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Sample records for asymptotically scale-invariant occupancy

  1. Asymptotically scale-invariant occupancy of phase space makes the entropy Sq extensive

    PubMed Central

    Tsallis, Constantino; Gell-Mann, Murray; Sato, Yuzuru

    2005-01-01

    Phase space can be constructed for N equal and distinguishable subsystems that could be probabilistically either weakly correlated or strongly correlated. If they are locally correlated, we expect the Boltzmann-Gibbs entropy SBG ≡ -k Σi pi ln pi to be extensive, i.e., SBG(N) ∝ N for N → ∞. In particular, if they are independent, SBG is strictly additive, i.e., SBG(N) = NSBG(1), ∀N. However, if the subsystems are globally correlated, we expect, for a vast class of systems, the entropy Sq ≡ k[1 - Σi pqi]/(q - 1) (with S1 = SBG) for some special value of q ≠ 1 to be the one which is extensive [i.e., Sq(N) ∝ N for N → ∞]. Another concept which is relevant is strict or asymptotic scale-freedom (or scale-invariance), defined as the situation for which all marginal probabilities of the N-system coincide or asymptotically approach (for N → ∞) the joint probabilities of the (N - 1)-system. If each subsystem is a binary one, scale-freedom is guaranteed by what we hereafter refer to as the Leibnitz rule, i.e., the sum of two successive joint probabilities of the N-system coincides or asymptotically approaches the corresponding joint probability of the (N - 1)-system. The kinds of interplay of these various concepts are illustrated in several examples. One of them justifies the title of this paper. We conjecture that these mechanisms are deeply related to the very frequent emergence, in natural and artificial complex systems, of scale-free structures and to their connections with nonextensive statistical mechanics. Summarizing, we have shown that, for asymptotically scale-invariant systems, it is Sq with q ≠ 1, and not SBG, the entropy which matches standard, clausius-like, prescriptions of classical thermodynamics. PMID:16230624

  2. Generalized scale invariant theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padilla, Antonio; Stefanyszyn, David; Tsoukalas, Minas

    2014-03-01

    We present the most general actions of a single scalar field and two scalar fields coupled to gravity, consistent with second-order field equations in four dimensions, possessing local scale invariance. We apply two different methods to arrive at our results. One method, Ricci gauging, was known to the literature and we find this to produce the same result for the case of one scalar field as a more efficient method presented here. However, we also find our more efficient method to be much more general when we consider two scalar fields. Locally scale invariant actions are also presented for theories with more than two scalar fields coupled to gravity and we explain how one could construct the most general actions for any number of scalar fields. Our generalized scale invariant actions have obvious applications to early Universe cosmology and include, for example, the Bezrukov-Shaposhnikov action as a subset.

  3. Scale-invariant fluctuations from Galilean genesis

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yi; Brandenberger, Robert E-mail: rhb@physics.mcgill.ca

    2012-10-01

    We study the spectrum of cosmological fluctuations in scenarios such as Galilean Genesis \\cite(Nicolis) in which a spectator scalar field acquires a scale-invariant spectrum of perturbations during an early phase which asymptotes in the far past to Minkowski space-time. In the case of minimal coupling to gravity and standard scalar field Lagrangian, the induced curvature fluctuations depend quadratically on the spectator field and are hence non-scale-invariant and highly non-Gaussian. We show that if higher dimensional operators (the same operators that lead to the η-problem for inflation) are considered, a linear coupling between background and spectator field fluctuations is induced which leads to scale-invariant and Gaussian curvature fluctuations.

  4. The scale invariant generator technique for quantifying anisotropic scale invariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, G. M.; Lovejoy, S.; Schertzer, D.; Pecknold, S.

    1999-11-01

    Scale invariance is rapidly becoming a new paradigm for geophysics. However, little attention has been paid to the anisotropy that is invariably present in geophysical fields in the form of differential stratification and rotation, texture and morphology. In order to account for scaling anisotropy, the formalism of generalized scale invariance (GSI) was developed. Until now there has existed only a single fairly ad hoc GSI analysis technique valid for studying differential rotation. In this paper, we use a two-dimensional representation of the linear approximation to generalized scale invariance, to obtain a much improved technique for quantifying anisotropic scale invariance called the scale invariant generator technique (SIG). The accuracy of the technique is tested using anisotropic multifractal simulations and error estimates are provided for the geophysically relevant range of parameters. It is found that the technique yields reasonable estimates for simulations with a diversity of anisotropic and statistical characteristics. The scale invariant generator technique can profitably be applied to the scale invariant study of vertical/horizontal and space/time cross-sections of geophysical fields as well as to the study of the texture/morphology of fields.

  5. Quadratic Generalized Scale Invariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovejoy, S.; Schertzer, D.; Addor, J. B.

    Nearly twenty years ago, two of us argued that in order to account for the scaling strat- ification of the atmosphere, that an anisotropic "unified scaling model" of the atmo- sphere was required with elliptical dimension 23/9=2.555... "in between" the standard 3-D (small scale) and 2-D large scale model. This model was based on the formal- ism of generalized scale invariance (GSI). Physically, GSI is justified by arguing that various conserved fluxes (energy, buoyancy force variance etc.) should define the ap- propriate notion of scale. In a recent large scale satellite cloud image analysis, we directly confirmed this model by studying the isotropic (angle averaged) horizontal cloud statistics. Mathematically, GSI is based on a a group of scale changing opera- tors and their generators but to date, both analyses (primarily of cloud images) and nu- merical (multifractal) simulations, have been limited to the special case of linear GSI. This has shown that cloud texture can plausibly be associated with local linearizations. However realistic morphologies involve spatially avarying textures; the full non linear GSI is clearly necessary. In this talk, we first show that the observed angle averaged (multi)scaling statistics only give a realtively weak constraint on the nonlinear gner- ator: that the latter can be expressed by self-similar (isotropic) part, and a deviatoric part described (in two dimensions) by an arbitrary scalar potential which contains all the information about the cloud morphology. We then show (using a theorem due to Poincaré) how to reduce nonlinear GSI to linear GSI plus a nonlinear coordinate trans- formation numerically, using this to take multifractal GSI modelling to the next level of approximation: quadratic GSI. We show many examples of the coresponding simu- lations which include transitions from various morphologies (including cyclones) and we discuss the results in relation to satellite cloud images.

  6. Scale invariance vs conformal invariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Yu

    2015-03-01

    In this review article, we discuss the distinction and possible equivalence between scale invariance and conformal invariance in relativistic quantum field theories. Under some technical assumptions, we can prove that scale invariant quantum field theories in d = 2 space-time dimensions necessarily possess the enhanced conformal symmetry. The use of the conformal symmetry is well appreciated in the literature, but the fact that all the scale invariant phenomena in d = 2 space-time dimensions enjoy the conformal property relies on the deep structure of the renormalization group. The outstanding question is whether this feature is specific to d = 2 space-time dimensions or it holds in higher dimensions, too. As of January 2014, our consensus is that there is no known example of scale invariant but non-conformal field theories in d = 4 space-time dimensions under the assumptions of (1) unitarity, (2) Poincaré invariance (causality), (3) discrete spectrum in scaling dimensions, (4) existence of scale current and (5) unbroken scale invariance in the vacuum. We have a perturbative proof of the enhancement of conformal invariance from scale invariance based on the higher dimensional analogue of Zamolodchikov's c-theorem, but the non-perturbative proof is yet to come. As a reference we have tried to collect as many interesting examples of scale invariance in relativistic quantum field theories as possible in this article. We give a complementary holographic argument based on the energy-condition of the gravitational system and the space-time diffeomorphism in order to support the claim of the symmetry enhancement. We believe that the possible enhancement of conformal invariance from scale invariance reveals the sublime nature of the renormalization group and space-time with holography. This review is based on a lecture note on scale invariance vs conformal invariance, on which the author gave lectures at Taiwan Central University for the 5th Taiwan School on Strings and

  7. Some Asymptotic Results for Occupancy Problems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-04-01

    inber) Occupancy problems, coupon collectors problem, limit theorems 0.AISTRACT (Continue an tmw. old* It nocooay and ldontit7r by block ntm&.e...Consider a situation in which balls are falling into N cells with arbitrary probabilities. Limit distributions for the number of empty cells are...considered when N-o- o and the number of balls n - ca so that n/N - co Limit distribu- tions for the number of balls to achieve exactly b empty cells are

  8. Hidden scale invariance of metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hummel, Felix; Kresse, Georg; Dyre, Jeppe C.; Pedersen, Ulf R.

    2015-11-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations of 58 liquid elements at their triple point show that most metals exhibit near proportionality between the thermal fluctuations of the virial and the potential energy in the isochoric ensemble. This demonstrates a general "hidden" scale invariance of metals making the condensed part of the thermodynamic phase diagram effectively one dimensional with respect to structure and dynamics. DFT computed density scaling exponents, related to the Grüneisen parameter, are in good agreement with experimental values for the 16 elements where reliable data were available. Hidden scale invariance is demonstrated in detail for magnesium by showing invariance of structure and dynamics. Computed melting curves of period three metals follow curves with invariance (isomorphs). The experimental structure factor of magnesium is predicted by assuming scale invariant inverse power-law (IPL) pair interactions. However, crystal packings of several transition metals (V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Nb, Mo, Ta, W, and Hg), most post-transition metals (Ga, In, Sn, and Tl), and the metalloids Si and Ge cannot be explained by the IPL assumption. The virial-energy correlation coefficients of iron and phosphorous are shown to increase at elevated pressures. Finally, we discuss how scale invariance explains the Grüneisen equation of state and a number of well-known empirical melting and freezing rules.

  9. Fixed points and the spontaneous breaking of scale invariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litim, Daniel F.; Marchais, Edouard; Mati, Péter

    2017-06-01

    We investigate critical N -component scalar field theories and the spontaneous breaking of scale invariance in three dimensions using functional renormalization. Global and local renormalization group flows are solved analytically in the infinite N limit to establish the exact phase diagram of the theory including the Wilson-Fisher fixed point and a line of asymptotically safe UV fixed points. We also study the Bardeen-Moshe-Bander phenomenon of spontaneously broken scale invariance and the stability of the vacuum for general regularization. Our findings clarify a long-standing puzzle about the apparent unboundedness of the effective potential. Implications for other theories are indicated.

  10. Emerging universe from scale invariance

    SciTech Connect

    Del Campo, Sergio; Herrera, Ramón; Guendelman, Eduardo I.; Labraña, Pedro E-mail: guendel@bgu.ac.il E-mail: plabrana@ubiobio.cl

    2010-06-01

    We consider a scale invariant model which includes a R{sup 2} term in action and show that a stable ''emerging universe'' scenario is possible. The model belongs to the general class of theories, where an integration measure independent of the metric is introduced. To implement scale invariance (S.I.), a dilaton field is introduced. The integration of the equations of motion associated with the new measure gives rise to the spontaneous symmetry breaking (S.S.B) of S.I. After S.S.B. of S.I. in the model with the R{sup 2} term (and first order formalism applied), it is found that a non trivial potential for the dilaton is generated. The dynamics of the scalar field becomes non linear and these non linearities are instrumental in the stability of some of the emerging universe solutions, which exists for a parameter range of the theory.

  11. Shift and Scale Invariant Preprocessor.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-01

    1982 THESIS D V SHIFT AND SCALE INVARIANT ?PREPROCESSOR by Norman E. Huston, Jr. December 1981 0 Thesis Advisor: L. A. Wilson Approved for public...SCHOOL December 1981 Author: - . 4 ,/ A pp ro0ved by: rYY. ( Thesis Advisor Co-Ad isor Chairman, De artment of 4n n eing Dean of Science and...large range of problems/disciplines. Fields where it is particularly common include optical imagery, acoustic signal processing , radiology, radio

  12. Measuring Scale Invariance between and within Subjects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, Jeri; Hocevar, Dennis

    The present paper represents a demonstration of how LISREL V can be used to investigate scale invariance (1) across time (its relationship to test-retest reliability), and (2) across groups. Five criteria were established to test scale invariance across time and four criteria were established to test scale invariance across groups. Using the…

  13. Scale invariance in road networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalapala, Vamsi; Sanwalani, Vishal; Clauset, Aaron; Moore, Cristopher

    2006-02-01

    We study the topological and geographic structure of the national road networks of the United States, England, and Denmark. By transforming these networks into their dual representation, where roads are vertices and an edge connects two vertices if the corresponding roads ever intersect, we show that they exhibit both topological and geographic scale invariance. That is, we show that for sufficiently large geographic areas, the dual degree distribution follows a power law with exponent 2.2⩽α⩽2.4 , and that journeys, regardless of their length, have a largely identical structure. To explain these properties, we introduce and analyze a simple fractal model of road placement that reproduces the observed structure, and suggests a testable connection between the scaling exponent α and the fractal dimensions governing the placement of roads and intersections.

  14. Scale-invariant growth processes in expanding space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Adnan; Ball, Robin C.; Grosskinsky, Stefan; Somfai, Ellák

    2013-02-01

    Many growth processes lead to intriguing stochastic patterns and complex fractal structures which exhibit local scale invariance properties. Such structures can often be described effectively by space-time trajectories of interacting particles, and their large scale behavior depends on the overall growth geometry. We establish an exact relation between statistical properties of structures in uniformly expanding and fixed geometries, which preserves the local scale invariance and is independent of other properties such as the dimensionality. This relation generalizes standard conformal transformations as the natural symmetry of self-affine growth processes. We illustrate our main result numerically for various structures of coalescing Lévy flights and fractional Brownian motions, including also branching and finite particle sizes. One of the main benefits of this approach is a full, explicit description of the asymptotic statistics in expanding domains, which are often nontrivial and random due to amplification of initial fluctuations.

  15. Interacting scale invariant but nonconformal field theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Yu

    2017-03-01

    There is a dilemma in constructing interacting scale invariant Euclidean field theories that are not conformal invariant. On one hand, scale invariance without conformal invariance seems more generic by requiring only a smaller symmetry. On the other hand, the existence of a nonconserved current with exact scaling dimension d -1 in d dimensions seems to require extra fine-tuning. To understand the competition better, we explore some examples without the reflection positivity. We show that a theory of elasticity (also known as Riva-Cardy theory) coupled with massless fermions in d =4 -ɛ dimensions does not possess an interacting scale invariant fixed point except for an unstable (and unphysical) one with an infinite coefficient of compression. We do, however, find interacting scale invariant but nonconformal field theories in gauge fixed versions of the Banks-Zaks fixed points in d =4 dimensions.

  16. Rainbow gravity and scale-invariant fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amelino-Camelia, Giovanni; Arzano, Michele; Gubitosi, Giulia; Magueijo, João

    2013-08-01

    We reexamine a recently proposed scenario where the deformed dispersion relations associated with a flow of the spectral dimension to a UV value of 2 leads to a scale-invariant spectrum of cosmological fluctuations, without the need for inflation. In that scenario Einstein gravity was assumed. The theory displays a wavelength-dependent speed of light but by transforming to a suitable “rainbow frame” this feature can be removed, at the expense of modifying gravity. We find that the ensuing rainbow gravity theory is such that gravity switches off at high energy (or at least leads to a universal conformal coupling). This explains why the fluctuations are scale invariant on all scales: there is no horizon scale as such. For dispersion relations that do not lead to exact scale invariance we find instead esoteric inflation in the rainbow frame. We argue that these results shed light on the behavior of gravity under the phenomenon of dimensional reduction.

  17. Scale Invariant Gravity - a Simple Formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesson, P. S.

    1981-09-01

    Using the Cosmological Principle as justification, it is suggested that the scale-invariant theory of gravity be based on a Conspiracy Hypothesis (CH). The CH says: The matter parameters of a system (mass, density, pressure, etc.), the "constants" of physics and the coordinates occur together in dimensionless combinations (η-numbers) in which the components may vary but in such a manner that the variations conspire to keep the -numbers constant. This hypothesis yields a formulation of the scale-invariant theory that is simpler than other versions of it in which the Newtonian gravitational parameter G is treated as a field variable (Dirac, Hoyle/Narlikar, Canuto et al.). This simple formulation of scale-invariant gravity agrees with a recent reformulation of the (Perfect) Cosmological Principle. It also agrees with observations that have been made to date, and the equations suggest several new tests that can possibly be carried out.

  18. Cosmological constant in scale-invariant theories

    SciTech Connect

    Foot, Robert; Kobakhidze, Archil; Volkas, Raymond R.

    2011-10-01

    The incorporation of a small cosmological constant within radiatively broken scale-invariant models is discussed. We show that phenomenologically consistent scale-invariant models can be constructed which allow a small positive cosmological constant, providing certain relation between the particle masses is satisfied. As a result, the mass of the dilaton is generated at two-loop level. Another interesting consequence is that the electroweak symmetry-breaking vacuum in such models is necessarily a metastable ''false'' vacuum which, fortunately, is not expected to decay on cosmological time scales.

  19. Broken Scale Invariance and Anomalous Dimensions

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Wilson, K. G.

    1970-05-01

    Mack and Kastrup have proposed that broken scale invariance is a symmetry of strong interactions. There is evidence from the Thirring model and perturbation theory that the dimensions of fields defined by scale transformations will be changed by the interaction from their canonical values. We review these ideas and their consequences for strong interactions.

  20. Scale invariant density perturbations from cyclic cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frampton, Paul Howard

    2016-04-01

    It is shown how quantum fluctuations of the radiation during the contraction era of a comes back empty (CBE) cyclic cosmology can provide density fluctuations which re-enter the horizon during the subsequent expansion era and at lowest order are scale invariant, in a Harrison-Zel’dovich-Peebles sense. It is necessary to be consistent with observations of large scale structure.

  1. From scale invariance to Lorentz symmetry.

    PubMed

    Sibiryakov, Sergey

    2014-06-20

    It is shown that a unitary translationally invariant field theory in 1+1 dimensions, satisfying isotropic scale invariance, standard assumptions about the spectrum of states and operators, and the requirement that signals propagate with finite velocity, possesses an infinite dimensional symmetry given by one or a product of several copies of conformal algebra. In particular, this implies the presence of one or several Lorentz groups acting on the operator algebra of the theory.

  2. Data series embedding and scale invariant statistics.

    PubMed

    Michieli, I; Medved, B; Ristov, S

    2010-06-01

    Data sequences acquired from bio-systems such as human gait data, heart rate interbeat data, or DNA sequences exhibit complex dynamics that is frequently described by a long-memory or power-law decay of autocorrelation function. One way of characterizing that dynamics is through scale invariant statistics or "fractal-like" behavior. For quantifying scale invariant parameters of physiological signals several methods have been proposed. Among them the most common are detrended fluctuation analysis, sample mean variance analyses, power spectral density analysis, R/S analysis, and recently in the realm of the multifractal approach, wavelet analysis. In this paper it is demonstrated that embedding the time series data in the high-dimensional pseudo-phase space reveals scale invariant statistics in the simple fashion. The procedure is applied on different stride interval data sets from human gait measurements time series (Physio-Bank data library). Results show that introduced mapping adequately separates long-memory from random behavior. Smaller gait data sets were analyzed and scale-free trends for limited scale intervals were successfully detected. The method was verified on artificially produced time series with known scaling behavior and with the varying content of noise. The possibility for the method to falsely detect long-range dependence in the artificially generated short range dependence series was investigated.

  3. Scale Invariant Relationships for Snow Avalanches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landry, C. C.; Birkeland, K. W.

    2002-12-01

    Snow avalanches have been described as the most common form of lethal mass wasting in the mountains of the western United States and result in more than 30 fatalities per winter. In this poster, we investigate scale-invariant relationships associated with snow avalanches to better understand some of the complex interactions of the snow avalanche system. This work utilizes over 20 years of data from a number of ski areas and other avalanche-prone locations in the western United States. Our results reveal power-law relationships between avalanche frequency and size for several groups of avalanche paths. Further, following some recent work by others, we also demonstrate a power law between avalanche frequency and the estimated fracture depth of the avalanches for groups of avalanche paths in several different snow climates. Interestingly, the relationships explored are valid both for datasets consisting largely of avalanches artificially triggered with explosives as well as for datasets consisting entirely of natural avalanches. Recent research by others also demonstrates scale invariance in the fracture and fragmentation of ice. Our work suggests that scale invariance may also exist in the complicated fracture processes within seasonal snowpacks that result in the release of slab avalanches.

  4. Scale-invariant perturbations from null-energy-condition violation: A new variant of Galilean genesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishi, Sakine; Kobayashi, Tsutomu

    2017-03-01

    We propose a novel branch of the Galilean genesis scenario as an alternative to inflation, in which the Universe starts expanding from Minkowski in the asymptotic past with a gross violation of the null energy condition (NEC). This variant, described by several functions and parameters within the Horndeski scalar-tensor theory, shares the same background dynamics with the existing genesis models, but the nature of primordial quantum fluctuations is quite distinct. In some cases, tensor perturbations grow on superhorizon scales. The tensor power spectrum can be red, blue, or scale invariant, depending on the model, while scalar perturbations are nearly scale invariant. This is in sharp contrast to typical NEC-violating cosmologies, in which a blue tensor tilt is generated. Though the primordial tensor and scalar spectra are both nearly scale invariant as in the inflationary scenario, the consistency relation in our variant of Galilean genesis is nonstandard.

  5. Scale Invariance in Rain Time Series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deluca, A.; Corral, A.

    2009-09-01

    In the last few years there have been pieces of evidence that rain events can be considered analogous to other nonequilibrium relaxation processes in Nature such as earthquakes, solar flares and avalanches. In this work we compare the probability densities of rain event size, duration, and recurrence times (i.e., drought periods) between one Mediterranean site and different sites worldwide. We test the existence of scale invariance in these distributions and the possibility of a universal scaling exponent, despite the different climatic characteristics of the different places.

  6. Scale Invariant Feature Transform Plus Hue Feature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daneshvar, M. B.

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents an enhanced method for extracting invariant features from images based on Scale Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT). Although SIFT features are invariant to image scale and rotation, additive noise, and changes in illumination but we think this algorithm suffers from excess keypoints. Besides, by adding the hue feature, which is extracted from combination of hue and illumination values in HSI colour space version of the target image, the proposed algorithm can speed up the matching phase. Therefore, we proposed the Scale Invariant Feature Transform plus Hue (SIFTH) that can remove the excess keypoints based on their Euclidean distances and adding hue to feature vector to speed up the matching process which is the aim of feature extraction. In this paper we use the difference of hue features and the Mean Square Error (MSE) of orientation histograms to find the most similar keypoint to the under processing keypoint. The keypoint matching method can identify correct keypoint among clutter and occlusion robustly while achieving real-time performance and it will result a similarity factor of two keypoints. Moreover removing excess keypoint by SIFTH algorithm helps the matching algorithm to achieve this goal.

  7. Scale-invariance in soft gamma repeaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Zhe; Lin, Hai-Nan; Sang, Yu; Wang, Ping

    2017-06-01

    The statistical properties of the soft gamma repeater SGR J1550-5418 are investigated carefully. We find that the cumulative distributions of fluence, peak flux and duration can be well fitted by a bent power law, while the cumulative distribution of waiting time follows a simple power law. In particular, the probability density functions of fluctuations of fluence, peak flux, and duration have a sharp peak and fat tails, which can be well fitted by a q-Gaussian function. The q values keep approximately steady for different scale intervals, indicating a scale-invariant structure of soft gamma repeaters. Those results support that the origin of soft gamma repeaters is crustquakes of neutron stars with extremely strong magnetic fields. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11375203, 11675182, 11690022, 11603005), and Fundamental Research Funds for Central Universities (106112016CDJCR301206)

  8. Scale invariance and universality of economic fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, H. E.; Amaral, L. A. N.; Gopikrishnan, P.; Plerou, V.

    2000-08-01

    In recent years, physicists have begun to apply concepts and methods of statistical physics to study economic problems, and the neologism “econophysics” is increasingly used to refer to this work. Much recent work is focused on understanding the statistical properties of time series. One reason for this interest is that economic systems are examples of complex interacting systems for which a huge amount of data exist, and it is possible that economic time series viewed from a different perspective might yield new results. This manuscript is a brief summary of a talk that was designed to address the question of whether two of the pillars of the field of phase transitions and critical phenomena - scale invariance and universality - can be useful in guiding research on economics. We shall see that while scale invariance has been tested for many years, universality is relatively less frequently discussed. This article reviews the results of two recent studies - (i) The probability distribution of stock price fluctuations: Stock price fluctuations occur in all magnitudes, in analogy to earthquakes - from tiny fluctuations to drastic events, such as market crashes. The distribution of price fluctuations decays with a power-law tail well outside the Lévy stable regime and describes fluctuations that differ in size by as much as eight orders of magnitude. (ii) Quantifying business firm fluctuations: We analyze the Computstat database comprising all publicly traded United States manufacturing companies within the years 1974-1993. We find that the distributions of growth rates is different for different bins of firm size, with a width that varies inversely with a power of firm size. Similar variation is found for other complex organizations, including country size, university research budget size, and size of species of bird populations.

  9. No fifth force in a scale invariant universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Pedro G.; Hill, Christopher T.; Ross, Graham G.

    2017-03-01

    We revisit the possibility that the Planck mass is spontaneously generated in scale-invariant scalar-tensor theories of gravity, typically leading to a "dilaton." The fifth force, arising from the dilaton, is severely constrained by astrophysical measurements. We explore the possibility that nature is fundamentally scale invariant and argue that, as a consequence, the fifth-force effects are dramatically suppressed and such models are viable. We discuss possible obstructions to maintaining scale invariance and how these might be resolved.

  10. Scale-invariant correlations and the distribution of prime numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holdom, B.

    2009-08-01

    Negative correlations in the distribution of prime numbers are found to display a scale invariance. This occurs in conjunction with a nonstationary behavior. We compare the prime number series to a type of fractional Brownian motion which incorporates both the scale invariance and the nonstationary behavior. Interesting discrepancies remain. The scale invariance also appears to imply the Riemann hypothesis and we study the use of the former as a test of the latter.

  11. Some topics on scale-invariant perturbations from noninflationary universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mingzhe

    In this paper, we review some topics on generations of scale-invariant primordial scalar and tensor perturbations in the early universe models different from inflation. The content includes generation of scale-invariant and Gaussian scalar perturbation in the ekpyrotic/cyclic universe, and production scale-invariant tensor perturbation in contracting universe. The main property of the models reviewed in this paper is the nonminimal couplings, include nonminimal couplings between the scalar fields and those to the gravity. By introducing these couplings, it is not difficult to achieve scale-invariances for the perturbations in the early universe models alternative to inflation.

  12. Scale-Invariant Transition Probabilities in Free Word Association Trajectories

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Martin Elias; Bonomo, Flavia; Sigman, Mariano

    2009-01-01

    Free-word association has been used as a vehicle to understand the organization of human thoughts. The original studies relied mainly on qualitative assertions, yielding the widely intuitive notion that trajectories of word associations are structured, yet considerably more random than organized linguistic text. Here we set to determine a precise characterization of this space, generating a large number of word association trajectories in a web implemented game. We embedded the trajectories in the graph of word co-occurrences from a linguistic corpus. To constrain possible transport models we measured the memory loss and the cycling probability. These two measures could not be reconciled by a bounded diffusive model since the cycling probability was very high (16% of order-2 cycles) implying a majority of short-range associations whereas the memory loss was very rapid (converging to the asymptotic value in ∼7 steps) which, in turn, forced a high fraction of long-range associations. We show that memory loss and cycling probabilities of free word association trajectories can be simultaneously accounted by a model in which transitions are determined by a scale invariant probability distribution. PMID:19826622

  13. Computing with scale-invariant neural representations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Marc; Shankar, Karthik

    The Weber-Fechner law is perhaps the oldest quantitative relationship in psychology. Consider the problem of the brain representing a function f (x) . Different neurons have receptive fields that support different parts of the range, such that the ith neuron has a receptive field at xi. Weber-Fechner scaling refers to the finding that the width of the receptive field scales with xi as does the difference between the centers of adjacent receptive fields. Weber-Fechner scaling is exponentially resource-conserving. Neurophysiological evidence suggests that neural representations obey Weber-Fechner scaling in the visual system and perhaps other systems as well. We describe an optimality constraint that is solved by Weber-Fechner scaling, providing an information-theoretic rationale for this principle of neural coding. Weber-Fechner scaling can be generated within a mathematical framework using the Laplace transform. Within this framework, simple computations such as translation, correlation and cross-correlation can be accomplished. This framework can in principle be extended to provide a general computational language for brain-inspired cognitive computation on scale-invariant representations. Supported by NSF PHY 1444389 and the BU Initiative for the Physics and Mathematics of Neural Systems,.

  14. Noninflationary model with scale invariant cosmological perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Peter, Patrick; Pinho, Emanuel J. C.; Pinto-Neto, Nelson

    2007-01-15

    We show that a contracting universe which bounces due to quantum cosmological effects and connects to the hot big-bang expansion phase, can produce an almost scale invariant spectrum of perturbations provided the perturbations are produced during an almost matter dominated era in the contraction phase. This is achieved using Bohmian solutions of the canonical Wheeler-DeWitt equation, thus treating both the background and the perturbations in a fully quantum manner. We find a very slightly blue spectrum (n{sub S}-1>0). Taking into account the spectral index constraint as well as the cosmic microwave background normalization measure yields an equation of state that should be less than {omega} < or approx. 8x10{sup -4}, implying n{sub S}-1{approx}O(10{sup -4}), and that the characteristic curvature scale of the Universe at the bounce is L{sub 0}{approx}10{sup 3}l{sub Pl}, a region where one expects that the Wheeler-DeWitt equation should be valid without being spoiled by string or loop quantum gravity effects. We have also obtained a consistency relation between the tensor-to-scalar ratio T/S and the scalar spectral index as T/S{approx}4.6x10{sup -2}{radical}(n{sub S}-1), leading to potentially measurable differences with inflationary predictions.

  15. Scale invariance, conformality, and generalized free fields

    DOE PAGES

    Dymarsky, Anatoly; Farnsworth, Kara; Komargodski, Zohar; ...

    2016-02-16

    This paper addresses the question of whether there are 4D Lorentz invariant unitary quantum fi eld theories with scale invariance but not conformal invariance. We present an important loophole in the arguments of Luty-Polchinski-Rattazzi and Dymarsky-Komargodski-Schwimmer-Theisen that is the trace of the energy-momentum tensor T could be a generalized free field. In this paper we rule out this possibility. The key ingredient is the observation that a unitary theory with scale but not conformal invariance necessarily has a non-vanishing anomaly for global scale transformations. We show that this anomaly cannot be reproduced if T is a generalized free field unlessmore » the theory also contains a dimension-2 scalar operator. In the special case where such an operator is present it can be used to redefine ("improve") the energy-momentum tensor, and we show that there is at least one energy-momentum tensor that is not a generalized free field. In addition, we emphasize that, in general, large momentum limits of correlation functions cannot be understood from the leading terms of the coordinate space OPE. This invalidates a recent argument by Farnsworth-Luty-Prilepina (FLP). Finally, despite the invalidity of the general argument of FLP, some of the techniques turn out to be useful in the present context.« less

  16. Scale invariance, conformality, and generalized free fields

    SciTech Connect

    Dymarsky, Anatoly; Farnsworth, Kara; Komargodski, Zohar; Luty, Markus A.; Prilepina, Valentina

    2016-02-16

    This paper addresses the question of whether there are 4D Lorentz invariant unitary quantum fi eld theories with scale invariance but not conformal invariance. We present an important loophole in the arguments of Luty-Polchinski-Rattazzi and Dymarsky-Komargodski-Schwimmer-Theisen that is the trace of the energy-momentum tensor T could be a generalized free field. In this paper we rule out this possibility. The key ingredient is the observation that a unitary theory with scale but not conformal invariance necessarily has a non-vanishing anomaly for global scale transformations. We show that this anomaly cannot be reproduced if T is a generalized free field unless the theory also contains a dimension-2 scalar operator. In the special case where such an operator is present it can be used to redefine ("improve") the energy-momentum tensor, and we show that there is at least one energy-momentum tensor that is not a generalized free field. In addition, we emphasize that, in general, large momentum limits of correlation functions cannot be understood from the leading terms of the coordinate space OPE. This invalidates a recent argument by Farnsworth-Luty-Prilepina (FLP). Finally, despite the invalidity of the general argument of FLP, some of the techniques turn out to be useful in the present context.

  17. No fifth force in a scale invariant universe

    DOE PAGES

    Ferreira, Pedro G.; Hill, Christopher T.; Ross, Graham G.

    2017-03-15

    We revisit the possibility that the Planck mass is spontaneously generated in scale-invariant scalar-tensor theories of gravity, typically leading to a “dilaton.” The fifth force, arising from the dilaton, is severely constrained by astrophysical measurements. We explore the possibility that nature is fundamentally scale invariant and argue that, as a consequence, the fifth-force effects are dramatically suppressed and such models are viable. Finally, we discuss possible obstructions to maintaining scale invariance and how these might be resolved.

  18. The Scale Invariant Synchrotron Jet of Flat Spectrum Radio Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, L. M.; Bai, J. M.; Xie, Z. H.; Yi, T. F.; Xu, Y. B.; Xue, R.; Wang, X. H.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, the scale invariance of the synchrotron jet of Flat Spectrum Radio Quasars has been studied using a sample of combined sources from FKM04 and from SDSS DR3 catalogue. Since the research of scale invariance has been focused on sub-Eddington cases that can be fitted onto the fundamental plane, while near-Eddington sources such as FSRQs have not been explicitly studied. The extracted physical properties of synchrotron jet of FSRQs have been shown to be scale invariant using our sample. The results are in good agreement with theoretical expectations of Heinz & Sunyaev (2003). Therefore, the jet synchrotron is shown to be scale independent, regardless of the accretion modes. Results in this article thus lend support to the scale invariant model of the jet synchrotron throughout the mass scale of black hole systems.

  19. A Bayesian Analysis of Scale-Invariant Processes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    Analysis of Scale-Invariant Processes Jingfeng Wang, Rafael L. Bras, Veronica Nieves Georgia Tech Research Corporation Office of Sponsored Programs...processes Veronica Nieves , Jingfeng Wang, and Rafael L. Bras Citation: AIP Conf. Proc. 1443, 56 (2012); doi: 10.1063/1.3703620 View online: http...http://proceedings.aip.org/about/rights_permissions A Bayesian Analysis of Scale-Invariant Processes Veronica Nieves ∗, Jingfeng Wang† and Rafael L. Bras

  20. Maximum entropy distributions of scale-invariant processes.

    PubMed

    Nieves, Veronica; Wang, Jingfeng; Bras, Rafael L; Wood, Elizabeth

    2010-09-10

    Organizations of many variables in nature such as soil moisture and topography exhibit patterns with no dominant scales. The maximum entropy (ME) principle is proposed to show how these variables can be statistically described using their scale-invariant properties and geometric mean. The ME principle predicts with great simplicity the probability distribution of a scale-invariant process in terms of macroscopic observables. The ME principle offers a universal and unified framework for characterizing such multiscaling processes.

  1. Broken scale invariance in time-dependent trapping potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharashi, Seyed Ebrahim; Blume, D.

    2016-12-01

    The response of a cold atom gas with contact interactions to a smoothly varying external harmonic confinement in the nonadiabatic regime is studied. The time variation of the angular frequency is varied such that the system is, for vanishing or infinitely strong contact interactions, scale invariant. The time evolution of the system with broken scale invariance (i.e., the time evolution of the system with finite interaction strength) is contrasted with that for a scale invariant system, which exhibits Efimovian-like expansion dynamics that is characterized by log-periodic oscillations with unique period and amplitude. It is found that the breaking of the scale invariance by the finiteness of the interactions leads to a time dependence of the oscillation period and amplitude. It is argued, based on analytical considerations for atomic gases of arbitrary size and numerical results for two one-dimensional particles, that the oscillation period approaches that of the scale-invariant system at large times. The role of the time-dependent contact in the expansion dynamics is analyzed.

  2. Scale invariance of subsurface flow patterns and its limitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hergarten, S.; Winkler, G.; Birk, S.

    2016-05-01

    Preferential flow patterns in the subsurface are of great importance for the availability and the quality of water resources. However, knowledge of their spatial structure is still behind their importance, so that understanding the nature of preferential flow patterns is a major issue in subsurface hydrology. Comparing the statistics of river catchment sizes and spring discharges, we found that the morphology of preferential subsurface flow patterns is probably scale invariant and similar to that of dendritic river networks. This result is not limited to karstic aquifers where the occurrence of dendritic structures has been known at least qualitatively for a long time. The scale invariance even seems to be independent of the lithology of the aquifer. However, scale invariance of river patterns seems to be only limited by the continental scale, while scale invariance of subsurface flow patterns breaks down at much smaller scales. The upper limit of scale invariance in subsurface flow patterns is highly variable. We found a range from thousands of square kilometers for limestone aquifers down to less than 1 km2 in the weathered zone and debris accumulations of crystalline rocks.

  3. Tuning the cosmological constant, broken scale invariance, unitarity

    SciTech Connect

    Förste, Stefan; Manz, Paul

    2016-06-10

    We study gravity coupled to a cosmological constant and a scale but not conformally invariant sector. In Minkowski vacuum, scale invariance is spontaneously broken. We consider small fluctuations around the Minkowski vacuum. At the linearised level we find that the trace of metric perturbations receives a positive or negative mass squared contribution. However, only for the Fierz-Pauli combination the theory is free of ghosts. The mass term for the trace of metric perturbations can be cancelled by explicitly breaking scale invariance. This reintroduces fine-tuning. Models based on four form field strength show similarities with explicit scale symmetry breaking due to quantisation conditions.

  4. Scalar dark matter in scale invariant standard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghorbani, Karim; Ghorbani, Hossein

    2016-04-01

    We investigate single and two-component scalar dark matter scenarios in classically scale invariant standard model which is free of the hierarchy problem in the Higgs sector. We show that despite the very restricted space of parameters imposed by the scale invariance symmetry, both single and two-component scalar dark matter models overcome the direct and indirect constraints provided by the Planck/WMAP observational data and the LUX/Xenon100 experiment. We comment also on the radiative mass corrections of the classically massless scalon that plays a crucial role in our study.

  5. Binary optical filters for scale invariant pattern recognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Max B.; Downie, John D.; Hine, Butler P.

    1992-01-01

    Binary synthetic discriminant function (BSDF) optical filters which are invariant to scale changes in the target object of more than 50 percent are demonstrated in simulation and experiment. Efficient databases of scale invariant BSDF filters can be designed which discriminate between two very similar objects at any view scaled over a factor of 2 or more. The BSDF technique has considerable advantages over other methods for achieving scale invariant object recognition, as it also allows determination of the object's scale. In addition to scale, the technique can be used to design recognition systems invariant to other geometric distortions.

  6. Non-equilibrium scale invariance and shortcuts to adiabaticity in a one-dimensional Bose gas

    PubMed Central

    Rohringer, W.; Fischer, D.; Steiner, F.; Mazets, I. E.; Schmiedmayer, J.; Trupke, M.

    2015-01-01

    We present experimental evidence for scale invariant behaviour of the excitation spectrum in phase-fluctuating quasi-1d Bose gases after a rapid change of the external trapping potential. Probing density correlations in free expansion, we find that the temperature of an initial thermal state scales with the spatial extension of the cloud as predicted by a model based on adiabatic rescaling of initial eigenmodes with conserved quasiparticle occupation numbers. Based on this result, we demonstrate that shortcuts to adiabaticity for the rapid expansion or compression of the gas do not induce additional heating. PMID:25867640

  7. Ordered hierarchy versus scale invariance in sequence stratigraphy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlager, Wolfgang

    2010-10-01

    Sequence stratigraphy has been applied in a wide range of scales of time and space, from decimeter-thick layers formed within hours to kilometer-thick basin fills formed during hundreds of millions of years. The traditional approach to practice sequence stratigraphy in this wide range of scales is to subdivide the sediment piles into an ordered hierarchy of sequence cycles of different duration and different architecture. An alternative are scale-invariant models with fractal characteristics. Published data confirm two predictions of the ordered-hierarchy model: sequences of very short duration (<1 × 103 years) are parasequences bounded by flooding surfaces, very long sequences (>200 × 106 years) are symmetrical transgressive-regressive cycles. However, the sequence record in the range of 1 × 104-200 × 106 years, the principal domain of sequence stratigraphy, shows a rather irregular succession of sequences with variable symmetry and bounded by flooding surfaces or exposure surfaces. For these time scales, scale-invariant models are a good first approximation, particularly because the evidence for scale-invariance and randomness in the stratigraphic record is strong: Frequency spectra of sea-level change as well as rates of sedimentation and rates of accommodation change plotted against length of observation span show basic trends indistinguishable from random walk. These trends, combined with scale-invariant sequence models may be the most efficient tools for across-the-board predictions on sequences and for locating islands of order in the sequence record.

  8. Gauge coupling unification in a classically scale invariant model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haba, Naoyuki; Ishida, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Ryo; Yamaguchi, Yuya

    2016-02-01

    There are a lot of works within a class of classically scale invariant model, which is motivated by solving the gauge hierarchy problem. In this context, the Higgs mass vanishes at the UV scale due to the classically scale invariance, and is generated via the Coleman-Weinberg mechanism. Since the mass generation should occur not so far from the electroweak scale, we extend the standard model only around the TeV scale. We construct a model which can achieve the gauge coupling unification at the UV scale. In the same way, the model can realize the vacuum stability, smallness of active neutrino masses, baryon asymmetry of the universe, and dark matter relic abundance. The model predicts the existence vector-like fermions charged under SU(3) C with masses lower than 1 TeV, and the SM singlet Majorana dark matter with mass lower than 2.6 TeV.

  9. Scale-invariant entropy-based theory for dynamic ordering

    SciTech Connect

    Mahulikar, Shripad P. E-mail: spm@aero.iitb.ac.in; Kumari, Priti

    2014-09-01

    Dynamically Ordered self-organized dissipative structure exists in various forms and at different scales. This investigation first introduces the concept of an isolated embedding system, which embeds an open system, e.g., dissipative structure and its mass and/or energy exchange with its surroundings. Thereafter, scale-invariant theoretical analysis is presented using thermodynamic principles for Order creation, existence, and destruction. The sustainability criterion for Order existence based on its structured mass and/or energy interactions with the surroundings is mathematically defined. This criterion forms the basis for the interrelationship of physical parameters during sustained existence of dynamic Order. It is shown that the sufficient condition for dynamic Order existence is approached if its sustainability criterion is met, i.e., its destruction path is blocked. This scale-invariant approach has the potential to unify the physical understanding of universal dynamic ordering based on entropy considerations.

  10. Local scale invariance for wetting and confined interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parry, A. O.; Rascón, C.

    2010-03-01

    When a fluid or Ising-like magnet is confined between two parallel walls that are each completely wet by different bulk phases, the interface separating the phases is subject to large-scale fluctuations determined by the slit width. It was noted some time ago that, in two dimensions, the scaling expression for the probability distribution function describing the interfacial height across the slit shows remarkable similarities with predictions of conformal invariance. However, this local scale invariance appears to contradict the strongly anisotropic nature of (1 + 1)-dimensional interfacial fluctuations along and perpendicular to the interface, characterized by the wandering exponent. In this paper, we show that similarity with conformal invariance is not coincidental and can be understood explicitly as the projection of a local scale invariance for a wandering line in 2 + 1 dimensions.

  11. Manifestly scale-invariant regularization and quantum effective operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghilencea, D. M.

    2016-05-01

    Scale-invariant theories are often used to address the hierarchy problem. However the regularization of their quantum corrections introduces a dimensionful coupling (dimensional regularization) or scale (Pauli-Villars, etc) which breaks this symmetry explicitly. We show how to avoid this problem and study the implications of a manifestly scale-invariant regularization in (classical) scale-invariant theories. We use a dilaton-dependent subtraction function μ (σ ) which, after spontaneous breaking of the scale symmetry, generates the usual dimensional regularization subtraction scale μ (⟨σ ⟩) . One consequence is that "evanescent" interactions generated by scale invariance of the action in d =4 -2 ɛ (but vanishing in d =4 ) give rise to new, finite quantum corrections. We find a (finite) correction Δ U (ϕ ,σ ) to the one-loop scalar potential for ϕ and σ , beyond the Coleman-Weinberg term. Δ U is due to an evanescent correction (∝ɛ ) to the field-dependent masses (of the states in the loop) which multiplies the pole (∝1 /ɛ ) of the momentum integral to give a finite quantum result. Δ U contains a nonpolynomial operator ˜ϕ6/σ2 of known coefficient and is independent of the subtraction dimensionless parameter. A more general μ (ϕ ,σ ) is ruled out since, in their classical decoupling limit, the visible sector (of the Higgs ϕ ) and hidden sector (dilaton σ ) still interact at the quantum level; thus, the subtraction function must depend on the dilaton only, μ ˜σ . The method is useful in models where preserving scale symmetry at quantum level is important.

  12. The evolving Planck mass in classically scale-invariant theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannike, K.; Raidal, M.; Spethmann, C.; Veermäe, H.

    2017-04-01

    We consider classically scale-invariant theories with non-minimally coupled scalar fields, where the Planck mass and the hierarchy of physical scales are dynamically generated. The classical theories possess a fixed point, where scale invariance is spontaneously broken. In these theories, however, the Planck mass becomes unstable in the presence of explicit sources of scale invariance breaking, such as non-relativistic matter and cosmological constant terms. We quantify the constraints on such classical models from Big Bang Nucleosynthesis that lead to an upper bound on the non-minimal coupling and require trans-Planckian field values. We show that quantum corrections to the scalar potential can stabilise the fixed point close to the minimum of the Coleman-Weinberg potential. The time-averaged motion of the evolving fixed point is strongly suppressed, thus the limits on the evolving gravitational constant from Big Bang Nucleosynthesis and other measurements do not presently constrain this class of theories. Field oscillations around the fixed point, if not damped, contribute to the dark matter density of the Universe.

  13. Scale-invariance and the strong coupling problem

    SciTech Connect

    Baumann, Daniel; Zaldarriaga, Matias; Senatore, Leonardo E-mail: senatore@stanford.edu

    2011-05-01

    The effective theory of adiabatic fluctuations around arbitrary Friedmann-Robertson-Walker backgrounds — both expanding and contracting — allows for more than one way to obtain scale-invariant two-point correlations. However, as we show in this paper, it is challenging to produce scale-invariant fluctuations that are weakly coupled over the range of wavelengths accessible to cosmological observations. In particular, requiring the background to be a dynamical attractor, the curvature fluctuations are scale-invariant and weakly coupled for at least 10 e-folds only if the background is close to de Sitter space. In this case, the time-translation invariance of the background guarantees time-independent n-point functions. For non-attractor solutions, any predictions depend on assumptions about the evolution of the background even when the perturbations are outside of the horizon. For the simplest such scenario we identify the regions of the parameter space that avoid both classical and quantum mechanical strong coupling problems. Finally, we present extensions of our results to backgrounds in which higher-derivative terms play a significant role.

  14. Standard model with spontaneously broken quantum scale invariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghilencea, D. M.; Lalak, Z.; Olszewski, P.

    2017-09-01

    We explore the possibility that scale symmetry is a quantum symmetry that is broken only spontaneously and apply this idea to the standard model. We compute the quantum corrections to the potential of the Higgs field (ϕ ) in the classically scale-invariant version of the standard model (mϕ=0 at tree level) extended by the dilaton (σ ). The tree-level potential of ϕ and σ , dictated by scale invariance, may contain nonpolynomial effective operators, e.g., ϕ6/σ2, ϕ8/σ4, ϕ10/σ6, etc. The one-loop scalar potential is scale invariant, since the loop calculations manifestly preserve the scale symmetry, with the dimensional regularization subtraction scale μ generated spontaneously by the dilaton vacuum expectation value μ ˜⟨σ ⟩. The Callan-Symanzik equation of the potential is verified in the presence of the gauge, Yukawa, and the nonpolynomial operators. The couplings of the nonpolynomial operators have nonzero beta functions that we can actually compute from the quantum potential. At the quantum level, the Higgs mass is protected by spontaneously broken scale symmetry, even though the theory is nonrenormalizable. We compare the one-loop potential to its counterpart computed in the "traditional" dimensional regularization scheme that breaks scale symmetry explicitly (μ =constant) in the presence at the tree level of the nonpolynomial operators.

  15. Non-scale-invariant density perturbations from chaotic extended inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Mollerach, S. ); Matarrese, S. )

    1992-03-15

    Chaotic inflation is analyzed in the frame of scalar-tensor theories of gravity. Fluctuations in the energy density arise from quantum fluctuations of the Brans-Dicke field and of the inflaton field. The spectrum of perturbations is studied for a class of models: it is non-scale-invariant and, for certain values of the parameters, it has a peak. If the peak appears at astrophysically interesting scales it may help to reconcile the cold-dark-matter scenario for structure formation with large-scale observations.

  16. Scale Invariance in 2D BCS-BEC Crossover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sensarma, Rajdeep; Taylor, Edward; Randeria, Mohit

    2013-03-01

    In 2D BCS-BEC crossover, the frequency of the breathing mode in a harmonic trap, as well as the lower edge of the radio frequency spectroscopy response, show remarkable scale-invariance throughout the crossover regime, i.e. they are independent of the coupling constant. Using functional integral methods, we study the behaviour of these quantities in the 2D BCS-BEC crossover and comment on the possible reasons for this scale independence. RS was supported by DAE, Govt. of India. MR was supported by NSF Grant No. DMR-1006532. ET was supported by NSERC and the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research.

  17. Scale invariance in meridional distribution of stratospheric ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruzdev, A. N.

    1997-05-01

    Analysis of SBUV measurements of stratospheric ozone in 1983-1984 shows that ensemble meridional distributions of the ozone mixing ratios exhibit scale invariance (or scaling) over the scale range 208-6660 km, or at least 208-3330 km, in 100-50 mb and 15-7 mb layers, such that meridional variations at small scales are (on average) related to larger ones by the same scale law. The scaling laws are determined from meridional structure functions of ozone mixing ratios. The scaling exponent depends on height and season and is different for the Northern and Southern Hemispheres.

  18. Scale-Invariant Correlations in Dynamic Bacterial Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiao; Dong, Xu; Be'er, Avraham; Swinney, Harry L.; Zhang, H. P.

    2012-04-01

    In Bacillus subtilis colonies, motile bacteria move collectively, spontaneously forming dynamic clusters. These bacterial clusters share similarities with other systems exhibiting polarized collective motion, such as bird flocks or fish schools. Here we study experimentally how velocity and orientation fluctuations within clusters are spatially correlated. For a range of cell density and cluster size, the correlation length is shown to be 30% of the spatial size of clusters, and the correlation functions collapse onto a master curve after rescaling the separation with correlation length. Our results demonstrate that correlations of velocity and orientation fluctuations are scale invariant in dynamic bacterial clusters.

  19. Non scale-invariant density perturbations from chaotic extended inflation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mollerach, Silvia; Matarrese, Sabino

    1991-01-01

    Chaotic inflation is analyzed in the frame of scalar-tensor theories of gravity. Fluctuations in the energy density arise from quantum fluctuations of the Brans-Dicke field and of the inflation field. The spectrum of perturbations is studied for a class of models: it is non scale-invarient and, for certain values of the parameters, it has a peak. If the peak appears at astrophysically interesting scales, it may help to reconcile the Cold Dark Matter scenario for structure formation with large scale observations.

