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Sample records for asymptomatic viral excretion

  1. Monitoring of Calicivirus among day-care children: evidence of asymptomatic viral excretion and first report of GI.7 Norovirus and GI.3 Sapovirus in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Marques Mendanha de Oliveira, Denisy; Souza, Menira; Souza Fiaccadori, Fabíola; César Pereira Santos, Hugo; das Dôres de Paula Cardoso, Divina

    2014-09-01

    Caliciviruses (Norovirus and Sapovirus) are important causes of acute gastroenteritis, with Norovirus (NoV) considered the leading cause of epidemic non-bacterial acute gastroenteritis; however, molecular and epidemiological data of the circulating Calicivirus (CV) strains among day-care children are still considered scarce. The role of asymptomatic CV excretion on viral transmission also remains poorly understood. The aim of the present study was to monitor the occurrence of NoV and Sapovirus (SaV) in a day-care center and to describe the molecular epidemiology of the circulating strains. Genomic sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of the capsid region were carried out in CV positive samples obtained from children younger than 5 years, with or without diarrhea, between October 2009 and October 2011. A total of 539 fecal samples were screened for CV. Forty-three (8%) were positive for NoV and 25 (4.6%) for SaV. Surprisingly, positivity rates for CV were significant in asymptomatic children, and virus circulation was detected in every month of the study. Great genomic diversity of CV was observed, and the circulating NoV strains were: GII.6, GII.2, GII.1, GI.7, GII.4, and GI.1. The SaV genotypes GI.1 and GI.3 were also detected. Five CV outbreaks caused by distinct viral strains were documented. This study provides an insight on the genetic diversity of CV in a day-care in Central West Brazil, highlighting the probable role of asymptomatic viral excretion and the significance of semi-closed settings in the dissemination of these agents.

  2. Characterization of rotavirus electropherotypes excreted by symptomatic and asymptomatic infants.

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, J.; Sandino, A. M.; Pizarro, J.; Avendaño, L. F.; Pizarro, J. M.; Spencer, E.

    1991-01-01

    Human rotavirus isolates from 1100 stool samples were analyzed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and 48 different migration patterns were detected. Heterogeneity in the migration of segment 10 was observed in both long and short electropherotypes in which three long and two short patterns were identified. In spite of these variations all short and long electropherotypes were subgrouped by enzyme immunoassay as subgroups I and II respectively. Mixed infections were detected in 17% of cases and the subgrouping correlated with the corresponding electropherotypes. The same electropherotypes were present in severe, mild and asymptomatic cases and no electropherotype was particularly associated with greater virulence. Furthermore, the electropherotypes isolated from nosocomial asymptomatic cases were the same as those detected from those admitted with severe diarrhea. It seems unlikely that electropherotyping can be used to identify more virulent strains of rotavirus. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 PMID:1847104

  3. Respiratory Viral Detections During Symptomatic and Asymptomatic Periods in Young Andean Children

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Leigh M.; Johnson, Monika; Williams, John V.; Zhu, Yuwei; Gil, Ana I.; Edwards, Kathryn M.; Griffin, Marie R.; Lanata, Claudio F.; Grijalva, Carlos G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Viruses are commonly detected in children with acute respiratory illnesses (ARI) and in asymptomatic children. Longitudinal studies of viral detections during asymptomatic periods surrounding ARI could facilitate interpretation of viral detections but are currently scant. Methods We used reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to analyze respiratory samples from young Andean children for viruses during asymptomatic periods within 8-120 days of index ARI (cough or fever). We compared viral detections over time within children and explored RT-PCR cycle thresholds (CT) as surrogates for viral loads. Results At least one respiratory virus was detected in 367 (43%) of 859 samples collected during asymptomatic periods, with more frequent detections in periods with rhinorrhea (49%) than those without (34%, p<0.001). Relative to index ARI with human rhinovirus (HRV), adenovirus (AdV), respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), and parainfluenza virus (PIV) detected, the same virus was also detected during 32%, 22%, 10%, and 3% of asymptomatic periods, respectively. RSV was only detected 8-30 days after index RSV ARI, whereas HRV and AdV were detected throughout asymptomatic periods. Human metapneumovirus (MPV) and influenza were rarely detected during asymptomatic periods (<3%). No significant differences were observed in the CT for HRV or AdV during asymptomatic periods relative to ARI. For RSV, CT were significantly lower during ARI relative to the asymptomatic period (p=0.03). Conclusions These findings indicate that influenza, MPV, PIV, and RSV detections in children with ARI usually indicate a causal relationship. When HRV or AdV is detected during ARI, the causal relationship is less certain. PMID:26121205

  4. Excretion of serotype G1 rotavirus strains by asymptomatic staff: a possible source of nosocomial infection.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Graeme L; Callaghan, Sarah L; Kirkwood, Carl D; Bogdanovic-Sakran, Nada; Johnston, Linda J; Bishop, Ruth F

    2003-06-01

    This study supports the hypothesis that feces from asymptomatic adults may provide a vehicle for the transmission of rotavirus, in addition to aerosols, hands, and fomites. The observed preferential carriage of serotype G1 strains in the adult gastrointestinal tract may explain G1 predominance and persistence in epidemiologic studies worldwide.

  5. Viral Reservoirs in Lymph Nodes of FIV-Infected Progressor and Long-Term Non-Progressor Cats during the Asymptomatic Phase

    PubMed Central

    Eckstrand, C. D.; Hillman, C.; Smith, A. L.; Sparger, E. E.; Murphy, B. G.

    2016-01-01

    Background Examination of a cohort of cats experimentally infected with feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) for 5.75 years revealed detectable proviral DNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) harvested during the asymptomatic phase, undetectable plasma viral RNA (FIV gag), and rarely detectable cell-associated viral RNA. Despite apparent viral latency in peripheral CD4+ T cells, circulating CD4+ T cell numbers progressively declined in progressor animals. The aim of this study was to explore this dichotomy of peripheral blood viral latency in the face of progressive immunopathology. The viral replication status, cellular immunophenotypes, and histopathologic features were compared between popliteal lymph nodes (PLNs) and peripheral blood. Also, we identified and further characterized one of the FIV-infected cats identified as a long-term non-progressor (LTNP). Results PLN-derived leukocytes from FIV-infected cats during the chronic asymptomatic phase demonstrated active viral gag transcription and FIV protein translation as determined by real-time RT-PCR, Western blot and in situ immunohistochemistry, whereas viral RNA in blood leukocytes was either undetectable or intermittently detectable and viral protein was not detected. Active transcription of viral RNA was detectable in PLN-derived CD4+ and CD21+ leukocytes. Replication competent provirus was reactivated ex vivo from PLN-derived leukocytes from three of four FIV-infected cats. Progressor cats showed a persistent and dramatically decreased proportion and absolute count of CD4+ T cells in blood, and a decreased proportion of CD4+ T cells in PLNs. A single long-term non-progressor (LTNP) cat persistently demonstrated an absolute peripheral blood CD4+ T cell count indistinguishable from uninfected animals, a lower proviral load in unfractionated blood and PLN leukocytes, and very low amounts of viral RNA in the PLN. Conclusion Collectively our data indicates that PLNs harbor important reservoirs of

  6. Routes of Hendra Virus Excretion in Naturally-Infected Flying-Foxes: Implications for Viral Transmission and Spillover Risk.

    PubMed

    Edson, Daniel; Field, Hume; McMichael, Lee; Vidgen, Miranda; Goldspink, Lauren; Broos, Alice; Melville, Deb; Kristoffersen, Joanna; de Jong, Carol; McLaughlin, Amanda; Davis, Rodney; Kung, Nina; Jordan, David; Kirkland, Peter; Smith, Craig

    2015-01-01

    Pteropid bats or flying-foxes (Chiroptera: Pteropodidae) are the natural host of Hendra virus (HeV) which sporadically causes fatal disease in horses and humans in eastern Australia. While there is strong evidence that urine is an important infectious medium that likely drives bat to bat transmission and bat to horse transmission, there is uncertainty about the relative importance of alternative routes of excretion such as nasal and oral secretions, and faeces. Identifying the potential routes of HeV excretion in flying-foxes is important to effectively mitigate equine exposure risk at the bat-horse interface, and in determining transmission rates in host-pathogen models. The aim of this study was to identify the major routes of HeV excretion in naturally infected flying-foxes, and secondarily, to identify between-species variation in excretion prevalence. A total of 2840 flying-foxes from three of the four Australian mainland species (Pteropus alecto, P. poliocephalus and P. scapulatus) were captured and sampled at multiple roost locations in the eastern states of Queensland and New South Wales between 2012 and 2014. A range of biological samples (urine and serum, and urogenital, nasal, oral and rectal swabs) were collected from anaesthetized bats, and tested for HeV RNA using a qRT-PCR assay targeting the M gene. Forty-two P. alecto (n = 1410) had HeV RNA detected in at least one sample, and yielded a total of 78 positive samples, at an overall detection rate of 1.76% across all samples tested in this species (78/4436). The rate of detection, and the amount of viral RNA, was highest in urine samples (>serum, packed haemocytes >faecal >nasal >oral), identifying urine as the most plausible source of infection for flying-foxes and for horses. Detection in a urine sample was more efficient than detection in urogenital swabs, identifying the former as the preferred diagnostic sample. The detection of HeV RNA in serum is consistent with haematogenous spread, and with

  7. Routes of Hendra Virus Excretion in Naturally-Infected Flying-Foxes: Implications for Viral Transmission and Spillover Risk.

    PubMed

    Edson, Daniel; Field, Hume; McMichael, Lee; Vidgen, Miranda; Goldspink, Lauren; Broos, Alice; Melville, Deb; Kristoffersen, Joanna; de Jong, Carol; McLaughlin, Amanda; Davis, Rodney; Kung, Nina; Jordan, David; Kirkland, Peter; Smith, Craig

    2015-01-01

    Pteropid bats or flying-foxes (Chiroptera: Pteropodidae) are the natural host of Hendra virus (HeV) which sporadically causes fatal disease in horses and humans in eastern Australia. While there is strong evidence that urine is an important infectious medium that likely drives bat to bat transmission and bat to horse transmission, there is uncertainty about the relative importance of alternative routes of excretion such as nasal and oral secretions, and faeces. Identifying the potential routes of HeV excretion in flying-foxes is important to effectively mitigate equine exposure risk at the bat-horse interface, and in determining transmission rates in host-pathogen models. The aim of this study was to identify the major routes of HeV excretion in naturally infected flying-foxes, and secondarily, to identify between-species variation in excretion prevalence. A total of 2840 flying-foxes from three of the four Australian mainland species (Pteropus alecto, P. poliocephalus and P. scapulatus) were captured and sampled at multiple roost locations in the eastern states of Queensland and New South Wales between 2012 and 2014. A range of biological samples (urine and serum, and urogenital, nasal, oral and rectal swabs) were collected from anaesthetized bats, and tested for HeV RNA using a qRT-PCR assay targeting the M gene. Forty-two P. alecto (n = 1410) had HeV RNA detected in at least one sample, and yielded a total of 78 positive samples, at an overall detection rate of 1.76% across all samples tested in this species (78/4436). The rate of detection, and the amount of viral RNA, was highest in urine samples (>serum, packed haemocytes >faecal >nasal >oral), identifying urine as the most plausible source of infection for flying-foxes and for horses. Detection in a urine sample was more efficient than detection in urogenital swabs, identifying the former as the preferred diagnostic sample. The detection of HeV RNA in serum is consistent with haematogenous spread, and with

  8. Routes of Hendra Virus Excretion in Naturally-Infected Flying-Foxes: Implications for Viral Transmission and Spillover Risk

    PubMed Central

    Edson, Daniel; Field, Hume; McMichael, Lee; Vidgen, Miranda; Goldspink, Lauren; Broos, Alice; Melville, Deb; Kristoffersen, Joanna; de Jong, Carol; McLaughlin, Amanda; Davis, Rodney; Kung, Nina; Jordan, David; Kirkland, Peter; Smith, Craig

    2015-01-01

    Pteropid bats or flying-foxes (Chiroptera: Pteropodidae) are the natural host of Hendra virus (HeV) which sporadically causes fatal disease in horses and humans in eastern Australia. While there is strong evidence that urine is an important infectious medium that likely drives bat to bat transmission and bat to horse transmission, there is uncertainty about the relative importance of alternative routes of excretion such as nasal and oral secretions, and faeces. Identifying the potential routes of HeV excretion in flying-foxes is important to effectively mitigate equine exposure risk at the bat-horse interface, and in determining transmission rates in host-pathogen models. The aim of this study was to identify the major routes of HeV excretion in naturally infected flying-foxes, and secondarily, to identify between-species variation in excretion prevalence. A total of 2840 flying-foxes from three of the four Australian mainland species (Pteropus alecto, P. poliocephalus and P. scapulatus) were captured and sampled at multiple roost locations in the eastern states of Queensland and New South Wales between 2012 and 2014. A range of biological samples (urine and serum, and urogenital, nasal, oral and rectal swabs) were collected from anaesthetized bats, and tested for HeV RNA using a qRT-PCR assay targeting the M gene. Forty-two P. alecto (n = 1410) had HeV RNA detected in at least one sample, and yielded a total of 78 positive samples, at an overall detection rate of 1.76% across all samples tested in this species (78/4436). The rate of detection, and the amount of viral RNA, was highest in urine samples (>serum, packed haemocytes >faecal >nasal >oral), identifying urine as the most plausible source of infection for flying-foxes and for horses. Detection in a urine sample was more efficient than detection in urogenital swabs, identifying the former as the preferred diagnostic sample. The detection of HeV RNA in serum is consistent with haematogenous spread, and with

  9. Relevance of feline interferon omega for clinical improvement and reduction of concurrent viral excretion in retrovirus infected cats from a rescue shelter.

    PubMed

    Gil, Solange; Leal, Rodolfo O; Duarte, Ana; McGahie, David; Sepúlveda, Nuno; Siborro, Inês; Cravo, Joana; Cartaxeiro, Clara; Tavares, Luís M

    2013-06-01

    Feline Immnunodeficiency (FIV) and Feline Leukemia (FeLV) viruses are common infectious agents in stray cats and shelter environments. Recombinant feline interferon-ω (rFeIFNω) has shown an antiviral action not only against FIV and FeLV but also against herpesvirus (FHV-1) and calicivirus (FCV). Sixteen naturally infected FIV/FeLV cats were followed during rFeIFNω therapy in order to monitor clinical signs and to correlate with excretion of concomitant viruses (FCV, FHV-1, feline coronavirus (FCoV) and parvovirus (FPV)). Cats were submitted to clinical evaluations and concomitant virus excretion assessement. Comparing D0-D65, 10/16 cats improved clinical scores. Of the 10 cats positive for FHV-1 on D0, 4 were negative and 6 reduced viral loads. Of the 11 FCoV positive cats, 9 reduced viral loads. The 13 FCV positive cats and the FPV positive cat were negative on D65. In conclusion, rFeIFNω improves clinical signs and reduces concurrent viral excretion in naturally infected retroviral cats.

  10. Length Variations in the NA Stalk of an H7N1 Influenza Virus Have Opposite Effects on Viral Excretion in Chickens and Ducks

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, T. W.; Munier, S.; Larcher, T.; Soubieux, D.; Ledevin, M.; Esnault, E.; Tourdes, A.; Croville, G.; Guérin, J.-L.; Quéré, P.; Volmer, R.

    2012-01-01

    A deletion of ∼20 amino acids in the stalk of neuraminidase is frequently observed upon transmission of influenza A viruses from waterfowl to domestic poultry. A pair of recombinant H7N1 viruses bearing either a short- or long-stalk neuraminidase was genetically engineered. Inoculation of the long-stalk-neuraminidase virus resulted in a higher cloacal excretion in ducks and led conversely to lower-level oropharyngeal excretion in chickens, associated with a higher-level local immune response and better survival. Therefore, a short-stalk neuraminidase is a determinant of viral adaptation and virulence in chickens but is detrimental to virus replication and shedding in ducks. PMID:22013034

  11. Excretion of dengue virus RNA by Aedes aegypti allows non-destructive monitoring of viral dissemination in individual mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Fontaine, Albin; Jiolle, Davy; Moltini-Conclois, Isabelle; Lequime, Sebastian; Lambrechts, Louis

    2016-01-01

    Successful transmission of a vector-borne pathogen relies on a complex life cycle in the arthropod vector that requires initial infection of the digestive tract followed by systemic viral dissemination. The time interval between acquisition and subsequent transmission of the pathogen, called the extrinsic incubation period, is one of the most influential parameters of vector-borne pathogen transmission. However, the dynamic nature of this process is often ignored because vector competence assays are sacrificial and rely on end-point measurements. Here, we report that individual Aedes aegypti mosquitoes release large amounts of dengue virus (DENV) RNA in their excreta that can be non-sacrificially detected over time following oral virus exposure. Further, we demonstrate that detection of DENV RNA in excreta from individual mosquitoes is correlated to systemic viral dissemination with high specificity (0.9–1) albeit moderate sensitivity (0.64–0.89). Finally, we illustrate the potential of our finding to detect biological differences in the dynamics of DENV dissemination in a proof-of-concept experiment. Individual measurements of the time required for systemic viral dissemination, a prerequisite for transmission, will be valuable to monitor the dynamics of DENV vector competence, to carry out quantitative genetics studies, and to evaluate the risk of DENV transmission in field settings. PMID:27117953

  12. Human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 viral load variability and long-term trends in asymptomatic carriers and in patients with human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1-related diseases.

    PubMed

    Demontis, Maria A; Hilburn, Silva; Taylor, Graham P

    2013-02-01

    Human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) proviral load (PVL) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) is high in patients with adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma or HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) and in some asymptomatic carriers, but fluctuates. Our objectives were to document ranges of HTLV PVL across a broader spectrum of diseases and tissues, to quantify the normal range of intrapatient PVL variability, and to identify which PVL values and changes deserve further investigation. PVL was measured in 191 patients with HTLV-1-associated diseases and in 211 asymptomatic carriers, using real-time quantitative PCR. The intraassay variability increases as viral load decreases: 8% at high load, 17% at medium load, and 33% at low load. The interassay variability is not different from the intraassay. Mean intrapatient CV is 65% (SD 21) in asymptomatic carriers and 59% (SD 22) in HAM/TSP. PVL values varied widely between individuals, but were relatively constant within individuals. High PVL in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and lymph nodes (LN) was associated with disease but 57% of asymptomatic carriers had a PVL greater than 1% in PBMCs. Our results suggest that (1) PVL changes falling outside a coefficient of variation of 100% require more detailed assessment, (2) asymptomatic carriers with PVL higher than 10% should undergo more frequent clinical and laboratory monitoring, and (3) HTLV-1 PVL in blood and tissue is helpful in the diagnosis and monitoring of HTLV-1 infection.

  13. Asymptomatic bacteriuria

    MedlinePlus

    ... Older age Pregnancy -- up to 40% of pregnant women with untreated asymptomatic bacteriuria will develop a kidney infection Vesicoureteral reflux (backward movement of urine from the bladder into ureters or ...

  14. The use of the SAEM algorithm in MONOLIX software for estimation of population pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic-viral dynamics parameters of maraviroc in asymptomatic HIV subjects.

    PubMed

    Chan, Phylinda L S; Jacqmin, Philippe; Lavielle, Marc; McFadyen, Lynn; Weatherley, Barry

    2011-02-01

    Using simulated viral load data for a given maraviroc monotherapy study design, the feasibility of different algorithms to perform parameter estimation for a pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic-viral dynamics (PKPD-VD) model was assessed. The assessed algorithms are the first-order conditional estimation method with interaction (FOCEI) implemented in NONMEM VI and the SAEM algorithm implemented in MONOLIX version 2.4. Simulated data were also used to test if an effect compartment and/or a lag time could be distinguished to describe an observed delay in onset of viral inhibition using SAEM. The preferred model was then used to describe the observed maraviroc monotherapy plasma concentration and viral load data using SAEM. In this last step, three modelling approaches were compared; (i) sequential PKPD-VD with fixed individual Empirical Bayesian Estimates (EBE) for PK, (ii) sequential PKPD-VD with fixed population PK parameters and including concentrations, and (iii) simultaneous PKPD-VD. Using FOCEI, many convergence problems (56%) were experienced with fitting the sequential PKPD-VD model to the simulated data. For the sequential modelling approach, SAEM (with default settings) took less time to generate population and individual estimates including diagnostics than with FOCEI without diagnostics. For the given maraviroc monotherapy sampling design, it was difficult to separate the viral dynamics system delay from a pharmacokinetic distributional delay or delay due to receptor binding and subsequent cellular signalling. The preferred model included a viral load lag time without inter-individual variability. Parameter estimates from the SAEM analysis of observed data were comparable among the three modelling approaches. For the sequential methods, computation time is approximately 25% less when fixing individual EBE of PK parameters with omission of the concentration data compared with fixed population PK parameters and retention of concentration data in the PD

  15. Asymptomatic dystrophinopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Morrone, A. |; Hoffman, E.P.; Hoop, R.C.

    1997-03-31

    A 4-year-old girl was referred for evaluation for a mild but persistent serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST) elevation detected incidentally during routine blood screening for a skin infection. Serum creatine kinase activity was found to be increased. Immuno-histochemical study for dystrophin in her muscle biopsy showed results consistent with a carrier state for muscular dystrophy. Molecular work-up showed the proposita to be a carrier of a deletion mutation of exon 48 of the dystrophin gene. Four male relatives also had the deletion mutation, yet showed no clinical symptoms of muscular dystrophy (age range 8-58 yrs). Linkage analysis of the dystrophin gene in the family showed a spontaneous change of an STR45 allele, which could be due to either an intragenic double recombination event, or CA repeat length mutation leading to identical size alleles. To our knowledge, this is the first documentation of an asymptomatic dystrophinopathy in multiple males of advanced age. Based on molecular findings, this family would be given a diagnosis of Becker muscular dystrophy. This diagnosis implies the development of clinical symptoms, even though this family is clearly asymptomatic. This report underscores the caution which must be exercised when giving presymptomatic diagnoses based on molecular studies. 28 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Spontaneous asymptomatic gallbladder perforation

    PubMed Central

    Seçil, Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    Gallstone disease is common. However, a proportion of patients are asymptomatic and remain undiagnosed until the occurrence of complications. Common complications include acute cholecystitis, biliary obstruction, acute pancreatitis and cholangitis. Severe complications include gallbladder perforation, Mirizzi syndrome and fistula formation are usually associated with significant morbidity and mortality. We report a case of asymptomatic spotaneous gallbladder perforation due to acute cholecystitis. PMID:24914424

  17. Asymptomatic encephalitis in calves experimentally infected with bovine herpesvirus-5

    PubMed Central

    Isernhagen, Allan Jürgen; Cosenza, Mariana; da Costa, Marcio Carvalho; Médici, Kerlei Cristina; Balarin, Mara Regina Stipp; Bracarense, Ana Paula Frederico Rodrigues Loureiro; Alfieri, Amauri Alcindo; Lisbôa, Júlio Augusto Naylor

    2011-01-01

    This study demonstrated that bovine herpesvirus 5 (BoHV)-5 infected calves can develop encephalitis and remain asymptomatic. Seven calves were infected intranasally and monitored for 30 days. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis was performed from the onset of neurological signs. Multiple sections of brain and the trigeminal ganglion were submitted to histopathology. Virus detection (PCR and isolation) was performed on CSF and tissues. Four calves developed signs of neurologic disease and died. Three calves remained asymptomatic and were euthanized 30 days post-infection. Cerebrospinal fluid mononuclear pleocytosis occurred in symptomatic and asymptomatic calves. BoHV-5 was isolated and viral DNA was detected in multiple areas of the encephalon of all calves. The viral DNA was detected in the CSF of 2 calves showing neurological signs. Histologically, inflammation was noted in the brain of all calves and confirmed that the encephalitis caused by BoHV-5 may be mild and asymptomatic. PMID:22654135

  18. Asymptomatic infection with Borrelia burgdorferi.

    PubMed

    Steere, Allen C; Sikand, Vijay K; Schoen, Robert T; Nowakowski, John

    2003-08-15

    The natural history of asymptomatic seroconversion to Borrelia burgdorferi has been unclear. We report here, on the basis of a post hoc assessment, the frequency and outcome of asymptomatic seroconversion to B. burgdorferi in participants of a large Lyme disease vaccine trial. We show that infection with B. burgdorferi may be asymptomatic but that asymptomatic infection is unusual in the United States.

  19. Asymptomatic inhaled foreign body

    PubMed Central

    Salim, Muhammad U.; Asghar, Asif; Tareen, Irum; Azhar, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    It is very rare to have a big foreign body in the lungs without any complications or symptoms for 2 years. A 14-year-old male with episodes of minor hemoptysis for 4 weeks had a history of inhalation of a bullet 2 years earlier. He had asymptomatic for lung complications for 2 years. The bullet was removed by right thoracotomy and non-anatomical wedge stapled resection, and he followed an uneventful recovery. An aspirated foreign body although big can remain asymptomatic for a long time, especially if it has migrated to the periphery. PMID:27652366

  20. Asymptomatic memory CD8+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Arif Azam; Srivastava, Ruchi; Lopes, Patricia Prado; Wang, Christine; Pham, Thanh T; Cochrane, Justin; Thai, Nhi Thi Uyen; Gutierrez, Lucas; BenMohamed, Lbachir

    2014-01-01

    Generation and maintenance of high quantity and quality memory CD8+ T cells determine the level of protection from viral, bacterial, and parasitic re-infections, and hence constitutes a primary goal for T cell epitope-based human vaccines and immunotherapeutics. Phenotypically and functionally characterizing memory CD8+ T cells that provide protection against herpes simplex virus type 1 and type 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2) infections, which cause blinding ocular herpes, genital herpes, and oro-facial herpes, is critical for better vaccine design. We have recently categorized 2 new major sub-populations of memory symptomatic and asymptomatic CD8+ T cells based on their phenotype, protective vs. pathogenic function, and anatomical locations. In this report we are discussing a new direction in developing T cell-based human herpes vaccines and immunotherapeutics based on the emerging new concept of “symptomatic and asymptomatic memory CD8+ T cells.” PMID:24499824

  1. Asymptomatic cervical bruits.

    PubMed Central

    Côté, R.; Battista, R. N.

    1984-01-01

    The diagnosis, significance and management of asymptomatic cervical bruits have been the focus of considerable controversy. The literature does not support an aggressive approach but, rather, careful follow-up of patients with this disorder. This paper reviews the available data and discusses the management options of family practitioners who may detect this disorder during a routine physical examination, during an examination prompted by an unrelated problem or preoperatively when elective surgery is being considered. PMID:6367922

  2. Urinary Adiponectin Excretion

    PubMed Central

    von Eynatten, Maximilian; Liu, Dan; Hock, Cornelia; Oikonomou, Dimitrios; Baumann, Marcus; Allolio, Bruno; Korosoglou, Grigorios; Morcos, Michael; Campean, Valentina; Amann, Kerstin; Lutz, Jens; Heemann, Uwe; Nawroth, Peter P.; Bierhaus, Angelika; Humpert, Per M.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Markers reliably identifying vascular damage and risk in diabetic patients are rare, and reports on associations of serum adiponectin with macrovascular disease have been inconsistent. In contrast to existing data on serum adiponectin, this study assesses whether urinary adiponectin excretion might represent a more consistent vascular damage marker in type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Adiponectin distribution in human kidney biopsies was assessed by immunohistochemistry, and urinary adiponectin isoforms were characterized by Western blot analysis. Total urinary adiponectin excretion rate was measured in 156 patients with type 2 diabetes who had a history of diabetic nephropathy and 40 healthy control subjects using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Atherosclerotic burden was assessed by common carotid artery intima-media-thickness (IMT). RESULTS A homogenous staining of adiponectin was found on the endothelial surface of glomerular capillaries and intrarenal arterioles in nondiabetic kidneys, whereas staining was decreased in diabetic nephropathy. Low-molecular adiponectin isoforms (∼30–70 kDa) were detected in urine by Western blot analysis. Urinary adiponectin was significantly increased in type 2 diabetes (7.68 ± 14.26 vs. control subjects: 2.91 ± 3.85 μg/g creatinine, P = 0.008). Among type 2 diabetic patients, adiponectinuria was associated with IMT (r = 0.479, P < 0.001) and proved to be a powerful independent predictor of IMT (β = 0.360, P < 0.001) in multivariable regression analyses. In a risk prediction model including variables of the UK Prospective Diabetes Study coronary heart disease risk engine urinary adiponectin, but not the albumin excretion rate, added significant value for the prediction of increased IMT (P = 0.007). CONCLUSIONS Quantification of urinary adiponectin excretion appears to be an independent indicator of vascular damage potentially identifying an increased risk for vascular events. PMID:19509019

  3. Asymptomatic monoclonal gammopathies.

    PubMed

    Bories, Claire; Jagannath, Sundar

    2014-09-01

    Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) and smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM) represent the earlier phases of plasma cell dyscrasias. Their definition is based on absence of end-organ damage with presence of a malignant clone that grows in the bone marrow. They share, as a common feature, the risk of progression to a symptomatic disease. MGUS progression risk is approximately 1% per year, and SMM has a risk of progression of 10% for the first 5 years which tapers off over time. The main purpose of identification of these earlier phases of the plasma cell dyscrasia was to identify patients who do not warrant treatment with chemotherapy, in whom the risk of treatment outweighs the benefit. Over the years, the definitions have not been modified to incorporate developments in imaging (magnetic resonance or positron emission and computed tomography), or genomics to identify patients at highest risk of progression within 2 years, where wait and watch might not be an appropriate option. In the absence of such definition, patients who have only a 50% chance of progression within 2 years are being offered therapy, which might also not be an optimal approach. In this review, we provide an overview of the definition, current prognostic factors, and risk stratifications in asymptomatic gammopathies, and discuss clinical trial outcomes in high-risk SMM. PMID:25486961

  4. Viral Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Public Home » For Veterans and the Public Viral Hepatitis Menu Menu Viral Hepatitis Viral Hepatitis Home For ... the Public Veterans and Public Home How is Hepatitis C Treated? Find the facts about the newest ...

  5. Is asymptomatic malaria really asymptomatic? Hematological, vascular and inflammatory effects of asymptomatic malaria parasitemia.

    PubMed

    de Mast, Quirijn; Brouwers, Judith; Syafruddin, Din; Bousema, Teun; Baidjoe, Amrish Y; de Groot, Philip G; van der Ven, Andre J; Fijnheer, Rob

    2015-11-01

    Asymptomatic malaria infections are highly prevalent in malaria endemic regions and most of these infections remain undiagnosed and untreated. Whereas conventional malaria symptoms are by definition absent, little is known on the more subtle health consequences of these infections. The aim of our study was to analyze the hematologic, vascular and inflammatory effects of patent and subpatent asymptomatic malaria parasitemia in children and adults on the Indonesian island Sumba. Both children and adults with parasitemia had increased high-sensitive C-reactive protein levels compared to aparasitemic individuals. In addition, children, but not adults with parasitemia also had lower platelet counts and Hb levels and higher levels of von Willebrand factor and platelet factor-4, markers of endothelial and platelet activation, respectively. These findings suggest that asymptomatic malaria infections have subtle health consequences, especially in children, and should be regarded as potentially harmful.

  6. Is asymptomatic malaria really asymptomatic? Hematological, vascular and inflammatory effects of asymptomatic malaria parasitemia.

    PubMed

    de Mast, Quirijn; Brouwers, Judith; Syafruddin, Din; Bousema, Teun; Baidjoe, Amrish Y; de Groot, Philip G; van der Ven, Andre J; Fijnheer, Rob

    2015-11-01

    Asymptomatic malaria infections are highly prevalent in malaria endemic regions and most of these infections remain undiagnosed and untreated. Whereas conventional malaria symptoms are by definition absent, little is known on the more subtle health consequences of these infections. The aim of our study was to analyze the hematologic, vascular and inflammatory effects of patent and subpatent asymptomatic malaria parasitemia in children and adults on the Indonesian island Sumba. Both children and adults with parasitemia had increased high-sensitive C-reactive protein levels compared to aparasitemic individuals. In addition, children, but not adults with parasitemia also had lower platelet counts and Hb levels and higher levels of von Willebrand factor and platelet factor-4, markers of endothelial and platelet activation, respectively. These findings suggest that asymptomatic malaria infections have subtle health consequences, especially in children, and should be regarded as potentially harmful. PMID:26304688

  7. Viral pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, S B

    1991-09-01

    Viral pneumonias are common in infants and young children but rare in adults. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and para-influenza viruses are the most frequent viral pathogens in infants and children. Influenza virus types A and B account for over one half of viral pneumonias in adults. Immunocompromised hosts are susceptible to pneumonias caused by cytomegalovirus (CMV) and other herpesviruses, as well as rubeola and adenovirus. Diagnosis of viral pneumonia depends on appropriate viral cultures and acute and convalescent sera for specific antibodies. Superinfection with bacteria is common in adults. Anti-viral therapy is available for several respiratory viruses. Ribavirin, amantadine/rimantadine, interferon alpha, and acyclovir are antiviral drugs that may be of benefit in treatment and prophylaxis. Prevention of viral pneumonia will depend upon improved viral immunization practices.

  8. Viral pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Names Pneumonia - viral; "Walking pneumonia" - viral Images Lungs Respiratory system References Lee FE, Treanor J. Viral infections. In: Mason RJ, VC Broaddus, Martin TR, et al, eds. Murray and Nadel’s Textbook of Respiratory Medicine . 5th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Saunders Elsevier; 2010: ...

  9. Viral infection

    PubMed Central

    Puigdomènech, Isabel; de Armas-Rillo, Laura; Machado, José-David

    2011-01-01

    Viruses have developed different survival strategies in host cells by crossing cell-membrane compartments, during different steps of their viral life cycle. In fact, the non-regenerative viral membrane of enveloped viruses needs to encounter the dynamic cell-host membrane, during early steps of the infection process, in which both membranes fuse, either at cell-surface or in an endocytic compartment, to promote viral entry and infection. Once inside the cell, many viruses accomplish their replication process through exploiting or modulating membrane traffic, and generating specialized compartments to assure viral replication, viral budding and spreading, which also serve to evade the immune responses against the pathogen. In this review, we have attempted to present some data that highlight the importance of membrane dynamics during viral entry and replicative processes, in order to understand how viruses use and move through different complex and dynamic cell-membrane structures and how they use them to persist. PMID:21966556

  10. Dengue viral infections

    PubMed Central

    Malavige, G; Fernando, S; Fernando, D; Seneviratne, S

    2004-01-01

    Dengue viral infections are one of the most important mosquito borne diseases in the world. They may be asymptomatic or may give rise to undifferentiated fever, dengue fever, dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF), or dengue shock syndrome. Annually, 100 million cases of dengue fever and half a million cases of DHF occur worldwide. Ninety percent of DHF subjects are children less than 15 years of age. At present, dengue is endemic in 112 countries in the world. No vaccine is available for preventing this disease. Early recognition and prompt initiation of appropriate treatment are vital if disease related morbidity and mortality are to be limited. This review outlines aspects of the epidemiology of dengue infections, the dengue virus and its mosquito vector, clinical features and pathogenesis of dengue infections, and the management and control of these infections. PMID:15466994

  11. Dengue viral infections.

    PubMed

    Malavige, G N; Fernando, S; Fernando, D J; Seneviratne, S L

    2004-10-01

    Dengue viral infections are one of the most important mosquito borne diseases in the world. They may be asymptomatic or may give rise to undifferentiated fever, dengue fever, dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF), or dengue shock syndrome. Annually, 100 million cases of dengue fever and half a million cases of DHF occur worldwide. Ninety percent of DHF subjects are children less than 15 years of age. At present, dengue is endemic in 112 countries in the world. No vaccine is available for preventing this disease. Early recognition and prompt initiation of appropriate treatment are vital if disease related morbidity and mortality are to be limited. This review outlines aspects of the epidemiology of dengue infections, the dengue virus and its mosquito vector, clinical features and pathogenesis of dengue infections, and the management and control of these infections.

  12. Early immune responses accompanying human asymptomatic Ebola infections

    PubMed Central

    Leroy, E M; Baize, S; Debre, P; Lansoud-Soukate, J; Mavoungou, E

    2001-01-01

    In a recent study we identified certain asymptomatic individuals infected by Ebola virus (EBOV) who mounted specific IgG and early and strong inflammatory responses. Here, we further characterized the primary immune response to EBOV during the course of asymptomatic infection in humans. Inflammatory responses occurred in temporal association with anti-inflammatory phase composed by soluble antagonist IL-1RA, circulating TNF receptors, IL-10 and cortisol. At the end of the inflammatory process, mRNA expression of T-cell cytokines (IL-2 and IL-4) and activation markers (CD28, CD40L and CTLA4) was up-regulated, strongly suggesting T-cell activation. This T-cell activation was followed by EBOV-specific IgG responses (mainly IgG3 ang IgG1), and by marked and sustained up-regulation of IFNγ, FasL and perforin mRNA expression, suggesting activation of cytotoxic cells. The terminal down-regulation of these latter markers coincided with the release of the apoptotic marker 41/7 NMP in blood and with the disappearance of viral RNA from PBMC, suggesting that infected cells are eliminated by cytotoxic mechanisms. Finally, RT-PCR analysis of TCR-Vβ repertoire usage showed that TCR-Vβ12 mRNA was never expressed during the infection. Taken together, these findings improve our understanding about immune response during human asymptomatic Ebola infection, and throw new light on protection against Ebola virus. PMID:11472407

  13. Viral meningitis.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, David R

    2005-01-01

    Viruses probably account for most cases of acute meningitis. Viral meningitis is often assumed to be a largely benign disease. For the commonest pathogens causing meningitis, enteroviruses, this is usually the case; however, for many of the other pathogens causing viral meningitis, and for common pathogens in the immunocompromised or infants, viral meningitis is frequently associated with substantial neurological complications and a significant mortality. Diagnostic methods for rapid and accurate identification of pathogens have improved over recent years, permitting more precise and earlier diagnoses. There have been fewer developments in therapies for viral meningitis, and there remain no effective therapies for most pathogens, emphasising the importance of prevention and early diagnosis. This review focuses on the presentation, diagnosis and management of viral meningitis and also covers the prevention of meningitis for pathogens where effective vaccines are available. PMID:16474042

  14. Viral meningitis.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, David R

    2005-01-01

    Viruses probably account for most cases of acute meningitis. Viral meningitis is often assumed to be a largely benign disease. For the commonest pathogens causing meningitis, enteroviruses, this is usually the case; however, for many of the other pathogens causing viral meningitis, and for common pathogens in the immunocompromised or infants, viral meningitis is frequently associated with substantial neurological complications and a significant mortality. Diagnostic methods for rapid and accurate identification of pathogens have improved over recent years, permitting more precise and earlier diagnoses. There have been fewer developments in therapies for viral meningitis, and there remain no effective therapies for most pathogens, emphasising the importance of prevention and early diagnosis. This review focuses on the presentation, diagnosis and management of viral meningitis and also covers the prevention of meningitis for pathogens where effective vaccines are available.

  15. Salivary excretion of rabies virus by healthy vampire bats.

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Setien, A; Loza-Rubio, E; Salas-Rojas, M; Brisseau, N; Cliquet, F; Pastoret, P P; Rojas-Dotor, S; Tesoro, E; Kretschmer, R

    2005-06-01

    Salivary excretion of rabies virus was evaluated in 14 adult vampire bats (Desmodus rotundus) intramuscularly injected with a large dose (10(6) MICLD50) of vampire rabies virus variant CASS88. Saliva samples were obtained from surviving bats every other day for 30 days, then weekly for 2 months, and finally 1 and 2 years later. Rabies virus was isolated in murine neuroblastoma cells and in randomly selected cases by PCR. Rabies virus was not detected in the saliva of any of the 11 animals that succumbed (somewhat early) to rabies challenge, nor in the control bats. In contrast, virus was detected early, and only once (days 6, 6 and 21) in each of the three animals that survived rabies challenge and remained healthy for at least 2 years after challenge. At that time even vigorous dexamethasone and cyclosporine administration failed to provoke further viral excretion.

  16. Salivary excretion of rabies virus by healthy vampire bats.

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar-Setien, A.; Loza-Rubio, E.; Salas-Rojas, M.; Brisseau, N.; Cliquet, F.; Pastoret, P. P.; Rojas-Dotor, S.; Tesoro, E.; Kretschmer, R.

    2005-01-01

    Salivary excretion of rabies virus was evaluated in 14 adult vampire bats (Desmodus rotundus) intramuscularly injected with a large dose (10(6) MICLD50) of vampire rabies virus variant CASS88. Saliva samples were obtained from surviving bats every other day for 30 days, then weekly for 2 months, and finally 1 and 2 years later. Rabies virus was isolated in murine neuroblastoma cells and in randomly selected cases by PCR. Rabies virus was not detected in the saliva of any of the 11 animals that succumbed (somewhat early) to rabies challenge, nor in the control bats. In contrast, virus was detected early, and only once (days 6, 6 and 21) in each of the three animals that survived rabies challenge and remained healthy for at least 2 years after challenge. At that time even vigorous dexamethasone and cyclosporine administration failed to provoke further viral excretion. PMID:15966107

  17. Salivary excretion of rabies virus by healthy vampire bats.

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Setien, A; Loza-Rubio, E; Salas-Rojas, M; Brisseau, N; Cliquet, F; Pastoret, P P; Rojas-Dotor, S; Tesoro, E; Kretschmer, R

    2005-06-01

    Salivary excretion of rabies virus was evaluated in 14 adult vampire bats (Desmodus rotundus) intramuscularly injected with a large dose (10(6) MICLD50) of vampire rabies virus variant CASS88. Saliva samples were obtained from surviving bats every other day for 30 days, then weekly for 2 months, and finally 1 and 2 years later. Rabies virus was isolated in murine neuroblastoma cells and in randomly selected cases by PCR. Rabies virus was not detected in the saliva of any of the 11 animals that succumbed (somewhat early) to rabies challenge, nor in the control bats. In contrast, virus was detected early, and only once (days 6, 6 and 21) in each of the three animals that survived rabies challenge and remained healthy for at least 2 years after challenge. At that time even vigorous dexamethasone and cyclosporine administration failed to provoke further viral excretion. PMID:15966107

  18. Ammonia excretion by Azobacter chroococcum

    SciTech Connect

    Narula, N.; Lakshminarayana, K.; Tauro, P.

    1981-02-01

    In recent years, research has focused attention on the development of biological systems for nitrogen fixation. In this report, two strains of Azotobacter chroococcum are identified which can excrete as much as 45 mg ammonia/ml of the culture broth in a sucrose supplemented synthetic medium.

  19. Cytomegalovirus excretion in gnotobiotic pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Edington, N.; Watt, R. G.; Plowright, W.

    1976-01-01

    Germ-free piglets were infected intranasally with porcine cytomegalovirus (PCMV) at 1 day (group A) or 3 weeks of age (group B). Viraemia and virus excretion by the nasal, pharyngeal and conjunctival routes was studied up to the time of death or to 12 weeks. Virus was also sought in tissues at death or at slaughter, as well as in a few urine samples. Viraemia was detected in group A between days 5 and 19 after infection and in group B between days 14 and 16 inclusive. The chief route of virus excretion was the nasal mucosa, followed by the pharynx and conjunctiva; the maximal duration of excretion by these routes was 32, 25 and 14 days for pigs of group A and 9, 7 and 4 days for group B. The quantity of virus was also greater in the former group, of which died of generalized PCMV infection. A viruria was demonstrated in 2 animals. Antibody detectable in indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) tests appeared towards the end of the third week, reaching maximal titres at 5 to 7 weeks after infection. The mean peak titre of antibody in group B was lower than in group A. Corticosteroid treatment at days 56--62 after infection resulted in some recrudescence of virus excretion, accompanied in group B by about a twofold increase in IIF antibody. PCMV was isolated in cultures of lung macrophages from 4 of 7 animals killed at about 12 weeks after inoculation. PMID:185292

  20. Gonadotropin excretion and body composition.

    PubMed

    Penny, R; Goldstein, I P; Frasier, S D

    1978-02-01

    Urinary follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) excretion was correlated with calculated total body water (TBW) and body fat (BF) in 140 normal girls and 142 normal boys, ages 3 to 16 years. In girls, there was a significant increase in gonadotropin excretion at the time of a significant increase in BF as a percent of body weight and decrease in TBW as a percent of body weight. Pubertal changes in body composition were seen in girls at the same chronological age and stage of puberty as increased gonadotropin excretion. Similar findings were observed in boys. Pubertal changes in body composition (an increase in TBW as a percent of body weight and decrease of BF as a percent of body weight) accompanied significantly increased gonadotropin excretion. Both developmental changes were seen at the same chronological age and stage of puberty. Our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that characteristic changes in body composition as well as the other hallmarks of puberty, including menarche in girls, result from increased gonadotropin and gonadal steroid secretion. They do not support the hypothesis that changes of body composition trigger increased hypothalamic function and hormone secretion leading to the subsequent events of puberty. PMID:634687

  1. Viral Gastroenteritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... stomach, small intestine, and large intestine. Several different viruses can cause viral gastroenteritis, which is highly contagious ... and last for 1 to 3 days. Some viruses cause symptoms that last longer. [ Top ] What are ...

  2. Viral arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    Infectious arthritis - viral ... Ohl CA, Forster D. Infectious arthritis of native joints. In: Bennett JE, Dolin R, Blaser MJ, eds. Mandell, Douglas, and Bennett's Principles and Practice of Infectious ...

  3. Asymptomatic Clostridium difficile Colonisation and Onward Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Eyre, David W.; Griffiths, David; Vaughan, Alison; Golubchik, Tanya; Acharya, Milind; O’Connor, Lily; Crook, Derrick W.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Combined genotyping/whole genome sequencing and epidemiological data suggest that in endemic settings only a minority of Clostridium difficile infection, CDI, is acquired from other cases. Asymptomatic patients are a potential source for many unexplained cases. Methods We prospectively screened a cohort of medical inpatients in a UK teaching hospital for asymptomatic C. difficile carriage using stool culture. Electronic and questionnaire data were used to determine risk factors for asymptomatic carriage by logistic regression. Carriage isolates were compared with all hospital/community CDI cases from the same geographic region, from 12 months before the study to 3 months after, using whole genome sequencing and hospital admission data, assessing particularly for evidence of onward transmission from asymptomatic cases. Results Of 227 participants recruited, 132 provided ≥1 stool samples for testing. 18 participants were culture-positive for C. difficile, 14/132(11%) on their first sample. Independent risk factors for asymptomatic carriage were patient reported loose/frequent stool (but not meeting CDI criteria of ≥3 unformed stools in 24 hours), previous overnight hospital stay within 6 months, and steroid/immunosuppressant medication in the last 6 months (all p≤0.02). Surprisingly antibiotic exposure in the last 6 months was independently associated with decreased risk of carriage (p = 0.005). The same risk factors were identified excluding participants reporting frequent/loose stool. 13/18(72%) asymptomatically colonised patients carried toxigenic strains from common disease-causing lineages found in cases. Several plausible transmission events to asymptomatic carriers were identified, but in this relatively small study no clear evidence of onward transmission from an asymptomatic case was seen. Conclusions Transmission events from any one asymptomatic carrier are likely to be relatively rare, but as asymptomatic carriage is common, it may

  4. Predicting nitrogen excretion from cattle.

    PubMed

    Reed, K F; Moraes, L E; Casper, D P; Kebreab, E

    2015-05-01

    Manure nitrogen (N) from cattle production facilities can lead to negative environmental effects, such as contribution to greenhouse gas emissions, leaching and runoff to aqueous ecosystems leading to eutrophication, and acid rain. To mitigate these effects and to improve the efficiency of N use, accurate prediction of N excretion and secretions are required. A genetic algorithm was implemented to select models to predict fecal, urinary, and total manure N excretions, and milk N secretions from 3 classes of animals: lactating dairy cows, heifers and dry cows, and steers. Two tiers of model classes were developed for each category of animals based on model input requirements. A total of 6 models for heifers and dry cows and steers and an additional 2 models for lactating dairy cattle were developed. Evaluation of the models using K-fold cross validation based on all data and using the most recent 6 yr of data showed better prediction for total manure N and fecal N compared with urinary N excretion, which was the most variable response in the database. Compared with extant models from the literature, the models developed in this study resulted in a significant improvement in prediction error for fecal and urinary N excretions from lactating cows. For total manure production by lactating cows, extant and new models were comparable in their prediction ability. Both proposed and extant models performed better than the prediction methods used by the US Environmental Protection Agency for the national inventory of greenhouse gases. Therefore, the proposed models are recommended for use in estimation of manure N from various classes of animals. PMID:25747829

  5. Predicting nitrogen excretion from cattle.

    PubMed

    Reed, K F; Moraes, L E; Casper, D P; Kebreab, E

    2015-05-01

    Manure nitrogen (N) from cattle production facilities can lead to negative environmental effects, such as contribution to greenhouse gas emissions, leaching and runoff to aqueous ecosystems leading to eutrophication, and acid rain. To mitigate these effects and to improve the efficiency of N use, accurate prediction of N excretion and secretions are required. A genetic algorithm was implemented to select models to predict fecal, urinary, and total manure N excretions, and milk N secretions from 3 classes of animals: lactating dairy cows, heifers and dry cows, and steers. Two tiers of model classes were developed for each category of animals based on model input requirements. A total of 6 models for heifers and dry cows and steers and an additional 2 models for lactating dairy cattle were developed. Evaluation of the models using K-fold cross validation based on all data and using the most recent 6 yr of data showed better prediction for total manure N and fecal N compared with urinary N excretion, which was the most variable response in the database. Compared with extant models from the literature, the models developed in this study resulted in a significant improvement in prediction error for fecal and urinary N excretions from lactating cows. For total manure production by lactating cows, extant and new models were comparable in their prediction ability. Both proposed and extant models performed better than the prediction methods used by the US Environmental Protection Agency for the national inventory of greenhouse gases. Therefore, the proposed models are recommended for use in estimation of manure N from various classes of animals.

  6. Prolonged excretion of a low-pathogenicity H5N2 avian influenza virus strain in the Pekin duck

    PubMed Central

    Carranza-Flores, José Manuel; Padilla-Noriega, Luis; Loza-Rubio, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    H5N2 strains of low-pathogenicity avian influenza virus (LPAIV) have been circulating for at least 17 years in some Mexican chicken farms. We measured the rate and duration of viral excretion from Pekin ducks that were experimentally inoculated with an H5N2 LPAIV that causes death in embryonated chicken eggs (A/chicken/Mexico/2007). Leghorn chickens were used as susceptible host controls. The degree of viral excretion was evaluated with real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RRT-PCR) using samples from oropharyngeal and cloacal swabs. We observed prolonged excretion from both species of birds lasting for at least 21 days. Prolonged excretion of LPAIV A/chicken/Mexico/2007 is atypical. PMID:23820212

  7. Presence of Mycoplasma agalactiae in semen of naturally infected asymptomatic rams.

    PubMed

    Prats-van der Ham, Miranda; Tatay-Dualde, Juan; de la Fe, Christian; Paterna, Ana; Sánchez, Antonio; Corrales, Juan C; Contreras, Antonio; Gómez-Martín, Ángel

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of the present study was to assess the presence of Mycoplasma agalactiae (Ma), the main causative agent of ovine contagious agalactia (CA), in semen of naturally infected rams. Therefore, semen samples from 167 rams residing in three different artificial insemination (AI) centers of a CA-endemic area were studied by microbiological and molecular techniques. In addition, serial ejaculates from the same rams were evaluated to determine the excretion dynamics of Ma. Of the 384 samples studied, Ma was detected in 56 (14.58%) which belonged to 44 different rams (26.35%). These findings confirm the ability of Ma to be excreted in semen of asymptomatic rams. Furthermore, these results also evidence the presence of these asymptomatic carriers of Ma in ovine AI centers, representing a serious health risk regarding the spread and maintenance of CA, especially in endemic areas. Moreover, the excretion of Ma in semen also points to the risk of venereal transmission of this disease. The current results highlight the need to implement control measures to prevent the admission of infected rams in AI centers and the necessity to continuously monitor semen samples to effectively detect infected individuals. PMID:27045625

  8. Viral arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Michael; Marks, Jonathan L

    2016-01-01

    Acute-onset arthritis is a common clinical problem facing both the general clinician and the rheumatologist. A viral aetiology is though to be responsible for approximately 1% of all cases of acute arthritis with a wide range of causal agents recognised. The epidemiology of acute viral arthritis continues to evolve, with some aetiologies, such as rubella, becoming less common due to vaccination, while some vector-borne viruses have become more widespread. A travel history therefore forms an important part of the assessment of patients presenting with an acute arthritis. Worldwide, parvovirus B19, hepatitis B and C, HIV and the alphaviruses are among the most important causes of virally mediated arthritis. Targeted serological testing may be of value in establishing a diagnosis, and clinicians must also be aware that low-titre autoantibodies, such as rheumatoid factor and antinuclear antibody, can occur in the context of acute viral arthritis. A careful consideration of epidemiological, clinical and serological features is therefore required to guide clinicians in making diagnostic and treatment decisions. While most virally mediated arthritides are self-limiting some warrant the initiation of specific antiviral therapy. PMID:27037381

  9. Viral population dynamics and virulence thresholds.

    PubMed

    Lancaster, Karen Z; Pfeiffer, Julie K

    2012-08-01

    Viral factors and host barriers influence virally induced disease, and asymptomatic versus symptomatic infection is governed by a 'virulence threshold'. Understanding modulation of virulence thresholds could lend insight into disease outcome and aid in rational therapeutic and vaccine design. RNA viruses are an excellent system to study virulence thresholds in the context of quasispecies population dynamics. RNA viruses have high error frequencies and our understanding of viral population dynamics has been shaped by quasispecies evolutionary theory. In turn, research using RNA viruses as replicons with short generation times and high mutation rates has been an invaluable tool to test models of quasispecies theory. The challenge and new frontier of RNA virus population dynamics research is to combine multiple theoretical models and experimental data to describe viral population behavior as it changes, moving within and between hosts, to predict disease and pathogen emergence. Several excellent studies have begun to undertake this challenge using novel approaches.

  10. Salt excretion in Suaeda fruticosa.

    PubMed

    Labidi, Nehla; Ammari, Manel; Mssedi, Dorsaf; Benzerti, Maali; Snoussi, Sana; Abdelly, C

    2010-09-01

    Suaeda fruticosa is a perennial "includer" halophyte devoid of glands or trichomes with a strong ability of accumulating and sequestrating Na(+) and Cl(-). We were interested in determining whether leaf cuticle salt excretion could be involved as a further mechanism in salt response of this species after long-term treatment with high salinity levels. Seedlings had been treated for three months with seawater (SW) diluted with tap water (0, 25, 50 and 75% SW). Leaf scanning electron microscopy revealed a convex adaxial side sculpture and a higher accumulation of saline crystals at the lamina margin, with a large variability on repartition and size between treatments. No salt gland or salt bladder was found. Threedimensional wax decorations were the only structures found on leaf surface. Washing the leaf surface with water indicated that sodium and chloride predominated in excreted salts, and that potassium was poorly represented. Optimal growth of whole plant was recorded at 25% SW, correlating with maximum Na(+) and Cl(-) absolute secretion rate. The leaves of plants treated with SW retained more water than those of plants treated with tap water due to lower solute potential, especially at 25% SW. Analysis of compatible solute, such as proline, total soluble carbohydrates and glycinebetaine disclosed strong relationship between glycinebetaine and osmotic potential (r = 0.92) suggesting that tissue hydration was partly maintained by glycinebetaine accumulation. Thus in S. fruticosa , increased solute accumulation associated with water retention, and steady intracellular ion homeostasis confirms the "includer" strategy of salt tolerance previously demonstrated. However, salt excretion at leaf surface also participated in conferring to this species a capacity in high salinity tolerance.

  11. Purine and pyrimidine excretion in psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Simmonds, H. A.; Bowyer, A.

    1974-01-01

    1 Urinary purine excretion has been investigated in two healthy controls and two patients with psoriasis, one a hyperuricaemic, one a normouricaemic. No difference was detected between the patients and controls. Therapy with allopurinol effectively lowered blood and urinary uric acid levels and produced a deficit in total urinary oxypurine excretion in both controls and patients with psoriasis. The concomitant increase in xanthine excretion was greater than the increase in hypoxanthine excretion and xanthine/hypoxanthine ratios (average 0.70 and 1.0 prior to therapy) were increased by allopurinol to an average of 3.0 and 3.8 respectively in the two groups. Allopurinol also reduced the excretion of 8-hydroxy-7-methyl guanine but no effect on the excretion levels of other minor purine bases was noted. 2 Allopurinol was metabolized similarly by both patients and controls, 84% of the administered allopurinol being accounted for as urinary metabolites. 74% of the drug in the urine was excreted as oxipurinol, 26% as unchanged allopurinol plus allopurinol riboside, the remainder being oxipurinol riboside. 3 Pseudouridine excretion in 25 healthy controls was 86.5 ± 17.8 mg/24 hours. Pseudouridine excretion was not excessive in the patients with psoriasis and was not altered by allopurinol therapy. 4 No abnormality or difference in purine or pyrimidine excretion in either patient was detected prior to or during therapy which could be related to the epidermal lesion. PMID:22454896

  12. Viral Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... with hepatitis? How does a pregnant woman pass hepatitis B virus to her baby? If I have hepatitis B, what does my baby need so that she ... Can I breastfeed my baby if I have hepatitis B? More information on viral hepatitis What is hepatitis? ...

  13. Inflammation-Induced Reactivation of the Ranavirus Frog Virus 3 in Asymptomatic Xenopus laevis

    PubMed Central

    Robert, Jacques; Grayfer, Leon; Edholm, Eva-Stina; Ward, Brian; De Jesús Andino, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Natural infections of ectothermic vertebrates by ranaviruses (RV, family Iridoviridae) are rapidly increasing, with an alarming expansion of RV tropism and resulting die-offs of numerous animal populations. Notably, infection studies of the amphibian Xenopus laevis with the ranavirus Frog Virus 3 (FV3) have revealed that although the adult frog immune system is efficient at controlling RV infections, residual quiescent virus can be detected in mononuclear phagocytes of otherwise asymptomatic animals following the resolution of RV infections. It is noteworthy that macrophage-lineage cells are now believed to be a critical element in the RV infection strategy. In the present work, we report that inflammation induced by peritoneal injection of heat-killed bacteria in asymptomatic frogs one month after infection with FV3 resulted in viral reactivation including detectable viral DNA and viral gene expression in otherwise asymptomatic frogs. FV3 reactivation was most prominently detected in kidneys and in peritoneal HAM56+ mononuclear phagocytes. Notably, unlike adult frogs that typically clear primary FV3 infections, a proportion of the animals succumbed to the reactivated FV3 infection, indicating that previous exposure does not provide protection against subsequent reactivation in these animals. PMID:25390636

  14. Inflammation-induced reactivation of the ranavirus Frog Virus 3 in asymptomatic Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Robert, Jacques; Grayfer, Leon; Edholm, Eva-Stina; Ward, Brian; De Jesús Andino, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Natural infections of ectothermic vertebrates by ranaviruses (RV, family Iridoviridae) are rapidly increasing, with an alarming expansion of RV tropism and resulting die-offs of numerous animal populations. Notably, infection studies of the amphibian Xenopus laevis with the ranavirus Frog Virus 3 (FV3) have revealed that although the adult frog immune system is efficient at controlling RV infections, residual quiescent virus can be detected in mononuclear phagocytes of otherwise asymptomatic animals following the resolution of RV infections. It is noteworthy that macrophage-lineage cells are now believed to be a critical element in the RV infection strategy. In the present work, we report that inflammation induced by peritoneal injection of heat-killed bacteria in asymptomatic frogs one month after infection with FV3 resulted in viral reactivation including detectable viral DNA and viral gene expression in otherwise asymptomatic frogs. FV3 reactivation was most prominently detected in kidneys and in peritoneal HAM56+ mononuclear phagocytes. Notably, unlike adult frogs that typically clear primary FV3 infections, a proportion of the animals succumbed to the reactivated FV3 infection, indicating that previous exposure does not provide protection against subsequent reactivation in these animals.

  15. [Asymptomatic kidney stones: active surveillance vs. treatment].

    PubMed

    Neisius, A; Thomas, C; Roos, F C; Hampel, C; Fritsche, H-M; Bach, T; Thüroff, J W; Knoll, T

    2015-09-01

    The prevalence of kidney stones is increasing worldwide. Asymptomatic non-obstructing kidney stones are increasingly detected as an incidental finding on radiologic imaging, which has been performed more frequently over the last decades. Beside the current interventional treatment modalities such as extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL), ureterorenoscopy (URS) and percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL), active surveillance of asymptomatic kidney stones has been a focus of discussion lately, not only for attending physicians, but even more so for patients. The current German and European guidelines recommend active surveillance for patients with asymptomatic kidney stones if no interventional therapy is mandatory because of pain or medical factors. Herein we review the current literature on risks and benefits of active surveillance of asymptomatic non-obstructing kidney stones.

  16. [Asymptomatic kidney stones: active surveillance vs. treatment].

    PubMed

    Neisius, A; Thomas, C; Roos, F C; Hampel, C; Fritsche, H-M; Bach, T; Thüroff, J W; Knoll, T

    2015-09-01

    The prevalence of kidney stones is increasing worldwide. Asymptomatic non-obstructing kidney stones are increasingly detected as an incidental finding on radiologic imaging, which has been performed more frequently over the last decades. Beside the current interventional treatment modalities such as extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL), ureterorenoscopy (URS) and percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL), active surveillance of asymptomatic kidney stones has been a focus of discussion lately, not only for attending physicians, but even more so for patients. The current German and European guidelines recommend active surveillance for patients with asymptomatic kidney stones if no interventional therapy is mandatory because of pain or medical factors. Herein we review the current literature on risks and benefits of active surveillance of asymptomatic non-obstructing kidney stones. PMID:26378390

  17. Carcinoid Tumor in Accidental, Asymptomatic Meckel's Diverticulum.

    PubMed

    Baranyai, Zsolt; Jósa, Valeria; Merkel, Keresztely; Zolnai, Zsofia

    2013-01-01

    Although Meckel's diverticulum is the most common congenital gastrointestinal disorder, it is controversial whether asymptomatic diverticula in adults should be respected. The authors report the case of a patient who was operated due to ileus caused by adhesions and a Meckel's diverticulum without any sign of inflammation was accidentally noted and removed. As a surprise, the pathological examination of the diverticulum proved carcinoid tumor, a neuroendocrine malignant tumor. The case raises the importance of the removal of asymptomatic Meckel's diverticulum.

  18. Asymptomatic bacteriuria. Which patients should be treated?

    PubMed

    Zhanel, G G; Harding, G K; Guay, D R

    1990-07-01

    Asymptomatic bacteriuria is common in both the community nursing home and hospital settings. Few data, however, are available about the potential complications arising from asymptomatic bacteriuria (eg, the development of symptomatic infection and renal damage) for various patient populations and for various medical conditions. On the basis of data in the literature, we believe that neonates and preschool children with asymptomatic bacteriuria should be treated. Pregnant women and "nonelderly" (less than 60 years old) men should be treated. We do not think that school-age children, nonpregnant, nonelderly women, or elderly men and women need antimicrobial treatment if their urinary tracks are normal. In addition, antimicrobial treatment is recommended for patients with asymptomatic bacteriuria and abnormal urinary tracts and those undergoing clean intermittent catheterization, genitourinary manipulation, or instrumentation. Patients with long-term indwelling catheters should not be treated. The treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria in patients with short-term indwelling catheters and those with ileal conduits is controversial. These treatment recommendations should not necessarily be accepted as the standards of practice, since treatment is often controversial due to the lack of published data describing the natural course of asymptomatic bacteriuria in various patient populations. PMID:2196024

  19. Asymptomatic Renal Colonization of Humans in the Peruvian Amazon by Leptospira

    PubMed Central

    Ganoza, Christian A.; Matthias, Michael A.; Saito, Mayuko; Cespedes, Manuel; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Vinetz, Joseph M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Renal carriage and shedding of leptospires is characteristic of carrier or maintenance animal hosts. Sporadic reports indicate that after infection, humans may excrete leptospires for extended periods. We hypothesized that, like mammalian reservoir hosts, humans develop asymptomatic leptospiruria in settings of high disease transmission such as the Peruvian Amazon. Methodology/Principal Findings Using a cross-sectional study design, we used a combination of epidemiological data, serology and molecular detection of the leptospiral 16S rRNA gene to identify asymptomatic urinary shedders of Leptospira. Approximately one-third of the 314 asymptomatic participants had circulating anti-leptospiral antibodies. Among enrolled participants, 189/314 (59%) had evidence of recent infection (microscopic agglutination test (MAT0 ≥1∶800 or ELISA IgM-positive or both). The proportion of MAT-positive and high MAT-titer (≥1∶800) persons was higher in men than women (p = 0.006). Among these people, 13/314 (4.1%) had Leptospira DNA-positive urine samples. Of these, the 16S rRNA gene from 10 samples was able to be sequenced. The urine-derived species clustered within both pathogenic (n = 6) and intermediate clades of Leptospira (n = 4). All of the thirteen participants with leptospiral DNA in urine were women. The median age of the DNA-positive group was older compared to the negative group (p≤0.05). A group of asymptomatic participants (“long-term asymptomatic individuals,” 102/341 (32.5%) of enrolled individuals) without serological evidence of recent infection was identified; within this group, 6/102 (5.9%) excreted pathogenic and intermediate-pathogenic Leptospira (75–229 bacteria/mL of urine). Conclusions/Significance Asymptomatic renal colonization of leptospires in a region of high disease transmission is common, including among people without serological or clinical evidence of recent infection. Both pathogenic and intermediate Leptospira

  20. [Renal calcium excretion and urolithiasis].

    PubMed

    Aruga, Seiji; Honma, Yukio

    2011-10-01

    Patients with urolithiasis have been increasing in the world, especially morbidity of calcium nephrolithiasis has been increasing in the advanced countries. The changes in the environmental factors including alternation of diet are said to be associated with the increment of morbidity of kidney stone. Idiopathic hypercalciuria is one of the most important risk factor of calcium nephrolithiasis and is classified into absorptive, resorptive, and renal leak. Though the origins of these three types of hypercalciuria are different, increased bone resorption and increased calcium absorption from gut tend to be observed simultaneously. Not only genetic abnormalities in the proteins which are involved in calcium metabolisms but environmental factors such as high sodium intake and chronic acid load caused by increased ingestion of animal protein have been considered to be associated with increased urinary calcium excretion. Renal metabolisms of oxalate and phosphate which are important compositions of calcium containing stone, uric acid as a promoter and citrate as a inhibitor of nephrolithiasis are also described.

  1. DENGUE VIRAL INFECTIONS

    PubMed Central

    Gurugama, Padmalal; Garg, Pankaj; Perera, Jennifer; Wijewickrama, Ananda; Seneviratne, Suranjith L

    2010-01-01

    Dengue viral infections are one of the most important mosquito-borne diseases in the world. Presently dengue is endemic in 112 countries in the world. It has been estimated that almost 100 million cases of dengue fever and half a million cases of dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) occur worldwide. An increasing proportion of DHF is in children less than 15 years of age, especially in South East and South Asia. The unique structure of the dengue virus and the pathophysiologic responses of the host, different serotypes, and favorable conditions for vector breeding have led to the virulence and spread of the infections. The manifestations of dengue infections are protean from being asymptomatic to undifferentiated fever, severe dengue infections, and unusual complications. Early recognition and prompt initiation of appropriate supportive treatment are often delayed resulting in unnecessarily high morbidity and mortality. Attempts are underway for the development of a vaccine for preventing the burden of this neglected disease. This review outlines the epidemiology, clinical features, pathophysiologic mechanisms, management, and control of dengue infections. PMID:20418983

  2. Dengue viral infections.

    PubMed

    Gurugama, Padmalal; Garg, Pankaj; Perera, Jennifer; Wijewickrama, Ananda; Seneviratne, Suranjith L

    2010-01-01

    Dengue viral infections are one of the most important mosquito-borne diseases in the world. Presently dengue is endemic in 112 countries in the world. It has been estimated that almost 100 million cases of dengue fever and half a million cases of dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) occur worldwide. An increasing proportion of DHF is in children less than 15 years of age, especially in South East and South Asia. The unique structure of the dengue virus and the pathophysiologic responses of the host, different serotypes, and favorable conditions for vector breeding have led to the virulence and spread of the infections. The manifestations of dengue infections are protean from being asymptomatic to undifferentiated fever, severe dengue infections, and unusual complications. Early recognition and prompt initiation of appropriate supportive treatment are often delayed resulting in unnecessarily high morbidity and mortality. Attempts are underway for the development of a vaccine for preventing the burden of this neglected disease. This review outlines the epidemiology, clinical features, pathophysiologic mechanisms, management, and control of dengue infections.

  3. Synergism between maggot excretions and antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Cazander, Gwendolyn; Pawiroredjo, Janity S; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, Christina M J E; Schreurs, Marco W J; Jukema, Gerrolt N

    2010-01-01

    Maggots are successfully used to treat severe, infected wounds. This study investigated whether maggot excretions/secretions influence the antibacterial activity of different antibiotics. Minimal inhibitory concentrations and minimal bactericidal concentrations (MBC) were determined of gentamicin and flucloxacillin for Staphylococcus aureus, of penicillin for Streptococcus pyogenes, of amoxicillin and vancomycin for Enterococcus faecalis, of gentamicin for Enterobacter cloacae, and of gentamicin, tobramycin, and ciprofloxacin for Pseudomonas aeruginosa by checkerboard titration. A range of concentrations of antibiotics in combination with excretions/secretions was examined to investigate the potential of maggot excretions/secretions to affect antibacterial activity. The results showed a dose-dependent increase of the antibacterial effect of gentamicin in the presence of excretions/secretions on S. aureus. Minimal concentrations and MBC of gentamicin decreased, respectively, 64- and 32-fold. The MBC of flucloxacillin and excretions/secretions against S. aureus were also decreased. The other antibiotic and excretions/secretions combinations exerted an indifferent effect. Excretions/secretions alone did not have any antibacterial effect. The synergism between gentamicin and maggot excretions/secretions could be of direct importance in clinical practice, because it could allow the use of lower doses of gentamicin and thus minimize the risk of gentamicin-related side effects.

  4. Hepatic sarcoidosis complicating treatment-naive viral hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Aravinthan, Aloysious; Gelson, William; Limbu, Anita; Brais, Rebecca; Richardson, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Hepatic sarcoidosis is usually asymptomatic but rarely leads to adverse liver-related outcome. Co-existence of viral hepatitis and hepatic sarcoidosis is a rare, but recognised phenomenon. Obtaining a balance between immune suppression and anti-viral therapy may be problematic. Immunosuppression in the presence of viral hepatitis can lead to rapid deterioration of liver disease. Similarly, anti-viral therapy may exacerbate granulomatous hepatitis. Here we present two cases of viral hepatitis co-existing with sarcoidosis that illustrate successful management strategies. In one, hepatitis B replication was suppressed with oral anti-viral therapy before commencing prednisolone. In the second, remission of hepatic sarcoidosis was achieved with prednisolone, before treating hepatitis C and obtaining a sustained virological response with pegylated interferon and ribavirin therapy. PMID:23355920

  5. Diagnosis and treatment of viral diseases in recipients of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Viral infections are important causes of morbidity and mortality after allogeneic stem cell hematopoietic transplantation (allo-HSCT). Although most viral infections present with asymptomatic or subclinical manifestations, viruses may result in fatal complications in severe immunocompromised recipients. Reactivation of latent viruses, such as herpesviruses, is frequent during the immunosuppression that occurs with allo-HSCT. Viruses acquired from community, such as the respiratory and gastrointestinal viruses, are also important pathogens of post-transplant viral diseases. Currently, molecular diagnostic methods have replaced or supplemented traditional methods, such as viral culture and antigen detection, in diagnosis of viral infections. The utilization of polymerase chain reaction facilitates the early diagnosis. In view of lacking efficacious agents for treatment of viral diseases, prevention of viral infections is extremely valuable. Application of prophylactic strategies including preemptive therapy reduces viral infections and diseases. Adoptive cellular therapy for restoring virus-specific immunity is a promising method in the treatment of viral diseases. PMID:24341630

  6. The relationship between kallikrein and water excretion and the conditional relationship between kallikrein and sodium excretion.

