compared with the general adult population remains controversial. Methods We used nationally representative survey (2009–2010) data from the Medical Monitoring Project (n=8610 HIV-infected adults) and the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n=5604 general population adults) and fit logistic regression models to determine and compare weighted prevalences of DM between the two populations, and examine factors associated with DM among HIV-infected adults. Results DM prevalence among HIV-infected adults was 10.3% (95% CI 9.2% to 11.5%). DM prevalence was 3.8% (CI 1.8% to 5.8%) higher in HIV-infected adults compared with general population adults. HIV-infected subgroups, including women (prevalence difference 5.0%, CI 2.3% to 7.7%), individuals aged 20–44 (4.1%, CI 2.7% to 5.5%), and non-obese individuals (3.5%, CI 1.4% to 5.6%), had increased DM prevalence compared with general population adults. Factors associated with DM among HIV-infected adults included age, duration of HIV infection, geometric mean CD4 cell count, and obesity. Conclusions 1 in 10 HIV-infected adults receiving medical care had DM. Although obesity contributes to DM risk among HIV-infected adults, comparisons to the general adult population suggest that DM among HIV-infected persons may develop at earlier ages and in the absence of obesity. PMID:28191320

  16. Intravaginal Practices, Bacterial Vaginosis, and HIV Infection in Women: Individual Participant Data Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Low, Nicola; Chersich, Matthew F.; Schmidlin, Kurt; Egger, Matthias; Francis, Suzanna C.; H. H. M. van de Wijgert, Janneke; Hayes, Richard J.; Baeten, Jared M.; Brown, Joelle; Delany-Moretlwe, Sinead; Kaul, Rupert; McGrath, Nuala; Morrison, Charles; Myer, Landon; Temmerman, Marleen; van der Straten, Ariane; Watson-Jones, Deborah; Zwahlen, Marcel; Martin Hilber, Adriane

    2011-01-01

    Background Identifying modifiable factors that increase women's vulnerability to HIV is a critical step in developing effective female-initiated prevention interventions. The primary objective of this study was to pool individual participant data from prospective longitudinal studies to investigate the association between intravaginal practices and acquisition of HIV infection among women in sub-Saharan Africa. Secondary objectives were to investigate associations between intravaginal practices and disrupted vaginal flora; and between disrupted vaginal flora and HIV acquisition. Methods and Findings We conducted a meta-analysis of individual participant data from 13 prospective cohort studies involving 14,874 women, of whom 791 acquired HIV infection during 21,218 woman years of follow-up. Data were pooled using random-effects meta-analysis. The level of between-study heterogeneity was low in all analyses (I2 values 0.0%–16.1%). Intravaginal use of cloth or paper (pooled adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] 1.47, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.18–1.83), insertion of products to dry or tighten the vagina (aHR 1.31, 95% CI 1.00–1.71), and intravaginal cleaning with soap (aHR 1.24, 95% CI 1.01–1.53) remained associated with HIV acquisition after controlling for age, marital status, and number of sex partners in the past 3 months. Intravaginal cleaning with soap was also associated with the development of intermediate vaginal flora and bacterial vaginosis in women with normal vaginal flora at baseline (pooled adjusted odds ratio [OR] 1.24, 95% CI 1.04–1.47). Use of cloth or paper was not associated with the development of disrupted vaginal flora. Intermediate vaginal flora and bacterial vaginosis were each associated with HIV acquisition in multivariable models when measured at baseline (aHR 1.54 and 1.69, p<0.001) or at the visit before the estimated date of HIV infection (aHR 1.41 and 1.53, p<0.001), respectively. Conclusions This study provides evidence to suggest

  17. Appearance concerns and psychological distress among HIV-infected individuals with injection drug use histories: prospective analyses.

    PubMed

    Blashill, Aaron J; Gordon, Janna R; Safren, Steven A

    2012-09-01

    Morphologic alterations in body composition are common among HIV-infected individuals, and these changes are associated with increased appearance concerns. Previous cross-sectional data indicate that appearance concerns among HIV-infected individuals are related to increased levels of psychological distress. However, to date, no known prospective data have been published on these relationships. The purpose of the current study was to address the temporal prediction of appearance concerns on depression and anxiety severity. Data were culled from a prospective, randomized controlled trial of cognitive behavioral therapy for depression and medication adherence in individuals with a history of injection drug use (IDU). Participants were 89 HIV-infected individuals who were randomized to either a cognitive behavioral therapy or treatment as usual condition. Linear mixed-level modeling revealed elevated levels of appearance concerns were prospectively related to increased depression and anxiety, as rated by both clinician-administered and self-report measures. Appearance concerns among depressed, IDU, HIV-infected individuals are associated with changes in psychological distress. Psychosocial interventions should consider the role of appearance as it relates to psychological functioning.

  18. Binge Drinking is Associated with Differences in Weekday and Weekend Adherence in HIV-Infected Individuals

    PubMed Central

    De Boni, Raquel B.; Zheng, Lu; Rosenkranz, Susan L.; Sun, Xin; Lavenberg, Jeffrey; Cardoso, Sandra W.; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; La Rosa, Alberto; Pierre, Samuel; Severe, Patrice; Cohn, Susan E.; Collier, Ann C.; Gross, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Background Understanding patterns of antiretroviral adherence and its predictors is important for designing tailored interventions. Alcohol use is associated with non-adherence. This study aimed to evaluate: 1) if there was a difference in weekday compared with weekend adherence in HIV-infected individuals from low and middle income countries (LMIC), and 2) whether binge drinking was associated with this difference. Methods Data from a randomized trial conducted at 9 sites in 8 LMIC were analyzed. Microelectronic monitors were used to measure adherence. Differences between weekday and weekend adherence in each quarter (successive 12-week periods) were compared using Wilcoxon signed rank tests and predictors of adherence, including baseline binge drinking, were evaluated using Generalized Estimating Equations. Results Data from 255 participants were analyzed: 49.8% were male, median age was 37 years and 28.6% enrolled in Haiti. At study entry, only 2.7% reported illicit substance use, but 22.3% reported binge drinking at least once in the 30 days prior to enrollment. Adherence was higher on weekdays than weekends (median percent doses taken: 96.0% vs 94.4%; 93.7% vs 91.7%; 92.6% vs 89.7% and 93.7% vs 89.7% in quarters 1–4 respectively, all p<0.001). Binge drinking at baseline and time on study were both associated with greater differences between weekday and weekend adherence. Conclusions Adherence was worse on weekends compared to weekdays: difference was small at treatment initiation, increased over time and was associated with binge drinking. Screening and new interventions to address binge drinking, a potentially modifiable behavior, may improve adherence in HIV-infected individuals in LMIC. PMID:26774947

  19. Effect of secondary preventive therapy on recurrence of tuberculosis in HIV-infected individuals: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Bruins, Wassilis Sc; van Leth, Frank

    2017-03-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals successfully treated for tuberculosis (TB) remain at risk of recurrence of the disease, especially in high TB incidence settings. We performed a systematic review, investigating whether secondary preventive therapy (sPT) with anti-TB drugs (preventive therapy in former TB patients with treatment success) is an effective strategy to prevent recurrence of TB in this patient group. We searched the databases PubMed, Cochrane Library, EMBASE, Web of Science and Google Scholar using the keywords HIV-infections, HIV, human immunodeficiency virus, AIDS, isoniazid, isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT), tuberculosis, TB, recurrence and recurrent disease, resulting in 253 potential publications. We identified eight publications for full text assessment, after which four articles qualified for inclusion in this systematic review. The quality of the included articles was rated using the GRADE system. All but one study were rated as having a high quality. In all included studies, sPT significantly decreased the incidence of recurrent TB in HIV-infected individuals to a substantial degree in comparison to non-treatment or placebo. Relative reductions varied from 55.0% to 82.1%. These data showed that the use of sPT to prevent recurrent TB in HIV-infected individuals was highly beneficial. These findings need to be confirmed in prospective studies with an adequate assessment of the effect of antiretroviral therapy (ART) and the occurrence of drug resistance.

  20. Increased Rates of Respiratory and Diarrheal Illnesses in HIV-Negative Persons Living With HIV-Infected Individuals in a Densely Populated Urban Slum in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Joshua M.; Cosmas, Leonard; Nyachieo, Dhillon; Williamson, John M.; Olack, Beatrice; Okoth, George; Njuguna, Henry; Feikin, Daniel R.; Burke, Heather; Montgomery, Joel M.; Breiman, Robert F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Prolonged pathogen shedding and increased duration of illness associated with infections in immunosuppressed individuals put close human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–negative contacts of HIV-infected persons at increased risk of exposure to infectious pathogens. Methods We calculated incidence and longitudinal prevalence (number of days per year) of influenzalike illness (ILI), diarrhea, and nonspecific febrile illness during 2008 from a population-based surveillance program in the urban slum of Kibera (Kenya) that included 1830 HIV-negative household contacts of HIV-infected individuals and 13 677 individuals living in exclusively HIV-negative households. Results For individuals ≥5 years old, incidence was significantly increased for ILI (risk ratio [RR], 1.47; P < .05) and diarrhea (RR, 1.41; P < .05) in HIV-negative household contacts of HIV-infected individuals compared with exclusively HIV-negative households. The risk of illness among HIV-negative persons was directly proportional to the number of HIV-infected persons living in the home for ILI (RR, 1.39; P < .05) and diarrhea (RR, 1.36; P < .01). We found no increased rates of illness in children <5 years old who lived with HIV-infected individuals. Conclusions Living with HIV-infected individuals is associated with modestly increased rates of respiratory and diarrheal infections in HIV-negative individuals >5 years old. Targeted interventions are needed, including ensuring that HIV-infected persons are receiving appropriate care and treatment. PMID:25722292

  1. Seropositive individuals willingness to communicate, self-efficacy, and assertiveness prior to HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Crowell, Tara L

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine possible communication similarities between human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positive and HIV negative individuals. Forty HIV positive heterosexuals, who were infected through heterosexual sex, completed an on-line questionnaire to assess their safer sexual communication, willingness to communicate, condom self-efficacy, and assertiveness prior to HIV infection. Results indicate that prior to infection, HIV positive heterosexuals reported having similar safer sexual communication behaviors to those not infected with the virus. Participants in this study reported high levels of willingness to engage in safer sex communication, but low levels of actual communication. Further, results reveal that participants who engaged more often in safer sex communication were more likely to use condoms. Additionally, participants reported high levels of condom self-efficacy and moderate levels of assertiveness; both variables positively correlated with condom use. Finally, participants reported that they believed they did not need to discuss using condoms because they were not at risk. Previous safer sexual communication research reveals HIV negative individuals reported engaging in the same behaviors and holding the same beliefs reported by seropositive individuals. Hence, discussion of the importance of safer sexual communication and the utility of personalization to increase the communication of HIV negative individuals is explored.

  2. HIV Prevalence and Risks Associated with HIV Infection among Transgender Individuals in Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Ngak, Song; Srean, Chhim; Sansothy, Neth; Mills, Stephen; Ferradini, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    = 3.25 [1.35,7.85]) were independently associated with HIV infection. Conclusions This study confirms transgender individuals as one of the highest-risk groups for HIV infection in Cambodia. It suggests the need for programmatic strategies that mitigate identified associated risks and facilitate access to HIV care for this population. PMID:27070152

  3. Chemokines in cerebrospinal fluid correlate with cerebral metabolite patterns in HIV-infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Letendre, Scott L; Zheng, Jialin C; Kaul, Marcus; Yiannoutsos, Constantin T; Ellis, Ronald J; Taylor, Michael J; Marquie-Beck, Jennifer; Navia, Bradford

    2011-02-01

    Chemokines influence HIV neuropathogenesis by affecting the HIV life cycle, trafficking of macrophages into the nervous system, glial activation, and neuronal signaling and repair processes; however, knowledge of their relationship to in vivo measures of cerebral injury is limited. The primary objective of this study was to determine the relationship between a panel of chemokines in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and cerebral metabolites measured by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) in a cohort of HIV-infected individuals. One hundred seventy-one stored CSF specimens were assayed from HIV-infected individuals who were enrolled in two ACTG studies that evaluated the relationship between neuropsychological performance and cerebral metabolites. Concentrations of six chemokines (fractalkine, IL-8, IP-10, MCP-1, MIP-1β, and SDF-1) were measured and compared with cerebral metabolites individually and as composite neuronal, basal ganglia, and inflammatory patterns. IP-10 and MCP-1 were the chemokines most strongly associated with individual cerebral metabolites. Specifically, (1) higher IP-10 levels correlated with lower N-acetyl aspartate (NAA)/creatine (Cr) ratios in the frontal white matter and higher MI/Cr ratios in all three brain regions considered and (2) higher MCP-1 levels correlated with lower NAA/Cr ratios in frontal white matter and the parietal cortex. IP-10, MCP-1, and IL-8 had the strongest associations with patterns of cerebral metabolites. In particular, higher levels of IP-10 correlated with lower neuronal pattern scores and higher basal ganglia and inflammatory pattern scores, the same pattern which has been associated with HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). Subgroup analysis indicated that the effects of IP-10 and IL-8 were influenced by effective antiretroviral therapy and that memantine treatment may mitigate the neuronal effects of IP-10. This study supports the role of chemokines in HAND and the validity of MRS as an assessment

  4. Identification of Germinal Center B Cells in Blood from HIV-infected Drug-naive Individuals in Central Africa

    PubMed Central

    Béniguel, Lydie; Bégaud, Evelyne; Cognasse, Fabrice; Gabrié, Philippe; Mbolidi, Christophe D.; Sabido, Odile; Marovich, Mary A.; deFontaine, Christiane; Frésard, Anne; Lucht, Frédéric; Genin, Christian; Garraud, Olivier

    2004-01-01

    To better understand the pathophysiology of B cell populations—the precursors of antibody secreting cells—during chronic human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, we examined the phenotype of circulating B cells in newly diagnosed Africans. We found that all African individuals displayed low levels of naive B cells and of memory-type CD27+ B cells, and high levels of differentiated B cells. On the other hand, HIV-infected African patients had a population of germinal center B cells (i.e. CD20+, sIgM-, sIgD+, CD77+, CD138±), which are generally restricted to lymph nodes and do not circulate unless the lymph node architecture is altered. The first observations could be linked to the tropical environment whereas the presence of germinal center B cells may be attributable to chronic exposure to HIV as it is not observed in HIV-negative African controls and HAART treated HIV-infected Europeans. It may impact the management of HIV infection in countries with limited access to HIV drugs and urges consideration for implementation of therapeutic vaccines. PMID:15154608

  5. Epidemiological Characterization of Individuals With Newly Reported HIV Infection: South Carolina, 2004–2005

    PubMed Central

    Ogbuanu, Ikechukwu U.; Torres, Myriam E.; Kettinger, Lynda; Albrecht, Helmut

    2009-01-01

    Objectives. We used statewide data to assess HIV disease stage at initial diagnosis and laboratory indications for initiating antiretroviral therapy among South Carolina residents with newly diagnosed HIV infection. Methods. Initial CD4+ counts and viral loads among individuals diagnosed with HIV between May 2004 and April 2005 were categorized according to current staging and treatment guidelines. Results. Of 759 individuals who had a CD4+ count reported, 34% and 56% had counts of 200 cells/mm3 or below and 350 cells/mm3 or below, respectively. CD4+ counts of 200 cells/mm3 or below were significantly associated with male gender (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 2.07; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.36, 3.16), age above 29 years (AOR = 2.45; 95% CI = 1.51, 3.96), and hospital-reported patients (AOR = 2.17; 95% CI = 1.41, 3.36). The same characteristics were significant risk factors for elevated viral loads. Conclusions. At least in South Carolina, HIV diagnoses are delayed in a significant percentage of patients. New testing strategies need to be implemented to encourage earlier HIV diagnoses, and future studies should evaluate the effects of expanded routine testing on earlier detection. PMID:18048784

  6. Gut Homing CD4+ and CD8+ T-Cell Frequencies in HIV Infected Individuals on Antiretroviral Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Briceño, Olivia; Pinto-Cardoso, Sandra; Rodríguez-Bernabe, Nataly; Murakami-Ogasawara, Akio; Reyes-Terán, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    The depletion of mucosal CD4+ T-cells occurs early in HIV infection and despite years on antiretroviral treatment (ART), this population never reconstitutes to pre-HIV infection levels. In an effort to understand the effect of ART initiation and different ART regimens on the reconstitution of mucosal T cells within the gut associated lymphoid tissue (GALT), we quantified the frequency of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells expressing the gut homing receptors CCR9 and β7 in peripheral blood (PB) of HIV infected individuals naive to ART and treated individuals on both short-term (less than a year) and long-term ART (more than 2 years). We found that the gut homing CD4+ T cells were depleted in ART-naive individuals and increased after ART initiation but levels were not comparable to HIV uninfected individuals. Gut homing CD4+ T cell activation decreased after ART initiation whilst gut homing CD8+ T cell activation remained elevated in ART experienced individuals, especially in those individuals taking protease inhibitors. Our findings provide new insights into the effects of ART initiation and ART regimens on the frequency and immune status of gut homing CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. PMID:27898686

  7. Incidence and Risk Factors of Nasal Carriage of Staphylococcus aureus in HIV-Infected Individuals in Comparison to HIV-Uninfected Individuals: A Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Kotpal, Ruchi; S, Krishna Prakash; Bhalla, Preena; Dewan, Richa; Kaur, Ravinder

    2016-01-01

    The study was conducted to evaluate the prevalence of nasal colonization of Staphylococcus aureus in individuals with HIV infection attending the Integrated Counselling and Testing Centre in a teaching hospital and compare the prevalence with HIV-uninfected individuals. A case-control study was conducted among newly diagnosed HIV-infected individuals and an equal number of age-group and sex-matched HIV-uninfected individuals, and nasal swabs were collected from both the samples. Sociodemographic and clinical data were collected through individual interviews. Ethical aspects were respected. A total of 100 individuals participated in the study, and 22 (44%) of the 50 HIV-infected cases were colonized by S aureus, including 19 (86.4%) methicillin-sensitive S aureus (MSSA) and 3 (13.6%) methicillin-resistant S aureus (MRSA). Only 12 (24%) strains were isolated from 50 HIV-uninfected individuals, with 11 being MSSA and 1 being MRSA. This difference in the isolation rate was statistically significant (P = .035). The 2 most commonly encountered risk factors in both the groups appeared to be history of tuberculosis and history of surgical procedures but none being statistically significant (P = .093 and P = .996). All the strains of S aureus were sensitive to mupirocin. The study concluded that HIV-infected individuals are at a higher risk of carriage as compared to HIV-uninfected individuals. By eliminating carriage in immunocompromised individuals, infections due to S aureus can also be minimized.

  8. The association between food insecurity and mortality among HIV-infected individuals on HAART

    PubMed Central

    Weiser, Sheri D.; Fernandes, Kimberly A.; Brandson, Eirikka K.; Lima, Viviane D.; Anema, Aranka; Bangsberg, David R.; Montaner, Julio S.; Hogg, Robert S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Food insecurity is increasingly recognized as a barrier to optimal treatment outcomes but there is little data on this issue. We assessed associations between food insecurity and mortality in HIV-infected antiretroviral therapy (ART)-treated individuals in Vancouver, British Columbia (BC), and whether body max index (BMI) modified associations. Methods Individuals were recruited from the BC HIV/AIDS drug treatment program in 1998 and 1999, and were followed until June 2007 for outcomes. Food insecurity was measured with the Radimer/Cornell questionnaire. Cox proportional hazard models were used to determine associations between food insecurity, BMI and non-accidental deaths when controlling for confounders. Results Among 1119 participants, 536 (48%) were categorized as food insecure and 160 (14%) were categorized as underweight (BMI <18.5). After a median follow-up time of 8.2 years, 153 individuals (14%) had died from non-accidental deaths. After controlling for adherence, CD4 counts, and socioeconomic variables, people who were food insecure and underweight were nearly two times more likely to die (Adjusted hazard ratio [AHR]=1.94, 95% Confidence interval [CI]=1.10-3.40) compared with people who were not food insecure or underweight. There was also a trend towards increased risk of mortality among people who were food insecure and not underweight (AHR= 1.40, 95% CI=0.91-2.05). In contrast, people who were underweight but food secure were not more likely to die. Conclusions Food insecurity is a risk factor for mortality among ART-treated individuals in BC, particularly among individuals who are underweight. Innovative approaches to address food insecurity should be incorporated into HIV treatment programs. PMID:19675463

  9. Immunologic characteristics of HIV-infected individuals who make broadly neutralizing antibodies.

    PubMed

    Borrow, Persephone; Moody, M Anthony

    2017-01-01

    Induction of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) capable of inhibiting infection with diverse variants of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is a key, as-yet-unachieved goal of prophylactic HIV-1 vaccine strategies. However, some HIV-infected individuals develop bnAbs after approximately 2-4 years of infection, enabling analysis of features of these antibodies and the immunological environment that enables their induction. Distinct subsets of CD4(+) T cells play opposing roles in the regulation of humoral responses: T follicular helper (Tfh) cells support germinal center formation and provide help for affinity maturation and the development of memory B cells and plasma cells, while regulatory CD4(+) (Treg) cells including T follicular regulatory (Tfr) cells inhibit the germinal center reaction to limit autoantibody production. BnAbs exhibit high somatic mutation frequencies, long third heavy-chain complementarity determining regions, and/or autoreactivity, suggesting that bnAb generation is likely to be highly dependent on the activity of CD4(+) Tfh cells, and may be constrained by host tolerance controls. This review discusses what is known about the immunological environment during HIV-1 infection, in particular alterations in CD4(+) Tfh, Treg, and Tfr populations and autoantibody generation, and how this is related to bnAb development, and considers the implications for HIV-1 vaccine design.

  10. Treatment Considerations for HIV-Infected Individuals with Severe Mental Illness

    PubMed Central

    Himelhoch, Seth; Walkup, James; Eisenberg, Marlene M.

    2013-01-01

    There has been a general recognition of a syndemic that includes HIV/AIDS and serve mental illnesses including schizophrenia, major depression, bipolar disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, and others. The pathophysiology and direction of effects between severe mental illness and HIV infection is less clear however, and relatively little work has been done on prevention and treatment for people with these complex, co-occurring conditions. Here we present the most recent work that has been published on HIV and mental illness. Further, we describe the need for better treatments for “triply diagnosed persons”; those with HIV, mental illness, and substance abuse and dependence. Finally, we describe the potential drug-drug interactions between psychotropic medications and anti-retrovirals, and the need for better treatment guidelines in this area. We describe one example of an individually tailored intervention for persons with serious mental illness and HIV (PATH+) that shows that integrated community-based treatments using advanced practice nurses (APNs) as health navigators can be successful in improving health-related quality of life and reducing the burden of disease in these persons. PMID:24158425

  11. Hepatitis C in HIV-infected individuals: a systematic review and meta-analysis of estimated prevalence in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Azevedo, Tiago Castro Lopes; Zwahlen, Marcel; Rauch, Andri; Egger, Matthias; Wandeler, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Although hepatitis C virus (HCV) screening is recommended for all HIV-infected patients initiating antiretroviral therapy, data on epidemiologic characteristics of HCV infection in resource-limited settings are scarce. Methods We searched PubMed and EMBASE for studies assessing the prevalence of HCV infection among HIV-infected individuals in Africa and extracted data on laboratory methods used. Prevalence estimates from individual studies were combined for each country using random-effects meta-analysis. The importance of study design, population and setting as well as type of test (anti-HCV antibody tests and polymerase chain reactions) was examined with meta-regression. Results Three randomized controlled trials, 28 cohort studies and 121 cross-sectional analyses with 108,180 HIV-infected individuals from 35 countries were included. The majority of data came from outpatient populations (55%), followed by blood donors (15%) and pregnant women (14%). Based on estimates from 159 study populations, anti-HCV positivity prevalence ranged between 3.3% (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.8–4.7) in Southern Africa and 42.3% (95% CI 4.1–80.5) in North Africa. Study design, type of setting and age distribution did not influence this prevalence significantly. The prevalence of replicating HCV infection, estimated from data of 29 cohorts, was 2.0% (95% CI 1.5–2.6). Ten studies from nine countries reported the HCV genotype of 74 samples, 53% were genotype 1, 24% genotype 2, 14% genotype 4 and 9% genotypes 3, 5 or 6. Conclusions The prevalence of anti-HCV antibodies is high in HIV-infected patients in Africa, but replicating HCV infection is rare and varies widely across countries. PMID:27293220

  12. Dysregulation of alveolar macrophage PPARγ, NADPH oxidases and TGFβ1 in otherwise healthy HIV-infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Yeligar, Samantha M; Ward, Janine M; Harris, Frank L; Brown, Lou Ann; Guidot, David; Cribbs, Sushma K

    2017-03-17

    Rationale: Despite antiretroviral therapy (ART), respiratory infections increase mortality in individuals living with chronic human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. In experimental and clinical studies of chronic HIV infection, alveolar macrophages (AMs) exhibit impaired phagocytosis and bacterial clearance. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)γ, NADPH oxidase (Nox) isoforms Nox1, Nox2, Nox4, and transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGFβ1) are critical mediators of AM oxidative stress and phagocytic dysfunction. Therefore, we hypothesized that HIV alters AM expression of these targets, resulting in chronic lung oxidative stress and subsequent immune dysfunction. Methods: A cross-sectional study of HIV-infected (n=22) and HIV-uninfected (n=6) subjects was conducted. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed and AMs were isolated. Lung H2O2 generation was determined by measuring H2O2 in the BAL fluid. In AMs, PPARγ, Nox1, Nox2, Nox4, and TGFβ1 mRNA (qRT-PCR) and protein (fluorescent immunomicroscopy) levels were assessed. Results: Compared to HIV-uninfected (control) subjects, HIV-infected subjects were relatively older and the majority were African American; ~86% were on ART and their median CD4 count was 445 with a median viral load of 0 log copies/mL. HIV infection was associated with increased H2O2 in the BAL, decreased AM mRNA and protein levels of PPARγ, and increased AM mRNA and protein levels of Nox1, Nox2, Nox4, and TGFβ1. Conclusions: PPARγ attenuation and increases in Nox1, Nox2, Nox4, and TGFβ1 contribute to AM oxidative stress and immune dysfunction in the AMs of otherwise healthy HIV-infected subjects. These findings provide novel insights into the molecular mechanisms by which HIV increases susceptibility to pulmonary infections.

  13. Acyclovir Prophylaxis Reduces the Incidence of Herpes Zoster Among HIV-Infected Individuals: Results of a Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Barnabas, Ruanne V; Baeten, Jared M; Lingappa, Jairam R; Thomas, Katherine K; Hughes, James P; Mugo, Nelly R; Delany-Moretlwe, Sinead; Gray, Glenda; Rees, Helen; Mujugira, Andrew; Ronald, Allan; Stevens, Wendy; Kapiga, Saidi; Wald, Anna; Celum, Connie

    2016-02-15

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected persons have higher rates of herpes zoster than HIV-uninfected individuals. We assessed whether twice daily treatment with 400 mg of oral acyclovir reduces the incidence of herpes zoster in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial among 3408 persons coinfected with HIV and herpes simplex virus type 2. During 5175 person-years of follow-up, 26 cases of herpes zoster occurred among those assigned acyclovir, compared with 69 cases among those assigned placebo (rates, 1.00 and 2.68/100 person-years, respectively), a relative decrease of 62% (hazard ratio, 0.38; 95% confidence interval, .24-.67; P < .001). Daily acyclovir prophylaxis significantly reduced herpes zoster incidence among HIV-infected persons.

  14. Synthetic consensus HIV-1 DNA induces potent cellular immune responses and synthesis of granzyme B, perforin in HIV infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Morrow, Matthew P; Tebas, Pablo; Yan, Jian; Ramirez, Lorenzo; Slager, Anna; Kraynyak, Kim; Diehl, Malissa; Shah, Divya; Khan, Amir; Lee, Jessica; Boyer, Jean; Kim, J Joseph; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Weiner, David B; Bagarazzi, Mark L

    2015-03-01

    This study evaluated the safety and immunogenicity of PENNVAX-B in 12 HIV infected individuals. PENNVAX-B is a combination of three optimized synthetic plasmids encoding for multiclade HIV Gag and Pol and a consensus CladeB Env delivered by electroporation. HIV infected individuals whose virus was effectively suppressed using highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) received PENNVAX-B DNA followed by electroporation with CELLECTRA-5P at study weeks 0, 4, 8, and 16. Local administration site and systemic reactions to PENNVAX-B were recorded after each treatment along with any adverse events. Pain of the treatment procedure was assessed using a Visual Analog Scale. Whole PBMCs were isolated for use in IFN ELISpot and Flow Cytometric assays. PENNVAX-B was generally safe and well tolerated. Overall, the four dose regimen was not associated with any serious adverse events or severe local or systemic reactions. A rise in antigen-specific SFU was detected in the INFγ ELISpot assay in all 12 participants. T cells from 8/12 participants loaded with both granzyme B and perforin in response to HIV antigen, an immune finding characteristic of long-term nonprogressors (LTNPs) and elite controllers (ECs). Thus administration of PENNVAX-B may prove useful adjunctive therapy to ART for treatment and control of HIV infection.

  15. Synthetic Consensus HIV-1 DNA Induces Potent Cellular Immune Responses and Synthesis of Granzyme B, Perforin in HIV Infected Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Morrow, Matthew P; Tebas, Pablo; Yan, Jian; Ramirez, Lorenzo; Slager, Anna; Kraynyak, Kim; Diehl, Malissa; Shah, Divya; Khan, Amir; Lee, Jessica; Boyer, Jean; Kim, J Joseph; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Weiner, David B; Bagarazzi, Mark L

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the safety and immunogenicity of PENNVAX-B in 12 HIV infected individuals. PENNVAX-B is a combination of three optimized synthetic plasmids encoding for multiclade HIV Gag and Pol and a consensus CladeB Env delivered by electroporation. HIV infected individuals whose virus was effectively suppressed using highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) received PENNVAX-B DNA followed by electroporation with CELLECTRA-5P at study weeks 0, 4, 8, and 16. Local administration site and systemic reactions to PENNVAX-B were recorded after each treatment along with any adverse events. Pain of the treatment procedure was assessed using a Visual Analog Scale. Whole PBMCs were isolated for use in IFN ELISpot and Flow Cytometric assays. PENNVAX-B was generally safe and well tolerated. Overall, the four dose regimen was not associated with any serious adverse events or severe local or systemic reactions. A rise in antigen-specific SFU was detected in the INFγ ELISpot assay in all 12 participants. T cells from 8/12 participants loaded with both granzyme B and perforin in response to HIV antigen, an immune finding characteristic of long-term nonprogressors (LTNPs) and elite controllers (ECs). Thus administration of PENNVAX-B may prove useful adjunctive therapy to ART for treatment and control of HIV infection. PMID:25531694

  16. Factors Associated with D-Dimer Levels in HIV-Infected Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Borges, Álvaro H.; O’Connor, Jemma L.; Phillips, Andrew N.; Baker, Jason V.; Vjecha, Michael J.; Losso, Marcelo H.; Klinker, Hartwig; Lopardo, Gustavo; Williams, Ian; Lundgren, Jens D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Higher plasma D-dimer levels are strong predictors of mortality in HIV+ individuals. The factors associated with D-dimer levels during HIV infection, however, remain poorly understood. Methods In this cross-sectional study, participants in three randomized controlled trials with measured D-dimer levels were included (N = 9,848). Factors associated with D-dimer were identified by linear regression. Covariates investigated were: age, gender, race, body mass index, nadir and baseline CD4+ count, plasma HIV RNA levels, markers of inflammation (C-reactive protein [CRP], interleukin-6 [IL-6]), antiretroviral therapy (ART) use, ART regimens, co-morbidities (hepatitis B/C, diabetes mellitus, prior cardiovascular disease), smoking, renal function (estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR] and cystatin C) and cholesterol. Results Women from all age groups had higher D-dimer levels than men, though a steeper increase of D-dimer with age occurred in men. Hepatitis B/C co-infection was the only co-morbidity associated with higher D-dimer levels. In this subgroup, the degree of hepatic fibrosis, as demonstrated by higher hyaluronic acid levels, but not viral load of hepatitis viruses, was positively correlated with D-dimer. Other factors independently associated with higher D-dimer levels were black race, higher plasma HIV RNA levels, being off ART at baseline, and increased levels of CRP, IL-6 and cystatin C. In contrast, higher baseline CD4+ counts and higher high-density lipoprotein cholesterol were negatively correlated with D-dimer levels. Conclusions D-dimer levels increase with age in HIV+ men, but are already elevated in women at an early age due to reasons other than a higher burden of concomitant diseases. In hepatitis B/C co-infected individuals, hepatic fibrosis, but not hepatitis viral load, was associated with higher D-dimer levels. PMID:24626096

  17. Probiotics Reduce Inflammation in Antiretroviral Treated, HIV-Infected Individuals: Results of the “Probio-HIV” Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    d’Ettorre, Gabriella; Ceccarelli, Giancarlo; Giustini, Noemi; Serafino, Sara; Calantone, Nina; De Girolamo, Gabriella; Bianchi, Luigi; Bellelli, Valeria; Ascoli-Bartoli, Tommaso; Marcellini, Sonia; Turriziani, Ombretta; Brenchley, Jason M.; Vullo, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Background HIV infection results in damage to the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, microbial translocation and immune activation. These are not completely normalized with combined antiretroviral therapy (cART). Moreover, increate morbidity and mortality of cART-treated HIV-infected individuals is associated with inflammation. Methods In order to enhance GI tract immunity, we recruited and treated 20 HIV-infected humans with cART supplemented with probiotics and followed inflammation and immunological parameters (clinical trial number NCT02164344). 11 HIV seronegative subjects were included as control group. The enumeration of CD4+, CD8+, CD38+ and HLA-DR+ lymphocytes were evaluated on peripheral blood; HIV-RNA levels, sCD14, d-dimer, C-reactive protein (CRP) high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), IL-6 and Lipopolysaccharide Binding Protein (LBP) were assayed on plasma. Results We observe that cART does not normalize the levels of immune activation in HIV positive patients anyway inflammation and markers of microbial translocation were significantly reduced with probiotic supplementation. Patients show a clear and statistically significant reduction in the levels of immune activation on CD4 T-lymphocytes, for both markers CD38 and HLA-DR and their simultaneous expression, LBP and hsCRP plasma levels after probiotic diet supplementation settling to values comparable to controls. Conclusions Supplementing cART with probiotics in HIV-infected individuals may improve GI tract immunity and there by mitigate inflammatory sequelae, ultimately improving prognosis. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02164344 PMID:26376436

  18. Liposomal Glutathione Supplementation Restores TH1 Cytokine Response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection in HIV-Infected Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Ly, Judy; Lagman, Minette; Saing, Tommy; Singh, Manpreet Kaur; Tudela, Enrique Vera; Morris, Devin; Anderson, Jessica; Daliva, John; Ochoa, Cesar; Patel, Nishita; Pearce, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Cytokines are signaling biomolecules that serve as key regulators of our immune system. CD4+ T-cells can be grouped into 2 major categories based on their cytokine profile: T-helper 1 (TH1) subset and T-helper 2 (TH2) subset. Protective immunity against HIV infection requires TH1-directed CD4 T-cell responses, mediated by cytokines, such as interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-12, interferon-γ (IFN-γ), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). Cytokines released by the TH1 subset of CD4 T-cells are considered important for mediating effective immune responses against intracellular pathogens such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb). Oxidative stress and redox imbalance that occur during HIV infection often lead to inappropriate immune responses. Glutathione (GSH) is an antioxidant present in nearly all cells and is recognized for its function in maintaining redox homeostasis. Our laboratory previously reported that individuals with HIV infection have lower levels of GSH. In this study, we report a link between lower levels of GSH and dysregulation of TH1- and TH2-associated cytokines in the plasma samples of HIV-positive subjects. Furthermore, we demonstrate that supplementing individuals with HIV infection for 13 weeks with liposomal GSH (lGSH) resulted in a significant increase in the levels of TH1 cytokines, IL-1β, IL-12, IFN-γ, and TNF-α. lGSH supplementation in individuals with HIV infection also resulted in a substantial decrease in the levels of free radicals and immunosuppressive cytokines, IL-10 and TGF-β, relative to those in a placebo-controlled cohort. Finally, we determined the effects of lGSH supplementation in improving the functions of immune cells to control M. tb infection by conducting in vitro assays using peripheral blood mononuclear cells collected from HIV-positive individuals at post-GSH supplementation. Our studies establish a correlation between low levels of GSH and increased susceptibility to M. tb infection through TH2-directed response

  19. Liposomal Glutathione Supplementation Restores TH1 Cytokine Response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection in HIV-Infected Individuals.

    PubMed

    Ly, Judy; Lagman, Minette; Saing, Tommy; Singh, Manpreet Kaur; Tudela, Enrique Vera; Morris, Devin; Anderson, Jessica; Daliva, John; Ochoa, Cesar; Patel, Nishita; Pearce, Daniel; Venketaraman, Vishwanath

    2015-11-01

    Cytokines are signaling biomolecules that serve as key regulators of our immune system. CD4(+) T-cells can be grouped into 2 major categories based on their cytokine profile: T-helper 1 (TH1) subset and T-helper 2 (TH2) subset. Protective immunity against HIV infection requires TH1-directed CD4 T-cell responses, mediated by cytokines, such as interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-12, interferon-γ (IFN-γ), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). Cytokines released by the TH1 subset of CD4 T-cells are considered important for mediating effective immune responses against intracellular pathogens such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb). Oxidative stress and redox imbalance that occur during HIV infection often lead to inappropriate immune responses. Glutathione (GSH) is an antioxidant present in nearly all cells and is recognized for its function in maintaining redox homeostasis. Our laboratory previously reported that individuals with HIV infection have lower levels of GSH. In this study, we report a link between lower levels of GSH and dysregulation of TH1- and TH2-associated cytokines in the plasma samples of HIV-positive subjects. Furthermore, we demonstrate that supplementing individuals with HIV infection for 13 weeks with liposomal GSH (lGSH) resulted in a significant increase in the levels of TH1 cytokines, IL-1β, IL-12, IFN-γ, and TNF-α. lGSH supplementation in individuals with HIV infection also resulted in a substantial decrease in the levels of free radicals and immunosuppressive cytokines, IL-10 and TGF-β, relative to those in a placebo-controlled cohort. Finally, we determined the effects of lGSH supplementation in improving the functions of immune cells to control M. tb infection by conducting in vitro assays using peripheral blood mononuclear cells collected from HIV-positive individuals at post-GSH supplementation. Our studies establish a correlation between low levels of GSH and increased susceptibility to M. tb infection through TH2-directed response

  20. The Confidentiality Rights of HIV-Infected Individuals within a School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams-Nepote, Sue

    The right of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infected students and staff members to continue in the public school system without disruption has been legally established. However, the question now lies in the legal implications of confidentiality. School districts must implement policies and procedures to ensure medical record confidentiality of…

  1. High prevalence of food insecurity among HIV-infected individuals receiving HAART in a resource-rich setting.

    PubMed

    Anema, A; Weiser, S D; Fernandes, K A; Ding, E; Brandson, E K; Palmer, A; Montaner, J S G; Hogg, R S

    2011-02-01

    This study aimed to assess the prevalence and correlates of food insecurity in a cohort of HIV-infected individuals on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in British Columbia (BC), Canada. Adults receiving HAART voluntarily enrolled into the Longitudinal Investigations into Supportive and Ancillary Health Services (LISA) cohort. Individual food insecurity was measured using a modified version of the Radimer/Cornell Questionnaire. We performed bivariate analyses to determine differences between explanatory variables for individuals who were food secure and food insecure. We performed logistic regression to determine independent predictors of food insecurity. Of the 457 individuals enrolled in the LISA cohort, 324 (71.0%) were found to be food insecure. Multivariate analysis indicated that individuals who had an annual incomes less than $15,000 (odds ratio [OR] 3.15, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.83, 5.44), used illicit drugs (OR 1.85, 95% CI 1.03, 3.33), smoked tobacco (OR 2.30, 95% CI 1.30, 4.07), had depressive symptoms (OR 2.34, 95% CI 1.38, 3.96), and were younger (OR 0.95, 95% CI, 0.92, 0.98) were more likely to be food insecure. Our results demonstrated a high (71%) prevalence of food insecurity among HIV-infected individuals receiving HAART in this resource-rich setting, and that food insecurity is associated with a compendium of environmental and behavioral factors. More research is needed to understand the biological and social pathways linking food insecurity to these variables in order to identify program strategies that can effectively improve food security among HIV-infected populations.

  2. Epigenome-wide differential DNA methylation between HIV-infected and uninfected individuals.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinyu; Justice, Amy C; Hu, Ying; Wang, Zuoheng; Zhao, Hongyu; Wang, Guilin; Johnson, Eric O; Emu, Brinda; Sutton, Richard E; Krystal, John H; Xu, Ke

    2016-08-12

    Epigenetic control of human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) genes is critical for viral integration and latency. However, epigenetic changes in the HIV-1-infected host genome have not been well characterized. Here, we report the first large-scale epigenome-wide association study of DNA methylation for HIV-1 infection. We recruited HIV-infected (n = 261) and uninfected (n = 117) patients from the Veteran Aging Cohort Study (VACS) and all samples were profiled for 485,521 CpG sites in DNA extracted from the blood. After adjusting for cell type and clinical confounders, we identified 20 epigenome-wide significant CpGs for HIV-1 infection. Importantly, 2 CpGs in the promoter of the NLR family, CARD domain containing gene 5 (NLRC5), a key regulator of major histocompatibility complex class I gene expression, showed significantly lower methylation in HIV-infected subjects than in uninfected subjects (cg07839457: t = -6.03, Pnominal = 4.96 × 10(-9); cg16411857: t = -7.63, Pnominal = 3.07 × 10(-13)). Hypomethylation of these 2 CpGs was replicated in an independent sample (GSE67705: cg07839457: t = -4.44, Pnominal = 1.61 × 10(-5); cg16411857: t = -5.90; P = 1.99 × 10(-8)). Methylation of these 2 CpGs in NLRC5 was negatively correlated with viral load in the 2 HIV-infected samples (cg07839457: P = 1.8 × 10(-4); cg16411857: P = 0.03 in the VACS; and cg07839457: P = 0.04; cg164111857: P = 0.01 in GSE53840). Our findings demonstrate that differential DNA methylation is associated with HIV infection and suggest the involvement of a novel host gene, NLRC5, in HIV pathogenesis.

  3. Epigenome-wide differential DNA methylation between HIV-infected and uninfected individuals

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xinyu; Justice, Amy C.; Hu, Ying; Wang, Zuoheng; Zhao, Hongyu; Wang, Guilin; Johnson, Eric O.; Emu, Brinda; Sutton, Richard E.; Krystal, John H.; Xu, Ke

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Epigenetic control of human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) genes is critical for viral integration and latency. However, epigenetic changes in the HIV-1-infected host genome have not been well characterized. Here, we report the first large-scale epigenome-wide association study of DNA methylation for HIV-1 infection. We recruited HIV-infected (n = 261) and uninfected (n = 117) patients from the Veteran Aging Cohort Study (VACS) and all samples were profiled for 485,521 CpG sites in DNA extracted from the blood. After adjusting for cell type and clinical confounders, we identified 20 epigenome-wide significant CpGs for HIV-1 infection. Importantly, 2 CpGs in the promoter of the NLR family, CARD domain containing gene 5 (NLRC5), a key regulator of major histocompatibility complex class I gene expression, showed significantly lower methylation in HIV-infected subjects than in uninfected subjects (cg07839457: t = −6.03, Pnominal = 4.96 × 10−9; cg16411857: t = −7.63, Pnominal = 3.07 × 10−13). Hypomethylation of these 2 CpGs was replicated in an independent sample (GSE67705: cg07839457: t = −4.44, Pnominal = 1.61 × 10−5; cg16411857: t = −5.90; P = 1.99 × 10−8). Methylation of these 2 CpGs in NLRC5 was negatively correlated with viral load in the 2 HIV-infected samples (cg07839457: P = 1.8 × 10−4; cg16411857: P = 0.03 in the VACS; and cg07839457: P = 0.04; cg164111857: P = 0.01 in GSE53840). Our findings demonstrate that differential DNA methylation is associated with HIV infection and suggest the involvement of a novel host gene, NLRC5, in HIV pathogenesis. PMID:27672717

  4. Associations between Cognition, Gender and Monocyte Activation among HIV Infected Individuals in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Royal, Walter; Cherner, Mariana; Burdo, Tricia H.; Umlauf, Anya; Letendre, Scott L.; Jumare, Jibreel; Abimiku, Alash’le; Alabi, Peter; Alkali, Nura; Bwala, Sunday; Okwuasaba, Kanayo; Eyzaguirre, Lindsay M.; Akolo, Christopher; Guo, Ming; Williams, Kenneth C.; Blattner, William A.

    2016-01-01

    The potential role of gender in the occurrence of HIV-related neurocognitive impairment (NCI) and associations with markers of HIV-related immune activity has not been previously examined. In this study 149 antiretroviral-naïve seropositive subjects in Nigeria (SP, 92 women and 57 men) and 58 seronegative (SN, 38 women and 20 men) were administered neuropsychological testing that assessed 7 ability domains. From the neuropsychological test scores was calculated a global deficit score (GDS), a measure of overall NCI. Percentages of circulating monocytes and plasma HIV RNA, soluble CD163 and soluble CD14 levels were also assessed. HIV SP women were found to be younger, more educated and had higher CD4+ T cell counts and borderline higher viral load measures than SP men. On the neuropsychological testing, SP women were more impaired in speed of information processing and verbal fluency and had a higher mean GDS than SN women. Compared to SP men, SP women were also more impaired in speed of information processing and verbal fluency as well as on tests of learning and memory. Numbers of circulating monocytes and plasma sCD14 and sCD163 levels were significantly higher for all SP versus all SN individuals and were also higher for SP women and for SP men versus their SN counterparts. Among SP women, soluble CD14 levels were slightly higher than for SP men, and SP women had higher viral load measurements and were more likely to have detectable virus than SP men. Higher sCD14 levels among SP women correlated with more severe global impairment, and higher viral load measurements correlated with higher monocyte numbers and sCD14 and sCD14 levels, associations that were not observed for SP men. These studies suggest that the risk of developing NCI differ for HIV infected women and men in Nigeria and, for women, may be linked to effects from higher plasma levels of HIV driving activation of circulating monocytes. PMID:26829391

  5. Associations between Cognition, Gender and Monocyte Activation among HIV Infected Individuals in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Royal, Walter; Cherner, Mariana; Burdo, Tricia H; Umlauf, Anya; Letendre, Scott L; Jumare, Jibreel; Abimiku, Alash'le; Alabi, Peter; Alkali, Nura; Bwala, Sunday; Okwuasaba, Kanayo; Eyzaguirre, Lindsay M; Akolo, Christopher; Guo, Ming; Williams, Kenneth C; Blattner, William A

    2016-01-01

    The potential role of gender in the occurrence of HIV-related neurocognitive impairment (NCI) and associations with markers of HIV-related immune activity has not been previously examined. In this study 149 antiretroviral-naïve seropositive subjects in Nigeria (SP, 92 women and 57 men) and 58 seronegative (SN, 38 women and 20 men) were administered neuropsychological testing that assessed 7 ability domains. From the neuropsychological test scores was calculated a global deficit score (GDS), a measure of overall NCI. Percentages of circulating monocytes and plasma HIV RNA, soluble CD163 and soluble CD14 levels were also assessed. HIV SP women were found to be younger, more educated and had higher CD4+ T cell counts and borderline higher viral load measures than SP men. On the neuropsychological testing, SP women were more impaired in speed of information processing and verbal fluency and had a higher mean GDS than SN women. Compared to SP men, SP women were also more impaired in speed of information processing and verbal fluency as well as on tests of learning and memory. Numbers of circulating monocytes and plasma sCD14 and sCD163 levels were significantly higher for all SP versus all SN individuals and were also higher for SP women and for SP men versus their SN counterparts. Among SP women, soluble CD14 levels were slightly higher than for SP men, and SP women had higher viral load measurements and were more likely to have detectable virus than SP men. Higher sCD14 levels among SP women correlated with more severe global impairment, and higher viral load measurements correlated with higher monocyte numbers and sCD14 and sCD14 levels, associations that were not observed for SP men. These studies suggest that the risk of developing NCI differ for HIV infected women and men in Nigeria and, for women, may be linked to effects from higher plasma levels of HIV driving activation of circulating monocytes.

  6. Metabolic syndrome before and after initiation of antiretroviral therapy in treatment-naïve HIV-infected individuals

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, S; Schouten, JT; Atkinson, B; Brown, T; Wohl, D; McComsey, GA; Glesby, MJ; Shikuma, C; Haubrich, R; Tebas, P; Campbell, TB; Jacobson, DL

    2012-01-01

    Background Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a cluster of risk factors for cardiovascular disease and diabetes, many of which are associated with HIV and antiretroviral therapy (ART). We examined prevalence and incidence of MetS, and risk factors for MetS in ART-naïve HIV-infected individuals starting ART. Methods MetS, defined by the Adult Treatment Panel III criteria, was assessed at and after ART initiation in HIV-infected individuals who enrolled in selected AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG) trials and were followed long-term after these trials as part of the ACTG Longitudinal Linked Randomized Trials cohort. Cox proportional hazards models were used to examine risk factors of incident MetS. Adjusted hazard ratios (aHR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) are reported. Results At ART initiation, the prevalence of MetS was 20%. After ART initiation, the incidence of MetS was 8.5 per 100 person-years. After adjusting for demographics and body mass index, the risk of MetS was decreased for CD4+ T-cell counts>50 cells/mm3 (aHR = 0.62, 95% CI=0.43 to 0.90 for CD4>500), and the risk was increased for HIV-1 RNA >400 copies/mL (aHR=1.55 (95% CI=1.25 to 1.92) and use of a protease-inhibitor (PI) based regimen (relative to no PI use, aHR=1.25 (95% CI=1.04 to 1.51) for any PI use). Conclusion In HIV-infected individuals on ART, virologic suppression and maintenance of high CD4+ T-cell counts may be potentially modifiable factors that can reduce the risk of MetS. The effect of MetS on the risk of cardiovascular disease and diabetes needs to be evaluated. PMID:22828718

  7. Alarming attrition rates among HIV-infected individuals in pre-antiretroviral therapy care in Myanmar, 2011–2014

    PubMed Central

    Oo, Myo Minn; Gupta, Vivek; Aung, Thet Ko; Kyaw, Nang Thu Thu; Oo, Htun Nyunt; Kumar, Ajay MV

    2016-01-01

    Background High retention rates have been documented among patients receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Myanmar. However, there is no information on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals in care before initiation of ART (pre-ART care). We assessed attrition (loss-to-follow-up [LTFU] and death) rates among HIV-infected individuals in pre-ART care and their associated factors over a 4-year period. Design In this retrospective cohort study, we extracted routinely collected data of HIV-infected adults (>15 years old) entering pre-ART care (June 2011–June 2014) as part of an Integrated HIV Care (IHC) programme, Myanmar. Attrition rates per 100 person-years and cumulative incidence of attrition were calculated. Factors associated with attrition were examined by calculating hazard ratios (HRs). Results Of 18,037 HIV-infected adults enrolled in the IHC programme, 11,464 (63%) entered pre-ART care (60% men, mean age 37 years, median cluster of differentiation 4 (CD4) cell count 160 cells/µL). Of the 11,464 eligible participants, 3,712 (32%) underwent attrition of which 43% were due to deaths and 57% were due to LTFU. The attrition rate was 78 per 100 person-years (95% CI, 75–80). The cumulative incidence of attrition was 70% at the end of a 4-year follow-up, of which nearly 90% occurred in the first 6 months. Male sex (HR 1.5, 95% CI 1.4–1.6), WHO clinical Stage 3 and 4, CD4 count <200 cells/µL, abnormal BMI, and anaemia were statistically significant predictors of attrition. Conclusions Pre-ART care attrition among persons living with HIV in Myanmar was alarmingly high – with most attrition occurring within the first 6 months. Strategies aimed at improving early HIV diagnosis and initiation of ART are needed. Suggestions include comprehensive nutrition support and intensified monitoring to prevent pre-ART care attrition by tracking patients who do not return for pre-ART care appointments. It is high time that Myanmar moves towards a

  8. Patient Navigation Facilitates Medical and Social Services Engagement Among HIV-Infected Individuals Leaving Jail and Returning to the Community

    PubMed Central

    Morewitz, Mark; Pearson, Charles; Weeks, John; Packard, Rebecca; Estes, Milton; Tulsky, Jacqueline; Kang-Dufour, Mi_Suk; Myers, Janet J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract HIV-infected individuals leaving jails, facilities typically used to confine accused persons awaiting trial or to incarcerate persons for minor offenses, often face barriers to engagement with medical and social-support services. Patient navigation is a model that may ease these barriers by supporting individuals in negotiating fragmented and highly bureaucratic systems for services and care. While there is evidence linking navigation to a reduction in health disparities, little is known about the mechanisms by which the model works. We present findings of an ethnographic study of interactions between navigators and their clients: HIV-infected men and women recently released from jails in San Francisco, California. We conducted 29 field observations of navigators as they accompanied their clients to appointments, and 40 in-depth interviews with clients and navigators. Navigators worked on strengthening clients' abilities to engage with social-services and care systems. Building this strength required navigators to gain clients' trust by leveraging their own similar life experiences or expressing social concordance. After establishing meaningful connections, navigators spent time with clients in their day-to-day environments serving as mentors while escorting clients to and through their appointments. Intensive time spent together, in combination with a shared background of incarceration, HIV, and drug use, was a critical mechanism of this model. This study illustrates that socially concordant navigators are well positioned to facilitate successful transition to care and social-services engagement among a vulnerable population. PMID:24517539

  9. Patient navigation facilitates medical and social services engagement among HIV-infected individuals leaving jail and returning to the community.

    PubMed

    Koester, Kimberly A; Morewitz, Mark; Pearson, Charles; Weeks, John; Packard, Rebecca; Estes, Milton; Tulsky, Jacqueline; Kang-Dufour, Mi Suk; Myers, Janet J

    2014-02-01

    HIV-infected individuals leaving jails, facilities typically used to confine accused persons awaiting trial or to incarcerate persons for minor offenses, often face barriers to engagement with medical and social-support services. Patient navigation is a model that may ease these barriers by supporting individuals in negotiating fragmented and highly bureaucratic systems for services and care. While there is evidence linking navigation to a reduction in health disparities, little is known about the mechanisms by which the model works. We present findings of an ethnographic study of interactions between navigators and their clients: HIV-infected men and women recently released from jails in San Francisco, California. We conducted 29 field observations of navigators as they accompanied their clients to appointments, and 40 in-depth interviews with clients and navigators. Navigators worked on strengthening clients' abilities to engage with social-services and care systems. Building this strength required navigators to gain clients' trust by leveraging their own similar life experiences or expressing social concordance. After establishing meaningful connections, navigators spent time with clients in their day-to-day environments serving as mentors while escorting clients to and through their appointments. Intensive time spent together, in combination with a shared background of incarceration, HIV, and drug use, was a critical mechanism of this model. This study illustrates that socially concordant navigators are well positioned to facilitate successful transition to care and social-services engagement among a vulnerable population.

  10. Prevalence and antifungal susceptibility of Candida parapsilosis complex isolates collected from oral cavities of HIV-infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Moris, D V; Melhem, M S C; Martins, M A; Souza, L R; Kacew, S; Szeszs, M W; Carvalho, L R; Pimenta-Rodrigues, M V; Berghs, H A M; Mendes, R P

    2012-12-01

    At present, few data are available on the prevalence and antifungal susceptibility of Candida parapsilosis complex isolates from HIV-infected individuals. The C. parapsilosis complex comprises three species, C. parapsilosis sensu stricto, C. metapsilosis and C. orthopsilosis. Fifteen of 318 Candida isolates were identified as members of the C. parapsilosis complex by PCR and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). The prevalence of C. parapsilosis complex isolates was 4.7 %, 2.2 % being identified as C. parapsilosis sensu stricto and 2.5 % as C. metapsilosis, while no C. orthopsilosis was isolated. This is believed to be the first study that has identified isolates of C. metapsilosis obtained from the oral cavity of HIV-infected individuals. Antifungal susceptibility tests indicated that all the isolates were susceptible to amphotericin B (AMB), fluconazole (FLC), ketoconazole (KTC), itraconazole (ITC), voriconazole (VRC) and caspofungin (CASPO). Although isolates of C. parapsilosis sensu stricto and C. metapsilosis were susceptible to FLC, isolates of C. metapsilosis showed a tendency for higher MICs (≥1.0 µg ml(-1)). Based upon the frequency of candidiasis and the fact that certain isolates of the C. parapsilosis complex respond differently to FLC therapy, our data may be of therapeutic relevance with respect to susceptibility and potential resistance to specific antifungal agents. Our data suggest that C. metapsilosis can be a human commensal; its importance as a pathogen has yet to be confirmed.

  11. Screening for Neurocognitive Impairment in HIV-Infected Individuals at First Contact after HIV Diagnosis: The Experience of a Large Clinical Center in Northern Italy.

    PubMed

    Focà, Emanuele; Magro, Paola; Motta, Davide; Compostella, Silvia; Casari, Salvatore; Bonito, Andrea; Brianese, Nigritella; Ferraresi, Alice; Rodari, Paola; Pezzoli, Maria Chiara; Quiros-Roldan, Eugenia; Castelli, Francesco

    2016-03-24

    Neurocognitive disorders are emerging, probably underestimated, complications in HIV-infected people. The aim of the study was to assess neurocognitive profiles of newly detected HIV-infected patients. We performed an observational retrospective single-cohort study. Illiterates and patients with neurologic symptoms or previous psychiatric diagnosis were excluded. Neuropsychological profiles were assessed using a validated battery of neuropsychological tests. We included 206 patients; with males representing the majority of them (85%). Risk factors for HIV acquisition were unprotected sexual intercourse (homo/bisexual in 39.8% and heterosexual in 60.2%). Thirty-nine patients (18.9%) were previous injection drug users, while 41 (19.9%) were alcohol abusers. Mean education was 11.1 years (SD--standard deviation--3.7). A high prevalence of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND, 47.1%) was present in HIV-infected patients: particularly, asymptomatic neurocognitive impairment (ANI) was found in 30.6%, mild neurocognitive disorder (MND) in 15% and HIV-associated dementia (HAD) in 1.5%. Male gender, low degree of education, AIDS diagnosis and gepatitis B virus (HBV) co-infection were factors independently associated with HAND in a multivariable logistic regression model. Our data suggest that patient-specific factors and AIDS diagnosis have a certain kind of impact in HAND occurrence. A complete neuropsychological screening must be recommended in all patients at HIV-infection diagnosis.

  12. Cognitive change trajectories in virally suppressed HIV-infected individuals indicate high prevalence of disease activity

    PubMed Central

    Gott, Chloe; Gates, Thomas; Dermody, Nadene; Brew, Bruce J.

    2017-01-01

    Background The longitudinal rate and profile of cognitive decline in persons with stable, treated, and virally suppressed HIV infection is not established. To address this question, the current study quantifies the rate of cognitive decline in a cohort of virally suppressed HIV+ persons using clinically relevant definitions of decline, and determine cognitive trajectories taking into account historical and baseline HAND status. Methods Ninety-six HIV+ (clinically stable and virally undetectable) and 44 demographically comparable HIV- participants underwent standard neuropsychological testing at baseline and 18-months follow-up. We described clinically relevant cognitive trajectories based on standard definitions of historical and baseline HAND status and cognitive decline. Historical, moderate to severe HAND was formally diagnosed at the start of the cART era in 15/96 participants based on clinical neurological and neuropsychological assessment. The same standard of care has been applied to all participants at St. Vincent’s Hospital Infectious Disease Department for the duration of their HIV infection (median of 20 years). Results Relative to HIV- controls (4.5%), 14% of HIV+ participants declined (p = .11), they also scored significantly lower on the global change score (p = .03), processing speed (p = .02), and mental flexibility/inhibition (p = .02) domains. Having HAND at baseline significantly predicted cognitive decline at follow up (p = .005). We determined seven clinically relevant cognitive trajectories taking into account whether participant has a history of HAND prior to study entry (yes/no); their results on the baseline assessment (baseline impairment: yes/no) and their results on the 18-month follow up (decline or stable) which in order of prevalence were: 1) No HAND history, no baseline impairment, 18-month follow-up stable (39%), 2) No HAND history, baseline impairment, 18-month follow-up stable (35%), 3) History of HAND; baseline impairment, 18

  13. Vitamin D Levels and Markers of Inflammation and Metabolism in HIV-Infected Individuals on Suppressive Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lake, Jordan E.; Wilhalme, Holly M.; Tseng, Chi-Hong; Currier, Judith S.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Data on vitamin D insufficiency as a cause of inflammation and metabolic dysfunction in HIV-infected individuals are conflicting. We examined the relationships between levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] and biomarkers of inflammation and metabolism in stored blood samples from a prospective trial of vitamin D repletion. Blood samples from HIV-infected individuals on antiretroviral therapy (ART) with HIV-1 RNA <200 copies/ml enrolled in a prospective study were analyzed for 25(OH)D levels, a broad panel of cytokines, highly sensitive C-reactive protein, D-dimer, adiponectin, leptin, and insulin. Correlations between markers and 25(OH)D levels were determined. The Wilcoxon Rank Sum test was used to compare markers between individuals 25(OH)D insufficient and sufficient at baseline and before and after repletion among those who were insufficient and repleted to ≥30 ng/ml after 12 weeks. Of 106 subjects with stored plasma [66 with 25(OH)D <30 ng/ml and 40 ≥ 30 ng/ml], the median age was 50, the CD4 count was 515 cells/mm3, 94% were male, and the median baseline 25(OH)D was 27 ng/ml. Higher 25(OH)D levels were associated with lower tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α (r = −0.20, p = 0.04) and higher adiponectin levels (r = 0.30, p = 0.002). Following successful repletion to 25(OH)D ≥30 ng/ml there were no significant changes in inflammatory or metabolic parameters. Our study found associations between low 25(OH)D levels and TNF-α and adiponectin. Repletion did not result in changes in markers of inflammation or metabolism. These data support continued study of the relationship between vitamin D, inflammation, and metabolism in treated HIV infection. PMID:26569649

  14. [The HIV infection - the limits of prevention concepts. Consideration with respect to responsibilities incumbent on the infected individual, politics and society at large].

    PubMed

    Dennin, R H; Doese, D; Theobald, W; Lafrenz, M

    2007-04-01

    Despite the introduction of campaigns to prevent the continued spread of HIV/AIDS in Germany, the number of annual firsttime HIV-diagnoses is continuing steadily. The concepts behind the current campaigns are largely based on models of New Public Health, of which social learning strategies are an essential element. The established personal and individual rights should be unimpeachable but the right not to know the status of HIV infection should be questioned for those people who spread their HIV infection intentionally and wilfully. Confronted with more than 10,000 people in Germany unconscious of their HIV infection, easy access to HIV testing and access of opportune therapy should be offered with the goal of reducing the number of new infections. Expanded strategies on the responsibility to one's personal health and that of the partner, understandable and adapted to special groups of the society, should be established and maintained at a high level of awareness. All measures must be performed voluntarily.

  15. Gene variation in IL-7 receptor (IL-7R)α affects IL-7R response in CD4+ T cells in HIV-infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Hartling, Hans Jakob; Ryder, Lars P; Ullum, Henrik; Ødum, Niels; Nielsen, Susanne Dam

    2017-02-09

    Optimal CD4+ T cell recovery after initiating combination antiretroviral treatment (cART) in HIV infection reduces risk of morbidity and mortality. T-allele homozygosity ('TT') in the single nucleotide polymorphism, rs6897932(C/T), in the IL-7 receptor α (IL-7RA) is associated with faster CD4+ T cell recovery after cART initiation compared to C-allele homozygosity in rs6897932 ('CC'). However, underlying mechanisms are unknown. We aimed to examine potential mechanisms explaining the association between rs6897932 and CD4+ T cell recovery. Ten 'TT' and 10 'CC' HIV-infected individuals matched on gender, age, and nadir and current CD4+ T cell counts were included in a cross-sectional study. 'TT' individuals had higher proportion of CD4+ T cells expressing pSTAT5 compared to 'CC' individuals after stimulating with IL-7, especially when co-stimulated with soluble IL7-RA (sIL-7RA). Furthermore, 'TT' individuals had a higher proportion of proliferating CD4+ T cells after 7 days of culture with IL-7 + sIL-7RA compared to 'CC' individuals. No differences between 'TT' and 'CC' in binding of biotinylated IL-7 were found. In conclusion, increased signal transduction and proliferation in response to IL-7 was found in 'TT' compared to 'CC' HIV-infected individuals providing a mechanistic explanation of the effect of rs6897932 T-allele on CD4+ T cell recovery in HIV infection.