  20. Scale invariance of subsurface flow patterns and its limitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hergarten, Stefan; Winkler, Gerfried; Birk, Steffen

    2015-04-01

    The morphology of river networks at the Earth's surface has been addressed in numerous studies. Numerical simulations of fluvial erosion processes and concepts of optimization have provided a rather comprehensive understanding about the scale invariance of river networks. Less is known about the structure of preferential flow patterns in the subsurface because these are only accessible by indirect measurements in most cases. As preferential flow patterns are crucial for all transport processes in the subsurface, unraveling their structure is a major challenge in subsurface hydrology. Transferring the idea of optimization from surface flow to subsurface flow it was recently suggested that preferential subsurface flow patterns should also have a dendritic, scale-invariant structure similar to that of river networks. In this study we analyzed the mean discharges of serval thousand springs with respect to scale invariance. For this purpose we reanalyzed a data set comprising about 17,000 springs from Spain already published in the literature and three new data sets from the Eastern Alps in Austria. We found that the probability density f(Q) of the discharge distribution can be described by a power law with an exponential cutoff, f(Q) ≈ Q-τe- QQc. The scaling exponent τ was found to be about 1.6, which is slightly larger than the exponent τ = 1.5 of river networks. In contrast to rivers, the distributions of the spring discharges are characterized by a significant cutoff at large discharges. This cutoff strongly depends on the lithology of the aquifers, while the scaling exponent τ ˜ 1.6 seems to be universal. The highest cutoff was found for limestones being one of the primary host rocks for karstic aquifers. We found Qc ˜ 6000 l/s for the limestones in the data set from Spain, suggesting a scale-invariant subsurface flow pattern up to catchment sizes of several thousand square kilometers. At the other edge, we found a cutoff at catchment sizes in the order of

  1. Scale invariance and invariant scaling in a mixed hierarchical system.

    PubMed

    Shnirman, M G; Blanter, E M

    1999-11-01

    We consider a mixed hierarchical model with heterogeneous and monotone conditions of destruction. We investigate how scaling properties of defects in the model are related with heterogeneity of rules of destruction, determined by concentration of the mixture. The system demonstrates different kinds of criticality as a general form of system behavior. The following forms of critical behavior are obtained: stability, catastrophe, scale invariance, and invariant scaling. Different slopes of the magnitude-frequency relation are realized in areas of critical stability and catastrophe. A simple relation between the slope of magnitude-frequency relation and parameters of the mixture is established.

  2. Scale-invariant curvature fluctuations from an extended semiclassical gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Pinamonti, Nicola E-mail: siemssen@dima.unige.it; Siemssen, Daniel E-mail: siemssen@dima.unige.it

    2015-02-15

    We present an extension of the semiclassical Einstein equations which couple n-point correlation functions of a stochastic Einstein tensor to the n-point functions of the quantum stress-energy tensor. We apply this extension to calculate the quantum fluctuations during an inflationary period, where we take as a model a massive conformally coupled scalar field on a perturbed de Sitter space and describe how a renormalization independent, almost-scale-invariant power spectrum of the scalar metric perturbation is produced. Furthermore, we discuss how this model yields a natural basis for the calculation of non-Gaussianities of the considered metric fluctuations.

  3. Scale invariance of human electroencephalogram signals in sleep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Shi-Min; Jiang, Zhao-Hui; Zhou, Tao; Zhou, Pei-Ling; Yang, Hui-Jie; Wang, Bing-Hong

    2007-12-01

    In this paper, we investigate the dynamical properties of electroencephalogram (EEG) signals of humans in sleep. By using a modified random walk method, we demonstrate that scale-invariance is embedded in EEG signals after a detrending procedure is applied. Furthermore, we study the dynamical evolution of the probability density function (PDF) of the detrended EEG signals by nonextensive statistical modeling. It displays a scale-independent property, which is markedly different from the usual scale-dependent PDF evolution and cannot be described by the Fokker-Planck equation.

  4. Inconsistency of scale invariant curvature coupled to gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Zoller, D.

    1990-01-01

    We show that the scale invariant curvature action for paths, the point particle version of Polyakov's extrinsic curvature action for surfaces, does not couple consistently to gravity. Although the curvature action for paths yields a massless representation of the Poincare group with fixed helicity and so potentially provides a description of single photons and gravitons, the inconsistent coupling to gravity apparently suggests such a description is not viable. We present a physical interpretation of the inconsistency in terms of the non-localizability of the photon and point out a conceptual kinship between the local symmetry of the curvature theory and the local supersymmetry of a spinning particle or spinning string. 11 refs.

  5. Inconsistency of scale-invariant curvature coupled to gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Zoller, D. )

    1990-10-29

    We show that the scale-invariant curvature action for paths, the point-particle version of Polyakov's extrinsic-curvature action for surfaces, does not couple consistently to gravity. The curvature action for paths yields a massless representation of the Poincare group with fixed helicity and so potentially provides a description of single photons and gravitons. We present a physical interpretation of the inconsistency in terms of the nonlocalizability of the photon and point out a conceptual kinship with the local supersymmetry of a spinning particle.

  6. Inconsistency of scale-invariant curvature coupled to gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoller, D.

    1990-10-01

    We show that the scale-invariant curvature action for paths, the point-particle version of Polyakov's extrinsic-curvature action for surfaces, does not couple consistently to gravity. The curvature action for paths yields a massless representation of the Poincaré group with fixed helicity and so potentially provides a description of single photons and gravitons. We present a physical interpretation of the inconsistency in terms of the nonlocalizability of the photon and point out a conceptual kinship with the local supersymmetry of a spinning particle.

  7. Scale Invariance in Landscape Evolution Models Using Stream Power Laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwang, J. S.; Parker, G.

    2014-12-01

    Landscape evolution models (LEM) commonly utilize stream power laws to simulate river incision with formulations such as E = KAmSn, where E is a vertical incision rate [L/T], K is an erodibility constant [L1-2m/T], A is an upstream drainage area [L2], S is a local channel gradient [-], and m and n are positive exponents that describe the basin hydrology. In our reduced complexity model, the landscape approached equilibrium by balancing an incision rate with a constant, uniform, vertical rock uplift rate at every location in the landscape. From our simulations, for a combination of m and n, the landscape exhibited scale invariance. That is, regardless of the size and scale of the basin, the relief and vertical structure of the landscape remained constant. Therefore, the relief and elevation profile of the landscape at equilibrium were only dependent on the coefficients for erodibility and uplift and an equation that described how upstream area, A, increased as the length of a stream increased. In our analytical 1D models, we utilized two equations that described upslope area, (a) A = Bl, where B is the profile width [L], and l is the stream length from the ridge [L] and (b) A = Clh, Hack's Law, where C is a constant [L2-h] and h is a positive exponent. With these equations, (a) m = n and (b) hm = n resulted in scale invariance. In our numerical 2D models, the relationship between A and l was inherent in the actual structure of the drainage network. From our numerical 2D results, scale invariance occurred when 2m = n. Additionally, using reasonable values from the literature for exponents, n, m and h, resulted in singularities at the ridges in the landscape, which caused truncation error. In consequence, the elevation of the ridge increased as the number of grid cells in the domain increased in the numerical model, and the model was unable to converge. These singularities at the ridges appeared when (a) m ≥ n and (b) hm ≥ n in the analytical model and 2m ≥ n in

  8. Enhanced Raman scattering by fractal clusters: Scale-invariant theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockman, Mark I.; Shalaev, Vladimir M.; Moskovits, Martin; Botet, Robert; George, Thomas F.

    1992-08-01

    A scale-invariant theory of Raman scattering of light by fractal clusters is developed. The enhancement factor GRS of Raman scattering is shown to scale in terms of a properly chosen spectral variable X. The critical indices of the enhancement factor are found to be determined by the optical spectral dimension of the fractal. Numerical modeling is carried out and shown to support the analytical results obtained. The theory, which does not contain any adjustable parameters, agrees well with experimental data on surface-enhanced Raman scattering over a wide spectral range.

  9. Critical Scale Invariance in a Healthy Human Heart Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyono, Ken; Struzik, Zbigniew R.; Aoyagi, Naoko; Sakata, Seiichiro; Hayano, Junichiro; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu

    2004-10-01

    We demonstrate the robust scale-invariance in the probability density function (PDF) of detrended healthy human heart rate increments, which is preserved not only in a quiescent condition, but also in a dynamic state where the mean level of the heart rate is dramatically changing. This scale-independent and fractal structure is markedly different from the scale-dependent PDF evolution observed in a turbulentlike, cascade heart rate model. These results strongly support the view that a healthy human heart rate is controlled to converge continually to a critical state.

  10. Convolution-controlled rotation and scale invariance in optical correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juday, Richard D.; Bourgeois, Brian

    1988-01-01

    A method is presented for evoking a controlled, continuously-variable degree of rotation- and scale-invariance in optical correlation; the method is suitable for off-line computation of filters, though not for real-time computation. While a closed-form solution for the blur kernels has thus far evaded solution, a digital approximation method has been presented. A simulated correlation run with real, frame-grabbed imagery has indicated the method's desired performance. These Gaussian blur kernels can be replaced with box-car kernels or other blur kernels suitable for the given correlation-task.

  11. Strong anisotropy in two-dimensional surfaces with generic scale invariance: Gaussian and related models.

    PubMed

    Vivo, Edoardo; Nicoli, Matteo; Cuerno, Rodolfo

    2012-11-01

    Among systems that display generic scale invariance, those whose asymptotic properties are anisotropic in space (strong anisotropy, SA) have received relatively less attention, especially in the context of kinetic roughening for two-dimensional surfaces. This is in contrast with their experimental ubiquity, e.g., in the context of thin-film production by diverse techniques. Based on exact results for integrable (linear) cases, here we formulate a SA ansatz that, albeit equivalent to existing ones borrowed from equilibrium critical phenomena, is more naturally adapted to the type of observables that are measured in experiments on the dynamics of thin films, such as one- and two-dimensional height structure factors. We test our ansatz on a paradigmatic nonlinear stochastic equation displaying strong anisotropy like the Hwa-Kardar equation [Phys. Rev. Lett. 62, 1813 (1989)], which was initially proposed to describe the interface dynamics of running sand piles. A very important role to elucidate its SA properties is played by an accurate (Gaussian) approximation through a nonlocal linear equation that shares the same asymptotic properties.

  12. Evaluation of Scaling Invariance Embedded in Short Time Series

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xue; Hou, Lei; Stephen, Mutua; Yang, Huijie; Zhu, Chenping

    2014-01-01

    Scaling invariance of time series has been making great contributions in diverse research fields. But how to evaluate scaling exponent from a real-world series is still an open problem. Finite length of time series may induce unacceptable fluctuation and bias to statistical quantities and consequent invalidation of currently used standard methods. In this paper a new concept called correlation-dependent balanced estimation of diffusion entropy is developed to evaluate scale-invariance in very short time series with length . Calculations with specified Hurst exponent values of show that by using the standard central moving average de-trending procedure this method can evaluate the scaling exponents for short time series with ignorable bias () and sharp confidential interval (standard deviation ). Considering the stride series from ten volunteers along an approximate oval path of a specified length, we observe that though the averages and deviations of scaling exponents are close, their evolutionary behaviors display rich patterns. It has potential use in analyzing physiological signals, detecting early warning signals, and so on. As an emphasis, the our core contribution is that by means of the proposed method one can estimate precisely shannon entropy from limited records. PMID:25549356

  13. Evaluation of scaling invariance embedded in short time series.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xue; Hou, Lei; Stephen, Mutua; Yang, Huijie; Zhu, Chenping

    2014-01-01

    Scaling invariance of time series has been making great contributions in diverse research fields. But how to evaluate scaling exponent from a real-world series is still an open problem. Finite length of time series may induce unacceptable fluctuation and bias to statistical quantities and consequent invalidation of currently used standard methods. In this paper a new concept called correlation-dependent balanced estimation of diffusion entropy is developed to evaluate scale-invariance in very short time series with length ~10(2). Calculations with specified Hurst exponent values of 0.2,0.3,...,0.9 show that by using the standard central moving average de-trending procedure this method can evaluate the scaling exponents for short time series with ignorable bias (≤0.03) and sharp confidential interval (standard deviation ≤0.05). Considering the stride series from ten volunteers along an approximate oval path of a specified length, we observe that though the averages and deviations of scaling exponents are close, their evolutionary behaviors display rich patterns. It has potential use in analyzing physiological signals, detecting early warning signals, and so on. As an emphasis, the our core contribution is that by means of the proposed method one can estimate precisely shannon entropy from limited records.

  14. Scale-invariant model of marine population dynamics.

    PubMed

    Capitán, José A; Delius, Gustav W

    2010-06-01

    A striking feature of the marine ecosystem is the regularity in its size spectrum: the abundance of organisms as a function of their weight approximately follows a power law over almost ten orders of magnitude. We interpret this as evidence that the population dynamics in the ocean is approximately scale-invariant. We use this invariance in the construction and solution of a size-structured dynamical population model. Starting from a Markov model encoding the basic processes of predation, reproduction, maintenance respiration, and intrinsic mortality, we derive a partial integro-differential equation describing the dependence of abundance on weight and time. Our model represents an extension of the jump-growth model and hence also of earlier models based on the McKendrick-von Foerster equation. The model is scale-invariant provided the rate functions of the stochastic processes have certain scaling properties. We determine the steady-state power-law solution, whose exponent is determined by the relative scaling between the rates of the density-dependent processes (predation) and the rates of the density-independent processes (reproduction, maintenance, and mortality). We study the stability of the steady-state against small perturbations and find that inclusion of maintenance respiration and reproduction in the model has a strong stabilizing effect. Furthermore, the steady state is unstable against a change in the overall population density unless the reproduction rate exceeds a certain threshold.

  15. From dynamical scaling to local scale-invariance: a tutorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henkel, Malte

    2017-03-01

    Dynamical scaling arises naturally in various many-body systems far from equilibrium. After a short historical overview, the elements of possible extensions of dynamical scaling to a local scale-invariance will be introduced. Schrödinger-invariance, the most simple example of local scale-invariance, will be introduced as a dynamical symmetry in the Edwards-Wilkinson universality class of interface growth. The Lie algebra construction, its representations and the Bargman superselection rules will be combined with non-equilibrium Janssen-de Dominicis field-theory to produce explicit predictions for responses and correlators, which can be compared to the results of explicit model studies. At the next level, the study of non-stationary states requires to go over, from Schrödinger-invariance, to ageing-invariance. The ageing algebra admits new representations, which acts as dynamical symmetries on more general equations, and imply that each non-equilibrium scaling operator is characterised by two distinct, independent scaling dimensions. Tests of ageing-invariance are described, in the Glauber-Ising and spherical models of a phase-ordering ferromagnet and the Arcetri model of interface growth.

  16. A dimension scale-invariant probabilistic model based on Leibniz-like pyramids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, A.; Tsallis, C.

    2012-02-01

    We introduce a family of dimension scale-invariant Leibniz-like pyramids and (d + 1)-dimensional hyperpyramids (d = 1, 2, 3, …), with d = 1 corresponding to triangles, d = 2 to (tetrahedral) pyramids, and so on. For all values of d, they are characterized by a parameter ν > 0, whose value determines the degree of correlation between N (d + 1)-valued random variables (d = 1 corresponds to binary variables, d = 2 to ternary variables, and so on). There are (d + 1)N different events, and the limit ν → ∞ corresponds to independent random variables, in which case each event has a probability 1/(d + 1)N to occur. The sums of these N (d + 1)-valued random variables correspond to a d-dimensional probabilistic model and generalize a recently proposed one-dimensional (d = 1) model having q -Gaussians (with q = (ν - 2)/(ν - 1) for ν ∈ [1, ∞)) as N → ∞ limit probability distributions for the sum of the N binary variables [A. Rodríguez, V. Schwammle, and C. Tsallis, J. Stat. Mech.: Theory Exp. 2008, P09006; R. Hanel, S. Thurner, and C. Tsallis, Eur. Phys. J. B 72, 263 (2009)]. In the ν → ∞ limit the d-dimensional multinomial distribution is recovered for the sums, which approach a d-dimensional Gaussian distribution for N → ∞. For any ν, the conditional distributions of the d-dimensional model are shown to yield the corresponding joint distribution of the (d-1)-dimensional model with the same ν. For the d = 2 case, we study the joint probability distribution and identify two classes of marginal distributions, one of them being asymmetric and dimension scale-invariant, while the other one is symmetric and only asymptotically dimension scale-invariant. The present probabilistic model is proposed as a testing ground for a deeper understanding of the necessary and sufficient conditions for having q-Gaussian attractors in the N → ∞ limit, the ultimate goal being a neat mathematical view of the causes clarifying the ubiquitous emergence of q

  17. Analysis of scale-invariant slab avalanche size distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faillettaz, J.; Louchet, F.; Grasso, J.-R.; Daudon, D.

    2003-04-01

    Scale invariance of snow avalanche sizes was reported for the first time in 2001 by Louchet et al. at the EGS conference, using both acoustic emission duration, and the surface of the crown step left at the top of the starting zone, where the former parameter characterises the size of the total avalanche flow, and the latter that of the starting zone. The present paper focuses on parameters of the second type, that are more directly related to precise release mechanisms, vz. the crown crack length L, the crown crack or slab depth H, the crown step surface HxL, the volume HxL^2 of the snow involved in the starting zone, and LxH^2 which is a measure of the stress concentration at the basal crack tip at failure. The analysis is performed on two data sets, from la Grande Plagne (GP) and Tignes (T) ski resorts. For both catalogs, cumulative distributions of L, H, HxL, HxL^2 and LxH^2 are shown to be roughly linear in a log-log plot. i.e. consistent with so-called scale invariant (or power law) distributions for both triggered and natural avalanches. Plateaus are observed at small sizes, and roll-offs at large sizes. The power law exponents for each of these quantities are roughly independent of the ski resort (GP or T) they come from. In contrast, exponents for natural events are significantly smaller than those for artificial ones. We analyse the possible reasons for the scale invariance of these quantities, for the possible "universality" of the exponents corresponding to a given triggering mode, and for the difference in exponents between triggered and natural events. The physical meaning of the observed roll-offs and plateaus is also discussed. The power law distributions analysed here provide the occurrence probability of an avalanche of a given (starting) volume in a given time period on a given area. A possible use of this type of distributions for snow avalanche hazard assessment is contemplated, as it is for earthquakes or rockfalls.

  18. Classically Scale Invariant Inflation and (A)gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farzinnia, Arsham

    2016-07-01

    In this talk, I present the minimal classically scale-invariant and CP-symmetric extension of the standard model, containing one additional complex gauge singlet and three flavors of right-handed Majorana neutrinos, incorporated within a renormalizable framework of gravity, consistent with these symmetries; the Agravity. I particularly focus on the slow-roll inflationary paradigm within this framework, by identifying the pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone boson of the (approximate) scale symmetry with the inflaton field, constructing its one-loop effective potential, computing the slow-roll parameters and the inflationary observables, and demonstrating the compatibility of the small field inflation scenario with the latest Planck collaboration data sets.a

  19. Excitation of flow instabilities due to nonlinear scale invariance

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad Datta, Dhurjati; Sen, Sudip

    2014-05-15

    A novel route to instabilities and turbulence in fluid and plasma flows is presented in kinetic Vlasov-Maxwell model. New kind of flow instabilities is shown to arise due to the availability of new kinetic energy sources which are absent in conventional treatments. The present approach is based on a scale invariant nonlinear analytic formalism developed to address irregular motions on a chaotic attractor or in turbulence in a more coherent manner. We have studied two specific applications of this turbulence generating mechanism. The warm plasma Langmuir wave dispersion relation is shown to become unstable in the presence of these multifractal measures. In the second application, these multifractal measures are shown to induce naturally non-Gaussian, i.e., a stretched, Gaussian distribution and anomalous transport for tracer particles from the turbulent advection-diffusion transport equation in a Vlasov plasma flow.

  20. Weyl current, scale-invariant inflation, and Planck scale generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Pedro G.; Hill, Christopher T.; Ross, Graham G.

    2017-02-01

    Scalar fields, ϕi, can be coupled nonminimally to curvature and satisfy the general criteria: (i) the theory has no mass input parameters, including MP=0 ; (ii) the ϕi have arbitrary values and gradients, but undergo a general expansion and relaxation to constant values that satisfy a nontrivial constraint, K (ϕi)=constant; (iii) this constraint breaks scale symmetry spontaneously, and the Planck mass is dynamically generated; (iv) there can be adequate inflation associated with slow roll in a scale-invariant potential subject to the constraint; (v) the final vacuum can have a small to vanishing cosmological constant; (vi) large hierarchies in vacuum expectation values can naturally form; (vii) there is a harmless dilaton which naturally eludes the usual constraints on massless scalars. These models are governed by a global Weyl scale symmetry and its conserved current, Kμ. At the quantum level the Weyl scale symmetry can be maintained by an invariant specification of renormalized quantities.

  1. Scale Invariance & Emergent Behavior in Spontaneous Activity of Heart Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Netta; Rotstein, Horacio G.; Braun, Erez

    2004-03-01

    Cultured heart cells from newborn rat ventricles have the capacity to beat spontaneously. Long-term noninvasive recordings of beating activity reveal a rich repertoire of behavior that is characterized by variable interspike intervals, sudden rate changes and long intermissions. Statistical analysis of the recorded time series is presented. In particular, scale-invariant fluctuations in the interspike intervals are found both in single cells and in extended networks. A model of single-cell activity in the vicinity of an infinite-period bifurcation captures the main statistical and qualitative features of activity and successfully links single-cell dynamics to emergent network properties. Simulations of nonlinear oscillators and instructive `cartoon models' are presented. Simulations of coupled oscillators are shown to reproduce qualitative signatures of the dynamics in small groups of cells as well as in extended networks. N Cohen, PhD Thesis, Technion, Haifa (2001).

  2. Fisher information and the thermodynamics of scale-invariant systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernando, A.; Vesperinas, C.; Plastino, A.

    2010-02-01

    We present a thermodynamic formulation for scale-invariant systems based on the minimization with constraints of the Fisher information measure. In such a way a clear analogy between these systems’ thermal properties and those of gases and fluids is seen to emerge in a natural fashion. We focus our attention on the non-interacting scenario, speaking thus of scale-free ideal gases (SFIGs) and present some empirical evidences regarding such disparate systems as electoral results, city populations and total citations in Physics journals, that seem to indicate that SFIGs do exist. We also illustrate the way in which Zipf’s law can be understood in a thermodynamical context as the surface of a finite system. Finally, we derive an equivalent microscopic description of our systems which totally agrees with previous numerical simulations found in the literature.

  3. Transport in fractal media: an effective scale-invariant approach.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Coronado, H; Coronado, M; Herrera-Hernandez, E C

    2012-06-01

    In this paper an advective-dispersion equation with scale-dependent coefficients is proposed for describing transport through fractals. This equation is obtained by imposing scale invariance and assuming that the porosity, the dispersion coefficient, and the velocity follow fractional power laws on the scale. The model incorporates the empirically found trends in highly heterogeneous media, regarding the dependence of the dispersivity on the scale and the dispersion coefficient on the velocity. We conclude that the presence of nontrivial fractal parameters produces anomalous dispersion, as expected, and that the presence of convective processes induces a reescalation in the concentration and shifts the tracer velocity to different values with respect to the nonfractal case.

  4. Scale Invariant and Noise Robust Interest Points With Shearlets.

    PubMed

    Duval-Poo, Miguel A; Noceti, Nicoletta; Odone, Francesca; De Vito, Ernesto

    2017-06-01

    Shearlets are a relatively new directional multi-scale framework for signal analysis, which have been shown effective to enhance signal discontinuities, such as edges and corners at multiple scales even in the presence of a large quantity of noise. In this paper, we consider blob-like features in the shearlets framework. We derive a measure, which is very effective for blob detection, and, based on this measure, we propose a blob detector and a keypoint description, whose combination outperforms the state-of-the-art algorithms with noisy and compressed images. We also demonstrate that the measure satisfies the perfect scale invariance property in the continuous case. We evaluate the robustness of our algorithm to different types of noise, including blur, compression artifacts, and Gaussian noise. Furthermore, we carry on a comparative analysis on benchmark data, referring, in particular, to tolerance to noise and image compression.

  5. Scale Invariance in Lateral Head Scans During Spatial Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Chetan K.; Doreswamy, Yoganarasimha

    2017-04-01

    Universality connects various natural phenomena through physical principles governing their dynamics, and has provided broadly accepted answers to many complex questions, including information processing in neuronal systems. However, its significance in behavioral systems is still elusive. Lateral head scanning (LHS) behavior in rodents might contribute to spatial navigation by actively managing (optimizing) the available sensory information. Our findings of scale invariant distributions in LHS lifetimes, interevent intervals and event magnitudes, provide evidence for the first time that the optimization takes place at a critical point in LHS dynamics. We propose that the LHS behavior is responsible for preprocessing of the spatial information content, critical for subsequent foolproof encoding by the respective downstream neural networks.

  6. Generalized scale invariance, clouds and radiative transfer on multifractal clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Lovejoy, S.; Schertzer, D.

    1995-09-01

    Recent systematic satellite studies (LANDSAT, AVHRR, METEOSAT) of cloud radiances using (isotropic) energy spectra have displayed excellent scaling from at least about 300m to about 4000km, even for individual cloud pictures. At first sight, this contradicts the observed diversity of cloud morphology, texture and type. The authors argue that the explanation of this apparent paradox is that the differences are due to anisotropy, e.g. differential stratification and rotation. A general framework for anisotropic scaling expressed in terms of isotropic self-similar scaling and fractals and multifractals is needed. Schertzer and Lovejoy have proposed Generalized Scale Invariance (GSI) in response to this need. In GSI, the statistics of the large and small scales of system can be related to each other by a scale changing operator T{sub {lambda}} which depends only on the scale ratio {lambda}{sub i} there is no characteristic size. 3 refs., 1 fig.

  7. Scale-invariant structure of size fluctuations in plants

    PubMed Central

    Picoli, S.; Mendes, R. S.; Lenzi, E. K.; Malacarne, L. C.

    2012-01-01

    A wide range of physical and biological systems exhibit complex behaviours characterised by a scale-invariant structure of the fluctuations in their output signals. In the context of plant populations, scaling relationships are typically allometric. In this study, we analysed spatial variation in the size of maize plants (Zea Mays L.) grown in agricultural plots at constant densities and found evidence of scaling in the size fluctuations of plants. The findings indicate that the scaling of the probability distribution of spatial size fluctuation exhibits non-Gaussian behaviour compatible with a Lévy stable process. The scaling relationships were observed for spatial scales spanning three orders of magnitude. These findings should provide additional information for the selection and development of empirically accurate models of pattern formation in plant populations. PMID:22439105

  8. Ballistic deposition on deterministic fractals: Observation of discrete scale invariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horowitz, Claudio M.; Romá, Federico; Albano, Ezequiel V.

    2008-12-01

    The growth of ballistic aggregates on deterministic fractal substrates is studied by means of numerical simulations. First, we attempt the description of the evolving interface of the aggregates by applying the well-established Family-Vicsek dynamic scaling approach. Systematic deviations from that standard scaling law are observed, suggesting that significant scaling corrections have to be introduced in order to achieve a more accurate understanding of the behavior of the interface. Subsequently, we study the internal structure of the growing aggregates that can be rationalized in terms of the scaling behavior of frozen trees, i.e., structures inhibited for further growth, lying below the growing interface. It is shown that the rms height (hs) and width (ws) of the trees of size s obey power laws of the form hs∝sν∥ and ws∝sν⊥ , respectively. Also, the tree-size distribution (ns) behaves according to ns˜s-τ . Here, ν∥ and ν⊥ are the correlation length exponents in the directions parallel and perpendicular to the interface, respectively. Also, τ is a critical exponent. However, due to the interplay between the discrete scale invariance of the underlying fractal substrates and the dynamics of the growing process, all these power laws are modulated by logarithmic periodic oscillations. The fundamental scaling ratios, characteristic of these oscillations, can be linked to the (spatial) fundamental scaling ratio of the underlying fractal by means of relationships involving critical exponents. We argue that the interplay between the spatial discrete scale invariance of the fractal substrate and the dynamics of the physical process occurring in those media is a quite general phenomenon that leads to the observation of logarithmic-periodic modulations of physical observables.

  9. Levels of complexity in scale-invariant neural signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Plamen Ch.; Ma, Qianli D. Y.; Bartsch, Ronny P.; Hausdorff, Jeffrey M.; Nunes Amaral, Luís A.; Schulte-Frohlinde, Verena; Stanley, H. Eugene; Yoneyama, Mitsuru

    2009-04-01

    Many physical and physiological signals exhibit complex scale-invariant features characterized by 1/f scaling and long-range power-law correlations, indicating a possibly common control mechanism. Specifically, it has been suggested that dynamical processes, influenced by inputs and feedback on multiple time scales, may be sufficient to give rise to 1/f scaling and scale invariance. Two examples of physiologic signals that are the output of hierarchical multiscale physiologic systems under neural control are the human heartbeat and human gait. Here we show that while both cardiac interbeat interval and gait interstride interval time series under healthy conditions have comparable 1/f scaling, they still may belong to different complexity classes. Our analysis of the multifractal scaling exponents of the fluctuations in these two signals demonstrates that in contrast to the multifractal behavior found in healthy heartbeat dynamics, gait time series exhibit less complex, close to monofractal behavior. Further, we find strong anticorrelations in the sign and close to random behavior for the magnitude of gait fluctuations at short and intermediate time scales, in contrast to weak anticorrelations in the sign and strong positive correlation for the magnitude of heartbeat interval fluctuations—suggesting that the neural mechanisms of cardiac and gait control exhibit different linear and nonlinear features. These findings are of interest because they underscore the limitations of traditional two-point correlation methods in fully characterizing physiological and physical dynamics. In addition, these results suggest that different mechanisms of control may be responsible for varying levels of complexity observed in physiological systems under neural regulation and in physical systems that possess similar 1/f scaling.

  10. Levels of complexity in scale-invariant neural signals.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Plamen Ch; Ma, Qianli D Y; Bartsch, Ronny P; Hausdorff, Jeffrey M; Nunes Amaral, Luís A; Schulte-Frohlinde, Verena; Stanley, H Eugene; Yoneyama, Mitsuru

    2009-04-01

    Many physical and physiological signals exhibit complex scale-invariant features characterized by 1/f scaling and long-range power-law correlations, indicating a possibly common control mechanism. Specifically, it has been suggested that dynamical processes, influenced by inputs and feedback on multiple time scales, may be sufficient to give rise to 1/f scaling and scale invariance. Two examples of physiologic signals that are the output of hierarchical multiscale physiologic systems under neural control are the human heartbeat and human gait. Here we show that while both cardiac interbeat interval and gait interstride interval time series under healthy conditions have comparable 1/f scaling, they still may belong to different complexity classes. Our analysis of the multifractal scaling exponents of the fluctuations in these two signals demonstrates that in contrast to the multifractal behavior found in healthy heartbeat dynamics, gait time series exhibit less complex, close to monofractal behavior. Further, we find strong anticorrelations in the sign and close to random behavior for the magnitude of gait fluctuations at short and intermediate time scales, in contrast to weak anticorrelations in the sign and strong positive correlation for the magnitude of heartbeat interval fluctuations-suggesting that the neural mechanisms of cardiac and gait control exhibit different linear and nonlinear features. These findings are of interest because they underscore the limitations of traditional two-point correlation methods in fully characterizing physiological and physical dynamics. In addition, these results suggest that different mechanisms of control may be responsible for varying levels of complexity observed in physiological systems under neural regulation and in physical systems that possess similar 1/f scaling.

  11. Generation of scale invariant magnetic fields in bouncing universes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sriramkumar, L.; Atmjeet, Kumar; Jain, Rajeev Kumar

    2015-09-01

    We consider the generation of primordial magnetic fields in a class of bouncing models when the electromagnetic action is coupled non-minimally to a scalar field that, say, drives the background evolution. For scale factors that have the power law form at very early times and non-minimal couplings which are simple powers of the scale factor, one can easily show that scale invariant spectra for the magnetic field can arise before the bounce for certain values of the indices involved. It will be interesting to examine if these power spectra retain their shape after the bounce. However, analytical solutions for the Fourier modes of the electromagnetic vector potential across the bounce are difficult to obtain. In this work, with the help of a new time variable that we introduce, which we refer to as the e-Script N-fold, we investigate these scenarios numerically. Imposing the initial conditions on the modes in the contracting phase, we numerically evolve the modes across the bounce and evaluate the spectra of the electric and magnetic fields at a suitable time after the bounce. As one could have intuitively expected, though the complete spectra depend on the details of the bounce, we find that, under the original conditions, scale invariant spectra of the magnetic fields do arise for wavenumbers much smaller than the scale associated with the bounce. We also show that magnetic fields which correspond to observed strengths today can be generated for specific values of the parameters. But, we find that, at the bounce, the backreaction due to the electromagnetic modes that have been generated can be significantly large calling into question the viability of the model. We briefly discuss the implications of our results.

  12. Generation of scale invariant magnetic fields in bouncing universes

    SciTech Connect

    Sriramkumar, L.; Atmjeet, Kumar; Jain, Rajeev Kumar E-mail: katmjeet@physics.du.ac.in

    2015-09-01

    We consider the generation of primordial magnetic fields in a class of bouncing models when the electromagnetic action is coupled non-minimally to a scalar field that, say, drives the background evolution. For scale factors that have the power law form at very early times and non-minimal couplings which are simple powers of the scale factor, one can easily show that scale invariant spectra for the magnetic field can arise before the bounce for certain values of the indices involved. It will be interesting to examine if these power spectra retain their shape after the bounce. However, analytical solutions for the Fourier modes of the electromagnetic vector potential across the bounce are difficult to obtain. In this work, with the help of a new time variable that we introduce, which we refer to as the e-N-fold, we investigate these scenarios numerically. Imposing the initial conditions on the modes in the contracting phase, we numerically evolve the modes across the bounce and evaluate the spectra of the electric and magnetic fields at a suitable time after the bounce. As one could have intuitively expected, though the complete spectra depend on the details of the bounce, we find that, under the original conditions, scale invariant spectra of the magnetic fields do arise for wavenumbers much smaller than the scale associated with the bounce. We also show that magnetic fields which correspond to observed strengths today can be generated for specific values of the parameters. But, we find that, at the bounce, the backreaction due to the electromagnetic modes that have been generated can be significantly large calling into question the viability of the model. We briefly discuss the implications of our results.

  13. Scale-invariant gauge theories of gravity: Theoretical foundations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasenby, A. N.; Hobson, M. P.

    2016-09-01

    We consider the construction of gauge theories of gravity, focussing in particular on the extension of local Poincaré invariance to include invariance under local changes of scale. We work exclusively in terms of finite transformations, which allow for a more transparent interpretation of such theories in terms of gauge fields in Minkowski spacetime. Our approach therefore differs from the usual geometrical description of locally scale-invariant Poincaré gauge theory (PGT) and Weyl gauge theory (WGT) in terms of Riemann-Cartan and Weyl-Cartan spacetimes, respectively. In particular, we reconsider the interpretation of the Einstein gauge and also the equations of motion of matter fields and test particles in these theories. Inspired by the observation that the PGT and WGT matter actions for the Dirac field and electromagnetic field have more general invariance properties than those imposed by construction, we go on to present a novel alternative to WGT by considering an "extended" form for the transformation law of the rotational gauge field under local dilations, which includes its "normal" transformation law in WGT as a special case. The resulting "extended" Weyl gauge theory (eWGT) has a number of interesting features that we describe in detail. In particular, we present a new scale-invariant gauge theory of gravity that accommodates ordinary matter and is defined by the most general parity-invariant eWGT Lagrangian that is at most quadratic in the eWGT field strengths, and we derive its field equations. We also consider the construction of PGTs that are invariant under local dilations assuming either the "normal" or "extended" transformation law for the rotational gauge field, but show that they are special cases of WGT and eWGT, respectively.

  14. Discrete scale invariant quantum dynamics and universal quantum beats in Bose gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maki, J.; Jiang, S. J.; Zhou, F.

    2017-06-01

    We study the signature of classical scale invariance in the far-from-equilibrium quantum dynamics of two-dimensional Bose gases. We show that the density profile displays a scale invariant logarithmic singularity near the center. In addition, the density oscillates due to quantum beats with universal structures. Namely, the frequencies of the beats can be connected with one another by a universal discrete scale transformation induced by the classical scale invariance. The experimental applicability of these results is then discussed.

  15. Scale-invariant spectrum of Lee-Wick model in de Sitter spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myung, Yun Soo; Moon, Taeyoon

    2015-02-01

    We obtain a scale-invariant spectrum from the Lee-Wick model in de Sitter spacetime. This model is a fourth-order scalar theory whose mass parameter is determined by M2=2H2. The Harrison-Zel'dovich scale-invariant spectrum is obtained by Fourier transforming the propagator in position space as well as by computing the power spectrum directly. It shows clearly that the LW scalar theory provides a truly scale-invariant spectrum in whole de Sitter, while the massless scalar propagation in de Sitter shows a scale-invariant spectrum in the superhorizon region only.

  16. Category-Specific Processing of Scale-Invariant Sounds in Infancy

    PubMed Central

    Gervain, Judit; Werker, Janet F.; Geffen, Maria N.

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that the natural world has a special status for our sensory and cognitive functioning. The mammalian sensory system is hypothesized to have evolved to encode natural signals in an efficient manner. Exposure to natural stimuli, but not to artificial ones, improves learning and cognitive function. Scale-invariance, the property of exhibiting the same statistical structure at different spatial or temporal scales, is common to naturally occurring sounds. We recently developed a 3-parameter model to capture the essential characteristics of water sounds, and from this generated both scale-invariant and variable-scale sounds. In a previous study, we found that adults perceived a wide range of the artificial scale-invariant, but not the variable-scale, sounds as instances of natural sounds. Here, we explored the ontogenetic origins of these effects by investigating how young infants perceive and categorize scale-invariant acoustic stimuli. Even though they have several months of experience with natural water sounds, infants aged 5 months did not show a preference, in the first experiment, for the instances of the scale-invariant sounds rated as typical water-like sounds by adults over non-prototypical, but still scale-invariant instances. Scale-invariance might thus be a more relevant factor for the perception of natural signals than simple familiarity. In a second experiment, we thus directly compared infants' perception of scale-invariant and variable-scale sounds. When habituated to scale-invariant sounds, infants looked significantly longer to a change in sound category from scale-invariant to variable-scale sounds, whereas infants habituated to variable-scale sounds showed no such difference. These results suggest that infants were able to form a perceptual category of the scale-invariant, but not variable-scale sounds. These findings advance the efficient coding hypothesis, and suggest that the advantage for perceiving and learning about

  17. Weyl current, scale-invariant inflation, and Planck scale generation

    DOE PAGES

    Ferreira, Pedro G.; Hill, Christopher T.; Ross, Graham G.

    2017-02-08

    Scalar fields,more » $$\\phi$$i, can be coupled nonminimally to curvature and satisfy the general criteria: (i) the theory has no mass input parameters, including MP=0; (ii) the $$\\phi$$i have arbitrary values and gradients, but undergo a general expansion and relaxation to constant values that satisfy a nontrivial constraint, K($$\\phi$$i)=constant; (iii) this constraint breaks scale symmetry spontaneously, and the Planck mass is dynamically generated; (iv) there can be adequate inflation associated with slow roll in a scale-invariant potential subject to the constraint; (v) the final vacuum can have a small to vanishing cosmological constant; (vi) large hierarchies in vacuum expectation values can naturally form; (vii) there is a harmless dilaton which naturally eludes the usual constraints on massless scalars. Finally, these models are governed by a global Weyl scale symmetry and its conserved current, Kμ. At the quantum level the Weyl scale symmetry can be maintained by an invariant specification of renormalized quantities.« less

  18. Scale invariance of a diode-like tunnel junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera, Hugo; Zanin, Danilo Andrea; de Pietro, Lorenzo Giuseppe; Michaels, Thomas; Thalmann, Peter; Ramsperger, Urs; Vindigni, Alessandro; Pescia, Danilo

    2013-03-01

    In Near Field-Emission SEM (NFESEM), electrostatic considerations favor a diode-like tunnel junction consisting of an atomic-sized source mounted at the apex of a thin wire placed at nanometric distances from a collector. The quantum mechanical tunnel process, instead, can provide a barrier toward miniaturization. In the first place, it deteriorates the generation of electrons by introducing non-linearities within the classically forbidden zone that exponentially increase with decreasing sizes. In addition, in the direct tunnelling regime, i.e. when the distance between emitter and collector d approaches the subnanometer range, a characteristic length appears, making the cross-over from the (almost) scale-invariant electric-field assisted regime to the essentially different STM-regime. We have observed that the experimental data relating the current I to the two experimental variables V (bias voltage between tip and collector) and d can be made (almost) collapse onto a ``scaling curve'' relating I to the single variable V .d-λ , λ being some exponent that depends solely on the geometry of the junction. This scaling property can be used to highlight non-linear aspects of the quantum mechanical tunnelling process.

  19. Scale-Invariant Hydrodynamics and Quantum Viscosity in Fermi Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, John

    2015-05-01

    An optically-trapped gas of spin 1/2-up and spin 1/2-down 6Li atoms, tuned near a collisional (Feshbach) resonance, provides a unique paradigm for testing predictions that cross interdisciplinary boundaries, from high temperature superconductors to nuclear matter. At resonance, the dilute atomic cloud becomes the most strongly interacting, non-relativistic fluid known: Shock waves are produced when two clouds collide. We observe scale-invariant hydrodynamic expansion of a resonantly interacting gas and determine the quantum shear viscosity η = α ℏn , with n the density, as a function of interaction strength and temperature, from nearly the ground state through the superfluid phase transition. We extract the local shear viscosity coefficient α from cloud-averaged data, using iterative methods borrowed from image processing, and observe previously hidden features, which are compared to recent predictions. In collaboration with Ethan Elliott and James Joseph, Physics Department, North Carolina State University. Supported by NSF, DOE, ARO, AFOSR.

  20. Viscosity and scale invariance in the unitary Fermi gas

    SciTech Connect

    Enss, Tilman; Haussmann, Rudolf; Zwerger, Wilhelm

    2011-03-15

    We compute the shear viscosity of the unitary Fermi gas above the superfluid transition temperature, using a diagrammatic technique that starts from the exact Kubo formula. The formalism obeys a Ward identity associated with scale invariance which guarantees that the bulk viscosity vanishes identically. For the shear viscosity, vertex corrections and the associated Aslamazov-Larkin contributions are shown to be crucial to reproduce the full Boltzmann equation result in the high-temperature, low fugacity limit. The frequency dependent shear viscosity {eta}({omega}) exhibits a Drude-like transport peak and a power-law tail at large frequencies which is proportional to the Tan contact. The weight in the transport peak is given by the equilibrium pressure, in agreement with a sum rule due to Taylor and Randeria. Near the superfluid transition the peak width is of the order of 0.5T{sub F}, thus invalidating a quasiparticle description. The ratio {eta}/s between the static shear viscosity and the entropy density exhibits a minimum near the superfluid transition temperature whose value is larger than the string theory bound h/(4{pi}k{sub B}) by a factor of about seven.

  1. Orthogonal design for scale invariant feature transform optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Xintao; Luo, Yonglong; Yi, Yunyun; Jie, Biao; Wang, Taochun; Bian, Weixin

    2016-09-01

    To improve object recognition capabilities in applications, we used orthogonal design (OD) to choose a group of optimal parameters in the parameter space of scale invariant feature transform (SIFT). In the case of global optimization (GOP) and local optimization (LOP) objectives, our aim is to show the operation of OD on the SIFT method. The GOP aims to increase the number of correctly detected true matches (NoCDTM) and the ratio of NoCDTM to all matches. In contrast, the LOP mainly aims to increase the performance of recall-precision. In detail, we first abstracted the SIFT method to a 9-way fixed-effect model with an interaction. Second, we designed a mixed orthogonal array, MA(64,23420,2), and its header table to optimize the SIFT parameters. Finally, two groups of parameters were obtained for GOP and LOP after orthogonal experiments and statistical analyses were implemented. Our experiments on four groups of data demonstrate that compared with the state-of-the-art methods, GOP can access more correct matches and is more effective against object recognition. In addition, LOP is favorable in terms of the recall-precision.

  2. Dark matter and leptogenesis linked by classical scale invariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoze, Valentin V.; Plascencia, Alexis D.

    2016-11-01

    In this work we study a classically scale invariant extension of the Standard Model that can explain simultaneously dark matter and the baryon asymmetry in the universe. In our set-up we introduce a dark sector, namely a non-Abelian SU(2) hidden sector coupled to the SM via the Higgs portal, and a singlet sector responsible for generating Majorana masses for three right-handed sterile neutrinos. The gauge bosons of the dark sector are mass-degenerate and stable, and this makes them suitable as dark matter candidates. Our model also accounts for the matter-anti-matter asymmetry. The lepton flavour asymmetry is produced during CP-violating oscillations of the GeV-scale right-handed neutrinos, and converted to the baryon asymmetry by the electroweak sphalerons. All the characteristic scales in the model: the electro-weak, dark matter and the leptogenesis/neutrino mass scales, are generated radiatively, have a common origin and related to each other via scalar field couplings in perturbation theory.

  3. Scale Invariant Gabor Descriptor-Based Noncooperative Iris Recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Yingzi; Belcher, Craig; Zhou, Zhi

    2010-12-01

    A new noncooperative iris recognition method is proposed. In this method, the iris features are extracted using a Gabor descriptor. The feature extraction and comparison are scale, deformation, rotation, and contrast-invariant. It works with off-angle and low-resolution iris images. The Gabor wavelet is incorporated with scale-invariant feature transformation (SIFT) for feature extraction to better extract the iris features. Both the phase and magnitude of the Gabor wavelet outputs were used in a novel way for local feature point description. Two feature region maps were designed to locally and globally register the feature points and each subregion in the map is locally adjusted to the dilation/contraction/deformation. We also developed a video-based non-cooperative iris recognition system by integrating video-based non-cooperative segmentation, segmentation evaluation, and score fusion units. The proposed method shows good performance for frontal and off-angle iris matching. Video-based recognition methods can improve non-cooperative iris recognition accuracy.

  4. Scale invariance in chaotic time series: Classical and quantum examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landa, Emmanuel; Morales, Irving O.; Stránský, Pavel; Fossion, Rubén; Velázquez, Victor; López Vieyra, J. C.; Frank, Alejandro

    Important aspects of chaotic behavior appear in systems of low dimension, as illustrated by the Map Module 1. It is indeed a remarkable fact that all systems tha make a transition from order to disorder display common properties, irrespective of their exacta functional form. We discuss evidence for 1/f power spectra in the chaotic time series associated in classical and quantum examples, the one-dimensional map module 1 and the spectrum of 48Ca. A Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA) method is applied to investigate the scaling properties of the energy fluctuations in the spectrum of 48Ca obtained with a large realistic shell model calculation (ANTOINE code) and with a random shell model (TBRE) calculation also in the time series obtained with the map mod 1. We compare the scale invariant properties of the 48Ca nuclear spectrum sith similar analyses applied to the RMT ensambles GOE and GDE. A comparison with the corresponding power spectra is made in both cases. The possible consequences of the results are discussed.

  5. Rotation and Scale Invariant Wavelet Feature for Content-Based Texture Image Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Moon-Chuen; Pun, Chi-Man

    2003-01-01

    Introduces a rotation and scale invariant log-polar wavelet texture feature for image retrieval. The underlying feature extraction process involves a log-polar transform followed by an adaptive row shift invariant wavelet packet transform. Experimental results show that this rotation and scale invariant wavelet feature is quite effective for image…

  6. Rotation and Scale Invariant Wavelet Feature for Content-Based Texture Image Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Moon-Chuen; Pun, Chi-Man

    2003-01-01

    Introduces a rotation and scale invariant log-polar wavelet texture feature for image retrieval. The underlying feature extraction process involves a log-polar transform followed by an adaptive row shift invariant wavelet packet transform. Experimental results show that this rotation and scale invariant wavelet feature is quite effective for image…

  7. Evaluating Empirical Relationships among Prediction, Measurement, and Scaling Invariance. Research Report. ETS RR-11-06

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moses, Tim

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to consider the relationships of prediction, measurement, and scaling invariance when these invariances were simultaneously evaluated in psychometric test data. An approach was developed to evaluate prediction, measurement, and scaling invariance based on linear and nonlinear prediction, measurement, and scaling…

  8. Scale invariance implies conformal invariance for the three-dimensional Ising model.

    PubMed

    Delamotte, Bertrand; Tissier, Matthieu; Wschebor, Nicolás

    2016-01-01

    Using the Wilson renormalization group, we show that if no integrated vector operator of scaling dimension -1 exists, then scale invariance implies conformal invariance. By using the Lebowitz inequalities, we prove that this necessary condition is fulfilled in all dimensions for the Ising universality class. This shows, in particular, that scale invariance implies conformal invariance for the three-dimensional Ising model.

  9. Power spectrum scale invariance identifies prefrontal dysregulation in paranoid schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Radulescu, Anca R; Rubin, Denis; Strey, Helmut H; Mujica-Parodi, Lilianne R

    2012-07-01

    Theory and experimental evidence suggest that complex living systems function close to the boundary of chaos, with erroneous organization to an improper dynamical range (too stiff or chaotic) underlying system-wide dysregulation and disease. We hypothesized that erroneous organization might therefore also characterize paranoid schizophrenia, via optimization abnormalities in the prefrontal-limbic circuit regulating emotion. To test this, we acquired fMRI scans from 35 subjects (N = 9 patients with paranoid schizophrenia and N = 26 healthy controls), while they viewed affect-valent stimuli. To quantify dynamic regulation, we analyzed the power spectrum scale invariance (PSSI) of fMRI time-courses and computed the geometry of time-delay (Poincaré) maps, a measure of variability. Patients and controls showed distinct PSSI in two clusters (k(1) : Z = 4.3215, P = 0.00002 and k(2) : Z = 3.9441, P = 0.00008), localized to the orbitofrontal/medial prefrontal cortex (Brodmann Area 10), represented by β close to white noise in patients (β ≈ 0) and in the pink noise range in controls (β ≈ -1). Interpreting the meaning of PSSI differences, the Poincaré maps indicated less variability in patients than controls (Z = -1.9437, P = 0.05 for k(1) ; Z = -2.5099, P = 0.01 for k(2) ). That the dynamics identified Brodmann Area 10 is consistent with previous schizophrenia research, which implicates this area in deficits of working memory, executive functioning, emotional regulation and underlying biological abnormalities in synaptic (glutamatergic) transmission. Our results additionally cohere with a large body of work finding pink noise to be the normal range of central function at the synaptic, cellular, and small network levels, and suggest that patients show less supple responsivity of this region. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Time-scale invariance as an emergent property in a perceptron with realistic, noisy neurons

    PubMed Central

    Buhusi, Catalin V.; Oprisan, Sorinel A.

    2013-01-01

    In most species, interval timing is time-scale invariant: errors in time estimation scale up linearly with the estimated duration. In mammals, time-scale invariance is ubiquitous over behavioral, lesion, and pharmacological manipulations. For example, dopaminergic drugs induce an immediate, whereas cholinergic drugs induce a gradual, scalar change in timing. Behavioral theories posit that time-scale invariance derives from particular computations, rules, or coding schemes. In contrast, we discuss a simple neural circuit, the perceptron, whose output neurons fire in a clockwise fashion (interval timing) based on the pattern of coincidental activation of its input neurons. We show numerically that time-scale invariance emerges spontaneously in a perceptron with realistic neurons, in the presence of noise. Under the assumption that dopaminergic drugs modulate the firing of input neurons, and that cholinergic drugs modulate the memory representation of the criterion time, we show that a perceptron with realistic neurons reproduces the pharmacological clock and memory patterns, and their time-scale invariance, in the presence of noise. These results suggest that rather than being a signature of higher-order cognitive processes or specific computations related to timing, time-scale invariance may spontaneously emerge in a massively-connected brain from the intrinsic noise of neurons and circuits, thus providing the simplest explanation for the ubiquity of scale invariance of interval timing. PMID:23518297

  11. Time-scale invariance as an emergent property in a perceptron with realistic, noisy neurons.

    PubMed

    Buhusi, Catalin V; Oprisan, Sorinel A

    2013-05-01

    In most species, interval timing is time-scale invariant: errors in time estimation scale up linearly with the estimated duration. In mammals, time-scale invariance is ubiquitous over behavioral, lesion, and pharmacological manipulations. For example, dopaminergic drugs induce an immediate, whereas cholinergic drugs induce a gradual, scalar change in timing. Behavioral theories posit that time-scale invariance derives from particular computations, rules, or coding schemes. In contrast, we discuss a simple neural circuit, the perceptron, whose output neurons fire in a clockwise fashion based on the pattern of coincidental activation of its input neurons. We show numerically that time-scale invariance emerges spontaneously in a perceptron with realistic neurons, in the presence of noise. Under the assumption that dopaminergic drugs modulate the firing of input neurons, and that cholinergic drugs modulate the memory representation of the criterion time, we show that a perceptron with realistic neurons reproduces the pharmacological clock and memory patterns, and their time-scale invariance, in the presence of noise. These results suggest that rather than being a signature of higher order cognitive processes or specific computations related to timing, time-scale invariance may spontaneously emerge in a massively connected brain from the intrinsic noise of neurons and circuits, thus providing the simplest explanation for the ubiquity of scale invariance of interval timing. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Scale-invariant radio jets and varying black hole spin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mościbrodzka, M.; Falcke, H.; Noble, S.