    PubMed Central

    Mills, I H; Ward, P E

    1975-01-01

    1. The renal kallikrein-kinin system has previously been linked with renal control of sodium and water excretion. The present investigations were carried out to examine more closely these relationships. 2. In physiological studies with rabbits, urinary kallikrein was measured by a modification of the [3-H]TAME method. 3. With rabbits on free sodium and water intake, urinary kallikrein was positively correlated with both sodium and water excretion. Kallikrein excretion was also negatively correlated with urinary osmolality. 4. In rabbits on chronic high and low sodium diets, urinary kallikrein was positively correlated with urinary volume but not with sodium excretion. 5. In rabbits held to a constant fluid intake but with sodium intake changed, urinary kallikrein was not correlated with sodium excretion. 6. These results indicate that the positive correlation of kallikrein excretion with sodium excretion under conditions of free sodium and water intake may be only secondary to the positive relationship of kallikrein excretion with urinary volume. 7. The results of the present investigations do not support the hypothesis that the renal kallikrein-kinin system is necessarily involved in renal control of sodium excretion under normal conditions but it is where a change in sodium intake leads to a change in fluid intake and consequently of urinary volume. 8. In the above experiments, urinary kallikrein was always positively correlated with urinary volume and negatively correlated with urinary osmolality. This may indicate a functional relationship between renal kallikrein and water excretion. PMID:1133793

  7. Asymptomatic maternal 3-methylcrotonylglycinuria detected by her unaffected baby's neonatal screening test

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sun Hee

    2014-01-01

    3-methylcrotonyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (3MCC) deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder in which leucine catabolism is hampered, leading to increased urinary excretion of 3-methylcrotonylglycine. In addition, 3-hydroxyisovalerylcarnitine levels increase in the blood, and the elevated levels form the basis of neonatal screening. 3MCC deficiency symptoms are variable, ranging from neonatal onset with severe neurological abnormality to a normal, asymptomatic phenotype. Although 3MCC deficiency was previously considered to be rare, it has been found to be one of the most common metabolic disorders in newborns after the neonatal screening test using tandem mass spectrometry was introduced. Additionally, asymptomatic 3MCC deficient mothers have been identified due to abnormal results of unaffected baby's neonatal screening test. Some of the 3MCC-deficient mothers show symptoms such as fatigue, myopathy, or metabolic crisis with febrile illnesses. In the current study, we identified an asymptomatic 3MCC deficient mother when she showed abnormal results during a neonatal screening test of a healthy infant. PMID:25114694

  8. Asymptomatic maternal 3-methylcrotonylglycinuria detected by her unaffected baby's neonatal screening test.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun Hee; Hong, Yong Hee

    2014-07-01

    3-methylcrotonyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (3MCC) deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder in which leucine catabolism is hampered, leading to increased urinary excretion of 3-methylcrotonylglycine. In addition, 3-hydroxyisovalerylcarnitine levels increase in the blood, and the elevated levels form the basis of neonatal screening. 3MCC deficiency symptoms are variable, ranging from neonatal onset with severe neurological abnormality to a normal, asymptomatic phenotype. Although 3MCC deficiency was previously considered to be rare, it has been found to be one of the most common metabolic disorders in newborns after the neonatal screening test using tandem mass spectrometry was introduced. Additionally, asymptomatic 3MCC deficient mothers have been identified due to abnormal results of unaffected baby's neonatal screening test. Some of the 3MCC-deficient mothers show symptoms such as fatigue, myopathy, or metabolic crisis with febrile illnesses. In the current study, we identified an asymptomatic 3MCC deficient mother when she showed abnormal results during a neonatal screening test of a healthy infant.

  9. Risk factors for symptomatic and asymptomatic norovirus infection in the community.

    PubMed

    Phillips, G; Tam, C C; Rodrigues, L C; Lopman, B

    2011-11-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate risk factors for norovirus-associated infectious intestinal disease (IID) and asymptomatic norovirus infection. Individuals with IID and healthy controls were recruited in a community-based study in England (1993-1996). This is the first risk-factor study to use viral load measurements, generated by real-time RT-PCR, to identify cases of norovirus-associated IID and asymptomatic infections. Using multivariable logistic regression the main risk factor identified for norovirus-associated IID was contact with a person with IID symptoms. Infectious contacts accounted for 54% of norovirus cases in young children and 39% of norovirus cases in older children and adults. For young children, contacts outside the household presented the highest risk; for older children and adults, the highest risk was associated with child contacts inside the household. Foreign travel and consumption of shellfish increased the risk of norovirus-associated IID. Lifestyle and dietary factors were associated with a decreased risk of both norovirus-associated IID and asymptomatic infection. No risk factors were identified for asymptomatic norovirus infection.

  10. Asymptomatic arsine nephrotoxicity. A case report.

    PubMed

    Levy, H; Lewin, J R; Ninin, D T; Schneider, H R; Milne, F J

    1979-08-01

    A completely asymptomatic patient with arsine nephrotoxicity is described. The light and electron microscopic appearances of the kidney biopsy specimen are documented. The pathogenesis of the lesions, the usual manifestations of arsine exposure, and how these differed from those seen in our patient, are discussed.

  11. Viral Parkinsonism

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Haeman; Boltz, David A.; Webster, Robert G.; Smeyne, Richard Jay

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is a debilitating neurological disorder characterized that affects 1-2% of the adult population over 55 years of age. For the vast majority of cases, the etiology of this disorder is unknown, although it is generally accepted that there is a genetic susceptibility to any number of environmental agents. One such agent may be viruses. It has been shown that numerous viruses can enter the nervous system, i.e. they are neurotropic, and induce a number of encephalopathies. One of the secondary consequences of these encephalopathies can be parkinsonism, that is both transient as well as permanent. One of the most highlighted and controversial cases of viral parkinsonism is that which followed the 1918 influenza outbreak and the subsequent induction of von Economo's encephalopathy. In this review, we discuss the neurological sequelae of infection by influenza virus as well as that of other viruses known to induce parkinsonism including Coxsackie, Japanese encephalitis B, St. Louis, West Nile and HIV viruses. PMID:18760350

  12. Viral evolution

    PubMed Central

    Nasir, Arshan; Kim, Kyung Mo; Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo

    2012-01-01

    Explaining the origin of viruses remains an important challenge for evolutionary biology. Previous explanatory frameworks described viruses as founders of cellular life, as parasitic reductive products of ancient cellular organisms or as escapees of modern genomes. Each of these frameworks endow viruses with distinct molecular, cellular, dynamic and emergent properties that carry broad and important implications for many disciplines, including biology, ecology and epidemiology. In a recent genome-wide structural phylogenomic analysis, we have shown that large-to-medium-sized viruses coevolved with cellular ancestors and have chosen the evolutionary reductive route. Here we interpret these results and provide a parsimonious hypothesis for the origin of viruses that is supported by molecular data and objective evolutionary bioinformatic approaches. Results suggest two important phases in the evolution of viruses: (1) origin from primordial cells and coexistence with cellular ancestors, and (2) prolonged pressure of genome reduction and relatively late adaptation to the parasitic lifestyle once virions and diversified cellular life took over the planet. Under this evolutionary model, new viral lineages can evolve from existing cellular parasites and enhance the diversity of the world’s virosphere. PMID:23550145

  13. Viral hepatitis*

    PubMed Central

    Deinhardt, F.; Gust, I. D.

    1982-01-01

    Three forms of viral hepatitis can be recognized: hepatitis A, hepatitis B, and hepatitis non-A, non-B. Hepatitis A is caused by a picornavirus, is transmitted by the faceal—oral route, does not become chronic, and no chronic virus carriers exist. The virus can be grown in cell cultures, and killed as well as live attenuated virus vaccines are under development. Hepatitis B is caused by an enveloped virus containing a circular, double-stranded form of DNA. The disease is transmitted parenterally through inoculation of blood or blood products containing virus or through close personal contact with a virus-positive person. Hepatitis B becomes chronic in a certain number of cases and can lead to cirrhosis and primary liver cell carcinoma. The blood and certain body secretions of individuals with a persistent or chronic infection may remain infectious for many years. The hepatitis B virus cannot be grown in cell cultures but the entire genome has been sequenced and cloned in bacterial and eukaryotic cells. An inactivated virus vaccine has been prepared from hepatitis B surface antigen present in the plasma of hepatitis B virus carriers and further vaccines are under development. The agents of hepatitis non-A, non-B have not been identified. It is possible to distinguish between a predominantly parenterally transmitted and an orally transmitted form of hepatitis non-A, non-B. The latter is reported to be caused by a picornavirus that does not, however, have any antigenic relationship with hepatitis A virus. PMID:6817933

  14. Motor slowing in asymptomatic HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Fitzgibbon, M L; Cella, D F; Humfleet, G; Griffin, E; Sheridan, K

    1989-06-01

    To examine neuropsychological deficits associated with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), 25 asymptomatic homosexual men and sexual partners of intravenous drug users and 25 seronegative homosexual men and nonhigh-risk heterosexuals were assessed on measures of fine motor control, visual scanning, attention, depression, and global psychological functioning. Analysis suggested that HIV infection is associated with reduced fine motor control. Seropositivity is associated with elevated depression and global psychological maladjustment. When depression and global adjustment were analyzed as covariates, motor slowing was evident in the seropositive group. These findings suggest an association between motor slowing and HIV infection in asymptomatic subjects and point to the necessity of measuring affect at least as a control variable. Further study is needed to determine whether the fine motor deficit evident in this sample is limited to distinct subgrouping of the over-all sample. PMID:2762096

  15. Treatment approaches to asymptomatic follicular lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Sarkozy, Clémentine; Salles, Gilles

    2013-12-01

    Follicular lymphoma is a heterogeneous disease in which some patients present an indolent evolution for decades and others, a rather aggressive form of the disease requiring immediate therapy. While immunochemotherapy has emerged as a standard of care for symptomatic patients, treatment of the asymptomatic population remains controversial. Since the disease is still considered incurable, delayed initiation of therapy is an acceptable option. However, four single injections of rituximab can result in an acceptable clinical response and can improve the duration of the interval without cytotoxic therapy. With recent therapeutic approaches that enable substantial improvements in life expectancy for follicular lymphoma patients, limiting short- or long-term treatment toxicities appears as a new concern in the asymptomatic population. Based on these options, the challenge is to preserve patient quality of life and prolong survival: from the patient's perspective, his/her opinion is therefore of significant importance. PMID:24219551

  16. The maximal exercise ECG in asymptomatic men.

    PubMed

    Cumming, G R; Borysyk, L; Dufresne, C

    1972-03-18

    Lead MC5 bipolar exercise ECG was obtained in 510 asymptomatic males, aged 40 to 65, utilizing the bicycle ergometer, with maximal stress in 71% of the subjects. "Ischemic changes" occurred in 61 subjects, the frequency increasing from 4% at age 40 to 45, to 20% at age 50 to 55, to 37% at age 61 to 65. Subjects having an ischemic type ECG change on exercise had more frequent minor resting ECG changes, more resting hypertension, and a greater incidence of high cholesterol values than subjects with a normal ECG response to exercise, but there was no difference in the incidence of obesity, low fitness, or high systolic blood pressure after exercise. Current evidence suggests that asymptomatic male subjects with an abnormal exercise ECG develop clinical coronary heart disease from 2.5 to over 30 times more frequently than those with a normal exercise ECG.

  17. Prevalence of asymptomatic urinary abnormalities among adolescents.

    PubMed

    Fouad, Mohamed; Boraie, Maher

    2016-05-01

    To determine the prevalence of asymptomatic urinary abnormalities in adolescents, first morning clean mid-stream urine specimens were obtained from 2500 individuals and examined by dipstick and light microscopy. Adolescents with abnormal screening results were reexamined after two weeks and those who had abnormal results twice were subjected to systemic clinical examination and further clinical and laboratory investigations. Eight hundred and three (32.1%) individuals had urinary abnormalities at the first screening, which significantly decreased to 345 (13.8%) at the second screening, (P <0.001). Hematuria was the most common urinary abnormalities detected in 245 (9.8%) adolescents who had persistent urine abnormalities; 228 (9.1%) individuals had non glomerular hematuria. The hematuria was isolated in 150 (6%) individuals, combined with leukocyturia in 83 (3.3%) individuals, and combined with proteinuria in 12 (0.5%) individuals. Leukocyturia was detected in 150 (6%) of all studied adolescents; it was isolated in 39 (1.6%) individuals and combined with proteinuria in 28 (1.1%) of them. Asymptomatic bacteriuria was detected in 23 (0.9%) of all studied adolescents; all the cases were females. Proteinuria was detected in 65 (2.6%) of all the studied adolescents; 45 (1.8%) individuals had <0.5 g/day and twenty (0.8%) individuals had 0.5-3 g/day. Asymptomatic urinary abnormalities were more common in males than females and adolescents from rural than urban areas (P <0.01) and (P <0.001), respectively. The present study found a high prevalence of asymptomatic urinary abnormalities among adolescents in our population.

  18. Maggot excretions affect the human complement system.

    PubMed

    Cazander, Gwendolyn; Schreurs, Marco W J; Renwarin, Lennaert; Dorresteijn, Corry; Hamann, Dörte; Jukema, Gerrolt N

    2012-01-01

    The complement system plays an important role in the activation of the inflammatory response to injury, although inappropriate complement activation (CA) can lead to severe tissue damage. Maggot therapy is successfully used to treat infected wounds. In this study, we hypothesized that maggot excretions/secretions influence CA in order to modulate the host's inflammatory response. Therefore, the effect of maggot excretions on CA was investigated in preoperatively and postoperatively obtained sera from patients. Our results show that maggot excretions reduce CA in healthy and postoperatively immune-activated human sera up to 99.9%, via all pathways. Maggot excretions do not specifically initiate or inhibit CA, but break down complement proteins C3 and C4 in a cation-independent manner and this effect proves to be temperature tolerant. This study indicates a CA-reducing substrate that is already successfully used in clinical practice and may explain part of the improved wound healing caused by maggot therapy. Furthermore, the complement activation-reducing substance present in maggot excretions could provide a novel treatment modality for several diseases, resulting from an (over)active complement system.

  19. Cancer, Warts, or Asymptomatic Infections: Clinical Presentation Matches Codon Usage Preferences in Human Papillomaviruses.

    PubMed

    Félez-Sánchez, Marta; Trösemeier, Jan-Hendrik; Bedhomme, Stéphanie; González-Bravo, Maria Isabel; Kamp, Christel; Bravo, Ignacio G

    2015-07-01

    Viruses rely completely on the hosts' machinery for translation of viral transcripts. However, for most viruses infecting humans, codon usage preferences (CUPrefs) do not match those of the host. Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are a showcase to tackle this paradox: they present a large genotypic diversity and a broad range of phenotypic presentations, from asymptomatic infections to productive lesions and cancer. By applying phylogenetic inference and dimensionality reduction methods, we demonstrate first that genes in HPVs are poorly adapted to the average human CUPrefs, the only exception being capsid genes in viruses causing productive lesions. Phylogenetic relationships between HPVs explained only a small proportion of CUPrefs variation. Instead, the most important explanatory factor for viral CUPrefs was infection phenotype, as orthologous genes in viruses with similar clinical presentation displayed similar CUPrefs. Moreover, viral genes with similar spatiotemporal expression patterns also showed similar CUPrefs. Our results suggest that CUPrefs in HPVs reflect either variations in the mutation bias or differential selection pressures depending on the clinical presentation and expression timing. We propose that poor viral CUPrefs may be central to a trade-off between strong viral gene expression and the potential for eliciting protective immune response.

  20. Hepatitis C virus infection in the asymptomatic British blood donor.

    PubMed

    Mutimer, D J; Harrison, R F; O'Donnell, K B; Shaw, J; Martin, B A; Atrah, H; Ala, F A; Skidmore, S; Hubscher, S G; Neuberger, J M

    1995-01-01

    Blood donor screening for hepatitis C virus (HCV) antibodies is now routine. Most blood transfusion services recommend that seropositive donors are referred for further investigation. Southern European studies suggest that many asymptomatic seropositive donors have clinically significant liver disease. Seropositive donors in areas of high prevalence may not, however, be representative of British donors. We have prospectively examined the prevalence and severity of HCV infection in a British volunteer blood donor population. During a 14 month period, only 0.35% (999/287,332) of all donors in the West Midlands were anti-HCV (screening assay) positive. Only 5% (52/999) of these were confirmed true seropositive. Nearly 80% (41/52) of seropositive donors were referred to the Queen Elizabeth Hospital Liver Unit for further investigation. Most underwent complete investigation, including liver biopsy. Forty of forty-one donors had biochemical, histological, or virological evidence of persistent viral infection. Histological changes were generally mild and none was cirrhotic. Covertly infected patients had less severe disease than those with an overt risk factor for HCV exposure. In the British Midlands, the prevalence of blood donor seropositivity is low. In contrast with seropositive Southern European donors, the British donor is more likely to belong to an at-risk group for parenteral exposure and is less likely to have severe histological changes. This study highlights the importance of developing locally relevant guidelines for the counselling and investigation of anti-HCV-positive blood donors. PMID:7493294

  1. Enhancement of radiopharmaceutical excretion by chemical interventions

    SciTech Connect

    Oster, Z.H.; Som, P.; Brill, A.B.; Sacker, D.F.; Atkins, H.L.

    1982-01-01

    The goal was to find methods of decreasing the radiation dose after radionuclide studies, by giving a compound that will increase the rate of excretion of the radionuclide. Sprague - 1 Dawley rats were given Tc-99m pertechnetate, Ga-67 citrate or Tl-201 chloride intravenously followed at intervals of 1 to 24 hours by one of the following compounds: desferroxamine (DFO), 2,3-dimercapto-1-propanol (BAL), triethylene tetraamine hexaacetic acid (TETHA), stannous tartarate, bleomycin (BLEO), 2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA), diethylene-triaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA), DTPA+SnCl.2H/sub 2/O, dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB), and ferric-cyanoferrate (IT)(Prussian blue, PB). All the agents except PB are chelators. Some of these agents enhance excretion through the urinary tract (DFO), while most are excreted through the bile. PB was shown to increase Cs excrection through the G.I. tract. (ACR)

  2. The Paradigm Shift to Non-Treatment of Asymptomatic Bacteriuria

    PubMed Central

    Nicolle, Lindsay E.

    2016-01-01

    Asymptomatic bacteriuria, also called asymptomatic urinary infection, is a common finding in healthy women, and in women and men with abnormalities of the genitourinary tract. The characterization and introduction of the quantitative urine culture in the 1950s first allowed the reliable recognition of asymptomatic bacteriuria. The observations that a substantial proportion of patients with chronic pyelonephritis at autopsy had no history of symptomatic urinary infection, and the high frequency of pyelonephritis observed in pregnant women with untreated asymptomatic bacteriuria, supported a conclusion that asymptomatic bacteriuria was harmful. Subsequent screening and long term follow-up programs for asymptomatic bacteriuria in schoolgirls and women reported an increased frequency of symptomatic urinary tract infection for subjects with asymptomatic bacteriuria, but no increased morbidity from renal failure or hypertension, or increased mortality. Treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria did not decrease the frequency of symptomatic infection. Prospective, randomized, comparative trials enrolling premenopausal women, children, elderly populations, patients with long term catheters, and diabetic patients consistently report no benefits with antimicrobial treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria, and some evidence of harm. Several studies have also reported that antimicrobial treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria increases the short term risk of pyelonephritis. Current investigations are exploring the potential therapeutic intervention of establishing asymptomatic bacteriuria with an avirulent Escherichia coli strain to prevent symptomatic urinary tract infection for selected patients. PMID:27104571

  3. Clinical study of urinary excretion of Ga-67

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, S.; Hasegawa, Y.; Ibuka, K.; Hashizume, T.; Noguchi, A.; Kojima, J.; Sasakuma, F.; Ishigami, S. )

    1990-04-01

    Ga-67 urinary excretion was examined in 59 patients. The 72-hour urinary excretion rate ranged from 4.3 to 67.8% of the injected dose. Within the first 24 hours, 60.9% of the 72-hour urinary excretion was excreted. There was no significant difference in the Ga-67 urinary excretion rate between males and females, nor between the Ga-67 positive and negative cases. A significant negative correlation was found between the 72-hour Ga-67 urinary excretion rate and the unsaturated iron binding capacity. Notably, four patients with hyperferremia, which was considered secondary to leukemia and/or chemotherapy or liver cirrhosis, excreted more than 46.8% of Ga-67 within 72 hours. A significant negative correlation was also found between the 72-hour Ga-67 urinary excretion rate and age. Urinary excretion of Ga-67 may be related to the glomerular filtration rate, which decreases with age.

  4. Metagenomic analysis demonstrates the diversity of the fecal virome in asymptomatic pigs in East Africa.

    PubMed

    Amimo, Joshua O; El Zowalaty, Mohamed E; Githae, Dedan; Wamalwa, Mark; Djikeng, Apollinaire; Nasrallah, Gheyath K

    2016-04-01

    Pigs harbor a variety of viruses that are closely related to human viruses and are suspected to have zoonotic potential. Little is known about the presence of viruses in smallholder farms where pigs are in close contact with humans and wildlife. This study provides insight into viral communities and the prevalence and characteristics of enteric viral co-infections in smallholder pigs in East Africa. Sequence-independent amplification and high-throughput sequencing were applied to the metagenomics analysis of viruses in feces collected from asymptomatic pigs. A total of 47,213 de novo-assembled contigs were constructed and compared with sequences from the GenBank database. Blastx search results revealed that 1039 contigs (>200 nt) were related to viral sequences in the GenBank database. Of the 1039 contigs, 612 were not assigned to any viral taxa because they had little similarity to known viral genomic or protein sequences, while 427 contigs had a high level of sequence similarity to known viruses and were assigned to viral taxa. The most frequent contigs related to mammalian viruses resembling members of the viral genera Astrovirus, Rotavirus, Bocavirus, Circovirus, and Kobuvirus. Other less abundant contigs were related to members of the genera Sapelovirus, Pasivirus, Posavirus, Teschovirus and Picobirnavirus. This is the first report on the diversity of the fecal virome of pig populations in East Africa. The findings of the present study help to elucidate the etiology of diarrheal diseases in pigs and identify potential zoonotic and emerging viruses in the region. Further investigations are required to compare the incidence of these viruses in healthy and diseased pigs in order to better elucidate their pathogenic role. PMID:26965436

  5. [Viral superantigens].

    PubMed

    Us, Dürdal

    2016-07-01

    , expression of endogenous SAgs leads to thymic deletion of responding T cells (bearing Vβ6-9+ TCR) due to self-tolerance induction during the fetal life, and protects the host against future exogenous MMTV infections. The SAg of rabies virus is the N protein found in nucleocapsid structure and stimulates Vβ8+TCR-bearing T cells. The SAg-induced polyclonal activation of T cells leads to turn-off the specific immune response, to enhance the immunopathogenesis and facilitates viral transmission from the initial site of infection (the muscle tissue) to the nerve endings. In case of EBV-associated SAg that activates Vβ13+TCR-bearing T cells, it was detected that the SAg activity was not encoded by EBV itself, but instead was due to the transactivation of HERV-K18 by EBV latent membrane proteins, whose env gene encodes the SAg (Sutkowski, et al. 2001). It has been denoted that EBV-induced SAg expression plays a role in the long-term persistence and latency of virus in memory B cells, in the development of autoimmune diseases and in the oncogenesis mechanisms. The proteins which are identified as SAgs of HIV are Nef and gp120. It is believed that, the massive activation of CD4+ T cells (selectively with Vβ-12+, Vβ-5.3+ and Vβ-18+ TCRs) in early stages of infection and clonal deletion, anergy and apoptosis of bystander T cells in the late stages may be due to SAg property of Nef protein, as well as the other mechanisms. However there are some studies indicating that Nef does not act as a SAg (Lapatschek, et al. 2001). HIV gp120 glycoprotein is a B-cell SAg that binds to VH3-expressing B cell receptors and causes polyclonal B cell activation. In addition, binding of gp120 to IgE on the surface of basophiles and mast cells causes activation of those cells, secretion of high level proinflammatory mediators leading to allergic reactions and tissue damage. In a recent study, the depletion (anergy or deletion) of T cell populations bearing Vβ12+, Vβ13+ and Vβ17+ TCR have been

  6. Dengue Fever Presenting Atypically with Viral Conjunctivitis and Subacute Thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Sheraz, Faizan; Tahir, Hassan; Saqi, Jannavi; Daruwalla, Vistasp

    2016-06-01

    The majority of dengue viral infections are asymptomatic, though symptoms may range from self-limiting febrile illness to life threatening hemorrhagic manifestations. As the burden of disease is dramatically rising in recent years, more patients with atypical presentations and rare complications are increasingly reported. Dengue virus may rarely involve different organ systems including CNS, liver, and heart. However, involvement of eye and thyroid is extremely rare. We present a case of 32-year old patient who presented with conjunctivitis and subacute thyroiditis and was found to have dengue viral infection as the cause of these conditions. PMID:27376214

  7. Urinary excretion of Iopamidol following intrathecal administration.

    PubMed

    Pitrè, D; Zingales, M F; Trevisan, C

    1983-01-01

    No iodinated compound other than Iopamidol was found in the urine of subjects who received intrathecal injection of 10 ml of Iopamiro "300". The compound was neither metabolized nor altered in its optical configuration and urinary iodide content was always in the normal range. Between 72 and 85% of injected Iopamidol was excreted within 72 h of injection.

  8. Viral Skin Diseases.

    PubMed

    Ramdass, Priya; Mullick, Sahil; Farber, Harold F

    2015-12-01

    In the vast world of skin diseases, viral skin disorders account for a significant percentage. Most viral skin diseases present with an exanthem (skin rash) and, oftentimes, an accompanying enanthem (lesions involving the mucosal membrane). In this article, the various viral skin diseases are explored, including viral childhood exanthems (measles, rubella, erythema infectiosum, and roseola), herpes viruses (herpes simplex virus, varicella zoster virus, Kaposi sarcoma herpes virus, viral zoonotic infections [orf, monkeypox, ebola, smallpox]), and several other viral skin diseases, such as human papilloma virus, hand, foot, and mouth disease, molluscum contagiosum, and Gianotti-Crosti syndrome.

  9. Viral Skin Diseases.

    PubMed

    Ramdass, Priya; Mullick, Sahil; Farber, Harold F

    2015-12-01

    In the vast world of skin diseases, viral skin disorders account for a significant percentage. Most viral skin diseases present with an exanthem (skin rash) and, oftentimes, an accompanying enanthem (lesions involving the mucosal membrane). In this article, the various viral skin diseases are explored, including viral childhood exanthems (measles, rubella, erythema infectiosum, and roseola), herpes viruses (herpes simplex virus, varicella zoster virus, Kaposi sarcoma herpes virus, viral zoonotic infections [orf, monkeypox, ebola, smallpox]), and several other viral skin diseases, such as human papilloma virus, hand, foot, and mouth disease, molluscum contagiosum, and Gianotti-Crosti syndrome. PMID:26612372

  10. Acute viral E hepatitis with chronic liver disease (autoimmune hepatitis).

    PubMed

    Desai, H G; Naik, A S

    2005-03-01

    A 36 years old male presented with anorexia, jaundice and ascites. He was suffering from acute viral E hepatitis. In view of ascites, he was investigated for associated asymptomatic chronic liver disease (CLD). The CLD was diagnosed as cirrhosis with autoimmune hepatitis and was treated with steroid with good response. He is maintaining good health with low dose steroid, on follow up for 1 year.

  11. Current management of asymptomatic carotid stenosis.

    PubMed

    Castilla-Guerra, L; Fernández-Moreno, M C; Serrano-Rodríguez, L

    2015-05-01

    Asymptomatic carotid stenosis (ACS) is a common problem in daily clinical practice, and its management is still the subject of controversy. In contrast to symptomatic carotid disease, the main studies on surgical treatment of patients with ACS have shown only a modest benefit in the primary prevention of stroke. In addition, current medical treatment has drastically decreased the risk of stroke in patients with ACS. Selecting patients amenable to endovascular treatment and determining how and when to conduct the ultrasound follow-up of these patients are issues that still need resolving. This article analyzes two new studies underway that provide evidence for better management of ACS in daily clinical practice.

  12. Asymptomatic Unilateral Hyperlucent Lung in a Prospective Kidney Donor.

    PubMed

    Lunia, Prajay; Karkhanis, Vinaya; Joshi, J M

    2015-09-01

    A 50 year old lady, prospective kidney donor was referred to our department for opinion in view of abnormal clinical findings during preoperative evaluation. She was asymptomatic from respiratory point of view. Her vital parameters were normal and on auscultation found to have decreased breath sounds and fine crackles throughout left hemithorax. Chest x-ray (CXR) showed left sided hyperlucency with small hilum (Figure 1). High resolution computed tomography (HRCT) showed scattered areas of bronchiectasis with associated air trapping throughout left lung with small left pulmonary artery (Figure 2). Sputum for acid fast bacilli (AFB) was negative. Spirometry showed moderate obstructive abnormality with forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) - 51% predicted, forced vital capacity (FVC) - 60% and FEV1/FVC - 76% with no bronchodilator reversibility. On post bronchodilator study there was paradoxical fall in FEV1/FVC to 72% consistent with small airway disease. Arterial blood gas analysis was normal. Technetium (Tc) 99m MAA lung perfusion scan (Figure3) showed normal perfusion of right lung contributing 75.4% of relative function and left lung contributing only 24.6%. Diagnosis of Swyer-James-MacLeod syndrome (SJMS) probably due to a childhood viral infection was made. Operative complications in such cases like difficult weaning and extubation, post-operative respiratory infections, collapse and respiratory failure are likely. However, our patient had an uneventful operative and post-operative course. SJMS is characterized by unilateral hyperlucency of a part of or the entire lung which was first described in 1953 by Swyer and James and later in 1954 by Macleod.1,2 It is considered to be an acquired disease as a result of post-infectious obliterative bronchiolitis. Productive cough, shortness of breath and sometimes hemoptysis are presenting symptoms. Some patients are asymptomatic and not diagnosed until they are adults.3 Radiologically it presents as predominant

  13. Urine protein excretion and swimming events.

    PubMed

    Poortmans, J R; Engels, M F; Sellier, M; Leclercq, R

    1991-07-01

    To determine total urinary protein, albumin (ALB), and beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2m) excretion rates in relation to different speeds, 12 males were studied while swimming distances of 100, 600, and 2,000 m at maximal speed. Venous blood lactate concentrations rose to 16.1, 11.6, and 4.5 mmol.l-1 after the 100, 600, and 2,000 m events, while plasma volumes were reduced by 11.3, 7.7, and 5.5%, respectively. ALB urine excretion increased to 110-120 micrograms.min-1 after the 100 and 600 m swims and to 56 micrograms.min-1 after 2,000 m (resting values: 9 micrograms.min-1). In the meantime, the beta 2m excretion rate increased 21 and 10 times the resting values, respectively, for the two shorter swims, with no change for the longer one. Progressive plasma volume reduction was associated with the increase of the protein excretion rate. As evidenced by the creatinine clearance, the glomerular filtration rate did not change for the 100 m swim but dropped by 23 and 35% for the 600 and 2,000 m ones, respectively. On the other hand, the ALB clearance increases were elevated for the three swims, while the beta 2m clearance increases were inversely related to the swimming speeds. The data showed a relationship between the rate of protein excretion and the speed of the swim, and the reduction of plasma volume. The findings could indicate a renal glomerular alteration, with an additional dysfunction of the tubular reabsorption process when the exercise load is high during swimming events. PMID:1921676

  14. Famciclovir suppression of asymptomatic and symptomatic recurrent anogenital herpes simplex virus shedding in women: a randomized, double-blind, double-dummy, placebo-controlled, parallel-group, single-center trial.

    PubMed

    Sacks, Stephen L

    2004-04-15

    Genital herpes is most often transmitted while the patient is asymptomatic, presumably during episodes of viral shedding. To determine whether famciclovir is effective in reducing asymptomatic shedding, women with frequent, recurrent genital outbreaks were enrolled in a randomized, double-blind, double-dummy, placebo-controlled, parallel-group, 112-day trial of suppressive treatment with famciclovir for anogenital viral shedding. Sixty women received 125 mg of famciclovir 3 times daily, 59 received 250 mg of famciclovir 3 times daily, and 58 received placebo. Patients recorded symptoms and self-obtained cultures daily. Famciclovir reduced asymptomatic shedding, compared with placebo (P < .0001). The onset of asymptomatic shedding was also delayed (P < .0001). Famciclovir reduced symptomatic shedding in a dose-dependent manner (0.72% for 125 mg 3 times daily vs. 0.19% for 250 mg 3 times daily [P < .0001] vs. 5.53% for placebo [P < .0001]). In conclusion, suppressive treatment with famciclovir reduced both asymptomatic and symptomatic viral shedding and delayed the onset of asymptomatic shedding in women with frequently recurring genital herpes. Studies to examine the effects of suppression by famciclovir on the transmission of genital herpes are warranted.

  15. Latent Herpes Viral Reactivation in Astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, D. L.; Mehta, S. K.; Stowe, R.

    2008-01-01

    Latent viruses are ubiquitous and reactivate during stressful periods with and without symptoms. Latent herpes virus reactivation is used as a tool to predict changes in the immune status in astronauts and to evaluate associated health risks. Methods: Viral DNA was detected by real time polymerase chain reaction in saliva and urine from astronauts before, during and after short and long-duration space flights. Results and Discussion: EpsteinBarr virus (EBV), cytomegalovirus (CMV), and varicella zoster virus (VZV) reactivated, and viral DNA was shed in saliva (EBV and VZV) or urine (CMV). EBV levels in saliva during flight were 10fold higher than baseline levels. Elevations in EBV specific CD8+ T-cells, viral antibody titers, and specific cytokines were consistent with viral reactivation. Intracellular levels of cytokines were reduced in EBVspecific Tcells. CMV, rarely present in urine of healthy individuals, was shed in urine of 27% of astronauts during all phases of spaceflight. VZV, not found in saliva of asymptomatic individuals, was found in saliva of 50% of astronauts during spaceflight and 35 days after flight. VZV recovered from astronaut saliva was found to be live, infectious virus. DNA sequencing demonstrated that the VZV recovered from astronauts was from the common European strain of VZV. Elevation of stress hormones accompanied viral reactivation indicating involvement of the hypothalmic-pituitary-adrenal and sympathetic adrenal-medullary axes in the mechanism of viral reactivation in astronauts. A study of 53 shingles patients found that all shingles patients shed VZV DNA in their saliva and the VZV levels correlated with the severity of the disease. Lower VZV levels in shingles patients were similar to those observed in astronauts. We proposed a rapid, simple, and cost-effective assay to detect VZV in saliva of patients with suspected shingles. Early detection of VZV infection allows early medical intervention.

  16. PREVALENCE AND RISK FACTORS FOR ASYMPTOMATIC INTESTINAL MICROSPORIDIOSIS AMONG ABORIGINAL SCHOOL CHILDREN IN PAHANG, MALAYSIA.

    PubMed

    Anuar, Tengku Shahrul; Bakar, Nur Hazirah Abu; Al-Mekhlafi, Hesham M; Moktar, Norhayati; Osman, Emelia

    2016-05-01

    The epidemiology and environmental factors affecting transmission of human microsporidiosis are poorly understood. We conducted the present study to determine the prevalence and risk factors associated with asymptomatic intestinal microsporidiosis among aboriginal school children in the Kuala Krau District, Pahang State, Malaysia. We collected stool samples from 255 school children and examined the samples using Gram-chromotrope Kinyoun stain. We also collected demographic, socioeconomic, environmental and personal hygiene information using a pre-tested questionnaire. Sixty-nine of the children was positive for microsporidia: 72.5% and 27.5% were low (1+) and moderate (2+) excretions of microsporidia spores, respectively. Univariate and multivariate analyses showed being aged 10 years (p = 0.026), using an unsafe water supply as a source for drinking water (p = 0.044) and having close contact with domestic animals (p = 0.031) were all significantly associated with microsporidial infection among study subjects. Our findings suggest asymptomatic intestinal microsporidiosis is common in the study population, more than previously reported. In the study population, control measures need to be implemented, such as good personal hygiene, proper sanitation and safe drinking water supply. PMID:27405127

  17. PREVALENCE AND RISK FACTORS FOR ASYMPTOMATIC INTESTINAL MICROSPORIDIOSIS AMONG ABORIGINAL SCHOOL CHILDREN IN PAHANG, MALAYSIA.

    PubMed

    Anuar, Tengku Shahrul; Bakar, Nur Hazirah Abu; Al-Mekhlafi, Hesham M; Moktar, Norhayati; Osman, Emelia

    2016-05-01

    The epidemiology and environmental factors affecting transmission of human microsporidiosis are poorly understood. We conducted the present study to determine the prevalence and risk factors associated with asymptomatic intestinal microsporidiosis among aboriginal school children in the Kuala Krau District, Pahang State, Malaysia. We collected stool samples from 255 school children and examined the samples using Gram-chromotrope Kinyoun stain. We also collected demographic, socioeconomic, environmental and personal hygiene information using a pre-tested questionnaire. Sixty-nine of the children was positive for microsporidia: 72.5% and 27.5% were low (1+) and moderate (2+) excretions of microsporidia spores, respectively. Univariate and multivariate analyses showed being aged 10 years (p = 0.026), using an unsafe water supply as a source for drinking water (p = 0.044) and having close contact with domestic animals (p = 0.031) were all significantly associated with microsporidial infection among study subjects. Our findings suggest asymptomatic intestinal microsporidiosis is common in the study population, more than previously reported. In the study population, control measures need to be implemented, such as good personal hygiene, proper sanitation and safe drinking water supply.

  18. Differences in toileting habits between children with chronic encopresis, asymptomatic siblings, and asymptomatic nonsiblings.

    PubMed

    Borowitz, S M; Cox, D J; Sutphen, J L

    1999-06-01

    No studies have compared toileting-specific behaviors of encopretic children with those of asymptomatic children and have controlled for environmental factors such as parental attitudes, parenting styles, and bathroom facilities. This study prospectively examined the toileting habits of 86 chronically encopretic children compared with those of 27 asymptomatic siblings and 35 asymptomatic nonsiblings. Although encopretic children experienced significantly more soiling than did controls, the total number of daily bowel movements passed in the toilet (+/-SD) was comparable in the three groups (.92 +/- .76 in encopretic children compared with 1.14 +/- .43 and 1.08 +/- .47 in siblings and nonsiblings, respectively). Encopretic children experienced pain with defecation more often than did controls. During the 14-day study period, encopretic children complained of pain on 2.75 +/- 4.03 days compared with .58 +/- 1.84 days among sibling controls and 2.31 +/- 3.21 days among nonsibling controls. The mean pain score in encopretic children was .76 +/- 1.00 compared with .05 +/- .15 and .26 +/- .38 among siblings and nonsiblings, respectively. All three groups of children sat on the toilet without parental prompting the same number of times each day. In summary, children with chronic encopresis do not seem to avoid toileting, and they exhibit toileting behaviors that are very similar to those of asymptomatic siblings as well as to those of nonsibling controls. PMID:10393070

  19. Coronary angiographic findings in asymptomatic systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Tarek, El-Gohary; Yasser, Amin E; Gheita, Tamer

    2006-07-01

    The objective of this study was to assess coronary arterial involvement in asymptomatic systemic sclerosis (SSc) patients. Fourteen female patients with SSc (five limited and nine diffuse) were recruited for this study. All patients fulfilled the following 1980 American College of Rheumatology criteria for classification of SSc Masi et al (Arthritis Rheum 23:581-590 1980). None of them had chest pain nor electrocardiogram (ECG) changes suggestive of myocardial ischemia. All patients underwent thorough history taking, full clinical examination, routine laboratory investigations, and basic screening for conventional atherosclerotic disease risk factors. ECG and coronary catheterization were done for all patients. We detected 19 coronary angiographic abnormalities in our cohort. Three out of nine diffuse SSc patients (33.33%) had ectasia of the coronary arteries, and all of them had slow flow but none in the limited type. One patient with limited SSc showed spasm. Three out of five patients with limited type (60%) had stenosis, one of them had uncontrolled hypertension, while none of the diffuse type had. Five patients (55.55%) of the diffuse type had tortuosity, while it was found in only two patients (40%) of the limited type. Three patients (33.3%) of the diffuse type had calcification of the coronaries, while it was seen in two patients (40%) of the limited type. Pathological involvement of coronary arteries in asymptomatic SSc patients is not uncommon but not paralleled by clinical symptomatology.

  20. Effects of methylxanthines on urinary prostaglandin E excretion in rats.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, K; Kogo, H; Aizawa, Y

    1981-04-01

    Effect of methylxanthines (theophylline, theobromine and caffeine) on urinary prostaglandin E (PGE) excretion in male rats was studied. Oral administration of xanthines significantly increased the urinary excretion of PGE. Dose-response studies showed that the maximal excretion of urinary PGE and water was obtained by administration of theophylline (50 mg/kg), where the increase in PGE was about 20 times that of the control. The excretion of urinary sodium, potassium and chloride was also markedly increased by xanthines, particularly, theophylline. Increases in urinary PGE excretion, urine volume and electrolytes excretion were inhibited by 10 mg/kg of indomethacin administered prior to theophylline. The increase of urinary PGE excretion after theophylline administration (50 mg/kg) preceded increases in water and sodium excretion. These results suggest that renal PGE mediates, at least in part, the diuretic effect of theophylline. PMID:7311144

  1. Strain Variation and Disease Severity in Congenital Cytomegalovirus Infection: In Search of a Viral Marker.

    PubMed

    Arav-Boger, Ravit

    2015-09-01

    The wide spectrum of congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) disease and known differences in the biology and in vitro growth of CMV strains continue to drive studies in search for specific viral genetic determinants that may predict severity of congenital CMV disease. Several CMV genes have been studied in detail in congenitally infected children, but the complexity of the viral genome and differences in the definition of symptomatic disease versus asymptomatic CMV infection continue to raise questions related to what constitutes a pathogenic CMV strain.

  2. Asymptomatic brucellosis infection in humans: implications for diagnosis and prevention.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Q; Lu, Y; Yuan, X; Qiu, Y; Xu, J; Li, W; Ke, Y; Yu, Y; Huang, L; Wang, Y; Chen, Z

    2013-09-01

    Human brucellosis is mainly caused by contact with Brucella-infected animals and their secretions and carcasses. Individuals who are continuously in contact with animals are considered to be at a high risk but only some show symptoms and are diagnosed as cases of brucellosis. Here, we showed that asymptomatic brucellosis infections occur among humans. Asymptomatic infections mainly result from less frequent contact with Brucella and/or contact with low-virulence Brucella. In our study, patients with asymptomatic infection had low antibody titres and different contact patterns. Awareness of asymptomatic infection is important for early diagnosis of brucellosis and prevention of chronic infection.

  3. Urinary excretion of arsenic following rice consumption.

    PubMed

    Meharg, A A; Williams, P N; Deacon, C M; Norton, G J; Hossain, M; Louhing, D; Marwa, E; Lawgalwi, Y; Taggart, M; Cascio, C; Haris, P

    2014-11-01

    Patterns of arsenic excretion were followed in a cohort (n = 6) eating a defined rice diet, 300 g per day d.wt. where arsenic speciation was characterized in cooked rice, following a period of abstinence from rice, and other high arsenic containing foods. A control group who did not consume rice were also monitored. The rice consumed in the study contained inorganic arsenic and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) at a ratio of 1:1, yet the urine speciation was dominated by DMA (90%). At steady state (rice consumption/urinary excretion) ∼40% of rice derived arsenic was excreted via urine. By monitoring of each urine pass throughout the day it was observed that there was considerable variation (up to 13-fold) for an individual's total arsenic urine content, and that there was a time dependent variation in urinary total arsenic content. This calls into question the robustness of routinely used first pass/spot check urine sampling for arsenic analysis. PMID:25145278

  4. Chylomicrons enhance endotoxin excretion in bile.

    PubMed Central

    Read, T E; Harris, H W; Grunfeld, C; Feingold, K R; Calhoun, M C; Kane, J P; Rapp, J H

    1993-01-01

    Chylomicrons prevent endotoxin toxicity and increase endotoxin uptake by hepatocytes. As a consequence, less endotoxin is available to activate macrophages, thereby reducing tumor necrosis factor secretion. To determine whether the chylomicron-mediated increase in hepatocellular uptake of endotoxin results in increased endotoxin excretion into bile, we examined bile after endotoxin administration. A sublethal dose (7 micrograms/kg) of 125I-endotoxin was incubated with either rat mesenteric lymph containing nascent chylomicrons (500 mg of chylomicron triglyceride per kg of body weight) or an equal volume of normal saline (controls) for 3 h and then infused into male Sprague-Dawley rats. Bile samples were collected via a common bile duct catheter for 24 h. Infusion of endotoxin incubated with chylomicrons increased biliary excretion of endotoxin by 67% at 3 h (P < or = 0.006) and by 20% at 24 h (P < or = 0.01) compared with infusion of endotoxin incubated in saline. Endotoxin activity, as measured by the Limulus assay, was not detected in the bile of test animals. However, endotoxin activity was detected after hot phenol-water extraction of bile, demonstrating that endotoxin is inactive in the presence of bile but retains bioactivity after hepatic processing. Since the majority of an intravenous endotoxin load has been shown to be cleared by the liver, acceleration of hepatocyte clearance and biliary excretion of endotoxin may represent a component of the mechanism by which chylomicrons protect against endotoxin-induced lethality. PMID:8335381

  5. Urinary excretion of arsenic following rice consumption.

    PubMed

    Meharg, A A; Williams, P N; Deacon, C M; Norton, G J; Hossain, M; Louhing, D; Marwa, E; Lawgalwi, Y; Taggart, M; Cascio, C; Haris, P

    2014-11-01

    Patterns of arsenic excretion were followed in a cohort (n = 6) eating a defined rice diet, 300 g per day d.wt. where arsenic speciation was characterized in cooked rice, following a period of abstinence from rice, and other high arsenic containing foods. A control group who did not consume rice were also monitored. The rice consumed in the study contained inorganic arsenic and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) at a ratio of 1:1, yet the urine speciation was dominated by DMA (90%). At steady state (rice consumption/urinary excretion) ∼40% of rice derived arsenic was excreted via urine. By monitoring of each urine pass throughout the day it was observed that there was considerable variation (up to 13-fold) for an individual's total arsenic urine content, and that there was a time dependent variation in urinary total arsenic content. This calls into question the robustness of routinely used first pass/spot check urine sampling for arsenic analysis.

  6. Asymptomatic humans transmit dengue virus to mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Duong, Veasna; Lambrechts, Louis; Paul, Richard E.; Ly, Sowath; Lay, Rath Srey; Long, Kanya C.; Huy, Rekol; Tarantola, Arnaud; Scott, Thomas W.; Sakuntabhai, Anavaj; Buchy, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Three-quarters of the estimated 390 million dengue virus (DENV) infections each year are clinically inapparent. People with inapparent dengue virus infections are generally considered dead-end hosts for transmission because they do not reach sufficiently high viremia levels to infect mosquitoes. Here, we show that, despite their lower average level of viremia, asymptomatic people can be infectious to mosquitoes. Moreover, at a given level of viremia, DENV-infected people with no detectable symptoms or before the onset of symptoms are significantly more infectious to mosquitoes than people with symptomatic infections. Because DENV viremic people without clinical symptoms may be exposed to more mosquitoes through their undisrupted daily routines than sick people and represent the bulk of DENV infections, our data indicate that they have the potential to contribute significantly more to virus transmission to mosquitoes than previously recognized. PMID:26553981

  7. Asymptomatic post-rheumatic giant left atrium

    PubMed Central

    Özkartal, Tardu; Tanner, Felix C; Niemann, Markus

    2016-01-01

    A 78-year-old asymptomatic woman was referred to our clinic for a second opinion regarding indication for mitral valve surgery. An echocardiogram showed a moderate mitral stenosis with a concomitant severe regurgitation. The most striking feature, however, was a giant left atrium with a parasternal anteroposterior diameter of 79 mm and a left atrial volume index of 364 mL/m². There are various echocardiographic definitions of a giant left atrium, which are mainly based on measurements of the anteroposterior diameter of the left atrium using M-mode in the parasternal long axis view. Since the commonly accepted method for echocardiographic evaluation of left atrial size is left atrial volume index, we propose a cut-off value of 140 mL/m2 for the definition of a “giant left atrium”. PMID:27354895

  8. Asymptomatic humans transmit dengue virus to mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Duong, Veasna; Lambrechts, Louis; Paul, Richard E; Ly, Sowath; Lay, Rath Srey; Long, Kanya C; Huy, Rekol; Tarantola, Arnaud; Scott, Thomas W; Sakuntabhai, Anavaj; Buchy, Philippe

    2015-11-24

    Three-quarters of the estimated 390 million dengue virus (DENV) infections each year are clinically inapparent. People with inapparent dengue virus infections are generally considered dead-end hosts for transmission because they do not reach sufficiently high viremia levels to infect mosquitoes. Here, we show that, despite their lower average level of viremia, asymptomatic people can be infectious to mosquitoes. Moreover, at a given level of viremia, DENV-infected people with no detectable symptoms or before the onset of symptoms are significantly more infectious to mosquitoes than people with symptomatic infections. Because DENV viremic people without clinical symptoms may be exposed to more mosquitoes through their undisrupted daily routines than sick people and represent the bulk of DENV infections, our data indicate that they have the potential to contribute significantly more to virus transmission to mosquitoes than previously recognized.

  9. Asymptomatic post-rheumatic giant left atrium.

    PubMed

    Özkartal, Tardu; Tanner, Felix C; Niemann, Markus

    2016-06-26

    A 78-year-old asymptomatic woman was referred to our clinic for a second opinion regarding indication for mitral valve surgery. An echocardiogram showed a moderate mitral stenosis with a concomitant severe regurgitation. The most striking feature, however, was a giant left atrium with a parasternal anteroposterior diameter of 79 mm and a left atrial volume index of 364 mL/m². There are various echocardiographic definitions of a giant left atrium, which are mainly based on measurements of the anteroposterior diameter of the left atrium using M-mode in the parasternal long axis view. Since the commonly accepted method for echocardiographic evaluation of left atrial size is left atrial volume index, we propose a cut-off value of 140 mL/m(2) for the definition of a "giant left atrium".

  10. Management of Asymptomatic Renal Stones in Astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reyes, David; Locke, James

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Management guidelines were created to screen and manage asymptomatic renal stones in U.S. astronauts. The risks for renal stone formation in astronauts due to bone loss and hypercalcuria are unknown. Astronauts have a stone risk which is about the same as commercial aviation pilots, which is about half that of the general population. However, proper management of this condition is still crucial to mitigate health and mission risks in the spaceflight environment. Methods: An extensive review of the literature and current aeromedical standards for the monitoring and management of renal stones was done. The NASA Flight Medicine Clinic's electronic medical record and Longitudinal Survey of Astronaut Health were also reviewed. Using this work, a screening and management algorithm was created that takes into consideration the unique operational environment of spaceflight. Results: Renal stone screening and management guidelines for astronauts were created based on accepted standards of care, with consideration to the environment of spaceflight. In the proposed algorithm, all astronauts will receive a yearly screening ultrasound for renal calcifications, or mineralized renal material (MRM). Any areas of MRM, 3 millimeters or larger, are considered a positive finding. Three millimeters approaches the detection limit of standard ultrasound, and several studies have shown that any stone that is 3 millimeters or less has an approximately 95 percent chance of spontaneous passage. For mission-assigned astronauts, any positive ultrasound study is followed by low-dose renal computed tomography (CT) scan, and flexible ureteroscopy if CT is positive. Other specific guidelines were also created. Discussion: The term "MRM" is used to account for small areas of calcification that may be outside the renal collecting system, and allows objectivity without otherwise constraining the diagnostic and treatment process for potentially very small calcifications of uncertain

  11. Viral Entry into Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Orsogna, Maria R.

    2010-09-01

    Successful viral infection of a healthy cell requires complex host-pathogen interactions. In this talk we focus on the dynamics specific to the HIV virus entering a eucaryotic cell. We model viral entry as a stochastic engagement of receptors and coreceptors on the cell surface. We also consider the transport of virus material to the cell nucleus by coupling microtubular motion to the concurrent biochemical transformations that render the viral material competent for nuclear entry. We discuss both mathematical and biological consequences of our model, such as the formulation of an effective integrodifferential boundary condition embodying a memory kernel and optimal timing in maximizing viral probabilities.

  12. Noninvasive testing of asymptomatic bilateral hilar adenopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, P.L.; Singer, D.E.; Goldenheim, P.; Bernardo, J.; Mulley, A.G. )

    1990-03-01

    The diagnostic strategy for asymptomatic patients with persistent bilateral bilar adenopathy often involves invasive procedures. The authors used Bayesian analysis to: (1) estimate the relative prevalences of diseases causing bilateral bilar adenopathy; (2) assess changes in the prevalence of disease by race, the presence of other clinical symptoms, and geography; and (3) determine the value of relevant noninvasive tests, including the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) assay, gallium scan, and purified protein derivative (PPD), in order to assess when a strategy of watchful waiting is appropriate. The analysis indicated that the ACE assay, particularly when paired with the PPD, can identify many patients who might safely be managed without immediate invasive biopsy. Patients who are ACE+ and PPD- have an estimated probability of sarcoidosis of 0.95 or greater; patients who are ACE- and PPD+ have a probability of tuberculosis of 0.86 if black, 0.79 if white. In contrast, gallium scanning has no diagnostic role in this clinical situation. Bronchoscopic or mediastinoscopic biopsy has a limited role for patients who are ACE+ PPD- or ACE- PPD+ because of limited sensitivity. Patients who are both ACE- and PPD-, particularly if white, may have a high enough risk of lymphoma to consider invasive biopsy.

  13. Ammonia excretion in aquatic and terrestrial crabs.

    PubMed

    Weihrauch, Dirk; Morris, Steve; Towle, David W

    2004-12-01

    The excretory transport of toxic ammonia across epithelia is not fully understood. This review presents data combined with models of ammonia excretion derived from studies on decapod crabs, with a view to providing new impetus to investigation of this essential issue. The majority of crabs preserve ammonotely regardless of their habitat, which varies from extreme hypersaline to freshwater aquatic environments, and ranges from transient air exposure to obligate air breathing. Important components in the excretory process are the Na+/K+(NH4+)-ATPase and other membrane-bound transport proteins identified in many species, an exocytotic ammonia excretion mechanism thought to function in gills of aquatic crabs such as Carcinus maenas, and gaseous ammonia release found in terrestrial crabs, such as Geograpsus grayi and Ocypode quadrata. In addition, this review presents evidence for a crustacean Rhesus-like protein that shows high homology to the human Rhesus-like ammonia transporter both in its amino acid sequence and in its predicted secondary structure. PMID:15579545

  14. Renal protein excretion after exercise in man.

    PubMed

    Poortmans, J R; Rampaer, L; Wolfs, J C

    1989-01-01

    Thirteen men were submitted to graded exhaustive cycle exercise to determine the kinetics of proteinuria in the recovery period. Venous blood samples were analysed for haematocrit, lactate, creatinine, total protein and albumin for 1 h following exercise. Urine samples were collected during a 3-h recovery period. Total protein, albumin, and creatinine levels were determined for these samples. Total protein and albumin urinary excretion increased to 581 and 315 micrograms min-1, respectively, at the end of the 1st h of recovery as compared to 42 and 15 micrograms.min-1 for resting values. Plasma volume returned to pre-exercise levels between 30 and 60 min after cessation of exercise, while urinary total protein and albumin content still remained above the resting values for the following 2 h. Both post-exercise urinary total protein and albumin excretion followed a logarithmic decline with the same half-life of 54 min, thus requiring about 4 h to regain resting values. The reduction of plasma volume and the degree of dehydration do not seem to be involved in the process. The present study indicates the delayed recovery of protein handling by the kidney, as compared with other biochemical parameters, and provides accurate information on the kinetics of post-exercise proteinuria. PMID:2759073

  15. Effect of monofluoroacetate on renal H+ excretion in the rat.

    PubMed

    Simonnet, H; Gauthier, C; Pellet, M V

    1979-05-01

    In order to investigate the effect of monofluoroacetate (MFA) on renal H+ excretion, anesthetized rats under mannitol diuresis were given intraperitoneally MFA and some of the acido-basic status parameters were determined. Urinary pH and pCO2 did not change after MFA administration, while urinary flow rate increased. MFA induced a decrease in H+ net excretion and in ammonia excretion. Titratable acidity did not change significantly within the experiment.

  16. Exosomes in Viral Disease.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Monique R; Kashanchi, Fatah; Jacobson, Steven

    2016-07-01

    Viruses have evolved many mechanisms by which to evade and subvert the immune system to ensure survival and persistence. However, for each method undertaken by the immune system for pathogen removal, there is a counteracting mechanism utilized by pathogens. The new and emerging role of microvesicles in immune intercellular communication and function is no different. Viruses across many different families have evolved to insert viral components in exosomes, a subtype of microvesicle, with many varying downstream effects. When assessed cumulatively, viral antigens in exosomes increase persistence through cloaking viral genomes, decoying the immune system, and even by increasing viral infection in uninfected cells. Exosomes therefore represent a source of viral antigen that can be used as a biomarker for disease and targeted for therapy in the control and eradication of these disorders. With the rise in the persistence of new and reemerging viruses like Ebola and Zika, exploring the role of exosomes become more important than ever. PMID:27324390

  17. Viral Disease Networks?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulbahce, Natali; Yan, Han; Vidal, Marc; Barabasi, Albert-Laszlo

    2010-03-01

    Viral infections induce multiple perturbations that spread along the links of the biological networks of the host cells. Understanding the impact of these cascading perturbations requires an exhaustive knowledge of the cellular machinery as well as a systems biology approach that reveals how individual components of the cellular system function together. Here we describe an integrative method that provides a new approach to studying virus-human interactions and its correlations with diseases. Our method involves the combined utilization of protein - protein interactions, protein -- DNA interactions, metabolomics and gene - disease associations to build a ``viraldiseasome''. By solely using high-throughput data, we map well-known viral associated diseases and predict new candidate viral diseases. We use microarray data of virus-infected tissues and patient medical history data to further test the implications of the viral diseasome. We apply this method to Epstein-Barr virus and Human Papillomavirus and shed light into molecular development of viral diseases and disease pathways.

  18. Asymptomatic hyponatremia due to inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone as the first sign of a small cell lung cancer in an elderly man.

    PubMed

    Kamoi, K; Kurokawa, I; Kasai, H; Mizusawa, A; Ebe, T; Sasaki, H; Matuzuki, Y; Seino, Y; Takahashi, M; Togashi, K; Miyamura, H; Sato, Y; Takato, H; Kaneko, H

    1998-11-01

    A 72-year-old man was hospitalized with asymptomatic hyponatremia. Despite hyponatremia, urinary sodium excretion with urine osmolality exceeding plasma osmolality persisted. Plasma vasopressin levels were high and independent of plasma osmolality during hypertonic saline infusion. Computed tomography of the chest showed enlarged mediastinal and right hilar lymph nodes. Microscopically, a specimen of lymph nodes obtained by biopsy represented vasopressin-producing small cell lung carcinoma. Chemotherapy plus irradiation improved the hyponatremia. Thus, careful evaluation is necessary to determine the cause of hyponatremia disorders in elderly patients. PMID:9868958

  19. Modeling single cell antibody excretion on a biosensor.

    PubMed

    Stojanović, Ivan; Baumgartner, Wolfgang; van der Velden, Thomas J G; Terstappen, Leon W M M; Schasfoort, Richard B M

    2016-07-01

    We simulated, using Comsol Multiphysics, the excretion of antibodies by single hybridoma cells and their subsequent binding on a surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi) sensor. The purpose was to confirm that SPRi is suitable to accurately quantify antibody (anti-EpCAM) excretion. The model showed that antibody loss by diffusion away from the sensor was less than 1%. Unexpectedly, more than 99% of the excreted antibodies were captured on the sensor. These data prove the remarkable phenomenon that the SPRi output of cellular antibody excretion and its subsequent binding, performed under the conditions described here, is directly usable for quantification of single cell antibody production rates. PMID:27040182

  20. Modeling single cell antibody excretion on a biosensor.

    PubMed

    Stojanović, Ivan; Baumgartner, Wolfgang; van der Velden, Thomas J G; Terstappen, Leon W M M; Schasfoort, Richard B M

    2016-07-01

    We simulated, using Comsol Multiphysics, the excretion of antibodies by single hybridoma cells and their subsequent binding on a surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi) sensor. The purpose was to confirm that SPRi is suitable to accurately quantify antibody (anti-EpCAM) excretion. The model showed that antibody loss by diffusion away from the sensor was less than 1%. Unexpectedly, more than 99% of the excreted antibodies were captured on the sensor. These data prove the remarkable phenomenon that the SPRi output of cellular antibody excretion and its subsequent binding, performed under the conditions described here, is directly usable for quantification of single cell antibody production rates.

  1. Asymptomatic myocardial ischemia following cold provocation

    SciTech Connect

    Shea, M.J.; Deanfield, J.E.; deLandsheere, C.M.; Wilson, R.A.; Kensett, M.; Selwyn, A.P.

    1987-09-01

    Cold is thought to provoke angina in patients with coronary disease either by an increase in myocardial demand or an increase in coronary vascular resistance. We investigated and compared the effects of cold pressor stimulation and symptom-limited supine bicycle exercise on regional myocardial perfusion in 35 patients with stable angina and coronary disease and in 10 normal subjects. Regional myocardial perfusion was assessed with positron emission tomography and rubidium-82. Following cold pressor stimulation 24 of 35 patients demonstrated significant abnormalities of regional myocardial perfusion with reduced cation uptake in affected regions of myocardium: 52 +/- 9 to 43 +/- 9 (p less than 0.001 vs normal subjects). Among these 24 patients only nine developed ST depression and only seven had angina. In contrast, 29 of 35 patients underwent supine exercise, and abnormal regional myocardial perfusion occurred in all 29, with a reduction in cation intake from 48 +/- 10 to 43 +/- 14 (p less than 0.001 vs normal subjects). Angina was present in 27 of 29 and ST depression in 25 of 29. Although the absolute decrease in cation uptake was somewhat greater following cold as opposed to exercise, the peak heart rate after cold was significantly lower than that after exercise (82 +/- 12 vs 108 +/- 16 bpm, p less than 0.05). Peak systolic blood pressures after cold and exercise were similar (159 +/- 24 vs 158 +/- 28). Thus, cold produces much more frequent asymptomatic disturbances of regional myocardial perfusion in patients with stable angina and coronary disease than is suggested by pain or ECG changes.

  2. Neuropsychological abnormalities in AIDS and asymptomatic HIV seropositive patients.

    PubMed Central

    Villa, G; Monteleone, D; Marra, C; Bartoli, A; Antinori, A; Pallavicini, F; Tamburrini, E; Izzi, I

    1993-01-01

    Neuropsychological and immunological parameters were studied in 36 AIDS patients with early disease and without clinical, laboratory, and neuroradiological signs of CNS impairment, and also in 33 asymptomatic HIV seropositive subjects. Many AIDS patients performed abnormally on timed psychomotor tasks, tasks involving sequencing and "set-shifting", and memory tasks stressing attention, learning, active retrieval, and monitoring of information. Asymptomatic HIV seropositive subjects as a group did not perform significantly worse than controls. However, on the basis of a cut off number of pathological performances on neuropsychological tasks, 52.8% of AIDS and 30.3% of asymptomatic HIV seropositive subjects had cognitive impairment, compared with 3.9% of HIV seronegative controls. Low values of CD4+ cells and of CD4+/CD8+ ratio and high titres of P-24 antigen in the blood prevailed among subjects with cognitive impairment, especially in the asymptomatic HIV seropositive group. PMID:8350104

  3. Bartonella clarridgeiae bacteremia detected in an asymptomatic blood donor.

    PubMed

    Vieira-Damiani, Gislaine; Diniz, Pedro Paulo Vissotto de Paiva; Pitassi, Luiza Helena Urso; Sowy, Stanley; Scorpio, Diana Gerardi; Lania, Bruno Grosselli; Drummond, Marina Rovani; Soares, Tânia Cristina Benetti; Barjas-Castro, Maria de Lourdes; Breitschwerdt, Edward B; Nicholson, William L; Velho, Paulo Eduardo Neves Ferreira

    2015-01-01

    Human exposure to Bartonella clarridgeiae has been reported only on the basis of antibody detection. We report for the first time an asymptomatic human blood donor infected with B. clarridgeiae, as documented by enrichment blood culture, PCR, and DNA sequencing.

  4. [Asymptomatic myxoma of the tricuspid valve septal leaflet].

    PubMed

    Jedliński, Ireneusz; Jamrozek-Jedlińska, Maria; Bugajski, Paweł; Kalawski, Ryszard; Poprawski, Kajetan; Słomczyński, Marek

    2012-01-01

    We presented a case of asymptomatic myxoma of the tricuspid valve septal leaflet. The tumour was diagnosed accidentally during rutine transthoracic echocardiography and confirmed by transesophageal echocardiography. It was resected and the septal leaflet repaired during surgery.

  5. Asymptomatic infection with American cutaneous leishmaniasis: epidemiological and immunological studies

    PubMed Central

    Andrade-Narvaez, Fernando J; Loría-Cervera, Elsy Nalleli; Sosa-Bibiano, Erika I; Van Wynsberghe, Nicole R

    2016-01-01

    American cutaneous leishmaniasis (ACL) is a major public health problem caused by vector-borne protozoan intracellular parasites from the genus Leishmania, subgenera Viannia and Leishmania. Asymptomatic infection is the most common outcome after Leishmania inoculation. There is incomplete knowledge of the biological processes explaining the absence of signs or symptoms in most cases while other cases present a variety of clinical findings. Most studies of asymptomatic infection have been conducted in areas of endemic visceral leishmaniasis. In contrast, asymptomatic ACL infection has been neglected. This review is focused on the following: (1) epidemiological studies supporting the existence of asymptomatic ACL infection and (2) immunological studies conducted to understand the mechanisms responsible for controlling the parasite and avoiding tissue damage. PMID:27759762

  6. Mathematical models of immune effector responses to viral infections: Virus control versus the development of pathology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wodarz, Dominik

    2005-12-01

    This article reviews mathematical models which have investigated the importance of lytic and non-lytic immune responses for the control of viral infections. Lytic immune responses fight the virus by killing infected cells, while non-lytic immune responses fight the virus by inhibiting viral replication while leaving the infected cell alive. The models suggest which types or combinations of immune responses are required to resolve infections which vary in their characteristics, such as the rate of viral replication and the rate of virus-induced target cell death. This framework is then applied to persistent infections and viral evolution. It is investigated how viral evolution and antigenic escape can influence the relative balance of lytic and non-lytic responses over time, and how this might correlate with the transition from an asymptomatic infection to pathology. This is discussed in the specific context of hepatitis C virus infection.

  7. Viruses and viral proteins

    PubMed Central

    Verdaguer, Nuria; Ferrero, Diego; Murthy, Mathur R. N.

    2014-01-01

    For more than 30 years X-ray crystallography has been by far the most powerful approach for determining the structures of viruses and viral proteins at atomic resolution. The information provided by these structures, which covers many important aspects of the viral life cycle such as cell-receptor recognition, viral entry, nucleic acid transfer and genome replication, has extensively enriched our vision of the virus world. Many of the structures available correspond to potential targets for antiviral drugs against important human pathogens. This article provides an overview of the current knowledge of different structural aspects of the above-mentioned processes. PMID:25485129

  8. INTESTINAL EXCRETION OF ENDOGENOUS ZINC IN GUATEMALAN SCHOOL CHILDREN

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: The intestine is the major route of excretion of endogenous zinc and has a key role in maintaining zinc homeostasis. Phytate has been reported to increase these losses. Objective: To determine the rate of excretion of endogenous zinc in school-aged children in a poor rural community for ...

  9. Biphasic changes in 3-methylhistidine excretion in humans after exercise.

    PubMed

    Dohm, G L; Israel, R G; Breedlove, R L; Williams, R T; Askew, E W

    1985-05-01

    We previously reported that 3-methylhistidine excretion was increased in human subjects after a strenuous bout of exercise. Because other investigators have not corroborated this finding, we undertook the present study to investigate the conditions that result in decreased and increased 3-methylhistidine excretion in human subjects after exercise. Four experiments were performed: a cross-sectional study comparing 3-methylhistidine excretion in endurance-trained subjects with untrained controls, a longitudinal study of 3-methylhistidine excretion by female basketball players before the start of the season and again during the competitive season, an experiment to determine changes in 3-methylhistidine excretion as a result of 2 h of exercise each day for 7 consecutive days, and a study to determine changes in 3-methylhistidine excretion during 4-h intervals after a strenuous exercise bout. The 3-methylhistidine-to-creatinine ratio was approximately 20% higher for trained than nontrained subjects. In three separate experiments a biphasic change of 3-methylhistidine excretion was observed in response to exercise with an immediate decrease in the 3-methylhistidine-to-creatinine ratio during exercise followed by a prolonged increase. The magnitudes of the negative and positive responses determine whether one observes an increase, no change, or a decrease in the total daily excretion of 3-methylhistidine.

  10. Viral infections during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Silasi, Michelle; Cardenas, Ingrid; Kwon, Ja-Young; Racicot, Karen; Aldo, Paula; Mor, Gil

    2015-03-01

    Viral infections during pregnancy have long been considered benign conditions with a few notable exceptions, such as herpes virus. The recent Ebola outbreak and other viral epidemics and pandemics show how pregnant women suffer worse outcomes (such as preterm labor and adverse fetal outcomes) than the general population and non-pregnant women. New knowledge about the ways the maternal-fetal interface and placenta interact with the maternal immune system may explain these findings. Once thought to be 'immunosuppressed', the pregnant woman actually undergoes an immunological transformation, where the immune system is necessary to promote and support the pregnancy and growing fetus. When this protection is breached, as in a viral infection, this security is weakened and infection with other microorganisms can then propagate and lead to outcomes, such as preterm labor. In this manuscript, we review the major viral infections relevant to pregnancy and offer potential mechanisms for the associated adverse pregnancy outcomes. PMID:25582523

  11. Viral Hemorrhagic Fevers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Related Links About VSPB (Viral Special Pathogens Branch) File Formats Help: How do I view different file formats (PDF, DOC, PPT, MPEG) on this site? Adobe PDF file Microsoft PowerPoint file Microsoft Word file Microsoft Excel ...

  12. VIRAL INFECTIONS DURING PREGNANCY

    PubMed Central

    Silasi, Michelle; Cardenas, Ingrid; Racicot, Karen; Kwon, Ja-Young; Aldo, Paula; Mor, Gil

    2015-01-01

    Viral infections during pregnancy have long been considered benign conditions with a few notable exceptions, such as herpes virus. The recent Ebola outbreak and other viral epidemics and pandemics show how pregnant women suffer worse outcomes (such as preterm labor and adverse fetal outcomes) than the general population and non-pregnant women. New knowledge about the ways the maternal-fetal interface and placenta interact with the maternal immune system may explain these findings. Once thought to be “immunosuppressed”, the pregnant woman actually undergoes an immunological transformation, where the immune system is necessary to promote and support the pregnancy and growing fetus. When this protection is breached, as in a viral infection, this security is weakened and infection with other microorganisms can then propagate and lead to outcomes, such as preterm labor. In this manuscript, we review the major viral infections relevant to pregnancy, and offer potential mechanisms for the associated adverse pregnancy outcomes. PMID:25582523

  13. HIV and Viral Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... prevalent among blacks as among whites. Viral Hepatitis Transmission People can be infected with the three most ... risk for HAV. • • New data suggest that sexual transmission of HCV among MSM with HIV occurs more ...

  14. Urinary copper excretion and hepatic copper concentrations in liver disease.

    PubMed

    Frommer, D J

    1981-01-01

    Urinary copper excretion was found to be increased in patients with cholestasis, hepatitis and cirrhosis, but the penicillamine-induced increment was normal. Wilson's disease patients had increased copper excretion before and after penicillamine, especially in untreated cases. Hepatic copper concentrations correlated with urinary copper excretion in cholestasis and treated Wilson's disease, but not in hepatitis or cirrhosis. In treated Wilson's disease, measurement of urinary copper excretion should be valuable in estimating the degree of removal of copper from the body during therapy. Urinary copper clearances were raised in various liver conditions, maximally in untreated Wilson's disease. It is suggested that only part of the serum non-caeruloplasmin copper is available for excretion into urine.

  15. Viral miRNAs.

    PubMed

    Plaisance-Bonstaff, Karlie; Renne, Rolf

    2011-01-01

    Since 2004, more than 200 microRNAs (miRNAs) have been discovered in double-stranded DNA viruses, mainly herpesviruses and polyomaviruses (Nucleic Acids Res 32:D109-D111, 2004). miRNAs are short 22  ±  3 nt RNA molecules that posttranscriptionally regulate gene expression by binding to 3'-untranslated regions (3'UTR) of target mRNAs, thereby inducing translational silencing and/or transcript degradation (Nature 431:350-355, 2004; Cell 116:281-297, 2004). Since miRNAs require only limited complementarity for binding, miRNA targets are difficult to determine (Mol Cell 27:91-105, 2007). To date, targets have only been experimentally verified for relatively few viral miRNAs, which either target viral or host cellular gene expression: For example, SV40 and related polyomaviruses encode miRNAs which target viral large T antigen expression (Nature 435:682-686, 2005; J Virol 79:13094-13104, 2005; Virology 383:183-187, 2009; J Virol 82:9823-9828, 2008) and miRNAs of α-, β-, and γ-herpesviruses have been implicated in regulating the transition from latent to lytic gene expression, a key step in the herpesvirus life cycle. Viral miRNAs have also been shown to target various host cellular genes. Although this field is just beginning to unravel the multiple roles of viral miRNA in biology and pathogenesis, the current data strongly suggest that virally encoded miRNAs are able to regulate fundamental biological processes such as immune recognition, promotion of cell survival, angiogenesis, proliferation, and cell differentiation. This chapter aims to summarize our current knowledge of viral miRNAs, their targets and function, and the challenges lying ahead to decipher their role in viral biology, pathogenesis, and for γ-herepsvirus-encoded miRNAs, potentially tumorigenesis. PMID:21431678

  16. NCBI viral genomes resource.

    PubMed

    Brister, J Rodney; Ako-Adjei, Danso; Bao, Yiming; Blinkova, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Recent technological innovations have ignited an explosion in virus genome sequencing that promises to fundamentally alter our understanding of viral biology and profoundly impact public health policy. Yet, any potential benefits from the billowing cloud of next generation sequence data hinge upon well implemented reference resources that facilitate the identification of sequences, aid in the assembly of sequence reads and provide reference annotation sources. The NCBI Viral Genomes Resource is a reference resource designed to bring order to this sequence shockwave and improve usability of viral sequence data. The resource can be accessed at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/genome/viruses/ and catalogs all publicly available virus genome sequences and curates reference genome sequences. As the number of genome sequences has grown, so too have the difficulties in annotating and maintaining reference sequences. The rapid expansion of the viral sequence universe has forced a recalibration of the data model to better provide extant sequence representation and enhanced reference sequence products to serve the needs of the various viral communities. This, in turn, has placed increased emphasis on leveraging the knowledge of individual scientific communities to identify important viral sequences and develop well annotated reference virus genome sets.