  16. Cumulative Incidence of Cancer among HIV-infected Individuals in North America

    PubMed Central

    Silverberg, Michael J.; Lau, Bryan; Achenbach, Chad J.; Jing, Yuezhou; Althoff, Keri N.; D’Souza, Gypsyamber; Engels, Eric A.; Hessol, Nancy; Brooks, John T.; Burchell, Ann N.; Gill, M. John; Goedert, James J.; Hogg, Robert; Horberg, Michael A.; Kirk, Gregory D.; Kitahata, Mari M.; Korthuis, Phillip T.; Mathews, William C.; Mayor, Angel; Modur, Sharada P.; Napravnik, Sonia; Novak, Richard M.; Patel, Pragna; Rachlis, Anita R.; Sterling, Timothy R.; Willig, James H.; Justice, Amy C.; Moore, Richard D.; Dubrow, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Background Cancer is increasingly common among HIV patients given improved survival. Objective To examine calendar trends in cumulative cancer incidence and hazard rate by HIV status. Design Cohort study Setting North American AIDS Cohort Collaboration on Research and Design during 1996–2009 Patients 86,620 HIV-infected and 196,987 uninfected adults Measurements We estimated cancer-type-specific cumulative incidence by age 75 years by HIV status and calendar era, and examined calendar trends in cumulative incidence and hazard rates. Results Cumulative incidences (%) of cancer by age 75 (HIV+/HIV−) were: Kaposi sarcoma (KS), 4.4/0.01; non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL), 4.5/0.7; lung, 3.4/2.8; anal, 1.5/0.1; colorectal, 1.0/1.5; liver, 1.1/0.4; Hodgkin lymphoma (HL), 0.9/0.1; melanoma, 0.5/0.6; and oral cavity/pharyngeal, 0.8/0.8. Among HIV-infected subjects, we observed decreasing calendar trends in cumulative incidence and hazard rate for KS and NHL. For anal, colorectal and liver cancers, increasing cumulative incidence, but not hazard rate trends, were due to the decreasing mortality rate trend (−9% per year), allowing greater opportunity to be diagnosed with these cancer types. Despite decreasing hazard rate trends for lung, HL, and melanoma, we did not observe cumulative incidence trends due to the compensating effect of the declining mortality rate on cumulative incidence. Limitations Secular trends in screening, smoking, and viral co-infections were not evaluated. Conclusions Our analytic approach helped disentangle the effects of improved survival and changing cancer-specific hazard rates on cumulative incidence trends among HIV patients. Cumulative cancer incidence by age 75, approximating lifetime risk in HIV patients, may have clinical utility in this population. The high cumulative incidences by age 75 for KS, NHL, and lung cancer supports early and sustained ART and smoking cessation. Primary Funding Source National Institutes of Health PMID:26436616

  17. Changes in neurocognition and adherence over six months in HIV-infected individuals with cocaine or heroin dependence.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Albert M; Higgins, Melinda K; Ownby, Raymond L; Waldrop-Valverde, Drenna

    2015-01-01

    We sought to examine the course of adherence and cognition in HIV-infected individuals with either cocaine or heroin dependence and investigate independent predictors of cognition change. A prospective study over six months was undertaken in which adherence was measured by monthly electronic pill cap monitoring (Medication Event Monitoring System), while a comprehensive neuropsychological battery resulting in a composite score (NPZ8) was performed at baseline and six months. Multivariable regression models were performed in order to determine independent associations with change in cognition. There were 101 subjects at baseline, of whom 62% were male and 83% were non-Hispanic black. 46.6% of subjects at baseline had completed high school, 36.6% reported active cocaine use during the course of the study, and 0% reported active heroin use during the course of the study. 66 subjects completed the final cognitive assessment at six months. Subjects had markedly impaired cognitive function at baseline (NPZ8 -1.49) which persisted at six months (NPZ8 -1.47) in the group of study completers. There was an average monthly decrease in adherence of -2.91% overall (p = 0.008). In the multivariable model, each of the following variables: baseline cognition (R(2) change = 0.121, p = 0.006), cocaine use during the study (R(2) change = 0.059, p = 0.046), and monthly adherence change (R(2) change = 0.078, p = 0.018) independently contributed to NPZ8 change with an overall R(2) change = 0.219 (p = 0.001). This study shows an overall decrease in adherence over time in this population of subjects with a history of drug dependence. Active cocaine use, baseline cognition, and temporal adherence changes independently contributed to changes in cognition. Further study on enhancing adherence, cognition, and limiting drug abuse are warranted in this subgroup of HIV-infected individuals.

  18. Low-cost assays for monitoring HIV infected individuals in resource-limited settings

    PubMed Central

    Balakrishnan, Pachamuthu; Iqbal, Hussain Syed; Shanmugham, Saravanan; Mohanakrishnan, Janardhanan; Solomon, Sunil S.; Mayer, Kenneth H.; Solomon, Suniti

    2011-01-01

    Use of a combination of CD4 counts and HIV viral load testing in the management of antiretroviral therapy (ART) provides higher prognostic estimation of the risk of disease progression than does the use of either test alone. The standard methods to monitor HIV infection are flow cytometry based for CD4+ T cell count and molecular assays to quantify plasma viral load of HIV. Commercial assays have been routinely used in developed countries to monitor ART. However, these assays require expensive equipment and reagents, well trained operators, and established laboratory infrastructure. These requirements restrict their use in resource-limited settings where people are most afflicted with the HIV-1 epidemic. With the advent of low-cost and/or low-tech alternatives, the possibility of implementing CD4 count and viral load testing in the management of ART in resource-limited settings is increasing. However, an appropriate validation should have been done before putting them to use for patient testing. PMID:22310816

  19. Characteristics of foreign-born HIV infected individuals and differences by region of origin and gender.

    PubMed

    Carten, Monica L; Castillo-Mancilla, Jose R; Allshouse, Amanda A; Johnson, Steven C

    2013-08-01

    To compare foreign-born (FB) and US-born (USB) patients (pts) in a US HIV care program. Retrospective review. Data were collected on all FB and a random sample of 5 % of USB pts in an HIV clinic in Colorado, USA. Comparisons were made between FB pts and USB pts and among FB pts by global region of origin and sex. Among 150 FB and 59 USB pts, FB pts were younger (40 vs. 45 years), proportionately more female (39 vs. 17 %), with heterosexual sex as HIV risk factor (69 vs. 23 %) and reported substance use less (6 vs. 38 %) (All p ≤ 0.001) compared to USB pts. Age and substance differences persisted between FB and USB women. Significant differences also existed between FB and USB pts in reason for HIV test, tuberculosis and mental health diagnoses, and diagnosis of >1 co-morbidity, but not in mean CD4 cell count (502 vs. 569), antiretroviral therapy (ART) (92 vs. 90 %), or alcohol use (29 vs. 37 %). Compared to FB women, FB men were more commonly men that have sex with men, from Latin America/Caribbean, have HIV testing for illness, and have had a concomitant HIV and AIDS diagnosis while FB women were more commonly refugees, heterosexual and from Africa. Differences exist between FB and USB HIV-infected pts, and among FB pts themselves. HIV care and prevention programs must recognize and address these dissimilarities in order to maximize clinical outcomes, improve linkage to and continuity in care and optimize resource allocation.

  20. The Role of Current and Historical Alcohol Use in Hepatic Fibrosis Among HIV-Infected Individuals.

    PubMed

    Kim, H Nina; Crane, Heidi M; Rodriguez, Carla V; Van Rompaey, Stephen; Mayer, Kenneth H; Christopoulos, Katerina; Napravnik, Sonia; Chander, Geetanjali; Hutton, Heidi; McCaul, Mary E; Cachay, Edward R; Mugavero, Michael J; Moore, Richard; Geng, Elvin; Eron, Joseph J; Saag, Michael S; Merrill, Joseph O; Kitahata, Mari M

    2016-12-29

    We examined risk factors for advanced hepatic fibrosis [fibrosis-4 (FIB)-4 >3.25] including both current alcohol use and a diagnosis of alcohol use disorder among HIV-infected patients. Of the 12,849 patients in our study, 2133 (17%) reported current hazardous drinking by AUDIT-C, 2321 (18%) had a diagnosis of alcohol use disorder, 2376 (18%) were co-infected with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV); 596 (5%) had high FIB-4 scores >3.25 as did 364 (15%) of HIV/HCV coinfected patients. In multivariable analysis, HCV (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 6.3, 95% confidence interval (CI) 5.2-7.5), chronic hepatitis B (aOR 2.0, 95% CI 1.5-2.8), diabetes (aOR 2.3, 95% CI 1.8-2.9), current CD4 <200 cells/mm(3) (aOR 5.4, 95% CI 4.2-6.9) and HIV RNA >500 copies/mL (aOR 1.3, 95% CI 1.0-1.6) were significantly associated with advanced fibrosis. A diagnosis of an alcohol use disorder (aOR 1.9, 95% CI 1.6-2.3) rather than report of current hazardous alcohol use was associated with high FIB-4. However, among HIV/HCV coinfected patients, both current hazardous drinkers (aOR 1.6, 95% CI 1.1-2.4) and current non-drinkers (aOR 1.6, 95% CI 1.2-2.0) were more likely than non-hazardous drinkers to have high FIB-4, with the latter potentially reflecting the impact of sick abstainers. These findings highlight the importance of using a longitudinal measure of alcohol exposure when evaluating the impact of alcohol on liver disease and associated outcomes.

  1. Clinical features and preliminary studies of virological correlates of neurocognitive impairment among HIV-infected individuals in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Royal, Walter; Cherner, Mariana; Carr, Jean; Habib, Abdulrazaq G; Akomolafe, Abimbola; Abimiku, Alashl'e; Charurat, Manhattan; Farley, John; Oluyemisi, Akinwande; Mamadu, Ibrahim; Johnson, Joyce; Ellis, Ronald; McCutchan, J Allen; McCutchen, J Allen; Grant, Igor; Blattner, William A

    2012-06-01

    In Nigeria, the incidence and prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related neurocognitive impairment (NCI) are unknown and there currently exists little information related to the viral correlates rates of NCI. Therefore, studies were performed to examine the potential utility of applying an established neuropsychological (NP) screening battery and detailed NP testing to detect NCI and correlations with functional impairment and the presence of specific viral signatures among infected subjects. A total of 60 HIV-1 seropositive antiretroviral-naive individuals and 56 seronegative control subjects were administered the International HIV Dementia Scale (IHDS) and assessed for functional impairment using the Karnofsky performance status scale. Fifteen HIV-infected patients and 11 controls were also administered a detailed NP battery. Blood samples from eight infected subjects, three with evidence of NCI, were obtained for molecular analysis of HIV-1 strain. Unadjusted scores on the IHDS showed that, using a recommended total score cutoff of 10, 28.8% of the HIV-1 seropositive and 16.0% of seropositive individuals scored abnormally. Results from testing using the full NP battery showed that, overall, the HIV seropositive group performed worse than the seronegative group, with effect sizes spanning from small (0.25 on the trail making test A) to large (0.82 on action fluency), and an average effect size across the battery of 0.45, which approaches that which has been recorded in other international settings. Sequencing of partial pol amplicons from viral isolates revealed that two of three patients with NCI were infected with subtype G virus and 1 with the circulating recombinant form (CRF)02_AG; all four individuals without NCI were infected with CRF_02AG. These studies demonstrate the utility of the IHDS in identifying cognitive impairment among HIV infected individuals in Nigeria. Future studies aimed at examining the burden of NCI among the population of

  2. HIV-infected individuals with co-occurring bipolar disorder evidence poor antiretroviral and psychiatric medication adherence.

    PubMed

    Moore, David J; Posada, Carolina; Parikh, Mili; Arce, Miguel; Vaida, Florin; Riggs, Patricia K; Gouaux, Ben; Ellis, Ronald J; Letendre, Scott L; Grant, Igor; Atkinson, J Hampton

    2012-11-01

    The contribution of bipolar disorder (BD), a prevalent serious mental illness characterized by impulsivity and mood instability, to antiretroviral (ART) and psychiatric medication adherence among HIV-infected (HIV+) individuals is unknown. We examined medication adherence among 44 HIV+/BD+ persons as compared to 33 demographically- and medically-comparable HIV+/BD- persons. Classification of adherent (≥ 90%) or non-adherent (<90%) based on proportion of correctly taken doses over 30 days was determined using electronic medication monitoring devices. HIV+/BD+ persons were significantly less likely to be ART adherent (47.7%) as compared to HIV+/BD- (90.9%) persons. Within the HIV+/BD+ group, mean psychiatric medication adherence was significantly worse than ART medication adherence, although there was a significant correlation between ART and psychiatric adherence levels. Importantly, 30-day ART adherence was associated with plasma virologic response among HIV+/BD+ individuals. Given the high overlap of HIV and BD, and the observed medication adherence difficulties for these persons, specialized adherence improvement interventions are needed.

  3. HIV-infected individuals with co-occurring bipolar disorder evidence poor antiretroviral and psychiatric medication adherence

    PubMed Central

    Moore, David J.; Posada, Carolina; Parikh, Mili; Arce, Miguel; Vaida, Florin; Riggs, Patricia K.; Gouaux, Ben; Ellis, Ronald J.; Letendre, Scott L.; Grant, Igor; Atkinson, J. Hampton

    2012-01-01

    The contribution of bipolar disorder (BD), a prevalent serious mental illness characterized by impulsivity and mood instability, to antiretroviral (ART) and psychiatric medication adherence among HIV-infected (HIV+) individuals is unknown. We examined medication adherence among 44 HIV+/BD+ persons as compared to 33 demographically- and medically-comparable HIV+/BD− persons. Classification of adherent (≥90%) or non-adherent (<90%) based on proportion of correctly taken doses over 30 days was determined using electronic medication monitoring devices. HIV+/BD+ persons were significantly less likely to be ART adherent (47.7%) as compared to HIV+/BD− (90.9%) persons. Within the HIV+/BD+ group, mean psychiatric medication adherence was significantly worse than ART medication adherence, although there was a significant correlation between ART and psychiatric adherence levels. Importantly, 30-day ART adherence was associated with plasma virologic response among HIV+/BD+ individuals. Given the high overlap of HIV and BD, and the observed medication adherence difficulties for these persons, specialized adherence improvement interventions are needed. PMID:22041931

  4. Impact of HIV Infection on Diastolic Function and Left Ventricular Mass

    PubMed Central

    Hsue, Priscilla Y.; Hunt, Peter W.; Ho, Jennifer E.; Farah, Husam H.; Schnell, Amanda; Hoh, Rebecca; Martin, Jeffrey N.; Deeks, Steven G.; Bolger, Ann F.

    2010-01-01

    Background HIV patients have increased risk for cardiovascular disease, but the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of echocardiographic abnormalities among asymptomatic HIV-infected individuals compared to HIV-uninfected individuals. Methods/Results We performed echocardiography in 196 HIV-infected adults and 52 controls. Left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), left ventricular mass indexed to the body surface area (LVMI), and diastolic function were assessed according to American Society of Echocardiography standards. LVMI was higher in HIV-infected patients (77.2g/m2 in HIV patients vs. 66.5g/m2 in controls, p<0.0001). LVEF was similar in both groups. Eight(4%) of the HIV patients had evidence of LV systolic dysfunction (defined as an EF<50%) versus none of the controls; 97(50%) had mild diastolic dysfunction compared to 29% of the HIV-uninfected subjects (p=0.008). After adjustment for hypertension and race, HIV-infected participants had a mean 8g/m2 larger LVMI compared to controls (p=0.001). Higher LVMI was independently associated with lower nadir CD4 T cell count, suggesting that immunodeficiency may play a role in this process. After adjustment for age and traditional risk factors, HIV patients had a 2.4 greater odds of having diastolic dysfunction as compared to controls (p=0.019). Conclusions HIV-infected patients had a higher prevalence of diastolic dysfunction and higher LVMI compared to controls. These differences were not readily explained by differences in traditional risk factors and were independently associated with HIV infection. These results suggest that contemporary asymptomatic HIV patients manifest mild functional and morphological cardiac abnormalities which are independently associated with HIV infection. PMID:19933410

  5. The impact of food assistance on weight gain and disease progression among HIV-infected individuals accessing AIDS care and treatment services in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The evidence evaluating the benefits of programmatic nutrition interventions to HIV-infected individuals in developing countries, where there is a large overlap between HIV prevalence and malnutrition, is limited. This study evaluates the impact of food assistance (FA) on change in weight and disease progression as measured by WHO staging. Methods We utilize program data from The AIDS Support Organization (TASO) in Uganda to compare outcomes among FA recipients to a control group, using propensity score matching (PSM) methods among 14,481 HIV-infected TASO clients. Results FA resulted in a significant mean weight gain of 0.36 kg over one year period. This impact was conditional on anti-retroviral therapy (ART) receipt and disease stage at baseline. FA resulted in mean weight gain of 0.36 kg among individuals not receiving ART compared to their matched controls. HIV-infected individuals receiving FA with baseline WHO stage II and III had a significant weight gain (0.26 kg and 0.2 kg respectively) compared to their matched controls. Individuals with the most advanced disease at baseline (WHO stage IV) had the highest weight gain of 1.9 kg. The impact on disease progression was minimal. Individuals receiving FA were 2 percentage points less likely to progress by one or more WHO stage compared to their matched controls. There were no significant impacts on either outcome among individuals receiving ART. Conclusions Given the widespread overlap of HIV and malnutrition in sub-Saharan Africa, FA programs have the potential to improve weight and delay disease progression, especially among HIV-infected individuals not yet on ART. Additional well designed prospective studies evaluating the impact of FA are urgently needed. PMID:20529283

  6. Gene variation in IL-7 receptor (IL-7R)α affects IL-7R response in CD4+ T cells in HIV-infected individuals

    PubMed Central

    Hartling, Hans Jakob; Ryder, Lars P.; Ullum, Henrik; Ødum, Niels; Nielsen, Susanne Dam

    2017-01-01

    Optimal CD4+ T cell recovery after initiating combination antiretroviral treatment (cART) in HIV infection reduces risk of morbidity and mortality. T-allele homozygosity (‘TT’) in the single nucleotide polymorphism, rs6897932(C/T), in the IL-7 receptor α (IL-7RA) is associated with faster CD4+ T cell recovery after cART initiation compared to C-allele homozygosity in rs6897932 (‘CC’). However, underlying mechanisms are unknown. We aimed to examine potential mechanisms explaining the association between rs6897932 and CD4+ T cell recovery. Ten ‘TT’ and 10 ‘CC’ HIV-infected individuals matched on gender, age, and nadir and current CD4+ T cell counts were included in a cross-sectional study. ‘TT’ individuals had higher proportion of CD4+ T cells expressing pSTAT5 compared to ‘CC’ individuals after stimulating with IL-7, especially when co-stimulated with soluble IL7-RA (sIL-7RA). Furthermore, ‘TT’ individuals had a higher proportion of proliferating CD4+ T cells after 7 days of culture with IL-7 + sIL-7RA compared to ‘CC’ individuals. No differences between ‘TT’ and ‘CC’ in binding of biotinylated IL-7 were found. In conclusion, increased signal transduction and proliferation in response to IL-7 was found in ‘TT’ compared to ‘CC’ HIV-infected individuals providing a mechanistic explanation of the effect of rs6897932 T-allele on CD4+ T cell recovery in HIV infection. PMID:28181541

  7. A Cross Section Study to Determine the Prevalence of Antibodies against HIV Infection among Hepatitis B and C Infected Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Geane L.; de Almeida, Adilson J.; Miguel, Juliana C.; Cruz, Helena M.; Portilho, Moyra M.; de P. Scalioni, Letícia; Marques, Vanessa A.; Lewis-Ximenez, Lia Laura; Lampe, Elisabeth; Melo Villar, Livia

    2016-01-01

    (1) Background: There are limited data regarding human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevalence among hepatitis B virus (HBV) or hepatitis C virus (HCV) infected individuals. The aim of this cross-sectional study is to determine the prevalence of HBV and HCV infection among HIV individuals; (2) Methods: A total of 409 patients (126 HBV+ and 283 HCV+) referred to the Brazilian Reference Laboratory for Viral Hepatitis from 2010 to 2013 donated serum samples. Anti-HIV, HBsAg, anti-HBc, anti-HBs, anti-HBcIgM, anti-HBe, HBeAg, and anti-HCV antibodies were measured, and anti-HCV positive samples were tested for viral RNA and genotype; (3) Results: The anti-HIV antibody prevalence was 10.31% and 4.59% among HBV+ and HCV+ patients, respectively. The HCV mean (SD) viral load was log 5.14 ± 1.64 IU/mL, and genotype I was most prevalent (163/283). Anti-HBs and anti-HBc were detected in 40% and 26% of HCV+ individuals, respectively. Among the HBV+ population, the presence of anti-HIV antibodies was associated with male gender, marital status (married), tattoo, sexual orientation, sexual practices (oral sex and anal sex), history of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), history of viral hepatitis treatment, and a sexual partner with hepatitis or HIV. For the HCV+ group, the presence of anti-HIV antibodies was associated with female gender, marital status (married), anal intercourse, previous history of STDs, and number of sexual partners; (4) Conclusion: A high prevalence of anti-HIV antibodies was found among individuals with HBV and HCV, showing the importance of education programmes towards HIV infection among HBV- and HCV-infected individuals. PMID:26978383

  8. Longitudinal evaluation of regulatory T-cell dynamics on HIV-infected individuals during the first 2 years of therapy

    PubMed Central

    Nobrega, Claudia; Horta, Ana; Coutinho-Teixeira, Vítor; Martins-Ribeiro, Ana; Baldaia, Ana; Rb-Silva, Rita; Santos, Catarina L.; Sarmento-Castro, Rui; Correia-Neves, Margarida

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: A sizeable percentage of individuals infected by HIV and on antiretroviral therapy (ART) fail to increase their CD4+ T-cells to satisfactory levels. The percentage of regulatory T-cells (Tregs) has been suggested to contribute to this impairment. This study aimed to address this question and to expand the analysis of Tregs subpopulations during ART. Design: Longitudinal follow-up of 81 HIV-infected individuals during the first 24 months on ART. Methods: CD4+ T-cell counts, Tregs percentages, and specific Tregs subpopulations were evaluated at ART onset, 2, 6, 9, 12, 16, 20, and 24 months of ART (five individuals had no Tregs information at baseline). Results: The slope of CD4+ T-cell recovery was similar for individuals with moderate and with severe lymphopenia at ART onset. No evidence was found for a contribution of the baseline Tregs percentages on the CD4+ T-cell counts recovery throughout ART. In comparison to uninfected individuals, Tregs percentages were higher at ART onset only for patients with less than 200 cells/μl at baseline and decreased afterwards reaching normal values. Within Tregs, the percentage of naive cells remained low in these patients. Reduced thymic export and increased proliferation of Tregs vs. conventional CD4+ T cells might explain these persistent alterations. Conclusion: No effect of Tregs percentages at baseline was detected on CD4+ T-cell recovery. However, profound alterations on Tregs subpopulations were consistently observed throughout ART for patients with severe lymphopenia at ART onset. PMID:26919738

  9. Toll-Like Receptor 7 Agonist GS-9620 Induces HIV Expression and HIV-Specific Immunity in Cells from HIV-Infected Individuals on Suppressive Antiretroviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Angela; Irrinki, Alivelu; Kaur, Jasmine; Cihlar, Tomas; Kukolj, George; Sloan, Derek D; Murry, Jeffrey P

    2017-02-08

    Antiretroviral therapy can suppress HIV replication to undetectable levels but does not eliminate latent HIV, thus necessitating lifelong therapy. Recent efforts to target this persistent reservoir have focused on inducing the expression of latent HIV so that infected cells may be recognized and eliminated by the immune system. Toll like receptor (TLR) activation stimulates antiviral immunity and has been shown to induce HIV from latently infected cells. Activation of TLR7 leads to the production of several stimulatory cytokines, including type I interferons (IFNs). In this study, we show that the selective TLR7 agonist, GS-9620, induced HIV in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from HIV-infected individuals on suppressive antiretroviral therapy. GS-9620 increased extracellular HIV RNA 1.5-2-fold through a mechanism that required type I IFN signaling. GS-9620 also activated HIV-specific T cells and enhanced antibody-mediated clearance of HIV-infected cells. Activation by GS-9620 in combination with HIV peptide stimulation increased CD8 T cell degranulation, production of intracellular cytokines, and cytolytic activity. T cell activation was again dependent on type I IFNs produced by plasmacytoid dendritic cells. GS-9620 induced phagocytic cell maturation and improved effector-mediated killing of HIV-infected CD4 T cells by the HIV envelope-specific broadly neutralizing antibody PGT121. Collectively, these data show that GS-9620 can activate HIV production and improve the effector functions that target latently infected cells. GS-9620 may effectively complement orthogonal therapies designed to stimulate antiviral immunity, such as therapeutic vaccines or broadly neutralizing antibodies. Clinical studies are underway to determine if GS-9620 can target HIV reservoirs.IMPORTANCE Though antiretroviral therapies effectively suppress viral replication, they do not eliminate integrated proviral DNA. This stable intermediate of viral infection is persistently

  10. Toll-Like Receptor 7 Agonist GS-9620 Induces HIV Expression and HIV-Specific Immunity in Cells from HIV-Infected Individuals on Suppressive Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Angela; Irrinki, Alivelu; Kaur, Jasmine; Cihlar, Tomas; Kukolj, George

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Antiretroviral therapy can suppress HIV replication to undetectable levels but does not eliminate latent HIV, thus necessitating lifelong therapy. Recent efforts to target this persistent reservoir have focused on inducing the expression of latent HIV so that infected cells may be recognized and eliminated by the immune system. Toll-like receptor (TLR) activation stimulates antiviral immunity and has been shown to induce HIV from latently infected cells. Activation of TLR7 leads to the production of several stimulatory cytokines, including type I interferons (IFNs). In this study, we show that the selective TLR7 agonist GS-9620 induced HIV in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from HIV-infected individuals on suppressive antiretroviral therapy. GS-9620 increased extracellular HIV RNA 1.5- to 2-fold through a mechanism that required type I IFN signaling. GS-9620 also activated HIV-specific T cells and enhanced antibody-mediated clearance of HIV-infected cells. Activation by GS-9620 in combination with HIV peptide stimulation increased CD8 T cell degranulation, production of intracellular cytokines, and cytolytic activity. T cell activation was again dependent on type I IFNs produced by plasmacytoid dendritic cells. GS-9620 induced phagocytic cell maturation and improved effector-mediated killing of HIV-infected CD4 T cells by the HIV envelope-specific broadly neutralizing antibody PGT121. Collectively, these data show that GS-9620 can activate HIV production and improve the effector functions that target latently infected cells. GS-9620 may effectively complement orthogonal therapies designed to stimulate antiviral immunity, such as therapeutic vaccines or broadly neutralizing antibodies. Clinical studies are under way to determine if GS-9620 can target HIV reservoirs. IMPORTANCE Though antiretroviral therapies effectively suppress viral replication, they do not eliminate integrated proviral DNA. This stable intermediate of viral infection is

  11. JAM-A and ALCAM are therapeutic targets to inhibit diapedesis across the BBB of CD14+CD16+ monocytes in HIV-infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Williams, Dionna W; Anastos, Kathryn; Morgello, Susan; Berman, Joan W

    2015-02-01

    Monocyte transmigration across the BBB is a critical step in the development of cognitive deficits termed HAND that affect 40-70% of HIV-infected individuals, even with successful antiretroviral therapy. The monocyte subsets that enter the CNS during HIV infection are not fully characterized. We examined PBMC from HIV-positive individuals from 2 distinct cohorts and enumerated monocyte populations, characterized their transmigration properties across an in vitro human BBB model, and identified surface proteins critical for the entry of these cells into the CNS. We demonstrated that the frequency of peripheral blood CD14(+)CD16(+) and CD14(low)CD16(+) monocytes was increased in HIV-seropositive compared with -seronegative individuals, despite virologic control. We showed that CD14(+)CD16(+) monocytes selectively transmigrated across our BBB model as a result of their increased JAM-A and ALCAM expression. Antibody blocking of these proteins inhibited diapedesis of CD14(+)CD16(+) monocytes but not of T cells from the same HIV-infected people across the BBB. Our data indicate that JAM-A and ALCAM are therapeutic targets to decrease the entry of CD14(+)CD16(+) monocytes into the CNS of HIV-seropositive individuals, contributing to the eradication of neuroinflammation, HAND, and CNS viral reservoirs.

  12. Depression longitudinally mediates the association of appearance concerns to ART non-adherence in HIV-infected individuals with a history of injection drug use.

    PubMed

    Blashill, Aaron J; Gordon, Janna R; Safren, Steven A

    2014-02-01

    Appearance concerns are common among HIV-infected individuals, and previous cross-sectional and longitudinal data indicate that these concerns are associated with antiretroviral therapy (ART) non-adherence. However, to date, no known prospective data have explored the mechanism behind this relationship. Thus, the aim of the current study was to test depression severity as a prospective mediator of the relationship between appearance concerns and ART non-adherence in HIV-infected individuals with a history of injection drug use (IDU). Participants were 89 HIV-infected individuals with a history of IDU who participated in a prospective, randomized controlled trial of cognitive behavioral therapy for depression and medication adherence. Clinician-administered measures of depression severity and appearance concerns, along with electronic monitoring of ART non-adherence were included. Data were analyzed using longitudinal linear mixed-level modeling, and mediation was tested via the Monte Carlo Method of Assessing Mediation. Appearance concerns were predictive of depression severity, γ = .31, SE = .076, 95 % CI [.16, .46], t = 4.1, p = .0001, and depression severity was predictive of ART non-adherence, γ = 3.3, SE = 1.3, 95 % CI [.8, 5.8], t = 2.6, p = .01. The effect of appearance concerns on ART non-adherence, however, was significantly mediated by depression severity, γ = 1.02, 95 % CI [.21, 2.1]. Appearance concerns are associated with depression severity, which in turn is associated with ART non-adherence. Integrative interventions addressing appearance concerns, depression and ART adherence are needed, as this is one potential pathway towards worse health outcomes in HIV-infected individuals.

  13. Restoration of CD4+ Responses to Copathogens in HIV-Infected Individuals on Antiretroviral Therapy Is Dependent on T Cell Memory Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Riou, Catherine; Tanko, Ramla F; Soares, Andreia P; Masson, Lindi; Werner, Lise; Garrett, Nigel J; Samsunder, Natasha; Abdool Karim, Quarraisha; Abdool Karim, Salim S; Burgers, Wendy A

    2015-09-01

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) induces rapid suppression of viral replication and a progressive replenishment of CD4(+) T cells in HIV-infected individuals. However, the effect of ART on restoring pre-existing memory CD4(+) T cells specific for common copathogens is still unclear. To better understand the dynamics of Ag-specific CD4(+) T cells during ART, we assessed the frequency, functional capacity, and memory profile of CD4(+) T cells specific for Mycobacterium tuberculosis and CMV in 15 HIV-infected individuals before and 1 y after ART initiation. After ART initiation, the frequency of M. tuberculosis-specific CD4(+) T cells showed little change, whereas CMV-specific CD4(+) T cells were significantly lower (p = 0.003). There was no difference in the polyfunctional or memory profile of Ag-specific CD4(+) T cells before and after ART. The replenishment of Ag-specific CD4(+) T cells correlated with the memory differentiation profile of these cells prior to ART. Pathogen-specific CD4(+) T cells exhibiting a late differentiated profile (CD45RO(+)CD27(-)) had a lower capacity to replenish (p = 0.019; r = -0.5) compared with cells with an early differentiated profile (CD45RO(+)CD27(+); p = 0.04; r = 0.45). In conclusion, restoration of copathogen-specific memory CD4(+) T cells during treated HIV infection is related to their memory phenotype, in which early differentiated cells (such as most M. tuberculosis-specific cells) have a higher replenishment capacity compared with late differentiated cells (such as most CMV-specific cells). These data identify an important, hitherto unrecognized, factor that may limit restoration of copathogen immunity in HIV-infected individuals on ART.

  14. Failure of standard antimicrobial therapy in children aged 3-59 months with mild or asymptomatic HIV infection and severe pneumonia.

    PubMed Central

    Jeena, Prakash; Thea, Donald M.; MacLeod, William B.; Chisaka, Noel; Fox, Matthew P.; Coovadia, H. M.; Qazi, Shamim

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether children aged 3-59 months with mild or non-symptomatic human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and WHO-defined severe pneumonia have a higher failure rate than do HIV-uninfected children when treated with the standard WHO treatment of parenteral penicillin or oral amoxicillin. METHODS: This study was a planned sub-analysis of a randomized trial of 3-59-month-old children presenting with WHO-defined severe pneumonia (the APPIS study). We included two sites with high HIV prevalence in Durban, South Africa and Ndola, Zambia. Primary outcome measures were clinical treatment failure at day 2 and day 14. CLINICALTRIALS.GOV IDENTIFIER: CT00227331http://www.clinicaltrialsgov/show/NCT00227331). FINDINGS: Of the 523 children enrolled, HIV status was known for 464 participants; 106 (23%) of these were infected with HIV. By day 2, 57 (12.3%) children had failed treatment and 110 (23.7%) failed by day 14. Twenty (18.9%) HIV-infected children failed by day 2 compared with 37 (10.3%) uninfected children (adjusted odds ratio (OR) 2.07; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.07-4.00). Thirty-four (32.1%) HIV-infected children failed treatment by day 14 compared with 76 (21.2%) uninfected children (adjusted OR 1.88; 95% CI: 1.11-3.17). Analysis stratified by age showed that the greatest differential in treatment failure at day 2 and day 14 occurred in the children aged 3-5 months. CONCLUSIONS: HIV-infected children with severe pneumonia fail WHO-standard treatment with parenteral penicillin or amoxicillin at day 2 and day 14 more often than do HIV-uninfected children, especially young infants. Standard case management of acute respiratory infection (ARI) using WHO treatment guidelines is inadequate in areas of high HIV prevalence and reappraisal of empiric antimicrobial therapy is urgently needed for severe pneumonia associated with HIV-1. PMID:16628299

  15. Predictors of New Onset Distal Neuropathic Pain in HIV-infected Individuals in the Era of Combination Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Malvar, Jemily; Vaida, Florin; Sanders, Chelsea Fitzsimons; Atkinson, J. Hampton; Bohannon, William; Keltner, John; Robinson-Papp, Jessica; Simpson, David M.; Marra, Christina M.; Clifford, David B.; Gelman, Benjamin; Fan, Juanjuan; Grant, Igor; Ellis, Ronald J.

    2015-01-01

    Despite modern combination antiretroviral therapy (CART), distal neuropathic pain (DNP) continues to affect many individuals with HIV infection. We evaluated risk factors for new onset DNP in the CNS Antiretroviral Therapy Effects Research (CHARTER) study, an observational cohort. Standardized, semi-annual clinical evaluations were administered at six U.S. sites. DNP was defined by using a clinician-administered instrument standardized across sites. All participants analyzed were free of DNP at study entry. New onset DNP was recorded at the first follow-up visit at which it was reported. Mixed effects logistic regression was used to evaluate potential predictors including HIV disease and treatment factors, demographics, medical comorbidities and neuropsychiatric factors. Among 493 participants, 131 (27%) reported new DNP over 2,306 visits during a median follow-up of 24 months [interquartile range (IQR) 12-42]. In multivariable regression, after adjusting for other covariates, significant entry predictors of new DNP were older age, female sex, current and past antiretroviral treatment, lack of virologic suppression, and lifetime history of opioid use disorder. During follow-up, more severe depression symptoms conferred a significantly elevated risk. The associations with opioid use disorders and depression reinforce the view that the clinical expression of neuropathic pain with peripheral nerve disease is strongly influenced by neuropsychiatric factors. Delineating such risk factors might help target emerging preventive strategies, for example, to individuals with a prior history of opioid use disorder, or might lead to new treatment approaches such as the use of tools to ameliorate depressed mood. PMID:25659067

  16. The Healthy Living Project: An Individually Tailored, Multidimensional Intervention for HIV-Infected Persons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gore-Felton, Cheryl; Rotheram-Borus, Mary Jane; Weinhardt, Lance S.; Kelly, Jeffrey A.; Lightfoot, Marguerita; Kirshenbaum, Sheri B.; Johnson, Mallory O.; Chesney, Margaret A.; Catz, Sheryl L.; Ehrhardt, Anke A.; Remien, Robert H.; Morin, Stephen F.

    2005-01-01

    The NIMH Healthy Living Project (HLP), a randomized behavioral intervention trial for people living with HIV, enrolled 943 individuals, including women, heterosexual men, injection drug users, and men who have sex with men from Los Angeles, Milwaukee, New York, and San Francisco. The intervention, which is based on qualitative formative research…

  17. Characterization of Lipid Composition and High-Density Lipoprotein Function in HIV-Infected Individuals on Stable Antiretroviral Regimens

    PubMed Central

    Munger, Alana M.; Chow, Dominic C.; Playford, Martin P.; Parikh, Nisha I.; Gangcuangco, Louie Mar A.; Nakamoto, Beau K.; Kallianpur, Kalpana J.; Ndhlovu, Lishomwa C.; Shikuma, Cecilia M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract There is an increase in the cardiovascular disease (CVD) morbidity in individuals infected with HIV that may be due to inflammatory lipid modulation not captured by traditional lipid measures. The objective of this study was to perform advanced lipoprotein phenotyping inclusive of the high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol efflux capacity and lipoprotein particle concentration and size in a well-phenotyped group of 118 patients infected with HIV. We used simple and multivariable analyses to determine the associations between advanced lipoprotein parameters and known cardiometabolic risk factors. Participants were on stable antiretroviral therapy (ART) and had benign traditional lipid panels [median total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-C, HDL-C, and triglycerides of 178 mg/dl, 108 mg/dl, 44 mg/dl, and 122.5 mg/dl, respectively]. However, advanced lipoprotein phenotyping demonstrated an elevation of LDL particle number (median of 1,233 nmol/liter) and a decrease in LDL size (median of 20.4 nm), along with a decrease in protective, large HDL particles (median of 3.15 μmol/liter) and reduced HDL cholesterol efflux capacity in comparison to controls of other studies. HDL cholesterol efflux capacity was associated with HDL levels (β=0.395, p<0.001), small LDL particle concentration (β=–0.198, p=0.031), insulin sensitivity by the Matsuda index (β=0.218, p=0.029), and the Framingham Risk Score (β=–0.184, p=0.046). We demonstrate an atherogenic lipoprotein profile by NMR spectroscopy and HDL efflux measurement in a group of HIV-infected patients on stable ART with normal lipid panels. PMID:25416403

  18. Tryptophan Metabolism and Its Relationship with Depression and Cognitive Impairment Among HIV-infected Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Keegan, Michael R.; Chittiprol, Seetharamaiah; Letendre, Scott L.; Winston, Alan; Fuchs, Dietmar; Boasso, Adriano; Iudicello, Jennifer; Ellis, Ronald J.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Cognitive impairment (CI) and major depressive disorder (MDD) remain prevalent in treated HIV-1 disease; however, the pathogenesis remains elusive. A possible contributing mechanism is immune-mediated degradation of tryptophan (TRP) via the kynurenine (KYN) pathway, resulting in decreased production of serotonin and accumulation of TRP degradation products. We explored the association of these biochemical pathways and their relationship with CI and MDD in HIV-positive (HIV+) individuals. METHODS In a cross-sectional analysis, concentrations of neopterin (NEO), tumor necrosis factor-alpha, TRP, KYN, KYN/TRP ratio, phenylalanine (PHE), tyrosine (TYR), PHE/TYR ratio, and nitrite were assessed in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and plasma of HIV+ (n = 91) and HIV-negative (HIV−) individuals (n = 66). CI and MDD were assessed via a comprehensive neuropsychological test battery. A Global Deficit Score ≥0.5 was defined as CI. Nonparametric statistical analyses included Kruskal–Wallis and Mann–Whitney U tests, and multivariate logistic regression. RESULTS Following Bonferroni correction, NEO concentrations were found to be greater in CSF and TRP concentration was found to be lower in the plasma of HIV+ versus HIV− individuals, including a subgroup of aviremic (defined as HIV-1 RNA <50 cps/mL) HIV+ participants receiving antiretroviral therapy (n = 44). There was a nonsignificant trend toward higher KYN/TRP ratios in plasma in the HIV+ group (P = 0.027; Bonferroni corrected α = 0.0027). In a logistic regression model, lower KYN/TRP ratios in plasma were associated with CI and MDD in the overall HIV+ group (P = 0.038 and P = 0.063, respectively) and the aviremic subgroup (P = 0.066 and P = 0.027, respectively), though this observation was not statistically significant following Bonferroni correction (Bonferroni corrected α = 0.0031). CONCLUSIONS We observed a trend toward lower KYN/TRP ratios in aviremic HIV+ patients with CI and MDD. PMID:27812290

  19. Pain Self-Management in HIV-infected Individuals with Chronic Pain: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Merlin, Jessica S.; Walcott, Melonie; Kerns, Robert; Bair, Matthew J.; Burgio, Kathryn L.; Turan, Janet M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Chronic pain in individuals with HIV is a common, impairing condition. Behavioral interventions for chronic pain specifically tailored to this population have yet to be developed. We assert that understanding self-management strategies already used by persons living with these conditions is an essential first step, and is the objective of this investigation. Design We conducted a thematic analysis of qualitative data from 25 in-depth interviews with individuals with HIV and chronic pain. Results The primary pain self-management strategies articulated by participants were: physical activity; cognitive and spiritual strategies; spending time with family and friends and social support; avoidance of physical/social activity; medication-centric pain management; and substance use. Conclusions Some of these strategies may be viewed as beneficial and overlap with known HIV self-management strategies (cognitive strategies), whereas others may have negative health consequences (substance use). Interventions that incorporate healthy self-management strategies may be particularly effective in improving both HIV and pain outcomes. PMID:25645646

  20. Response to region of difference 1 (RD1) epitopes in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals enrolled with suspected active tuberculosis: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Vincenti, D; Carrara, S; Butera, O; Bizzoni, F; Casetti, R; Girardi, E; Goletti, D

    2007-01-01

    Tuberculosis is the most frequent co-infection in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals, and which still presents diagnostic difficulties. Recently we set up an assay based on interferon (IFN)-γ response to region of difference 1 (RD1) peptides selected by computational analysis which is associated with active Mycobacterium tuberculosis replication. The objective of this study was to investigate the response to RD1 selected peptides in HIV-1-infected individuals in a clinical setting. The mechanisms of this immune response and comparison with other immune assays were also investigated. A total of 111 HIV-infected individuals with symptoms and signs consistent with active tuberculosis were enrolled prospectively. Interferon (IFN)-γ responses to RD1 selected peptides and recall antigens were evaluated by enzyme-linked immunospot assay. Results were correlated with CD4− T cell counts, individuals' characteristics, tuberculin skin test, QuantiFERON-TB Gold and T-SPOT.TB. Results from 21 (19%) individuals were indeterminate due to in vitro cell anergy. Among ‘non-anergic’ individuals, sensitivity for active tuberculosis of the assay based on RD1 selected peptides was 67% (24 of 36), specificity was 94% (three of 54). The assay also resulted positive in cases of extra-pulmonary and smear-negative pulmonary active tuberculosis. The response was mediated by CD4− effector/memory T cells and correlated with CD4− T cell counts, but not with plasma HIV-RNA load. Moreover, the RD1 selected peptides assay had the highest diagnostic odds ratio for active tuberculosis compared to tuberculin skin test (TST), QuantiFERON-TB Gold and T-SPOT.TB. RD1 selected peptides assay is associated with M. tuberculosis replication in HIV-infected individuals, although T cell anergy remains an important obstacle to be overcome before the test can be proposed as a diagnostic tool. PMID:17680823

  1. Psychiatric Comorbidity in Depressed HIV-infected Individuals: Common and Clinically Consequential

    PubMed Central

    Gaynes, Bradley N.; O'Donnell, Julie; Nelson, Elise; Heine, Amy; Zinski, Anne; Edwards, Malaika; McGuinness, Teena; Riddhi, Modi A.; Montgomery, Charita; Pence, Brian W

    2015-01-01

    Objective To report on the prevalence of psychiatric comorbidity and its association with illness severity in depressed HIV patients. Methods As part of a multi-site randomized controlled trial of depression treatment for HIV patients, 304 participants meeting criteria for current Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) were assessed for other mood, anxiety and substance use disorders with the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview, a structured psychiatric diagnostic interview. We also assessed baseline adherence, risk, and health measures. Results Complicated depressive illness was common. Only 18% of participants experienced MDD with no comorbid psychiatric diagnoses; 49% had comorbid dysthymia, 62% had ≥1 comorbid anxiety disorder, and 28% had a comorbid substance use disorder. Self-reported antiretroviral adherence did not differ by the presence of psychiatric comorbidity. However, psychiatric comorbidity was associated with worse physical health and functioning: compared to those with MDD alone, individuals with ≥1 comorbidity reported more HIV symptoms (5.1 vs. 4.1, p-value=0.01), and worse mental health-related quality of life on the SF-12 (29 vs. 35, p<0.01). Conclusion For HIV patients with MDD, chronic depression and psychiatric comorbidity are strikingly common, and this complexity is associated with greater HIV disease severity and worse quality of life. Appreciating this comorbidity can help clinicians better target those at risk of harder-to-treat HIV disease, and underscores the challenge of treating depression in this population. PMID:25892152

  2. RELATED FACTORS FOR COLONIZATION BY Candida SPECIES IN THE ORAL CAVITY OF HIV-INFECTED INDIVIDUALS

    PubMed Central

    MENEZES, Ralciane de Paula; BORGES, Aércio Sebastião; de ARAUJO, Lúcio Borges; PEDROSO, Reginaldo dos Santos; RÖDER, Denise Von Dolinger de Brito

    2015-01-01

    The colonization of the oral cavity is a prerequisite to the development of oropharyngeal candidiasis. Aims: The aims of this study were: to evaluate colonization and quantify Candida spp. in the oral cavity; to determine the predisposing factors for colonization; and to correlate the levels of CD4+ cells and viral load with the yeast count of colony forming units per milliliter (CFU/mL) in HIV-positive individuals treated at a University Hospital. Saliva samples were collected from 147 HIV patients and were plated on Sabouraud Dextrose Agar (SDA) and chromogenic agar, and incubated at 30 ºC for 72 h. Colonies with similar morphology in both media were counted and the result expressed in CFU/mL. Results: Of the 147 HIV patients, 89 had positive cultures for Candida spp., with a total of 111 isolates, of which C. albicans was the most frequent species (67.6%), and the mean of colonies counted was 8.8 × 10³ CFU/mL. The main predisposing factors for oral colonization by Candida spp. were the use of antibiotics and oral prostheses. The use of reverse transcriptase inhibitors appears to have a greater protective effect for colonization. A low CD4+ T lymphocyte count is associated with a higher density of yeast in the saliva of HIV patients. PMID:26603229

  3. A Systematic Review of Individual and Contextual Factors Affecting ART Initiation, Adherence, and Retention for HIV-Infected Pregnant and Postpartum Women

    PubMed Central

    Hodgson, Ian; Plummer, Mary L.; Konopka, Sarah N.; Colvin, Christopher J.; Jonas, Edna; Albertini, Jennifer; Amzel, Anouk; Fogg, Karen P.

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite progress reducing maternal mortality, HIV-related maternal deaths remain high, accounting, for example, for up to 24 percent of all pregnancy-related deaths in sub-Saharan Africa. Antiretroviral therapy (ART) is effective in improving outcomes among HIV-infected pregnant and postpartum women, yet rates of initiation, adherence, and retention remain low. This systematic literature review synthesized evidence about individual and contextual factors affecting ART use among HIV-infected pregnant and postpartum women. Methods Searches were conducted for studies addressing the population (HIV-infected pregnant and postpartum women), intervention (ART), and outcomes of interest (initiation, adherence, and retention). Quantitative and qualitative studies published in English since January 2008 were included. Individual and contextual enablers and barriers to ART use were extracted and organized thematically within a framework of individual, interpersonal, community, and structural categories. Results Thirty-four studies were included in the review. Individual-level factors included both those within and outside a woman’s awareness and control (e.g., commitment to child’s health or age). Individual-level barriers included poor understanding of HIV, ART, and prevention of mother-to-child transmission, and difficulty managing practical demands of ART. At an interpersonal level, disclosure to a spouse and spousal involvement in treatment were associated with improved initiation, adherence, and retention. Fear of negative consequences was a barrier to disclosure. At a community level, stigma was a major barrier. Key structural barriers and enablers were related to health system use and engagement, including access to services and health worker attitudes. Conclusions To be successful, programs seeking to expand access to and continued use of ART by integrating maternal health and HIV services must identify and address the relevant barriers and enablers in

  4. Conceptual models for Mental Distress among HIV-infected and uninfected individuals: A contribution to clinical practice and research in primary-health-care centers in Zambia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Mental distress is common in primary care and overrepresented among Human Immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals, but access to effective treatment is limited, particularly in developing countries. Explanatory models (EM) are contextualised explanations of illnesses and treatments framed within a given society and are important in understanding an individual's perspective on the illness. Although individual variations are important in determining help-seeking and treatment behaviour patterns, the ability to cope with an illness and quality of life, the role of explanatory models in shaping treatment preferences is undervalued. The aim was to identify explanatory models employed by HIV-infected and uninfected individuals and to compare them with those employed by local health care providers. Furthermore, we aimed to build a theoretical model linking the perception of mental distress to treatment preferences and coping mechanisms. Methods Qualitative investigation nested in a cross-sectional validation study of 28 (male and female) attendees at four primary care clinics in Lusaka, Zambia, between December 2008 and May 2009. Consecutive clinic attendees were sampled on random days and conceptual models of mental distress were examined, using semi-structured interviews, in order to develop a taxonomic model in which each category was associated with a unique pattern of symptoms, treatment preferences and coping strategies. Results Mental distress was expressed primarily as somatic complaints including headaches, perturbed sleep and autonomic symptoms. Economic difficulties and interpersonal relationship problems were the most common causal models among uninfected individuals. Newly diagnosed HIV patients presented with a high degree of hopelessness and did not value seeking help for their symptoms. Patients not receiving anti-retroviral drugs (ARV) questioned their effectiveness and were equivocal about seeking help. Individuals receiving ARV were

  5. Etiology and pharmacologic management of noninfectious diarrhea in HIV-infected individuals in the highly active antiretroviral therapy era.

    PubMed

    MacArthur, Rodger D; DuPont, Herbert L

    2012-09-01

    Diarrhea remains a common problem for patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection despite highly active antiretroviral therapies (HAART) and can negatively affect patient quality of life and lead to discontinuation or switching of HAART regimens. In the era of HAART, diarrhea from opportunistic infections is uncommon, and HIV-associated diarrhea often has noninfectious causes, including HAART-related adverse events and HIV enteropathy. Diarrhea associated with HAART is typically caused by protease inhibitors (eg, ritonavir), which may damage the intestinal epithelial barrier (leaky-flux diarrhea) and/or alter chloride ion secretion (secretory diarrhea). HIV enteropathy may result from direct effects of HIV on gastrointestinal tract cells and on the gastrointestinal immune system and gut-associated lymphoid tissue, which may be active sites of HIV infection and ongoing inflammation and mucosal damage. New therapies targeting the pathogenic mechanisms of noninfectious diarrheas are needed.

  6. Effect of mild-to-moderate smoking on viral load, cytokines, oxidative stress, and cytochrome P450 enzymes in HIV-infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Ande, Anusha; McArthur, Carole; Ayuk, Leo; Awasom, Charles; Achu, Paul Ngang; Njinda, Annette; Sinha, Namita; Rao, P S S; Agudelo, Marisela; Nookala, Anantha Ram; Simon, Stephen; Kumar, Anil; Kumar, Santosh

    2015-01-01

    Mild-to-moderate tobacco smoking is highly prevalent in HIV-infected individuals, and is known to exacerbate HIV pathogenesis. The objective of this study was to determine the specific effects of mild-to-moderate smoking on viral load, cytokine production, and oxidative stress and cytochrome P450 (CYP) pathways in HIV-infected individuals who have not yet received antiretroviral therapy (ART). Thirty-two human subjects were recruited and assigned to four different cohorts as follows: a) HIV negative non-smokers, b) HIV positive non-smokers, c) HIV negative mild-to-moderate smokers, and d) HIV positive mild-to-moderate smokers. Patients were recruited in Cameroon, Africa using strict selection criteria to exclude patients not yet eligible for ART and not receiving conventional or traditional medications. Those with active tuberculosis, hepatitis B or with a history of substance abuse were also excluded. Our results showed an increase in the viral load in the plasma of HIV positive patients who were mild-to-moderate smokers compared to individuals who did not smoke. Furthermore, although we did not observe significant changes in the levels of most pro-inflammatory cytokines, the cytokine IL-8 and MCP-1 showed a significant decrease in the plasma of HIV-infected patients and smokers compared with HIV negative non-smokers. Importantly, HIV-infected individuals and smokers showed a significant increase in oxidative stress compared with HIV negative non-smoker subjects in both plasma and monocytes. To examine the possible pathways involved in increased oxidative stress and viral load, we determined the mRNA levels of several antioxidant and cytochrome P450 enzymes in monocytes. The results showed that the levels of most antioxidants are unaltered, suggesting their inability to counter oxidative stress. While CYP2A6 was induced in smokers, CYP3A4 was induced in HIV and HIV positive smokers compared with HIV negative non-smokers. Overall, the findings suggest a possible

  7. Exercise and the Asymptomatic Individual: Assessment and Advice

    PubMed Central

    Skrastins, Roland; McCans, John L.

    1982-01-01

    With the current popularity of physical fitness, the family physician is often asked to advise asymptomatic individuals who wish to undertake an exercise program. In the majority of cases, adequate assessment consists of a thorough history and physical examination, along with a few simple investigations, including a resting electrocardiogram. Exercise stress testing of asymptomatic individuals produces an unacceptably high frequency of false-positive results, and its use should be restricted to those patients with cardiac symptoms or major cardiac risk factors. The potential benefits of a longterm commitment to regular exercise should be discussed with the patient and guidance provided on the optimal form of exercise program for that individual. Exercise must not be considered in isolation. Other major cardiovascular risk factors should be sought and dealt with appropriately. PMID:21286106

  8. Managing vaccines: defining the remit of primary care and specialist HIV clinics in the delivery of immunization to individuals with HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Quinn, K J; McCarty, E J; Quah, S P; Emerson, C R; Donnelly, C M

    2012-02-01

    The British HIV Association (BHIVA) has published guidelines for immunization of HIV-infected adults. A chart review of 200 HIV-infected patients diagnosed was conducted to determine shortcomings in previous practice and determine which vaccines should routinely be given in specialist HIV clinics and which might be able to be delegated to primary care clinics. Data were collected on administration of three categories of vaccinations: (1) vaccines used in all individuals with chronic disease (pneumococcal, influenza, swine flu H1N1); (2) targeted vaccinations used in non-immune individuals with HIV who are at risk of exposure (hepatitis A and hepatitis B); (3) routine vaccines traditionally delivered to the whole population (measles/mumps/rubella [MMR], diphtheria/tetanus/pertussis and meningitis C/ACWY). Pneumococcal vaccine was delivered to 54% of eligible patients, 52% of eligible individuals completed a full hepatitis B programme of vaccination and 21% (42/200) were naturally immune; hepatitis A vaccine was delivered to 36% of eligible individuals. With increasing demands on resources, it seems likely that HIV services will have to harness resources of primary care in vaccine programmes in relation to routine vaccines. By improving communication between primary and secondary care mistakes with live vaccination decisions could be avoided; HIV services should continue to perform targeted and chronic disease vaccines, i.e. for category 1 and category 2 vaccines.

  9. [HIV infection and immigration].

    PubMed

    Monge, Susana; Pérez-Molina, José A

    2016-01-01

    Migrants represent around one third of patients newly diagnosed with HIV in Spain and they constitute a population with higher vulnerability to its negative consequences due to the socio-cultural, economical, working, administrative and legal contexts. Migrants are diagnosed later, which worsens their individual prognosis and facilitates the maintenance of the HIV epidemic. In spite of the different barriers they experience to access healthcare in general, and HIV-related services in particular, access to antiretroviral treatment has been similar to that of the autochthonous population. However, benefits of treatment have been not, with women in general and men from Sub-Saharan Africa exhibiting the worse response to treatment. We need to proactively promote earlier diagnosis of HIV infection, the adoption of preventive measures to avoid new infections, and to deliver accessible, adapted and high-quality health-care.

  10. Plasma and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers predict cerebral injury in HIV-infected individuals on stable combination antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Albert M.; Harezlak, Jaroslaw; Bharti, Ajay; Mi, Deming; Taylor, Michael J.; Daar, Eric S.; Schifitto, Giovanni; Zhong, Jianhui; Alger, Jeffry R.; Brown, Mark S.; Singer, Elyse J.; Campbell, Thomas B.; McMahon, Deborah D.; Buchthal, Steven; Cohen, Ronald; Yiannoutsos, Constantin; Letendre, Scott L.; Navia, Bradford A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives HIV-associated brain injury persists despite antiretroviral therapy (cART), but contributing factors remain poorly understood. We postulated that inflammation-associated biomarkers will be associated with cerebral injury on proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) in chronically HIV-infected subjects. Methods Five biomarkers were measured in 197 HIV-infected subjects: soluble CD14, MCP-1, IP-10, MIP-1β, and fractalkine. Levels of N-acetyl aspartate (NAA), Choline (Cho), Myoinositol (MI), Glutamate+Glutamine (Glx), and Creatine (Cr) were acquired in the midfrontal cortex (MFC), frontal white matter (FWM), and basal ganglia (BG). Predictive models were built via linear regression and the best models were chosen using the Akaike Information Criterion. Results Increases in plasma or CSF MCP-1 were associated with lower NAA/Cr in the MFC and BG while metabolite changes in the FWM for NAA/Cr, GlxCr and Cho/Cr were explained almost exclusively by a single factor, sCD14. Plasma and CSF levels of this factor were also significantly associated with Glx/Cr in MFC and BG. Higher CSF FKN was associated with higher NAA/Cr in BG. Best predictors for higher Cho/Cr in BG and MFC were CSF sCD14 and CSF MIP-1β. Plasma and CSF IP-10 were only associated with Cho/Cr in MFC. Of the three models that simultaneously accounted for both plasma and CSF, there were more associations between CSF biomarkers and MRS metabolites. Conclusions Markers of inflammation and immune activation, in particular MCP-1 and sCD14, predominantly reflecting CNS sources, contribute to the persistence of brain injury in a metabolite and region dependent manner in chronically HIV-infected patients on stable cART. PMID:25622053

  11. Food insecurity is associated with morbidity and patterns of healthcare utilization among HIV-infected individuals in a resource-poor setting

    PubMed Central

    Weiser, Sheri D.; Tsai, Alexander C.; Gupta, Reshma; Frongillo, Edward A.; Kawuma, Annet; Senkungu, Jude; Hunt, Peter W.; Emenyonu, Nneka I.; Mattson, Jennifer E.; Martin, Jeffrey N.; Bangsberg, David R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective We undertook a longitudinal study in rural Uganda to understand the association of food insecurity with morbidity and patterns of healthcare utilization among HIV-infected individuals enrolled in an antiretroviral therapy program. Design Longitudinal cohort study. Methods Participants were enrolled from the Uganda AIDS Rural Treatment Outcomes cohort, and underwent quarterly structured interviews and blood draws. The primary predictor was food insecurity measured by the validated Household Food Insecurity Access Scale. Primary outcomes included health-related quality of life measured by the validated Medical Outcomes Study-HIV Physical Health Summary (PHS), incident self-reported opportunistic infections, number of hospitalizations, and missed clinic visits. To estimate model parameters, we used the method of generalized estimating equations, adjusting for sociodemographic and clinical variables. Explanatory variables were lagged by 3 months to strengthen causal interpretations. Results Beginning in May 2007, 458 persons were followed for a median of 2.07 years, and 40% were severely food insecure at baseline. Severe food insecurity was associated with worse PHS, opportunistic infections, and increased hospitalizations (results were similar in concurrent and lagged models). Mild/moderate food insecurity was associated with missed clinic visits in concurrent models, whereas in lagged models, severe food insecurity was associated with reduced odds of missed clinic visits. Conclusion Based on the negative impact of food insecurity on morbidity and patterns of healthcare utilization among HIV-infected individuals, policies and programs that address food insecurity should be a critical component of HIV treatment programs worldwide. PMID:21904186

  12. Cold urticaria and HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Lin, R Y; Schwartz, R A

    1993-10-01

    Three patients, all seropositive for HIV antibody, complained of swelling and pruritus on the head and limbs when exposed to the cold. All three had received zidovudine for significant CD4 cell depletion, but had no AIDS-defining illnesses. An ice-cube test was positive on each individual. There was no evidence of cold agglutinins, cryoglobulins, syphilis, or other concurrent diseases in any of the patients. This association may represent yet another allergic manifestation in HIV infection.

  13. MicroRNA Profile in CD8+ T-Lymphocytes from HIV-Infected Individuals: Relationship with Antiviral Immune Response and Disease Progression

    PubMed Central

    Bargalló, Manel E.; Planet, Evarist; Vilaplana, Elisenda; Escribà, Tuixent; Pérez, Iñaki; Gatell, Josep Maria; García, Felipe; Arnedo, Mireia; Plana M, Montserrat

    2016-01-01

    Background The relationship between host microRNAs (miRNA), viral control and immune response has not yet been elucidated in the field of HIV. The aim of this study was to assess the differential miRNA profile in CD8+ T-cells between HIV-infected individuals who differ in terms of viral replication control and immune response. Methods miRNA profile from resting and CD3/CD28-stimulated CD8+ T-cells from uninfected individuals (HIV-, n = 11), Elite Controllers (EC, n = 15), Viremic Controllers (VC, n = 15), Viremic Progressors (VP, n = 13) and HIV-infected patients on therapy (ART, n = 14) was assessed using Affymetrix miRNA 3.1 arrays. After background correction, quantile normalization and median polish summarization, normalized data were fit to a linear model. The analysis comprised: resting samples between groups; stimulated samples between groups; and stimulated versus resting samples within each group. Enrichment analyses of the putative target genes were perfomed using bioinformatic algorithms. Results A downregulated miRNA pattern was observed when resting samples from all infected groups were compared to HIV-. A miRNA downregulation was also observed when stimulated samples from EC, ART and HIV- groups were compared to VP, being hsa-miR-4492 the most downregulated. Although a preferential miRNA downregulation was observed when stimulated samples were compared to the respective resting samples, VP presented a differential miRNA expression pattern. In fact, hsa-miR-155 and hsa-miR-181a were downregulated in VP whereas in the other groups, either an upregulation or no differences were observed after stimulation, respectively. Overall, functional enrichment analysis revealed that the predicted target genes were involved in signal transduction pathways, metabolic regulation, apoptosis, and immune response. Conclusions Resting CD8+ T-cells do not exhibit a differential miRNA expression between HIV-infected individuals but they do differ from non

  14. Cancer risk in HIV-infected individuals on HAART is largely attributed to oncogenic infections and state of immunocompetence

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To estimate the cancer risk of HIV-infected patients in the HAART era with respect to a general reference population and to determine risk factors for malignancy. Methods Long term (1996-2009) cancer incidence of the Bonn single centre HIV cohort was compared to the incidence of the reference population of Saarland using standardized incidence ratios (SIR). Poisson regression analysis was used to identify predictors of cancer risk. Results 1,476 patients entered the cohort, enabling 8,772 person years of observation. 121 tumours in 114 patients, 7 in-situ and 114 invasive cancers, were identified. Malignancies associated with infectious agents such as Kaposi sarcoma (SIRs: male: 5,683; female: 277), non-Hodgkin lymphoma (SIRs male: 35; female: 18), anal cancer (SIRs male: 88; female: 115) as well a cervical carcinoma (SIR female: 4) and Hodgkin's disease (SIR male: 39) and liver cancer (SIR male: 18) were substantially more frequent in HIV-infected patients than in the general population (p < 0.001, each), whereas all other types of cancer were not increased. Poisson regression identified HAART (incidence rate ratio IRR (95% CI): 0.28 (0.19-0.41), p < 0.001), CD4 count (IRR per 100 cells/μl increase: 0.66 (0.57-0.76), p < 0.001), hepatitis B (IRR: 2.15 (1.10-4.20), p = 0.046) and age (IRR per 10 year increase: 1.23 (1.03 - 1.46), p = 0.023) as independent predictors for the occurrence of any type of cancer. Conclusions HAART and preserved CD4 cells preferentially reduce the risk of malignancies associated with oncogenic infections. PMID:21486722

  15. High Oral Human Papillomavirus Type 16 Load Predicts Long-term Persistence in Individuals With or at Risk for HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Beachler, Daniel C.; Guo, Yingshi; Xiao, Wiehong; Burk, Robert D.; Minkoff, Howard; Strickler, Howard D.; Cranston, Ross D.; Wiley, Dorothy J.; Jacobson, Lisa P.; Weber, Kathleen M.; Margolick, Joseph B.; Sugar, Elizabeth A.; Reddy, Susheel; Gillison, Maura L.; D'Souza, Gypsyamber

    2015-01-01

    The association between oral human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) DNA load and infection clearance was evaluated among 88 individuals with oral HPV16 infection who were identified within a prospective cohort of 1470 HIV-infected and uninfected individuals. Oral rinse specimens were collected semiannually for up to 5 years. The oral HPV16 load at the time of the first positive test result was significantly associated with the time to clearance of infection (continuous P trends <.01). Notably, clearance rates by 24 months were 41% and 94% in the highest and lowest HPV16 load tertiles (P = .03), respectively. High oral HPV16 load warrants consideration as a biomarker for infection persistence, the presumed precursor of HPV16-associated oropharyngeal cancer. PMID:25954049

  16. High Oral Human Papillomavirus Type 16 Load Predicts Long-term Persistence in Individuals With or at Risk for HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Beachler, Daniel C; Guo, Yingshi; Xiao, Wiehong; Burk, Robert D; Minkoff, Howard; Strickler, Howard D; Cranston, Ross D; Wiley, Dorothy J; Jacobson, Lisa P; Weber, Kathleen M; Margolick, Joseph B; Sugar, Elizabeth A; Reddy, Susheel; Gillison, Maura L; D'Souza, Gypsyamber

    2015-11-15

    The association between oral human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) DNA load and infection clearance was evaluated among 88 individuals with oral HPV16 infection who were identified within a prospective cohort of 1470 HIV-infected and uninfected individuals. Oral rinse specimens were collected semiannually for up to 5 years. The oral HPV16 load at the time of the first positive test result was significantly associated with the time to clearance of infection (continuous P trends <.01). Notably, clearance rates by 24 months were 41% and 94% in the highest and lowest HPV16 load tertiles (P = .03), respectively. High oral HPV16 load warrants consideration as a biomarker for infection persistence, the presumed precursor of HPV16-associated oropharyngeal cancer.