    2016-11-01

    Context. Compact radio cores associated with relativistic jets are often observed in both active galactic nuclei and X-ray binaries. Their radiative properties follow some general scaling laws that primarily depend on their masses and accretion rates. However, it has been suggested that black hole spin can also strongly influence the power and radio flux of these. Aims: We attempt to estimate the dependency of the radio luminosity of steady jets launched by accretion disks on black hole mass, accretion rate, and spin using numerical simulations. Methods: We make use of three-dimensional general relativistic magnetohydrodynamical simulations of accretion disks around low-luminosity black holes in which the jet radio emission is produced by the jet sheath. Results: We find that the radio flux increases roughly by a factor of 6 as the black hole spin increases from a∗ ≈ 0 to a∗ = 0.98. This is comparable to the increase in accretion power with spin, meaning that the ratio between radio jet and accretion power hardly changes. Although our jet spine power scales as expected for the Blandford-Znajek process, the dependency of jet radio luminosity on the black hole spin is somewhat weaker. Also weakly rotating black holes can produce visible radio jets. The overall scaling of the radio emission with black hole mass and accretion rate is consistent with the scale-invariant analytical models used to explain the fundamental plane of black hole activity. Spin does not introduce a significant scatter in this model. Conclusions: The jet-sheath model can describe well-resolved accreting systems, such as Sgr A* and M 87, as well as the general scaling behavior of low-luminosity black holes. Hence the model should be applicable to a wide range of radio jets in sub-Eddington black holes. The black hole spin has an effect on the production of visible radio jet, but it may not be the main driver to produce visible radio jets. An extension of our findings to powerful quasars

  13. General conditions for scale-invariant perturbations in an expanding universe

    SciTech Connect

    Geshnizjani, Ghazal; Kinney, William H.; Dizgah, Azadeh Moradinezhad E-mail: whkinney@buffalo.edu

    2011-11-01

    We investigate the general properties of expanding cosmological models which generate scale-invariant curvature perturbations in the presence of a variable speed of sound. We show that in an expanding universe, generation of a super-Hubble, nearly scale-invariant spectrum of perturbations over a range of wavelengths consistent with observation requires at least one of three conditions: (1) accelerating expansion, (2) a speed of sound faster than the speed of light, or (3) super-Planckian energy density.

  14. The neural correlates of processing scale-invariant environmental sounds at birth.

    PubMed

    Gervain, Judit; Werker, Janet F; Black, Alexis; Geffen, Maria N

    2016-06-01

    Sensory systems are thought to have evolved to efficiently represent the full range of sensory stimuli encountered in the natural world. The statistics of natural environmental sounds are characterized by scale-invariance: the property of exhibiting similar patterns at different levels of observation. The statistical structure of scale-invariant sounds remains constant at different spectro-temporal scales. Scale-invariance plays a fundamental role in how efficiently animals and human adults perceive acoustic signals. However, the developmental origins and brain correlates of the neural encoding of scale-invariant environmental sounds remain unexplored. Here, we investigate whether the human brain extracts the statistical property of scale-invariance. Synthetic sounds generated by a mathematical model to respect scale-invariance or violate it were presented to newborns. In alternating blocks, the two sound types were presented together in an alternating fashion, whereas in non-alternating blocks, only one type of sound was presented. Newborns' brain responses were measured using near-infrared spectroscopy. We found that scale-invariant and variable-scale sounds were discriminated by the newborn brain, as suggested by differential activation in the left frontal and temporal areas to alternating vs. non-alternating blocks. These results indicate that newborns already detect and encode scale-invariance as a characteristic feature of acoustic stimuli. This suggests that the mathematical principle of efficient coding of information guides the auditory neural code from the beginning of human development, a finding that may help explain how evolution has prepared the brain for perceiving the natural world.

  15. Two-measure approach to breaking scale-invariance in a standard-model extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guendelman, Eduardo I.; Nishino, Hitoshi; Rajpoot, Subhash

    2017-02-01

    We introduce Weyl's scale-invariance as an additional global symmetry in the standard model of electroweak interactions. A natural consequence is the introduction of general relativity coupled to scalar fields à la Dirac, that includes the Higgs doublet and a singlet σ-field required for implementing global scale-invariance. We introduce a mechanism for 'spontaneous breaking' of scale-invariance by introducing a coupling of the σ-field to a new metric-independent measure Φ defined in terms of four scalars ϕi (i = 1 , 2 , 3 , 4). Global scale-invariance is regained by combining it with internal diffeomorphism of these four scalars. We show that once the global scale-invariance is broken, the phenomenon (a) generates Newton's gravitational constant GN and (b) triggers spontaneous symmetry breaking in the normal manner resulting in masses for the conventional fermions and bosons. In the absence of fine-tuning the scale at which the scale-symmetry breaks can be of order Planck mass. If right-handed neutrinos are also introduced, their absence at present energy scales is attributed to their mass terms tied to the scale where scale-invariance breaks.

  16. Lack of exercise leads to significant and reversible loss of scale invariance in both aged and young mice

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Changgui; Coomans, Claudia P.; Hu, Kun; Scheer, Frank A. J. L.; Stanley, H. Eugene; Meijer, Johanna H.

    2015-01-01

    In healthy humans and other animals, behavioral activity exhibits scale invariance over multiple timescales from minutes to 24 h, whereas in aging or diseased conditions, scale invariance is usually reduced significantly. Accordingly, scale invariance can be a potential marker for health. Given compelling indications that exercise is beneficial for mental and physical health, we tested to what extent a lack of exercise affects scale invariance in young and aged animals. We studied six or more mice in each of four age groups (0.5, 1, 1.5, and 2 y) and observed an age-related deterioration of scale invariance in activity fluctuations. We found that limiting the amount of exercise, by removing the running wheels, leads to loss of scale-invariant properties in all age groups. Remarkably, in both young and old animals a lack of exercise reduced the scale invariance in activity fluctuations to the same level. We next showed that scale invariance can be restored by returning the running wheels. Exercise during the active period also improved scale invariance during the resting period, suggesting that activity during the active phase may also be beneficial for the resting phase. Finally, our data showed that exercise had a stronger influence on scale invariance than the effect of age. The data suggest that exercise is beneficial as revealed by scale-invariant parameters and that, even in young animals, a lack of exercise leads to strong deterioration in these parameters. PMID:25675516

  17. Scale invariance in biology: coincidence or footprint of a universal mechanism?

    PubMed

    Gisiger, T

    2001-05-01

    In this article, we present a self-contained review of recent work on complex biological systems which exhibit no characteristic scale. This property can manifest itself with fractals (spatial scale invariance), flicker noise or 1/f-noise where f denotes the frequency of a signal (temporal scale invariance) and power laws (scale invariance in the size and duration of events in the dynamics of the system). A hypothesis recently put forward to explain these scale-free phenomomena is criticality, a notion introduced by physicists while studying phase transitions in materials, where systems spontaneously arrange themselves in an unstable manner similar, for instance, to a row of dominoes. Here, we review in a critical manner work which investigates to what extent this idea can be generalized to biology. More precisely, we start with a brief introduction to the concepts of absence of characteristic scale (power-law distributions, fractals and 1/f-noise) and of critical phenomena. We then review typical mathematical models exhibiting such properties: edge of chaos, cellular automata and self-organized critical models. These notions are then brought together to see to what extent they can account for the scale invariance observed in ecology, evolution of species, type III epidemics and some aspects of the central nervous system. This article also discusses how the notion of scale invariance can give important insights into the workings of biological systems.

  18. Proposed Empirical Entropy and Gibbs Energy Based on Observations of Scale Invariance in Open Nonequilibrium Systems.

    PubMed

    Tuck, Adrian F

    2017-09-07

    There is no widely agreed definition of entropy, and consequently Gibbs energy, in open systems far from equilibrium. One recent approach has sought to formulate an entropy and Gibbs energy based on observed scale invariances in geophysical variables, particularly in atmospheric quantities, including the molecules constituting stratospheric chemistry. The Hamiltonian flux dynamics of energy in macroscopic open nonequilibrium systems maps to energy in equilibrium statistical thermodynamics, and corresponding equivalences of scale invariant variables with other relevant statistical mechanical variables such as entropy, Gibbs energy, and 1/(kBoltzmannT), are not just formally analogous but are also mappings. Three proof-of-concept representative examples from available adequate stratospheric chemistry observations-temperature, wind speed and ozone-are calculated, with the aim of applying these mappings and equivalences. Potential applications of the approach to scale invariant observations from the literature, involving scales from molecular through laboratory to astronomical, are considered. Theoretical support for the approach from the literature is discussed.

  19. Effects of random and deterministic discrete scale invariance on the critical behavior of the Potts model.

    PubMed

    Monceau, Pascal

    2012-12-01

    The effects of disorder on the critical behavior of the q-state Potts model in noninteger dimensions are studied by comparison of deterministic and random fractals sharing the same dimensions in the framework of a discrete scale invariance. We carried out intensive Monte Carlo simulations. In the case of a fractal dimension slightly smaller than two d(f) ~/= 1.974636, we give evidence that the disorder structured by discrete scale invariance does not change the first order transition associated with the deterministic case when q = 7. Furthermore the study of the high value q = 14 shows that the transition is a second order one both for deterministic and random scale invariance, but that their behavior belongs to different university classes.

  20. Distinctive Feature Extraction for Indian Sign Language (ISL) Gesture using Scale Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Sandeep Baburao; Sinha, G. R.

    2017-02-01

    India, having less awareness towards the deaf and dumb peoples leads to increase the communication gap between deaf and hard hearing community. Sign language is commonly developed for deaf and hard hearing peoples to convey their message by generating the different sign pattern. The scale invariant feature transform was introduced by David Lowe to perform reliable matching between different images of the same object. This paper implements the various phases of scale invariant feature transform to extract the distinctive features from Indian sign language gestures. The experimental result shows the time constraint for each phase and the number of features extracted for 26 ISL gestures.

  1. The four fixed points of scale invariant single field cosmological models

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, BingKan

    2012-10-01

    We introduce a new set of flow parameters to describe the time dependence of the equation of state and the speed of sound in single field cosmological models. A scale invariant power spectrum is produced if these flow parameters satisfy specific dynamical equations. We analyze the flow of these parameters and find four types of fixed points that encompass all known single field models. Moreover, near each fixed point we uncover new models where the scale invariance of the power spectrum relies on having simultaneously time varying speed of sound and equation of state. We describe several distinctive new models and discuss constraints from strong coupling and superluminality.

  2. Inflation and reheating in theories with spontaneous scale invariance symmetry breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinaldi, Massimiliano; Vanzo, Luciano

    2016-07-01

    We study a scale-invariant model of quadratic gravity with a nonminimally coupled scalar field. We focus on cosmological solutions and find that scale invariance is spontaneously broken and a mass scale naturally emerges. Before the symmetry breaking, the Universe undergoes an inflationary expansion with nearly the same observational predictions of Starobinsky's model. At the end of inflation, the Hubble parameter and the scalar field converge to a stable fixed point through damped oscillations and the usual Einstein-Hilbert action is recovered. The oscillations around the fixed point can reheat the Universe in various ways, and we study in detail some of these possibilities.

  3. Distinctive Feature Extraction for Indian Sign Language (ISL) Gesture using Scale Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Sandeep Baburao; Sinha, G. R.

    2016-07-01

    India, having less awareness towards the deaf and dumb peoples leads to increase the communication gap between deaf and hard hearing community. Sign language is commonly developed for deaf and hard hearing peoples to convey their message by generating the different sign pattern. The scale invariant feature transform was introduced by David Lowe to perform reliable matching between different images of the same object. This paper implements the various phases of scale invariant feature transform to extract the distinctive features from Indian sign language gestures. The experimental result shows the time constraint for each phase and the number of features extracted for 26 ISL gestures.

  4. Definition of fractal topography to essential understanding of scale-invariance

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Yi; Wu, Ying; Li, Hui; Zhao, Mengyu; Pan, Jienan

    2017-01-01

    Fractal behavior is scale-invariant and widely characterized by fractal dimension. However, the cor-respondence between them is that fractal behavior uniquely determines a fractal dimension while a fractal dimension can be related to many possible fractal behaviors. Therefore, fractal behavior is independent of the fractal generator and its geometries, spatial pattern, and statistical properties in addition to scale. To mathematically describe fractal behavior, we propose a novel concept of fractal topography defined by two scale-invariant parameters, scaling lacunarity (P) and scaling coverage (F). The scaling lacunarity is defined as the scale ratio between two successive fractal generators, whereas the scaling coverage is defined as the number ratio between them. Consequently, a strictly scale-invariant definition for self-similar fractals can be derived as D = log F /log P. To reflect the direction-dependence of fractal behaviors, we introduce another parameter Hxy, a general Hurst exponent, which is analytically expressed by Hxy = log Px/log Py where Px and Py are the scaling lacunarities in the x and y directions, respectively. Thus, a unified definition of fractal dimension is proposed for arbitrary self-similar and self-affine fractals by averaging the fractal dimensions of all directions in a d-dimensional space, which . Our definitions provide a theoretical, mechanistic basis for understanding the essentials of the scale-invariant property that reduces the complexity of modeling fractals. PMID:28436450

  5. Nonlocal matching condition and scale-invariant spectrum in bouncing cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, C.-S.; Furuta, K.; Lin, F.-L.

    2006-05-15

    In cosmological scenarios such as the pre-big bang scenario or the ekpyrotic scenario, a matching condition between the metric perturbations in the pre-big bang phase and those in the post big bang phase is often assumed. Various matching conditions have been considered in the literature. Nevertheless obtaining a scale-invariant CMB spectrum via a concrete mechanism remains impossible. In this paper, we examine this problem from the point of view of local causality. We begin with introducing the notion of local causality and explain how it constrains the form of the matching condition. We then prove a no-go theorem: independent of the details of the matching condition, a scale-invariant spectrum is impossible as long as the local causality condition is satisfied. In our framework, it is easy to show that a violation of local causality around the bounce is needed in order to give a scale-invariant spectrum. We study a specific scenario of this possibility by considering a nonlocal effective theory inspired by noncommutative geometry around the bounce and show that a scale-invariant spectrum is possible. Moreover we demonstrate that the magnitude of the spectrum is compatible with observations if the bounce is assumed to occur at an energy scale which is a few orders of magnitude below the Planckian energy scale.

  6. Definition of fractal topography to essential understanding of scale-invariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yi; Wu, Ying; Li, Hui; Zhao, Mengyu; Pan, Jienan

    2017-04-01

    Fractal behavior is scale-invariant and widely characterized by fractal dimension. However, the cor-respondence between them is that fractal behavior uniquely determines a fractal dimension while a fractal dimension can be related to many possible fractal behaviors. Therefore, fractal behavior is independent of the fractal generator and its geometries, spatial pattern, and statistical properties in addition to scale. To mathematically describe fractal behavior, we propose a novel concept of fractal topography defined by two scale-invariant parameters, scaling lacunarity (P) and scaling coverage (F). The scaling lacunarity is defined as the scale ratio between two successive fractal generators, whereas the scaling coverage is defined as the number ratio between them. Consequently, a strictly scale-invariant definition for self-similar fractals can be derived as D = log F /log P. To reflect the direction-dependence of fractal behaviors, we introduce another parameter Hxy, a general Hurst exponent, which is analytically expressed by Hxy = log Px/log Py where Px and Py are the scaling lacunarities in the x and y directions, respectively. Thus, a unified definition of fractal dimension is proposed for arbitrary self-similar and self-affine fractals by averaging the fractal dimensions of all directions in a d-dimensional space, which . Our definitions provide a theoretical, mechanistic basis for understanding the essentials of the scale-invariant property that reduces the complexity of modeling fractals.

  7. Dynamical and scale invariance of charged particles slipping on a rough surface with periodic excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Luo, Pengcheng; Ding, Huifang

    2017-07-01

    This letter deals with the dynamical and scaling invariance of charged particles slipping on a rough surface with periodic excitation. A variant of the Fermi-Ulam model (FUM) is proposed to describe the transport behavior of the particles when the electric field force Fe is smaller or larger than the friction force Ff, i.e., A < 0 or A > 0. For these two cases, the stability of fixed points is analyzed with the help of the eigenvalue analysis method, and further the invariant manifolds are constructed to investigate the dynamical invariance such as energy diffusion for some initial conditions in the case A > 0 and decay process in the case A < 0. Moreover, the scaling invariance analysis is performed to demonstrate the power law of the statistical behavior. It follows that both the FA phenomenon for A > 0 and the velocity decay process for A < 0 satisfy scaling invariance with respect to the nondimensional acceleration A. Besides, for A < 0, the transient number nx is proposed to evaluate the speed of the velocity decay process. More importantly, nx is found to possess the attribute of scaling invariance with respect to both the initial velocity V0 and the nondimensional acceleration A. These results are very useful for the in-depth understanding of the energy transport properties of charged particle systems.

  8. Definition of fractal topography to essential understanding of scale-invariance.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yi; Wu, Ying; Li, Hui; Zhao, Mengyu; Pan, Jienan

    2017-04-24

    Fractal behavior is scale-invariant and widely characterized by fractal dimension. However, the cor-respondence between them is that fractal behavior uniquely determines a fractal dimension while a fractal dimension can be related to many possible fractal behaviors. Therefore, fractal behavior is independent of the fractal generator and its geometries, spatial pattern, and statistical properties in addition to scale. To mathematically describe fractal behavior, we propose a novel concept of fractal topography defined by two scale-invariant parameters, scaling lacunarity (P) and scaling coverage (F). The scaling lacunarity is defined as the scale ratio between two successive fractal generators, whereas the scaling coverage is defined as the number ratio between them. Consequently, a strictly scale-invariant definition for self-similar fractals can be derived as D = log F /log P. To reflect the direction-dependence of fractal behaviors, we introduce another parameter Hxy, a general Hurst exponent, which is analytically expressed by Hxy = log Px/log Py where Px and Py are the scaling lacunarities in the x and y directions, respectively. Thus, a unified definition of fractal dimension is proposed for arbitrary self-similar and self-affine fractals by averaging the fractal dimensions of all directions in a d-dimensional space, which . Our definitions provide a theoretical, mechanistic basis for understanding the essentials of the scale-invariant property that reduces the complexity of modeling fractals.

  9. Discrete Scale Invariance in the Cascade Heart Rate Variability of Healthy Humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, D. C.

    Evidence of discrete scale invariance (DSI) in daytime healthy heart rate variability (HRV) is presented based on the log-periodic power law scaling of the heart beat interval increment. Our analysis suggests multiple DSI groups and a dynamic cascading process. A cascade model is presented to simulate such a property.

  10. An Alternative to the ΛCDM Model: The Case of Scale Invariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeder, Andre

    2017-01-01

    The hypothesis is made that, at large scales where general relativity may be applied, empty space is scale invariant. This establishes a relation between the cosmological constant and the scale factor λ of the scale-invariant framework. This relation brings major simplifications in the scale-invariant equations for cosmology, which contain a new term, depending on the derivative of the scale factor, that opposes gravity and produces an accelerated expansion. The displacements due to the acceleration term make a high contribution {{{Ω }}}λ to the energy density of the universe, satisfying an equation of the form {{{Ω }}}{{m}}+{{{Ω }}}{{k}}+{{{Ω }}}λ =1. The models do not demand the existence of unknown particles. There is a family of flat models with different density parameters {{{Ω }}}{{m}}< 1. Numerical integrations of the cosmological equations for different values of the curvature and density parameter k and {{{Ω }}}{{m}} are performed. The presence of even tiny amounts of matter in the universe tends to kill scale invariance. The point is that for {{{Ω }}}{{m}}=0.3 the effect is not yet completely killed. Models with non-zero density start explosively with a braking phase followed by a continuously accelerating expansion. Several observational properties are examined, in particular the distances, the m-z diagram, and the {{{Ω }}}{{m}} versus {{{Ω }}}λ plot. Comparisons with observations are also performed for the Hubble constant H0 versus {{{Ω }}}{{m}}, for the expansion history in the plot H(z)/(z+1) versus redshift z, and for the transition redshift from braking to acceleration. These first dynamical tests are satisfied by scale-invariant models, which thus deserve further study.

  11. Scaling and scale invariance of conservation laws in Reynolds transport theorem framework.

    PubMed

    Haltas, Ismail; Ulusoy, Suleyman

    2015-07-01

    Scale invariance is the case where the solution of a physical process at a specified time-space scale can be linearly related to the solution of the processes at another time-space scale. Recent studies investigated the scale invariance conditions of hydrodynamic processes by applying the one-parameter Lie scaling transformations to the governing equations of the processes. Scale invariance of a physical process is usually achieved under certain conditions on the scaling ratios of the variables and parameters involved in the process. The foundational axioms of hydrodynamics are the conservation laws, namely, conservation of mass, conservation of linear momentum, and conservation of energy from continuum mechanics. They are formulated using the Reynolds transport theorem. Conventionally, Reynolds transport theorem formulates the conservation equations in integral form. Yet, differential form of the conservation equations can also be derived for an infinitesimal control volume. In the formulation of the governing equation of a process, one or more than one of the conservation laws and, some times, a constitutive relation are combined together. Differential forms of the conservation equations are used in the governing partial differential equation of the processes. Therefore, differential conservation equations constitute the fundamentals of the governing equations of the hydrodynamic processes. Applying the one-parameter Lie scaling transformation to the conservation laws in the Reynolds transport theorem framework instead of applying to the governing partial differential equations may lead to more fundamental conclusions on the scaling and scale invariance of the hydrodynamic processes. This study will investigate the scaling behavior and scale invariance conditions of the hydrodynamic processes by applying the one-parameter Lie scaling transformation to the conservation laws in the Reynolds transport theorem framework.

  12. Evaluation of scale invariance in physiological signals by means of balanced estimation of diffusion entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wenqing; Qiu, Lu; Xiao, Qin; Yang, Huijie; Zhang, Qingjun; Wang, Jianyong

    2012-11-01

    By means of the concept of the balanced estimation of diffusion entropy, we evaluate the reliable scale invariance embedded in different sleep stages and stride records. Segments corresponding to waking, light sleep, rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, and deep sleep stages are extracted from long-term electroencephalogram signals. For each stage the scaling exponent value is distributed over a considerably wide range, which tell us that the scaling behavior is subject and sleep cycle dependent. The average of the scaling exponent values for waking segments is almost the same as that for REM segments (˜0.8). The waking and REM stages have a significantly higher value of the average scaling exponent than that for light sleep stages (˜0.7). For the stride series, the original diffusion entropy (DE) and the balanced estimation of diffusion entropy (BEDE) give almost the same results for detrended series. The evolutions of local scaling invariance show that the physiological states change abruptly, although in the experiments great efforts have been made to keep conditions unchanged. The global behavior of a single physiological signal may lose rich information on physiological states. Methodologically, the BEDE can evaluate with considerable precision the scale invariance in very short time series (˜102), while the original DE method sometimes may underestimate scale-invariance exponents or even fail in detecting scale-invariant behavior. The BEDE method is sensitive to trends in time series. The existence of trends may lead to an unreasonably high value of the scaling exponent and consequent mistaken conclusions.

  13. Evaluation of scale invariance in physiological signals by means of balanced estimation of diffusion entropy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenqing; Qiu, Lu; Xiao, Qin; Yang, Huijie; Zhang, Qingjun; Wang, Jianyong

    2012-11-01

    By means of the concept of the balanced estimation of diffusion entropy, we evaluate the reliable scale invariance embedded in different sleep stages and stride records. Segments corresponding to waking, light sleep, rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, and deep sleep stages are extracted from long-term electroencephalogram signals. For each stage the scaling exponent value is distributed over a considerably wide range, which tell us that the scaling behavior is subject and sleep cycle dependent. The average of the scaling exponent values for waking segments is almost the same as that for REM segments (∼0.8). The waking and REM stages have a significantly higher value of the average scaling exponent than that for light sleep stages (∼0.7). For the stride series, the original diffusion entropy (DE) and the balanced estimation of diffusion entropy (BEDE) give almost the same results for detrended series. The evolutions of local scaling invariance show that the physiological states change abruptly, although in the experiments great efforts have been made to keep conditions unchanged. The global behavior of a single physiological signal may lose rich information on physiological states. Methodologically, the BEDE can evaluate with considerable precision the scale invariance in very short time series (∼10^{2}), while the original DE method sometimes may underestimate scale-invariance exponents or even fail in detecting scale-invariant behavior. The BEDE method is sensitive to trends in time series. The existence of trends may lead to an unreasonably high value of the scaling exponent and consequent mistaken conclusions.

  14. Polynomial Asymptotes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobbs, David E.

    2010-01-01

    This note develops and implements the theory of polynomial asymptotes to (graphs of) rational functions, as a generalization of the classical topics of horizontal asymptotes and oblique/slant asymptotes. Applications are given to hyperbolic asymptotes. Prerequisites include the division algorithm for polynomials with coefficients in the field of…

  15. Polynomial Asymptotes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobbs, David E.

    2010-01-01

    This note develops and implements the theory of polynomial asymptotes to (graphs of) rational functions, as a generalization of the classical topics of horizontal asymptotes and oblique/slant asymptotes. Applications are given to hyperbolic asymptotes. Prerequisites include the division algorithm for polynomials with coefficients in the field of…

  16. Scale-Invariant Forms of Conservation Equations in Reactive Fields and a Modified Hydro-Thermo-Diffusive Theory of Laminar Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sohrab, Siavash H.; Piltch, Nancy (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A scale-invariant model of statistical mechanics is applied to present invariant forms of mass, energy, linear, and angular momentum conservation equations in reactive fields. The resulting conservation equations at molecular-dynamic scale are solved by the method of large activation energy asymptotics to describe the hydro-thermo-diffusive structure of laminar premixed flames. The predicted temperature and velocity profiles are in agreement with the observations. Also, with realistic physico-chemical properties and chemical-kinetic parameters for a single-step overall combustion of stoichiometric methane-air premixed flame, the laminar flame propagation velocity of 42.1 cm/s is calculated in agreement with the experimental value.

  17. Void probability as a function of the void's shape and scale-invariant models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elizalde, E.; Gaztanaga, E.

    1991-01-01

    The dependence of counts in cells on the shape of the cell for the large scale galaxy distribution is studied. A very concrete prediction can be done concerning the void distribution for scale invariant models. The prediction is tested on a sample of the CfA catalog, and good agreement is found. It is observed that the probability of a cell to be occupied is bigger for some elongated cells. A phenomenological scale invariant model for the observed distribution of the counts in cells, an extension of the negative binomial distribution, is presented in order to illustrate how this dependence can be quantitatively determined. An original, intuitive derivation of this model is presented.

  18. A scale-invariant keypoint detector in log-polar space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Tao; Zhang, Yun

    2017-02-01

    The scale-invariant feature transform (SIFT) algorithm is devised to detect keypoints via the difference of Gaussian (DoG) images. However, the DoG data lacks the high-frequency information, which can lead to a performance drop of the algorithm. To address this issue, this paper proposes a novel log-polar feature detector (LPFD) to detect scale-invariant blubs (keypoints) in log-polar space, which, in contrast, can retain all the image information. The algorithm consists of three components, viz. keypoint detection, descriptor extraction and descriptor matching. Besides, the algorithm is evaluated in detecting keypoints from the INRIA dataset by comparing with the SIFT algorithm and one of its fast versions, the speed up robust features (SURF) algorithm in terms of three performance measures, viz. correspondences, repeatability, correct matches and matching score.

  19. Exact scale-invariant background of gravitational waves from cosmic defects.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, Daniel G; Hindmarsh, Mark; Urrestilla, Jon

    2013-03-08

    We demonstrate that any scaling source in the radiation era produces a background of gravitational waves with an exact scale-invariant power spectrum. Cosmic defects, created after a phase transition in the early universe, are such a scaling source. We emphasize that the result is independent of the topology of the cosmic defects, the order of phase transition, and the nature of the symmetry broken, global or gauged. As an example, using large-scale numerical simulations, we calculate the scale-invariant gravitational wave power spectrum generated by the dynamics of a global O(N) scalar theory. The result approaches the large N theoretical prediction as N(-2), albeit with a large coefficient. The signal from global cosmic strings is O(100) times larger than the large N prediction.

  20. Titius-Bode laws in the solar system. 1: Scale invariance explains everything

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graner, F.; Dubrulle, B.

    1994-02-01

    According to the Titius-Bode law, the planetary distances to the sun follow a geometric progression. We review the major interpretations and explanations of the law. We show that most derivations of Titius-Bode law are implicitely based on the assumption of both rotational and scale invariance. In absence of any radial length scale, linear instabilities cause periodic perturbations in the variable x = ln(r/r0). Since maxima equidistant in x obey a geometric progression in the variable r, Titius-Bode type of laws are natural outcome of the linear regime of systems in which both symmetries are present; we discuss possible nonlinear corrections to the law. Thus, if Titius-Bode law is real, it is probably only a consequence of the scale invariance of the disk which gave rise to the planets.

  1. Do scale-invariant fluctuations imply the breaking of de Sitter invariance?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youssef, A.

    2013-01-01

    The quantization of the massless minimally coupled (mmc) scalar field in de Sitter spacetime is known to be a non-trivial problem due to the appearance of strong infrared (IR) effects. In particular, the scale-invariance of the CMB power-spectrum - certainly one of the most successful predictions of modern cosmology - is widely believed to be inconsistent with a de Sitter invariant mmc two-point function. Using a Cesaro-summability technique to properly define an otherwise divergent Fourier transform, we show in this Letter that de Sitter symmetry breaking is not a necessary consequence of the scale-invariant fluctuation spectrum. We also generalize our result to the tachyonic scalar fields, i.e. the discrete series of representations of the de Sitter group, that suffer from similar strong IR effects.

  2. Scale-invariant scalar spectrum from the nonminimal derivative coupling with fourth-order term

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myung, Yun Soo; Moon, Taeyoon

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, an exactly scale-invariant spectrum of scalar perturbation generated during de Sitter spacetime is found from the gravity model of the nonminimal derivative coupling with fourth-order term. The nonminimal derivative coupling term generates a healthy (ghost-free) fourth-order derivative term, while the fourth-order term provides an unhealthy (ghost) fourth-order derivative term. The Harrison-Zel’dovich spectrum obtained from Fourier transforming the fourth-order propagator in de Sitter space is recovered by computing the power spectrum in its momentum space directly. It shows that this model provides a truly scale-invariant spectrum, in addition to the Lee-Wick scalar theory.

  3. Irregular spiking of pyramidal neurons organizes as scale-invariant neuronal avalanches in the awake state.

    PubMed

    Bellay, Timothy; Klaus, Andreas; Seshadri, Saurav; Plenz, Dietmar

    2015-07-07

    Spontaneous fluctuations in neuronal activity emerge at many spatial and temporal scales in cortex. Population measures found these fluctuations to organize as scale-invariant neuronal avalanches, suggesting cortical dynamics to be critical. Macroscopic dynamics, though, depend on physiological states and are ambiguous as to their cellular composition, spatiotemporal origin, and contributions from synaptic input or action potential (AP) output. Here, we study spontaneous firing in pyramidal neurons (PNs) from rat superficial cortical layers in vivo and in vitro using 2-photon imaging. As the animal transitions from the anesthetized to awake state, spontaneous single neuron firing increases in irregularity and assembles into scale-invariant avalanches at the group level. In vitro spike avalanches emerged naturally yet required balanced excitation and inhibition. This demonstrates that neuronal avalanches are linked to the global physiological state of wakefulness and that cortical resting activity organizes as avalanches from firing of local PN groups to global population activity.

  4. Inflation and reheating in scale-invariant scalar-tensor gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tambalo, Giovanni; Rinaldi, Massimiliano

    2017-04-01

    We consider the scale-invariant inflationary model studied in Rinaldi and Vanzo (Phys Rev D 94: 024009, 2016). The Lagrangian includes all the scale-invariant operators that can be built with combinations of R, R2 and one scalar field. The equations of motion show that the symmetry is spontaneously broken after an arbitrarily long inflationary period and a fundamental mass scale is generated. Upon symmetry breaking, and in the Jordan frame, both Hubble function and the scalar field undergo damped oscillations that can eventually amplify Standard Model fields and reheat the Universe. In the present work, we study in detail inflation and the reheating mechanism of this model in the Einstein frame and we compare some of the results with the latest observational data.

  5. Reconstruction of a nonminimal coupling theory with scale-invariant power spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, Taotao

    2012-06-01

    A nonminimal coupling single scalar field theory, when transformed from Jordan frame to Einstein frame, can act like a minimal coupling one. Making use of this property, we investigate how a nonminimal coupling theory with scale-invariant power spectrum could be reconstructed from its minimal coupling counterpart, which can be applied in the early universe. Thanks to the coupling to gravity, the equation of state of our universe for a scale-invariant power spectrum can be relaxed, and the relation between the parameters in the action can be obtained. This approach also provides a means to address the Big-Bang puzzles and anisotropy problem in the nonminimal coupling model within Jordan frame. Due to the equivalence between the two frames, one may be able to find models that are free of the horizon, flatness, singularity as well as anisotropy problems.

  6. Detecting people in IR border surveillance video using scale invariant image moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Hara, Stephen; Fischer, Amber

    2009-04-01

    This paper describes a real-time system for detecting people in infrared video taken by a re-locatable camera tower suitable for border monitoring. Wind effects cause the camera to sway, so typical background modeling techniques prove difficult to apply. Instead, detection is performed using a supervised classifier over a set of seven Scale Invariant Image Moments. Blobs images are generated with a simple application of thresholding and dilation, yielding a set of possible targets. For each potential target, the Scale Invariant Moments are computed and classified as "Person" or "Non-Person." We present three methods for training the classifier: Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA), Quadratic Discriminant Analysis (QDA), and a two-layer Neural Network (NN). We compare the accuracy for the three methods. Results are presented for sample videos, showing acceptable accuracy while maintaining real time throughput. The key advantages of this method are real-time performance and tolerance of random ego motion.

  7. Observation of the Efimovian expansion in scale-invariant Fermi gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Shujin; Shi, Zhe-Yu; Diao, Pengpeng; Yu, Qianli; Zhai, Hui; Qi, Ran; Wu, Haibin

    2016-07-01

    Scale invariance plays an important role in unitary Fermi gases. Discrete scaling symmetry manifests itself in quantum few-body systems such as the Efimov effect. Here, we report on the theoretical prediction and experimental observation of a distinct type of expansion dynamics for scale-invariant quantum gases. When the frequency of the harmonic trap holding the gas decreases continuously as the inverse of time t, the expansion of the cloud size exhibits a sequence of plateaus. The locations of these plateaus obey a discrete geometric scaling law with a controllable scale factor, and the expansion dynamics is governed by a log-periodic function. This marked expansion shares the same scaling law and mathematical description as the Efimov effect.

  8. Shift- and scale-invariant recognition of contour objects with logarithmic radial harmonic filters.

    PubMed

    Moya, A; Esteve-Taboada, J J; García, J; Ferreira, C

    2000-10-10

    The phase-only logarithmic radial harmonic (LRH) filter has been shown to be suitable for scale-invariant block object recognition. However, an important set of objects is the collection of contour functions that results from a digital edge extraction of the original block objects. These contour functions have a constant width that is independent of the scale of the original object. Therefore, since the energy of the contour objects decreases more slowly with the scale factor than does the energy of the block objects, the phase-only LRH filter has difficulties in the recognition tasks when these contour objects are used. We propose a modified LRH filter that permits the realization of a shift- and scale-invariant optical recognition of contour objects. The modified LRH filter is a complex filter that compensates the energy variation resulting from the scaling of contour objects. Optical results validate the theory and show the utility of the newly proposed method.

  9. Producing a scale-invariant spectrum of perturbations in a Hagedorn phase of string cosmology.

    PubMed

    Nayeri, Ali; Brandenberger, Robert H; Vafa, Cumrun

    2006-07-14

    We study the generation of cosmological perturbations during the Hagedorn phase of string gas cosmology. Using tools of string thermodynamics we provide indications that it may be possible to obtain a nearly scale-invariant spectrum of cosmological fluctuations on scales which are of cosmological interest today. In our cosmological scenario, the early Hagedorn phase of string gas cosmology goes over smoothly into the radiation-dominated phase of standard cosmology, without having a period of cosmological inflation.

  10. Anisotropic Scale Invariance Investigation of Drainage Areas Via Remotely Sensed Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaulieu, A.; Gaonac'h, H.; Lovejoy, S.

    Spatial and temporal scale invariance investigation is now widespread in geophysical fields and reveals in most cases the existence of scaling or multiscaling behaviour over a large range of scales. However, not much attention is being paid to the anisotropy present in the analyzed geological and geophysical fields while self-similarity is as- sumed most of the time. Theory and models omitting such anisotropy do not take appropriately in consideration the anisotropic dynamics of these natural processes. However, anisotropy is a common characteristics of geophysical dynamics present in the oceans, atmosphere and earth interior and surface. It often implies differential strat- ification and rotation when describing the texture and morphology of the phenomenon scale by scale. In order to account for scaling anisotropy, the formalism of generalized scale invariance (GSI) was developed. Investigation of remotely sensed images (Land- sat, Aster and ERS-1) over drainage areas such as in Ethiopia is conducted to assess the importance of anisotropic scale invariance between eroded (highly anisotropic) and non-eroded (nearly isotropic) areas. The various spectral regions covered by these different satellite images reveal distinct anisotropic intrinsic characteristics of the re- gions (topography, chemical composition, structural features) which need to be ana- lyzed scale by scale. Multifractal parameters are reconsidered in this new anisotropic framework.

  11. A Canonical Model of Multistability and Scale-Invariance in Biological Systems

    PubMed Central

    Freyer, Frank; Roberts, James A.; Ritter, Petra; Breakspear, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Multistability and scale-invariant fluctuations occur in a wide variety of biological organisms from bacteria to humans as well as financial, chemical and complex physical systems. Multistability refers to noise driven switches between multiple weakly stable states. Scale-invariant fluctuations arise when there is an approximately constant ratio between the mean and standard deviation of a system's fluctuations. Both are an important property of human perception, movement, decision making and computation and they occur together in the human alpha rhythm, imparting it with complex dynamical behavior. Here, we elucidate their fundamental dynamical mechanisms in a canonical model of nonlinear bifurcations under stochastic fluctuations. We find that the co-occurrence of multistability and scale-invariant fluctuations mandates two important dynamical properties: Multistability arises in the presence of a subcritical Hopf bifurcation, which generates co-existing attractors, whilst the introduction of multiplicative (state-dependent) noise ensures that as the system jumps between these attractors, fluctuations remain in constant proportion to their mean and their temporal statistics become long-tailed. The simple algebraic construction of this model affords a systematic analysis of the contribution of stochastic and nonlinear processes to cortical rhythms, complementing a recently proposed biophysical model. Similar dynamics also occur in a kinetic model of gene regulation, suggesting universality across a broad class of biological phenomena. PMID:22912567

  12. Apparent Low-Energy Scale Invariance in Two-Dimensional Fermi Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Edward

    2013-05-01

    Strongly-interacting systems in two dimensions have occupied a central position in the study of quantum materials. From high temperature superconductors to the Hall effect in two-dimensional electron gases, strong quantum and thermal fluctuations conspire to make this an extremely rich yet poorly-understood regime to work in. Several remarkable and surprising recent experiments in ultracold atomic gases show us that there are puzzles to be understood even in the simplest nontrivial two-dimensional system: a dilute quantum gas with strong s-wave interactions. Amongst these is an experiment that finds an undamped breathing mode oscillating at twice the trap frequency over a wide range of parameters, behaviour nominally associated with scale invariance, even though scale invariance is strictly broken in this system by a finite s-wave scattering length. This apparent scale symmetry is all the more remarkable given that the mean-field BCS theory for the 2D gas predicts an exact low-energy scale invariance, relevant to the low-energy breathing mode, meaning that only quantum and thermal fluctuations can break this low-energy scale symmetry. Understanding why the symmetry breaking is so weak may give insight into how to make reliable theoretical predictions in systems with strong fluctuation effects, where there is no obvious small parameter from which a perturbation expansion can be formulated. Supported by NSF Grant No. DMR-1006532 (Mohit Randeria), NSERC, and the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research.

  13. Scale-invariant hidden local symmetry, topology change, and dense baryonic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paeng, Won-Gi; Kuo, Thomas T. S.; Lee, Hyun Kyu; Rho, Mannque

    2016-05-01

    When scale symmetry is implemented into hidden local symmetry in low-energy strong interactions to arrive at a scale-invariant hidden local symmetric (HLS) theory, the scalar f0(500 ) may be interpreted as pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone (pNG) boson, i.e., dilaton, of spontaneously broken scale invariance, joining the pseudoscalar pNG bosons π and the matter fields V =(ρ ,ω ) as relevant degrees of freedom. Implementing the skyrmion-half-skyrmion transition predicted at large Nc in QCD at a density roughly twice the nuclear matter density found in the crystal simulation of dense skyrmion matter, we determine the intrinsically density-dependent "bare parameters" of the scale-invariant HLS Lagrangian matched to QCD at a matching scale ΛM. The resulting effective Lagrangian, with the parameters scaling with the density of the system, is applied to nuclear matter and dense baryonic matter relevant to massive compact stars by means of the double-decimation renormalization-group Vlow k formalism. We satisfactorily postdict the properties of normal nuclear matter and more significantly predict the equation of state of dense compact-star matter that quantitatively accounts for the presently available data coming from both the terrestrial and space laboratories. We interpret the resulting structure of compact-star matter as revealing how the combination of hidden-scale symmetry and hidden local symmetry manifests itself in compressed baryonic matter.

  14. How noise contributes to time-scale invariance of interval timing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oprisan, Sorinel A.; Buhusi, Catalin V.

    2013-05-01

    Time perception in the suprasecond range is crucial for fundamental cognitive processes such as decision making, rate calculation, and planning. In the vast majority of species, behavioral manipulations, and neurophysiological manipulations, interval timing is scale invariant: the time-estimation errors are proportional to the estimated duration. The origin and mechanisms of this fundamental property are unknown. We discuss the computational properties of a circuit consisting of a large number of (input) neural oscillators projecting on a small number of (output) coincidence detector neurons, which allows time to be coded by the pattern of coincidental activation of its inputs. We show that time-scale invariance emerges from the neural noise, such as small fluctuations in the firing patterns of its input neurons and in the errors with which information is encoded and retrieved by its output neurons. In this architecture, time-scale invariance is resistant to manipulations as it depends neither on the details of the input population nor on the distribution probability of noise.

  15. Evidence of Discrete Scale Invariance in DLA and Time-to-Failure by Canonical Averaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansen, A.; Sornette, D.

    Discrete scale invariance, which corresponds to a partial breaking of the scaling symmetry, is reflected in the existence of a hierarchy of characteristic scales l0,l0λ,l0λ2,…, where λ is a preferred scaling ratio and l0 a microscopic cut-off. Signatures of discrete scale invariance have recently been found in a variety of systems ranging from rupture, earthquakes, Laplacian growth phenomena, "animals" in percolation to financial market crashes. We believe it to be a quite general, albeit subtle phenomenon. Indeed, the practical problem in uncovering an underlying discrete scale invariance is that standard ensemble averaging procedures destroy it as if it was pure noise. This is due to the fact, that while λ only depends on the underlying physics, l0 on the contrary is realization-dependent. Here, we adapt and implement a novel so-called "canonical" averaging scheme which re-sets the l0 of different realizations to approximately the same value. The method is based on the determination of a realization-dependent effective critical point obtained from, e.g., a maximum susceptibility criterion. We demonstrate the method on diffusion limited aggregation and a model of rupture.

  16. Scale-invariance of sediment patterns - the fingerprint of fundamental drivers (Jean Baptiste Lamarck Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlager, Wolfgang

    2015-04-01

    In contrast to the realms of magmatism and metamorphism, most depositional processes can be observed directly at the earth's surface. Observation of sediment patterns advanced significantly with the advent of remote sensing and 3D reflection seismics. Remote sensing is particularly relevant for the present topic because it documents mainly Holocene sediments - the best objects to link depositional processes to products. Classic examples of scale-invariant geometry are channel-fan systems, i.e. river-delta and canyon-fan complexes. The underlying control in both instances is the energy-dispersion of a channeled stream of water that discharges in a body of still water. The resulting fan-shaped sediment accumulations are scale-invariant over 7 orders of magnitude in linear size. The Mesozoic-Cenozoic record shows comparable trends and patterns. Further examples of depositional scale-invariance include foresets of non-cohesive sediments and braided-channel deposits. Reefs and carbonate platforms offer an example of scale-invariance related to biotic growth. Shallow-water carbonate platforms rimmed by reefs or reef-rimmed atolls with deep lagoons are characteristic morphologies of tropical carbonate deposits. The structure has been compared to a bucket where stiff reef rims hold a pile of loose sediment. Remote sensing data from the Maldive, Chagos and Laccadive archipelagos of the Indian Ocean show that bucket structures are the dominant depositional pattern from meter-size reefs to archipelagos of hundreds of kilometers in diameter, i.e. over more than 4 orders of magnitude in linear size. Over 2.5 orders of magnitude, the bucket structures qualify as statistical fractals. Ecologic and hydrodynamic studies on modern reefs suggest that the bucket structure is a form of biotic self-organization: The edge position in a reef is favored over the center position because bottom shear is higher and the diffusive boundary layer between reef and water thinner. Thus, the reef

  17. Euclidean M-theory background dual to a three-dimensional scale-invariant field theory without conformal invariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Yu

    2017-02-01

    We show that 11-dimensional supergravity in Euclidean signature admits an exact classical solution with isometry corresponding to a three-dimensional scale-invariant field theory without conformal invariance. We also construct the holographic renormalization group flow that connects the known UV conformal fixed point and the new scale-invariant but not conformal fixed point. In view of holography, the existence of such classical solutions suggests that the topologically twisted M2-brane gauge theory possesses a scale-invariant but not conformal phase.

  18. Determination of scale invariance in random-matrix spectral fluctuations without unfolding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Vargas, G.; Fossion, R.; Tapia-Ignacio, C.; López-Vieyra, J. C.

    2017-07-01

    We apply the singular value decomposition (SVD) method, based on normal-mode analysis, to decompose the spectra of finite random matrices of standard Gaussian ensembles in trend and fluctuation modes. We use the fact that the fluctuation modes are scale invariant and follow a power law, to characterize the transition between the extreme regular and chaotic cases. Thereby, we quantify the quantum chaos in systems described by random matrix theory in a direct way, without performing any previous unfolding procedure, and therefore, avoiding possible artifacts.

  19. Scale invariance of shallow seismicity and the prognostic signatures of earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stakhovsky, I. R.

    2017-08-01

    The results of seismic investigations based on methods of the theory of nonequilibrium processes and self-similarity theory have shown that a shallow earthquake can be treated as a critical transition that occurs during the evolution of a non-equilibrium seismogenic system and is preceded by phenomena such as the scale invariance of spatiotemporal seismic structures. The implication is that seismicity can be interpreted as a purely multifractal process. Modeling the focal domain as a fractal cluster of microcracks allows formulating the prognostic signatures of earthquakes actually observed in seismic data. Seismic scaling permits monitoring the state of a seismogenic system as it approaches instability.

  20. Testing for scale-invariance in extreme events, with application to earthquake occurrence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Main, I.; Naylor, M.; Greenhough, J.; Touati, S.; Bell, A.; McCloskey, J.

    2009-04-01

    We address the generic problem of testing for scale-invariance in extreme events, i.e. are the biggest events in a population simply a scaled model of those of smaller size, or are they in some way different? Are large earthquakes for example ‘characteristic', do they ‘know' how big they will be before the event nucleates, or is the size of the event determined only in the avalanche-like process of rupture? In either case what are the implications for estimates of time-dependent seismic hazard? One way of testing for departures from scale invariance is to examine the frequency-size statistics, commonly used as a bench mark in a number of applications in Earth and Environmental sciences. Using frequency data however introduces a number of problems in data analysis. The inevitably small number of data points for extreme events and more generally the non-Gaussian statistical properties strongly affect the validity of prior assumptions about the nature of uncertainties in the data. The simple use of traditional least squares (still common in the literature) introduces an inherent bias to the best fit result. We show first that the sampled frequency in finite real and synthetic data sets (the latter based on the Epidemic-Type Aftershock Sequence model) converge to a central limit only very slowly due to temporal correlations in the data. A specific correction for temporal correlations enables an estimate of convergence properties to be mapped non-linearly on to a Gaussian one. Uncertainties closely follow a Poisson distribution of errors across the whole range of seismic moment for typical catalogue sizes. In this sense the confidence limits are scale-invariant. A systematic sample bias effect due to counting whole numbers in a finite catalogue makes a ‘characteristic'-looking type extreme event distribution a likely outcome of an underlying scale-invariant probability distribution. This highlights the tendency of ‘eyeball' fits unconsciously (but wrongly in

  1. Scale-Invariant Sparse PCA on High Dimensional Meta-elliptical Data.

    PubMed

    Han, Fang; Liu, Han

    2014-01-01

    We propose a semiparametric method for conducting scale-invariant sparse principal component analysis (PCA) on high dimensional non-Gaussian data. Compared with sparse PCA, our method has weaker modeling assumption and is more robust to possible data contamination. Theoretically, the proposed method achieves a parametric rate of convergence in estimating the parameter of interests under a flexible semiparametric distribution family; Computationally, the proposed method exploits a rank-based procedure and is as efficient as sparse PCA; Empirically, our method outperforms most competing methods on both synthetic and real-world datasets.

  2. Conservation law for massive scale-invariant photons in Weyl-invariant gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Aradhya; Abhinav, Kumar; Panigrahi, Prasanta K.

    2016-12-01

    It is demonstrated that a Stückelberg-type gauge theory, coupled to the scalar-tensor theory of gravity, is invariant under both gauge and Weyl transformations. Unlike the pure Stückelberg theory, this coupled Lagrangian has a genuine Weyl symmetry, with a non-vanishing current. The above is true in the Jordan frame, whereas in the Einstein frame, the same theory manifests as Proca theory in presence of pure gravity. It is found that broken scale invariance leads to simultaneous spontaneous breaking of the gauge symmetry.

  3. Geometrically robust image watermarking using scale-invariant feature transform and Zernike moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Leida; Guo, Baolong; Shao, Kai

    2007-06-01

    In order to resist geometric attacks, a robust image watermarking algorithm is proposed using scale-invariant feature transform (SIFT) and Zernike moments. As SIFT features are invariant to rotation and scaling, we employ SIFT to extract feature points. Then circular patches are generated using the most robust points. An invariant watermark is generated from each circular patch based on Zernike moments. The watermark is embedded into multiple patches for resisting locally cropping attacks. Experimental results show that the proposed scheme is robust to both geometric attacks and signal processing attacks.

  4. A self-recalibration method based on scale-invariant registration for structured light measurement systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Rui; Xu, Jing; Zhang, Song; Chen, Heping; Guan, Yong; Chen, Ken

    2017-01-01

    The accuracy of structured light measurement depends on delicate offline calibration. However, in some practical applications, the system is supposed to be reconfigured so frequently to track the target that an online calibration is required. To this end, this paper proposes a rapid and autonomous self-recalibration method. For the proposed method, first, the rotation matrix and the normalized translation vector are attained from the fundamental matrix; second, the scale factor is acquired based on scale-invariant registration such that the actual translation vector is obtained. Experiments have been conducted to verify the effectiveness of our proposed method and the results indicate a high degree of accuracy.