  17. Immigration and viral hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Suraj; Carballo, Manuel; Feld, Jordan J; Janssen, Harry L A

    2015-08-01

    WHO estimates reveal that the global prevalence of viral hepatitis may be as high as 500 million, with an annual mortality rate of up to 1.3 million individuals. The majority of this global burden of disease is borne by nations of the developing world with high rates of vertical and iatrogenic transmission of HBV and HCV, as well as poor access to healthcare. In 2013, 3.2% of the global population (231 million individuals) migrated into a new host nation. Migrants predominantly originate from the developing countries of the south, into the developed economies of North America and Western Europe. This mass migration of individuals from areas of high-prevalence of viral hepatitis poses a unique challenge to the healthcare systems of the host nations. Due to a lack of universal standards for screening, vaccination and treatment of viral hepatitis, the burden of chronic liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma continues to increase among migrant populations globally. Efforts to increase case identification and treatment among migrants have largely been limited to small outreach programs in urban centers, such that the majority of migrants with viral hepatitis continue to remain unaware of their infection. This review summarizes the data on prevalence of viral hepatitis and burden of chronic liver disease among migrants, current standards for screening and treatment of immigrants and refugees, and efforts to improve the identification and treatment of viral hepatitis among migrants. PMID:25962882

  18. Immigration and viral hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Suraj; Carballo, Manuel; Feld, Jordan J; Janssen, Harry L A

    2015-08-01

    WHO estimates reveal that the global prevalence of viral hepatitis may be as high as 500 million, with an annual mortality rate of up to 1.3 million individuals. The majority of this global burden of disease is borne by nations of the developing world with high rates of vertical and iatrogenic transmission of HBV and HCV, as well as poor access to healthcare. In 2013, 3.2% of the global population (231 million individuals) migrated into a new host nation. Migrants predominantly originate from the developing countries of the south, into the developed economies of North America and Western Europe. This mass migration of individuals from areas of high-prevalence of viral hepatitis poses a unique challenge to the healthcare systems of the host nations. Due to a lack of universal standards for screening, vaccination and treatment of viral hepatitis, the burden of chronic liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma continues to increase among migrant populations globally. Efforts to increase case identification and treatment among migrants have largely been limited to small outreach programs in urban centers, such that the majority of migrants with viral hepatitis continue to remain unaware of their infection. This review summarizes the data on prevalence of viral hepatitis and burden of chronic liver disease among migrants, current standards for screening and treatment of immigrants and refugees, and efforts to improve the identification and treatment of viral hepatitis among migrants.

  19. Viral hepatitis: how to manage type C and D infections.

    PubMed

    Najm, W

    1997-05-01

    Hepatitis C and D are relative newcomers to the study of viral hepatitis. Their transmission is mainly parenteral. The 0.5 to 2.2% prevalence of hepatitis C in the United States does not vary by patient age. Often, hepatitis C is asymptomatic. In older patients, symptomatic infection has a cholesteatic appearance, and progress to chronic hepatitis and cirrhosis is more rapid than in younger adults. Hepatitis D virus is a defective single-stranded RNA that presents as a co-infection or superinfection of hepatitis B. Prevalence varies by geographic region. The rate of progression to chronic disease and cirrhosis is high in superinfection.

  20. Asymptomatic severe aortic stenosis: challenges in diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Chisato

    2016-08-01

    Optimal management for asymptomatic severe aortic stenosis (AS) remains controversial. Considering the increase in elderly patients, improved surgical outcomes and the introduction of transcatheter aortic valve implantation, we must reconsider the optimal management of asymptomatic severe AS. In this article, previous studies regarding the natural history of asymptomatic severe AS were reviewed to obtain a clinical perspective of AS in the growing elderly patient population. The incidence of sudden death in asymptomatic severe AS varies among studies from 0.25% to 1.7% per year, with differences related to study design and patient background. Except for very severe AS, sudden death or AS-related cardiac death without preceding symptoms is uncommon if 'watchful' waiting strategy is possible. Therefore, early operation is reasonable in very severe AS, but it is not recommended for all patients with severe AS. Using exercise tests, plasma levels of natriuretic peptides and other parameters, risk stratification of asymptomatic severe AS is needed to select patients who may have greater benefit following early operation. On the other hand, 'watchful' waiting is not always possible in real world of our practice. Patient education and periodic echocardiography are essential in 'watchful' waiting, which is not simply waiting strategy without careful monitoring. Individualised discussion regarding the indication for early operation is necessary, considering age, clinical background, predicted natural history and operative risk in each patient. PMID:27091844

  1. Significant asymptomatic bacteriuria among Nigerian type 2 diabetics.

    PubMed Central

    Alebiosu, C. O.; Osinupebi, O. A.; Olajubu, F. A.

    2003-01-01

    Significant asymptomatic bacteriuria is a risk factor for symptomatic urinary infection and septicemia among predisposed individuals such as diabetics. We investigated the pattern of asymptomatic bacteriuria among our type 2 diabetics with a view to documenting the prevalence, type of organisms responsible and the antibiotic susceptibility pattern. One hundred and twenty-four type 2 Nigerian diabetics (55 males and 69 females) submitted midstream urine specimens for culture. Thirty-three patients had significant bacteriuria (9 males and 24 females), showing the frequency of occurrence of asymptomatic bacteriuria to be 26.6%. The most common organism isolated was Klebsiella pneumonia at 42.4%. Gram-negative bacilli made up about 23 (69.7%) of the isolates. Isolates were poorly sensitive to the readily available antibiotics (ampicillin, tetracycline and cotrimoxazole), but a large number of the organisms isolated were sensitive to nitrofurantoin, gentamicin, ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin. Sensitivity to erythromycin, nalidixic acid and cefuroxime was moderate. Asymptomatic bacteriuria is, thus, more prevalent among the Nigerian diabetic population than in the non-diabetics. A changing pattern of disease is observed with Klebsiella sp. now accounting for the majority of asymptomatic bacteriuria among diabetics. The organisms are not sensitive to the commonly available antibacterial agents. PMID:12793791

  2. Ultrasonographic evaluation of the shoulder in asymptomatic overhead athletes.

    PubMed

    Ocguder, Durmus Ali; Tosun, Ozgur; Bektaser, Bulent; Cicek, Nuriye; Ipek, Ali; Bozkurt, Murat

    2010-08-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the efficiency of ultrasonography (US) in the examination of soft tissue anatomical structures of the shoulder in overhead athletes. The study evaluated the shoulders of overhead elite premier league athletes involved in basketball, handball, volleyball, body building, and water polo. US examination of both shoulders was performed prospectively in 45 asymptomatic overhead athletes and 43 asymptomatic volunteers matched for age. On US examination, subacromial-subdeltoid bursa effusion was observed in 16 of the dominant shoulders and in 2 of the non-dominant shoulders of 45 overhead athletes and in none of the asymptomatic volunteers. The mean thickness of the subacromial-subdeltoid bursa was significantly larger in the dominant and non-dominant shoulders of the overhead athletes than in the asymptomatic volunteers (p < 0.001, p < 0.05 respectively). Ultrasonography appeared as an effective, convenient and non-invasive tool for the early diagnosis of shoulder pathologies occurring in overhead athletes, even in the asymptomatic stage.

  3. Excretion of biliary compounds during intrauterine life

    PubMed Central

    Macias, Rocio IR; Marin, Jose JG; Serrano, Maria A

    2009-01-01

    In adults, the hepatobiliary system, together with the kidney, constitute the main routes for the elimination of several endogenous and xenobiotic compounds into bile and urine, respectively. However, during intrauterine life the biliary route of excretion for cholephilic compounds, such as bile acids and biliary pigments, is very poor. Although very early in pregnancy the fetal liver produces bile acids, bilirubin and biliverdin, these compounds cannot be efficiently eliminated by the fetal hepatobiliary system, owing to the immaturity of the excretory machinery in the fetal liver. Therefore, the potentially harmful accumulation of cholephilic compounds in the fetus is prevented by their elimination across the placenta. Owing to the presence of detoxifying enzymes and specific transport systems at different locations of the placental barrier, such as the endothelial cells of chorionic vessels and trophoblast cells, this organ plays an important role in the hepatobiliary-like function during intrauterine life. The relevance of this excretory function in normal fetal physiology is evident in situations where high concentrations of biliary compounds are accumulated in the mother. This may result in oxidative stress and apoptosis, mainly in the placenta and fetal liver, which might affect normal fetal development and challenge the fate of the pregnancy. The present article reviews current knowledge of the mechanisms underlying the hepatobiliary function of the fetal-placental unit and the repercussions of several pathological conditions on this tandem. PMID:19230042

  4. Excretion of drugs in human breast milk

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, R.M.; Findlay, J.W.

    1981-01-01

    The present report briefly discusses some of the morphological, physiological, and compositional aspects of animal and human breast milk and how these characteristics might be important for the accumulation of drugs and foreign compounds. In addition, a study is described confirming the presence of caffeine, codeine, morphine, phenacetin, acetaminophen, and salicylic acid in the breast milk of a lactating mother following oral administration of a combination analgesic containing aspirin, phenacetin, caffeine, and codeine. Although the study is limited to one subject, it has provided critically needed data on the rates of appearance in, and elimination of these drugs from, breast milk. A similar amount of information is presented on phenacetin, also a component of the analgesic mixture, which has not been previously reported to enter human milk. The distribution of these drugs between the slightly more acidic breast milk and the relatively neutral plasma is consistent with their weakly basic, acidic, or relatively neutral properties. In general, the study shows that codeine and morphine milk concentrations are higher than, salicylic acid milk levels are much lower than, and phenacetin, caffeine, and acetaminophen milk concentrations are relatively similar to their respective plasma levels. It is projected, from estimated steady-state milk concentrations of the drugs and their metabolites studied, that very low percentages of the therapeutic dosages (less than 0.7%) would be excreted in mother's milk, too low an amount to be clinically significant to the infant.

  5. Absence of Genetic Differences among G10P[11] Rotaviruses Associated with Asymptomatic and Symptomatic Neonatal Infections in Vellore, India

    PubMed Central

    Libonati, Margaret H.; Dennis, Allison F.; Ramani, Sasirekha; McDonald, Sarah M.; Akopov, Asmik; Kirkness, Ewen F.; Kang, Gagandeep

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rotaviruses (RVs) are leading causes of severe diarrhea and vomiting in infants and young children. RVs with G10P[11] genotype specificity have been associated with symptomatic and asymptomatic neonatal infections in Vellore, India. To identify possible viral genetic determinants responsible for differences in symptomology, the genome sequences of G10P[11] RVs in stool samples of 19 neonates with symptomatic infections and 20 neonates with asymptomatic infections were determined by Sanger and next-generation sequencing. The data showed that all 39 viruses had identical genotype constellations (G10-P[11]-I2-R2-C2-M2-A1-N1-T1-E2-H3), the same as those of the previously characterized symptomatic N155 Vellore isolate. The data also showed that the RNA and deduced protein sequences of all the Vellore G10P[11] viruses were nearly identical; no nucleotide or amino acid differences were found that correlated with symptomatic versus asymptomatic infection. Next-generation sequencing data revealed that some stool samples, both from neonates with symptomatic infections and from neonates with asymptomatic infections, also contained one or more positive-strand RNA viruses (Aichi virus, astrovirus, or salivirus/klassevirus) suspected of being potential causes of pediatric gastroenteritis. However, none of the positive-strand RNA viruses could be causally associated with the development of symptoms. These results indicate that the diversity of clinical symptoms in Vellore neonates does not result from genetic differences among G10P[11] RVs; instead, other undefined factors appear to influence whether neonates develop gastrointestinal disease symptoms. IMPORTANCE Rotavirus (RV) strains have been identified that preferentially replicate in neonates, in some cases, without causing gastrointestinal disease. Surveillance studies have established that G10P[11] RVs are a major cause of neonatal infection in Vellore, India, with half of infected neonates exhibiting symptoms. We

  6. Bovine viral diarrhoea: pathogenesis and diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Lanyon, Sasha R; Hill, Fraser I; Reichel, Michael P; Brownlie, Joe

    2014-02-01

    Bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) is the most prevalent infectious disease of cattle. It causes financial losses from a variety of clinical manifestations and is the subject of a number of mitigation and eradication schemes around the world. The pathogenesis of BVDV infection is complex, with infection pre- and post-gestation leading to different outcomes. Infection of the dam during gestation results in fetal infection, which may lead to embryonic death, teratogenic effects or the birth of persistently infected (PI) calves. PI animals shed BVDV in their excretions and secretions throughout life and are the primary route of transmission of the virus. These animals can usually be readily detected by virus or viral antigen detection assays (RT-PCR, ELISA), except in the immediate post-natal period where colostral antibodies may mask virus presence. PI calves in utero (the 'Trojan cow' scenario) currently defy detection with available diagnostic tests, although dams carrying PI calves have been shown to have higher antibody levels than seropositive cows carrying non-PI calves. Acute infection with BVDV results in transient viraemia prior to seroconversion and can lead to reproductive dysfunction and immunosuppression leading to an increased incidence of secondary disease. Antibody assays readily detect virus exposure at the individual level and can also be used in pooled samples (serum and milk) to determine herd exposure or immunity. Diagnostic tests can be used to diagnose clinical cases, establish disease prevalence in groups and detect apparently normal but persistently infected animals. This review outlines the pathogenesis and pathology of BVD viral infection and uses this knowledge to select the best diagnostic tests for clinical diagnosis, monitoring, control and eradication efforts. Test methods, types of samples and problems areas of BVDV diagnosis are discussed.

  7. Insurability for asymptomatic hematuria or proteinuria during childhood.

    PubMed

    Feld, L G; Stapleton, F B

    1993-08-01

    The objective of this survey was to describe life insurance underwriting practices concerning children with asymptomatic hematuria and proteinuria. A questionnaire was sent to 200 companies licensed to issue life insurance policies in the state of New York. The medical director of each company was asked to respond to the insurability of children with asymptomatic hematuria and proteinuria. Two case summaries were provided with the questionnaire. Of 97 companies, 66 would offer insurance to the patient with hematuria, although 38 (58%) would charge additional premiums. In response to the problem of proteinuria, 61 companies would offer life insurance, although 50 (82%) would require higher premium charges (P < 0.002 compared with hematuria). We conclude that children with asymptomatic hematuria and proteinuria can usually obtain life insurance, although often at higher cost. Invasive diagnostic tests are not necessary for insurers to offer insurance.

  8. [Post-traumatic and postoperative asymptomatic urinoma. 2 case reports].

    PubMed

    Werner, W; Reichelt, O; Schubert, J

    2001-11-29

    A urinoma is a collection of extravasated urine developing after injury to the urinary tract, almost always asymptomatic, but requiring urgent surgical treatment. A Medline search for the term urinoma in publications appearing between 1996 and 1998, turned up only two reports describing an asymptomatic course. We now describe two cases of urinomas that remained asymptomatic over a period of four months. Although initially misinterpreted, a subsequent revisionary operation nevertheless resulted in a cure. In case 1, the urinoma appeared after an operation to treat recurrent rectal cancer; in case 2, the causal mechanism was an avulsed ureter. Treatment is orientated to the location (intra- or retroperitoneal) and extent of the injury, and comprises temporary stenting, drainage and, where necessary, plastic reconstruction. Even in the absence of a clinical correlate, any urinary retention newly discovered on ultrasonography must be investigated by uroradiography.

  9. [Oral viral infections].

    PubMed

    Parent, Dominique

    2016-02-01

    Exclude herpes infection in the presence of acute oral ulcers of unknown origin, particularly in patients in poor general condition. Remember that asymptomatic HSV-1 shedding in saliva may result in an oral-genital transmission. Perform an anogenital examination and a screening for other sexually transmitted diseases when oral warts are diagnosed. Search for immunosuppression and monitor the patient (screening for a potential associated carcinoma) when there is rapid growth of oral warts. Consider all the clinical signs (systemic, skin, other mucosa, immunity...) when a patient has an enanthem or oral ulcerations. Ask for a HIV test when an oral Kaposi's sarcoma, a hairy leukoplakia or major aphthae are diagnosed. PMID:26854091

  10. Nosocomial viral respiratory infections.

    PubMed

    Graman, P S; Hall, C B

    1989-12-01

    Nosocomial infections with respiratory tract viruses, particularly influenza and respiratory syncytial viruses, account for the majority of serious nosocomial viral disease. Chronically ill, immunocompromised, elderly, and very young hosts are especially vulnerable to potentially life-threatening involvement of the lower respiratory tract. Effective preventive strategies are based upon early accurate viral diagnosis and an appreciation of the epidemiology and mechanisms of transmission for each viral agent. Influenza viruses spread via airborne dispersion of small particle aerosols, resulting in explosive outbreaks; control measures emphasize immunization and chemoprophylaxis of susceptible patients and personnel, and isolation of those already infected. Transmission of respiratory syncytial virus, in contrast, seems to require closer contact, with virus passed on hands, fomites, or in large droplets inoculated into the eyes and nose at close range. Strategies for control of nosocomial respiratory syncytial virus are designed to interrupt hand carriage and inoculation of virus onto mucous membranes.

  11. Viral hepatitis: Indian scenario.

    PubMed

    Satsangi, Sandeep; Chawla, Yogesh K

    2016-07-01

    Viral hepatitis is a cause for major health care burden in India and is now equated as a threat comparable to the "big three" communicable diseases - HIV/AIDS, malaria and tuberculosis. Hepatitis A virus and Hepatitis E virus are predominantly enterically transmitted pathogens and are responsible to cause both sporadic infections and epidemics of acute viral hepatitis. Hepatitis B virus and Hepatitis C virus are predominantly spread via parenteral route and are notorious to cause chronic hepatitis which can lead to grave complications including cirrhosis of liver and hepatocellular carcinoma. Around 400 million people all over the world suffer from chronic hepatitis and the Asia-Pacific region constitutes the epicentre of this epidemic. The present article would aim to cover the basic virologic aspects of these viruses and highlight the present scenario of viral hepatitis in India. PMID:27546957

  12. Modeling Viral Capsid Assembly

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    I present a review of the theoretical and computational methodologies that have been used to model the assembly of viral capsids. I discuss the capabilities and limitations of approaches ranging from equilibrium continuum theories to molecular dynamics simulations, and I give an overview of some of the important conclusions about virus assembly that have resulted from these modeling efforts. Topics include the assembly of empty viral shells, assembly around single-stranded nucleic acids to form viral particles, and assembly around synthetic polymers or charged nanoparticles for nanotechnology or biomedical applications. I present some examples in which modeling efforts have promoted experimental breakthroughs, as well as directions in which the connection between modeling and experiment can be strengthened. PMID:25663722

  13. Non-compaction cardiomyopathy in an asymptomatic athlete.

    PubMed

    Manus, Margaret Kapor; Roy, Satyajeet; Stag, Rosemarie; Hyman, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Prevention of sudden cardiac death in athletes requires the screening and recognition of pathologies that often remain clinically silent for years until provoked by a physiologic stressor. This can result in the manifestation of disease and even death. Left ventricular non-compaction cardiomyopathy (LVNC), newly classified as a distinct entity arising in the adult population, is a cardiomyopathy that at initial presentation can manifest as a wide spectrum of symptoms from asymptomatic to ventricular arrhythmias, systemic embolism and even sudden cardiac death. We present the case of an asymptomatic athlete found to have LVNC and discuss the implications this finding may have on sports participation. PMID:27535732

  14. Spatial working memory in asymptomatic HIV-infected subjects.

    PubMed

    Grassi, B; Garghentini, G; Campana, A; Grassi, E; Bertelli, S; Cinque, P; Epifani, M; Lazzarin, A; Scarone, S

    1999-01-01

    Many clinical and research findings converge to indicate that frontal lobe, basal ganglia, and related neuronal connections are primarily involved in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection; frontal lobe, mainly the prefrontal cortex, has a specialized role in working memory processes. This study focused on neuropsychological evaluation of the spatial component of working memory in a sample of 34 asymptomatic HIV-infected subjects as compared with 34 age- and sex-matched seronegative control subjects. A computer-administered test assessing spatial working memory was used for the neuropsychological evaluation. The findings did not show any spatial working memory impairment during the asymptomatic phase of HIV infection.

  15. Viral vaccines: selected topics.

    PubMed

    Kańtoch, M

    1996-01-01

    Significant role of viruses in pathology, their dominating position in etiology of infectious diseases point at the special position of active prophylactic procedures based on vaccination. The real role and value of viral vaccines of classic and modern generations, the limitation of immune potency in suppression of defence mechanisms, some problems of immunization against virus vertical transmission are presented in the paper. The reader may find tables which cumulate selected but significant patterns of viral vaccines and vaccinations, and selected papers devoted to topics discussed. PMID:9017153

  16. Viral meningitis and encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Tuppeny, Misti

    2013-09-01

    Meningitis is an inflammation of the meninges, whereas encephalitis is inflammation of the parenchymal brain tissue. The single distinguishing element between the 2 diagnoses is the altered state of consciousness, focal deficits, and seizures found in encephalitis. Consequently meningoencephalitis is a term used when both findings are present in the patient. Viral meningitis is not necessarily reported as it is often underdiagnosed, whereas encephalitis cases are on the increase in various areas of North America. Improved imaging and viral diagnostics, as well as enhanced neurocritical care management, have improved patient outcomes to date.

  17. Viral infections in pigeons.

    PubMed

    Marlier, D; Vindevogel, H

    2006-07-01

    This review provides a current update on the major viral diseases of the domestic pigeon (Columba livia domestica), based on scientific reports and clinical experience. Paramyxovirus 1, adenovirus, rotavirus, herpesvirus 1, poxvirus and circovirus infections are described according to common clinical signs and target tissues. Since pigeons are sometimes treated as if they were poultry, the review also summarises the common viral infections of poultry for which pigeons are considered resistant. It is hoped that the review will provide a useful reference for veterinarians and others and offer advice on the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of the major infectious diseases of pigeons.

  18. Failure of Viral Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klug, William S.; Bruinsma, Robijn F.; Michel, Jean-Philippe; Knobler, Charles M.; Ivanovska, Irena L.; Schmidt, Christoph F.; Wuite, Gijs J. L.

    2006-12-01

    We report a combined theoretical and experimental study of the structural failure of viral shells under mechanical stress. We find that discontinuities in the force-indentation curve associated with failure should appear when the so-called Föppl von Kármán (FvK) number exceeds a critical value. A nanoindentation study of a viral shell subject to a soft-mode instability, where the stiffness of the shell decreases with increasing pH, confirms the predicted onset of failure as a function of the FvK number.

  19. Dengue viral infection.

    PubMed

    Sarin, Y K; Singh, S; Singh, T

    1998-02-01

    Dengue viral infection produces a spectrum of disease. For example, mild dengue disease is characterized by biphasic fever, myalgia, arthralgia, leukopenia, and lymphadenopathy, while dengue hemorrhagic fever is an often fatal disease characterized by hemorrhages and shock syndrome. The disease, especially in its severe form, is seen more often among children than among adults. With focus upon India, dengue's etiology, epidemiology, pathology, pathogenesis of dengue hemorrhagic fever, clinical manifestations of both the mild and severe forms of dengue viral infection, diagnosis, differential diagnosis, treatment, prevention, and prognosis are discussed.

  20. Emerging viral infections.

    PubMed

    Bale, James F

    2012-09-01

    Unique disorders appear episodically in human populations and cause life-threatening systemic or neurological disease. Historical examples of such disorders include von Economo encephalitis, a disorder of presumed viral etiology; acquired immune deficiency syndrome, caused by the human immunodeficiency virus; and severe acute respiratory syndrome, caused by a member of the coronavirus family. This article describes the factors that contribute to the emergence of infectious diseases and focuses on selected recent examples of emerging viral infections that can affect the nervous system of infants, children, and adolescents.

  1. Viral apoptotic mimicry.

    PubMed

    Amara, Ali; Mercer, Jason

    2015-08-01

    As opportunistic pathogens, viruses have evolved many elegant strategies to manipulate host cells for infectious entry and replication. Viral apoptotic mimicry, defined by the exposure of phosphatidylserine - a marker for apoptosis - on the pathogen surface, is emerging as a common theme used by enveloped viruses to promote infection. Focusing on the four best described examples (vaccinia virus, dengue virus, Ebola virus and pseudotyped lentivirus), we summarize our current understanding of apoptotic mimicry as a mechanism for virus entry, binding and immune evasion. We also describe recent examples of non-enveloped viruses that use this mimicry strategy, and discuss future directions and how viral apoptotic mimicry could be targeted therapeutically.

  2. Late-onset BK viral nephropathy in a kidney transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Mathew, J C; Holanda, D G; Figanbaum, T L; Fraer, M; Thomas, C P

    2014-09-01

    BK polyoma viral infection occurs as an asymptomatic infection in a high proportion of normal hosts without obvious sequelae. In the kidney transplant population, the virus is reactivated because of reduced immunity and, if not appropriately managed, can lead to BK viral nephropathy, which has emerged as a common cause of acute kidney injury and progressive chronic kidney disease in renal transplant recipients. BK viremia almost always occurs during the first 2 years after transplantation, when immunosuppressive therapy is high, or at other periods when immunosuppression is intensified. BK viremia is now detected by routine screening of transplant patients for the first few years, and BK viral nephropathy is considered to be high in the differential diagnosis of acute kidney injury in recently transplanted patients. We report a case of BK viral nephropathy developing 10 years after transplantation and present the challenges of managing advanced disease.

  3. An isotopic study of oxalate excretion in sheep.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, G H; Belling, G B

    1975-12-01

    Intravenously injected 14C labelled oxalate was rapidly removed from the blood stream via the kidney in 2 sheep, 75% being cleared within 8 h. Mean daily urinary oxalate excretions over 5 days were 21-2 and 27-5 mg and the derived plasma oxalate concentrations were 52-6 and 74-4 mug/100 ml, respectively. Oxalate was both filtered and secreted by the renal tubule with oxalate/inulin ratios varying from 1-11 to 1-57 in 6 normal sheep. A large increase in calcium excretion induced by calcium borogluconate infusion over 5 days was accompanied by a small but consistent increase in urinary oxalate excretion relative to calcium. Oxalate in blood was to be found mainly in the plasma, there being a small (8%) proporation within erythrocytes. This is lower than that reported for man, and yet in its excretion of oxalate via the kidney the sheep appears to closely resemble man and dog.

  4. Diet and urinary excretion of lignans in female subjects.

    PubMed

    Adlercreutz, H; Fotsis, T; Heikkinen, R; Dwyer, J T; Goldin, B R; Gorbach, S L; Lawson, A M; Setchell, K D

    1981-08-01

    Lignans, a class of compounds having a 2,3-dibenzylbutane skeleton, have recently been identified for the first time in humans and animals and evidence indicating their formation by intestinal microflora has previously been established in rats and humans. In the present report the influence of diet on the biosynthesis of this new group of compounds was investigated by comparing the urinary excretion of the principal lignan, trans-2,3-bis-(3-hydroxybenzyl) -butyrolactone (enterolactone, HBBL), in 12 omnivoric and 14 vegetarian women. Young vegetarian women were found to excrete significantly greater amounts of enterolactone than omnivores, while old vegetarians excreted comparable amounts to the omnivore group. A statistically significant (P less than 0.01-0.001) correlation was found between the amount of fibre in the diet and the urinary enterolactone excretion.

  5. Viral metagenomics: a tool for virus discovery and diversity in aquaculture.

    PubMed

    Alavandi, S V; Poornima, M

    2012-09-01

    Viruses are abundant biological entities on earth and the emergence of viral pathogens has become a serious threat to aquaculture and fisheries worldwide. However, our response to viral pathogens has been largely reactive, in the sense that a new pathogen is usually not discovered until it has already reached epidemic proportions. Current diagnostic methods such as PCR, immunological assays and pan-viral microarrays are limited in their ability to identify novel viruses. In this context, the knowledge on the diversity of viruses in healthy and disease situations becomes important for understanding their role on the health of animals in aquaculture species. Viral metagenomics, which involves viral purification and shotgun sequencing, has proven to be useful for understanding viral diversity and describing novel viruses in new diseases and has been recognized as an important tool for discovering novel viruses in human and veterinary medicine. With the advancements in sequencing technology and development of bioinformatics tools for nucleic acid sequence assembly and annotation, information on novel viruses and diversity of viruses in marine ecosystems has been rapidly expanding through viral metagenomics. Novel circoviruses and RNA viruses in Tampa bay pink shrimp, annelovirus in sea lion, picornavirus in ringed seals and several new viruses of marine animals have been recently described using viral metagenomics and this tool has been also recently used in describing viral diversity in aquaculture ponds. Further, a large amount of information has been generated on the diversity of viruses in the marine environment using viral metagenomics during the last decade. There exists a great potential with viral metagenomics for discovering novel viruses in asymptomatic marine candidate animals of aquaculture/mariculture, some of which may assume pathogenic status under high density culture and stress. Additionally, viral metagenomics can help our understanding of viruses

  6. Ammonia excretion in mytilid mussels is facilitated by ciliary beating.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, J; Himmerkus, N; Holland, N; Sartoris, F J; Bleich, M; Tresguerres, M

    2016-08-01

    The excretion of nitrogenous waste products in the form of ammonia (NH3) and ammonium (NH4 (+)) is a fundamental process in aquatic organisms. For mytilid bivalves, little is known about the mechanisms and sites of excretion. This study investigated the localization and the mechanisms of ammonia excretion in mytilid mussels. An Rh protein was found to be abundantly expressed in the apical cell membrane of the plicate organ, which was previously described as a solely respiratory organ. The Rh protein was also expressed in the gill, although at significantly lower concentrations, but was not detectable in mussel kidney. Furthermore, NH3/NH4 (+) was not enriched in the urine, suggesting that kidneys are not involved in active NH3/NH4 (+) excretion. Exposure to elevated seawater pH of 8.5 transiently reduced NH3/NH4 (+) excretion rates, but they returned to control values following 24 h acclimation. These mussels had increased abundance of V-type H(+)-ATPase in the apical membranes of plicate organ cells; however, NH3/NH4 (+) excretion rates were not affected by the V-type H(+)-ATPase specific inhibitor concanamycin A (100 nmol l(-1)). In contrast, inhibition of ciliary beating with dopamine and increased seawater viscosity significantly reduced NH3 excretion rates under control pH (8.0). These results suggest that NH3/NH4 (+) excretion in mytilid mussels takes place by passive NH3 diffusion across respiratory epithelia via the Rh protein, facilitated by the water current produced for filter feeding, which prevents accumulation of NH3 in the boundary layer. This mechanism would be energy efficient for sessile organisms, as they already generate water currents for filter feeding. PMID:27489216

  7. BIOMARKERS OF VIRAL EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Viral and protozoan pathogens associated with raw sludge can cause encephalitis, gastroenteritis, hepatitis, myocarditis, and a number of other diseases. Raw sludge that has been treated to reduce these pathogens can be used for land application according to the regulations spec...

  8. Viral Space Situational Awareness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleckler, A.; Butterfield, M. C.

    2012-09-01

    Viral SSA takes advantage of the amateur astronomy community to provide an extremely low-cost and geographically-diverse network of optical SSA sites. In the spirit of programs such as DARPA's Grand Challenge and the National Weather Service's program of providing amateur meteorologists with weather stations linked to a central professional meteorological facility, we form a cooperative bond with a willing community of technically-minded individuals. We term this program "viral" because we will qualify an initial set of astronomers for SSA operation and then use word of mouth in the astronomy community, as well as an outreach program, to pull in new observers. The use of modern remote controlled telescopes allows the incorporation of certified amateur, university, and commercial telescope systems. The availability of the local Viral SSA member for troubleshooting eliminates most significant costs of operating a large network. In this talk, we discuss the key concepts of Viral SSA and the route to a network of 100+ sites in a three year or less timeframe.

  9. Leafhopper viral pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Four newly discovered viral pathogens in leafhopper vectors of Pierce’s disease of grapes, have been shown to replicate in sharpshooter leafhoppers; the glassy-winged sharpshooter, GWSS, Homalodisca vitripennis, and Oncometopia nigricans (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae). The viruses were classified as memb...

  10. Species differences in biliary excretion of benzo(a)pyrene

    SciTech Connect

    Weyand, E.H.; Bevan, D.R.

    1986-05-01

    Biliary excretion of benzo(a)pyrene (B(a)P) was investigated in rats, hamsters, and guinea pigs following intratracheal administration. (/sup 3/H)-B(a)P, in amounts of approximately 150 ng or 350 ..mu..g, was instilled into lungs and amounts of radioactivity excreted in bile were monitored for six hrs following administration. Differences in biliary excretion of (/sup 3/H)-B(a)P and/or metabolites among species were observed at low doses but not at high doses. Six hours after instillation of a low dose of B(a)P, 70, 54, and 62% of the dose was excreted in bile of rats, hamsters, and guinea pigs, respectively. Upon administration of the higher dose of B(a)P, approximately 50% of the dose was excreted in bile in six hrs by all species. Thus, rats and guinea pigs exhibit differences in biliary excretion of low and high doses of B(a)P whereas hamsters do not. Profiles of phase II metabolites in rats and hamsters were similar at both low and high doses, with the majority of metabolites being glucuronides and thioether conjugates. However, differences in relative amounts of these conjugates were observed between the two doses, with a shift towards a greater proportion of glucuronides at the higher dose. Metabolites in bile from guinea pigs were primarily thioether conjugates, which accounted for 88% of metabolites at the low dose and 95% at the high dose.

  11. Kinetic analysis of biliary lipid excretion in man and dog.

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, C I; Trotman, B W; Soloway, R D

    1976-01-01

    To understand better the mechanisms involved in biliary lipid excretion and to evaluate their role in cholesterol gallstone formation, the rates of biliary excretion of bile salts, cholesterol, and phospholipids were measured in two species, man and dog. Seven cholecystectomized patients with balloon-occludable reinfusion T-tubes were studied during intact and interrupted enterohepatic circulation and four cholecystectomized dogs were studied during interrupted enterohepatic circulation. In man and dog both cholesterol and phospholipid outputs were hyperbolically related to bile salt output by the equation y = x/(a + bx). The output curves intersected the origin and showed an initial rapid rise, followed by a slower increase to a maximum, suggesting a rate-limited mechanism. The shape of the curves permitted calculation of the theoretical maximal outputs and the rates of rise to those outputs. Comparison of these values showed that in both man and dog phospholipid output was greater than cholesterol output and that cholesterol and phospholipid were excreted at different rates. These studies (a) indicate that cholesterol, phospholipids, and bile salts are not excreted in a fixed relationship and (b) demonstrate the usefulness of the derived theoretical maximal lipid output, and the rate of rise of lipid excretion to a maximum, in evaluating the kinetics of biliary lipid excretion. PMID:943421

  12. Ammonia excretion in the freshwater planarian Schmidtea mediterranea.

    PubMed

    Weihrauch, Dirk; Chan, Ainsely C; Meyer, Heiko; Döring, Carmen; Sourial, Mary; O'Donnell, Michael J

    2012-09-15

    In aquatic invertebrates, metabolic nitrogenous waste is excreted predominately as ammonia. Very little is known, however, of the underlying mechanisms of ammonia excretion, particularly in freshwater species. Our results indicate that in the non-parasitic freshwater planarian Schmidtea mediterranea, ammonia excretion depends on acidification of the apical unstirred layer of the body surface and consequent ammonia trapping. Buffering of the environment to a pH of 7 or higher decreased the excretion rate. Inhibitor experiments suggested further that the excretion mechanism involves the participation of the V-type H(+)-ATPase and carbonic anhydrase and possibly also the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase and Na(+)/H(+) exchangers. Alkalinization (pH 8.5, 2 days) of the environment led to a 1.9-fold increase in body ammonia levels and to a downregulation of V-ATPase (subunit A) and Rh-protein mRNA. Further, a 2 day exposure to non-lethal ammonia concentrations (1 mmol l(-1)) caused a doubling of body ammonia levels and led to an increase in Rh-protein and Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase (α-subunit) mRNA expression levels. In situ hybridization studies indicated a strong mRNA expression of the Rh-protein in the epidermal epithelium. The ammonia excretion mechanism proposed for S. mediterranea reveals striking similarities to the current model suggested to function in the gills of freshwater fish.

  13. Coordinacy of lysosomal enzyme excretion in human urine.

    PubMed Central

    Paigen, K; Peterson, J

    1978-01-01

    Assay conditions have been developed for the determination of urinary beta-glucuronidase, beta-galactosidase, alpha-galactosidase, and beta-hexosaminidase using fluorometric substrates. The assay conditions for beta-glucuronidase overcome interference by both low and high molecular weight inhibitors, a problem that has confused earlier studies of enzyme excretion. The four lysosomal enzymes are excreted corrdinately: although their absolute levels (in units per milligram of creatinine) vary during the day and from one day to the next, the ratio of one enzyme to another remains relatively constant. The lack of correlation betweem plasma and urine enzyme levels, together with the high molecular weights of these enzymes, suggests that the urinary enzymes are not derived by glomerular filtration. The lack of coordinacy with lactate dehydrogenase suggests they are not derived from exfoliated cells. by analogy with experimental animals, they may be derived from lysosomes extruded into the lumen of the proximal tubule by epithelial cells. There is considerable variation among a population of 125 healthy adult subjects for total enzyme excretion. Both total enzyme excretion and coordinacy ratios are log-normally distributed, suggesting that they are the resultants of many factors, each of which has a relative, or proportional, effect on enzyme excretion. About one-half the population variation resides in a process common to the excretion of all four enzymes (possibly the lysosome extrusion pathway), and about one-half resides in factors affecting each enzyme independently. PMID:25285

  14. Asymptomatic herpes simplex type 1 virus infection of the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Boggian, I; Buzzacaro, E; Calistri, A; Calvi, P; Cavaggioni, A; Mucignat-Caretta, C; Palu, G

    2000-08-01

    An asymptomatic and transitory brain infection takes place in adult Swiss CD-1 mice after intranasal inoculation of HSV-1 strain SC16. Time course and distribution of the infection in the brain are demonstrated, (i) by titration of the nasal tissue and olfactory bulbs for 16 days post-infection (p.i.), showing a maximum production yield on day 7 p.i. and no replicating virus on day 16 p. i.; (ii) expression in the brain of the lac Z reporter gene of HSV-1 strain SC16-DeltaUS5-lac Z consistent with a central spread of the virus through the central olfactory pathways and the trigeminal system as described in acute HSV-1 encephalitis models; (iii) PCR amplifications of a segment of the thymidine kinase gene (HSV-tk) showing the persistence of viral genome in the nasal tissue and olfactory bulbs after clearance of infectious virus. The asymptomatic character of the infection is demonstrated over 2 months p.i. (i) by normal body weight; (ii) a neurological survey which excludes motor, sensory, balance and postural signs; (iii) two behavioral tests, the open-field test for exploratory activity and the cookie-finding test for olfactory search. On the other hand, intracerebral inocula cause encephalitis and death in a few days (LD50 ca. 14 p.f.u.). Intracranial, surgical transection of one olfactory nerve does not prevent infection of the corresponding bulb nor does it modify virus distribution, suggesting multiple entry routes from the nasal cavity to the brain. In conclusion, HSV-1 strain SC16 reaches the brain of CD-1 mice from the nasal cavity and replicates without neurological or behavioral signs.

  15. Differential evolution of peripheral cytokine levels in symptomatic and asymptomatic responses to experimental influenza virus challenge.

    PubMed

    McClain, M T; Henao, R; Williams, J; Nicholson, B; Veldman, T; Hudson, L; Tsalik, E L; Lambkin-Williams, R; Gilbert, A; Mann, A; Ginsburg, G S; Woods, C W

    2016-03-01

    Exposure to influenza virus triggers a complex cascade of events in the human host. In order to understand more clearly the evolution of this intricate response over time, human volunteers were inoculated with influenza A/Wisconsin/67/2005 (H3N2), and then had serial peripheral blood samples drawn and tested for the presence of 25 major human cytokines. Nine of 17 (53%) inoculated subjects developed symptomatic influenza infection. Individuals who will go on to become symptomatic demonstrate increased circulating levels of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, IL-15, monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1 and interferon (IFN) gamma-induced protein (IP)-10 as early as 12-29 h post-inoculation (during the presymptomatic phase), whereas challenged patients who remain asymptomatic do not. Overall, the immunological pathways of leucocyte recruitment, Toll-like receptor (TLR)-signalling, innate anti-viral immunity and fever production are all over-represented in symptomatic individuals very early in disease, but are also dynamic and evolve continuously over time. Comparison with simultaneous peripheral blood genomics demonstrates that some inflammatory mediators (MCP-1, IP-10, IL-15) are being expressed actively in circulating cells, while others (IL-6, IL-8, IFN-α and IFN-γ) are probable effectors produced locally at the site of infection. Interestingly, asymptomatic exposed subjects are not quiescent either immunologically or genomically, but instead exhibit early and persistent down-regulation of important inflammatory mediators in the periphery. The host inflammatory response to influenza infection is variable but robust, and evolves over time. These results offer critical insight into pathways driving influenza-related symptomatology and offer the potential to contribute to early detection and differentiation of infected hosts.

  16. Increased peak flow variability in children with asymptomatic hyperresponsiveness.

    PubMed

    Gibson, P G; Mattoli, S; Sears, M R; Dolovich, J; Hargreave, F E

    1995-10-01

    The relevance of increased methacholine airway responsiveness detected in children with no current or past symptoms of asthma is not known. We wished to determine whether the presence of airway hyperresponsiveness in asymptomatic children is also associated with abnormal variability of peak expiratory flow (PEF). In 12 asymptomatic children with methacholine hyperresponsiveness, we examined the diurnal variation of peak expiratory flow (PEF) and response to inhaled bronchodilator. Twelve asthmatic children with a comparable range of methacholine hyperresponsiveness, and 12 normal children without methacholine responsiveness, were used as positive and negative controls. The children were aged 11 (range 9-14) yrs. The mean diurnal variation of PEF in those children with asymptomatic hyperresponsiveness was increased at 9.3%, to a degree comparable to the symptomatic asthmatic children (10.7%), and greater than the normal children (5.7%). Methacholine stimulated airway constriction was associated with symptoms in subjects from each group, indicating that the children were capable of perceiving airway constriction. We conclude that asymptomatic children with methacholine airway hyperresponsiveness have other evidence of mild variable airflow obstruction with increased diurnal PEF variability, and can perceive airflow limitation. The lack of symptoms in the children with airway hyperresponsiveness could be due to an insufficient stimulus to cause symptomatic obstruction, or the absence of eosinophilic airway inflammation, which may be a requirement for the development of symptomatic airway hyperresponsiveness.

  17. Aortic coarctation, aneurysm, and ventricular dysfunction in an asymptomatic infant.

    PubMed

    García, Ana I; Aguilar, Juan M; García, Enrique

    2016-06-01

    Aortic arch coarctation with post-coarctation aneurysm is rare in infants. We present the case of an asymptomatic 3-month-old infant with severe left ventricular dysfunction in this setting. The patient underwent surgical repair, and the left ventricular ejection fraction improved to recovery the 4th post-operative month. PMID:26980403

  18. [Screening of parasitic diseases in the asymptomatic immigrant population].

    PubMed

    Goterris, Lidia; Bocanegra, Cristina; Serre-Delcor, Núria; Moure, Zaira; Treviño, Begoña; Zarzuela, Francesc; Espasa, Mateu; Sulleiro, Elena

    2016-07-01

    Parasitic diseases suppose an important health problem in people from high endemic areas, so these must be discarded properly. Usually, these infections develop asymptomatically but, in propitious situations, are likely to reactivate themselves and can cause clinical symptoms and/or complications in the receiving country. Moreover, in some cases it is possible local transmission. Early diagnosis of these parasitic diseases made by appropriate parasitological techniques and its specific treatment will benefit both, the individual and the community. These techniques must be selected according to geoepidemiological criteria, patient's origin, migration route or time spent outside the endemic area; but other factors must also be considered as its sensitivity and specificity, implementation experience and availability. Given the high prevalence of intestinal parasites on asymptomatic immigrants, it is recommended to conduct a study by coproparasitological techniques. Because of its potential severity, the screening of asymptomatic malaria with sensitive techniques such as PCR (polymerase chain reaction) is also advisable. Serological screening for Chagas disease should be performed on all Latin American immigrants, except for people from the Caribbean islands. Other important parasites, which should be excluded, are filariasis and urinary schistosomiasis, by using microscopic examination. The aim of this paper is to review the different techniques for the screening of parasitic diseases and its advices within the care protocols for asymptomatic immigrants.

  19. Human giardiasis in Serbia: asymptomatic vs symptomatic infection*

    PubMed Central

    Nikolić, A.; Klun, I.; Bobić, B.; Ivović, V.; Vujanić, M.; Živković, T.; Djurković-Djaković, O.

    2011-01-01

    Despite the public health importance of giardiasis in all of Europe, reliable data on the incidence and prevalence in Western Balkan Countries (Serbia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Montenegro and FYR Macedonia) are scarce, and the relative contribution of waterborne and food-borne, or person-to-person and/or animalto- person, transmission of human giardiasis is not yet clear. To provide baseline data for the estimation of the public health risk caused by Giardia, we here review the information available on the epidemiological characteristics of asymptomatic and symptomatic human infection in Serbia. Although asymptomatic cases of Giardia represent a major proportion of the total cases of infection, high rates of Giardia infection were found in both asymptomatic and symptomatic populations. No waterborne outbreaks of giardiasis have been reported, and it thus seems that giardiasis mostly occurs sporadically in our milieu. Under such circumstances, control measures to reduce the high prevalence of giardiasis in Serbia have focused on person-to-person transmission, encouraging proper hygiene, but for more targeted intervention measures, studies to identify other risk factors for asymptomatic and symptomatic infections are needed. PMID:21678797

  20. [Asymptomatic, right reno-ureteral calculi in a cake kidney].

    PubMed

    Cocimano, V; Marino, G; Genovese, M G; Cavallotti, G P; Cevoli, R

    1989-01-01

    The primary caudal site of the urogenital anlage in the embryo explains why certain positional anomalies occur during cranial migration and are the outcome of various associated factors. A case of ectopic fusion in the ileo-sacral site known as cake kidney whose peculiarity consists of totally asymptomatic right multiple reno-ureteral lithiasis identified by chance is reported.

  1. [Screening of parasitic diseases in the asymptomatic immigrant population].

    PubMed

    Goterris, Lidia; Bocanegra, Cristina; Serre-Delcor, Núria; Moure, Zaira; Treviño, Begoña; Zarzuela, Francesc; Espasa, Mateu; Sulleiro, Elena

    2016-07-01

    Parasitic diseases suppose an important health problem in people from high endemic areas, so these must be discarded properly. Usually, these infections develop asymptomatically but, in propitious situations, are likely to reactivate themselves and can cause clinical symptoms and/or complications in the receiving country. Moreover, in some cases it is possible local transmission. Early diagnosis of these parasitic diseases made by appropriate parasitological techniques and its specific treatment will benefit both, the individual and the community. These techniques must be selected according to geoepidemiological criteria, patient's origin, migration route or time spent outside the endemic area; but other factors must also be considered as its sensitivity and specificity, implementation experience and availability. Given the high prevalence of intestinal parasites on asymptomatic immigrants, it is recommended to conduct a study by coproparasitological techniques. Because of its potential severity, the screening of asymptomatic malaria with sensitive techniques such as PCR (polymerase chain reaction) is also advisable. Serological screening for Chagas disease should be performed on all Latin American immigrants, except for people from the Caribbean islands. Other important parasites, which should be excluded, are filariasis and urinary schistosomiasis, by using microscopic examination. The aim of this paper is to review the different techniques for the screening of parasitic diseases and its advices within the care protocols for asymptomatic immigrants. PMID:27474244

  2. Bartonella clarridgeiae Bacteremia Detected in an Asymptomatic Blood Donor

    PubMed Central

    Vieira-Damiani, Gislaine; Pitassi, Luiza Helena Urso; Sowy, Stanley; Scorpio, Diana Gerardi; Lania, Bruno Grosselli; Drummond, Marina Rovani; Soares, Tânia Cristina Benetti; Barjas-Castro, Maria de Lourdes; Breitschwerdt, Edward B.; Nicholson, William L.; Velho, Paulo Eduardo Neves Ferreira

    2014-01-01

    Human exposure to Bartonella clarridgeiae has been reported only on the basis of antibody detection. We report for the first time an asymptomatic human blood donor infected with B. clarridgeiae, as documented by enrichment blood culture, PCR, and DNA sequencing. PMID:25392353

  3. Time to rethink management strategies in asymptomatic carotid artery disease.

    PubMed

    Naylor, A Ross

    2011-10-11

    Despite level I evidence, no worldwide consensus of opinion exists on how best to manage patients with asymptomatic carotid artery disease. In this article, I present the evidence supporting intervention in these patients, highlighting a number of 'inconvenient truths' that challenge the current 'one size fits all' approach to treatment. I will demonstrate that, even if one could identify and treat every individual with a 60-99% asymptomatic stenosis, >95% of all strokes will still occur. Evidence shows that 94% of all carotid endarterectomy and carotid artery stenting procedures in asymptomatic patients in the US are ultimately unnecessary, costing health-care providers US$2 billion annually. Evidence also exists that the risk of stroke in patients treated medically is lower than when the asymptomatic trials were recruiting, challenging the appropriateness of basing contemporary guidelines upon historical data. A small cohort of 'high-risk for stroke' patients will undoubtedly benefit from intervention and our goal must be to identify and treat these individuals, rather than continuing with a policy of mass intervention that benefits very few patients in the long term.

  4. Noninvasive evaluation and management of the "asymptomatic" carotid bruit.

    PubMed

    Kartchner, M M; McRae, L P

    1977-12-01

    Cervical bruits in patients who are asymptomatic or who have nonhemispheric neurological symptoms present a universal challenge. Of 4,000 patients evaluated noninvasively for carotid occlusive disease, 1,287 presented with "asymptomatic" bruits (697 had nonhemispheric neurological symptoms and 590 were clinically asymptomatic). Carotid phonoangiography (CPA), the visual analysis of carotid bruits, identifies bruits indicative of significant stenosis, documents progression, and differentiates bruits of carotid bifurcation and sub-bifurcation origin. Sub-bifurication bruits were diagnosed in 619, insignificant bifurcation bruits in 426, and significant carotid bruits in 242 patients by CPA. Oculoplethysmography (OPG) evaluates the hemodynamic significance of carotid bruits by comparative timing of simultaneously recorded ocular and ear lobe pulses. OPG detected 273 asymptomatic bruit patients with significant internal carotid flow reduction and indicated 5% of the bifurcation bruits were of external carotid origin. An accuracy of 89% in determining greater than 40% stenosis by OPG/CPA in 295 patients having arteriography increases to 97% when both OPG and CPA are positive. Six-month to 70-month clinical follow-up of the 1,287 patients documented 154 carotid endarterectomies and 38 strokes. Analysis of the strokes favors arteriography and operation only for those patients with appropriately positive or progressive OPG/CPA or with focal transient ischemic attacks (TIAs).

  5. Aortic coarctation, aneurysm, and ventricular dysfunction in an asymptomatic infant.

    PubMed

    García, Ana I; Aguilar, Juan M; García, Enrique

    2016-06-01

    Aortic arch coarctation with post-coarctation aneurysm is rare in infants. We present the case of an asymptomatic 3-month-old infant with severe left ventricular dysfunction in this setting. The patient underwent surgical repair, and the left ventricular ejection fraction improved to recovery the 4th post-operative month.

  6. The asymptomatic smooth palatal mass. A dangerously deceptive growth.

    PubMed

    Johnson, J T; Edwards, P A

    1980-09-01

    Occasionally, significant or even malignant disease may be asymptomatic or mimic a benign disorder. A neoplasm arising in a minor salivary gland is just such an entity. In evaluating these tumors, an adequate index of suspicion is integral to prompt diagnosis and early institution of treatment.

  7. Evaluation of Leishmania (Leishmania) infantum excreted-secreted antigens for detection of canine leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Pinedo-Cancino, Viviana; Laurenti, Márcia Dalastra; Kesper, Norival; Umezawa, Eufrosina Setsu

    2016-09-01

    The efficacy of tests with L. (L.) infantum excreted-secreted antigens (ESA) to detect canine leishmaniasis (CanL) was evaluated using immunoblotting (ESA-blot), ELISA (ESA-ELISA) and ELISA with alkaline extract from promastigotes (PAE). Of one hundred fifty-five domestic dogs tested, 100 were suspected of CanL, 23 had other diseases and 32 were healthy. Sera from the dogs suspected of CanL were tested by immunohistochemistry (IHC), and 54% were confirmed to be infected by L. (L.) infantum (38 symptomatic and 16 asymptomatic). Of these, 100% were positive by ESA-blot, ESA-ELISA and PAE-ELISA. In the ESA-blot their sera recognized polypeptides in the 26.5-31.5kDa region. Of the 46% of dogs with negative IHC, 44-53% tested positive in all three tests irrespective of clinical status. The twenty-three dogs with other diseases were negative by ESA-blot, but sera from 9% and 26% of them reacted with ESA-ELISA and PAE-ELISA, respectively. The 32 healthy dogs were negative in all the tests. ESA-blot showed good correlation with IHC in the detection of CanL and a high specificity index. PMID:27212707

  8. Prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in asymptomatic smokers

    PubMed Central

    Sansores, Raúl H; Velázquez-Uncal, Mónica; Pérez-Bautista, Oliver; Villalba-Caloca, Jaime; Falfán-Valencia, Ramcés; Ramírez-Venegas, Alejandra

    2015-01-01

    Background Physicians do not routinely recommend smokers to undergo spirometry unless they are symptomatic. Objective To test the hypothesis that there are a significant number of asymptomatic smokers with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), we estimated the prevalence of COPD in a group of asymptomatic smokers. Methods Two thousand nine hundred and sixty-one smokers with a cumulative consumption history of at least 10 pack-years, either smokers with symptoms or smokers without symptoms (WOS) were invited to perform a spirometry and complete a symptom questionnaire. Results Six hundred and thirty-seven (21.5%) smokers had no symptoms, whereas 2,324 (78.5%) had at least one symptom. The prevalence of COPD in subjects WOS was 1.5% when considering the whole group of smokers (45/2,961) and 7% when considering only the group WOS (45/637). From 329 smokers with COPD, 13.7% were WOS. Subjects WOS were younger, had better lung function and lower cumulative consumption of cigarettes, estimated as both cigarettes per day and pack-years. According to severity of airflow limitation, 69% vs 87% of subjects were classified as Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease stages I–II in the WOS and smokers with symptoms groups, respectively (P<0.001). A multivariate analysis showed that forced expiratory volume in 1 second (mL) was the only predictive factor for COPD in asymptomatic smokers. Conclusion Prevalence of COPD in asymptomatic smokers is 1.5%. This number of asymptomatic smokers may be excluded from the benefit of an “early” intervention, not just pharmacological but also from smoking cessation counseling. The higher forced expiratory volume in 1 second may contribute to prevent early diagnosis. PMID:26586941

  9. Urinary chromium excretion, diurnal changes, and relationship to creatinine excretion in healthy and sick individuals of different ages.

    PubMed

    Gürson, C T; Saner, G

    1978-07-01

    Since urine is the main excretory pathway for chromium, this study was conducted to compare in normal individuals the daily urinary chromium excretion with a 4 hr sample, to investigate diurnal fluctuations of urinary chromium and age-dependent relationship between urinary chromium and creatinine excretion. The results can be summarized as 1) there was no significant difference between the observed 24 hr chromium excretion and 24 hr excretion calculated from the one 4 hr samples, 2) a diurnal variation was observed when urinary excretion was expressed as chromium per minute, but no time-related variation could be established when chromium/creatinine (Cr/Cre) ratios in samples from three different periods of the same day were compared, although a significant positive correlation existed between urinary chromium and creatinine concentration, 3) the Cr/Cre ratio was found to be age-dependent, 4) in malnourished children the Cr/Cre ratio was very high and significantly different from that of normal infants, 5) This ratio for the eight diabetics was found to be significantly higher when compared with normal adults. On the basis of these results, it is suggested that morning 4 hr urinary chromium reflects the daily chromium excretion and that the Cr/Cre ratio of single urine samples obtained during this period is a reliable criterion in the evaluation of chromium nutrition of individuals in different conditions, provided that the influence of age is taken into consideration.

  10. [Trans-intestinal cholesterol excretion (TICE): a new route for cholesterol excretion].

    PubMed

    Blanchard, Claire; Moreau, François; Cariou, Bertrand; Le May, Cédric

    2014-10-01

    The small intestine plays a crucial role in dietary and biliary cholesterol absorption, as well as its lymphatic secretion as chylomicrons (lipoprotein exogenous way). Recently, a new metabolic pathway called TICE (trans-intestinal excretion of cholesterol) that plays a central role in cholesterol metabolism has emerged. TICE is an inducible way, complementary to the hepatobiliary pathway, allowing the elimination of the plasma cholesterol directly into the intestine lumen through the enterocytes. This pathway is poorly characterized but several molecular actors of TICE have been recently identified. Although it is a matter of debate, two independent studies suggest that TICE is involved in the anti-atherogenic reverse cholesterol transport pathway. Thus, TICE is an innovative drug target to reduce -cardiovascular diseases.

  11. Japanese viral encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Tiroumourougane, S; Raghava, P; Srinivasan, S

    2002-01-01

    One of the leading causes of acute encephalopathy in children in the tropics is Japanese encephalitis (JE). Transmitted by the culex mosquito, this neurotropic virus predominately affects the thalamus, anterior horns of the spinal cord, cerebral cortex, and cerebellum. It mainly affects children <15 years and is mostly asymptomatic. The occasional symptomatic child typically presents with a neurological syndrome characterised by altered sensorium, seizures, and features of intracranial hypertension. Aetiological diagnosis is based on virus isolation or demonstration of virus specific antigen or antibodies in the cerebrospinal fluid/blood. Though no antiviral drug is available against JE, effective supportive management can improve the outcome. Control of JE involves efficient vector control and appropriate use of vaccines. PMID:11930023

  12. Quantitative urinary protein excretion in chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    McMorrow, R G; Galla, J H; Luke, R G

    1982-01-01

    The diagnostic value of the measurement of quantitative proteinuria in patients with a creatinine clearance of less than 10 ml/min was determined in patients seen in a single center over a 5-year period. All 126 patients in whom a definitive renal diagnosis was possible were included. Patients with glomerular disease excreted 6.1 +/- 0.6 g/day and patients with interstitial disease 1.5 +/- 0.3 g/day (p less than 0.001). In individual patients with end-stage renal disease, however, measurement of urinary protein excretion excluded (with 95% confidence levels) patients with interstitial diseases only when greater than 2.9 g/day. To examine the natural history of proteinuria in progressive renal disease, urinary protein, absolute and factored for glomerular filtration rate (GFR; creatinine clearance), was determined at 10 ml/min decrements in GFR for patients with membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis, idiopathic membranous glomerulonephritis and focal glomerulosclerosis. Quantitative urinary protein excretion was relatively constant as GFR fell but did fall significantly at less than 10 ml/min but only to 4.8-7.0 g/day at even that level. Urinary protein excretion/GFR increased as GFR fell, particularly at end stage where a highly significant four-fold rise was seen; an increase also occurred in patients with primary interstitial disease. Similar data were obtained for 34 randomly selected patients after at least 1 year of chronic hemodialysis. Although a significant decline in absolute urinary protein excretion occurred during the year of dialysis to levels not different between glomerular and interstitial disease, urinary protein excretion/unit GFR remained elevated. Increased urinary protein excretion/unit GFR may result from a functional adaptation of remaining nephrons in response to declining renal mass.

  13. Urinary Sodium and Potassium Excretion and CKD Progression.

    PubMed

    He, Jiang; Mills, Katherine T; Appel, Lawrence J; Yang, Wei; Chen, Jing; Lee, Belinda T; Rosas, Sylvia E; Porter, Anna; Makos, Gail; Weir, Matthew R; Hamm, L Lee; Kusek, John W

    2016-04-01

    CKD is a major risk factor for ESRD, cardiovascular disease, and premature death. Whether dietary sodium and potassium intake affect CKD progression remains unclear. We prospectively studied the association of urinary sodium and potassium excretion with CKD progression and all-cause mortality among 3939 patients with CKD in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort Study. Urinary sodium and potassium excretion were measured using three 24-hour urine specimens, and CKD progression was defined as incident ESRD or halving of eGFR. During follow-up, 939 CKD progression events and 540 deaths occurred. Compared with the lowest quartile of urinary sodium excretion (<116.8 mmol/24 h), hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals) for the highest quartile of urinary sodium excretion (≥194.6 mmol/24 h) were 1.54 (1.23 to 1.92) for CKD progression, 1.45 (1.08 to 1.95) for all-cause mortality, and 1.43 (1.18 to 1.73) for the composite outcome of CKD progression and all-cause mortality after adjusting for multiple covariates, including baseline eGFR. Additionally, compared with the lowest quartile of urinary potassium excretion (<39.4 mmol/24 h), hazard ratios for the highest quartile of urinary potassium excretion (≥67.1 mmol/24 h) were 1.59 (1.25 to 2.03) for CKD progression, 0.98 (0.71 to 1.35) for all-cause mortality, and 1.42 (1.15 to 1.74) for the composite outcome. These data indicate that high urinary sodium and potassium excretion are associated with increased risk of CKD progression. Clinical trials are warranted to test the effect of sodium and potassium reduction on CKD progression.

  14. Homeostatic control of manganese excretion in the neonatal rat

    SciTech Connect

    Ballatori, N.; Miles, E.; Clarkson, T.W.

    1987-05-01

    Previous studies in neonatal and suckling animals showed that immature animals have a greatly diminished capacity to excrete manganese and therefore were considered to be unable to regulate tissue manganese concentrations. In contrast, the present studies indicate that suckling rats have the capacity to excrete excess manganese at rates nearly comparable to those of adults. Eight- to 10-day-old rats given a tracer dose of /sup 54/MnCl/sub 2/ (essentially carrier free), either via gavage or by intraperitoneal injection showed little elimination of the /sup 54/Mn until the 18-19th day of life, when there was an abrupt increase in the rate of the metal's excretion. However, when manganese was given in doses of 1 and 10 mg/kg, the young animals excreted from 30-70% of the dose in only 4 days, at which time a new rate of excretion was achieved. This enhanced rate of excretion remained constant until the 18-19th day of life, when it was again accelerated. Biliary excretion of manganese, the primary route for the elimination of the metal, was only 30-60% lower in 14-day-old rats compared with adults at doses ranging from tracer to 10 mg /sup 54/Mn/kg. For both the 14-day-old and adult rats, an apparent biliary transport maximum was reached at a dose of 10 mg Mn/kg. These studies indicate that the excretory pathways for manganese are well developed in the neonatal rat. The avid retention of tracer quantities of manganese by the neonate may be a consequence of the scarcity of this essential trace metal in its diet.

  15. Manure nutrient excretion by Jersey and Holstein cows.

    PubMed

    Knowlton, K F; Wilkerson, V A; Casper, D P; Mertens, D R

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate feces, urine, and N excretion by Jersey and Holstein cows. Sixteen multiparous cows (n=8 per breed) were fed 2 experimental rations at calving in a switchback experimental design. Diets were 50% forage and based on corn meal (control) or whole cottonseed. Half the cows in each breed started on the control diet and half started on the whole cottonseed diet. Cows were switched to the other diet at 60 d in milk and switched back to their original diet at 165 d in milk. Pairs of cows were moved into open-circuit respiration chambers on d 49, 154, and 271 of lactation for 7-d measurement periods. While in the chambers, total collection of feed refusals, milk, recovered hair, feces, and urine was conducted. No effect of the interaction of diet and breed was observed for measures of nutrient digestibility and manure excretion. Total daily manure excretion was lower in Jersey cows than in Holstein cows, with reductions generally proportional to changes in feed intake. Jersey cows consumed 29% less feed and excreted 33% less wet feces and 28% less urine than Holstein cows. Intake, fecal, and urinary N were reduced by 29, 33, and 24%, respectively, in Jersey cows compared with Holstein cows. Equations from American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers underpredicted observed values for all manure measures evaluated (urine, manure solids, N, wet manure), and breed bias was observed in equations predicting excretion of urine, N, and wet manure. Although these equations include animal and dietary factors, intercepts of regression of observed values on predicted values differed between Holsteins and Jerseys for those 3 measures. No breed bias was observed in the prediction of manure solids excretion, however, making that equation equally appropriate for Jerseys and Holsteins. The effect of breed on manure and nutrient excretion has significant nutrient management implications.

  16. Biliary excretion of lecithin and cholesterol in the dog

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, Henry O.; King, Katherine K.

    1972-01-01

    The biliary excretion rates of bile acid, lecithin, and cholesterol were measured in unanesthetized dogs after interruption of enterohepatic circulation and during infusions of sodium taurocholate, sodium glycocholate, sodium dehydrocholate, SC2644 (a bicyclic organic acid with high choleretic potency), and secretin. Both lecithin output and cholesterol output were directly related to bile acid excretion rate. The curves describing these relationships were concave downward. Molar concentration ratios of lecithin-to-bile acid declined gradually from approximately 0.4 to 0.2 as bile acid output increased from approximately 1 to 70 μmoles/min. Cholesterol-to-lecithin molar ratios were highest (0.05-0.15) at very low rates of bile acid excretion, but descended rapidly to a plateau (0.03-0.04) which was constant over the entire range of bile acid excretion rates from 10 to 70 μmoles/min. Similar lipid excretion patterns were observed during glycocholate infusion, but secretin-induced choleresis and dehydrocholate-induced choleresis were unaccompanied by any increments in lecithin or cholesterol excretion and SC2644 (which caused a marked increase in canalicular bile production as measured by erythritol clearance) caused a depression of lipid excretion. The data are consistent with the view that lecithin moves passively from cell membranes to intracanalicular micelles, that transport of cholesterol is coupled to lecithin transport, and that there is also a small amount of independent passive transport of cholesterol from membranes to micelles. A model developed on these assumptions has been shown to behave in a fashion consistent with the entire range of these observations. PMID:5024035

  17. Contribution of dietary oxalate to urinary oxalate excretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, R. P.; Goodman, H. O.; Assimos, D. G.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The amount of oxalate excreted in urine has a significant impact on calcium oxalate supersaturation and stone formation. Dietary oxalate is believed to make only a minor (10 to 20%) contribution to the amount of oxalate excreted in urine, but the validity of the experimental observations that support this conclusion can be questioned. An understanding of the actual contribution of dietary oxalate to urinary oxalate excretion is important, as it is potentially modifiable. METHODS: We varied the amount of dietary oxalate consumed by a group of adult individuals using formula diets and controlled, solid-food diets with a known oxalate content, determined by a recently developed analytical procedure. Controlled solid-food diets were consumed containing 10, 50, and 250 mg of oxalate/2500 kcal, as well as formula diets containing 0 and 180 mg oxalate/2500 kcal. Changes in the content of oxalate and other ions were assessed in 24-hour urine collections. RESULTS: Urinary oxalate excretion increased as dietary oxalate intake increased. With oxalate-containing diets, the mean contribution of dietary oxalate to urinary oxalate excretion ranged from 24.4 +/- 15.5% on the 10 mg/2500 kcal/day diet to 41.5 +/- 9.1% on the 250 mg/2500 kcal/day diet, much higher than previously estimated. When the calcium content of a diet containing 250 mg of oxalate was reduced from 1002 mg to 391 mg, urinary oxalate excretion increased by a mean of 28.2 +/- 4.8%, and the mean dietary contribution increased to 52.6 +/- 8.6%. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that dietary oxalate makes a much greater contribution to urinary oxalate excretion than previously recognized, that dietary calcium influences the bioavailability of ingested oxalate, and that the absorption of dietary oxalate may be an important factor in calcium oxalate stone formation.

  18. Viral Membrane Scission

    PubMed Central

    Rossman, Jeremy S.; Lamb, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    Virus budding is a complex, multistep process in which viral proteins make specific alterations in membrane curvature. Many different viral proteins can deform the membrane and form a budding virion, but very few can mediate membrane scission to complete the budding process. As a result, enveloped viruses have developed numerous ways of facilitating membrane scission, including hijacking host cellular scission machinery and expressing their own scission proteins. These proteins mediate scission in very different ways, though the biophysical mechanics underlying their actions may be similar. In this review, we explore the mechanisms of membrane scission and the ways in which enveloped viruses use these systems to mediate the release of budding virions. PMID:24099087

  19. Viral membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Stephen C

    2015-05-01

    Membrane fusion is an essential step when enveloped viruses enter cells. Lipid bilayer fusion requires catalysis to overcome a high kinetic barrier; viral fusion proteins are the agents that fulfill this catalytic function. Despite a variety of molecular architectures, these proteins facilitate fusion by essentially the same generic mechanism. Stimulated by a signal associated with arrival at the cell to be infected (e.g., receptor or co-receptor binding, proton binding in an endosome), they undergo a series of conformational changes. A hydrophobic segment (a "fusion loop" or "fusion peptide") engages the target-cell membrane and collapse of the bridging intermediate thus formed draws the two membranes (virus and cell) together. We know of three structural classes for viral fusion proteins. Structures for both pre- and postfusion conformations of illustrate the beginning and end points of a process that can be probed by single-virion measurements of fusion kinetics.

  20. Papillomaviruses: Viral evolution, cancer and evolutionary medicine.

    PubMed

    Bravo, Ignacio G; Félez-Sánchez, Marta

    2015-01-28

    Papillomaviruses (PVs) are a numerous family of small dsDNA viruses infecting virtually all mammals. PVs cause infections without triggering a strong immune response, and natural infection provides only limited protection against reinfection. Most PVs are part and parcel of the skin microbiota. In some cases, infections by certain PVs take diverse clinical presentations from highly productive self-limited warts to invasive cancers. We propose PVs as an excellent model system to study the evolutionary interactions between the immune system and pathogens causing chronic infections: genotypically, PVs are very diverse, with hundreds of different genotypes infecting skin and mucosa; phenotypically, they display extremely broad gradients and trade-offs between key phenotypic traits, namely productivity, immunogenicity, prevalence, oncogenicity and clinical presentation. Public health interventions have been launched to decrease the burden of PV-associated cancers, including massive vaccination against the most oncogenic human PVs, as well as systematic screening for PV chronic anogenital infections. Anti-PVs vaccines elicit protection against infection, induce cross-protection against closely related viruses and result in herd immunity. However, our knowledge on the ecological and intrapatient dynamics of PV infections remains fragmentary. We still need to understand how the novel anthropogenic selection pressures posed by vaccination and screening will affect viral circulation and epidemiology. We present here an overview of PV evolution and the connection between PV genotypes and the phenotypic, clinical manifestations of the diseases they cause. This differential link between viral evolution and the gradient cancer-warts-asymptomatic infections makes PVs a privileged playground for evolutionary medicine research.

  1. Viral membrane fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, Stephen C.

    2015-05-15

    Membrane fusion is an essential step when enveloped viruses enter cells. Lipid bilayer fusion requires catalysis to overcome a high kinetic barrier; viral fusion proteins are the agents that fulfill this catalytic function. Despite a variety of molecular architectures, these proteins facilitate fusion by essentially the same generic mechanism. Stimulated by a signal associated with arrival at the cell to be infected (e.g., receptor or co-receptor binding, proton binding in an endosome), they undergo a series of conformational changes. A hydrophobic segment (a “fusion loop” or “fusion peptide”) engages the target-cell membrane and collapse of the bridging intermediate thus formed draws the two membranes (virus and cell) together. We know of three structural classes for viral fusion proteins. Structures for both pre- and postfusion conformations of illustrate the beginning and end points of a process that can be probed by single-virion measurements of fusion kinetics. - Highlights: • Viral fusion proteins overcome the high energy barrier to lipid bilayer merger. • Different molecular structures but the same catalytic mechanism. • Review describes properties of three known fusion-protein structural classes. • Single-virion fusion experiments elucidate mechanism.

  2. Short communication: Evaluation of nitrogen excretion equations from cattle.

    PubMed

    Johnson, A C B; Reed, K F; Kebreab, E

    2016-09-01

    Nitrogen excretion in dairy manure is a precursor for N2O and NH3 formation in livestock housing, manure storage facilities, and after manure is applied to land. Nitrous oxide is a major contributor to greenhouse gas emissions, and reducing N output from dairy production facilities can reduce the amount of anthropogenic N2O entering the atmosphere. The objective of the study was to conduct a comprehensive evaluation of extant prediction models for N excretion in feces and urine using extensive literature data. A total of 45 N excretion equations were evaluated for lactating cows, heifers, and nonlactating cows and steers. These equations were evaluated with 215 treatment means from 69 published studies collected over 20 yr from 1995 to 2015. Two evaluation methods were used: the root mean square prediction error and the concordance correlation coefficient. Equations constructed using a more rigorous development process fared better than older extant equations. Equations for heifers and nonlactating cows had greater error of prediction compared with equations used for lactating cows. This could be due to limited amount of data available for construction and evaluation of the equations. Urinary N equations had greater prediction errors than other forms of excretion, possibly due to high variability in urinary N excretion and challenges in urine collection. Fecal N equations had low error bias and reached an acceptable level of precision and accuracy. PMID:27320670

  3. Renal melatonin excretion in sheep is enhanced by water diuresis.

    PubMed

    Valtonen, M; Laitinen, J T; Eriksson, L

    1993-09-01

    Diurnal variation in blood melatonin levels and renal melatonin excretion was monitored in five ewes by blood sampling and quantitative urine collection at 2-h intervals. A typical secretory pattern of melatonin was seen both in blood and urine levels and in the renal excretion of melatonin. Serum melatonin levels increased from daytime values of approximately 200 pmol/l to a mean of 800 pmol/l during darkness. Urine flow rate and urine osmolality did not show any clear diurnal rhythm. To examine whether urine flow rate affects renal melatonin excretion at night, urine was collected in three consecutive 30-min fractions, and blood was sampled in the middle of each urine collection period when the sheep were in normal water balance or after hydration. Hydration increased urine flow rate over sixfold and decreased urine osmolality well below plasma osmolality. Glomerular filtration rate, measured as creatinine clearance, did not change. Serum melatonin concentrations did not differ between hydrated and non-hydrated sheep. However, urinary melatonin excretion was 1.1 +/- 0.3 (S.E.M.) pmol/min at midnight in normal water balance, and significantly higher (2.6 +/- 0.4 pmol/min) in the hydrated state. In this study, the validity of urinary melatonin determinations as an indicator of pineal function was confirmed in normal water balance. In addition, our results suggest that a high tubular fluid load during diuresis increases urinary melatonin excretion because of decreased tubular reabsorption.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Changes in parasite transmission stage excretion after pheasant release.