  17. Education, individual time preferences, and asymptomatic disease detection.

    PubMed

    Kim, Younoh; Radoias, Vlad

    2016-02-01

    Asymptomatic conditions such as hypertension are generally hard to diagnose, absent routine medical examinations. This is especially problematic in developing countries, where most citizens do not engage in routine examinations due to limited economic resources. We study the roles of education and individual time preferences in asymptomatic disease detection and management. Using discrete choice models on a sample of 4209 hypertensive Indonesian adults surveyed between November 2007 and April 2008, we find that both education and individual time preferences play important roles. However, the effects are different for people in good health than they are for people in bad health. Education does not seem to matter for disease detection when respondents are in good general health, and its effects on disease management vary largely in magnitudes between these groups. In terms of disease detection, more educated respondents have a higher probability of being diagnosed, but only conditional on being in poor general health. Time preferences, on the other hand, matter for respondents in good general health, but the effect is not significant for those in bad health. More impatient respondents that are in good health have a higher probability of being under-diagnosed because they are more likely to forgo routine physicals. The findings point to two distinct channels through which education can affect health, and suggest that different types of policies need to be implemented, in order to reach the entire population. Traditional programs that stimulate education and improve the socio-economic status of individuals in developing countries are helpful, but they do not address the whole problem. Besides its more usual positive effects, education can also negatively affect the health of asymptomatic patients, because it reflects a higher opportunity cost of engaging in preventative health screenings.

  18. Ocular manifestations of HIV infection.

    PubMed Central

    Jabs, D A

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the frequency of ocular complications and the clinical outcomes of these complications in patients with various stages of HIV infection. METHODS: Retrospective review of all HIV-infected patients seen in an AIDS ophthalmology clinic from November 1983 through December 31, 1992. RESULTS: Eleven-hundred sixty-three patients were seen for ophthalmologic evaluation. Of these, 781 had the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), 226 had symptomatic HIV infection (AIDs-related complex [ARC]), and 156 had asymptomatic HIV infection. Non-infectious HIV retinopathy was the most common ocular complication, affecting 50% of the patients with AIDS, 34% of the patients with ARC, and 3% of the patients with asymptomatic HIV infection. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis was the most common opportunistic ocular infection, affecting 37% of the patients with AIDS. Other opportunistic ocular infections, including ocular toxoplasmosis, varicella zoster virus retinitis, and Pneumocystis choroidopathy were all much less common, each occurring in < or = 1% of the patients with AIDS. Treatment of CMV retinitis with either foscarnet or ganciclovir was successful in initially controlling the retinitis. However, relapse represented a significant problem and required frequent re-inductions. As a consequence of the retinal damage associated with relapse, loss of visual acuity occurred. The median time to a visual acuity of 20/200 or worse for all eyes with CMV retinitis was 13.4 months, and the median time to a visual acuity of 20/200 or worse in the better eye was 21.1 months. At last follow-up, 75% of the patients had a final visual acuity of 20/40 or better in at least one eye. Retinal detachments were a frequent ophthalmologic complication of CMV retinitis with a cumulative probability of a retinal detachment in at least one eye of 57% at 12 months after the diagnosis of CMV retinitis. Herpes zoster ophthalmicus developed in 3% of the overall series and was seen in

  19. Thinking about HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Simpkins, Evelyn P; Siberry, George K; Hutton, Nancy

    2009-09-01

    Mother-to-child transmission of HIV can occur during pregnancy, labor, delivery, and breastfeeding. Evidence-based interventions (routine screening of pregnant women, initiation of antiretroviral drugs for mother's treatment or prevention of MTCT, and avoiding breastfeeding) have reduced transmission rates in the United States from 25% to 30% to less than 2%. Triple-drug combination antiretroviral therapy effectively controls HIV infection and improves survival and quality of life for HIV-infected children and adolescents. Initial regimens use combinations of two NRTIs together with an NNRTI or a ritonavir-boosted PI. These regimens have been shown to increase CD4 counts and achieve virologic suppression. Prevention of serious and opportunistic infections reduces morbidity and mortality in children and adolescents who have HIV infection. Recommendations for immunizations and chemoprophylaxis vary with the patient's CD4 count. Condoms made from latex, polyurethane, or other synthetic materials have been shown to decrease the transmission of STIs, including HIV infection.

  20. Pediatric HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Espanol, Teresa; Caragol, Isabel; Soler, Pere; Hernandez, Manuel

    2004-12-01

    HIV infection by maternal transmission is increasing in the world due to the increase in infected women who are not receiving appropriate antiretroviral therapy. Prognosis of HIV infection in children is poor because the newborn has an immature immune system. Early diagnosis and therapy are needed to avoid the development of AIDS. New therapies are becoming available but prevention of infection, through maternal therapy during pregnancy, is the most effective measure in avoiding this infection through this transmission route.

  1. Vitamin D Levels, Natural H1N1 Infection and Response to H1N1 Vaccine among HIV-Infected Individuals.

    PubMed

    Momplaisir, Florence; Frank, Ian; Meyer, Wa; Kim, Deborah; Kappes, Rosemary; Tebas, Pablo

    2012-05-20

    BACKGROUND: Beyond its role in calcium homeostasis, vitamin D plays a critical role in immunological responses to pathogens. We evaluated the relationship between 25-OH vitamin D levels and susceptibility to natural H1N1 infection and H1N1 vaccine responses in HIV infected individuals. METHODS: This was a sub study of an H1N1 vaccine trial conducted at the University of Pennsylvania in 2009/10. We compared the 25-OH vitamin D levels among individuals with and without baseline evidence of prior H1N1 infection and between vaccine responders and non-responders. RESULTS: 120 participants enrolled in the trial, 71% male, 68% African American, median age 46 years. The majority had controlled HIV disease. At baseline, 86% had 25-OH vitamin D levels < 30 ng/ml and 54% had levels < 20 ng/ml. Thirty participants (25%) had evidence of prior H1N1 exposure. There was no difference in mean 25-OH vitamin D levels among patients with or without prior natural H1N1 infection (21 ng/ml vs 20 ng/ml, p=0.72). Among participants without previous H1N1 exposure, only 61% developed protective antibody titers following vaccination. 25-OH vitamin D levels were similar between vaccine responders (20 ng/ml) and non-responders (20 ng/ml) (p=0.83). CONCLUSION: Although 25-OH vitamin D deficiency was very common among HIV-infected individuals, it was not associated with natural susceptibility to H1N1 or to vaccine responses.

  2. HIV Infection Legal Issues: An Introduction for Developmental Services. Technical Report on Developmental Disabilities and HIV Infection, Number 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, David C.; Decker, Curtis L.

    As agencies and programs serving individuals with developmental disabilities are called upon to serve a new population of individuals with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, they will be forced to confront complex legal questions. This paper discusses the legal frameworks in which individuals with HIV infection are considered eligible…

  3. Association of neurotropic viruses in HIV-infected individuals who died of secondary complications of tuberculosis, cryptococcosis, or toxoplasmosis in South India.

    PubMed

    Kannangai, Rajesh; Sachithanandham, Jaiprasath; Mahadevan, Anita; Abraham, Asha Mary; Sridharan, Gopalan; Desai, Anita; Ravi, Vasanthapuram; Shankar, Susarla Krishna

    2013-03-01

    The frequencies of 10 opportunistic DNA viruses were determined by multiplex real-time PCR in paired cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and brain tissue of HIV-infected individuals. In the CSF, viruses were detectable in 45/55 cases: JC virus (JCV) in 62%, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in 44%, cytomegalovirus (CMV) in 25%, varicella-zoster virus (VZV) in 3.6%, herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) in 1.8%, and human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) in 1.8% of cases. A single virus was detectable in 20 cases, 19 cases had coinfection with two viruses, and 6 cases were positive for three viruses. JCV was detectable in the CSF of 62% of cases and in 42% of brain tissues, with higher loads in progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) (P < 0.05).

  4. Increased cell-free mitochondrial DNA is a marker of ongoing inflammation and better neurocognitive function in virologically suppressed HIV-infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Santiago, Josué; De Oliveira, Michelli F; Var, Susanna R; Day, Tyler R C; Woods, Steven P; Gianella, Sara; Mehta, Sanjay R

    2017-04-01

    Cell-free mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is a highly immunogenic molecule that is associated with several inflammatory conditions and with neurocognitive impairment during untreated HIV infection. Here, we investigate how cell-free mtDNA in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is associated with inflammation, neuronal damage, and neurocognitive functioning in the context of long-term suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART). We quantified the levels of cell-free mtDNA in the CSF from 41 HIV-infected individuals with completely suppressed HIV RNA levels in blood plasma (<50 copies/mL) by droplet digital PCR. We measured soluble CD14, soluble CD163, interferon γ-induced protein 10 (IP-10), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), interleukin 6 (IL-6), interleukin 8 (IL-8), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), neopterin, and neurofilament light chain (NFL) by immunoassays in CSF supernatant or blood plasma. Higher levels of mtDNA in CSF were associated with higher levels of MCP-1 (r = 0.56, p < 0.01) in CSF and TNF-α (r = 0.43, p < 0.01) and IL-8 (r = 0.44, p < 0.01) in blood plasma. Subjects with a previous diagnosis of AIDS showed significantly higher levels of mtDNA (p < 0.01) than subjects without AIDS. The associations between mtDNA and MCP-1 in CSF and TNF-α in blood remained significant after adjusting for previous diagnosis of AIDS (p < 0.01). Additionally, higher levels of mtDNA were associated with a lower CD4 nadir (r = -0.41, p < 0.01) and lower current CD4% (r = -0.34, p = 0.03). Paradoxically, higher levels of mtDNA in CSF were significantly associated with better neurocognitive performance (r = 0.43, p = 0.02) and with less neuronal damage (i.e. lower NFL). Higher cell-free mtDNA is associated with inflammation during treated HIV infection, but the impact on neurocognitive functioning and neuronal damage remains unclear and may differ in the setting of suppressive ART.

  5. Toxoplasmosis in HIV infection: An overview.

    PubMed

    Basavaraju, Anuradha

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular protozoan parasite presenting as a zoonotic infection distributed worldwide. In HIV-positive individuals, it causes severe opportunistic infections, which is of major public health concern as it results in physical and psychological disabilities. In healthy immunocompetent individuals, it causes asymptomatic chronic persistent infections, but in immunosuppressed patients, there is reactivation of the parasite if the CD4 counts fall below 200 cells/μl. The seroprevalence rates are variable in different geographic areas. The tissue cyst or oocyst is the infective form which enters by ingestion of contaminated meat and transform into tachyzoites and disseminate into blood stream. In immunocompetent persons due to cell-mediated immunity the parasite is transformed into tissue cyst resulting in life long chronic infection. In HIV-infected people opportunistic infection by T. gondii occurs due to depletion of CD4 cells, decreased production of cytokines and interferon gamma and impaired cytotoxic T-lymphocyte activity resulting in reactivation of latent infection. The diagnosis can be done by clinical, serological, radiological, histological or molecular methods, or by the combination of these. There is various treatment regimen including acute treatment, maintenance therapy should be given as the current anti T. gondii therapy cannot eradicate tissue cysts. In HIV patients, CD4 counts <100; cotrimoxazole, alternately dapsone + pyrimethamine can be given for 6 months. Hence, early diagnosis of T. gondii antibodies is important in all HIV-positive individuals to prevent complications of cerebral toxoplasmosis.

  6. Toxoplasmosis in HIV infection: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Basavaraju, Anuradha

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular protozoan parasite presenting as a zoonotic infection distributed worldwide. In HIV-positive individuals, it causes severe opportunistic infections, which is of major public health concern as it results in physical and psychological disabilities. In healthy immunocompetent individuals, it causes asymptomatic chronic persistent infections, but in immunosuppressed patients, there is reactivation of the parasite if the CD4 counts fall below 200 cells/μl. The seroprevalence rates are variable in different geographic areas. The tissue cyst or oocyst is the infective form which enters by ingestion of contaminated meat and transform into tachyzoites and disseminate into blood stream. In immunocompetent persons due to cell-mediated immunity the parasite is transformed into tissue cyst resulting in life long chronic infection. In HIV-infected people opportunistic infection by T. gondii occurs due to depletion of CD4 cells, decreased production of cytokines and interferon gamma and impaired cytotoxic T-lymphocyte activity resulting in reactivation of latent infection. The diagnosis can be done by clinical, serological, radiological, histological or molecular methods, or by the combination of these. There is various treatment regimen including acute treatment, maintenance therapy should be given as the current anti T. gondii therapy cannot eradicate tissue cysts. In HIV patients, CD4 counts <100; cotrimoxazole, alternately dapsone + pyrimethamine can be given for 6 months. Hence, early diagnosis of T. gondii antibodies is important in all HIV-positive individuals to prevent complications of cerebral toxoplasmosis. PMID:27722101

  7. Effect of occlusion on joint sounds in asymptomatic individuals.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Alício Rosalino; Zuim, Paulo R Junqueira; Goiato, Marcelo Coelho; dos Santos, Paulo H; Ribeiro, Adriana Barbosa; Pita, Murillo Sucena; Flacón-Antenucci, Rosse M

    2008-01-01

    Occlusion is a predisposing factor for Temporomandibular Dysfunctions (TMD) of the joint, whose first sign and/or symptom is usually joint sound. To verify the effect of occlusion on joint sounds, temporomandibular joints (TMJ) were analyzed in 78 asymptomatic individuals with various dental conditions. Electrosonography was used to determine the intensity of the vibration in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) on opening and closing the mouth. Transducers (piezoelectric accelerometer) were placed on the right and left joints. Results were tabled and analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis test (a=0.05). It was concluded that TMJ vibration in partly edentulous individuals from Kennedy classes I, II and III is statistically higher than in dentate and fully edentulous subjects.

  8. Methamphetamine Use in HIV-infected Individuals Affects T-cell Function and Viral Outcome during Suppressive Antiretroviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Massanella, Marta; Gianella, Sara; Schrier, Rachel; Dan, Jennifer M; Pérez-Santiago, Josué; Oliveira, Michelli F; Richman, Douglas D; Little, Susan J; Benson, Constance A; Daar, Eric S; Dube, Michael P; Haubrich, Richard H; Smith, Davey M; Morris, Sheldon R

    2015-08-24

    We investigated the associations between methamphetamine (meth) use, immune function, and the dynamics of HIV and cytomegalovirus [CMV] in the blood and genital tract of HIV-infected ART-suppressed subjects. Self-reported meth use was associated with increased CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell proliferation (Ki67(+), p < 0.005), CD4(+) T-cell activation (CD45RA(-)CD38(+), p = 0.005) and exhaustion (PD-1(+), p = 0.0004) in blood, compared to non-meth users. Meth use was also associated with a trend towards higher blood HIV DNA levels (p = 0.09) and more frequent shedding of CMV in seminal plasma (p = 0.002). To explore possible mechanisms, we compared ex vivo spontaneous and antigen-specific proliferation in PBMC collected from subjects with and without positive meth detection in urine (Utox+ vs. Utox-). Despite higher levels of spontaneous proliferation, lymphocytes from Utox+ meth users had a significantly lower proliferative capacity after stimulation with a number of pathogens (CMV, candida, mycobacterium, toxoplasma, HIV, p < 0.04 in all cases), compared to Utox- participants. Our findings suggest that meth users have greater proliferation and exhaustion of the immune system. Meth use is also associated with a loss of control of CMV replication, which could be related to loss of immune response to pathogens. Future studies should consider meth use as a potential modulator of T-cell responses.

  9. The Interplay Between Host Genetic Variation, Viral Replication, and Microbial Translocation in Untreated HIV-Infected Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, Molly R.; Bartha, Istvan; Timmer, J. Katherina; Liebner, Julia C.; Wollinsky, David; Günthard, Huldrych F.; Hauser, Christoph; Bernasconi, Enos; Hoffmann, Matthias; Calmy, Alexandra; Battegay, Manuel; Telenti, Amalio; Douek, Daniel C.; Fellay, Jacques; Aubert, V.; Battegay, M.; Bernasconi, E.; Böni, J.; Bucher, H.C.; Burton-Jeangros, C.; Calmy, A.; Cavassini, M.; Dollenmaier, G.; Egger, M.; Elzi, L.; Fehr, J.; Fellay, J.; Furrer, H.; Fux, C.A.; Gorgievski, M.; Günthard, H.; Haerry, D.; Hasse, B.; Hirsch, H.H.; Hoffmann, M.; Hösli, I.; Kahlert, C.; Kaiser, L.; Keiser, O.; Klimkait, T.; Kouyos, R.; Kovari, H.; Ledergerber, B.; Martinetti, G.; Martinez de Tejada, B.; Metzner, K.; Müller, N.; Nadal, D.; Nicca, D.; Pantaleo, G.; Rauch, A.; Regenass, S.; Rickenbach, M.; Rudin, C.; Schöni-Affolter, F.; Schmid, P.; Schüpbach, J.; Speck, R.; Tarr, P.; Telenti, A.; Trkola, A.; Vernazza, P.; Weber, R.; Yerly, S.

    2015-01-01

    Systemic immune activation, a major determinant of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease progression, is the result of a complex interplay between viral replication, dysregulation of the immune system, and microbial translocation due to gut mucosal damage. Although human genetic variants influencing HIV load have been identified, it is unknown how much the host genetic background contributes to interindividual differences in other determinants of HIV pathogenesis such as gut damage and microbial translocation. Using samples and data from 717 untreated participants in the Swiss HIV Cohort Study and a genome-wide association study design, we searched for human genetic determinants of plasma levels of intestinal fatty acid–binding protein (I-FABP/FABP2), a marker of gut damage, and of soluble CD14 (sCD14), a marker of lipopolysaccharide bioactivity and microbial translocation. We also assessed the correlations between HIV load, sCD14, and I-FABP. Although we found no genome-wide significant determinant of the tested plasma markers, we observed strong associations between sCD14 and both HIV load and I-FABP, shedding new light on the relationships between processes that drive progression of untreated HIV infection. PMID:25701868

  10. Project Enhance: A Randomized Controlled Trial of an Individualized HIV Prevention Intervention for HIV-Infected Men Who Have Sex With Men Conducted in a Primary Care Setting

    PubMed Central

    Safren, Steven A.; O’Cleirigh, Conall M.; Skeer, Margie; Elsesser, Steven A.; Mayer, Kenneth H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Men who have sex with men (MSM) are the largest group of individuals in the U.S. living with HIV and have the greatest number of new infections. This study was designed to test a brief, culturally relevant prevention intervention for HIV-infected MSM, which could be integrated into HIV care. Method HIV-infected MSM who received HIV care in a community health center (N = 201), and who reported HIV sexual transmission-risk behavior (TRB) in the prior 6 months, were randomized to receive the intervention or treatment as usual. The intervention, provided by a medical social worker, included proactive case management for psychosocial problems, counseling about living with HIV, and HIV TRB risk reduction. Participants were followed every 3 months for one year. Results Participants, regardless of study condition, reported reductions in HIV TRB, with no significant differential effect by condition in primary intent-to-treat analyses. When examining moderators, the intervention was differentially effective in reducing HIV TRB for those who screened in for baseline depression, but this was not the case for those who did not screen in for depression. Conclusions The similar level of reduction in HIV TRB in the intervention and control groups, consistent with other recent secondary prevention interventions, speaks to the need for new, creative designs, or more potent interventions in secondary HIV prevention trials, as the control group seemed to benefit from risk assessment, study contact, and referrals provided by study staff. The differential finding for those with depression may suggest that those without depression could reap benefits from limited interventions, but those with a comorbid psychiatric diagnosis may require additional interventions to modify their sexual risk behaviors. PMID:22746262

  11. APOBEC3G mRNA expression in exposed seronegative and early stage HIV infected individuals decreases with removal of exposure and with disease progression

    PubMed Central

    Vázquez-Pérez, Joel A; Ormsby, Christopher E; Hernández-Juan, Ramón; Torres, Klintsy J; Reyes-Terán, Gustavo

    2009-01-01

    Background APOBEC3G is an antiretroviral factor that acts by inducing G to A mutations. In this study, we examined the expression of APOBEC3G in uninfected HIV-1 exposed individuals at the time of their partner's diagnosis and one year later. We then compared this expression with that of infected individuals at different disease stages. APOBEC3G mRNA was measured in PBMCs from three groups: healthy controls with no known risk factor to HIV infection (n = 26), exposed uninfected individuals who had unprotected sex with their HIV+ partners for at least 3 months (n = 37), and HIV infected patients at various disease stages (n = 45), including 8 patients with low HIV viral loads < 10,000 copies/mL (LVL) for at least 3 years. Additionally, we obtained sequences from the env, gag, pol, nef, vif and the LTR of the patients' virus. Results Exposed uninfected individuals expressed higher APOBEC3G than healthy controls (3.86 vs. 1.69 relative expression units), and their expression significantly decreased after a year from the HIV diagnosis and subsequent treatment of their partners. Infected individuals showed a positive correlation (Rho = 0.57, p = 0.00006) of APOBEC3G expression with CD4+ T cell count, and a negative correlation with HIV viremia (Rho = -0.54, p = 0.00004). The percentage of G to A mutations had a positive correlation (Rho = 0.43, p = 0.0226) with APOBEC3G expression, and it was higher in LVL individuals than in the other patients (IQR 8.27 to 9.64 vs. 7.06 to 8.1, p = 0.0084). Out of 8 LVLs, 3 had hypermutations, and 4 had premature stop codons only in viral vif. Conclusion The results suggest that exposure to HIV may trigger APOBEC3G expression in PBMCs, in the absence of infection. Additionally, cessation of exposure or advanced disease is associated with decreased APOBEC3G expression. PMID:19254362

  12. Torque Teno Midi Virus/Small Anellovirus in Sera of Healthy, HIV/HCV and HIV Infected Individuals in Lorestan Province, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Fatholahi, Maryam; Bouzari, Majid

    2015-01-01

    Background: Torque Teno Midi Virus/Small Anellovirus (TTMDV/SAV) is a member of the Gammatorquevirus genus within the family Anelloviridae. It is detected in healthy, Hepatitis B Virus, Hepatitis C Virus and HIV infected individuals and also patients with acute respiratory disease in different countries, but its role in clinical diseases and its full geographical distribution is still unclear. Objectives: The current study aimed to detect the frequency of infection with TTMDV/SAV in the sera of healthy blood donors, hepatitis C infected and HIV positive individuals in Lorestan province, Iran; and also investigate the possible role of TTMDV/SAV virus in liver diseases. Materials and Methods: Fifty two, 36, 4, and 110 serum samples from HIV positive, patients with HIV/HCV and HIV/HCV/HBV co-infections, and healthy individuals were collected in Khorramabad city, respectively. Nested-polymerase chain reaction was performed using SMAs/SMAr primers to detect TTMDV/SAV DNA. Serum aminotransferases were measured. Results: In the HIV/HCV, HIV/HCV/HBV, HIV, and control cases, 29 (80.5%), 3 (75%), 43 (82.7%), and 16 (14.5%) were positive for DNA of TTMDV/SAV, respectively. In the HIV/HCV infected cases and HIV positive cases the level of Alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and Aspartate aminotransferase (AST) were not significantly different in TTMDV/SAV infected and non-infected individuals (P > 0.05). Conclusions: Although significant differences (P < 0.01) were observed in the frequency of TTMDV/SAV between healthy controls and each of the HIV positive and HIV/HCV co-infected individuals, no significant difference was observed between HIV positive and HIV/HCV co-infected cases, which may be due to HIV associated immunodeficiency. This is the first time that TTMDV/SAV is reported in HIV infected individuals worldwide. Interpretation of the high frequency of the virus (82.7%) in HIV cases needs more detailed studies. PMID:26862377

  13. Interferon Gamma Release Assays for the Diagnosis of Latent TB Infection in HIV-Infected Individuals in a Low TB Burden Country

    PubMed Central

    Ní Cheallaigh, Clíona; Fitzgerald, Ian; Grace, Jacinta; Jagjit Singh, Gurmit; El-Eraki, Nahla; Gibbons, Noel; Keane, Joseph; Rogers, Thomas R.; Clarke, Susan; Bergin, Colm

    2013-01-01

    Background Interferon gamma release assays (IGRAs) are used to diagnose latent tuberculosis infection. Two IGRAs are commercially available: the Quantiferon TB Gold In Tube (QFT-IT) and the T-SPOT.TB. There is debate as to which test to use in HIV+ individuals. Previous publications from high TB burden countries have raised concerns that the sensitivity of the QFT-IT assay, but not the T-SPOT.TB, may be impaired in HIV+ individuals with low CD4+ T-cell counts. We sought to compare the tests in a low TB burden setting. Methodology/Principal Findings T-SPOT.TB, QFT-IT, and tuberculin skin tests (TST) were performed in HIV infected individuals. Results were related to patient characteristics. McNemar’s test, multivariate regression and correlation analysis were carried out using SPSS (SPSS Inc). 256 HIV infected patients were enrolled in the study. The median CD4+ T-cell count was 338 cells/µL (range 1–1328). 37 (14%) patients had a CD4+ T-cell count of <100 cells/µL. 46/256 (18% ) of QFT-IT results and 28/256 (11%) of T-SPOT.TB results were positive. 6 (2%) of QFT-IT and 18 (7%) of T-SPOT.TB results were indeterminate. An additional 9 (4%) of T-SPOT.TB results were unavailable as tests were not performed due to insufficient cells or clotting of the sample. We found a statistically significant association between lower CD4+ T-cell count and negative QFT-IT results (OR 1.055, p = 0.03), and indeterminate/unavailable T-SPOT.TB results (OR 1.079, p = 0.02). Conclusions/Significance In low TB prevalence settings, the QFT-IT yields more positive and fewer indeterminate results than T-SPOT.TB. Negative results on the QFT-IT and indeterminate/unavailable results on the T-SPOT.TB were more common in individuals with low CD4+ T-cell counts. PMID:23382842

  14. [The Spanish AIDS Study Group and Spanish National AIDS Plan (GESIDA/Secretaría del Plan Nacional sobre el Sida) recommendations for the treatment of tuberculosis in HIV-infected individuals (Updated January 2013)].

    PubMed

    Rivero, Antonio; Pulido, Federico; Caylá, Joan; Iribarren, José A; Miró, José M; Moreno, Santiago; Pérez-Camacho, Inés

    2013-12-01

    This consensus document was prepared by an expert panel of the Grupo de Estudio de Sida (GESIDA [Spanish AIDS Study Group]) and the Plan Nacional sobre el Sida (PNS [Spanish National AIDS Plan]). The document updates current guidelines on the treatment of tuberculosis (TB) in HIV-infected individuals contained in the guidelines on the treatment of opportunistic infections published by GESIDA and PNS in 2008. The document aims to facilitate the management and treatment of HIV-infected patients with TB in Spain, and includes specific sections and recommendations on the treatment of drug-sensitive TB, multidrug-resistant TB, and extensively drug-resistant TB, in this population. The consensus guidelines also make recommendations on the treatment of HIV-infected patients with TB in special situations, such as chronic liver disease, pregnancy, kidney failure, and transplantation. Recommendations are made on the timing and initial regimens of antiretroviral therapy in patients with TB, and on immune reconstitution syndrome in HIV-infected patients with TB who are receiving antiretroviral therapy. The document does not cover the diagnosis of TB, diagnosis/treatment of latent TB, or treatment of TB in children. The quality of the evidence was evaluated and the recommendations graded using the approach of the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation Working Group.

  15. Risk factors for default from tuberculosis treatment in HIV-infected individuals in the state of Pernambuco, Brazil: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Concomitant treatment of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection and tuberculosis (TB) presents a series of challenges for treatment compliance for both providers and patients. We carried out this study to identify risk factors for default from TB treatment in people living with HIV. Methods We conducted a cohort study to monitor HIV/TB co-infected subjects in Pernambuco, Brazil, on a monthly basis, until completion or default of treatment for TB. Logistic regression was used to calculate crude and adjusted odds ratios, 95% confidence intervals and P-values. Results From a cohort of 2310 HIV subjects, 390 individuals (16.9%) who had started treatment after a diagnosis of TB were selected, and data on 273 individuals who completed or defaulted on treatment for TB were analyzed. The default rate was 21.7% and the following risk factors were identified: male gender, smoking and CD4 T-cell count less than 200 cells/mm3. Age over 29 years, complete or incomplete secondary or university education and the use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) were identified as protective factors for the outcome. Conclusion The results point to the need for more specific actions, aiming to reduce the default from TB treatment in males, younger adults with low education, smokers and people with CD4 T-cell counts < 200 cells/mm3. Default was less likely to occur in patients under HAART, reinforcing the strategy of early initiation of HAART in individuals with TB. PMID:22176628

  16. [Osteonecrosis in HIV-infected patients].

    PubMed

    Bottaro, Edgardo G; Figueroa, Raúl H; Scapellato, Pablo G; Vidal, Gabriela I; Rodriguez Brieschke, Maria T; Da Representaçao, Silvia; Seoane, Maria B; Laurido, Marcelo F; Caiafa, Diego; Lopardo, Gustavo; Herrera, Fabian; Cassetti, Isabel

    2004-01-01

    Osteonecrosis, also known as avascular necrosis, is chiefly characterized by death of bone caused by vascular compromise. The true incidence of osteonecrosis in HIV-infected patients is not well known and the pathogenesis remains undefined. Hypothetical risk factors peculiar to HIV-infected individuals that might play a role in the pathogenesis of osteonecrosis include the introduction of protease inhibitors and resulting hyperlipidemia, the presence of anticardiolipin antibodies in serum leading to a hypercoagulable state, immune recovery and vasculitis. Hereby we present a series of 13 HIV-infected patients with osteonecrosis. The most common symptom upon presentation was arthralgia. The majority of the patients had received steroids, 9 had developed hyperlipidemia after the introduction of HAART, 8 were smokers and 4 patients were alcoholics. In 2 patients, seric anticardiolipin antibodies were detected. Twelve patients had AIDS and were on HAART (11 were on protease inhibitors). We believe that osteonecrosis should be included as differential diagnosis of every HIV-infected patient who complains of pain of weight bearing joints. Likewise, it seems prudent to rule out HIV infection in subjects with osteonecrosis.

  17. HIV Infection Affects Streptococcus mutans Levels, but Not Genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, G.; Saxena, D.; Chen, Z.; Norman, R.G.; Phelan, J.A.; Laverty, M.; Fisch, G.S.; Corby, P.M.; Abrams, W.; Malamud, D.; Li, Y.

    2012-01-01

    We report a clinical study that examines whether HIV infection affects Streptococcus mutans colonization in the oral cavity. Whole stimulated saliva samples were collected from 46 HIV-seropositive individuals and 69 HIV-seronegative control individuals. The level of S. mutans colonization was determined by conventional culture methods. The genotype of S. mutans was compared between 10 HIV-positive individuals before and after highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) and 10 non-HIV-infected control individuals. The results were analyzed against viral load, CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell counts, salivary flow rate, and caries status. We observed that S. mutans levels were higher in HIV-infected individuals than in the non-HIV-infected control individuals (p = 0.013). No significant differences in S. mutans genotypes were found between the two groups over the six-month study period, even after HAART. There was a bivariate linear relationship between S. mutans levels and CD8+ counts (r = 0.412; p = 0.007), but not between S. mutans levels and either CD4+ counts or viral load. Furthermore, compared with non-HIV-infected control individuals, HIV-infected individuals experienced lower salivary secretion (p = 0.009) and a positive trend toward more decayed tooth surfaces (p = 0.027). These findings suggest that HIV infection can have a significant effect on the level of S. mutans, but not genotypes. PMID:22821240

  18. Kinetics of HIV-1 CTL epitopes recognized by HLA I alleles in HIV-infected individuals at times near primary infection: the Provir/Latitude45 study.

    PubMed

    Papuchon, Jennifer; Pinson, Patricia; Guidicelli, Gwenda-Line; Bellecave, Pantxika; Thomas, Réjean; LeBlanc, Roger; Reigadas, Sandrine; Taupin, Jean-Luc; Baril, Jean Guy; Routy, Jean Pierre; Wainberg, Mark; Fleury, Hervé

    2014-01-01

    In patients responding successfully to ART, the next therapeutic step is viral cure. An interesting strategy is antiviral vaccination, particularly involving CD8 T cell epitopes. However, attempts at vaccination are dependent on the immunogenetic background of individuals. The Provir/Latitude 45 project aims to investigate which CTL epitopes in proviral HIV-1 will be recognized by the immune system when HLA alleles are taken into consideration. A prior study (Papuchon et al, PLoS ONE 2013) showed that chronically-infected patients under successful ART exhibited variations of proviral CTL epitopes compared to a reference viral strain (HXB2) and that a generic vaccine may not be efficient. Here, we investigated viral and/or proviral CTL epitopes at different time points in recently infected individuals of the Canadian primary HIV infection cohort and assessed the affinity of these epitopes for HLA alleles during the study period. An analysis of the results confirms that it is not possible to fully predict which epitopes will be recognized by the HLA alleles of the patients if the reference sequences and epitopes are taken as the basis of simulation. Epitopes may be seen to vary in circulating RNA and proviral DNA. Despite this confirmation, the overall variability of the epitopes was low in these patients who are temporally close to primary infection.

  19. Innate immunity in resistance to HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Biasin, Mara; Clerici, Mario; Piacentini, Luca

    2010-11-01

    Resistance to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in subjects who do not seroconvert despite multiple exposures to the virus and to the progression to AIDS in HIV‐infected individuals depends on multiple factors involving both the innate and the adaptive immune system. The contribution of natural immunity in preventing HIV infection has so far received little attention, but many recently published articles suggest a key role for Toll‐like receptors, natural killer cells, interleukin‐22, acute‐phase amyloid A protein, and APOBEC3G in conferring resistance to HIV infection. The study of these factors will shed light on HIV pathogenesis and contribute to the development of new therapeutic approaches to this elusive disease.

  20. Cancer Prevention in HIV-Infected Populations

    PubMed Central

    Goncalves, Priscila H.; Montezuma-Rusca, Jairo M.; Yarchoan, Robert; Uldrick, Thomas S.

    2016-01-01

    People living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are living longer since the advent of effective combined antiretroviral therapy (cART). While cART substantially decreases the risk of developing some cancers, HIV-infected individuals remain at high risk for Kaposi sarcoma, lymphoma and several solid tumors. Currently HIV-infected patients represent an aging group, and malignancies have become a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Tailored cancer-prevention strategies are needed for this population. In this review we describe the etiologic agents and pathogenesis of common malignancies in the setting of HIV, as well as current evidence for cancer prevention strategies and screening programs. PMID:26970136

  1. Immunological memory to hyperphosphorylated tau in asymptomatic individuals.

    PubMed

    Pascual, Gabriel; Wadia, Jehangir S; Zhu, Xueyong; Keogh, Elissa; Kükrer, Başak; van Ameijde, Jeroen; Inganäs, Hanna; Siregar, Berdien; Perdok, Gerrard; Diefenbach, Otto; Nahar, Tariq; Sprengers, Imke; Koldijk, Martin H; der Linden, Els C Brinkman-van; Peferoen, Laura A; Zhang, Heng; Yu, Wenli; Li, Xinyi; Wagner, Michelle; Moreno, Veronica; Kim, Julie; Costa, Martha; West, Kiana; Fulton, Zara; Chammas, Lucy; Luckashenak, Nancy; Fletcher, Lauren; Holland, Trevin; Arnold, Carrie; Anthony Williamson, R; Hoozemans, Jeroen J; Apetri, Adrian; Bard, Frederique; Wilson, Ian A; Koudstaal, Wouter; Goudsmit, Jaap

    2017-05-01

    Several reports have described the presence of antibodies against Alzheimer's disease-associated hyperphosphorylated forms of tau in serum of healthy individuals. To characterize the specificities that can be found, we interrogated peripheral IgG(+) memory B cells from asymptomatic blood donors for reactivity to a panel of phosphorylated tau peptides using a single-cell screening assay. Antibody sequences were recovered, cloned, and expressed as full-length IgGs. In total, 52 somatically mutated tau-binding antibodies were identified, corresponding to 35 unique clonal families. Forty-one of these antibodies recognize epitopes in the proline-rich and C-terminal domains, and binding of 26 of these antibodies is strictly phosphorylation dependent. Thirteen antibodies showed inhibitory activity in a P301S lysate seeded in vitro tau aggregation assay. Two such antibodies, CBTAU-7.1 and CBTAU-22.1, which bind to the proline-rich and C-terminal regions of tau, respectively, were characterized in more detail. CBTAU-7.1 recognizes an epitope that is similar to that of murine anti-PHF antibody AT8, but has different phospho requirements. Both CBTAU-7.1 and CBTAU-22.1 detect pathological tau deposits in post-mortem brain tissue. CBTAU-7.1 reveals a similar IHC distribution pattern as AT8, immunostaining (pre)tangles, threads, and neuritic plaques. CBTAU-22.1 shows selective detection of neurofibrillary changes by IHC. Taken together, these results suggest the presence of an ongoing antigen-driven immune response against tau in healthy individuals. The wide range of specificities to tau suggests that the human immune repertoire may contain antibodies that can serve as biomarkers or be exploited for therapy.

  2. Identification of Immunogenic Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte Epitopes Containing Drug Resistance Mutations in Antiretroviral Treatment-Naïve HIV-Infected Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Blanco-Heredia, Juan; Lecanda, Aarón; Valenzuela-Ponce, Humberto; Brander, Christian; Ávila-Ríos, Santiago; Reyes-Terán, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    Background Therapeutic HIV vaccines may prove helpful to intensify antiretroviral treatment (ART) efficacy and may be an integral part of future cure strategies. Methods We examined IFN-gamma ELISpot responses to a panel of 218 HIV clade B consensus-based HIV protease-reverse transcriptase peptides, designed to mimic previously described and predicted cytotoxic T lymphocyte epitopes overlapping drug resistance (DR) positions, that either included the consensus sequence or the DR variant sequence, in 49 ART-naïve HIV-infected individuals. Next generation sequencing was used to assess the presence of minority DR variants in circulating viral populations. Results Although a wide spectrum of differential magnitudes of response to DR vs. WT peptide pairs was observed, responses to DR peptides were frequent and strong in the study cohort. No difference between the median magnitudes of response to DR vs. WT peptides was observed. Interestingly, of the 22 peptides that were recognized by >15% of the participants, two-thirds (64%) corresponded to DR peptides. When analysing responses per peptide pair per individual, responses to only WT (median 4 pairs/individual) or DR (median 6 pairs/individual) were more common than responses to both WT and DR (median 2 pairs/individual; p<0.001). While the presence of ELISpot responses to WT peptides was frequently associated with the presence of the corresponding peptide sequence in the patient’s virus (mean 68% of cases), responses to DR peptides were generally not associated with the presence of DR mutations in the viral population, even at low frequencies (mean 1.4% of cases; p = 0.0002). Conclusions Our data suggests that DR peptides are frequently immunogenic and raises the potential benefit of broadening the antigens included in a therapeutic vaccine approach to immunogenic epitopes containing common DR sequences. Further studies are needed to assess the quality of responses elicited by DR peptides. PMID:26808823

  3. Deep sequencing of RYR3 gene identifies rare and common variants associated with increased carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) in HIV-infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Degui; Shendre, Aditi; Scherzer, Rebecca; Irvin, Marguerite R; Perry, Rodney T; Levy, Shawn; Arnett, Donna K; Grunfeld, Carl; Shrestha, Sadeep

    2015-02-01

    Carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) is a subclinical measure of atherosclerosis with mounting evidence that higher cIMT confers an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. The ryanodine receptor 3 gene (RYR3) has previously been linked to increased cIMT; however, the causal variants have not yet been localized. Therefore, we sequenced 339,480 bp encompassing 104 exons and 2 kb flanking region of the RYR3 gene in 96 HIV-positive white men from the extremes of the distribution of common cIMT from the Fat Redistribution and Metabolic Changes in HIV infection study (FRAM). We identified 2710 confirmed variants (2414 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 296 insertion/deletions (indels)), with a mean count of 736 SNPs (ranging from 528 to 1032) and 170 indels (ranging from 128 to 214) distributed in each individual. There were 39 variants in the exons and 15 of these were non-synonymous, of which with only 4 were common variants and the remaining 11 were rare variants, one was a novel SNP. We confirmed that the common variant rs2229116 was significantly associated with cIMT in this design (P<7.9 × 10(-9)), and observed seven other significantly associated SNPs (P<10(-8)). These variants including the private non-synonymous SNPs need to be followed up in a larger sample size and also tested with clinical atherosclerotic outcomes.

  4. Preliminary Evidence for Feasibility, Use, and Acceptability of Individualized Texting for Adherence Building for Antiretroviral Adherence and Substance Use Assessment among HIV-Infected Methamphetamine Users

    PubMed Central

    Moore, David J.; Montoya, Jessica L.; Blackstone, Kaitlin; Depp, Colin A.; Atkinson, J. Hampton; TMARC Group, The

    2013-01-01

    The feasibility, use, and acceptability of text messages to track methamphetamine use and promote antiretroviral treatment (ART) adherence among HIV-infected methamphetamine users was examined. From an ongoing randomized controlled trial, 30-day text response rates of participants assigned to the intervention (individualized texting for adherence building (iTAB), n = 20) were compared to those in the active comparison condition (n = 9). Both groups received daily texts assessing methamphetamine use, and the iTAB group additionally received personalized daily ART adherence reminder texts. Response rate for methamphetamine use texts was 72.9% with methamphetamine use endorsed 14.7% of the time. Text-derived methamphetamine use data was correlated with data from a structured substance use interview covering the same time period (P < 0.05). The iTAB group responded to 69.0% of adherence reminder texts; among those responses, 81.8% endorsed taking ART medication. Standardized feedback questionnaire responses indicated little difficulty with the texts, satisfaction with the study, and beliefs that future text-based interventions would be helpful. Moreover, most participants believed the intervention reduced methamphetamine use and improved adherence. Qualitative feedback regarding the intervention was positive. Future studies will refine and improve iTAB for optimal acceptability and efficacy. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01317277. PMID:24078868

  5. Microbiome in HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Salas, January T.; Chang, Theresa L.

    2014-01-01

    HIV primary infection occurs at mucosa tissues, suggesting an intricate interplay between microbiome and HIV infection. Recent advanced technologies of high-throughput sequencing and bioinformatics allow researchers to explore nonculturable microbes including bacteria, virus and fungi and their association with diseases. HIV/SIV infection is associated with microbiome shifts and immune activation that may affect the outcome of disease progression. Similarly, altered microbiome and inflammation are associated with increased risks of HIV acquisition, suggesting the role of microbiome in HIV transmission. In this review, we will focus on microbiome in HIV infection at various mucosal compartments. Understanding the relationship between microbiome and HIV may offer insights into development of better strategies for HIV prevention and treatment. PMID:25439273

  6. Increased neurocognitive intra-individual variability is associated with declines in medication adherence in HIV-infected adults

    PubMed Central

    Thaler, Nicholas S.; Sayegh, Philip; Arentoft, Alyssa; Thames, April D.; Castellon, Steven A.; Hinkin, Charlie H.

    2015-01-01

    There is cross-sectional evidence that neurocognitive intra-individual variability (IIV), or dispersion, is elevated in HIV disease and is associated with declines in activities of daily living, including medication adherence. This longitudinal study extends this literature by examining whether increased neurocognitive IIV in HIV+ persons over time predicts declines in medication adherence above and beyond changes in mean level of performance over a six-month observation. After controlling for drug use, declines in mean performance, and changes in depressive symptoms, results confirmed that increases in IIV were associated with overall poorer antiretroviral medication adherence. HIV+ individuals with the greatest increases in dispersion demonstrated marked reductions in adherence by the third month that exceed that observed in less variable individuals. Our results indicate that increases in dispersion are associated with poorer declines in medication adherence in HIV disease, which may have implications for the early detection and remediation of suboptimal antiretroviral adherence. PMID:25730729

  7. Food Insecurity, Dietary Diversity, and Body Mass Index of HIV-Infected Individuals on Antiretroviral Therapy in Rural Haiti.

    PubMed

    Rebick, Gabriel W; Franke, Molly F; Teng, Jessica E; Gregory Jerome, J; Ivers, Louise C

    2016-05-01

    Food rations are increasingly offered as part of HIV programs in resource-poor settings, often targeted solely to those with under-nutrition by low body mass index (BMI). This practice does not consider food insecurity, another important risk factor for poor outcomes in people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWH). We analyzed factors associated with low BMI and severe food insecurity in 523 PLWH receiving antiretroviral therapy in rural Haiti using logistic regression. Food insecurity was present in 89 % of individuals. Among those with severe food insecurity, 86 % had a BMI ≥ 18.5 kg/m(2). Severe food insecurity was associated with illiteracy [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 1.79, p = 0.005], having no income (AOR 1.58, p = 0.04), and poverty (p < 0.001). Compared with those with little to no food insecurity, individuals with severe food insecurity had a less diverse diet. We found that food insecurity was highly prevalent in PLWH receiving antiretroviral therapy in rural Haiti. Using BMI as a sole criterion for food supplementation in HIV programs can exclude highly vulnerable individuals who may benefit from such support.

  8. Knowledge, attitudes and practices of South African healthcare workers regarding the prevention and treatment of influenza among HIV-infected individuals

    PubMed Central

    Gaga, Sisanda; Clark, David; Muller, Madeleine; Kuwane, Bulenani; Cohen, Cheryl; Walaza, Sibongile; Tempia, Stefano; Ramatoboe, Puleng; Furumele, Tsakani; Widdowson, Marc-Alain; McMorrow, Meredith L.; Cohen, Adam L.

    2017-01-01

    Background The South African Department of Health (DOH) publishes annual guidelines identifying priority groups, including immunosuppressed individuals and healthcare workers (HCW), for influenza vaccination and treatment. How these guidelines have impacted HCW and their patients, particularly those infected with HIV, remains unknown. Methods We aimed to describe the knowledge, attitudes and practices regarding influenza and the vaccine among South African HCW. Surveys were distributed by two local non-governmental organizations in public health clinics and hospitals in 21 districts/municipalities (5 of 9 provinces). Results There were 1164 respondents; median age 41 years; 978/1126 (87%) female; 801/1122 (71%) nurses. One-third (34%) of HCW reported getting influenza vaccine 2013/2014 and most (94%) recommended influenza vaccine to patients infected with HIV. Ability to get vaccine free of charge (aOR 1.69; 95% CI 1.21–2.37) and having received influenza government training (aOR 1.50; 95% CI 1.04–2.15) were significantly associated with self-reported vaccination in 2013/2014. Self-reported 2013/2014 vaccination (aOR 3.76; 95% CI 1.28–11.03) and availability of influenza vaccine during the healthcare visit (aOR 2.56; 95% CI 1.18–5.57) were significantly associated with recommending influenza vaccine to patients infected with HIV/AIDS. Conclusion Only one-third of participants were vaccinated in 2013–2014 but those who were vaccinated were more likely to recommend vaccination to their patients. Free and close access to influenza vaccine were associated with a higher likelihood of getting vaccinated in 2013/2014. HCW who reported getting the influenza vaccine themselves, had vaccine to offer during the patient consult and were familiar with DOH guidelines/trainings were more likely to recommend vaccine to HIV-infected patients. PMID:28301593

  9. Lipoprotein Changes in HIV-Infected Antiretroviral-Naïve Individuals after Starting Antiretroviral Therapy: ACTG Study A5152s Stein: Lipoprotein Changes on Antiretroviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Stein, James H; Komarow, Lauren; Cotter, Bruno R; Currier, Judith S; Dubé, Michael P; Fichtenbaum, Carl J; Gerschenson, Mariana; Mitchell, Carol K C; Murphy, Robert L; Squires, Kathleen; Parker, Robert A; Torriani, Francesca J

    2008-12-01

    BACKGROUND: Dyslipidemia is a frequent complication of antiretroviral therapy (ART) for patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection (HIV). The effects of ART on lipoproteins are less well-understood, and have not been investigated in a prospective study where assignment to ART is randomized. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of three class-sparing ART regimens on lipids and lipoproteins. METHODS: This was a substudy of a prospective, multicenter study treatment-naïve HIV-infected individuals randomly assigned to receive a regimen of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) + the non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor efavirenz, NRTIs + the protease inhibitor lopinavir/ritonavir, or a NRTI-sparing regimen of efavirenz + lopinavir/ritonavir. Lipoproteins were measured by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. RESULTS: Among the 82 participants, total and small low-density lipoprotein concentrations increased (median, interquartile range) by 152 (-49 - +407, p<0.01) and 130 (-98 - +417, p<0.01) nmol/L, respectively, especially in the arms containing lopinavir/ritonavir (p(KW)<0.04). Very low-density lipoproteins also increased (p<0.01), with a larger increase in the arms that contained lopinavir/ritonavir (p=0.022). High-density lipoproteins increased by 6.0 nmol/L (2.8 - 10.4, p<0.01), but differences between arms were not significant (p(KW)=0.069). Changes were not related to changes in markers of insulin/glucose metabolism. CONCLUSIONS: Total and small low-density lipoprotein concentrations increased, especially in the arms containing lopinavir/ritonavir, as did increases in total very low-density lipoproteins. Adverse changes were especially prominent in the arm with efavirenz + lopinavir/ritonavir.

  10. Cryptococcal meningitis associated with tuberculosis in HIV infected patients.

    PubMed

    Singh, Urvinderpal; Aditi; Aneja, Pooja; Kapoor, B K; Singh, S P; Purewal, Sukhpreet Singh

    2013-07-01

    Opportunistic infections are common complications of advanced immuno-deficiency in individuals with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection. Following involvement of the lung, the central nervous system (CNS) is the second most commonly affected organ. We report two cases of concurrent cryptococcal meningitis and tuberculosis (TB) in HIV infected persons. A high suspicion of multiple opportunistic infections should be kept in mind in HIV seropositive individuals.

  11. HIV infections in otolaryngology

    PubMed Central

    Rzewnicki, Ireneusz; Olszewska, Ewa; Rogowska-Szadkowska, Dorota

    2012-01-01

    Summary HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) infection may produce no clinical symptoms for 10 years on average. However, after many years of infection most people develop symptoms that indicate progression of the disease. There are no regular characteristic symptoms or early stage, and no logical sequence of AIDS indicator disorders has been observed. People who are not aware of the infection are referred to physicians of various specializations, including otolaryngologists. It is on their knowledge about HIV infections, among other factors, that early diagnosis of the disease depends. Appropriate and quick introduction of anti-retroviral drugs may let a person with HIV live decades longer. PMID:22367140

  12. Immigration and HIV infection: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Loue, S; Oppenheim, S

    1994-02-01

    This pilot study was conducted to determine areas in which additional education regarding the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is needed by the undocumented and recently immigrated HIV-infected population, and to obtain preliminary information on the ability of this community to access medical treatment for HIV. Information regarding health status, immigration status, and the use of medical services was obtained from all HIV-infected undocumented and recently immigrated individuals who sought services from a Southern California nonprofit agency between July 1, 1990 and December 31, 1990. A total of 54 such individuals presented for services. Thirteen individuals reported participating in shared needle usage for the administration of medication or vitamins, in addition to other known risk factors for HIV. Only one of these 13 individuals had access to nonemergency medical care. Additional research is necessary to determine the reasons for these needle sharing behaviors. Educational outreach is needed to address these behaviors as a possible risk factor for HIV transmission.

  13. Net survival of perinatally and postnatally HIV-infected children: a pooled analysis of individual data from sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    Marston, Milly; Becquet, Renaud; Zaba, Basia; Moulton, Lawrence H; Gray, Glenda; Coovadia, Hoosen; Essex, Max; Ekouevi, Didier K; Jackson, Debra; Coutsoudis, Anna; Kilewo, Charles; Leroy, Valériane; Wiktor, Stefan; Nduati, Ruth; Msellati, Philippe; Dabis, François; Newell, Marie-Louise; Ghys, Peter D

    2011-01-01

    Background Previously, HIV epidemic models have used a double Weibull curve to represent high initial and late mortality of HIV-infected children, without distinguishing timing of infection (peri- or post-natally). With more data on timing of infection, which may be associated with disease progression, a separate representation of children infected early and late was proposed. Methods Paediatric survival post-HIV infection without anti-retroviral treatment was calculated using pooled data from 12 studies with known timing of HIV infection. Children were grouped into perinatally or post-natally infected. Net mortality was calculated using cause-deleted life tables to give survival as if HIV was the only competing cause of death. To extend the curve beyond the available data, children surviving beyond 2.5 years post infection were assumed to have the same survival as young adults. Double Weibull curves were fitted to both extended survival curves to represent survival of children infected perinatally or through breastfeeding. Results Those children infected perinatally had a much higher risk of dying than those infected through breastfeeding, even allowing for background mortality. The final-fitted double Weibull curves gave 75% survival at 5 months after infection for perinatally infected, and 1.1 years for post-natally infected children. An estimated 25% of the early infected children would still be alive at 10.6 years compared with 16.9 years for those infected through breastfeeding. Conclusions The increase in available data has enabled separation of child mortality patterns by timing of infection allowing improvement and more flexibility in modelling of paediatric HIV infection and survival. PMID:21247884

  14. [Intestinal parasitic diseases in HIV-infected patients in Uzbekistan].

    PubMed

    Nurtaev, Kh S; Badalova, N S; Zalialieva, M V; Osipova, S O

    2005-01-01

    Intestinal parasitic diseases were diagnosed in 100 HIV-infected patients at different stages of disease (its asymptomatic form, persistent generalized lymphoadenopathy, pre-AIDS, and AIDS) (Group 1), 100 Tashkent residents (Group 2), and 349 patients with gastrointestinal diseases, allergic dermatoses, and skin depigmentation foci (Group 3). The HIV-infected patients were found to have virtually all parasites, such as Giardia lamblia, Cryptosporidium parvum, Chilomastix mesnili, Entamoeba coli, Iodamoeba butschlii, Entamoeba histolytica/dispar, Endolimax nana, Blastocystis hominis, Enlerobius vermicularis, Ascaris lumbricoides, Hymenolepis nana, detectable in the population of Tashkent. The highest infestation with intestinal protozoa, including nonpathogenic amoebas and helmninths, was found in Groups 1 and 3. However, in all the forms of HIV infection, the infestation with E. histolytical/dispar was 10 times greater than that in Groups 2 and 3 (1% and 0.8%, respectively). G. lamblia was detected in 16, 21, and 45.2% in Groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively. In all the HIV-infected patients, the content of CD8 lymphocytes was increased, but that of CD20 lymphocytes was normal. Parasites were detectable with different levels of CD4 lymphocytes, but C. parvum was found only if its count was > 200/ml. In the HIV-infected patients, the hyperproduction of IgE was caused mainly by helminths rather than protozoa. In these patients, the increased level of IgE was also noted in the absence of parasites.

  15. Autoimmune diseases and HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Virot, Emilie; Duclos, Antoine; Adelaide, Leopold; Miailhes, Patrick; Hot, Arnaud; Ferry, Tristan; Seve, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    Abstract To describe the clinical manifestations, treatments, prognosis, and prevalence of autoimmune diseases (ADs) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients. All HIV-infected patients managed in the Infectious Diseases Department of the Lyon University Hospitals, France, between January 2003 and December 2013 and presenting an AD were retrospectively included. Thirty-six ADs were found among 5186 HIV-infected patients which represents a prevalence of 0.69% including immune thrombocytopenic purpura (n = 15), inflammatory myositis (IM) (n = 4), sarcoidosis (n = 4), Guillain–Barré syndrome (GBS) (n = 4), myasthenia gravis (n = 2), Graves’ disease (n = 2), and 1 case of each following conditions: systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, autoimmune hepatitis, Hashimoto thyroiditis and autoimmune hemolytic anemia. One patient presented 2 ADs. Thirty patients were known to be HIV-infected when they developed an AD. The AD preceded HIV infection in 2 patients. GBS and HIV infection were diagnosed simultaneously in 3 cases. At AD diagnosis, CD4 T lymphocytes count were higher than 350/mm3 in 63% of patients, between 200 and 350/mm3 in 19% and less than 200/mm3 in 19%. Twenty patients benefited from immunosuppressant treatments, with a good tolerance. ADs during HIV infection are uncommon in this large French cohort. Immune thrombocytopenic purpura, sarcoidosis, IM, and GBS appear to be more frequent than in the general population. Immunosuppressant treatments seem to be effective and well tolerated. PMID:28121924

  16. A Description of Mortality Associated with IPT plus ART Compared to ART Alone among HIV-Infected Individuals in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia: A Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Edessa, Dumessa; Likisa, Jimma

    2015-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis (TB) is the most common human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) associated opportunistic infection. It is the leading cause of death in HIV-infected individuals in sub-Saharan Africa. Anti-retroviral therapy (ART) and isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT) are the two useful TB preventative strategies available to reduce TB among people living with HIV (PLHIV). Therefore, the aim of this study is to compare mortality associated with IPT taken together with ART, as well as ART alone, among PLHIV. Methods A retrospective cohort study was undertaken at Tikur Anbessa Specialized Hospital (TASH) and Zewditu Memorial Hospital (ZMH) on 185 patients receiving IPT (6 months) plus ART and 557 patients receiving ART alone. Mortality rates (MR) per 100 person-years (PYs) were used to compare mortality rates amongst the groups. Time-to-death and survival probabilities of the patients were determined using the Kaplan Meier Method. The Cox Proportional Hazard Model was employed to estimate the effect of IPT plus ART on survival of PLHIV. Results The mortality cases noted in patients treated by IPT plus ART versus ART alone were 18 (4.5 cases/100 PYs) and 116 (10 cases/100 PYs), respectively. In reference to the ART alone, the IPT plus ART reduced the likelihood of death significantly (aHR 0.48; 95% CI 0.38–0.69) and median time to death was about 26 months (IQR 19–34). Moreover, WHO stage IV (aHR 2.42: 95% CI 1.42–4.11), CD4 values ≥350cells/mm3 (aHR 0.52; 95% CI 0.28–0.94), adherence to ART (aHR 0.12; 95% CI 0.08–0.20), primary levels of education (aHR 2.20; 95% CI 1.07–4.52); and alcohol consumption (aHR 1.71; 95% CI 1.04–2.81) were factors strongly associated with mortality. Conclusion We found that PLHIV treated by the IPT plus ART had a lower likelihood of mortality and delayed time-to-death when compared to patients treated by ART alone. PMID:26348618

  17. Is Impact of Statin Therapy on All-Cause Mortality Different in HIV-Infected Individuals Compared to General Population? Results from the FHDH-ANRS CO4 Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Sylvie; Lacombe, Jean-Marc; Mary-Krause, Murielle; Partisani, Marialuisa; Bidegain, Frédéric; Cotte, Laurent; Aslangul, Elisabeth; Chéret, Antoine; Boccara, Franck; Meynard, Jean-Luc; Pradier, Christian; Roger, Pierre-Marie; Tattevin, Pierre; Costagliola, Dominique; Molina, Jean-Michel

    2015-01-01

    Background The effect of statins on all-cause mortality in the general population has been estimated as 0.86 (95%CI 0.79-0.94) for primary prevention. Reported values in HIV-infected individuals have been discordant. We assessed the impact of statin-based primary prevention on all-cause mortality among HIV-infected individuals. Methods Patients were selected among controls from a multicentre nested case-control study on the risk of myocardial infarction. Patients with prior cardiovascular or cerebrovascular disorders were not eligible. Potential confounders, including variables that were associated either with statin use and/or death occurrence and statin use were evaluated within the last 3 months prior to inclusion in the case-control study. Using an intention to continue approach, multiple imputation of missing data, Cox’s proportional hazard models or propensity based weighting, the impact of statins on the 7-year all-cause mortality was evaluated. Results Among 1,776 HIV-infected individuals, 138 (8%) were statins users. During a median follow-up of 53 months, 76 deaths occurred, including 6 in statin users. Statin users had more cardiovascular risk factors and a lower CD4 T cell nadir than statin non-users. In univariable analysis, the death rate was higher in statins users (11% vs 7%, HR 1.22, 95%CI 0.53-2.82). The confounders accounted for were age, HIV transmission group, current CD4 T cell count, haemoglobin level, body mass index, smoking status, anti-HCV antibodies positivity, HBs antigen positivity, diabetes and hypertension. In the Cox multivariable model the estimated hazard ratio of statin on all-cause mortality was estimated as 0.86 (95%CI 0.34-2.19) and it was 0.83 (95%CI 0.51-1.35) using inverse probability treatment weights. Conclusion The impact of statin for primary prevention appears similar in HIV-infected individuals and in the general population. PMID:26200661

  18. NEUROCOGNITIVE CORRELATES OF ALEXITHYMIA IN ASYMPTOMATIC INDIVIDUALS WITH HIV

    PubMed Central

    Bogdanova, Yelena; Díaz-Santos, Mirella; Cronin-Golomb, Alice

    2010-01-01

    Alexithymia, an impairment of affective and cognitive emotional processing, is often associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and may reflect effects of the virus on brain areas that are also important for multiple cognitive functions, such as the prefrontal and anterior cingulate cortices. We hypothesized that there would be a correlation between extent of alexithymia and cognitive performance associated with these brain areas, including attention, executive function, and visuospatial processing. Thirty-four asymptomatic HIV+ participants and 34 matched healthy HIV− volunteers were administered the Toronto Alexithymia Scale, a series of neuropsychological tests, and measures of apathy, depression, and quality of life (QoL). The HIV+ participants had significantly higher levels of alexithymia, depression and apathy than the HIV− group. The extent of alexithymia and two of its processing components (Difficulty Describing Feelings [DDF] and Externally Oriented Thinking), but not depression, correlated with performance on measures of executive and visuospatial abilities, consistent with dysfunction of the frontostriatal circuits and their cortical projections. Apathy was related to alexithymia and two processing components (Difficulty Identifying Feelings and DDF) but to only one cognitive measure. The higher rate of alexithymia, as well as cognitive dysfunction, in HIV may be a consequence of the infection on the frontostriatal system and its cortical connections. Our findings also demonstrated a dissociation of apathy and alexithymia in HIV, pointing to overlapping but distinct neural substrates within frontostriatal circuits. Alexithymia correlated strongly with QoL ratings, underscoring the importance of assessment and treatment of HIV-associated emotional and cognitive processing deficits. PMID:20036267

  19. Psychopharmacology in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Repetto, Martin J; Petitto, John M

    2008-06-01

    Neuropsychiatric disorders and syndromes may be underdiagnosed and inadequately treated in individuals infected with HIV. Depression in particular is among the most prevalent diagnoses, and data from controlled clinical studies have shown that antidepressant medications are efficacious and safe for treating depression in HIV-infected persons. A significant shortcoming of this literature is that most of the available data are from studies conducted before the advent of highly active antiretroviral therapy. In addition, apart from antidepressant medications, controlled studies systematically assessing efficacy and safety issues for other classes of psychotropic drugs (e.g., antipsychotic and anxiolytic medications) in HIV-infected persons are lacking. This review summarizes essential findings pertaining to the use of psychotropic medications to treat depression and other neuropsychiatric disorders in the context of HIV. It includes a discussion of clinically relevant treatment considerations (e.g., side effects, drug-drug interactions) derived from the existing literature as well as judgments that clinicians face in the absence of research data. Despite some shortcomings of the existing literature, overall there is compelling evidence that the appropriate use of psychotropic medications (coupled with behavioral therapy) can improve the quality of life of mentally ill HIV-infected individuals.

  20. Immunology of Pediatric HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Tobin, Nicole H.; Aldrovandi, Grace M.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Most infants born to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected women escape HIV infection. Infants evade infection despite an immature immune system and, in the case of breastfeeding, prolonged repetitive, exposure. If infants become infected, the course of their infection and response to treatment differs dramatically depending upon the timing (in utero, intrapartum, or during breastfeeding) and potentially the route of their infection. Perinatally acquired HIV infection occurs during a critical window of immune development. HIV’s perturbation of this dynamic process may account for the striking age-dependent differences in HIV disease progression. HIV infection also profoundly disrupts the maternal immune system upon which infants rely for protection and immune instruction. Therefore, it is not surprising that infants who escape HIV infection still suffer adverse effects. In this review, we highlight the unique aspects of pediatric HIV transmission and pathogenesis with a focus on mechanisms by which HIV infection during immune ontogeny may allow discovery of key elements for protection and control from HIV. PMID:23772619

  1. Substance Use in Older HIV-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Edelman, E. Jennifer; Tetrault, Jeanette M.; Fiellin, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of the Review Substance use may persist throughout the life course and has a substantial impact on health outcomes globally. As HIV-infected individuals are disproportionately impacted by substance use and living longer, it is critical that providers and researchers alike understand the impact of substance use on older, HIV-infected patients and potential treatment options. To this end, we conducted a review of the literature focusing on the most commonly used substances to outline the epidemiology, health consequences, treatment options and latest research relevant to older, HIV-infected patients. Recent Findings Substance use impacts older, HIV-infected patients with regards to HIV-related and non-HIV related outcomes. Counseling strategies are available for marijuana and stimulant use disorders. Brief counseling is useful alongside medications for alcohol, tobacco and opioid use disorders. Many medications for alcohol, tobacco, and opioid use disorders are safe in the setting of antiretroviral therapy. Unfortunately, few interventions targeting substance use in older, HIV-infected patients have been developed and evaluated. Summary As older, HIV-infected patients continue to experience substance use and its related health consequences, there will be a growing need for the development of safe and effective interventions which address the complex needs of this population. PMID:24824888

  2. [HIV infection in immigrants].

    PubMed

    López-Vélez, Rogelio; Navarro Beltrá, Miriam; Hernando Jerez, Asunción; del Amo Valero, Julia

    2008-05-01

    Immigration to Spain has greatly increased since 1995. Currently, more than 4 million foreigners are resident in the country. The immigration process increases vulnerability. The most common route of HIV infection in the immigrant population and ethnic minorities is heterosexual transmission. The number of people living with HIV worldwide (39.5 million people in 2006) and the number of those dying from AIDS continues to increase. In 2006, there were an estimated 30,000 people living with HIV/AIDS in Spain. The number of cases of AIDS in immigrants has risen in the last few years. AIDS in immigrants from any country, and especially in those from sub-Saharan Africa, is associated with a greater frequency of tuberculosis disease. Knowledge of opportunistic pathogens with tropical distribution is required for a correct differential diagnosis. Throughout the European Union, the number of AIDS cases has progressively decreased since the introduction of highly effective anti- HIV treatment, but this decrease has been significantly lower in immigrants. The difference may be due to lower access to health systems caused by administrative, legal, cultural and linguistic barriers.