  5. Scale-invariant Cosmology and CMB Temperatures as a Function of Redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeder, Andre

    2017-09-01

    Cosmological models assuming the scale invariance of the macroscopic empty space show an accelerated expansion, without calling for some unknown particles. Several comparisons between models and observations (tests on distances, m‑z diagram, {{{Ω }}}{{Λ }} versus {{{Ω }}}{{m}} plot, age versus H 0, H(z) versus z, transition braking-acceleration) have indicated an impressive agreement. We pursue the tests with the CMB temperatures {T}{CMB} as a function of redshifts z. CO molecules in DLA systems provide the most accurate excitation temperatures {T}{exc} up to z≈ 2.7. Such data need corrections for local effects like particle collisions, optical depths, UV radiation, etc., We estimate these corrections as a function of the ({CO}/{{{H}}}2) ratios from far-UV observations of CO molecules in the Galaxy. The results show that it is not sufficient to apply theoretical collisional corrections to get the proper values of {T}{CMB} versus z. Thus, the agreement often found with the standard model may be questioned. The {T}{CMB}(z) relation needs further careful attention and the same for the scale-invariant cosmology in view of its positive tests.

  6. Irregular spiking of pyramidal neurons organizes as scale-invariant neuronal avalanches in the awake state

    PubMed Central

    Bellay, Timothy; Klaus, Andreas; Seshadri, Saurav; Plenz, Dietmar

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous fluctuations in neuronal activity emerge at many spatial and temporal scales in cortex. Population measures found these fluctuations to organize as scale-invariant neuronal avalanches, suggesting cortical dynamics to be critical. Macroscopic dynamics, though, depend on physiological states and are ambiguous as to their cellular composition, spatiotemporal origin, and contributions from synaptic input or action potential (AP) output. Here, we study spontaneous firing in pyramidal neurons (PNs) from rat superficial cortical layers in vivo and in vitro using 2-photon imaging. As the animal transitions from the anesthetized to awake state, spontaneous single neuron firing increases in irregularity and assembles into scale-invariant avalanches at the group level. In vitro spike avalanches emerged naturally yet required balanced excitation and inhibition. This demonstrates that neuronal avalanches are linked to the global physiological state of wakefulness and that cortical resting activity organizes as avalanches from firing of local PN groups to global population activity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07224.001 PMID:26151674

  7. Dimensionless, Scale Invariant, Edge Weight Metric for the Study of Complex Structural Networks.

    PubMed

    Colon-Perez, Luis M; Spindler, Caitlin; Goicochea, Shelby; Triplett, William; Parekh, Mansi; Montie, Eric; Carney, Paul R; Price, Catherine; Mareci, Thomas H

    2015-01-01

    High spatial and angular resolution diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) with network analysis provides a unique framework for the study of brain structure in vivo. DWI-derived brain connectivity patterns are best characterized with graph theory using an edge weight to quantify the strength of white matter connections between gray matter nodes. Here a dimensionless, scale-invariant edge weight is introduced to measure node connectivity. This edge weight metric provides reasonable and consistent values over any size scale (e.g. rodents to humans) used to quantify the strength of connection. Firstly, simulations were used to assess the effects of tractography seed point density and random errors in the estimated fiber orientations; with sufficient signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), edge weight estimates improve as the seed density increases. Secondly to evaluate the application of the edge weight in the human brain, ten repeated measures of DWI in the same healthy human subject were analyzed. Mean edge weight values within the cingulum and corpus callosum were consistent and showed low variability. Thirdly, using excised rat brains to study the effects of spatial resolution, the weight of edges connecting major structures in the temporal lobe were used to characterize connectivity in this local network. The results indicate that with adequate resolution and SNR, connections between network nodes are characterized well by this edge weight metric. Therefore this new dimensionless, scale-invariant edge weight metric provides a robust measure of network connectivity that can be applied in any size regime.

  8. A scale-invariant cellular-automata model for distributed seismicity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barriere, Benoit; Turcotte, Donald L.

    1991-01-01

    In the standard cellular-automata model for a fault an element of stress is randomly added to a grid of boxes until a box has four elements, these are then redistributed to the adjacent boxes on the grid. The redistribution can result in one or more of these boxes having four or more elements in which case further redistributions are required. On the average added elements are lost from the edges of the grid. The model is modified so that the boxes have a scale-invariant distribution of sizes. The objective is to model a scale-invariant distribution of fault sizes. When a redistribution from a box occurs it is equivalent to a characteristic earthquake on the fault. A redistribution from a small box (a foreshock) can trigger an instability in a large box (the main shock). A redistribution from a large box always triggers many instabilities in the smaller boxes (aftershocks). The frequency-size statistics for both main shocks and aftershocks satisfy the Gutenberg-Richter relation with b = 0.835 for main shocks and b = 0.635 for aftershocks. Model foreshocks occur 28 percent of the time.

  9. The pseudo-conformal universe: scale invariance from spontaneous breaking of conformal symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Hinterbichler, Kurt; Khoury, Justin E-mail: jkhoury@sas.upenn.edu

    2012-04-01

    We present a novel theory of the very early universe which addresses the traditional horizon and flatness problems of big bang cosmology and predicts a scale invariant spectrum of perturbations. Unlike inflation, this scenario requires no exponential accelerated expansion of space-time. Instead, the early universe is described by a conformal field theory minimally coupled to gravity. The conformal fields develop a time-dependent expectation value which breaks the flat space so(4,2) conformal symmetry down to so(4,1), the symmetries of de Sitter, giving perturbations a scale invariant spectrum. The solution is an attractor, at least in the case of a single time-dependent field. Meanwhile, the metric background remains approximately flat but slowly contracts, which makes the universe increasingly flat, homogeneous and isotropic, akin to the smoothing mechanism of ekpyrotic cosmology. Our scenario is very general, requiring only a conformal field theory capable of developing the appropriate time-dependent expectation values, and encompasses existing incarnations of this idea, specifically the U(1) model of Rubakov and the Galileon Genesis scenario. Its essential features depend only on the symmetry breaking pattern and not on the details of the underlying lagrangian. It makes generic observational predictions that make it potentially distinguishable from standard inflation, in particular significant non-gaussianities and the absence of primordial gravitational waves.

  10. Dimensionless, Scale Invariant, Edge Weight Metric for the Study of Complex Structural Networks

    PubMed Central

    Colon-Perez, Luis M.; Spindler, Caitlin; Goicochea, Shelby; Triplett, William; Parekh, Mansi; Montie, Eric; Carney, Paul R.; Price, Catherine; Mareci, Thomas H.

    2015-01-01

    High spatial and angular resolution diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) with network analysis provides a unique framework for the study of brain structure in vivo. DWI-derived brain connectivity patterns are best characterized with graph theory using an edge weight to quantify the strength of white matter connections between gray matter nodes. Here a dimensionless, scale-invariant edge weight is introduced to measure node connectivity. This edge weight metric provides reasonable and consistent values over any size scale (e.g. rodents to humans) used to quantify the strength of connection. Firstly, simulations were used to assess the effects of tractography seed point density and random errors in the estimated fiber orientations; with sufficient signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), edge weight estimates improve as the seed density increases. Secondly to evaluate the application of the edge weight in the human brain, ten repeated measures of DWI in the same healthy human subject were analyzed. Mean edge weight values within the cingulum and corpus callosum were consistent and showed low variability. Thirdly, using excised rat brains to study the effects of spatial resolution, the weight of edges connecting major structures in the temporal lobe were used to characterize connectivity in this local network. The results indicate that with adequate resolution and SNR, connections between network nodes are characterized well by this edge weight metric. Therefore this new dimensionless, scale-invariant edge weight metric provides a robust measure of network connectivity that can be applied in any size regime. PMID:26173147

  11. Exact Scale Invariance in Mixing of Binary Candidates in Voting Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Shintaro; Hisakado, Masato

    2010-03-01

    We introduce a voting model and discuss the scale invariance in the mixing of candidates. The Candidates are classified into two categories μ\\in \\{0,1\\} and are called as “binary” candidates. There are in total N=N0+N1 candidates, and voters vote for them one by one. The probability that a candidate gets a vote is proportional to the number of votes. The initial number of votes (“seed”) of a candidate μ is set to be sμ. After infinite counts of voting, the probability function of the share of votes of the candidate μ obeys gamma distributions with the shape exponent sμ in the thermodynamic limit Z0=N1s1+N0s0\\to ∞. Between the cumulative functions \\{xμ\\} of binary candidates, the power-law relation 1-x1 ˜ (1-x0)α with the critical exponent α=s1/s0 holds in the region 1-x0,1-x1≪ 1. In the double scaling limit (s1,s0)\\to (0,0) and Z0 \\to ∞ with s1/s0=α fixed, the relation 1-x1=(1-x0)α holds exactly over the entire range 0≤ x0,x1 ≤ 1. We study the data on horse races obtained from the Japan Racing Association for the period 1986 to 2006 and confirm scale invariance.

  12. Asymptotic solutions in asymptotic safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Martin, Sergio; Morris, Tim R.; Slade, Zoë H.

    2017-05-01

    We explain how to find the asymptotic form of fixed point solutions in functional truncations, in particular f (R ) approximations. We find that quantum fluctuations do not decouple at large R , typically leading to elaborate asymptotic solutions containing several free parameters. By a counting argument, these can be used to map out the dimension of the fixed point solution spaces. They are also necessary to validate the numerical solution and provide the physical part in the limit that the cutoff is removed: the fixed point equation of state. As an example, we apply the techniques to a recent f (R ) approximation by Demmel et al., finding asymptotic matches to their numerical solution. Depending on the value of the endomorphism parameter, we find many other asymptotic solutions and fixed point solution spaces of differing dimensions, yielding several alternative scenarios for the equation of state. Asymptotic studies of other f (R ) approximations are needed to clarify the picture.

  13. Real-time object tracking based on scale-invariant features employing bio-inspired hardware.

    PubMed

    Yasukawa, Shinsuke; Okuno, Hirotsugu; Ishii, Kazuo; Yagi, Tetsuya

    2016-09-01

    We developed a vision sensor system that performs a scale-invariant feature transform (SIFT) in real time. To apply the SIFT algorithm efficiently, we focus on a two-fold process performed by the visual system: whole-image parallel filtering and frequency-band parallel processing. The vision sensor system comprises an active pixel sensor, a metal-oxide semiconductor (MOS)-based resistive network, a field-programmable gate array (FPGA), and a digital computer. We employed the MOS-based resistive network for instantaneous spatial filtering and a configurable filter size. The FPGA is used to pipeline process the frequency-band signals. The proposed system was evaluated by tracking the feature points detected on an object in a video. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Dark matter from a classically scale-invariant S U (3 )X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karam, Alexandros; Tamvakis, Kyriakos

    2016-09-01

    In this work we study a classically scale-invariant extension of the Standard Model in which the dark matter and electroweak scales are generated through the Coleman-Weinberg mechanism. The extra S U (3 )X gauge factor gets completely broken by the vacuum expectation values of two scalar triplets. Out of the eight resulting massive vector bosons the three lightest are stable due to an intrinsic Z2×Z2' discrete symmetry and can constitute dark matter candidates. We analyze the phenomenological viability of the predicted multi-Higgs sector imposing theoretical and experimental constraints. We perform a comprehensive analysis of the dark matter predictions of the model solving numerically the set of coupled Boltzmann equations involving all relevant dark matter processes and explore the direct detection prospects of the dark matter candidates.

  15. Do joint CMB and HST data support a scale invariant spectrum?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benetti, Micol; Graef, Leila L.; Alcaniz, Jailson S.

    2017-04-01

    We combine current measurements of the local expansion rate, H0, and Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN) estimates of helium abundance with the latest cosmic microwave background (CMB) data from the Planck Collaboration to discuss the observational viability of the scale invariant Harrison-Zeldovch-Peebles (HZP) spectrum. We also analyze some of its extensions, namely, HZP + YP and HZP + Neff, where YP is the primordial helium mass fraction and Neff is the effective number of relativistic degrees of freedom. We perform a Bayesian analysis and show that the latter model is favored with respect to the standard cosmology for values of Neff lying in the interval 3.70 ± 0.13 (1σ), which is currently allowed by some independent analyses.

  16. Scale invariance of continuum size distribution upon irreversible growth of surface islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubrovskii, V. G.; Sokolova, Zh. V.

    2015-06-01

    The continuum kinetic equation for irreversible heterogeneous growth of a surface island is ana-lyzed given a special form of the dependence of capture coefficient σ on size s and coverage of the surface Θ. It is shown that, if σ( s, Θ) = α(Θ)( a + s)β, the function α(Θ) is arbitrary, and 0 ≤ β ≤ 1, then the solutions of the continuum equation of the first order satisfy the hypothesis about the scale invariance of the size distribu-tion (scaling) in a single exceptional case—at ≤ = 1. The obtained results testify about the presence of a fun-damental relation of the scaling and linearity of the dependence σ( s). Problems about associations of distri-bution functions in continuum and discrete growth models and about application of the obtained solutions for modeling and interpretation of experimental data in different systems are discussed.

  17. Retinal Identification Based on an Improved Circular Gabor Filter and Scale Invariant Feature Transform

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Xianjing; Yin, Yilong; Yang, Gongping; Xi, Xiaoming

    2013-01-01

    Retinal identification based on retinal vasculatures in the retina provides the most secure and accurate means of authentication among biometrics and has primarily been used in combination with access control systems at high security facilities. Recently, there has been much interest in retina identification. As digital retina images always suffer from deformations, the Scale Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT), which is known for its distinctiveness and invariance for scale and rotation, has been introduced to retinal based identification. However, some shortcomings like the difficulty of feature extraction and mismatching exist in SIFT-based identification. To solve these problems, a novel preprocessing method based on the Improved Circular Gabor Transform (ICGF) is proposed. After further processing by the iterated spatial anisotropic smooth method, the number of uninformative SIFT keypoints is decreased dramatically. Tested on the VARIA and eight simulated retina databases combining rotation and scaling, the developed method presents promising results and shows robustness to rotations and scale changes. PMID:23873409

  18. Pumping-induced leakage in a bounded aquifer: An example of a scale-invariant phenomenon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Butler, J.J.; Tsou, M.-S.

    2003-01-01

    A new approach is presented for calculation of the volume of pumping-induced leakage entering an aquifer as a function of time. This approach simplifies the total leakage calculation by extending analytical-based methods developed for infinite systems to bounded aquifers of any size. The simplification is possible because of the relationship between drawdown and leakage in aquifers laterally bounded by impermeable formations. This relationship produces a scale-invariant total leakage; i.e., the volume of leakage as a function of time does not change with the size of the aquifer or with the location of the pumping well. Two examples and image well theory are used to demonstrate and prove, respectively, the generality of this interesting phenomenon.

  19. Automated Image Retrieval of Chest CT Images Based on Local Grey Scale Invariant Features.

    PubMed

    Arrais Porto, Marcelo; Cordeiro d'Ornellas, Marcos

    2015-01-01

    Textual-based tools are regularly employed to retrieve medical images for reading and interpretation using current retrieval Picture Archiving and Communication Systems (PACS) but pose some drawbacks. All-purpose content-based image retrieval (CBIR) systems are limited when dealing with medical images and do not fit well into PACS workflow and clinical practice. This paper presents an automated image retrieval approach for chest CT images based local grey scale invariant features from a local database. Performance was measured in terms of precision and recall, average retrieval precision (ARP), and average retrieval rate (ARR). Preliminary results have shown the effectiveness of the proposed approach. The prototype is also a useful tool for radiology research and education, providing valuable information to the medical and broader healthcare community.

  20. SUPERFLUID VORTEX UNPINNING AS A COHERENT NOISE PROCESS, AND THE SCALE INVARIANCE OF PULSAR GLITCHES

    SciTech Connect

    Melatos, A.; Warszawski, L.

    2009-08-01

    The scale-invariant glitch statistics observed in individual pulsars (exponential waiting-time and power-law size distributions) are consistent with a critical self-organization process, wherein superfluid vortices pin metastably in macroscopic domains and unpin collectively via nearest-neighbor avalanches. Macroscopic inhomogeneity emerges naturally if pinning occurs at crustal faults. If, instead, pinning occurs at lattice sites and defects, which are macroscopically homogeneous, we show that an alternative, noncritical self-organization process operates, termed coherent noise, wherein the global Magnus force acts uniformly on vortices trapped in a range of pinning potentials and undergoing thermal creep. It is found that vortices again unpin collectively, but not via nearest-neighbor avalanches, and that, counterintuitively, the resulting glitch sizes are scale invariant, in accord with observational data. A mean-field analytic theory of the coherent noise process, supported by Monte Carlo simulations, yields a power-law size distribution, between the smallest and largest glitch, with exponent a in the range -2 {<=} a {<=} 0. When the theory is fitted to data from the nine most active pulsars, including the two quasi-periodic glitchers PSR J0537-6910 and PSR J0835-4510, it directly constrains the distribution of pinning potentials in the star, leading to two conclusions: (1) the potentials are broadly distributed, with the mean comparable to the standard deviation; and (2) the mean potential decreases with characteristic age. Fitting the theory to the data also constrains the pinned vortex fraction and the rate of thermal creep. An observational test is proposed to discriminate between nearest-neighbor avalanches and coherent noise: the latter process predicts a statistical excess of large glitches ('aftershocks') following a large glitch, whereas the former process does not. Its discriminatory power is discussed under various microphysical scenarios.

  1. New physics at the weak scale: axigluon models, scale invariance and naturalness, and interacting dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavares, Gustavo Marques

    The Standard Model of particle physics describes all known elementary particles and their interactions. Despite its great experimental success, we know that the Standard Model is not a complete description of Nature and therefore new phenomena should be observed at higher energies. In the coming years the Large Hadron Collider will test the Standard Model by colliding protons with center of mass energies of up to 14 TeV providing some of the most stringent tests on the Standard Model. Experimental searches for Dark Matter provide a complementary program to test physics at the weak scale. In the near future new experimental data coming from direct detection experiments, and from satellites and telescopes will drastically improve our sensitivity to weak scale dark matter. This could lead to the first direct observation of dark matter, and thus of physics beyond the Standard Model. In this thesis I propose different extensions of the Standard Model and discuss their experimental consequences. I first discuss models for Axigluons, which are spin one particles in the adjoint representation of the SU(3) color gauge group. These models were motivated by the measurement of higher than predicted forward-backward asymmetry in top quark pair production at the Tevatron. I study different scenarios for Axigluon models that can explain the Tevatron result and explore their signatures at the Large Hadron Collider. Second I discuss the implications of ultraviolet scale invariance for the Standard Model, which has been advocated as a solution to the hierarchy problem. I show that in order to solve the hierarchy problem with scale invariance, new physics is required not far from the weak scale. In the last part of this thesis I propose a new model for dark matter, in which dark matter is charged under a hidden non-Abelian gauge group. This leads to modifications in the sensitivity of the usual experimental searches for dark matter in addition to distinct signatures in the Cosmic

  2. Scale invariance properties of the peak of the width function in topologically random networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agnese, Carmelo; Criminisi, Antonio; D'Asaro, Francesco

    Some scaling properties of the topological width function for an infinite population of networks obeying the random model are analyzed. A Monte Carlo procedure is applied to generate width functions according to the hypothesis of topological randomness. The probability distributions of both peak and distance to peak of the topological width functions, conditioned (1) on the network diameter λ and (2) on λ and parameter β=[log(2μ-1)]/logλ, are studied. The parameter β can be considered a shape factor of the network; indeed, low β values describe elongated networks, while high β values refer to fan-like networks. Scale invariance for both random variables is established in the first case by using λ as a scale parameter. Also in the second case, scale invariance is observed for both the peak and the distance to peak of the topological width function; in particular, the invariance property for the peak involves a scaling function which is directly related to the shape factor β, allowing determination of the statistical similarity between random networks indexed by the same β. Then, a coarse-graining procedure is applied to a set of 15,000 width functions with λ=512 a scaling behavior of peaks of the original width function and aggregated ones is observed over a wide range of aggregation scales. Consequently, a statistical self-similarity for the peaks is also observed, which involved the same β-related scaling function. Finally, possible implication of the present results on the hydrologic response, at the basin scale, is discussed.

  3. Beyond Quasi-Geostrophic Turbulence: Generalized Scale Invariance and (2+Hz)-Dimensional Vorticity Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schertzer, D. J.; Tchiguirinskaia, I.; Lovejoy, S.; Tuck, A.

    2010-12-01

    We discuss the claim of Lindborg et al (2009) that the spectrum power law E(k)≈k-3 on scales ≥600 km obtained with the help of commercial jetliner trajectory deviations (GASP and Mozaic databases) could not be brought into question by Lovejoy et al (2009), because this spectrum corresponds to a “well known theory of quasi-geostrophic turbulence developed by Charney (1971)”. Lindborg, et al (2009) also argued that “earlier limitations [of this theory] would have been relaxed in many of the modern models of atmospheric turbulence”. We show that both these statements are irrelevant and that generalized scale invariance (GSI, Schertzer and Lovejoy 1985) is rather indispensable to go beyond the quasi-geostrophic limitations, to go in fact from scale analysis to scaling analysis. This enables us to derive dynamical equations for the vorticity in an embedding space of (fractional) dimension D=2+Hz (0≤ Hz ≤1, 1- Hz measures the scaling stratification of atmospheric turbulence). These equations correspond to an interesting dynamical alternative to quasi-geostrophic approximation and turbulence. References: Charney, J. G. (1971). "Geostrophic Turbulence." J. Atmos. Sci 28: 1087. Lindborg, E., K. K. Tung, G. D. Nastrom, J. Y. N. Cho and K. S. Gage (2009). "Comment on "Reinterpreting aircraft measurements in anisotropic scaling turbulence" by lovejoy et al. (2009)." Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss. 9: 22331-22336. Lovejoy, S., A. F. Tuck, D. Schertzer and S. J. Hovde (2009). "Rinterpreting aircraft measurements in anisotropic scaling turbulence." Atmos. Chem. Phys. 9: 5007-5025. Schertzer, D. and S. Lovejoy (1985). "Generalised scale invariance in turbulent phenomena." Physico-Chemical Hydrodynamics Journal 6: 623-635.

  4. Asymptotic eigenstructures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, P. M.; Stein, G.

    1980-01-01

    The behavior of the closed loop eigenstructure of a linear system with output feedback is analyzed as a single parameter multiplying the feedback gain is varied. An algorithm is presented that computes the asymptotically infinite eigenstructure, and it is shown how a system with high gain feedback decouples into single input single ouput systems. Then a synthesis algorithm is presented which uses full state feedback to achieve a desired asymptotic eigenstructure.

  5. Asymptotic Eigenstructures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, P. M.; Stein, G.

    1980-01-01

    The behavior of the closed loop eigenstructure of a linear system with output feedback is analyzed as a single parameter multiplying the feedback gain is varied. An algorithm is presented that computes the asymptotically infinite eigenstructure, and it is shown how a system with high gain, feedback decouples into single input, single output systems. Then a synthesis algorithm is presented which uses full state feedback to achieve a desired asymptotic eigenstructure.

  6. Explicit Adaptive Symplectic (Easy) Integrators: A Scaling Invariant Generalisation of the Levi-Civita and KS Regularisations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanes, Sergio; Budd, Chris J.

    2004-05-01

    We present a generalisation of the Levi-Civita and Kustaanheimo-Stiefel regularisation. This allows the use of more general time rescalings. In particular, it is possible to find a regularisation which removes the singularity of the equations and preserves scaling invariance. In addition, these equations can, in certain cases, be integrated with explicit symplectic Runge-Kutta-Nyström methods. The combination of both techniques gives an explicit adaptive symplectic (EASY) integrator. We apply those methods to some perturbations of the Kepler problem and illustrate, by means of some numerical examples, when scaling invariant regularisations are more efficient that the LC/KS regularisation.

  7. Local scale-invariance of the 2  +  1 dimensional Kardar–Parisi–Zhang model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelling, Jeffrey; Ódor, Géza; Gemming, Sibylle

    2017-03-01

    Local scale-invariance theory is tested by extensive dynamical simulations of the driven dimer lattice gas model, describing the surface growth of the 2  +  1 dimensional Kardar–Parisi–Zhang surfaces. Very precise measurements of the universal autoresponse function enabled us to perform nonlinear fitting with the scaling forms, suggested by local scale-invariance (LSI). While the simple LSI ansatz does not seem to work, forms based on logarithmic extension of LSI provide satisfactory description of the full (measured) time evolution of the autoresponse function.

  8. Is the applicability of fractal statistics to sedimentary structures the result of scale-invariant stochastic processes or deterministic chaos

    SciTech Connect

    Turcotte, D.L. )

    1991-03-01

    Fractal statistics are the only statistics that are scale invariant. Examples in tectonics include distributions of faults, displacements on faults, distributions and permeabilities of fractures, and distributions of folds. Many aspects of sedimentology are also fractal including distributions of sedimentary sequences, variations in permeability, and shapes of boundaries. Since the underlying processes are likely to be scale invariant, it is reasonable to conclude that the number-size statistics of oil fields will be fractal. Log-normal statistics are often applied; they are not scale invariant. Two explanations for fractal statistics can be given. They may be the result of scale-invariant stochastic processes. Random walk (Brownian noise) is one example. Topography generally resembles Brownian noise, a power-law spectrum with fractal dimension D = 1.5. Alternatively fractal statistics can be the result of deterministic chaos. Turbulent flows are examples of deterministic chaos, the governing equations are deterministic but the resulting flows are statistical. Tectonic displacements can be shown to be the result of deterministic chaos; it is likely that erosion is another example.

  9. Tsunami asymptotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, M. V.

    2005-01-01

    By applying the technique of uniform asymptotic approximation to the oscillatory integrals representing tsunami wave profiles, the form of the travelling wave far from the source is calculated for arbitrary initial disturbances. The approximations reproduce the entire profiles very accurately, from the front to the tail, and their numerical computation is much faster than that of the oscillatory integrals. For one-dimensional propagation, the uniform asymptotics involve Airy functions and their derivatives; for two-dimensional propagation, the uniform asymptotics involve products of these functions. Separate analyses are required when the initial disturbance is specified as surface elevation or surface velocity as functions of position, and when these functions are even or odd. 'There was an awful rainbow once in heaven' (John Keats, 1820)

  10. Improving scale invariant feature transform with local color contrastive descriptor for image classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Sheng; Huang, Weilin; Qiao, Yu

    2017-01-01

    Image representation and classification are two fundamental tasks toward version understanding. Shape and texture provide two key features for visual representation and have been widely exploited in a number of successful local descriptors, e.g., scale invariant feature transform (SIFT), local binary pattern descriptor, and histogram of oriented gradient. Unlike these gradient-based descriptors, this paper presents a simple yet efficient local descriptor, named local color contrastive descriptor (LCCD), which captures the contrastive aspects among local regions or color channels for image representation. LCCD is partly inspired by the neural science facts that color contrast plays important roles in visual perception and there exist strong linkages between color and shape. We leverage f-divergence as a robust measure to estimate the contrastive features between different spatial locations and multiple channels. Our descriptor enriches local image representation with both color and contrast information. Due to that LCCD does not explore any gradient information, individual LCCD does not yield strong performance. But we verified experimentally that LCCD can compensate strongly SIFT. Extensive experimental results on image classification show that our descriptor improves the performance of SIFT substantially by combination on three challenging benchmarks, including MIT Indoor-67 database, SUN397, and PASCAL VOC 2007.

  11. Robust FFT-based scale-invariant image registration with image gradients.

    PubMed

    Tzimiropoulos, Georgios; Argyriou, Vasileios; Zafeiriou, Stefanos; Stathaki, Tania

    2010-10-01

    We present a robust FFT-based approach to scale-invariant image registration. Our method relies on FFT-based correlation twice: once in the log-polar Fourier domain to estimate the scaling and rotation and once in the spatial domain to recover the residual translation. Previous methods based on the same principles are not robust. To equip our scheme with robustness and accuracy, we introduce modifications which tailor the method to the nature of images. First, we derive efficient log-polar Fourier representations by replacing image functions with complex gray-level edge maps. We show that this representation both captures the structure of salient image features and circumvents problems related to the low-pass nature of images, interpolation errors, border effects, and aliasing. Second, to recover the unknown parameters, we introduce the normalized gradient correlation. We show that, using image gradients to perform correlation, the errors induced by outliers are mapped to a uniform distribution for which our normalized gradient correlation features robust performance. Exhaustive experimentation with real images showed that, unlike any other Fourier-based correlation techniques, the proposed method was able to estimate translations, arbitrary rotations, and scale factors up to 6.

  12. Scale Invariant Feature Transform Technique for Weed Classification in Oil Palm Plantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawari Ghazali, Kamarul; Marzuki Mustafa, Mohd.; Hussain, Aini; Razali, Saifudin

    This study presents a new and robust technique using Scale Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT) for weed classification in oil palm plantation. The proposed SIFT classification technique was developed to overcome problem in real application of image processing such as varies of lighting densities, resolution and target range which contributed to classification accuracy. In this study, SIFT classification algorithm is used to extract a set of feature vectors to represent the input image. The set of feature vectors then can be used to classify weed. In general, the weeds can be classified as either broad or narrow. Based on this classification, a decision will be made to control the strategy of weed infestation in oil palm plantations. The effectiveness of the robust SIFT technique has been tested offline where the input images were captured under varies conditions such as different lighting effects, ambiguity resolution values, variable range of object and many sizes of weed which simulate the actual field conditions. The proposed SIFT resulted in over 95.7% accuracy of classification of weed in palm oil plantation.

  13. Discriminative phenomenological features of scale invariant models for electroweak symmetry breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashino, Katsuya; Kanemura, Shinya; Orikasa, Yuta

    2016-01-01

    Classical scale invariance (CSI) may be one of the solutions for the hierarchy problem. Realistic models for electroweak symmetry breaking based on CSI require extended scalar sectors without mass terms, and the electroweak symmetry is broken dynamically at the quantum level by the Coleman-Weinberg mechanism. We discuss discriminative features of these models. First, using the experimental value of the mass of the discovered Higgs boson h (125), we obtain an upper bound on the mass of the lightest additional scalar boson (≃ 543 GeV), which does not depend on its isospin and hypercharge. Second, a discriminative prediction on the Higgs-photon-photon coupling is given as a function of the number of charged scalar bosons, by which we can narrow down possible models using current and future data for the di-photon decay of h (125). Finally, for the triple Higgs boson coupling a large deviation (∼ + 70%) from the SM prediction is universally predicted, which is independent of masses, quantum numbers and even the number of additional scalars. These models based on CSI can be well tested at LHC Run II and at future lepton colliders.

  14. Possibility Study of Scale Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT) Algorithm Application to Spine Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Hoon; Lee, Do-Wan; Han, Bong-Soo

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is an application of scale invariant feature transform (SIFT) algorithm to stitch the cervical-thoracic-lumbar (C-T-L) spine magnetic resonance (MR) images to provide a view of the entire spine in a single image. All MR images were acquired with fast spin echo (FSE) pulse sequence using two MR scanners (1.5 T and 3.0 T). The stitching procedures for each part of spine MR image were performed and implemented on a graphic user interface (GUI) configuration. Moreover, the stitching process is performed in two categories; manual point-to-point (mPTP) selection that performed by user specified corresponding matching points, and automated point-to-point (aPTP) selection that performed by SIFT algorithm. The stitched images using SIFT algorithm showed fine registered results and quantitatively acquired values also indicated little errors compared with commercially mounted stitching algorithm in MRI systems. Our study presented a preliminary validation of the SIFT algorithm application to MRI spine images, and the results indicated that the proposed approach can be performed well for the improvement of diagnosis. We believe that our approach can be helpful for the clinical application and extension of other medical imaging modalities for image stitching.

  15. Three-dimensional object tracking based on perspective scale invariant feature transform correspondences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei; Liang, Luming; Zhao, Yuelong; Chen, Shu

    2017-05-01

    Reconstructing three-dimensional (3-D) poses from matched feature correspondences is widely used in 3-D object tracking. The precision of correspondence matching plays a major role in the pose reconstruction. Without prior knowledge of the perspective camera model, state-of-the-art methods only deal with two-dimensional (2-D) planar affine transforms. An interest point's detector and descriptor [perspective scale invariant feature transform (SIFT)] is proposed to overcome the side effects of viewpoint changing, i.e., our detector is invariant to viewpoint changing. Perspective SIFT is detected by the SIFT approach, where the sample region is determined by projecting the original sample region to the image plane based on the established camera model. An iterative algorithm then modifies the pose of the tracked object and it generally converges to a 3-D perspective invariant point. The pose of the tracked object is finally estimated by the combination of template warping and perspective SIFT correspondences. Thorough evaluations are performed on two public databases, the Biwi Head Pose dataset and the Boston University dataset. Comparisons illustrate that the proposed keypoint's detector largely improves the tracking performance.

  16. Scale-invariance of receptive field properties in primary visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Teichert, Tobias; Wachtler, Thomas; Michler, Frank; Gail, Alexander; Eckhorn, Reinhard

    2007-06-11

    Our visual system enables us to recognize visual objects across a wide range of spatial scales. The neural mechanisms underlying these abilities are still poorly understood. Size- or scale-independent representation of visual objects might be supported by processing in primary visual cortex (V1). Neurons in V1 are selective for spatial frequency and thus represent visual information in specific spatial wavebands. We tested whether different receptive field properties of neurons in V1 scale with preferred spatial wavelength. Specifically, we investigated the size of the area that enhances responses, i.e., the grating summation field, the size of the inhibitory surround, and the distance dependence of signal coupling, i.e., the linking field. We found that the sizes of both grating summation field and inhibitory surround increase with preferred spatial wavelength. For the summation field this increase, however, is not strictly linear. No evidence was found that size of the linking field depends on preferred spatial wavelength. Our data show that some receptive field properties are related to preferred spatial wavelength. This speaks in favor of the hypothesis that processing in V1 supports scale-invariant aspects of visual performance. However, not all properties of receptive fields in V1 scale with preferred spatial wavelength. Spatial-wavelength independence of the linking field implies a constant spatial range of signal coupling between neurons with different preferred spatial wavelengths. This might be important for encoding extended broad-band visual features such as edges.

  17. Speckle-reducing scale-invariant feature transform match for synthetic aperture radar image registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xianmin; Li, Bo; Xu, Qizhi

    2016-07-01

    The anisotropic scale space (ASS) is often used to enhance the performance of a scale-invariant feature transform (SIFT) algorithm in the registration of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images. The existing ASS-based methods usually suffer from unstable keypoints and false matches, since the anisotropic diffusion filtering has limitations in reducing the speckle noise from SAR images while building the ASS image representation. We proposed a speckle reducing SIFT match method to obtain stable keypoints and acquire precise matches for the SAR image registration. First, the keypoints are detected in a speckle reducing anisotropic scale space constructed by the speckle reducing anisotropic diffusion, so that speckle noise is greatly reduced and prominent structures of the images are preserved, consequently the stable keypoints can be derived. Next, the probabilistic relaxation labeling approach is employed to establish the matches of the keypoints then the correct match rate of the keypoints is significantly increased. Experiments conducted on simulated speckled images and real SAR images demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  18. Physical Origins of Statistical Scale Invariance or Scaling in Peak Flows in Real River Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantilla, R.; Gupta, V. K.; Furey, P.

    2005-12-01

    For nearly forty years, regional flood frequency analyses in unnested and in nested basins have shown that annual peak-flow quantiles can be related to drainage areas as power laws that arise from the property of scale invariance. This empirical feature has instigated a basic hydrologic question: Can power laws be obtained from physical processes governing rainfall-runoff transformations on real channel networks? There has been steady progress in answering this question since 1990. A physical understanding of peak flow scaling requires the time scales of individual rainfall-runoff events as a first step before going to longer time scales. We have used data from two Agriculture Research Service (ARS) experimental basins in the United States to test the physical basis of scaling in peak flows. The first basin is Goodwin Creek in Mississippi (21 km2), and the second one is Walnut Gulch in Arizona (150 km2). We have tested the hypothesis that scaling parameters of individual flood events on Goodwin Creek vary from one event to the next due to the effect of temporal rainfall variability. On the Walnut Gulch, we have tested the hypothesis that scaling in peak flows for short duration rainfall events is controlled by the river network topological and geometric configuration and the downstream hydraulic-geometric properties. Based on these results we present a gauging strategy to investigate peak flow scaling in the 1100 km2 Whitewater basin in Kansas.

  19. Are galaxy distributions scale invariant? A perspective from dynamical systems theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCauley, J. L.

    2002-06-01

    Unless there is an evidence for fractal scaling with a single exponent over distances 0.1<=r<=100h-1Mpc, then the widely accepted notion of scale invariance of the correlation integral for 0.1<=r<=10h-1Mpc must be questioned. The attempt to extract a scaling exponent /ν from the correlation integral /n(r) by plotting /log(n(r)) vs. /log(r) is unreliable unless the underlying point set is approximately monofractal. The extraction of a spectrum of generalized dimensions νq from a plot of the correlation integral generating function Gn(q) by a similar procedure is probably an indication that Gn(q) does not scale at all. We explain these assertions after defining the term multifractal, mutually inconsistent definitions having been confused together in the cosmology literature. Part of this confusion is traced to the confusion in interpreting a measure-theoretic formula written down by Hentschel and Procaccia in the dynamical systems theory literature, while other errors follow from confusing together entirely different definitions of multifractal from two different schools of thought. Most important are serious errors in data analysis that follow from taking for granted a largest term approximation that is inevitably advertised in the literature on both fractals and dynamical systems theory.

  20. Naturalness of scale-invariant NMSSMs with and without extra matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binjonaid, Maien Y.; King, Stephen F.

    2014-09-01

    We present a comparative and systematic study of the fine-tuning in Higgs sectors in three scale-invariant next-to-minimal supersymmetric standard model (NMSSM) models: the first is the standard Z3-invariant NMSSM; the second is the NMSSM plus additional matter filling 3(5+5¯) representations of SU(5) and is called the NMSSM +; while the third model comprises 4(5+5¯) and is called the NMSSM ++. Naively, one would expect the fine-tuning in the plus-type models to be smaller than that in the NMSSM since the presence of extra matter relaxes the perturbativity bound on λ at the low scale. This, in turn, allows larger tree-level Higgs mass and smaller loop contribution from the top squarks. However we find that LHC limits on the masses of sparticles, especially the gluino mass, can play an indirect, but vital, role in controlling the fine-tuning. In particular, working in a semiconstrained framework at the grand unified theory scale, we find that the masses of third generation top squarks are always larger in the plus-type models than in the NMSSM without extra matter. This is a renormalization group equation effect which cannot be avoided, and as a consequence the fine-tuning in the NMSSM + (Δ˜200) is significantly larger than in the NMSSM (Δ˜100), with fine-tuning in the NMSSM ++ (Δ˜600) being significantly larger than in the NMSSM +.

  1. Possibility Study of Scale Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT) Algorithm Application to Spine Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong-Hoon; Lee, Do-Wan; Han, Bong-Soo

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is an application of scale invariant feature transform (SIFT) algorithm to stitch the cervical-thoracic-lumbar (C-T-L) spine magnetic resonance (MR) images to provide a view of the entire spine in a single image. All MR images were acquired with fast spin echo (FSE) pulse sequence using two MR scanners (1.5 T and 3.0 T). The stitching procedures for each part of spine MR image were performed and implemented on a graphic user interface (GUI) configuration. Moreover, the stitching process is performed in two categories; manual point-to-point (mPTP) selection that performed by user specified corresponding matching points, and automated point-to-point (aPTP) selection that performed by SIFT algorithm. The stitched images using SIFT algorithm showed fine registered results and quantitatively acquired values also indicated little errors compared with commercially mounted stitching algorithm in MRI systems. Our study presented a preliminary validation of the SIFT algorithm application to MRI spine images, and the results indicated that the proposed approach can be performed well for the improvement of diagnosis. We believe that our approach can be helpful for the clinical application and extension of other medical imaging modalities for image stitching. PMID:27064404

  2. Hierarchical model of natural images and the origin of scale invariance

    PubMed Central

    Saremi, Saeed; Sejnowski, Terrence J.

    2013-01-01

    The study of natural images and how our brain processes them has been an area of intense research in neuroscience, psychology, and computer science. We introduced a unique approach to studying natural images by decomposing images into a hierarchy of layers at different logarithmic intensity scales and mapping them to a quasi-2D magnet. The layers were in different phases: “cold” and ordered at large-intensity scales, “hot” and disordered at small-intensity scales, and going through a second-order phase transition at intermediate scales. There was a single “critical” layer in the hierarchy that exhibited long-range correlation similar to that found in the 2D Ising model of ferromagnetism at the critical temperature. We also determined the interactions between layers mapped from natural images and found mutual inhibition that generated locally “frustrated” antiferromagnetic states. Almost all information in natural images was concentrated in a few layers near the phase transition, which has biological implications and also points to the hierarchical origin of scale invariance in natural images. PMID:23382241

  3. Self-organization of developing embryo using scale-invariant approach

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Self-organization is a fundamental feature of living organisms at all hierarchical levels from molecule to organ. It has also been documented in developing embryos. Methods In this study, a scale-invariant power law (SIPL) method has been used to study self-organization in developing embryos. The SIPL coefficient was calculated using a centro-axial skew symmetrical matrix (CSSM) generated by entering the components of the Cartesian coordinates; for each component, one CSSM was generated. A basic square matrix (BSM) was constructed and the determinant was calculated in order to estimate the SIPL coefficient. This was applied to developing C. elegans during early stages of embryogenesis. The power law property of the method was evaluated using the straight line and Koch curve and the results were consistent with fractal dimensions (fd). Diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) was used to validate the SIPL method. Results and conclusion The fractal dimensions of both the straight line and Koch curve showed consistency with the SIPL coefficients, which indicated the power law behavior of the SIPL method. The results showed that the ABp sublineage had a higher SIPL coefficient than EMS, indicating that ABp is more organized than EMS. The fd determined using DLA was higher in ABp than in EMS and its value was consistent with type 1 cluster formation, while that in EMS was consistent with type 2. PMID:21635789

  4. Hierarchical model of natural images and the origin of scale invariance.

    PubMed

    Saremi, Saeed; Sejnowski, Terrence J

    2013-02-19

    The study of natural images and how our brain processes them has been an area of intense research in neuroscience, psychology, and computer science. We introduced a unique approach to studying natural images by decomposing images into a hierarchy of layers at different logarithmic intensity scales and mapping them to a quasi-2D magnet. The layers were in different phases: "cold" and ordered at large-intensity scales, "hot" and disordered at small-intensity scales, and going through a second-order phase transition at intermediate scales. There was a single "critical" layer in the hierarchy that exhibited long-range correlation similar to that found in the 2D Ising model of ferromagnetism at the critical temperature. We also determined the interactions between layers mapped from natural images and found mutual inhibition that generated locally "frustrated" antiferromagnetic states. Almost all information in natural images was concentrated in a few layers near the phase transition, which has biological implications and also points to the hierarchical origin of scale invariance in natural images.

  5. Online fringe projection profilometry based on scale-invariant feature transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hongru; Feng, Guoying; Yang, Peng; Wang, Zhaomin; Zhou, Shouhuan; Asundi, Anand

    2016-08-01

    An online fringe projection profilometry (OFPP) based on scale-invariant feature transform (SIFT) is proposed. Both rotary and linear models are discussed. First, the captured images are enhanced by "retinex" theory for better contrast and an improved reprojection technique is carried out to rectify pixel size while keeping the right aspect ratio. Then the SIFT algorithm with random sample consensus algorithm is used to match feature points between frames. In this process, quick response code is innovatively adopted as a feature pattern as well as object modulation. The characteristic parameters, which include rotation angle in rotary OFPP and rectilinear displacement in linear OFPP, are calculated by a vector-based solution. Moreover, a statistical filter is applied to obtain more accurate values. The equivalent aligned fringe patterns are then extracted from each frame. The equal step algorithm, advanced iterative algorithm, and principal component analysis are eligible for phase retrieval according to whether the object moving direction accords with the fringe direction or not. The three-dimensional profile of the moving object can finally be reconstructed. Numerical simulations and experimental results verified the validity and feasibility of the proposed method.

  6. An anisotropic scale-invariant unstructured mesh generator suitable for volumetric imaging data

    PubMed Central

    Kuprat, Andrew P.; Einstein, Daniel R.

    2009-01-01

    We present a boundary-fitted, scale-invariant unstructured tetrahedral mesh generation algorithm that enables registration of element size to local feature size. Given an input triangulated surface mesh, a feature size field is determined by casting rays normal to the surface and into the geometry and then performing gradient-limiting operations to enforce continuity of the resulting field. Surface mesh density is adjusted to be proportional to the feature size field and then a layered anisotropic volume mesh is generated. This mesh is “scale-invariant” in that roughly the same number of layers of mesh exist in mesh cross-sections, between a minimum scale size Lmin and a maximum scale size Lmax. We illustrate how this field can be used to produce quality grids for computational fluid dynamics based simulations of challenging, topologically complex biological surfaces derived from magnetic resonance images. The algorithm is implemented in the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) version of the Los Alamos grid toolbox LaGriT[14]. Research funded by the National Heart and Blood Institute Award 1RO1HL073598-01A1. PMID:19784397

  7. Efficient and Robust Model-to-Image Alignment using 3D Scale-Invariant Features

    PubMed Central

    Toews, Matthew; Wells, William M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents feature-based alignment (FBA), a general method for efficient and robust model-to-image alignment. Volumetric images, e.g. CT scans of the human body, are modeled probabilistically as a collage of 3D scale-invariant image features within a normalized reference space. Features are incorporated as a latent random variable and marginalized out in computing a maximum a-posteriori alignment solution. The model is learned from features extracted in pre-aligned training images, then fit to features extracted from a new image to identify a globally optimal locally linear alignment solution. Novel techniques are presented for determining local feature orientation and efficiently encoding feature intensity in 3D. Experiments involving difficult magnetic resonance (MR) images of the human brain demonstrate FBA achieves alignment accuracy similar to widely-used registration methods, while requiring a fraction of the memory and computation resources and offering a more robust, globally optimal solution. Experiments on CT human body scans demonstrate FBA as an effective system for automatic human body alignment where other alignment methods break down. PMID:23265799

  8. Shortcuts to adiabaticity in classical and quantum processes for scale-invariant driving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deffner, Sebastian; Jarzynski, Christopher; Del Campo, Adolfo

    2014-03-01

    All real physical processes in classical as well as in quantum devices operate in finite-time. For most applications, however, adiabatic, i.e. infinitely-slow processes, are more favorable, as these do not cause unwanted, parasitic excitations. A shortcut to adiabaticity is a driving protocol which reproduces in a short time the same final state that would result from an adiabatic process. A particular powerful technique to engineer such shortcuts is transitionless quantum driving by means of counterdiabatic fields. However, determining closed form expressions for the counterdiabatic field has generally proven to be a daunting task. In this paper, we introduce a novel approach, with which we find the explicit form of the counterdiabatic driving field in arbitrary scale-invariant dynamical processes, encompassing expansions and transport. Our approach originates in the formalism of generating functions, and unifies previous approaches independently developed for classical and quantum systems. We show how this new approach allows to design shortcuts to adiabaticity for a large class of classical and quantum, single-particle, non-linear, and many-body systems. SD and CJ acknowledge support from the National Science Foundation (USA) under grant DMR-1206971. This research is further supported by the U.S Department of Energy through the LANL/LDRD Program and a LANL J. Robert Oppenheimer fellowship (AdC).

  9. Scale invariance and universality of force networks in static granular matter.

    PubMed

    Ostojic, Srdjan; Somfai, Ellák; Nienhuis, Bernard

    2006-02-16

    Force networks form the skeleton of static granular matter. They are the key factor that determines mechanical properties such as stability, elasticity and sound transmission, which are important for civil engineering and industrial processing. Previous studies have focused on investigations of the global structure of external forces (the boundary condition) and on the probability distribution of individual contact forces. So far, however, precise knowledge of the disordered spatial structure of the force network has remained elusive. Here we report that molecular dynamics simulations of realistic granular packings reveal scale invariance of clusters of particles interacting by means of relatively strong forces. Despite visual variation, force networks for various values of the confining pressure and other parameters have identical scaling exponents and scaling function, thereby determining a universality class. Unexpectedly, the flat ensemble of force configurations (a simple generalization of equilibrium statistical mechanics) belongs to this universality class, whereas some widely studied simplified models do not. This implies that the elasticity of the grains and their geometrical disorder do not affect the universal mechanical properties.

  10. Fast scale-invariant lateral lumbar vertebrae detection and segmentation in X-ray images.

    PubMed

    Sa, Ruhan; Owens, William; Wiegand, Raymond; Chaudhary, Vipin; Sa, Ruhan; Owens, William; Wiegand, Raymond; Chaudhary, Vipin; Owens, William; Sa, Ruhan; Wiegand, Raymond; Chaudhary, Vipin

    2016-08-01

    Fully automatic localization of lumbar vertebrae from clinical X-ray images is very challenging due to the variation of X-ray quality, scale, contrast, number of visible vertebrae, etc. To overcome these challenges, we present a novel framework, where we accelerate a scale-invariant object detection method using Support Vector Machines (SVM) trained on Histogram of Oriented Gradients (HOG) features and segmenting a fine vertebra contour using Gradient Vector Flow (GVF) based snake model. Support Vector Machines trained on HOG features are now an object detection standard in many perception fields and have demonstrated good performance on medical images as well. However, the computational complexity and lack of robustness brought by rescaling the original images have prevented its applicability. The proposed multistage detection framework uses lower-level detection result to determine the rescaling regions to reduce the region of interest, thereby decreasing the execution time. We further refine the detection result by segmenting the contour of vertebra using GVF snake, where we use edge detection techniques to increase the robustness of the GVF snake. Finally, we experimentally demonstrate the effectiveness of this framework using a large set of clinical X-ray images.

  11. From elasticity to inelasticity in cancer cell mechanics: A loss of scale-invariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laperrousaz, B.; Drillon, G.; Berguiga, L.; Nicolini, F.; Audit, B.; Satta, V. Maguer; Arneodo, A.; Argoul, F.

    2016-08-01

    Soft materials such as polymer gels, synthetic biomaterials and living biological tissues are generally classified as viscoelastic or viscoplastic materials, because they behave neither as pure elastic solids, nor as pure viscous fluids. When stressed beyond their linear viscoelastic regime, cross-linked biopolymer gels can behave nonlinearly (inelastically) up to failure. In living cells, this type of behavior is more frequent because their cytoskeleton is basically made of cross-linked biopolymer chains with very different structural and flexibility properties. These networks have high sensitivity to stress and great propensity to local failure. But in contrast to synthetic passive gels, they can "afford" these failures because they have ATP driven reparation mechanisms which often allow the recovery of the original texture. A cell pressed in between two plates for a long period of time may recover its original shape if the culture medium brings all the nutrients for keeping it alive. When the failure events are too frequent or too strong, the reparation mechanisms may abort, leading to an irreversible loss of mechanical homeostasis and paving the way for chronic diseases such as cancer. To illustrate this discussion, we consider a model of immature cell transformation during cancer progression, the chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), where the formation of the BCR-ABL oncogene results from a single chromosomal translocation t(9; 22). Within the assumption that the cell response to stress is scale invariant, we show that the power-law exponent that characterizes their mechanosensitivity can be retrieved from AFM force indentation curves. Comparing control and BCR-ABL transduced cells, we observe that in the later case, one month after transduction, a small percentage the cancer cells no longer follows the control cell power law, as an indication of disruption of the initial cytoskeleton network structure.