    PubMed

    Villanúa, D; Acevedo, P; Höfle, U; Rodríguez, O; Gortázar, C

    2006-09-01

    The production of parasite transmission stages was investigated in the faeces of 77 farm-bred ring-necked pheasants (Phasianus colchicus). Coccidian oocysts (Eimeria sp.), and nematode eggs (Heterakis sp., and Capillaria-like eggs) were recovered before and after release but all birds were treated prior to release. Treatment with fenbendazole significantly reduced the abundance of transmission-stage excretion for all parasites, and reduced the prevalence in the case of Eimeria sp. and Heterakis sp. Nonetheless, a significant increase in the excretion abundance for all parasites and in the prevalence of Eimeria sp. and Heterakis sp. was found after release. Eggs of Ascaridia sp. were found only after releasing, suggesting infection ocurred in the wild. A negative relationship was found between the pheasant body condition and Heterakis excretion abundance and a higher abundance of Capillaria sp. eggs in female birds. No significant relationship was found between parasite excretion abundance and pheasant survival. Despite this, results suggest that an increase in the excretion of parasite transmission stages follows the release of captive pheasants into the wild. This can in part explain restocking failures, but also means that autochtonous free-living birds may become exposed to new and potentially harmful pathogens. To avoid these risks it is proposed that improved prophylactic measures should be taken.

  5. Urine excretion strategy for stem cell-generated embryonic kidneys

    PubMed Central

    Yokote, Shinya; Matsunari, Hitomi; Iwai, Satomi; Yamanaka, Shuichiro; Uchikura, Ayuko; Fujimoto, Eisuke; Matsumoto, Kei; Nagashima, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Eiji; Yokoo, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    There have been several recent attempts to generate, de novo, a functional whole kidney from stem cells using the organogenic niche or blastocyst complementation methods. However, none of these attempts succeeded in constructing a urinary excretion pathway for the stem cell-generated embryonic kidney. First, we transplanted metanephroi from cloned pig fetuses into gilts; the metanephroi grew to about 3 cm and produced urine, although hydronephrosis eventually was observed because of the lack of an excretion pathway. Second, we demonstrated the construction of urine excretion pathways in rats. Rat metanephroi or metanephroi with bladders (developed from cloacas) were transplanted into host rats. Histopathologic analysis showed that tubular lumina dilation and interstitial fibrosis were reduced in kidneys developed from cloacal transplants compared with metanephroi transplantation. Then we connected the host animal’s ureter to the cloacal-developed bladder, a technique we called the “stepwise peristaltic ureter” (SWPU) system. The application of the SWPU system avoided hydronephrosis and permitted the cloacas to differentiate well, with cloacal urine being excreted persistently through the recipient ureter. Finally, we demonstrated a viable preclinical application of the SWPU system in cloned pigs. The SWPU system also inhibited hydronephrosis in the pig study. To our knowledge, this is the first report showing that the SWPU system may resolve two important problems in the generation of kidneys from stem cells: construction of a urine excretion pathway and continued growth of the newly generated kidney. PMID:26392557

  6. Optimizing Viral Discovery in Bats

    PubMed Central

    Young, Cristin C. W.; Olival, Kevin J.

    2016-01-01

    Viral discovery studies in bats have increased dramatically over the past decade, yet a rigorous synthesis of the published data is lacking. We extract and analyze data from 93 studies published between 2007–2013 to examine factors that increase success of viral discovery in bats, and specific trends and patterns of infection across host taxa and viral families. Over the study period, 248 novel viruses from 24 viral families have been described. Using generalized linear models, at a study level we show the number of host species and viral families tested best explained number of viruses detected. We demonstrate that prevalence varies significantly across viral family, specimen type, and host taxonomy, and calculate mean PCR prevalence by viral family and specimen type across all studies. Using a logistic model, we additionally identify factors most likely to increase viral detection at an individual level for the entire dataset and by viral families with sufficient sample sizes. Our analysis highlights major taxonomic gaps in recent bat viral discovery efforts and identifies ways to improve future viral pathogen detection through the design of more efficient and targeted sample collection and screening approaches. PMID:26867024

  7. Optimizing Viral Discovery in Bats.

    PubMed

    Young, Cristin C W; Olival, Kevin J

    2016-01-01

    Viral discovery studies in bats have increased dramatically over the past decade, yet a rigorous synthesis of the published data is lacking. We extract and analyze data from 93 studies published between 2007-2013 to examine factors that increase success of viral discovery in bats, and specific trends and patterns of infection across host taxa and viral families. Over the study period, 248 novel viruses from 24 viral families have been described. Using generalized linear models, at a study level we show the number of host species and viral families tested best explained number of viruses detected. We demonstrate that prevalence varies significantly across viral family, specimen type, and host taxonomy, and calculate mean PCR prevalence by viral family and specimen type across all studies. Using a logistic model, we additionally identify factors most likely to increase viral detection at an individual level for the entire dataset and by viral families with sufficient sample sizes. Our analysis highlights major taxonomic gaps in recent bat viral discovery efforts and identifies ways to improve future viral pathogen detection through the design of more efficient and targeted sample collection and screening approaches. PMID:26867024

  8. Tax secretion from peripheral blood mononuclear cells and Tax detection in plasma of patients with human T-lymphotropic virus-type 1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis and asymptomatic carriers.

    PubMed

    Medina, Fernando; Quintremil, Sebastián; Alberti, Carolina; Godoy, Fabián; Pando, María E; Bustamante, Andrés; Barriga, Andrés; Cartier, Luis; Puente, Javier; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Valenzuela, María A; Ramírez, Eugenio

    2016-03-01

    Human T-lymphotropic virus-type 1 (HTLV-1) is the etiologic agent of the neurologic disease HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). Tax viral protein plays a critical role in viral pathogenesis. Previous studies suggested that extracellular Tax might involve cytokine-like extracellular effects. We evaluated Tax secretion in 18 h-ex vivo peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) cultures from 15 HAM/TSP patients and 15 asymptomatic carriers. Futhermore, Tax plasma level was evaluated from other 12 HAM/TSP patients and 10 asymptomatic carriers. Proviral load and mRNA encoding Tax were quantified by PCR and real-time RT-PCR, respectively. Intracellular Tax in CD4(+)CD25(+) cells occurred in 100% and 86.7% of HAM/TSP patients and asymptomatic carriers, respectively. Percentage of CD4(+)CD25(+) Tax+, proviral load and mRNA encoding Tax were significantly higher in HAM/TSP patients. Western blot analyses showed higher secretion levels of ubiquitinated Tax in HAM/TSP patients than in asymptomatic carriers. In HTLV-1-infected subjects, Western blot of plasma Tax showed higher levels in HAM/TSP patients than in asymptomatic carriers, whereas no Tax was found in non-infected subjects. Immunoprecipitated plasma Tax resolved on SDS-PAGE gave two major bands of 57 and 48 kDa allowing identification of Tax and Ubiquitin peptides by mass spectrometry. Relative percentage of either CD4(+)CD25(+) Tax+ cells, or Tax protein released from PBMCs, or plasma Tax, correlates neither with tax mRNA nor with proviral load. This fact could be explained by a complex regulation of Tax expression. Tax secreted from PBMCs or present in plasma could potentially become a biomarker to distinguish between HAM/TSP patients and asymptomatic carriers.

  9. Diagnosis of viral gastroenteritis in children: interpretation of real-time PCR results and relation to clinical symptoms.

    PubMed

    Corcoran, M S; van Well, G T J; van Loo, I H M

    2014-10-01

    Molecular methods such as real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) are rapidly replacing traditional tests to detect fecal viral pathogens in childhood diarrhea. This technique has now increased the analytical sensitivity so drastically that positive results are found in asymptomatic children, leading to complex interpretation of real-time PCR results and difficult distinction between asymptomatic shedding and etiological cause of disease. We performed a review of the literature including pediatric studies using real-time PCR and a minimal inclusion period of one year to exclude bias by seasonality. We searched for studies on rotavirus, norovirus, adenovirus, astrovirus, and sapovirus, known to be the most common viruses to cause gastroenteritis in the pediatric population. For these viruses, we summarized the detection rates in hospitalized and community-based children with clinical symptoms of gastroenteritis, as well as subjects with asymptomatic viral shedding. Moreover, insight is given into the different viral sero- and genotypes causing pediatric gastroenteritis. We also discuss the scoring systems for severity of disease and their clinical value. A few published proposals have been made to improve the clinical interpretation of real-time PCR results, which we recapitulate and discuss in this review. We propose using the semi-quantitative measure of real-time PCR, as a surrogate for viral load, in relation to the severity score to distinguish asymptomatic viral shedding from clinically relevant disease. Overall, this review provides a better understanding of the scope of childhood gastroenteritis, discusses a method to enhance the interpretation of real-time PCR results, and proposes conditions for future research to enhance clinical implementation.

  10. Kinetics of serum and local cytokine profile in experimental intravaginal trichomoniasis induced with Trichomonas vaginalis isolates from symptomatic and asymptomatic women.

    PubMed

    Malla, N; Yadav, M; Gupta, I

    2007-02-01

    Trichomoniasis, the most common non-viral sexually transmitted disease, is caused by infection with the protist Trichomonas vaginalis. The clinical spectrum varies from an asymptomatic to a severe symptomatic state. However, the exact factors leading to varied symptomatology have not been well elucidated. The role of cytokines in the pathogenesis of many microbial diseases has been reported. The present study reports the cytokine levels (IL-2, IL-4, IFN-gamma) on different days post infection (3rd, 7th, 14th, 21st and 28th d.p.i.) in serum and vaginal washes (VWs) of mice infected intravaginally with T. vaginalis isolates from 15 symptomatic and 15 asymptomatic women. Significantly higher production of IL-2 and IFN-gamma was observed on the 3rd to 28th d.p.i., and IL-4 on the 7th to 21st d.p.i., in infected as compared to uninfected mice. A significant increase in cytokine IL-2 and IFN-gamma was observed on the 3rd to 28th d.p.i. in serum and VWs of mice infected with T. vaginalis isolates from asymptomatic as compared to symptomatic women. IL-2 (P < 0.001) and IFN-gamma (P < 0.05) concentrations were significantly higher on the 14th d.p.i. in serum samples as compared to VWs of mice infected with T. vaginalis isolates from asymptomatic and symptomatic women, while no significant difference was observed in IL-4 concentration between the two groups of mice. The study indicates the involvement of a Th-1 (IL-2 and IFN-gamma) like response in mice infected with isolates from asymptomatic women as compared to symptomatic women and suggests that Th-1 type cytokines might be playing a role in maintaining low levels of infection. PMID:17241398

  11. Asymptomatic Effluent Protozoa Colonization in Peritoneal Dialysis Patients.

    PubMed

    Simões-Silva, Liliana; Correia, Inês; Barbosa, Joana; Santos-Araujo, Carla; Sousa, Maria João; Pestana, Manuel; Soares-Silva, Isabel; Sampaio-Maia, Benedita

    Currently, chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a global health problem. Considering the impaired immunity of CKD patients, the relevance of infection in peritoneal dialysis (PD), and the increased prevalence of parasites in CKD patients, protozoa colonization was evaluated in PD effluent from CKD patients undergoing PD. Overnight PD effluent was obtained from 49 asymptomatic stable PD patients. Protozoa analysis was performed microscopically by searching cysts and trophozoites in direct wet mount of PD effluent and after staining smears. Protozoa were found in PD effluent of 10.2% of evaluated PD patients, namely Blastocystis hominis, in 2 patients, and Entamoeba sp., Giardia sp., and Endolimax nana in the other 3 patients, respectively. None of these patients presented clinical signs or symptoms of peritonitis at the time of protozoa screening. Our results demonstrate that PD effluent may be susceptible to asymptomatic protozoa colonization. The clinical impact of this finding should be further investigated. PMID:27659930

  12. Asymptomatic Effluent Protozoa Colonization in Peritoneal Dialysis Patients.

    PubMed

    Simões-Silva, Liliana; Correia, Inês; Barbosa, Joana; Santos-Araujo, Carla; Sousa, Maria João; Pestana, Manuel; Soares-Silva, Isabel; Sampaio-Maia, Benedita

    Currently, chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a global health problem. Considering the impaired immunity of CKD patients, the relevance of infection in peritoneal dialysis (PD), and the increased prevalence of parasites in CKD patients, protozoa colonization was evaluated in PD effluent from CKD patients undergoing PD. Overnight PD effluent was obtained from 49 asymptomatic stable PD patients. Protozoa analysis was performed microscopically by searching cysts and trophozoites in direct wet mount of PD effluent and after staining smears. Protozoa were found in PD effluent of 10.2% of evaluated PD patients, namely Blastocystis hominis, in 2 patients, and Entamoeba sp., Giardia sp., and Endolimax nana in the other 3 patients, respectively. None of these patients presented clinical signs or symptoms of peritonitis at the time of protozoa screening. Our results demonstrate that PD effluent may be susceptible to asymptomatic protozoa colonization. The clinical impact of this finding should be further investigated.

  13. Heterogeneous and Dynamic Prevalence of Asymptomatic Influenza Virus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Furuya-Kanamori, Luis; Cox, Mitchell; Milinovich, Gabriel J.; Magalhaes, Ricardo J. Soares; Mackay, Ian M.

    2016-01-01

    Influenza infection manifests in a wide spectrum of severity, including symptomless pathogen carriers. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of 55 studies to elucidate the proportional representation of these asymptomatic infected persons. We observed extensive heterogeneity among these studies. The prevalence of asymptomatic carriage (total absence of symptoms) ranged from 5.2% to 35.5% and subclinical cases (illness that did not meet the criteria for acute respiratory or influenza-like illness) from 25.4% to 61.8%. Statistical analysis showed that the heterogeneity could not be explained by the type of influenza, the laboratory tests used to detect the virus, the year of the study, or the location of the study. Projections of infection spread and strategies for disease control require that we identify the proportional representation of these insidious spreaders early on in the emergence of new influenza subtypes or strains and track how this rate evolves over time and space. PMID:27191967

  14. Heterogeneous and Dynamic Prevalence of Asymptomatic Influenza Virus Infections.

    PubMed

    Furuya-Kanamori, Luis; Cox, Mitchell; Milinovich, Gabriel J; Magalhaes, Ricardo J Soares; Mackay, Ian M; Yakob, Laith

    2016-06-01

    Influenza infection manifests in a wide spectrum of severity, including symptomless pathogen carriers. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of 55 studies to elucidate the proportional representation of these asymptomatic infected persons. We observed extensive heterogeneity among these studies. The prevalence of asymptomatic carriage (total absence of symptoms) ranged from 5.2% to 35.5% and subclinical cases (illness that did not meet the criteria for acute respiratory or influenza-like illness) from 25.4% to 61.8%. Statistical analysis showed that the heterogeneity could not be explained by the type of influenza, the laboratory tests used to detect the virus, the year of the study, or the location of the study. Projections of infection spread and strategies for disease control require that we identify the proportional representation of these insidious spreaders early on in the emergence of new influenza subtypes or strains and track how this rate evolves over time and space. PMID:27191967

  15. Internal dosimetry of plutonium using the late urinary excretion.

    PubMed

    Sharma, R C; Abani, M C

    2000-10-01

    An attempt has been made to standardize the methodology of internal dose computation from the late urinary excretion data. The methodology was selected keeping in mind the most recent ICRP publications and the results of internal dosimetry intercomparison studies reported in literature. The key element of this methodology is the PC-based computational software LUDEP 2.05, which implements the new model of the human respiratory tract. Late urinary excretion data of three male subjects involved in accidental intakes of plutonium aerosols more than 25 years ago were interpreted in terms of intakes and internal doses with the aid of the standardized methodology. An important implication of this work is that late urinary excretion data of the occupational workers of any plutonium handling facility could be used to show the compliance with the life-time dose limit.

  16. Urinary excretion of methaqualone-N-oxide in man.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, C N; Wilson, K; Burnett, D

    1976-02-01

    1. Oral administration of therapeutic doses (250 mg) of methaqualone (Melsed) to adult human subjects gives rise to the urinary excretion of methaqualone-N-oxide. This metabolite has been identified by chromatography and mass spectrometry and quantitatively determined by reduction with titanium trichloride to methaqualone which was then determined by g.l.c. 2. The N-oxide accounts for 5-9% of the dose in 24 h. 3. 2-Nitrobenzo-o-toluidide, a possible oxidation product of methaqualone-N-oxide, has not been detected. 4. The urinary excretion of unchanged methaqualone is less than 0-3% of the dose. The ease with which methaqualone-N-oxide is thermally converted to methaqualone casts doubts on the previously published figures for the urinary excretion of methaqualone.

  17. Urinary excretion pattern of methaqualone metabolites in man.

    PubMed

    Ericsson, O; Danielsson, B

    1977-01-01

    A method based on selected ion monitoring for determination of five monohydroxy metabolites of methaqualone in urine has been worked out. By means of this method the time course of metabolite excretion was studied in three healthy volunteers receiving an oral therapeutic dose of methaqualone. In all subjects the main monohydroxy metabolite was conjugated 4'-hydroxymethaqualone, but the relative importance of the five metabolites showed intersubject variation. Metabolite excretion was still going on, when urine sampling was discontinued after 70 hr. Only small amounts (less than 1% of the dose during 70 hr) of unmetabolized methaqualone were excreted. On the other hand, it was confirmed that methaqualone-N1-oxide is an important metabolite. The presence of a hydroxy methoxy metabolite of methaqualone, very probably 4'-hydroxy-5'-methoxymethaqualone, as a minor metabolite was established by comparison with authentic, synthetic material. 8-Hydroxymethaqualone and 2-nitrobenz-o-toluidide, reported by other groups, could not be detected.

  18. Quantitation of phosphorus excretion in sheep by compartmental analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, K.M.; Boston, R.C.; Leaver, D.D.

    1987-04-01

    The control of phosphorus excretion in sheep has been examined by constructing a kinetic model that contains a mechanistic set of connections between blood and gastrointestinal tract. The model was developed using experimental data from chaff-fed sheep and gives an accurate description of the absorption and excretion of /sup 32/P phosphorus in feces and urine of the ruminating sheep. These results indicated the main control site for phosphorus excretion in the ruminating sheep was the gastrointestinal tract, whereas for the non-ruminating sheep fed the liquid diet, control was exerted by the kidney. A critical factor in the induction of adaptation of phosphorus reabsorption by the kidney was the reduction in salivation, and since this response occurred independently of marked changes in the delivery of phosphorus to the kidney, a humoral factor may be involved in this communication between salivary gland and kidney.

  19. Is surgery necessary for 'mild' or 'asymptomatic' hyperparathyroidism?

    PubMed

    Niederle, Bruno; Wémeau, Jean-Louis

    2015-09-01

    A large majority of the currently diagnosed patients with hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) are mild or asymptomatic, mainly women after menopause. Following the debate held at the 16th European Congress of Endocrinology in Wroclaw (Poland) from May 3-7, 2014, arguments are here presented by a surgeon and a medical practitioner considering these situations rather have to profit from surgery, or simply from survey. For the trained endocrine surgeon, it is evident that parathyroidectomy confirms the diagnosis and undoubtedly reduces the discomfort felt by certain patients, prevents all risks of complications, removes patients and medical teams from the monitoring and represents a real individual financial benefit. On the other hand, the medical practitioner considers that mild or asymptomatic PHPT is commonly stable, and very rare are the subjects at risk of complications, particularly of fractures; prevention of vascular and metabolic disorders, nephrolithiasis and bone rarefaction justify regular physical exercise, a safe alimentation, a sufficient calcium and high water intake, the correction of the frequent deficit in vitamin D; finally has also to be considered the impossibility to refer to specialized (endocrine) surgeons, the enormous cohort of subjects more than 50 years with 'mild' or 'asymptomatic' PHPT. The surgeon and the medical practitioner agree to consider that in patients with 'mild' or 'asymptomatic' disease, there is no place for medical treatments, in particular calcimimetics and bisphophonates. Both agree that further studies are needed to clarify the long-term prognosis of operated and non-operated PHPT in term of fractures, cardiovascular risk and mortality. Individual and collective cost/benefit ratios of surgery or survey are also still imperfectly evaluated.

  20. Asymptomatic “Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis” Infections in Immunocompetent Humans

    PubMed Central

    Siński, Edward; Kowalec, Maciej; Zajkowska, Joanna; Pancewicz, Sławomir A.

    2014-01-01

    In Europe, human infections with “Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis” have mainly been restricted to immunocompromised patients. We report here the first cases of asymptomatic “Ca. Neoehrlichia mikurensis” infection in immunocompetent humans (5/316 [1.6%] were infected). Due to the potential threats of infections with “Ca. Neoehrlichia mikurensis” in healthy persons to the safety of the blood supply, further study of this phenomenon is required. PMID:24899023

  1. Prevalence and Risk Factors for Asymptomatic Clostridium difficile Carriage

    PubMed Central

    Alasmari, Faisal; Seiler, Sondra M.; Hink, Tiffany; Burnham, Carey-Ann D.; Dubberke, Erik R.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) incidence has increased dramatically over the last decade. Recent studies suggest that asymptomatic carriers may be an important reservoir of C. difficile in healthcare settings. We sought to identify the prevalence and risk factors for asymptomatic C. difficile carriage on admission to the hospital. Methods. Patients admitted to Barnes-Jewish Hospital without diarrhea were enrolled from June 2010 through October 2011. Demographic information and healthcare and medication exposures 90 days prior to admission were collected. Stool specimens or rectal swabs were collected within 48 hours of admission and stored at −30°C until cultured. Clostridium difficile isolates were typed and compared with isolates from patients with CDI. Results. A stool/swab specimen was obtained for 259 enrolled subjects on admission. Two hundred four (79%) were not colonized, 40 (15%) had toxigenic C. difficile (TCD), and 15 (6%) had nontoxigenic C. difficile. There were no differences between TCD-colonized and -uncolonized subjects for age (mean, 56 vs 58 years; P = .46), comorbidities, admission from another healthcare facility (33% vs 24%; P = .23), or recent hospitalization (50% vs 50%; P = .43). There were no differences in antimicrobial exposures in the 90 days prior to admission (55% vs 56%; P = .91). Asymptomatic carriers were colonized with strains similar to strains from patients with CDI, but the relative proportions were different. Conclusions. There was a high prevalence of TCD colonization on admission. In contrast to past studies, TCD colonization was not associated with recent antimicrobial or healthcare exposures. Additional investigation is needed to determine the role of asymptomatic TCD carriers on hospital-onset CDI incidence. PMID:24755858

  2. Asymptomatic "Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis" infections in immunocompetent humans.

    PubMed

    Welc-Falęciak, Renata; Siński, Edward; Kowalec, Maciej; Zajkowska, Joanna; Pancewicz, Sławomir A

    2014-08-01

    In Europe, human infections with "Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis" have mainly been restricted to immunocompromised patients. We report here the first cases of asymptomatic "Ca. Neoehrlichia mikurensis" infection in immunocompetent humans (5/316 [1.6%] were infected). Due to the potential threats of infections with "Ca. Neoehrlichia mikurensis" in healthy persons to the safety of the blood supply, further study of this phenomenon is required. PMID:24899023

  3. Treatment of liver hydatidosis: How to treat an asymptomatic carrier?

    PubMed Central

    Frider, Bernardo; Larrieu, Edmundo

    2010-01-01

    Liver hydatidosis is the most common clinical presentation of cystic echinococcosis (CE). Ultrasonographic mass surveys have demonstrated the true prevalence, including the asymptomatic characteristic of the majority of cases, providing new insight into the natural history of the disease. This raises the question of whether to treat or not to treat these patients, due to the high and unsuspected prevalence of CE. The high rate of liver/lung frequencies of cyst localization, the autopsy findings, and the involution of cysts demonstrated in long time follow-up of asymptomatic carriers contribute to this discussion. The decision to treat an asymptomatic patient by surgery, albendazole, or puncture aspiration injection and reaspiration or to wait and watch, is based on conflicting reports in the literature, the lack of complications in untreated patients over time, and the spontaneous disappearance and involution of cysts. All these points contribute to difficulties of individual clinical decisions. The patients should be informed of the reasons and the risks of watchful/waiting without treatment, the possibility of complications, and the risks of the other options. As more information on the natural history of liver hydatidosis is acquired, selection of the best treatment will be come easier. Without this knowledge it would be very difficult to establish definitive rules of treatment. At present, it is possible to manage these patients over time and to wait for the best moment for treatment. Follow-up studies must be conducted to achieve this objective. PMID:20806427

  4. Asymptomatic spread of huanglongbing and implications for disease control.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jo Ann; Halbert, Susan E; Dawson, William O; Robertson, Cecile J; Keesling, James E; Singer, Burton H

    2015-06-16

    Huanglongbing (HLB) is a bacterial infection of citrus trees transmitted by the Asian citrus psyllid Diaphorina citri. Mitigation of HLB has focused on spraying of insecticides to reduce the psyllid population and removal of trees when they first show symptoms of the disease. These interventions have been only marginally effective, because symptoms of HLB do not appear on leaves for months to years after initial infection. Limited knowledge about disease spread during the asymptomatic phase is exemplified by the heretofore unknown length of time from initial infection of newly developing cluster of young leaves, called flush, by adult psyllids until the flush become infectious. We present experimental evidence showing that young flush become infectious within 15 d after receiving an inoculum of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (bacteria). Using this critical fact, we specify a microsimulation model of asymptomatic disease spread and intensity in a grove of citrus trees. We apply a range of psyllid introduction scenarios to show that entire groves can become infected with up to 12,000 psyllids per tree in less than 1 y, before most of the trees show any symptoms. We also show that intervention strategies that reduce the psyllid population by 75% during the flushing periods can delay infection of a full grove, and thereby reduce the amount of insecticide used throughout a year. This result implies that psyllid surveillance and control, using a variety of recently available technologies, should be used from the initial detection of invasion and throughout the asymptomatic period.

  5. Asymptomatic spread of huanglongbing and implications for disease control

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jo Ann; Halbert, Susan E.; Dawson, William O.; Robertson, Cecile J.; Keesling, James E.; Singer, Burton H.

    2015-01-01

    Huanglongbing (HLB) is a bacterial infection of citrus trees transmitted by the Asian citrus psyllid Diaphorina citri. Mitigation of HLB has focused on spraying of insecticides to reduce the psyllid population and removal of trees when they first show symptoms of the disease. These interventions have been only marginally effective, because symptoms of HLB do not appear on leaves for months to years after initial infection. Limited knowledge about disease spread during the asymptomatic phase is exemplified by the heretofore unknown length of time from initial infection of newly developing cluster of young leaves, called flush, by adult psyllids until the flush become infectious. We present experimental evidence showing that young flush become infectious within 15 d after receiving an inoculum of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (bacteria). Using this critical fact, we specify a microsimulation model of asymptomatic disease spread and intensity in a grove of citrus trees. We apply a range of psyllid introduction scenarios to show that entire groves can become infected with up to 12,000 psyllids per tree in less than 1 y, before most of the trees show any symptoms. We also show that intervention strategies that reduce the psyllid population by 75% during the flushing periods can delay infection of a full grove, and thereby reduce the amount of insecticide used throughout a year. This result implies that psyllid surveillance and control, using a variety of recently available technologies, should be used from the initial detection of invasion and throughout the asymptomatic period. PMID:26034273

  6. Asymptomatic spread of huanglongbing and implications for disease control.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jo Ann; Halbert, Susan E; Dawson, William O; Robertson, Cecile J; Keesling, James E; Singer, Burton H

    2015-06-16

    Huanglongbing (HLB) is a bacterial infection of citrus trees transmitted by the Asian citrus psyllid Diaphorina citri. Mitigation of HLB has focused on spraying of insecticides to reduce the psyllid population and removal of trees when they first show symptoms of the disease. These interventions have been only marginally effective, because symptoms of HLB do not appear on leaves for months to years after initial infection. Limited knowledge about disease spread during the asymptomatic phase is exemplified by the heretofore unknown length of time from initial infection of newly developing cluster of young leaves, called flush, by adult psyllids until the flush become infectious. We present experimental evidence showing that young flush become infectious within 15 d after receiving an inoculum of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (bacteria). Using this critical fact, we specify a microsimulation model of asymptomatic disease spread and intensity in a grove of citrus trees. We apply a range of psyllid introduction scenarios to show that entire groves can become infected with up to 12,000 psyllids per tree in less than 1 y, before most of the trees show any symptoms. We also show that intervention strategies that reduce the psyllid population by 75% during the flushing periods can delay infection of a full grove, and thereby reduce the amount of insecticide used throughout a year. This result implies that psyllid surveillance and control, using a variety of recently available technologies, should be used from the initial detection of invasion and throughout the asymptomatic period. PMID:26034273

  7. Management of early asymptomatic gastrointestinal stromal tumors of the stomach

    PubMed Central

    Scherübl, Hans; Faiss, Siegbert; Knoefel, Wolfram-Trudo; Wardelmann, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) are the most common mesenchymal tumors of the digestive tract. Approximately two thirds of clinically manifest tumors occur in the stomach, nearly one third in the small bowel, and the rest in the colorectal region with a few cases in the esophagus. GIST originate within the smooth muscle layer in the wall of the tubular gastrointestinal tract and grow mostly toward the serosa, far less often toward the mucosa. In the latter case, ulceration may develop and can cause gastrointestinal bleeding as the cardinal symptom. However, most GIST of the stomach are asymptomatic. They are increasingly detected incidentally as small intramural or submucosal tumors during endoscopy and particularly during endoscopic ultrasound. Epidemiological and molecular genetic findings suggest that early asymptomatic GIST of the stomach (< 1 cm) show self-limiting tumorigenesis. Thus, early (< 1 cm) asymptomatic gastric GIST (synonym: micro-GIST) are found in 20%-30% of the elderly. The mostly elderly people with early gastric GIST have an excellent GIST-specific prognosis. Patients with early GIST of the stomach can therefore be managed by endoscopic surveillance. PMID:25031785

  8. Dynamics of renal electrolyte excretion in growing mice.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Katharina; Ripper, Maria; Tegtmeier, Ines; Humberg, Evelyn; Sterner, Christina; Reichold, Markus; Warth, Richard; Bandulik, Sascha

    2013-01-01

    Genetically modified mice represent important models for elucidating renal pathophysiology, but gene deletions frequently cause severe failure to thrive. In such cases, the analysis of the phenotype is often limited to the first weeks of life when renal excretory function undergoes dramatic physiological changes. Here, we investigated the postnatal dynamics of urinary ion excretion in mice. The profiles of urinary electrolyte excretion of mice were examined from birth until after weaning using an automated ion chromatography system. Postnatally, mice grew about 0.4 g/day, except during two phases with slower weight gain: (i) directly after birth during adaptation to extrauterine conditions (P0-P2) and (ii) during the weaning period (P15-P21), when nutrition changed from mother's milk to solid chow and water. During the first 3 days after birth, remarkable changes in urinary Na(+), Ca(2+), Mg(2+), and phosphate concentrations occurred, whereas K(+) and Cl(-) concentrations hardly changed. From days 4-14 after birth, Na(+), Ca(2+), Mg(2+), K(+), and Cl(-) concentrations remained relatively stable at low levels. Urinary concentrations of creatinine, NH4(+), phosphate, and sulfate constantly increased from birth until after weaning. Profiles of salt excretion in KCNJ10(-/-) mice exemplified the relevance of age-dependent analysis of urinary excretion. In conclusion, the most critical phases for analysis of renal ion excretion during the first weeks of life are directly after birth and during the weaning period. The age dependence of urinary excretion varies for the different ions. This should be taken into consideration when the renal phenotype of mice is investigated during the first weeks of life. PMID:24296675

  9. Detection of elephant endotheliotropic herpesvirus type 1 in asymptomatic elephants using TaqMan real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Hardman, K; Dastjerdi, A; Gurrala, R; Routh, A; Banks, M; Steinbach, F; Bouts, T

    2012-02-25

    This study assessed the feasibility of identifying asymptomatic viral shedders using a novel TaqMan real-time PCR on trunk washes and swabs from the conjunctiva, palate and vulva of elephants. Six elephants from a UK collection were sampled weekly over a period of 11 weeks for this study. The herd prevalence of elephant endotheliotropic herpesvirus-1 (EEHV-1) was 100 per cent by PCR. The virus DNA was detected in all the sampling sites; however, the prevalence of virus DNA in the conjunctiva swabs was higher. In addition, Asian elephants from two continental European collections were sampled once and one animal tested positive on a trunk wash. The virus from this animal was phylogenetically typed as EEHV-1A based on 231 nucleotides of the terminase gene.

  10. Conservation of the fourth gene among rotaviruses recovered from asymptomatic newborn infants and its possible role in attenuation

    SciTech Connect

    Flores, J.; Midthun, K.; Hoshino, Y.; Green, K.; Gorziglia, M.; Kapikian, A.Z.; Chanock, R.M.

    1986-11-01

    RNA-RNA hybridization was performed to assess the extent of genetic relatedness among human rotaviruses isolated from children with gastroenteritis and from asymptomatic newborn infants. /sup 32/P-labeled single-stranded RNAs produced by in vitro transcription from viral cores of the different strains tested were used as probes in two different hybridization assays: (1) undenatured genomic RNAs were resolved by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, denatured in situ, electrophoretically transferred to diazobenzyloxymethyl-paper (Northern blots), and then hybridized to the probes under two different conditions of stringency; and (ii) denatured genomic double-stranded RNAs were hybridized to the probes in solution and the hybrids which formed were identified by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. When analyzed by Northern blot hybridization at a low level of stringency, all genes from the strains tested cross-hybridized, providing evidence for some sequence homology in each of the corresponding genes. However, when hybridization stringency was increased, a difference in gene 4 sequence was detected between strains recovered from asymptomatic newborn infants (nursery strains) and strains recovered from infants and young children with diarrhea. Although the nursery strains exhibited serotypic diversity, the fourth gene appeared to be highly conversed. These results were confirmed and extended during experiments in which the RNA-RNA hybridization was carried out in solution and the resulting hybrids were analyzed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Full-length hybrids did not form between the fourth genes from the nursery strains and the corresponding genes from the strains recovered from symptomatic infants and young children.

  11. Combating emerging viral threats

    PubMed Central

    Bekerman, Elena; Einav, Shirit

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Most approved antiviral therapeutics selectively inhibit proteins encoded by a single virus, thereby providing a “one drug-one bug” solution. As a result of this narrow spectrum of coverage and the high cost of drug development, therapies are currently approved for fewer than ten viruses out of the hundreds known to cause human disease. This perspective summarizes progress and challenges in the development of broad-spectrum antiviral therapies. These strategies include targeting enzymatic functions shared by multiple viruses and host cell machinery by newly discovered compounds or by repurposing approved drugs. These approaches offer new practical means for developing therapeutics against existing and emerging viral threats. PMID:25883340

  12. Viral complement regulatory proteins.

    PubMed

    Rosengard, A M; Ahearn, J M

    1999-05-01

    The inactivation of complement provides cells and tissues critical protection from complement-mediated attack and decreases the associated recruitment of other inflammatory mediators. In an attempt to evade the host immune response, viruses have evolved two mechanisms to acquire complement regulatory proteins. They can directly seize the host cell complement regulators onto their outer envelope and/or they can produce their own proteins which are either secreted into the neighboring intercellular space or expressed as membrane-bound proteins on the infected host cell. The following review will concentrate on the viral homologues of the mammalian complement regulatory proteins, specifically those containing complement control protein (CCP) repeats. PMID:10408371

  13. [Viral exanthematic childhood diseases].

    PubMed

    Allwinn, R; Doerr, H W

    1997-01-01

    Exanthem is defined as multiple, inflammatory skin alteration with a hematogenic, lymphogenic or neurogenic origin. Typically, so called exanthematic children's diseases are measles, mumps, rubella, varicella, erythema infectiosum (fifth disease) and in the past small pox. The pathogenesis of the viral-caused diseases primarily occurs in the vascular connective tissue. The cytopathogenetic effects result in inflammatory tissue reactions with activation of defence mechanism and producing of immune complexes. First symptoms are hyperemia, edema and inflammatory infiltrates with itchy swellings. Virological laboratory diagnosis are necessary especially for the progress of atypical infectious diseases, for persons with immunological or chronical illness and under chemotherapeutical or immunosuppressival treatment.

  14. Viral surveillance and discovery

    PubMed Central

    Lipkin, Walter Ian; Firth, Cadhla

    2014-01-01

    The field of virus discovery has burgeoned with the advent of high throughput sequencing platforms and bioinformatics programs that enable rapid identification and molecular characterization of known and novel agents, investments in global microbial surveillance that include wildlife and domestic animals as well as humans, and recognition that viruses may be implicated in chronic as well as acute diseases. Here we review methods for viral surveillance and discovery, strategies and pitfalls in linking discoveries to disease, and identify opportunities for improvements in sequencing instrumentation and analysis, the use of social media and medical informatics that will further advance clinical medicine and public health. PMID:23602435

  15. Equine viral arteritis.

    PubMed

    Balasuriya, Udeni B R

    2014-12-01

    Equine arteritis virus (EAV), the causative agent of equine viral arteritis (EVA), is a respiratory and reproductive disease that occurs throughout the world. EAV infection is highly species-specific and exclusively limited to members of the family Equidae, which includes horses, donkeys, mules, and zebras. EVA is an economically important disease and outbreaks could cause significant losses to the equine industry. The primary objective of this article is to summarize current understanding of EVA, specifically the disease, pathogenesis, epidemiology, host immune response, vaccination and treatment strategies, prevention and control measures, and future directions.

  16. Identifying predictors of time-inhomogeneous viral evolutionary processes

    PubMed Central

    Bielejec, Filip; Baele, Guy; Rodrigo, Allen G.; Suchard, Marc A.; Lemey, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Various factors determine the rate at which mutations are generated and fixed in viral genomes. Viral evolutionary rates may vary over the course of a single persistent infection and can reflect changes in replication rates and selective dynamics. Dedicated statistical inference approaches are required to understand how the complex interplay of these processes shapes the genetic diversity and divergence in viral populations. Although evolutionary models accommodating a high degree of complexity can now be formalized, adequately informing these models by potentially sparse data, and assessing the association of the resulting estimates with external predictors, remains a major challenge. In this article, we present a novel Bayesian evolutionary inference method, which integrates multiple potential predictors and tests their association with variation in the absolute rates of synonymous and non-synonymous substitutions along the evolutionary history. We consider clinical and virological measures as predictors, but also changes in population size trajectories that are simultaneously inferred using coalescent modelling. We demonstrate the potential of our method in an application to within-host HIV-1 sequence data sampled throughout the infection of multiple patients. While analyses of individual patient populations lack statistical power, we detect significant evidence for an abrupt drop in non-synonymous rates in late stage infection and a more gradual increase in synonymous rates over the course of infection in a joint analysis across all patients. The former is predicted by the immune relaxation hypothesis while the latter may be in line with increasing replicative fitness during the asymptomatic stage. PMID:27774306

  17. Polyomavirus JCV excretion and genotype analysis in HIV-infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lednicky, John A.; Vilchez, Regis A.; Keitel, Wendy A.; Visnegarwala, Fehmida; White, Zoe S.; Kozinetz, Claudia A.; Lewis, Dorothy E.; Butel, Janet S.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the frequency of shedding of polyomavirus JC virus (JCV) genotypes in urine of HIV-infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). METHODS: Single samples of urine and blood were collected prospectively from 70 adult HIV-infected patients and 68 uninfected volunteers. Inclusion criteria for HIV-infected patients included an HIV RNA viral load < 1000 copies, CD4 cell count of 200-700 x 106 cells/l, and stable HAART regimen. PCR assays and sequence analysis were carried out using JCV-specific primers against different regions of the virus genome. RESULTS: JCV excretion in urine was more common in HIV-positive patients but not significantly different from that of the HIV-negative group [22/70 (31%) versus 13/68 (19%); P = 0.09]. HIV-positive patients lost the age-related pattern of JCV shedding (P = 0.13) displayed by uninfected subjects (P = 0.01). Among HIV-infected patients significant differences in JCV shedding were related to CD4 cell counts (P = 0.03). Sequence analysis of the JCV regulatory region from both HIV-infected patients and uninfected volunteers revealed all to be JCV archetypal strains. JCV genotypes 1 (36%) and 4 (36%) were the most common among HIV-infected patients, whereas type 2 (77%) was the most frequently detected among HIV-uninfected volunteers. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that JCV shedding is enhanced by modest depressions in immune function during HIV infection. JCV shedding occurred in younger HIV-positive persons than in the healthy controls. As the common types of JCV excreted varied among ethnic groups, JCV genotypes associated with progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy may reflect demographics of those infected patient populations.

  18. Human viral gastroenteritis.

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, M L

    1989-01-01

    During the last 15 years, several different groups of fastidious viruses that are responsible for a large proportion of acute viral gastroenteritis cases have been discovered by the electron microscopic examination of stool specimens. This disease is one of the most prevalent and serious clinical syndromes seen around the world, especially in children. Rotaviruses, in the family Reoviridae, and fastidious fecal adenoviruses account for much of the viral gastroenteritis in infants and young children, whereas the small caliciviruses and unclassified astroviruses, and possibly enteric coronaviruses, are responsible for significantly fewer cases overall. In addition to electron microscopy, enzyme immunoassays and other rapid antigen detection systems have been developed to detect rotaviruses and fastidious fecal adenoviruses in the stool specimens of both nonhospitalized patients and those hospitalized for dehydration and electrolyte imbalance. Experimental rotavirus vaccines have also been developed, due to the prevalence and seriousness of rotavirus infection. The small, unclassified Norwalk virus and morphologically similar viruses are responsible for large and small outbreaks of acute gastroenteritis in older children, adolescents, and adults. Hospitalization of older patients infected with these viruses is usually not required, and their laboratory diagnoses have been limited primarily to research laboratories. Images PMID:2644024

  19. [Emergent viral infections].

    PubMed

    Galama, J M

    2001-03-31

    The emergence and re-emergence of viral infections is an ongoing process. Large-scale vaccination programmes led to the eradication or control of some viral infections in the last century, but new viruses are always emerging. Increased travel is leading to a rise in the importation of exotic infections such as dengue and hepatitis E, but also of hepatitis A, which is no longer endemic. Apart from import diseases new viruses have appeared (Nipah-virus and transfusion-transmitted virus). Existing viruses may suddenly cause more severe diseases, e.g. infection by enterovirus 71. The distribution area of a virus may change, e.g. in case of West Nile virus, an Egyptian encephalitis virus that appears to have established itself in the USA. Furthermore, there is no such thing as a completely new virus; it is always an existing virus that has adapted itself to another host or that was already present in humans but has only recently been discovered. A number of factors facilitate the emergence of new infectious diseases. These include intensive animal husbandry and the transport of animals. The unexpected appearance of West Nile virus in the western hemisphere was possibly due to animal transportation.

  20. Viral noncoding RNAs: more surprises

    PubMed Central

    Tycowski, Kazimierz T.; Guo, Yang Eric; Lee, Nara; Moss, Walter N.; Vallery, Tenaya K.; Xie, Mingyi

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells produce several classes of long and small noncoding RNA (ncRNA). Many DNA and RNA viruses synthesize their own ncRNAs. Like their host counterparts, viral ncRNAs associate with proteins that are essential for their stability, function, or both. Diverse biological roles—including the regulation of viral replication, viral persistence, host immune evasion, and cellular transformation—have been ascribed to viral ncRNAs. In this review, we focus on the multitude of functions played by ncRNAs produced by animal viruses. We also discuss their biogenesis and mechanisms of action. PMID:25792595

  1. Aztreonam biliary excretion in bile duct ligated jaundiced rats.

    PubMed

    Rulli, F; Muzi, M; Zanella, E; Cipriani, P; Magni, A; Giordano, A; Filadoro, F

    1991-04-01

    An experimental study was undertaken to assess aztreonam biliary concentrations in bile duct ligated jaundiced rats. The study proved that aztreonam biliary concentrations are sufficient to inhibit Gram-negative bacteria within the first and the second hour after antibiotic administration. The experimental model suggests that clinical conditions such as lithiasis or neoplasms of the biliary tree should not totally inhibit the antibiotic excretion.

  2. Predicting nitrogen excretion in commercial grazing system dairy farms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Improving nitrogen (N) management on dairy farms is best facilitated through management of dairy cow feed N intakes (NI), due to strong associations between NI, feed N use efficiencies (NUE, proportion of NI secreted as milk N) and manure N excretion (Nex). Milk urea N (MUN) has also been used as an...

  3. Excretion of intracorporeal cadmium with S-benzoylthiamin monophosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, J.; Kaneda, Y.

    1995-05-01

    Examination was made of the excretion of intracorporeal methylmercury into body hair by the administration of thiamin tetrahydrofurfuryl disulfide (TTFD) which caused significant increase in mercury content in human mustache. The thiamin derivative, S-benzoylthiamin monophosphate (BTMP) failed to have such effect. The mechanism of mercury excretion is thus based on the side chain structure of TTFD, mercaptan. At the start of the 20th century in Japan, many multiparae were found to have itai-itai disease, the main symptom of which is general pain. The cause of this disease was considered cadmium deposition on the bone from sourced such as soil and river water which contaminated rice and cereals. The previous system for mercury was applied based on cadmium content variation in human mustache. Although TTFD worked well in the mercury excretion system, the usual dosage of TTFD administered orally did not cause significant increase in cadmium in the mustache. BTMP appeared to exert effect by generating thiol-type thiamin. Experiments in vitro should be conducted to demonstrate the chelating effects of thiol-type thiamin. It is quite important to find evidence for cadmium excretion from human body. 3 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. INFLUENCE OF DIETARY ARSENIC ON URINARY ARSENIC METABOLITE EXCRETION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Influence of Dietary Arsenic on Urinary Arsenic Metabolite Excretion

    Cara L. Carty, M.S., Edward E. Hudgens, B.Sc., Rebecca L. Calderon, Ph.D., M.S.P.H., Richard Kwok, M.S.P.H., Epidemiology and Biomarkers Branch/HSD, NHEERL/US EPA; David J. Thomas, Ph.D., Pharmacokinetics...

  5. Renal Regulation of Acid-Base Balance: Ammonia Excretion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanner, George A.

    1984-01-01

    Describes an experiment which demonstrates changes in ammonia excretion and urine pH that occur in response to metabolic acidosis (induced by ammonium chloride ingestion) or metabolic alkalosis (produced by sodium bicarbonate ingestion). List of materials needed and background information are included. Typical results are provided and discussed.…

  6. Urinary Calcium Excretion After Immobilization and Spinal Fusion in Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Millard, F. J. C.; Nassim, J. R.; Woollen, J. W.

    1970-01-01

    The effect of prolonged immobilization and spinal fusion on the urinary calcium excretion of adolescents is described. Some patients developed severe hypercalcuria, but there was considerable individual variation. No significant difference was found between the sexes nor between patients with scoliosis due to muscle weakness and idiopathic scoliosis. PMID:5427856

  7. Increased leukotriene E4 excretion in systemic mastocytosis.

    PubMed

    Butterfield, Joseph H

    2010-06-01

    Cysteinyl leukotrienes such as LTE(4) are produced by mast cells, neutrophils, eosinophils, and macrophages. LTE(4) levels have not been reported in systemic mastocytosis, a disorder with a large increase in mast cell numbers. Urinary LTE(4) from patients referred for symptoms potentially due to mast cell degranulation or systemic mastocytosis was measured by a commercial cysteinyl leukotriene enzyme immunoassay kit. The diagnosis of systemic mastocytosis was established using current World Health Organization criteria. Compared with a control group of patients with various potential mast cell-related symptoms (e.g., "spells"), patients with systemic mastocytosis had a significant (P=.01) increase in urinary LTE(4) excretion, whether expressed as LTE(4) ng/g creatinine or as LTE(4) ng/24h. There was a moderate correlation of LTE(4) ng/24h with excretion of N-methyl histamine and serum tryptase but not with urinary 11beta-prostaglandin F(2alpha) (11beta-PGF(2alpha)) excretion. LTE(4) excretion is increased in patients with systemic mastocytosis and potentially contributes to clinical symptoms.

  8. Urinary Albumin Excretion and Vascular Function in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Pieringer, Herwig; Brummaier, Tobias; Piringer, Bettina; Auer-Hackenberg, Lorenz; Hartl, Andreas; Puchner, Rudolf; Pohanka, Erich; Schmid, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is associated with significant cardiovascular (CV) morbidity and mortality. Increased urinary albumin excretion is a marker of CV risk. There are only few data on urinary albumin excretion in RA patients. Aim of the present study was to investigate urinary albumin excretion in RA patients and analyze, whether there is an association between urinary albumin excretion and vascular function as measured by the augmentation index (AIx). In a total of 341 participants (215 with RA, 126 without RA) urinary albumin-creatinine ratio (ACR) was determined and the AIx was measured. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov-test was used to cluster patient groups whose distributions of ACR can be considered to be equal. A crude analysis showed a median ACR of 6.6 mg/g in the RA group and 5.7 mg/g in patients without RA (P > 0.05). In order to account for diabetes (DM) we formed 4 distinct patient groups. Group 1: RA-/DM- (n = 74); group 2: RA+/DM- (n = 195); group 3: RA-/DM+ (n = 52); group 4: RA+/DM+ (n = 20). Clustering of these groups revealed two distinct patient groups: those without RA and DM, and those with either RA or DM or both. The latter group showed statistically significant higher ACR (median 8.1 mg/g) as the former (median 4.5 mg/g). We found no significant correlation between AIx and ACR. Urinary albumin excretion in patients with RA or DM or both is higher than in subjects without RA and DM. This can be seen as a sign of vascular alteration and increased CV risk in these patients. PMID:26955238

  9. Effect of diethyl ether on the biliary excretion of acetaminophen.

    PubMed

    Watkins, J B; Siegers, C P; Klaassen, C D

    1984-10-01

    The biliary and renal excretion of acetaminophen and its metabolites over 8 hr was determined in rats exposed to diethyl ether by inhalation for 1 hr. Additional rats were anesthetized with urethane (1 g/kg ip) while control animals were conscious throughout the experiment (surgery was performed under hexobarbital narcosis: 150 mg/kg ip; 30-min duration). The concentration of UDP-glucuronic acid was decreased 80% in livers from ether-anesthetized rats but was not reduced in urethane-treated animals when compared to that in control rats. The concentration of reduced glutathione was not affected by either urethane or diethyl ether. Basal bile flow was not altered by the anesthetic agents. Bile flow rate after acetaminophen injection (100 mg/kg iv) was increased slightly over basal levels for 2 hr in hexobarbital-treated control rats, was unaltered in urethane-anesthetized animals, and was decreased throughout the 8-hr experiment in rats exposed to diethyl ether for 1 hr. In control and urethane-anesthetized animals, approximately 30-35% of the total acetaminophen dose (100 mg/kg iv) was excreted into bile in 8 hr, while only 16% was excreted in rats anesthetized with diethyl ether. Urinary elimination (60-70% of the dose) was not altered by exposure to ether. Separation of metabolites by reverse-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography showed that ether decreased the biliary elimination of unchanged acetaminophen and its glucuronide, sulfate, and glutathione conjugates by 47, 40, 49, and 73%, respectively, as compared to control rats. Excretion of unchanged acetaminophen and the glutathione conjugate into bile was depressed in urethane-anesthetized animals by 45 and 66%, respectively, whereas elimination of the glucuronide and sulfate conjugates was increased by 27 and 50%, respectively. These results indicate that biliary excretion is influenced by the anesthetic agent and that diethyl ether depresses conjugation with sulfate and glutathione as well as glucuronic

  10. Racial differences in microalbumin excretion in healthy adolescents.

    PubMed

    Hanevold, Coral D; Pollock, Jennifer S; Harshfield, Gregory A

    2008-02-01

    It has been suggested that "normal" levels of urine albumin excretion rate (AER) may be predictive of an increased risk for progression of hypertension, cardiovascular morbidity, and mortality. No data are available on the effect of race and gender on AER in normal youth. We evaluated AER in timed urine samples in subjects participating in a study of stress-induced pressure natriuresis. A total of 317 healthy, normotensive adolescents aged 15 to 18 years (155 males and 162 females; 216 blacks and 101 whites) participated in a 5-hour testing protocol, which included a 1-hour period of mental stress preceded and followed by a 2-hour rest period. AER (micrograms per minute) was determined after 60 minutes of rest, and log transformation was used to normalize the data. AER was significantly higher in blacks as compared with whites (P=0.006). We also found a race-by-sex interaction, which was driven by the low albumin excretion in white females (P=0.036). Indexing urine albumin to creatinine excretion revealed the same pattern. Among blacks, AER was also higher in subjects who demonstrated impaired stress-induced pressure natriuresis versus those with normal sodium excretion (P=0.024). AER was related to blood pressure only in African-American males. The relative elevation of AER in normotensive black adolescents and the association with impaired pressure natriuresis and blood pressure is noteworthy. These findings suggest that albumin excretion may be a marker for a population at increased risk for the development of vascular and renal injury even before the manifestation of hypertension. PMID:18172060

  11. Elevated urinary excretion of aluminium and iron in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Exley, Christopher; Mamutse, Godwin; Korchazhkina, Olga; Pye, Eleanor; Strekopytov, Stanislav; Polwart, Anthony; Hawkins, Clive

    2006-10-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic, immune-mediated, demyelinating disease of the central nervous system of as yet unknown aetiology. A consensus of opinion has suggested that the disorder is the result of an interplay between environmental factors and susceptibility genes. We have used a battery of analytical techniques to determine if the urinary excretion of i) markers of oxidative damage; ii) iron and iii) the environmental toxin aluminium and its antagonist, silicon, are altered in relapsing-remitting (RRMS) and secondary progressive MS (SPMS). Urinary concentrations of oxidative biomarkers, MDA and TBARS, were not found to be useful indicators of inflammatory disease in MS. However, urinary concentrations of another potential marker for inflammation and oxidative stress, iron, were significantly increased in SPMS (P<0.01) and insignificantly increased in RRMS (P>0.05). Urinary concentrations of aluminium were also significantly increased in RRMS (P<0.001) and SPMS (P <0.05) such that the levels of aluminium excretion in the former were similar to those observed in individuals undergoing metal chelation therapy. The excretion of silicon was lower in MS and significantly so in SPMS (P<0.05). Increased excretion of iron in urine supported a role for iron dysmetabolism in MS. Levels of urinary aluminium excretion similar to those seen in aluminium intoxication suggested that aluminium may be a hitherto unrecognized environmental factor associated with the aetiology of MS. If aluminium is involved in MS then an increased dietary intake of its natural antagonist, silicon, might be a therapeutic option.

  12. Increased Renal Solute Excretion in Rats Following Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wade, Charles E.; Moore, A. L.; Morey-Holton, E.

    1995-01-01

    Following space flight a diuresis, due to an increase in free water clearance, has been suggested in humans. To assess the effects of space flight on renal function, rats were flown in space for 14 days. Rats were divided into three groups; vivarium controls (V;n=6; housed 2/shoe box cage), flight controls (FC;n=6; group housed in a flight cage), and flight animals (F;n=6). Upon landing all animals were placed into individual metabolic cages. Urine was collected daily for 7 days and every other day for 14 days. Urine output was increased (p less than 0.05; ANOVA) following flight for 3 days. On postflight day 1, flow rates were, V=6.8 plus or minus 0.9, FC=8.711.8 and F=16.6 plus or minus 2.7 microliter/min. Excretion rates of Na+ and K+ were increased, resulting in an increased osmotic excretion rate (V=7.9 plus or minus 0.9, FC=6.1 plus or minus 0.7 and F=13.5 plus or minus 0.7 uOsm/min). Creatinine excretion rate was increased over the first two postflight days. In the absence of changes in plasma creatinine, Na+, or K+ (samples obtained immediately post flight from similar rats compared to Day 14), GFR was increased following space flight. The increased excretion of solute was thus the result of increased delivery and decreased reabsorption. Osmotic clearance was increased (V=28, FC=27 and F=51 microliter/min), while free water clearance was decreased post flight (V=-21,FC=-18 and F=-34 microliter/min). In rats, the postflight diuresis is the result of an increase in solute (osmotic) excretion with an accompanying reduction in free water clearance.

  13. Impairment of renal sodium excretion in tropical residents - phenomenological analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arthur, S. K.; Aryee, P. A.; Amuasi, J.; Hesse, I. F. A.; Affram, R. K.

    There is evidence of impaired renal sodium excretion in salt-sensitive African Blacks. A decreased rate of renal sodium chloride (NaCl) excretion, low plasma renin activity and a tendency to elevated blood pressure are the hallmarks of salt sensitivity. Recent evidence indicates that increased proximal and distal tubular fluid reabsorption in some tropical residents may explain the impaired sodium excretion in these people. In this study of a cohort population, we speculated that subjects selected from that population might be salt-sensitive. We therefore measured the sodium balance in 10 normotensive male subjects over 10 consecutive days, after they had ingested a normal or a high amount of sodium, as NaCl (salt) in their diet. We quantified their renal sodium excretion rate by phenomenological analysis of their sodium balance data. We also measured plasma renin activity for 7 consecutive days in a separate group of 6 male and 4 female subjects in order to assess the state of their renin/angiotensin system. We selected all our subjects from a cohort population of 269 subjects randomly selected from a community known to have a high prevalence of primary hypertension. Our data on two separate groups of subjects from the same cohort population revealed delayed renal sodium excretion with t1/2 of about 5 days, compared to published data for normal individuals with t1/2 of less than 24 h. Also, plasma renin activity levels were low. Hence, our subjects are salt-sensitive. Quantification of their renal impairment is important for various reasons: it heightens one's appreciation of the problem of salt retention in African Blacks who are salt-sensitive and it also underlines the importance of the need for further research into the benefits of dietary salt restriction for reducing cardiovascular mortality in African populations, as has been done in some Western countries.

  14. Urinary Albumin Excretion and Vascular Function in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is associated with significant cardiovascular (CV) morbidity and mortality. Increased urinary albumin excretion is a marker of CV risk. There are only few data on urinary albumin excretion in RA patients. Aim of the present study was to investigate urinary albumin excretion in RA patients and analyze, whether there is an association between urinary albumin excretion and vascular function as measured by the augmentation index (AIx). In a total of 341 participants (215 with RA, 126 without RA) urinary albumin-creatinine ratio (ACR) was determined and the AIx was measured. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov-test was used to cluster patient groups whose distributions of ACR can be considered to be equal. A crude analysis showed a median ACR of 6.6 mg/g in the RA group and 5.7 mg/g in patients without RA (P > 0.05). In order to account for diabetes (DM) we formed 4 distinct patient groups. Group 1: RA-/DM- (n = 74); group 2: RA+/DM- (n = 195); group 3: RA-/DM+ (n = 52); group 4: RA+/DM+ (n = 20). Clustering of these groups revealed two distinct patient groups: those without RA and DM, and those with either RA or DM or both. The latter group showed statistically significant higher ACR (median 8.1 mg/g) as the former (median 4.5 mg/g). We found no significant correlation between AIx and ACR. Urinary albumin excretion in patients with RA or DM or both is higher than in subjects without RA and DM. This can be seen as a sign of vascular alteration and increased CV risk in these patients. PMID:26955238

  15. Presence of viral nucleic acids in the middle ear: acute otitis media pathogen or bystander?

    PubMed

    Chonmaitree, Tasnee; Ruohola, Aino; Hendley, J Owen

    2012-04-01

    Viruses play an important role in acute otitis media (AOM) pathogenesis, and live viruses may cause AOM in the absence of pathogenic bacteria. Detection of AOM pathogens generally relies on bacterial culture of middle ear fluid. When viral culture is used and live viruses are detected in the middle ear fluid of children with AOM, the viruses are generally accepted as AOM pathogens. Because viral culture is not sensitive and does not detect the comprehensive spectrum of respiratory viruses, polymerase chain reaction assays are commonly used to detect viral nucleic acids in the middle ear fluid. Although polymerase chain reaction assays have greatly increased the viral detection rate, new questions arise on the significance of viral nucleic acids detected in the middle ear because nucleic acids of multiple viruses are detected simultaneously, and nucleic acids of specific viruses are detected repeatedly and in a high proportion of asymptomatic children. This article first reviews the role of live viruses in AOM and presents the point-counterpoint arguments on whether viral nucleic acids in the middle ear represent an AOM pathogen or a bystander status. Although there is evidence to support both directions, helpful information for interpretation of the data and future research direction is outlined.

  16. [Update chronic viral hepatitis].

    PubMed

    Ziegenhagen, D J

    2016-03-01

    More than 500,000 people in Germany have chronic viral hepatitis. The interferon-based treatments formerly used in hepatitis B have been widely replaced by life-long oral medication with nucleoside or nucleotide analogues. Treatment for chronic hepatitis C has been improved substantially by the development of new and very expensive drug combinations. Up to 90% of patients can now be cured with certainty, and one to two years after successful treatment there is no relevant risk of recurrence. These individuals expect to receive insurance cover under appropriate conditions. Vaccination programmes are very efficient at decreasing the incidence of hepatitis B, but no vaccine against hepatitis C is likely to become available in the next decade. PMID:27111951

  17. Viral quasispecies evolution.

    PubMed

    Domingo, Esteban; Sheldon, Julie; Perales, Celia

    2012-06-01

    Evolution of RNA viruses occurs through disequilibria of collections of closely related mutant spectra or mutant clouds termed viral quasispecies. Here we review the origin of the quasispecies concept and some biological implications of quasispecies dynamics. Two main aspects are addressed: (i) mutant clouds as reservoirs of phenotypic variants for virus adaptability and (ii) the internal interactions that are established within mutant spectra that render a virus ensemble the unit of selection. The understanding of viruses as quasispecies has led to new antiviral designs, such as lethal mutagenesis, whose aim is to drive viruses toward low fitness values with limited chances of fitness recovery. The impact of quasispecies for three salient human pathogens, human immunodeficiency virus and the hepatitis B and C viruses, is reviewed, with emphasis on antiviral treatment strategies. Finally, extensions of quasispecies to nonviral systems are briefly mentioned to emphasize the broad applicability of quasispecies theory.

  18. Viral Quasispecies Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Sheldon, Julie; Perales, Celia

    2012-01-01

    Summary: Evolution of RNA viruses occurs through disequilibria of collections of closely related mutant spectra or mutant clouds termed viral quasispecies. Here we review the origin of the quasispecies concept and some biological implications of quasispecies dynamics. Two main aspects are addressed: (i) mutant clouds as reservoirs of phenotypic variants for virus adaptability and (ii) the internal interactions that are established within mutant spectra that render a virus ensemble the unit of selection. The understanding of viruses as quasispecies has led to new antiviral designs, such as lethal mutagenesis, whose aim is to drive viruses toward low fitness values with limited chances of fitness recovery. The impact of quasispecies for three salient human pathogens, human immunodeficiency virus and the hepatitis B and C viruses, is reviewed, with emphasis on antiviral treatment strategies. Finally, extensions of quasispecies to nonviral systems are briefly mentioned to emphasize the broad applicability of quasispecies theory. PMID:22688811

  19. [Viral hemorrhagic fever].

    PubMed

    Kager, P A

    1998-02-28

    Viral haemorrhagic fevers, such as Lassa fever and yellow fever, cause tens of thousands of deaths annually outside the Netherlands. The viruses are mostly transmitted by mosquitoes, ticks or via excreta of rodents. Important to travellers are yellow fever, dengue and Lassa and Ebola fever. For yellow fever there is an efficacious vaccine. Dengue is frequently observed in travellers; prevention consists in avoiding mosquito bites, the treatment is symptomatic. Lassa and Ebola fever are extremely rare among travellers; a management protocol can be obtained from the Netherlands Ministry of Health, Welfare and Sports. Diagnostics of a patient from the tropics with fever and haemorrhagic diathesis should be aimed at treatable disorders such as malaria, typhoid fever, rickettsiosis or bacterial sepsis, because the probability of such a disease is much higher than that of Lassa or Ebola fever.

  20. Preliminary ultrasound evaluation of the rotator cable in asymptomatic volunteers☆

    PubMed Central

    Orlandi, D.; Sconfienza, L.M.; Fabbro, E.; Ferrero, G.; Martini, C.; Lacelli, F.; Serafini, G.; Silvestri, E.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To characterize the rotator cable high-resolution ultrasound appearance in asymptomatic shoulders of volunteers of different age. Materials and methods IRB approval and volunteers’ written consent was obtained. Excluding subjects with known shoulder affections, we screened 24 asymptomatic volunteers. Supraspinatus and infraspinatus tendons high-resolution ultrasound evaluation was performed according to standard scan protocols, further excluding shoulders with partial/full-thickness cuff tears. Thus, we studied 24 shoulders in 12 young volunteers (age range 21–39 years, mean age 33 ± 8 years) and 21 shoulders in 11 elderly volunteers (age range 62–83 years, mean age 75 ± 45 years). For each shoulder, we noted rotator cable visibility and its thickness and width. Fisher’s and U Mann–Whitney statistics were used. Results Rotator cable was less frequently detected in young than in elderly volunteers (5/24 vs. 11/21 shoulders; P = 0.034). When detected, rotator cable was significantly thicker in young (range 1.2–1.5 mm, mean thickness 1.3 ± 0.1 mm) than in elderly (range 0.9–1.4 mm, mean thickness 1.2 ± 0.1 mm) volunteers (P = 0.025), while its width was not significantly different in young (range 4.5–7.1 mm, mean 5.6 ± 1.1 mm) compared to elderly (range 2.5–7.1 mm, mean 4.2 ± 1.4 mm) volunteers (P = 0.074) although a tendency can be highlighted. Conclusions Ultrasound demonstrated the different consistency of rotator cable in young and elderly asymptomatic patients, with high interobserver reproducibility. PMID:23396940

  1. Temporal trends in safety of carotid endarterectomy in asymptomatic patients

    PubMed Central

    Munster, Alex B.; Franchini, Angelo J.; Qureshi, Mahim I.; Thapar, Ankur

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To systematically review temporal changes in perioperative safety of carotid endarterectomy (CEA) in asymptomatic individuals in trial and registry studies. Methods: The MEDLINE and EMBASE databases were searched using the terms “carotid” and “endarterectomy” and “asymptomatic” from 1947 to August 23, 2014. Articles dealing with 50%–99% stenosis in asymptomatic individuals were included and low-volume studies were excluded. The primary endpoint was 30-day stroke or death and the secondary endpoint was 30-day all-cause mortality. Statistical analysis was performed using random-effects meta-regression for registry data and for trial data graphical interpretation alone was used. Results: Six trials (n = 4,431 procedures) and 47 community registries (n = 204,622 procedures) reported data between 1983 and 2013. Registry data showed a significant decrease in postoperative stroke or death incidence over the period 1991–2010, equivalent to a 6% average proportional annual reduction (95% credible interval [CrI] 4%–7%; p < 0.001). Considering postoperative all-cause mortality, registry data showed a significant 5% average proportional annual reduction (95% CrI 3%–9%; p < 0.001). Trial data showed a similar visual trend. Conclusions: CEA is safer than ever before and high-volume registry results closely mirror the results of trials. New benchmarks for CEA are a stroke or death risk of 1.2% and a mortality risk of 0.4%. This information will prove useful for quality improvement programs, for health care funders, and for those re-examining the long-term benefits of asymptomatic revascularization in future trials. PMID:26115734

  2. Education, individual time preferences, and asymptomatic disease detection.

    PubMed

    Kim, Younoh; Radoias, Vlad

    2016-02-01

    Asymptomatic conditions such as hypertension are generally hard to diagnose, absent routine medical examinations. This is especially problematic in developing countries, where most citizens do not engage in routine examinations due to limited economic resources. We study the roles of education and individual time preferences in asymptomatic disease detection and management. Using discrete choice models on a sample of 4209 hypertensive Indonesian adults surveyed between November 2007 and April 2008, we find that both education and individual time preferences play important roles. However, the effects are different for people in good health than they are for people in bad health. Education does not seem to matter for disease detection when respondents are in good general health, and its effects on disease management vary largely in magnitudes between these groups. In terms of disease detection, more educated respondents have a higher probability of being diagnosed, but only conditional on being in poor general health. Time preferences, on the other hand, matter for respondents in good general health, but the effect is not significant for those in bad health. More impatient respondents that are in good health have a higher probability of being under-diagnosed because they are more likely to forgo routine physicals. The findings point to two distinct channels through which education can affect health, and suggest that different types of policies need to be implemented, in order to reach the entire population. Traditional programs that stimulate education and improve the socio-economic status of individuals in developing countries are helpful, but they do not address the whole problem. Besides its more usual positive effects, education can also negatively affect the health of asymptomatic patients, because it reflects a higher opportunity cost of engaging in preventative health screenings.

  3. The Prognostic Significance of Asymptomatic Carotid Bruits in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Shorr, Ronald I; Johnson, Karen C; Wan, Jim Y; Sutton-Tyrrell, Kim; Pahor, Marco; Bailey, James E; Applegate, William B

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the association between asymptomatic carotid bruits and the development of subsequent stroke in older adults with isolated systolic hypertension. DESIGN Retrospective cohort study. SETTING The Systolic Hypertension in the Elderly Program (SHEP), a 5-year randomized trial testing the efficacy of treating systolic hypertension in noninstitutionalized persons aged 60 years or older. From the original 4,736 SHEP participants, we identified a cohort of 4,442 persons who had no prior history of stroke, transient ischemic attack, or myocardial infarction at randomization. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS The end point for this ancillary study was the development of a stroke. The average follow-up was 4.2 years. Carotid bruits were found in 284 (6.4%) of the participants at baseline. Strokes developed in 21 (7.4%) of those with carotid bruits and in 210 (5.0%) of those without carotid bruits. The unadjusted risk of stroke among persons with carotid bruits was 1.53 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.98, 2.40). Adjusting for age, gender, race, blood pressure, smoking, lipid levels, self-reported aspirin use, and treatment group assignment, the relative risk of stroke among persons with asymptomatic carotid bruits was 1.29 (95% CI 0.80, 2.06). Among SHEP enrollees aged 60 to 69 years, there was a trend (p=.08) toward increased risk (relative risk [RR] 2.05; 95% CI 0.92, 4.68) of subsequent stroke in persons with, compared to those without, carotid bruits. However, among enrollees aged 70 years or over, there was no relation between carotid bruit and subsequent stroke (RR 0.98; 95% CI 0.55, 1.76). In no other subgroup of SHEP enrollees did the presence of carotid bruit independently predict stroke. CONCLUSIONS Although we cannot rule out a small increased risk of stroke associated with bruits in asymptomatic SHEP enrollees aged 60 to 69 years, the utility of carotid bruits as a marker for increased risk of stroke among asymptomatic elderly with isolated

  4. Nearly Asymptomatic Eight-Month Thoracic Aortic Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Arjun; Kumar, Krishan; Zeltser, Roman; Makaryus, Amgad N.

    2016-01-01

    Thoracic aortic dissection is a rare, but lethal, medical condition that is either misdiagnosed as a myocardial infarction or overlooked completely. Though thoracic aortic dissections are commonly diagnosed in patients exhibiting sharp chest pain, there are some notable cases where patients do not report the expected severity of pain. We report a unique case of a patient with a thoracic aortic dissection who was initially nearly asymptomatic for eight months, in order to heighten awareness, highlight diagnosis protocol, and improve prognosis for this commonly misdiagnosed, but fatal, condition. PMID:27257400

  5. Diagnosis and importance of asymptomatic bacteriuria in adults.

    PubMed

    Jackson, G G

    1975-01-01

    There are now laboratory means of screening and identifying people who, although they are free from the signs of urinary tract infection, fit into abnormal groups owing to the high numbers of bacteria and leukocytes in their urine. Chronic bacteriuria and pathologic pyuria, with or without symptoms, have important physiologic and pathologic consequences. It is the physicians opportunity to recognize and treat these asymptomatic as well as symtomatic urinary tract infections. If untreated and uncorrected the result, with progressive frequency over a period of 10-15 years, is increased morbidity, especially with pregnancies, structural damage to the kidneys, kidney stones, uremia, hypertension, and premature death.

  6. Dataset of mitochondrial genome variants associated with asymptomatic atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Sazonova, Margarita A.; Zhelankin, Andrey V.; Barinova, Valeria A.; Sinyov, Vasily V.; Khasanova, Zukhra B.; Postnov, Anton Y.; Sobenin, Igor A.; Bobryshev, Yuri V.; Orekhov, Alexander N.