  3. Body Composition in Individuals with Asymptomatic Osteoarthritis of the Knee.

    PubMed

    Ho-Pham, Lan T; Lai, Thai Q; Mai, Linh D; Doan, Minh C; Nguyen, Tuan V

    2016-02-01

    Greater body mass index (BMI) is associated with a greater risk of osteoarthritis (OA). This study sought to investigate whether the association is mediated by fat mass or lean mass. The study involved 170 men and 488 women aged between 20 and 90 (average age: 55) who were randomly recruited from Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. The presence of knee OA was radiographically diagnosed based on the Kellgren-Lawrence criteria. Lean mass (LM) and fat mass (FM) were obtained from the DXA whole body scan (Hologic QDR-4500). The relationship between OA, LM, and FM was analyzed by a series of multiple linear regression models which take into account the effects of gender and age. As expected, men and women with knee OA were older than those without OA (65 vs 51 year in men, and 64 vs 52 year in women). After adjusting for age, OA was associated with greater FM and percent body fat (PBF), but the association was only observed in women, not in men. There was no statistically significant difference in LM between OA and non-OA individuals. Moreover, after adjusting for age and BMI or PBF, bone density in OA patients was not significantly different from non-OA individuals. Women with OA of the knee have greater fat mass than non-OA individuals, and that there is no significant difference in bone density between OA and non-OA individuals. Thus, the association between body mass index and OA is mainly mediated by fat mass.

  4. Perturbed CD8+ T cell TIGIT/CD226/PVR axis despite early initiation of antiretroviral treatment in HIV infected individuals

    PubMed Central

    Tauriainen, Johanna; Scharf, Lydia; Frederiksen, Juliet; Naji, Ali; Ljunggren, Hans-Gustaf; Sönnerborg, Anders; Lund, Ole; Reyes-Terán, Gustavo; Hecht, Frederick M.; Deeks, Steven G.; Betts, Michael R.; Buggert, Marcus; Karlsson, Annika C.

    2017-01-01

    HIV-specific CD8+ T cells demonstrate an exhausted phenotype associated with increased expression of inhibitory receptors, decreased functional capacity, and a skewed transcriptional profile, which are only partially restored by antiretroviral treatment (ART). Expression levels of the inhibitory receptor, T cell immunoglobulin and ITIM domain (TIGIT), the co-stimulatory receptor CD226 and their ligand PVR are altered in viral infections and cancer. However, the extent to which the TIGIT/CD226/PVR-axis is affected by HIV-infection has not been characterized. Here, we report that TIGIT expression increased over time despite early initiation of ART. HIV-specific CD8+ T cells were almost exclusively TIGIT+, had an inverse expression of the transcription factors T-bet and Eomes and co-expressed PD-1, CD160 and 2B4. HIV-specific TIGIThi cells were negatively correlated with polyfunctionality and displayed a diminished expression of CD226. Furthermore, expression of PVR was increased on CD4+ T cells, especially T follicular helper (Tfh) cells, in HIV-infected lymph nodes. These results depict a skewing of the TIGIT/CD226 axis from CD226 co-stimulation towards TIGIT-mediated inhibition of CD8+ T cells, despite early ART. These findings highlight the importance of the TIGIT/CD226/PVR axis as an immune checkpoint barrier that could hinder future “cure” strategies requiring potent HIV-specific CD8+ T cells. PMID:28084312

  5. HIV infection and AIDS.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, A

    1996-09-01

    Many of the clinical features of HIV/AIDS can be ascribed to the profound immune deficiency which develops in infected patients. The destruction of the immune system by the virus results in opportunistic infection, as well as an increased risk of autoimmune disease and malignancy. In addition, disease manifestations related to the virus itself may occur. For example, during the primary illness which occurs within weeks after first exposure to HIV, clinical symptoms occur in at least 50% of cases, typically as a mononucleosis syndrome. HIV-related complications are rarely encountered in patients with preserved immunity (i.e. CD4 T-cell counts greater than 500 cells/mm3). Recurrent mucocutaneous herpes simplex (HSV), herpes zoster (VZV), oral candidiasis and oral hairy leukoplakia occur with increasing frequency as the CD4 count drops below this level. Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) occurs in association with HIV and often presents early in the clinical course. The risk of developing opportunistic infections and malignancies typical of AIDS increases progressively as CD4 counts fall below 200 cells/mm3. The clinical manifestations of infections associated with AIDS tend to fall into well-recognized patterns of presentation, including pneumonia, dysphagia/odynophagia, diarrhoea, neurological symptoms, fever, wasting, anaemia and visual loss. The commonest pathogens include Candida albicans, Pneumocystis carinii, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Toxoplasma gondii, Cryptococcus neoformans, Mycobacterium avium intracellulare and cytomegalovirus. Malignant disease in patients with HIV infection also occurs in a characteristic pattern. Only two tumours are prevalent: Kaposi's sarcoma, a multifocal tumour of vascular endothelium which typically involves skin and mucosal surfaces; and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, which is typically high grade in phenotype, often arising within the central nervous system. The principles of therapy include reduction of HIV replication by antiretroviral

  6. HIV infection in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Nancy; Holodniy, Mark

    2008-01-01

    In the US, an estimated 1 million people are infected with HIV, although one-third of this population are unaware of their diagnosis. While HIV infection is commonly thought to affect younger adults, there are an increasing number of patients over 50 years of age living with the condition. UNAIDS and WHO estimate that of the 40 million people living with HIV/AIDS in the world, approximately 2.8 million are 50 years and older. With the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in the mid-1990s, survival following HIV diagnosis has risen dramatically and HIV infection has evolved from an acute disease process to being managed as a chronic medical condition. As treated HIV-infected patients live longer and the number of new HIV diagnoses in older patients rise, clinicians need to be aware of these trends and become familiar with the management of HIV infection in the older patient. This article is intended for the general clinician, including geriatricians, and will review epidemiologic data and HIV treatment as well as provide a discussion on medical management issues affecting the older HIV-infected patient. PMID:18982916

  7. HIV infection and AIDS in the public health and health care systems: the role of law and litigation.

    PubMed

    Gostin, L O; Webber, D W

    1998-04-08

    The AIDS Litigation Project has reviewed nearly 600 reported cases involving individuals with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in the federal and state courts in the United States between 1991 and 1997. Cases were identified through a federal and 50-state computer and library search. An important subset of litigation relates to HIV/AIDS in the public health and health care systems, since the law affects health care institutions and professionals, patients, and public health policy in America. This subset of HIV/AIDS litigation includes testing and reporting; privacy, the duty to warn, and the right to know; physician standards of care in prevention and treatment; and discrimination and access to health care. In broad terms, the review demonstrates a reliance on voluntary testing and protection of patient privacy through HIV-specific statutes and the common law. Negligence with potential civil and criminal liability has been alleged in cases of erroneous or missed diagnosis of HIV infection. In the first AIDS case to be considered by the Supreme Court, the Court will decide whether patients with asymptomatic HIV infection are protected under the Americans With Disabilities Act. Considerable progress has been made, both socially and legally, during the first 2 decades of the epidemic, but much still needs to be accomplished to protect privacy, prevent discrimination, and promote tolerance.

  8. Regulatory T cells generated during cytomegalovirus in vitro stimulation of mononuclear cells from HIV-infected individuals on HAART correlate with decreased lymphocyte proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Jesser, Renee D.; Li, Shaobing; Weinberg, Adriana . E-mail: Adriana.Weinberg@uchsc.edu

    2006-09-01

    HIV-infected patients fail to fully recover cell-mediated immunity despite HAART. To identify regulatory factors, we studied the phenotype and function of in vitro cytomegalovirus (CMV)-stimulated T cells from HAART recipients. CFSE-measured proliferation showed CD4{sup +} and CD8{sup +} cells dividing in CMV-stimulated cultures. Compared with healthy controls, CMV-stimulated lymphocytes from HAART recipients had lower {sup 3}H-thymidine incorporation; lower IFN{gamma} and TNF{alpha} production; higher CD4{sup +}CD27{sup -}CD28{sup -} and CD8{sup +}CD27{sup -}CD28{sup -} frequencies; lower CD4{sup +}CD25{sup hi}; and higher FoxP3 expression in CD8{sup +}CD25{sup hi} cells. CMV-specific proliferation correlated with higher IFN{gamma}, TNF{alpha} and IL10 levels and higher CD4{sup +}perforin{sup +} and CD8{sup +}perforin{sup +} frequencies. Decreased proliferation correlated with higher CD4{sup +}CD27{sup -}CD28{sup -} frequencies and TGF{beta}1 production, which also correlated with each other. Anti-TGF{beta}1 neutralizing antibodies restored CMV-specific proliferation in a dose-dependent fashion. In HIV-infected subjects, decreased proliferation correlated with higher CMV-stimulated CD8{sup +}CD25{sup hi} frequencies and their FoxP3 expression. These data indicate that FoxP3- and TGF{beta}1-expressing regulatory T cells contribute to decreased immunity in HAART recipients.

  9. [Microbiological diagnosis of HIV infection].

    PubMed

    López-Bernaldo de Quirós, Juan Carlos; Delgado, Rafael; García, Federico; Eiros, José M; Ortiz de Lejarazu, Raúl

    2007-12-01

    Currently, there are around 150,000 HIV-infected patients in Spain. This number, together with the fact that this disease is now a chronic condition since the introduction of antiretroviral therapy, has generated an increasing demand on the clinical microbiology laboratories in our hospitals. This increase has occurred not only in the diagnosis and treatment of opportunistic diseases, but also in tests related to the diagnosis and therapeutic management of HIV infection. To meet this demand, the Sociedad de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clinica (Spanish Society of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology) has updated its standard Procedure for the microbiological diagnosis of HIV infection. The main advances related to serological diagnosis, plasma viral load, and detection of resistance to antiretroviral drugs are reviewed in this version of the Procedure.

  10. Bone disease and HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Amorosa, Valerianna; Tebas, Pablo

    2006-01-01

    The high prevalence of bone demineralization among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients in the current therapeutic era has been described in multiple studies, sounding the alarm that we may expect an epidemic of fragility fractures in the future. However, despite noting high overall prevalences of osteopenia and osteoporosis, recent longitudinal studies that we review here have generally not observed accelerated bone loss during antiretroviral therapy beyond the initial period after treatment initiation. We discuss the continued progress toward understanding the mechanisms of HIV-associated bone loss, particularly the effects of HIV infection, antiretroviral therapy, and host immune factors on bone turnover. We summarize results of clinical trials published in the past year that studied the safety and efficacy of treatment of bone loss in HIV-infected patients and provide provisional opinions about who should be considered for bone disease screening and treatment.

  11. Neurological Complications in Controlled HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Crossley, Kate M; Brew, Bruce J

    2013-12-01

    In recent years, there have been great advances in therapies for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) that have allowed suppression of the virus and its effects on the body. Despite this progress, neurological complications persist in HIV-infected individuals. In this review we consider the possible ways that HIV might cause neurotoxicity and neuroinflammation. We discuss the spectrum of neurological disorders caused by HIV and its treatment, with a particular focus on both HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders and peripheral neuropathies. Since there has been a shift to HIV being a chronic illness, we also review the increasing prevalence of cerebrovascular disease and neurodegenerative disorders.

  12. Troubled Adolescents and HIV Infection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodruff, John O., Ed.; And Others

    This report on adolescents, Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS), and Human Immune Virus (HIV) infection had its beginning in the Knowledge Development Workshop "Issues in the Prevention and Treatment of AIDS Among Adolescents with Serious Emotional Disturbance," held June 9-10, 1988 in the District of Columbia. These papers are included:…

  13. International travel and HIV infection.

    PubMed Central

    von Reyn, C. F.; Mann, J. M.; Chin, J.

    1990-01-01

    Although human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is a worldwide problem, its prevalence and pattern vary from country to country. Accordingly, the risk to international travellers of acquiring HIV infection also varies widely in different parts of the world, and depends principally on their behaviour. The risk of sexual acquisition of HIV infection can be virtually eliminated by avoiding penetrative sexual intercourse with intravenous drug users and persons who have had multiple sexual partners (such as prostitutes) or reduced by the use of condoms. The risk of parenteral exposure to HIV can be reduced by avoiding parenteral drug use and behaviour that is likely to lead to injury (with its attendant risk of requiring blood transfusion) and by seeking medical facilities with adequate capabilities to screen blood donors for HIV and to sterilize instruments. HIV screening of international travellers is an ineffective, costly, and impractical public health strategy for limiting the worldwide spread of HIV infection. Travellers infected with HIV require specialized advice regarding health precautions, prophylactic medications, and immunization. PMID:2194689

  14. Identification of coronary heart disease in asymptomatic individuals with diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Psaty, Bruce M; Di Carli, Marcelo F; Branch, Kelley R

    2015-01-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is highly prevalent in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM), and remains the single most common cause of death among this population. Regrettably, a significant percentage of diabetics fail to perceive the classic symptoms associated with myocardial ischemia. Among asymptomatic diabetics, the prevalence of abnormal cardiac testing appears to be high, ranging between 10% and 62%, and mortality is significantly higher in those with abnormal scans. Hence, the potential use of screening for CHD detection among asymptomatic DM individuals is appealing and has been recommended in certain circumstances. However, it was not until recently, that this question was addressed in clinical trials. Two studies randomized a total of 2,023 asymptomatic diabetics to screening or not using cardiac imaging with a mean follow up of 4.4 ± 1.4 years. In combination, both trials showed lower than expected annual event rates, and failed to reduce major cardiovascular events in the screened group compared to the standard of care alone. The results of these trials do not currently support the use of screening tools for CHD detection in asymptomatic DM individuals. However, these studies have important limitations, and potential explanations for their negative results that are discussed in this manuscript. PMID:26019384

  15. Spatiotemporal dynamics of HIV infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strain, Matthew Carl

    Mathematical models of the dynamics of infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have contributed to tremendous advances over the past 20 years. This thesis extends this previous work by exploring the importance of spatial heterogeneity in HIV infection both in vitro and in vivo in patients treated with highly-active antiretroviral therapy. Viral infections propagate locally in space, yet HIV infection has been widely regarded as equilibrated over the entire body of an infected patient. This dissertation constructs and explores a cellular automata model of viral spread at the cellular level. Coupling the automata to a blood compartment represented by a differential equation leads to a whole-body model of HIV infection that explicitly includes spatial effects at both the cellular and tissue levels. These models are tested by comparison with experimental data. A central prediction of the spatial model is that, due to competition between Brownian motion and viral lability, HIV infectivity increases with target cell density. This production is verified in a series of in vitro experiments in cell culture. The predicted independence of inhibitory concentrations of antiretoviral agents is verified for nevirapine, but azidothymidine inhibits HIV replication less efficiently in more dense cultures. These in vitro results suggest that systems allowing cell concentrations closer to tissue densities would better reflect virus replication kinetics, although standard measures of relative drug susceptibility may accurately reflect in vivo conditions. The coupled spatial model of in vivo dynamics is compared with novel mathematical analysis of experiments in HIV-infected patients. These analyses indicate that HIV DNA provides a useful marker of the size of long-lived cellular reservoirs of HIV. Levels of HIV DNA in peripheral blood are predictive of the average rate of residual virus production after years of treatment, regardless of whether patients initiate therapy

  16. Partners in Crime: The Role of CMV in Immune Dysregulation and Clinical Outcome During HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Michael L; Lederman, Michael M; Gianella, Sara

    2016-02-01

    In the current era of combination antiretroviral therapy (ART), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals are living longer and healthier lives. Nevertheless, HIV-infected persons are at greater risk for age-related disorders, which have been linked to residual immune dysfunction and inflammation. HIV-infected individuals are almost universally co-infected with cytomegalovirus (CMV) and both viruses are associated with inflammation-related morbidities. Therefore, a detailed investigation of the relationship between CMV and aging-related morbidities emerging during chronic HIV infection is warranted. Here, we review the literature on how CMV co-infection affects HIV infection and host immunity and we discuss the gaps in our knowledge that need elucidation.

  17. The induction of CD80 and apoptosis on B cells and CD40L in CD4+ T cells in response to seasonal influenza vaccination distinguishes responders versus non-responders in healthy controls and aviremic ART-treated HIV-infected individuals

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Anna M.; Luo, Zhenwu; Martin, Lisa; Wan, Zhuang; Ma, Lei; Liao, Guoyang; Song, Yuxia; Li, Xiaochun; Kilby, J. Michael; Huang, Lei; Jiang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Background Studies have shown that HIV infection is associated with an impaired influenza vaccine response. We examined the role of cellular phenotypes and function in influenza vaccine responsiveness in healthy controls and aviremic HIV-infected subjects on antiretroviral treatment (ART). Methods 16 healthy controls and 26 ART+ aviremic HIV+ subjects were enrolled in the current study. Blood was collected at pre-vaccination (D0), and on days 7–10 (D7) and 14–21 (D14) following the 2013–2014 seasonal influenza vaccine administrations. Subjects were classified as responders if neutralizing titers against H1N1 virus increased ≥ 4-fold at D14 compared to D0. A serial analysis of B and CD4+ T cell frequencies and activation was performed on D0 and D7 by flow cytometry. Results 9 of 26 (34.6%) HIV-infected individuals and 7 of 16 (43.8%) healthy controls were classified as responders to influenza vaccines. Total B cell apoptosis (annexin V) was increased on D7 post-vaccination in non-responders but not in responders among both controls and HIV+ subjects. Surface CD80 expression on memory B cells and intracellular CD40L expression on memory CD4+ T cells were induced on D7 in responders of controls but not in non-responders. The CD80 and CD40L induction was not demonstrable in HIV-infected subjects regardless of responders and non-responders. Memory CD4+ T cell cycling tended to increase on D7 in the four study groups but did not achieve significance. All the other parameters were indistinguishable between responders and non-responders, regardless of HIV-infection status. Conclusion The perturbation of activation and apoptotic induction on B cells or CD4+ T cells after seasonal influenza vaccination in non-responders and HIV-infected subjects may help understand the mechanism of impaired vaccine responsiveness. PMID:28017428

  18. A rapid expansion of HIV-1 CRF63_02A1 among newly diagnosed HIV-infected individuals in the Tomsk Region, Russia.

    PubMed

    Gashnikova, Natalya M; Bogachev, Vladislav V; Baryshev, Pavel B; Totmenin, Alexei V; Gashnikova, Maria P; Kazachinskaya, Anastasia G; Ismailova, Tatiana N; Stepanova, Svetlana A; Chernov, Alexander S; Mikheev, Valery N

    2015-04-01

    The prevalence of HIV infection in different Russian regions is nonuniform. In the Tomsk region (TR), 2020 HIV new infection cases were recorded in 2013, the morbidity having increased 5.9-fold as compared to 2012. In total, 64 blood plasma samples from primary HIV cases have been examined. HIV-specific fragments of the pol gene have been obtained for 61 samples (of protease for 58 and of integrase for 23) and of the env gene V3 region for 40 samples. Phylogenetic analysis of the determined HIV-1 sequences has detected CRF63_02A1 in 55 (90.2%) cases, whereas HIV subtype A1, characteristic of Russia, has been observed in only three (4.9%) patients. Three (4.9%) cases contain CRF63_02A1/A recombinant variants. This article demonstrates that a drastic activation of the epidemic in the Tomsk region is accompanied by a rapid spreading of the recently described HIV-1 CRF63_02A1, which we detected in the Novosibirsk region outbreak of 2008.

  19. Diagnostic tests in HIV management: a review of clinical and laboratory strategies to monitor HIV-infected individuals in developing countries.

    PubMed Central

    Kimmel, April D.; Losina, Elena; Freedberg, Kenneth A.; Goldie, Sue J.

    2006-01-01

    We conducted a systematic review on the performance of diagnostic tests for clinical and laboratory monitoring of HIV-infected adults in developing countries. Diagnostic test information collected from computerized databases, bibliographies and the Internet were categorized as clinical (non-laboratory patient information), immunologic (information from immunologic laboratory tests), or virologic (information from virologic laboratory tests). Of the 51 studies selected for the review 28 assessed immunologic tests, 12 virologic tests and seven clinical and immunologic tests. Methods of performance evaluation were primarily sensitivity and specificity for the clinical category and correlation coefficients for immunologic and virologic categories. In the clinical category, the majority of test performance measures was reported as >70% sensitive and >65% specific. In the immunologic category, correlation coefficients ranged from r=0.54 to r=0.99 for different CD4 count enumeration techniques, while correlation for CD4 and total lymphocyte counts was between r=0.23 and r=0.74. In the virologic category, correlation coefficients for different human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) ribonucleic acid (RNA) quantification techniques ranged from r=0.54 to r=0.90. Future research requires consensus on designing studies, and collecting and reporting data useful for decision-makers. We recommend classifying information into clinically relevant categories, using a consistent definition of disease across studies and providing measures of both association and accuracy. PMID:16878233

  20. The macrophage: the intersection between HIV infection and atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Crowe, Suzanne M.; Westhorpe, Clare L. V.; Mukhamedova, Nigora; Jaworowski, Anthony; Sviridov, Dmitri; Bukrinsky, Michael

    2010-01-01

    HIV-infected individuals are at increased risk of coronary artery disease (CAD) with underlying mechanisms including chronic immune activation and inflammation secondary to HIV-induced microbial translocation and low-grade endotoxemia; direct effects of HIV and viral proteins on macrophage cholesterol metabolism; and dyslipidemia related to HIV infection and specific antiretroviral therapies. Monocytes are the precursors of the lipid-laden foam cells within the atherosclerotic plaque and produce high levels of proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-6. The minor CD14+/CD16+ “proinflammatory” monocyte subpopulation is preferentially susceptible to HIV infection and may play a critical role in the pathogenesis of HIV-related CAD. In this review, the central role of monocytes/macrophages in HIV-related CAD and the importance of inflammation and cholesterol metabolism are discussed. PMID:19952353

  1. Acute hepatitis C: changing epidemiology and association with HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Brejt, Nick; Gilleece, Yvonne; Fisher, Martin

    2007-03-01

    Over the past 6 to 7 years an increasing incidence of acute hepatitis C virus (AHCV) has been fuelled by two different changing epidemics: (1) a new resurgence of AHCV amongst intravenous drug users (IVDU); and (2) presumed sexually transmitted AHCV amongst predominantly HIV-positive men who have sex with men (MSM). Increasing incidence amongst IVDUs is likely to be a consequence of changing injecting behaviour, possibly related to changes in perception of HIV as well as HCV risk and consequences. Increasing incidence amongst MSM is likely to be a consequence of changing sexual practices, for example number of sexual partners and type of sexual behaviour, as well as increasing availability of recreational drugs associated with sexual risk-taking, and wider availability of casual sexual partners via the internet or sex-on-premises venues. It remains unclear whether the current outbreaks in MSM, predominantly seen in HIV-positive individuals, reflect a predisposition to AHCV secondary to HIV status per se, or whether this reflects differences in behaviour amongst HIV-positive versus HIV-negative MSM, or potentially increased screening (either routine or secondary to abnormal liver function tests) in HIV-positive MSM. The majority of individuals with AHCV are asymptomatic and therefore routine screening of individuals in at-risk groups with abnormal liver function tests should be considered. Previous historical studies suggest that individuals with concomitant HIV infection are far less likely than those without to spontaneously clear HCV. It is currently recommended that such individuals acutely infected with HCV should undergo monitoring of HCV viral load levels to determine whether spontaneous clearance is likely or whether the opportunity for early treatment should be considered.

  2. Factors affecting abnormal Pap smear follow-up among HIV-infected women.

    PubMed

    Abercrombie, Priscilla D

    2003-01-01

    Women with HIV infection are at least 10 times more likely to have an abnormal Pap smear than women who are HIV negative. Unfortunately, many women with HIV do not return for care after an abnormal Pap smear. Through the use of focus groups and individual interviews, HIV-positive women's experiences with abnormal Pap smears and the factors that affected whether they returned for care were explored. Two thirds of the 18 participants were minority women, and the average age was 40. Using techniques of constant comparative analysis, five factors were identified that affected whether women came back for care. These factors included fear, the asymptomatic nature of the problem, life circumstances, the participant's perspectives on health, and the health care provider. The findings from this study have implications for clinical practice and future research regarding adherence and abnormal Pap smear follow-up among women with HIV.

  3. The stochastic dance of early HIV infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrill, Stephen J.

    2005-12-01

    The stochastic nature of early HIV infection is described in a series of models, each of which captures aspects of the dance of HIV during the early stages of infection. It is to this highly variable target that the immune response must respond. The adaptability of the various components of the immune response is an important aspect of the system's operation, as the nature of the pathogens that the response will be required to respond to and the order in which those responses must be made cannot be known beforehand. As HIV infection has direct influence over cells responsible for the immune response, the dance predicts that the immune response will be also in a variable state of readiness and capability for this task of adaptation. The description of the stochastic dance of HIV here will use the tools of stochastic models, and for the most part, simulation. The justification for this approach is that the early stages and the development of HIV diversity require that the model to be able to describe both individual sample path and patient-to-patient variability. In addition, as early viral dynamics are best described using branching processes, the explosive growth of these models both predicts high variability and rapid response of HIV to changes in system parameters.In this paper, a basic viral growth model based on a time dependent continuous-time branching process is used to describe the growth of HIV infected cells in the macrophage and lymphocyte populations. Immigration from the reservoir population is added to the basic model to describe the incubation time distribution. This distribution is deduced directly from the modeling assumptions and the model of viral growth. A system of two branching processes, one in the infected macrophage population and one in the infected lymphocyte population is used to provide a description of the relationship between the development of HIV diversity as it relates to tropism (host cell preference). The role of the immune

  4. Screening and risk assessment for coronary artery disease in HIV infection: an unmet need.

    PubMed

    Nadel, J; Holloway, C J

    2017-04-01

    HIV infection is now considered a chronic, treatable disease, although treatment is associated with increased rates of coronary artery disease (CAD). Increased risk of CAD in HIV-infected patients has been associated with the inflammatory sequelae of the infection as well as the greater prevalence of cardiac risk factors in HIV-positive populations and the side effects of life-prolonging antiretroviral therapies. Patients with HIV infection now have a 1.5 to 2-fold greater risk of developing CAD compared with noninfected individuals, raising the independent risk of CAD in HIV infection to levels similar to those in diabetes. Despite this increased risk, screening and other adjuvant assessment tools are lacking. In this paper we explore the current climate of CAD in the contemporary HIV-infected population and look at the tools used in the assessment and management of patients as well as the limitations of these approaches for this at-risk population group.

  5. Bystander CD4+ T lymphocytes survive in HIV-infected human lymphoid tissue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grivel, Jean-Charles; Biancotto, Angelique; Ito, Yoshinori; Lima, Rosangela G.; Margolis, Leonid B.

    2003-01-01

    HIV infection is associated with depletion of CD4(+) T cells. The mechanisms of this phenomenon remain to be understood. In particular, it remains controversial whether and to what extent uninfected ("bystander") CD4(+) T cells die in HIV-infected individuals. We address this question using a system of human lymphoid tissue ex vivo. Tissue blocks were inoculated with HIV-1. After productive infection was established, they were treated with the reverse transcriptase inhibitor nevirapine to protect from infection those CD4(+) T cells that had not yet been infected. These CD4(+) T cells residing in HIV-infected tissue are by definition bystanders. Our results demonstrate that after nevirapine application the number of bystander CD4(+) T cells is conserved. Thus, in the context of HIV-infected human lymphoid tissue, productive HIV infection kills infected cells but is not sufficient to cause the death of a significant number of uninfected CD4(+) T cells.

  6. Immunogenicity of the Bivalent Oral Cholera Vaccine Shanchol in Haitian Adults With HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Ivers, Louise C; Charles, Richelle C; Hilaire, Isabelle J; Mayo-Smith, Leslie M; Teng, Jessica E; Jerome, J Gregory; Rychert, Jenna; LaRocque, Regina C; Xu, Peng; Kovácˇ, Pavol; Ryan, Edward T; Qadri, Firdausi; Almazor, Charles P; Franke, Molly F; Harris, Jason B

    2015-09-01

    We evaluated immune responses following bivalent oral cholera vaccination (Shanchol [Shantha Biotechnics]; BivWC) in a cohort of 25 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected adults in Haiti. Compared with adults without HIV infection, vaccination in HIV-infected individuals resulted in lower vibriocidal responses against Vibrio cholerae O1, and there was a positive relationship between the CD4(+) T-cell count and vibriocidal responses following vaccination. Nevertheless, seroconversion occurred at a rate of 65% against the Ogawa serotype and 74% against the Inaba serotype in adults with HIV infection. These results suggest that the vaccine retains substantial immunogenicity in adults with HIV infection and may benefit this population by protecting against cholera.

  7. Oral and airway microbiota in HIV-infected pneumonia patients.

    PubMed

    Iwai, Shoko; Fei, Matthew; Huang, Delphine; Fong, Serena; Subramanian, Anuradha; Grieco, Katherine; Lynch, Susan V; Huang, Laurence

    2012-09-01

    Despite the increased frequency of recurrent pneumonia in HIV-infected patients and recent studies linking the airway bacterial community (microbiota) to acute and chronic respiratory infection, little is known of the oral and airway microbiota that exist in these individuals and their propensity to harbor pathogens despite antimicrobial treatment for acute pneumonia. This pilot study compared paired samples of the oral and airway microbiota from 15 hospitalized HIV-infected patients receiving antimicrobial treatment for acute pneumonia. Total DNA was extracted, bacterial burden was assessed by quantitative PCR, and amplified 16S rRNA was profiled for microbiome composition using a phylogenetic microarray (16S rRNA PhyloChip). Though the bacterial burden of the airway was significantly lower than that of the oral cavity, microbiota in both niches were comparably diverse. However, oral and airway microbiota exhibited niche specificity. Oral microbiota were characterized by significantly increased relative abundance of multiple species associated with the mouth, including members of the Bacteroides, Firmicutes, and TM7 phyla, while airway microbiota were primarily characterized by a relative expansion of the Proteobacteria. Twenty-two taxa were detected in both niches, including Streptococcus bovis and Chryseobacterium species, pathogens associated with HIV-infected populations. In addition, we compared the airway microbiota of five of these patients to those of five non-HIV-infected pneumonia patients from a previous study. Compared to the control population, HIV-infected patients exhibited relative increased abundance of a large number of phylogenetically distinct taxa, which included several known or suspected pathogenic organisms, suggesting that recurrent pneumonia in HIV-infected populations may be related to the presence of these species.

  8. The dopamine-related polymorphisms BDNF, COMT, DRD2, DRD3, and DRD4 are not linked with changes in CSF dopamine levels and frequency of HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Horn, Anne; Scheller, C; du Plessis, S; Burger, R; Arendt, G; Joska, J; Sopper, S; Maschke, C M; Obermann, M; Husstedt, I W; Hain, J; Riederer, P; Koutsilieri, E

    2017-04-01

    We showed previously that higher levels in CSF dopamine in HIV patients are associated with the presence of the dopamine transporter (DAT) 10/10-repeat allele which was also detected more frequently in HIV-infected individuals compared to uninfected subjects. In the current study, we investigated further whether other genetic dopamine (DA)-related polymorphisms may be related with changes in CSF DA levels and frequency of HIV infection in HIV-infected subjects. Specifically, we studied genetic polymorphisms of brain-derived neurotrophic factor, catechol-O-methyltransferase, and dopamine receptors DRD2, DRD3, and DRD4 genetic polymorphisms in uninfected and HIV-infected people in two different ethnical groups, a German cohort (Caucasian, 72 individuals with HIV infection and 22 individuals without HIV infection) and a South African cohort (Xhosan, 54 individuals with HIV infection and 19 individuals without HIV infection). We correlated the polymorphisms with CSF DA levels, HIV dementia score, CD4(+) T cell counts, and HIV viral load. None of the investigated DA-related polymorphisms was associated with altered CSF DA levels, CD4(+) T cell count, viral load, and HIV dementia score. The respective allele frequencies were equally distributed between HIV-infected patients and controls. Our findings do not show any influence of the studied genetic polymorphisms on CSF DA levels and HIV infection. This is in contrast to what we found previously for the DAT 3'UTR VNTR and highlights the specific role of the DAT VNTR in HIV infection and disease.

  9. Vitamin D in HIV-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    JE, Lake; JS, Adams

    2013-01-01

    Observational studies have noted very high rates of low 25(OH)D (vitamin D) levels in both the general and HIV-infected populations. In HIV-infected patients, low 25(OH)D levels are likely a combination of both traditional risk factors and HIV- and antiretroviral therapy-specific contributors. Because of this unique risk profile, HIV-infected persons may be at greater risk for low 25(OH)D levels and frank deficiency and/or may respond to standard repletion regimens differently than HIV-uninfected patients. Currently, the optimal repletion and maintenance dosing regimens for HIV-infected patients remain unknown, as do potential benefits of supplementation that may be unique to the HIV-infected population. This paper reviews data published on HIV infection and vitamin D health in adults over the last year. PMID:21647555

  10. Evaluation of two line probe assays for rapid detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, tuberculosis (TB) drug resistance, and non-TB Mycobacteria in HIV-infected individuals with suspected TB.

    PubMed

    Luetkemeyer, Anne F; Kendall, Michelle A; Wu, Xingye; Lourenço, Maria Cristina; Jentsch, Ute; Swindells, Susan; Qasba, Sarojini S; Sanchez, Jorge; Havlir, Diane V; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Sanne, Ian M; Firnhaber, Cynthia

    2014-04-01

    Limited performance data from line probe assays (LPAs), nucleic acid tests used for the rapid diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB), nontuberculosis mycobacteria (NTM), and Mycobacterium tuberculosis drug resistance are available for HIV-infected individuals, in whom paucibacillary TB is common. In this study, the strategy of testing sputum with GenoType MTBDRplus (MTBDR-Plus) and GenoType Direct LPA (Direct LPA) was compared to a gold standard of one mycobacterial growth indicator tube (MGIT) liquid culture. HIV-positive (HIV(+)) individuals with suspected TB from southern Africa and South America with <7 days of TB treatment had 1 sputum specimen tested with Direct LPA, MTBDR-Plus LPA, smear microscopy, MGIT, biochemical identification of mycobacterial species, and culture-based drug-susceptibility testing (DST). Of 639 participants, 59.3% were MGIT M. tuberculosis culture positive, of which 276 (72.8%) were acid-fast bacillus (AFB) smear positive. MTBDR-Plus had a sensitivity of 81.0% and a specificity of 100%, with sensitivities of 44.1% in AFB smear-negative versus 94.6% in AFB smear-positive specimens. For specimens that were positive for M. tuberculosis by MTBDR-Plus, the sensitivity and specificity for rifampin resistance were 91.7% and 96.6%, respectively, and for isoniazid (INH) they were 70.6% and 99.1%. The Direct LPA had a sensitivity of 88.4% and a specificity of 94.6% for M. tuberculosis detection, with a sensitivity of 72.5% in smear-negative specimens. Ten of 639 MGIT cultures grew Mycobacterium avium complex or Mycobacterium kansasii, half of which were detected by Direct LPA. Both LPA assays performed well in specimens from HIV-infected individuals, including in AFB smear-negative specimens, with 72.5% sensitivity for M. tuberculosis identification with the Direct LPA and 44.1% sensitivity with MTBDR-Plus. LPAs have a continued role for use in settings where rapid identification of INH resistance and clinically relevant NTM are priorities.

  11. The challenges of modelling antibody repertoire dynamics in HIV infection

    DOE PAGES

    Luo, Shishi; Perelson, Alan S.

    2015-07-20

    Antibody affinity maturation by somatic hypermutation of B-cell immunoglobulin variable region genes has been studied for decades in various model systems using well-defined antigens. While much is known about the molecular details of the process, our understanding of the selective forces that generate affinity maturation are less well developed, particularly in the case of a co-evolving pathogen such as HIV. Despite this gap in understanding, high-throughput antibody sequence data are increasingly being collected to investigate the evolutionary trajectories of antibody lineages in HIV-infected individuals. Here, we review what is known in controlled experimental systems about the mechanisms underlying antibody selectionmore » and compare this to the observed temporal patterns of antibody evolution in HIV infection. In addition, we describe how our current understanding of antibody selection mechanisms leaves questions about antibody dynamics in HIV infection unanswered. Without a mechanistic understanding of antibody selection in the context of a co-evolving viral population, modelling and analysis of antibody sequences in HIV-infected individuals will be limited in their interpretation and predictive ability.« less

  12. The challenges of modelling antibody repertoire dynamics in HIV infection

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Shishi; Perelson, Alan S.

    2015-07-20

    Antibody affinity maturation by somatic hypermutation of B-cell immunoglobulin variable region genes has been studied for decades in various model systems using well-defined antigens. While much is known about the molecular details of the process, our understanding of the selective forces that generate affinity maturation are less well developed, particularly in the case of a co-evolving pathogen such as HIV. Despite this gap in understanding, high-throughput antibody sequence data are increasingly being collected to investigate the evolutionary trajectories of antibody lineages in HIV-infected individuals. Here, we review what is known in controlled experimental systems about the mechanisms underlying antibody selection and compare this to the observed temporal patterns of antibody evolution in HIV infection. In addition, we describe how our current understanding of antibody selection mechanisms leaves questions about antibody dynamics in HIV infection unanswered. Without a mechanistic understanding of antibody selection in the context of a co-evolving viral population, modelling and analysis of antibody sequences in HIV-infected individuals will be limited in their interpretation and predictive ability.

  13. Public Policy Affirmations Affecting the Planning and Implementation of Developmental Services for Children and Adults with HIV Infection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crocker, Allen C., Comp.; And Others

    The increasing number of individuals infected with symptomatic human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has created a need to examine public policy issues and to further efforts in planning, implementing, and evaluating services for individuals with HIV infection and their families. A working conference was convened, which identified several…

  14. Vaccination in HIV-Infected Adults

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Mark R.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Vaccines are critical components for protecting HIV-infected adults from an increasing number of preventable diseases. However, missed opportunities for vaccination among HIV-infected persons persist, likely due to concerns regarding the safety and efficacy of vaccines, as well as the changing nature of vaccine guidelines. In addition, the optimal timing of vaccination among HIV-infected adults in regards to HIV stage and receipt of antiretroviral therapy remain important questions. This article provides a review of the current recommendations regarding vaccines among HIV-infected adults and a comprehensive summary of the evidence-based literature of the benefits and risks of vaccines among this vulnerable population. PMID:25029589

  15. Prevalence of Asymptomatic Neurophysiological Carpal Tunnel Syndrome in 130 Healthy Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Alrawashdeh, Omar

    2016-01-01

    Diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is frequently confirmed by performing nerve conduction studies. Previous studies demonstrated that abnormal nerve conduction study (NCS) is suggestive of CTS among asymptomatic individuals. However, previous studies included individuals with risk factors for the syndrome. A NCS was performed on the median and ulnar nerves in 130 healthy individuals. About 15% of individuals in this study demonstrated electrodiagnostic evidence of carpal tunnels syndrome. Four cases have shown signs of isolated median neuropathy with normal median sensory component. Results indicated that the most widely used method for confirming diagnosis of CTS may have up to 15% of false positives. However, most of those showed changes of minimal CTS. Isolated prolongation of the median motor latency should be investigated further as they are usually classified as moderate to severe CTS and may undergo unnecessary surgeries. PMID:27994828

  16. Opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome and HIV-infection.

    PubMed

    Scott, Kirsten M; Parker, Faheema; Heckmann, Jeannine M

    2009-09-15

    Opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome (OMS) typically presents with chaotic eye movements and myoclonus with some patients exhibiting ataxia and behavioural disturbance. The pathogenesis may be inflammatory with an infectious or paraneoplastic trigger. In this report, we describe four HIV-infected cases with OMS presenting to a tertiary referral centre in Cape Town, South Africa, over a 10-year period. OMS was the initial neurological presentation of HIV-infection in three subjects of whom two had preserved CD4+ cell counts. Immunosuppressive therapy, mainly prednisone, led to a dramatic improvement of symptoms in all cases suggesting an inflammatory aetiology, consistent with the observation that HIV-infection can be associated with both inflammatory and autoimmune conditions. Three previous reports of OMS associated with HIV-infection have been documented including a sero-conversion syndrome and as part of an immune reconstitution syndrome. We suggest that in HIV-associated OMS the pathophysiology may be the consequence of a dysregulated immune system in which a reduced CD4/CD8 ratio, in addition to a critical level of functional CD4+ cells for efficient CD8+ cytotoxicity, results in dysfunction of the brainstem-cerebellar circuitry in susceptible individuals.

  17. HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorders: The Relationship of HIV Infection with Physical and Social Comorbidities

    PubMed Central

    Tedaldi, Ellen M.; Minniti, Nancy L.; Fischer, Tracy

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) will undoubtedly increase with the improved longevity of HIV-infected persons. HIV infection, itself, as well as multiple physiologic and psychosocial factors can contribute to cognitive impairment and neurologic complications. These comorbidities confound the diagnosis, assessment, and interventions for neurocognitive disorders. In this review, we discuss the role of several key comorbid factors that may contribute significantly to the development and progression of HIV-related neurocognitive impairment, as well as the current status of diagnostic strategies aimed at identifying HIV-infected individuals with impaired cognition and future research priorities and challenges. PMID:25815329

  18. HIV infection induces morphometrical changes on the oral (buccal mucosa and tongue) epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Pompermayer, Adriane Bastos; Gil, Francisca Berenice Dias; França, Beatriz Helena Sottile; Machado, Maria Ângela Naval; Trevilatto, Paula Cristina; Fernandes, Angela; de Lima, Antônio Adilson Soares

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess morphological and morphometrical alterations of oral squamous epithelial cells in type 1 HIV infected individuals. Oral smears were collected from tongue and buccal mucosa of 30 HIV infected (experimental) and 30 non-infected (control) individuals by liquid-based exfoliative cytology. The cells were morphologically analyzed and the nuclear area (NA), the cytoplasmic area (CA) and the nucleus-to-cytoplasm area ratio (NA/CA) were calculated. No morphological differences were found between the groups. The mean values of CA were decreased in tongue (P=.00006) and buccal mucosa (P=.00242) in HIV infected individual, while mean values of NA were increased (P=.00308 and .00095, respectively) in the same group. NA/CA ratio for experimental group was increased in both collected places, with P=.00001 (tongue) and P=.00000 (buccal mucosa). This study revealed that HIV infection was able to induce morphometrical changes on the oral epithelial cells.

  19. [Mortality and morbidity in HIV-infected patients undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery: a case control study].

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Expósito, María J; Mestres, Carlos A; Claramonte, Xavier; Cartañá, Ramón; Josa, Miquel; Pomar, José L; Mulet, Jaume; Miró, José M

    2006-03-01

    The use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in patients with HIV infection has improved survival. This improvement combined with the metabolic effects of treatment has increased cardiovascular risk and the need for cardiac surgery in these patients. We compared morbidity and mortality in HIV-infected patients (cases, n=7) and non-HIV-infected patients (controls, n=21) who underwent isolated coronary artery surgery between 1997 and 2004. The durations of extracorporeal circulation and aortic cross-clamping were shorter in HIV-infected patients (P=.002 and P=.014, respectively). The percentage of patients who experienced complications was similar, at 57.1% in both groups, but there was a slightly higher number of complications per patient in non-HIV-infected individuals. The mean length of total hospitalization was greater in HIV-infected patients (27.1 [13.3] versus 8.8 [5.3] days; P=.003), as was that of postoperative hospitalization (18.2 [15.4] vs 7.9 [4.2] days; P=.08). No HIV-infected patient died or needed a repeat cardiac operation. No progression of the HIV infection was observed. Isolated coronary artery surgery in HIV-infected patients produces good results, and there is no increase in morbidity or mortality. Extracorporeal circulation did not influence disease progression.

  20. Blastocystis hominis among symptomatic and asymptomatic individuals in Talkha Center, Dakahlia Governorate, Egypt.

    PubMed

    El-Shazly, Atef M; Abdel-Magied, Aida A; El-Beshbishi, Samar N; El-Nahas, Hala A; Fouad, Mahmoud A H; Monib, Mohamed S M

    2005-08-01

    Blastocystis hominis is now getting acceptance as an agent of human intestinal disease. B. hominis in stool samples of symptomatic and asymptomatic individuals was evaluated as a possible cause of gastro-intestinal troubles. B. hominis was found in 106 (10.1%) out of 1050 individuals examined from six villages and one city in Talkha Center, Dakahlia Governorate. The highest infection rate was in Manshayt El-Badawy village (25.47%), whereas Talkha City showed the lowest rate (4.73%). Age group 10-20 years had higher infection (13.3%). In twenty-three symptomatic patients, B. hominis represented the only causative parasitic agent. The most common symptoms were diarrhoea (30.4%), abdominal pain (26.1%), flatulence (21.7%). vomiting (13.1%) and fatigue (8.7%). High concentrations of B. hominis were found in symptomatic patients than in asymptomatic ones with statistical significant difference (8.2 cells/100 x field versus 3.8 respectively). The mean number of B. hominis was significantly high in patients complaining of diarrhoea and abdominal pain.

  1. Incidental pancreatic cystic neoplasms in an asymptomatic healthy population of 21,745 individuals

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ye Rim; Park, Joo Kyung; Jang, Jin-Young; Kwon, Wooil; Yoon, Jeong Hee; Kim, Sun-Whe

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although incidental pancreatic cystic neoplasms are being diagnosed with increasing frequency, little is known about the accurate prevalence of pancreatic cysts in the general population. The aims of this study were to evaluate the crude prevalence rate of pancreatic cystic neoplasms in asymptomatic healthy adults, and calculate the age- and sex-adjusted nationwide prevalence rate. A total of 21,745 asymptomatic individuals who underwent abdominal computed tomography (CT) as a health screening examination were enrolled between 2003 and 2013 at the Seoul National University Hospital Healthcare System Gangnam Center. Nationwide population data of 2010 were collected from the National Statistical Office, Korea. Incidental pancreatic cystic neoplasms were found in 457 individuals whose mean age was 58.7 years. The types of neoplasms were reviewed by 2 separate designated radiologists and the final diagnosis was made as follows: intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm: 376 (82%), serous cystic neoplasm: 19 (4%), mucinous cystic neoplasm: 7 (2%), and indeterminate cysts: 55 (12%). Eight cases underwent operation. The crude prevalence rate was 2.1% and the age- and sex-adjusted expected nationwide prevalence was 2.2%. The prevalence increased with age. Here, we reported the first large-scale study among the healthy population to find out the prevalence rate of pancreatic cystic neoplasms; the age- and sex-adjusted prevalence was 2.2%, and increased with age. Further investigations regarding the clinical implications of incidental pancreatic neoplasms are necessary. PMID:28002329

  2. [Stroke in HIV-infected patients].

    PubMed

    Lino, Ireneia; Sousa, António; Correia, José

    2007-01-01

    The spectrum of human immunodeficiency virus infection (HIV) is changing. New drug treatments have reduced morbidity and mortality of this disease, therefore it is necessary to start treating the HIV infection as a chronical disease. The association of the stroke with the HIV infection was inicially thought to be a result of other opportunistic infeccions and tumors. However, the vascular disease associated with HIV infection has been a subject of research and debate. New evidence shows that the vascular diseases could be a threat for the pacients doing highly active antirretroviral therapy (HAART). In this paper, we review the association between the HIV infection and stroke. Furthermore, we have done an analysis of the risk for the stroke on pacients with HIV infection considering the changes of the infection spectrum by the introduction of HAART.

  3. Chemokine receptor CCR2b 64I polymorphism and its relation to CD4 T-cell counts and disease progression in a Danish cohort of HIV-infected individuals. Copenhagen AIDS cohort.

    PubMed

    Eugen-Olsen, J; Iversen, A K; Benfield, T L; Koppelhus, U; Garred, P

    1998-06-01

    We have investigated the role of the recently described mutation in CCR2b named 64I in relation to HIV resistance, CD4 T-cell counts, and disease progression in Danish individuals by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods as well as sequenced full-length CXCR4 and CCR5 genes from HIV-infected long-term nonprogressors for possible mutations. In total, 215 Danish individuals were analyzed for 64I allele frequency; disease progression was followed in 105 HIV-1-positive homosexual Danish men from their first known positive HIV-1 test result and up to 11 years. In 87 individuals, the CD4 T-cell count was monitored closely. We found no significant difference in 64I allele frequency between HIV-1-seropositive persons (0.08), high-risk HIV-1-seronegative persons (0.11), and blood donors (0.06). No significant difference was observed in annual CD4 T-cell decline, CD4 T-cell counts at the time of AIDS, in AIDS-free survival as well as survival with AIDS, between 64I allele carriers and wild-type individuals. Among 9 long-term nonprogressors, 2 carried the 64I allele, while none of 9 fast progressors carried the 64I allele. However, this was not significantly different (p=.47). Long-term nonprogression could not be explained by CXCR4 polymorphism or other polymorphisms in the CCR5 gene than the CCR5delta32 allele. Furthermore, we were not able to detect any significant independent effect of the 64I allele on development to AIDS, overall survival, and annual CD4 T-cell decline in this cohort.

  4. Rapid development of advanced liver fibrosis after acquisition of hepatitis C infection during primary HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Osinusi, Anu; Kleiner, David; Wood, Brad; Polis, Michael; Masur, Henry; Kottilil, Shyam

    2009-06-01

    We report the first reported case of a 61-year-old MSM who was diagnosed with syphilis, primary HIV infection, and acute hepatitis C (HCV) within the same time period who rapidly developed significant liver fibrosis within 6 months of acquisition of both infections. It has been well described that individuals with primary HIV infection have an increase in activated CD8+ T cells, which causes a state of immune activation as was evident in this patient. Acquisition of HCV during this time could have further skewed this response resulting in massive hepatocyte destruction, inflammation, and subsequent liver fibrosis. Recent literature suggest that MSM with primary HIV infection have higher rates of acquisition of HCV than other HIV-positive cohorts and HCV acquisition can occur very soon after acquiring HIV. This case of rapid hepatic fibrosis progression coupled with the increasing incidence of HCV in individuals with primary HIV infection demonstrates a need for this phenomenon to be studied more extensively.

  5. A mathematical approach to HIV infection dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ida, A.; Oharu, S.; Oharu, Y.

    2007-07-01

    In order to obtain a comprehensive form of mathematical models describing nonlinear phenomena such as HIV infection process and AIDS disease progression, it is efficient to introduce a general class of time-dependent evolution equations in such a way that the associated nonlinear operator is decomposed into the sum of a differential operator and a perturbation which is nonlinear in general and also satisfies no global continuity condition. An attempt is then made to combine the implicit approach (usually adapted for convective diffusion operators) and explicit approach (more suited to treat continuous-type operators representing various physiological interactions), resulting in a semi-implicit product formula. Decomposing the operators in this way and considering their individual properties, it is seen that approximation-solvability of the original model is verified under suitable conditions. Once appropriate terms are formulated to describe treatment by antiretroviral therapy, the time-dependence of the reaction terms appears, and such product formula is useful for generating approximate numerical solutions to the governing equations. With this knowledge, a continuous model for HIV disease progression is formulated and physiological interpretations are provided. The abstract theory is then applied to show existence of unique solutions to the continuous model describing the behavior of the HIV virus in the human body and its reaction to treatment by antiretroviral therapy. The product formula suggests appropriate discrete models describing the dynamics of host pathogen interactions with HIV1 and is applied to perform numerical simulations based on the model of the HIV infection process and disease progression. Finally, the results of our numerical simulations are visualized and it is observed that our results agree with medical and physiological aspects.

  6. Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia in non-HIV-infected patients in the era of novel immunosuppressive therapies.

    PubMed

    Tasaka, Sadatomo; Tokuda, Hitoshi

    2012-12-01

    In human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients, Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PCP) is a well-known opportunistic infection, and its management has been established. However, PCP is an emerging threat to immunocompromised patients without HIV infection, such as those receiving novel immunosuppressive therapeutics for malignancy, organ transplantation, or connective tissue diseases. Clinical manifestations of PCP are quite different between patients with and without HIV infections. In patients without HIV infection, PCP rapidly progresses, is difficult to diagnose correctly, and causes severe respiratory failure with a poor prognosis. High-resolution computed tomography findings are different between PCP patients with HIV infection and those without. These differences in clinical and radiologic features are the result of severe or dysregulated inflammatory responses that are evoked by a relatively small number of Pneumocystis organisms in patients without HIV infection. In recent years, the usefulness of PCR and serum β-D-glucan assay for rapid and noninvasive diagnosis of PCP has been revealed. Although corticosteroid adjunctive to anti-Pneumocystis agents has been shown to be beneficial in some populations, the optimal dose and duration remain to be determined. Recent investigations revealed that Pneumocystis colonization is prevalent, and that asymptomatic carriers are at risk for developing PCP and can serve as the reservoir for the spread of Pneumocystis by person-to-person transmission. These findings suggest the need for chemoprophylaxis in immunocompromised patients without HIV infection, although its indication and duration are still controversial. Because a variety of novel immunosuppressive therapeutics have been emerging in medical practice, further innovations in the diagnosis and treatment of PCP are needed.

  7. Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia in non-HIV-infected patients in the era of novel immunosuppressive therapies.

    PubMed

    Tasaka, Sadatomo; Tokuda, Hitoshi

    2014-11-01

    In human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients, Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PCP) is a well-known opportunistic infection, and its management has been established. However, PCP is an emerging threat to immunocompromised patients without HIV infection, such as those receiving novel immunosuppressive therapeutics for malignancy, organ transplantation, or connective tissue diseases. Clinical manifestations of PCP are quite different between patients with and without HIV-infections. In patients without HIV infection, PCP rapidly progresses, is difficult to diagnose correctly, and causes severe respiratory failure with a poor prognosis. High-resolution computed tomography findings are different between PCP patients with HIV infection and those without. These differences in clinical and radiologic features are the result of severe or dysregulated inflammatory responses that are evoked by a relatively small number of Pneumocystis organisms in patients without HIV infection. In recent years, the usefulness of PCR and serum β-D-glucan assay for rapid and noninvasive diagnosis of PCP has been revealed. Although corticosteroid adjunctive to anti-Pneumocystis agents has been shown to be beneficial in some populations, the optimal dose and duration remain to be determined. Recent investigations revealed that Pneumocystis colonization is prevalent, and that asymptomatic carriers are at riskfor developing PCP and can serve as the reservoir for the spread of Pneumocystis by person-to-person transmission. These findings suggest the need for chemoprophylaxis in immunocompromised patients without HIV infection, although its indication and duration are still controversial. Because a variety of novel immunosuppressive therapeutics have been emerging in medical practice, further innovations in the diagnosis and treatment of PCP are needed.

  8. Paradoxical Mycobacterium tuberculosis meningitis immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome in an HIV-infected child.

    PubMed

    Kalk, Emma; Technau, Karl; Hendson, Willy; Coovadia, Ashraf

    2013-02-01

    Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome occurs in a subset of HIV-infected individuals as the immune system recovers secondary to antiretroviral therapy. An exaggerated and uncontrolled inflammatory response to antigens of viable or nonviable organisms is characteristic, with clinical deterioration despite improvement in laboratory indicators. We describe a fatal case of Mycobacterium tuberculosis meningitis immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome in an HIV-infected child and review the literature.

  9. Coagulase-negative staphylococci in an HIV-infected child causing pancytopaenia.

    PubMed

    Kataria, Rachna; Shah, Ira

    2014-04-01

    Although coagulase-negative staphylococci (CONS) constitute normal flora of the human body, some species can produce human infections, particularly when the host defense is breached. There is little evidence of the pathogenicity of CONS in HIV-infected individuals. We present the case of a 14-year-old HIV-infected boy who presented with a right lower zone pneumonia and a cutaneous abscess, following which he developed pancytopaenia due to underlying CONS infection that responded to antibiotic treatment.

  10. [HIV infection in northwestern Sardinia].

    PubMed

    Cherchi, G B; Mura, M S; Calia, M G; Gakis, C; Ginanneschi, R; Zara, G M; Flumene, A; Andreoni, G

    1987-01-01

    The prevalence of anti HIV antibodies was investigated in the sera of 150 drug addicts and of 62 patients not drug addicts hospitalized in the Institute of Infectious diseases of the University of Sassari in the years 1980-86. No seropositivity was detected in not drug addicts patients in the years of observation and in the drug addict ones in the years 1980-81-82. The seropositivity discovered in 1983 in 24% of drug addicts raised to 75% in the first 8 months of 1986. As regards the prevalence of anti HIV antibodies in 1986 the sera of different categories were investigated. Seropositivity was detected in 55% of 20 drug addicts prisoners, in 6.25% of 16 homosexual men, 13 of which prisoners and 3 drug addicts, in 3.7% of 27 transfused individuals, 26 of which under dyalitical treatment, and in 33.3% of sexual partners of HIV positive patients. Anti HIV antibodies were not detected in the sera of 20 laboratory workers, 22 prisoners with a negative history for homosexuality and drug addiction, 45 prison guards and 100 individuals taken at random from general population. The stages of infection in 27 drug addicts were classified according to Atlanta CDC criteria as follows: 63% of cases asymptomatic, 22.2% persistent generalized lymphoadenopathy, 7.4% minor clinical features, 3.7% serious clinical picture, 3.7% full clinical picture of AIDS.

  11. Invasive Pneumococcal Disease Among HIV-Infected and HIV-Uninfected Adults in a Large Integrated Healthcare System.

    PubMed

    Marcus, Julia L; Baxter, Roger; Leyden, Wendy A; Muthulingam, Dharushana; Yee, Arnold; Horberg, Michael A; Klein, Daniel B; Towner, William J; Chao, Chun R; Quesenberry, Charles P; Silverberg, Michael J

    2016-10-01

    It is unclear whether HIV-infected individuals remain at higher risk of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) compared with HIV-uninfected individuals. We conducted a cohort study of HIV-infected and demographically matched HIV-uninfected adults within Kaiser Permanente Northern California during the period 1996-2011. We used Poisson models to obtain rate ratios (RRs) for incident IPD associated with HIV infection and other risk factors. Among 13,079 HIV-infected and 137,643 HIV-uninfected adults, the IPD rate per 100,000 person-years was 160 (n = 109 events) for HIV-infected and 8 (n = 75 events) for HIV-uninfected subjects, with an adjusted RR of 13.0 [95% confidence interval (CI): 9.1-18.7]. For HIV-infected individuals, IPD incidence per 100,000 person-years decreased by 71% during study follow-up, from 305 in 1996-1999 to 88 in 2010-2011 (p < 0.001), with an adjusted RR of 6.6 (95% CI: 2.7-16.1) compared with HIV-uninfected subjects in 2010-2011. Risk factors for IPD among HIV-infected individuals included black compared with white race/ethnicity, smoking, cancer, and higher HIV RNA levels. The 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccination was not associated with a reduced risk of IPD in HIV-infected or HIV-uninfected individuals. Among HIV-infected IPD cases, the most common serotype was 19A (33%), and 59% of serotypes were covered by the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13). Despite a dramatic decline in IPD incidence for HIV-infected adults since 1996, IPD rates were nearly sevenfold higher compared with HIV-uninfected adults in recent years, even after adjustment for risk factors. Timely antiretroviral therapy initiation, risk reduction strategies, and recent guidelines recommending PCV13 use may further reduce IPD incidence among HIV patients.

  12. The impact of screening for asymptomatic myocardial ischemia in individuals with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Chyun, Deborah A; Katten, Deborah M; Melkus, Gail D; Talley, Sandra; Davey, Janice A; Wackers, Frans J Th

    2006-01-01

    Little is known about factors that contribute to either emotional or behavior outcomes following screening for coronary artery disease (CAD). The purpose of this prospective study was to explore these outcomes, along with potentially contributing factors in individuals enrolled in a screening trial for asymptomatic CAD. Included were 47 subjects with type 2 diabetes. Data were collected at study baseline and 3 and 6 months following entry by self-administered questionnaires and telephone follow-up. Emotional outcomes (quality of life and anxiety) tended to improve in those who underwent more aggressive screening with myocardial perfusion imaging, as well as in those who discussed the results of laboratory tests with their providers. Lower levels of diabetes competence and higher levels of controlled motivation for diet were associated with poorer emotional outcomes. Improvements in CAD risk factor behaviors were not observed.

  13. Tuberculosis rates among HIV-infected persons in New York City, 2001-2005.

    PubMed

    Trieu, Lisa; Li, Jiehui; Hanna, David B; Harris, Tiffany G

    2010-06-01

    We calculated population-based tuberculosis (TB) rates among HIV-infected persons in New York City from 2001 through 2005 using data from the city's TB and HIV/AIDS surveillance registries, and we examined those rates using linear trend tests and incidence rate ratios (IRRs). HIV-infected individuals had 16 times the TB rate of a "non-HIV" population (HIV status negative or unknown; IRR = 16.0; 95% confidence interval = 14.9, 17.2). TB rates declined significantly among the US-born HIV-infected population (P (trend) < .001) but not among the foreign-born HIV-infected population (P (trend) = .355). Such disparities must be addressed if further declines are to be achieved.

  14. A multi-stage compartmental model for HIV-infected individuals: II--application to insurance functions and health-care costs.

    PubMed

    Billard, L; Dayananda, P W A

    2014-03-01

    Stochastic population processes have received a lot of attention over the years. One approach focuses on compartmental modeling. Billard and Dayananda (2012) developed one such multi-stage model for epidemic processes in which the possibility that individuals can die at any stage from non-disease related causes was also included. This extra feature is of particular interest to the insurance and health-care industries among others especially when the epidemic is HIV/AIDS. Rather than working with numbers of individuals in each stage, they obtained distributional results dealing with the waiting time any one individual spent in each stage given the initial stage. In this work, the impact of the HIV/AIDS epidemic on several functions relevant to these industries (such as adjustments to premiums) is investigated. Theoretical results are derived, followed by a numerical study.

  15. Pharmacotherapy of pediatric and adolescent HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Schuval, Susan J

    2009-01-01

    Significant advances have been made in the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection over the past two decades. Improved therapy has prolonged survival and improved clinical outcome for HIV-infected children and adults. Sixteen antiretroviral (ART) medications have been approved for use in pediatric HIV infection. The Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) has issued “Guidelines for the Use of Antiretroviral Agents in Pediatric HIV Infection”, which provide detailed information on currently recommended antiretroviral therapies (ART). However, consultation with an HIV specialist is recommended as the current therapy of pediatric HIV therapy is complex and rapidly evolving. PMID:19707256

  16. Screening for subclinical Leishmania infection in HIV-infected patients living in eastern Spain

    PubMed Central

    Ena, Javier; Pasquau, Francisco; López-Perezagua, María del Mar; Martinez-Peinado, Carmen; Arjona, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Background: We anticipated that patients with HIV infection living in endemic areas were at greater risk of infection which can reactivate due to immunosuppression; therefore, we analyzed the prevalence of latent Leishmania infantum infection in patients infected with HIV. Methods: A total of 179 patients with HIV infection were screened for the presence of anti-Leishmania antibodies using indirect immunofluorescent antibody test (IFAT) (Leishmania-spot IF; bioMérieux, Marcy l’Etoile, France). All patients were followed up for at least 1 year. The primary end-point was to confirm the presence of Leishmania infection. Results: Significant titer of antibodies to Leishmania was detected in six (3%; 95% confidence interval: 0.5–5.5%) asymptomatic patients. Two of them had visceral leishmaniasis that was confirmed by parasite visualization in clinical samples, the presence of Leishmania promastigotes in Novy–MacNeal–Nicolle culture, polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods, and/or urinary antigen test. Among 173 patients with indirect immunofluorescent antibody test below 1∶40, one HIV-infected patient severely immunosuppressed, confirmed negative by IFAT, was diagnosed of visceral leishmaniasis. Conclusion: The use of indirect immunofluorescent antibody test for Leishmania screening is not justified in asymptomatic patients with HIV infection living in endemic areas due to the small rate of significant antibody titer and the low frequency of clinical disease. PMID:25468205

  17. Impact of HIV infection on the haemostatic response during sepsis and malaria.

    PubMed

    Huson, Michaëla A M; Kalkman, Rachel; Hoogendijk, Arie J; Alabi, Abraham S; van 't Veer, Cornelis; Grobusch, Martin P; Meijers, Joost C M; van der Poll, Tom

    2016-06-01

    Patients positive for the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are more susceptible to sepsis and malaria, two conditions known to activate the coagulation system. As chronic HIV infection also influences haemostatic mechanisms, we determined the influence of HIV co-infection on coagulation, anticoagulation and the endothelium during sepsis or malaria. We performed a prospective observational study in 325 subjects with or without HIV infection (103 with sepsis, 127 with malaria and 95 asymptomatic controls) in an HIV endemic area in Central Africa. We measured plasma biomarkers indicative of activation of distinct haemostatic mechanisms. Sepsis and malaria had similar effects with elevated markers of coagulation, reduced anticoagulation markers and activation of endothelium. In particular, asymptomatic HIV infection reduced the plasma levels of the anticoagulant co-factor free protein S, and increased activation of the vascular endothelium, which were not normalized by combination antiretroviral therapy. HIV co-infection during sepsis and malaria caused more profound changes in free protein S and von Willebrand factor in sepsis and malaria, and ADAMTS13 in sepsis, while not influencing sepsis- or malaria-induced coagulation activation. These results show for the first time that HIV infection augments selective haemostatic changes during sepsis and malaria, which may contribute to the enhanced morbidity of these conditions in HIV patients.

  18. Lack of protection from HIV infection by the mutant HIV coreceptor CCR5 in intravenously HIV infected hemophilia patients.

    PubMed

    Malo, A; Rommel, F; Bogner, J; Gruber, R; Schramm, W; Goebel, F D; Riethmüller, G; Wank, R

    1998-02-01

    The CCR5 chemokine receptor is an important coreceptor for macrophage-tropic HIV strains. Homozygous carriers of the mutated CCR5 receptor with a 32 bp deletion (delta 32-CCR5) are highly protected against HIV infection. A protective effect has also been described for heterozygous individuals carrying both mutated and wildtype CCR5 receptors. We compared the frequency of the mutated delta 32-CCR5 HIV coreceptor in HIV positive patients infected by sexual contact (N = 160) with intravenously HIV infected hemophilic patients (N = 84) and HIV negative individuals (N = 421). We found no protective effect of delta 32-CCR5 HIV coreceptor in hemophilic patients (p = 0.0134). If proteins of plasma concentrates would be responsible for facilitating the entry of HIV macrophages by upregulation of the CCR5 wildtype receptor it would be of therapeutical interest to identify the responsible plasma proteins.