  12. Scale-Invariance in the Spatial Development of Landslides in the Umbria Region (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liucci, Luisa; Melelli, Laura; Suteanu, Cristian

    2015-07-01

    Understanding the spatial distribution of mass movements is a major issue in the management and forecasting of landslide risk. In this context, the present study examines the most widespread types of landslide in the Umbria region (central Italy), that is, slides and flows, in order to establish if it is possible to identify a well-defined structure in their spatial pattern. By using the landslide inventory map available for the area and by resorting to the principles of fractal theory, the scaling properties of the landslide sample were investigated. The application of the box-counting algorithm to the maps of landslide triggering points and landslide areas allowed for the identification of a clear scale-invariant structure. Two distinct types of fractal behaviour were recognized, separated by a scale value of 1 km and characterized by capacity dimensions of 1.35 and 1.76, in the ranges of 25 m-1 km and 1-16 km, respectively. The comparison between the scaling exponents obtained from a map of points and one of areas, and the elaboration of the cumulative frequency distributions of landslide areas supported the interpretation of this result: the higher capacity dimension describes the spatial distribution of landslides in the Umbria region, while the lower contains additional information about their geometries, suggesting that the latter also possess scaling properties. Based on the finding of two different types of behaviour of landslides in space, the hypothesis is discussed that the contribution of each causal factor (i.e., predisposing and triggering factors) to the occurrence of landslide events and to their spatial development could be different in the two scale ranges identified, depending on its spatial variability at local and regional scale. According to this hypothesis, factors with high local variability (i.e., topographic attributes) would mainly affect the assortment of landslide geometries, while those with high regional variability (e.g., rainfalls

  13. Scale-Invariant Neuronal Avalanche Dynamics and the Cut-Off in Size Distributions

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hongdian; Plenz, Dietmar

    2014-01-01

    Identification of cortical dynamics strongly benefits from the simultaneous recording of as many neurons as possible. Yet current technologies provide only incomplete access to the mammalian cortex from which adequate conclusions about dynamics need to be derived. Here, we identify constraints introduced by sub-sampling with a limited number of electrodes, i.e. spatial ‘windowing’, for well-characterized critical dynamics―neuronal avalanches. The local field potential (LFP) was recorded from premotor and prefrontal cortices in two awake macaque monkeys during rest using chronically implanted 96-microelectrode arrays. Negative deflections in the LFP (nLFP) were identified on the full as well as compact sub-regions of the array quantified by the number of electrodes N (10–95), i.e., the window size. Spatiotemporal nLFP clusters organized as neuronal avalanches, i.e., the probability in cluster size, p(s), invariably followed a power law with exponent −1.5 up to N, beyond which p(s) declined more steeply producing a ‘cut-off’ that varied with N and the LFP filter parameters. Clusters of size s≤N consisted mainly of nLFPs from unique, non-repeated cortical sites, emerged from local propagation between nearby sites, and carried spatial information about cluster organization. In contrast, clusters of size s>N were dominated by repeated site activations and carried little spatial information, reflecting greatly distorted sampling conditions. Our findings were confirmed in a neuron-electrode network model. Thus, avalanche analysis needs to be constrained to the size of the observation window to reveal the underlying scale-invariant organization produced by locally unfolding, predominantly feed-forward neuronal cascades. PMID:24927158

  14. From genes to genomes: universal scale-invariant properties of microbial chromosome organisation.

    PubMed

    Audit, Benjamin; Ouzounis, Christos A

    2003-09-19

    The availability of complete genome sequences for a large variety of organisms is a major advance in understanding genome structure and function. One attribute of genome structure is chromosome organisation in terms of gene localisation and orientation. For example, bacterial operons, i.e. clusters of co-oriented genes that form transcription units, enable functionally related genes to be expressed simultaneously. The description of genome organisation was pioneered with the study of the distribution of genes of the Escherichia coli partial genetic map before the full genome sequence was known. Deploying powerful techniques from circular statistics and signal processing, we revisit the issue of gene localisation and orientation using 89 complete microbial chromosomes from the eubacterial and archaeal domains. We demonstrate that there is no characteristic size pertinent to the description of chromosome structure, e.g. there does not exist any single length appropriate to describe gene clustering. Our results show that, for all 89 chromosomes, gene positions and gene orientations share a common form of scale-invariant correlations known as "long-range correlations" that we can reveal for distances from the gene length, up to the chromosome size. This observation indicates that genes tend to assemble and to co-orient over any scale of observation greater than a few kilobases. This unexpected property of chromosome structure can be portrayed as an operon-like organisation at all scales and implies that a complete scale range extending over more than three orders of magnitudes of chromosome segment lengths is necessary to properly describe prokaryotic genome organisation. We propose that this pattern results from the effects of the superhelical context on gene expression coupled with the structure and dynamics of the nucleoid, possibly accommodating the diverse gene expression profiles needed during the different stages of cellular life.

  15. Power spectrum scale invariance as a neural marker of cocaine misuse and altered cognitive control.

    PubMed

    Ide, Jaime S; Hu, Sien; Zhang, Sheng; Mujica-Parodi, Lilianne R; Li, Chiang-Shan R

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has highlighted the effects of chronic cocaine exposure on cerebral structures and functions, and implicated the prefrontal cortices in deficits of cognitive control. Recent investigations suggest power spectrum scale invariance (PSSI) of cerebral blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signals as a neural marker of cerebral activity. We examined here how PSSI is altered in association with cocaine misuse and impaired cognitive control. Eighty-eight healthy (HC) and seventy-five age and gender matched cocaine dependent (CD) adults participated in functional MRI of a stop signal task (SST). BOLD images were preprocessed using standard procedures in SPM, including detrending, band-pass filtering (0.01-0.25 Hz), and correction for head motions. Voxel-wise PSSI measures were estimated by a linear fit of the power spectrum with a log-log scale. In group analyses, we examined differences in PSSI between HC and CD, and its association with clinical and behavioral variables using a multiple regression. A critical component of cognitive control is post-signal behavioral adjustment, which is compromised in cocaine dependence. Therefore, we examined the PSSI changes in association with post-signal slowing (PSS) in the SST. Compared to HC, CD showed decreased PSS and PSSI in multiple frontoparietal regions. PSSI was positively correlated with PSS in HC in multiple regions, including the left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) and right supramarginal gyrus (SMG), which showed reduced PSSI in CD. These findings suggest disrupted connectivity dynamics in the fronto-parietal areas in association with post-signal behavioral adjustment in cocaine addicts. These new findings support PSSI as a neural marker of impaired cognitive control in cocaine addiction.

  16. On supersymmetric geometric flows and R2 inflation from scale invariant supergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajpoot, Subhash; Vacaru, Sergiu I.

    2017-09-01

    Models of geometric flows pertaining to R2 scale invariant (super) gravity theories coupled to conformally invariant matter fields are investigated. Related to this work are supersymmetric scalar manifolds that are isomorphic to the Kählerian spaces Mn = SU(1 , 1 + k) / U(1) × SU(1 + k) as generalizations of the non-supersymmetric analogs with SO(1 , 1 + k) / SO(1 + k) manifolds. For curved superspaces with geometric evolution of physical objects, a complete supersymmetric theory has to be elaborated on nonholonomic (super) manifolds and bundles determined by non-integrable superdistributions with additional constraints on (super) field dynamics and geometric evolution equations. We also consider generalizations of Perelman's functionals using such nonholonomic variables which result in the decoupling of geometric flow equations and Ricci soliton equations with supergravity modifications of the R2 gravity theory. As such, it is possible to construct exact non-homogeneous and locally anisotropic cosmological solutions for various types of (super) gravity theories modeled as modified Ricci soliton configurations. Such solutions are defined by employing the general ansatz encompassing coefficients of generic off-diagonal metrics and generalized connections that depend generically on all spacetime coordinates. We consider nonholonomic constraints resulting in diagonal homogeneous configurations encoding contributions from possible nonlinear parametric geometric evolution scenarios, off-diagonal interactions and anisotropic polarization/modification of physical constants. In particular, we analyze small parametric deformations when the underlying scale symmetry is preserved and the nontrivial anisotropic vacuum corresponds to generalized de Sitter spaces. Such configurations may mimic quantum effects whenever transitions to flat space are possible. Our approach allows us to generate solutions with scale violating terms induced by geometric flows, off

  17. Strong dynamics in a classically scale invariant extension of the standard model with a flat potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haba, Naoyuki; Yamada, Toshifumi

    2017-06-01

    We investigate the scenario where the standard model is extended with classical scale invariance, which is broken by chiral symmetry breaking and confinement in a new strongly coupled gauge theory that resembles QCD. The standard model Higgs field emerges as a result of the mixing of a scalar meson in the new strong dynamics and a massless elementary scalar field. The mass and scalar decay constant of that scalar meson, which are generated dynamically in the new gauge theory, give rise to the Higgs field mass term, automatically possessing the correct negative sign by the bosonic seesaw mechanism. Using analogy with QCD, we evaluate the dynamical scale of the new gauge theory and further make quantitative predictions for light pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone bosons associated with the spontaneous breaking of axial symmetry along chiral symmetry breaking in the new gauge theory. A prominent consequence of the scenario is that there should be a standard model gauge singlet pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone boson with mass below 220 GeV, which couples to two electroweak gauge bosons through the Wess-Zumino-Witten term, whose strength is thus determined by the dynamical scale of the new gauge theory. Other pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone bosons, charged under the electroweak gauge groups, also appear. Concerning the theoretical aspects, it is shown that the scalar quartic coupling can vanish at the Planck scale with the top quark pole mass as large as 172.5 GeV, realizing the flatland scenario without being in tension with the current experimental data.

  18. Spontaneous breaking of scale invariance in a D = 3 U(N ) model with Chern-Simons gauge fields

    SciTech Connect

    Bardeen, William A.; Moshe, Moshe

    2014-06-18

    We study spontaneous breaking of scale invariance in the large N limit of three dimensional U(N )κ Chern-Simons theories coupled to a scalar field in the fundamental representation. When a λ6 ( Ø· Ø)3 self interaction term is added to the action we find a massive phase at a certain critical value for a combination of the λ(6) and ’t Hooft’s λ = N/κ couplings. This model attracted recent attention since at finite κ it contains a singlet sector which is conjectured to be dual to Vasiliev’s higher spin gravity on AdS4. Our paper concentrates on the massive phase of the 3d boundary theory. We discuss the advantage of introducing masses in the boundary theory through spontaneous breaking of scale invariance.

  19. Critical frequencies in the perception of letters, faces, and novel shapes: evidence for limited scale invariance for faces.

    PubMed

    Oruç, Ipek; Barton, Jason J S

    2010-10-18

    Despite the common intuition that object recognition processes should be relatively scale invariant, a number of studies show that this is not the case. Using a critical-band masking paradigm, we examined the pattern of scale dependence of diagnostic spatial frequencies across a range of stimuli that varied in participants' prior experience and the 'ecological significance' of the stimuli, by which we mean the degree of universality and recency of the development of the stimulus in human culture, letters being an example of a culturally arbitrary stimulus and faces a universal one. We found scale dependence for letters, mirror-image letters, and novel shapes, consistent with prior results, as well as for inverted faces. However, upright faces showed a relatively scale-invariant pattern especially for face sizes that corresponded to those encountered in typical social interactions. This suggests an important difference between the processing of faces and other objects that may reflect their unique status as stimuli.

  20. Void probability as a function of the void's shape and scale-invariant models. [in studies of spacial galactic distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elizalde, E.; Gaztanaga, E.

    1992-01-01

    The dependence of counts in cells on the shape of the cell for the large scale galaxy distribution is studied. A very concrete prediction can be done concerning the void distribution for scale invariant models. The prediction is tested on a sample of the CfA catalog, and good agreement is found. It is observed that the probability of a cell to be occupied is bigger for some elongated cells. A phenomenological scale invariant model for the observed distribution of the counts in cells, an extension of the negative binomial distribution, is presented in order to illustrate how this dependence can be quantitatively determined. An original, intuitive derivation of this model is presented.

  1. Spontaneous breaking of scale invariance in a D = 3 U(N ) model with Chern-Simons gauge fields

    DOE PAGES

    Bardeen, William A.; Moshe, Moshe

    2014-06-18

    We study spontaneous breaking of scale invariance in the large N limit of three dimensional U(N )κ Chern-Simons theories coupled to a scalar field in the fundamental representation. When a λ6 ( ؆ · Ø)3 self interaction term is added to the action we find a massive phase at a certain critical value for a combination of the λ(6) and ’t Hooft’s λ = N/κ couplings. This model attracted recent attention since at finite κ it contains a singlet sector which is conjectured to be dual to Vasiliev’s higher spin gravity on AdS4. Our paper concentrates on the massive phasemore » of the 3d boundary theory. We discuss the advantage of introducing masses in the boundary theory through spontaneous breaking of scale invariance.« less

  2. Strongly first-order electroweak phase transition and classical scale invariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farzinnia, Arsham; Ren, Jing

    2014-10-01

    In this work, we examine the possibility of realizing a strongly first-order electroweak phase transition within the minimal classically scale-invariant extension of the standard model (SM), previously proposed and analyzed as a potential solution to the hierarchy problem. By introducing one complex gauge-singlet scalar and three (weak scale) right-handed Majorana neutrinos, the scenario was successfully rendered capable of achieving a radiative breaking of the electroweak symmetry (by means of the Coleman-Weinberg mechanism), inducing nonzero masses for the SM neutrinos (via the seesaw mechanism), presenting a pseudoscalar dark matter candidate (protected by the CP symmetry of the potential), and predicting the existence of a second CP-even boson (with suppressed couplings to the SM content) in addition to the 125 GeV scalar. In the present treatment, we construct the full finite-temperature one-loop effective potential of the model, including the resummed thermal daisy loops, and demonstrate that finite-temperature effects induce a first-order electroweak phase transition. Requiring the thermally driven first-order phase transition to be sufficiently strong at the onset of the bubble nucleation (corresponding to nucleation temperatures TN˜100-200 GeV) further constrains the model's parameter space; in particular, an O(0.01) fraction of the dark matter in the Universe may be simultaneously accommodated with a strongly first-order electroweak phase transition. Moreover, such a phase transition disfavors right-handed Majorana neutrino masses above several hundreds of GeV, confines the pseudoscalar dark matter masses to ˜1-2 TeV, predicts the mass of the second CP-even scalar to be ˜100-300 GeV, and requires the mixing angle between the CP-even components of the SM doublet and the complex singlet to lie within the range 0.2≲sinω ≲0.4. The obtained results are displayed in comprehensive exclusion plots, identifying the viable regions of the parameter space

  3. Quantification of organ motion based on an adaptive image-based scale invariant feature method

    SciTech Connect

    Paganelli, Chiara; Peroni, Marta

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: The availability of corresponding landmarks in IGRT image series allows quantifying the inter and intrafractional motion of internal organs. In this study, an approach for the automatic localization of anatomical landmarks is presented, with the aim of describing the nonrigid motion of anatomo-pathological structures in radiotherapy treatments according to local image contrast.Methods: An adaptive scale invariant feature transform (SIFT) was developed from the integration of a standard 3D SIFT approach with a local image-based contrast definition. The robustness and invariance of the proposed method to shape-preserving and deformable transforms were analyzed in a CT phantom study. The application of contrast transforms to the phantom images was also tested, in order to verify the variation of the local adaptive measure in relation to the modification of image contrast. The method was also applied to a lung 4D CT dataset, relying on manual feature identification by an expert user as ground truth. The 3D residual distance between matches obtained in adaptive-SIFT was then computed to verify the internal motion quantification with respect to the expert user. Extracted corresponding features in the lungs were used as regularization landmarks in a multistage deformable image registration (DIR) mapping the inhale vs exhale phase. The residual distances between the warped manual landmarks and their reference position in the inhale phase were evaluated, in order to provide a quantitative indication of the registration performed with the three different point sets.Results: The phantom study confirmed the method invariance and robustness properties to shape-preserving and deformable transforms, showing residual matching errors below the voxel dimension. The adapted SIFT algorithm on the 4D CT dataset provided automated and accurate motion detection of peak to peak breathing motion. The proposed method resulted in reduced residual errors with respect to standard SIFT

  4. Alzheimer's Disease as Subcellular `Cancer' --- The Scale-Invariant Principles Underlying the Mechanisms of Aging ---

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murase, M.

    1996-01-01

    with self-organization, has been thought to underlie `creative' aspects of biological phenomena such as the origin of life, adaptive evolution of viruses, immune recognition and brain function. It therefore must be surprising to find that the same principles will also underlie `non-creative' aspects, for example, the development of cancer and the aging of complex organisms. Although self-organization has extensively been studied in nonliving things such as chemical reactions and laser physics, it is undoubtedly true that the similar sources of the order are available to living things at different levels and scales. Several paradigm shifts are, however, required to realize how the general principles of natural selection can be extensible to non-DNA molecules which do not possess the intrinsic nature of self-reproduction. One of them is, from the traditional, genetic inheritance view that DNA (or RNA) molecules are the ultimate unit of heritable variations and natural selection at any organization level, to the epigenetic (nongenetic) inheritance view that any non-DNA molecule can be the target of heritable variations and molecular selection to accumulate in certain biochemical environment. Because they are all enriched with a β-sheet content, ready to mostly interact with one another, different denatured proteins like β-amyloid, PHF and prions can individually undergo self-templating or self-aggregating processes out of gene control. Other paradigm shifts requisite for a break-through in the etiology of neurodegenerative disorders will be discussed. As it is based on the scale-invariant principles, the present theory also predicts plausible mechanisms underlying quite different classes of disorders such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), atherosclerosis, senile cataract and many other symptoms of aging. The present theory, thus, provides the consistent and comprehensive account to the origin of aging by means of natural selection and self-organization.

  5. On the scale-invariance of fractures and fracture patterns in the Transscandinavian Igneous Belt, Southeast Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krumbholz, M.; Burchardt, S.; Tanner, D. C.; Koyi, H.

    2012-04-01

    Fracture dimensions and their spatial distribution are of primary importance in many fields of applied geology, e.g. they determine the quality of sites for the long-term storage of hazardous waste and fractured reservoirs for e.g. hydrocarbons, CO2 sequestration, and geothermal energy. Unfortunately, the observation of fracture systems is commonly limited by the outcrop size or the resolution of the measuring method. Fractures and fracture properties are often assumed to be scale-invariant, albeit within a certain range. Therefore, knowing the fractal dimension of fracture properties allows conclusions to be drawn from one particular scale to another. We investigated fracture trace lengths and patterns at map-, outcrop- and handspecimen scale, covering a large area in the Transscandinavian Igneous Belt. The dataset comprises 11 fracture maps at three different scales containing 8641 fracture trace lengths. Analysis of the fracture trace lengths was carried out using cumulative frequency distributions, while the fracture patterns were analysed with the standard box-counting technique. Combining the three analysed scales, our results indicate that the fracture trace lengths can be considered to be scale-invariant with a fractal dimension of about 1.8. In contrast, the fractal dimension at one particular scale could not be determined, probably due to censoring and truncation effects. Analyses with the box-counting method show that the fracture patterns, in contrast to fracture trace lengths, are not scale-invariant. The box-counting dimension increases with increasing scale. It is a measure of the complexity and maturity of a fracture system, which increases with scale. Consequently, the complexity of fracture pattern is scale-variant.

  6. Global strong solution to the 3D incompressible magnetohydrodynamic system in the scaling invariant Besov-Sobolev-type spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Haitao; Zhai, Xiaoping; Yan, Wei; Li, Yongsheng

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we study the global well posedness of the 3D incompressible magnetohydrodynamic system with horizontal dissipation and horizontal magnetic diffusion in the scaling invariant Besov-Sobolev-type spaces. We first get a unique global solution to this system with small initial data by the classical Friedrich's regularization method. Then using a weighted Chemin-Lerner-type norm, we prove the system also can generate a global solution if the horizontal components of the initial data are small enough compared to the vertical components. In particular, our results imply the global large solutions with highly oscillating initial data.

  7. Probing the Scale Invariance of the Inflationary Power Spectrum in Expanding Quasi-Two-Dimensional Dipolar Condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chä, Seok-Yeong; Fischer, Uwe R.

    2017-03-01

    We consider an analogue de Sitter cosmos in an expanding quasi-two-dimensional Bose-Einstein condensate with dominant dipole-dipole interactions between the atoms or molecules in the ultracold gas. It is demonstrated that a hallmark signature of inflationary cosmology, the scale invariance of the power spectrum of inflaton field correlations, experiences strong modifications when, at the initial stage of expansion, the excitation spectrum displays a roton minimum. Dipolar quantum gases thus furnish a viable laboratory tool to experimentally investigate, with well-defined and controllable initial conditions, whether primordial oscillation spectra deviating from Lorentz invariance at trans-Planckian momenta violate standard predictions of inflationary cosmology.

  8. Analysis of intermittence, scale invariance and characteristic scales in the behavior of major indices near a crash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraro, Marta; Furman, Nicolas; Liu, Yang; Mariani, Cristina; Rial, Diego

    2006-01-01

    This work is devoted to the study of the relation between intermittence and scale invariance. We find the conditions that a function in which both effects are present must satisfy, and we analyze the relation with characteristic scales. We present an efficient method that detects characteristic scales in different systems. Finally we develop a model that predicts the existence of intermittence and characteristic scales in the behavior of a financial index near a crash, and we apply the model to the analysis of several financial indices.

  9. A new analysis of intermittence, scale invariance and characteristic scales applied to the behavior of financial indices near a crash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariani, Maria Cristina; Liu, Yang

    2006-07-01

    This work is devoted to the study of the relation between intermittence and scale invariance, and applications to the behavior of financial indices near a crash. We developed a numerical analysis that predicts the critical date of a financial index, and we apply the model to the analysis of several financial indices. We were able to obtain optimum values for the critical date, corresponding to the most probable date of the crash. We only used data from before the true crash date in order to obtain the predicted critical date. The good numerical results validate the model.

  10. Integration of Scale Invariant Generator Technique and S-A Technique for Characterizing 2-D Patterns for Information Retrieve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, L.; Cheng, Q.

    2004-12-01

    The scale invariant generator technique (SIG) and spectrum-area analysis technique (S-A) were developed independently relevant to the concept of the generalized scale invariance (GSI). The former was developed for characterizing the parameters involved in the GSI for characterizing and simulating multifractal measures whereas the latter was for identifying scaling breaks for decomposition of superimposed multifractal measures caused by multiple geophysical processes. A natural integration of these two techniques may yield a new technique to serve two purposes, on the one hand, that can enrich the power of S-A by increasing the interpretability of decomposed patterns in some applications of S-A and, on the other hand, that can provide a mean to test the uniqueness of multifractality of measures which is essential for application of SIG technique in more complicated environment. The implementation of the proposed technique has been done as a Dynamic Link Library (DLL) in Visual C++. The program can be friendly used for method validation and application in different fields.

  11. Rotation-and-scale-invariant airplane detection in high-resolution satellite images based on deep-Hough-forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yongtao; Guan, Haiyan; Zai, Dawei; Ji, Zheng

    2016-02-01

    This paper proposes a rotation-and-scale-invariant method for detecting airplanes from high-resolution satellite images. To improve feature representation capability, a multi-layer feature generation model is created to produce high-order feature representations for local image patches through deep learning techniques. To effectively estimate airplane centroids, a Hough forest model is trained to learn mappings from high-order patch features to the probabilities of an airplane being present at specific locations. To handle airplanes with varying orientations, patch orientation is defined and integrated into the Hough forest to augment Hough voting. The scale invariance is achieved by using a set of scale factors embedded in the Hough forest. Quantitative evaluations on the images collected from Google Earth service show that the proposed method achieves a completeness, correctness, quality, and F1-measure of 0.968, 0.972, 0.942, and 0.970, respectively, in detecting airplanes with arbitrary orientations and sizes. Comparative studies also demonstrate that the proposed method outperforms the other three existing methods in accurately and completely detecting airplanes in high-resolution remotely sensed images.

  12. Constructions for scale-invariant and kink-free vortex stretching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dijkhuis, Geert C.

    1996-10-01

    Models for turbulent vortex stretching are presented as differentiable fractal curve constructions with circle arcs and screw segments replacing line elements in the usual definitions of non-analytic Koch- and Peano curves. Examples pf kink-free fractal curves are shown as self-intersecting, self-avoiding or (asymptotically) self-tangent loops, with flat versions partially or fully filling the plane, and spatial versions likewise for three dimensions. One set of kink-free fractal curves analytically models growing horseshoe vortices in Hinześ conceptual model for turbulence near a wall. From random walk analysis of transition layer vorticity on a defective lattice for intermittency, the inverse Von Karman constant emerges as fractal dimension threshold for escape of turbulence to infinity. A second curve sequence analytically models a vortex ring in superfluid helium stretching into a homogeneous vortex tangle moving between flat walls in a square channel. The deformation rule employs Hilbert's cube-filling loop construction with line segments bent into circle arcs with end points meeting at zero angle. Dynamically, the deformation geometry demands unequal skin friction on adjacent channel walls as boundary condition. The stretching process accelerates circulation velocities exponentially by conservation of angular momentum in vortex tubes with constant core volume. A third class of curves models deformation of a plasma vortex ring formed by (high-voltage or laser) discharge impact on a flat electrode surface, and carried sideways by turbulent shear flow. The construction rule now uses circle arcs twisted into Hopf-invariant screw segments for the streamlines, with mirror-symmetric halves preserving zero topoligical charge in the loop structure. Dynamically, skin friction from no-slip boundary conditions here exerts parallel torques on leading and trailing ring sections, twisting its right and left halves into mirror images with equal amounts of opposite helicity.

  13. Creasing, point-bifurcations, and the spontaneous breakdown of scale-invariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohlfeld, Evan Benjamin

    Symmetry and symmetry breaking are important in condensed matter theory; they explain how continuum phases of matter emerge from molecular-scale chaos and lead directly to the classes of Partial Differential Equations (PDEs) that describe them. Here I suggest a new kind of symmetry breaking, the spontaneous breaking of scale symmetry, which is an asymptotic symmetry of all continuum models at small scales, and explains why things like fracture and first order phase transitions have macroscopic robustness. I formalize this idea with the notions of a point-instability and a point-bifurcation, which are sudden changes in the state of a system that develop from a point manifesting as a kind of topological change. As a non-trivial example of an equilibrium point-bifurcation, I discuss creasing in the surfaces of soft rubber-like materials. A crease is a singular, self-contacting fold, such as in the cup of the hand. Numerical methods (which rely on a novel kind of pseudo arc-length continuation for variational inequalities, called rough continuation) agree with experiments that show that creases in bent PDMS blocks form suddenly, but vanish continuously to a point, showing an effect called perfect hysteresis. Like a phase transition, creasing is characterized by intensive criterion---critical stresses---but the "phases" are a smooth surface and an intrinsically localized crease. Indeed I prove that for a wide class of PDEs of any differential and in any dimension, the only kinds of instabilities are ordinary linear instabilities and point-instabilities. I show that while linear stability is almost never sufficient to prove actual stability, linear stability (linear hyperbolicity) and a condition called a point-Lipshitz condition (or metastability) are necessary and sufficient conditions. I show this constructively: generically, when an equilibrium system loses metastability but retains linear stability, a bifurcation occurs where the bifurcating branch develops as a

  14. Long-Time Behavior and Critical Limit of Subcritical SQG Equations in Scale-Invariant Sobolev Spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coti Zelati, Michele

    2017-09-01

    We consider the subcritical SQG equation in its natural scale-invariant Sobolev space and prove the existence of a global attractor of optimal regularity. The proof is based on a new energy estimate in Sobolev spaces to bootstrap the regularity to the optimal level, derived by means of nonlinear lower bounds on the fractional Laplacian. This estimate appears to be new in the literature and allows a sharp use of the subcritical nature of the L^∞ bounds for this problem. As a by-product, we obtain attractors for weak solutions as well. Moreover, we study the critical limit of the attractors and prove their stability and upper semicontinuity with respect to the strength of the diffusion.

  15. Wireless capsule endoscopy video segmentation using an unsupervised learning approach based on probabilistic latent semantic analysis with scale invariant features.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yao; Guturu, Parthasarathy Partha; Buckles, Bill P

    2012-01-01

    Since wireless capsule endoscopy (WCE) is a novel technology for recording the videos of the digestive tract of a patient, the problem of segmenting the WCE video of the digestive tract into subvideos corresponding to the entrance, stomach, small intestine, and large intestine regions is not well addressed in the literature. A selected few papers addressing this problem follow supervised leaning approaches that presume availability of a large database of correctly labeled training samples. Considering the difficulties in procuring sizable WCE training data sets needed for achieving high classification accuracy, we introduce in this paper an unsupervised learning approach that employs Scale Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT) for extraction of local image features and the probabilistic latent semantic analysis (pLSA) model used in the linguistic content analysis for data clustering. Results of experimentation indicate that this method compares well in classification accuracy with the state-of-the-art supervised classification approaches to WCE video segmentation.

  16. Computer-aided mass detection in mammography: False positive reduction via gray-scale invariant ranklet texture features

    SciTech Connect

    Masotti, Matteo; Lanconelli, Nico; Campanini, Renato

    2009-02-15

    In this work, gray-scale invariant ranklet texture features are proposed for false positive reduction (FPR) in computer-aided detection (CAD) of breast masses. Two main considerations are at the basis of this proposal. First, false positive (FP) marks surviving our previous CAD system seem to be characterized by specific texture properties that can be used to discriminate them from masses. Second, our previous CAD system achieves invariance to linear/nonlinear monotonic gray-scale transformations by encoding regions of interest into ranklet images through the ranklet transform, an image transformation similar to the wavelet transform, yet dealing with pixels' ranks rather than with their gray-scale values. Therefore, the new FPR approach proposed herein defines a set of texture features which are calculated directly from the ranklet images corresponding to the regions of interest surviving our previous CAD system, hence, ranklet texture features; then, a support vector machine (SVM) classifier is used for discrimination. As a result of this approach, texture-based information is used to discriminate FP marks surviving our previous CAD system; at the same time, invariance to linear/nonlinear monotonic gray-scale transformations of the new CAD system is guaranteed, as ranklet texture features are calculated from ranklet images that have this property themselves by construction. To emphasize the gray-scale invariance of both the previous and new CAD systems, training and testing are carried out without any in-between parameters' adjustment on mammograms having different gray-scale dynamics; in particular, training is carried out on analog digitized mammograms taken from a publicly available digital database, whereas testing is performed on full-field digital mammograms taken from an in-house database. Free-response receiver operating characteristic (FROC) curve analysis of the two CAD systems demonstrates that the new approach achieves a higher reduction of FP marks

  17. Robust Texture Analysis Using Multi-Resolution Gray-Scale Invariant Features for Breast Sonographic Tumor Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Min-Chun Yang; Woo Kyung Moon; Wang, Yu-Chiang Frank; Min Sun Bae; Chiun-Sheng Huang; Jeon-Hor Chen; Ruey-Feng Chang

    2013-12-01

    Computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) systems in gray-scale breast ultrasound images have the potential to reduce unnecessary biopsy of breast masses. The purpose of our study is to develop a robust CAD system based on the texture analysis. First, gray-scale invariant features are extracted from ultrasound images via multi-resolution ranklet transform. Thus, one can apply linear support vector machines (SVMs) on the resulting gray-level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM)-based texture features for discriminating the benign and malignant masses. To verify the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed texture analysis, breast ultrasound images obtained from three different platforms are evaluated based on cross-platform training/testing and leave-one-out cross-validation (LOO-CV) schemes. We compare our proposed features with those extracted by wavelet transform in terms of receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. The AUC values derived from the area under the curve for the three databases via ranklet transform are 0.918 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.848 to 0.961), 0.943 (95% CI, 0.906 to 0.968), and 0.934 (95% CI, 0.883 to 0.961), respectively, while those via wavelet transform are 0.847 (95% CI, 0.762 to 0.910), 0.922 (95% CI, 0.878 to 0.958), and 0.867 (95% CI, 0.798 to 0.914), respectively. Experiments with cross-platform training/testing scheme between each database reveal that the diagnostic performance of our texture analysis using ranklet transform is less sensitive to the sonographic ultrasound platforms. Also, we adopt several co-occurrence statistics in terms of quantization levels and orientations (i.e., descriptor settings) for computing the co-occurrence matrices with 0.632+ bootstrap estimators to verify the use of the proposed texture analysis. These experiments suggest that the texture analysis using multi-resolution gray-scale invariant features via ranklet transform is useful for designing a robust CAD system.

  18. NDVI, scale invariance and the modifiable areal unit problem: An assessment of vegetation in the Adelaide Parklands.

    PubMed

    Nouri, Hamideh; Anderson, Sharolyn; Sutton, Paul; Beecham, Simon; Nagler, Pamela; Jarchow, Christopher J; Roberts, Dar A

    2017-04-15

    This research addresses the question as to whether or not the Normalised Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) is scale invariant (i.e. constant over spatial aggregation) for pure pixels of urban vegetation. It has been long recognized that there are issues related to the modifiable areal unit problem (MAUP) pertaining to indices such as NDVI and images at varying spatial resolutions. These issues are relevant to using NDVI values in spatial analyses. We compare two different methods of calculation of a mean NDVI: 1) using pixel values of NDVI within feature/object boundaries and 2) first calculating the mean red and mean near-infrared across all feature pixels and then calculating NDVI. We explore the nature and magnitude of these differences for images taken from two sensors, a 1.24m resolution WorldView-3 and a 0.1m resolution digital aerial image. We apply these methods over an urban park located in the Adelaide Parklands of South Australia. We demonstrate that the MAUP is not an issue for calculation of NDVI within a sensor for pure urban vegetation pixels. This may prove useful for future rule-based monitoring of the ecosystem functioning of green infrastructure.

  19. A novel and robust rotation and scale invariant structuring elements based descriptor for pedestrian classification in infrared images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soundrapandiyan, Rajkumar; Chandra Mouli, P. V. S. S. R.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, a novel and robust rotation and scale invariant structuring elements based descriptor (RSSED) for pedestrian classification in infrared (IR) images is proposed. In addition, a segmentation method using difference of Gaussian (DoG) and horizontal intensity projection is proposed. The three major steps are moving object segmentation, feature extraction and classification of objects as pedestrian or non-pedestrian. The segmentation result is used to extract the RSSED feature descriptor. To extract features, the segmentation result is encoded using local directional pattern (LDP). This helps in the identification of local textural patterns. The LDP encoded image is further quantized adaptively to four levels. Finally the proposed RSSED is used to formalize the descriptor from the quantized image. Support vector machine is employed for classification of the moving objects in a given IR image into pedestrian and non-pedestrian classes. The segmentation results shows the robustness in extracting the moving objects. The classification results obtained from SVM classifier shows the efficacy of the proposed method.

  20. A Scale-Invariant Model of Statistical Mechanics and Modified Forms of the First and the Second Laws of Thermodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sohrab, Siavash H.; Pitch, Nancy (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    A scale-invariant statistical theory of fields is presented that leads to invariant definition of density, velocity, temperature, and pressure, The definition of Boltzmann constant is introduced as k(sub k) = m(sub k)v(sub k)c = 1.381 x 10(exp -23) J x K(exp -1), suggesting that the Kelvin absolute temperature scale is equivalent to a length scale. Two new state variables called the reversible heat Q(sub rev) = TS and the reversible work W(sub rev) = PV are introduced. The modified forms of the first and second law of thermodynamics are presented. The microscopic definition of heat (work) is presented as the kinetic energy due to the random (peculiar) translational, rotational, and pulsational motions. The Gibbs free energy of an element at scale Beta is identified as the total system energy at scale (Beta-1), thus leading to an invariant form of the first law of thermodynamics U(sub Beta) = Q(sub Beta) - W(sub Beta) +N(e3)U(sub Beta-1).

  1. Discrete Scale Invariance of Human Large EEG Voltage Deflections is More Prominent in Waking than Sleep Stage 2

    PubMed Central

    Zorick, Todd; Mandelkern, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) is typically viewed through the lens of spectral analysis. Recently, multiple lines of evidence have demonstrated that the underlying neuronal dynamics are characterized by scale-free avalanches. These results suggest that techniques from statistical physics may be used to analyze EEG signals. We utilized a publicly available database of fourteen subjects with waking and sleep stage 2 EEG tracings per subject, and observe that power-law dynamics of critical-state neuronal avalanches are not sufficient to fully describe essential features of EEG signals. We hypothesized that this could reflect the phenomenon of discrete scale invariance (DSI) in EEG large voltage deflections (LVDs) as being more prominent in waking consciousness. We isolated LVDs, and analyzed logarithmically transformed LVD size probability density functions (PDF) to assess for DSI. We find evidence of increased DSI in waking, as opposed to sleep stage 2 consciousness. We also show that the signatures of DSI are specific for EEG LVDs, and not a general feature of fractal simulations with similar statistical properties to EEG. Removing only LVDs from waking EEG produces a reduction in power in the alpha and beta frequency bands. These findings may represent a new insight into the understanding of the cortical dynamics underlying consciousness. PMID:26696860

  2. Scale invariant feature transform in adaptive radiation therapy: a tool for deformable image registration assessment and re-planning indication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paganelli, Chiara; Peroni, Marta; Riboldi, Marco; Sharp, Gregory C.; Ciardo, Delia; Alterio, Daniela; Orecchia, Roberto; Baroni, Guido

    2013-01-01

    Adaptive radiation therapy (ART) aims at compensating for anatomic and pathological changes to improve delivery along a treatment fraction sequence. Current ART protocols require time-consuming manual updating of all volumes of interest on the images acquired during treatment. Deformable image registration (DIR) and contour propagation stand as a state of the ART method to automate the process, but the lack of DIR quality control methods hinder an introduction into clinical practice. We investigated the scale invariant feature transform (SIFT) method as a quantitative automated tool (1) for DIR evaluation and (2) for re-planning decision-making in the framework of ART treatments. As a preliminary test, SIFT invariance properties at shape-preserving and deformable transformations were studied on a computational phantom, granting residual matching errors below the voxel dimension. Then a clinical dataset composed of 19 head and neck ART patients was used to quantify the performance in ART treatments. For the goal (1) results demonstrated SIFT potential as an operator-independent DIR quality assessment metric. We measured DIR group systematic residual errors up to 0.66 mm against 1.35 mm provided by rigid registration. The group systematic errors of both bony and all other structures were also analyzed, attesting the presence of anatomical deformations. The correct automated identification of 18 patients who might benefit from ART out of the total 22 cases using SIFT demonstrated its capabilities toward goal (2) achievement.

  3. Content-based image retrieval using scale invariant feature transform and gray level co-occurrence matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Prashant; Khare, Manish; Khare, Ashish

    2017-06-01

    The rapid growth of different types of images has posed a great challenge to the scientific fraternity. As the images are increasing everyday, it is becoming a challenging task to organize the images for efficient and easy access. The field of image retrieval attempts to solve this problem through various techniques. This paper proposes a novel technique of image retrieval by combining Scale Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT) and Co-occurrence matrix. For construction of feature vector, SIFT descriptors of gray scale images are computed and normalized using z-score normalization followed by construction of Gray-Level Co-occurrence Matrix (GLCM) of normalized SIFT keypoints. The constructed feature vector is matched with those of images in database to retrieve visually similar images. The proposed method is tested on Corel-1K dataset and the performance is measured in terms of precision and recall. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method outperforms some of the other state-of-the-art methods.

  4. NDVI, scale invariance and the modifiable areal unit problem: An assessment of vegetation in the Adelaide Parklands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nouri, Hamideh; Anderson, Sharolyn; Sutton, Paul; Beecham, Simon; Nagler, Pamela L.; Jarchow, Christopher J; Roberts, Dar A.

    2017-01-01

    This research addresses the question as to whether or not the Normalised Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) is scale invariant (i.e. constant over spatial aggregation) for pure pixels of urban vegetation. It has been long recognized that there are issues related to the modifiable areal unit problem (MAUP) pertaining to indices such as NDVI and images at varying spatial resolutions. These issues are relevant to using NDVI values in spatial analyses. We compare two different methods of calculation of a mean NDVI: 1) using pixel values of NDVI within feature/object boundaries and 2) first calculating the mean red and mean near-infrared across all feature pixels and then calculating NDVI. We explore the nature and magnitude of these differences for images taken from two sensors, a 1.24 m resolution WorldView-3 and a 0.1 m resolution digital aerial image. We apply these methods over an urban park located in the Adelaide Parklands of South Australia. We demonstrate that the MAUP is not an issue for calculation of NDVI within a sensor for pure urban vegetation pixels. This may prove useful for future rule-based monitoring of the ecosystem functioning of green infrastructure.

  5. A Scale-Invariant Model of Statistical Mechanics and Modified Forms of the First and the Second Laws of Thermodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sohrab, Siavash H.; Pitch, Nancy (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    A scale-invariant statistical theory of fields is presented that leads to invariant definition of density, velocity, temperature, and pressure, The definition of Boltzmann constant is introduced as k(sub k) = m(sub k)v(sub k)c = 1.381 x 10(exp -23) J x K(exp -1), suggesting that the Kelvin absolute temperature scale is equivalent to a length scale. Two new state variables called the reversible heat Q(sub rev) = TS and the reversible work W(sub rev) = PV are introduced. The modified forms of the first and second law of thermodynamics are presented. The microscopic definition of heat (work) is presented as the kinetic energy due to the random (peculiar) translational, rotational, and pulsational motions. The Gibbs free energy of an element at scale Beta is identified as the total system energy at scale (Beta-1), thus leading to an invariant form of the first law of thermodynamics U(sub Beta) = Q(sub Beta) - W(sub Beta) +N(e3)U(sub Beta-1).

  6. Discrete Scale Invariance of Human Large EEG Voltage Deflections is More Prominent in Waking than Sleep Stage 2.

    PubMed

    Zorick, Todd; Mandelkern, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) is typically viewed through the lens of spectral analysis. Recently, multiple lines of evidence have demonstrated that the underlying neuronal dynamics are characterized by scale-free avalanches. These results suggest that techniques from statistical physics may be used to analyze EEG signals. We utilized a publicly available database of fourteen subjects with waking and sleep stage 2 EEG tracings per subject, and observe that power-law dynamics of critical-state neuronal avalanches are not sufficient to fully describe essential features of EEG signals. We hypothesized that this could reflect the phenomenon of discrete scale invariance (DSI) in EEG large voltage deflections (LVDs) as being more prominent in waking consciousness. We isolated LVDs, and analyzed logarithmically transformed LVD size probability density functions (PDF) to assess for DSI. We find evidence of increased DSI in waking, as opposed to sleep stage 2 consciousness. We also show that the signatures of DSI are specific for EEG LVDs, and not a general feature of fractal simulations with similar statistical properties to EEG. Removing only LVDs from waking EEG produces a reduction in power in the alpha and beta frequency bands. These findings may represent a new insight into the understanding of the cortical dynamics underlying consciousness.

  7. Stratification Pattern of Static and Scale-Invariant Dynamic Measures of Heartbeat Fluctuations Across Sleep Stages in Young and Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Daniel T.; Stein, Phyllis K.; Ivanov, Plamen Ch.

    2010-01-01

    Cardiac dynamics exhibit complex variability characterized by scale-invariant and nonlinear temporal organization related to the mechanism of neuroautonomic control, which changes with physiologic states and pathologic conditions. Changes in sleep regulation during sleep stages are also related to fluctuations in autonomic nervous activity. However, the interaction between sleep regulation and cardiac autonomic control remains not well understood. Even less is known how this interaction changes with age, as aspects of both cardiac dynamics and sleep regulation differ in healthy elderly compared to young subjects. We hypothesize that because of the neuroautonomic responsiveness in young subjects, fractal and nonlinear features of cardiac dynamics exhibit a pronounced stratification pattern across sleep stages, while in elderly these features will remain unchanged due to age-related loss of cardiac variability and decline of neuroautonomic responsiveness. We analyze the variability and the temporal fractal organization of heartbeat fluctuations across sleep stages in both young and elderly. We find that independent linear and nonlinear measures of cardiac control consistently exhibit the same ordering in their values across sleep stages, forming a robust stratification pattern. Despite changes in sleep architecture and reduced heart rate variability in elderly subjects, this stratification surprisingly does not break down with advanced age. Moreover, the difference between sleep stages for some linear, fractal, and nonlinear measures exceeds the difference between young and elderly, suggesting that the effect of sleep regulation on cardiac dynamics is significantly stronger than the effect of healthy aging. Quantifying changes in this stratification pattern may provide insights into how alterations in sleep regulation contribute to increased cardiac risk. PMID:19203874

  8. Limit distributions of scale-invariant probabilistic models of correlated random variables with the q-Gaussian as an explicit example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanel, R.; Thurner, S.; Tsallis, C.

    2009-11-01

    Extremization of the Boltzmann-Gibbs (BG) entropy S_{BG}=-kint dx p(x) ln p(x) under appropriate norm and width constraints yields the Gaussian distribution pG(x) ∝e-βx. Also, the basic solutions of the standard Fokker-Planck (FP) equation (related to the Langevin equation with additive noise), as well as the Central Limit Theorem attractors, are Gaussians. The simplest stochastic model with such features is N ↦∞ independent binary random variables, as first proved by de Moivre and Laplace. What happens for strongly correlated random variables? Such correlations are often present in physical situations as e.g. systems with long range interactions or memory. Frequently q-Gaussians, pq(x) ∝[1-(1-q)βx2]1/(1-q) [p1(x)=pG(x)] become observed. This is typically so if the Langevin equation includes multiplicative noise, or the FP equation to be nonlinear. Scale-invariance, e.g. exchangeable binary stochastic processes, allow a systematical analysis of the relation between correlations and non-Gaussian distributions. In particular, a generalized stochastic model yielding q-Gaussians for all (q ≠ 1) was missing. This is achieved here by using the Laplace-de Finetti representation theorem, which embodies strict scale-invariance of interchangeable random variables. We demonstrate that strict scale invariance together with q-Gaussianity mandates the associated extensive entropy to be BG.

  9. The social brain: scale-invariant layering of Erdős-Rényi networks in small-scale human societies.

    PubMed

    Harré, Michael S; Prokopenko, Mikhail

    2016-05-01

    The cognitive ability to form social links that can bind individuals together into large cooperative groups for safety and resource sharing was a key development in human evolutionary and social history. The 'social brain hypothesis' argues that the size of these social groups is based on a neurologically constrained capacity for maintaining long-term stable relationships. No model to date has been able to combine a specific socio-cognitive mechanism with the discrete scale invariance observed in ethnographic studies. We show that these properties result in nested layers of self-organizing Erdős-Rényi networks formed by each individual's ability to maintain only a small number of social links. Each set of links plays a specific role in the formation of different social groups. The scale invariance in our model is distinct from previous 'scale-free networks' studied using much larger social groups; here, the scale invariance is in the relationship between group sizes, rather than in the link degree distribution. We also compare our model with a dominance-based hierarchy and conclude that humans were probably egalitarian in hunter-gatherer-like societies, maintaining an average maximum of four or five social links connecting all members in a largest social network of around 132 people. © 2016 The Author(s).

  10. Fracture Scale-Invariance in Antarctic Shelf Ice: Wing and Comb Crevasses along Shear Faults within the Minna Bluff Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arcone, S. A.

    2016-12-01

    Wing and comb crevasses at the 0.1-10 km scale are associated with three of five large rifts presently off Minna Bluff on the western side of the Ross Ice Shelf, Antarctica. Their similarity to millimeter-scale parent-wing structures that grow from random fractures in biaxially compressed polycrystalline ice specimens demonstrates fracture scale-invariance for these phenomena, as previously shown for sea ice at multi-km scale. Historical WorldView and Landsat images show that these rifts, at least partially filled with marine ice, initiate in a small parent-double wing structure near the Bluff. The tip of the east wing then grows to multi-km lengths eastward into the shelf as it is wedged open by sea water and marine ice to form a rift. The northern edge of each rift is now a right lateral transform fault, with motion caused by expansion rather than by compression in the crystallographic case. RADARSAT imagery differentiates these shear faults from true crevasses. Because of this shear the north edge becomes a new parent. On its relatively faster north side, these new parents have acutely angled stick-slip crevasses. 25 m of movement along the fault relative to the south side occurred over a 20 month period from 2010 to 2011. On the relatively slower south side, as in the crystallographic case the shear has generated multi-km-long curvilinear wings starting at the fault tips, curvilinear wing mouth crevasses that eventually converge far to the east, and comb crevasses (known as teeth) that parallel the wings, all starting more nearly orthogonally to the fault direction. Wings and combs can be as long as parents. Wings are also characterized by a shear fault from which new combs grow. Such evidence for shear along wings has not been seen in SEM crystallographic images, so that the Minna Bluff scale appears to have revealed this new phenomenon. By late 2015 shear crevasses beneath the north parent edge of this one particular rift had virtually closed, which reflects

  11. Asymptotic Normality Through Factorial Cumulants and Partition Identities

    PubMed Central

    Bobecka, Konstancja; Hitczenko, Paweł; López-Blázquez, Fernando; Rempała, Grzegorz; Wesołowski, Jacek

    2013-01-01

    In the paper we develop an approach to asymptotic normality through factorial cumulants. Factorial cumulants arise in the same manner from factorial moments as do (ordinary) cumulants from (ordinary) moments. Another tool we exploit is a new identity for ‘moments’ of partitions of numbers. The general limiting result is then used to (re-)derive asymptotic normality for several models including classical discrete distributions, occupancy problems in some generalized allocation schemes and two models related to negative multinomial distribution. PMID:24591773

  12. Asymptotically safe Higgs inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Xianyu, Zhong-Zhi; He, Hong-Jian E-mail: hjhe@tsinghua.edu.cn

    2014-10-01

    We construct a new inflation model in which the standard model Higgs boson couples minimally to gravity and acts as the inflaton. Our construction of Higgs inflation incorporates the standard model with Einstein gravity which exhibits asymptotic safety in the ultraviolet region. The slow roll condition is satisfied at large field value due to the asymptotically safe behavior of Higgs self-coupling at high energies. We find that this minimal construction is highly predictive, and is consistent with both cosmological observations and collider experiments.

  13. Asymptotic freedom, asymptotic flatness and cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Kiritsis, Elias

    2013-11-01

    Holographic RG flows in some cases are known to be related to cosmological solutions. In this paper another example of such correspondence is provided. Holographic RG flows giving rise to asymptotically-free β-functions have been analyzed in connection with holographic models of QCD. They are shown upon Wick rotation to provide a large class of inflationary models with logarithmically-soft inflaton potentials. The scalar spectral index is universal and depends only on the number of e-foldings. The ratio of tensor to scalar power depends on the single extra real parameter that defines this class of models. The Starobinsky inflationary model as well as the recently proposed models of T-inflation are members of this class. The holographic setup gives a completely new (and contrasting) view to the stability, naturalness and other problems of such inflationary models.

  14. An asymptotical machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristallini, Achille

    2016-07-01

    A new and intriguing machine may be obtained replacing the moving pulley of a gun tackle with a fixed point in the rope. Its most important feature is the asymptotic efficiency. Here we obtain a satisfactory description of this machine by means of vector calculus and elementary trigonometry. The mathematical model has been compared with experimental data and briefly discussed.

  15. Scale invariance and scaling law of Thomson backscatter spectra of electrons moving in the resonance regime in combined laser and magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yi-Jia; Jiang, Chun; Lv, Chong; Wan, Feng; Sang, Hai-Bo; Xie, Bai-Song

    2016-11-01

    The Thomson backscatter spectra by an electron moving in the resonance acceleration regime are derived analytically and computed numerically in the simultaneous presence of a superintense laser field and a strong uniform magnetic field. The dependences of fundamental frequency of harmonic spectra on the laser intensity and magnetic resonance parameter are examined carefully. By calculating the emission of a single electron in a circularly polarized laser field of plane-wave form and a constant external magnetic field, the scale invariance of the radiation spectra is evident in terms of harmonic orders. The scaling law of backscattered spectra is exhibited remarkably for the laser intensity as well as for the initial axial momentum of the electron when the cyclotron frequency of the electron approaches the laser frequency. The results indicate that the magnetic resonance parameter plays an important role in the strength of emission. And the found rich features of backscattering spectra may be useful to the tunability of the radiation source.

  16. Determination of scale-invariant equations of state without fitting parameters: application to the two-dimensional Bose gas across the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless transition.

    PubMed

    Desbuquois, Rémi; Yefsah, Tarik; Chomaz, Lauriane; Weitenberg, Christof; Corman, Laura; Nascimbène, Sylvain; Dalibard, Jean

    2014-07-11

    We present a general "fit-free" method for measuring the equation of state (EoS) of a scale-invariant gas. This method, which is inspired from the procedure introduced by Ku et al. [Science 335, 563 (2012)] for the unitary three-dimensional Fermi gas, provides a general formalism which can be readily applied to any quantum gas in a known trapping potential, in the frame of the local density approximation. We implement this method on a weakly interacting two-dimensional Bose gas across the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless transition and determine its EoS with unprecedented accuracy in the critical region. Our measurements provide an important experimental benchmark for classical-field approaches which are believed to accurately describe quantum systems in the weakly interacting but nonperturbative regime.