    2016-01-01

    This dataset report is dedicated to mitochondrial genome variants associated with asymptomatic atherosclerosis. These data were obtained using the method of next generation pyrosequencing (NGPS). The whole mitochondrial genome of the sample of patients from the Moscow region was analyzed. In this article the dataset including anthropometric, biochemical and clinical parameters along with detected mtDNA variants in patients with carotid atherosclerosis and healthy individuals was presented. Among 58 of the most common homoplasmic mtDNA variants found in the observed sample, 7 variants occurred more often in patients with atherosclerosis and 16 variants occurred more often in healthy individuals. PMID:27222855

  7. Asymptomatic pulmonary embolism: a common event in high risk patients

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, J.W.; Eikman, E.A.; Greenberg, S.

    1982-03-01

    Ventilation and perfusion lung scans were obtained before and at weekly intervals following hip surgery or major amputation in 158 patients. Pulmonary arteriograms were obtained in 21 of 33 patients developing perfusion patterns strongly suggesting embolism; 19 of the 21 arteriograms demonstrated pulmonary embolism. From autopsy and clinical data, 36 patients were diagnosed as having an embolus while under study, and 12 patients were suspected of having had an embolus during their illness but prior to entry into the study. Only four of these 48 patients experienced symptoms suggestive of pulmonary embolism. We conclude that asymptomatic pulmonary embolism is a common event in the populations studied.

  8. Asymptomatic leukemic-cell infiltration of the pancreas: US findings.

    PubMed

    Collado, Laura; Dardanelli, Esteban; Sierre, Sergio; Moguillansky, Silvia; Lipsich, José

    2011-06-01

    Pancreatic infiltration of leukemic cells is a very rare manifestation at the onset of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in childhood. Pancreatic enlargement in this situation is unusual and pancreatic involvement is often associated with biliary obstruction, cholestasis and pancreatitis. We report a 3-month-old girl who presented with asymptomatic leukemic infiltration of the pancreas, demonstrated by US with heterogeneous pancreatic enlargement associated with multiple hypoechogenic lesions, without cholestasis. Although these manifestations are rare, ALL should be considered a cause of pancreatic enlargement.

  9. Reduced renal sodium excretion in Walker-256 tumor-bearing rats.

    PubMed

    Rettori, O; Vieira-Matos, A N; Gontijo, J A

    1996-01-01

    Subcutaneous inoculation of Walker-256 tumor is followed by an asymptomatic period which is widely variable in duration, after which, paraneoplastic effects appear suddenly in the form of progressive and rapidly changing homeostatic alterations. Multifocal inoculation of tumor cells in each animal, was carried out with data averaging in each (sub-clinical [SubC], moderate [mCP] and grave [gCP] clinical phases and compared to foodrestricted (FR) rats. Results showed a significant and early decrease in urinary sodium excretion during mCP when compared to SubC and FR. The renal sites involved were studied in awake unrestrained animals by measure of sodium, creatinine and lithium clearance. Results indicated an initial increase of both absolute proximal (mCP: 21.4 +/- 1.7 vs FR: 16.0 +/- 1.1 mmol@min/100 g.b.w., p < 0.05) and postproximal (mCP: 11.1 +/- 0.4 vs FR: 6.6 +/- 0.4 mmol/min/100 g b.w., p < 0.001) Na+ reabsorption, which were partially compensated by a rise in glomerular filtration rate (mCP: 213 +/- 11.4 vs FR: 162+ 10.2pl/min/100 g b.w., p < 0.01) and by fell of fractional proximal Na+ reabsorption (mCP: 62.8 +/- 2.2 vs FR: 70.1 +/- 1.7%, p < 0.05), despite this a significant Na+ and fluid retention was observed. Additionally, this study shows that terminal phase of the illness (gCP) culminated with a marked decrease in the creatinine clearance suggesting a significant fall of the renal function.

  10. Intake and urinary excretion of sodium chloride under varying conditions of effort and environment heat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zohar, E.; Adar, R.; Tennenbaum, J.; Kesten, M.

    1982-01-01

    Intake and urinary excretion of sodium were investigated in a group of young, healthy and acclimated men. The sodium excretions of workers and of machinists in the engine rooms of a ship were also investigated.

  11. Biochemical, molecular and outcome analysis of eight chinese asymptomatic individuals with methyl malonic acidemia detected through newborn screening.

    PubMed

    Han, Lianshu; Wu, Shengnan; Ye, Jun; Qiu, Wenjuan; Zhang, Huiwen; Gao, Xiaolan; Wang, Yu; Gong, Zhuwen; Jin, Jing; Gu, Xuefan

    2015-10-01

    Methyl malonic academia (MMA) is characterized by abnormal accumulation of methyl malonic acid in body fluids. Patients usually have a variety of clinical symptoms including recurrent vomiting, metabolic acidosis, developmental delay, seizure, or death. However, a few cases where the patients have no symptom are also reported. Here, we conducted clinical, biochemical, and molecular analysis of eight Chinese patients identified through newborn screening between 2003 and 2013. All the patients had significantly higher blood propionylcarnitine (C3) concentrations, ratio of propionylcarnitine/acetylcarnitine (C3/C2); and their urine methyl malonic acid and methylcitric acid (MCA) excretions were remarkably higher than normal at diagnosis and during follow-ups. In addition, five different known mutations were identified in seven of the eight patients in either MUT or MMACHC. All these mutations were expected to produce defective proteins that would result in decreased or even total loss of methyl malonyl-CoA mutase activity. However, normal outcomes were found in all patients in physical growth, intellectual performance and cerebral MRI analysis at diagnosis (range, 14-53 days) and during follow-ups (range, 1.8-10 years). Our study is the first report of Chinese MMA patients with increased secretion of methyl malonic acid and molecular defects in MUT or MMACHC yet remain asymptomatic. PMID:25982642

  12. Dendritic cells in cytomegalovirus infection: viral evasion and host countermeasures.

    PubMed

    Rölle, Alexander; Olweus, Johanna

    2009-05-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a beta-herpesvirus that infects the majority of the population during early childhood and thereafter establishes life-long latency. Primary infection as well as spontaneous reactivation usually remains asymptomatic in healthy hosts but can, in the context of systemic immunosuppression, result in substantial morbidity and mortality. HCMV counteracts the host immune response by interfering with the recognition of infected cells. A growing body of literature has also suggested that the virus evades the immune system by paralyzing the initiators of antiviral immune responses--the dendritic cells (DCs). In the current review, we discuss the effects of CMV (HCMV and murine CMV) on various DC subsets and the ensuing innate and adaptive immune responses. The impact of HCMV on DCs has mainly been investigated using monocyte-derived DCs, which are rendered functionally impaired by infection. In mouse models, DCs are targets of viral evasion as well, but the complex cross-talk between DCs and natural killer cells has, however, demonstrated an instrumental role for DCs in the control and clearance of viral infection. Fewer studies address the role of peripheral blood DC subsets, plasmacytoid DCs and CD11c+ myeloid DCs in the response against HCMV. These DCs, rather than being paralyzed by HCMV, are largely resistant to infection, mount a vigorous first-line defense and induce T-cell responses to the virus. This possibly provides a partial explanation for an intriguing conundrum: the highly efficient control of viral infection and reactivation in immunocompetent hosts in spite of multi-layered viral evasion mechanisms.

  13. Time course of asymptomatic interstitial pulmonary oedema at high altitude.

    PubMed

    Bouzat, Pierre; Walther, Guillaume; Rupp, Thomas; Doucende, Gregory; Payen, Jean-François; Levy, Patrick; Verges, Samuel

    2013-03-01

    The time course of asymptomatic pulmonary oedema during high-altitude exposure and its potential relationship with changes in cardiac function remain to clarify. Eleven volunteers were rapidly exposed to 4350m during a 4-day period. Each subject received clinical examination and thoracic ultrasonography to assess ultrasound lung comets (USLC) on day 1, 2 and 3 after arrival. Echocardiography was performed on day 2 and 4 at 4350m. All subjects had a significant increase in the number of USLC on day 1 (n=8±3), day 2 (n=7±4) and day 3 (n=3±2) compared to sea level (n=1±1) (P<0.01). Although left ventricle diastolic function and systolic tricuspid regurgitation gradient were significantly different at altitude compared to sea level, they did not correlate with the number of USLC (P>0.05). Asymptomatic pulmonary oedema seems to be transiently present in fast-ascending recreational climbers. The lack of correlation between the number of USLC and indices of cardiac changes suggest that non-cardiogenic mechanisms may underlie this transient increase in lung water. PMID:23279868

  14. Articulated dental cast analysis of asymptomatic and symptomatic populations.

    PubMed

    Cordray, Frank E

    2016-06-30

    Dental instrumentation has long provided insight into the mechanism of musculo-skeletal function of the gnathic system. While large population studies associate dental arch displacement (DAD), especially laterally, with symptoms, mandibular condyle displacement (CD) resulting from DAD has not been targeted as possibly etiologic in the production of common muscle contraction headache (CMCH) and temporo-mandibular dysfunction (TMD). The objective was to evaluate the three-dimensional nature of DAD and CD between the seated condylar position (SCP) and the intercuspal position (ICP) and to compare results derived from large deprogrammed asymptomatic and symptomatic populations. A total of 1 192 sets of dental casts collected from asymptomatic and symptomatic populations were articulated in the SCP. The initial occlusal contact, DAD, and condylar displacement were evaluated for frequency, direction, and magnitude of displacement between the SCP and ICP. The data revealed significant displacement between the SCP and ICP of the condyles (displaced most frequently inferior (down) and posterior (distal)) and substantially increased frequency and magnitude of displacement of the dental arches (with posterior premature occlusal contacts, increased overjet, decreased overbite, midline differences, and occlusal classification changes) in symptomatic subjects. These discrepancies were statistically significant and clinically significant. The data support the concept of increased DAD and CD with dysfunction. Transverse condylar displacement, commonly presenting with dental cross bite, may be associated with CMCH and TMD. Displacement of the mandibular condyle may be an etiologic factor in CMCH and dysfunction of the temporo-mandibular joint.

  15. Articulated dental cast analysis of asymptomatic and symptomatic populations

    PubMed Central

    Cordray, Frank E

    2016-01-01

    Dental instrumentation has long provided insight into the mechanism of musculo-skeletal function of the gnathic system. While large population studies associate dental arch displacement (DAD), especially laterally, with symptoms, mandibular condyle displacement (CD) resulting from DAD has not been targeted as possibly etiologic in the production of common muscle contraction headache (CMCH) and temporo-mandibular dysfunction (TMD). The objective was to evaluate the three-dimensional nature of DAD and CD between the seated condylar position (SCP) and the intercuspal position (ICP) and to compare results derived from large deprogrammed asymptomatic and symptomatic populations. A total of 1 192 sets of dental casts collected from asymptomatic and symptomatic populations were articulated in the SCP. The initial occlusal contact, DAD, and condylar displacement were evaluated for frequency, direction, and magnitude of displacement between the SCP and ICP. The data revealed significant displacement between the SCP and ICP of the condyles (displaced most frequently inferior (down) and posterior (distal)) and substantially increased frequency and magnitude of displacement of the dental arches (with posterior premature occlusal contacts, increased overjet, decreased overbite, midline differences, and occlusal classification changes) in symptomatic subjects. These discrepancies were statistically significant and clinically significant. The data support the concept of increased DAD and CD with dysfunction. Transverse condylar displacement, commonly presenting with dental cross bite, may be associated with CMCH and TMD. Displacement of the mandibular condyle may be an etiologic factor in CMCH and dysfunction of the temporo-mandibular joint. PMID:27357324

  16. [Symptomatic cyst of the pancreas and asymptomatic bilateral phaeochromocytoma

    PubMed

    Karvar, S; Breidert, M; Nagel, M; Kirsch, C; Pinkert, J; Ehninger, G

    2001-01-01

    Symptomatic cyst of the pancreas and asymptomatic bilateral phaeochromocytoma. HISTORY AND CLINICAL FINDINGS: A 39-year-old woman was admitted to our department of gastroenterology with recurrent epigastrical pain. Ten years previously the diagnosis of von Hippel-Lindau (VHL)-syndrome has been established. Two years before a germ line mutation in exon 3 of the VHL-tumour suppressor gene has been detected. The patient has a healthy son with a normal VHL-gene and four healthy siblings who had refused a genetic blood test. INVESTIGATIONS: At abdominal ultrasound at the head of the pancreas three 4 2 cm large cysts and in the region of the left adrenal gland a 2,9 2,7 cm large tumor were visible. MRI of the abdomen revealed in addition a 2,2 1,5 cm large tumour of the right adrenal gland. An asymptomatic biadrenal phaeochromocytoma was detected by elevated urine catecholamines and 123I-MIBG-scintigraphy. TREATMENT AND COURSE: The cysts of the pancreas were punctured under endosonographical control and analysis of the cyst fluid was not suspicious of a malignant cystic tumour. The patient had no further abdominal complaints. After oral treatment with the alpha-blocker phentolamine the biadrenal phaeochromocytoma was treated by retroperitoneal laparoscopic surgery in an organ-sparing fashion. Postoperatively ACTH-stimulating test revealed a normal cortisol response. CONCLUSION: Adrenocortical function can be preserved by la-paroscopic adrenal-sparing surgery in bilateral phaeochromocytoma.

  17. Depressive symptoms and spiritual wellbeing in asymptomatic heart failure patients.

    PubMed

    Mills, Paul J; Wilson, Kathleen; Iqbal, Navaid; Iqbal, Fatima; Alvarez, Milagros; Pung, Meredith A; Wachmann, Katherine; Rutledge, Thomas; Maglione, Jeanne; Zisook, Sid; Dimsdale, Joel E; Lunde, Ottar; Greenberg, Barry H; Maisel, Alan; Raisinghani, Ajit; Natarajan, Loki; Jain, Shamini; Hufford, David J; Redwine, Laura

    2015-06-01

    Depression adversely predicts prognosis in individuals with symptomatic heart failure. In some clinical populations, spiritual wellness is considered to be a protective factor against depressive symptoms. This study examined associations among depressive symptoms, spiritual wellbeing, sleep, fatigue, functional capacity, and inflammatory biomarkers in 132 men and women with asymptomatic stage B heart failure (age 66.5 years ± 10.5). Approximately 32 % of the patients scored ≥10 on the Beck Depression Inventory, indicating potentially clinically relevant depressive symptoms. Multiple regression analysis predicting fewer depressive symptoms included the following significant variables: a lower inflammatory score comprised of disease-relevant biomarkers (p < 0.02), less fatigue (p < 0.001), better sleep (p < 0.04), and more spiritual wellbeing (p < 0.01) (overall model F = 26.6, p < 0.001, adjusted R square = 0.629). Further analyses indicated that the meaning (p < 0.01) and peace (p < 0.01) subscales, but not the faith (p = 0.332) subscale, of spiritual wellbeing were independently associated with fewer depressive symptoms. Interventions aimed at increasing spiritual wellbeing in patients lives, and specifically meaning and peace, may be a potential treatment target for depressive symptoms asymptomatic heart failure. PMID:25533643

  18. Articulated dental cast analysis of asymptomatic and symptomatic populations.

    PubMed

    Cordray, Frank E

    2016-01-01

    Dental instrumentation has long provided insight into the mechanism of musculo-skeletal function of the gnathic system. While large population studies associate dental arch displacement (DAD), especially laterally, with symptoms, mandibular condyle displacement (CD) resulting from DAD has not been targeted as possibly etiologic in the production of common muscle contraction headache (CMCH) and temporo-mandibular dysfunction (TMD). The objective was to evaluate the three-dimensional nature of DAD and CD between the seated condylar position (SCP) and the intercuspal position (ICP) and to compare results derived from large deprogrammed asymptomatic and symptomatic populations. A total of 1 192 sets of dental casts collected from asymptomatic and symptomatic populations were articulated in the SCP. The initial occlusal contact, DAD, and condylar displacement were evaluated for frequency, direction, and magnitude of displacement between the SCP and ICP. The data revealed significant displacement between the SCP and ICP of the condyles (displaced most frequently inferior (down) and posterior (distal)) and substantially increased frequency and magnitude of displacement of the dental arches (with posterior premature occlusal contacts, increased overjet, decreased overbite, midline differences, and occlusal classification changes) in symptomatic subjects. These discrepancies were statistically significant and clinically significant. The data support the concept of increased DAD and CD with dysfunction. Transverse condylar displacement, commonly presenting with dental cross bite, may be associated with CMCH and TMD. Displacement of the mandibular condyle may be an etiologic factor in CMCH and dysfunction of the temporo-mandibular joint. PMID:27357324

  19. Myelopathy in a previously asymptomatic HIV-1-infected patient.

    PubMed

    Eyer-Silva, W A; Auto, I; Pinto, J F; Morais-de-Sá, C A

    2001-01-01

    A wide variety of disorders of diverse pathogenic mechanisms can trigger spinal cord dysfunction in HIV-1-infected patients. The most common such condition is HIV-1-associated myelopathy (HM) which characteristically complicates advanced HIV-1 disease in patients with low CD4 cell counts and previous AIDS-defining diagnoses. We describe an unusual presentation of HM in a previously asymptomatic patient with a relatively preserved CD4 cell count (458 cells/mm3) who was even unaware of his serological status. The patient presented with a clinically severe, slowly progressive myelopathy and could not walk unassisted. Significant neurological improvement could be obtained as rapidly as within 4 weeks after the institution of an antiretroviral combination of only two nucleoside analog HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors (zidovudine and didanosine). An HIV-1 protease inhibitor was also prescribed at that point but could only be added to intensify the regimen 3 months later, when significant neurological improvement had already been recorded. We also review the disorders reported to derange spinal cord function in previously asymptomatic HIV-1-infected patients.

  20. Prediction and evaluation of urine and urinary nitrogen and mineral excretion from dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Nennich, T D; Harrison, J H; VanWieringen, L M; St-Pierre, N R; Kincaid, R L; Wattiaux, M A; Davidson, D L; Block, E

    2006-01-01

    Urine excretion is a substantial factor in the amount of manure that needs to be managed, and urinary N can contribute to ammonia volatilization. Development and validation of prediction equations focusing on dietary factors to decrease urine and urinary nutrient excretion will provide information for managing urine and feces separately or for other future technologies. The objective of this study was to develop equations for prediction of urine excretion and excretion of urinary N, Na, and K and to evaluate both new and previously published prediction equations for estimation of urine and urinary nutrient excretion from lactating dairy cows. Data sets from metabolism studies conducted at Washington State University were compiled and evaluated for excretion of minerals. Urine excretion averaged 24.1 kg/d and urinary nitrogen excretion ranged from 63 to 499 g/d in the calibration data set. Regression equations were developed to predict urine excretion, urinary N excretion, and urinary Na and K excretion. Predictors used in the regression equations included milk yield, body weight, dietary crude protein percentage, milk urea nitrogen, and nutrient intakes. Previously published prediction equations were evaluated using data sets from Washington State University and the University of Wisconsin. Mean and linear biases were evaluated by determining the regression of residuals on predicted values. Evaluation and validation of prediction equations are important to develop equations that will more accurately estimate urine and urinary nitrogen excretion from lactating dairy cows.

  1. Detection of African swine fever virus DNA in blood samples stored on FTA cards from asymptomatic pigs in Mbeya region, Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Braae, U C; Johansen, M V; Ngowi, H A; Rasmussen, T B; Nielsen, J; Uttenthal, Å

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the study was to assess whether blood samples collected onto FTA(®) cards could be used in combination with real-time PCR for the detection of African swine fever virus (ASFV) DNA in samples from resource-poor settings under the assumption that asymptomatically (sub-clinically) infected pigs may be present. Blood samples were collected from clinically healthy pigs from Mbeya Region, Tanzania. The blood samples were stored on FTA(®) cards and analysed by real-time PCR assays in duplicate; three pigs had high levels of viral DNA (Ct values of 27-29), and three pigs had a low level of viral DNA (Ct 36-45). Four pigs were positive in one of the duplicate samples only, but clear products of the expected size were obtained when the reactions were analysed by gel electrophoresis. For comparison, blood samples from pigs experimentally infected with either a pathogenic (OURT T88/1) or a non-pathogenic (OURT T88/3) isolate of ASFV were collected, stored on FTA(®) cards and analysed in the same way. The blood from pigs infected with the OURT T88/1 isolate showed high levels of viral DNA (Ct 22-33), whereas infection with non-pathogenic OURT T88/3 isolate resulted in only low levels of viral DNA (Ct 39) in samples collected at 10-14 days after inoculation.

  2. HIV Stages Contributions to the Epidemic, Due to a Changing Viral Load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Combadão, Jaime; Gomes, M. Gabriela M.

    2009-09-01

    It is very important to understand the contribution of the various HIV progression stages -acute, asymptomatic, late-, so as to optimize the fight against the HIV epidemic. In the last recent years, some have given the acute phase the responsibility for the majority of the new infections, while others thought that the late phase was more important, no doubt because these two phases are more infectious. More recently, it was argued that no HIV stage is dominant in the HIV epidemic in sub-Saharan Africa. Here, by a simple population model with continuous influx of susceptible individuals, and using known relationships between the viral load, the duration of the asymptomatic infection and transmission probability, we calculated the contributions of each stage to the spreading of the disease in a high risk group. Also, we analyzed some evolutionary scenarios, in which the virulence of the virus can evolve.

  3. Different antibiotic regimens for treating asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Guinto, Valerie T; De Guia, Blanca; Festin, Mario R; Dowswell, Therese

    2014-01-01

    Background Asymptomatic bacteriuria occurs in 5% to 10% of pregnancies and, if left untreated, can lead to serious complications. Objectives To assess which antibiotic is most effective and least harmful as initial treatment for asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnancy. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group’s Trials Register (March 2010) and reference lists of retrieved studies. Selection criteria Randomized controlled trials comparing two antibiotic regimens for treating asymptomatic bacteriuria. Data collection and analysis Review authors independently screened the studies for inclusion and extracted data. Main results We included five studies involving 1140 women with asymptomatic bacteriuria. We did not perform meta-analysis; each trial examined different antibiotic regimens and so we were not able to pool results. In a study comparing a single dose of fosfomycin trometamol 3 g with a five-day course of cefuroxime, there was no significant difference in persistent infection (risk ratio (RR) 1.36, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.24 to 7.75), shift to other antibiotics (RR 0.08, 95% CI 0.00 to 1.45), or in allergy or pruritus (RR 2.73, 95% CI 0.11 to 65.24). A comparison of seven-day courses of 400 mg pivmecillinam versus 500 mg ampicillin, both given four times daily, showed no significant difference in persistent infection at two weeks or recurrent infection, but there was an increase in vomiting (RR 4.57, 95% CI 1.40 to 14.90) and women were more likely to stop treatment early with pivmecillinam (RR 8.82, 95% CI 1.16 to 66.95). When cephalexin 1 g versus Miraxid® (pivmecillinam 200 mg and pivampicillin 250 mg) were given twice-daily for three days, there was no significant difference in persistent or recurrent infection. A one- versus seven-day course of nitrofurantoin resulted in more persistent infection with the shorter course (RR 1.76, 95% CI 1.29 to 2.40), but no significant difference in symptomatic infection at two weeks

  4. An orthopoxvirus-based vaccine reduces virus excretion after MERS-CoV infection in dromedary camels.

    PubMed

    Haagmans, Bart L; van den Brand, Judith M A; Raj, V Stalin; Volz, Asisa; Wohlsein, Peter; Smits, Saskia L; Schipper, Debby; Bestebroer, Theo M; Okba, Nisreen; Fux, Robert; Bensaid, Albert; Solanes Foz, David; Kuiken, Thijs; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang; Segalés, Joaquim; Sutter, Gerd; Osterhaus, Albert D M E

    2016-01-01

    Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) infections have led to an ongoing outbreak in humans, which was fueled by multiple zoonotic MERS-CoV introductions from dromedary camels. In addition to the implementation of hygiene measures to limit further camel-to-human and human-to-human transmissions, vaccine-mediated reduction of MERS-CoV spread from the animal reservoir may be envisaged. Here we show that a modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) vaccine expressing the MERS-CoV spike protein confers mucosal immunity in dromedary camels. Compared with results for control animals, we observed a significant reduction of excreted infectious virus and viral RNA transcripts in vaccinated animals upon MERS-CoV challenge. Protection correlated with the presence of serum neutralizing antibodies to MERS-CoV. Induction of MVA-specific antibodies that cross-neutralize camelpox virus would also provide protection against camelpox.

  5. Viral Hepatitis: A through E and Beyond

    MedlinePlus

    Viral Hepatitis: A through E and Beyond NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse What is viral hepatitis? Viral hepatitis is inflammation of the liver caused ...

  6. Krill excretion boosts microbial activity in the Southern Ocean.

    PubMed

    Arístegui, Javier; Duarte, Carlos M; Reche, Isabel; Gómez-Pinchetti, Juan L

    2014-01-01

    Antarctic krill are known to release large amounts of inorganic and organic nutrients to the water column. Here we test the role of krill excretion of dissolved products in stimulating heterotrophic bacteria on the basis of three experiments where ammonium and organic excretory products released by krill were added to bacterial assemblages, free of grazers. Our results demonstrate that the addition of krill excretion products (but not of ammonium alone), at levels expected in krill swarms, greatly stimulates bacteria resulting in an order-of-magnitude increase in growth and production. Furthermore, they suggest that bacterial growth rate in the Southern Ocean is suppressed well below their potential by resource limitation. Enhanced bacterial activity in the presence of krill, which are major sources of DOC in the Southern Ocean, would further increase recycling processes associated with krill activity, resulting in highly efficient krill-bacterial recycling that should be conducive to stimulating periods of high primary productivity in the Southern Ocean.

  7. Uric acid excretion predicts increased aggression in urban adolescents.

    PubMed

    Mrug, Sylvie; Mrug, Michal

    2016-09-01

    Elevated levels of uric acid have been linked with impulsive and disinhibited behavior in clinical and community populations of adults, but no studies have examined uric acid in relation to adolescent aggression. This study examined the prospective role of uric acid in aggressive behavior among urban, low income adolescents, and whether this relationship varies by gender. A total of 84 adolescents (M age 13.36years; 50% male; 95% African American) self-reported on their physical aggression at baseline and 1.5years later. At baseline, the youth also completed a 12-h (overnight) urine collection at home which was used to measure uric acid excretion. After adjusting for baseline aggression and age, greater uric acid excretion predicted more frequent aggressive behavior at follow up, with no significant gender differences. The results suggest that lowering uric acid levels may help reduce youth aggression. PMID:27180134

  8. Excretion and metabolism of nikethamide in the horse.

    PubMed Central

    Delbeke, F. T.; Debackere, M.

    1976-01-01

    It is well known that nikethamide (N,N-diethylnicotinamide, CoramineR) is metabolized very rapidly to nicotinamide. Hence, there is difficulty in proving that nikethamide has been used as a doping substance because nicotinamide is a normal physiological metabolite in the organism as well as a vitamin preparation. However, an intermediate metabolite (N-ethylnicotinamide) was found by us in the urine of horses treated with CoramineR. This was characterized by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, and synthesized and identified as being N-ethylnicotinamide. The excretion and metabolism of nikethamide after intramuscular injection in the horse was followed using quantitative gas chromatography of urine extracts over a period of several hours and the results of these experiments are reported. Changes in urinary pH had no significant effect upon either the metabolism or rate of excretion of the drug. PMID:11864

  9. Proteomic analysis of Taenia solium metacestode excretion-secretion proteins.

    PubMed

    Victor, Bjorn; Kanobana, Kirezi; Gabriël, Sarah; Polman, Katja; Deckers, Nynke; Dorny, Pierre; Deelder, André M; Palmblad, Magnus

    2012-06-01

    The metacestode larval stage of Taenia solium is the causal agent of a zoonotic disease called cysticercosis. The disease has an important impact on pork trade (due to porcine cysticercosis) and public health (due to human neurocysticercosis). In order to improve the current diagnostic tools and to get a better understanding of the interaction between T. solium metacestodes and their host, there is a need for more information about the proteins that are released by the parasite. In this study, we used protein sequences from different helminths, 1DE, reversed-phase LC, and MS/MS to analyze the excretion-secretion proteins produced by T. solium metacestodes from infected pigs. This is the first report of the T. solium metacestode excretion-secretion proteome. We report 76 proteins including 27 already described T. solium proteins, 17 host proteins and 32 proteins likely to be of T. solium origin, but identified using sequences from other helminths.

  10. Efficient production of ectoine using ectoine-excreting strain.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling-hua; Lang, Ya-jun; Nagata, Shinichi

    2009-07-01

    Halophilic bacteria strain Halomonas salina DSM 5928 was found to excrete ectoine, suggesting its potential in the development of a new method of ectoine production. We performed HPLC and LC-MS analyses that showed that Halomonas salina DSM 5928 excreted ectoine under constant extracellular osmolarity. Medium adopting monosodium glutamate as a sole source of carbon and nitrogen was beneficial for ectoine synthesis. The total concentration of ectoine was not affected by NaCl concentration in the range 0.5-2 mol l(-1). The total concentration of ectoine and productivity in a 10-l fermentor with 0.5 mol l(-1) NaCl were 6.9 g l(-1) and 7.9 g l(-1) d(-1), respectively. These findings show that Halomonas salina DSM 5928 efficiently produces ectoine at relatively low NaCl concentration. This research also indicates the potential application of free or immobilized cells for continuous culture to produce ectoine.

  11. Metabolism and excretion of [14C] verruculogen in a sheep.

    PubMed

    Perera, K P; Mantle, P G; Penny, R H

    1982-05-01

    [14C] Verruculogen (75 micrograms/kg) was given intravenously to a sheep under barbiturate anaesthesia to prevent the severe tremor and convulsions which would otherwise have occurred. Two hours later 28 per cent of the tremorgenic mycotoxin was detected in the liver, bile and small intestine. Approximately 0.5 per cent was excreted in the urine. Trace amounts of radiolabel were detected in the cortex and corpus striatum of the brain. Verruculogen was metabolised by the liver and converted completely to four more polar products, including two isomeric forms of desoxy-verruculogen and the weakly tremorgenic mycotoxin TR-2. The principal and most polar metabolite excreted is probably an isomer of TR-2. PMID:7100651

  12. III. Quantitative aspects of phosphorus excretion in ruminants.

    PubMed

    Bravo, David; Sauvant, Daniel; Bogaert, Catherine; Meschy, François

    2003-01-01

    Ruminant phosphorus excretion and metabolism were studied through a database. Faecal endogenous phosphorus is the main pathway of phosphorus excretion and averages 0.85 of total faecal phosphorus. The remaining 0.15 is unabsorbed dietary phosphorus. Faecal endogenous phosphorus is mainly unabsorbed phosphorus, with saliva being the major source, and is correlated to factors influencing saliva secretion (DM intake, physical dietary characteristics and dietary phosphorus content). Another source of faecal endogenous phosphorus is rumen microbial phosphorus that escaped solubilisation during post-rumen digestion. All factors stimulating microbial growth would increase phosphorus uptake by the rumen microbes and consequently the faecal endogenous phosphorus. Understanding the determinants of faecal endogenous phosphorus flow will help to precise the determination of net phosphorus requirements for maintenance. The role of plasma phosphorus in urinary phosphorus loss is discussed.

  13. [Body mass and excretion of phosphorus in aqueous invertebrates].

    PubMed

    Golubkov, S M

    2014-01-01

    Empirical materials on the dependence of the intensity of mineral phosphorus excretion (Ex) on the body mass (W) in invertebrates are summarized. The parameters of the average dependence of Ex on Win animals at 20 degrees C are determined. The main factors that influence the parameters ofthis dependence are discussed. It is shown that the decrease of Ex with an increase of Win animals is, as a rule, more significant compared with the decrease in the intensity of metabolism.

  14. Factors affecting urinary excretion of testosterone metabolites conjugated with cysteine.

    PubMed

    Fabregat, Andreu; Marcos, Josep; Segura, Jordi; Ventura, Rosa; Pozo, Oscar J

    2016-01-01

    The implementation of the athlete steroidal passport in doping control analysis aims to detect intra-individual changes in the steroid profile related to the abuse of anabolic steroids. In this context, the study of intrinsic variations associated with each marker is of utmost importance. In the present work, the influence of several factors in the excretion of the recently reported testosterone metabolites conjugated with cysteine (Δ(1) -AED; 1,4-androstadien-3,17-dione, Δ(6) -AED; 4,6-androstadien-3,17-dione, Δ(6) -T; 4,6-androstadien-17β-ol-3-one, and Δ(15) -AD; 15-androsten-3,17-dione) is evaluated for the first time. Degradation experiments at 37 °C proved that, although the cysteinyl moiety is released, the variation for urinary Δ(1) -AED/Δ(6) -AED, Δ(1) -AED/Δ(6) -T ratios is less than 30%. Moreover, freeze/thaw cycle testing resulted in RSDs values below 15% for all the analytes. Regarding infradian variability, moderate variations (below 40%) were observed. Additionally, notable alterations in the excretion of these compounds have been observed in the earliest stages of pregnancy. UGT2B17 polymorphism, responsible for the low T/E ratio found in some population, does not influence the excretion of cysteinyl compounds whereas the intake of exogenous substances (alcohol or 5α-reductase inhibitors) dramatically affects their excretion. The urinary concentrations of Δ(1) -AED, Δ(6) -AED, and Δ(15) -AD decreased (<50 %) after the ethanol intake, whereas after the administration of dutasteride, an important increase was observed for the concentrations of Δ(6) -AED, Δ(6) -T and Δ(15) -AD. Overall, the presented data describes the stability of the urinary cysteinyl steroids under the influence of many factors, proving their potential as suitable parameters to be included in the steroidal module of the athlete's biological passport. PMID:25917157

  15. Factors affecting urinary excretion of testosterone metabolites conjugated with cysteine.

    PubMed

    Fabregat, Andreu; Marcos, Josep; Segura, Jordi; Ventura, Rosa; Pozo, Oscar J

    2016-01-01

    The implementation of the athlete steroidal passport in doping control analysis aims to detect intra-individual changes in the steroid profile related to the abuse of anabolic steroids. In this context, the study of intrinsic variations associated with each marker is of utmost importance. In the present work, the influence of several factors in the excretion of the recently reported testosterone metabolites conjugated with cysteine (Δ(1) -AED; 1,4-androstadien-3,17-dione, Δ(6) -AED; 4,6-androstadien-3,17-dione, Δ(6) -T; 4,6-androstadien-17β-ol-3-one, and Δ(15) -AD; 15-androsten-3,17-dione) is evaluated for the first time. Degradation experiments at 37 °C proved that, although the cysteinyl moiety is released, the variation for urinary Δ(1) -AED/Δ(6) -AED, Δ(1) -AED/Δ(6) -T ratios is less than 30%. Moreover, freeze/thaw cycle testing resulted in RSDs values below 15% for all the analytes. Regarding infradian variability, moderate variations (below 40%) were observed. Additionally, notable alterations in the excretion of these compounds have been observed in the earliest stages of pregnancy. UGT2B17 polymorphism, responsible for the low T/E ratio found in some population, does not influence the excretion of cysteinyl compounds whereas the intake of exogenous substances (alcohol or 5α-reductase inhibitors) dramatically affects their excretion. The urinary concentrations of Δ(1) -AED, Δ(6) -AED, and Δ(15) -AD decreased (<50 %) after the ethanol intake, whereas after the administration of dutasteride, an important increase was observed for the concentrations of Δ(6) -AED, Δ(6) -T and Δ(15) -AD. Overall, the presented data describes the stability of the urinary cysteinyl steroids under the influence of many factors, proving their potential as suitable parameters to be included in the steroidal module of the athlete's biological passport.

  16. Immunization Against Viral Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wehrle, Paul F.

    1965-01-01

    Means are now at hand, if properly employed, to virtually eliminate clinical poliomyelitis and measles from this country. If such control is to be accomplished, more effective means are required to reach virtually all of the four million infants born each year in this country. Influenza can be suppressed, and improvements in influenza vaccine have been achieved in recent years. It seems likely at this time that at least several of the more important viral diseases can be controlled by utilizing antigens based on the biologic characteristics of the agent, and directed toward the reservoir of infection and the conditions favoring transmission of the infection. The theoretical problem of the effects in man of viruses that are oncogenic in rodents and are derived from various tissue culture systems deserves serious attention. However, this consideration, that of antigenic potency, and other problems reviewed should not be allowed to subvert efforts to solve the real problems that face us, the disability and death resulting from these common infections. PMID:14347979

  17. ABCG2 dysfunction increases serum uric acid by decreased intestinal urate excretion.

    PubMed

    Takada, Tappei; Ichida, Kimiyoshi; Matsuo, Hirotaka; Nakayama, Akiyoshi; Murakami, Keizo; Yamanashi, Yoshihide; Kasuga, Hiroshi; Shinomiya, Nariyoshi; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette transporter G2 (ABCG2), also known as breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), is identified as a high-capacity urate exporter and its dysfunction has an association with serum uric acid (SUA) levels and gout/hyperuricemia risk. However, pathophysiologically important pathway(s) responsible for the ABCG2-mediated urate excretion were unknown. In this study, we investigated how ABCG2 dysfunction affected the urate excretion pathways. First, we revealed that mouse Abcg2 mediates urate transport using the membrane vesicle system. The export process by mouse Abcg2 was ATP-dependent and not saturable under the physiological concentration of urate. Then, we characterized the excretion of urate into urine, bile, and intestinal lumen using in vivo mouse model. SUA of Abcg2-knockout mice was significantly higher than that of control mice. Under this condition, the renal urate excretion was increased in Abcg2-knockout mice, whereas the urate excretion from the intestine was decreased to less than a half. Biliary urate excretion showed no significant difference regardless of Abcg2 genotype. From these results, we estimated the relative contribution of each pathway to total urate excretion; in wild-type mice, the renal excretion pathway contributes approximately two-thirds, the intestinal excretion pathway contributes one-third of the total urate excretion, and the urate excretion into bile is minor. Decreased intestinal excretion could account for the increased SUA of Abcg2-knockout mice. Thus, ABCG2 is suggested to have an important role in extra-renal urate excretion, especially in intestinal excretion. Accordingly, increased SUA in patients with ABCG2 dysfunction could be explained by the decreased excretion of urate from the intestine.

  18. Urinary excretion of morphine and biosynthetic precursors in mice

    PubMed Central

    Grobe, Nadja; Lamshöft, Marc; Orth, Robert G.; Dräger, Birgit; Kutchan, Toni M.; Zenk, Meinhart H.; Spiteller, Michael

    2010-01-01

    It has been firmly established that humans excrete a small but steady amount of the isoquinoline alkaloid morphine in their urine. It is unclear whether it is of dietary or endogenous origin. There is no doubt that a simple isoquinoline alkaloid, tetrahydropapaveroline (THP), is found in human and rodent brain as well as in human urine. This suggests a potential biogenetic relationship between both alkaloids. Unlabeled THP or [1,3,4-D3]-THP was injected intraperitoneally into mice and the urine was analyzed. This potential precursor was extensively metabolized (96%). Among the metabolites found was the phenol-coupled product salutaridine, the known morphine precursor in the opium poppy plant. Synthetic [7D]-salutaridinol, the biosynthetic reduction product of salutaridine, injected intraperitoneally into live animals led to the formation of [7D]-thebaine, which was excreted in urine. [N-CD3]-thebaine was also administered and yielded [N-CD3]-morphine and the congeners [N-CD3]-codeine and [N-CD3]-oripavine in urine. These results show for the first time that live animals have the biosynthetic capability to convert a normal constituent of rodents, THP, to morphine. Morphine and its precursors are normally not found in tissues or organs, presumably due to metabolic breakdown. Hence, only that portion of the isoquinoline alkaloids excreted in urine unmetabolized can be detected. Analysis of urine by high resolution-mass spectrometry proved to be a powerful method for tracking endogenous morphine and its biosynthetic precursors. PMID:20421505

  19. Urinary excretion of morphine and biosynthetic precursors in mice.

    PubMed

    Grobe, Nadja; Lamshöft, Marc; Orth, Robert G; Dräger, Birgit; Kutchan, Toni M; Zenk, Meinhart H; Spiteller, Michael

    2010-05-01

    It has been firmly established that humans excrete a small but steady amount of the isoquinoline alkaloid morphine in their urine. It is unclear whether it is of dietary or endogenous origin. There is no doubt that a simple isoquinoline alkaloid, tetrahydropapaveroline (THP), is found in human and rodent brain as well as in human urine. This suggests a potential biogenetic relationship between both alkaloids. Unlabeled THP or [1,3,4-D(3)]-THP was injected intraperitoneally into mice and the urine was analyzed. This potential precursor was extensively metabolized (96%). Among the metabolites found was the phenol-coupled product salutaridine, the known morphine precursor in the opium poppy plant. Synthetic [7D]-salutaridinol, the biosynthetic reduction product of salutaridine, injected intraperitoneally into live animals led to the formation of [7D]-thebaine, which was excreted in urine. [N-CD(3)]-thebaine was also administered and yielded [N-CD(3)]-morphine and the congeners [N-CD(3)]-codeine and [N-CD(3)]-oripavine in urine. These results show for the first time that live animals have the biosynthetic capability to convert a normal constituent of rodents, THP, to morphine. Morphine and its precursors are normally not found in tissues or organs, presumably due to metabolic breakdown. Hence, only that portion of the isoquinoline alkaloids excreted in urine unmetabolized can be detected. Analysis of urine by high resolution-mass spectrometry proved to be a powerful method for tracking endogenous morphine and its biosynthetic precursors.

  20. Evaluation of aldosterone excretion in very low birth weight infants.

    PubMed

    Abdel Mohsen, Abdel Hakeem; Taha, Gamal; Kamel, Bothina A; Maksood, Mohamed Abdel

    2016-01-01

    Data about aldosterone production and excretion in the neonatal period are still few and controversial. Our objectives are to assess urinary aldosterone excretion (UAE) in very low birth weight (VLBW) infants and to identify clinical and biochemical variables that may influence this excretion. Thirty VLBW infants (14 males and 16 females), their gestational age <32 weeks and body weight <1500 g, were included in the study. Demographic and clinical data were recorded, within the first 72 h of life and urine and blood samples were collected for the measurement of urinary aldosterone and serum potassium, sodium, and chloride. The mean UAE value was 0.176 ± 0.05 μg/24 h and the mean absolute UAE was 1906 ± 271 pg/mL. There was a statistically significant positive correlation between UAE and gestational age and birth weight; also, infants with respiratory distress syndrome had higher urinary aldosterone levels than infants without respiratory distress. Only plasma sodium was a significant independent factor that negatively influenced UAE on linear regression analysis. The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system of VLBW infants seems to be able, even immediately after birth, to respond to variations of plasma sodium concentrations; measurement of UAE constitutes an interesting method to determine aldosterone production in VLBW infants. PMID:27424689

  1. Urinary Kallikrein Excretion in Essential and Mineralocorticoid Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Holland, O. Bryan; Chud, James M.; Braunstein, Helen

    1980-01-01

    Urinary kallikrein excretion has been reported to be decreased in patients with essential hypertension and elevated in patients with primary aldosteronism as a reflection of mineralocorticoid activity. Low renin essential hypertension (LREH) has been postulated to result from excess production of an unknown mineralocorticoid(s). Urinary kallikrein excretion was compared in outpatients with essential hypertension, mineralocorticoid hypertension (primary aldosteronism and 17α-hydroxylase deficiency), and in normal subjects of the same race. No significant difference in urinary kallikrein excretion of patients with LREH vs. normal renin essential hypertension (NREH) was found for either black (4.1±0.4 vs. 4.8±0.5 esterase units (EU)/24 h, mean±SE, for 27 LREH and 38 NREH, respectively) or white patients (12.2±2.3 vs. 11.7±1.4 EU/24 h for 13 LREH and 25 NREH, respectively). Urinary kallikrein was decreased in black vs. white hypertensive patients and normal subjects. However, in patients with normal renal function (creatinine clearance ≥80 ml/min) urinary kallikrein was not significantly decreased in either black hypertensive vs. black normal subjects (4.3±0.3 vs. 5.4±0.6 EU/24 h) or in white hypertensive vs. white normal subjects (11.9±1.2 vs. 8.4±0.9 EU/24 h). In contrast, hypertensive patients with mild renal insufficiency (creatinine clearance of 41.8±78.5 ml/min) had reduced (P < 0.05) urinary kallikrein (3.3 EU/24 h with creatinine clearance of 63.6±2.0 for 24 black patients and 4.2±0.7 EU/24 h with creatinine clearance of 67.0±3.5 for 6 white patients). These results suggest that a reduction in urinary kallikrein excretion rate is an early accompaniment of hypertensive renal injury. Urinary kallikrein excretion in response to a 6-d 10-meq sodium diet and a 3-d Florinef (0.5 mg b.i.d.) administration was compared in hypertensive patients with normal renal function vs. race and age-matched normal subjects. Stimulation of urinary kallikrein

  2. Viral BLIP dynamics during HAART.

    SciTech Connect

    Markowitz, M.; Louie, M.; Hurley, A.; Ho, David D.; Perelson, Alan S.,; Di Mascio, M.

    2001-01-01

    Intermittent episodes of low-level viremia (blips) are often observed in well-suppressed, HAART-treated patients. It has been reported that viral blips do not correlate with the emergence of new HAART-related mutations; however, increased frequency of blips correlates with slower decay of latently infected cells. Since blips are transient and unpredictable, detailed knowledge about them is difficult to obtain. We present an analysis of the dynamics of viral blips from viral load (VL) measurements on 123 patients for a period of 809k480d (21-1817d) and sampled every 31{+-}12d for a total of 26{+-}15 samples per patient.

  3. Polycistronic viral vectors.

    PubMed

    de Felipe, P

    2002-09-01

    Traditionally, vectors for gene transfer/therapy experiments were mono- or bicistronic. In the latter case, vectors express the gene of interest coupled with a marker gene. An increasing demand for more complex polycistronic vectors has arisen in recent years to obtain complex gene transfer/therapy effects. In particular, this demand is stimulated by the hope of a more powerful effect from combined gene therapy than from single gene therapy in a process whose parallels lie in the multi-drug combined therapies for cancer or AIDS. In the 1980's we had only splicing signals and internal promoters to construct such vectors: now a new set of biotechnological tools enables us to design new and more reliable bicistronic and polycistronic vectors. This article focuses on the description and comparison of the strategies for co-expression of two genes in bicistronic vectors, from the oldest to the more recently described: internal promoters, splicing, reinitiation, IRES, self-processing peptides (e.g. foot-and-mouth disease virus 2A), proteolytic cleavable sites (e.g. fusagen) and fusion of genes. I propose a classification of these strategies based upon either the use of multiple transcripts (with transcriptional mechanisms), or single transcripts (using translational/post-translational mechanisms). I also examine the different attempts to utilize these strategies in the construction of polycistronic vectors and the main problems encountered. Several potential uses of these polycistronic vectors, both in basic research and in therapy-focused applications, are discussed. The importance of the study of viral gene expression strategies and the need to transfer this knowledge to vector design is highlighted.

  4. Neuroanatomy goes viral!

    PubMed

    Nassi, Jonathan J; Cepko, Constance L; Born, Richard T; Beier, Kevin T

    2015-01-01

    The nervous system is complex not simply because of the enormous number of neurons it contains but by virtue of the specificity with which they are connected. Unraveling this specificity is the task of neuroanatomy. In this endeavor, neuroanatomists have traditionally exploited an impressive array of tools ranging from the Golgi method to electron microscopy. An ideal method for studying anatomy would label neurons that are interconnected, and, in addition, allow expression of foreign genes in these neurons. Fortuitously, nature has already partially developed such a method in the form of neurotropic viruses, which have evolved to deliver their genetic material between synaptically connected neurons while largely eluding glia and the immune system. While these characteristics make some of these viruses a threat to human health, simple modifications allow them to be used in controlled experimental settings, thus enabling neuroanatomists to trace multi-synaptic connections within and across brain regions. Wild-type neurotropic viruses, such as rabies and alpha-herpes virus, have already contributed greatly to our understanding of brain connectivity, and modern molecular techniques have enabled the construction of recombinant forms of these and other viruses. These newly engineered reagents are particularly useful, as they can target genetically defined populations of neurons, spread only one synapse to either inputs or outputs, and carry instructions by which the targeted neurons can be made to express exogenous proteins, such as calcium sensors or light-sensitive ion channels, that can be used to study neuronal function. In this review, we address these uniquely powerful features of the viruses already in the neuroanatomist's toolbox, as well as the aspects of their biology that currently limit their utility. Based on the latter, we consider strategies for improving viral tracing methods by reducing toxicity, improving control of transsynaptic spread, and extending

  5. Neuroanatomy goes viral!

    PubMed Central

    Nassi, Jonathan J.; Cepko, Constance L.; Born, Richard T.; Beier, Kevin T.

    2015-01-01

    The nervous system is complex not simply because of the enormous number of neurons it contains but by virtue of the specificity with which they are connected. Unraveling this specificity is the task of neuroanatomy. In this endeavor, neuroanatomists have traditionally exploited an impressive array of tools ranging from the Golgi method to electron microscopy. An ideal method for studying anatomy would label neurons that are interconnected, and, in addition, allow expression of foreign genes in these neurons. Fortuitously, nature has already partially developed such a method in the form of neurotropic viruses, which have evolved to deliver their genetic material between synaptically connected neurons while largely eluding glia and the immune system. While these characteristics make some of these viruses a threat to human health, simple modifications allow them to be used in controlled experimental settings, thus enabling neuroanatomists to trace multi-synaptic connections within and across brain regions. Wild-type neurotropic viruses, such as rabies and alpha-herpes virus, have already contributed greatly to our understanding of brain connectivity, and modern molecular techniques have enabled the construction of recombinant forms of these and other viruses. These newly engineered reagents are particularly useful, as they can target genetically defined populations of neurons, spread only one synapse to either inputs or outputs, and carry instructions by which the targeted neurons can be made to express exogenous proteins, such as calcium sensors or light-sensitive ion channels, that can be used to study neuronal function. In this review, we address these uniquely powerful features of the viruses already in the neuroanatomist’s toolbox, as well as the aspects of their biology that currently limit their utility. Based on the latter, we consider strategies for improving viral tracing methods by reducing toxicity, improving control of transsynaptic spread, and

  6. Understanding HIV-1 viral load.

    PubMed

    Paxton, W B

    1995-01-01

    HIV viral markers, such as p24 antigen and viral RNA, measure how much virus is present. Studies are showing a relationship between RNA levels and clinical outcomes, which can help doctors evaluate the efficacy of drug therapy. Eventually, it is believed, RNA will replace T-cell counts as the marker of choice. The challenge is to interpret what the results of a viral load test mean for a specific patient. Currently, the two main viral load tests commercially available do not have a one-to-one linear relationship, so tests should not be switched. Doctors are advised not to over-interpret minor changes because of the ten to thirty percent variation in individual test results. These tests are not FDA-approved but are available at commercial reference labs. PMID:11362660

  7. Aseptic meningitis and viral myelitis.

    PubMed

    Irani, David N

    2008-08-01

    Meningitis and myelitis represent common and very infrequent viral infections of the central nervous system, respectively. The number of cases of viral meningitis that occurs annually exceeds the total number of meningitis cases caused by all other etiologies combined. Focal central nervous system infections, such as occur in the spinal cord with viral myelitis, are much less common and may be confused with noninfectious disorders that cause acute flaccid paralysis. This article reviews some of the important clinical features, epidemiology, diagnostic approaches, and management strategies for patients with aseptic meningitis and viral myelitis. Particular focus is placed on the diseases caused by enteroviruses, which as a group account for most aseptic meningitis cases and many focal infections of the spinal cord.

  8. Statistical Mechanics of Viral Entry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yaojun; Dudko, Olga K.

    2015-01-01

    Viruses that have lipid-membrane envelopes infect cells by fusing with the cell membrane to release viral genes. Membrane fusion is known to be hindered by high kinetic barriers associated with drastic structural rearrangements—yet viral infection, which occurs by fusion, proceeds on remarkably short time scales. Here, we present a quantitative framework that captures the principles behind the invasion strategy shared by all enveloped viruses. The key to this strategy—ligand-triggered conformational changes in the viral proteins that pull the membranes together—is treated as a set of concurrent, bias field-induced activated rate processes. The framework results in analytical solutions for experimentally measurable characteristics of virus-cell fusion and enables us to express the efficiency of the viral strategy in quantitative terms. The predictive value of the theory is validated through simulations and illustrated through recent experimental data on influenza virus infection.

  9. [Association between asymptomatic hyperuricaemia and metabolic syndrome in the adolescents].

    PubMed

    Koborová, Ivana; Gurecká, Radana; Hlavatá, Anna; Šebeková, Katarína

    2015-01-01

    In humans, uric acid represents a biologically active end-product of purine nucleotides. Several studies in children and adolescents documented an association between hyperuricaemia and the components metabolic syndrome. High intake of fructose-sweetened beverages might increase uricaemia, since fructose is the only saccharide which metabolism results in the formation of uric acid. Current knowledge does not allow distinguishing whether hyperuricaemia is causally related to the components of metabolic syndrome, or rather represents a marker of an enhanced risk, and poor outcome. No guidelines exist whether or not to treat asymptomatic hyperuricaemia in the adolescents. Randomized controlled prospective clinical studies are needed to elucidate whether uric acid-lowering management would beneficially affect the prevalence of metabolic syndrome, and the incidence of cardiovascular disease.

  10. Management of asymptomatic gene carriers of transthyretin familial amyloid polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Hartmut H-J; Barroso, Fabio; González-Duarte, Alejandra; Conceição, Isabel; Obici, Laura; Keohane, Denis; Amass, Leslie

    2016-09-01

    Transthyretin familial amyloid polyneuropathy (TTR-FAP) is a rare, severe, and irreversible, adult-onset, hereditary disorder caused by autosomal-dominant mutations in the TTR gene that increase the intrinsic propensity of transthyretin protein to misfold and deposit systemically as insoluble amyloid fibrils in nerve tissues, the heart, and other organs. TTR-FAP is characterized by relentless, progressively debilitating polyneuropathy, and leads to death, on average, within 10 years of symptom onset without treatment. With increased availability of disease-modifying treatment options for a wider spectrum of patients with TTR-FAP, timely detection of the disease may offer substantial clinical benefits. This review discusses mutation-specific predictive genetic testing in first-degree relatives of index patients diagnosed with TTR-FAP and the structured clinical follow-up of asymptomatic gene carriers for prompt diagnosis and early therapeutic intervention before accumulation of substantial damage. Muscle Nerve 54: 353-360, 2016.

  11. Timing of testing and treatment for asymptomatic diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Kırkızlar, Eser; Faissol, Daniel M.; Griffin, Paul M.; Swann, Julie L.

    2010-07-01

    Many papers in the medical literature analyze the cost-effectiveness of screening for diseases by comparing a limited number of a priori testing policies under estimated problem parameters. However, this may be insufficient to determine the best timing of the tests or incorporate changes over time. In this paper, we develop and solve a Markov Decision Process (MDP) model for a simple class of asymptomatic diseases in order to provide the building blocks for analysis of a more general class of diseases. We provide a computationally efficient method for determining a cost-effective dynamic intervention strategy that takes into account (i) the results of the previous test for each individual and (ii) the change in the individual’s behavior based on awareness of the disease. We demonstrate the usefulness of the approach by applying the results to screening decisions for Hepatitis C (HCV) using medical data, and compare our findings to current HCV screening recommendations.

  12. [Detection of asymptomatic prolactinoma by a mass screening program].

    PubMed

    Ichihara, K; Miyai, K

    1990-06-01

    Mass screening for prolactinoma was performed among the general population of 10,550 normal adults (8,450 men and 2,100 women) using a paired assay method for serum PRL. Forty subjects with hyperprolactinemia were studied. There were five patients with pituitary prolactinoma, and 10 with 'big' prolactinemia. The patients with prolactinoma had few if any complaints. The occurrence of asymptomatic big prolactinemia showed marked female predominance. The implication of such a screening program for laboratory medicine in future is two-fold: 1) prospect of laboratory 'physician' taking active role in the promotion of mass screening program to cover wide range of disorders affecting adult population and 2) feasibility of analyzing or discovering subclinical disorders of academic interest, being allowed to explore every single individual in the population.

  13. Asymptomatic myocardial infarction in Kawasaki disease: Long-term prognosis

    SciTech Connect

    Shiraishi, I.; Onouchi, Z.; Hayano, T.; Hamaoka, K.; Kiyosawa, N. )

    1991-04-01

    Eight patients with Kawasaki disease who had sustained asymptomatic myocardial infarction 8-15 years ago (mean, 13.1 years) were reexamined by various noninvasive cardiac function tests to assess long-term prognosis. At present, electrocardiograms (ECGs) are normal in six patients. However, all eight patients had a prolonged preejection period (PEP) to left ventricular ejection time (LVET) ratio 30 s after amylnitrate (AN) inhalation. Six patients had perfusion defects by exercise thallium-201 myocardial scintigraphy, and two patients developed ST segment depression in treadmill exercise testing. These patients are symptom-free even though their physical activity has not been restricted. Yet they proved to have serious abnormalities suggesting sequelae of myocardial infarction or existing myocardial ischemia. Judging from the results of noninvasive cardiac function tests and recently performed coronary angiography, five of the eight patients require coronary bypass surgery.

  14. Asymptomatic bacteriuria in spinal cord patients and the elderly.

    PubMed

    Reid, G; Nicolle, L E

    1999-11-01

    The prevalence and incidence of symptomatic and asymptomatic bacteriuria will remain high for many years to come. Antimicrobial agents are necessary to treat symptomatic UTI because no natural methods have been shown to be effective. Treatment of ABU is not appropriate. There is growing resistance to antibiotics, biocides, and antiseptics and, simultaneously, a decreasing rate of introduction of new antibacterial agents; thus the problem of resistance is magnified and potentially complicates the management of patients with SCI and elderly persons. New options of managing health and of preventing ABU and UTI and the complications arising from these diseases must be investigated vigorously and urgently. In particular, further study of the role of bacterial biofilms, the normal microflora, the influence of diet and hygiene, and the importance of the host immune response in the process of urinary tract colonization and infection is relevant and necessary.

  15. The use of tampons for identifying asymptomatic N. gonorrhoeae infections.

    PubMed

    Haughie, G E; Ames, W R; Madsen, E F

    1975-12-01

    Female contacts of males with gonococcal urethritis were screened for asymptomatic infection using self-inserted tampons. Results of cultures were compared with specimens collected with cervical swabs during a pelvic examination. The sequence of collection of specimens was randomized, and specimens were promptly incubated. Among 297 patients, 40.4% had positive cervical specimens and 35.4% had positive tampon specimens. A difference in rates of recovery by method of collection was 5.0% +/- 1.7%. A better correlation in results was noted among patients using oral contraceptives and among patients whose tampon specimen was collected after a pelvic examination. A relatively small difference in results by method of collection suggests that tampons may serve as an inexpensive screening device for sexually active women, especially in settings where pelvic examinations are not routinely performed, but where immediate processing of specimens is possible.

  16. Impact of Chloroquine on Viral Load in Breast Milk

    PubMed Central

    Semrau, Katherine; Kuhn, Louise; Kasonde, Prisca; Sinkala, Moses; Kankasa, Chipepo; Shutes, Erin; Vwalika, Cheswa; Ghosh, Mrinal; Aldrovandi, Grace; Thea, Donald M.

    2006-01-01

    Summary The anti-malarial agent chloroquine has activity against HIV. We compared the effect of chloroquine (n = 18) to an anti-malarial agent without known anti-HIV-activity, sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (n = 12), on breast milk HIV RNA levels among HIV-infected breastfeeding women in Zambia. After adjusting for CD4 count and plasma viral load, chloroquine was associated with a trend towards lower levels of HIV RNA in breast milk compared with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (P 0.05). Higher breastmilk viral load was also observed among women receiving presumptive treatment = for symptomatic malaria compared with asymptomatic controls and among controls reporting fever in the prior week. Further research is needed to determine the potential role of chloroquine in prevention of HIV transmission through breastfeeding. Impacte de la chloroquine sur la charge virale dans le lait maternelle La chloroquine, agent antimalarique, a une activité contre le VIH. Nous avons comparé l’effet de la chloroquine à celui d’un autre agent antimalarique, la sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine, dont l’activité sur le VIH n’est pas connue, en mesurant les taux d’ARN de VIH dans le lait maternel de femmes allaitantes infectées par le VIH en Zambie. Après ajustement pour les taux de CD4 et la charge virale dans le plasma, la chloroquine comparée à la sulfadoxine pyrimethamine était associée à une tendance vers des teneurs plus bas en ARN de VIH dans le lait maternel (P = 0,05). Des charges virales plus élevées dans le lait maternel étaient aussi observées chez des femmes recevant un traitement présomptif pour des symptômes de malaria par rapport aux contrôles asymptomatiques et par rapport à des contrôles rapportant de la fièvre durant la première semaine. Des études supplémentaires sont nécessaires pour déterminer le rôle potentiel de la chloroquine dans la prévention de la transmission du VIH par l’allaitement maternel. mots clésVIH, malaria, allaitement maternel

  17. Screening and Management of Asymptomatic Renal Stones in Astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reyes, David; Locke, James; Sargsyan, Ashot; Garcia, Kathleen

    2017-01-01

    Management guidelines were created to screen and manage asymptomatic renal stones in U.S. astronauts. The true risk for renal stone formation in astronauts due to the space flight environment is unknown. Proper management of this condition is crucial to mitigate health and mission risks. The NASA Flight Medicine Clinic electronic medical record and the Lifetime Surveillance of Astronaut Health databases were reviewed. An extensive review of the literature and current aeromedical standards for the monitoring and management of renal stones was also done. This work was used to develop a screening and management protocol for renal stones in astronauts that is relevant to the spaceflight operational environment. In the proposed guidelines all astronauts receive a yearly screening and post-flight renal ultrasound using a novel ultrasound protocol. The ultrasound protocol uses a combination of factors, including: size, position, shadow, twinkle and dispersion properties to confirm the presence of a renal calcification. For mission-assigned astronauts, any positive ultrasound study is followed by a low-dose renal computed tomography scan and urologic consult. Other specific guidelines were also created. A small asymptomatic renal stone within the renal collecting system may become symptomatic at any time, and therefore affect launch and flight schedules, or cause incapacitation during a mission. Astronauts in need of definitive care can be evacuated from the International Space Station, but for deep space missions evacuation is impossible. The new screening and management algorithm has been implemented and the initial round of screening ultrasounds is under way. Data from these exams will better define the incidence of renal stones in U.S. astronauts, and will be used to inform risk mitigation for both short and long duration spaceflights.

  18. Progression of asymptomatic peripheral artery disease over 1 year.

    PubMed

    Mohler, Emile R; Bundens, Warner; Denenberg, Julie; Medenilla, Elizabeth; Hiatt, William R; Criqui, Michael H

    2012-02-01

    The pathophysiology and time course of an individual converting from asymptomatic peripheral artery disease (PAD) to symptomatic claudication is unclear. The objectives of this study were: (1) to characterize the extent of atherosclerotic disease in individuals with an abnormal ankle-brachial index (ABI), but without claudication; and over 1 year of follow-up to (2) evaluate the progression of PAD using ultrasound imaging, (3) determine changes in the ABI and leg pain symptoms, and (4) correlate PAD progression with changes in the ABI and leg symptoms. We hypothesized that PAD progression would be associated with the development of claudication and changes in the ABI, 6-minute walk distance (6-MWD), and walking quality of life. Individuals with a reduced ABI but without typical intermittent claudication noted on community screening were invited to undergo baseline and 1-year follow-up assessment, including duplex ultrasound. The initial and repeat evaluations included measurement of the ABI, lower extremity duplex arterial mapping, and assessment of leg pain and functional status. Of the 50 people studied, 44 (88%) had significant atherosclerotic lesions in the lower extremity arteries, affecting 80 legs. A total of 33 of 50 individuals (66%) returned for the 1-year follow-up visit. On ultrasound examination, two of 18 normal legs developed PAD, and in 48 legs with PAD at baseline, 17 legs (35%) developed new or progressive lesions. Thirteen legs developed new claudication. Overall, there was no significant worsening in the ABI, 6-MWD, or the Walking Impairment Questionnaire (WIQ). However, legs with new lesions or lesion progression were significantly more likely to develop claudication, and the 13 legs (seven subjects) developing claudication showed a significant decline in the 6-MWD. In conclusion, these data indicate that a significant number of people with asymptomatic PAD show progression over 1 year, that such individuals are more likely to develop

  19. Viral Control of Mitochondrial Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Morselli, Eugenia; Touat, Zahia; Kroemer, Guido

    2008-01-01

    Throughout the process of pathogen–host co-evolution, viruses have developed a battery of distinct strategies to overcome biochemical and immunological defenses of the host. Thus, viruses have acquired the capacity to subvert host cell apoptosis, control inflammatory responses, and evade immune reactions. Since the elimination of infected cells via programmed cell death is one of the most ancestral defense mechanisms against infection, disabling host cell apoptosis might represent an almost obligate step in the viral life cycle. Conversely, viruses may take advantage of stimulating apoptosis, either to kill uninfected cells from the immune system, or to induce the breakdown of infected cells, thereby favoring viral dissemination. Several viral polypeptides are homologs of host-derived apoptosis-regulatory proteins, such as members of the Bcl-2 family. Moreover, viral factors with no homology to host proteins specifically target key components of the apoptotic machinery. Here, we summarize the current knowledge on the viral modulation of mitochondrial apoptosis, by focusing in particular on the mechanisms by which viral proteins control the host cell death apparatus. PMID:18516228

  20. Viral RNAs Are Unusually Compact

    PubMed Central

    Gopal, Ajaykumar; Egecioglu, Defne E.; Yoffe, Aron M.; Ben-Shaul, Avinoam; Rao, Ayala L. N.; Knobler, Charles M.; Gelbart, William M.

    2014-01-01

    A majority of viruses are composed of long single-stranded genomic RNA molecules encapsulated by protein shells with diameters of just a few tens of nanometers. We examine the extent to which these viral RNAs have evolved to be physically compact molecules to facilitate encapsulation. Measurements of equal-length viral, non-viral, coding and non-coding RNAs show viral RNAs to have among the smallest sizes in solution, i.e., the highest gel-electrophoretic mobilities and the smallest hydrodynamic radii. Using graph-theoretical analyses we demonstrate that their sizes correlate with the compactness of branching patterns in predicted secondary structure ensembles. The density of branching is determined by the number and relative positions of 3-helix junctions, and is highly sensitive to the presence of rare higher-order junctions with 4 or more helices. Compact branching arises from a preponderance of base pairing between nucleotides close to each other in the primary sequence. The density of branching represents a degree of freedom optimized by viral RNA genomes in response to the evolutionary pressure to be packaged reliably. Several families of viruses are analyzed to delineate the effects of capsid geometry, size and charge stabilization on the selective pressure for RNA compactness. Compact branching has important implications for RNA folding and viral assembly. PMID:25188030

  1. Outbreaks where food workers have been implicated in the spread of foodborne disease. Part 5. Sources of contamination and pathogen excretion from infected persons.

    PubMed

    Todd, Ewen C D; Greig, Judy D; Bartleson, Charles A; Michaels, Barry S

    2008-12-01

    In this article, the fifth in a series reviewing the role of food workers in foodborne outbreaks, background information on the routes of infection for food workers is considered. Contamination most frequently occurs via the fecal-oral route, when pathogens are present in the feces of ill, convalescent, or otherwise colonized persons. It is difficult for managers of food operations to identify food workers who may be excreting pathogens, even when these workers report their illnesses, because workers can shed pathogens during the prodrome phase of illness or can be long-term excretors or asymptomatic carriers. Some convalescing individuals excreted Salmonella for 102 days. Exclusion policies based on stool testing have been evaluated but currently are not considered effective for reducing the risk of enteric disease. A worker may exhibit obvious signs of illness, such as vomiting, but even if the ill worker immediately leaves the work environment, residual vomitus can contaminate food, contact surfaces, and fellow workers unless the clean-up process is meticulous. Skin infections and nasopharyngeal or oropharyngeal staphylococcal or streptococcal secretions also have been linked frequently to worker-associated outbreaks. Dermatitis, rashes, and painful hand lesions may cause workers to reduce or avoid hand washing. Regardless of the origin of the contamination, pathogens are most likely to be transmitted through the hands touching a variety of surfaces, highlighting the need for effective hand hygiene and the use of barriers throughout the work shift. PMID:19244919

  2. Identification of viral pathogen diversity in sewage sludge by metagenome analysis.

    PubMed

    Bibby, Kyle; Peccia, Jordan

    2013-02-19

    The large diversity of viruses that exist in human populations are potentially excreted into sewage collection systems and concentrated in sewage sludge. In the U.S., the primary fate of processed sewage sludge (class B biosolids) is application to agricultural land as a soil amendment. To characterize and understand infectious risks associated with land application, and to describe the diversity of viruses in human populations, shotgun viral metagenomics was applied to 10 sewage sludge samples from 5 wastewater treatment plants throughout the continental U.S, each serving between 100,000 and 1,000,000 people. Nearly 330 million DNA sequences were produced and assembled, and annotation resulted in identifying 43 (26 DNA, 17 RNA) different types of human viruses in sewage sludge. Novel insights include the high abundance of newly emerging viruses (e.g., Coronavirus HKU1, Klassevirus, and Cosavirus) the strong representation of respiratory viruses, and the relatively minor abundance and occurrence of Enteroviruses. Viral metagenome sequence annotations were reproducible and independent PCR-based identification of selected viruses suggests that viral metagenomes were a conservative estimate of the true viral occurrence and diversity. These results represent the most complete description of human virus diversity in any wastewater sample to date, provide engineers and environmental scientists with critical information on important viral agents and routes of infection from exposure to wastewater and sewage sludge, and represent a significant leap forward in understanding the pathogen content of class B biosolids. PMID:23346855

  3. Insight into alteration of gut microbiota in Clostridium difficile infection and asymptomatic C. difficile colonization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lihua; Dong, Danfeng; Jiang, Cen; Li, Zhen; Wang, Xuefeng; Peng, Yibing

    2015-08-01

    Clostridium difficile is well recognized as the common pathogen of nosocomial diarrhea, meanwhile, asymptomatic colonization with C. difficile in part of the population has also drawn public attention. Although gut microbiota is known to play an important role in the pathogenesis of C. difficile infection (CDI), whether there is any alteration of gut microbial composition in asymptomatic C. difficile carriers hasn't been clearly described. The purpose of this study was to explore the differences in gut microbiome among CDI patients, asymptomatic C. difficile carriers and healthy individuals. We performed fecal microbiota analysis on the samples of eight CDI patients, eight asymptomatic C. difficile carriers and nine healthy subjects using 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing. CDI patients and asymptomatic carriers showed reduced microbial richness and diversity compared with healthy subjects, accompanied with a paucity of phylum Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes as well as an overabundance of Proteobacteria. Some normally commensal bacteria, especially butyrate producers, were significantly depleted in CDI patients and asymptomatic carriers. Furthermore, the differences observed in microbial community structure between CDI patients and asymptomatic carriers suggested that the gut microbiota may be a potential factor of disease state for CDI. Our study demonstrates the characterization and diversity of gut microbiota in CDI and asymptomatic C. difficile colonization, which will provide new ideas for surveillance of the disease state and development of microbiota-targeted agents for CDI prevention and treatment.

  4. [Neuropsychiatric sequelae of viral meningitis in adults].

    PubMed

    Damsgaard, Jesper; Hjerrild, Simon; Renvillard, Signe Groth; Leutscher, Peter Derek Christian

    2011-10-10

    Viral meningitis is considered to be a benign illness with only mild symptoms. In contrast to viral encephalitis and bacterial meningitis, the prognosis is usually good. However, retrospective studies have demonstrated that patients suffering from viral meningitis may experience cognitive impairment following the acute course of infection. Larger controlled studies are needed to elucidate the potential neuropsychiatric adverse outcome of viral meningitis.

  5. Health risks of enteric viral infections in children.

    PubMed

    Nwachuku, Nena; Gerba, Charles P

    2006-01-01

    Children are at a greater risk of infections from serious enteric viral illness than adults for a number of reasons. Most important is the immune system, which is needed to control the infection processes. This difference can lead to more serious infections than in adults, who have fully developed immune systems. There are a number of significant physiological and behavioral differences between adults and children that place children at a greater risk of exposure and a greater risk of serious infection from enteric viruses. Although most enteric viruses cause mild or asymptomatic infections, they can cause a wide range of serious and life-threatening illnesses in children. The peak incidence of most enteric viral illnesses is in children <2yr of age, although all age groups of children are affected. Most of these infections are more serious and result in higher mortality in children than adults. The fetus is also affected by enterovirus and infectious hepatitis resulting in significant risk of fetal death or serious illness. In addition to the poliovirus vaccine, the only vaccine available is for hepatitis A virus (HAV). A vaccine for rotavirus has currently been withdrawn, pending review because of potential adverse effects in infants. No specific treatment is available for the other enteric viruses. Enteric viral infections are very common in childhood. Most children are infected with rotavirus during the first 2yr of life. The incidence of enteroviruses and the viral enteric viruses ranges from 10% to 40% in children and is largely dependent on age. On average, half or more of the infections are asymptomatic. The incidence of hepatitis A virus is much lower than the enteric diarrheal viruses. There is no current evidence for hepatitis E virus (HEV) acquisition in children in the U.S. Enteric viral diseases have a major impact on direct and indirect health care costs (i.e., lost wages) and amount to several billion dollars a year in the U.S. Total direct and

  6. [Pathology and viral metagenomics, a recent history].