  19. Profile of candidiasis in HIV infected patients

    PubMed Central

    Anwar, Khan P; Malik, A; Subhan, Khan H

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives Candidiasis is a common opportunistic infection in HIV-infected patients. The spectrum of Candida infection is diverse, starting from asymptomatic colonization to pathogenicforms. The low absolute CD4+ T-lymphocyte count has traditionally been cited as the greatest risk factor for the development of Oropharyngeal Candidiasis and current guidelines suggest increased risk once CD4+ T lymphocyte counts fall below 200 cells/µL. Gradual emergence of non-albicans Candida species as a cause of refractory mucosal and invasive Candidiasis, particularly in patients with advanced immunosuppression and problem of resistance to azoles and other antifungal agents in the Candida species is a point of concern. Materials and Methods A prospective study was carried out over a period of 2 years (2010-2011) on patients suffering from AIDS for the presence of candida infection. After thorough clinical examination relevant specimens were collected and processed specifically to ascertain candida infection. Speciation of candida isolates and antifungal sensitivity testing was also done. The CD4 cell counts of all the patients were estimated and correlated with the presence (or absence) of candidiasis. Results Out of a total of 165 HIV positive patients, a definitive diagnosis of candidiasis was made in 80 patients. Candida albicans was the most common yeast isolated. Patients with candidiasis had CD4 counts less than 200 cells/mm3. Maximum resistance was seen with fluconazole while no resistance was seen with voriconazole. Conclusion The most common opportunistic fungal infection in HIV positive patients is candidiasis, affecting the mucocutaneous system mainly but the invasive form is also common. Resistance to azoles and other antifungal agents in the Candida species is a point of concern. PMID:23205253

  20. Increased Hepatitis E Virus Seroprevalence Correlates with Lower CD4+ Cell Counts in HIV-Infected Persons in Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Debes, José D.; Martínez Wassaf, Maribel; Pisano, María Belén; Isa, María Beatriz; Lotto, Martin; Marianelli, Leonardo G.; Frassone, Natalia; Ballari, Estefania; Bohjanen, Paul R.; Hansen, Bettina E.; Ré, Viviana

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a single-stranded RNA virus that can cause hepatitis in an epidemic fashion. HEV usually causes asymptomatic or limited acute infections in immunocompetent individuals, whereas in immunosuppressed individuals such as transplant recipients, HEV can cause chronic infections. The risks and outcomes of HEV co-infection in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are poorly characterized. We used a third generation immunoassay to measure serum IgG antibodies specific for HEV in 204 HIV-infected individuals from Argentina and a control group of 433 HIV-negative individuals. We found 15 of 204 (7.3%, 95%CI 3.74–10.96%) individuals in the HIV-positive group to have positive HEV IgG levels suggestive of previous infection, compared to 19 of 433 (4.4%, 95% CI 2.5–6.3%) individuals in the HIV-negative control group (p = 0.12). Among HIV-positive individuals, those with HEV seropositivity had lower CD4 counts compared to those that were HEV seronegative (average CD4 count of 234 vs 422 mm3, p = 0.01), indicating that patients with lower CD4 counts were more likely to be HEV IgG positive. Moreover, HEV seropositivity in patients with CD4 counts <200 mm3 was 16%, compared to 4.5% in those with CD4 counts >200 mm3 (p = 0.012). We found a positive PCR result for HEV in one individual. Our study found that increased seroprevalence of HEV IgG correlated with lower CD4 counts in HIV-infected patients in Argentina. PMID:27467394

  1. Cognitive Deficits in HIV Infected Children

    PubMed Central

    Ravindran, O. S.; Rani, Mrudula P.; Priya, G.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Children infected with HIV are at risk for significant neurological and neuropsychological problems. This study is aimed at identifying cognitive deficits in HIV-infected children and to compare them with equal number of normal controls. Materials and Methods: Twenty children with HIV infection who are currently on antiretroviral therapy were recruited. They were assessed for their intelligence using Malin's Intelligence Scale for Indian Children and also evaluated for their cognitive abilities with a comprehensive neuropsychological battery. They were matched with equal number of normal controls. Results: HIV-infected children have shown substantial impairments in the domains of attention, language, verbal learning and memory, visuomotor functions, fine motor performance, and executive functions. Conclusion: HIV-infected children have average intelligence, but they performed poorly on several neuropsychological measures. PMID:25035547

  2. Vaccinations for Adults with HIV Infection

    MedlinePlus

    Vaccinations for Adults with HIV Infection The table below shows which vaccinations you should have to protect your health if ... sure you and your healthcare provider keep your vaccinations up to date. Vaccine Do you need it? ...

  3. The effects of anti-retroviral treatment initiation on cognition in HIV-infected individuals with advanced disease in Pune, India

    PubMed Central

    Ghate, Manisha; Mehendale, Sanjay; Meyer, Rachel; Umlauf, Anya; Deutsch, Reena; Kamat, Rujvi; Thakar, Madhuri; Risbud, Arun; Kulkarni, Smita; Sakamoto, Maiko; Alexander, Terry; Franklin, Donald; Letendre, Scott; Heaton, Robert; Grant, Igor; Marcotte, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    There has been a reduction in the most severe cases of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) with advances in antiretroviral treatment (ART). But the prevalence of milder forms of HAND still remains high. Data from systematically conducted studies on the effects of ART on cognition are scanty in India where HIV-1 clade C is prevalent. The purpose of the present study was to assess the effect of antiretroviral therapy in HIV seropositive (HIV+) individuals (n = 92) with CD4 cell counts < 200 cells/mm3. Overall and domain-specific levels of cognitive functioning were determined using a locally-recruited normative sample and change in neurocognitive functioning at the one-year follow-up visit was analyzed. Results revealed cognitive impairment in 44.6% of the HIV+ group at baseline. At the one-year follow-up, the group showed significant improvement in the Learning domain (p<0.05). HIV+ individuals showing improvement in the global cognitive scores had a significantly lower baseline CD4 cell count compared to others. Overall, the degree of improvement associated with the magnitude of rise in CD4 suggests the possibility that early, mild subclinical declines may also benefit from treatment. PMID:25750072

  4. Frontostriatal fiber bundle compromise in HIV infection without dementia

    PubMed Central

    Pfefferbaum, Adolf; Rosenbloom, Margaret J.; Rohlfing, Torsten; Kemper, Carol A.; Deresinski, Stanley; Sullivan, Edith V.

    2010-01-01

    Background Quantitative fiber tracking derived from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was used to determine whether white matter association, projection, or commissural tracts are affected in nondemented individuals with HIV infection and to identify the regional distribution of sparing and impairment of fiber systems. Methods DTI measured fractional anisotropy and diffusivity, quantified separately for longitudinal (λL) diffusivity (index of axonal injury) and transverse (λT) diffusivity (index of myelin injury), in 11 association and projection white matter tracts and six commissural tracts in 29 men and 13 women with HIV infection and 88 healthy, age-matched controls (42 men and 46 women). Results The total group of HIV-infected individuals had higher diffusivity (principally longitudinal) than controls in the posterior sectors of the corpus callosum, internal and external capsules, and superior cingulate bundles. High longitudinal diffusivity, indicative of axonal compromise, was especially prominent in posterior callosal sectors, fornix, and superior cingulate bundle in HIV with AIDS. Unmedicated patients had notably high transverse diffusivity, indicative of myelin compromise, in the occipital forceps, inferior cingulate bundle, and superior longitudinal fasciculus. Pontocerebellar projection fibers were resistant to HIV effects as were commissural fibers coursing through premotor and sensorimotor callosal sectors. Conclusion This quantitative survey of brain fiber tract integrity indicates that even nondemented HIV patients can have neuroradiological evidence for damage to association and commissural tracts. These abnormalities were vulnerable to exacerbation with AIDS and possibly mitigated by HAART. PMID:19730350

  5. Molar incisor hypomineralization in HIV-infected children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Natália Silva; Pontes, Alessandra Silva; de Sousa Paz, Hélvis Enri; de Moura, Marcoeli Silva; Moura, Lúcia de Fátima Almeida de Deus; Lima, Marina de Deus Mourade

    2017-01-01

    The objective was to determine the prevalence of molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH) among individuals between 7 and 15 years old infected or noninfected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The study was conducted with 33 HIV-infected individuals (study group; SG) and 66 non-HIV-infected schoolchildren (control group; CG), paired by gender and age. Data collection was based on medical records (SG), a questionnaire for caregivers and oral examination for diagnosis of MIH (European Academy of Pediatric Dentistry criteria) and caries (DMFT index and ICDAS). Data were analyzed with Mann-Whitney, chi-square, and Fisher's exact tests and logistic regression. In SG, MIH (45.5%) and caries (87.9%) had higher prevalence. MIH was associated with use of protease inhibitors in SG (OR: 2.14; 95% CI: 1.21 to 3.77) and incubator need in CG (OR: 2.80; 95% CI: 1.71 to 9.10). HIV-infected patients had a higher prevalence of MIH and dental caries in the permanent dentition.

  6. Structural brain alterations can be detected early in HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Ochs, Renee; Wu, Ying; Sammet, Christina L.; Shoukry, Alfred; Epstein, Leon G.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Brain changes occurring early in HIV infection are not well characterized. The Chicago Early HIV Infection Study aimed to evaluate the presence and extent of structural brain alterations using quantitative MRI. Methods: Forty-three HIV and 21 control subjects were enrolled. Mean length of infection was estimated as less than 1 year based on assay results. High-resolution neuroanatomical images were acquired. Automated image analysis was used to derive measurements for total brain, ventricular volume, and for tissue classes (total and cortical gray matter, white matter, and CSF). A separate image analysis algorithm was used to calculate measurements for individual brain regions. Cognitive function was assessed by neuropsychological evaluation. Results: Reductions were quantified in total (p = 0.0547) and cortical (p = 0.0109) gray matter in the HIV group. Analysis of individual brain regions with a separate image analysis algorithm revealed consistent findings of reductions in cerebral cortex (p = 0.042) and expansion of third ventricle (p = 0.046). The early HIV group also demonstrated weaker performance on several neuropsychological tests, with the most pronounced difference in psychomotor speed (p = 0.001). Conclusions: This cross-sectional brain volumetric study indicates structural alterations early in HIV infection. The findings challenge the prevailing assumption that the brain is spared in this period. Revisiting the question of the brain's vulnerability to processes unfolding in the initial virus-host interaction and the early natural history may yield new insights into neurologic injury in HIV infection and inform neuroprotection strategies. PMID:23197750

  7. Efficacy of an unsupervised 8-month rifampicin-containing regimen for the treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis in HIV-infected adults

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, J. L.; Okwera, A.; Nsubuga, P.; Nakibali, J. G.; Whalen, C. C.; Hom, D.; Cave, M. D.; Yang, Z. H.; Mugerwa, R. D.; Ellner, J. J.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY SETTING National Tuberculosis Treatment Centre, Mulago Hospital, Kampala, Uganda. OBJECTIVE To assess the efficacy of a daily, self-administered 8-month rifampicin-containing regimen for the treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected adults. DESIGN Treatment outcomes in patients with pulmonary TB treated with a single 8-month regimen and followed in a prospective epidemiological study. RESULTS Two hundred and sixty-five HIV-infected and 26 non-HIV-infected adults with initial episodes of pulmonary tuberculosis were treated with 2 months of daily isoniazid (INH), rifampicin (RMP), ethambutol and pyrazinamide followed by 6 months of daily INH + RMP. Median follow-up was 17.8 months. Ninety-five per cent of the HIV-infected and all of the non-HIV-infected patients who had sputum examined were sputum culture negative after 2 months of treatment. Twenty-two HIV-infected and no non-HIV-infected patients died during treatment. Relapse rates were 8.4% (5.9 per 100 person-years of observation [PYO], 95%CI 3.2–8.6) among HIV-infected patients and 4.5% (2.1/100 PYO, 95%CI 0–7.8) for non-HIV-infected patients. Adverse drug reactions occurred in 37% of the HIV-infected patients; most were minor and self-limiting. CONCLUSION An 8-month RMP-containing regimen was well tolerated and effective in the treatment of HIV-infected adults with initial episodes of pulmonary TB. Relapse rates were similar to those reported with 6-month short-course regimens in HIV-infected individuals. Decisions about the duration of anti-tuberculosis treatment for HIV-infected adults must balance programme resources and the likelihood of poor compliance with longer regimens with the potential for a modest decrease in relapses with longer treatment. PMID:11092715

  8. HIV-related stigma and symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder and depression in HIV-infected individuals: does social support play a mediating or moderating role?

    PubMed

    Breet, Elsie; Kagee, Ashraf; Seedat, Soraya

    2014-01-01

    HIV stigma plays a major role in the etiology of psychological distress among persons living with HIV, but may be ameliorated by social support. This cross-sectional study examined whether social support mediates or moderates the relationship between HIV stigma and psychological symptoms. We recruited a convenience sample of 210 individuals living with HIV in three peri-urban communities in the Western Cape, South Africa. People living with HIV and AIDS (PLWHA) completed self-report questionnaires that assessed HIV-related stigma, social support, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression. Product-term regression analyses showed that social support played a mediating role in the relationship between HIV-related stigma and symptoms of PTSD (not depression). Social support did not, however, moderate the relationship between HIV-related stigma and PTSD or depression. The results indicate that perceived HIV-related stigma may decrease PLWHA's perceived level of social support, which in turn may increase PTSD symptoms. Moreover, these findings suggest that despite the protective role of social support, there are other factors that affect the relationship between HIV-related stigma and mental health that hinder the buffering role of social support in this relationship. These findings may have implications for designing and implementing interventions that increase perceived social support and decrease perceived HIV-related stigma, which in turn may decrease symptoms of PTSD among PLWHA.

  9. Food Insecurity is Associated with Incomplete HIV RNA Suppression Among Homeless and Marginally Housed HIV-infected Individuals in San Francisco

    PubMed Central

    Frongillo, Edward A.; Ragland, Kathleen; Hogg, Robert S.; Riley, Elise D.; Bangsberg, David R.

    2008-01-01

    Background and Objectives There is growing international concern that food insecurity may negatively impact antiretroviral (ARV) treatment outcomes, but no studies have directly evaluated the effect of food insecurity on viral load suppression and antiretroviral adherence. We hypothesized that food insecurity would be associated with poor virologic response among homeless and marginally housed HIV-positive ARV-treated patients. Design This is a cross-sectional study. Participants and Setting Participants were ARV-treated homeless and marginally housed persons receiving adherence monitoring with unannounced pill counts in the Research on Access to Care in the Homeless (REACH) Cohort. Measurements Food insecurity was measured by the Household Food Insecurity Access Scale (HFIAS). The primary outcome was suppression of HIV viral RNA to <50 copies/ml. We used multivariate logistic regression to assess whether food insecurity was associated with viral suppression. Results Among 104 participants, 51% were food secure, 24% were mildly or moderately food insecure and 25% were severely food insecure. Severely food insecure participants were less likely to have adherence >=80%. In adjusted analyses, severe food insecurity was associated with a 77% lower odds of viral suppression (95% CI = 0.06–0.82) when controlling for all covariates. In analyses stratified by adherence level, severe food insecurity was associated with an 85% lower odds of viral suppression (95% CI = 0.02–0.99) among those with <=80% adherence and a 66% lower odds among those with >80% adherence (95% CI = 0.06–1.81). Conclusions Food insecurity is present in half of the HIV-positive urban poor in San Francisco, one of the best resourced settings for HIV-positive individuals in the United States, and is associated with incomplete viral suppression. These findings suggest that ensuring access to food should be an integral component of public health HIV programs serving impoverished

  10. [Diagnosis of HIV infections in legal regulations].

    PubMed

    Zaba, Czesław; Zaba, Zbigniew; Klimberg, Aneta; Swiderski, Paweł

    2007-01-01

    The study aimed at presenting current legal regulations associated with the management of patients suspected of being infected with HIV. Diagnostic management of infections with HIV represents a complex issue that is associated with several problems, not only of a legal, but also practical character. Drawing a blood sample from the patient and its testing for HIV results in infringement of the patient's privacy, and the latter is legally protected. Before conducting the test for HIV infection, the doctor is obliged to obtain the consent of the patient and, when the result is available, he should inform the individual in question and provide recommendations, as recommended by WHO. The patient has the right to be tested anonymously. Blood samples for HIV detection may be collected without the patient's consent in cases of obligatory tests performed as an element of a disease prevention program, in individuals who are charged with or convicted of a crime, or in case of a medical treatment. Unlawful activities result in infringement of the patient's right to self-determination and constitute acts against his/her interests.

  11. Patterns of White Matter Injury in HIV Infection after Partial Immune Reconstitution: A DTI Tract-Based Spatial Statistics Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Tong; Zhong, Jianhui; Hu, Rui; Tivarus, Madalina; Ekholm, Sven; Harezlak, Jaroslaw; Ombao, Hernando; Navia, Bradford; Cohen, Ron; Schifitto, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    HIV infected individuals with severe immune suppression are more likely to develop HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders than those with preserved immune function. While partial immune reconstitution occurs in those with severe immune suppression after starting combined antiretroviral therapy, it is not established whether improvement in immune function reverses or prevents injury to the central nervous system (CNS). To address this question, 50 participants (nadir CD4 counts ≤200cells/mm3, on a stable antiretroviral regimen for at least 12 consecutive weeks prior to study) and 13 HIV negative participants underwent a comprehensive neurological evaluation followed by diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). 84% of the 50 HIV participants were neurologically asymptomatic (HIVNA) and 16% had mild cognitive impairment (HIVCI). Tract-Based Spatial Statistics (TBSS) on DTI data revealed that mean diffusivity (MD) increased significantly in the posterior aspect of both hemispheres in HIVNA compared to controls. In HIVCI, compared to controls and HIVNA, increased MD extended to prefrontal areas. Fractional anisotropy (FA) decreased only in HIVCI, compared to either controls or HIVNA. Furthermore, DTI showed significant correlations to duration of HIV infection and significant associations with multiple cognitive domains. This study highlights that in partial immune reconstitution, injury to the CNS is present even in those that are neurologically asymptomatic and there are discrete spatial patterns of white matter injury in HIVNA subjects compared to HIVCI subjects. Our results also show that quantitative analysis of DTI using TBSS is a sensitive approach to evaluate HIV-associated white matter disease and thus valuable in monitoring central nervous system injury. PMID:23179680

  12. A 15-year warranty period for asymptomatic individuals without coronary artery calcium: a prospective follow-up of 9715 individuals

    PubMed Central

    Valenti, Valentina; Hartaigh, Bríain ó; Heo, Ran; Cho, Iksung; Schulman-Marcus, Joshua; Gransar, Heidi; Truong, Quynh A.; Shaw, Leslee J.; Knapper, Joseph; Kelkar, Anita A.; Sandesara, Pratik; Lin, Fay Y.; Sciarretta, Sebastiano; Chang, Hyuk-Jae; Callister, Tracy Q.; Min, James K

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine long-term prognosis of a zero coronary artery calcium (CAC) score among asymptomatic individuals and its associated warranty period. Background Emerging evidence supports CAC=0 as a favorable cardiovascular short-to-intermediate term prognostic factor. Methods 9715 individuals undergoing CAC imaging were stratified by age, Framingham risk score (FRS) and Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP ATP III) categories and followed for a mean of 14.6 (12.9–16.8) years. Cox regression, area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) and net reclassification information (NRI) were used to assess all-cause mortality, discrimination and reclassification of CAC=0 compared with FRS and NCEP ATP III, respectively. A warranty period was pre-defined as <1% annual mortality rate. Vascular age was estimated by linear regression. Results Among 4864 individuals with baseline CAC=0 (mean age 52.1±10.8 years; 57.9% male), 229 deaths occurred. The warranty period of CAC=0 was almost 15 years for individuals at low and intermediate risk with no significant differences regarding age and gender. CAC=0 was associated with a vascular age of 1, 10, 20, and 30 years below chronologic age for individuals between 50–59, 60–69, 70–79, and ≥80 years, respectively. CAC score was the strongest predictor of death (HR 2.67, 95% CI 2.29–3.11) that enabled discrimination and consistent reclassification beyond FRS (AUC 0.71 vs. 0.64, p<0.001) and NCEP ATP III (AUC 0.72 vs. 0.64, p<0.001). Conclusions CAC=0 confers a 15-year warranty period against mortality among individuals at low-to-intermediate risk, which is unaffected by age or gender. Furthermore, in individuals considered at high-risk by clinical risk scores the presence of CAC=0 confers better survival than in individuals at low-to-intermediate risk but with any CAC. PMID:26189116

  13. The Emerging Roles of Coronary Computed Tomographic Angiography: Acute Chest Pain Evaluation and Screening for Asymptomatic Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Chien, Ning; Wang, Tzung-Dau; Chang, Yeun-Chung; Lin, Po-Chih; Tseng, Yao-Hui; Lee, Yee-Fan; Ko, Wei-Chun; Lee, Bai-Chin; Lee, Wen-Jeng

    2016-01-01

    Coronary computed tomographic angiography (CCTA) has been widely available since 2004. After that, the diagnostic accuracy of CCTA has been extensively validated with invasive coronary angiography for detection of coronary arterial stenosis. In this paper, we reviewed the updated evidence of the role of CCTA in both scenarios including acute chest pain and screening in asymptomatic adults. Several large-scale studies have been conducted to evaluate the diagnostic value of CCTA in the context of acute chest pain patients. CCTA could play a role in delivering more efficient care. For risk stratification of asymptomatic patients using CCTA, latest studies have revealed incremental benefits. Future studies evaluating the totality of plaque characteristics may be useful for determining the role of noncalcified plaque for risk stratification in asymptomatic individuals. PMID:27122947

  14. Anxiety symptoms in HIV-infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Kemppainen, Jeanne K; MacKain, Sally; Reyes, Darcel

    2013-01-01

    Anxiety is one of the most frequent symptoms recognized by providers who care for persons living with HIV disease (PLWH). This evidence-based review of anxiety and HIV disease includes an overview of anxiety symptoms, their prevalence in PLWH, and co-existing mood and behavioral disorders. Harmful physiologic effects are also highlighted. Valid and reliable clinical measurement tools used for assessing anxiety include the Clinical Diagnostic Questionnaire, the Hamilton Anxiety Scale, the State-Trait Anxiety Scale, the Profile of Mood States, and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Evidence supports the use of cognitive behavioral therapy as a recommended intervention for the treatment of anxiety symptoms and/or anxiety disorders in PLWH. Medications for use with more severe and disabling anxiety are discussed, as well as evidence based on expert opinion for anxiety self-management.

  15. Nature and incidence of peripheral nerve syndromes in HIV infection.

    PubMed Central

    Fuller, G N; Jacobs, J M; Guiloff, R J

    1993-01-01

    Fifty four patients with peripheral nerve syndromes were seen during a 15 month period in a population of about 1500 HIV infected patients at all stages of the disease. Distal symmetrical peripheral neuropathies were seen in 38 of the 54 patients, (11.5% of AIDS patients) and could be distinguished into two forms. The most common (n = 25) was a painful peripheral neuropathy during AIDS, which is distinct clinically and pathologically, having axonal atrophy, and is associated with cytomegalovirus infection at other sites. The 13 non-painful neuropathies seen were more heterogeneous. Lumbosacral polyradiculopathy associated with cytomegalovirus and lymphomatous mononeuritis multiplex occurred in fewer than 1% of AIDS patients. Mononeuropathies were seen in 3% of AIDS patients. No patients with acute or chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathies were seen. The annual incidence of neuropathies during the AIDS related complex stage was less than 1%; none were seen in asymptomatic HIV seropositive patients. Images PMID:8387098

  16. Effectiveness of individual counseling for smoking cessation in smokers with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asymptomatic smokers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Juan; Chen, Yan; Chen, Ping; Liu, Zhijun; Luo, Hong; Cai, Shan

    2014-03-01

    Few studies have examined the effect of individual counseling for smoking cessation in China. The present study evaluated the efficacy of individual counseling in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asymptomatic smokers. This prospective randomized study evaluated 85 smokers with COPD and 105 asymptomatic smokers with normal lung function. The individuals were randomly allocated to intervention and control groups. Subjects in the intervention group were provided with individual cognitive counseling based on face-to-face individual consultation, self-help materials and nine telephone follow-ups. Subjects in the control group were provided with simple smoking cessation advice. The smoking status for all subjects and the St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) for COPD patients were assessed at baseline, week 4 and month 6. The COPD patient exacerbations during the 6 months were recorded. In the total study population, individual counseling resulted in higher abstinence rates compared with those in the control: Intervention vs. control, 23.4 vs. 10.4% (P=0.007), respectively. Similar results were observed in the smokers with COPD: Intervention vs. control, 40.5 vs. 18.6% (P=0.027), respectively. However, for asymptomatic smokers, the effect of individual counseling was identified to be statistically insignificant: Intervention vs. control, 9.6 vs. 3.8% (P=0.230), respectively. SGRQ scores and COPD exacerbations were significantly improved in patients who abstained from smoking compared with those in the patients who failed to stop smoking. Airway obstruction, quitting motivation and individual counseling were predictors associated with smoking cessation. Airway obstruction was the most significant predictor of smoking cessation (odds ratio, 4.215; 95% confidence interval, 2.215-7.865). The results of the present study show that individual counseling is an effective method for smoking cessation, particularly in COPD patients. However

  17. CCR5 and HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Blanpain, Cédric; Libert, Frédérick; Vassart, Gilbert; Parmentier, Marc

    2002-01-01

    Chemokines and chemokine receptors play a crucial role in the trafficking of leukocyte populations across the body, and are involved in the development of a large variety of human diseases. CCR5 is the main coreceptor used by macrophage (M)-tropic strains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and HIV-2, which are responsible for viral transmission. CCR5 therefore plays an essential role in HIV pathogenesis. A number of inflammatory CC-chemokines, including MIP-1 alpha, MIP-1 beta, RANTES, MCP-2, and HCC-1[9-74] act as CCR5 agonists, while MCP-3 is a natural antagonist of the receptor. CCR5 is mainly expressed in memory T-cells, macrophages, and immature dendritic cells, and is upregulated by proinflammatory cytokines. It is coupled to the Gi class of heterotrimeric G-proteins, and inhibits cAMP production, stimulates Ca2+ release, and activates PI3-kinase and MAP kinases, as well as other tyrosine kinase cascades. A mutant allele of CCR5, CCR5 delta 32 is frequent in populations of European origin, and encodes a nonfunctional truncated protein that is not transported to the cell surface. Homozygotes for the delta 32 allele exhibit a strong, although incomplete, resistance to HIV infection, whereas heterozygotes display delayed progression to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Many other alleles, affecting the primary structure of CCR5 or its promoter have been described, some of which lead to nonfunctional receptors or otherwise influence AIDS progression. CCR5 is considered as a drug target in the field of HIV, but also in a growing number of inflammatory diseases. Modified chemokines, monoclonal antibodies and small chemical antagonists, as well as a number of gene therapy approaches have been developed in this frame.

  18. The Oral Bacterial Communities of Children with Well-Controlled HIV Infection and without HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Brittany E.; Mongodin, Emmanuel F.; Jones, Cheron E.; Chung, Michelle; Fraser, Claire M.; Tate, Anupama; Zeichner, Steven L.

    2015-01-01

    The oral microbial community (microbiota) plays a critical role in human health and disease. Alterations in the oral microbiota may be associated with disorders such as gingivitis, periodontitis, childhood caries, alveolar osteitis, oral candidiasis and endodontic infections. In the immunosuppressed population, the spectrum of potential oral disease is even broader, encompassing candidiasis, necrotizing gingivitis, parotid gland enlargement, Kaposi’s sarcoma, oral warts and other diseases. Here, we used 454 pyrosequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA genes to examine the oral microbiome of saliva, mucosal and tooth samples from HIV-positive and negative children. Patient demographics and clinical characteristics were collected from a cross-section of patients undergoing routine dental care. Multiple specimens from different sampling sites in the mouth were collected for each patient. The goal of the study was to observe the potential diversity of the oral microbiota among individual patients, sample locations, HIV status and various dental characteristics. We found that there were significant differences in the microbiome among the enrolled patients, and between sampling locations. The analysis was complicated by uneven enrollment in the patient cohorts, with only five HIV-negative patients enrolled in the study and by the rapid improvement in the health of HIV-infected children between the time the study was conceived and completed. The generally good oral health of the HIV-negative patients limited the number of dental plaque samples that could be collected. We did not identify significant differences between well-controlled HIV-positive patients and HIV-negative controls, suggesting that well-controlled HIV-positive patients essentially harbor similar oral flora compared to patients without HIV. Nor were significant differences in the oral microbiota identified between different teeth or with different dental characteristics. Additional studies are needed to better

  19. Antifungal Treatment is Not Required for Immunocompetent Individuals With Asymptomatic Esophageal Candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Min, Yang Won; Kim, Eun; Son, Hee Jung; Kim, Jae J.; Rhee, Poong-Lyul

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Although esophageal candidiasis (EC) is an opportunistic infection, asymptomatic EC (AEC) is occasionally encountered in otherwise healthy individuals. This study evaluates the impact of antifungal treatment in immunocompetent individuals with AEC and investigates risk factors for persistent or recurrent EC. The authors identified patients with biopsy-proven AEC from the database of individuals receiving screening endoscopy (n = 99,255). After excluding patients receiving immunosuppressive therapy, being positive for human immunodeficiency virus, receiving no follow-up endoscopy, or having no antifungal treatment data, a total of 142 patients were divided into remission and nonremission groups. Remission was defined when EC was not detectable on follow-up endoscopy. On baseline comparison, nonremission group was older (57.5 ± 10.3 versus 52.5 ± 10.5 years, P = 0.017) and more likely to have cardiovascular disease (12.9% versus 1.8%, P = 0.021) and history of pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) (22.6% versus 4.5%, P = 0.004) and exhibited a lower triglyceride level (101.4 ± 37.4 versus 122.6 ± 79.6 mg/dL, P = 0.039) than remission group, whereas grade of EC and concomitant endoscopic findings did not differ between 2 groups. Antifungal treatment was also similarly performed between 2 groups. Multivariate analysis revealed that history of PTB is independently associated with nonremission (odds ratio 4.495, 95% confidence interval 1.023–19.762, P = 0.047). No patients demonstrated EC-related complications during a mean follow-up of 28.0 ± 12.0 months. In conclusion, our results suggested that antifungal treatment is not required for immunocompetent individuals with AEC and past history of PTB is an independent predictor for persistent or recurrent EC. PMID:26559270

  20. HIV Infection and Compromised Mucosal Immunity: Oral Manifestations and Systemic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Heron, Samantha E.; Elahi, Shokrollah

    2017-01-01

    Mucosal surfaces account for the vast majority of HIV transmission. In adults, HIV transmission occurs mainly by vaginal and rectal routes but rarely via oral route. By contrast, pediatric HIV infections could be as the result of oral route by breastfeeding. As such mucosal surfaces play a crucial role in HIV acquisition, and spread of the virus depends on its ability to cross a mucosal barrier. HIV selectively infects, depletes, and/or dysregulates multiple arms of the human immune system particularly at the mucosal sites and causes substantial irreversible damage to the mucosal barriers. This leads to microbial products translocation and subsequently hyper-immune activation. Although introduction of antiretroviral therapy (ART) has led to significant reduction in morbidity and mortality of HIV-infected patients, viral replication persists. As a result, antigen presence and immune activation are linked to “inflammaging” that attributes to a pro-inflammatory environment and the accelerated aging process in HIV patients. HIV infection is also associated with the prevalence of oral mucosal infections and dysregulation of oral microbiota, both of which may compromise the oral mucosal immunity of HIV-infected individuals. In addition, impaired oral immunity in HIV infection may predispose the patients to periodontal diseases that are associated with systemic inflammation and increased risk of cardiovascular diseases. The purpose of this review is to examine existing evidence regarding the role of innate and cellular components of the oral cavity in HIV infection and how HIV infection may drive systemic hyper-immune activation in these patients. We will also discuss current knowledge on HIV oral transmission, HIV immunosenescence in relation to the oral mucosal alterations during the course of HIV infection and periodontal disease. Finally, we discuss oral manifestations associated with HIV infection and how HIV infection and ART influence the oral microbiome

  1. Short Communication: New HIV Infections at Southern New England Academic Institutions: Implications for Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Kazi, Shahzeb; Rana, Amaad; Blazar, Ilyse; Dejong, Colette C.; Mayer, Kenneth H.; Huard, Thomas K.; Carleton, Kim; Gillani, Fizza; Alexander, Nicole; Parillo, Zoanne; Flanigan, Timothy P.; Kantor, Rami

    2013-01-01

    Abstract New HIV infections among younger men who have sex with men (MSM) in the United States are escalating. Data on HIV infections in college students are limited. In 2010, three MSM college students presented to our clinic with primary HIV infection (PHI) in a single month. To determine the number of college students among new HIV diagnoses, we reviewed clinical characteristics and molecular epidemiology of HIV-diagnosed individuals from January to December 2010 at the largest HIV clinic in Southern New England. PHI was defined as acute HIV infection or seroconversion within the last 6 months. Of 66 individuals diagnosed with HIV in 2010, 62% were MSM and 17% were academic students (12% college or university, 5% other). Seventy-three percent of students were MSM. Compared to nonstudents, students were more likely to be younger (24 versus 39 years), born in the United States (91% versus 56%), have another sexually transmitted disease (45% versus 11%), and present with PHI (73% versus 16%, all p-values<0.05). Thirty percent of individuals formed eight transmission clusters including four students. MSM were more likely to be part of clusters. Department of Health contact tracing of cluster participants allowed further identification of epidemiological linkages. Given these high rates of PHI in recently diagnosed students, institutions of higher education should be aware of acute HIV presentation and the need for rapid diagnosis. Prevention strategies should focus on younger MSM, specifically college-age students who may be at increased risk of HIV infection. PMID:22724920

  2. Unusual primary HIV infection with colonic ulcer complicated by hemorrhagic shock: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Timely diagnosis of primary HIV infection is important to prevent further transmission of HIV. Primary HIV infection may take place without symptoms or may be associated with fever, pharyngitis or headache. Sometimes, the clinical presentation includes aseptic meningitis or cutaneous lesions. Intestinal ulceration due to opportunistic pathogens (cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, Toxoplasma gondii) has been described in patients with AIDS. However, although invasion of intestinal lymphoid tissue is a prominent feature of human and simian lentivirus infections, colonic ulceration has not been reported in acute HIV infection. Case description A 42-year-old Caucasian man was treated with amoxicillin-clavulanate for pharyngitis. He did not improve, and a rash developed. History taking revealed a negative HIV antibody test five months previously and unprotected sex with a male partner the month before admission. Repeated tests revealed primary HIV infection with an exceptionally high HIV-1 RNA plasma concentration (3.6 × 107 copies/mL) and a low CD4 count (101 cells/mm3, seven percent of total lymphocytes). While being investigated, the patient had a life-threatening hematochezia. After angiographic occlusion of a branch of the ileocaecal artery and initiation of antiretroviral therapy, the patient became rapidly asymptomatic and could be discharged. Colonoscopy revealed a bleeding colonic ulcer. We were unable to identify an etiology other than HIV for this ulcer. Conclusion This case adds to the known protean manifestation of primary HIV infection. The lack of an alternative etiology, despite extensive investigations, suggests that this ulcer was directly caused by primary HIV infection. This conclusion is supported by the well-described extensive loss of intestinal mucosal CD4+ T cells associated with primary HIV infection, the extremely high HIV viral load observed in our patient, and the rapid improvement of the ulcer after initiation of highly

  3. Identification of coronary heart disease in asymptomatic individuals with diabetes mellitus: to screen or not to screen.

    PubMed

    Bravo, Paco E; Psaty, Bruce M; Di Carli, Marcelo F; Branch, Kelley R

    2015-01-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is highly prevalent in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM), and remains the single most common cause of death among this population. Regrettably, a significant percentage of diabetics fail to perceive the classic symptoms associated with myocardial ischemia. Among asymptomatic diabetics, the prevalence of abnormal cardiac testing appears to be high, ranging between 10% and 62%, and mortality is significantly higher in those with abnormal scans. Hence, the potential use of screening for CHD detection among asymptomatic DM individuals is appealing and has been recommended in certain circumstances. However, it was not until recently, that this question was addressed in clinical trials. Two studies randomized a total of 2,023 asymptomatic diabetics to screening or not using cardiac imaging with a mean follow up of 4.4 ± 1.4 years. In combination, both trials showed lower than expected annual event rates, and failed to reduce major cardiovascular events in the screened group compared to the standard of care alone. The results of these trials do not currently support the use of screening tools for CHD detection in asymptomatic DM individuals. However, these studies have important limitations, and potential explanations for their negative results that are discussed in this manuscript.

  4. [Travel medicine for HIV-infected patients].

    PubMed

    Rossi, M; Furrer, H

    2001-06-01

    Many HIV-infected persons travel from temperate zones to (sub)tropical destinations. HIV-specific immigration issues, medical resources abroad and problems regarding travelling with multiple medications have to be anticipated. When prescribing immunizations and specific chemoprophylaxis, the stage of immunodeficiency as well as drug interactions with antiretrovirals and medicaments against opportunistic infections have to be taken into account. Live vaccines may be contraindicated. Immunocompromised HIV-infected travellers have a higher risk for serious courses of diseases by enteropathogens. Therefore a good information about food hygiene is important and a prescription of an antibiotic to take in case of severe diarrhea may be indicated. A new antiretroviral combination therapy should not be started immediately before travelling to the tropics. The possibility to continue an established HIV treatment during travel has to be evaluated cautiously. With good pre-travel advice the risk of severe health problems is low for most HIV-infected travellers.

  5. Can ultrasonography make identification of asymptomatic hyperuricemic individuals at risk for developing gouty arthritis more crystal clear?

    PubMed

    Schlesinger, Naomi

    2011-04-19

    Hyperuricemia is the most important risk factor for gouty arthritis. The quandary is how to predict which patient with asymptomatic hyperuricemia will develop gouty arthritis. Can ultrasonography help identify hyperuricemic individuals at risk for developing gouty arthritis? In the previous issue of Arthritis Research & Therapy, Pineda and colleagues found ultrasonography changes suggestive of gouty arthritis in 25% of hyperuricemic individuals. These were found exclusively in hyperuricemic individuals but not in normouricemic patients. Ultrasonography may serve as a noninvasive means to diagnose gouty arthritis in hyperuricemic individuals who have yet to develop symptomatic gouty arthritis.

  6. Altered Functional Response to Risky Choice in HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, Colm G.; Bischoff-Grethe, Amanda; Jordan, Stephan J.; Woods, Steven Paul; Ellis, Ronald J.; Paulus, Martin P.; Grant, Igor

    2014-01-01

    Background Risky decision-making is commonly observed in persons at risk for and infected with HIV and is associated with executive dysfunction. Yet it is currently unknown whether HIV alters brain processing of risk-taking decision-making. Methods This study examined the neural substrate of a risky decision-making task in 21 HIV seropositive (HIV+) and 19 seronegative (HIV-) comparison participants. Functional magnetic resonance imaging was conducted while participants performed the risky-gains task, which involves choosing among safe (20 cents) and risky (40/80 cent win or loss) choices. Linear mixed effects analyses examining group and decision type were conducted. Robust regressions were performed to examine the relationship between nadir CD4 count and Kalichman sexual compulsivity and brain activation in the HIV+ group. The overlap between the task effects and robust regressions was explored. Results Although there were no serostatus effects in behavioral performance on the risky-gains task, HIV+ individuals exhibited greater activation for risky choices in the basal ganglia, i.e. the caudate nucleus, but also in the anterior cingulate, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, and insula relative to the HIV- group. The HIV+ group also demonstrated reduced functional responses to safe choices in the anterior cingulate and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex relative to the HIV- group. HIV+ individuals with higher nadir CD4 count and greater sexual compulsivity displayed lower differential responses to safe versus risky choices in many of these regions. Conclusions This study demonstrated fronto-striatal loop dysfunction associated with HIV infection during risky decision-making. Combined with similar between-group task behavior, this suggests an adaptive functional response in regions critical to reward and behavioral control in the HIV+ group. HIV-infected individuals with higher CD4 nadirs demonstrated activation patterns more similar to seronegative individuals. This

  7. Cutaneous histoplasmosis disclosing an HIV-infection*

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Silvio Alencar; Silvares, Maria Regina Cavariani; de Camargo, Rosangela Maria Pires; Marques, Mariangela Esther Alencar

    2013-01-01

    Histoplasmosis is a systemic mycosis endemic in extensive areas of the Americas. The authors report on an urban adult male patient with uncommon oral-cutaneous lesions proven to be histoplasmosis. Additional investigation revealed unnoticed HIV infection with CD4+ cell count of 7/mm3. The treatment was performed with amphotericin B, a 2065 mg total dose followed by itraconazole 200mg/daily plus antiretroviral therapy with apparent cure. Histoplasmosis is an AIDS-defining opportunistic disease process; therefore, its clinical diagnosis must drive full laboratory investigation looking for unnoted HIV-infection. PMID:23793220

  8. Characteristics of the Motor Units during Sternocleidomastoid Isometric Flexion among Patients with Mechanical Neck Disorder and Asymptomatic Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chia-Chi; Su, Fong-Chin; Yang, Po-Ching; Lin, Hwai-Ting

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical neck disorder is a widespread and non-neurological musculoskeletal condition resulting from modern lifestyles. Presently, the fundamental electrophysiological properties of the motor units of the sternocleidomastoid muscles and the characteristics of the short-term synchronization of the motor unit in patients with neck pain are ambiguous. This study therefore aims to clarify the fundamental electrophysiological properties of the motor units of the sternocleidomastoid muscles in patients with mechanical neck disorder and in asymptomatic individuals. We further investigated whether alterations in the degree of motor unit short-term synchronization occur. The surface electrophysiological signals of the bilateral sternal heads of the sternocleidomastoid muscles of twelve patients with mechanical neck disorder and asymptomatic individuals were detected at 25% of the maximum voluntary contraction during cervical isometric flexion and then decomposed into individual motor unit action potential trains. We found that the patients with mechanical neck disorder showed significantly higher initial and mean firing rates of the sternocleidomastoid muscles and displayed substantially lower motor unit short-term synchronization values compared with the asymptomatic subjects. Consequently, these convincing findings support the assertion that patients with mechanical neck disorder display altered neuromuscular control strategies, such as the reinforcement of motor unit recruitment firing rates in the sternocleidomastoid muscles. The motor units of these patients also revealed neural recruitment strategies with relatively poor efficiency when executing the required motor tasks. PMID:27941995

  9. Characteristics of the Motor Units during Sternocleidomastoid Isometric Flexion among Patients with Mechanical Neck Disorder and Asymptomatic Individuals.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chia-Chi; Su, Fong-Chin; Yang, Po-Ching; Lin, Hwai-Ting; Guo, Lan-Yuen

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical neck disorder is a widespread and non-neurological musculoskeletal condition resulting from modern lifestyles. Presently, the fundamental electrophysiological properties of the motor units of the sternocleidomastoid muscles and the characteristics of the short-term synchronization of the motor unit in patients with neck pain are ambiguous. This study therefore aims to clarify the fundamental electrophysiological properties of the motor units of the sternocleidomastoid muscles in patients with mechanical neck disorder and in asymptomatic individuals. We further investigated whether alterations in the degree of motor unit short-term synchronization occur. The surface electrophysiological signals of the bilateral sternal heads of the sternocleidomastoid muscles of twelve patients with mechanical neck disorder and asymptomatic individuals were detected at 25% of the maximum voluntary contraction during cervical isometric flexion and then decomposed into individual motor unit action potential trains. We found that the patients with mechanical neck disorder showed significantly higher initial and mean firing rates of the sternocleidomastoid muscles and displayed substantially lower motor unit short-term synchronization values compared with the asymptomatic subjects. Consequently, these convincing findings support the assertion that patients with mechanical neck disorder display altered neuromuscular control strategies, such as the reinforcement of motor unit recruitment firing rates in the sternocleidomastoid muscles. The motor units of these patients also revealed neural recruitment strategies with relatively poor efficiency when executing the required motor tasks.

  10. Pediatric HIV Infection and Developmental Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seidel, John F.

    This paper presents an overview of the developmental disabilities associated with pediatric Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection, and examines efficacious practices for assessment and intervention programming. The focus population is early childhood into school age. The paper describes the complex array of challenges presented by these…

  11. Kaleidoscope of autoimmune diseases in HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Roszkiewicz, Justyna; Smolewska, Elzbieta

    2016-11-01

    Within the last 30 years, the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has changed its status from inevitably fatal to chronic disorder with limited impact on life span. However, this breakthrough was mainly the effect of introduction of the aggressive antiviral treatment, which has led to the clinically significant increase in CD4+ cell count, resulting in fewer cases of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and improved management of opportunistic infections occurring in the course of the disease. The occurrence of a particular autoimmune disease depends on degree of immunosuppression of the HIV-positive patient. In 2002, four stages of autoimmunity were proposed in patients infected by HIV, based on the absolute CD4+ cell count, feature of AIDS as well as on the presence of autoimmune diseases. Spectrum of autoimmune diseases associated with HIV infection seems to be unexpectedly wide, involving several organs, such as lungs (sarcoidosis), thyroid gland (Graves' disease), liver (autoimmune hepatitis), connective tissue (systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, polyarteritis nodosa and other types of vasculitis, antiphospholipid syndrome) or hematopoietic system (autoimmune cytopenias). This paper contains the state of art on possible coincidences between HIV infection and a differential types of autoimmune diseases, including the potential mechanisms of this phenomenon. As the clinical manifestations of autoimmunization often mimic those inscribed in the course of HIV infection, health care providers should be aware of this rare but potentially deadly association and actively seek for its symptoms in their patients.

  12. Liver transplantation in HIV-infected recipients.

    PubMed

    Roland, Michelle E; Stock, Peter G

    2006-08-01

    Although human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients are living longer and dying less often from complications related to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), they are experiencing significant morbidity and mortality related to end-stage liver disease. Advances in the management of HIV disease have made it difficult to continue denying transplantation to this population based upon futility arguments alone. Patient and graft survival rates in HIV-infected study subjects appear similar to those in large transplant databases. There are no reports suggesting significant HIV disease progression. There are substantial interactions between immunosuppressants and antiretroviral drugs that require careful monitoring and dose adjustment. The evaluation and management of HIV-infected transplant candidates and recipients require excellent communication among a multidisciplinary team and the primary HIV care provider. It is critical that HIV clinicians and hepatologists are aware that liver transplantation is an option for HIV-infected patients at many transplant centers as delays in referral result in unnecessary mortality during the pretransplantation evaluation process.

  13. Cognitive reserve and neuropsychological functioning in older HIV-infected people.

    PubMed

    Milanini, Benedetta; Ciccarelli, Nicoletta; Fabbiani, Massimiliano; Limiti, Silio; Grima, Pierfrancesco; Rossetti, Barbara; Visconti, Elena; Tamburrini, Enrica; Cauda, Roberto; Di Giambenedetto, Simona

    2016-10-01

    Progress in treatments has led to HIV+ patients getting older. Age and HIV are risk factors for neurocognitive impairment (NCI). We explored the role of cognitive reserve (CR) on cognition in a group of virologically suppressed older HIV+ people. We performed a multicenter study, consecutively enrolling asymptomatic HIV+ subjects ≥60 years old during routine outpatient visits. A comprehensive neuropsychological battery was administered. Raw test scores were adjusted based on Italian normative data and transformed into z-scores; NCI was defined according to Frascati criteria. All participants underwent the Brief Intelligence Test (TIB) and the Cognitive Reserve Index (CRI) questionnaire as proxies for CR. Relationships between TIB, CRI, and NCI were investigated by logistic or linear regression analyses. Sixty patients (85 % males, median age 66, median education 12, 10 % HCV co-infected, 25 % with past acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-defining events, median CD4 cells count 581 cells/μL, median nadir CD4 cells count 109 cells/μL) were enrolled. Twenty-four patients (40 %) showed Asymptomatic Neurocognitive Impairment. At logistic regression analysis, only CRI (OR 0.94; 95 % CI 0.91-0.97; P = 0.001) and TIB (OR 0.80; 95 % CI 0.71-0.90; P < 0.001) were associated with a lower risk of NCI. Higher CRI and TIB were significantly correlated with a better performance (composite z-score) both globally and at individual cognitive domains. Our findings highlight the role of CR over clinical variables in maintaining cognitive integrity in a virologically suppressed older HIV-infected population. A lifestyle characterized by experiences of mental stimulation may help to cope aging and HIV-related neurodegeneration.

  14. [Incidence and etiology of psychotic disorders in HIV infected patients].

    PubMed

    Niederecker, M; Naber, D; Riedel, R; Perro, C; Goebel, F D

    1995-05-01

    There are numerous case reports on psychoses in AIDS patients and, although more seldom, also in HIV-positive patients in early stages of infection; however, systematic investigations on the frequency, e.g., relevant for the indication of an HIV test in psychiatric patients, are missing. For this study, 1046 HIV-positive patients were examined regarding psychoses. A total of 301 patients (28.8%) were HIV-positive but asymptomatic, and 380 patients (36.2%) had the lymphadenopathy syndrome. One hundred thirty-two patients (12.6%) suffered from an AIDS-related complex and 233 patients (22.3%) from AIDS. Of these 1046 patients, only 9 (0.9%) suffered from psychoses. One patient with a paranoid-hallucinatory syndrome was asymptomatic; one in the lymphadenopathy syndrome was manic. The other 7 patients were all in late stages of the infection. A causal relationship between HIV infection and psychosis and probable in only 3 patients. These data do not indicate a markedly elevated prevalence of psychosis in HIV-positive or AIDS patients.

  15. Therapy insight: the changing spectrum of rheumatic disease in HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Maganti, Rashmi M; Reveille, John D; Williams, Frances M

    2008-08-01

    HIV infection and AIDS have protean and multisystem manifestations throughout the various stages of infection. Progression from HIV infection to AIDS is associated with a gradual loss of immunocompetence and the occurrence of opportunistic infections and malignancies; it is also associated with immune dysregulation and persistent, prolonged immune activation that leads to autoimmune phenomena such as vasculitis and serological abnormalities. In people who are infected with HIV, the recognition of autoinflammatory disorders, their differentiation from infections or lymphoproliferative malignancies and their treatment using potentially immunosuppressive drugs is a challenging clinical scenario. The spectrum of rheumatologic diseases reported in HIV-infected individuals has changed dramatically since the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy in 1995. Complications such as metabolic abnormalities, osteoporosis, and immune restoration inflammatory syndrome have emerged.

  16. Periodontal disease in HIV-infected adults in the HAART era: Clinical, immunological, and microbiological aspects.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Lucio Souza; Gonçalves, Barbara Mulatinho Lopo; Fontes, Tatiana Vasconcellos

    2013-10-01

    The introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has decreased the incidence and prevalence of several oral manifestations such as oral candidiasis, hairy leukoplakia, and Kaposi's sarcoma in HIV-infected patients. Regarding periodontal disease the findings are not clear. This disease represents a group of chronic oral diseases characterized by infection and inflammation of the periodontal tissues. These tissues surround the teeth and provide periodontal protection (the gingival tissue) and periodontal support (periodontal ligament, root cementum, alveolar bone). Clinical, immunological, and microbiological aspects of these diseases, such as linear gingival erythema (LGE), necrotizing periodontal diseases (NPD) (necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis [NUG], necrotizing ulcerative periodontitis [NUP] and necrotizing stomatitis), and chronic periodontitis, have been widely studied in HIV-infected individuals, but without providing conclusive results. The purpose of this review was to contribute to a better overall understanding of the probable impact of HIV-infection on the characteristics of periodontal infections.

  17. Brief Report: HIV Infection Is Associated With Worse Bone Material Properties, Independently of Bone Mineral Density.

    PubMed

    Güerri-Fernández, Robert; Molina, Daniel; Villar-García, Judit; Prieto-Alhambra, Daniel; Mellibovsky, Leonardo; Nogués, Xavier; González-Mena, Alicia; Guelar, Ana; Trenchs-Rodríguez, Marta; Herrera-Fernández, Sabina; Horcajada, Juan Pablo; Díez-Pérez, Adolfo; Knobel, Hernando

    2016-07-01

    Low bone mineral density (BMD) in HIV-infected individuals has been documented in an increasing number of studies. However, it is not clear whether it is the infection itself or the treatment that causes bone impairment. Microindentation measures bone material strength (Bone Material Strength index) directly. We recruited 85 patients, 50 infected with HIV and 35 controls. Median Bone Material Strength index was 84.5 (interquartile range 83-87) in HIV-infected patients and 90 (88.5-93) in controls (P < 0.001). No significant differences in BMD between cases and controls at any of the sites examined (total hip, femoral neck, and lumbar spine). HIV infection is associated with bone damage, independently of BMD.

  18. Quantifying Adaptive and Innate Immune Responses in HIV-Infected Participants Using a Novel High Throughput Assay

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Paul U.; Spelman, Tim; Elliott, Julian H.; Fairley, Christopher K.; Boyle, Jeffrey; Miyamasu, Misato; Lewin, Sharon R.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives HIV infection is characterised by persistent immune dysfunction of both the adaptive and innate immune responses. The aim of this study was to evaluate these responses using a novel high throughput assay in healthy controls and HIV-infected individuals prior to and following anti-retroviral treatment (ART). Design Cross-sectional study. Methods Whole blood was assessed using the QuantiFERON Monitor® (QFM) assay containing adaptive and innate immunostimulants. Interferon (IFN)-γ levels (IU/mL) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results We recruited HIV-infected participants (n = 20 off ART and viremic; n = 59 on suppressive ART) and HIV-uninfected controls (n = 229). Median IFN-γ production was significantly higher in HIV-infected participants compared to controls (IFN-γ 512 vs 223 IU/ml, p<0.0001), but within the HIV-infected participants there was no difference between those on or off ART (median IFN-γ 512 vs 593 IU/ml p = 0.94). Amongst the HIV-infected participants, IFN-γ production was higher in individuals with CD4 count>350 compared to <350 cells/μL (IFN-γ IU/ml 561 vs 259 p = 0.02) and in males compared to females (IFN-γ 542 vs 77 IU/ml p = 0.04). There were no associations between IFN-γ production and age, plasma HIV RNA, nadir CD4 count or duration of HIV infection. Using a multivariable analysis, neither CD4 nor sex were independently predictive of IFN-γ production. Conclusion Using a high throughput assay which assesses both adaptive and innate immune function, we showed elevated IFN-γ production in HIV-infected patients both on and off ART. Further research is warranted to determine if changes in QuantiFERON Monitor® are associated with clinical outcomes. PMID:27935986

  19. Bactericidal Immunity to Salmonella in Africans and Mechanisms Causing Its Failure in HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Yun Shan; Necchi, Francesca; O’Shaughnessy, Colette M.; Micoli, Francesca; Gavini, Massimiliano; Young, Stephen P.; Msefula, Chisomo L.; Gondwe, Esther N.; Mandala, Wilson L.; Gordon, Melita A.; Saul, Allan J.; MacLennan, Calman A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Nontyphoidal strains of Salmonella are a leading cause of death among HIV-infected Africans. Antibody-induced complement-mediated killing protects healthy Africans against Salmonella, but increased levels of anti-lipopolysaccharide (LPS) antibodies in some HIV-infected African adults block this killing. The objective was to understand how these high levels of anti-LPS antibodies interfere with the killing of Salmonella. Methodology/Principal Findings Sera and affinity-purified antibodies from African HIV-infected adults that failed to kill invasive S. Typhimurium D23580 were compared to sera from HIV-uninfected and HIV-infected subjects with bactericidal activity. The failure of sera from certain HIV-infected subjects to kill Salmonella was found to be due to an inherent inhibitory effect of anti-LPS antibodies. This inhibition was concentration-dependent and strongly associated with IgA and IgG2 anti-LPS antibodies (p<0.0001 for both). IgG anti-LPS antibodies, from sera of HIV-infected individuals that inhibit killing at high concentration, induced killing when diluted. Conversely, IgG, from sera of HIV-uninfected adults that induce killing, inhibited killing when concentrated. IgM anti-LPS antibodies from all subjects also induced Salmonella killing. Finally, the inhibitory effect of high concentrations of anti-LPS antibodies is seen with IgM as well as IgG and IgA. No correlation was found between affinity or avidity, or complement deposition or consumption, and inhibition of killing. Conclusion/Significance IgG and IgM classes of anti-S. Typhimurium LPS antibodies from HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected individuals are bactericidal, while at very high concentrations, anti-LPS antibodies of all classes inhibit in vitro killing of Salmonella. This could be due to a variety of mechanisms relating to the poor ability of IgA and IgG2 to activate complement, and deposition of complement at sites where it cannot insert in the bacterial membrane. Vaccine trials

  20. Sevelamer Does Not Decrease Lipopolysaccharide or Soluble CD14 Levels But Decreases Soluble Tissue Factor, Low-Density Lipoprotein (LDL) Cholesterol, and Oxidized LDL Cholesterol Levels in Individuals With Untreated HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Sandler, Netanya G.; Zhang, Xinyan; Bosch, Ronald J.; Funderburg, Nicholas T.; Choi, Andrew I.; Robinson, Janet K.; Fine, Derek M.; Coombs, Robert W.; Jacobson, Jeffrey M.; Landay, Alan L.; Douek, Daniel C.; Tressler, Randall; Read, Sarah W.; Wilson, Cara C.; Deeks, Steven G.; Lederman, Michael M.; Gandhi, Rajesh T.

    2014-01-01

    Abnormal levels of inflammation are associated with cardiovascular disease and mortality in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–infected patients. Microbial translocation, which may cause inflammation, is decreased by sevelamer in patients undergoing hemodialysis. In this single-arm study, we evaluated the effects of 8 weeks of sevelamer therapy on 36 HIV-infected subjects who were not receiving antiretroviral therapy. Sevelamer did not significantly change markers of microbial translocation, inflammation, or T-cell activation. During sevelamer treatment, however, levels of soluble tissue factor, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, and oxidized LDL cholesterol decreased significantly, whereas D-dimer levels increased. Thus, in this study population, sevelamer did not reduce microbial translocation but may have yielded cardiovascular benefits. Clinical Trials Registration. NCT 01543958. PMID:24864123

  1. Revised surveillance case definitions for HIV infection among adults, adolescents, and children aged <18 months and for HIV infection and AIDS among children aged 18 months to <13 years--United States, 2008.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Eileen; Whitmore, Suzanne; Glynn, Kathleen M; Dominguez, Kenneth; Mitsch, Andrew; McKenna, Matthew T

    2008-12-05

    For adults and adolescents (i.e., persons aged >/=13 years), the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection classification system and the surveillance case definitions for HIV infection and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) have been revised and combined into a single case definition for HIV infection. In addition, the HIV infection case definition for children aged <13 years and the AIDS case definition for children aged 18 months to <13 years have been revised. No changes have been made to the HIV infection classification system, the 24 AIDS-defining conditions for children aged <13 years, or the AIDS case definition for children aged <18 months. These case definitions are intended for public health surveillance only and not as a guide for clinical diagnosis. Public health surveillance data are used primarily for monitoring the HIV epidemic and for planning on a population level, not for making clinical decisions for individual patients. CDC and the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists recommend that all states and territories conduct case surveillance of HIV infection and AIDS using the 2008 surveillance case definitions, effective immediately.

  2. End-Stage Renal Disease Among HIV-Infected Adults in North America

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Alison G.; Althoff, Keri N.; Jing, Yuezhou; Estrella, Michelle M.; Kitahata, Mari M.; Wester, C. William; Bosch, Ronald J.; Crane, Heidi; Eron, Joseph; Gill, M. John; Horberg, Michael A.; Justice, Amy C.; Klein, Marina; Mayor, Angel M.; Moore, Richard D.; Palella, Frank J.; Parikh, Chirag R.; Silverberg, Michael J.; Golub, Elizabeth T.; Jacobson, Lisa P.; Napravnik, Sonia; Lucas, Gregory M.; Kirk, Gregory D.; Benson, Constance A.; Bosch, Ronald J.; Collier, Ann C.; Boswell, Stephen; Grasso, Chris; Mayer, Ken; Hogg, Robert S.; Harrigan, Richard; Montaner, Julio; Cescon, Angela; Brooks, John T.; Buchacz, Kate; Gebo, Kelly A.; Moore, Richard D.; Moore, Richard D.; Carey, John T.; Rodriguez, Benigno; Horberg, Michael A.; Silverberg, Michael J.; Thorne, Jennifer E.; Goedert, James J.; Jacobson, Lisa P.; Klein, Marina B.; Rourke, Sean B.; Burchell, Ann; Rachlis, Anita R.; Hunter-Mellado, Robert F.; Mayor, Angel M.; Gill, M. John; Deeks, Steven G.; Martin, Jeffrey N.; Saag, Michael S.; Mugavero, Michael J.; Willig, James; Eron, Joseph J.; Napravnik, Sonia; Kitahata, Mari M.; Crane, Heidi M.; Justice, Amy C.; Dubrow, Robert; Fiellin, David; Sterling, Timothy R.; Haas, David; Bebawy, Sally; Turner, Megan; Gange, Stephen J.; Anastos, Kathryn; Moore, Richard D.; Saag, Michael S.; Gange, Stephen J.; Althoff, Keri N.; Kitahata, Mari M.; McKaig, Rosemary G.; Justice, Amy C.; Freeman, Aimee M.; Moore, Richard D.; Freeman, Aimee M.; Lent, Carol; Kitahata, Mari M.; Van Rompaey, Stephen E.; Crane, Heidi M.; Webster, Eric; Morton, Liz; Simon, Brenda; Gange, Stephen J.; Althoff, Keri N.; Abraham, Alison G.; Lau, Bryan; Zhang, Jinbing; Jing, Jerry; Golub, Elizabeth; Modur, Shari; Hanna, David B.; Rebeiro, Peter; Wong, Cherise; Mendes, Adell

    2015-01-01

    Background. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected adults, particularly those of black race, are at high-risk for end-stage renal disease (ESRD), but contributing factors are evolving. We hypothesized that improvements in HIV treatment have led to declines in risk of ESRD, particularly among HIV-infected blacks. Methods. Using data from the North American AIDS Cohort Collaboration for Research and Design from January 2000 to December 2009, we validated 286 incident ESRD cases using abstracted medical evidence of dialysis (lasting >6 months) or renal transplant. A total of 38 354 HIV-infected adults aged 18–80 years contributed 159 825 person-years (PYs). Age- and sex-standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were estimated by race. Poisson regression was used to identify predictors of ESRD. Results. HIV-infected ESRD cases were more likely to be of black race, have diabetes mellitus or hypertension, inject drugs, and/or have a prior AIDS-defining illness. The overall SIR was 3.2 (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.8–3.6) but was significantly higher among black patients (4.5 [95% CI, 3.9–5.2]). ESRD incidence declined from 532 to 303 per 100 000 PYs and 138 to 34 per 100 000 PYs over the time period for blacks and nonblacks, respectively, coincident with notable increases in both the prevalence of viral suppression and the prevalence of ESRD risk factors including diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and hepatitis C virus coinfection. Conclusions. The risk of ESRD remains high among HIV-infected individuals in care but is declining with improvements in virologic suppression. HIV-infected black persons continue to comprise the majority of cases, as a result of higher viral loads, comorbidities, and genetic susceptibility. PMID:25409471

  3. Symptoms and Quality of Life for People Living with HIV Infection in Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    Rivero-Mendez, Marta; Portillo, Carmen; Solis-Baez, Solymar S.; Wantland, Dean; Holzemer, William L.

    2009-01-01

    Background People living with HIV infection are confronted with physical and psychological symptoms that impact their quality of life. This study explored the symptom experience of people living with HIV infection in Puerto Rico and its correlation with quality of life. Methods A cross-sectional descriptive design was used to survey 44 men, women, and transgender people living with HIV infection. Measures included a demographic questionnaire, sign and symptom checklist, and a quality of life instrument. Results The sample was 50% male with a mean age of 42.1 years; the participants had been living with HIV infection on average for 9.8 years. The top five symptoms reported by the sample included: muscle aches (81.8%), depression (77.2%), weakness (70.5%), fear/worries (70.5), and difficulty with concentration (65.9%). Symptom frequency was significantly related to four dimensions of quality of life: overall function (r=−0.58), life satisfaction (r=−0.59), health worries (r=0.32) and HIV medication worries (r=0.59). The symptom experience was not related to financial worries, disclosure worries, or sexual functioning. Individuals who reported taking HIV medications reported significantly fewer symptoms than those not taking HIV medications (t=3.061, df=42, p<0.01). Conclusions These results suggest that people living with HIV infection in Puerto Rico experience a wide array of physical and psychological symptoms and that these symptoms have a correlation with their perceived quality of life. Better management of symptoms may have an impact on perceived quality of life for people living with HIV infection. PMID:19266741

  4. Physical exercise is associated with less neurocognitive impairment among HIV-infected adults.

    PubMed

    Dufour, Catherine A; Marquine, Maria J; Fazeli, Pariya L; Henry, Brook L; Ellis, Ronald J; Grant, Igor; Moore, David J

    2013-10-01

    Neurocognitive impairment (NCI) remains prevalent in HIV infection. Randomized trials have shown that physical exercise improves NCI in non-HIV-infected adults, but data on HIV-infected populations are limited. Community-dwelling HIV-infected participants (n = 335) completed a comprehensive neurocognitive battery that was utilized to define both global and domain-specific NCI. Participants were divided into "exercise" (n = 83) and "no exercise" (n = 252) groups based on whether they self-reported engaging in any activity that increased heart rate in the last 72 h or not. We also measured and evaluated a series of potential confounding factors, including demographics, HIV disease characteristics, substance use and psychiatric comorbidities, and physical functioning. Lower rates of global NCI were observed among the exercise group (15.7 %) as compared to those in the no exercise group (31.0 %; p < 0.01). A multivariable logistic regression controlling for potential confounds (i.e., education, AIDS status, current CD4+ lymphocyte count, self-reported physical function, current depression) showed that being in the exercise group remained significantly associated with lower global NCI (odds ratio = 2.63, p < 0.05). Similar models of domain-specific NCI showed that exercise was associated with reduced impairment in working memory (p < 0.05) and speed of information processing (p < 0.05). The present findings suggest that HIV-infected adults who exercise are approximately half as likely to show NCI as compared to those who do not. Future longitudinal studies might be best suited to address causality, and intervention trials in HIV-infected individuals will determine whether exercise can prevent or ameliorate NCI in this population.