  17. Reference distribution functions for magnetically confined plasmas from the minimum entropy production theorem and the MaxEnt principle, subject to the scale-invariant restrictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonnino, Giorgio; Cardinali, Alessandro; Steinbrecher, Gyorgy; Peeters, Philippe; Sonnino, Alberto; Nardone, Pasquale

    2013-12-01

    We derive the expression of the reference distribution function for magnetically confined plasmas far from the thermodynamic equilibrium. The local equilibrium state is fixed by imposing the minimum entropy production theorem and the maximum entropy (MaxEnt) principle, subject to scale invariance restrictions. After a short time, the plasma reaches a state close to the local equilibrium. This state is referred to as the reference state. The aim of this Letter is to determine the reference distribution function (RDF) when the local equilibrium state is defined by the above mentioned principles. We prove that the RDF is the stationary solution of a generic family of stochastic processes corresponding to an universal Landau-type equation with white parametric noise. As an example of application, we consider a simple, fully ionized, magnetically confined plasmas, with auxiliary Ohmic heating. The free parameters are linked to the transport coefficients of the magnetically confined plasmas, by the kinetic theory.

  18. Asymptotically hyperbolic connections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fine, Joel; Herfray, Yannick; Krasnov, Kirill; Scarinci, Carlos

    2016-09-01

    General relativity in four-dimensions can be equivalently described as a dynamical theory of {SO}(3)˜ {SU}(2)-connections rather than metrics. We introduce the notion of asymptotically hyperbolic connections, and work out an analogue of the Fefferman-Graham expansion in the language of connections. As in the metric setup, one can solve the arising ‘evolution’ equations order by order in the expansion in powers of the radial coordinate. The solution in the connection setting is arguably simpler, and very straightforward algebraic manipulations allow one to see how the unconstrained by Einstein equations ‘stress-energy tensor’ appears at third order in the expansion. Another interesting feature of the connection formulation is that the ‘counter terms’ required in the computation of the renormalised volume all combine into the Chern-Simons functional of the restriction of the connection to the boundary. As the Chern-Simons invariant is only defined modulo large gauge transformations, the requirement that the path integral over asymptotically hyperbolic connections is well-defined requires the cosmological constant to be quantised. Finally, in the connection setting one can deform the 4D Einstein condition in an interesting way, and we show that asymptotically hyperbolic connection expansion is universal and valid for any of the deformed theories.

  19. Asymptotic black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Pei-Ming

    2017-04-01

    Following earlier works on the KMY model of black-hole formation and evaporation, we construct the metric for a matter sphere in gravitational collapse, with the back-reaction of pre-Hawking radiation taken into consideration. The mass distribution and collapsing velocity of the matter sphere are allowed to have an arbitrary radial dependence. We find that a generic gravitational collapse asymptote to a universal configuration which resembles a black hole but without horizon. This approach clarifies several misunderstandings about black-hole formation and evaporation, and provides a new model for black-hole-like objects in the universe.

  20. Asymptotically flat multiblack lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomizawa, Shinya; Okuda, Taika

    2017-03-01

    We present an asymptotically flat and stationary multiblack lens solution with biaxisymmetry of U (1 )×U (1 ) as a supersymmetric solution in the five-dimensional minimal ungauged supergravity. We show that the spatial cross section of each degenerate Killing horizon admits different lens space topologies of L (n ,1 )=S3/Zn as well as a sphere S3. Moreover, we show that, in contrast to the higher-dimensional Majumdar-Papapetrou multiblack hole and multi-Breckenridge-Myers-Peet-Vafa (BMPV) black hole spacetime, the metric is smooth on each horizon even if the horizon topology is spherical.

  1. Thermodynamics of Asymptotically Conical Geometries.

    PubMed

    Cvetič, Mirjam; Gibbons, Gary W; Saleem, Zain H

    2015-06-12

    We study the thermodynamical properties of a class of asymptotically conical geometries known as "subtracted geometries." We derive the mass and angular momentum from the regulated Komar integral and the Hawking-Horowitz prescription and show that they are equivalent. By deriving the asymptotic charges, we show that the Smarr formula and the first law of thermodynamics hold. We also propose an analog of Christodulou-Ruffini inequality. The analysis can be generalized to other asymptotically conical geometries.

  2. Occupational Clusters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pottawattamie County School System, Council Bluffs, IA.

    The 15 occupational clusters (transportation, fine arts and humanities, communications and media, personal service occupations, construction, hospitality and recreation, health occupations, marine science occupations, consumer and homemaking-related occupations, agribusiness and natural resources, environment, public service, business and office…

  3. Asymptotic behavior of dynamical variables and naked singularity formation in spherically symmetric gravitational collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Kawakami, Hayato; Mitsuda, Eiji; Nambu, Yasusada; Tomimatsu, Akira

    2009-07-15

    In considering the gravitational collapse of matter, it is an important problem to clarify what kind of conditions leads to the formation of naked singularity. For this purpose, we apply the 1+3 orthonormal frame formalism introduced by Uggla et al. to the spherically symmetric gravitational collapse of a perfect fluid. This formalism allows us to construct an autonomous system of evolution and constraint equations for scale-invariant dynamical variables normalized by the volume expansion rate of the timelike orthonormal frame vector. We investigate the asymptotic evolution of such dynamical variables towards the formation of a central singularity and present a conjecture that the steep spatial gradient for the normalized density function is a characteristic of the naked singularity formation.

  4. Asymptotic symmetries on Killing horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koga, Jun-Ichirou

    2001-12-01

    We investigate asymptotic symmetries regularly defined on spherically symmetric Killing horizons in Einstein theory with or without the cosmological constant. These asymptotic symmetries are described by asymptotic Killing vectors, along which the Lie derivatives of perturbed metrics vanish on a Killing horizon. We derive the general form of the asymptotic Killing vectors and find that the group of asymptotic symmetries consists of rigid O(3) rotations of a horizon two-sphere and supertranslations along the null direction on the horizon, which depend arbitrarily on the null coordinate as well as the angular coordinates. By introducing the notion of asymptotic Killing horizons, we also show that local properties of Killing horizons are preserved not only under diffeomorphisms but also under nontrivial transformations generated by the asymptotic symmetry group. Although the asymptotic symmetry group contains the Diff(S1) subgroup, which results from supertranslations dependent only on the null coordinate, it is shown that the Poisson brackets algebra of the conserved charges conjugate to asymptotic Killing vectors does not acquire nontrivial central charges. Finally, by considering extended symmetries, we discuss the fact that unnatural reduction of the symmetry group is necessary in order to obtain the Virasoro algebra with nontrivial central charges, which is not justified when we respect the spherical symmetry of Killing horizons.

  5. Estimation of intensity-duration-frequency relationships according to the property of scale invariance and regionalization analysis in a Mediterranean coastal area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanmi, Hanen; Bargaoui, Zoubeida; Mallet, Cécile

    2016-10-01

    Usually, networks of daily rainfall raingauges have a higher spatial cover than tippet bucket raingauges networks. Consequently, it would be of high interest to make use of daily rainfall information to asses IDF curves for unobserved locations. The present work proposes achieving this goal by using the assumption of simple scaling invariance. Indeed, series observed over sufficiently long periods for 10 tippet bucket raingauge, allowed us to test the hypothesis of simple scaling of annual maximum rainfall intensities in northern Tunisia. This assumption, combined with Gumbel model of maximum rainfall intensities allowed us to develop a methodology to estimate IDF curves from the daily rainfall totals. In fact, a regionalization formula which involves the percentile 90% of the annual maximum daily rainfall was developed and validated. This regionalization formula applied to daily data of 25 rainfall stations in the sub area of Tunis region, combined with the assumption of simple scaling has enabled us to develop Intensity Duration Area Frequency (IDAF) curves for Tunis area.

  6. Joint detection and tracking of independently moving objects in stereo sequences using scale-invariant feature transform features and particle filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hao; Wang, Cheng; El-Sheimy, Naser

    2010-03-01

    A scale-invariant feature transform (SIFT)-based particle filter algorithm is presented for joint detection and tracking of independently moving objects in stereo sequences observed by uncalibrated moving cameras. The major steps include feature detection and matching, moving object detection based on multiview geometric constraints, and tracking based on particle filter. Our contributions are first, a novel closed-loop mapping (CLM) multiview matching scheme proposed for stereo matching and motion tracking. CLM outperforms several state-of-the-art SIFT matching methods in terms of density and reliability of feature correspondences. Our second contribution is a multiview epipolar constraint derived from the relative camera positions in pairs of consecutive stereo views for independent motion detection. The multiview epipolar constraint is able to detect moving objects followed by moving cameras in the same direction, a configuration where the epipolar constraint fails. Our third contribution is a proposed dimensional variable particle filter for joint detection and tracking of independently moving objects. Multiple moving objects entering or leaving the field of view are handled effectively within the proposed framework. Experimental results on real-world stereo sequences demonstrate the effectiveness and robustness of our method.

  7. Investigation into Improving Predictions of Channel Morphology: Scale Invariance Conditions of the One-Dimension Non-Equilibrium Bedload Transport Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, K. J.; Ercan, A.; Kavvas, M. L.

    2016-12-01

    While bedload is commonly accepted as contributing only 5 to 10% of the total sediment load in a stream, it is pivotal in describing channel morphology. Because bedload (rolling, sliding and saltating particles) often dominates bed-material load (the portion of the sediment load that interacts with the bed) accurate representations of bedload are central to understanding and predicting changes in channel shape and direction. Channel morphology can be effected by a variety of anthropogenic factors, some of which are acute and planned (hydraulic structures, diversions, restoration efforts). Physical scale modeling of proposed changes could serve to predict morphological consequences, and could compliment numerical modeling of the same, if scale errors are reduced. It is proposed that scale errors could be reduced through identification of the conditions under which non-equilibrium bedload sediment transport is self-similar and scale invariant. These conditions are investigated through application of the one-parameter Lie group of point scaling transformations to the one-dimensional non-equilibrium bedload transport process. Self-similarity conditions imposed due to initial and boundary conditions are also examined. The proposed scaling approach identifies the self-similarity conditions due to the initial and boundary conditions of the corresponding initial and boundary value problem, along with those due to the governing equations, thus expanding scaling of transport to unsteady non-equilibrium conditions.

  8. Asymptotically safe grand unification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajc, Borut; Sannino, Francesco

    2016-12-01

    Phenomenologically appealing supersymmetric grand unified theories have large gauge representations and thus are not asymptotically free. Their ultraviolet validity is limited by the appearance of a Landau pole well before the Planck scale. One could hope that these theories save themselves, before the inclusion of gravity, by generating an interacting ultraviolet fixed point, similar to the one recently discovered in non-supersymmetric gauge-Yukawa theories. Employing a-maximization, a-theorem, unitarity bounds, as well as positivity of other central charges we nonperturbatively rule out this possibility for a broad class of prime candidates of phenomenologically relevant supersymmetric grand unified theories. We also uncover candidates passing these tests, which have either exotic matter or contain one field decoupled from the superpotential. The latter class of theories contains a model with the minimal matter content required by phenomenology.

  9. Asymptotic energy of lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Weigen; Zhang, Zuhe

    2009-04-01

    The energy of a simple graph G arising in chemical physics, denoted by E(G), is defined as the sum of the absolute values of eigenvalues of G. As the dimer problem and spanning trees problem in statistical physics, in this paper we propose the energy per vertex problem for lattice systems. In general for a type of lattice in statistical physics, to compute the entropy constant with toroidal, cylindrical, Mobius-band, Klein-bottle, and free boundary conditions are different tasks with different hardness and may have different solutions. We show that the energy per vertex of plane lattices is independent of the toroidal, cylindrical, Mobius-band, Klein-bottle, and free boundary conditions. In particular, the asymptotic formulae of energies of the triangular, 33.42, and hexagonal lattices with toroidal, cylindrical, Mobius-band, Klein-bottle, and free boundary conditions are obtained explicitly.

  10. HMI Data Driven Magnetohydrodynamic Model Predicted Active Region Photospheric Heating Rates: Their Scale Invariant, Flare Like Power Law Distributions, and Their Possible Association With Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Michael L.; Kwan, Chiman; Ayhan, Bulent; Shang, Eric L.

    2017-01-01

    A data driven, near photospheric, 3 D, non-force free magnetohydrodynamic model pre- dicts time series of the complete current density, and the resistive heating rate Q at the photosphere in neutral line regions (NLRs) of 14 active regions (ARs). The model is driven by time series of the magnetic field B observed by the Helioseismic & Magnetic Imager on the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) satellite. Spurious Doppler periods due to SDO orbital motion are filtered out of the time series for B in every AR pixel. Errors in B due to these periods can be significant. The number of occurrences N(q) of values of Q > or = q for each AR time series is found to be a scale invariant power law distribution, N(Q) / Q-s, above an AR dependent threshold value of Q, where 0.3952 < or = s < or = 0.5298 with mean and standard deviation of 0.4678 and 0.0454, indicating little variation between ARs. Observations show that the number of occurrences N(E) of coronal flares with a total energy released > or = E obeys the same type of distribution, N(E) / E-S, above an AR dependent threshold value of E, with 0.38 < or approx. S < or approx. 0.60, also with little variation among ARs. Within error margins the ranges of s and S are nearly identical. This strong similarity between N(Q) and N(E) suggests a fundamental connection between the process that drives coronal flares and the process that drives photospheric NLR heating rates in ARs. In addition, results suggest it is plausible that spikes in Q, several orders of magnitude above background values, are correlated with times of the subsequent occurrence of M or X flares.

  11. HMI Data Driven Magnetohydrodynamic Model Predicted Active Region Photospheric Heating Rates: Their Scale Invariant, Flare Like Power Law Distributions, and Their Possible Association With Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Michael L.; Kwan, Chiman; Ayhan, Bulent; Shang, Eric L.

    2017-01-01

    A data driven, near photospheric, 3 D, non-force free magnetohydrodynamic model predicts time series of the complete current density, and the resistive heating rate Q at the photosphere in neutral line regions (NLRs) of 14 active regions (ARs). The model is driven by time series of the magnetic field B observed by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) satellite. Spurious Doppler periods due to SDO orbital motion are filtered out of the time series for B in every AR pixel. Errors in B due to these periods can be significant. The number of occurrences N(q) of values of Q > or = q for each AR time series is found to be a scale invariant power law distribution, N(Q) / Q-s, above an AR dependent threshold value of Q, where 0.3952 < or = s < or = 0.5298 with mean and standard deviation of 0.4678 and 0.0454, indicating little variation between ARs. Observations show that the number of occurrences N(E) of coronal flares with a total energy released > or = E obeys the same type of distribution, N(E) / E-S, above an AR dependent threshold value of E, with 0.38 < or approx. S < or approx. 0.60, also with little variation among ARs. Within error margins the ranges of s and S are nearly identical. This strong similarity between N(Q) and N(E) suggests a fundamental connection between the process that drives coronal flares and the process that drives photospheric NLR heating rates in ARs. In addition, results suggest it is plausible that spikes in Q, several orders of magnitude above background values, are correlated with times of the subsequent occurrence of M or X flares.

  12. Asymptotic Parachute Performance Sensitivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Way, David W.; Powell, Richard W.; Chen, Allen; Steltzner, Adam D.

    2006-01-01

    In 2010, the Mars Science Laboratory mission will pioneer the next generation of robotic Entry, Descent, and Landing systems by delivering the largest and most capable rover to date to the surface of Mars. In addition to landing more mass than any other mission to Mars, Mars Science Laboratory will also provide scientists with unprecedented access to regions of Mars that have been previously unreachable. By providing an Entry, Descent, and Landing system capable of landing at altitudes as high as 2 km above the reference gravitational equipotential surface, or areoid, as defined by the Mars Orbiting Laser Altimeter program, Mars Science Laboratory will demonstrate sufficient performance to land on 83% of the planet s surface. By contrast, the highest altitude landing to date on Mars has been the Mars Exploration Rover at 1.3 km below the areoid. The coupling of this improved altitude performance with latitude limits as large as 60 degrees off of the equator and a precise delivery to within 10 km of a surface target, will allow the science community to select the Mars Science Laboratory landing site from thousands of scientifically interesting possibilities. In meeting these requirements, Mars Science Laboratory is extending the limits of the Entry, Descent, and Landing technologies qualified by the Mars Viking, Mars Pathfinder, and Mars Exploration Rover missions. Specifically, the drag deceleration provided by a Viking-heritage 16.15 m supersonic Disk-Gap-Band parachute in the thin atmosphere of Mars is insufficient, at the altitudes and ballistic coefficients under consideration by the Mars Science Laboratory project, to maintain necessary altitude performance and timeline margin. This paper defines and discusses the asymptotic parachute performance observed in Monte Carlo simulation and performance analysis and its effect on the Mars Science Laboratory Entry, Descent, and Landing architecture.

  13. Asymptotic dynamics of monopole walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, R.

    2015-08-01

    We determine the asymptotic dynamics of the U(N) doubly periodic BPS monopole in Yang-Mills-Higgs theory, called a monopole wall, by exploring its Higgs curve using the Newton polytope and amoeba. In particular, we show that the monopole wall splits into subwalls when any of its moduli become large. The long-distance gauge and Higgs field interactions of these subwalls are Abelian, allowing us to derive an asymptotic metric for the monopole wall moduli space.

  14. New Analysis Method Application in Metallographic Images through the Construction of Mosaics Via Speeded Up Robust Features and Scale Invariant Feature Transform

    PubMed Central

    Rebouças Filho, Pedro Pedrosa; Moreira, Francisco Diego Lima; Xavier, Francisco Geilson de Lima; Gomes, Samuel Luz; dos Santos, José Ciro; Freitas, Francisco Nélio Costa; Freitas, Rodrigo Guimarães

    2015-01-01

    expediting the decision making process. Two different methods are proposed: One using the transformed Scale Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT), and the second using features extractor Speeded Up Robust Features (SURF). Although slower, the SIFT method is more stable and has a better performance than the SURF method and can be applied to real applications. The best results were obtained using SIFT with Peak Signal-to-Noise Ratio = 61.38, Mean squared error = 0.048 and mean-structural-similarity = 0.999, and processing time of 4.91 seconds for mosaic building. The methodology proposed shows be more promissory in aiding specialists during analysis of metallographic images. PMID:28793412

  15. New Analysis Method Application in Metallographic Images through the Construction of Mosaics Via Speeded Up Robust Features and Scale Invariant Feature Transform.

    PubMed

    Filho, Pedro Pedrosa Rebouças; Moreira, Francisco Diego Lima; Xavier, Francisco Geilson de Lima; Gomes, Samuel Luz; Santos, José Ciro Dos; Freitas, Francisco Nélio Costa; Freitas, Rodrigo Guimarães

    2015-06-25

    expediting the decision making process. Two different methods are proposed: One using the transformed Scale Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT), and the second using features extractor Speeded Up Robust Features (SURF). Although slower, the SIFT method is more stable and has a better performance than the SURF method and can be applied to real applications. The best results were obtained using SIFT with Peak Signal-to-Noise Ratio = 61.38, Mean squared error = 0.048 and mean-structural-similarity = 0.999, and processing time of 4.91 seconds for mosaic building. The methodology proposed shows be more promissory in aiding specialists during analysis of metallographic images.

  16. Polynomial Asymptotes of the Second Kind

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobbs, David E.

    2011-01-01

    This note uses the analytic notion of asymptotic functions to study when a function is asymptotic to a polynomial function. Along with associated existence and uniqueness results, this kind of asymptotic behaviour is related to the type of asymptote that was recently defined in a more geometric way. Applications are given to rational functions and…

  17. Polynomial Asymptotes of the Second Kind

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobbs, David E.

    2011-01-01

    This note uses the analytic notion of asymptotic functions to study when a function is asymptotic to a polynomial function. Along with associated existence and uniqueness results, this kind of asymptotic behaviour is related to the type of asymptote that was recently defined in a more geometric way. Applications are given to rational functions and…

  18. Asymptotic conditions and conserved quantities

    SciTech Connect

    Koul, R.K.

    1990-01-01

    Two problems have been investigated in this dissertation. The first one deals with the relationship between stationary space-times which are flat at null infinity and stationary space-times which are asymptotic flat at space-like infinity. It is shown that the stationary space-times which are asymptotically flat, in the Penrose sense, at null infinity, are asymptotically flat at space-like infinity in the Geroch sense and metric at space like infinity is at least C{sup 1}. In the converse it is shown that the stationary space-times which are asymptotically flat at space like infinity, in the Beig sense, are asymptotically flat at null infinity in the Penrose sense. The second problem addressed deals with the theories of arbitrary dimensions. The theories treated are the ones which have fiber bundle structure, outside some compact region. For these theories the criterion for the choice of the background metric is specified, and the boundary condition for the initial data set (q{sub ab}, P{sup ab}) is given in terms of the background metric. Having these boundary conditions it is shown that the symplectic structure and the constraint functionals are well defined. The conserved quantities associated with internal Killing vector fields are specified. Lastly the energy relative to a fixed background and the total energy of the theory have been given. It is also shown that the total energy of the theory is independent of the choice of the background.

  19. Occupancy in continuous habitat

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Efford, Murray G.; Dawson, Deanna K.

    2012-01-01

    The probability that a site has at least one individual of a species ('occupancy') has come to be widely used as a state variable for animal population monitoring. The available statistical theory for estimation when detection is imperfect applies particularly to habitat patches or islands, although it is also used for arbitrary plots in continuous habitat. The probability that such a plot is occupied depends on plot size and home-range characteristics (size, shape and dispersion) as well as population density. Plot size is critical to the definition of occupancy as a state variable, but clear advice on plot size is missing from the literature on the design of occupancy studies. We describe models for the effects of varying plot size and home-range size on expected occupancy. Temporal, spatial, and species variation in average home-range size is to be expected, but information on home ranges is difficult to retrieve from species presence/absence data collected in occupancy studies. The effect of variable home-range size is negligible when plots are very large (>100 x area of home range), but large plots pose practical problems. At the other extreme, sampling of 'point' plots with cameras or other passive detectors allows the true 'proportion of area occupied' to be estimated. However, this measure equally reflects home-range size and density, and is of doubtful value for population monitoring or cross-species comparisons. Plot size is ill-defined and variable in occupancy studies that detect animals at unknown distances, the commonest example being unlimited-radius point counts of song birds. We also find that plot size is ill-defined in recent treatments of "multi-scale" occupancy; the respective scales are better interpreted as temporal (instantaneous and asymptotic) rather than spatial. Occupancy is an inadequate metric for population monitoring when it is confounded with home-range size or detection distance.

  20. Occupational Asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Library ▸ Asthma Library ▸ Occupational asthma TTR Share | Occupational Asthma This article has been reviewed by Thanai Pongdee, MD, FAAAAI Occupational asthma has become the most common work-related lung ...

  1. Asymptotic Normality of Quadratic Estimators.

    PubMed

    Robins, James; Li, Lingling; Tchetgen, Eric; van der Vaart, Aad

    2016-12-01

    We prove conditional asymptotic normality of a class of quadratic U-statistics that are dominated by their degenerate second order part and have kernels that change with the number of observations. These statistics arise in the construction of estimators in high-dimensional semi- and non-parametric models, and in the construction of nonparametric confidence sets. This is illustrated by estimation of the integral of a square of a density or regression function, and estimation of the mean response with missing data. We show that estimators are asymptotically normal even in the case that the rate is slower than the square root of the observations.

  2. Asymptotic Rayleigh instantaneous unit hydrograph

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Troutman, B.M.; Karlinger, M.R.

    1988-01-01

    The instantaneous unit hydrograph for a channel network under general linear routing and conditioned on the network magnitude, N, tends asymptotically, as N grows large, to a Rayleigh probability density function. This behavior is identical to that of the width function of the network, and is proven under the assumption that the network link configuration is topologically random and the link hydraulic and geometric properties are independent and identically distributed random variables. The asymptotic distribution depends only on a scale factor, {Mathematical expression}, where ?? is a mean link wave travel time. ?? 1988 Springer-Verlag.

  3. Wedge locality and asymptotic commutativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soloviev, M. A.

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we study twist deformed quantum field theories obtained by combining the Wightman axiomatic approach with the idea of spacetime noncommutativity. We prove that the deformed fields with deformation parameters of opposite sign satisfy the condition of mutual asymptotic commutativity, which was used earlier in nonlocal quantum field theory as a substitute for relative locality. We also present an improved proof of the wedge localization property discovered for the deformed fields by Grosse and Lechner, and we show that the deformation leaves the asymptotic behavior of the vacuum expectation values in spacelike directions substantially unchanged.

  4. Occupational asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Names Asthma - occupational exposure; Irritant-induced reactive airways disease Images Spirometry Respiratory system References Lemiere C, Vandenplas O. Occupational allergy and asthma. In: Adkinson NF Jr., Bochner ...

  5. Lorentzian proper vertex amplitude: Asymptotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engle, Jonathan; Vilensky, Ilya; Zipfel, Antonia

    2016-09-01

    In previous work, the Lorentzian proper vertex amplitude for a spin-foam model of quantum gravity was derived. In the present work, the asymptotics of this amplitude are studied in the semiclassical limit. The starting point of the analysis is an expression for the amplitude as an action integral with action differing from that in the Engle-Pereira-Rovelli-Livine (EPRL) case by an extra "projector" term. This extra term scales linearly with spins only in the asymptotic limit, and is discontinuous on a (lower dimensional) submanifold of the integration domain in the sense that its value at each such point depends on the direction of approach. New tools are introduced to generalize stationary phase methods to this case. For the case of boundary data which can be glued to a nondegenerate Lorentzian 4-simplex, the asymptotic limit of the amplitude is shown to equal the single Feynman term, showing that the extra term in the asymptotics of the EPRL amplitude has been eliminated.

  6. Asymptotic screened hydrogenic radial integrals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsgaard, D. A.; Khan, F.; Khandelwal, G. S.

    1988-01-01

    The usefulness of the screened hydrogenic model for the transitions of the helium sequence is studied. The screened hydrogenic radial dipole integral for discrete-discrete transitions from the initial state to the final state is asymptotically expanded to the lowest order such that the final quantum number n approaches infinity. The analytical expression obtained is in terms of confluent hypergeometric functions.

  7. Remarks on asymptotically safe inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tye, S.-H. Henry; Xu, Jiajun

    2010-12-01

    We comment on Weinberg’s interesting analysis of asymptotically safe inflation [S. Weinberg, Phys. Rev. DPRVDAQ1550-7998 81, 083535 (2010).10.1103/PhysRevD.81.083535]. We find that even if the gravity theory exhibits an ultraviolet fixed point, the energy scale during inflation is way too low to drive the theory close to the fixed point value. We choose the specific renormalization group flow away from the fixed point towards the infrared region that reproduces the Newton’s constant and today’s cosmological constant. We follow this renormalization group flow path to scales below the Planck scale to study the stability of the inflationary scenario. Again, we find that some fine-tuning is necessary to get enough e folds of inflation in the asymptotically safe inflationary scenario.

  8. Asymptotic safety goes on shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedetti, Dario

    2012-01-01

    It is well known in quantum field theory that the off-shell effective action depends on the gauge choice and field parametrization used in calculating it. Nevertheless, the typical scheme in which the scenario of asymptotically safe gravity is investigated is an off-shell version of the functional renormalization group equation. Working with the Einstein-Hilbert truncation as a test bed, we develop a new scheme for the analysis of asymptotically safe gravity in which the on-shell part of the effective action is singled out and we show that the beta function for the essential coupling has no explicit gauge dependence. In order to reach our goal, we introduce several technical novelties, including a different decomposition of the metric fluctuations, a new implementation of the ghost sector and a new cut-off scheme. We find a nontrivial fixed point, with a value of the cosmological constant that is independent of the gauge-fixing parameters.

  9. Asymptotic controllability and optimal control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motta, M.; Rampazzo, F.

    We consider a control problem where the state must approach asymptotically a target C while paying an integral cost with a non-negative Lagrangian l. The dynamics f is just continuous, and no assumptions are made on the zero level set of the Lagrangian l. Through an inequality involving a positive number p and a Minimum Restraint FunctionU=U(x) - a special type of Control Lyapunov Function - we provide a condition implying that (i) the system is asymptotically controllable, and (ii) the value function is bounded by U/p. The result has significant consequences for the uniqueness issue of the corresponding Hamilton-Jacobi equation. Furthermore it may be regarded as a first step in the direction of a feedback construction.

  10. Composite operators in asymptotic safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagani, Carlo; Reuter, Martin

    2017-03-01

    We study the role of composite operators in the asymptotic safety program for quantum gravity. By including in the effective average action an explicit dependence on new sources, we are able to keep track of operators which do not belong to the exact theory space and/or are normally discarded in a truncation. Typical examples are geometric operators such as volumes, lengths, or geodesic distances. We show that this setup allows us to investigate the scaling properties of various interesting operators via a suitable exact renormalization group equation. We test our framework in several settings including quantum Einstein gravity, the conformally reduced Einstein-Hilbert truncation, and two-dimensional quantum gravity. Finally, we briefly argue that our construction paves the way to approach observables in the asymptotic safety program.

  11. Asymptotic Techniques in Ignition Theory.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-01

    conduction, until the exothermic reaction leads to a thermal runaway at a finite ignition time. Since the heat conductivity of the wire is often very large...Large activation energy asymptotics have been very useful in describing thermal ignition with different tyres of heating mechanisms. These methods...good agreement with the results of numerical integra- tions. -2- Thermal runaway leading to ignition is a strongly dependent function of temperature

  12. Asymptotic prime partitions of integers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartel, Johann; Bhaduri, R. K.; Brack, Matthias; Murthy, M. V. N.

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, we discuss P (n ) , the number of ways a given integer n may be written as a sum of primes. In particular, an asymptotic form Pas(n ) valid for n →∞ is obtained analytically using standard techniques of quantum statistical mechanics. First, the bosonic partition function of primes, or the generating function of unrestricted prime partitions in number theory, is constructed. Next, the density of states is obtained using the saddle-point method for Laplace inversion of the partition function in the limit of large n . This gives directly the asymptotic number of prime partitions Pas(n ) . The leading term in the asymptotic expression grows exponentially as √{n /ln(n ) } and agrees with previous estimates. We calculate the next-to-leading-order term in the exponent, proportional to ln[ln(n )]/ln(n ) , and we show that an earlier result in the literature for its coefficient is incorrect. Furthermore, we also calculate the next higher-order correction, proportional to 1 /ln(n ) and given in Eq. (43), which so far has not been available in the literature. Finally, we compare our analytical results with the exact numerical values of P (n ) up to n ˜8 ×106 . For the highest values, the remaining error between the exact P (n ) and our Pas(n ) is only about half of that obtained with the leading-order approximation. But we also show that, unlike for other types of partitions, the asymptotic limit for the prime partitions is still quite far from being reached even for n ˜107 .

  13. On asymptotically lacunary invariant statistical equivalent set sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pancaroglu, Nimet; Nuray, Fatih; Savas, Ekrem

    2013-10-01

    In this paper, we define asymptotically invariant equivalence, strongly asymptotically invariant equivalence, asymptotically invariant statistical equivalence, asymptotically lacunary invariant statistical equivalence, strongly asymptotically lacunary invariant equivalence, asymptotically lacunary invariant equivalence (Wijsman sense) for sequences of sets. Also we investigate some relations between asymptotically lacunary invariant statistical equivalence and asymptotically invariant statistical equivalence for sequences of sets. We introduce some notions and theorems as follows, asymptotically lacunary invariant statistical equivalence, strongly asymptotically lacunary invariant equivalence, asymptotically lacunary invariant equivalence (Wijsman sense) for sequences of sets.

  14. Occupational Employment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Occupational Outlook Quarterly, 2012

    2012-01-01

    When choosing a career, jobseekers often want to know which occupations offer the best prospects. Generally, occupations that have rapid job growth, many new jobs, or many job openings--and good wages--promise better opportunities. This paper shows how employment in particular occupations is projected to change from 2010 to 2020. It presents…

  15. Asymptotically Free Gauge Theories. I

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Wilczek, Frank; Gross, David J.

    1973-07-01

    Asymptotically free gauge theories of the strong interactions are constructed and analyzed. The reasons for doing this are recounted, including a review of renormalization group techniques and their application to scaling phenomena. The renormalization group equations are derived for Yang-Mills theories. The parameters that enter into the equations are calculated to lowest order and it is shown that these theories are asymptotically free. More specifically the effective coupling constant, which determines the ultraviolet behavior of the theory, vanishes for large space-like momenta. Fermions are incorporated and the construction of realistic models is discussed. We propose that the strong interactions be mediated by a "color" gauge group which commutes with SU(3)xSU(3). The problem of symmetry breaking is discussed. It appears likely that this would have a dynamical origin. It is suggested that the gauge symmetry might not be broken, and that the severe infrared singularities prevent the occurrence of non-color singlet physical states. The deep inelastic structure functions, as well as the electron position total annihilation cross section are analyzed. Scaling obtains up to calculable logarithmic corrections, and the naive lightcone or parton model results follow. The problems of incorporating scalar mesons and breaking the symmetry by the Higgs mechanism are explained in detail.

  16. The maximum drag reduction asymptote

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choueiri, George H.; Hof, Bjorn

    2015-11-01

    Addition of long chain polymers is one of the most efficient ways to reduce the drag of turbulent flows. Already very low concentration of polymers can lead to a substantial drag and upon further increase of the concentration the drag reduces until it reaches an empirically found limit, the so called maximum drag reduction (MDR) asymptote, which is independent of the type of polymer used. We here carry out a detailed experimental study of the approach to this asymptote for pipe flow. Particular attention is paid to the recently observed state of elasto-inertial turbulence (EIT) which has been reported to occur in polymer solutions at sufficiently high shear. Our results show that upon the approach to MDR Newtonian turbulence becomes marginalized (hibernation) and eventually completely disappears and is replaced by EIT. In particular, spectra of high Reynolds number MDR flows are compared to flows at high shear rates in small diameter tubes where EIT is found at Re < 100. The research leading to these results has received funding from the People Programme (Marie Curie Actions) of the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under REA grant agreement n° [291734].

  17. Asymptotic density and effective negligibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astor, Eric P.

    In this thesis, we join the study of asymptotic computability, a project attempting to capture the idea that an algorithm might work correctly in all but a vanishing fraction of cases. In collaboration with Hirschfeldt and Jockusch, broadening the original investigation of Jockusch and Schupp, we introduce dense computation, the weakest notion of asymptotic computability (requiring only that the correct answer is produced on a set of density 1), and effective dense computation, where every computation halts with either the correct answer or (on a set of density 0) a symbol denoting uncertainty. A few results make more precise the relationship between these notions and work already done with Jockusch and Schupp's original definitions of coarse and generic computability. For all four types of asymptotic computation, including generic computation, we demonstrate that non-trivial upper cones have measure 0, building on recent work of Hirschfeldt, Jockusch, Kuyper, and Schupp in which they establish this for coarse computation. Their result transfers to yield a minimal pair for relative coarse computation; we generalize their method and extract a similar result for relative dense computation (and thus for its corresponding reducibility). However, all of these notions of near-computation treat a set as negligible iff it has asymptotic density 0. Noting that this definition is not computably invariant, this produces some failures of intuition and a break with standard expectations in computability theory. For instance, as shown by Hamkins and Miasnikov, the halting problem is (in some formulations) effectively densely computable, even in polynomial time---yet this result appears fragile, as indicated by Rybalov. In independent work, we respond to this by strengthening the approach of Jockusch and Schupp to avoid such phenomena; specifically, we introduce a new notion of intrinsic asymptotic density, invariant under computable permutation, with rich relations to both

  18. Asymptotic safety, emergence and minimal length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Percacci, Roberto; Vacca, Gian Paolo

    2010-12-01

    There seems to be a common prejudice that asymptotic safety is either incompatible with, or at best unrelated to, the other topics in the title. This is not the case. In fact, we show that (1) the existence of a fixed point with suitable properties is a promising way of deriving emergent properties of gravity, and (2) there is a sense in which asymptotic safety implies a minimal length. In doing so we also discuss possible signatures of asymptotic safety in scattering experiments.

  19. Every composition operator is (mean) asymptotically Toeplitz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, Joel H.

    2007-09-01

    Nazarov and Shapiro recently showed that, while composition operators on the Hardy space H2 can only trivially be Toeplitz, or even "Toeplitz plus compact," it is an interesting problem to determine which of them can be "asymptotically Toeplitz." I show here that if "asymptotically" is interpreted in, for example, the Cesaro (C,[alpha]) sense ([alpha]>0), then every composition operator on H2 becomes asymptotically Toeplitz.

  20. Asymptotic and Fredholm representations of discrete groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manuilov, V. M.; Mishchenko, A. S.

    1998-10-01

    A C^*-algebra servicing the theory of asymptotic representations and its embedding into the Calkin algebra that induces an isomorphism of K_1-groups is constructed. As a consequence, it is shown that all vector bundles over the classifying space B\\pi that can be obtained by means of asymptotic representations of a discrete group \\pi can also be obtained by means of representations of the group \\pi \\times {\\mathbb Z} into the Calkin algebra. A generalization of the concept of Fredholm representation is also suggested, and it is shown that an asymptotic representation can be regarded as an asymptotic Fredholm representation.

  1. Occupational Consciousness

    PubMed Central

    Ramugondo, Elelwani L.

    2015-01-01

    Occupational consciousness refers to ongoing awareness of the dynamics of hegemony and recognition that dominant practices are sustained through what people do every day, with implications for personal and collective health. The emergence of the construct in post-apartheid South Africa signifies the country’s ongoing struggle with negotiating long-standing dynamics of power that were laid down during colonialism, and maintained under black majority rule. Consciousness, a key component of the new terminology, is framed from post-colonial perspectives – notably work by Biko and Fanon – and grounded in the philosophy of liberation, in order to draw attention to continuing unequal intersubjective relations that play out through human occupation. The paper also draws important links between occupational consciousness and other related constructs, namely occupational possibilities, occupational choice, occupational apartheid, and collective occupation. The use of the term ‘consciousness’ in sociology, with related or different meanings, is also explored. Occupational consciousness is then advanced as a critical notion that frames everyday doing as a potentially liberating response to oppressive social structures. This paper advances theorizing as a scholarly practice in occupational science, and could potentially expand inter or transdisciplinary work for critical conceptualizations of human occupation. PMID:26549984

  2. Occupational Consciousness.

    PubMed

    Ramugondo, Elelwani L

    2015-10-02

    Occupational consciousness refers to ongoing awareness of the dynamics of hegemony and recognition that dominant practices are sustained through what people do every day, with implications for personal and collective health. The emergence of the construct in post-apartheid South Africa signifies the country's ongoing struggle with negotiating long-standing dynamics of power that were laid down during colonialism, and maintained under black majority rule. Consciousness, a key component of the new terminology, is framed from post-colonial perspectives - notably work by Biko and Fanon - and grounded in the philosophy of liberation, in order to draw attention to continuing unequal intersubjective relations that play out through human occupation. The paper also draws important links between occupational consciousness and other related constructs, namely occupational possibilities, occupational choice, occupational apartheid, and collective occupation. The use of the term 'consciousness' in sociology, with related or different meanings, is also explored. Occupational consciousness is then advanced as a critical notion that frames everyday doing as a potentially liberating response to oppressive social structures. This paper advances theorizing as a scholarly practice in occupational science, and could potentially expand inter or transdisciplinary work for critical conceptualizations of human occupation.

  3. Asymptotic expansions in nonlinear rotordynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, William B.

    1987-01-01

    This paper is an examination of special nonlinearities of the Jeffcott equations in rotordynamics. The immediate application of this analysis is directed toward understanding the excessive vibrations recorded in the LOX pump of the SSME during hot-firing ground testing. Deadband, side force, and rubbing are three possible sources of inducing nonlinearity in the Jeffcott equations. The present analysis initially reduces these problems to the same mathematical description. A special frequency, named the nonlinear natural frequency, is defined and used to develop the solutions of the nonlinear Jeffcott equations as singular asymptotic expansions. This nonlinear natural frequency, which is the ratio of the cross-stiffness and the damping, plays a major role in determining response frequencies.

  4. Asymptotic invariants of homotopy groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manin, Fedor

    We study the homotopy groups of a finite CW complex X via constraints on the geometry of representatives of their elements. For example, one can measure the "size" of alpha ∈ pi n (X) by the optimal Lipschitz constant or volume of a representative. By comparing the geometrical structure thus obtained with the algebraic structure of the group, one can define functions such as growth and distortion in pin(X), analogously to the way that such functions are studied in asymptotic geometric group theory. We provide a number of examples and techniques for studying these invariants, with a special focus on spaces with few rational homotopy groups. Our main theorem characterizes those X in which all non-torsion homotopy classes are undistorted, that is, their volume distortion functions, and hence also their Lipschitz distortion functions, are linear.

  5. Involatile nanodroplets: an asymptotic analysis.

    PubMed

    Jarymowycz, Lucien B; Ortoleva, Peter J

    2006-06-21

    The structure of nanometer-scale droplets of weakly volatile liquids arises through the interplay of strong intermolecular attraction, and core intermolecular repulsion, interfacial forces, and the large, negative chemical potential of the low density vapor with which it is in equilibrium. Using a van der Waals equation of state and a mesoscopic multiphase model, the structure of such nanodroplets is determined via an asymptotic analysis in terms of the ambient to critical temperature ratio. The structure of a spherical droplet is obtained as the solution of a simple "shooting" problem. The intradroplet pressure profile and a minimal droplet size are determined. The high pressure in the core of the droplet gives evidence for the preferred melting there for systems like water with a negative volume of melting. Our methodology can be generalized to multiphase droplets, as well as to composite structures wherein viruses or other nanoparticles are embedded.

  6. Einstein-Yang-Mills theory: Asymptotic symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnich, Glenn; Lambert, Pierre-Henry

    2013-11-01

    Asymptotic symmetries of the Einstein-Yang-Mills system with or without cosmological constant are explicitly worked out in a unified manner. In agreement with a recent conjecture, one finds a Virasoro-Kac-Moody type algebra not only in three dimensions but also in the four-dimensional asymptotically flat case.

  7. An asymptotic model of the F layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, W. L.

    2012-01-01

    A model of the F layer of the ionosphere is presented that consists of a bottomside asymptote that ignores transport and a topside asymptote that ignores chemistry. The asymptotes connect at the balance height dividing the chemistry and transport regimes. A combination of these two asymptotes produces a good approximation to the true F layer. Analogously, a model of F layer response to an applied vertical drift is presented that consists of two asymptotic responses, one that ignores transport and one that ignores chemistry. The combination of these asymptotic responses produces a good approximation to the response of the true F layer. This latter response is identical to the “servo” response of Rishbeth et al. (1978), derived from the continuity equation. The asymptotic approach bypasses the continuity equation in favor of “force balance” arguments and so replaces a differential equation with simpler algebraic equations. This new approach provides a convenient and intuitive mean for first-order estimates of the change in F layer peak height and density in terms of changes in neutral density, composition, temperature, winds, and electric fields. It is applicable at midlatitudes and at magnetically quiet times at high latitudes. Forensic inverse relations are possible but are not unique. The validity of the asymptotic relations is shown through numerical simulation.

  8. On SLλ(I)-asymptotically statistical equivalent sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gumus, Hafize; Savas, Ekrem

    2012-09-01

    This paper presents the notion of SLλ(I)-asymptotically statistical equivalence which is a natural combination of asymptotic I-equivalence and λ-statistical equivalence. We find its relation to I-asymptotically statistical convergence, strong λI-asymptotically equivalence and strong Cesàro I-asymptotically equivalence.

  9. Occupational Therapists

    MedlinePlus

    ... nurses , and other types of therapists. They may work with patients who have chronic conditions, such as diabetes, or help rehabilitate a patient recovering from hip replacement surgery. Occupational therapists also oversee the work of occupational therapy assistants and aides . <- Summary Work ...

  10. Asymptotics of Simple Branching Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huillet, Thierry; Kłopotowski, Andrzej; Porzio, Anna

    1995-09-01

    In this paper we study a simple deterministic tree structure: an initial individual generates a finite number of offspring, each of which has given integer valued lifetime, iterating the same procedure when dying. Three asymptotic distributions of this asynchronous deterministic branching procedure are considered: the generation distribution, the ability of individuals to generate offspring and the age distribution. Thermodynamic formalism is then developped to reveal the multifractal nature of the mass splitting associated to our process. On considère l'itération d'une structure déterministe arborescente selon laquelle un ancêtre engendre un nombre fini de descendants dont la durée de vie (à valeurs entières) est donnée. Dans un premier temps on s'intéresse aux trois distributions asymptotiques suivantes : répartition des générations, aptitude à engendrer des descendants et répartition selon l'âge. Ensuite nous développons le formalisme thermodynamique pour mettre en évidence le caractère multifractal de la scission d'une masse unitaire associée à cette arborescence.

  11. Asymptotic Potential for Simulated Annealing.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Philip Andrew

    1995-01-01

    Potential theory is an important area of mathematical physics which has been intensively studied in the areas of partial differential equations and probability. The purpose of this thesis is to develop a potential theory for the time-inhomogeneous Markov chains defined by simulated annealing. First the notion of global recurrence orders is extended to that of global recurrence functions. Then this idea is condensed to local attractors (cups), resulting in improved and sharper estimates for the exit probabilities. For each cup, the weighted activity of a point in the cup is considered, that is the value of sum_sp {n=m}{sigma}lambda_sp {n}{c}P(X_ n=x) for a suitable value of c. Here sigma is the exit time from the cup, representing our localized viewpoint. The convergence as m goes to infinity is considered, the result having many properties of classical potentials, and hence is called the asymptotic potential. A consequence is to simplify previous results and produce calculable constants for estimates. This is important for practical applications where such knowledge is often required and used.

  12. Detecting communities using asymptotical surprise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traag, V. A.; Aldecoa, R.; Delvenne, J.-C.

    2015-08-01

    Nodes in real-world networks are repeatedly observed to form dense clusters, often referred to as communities. Methods to detect these groups of nodes usually maximize an objective function, which implicitly contains the definition of a community. We here analyze a recently proposed measure called surprise, which assesses the quality of the partition of a network into communities. In its current form, the formulation of surprise is rather difficult to analyze. We here therefore develop an accurate asymptotic approximation. This allows for the development of an efficient algorithm for optimizing surprise. Incidentally, this leads to a straightforward extension of surprise to weighted graphs. Additionally, the approximation makes it possible to analyze surprise more closely and compare it to other methods, especially modularity. We show that surprise is (nearly) unaffected by the well-known resolution limit, a particular problem for modularity. However, surprise may tend to overestimate the number of communities, whereas they may be underestimated by modularity. In short, surprise works well in the limit of many small communities, whereas modularity works better in the limit of few large communities. In this sense, surprise is more discriminative than modularity and may find communities where modularity fails to discern any structure.

  13. Particle creation in asymptotically Minkowskian spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradi, Shahpoor

    2009-02-01

    Exact solutions of Klein-Gordon and Dirac equations are obtained for two classes of Robertson-Walker (RW) spacetimes with asymptotically Minkowskian regions. One class is Minkowskian in the remote past and future. In this class in and out vacua are well defined, because the scale factor reduces to a constant at the asymptotic regions. Another class is asymptotically flat only in the far past. Using the obtained exact solutions we calculate the density of scalar and Dirac particles created through the Bogolubov transformations technique. For Dirac field it is shown that the rates of creation of particles and antiparticles are equal.

  14. Renormalized asymptotic enumeration of Feynman diagrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borinsky, Michael

    2017-10-01

    A method to obtain all-order asymptotic results for the coefficients of perturbative expansions in zero-dimensional quantum field is described. The focus is on the enumeration of the number of skeleton or primitive diagrams of a certain QFT and its asymptotics. The procedure heavily applies techniques from singularity analysis. To utilize singularity analysis, a representation of the zero-dimensional path integral as a generalized hyperelliptic curve is deduced. As applications the full asymptotic expansions of the number of disconnected, connected, 1PI and skeleton Feynman diagrams in various theories are given.

  15. Occupational Rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Grammer, Leslie C

    2016-05-01

    Occupational rhinitis (OR) involves nasal congestion, rhinorrhea, nasal itching, and/or sneezing resulting from workplace exposures. OR can have a significant negative effect on quality of life and productivity. OR can be divided into allergic or nonallergic subgroups based on the underlying pathogenesis. Certain occupational exposures place employees at greater risk for developing disease. Primary treatment is avoidance of implicated exposures. Antihistamines, saline rinses, and nasal steroids may be useful. OR can coexist with occupational asthma, and rhinitis symptoms have been reported to precede those of the lower respiratory tract. OR is has both medical and socioeconomic implications.

  16. Occupational Health

    MedlinePlus

    Occupational health problems occur at work or because of the kind of work you do. These problems can include ... by exposure to radiation Exposure to germs in health care settings Good job safety and prevention practices ...

  17. Asymptotic unbounded root loci - Formulas and computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sastry, S. S.; Desoer, C. A.

    1983-01-01

    A new geometric way of computing the asymptotic behavior of unbounded root loci of a strictly proper linear time-invariant control system as loop gain goes to infinity is presented. Properties of certain restricted linear maps and nested restrictions of linear maps are developed, and formulas are obtained for the leading coefficient of the asymptotic values of the unbounded multivariable root loci are obtained in terms of eigenvalues of those maps. Published results and a certain simple null structure assumption are used to relate these asymptotic values to the structure at infinity of the Smith-McMillan form of the open loop transfer function. Explicit matrix formulas for the more abstract derived formulas are given and additional geometric insights are developed with orthogonal projections and singular value decomposition. Formulas for the pivots of the unbounded root loci are calculated and shown to have the same form as the coefficients of the unbounded asymptotic root loci.

  18. On asymptotically generalized statistical equivalent set sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savas, Ekrem

    2013-10-01

    In this paper we shall study the asymptotically λ-statistical equivalent (Wijsman sense) of multiple L. In addition to these definition, natural inclusion theorems shall also be presented. This approach has not been considered in any context before.

  19. Asymptotic unbounded root loci - Formulas and computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sastry, S. S.; Desoer, C. A.

    1983-01-01

    A new geometric way of computing the asymptotic behavior of unbounded root loci of a strictly proper linear time-invariant control system as loop gain goes to infinity is presented. Properties of certain restricted linear maps and nested restrictions of linear maps are developed, and formulas are obtained for the leading coefficient of the asymptotic values of the unbounded multivariable root loci are obtained in terms of eigenvalues of those maps. Published results and a certain simple null structure assumption are used to relate these asymptotic values to the structure at infinity of the Smith-McMillan form of the open loop transfer function. Explicit matrix formulas for the more abstract derived formulas are given and additional geometric insights are developed with orthogonal projections and singular value decomposition. Formulas for the pivots of the unbounded root loci are calculated and shown to have the same form as the coefficients of the unbounded asymptotic root loci.

  20. Asymptotic Poincare lemma and its applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ziolkowski, R.W.; Deschamps, G.A.

    1984-05-01

    An asymptotic version of Poincare's lemma is defined and solutions are obtained with the calculus of exterior differential forms. They are used to construct the asymptotic approximations of multidimensional oscillatory integrals whose forms are commonly encountered, for example, in electromagnetic problems. In particular, the boundary and stationary point evaluations of these integrals are considered. The former is applied to the Kirchhoff representation of a scalar field diffracted through an aperture and simply recovers the Maggi-Rubinowicz-Miyamoto-Wolf results. Asymptotic approximations in the presence of other (standard) critical points are also discussed. Techniques developed for the asymptotic Poincare lemma are used to generate a general representation of the Leray form. All of the (differential form) expressions presented are generalizations of known (vector calculus) results. 14 references, 4 figures.

  1. Asymptotic Symmetries of Spacelike Stretched ADS Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blagojević, Milutin; Cvetković, Branislav

    We study asymptotic symmetries in the spacelike stretched AdS sector of topologically massive gravity. The Poisson bracket algebra of the canonical generators is shown to be centrally extended semi-direct sum of the Virasoro and u(1) Kac-Moody algebra. By using the Sugawara construction, we prove that the asymptotic symmetry coincides with the conformal symmetry, described by two independent Virasoro algebras with central charges.

  2. Preconditioning via asymptotically-defined domain decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Ashby, S.F.; Kelley, C.T.; Scroggs, J.S.; Saylor, P.E.