    PubMed

    Bernardo, Pauline; Albina, Emmanuel; Eloit, Marc; Roumagnac, Philippe

    2013-05-01

    Human, animal and plant viral diseases have greatly benefited from recent metagenomics developments. Viral metagenomics is a culture-independent approach used to investigate the complete viral genetic populations of a sample. During the last decade, metagenomics concepts and techniques that were first used by ecologists progressively spread into the scientific field of viral pathology. The sample, which was first for ecologists a fraction of ecosystem, became for pathologists an organism that hosts millions of microbes and viruses. This new approach, providing without a priori high resolution qualitative and quantitative data on the viral diversity, is now revolutionizing the way pathologists decipher viral diseases. This review describes the very last improvements of the high throughput next generation sequencing methods and discusses the applications of viral metagenomics in viral pathology, including discovery of novel viruses, viral surveillance and diagnostic, large-scale molecular epidemiology, and viral evolution.

  7. Decabromodiphenyl ether in the rat: absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion.

    PubMed

    Morck, Anna; Hakk, Heldur; Orn, Ulrika; Klasson Wehler, Eva

    2003-07-01

    Among the group of polybrominated diphenyl ethers used as flame-retardants, the fully brominated diphenyl ether, decabromodiphenyl ether (decaBDE), is the most commonly used. Despite the large usage of decaBDE, neither the metabolic pathways nor the absorption have been addressed, and there are very few studies on its toxicology. In this work, it is shown that after a single oral dose of 14C-labeled decaBDE to rats, at least 10% of the decaBDE dose is absorbed. The major excretion route in conventional rats is via feces that contained 90% of the decaBDE dose. The excretion in bile was close to 10% of the dose and represented mainly metabolites. It cannot be excluded that greater than 10% of the oral dose had been absorbed since 65% of the radioactivity excreted in feces was metabolites. The highest concentrations on a lipid weight basis were found in plasma and blood-rich tissues, and the adipose tissue had the lowest concentration of decaBDE. After derivatization of a phenolic fraction, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analyses indicated that metabolites with five to seven bromine atoms had formed, and they possessed a guaiacol structure (a hydroxy and a methoxy group) in one of the rings. In addition, traces of nonabrominated diphenyl ethers and monohydroxylated metabolites were found by GC/MS. Metabolites, characterized by their chemical properties, were interpreted to be covalently bound to macromolecules, either proteins or lipids. In addition, water solubility was suggested. The metabolic pathway was indicated to include a reactive intermediate. PMID:12814967

  8. Urine Creatinine Excretion and Clinical Outcomes in CKD

    PubMed Central

    Di Micco, Lucia; Quinn, Robert Ross; Ronksley, Paul Everett; Bellizzi, Vincenzo; Lewin, Adriane Marlene; Cianciaruso, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Twenty-four–hour urine creatinine excretion is a reliable approximation of muscle mass. Whether changes in urine creatinine predict clinical outcomes in persons with CKD is unknown. This work studied the relationship between urine creatinine and patient and renal survival in people with CKD not requiring renal replacement therapy. Design, setting, participants, & measurements This longitudinal cohort study included incident stages 3–5 CKD patients referred to the renal clinic at the University Federico II in Naples between January of 1995 and December of 2005. Clinical data and urine creatinine were updated at each visit. Main outcomes were all-cause mortality and kidney failure requiring dialysis. Results This study enrolled 525 individuals and followed them for a median of 6 years (range of 4 months to 15 years). Urine creatinine excretion declined by 16 mg/d per year (95% confidence interval, 14 to 19) in participants with CKD stages 3a, 3b, and 4, and it remained stable in participants with stage 5 CKD. Per each 20 mg/d decline in urine creatinine, mortality increased by 3% (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.03; 95% confidence interval, 1.01 to 1.05), and the risk of initiating dialysis increased by 2% (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.02; 95% confidence interval, 1.01 to 1.03). These associations were independent of body mass index and GFR. Conclusions In persons with CKD stages 3 and 4, urine creatinine declines at a rate of 16 mg/d per year. Lower urine creatinine excretion predicts greater risk of kidney failure and patient mortality. PMID:24158796

  9. Iron excretion in iron dextran-overloaded mice

    PubMed Central

    Musumeci, Marco; Maccari, Sonia; Massimi, Alessia; Stati, Tonino; Sestili, Paola; Corritore, Elisa; Pastorelli, Augusto; Stacchini, Paolo; Marano, Giuseppe; Catalano, Liviana

    2014-01-01

    Background Iron homeostasis in humans is tightly regulated by mechanisms aimed to conserve iron for reutilisation, with a negligible role played by excretory mechanisms. In a previous study we found that mice have an astonishing ability to tolerate very high doses of parenterally administered iron dextran. Whether this ability is linked to the existence of an excretory pathway remains to be ascertained. Materials and methods Iron overload was generated by intraperitoneal injections of iron dextran (1 g/kg) administered once a week for 8 weeks in two different mouse strains (C57bl/6 and B6D2F1). Urinary and faecal iron excretion was assessed by inductively coupling plasma-mass spectrometry, whereas cardiac and liver architecture was evaluated by echocardiography and histological methods. For both strains, 24-hour faeces and urine samples were collected and iron concentration was determined on days 0, 1 and 2 after iron administration. Results In iron-overloaded C57bl/6 mice, the faecal iron concentration increased by 218% and 157% on days 1 and 2, respectively (p<0.01). The iron excreted represented a loss of 14% of total iron administered. Similar but smaller changes was also found in B6D2F1 mice. Conversely, we found no significant changes in the concentration of iron in the urine in either of the strains of mice. In both strains, histological examination showed accumulation of iron in the liver and heart which tended to decrease over time. Conclusions This study indicates that mice have a mechanism for removal of excess body iron and provides insights into the possible mechanisms of excretion. PMID:24960657

  10. Chlordecone impaired biliary excretion: In vivo and in vitro correlates

    SciTech Connect

    Rochelle, L.G.

    1989-01-01

    The focus of this research was to investigate mechanisms of impaired biliary excretion localized to the bile canaliculus. Two modes of chlordecone (CD) action were investigated: (1) direct effects on organic anion transport at the bile canaliculus; and/or (2) general membrane perturbation, indirectly affecting anion transport proteins. Bile canaliculi-enriched fractions (BCEF) were isolated from rat livers in order to characterize effects of CD on this domain of the plasma membranes. CD inhibited the initial rate leading to a peak Na{sup +}-stimulated ({sup 3}H)L-glutamate uptake in BCEF CD inhibition of the initial or Na{sup +}-gradient driven phase of ({sup 3}H)L-glutamate uptake suggested that CD was affecting maintenance of the Na{sup +}-gradient by the BCEF membrane vesicles. In vivo PG anion excretion was inhibited as well as in vitro ({sup 3}H)L-glutamate transport at 24 hr following in vivo CD treatment of rats. Seventy-two hr following CD treatment, rats recovered to control PG excretion levels. PG excretory performance was regained in 72 hr pretreated rats despite an increase in liver CD concentration. Liver CD concentrations in 24 hr pretreated rats were approximately 50% of the concentrations in 72 hr pretreated rats. At low CD concentrations, there was no evidence of general membrane perturbation in terms of immobilization of the lipid electron spin resonance probe, 16-doxyl stearate, in BCEF. Mobility of 16-doxyl stearate in BCEF was reduced at in vitro CD concentrations of 0.20 {mu}mol/mg protein or greater. CD did reduce hepatobiliary permeability to ({sup 14}C)mannitol in 24 and 72 hr pretreated rats; perhaps restricting movement through membrane aqueous pores.

  11. Enantioselective renal excretion of albendazole metabolites in patients with neurocysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Lanchote, V L; Takayanagui, O M; Mateus, F H

    2004-10-01

    The present study investigates the urinary excretion of the enantiomers of (+)- and (-)-albendazole sulfoxide (ASOX) and albendazole sulfone (ASON) in 12 patients with neurocysticercosis treated with albendazole for 8 days (7.5 mg/kg/12 h). Serial blood samples (0-12 h) and urine (three periods of 8 h) were collected after administration of the last dose of albendazole. Plasma and urine (+)-ASOX, (-)-ASOX, and ASON metabolites were determined by HPLC using a chiral phase column (Chiralpak AD) with fluorescence detection. The pharmacokinetic parameters (P < 0.05) for (+)-ASOX, (-)-ASOX, and ASON metabolites are reported as means (95% CI); amount excreted (Ae) = 3.19 (1.53-4.85) vs. 0.72 (0.41-1.04) vs. 0.08 (0.03-0.13) mg; plasma concentration-time area under the curve, AUC(0-24) = 3.56 (0.93-6.18) vs. 0.60 (0.12-1.08) vs. 0.38 (0.20-0.55) microg x h/ml, and renal clearance Cl(R) = 1.20 (0.66-1.73) vs. 2.72 (0.39-5.05) vs. 0.25 (0.13-0.37) l/h. Sulfone formation capacity, expressed as the Ae ratio ASON/ASOX + ASON, was 2.21 (1.43-2.99). These data point to enantioselectivity in the renal excretion of ASOX as a complementary mechanism to the metabolism responsible for the plasma accumulation of (+)-ASOX. The results also suggest that the metabolite ASON is partially eliminated as a reaction product of the subsequent metabolism.

  12. Episodic ventilation lowers the efficiency of pulmonary CO2 excretion.

    PubMed

    Malte, Christian Lind; Malte, Hans; Wang, Tobias

    2013-11-01

    The ventilation pattern of many ectothermic vertebrates, as well as hibernating and diving endotherms, is episodic where breaths are clustered in bouts interspersed among apneas of varying duration. Using mechanically ventilated, anesthetized freshwater turtles (Trachemys scripta), a species that normally exhibits this episodic ventilation pattern, we investigated whether episodic ventilation affects pulmonary gas exchange compared with evenly spaced breaths. In two separate series of experiments (a noninvasive and an invasive), ventilation pattern was switched from a steady state, with evenly spaced breaths, to episodic ventilation while maintaining overall minute ventilation (30 ml·min(-1)·kg(-1)). On switching to an episodic ventilation pattern of 10 clustered breaths, mean CO2 excretion rate was reduced by 6 ± 5% (noninvasive protocol) or 20 ± 8% (invasive protocol) in the first ventilation pattern cycle, along with a reduction in the respiratory exchange ratio. O2 uptake was either not affected or increased in the first ventilation pattern cycle, while neither heart rate nor overall pulmonary blood flow was significantly affected by the ventilation patterns. The results confirm that, for a given minute ventilation, episodic ventilation is intrinsically less efficient for CO2 excretion, thereby indicating an increase in the total bodily CO2 store in the protocol. Despite the apparent CO2 retention, mean arterial Pco2 only increased 1 Torr during the episodic ventilation pattern, which was concomitant with a possible reduction of respiratory quotient. This would indicate a shift in metabolism such that less CO2 is produced when the efficiency of excretion is reduced. PMID:23970538

  13. [Immunohistochemical study on the mechanism of excretion of methamphetamine].

    PubMed

    Kajitani, A; Kaiho, M; Mori, A; Okada, Y; Mukaida, M; Ishiyama, I

    1989-06-01

    Many methods of analysis are available to the forensic toxicologist for determining the amount of methamphetamine within human tissues, but few have the potential of histochemistry for enabling the precise site of excretion of methamphetamine to be defined. We have established a method for the demonstration of methamphetamine by immunohistochemistry, and applied this method for showing morphologically the disposition of methamphetamine. The following cells in the tissues of methamphetamine-intoxicated mice gave a strong positive reaction of the localization, which was thought to be the histological evidence of excretion of this drug: epithelial cells of the distal part of the renal tubule and of the collecting tubule, transitional epithelial cells of the bladder, liver parenchymal cells, epithelial cells of the striated duct of the salivary gland, parietal cells of the gastric gland, part of epithelial cells of the distal portion of the large intestine, secretory cells and part of epithelial cells of the ductal portion of the sweat gland, alveolar cells of the mammary gland, secretory cells of the sebaceous gland and hair medulla and cortex. These results indicated passive diffusion of methamphetamine across membranes of the cells of the distal tubule and collecting tubule of the kidney, of the bladder and of the striated duct of the salivary gland. In the parietal cells of the gastric gland, part of epithelial cells of the distal portion of the large intestine and secretory cells of the sweat gland, methamphetamine was thought to be stored and subsequently released. In the mammary gland, methamphetamine was found to be combined with casein and excreted by exocytosis. Accumulation of methamphetamine in the hair was supposed to be chiefly due to the penetration of this drug derived from tissue fluid and sebum.

  14. Value of estimating methylamalonic acid excretion in anaemia.

    PubMed

    Green, A E; Pegrum, G D

    1968-09-01

    A rapid technique suitable for routine pathology laboratories has been used to estimate methylmalonic acid excretion in a 24-hour urine collection following a 10g. valine load. Levels above 40 mg./24 hours were found only in patients with vitamin B(12) deficiency. Patients with pernicious anaemia treated more than 24 hours before urine collection and patients with other types of anaemia had methylmalonic acid levels below 25 mg./24 hours.This method of demonstrating vitamin B(12) deficiency can be applied rapidly in debilitated patients so that specific treatment can be instituted within 36 hours of admission.

  15. Radiation dosimetry from breast milk excretion of radioiodine and pertechnetate

    SciTech Connect

    Hedrick, W.R.; Di Simone, R.N.; Keen, R.L.

    1986-10-01

    Measurements were made of the activity in samples of breast milk obtained from a patient with postpartum thyroiditis following administration of (/sup 123/I)sodium iodide and subsequently (99mTc)pertechnetate 24 hr later. Both /sup 123/I and 99mTc were found to be excreted exponentially with an effective half-life of 5.8 hr and 2.8 hr, respectively. Less than 10% of the activity was incorporated into breast-milk protein. After administration of (/sup 123/I)sodium iodide breast feeding should be discontinued for 24-36 hr to reduce the absorbed dose to the child's thyroid.

  16. [The effect of aldosterone A on renal potassium excretion].

    PubMed

    Winther, Signe Abitz; Egfjord, Martin

    2011-01-10

    Recent studies have shown expression of the following regulatory WNK kinases in the kidney: the full-length WNK1 (L-WNK1), the shorter kidney specific WNK1 transcript (KS-WNK1), formed by alternative splicing, and WNK4. Aldosterone activates expression of KS-WNK1 and inhibits WNK4 via SGK1 - both leading to stimulation of ENaC and activation of ROMK, and increased potassium excretion. Thus, further characterization of the WNK system may lead to elucidation of the dual anti-natriuretic and kaliuretic effects of aldosterone, in situations where only activation of one of these effects is needed. PMID:21219845

  17. Quantitative estimation of urinary protein excretion by refractometry.

    PubMed

    Kumar, S; Visweswaran, K; Sobha, A; Sarasa, G; Nampoory, M R

    1992-09-01

    Quantitative estimation of proteinuria done by the refractometric method was compared with that done by the sulphosalycilic acid method and biuret method in 102 urine samples. The analysis of results by students' t test showed no statistically significant difference between the three methods. It is concluded that quantitative estimation of urinary protein excretion by refractometric method is a simple cheap and reliable method and can be performed easily in the outpatient clinic. The instrument is quite handy and can be carried in the pocket.

  18. Testosterone urinary excretion rate increases during hypergravity in male monkeys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strollo, F.; Barger, L.; Fuller, C.

    2000-01-01

    Real and simulated microgravity impairs T secretion both in animals and in the human. To verify whether hypergravity might enhance T secretion as a consequence of an opposite mechanical effect, 6 male monkeys were centrifuged at 2 G for 3 weeks after a 1 G stabilization period lasting 3 weeks and then taken back to 1 G for 1 week and urine were collected daily for T excretion measurement. Significantly higher level were observed during the initial 2 G phase as compared to pre- and post centrifugation periods and the trend was the same during the remaining 2 G period. This may reflect changes in testicular perfusion rather than endocrine adaptation per se.

  19. Cellular sensing of viral DNA and viral evasion mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Orzalli, Megan H; Knipe, David M

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian cells detect foreign DNA introduced as free DNA or as a result of microbial infection, leading to the induction of innate immune responses that block microbial replication and the activation of mechanisms that epigenetically silence the genes encoded by the foreign DNA. A number of DNA sensors localized to a variety of sites within the cell have been identified, and this review focuses on the mechanisms that detect viral DNA and how the resulting responses affect viral infections. Viruses have evolved mechanisms that inhibit these host sensors and signaling pathways, and the study of these antagonistic viral strategies has provided insight into the mechanisms of these host responses. The field of cellular sensing of foreign DNA is in its infancy, but our currently limited knowledge has raised a number of important questions for study.

  20. Computational mechanics of viral capsids.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, Melissa M; Perotti, Luigi E; Klug, William S

    2015-01-01

    Viral capsids undergo significant mechanical deformations during their assembly, maturation, and infective life-span. In order to characterize the mechanics of viral capsids, their response to applied external forces is analyzed in several experimental studies using, for instance, Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) indentation experiments. In recent years, a broader approach to study the mechanics of viral capsids has leveraged the theoretical tools proper of continuum mechanics. Even though the theory of continuum elasticity is most commonly used to study deformable bodies at larger macroscopic length scales, it has been shown that this very rich theoretical field can still offer useful insights into the mechanics of viral structures at the nanometer scale. Here we show the construction of viral capsid continuum mechanics models starting from different forms of experimental data. We will discuss the kinematics assumptions, the issue of the reference configuration, the material constitutive laws, and the numerical discretization necessary to construct a complete Finite Element capsid mechanical model. Some examples in the second part of the chapter will show the predictive capabilities of the constructed models and underline useful practical aspects related to efficiency and accuracy. We conclude each example by collecting several key findings discovered by simulating AFM indentation experiments using the constructed numerical models.

  1. Viral metagenomics and blood safety.

    PubMed

    Sauvage, V; Eloit, M

    2016-02-01

    The characterization of the human blood-associated viral community (also called blood virome) is essential for epidemiological surveillance and to anticipate new potential threats for blood transfusion safety. Currently, the risk of blood-borne agent transmission of well-known viruses (HBV, HCV, HIV and HTLV) can be considered as under control in high-resource countries. However, other viruses unknown or unsuspected may be transmitted to recipients by blood-derived products. This is particularly relevant considering that a significant proportion of transfused patients are immunocompromised and more frequently subjected to fatal outcomes. Several measures to prevent transfusion transmission of unknown viruses have been implemented including the exclusion of at-risk donors, leukocyte reduction of donor blood, and physicochemical treatment of the different blood components. However, up to now there is no universal method for pathogen inactivation, which would be applicable for all types of blood components and, equally effective for all viral families. In addition, among available inactivation procedures of viral genomes, some of them are recognized to be less effective on non-enveloped viruses, and inadequate to inactivate higher viral titers in plasma pools or derivatives. Given this, there is the need to implement new methodologies for the discovery of unknown viruses that may affect blood transfusion. Viral metagenomics combined with High Throughput Sequencing appears as a promising approach for the identification and global surveillance of new and/or unexpected viruses that could impair blood transfusion safety. PMID:26778104

  2. Low incidence of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis in asymptomatic cirrhotic outpatients

    PubMed Central

    Cadranel, Jean-François; Nousbaum, Jean-Baptiste; Bessaguet, Christophe; Nahon, Pierre; Nguyen-Khac, Eric; Moreau, Richard; Thévenot, Thierry; Silvain, Christine; Bureau, Christophe; Nouel, Olivier; Pilette, Christophe; Paupard, Thierry; Pauwels, Arnaud; Sapey, Thierry; Grangé, Jean-Didier; Tran, Albert

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To compare the incidence of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis in cirrhotic outpatients and inpatients undergoing therapeutic paracentesis METHODS: From January 1 to May 31, 2004, 1041 patients from 70 different hospitals underwent 2123 therapeutic abdominal paracentesis (AP) performed as a outpatient procedure in 355 and as inpatient procedure in 686 cases respectively. The following parameters were compared prospectively between outpatients and inpatients: spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) prevalence, age, gender, cause of cirrhosis, symptoms, score and grade according to Child-Pugh classification, cirrhosis complications, antibiotics treatment, serum creatinine, platelet count and ascitic protein concentration. RESULTS: SBP was observed in 91 patients. In the whole population the SBP prevalence was 8.7% (95%CI: 7.2-10.6) it was 11.7% (95%CI: 9.5-14.3) in inpatients and 3.1% (95%CI: 1.7-5.5) in outpatients (P < 0.00001). SBP prevalence was 8.3% (95%CI: 4.3-15.6) in symptomatic outpatients vs 1.2% (95%CI: 0.4-3.4) in asymptomatic outpatients (P < 0.002). Patients undergoing outpatient AP were significantly different from those undergoing inpatient AP; they were older (61.1 ± 11.1 years vs 59.4 ± 11.7 years; P = 0.028), cause of cirrhosis was less often alcohol (83 .7 vs 88.2%; P < 0.001), Child-Pugh score was lower (8.9 vs 10.1; P < 0.001) and more often B than C (63.7% vs 38%; P < 0.001). In addition, in outpatients the platelet count was higher (161 ± 93 Giga/L vs 143 ± 89 Giga/L; P = 0.003), serum total bilirubin concentration was lower (38.2 ± 60.7 μmol/L vs 96.3 ± 143.3 μmol/L; P < 0.0001), and ascitic protein concentration higher (17.9 ± 10.7 g/L vs 14.5 ± 10.9 g/L; P < 0.001) than in inpatients. CONCLUSION: In asymptomatic cirrhotic outpatients, the incidence of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis is low thus exploratory paracentesis could be avoided in these patients without significant risk. PMID:23556041

  3. Relevance of prehypertension as a diagnostic category in asymptomatic adults

    PubMed Central

    Nary, Fernando Costa; Santos, Raul D.; Laurinavicius, Antonio Gabriele; Conceição, Raquel Dilguerian de Oliveira; de Carvalho, José Antonio Maluf

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To assess the association of prehypertension with metabolic, inflammatory and cardiovascular risk profile in asymptomatic individuals. Methods: Between 2006 and 2009, 11,011 asymptomatic adults (mean age: 43 years; 22% females), underwent a check-up protocol. They were divided into 3 groups: normotensive group (arterial pressure=120/80mmHg), prehypertensive group (arterial pressure >120/80mmHg and <140/90mmHg) and hypertensive group (arterial pressure≥140/90mmHg or prior diagnosis of hypertension). Each group metabolic and cardiovascular group profile was assessed. Results: The prevalence of normotension, prehypertension and hypertension was 27.9%, 53.9% and 18.2%, respectively. Prehypertensive individuals were older (mean age: 42.7 versus 40 years; p<0.001) than normotensive patients, and had higher body mass index (mean: 26.7kg/m2 versus 24kg/m2; p<0.001), higher plasma triglycerides levels (mean: 139mg/dL versus 108mg/dL; p<0.001), higher LDL-choleterol levels (mean: 128mg/dL versus 117mg/dL; p<0.001), and lower HDL-cholesterol (mean: 46.7mg/dL versus 52.7mg/dL; p<0.001). Prehypertensive individuals were more likely to have impaired fasting glucose (OR: 1.69; 95%CI: 1.39-2.04), overweight and obesity - body mass index >25kg/m2 (OR: 2.48; 95%CI: 2.24-2.74), hepatic steatosis: (OR: 2.23; 95%CI: 1.97-2.53), metabolic syndrome (OR: 3.05; 95%CI: 2.67-3.49), and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels>2mg/L (OR: 1.52; 95%CI: 1.35-1.71). Conclusion: Prehypertension is associated with an increased prevalence of metabolic syndrome, hepatic steatosis and subclinical inflammation. PMID:24136756

  4. Seroepidemiology of Asymptomatic Dengue Virus Infection in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Jamjoom, Ghazi A.; Azhar, Esam I.; Kao, Moujahid A.; Radadi, Raja M.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Although virologically confirmed dengue fever has been recognized in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, since 1994, causing yearly outbreaks, no proper seroepidemiologic studies on dengue virus have been conducted in this region. Such studies can define the extent of infection by this virus and estimate the proportion that may result in disease. The aim of this study was to measure the seroprevalence of past dengue virus infection in healthy Saudi nationals from different areas in the city of Jeddah and to investigate demographic and environmental factors that may increase exposure to infection. METHODS Sera were collected from 1984 Saudi subjects attending primary health care centers in six districts of Jeddah. These included general patients of various ages seeking routine vaccinations, antenatal care or treatment of different illnesses excluding fever or suspected dengue. A number of blood donors were also tested. Serum samples were tested by enzyme immunoassay (EIA) for IgG antibodies to dengue viruses 1, 2, 3, 4. A questionnaire was completed for each patient recording various anthropometric data and factors that may indicate possible risk of exposure to mosquito bites and dengue infection. Patients with missing data and those who reported a history of dengue fever were excluded from analysis, resulting in a sample of 1939 patients to be analyzed. RESULTS The overall prevalence of dengue virus infection as measured by anti-dengue IgG antibodies from asymptomatic residents in Jeddah was 47.8% (927/1939) and 37% (68/184) in blood donors. Infection mostly did not result in recognizable disease, as only 19 of 1956 subjects with complete information (0.1%) reported having dengue fever in the past. Anti dengue seropositivity increased with age and was higher in males than females and in residents of communal housing and multistory buildings than in villas. One of the six districts showed significant increase in exposure rate as compared to the others. Availability of

  5. Rapid Hepatobiliary Excretion of Micelle-Encapsulated/Radiolabeled Upconverting Nanoparticles as an Integrated Form

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Hyo Jung; Nam, Sang Hwan; Im, Hyung-Jun; Park, Ji-yong; Lee, Ji Youn; Yoo, Byeongjun; Lee, Yun-Sang; Jeong, Jae Min; Hyeon, Taeghwan; Who Kim, Ji; Lee, Jae Sung; Jang, In-Jin; Cho, Joo-Youn; Hwang, Do Won; Suh, Yung Doug; Lee, Dong Soo

    2015-01-01

    In the field of nanomedicine, long term accumulation of nanoparticles (NPs) in the mononuclear phagocyte system (MPS) such as liver is the major hurdle in clinical translation. On the other hand, NPs could be excreted via hepatobiliary excretion pathway without overt tissue toxicity. Therefore, it is critical to develop NPs that show favorable excretion property. Herein, we demonstrated that micelle encapsulated 64Cu-labeled upconverting nanoparticles (micelle encapsulated 64Cu-NOTA-UCNPs) showed substantial hepatobiliary excretion by in vivo positron emission tomography (PET) and also upconversion luminescence imaging (ULI). Ex vivo biodistribution study reinforced the imaging results by showing clearance of 84% of initial hepatic uptake in 72 hours. Hepatobiliary excretion of the UCNPs was also verified by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) examination. Micelle encapsulated 64Cu-NOTA-UCNPs could be an optimal bimodal imaging agent owing to quantifiability of 64Cu, ability of in vivo/ex vivo ULI and good hepatobiliary excretion property. PMID:26494465

  6. The significance of nitrate in the nitrogenous excretion of carcinus maenas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spaargaren, D. H.

    Total inorganic-N and NH 4+-N were measured in blood and external media of shore crabs, Carcinus maenas (L.), exposed to various salinities at low (4°C) and high (20°C) temperatures. Total inorganic-N and NH 4+-N were both excreted in larger amounts at lower salinities and at the higher temperature. Nitrate excretion is highest in brackish water and decreases in both higher and lower salinities. Nitrate excretion (0.11-0.72 μmol -1·h -1) was of the same order of magnitude as NH 4 + excretion, but in brackish water NO 3 - excretion predominated, whereas at lower salinities NH 4 + excretion predominated. NO 3 - formation may serve in the detoxification of NH 4 + and the maintenance of electroneutrality. Blood NO 3 - concentrations, like blood NH 4 + concentrations, are strongly stabilized, independent of either temperature or salinity.

  7. [Basic mechanisms: absorption and excretion of cholesterol and other sterols].

    PubMed

    Cofan Pujol, Montserrat

    2014-01-01

    Cholesterol is of vital importance for vertebrate cell membrane structure and function. It is obvious that adequate regulation of cholesterol homeostasis is essential. Hypercholesterolemia promotes atherosclerosis and thereby represents a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. The liver has been considered the major site of control in maintenance of cholesterol homeostasis. The liver facilitates clearance of (very) low density lipoprotein particles and cholesterol-containing chylomicron remnants, synthesizes cholesterol, synthesizes and secretes (nascent) high density lipoprotein particles, secretes cholesterol and bile salts to bile, and is involved in reverse cholesterol transport. In recent years, however, the importance of the intestine in many aspects of cholesterol physiology is increasingly recognized. It has become apparent that direct secretion of cholesterol from the blood compartment into the intestine, or transintestinal cholesterol excretion, plays a major role in disposal of cholesterol via the feces. This review will discuss current knowledge on the physiology of cholesterol homeostasis, with emphasis on cholesterol absorption, cholesterol synthesis and fecal excretion, and therapeutic options for hypercholesterolemia. PMID:24461630

  8. Effect of chloroquine on the urinary excretion of ciprofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Ilo, Cajetan E; Ezejiofor, Ndidi A; Agbakoba, Nneka; Brown, Sinye A; Maduagwuna, Chinonye A; Agbasi, Patrick U; Orisakwe, Orish E; Orisakweph, Orish E

    2008-01-01

    Ciprofloxacin is an inexpensive antibacterial, whereas chloroquine is an inexpensive antimalarial. The coadministration of chloroquine and ciprofloxacin is easily encountered because both drugs are commonly prescribed to patients in the tropics. Five healthy male volunteers aged 19 to 31 years who were not taking any of the prescribed medications and who had no sensitivity to either ciprofloxacin or chloroquine each received 500 mg ciprofloxacin orally with 250 mL of water, and after a 2-week washout period, 500 mg ciprofloxacin plus 600 mg chloroquine was administered orally with 250 mL of water after providing informed consent. A urine sample (7 mL) was collected just before taking the drug at 8:00 AM representing 0 hour and continued afterward at 1, 2, 4, 8, 12, and 24 hours the next day. The samples were stored at -20 degrees C until analyzed. The minimum inhibitory concentrations by diffusion through agar technique were used for the assay of urine ciprofloxacin. The rate of ciprofloxacin excretion and cumulative urine ciprofloxacin were significantly increased. The coadministration of chloroquine increased the cumulative urinary concentration and excretion rate of ciprofloxacin.

  9. Effect of chloroquine on the urinary excretion of ciprofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Ilo, Cajetan E; Ezejiofor, Ndidi A; Agbakoba, Nneka; Brown, Sinye A; Maduagwuna, Chinonye A; Agbasi, Patrick U; Orisakwe, Orish E; Orisakweph, Orish E

    2008-01-01

    Ciprofloxacin is an inexpensive antibacterial, whereas chloroquine is an inexpensive antimalarial. The coadministration of chloroquine and ciprofloxacin is easily encountered because both drugs are commonly prescribed to patients in the tropics. Five healthy male volunteers aged 19 to 31 years who were not taking any of the prescribed medications and who had no sensitivity to either ciprofloxacin or chloroquine each received 500 mg ciprofloxacin orally with 250 mL of water, and after a 2-week washout period, 500 mg ciprofloxacin plus 600 mg chloroquine was administered orally with 250 mL of water after providing informed consent. A urine sample (7 mL) was collected just before taking the drug at 8:00 AM representing 0 hour and continued afterward at 1, 2, 4, 8, 12, and 24 hours the next day. The samples were stored at -20 degrees C until analyzed. The minimum inhibitory concentrations by diffusion through agar technique were used for the assay of urine ciprofloxacin. The rate of ciprofloxacin excretion and cumulative urine ciprofloxacin were significantly increased. The coadministration of chloroquine increased the cumulative urinary concentration and excretion rate of ciprofloxacin. PMID:18806516

  10. Retention and excretion of 95Zr-95Nb in humans.

    PubMed

    Thind, K S

    1995-12-01

    This note describes the retention and excretion of 95Zr-95Nb in humans based on a recent CANDU experience and a literature survey of reported cases. Two data bases, QUEST and INIS were used for the survey. Three reported cases were discovered: two for occupational exposures and one for public exposure from nuclear weapons fallout. Human lung retention from these three cases, plus whole body retention and some limited fecal excretion data from a recently occurred exposure at a CANDU station, were reviewed and tested against predictions based on ICRP Publication 30 model. Based on the fits of this model to the reported data it seems that the three occupational exposures exhibit class Y behavior while the public exposure exhibits class W behavior. For only one case is the chemical compound known with certainty: ZrO2. Zirconium oxides are currently classified as class W in ICRP Publications 30 and 54. This work confirms a suggestion that oxides of zirconium be classified as class Y and should be taken into account by the ICRP in its future publications.

  11. Enhancement of anammox by the excretion of diel vertical migrators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, Daniele; Babbin, Andrew R.; Galbraith, Eric D.

    2014-11-01

    Measurements show that anaerobic ammonium oxidation with nitrite (anammox) is a major pathway of fixed nitrogen removal in the anoxic zones of the open ocean. Anammox requires a source of ammonium, which under anoxic conditions could be supplied by the breakdown of sinking organic matter via heterotrophic denitrification. However, at many locations where anammox is measured, denitrification rates are small or undetectable. Alternative sources of ammonium have been proposed to explain this paradox, for example through dissimilatory reduction of nitrate to ammonium and transport from anoxic sediments. However, the relevance of these sources in open-ocean anoxic zones is debated. Here, we bring to attention an additional source of ammonium, namely, the daytime excretion by zooplankton and micronekton migrating from the surface to anoxic waters. We use a synthesis of acoustic data to show that, where anoxic waters occur within the water column, most migrators spend the daytime within them. Although migrators export only a small fraction of primary production from the surface, they focus excretion within a confined depth range of anoxic water where particle input is small. Using a simple biogeochemical model, we suggest that, at those depths, the source of ammonium from organisms undergoing diel vertical migrations could exceed the release from particle remineralization, enhancing in situ anammox rates. The contribution of this previously overlooked process, and the numerous uncertainties surrounding it, call for further efforts to evaluate the role of animals in oxygen minimum zone biogeochemistry.

  12. High Salt Diet Affects Renal Sodium Excretion and ERRα Expression

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dan; Wang, Yang; Liu, Fu-Qiang; Yuan, Zu-Yi; Mu, Jian-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Kidneys regulate the balance of water and sodium and therefore are related to blood pressure. It is unclear whether estrogen-related receptor α (ERRα), an orphan nuclear receptor and transcription factor highly expressed in kidneys, affects the reabsorption of water and sodium. The aim of this study was to determine whether changes in the expressions of ERRα, Na+/K+-ATPase and epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) proteins affected the reabsorption of water and sodium in kidneys of Dahl salt-sensitive (DS) rats. SS.13BN rats, 98% homologous to the DS rats, were used as a normotensive control group. The 24 h urinary sodium excretion of the DS and SS.13BN rats increased after the 6-week high salt diet intervention, while sodium excretion was increased in DS rats with daidzein (agonist of ERRα) treatment. ERRα expression was decreased, while β- and γ-ENaC mRNA expressions were increased upon high sodium diet treatment in the DS rats. In the chromatin immunoprecipitation (CHIP) assay, positive PCR signals were obtained in samples treated with anti-ERRα antibody. The transcriptional activity of ERRα was decreased upon high salt diet intervention. ERRα reduced the expressions of β- and γ-ENaC by binding to the ENaC promoter, thereby increased Na+ reabsorption. Therefore, ERRα might be one of the factors causing salt-sensitive hypertension. PMID:27043552

  13. Urinary oxalate and glycolate excretion and plasma oxalate concentration.

    PubMed Central

    Barratt, T M; Kasidas, G P; Murdoch, I; Rose, G A

    1991-01-01

    The diagnosis of primary hyperoxaluria in young children is hampered by the lack of a reliable reference range for urinary oxalate excretion, especially in infants. We present data on urinary oxalate and glycolate excretion in 137 normal children, on the plasma oxalate concentration in 33 normal children and 53 with chronic renal failure, and on amniotic fluid oxalate concentration in 63 uncomplicated pregnancies. The urinary oxalate:creatinine molar ratios were log normally distributed: mean (range) values were less than 1 year 0.061 (0.015-0.26), 1-5 years 0.036 (0.011-0.12), 5-12 years 0.030 (0.0059-0.15), and greater than 12 years 0.013 (0.0021-0.083). Geometric mean (range) plasma oxalate concentration in the normal children was 1.53 (0.78-3.02) mumols/l and was independent of age. The mean (SD) plasma oxalate: creatinine molar ratio in these normal children and 50 with chronic renal failure was 0.033 (0.013), and was independent of age and renal function. Mean (SD) amniotic fluid oxalate concentration was 19.0 (4.3) mumols/l. PMID:2031609

  14. [Basic mechanisms: absorption and excretion of cholesterol and other sterols].

    PubMed

    Cofan Pujol, Montserrat

    2014-01-01

    Cholesterol is of vital importance for vertebrate cell membrane structure and function. It is obvious that adequate regulation of cholesterol homeostasis is essential. Hypercholesterolemia promotes atherosclerosis and thereby represents a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. The liver has been considered the major site of control in maintenance of cholesterol homeostasis. The liver facilitates clearance of (very) low density lipoprotein particles and cholesterol-containing chylomicron remnants, synthesizes cholesterol, synthesizes and secretes (nascent) high density lipoprotein particles, secretes cholesterol and bile salts to bile, and is involved in reverse cholesterol transport. In recent years, however, the importance of the intestine in many aspects of cholesterol physiology is increasingly recognized. It has become apparent that direct secretion of cholesterol from the blood compartment into the intestine, or transintestinal cholesterol excretion, plays a major role in disposal of cholesterol via the feces. This review will discuss current knowledge on the physiology of cholesterol homeostasis, with emphasis on cholesterol absorption, cholesterol synthesis and fecal excretion, and therapeutic options for hypercholesterolemia.

  15. High Salt Diet Affects Renal Sodium Excretion and ERRα Expression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dan; Wang, Yang; Liu, Fu-Qiang; Yuan, Zu-Yi; Mu, Jian-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Kidneys regulate the balance of water and sodium and therefore are related to blood pressure. It is unclear whether estrogen-related receptor α (ERRα), an orphan nuclear receptor and transcription factor highly expressed in kidneys, affects the reabsorption of water and sodium. The aim of this study was to determine whether changes in the expressions of ERRα, Na⁺/K⁺-ATPase and epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) proteins affected the reabsorption of water and sodium in kidneys of Dahl salt-sensitive (DS) rats. SS.13BN rats, 98% homologous to the DS rats, were used as a normotensive control group. The 24 h urinary sodium excretion of the DS and SS.13BN rats increased after the 6-week high salt diet intervention, while sodium excretion was increased in DS rats with daidzein (agonist of ERRα) treatment. ERRα expression was decreased, while β- and γ-ENaC mRNA expressions were increased upon high sodium diet treatment in the DS rats. In the chromatin immunoprecipitation (CHIP) assay, positive PCR signals were obtained in samples treated with anti-ERRα antibody. The transcriptional activity of ERRα was decreased upon high salt diet intervention. ERRα reduced the expressions of β- and γ-ENaC by binding to the ENaC promoter, thereby increased Na+ reabsorption. Therefore, ERRα might be one of the factors causing salt-sensitive hypertension. PMID:27043552

  16. Metabolism and Excretion of Trichloroethylene after Inhalation by Human Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Bartoníček, V.

    1962-01-01

    Eight volunteers were exposed to trichloroethylene vapour (1,042 μg./l.) for five hours; 51 to 64% of the inhaled trichloroethylene was retained. The concentration of trichloroethanol and trichloroacetic acid in the urine was studied daily for a three-week period; on the third day both metabolites were determined in faeces, sweat, and saliva. The concentration of trichloroacetic acid in plasma and red blood cells was studied on alternate days. Of the trichloroethylene retained, 38·0 to 49·7% was excreted in the urine as trichloroethanol and 27·4 to 35·7% as trichloroacetic acid. Of both metabolites 8·4% was excreted in the faeces. Sweat collected on the third day of the experiment contained 0·10 to 1·92 mg./100 ml. trichloroethanol and 0·15 to 0·35 mg./100 ml. trichloroacetic acid. In saliva the concentrations were 0·09 to 0·32 mg./100 ml. trichloroethanol and 0·10 to 0·15 mg./100 ml. trichloroacetic acid. The value of the expression trichloroethanol/trichloroacetic acid calculated in the urine within 22 days was within the range 1·15 to 1·81. PMID:13865497

  17. Noncoding RNPs of viral origin.

    PubMed

    Steitz, Joan; Borah, Sumit; Cazalla, Demian; Fok, Victor; Lytle, Robin; Mitton-Fry, Rachel; Riley, Kasandra; Samji, Tasleem

    2011-03-01

    Like their host cells, many viruses produce noncoding (nc)RNAs. These show diversity with respect to time of expression during viral infection, length and structure, protein-binding partners and relative abundance compared with their host-cell counterparts. Viruses, with their limited genomic capacity, presumably evolve or acquire ncRNAs only if they selectively enhance the viral life cycle or assist the virus in combating the host's response to infection. Despite much effort, identifying the functions of viral ncRNAs has been extremely challenging. Recent technical advances and enhanced understanding of host-cell ncRNAs promise accelerated insights into the RNA warfare mounted by this fascinating class of RNPs. PMID:20719877

  18. COMPARISON OF METHODS TO IDENTIFY Neisseria meningitidis IN ASYMPTOMATIC CARRIERS

    PubMed Central

    RIZEK, Camila F.; LUIZ, André Machado; de ASSIS, Gracilene Ramos; COSTA, Silvia Figueiredo; LEVIN, Anna Sara; LOPES, Marta Heloisa

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Neisseria meningitidis is a cause of several life-threatening diseases and can be a normal commensal in the upper respiratory tract of healthy carriers. The carrier rate is not well established especially because there is no standard method for the isolation of N. meningitidis. Therefore, the aim of this study was to compare identification methods for the carrier state. Two swabs were collected from 190 volunteers: one was cultured and the other had DNA extracted directly from the sample. The Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) was performed to determine species and serogroups and compared the results between the methods. PCR for species determination used two pairs of primers and when there was only one amplicon, it was sequenced. The culture technique was positive in 23 (12.1%) subjects while the direct extraction method was positive in 132 (69.5%), p < 0.001. Among the 135 subjects with positive N. meningitides tests, 88 (65.2%) were serogroup C; 3 (2.2%) serogroup B; 5 (3.7%) were positive for both serogroup B and C, and 39 (28.9%) did not belong to any of the tested serogroups. In this study, PCR from DNA extracted directly from swabs identified more N. meningitidis asymptomatic carriers than the culture technique. PMID:27680165

  19. Evaluation of the patient with asymptomatic microscopic hematuria.

    PubMed

    Ziemba, Justin; Guzzo, Thomas J; Ramchandani, Parvati

    2015-08-01

    Asymptomatic microscopic hematuria (AMH) is relatively common in clinical practice but the etiology remains unclear in the majority of patients; it is rarely related to genitourinary malignancies. The 2012 guidelines of the American Urological Association recommend an evaluation after a single positive urinalysis with mandatory upper tract evaluation in all patients, preferably with CT urography (CTU). The likelihood of detecting significant upper track abnormalities, particularly malignancies is low with CTU, while incidental extraurinary abnormalities are often found, the majority of which are not clinically significant. The workup for these incidental findings has significant financial and clinical implications. Primary care physicians, who are most apt to encounter patients with AMH, have a low rate of adherence to the AUA guidelines, possibly as a result of the broadening of criteria for AMH evaluation by the AUA, with resultant uncertainty amongst primary care physicians about the appropriate candidates for such evaluation. Selection of subgroups of patients with risk factors for GU malignancies who may benefit from a complete evaluation is essential, as opposed to evaluation of all patients classified as having AMH.

  20. Prevalence of asymptomatic cardiac valve anomalies in idiopathic scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Colomina, M J; Puig, L; Godet, C; Villanueva, C; Bago, J

    2002-01-01

    The prevalence of asymptomatic cardiac valve anomalies was determined in 82 patients (69 females and 13 males) diagnosed as having idiopathic scoliosis and scheduled for corrective surgery (mean age at surgery 16.3 years). The preoperative study in each patient included echocardiography and ultrasound Doppler. Twenty-three valvular anomalies were found in 20 patients (24.4%). The most frequent was mitral valve prolapse. The occurrence of valvular anomalies did not correlate with sex, curve magnitude, or age at diagnosis. Eighteen patients presented a total of 20 comorbid conditions: positive family history of scoliosis (five cases), isthmic spondylolisthesis (five cases), nervous anorexia (two cases), hereditary exostosis, cystic fibrosis, ureteral stenosis, mammary hypoplasia, slipped capital femoral epiphysis, psoriasis, celiac disease, and lactose intolerance. A significant relationship was found between valvular anomalies and comorbidity. Valvular anomalies were detected in 11 out of 64 patients (17.2%) with no comorbidity and in nine out of 18 patients (50%) with a comorbid condition (Chi-square 8.2, p = 0.004). In this latter group of patients, routine echocardiographic study seems advisable in the preoperative evaluation. PMID:12170360

  1. Evaluation of the patient with asymptomatic microscopic hematuria.

    PubMed

    Ziemba, Justin; Guzzo, Thomas J; Ramchandani, Parvati

    2015-08-01

    Asymptomatic microscopic hematuria (AMH) is relatively common in clinical practice but the etiology remains unclear in the majority of patients; it is rarely related to genitourinary malignancies. The 2012 guidelines of the American Urological Association recommend an evaluation after a single positive urinalysis with mandatory upper tract evaluation in all patients, preferably with CT urography (CTU). The likelihood of detecting significant upper track abnormalities, particularly malignancies is low with CTU, while incidental extraurinary abnormalities are often found, the majority of which are not clinically significant. The workup for these incidental findings has significant financial and clinical implications. Primary care physicians, who are most apt to encounter patients with AMH, have a low rate of adherence to the AUA guidelines, possibly as a result of the broadening of criteria for AMH evaluation by the AUA, with resultant uncertainty amongst primary care physicians about the appropriate candidates for such evaluation. Selection of subgroups of patients with risk factors for GU malignancies who may benefit from a complete evaluation is essential, as opposed to evaluation of all patients classified as having AMH. PMID:26100195

  2. Guidelines for noninvasive evaluation of asymptomatic carotid bruits.

    PubMed

    Kartchner, M M; McRae, L P

    1981-01-01

    Basic recommendations for follow-up utilizing OPG/CPA results are as follows: Grade 1: Repeat studies in 12 months in the absence of specific focal TIAs or increase of bifurcation level bruit. Grade 2: Serial studies in 6 to 12 months in the absence of focal TIAs which provide their own indications for evaluation. If stability is established, 12-month interval testing is adequate. Grade 3: Serial studies in 3 to 6 months until a progression trend is established. Anticipation of major surgery with possible hypotension or severe blood loss is an indication for arteriography and possible endarterectomy. Grade 4: If repeat studies confirm grade 4 status, prophylactic carotid arteriography and endarterectomy should be seriously considered. If surgery is not employed, repeat OPG/CPA evaluation at 2 to 4 month intervals detects further progression toward total occlusion. Grade 5: Indications for arteriography in anticipation of surgery are tempered by the lower probability (30%) of a surgically correctable stenosis and the clinical status of the patient. In conclusion, we feel that OPG/CPA represents one valid means of noninvasively evaluating the presence and underlying hemodynamic significance of an asymptomatic bruit with sufficient reliability to justify angiography and prophylactic carotid endarterectomy on the basis of appropriate findings.

  3. Neurocognitive correlates of alexithymia in asymptomatic individuals with HIV.

    PubMed

    Bogdanova, Yelena; Díaz-Santos, Mirella; Cronin-Golomb, Alice

    2010-04-01

    Alexithymia, an impairment of affective and cognitive emotional processing, is often associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and may reflect effects of the virus on brain areas that are also important for multiple cognitive functions, such as the prefrontal and anterior cingulate cortices. We hypothesized that there would be a correlation between extent of alexithymia and cognitive performance associated with these brain areas, including attention, executive function, and visuospatial processing. Thirty-four asymptomatic HIV+ participants and 34 matched healthy HIV- volunteers were administered the Toronto Alexithymia Scale, a series of neuropsychological tests, and measures of apathy, depression, and quality of life (QoL). The HIV+ participants had significantly higher levels of alexithymia, depression and apathy than the HIV- group. The extent of alexithymia and two of its processing components (Difficulty Describing Feelings [DDF] and Externally Oriented Thinking), but not depression, correlated with performance on measures of executive and visuospatial abilities, consistent with dysfunction of the frontostriatal circuits and their cortical projections. Apathy was related to alexithymia and two processing components (Difficulty Identifying Feelings and DDF) but to only one cognitive measure. The higher rate of alexithymia, as well as cognitive dysfunction, in HIV may be a consequence of the infection on the frontostriatal system and its cortical connections. Our findings also demonstrated a dissociation of apathy and alexithymia in HIV, pointing to overlapping but distinct neural substrates within frontostriatal circuits. Alexithymia correlated strongly with QoL ratings, underscoring the importance of assessment and treatment of HIV-associated emotional and cognitive processing deficits.

  4. Mammographic Breast Density Patterns in Asymptomatic Mexican Women

    PubMed Central

    Calderón-Garcidueñas, Ana Laura; Sanabria-Mondragón, Mónica; Hernández-Beltrán, Lourdes; López-Amador, Noé; Cerda-Flores, Ricardo M.

    2012-01-01

    Breast density (BD) is a risk factor for breast cancer. Aims. To describe BD patterns in asymptomatic Mexican women and the pathological mammographic findings. Methods and Material. Prospective, descriptive, and comparative study. Women answered a questionnaire and their mammograms were analyzed according to BI-RADS. Univariate (χ2) and conditional logistic regression analyses were performed. Results. In 300 women studied the BD patterns were fat 56.7% (170), fibroglandular 29% (87), heterogeneously dense 5.7% (17), and dense pattern 8.6% (26). Prevalence of fat pattern was significantly different in women under 50 years (37.6%, 44/117) and older than 50 (68.8%, 126/183). Patterns of high breast density (BD) (dense + heterogeneously dense) were observed in 25.6% (30/117) of women ≤50 years and 7.1% (13/183) of women >50. Asymmetry in BD was observed in 22% (66/300). Compression cone ruled out underlying disease in 56 cases. In the remaining 10, biopsy revealed one fibroadenoma, one complex cyst, and 6 invasive and 2 intraductal carcinomas. 2.6% (8/300) of patients had non-palpable carcinomas. Benign lesions were observed in 63.3% (190/300) of cases, vascular calcification in 150 cases (78.9%), and fat necrosis in 38 cases (20%). Conclusions. Mexican women have a low percentage of high-density patterns. PMID:23346398

  5. Asymptomatic abdominal wall endometrioma 15 years after cesarean section.

    PubMed

    Tica, V I; Tomescu, C L; Tomescu, Aneta; Micu, Luminiţa; Zaher, M; Bafani, S; Beghim, M; Serbănescu, L; Tica, Irina

    2006-01-01

    Abdominal wall endometriosis is rare and its diagnosis is difficult. However, the consequences may be serious, like recurrences or even malignant transformation. We report a rarer case of asymptomatic abdominal wall endometrioma, accidentally found during a surgical procedure for a second cesarean section, in a 39-years old patient, without any relevant history of endometriosis. The tumor was subcutaneous, 3/3 cm in size, located in the left angle of the incision from the 15 years previously performed cesarean section and freely mobile in relation with the skin and the fascia. It was excised, with clear margins (to prevent recurrences), during the procedure. The patient was discharged after five days. The postoperative period and the follow-up at one and three months were uneventful. The pathological examination clarified the diagnosis by revealing an endometrioma with decidual reaction. Such a condition may be, therefore, evoked before an abdominal wall tumor, even without specific symptoms, even in a 39-years old woman and longtime after the possible causal surgery. Pathological examination remains the ultimate diagnostic tool. Relevant prophylactic attitude at the end of the cesarean section may be considered.

  6. [Emerging viral diseases in Europe].

    PubMed

    Löbermann, M; Gürtler, L G; Eichler-Löbermann, B; Reisinger, E C

    2012-04-01

    Emergence of viral agents in Europe is influenced by various factors. Climatic changes influencing possible vectors, insufficient vaccination, and travel of man and goods are among the most important reasons to explain these changes. Fever and arthralgia are the leading symptoms in infection with Dengue, Sindbis, or Chikungunya virus. In contrast, tick-born encephalitis (TBE), Toscana, or West Nile virus infections mainly lead to meningo-encephalitis. In Europe, hemorrhagic fever is caused by Crimean Congo and Hanta virus. Protective vaccines are available for emerging viral agents like TBE, influenza and measles.

  7. Viral IAPs, then and now.

    PubMed

    Clem, Rollie J

    2015-03-01

    The identification, now more than 20 years ago, of the first iap genes in baculoviruses subsequently led to many important discoveries concerning the regulation of apoptosis and other important biological processes in insects and mammals. Currently there are more than 200 known viral IAP homologs in baculoviruses and other families of invertebrate DNA viruses. This review begins with a personal account of the events leading up to the discovery of the first iap genes, followed by a summary of what is currently known about the different types of viral IAPs and their functions in regulating apoptosis, and possibly other cellular processes.

  8. Influence of curcumin on cyclosporin-induced reduction of biliary bilirubin and cholesterol excretion and on biliary excretion of cyclosporin and its metabolites.

    PubMed

    Deters, M; Siegers, C; Hänsel, W; Schneider, K P; Hennighausen, G

    2000-06-01

    We investigated the ability of curcumin, which can be extracted from different Curcuma species, to prevent cyclosporin-induced reduction of biliary bilirubin and cholesterol excretion, and its influence on biliary excretion of cyclosporin (CS) and its metabolites in the bile fistula model in rats. I.v. injection of curcumin (25 and 50 mg/kg) after 30 min increased dose-dependently basal bile flow (30 microliters/kg/min) up to 200%, biliary bilirubin excretion (3000 pmol/kg/min) up to 150%, and biliary cholesterol excretion (22 nmol/kg/min) up to 113%. CS (30 mg/kg) reduced bile flow to 66% and biliary excretion of bilirubin and of cholesterol to 33% of the basal value 30 min after i.v. injection. I.v. administration of curcumin (25 and 50 mg/kg) 30 min after CS increased bile flow dose dependently again to 130% for 1 hour and biliary excretion of cholesterol and of bilirubin to 100% of the basal value for 30 and 150 min, respectively. Injection of curcumin 15 min before CS prevented the CS-induced drop of bile flow at 50 mg/kg and reduction of biliary bilirubin excretion already at 25 mg/kg until the end of the experiment (180 min). The CS-induced reduction of biliary cholesterol excretion, however, was not prevented by curcumin. Finally, the biliary excretions of CS (1200 ng/kg/min) and its metabolites (1200 ng/kg/min) were slightly reduced by curcumin at a dose of 50 mg/kg (to 83% of the initial values). The clinical importance of these controversial effects remains to be shown.

  9. Nitric oxide radicals in leucocytes and vaginal washes of Trichomonas vaginalis -infected symptomatic and asymptomatic women.

    PubMed

    Yadav, M; Dubey, M L; Gupta, I; Malla, N

    2006-03-01

    The clinical spectrum of Trichomonas vaginalis infection varies from asymptomatic to mild, moderate or severe vaginitis. Nitric oxide and other reactive nitrogen radicals produced by immune effector cells are important cytotoxic and cytostatic mediators against several microorganisms including parasites. In the present study, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and reactive nitrogen intermediates (RNI) were determined in leucocyte cultures (stimulated with T. vaginalis in vitro) and vaginal washes (VWs) of 22 symptomatic and 20 asymptomatic T. vaginalis-infected and 20 healthy women by immunoblotting and Griess method respectively. The iNOS protein was detected in leucocytes and VWs of all the symptomatic and asymptomatic women, but was not detected in any of the samples from healthy women. Mean iNOS protein band intensity was significantly higher in leucocytes as compared to VWs (P<0.001) of both symptomatic and asymptomatic women and was also higher in leucocytes of asymptomatic as compared to symptomatic women (P<0.05). Mean RNI concentration was also significantly higher in leucocytes (P<0.01) and VWs (P<0.05) of asymptomatic as compared to symptomatic women, and was also higher in samples of infected as compared to healthy women (P<0.001). These results suggest that reactive nitrogen radicals may have a role in limiting T. vaginalis infection in asymptomatic women. PMID:16529664

  10. High viral load in lymph nodes and latent human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in peripheral blood cells of HIV-1-infected chimpanzees.

    PubMed Central

    Saksela, K; Muchmore, E; Girard, M; Fultz, P; Baltimore, D

    1993-01-01

    We have examined human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection in chimpanzees by analyzing HIV-1 DNA and RNA in lymph nodes and peripheral mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Like certain asymptomatic HIV-infected persons, these chimpanzees had no detectable viral replication in their PBMCs. However, viral replication and a high viral load were observed in the lymphatic tissue. Despite the absence of viral replication in PBMCs, 1/1,000 to 1/10,000 of the PBMCs contained HIV-1 proviral DNA, and HIV transcription could be rapidly induced in these cells in vitro. These results provide direct evidence of cellular latency of HIV in vivo and suggest that HIV infection in chimpanzees may be a useful model for clinical latency of HIV infection in humans. Images PMID:8230463

  11. Outcome and survival of asymptomatic PML in natalizumab-treated MS patients

    PubMed Central

    Dong-Si, Tuan; Richman, Sandra; Wattjes, Mike P; Wenten, Made; Gheuens, Sarah; Philip, Jeffrey; Datta, Shoibal; McIninch, James; Bozic, Carmen; Bloomgren, Gary; Richert, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    Objective As of 3 September 2013, 399 cases of natalizumab-associated progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) were confirmed in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. We evaluated outcomes of natalizumab-treated MS patients who were asymptomatic at PML diagnosis. Methods Analyses included data available as of 5 June 2013. Asymptomatic patients diagnosed with PML by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings and JC virus DNA detection in the central nervous system were compared with patients presenting with symptoms at diagnosis. Demographics, MRI, and survival over 12 months were analyzed. Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) and Karnofsky Performance Scale (KPS) scores were recorded pre-PML, at diagnosis, and at 6 and 12 months post-diagnosis. Results A total of 372 PML cases were analyzed; 30 patients were asymptomatic and 342 were symptomatic at PML diagnosis. Classifications of PML lesions on MRI in asymptomatic versus symptomatic patients were unilobar in 68% versus 37%, multilobar in 21% versus 24%, and widespread in 11% versus 40%. In both groups with unilobar lesions, frontal lobe lesions predominated. Prior to PML, mean EDSS and KPS scores were similar for asymptomatic and symptomatic patients. At diagnosis, mean EDSS score was significantly lower for asymptomatic patients (4.1; n = 11) than for symptomatic patients (5.4; n = 193; P = 0.038). Six months after PML diagnosis, asymptomatic patients had less functional disability than symptomatic patients. As of 5 June 2013, 96.7% of asymptomatic patients and 75.4% of symptomatic patients were alive. Interpretation PML patients asymptomatic at diagnosis had better survival and less functional disability than those who were symptomatic at diagnosis. PMID:25493267

  12. Abnormal findings on knee magnetic resonance imaging in asymptomatic NBA players.

    PubMed

    Walczak, Brian E; McCulloch, Patrick C; Kang, Richard W; Zelazny, Anthony; Tedeschi, Fred; Cole, Brian J

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the knees of asymptomatic National Basketball Association (NBA) players via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and confirm or dispute findings reported in the previous literature. It is thought that a variety of significant abnormalities affecting the knee exist in asymptomatic patients and that these findings can be accurately identified on MRI. Two months prior to the 2005 season, bilateral knee MRI examinations of 14 asymptomatic NBA players (28 knees) were evaluated for abnormalities of the articular cartilage, menisci, and patellar and quadriceps tendons. The presence of joint effusion, subchondral edema, and cystic lesions and the integrity of the collateral and cruciate ligaments were also assessed.

  13. Endemic versus epidemic viral spreads display distinct patterns of HTLV-2b replication

    SciTech Connect

    Gabet, Anne-Sophie; Moules, Vincent; Sibon, David; Nass, Catharie C.; Mortreux, Franck; Mauclere, Philippe; Gessain, Antoine; Murphy, Edward L.; Wattel, Eric . E-mail: wattel@lyon.fnclcc.fr

    2006-02-05

    As the replication pattern of leukemogenic PTLVs possesses a strong pathogenic impact, we investigated HTLV-2 replication in vivo in asymptomatic carriers belonging into 2 distinct populations infected by the same HTLV-2b subtype. They include epidemically infected American blood donors, in whom HTLV-2b has been present for only 30 years, and endemically infected Bakola Pygmies from Cameroon, characterized by a long viral endemicity (at least few generations). In blood donors, both the circulating proviral loads and the degree of infected cell proliferation were largely lower than those characterizing asymptomatic carriers infected with leukemogenic PTLVs (HTLV-1, STLV-1). This might contribute to explain the lack of known link between HTLV-2b infection and the development of malignancies in this population. In contrast, endemically infected individuals displayed high proviral loads resulting from the extensive proliferation of infected cells. The route and/or the duration of infection, viral genetic drift, host immune response, genetic background, co-infections or a combination thereof might have contributed to these differences between endemically and epidemically infected subjects. As the clonality pattern observed in endemically infected individuals is very reminiscent of that of leukemogenic PTLVs at the pre-leukemic stage, our results highlight the possible oncogenic effect of HTLV-2b infection in such population.

  14. Viral subversion of nucleocytoplasmic trafficking.

    PubMed

    Yarbrough, Melanie L; Mata, Miguel A; Sakthivel, Ramanavelan; Fontoura, Beatriz M A

    2014-02-01

    Trafficking of proteins and RNA into and out of the nucleus occurs through the nuclear pore complex (NPC). Because of its critical function in many cellular processes, the NPC and transport factors are common targets of several viruses that disrupt key constituents of the machinery to facilitate viral replication. Many viruses such as poliovirus and severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) virus inhibit protein import into the nucleus, whereas viruses such as influenza A virus target and disrupt host mRNA nuclear export. Current evidence indicates that these viruses may employ such strategies to avert the host immune response. Conversely, many viruses co-opt nucleocytoplasmic trafficking to facilitate transport of viral RNAs. As viral proteins interact with key regulators of the host nuclear transport machinery, viruses have served as invaluable tools of discovery that led to the identification of novel constituents of nuclear transport pathways. This review explores the importance of nucleocytoplasmic trafficking to viral pathogenesis as these studies revealed new antiviral therapeutic strategies and exposed previously unknown cellular mechanisms. Further understanding of nuclear transport pathways will determine whether such therapeutics will be useful treatments for important human pathogens.

  15. Asian citrus psyllid viral pathogen

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A newly discovered viral pathogen of Asian citrus psyllid, AsCP, Diaphorina citri, Kuwayama (Psyllidae: Hemiptera) was classified as a Reoviridae. This virus may serve as a biological control agent for AsCP. The AsCP is an efficient vector of the plant-infecting bacterium (Candidatus Liberibacter as...

  16. Viral Subversion of Nucleocytoplasmic Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Yarbrough, Melanie L.; Mata, Miguel A.; Sakthivel, Ramanavelan; Fontoura, Beatriz M. A.

    2014-01-01

    Trafficking of proteins and RNA into and out of the nucleus occurs through the nuclear pore complex (NPC). Due to its critical function in many cellular processes, the NPC and transport factors are common targets of several viruses that disrupt key constituents of the machinery to facilitate viral replication. Many viruses such as poliovirus and severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) virus inhibit protein import into the nucleus, while viruses such as influenza A virus target and disrupt host mRNA nuclear export. Current evidence indicates that these viruses may employ such strategies to avert the host immune response. Conversely, many viruses co-opt nucleocytoplasmic trafficking to facilitate transport of viral RNAs. Since viral proteins interact with key regulators of the host nuclear transport machinery, viruses have served as invaluable tools of discovery that led to the identification of novel constituents of nuclear transport pathways. In addition, this review explores the importance of nucleocytoplasmic trafficking to viral pathogenesis as these studies revealed new antiviral therapeutic strategies and exposed previously unknown cellular mechanisms. Further understanding of nuclear transport pathways will determine whether such therapeutics will be useful treatments for important human pathogens. PMID:24289861

  17. The Paradigm of Viral Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welker, Carl B.

    2002-01-01

    Introduces the concepts of idea viruses and viral communication, a technology-based communication that spreads ideas quickly. Explains its applicability in the area of direct marketing and discusses a technology platform that provides the opportunity of sending a message to a large number of people and emotional or pecuniary incentives to…

  18. Nosocomial Spread of Viral Disease

    PubMed Central

    Aitken, Celia; Jeffries, Donald J.

    2001-01-01

    Viruses are important causes of nosocomial infection, but the fact that hospital outbreaks often result from introduction(s) from community-based epidemics, together with the need to initiate specific laboratory testing, means that there are usually insufficient data to allow the monitoring of trends in incidences. The most important defenses against nosocomial transmission of viruses are detailed and continuing education of staff and strict adherence to infection control policies. Protocols must be available to assist in the management of patients with suspected or confirmed viral infection in the health care setting. In this review, we present details on general measures to prevent the spread of viral infection in hospitals and other health care environments. These include principles of accommodation of infected patients and approaches to good hygiene and patient management. They provide detail on individual viral diseases accompanied in each case with specific information on control of the infection and, where appropriate, details of preventive and therapeutic measures. The important areas of nosocomial infection due to blood-borne viruses have been extensively reviewed previously and are summarized here briefly, with citation of selected review articles. Human prion diseases, which present management problems very different from those of viral infection, are not included. PMID:11432812

  19. Autistic disorder and viral infections.

    PubMed

    Libbey, Jane E; Sweeten, Thayne L; McMahon, William M; Fujinami, Robert S

    2005-02-01

    Autistic disorder (autism) is a behaviorally defined developmental disorder with a wide range of behaviors. Although the etiology of autism is unknown, data suggest that autism results from multiple etiologies with both genetic and environmental contributions, which may explain the spectrum of behaviors seen in this disorder. One proposed etiology for autism is viral infection very early in development. The mechanism, by which viral infection may lead to autism, be it through direct infection of the central nervous system (CNS), through infection elsewhere in the body acting as a trigger for disease in the CNS, through alteration of the immune response of the mother or offspring, or through a combination of these, is not yet known. Animal models in which early viral infection results in behavioral changes later in life include the influenza virus model in pregnant mice and the Borna disease virus model in newborn Lewis rats. Many studies over the years have presented evidence both for and against the association of autism with various viral infections. The best association to date has been made between congenital rubella and autism; however, members of the herpes virus family may also have a role in autism. Recently, controversy has arisen as to the involvement of measles virus and/or the measles, mumps, rubella (MMR) vaccine in the development of autism. Biological assays lend support to the association between measles virus or MMR and autism whereas epidemiologic studies show no association between MMR and autism. Further research is needed to clarify both the mechanisms whereby viral infection early in development may lead to autism and the possible involvement of the MMR vaccine in the development of autism.

  20. Management of small asymptomatic abdominal aortic aneurysms – a review

    PubMed Central

    Silaghi, H; Branchereau, A; Malikov, S; Andercou, Aurel

    2007-01-01

    The approach for abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) larger than 55 mm is well defined due to the risk of rupture being higher than 10% per year, and a 30-day perioperative mortality rate between 2.5% and 5%. However, the approach for small asymptomatic AAAs is less well defined. There are different definitions given to describe a small AAA. The one the authors accepted and applied is “a localized, permanent and irreversible dilation of the aorta of at least 50% in relation to the normal adjacent infrarenal or suprarenal aorta, with a maximum diameter between 30–55 mm”. The investigators of the largest study on small AAAs (United Kingdom Small Aneurysm Trial [UK-SAT]) concluded, in brief, that ultrasound monitoring is the most appropriate solution because the results do not support a policy of surgical restoration for AAAs with a diameter of between 40 mm and 55 mm. The aim of the present review article is to highlight several challenges that could change the limits or create a more flexible deciding factor in the management of AAAs. There are multiple factors that influence surgical decision-making, and the limit on aneurysm diameter that indicates surgery should depend on the patient’s age, life expectancy, general status, associated diseases, diameter in relation to body mass, risk factors, sex, anxiety and compliance during the follow-up period. Monitoring is an acceptable alternative for AAAs between 40 mm and 55 mm, and is probably the best solution for high-risk patients. Surgery is the most reasonable solution for patients who are at moderate risk, have a significant life expectancy, are less than 70 to 75 years of age, and/or have aortic aneurysms larger than 50 mm. PMID:22477326

  1. T1 Relaxation Time in Lungs of Asymptomatic Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Alamidi, Daniel F.; Kindvall, Simon S. I.; Hubbard Cristinacce, Penny L.; McGrath, Deirdre M.; Young, Simon S.; Naish, Josephine H.; Waterton, John C.; Wollmer, Per; Diaz, Sandra; Olsson, Marita; Hockings, Paul D.; Lagerstrand, Kerstin M.; Parker, Geoffrey J. M.; Olsson, Lars E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Interest in using T1 as a potential MRI biomarker of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has recently increased. Since tobacco smoking is the major risk factor for development of COPD, the aim for this study was to examine whether tobacco smoking, pack-years (PY), influenced T1 of the lung parenchyma in asymptomatic current smokers. Materials and Methods Lung T1 measurements from 35 subjects, 23 never smokers and 12 current smokers were retrospectively analyzed from an institutional review board approved study. All 35 subjects underwent pulmonary function test (PFT) measurements and lung T1, with similar T1 measurement protocols. A backward linear model of T1 as a function of FEV1, FVC, weight, height, age and PY was tested. Results A significant correlation between lung T1 and PY was found with a negative slope of -3.2 ms/year (95% confidence interval [CI] [-5.8, -0.6], p = 0.02), when adjusted for age and height. Lung T1 shortens with ageing among all subjects, -4.0 ms/year (95%CI [-6.3, -1.7], p = 0.001), and among the never smokers, -3.7 ms/year (95%CI [-6.0, -1.3], p = 0.003). Conclusions A correlation between lung T1 and PY when adjusted for both age and height was found, and T1 of the lung shortens with ageing. Accordingly, PY and age can be significant confounding factors when T1 is used as a biomarker in lung MRI studies that must be taken into account to detect underlying patterns of disease. PMID:26958856

  2. Dental occlusion influences knee muscular performances in asymptomatic females.

    PubMed

    Grosdent, Stéphanie; O'Thanh, Roseline; Domken, Olivier; Lamy, Marc; Croisier, Jean-Louis

    2013-09-14

    Some authors claim that occlusal appliances can enhance athletic performance. Therefore this study investigated the influence of dental occlusion on knee muscle strength performance. Twelve healthy female subjects (mean age 24.1 ± 3.1 years) without temporomandibular joint dysfunction participated in this study. Isokinetic quadriceps and hamstring strength were assessed in relation to three randomized jaw conditions: mouth closed in maximum intercuspidation without splint, mouth closed on a balanced splint which optimized contact over the dental arch, mouth closed on a piece of resin of 1 mm which created an imbalanced occlusion. Tests were performed at 60°/s and 240°/s in concentric and 30°/s in eccentric exertions. Concentric performances did not show any significant difference between the 3 jaw conditions (p > 0.05). By contrast, in the eccentric trials related to quadriceps performance, significant differences (p < 0.05) were observed between the resin condition and the two other modalities (without splint or with a balanced splint). The imbalanced occlusion created by the resin component corresponded to an average decrease of 9% in eccentric peak torque. The eccentric hamstring peak torques also showed a significant difference (p < 0.05) between measurements with splint and with resin (7% decrease when occlusion was imbalanced). In conclusion, among asymptomatic females, artificial imbalanced occlusion induces immediate and significant alteration of knee eccentric muscle performances. Therefore, occlusion examination should be undertaken on a regular and frequent basis for high-level athletes. Moreover, for athletes using mouthguards, muscular performance assessments should be planned with and without the dental protection.

  3. Dental occlusion influences knee muscular performances in asymptomatic females.

    PubMed

    Grosdent, Stéphanie; O'Thanh, Roseline; Domken, Olivier; Lamy, Marc; Croisier, Jean-Louis

    2014-02-01

    Some authors claim that occlusal appliances can enhance athletic performance. Therefore, this study investigated the influence of dental occlusion on knee muscle strength performance. Twelve healthy female subjects (mean age, 24.1 ± 3.1 years) without temporomandibular joint dysfunction participated in this study. Isokinetic quadriceps and hamstring strength were assessed in relation to 3 randomized jaw conditions: mouth closed in maximum intercuspidation without splint, mouth closed on a balanced splint which optimized contact over the dental arch, mouth closed on a piece of resin of 1 mm which created an imbalanced occlusion. Tests were performed at 60 and 240°·s in concentric and 30°·s in eccentric exertions. Concentric performances did not show any significant difference between the 3 jaw conditions (p > 0.05). In contrast, in the eccentric trials related to quadriceps performance, significant differences (p ≤ 0.05) were observed between the resin condition and the 2 other modalities (without splint or with a balanced splint). The imbalanced occlusion created by the resin component corresponded to an average decrease of 9% in eccentric peak torque. The eccentric hamstring peak torques also showed a significant difference (p ≤ 0.05) between measurements with splint and with resin (7% decrease when occlusion was imbalanced). In conclusion, among asymptomatic females, artificial imbalanced occlusion induces immediate and significant alteration of knee eccentric muscle performances. Therefore, occlusion examination should be undertaken on a regular and frequent basis for high-level athletes. Moreover, for athletes using mouthguards, muscular performance assessments should be planned with and without the dental protection.