  5. Physical Exercise is Associated with Less Neurocognitive Impairment Among HIV-Infected Adults

    PubMed Central

    Dufour, Catherine A.; Marquine, Maria J.; Fazeli, Pariya L.; Henry, Brook L.; Ellis, Ronald J.; Grant, Igor; Moore, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Neurocognitive impairment (NCI) remains prevalent in HIV-infection. Randomized trials have shown that physical exercise improves NCI in non HIV-infected adults, but data on HIV-infected populations is limited. Community-dwelling HIV-infected participants (n=335) completed a comprehensive neurocognitive battery that was utilized to define both global and domain-specific NCI. Participants were divided into “Exercise” (n=83) and “No Exercise” (n=252) groups based on whether they self-reported engaging in any activity that increased heart rate in the last 72 hours or not. We also measured and evaluated a series of potential confounding factors, including demographics, HIV-disease characteristics, substance use and psychiatric comorbidities, and physical functioning. Lower rates of global NCI were observed among the Exercise group (15.7%) as compared to those in the No Exercise group (31.0%; p<.01). A multivariable logistic regression controlling for potential confounds (i.e., education, AIDS status, current CD4+ lymphocyte count, self-reported physical function, current depression) showed that being in the Exercise group remained significantly associated with lower global NCI (OR=2.63, p<.05). Similar models of domain-specific NCI showed that Exercise was associated with reduced impairment in working memory (p<.05) and speed of information processing (p<.05). The present findings suggest that HIV-infected adults who exercise are approximately half as likely to show NCI as compared to those who do not. Future longitudinal studies might be best suited to address causality and intervention trials in HIV-infected individuals will determine whether exercise can prevent or ameliorate NCI in this population. PMID:23934585

  6. Association of HIV Infection and HIV/HCV Coinfection With C-Reactive Protein Levels

    PubMed Central

    Reingold, Jason S.; Wanke, Christine; Kotler, Donald P.; Lewis, Cora E.; Tracy, Russell; Heymsfield, Steven; Tien, Phyllis C.; Bacchetti, Peter; Scherzer, Rebecca; Grunfeld, Carl; Shlipak, Michael G.

    2008-01-01

    Objective Inflammation is a potential mechanism to explain the accelerated atherosclerosis observed in HIV- and hepatitis C virus (HCV)–infected persons. We evaluated C-reactive protein (CRP) in HIV-infected and HIV/HCV-coinfected individuals in the era of effective antiretroviral (ARV) therapy. Design Cross-sectional study of Fat Redistribution and Metabolic Change in HIV Infection (FRAM) cohort and controls from the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study. Methods CRP levels were measured in 1135 HIV-infected participants from the FRAM cohort and 281 controls from the CARDIA study. The associations of HIV and HIV/HCV infection with CRP levels were estimated by multivariable linear regression. Results Compared with controls, HIV monoinfection was associated with an 88% higher CRP level in men (P < 0.0001) but with no difference in women (5%; P = 0.80) in multivariate analysis. CRP levels were not associated with ARV therapy, HIV RNA level, or CD4 cell count. Compared with controls, HIV/HCV coinfection was associated with a 41% lower CRP level in women (P = 0.012) but with no difference in men (+4%; P = 0.90). Among HIV-infected participants, HCV coinfection was associated with 50% lower CRP levels after multivariable analysis (P < 0.0001) in men and women. Greater visceral adipose tissue (VAT) and subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) were strongly associated with CRP levels. Among HIV- infected participants, CRP levels were 17% (P < 0.001) and 21% (P = 0.002) higher per doubling of VAT and SAT; among controls, CRP levels were 34% (P < 0.001) and 61% (P = 0.009) higher, respectively. Conclusions In the absence of HCV coinfection, HIV infection is associated with higher CRP levels in men. HCV coinfection is associated with lower CRP levels in men and women. PMID:18344877

  7. Bloodstream infections in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Taramasso, Lucia; Tatarelli, Paola; Di Biagio, Antonio

    2016-04-02

    In the combined antiretroviral therapy era, HIV-infected patients remain a vulnerable population for the onset of bloodstream infections (BSI). Worldwide, nontyphoid salmonellae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase negative staphylococci are the most important pathogens. Intravenous catheter associated infection, skin-soft tissue infection and endocarditis are associated with Gram-positive bacteremia. Among the Gram-negative, nontyphoidal Salmonella have been previously correlated to sepsis. Other causes of BSI in HIV-infected patients are mycobacteria and fungi. Mycobacteria constitute a major cause of BSI in limited resource countries. Fungal BSI are not frequent and among them Cryptococcus neoformans is the most common life-threatening infection. The degree of immunosuppression remains the key prognostic factor leading to the development of BSI.

  8. Bloodstream infections in HIV-infected patients

    PubMed Central

    Taramasso, Lucia; Tatarelli, Paola; Di Biagio, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In the combined antiretroviral therapy era, HIV-infected patients remain a vulnerable population for the onset of bloodstream infections (BSI). Worldwide, nontyphoid salmonellae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase negative staphylococci are the most important pathogens. Intravenous catheter associated infection, skin-soft tissue infection and endocarditis are associated with Gram-positive bacteremia. Among the Gram-negative, nontyphoidal Salmonella have been previously correlated to sepsis. Other causes of BSI in HIV-infected patients are mycobacteria and fungi. Mycobacteria constitute a major cause of BSI in limited resource countries. Fungal BSI are not frequent and among them Cryptococcus neoformans is the most common life-threatening infection. The degree of immunosuppression remains the key prognostic factor leading to the development of BSI. PMID:26950194

  9. [Problems of early detection of HIV infection, medical and psychological support of HIV-infected soldiers].

    PubMed

    Uliukin, I M; Bolekhan, V N; Iusupov, V V; Bulan'kov, Iu I; Orlova, E S

    2015-01-01

    The article contains the analysis of materials about HIV infection and the status of work on its early detection among soldiers. Currently, the figures have a tendency to stabilization, but there is an increase in the persantage of HIV-infected persons performing military service under the contract, as well as the actualization sexual way of infection. The insufficient effectiveness of the barrier screening during the laboratory examination of recruits may contribute the increase in the incidence of HIV infection. Have been reviewed the questions medical-diagnostic and medical-psychological support of HIV-infected soldiers. Been analyzed the social consequences of delays in seeking medical help of patients in this group, the opportunities and challenges of their dispensary observation. It was noted that early detection of HIV infection and proper medical and psychological support in the dynamics of pathological process helps to reduce the number of new cases and improve their outcomes and to reduce the period of efficiency recovery of military personnel.

  10. Children Who Acquire HIV Infection Perinatally Are at Higher Risk of Early Death than Those Acquiring Infection through Breastmilk: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Becquet, Renaud; Marston, Milly; Dabis, François; Moulton, Lawrence H.; Gray, Glenda; Coovadia, Hoosen M.; Essex, Max; Ekouevi, Didier K.; Jackson, Debra; Coutsoudis, Anna; Kilewo, Charles; Leroy, Valériane; Wiktor, Stefan Z.; Nduati, Ruth; Msellati, Philippe; Zaba, Basia; Ghys, Peter D.; Newell, Marie-Louise

    2012-01-01

    Background Assumptions about survival of HIV-infected children in Africa without antiretroviral therapy need to be updated to inform ongoing UNAIDS modelling of paediatric HIV epidemics among children. Improved estimates of infant survival by timing of HIV-infection (perinatally or postnatally) are thus needed. Methodology/Principal Findings A pooled analysis was conducted of individual data of all available intervention cohorts and randomized trials on prevention of HIV mother-to-child transmission in Africa. Studies were right-censored at the time of infant antiretroviral initiation. Overall mortality rate per 1000 child-years of follow-up was calculated by selected maternal and infant characteristics. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate survival curves by child's HIV infection status and timing of HIV infection. Individual data from 12 studies were pooled, with 12,112 children of HIV-infected women. Mortality rates per 1,000 child-years follow-up were 39.3 and 381.6 for HIV-uninfected and infected children respectively. One year after acquisition of HIV infection, an estimated 26% postnatally and 52% perinatally infected children would have died; and 4% uninfected children by age 1 year. Mortality was independently associated with maternal death (adjusted hazard ratio 2.2, 95%CI 1.6–3.0), maternal CD4<350 cells/ml (1.4, 1.1–1.7), postnatal (3.1, 2.1–4.1) or peri-partum HIV-infection (12.4, 10.1–15.3). Conclusions/Results These results update previous work and inform future UNAIDS modelling by providing survival estimates for HIV-infected untreated African children by timing of infection. We highlight the urgent need for the prevention of peri-partum and postnatal transmission and timely assessment of HIV infection in infants to initiate antiretroviral care and support for HIV-infected children. PMID:22383946

  11. Fatal disseminated toxoplasmosis during primary HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Signorini, Liana; Gulletta, Maurizio; Coppini, Davide; Donzelli, Carla; Stellini, Roberto; Manca, Nino; Carosi, Giampiero; Matteelli, Alberto

    2007-03-01

    Toxoplasmosis is a well recognized manifestation of AIDS, but the disseminated disease is a rare condition and it has not been associated to HIV seroconversion to our knowledge. We describe a fatal episode of disseminated T. gondii acute infection with massive organ involvement during primary HIV infection. The serological data demonstrate primary T. gondii infection. The avidity index for HIV antibodies supports recent HIV-1 infection.

  12. Bacterial infections in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Berger, B J; Hussain, F; Roistacher, K

    1994-06-01

    Although the original opportunistic pathogens described in AIDS were protozoal and fungal organisms, bacterial infections are now recognized with increased prevalence and altered expression in patients with HIV infection. Especially since populations outside of North America and populations of i.v. drug abusers have been studied, bacterial infections have been shown to cause substantially increased morbidity and mortality both early and late in the course of HIV infection. Just as strategies have been developed for primary and secondary prophylaxis of classical HIV-related opportunistic infections, prevention of bacterial complications should be a high priority. Good hygiene and avoidance of unsterile needles in illicit drug use, tattooing, ear-piercing, or other cosmetic or ritual activities should be emphasized in patient education. Patients should be counseled to avoid uncooked or poorly cooked eggs and poultry and to avoid unpasteurized milk products. Pneumococcal vaccine is recommended for all HIV-seropositive patients and should be given as early as possible after recognition of HIV infection for maximal efficacy. Influenza vaccine is also recommended. It may have a role in preventing bacterial pneumonia secondary to influenza. Patient management should include regular dental care and nutritional evaluation. The use of intravenous or central catheters should be limited to essential therapies. When patients present with new febrile illness, a high index of suspicion for invasive bacterial disease is appropriate. The signs of serious bacterial infection in HIV-positive patients are subtle. Diagnostic evaluation should include cultures of blood and other relevant clinical specimens. Empiric antimicrobial therapy based on the clinical presentation may be life saving in patients with invasive bacterial disease complicating HIV infection.

  13. Evaluation of five conventional and molecular approaches for diagnosis of cryptococcal meningitis in non-HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Chen, Min; Zhou, Jie; Li, Juan; Li, Meng; Sun, Jun; Fang, Wen J; Al-Hatmi, Abdullah M S; Xu, Jianping; Boekhout, Teun; Liao, Wan Q; Pan, Wei H

    2016-08-01

    Cryptococcal meningitis (CM) is a life-threatening mycosis primarily occurring in HIV-infected individuals. Recently, non-HIV-infected hosts were increasingly reported to form a considerable proportion. However, the majority of the reported studies on the diagnosis of CM patients were performed on HIV-infected patients. For evaluation of various diagnostic approaches for CM in non-HIV-infected patients, a range of conventional and molecular assays used for diagnosis of CM were verified on 85 clinical CSFs from non-HIV-infected CM patients, including India ink staining, culture, a newly developed loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP), the lateral flow assay (LFA) of cryptococcal antigen detection and a qPCR assay. The LFA had the highest positive detection rate (97.6%; 95% CI, 91.8-99.7%) in non-HIV-infected CM patients, followed by the LAMP (87.1%; 95% CI, 78.0-93.4%), the qPCR (80.0%; 95% CI, 69.9-87.9%), India ink staining (70.6%; 95% CI, 59.7-80.0%) and culture (35.3%; 95% CI, 25.2-46.4%). All culture positive specimens were correctly identified by the LFA.

  14. [HIV infection and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome].

    PubMed

    Takamatsu, J

    1997-05-01

    On June 4, 1981, MMWR published a report about Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in homosexual men in Los Angeles. This was the first published report. A years later, this disease was named acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). In the following year, Montangier et al in France discovered the causative agent, which they called lymphadenopathy virus (LAV), now known as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). In 1985, solid-phase enzymeimmunoassay for the detection of the antibody to HIV was developed. Since then, other new techniques for the identification of HIV infection have been become available. These include more sensitive methods (for example; polymerase chain reaction techniques). Although these techniques facilitate early and definite diagnosis of infection, these tests may fail to detect the antibody in sera during window period of infection or overdiagnose infection in sera contaminated with genes not related to HIV. Although preventing blood exposure is the primary means of preventing occupationally acquired human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, appropriate post-exposure management is an important element of workplace safety. Information suggesting that zidovudine (ZDV) postexposure prophylaxis (PEP) may reduce the risk for HIV transmission after occupational exposure to HIV infected blood prompted a Public Health Service (PHS) interagency working group, with expert consultation, and recommendations on PEP and management of occupational exposure to HIV in relation to these findings were discussed.

  15. Fosamprenavir calcium plus ritonavir for HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Torres, Harrys A; Arduino, Roberto C

    2007-06-01

    Fosamprenavir is a protease inhibitor (PI) approved for the treatment of HIV-1 infection. Fosamprenavir is a prodrug of amprenavir developed to reduce the pill burden yet maintain the unique resistance pattern and efficacy associated with amprenavir. In a head-to-head, noninferiority trial in antiretroviral treatment-naive HIV-infected patients, the antiviral efficacy and tolerability of ritonavir-boosted fosamprenavir was not inferior to ritonavir-boosted lopinavir, when the PIs were combined with two other nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors. There are fewer studies published about fosamprenavir use in antiretroviral treatment-experienced HIV-infected patients. The high genetic barrier to the development of resistance to fosamprenavir and the low level of cross-resistance between ritonavir-boosted fosamprenavir and other PI regimens are notable. As with amprenavir, gastrointestinal disturbance and rash are the most frequent short-term treatment-limiting events with fosamprenavir. Treatment with ritonavir-boosted fosamprenavir can produce a durable response. To date, fosamprenavir is one of the recommended preferred PI components for the treatment of antiretroviral-naive HIV-infected patients.

  16. Projection of HIV infection in Calcutta.

    PubMed

    Basu, A; Basu, S; Chakraborty, M S; Dewanji, A; Ghosh, J K; Majumder, P P

    1998-04-01

    Starting with the base year of 1991, the HIV infection projection for 1992-99 for the total, as well as various high-risk sub-populations of Calcutta, the first of its kind is provided. These projections are based on statistical methodology developed in this paper. Our methodology for spread of HIV infection takes into account various social interactions and practices and also uses available data. Rates of these interactions and practices and estimates of demographic parameters used in making projections were obtained primarily from surveys and census data. Since one of these estimated rates, that of HIV transmission rate through heterosexual encounters between an infected and an uninfected had a large range, we have provided two sets of projections based on the largest of these rates (worst-case scenario) and another that is consistent with the available data. The total projection of the number of HIV infected cases in Calcutta for 1999 is between 49,000 and 1,26,000. Separate projections are also provided for high-risk sub-groups. Among these, the sex workers expectedly will continue to manifest the highest numbers of newly infected cases. The temporal rate of increase in prevalence is projected to be alarmingly higher in the general population than even among sex workers, although the actual prevalence will continue to be the lowest in the general population compared to all other sub-groups of the population.

  17. Reversible Reprogramming of Circulating Memory T Follicular Helper Cell Function during Chronic HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Cubas, Rafael; van Grevenynghe, Julien; Wills, Saintedym; Kardava, Lela; Santich, Brian H.; Buckner, Clarisa M.; Muir, Roshell; Tardif, Virginie; Nichols, Carmen; Procopio, Francesco; He, Zhong; Metcalf, Talibah; Ghneim, Khader; Locci, Michela; Ancuta, Petronella; Routy, Jean-Pierre; Trautmann, Lydie; Li, Yuxing; McDermott, Adrian B.; Koup, Rick A.; Petrovas, Constantinos; Migueles, Steven A.; Connors, Mark; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Moir, Susan; Crotty, Shane

    2015-01-01

    Despite the overwhelming benefits of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in curtailing viral load in HIV-infected individuals, ART does not fully restore cellular and humoral immunity. HIV-infected individuals under ART show reduced responses to vaccination and infections and are unable to mount an effective antiviral immune response upon ART cessation. Many factors contribute to these defects, including persistent inflammation, especially in lymphoid tissues, where T follicular helper (Tfh) cells instruct and help B cells launch an effective humoral immune response. In this study we investigated the phenotype and function of circulating memory Tfh cells as a surrogate of Tfh cells in lymph nodes and found significant impairment of this cell population in chronically HIV-infected individuals, leading to reduced B cell responses. We further show that these aberrant memory Tfh cells exhibit an IL-2–responsive gene signature and are more polarized toward a Th1 phenotype. Treatment of functional memory Tfh cells with IL-2 was able to recapitulate the detrimental reprogramming. Importantly, this defect was reversible, as interfering with the IL-2 signaling pathway helped reverse the abnormal differentiation and improved Ab responses. Thus, reversible reprogramming of memory Tfh cells in HIV-infected individuals could be used to enhance Ab responses. Altered microenvironmental conditions in lymphoid tissues leading to altered Tfh cell differentiation could provide one explanation for the poor responsiveness of HIV-infected individuals to new Ags. This explanation has important implications for the development of therapeutic interventions to enhance HIV- and vaccine-mediated Ab responses in patients under ART. PMID:26546609

  18. Reversible Reprogramming of Circulating Memory T Follicular Helper Cell Function during Chronic HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Cubas, Rafael; van Grevenynghe, Julien; Wills, Saintedym; Kardava, Lela; Santich, Brian H; Buckner, Clarisa M; Muir, Roshell; Tardif, Virginie; Nichols, Carmen; Procopio, Francesco; He, Zhong; Metcalf, Talibah; Ghneim, Khader; Locci, Michela; Ancuta, Petronella; Routy, Jean-Pierre; Trautmann, Lydie; Li, Yuxing; McDermott, Adrian B; Koup, Rick A; Petrovas, Constantinos; Migueles, Steven A; Connors, Mark; Tomaras, Georgia D; Moir, Susan; Crotty, Shane; Haddad, Elias K

    2015-12-15

    Despite the overwhelming benefits of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in curtailing viral load in HIV-infected individuals, ART does not fully restore cellular and humoral immunity. HIV-infected individuals under ART show reduced responses to vaccination and infections and are unable to mount an effective antiviral immune response upon ART cessation. Many factors contribute to these defects, including persistent inflammation, especially in lymphoid tissues, where T follicular helper (Tfh) cells instruct and help B cells launch an effective humoral immune response. In this study we investigated the phenotype and function of circulating memory Tfh cells as a surrogate of Tfh cells in lymph nodes and found significant impairment of this cell population in chronically HIV-infected individuals, leading to reduced B cell responses. We further show that these aberrant memory Tfh cells exhibit an IL-2-responsive gene signature and are more polarized toward a Th1 phenotype. Treatment of functional memory Tfh cells with IL-2 was able to recapitulate the detrimental reprogramming. Importantly, this defect was reversible, as interfering with the IL-2 signaling pathway helped reverse the abnormal differentiation and improved Ab responses. Thus, reversible reprogramming of memory Tfh cells in HIV-infected individuals could be used to enhance Ab responses. Altered microenvironmental conditions in lymphoid tissues leading to altered Tfh cell differentiation could provide one explanation for the poor responsiveness of HIV-infected individuals to new Ags. This explanation has important implications for the development of therapeutic interventions to enhance HIV- and vaccine-mediated Ab responses in patients under ART.

  19. Coinfection with herpesviruses in young children of HIV-infected women.

    PubMed

    Sever, J L; Rakusan, T A; Ellaurie, M; Frenkel, N; Wyatt, L S; Campos, J M; O'Donnell, R M; Price, M V

    1995-04-01

    Coinfection with herpesviruses in young children born to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected women was studied with blood samples from children who were 9-12 months and 15-24 months of age. Three groups of children were included: (I) HIV-uninfected, asymptomatic (HIV-); (II) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and/or culture-positive and asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic (HIV+ asymptomatic); and (III) PCR and/or culture-positive and symptomatic (HIV+ symptomatic). Significantly more of the HIV+ symptomatic patients had cytomegalovirus (CMV) antibody than the HIV patients. In addition, CMV antibody levels were significantly higher in the HIV+ symptomatic patients than in either of the other two groups. Human herpesvirus 7 (HHV-7) antibody titers were significantly different among the three groups of patients; however, no pairwise comparisons were significant. No differences were found for HHV-6 or Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) antibody frequencies or titers. These findings suggest that infection with CMV is a cofactor or an opportunistic infection causing symptomatic HIV infections in young children.

  20. [Prevalence of HIV infection in patients with pellagra and pellagra-like erythemas].

    PubMed

    Pitche, P; Kombate, K; Tchangai-Walla, K

    1999-01-01

    Pellagra is a systemic disorder caused by severe niacin deficiency. While uncommon in Europe and North America, pellagra and pellagra-like erythema are frequently encountered in undernourished adults in poor African countries. The purpose of this three-year prospective study was to determine the prevalence of HIV infection in patients with pellagra. Between 1996 and 1998, all documented cases of pellagra and pellagra-like erythema diagnosed in the Dermatology Department and Internal Medicine Department of the Teaching Hospital in Lome, Togo were included. Patients underwent screening tests for HIV infection. During the study period, pellagra or pellagra-like erythema was diagnosed in a total of 108 patients (59 women and 49 men) with a mean age of 41 +/- 3.5 years (range, 18 to 68 years). Serology tests for HIV were positive in 6 of these patients (5.5 p. 100; mean age 35 years). In four asymptomatic patients with no opportunistic infection, detection of HIV was an incidental discovery. The other two patients had AIDS symptoms. The principal causes of pellagra were malnutrition (n = 30), alcoholism (n = 15), and combined malnutrition and alcoholism (n = 60). The findings of this study suggest that the incidence of HIV infection in patients with pellagra and pellagra-like erythema is low, i.e., not higher than in the general population. This study also confirms previous etiologic and epidemiological data concerning pellagra in poor countries, i.e., the preponderant role of nutritional deficiency.

  1. Are Time- and Event-based Prospective Memory Comparably Affected in HIV Infection?†

    PubMed Central

    Zogg, Jennifer B.; Woods, Steven Paul; Weber, Erica; Doyle, Katie; Grant, Igor; Atkinson, J. Hampton; Ellis, Ronald J.; McCutchan, J. Allen; Marcotte, Thomas D.; Hale, Braden R.; Ellis, Ronald J.; McCutchan, J. Allen; Letendre, Scott; Capparelli, Edmund; Schrier, Rachel; Heaton, Robert K.; Cherner, Mariana; Moore, David J.; Jernigan, Terry; Fennema-Notestine, Christine; Archibald, Sarah L.; Hesselink, John; Annese, Jacopo; Taylor, Michael J.; Masliah, Eliezer; Everall, Ian; Langford, T. Dianne; Richman, Douglas; Smith, David M.; McCutchan, J. Allen; Everall, Ian; Lipton, Stuart; McCutchan, J. Allen; Atkinson, J. Hampton; Ellis, Ronald J.; Letendre, Scott; Atkinson, J. Hampton; von Jaeger, Rodney; Gamst, Anthony C.; Cushman, Clint; Masys, Daniel R.; Abramson, Ian; Ake, Christopher; Vaida, Florin

    2011-01-01

    According to the multi-process theory of prospective memory (ProM), time-based tasks rely more heavily on strategic processes dependent on prefrontal systems than do event-based tasks. Given the prominent frontostriatal pathophysiology of HIV infection, one would expect HIV-infected individuals to demonstrate greater deficits in time-based versus event-based ProM. However, the two prior studies examining this question have produced variable results. We evaluated this hypothesis in 143 individuals with HIV infection and 43 demographically similar seronegative adults (HIV−) who completed the research version of the Memory for Intentions Screening Test, which yields parallel subscales of time- and event-based ProM. Results showed main effects of HIV serostatus and cue type, but no interaction between serostatus and cue. Planned pair-wise comparisons showed a significant effect of HIV on time-based ProM and a trend-level effect on event-based ProM that was driven primarily by the subset of participants with HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. Nevertheless, time-based ProM was more strongly correlated with measures of executive functions, attention/working memory, and verbal fluency in HIV-infected persons. Although HIV-associated deficits in time- and event-based ProM appear to be of comparable severity, the cognitive architecture of time-based ProM may be more strongly influenced by strategic monitoring and retrieval processes. PMID:21459901

  2. B-cell activation in HIV infection: relationship of spontaneous immunoglobulin secretion to various immunological parameters.

    PubMed Central

    Mizuma, H; Litwin, S; Zolla-Pazner, S

    1988-01-01

    Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from HIV-infected individuals spontaneously secrete elevated levels of IgG, IgM and IgD. This increased level of synthesis and secretion is similar in HIV-infected subjects with no or few symptoms, in ARC patients and in AIDS patients. Thus, abnormal B-cell activation is characteristic of patients with mild as well as severe manifestations of HIV infection. The level of spontaneous cellular secretion of IgG, IgM and IgD correlates with serum levels of these isotypes. Levels of spontaneous cellular secretion of IgG and IgM correlate negatively with the percentage but not with the absolute number of T4-positive cells and correlate positively with the percentage but not with the absolute number of T8-positive cells. The data suggest that the proportional distribution of these T-cell subsets is a critical factor in the B-cell dysregulation leading to overproduction of IgG and IgM. On the other hand, spontaneous IgD secretion correlates with neither the percent nor the absolute number of T4 or T8 cells suggesting that the increase of IgD-secretion by B cells is independent of the T-cell defects. The data imply that more than one mechanism underlies the B-cell activation in HIV-infected individuals. PMID:3260155

  3. The cerebrospinal fluid proteome in HIV infection: change associated with disease severity.

    SciTech Connect

    Angel, Thomas E.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Spudich, Serena S.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Fuchs, Dietmar; Liegler, Teri; Zetterberg, Henrik; Camp, David G.; Price, Richard W.; Smith, Richard D.

    2012-03-20

    Central nervous system (CNS) infection is a constant feature of systemic HIV infection with a clinical spectrum that ranges from chronic asymptomatic infection to severe cognitive and motor dysfunction. Analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) has played an important part in defining the character of this evolving infection and response to treatment. To further characterize CNS HIV infection and its effects, we applied advanced high-throughput proteomic methods to CSF to identify novel proteins and their changes with disease progression and treatment. After establishing an accurate mass and time (AMT) tag database containing 23,141 AMT tags for CSF peptides, we analyzed 91 CSF samples by LC-MS from 12 HIV-uninfected and 14 HIV-infected subjects studied in the context of initiation of antiretroviral and correlated abundances of identified proteins (a) within and between subjects, (b) with all other proteins across the entire sample set, and (c) with 'external' CSF biomarkers of infection (HIV RNA), immune activation (neopterin) and neural injury (neurofilament light chain protein, NFL). We identified a mean of 2,333 +/- 328 (SD) peptides covering 307 +/-16 proteins in the 91 CSF sample set. Protein abundances differed both between and within subjects sampled at different time points and readily separated those with and without HIV infection. Proteins also showed inter-correlations across the sample set that were associated with biologically relevant dynamic processes. One-hundred and fifty proteins showed correlations with the external biomarkers. For example, using a threshold of cross correlation coefficient (Pearson's) {le}0.3 and {ge}0.3 for potentially meaningful relationships, a total of 99 proteins correlated with CSF neopterin (43 negative and 56 positive correlations) and related principally to neuronal plasticity and survival and to innate immunity. Pathway analysis defined several networks connecting the identified proteins, including one with amyloid

  4. Peripheral T Follicular Helper Cells Are the Major HIV Reservoir within Central Memory CD4 T Cells in Peripheral Blood from Chronically HIV-Infected Individuals on Combination Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Pallikkuth, Suresh; Sharkey, Mark; Babic, Dunja Z.; Gupta, Sachin; Stone, Geoffrey W.; Fischl, Margaret A.; Stevenson, Mario

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT In this study, we examined the peripheral blood (PB) central memory (TCM) CD4+ T cell subsets designated peripheral T follicular helper cells (pTfh cells) and non-pTfh cells to assess HIV permissiveness and persistence. Purified pTfh and non-pTfh cells from healthy HIV-negative donors were tested for HIV permissiveness using green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing HIV-1NL4-3/Ba-L, followed by viral reactivation using beads coated with anti-CD3/anti-CD28 monoclonal antibodies. The role of pTfh cells in HIV persistence was analyzed in 12 chronically HIV-1 infected patients before and 48 weeks after initiation of raltegravir-containing combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). Total cellular HIV-1 DNA and episomes containing two copies of the viral long terminal repeat (2LTR circles) were analyzed in using droplet digital PCR in the purified pTfh and non-pTfh cells. Activation-inducible HIV p24 expression was determined by flow cytometry. Results indicate that pTfh cells, in particular PD1+ pTfh cells, showed greater permissiveness for HIV infection than non-pTfh cells. At week 48 on cART, HIV DNA levels were unchanged from pre-cART levels, although a significant decrease in 2LTR circles was observed in both cell subsets. Inducible HIV p24 expression was higher in pTfh cells than in non-pTfh cells, with the highest frequencies in the PD1+ CXCR3− pTfh cell subset. Frequencies of HLADR+ CD38+ activated CD4 T cells correlated with 2LTR circles in pTfh and non-pTfh cells at both time points and with p24+ cells at entry. In conclusion, among CD4 TCM cells in PB of aviremic patients on cART, pTfh cells, in particular the PD1+ CXCR3− subset, constitute a major HIV reservoir that is sustained by ongoing residual immune activation. The inducible HIV p24 assay is useful for monitoring HIV reservoirs in defined CD4 T cell subsets. IMPORTANCE Identification of the type and nature of the cellular compartments of circulating HIV reservoirs is important for

  5. Stem-Cell-Based Gene Therapy for HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhen, Anjie; Kitchen, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Despite the enormous success of combined anti-retroviral therapy, HIV infection is still a lifelong disease and continues to spread rapidly worldwide. There is a pressing need to develop a treatment that will cure HIV infection. Recent progress in stem cell manipulation and advancements in humanized mouse models have allowed rapid developments of gene therapy for HIV treatment. In this review, we will discuss two aspects of HIV gene therapy using human hematopoietic stem cells. The first is to generate immune systems resistant to HIV infection while the second strategy involves enhancing anti-HIV immunity to eliminate HIV infected cells. PMID:24368413

  6. Stem-cell-based gene therapy for HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Anjie; Kitchen, Scott

    2013-12-24

    Despite the enormous success of combined anti-retroviral therapy, HIV infection is still a lifelong disease and continues to spread rapidly worldwide. There is a pressing need to develop a treatment that will cure HIV infection. Recent progress in stem cell manipulation and advancements in humanized mouse models have allowed rapid developments of gene therapy for HIV treatment. In this review, we will discuss two aspects of HIV gene therapy using human hematopoietic stem cells. The first is to generate immune systems resistant to HIV infection while the second strategy involves enhancing anti-HIV immunity to eliminate HIV infected cells.

  7. Low-level Viremia Early in HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Iris; Cummings, Vanessa; Fogel, Jessica M.; Marzinke, Mark A.; Clarke, William; Connor, Matthew B.; Griffith, Sam; Buchbinder, Susan; Shoptaw, Steven; del Rio, Carlos; Magnus, Manya; Mannheimer, Sharon; Wheeler, Darrell P.; Mayer, Kenneth H.; Koblin, Beryl A.; Eshleman, Susan H.

    2014-01-01

    HIV RNA levels are usually high early in HIV infection. In the HPTN 061 study, men were tested for HIV infection every six months; six (21.4%) of 28 men who acquired HIV infection during the study had low or undetectable HIV RNA at the time of HIV diagnosis. Antiretroviral drugs were not detected at the time of HIV diagnosis. False-negative HIV test results were obtained for two men using multiple assays. Antiretroviral drug resistance mutations were detected in HIV from one man. Additional studies are needed to identify factors associated with low HIV RNA levels during early HIV infection. PMID:25140905

  8. Induction of Gag-Specific CD4 T Cell Responses during Acute HIV Infection Is Associated with Improved Viral Control

    PubMed Central

    Schieffer, Miriam; Jessen, Heiko K.; Oster, Alexander F.; Pissani, Franco; Soghoian, Damien Z.; Lu, Richard; Jessen, Arne B.; Zedlack, Carmen; Schultz, Bruce T.; Davis, Isaiah; Ranasinghe, Srinika; Rosenberg, Eric S.; Alter, Galit; Schumann, Ralf R.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Effector CD4 T cell responses have been shown to be critically involved in the containment and clearance of viral pathogens. However, their involvement in the pathogenesis of HIV infection is less clear, given their additional role as preferred viral targets. We previously demonstrated that the presence of HIV-specific CD4 T cell responses is somewhat associated with HIV control and that specific CD4 T cell functions, such as direct cytolytic activity, can contribute to control of HIV viremia. However, little is known about how the induction of HIV-specific CD4 T cell responses during acute HIV infection influences disease progression and whether responses induced during the early phase of infection are preferentially depleted. We therefore longitudinally assessed, in a cohort of 55 acutely HIV-infected individuals, HIV-specific CD4 T cell responses from acute to chronic infection. Interestingly, we found that the breadth, magnitude, and protein dominance of HIV-specific CD4 T cell responses remained remarkably stable over time. Moreover, we found that the epitopes targeted at a high frequency in acute HIV infection were recognized at the same frequency by HIV-specific CD4 T cells in chronic HIV infection. Interestingly the induction of Gag-specific CD4 T cell responses in acute HIV infection was significantly inversely correlated with viral set point in chronic HIV infection (R = −0.5; P = 0.03), while the cumulative contribution of Env-specific CD4 T cell responses showed the reverse effect. Moreover, individuals with HIV-specific CD4 T cell responses dominantly targeting Gag over Env in acute HIV infection remained off antiretroviral therapy significantly longer (P = 0.03; log rank). Thus, our data suggest that the induction of HIV-specific CD4 T cell responses during acute HIV infection is beneficial overall and does not fuel disease progression. IMPORTANCE CD4 T cells are critical for the clearance and control of viral infections. However, HIV

  9. Autonomic dysfunction independently predicts poor cardiovascular outcomes in asymptomatic individuals with type 2 diabetes in the DIAD study

    PubMed Central

    Wackers, Frans JTh; Inzucchi, Silvio E; Jose, Powell; Weiss, Curtis; Davey, Janice A; Heller, Gary V; Iskandrian, Ami E; Young, Lawrence H

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The primary aim of this secondary analysis was to determine whether cardiac autonomic neuropathy independently predicted adverse cardiac outcomes in asymptomatic individuals with type 2 diabetes. Additional aims include the determination of the correlation of standard autonomic testing measures and power spectral analysis of heart rate variability, and the association of diabetes-related and cardiac risk factors with cardiac autonomic neuropathy measures. Methods: Cardiac autonomic neuropathy was assessed at the study entry into the Detection of Ischemia in Asymptomatic Diabetics study, using autonomic heart rate and blood pressure testing, and power spectral analysis of heart rate variability. All participants were prospectively followed for the composite clinical outcome of cardiac death, acute coronary syndromes, heart failure, or coronary revascularization. Results: Over 5 years of follow-up, 94 of 1119 (8.4%) subjects developed symptomatic cardiac disease. In unadjusted bivariate analyses, abnormalities in several cardiac autonomic neuropathy tests, including lower Valsalva and Standing Heart Rate Ratios, higher resting Heart Rate, greater systolic blood pressure decrease on standing, and lower low-frequency power, were predictive of symptomatic disease. Independent predictors of poor cardiac outcome were a lower Valsalva Heart Rate Ratio, non-Black ethnicity, longer diabetes duration, higher glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), insulin use, reported numbness in the extremities, higher pulse pressure, family history of coronary artery disease, and higher waist-to-hip ratio. Clinical factors independently associated with a lower Valsalva Heart Rate Ratio were insulin use, clinical proteinuria, higher pulse pressure, use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor and non-Black ethnicity. Conclusion: Cardiac autonomic neuropathy predicted adverse cardiac outcomes in asymptomatic type 2 diabetes without known cardiac disease. Clinical variables may help to

  10. Antiretroviral Drugs for Treatment and Prevention of HIV Infection in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Günthard, Huldrych F.; Saag, Michael S.; Benson, Constance A.; del Rio, Carlos; Eron, Joseph J.; Gallant, Joel E.; Hoy, Jennifer F.; Mugavero, Michael J.; Sax, Paul E.; Thompson, Melanie A.; Gandhi, Rajesh T.; Landovitz, Raphael J.; Smith, Davey M.; Jacobsen, Donna M.; Volberding, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE New data and therapeutic options warrant updated recommendations for the use of antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) to treat or to prevent HIV infection in adults. OBJECTIVE To provide updated recommendations for the use of antiretroviral therapy in adults (aged ≥18 years) with established HIV infection, including when to start treatment, initial regimens, and changing regimens, along with recommendations for using ARVs for preventing HIV among those at risk, including preexposure and postexposure prophylaxis. EVIDENCE REVIEW A panel of experts in HIV research and patient care convened by the International Antiviral Society-USA reviewed data published in peer-reviewed journals, presented by regulatory agencies, or presented as conference abstracts at peer-reviewed scientific conferences since the 2014 report, for new data or evidence that would change previous recommendations or their ratings. Comprehensive literature searches were conducted in the PubMed and EMBASE databases through April 2016. Recommendations were by consensus, and each recommendation was rated by strength and quality of the evidence. FINDINGS Newer data support the widely accepted recommendation that antiretroviral therapy should be started in all individuals with HIV infection with detectable viremia regardless of CD4 cell count. Recommended optimal initial regimens for most patients are 2 nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) plus an integrase strand transfer inhibitor (InSTI). Other effective regimens include nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors or boosted protease inhibitors with 2 NRTIs. Recommendations for special populations and in the settings of opportunistic infections and concomitant conditions are provided. Reasons for switching therapy include convenience, tolerability, simplification, anticipation of potential new drug interactions, pregnancy or plans for pregnancy, elimination of food restrictions, virologic failure, or drug toxicities. Laboratory

  11. Individualized Follow-up of Pregnant Women with Asymptomatic Autoimmune Thyroid Disease.

    PubMed

    Stoian, Dana; Pantea, Stelian; Margan, Madalin; Timar, Bogdan; Borcan, Florin; Craina, Marius; Craciunescu, Mihaela

    2016-01-12

    Maternal hormones are essential for the normal fetal development during pregnancy. Autoimmune thyroid disease is a frequent pathology in our iodine replete region. The aim of this study is to evaluate the occurrence of subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH) in cases with known autoimmune thyroid disease, which were in a euthyroid state prior to pregnancy, and to assess the association between supplemental treatments administered and the outcome of the pregnancy. The study is a prospective interventional controlled study. The two cohorts comprise the interventional group, consisting of 109 pregnant women with known autoimmune asymptomatic thyroid disease, without any levothyroxine (LT4) treatment and an aged-matched control group, with an unknown thyroid disease. After the pregnancy, a monthly evaluation of TSH, FT3, and FT4 was performed. Offspring evaluation was made at birth time. 88.8% of the women developed SCH in the first four weeks of pregnancy. Average LT4 doses increased as the pregnancy progressed. The monthly adjustment was 12.5 or 25 μg. All SCH cases developed in the first trimester of pregnancy. There was no significant difference regarding the gestational week, weight, or length at birth between the interventional group and controls, when TSH values were in the optimal range, during the whole pregnancy. Premature birth was described in one case in the interventional group.

  12. Individualized Follow-up of Pregnant Women with Asymptomatic Autoimmune Thyroid Disease

    PubMed Central

    Stoian, Dana; Pantea, Stelian; Margan, Madalin; Timar, Bogdan; Borcan, Florin; Craina, Marius; Craciunescu, Mihaela

    2016-01-01

    Maternal hormones are essential for the normal fetal development during pregnancy. Autoimmune thyroid disease is a frequent pathology in our iodine replete region. The aim of this study is to evaluate the occurrence of subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH) in cases with known autoimmune thyroid disease, which were in a euthyroid state prior to pregnancy, and to assess the association between supplemental treatments administered and the outcome of the pregnancy. The study is a prospective interventional controlled study. The two cohorts comprise the interventional group, consisting of 109 pregnant women with known autoimmune asymptomatic thyroid disease, without any levothyroxine (LT4) treatment and an aged-matched control group, with an unknown thyroid disease. After the pregnancy, a monthly evaluation of TSH, FT3, and FT4 was performed. Offspring evaluation was made at birth time. 88.8% of the women developed SCH in the first four weeks of pregnancy. Average LT4 doses increased as the pregnancy progressed. The monthly adjustment was 12.5 or 25 μg. All SCH cases developed in the first trimester of pregnancy. There was no significant difference regarding the gestational week, weight, or length at birth between the interventional group and controls, when TSH values were in the optimal range, during the whole pregnancy. Premature birth was described in one case in the interventional group. PMID:26771604

  13. The Fc and not CD4 Receptor Mediates Antibody Enhancement of HIV Infection in Human Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homsy, Jacques; Meyer, Mia; Tateno, Masatoshi; Clarkson, Sarah; Levy, Jay A.

    1989-06-01

    Antibodies that enhance human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infectivity have been found in the blood of infected individuals and in infected or immunized animals. These findings raise serious concern for the development of a safe vaccine against acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. To address the in vivo relevance and mechanism of this phenomenon, antibody-dependent enhancement of HIV infectivity in peripheral blood macrophages, lymphocytes, and human fibroblastoid cells was studied. Neither Leu3a, a monoclonal antibody directed against the CD4 receptor, nor soluble recombinant CD4 even at high concentrations prevented this enhancement. The addition of monoclonal antibody to the Fc receptor III (anti-FcRIII), but not of antibodies that react with FcRI or FcRII, inhibited HIV type 1 and HIV type 2 enhancement in peripheral blood macrophages. Although enhancement of HIV infection in CD4+ lymphocytes could not be blocked by anti-FcRIII, it was inhibited by the addition of human immunoglobulin G aggregates. The results indicate that the FcRIII receptor on human macrophages and possibly another Fc receptor on human CD4+ lymphocytes mediate antibody-dependent enhancement of HIV infectivity and that this phenomenon proceeds through a mechanism independent of the CD4 protein.

  14. Fatigue in HIV-Infected People: A Three-Year Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Barroso, Julie; Leserman, Jane; Harmon, James L.; Hammill, Bradley; Pence, Brian W.

    2015-01-01

    Context HIV-related fatigue remains the most frequent complaint of seropositive patients. Objectives To describe the natural course of fatigue in HIV infection, in a sample (n=128) followed for a three-year period. Methods A longitudinal prospective design was used to determine what factors influenced changes in fatigue intensity and fatigue-related impairment of functioning in a community-dwelling sample of HIV-infected individuals. Participants were followed every six months for a three-year period. At each study visit, we collected data on a large number of physiological and psychosocial markers that have been shown to be related to fatigue in HIV-infected people. At three-month intervals between study visits, we collected data on fatigue via mailed questionnaires. Results Fatigue in HIV infection is largely a result of stressful life events, and is closely tied to the anxiety and depression that accompany such events. Fatigue did not remit spontaneously over the course of the study, indicating the need for interventions to ameliorate this debilitating symptom. Conclusion Intervening to help people who are suffering from HIV-related fatigue to deal with stressful life events may help to ameliorate this debilitating symptom. PMID:25701691

  15. The role of enacted stigma in parental HIV disclosure among HIV-infected parents in China

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Shan; Li, Xiaoming; Zhou, Yuejiao; Shen, Zhiyong; Tang, Zhenzhu; Stanton, Bonita

    2015-01-01

    Existing studies have delineated that HIV-infected parents face numerous challenges in disclosing their HIV infection to the children (“parental HIV disclosure”), and practices of parental HIV disclosure vary with individual characteristics, family contexts, and social environment. Using cross-sectional data from 1254 HIV-infected parents who had children aged 5–16 years in southwest China, the current study examined the association of parental HIV disclosure with mental health and medication adherence among parents and explored the possible effect of enacted stigma on such association. Multivariate analysis of variance revealed that parents who had experienced disclosure to children reported higher level enacted stigma, worse mental health conditions, and poorer medication adherence. Enacted stigma partially mediated the associations between disclosure and both mental health and medication adherence after controlling basic background characteristics. Our findings highlight the importance of providing appropriate disclosure-related training and counseling service among HIV-infected parents. In a social setting where HIV-related stigma is still persistent, disclosure intervention should address and reduce stigma and discrimination in the practice of parental HIV disclosure. PMID:26616123

  16. Obesity Is Not Associated with Impaired Immune Response to Influenza Vaccination in HIV-Infected Persons

    PubMed Central

    Gowda, Charitha; McKittrick, Noah; Kim, Deborah; Kappes, Rosemarie A.; Lo Re, Vincent; Tebas, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. HIV-infected individuals demonstrate lower immunogenicity to the influenza vaccine, despite immunologic and virologic control of HIV infection. Obesity has been previously shown to be associated with diminished antibody responses to other vaccines in HIV-uninfected persons. However, no studies have examined if obesity is associated with diminished protective immune response to influenza vaccination among HIV-infected persons on antiretroviral therapy (ART). Methods. We performed a retrospective analysis of immunogenicity data from a clinical trial of inactivated, trivalent influenza vaccine. The primary endpoint was the proportion of participants with seroconversion, defined as >4-fold increase in anti-hemagglutinin antibody titers after vaccination. Secondary endpoints were the proportion of participants with seroprotection (defined as antibody titers of ≥1 : 40) and geometric mean hemagglutination inhibition antibody titers. Results. Overall, 48 (27%) participants were obese (body mass index ≥ 30 kg/m2). Seroconversion rates were comparable between obese and nonobese subjects for all three vaccine strains. Further, postvaccination geometric mean titers did not differ by body mass index category. Conclusion. Obesity was not associated with diminished antibody response to influenza vaccination in a sample of healthy HIV-infected persons. PMID:26576297

  17. Obesity Is Not Associated with Impaired Immune Response to Influenza Vaccination in HIV-Infected Persons.

    PubMed

    Gowda, Charitha; McKittrick, Noah; Kim, Deborah; Kappes, Rosemarie A; Lo Re, Vincent; Tebas, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. HIV-infected individuals demonstrate lower immunogenicity to the influenza vaccine, despite immunologic and virologic control of HIV infection. Obesity has been previously shown to be associated with diminished antibody responses to other vaccines in HIV-uninfected persons. However, no studies have examined if obesity is associated with diminished protective immune response to influenza vaccination among HIV-infected persons on antiretroviral therapy (ART). Methods. We performed a retrospective analysis of immunogenicity data from a clinical trial of inactivated, trivalent influenza vaccine. The primary endpoint was the proportion of participants with seroconversion, defined as >4-fold increase in anti-hemagglutinin antibody titers after vaccination. Secondary endpoints were the proportion of participants with seroprotection (defined as antibody titers of ≥1 : 40) and geometric mean hemagglutination inhibition antibody titers. Results. Overall, 48 (27%) participants were obese (body mass index ≥ 30 kg/m(2)). Seroconversion rates were comparable between obese and nonobese subjects for all three vaccine strains. Further, postvaccination geometric mean titers did not differ by body mass index category. Conclusion. Obesity was not associated with diminished antibody response to influenza vaccination in a sample of healthy HIV-infected persons.

  18. Effect of Cocaine on HIV Infection and Inflammasome Gene Expression Profile in HIV Infected Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Atluri, Venkata Subba Rao; Pilakka-Kanthikeel, Sudheesh; Garcia, Gabriella; Jayant, Rahul Dev; Sagar, Vidya; Samikkannu, Thangavel; Yndart, Adriana; Nair, Madhavan

    2016-01-01

    We have observed significantly increased HIV infection in HIV infected macrophages in the presence of cocaine that could be due to the downregulation of BST2 restriction factor in these cells. In human inflammasome PCR array, among different involved in inflammasome formation, in HIV infected macrophages in the presence of cocaine, we have observed significant upregulation of NLRP3, AIM2 genes and downstream genes IL-1β and PTGS2. Whereas negative regulatory gene MEFV was upregulated, CD40LG and PYDC1 were significantly downregulated. Among various NOD like receptors, NOD2 was significantly upregulated in both HIV alone and HIV plus cocaine treated cells. In the downstream genes, chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2), CCL7 and IL-6 were significantly up regulated in HIV plus cocaine treated macrophages. We have also observed significant ROS production (in HIV and/or cocaine treated cells) which is one of the indirect-activators of inflammasomes formation. Further, we have observed early apoptosis in HIV alone and HIV plus cocaine treated macrophages which may be resultant of inflammasome formation and cspase-1 activation. These results indicate that in case of HIV infected macrophages exposed to cocaine, increased ROS production and IL-1β transcription serve as an activators for the formation of NLRP3 and AIM2 mediated inflammasomes that leads to caspase 1 mediated apoptosis. PMID:27321752

  19. Intimate partner violence and HIV infection among women: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ying; Marshall, Caitlin M; Rees, Hilary C; Nunez, Annabelle; Ezeanolue, Echezona E; Ehiri, John E

    2014-01-01

    Introduction To assess evidence of an association between intimate partner violence (IPV) and HIV infection among women. Methods Medline/PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, EBSCO, Ovid, Cochrane HIV/AIDS Group's Specialized Register and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched up to 20 May 2013 to identify studies that examined the association between IPV and HIV infection in women. We included studies on women aged ≥15 years, in any form of sexually intimate relationship with a male partner. Results Twenty-eight studies [(19 cross-sectional, 5 cohorts and 4 case-control studies) involving 331,468 individuals in 16 countries – the US (eight studies), South Africa (four studies), East Africa (10 studies), India (three studies), Brazil (one study) and multiple low-income countries (two studies)] were included. Results were pooled using RevMan 5.0. To moderate effect estimates, we analyzed all data using the random effects model, irrespective of heterogeneity level. Pooled results of cohort studies indicated that physical IPV [pooled RR (95% CI): 1.22 (1.01, 1.46)] and any type of IPV [pooled RR (95% CI): 1.28 (1.00, 1.64)] were significantly associated with HIV infection among women. Results of cross-sectional studies demonstrated significant associations of physical IPV with HIV infection among women [pooled OR (95% CI): 1.44 (1.10, 1.87)]. Similarly, results of cross-sectional studies indicated that combination of physical and sexual IPV [pooled OR (95% CI): 2.00 (1.24, 3.22) and any type of IPV [pooled OR (95% CI): 1.41 (1.16, 1.73)] were significantly associated with HIV infection among women. Conclusions Available evidence suggests a moderate statistically significant association between IPV and HIV infection among women. To further elucidate the strength of the association between IPV and HIV infection among women, there is a need for high-quality follow-up studies conducted in different geographical regions of the world, and among

  20. Transition to Parenthood and HIV Infection in Rural Zimbabwe

    PubMed Central

    Piccarreta, Raffaella; Gregson, Simon; Melegaro, Alessia

    2016-01-01

    Background The relationship between the risk of acquiring human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and people’s choices about life course events describing the transition to parenthood–sexual debut, union (in the form of marriage, cohabitation, or long-term relationship), and parenthood–is still unclear. A crucial role in shaping this relationship may be played by the sequence of these events and by their timing. This suggests the opportunity to focus on the life courses in their entirety rather than on the specific events, thus adopting a holistic approach that regards each individual’s life course trajectory as a whole. Methods We summarise the individual life courses describing the transition to parenthood using ordered sequences of the three considered events. We aim to (i) investigate the association between the sequences and HIV infection, and (ii) understand how these sequences interact with known mechanisms for HIV transmission, such as the length of sexual exposure and the experience of non-regular sexual partnerships. For this purpose, we use data from a general population cohort study run in Manicaland (Zimbabwe), a Sub-Saharan African area characterised by high HIV prevalence. Results For both genders, individuals who experienced either premarital or delayed childbearing have higher HIV risk compared to individuals following more standard transitions. This can be explained by the interplay of the sequences with known HIV proximate determinants, e.g., a longer exposure to sexual activity and higher rates of premarital sex. Moreover, we found that people in the younger birth cohorts experience more normative and safer sequences. Conclusions The shift of younger generations towards more normative transitions to parenthood is a sign of behaviour change that might have contributed to the observed reduction in HIV prevalence in the area. On the other hand, for people with less normative transitions, targeted strategies are essential for HIV

  1. Cancer Stage at Diagnosis in HIV-infected People and Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Shiels, Meredith S.; Copeland, Glenn; Goodman, Marc T.; Harrell, Janna; Lynch, Charles F.; Pawlish, Karen; Pfeiffer, Ruth M.; Engels, Eric A.

    2015-01-01

    Background It is unknown whether immunosuppression results in more aggressive, advanced stage cancers. As cancer stage is influenced both by tumor biology and medical surveillance, we assessed cancer stage in HIV-infected individuals and solid organ transplant recipients, two immunosuppressed groups with differences in healthcare utilization. Methods We used data on all cases of 15 cancer types, diagnosed during 1996–2010 in two studies that linked U.S. cancer registries to HIV and transplant registries. Odds ratios (ORs) for advanced (vs. local) disease were estimated comparing HIV and transplant populations to immunocompetent people in polytomous logistic regression models, adjusted for age, sex, race, registry and year. Results A total of 8,411 of 4.5 million cancer cases occurred in HIV-infected people, and 7,322 of 6.4 million cancer cases occurred in transplant recipients. Compared to immunocompetent people with cancer, HIV-infected people were more likely to be diagnosed with distant stage lung (OR=1.13), female breast (OR=1.99), and prostate cancers (OR=1.57), while transplant recipients had fewer distant stage lung (OR=0.54), female breast (OR=0.75) and prostate cancers (OR=0.72). Both immunosuppressed populations had a shift toward advanced stage melanoma (ORs: HIV=1.97; transplant=1.82) and bladder cancer (ORs: HIV=1.42; transplant=1.54). Conclusions Bladder cancer and melanoma were more likely to be diagnosed at non-local stage in both HIV-infected people and transplant recipients, suggesting a role of immunosuppression in their progression. Additionally, we observed a shift for some common cancers toward later stages in HIV-infected individuals and toward earlier stages in transplant recipients, consistent with differential access to medical care or surveillance. PMID:25739496

  2. [Toxoplasmosis in HIV infection: invasion reactivation criteria].

    PubMed

    Goncharov, D B; Gubareva, E V; Kobets, N V; Domonova, E A; Ievleva, E S

    2012-01-01

    Contemporary representation of toxoplasmosis reactivation criteria in HIV infection is generalized. Significance of the issue is justified: toxoplasmosis is a leading neurological pathology in AIDS with a high lethality percentage due to complexity of clinical confirmation and difficulties of laboratory confirmation of the start of reactivation. Clinical, instrumental, immunologic, molecular genetic invasion reactivation criteria are discussed in the article and analysis of their effectiveness is performed; their most feasible combinations are justified. Further system analysis of the cerebral toxoplasmosis reactivation criteria specified in the article in combination with search of new pathogen dissemination markers will allow to obtain important information that has both fundamental interest and important practical significance.

  3. [HIV infection and AIDS in urology].

    PubMed

    Fischer, C; Miller, J; Gahr, M; Ringert, R H

    1994-05-01

    Up to December 1993, a total of 10858 AIDS cases were reported to the central AIDS registry at the Federal Health Office. Human immunodeficiency virus is acquired through needle sharing (i.v. drug users), contaminated blood transfusions, intercourse with infected persons and transplacentally by fetuses. In Germany, about seven people a day are estimated to acquire the HIV infection. Half the patients will develop systemic manifestations of AIDS within 12-13 years. Only a small percentage of these patients suffer from urological manifestations, e.g. urinary tract infection, prostatism or HIV-associated nephropathy. Nevertheless, knowledge of genitourinary pathology caused by HIV makes early diagnosis of AIDS possible.

  4. Endothelial Dysfunction: An Early Cardiovascular Risk Marker in Asymptomatic Obese Individuals with Prediabetes

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Alok K.; Ravussin, Eric; Johannsen, Darcy L.; Stull, April J.; Cefalu, William T.; Johnson, William D.

    2012-01-01

    Aims To elucidate if endothelial dysfunction is an early CV risk marker in obese men and women with prediabetes. Study Design Cross-sectional study. Place and Duration of Study Clinical Research Unit, Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Baton Rouge, LA. United States. Methodology Overweight and obese status denotes an increasing adipose tissue burden which spills over into ectopic locations, including the visceral compartment, muscle and liver. Associated co-morbidities enhance cardiovascular (CV) risk. Endothelium which is the largest receptor-effector end-organ in our bodies, while responding to numerous physical and chemical stimuli maintains vascular homeostasis. Endothelial dysfunction (ED) is the initial perturbation, which precedes fatty streak known to initiate atherosclerosis: insidious process which often culminates as sudden catastrophic CV adverse event. Asymptomatic men and women; [n=42] coming in after an overnight fast had demographic, anthropometric, clinical chemistry and resting endothelial function [EF: increased test finger peripheral arterial tone (PAT) relative to control; expressed as relative hyperemia index (RHI)] assessments. Results Adults with desirable weight [n=12] and overweight [n=8] state, had normal fasting plasma glucose [Mean(SD)]: FPG [91.1(4.5), 94.8(5.8) mg/dL], insulin [INS, 2.3(4.4), 3.1(4.8) μU/ml], insulin sensitivity by homeostasis model assessment [HOMA-IR, 0.62(1.2), 0.80(1.2)] and desirable resting clinic blood pressure [SBP/DBP, 118(12)/74(5), 118(13)/76(8) mmHg]. Obese adults [n=22] had prediabetes [FPG, 106.5(3.5) mg/dL], hyperinsulinemia [INS 18.0(5.2) μU/ml], insulin resistance [HOMA-IR 4.59(2.3)], prehypertension [PreHTN; SBP/DBP 127(13)/81(7) mmHg] and endothelial dysfunction [ED; reduced RHI 1.7(0.3) vs. 2.4(0.3); all p<0.05]. Age-adjusted RHI correlated with BMI [r=−0.53; p<0.001]; however, BMI-adjusted RHI was not correlated with age [r=−0.01; p=0.89]. Conclusion Endothelial dysfunction reflective of

  5. Health care delivery for people with HIV infection and AIDS.

    PubMed

    Arkell, S

    Health care delivery for people with HIV infection and AIDS will need to change in the future to accommodate the expected increasing numbers of people affected. Nurses have an important role in preventing the spread of HIV infection and in caring for this group of people.

  6. Primary cutaneous plasmablastic lymphoma revealing clinically unsuspected HIV infection*

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Silvio Alencar; Abbade, Luciana P. Fernandes; Guiotoku, Marcelo Massaki; Marques, Mariangela Esther Alencar

    2016-01-01

    Plasmablastic lymphoma is a rare subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma more frequently diagnosed in immunosuppressed patients, mainly HIV-infected. Primary cutaneous plasmablastic lymphoma is extremely rare, and in this patient it was the first clinical manifestation of unsuspected HIV-infection. PMID:27579749

  7. The HIV-Infected Patient and Family Social Support.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Thomas M.; And Others

    The goal of this study was to examine the complex interplay among family, neuropsychological, psychosocial, psychiatric, and immunological variables with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected homosexual/bisexual men and their families. The subjects were a broad spectrum of 29 outpatient HIV-infected homosexual/bisexual men between the ages…

  8. Effects of long-term use of HAART on oral health status of HIV-infected subjects

    PubMed Central

    Nittayananta, Wipawee; Talungchit, Sineepat; Jaruratanasirikul, Sutep; Silpapojakul, Kachornsakdi; Chayakul, Panthip; Nilmanat, Ampaipith; Pruphetkaew, Nannapat

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND The aim of this study was to determine the effects of long-term use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) on oral health status of HIV-infected subjects. METHODS Oral examination and measurement of saliva flow rate of both unstimulated and wax-stimulated whole saliva were performed in HIV-infected subjects with and without HAART, and in non-HIV individuals. The following data were recorded; duration and risk of HIV infection, type and duration of HAART, CD4 cell count, viral load, presence of orofacial pain, oral dryness, oral burning sensation, oral lesions, cervical caries, and periodontal pocket. Multiple logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the effects of long-term use of HAART on oral health status of HIV-infected subjects. RESULTS: One hundred and fifty-seven HIV-infected subjects – 99 on HAART (age range 23–57 years, mean 39 years) and 58 not on HAART (age range 20–59 years, mean 34 years) – and 50 non-HIV controls (age range 19–59 years, mean 36 years) were enrolled. The most common HAART regimen was 2 NRTI + 2 NNRTI. HIV-infected subjects without HAART showed greater risks of having orofacial pain, oral dryness, oral lesions, and periodontal pockets than those with short-term HAART (P < 0.01). The subjects with long-term HAART were found to have a greater risk of having oral lesions than those with short-term HAART (P < 0.05). The unstimulated and stimulated salivary flow rates of the subjects with HAART were significantly lower than in those without HAART (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION We conclude that long-term HAART has adverse effects on oral health status of HIV-infected subjects. PMID:20202089

  9. Interventions for body habitus changes associated with HIV infection and its treatment.

    PubMed

    Tebas, Pablo

    2007-05-01

    Lipodystrophy and its two components lipo-accumulation and lipoatropy are very common among individuals with HIV infection on treatment, especially among those who started therapy in the late 1990s and early 2000s. This review discusses the current management of these complications of HIV and its treatment. For the purpose of clarity in this review, we have divided the interventions according to the predominant phenotype of the individual.

  10. The Development and Implementation of an Outreach Program to Identify Acute and Recent HIV Infections in New York City

    PubMed Central

    Silvera, Richard; Stein, Dylan; Hutt, Richard; Hagerty, Robert; Daskalakis, Demetre; Valentine, Fred; Marmor, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Since 2004, the authors have been operating First Call NYU, an outreach program to identify acute and recent HIV infections, also called primary HIV infections, among targeted at-risk communities in the New York City (NYC) metropolitan area. Materials and Methodology: First Call NYU employed mass media advertising campaigns, outreach to healthcare providers in NYC, and Internet-based efforts including search engine optimization (SEO) and Internet-based advertising to achieve these goals. Results: Between October 2004 and October 2008, 571 individuals were screened through this program, leading to 446 unique, in-person screening visits. 47 primary HIV infections, including 14 acute and 33 recent HIV infections, were identified. Discussion: Internet and traditional recruitment methods can be used to increase self-referrals for screening following possible exposure to HIV. Conclusion: Community education of at-risk groups, with the goal of increased self-diagnosis of possible acute HIV infection, may be a useful addition to traditional efforts to identify such individuals. PMID:20386719

  11. Acute pancreatitis: Manifestation of acute HIV infection in an adolescent

    PubMed Central

    Bitar, Anas; Altaf, Muhammad; Sferra, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background: Pancreatitis in the pediatric age group is not as common as in adults. Etiologies are various and differ from those in adults. Although infectious etiology accounts for a significant number of cases of pancreatitis, acute infection with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) was rarely reported as a possible etiology for acute pancreatitis in adults. Acute pancreatitis has never been reported as a presenting manifestation of acute HIV infection in children. Case Report: We describe a pediatric patient who presented with acute pancreatitis that revealed acute HIV infection. Conclusions: Acute pancreatitis as a primary manifestation of HIV infection is very rare. It may represent an uncommon aspect of primary HIV infection. We suggest that acute HIV infection should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute pancreatitis at all ages. PMID:23569476

  12. Liver and kidney transplantation in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Tan-Tam, Clara C; Frassetto, Lynda A; Stock, Peter G

    2009-01-01

    HIV infection has evolved into a chronic condition as a result of improvements in therapeutic options. Chronic exposure with HIV and associated co-pathogens as well as toxicities from prolonged therapy with antiviral medications has resulted in increased morbidity and mortality rates from end-stage liver and kidney disease in the HIV-infected population. Since the definitive treatment for end-stage organ failure is transplantation, demand has increased among HIV-infected patients. Although the transplant community has been slow to recognize HIV as a chronic condition, many transplant centers have eliminated HIV infection as a contraindication to transplantation as a result of better patient management and demand. This review examines the current clinical strategies and issues surrounding liver and kidney transplantation in HIV-infected patients.