    1994-06-01

    Asymptotic analysis is used to derive preconditioners based on operator splitting and domain decomposition for the numerical solution of the advection-diffusion equation. Specifically, asymptotics is used to identify subdomains in which the solution is dominated by a certain operator, and this information is used to construct an effective preconditioner. The authors analyze the one-dimensional case in a function space setting and present numerical results for both one and two dimensions.

  3. [Occupational asthma].

    PubMed

    Rico-Rosillo, Guadalupe; Cambray-Gutiérrez, Julio César; Vega-Robledo, Gloria Bertha

    2015-01-01

    The occupational asthma is the most common form of lung disease caused by factors that are attributed to a specific working environment in industrialized countries. It causes variable limitation of airflow and/or hyper-responsiveness of the airway due to contact with specific agents present in an atmosphere of work and not to stimuli found out of this place. It is recognized more and more frequently, and many agents are capable of causing occupational asthma by different pathophysiological mechanisms. More than 400 agents causing occupational asthma are known and every year new triggers are detected. Numerous factors contribute to the pathogenesis of occupational asthma induced chemically, including immunological, non-immunological mechanisms of epithelial damage, airway remodeling, oxidative stress, neurogenic inflammation as well as genetic factors. The most important risk factors for occupational asthma include: atopy, smoking and genetic factors. The diagnosis is based on the clinical history, skin tests, immunological tests and functional studies. The fundamental treatment is removing the worker from exposure as soon as possible. The advance in the knowledge of the pathogenesis of occupational asthma will importantly influence in the prevention and the management of this disease.

  4. Dynamics on Scale-Invariant Structures.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christou, Alexis

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. We investigate dynamical processes on random and regular fractals. The (static) problem of percolation in the semi -infinite plane introduces many pertinent ideas including real space renormalisation group (RSRG) fugacity transformations and scaling forms. We study the percolation probability to determine the surface critical behaviour and to establish exponent relations. The fugacity approach is generalised to study random walks on diffusion-limited aggregates (DLA). Using regular and random models, we calculate the walk dimensionality and demonstrate that it is consistent with a conjecture by Aharony and Stauffer. It is shown that the kinetically grown DNA is in a distinct dynamic universality class to lattice animals. Similarly, the speculation of Helman -Coniglio-Tsallis regarding diffusion on self-avoiding walks (SAWs) is shown to be incorrect. The results are corroborated by an exact enumeration analysis of the internal structure of SAWs. A 'spin' and field theoretic Hamiltonian formulation for the conformational and resistance properties of random walks is presented. We consider Gaussian random walks, SAWs, spiral SAWs and valence walks. We express resistive susceptibilities as correlation functions and hence epsilon-expansions are calculated for the resistance exponents. For SAWs, the local crosslinks are shown to be irrelevant and we calculate corrections to scaling. A scaling description is introduced into an equation -of-motion method in order to study spin wave damping in d-dimensional isotropic Heisenberg ferro-, antiferro- and ferri- magnets near p_{rm c} . Dynamic scaling is shown to be obeyed by the Lorentzian spin wave response function and lifetime. The ensemble of finite clusters and multicritical behaviour is also treated. In contrast, the relaxational dynamics of the dilute Anisotropic Heisenberg model is shown to violate conventional dynamic scaling near the percolation bicritical point but satisfies instead a singular scaling behaviour arising from activation of Bloch walls over percolation cluster energy barriers.

  5. Occupational neurology.

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, R. G.

    1987-01-01

    The nervous system is vulnerable to the effects of certain chemicals and physical conditions found in the work environment. The activities of an occupational neurologist focus on the evaluation of patients with neurological disorders caused by occupational or environmental conditions. When one is making a differential diagnosis in patients with neurological disorders, the possibility of toxic exposure or encounters with physical factors in the workplace must not be overlooked. Central to an accurate clinical diagnosis is the patient's history. A diagnosis of an occupational or environmental neurological problem requires a careful assessment of the clinical abnormalities and confirmation of these disabilities by objective tests such as nerve conduction velocity, evoked potentials, electroencephalogram, neuropsychological batteries, or nerve biopsy. On the basis of information about hazards in the workplace, safety standards and environmental and biological monitoring can be implemented in the workplace to reduce the risks of undue injury. Clinical manifestations of headache, memory disturbance, and peripheral neuropathy are commonly encountered presentations of the effects of occupational hazards. Physicians in everyday clinical practice must be aware of the signs and symptoms associated with exposure to possible neurotoxins and work methods. Occupational and environmental circumstances must be explored when evaluating patients with neurologic disorders. PMID:3577214

  6. Occupational rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Sublett, J Wesley; Bernstein, David I

    2011-11-01

    Work-related rhinitis, which includes work-exacerbated rhinitis and occupational rhinoconjunctivitis (OR), is two to three times more common than occupational asthma. High molecular weight proteins and low molecular weight chemicals have been implicated as causes of OR. The diagnosis of work-related rhinitis is established based on occupational history and documentation of immunoglobulin E (IgE) mediated sensitization to the causative agent if possible. Management of work-related rhinitis is similar to that of other causes of rhinitis and includes elimination or reduction of exposure to causative agents combined with pharmacotherapy. If allergens are commercially available, allergen immunotherapy can be considered. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Asymptotic analysis and symmetry in MHD convection

    SciTech Connect

    Alboussiere, T.; Garandet, J.P.

    1996-08-01

    The motion of an electrically conducting fluid in the presence of a steady magnetic field is analyzed. For any non-uniform magnetic field and any non-electromagnetic driving force, a high Hartmann number asymptotic analysis is developed using curvilinear coordinates based on the magnetic field. This analysis yields the structure of the electric current density and velocity fields. In a second step, orthogonal planar symmetries lead to a significant simplification of the asymptotic structure, depending on the nature of the symmetry. The asymptotic solution is applied to some configurations, some of them corresponding to crystal growth from a melt. In the case of electrically insulating boundaries, the nature of the symmetry is found to govern the magnitude and structure of the damped velocity. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  8. Dispersive shock wave interactions and asymptotics.

    PubMed

    Ablowitz, Mark J; Baldwin, Douglas E

    2013-02-01

    Dispersive shock waves (DSWs) are physically important phenomena that occur in systems dominated by weak dispersion and weak nonlinearity. The Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation is the universal model for systems with weak dispersion and weak, quadratic nonlinearity. Here we show that the long-time-asymptotic solution of the KdV equation for general, steplike data is a single-phase DSW; this DSW is the "largest" possible DSW based on the boundary data. We find this asymptotic solution using the inverse scattering transform and matched-asymptotic expansions. So while multistep data evolve to have multiphase dynamics at intermediate times, these interacting DSWs eventually merge to form a single-phase DSW at large time.

  9. Asymptotic wave propagation in excitable media.

    PubMed

    Bernus, Olivier; Vigmond, Edward

    2015-07-01

    Wave shape and velocity are important issues in reaction-diffusion systems, and are often the result of competition in media with heterogeneous conduction properties. Asymptotic wave front propagation at maximal conduction velocity has been previously reported in the context of anisotropic cardiac tissue, but it is unknown whether this is a universal property of excitable tissues where conduction velocity can be locally modulated by mechanisms other than anisotropy. Here, we investigate the impact of conduction heterogeneities and boundary effects on wave propagation in excitable media. Following a theoretical analysis, we find that wave-front cusps occur where local velocity is reduced and that asymptotic wave fronts propagate at the maximal translational conduction velocity. Simulations performed in different reaction-diffusion systems, including cardiac tissue, confirm our theoretical findings. We conclude that this property can be found in a wide range of reaction-diffusion systems with excitable dynamics and that asymptotic wave-front shapes can be predicted.

  10. Occupational Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, William R.

    Although fiscal support for occupational programs in California Community Colleges is provided primarily by state and local district taxes, about ten percent of the total support is provided through federal sources. Federal regulations under the Vocational Education Act (VEA) require the recipients of federal funds to provide consultative,…

  11. Occupational cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Guidotti, T.L.; Goldsmith, D.F.

    1986-09-01

    When cancer is possibly related to occupation, the family physician's task is to put the matter in perspective by educating the patient and carefully documenting the appearance of the tumor and the patient's work history. Occasionally, physicians are the first to recognize new associations between chemicals and cancer and can help to bring hazards under control.

  12. Asymptotic stability of singularly perturbed differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artstein, Zvi

    2017-02-01

    Asymptotic stability is examined for singularly perturbed ordinary differential equations that may not possess a natural split into fast and slow motions. Rather, the right hand side of the equation is comprised of a singularly perturbed component and a regular one. The limit dynamics consists then of Young measures, with values being invariant measures of the fast contribution, drifted by the slow one. Relations between the asymptotic stability of the perturbed system and the limit dynamics are examined, and a Lyapunov functions criterion, based on averaging, is established.

  13. Asymptotics of a horizontal liquid bridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haynes, M.; O'Brien, S. B. G.; Benilov, E. S.

    2016-04-01

    This paper uses asymptotic techniques to find the shape of a two dimensional liquid bridge suspended between two vertical walls. We model the equilibrium bridge shape using the Laplace-Young equation. We use the Bond number as a small parameter to deduce an asymptotic solution which is then compared with numerical solutions. The perturbation approach demonstrates that equilibrium is only possible if the contact angle lies within a hysteresis interval and the analysis relates the width of this interval to the Bond number. This result is verified by comparison with a global force balance. In addition, we examine the quasi-static evolution of such a two dimensional bridge.

  14. Directions for model building from asymptotic safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bond, Andrew D.; Hiller, Gudrun; Kowalska, Kamila; Litim, Daniel F.

    2017-08-01

    Building on recent advances in the understanding of gauge-Yukawa theories we explore possibilities to UV-complete the Standard Model in an asymptotically safe manner. Minimal extensions are based on a large flavor sector of additional fermions coupled to a scalar singlet matrix field. We find that asymptotic safety requires fermions in higher representations of SU(3) C × SU(2) L . Possible signatures at colliders are worked out and include R-hadron searches, diboson signatures and the evolution of the strong and weak coupling constants.

  15. Lectures on renormalization and asymptotic safety

    SciTech Connect

    Nagy, Sandor

    2014-11-15

    A short introduction is given on the functional renormalization group method, putting emphasis on its nonperturbative aspects. The method enables to find nontrivial fixed points in quantum field theoretic models which make them free from divergences and leads to the concept of asymptotic safety. It can be considered as a generalization of the asymptotic freedom which plays a key role in the perturbative renormalization. We summarize and give a short discussion of some important models, which are asymptotically safe such as the Gross–Neveu model, the nonlinear σ model, the sine–Gordon model, and we consider the model of quantum Einstein gravity which seems to show asymptotic safety, too. We also give a detailed analysis of infrared behavior of such scalar models where a spontaneous symmetry breaking takes place. The deep infrared behavior of the broken phase cannot be treated within the framework of perturbative calculations. We demonstrate that there exists an infrared fixed point in the broken phase which creates a new scaling regime there, however its structure is hidden by the singularity of the renormalization group equations. The theory spaces of these models show several similar properties, namely the models have the same phase and fixed point structure. The quantum Einstein gravity also exhibits similarities when considering the global aspects of its theory space since the appearing two phases there show analogies with the symmetric and the broken phases of the scalar models. These results be nicely uncovered by the functional renormalization group method.

  16. Asymptotic theory of relativistic, magnetized jets

    SciTech Connect

    Lyubarsky, Yuri

    2011-01-15

    The structure of a relativistically hot, strongly magnetized jet is investigated at large distances from the source. Asymptotic equations are derived describing collimation and acceleration of the externally confined jet. Conditions are found for the transformation of the thermal energy into the fluid kinetic energy or into the Poynting flux. Simple scalings are presented for the jet collimation angle and Lorentz factors.

  17. Stationary solutions and asymptotic flatness I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiris, Martin

    2014-08-01

    In general relativity, a stationary isolated system is defined as an asymptotically flat (AF) stationary spacetime with compact material sources. Other definitions that are less restrictive on the type of asymptotic could in principle be possible. Between this article and its sequel, we show that under basic assumptions, asymptotic flatness indeed follows as a consequence of Einstein's theory. In particular, it is proved that any vacuum stationary spacetime-end whose (quotient) manifold is diffeomorphic to {{{R}}^{3}} minus a ball and whose Killing field has its norm bounded away from zero, is necessarily AF with Schwarzschildian fall off. The ‘excised’ ball would contain (if any) the actual material body, but this information is unnecessary to reach the conclusion. In this first article, we work with weakly asymptotically flat (WAF) stationary ends, a notion that generalizes as much as possible that of the AF end, and prove that WAF ends are AF with Schwarzschildian fall off. Physical and mathematical implications are also discussed.

  18. Asymptotic theory of relativistic, magnetized jets.

    PubMed

    Lyubarsky, Yuri

    2011-01-01

    The structure of a relativistically hot, strongly magnetized jet is investigated at large distances from the source. Asymptotic equations are derived describing collimation and acceleration of the externally confined jet. Conditions are found for the transformation of the thermal energy into the fluid kinetic energy or into the Poynting flux. Simple scalings are presented for the jet collimation angle and Lorentz factors.

  19. Layer tracking, asymptotics, and domain decomposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, D. L.; Chin, R. C. Y.; Hedstrom, G. W.; Manteuffel, T. A.

    1991-01-01

    A preliminary report is presented on the work on the tracking of internal layers in a singularly-perturbed convection-diffusion equation. It is shown why such tracking may be desirable, and it is also shown how to do it using domain decomposition based on asymptotic analysis.

  20. On asymptotic properties of biharmonic Steklov eigenvalues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Genqian

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, by explicitly calculating the principal symbols of pseudodifferential operators, we establish two Weyl-type asymptotic formulas with sharp remainder estimates for the counting functions of the two classes of biharmonic Steklov eigenvalue problems of smooth bounded domains in a Riemannian manifold.

  1. Behavior of asymptotically electro-Λ spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saw, Vee-Liem

    2017-04-01

    We present the asymptotic solutions for spacetimes with nonzero cosmological constant Λ coupled to Maxwell fields, using the Newman-Penrose formalism. This extends a recent work that dealt with the vacuum Einstein (Newman-Penrose) equations with Λ ≠0 . The results are given in two different null tetrads: the Newman-Unti and Szabados-Tod null tetrads, where the peeling property is exhibited in the former but not the latter. Using these asymptotic solutions, we discuss the mass loss of an isolated electrogravitating system with cosmological constant. In a universe with Λ >0 , the physics of electromagnetic (EM) radiation is relatively straightforward compared to those of gravitational radiation: (1) It is clear that outgoing EM radiation results in a decrease to the Bondi mass of the isolated system. (2) It is also perspicuous that if any incoming EM radiation from elsewhere is present, those beyond the isolated system's cosmological horizon would eventually arrive at the spacelike I and increase the Bondi mass of the isolated system. Hence, the (outgoing and incoming) EM radiation fields do not couple with Λ in the Bondi mass-loss formula in an unusual manner, unlike the gravitational counterpart where outgoing gravitational radiation induces nonconformal flatness of I . These asymptotic solutions to the Einstein-Maxwell-de Sitter equations presented here may be used to extend a raft of existing results based on Newman-Unti's asymptotic solutions to the Einstein-Maxwell equations where Λ =0 , to now incorporate the cosmological constant Λ .

  2. Asymptotic Distributions for Tests of Combined Significance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Betsy Jane

    This paper discusses distribution theory and power computations for four common "tests of combined significance." These tests are calculated using one-sided sample probabilities or p values from independent studies (or hypothesis tests), and provide an overall significance level for the series of results. Noncentral asymptotic sampling…

  3. Occupational asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Chan-Yeung, M.; Grzybowski, S.

    1976-01-01

    Occupational asthma is probably much more common than is generally realized. Though many causes have been described, undoubtedly many more are yet to be recognized. One of the diagnostic difficulties lies in the fact that in most forms of this disease a late asthmatic reaction occurs in the evening rather than at work. The pathogenetic mechanisms differ in various forms of occupational asthma. In some, an immunologic mechanism is likely; in others, a "pharmacologic" action of the offending agent is implicated. Asthma due to inhalation of dusts of western red cedar, isocyanates, detergent enzymes and textiles is considered in detail. Periodic examination of workers at risk is of value for early diagnosis and prevention of irrversible airway obstruction. PMID:766943

  4. Scale Invariant Power Laws Capture the 3-D Coupling Between Water, Energy and Carbon Budgets Across River Basins of Increasing Horton-Strahler Orders in the Andes-Amazon System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poveda, G.; Zapata, A. F.

    2016-12-01

    The Andes-Amazon system exhibits complex interactions and feedbacks between hydrological, ecological, biogeochemical and climatic factors in a broad range of temporal and spatial scales. We aim to understand the coupling existing between water, energy and carbon budgets in the Andes-Amazon system, by performing a systematic study of the system for river basins of increasing Horton-Strahler orders, from the headwaters of the Amazon River basin along the Andes (order ω=1 river sub-basins) to the low-lying larger river sub-basins (order ω=10). To that end, this works introduces a 3-D generalization of the Budyko framework that aims to link the water, energy, and Carbon budgets in river basins. The newly proposed 3-D non-dimensional space is defined by: (1) the ratio between long-term mean values of Actual Evapotranspiration (AET) and Precipitation (P), α=AET/P, representing the water balance; (2) the ratio between AET and Potential Evapotranspiration (PET), β=AET/PET, representing the energy balance; and (3) the ratio between AET and Aboveground Net Primary Productivity, δ=AET/ANPP, representing the carbon budget. We use a 3" Digital Elevation Model (DEM), which allows defining river basins with Horton-Strahler orders from 1 to 10. The long-term water, energy, and carbon budgets are estimated for increasing values of the Horton-Strahler orders during the period 1987-2007. Data sets pertaining to the water balance come from ORE-HYBAM, potential evapotranspiration (PET) from GLEAM (Global Land-surface Evaporation: the Amsterdam Methodology). Data for the energy budget are from the Surface Radiation Budget (SRB). Data for the Carbon budget (annual mean net primary productivity, ANPP, gross primary productivity, GPP, and respiration rates, Rr, come from AMAZALERT and ORCHEDEE (Organizing Carbon and Hydrology In Dynamic EcosystEms), as well as from Flux Tower Data and the LBA project. Our results show that scale invariant power-laws emerge to capture the three 2-D

  5. Occupational Orientation: Health Occupations. Experimental Curriculum Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois State Office of Education, Springfield.

    These experimental curriculum materials for one of five clusters developed for the occupational program in Illinois include a series of learning activity packages (LAPs) designed to acquaint the student with the wide range of occupational choices available in the health occupations field. The 28 LAPs, each with a different occupation focus, are…

  6. Asymptotic Dynamics of Attractive-Repulsive Swarms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leverentz, Andrew J.; Topaz, Chad M.; Bernoff, Andrew J.

    2009-01-01

    We classify and predict the asymptotic dynamics of a class of swarming models. The model consists of a conservation equation in one dimension describing the movement of a population density field. The velocity is found by convolving the density with a kernel describing attractive-repulsive social interactions. The kernel's first moment and its limiting behavior at the origin determine whether the population asymptotically spreads, contracts, or reaches steady state. For the spreading case, the dynamics approach those of the porous medium equation. The widening, compactly supported population has edges that behave like traveling waves whose speed, density, and slope we calculate. For the contracting case, the dynamics of the cumulative density approach those of Burgers' equation. We derive an analytical upper bound for the finite blow-up time after which the solution forms one or more delta-functions.

  7. Brane model with two asymptotic regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubo, Musongela

    2005-02-01

    Some brane models rely on a generalization of the Melvin magnetic universe including a complex scalar field among the sources. We argue that the geometric interpretation of Kip. S. Thorne of this geometry restricts the kind of potential a complex scalar field can display to keep the same asymptotic behavior. While a finite energy is not obtained for a Mexican hat potential in this interpretation, this is the case for a potential displaying a broken phase and an unbroken one. We use for technical simplicity and illustrative purposes an ad hoc potential which however shares some features with those obtained in some supergravity models. We construct a sixth dimensional cylindrically symmetric solution which has two asymptotic regions: the Melvin-like metric on one side and a flat space displaying a conical singularity on the other. The causal structure of the configuration is discussed. Unfortunately, gravity is not localized on the brane.

  8. The Asymptotic Safety Scenario in Quantum Gravity.

    PubMed

    Niedermaier, Max; Reuter, Martin

    2006-01-01

    The asymptotic safety scenario in quantum gravity is reviewed, according to which a renormalizable quantum theory of the gravitational field is feasible which reconciles asymptotically safe couplings with unitarity. The evidence from symmetry truncations and from the truncated flow of the effective average action is presented in detail. A dimensional reduction phenomenon for the residual interactions in the extreme ultraviolet links both results. For practical reasons the background effective action is used as the central object in the quantum theory. In terms of it criteria for a continuum limit are formulated and the notion of a background geometry self-consistently determined by the quantum dynamics is presented. Self-contained appendices provide prerequisites on the background effective action, the effective average action, and their respective renormalization flows.

  9. Asymptotic scaling in turbulent pipe flow.

    PubMed

    McKeon, B J; Morrison, J F

    2007-03-15

    The streamwise velocity component in turbulent pipe flow is assessed to determine whether it exhibits asymptotic behaviour that is indicative of high Reynolds numbers. The asymptotic behaviour of both the mean velocity (in the form of the log law) and that of the second moment of the streamwise component of velocity in the outer and overlap regions is consistent with the development of spectral regions which indicate inertial scaling. It is shown that an 'inertial sublayer' in physical space may be considered as a spatial analogue of the inertial subrange in the velocity spectrum and such behaviour only appears for Reynolds numbers R+>5 x 10(3), approximately, much higher than was generally thought.

  10. Asymptotically safe cosmology - A status report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonanno, Alfio; Saueressig, Frank

    2017-03-01

    Asymptotic safety, based on a non-Gaussian fixed point of the gravitational renormalization group flow, provides an elegant mechanism for completing the gravitational force at sub-Planckian scales. At high energies, the fixed point controls the scaling of couplings such that unphysical divergences are absent, while the emergence of classical low-energy physics is linked to a crossover between two renormalization group fixed points. These features make asymptotic safety an attractive framework for the building of a cosmological model. The resulting scenarios may naturally give rise to a quantum-gravity-driven inflationary phase in the very early universe and an almost scale-free fluctuation spectrum. Moreover, effective descriptions arising from an improvement of the renormalization group permit a direct comparison to cosmological observations as, e.g., Planck data.

  11. Asymptotic Markov inequality on Jordan arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Totik, V.

    2017-03-01

    Markov's inequality for the derivative of algebraic polynomials is considered on C^2-smooth Jordan arcs. The asymptotically best estimate is given for the kth derivative for all k=1,2,\\dots . The best constant is related to the behaviour around the endpoints of the arc of the normal derivative of the Green's function of the complementary domain. The result is deduced from the asymptotically sharp Bernstein inequality for the kth derivative at inner points of a Jordan arc, which is derived from a recent result of Kalmykov and Nagy on the Bernstein inequality on analytic arcs. In the course of the proof we shall also need to reduce the analyticity condition in this last result to C^2-smoothness. Bibliography: 21 titles.

  12. On asymptotic flatness and Lorentz charges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compère, Geoffrey; Dehouck, François; Virmani, Amitabh

    2011-07-01

    In this paper we establish two results concerning four-dimensional asymptotically flat spacetimes at spatial infinity. First, we show that the six conserved Lorentz charges are encoded in two unique, distinct, but mutually dual symmetric divergence-free tensors that we construct from the equations of motion. Second, we show that the integrability of Einstein's equations in the asymptotic expansion is sufficient to establish the equivalence between counter-term charges defined from the variational principle and charges defined by Ashtekar and Hansen. These results clarify earlier constructions of conserved charges in the hyperboloid representation of spatial infinity. In showing this, the parity condition on the mass aspect is not needed. Along the way in establishing these results, we prove two lemmas on tensor fields on three-dimensional de Sitter spacetime stated by Ashtekar-Hansen and Beig-Schmidt and state and prove three additional lemmas. A la mémoire de notre ami et professeur Laurent Houart.

  13. Brane model with two asymptotic regions

    SciTech Connect

    Lubo, Musongela

    2005-02-15

    Some brane models rely on a generalization of the Melvin magnetic universe including a complex scalar field among the sources. We argue that the geometric interpretation of Kip. S. Thorne of this geometry restricts the kind of potential a complex scalar field can display to keep the same asymptotic behavior. While a finite energy is not obtained for a Mexican hat potential in this interpretation, this is the case for a potential displaying a broken phase and an unbroken one. We use for technical simplicity and illustrative purposes an ad hoc potential which however shares some features with those obtained in some supergravity models. We construct a sixth dimensional cylindrically symmetric solution which has two asymptotic regions: the Melvin-like metric on one side and a flat space displaying a conical singularity on the other. The causal structure of the configuration is discussed. Unfortunately, gravity is not localized on the brane.

  14. Asymptotics of Determinants of Bessel Operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basor, Estelle L.; Ehrhardt, Torsten

    For aL∞(+)∩L1(+) the truncated Bessel operator Bτ(a) is the integral operator acting on L2[0,τ] with the kernel where Jν stands for the Bessel function with ν>-1. In this paper we determine the asymptotics of the determinant det(I+Bτ(a)) as τ-->∞ for sufficiently smooth functions a for which a(x)≠1 for all x[0,∞). The asymptotic formula is of the form det(I+Bτ(a)) GτE with certain constants G and E, and thus similar to the well-known Szegö-Akhiezer-Kac formula for truncated Wiener-Hopf determinants.

  15. Asymptotic safety and the cosmological constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falls, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    We study the non-perturbative renormalisation of quantum gravity in four dimensions. Taking care to disentangle physical degrees of freedom, we observe the topological nature of conformal fluctuations arising from the functional measure. The resulting beta functions possess an asymptotically safe fixed point with a global phase structure leading to classical general relativity for positive, negative or vanishing cosmological constant. If only the conformal fluctuations are quantised we find an asymptotically safe fixed point predicting a vanishing cosmological constant on all scales. At this fixed point we reproduce the critical exponent, ν = 1/3, found in numerical lattice studies by Hamber. Returning to the full theory we find that by setting the cosmological constant to zero the critical exponent agrees with the conformally reduced theory. This suggests the fixed point may be physical while hinting at solution to the cosmological constant problem.

  16. Non-asymptotic Analysis of Bandlimited Functions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-12

    Illustration of Theorem 10 with c = 1000 and n = 670. 44 References [1] Richard K. Miller, Anthony N. Michel, Ordinary Differential Equations, Dover ...Publications, Inc., 1982. [2] Yoel Shkolnisky, Mark Tygert, Vladimir Rokhlin, Approximation of Ban - dlimited Functions. [3] Andreas Glaser, Xiangtao Liu...A. Stegun, Handbook of Mathematical Functions with Formulas, Graphs and Mathematical Tables, Dover Publications, 1964. [22] M.V. Fedoryuk, Asymptotic

  17. Asymptotic properties of path integral ideals

    SciTech Connect

    Bogojevic, A.; Balaz, A.; Belic, A.

    2005-09-01

    We introduce and analyze an interesting quantity, the path integral ideal, governing the flow of generic discrete theories to the continuum limit and greatly increasing their convergence. The said flow is classified according to the degree of divergence of the potential at spatial infinity. Studying the asymptotic behavior of path integral ideals we isolate the dominant terms in the effective potential that determine the behavior of a generic theory for large discrete time steps.

  18. Asymptotic dynamics of the exceptional Bianchi cosmologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewitt, C. G.; Horwood, J. T.; Wainwright, J.

    2003-05-01

    In this paper we give, for the first time, a qualitative description of the asymptotic dynamics of a class of non-tilted spatially homogeneous (SH) cosmologies, the so-called exceptional Bianchi cosmologies, which are of Bianchi type VI$_{-1/9}$. This class is of interest for two reasons. Firstly, it is generic within the class of non-tilted SH cosmologies, being of the same generality as the models of Bianchi types VIII and IX. Secondly, it is the SH limit of a generic class of spatially inhomogeneous $G_{2}$ cosmologies. Using the orthonormal frame formalism and Hubble-normalized variables, we show that the exceptional Bianchi cosmologies differ from the non-exceptional Bianchi cosmologies of type VI$_{h}$ in two significant ways. Firstly, the models exhibit an oscillatory approach to the initial singularity and hence are not asymptotically self-similar. Secondly, at late times, although the models are asymptotically self-similar, the future attractor for the vacuum-dominated models is the so-called Robinson-Trautman SH model instead of the vacuum SH plane wave models.

  19. Some asymptotic properties of duplication graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raval, Alpan

    2003-12-01

    Duplication graphs are graphs that grow by duplication of existing vertices, and are important models of biological networks, including protein-protein interaction networks and gene regulatory networks. Three models of graph growth are studied: pure duplication growth, and two two-parameter models in which duplication forms one element of the growth dynamics. A power-law degree distribution is found to emerge in all three models. However, the parameter space of the latter two models is characterized by a range of parameter values for which duplication is the predominant mechanism of graph growth. For parameter values that lie in this “duplication-dominated” regime, it is shown that the degree distribution either approaches zero asymptotically, or approaches a nonzero power-law degree distribution very slowly. In either case, the approach to the true asymptotic degree distribution is characterized by a dependence of the scaling exponent on properties of the initial degree distribution. It is therefore conjectured that duplication-dominated, scale-free networks may contain identifiable remnants of their early structure. This feature is inherited from the idealized model of pure duplication growth, for which the exact finite-size degree distribution is found and its asymptotic properties studied.

  20. Asymptotically flat space-times: an enigma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Ezra T.

    2016-07-01

    We begin by emphasizing that we are dealing with standard Einstein or Einstein-Maxwell theory—absolutely no new physics has been inserted. The fresh item is that the well-known asymptotically flat solutions of the Einstein-Maxwell theory are transformed to a new coordinate system with surprising and (seemingly) inexplicable results. We begin with the standard description of (Null) asymptotically flat space-times described in conventional Bondi-coordinates. After transforming the variables (mainly the asymptotic Weyl tensor components) to a very special set of Newman-Unti (NU) coordinates, we find a series of relations totally mimicking standard Newtonian classical mechanics and Maxwell theory. The surprising and troubling aspect of these relations is that the associated motion and radiation does not take place in physical space-time. Instead these relations takes place in an unusual inherited complex four-dimensional manifold referred to as H-space that has no immediate relationship with space-time. In fact these relations appear in two such spaces, H-space and its dual space \\bar{H}.

  1. Asymptotic modal analysis and statistical energy analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowell, Earl H.

    1988-07-01

    Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) is defined by considering the asymptotic limit of Classical Modal Analysis, an approach called Asymptotic Modal Analysis (AMA). The general approach is described for both structural and acoustical systems. The theoretical foundation is presented for structural systems, and experimental verification is presented for a structural plate responding to a random force. Work accomplished subsequent to the grant initiation focusses on the acoustic response of an interior cavity (i.e., an aircraft or spacecraft fuselage) with a portion of the wall vibrating in a large number of structural modes. First results were presented at the ASME Winter Annual Meeting in December, 1987, and accepted for publication in the Journal of Vibration, Acoustics, Stress and Reliability in Design. It is shown that asymptotically as the number of acoustic modes excited becomes large, the pressure level in the cavity becomes uniform except at the cavity boundaries. However, the mean square pressure at the cavity corner, edge and wall is, respectively, 8, 4, and 2 times the value in the cavity interior. Also it is shown that when the portion of the wall which is vibrating is near a cavity corner or edge, the response is significantly higher.

  2. Asymptotic modal analysis and statistical energy analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowell, Earl H.

    1988-01-01

    Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) is defined by considering the asymptotic limit of Classical Modal Analysis, an approach called Asymptotic Modal Analysis (AMA). The general approach is described for both structural and acoustical systems. The theoretical foundation is presented for structural systems, and experimental verification is presented for a structural plate responding to a random force. Work accomplished subsequent to the grant initiation focusses on the acoustic response of an interior cavity (i.e., an aircraft or spacecraft fuselage) with a portion of the wall vibrating in a large number of structural modes. First results were presented at the ASME Winter Annual Meeting in December, 1987, and accepted for publication in the Journal of Vibration, Acoustics, Stress and Reliability in Design. It is shown that asymptotically as the number of acoustic modes excited becomes large, the pressure level in the cavity becomes uniform except at the cavity boundaries. However, the mean square pressure at the cavity corner, edge and wall is, respectively, 8, 4, and 2 times the value in the cavity interior. Also it is shown that when the portion of the wall which is vibrating is near a cavity corner or edge, the response is significantly higher.

  3. An asymptotically safe solution to the U(1) triviality problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christiansen, Nicolai; Eichhorn, Astrid

    2017-07-01

    We explore whether quantum gravity effects within the asymptotic safety paradigm can provide a predictive ultraviolet completion for Abelian gauge theories. We evaluate the effect of quantum gravity fluctuations on the running couplings in the gauge sector and discover an asymptotically safe fixed point of the Renormalization Group. In particular, if the strength of gravitational interactions remains below a critical strength, the minimal gauge coupling becomes asymptotically free. Further, we point out that a completely asymptotically free dynamics for the gauge field is impossible to achieve, as asymptotically safe quantum gravity necessarily induces non-vanishing higher-order interactions for the gauge field in the ultraviolet.

  4. Asymptotic form of the Kohn-Sham correlation potential

    SciTech Connect

    Joubert, D. P.

    2007-07-15

    The density-functional correlation potential of a finite system is shown to asymptotically approach a nonzero constant along a nodal surface of the energetically highest occupied orbital and zero everywhere else. This nonuniform asymptotic form of the correlation potential exactly cancels the nonuniform asymptotic behavior of the exact exchange potential discussed by Della Sala and Goerling [Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 33003 (2002)]. The sum of the exchange and correlation potentials therefore asymptotically tends to -1/r everywhere, consistent with the asymptotic form of the Kohn-Sham potential as analyzed by Almbladh and von Barth [Phys. Rev. B 31, 3231 (1985)].

  5. asymptoticMK: A Web-Based Tool for the Asymptotic McDonald-Kreitman Test.

    PubMed

    Haller, Benjamin C; Messer, Philipp W

    2017-05-05

    The McDonald-Kreitman (MK) test is a widely used method for quantifying the role of positive selection in molecular evolution. One key shortcoming of this test lies in its sensitivity to the presence of slightly deleterious mutations, which can severely bias its estimates. An asymptotic version of the MK test was recently introduced that addresses this problem by evaluating polymorphism levels for different mutation frequencies separately, and then extrapolating a function fitted to that data. Here, we present asymptoticMK, a web-based implementation of this asymptotic MK test. Our web service provides a simple R-based interface into which the user can upload the required data (polymorphism and divergence data for the genomic test region and a neutrally evolving reference region). The web service then analyzes the data and provides plots of the test results. This service is free to use, open-source, and available at http://benhaller.com/messerlab/asymptoticMK.html We provide results from simulations to illustrate the performance and robustness of the asymptoticMK test under a wide range of model parameters. Copyright © 2017 Haller and Messer.

  6. Occupational asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Chan-Yeung, M

    1995-01-01

    Many toxic compounds found in air emissions may induce bronchoconstriction. In the workplace, workers are exposed to these compounds, often in much higher concentrations. Some of these compounds act as sensitizers. Of these, some compounds induce asthma by producing specific IgE antibodies to the compound or its protein conjugate, while others induce asthma through yet unidentified immunologic mechanisms. Some compounds, when inhaled in high concentrations, act as irritants and produce bronchoconstriction probably by inducing acute airway inflammation. The latter condition is called Reactive Airways Dysfunction Syndrome (RADS) or irritant-induced asthma. Occupational asthma is an excellent model to study the pathogenesis and the natural history of adult onset asthma because the responsible agent can be identified, complete avoidance is possible, and exposure can be measured or estimated. PMID:8549481

  7. Occupational asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Newman Taylor, A. J.

    1988-01-01

    Occupational asthma is important both as a potentially curable and preventable cause of asthma and as a model of adult onset asthma. It is induced by sensitization to a specific agent inhaled at work; for many of its causes, including inhaled proteins and the low molecular weight chemicals acid anhydrides and reactive dyes, it is probably IgE dependent. The risk of developing specific IgE and associated asthma is markedly increased in cigarette smokers, probably as a consequence of non-specific damage to the respiratory mucosa. Asthma caused by several agents, which include some of its most frequent causes, isocyanates, colophony and plicatic acid (Western Red Cedar) persists in some 50% of cases for years, and possibly indefinitely, after avoidance of exposure. The development of chronic symptomatic asthma seems particularly to occur in those with longer duration of symptomatic exposure. PMID:3074282

  8. Image processing occupancy sensor

    DOEpatents

    Brackney, Larry J.

    2016-09-27

    A system and method of detecting occupants in a building automation system environment using image based occupancy detection and position determinations. In one example, the system includes an image processing occupancy sensor that detects the number and position of occupants within a space that has controllable building elements such as lighting and ventilation diffusers. Based on the position and location of the occupants, the system can finely control the elements to optimize conditions for the occupants, optimize energy usage, among other advantages.

  9. Asymptotic modal analysis and statistical energy analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowell, Earl H.

    1992-01-01

    Asymptotic Modal Analysis (AMA) is a method which is used to model linear dynamical systems with many participating modes. The AMA method was originally developed to show the relationship between statistical energy analysis (SEA) and classical modal analysis (CMA). In the limit of a large number of modes of a vibrating system, the classical modal analysis result can be shown to be equivalent to the statistical energy analysis result. As the CMA result evolves into the SEA result, a number of systematic assumptions are made. Most of these assumptions are based upon the supposition that the number of modes approaches infinity. It is for this reason that the term 'asymptotic' is used. AMA is the asymptotic result of taking the limit of CMA as the number of modes approaches infinity. AMA refers to any of the intermediate results between CMA and SEA, as well as the SEA result which is derived from CMA. The main advantage of the AMA method is that individual modal characteristics are not required in the model or computations. By contrast, CMA requires that each modal parameter be evaluated at each frequency. In the latter, contributions from each mode are computed and the final answer is obtained by summing over all the modes in the particular band of interest. AMA evaluates modal parameters only at their center frequency and does not sum the individual contributions from each mode in order to obtain a final result. The method is similar to SEA in this respect. However, SEA is only capable of obtaining spatial averages or means, as it is a statistical method. Since AMA is systematically derived from CMA, it can obtain local spatial information as well.

  10. The Two Isotropic Asymptotes of Fiber Composites,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-03-01

    Voigt and Reuss models of summed stiffness and compliance. The compliance quasi-isotropic asymptote, which >’-:’ has evidently not been discussed in the...i,j,e)de o0 The resulting pseudo -isotropic compliance (series-model) Hooke’s law matrix is similar but not identical to Eq. (3): W(1) W(4) 0 a aIE...given by 1 W( ) 14) E : - Vc Wc 4W(5) 2[W(1) - W()] (8) c W() W(14 12 Direct formulas for the pseudo -isctrcpic moduli, in terms of the ply 1s natural

  11. Asymptotic symmetries of Yang-Mills theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strominger, Andrew

    2014-07-01

    Asymptotic symmetries at future null infinity ( +) of Minkowski space for electrodynamics with massless charged fields, as well as nonabelian gauge theories with gauge group G, are considered at the semiclassical level. The possibility of charge/color flux through + suggests the symmetry group is infinite-dimensional. It is conjectured that the symmetries include a G Kac-Moody symmetry whose generators are "large" gauge transformations which approach locally holomorphic functions on the conformal two-sphere at + and are invariant under null translations. The Kac-Moody currents are constructed from the gauge field at the future boundary of +. The current Ward identities include Weinberg's soft photon theorem and its colored extension.

  12. Network asymptotics for high contrast impedance tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Borcea, L.; Papanicolaou, G.C.; Berryman, J.G.

    1996-05-01

    Fluid contaminant plumes underground are often electrically conducting and, therefore, can be imaged using electrical impedance tomography. The authors introduce an output least-squares method for impedance tomography problems that have regions of high conductivity surrounded by regions of lower conductivity. The high conductivity is modeled on network approximation results from an asymptotic analysis and its recovery is based on this model. The smoothly varying part of the conductivity is recovered by a linearization process as is usual. The authors present the results of several numerical experiments that illustrate the performance of the method.

  13. Asymptotics of loop quantum gravity fusion coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alesci, Emanuele; Bianchi, Eugenio; Magliaro, Elena; Perini, Claudio

    2010-05-01

    The fusion coefficients from SO(3) to SO(4) play a key role in the definition of spin foam models for the dynamics in loop quantum gravity. In this paper we give a simple analytic formula of the Engle-Pereira-Rovelli-Livine fusion coefficients. We study the large spin asymptotics and show that they map SO(3) semiclassical intertwiners into SU(2)L × SU(2)R semiclassical intertwiners. This non-trivial property opens the possibility for an analysis of the semiclassical behavior of the model.

  14. Singular asymptotic expansions in nonlinear rotordynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, W. B.

    1984-01-01

    During hot firing ground testing of the Space Shuttle's Main Engine, vibrations of the liquid oxygen pump occur at frequencies which cannot be explained by the linear Jeffcott model of the rotor. The model becomes nonlinear after accounting for deadband, side forces, and rubbing. Two phenomena present in the numerical solutions of the differential equations are unexpected periodic orbits of the rotor and tracking of the nonlinear frequency. A multiple scale asymptotic expansion of the differential equations is used to give an analytic explanation of these characteristics.

  15. Singular asymptotic expansions in nonlinear rotordynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, W. B.

    1985-01-01

    During hot firing ground testing of the Space shuttle's Main Engine, vibrations of the liquid oxygen pump occur at frequencies which cannot be explained by the linear Jeffcott model of the rotor. The model becomes nonlinear after accounting for deadband, side forces, and rubbing. Two phenomena present in the numerical solutions of the differential equations are unexpected periodic orbits of the rotor and tracking of the nonlinear frequency. A multiple scale asymptotic expansion of the differential equations is used to give an analytic explanation of these characteristics.

  16. Use of asymptotic methods in vibration analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashley, H.

    1978-01-01

    The derivation of dynamic differential equations, suitable for studying the vibrations of rotating, curved, slender structures was examined, and the Hamiltonian procedure was advocated for this purpose. Various reductions of the full system are displayed, which govern the vibrating troposkien when various order of magnitude restrictions are placed on important parameters. Possible advantages of the WKB asymptotic method for solving these classes of problems are discussed. A special case of this method is used illustratively to calculate eigenvalues and eigenfunctions for a flat turbine blade with small flexural stiffness.

  17. Vacuum Potential and its Asymptotic Variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahal, Pravin

    2016-09-01

    The possible form of existence of dark energy is explained and the relation for its asymptotic variation is given. This has two huge implications in the understanding of the Universe. The first is that the theory predicts that the Universe should be in negative pressure state in the very early period as required for inflation and spontaneous symmetry breaking. The second is that the theory gives the reasonable answer to the astrophysical evidence of dark energy dominating the Universe. The author is presenting his research in the nature of dark energy. Some of the work is submitted for publication in the journal and is currently under review.

  18. Asymptotic Representations of Quantum Affine Superalgebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Huafeng

    2017-08-01

    We study representations of the quantum affine superalgebra associated with a general linear Lie superalgebra. In the spirit of Hernandez-Jimbo, we construct inductive systems of Kirillov-Reshetikhin modules based on a cyclicity result that we established previously on tensor products of these modules, and realize their inductive limits as modules over its Borel subalgebra, the so-called q-Yangian. A new generic asymptotic limit of the same inductive systems is proposed, resulting in modules over the full quantum affine superalgebra. We derive generalized Baxter's relations in the sense of Frenkel-Hernandez for representations of the full quantum group.

  19. Asymptotic Theory for Nonparametric Confidence Intervals.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-07-01

    distributions. Ann. Math Statist. 14, 56-62. 24. ROY, S.N. and POTTHOFF, R.F. (1958). Confidence bounds on vector analogues of the "ratio of the mean" and...fl c,~_________ 14L TITLE feed &MV) S. TYPE or REPORT a PeftOo COVx:REC Asympeocic Theory for Nonaparuetric Technical Report Confidence Intevals 6...S..C-0S78 UNCLASSIFIED TŗU *uuuuumuuumhhhhmhhhm_4 ASYMPTOTIC THEORY FOR NONPARAMETRIC CONFIDENCE INTERVALS by Peter W. Glynn TECHNICAL REPORT NO. 63

  20. ON ASYMPTOTIC DISTRIBUTION AND ASYMPTOTIC EFFICIENCY OF LEAST SQUARES ESTIMATORS OF SPATIAL VARIOGRAM PARAMETERS. (R827257)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    In this article, we consider the least-squares approach for estimating parameters of a spatial variogram and establish consistency and asymptotic normality of these estimators under general conditions. Large-sample distributions are also established under a sp...

  1. ON ASYMPTOTIC DISTRIBUTION AND ASYMPTOTIC EFFICIENCY OF LEAST SQUARES ESTIMATORS OF SPATIAL VARIOGRAM PARAMETERS. (R827257)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    In this article, we consider the least-squares approach for estimating parameters of a spatial variogram and establish consistency and asymptotic normality of these estimators under general conditions. Large-sample distributions are also established under a sp...

  2. Asymptotic behavior of a flat plate wake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weygandt, James H.; Mehta, Rabindra D.

    1989-01-01

    An experimental study has been conducted to investigate the far-field, self-similar properties of a flat plate wake. A plane turbulent wake was generated at the trailing edge of a smooth splitter plate separating two legs of a Mixing Layer Wind Tunnel, with both initial boundary layers tripped. For the present study, both legs were operated at a free-steam velocity in the test section of 15 m/s, giving a Reynolds number based on wake momentum thickness of about 1750. Single profile measurements were obtained at five streamwise locations using a Pitot probe for the mean velocity measurements and a single cross-wire probe for the turbulence data, which included statistics up to third order. The mean flow data indicated a self-similar behavior beyond a streamwise distance equivalent to about 350 wake momentum thicknesses. However, the turbulence data show better collapse beyond a distance equivalent to about 500 momentum thicknesses, with all the measured peak Reynolds stresses achieving constant, asymptotic levels. The asymptotic mean flow behavior and peak primary stress levels agree well with theoretical predictions based on a constant eddy viscosity model. The present data also agree reasonably well with previous measurements, of which only one set extends into the self-similar region. Detailed comparisons with previous data are presented and discussed in this report.

  3. Asymptotic modal analysis and statistical energy analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowell, Earl H.; Peretti, Linda F.

    1990-01-01

    The sound field of a structural-acoustic enclosure was subject to experimental analysis and theoretical description in order to develop an efficient and accurate method for predicting sound pressure levels in enclosures such as aircraft fuselages. Asymptotic Modal Analysis (AMA) is the method under investigation. AMA is derived from classical modal analysis (CMA) by considering the asymptotic limit of the sound pressure level as the number of acoustic and/or structural modes approaches infinity. Using AMA, results identical to those of Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) were obtained for the spatially-averaged sound pressure levels in the interior. AMA is systematically derived from CMA and therefore the degree of generality of the end result can be adjusted through the choice of appropriate simplifying assumptions. For example, AMA can be used to obtain local sound pressure levels at particular points inside the enclosure, or to include the effects of varying the size and/or location of the sound source. AMA theoretical results were compared with CMA theory and also with experiment for the case where the structural-acoustic enclosure is a rectangular cavity with part of one wall flexible and vibrating, while the rest of the cavity is rigid.

  4. Guide for Occupational Exploration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Employment and Training Administration (DOL), Washington, DC.

    Intended for use with or without counseling help, this occupational exploration guide is organized around 12 interest areas, 66 work groups, and 348 subgroups of occupational titles. The interest areas (an expansion of John Holland's six occupational categories) represent the broad interest requirements of occupations as well as the vocational…

  5. Occupant Protection Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bopp, Genie; Somers, Jeff; Granderson, Brad; Gernhardt, Mike; Currie, Nancy; Lawrence, Chuck

    2010-01-01

    Topics include occupant protection overview with a focus on crew protection during dynamic phases of flight; occupant protection collaboration; modeling occupant protection; occupant protection considerations; project approach encompassing analysis tools, injury criteria, and testing program development; injury criteria update methodology, unique effects of pressure suits and other factors; and a summary.

  6. Health Occupations Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willett, Lynn H.

    A survey was conducted to determine the need for health occupations personnel in the Moraine Valley Community College district, specifically to: (1) describe present employment for selected health occupations; (2) project health occupation employment to 1974; (3) identify the supply of applicants for the selected occupations; and (4) identify…

  7. Occupational Therapy Assistant.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document, which is designed for use in developing a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of occupational therapy assistant, lists technical competencies and competency builders for 16 units pertinent to the health technologies cluster in general as well as those specific to the occupation of occupational therapy assistant. The…

  8. Occupations of Indonesian Graduates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmier, Leslie

    1982-01-01

    Analysis of 1978 occupational patterns of college graduates in Indonesia considers occupation type, government employment, pay level, degree, discipline, relevance of education to employment, and concentration of academic majors in certain occupations. No occupation was the preserve of any one subject. (MSE)

  9. Relaxing the parity conditions of asymptotically flat gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compère, Geoffrey; Dehouck, François

    2011-12-01

    Four-dimensional asymptotically flat spacetimes at spatial infinity are defined from first principles without imposing parity conditions or restrictions on the Weyl tensor. The Einstein-Hilbert action is shown to be a correct variational principle when it is supplemented by an anomalous counterterm which breaks asymptotic translation, supertranslation and logarithmic translation invariance. Poincaré transformations as well as supertranslations and logarithmic translations are associated with finite and conserved charges which represent the asymptotic symmetry group. Lorentz charges as well as logarithmic translations transform anomalously under a change of regulator. Lorentz charges are generally nonlinear functionals of the asymptotic fields but reduce to well-known linear expressions when parity conditions hold. We also define a covariant phase space of asymptotically flat spacetimes with parity conditions but without restrictions on the Weyl tensor. In this phase space, the anomaly plays classically no dynamical role. Supertranslations are pure gauge and the asymptotic symmetry group is the expected Poincaré group.

  10. The Asymptotic Distribution of Mortality Rates in Competing Risks Analyses,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-01

    For a sample of individuals from an animal or human population under observation in a clinical trial or life test, mortality rates are defined for...model, these mortality rates are shown to have an asymptotic normal distribution. An expression for the asymptotic correlation between a pair of... mortality rates is thus obtained and a necessary and sufficient condition for their asymptotic independence is investigated in some general situations with

  11. Numerical integration of asymptotic solutions of ordinary differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thurston, Gaylen A.

    1989-01-01

    Classical asymptotic analysis of ordinary differential equations derives approximate solutions that are numerically stable. However, the analysis also leads to tedious expansions in powers of the relevant parameter for a particular problem. The expansions are replaced with integrals that can be evaluated by numerical integration. The resulting numerical solutions retain the linear independence that is the main advantage of asymptotic solutions. Examples, including the Falkner-Skan equation from laminar boundary layer theory, illustrate the method of asymptotic analysis with numerical integration.

  12. Asymptotic behaviour of solutions of semilinear parabolic equations

    SciTech Connect

    Egorov, Yu V; Kondratiev, V A

    2008-04-30

    The asymptotic behaviour of solutions of a second-order semilinear parabolic equation is analyzed in a cylindrical domain that is bounded in the space variables. The dominant term of the asymptotic expansion of the solution as t{yields}+{infinity} is found. It is shown that the solution of this problem is asymptotically equivalent to the solution of a certain non-linear ordinary differential equation. Bibliography: 8 titles.

  13. Green's function asymptotics and sharp interpolation inequalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelik, S. V.; Ilyin, A. A.

    2014-04-01

    A general method is proposed for finding sharp constants for the embeddings of the Sobolev spaces H^m(\\mathscr{M}) on an n-dimensional Riemannian manifold \\mathscr{M} into the space of bounded continuous functions, where m\\gt n/2. The method is based on an analysis of the asymptotics with respect to the spectral parameter of the Green's function of an elliptic operator of order 2m whose square root has domain determining the norm of the corresponding Sobolev space. The cases of the n-dimensional torus {T}^n and the n-dimensional sphere {S}^n are treated in detail, as well as certain manifolds with boundary. In certain cases when \\mathscr{M} is compact, multiplicative inequalities with remainder terms of various types are obtained. Inequalities with correction terms for periodic functions imply an improvement for the well-known Carlson inequalities. Bibliography: 28 titles.