  4. Cool dialysate reduces asymptomatic intradialytic hypotension and increases baroreflex variability.

    PubMed

    Chesterton, Lindsay J; Selby, Nicholas M; Burton, James O; McIntyre, Chris W

    2009-04-01

    Intradialytic hypotension (IDH) remains an important cause of morbidity and mortality in chronic hemodialysis (HD) patients and can be ameliorated by cool temperature HD. The baroreflex arc is under autonomic control and is essential in the short-term regulation of blood pressure (BP). This study aimed to investigate if the baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) response to HD differed between standard and cool-temperature dialysate. Ten patients (mean age 67+/-2 years) prone to IDH were recruited into a randomized, crossover study to compare BRS variation at dialysate temperatures of 37 degrees C (HD(37)) and 35 degrees C (HD(35)). Each patient underwent continuous beat-to-beat BP monitoring during a dialysis session of HD(37) and HD(35). During HD(37) 2 patients developed symptomatic IDH, as opposed to 1 with HD(35). However, asymptomatic IDH occurred with a frequency of 0.4 episodes per session with HD(35) and 6.2 episodes per session during HD(37) (odds ratio15.5; 95%CI 5.6-14.2). Although absolute BRS measurements did not differ between the 2 modalities, BRS variability increased during HD(35). Our study has demonstrated that in IDH-prone patients, cool HD resulted in a reduction in heart rate and a greater reduction in cardiac output and stroke volume. Mean arterial pressure was maintained through a significantly greater increase in total peripheral resistance. Furthermore, although absolute BRS values during HD were not significantly altered by a reduction in dialysate temperature, there was a greater percentage increase in BRS values during cool HD. Understanding the varied causes of, and categorizing impaired hemodynamic responses to HD will enable further individualization of HD prescriptions according to patient need.

  5. Early diagnosis of asymptomatic oral and oropharyngeal squamous cancers.

    PubMed

    Mashberg, A; Samit, A

    1995-01-01

    An examination of the oral cavity and oropharynx in asymptomatic patients at high risk requires an orderly visual inspection of the entire oral and oropharyngeal mucosa with particular attention to the tongue, floor of mouth, soft palate, uvula, tonsillar pillars, and the lingual aspects of the retromolar trigones. Completion and clear documentation of the entire examination should be recorded. Detected lesions that do not resolve in a reasonable length of time--two to three weeks--require intense and assiduous investigation. The following specifics should be considered. 1. Alcohol drinkers and cigarette smokers, especially those 40 years of age and older, are at very high risk for the development of upper aerodigestive tract and lung squamous carcinomas. 2. The floor of the mouth, the ventrolateral tongue, and the soft palate complex are the high-risk sites within the oral cavity and oropharynx. 3. Persistent mucosal erythroplasia rather than leukoplakia is the earliest visual sign of oral and oropharyngeal carcinoma. These lesions should not be regarded merely as precancerous changes. The evidence indicates that these lesions in high-risk sites should be considered to be invasive carcinoma or carcinoma in situ unless proven otherwise by biopsy. 4. Toluidine blue staining is a useful diagnostic adjunct, particularly as a method of ruling out false-negative clinical impressions. It may also be used as a rinse in high-risk patients to encompass the entire oral mucosa after a negative clinical examination and as a guide to improve biopsy yields. 5. If oral or oropharyngeal cancer is identified, evaluations of the larynx, hypopharynx, esophagus, and lungs should be performed to rule out multiple primary cancers.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7583906

  6. Mechanism of gastroesophageal reflux in recumbent asymptomatic human subjects.

    PubMed

    Dent, J; Dodds, W J; Friedman, R H; Sekiguchi, T; Hogan, W J; Arndorfer, R C; Petrie, D J

    1980-02-01

    We investigated the mechanism of gastroesophageal reflux (GER) in 10 health volunteer subjects. Continuous recordings of intraluminal esophageal pH and pressure were obtained on two consecutive nights from 6:00 p.m. to 6:30 a.m. in each subject. During each study, the subject remained recumbent, except to eat a standardized meal after 1 h of basal recording. A manometric assembly with seven recording lumens monitored: (a) lower esophageal sphincter (LES) pressure via a sleeve device 6.5 cm in length, (b) esophageal-body motor activity, (c) swallowing activity in the pharynx, and (d) gastric pressure. An electrode 5 cm above the LES recorded esophageal pH. Sleep was monitored by electroencephalogram. All subjects showed wide variations of basal LES pressure. GER was not related to low steady-state basal LES pressure, but rather occurred during transient 5-30 s episodes of inappropriate complete LES relaxation. The inappropriate LES relaxations were usually either spontaneous or immediately followed appropriate sphincter relaxation induced by swallowing. The majority of GER episodes occurred within the first 3 h after eating. During the night LES relaxation and GER occurred only during transient arousals from sleep or when the subjects were fully awake, but not during stable sleep. After GER the esophagus was generally cleared of refluxed acid by primary peristalsis and less frequently by secondary peristalsis. Nonperistaltic contractions were less effective than peristalsis for clearing acid from the esophagus. We conclude that in asymptomatic recumbent subjects GER is related to transient inappropriate LES relaxations rather than to low steady-state basal LES pressure and also, that primary perstalsis is the major mechanism that clears the esophagus of refluxed material.

  7. Prevalence of hepatitis C virus antibodies and genotypes in asymptomatic, first-time blood donors in Namibia.

    PubMed Central

    Vardas, E.; Sitas, F.; Seidel, K.; Casteling, A.; Sim, J.

    1999-01-01

    Reported is the prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) in Namibia as determined using a third-generation enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) on samples of blood collected from all asymptomatic, first-time blood donors between 1 February and 31 July 1997 (n = 1941). The HCV seroprevalence was 0.9% (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.5-1.5%) and no associations were detected between a positive HCV serostatus and the person's sex, region of residence, or previous hepatitis B exposure or hepatitis B carrier status, as determined by hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). The only significant association in a logistic regression model was an increase in HCV positivity with increasing age (P = 0.04). Viral RNA was amplified from 2 out of 18 (11.1%) specimens that were ELISA positive. Genotyping of these specimens, by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP), showed the presence of genotypes 5 and 1a. The positive predictive value of using HBsAg positivity as a surrogate screening marker for HCV in Namibian blood donors was poor (1.6%), with low sensitivity (16.7%) and specificity (89.3%), and detecting only 3 out of 18 serologically HCV-positive specimens. The results of this first study of the prevalence and epidemiology of HCV infection in Namibia suggest that donor blood should be screened for HCV by ELISA in order to prevent the transmission of hepatitis C virus. PMID:10680243

  8. CD4+ T cell counts in initiation of antiretroviral therapy in HIV infected asymptomatic individuals; controversies and inconsistencies.

    PubMed

    Maina, E K; Bonney, E Y; Bukusi, E A; Sedegah, M; Lartey, M; Ampofo, W K

    2015-12-01

    The primary goal when devising strategies to define the start of therapy in HIV infected individuals is to avoid HIV disease progression and toxicity from antiretroviral therapy (ART). Intermediate goals includes, avoiding resistance by suppressing HIV replication, reducing transmission, limiting spread and diversity of HIV within the body and protecting the immune system from harm. The question of how early or late to start ART and achieve both primary and intermediate goals has dominated HIV research. The distinction between early and late treatment of HIV infection is currently a matter of CD4+ T cells count, a marker of immune status, rather than on viral load, a marker of virus replication. Discussions about respective benefits of early or delayed therapy, as well as the best CD4+ T cell threshold during the course of HIV infection at which ART is initiated remains inconclusive. Guidelines issued by various agencies, provide different initiation recommendations. This can be confusing for clinicians and policy-makers when determining the best time to initiate therapy. Optimizing ART initiation strategies are clearly complex and must be balanced between individual and broader public health needs. This review assesses available data that contributes to the debate on optimal time to initiate therapy in HIV-infected asymptomatic individuals. We also review reports on CD4+ T cell threshold to guide initiation of ART and finally discuss arguments for and against early or late initiation of ART.

  9. CD4+ T cell counts in initiation of antiretroviral therapy in HIV infected asymptomatic individuals; controversies and inconsistencies.

    PubMed

    Maina, E K; Bonney, E Y; Bukusi, E A; Sedegah, M; Lartey, M; Ampofo, W K

    2015-12-01

    The primary goal when devising strategies to define the start of therapy in HIV infected individuals is to avoid HIV disease progression and toxicity from antiretroviral therapy (ART). Intermediate goals includes, avoiding resistance by suppressing HIV replication, reducing transmission, limiting spread and diversity of HIV within the body and protecting the immune system from harm. The question of how early or late to start ART and achieve both primary and intermediate goals has dominated HIV research. The distinction between early and late treatment of HIV infection is currently a matter of CD4+ T cells count, a marker of immune status, rather than on viral load, a marker of virus replication. Discussions about respective benefits of early or delayed therapy, as well as the best CD4+ T cell threshold during the course of HIV infection at which ART is initiated remains inconclusive. Guidelines issued by various agencies, provide different initiation recommendations. This can be confusing for clinicians and policy-makers when determining the best time to initiate therapy. Optimizing ART initiation strategies are clearly complex and must be balanced between individual and broader public health needs. This review assesses available data that contributes to the debate on optimal time to initiate therapy in HIV-infected asymptomatic individuals. We also review reports on CD4+ T cell threshold to guide initiation of ART and finally discuss arguments for and against early or late initiation of ART. PMID:26475399

  10. I-131 rose bengal excretion test is not dead

    SciTech Connect

    Antico, V.F.; Denhartog, P.; Ash, J.M.; Gilday, D.L.; Houle, S.

    1985-03-01

    One hundred and thirty I-131 Rose Bengal Excretion Studies (RBI) were performed on 84 patients over nine years. In 90% (56/60) of cases with biliary atresia, the 72-hour RBI was less than or equal to 7%. In only 12.5% (3/24) of cases with neonatal hepatitis was the 72-hour RBI less than or equal to 7%. The accuracy of the test was 91% with a specificity of 88%. Thirty patients later were studied following a Kasai procedure. The RBI test reliably predicted the patency of the anastomosis. The authors conclude that the 72-hour RBI is a reliable test in the diagnosis of biliary atresia and in the documentation of biliary patency following surgery, provided adequate care is taken in stool collection and measurement.

  11. Excretion of artifactual endogenous digitalis-like factors

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, R.A.

    1986-07-01

    Radioimmunoassays have been used to detect digoxin-like immunoreactive factors (DLF) in the plasma and urine of hypertensive patients and rats with deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA)-salt hypertension. DLF, partially purified from DOCA-HS urine by antidigoxin antibody immunoaffinity chromatography, was found to have a molecular weight <2000. When DOCA-HS rats were switched to the low-sodium chow, DLF excretion dropped precipitously. No measurable DLF was detected in the plasma of rats eating either chow. However, >95% of the urinary DLF could be attributed to a contaminant in the standard laboratory chow. These data document the importance of excluding nonspecific compounds and exogenous sources of DLF when sensitive radioligand and biologic assays are used to detect endogenous inhibitors of the sodium pump.

  12. Serum protein adsorption and excretion pathways of metal nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Vinluan, Rodrigo D; Zheng, Jie

    2015-01-01

    While the synthesis of metal nanoparticles (NPs) with fascinating optical and electronic properties have progressed dramatically and their potential biomedical applications were also well demonstrated in the past decade, translation of metal NPs into the clinical practice still remains a challenge due to their severe accumulation in the body. Herein, we give a brief review on size-dependent material properties of metal NPs and their potential biomedical applications, followed by a summary of how structural parameters such as size, shape and charge influence their interactions with serum protein adsorption, cellular uptake and excretion pathways. Finally, the future challenges in minimizing serum protein adsorption and expediting clinical translation of metal NPs were also discussed. PMID:26377047

  13. Urinary excretion of parabens in pregnant Japanese women.

    PubMed

    Shirai, Sayaka; Suzuki, Yayoi; Yoshinaga, Jun; Shiraishi, Hiroaki; Mizumoto, Yoshifumi

    2013-01-01

    Urinary excretion of free and total (free plus conjugated) forms of methyl, ethyl, n-propyl and n-butyl parabens (MP, EP, PP and BP, respectively) and their metabolite p-hydroxybenzoic acid were measured for 111 pregnant Japanese women. Frequent detection of parabens and their metabolite indicated that exposure takes place daily for pregnant Japanese women. The estrogenic potency of PP was 20 times higher than those of the other 3 parabens for the present subjects when both abundance in the urine and the relative estrogenic activity of each compound was considered. Detection of free parabens suggested dermal exposure, probably from their inclusion in personal care products. No statistical association was found between the anogenital index (birth weight-adjusted AGD) of male offspring and the concentrations of any parabens in the urine of the mothers suggesting that the parabens were not apparently estrogenically active at the exposure level of the present subjects.

  14. Alkali absorption and citrate excretion in calcium nephrolithiasis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakhaee, K.; Williams, R. H.; Oh, M. S.; Padalino, P.; Adams-Huet, B.; Whitson, P.; Pak, C. Y.

    1993-01-01

    The role of net gastrointestinal (GI) alkali absorption in the development of hypocitraturia was investigated. The net GI absorption of alkali was estimated from the difference between simple urinary cations (Ca, Mg, Na, and K) and anions (Cl and P). In 131 normal subjects, the 24 h urinary citrate was positively correlated with the net GI absorption of alkali (r = 0.49, p < 0.001). In 11 patients with distal renal tubular acidosis (RTA), urinary citrate excretion was subnormal relative to net GI alkali absorption, with data from most patients residing outside the 95% confidence ellipse described for normal subjects. However, the normal relationship between urinary citrate and net absorbed alkali was maintained in 11 patients with chronic diarrheal syndrome (CDS) and in 124 stone-forming patients devoid of RTA or CDS, half of whom had "idiopathic" hypocitraturia. The 18 stone-forming patients without RTA or CDS received potassium citrate (30-60 mEq/day). Both urinary citrate and net GI alkali absorption increased, yielding a significantly positive correlation (r = 0.62, p < 0.0001), with the slope indistinguishable from that of normal subjects. Thus, urinary citrate was normally dependent on the net GI absorption of alkali. This dependence was less marked in RTA, confirming the renal origin of hypocitraturia. However, the normal dependence was maintained in CDS and in idiopathic hypocitraturia, suggesting that reduced citrate excretion was largely dietary in origin as a result of low net alkali absorption (from a probable relative deficiency of vegetables and fruits or a relative excess of animal proteins).

  15. Fecal Calprotectin Excretion in Preterm Infants during the Neonatal Period

    PubMed Central

    Rougé, Carole; Butel, Marie-José; Piloquet, Hugues; Ferraris, Laurent; Legrand, Arnaud; Vodovar, Michel; Voyer, Marcel; de la Cochetière, Marie-France; Darmaun, Dominique; Rozé, Jean-Christophe

    2010-01-01

    Background Fecal calprotectin has been proposed as a non-invasive marker of intestinal inflammation in inflammatory bowel disease in adults and children. Fecal calprotectin levels have been reported to be much higher in both healthy full-term and preterm infants than in children and adults. Objective To determine the time course of fecal calprotectin (f-calprotectin) excretion in preterm infants from birth until hospital discharge and to identify factors influencing f-calprotectin levels in the first weeks of life, including bacterial establishment in the gut. Methodology F-calprotectin was determined using an ELISA assay in 147 samples obtained prospectively from 47 preterm infants (gestational age, and birth-weight interquartiles 27–29 weeks, and 880–1320 g, respectively) at birth, and at 2-week intervals until hospital discharge. Principal Findings Although median f-calprotectin excretion was 138 µg/g, a wide range of inter- and intra-individual variation in f-calprotectin values (from day 3 to day 78) was observed (86% and 67%, respectively). In multivariate regression analysis, f-calprotectin correlated negatively with ante and per natal antibiotic treatment (p = 0.001), and correlated positively with the volume of enteral feeding (mL/kg/d) (p = 0.009), the need to interrupt enteral feeding (p = 0.001), and prominent gastrointestinal colonization by Clostridium sp (p = 0.019) and Staphylococcus sp (p = 0.047). Conclusion During the first weeks of life, the high f-calprotectin values observed in preterm infants could be linked to the gut bacterial establishment. PMID:20552029

  16. Increased Salivary Nitrite and Nitrate Excretion in Rats with Cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Mahmoodi, Somayeh; Rahmatollahi, Mahdieh; Shahsavari, Fatemeh; Shafaroodi, Hamed; Grayesh-Nejad, Siyavash; Dehpour, Ahmad R

    2015-11-01

    Increased nitric oxide (NO) formation is mechanistically linked to pathophysiology of the extrahepatic complications of cirrhosis. NO is formed by either enzymatic or non-enzymatic pathways. Enzymatic production is catalyzed by NO synthase (NOS) while entero-salivary circulation of nitrate and nitrite is linked to non-enzymatic formation of NO under acidic pH in the stomach. There is no data on salivary excretion of nitrate and nitrite in cirrhosis. This study was aimed to investigate salivary levels of nitrate and nitrite in a rat model of biliary cirrhosis. Cirrhosis was induced by bile duct ligation (BDL). Four weeks after the operation, submandibular ducts of anesthetized BDL and control rats were cannulated with polyethylene microtube for saliva collection. Assessment of pH, nitrite and nitrate levels was performed in our research. We also investigated NOS expression by real time RT-PCR to estimate eNOS, nNOS and iNOS mRNA levels in the submandibular glands. Salivary pH was significantly lower in BDL rats in comparison to control animals. We also observed a statistically significant increase in salivary levels of nitrite as well as nitrate in BDL rats while there was no elevation in the mRNA expression of nNOS, eNOS, and iNOS in submandibular glands of cirrhotic groups. This indicates that an increased salivary level of nitrite/nitrate is less likely to be linked to increased enzymatic production of NO in the salivary epithelium. It appears that nitrate/nitrite can be transported from the blood stream by submandibular glands and excreted into saliva as entero-salivary circulation, and this mechanism may have been exaggerated during cirrhosis. PMID:26786986

  17. Stereoselectivity of biliary excretion of 2-arylpropionates in rats.

    PubMed

    Menzel, S; Beck, W S; Brune, K; Geisslinger, G

    1993-01-01

    To examine the stereoselectivity of biliary excretion, the optically pure enanatiomers of ketoprofen (KT), ibuprofen (IBU), and flurbiprofen (FLU) were intravenously administered to normal and bile duct-cannulated rats at 10 mg/kg. The recovery of total KT in bile was significantly higher after administration of (S)-KT than after (R)-KT [90.1 +/- 3.5% vs 68.8 +/- 8.2%, n = 3, P < 0.05]. In normal rats the terminal half-life of (R)-KT was significantly shorter than that of (S)-KT after administration of (R)-KT (2.2 +/- 0.6 h vs 14.3 +/- 4.9 h, n = 3, P < 0.05). The terminal half-life of both enantiomers was significantly shorter in rats with continuous bile drainage as compared to normal rats. No significant differences in pharmacokinetic parameters could be found between both enantiomers in bile duct-cannulated animals. The total amount of IBU in bile was slightly higher after administration of (S)-IBU than after (R)-IBU administration. The percentage of (R)-IBU after (R)-IBU administration, however, was very low [(R)-IBU: 1.5 +/- 0.9%, (S)-IBU: 23.4 +/- 5.8%]. In normal rats the clearance of (R)-IBU was significantly higher as compared to (S)-IBU. Differences in pharmacokinetic parameters between normal and bile duct-cannulated rats were not statistically significant due to high interindividual variability. The total recovery of FLU, which was excreted in bile to a lower extent than either KT or IBU, also tended to be greater after S-enantiomer administration. Only small amounts of (S)-FLU could be recovered in bile after (R)-FLU administration.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Relationship between endogenous 3-methylhistidine excretion and body composition.

    PubMed

    Lukaski, H C; Mendez, J; Buskirk, E R; Cohn, S H

    1981-03-01

    Fourteen healthy men (aged 20-30 yr) consumed two isocaloric, isonitrogenous diets in the sequence of a 4-day meat diet (MD) followed by a 7-day meal-free diet (MFD). Urinary 3-methylhistidine (3MH) excretion during the MD (513 +/- 21 mumol . day-1, mean +/- SE) was significantly higher (P less than 0.01) than day 3 of the MFD (230 +/- 10 mumol . day-1), after which the mean daily 3MH output was constant with a mean coefficient of variation of 4.5%. There was no change in fat-free body mass (FFBM) determined by densitometry at the start (62.3 +/- 1.8 kg) and the end (62.2 +/- 1.9 kg) of the 11-day dietary period. Mean muscle mass (MM) calculated from measurements of total-body potassium and nitrogen was 23.4 +/- 1.3 kg. Endogenous 3MH excretion was related more closely to MM (r = 0.91, P less than 0.001) than to FFBM measured by densitometry (r = 0.81, P less than 0.001). Only a low correlation coefficient (r = 0.33, P less than 0.05) was observed between 3MH and the nonmuscle component of FFBM. Urinary creatinine output also was correlated significantly with 3MH (r = 0.87; P less than 0.001) and MM (r = 0.79; P less than 0.01). It is concluded that because endogenous 3MH is significantly related to MM in man, it can be used as a marker to study in vivo total-body muscle protein degradation provided that the necessary dietary restrictions are observed.

  19. Endemic Poultry Viral Diseases 2016 Research Update

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Viral infections of the avian gastrointestinal tract negatively impact poultry production; however, determining the complex etiologies of the viral enteric diseases in poultry has been difficult. Project scientists are continuing to investigate the species specificity, molecular phylogenetics, and p...

  20. Exploring the viral world through metagenomics.

    PubMed

    Rosario, Karyna; Breitbart, Mya

    2011-10-01

    Viral metagenomics, or shotgun sequencing of purified viral particles, has revolutionized the field of environmental virology by allowing the exploration of viral communities in a variety of sample types throughout the biosphere. The introduction of viral metagenomics has demonstrated that dominant viruses in environmental communities are not well-represented by the cultured viruses in existing sequence databases. Viral metagenomic studies have provided insights into viral ecology by elucidating the genetic potential, community structure, and biogeography of environmental viruses. In addition, viral metagenomics has expanded current knowledge of virus-host interactions by uncovering genes that may allow viruses to manipulate their hosts in unexpected ways. The intrinsic potential for virus discovery through viral metagenomics can help advance a wide array of disciplines including evolutionary biology, pathogen surveillance, and biotechnology.

  1. Asymptomatic natural Chlamydia pecorum infection reduces growth rates in calves by up to 48 percent

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Intracellular Chlamydia (C.) bacteria cause in cattle some acute but rare diseases such as abortion, sporadic bovine encephalomyelitis, kerato-conjunctivitis, pneumonia, enteritis and polyarthritis. Much more frequent, essentially ubiquitous worldwide, are low-level, asymptomatic chlamydial infecti...

  2. Computer-enhanced thallium scintigrams in asymptomatic men with abnormal exercise tests

    SciTech Connect

    Uhl, G.S.; Kay, T.N.; Hickman, J.R., Jr.

    1981-12-01

    The usefulness of computer-enhanced thallium-201 myocardial perfusion scintigraphy in excluding the diagnosis of coronary artery disease in asymptomatic patients showing abnormal exercise electrocardiograms is evaluated. Multigated thallium scans were obtained immediately following and 3 or 4 hours after maximal exercise testing in 191 consecutive asymptomatic Air Force aircrew members who had shown abnormal exercise electrocardiograms and who were due to undergo coronary angiography. Computer enhancement of the raw images is found to lead to four false positive and two false negative scintigrams as revealed by angiographic results, while the group of 15 with subcritical coronary disease exhibited equivocal results. Results reveal that enhanced thallium scintigrams are an accurate diagnostics tool in detecting myocardial ischemia in asymptomatic patients and may be used in counseling asymptomatic patients on their likelihood of having coronary artery disease.

  3. Asymptomatic Intrahepatic Portosystemic Venous Shunt: To Treat or Not To Treat?

    PubMed

    Palvanov, Arkadiy; Marder, Ruth Leah; Siegel, David

    2016-09-01

    Intrahepatic portosystemic venous shunts (IPSVSs) are rare vascular malformations. They can be asymptomatic or present with various symptoms including encephalopathy. We present two cases of IPSVS, one involving a patient presenting with altered mental status and the other discovered incidentally. While there is no question that patients presenting with symptomatic IPSVS should undergo definitive treatment, there is no consensus regarding elective therapy for asymptomatic lesions. PMID:27574389

  4. Asymptomatic Intrahepatic Portosystemic Venous Shunt: To Treat or Not To Treat?

    PubMed

    Palvanov, Arkadiy; Marder, Ruth Leah; Siegel, David

    2016-09-01

    Intrahepatic portosystemic venous shunts (IPSVSs) are rare vascular malformations. They can be asymptomatic or present with various symptoms including encephalopathy. We present two cases of IPSVS, one involving a patient presenting with altered mental status and the other discovered incidentally. While there is no question that patients presenting with symptomatic IPSVS should undergo definitive treatment, there is no consensus regarding elective therapy for asymptomatic lesions.

  5. Impact of Daily Cotrimoxazole on Clinical Malaria and Asymptomatic Parasitemias in HIV-Exposed, Uninfected Infants

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Nicole L.; Barnett, Eric J.; Miller, William C.; Dow, Anna; Chasela, Charles S.; Hudgens, Michael G.; Kayira, Dumbani; Tegha, Gerald; Ellington, Sascha R.; Kourtis, Athena P.; van der Horst, Charles; Jamieson, Denise J.; Juliano, Jonathan J.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Cotrimoxazole preventive therapy (CPT) is recommended for all human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–exposed infants to avoid opportunistic infections. Cotrimoxazole has antimalarial effects and appears to reduce clinical malaria infections, but the impact on asymptomatic malaria infections is unknown. Methods. We conducted an observational cohort study using data and dried blood spots (DBSs) from the Breastfeeding, Antiretrovirals and Nutrition study to evaluate the impact of CPT on malaria infection during peak malaria season in Lilongwe, Malawi. We compared malaria incidence 1 year before and after CPT implementation (292 and 682 CPT-unexposed and CPT-exposed infants, respectively), including only infants who remained HIV negative by 36 weeks of age. Malaria was defined as clinical, asymptomatic (using DBSs at 12, 24, and 36 weeks), or a composite outcome of clinical or asymptomatic. Linear and binomial regression with generalized estimating equations were used to estimate the association between CPT and malaria. Differences in characteristics of parasitemias and drug resistance polymorphisms by CPT status were also assessed in the asymptomatic infections. Results. CPT was associated with a 70% (95% confidence interval, 53%–81%) relative reduction in the risk of asymptomatic infection between 6 and 36 weeks of age. CPT appeared to provide temporary protection against clinical malaria and more sustained protection against asymptomatic infections, with no difference in parasitemia characteristics. Conclusions. CPT appears to reduce overall malaria infections, with more prolonged impacts on asymptomatic infections. Asymptomatic infections are potentially important reservoirs for malaria transmission. Therefore, CPT prophylaxis may have important individual and public health benefits. PMID:25900173

  6. Multidrug resistance p-glycoprotein 2 is essential for the biliary excretion of indocyanine green.

    PubMed

    Huang, L; Vore, M

    2001-05-01

    Multidrug resistance P-glycoprotein 2 (Mdr2) is a phospholipid translocator in the canalicular membrane that is essential for the formation of biliary phospholipid vesicles and mixed lipid/bile salt micelles. Incorporation into biliary vesicles and micelles is thought to contribute to the hepatobiliary excretion of certain hydrophobic organic anions, such as indocyanine green (ICG). The present studies characterized the biliary excretion of two hydrophobic organic anions, ICG and estradiol-17beta(beta-D-glucuronide) (E(2)17G), in the single-pass isolated perfused liver and the biliary excretion of glutathione (GSH) in vivo in wild-type and Mdr2-/- female mice. The biliary excretion of ICG (0.4 micromol) was reduced by 90%, while the biliary excretion of total GSH was decreased by 65% in Mdr2-/- mice relative to wild-type mice. In contrast, the biliary excretion of E(2)17G (0.1 micromol) was increased by 30% in Mdr2-/- mice. These data indicate that the absence of Mdr2 differentially influences the biliary excretion of these organic anions and suggest that phospholipid vesicles and mixed micelles in bile are essential for the biliary excretion of ICG.

  7. Urinary excretion of arsenicals following daily intake of various seafoods during a two weeks intervention.

    PubMed

    Molin, M; Ulven, S M; Dahl, L; Goessler, W; Fliegel, D; Holck, M; Sloth, J J; Oshaug, A; Alexander, J; Meltzer, H M; Ydersbond, T A

    2014-04-01

    The excretion pattern of arsenic (As) species after seafood intake varies widely depending on species ingested and individual handling. We have previously reported the 72 h urinary excretion of arsenicals following a single dose of seafood. Here, we report the excretion patterns in the same 37 subjects following 15 days daily consumption of either 150 g cod, salmon, blue mussels or potato (control), followed by a 72 h period with a low-As diet. In all seafood groups, total As (tAs) in plasma and urinary excretion of tAs, arsenobetaine (AB) and dimethylarsinate (DMA) increased significantly after the intervention. Confirming the single dose study AB and DMA excreted were apparently endogenously formed from other arsenicals ingested. Total tAs excretion was 1386, 763 and 303 μg in the cod, blue mussel and salmon groups, respectively; about twice the amounts after the single dose study indicating accumulation of arsenicals. In the cod group, rapid excretion after the single dose was associated with lower total As in blood and less accumulation after two weeks with seafood indicating lower accumulation. In the blue mussels group only, inorganic As (iAs) excretion increased significantly, whilst methylarsonate (MA) strongly increased, indicating a possible toxicological concern of repeated mussel consumption. PMID:24468672

  8. Renal excretion in coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) after acute exposure to 3-trifluoromethyl-4-nitrophenol

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunn, J.B.; Allen, J.L.

    1975-01-01

    COHO SALMON (ONCORHYNCHUS KISUTCH) EXPOSED TO AN ACUTE, SUBLETHAL CONCENTRATION OF 3-TRIFLUOROMETHLY 1-4 NITROPHENOL (TFM) EXHIBITED AN INCREASED OUTPUT OF URINE WHEN COMPARED WITH CONTROLS, BUT THE URINARY EXCRETION OF NA, K, CA, MG AND C1 WAS NOT AFFECTED. ABOUT 35 TIMES MORE CONJUGATED TFM THAN FREE TFM WAS EXCRETED DURING THE 24-HOUR STUDY PERIOD.

  9. Biological monitoring of dichloropropene: Air concentrations, urinary metabolite, and renal enzyme excretion

    SciTech Connect

    Osterloh, J.D.; Wang, R.; Schneider, F.; Maddy, K. )

    1989-07-01

    Fifteen applicators of dichloropropene (DCP) were studied for personal air exposure to DCP, excretion of the metabolite of DCP (3CNAC), and excretion of the renal tubular enzyme, N-acetyl glucosaminidase (NAG). Each was studied for four 6-8 h consecutive intervals following baseline determinations of 3CNAC and NAG excretion. In accord with pilot data, 24-h urinary excretion of 3CNAC (mg) correlated well with exposure product for DCP (min exposed.mg/m{sup 3}), r = 0.854, p less than .001. A more precise correlation of the air exposure product with urinary excretion of 3CNAC was discerned by using the morning urine after the previous day of exposure (micrograms/mg of creatinine), r = 0.914, p less than .001. Four workers had clinically elevated activity of NAG (greater than 4 mU/mg creatinine) in any of their urine collections after baseline. Nine workers showed greater than 25% increases in NAG excretion when compared to baseline. Dichloropropene air exposure products of greater than 700 mg.min/m{sup 3} or excretion of greater than 1.5 mg 3CNAC/d distinguished abnormally high daily excretion of NAG. These data demonstrate a firm positive relationship between air exposure and internal exposure, and a possible subclinical nephrotoxic effect in DCP workers.

  10. Peak CSF Velocities in Patients with Symptomatic and Asymptomatic Chiari I Malformation

    PubMed Central

    Krueger, K.D.; Haughton, V.M.; Hetzel, S.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE PCMR is used to evaluate the Chiari I malformation. We compared quantitative PCMR in symptomatic and asymptomatic patients with Chiari I. MATERIALS AND METHODS PCMR image data in an axial section near the foramen magnum in a consecutive series of patients with Chiari I malformations were evaluated. Patients were classified as symptomatic for a Chiari I if they had apnea spells and/or exertional headaches and as asymptomatic if they had symptoms not considered specific for a Chiari I malformation. The PCMR CSF flow study was obtained with the same protocol for all patients and with the neck in neutral, flexed, and extended positions. Images were inspected for CSF flow jets and synchronous bidirectional flow. Peak CSF flow velocities were calculated with commercial software. Differences between the 2 groups were tested with mixed-effects ANOVA and Wilcoxon rank sum or Fisher exact probability tests with significance set at the .05 level. RESULTS Twenty-six patients with Chiari I were classified as symptomatic, and 24, as asymptomatic. Abnormal flow jets tended to occur more often in the symptomatic than in the asymptomatic patients (P = .054). Peak CSF velocities ranged from 2 to 20 cm/s in the symptomatic and the asymptomatic groups and did not differ significantly between the 2 groups or with neck position. CONCLUSIONS Peak CSF flow velocities near the foramen magnum did not differentiate symptomatic and asymptomatic patients with Chiari I. PMID:20884747

  11. Asymptomatic and chronic carriage of Leptospira interrogans serovar Pomona in California sea lions (Zalophus californianus).

    PubMed

    Prager, K C; Greig, Denise J; Alt, David P; Galloway, Renee L; Hornsby, Richard L; Palmer, Lauren J; Soper, Jennifer; Wu, Qingzhong; Zuerner, Richard L; Gulland, Frances M D; Lloyd-Smith, James O

    2013-05-31

    Since 1970, periodic outbreaks of leptospirosis, caused by pathogenic spirochetes in the genus Leptospira, have caused morbidity and mortality of California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) along the Pacific coast of North America. Yearly seasonal epizootics of varying magnitude occur between the months of July and December, with major epizootics occurring every 3-5 years. Genetic and serological data suggest that Leptospira interrogans serovar Pomona is the infecting serovar and is enzootic in the California sea lion population, although the mechanism of persistence is unknown. We report asymptomatic carriage of Leptospira in 39% (33/85) of wild, free-ranging sea lions sampled during the epizootic season, and asymptomatic seroconversion with chronic asymptomatic carriage in a rehabilitated sea lion. This is the first report of asymptomatic carriage in wild, free-ranging California sea lions and the first example of seroconversion and asymptomatic chronic carriage in a sea lion. Detection of asymptomatic chronic carriage of Leptospira in California sea lions, a species known to suffer significant disease and mortality from the same Leptospira strain, goes against widely-held notions regarding leptospirosis in accidental versus maintenance host species. Further, chronic carriage could provide a mechanism for persistent circulation of Leptospira in the California sea lion population, particularly if these animals shed infectious leptospires for months to years. PMID:23419822

  12. Asymptomatic and chronic carriage of Leptospira interrogans serovar Pomona in California sea lions (Zalophus californianus).

    PubMed

    Prager, K C; Greig, Denise J; Alt, David P; Galloway, Renee L; Hornsby, Richard L; Palmer, Lauren J; Soper, Jennifer; Wu, Qingzhong; Zuerner, Richard L; Gulland, Frances M D; Lloyd-Smith, James O

    2013-05-31

    Since 1970, periodic outbreaks of leptospirosis, caused by pathogenic spirochetes in the genus Leptospira, have caused morbidity and mortality of California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) along the Pacific coast of North America. Yearly seasonal epizootics of varying magnitude occur between the months of July and December, with major epizootics occurring every 3-5 years. Genetic and serological data suggest that Leptospira interrogans serovar Pomona is the infecting serovar and is enzootic in the California sea lion population, although the mechanism of persistence is unknown. We report asymptomatic carriage of Leptospira in 39% (33/85) of wild, free-ranging sea lions sampled during the epizootic season, and asymptomatic seroconversion with chronic asymptomatic carriage in a rehabilitated sea lion. This is the first report of asymptomatic carriage in wild, free-ranging California sea lions and the first example of seroconversion and asymptomatic chronic carriage in a sea lion. Detection of asymptomatic chronic carriage of Leptospira in California sea lions, a species known to suffer significant disease and mortality from the same Leptospira strain, goes against widely-held notions regarding leptospirosis in accidental versus maintenance host species. Further, chronic carriage could provide a mechanism for persistent circulation of Leptospira in the California sea lion population, particularly if these animals shed infectious leptospires for months to years.

  13. Transcriptional regulation differs in affected facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy patients compared to asymptomatic related carriers

    PubMed Central

    Arashiro, Patricia; Eisenberg, Iris; Kho, Alvin T.; Cerqueira, Antonia M. P.; Canovas, Marta; Silva, Helga C. A.; Pavanello, Rita C. M.; Verjovski-Almeida, Sergio; Kunkel, Louis M.; Zatz, Mayana

    2009-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is a progressive muscle disorder that has been associated with a contraction of 3.3-kb repeats on chromosome 4q35. FSHD is characterized by a wide clinical inter- and intrafamilial variability, ranging from wheelchair-bound patients to asymptomatic carriers. Our study is unique in comparing the gene expression profiles from related affected, asymptomatic carrier, and control individuals. Our results suggest that the expression of genes on chromosome 4q is altered in affected and asymptomatic individuals. Remarkably, the changes seen in asymptomatic samples are largely in products of genes encoding several chemokines, whereas the changes seen in affected samples are largely in genes governing the synthesis of GPI-linked proteins and histone acetylation. Besides this, the affected patient and related asymptomatic carrier share the 4qA161 haplotype. Thus, these polymorphisms by themselves do not explain the pathogenicity of the contracted allele. Interestingly, our results also suggest that the miRNAs might mediate the regulatory network in FSHD. Together, our results support the previous evidence that FSHD may be caused by transcriptional dysregulation of multiple genes, in cis and in trans, and suggest some factors potentially important for FSHD pathogenesis. The study of the gene expression profiles from asymptomatic carriers and related affected patients is a unique approach to try to enhance our understanding of the missing link between the contraction in D4Z4 repeats and muscle disease, while minimizing the effects of differences resulting from genetic background. PMID:19339494

  14. Excretion of pyridinium crosslinks correlates with disease activity and appendicular bone loss in early rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Gough, A K; Peel, N F; Eastell, R; Holder, R L; Lilley, J; Emery, P

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To establish if urinary excretion rates of the collagen crosslinks pyridinoline and deoxypyridinoline, which are known to be elevated in established rheumatoid arthritis (RA), are useful markers of bone loss in this disease. METHODS--Eight hour urine collections on all patients and 52 controls were performed, and the rates of pyridinoline and deoxypyridinoline excretion were measured. Bone mineral density (BMD), by dual energy x-ray absorption, and full laboratory and clinical assessments were performed. RESULTS--The rates of excretion of pyridinoline and deoxypyridinoline were significantly increased in patients compared with controls (p < 0.001). Pyridinoline excretion was associated with increased disease activity (ESR/CRP) but not disability (HAQ score/Functional Grade), and correlated with BMD loss at the femoral neck (p < 0.01). CONCLUSION--The excretion of collagen crosslinks may be useful as markers of bone and cartilage turnover in patients with RA. PMID:8311548

  15. Cardiac Biomarkers and Left Ventricular Hypertrophy in Asymptomatic Hemodialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Koycheva, Reneta Yovcheva; Cholakov, Vasil; Andreev, Jivko; Penev, Margarit; Iliev, Rosen; Nancheva, Krasimira; Tsoneva, Vanya

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cardiac biomarkers are often elevated in dialysis patients showing the presence of left ventricular dysfunction. The aim of the study is to establish the plasma levels of high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T (hs TnT), precursor of B-natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs CRP) and their relation to the presence of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) in patients undergoing hemodialysis without signs of acute coronary syndrome or heart failure. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We studied 48 patients - 26 men and 22 women. Pre and postdialysis levels of hs cTnT, NT-proBNP and hs CRP were measured at week interim procedure. Patients were divided in two groups according to the presence of echocardiographic evidence of LVH - gr A - 40 patients (with LVH), and gr B - 8 patients (without LVH). RESULTS: In the whole group of patients was found elevated predialysis levels of all three biomarkers with significant increase (p < 0.05) after dialysis with low-flux dialyzers. Predialysis values of NT-proBNP show moderate positive correlation with hs cTnT (r = 0.47) and weaker with hs CRP (r = 0.163). Such dependence is observed in postdialysis values of these biomarkers. There is a strong positive correlation between the pre and postdialysis levels: for hs cTnT (r = 0.966), for NT-proBNP (r = 0.918) and for hs CRP (r = 0.859). It was found a significant difference in the mean values of hs cTnT in gr. A and gr. B (0.07 ± 0.01 versus 0.03 ± 0.01 ng/mL, p < 0.05) and NT-proBNP (15,605.8 ± 2,072.5 versus 2,745.5 ± 533.55 pg/mL, p < 0.05). Not find a significant difference in hs CRP in both groups. CONCLUSIONS: The results indicate the relationship of the studied cardiac biomarkers with LVH in asymptomatic patients undergoing hemodialysis treatment. PMID:27275331

  16. [Emergence of "new" viral zoonoses].

    PubMed

    Greiser-Wilke, I; Haas, L

    1999-08-01

    In the last two to three decades a significant increase of viral zoonotic infections was observed. These zoonoses are not only newly (or previously unrecognized) emerging diseases, but also due to the reappearance of diseases thought to have been defeated (re-emerging diseases). "New" viral diseases can arise when viruses broaden their host-range (monkey poxvirus; equine morbillivirus), or can be a consequence of intrinsic properties of the virus itself, such as high mutation rates (influenza A virus). Most new or reemerging viral zoonoses are due to infections with hemorrhagic viruses. Many of them are transmitted by insects (arboviruses, e.g. yellow fever virus) or by rodents (e.g. Hanta viruses), others by contact with patients and nosocomial infections (e.g. Ebola virus). The emergence and increase of these diseases are a consequence of anthropogenic environmental changes, such as distortions of the ecological balance and changes in agriculture. In addition, the uncontrolled growth of the cities in tropical and subtropical regions without improvement of the public health measures and the increasing international animal trade and travel also favour the spread and recurrence of these diseases.

  17. Problems in diagnosing viral hepatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Bonino, F; Colloredo Mels, G; Bellati, G; Ideo, G; Oliveri, F; Colombatto, P; Brunetto, M R

    1993-01-01

    The most reliable method of making a specific aetiological diagnosis of chronic viral hepatitis would be to identify virus specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes responsible for the killing of virus infected hepatocytes in each patient's liver. Unfortunately, this can not be proposed for routine diagnosis and surrogate tests are required. The detection of virus markers, and even of the virus itself, does not imply that liver damage is caused by virus infection. Indirect markers of the host's antiviral immunoresponse have to be used to confirm more specifically the diagnosis of viral hepatitis. IgM antibodies against viral antigens implicated in the elimination of the virus seem to be suitable alternative candidates. Significant changes in the serum values of viraemia and aminotransferases occur within a few days, while a significant variation in liver histology takes much longer. Only the kinetics of the highly variable parameters can be used for an appropriate study of the relationship between viraemia, antiviral immunoresponse, and liver cell necrosis. Quantitative and dynamic analyses of hepatitis virus markers seem the most suitable and reliable methods of monitoring the patients eligible for antiviral treatment and identifying the most appropriate time to start this. PMID:8314490

  18. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps Go Viral

    PubMed Central

    Schönrich, Günther; Raftery, Martin J.

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils are the most numerous immune cells. Their importance as the first line of defense against bacterial and fungal pathogens is well described. In contrast, the role of neutrophils in controlling viral infections is less clear. Bacterial and fungal pathogens can stimulate neutrophils extracellular traps (NETs) in a process called NETosis. Although NETosis has previously been described as a special form of programmed cell death, there are forms of NET production that do not end with the demise of neutrophils. As an end result of NETosis, genomic DNA complexed with microbicidal proteins is expelled from neutrophils. These structures can kill pathogens or at least prevent their local spread within host tissue. On the other hand, disproportionate NET formation can cause local or systemic damage. Only recently, it was recognized that viruses can also induce NETosis. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms by which NETs are produced in the context of viral infection and how this may contribute to both antiviral immunity and immunopathology. Finally, we shed light on viral immune evasion mechanisms targeting NETs. PMID:27698656

  19. Sudden Deafness: Is It Viral?

    PubMed Central

    Merchant, Saumil N.; Durand, Marlene L.; Adams, Joe C.

    2008-01-01

    A number of theories have been proposed to explain the etiopathogenesis of idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSHL), including viral infection, vascular occlusion, breaks of labyrinthine membranes, immune-mediated mechanisms and abnormal cellular stress responses within the cochlea. In the present paper, we provide a critical review of the viral hypothesis of ISSHL. The evidence reviewed includes published reports of epidemiological and serological studies, clinical observations and results of antiviral therapy, morphological and histopathological studies, as well as results of animal experiments. The published evidence does not satisfy the majority of the Henle-Koch postulates for viral causation of an infectious disease. Possible explanations as to why these postulates remain unfulfilled are reviewed, and future studies that may provide more insight are described. We also discuss other mechanisms that have been postulated to explain ISSHL. Our review indicates that vascular occlusion, labyrinthine membrane breaks and immune-mediated mechanisms are unlikely to be common causes of ISSHL. Finally, we review our recently proposed theory that abnormal cellular stress responses within the cochlea may be responsible for ISSHL. PMID:18235206

  20. Pediatric Asthma and Viral Infection.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Garcia, M Luz; Calvo Rey, Cristina; Del Rosal Rabes, Teresa

    2016-05-01

    Respiratory viral infections, particularly respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and rhinovirus, are the most importance risk factors for the onset of wheezing in infants and small children. Bronchiolitis is the most common acute respiratory infection in children under 1year of age, and the most common cause of hospitalization in this age group. RSV accounts for approximately 70% of all these cases, followed by rhinovirus, adenovirus, metapneumovirus and bocavirus. The association between bronchiolitis caused by RSV and the development of recurrent wheezing and/or asthma was first described more than 40years ago, but it is still unclear whether bronchiolitis causes chronic respiratory symptoms, or if it is a marker for children with a genetic predisposition for developing asthma in the medium or long term. In any case, sufficient evidence is available to corroborate the existence of this association, which is particularly strong when the causative agent of bronchiolitis is rhinovirus. The pathogenic role of respiratory viruses as triggers for exacerbations in asthmatic patients has not been fully characterized. However, it is clear that respiratory viruses, and in particular rhinovirus, are the most common causes of exacerbation in children, and some type of respiratory virus has been identified in over 90% of children hospitalized for an episode of wheezing. Changes in the immune response to viral infections in genetically predisposed individuals are very likely to be the main factors involved in the association between viral infection and asthma. PMID:26766408

  1. Recycling Endosomes and Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Vale-Costa, Sílvia; Amorim, Maria João

    2016-01-01

    Many viruses exploit specific arms of the endomembrane system. The unique composition of each arm prompts the development of remarkably specific interactions between viruses and sub-organelles. This review focuses on the viral–host interactions occurring on the endocytic recycling compartment (ERC), and mediated by its regulatory Ras-related in brain (Rab) GTPase Rab11. This protein regulates trafficking from the ERC and the trans-Golgi network to the plasma membrane. Such transport comprises intricate networks of proteins/lipids operating sequentially from the membrane of origin up to the cell surface. Rab11 is also emerging as a critical factor in an increasing number of infections by major animal viruses, including pathogens that provoke human disease. Understanding the interplay between the ERC and viruses is a milestone in human health. Rab11 has been associated with several steps of the viral lifecycles by unclear processes that use sophisticated diversified host machinery. For this reason, we first explore the state-of-the-art on processes regulating membrane composition and trafficking. Subsequently, this review outlines viral interactions with the ERC, highlighting current knowledge on viral-host binding partners. Finally, using examples from the few mechanistic studies available we emphasize how ERC functions are adjusted during infection to remodel cytoskeleton dynamics, innate immunity and membrane composition. PMID:27005655

  2. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps Go Viral

    PubMed Central

    Schönrich, Günther; Raftery, Martin J.

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils are the most numerous immune cells. Their importance as the first line of defense against bacterial and fungal pathogens is well described. In contrast, the role of neutrophils in controlling viral infections is less clear. Bacterial and fungal pathogens can stimulate neutrophils extracellular traps (NETs) in a process called NETosis. Although NETosis has previously been described as a special form of programmed cell death, there are forms of NET production that do not end with the demise of neutrophils. As an end result of NETosis, genomic DNA complexed with microbicidal proteins is expelled from neutrophils. These structures can kill pathogens or at least prevent their local spread within host tissue. On the other hand, disproportionate NET formation can cause local or systemic damage. Only recently, it was recognized that viruses can also induce NETosis. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms by which NETs are produced in the context of viral infection and how this may contribute to both antiviral immunity and immunopathology. Finally, we shed light on viral immune evasion mechanisms targeting NETs.

  3. Pediatric Asthma and Viral Infection.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Garcia, M Luz; Calvo Rey, Cristina; Del Rosal Rabes, Teresa

    2016-05-01

    Respiratory viral infections, particularly respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and rhinovirus, are the most importance risk factors for the onset of wheezing in infants and small children. Bronchiolitis is the most common acute respiratory infection in children under 1year of age, and the most common cause of hospitalization in this age group. RSV accounts for approximately 70% of all these cases, followed by rhinovirus, adenovirus, metapneumovirus and bocavirus. The association between bronchiolitis caused by RSV and the development of recurrent wheezing and/or asthma was first described more than 40years ago, but it is still unclear whether bronchiolitis causes chronic respiratory symptoms, or if it is a marker for children with a genetic predisposition for developing asthma in the medium or long term. In any case, sufficient evidence is available to corroborate the existence of this association, which is particularly strong when the causative agent of bronchiolitis is rhinovirus. The pathogenic role of respiratory viruses as triggers for exacerbations in asthmatic patients has not been fully characterized. However, it is clear that respiratory viruses, and in particular rhinovirus, are the most common causes of exacerbation in children, and some type of respiratory virus has been identified in over 90% of children hospitalized for an episode of wheezing. Changes in the immune response to viral infections in genetically predisposed individuals are very likely to be the main factors involved in the association between viral infection and asthma.

  4. Excretion of the dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor linagliptin in rats is primarily by biliary excretion and P-gp-mediated efflux.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Holger; Runge, Frank; Held, Heinz-Dieter

    2012-04-11

    Linagliptin is a selective, competitive dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor, recently approved in the USA, Japan and Europe for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. It has non-linear pharmacokinetics and, unlike other DPP-4 inhibitors, a largely non-renal excretion route. It was hypothesised that P-glycoprotein (P-gp)-mediated intestinal transport could influence linagliptin bioavailability, and might contribute to its elimination. Two studies evaluated the role of P-gp-mediated transport in the bioavailability and intestinal secretion of linagliptin in rats. In the bioavailability study, male Wistar rats received single oral doses of linagliptin, 1 or 15 mg/kg, plus either the P-gp inhibitor, zosuquidar trihydrochloride, or vehicle. For the intestinal secretion study, rats underwent bile duct cannulation, and urine, faeces, and bile were collected. At the end of the study, gut content was sampled. Inhibition of intestinal P-gp increased the bioavailability of orally administered linagliptin, indicating that this transport system plays a role in limiting the uptake of linagliptin from the intestine. This effect was dependent on linagliptin dose, and could play a role in its non-linear pharmacokinetics after oral dosing. Systemically available linagliptin was mainly excreted unchanged via bile (49% of i.v. dose), but some (12%) was also excreted directly into the gut independently of biliary excretion. Thus, direct excretion of linagliptin into the gut may be an alternative excretion route in the presence of liver and renal impairment. The primarily non-renal route of excretion is likely to be of benefit to patients with type 2 diabetes, who have a high prevalence of renal insufficiency.

  5. Extracting viral RNAs from plant protoplasts.

    PubMed

    Fabian, Marc R; Andrew White, K

    2007-08-01

    The analysis of viral RNA is a fundamental aspect of plant RNA virus research. Studies that focus on viral RNAs often involve virus infections of plant protoplasts (see UNITS 16D.1-16D.4). Protoplast offer the advantage of simultaneous initiation of infections, which allows for superior temporal and quantitative analyses of viral RNAs. The efficient isolation of intact viral RNA is key to any such investigations. This unit describes two basic protocols for extracting viral RNAs from plant protoplasts. An approach for preparing double-stranded viral RNA from total RNA pools is also provided. The viral RNA prepared by using these techniques can be used for further analyses such as primer extension, reverse transcription-PCR, and northern blotting.

  6. Renal excretion of intravenously infused amoxycillin and ampicillin.

    PubMed Central

    Sjövall, J; Westerlund, D; Alván, G

    1985-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether concentration-dependent renal clearance of ampicillin and amoxycillin occurs. The drugs were given as single 20 min i.v. infusions in doses ranging from 1.9 to 2.8 g to nine healthy volunteers using a cross-over design. Plasma and urinary concentrations were determined by a selective liquid chromatographic method using frequent sampling up to 10 and 30 h respectively after termination of the infusion. The renal clearance of the drugs was independent of the plasma concentration. The mean (s.d.) renal clearances of ampicillin and amoxycillin were 167 (24) and 157 (20) ml min-1 1.73 m-2 respectively. The net secretion was about 50% of the total renal clearance of both drugs. The plasma concentration and urinary excretion rate versus time curves indicated a polyexponential decline, which could be described by both a biexponential and a triexponential equation. The former proved to be more reliable, especially in the calculation of micro rate constants. There was a tendency to more sustained plasma concentrations after amoxycillin, also illustrated by a significantly lower mean (s.d.) plasma clearance of this drug, viz. 185 (30) ml min-1 1.73 m-2, as compared to ampicillin, 210 (24) ml min-1 1.73 m-2 (P less than 0.04). There were no major differences in the disposition rate constants and the distribution volumes of ampicillin and amoxycillin. The mean (s.d.) plasma half-life was 1.7 (0.3) h for both drugs. The urinary excretion rate indicated a slower terminal disposition rate however, with ampicillin and amoxycillin half-lives of 3.4 (2.0) and 3.9 (1.2) h respectively. The longer half-life in the terminal phase may be due to increased tubular reabsorption at low urinary concentrations. It was not possible to determine in this study whether the half-life was affected by changes in clearance or volume of distribution. The urinary solubility of the drugs was dependent on pH. This could explain the massive macroscopic

  7. Viral-templated Palladium Nanocatalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Cuixian

    Despite recent progress on nanocatalysis, there exist several critical challenges in simple and readily controllable nanocatalyst synthesis including the unpredictable particle growth, deactivation of catalytic activity, cumbersome catalyst recovery and lack of in-situ reaction monitoring. In this dissertation, two novel approaches are presented for the fabrication of viral-templated palladium (Pd) nanocatalysts, and their catalytic activities for dichromate reduction reaction and Suzuki Coupling reaction were thoroughly studied. In the first approach, viral template based bottom-up assembly is employed for the Pd nanocatalyst synthesis in a chip-based format. Specifically, genetically displayed cysteine residues on each coat protein of Tobacco Mosaic Virus (TMV) templates provide precisely spaced thiol functionalities for readily controllable surface assembly and enhanced formation of catalytically active Pd nanoparticles. Catalysts with the chip-based format allow for simple separation and in-situ monitoring of the reaction extent. Thorough examination of synthesis-structure-activity relationship of Pd nanoparticles formed on surface-assembled viral templates shows that Pd nanoparticle size, catalyst loading density and catalytic activity of viral-templated Pd nanocatalysts can be readily controlled simply by tuning the synthesis conditions. The viral-templated Pd nanocatalysts with optimized synthesis conditions are shown to have higher catalytic activity per unit Pd mass than the commercial Pd/C catalysts. Furthermore, tunable and selective surface assembly of TMV biotemplates is exploited to control the loading density and location of Pd nanocatalysts on solid substrates via preferential electroless deposition. In addition, the catalytic activities of surface-assembled TMV-templated Pd nanocatalysts were also investigated for the ligand-free Suzuki Coupling reaction under mild reaction conditions. The chip-based format enables simple catalyst separation and

  8. Outcome in adulthood of asymptomatic airway hyperresponsiveness in childhood: a longitudinal population study.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Finn; Taylor, D Robin; Flannery, Erin M; Cowan, Jan O; Greene, Justina M; Herbison, G Peter; Sears, Malcolm R

    2002-09-01

    The clinical outcome of asymptomatic airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) first detected in childhood is sparsely reported, with conflicting results. We used a birth cohort of 1,037 children followed to age 26 years to assess the clinical outcome of asymptomatic AHR to methacholine first documented in study members at age 9 years. Of 547 study members who denied wheezing symptoms ever at age 9 years, 41 (7.5%) showed AHR. Forty showed methacholine responsiveness, with a provocation concentration of methacholine that elicited a 20% drop in forced expired volume in 1 sec (PC(20)) < or = 8 mg/mL, and one had baseline airway obstruction with a bronchodilator response exceeding 10%. Of these 41 study members, 18 (44%), 11 (27%), and 4 (10%) maintained AHR in 1, 2, and 3 later assessments, respectively, while 23 (56%) manifested AHR only at age 9. Compared with asymptomatic study members without AHR, those with asymptomatic AHR at age 9 years were more likely to report asthma and wheeze at any subsequent assessment, were more likely to have high IgE levels and eosinophils at ages 11 and 21, and more often demonstrated positive responses to skin allergen testing at ages 13 and 21 years. Persistent AHR at later assessments increased these likelihoods further.In conclusion, asymptomatic children with AHR are more likely to develop asthma and atopy later in life compared with asymptomatic children without AHR. Persistent AHR, even though initially asymptomatic, was associated with an even greater increased risk of development of asthma. We suggest that rather than considering AHR as a marker of asthma, it should be regarded as a parallel pathological process that may lead to subsequent symptoms and clinical evidence of asthma.

  9. Investigation of Gastroduodenal Mucosal Injury in Japanese Asymptomatic Antiplatelet Drug Users.

    PubMed

    Sogabe, Masahiro; Okahisa, Toshiya; Nakasono, Masahiko; Fujino, Yasuteru; Mitsui, Yasuhiro; Takaoka, Yoshihumi; Kimura, Tetsuo; Okamoto, Koichi; Muguruma, Naoki; Takayama, Tetsuji

    2015-07-01

    Antiplatelet drugs are widely used for the prevention of cardiovascular disease and cerebral vascular disorders. Although there have been several studies on gastroduodenal mucosal injury with gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms such as GI bleeding, in antiplatelet drug users (including low-dose aspirin (LDA)), there have been few reports on the association between antiplatelet drug use and gastroduodenal mucosal injury in asymptomatic antiplatelet drug users. This study was a cross-sectional study elucidating the association between antiplatelet drug use and gastroduodenal mucosal injury in asymptomatic antiplatelet drug users.Subjects were 186 asymptomatic Japanese antiplatelet drug users who underwent a regular health checkup. Subjects were divided into those with and without gastroduodenal mucosal injury endoscopically, and the association between gastroduodenal mucosal injury and other data in asymptomatic antiplatelet drug users was investigated.The prevalence of males and drinkers were significantly higher in subjects with gastroduodenal mucosal injury than in those without. In addition, the prevalence of proton pump inhibitor (PPI) users was significantly lower in subjects with gastroduodenal mucosal injury than in subjects without gastroduodenal mucosal injury. Logistic regression analysis showed PPI (odds ratios: 0.116; 95% confidence intervals: 0.021-0.638; P < 0.05) was a significant predictor of a decreased prevalence of gastroduodenal mucosal injury and closed-type (C-type) atrophy (3.172; 1.322-7.609; P < 0.01) was a significant predictor of an increased prevalence of severe gastroduodenal mucosal injury in asymptomatic antiplatelet drug users.Gender and lifestyle, such as drinking, may have an impact on risk of gastroduodenal mucosal injury in asymptomatic subjects taking antiplatelet drugs. Although PPI is a significant predictor of a decreased prevalence of gastroduodenal mucosal injury, including in asymptomatic antiplatelet drug users, status of

  10. The absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion of procyanidins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liang; Wang, Yijun; Li, Daxiang; Ho, Chi-Tang; Li, Junsong; Wan, Xiaochun

    2016-03-01

    Procyanidins (PAs) are polyphenols in plant food that have many health benefits, including cancer prevention, cardiovascular protection and diabetes prevention. PAs have been known to have low oral bioavailability. In this review, we summarize the published results on the ADME (absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion) of PAs in vivo and in vitro. After oral administration, in the stomach the decomposition of PAs is highly dependent on the pH value of gastric juice, which is also affected by food intake. In the small intestine, PA polymers and oligomers with DP > 4 are not directly absorbed in vivo, but minor PA monomers and dimers could be detected in the plasma. Methylated and glucuronidated PA dimers and monomers are the main metabolites of PAs in plasma. In the colon, PAs are catabolized by colonic microflora into a series of low molecular weight phenolic acids, such as phenyl valerolactone, phenylacetic acids and phenylpropionic acids. We reviewed the degradation of PAs in gastric digestion, the absorption of PAs in the small intestine and the metabolic pathway of PAs by colonic microflora. To clearly explain the in vivo pharmacokinetics of PAs, a systematic comparative analysis on previously published data on PAs was conducted. PMID:26814915

  11. Absorption and excretion of organic compounds of copper by sheep.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, O M; Ford, E J

    1983-10-01

    When sheep are injected subcutaneously with copper calcium edetate or copper oxyquinoline sulphonate there is a rapid increase in the concentration of copper in whole blood, serum and urine within the first 24 h. When sheep are injected with copper methionate the concentration of copper in whole blood and serum rises slowly over a period of about 10 days and there is no detectable increase in urinary copper. After the injection of each of the three compounds, there was a steady increase in the caeruloplasmin activity in serum over a period of 10 to 20 days, followed by a slow fall to pre-injection activity by 40 days. There was a marked increase in the beta-globulin fraction of serum 9 days after the injection of copper methionate but not after the other 2 compounds and the amounts of 2 copper containing proteins in liver were greater 60 days after the injection of copper methionate than after the injection of the other two compounds. The copper content of the 3 organic compounds is absorbed and excreted at different rates by sheep. The amounts of copper-containing protein produced in the liver also differ according to the organic component of the compound injected. The results suggest that the lower toxicity of copper injected as methionate compared with that injected as copper calcium edetate or copper oxyquinoline sulphonate is due to the slower absorption and transport of the copper to the liver and kidney.

  12. Net acid excretion during first week of life.

    PubMed

    Chan, L L; Balfe, J W; Exeni, R; Cifuentes, R F; Bryan, M H; Atkinson, S A

    1981-03-01

    Metabolic acidosis occurs frequently in newborns. Net acid excretion (NAE) in 34 preterm and 12 term infants was measured during the first week of life. Twenty preterm infants received breast milk or formula; the remaining infants received total parenteral nutrition (TPN) -- synthetic amino acids or casein hydrolysate solution. NAE for breast milk vs formula fed infants was 5.4 +/- 0.4 and 7.8 +/- 0.6 muEq/min/m2 (mean +/- SEM). The corresponding values for the two TPN solutions in preterm infants were significantly higher at 12.5 +/- 1.4 and 19.4 +/- 3.5 muEq/min/m2. Term infants produced even greater amount of net acid, 20.6 +/- 2.9 and 35 +/- 3.7 muEq/min/m2 respectively for the two TPN solutions. Milk fed infants are less prone to acidosis because of base generated from milk consumption. Due to its inherent acidogenic effect, TPN solutions induce acidosis more readily. Infants receiving TPN are therefore required to generate a higher NAE rate to maintain acid-base homeostasis compared to milk fed infants.

  13. Excretion of Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy Infectivity in Urine

    PubMed Central

    Gregori, Luisa; Kovacs, Gabor G.; Alexeeva, Irina; Budka, Herbert

    2008-01-01

    The route of transmission of most naturally acquired transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) infections remains speculative. To investigate urine as a potential source of TSE exposure, we used a sensitive method for detection and quantitation of TSE infectivity. Pooled urine collected from 22 hamsters showing clinical signs of 263K scrapie contained 3.8 ± 0.9 infectious doses/mL of infectivity. Titration of homogenates of kidneys and urinary bladders from the same animals gave concentrations 20,000-fold greater. Histologic and immunohistochemical examination of these same tissues showed no indications of inflammatory or other pathologic changes except for occasional deposits of disease-associated prion protein in kidneys. Although the source of TSE infectivity in urine remains unresolved, these results establish that TSE infectivity is excreted in urine and may thereby play a role in the horizontal transmission of natural TSEs. The results also indicate potential risk for TSE transmission from human urine–derived hormones and other medicines. PMID:18760007

  14. Reduction of urinary uric acid excretion in patients with proteinuria.

    PubMed

    Zou, Huiqing; Xiang, Mingfeng; Ye, Xinming; Xiong, Yuanzhen; Xie, Baogang; Shao, Jianghua

    2015-12-01

    Serum uric acid (UA) concentration is positively associated with proteinuria. However, the relationship between proteinuria and urinary metabolites of purine metabolism remains unknown. This study developed a hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC)-based HPLC method with ultraviolet detection (UV) to quantify creatinine (Cr), UA, xanthine, and hypoxanthine in human urine simultaneously. The urinary concentrations of UA and Cr obtained by our method are consistent with those measured by an autoanalyzer. The HPLC-HILIC-UV method was validated as selective and robust with simple sample preparation for measuring UA, xanthine, hypoxanthine and Cr, which is suitable for large clinical studies. The UA/Cr ratios in random urine samples were 5.5 times lower in proteinuria patients (0.077±0.008) than in healthy individuals (0.424±0.037). Moreover, the UA/hypoxanthine ratio in proteinuria patients was approximately 10 times lower than that in healthy individuals. Our findings revealed a reduced urinary UA excretion, which is one of the factors leading to increased serum UA in proteinuria patients.

  15. Assessment of urinary iodine excretion among normal Kuwaiti adults.

    PubMed

    Al-Yatama, Fatma I; Al-Bader, Maie D; Al-Mazidi, Zaidan M; Ali, Ameena; Al-Omair, Ali S; Al-Jehma, Nasser A; Mohammed, Fawziah

    2009-12-01

    This study was performed to investigate the status of iodine intake among the Kuwaiti population and its effect on thyroid function. The study group was comprised of 139 females and 86 males with a mean age of 33 and 35 years, respectively. Urinary iodine excretion (UIE) and serum free T4 (FT4), thyrotropin hormone (TSH), antiperoxidase antibodies (anti- TPOAb), and antithyroglobulin antibodies (anti-TGAb) were determined. Median UIE was 148 μg/L (within the recommended level by the World Health Organization [WHO]). However, UIE levels of <100 and <50 μg/L were detected in both male and female groups, respectively. Serum levels of TSH and FT4 were normal for all except one of the participants who suffered from hyperthyroidism, possibly as a result of elevated iodine intake, which was reflected in an increased UIE of 590 μg/L. Elevated anti-TPOAb >75 IU/mL and anti-TGAb >150 IU/mL were detected in 15% and 34% of subjects; only 10% of them had elevated levels of both anti-TPOAb and anti-TGAb. Thus, based on the WHO recommendations, the iodine intake for the Kuwaiti population is adequate. However, it is recommended that a national study be conducted by the appropriate authority in order to eliminate any artifacts which may have appeared in this study.

  16. The absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion of procyanidins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liang; Wang, Yijun; Li, Daxiang; Ho, Chi-Tang; Li, Junsong; Wan, Xiaochun

    2016-03-01

    Procyanidins (PAs) are polyphenols in plant food that have many health benefits, including cancer prevention, cardiovascular protection and diabetes prevention. PAs have been known to have low oral bioavailability. In this review, we summarize the published results on the ADME (absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion) of PAs in vivo and in vitro. After oral administration, in the stomach the decomposition of PAs is highly dependent on the pH value of gastric juice, which is also affected by food intake. In the small intestine, PA polymers and oligomers with DP > 4 are not directly absorbed in vivo, but minor PA monomers and dimers could be detected in the plasma. Methylated and glucuronidated PA dimers and monomers are the main metabolites of PAs in plasma. In the colon, PAs are catabolized by colonic microflora into a series of low molecular weight phenolic acids, such as phenyl valerolactone, phenylacetic acids and phenylpropionic acids. We reviewed the degradation of PAs in gastric digestion, the absorption of PAs in the small intestine and the metabolic pathway of PAs by colonic microflora. To clearly explain the in vivo pharmacokinetics of PAs, a systematic comparative analysis on previously published data on PAs was conducted.

  17. Variation of ²¹⁰Po daily urinary excretion for male subjects at environmental level.

    PubMed

    Hölgye, Z; Hýža, M; Mihalík, J; Rulík, P; Škrkal, J

    2015-05-01

    (210)Po was determined in 24-h urine of seven healthy males from Prague, Czech Republic, for ten consecutive days. The results show that for each volunteer, the urinary excretion of (210)Po changed only little from day to day in the studied time period. For two volunteers, the difference in the daily excreted (210)Po activity for two consecutive days was not significant, given the 95% confidence interval (two sigma) of the activity measurements. The same is valid for the excretion data of the other volunteers, except for some days where the differences were slightly higher. The range of daily urinary excretion of (210)Po of each volunteer in the studied time period was quite narrow. Among the volunteers, the maximum daily urinary excretion value of (210)Po was at most about a factor of 2.5 higher than the lowest excretion value. An attempt to explain the observed small inter-individual variability of (210)Po excretion in daily urine is made.

  18. Variation of ²¹⁰Po daily urinary excretion for male subjects at environmental level.

    PubMed

    Hölgye, Z; Hýža, M; Mihalík, J; Rulík, P; Škrkal, J

    2015-05-01

    (210)Po was determined in 24-h urine of seven healthy males from Prague, Czech Republic, for ten consecutive days. The results show that for each volunteer, the urinary excretion of (210)Po changed only little from day to day in the studied time period. For two volunteers, the difference in the daily excreted (210)Po activity for two consecutive days was not significant, given the 95% confidence interval (two sigma) of the activity measurements. The same is valid for the excretion data of the other volunteers, except for some days where the differences were slightly higher. The range of daily urinary excretion of (210)Po of each volunteer in the studied time period was quite narrow. Among the volunteers, the maximum daily urinary excretion value of (210)Po was at most about a factor of 2.5 higher than the lowest excretion value. An attempt to explain the observed small inter-individual variability of (210)Po excretion in daily urine is made. PMID:25712002

  19. Excretion of laccase by sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus L.) cells. Effects of a copper deficiency.

    PubMed

    Bligny, R; Gaillard, J; Douce, R

    1986-07-15

    Copper-deprived sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus) cells do not excrete molecules of active laccase in their culture medium. In the range of 2-100 micrograms of copper initially present per litre of nutrient solution, the total laccase activity measured in the cell suspensions at the end of the exponential phase of growth was closely proportional to the amount of added copper. However, copper-deprived cells excreted the laccase apoprotein (laccase without copper) at the same rate as copper-supplied cells excreted the active, copper-containing, laccase. When the culture medium was initially supplied with limiting amounts of copper, the active laccase was excreted until all copper molecules were metabolized. Thereafter, the laccase apoprotein was excreted. Consequently, at the end of the exponential phase of growth, the cell supernatants contained a mixture of apoprotein and copper-containing laccase. After purification and concentration, this mixture of copper-containing laccase (blue) and laccase apoprotein (slightly yellow) showed a yellow-green colour. Under copper-limiting culture conditions an equivalent decrease of Type 1, Type 2 and Type 3 Cu2+ was observed. Addition of copper to copper-deficient enzyme solutions does not result in a recovery of the enzyme activity. However, when added to copper-deficient sycamore-cell suspensions, copper induced a recovery of the excretion of active enzyme, at a normal rate, within about 10 h. The first molecules of active laccase were excreted after 3-4 h.

  20. Virus present in the reproductive tract of asymptomatic drones of honey bee (Apis mellifera l.), and possible infection of queen during mating.

    PubMed

    Da Cruz-Landim, Carminda; Roat, Thaisa C; Fernadez, Fernanda C

    2012-07-01

    Virus particles and viral inclusions were detected by transmission electron microscopy examination of sections of the seminal vesicles and mucus gland of asymptomatic young drones from colonies of Apis mellifera lightly infested by Varroa mite. In the mucus gland the infection was found in the muscular sheath and epithelium, while in the seminal vesicle in cells of the outer serosa. Isolated viral particles were also observed in the hemolymph occupying the intercellular spaces of the muscular sheath fibers. In the muscle the virus appeared as polygonal crystalloid inclusions, while in the epithelium mainly inside cytoplasmic vesicles. The infected cells apparently are not damaged. The virus particles are present in the hemolymph and forming more mature structures, as crystalloids, in the muscle. This suggests that the virus is liberated in the body fluid and infects the tissues penetrating the cells through endocytosis. The presence of virus in mucus gland epithelial vesicles raise the possibility of its transference to the gland secretion and therefore, to the semen.

  1. Host Physiologic Changes Induced by Influenza A Virus Lead to Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm Dispersion and Transition from Asymptomatic Colonization to Invasive Disease

    PubMed Central

    Reddinger, Ryan M.; Luke-Marshall, Nicole R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Staphylococcus aureus is a ubiquitous opportunistic human pathogen and a major health concern worldwide, causing a wide variety of diseases from mild skin infections to systemic disease. S. aureus is a major source of severe secondary bacterial pneumonia after influenza A virus infection, which causes widespread morbidity and mortality. While the phenomenon of secondary bacterial pneumonia is well established, the mechanisms behind the transition from asymptomatic colonization to invasive staphylococcal disease following viral infection remains unknown. In this report, we have shown that S. aureus biofilms, grown on an upper respiratory epithelial substratum, disperse in response to host physiologic changes related to viral infection, such as febrile range temperatures, exogenous ATP, norepinephrine, and increased glucose. Mice that were colonized with S. aureus and subsequently exposed to these physiologic stimuli or influenza A virus coinfection developed pronounced pneumonia. This study provides novel insight into the transition from colonization to invasive disease, providing a better understanding of the events involved in the pathogenesis of secondary staphylococcal pneumonia. PMID:27507829

  2. The effect of ethanol on the urinary excretion and differential metabolism of folate compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenga, B.H.