  13. Proteomic Analysis of HIV-Infected Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Colon, Krystal; Rivera, Linda; Rodriguez-Franco, Eillen; Toro-Nieves, Dianedis

    2010-01-01

    Mononuclear phagocytes (monocytes, macrophages, and microglia) play an important role in innate immunity against pathogens including HIV. These cells are also important viral reservoirs in the central nervous system and secrete inflammatory mediators and toxins that affect the tissue environment and function of surrounding cells. In the era of antiretroviral therapy, there are fewer of these inflammatory mediators. Proteomic approaches including surface enhancement laser desorption ionization, one- and two-dimensional difference in gel electrophoresis, and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry have been used to uncover the proteins produced by in vitro HIV-infected monocytes, macrophages, and microglia. These approaches have advanced the understanding of novel mechanisms for HIV replication and neuronal damage. They have also been used in tissue macrophages that restrict HIV replication to understand the mechanisms of restriction for future therapies. In this review, we summarize the proteomic studies on HIV-infected mononuclear phagocytes and discuss other recent proteomic approaches that are starting to be applied to this field. As proteomic instruments and methods evolve to become more sensitive and quantitative, future studies are likely to identify more proteins that can be targeted for diagnosis or therapy and to uncover novel disease mechanisms. PMID:21153888

  14. Guidelines for antiretroviral therapy for HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Rachlis, A R; Zarowny, D P

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop guidelines for health care providers and their HIV-positive patients on the clinical use of antiretroviral agents for HIV infection. OPTIONS: Recommendations published in 1996 by an international panel. OUTCOMES: Improvement in clinical outcomes or in surrogate markers of disease activity. EVIDENCE AND VALUES: The Canadian HIV Trials Network held a workshop on Oct. 19-20, 1996, to develop Canadian guidelines that incorporate information from recent basic and clinical research. RECOMMENDATIONS: Recommendations for the use of antiretroviral drugs in HIV infection are provided for initial therapy, continuing therapy, primary infection, vertical transmission, pediatric therapy and postexposure prophylaxis. VALIDATION: The guidelines are based on consensus of the participants attending the workshop: Canadian investigators, clinicians and invited representatives from the community, government and the pharmaceutical industry. They are subject to review and updating as new information on clinical benefits is published. SPONSORS: The workshop was organized by the National Centre of the Canadian HIV Trials Network. Unrestricted educational grants were provided by 8 pharmaceutical companies. Additional support was provided from the National AIDS Strategy of Health Canada. PMID:9627563

  15. Fuzzy Modeling and Control of HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zarei, Hassan; Kamyad, Ali Vahidian; Heydari, Ali Akbar

    2012-01-01

    The present study proposes a fuzzy mathematical model of HIV infection consisting of a linear fuzzy differential equations (FDEs) system describing the ambiguous immune cells level and the viral load which are due to the intrinsic fuzziness of the immune system's strength in HIV-infected patients. The immune cells in question are considered CD4+ T-cells and cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTLs). The dynamic behavior of the immune cells level and the viral load within the three groups of patients with weak, moderate, and strong immune systems are analyzed and compared. Moreover, the approximate explicit solutions of the proposed model are derived using a fitting-based method. In particular, a fuzzy control function indicating the drug dosage is incorporated into the proposed model and a fuzzy optimal control problem (FOCP) minimizing both the viral load and the drug costs is constructed. An optimality condition is achieved as a fuzzy boundary value problem (FBVP). In addition, the optimal fuzzy control function is completely characterized and a numerical solution for the optimality system is computed. PMID:22536298

  16. Double-dose hepatitis B revaccination in nonresponsive HIV-infected adolescents.

    PubMed

    Bunupuradah, Torsak; Ananworanich, Jintanat; Puthanakit, Thanyawee

    2013-01-01

    There is no consensus regarding a best dosing regimen of hepatitis B virus vaccine (HBVV) for non-responsive HIV-infected individuals. Double-dose of hepatitis B vaccine (DDHBVV) could enhance immunogenicity to HBVV in non-responsive HIV-infected adults. We assessed the immunogenicity of DDHBVV in HIV-infected adolescents who failed to respond to standard HBVV revaccination. HIV-infected adolescents with current CD4 ≥ 200 cells/mm(3) and no protective antibody concentration of hepatitis B surface antibodies (antiHBs) after HBVV revaccination received DDHBVV, at months 0, 1, 2. The HBVV doses were 20 microgram per dose for adolescents aged < 18 years and 40 microgram per dose for adolescents aged ≥ 18 years. AntiHBs titers were measured at 1, 2, 3 months after first DDHBVV. AntiHBs ≥ 10 mIU/ml was considered protective. Seven adolescents were enrolled; mean age was 15.4 years, CD4 was 775 cells/mm(3) and all had HIV-RNA < 50 copies/ml. Proportions of adolescents with protective antiHBs were 86% at months 1 and 2, and 100% at month 3. Geometric means of antiHBs were 1.1 at baseline, 101.6 at 1 month, 137.1 at 2 months, and 355.9 mIU/ml at 3 months after the first DDHBVV. No grade 3-4 adverse event was reported. DDHBVV is an option for HIV-infected adolescents who are non-responder to standard HBVV revaccination.

  17. Change in Brain Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy after Treatment during Acute HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Sailasuta, Napapon; Ross, William; Ananworanich, Jintanat; Chalermchai, Thep; DeGruttola, Victor; Lerdlum, Sukalaya; Pothisri, Mantana; Busovaca, Edgar; Ratto-Kim, Silvia; Jagodzinski, Linda; Spudich, Serena; Michael, Nelson; Kim, Jerome H.; Valcour, Victor

    2012-01-01

    Objective Single voxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) can be used to monitor changes in brain inflammation and neuronal integrity associated with HIV infection and its treatments. We used MRS to measure brain changes during the first weeks following HIV infection and in response to antiretroviral therapy (ART). Methods Brain metabolite levels of N-acetyl aspartate (NAA), choline (tCHO), creatine (CR), myoinositol (MI), and glutamate and glutamine (GLX) were measured in acute HIV subjects (n = 31) and compared to chronic HIV+individuals (n = 26) and HIV negative control subjects (n = 10) from Bangkok, Thailand. Metabolites were measured in frontal gray matter (FGM), frontal white matter (FWM), occipital gray matter (OGM), and basal ganglia (BG). Repeat measures were obtained in 17 acute subjects 1, 3 and 6 months following initiation of ART. Results After adjustment for age we identified elevated BG tCHO/CR in acute HIV cases at baseline (median 14 days after HIV infection) compared to control (p = 0.0014), as well as chronic subjects (p = 0.0023). A similar tCHO/CR elevation was noted in OGM; no other metabolite abnormalities were seen between acute and control subjects. Mixed longitudinal models revealed resolution of BG tCHO/CR elevation after ART (p = 0.022) with tCHO/CR similar to control subjects at 6 months. Interpretation We detected cellular inflammation in the absence of measurable neuronal injury within the first month of HIV infection, and normalization of this inflammation following acutely administered ART. Our findings suggest that early ART may be neuroprotective in HIV infection by mitigating processes leading to CNS injury. PMID:23229129

  18. Community-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Colonization Burden in HIV-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Popovich, Kyle J.; Hota, Bala; Aroutcheva, Alla; Kurien, Lisa; Patel, Janki; Lyles-Banks, Rosie; Grasso, Amanda E.; Spec, Andrej; Beavis, Kathleen G.; Hayden, Mary K.; Weinstein, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Background. The epidemic of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) has had a disproportionate impact on patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Methods. We evaluated CA-MRSA colonization burden (number of colonized sites per total number sampled) among HIV-infected and HIV-negative inpatients within 72 hours of hospitalization. From March 2011 through April 2012, we obtained cultures from nasal and extranasal sites (throat, axilla, inguinal, perirectal, and chronic wound if present) and collected risk factor data. Results. Of 745 patients (374 HIV-infected, 371 HIV-negative), 15.7% were colonized with CA-MRSA at any site: 20% of HIV and 11% of HIV-negative patients (relative prevalence = 1.8, P = .002). HIV-infected patients had a higher prevalence of nasal, extranasal, and exclusive extranasal colonization as well as higher colonization burden. Perirectal and inguinal areas were the extranasal sites most frequently colonized, and 38.5% of colonized patients had exclusive extranasal colonization. Seventy-three percent of isolates were identified as USA300. Among HIV-infected patients, male sex, younger age, and recent incarceration were positively associated whereas Hispanic ethnicity was negatively associated with higher colonization burden. Among HIV-negative patients, temporary housing (homeless, shelter, or substance abuse center) was the only factor associated with higher colonization burden. Predictors of USA300 included HIV, younger age, illicit drug use, and male sex; all but 1 colonized individual with current or recent incarceration carried USA300. Conclusions. HIV-infected patients were more likely to have a higher CA-MRSA colonization burden and carry USA300. In certain populations, enhanced community and outpatient-based infection control strategies may be needed to prevent CA-MRSA cross-transmission and infection. PMID:23325428

  19. p16INK4a Expression and Immunologic Aging in Chronic HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    M. Milush, Jeffrey; Cunha-Neto, Edecio; G. Kallas, Esper; Kalil, Jorge; D. Passero, Luiz Felipe; W. Hunt, Peter; G. Deeks, Steven; F. Nixon, Douglas; SenGupta, Devi

    2016-01-01

    Chronic HIV infection is characterized by increased immune activation and immunosenescence. p16 INK4a (p16) is a member of the cyclin-dependent kinase antagonist family that inhibits cellular proliferation, and its protein expression increases during normal chronological aging. However, some infectious diseases can increase the expression of this anti-proliferative protein, potentially accelerating immunological aging and dysfunction. In order to investigate the immunological aging in HIV patients, p16 protein expression was evaluated by flow cytometry, in T cell subsets in a cohort of chronically HIV-infected patients on and off ART as well as age-matched healthy controls. Results showed that untreated HIV-infected subjects exhibited increased per-cell p16 protein expression that was discordant with chronological aging. ART restored p16 protein expression to levels comparable with HIV-negative subjects in the CD4 compartment, but not in CD8 T cells, which can be an indicative of an irreversible activation/exhaustion status on these cells. Additionally, the frequency of activated CD4+ and CD8+ T cells was positively correlated with p16 expression in CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in untreated subjects. In contrast to healthy controls, untreated HIV-infected individuals had increased p16 levels within the effector memory (TEM) subset, indicating a possible role for this marker in impaired clonal expansion during antiviral effector function. Taken together, these data demonstrate that chronic HIV infection is associated with elevated expression of the cellular aging marker p16 in T cells. ART restored normal p16 levels in the CD4+ T cell compartment, indicating that use of therapy can be of fundamental importance to normal cell cycling and maintaining immune homeostasis. PMID:27861555

  20. Multimodal neuroimaging evidence of alterations in cortical structure and function in HIV-infected older adults

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Tony W.; Heinrichs-Graham, Elizabeth; Becker, Katherine M.; Aloi, Joey; Robertson, Kevin R.; Sandkovsky, Uriel; White, Matthew L.; O’Neill, Jennifer; Knott, Nichole L.; Fox, Howard S.; Swindells, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Combination antiretroviral therapy transformed HIV-infection from a terminal illness to a manageable condition, but these patients remain at a significantly elevated risk of developing cognitive impairments and the mechanisms are not understood. Some previous neuroimaging studies have found hyperactivation in fronto-parietal networks of HIV-infected patients, whereas others reported aberrations restricted to sensory cortices. In this study, we utilize high-resolution structural and neurophysiological imaging to determine whether alterations in brain structure, function, or both contribute to HIV-related cognitive impairments. HIV-infected adults and individually-matched controls completed 3-Tesla structural magnetic-resonance imaging (sMRI) and a mechanoreception task during magnetoencephalography (MEG). MEG data was examined using advanced beamforming methods, and sMRI data was analyzed using the latest voxel-based morphometry methods with DARTEL. We found significantly reduced theta responses in the postcentral gyrus and increased alpha activity in the prefrontal cortices of HIV-infected patients compared with controls. Patients also had reduced gray matter volume in the postcentral gyrus, parahippocampal gyrus, and other regions. Importantly, reduced gray matter volume in the left postcentral gyrus was spatially-coincident with abnormal MEG responses in HIV-infected patients. Finally, left prefrontal and postcentral gyrus activity was correlated with neuropsychological performance and, when used in conjunction, these two MEG findings had a sensitivity and specificity of over 87.5% for HIV-associated cognitive impairment. This study is the first to demonstrate abnormally increased activity in association cortices with simultaneously decreased activity in sensory areas. These MEG findings had excellent sensitivity and specificity for HIV-associated cognitive impairment, and may hold promise as a potential disease marker. PMID:25376125

  1. Plasma and breastmilk selenium in HIV-infected Malawian mothers is positively associated with infant selenium status at 2 or 6 and 24 weeks post-partum but is not associated with supplementation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Selenium (Se) levels are typically low in HIV-infected individuals, but have been increased by supplementation in previous studies. In HIV-infected populations, the effect of Se supplementation on breastmilk Se and, consequently, plasma Se levels in exclusively breastfed infants is unknown. HIV-inf...

  2. Predictors of hypertension in an urban HIV-infected population at the University of Calabar Teaching Hospital, Calabar, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Okpa, Henry Ohem; Bisong, Elvis Mbu; Enang, Ofem Egbe; Monjok, Emmanuel; Essien, Ekere James

    2017-01-01

    Background The introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has remarkably improved the prognosis of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients, at the expense of the development of long-term complications such as cardiovascular and renal diseases. Hypertension (HTN) is a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases and its associated mortality. In this study, we aimed to determine the prevalence of HTN and to identify possible predictors among HIV-infected patients attending the HIV Special Treatment Clinic at the University of Calabar Teaching Hospital, Calabar. Materials and methods A cross-sectional study was carried out over a 5-month period from February to July 2016. A total of 112 HIV-infected persons were consecutively recruited and their blood pressures were measured in two consecutive clinic visits. They were compared with the HIV-negative control group (n=309). Data collected were analyzed with SPSS 18, and statistical significance was set at P<0.05. Results There was a female preponderance in both the HIV-infected individuals and HIV-negative control group (57.5% vs. 57.4%). The mean ages were 39.3 and 33.9 years in HIV-infected and HIV-negative subjects, respectively. The risk factors that were associated with HTN in both groups were older age (>40 years), increased weight and body mass index (BMI), and presence of obesity. Male sex and duration of exposure to HAART and CD4 count levels >200 cells/mm3 were associated with HTN in HIV-infected patients, whereas the absence of family history of HTN was significantly associated with HTN in both groups. However, in a multivariate logistic regression, the predictors of HTN in both groups are absence of family history of HTN and older age in HIV-infected patients and HIV-negative subjects, respectively. Conclusion Traditional risk factors such as older age, increased BMI, and obesity were linked to HTN in both HIV-infected and HIV-negative subjects, but higher CD4 count level and

  3. Interventions to Prevent Sexually Transmitted Infections, Including HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Cates, Willard

    2011-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Sexually Transmitted Disease (STD) Treatment Guidelines were last updated in 2006. To update the “Clinical Guide to Prevention Services” section of the 2010 CDC STD Treatment Guidelines, we reviewed the recent science with reference to interventions designed to prevent acquisition of STDs, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Major interval developments include (1) licensure and uptake of immunization against genital human papillomavirus, (2) validation of male circumcision as a potent prevention tool against acquisition of HIV and some other sexually transmitted infections (STIs), (3) failure of a promising HIV vaccine candidate to afford protection against HIV acquisition, (4) encouragement about the use of antiretroviral agents as preexposure prophylaxis to reduce risk of HIV and herpes simplex virus acquisition, (5) enhanced emphasis on expedited partner management and rescreening for persons infected with Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae, (6) recognition that behavioral interventions will be needed to address a new trend of sexually transmitted hepatitis C among men who have sex with men, and (7) the availability of a modified female condom. A range of preventive interventions is needed to reduce the risks of acquiring STI, including HIV infection, among sexually active people, and a flexible approach targeted to specific populations should integrate combinations of biomedical, behavioral, and structural interventions. These would ideally involve an array of prevention contexts, including (1) communications and practices among sexual partners, (2) transactions between individual clients and their healthcare providers, and (3) comprehensive population-level strategies for prioritizing prevention research, ensuring accurate outcome assessment, and formulating health policy. PMID:22080271

  4. Immune quiescence: a model of protection against HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Card, Catherine M; Ball, Terry Blake; Fowke, Keith R

    2013-11-20

    Aberrant immune activation is a strong correlate of HIV disease progression, but little is known about how immune activation alters susceptibility to HIV infection. Susceptibility to HIV infection varies between individuals, but the immunological determinants of HIV transmission are not well understood. Here, we present evidence from studies of HIV transmission in the context of clinical trials and HIV-exposed seronegative (HESN) cohorts that implicates elevated immune activation as a risk factor for acquiring HIV. We propose a model of protection from infection based on a phenotype of low baseline immune activation referred to as immune quiescence. Immune quiescence is evidenced by reduced expression of T cell activation markers, low levels of generalized gene transcription and low levels of proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine production in the periphery and genital mucosa of HESN. Since HIV preferentially replicates in activated CD4+ T cells, immune quiescence may protect against infection by limiting HIV target cell availability. Although the determinants of immune quiescence are unclear, several potential factors have been identified that may be involved in driving this phenotype. HESN were shown to have elevated proportions of regulatory T cells (Tregs), which are known to suppress T cell activation. Likewise, proteins involved in controlling inflammation in the genital tract have been found to be elevated in HESN. Furthermore, expression of interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF-1) is reduced in HESN as a consequence of genetic polymorphisms and differential epigenetic regulation. Since IRF-1 is an important regulator of immune responses, it may play a role in maintaining immune quiescence. Based on this model, we propose a novel avenue for HIV prevention targeted based on reducing host mucosal immune activation.

  5. HIV infection/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome at Siriraj Hospital, 2002: time for secondary prevention.

    PubMed

    Anekthananon, Thanomsak; Ratanasuwan, Winai; Techasathit, Wichai; Rongrungruang, Yong; Suwanagool, Surapol

    2004-02-01

    hospital against medical advice. The mortality rate in newly diagnosed HIV and in known HIV without antiretroviral treatment were comparable but much lower in known HIV-infected patients who received antiretroviral therapy. Secondary prevention by detection of HIV-infected patients while they are asymptomatic and providing them with appropriate chemoprophylaxis against specific opportunistic infections as well as appropriate antiretroviral treatment would decrease morbidity, mortality, and improve the quality of life of HIV-infected patients in Thailand.

  6. A Challenge for the Future: Aging and HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Rickabaugh, Tammy M.; Jamieson, Beth D.

    2010-01-01

    Older individuals (≥ 50 years of age) are increasingly becoming a new at-risk group for HIV-1 infection and, together with those surviving longer due to the introduction of anti-retroviral therapy (ART), it is predicted that more than half of all HIV-1-infected individuals in the U.S. will be greater than 50 years of age in the year 2015. Older individuals diagnosed with HIV-1 are prone to faster disease progression and reduced T-cell reconstitution despite successful virologic control with anti-retroviral therapy (ART). There is also growing evidence that the T-cell compartment in HIV-1+ adults displays an aged phenotype and HIV-1-infected individuals are increasingly diagnosed with clinical conditions more commonly seen in older uninfected persons. As aging in the absence of HIV infection is associated with alterations in T-cell function and immunosenescence, the combined impact of both HIV-1 infection and aging may provide an explanation for poorer clinical outcomes observed in older HIV-1-infected individuals. Thus, the development of novel therapeutics to stimulate immune function and delay immunosenescence is critical and would be beneficial to both the elderly and HIV-1 infected individuals. PMID:20734158

  7. Neurodevelopmental delay among HIV-infected preschool children receiving antiretroviral therapy and healthy preschool children in Soweto, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Lowick, Sarah; Sawry, Shobna; Meyers, Tammy

    2012-01-01

    Neurodevelopmental delay has been documented in up to 97.5% of HIV-infected children in Soweto who were not yet on antiretroviral treatment (ART). With growing numbers of children in South Africa being successfully treated with ART, the effects of ART on neurocognitive functioning in children require investigation. The objective of this study was to determine the extent of neurodevelopmental delay in stable HIV-infected preschool children (aged five to six years) receiving ART and compare it to an apparently healthy (unconfirmed HIV-status) group of preschool children. Thirty HIV-infected preschool children (virologically and immunologically stable on ART for more than one year) were conveniently sampled from 350 eligible children on ART at the Harriet Shezi Children's Clinic in Soweto, Johannesburg. The comparison group comprised 30 well-nourished preschool children attending the Lilian Ngoyi Primary Health Care Clinic in Soweto for routine immunizations. Each child was assessed using the Griffiths Mental Development Scales-Extended Revised Version (GMDS-ER), at a single point in time. The overall developmental z-scores on GMDS-ER were <-2 (indicating severe delay) in 27 (90%) children in the HIV-infected group compared to 23 (76%) in the comparison group (p = 0.166). Mental handicap (overall GQ < 70) was evident in 46.7% of children in the HIV-infected group compared to 10% in the comparison group (p = 0.002). There was a 7.88-fold increased likelihood of severe delay in the HIV infected group. The HIV-infected group and comparison group had significantly different (p = 0.001) mean overall GQ scores of 70 (95% CI: 66.0-74.0) and 78 (95% CI: 75.6-80.5), respectively, with lower mean scores in the HIV-infected group in all individual domains. Early initiation of ART in HIV-infected infants may improve cognitive functioning among this group; however, intervention strategies which optimize early cognitive development for all children in the area need to be

  8. Clinical experience with HIV-infected patients at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center: an update.

    PubMed

    Rohlman, V C; Haglund, L A; Swartz, M A; Dahl, E; Greenfield, R A; Slater, L N; Huycke, M M; Muchmore, H G; Fine, D P

    1993-04-01

    We reviewed the course of 545 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients seen between 1983 and March 30, 1991. A majority were Caucasian homosexual or bisexual men, while parenteral drug abusers represented a smaller proportion than seen nationwide. In the 274 patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), the distribution of AIDS-defining conditions was generally consistent with those reported in studies from elsewhere in the United States. However, toxoplasmosis remained relatively uncommon. There was a slightly higher incidence of disseminated histoplasmosis compared to other studies. HIV encephalopathy (AIDS dementia) was likely underdiagnosed. Although data suggested prolongation of the asymptomatic phase of HIV infection, median survival after AIDS diagnosis remained approximately 12 months.

  9. [Impediments to HIV testing in HIV-infected children and teenagers in Africa: look for them where they are!].

    PubMed

    Msellati, P; Ateba Ndongo, F; Hejoaka, F; Nacro, B

    2016-01-01

    A huge number of HIV-infected children and teenagers have no access to care or receive it very late. Of the 3.2 million infected children, 2.8 million should be receiving highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART) but only around 700,000 actually are. The first reason for this failure is the lack of HIV testing among HIV-exposed infants and thus early diagnosis or, even more frequently, the lack of testing among older children and teenagers. The objectives of this article are twofold: to review the current situation and to advocate routine offers of HIV testing to HIV-exposed children and teenagers (exposed either through mother-to-child transmission or repeated transfusions) and those suspected to be HIV-infected (because of malnutrition, tuberculosis, or other associated diseases). Finally, adults living with HIV should be made aware of the need for routine HIV screening of their children, even when asymptomatic.

  10. Autoimmune diseases and HIV infection: A cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Virot, Emilie; Duclos, Antoine; Adelaide, Leopold; Miailhes, Patrick; Hot, Arnaud; Ferry, Tristan; Seve, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    To describe the clinical manifestations, treatments, prognosis, and prevalence of autoimmune diseases (ADs) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients.All HIV-infected patients managed in the Infectious Diseases Department of the Lyon University Hospitals, France, between January 2003 and December 2013 and presenting an AD were retrospectively included.Thirty-six ADs were found among 5186 HIV-infected patients which represents a prevalence of 0.69% including immune thrombocytopenic purpura (n = 15), inflammatory myositis (IM) (n = 4), sarcoidosis (n = 4), Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) (n = 4), myasthenia gravis (n = 2), Graves' disease (n = 2), and 1 case of each following conditions: systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, autoimmune hepatitis, Hashimoto thyroiditis and autoimmune hemolytic anemia. One patient presented 2 ADs. Thirty patients were known to be HIV-infected when they developed an AD. The AD preceded HIV infection in 2 patients. GBS and HIV infection were diagnosed simultaneously in 3 cases. At AD diagnosis, CD4 T lymphocytes count were higher than 350/mm in 63% of patients, between 200 and 350/mm in 19% and less than 200/mm in 19%. Twenty patients benefited from immunosuppressant treatments, with a good tolerance.ADs during HIV infection are uncommon in this large French cohort. Immune thrombocytopenic purpura, sarcoidosis, IM, and GBS appear to be more frequent than in the general population. Immunosuppressant treatments seem to be effective and well tolerated.

  11. Circulating HIV DNA Correlates With Neurocognitive Impairment in Older HIV-infected Adults on Suppressive ART

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Michelli Faria de; Murrel, Ben; Pérez-Santiago, Josué; Vargas, Milenka; Ellis, Ronald J.; Letendre, Scott; Grant, Igor; Smith, Davey M.; Woods, Steven Paul; Gianella, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Older HIV-infected adults have a higher risk of neurocognitive impairment, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we investigated the associations between levels of HIV DNA in peripheral blood, soluble markers of inflammation and cellular trafficking in blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and neurocognitive functioning among 18 younger (22–40 years) and 26 older (50–71 years) HIV-infected subjects, who were administered a comprehensive neurocognitive battery. Older HIV-infected individuals presented higher levels of inflammation in CSF and blood compared to younger individuals, but no difference was observed in HIV DNA levels. Among older participants, higher HIV DNA levels were significantly associated with more severe neurocognitive impairment (p = 0.005), particularly in the Executive Functions domain (p = 0.004). No association was observed between HIV DNA and neurocognition among younger individuals. Despite significantly increased inflammation observed in the older group, none of the inflammatory markers were associated with neurocognitive impairment among older HIV+ individuals (p > 0.05). Our study supports the involvement of peripheral HIV DNA reservoir in the pathogenesis of neurocognitive disorder during suppressive ART. Correlates of neurocognitive impairment might differ between younger and older adults, suggesting that future treatment and prevention strategies for HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders likely need to be tailored based on age. PMID:26603568

  12. Executive summary of the consensus document on metabolic disorders and cardiovascular risk in patients with HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Polo Rodríguez, Rosa; Galindo Puerto, María José; Dueñas, Carlos; Gómez Candela, Carmen; Estrada, Vicente; Villar, Noemí G P; Locutura, Jaime; Mariño, Ana; Pascua, Javier; Palacios, Rosario; Von Wichmman, Miguel Ángel; Álvarez, Julia; Asensi, Victor; Lopez Aldeguer, José; Lozano, Fernando; Negredo, Eugenia; Ortega, Enrique; Pedrol, Enric; Gutiérrez, Félix; Sanz Sanz, Jesús; Martínez Chamorro, Esteban

    2015-01-01

    The importance of the metabolic disorders and their impact on patients with HIV infection requires an individualized study and continuous updating. HIV patients have the same cardiovascular risk factors as the general population. The HIV infection per se increases the cardiovascular risk, and metabolic disorders caused by some antiretroviral drugs are added risk factors. For this reason, the choice of drugs with a good metabolic profile is essential. The most common metabolic disorders of HIV infected-patients (insulin resistance, diabetes, hyperlipidemia or osteopenia), as well as other factors of cardiovascular risk, such as hypertension, should also be dealt with according to guidelines similar to the general population, as well as insisting on steps to healthier lifestyles. The aim of this document is to provide a query tool for all professionals who treat HIV-patients and who may present or display any metabolic disorders listed in this document.

  13. Insulin resistance and diabetes mellitus associated with antiretroviral use in HIV-infected patients: pathogenesis, prevention, and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Tebas, Pablo

    2008-09-01

    The contribution of current antiretroviral treatment regimens to the long-term survival of HIV-infected individuals is accompanied by increased risk of glucose metabolism abnormalities in this patient population. The risk of insulin resistance and diabetes in HIV-infected patients receiving antiretroviral treatment stems from 2 sources: exposure to the same environmental factors that have led to an increased incidence of these conditions in the general population and the negative effects on glucose metabolism inherent to components of antiretroviral treatment regimens. This article reviews the pathogenesis and diagnosis of insulin resistance and diabetes and the contribution of components of antiretroviral therapy regimens to increased risk for these conditions. Optimization of antiretroviral treatment regimens for HIV-infected patients with or at increased risk for development of abnormalities in glucose metabolism is discussed.

  14. Evidence for Within-Host Genetic Recombination among the Human Pegiviral Strains in HIV Infected Subjects.

    PubMed

    Wu, Haoming; Padhi, Abinash; Xu, Junqiang; Gong, Xiaoyan; Tien, Po

    2016-01-01

    The non-pathogenic Human Pegivirus (HPgV, formerly GBV-C/HGV), the most prevalent RNA virus worldwide, is known to be associated with reduced morbidity and mortality in HIV-infected individuals. Although previous studies documented its ubiquity and important role in HIV-infected individuals, little is known about the underlying genetic mechanisms that maintain high genetic diversity of HPgV within the HIV-infected individuals. To assess the within-host genetic diversity of HPgV and forces that maintain such diversity within the co-infected hosts, we performed phylogenetic analyses taking into account 229 HPgV partial E1-E2 clonal sequences representing 15 male and 8 female co-infected HIV patients from Hubei province of central China. Our results revealed the presence of eleven strongly supported clades. While nine clades belonged to genotype 3, two clades belonged to genotype 2. Additionally, four clades that belonged to genotype 3 exhibited inter-clade recombination events. The presence of clonal sequences representing multiple clades within the HIV-infected individual provided the evidence of co-circulation of HPgV strains across the region. Of the 23 patients, six patients (i.e., five males and one female) were detected to have HPgV recombinant sequences. Our results also revealed that while male patients shared the viral strains with other patients, viral strains from the female patients had restricted dispersal. Taken together, the present study revealed that multiple infections with divergent HPgV viral strains may have caused within-host genetic recombination, predominantly in male patients, and therefore, could be the major driver in shaping genetic diversity of HPgV.

  15. HIV infection and HERV expression: a review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The human genome contains multiple copies of retrovirus genomes known as endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) that have entered the germ-line at some point in evolution. Several of these proviruses have retained (partial) coding capacity, so that a number of viral proteins or even virus particles are expressed under various conditions. Human ERVs (HERVs) belong to the beta-, gamma-, or spuma- retrovirus groups. Endogenous delta- and lenti- viruses are notably absent in humans, although endogenous lentivirus genomes have been found in lower primates. Exogenous retroviruses that currently form a health threat to humans intriguingly belong to those absent groups. The best studied of the two infectious human retroviruses is the lentivirus human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) which has an overwhelming influence on its host by infecting cells of the immune system. One HIV-induced change is the induction of HERV transcription, often leading to induced HERV protein expression. This review will discuss the potential HIV-HERV interactions. Several studies have suggested that HERV proteins are unlikely to complement defective HIV virions, nor is HIV able to package HERV transcripts, probably due to low levels of sequence similarity. It is unclear whether the expression of HERVs has a negative, neutral, or positive influence on HIV-AIDS disease progression. A positive effect was recently reported by the specific expression of HERVs in chronically HIV-infected patients, which results in the presentation of HERV-derived peptides to CD8+ T-cells. These cytotoxic T-cells were not tolerant to HERV peptides, as would be expected for self-antigens, and consequently lysed the HIV-infected, HERV-presenting cells. This novel mechanism could control HIV replication and result in a low plasma viral load. The possibility of developing a vaccination strategy based on these HERV peptides will be discussed. PMID:22248111

  16. The effect of telephone support on depressive symptoms among HIV-infected pregnant women in Thailand: an embedded mixed methods study.

    PubMed

    Ross, Ratchneewan; Sawatphanit, Wilaiphan; Suwansujarid, Tatirat; Stidham, Andrea W; Drew, Barbara L; Creswell, John W

    2013-01-01

    Depressive symptoms negatively impact the lives of HIV-infected individuals and are correlated with faster progression to AIDS. Our embedded mixed methods study examined and described the effects of telephone support on depressive symptoms in a sample of HIV-infected pregnant Thai women. HIV-infected pregnant Thai women (n = 40) were randomly assigned to either the control or the intervention group. A registered nurse provided telephone support to the intervention group. Depressive symptoms were measured at three points in both groups. In-depth interviews were conducted at Time 2 and Time 3. Results show that depressive symptoms in the intervention group decreased over time. Qualitative results describe how telephone support can work, but also reveal that telephone support did not work for everyone. We recommend that a larger mixed methods study be conducted to examine the effects of telephone support on depressive symptoms among HIV-infected women, including the costs and benefits of such support.

  17. Acute encephalitis as initial presentation of primary HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Nzwalo, Hipólito; Añón, Rosário Pazos; Àguas, Maria João

    2012-07-03

    Acute encephalitis is a life-threatening condition. A wide variety of infectious agents are implicated and in many patients no cause is found. HIV acute seroconversion illness can rarely present as acute encephalitis. Although most experts agree in starting antiretroviral treatment in severe acute HIV infection, the evidence of the benefits are still lacking. The authors report a case of severe acute encephalitis as a primary presentation of HIV infection in which introduction of highly active antiretroviral treatment resulted in clinical recovery. This case highlights the need to consider HIV infection in the differential diagnosis of treatable viral encephalitis.

  18. Clinical diagnosis of cardiac involvement in HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Moldovan, L; Branzan, O; Nechita, O; Ardeleanu, C; Teodorescu, M; Geamai, A

    2012-01-01

    HIV infection is continuously raising, and different treatments did not manage to extend the patient's life. Clinical and morphopathological features of respiratory, gastrointestinal, hematological and nervous system are well characterized in HIV infection, but cardiac involvement is not so well known. Cardiac involvement is extremely rare in HIV disease, but demonstrated by echocardiography and anatomo-pathologic methods, it is more frequently met than the clinical features are supposed to be, and it can be demonstrated by positive serologic tests. The main reason of this research is the necessity to obtain data from HIV infection concerning heart involvement. PMID:23049631

  19. Description and Demonstration of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy to Enhance Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence and Treat Depression in HIV-Infected Adults.

    PubMed

    Newcomb, Michael E; Bedoya, C Andres; Blashill, Aaron J; Lerner, Jonathan A; O'Cleirigh, Conall; Pinkston, Megan M; Safren, Steven A

    2015-11-01

    There are an estimated 1.1 million individuals living with HIV/AIDS in the United States. In addition to the various medical comorbidities of HIV infection, depression is one of the most frequently co-occurring psychiatric conditions among HIV-infected individuals. Furthermore, depression has been found to be associated with nonadherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART), as well as HIV disease progression. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) has repeatedly been found to effectively treat depression in adult populations, and CBT for adherence and depression (CBT-AD) is an effective treatment for improving depressive symptoms and medication adherence in the context of various chronic health conditions, including diabetes and HIV-infection. This paper provides a description of the CBT-AD approach to treat depression and ART adherence in HIV-infected adults, which we have developed and tested in our clinic, and for which detailed therapist and client guides exist. To augment the description of treatment, the present article provides video component demonstrations of several core modules that highlight important aspects of this treatment, including Life-Steps for medication adherence, orientation to CBT-AD and psychoeducation, and suggestions for adaptation of core CBT modules for HIV-infected adults. Discussion of video demonstrations highlights differences in patient presentations and course of treatment between HIV-infected adults receiving CBT-AD and HIV-uninfected adults receiving traditional CBT for depression. This description and the accompanying demonstrations are intended as a practical guide to assist therapists wishing to conduct such a treatment in the outpatient setting.

  20. Description and Demonstration of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy to Enhance Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence and Treat Depression in HIV-Infected Adults

    PubMed Central

    Newcomb, Michael E.; Bedoya, C. Andres; Blashill, Aaron J.; Lerner, Jonathan A.; O’Cleirigh, Conall; Pinkston, Megan M.; Safren, Steven A.

    2015-01-01

    There are an estimated 1.1 million individuals living with HIV/AIDS in the United States. In addition to the various medical comorbidities of HIV infection, depression is one of the most frequently co-occurring psychiatric conditions among HIV-infected individuals. Furthermore, depression has been found to be associated with nonadherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART), as well as HIV disease progression. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) has repeatedly been found to effectively treat depression in adult populations, and CBT for adherence and depression (CBT-AD) is an effective treatment for improving depressive symptoms and medication adherence in the context of various chronic health conditions, including diabetes and HIV-infection. This paper provides a description of the CBT-AD approach to treat depression and ART adherence in HIV-infected adults, which we have developed and tested in our clinic, and for which detailed therapist and client guides exist. To augment the description of treatment, the present article provides video component demonstrations of several core modules that highlight important aspects of this treatment, including Life-Steps for medication adherence, orientation to CBT-AD and psychoeducation, and suggestions for adaptation of core CBT modules for HIV-infected adults. Discussion of video demonstrations highlights differences in patient presentations and course of treatment between HIV-infected adults receiving CBT-AD and HIV-uninfected adults receiving traditional CBT for depression. This description and the accompanying demonstrations are intended as a practical guide to assist therapists wishing to conduct such a treatment in the outpatient setting. PMID:26688659

  1. Depression and Social Functioning among HIV-infected and Uninfected Persons in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Peltzer, Karl; Szrek, Helena; Ramlagan, Shandir; Leite, Rui; Chao, Li-Wei

    2014-01-01

    Depression and other health problems are common co-morbidities among persons living with human immunodeficiency virus infection/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS). The aim of this study was to investigate depression, health status, and substance use in relation to HIV-infected and uninfected individuals in South Africa. Using a cross-sectional case-control design, we compared depression, physical health, mental health, problem alcohol use, and tobacco use in a sample of HIV infected (N=143) and HIV uninfected (N=199) respondents who had known their HIV status for two months. We found that depression was higher and physical health and mental health were lower in HIV positive than HIV negative individuals. Poor physical health also moderated the effect of HIV infection on depression; HIV positive individuals were significantly more depressed than HIV negative controls, but only when general physical health was also poor. We did not find an association between alcohol or tobacco use and HIV status. These results suggest the importance of incorporating the management of psychological health in the treatment of HIV. PMID:25105215

  2. Patient Experiences following Acute HIV Infection Diagnosis and Counseling in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Wolpaw, Benjamin J.; Mathews, Catherine; Mtshizana, Yolisa; Chopra, Mickey; Hardie, Diana; Lurie, Mark N.; De Azevedo, Virginia; Jennings, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Individuals in the acute stage of HIV infection (AHI) have an elevated potential to transmit HIV and play a critical role in the growth of the epidemic. Routine identification and counseling of individuals during AHI could decrease transmission behavior during this key period. However, diagnosis of AHI may present challenges distinct from those experienced through diagnosis of established HIV infection. A study was conducted in a public youth clinic outside of Cape Town, South Africa, to identify and counsel individuals with acute stage HIV infection. In-depth interviews were conducted with patients following diagnosis. After counseling, patients were accepting of the testing regimen used to diagnose AHI. They used the knowledge of having been recently infected to identify the source of their infection, but did not retain or place importance on information regarding the increased ability to transmit HIV during the acute stage. Future interventions directed at the reduction of HIV transmission following diagnosis with AHI will need to find ways of making this information more salient, possibly through more culturally meaningful educational approaches. PMID:25153674

  3. Coping and perception of women with HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Renesto, Helana Maria Ferreira; Falbo, Ana Rodrigues; Souza, Edvaldo; Vasconcelos, Maria Gorete

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze women’s perceptions and coping regarding the discovery of an HIV infection. METHODS A qualitative study in an HIV/AIDS Specialist Helpdesk in Recife, PE, Northeastern Brazil, from January to September 2010, involving eight women living with asymptomatic HIV aged between 27 and 37 years, without criteria for diagnosis of AIDS infected through intercourse and monitored by the service for at least one year. Forms were used to characterize the clinical situation and semi-structured interviews to understand perceptions and feelings related to personal trajectory after diagnosis and different ways of facing the diagnosis in family and social life. Content analysis was performed as suggested by Bardin. RESULTS The thematic category that emerged was stigma and discrimination. The women had life trajectories marked by stigma, which was perceived as discrimination after the diagnosis and in the experiences of everyday life. The revelation of the infection was perceived as limiting to a normal life, leading to the need to conceal the diagnosis. The discriminatory attitudes of some health care professionals, non-specialist in HIV/AIDS, had a negative impact on future experiences in other health services. Besides the effects of institutional stigma, the perception of women was that the service did not include dedicated space for the expression of other needs beyond the disease, which could help in fighting the infection. CONCLUSIONS Living with HIV was strongly linked to stigma. The results show the importance of strengthening educational approaches and emotional support at the time of diagnosis in order to facilitate coping with the condition of seropositivity. PMID:24789635

  4. Abnormalities in apolipoprotein and lipid levels in an HIV-infected Brazilian population under different treatment profiles: the relevance of apolipoprotein E genotypes and immunological status.

    PubMed

    Malavazi, Iran; Abrão, Emiliana P; Mikawa, Angela Y; Landgraf, Viviane O; da Costa, Paulo I

    2004-05-01

    HIV infection is associated with disturbances in lipid metabolism due to a host's response mechanism and the current antiretroviral therapy. The pathological appearance and progression of atherosclerosis is dependent on the presence of injurious agents in the vascular endothelium and variations in different subsets of candidate genes. Therefore, the Hha I polymorphism in the apolipoprotein E gene was evaluated in addition to triglycerides, total cholesterol, very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL), LDL, high-density lipoprotein (HDL), and apolipoprotein (apo) Al, B and E levels in 86 Brazilian HIV-infected patients and 29 healthy controls. The allele frequency for apoE in the HIV-infected group and controls was in agreement with data on the Brazilian population. Dyslipidemia was observed in the HIV group and verified by increased levels of triglycerides, VLDL and apoE, and decreased levels of HDL and apoAl. The greatest abnormalities in these biochemical variables were shown in the HIV-infected individuals whose immune function was more compromised. The effect of the genetic variation at the APOE gene on biochemical variables was more pronounced in the HIV-infected individuals who carried the apoE2/3 genotype. The highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART)-receiving group presented increased levels of total cholesterol and apoE. Dyslipidemia was a predictable consequence of HIV infection and the protease inhibitors intensified the increase in apoE values.

  5. HIV Infection Is Associated with Shortened Telomere Length in Ugandans with Suspected Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Auld, Elizabeth; Lin, Jue; Chang, Emily; Byanyima, Patrick; Ayakaka, Irene; Musisi, Emmanuel; Worodria, William; Davis, J. Lucian; Segal, Mark; Blackburn, Elizabeth; Huang, Laurence

    2016-01-01

    Introduction HIV infection is a risk factor for opportunistic pneumonias such as tuberculosis (TB) and for age-associated health complications. Short telomeres, markers of biological aging, are also associated with an increased risk of age-associated diseases and mortality. Our goals were to use a single cohort of HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected individuals hospitalized with pneumonia to assess whether shortened telomere length was associated with HIV infection, TB diagnosis, and 2-month mortality. Methods This was a sub-study of the IHOP Study, a prospective observational study. Participants consisted of 184 adults admitted to Mulago Hospital in Kampala, Uganda who underwent evaluation for suspected TB and were followed for 2 months. Standardized questionnaires were administered to collect demographic and clinical data. PBMCs were isolated and analyzed using quantitative PCR to determine telomere length. The association between HIV infection, demographic and clinical characteristics, and telomere length was assessed, as were the associations between telomere length, TB diagnosis and 2-month mortality. Variables with a P≤0.2 in bivariate analysis were included in multivariate models. Results No significant demographic or clinical differences were observed between the HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected subjects. Older age (P<0.0001), male gender (P = 0.04), total pack-years smoked (P<0.001), alcohol consumption in the past year (P = 0.12), and asthma (P = 0.08) were all associated (P≤0.2) with shorter telomere length in bivariate analysis. In multivariate analysis adjusting for these five variables, HIV-positive participants had significantly shorter telomeres than HIV-negative participants (β = -0.0621, 95% CI -0.113 to -0.011, P = 0.02). Shortened telomeres were not associated with TB or short-term mortality. Conclusions The association between HIV infection and shorter telomeres suggests that HIV may play a role in cellular senescence and biological aging and

  6. Occurrence of occult HCV infection among Hiv infected patients in Georgia.

    PubMed

    Gatserelia, L; Sharvadze, L; Karchava, M; Dolmazashvili, E; Tsertsvadze, T

    2014-01-01

    Occult hepatitis C (OCI) infection has been known as detectable HCV-RNA in the liver or peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in the absence of detectable serum or plasma HCV-RNA. OCI has been detected among different patients groups worldwide, it has been found not only in chronic hepatitis patients of unknown origin, but also among several groups at risk for HCV infection (hemodialysis patients or family members of patients with occult HCV). This occult infection has been reported also in healthy populations without evidence of liver disease. Prevalence of occult Hepatitis C virus has not been investigated in Georgian population, where a rate of HCV infection is highest (6.7%) among Eastern European Countries. The aim of this study was to investigate the occurrence of occult HCV infection among HIV infected individuals in Georgia. As a pilot study, we have selected three groups of HIV infected patients for analyses: Group 1- HIV infected patients without evidence of liver disease (n=98), group 2- HIV infected patients with cryptogenic liver disease (n=34) and group 3- HIV/HBV co infected patients (n=29). HCV RNA was tested in PBMCs samples by real-time polymerase chain reaction. HCV genotyping was performed by Line-probe assay based on reverse-hybridization technology. Liver fibrosis was evaluated by transient elastography (FibroScan®). HCV-RNA was detected in PBMCs specimens among 2 (2%) subjects from group 1, 4 (12%) subjects from group 2, and 9 (31%) subjects from group 3. HCV genotypes were determined for 14 of 15 OCI subjects resulting following genotype distribution: 6 (46%) - 1b, 3 (23%) - 2a/2c and 5 (38%) - 3a. One samples failed to be genotyped due to extremely low HCV viral load. Our data revealed the occurrence of occult HCV infection in HIV infected patients. No single HCV genotype was predominant in the present study. Liver fibrosis was found more frequently and the fibrosis score was significantly higher in OCI patients versus negative ones

  7. A Randomized Clinical Trial of Alternative Stress Management Interventions in Persons With HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    McCain, Nancy L.; Gray, D. Patricia; Elswick, R. K.; Robins, Jolynne W.; Tuck, Inez; Walter, Jeanne M.; Rausch, Sarah M.; Ketchum, Jessica McKinney

    2015-01-01

    Research in psychoneuroimmunology suggests that immunosuppression associated with perceived stress may contribute to disease progression in persons with HIV infection. While stress management interventions may enhance immune function, few alternative approaches have yet been tested. This randomized clinical trial was conducted to test effects of three 10-week stress management approaches—cognitive–behavioral relaxation training (RLXN), focused tai chi training (TCHI), and spiritual growth groups (SPRT)—in comparison to a wait-listed control group (CTRL) among 252 individuals with HIV infection. Using repeated measures mixed modeling, the authors found that in comparison to the CTRL group, (a) both the RLXN and TCHI groups used less emotion-focused coping, and (b) all treatment groups had augmented lymphocyte proliferative function. Despite modest effects of the interventions on psychosocial functioning, robust findings of improved immune function have important clinical implications, particularly for persons with immune-mediated illnesses. PMID:18540736

  8. A randomized clinical trial of alternative stress management interventions in persons with HIV infection.

    PubMed

    McCain, Nancy L; Gray, D Patricia; Elswick, R K; Robins, Jolynne W; Tuck, Inez; Walter, Jeanne M; Rausch, Sarah M; Ketchum, Jessica McKinney

    2008-06-01

    Research in psychoneuroimmunology suggests that immunosuppression associated with perceived stress may contribute to disease progression in persons with HIV infection. While stress management interventions may enhance immune function, few alternative approaches have yet been tested. This randomized clinical trial was conducted to test effects of three 10-week stress management approaches--cognitive-behavioral relaxation training (RLXN), focused tai chi training (TCHI), and spiritual growth groups (SPRT)--in comparison to a wait-listed control group (CTRL) among 252 individuals with HIV infection. Using repeated measures mixed modeling, the authors found that in comparison to the CTRL group, (a) both the RLXN and TCHI groups used less emotion-focused coping, and (b) all treatment groups had augmented lymphocyte proliferative function. Despite modest effects of the interventions on psychosocial functioning, robust findings of improved immune function have important clinical implications, particularly for persons with immune-mediated illnesses.

  9. Improving Clinical Laboratory Efficiency: Introduction of Systems for the Diagnosis and Monitoring of HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Marta; Chueca, Natalia; Guillot, Vicente; Bernal, María Del Carmen; García, Federico

    2012-01-01

    Since the first tests for identifying individuals with suspected human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection were introduced in the mid-1980s, diagnostic virology testing has greatly evolved. The technological advances, automating in the laboratories and the advances in molecular biology techniques have helped introduce invaluable laboratory methods for managing HIV patients. Tests for diagnosis, specially for screening HIV antibodies, are now fully automated; in the same way, tests for monitoring HIV viral load (HIV RNA copies/ml of plasma), which is used for monitoring infection and response to antiretroviral treatment, are also fully automated; however, resistance testing, tropism determination and minor variant detection, which are used to make decisions for changing antiretroviral treatment regimens in patients failing therapy, still remain highly laborious and time consuming. This chapter will review the main aspects relating to the automating of the methods available for laboratory diagnosis as well as for monitoring of the HIV infection and determination of resistance to antiretrovirals and viral tropism.

  10. Body mass index, inflammatory biomarkers and neurocognitive impairment in HIV-infected persons.

    PubMed

    Okafor, Chukwuemeka N; Kelso, Natalie E; Bryant, Vaughn; Burrell, Larry E; Míguez, Maria Jose; Gongvatana, Assawin; Tashima, Karen T; de la Monte, Suzanne; Cook, Robert L; Cohen, Ronald A

    2017-03-01

    To determine the relationships among body mass index (BMI), and HIV-associated neurocognitive impairment and the potential mediating effects of inflammatory cytokines. Among the HIV-infected individuals (N = 90) included in this study, obesity was associated with slower processing speed (β = -.229, standard error (SE) = 2.15, p = .033), compared to participants with a normal BMI, after controlling for psychosocial and HIV clinical factors. Serum concentrations of the interleukin-16 (IL-16) cytokine were significantly associated with slowed processing speed (β = -.235, SE = 1.62, p = .033) but did not mediate the relationship between obesity and processing speed These findings suggest that obesity may contribute to cognitive processing speed deficits in HIV-infected adults. Elevated concentrations of IL-16 are also associated with slowing, though the results suggest that obesity and IL-16 may exert independent effects.

  11. Body Mass Index, Inflammatory Biomarkers and Neurocognitive Impairment in HIV-Infected Persons

    PubMed Central

    Okafor, Chukwuemeka N.; Kelso, Natalie E.; Bryant, Vaughn; Burrell, Larry E.; Míguez, Maria Jose; Gongvatana, Assawin; Tashima, Karen T.; de la Monte, Suzanne; Cook, Robert L.; Cohen, Ronald A.

    2016-01-01

    To determine the relationships among body mass index (BMI), and HIV-associated neurocognitive impairment and the potential mediating effects of inflammatory cytokines. Among the HIV-infected individuals (N=90) included in this study, obesity was associated with slower processing speed (β = −.229, standard error (SE) = 2.15, p = .033), compared to participants with a normal BMI, after controlling for psychosocial and HIV clinical factors. Serum concentrations of the interleukin-16 (IL-16) cytokine were significantly associated with slowed processing speed (β = −.235, standard error (SE) = 1.62, p = .033) but did not mediate the relationship between obesity and processing speed These findings suggest that obesity may contribute to cognitive processing speed deficits in HIV-infected adults. Elevated concentrations of IL-16 are also associated with slowing, though the results suggest that obesity and IL-16 may exert independent effects. PMID:27319430

  12. Role of the dental surgeon in the early detection of adults with underlying HIV infection / AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Cano, Jorge; del Romero, Jorge; Hernando, Victoria; del Amo, Julia; Moreno, Santiago

    2012-01-01

    A review is made of the late diagnosis of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, a subject of growing interest in public health. It has been estimated that in Europe 30% of all HIV-infected people are unaware of their seropositive condition, and this in turn is associated with a poorer long-term disease prognosis and an increased risk of transmission to other individuals. The role of the dental surgeon in this context could be of great importance, since there are many oral lesions that can suggest the existence of underlying infection. The study also addresses the controversial subject of rapid HIV testing, and whether these tests should be performed on a routine basis in the dental clinic, or whether it is preferable to refer the patient to a specialized center. Key words:HIV in Spain, HIV screening, early diagnosis. PMID:22143719

  13. HIV Infection Accelerates Hepatitis C-Related Liver Fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Liver Fibrosis HIV Infection Accelerates Hepatitis C–Related Liver Fibrosis Email Facebook Twitter January 21, 2014 By ... Contributing Writer Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection causes liver fibrosis that worsens as patients age, potentially progressing ...

  14. YELLOW FEVER PREVENTION STRATEGIES AWARENESS AMONG HIV-INFECTED PATIENTS IN SÃO PAULO, BRAZIL

    PubMed Central

    Avelino-Silva, Vivian Iida; Francelino, Hilario Sousa; Kallás, Esper Georges

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Vaccination is the main preventive strategy against Yellow Fever (YF), which is a public health concern in Brazil. However, HIV-infected patients might have insufficient knowledge regarding YF, YF prevention, and vaccines in general. Methods: In this questionnaire-based study, data from 158 HIV-infected individuals were addressed in three distinct outpatient clinics in São Paulo. Information was collected on demographic and clinical characteristics, as well as patients' knowledge of vaccines, YF and YF preventive strategies. In addition, individual YF vaccine recommendations and vaccine status were investigated. Results: Although most participants adequately ascertain the vaccine as the main prevention strategy against YF, few participants were aware of the severity and lack of specific treatment for YF. Discrepancy in YF vaccine (patients who should have taken the vaccine, but did not) was observed in 18.8% of participants. Conclusion: YF is an important and preventable public health concern, and these results demonstrate that more information is necessary for the HIV-infected population. PMID:25229222

  15. Relationship between heterosexual anal sex, injection drug use and HIV infection among black men and women.

    PubMed

    Risser, J M H; Padgett, P; Wolverton, M; Risser, W L

    2009-05-01

    US blacks carry a disproportionate risk of heterosexually transmitted HIV. This study aimed to evaluate the association between self-reported heterosexual anal intercourse and HIV. Using respondent-driven sampling (RDS), we recruited and interviewed 909 blacks from areas of high poverty and HIV prevalence in Houston, Texas, and who reported heterosexual sex in the last year. All individuals were tested for HIV. Weighted prevalence values were calculated to account for non-random recruitment associated with RDS. The weighted population prevalence of HIV infection was 2.4% and 2.5% among men and women, respectively. Education, employment status, income and crack cocaine use were not associated with HIV infection. Lifetime injection drug use (odds ratio [OR] 3.31, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.31-8.33%) and heterosexual anal intercourse (OR 2.41, 95% CI 1.02-5.73%) were associated with HIV infection. Individuals who reported both injection drug use and heterosexual anal intercourse had 6.21 increased odds of HIV (95% CI 2.47-15.61%). Our results suggest that heterosexual anal sex may be a vector for HIV transmission, especially in the context of injection drug use. Prevention strategies directed at curbing the HIV epidemic among black heterosexuals require that we correctly identify the risks so that appropriate interventions can be developed.

  16. Age differences between sexual partners, behavioural and demographic correlates, and HIV infection on Likoma Island, Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Beauclair, Roxanne; Helleringer, Stéphane; Hens, Niel; Delva, Wim

    2016-01-01

    Patterns of age differences between sexual partners – “age-mixing” – may partially explain the magnitude of HIV epidemics in Sub-Saharan Africa. However, evidence of age-disparity as a risk factor for HIV remains mixed. We used data from a socio-centric study of sexual behaviour in Malawi to quantify the age-mixing pattern and to find associations between relationship characteristics and age differences for 1,922 participants. Three age difference measures were explored as predictors of prevalent HIV infection. We found that for each year increase in male participant age, the average age difference with their partners increased by 0.26 years, while among women it remained approximately constant around 5 years. Women in the study had larger within-individual variation in partner ages compared to men. Spousal partnerships and never using a condom during sex were associated with larger age differences in relationships of both men and women. Men who were more than five years younger than their partners had 5.39 times higher odds (95% CI: 0.93–31.24) of being HIV-infected than men 0–4 years older. The relationship between HIV-infection and age-asymmetry may be more complex than previously described. The role that women play in HIV transmission should not be under-estimated, particularly in populations with large within-individual variation in partner ages. PMID:27805053

  17. Understanding the modes of transmission model of new HIV infection and its use in prevention planning.

    PubMed

    Case, Kelsey K; Ghys, Peter D; Gouws, Eleanor; Eaton, Jeffrey W; Borquez, Annick; Stover, John; Cuchi, Paloma; Abu-Raddad, Laith J; Garnett, Geoffrey P; Hallett, Timothy B

    2012-11-01

    The modes of transmission model has been widely used to help decision-makers target measures for preventing human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. The model estimates the number of new HIV infections that will be acquired over the ensuing year by individuals in identified risk groups in a given population using data on the size of the groups, the aggregate risk behaviour in each group, the current prevalence of HIV infection among the sexual or injecting drug partners of individuals in each group, and the probability of HIV transmission associated with different risk behaviours. The strength of the model is its simplicity, which enables data from a variety of sources to be synthesized, resulting in better characterization of HIV epidemics in some settings. However, concerns have been raised about the assumptions underlying the model structure, about limitations in the data available for deriving input parameters and about interpretation and communication of the model results. The aim of this review was to improve the use of the model by reassessing its paradigm, structure and data requirements. We identified key questions to be asked when conducting an analysis and when interpreting the model results and make recommendations for strengthening the model's application in the future.

  18. Lack of Evidence for Molecular Mimicry in HIV-Infected Subjects.

    PubMed

    Burbelo, Peter D; Klimavicz, James S; Deeks, Steve G; Kovacs, Joseph A; Ragheb, Jack A

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies in HIV patients have reported autoantibodies to several human proteins, including erythropoietin (EPO), interferon-α (IFN-α), interleukin-2 (IL-2), and HLA-DR, as potential mediators of anemia or immunosuppression. The etiology of these autoantibodies has been attributed to molecular mimicry between HIV epitopes and self-proteins. Here, the Luciferase Immunoprecipitation System (LIPS) was used to investigate the presence of such autoantibodies in HIV-infected adults. High levels of antibodies to HIV proteins such as capsid (p24), matrix (p17), envelope (gp41), and reverse transcriptase (RT) were detected using LIPS in both untreated and anti-retroviral-treated HIV-infected individuals but not in uninfected controls. LIPS readily detected anti-EPO autoantibodies in serum samples from subjects with presumptive pure red cell aplasia but not in any of the samples from HIV-infected or uninfected individuals. Similarly, subjects with HIV lacked autoantibodies to IFN-α, IL-2, HLA-DR and the immunoglobulin lambda light chain; all purported targets of molecular mimicry. While molecular mimicry between pathogen proteins and self-proteins is a commonly proposed mechanism for autoantibody production, the findings presented here indicate such a process is not common in HIV disease.

  19. An integrative review of guidelines for anal cancer screening in HIV-infected persons.

    PubMed

    Wells, Jessica S; Holstad, Marcia M; Thomas, Tami; Bruner, Deborah Watkins

    2014-07-01

    HIV-infected individuals are 28 times more likely than the general population to be diagnosed with anal cancer. An integrative review of recommendations and guidelines for anal cancer screening was performed to provide a succinct guide to inform healthcare clinicians. The review excluded studies that were of non-HIV populations, redundant articles or publications, non-English manuscripts, or nonclinical trials. The review found no formal national or international guidelines exist for routine screening of anal cancer for HIV-infected individuals. To date, no randomized control trial provides strong evidence supporting efficaciousness and effectiveness of an anal cancer screening program. The screening recommendations from seven international-, national-, and state-based reports were reviewed and synthesized in this review. These guidelines suggest anal cancer screening, albeit unproven, may be beneficial at decreasing the incidence of anal cancer. This review highlights the paucity of screening-related research and is an area of need to provide clear direction and to define standard of care for anal cancer screening in HIV-infected persons.

  20. In vivo analysis of Fas/FasL interactions in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed Central

    Badley, A D; Dockrell, D H; Algeciras, A; Ziesmer, S; Landay, A; Lederman, M M; Connick, E; Kessler, H; Kuritzkes, D; Lynch, D H; Roche, P; Yagita, H; Paya, C V

    1998-01-01

    Recent insights into the pharmacological control of HIV replication and the molecular mechanisms of peripheral T cells homeostasis allowed us to investigate in vivo the mechanisms mediating T cell depletion in HIV-infected patients. Before the initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), a high degree of lymphoid tissue apoptosis is present, which is reduced upon HAART initiation (P < 0.001) and directly correlates with reduction of viral load and increases of peripheral T lymphocytes (P < 0.01). Because Fas/FasL interactions play a key role in peripheral T lymphocyte homeostasis, we investigated the susceptibility to Fas-mediated apoptosis in peripheral T lymphocytes and of FasL expression in lymphoid tissue before and during HAART. High levels of Fas-susceptibility found in peripheral CD4 T lymphocytes before HAART were significantly reduced after HAART, coinciding with decreases in viral load (P = 0.018) and increases in peripheral CD4 T lymphocyte counts (P < 0.01). However, the increased FasL expression in the lymphoid tissue of HIV-infected individuals was not reduced after HAART. These results demonstrate that lymphoid tissue apoptosis directly correlates with viral load and peripheral T lymphocyte numbers, and suggest that HIV-induced susceptibility to Fas-dependent apoptosis may play a key role in the regulation of T cell homeostasis in HIV-infected individuals. PMID:9649560

  1. Isolated cerebellar toxoplasmosis as a complication of HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Pott, H; Castelo, A

    2013-01-01

    Isolated cerebellar mass lesion is an uncommon presentation of toxoplasmosis. The authors report one rare case in a 50-year-old HIV-infected male patient who presented with clipped speech, gait ataxia and incoordination. The cerebellar toxoplasmosis was suspected based on imaging findings, despite the atypical location. This case highlights the need for a high index of clinical suspicion among HIV-infected patients with neurological manifestations and suspicious neuroimaging findings.

  2. CD4/CD8 Ratio and KT Ratio Predict Yellow Fever Vaccine Immunogenicity in HIV-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Peter W.; Huang, Yong; Simoes, Marisol; Lima, Sheila B.; Freire, Marcos S.; Caiaffa-Filho, Helio H.; Hong, Marisa A.; Costa, Dayane Alves; Dias, Juliana Zanatta C.; Cerqueira, Natalia B.; Nishiya, Anna Shoko; Sabino, Ester Cerdeira; Sartori, Ana M.; Kallas, Esper G.

    2016-01-01

    Background HIV-infected individuals have deficient responses to Yellow Fever vaccine (YFV) and may be at higher risk for adverse events (AE). Chronic immune activation–characterized by low CD4/CD8 ratio or high indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-1 (IDO) activity—may influence vaccine response in this population. Methods We prospectively assessed AE, viremia by the YFV virus and YF-specific neutralizing antibodies (NAb) in HIV-infected (CD4>350) and -uninfected adults through 1 year after vaccination. The effect of HIV status on initial antibody response to YFV was measured during the first 3 months following vaccination, while the effect on persistence of antibody response was measured one year following vaccination. We explored CD4/CD8 ratio, IDO activity (plasma kynurenine/tryptophan [KT] ratio) and viremia by Human Pegivirus as potential predictors of NAb response to YFV among HIV-infected participants with linear mixed models. Results 12 HIV-infected and 45-uninfected participants were included in the final analysis. HIV was not significantly associated with AE, YFV viremia or NAb titers through the first 3 months following vaccination. However, HIV–infected participants had 0.32 times the NAb titers observed for HIV-uninfected participants at 1 year following YFV (95% CI 0.13 to 0.83, p = 0.021), independent of sex, age and prior vaccination. In HIV-infected participants, each 10% increase in CD4/CD8 ratio predicted a mean 21% higher post-baseline YFV Nab titer (p = 0.024). Similarly, each 10% increase in KT ratio predicted a mean 21% lower post-baseline YFV Nab titer (p = 0.009). Viremia by Human Pegivirus was not significantly associated with NAb titers. Conclusions HIV infection appears to decrease the durability of NAb responses to YFV, an effect that may be predicted by lower CD4/CD8 ratio or higher KT ratio. PMID:27941965

  3. Immune Activation Response in Chronic HIV-Infected Patients: Influence of Hepatitis C Virus Coinfection

    PubMed Central

    Márquez, Mercedes; Romero-Cores, Paula; Montes-Oca, Monserrat; Martín-Aspas, Andrés; Soto-Cárdenas, María-José; Guerrero, Francisca; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Clotilde; Girón-González, José-Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We have analyzed the parameters (bacterial translocation, immune activation and regulation, presence of HCV coinfection) which could be implicated in an inappropriate immune response from individuals with chronic HIV infection. The influence of them on the evolution of CD4+ T cell count has been investigated. Patients and methods Seventy HIV-infected patients [monoinfected by HIV (n = 20), HCV-coinfected (with (n = 25) and without (n = 25) liver cirrhosis)] and 25 healthy controls were included. Median duration of HIV infection was 20 years. HIV- and HCV-related parameters, as well as markers relative to bacterial translocation, monocyte and lymphocyte activation and regulation were considered as independent variables. Dependent variables were the increase of CD4+ T cell count during the follow-up (12 months). Results Increased values of bacterial translocation, measured by lipopolysaccharide-binding protein, monocyte and lymphocyte activation markers and T regulatory lymphocytes were detected in HIV-monoinfected and HIV/HCV coinfected patients. Serum sCD14 and IL-6 were increased in HIV/HCV-coinfected patients with liver cirrhosis in comparison with those with chronic hepatitis or HIV-monoinfected individuals. Time with undetectable HIV load was not related with these parameters. The presence of cirrhosis was negatively associated with a CD4+ T cell count increase. Conclusion In patients with a chronic HIV infection, a persistent increase of lipopolysaccharide-binding protein and monocyte and lymphocyte modifications are present. HCV-related cirrhosis is associated with more elevated serum concentrations of monocyte-derived markers. Cirrhosis influences the continued immune reconstitution of these patients. PMID:25775475

  4. Improvements in depression and changes in quality of life among HIV-infected adults.

    PubMed

    Bengtson, Angela M; Pence, Brian W; O'Donnell, Julie; Thielman, Nathan; Heine, Amy; Zinski, Anne; Modi, Riddhi; McGuinness, Teena; Gaynes, Bradley

    2015-01-01

    Improving quality of life (QOL) for HIV-infected individuals is an important objective of HIV care, given the considerable physical and emotional burden associated with living with HIV. Although worse QOL has been associated with depression, no research has quantified the potential of improvement in depression to prospectively improve QOL among HIV-infected adults. We analyzed data from 115 HIV-infected adults with depression enrolled in a randomized controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness of improved depression care on antiretroviral drug adherence. Improvement in depression, the exposure of interest, was defined as the relative change in depression at six months compared to baseline and categorized as full response (≥50% improvement), partial response (25-49% improvement), and no response (<25% improvement). Multivariable linear regression was used to investigate the relationship between improvement in depression and four continuous measures of QOL at six months: physical QOL, mental QOL, HIV symptoms, and fatigue intensity. In multivariable analyses, physical QOL was higher among partial responders (mean difference [MD] = 2.51, 95% CI: -1.51, 6.54) and full responders (MD = 3.68, 95% CI: -0.36, 7.72) compared to individuals who did not respond. Mental QOL was an average of 4.01 points higher (95% CI: -1.01, 9.03) among partial responders and 14.34 points higher (95% CI: 9.42, 19.25) among full responders. HIV symptoms were lower for partial responders (MD = -0.69; 95% CI: -1.69, 0.30) and full responders (MD = -1.51; 95% CI: -2.50, -0.53). Fatigue intensity was also lower for partial responders (MD = -0.94; 95% CI: -1.94, 0.07) and full responders (MD = -3.00; 95% CI: -3.98, -2.02). Among HIV-infected adults with depression, improving access to high-quality depression treatment may also improve important QOL outcomes.