    1989-01-01

    In rats chronically fed ethanol and folate-containing diets for 12 weeks, urinary folate excretion was increased. However, no significant tissue depletion was noted unless rats were fed folate deficient diets. In rats fed folate-deficient diets urinary folate excretion was dramatically decreased at two weeks, when tissue folate stores were replete. After 16 weeks of diet treatment, the urinary excretion of an intraperitoneal dose of {sup 3}H-PteGlu was not altered in folate-deficient rats. Although acute ethanol administration (oral or intravenous) increased endogenous folate excretion that of {sup 3}H-PteGlu was not significantly altered, nor was the fractional excretion of {sup 3}H-label. To clarify this effect, the metabolism of {sup 3}H-PteGlu was studied. HPLC analysis of urine showed extensive metabolism of {sup 3}H-PteGlu to other folate substrates. Oral ethanol-treatment increased the fractional excretion of endogenous 5-CH{sub 3}-H{sub 4}PteGlu with no increase in urinary excretion or fractional excretion of other {sup 3}H-labeled derivatives. After infusion of tritium labeled 5-CH{sub 3}-H{sub 4}PteGlu, ethanol treatment increased the fractional excretion of endogenous and {sup 3}H-5-CH{sub 3}-H{sub 4}PteGlu, but not that of other folates. There was rapid uptake of {sup 3}H-label by the kidney with only 10% of the urinary {sup 3}H-label as {sup 3}H-5-CH{sub 3}-H{sub 4}PteGlu.

  3. Depletion of hepatic uridine diphosphoglucuronic acid decreases the biliary excretion of drugs.

    PubMed

    Gregus, Z; Watkins, J B; Thompson, T N; Klaassen, C D

    1983-05-01

    Hepatic levels of uridine diphosphoglucuronic acid (UDPGA) in rats decreased substantially (greater than 80%) 40 min after galactosamine (GAL) (600 mg/kg i.p.) or after 1 hr of diethyl ether (DE) narcosis. Biliary excretion of several cholephils requiring glucuronidation before excretion was reduced by GAL 76, 62, 92, 90 and 97% for bilirubin, diethylstilbestrol, iopanoic acid, phenolphthalein and valproic acid, respectively. GAL treatment caused delayed plasma clearances of the parent compounds and reductions in plasma concentrations and biliary excretions of glucuronide conjugates. The degree of this reduction was related to the maximal excretion rate of the individual compounds. For phenolphthalein glucuronide and phenol-3,6-dibromphthalein disulfonate, which do not undergo conjugation, GAL had no effect on their biliary excretion. DE-induced UDPGA depletion had no effect on phenolphthalein glucuronide excretion but reduced that of phenol-3,6-dibromphthalein disulfonate 25%. DE did not affect the plasma elimination or biliary secretion of phenolphthalein. Of the other cholephils requiring conjugation, DE reduced the excretion of bilirubin, diethylstilbestrol, iopanoic acid and valproic acid by 41, 29, 76 and 28%, respectively. DE decreased the plasma elimination of the parent compounds and the appearance of the conjugates in both plasma and bile. Reduction of glucuronide excretion into bile was less pronounced at higher doses of the cholephilic anions. Neither treatment reduced in vitro hepatic UDP-glucuronosyltransferase activity toward these substrates or substantially altered extrahepatic UDPGA concentrations. Thus, both GAL and DE decreased UDPGA to similar concentrations, but the biliary excretion of compounds requiring glucuronidation before secretion was depressed to a greater extent by GAL.

  4. Physiological and metabolic consequences of viral infection in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Pieter A; Johnson, Karyn N; White, Craig R

    2013-09-01

    An extensively used model system for investigating anti-pathogen defence and innate immunity involves Drosophila C virus (DCV) and Drosophila melanogaster. While there has been a significant effort to understand infection consequences at molecular and genetic levels, an understanding of fundamental higher-level physiology of this system is lacking. Here, we investigate the metabolic rate, locomotory activity, dry mass and water content of adult male flies injected with DCV, measured over the 4 days prior to virus-induced mortality. DCV infection resulted in multiple pathologies, notably the depression of metabolic rate beginning 2 days post-infection as a response to physiological stress. Even in this depressed metabolic state, infected flies did not decrease their activity until 1 day prior to mortality, which further suggests that cellular processes and synthesis are disrupted because of viral infection. Growth rate was also reduced, indicating that energy partitioning is altered as infection progresses. Microbial infection in insects typically results in an increase in excretion; however, water appeared to be retained in DCV-infected flies. We hypothesise that this is due to a fluid intake-output imbalance due to disrupted transport signalling and a reduced rate of metabolic processing. Furthermore, infected flies had a reduced rate of respiration as a consequence of metabolic depression, which minimised water loss, and the excess mass as a result of water retention is concurrent with impaired locomotory ability. These findings contribute to developing a mechanistic understanding of how pathologies accumulate and lead to mortality in infected flies. PMID:23685974

  5. Drug Sanctuaries, Low Steady State Viral Loads and Viral Blips.

    SciTech Connect

    Perelson, Alan S.,; Callaway, D.; Pomerantz, R. J.; Chen, H. Y.; Markowitz, M.; Ho, David D.; Di Mascio, M.

    2002-01-01

    Patients on HAART for long periods of time obtain viral loads (VLs) below 50 copies/ml. Ultrasensitive VL assays show that some of these patients obtain a low steady state VL, while others continue to exhibit VL declines to below 5 copies/ml. Low steady states can be explained by two-compartment models that incorporate a drug sanctuary. Interestingly, when patients exhibit continued declines below 50 copies/ml the rate of decline has a half-life of {approx} 6 months, consistent with some estimates of the rate of latent cell decline. Some patients, despite having sustained undetectable VLs show periods of transient viremia (blips). I will present some statistical characterization of the blips observed in a set of 123 patients, suggesting that blips are generated largely by random processes, that blips tend to correspond to periods of a few weeks in which VLs are elevated, and that VL decay from the peak of a blip may have two-phases. Using new results suggesting that the viral burst size, N {approx} 5 x 10{sup 4}, we estimate the number of cells needed to produce a blip.

  6. Viral proteases as targets for drug design.

    PubMed

    Skoreński, Marcin; Sieńczyk, Marcin

    2013-01-01

    In order to productively infect a host, viruses must enter the cell and force host cell replication mechanisms to produce new infectious virus particles. The success of this process unfortunately results in disease progression and, in the case of infection with many viral species, may cause mortality. The discoveries of Louis Pasteur and Edward Jenner led to one of the greatest advances in modern medicine - the development of vaccines that generate long-lasting memory immune responses to combat viral infection. Widespread use of vaccines has reduced mortality and morbidity associated with viral infection and, in some cases, has completely eradicated virus from the human population. Unfortunately, several viral species maintain a significant ability to mutate and "escape" vaccine-induced immune responses. Thus, novel anti-viral agents are required for treatment and prevention of viral disease. Targeting proteases that are crucial in the viral life cycle has proven to be an effective method to control viral infection, and this avenue of investigation continues to generate anti-viral treatments. Herein, we provide the reader with a brief history as well as a comprehensive review of the most recent advances in the design and synthesis of viral protease inhibitors. PMID:23016690

  7. [Cell analogs of viral proteins].

    PubMed

    Blinov, V M; Gaĭsler, V; Krasnov, G S; Shargunov, A V; Shurdov, M A; Zverev, V V

    2014-01-01

    Horizontal transfer of genes between viruses and their hosts played an important role in the evolution of various eukaryotes including contemporary mammals as well as the pathogens themselves. Elements of viruses of various types can be found in the genome of animals. Endogenous retroviral elements composing up to 8% of human genome length not only determine its high flexibility and rapid adaptation potential. Many of virus genes such as Fv1, Lv1, Lv2 being analogues of capsid and other proteins determine effective suppression of viral replication after cell penetration by the causative agent. Introduction of these elements into genome of a wide variety of animals from fish to primates could have taken place against the background of global natural cataclysms of viral origin. Integration of retrovirus genes coding surface glycoproteins with immunosuppressing domains into genetic apparatus of animals served as an impetus to the development of viviparity and spread ofplacental mammals. Their cell analogs syncytins perform a dual function: take direct part in the formation of syncytiotrophoblast layer of placenta and ensure tolerance of immune system of mother to embryo. The acquisition of cell genes by viruses also played an important role in their evolution: various interleukins and other modulators of immune response introduced into viral genome from cell genetic apparatus became one of the most important factors of pathogenicity of a wide variety of causative agents including poxviruses, cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus and many others. Evolutionary pathways of the virus and host are thus inseparable from each other, and character of one of these directions is largely dictated by the vector of another. PMID:25051706

  8. Infant botulism with prolonged faecal excretion of botulinum neurotoxin and Clostridium botulinum for 7 months.

    PubMed

    Derman, Y; Korkeala, H; Salo, E; Lönnqvist, T; Saxen, H; Lindström, M

    2014-02-01

    In Finland in April 2010, a 3-month old baby was diagnosed with type A infant botulism. He excreted botulinum neurotoxin and/or Clostridium botulinum in his faeces until November 2010. Five months of excretion was after clinical recovery and discharge from hospital. C. botulinum isolates recovered from the household dust in the patient's home were genetically identical to those found in the infant's stool samples. Long-term faecal excretion of C. botulinum may pose a possible health risk for the parents and others in close contact with the infant.

  9. Glutamate and Lipid Metabolic Perturbation in the Hippocampi of Asymptomatic Borna Disease Virus-Infected Horses

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Yang; Wang, Xiao; Liu, Zhao; Li, Dan; Zheng, Peng; Zhang, Lujun; Chen, Shigang; Xie, Peng

    2014-01-01

    Borna disease virus (BDV) is a neurotropic, enveloped, non-segmented, negative-stranded RNA virus that infects a wide variety of vertebrate species from birds to humans across a broad global geographic distribution. Animal symptomatology range from asymptomatic infection to behavioral abnormalities to acute meningoencephalitis. Asymptomatic BDV infection has been shown to be more frequent than conventionally estimated. However, the molecular mechanism(s) underyling asymptomatic BDV infection remain largely unknown. Here, based on real-time quantitative PCR and Western blotting, a total of 18 horse hippocampi were divided into BDV-infected (n = 8) and non-infected control (n = 10) groups. A gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC-MS) metabolomic approach, in conjunction with multivariate statistical analysis, was used to characterize the hippocampal metabolic changes associated with asymptomatic BDV infection. Multivariate statistical analysis showed a significant discrimination between the BDV-infected and control groups. BDV-infected hippocampi were characterized by lower levels of D-myo-inositol-1-phosphate, glutamate, phosphoethanolamine, heptadecanoic acid, and linoleic acid in combination with a higher level of ammonia. These differential metabolites are primarily involved in glutamate and lipid metabolism. These finding provide an improved understanding of hippocampal changes associated with asymptomatic BDV infection. PMID:24956478

  10. A new screening pathway for identifying asymptomatic patients using dental panoramic radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Tatsuro; Matsumoto, Takuya; Sawagashira, Tsuyoshi; Tagami, Motoki; Katsumata, Akitoshi; Hayashi, Yoshinori; Muramatsu, Chisako; Zhou, Xiangrong; Iida, Yukihiro; Matsuoka, Masato; Katagi, Kiyoji; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2012-03-01

    To identify asymptomatic patients is the challenging task and the essential first step in diagnosis. Findings of dental panoramic radiographs include not only dental conditions but also radiographic signs that are suggestive of possible systemic diseases such as osteoporosis, arteriosclerosis, and maxillary sinusitis. Detection of such signs on panoramic radiographs has a potential to provide supplemental benefits for patients. However, it is not easy for general dental practitioners to pay careful attention to such signs. We addressed the development of a computer-aided detection (CAD) system that detects radiographic signs of pathology on panoramic images, and the design of the framework of new screening pathway by cooperation of dentists and our CAD system. The performance evaluation of our CAD system showed the sensitivity and specificity in the identification of osteoporotic patients were 92.6 % and 100 %, respectively, and those of the maxillary sinus abnormality were 89.6 % and 73.6 %, respectively. The detection rate of carotid artery calcifications that suggests the need for further medical evaluation was approximately 93.6 % with 4.4 false-positives per image. To validate the utility of the new screening pathway, preliminary clinical trials by using our CAD system were conducted. To date, 223 panoramic images were processed and 4 asymptomatic patients with suspected osteoporosis, 7 asymptomatic patients with suspected calcifications, and 40 asymptomatic patients with suspected maxillary sinusitis were detected in our initial trial. It was suggested that our new screening pathway could be useful to identify asymptomatic patients with systemic diseases.

  11. Asymptomatic Malaria and Associated Risk Factors among School Children in Sanja Town, Northwest Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Worku, Ligabaw; Damtie, Demekech; Endris, Mengistu; Getie, Sisay

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Asymptomatic malaria is prevalent in highly endemic areas of Africa and is new challenge for malaria prevention and control strategies. Objective. To determine the prevalence of asymptomatic malaria and associated risk factors among school children in Sanja Town, northwest Ethiopia. Methods. A cross-sectional study was conducted from February to March 2013, on 385 school children selected using stratified proportionate systematic sampling technique. Pretested questionnaire was used to collect sociodemographic data and associated risk factors. Giemsa-stained thin and thick blood films were examined for detection, identification, and quantification of malaria parasites. Data were entered and analyzed using SPSS 20.0 statistical software. Multivariate logistic regression was done for assessing associated risk factors and proportions for categorical variables were compared using chi-square test. P values less than 0.05 were taken as statistically significant. Results. The prevalence of asymptomatic malaria was 6.8% (n = 26). The majority of parasitemic study participants had low parasite density 65.5% (17/26). Level of grade, age, bed net usage, and frequent exposure to malaria infection were associated with risk of asymptomatic malaria. Conclusion. Asymptomatic malaria was low in this study area and is associated with level of grade, age, bed net usage, and frequent exposure to malaria infection. PMID:27355032

  12. Dengue Patients Exhibit Higher Levels of PrM and E Antibodies Than Their Asymptomatic Counterparts

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Adeline Syin Lian; Manikam, Rishya; Sathar, Jameela; Kumari Natkunam, Santha

    2015-01-01

    Dengue virus infection is a common tropical disease which often occurs without being detected. These asymptomatic cases provide information in relation to the manifestation of immunological aspects. In this study, we developed an ELISA method to compare neutralizing effects of dengue prM and E antibodies between dengue patients and their asymptomatic household members. Recombinant D2 premembrane (prM) was constructed, cloned, and tested for antigenicity. The recombinant protein was purified and tested with controls by using an indirect ELISA method. Positive dengue serum samples with their asymptomatic pair were then carried out onto the developed ELISA. In addition, commercially available recombinant envelope (E) protein was used to develop an ELISA which was tested with the same set of serum samples in the prM ELISA. Asymptomatic individuals showed preexisting heterotypic neutralizing antibodies. The recombinant prM was antigenically reactive in the developed ELISA. Dengue patients had higher prM and E antibodies compared to their household members. Our study highlights the neutralizing antibodies levels with respect to dengue prM and E between dengue patients and asymptomatic individuals. PMID:25815314

  13. A new challenge for malaria control in Brazil: asymptomatic Plasmodium infection--a review.

    PubMed

    Coura, José Rodrigues; Suárez-Mutis, Martha; Ladeia-Andrade, Simone

    2006-05-01

    The evolution of malaria in Brazil, its morbidity, the malaria control programs, and the new challenges for these programs in the light of the emergence of asymptomatic infection in the Amazon region of Brazil were reviewed. At least six Brazilian research groups have demonstrated that asymptomatic infection by Plasmodium is an important impediment to malaria control, among mineral prospectors in Mato Grosso and riverside communities in Rondônia and, in our group, in the middle and upper reaches of the Negro river, in the state of Amazonas. Likewise, other researchers have studied the problem among indigenous communities in the Colombian, Peruvian, and Venezuelan parts of the Amazon basin, adjacent to Brazil. The frequency of positive results from the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) among asymptomatic individuals has ranged from 20.4 to 49.5%, and the presence of Plasmodium in the thick blood smears, from 4.2 to 38.5%. Infection with Anopheles darlingi has also been demonstrated by xenodiagnosis among asymptomatic patients with positive PCR results. If a mean of 25% is taken for the asymptomatic infection caused by Plasmodium sp. in the Amazon region of Brazil, malaria control will be difficult to achieve in that region with the measures currently utilized for such control. PMID:16862314

  14. Dengue patients exhibit higher levels of PrM and E antibodies than their asymptomatic counterparts.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Adeline Syin Lian; Rathakrishnan, Anusyah; Wang, Seok Mui; Ponnampalavanar, Sasheela; Manikam, Rishya; Sathar, Jameela; Kumari Natkunam, Santha; Sekaran, Shamala Devi

    2015-01-01

    Dengue virus infection is a common tropical disease which often occurs without being detected. These asymptomatic cases provide information in relation to the manifestation of immunological aspects. In this study, we developed an ELISA method to compare neutralizing effects of dengue prM and E antibodies between dengue patients and their asymptomatic household members. Recombinant D2 premembrane (prM) was constructed, cloned, and tested for antigenicity. The recombinant protein was purified and tested with controls by using an indirect ELISA method. Positive dengue serum samples with their asymptomatic pair were then carried out onto the developed ELISA. In addition, commercially available recombinant envelope (E) protein was used to develop an ELISA which was tested with the same set of serum samples in the prM ELISA. Asymptomatic individuals showed preexisting heterotypic neutralizing antibodies. The recombinant prM was antigenically reactive in the developed ELISA. Dengue patients had higher prM and E antibodies compared to their household members. Our study highlights the neutralizing antibodies levels with respect to dengue prM and E between dengue patients and asymptomatic individuals. PMID:25815314

  15. Congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries in an 83-year-old asymptomatic patient: description and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Placci, Angelo; Lovato, Luigi; Bonvicini, Marco

    2014-01-01

    We describe the case of an 83-year-old asymptomatic man followed in our centre. Transoesophageal echocardiography disclosed congenitally corrected transposition of great arteries (CCTGA) with no associated anomalies and only mild aortic regurgitation. Cardiac MR confirmed the diagnosis and revealed preserved systemic ventricle systolic function with a normal perfusional pathway. This report is a demonstration that CCTGA without associated anomalies can reach older life in an asymptomatic condition. This is the oldest asymptomatic living patient with CCTGA ever described. PMID:25336547

  16. T cell exhaustion during persistent viral infections.

    PubMed

    Kahan, Shannon M; Wherry, E John; Zajac, Allan J

    2015-05-01

    Although robust and highly effective anti-viral T cells contribute to the clearance of many acute infections, viral persistence is associated with the development of functionally inferior, exhausted, T cell responses. Exhaustion develops in a step-wise and progressive manner, ranges in severity, and can culminate in the deletion of the anti-viral T cells. This disarming of the response is consequential as it compromises viral control and potentially serves to dampen immune-mediated damage. Exhausted T cells are unable to elaborate typical anti-viral effector functions. They are characterized by the sustained upregulation of inhibitory receptors and display a gene expression profile that distinguishes them from prototypic effector and memory T cell populations. In this review we discuss the properties of exhausted T cells; the virological and immunological conditions that favor their development; the cellular and molecular signals that sustain the exhausted state; and strategies for preventing and reversing exhaustion to favor viral control.

  17. Sequencing Needs for Viral Diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, S N; Lam, M; Mulakken, N J; Torres, C L; Smith, J R; Slezak, T

    2004-01-26

    We built a system to guide decisions regarding the amount of genomic sequencing required to develop diagnostic DNA signatures, which are short sequences that are sufficient to uniquely identify a viral species. We used our existing DNA diagnostic signature prediction pipeline, which selects regions of a target species genome that are conserved among strains of the target (for reliability, to prevent false negatives) and unique relative to other species (for specificity, to avoid false positives). We performed simulations, based on existing sequence data, to assess the number of genome sequences of a target species and of close phylogenetic relatives (''near neighbors'') that are required to predict diagnostic signature regions that are conserved among strains of the target species and unique relative to other bacterial and viral species. For DNA viruses such as variola (smallpox), three target genomes provide sufficient guidance for selecting species-wide signatures. Three near neighbor genomes are critical for species specificity. In contrast, most RNA viruses require four target genomes and no near neighbor genomes, since lack of conservation among strains is more limiting than uniqueness. SARS and Ebola Zaire are exceptional, as additional target genomes currently do not improve predictions, but near neighbor sequences are urgently needed. Our results also indicate that double stranded DNA viruses are more conserved among strains than are RNA viruses, since in most cases there was at least one conserved signature candidate for the DNA viruses and zero conserved signature candidates for the RNA viruses.

  18. Population Dynamics of Viral Inactivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, Krista; Li, Dong; Behrens, Manja; Streletzky, Kiril; Olsson, Ulf; Evilevitch, Alex

    We have investigated the population dynamics of viral inactivation in vitrousing time-resolved cryo electron microscopy combined with light and X-ray scattering techniques. Using bacteriophage λ as a model system for pressurized double-stranded DNA viruses, we found that virions incubated with their cell receptor eject their genome in a stochastic triggering process. The triggering of DNA ejection occurs in a non synchronized manner after the receptor addition, resulting in an exponential decay of the number of genome-filled viruses with time. We have explored the characteristic time constant of this triggering process at different temperatures, salt conditions, and packaged genome lengths. Furthermore, using the temperature dependence we determined an activation energy for DNA ejections. The dependences of the time constant and activation energy on internal DNA pressure, affected by salt conditions and encapsidated genome length, suggest that the triggering process is directly dependent on the conformational state of the encapsidated DNA. The results of this work provide insight into how the in vivo kinetics of the spread of viral infection are influenced by intra- and extra cellular environmental conditions. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship under Grant No. DGE-1252522.

  19. Commercialization of veterinary viral vaccines.

    PubMed

    Flore, P H

    2004-12-01

    If vaccines are to reliably prevent disease, they must be developed, produced and quality-controlled according to very strict regulations and procedures. Veterinary viral vaccine registrations are governed by different rules in different countries, but these rules all emphasize that the quality of the raw materials--the cells, eggs, animals or plants that are used in production--need to be carefully controlled. The veterinary vaccine business is also very cost-conscious. Emphasis over the last 5-10 years has therefore been to develop culture systems that minimize labor and sterility problems and thus provide for reliable and cost-effective production. Implementing these often more complex systems in a production environment takes considerable effort, first in scale-up trials and further down the line in convincing production personnel to change their familiar system for something new and possibly untried. To complete scale-up trials successfully, it is absolutely necessary to understand the biochemistry of the cells and the influence of the virus on the cells under scale-up and later production conditions. Once a viral product can be produced on a large scale, it is imperative that the quality of the end-product is controlled in an intelligent way. One needs to know whether the end-product performs in the animal as was intended during its conception in the research and development department. The development of the appropriate tests to demonstrate this plays an important role in the successful development of a vaccine.

  20. Felinine excretion in domestic cat breeds: a preliminary investigation.

    PubMed

    Hagen-Plantinga, E A; Bosch, G; Hendriks, W H

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine possible differences in felinine excretion between domesticated cat breeds. For this purpose, urine was collected from a total of 83 privately owned entire male cats from eight different breeds in the Netherlands during the period of November 2010 till November 2011. In the collected samples, free felinine and creatinine concentrations were measured. Free felinine concentrations were expressed relative to the urinary creatinine concentration to compensate for possible variations in renal output. The mean (±SD) felinine:creatinine (Fel:Cr) ratio as measured over all cats was 0.702 (±0.265). Both the Abyssinian and Sphynx breeds showed the highest Fel:Cr ratio (0.878 ± 0.162 and 0.878 ± 0.341 respectively) which significantly differed from the ratios of the British Shorthairs (0.584 ± 0.220), Birmans (0.614 ± 0.266), Norwegian Forest cats (0.566 ± 0.296) and Siberian cats (0.627 ± 0.124). The Fel:Cr ratios of the Persians (0.792 ± 0.284) and Ragdolls (0.673 ± 0.256) showed no statistical difference with either of the other breeds. A significant proportion of the observed variation between the different feline breeds could be explained by hair growth, as both hair growth and felinine production compete for available cysteine. Shorthaired and hairless cat breeds generally showed a higher Fel:Cr ratio compared to longhaired cat breeds, with the exception of Persian cats. Further research is warranted to more closely study the effect of hair growth on felinine production. PMID:23819478

  1. Urinary excretion of 1-pyrenol in automotive repair workers.

    PubMed

    Granella, M; Clonfero, E

    1993-01-01

    The urinary excretion of a pyrene metabolite was evaluated in 65 automotive repair workers whose skin was exposed to used mineral oils, and in 41 controls. Pyrene contents were determined in oily material taken from cloths used to clean various types of engines (n = 8) and were found to vary (mean +/- SD) from 2.8 +/- 0.4 ppm for dirty matter obtained from diesel truck engines to 9.3 +/- 8.2 ppm for that from petrol car engines. Tobacco smoking and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-rich diets were considered as confounding factors. At both the beginning and the end of the working week, the values of urinary 1-pyrenol were slightly higher in exposed subjects (0.178 +/- 0.150 and 0.194 +/- 0.135 mumol/mol creatinine on Monday and Friday, respectively) than in controls (0.124 +/- 0.090 mumol/mol creatinine) (Mann-Whitney test, z = 2.741, P < 0.01). The urinary 1-pyrenol values were higher in both smoking and non-smoking subjects than in controls. The highest values were found in urinary samples of smokers exposed to used mineral oils (0.259 +/- 0.201 mumol/mol creatinine). In non-smoking workers (n = 40), post-shift 1-pyrenol values were 0.154 +/- 0.105 mumol/mol creatinine, as against 0.083 +/- 0.042 mumol/mol creatinine for the 19 non-smoking controls (Mann-Whitney test, z = 2.765, P < 0.01). In automobile repair workers, urinary 1-pyrenol values before the beginning of the weekly workshift did not differ substantially from those measured at the end of the week, not being related to the subjective degree of dirty skin as stated by workers.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8144234

  2. Absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion of isoflavonoids after soy intake.

    PubMed

    Franke, Adrian A; Lai, Jennifer F; Halm, Brunhild M

    2014-10-01

    Soy is the major source of dietary exposure to isoflavonoids (IFLs). Accumulating evidence supports a role for soy and IFLs in the protection against many chronic diseases including cancer. After soy intake we found a biphasic IFL appearance pattern in plasma as well as in urine that we suggest to be due to IFL absorption in the small intestine (ca. 10%) during the first 2h after intake and IFL absorption in the large intestine (ca. 90%) 4-6 h after intake. While each IFL disappears from the circulation at different times excellent correlations between urinary and circulating IFL values were discovered and algorithms to convert urinary excretion values into circulating levels were established. We suggest the term 'apparent bioavailability' when using urinary data to describe IFL exposure. The IFL bioavailability was found to be influenced by gut bacteria, oral antibiotic treatment (OABX), and an individual's age and health status. While daidzein (DE) and genistein start to be absorbed minutes after intake, equol (EQ) appears in plasma only after a minimum of 8h following soy intake owing to the required transit time of DE to the colon where the conversion of DE to EQ takes place by intestinal microbiota. We have also shown that the apparent IFL bioavailability is higher in children than adults, higher in healthy versus non-healthy individuals, and decreased in children but increased in adults during OABX. Finally, we propose to use a urinary EQ/DE ratio of 0.018 with a DE threshold to identify EQ producers. With this cutoff definition we observed that EQ production is inconsistent over time in 5-30% of both premenopausal and postmenopausal women.

  3. Avosentan Reduces Albumin Excretion in Diabetics with Macroalbuminuria

    PubMed Central

    Wenzel, René R.; Littke, Thomas; Kuranoff, Susan; Jürgens, Christiane; Bruck, Heike; Ritz, Eberhard; Philipp, Thomas; Mitchell, Anna

    2009-01-01

    Despite the first-line use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), there is still a large need to improve the prevention and progression of diabetic nephropathy and its associated cardiovascular events. Endothelin antagonists have shown anti-inflammatory, antifibrotic, and antiproteinuric effects in experimental studies. This study was a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, parallel-design, dosage-range study of the effect of the endothelin-A antagonist avosentan (SPP301) on urinary albumin excretion rate (UAER) in patients with diabetic nephropathy. We randomly assigned 286 patients with diabetic nephropathy, macroalbuminuria (UAER 0.2 to 5.6 mg/min), and BP <180/110 mmHg to 12 wk of avosentan (5, 10, 25, and 50 mg) or placebo, in addition to standard ACEI/ARB therapy. Relative to baseline, all avosentan dosages decreased mean relative UAER (−16.3 to −29.9%) compared with placebo (35.5%). Median relative UAER decreased with all avosentan dosages (−28.7 to −44.8%) compared with placebo (12.1%). Creatinine clearance and BP were unchanged at 12 wk. The main adverse events were peripheral edema (12%), mainly with high (≥25 mg) dosages of avosentan; significant increases in liver enzymes did not occur. Twenty-one (7.3%) patients experienced adverse events that led to withdrawal from study medication. In summary, the endothelin-A antagonist avosentan given in addition to standard ACEI/ARB treatment decreases UAER in patients with diabetic nephropathy and macroalbuminuria. PMID:19144760

  4. Asymptomatic complete atrioventricular block in a 13-year-old girl.

    PubMed

    Sykes, Joseph Anthony; Lubega, Joseph; Ezetendu, Chidibere; Verma, Rajiv; O'Connor, Brian; Kalyanaraman, Meena

    2011-11-01

    Atrioventricular (AV) block is a delay or an interruption in the transmission of an impulse from atria to ventricles due to an anatomic or a functional impairment in the conduction system. Atrioventricular block may be congenital or acquired. Electrocardiographic screening of asymptomatic school-aged children (median, 12.4 years) in Japan found the prevalence of a third-degree AV block to be 2 per 100,000. We report a case of asymptomatic complete AV block of unknown etiology in a 13-year-old child who did not require pacemaker placement. The importance of recognizing an asymptomatic complete AV block in the pediatric population, the classification and controversies of pacemaker placement, and the complications of pacemaker placement are discussed.

  5. A Reservoir of Drug-Resistant Pathogenic Bacteria in Asymptomatic Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Perron, Gabriel G.; Quessy, Sylvain; Bell, Graham

    2008-01-01

    The population genetics of pathogenic bacteria has been intensively studied in order to understand the spread of disease and the evolution of virulence and drug resistance. However, much less attention has been paid to bacterial carriage populations, which inhabit hosts without producing disease. Since new virulent strains that cause disease can be recruited from the carriage population of bacteria, our understanding of infectious disease is seriously incomplete without knowledge on the population structure of pathogenic bacteria living in an asymptomatic host. We report the first extensive survey of the abundance and diversity of a human pathogen in asymptomatic animal hosts. We have found that asymptomatic swine from livestock productions frequently carry populations of Salmonella enterica with a broad range of drug-resistant strains and genetic diversity greatly exceeding that previously described. This study shows how agricultural practice and human intervention may lead and influence the evolution of a hidden reservoir of pathogens, with important implications for human health. PMID:19015729

  6. Asymptomatic severe aortic stenosis with normal left ventricular function - A review.

    PubMed

    Sathyamurthy, I; Jayanthi, K

    2016-01-01

    Aortic stenosis (AS) is one of the commonest forms of acquired valvular heart disease. Aortic valve replacement (AVR) is the treatment of choice for symptomatic severe AS. Conservative management is usually advocated for asymptomatic severe AS. But there are data on predictors to identify subsets of asymptomatic AS patients at high risk of cardiac events in whom early surgical intervention is warranted. Non-invasive tests like exercise stress test, exercise echocardiography will help us to identify those who are at high risk of developing early symptoms due to LV dysfunction and also those at high risk of sudden death. In this article, an attempt is made to review the literature on this subset of asymptomatic severe AS to help clinicians to decide regarding the need for early aortic valve replacement in them. PMID:27543485

  7. Clinical Utility of Serologic Testing for Celiac Disease in Asymptomatic Patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The objective of this evidence-based analysis was to evaluate the clinical utility of serologic testing for celiac disease in asymptomatic individuals presenting with one of the non-gastrointestinal conditions evaluated in this report. The clinical utility was based on the effects of a gluten-free diet (GFD) on outcomes specific to each of these conditions. The prevalence of celiac disease in asymptomatic individuals and one of these non-gastrointestinal conditions was also evaluated. Clinical Need and Target Population Celiac Disease Celiac disease is an autoimmune disease characterized by a chronic inflammatory state of the proximal small bowel mucosa accompanied by structural and functional changes. Technology Under Evaluation Serologic Tests for Celiac Disease There are a number of serologic tests for celiac disease available. Serologic tests are automated with the exception of the anti-endomysial antibody test, which is more time-consuming and operator-dependent than the other tests. Research Questions What is the prevalence of asymptomatic celiac disease in patients presenting with one of the non-gastrointestinal conditions evaluated? What is the effect of the gluten-free diet on condition-specific outcomes in patients with asymptomatic celiac disease presenting with one of the non-gastrointestinal conditions evaluated? What is the clinical utility of serologic testing for celiac disease in asymptomatic patients presenting with one of the non-gastrointestinal conditions evaluated? The clinical utility was defined as the impact of the GFD on disease specific outcomes. What is the risk of all-cause mortality and lymphoma in individuals with asymptomatic celiac disease? What is the budget impact of serologic testing for celiac disease in asymptomatic subjects presenting with one of the non-gastrointestinal conditions evaluated? Research Methods Study Population The study population consisted of individuals with newly diagnosed celiac

  8. Antibody isotypes in urethral swabs of symptomatic and asymptomatic men infected with Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Imam, Naglaa F A; Eassa, Ahmed H A; Shoeib, Eman Y S; Abo-Raia, Gamal Y S

    2007-12-01

    Trichomoniasis may be asymptomatic or symptomatic in both sexes. The outcome of infection depends on the virulence factors of T. vaginalis, but these factors remain unclear. Genetic variability of the isolates and the host's immune response are likely to be key factors in that respect. Symptomatic and asymptomatic males infected with T. vaginalis were compared regarding the differences in antibody subclasses response in the urethral samples. In symptomatic cases there was a significant elevation in IgM, IgG1 & IgG2b levels in urethral samples, and a little, non-significant rise in IgG2a levels. However, there were no statistically significant differences between levels of IgA, IgG3 & IgG4. The results showed that specific IgG1 & IgM and to a lesser extent IgG2 may be involved in established symptomatic trichomoniasis in men, compared to asymptomatic ones. PMID:18383797

  9. MRI of the athletic knee. Findings in asymptomatic professional basketball and collegiate football players.

    PubMed

    Brunner, M C; Flower, S P; Evancho, A M; Allman, F L; Apple, D F; Fajman, W A

    1989-01-01

    For the dedicated athlete in whom minor injuries are frequent and major injuries relatively common, a noninvasive knee assessment could either obviate the need for arthroscopy or focus its direction. The opportunity to study asymptomatic athletes was not feasible before the advent of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this preliminary work, we examined 40 knees in 20 asymptomatic volunteer athletes, including five professional basketball players and 15 collegiate football players. Images were obtained at 0.5 T or 1.5 T. Spin echo sequences were used to obtain 5.0 mm thick coronal and sagittal sections. Fifty percent of asymptomatic athletes (10/20) had significant baseline MRI abnormalities that could have adversely affected scan interpretation in the context of an acute injury. Half of these athletes with MRI abnormalities, or 25% of the total (5/20), had no previous surgery and were unaware of significant injury.

  10. Electrophysiology testing and catheter ablation are helpful when evaluating asymptomatic patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White pattern: the pro perspective.

    PubMed

    Pappone, Carlo; Santinelli, Vincenzo

    2015-09-01

    Important advances in the natural history and diagnosis of, and therapy for, asymptomatic Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome have been made in the last decade by our group. These data have necessitated revisiting current practice guidelines to decide on the optimal management of the asymptomatic WPW population. There has also been an emphasis on identifying initially asymptomatic individuals who are at risk by nationwide screening programs using the electrocardiogram for prophylactic catheter ablation to prevent the lifetime risk of sudden cardiac death, particularly in young asymptomatic people, because only a subgroup of them is at high risk, requiring early catheter ablation.

  11. [Workshop on Molecular Epidemiology of Viral Diseases].

    PubMed

    Gómez, B; Cabrera, L; Arias, C F

    1997-01-01

    A workshop on viral epidemiology was held on September 29, 1995 at the Medical School of the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de Mexico. The aim of this workshop was to promote interaction among scientists working in viral epidemiology. Eighteen scientists from ten institutions presented their experiences and work. General aspects of the epidemiology of meaningful viral diseases in the country were discussed, and lectures presented on the rota, polio, respiratory syncytial, dengue, papiloma, rabies, VIH and hepatitis viruses.

  12. Biliary excretion of foreign compounds. Benzene and its derivatives in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Abou-El-Makarem, M. M.; Millburn, P.; Smith, R. L.; Williams, R. T.

    1967-01-01

    1. The extent of the excretion in the bile of the rat of benzene and 21 of its simple derivatives was studied. 2. Some 16 compounds of molecular weight less than 200, and including neutral molecules (benzene and toluene), aromatic acids, aromatic amines and phenols, were injected in solution intraperitoneally into biliary-cannulated rats. Metabolites in the bile were identified and estimated. The extent of biliary excretion of these compounds was low, i.e. 0–10% of the dose in 24hr., and most appeared in the bile mainly as conjugates. 3. The biliary excretion of six conjugates of molecular weight less than 300, including three glycine conjugates, one sulphate conjugate, one glucuronic acid conjugate and two acetyl derivatives, was low (less than 3% of the dose). 4. It is concluded that simple benzene derivatives of molecular weight less than about 300 are poorly excreted in rat bile. PMID:16742555

  13. Specific IgA Enhances the Transcytosis and Excretion of Hepatitis A Virus

    PubMed Central

    Counihan, Natalie A.; Anderson, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV) replicates in the liver, and is excreted from the body in feces. However, the mechanisms of HAV transport from hepatocytes to the gastrointestinal tract are poorly understood, mainly due to lack of suitable in vitro models. Here, we use a polarized hepatic cell line and in vivo models to demonstrate vectorial transport of HAV from hepatocytes into bile via the apical cell membrane. Although this transport is specific for HAV, the rate of fecal excretion in inefficient, accounting for less than 1% of input virus from the bloodstream per hour. However, we also found that the rate of HAV excretion was enhanced in the presence of HAV-specific IgA. Using mice lacking the polymeric IgA receptor (pIgR−/−), we show that a proportion of HAV:IgA complexes are transported via the pIgR demonstrating a role for specific antibody in pathogen excretion. PMID:26911447

  14. ENVIRONMENTAL FOOTPRINT OF PHARMACEUTICALS - THE SIGNIFICANCE OF FACTORS BEYOND DIRECT EXCRETION TO SEWERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The combined excretion of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) via urine and feces is considered the primary route by which APIs from human pharmaceuticals enter the environment. Disposal of unwanted, leftover medications by flushing into sewers has been considered a secondar...

  15. Evidence that auxin-induced growth of soybean hypocotyls involves proton excretion

    SciTech Connect

    Rayle, D.L.; Cleland, R.E.

    1980-09-01

    The role of H/sup +/ excretion in auxin-induced growth of soybean hypocotyl tissues has been investigated, using tissues whose cuticle was rendered permeable to protons or buffers by scarification (scrubbing). Indoleacetic acid induces both elongation and H/sup +/ excretion after a lag of 10 to 12 minutes. Cycloheximide inhibits growth and causes the tissues to remove protons from the medium. Neutral buffers (pH 7.0) inhibit auxin-induced growth of scrubbed but not intact sections; the inhibition increases as the buffers strength is increased. Both live and frozen-thawed sections, in the absence of auxin, extend in response to exogenously supplied protons. Fusicoccin induces both elongation and H/sup +/ excretion at rates greater than does auxin. These results indicate that H/sup +/ excretion is involved in the initiation of auxin-induced elongation in soybean hypocotyl tissue.

  16. Action of steroids on H+ and NH+4 excretion in the toad urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Frazier, L W; Zachariah, N Y

    1979-09-14

    This study was done to determine if steroid compounds will stimulate the urinary bladder of the toad to increase its capacity to acidify the urine and excrete NH+4. Aldosterone, 17 beta-estradiol, dexamethasone, pregnenolone, and cholesterol were tested on the bladder. All compounds tested were found to stimulate the rate of acidification by the bladder, above that of a paired control hemibladder. In contrast, only the steroids aldosterone and 17 beta-estradiol were found to stimulate NH+4 excretion in the bladder. Cycloheximide was found to block the action of aldosterone on the NH+4 excretion, but did not have a significant effect on the stimulation of acidification by aldosterone. We conclude that steroids stimulate H+ and NH+4 excretion in the toad urinary bladder. In addition, the NH+4 excretory system seems to be more specific to this effect than is the H+ excretory system. PMID:113550

  17. Grazing and excretion by zooplankton in the Peru upwelling system during April 1977

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dagg, M.; Cowles, T.; Whitledge, T.; Smith, S.; Howe, S.; Judkins, D.

    1980-01-01

    Rates of ingestion and excretion by adult females of the copepods Calanus chilensis, Eucalanus inermis, and Centropages brachiatus were measured in natural seawater during a cruise in the Peru upwelling system during April 1977. Simultaneously, zooplankton samples were collected for later determination of the abundance and distribution of these and other species. For these three organisms, feeding, and excretion rates of individuals are combined with information on the animal concentrations to estimate the grazing stress on the phytoplankton at each station, and to estimate the excretory nitrogen produced at each station. Comparison of grazing stresses with measured rates of primary production indicates that these large copepods were harvesting less than 5% of the daily phytoplankton production. Comparison of the nitrogen excretion rates with the amounts of excreted nitrogen in the water column indicates that less than 3% of the ambient excretory nitrogen was produced daily by these copepods. The importance of the abundant small zooplankton in the system is suggested.

  18. Interactions among lead, cadmium, and arsenic in relation to porphyrin excretion patterns.

    PubMed Central

    Fowler, B A; Mahaffey, K R

    1978-01-01

    This paper reviews the effects of lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd), and arsenic (As) on the mitrochondrion with emphasis on alteration of mitochondrial heme biosynthetic pathway. The information was used to examine results of a Pb x Cd x As interaction study which employed urinary porphyrin excretion patterns as one assessment criterion. Data from the study showed that dietary Pb produced increased urinary excretion of aminolevulinic acid (ALA) and coproporphyrin. Dietary exposure to organic or inorganic As caused increased excretion of uroporphyrin and to a lesser extent coproporphyrin, while dietary Cd caused no significant changes in urinary levels of any of the porphyrins measured. The combination of Pb plus As produced an additive effect on coproporphyrin excretion but not that of either ALA or uroporphyrin. These data are discussed in relation to utilization of urinary porphyrins for assessing toxicity and elemental interactions. PMID:720307

  19. Interindividual differences in circadian patterns of catecholamine excretion, body temperature, performance, and subjective arousal.

    PubMed

    Akerstedt, T; Fröberg, J E

    1976-12-01

    Interindividual differences in circadian rhythms of urinary catecholamine excretion, performance, self-ratings of arousal and oral temperature were studied in 80 subjects divided into three groups--morning-active, evening-active, and intermediate. Catecholamine excretion, body temperature, and self-ratings of arousal exhibited pronounced circadian variations. Morning-active subjects exceeded other groups in the 24 h level of adrenaline excretion but crest phases did not differ, occurring close to 13.00 h. No differences between groups were found for noradrenaline excretion. Crest phases occurred close to noon. Self-rated alertness exhibited a significantly earlier (14.12 h) crest phase for morning-active than for evening-active subjects (16.09 h). The performance did not differ between groups.

  20. Influence of frequent and long-term consumption of legume seeds on excretion of intestinal gases.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, A U; Fleming, S E

    1984-07-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the influence of long-term and frequent consumption of legume seeds on the excretion of fermentation gases. This was done by comparing gas excretion for one group (B) of individuals that habitually consumed legumes to that of another group (NB) of individuals that only infrequently consumed legumes. Gas excretion was measured during one diet period (control) when they consumed their normal diets and during one diet period (bean) when they consumed 100 g (dry weight), daily, of red kidney beans. Twelve men participated in this study on an outpatient basis and received each diet for 23 days. We found that there was neither short-term (no difference throughout the 23 days) nor long-term (NB and B groups were equivalent) adaptation in the quantity of gas that was excreted. However, both groups subjectively expressed greater tolerance and less physical discomfort as the bean-consuming period continued. PMID:6430062

  1. Accurate Risk Assessment of Patients with Asymptomatic Hematuria for the Presence of Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Eugene K.; Tirsar, Lenuta-Ancuta; Schwentner, Christian; Hennenlotter, Joerg; Christos, Paul J.; Stenzl, Arnulf; Mian, Christine; Martini, Thomas; Pycha, Armin; Shariat, Shahrokh F.; Schmitz-Dräger, Bernd J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Bladder cancer is frequently diagnosed during a workup for hematuria. However, most patients with microscopic hematuria and many with gross hematuria are not appropriately referred to urologists. We hypothesized that in patients presenting with asymptomatic hematuria, the risk of having bladder cancer can be predicted with high accuracy. Towards this end, we analyzed risk factors in patients with asymptomatic hematuria and developed a nomogram for the prediction of bladder cancer presence. Methods Data from 1,182 consecutive subjects without a history of bladder cancer undergoing initial evaluation for asymptomatic hematuria were collected at three centers. Clinical risk factors including age, gender, smoking status, and degree of hematuria were recorded. All subjects underwent standard workup including voided cytology, upper tract imaging, and cystourethroscopy. Factors associated with the presence of bladder cancer were evaluated by univariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses. The multivariable analysis was used to construct a nomogram. Internal validation was performed using 200 bootstrap samples. Results Of the 1,182 subjects who presented with asymptomatic hematuria, 245 (20.7%) had bladder cancer. Increasing age (OR=1.03, p<0.0001), smoking history (OR=3.72, p<0.0001), gross hematuria (OR=1.71, p=0.002), and positive cytology (OR=14.71, p<0.0001) were independent predictors of bladder cancer presence. The multivariable model achieved 83.1% accuracy for predicting the presence of bladder cancer. Conclusions Bladder cancer presence can be predicted with high accuracy in patients who present with asymptomatic hematuria. We developed a nomogram to help optimize referral patterns (i.e., timing and prioritization) of patients with asymptomatic hematuria. PMID:23124847

  2. The nature of iron deposits differs between symptomatic and asymptomatic carotid atherosclerotic plaques

    SciTech Connect

    Kopriva, David; Kisheev, Anastasye; Meena, Deiter; Pelle, Shaneen; Karnitsky, Max; Lavoie, Andrea; Buttigieg, Josef; Hagemeyer, Christoph E.

    2015-11-25

    Iron within atherosclerotic plaque has been implicated as a catalyst of oxidative stress that causes progression of plaque, and plaque rupture. Iron is believed to accumulate within plaque by incorporation of erythrocytes following plaque rupture and hemorrhage. There is only indirect evidence to support this hypothesis. Plaque specimens were obtained from ten symptomatic and fifteen asymptomatic patients undergoing carotid endarterectomy at a single institution. Plaques were sectioned for study using synchrotron radiation induced X-ray fluorescence the study the distribution of zinc, calcium and iron. Histologic staining was carried out with Prussian Blue, and immunohistochemical staining was done to localize macrophages with CD68. Data were compared against patient clinical variables. Ten symptomatic (15 ± 10 days between index symptoms and surgery) and fifteen asymptomatic carotid plaques were studied. Zinc and calcium co-localized in mineralized areas of symptomatic and asymptomatic plaque. Iron was identified away from zinc and calcium in both symptomatic and asymptomatic plaques. Within the symptomatic plaques, iron was found within the thrombus associated with plaque rupture and hemorrhage. It did not stain with Prussian Blue, but was found in association with CD68 positive macrophages. In symptomatic plaques, the abundance of iron showed an association with the source patient’s LDL cholesterol (R2 = 0.39, Significance F = 0.05). Iron in asymptomatic plaque was present as hemosiderin/ferritin that stained positive with Prussian Blue, and was observed in association with CD68 positive macrophages. Iron in acutely symptomatic plaques is found within thrombus, in the presence of macrophages. Moreover, the abundance of iron in symptomatic plaques is associated with the source patient’s LDL cholesterol. Within asymptomatic plaques, iron is found in association with macrophages, as hemosiderin/ferritin.

  3. The nature of iron deposits differs between symptomatic and asymptomatic carotid atherosclerotic plaques

    DOE PAGES

    Kopriva, David; Kisheev, Anastasye; Meena, Deiter; Pelle, Shaneen; Karnitsky, Max; Lavoie, Andrea; Buttigieg, Josef; Hagemeyer, Christoph E.

    2015-11-25

    Iron within atherosclerotic plaque has been implicated as a catalyst of oxidative stress that causes progression of plaque, and plaque rupture. Iron is believed to accumulate within plaque by incorporation of erythrocytes following plaque rupture and hemorrhage. There is only indirect evidence to support this hypothesis. Plaque specimens were obtained from ten symptomatic and fifteen asymptomatic patients undergoing carotid endarterectomy at a single institution. Plaques were sectioned for study using synchrotron radiation induced X-ray fluorescence the study the distribution of zinc, calcium and iron. Histologic staining was carried out with Prussian Blue, and immunohistochemical staining was done to localize macrophagesmore » with CD68. Data were compared against patient clinical variables. Ten symptomatic (15 ± 10 days between index symptoms and surgery) and fifteen asymptomatic carotid plaques were studied. Zinc and calcium co-localized in mineralized areas of symptomatic and asymptomatic plaque. Iron was identified away from zinc and calcium in both symptomatic and asymptomatic plaques. Within the symptomatic plaques, iron was found within the thrombus associated with plaque rupture and hemorrhage. It did not stain with Prussian Blue, but was found in association with CD68 positive macrophages. In symptomatic plaques, the abundance of iron showed an association with the source patient’s LDL cholesterol (R2 = 0.39, Significance F = 0.05). Iron in asymptomatic plaque was present as hemosiderin/ferritin that stained positive with Prussian Blue, and was observed in association with CD68 positive macrophages. Iron in acutely symptomatic plaques is found within thrombus, in the presence of macrophages. Moreover, the abundance of iron in symptomatic plaques is associated with the source patient’s LDL cholesterol. Within asymptomatic plaques, iron is found in association with macrophages, as hemosiderin/ferritin.« less

  4. The Nature of Iron Deposits Differs between Symptomatic and Asymptomatic Carotid Atherosclerotic Plaques

    PubMed Central

    Kopriva, David; Kisheev, Anastasye; Meena, Deiter; Pelle, Shaneen; Karnitsky, Max; Lavoie, Andrea; Buttigieg, Josef

    2015-01-01

    Iron within atherosclerotic plaque has been implicated as a catalyst of oxidative stress that causes progression of plaque, and plaque rupture. Iron is believed to accumulate within plaque by incorporation of erythrocytes following plaque rupture and hemorrhage. There is only indirect evidence to support this hypothesis. Plaque specimens were obtained from ten symptomatic and fifteen asymptomatic patients undergoing carotid endarterectomy at a single institution. Plaques were sectioned for study using synchrotron radiation induced X-ray fluorescence the study the distribution of zinc, calcium and iron. Histologic staining was carried out with Prussian Blue, and immunohistochemical staining was done to localize macrophages with CD68. Data were compared against patient clinical variables. Ten symptomatic (15 ± 10 days between index symptoms and surgery) and fifteen asymptomatic carotid plaques were studied. Zinc and calcium co-localized in mineralized areas of symptomatic and asymptomatic plaque. Iron was identified away from zinc and calcium in both symptomatic and asymptomatic plaques. Within the symptomatic plaques, iron was found within the thrombus associated with plaque rupture and hemorrhage. It did not stain with Prussian Blue, but was found in association with CD68 positive macrophages. In symptomatic plaques, the abundance of iron showed an association with the source patient’s LDL cholesterol (R2 = 0.39, Significance F = 0.05). Iron in asymptomatic plaque was present as hemosiderin/ferritin that stained positive with Prussian Blue, and was observed in association with CD68 positive macrophages. Iron in acutely symptomatic plaques is found within thrombus, in the presence of macrophages. The abundance of iron in symptomatic plaques is associated with the source patient’s LDL cholesterol. Within asymptomatic plaques, iron is found in association with macrophages, as hemosiderin/ferritin. PMID:26606178

  5. [Clinical aspects of viral respiratory infections].

    PubMed

    Pescetti, G; Gozzelino, F

    1980-12-01

    The Authors deal with some clinical aspect of the commonest types of respiratory tract viral infections. After a description of the characteristics of the most important diseases (common cold, ARD, influenza, viral pneumonia) they deal with some particular problem difficult in resolution, both from a pathogenetic and clinical viewpoint and quite constant bacterial over infection, the cardiac complications, th possible evolution to fibrosis and the relationship between viral infections and asthma. The nowadays problem of immunological and chemotherapeutic prevention of viral infections, particularly of type A influenza, is also discussed.

  6. Mosquito Defense Strategies against Viral Infection.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Gong; Liu, Yang; Wang, Penghua; Xiao, Xiaoping

    2016-03-01

    Mosquito-borne viral diseases are a major concern of global health and result in significant economic losses in many countries. As natural vectors, mosquitoes are very permissive to and allow systemic and persistent arbovirus infection. Intriguingly, persistent viral propagation in mosquito tissues neither results in dramatic pathological sequelae nor impairs the vectorial behavior or lifespan, indicating that mosquitoes have evolved mechanisms to tolerate persistent infection and developed efficient antiviral strategies to restrict viral replication to nonpathogenic levels. Here we provide an overview of recent progress in understanding mosquito antiviral immunity and advances in the strategies by which mosquitoes control viral infection in specific tissues.

  7. Associations of ambulatory blood pressure with urinary caffeine and caffeine metabolite excretions.

    PubMed

    Guessous, Idris; Pruijm, Menno; Ponte, Belén; Ackermann, Daniel; Ehret, Georg; Ansermot, Nicolas; Vuistiner, Philippe; Staessen, Jan; Gu, Yumei; Paccaud, Fred; Mohaupt, Markus; Vogt, Bruno; Pechère-Bertschi, Antoinette; Pechère-Berstchi, Antoinette; Martin, Pierre-Yves; Burnier, Michel; Eap, Chin B; Bochud, Murielle

    2015-03-01

    Intake of caffeinated beverages might be associated with reduced cardiovascular mortality possibly via the lowering of blood pressure. We estimated the association of ambulatory blood pressure with urinary caffeine and caffeine metabolites in a population-based sample. Families were randomly selected from the general population of Swiss cities. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring was conducted using validated devices. Urinary caffeine, paraxanthine, theophylline, and theobromine excretions were measured in 24 hours urine using ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. We used mixed models to explore the associations of urinary excretions with blood pressure although adjusting for major confounders. The 836 participants (48.9% men) included in this analysis had mean age of 47.8 and mean 24-hour systolic and diastolic blood pressure of 120.1 and 78.0 mm Hg. For each doubling of caffeine excretion, 24-hour and night-time systolic blood pressure decreased by 0.642 and 1.107 mm Hg (both P values <0.040). Similar inverse associations were observed for paraxanthine and theophylline. Adjusted night-time systolic blood pressure in the first (lowest), second, third, and fourth (highest) quartile of paraxanthine urinary excretions were 110.3, 107.3, 107.3, and 105.1 mm Hg, respectively (P trend <0.05). No associations of urinary excretions with diastolic blood pressure were generally found, and theobromine excretion was not associated with blood pressure. Anti-hypertensive therapy, diabetes mellitus, and alcohol consumption modify the association of caffeine urinary excretion with systolic blood pressure. Ambulatory systolic blood pressure was inversely associated with urinary excretions of caffeine and other caffeine metabolites. Our results are compatible with a potential protective effect of caffeine on blood pressure. PMID:25489060

  8. Associations of ambulatory blood pressure with urinary caffeine and caffeine metabolite excretions.

    PubMed

    Guessous, Idris; Pruijm, Menno; Ponte, Belén; Ackermann, Daniel; Ehret, Georg; Ansermot, Nicolas; Vuistiner, Philippe; Staessen, Jan; Gu, Yumei; Paccaud, Fred; Mohaupt, Markus; Vogt, Bruno; Pechère-Bertschi, Antoinette; Pechère-Berstchi, Antoinette; Martin, Pierre-Yves; Burnier, Michel; Eap, Chin B; Bochud, Murielle

    2015-03-01

    Intake of caffeinated beverages might be associated with reduced cardiovascular mortality possibly via the lowering of blood pressure. We estimated the association of ambulatory blood pressure with urinary caffeine and caffeine metabolites in a population-based sample. Families were randomly selected from the general population of Swiss cities. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring was conducted using validated devices. Urinary caffeine, paraxanthine, theophylline, and theobromine excretions were measured in 24 hours urine using ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. We used mixed models to explore the associations of urinary excretions with blood pressure although adjusting for major confounders. The 836 participants (48.9% men) included in this analysis had mean age of 47.8 and mean 24-hour systolic and diastolic blood pressure of 120.1 and 78.0 mm Hg. For each doubling of caffeine excretion, 24-hour and night-time systolic blood pressure decreased by 0.642 and 1.107 mm Hg (both P values <0.040). Similar inverse associations were observed for paraxanthine and theophylline. Adjusted night-time systolic blood pressure in the first (lowest), second, third, and fourth (highest) quartile of paraxanthine urinary excretions were 110.3, 107.3, 107.3, and 105.1 mm Hg, respectively (P trend <0.05). No associations of urinary excretions with diastolic blood pressure were generally found, and theobromine excretion was not associated with blood pressure. Anti-hypertensive therapy, diabetes mellitus, and alcohol consumption modify the association of caffeine urinary excretion with systolic blood pressure. Ambulatory systolic blood pressure was inversely associated with urinary excretions of caffeine and other caffeine metabolites. Our results are compatible with a potential protective effect of caffeine on blood pressure.

  9. K+ Excretion: The Other Purpose for Puddling Behavior in Japanese Papilio Butterflies

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    To elucidate the purpose of butterfly puddling, we measured the amounts of Na+, K+, Ca2+, and Mg2+ that were absorbed or excreted during puddling by male Japanese Papilio butterflies through a urine test. All of the butterflies that sipped water with a Na+ concentration of 13 mM absorbed Na+ and excreted K+, although certain butterflies that sipped solutions with high concentrations of Na+ excreted Na+. According to the Na+ concentrations observed in naturally occurring water sources, water with a Na+ concentration of up to 10 mM appears to be optimal for the health of male Japanese Papilio butterflies. The molar ratio of K+ to Na+ observed in leaves was 43.94 and that observed in flower nectars was 10.93. The Na+ amount in 100 g of host plant leaves ranged from 2.11 to 16.40 mg, and the amount in 100 g of flower nectar ranged from 1.24 to 108.21 mg. Differences in host plants did not explain the differences in the frequency of puddling observed for different Japanese Papilio species. The amounts of Na+, K+, Ca2+, and Mg2+ in the meconium of both male and female butterflies were also measured, and both males and females excreted more K+ than the other three ions. Thus, the fluid that was excreted by butterflies at emergence also had a role in the excretion of the excessive K+ in their bodies. The quantities of Na+ and K+ observed in butterfly eggs were approximately 0.50 μg and 4.15 μg, respectively; thus, female butterflies required more K+ than male butterflies. Therefore, female butterflies did not puddle to excrete K+. In conclusion, the purpose of puddling for male Papilio butterflies is not only to absorb Na+ to correct deficiencies but also to excrete excessive K+. PMID:25955856

  10. The effects of unsaturated dietary fats on absorption, excretion, synthesis, and distribution of cholesterol in man

    PubMed Central

    Grundy, Scott M.; Ahrens, E. H.

    1970-01-01

    Cholesterol balance studies were carried out in 11 patients with various types of hyperlipoproteinemia to determine the mechanism by which unsaturated fats lower plasma cholesterol. Unsaturated fats produced no increase in fecal endogenous neutral steroids in 10 of 11 patients and no decrease in absorption of exogenous cholesterol in 5 patients who received cholesterol in the diet. In 8 of 11 patients no changes occurred in excretion of bile acids during the period on unsaturated fat when plasma cholesterol was declining. However, in 3 of 11 patients small but significant increases in bile acid excretion were found during this transitional period; in 2 others increases also occurred after plasma cholesterol had become constant at lower levels on unsaturated fat. Since the majority of patients showed no change in cholesterol or bile acid excretions during the transitional period, we propose that when excretion changes did occur they were probably not the cause of the plasma cholesterol change. Furthermore, turnover data and specific activity curves suggested that cholesterol synthesis was not influenced by exchange of dietary fats. Thus, excluding changes in excretion and synthesis, we conclude that it is most likely that unsaturated fats cause plasma cholesterol to be redistributed into tissue pools. We have also examined the possibility that cholesterol which is redistributed into tissues could be secondarily excreted as neutral steroids or bile acids. In at least 5 of 11 patients excretion patterns were consistent with this explanation. However, we cannot rule out that excretion changes may have been due to alterations in transit time, to changes in bacterial flora, or to transitory changes in absorption or synthesis of cholesterol or bile acids. Our conclusion that unsaturated fats cause a redistribution of cholesterol between plasma and tissue pools points to the necessity in future to explore where cholesterol is stored, to what extent stored cholesterol can

  11. K+ excretion: the other purpose for puddling behavior in Japanese Papilio butterflies.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Takashi A; Ito, Tetsuo; Hagiya, Hiroshi; Hata, Tamako; Asaoka, Kiyoshi; Yokohari, Fumio; Niihara, Kinuko

    2015-01-01

    To elucidate the purpose of butterfly puddling, we measured the amounts of Na+, K+, Ca2+, and Mg2+ that were absorbed or excreted during puddling by male Japanese Papilio butterflies through a urine test. All of the butterflies that sipped water with a Na+ concentration of 13 mM absorbed Na+ and excreted K+, although certain butterflies that sipped solutions with high concentrations of Na+ excreted Na+. According to the Na+ concentrations observed in naturally occurring water sources, water with a Na+ concentration of up to 10 mM appears to be optimal for the health of male Japanese Papilio butterflies. The molar ratio of K+ to Na+ observed in leaves was 43.94 and that observed in flower nectars was 10.93. The Na+ amount in 100 g of host plant leaves ranged from 2.11 to 16.40 mg, and the amount in 100 g of flower nectar ranged from 1.24 to 108.21 mg. Differences in host plants did not explain the differences in the frequency of puddling observed for different Japanese Papilio species. The amounts of Na+, K+, Ca2+, and Mg2+ in the meconium of both male and female butterflies were also measured, and both males and females excreted more K+ than the other three ions. Thus, the fluid that was excreted by butterflies at emergence also had a role in the excretion of the excessive K+ in their bodies. The quantities of Na+ and K+ observed in butterfly eggs were approximately 0.50 μg and 4.15 μg, respectively; thus, female butterflies required more K+ than male butterflies. Therefore, female butterflies did not puddle to excrete K+. In conclusion, the purpose of puddling for male Papilio butterflies is not only to absorb Na+ to correct deficiencies but also to excrete excessive K+.

  12. Behavioral and Perceived Stressor Effects on Urinary Catecholamine Excretion in Adult Samoans

    PubMed Central

    Bergey, Meredith R.; Steele, Matthew S.; Bereiter, David A.; Viali, Satupaitea; McGarvey, Stephen T.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The effects of perceptions and behaviors related to culturally-patterned socioeconomic obligations on catecholamine excretion rates were studied in a cross-sectional sample of Samoan adults. Methods 378 participants, ages 29-62 years, from 9 villages throughout Samoa, provided timed overnight urine specimens, and self-reported perceptions and behaviors associated with contributions to one's family, aiga, and chief, matai, and communal gift exchanges, fa'alavelave. Urinary norepinephrine and epinephrine excretion rates were measured by high performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. Age (≤40 vs. >40 years) and gender-specific regression models were estimated to detect associations with catecholamine excretion. Results Young women who contribute more to their matai, who consider fa'alavelave to be a financial strain, and who view their contribution to their matai to be ‘just right’, had significantly higher residence-adjusted norepinephrine excretion. Young women who contribute more to their matai, who consider fa'alavelave to be a financial strain, and who consider their contribution to their aiga not to be a burden, had higher epinephrine excretion. Older men who contribute more to their aiga and who perceive their contribution to their aiga to be ‘just right’ had increased residence-adjusted epinephrine excretion. Conclusions Individual-level perceptions and behaviors related to traditional socioeconomic obligations are a significant correlate of increased overnight catecholamine excretion rates. Higher excretion rates may be attributed to psychosocial stress arousal associated with a discordance between personal desires for upward social mobility, and family and community-based socioeconomic obligations. Changes in patterns of individual-level psychosocial stress arousal may contribute to cardiovascular disease risk in modernizing Samoans. PMID:21793091

  13. K+ excretion: the other purpose for puddling behavior in Japanese Papilio butterflies.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Takashi A; Ito, Tetsuo; Hagiya, Hiroshi; Hata, Tamako; Asaoka, Kiyoshi; Yokohari, Fumio; Niihara, Kinuko

    2015-01-01

    To elucidate the purpose of butterfly puddling, we measured the amounts of Na+, K+, Ca2+, and Mg2+ that were absorbed or excreted during puddling by male Japanese Papilio butterflies through a urine test. All of the butterflies that sipped water with a Na+ concentration of 13 mM absorbed Na+ and excreted K+, although certain butterflies that sipped solutions with high concentrations of Na+ excreted Na+. According to the Na+ concentrations observed in naturally occurring water sources, water with a Na+ concentration of up to 10 mM appears to be optimal for the health of male Japanese Papilio butterflies. The molar ratio of K+ to Na+ observed in leaves was 43.94 and that observed in flower nectars was 10.93. The Na+ amount in 100 g of host plant leaves ranged from 2.11 to 16.40 mg, and the amount in 100 g of flower nectar ranged from 1.24 to 108.21 mg. Differences in host plants did not explain the differences in the frequency of puddling observed for different Japanese Papilio species. The amounts of Na+, K+, Ca2+, and Mg2+ in the meconium of both male and female butterflies were also measured, and both males and females excreted more K+ than the other three ions. Thus, the fluid that was excreted by butterflies at emergence also had a role in the excretion of the excessive K+ in their bodies. The quantities of Na+ and K+ observed in butterfly eggs were approximately 0.50 μg and 4.15 μg, respectively; thus, female butterflies required more K+ than male butterflies. Therefore, female butterflies did not puddle to excrete K+. In conclusion, the purpose of puddling for male Papilio butterflies is not only to absorb Na+ to correct deficiencies but also to excrete excessive K+. PMID:25955856

  14. Drug elimination function of rat small intestine: metabolism and intraluminal excretion.

    PubMed

    Yasuhara, M; Kurosaki, Y; Kimura, T; Sezaki, H

    1984-10-15

    The metabolic and excretory function of the small intestine was investigated after oral and intravenous administration of drugs having an aromatic amino group to rats. After administration of drugs into the intestinal loop at the initial concentration of 0.1 mM, significant excretion of their N-acetylated forms into the lumen was observed. The amount of N-acetyl forms excreted in the lumen were 39.3 +/- 3.5, 63.5 +/- 20.9 and 18.0 +/- 13.8% of disappeared drugs from the lumen for p-aminobenzoic acid (PABA), p-aminosalicylic acid and sulfanilic acid, respectively. The excretion of p-acetamidobenzoic acid (Ac-PABA) after the absorption of PABA was reduced by the coadministration with salicylic acid, benzoic acid and 2,4-dinitrophenol. Salicylic acid noncompetitively inhibited the acetylation of PABA by the intestinal N-acetyltransferase. A good correlation was found between the intestinal N-acetyltransferase activities for drugs and the intraluminal excretion of N-acetyl derivatives after intestinal absorption of drugs. These results indicate that a drug having a higher susceptibility to intestinal N-acetyltransferase would undergo a greater excretion into the lumen in its N-acetyl form after intestinal absorption. After intravenous administration of PABA at a dose of 100 mumole/kg, 4.02 +/- 0.51% of dose was excreted in the lumen as Ac-PABA in 30 min. On the other hand, a significantly smaller fraction (2.72 +/- 0.68% of dose) was excreted in the lumen after intravenous injection of 100 mumole/kg of Ac-PABA. The larger excretion of Ac-PABA after administration of PABA indicates the contribution of intestinal metabolism on the transfer of PABA not only after oral, but also after intravenous administration.

  15. Asymptomatic Incidental Ductal Carcinoma in situ in a Male Breast Presenting with Contralateral Gynecomastia

    PubMed Central

    Isley, Laura M.; Leddy, Rebecca J.; Rumboldt, Tihana; Bernard, Jacqueline M.

    2012-01-01

    Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) in males is rare and usually presents with symptoms on the affected side, such as, palpable mass or bloody nipple discharge. Even as DCIS has been reported in conjunction with gynecomastia in the same breast, we report an unusual case of a 62-year-old Caucasian male, with no family history of breast cancer, who presented with symptomatic side gynecomastia, and was incidentally found to have DCIS in a completely asymptomatic left breast. To the best of our knowledge, this case is the first report in literature of asymptomatic, incidentally discovered DCIS in a male patient. PMID:22530182

  16. [Risk factors of asymptomatic hypertension on the territory of Posusje Municipality (Bosnia and Herzegovina)].

    PubMed

    Beslić, Jozo; Pjevac, Neda; Sakić, Vjera; Pjevac, Nada

    2012-05-01

    Arterial hypertension is the leading mortality risk factor. The aim of the study was to assess the rate of asymptomatic hypertension detected in a randomly selected population sample in Posusje Municipality according to the grade of hypertension (mild, moderate or severe) and risk factors. The following risk factors were analyzed: intake of saturated fatty acids, alcohol, tobacco products and black coffee. Asymptomatic hypertension was detected in 532 of 2000 (26.60%) subjects included in the study. In comparison to the rest of the study sample, these 532 subjects reported a statistically significantly higher consumption of saturated fatty acids, alcohol, tobacco products and black coffee.

  17. Asymptomatic inhaled foreign body. A bullet in the lung for 2 years.

    PubMed

    Salim, Muhammad U; Asghar, Asif; Tareen, Irum; Azhar, Muhammad

    2016-10-01

    It is very rare to have a big foreign body in the lungs without any complications or symptoms for 2 years. A 14-year-old male with episodes of minor hemoptysis for 4 weeks had a history of inhalation of a bullet 2 years earlier. He had asymptomatic for lung complications for 2 years. The bullet was removed by right thoracotomy and  non-anatomical wedge stapled resection, and he followed an uneventful recovery. An aspirated foreign body although big can remain asymptomatic for a long time, especially if it has migrated to the periphery. PMID:27652366

  18. Symptomatic and asymptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia: Molecular differentiation by using microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Kulkarni; Pirozzi, Gregorio; Elashoff, Michael; Munger, William; Waga, Iwao; Dhir, Rajiv; Kakehi, Yoshiyuki; Getzenberg, Robert H.

    2002-05-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a disease of unknown etiology that significantly affects the quality of life in aging men. Histologic BPH may present itself either as symptomatic or asymptomatic in nature. To elucidate the molecular differences underlying BPH, gene expression profiles from the prostate transition zone tissue have been analyzed by using microarrays. A set of 511 differentially expressed genes distinguished symptomatic and asymptomatic BPH. This genetic signature separates BPH from normal tissue but does not seem to change with age. These data could provide novel approaches for alleviating symptoms and hyperplasia in BPH.

  19. Excretion rates of 210Po and 210Pb in Prague inhabitants.

    PubMed

    Hölgye, Zoltán

    2013-01-01

    Excretion rates of (210)Po and (210)Pb in the urine were investigated in 40 healthy inhabitants of Prague (22 males, 18 females, age: 23-70 y, non-smokers). In 20 inhabitants the excretion rates of (210)Po and (210)Pb in faeces were also studied. The mean urinary excretion rates of (210)Po and (210)Pb were 4.1 and 6.0 mBq d(-1), respectively. It was demonstrated, statistically, that the urinary excretion rates of (210)Po and (210)Pb are higher in men than those in women. The highest excretion rates of (210)Po and (210)Pb found in the participants were 10.8 and 16.6 mBq d(-1), respectively. The mean activity ratio of (210)Po/(210)Pb in the urine was 0.73. The mean excretion rates of (210)Po and (210)Pb in faeces were 56.5 and 54.6 mBq d(-1). The mean activity ratio of (210)Po/(210)Pb in faeces was 1.0.

  20. Oxalobacter sp. reduces urinary oxalate excretion by promoting enteric oxalate secretion.

    PubMed

    Hatch, M; Cornelius, J; Allison, M; Sidhu, H; Peck, A; Freel, R W

    2006-02-01

    The primary goal of this study was to test the hypothesis that Oxalobacter colonization alters colonic oxalate transport thereby reducing urinary oxalate excretion. In addition, we examined the effects of intraluminal calcium on Oxalobacter colonization and tested the hypothesis that endogenously derived colonic oxalate could be degraded by lyophilized Oxalobacter enzymes targeted to this segment of the alimentary tract. Oxalate fluxes were measured across short-circuited, in vitro preparations of proximal and distal colon removed from Sprague-Dawley rats and placed in Ussing chambers. For these studies, rats were colonized with Oxalobacter either artificially or naturally, and urinary oxalate, creatinine and calcium excretions were determined. Colonized rats placed on various dietary treatment regimens were used to evaluate the impact of calcium on Oxalobacter colonization and whether exogenous or endogenous oxalate influenced colonization. Hyperoxaluric rats with some degree of renal insufficiency were also used to determine the effects of administering encapsulated Oxalobacter lysate on colonic oxalate transport and urinary oxalate excretion. We conclude that in addition to its intraluminal oxalate-degrading capacity, Oxalobacter interacts physiologically with colonic mucosa by inducing enteric oxalate secretion/excretion leading to reduced urinary excretion. Whether Oxalobacter, or products of Oxalobacter, can therapeutically reduce urinary oxalate excretion and influence stone disease warrants further investigation in long-term studies in various patient populations. PMID:16518326