  5. Supplementation With Multivitamins and Vitamin A and Incidence of Malaria Among HIV-Infected Tanzanian Women

    PubMed Central

    Spiegelman, Donna; Aboud, Said; Duggan, Christopher; Danaei, Goodarz; Fawzi, Wafaie W.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: HIV and malaria infections occur in the same individuals, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa. We examined whether daily multivitamin supplementation (vitamins B complex, C, and E) or vitamin A supplementation altered malaria incidence in HIV-infected women of reproductive age. Methods: HIV-infected pregnant Tanzanian women recruited into the study were randomly assigned to daily multivitamins (B complex, C, and E), vitamin A alone, both multivitamins and vitamin A, or placebo. Women received malaria prophylaxis during pregnancy and were followed monthly during the prenatal and postpartum periods. Malaria was defined in 2 ways: presumptive diagnosis based on a physician's or nurse's clinical judgment, which in many cases led to laboratory investigations, and periodic examination of blood smears for malaria parasites. Results: Multivitamin supplementation compared with no multivitamins significantly lowered women's risk of presumptively diagnosed clinical malaria (relative risk: 0.78, 95% confidence interval: 0.67 to 0.92), although multivitamins increased their risk of any malaria parasitemia (relative risk: 1.24, 95% confidence interval: 1.02 to 1.50). Vitamin A supplementation did not change malaria incidence during the study. Conclusions: Multivitamin supplements have been previously shown to reduce HIV disease progression among HIV-infected women, and consistent with that, these supplements protected against development of symptomatic malaria. The clinical significance of increased risk of malaria parasitemia among supplemented women deserves further research, however. Preventive measures for malaria are warranted as part of an integrated approach to the care of HIV-infected individuals exposed to malaria. PMID:25436815

  6. CD4 T Follicular Helper and Regulatory Cell Dynamics and Function in HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Miles, Brodie; Miller, Shannon M.; Connick, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    T follicular helper cells (TFH) are a specialized subset of CD4 T cells that reside in B cell follicles and promote B cell maturation into plasma cells and long-lived memory B cells. During chronic infection prior to the development of AIDS, HIV-1 (HIV) replication is largely concentrated in TFH. Paradoxically, TFH numbers are increased in early and midstages of disease, thereby promoting HIV replication and disease progression. Despite increased TFH numbers, numerous defects in humoral immunity are detected in HIV-infected individuals, including dysregulation of B cell maturation, impaired somatic hypermutation, and low quality of antibody production despite hypergammaglobulinemia. Clinically, these defects are manifested by increased vulnerability to bacterial infections and impaired vaccine responses, neither of which is fully reversed by antiretroviral therapy (ART). Deficits in TFH function, including reduced HIV-specific IL-21 production and low levels of co-stimulatory receptor expression, have been linked to these immune impairments. Impairments in TFH likely contribute as well to the ability of HIV to persist and evade humoral immunity, particularly the inability to develop broadly neutralizing antibodies. In addition to direct infection of TFH, other mechanisms that have been linked to TFH deficits in HIV infection include upregulation of PD-L1 on germinal center B cells and augmented follicular regulatory T cell responses. Challenges to development of strategies to enhance TFH function in HIV infection include lack of an established phenotype for memory TFH as well as limited understanding of the relationship between peripheral TFH and lymphoid tissue TFH. Interventions to augment TFH function in HIV-infected individuals could enhance immune reconstitution during ART and potentially augment cure strategies. PMID:28082992

  7. A trial of 7-valent Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine in HIV-infected Adults

    PubMed Central

    French, Neil; Gordon, Stephen B; Mwalukomo, Thandie; White, Sarah A; Mwafulirwa, Gershom; Longwe, Herbert; Mwaiponya, Martin; Zijlstra, Eduard E; Molyneux, Malcolm E; Gilks, Charles F

    2010-01-01

    Background: Streptococcus pneumoniae is a leading and serious co-infection of HIV-infected adults, particularly in Africa. Prevention of disease by vaccination with the current 23-valent polysaccharide vaccine is sub-optimal. Protein conjugate vaccines offer a further option for protection but no data exist on their clinical efficacy in any adult population. Methods: We conducted a double-blind randomized placebo-controlled clinical efficacy trial of the seven-valent conjugate pneumococcal vaccine in predominantly HIV-infected Malawian adults who had recovered from documented invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). Vaccine was given as a two dose schedule four weeks apart. The primary end-point was a further episode of IPD caused by a vaccine-serotype or serotype-6A (VST/6A) pneumococcus. Results: Between February 2003 and October 2007, 496 individuals (44% male, 88% HIV seropositive) were followed for 798 person years of observation. There were 67 IPD events in 52 individuals, all in the HIV infected sub-group. There were 24 VST/6A events (19 VST, five 6A) in 24 participants, 5 in vaccine and 19 in the placebo recipients, a vaccine efficacy of 74% (95% CI 30% - 90%). There were 73 deaths in the vaccine arm and 63 in the placebo arm, Hazard Ratio 1.18 (95% confidence intervals 0.84 -1.66). Compared to placebo, serious adverse events were significantly lower (3 vs 17, p = 0.002) and minor adverse events significantly higher (41 vs 13, p = 0.003 ) in vaccine recipients. Conclusions: The seven-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine protects HIV infected adults from recurrent IPD of vaccine serotype or serotype 6A. PMID:20200385

  8. The EPIICAL project: an emerging global collaboration to investigate immunotherapeutic strategies in HIV-infected children.

    PubMed

    Palma, P; Foster, C; Rojo, P; Zangari, P; Yates, A; Cotugno, N; Klein, N; Luzuriaga, K; Pahwa, S; Nastouli, E; Gibb, D M; Borkowsky, W; Bernardi, S; Calvez, V; Manno, E; Mora, Nadia; Compagnucci, A; Wahren, B; Muñoz-Fernández, Má; De Rossi, A; Ananworanich, J; Pillay, D; Giaquinto, C; Rossi, P

    The EPIICAL (Early-treated Perinatally HIV-infected Individuals: Improving Children's Actual Life with Novel Immunotherapeutic Strategies) project arises from the firm belief that perinatally infected children treated with suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART) from early infancy represent the optimal population model in which to study novel immunotherapeutic strategies aimed at achieving ART-free remission. This is because HIV-infected infants treated within 2-3 months of life have a much reduced viral reservoir size, and rarely show HIV-specific immunity but preserve normal immune development. The goal of EPIICAL is the establishment of an international collaboration to develop a predictive platform using this model to select promising HIV therapeutic vaccine candidates, leading to prioritisation or deprioritisation of novel immunotherapeutic strategies. To establish this platform, the EPIICAL Consortium aims to: develop predictive models of virological and immunological dynamics associated with response to early ART and to treatment interruption using available data from existing cohorts/studies of early-treated perinatally HIV-infected children; optimise methodologies to better characterise immunological, virological and genomic correlates/profiles associated with viral control; test novel immunotherapeutic strategies using in vivo proof-of-concept (PoC) studies with the aim of inducing virological, immunological and transcriptomic correlates/profiles equivalent to those defined by the predictive model. This approach will strengthen the capacity for discovery, development and initial testing of new therapeutic vaccine strategies through the integrated efforts of leading international scientific groups, with the aim of improving the health of HIV-infected individuals.

  9. Evaluation of Olfactory and Gustatory Function of HIV Infected Women

    PubMed Central

    Kuti, Kehinde Mobolanle; Nwaorgu, Onyekwere George; Akinyinka, Olusina Olusegun

    2016-01-01

    Background. Compliance with medication requires good sense of smell and taste. Objective. To evaluate the olfactory and gustatory function of HIV infected women in Ibadan, Nigeria. Methods. A case control study of women comprising 83 HIV infected women and 79 HIV uninfected women. Subjective self-rating of taste and smell function was by visual analogue scale. Olfactory function was measured via olfactory threshold (OT), olfactory discrimination (OD), olfactory identification (OI), and TDI using “Sniffin' sticks” kits and taste function (Total Taste Strips (TTS) score) measurement was by taste strips. Results. The mean age of the HIV infected women was 43.67 years ± 10.72 and control was 41.48 years ± 10.99. There was no significant difference in the self-reported assessment of smell (p = 0.67) and taste (p = 0.84) of HIV infected and uninfected women. Although the mean OT, OD, OI, TDI, and TTS scores of HIV infected and uninfected women were within the normosmic and normogeusic values, the values were significantly higher in the controls (p < 0.05). Hyposmia was in 39.7% of subjects and 12.6% of controls while hypogeusia was in 15.7% of subjects and 1.3% of controls. Conclusions. Hyposmia and hypogeusia are commoner among the HIV infected women than the HIV uninfected women and the risk increases with an increased duration of highly active antiretroviral therapy. PMID:27047688

  10. Women and HIV infection: the makings of a midlife crisis.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Nanette; Fan, Maria; Maslow, BatSheva; Schoenbaum, Ellie

    2009-11-20

    With the advent of highly active antiretroviral agents, women with HIV infection can expect to live longer than ever before. This increased survival has led to concerns about the long-term implications of HIV disease and its treatment. Women with HIV infection appear to lose ovarian function earlier in life than women without HIV infection. They also have evidence of reduced bone mineral density and increased cardiovascular risk. Moreover, many of these increases in risk factors are present even prior to the menopausal transition. All of these risks, present at midlife, augur poorly for future health and describe a substantially increased burden of disease likely to accrue to HIV-infected women as they enter older age groups. Further compounding the adversity faced by the HIV infected, the demographics of women most vulnerable to this disease include adverse social and economic influences, both of which worsen their long-term prognosis. For example, drug use and poverty are related to more severe menopausal symptoms and chronic stress is related to worse psychological and cardiovascular risk. An understanding of how menopause interacts with HIV infection is therefore most important to alert the clinician to perform surveillance for common health problems in postmenopausal women, and to address directly and appropriately symptomatology during the menopausal transition.

  11. Association of Blood Pressure and Hypertension with Alcohol Consumption in HIV-Infected White and Nonwhite Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Maria Leticia R.; Barcellos, Nêmora T.; Alencastro, Paulo R.; Wolff, Fernando H.; Brandão, Ajácio B. M.; Fuchs, Flávio D.; Fuchs, Sandra C.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Although alcohol abuse is associated with hypertension in whites and nonwhites, it has been scarcely investigated in HIV-infected patients. Objective. To investigate whether the association of alcohol abuse with hypertension is influenced by skin color in HIV-infected individuals. Methods. Cross-sectional study in HIV-infected individuals aged 18 years or older. Demographic characteristics, lifestyle, and HIV infection were investigated. Alcohol abuse was defined as ≥15 (women) and ≥30 g/alcohol/day (men), and binge drinking by the intake of ≥5 drinks on a single occasion. Hypertension was defined by blood pressure ≥140/90 mmHg or use of blood pressure-lowering agents. Results. We studied 1,240 individuals, with 39.1 ± 10 years, 51% males and 57% whites. Age and body mass index were associated with blood pressure, and there was an independent association of alcohol abuse with hypertension in whites (RR = 1.9, 95% CI 1.1–3.3) and nonwhites (RR = 2.4, 95% CI 1.4 to 4.0). Among nonwhite individuals who were alcohol abusers, systolic (9.3 ± 3.2; P = 0.001) and diastolic blood pressures (6.4 ± 2.1; P = 0.008) were higher than in nonabusers. Conclusion. Alcohol abuse is a risk factor for hypertension in white and nonwhite HIV-infected individuals. The association of ethanol consumption with blood pressure is not explained by AIDS-related conditions. PMID:24235878

  12. Psychosocial aspects of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in a pre-HAART sample.

    PubMed

    Skydsbjerg, M; Lunn, S; Hutchings, B

    2001-09-01

    The psychosocial consequences of HLV-infection were studied using a semi-structured interview and the psychiatric questionnaire SCL-90-R, in 3 matched groups of homosexual men: 20 patients with Aids, 20 asymptomatic HIV-infected and 20 non-infected controls. The data was collected before the HAART (Highly Active Anti-retroviral Therapy) era. The results showed that the infected subjects more often concealed their homosexuality, engaged in more risky sexual behavior and were less inclined to regard AIDS as a serious problem. The infected subjects also revealed more psychopathology on 5 of the 9 indexes on the SCL-90. Across all 3 groups, contact ability was correlated to being open about homosexuality and to psychological well-being. These results indicate that HIV has considerable impact on psychological well-being among the infected and point to the need for health-care workers to be especially attentive to those HIV-infected who have difficulty in talking to others about their situation.

  13. Validation Protocol of Vitamin D Supplementation in Patients with HIV-Infection

    PubMed Central

    Güerri-Fernández, Roberto; Villar García, Judit; González Mena, Alicia; Guelar Grinberg, Ana; Montero, María Milagro; Sorli, Luisa; Calzado, Sonia; Horcajada, Juan Pablo; Díez-Pérez, Adolfo; Knobel Freud, Hernando

    2016-01-01

    Hypovitaminosis D and secondary hyperparathyroidism are frequent among HIV-infected patients. As there are no data about the best supplementation therapy both in treatment and in maintenance, we conducted an observational study of 300 HIV-infected patients for whom vitamin D and parathormone (PTH) had been measured in order to validate a protocol of vitamin D supplementation in patients with HIV-infection. Patients with vitamin D deficiency (defined as 25(OH)D < 10 ng/mL), insufficiency (defined as 25(OH)D < 20 ng/mL), or hyperparathyroidism (PTH > 65 pg/mL) were supplemented with cholecalciferol 16.000IU (0.266 mg) weekly (if deficiency) or fortnightly (if insufficiency or high PTH levels). Rates of normalization of 25(OH)D (levels above 20 ng/mL) and PTH levels (<65 pg/mL) were analyzed. Multivariate analysis of factors related to normalization was carried out. With a median follow-up of 2 years, 82.1% of patients with deficiency and 83.9% of cases with insufficiency reached levels above 20 ng/mL. However, only 67.2% of individuals with hyperparathyroidism at baseline reached target levels (<65 pg/mL). Independent factors for not achieving PTH objective were tenofovir (TDF) and protease inhibitors use. In HIV-infected patients with hypovitaminosis, the protocol of cholecalciferol supplementation normalized vitamin D levels regardless of antiretroviral regimen in a high proportion of patients but it was less effective to correct hyperparathyroidism. PMID:27699068

  14. HIV infection Heightens Concurrent Risk of Functional Dependence in Persons With Chronic Methamphetamine Use

    PubMed Central

    Blackstone, K.; Iudicello, J. E.; Morgan, E. E.; Weber, E.; Moore, D. J.; Franklin, D. R.; Ellis, R. J.; Grant, I.; Woods, S. P.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The causes of disability among chronic methamphetamine (MA) users are multifactorial. The current study examined the additive adverse impact of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, a common comorbidity in MA users, on functional dependence. Methods A large cohort of participants (N=798) stratified by lifetime MA dependence diagnoses (i.e., MA+ or MA−) and HIV serostatus (i.e., HIV+ or HIV−) underwent comprehensive baseline neuromedical, neuropsychiatric, and functional research evaluations, including assessment of neurocognitive symptoms in daily life, instrumental and basic activities of daily living, and employment status. Results Independent, additive effects of MA and HIV were observed across all measures of functional dependence, independent of other demographic, psychiatric, and substance use factors. The prevalence of global functional dependence increased in the expected stepwise fashion across the cohort, with the lowest rates in the MA−/HIV− group (29%) and the highest rates in the MA+/HIV+ sample (69%). The impact of HIV on MA-associated functional dependence was moderated by nadir CD4 count, such that MA use was associated with greater disability among those HIV-infected persons with higher, but not lower nadir CD4. Within the MA+/HIV+ cohort, functional dependence was reliably associated with neurocognitive impairment, lower cognitive reserve, polysubstance use, and major depressive disorder. Conclusions HIV infection confers an increased concurrent risk of MA-associated disability, particularly among HIV-infected persons without histories of immune compromise. Directed referrals, earlier HIV treatment, and compensatory strategies aimed at counteracting the effects of low cognitive reserve, neurocognitive impairment, and psychiatric comorbidities on functional dependence in MA+/HIV+ individuals may be warranted. PMID:23648641

  15. Nanotechnology and the Treatment of HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Parboosing, Raveen; Maguire, Glenn E. M.; Govender, Patrick; Kruger, Hendrik G.

    2012-01-01

    Suboptimal adherence, toxicity, drug resistance and viral reservoirs make the lifelong treatment of HIV infection challenging. The emerging field of nanotechnology may play an important role in addressing these challenges by creating drugs that possess pharmacological advantages arising out of unique phenomena that occur at the “nano” scale. At these dimensions, particles have physicochemical properties that are distinct from those of bulk materials or single molecules or atoms. In this review, basic concepts and terms in nanotechnology are defined, and examples are provided of how nanopharmaceuticals such as nanocrystals, nanocapsules, nanoparticles, solid lipid nanoparticles, nanocarriers, micelles, liposomes and dendrimers have been investigated as potential anti-HIV therapies. Such drugs may, for example, be used to optimize the pharmacological characteristics of known antiretrovirals, deliver anti-HIV nucleic acids into infected cells or achieve targeted delivery of antivirals to the immune system, brain or latent reservoirs. Also, nanopharmaceuticals themselves may possess anti-HIV activity. However several hurdles remain, including toxicity, unwanted biological interactions and the difficulty and cost of large-scale synthesis of nanopharmaceuticals. PMID:22590683

  16. Post-treatment control of HIV infection

    SciTech Connect

    Conway, Jessica M.; Perelson, Alan S.

    2015-04-13

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) for HIV is not a cure. However, recent studies suggest that ART, initiated early during primary infection, may induce post-treatment control (PTC) of HIV infection with HIV RNA maintained at <50 copies per mL. We investigate the hypothesis that ART initiated early during primary infection permits PTC by limiting the size of the latent reservoir, which, if small enough at treatment termination, may allow the adaptive immune response to prevent viral rebound (VR) and control infection. We use a mathematical model of within host HIV dynamics to capture interactions among target cells, productively infected cells, latently infected cells, virus, and cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). Analysis of our model reveals a range in CTL response strengths where a patient may show either VR or PTC, depending on the size of the latent reservoir at treatment termination. Below this range, patients will always rebound, whereas above this range, patients are predicted to behave like elite controllers. As a result, using data on latent reservoir sizes in patients treated during primary infection, we also predict population-level VR times for non-controllers consistent with observations.

  17. Post-treatment control of HIV infection

    DOE PAGES

    Conway, Jessica M.; Perelson, Alan S.

    2015-04-13

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) for HIV is not a cure. However, recent studies suggest that ART, initiated early during primary infection, may induce post-treatment control (PTC) of HIV infection with HIV RNA maintained at <50 copies per mL. We investigate the hypothesis that ART initiated early during primary infection permits PTC by limiting the size of the latent reservoir, which, if small enough at treatment termination, may allow the adaptive immune response to prevent viral rebound (VR) and control infection. We use a mathematical model of within host HIV dynamics to capture interactions among target cells, productively infected cells, latently infectedmore » cells, virus, and cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). Analysis of our model reveals a range in CTL response strengths where a patient may show either VR or PTC, depending on the size of the latent reservoir at treatment termination. Below this range, patients will always rebound, whereas above this range, patients are predicted to behave like elite controllers. As a result, using data on latent reservoir sizes in patients treated during primary infection, we also predict population-level VR times for non-controllers consistent with observations.« less

  18. Lung Cancer in HIV-Infected Patients.

    PubMed

    Mena, Álvaro; Meijide, Héctor; Marcos, Pedro J

    2016-01-01

    The widespread use of HAART for persons living with HIV since 1996 has resulted in a dramatic decline in AIDS-related mortality. However, other comorbidities are increasing, such as metabolic disturbances or cancers, including solid organ malignancies. Among the latest, lung cancer, especially the adenocarcinoma subtype, is on the rise. HIV infection, even controlling for smoking, is an independent risk factor for developing lung cancer. HIV could promote lung cancers through immunosuppression, chronic inflammation, and a direct oncogenic effect. Smoking, lung infections, and chronic pulmonary diseases are risk factors for lung cancer. All may contribute to the cumulative incidence of lung cancer in persons living with HIV. It is double that in the general population. The role of HAART in lung cancer development in persons living with HIV is not well established. Although data supporting it could be too preliminary, persons living with HIV should be considered within high-risk groups that could benefit from screening strategies with low-dose computed tomography, especially those with airway obstruction and emphysema. Current evidence suggests that quitting smoking strategies in persons living with HIV achieve abstinence rates comparable to those in healthy HIV-negative smokers.

  19. Genetic polymorphisms in the CD14 gene are associated with monocyte activation and carotid intima-media thickness in HIV-infected patients on antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Yean K.; Shankar, Esaki M.; Westhorpe, Clare L.V.; Maisa, Anna; Spelman, Tim; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Crowe, Suzanne M.; Lewin, Sharon R.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract HIV-infected individuals on antiretroviral therapy (ART) are at increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Given the relationship between innate immune activation and CVD, we investigated the association of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in TLR4 and CD14 and carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT), a surrogate measurement for CVD, in HIV-infected individuals on ART and HIV-uninfected controls as a cross-sectional, case-control study. We quantified the frequency of monocyte subsets (CD14, CD16), markers of monocyte activation (CD38, HLA-DR), and endothelial adhesion (CCR2, CX3CR1, CD11b) by flow cytometry. Plasma levels of lipopolysaccharide, sCD163, sCD14, sCX3CL1, and sCCL2, were measured by ELISA. Genotyping of TLR4 and CD14 SNPs was also performed. The TT genotype for CD14/−260SNP but not the CC/CT genotype was associated with elevated plasma sCD14, and increased frequency of CD11b+CD14+ monocytes in HIV-infected individuals. The TT genotype was associated with lower cIMT in HIV-infected patients (n = 47) but not in HIV-uninfected controls (n = 37). The AG genotype for TLR4/+896 was associated with increased CX3CR1 expression on total monocytes among HIV-infected individuals and increased sCCL2 and fibrinogen levels in HIV-uninfected controls. SNPs in CD14/−260 and TLR4/+896 were significantly associated with different markers of systemic and monocyte activation and cIMT that differed between HIV-infected participants on ART and HIV-uninfected controls. Further investigation on the relationship of these SNPs with a clinical endpoint of CVD is warranted in HIV-infected patients on ART. PMID:27495090

  20. Genetic polymorphisms in the CD14 gene are associated with monocyte activation and carotid intima-media thickness in HIV-infected patients on antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Yong, Yean K; Shankar, Esaki M; Westhorpe, Clare L V; Maisa, Anna; Spelman, Tim; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Crowe, Suzanne M; Lewin, Sharon R

    2016-08-01

    HIV-infected individuals on antiretroviral therapy (ART) are at increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Given the relationship between innate immune activation and CVD, we investigated the association of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in TLR4 and CD14 and carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT), a surrogate measurement for CVD, in HIV-infected individuals on ART and HIV-uninfected controls as a cross-sectional, case-control study. We quantified the frequency of monocyte subsets (CD14, CD16), markers of monocyte activation (CD38, HLA-DR), and endothelial adhesion (CCR2, CX3CR1, CD11b) by flow cytometry. Plasma levels of lipopolysaccharide, sCD163, sCD14, sCX3CL1, and sCCL2, were measured by ELISA. Genotyping of TLR4 and CD14 SNPs was also performed. The TT genotype for CD14/-260SNP but not the CC/CT genotype was associated with elevated plasma sCD14, and increased frequency of CD11b+CD14+ monocytes in HIV-infected individuals. The TT genotype was associated with lower cIMT in HIV-infected patients (n = 47) but not in HIV-uninfected controls (n = 37). The AG genotype for TLR4/+896 was associated with increased CX3CR1 expression on total monocytes among HIV-infected individuals and increased sCCL2 and fibrinogen levels in HIV-uninfected controls. SNPs in CD14/-260 and TLR4/+896 were significantly associated with different markers of systemic and monocyte activation and cIMT that differed between HIV-infected participants on ART and HIV-uninfected controls. Further investigation on the relationship of these SNPs with a clinical endpoint of CVD is warranted in HIV-infected patients on ART.

  1. The Effect of Latent Toxoplasma gondii Infection on the Immune Response in HIV-Infected Patients.

    PubMed

    Beran, Ondrej; Kodym, Petr; Maly, Marek; Davidova, Alzbeta; Reinvartova, Gabriela; Jilich, David; Holub, Michal; Rozsypal, Hanus

    2015-01-01

    A relationship between latent toxoplasmosis and the immune system during HIV disease is poorly understood. Therefore, the aim of this follow-up study was to characterize immunological parameters in HIV-infected patients with latent toxoplasmosis and noninfected individuals. A total of 101 HIV-infected patients were enrolled in the study. The patients were classified into two groups based on anti-Toxoplasma gondii antibodies: a group of 55 toxoplasma-positive persons (TP) and a group of 46 toxoplasma-negative persons (TN). Absolute counts of several lymphocyte subsets decreased in the TP group, namely, T cells (p = 0.007), B cells (p = 0.002), NK cells (p = 0.009), CD4 T cells (p = 0.028), and CD8 T cells (p = 0.004). On the other hand, the percentage of CD8 T cells expressing CD38 and HLA-DR significantly increased during the follow-up in the TP group (p = 0.003, p = 0.042, resp.) as well as the intensity of CD38 and HLA-DR expression (MFI) on CD8 T cells (p = 0.001, p = 0.057, resp.). In the TN group, analysis of the kinetics of immunological parameters revealed no significant changes over time. In conclusion, the results suggest that latent T. gondii infection modulates the immune response during HIV infection.

  2. Food insufficiency among HIV-infected crack-cocaine users in Atlanta and Miami

    PubMed Central

    Vogenthaler, Nicholas S; Hadley, Craig; Lewis, Sarah J; Rodriguez, Allan E; Metsch, Lisa R; del Rio, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    Objective To measure the occurrence and correlates of food insufficiency among HIV-infected crack-cocaine users in Atlanta and Miami, USA. Design Non-probability cross-sectional sample. Setting Inner-city hospitals in Atlanta and Miami. Subjects Two hundred and eighty-seven HIV-infected crack users. Results One-third (34 %) of respondents experienced food insufficiency within 30 d of interview. Increased odds of food insufficiency was associated with current homelessness (adjusted OR = 3·78, 95% CI 1·70, 8·41), living alone (adjusted OR = 2·85, 95% CI 1·36, 5·98), religious service attendance (adjusted OR = 2·34, 95% CI 1·02, 5·38) and presence of health insurance (adjusted OR = 2·41, 95% CI 1·06, 5·54). Monthly income greater than $US 600 (adjusted OR = 0·19, 95% CI 0·06, 0·58) was associated with decreased odds of food insufficiency, and less than weekly crack use was marginally associated with decreased odds of food insufficiency (adjusted OR = 0·39, 95 % CI 0·13, 1·08). Conclusions Food insufficiency is very prevalent among HIV-infected urban crack-cocaine users in Atlanta and Miami. Correlates of food insufficiency confirm the social vulnerability of these individuals. Routine assessment for food insecurity should become a routine component of treatment and prevention programmes in at-risk populations. PMID:20074395

  3. Clinical Spectrum of Oral Secondary Syphilis in HIV-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez-Amador, Velia; Anaya-Saavedra, Gabriela; Crabtree-Ramírez, Brenda; Esquivel-Pedraza, Lilly; Saeb-Lima, Marcela; Sierra-Madero, Juan

    2013-01-01

    Background. Oral lesions may constitute the first clinical manifestation in secondary syphilis, but detailed descriptions in HIV-infected individuals are scarce. Objective. To describe the clinical characteristics of oral secondary syphilis in HIV-infected patients and its relevance in the early diagnosis of syphilis. Methods. Twenty HIV/AIDS adult subjects with oral secondary syphilis lesions presenting at two HIV/AIDS referral centers in Mexico City (2003–2011) are described. An oral examination was performed by specialists in oral pathology and medicine; when possible, a punch biopsy was done, and Warthin-Starry stain and immunohistochemistry were completed. Intraoral herpes virus infection and erythematous candidosis were ruled out by cytological analysis. Diagnosis of oral syphilis was confirmed with positive nontreponemal test (VDRL), and, if possible, fluorescent treponemal antibody test. Results. Twenty male patients (median age 31.5, 21–59 years) with oral secondary syphilis lesions were included. Oral lesions were the first clinical sign of syphilis in 16 (80%) cases. Mucous patch was the most common oral manifestation (17, 85.5%), followed by shallow ulcers (2, 10%) and macular lesions (1, 5%). Conclusions. Due to the recent rise in HIV-syphilis coinfection, dental and medical practitioners should consider secondary syphilis in the differential diagnosis of oral lesions, particularly in HIV-infected patients. PMID:26316966

  4. Clinical Spectrum of Oral Secondary Syphilis in HIV-Infected Patients.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Amador, Velia; Anaya-Saavedra, Gabriela; Crabtree-Ramírez, Brenda; Esquivel-Pedraza, Lilly; Saeb-Lima, Marcela; Sierra-Madero, Juan

    2013-01-01

    Background. Oral lesions may constitute the first clinical manifestation in secondary syphilis, but detailed descriptions in HIV-infected individuals are scarce. Objective. To describe the clinical characteristics of oral secondary syphilis in HIV-infected patients and its relevance in the early diagnosis of syphilis. Methods. Twenty HIV/AIDS adult subjects with oral secondary syphilis lesions presenting at two HIV/AIDS referral centers in Mexico City (2003-2011) are described. An oral examination was performed by specialists in oral pathology and medicine; when possible, a punch biopsy was done, and Warthin-Starry stain and immunohistochemistry were completed. Intraoral herpes virus infection and erythematous candidosis were ruled out by cytological analysis. Diagnosis of oral syphilis was confirmed with positive nontreponemal test (VDRL), and, if possible, fluorescent treponemal antibody test. Results. Twenty male patients (median age 31.5, 21-59 years) with oral secondary syphilis lesions were included. Oral lesions were the first clinical sign of syphilis in 16 (80%) cases. Mucous patch was the most common oral manifestation (17, 85.5%), followed by shallow ulcers (2, 10%) and macular lesions (1, 5%). Conclusions. Due to the recent rise in HIV-syphilis coinfection, dental and medical practitioners should consider secondary syphilis in the differential diagnosis of oral lesions, particularly in HIV-infected patients.

  5. [Comparative study of pneumococcal bacteremia in patients with and without HIV infection].

    PubMed

    Roca, V; Pérez-Cecilia, E; Santillana, T; Romero, J; Picazo, J J

    1993-01-01

    A retrospective study of bacteriemias due to S. pneumoniae in adults is performed, from all the cases observed in our hospital during the 1989-1990 period. We compare the clinical characteristics of the disease depending if the affected patients were infected or not by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). In the considered period bacteriemia due to S. pneumoniae has been diagnosed in 12 patients with HIV infection and 29 without it. Ten of the twelve patients with HIV infection (83.3%) were in Stage IV (CDC) of the disease, staying the rest in a less developed phase of the disease. Age was significantly higher in non-HIV patients (p < 0.001) and a high percentage of patients in this group (75%) showed some disease considered as predisposing to bacteriemia due to S. pneumoniae. When a respiratory foci was present, VIH positive individuals showed more frequently bilateral radiologic infiltrates and less frequently pleural effusion. Leucocyte count when diagnosis was done were significantly higher in non-HIV group. Sensibility of isolated S. pneumoniae was similar in the two groups, being the immediate mortality related with bacteriemia due to S. pneumoniae higher in the non-HIV group. In our center 29.3% of bacteriemias due to S. pneumoniae are diagnosed in patients with HIV infection. This disease in itself could constitute an added risk factor in the development of bacteriemia due to S. pneumoniae.

  6. No Association Between Apoε4 Alleles, HIV Infection, Age, Neuropsychological Outcome or Death

    PubMed Central

    Becker, James T.; Martinson, Jeremy J.; Penugonda, Sudhir; Kingsley, Lawrence; Molsberry, Samantha; Wolinsky, Steven; Reynolds, Sandra; Aronow, Aaron; Goodkin, Karl; Levine, Andrew; Martin, Eileen; Miller, Eric N.; Munro, Cynthia A.; Ragin, Ann; Sacktor, Ned

    2014-01-01

    The ε4 allele of the ApoE gene may have important interactions with physical health and cognitive function among individuals with HIV disease. The purpose of this study is to examine the relationships between ε4, HIV disease, age, neuropsychological impairment and death in a large, well-characterized study sample. 2,846 men participating in the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study had ApoE genotyping and neuropsychological test data available for analysis. We found a significant association between HIV infection and time to death (from any cause), as well as older age, race, and education. But, ApoE status was not significantly associated with time to death. Similarly, we found a significant association between HIV infection and time to incident cognitive impairment, as well as age, education, and HIV serostatus; Apoε4 status was not related to incident cognitive impairment. There were no significant interactions between ApoE, HIV infection, and age on cognitive impairment. These data replicate and strengthen prior findings of the lack of association between ApoE ε4 and cognitive outcomes in HIV disease. We conclude that within the specific constraints of an exclusively male study in which the majority of participants were less than 65 years of age (range: 22-87 years), it appears reasonable to conclude that the ε4 allele is not significantly interacting with HIV serostatus. PMID:25388225

  7. Healthcare-seeking behaviour of HIV-infected mothers and male partners in Nairobi, Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Drake, Alison L.; Wilson, Suzanne K.; Kinuthia, John; Roxby, Alison C.; Matemo, Daniel; Farquhar, Carey; Rao, Deepa

    2015-01-01

    Healthcare-seeking behaviours of HIV-infected mothers in sub-Saharan Africa are poorly characterized and typically focus on individual health conditions rather than overall health. We conducted a qualitative study to understand how HIV-infected mothers, their male partners, and their HIV-exposed infants seek medical services. We performed 32 in-depth interviews (17 female, 15 male) and four focus group discussions (FGDs) among HIV-infected postpartum women and their male partners in Nairobi, Kenya. We used a grounded theory approach to explore the paths followed for health-related concerns. Female participants reported that willingness to be tested for HIV influences whether women sought antenatal care and the type of facility they preferred for childbirth. The need for medical care outside regular clinic hours and securing safe transportation at night were also significant barriers to seeking care. Most men sought services from traditional healers and chemists before HIV diagnosis, and at governmental facilities afterwards. Both men and women sent infants to traditional healers for non-medical conditions such as bewitching and massage, but rarely for medical conditions. Strategies to reduce HIV-related stigma and fears in antenatal and maternity settings, increase access to care after-hours, and improve linkage to HIV care for men early in their infection are needed. PMID:25646645

  8. Transmission and evolution of hepatitis C virus in HCV seroconverters in HIV infected subjects.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chengli; Gupta, Phalguni; Xu, Xiaochuan; Sanyal, Anwesha; Rinaldo, Charles; Seaberg, Eric; Margolick, Joseph B; Martinez-Maza, Otoniel; Chen, Yue

    2014-01-20

    HIV/HCV co-infection provides a model to determine the role of immunity on HCV transmission and evolution. In this study HCV transmission and evolution were evaluated in 6 HCV seroconverters in HIV-infected subjects with a wide range of CD4 cell count. The HCV envelope E1/E2 sequences were analyzed for transmission bottleneck, viral diversity/divergence, immune pressure, and mutations of HLA class I/II restricted epitopes. HCV infection started with transmission bottleneck in all HIV-infected individuals. During the 1.0-2.0 years of infection there was a shift of viral quasispecies in majority of the subjects from one to next visit. However, HCV diversity, divergence, mutations in HLA class I/II restricted and virus neutralizing epitopes were similar in all subjects regardless of CD4 cell count at the time of HCV infection. Our results suggest that HCV transmission and evolution in HIV-infected subjects may not be influenced by host CD4 cell count at the time of infection.

  9. Implications of apathy for everyday functioning outcomes in persons living with HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Kamat, Rujvi; Woods, Steven Paul; Marcotte, Thomas D; Ellis, Ronald J; Grant, Igor

    2012-08-01

    Apathy is a relatively common clinical feature of HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorders, but little is known about its implications for everyday functioning outcomes. In the present study, we examined the associations between apathy and self-reported instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) and neurocognitive complaints in 75 participants with HIV infection and 52 demographically comparable seronegative comparison subjects. All volunteers completed the apathy subscale of the Frontal Systems Behavioral Scale as part of a comprehensive neuromedical, psychiatric, and neurocognitive research evaluation. When compared with the seronegative comparison participants, the HIV+ group reported significantly higher current levels of apathy, but did not differ in self-report of prior (i.e., pre-seroconversion) apathy. Higher current apathy self-ratings were associated with greater severity of IADL declines and more numerous cognitive complaints in the HIV+ sample, even after adjusting for potential psychiatric (e.g., depression), medical (e.g., hepatitis C co-infection), and neurocognitive predictors. Cognitive complaints, but not IADLs, were also uniquely associated with ratings of executive dysfunction and disinhibition. All told, these findings suggest that apathy may make a unique contribution to important everyday functioning outcomes among persons living with HIV infection. The clinical detection of apathy may help identify HIV-infected individuals at particular risk for functional impairments who may require additional support to maintain independence.

  10. Employability and HIV infection: can the military claim to be an exception?

    PubMed

    London, Leslie; Manjra, Shuaib

    2011-01-01

    To determine whether policies that exclude HIV-positive recruits from military service are scientifically and ethically justified, we reviewed the literature for evidence regarding their capacity to undertake rigorous exercise, the risks and benefits of exercise regimes, their risks from opportunistic infections and the extra burden of care, within military contexts. The literature suggests that HIV-infected persons with CD4 counts within the normal range have the exercise capacity and training benefits similar to uninfected persons. Subjects with modest CD4 depression are capable of moderate to strenuous exercise, without adverse consequences. Risks from opportunistic infections are mitigated with normal CD4 counts. Neurobehavioral impairment in asymptomatic HNV-positive patients is unlikely to reduce work capacity for most military occupations and can be easily identified by appropriate neurobehavioral testing. HIV testing alone is poorly predictive of competencies required for military employment. Testing should be used to promote access to care. Use for exclusionary purposes is discriminatory.

  11. Trends in Epidemiology of COPD in HIV-Infected Patients in Spain (1997–2012)

    PubMed Central

    de Miguel-Díez, Javier; López-de-Andrés, Ana; Jiménez-García, Rodrigo; Puente-Maestu, Luis; Jiménez-Trujillo, Isabel; Hernández-Barrera, Valentín

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to estimate trends of incidence of hospital admissions and in-hospital mortality (IHM) in HIV-infected patients with COPD in the combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) era in Spain (1997–2012). Methods A retrospective study with data from nationwide population-based COPD diagnoses in the Spanish Minimum Basic Data Set (MBDS) was performed. We established groups according to their HIV and HCV infections: 1) HIV-uninfected patients; 2) HIV-infected patients (with or without HCV coinfection). Results 1,580,207 patients discharge with a COPD diagnosis were included in the study, 8902 of them were HIV-infected patients (5000 HIV-monoinfected patients and 3902 HIV/HCV-coinfected patients). The HIV-infected patients had higher incidence rates of hospital admissions for COPD than the HIV-uninfected patients during the study period. The HIV-monoinfected patients had higher rates of hospitalizations for COPD than the HIV/HCV-coinfected patients in the early-period cART (1997–1999), but these rates decreased in the first group and increased in the second, being even similar in both groups in the late-period cART (2004–2011). On the other hand, the HIV-infected patients with COPD had higher IHM than the HIV-uninfected patients with COPD. The mortality rates were higher in the HIV-monoinfected patients with COPD than in the HIV/HCV-coinfected patients with COPD in the early-period cART; however, in the late-period cART, the mortality rates trends seems higher in the HIV/HCV group. The likelihood of death in HIV/HCV-coinfected patients with COPD was similar to than in HIV-monoinfected patients with COPD. Conclusions Incidence of hospital admissions for COPD and IHM have decreased among HIV-monoinfected individuals but have increased steadily among HIV/HCV-coinfected individuals in the cART era. PMID:27846297

  12. Dysregulated B cell expression of RANKL and OPG correlates with loss of bone mineral density in HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Titanji, Kehmia; Vunnava, Aswani; Sheth, Anandi N; Delille, Cecile; Lennox, Jeffrey L; Sanford, Sara E; Foster, Antonina; Knezevic, Andrea; Easley, Kirk A; Weitzmann, M Neale; Ofotokun, Ighovwerha

    2014-10-01

    HIV infection is associated with high rates of osteopenia and osteoporosis, but the mechanisms involved are unclear. We recently reported that bone loss in the HIV transgenic rat model was associated with upregulation of B cell expression of the key osteoclastogenic cytokine receptor-activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL), compounded by a simultaneous decline in expression of its physiological moderator, osteoprotegerin (OPG). To clinically translate these findings we performed cross-sectional immuno-skeletal profiling of HIV-uninfected and antiretroviral therapy-naïve HIV-infected individuals. Bone resorption and osteopenia were significantly higher in HIV-infected individuals. B cell expression of RANKL was significantly increased, while B cell expression of OPG was significantly diminished, conditions favoring osteoclastic bone resorption. The B cell RANKL/OPG ratio correlated significantly with total hip and femoral neck bone mineral density (BMD), T- and/or Z-scores in HIV infected subjects, but revealed no association at the lumbar spine. B cell subset analyses revealed significant HIV-related increases in RANKL-expressing naïve, resting memory and exhausted tissue-like memory B cells. By contrast, the net B cell OPG decrease in HIV-infected individuals resulted from a significant decline in resting memory B cells, a population containing a high frequency of OPG-expressing cells, concurrent with a significant increase in exhausted tissue-like memory B cells, a population with a lower frequency of OPG-expressing cells. These data validate our pre-clinical findings of an immuno-centric mechanism for accelerated HIV-induced bone loss, aligned with B cell dysfunction.

  13. Molecular mechanisms for insulin resistance in treated HIV-infection

    PubMed Central

    Hruz, Paul W.

    2010-01-01

    Identification and characterization of the molecular mechanisms contributing to the high incidence of insulin resistance in HIV infected patients treated with combined antiretroviral therapy remains a critically important goal in the quest to improve the safety of antiretroviral treatment regimens. The use of in vitro model systems together with the investigation of drug-mediated effects on glucose homeostasis in animals and healthy human volunteers has provided important insight into the contribution of individual drugs to insulin resistance and affected cellular pathways. HIV protease inhibitor mediated blockade of glucose transport and nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor mediated mitochondrial toxicity have been well characterized. Together with growing understanding of mediators of insulin resistance in non-HIV metabolic syndrome, additional cellular effects including the induction of endoplasmic reticulum and oxidative stress, altered adipocytokine secretion, and lipotoxicity have been integrated into this developing picture. Further elucidation of these mechanisms provides potential for the continued development of safer antiviral drugs and targeted treatment of insulin resistance in affected patients. PMID:21663839

  14. Impact of HIV Infection on Medicare Beneficiaries with Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeannette Y; Moore, Page C; Lensing, Shelly Y

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of lung cancer among individuals infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is elevated compared to that among the general population. This study examines the prevalence of HIV and its impact on outcomes among Medicare beneficiaries who are 65 years of age or older and were diagnosed with nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) between 1997 and 2008. Prevalence of HIV was estimated using the Poisson point estimate and its 95% confidence interval. Relative risks for potential risk factors were estimated using the log-binomial model. A total of 111,219 Medicare beneficiaries met the study criteria. The prevalence of HIV was 156.4 per 100,000 (95% CI: 140.8 to 173.8) and has increased with time. Stage at NSCLC diagnosis did not vary by HIV status. Mortality rates due to all causes were 44%, 76%, and 88% for patients with stage I/II, III, and IV NSCLC, respectively. Across stages of disease, there was no difference between those who were HIV-infected and those who were not with respect to overall mortality. HIV patients, however, were more likely to die of causes other than lung cancer than their immunocompetent counterparts.

  15. Sociometric risk networks and risk for HIV infection.

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, S R; Neaigus, A; Jose, B; Curtis, R; Goldstein, M; Ildefonso, G; Rothenberg, R B; Des Jarlais, D C

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study examined whether networks of drug-injecting and sexual relationships among drug injectors are associated with individual human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) serostatus and with behavioral likelihood of future infection. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey of 767 drug injectors in New York City was performed with chain-referral and linking procedures to measure large-scale (sociometric) risk networks. Graph-theoretic algebraic techniques were used to detect 92 connected components (drug injectors linked to each other directly or through others) and a 105-member 2-core within a large connected component of 230 members. RESULTS: Drug injectors in the 2-core of the large component were more likely than others to be infected with HIV. Seronegative 2-core members engaged in a wide range of high-risk behaviors, including engaging in risk behaviors with infected drug injectors. CONCLUSIONS: Sociometric risk networks seem to be pathways along which HIV travels in drug-injecting peer groups. The cores of large components can be centers of high-risk behaviors and can become pockets of HIV infection. Preventing HIV from reaching the cores of large components may be crucial in preventing widespread HIV epidemics. PMID:9279263

  16. Ocular Manifestations in Patients with HIV Infection/AIDS who were Referred from the ART Centre, Hassan, Karnataka, India

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, Pavana Krishnaraj; Venugopal, Kavitha Chikkanayakanahalli; Karimsab, Dada Peer; Balasubramanya, S

    2012-01-01

    Background Ocular involvement in HIV infection/AIDS is very common and it includes various clinical presentations which may be asymptomatic or atypical or they may be the initial manifestations of the underlying disease. The severity of these lesions increases as the immune competency decreases, leading to visual impairment or blindness. Objective The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence and the types of HIV associated ocular conditions and their effect on the vision in patients with HIV/AIDS. Methods This cross sectional study was based on the patients with HIV infection/AIDS, who were referred to the Ophthalmic OPD, District hospital, Hassan. These patients were referred from the District ART Centre for a complete ophthalmic evaluation, irrespective of their immune status and the presence or absence of symptoms. All the patients underwent a complete ophthalmic examination, which included both anterior and posterior segment evaluation and colour vision assessment. Results Out of the 553 patients, 66% belonged to the age group of 21-40 years. 87% of the patients had a BCVA of >6/18, whereas 4.7% had very poor vision. 37.6% of the patients had ocular manifestations. Anterior segment, posterior segment and neuro-ophthalmic manifestations were seen in 7%, 9.94% and 5.79% of the patients respectively. The most common anterior segment manifestation was recurrent lid infections, while HIV microangiopathy was the most common posterior segment manifestation. The other unusual findings included an abnormal colour vision in 6.3% of the patients and bilateral lid retraction in 8.5% of the patients. Conclusion Since ocular manifestations are very common and as they can occur at any time during the course of HIV infection, an awareness on various patterns of the ocular disease and the screening of all the patients with HIV infection/AIDS is a must. PMID:23373045

  17. Neurocognitive Impairment Associated with Predominantly Early Stage HIV infection in Abuja, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Akolo, Christopher; Royal, Walter; Cherner, Mariana; Okwuasaba, Kanayo; Eyzaguirre, Lindsay; Adebiyi, Ruxton; Umlauf, Anya; Hendrix, Terence; Johnson, Joyce; Abimiku, Alashl’e; Blattner, William A.

    2014-01-01

    Detailed neuropsychological testing was performed on 134 HIV seropositive (SP) and 77 HIV seronegative (SN) individuals, 86% with early stage HIV infection in Nigeria, to determine the frequency of HIV-related neurocognitive impairment among the HIV-infected group. Twenty-two tests were administered to assess the following seven ability domains: speed of information processing (SIP); attention/working memory (AWM); executive functioning (EF); learning (LN); memory (MEM); verbal fluency (VF); and motor speed/dexterity (MSD). Demographically corrected individual test scores and scores for each domain or reflecting a global deficit (a global deficit score, or GDS) were compared for the SP and SN groups. SP participants were older, had fewer years of education, were more likely to be married, differed in ethnicity and had higher depression scores than SN individuals. On the testing, SP performed worse than SN on four tests that individually assessed LN, VF and MSD (the timed gait). SP subjects, however, performed better than SN on the finger-tapping test, also a motor task. Within the seven ability domains, SP performed worse than SN with respect to SIP, EF, LN, MEM and VF and also on the global measure. SP were also more frequently impaired on tests of SIP, and there was a borderline increase in the frequency of global impairment. Performance by SP subjects was not associated with CD4 counts. However, there were significant correlations between viral load measurements and individual tests of SIP, EF, LN and VF and with overall EF and a borderline correlation with the GDS. Depression scores for SP were associated with impairment on only a single test of EF. These results demonstrate that the ability of these assessments to identify areas of impairment that may be specifically linked to a history of HIV infection among individuals in Nigeria. Confirmation of these findings awaits analyses using data from a larger number of control subjects. PMID:24927825

  18. HIV Infection and Microbial Diversity in Saliva

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Deepak; Chen, Zhou; Liu, Gaoxia; Abrams, Willam R.; Phelan, Joan A.; Norman, Robert G.; Fisch, Gene S.; Corby, Patricia M.; Dewhirst, Floyd; Paster, Bruce J.; Kokaras, Alexis S.; Malamud, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Limited information is available about the effects of HIV and subsequent antiretroviral treatment on host-microbe interactions. This study aimed to determine the salivary microbial composition for 10 HIV-seropositive subjects, before and 6 months after highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), compared with that for 10 HIV-seronegative subjects. A conventional culture and two culture-independent analyses were used and consistently demonstrated differences in microbial composition among the three sets of samples. HIV-positive subjects had higher levels of total cultivable microbes, including oral streptococci, lactobacilli, Streptococcus mutans, and Candida, in saliva than did HIV-negative subjects. The total cultivable microbial levels were significantly correlated with CD4+ T cell counts. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), which compared the overall microbial profiles, showed distinct fingerprinting profiles for each group. The human oral microbe identification microarray (HOMIM) assay, which compared the 16S rRNA genes, showed clear separation among the three sample groups. Veillonella, Synergistetes, and Streptococcus were present in all 30 saliva samples. Only minor changes or no changes in the prevalence of Neisseria, Haemophilus, Gemella, Leptotrichia, Solobacterium, Parvimonas, and Rothia were observed. Seven genera, Capnocytophaga, Slackia, Porphyromonas, Kingella, Peptostreptococcaceae, Lactobacillus, and Atopobium, were detected only in HIV-negative samples. The prevalences of Fusobacterium, Campylobacter, Prevotella, Capnocytophaga, Selenomonas, Actinomyces, Granulicatella, and Atopobium were increased after HAART. In contrast, the prevalence of Aggregatibacter was significantly decreased after HAART. The findings of this study suggest that HIV infection and HAART can have significant effects on salivary microbial colonization and composition. PMID:24523469

  19. [Organ transplants in HIV infected patients. Update and recommendations].

    PubMed

    Barcan, Laura; Gadano, Adrian; Casetti, Isabel; Villamil, Federico

    2011-01-01

    Until few years ago, HIV infection was an absolute contraindication to consider organ transplants. Since HAART introduction, patient survival increased dramatically, but high mortality due to liver and kidney diseases became evident. For these reasons, this group of patients is now reconsidered for organ transplantation. In 2008, the Argentine Society of Transplants (SAT) and the Argentine Infectious Diseases Society (SADI), encouraged by the increasing published experience on kidney and liver transplants in this population, decided to form a Working Group, to prepare an update on this issue and elaborate practical recommendations for the better management of these patients. The first meeting was held on December 4th 2008. The most important conclusion was that HIV infection did not contraindicate a solid organ transplant. Later on, taking into account the accumulated experience and the available literature, the current document was prepared. HIV infected patients must fulfill certain clinical, immunological, virological and psychosocial criteria to be considered for solid organ transplants. HIV infected recipients of kidney and liver transplants currently show similar short and middle term survival to non HIV infected patients. There is not yet enough data on intrathoracic transplants in these patients in order to include them on a waiting list for these organs-transplants. Interactions between immunosupressors and antiretroviral drugs (specially protease inhibitors) are very important, and require a strict monitoring of immunosupressor levels.

  20. Talaromyces (Penicillium) marneffei infection in non-HIV-infected patients

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Jasper FW; Lau, Susanna KP; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Woo, Patrick CY

    2016-01-01

    Talaromyces (Penicillium) marneffei is an important pathogenic thermally dimorphic fungus causing systemic mycosis in Southeast Asia. The clinical significance of T. marneffei became evident when the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome epidemic arrived in Southeast Asia in 1988. Subsequently, a decline in the incidence of T. marneffei infection among HIV-infected patients was seen in regions with access to highly active antiretroviral therapy and other control measures for HIV. Since the 1990s, an increasing number of T. marneffei infections have been reported among non-HIV-infected patients with impaired cell-mediated immunity. Their comorbidities included primary adult-onset immunodeficiency due to anti-interferon-gamma autoantibodies and secondary immunosuppressive conditions including other autoimmune diseases, solid organ and hematopoietic stem cell transplantations, T-lymphocyte-depleting immunsuppressive drugs and novel anti-cancer targeted therapies such as anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies and kinase inhibitors. Moreover, improved immunological diagnostics identified more primary immunodeficiency syndromes associated with T. marneffei infection in children. The higher case-fatality rate of T. marneffei infection in non-HIV-infected than HIV-infected patients might be related to delayed diagnosis due to the lack of clinical suspicion. Correction of the underlying immune defects and early use of antifungals are important treatment strategies. Clinicians should be familiar with the changing epidemiology and clinical management of T. marneffei infection among non-HIV-infected patients. PMID:26956447

  1. Evidence of dysregulation of dendritic cells in primary HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Sabado, Rachel Lubong; O'Brien, Meagan; Subedi, Abhignya; Qin, Li; Hu, Nan; Taylor, Elizabeth; Dibben, Oliver; Stacey, Andrea; Fellay, Jacques; Shianna, Kevin V; Siegal, Frederick; Shodell, Michael; Shah, Kokila; Larsson, Marie; Lifson, Jeffrey; Nadas, Arthur; Marmor, Michael; Hutt, Richard; Margolis, David; Garmon, Donald; Markowitz, Martin; Valentine, Fred; Borrow, Persephone; Bhardwaj, Nina

    2010-11-11

    Myeloid and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (DCs) are important mediators of both innate and adaptive immunity against pathogens such as HIV. During the course of HIV infection, blood DC numbers fall substantially. In the present study, we sought to determine how early in HIV infection the reduction occurs and whether the remaining DC subsets maintain functional capacity. We find that both myeloid DC and plasmacytoid DC levels decline very early during acute HIV infection. Despite the initial reduction in numbers, those DCs that remain in circulation retain their function and are able to stimulate allogeneic T-cell responses, and up-regulate maturation markers plus produce cytokines/chemokines in response to stimulation with TLR7/8 agonists. Notably, DCs from HIV-infected subjects produced significantly higher levels of cytokines/chemokines in response to stimulation with TLR7/8 agonists than DCs from uninfected controls. Further examination of gene expression profiles indicated in vivo activation, either directly or indirectly, of DCs during HIV infection. Taken together, our data demonstrate that despite the reduction in circulating DC numbers, those that remain in the blood display hyperfunctionality and implicates a possible role for DCs in promoting chronic immune activation.

  2. [Tuberculosis in HIV-infected and AIDS patients].

    PubMed

    Rakhmanova, A G; Stepanova, E V; Romanova, E I; Evseeva, I D

    2003-01-01

    The course of the combined infection (tuberculosis plus HIV-infection) has been analysed in 41 patients. Of them, 24 patients developed tuberculosis in the presence of HIV-infection (group 1) and 17 were infected with HIV when they already had tuberculosis running up to 5 years. HIV-infection in group 1 ran a more severe course, the patients developed generalized, disseminated and complicated forms of tuberculosis with more frequent lethal outcome. 39 patients of both groups received specific antituberculous therapy including 1-5 drugs. A response to treatment was achieved in 23 (60%) patients (52 and 47.8% at early and late HIV-infection stages, respectively). Treatment failure was explained by development of severe opportunistic infections and secondary diseases (generalized cytomegalovirus infection, advanced candidiasis, toxoplasmosis), poor compliance, asocial life style, advanced tuberculosis process, late diagnosis, inadequate treatment. It is shown that in late HIV-infection positive results of treatment can be expected only in early detection of tuberculosis and active long-term treatment.

  3. Vorinostat positively regulates synaptic plasticity genes expression and spine density in HIV infected neurons: role of nicotine in progression of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND) is characterized by development of cognitive, behavioral and motor abnormalities, and occurs in approximately 50% of HIV infected individuals. In the United States, the prevalence of cigarette smoking ranges from 35-70% in HIV-infected individuals compared to 20% in general population. Cognitive impairment in heavy cigarette smokers has been well reported. However, the synergistic effects of nicotine and HIV infection and the underlying mechanisms in the development of HAND are unknown. Results In this study, we explored the role of nicotine in the progression of HAND using SK-N-MC, a neuronal cell line. SK-N-MC cells were infected with HIV-1 in the presence or absence of nicotine for 7 days. We observed significant increase in HIV infectivity in SK-N-MC treated with nicotine compared to untreated HIV-infected neuronal cells. HIV and nicotine synergize to significantly dysregulate the expression of synaptic plasticity genes and spine density; with a concomitant increase of HDAC2 levels in SK-N-MC cells. In addition, inhibition of HDAC2 up-regulation with the use of vorinostat resulted in HIV latency breakdown and recovery of synaptic plasticity genes expression and spine density in nicotine/HIV alone and in co-treated SK-N-MC cells. Furthermore, increased eIF2 alpha phosphorylation, which negatively regulates eukaryotic translational process, was observed in HIV alone and in co-treatment with nicotine compared to untreated control and nicotine alone treated SK-N-MC cells. Conclusions These results suggest that nicotine and HIV synergize to negatively regulate the synaptic plasticity gene expression and spine density and this may contribute to the increased risk of HAND in HIV infected smokers. Apart from disrupting latency, vorinostat may be a useful therapeutic to inhibit the negative regulatory effects on synaptic plasticity in HIV infected nicotine abusers. PMID:24886748

  4. Mass spectrometric phosphoproteome analysis of HIV-infected brain reveals novel phosphorylation sites and differential phosphorylation patterns

    PubMed Central

    Uzasci, Lerna; Auh, Sungyoung; Cotter, Robert J.; Nath, Avindra

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To map the phosphoproteome and identify changes in the phosphorylation patterns in the HIV-infected and uninfected brain using high-resolution mass spectrometry. Experimental Design Parietal cortex from brain of individuals with and without HIV infection were lysed and trypsinized. The peptides were labeled with iTRAQ reagents, combined, phospho-enriched by titanium dioxide chromatography, and analyzed by LC-MS/MS with high-resolution. Results Our phosphoproteomic workflow resulted in the identification of 112 phosphorylated proteins and 17 novel phosphorylation sites in all the samples that were analyzed. The phosphopeptide sequences were searched for kinase substrate motifs which revealed potential kinases involved in important signaling pathways. The site-specific phosphopeptide quantification showed that peptides from neurofilament medium polypeptide, myelin basic protein, and 2′–3′-cyclic nucleotide-3′ phosphodiesterase have relatively higher phosphorylation levels during HIV infection. Clinical Relevance This study has enriched the global phosphoproteome knowledge of the human brain by detecting novel phosphorylation sites on neuronal proteins and identifying differentially phosphorylated brain proteins during HIV infection. Kinases that lead to unusual phosphorylations could be therapeutic targets for the treatment of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). PMID:26033855

  5. A Longitudinal Analysis of the Impact of Physical Activity on Neurocognitive Functioning Among HIV-Infected Adults.

    PubMed

    Dufour, Catherine A; Marquine, María J; Fazeli, Pariya L; Umlauf, Anya; Henry, Brook L; Zlatar, Zvinka; Montoya, Jessica L; Ellis, Ronald J; Grant, Igor; Moore, David J

    2016-12-19

    Higher levels of physical activity (PA) have been linked to better neurocognitive functioning in many populations. The current study examines the longitudinal association between PA and neurocognitive functioning among HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected persons. Community-dwelling adults (N = 291) self-reported level of PA and completed a comprehensive neuropsychological battery at two to four study visits (Mean follow-up time = 2.6 years). Participants were divided into three PA groups: "No PA" (no PA at any visit), "consistent PA" (PA at ≥50% of visits), and "inconsistent PA" (PA < 50% of visits). A mixed effect model, adjusting for significant covariates showed that all PA groups had statistically significant, yet modest, neurocognitive decline over time; and, the consistent PA group began with, and maintained, significantly better neurocognitive function compared to the other two PA groups. This effect was evident among both HIV-uninfected and HIV-infected persons, despite the fact that HIV-infected persons showed lower baseline neurocognitive function. PA is a modifiable lifestyle behavior that may help to protect against neurocognitive impairment regardless of HIV status, however, given the proportion of HIV-infected individuals who evidence neurocognitive difficulties, a focus on increasing PA seems warranted.

  6. Tuberculosis and hepatic steatosis are prevalent liver pathology findings among HIV-infected patients in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Christopher J; Hoffmann, Jennifer D; Kensler, Caroline; van der Watt, Martin; Omar, Tanvier; Chaisson, Richard E; Martinson, Neil A; Variava, Ebrahim

    2015-01-01

    Liver disease epidemiology in sub-Saharan Africa has shifted as a result of HIV and the increased use of antiretroviral therapy leading to a need for updated data on common causes of liver disease. We retrospectively reviewed records from all hospitalized patients who had liver biopsy at a single hospital in South Africa from 2001 to 2009 and compared diagnosis by HIV status. During the period of study 262 patients had liver biopsy, 108 (41%) were HIV-infected, 25 (10%) were HIV-sero-negative, and 129 (49%) had unknown or unrecorded HIV status. Overall 81% of biopsies provided additional diagnostic data. Malignancy was the most common finding reported on 56 (21%) biopsies followed by granuloma or TB, hepatic steatosis, and fibrosis or cirrhosis. HIV-infected patients were more likely to have granulomas and steatosis. Half of patients with granulomas were already on TB treatment, suggesting paradoxical reactions or drug induced liver injury may have been important causes of liver inflammation among these patients. We note that TB, paradoxical reactions during TB treatment, possible drug induced liver injury, and hepatic steatosis are important causes of liver pathology among HIV-infected hospitalized patients with unclear etiology of liver disease after initial assessment. Among HIV sero-negative patients, malignancy was the major cause of liver disease. Our findings re-enforce the importance of TB as a diagnosis among HIV-infected individuals.

  7. Oral Mycobiome Analysis of HIV-Infected Patients: Identification of Pichia as an Antagonist of Opportunistic Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Pranab K.; Chandra, Jyotsna; Retuerto, Mauricio; Sikaroodi, Masoumeh; Brown, Robert E.; Jurevic, Richard; Salata, Robert A.; Lederman, Michael M.; Gillevet, Patrick M.; Ghannoum, Mahmoud A.

    2014-01-01

    Oral microbiota contribute to health and disease, and their disruption may influence the course of oral diseases. Here, we used pyrosequencing to characterize the oral bacteriome and mycobiome of 12 HIV-infected patients and matched 12 uninfected controls. The number of bacterial and fungal genera in individuals ranged between 8–14 and 1–9, among uninfected and HIV-infected participants, respectively. The core oral bacteriome (COB) comprised 14 genera, of which 13 were common between the two groups. In contrast, the core oral mycobiome (COM) differed between HIV-infected and uninfected individuals, with Candida being the predominant fungus in both groups. Among Candida species, C. albicans was the most common (58% in uninfected and 83% in HIV-infected participants). Furthermore, 15 and 12 bacteria-fungi pairs were correlated significantly within uninfected and HIV-infected groups, respectively. Increase in Candida colonization was associated with a concomitant decrease in the abundance of Pichia, suggesting antagonism. We found that Pichia spent medium (PSM) inhibited growth of Candida, Aspergillus and Fusarium. Moreover, Pichia cells and PSM inhibited Candida biofilms (P = .002 and .02, respectively, compared to untreated controls). The mechanism by which Pichia inhibited Candida involved nutrient limitation, and modulation of growth and virulence factors. Finally, in an experimental murine model of oral candidiasis, we demonstrated that mice treated with PSM exhibited significantly lower infection score (P = .011) and fungal burden (P = .04) compared to untreated mice. Moreover, tongues of PSM-treated mice had few hyphae and intact epithelium, while vehicle- and nystatin-treated mice exhibited extensive fungal invasion of tissue with epithelial disruption. These results showed that PSM was efficacious against oral candidiasis in vitro and in vivo. The inhibitory activity of PSM was associated with secretory protein/s. Our findings provide the

  8. A Meta-Analysis of the Metabolic Syndrome Prevalence in the Global HIV-Infected Population

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Kim A.; Peer, Nasheeta; Mills, Edward J.; Kengne, Andre P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardio-metabolic risk factors are of increasing concern in HIV-infected individuals, particularly with the advent of antiretroviral therapy (ART) and the subsequent rise in longevity. However, the prevalence of cardio-metabolic abnormalities in this population and the differential contribution, if any, of HIV specific factors to their distribution, are poorly understood. Therefore, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to estimate the global prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MS) in HIV-infected populations, its variation by the different diagnostic criteria, severity of HIV infection, ART used and other major predictive characteristics. Methods We performed a comprehensive search on major databases for original research articles published between 1998 and 2015. The pooled overall prevalence as well as by specific groups and subgroups were computed using random effects models. Results A total of 65 studies across five continents comprising 55094 HIV-infected participants aged 17–73 years (median age 41 years) were included in the final meta-analysis. The overall prevalence of MS according to the following criteria were: ATPIII-2001:16.7% (95%CI: 14.6–18.8), IDF-2005: 18% (95%CI: 14.0–22.4), ATPIII-2004-2005: 24.6% (95%CI: 20.6–28.8), Modified ATPIII-2005: 27.9% (95%CI: 6.7–56.5), JIS-2009: 29.6% (95%CI: 22.9–36.8), and EGIR: 31.3% (95%CI: 26.8–36.0). By some MS criteria, the prevalence was significantly higher in women than in men (IDF-2005: 23.2% vs. 13.4, p = 0.030), in ART compared to non-ART users (ATPIII-2001: 18.4% vs. 11.8%, p = 0.001), and varied significantly by participant age, duration of HIV diagnosis, severity of infection, non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) use and date of study publication. Across criteria, there were significant differences in MS prevalence by sub-groups such as in men, the Americas, older publications, regional studies, younger adults, smokers, ART-naïve participants