  14. Asymptotically dichotomic almost periodic differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos, Juan; Tarallo, Massimo

    2017-07-01

    Consider a non-linear differential equation in RN which asymptotically behaves as a linear equation admitting an exponential dichotomy. We wonder if almost periodic solutions exist when we add to the equation an almost periodic forcing term, large enough and not vanishing too much. A positive answer has been given in [3] for the scalar case N = 1 and our aim is to extend that result to higher dimensions. We discover that the extension seems to be driven by a new ingredient, namely the type of the exponential dichotomy: besides the pure stable types, the mixed hyperbolic type is now possible and leads to a weaker than expected extension. An example shows that a stronger extension cannot be obtained by the same method. The approach is blended and mixes methods of differential equations and functional analysis, especially when estimating norm and spectral radius of some crucial positive but non-compact linear integral operators.

  15. Asymptotic Linear Stability of Solitary Water Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pego, Robert L.; Sun, Shu-Ming

    2016-12-01

    We prove an asymptotic stability result for the water wave equations linearized around small solitary waves. The equations we consider govern irrotational flow of a fluid with constant density bounded below by a rigid horizontal bottom and above by a free surface under the influence of gravity neglecting surface tension. For sufficiently small amplitude waves, with waveform well-approximated by the well-known sech-squared shape of the KdV soliton, solutions of the linearized equations decay at an exponential rate in an energy norm with exponential weight translated with the wave profile. This holds for all solutions with no component in (that is, symplectically orthogonal to) the two-dimensional neutral-mode space arising from infinitesimal translational and wave-speed variation of solitary waves. We also obtain spectral stability in an unweighted energy norm.

  16. Asymptotic charged BTZ black hole solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendi, S. H.

    2012-03-01

    The well-known (2 + 1)-dimensional Reissner-Nordström (BTZ) black hole can be generalized to three dimensional Einstein-nonlinear electromagnetic field, motivated from obtaining a finite value for the self-energy of a pointlike charge. Considering three types of nonlinear electromagnetic fields coupled with Einstein gravity, we derive three kinds of black hole solutions which their asymptotic properties are the same as charged BTZ solution. In addition, we calculate conserved and thermodynamic quantities of the solutions and show that they satisfy the first law of thermodynamics. Finally, we perform a stability analysis in the canonical ensemble and show that the black holes are stable in the whole phase space.

  17. Chiral fermions in asymptotically safe quantum gravity.

    PubMed

    Meibohm, J; Pawlowski, J M

    2016-01-01

    We study the consistency of dynamical fermionic matter with the asymptotic safety scenario of quantum gravity using the functional renormalisation group. Since this scenario suggests strongly coupled quantum gravity in the UV, one expects gravity-induced fermion self-interactions at energies of the Planck scale. These could lead to chiral symmetry breaking at very high energies and thus to large fermion masses in the IR. The present analysis which is based on the previous works (Christiansen et al., Phys Rev D 92:121501, 2015; Meibohm et al., Phys Rev D 93:084035, 2016), concludes that gravity-induced chiral symmetry breaking at the Planck scale is avoided for a general class of NJL-type models. We find strong evidence that this feature is independent of the number of fermion fields. This finding suggests that the phase diagram for these models is topologically stable under the influence of gravitational interactions.

  18. The asymptotics of large constrained graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radin, Charles; Ren, Kui; Sadun, Lorenzo

    2014-05-01

    We show, through local estimates and simulation, that if one constrains simple graphs by their densities ɛ of edges and τ of triangles, then asymptotically (in the number of vertices) for over 95% of the possible range of those densities there is a well-defined typical graph, and it has a very simple structure: the vertices are decomposed into two subsets V1 and V2 of fixed relative size c and 1 - c, and there are well-defined probabilities of edges, gjk, between vj ∈ Vj, and vk ∈ Vk. Furthermore the four parameters c, g11, g22 and g12 are smooth functions of (ɛ, τ) except at two smooth ‘phase transition’ curves.

  19. Asymptotic properties of restricted naming games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacherjee, Biplab; Datta, Amitava; Manna, S. S.

    2017-07-01

    Asymptotic properties of the symmetric and asymmetric naming games have been studied under some restrictions in a community of agents. In one version, the vocabulary sizes of the agents are restricted to finite capacities. In this case, compared to the original naming games, the dynamics takes much longer time for achieving the consensus. In the second version, the symmetric game starts with a limited number of distinct names distributed among the agents. Three different quantities are measured for a quantitative comparison, namely, the maximum value of the total number of names in the community, the time at which the community attains the maximal number of names, and the global convergence time. Using an extensive numerical study, the entire set of three power law exponents characterizing these quantities are estimated for both the versions which are observed to be distinctly different from their counter parts of the original naming games.

  20. Asymptotic analysis of loaded, unstable, cylindrical resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Chitanvis, S.M. )

    1991-09-01

    I show that the solution of the electromagnetic equations for a loaded cavity with a large Fresnel number {ital F} ({ital F}{gt}100) can be obtained analytically. This asymptotic solution is obtained as a perturbation of the geometrical-optics solution, with edge-diffraction effects appearing as ripples of order 1/({ital F}){sup 1/2}. The basic technique is to obtain a series expansion of the relevant integrals in powers of 1/({ital F}){sup 1/2}. This scheme works even better if the laser is operating in the saturated regime. This method of solution represents an extension of the method of Butts and Avizonis (J. Opt. Soc. Am. {bold 68}, 1072 (1978)), which is applicable to empty, cylindrical, unstable resonators.

  1. Nucleosynthesis in asymptotic giant branch stars

    SciTech Connect

    El Eid, Mounib F.

    2014-05-09

    The nucleosynthesis in asymptotic giant branch stars (briefly: AGB)is a challenging and fascinating subject in the theory of stellar evolution and important for observations as well. This is because about of half the heavy elements beyond iron are synthesized during thermal pulsation phases of these stars. Furthermore, the understanding of the production of the heavy elements and some light elements like carbon and fluorine represent a powerful tool to get more insight into the internal structure of these stars. The diversity of nuclear processing during the AGB phases may also motivate experimental activities in measuring important nuclear reactions. In this contribution, we emphasize several interesting feature of the nucleosynthesis in AGB stars which still needs further elaboration especially from theoretical point of view.

  2. Asymptotically safe non-minimal inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tronconi, Alessandro

    2017-07-01

    We study the constraints imposed by the requirement of Asymptotic Safety on a class of inflationary models with an inflaton field non-minimally coupled to the Ricci scalar. The critical surface in the space of theories is determined by the improved renormalization group flow which takes into account quantum corrections beyond the one loop approximation. The combination of constraints deriving from Planck observations and those from theory puts severe bounds on the values of the parameters of the model and predicts a quite large tensor to scalar ratio. We finally comment on the dependence of the results on the definition of the infrared energy scale which parametrises the running on the critical surface.

  3. Universal Preparability of States and Asymptotic Completeness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gohm, Rolf; Haag, Florian; Kümmerer, Burkhard

    2017-05-01

    We introduce a notion of universal preparability for a state of a system, more precisely: for a normal state on a von Neumann algebra. It describes a situation where from an arbitrary initial state it is possible to prepare a target state with arbitrary precision by a repeated interaction with a sequence of copies of another system. For B(H) we give criteria sufficient to ensure that all normal states are universally preparable which can be verified for a class of non-commutative birth and death processes realized, in particular, by the interaction of a micromaser with a stream of atoms. As a tool, the theory of tight sequences of states and of stationary states is further developed and we show that in the presence of stationary faithful normal states universal preparability of all normal states is equivalent to asymptotic completeness, a notion studied earlier in connection with the scattering theory of non-commutative Markov processes.

  4. Chiral fermions in asymptotically safe quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meibohm, J.; Pawlowski, J. M.

    2016-05-01

    We study the consistency of dynamical fermionic matter with the asymptotic safety scenario of quantum gravity using the functional renormalisation group. Since this scenario suggests strongly coupled quantum gravity in the UV, one expects gravity-induced fermion self-interactions at energies of the Planck scale. These could lead to chiral symmetry breaking at very high energies and thus to large fermion masses in the IR. The present analysis which is based on the previous works (Christiansen et al., Phys Rev D 92:121501, 2015; Meibohm et al., Phys Rev D 93:084035, 2016), concludes that gravity-induced chiral symmetry breaking at the Planck scale is avoided for a general class of NJL-type models. We find strong evidence that this feature is independent of the number of fermion fields. This finding suggests that the phase diagram for these models is topologically stable under the influence of gravitational interactions.

  5. Universality and asymptotic scaling in drilling percolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grassberger, Peter

    2017-01-01

    We present simulations of a three-dimensional percolation model studied recently by K. J. Schrenk et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 055701 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.116.055701], obtained with a new and more efficient algorithm. They confirm most of their results in spite of larger systems and higher statistics used in the present Rapid Communication, but we also find indications that the results do not yet represent the true asymptotic behavior. The model is obtained by replacing the isotropic holes in ordinary Bernoulli percolation by randomly placed and oriented cylinders, with the constraint that the cylinders are parallel to one of the three coordinate axes. We also speculate on possible generalizations.

  6. Loop Quantum Gravity and Asymptotically Flat Spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnsdorf, Matthias

    2002-12-01

    Remarkable progress has been made in the field of non-perturbative (loop) quantum gravity in the last decade or so and it is now a rigorously defined kinematical theory (c.f. [5] for a review and references). We are now at the stage where physical applications of loop quantum gravity can be studied and used to provide checks for the consistency of the quantisation programme. Equally, old fundamental problems of canonical quantum gravity such as the problem of time or the interpretation of quantum cosmology need to be reevaluated seriously. These issues can be addressed most profitably in the asymptotically flat sector of quantum gravity. Indeed, it is likely that we should obtain a quantum theory for this special case even if it is not possible to quantise full general relativity. The purpose of this summary is to advertise the extension of loop quantum gravity to this sector that was developed in [1]...

  7. Rubidium-rich asymptotic giant branch stars.

    PubMed

    García-Hernández, D A; García-Lario, P; Plez, B; D'Antona, F; Manchado, A; Trigo-Rodríguez, J M

    2006-12-15

    A long-debated issue concerning the nucleosynthesis of neutron-rich elements in asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars is the identification of the neutron source. We report intermediate-mass (4 to 8 solar masses) AGB stars in our Galaxy that are rubidium-rich as a result of overproduction of the long-lived radioactive isotope (87)Rb, as predicted theoretically 40 years ago. This finding represents direct observational evidence that the (22)Ne(alpha,n)(25)Mg reaction must be the dominant neutron source in these stars. These stars challenge our understanding of the late stages of the evolution of intermediate-mass stars and would have promoted a highly variable Rb/Sr environment in the early solar nebula.

  8. Nucleosynthesis in asymptotic giant branch stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Eid, Mounib F.

    2014-05-01

    The nucleosynthesis in asymptotic giant branch stars (briefly: AGB)is a challenging and fascinating subject in the theory of stellar evolution and important for observations as well. This is because about of half the heavy elements beyond iron are synthesized during thermal pulsation phases of these stars. Furthermore, the understanding of the production of the heavy elements and some light elements like carbon and fluorine represent a powerful tool to get more insight into the internal structure of these stars. The diversity of nuclear processing during the AGB phases may also motivate experimental activities in measuring important nuclear reactions. In this contribution, we emphasize several interesting feature of the nucleosynthesis in AGB stars which still needs further elaboration especially from theoretical point of view.

  9. Global Asymptotic Behavior of Iterative Implicit Schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, H. C.; Sweby, P. K.

    1994-01-01

    The global asymptotic nonlinear behavior of some standard iterative procedures in solving nonlinear systems of algebraic equations arising from four implicit linear multistep methods (LMMs) in discretizing three models of 2 x 2 systems of first-order autonomous nonlinear ordinary differential equations (ODEs) is analyzed using the theory of dynamical systems. The iterative procedures include simple iteration and full and modified Newton iterations. The results are compared with standard Runge-Kutta explicit methods, a noniterative implicit procedure, and the Newton method of solving the steady part of the ODEs. Studies showed that aside from exhibiting spurious asymptotes, all of the four implicit LMMs can change the type and stability of the steady states of the differential equations (DEs). They also exhibit a drastic distortion but less shrinkage of the basin of attraction of the true solution than standard nonLMM explicit methods. The simple iteration procedure exhibits behavior which is similar to standard nonLMM explicit methods except that spurious steady-state numerical solutions cannot occur. The numerical basins of attraction of the noniterative implicit procedure mimic more closely the basins of attraction of the DEs and are more efficient than the three iterative implicit procedures for the four implicit LMMs. Contrary to popular belief, the initial data using the Newton method of solving the steady part of the DEs may not have to be close to the exact steady state for convergence. These results can be used as an explanation for possible causes and cures of slow convergence and nonconvergence of steady-state numerical solutions when using an implicit LMM time-dependent approach in computational fluid dynamics.

  10. Lattice quantum gravity and asymptotic safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laiho, J.; Bassler, S.; Coumbe, D.; Du, D.; Neelakanta, J. T.

    2017-09-01

    We study the nonperturbative formulation of quantum gravity defined via Euclidean dynamical triangulations (EDT) in an attempt to make contact with Weinberg's asymptotic safety scenario. We find that a fine-tuning is necessary in order to recover semiclassical behavior. Such a fine-tuning is generally associated with the breaking of a target symmetry by the lattice regulator; in this case we argue that the target symmetry is the general coordinate invariance of the theory. After introducing and fine-tuning a nontrivial local measure term, we find no barrier to taking a continuum limit, and we find evidence that four-dimensional, semiclassical geometries are recovered at long distance scales in the continuum limit. We also find that the spectral dimension at short distance scales is consistent with 3 /2 , a value that could resolve the tension between asymptotic safety and the holographic entropy scaling of black holes. We argue that the number of relevant couplings in the continuum theory is one, once symmetry breaking by the lattice regulator is accounted for. Such a theory is maximally predictive, with no adjustable parameters. The cosmological constant in Planck units is the only relevant parameter, which serves to set the lattice scale. The cosmological constant in Planck units is of order 1 in the ultraviolet and undergoes renormalization group running to small values in the infrared. If these findings hold up under further scrutiny, the lattice may provide a nonperturbative definition of a renormalizable quantum field theory of general relativity with no adjustable parameters and a cosmological constant that is naturally small in the infrared.

  11. Scattering in an external electric field asymptotically constant in time

    SciTech Connect

    Adachi, Tadayoshi; Ishida, Atsuhide

    2011-06-15

    We show the asymptotic completeness for two-body quantum systems in an external electric field asymptotically non-zero constant in time. One of the main ingredients of this paper is to give some propagation estimates for physical propagators generated by time-dependent Hamiltonians which govern the systems under consideration.

  12. Asymptotic expansions for the reciprocal of the gamma function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Withers, Christopher S.; Nadarajah, Saralees

    2014-05-01

    Asymptotic expansions are derived for the reciprocal of the gamma function. We show that the coefficients of the expansion are the same, up to a sign change, as the asymptotic expansions for the gamma function obtained by exponentiating the expansions of its logarithm due to Stirling and de Moivre. Expressions for the coefficients are given in terms of Bell polynomials.

  13. Gaussian and mean curvatures for discrete asymptotic nets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schief, W. K.

    2017-04-01

    We propose discretisations of Gaussian and mean curvatures of surfaces parametrised in terms of asymptotic coordinates and examine their relevance in the context of integrable discretisations of classical classes of surfaces and their underlying integrable systems. We also record discrete analogues of the classical relation between the Gaussian curvature of hyperbolic surfaces and the torsion of their asymptotic lines.

  14. An unsteady time asymptotic flow in the square driven cavity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, John W.

    1990-01-01

    Summary details of an aperiodic time asymptotic numerical solution for the square drive cavity at Re = 10000 are presented. The data presented is for 6100 less than t less than or equal to 7100, and is representative of the data that characterizes the aperiodic asymptotic state.

  15. Reduction arguments for geometric inequalities associated with asymptotically hyperboloidal slices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sle Cha, Ye; Khuri, Marcus; Sakovich, Anna

    2016-02-01

    We consider several geometric inequalities in general relativity involving mass, area, charge, and angular momentum for asymptotically hyperboloidal initial data. We show how to reduce each one to the known maximal (or time symmetric) case in the asymptotically flat setting, whenever a geometrically motivated system of elliptic equations admits a solution.

  16. Internal spin angular momentum of an asymptotically flat spacetime

    SciTech Connect

    Randono, Andrew; Sloan, David

    2009-08-15

    In this paper we investigate the manner in which the internal spin angular momentum of a spinor field is encoded in the gravitational field at asymptotic infinity. The inclusion of internal spin requires us to reanalyze our notion of asymptotic flatness. In particular, the Poincare symmetry at asymptotic infinity must be replaced by a spin-enlarged Poincare symmetry. Likewise, the generators of the asymptotic symmetry group must be supplemented to account for the internal spin. In the Hamiltonian framework of first-order Einstein-Cartan gravity, the extra generator comes from the boundary term of the Gauss constraint in the asymptotically flat context. With the additional term, we establish the relations among the Noether charges of a Dirac field, the Komar integral, and the asymptotic Arnowitt-Deser-Misner-like geometric integral. We show that by imposing mild restraints on the generating functionals of gauge transformations at asymptotic infinity, the phase space is rendered explicitly finite. We construct the energy-momentum and the new total (spin+orbital) angular momentum boundary integrals that satisfy the appropriate algebra to be the generators of the spin-enlarged Poincare symmetry. This demonstrates that the internal spin is encoded in the tetrad at asymptotic infinity. In addition, we find that a new conserved and (spin-enlarged) Poincare invariant charge emerges that is associated with the global structure of a gauge transformation.

  17. Internal spin angular momentum of an asymptotically flat spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randono, Andrew; Sloan, David

    2009-08-01

    In this paper we investigate the manner in which the internal spin angular momentum of a spinor field is encoded in the gravitational field at asymptotic infinity. The inclusion of internal spin requires us to reanalyze our notion of asymptotic flatness. In particular, the Poincaré symmetry at asymptotic infinity must be replaced by a spin-enlarged Poincaré symmetry. Likewise, the generators of the asymptotic symmetry group must be supplemented to account for the internal spin. In the Hamiltonian framework of first-order Einstein-Cartan gravity, the extra generator comes from the boundary term of the Gauss constraint in the asymptotically flat context. With the additional term, we establish the relations among the Noether charges of a Dirac field, the Komar integral, and the asymptotic Arnowitt-Deser-Misner-like geometric integral. We show that by imposing mild restraints on the generating functionals of gauge transformations at asymptotic infinity, the phase space is rendered explicitly finite. We construct the energy-momentum and the new total (spin+orbital) angular momentum boundary integrals that satisfy the appropriate algebra to be the generators of the spin-enlarged Poincaré symmetry. This demonstrates that the internal spin is encoded in the tetrad at asymptotic infinity. In addition, we find that a new conserved and (spin-enlarged) Poincaré invariant charge emerges that is associated with the global structure of a gauge transformation.

  18. Echoes of asymptotic silence in causal set quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichhorn, Astrid; Mizera, Sebastian; Surya, Sumati

    2017-08-01

    We explore the idea of asymptotic silence in causal set theory and find that causal sets approximated by continuum spacetimes exhibit behavior akin to asymptotic silence. We make use of an intrinsic definition of spatial distance between causal set elements in the discrete analogue of a spatial hypersurface. Using numerical simulations for causal sets approximated by \

  19. Asymptotic Properties of Some Classes of Generalized Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drozhzhinov, Yu N.; Zav'yalov, B. I.

    1986-02-01

    This paper studies the connection between the asymptotic and quasi-asymptotic properties at infinity of slowly increasing generalized functions with supports on the half-line and the asymptotic and quasi-asymptotic properties of the real parts of their Laplace and Fourier transforms in a neighborhood of the origin. The study is caried out in the scale of regularly varying self-similar functions. The results are applied to the study of the asymptotic properties of solutions of linear passive systems, and also to the study of the connection between Abel and Cesàro convergence (with respect to a self-similar weight) of the Fourier-Stieltjes series of nonnegative measures. Bibliography: 13 titles.

  20. Eigenvalue spectrum of the spheroidal harmonics: A uniform asymptotic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hod, Shahar

    2015-06-01

    The spheroidal harmonics Slm (θ ; c) have attracted the attention of both physicists and mathematicians over the years. These special functions play a central role in the mathematical description of diverse physical phenomena, including black-hole perturbation theory and wave scattering by nonspherical objects. The asymptotic eigenvalues {Alm (c) } of these functions have been determined by many authors. However, it should be emphasized that all the previous asymptotic analyzes were restricted either to the regime m → ∞ with a fixed value of c, or to the complementary regime | c | → ∞ with a fixed value of m. A fuller understanding of the asymptotic behavior of the eigenvalue spectrum requires an analysis which is asymptotically uniform in both m and c. In this paper we analyze the asymptotic eigenvalue spectrum of these important functions in the double limit m → ∞ and | c | → ∞ with a fixed m / c ratio.

  1. Asymptotic approximations to posterior distributions via conditional moment equations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yee, J.L.; Johnson, W.O.; Samaniego, F.J.

    2002-01-01

    We consider asymptotic approximations to joint posterior distributions in situations where the full conditional distributions referred to in Gibbs sampling are asymptotically normal. Our development focuses on problems where data augmentation facilitates simpler calculations, but results hold more generally. Asymptotic mean vectors are obtained as simultaneous solutions to fixed point equations that arise naturally in the development. Asymptotic covariance matrices flow naturally from the work of Arnold & Press (1989) and involve the conditional asymptotic covariance matrices and first derivative matrices for conditional mean functions. When the fixed point equations admit an analytical solution, explicit formulae are subsequently obtained for the covariance structure of the joint limiting distribution, which may shed light on the use of the given statistical model. Two illustrations are given. ?? 2002 Biometrika Trust.

  2. On the asymptotics of the α-Farey transfer operator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kautzsch, J.; Kesseböhmer, M.; Samuel, T.; Stratmann, B. O.

    2015-01-01

    We study the asymptotics of iterates of the transfer operator for non-uniformly hyperbolic α-Farey maps. We provide a family of observables which are Riemann integrable, locally constant and of bounded variation, and for which the iterates of the transfer operator, when applied to one of these observables, is not asymptotic to a constant times the wandering rate on the first element of the partition α. Subsequently, sufficient conditions on observables are given under which this expected asymptotic holds. In particular, we obtain an extension theorem which establishes that, if the asymptotic behaviour of iterates of the transfer operator is known on the first element of the partition α, then the same asymptotic holds on any compact set bounded away from the indifferent fixed point.

  3. Large gauge symmetries and asymptotic states in QED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabai, Barak; Sever, Amit

    2016-12-01

    Large Gauge Transformations (LGT) are gauge transformations that do not vanish at infinity. Instead, they asymptotically approach arbitrary functions on the conformal sphere at infinity. Recently, it was argued that the LGT should be treated as an infinite set of global symmetries which are spontaneously broken by the vacuum. It was established that in QED, the Ward identities of their induced symmetries are equivalent to the Soft Photon Theorem. In this paper we study the implications of LGT on the S-matrix between physical asymptotic states in massive QED. In appose to the naively free scattering states, physical asymptotic states incorporate the long range electric field between asymptotic charged particles and were already constructed in 1970 by Kulish and Faddeev. We find that the LGT charge is independent of the particles' momenta and may be associated to the vacuum. The soft theorem's manifestation as a Ward identity turns out to be an outcome of not working with the physical asymptotic states.

  4. Occupational skin diseases.

    PubMed

    Diepgen, Thomas L

    2012-05-01

    Occupational skin diseases are the most commonly reported notifiable occupational diseases. In Germany, 23 596 out of a total of 71 263 reported occupational diseases in 2010 were classified as occupational skin diseases (BK No. 5101: "severe or recurrent skin diseases which have forced the person to discontinue all occupational activities that caused or could cause the development, worsening, or recurrence of the disease"). Contact dermatitis (allergic, irritant) of the hands is the most common skin disease and atopic skin diathesis is often an important co-factor. The number of work-related skin diseases is many times higher than the number of notified occupational dermatoses. This CME article explains the legal framework of occupational diseases, the tasks and obligations of the legal statutory work insurance. Typical allergens and irritants of high risk professions are also presented as are the important steps from diagnosis to compensation. Early prevention of occupational skin diseases is very important to avoid severe chronic hand eczema. Therefore the "dermatologist's report" is crucial. Other occupational dermatoses (outside of BK 5101) are briefly mentioned. In recent years the number of notifications of occupational skin cancer due to occupational UV-irradiation has increased. According to recent epidemiological findings, there is a significant and consistent positive association between occupational UV-irradiation and squamous cell carcinoma. Therefore, an important criterion for a new occupational disease is fulfilled. © The Authors • Journal compilation © Blackwell Verlag GmbH, Berlin.

  5. Illinois Occupational Skill Standards: Occupational Therapy Cluster.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Occupational Skill Standards and Credentialing Council, Carbondale.

    This document, which is intended to serve as a guide for work force preparation program providers, details the Illinois occupational skill standards for programs preparing students for employment in jobs in occupational therapy. Agency partners involved in this project include: the Illinois State board of Education, Illinois Community College…

  6. Occupational Clusters. Occupational Investigation Guide. First Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    East Texas State Univ., Commerce. Occupational Curriculum Lab.

    This occupational investigation guide contains learning activities for instruction in fifteen occupational clusters: (1) agribusiness and natural resources, (2) business and office, (3) communications and media, (4) construction, (5) consumer and homemaking, (6) environment, (7) fine arts and humanities, (8) health, (9) hospitality and recreation,…

  7. Electricity Occupations Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technical Education Research Center, Champaign, IL.

    The first of four main sections of the electrical occupations curriculum guide is an introduction which describes the design and use of the guide and which provides five pages of suggested curriculum resources. Section two contains job descriptions for 18 electrical occupations. For each occupation the guide explains industry's expectations of the…

  8. Occupational Status and Suicide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lampert, Dominique I.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Examined relationship between occupational status and suicide in California males since 1925. Findings show an inverse relationship between occupational status and suicide for all age groups. Over time, male suicide rates have increased, particularly for employed males over 65, employed males aged 14 to 24, and males in low-status occupations.…

  9. Manual on Occupational Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hermann, Graham D.

    This manual on occupational analysis, developed in Australia, is organized in three sections. The first section provides a framework for occupational analysis (OA) and a discussion of possible outputs from an OA from each of three phases: (1) determining the nature and scope of the occupational area; (2) developing a competencies list; and (3)…

  10. Health Occupations Cluster Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Dept. of Education, Salem.

    Intended to assist the vocational teacher in designing and implementing a cluster program in health occupations, this guide suggests ideas for teaching the specific knowledge and skills that qualify students for entry-level employment in the health occupations field. The knowledge and skills are applicable to 12 occupations: dental assistant;…

  11. Agricultural Occupations Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lark, Floyd J.; Henderson, Billie

    This agricultural occupations handbook was developed from the Dictionary of Occupational Titles (DOT) and the U.S. Departments of Health, Education, and Welfare, and Labor publication, Vocational Education and Occupations. It includes the U.S. Office of Education coding for the instructional area of agriculture and the cluster coding for the…

  12. Occupation and thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Aschebrook-Kilfoy, Briseis; Ward, Mary H; Della Valle, Curt T; Friesen, Melissa C

    2014-05-01

    Numerous occupational and environmental exposures have been shown to disrupt thyroid hormones, but much less is known about their relationships with thyroid cancer. Here we review the epidemiology studies of occupations and occupational exposures and thyroid cancer incidence to provide insight into preventable risk factors for thyroid cancer. The published literature was searched using the Web of Knowledge database for all articles through August 2013 that had in their text 'occupation' 'job' 'employment' or 'work' and 'thyroid cancer'. After excluding 10 mortality studies and 4 studies with less than 5 exposed incident cases, we summarised the findings of 30 articles that examined thyroid cancer incidence in relation to occupations or occupational exposure. The studies were grouped by exposure/occupation category, study design and exposure assessment approach. Where available, gender-stratified results are reported. The most studied (19 of 30 studies) and the most consistent associations were observed for radiation-exposed workers and healthcare occupations. Suggestive, but inconsistent, associations were observed in studies of pesticide-exposed workers and agricultural occupations. Findings for other exposures and occupation groups were largely null. The majority of studies had few exposed cases and assessed exposure based on occupation or industry category, self-report, or generic (population-based) job exposure matrices. The suggestive, but inconsistent findings for many of the occupational exposures reviewed here indicate that more studies with larger numbers of cases and better exposure assessment are necessary, particularly for exposures known to disrupt thyroid homeostasis.

  13. Agricultural Occupations Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lark, Floyd J.; Henderson, Billie

    This agricultural occupations handbook was developed from the Dictionary of Occupational Titles (DOT) and the U.S. Departments of Health, Education, and Welfare, and Labor publication, Vocational Education and Occupations. It includes the U.S. Office of Education coding for the instructional area of agriculture and the cluster coding for the…

  14. Extended Analytic Device Optimization Employing Asymptotic Expansion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackey, Jonathan; Sehirlioglu, Alp; Dynsys, Fred

    2013-01-01

    Analytic optimization of a thermoelectric junction often introduces several simplifying assumptionsincluding constant material properties, fixed known hot and cold shoe temperatures, and thermallyinsulated leg sides. In fact all of these simplifications will have an effect on device performance,ranging from negligible to significant depending on conditions. Numerical methods, such as FiniteElement Analysis or iterative techniques, are often used to perform more detailed analysis andaccount for these simplifications. While numerical methods may stand as a suitable solution scheme,they are weak in gaining physical understanding and only serve to optimize through iterativesearching techniques. Analytic and asymptotic expansion techniques can be used to solve thegoverning system of thermoelectric differential equations with fewer or less severe assumptionsthan the classic case. Analytic methods can provide meaningful closed form solutions and generatebetter physical understanding of the conditions for when simplifying assumptions may be valid.In obtaining the analytic solutions a set of dimensionless parameters, which characterize allthermoelectric couples, is formulated and provide the limiting cases for validating assumptions.Presentation includes optimization of both classic rectangular couples as well as practically andtheoretically interesting cylindrical couples using optimization parameters physically meaningful toa cylindrical couple. Solutions incorporate the physical behavior for i) thermal resistance of hot andcold shoes, ii) variable material properties with temperature, and iii) lateral heat transfer through legsides.

  15. Asymptotic Behavior in Liquid Drop Coalescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulsen, Joseph; Burton, Justin; Nagel, Sidney; Appathurai, Santosh; Harris, Michael; Basaran, Osman

    2012-02-01

    During coalescence, two drops first touch and then merge, as a liquid bridge grows from initially microscopic scales to a macroscopic size comparable to the drop diameter. The initial dynamics of coalescence are expected to be universal, owing to a singularity in the Laplace pressure, which diverges when the curvature of the liquid interface is infinite at the point where the drops first touch. Conventionally, this process has been thought to have just two regimes: a highly viscous one dominated by macroscopic flows pulling the two drops together and an inertial one described by local deformations near the growing neck. We use high-speed imaging, electrical measurements and full Navier-Stokes simulations to reveal a new regime that dominates the asymptotic dynamics of coalescence for any finite viscosity. The character of this new regime improves our understanding of the unexpectedly late viscous-to-inertial crossover [1]. An argument based on force balance and an appropriate choice of length-scales allow the construction of a new phase diagram of coalescence.[4pt] [1] J. D. Paulsen, J. C. Burton, S. R. Nagel, PRL 106, 114501 (2011).

  16. Early Asymptotic Giant Branch: Theory and Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frantsman, Ju.

    1995-08-01

    While on the asymptotic giant branch (AGB), a star passes through two evolutionary phases: an early stage (E-AGB), and thermally pulsing AGB (TP-AGB). The theory of two AGB stages was developed more than a decade ago but till now some authors do not take into account the E-AGB phase in spite of the fact that E-AGB phase lasts for some stars considerably longer than the TP-AGB phase. The typical outcomes of such ignoration are shown in the report (wrong conclusions about the evolution of Large Magellanic Cloud, the mistakes in the determination of the ages of Magellanic Cloud clusters). The results are obtained using the "population simultaion" technique. The origin of some types of chemically peculiar stars is investigated (S-stars, faint carbon stars, carbon stars bluer and somewhat brighter than in the mean N-Type stars in the Magellanic Clouds). A suggestion is proposed that these stars are on the E-AGB evolutionary stage. They develop chemical peculiarities in the process of mass transfer in close binaries. It was assumed that during the TP-AGB phase, the primary (more massive) component, when being the carbon star, transfered the carbon enriched material by Roche-lobe overflow to the secondary component, which becomes the star with carbon overabundance. During the subsequent evolution the former secondary (and now after mass transfer carbon enriched) component reaches the E-AGB phase. The results of calculations are discussed and compared with observations.

  17. Scattering theory without large-distance asymptotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tong; Li, Wen-Du; Dai, Wu-Sheng

    2014-06-01

    In conventional scattering theory, to obtain an explicit result, one imposes a precondition that the distance between target and observer is infinite. With the help of this precondition, one can asymptotically replace the Hankel function and the Bessel function with the sine functions so that one can achieve an explicit result. Nevertheless, after such a treatment, the information of the distance between target and observer is inevitably lost. In this paper, we show that such a precondition is not necessary: without losing any information of distance, one can still obtain an explicit result of a scattering rigorously. In other words, we give an rigorous explicit scattering result which contains the information of distance between target and observer. We show that at a finite distance, a modification factor — the Bessel polynomial — appears in the scattering amplitude, and, consequently, the cross section depends on the distance, the outgoing wave-front surface is no longer a sphere, and, besides the phase shift, there is an additional phase (the argument of the Bessel polynomial) appears in the scattering wave function.

  18. Asymptotic safety of gravity-matter systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meibohm, J.; Pawlowski, J. M.; Reichert, M.

    2016-04-01

    We study the ultraviolet stability of gravity-matter systems for general numbers of minimally coupled scalars and fermions. This is done within the functional renormalization group setup put forward in [N. Christiansen, B. Knorr, J. Meibohm, J. M. Pawlowski, and M. Reichert, Phys. Rev. D 92, 121501 (2015).] for pure gravity. It includes full dynamical propagators and a genuine dynamical Newton's coupling, which is extracted from the graviton three-point function. We find ultraviolet stability of general gravity-fermion systems. Gravity-scalar systems are also found to be ultraviolet stable within validity bounds for the chosen generic class of regulators, based on the size of the anomalous dimension. Remarkably, the ultraviolet fixed points for the dynamical couplings are found to be significantly different from those of their associated background counterparts, once matter fields are included. In summary, the asymptotic safety scenario does not put constraints on the matter content of the theory within the validity bounds for the chosen generic class of regulators.

  19. Asymptotic methods for internal transonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamson, T. C., Jr.; Messiter, A. F.

    1989-01-01

    For many internal transonic flows of practical interest, some of the relevant nondimensional parameters typically are small enough that a perturbation scheme can be expected to give a useful level of numerical accuracy. A variety of steady and unsteady transonic channel and cascade flows is studied with the help of systematic perturbation methods which take advantage of this fact. Asymptotic representations are constructed for small changes in channel cross-section area, small flow deflection angles, small differences between the flow velocity and the sound speed, small amplitudes of imposed oscillations, and small reduced frequencies. Inside a channel the flow is nearly one-dimensional except in thin regions immediately downstream of a shock wave, at the channel entrance and exit, and near the channel throat. A study of two-dimensional cascade flow is extended to include a description of three-dimensional compressor-rotor flow which leads to analytical results except in thin edge regions which require numerical solution. For unsteady flow the qualitative nature of the shock-wave motion in a channel depends strongly on the orders of magnitude of the frequency and amplitude of impressed wall oscillations or fluctuations in back pressure. One example of supersonic flow is considered, for a channel with length large compared to its width, including the effect of separation bubbles and the possibility of self-sustained oscillations. The effect of viscosity on a weak shock wave in a channel is discussed.

  20. Articular Contact Mechanics from an Asymptotic Modeling Perspective: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Argatov, Ivan; Mishuris, Gennady

    2016-01-01

    In the present paper, we review the current state-of-the-art in asymptotic modeling of articular contact. Particular attention has been given to the knee joint contact mechanics with a special emphasis on implications drawn from the asymptotic models, including average characteristics for articular cartilage layer. By listing a number of complicating effects such as transverse anisotropy, non-homogeneity, variable thickness, nonlinear deformations, shear loading, and bone deformation, which may be accounted for by asymptotic modeling, some unsolved problems and directions for future research are also discussed. PMID:27847803

  1. Asymptotic stability properties of linear Volterra integrodifferential equations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. K.

    1971-01-01

    The Liapunov stability properties of solution to a certain system of Volterra integrodifferential equations is studied. Various types of Liapunov stability are defined; the definitions are natural extensions of the corresponding notions for ordinary differential equations. Necessary and sufficient conditions, in general, for uniform stability and uniform asymptotic stability are obtained in the form of a theorem. Connections between the stability of the system studied and the stability properties of a related Volterra integrodifferential equation with infinite memory are examined. Sufficient conditions in order that the trivial solution to the system studied be stable, uniformly stable, asymptotically stable, or uniformly asymptotically stable are derived.

  2. Uniform Asymptotic Expansion for the Incomplete Beta Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemes, Gergő; Olde Daalhuis, Adri B.

    2016-10-01

    In [Temme N.M., Special functions. An introduction to the classical functions of mathematical physics, A Wiley-Interscience Publication, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., New York, 1996, Section 11.3.3.1] a uniform asymptotic expansion for the incomplete beta function was derived. It was not obvious from those results that the expansion is actually an asymptotic expansion. We derive a remainder estimate that clearly shows that the result indeed has an asymptotic property, and we also give a recurrence relation for the coefficients.

  3. Coulomb string tension, asymptotic string tension, and the gluon chain

    SciTech Connect

    Greensite, Jeff; Szczepaniak, Adam P.

    2015-02-01

    We compute, via numerical simulations, the non-perturbative Coulomb potential and position-space ghost propagator in pure SU(3) gauge theory in Coulomb gauge. We find that that the Coulomb potential scales nicely in accordance with asymptotic freedom, that the Coulomb potential is linear in the infrared, and that the Coulomb string tension is about four times larger than the asymptotic string tension. We explain how it is possible that the asymptotic string tension can be lower than the Coulomb string tension by a factor of four.

  4. Asymptotic Structure of Constrained Exponential Random Graph Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Lingjiong

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, we study exponential random graph models subject to certain constraints. We obtain some general results about the asymptotic structure of the model. We show that there exists non-trivial regions in the phase plane where the asymptotic structure is uniform and there also exists non-trivial regions in the phase plane where the asymptotic structure is non-uniform. We will get more refined results for the star model and in particular the two-star model for which a sharp transition from uniform to non-uniform structure, a stationary point and phase transitions will be obtained.

  5. Coulomb string tension, asymptotic string tension, and the gluon chain

    DOE PAGES

    Greensite, Jeff; Szczepaniak, Adam P.

    2015-02-01

    We compute, via numerical simulations, the non-perturbative Coulomb potential and position-space ghost propagator in pure SU(3) gauge theory in Coulomb gauge. We find that that the Coulomb potential scales nicely in accordance with asymptotic freedom, that the Coulomb potential is linear in the infrared, and that the Coulomb string tension is about four times larger than the asymptotic string tension. We explain how it is possible that the asymptotic string tension can be lower than the Coulomb string tension by a factor of four.

  6. Occupational rhinitis: an update.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Whitney W; Grammer, Leslie C

    2015-01-01

    Occupational rhinitis is characterized by nasal congestion, rhinorrhea, nasal itching, and/or sneezing that occur secondary to exposures in the workplace. This disease can be classified into allergic or nonallergic subgroups based upon the underlying disease pathogenesis as well as the type of causative agent. While the true prevalence of occupational rhinitis is unknown, there are certain professions and occupational exposures that place workers at a higher risk for developing the disease. Additionally, occupational rhinitis can be associated with occupational asthma and upper airway symptoms may precede those of the lower respiratory tract. Taken together, occupational rhinitis is an important disease for study given its medical as well as socioeconomic implications. This review will focus on the classification of occupational rhinitis as well the prevalence, diagnosis, and treatment strategies.

  7. Exactification of the Poincaré asymptotic expansion of the Hankel integral: spectacularly accurate asymptotic expansions and non-asymptotic scales

    PubMed Central

    Galapon, Eric A.; Martinez, Kay Marie L.

    2014-01-01

    We obtain an exactification of the Poincaré asymptotic expansion (PAE) of the Hankel integral, as , using the distributional approach of McClure & Wong. We find that, for half-integer orders of the Bessel function, the exactified asymptotic series terminates, so that it gives an exact finite sum representation of the Hankel integral. For other orders, the asymptotic series does not terminate and is generally divergent, but is amenable to superasymptotic summation, i.e. by optimal truncation. For specific examples, we compare the accuracy of the optimally truncated asymptotic series owing to the McClure–Wong distributional method with owing to the Mellin–Barnes integral method. We find that the former is spectacularly more accurate than the latter, by, in some cases, more than 70 orders of magnitude for the same moderate value of b. Moreover, the exactification can lead to a resummation of the PAE when it is exact, with the resummed Poincaré series exhibiting again the same spectacular accuracy. More importantly, the distributional method may yield meaningful resummations that involve scales that are not asymptotic sequences. PMID:24511252

  8. Exactification of the Poincaré asymptotic expansion of the Hankel integral: spectacularly accurate asymptotic expansions and non-asymptotic scales.

    PubMed

    Galapon, Eric A; Martinez, Kay Marie L

    2014-02-08

    We obtain an exactification of the Poincaré asymptotic expansion (PAE) of the Hankel integral, [Formula: see text] as [Formula: see text], using the distributional approach of McClure & Wong. We find that, for half-integer orders of the Bessel function, the exactified asymptotic series terminates, so that it gives an exact finite sum representation of the Hankel integral. For other orders, the asymptotic series does not terminate and is generally divergent, but is amenable to superasymptotic summation, i.e. by optimal truncation. For specific examples, we compare the accuracy of the optimally truncated asymptotic series owing to the McClure-Wong distributional method with owing to the Mellin-Barnes integral method. We find that the former is spectacularly more accurate than the latter, by, in some cases, more than 70 orders of magnitude for the same moderate value of b. Moreover, the exactification can lead to a resummation of the PAE when it is exact, with the resummed Poincaré series exhibiting again the same spectacular accuracy. More importantly, the distributional method may yield meaningful resummations that involve scales that are not asymptotic sequences.

  9. Kolmogorov turbulence by matched asymptotic expansions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundgren, Thomas S.

    2003-04-01

    The Kolmogorov [Dokl. Akad. Nauk. SSSR 30, 299 (1941), hereafter K41] inertial range theory is derived from first principles by analysis of the Navier-Stokes equation using the method of matched asymptotic expansions without assuming isotropy or homogeneity and the Kolmogorov (K62) [J. Fluid Mech. 13, 82 (1962)] refined theory is analyzed. This paper is an extension of Lundgren [Phys. Fluids 14, 638 (2002)], in which the second- and third-order structure functions were determined from the isotropic Karman-Howarth [Proc. R. Soc. London, Ser. A 164, 192 (1938)] equation. The starting point for the present analysis is an equation for the difference in velocity between two points, one of which is a Lagrangian fluid point and the second, slaved to the first by a fixed separation r, is not Lagrangian. The velocity difference, so defined, satisfies the Navier-Stokes equation with spatial variable r. The analysis is carried out in two parts. In the first part the physical hypothesis is made that the mean dissipation is independent of viscosity as viscosity tends to zero, as assumed in K41. This means that the mean dissipation is finite as Reynolds number tends to infinity and leads to the K41 inertial range results. In the second part this dissipation assumption is relaxed in an attempt to duplicate the K62 theory. While the K62 structure is obtained, there are restrictions, resulting from the analysis which shows that there can be no inertial range intermittency as Reynolds number tends to infinity, and therefore the mean dissipation has to be finite as Reynolds number tends to infinity, as assumed in part one. Reynolds number-dependent corrections to the K41 results are obtained in the form of compensating functions of r/λ, which tend to zero slowly like Rλ-2/3 as Rλ→∞.

  10. Refined asymptotics for constant scalar curvature metrics with isolated singularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korevaar, Nick; Mazzeo, Rafe; Pacard, Frank; Schoen, Richard

    1999-01-01

    We consider the asymptotic behaviour of positive solutions u of the conformal scalar curvature equation, \\Delta u + n(n-2)/4 u^{(n+2)(n-2) = 0, in the neighbourhood of isolated singularities in the standard Euclidean ball. Although asymptotic radial symmetry for such solutions was proved some time ago, by Caffarelli, Gidas and Spruck, we present a much simpler and more geometric derivation of this fact. We also discuss a refinement, showing that any such solution is asymptotic to one of the deformed radial singular solutions. Finally we give some applications of these refined asymptotics, first to computing the global Pohozaev invariants of solutions on the sphere with isolated singularities, and then to the regularity of the moduli space of all such solutions.

  11. Asymptotics of 6j and 10j symbols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freidel, Laurent; Louapre, David

    2003-04-01

    It is well known that the building blocks for state sum models of quantum gravity are given by 6j and 10j symbols. In this work, we study the asymptotics of these symbols by using their expressions as group integrals. We carefully describe the measure involved in terms of invariant variables and develop new technics in order to study their asymptotics. Using these technics, we compute the asymptotics of the various Euclidean and Lorentzian 6j symbols. Finally, we compute the asymptotic expansion of the 10j symbol which is shown to be non-oscillating, in agreement with a recent result of Baez et al. We discuss the physical origin of this behaviour and a way to modify the Barrett-Crane model in order to cure this disease.

  12. Asymptotic analysis of numerical wave propagation in finite difference equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giles, M.; Thompkins, W. T., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    An asymptotic technique is developed for analyzing the propagation and dissipation of wave-like solutions to finite difference equations. It is shown that for each fixed complex frequency there are usually several wave solutions with different wavenumbers and the slowly varying amplitude of each satisfies an asymptotic amplitude equation which includes the effects of smoothly varying coefficients in the finite difference equations. The local group velocity appears in this equation as the velocity of convection of the amplitude. Asymptotic boundary conditions coupling the amplitudes of the different wave solutions are also derived. A wavepacket theory is developed which predicts the motion, and interaction at boundaries, of wavepackets, wave-like disturbances of finite length. Comparison with numerical experiments demonstrates the success and limitations of the theory. Finally an asymptotic global stability analysis is developed.

  13. Asymptotically anti-de Sitter spacetimes in topologically massive gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Henneaux, Marc; Martinez, Cristian; Troncoso, Ricardo

    2009-04-15

    We consider asymptotically anti-de Sitter spacetimes in three-dimensional topologically massive gravity with a negative cosmological constant, for all values of the mass parameter {mu} ({mu}{ne}0). We provide consistent boundary conditions that accommodate the recent solutions considered in the literature, which may have a slower falloff than the one relevant for general relativity. These conditions are such that the asymptotic symmetry is in all cases the conformal group, in the sense that they are invariant under asymptotic conformal transformations and that the corresponding Virasoro generators are finite. It is found that, at the chiral point |{mu}l|=1 (where l is the anti-de Sitter radius), allowing for logarithmic terms (absent for general relativity) in the asymptotic behavior of the metric makes both sets of Virasoro generators nonzero even though one of the central charges vanishes.

  14. Global asymptotic stability in a class of generalized Putnam equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaofan

    2006-10-01

    It was conjectured that for every integer m[greater-or-equal, slanted]3 the unique equilibrium c=1 of the generalized Putnam equation with positive initial conditions is globally asymptotically stable. In this paper, we prove this conjecture.

  15. Asymptotic expansions of Feynman integrals of exponentials with polynomial exponent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravtseva, A. K.; Smolyanov, O. G.; Shavgulidze, E. T.

    2016-10-01

    In the paper, an asymptotic expansion of path integrals of functionals having exponential form with polynomials in the exponent is constructed. The definition of the path integral in the sense of analytic continuation is considered.

  16. Asymptotic behavior of curvature of surface elements in isotropic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Girimaji, S. S.

    1991-01-01

    The asymptotic behavior of the curvature of material elements in turbulence is investigated using Lagrangian velocity-gradient time series obtained from direct numerical simulations of isotropic turbulence. Several material-element ensembles of different initial curvatures and shapes are studied. It is found that, at long times, the (first five) moments of the logarithm of characteristic curvature and shape factor asymptote to values that are independent of the initial curvature or shape. This evidence strongly suggests that the asymptotic pdf's of the curvature and shape of material elements are stationary and independent of initial conditions. Irrespective of initial curvature or shape, the asymptotic shape of a material surface is cylindrical with a high probability.

  17. An asymptotic model in acoustics: acoustic drift equations.

    PubMed

    Vladimirov, Vladimir A; Ilin, Konstantin

    2013-11-01

    A rigorous asymptotic procedure with the Mach number as a small parameter is used to derive the equations of mean flows which coexist and are affected by the background acoustic waves in the limit of very high Reynolds number.

  18. Listing Occupational Carcinogens

    PubMed Central

    Siemiatycki, Jack; Richardson, Lesley; Straif, Kurt; Latreille, Benoit; Lakhani, Ramzan; Campbell, Sally; Rousseau, Marie-Claude; Boffetta, Paolo

    2004-01-01

    The occupational environment has been a most fruitful one for investigating the etiology of human cancer. Many recognized human carcinogens are occupational carcinogens. There is a large volume of epidemiologic and experimental data concerning cancer risks in different work environments. It is important to synthesize this information for both scientific and public health purposes. Various organizations and individuals have published lists of occupational carcinogens. However, such lists have been limited by unclear criteria for which recognized carcinogens should be considered occupational carcinogens, and by inconsistent and incomplete information on the occupations and industries in which the carcinogenic substances may be found and on their target sites of cancer. Based largely on the evaluations published by the International Agency for Research on Cancer, and augmented with additional information, the present article represents an attempt to summarize, in tabular form, current knowledge on occupational carcinogens, the occupations and industries in which they are found, and their target organs. We have considered 28 agents as definite occupational carcinogens, 27 agents as probable occupational carcinogens, and 113 agents as possible occupational carcinogens. These tables should be useful for regulatory or preventive purposes and for scientific purposes in research priority setting and in understanding carcinogenesis. PMID:15531427

  19. Asymptotic-induced numerical methods for conservation laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garbey, Marc; Scroggs, Jeffrey S.

    1990-01-01

    Asymptotic-induced methods are presented for the numerical solution of hyperbolic conservation laws with or without viscosity. The methods consist of multiple stages. The first stage is to obtain a first approximation by using a first-order method, such as the Godunov scheme. Subsequent stages of the method involve solving internal-layer problems identified by using techniques derived via asymptotics. Finally, a residual correction increases the accuracy of the scheme. The method is derived and justified with singular perturbation techniques.

  20. Asymptotic Expansion in Enzyme Reactions with High Enzyme Concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bersani, Alberto Maria; Dell'Acqua, Guido

    2010-09-01

    In this paper we find a new asymptotic expansion valid in enzymatic reactions where the total amount of enzyme exceeds greatly the total amount of substrate. In such case it is well known that the Michelis-Menten approximation is no longer valid; therefore our asymptotic expansion is a new tool to approximate in a closed form the concentrations of the reactants in presence of an enzyme excess.

  1. Quick asymptotic expansion aided by a variational principle

    SciTech Connect

    Hameiri, Eliezer

    2013-02-15

    It is shown how expanding asymptotically a variational functional can yield the asymptotic expansion of its Euler equation. The procedure is simple but novel and requires taking the variation of the expanded functional with respect to the leading order of the originally unknown function, even though the leading order of this function has already been determined in a previous order. An example is worked out that of a large aspect ratio tokamak plasma equilibrium state with relatively strong flows and high plasma beta.

  2. Asymptotic relation between Bell-inequality violations and entanglement distillability

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Younghun

    2010-11-15

    We investigate the asymptotic relation between violations of the Mermin-Belinskii-Klyshko inequality and the entanglement distillability of multipartite entangled states, as the number of parties increases. We in particular consider noisy multiqubit GHZ and so-called Duer states in the Mermin-Belinskii-Klyshko inequality, and show that, in the asymptotic limit of the number of parties, the violation of the inequality implies the distillability in almost all bipartitions.

  3. Bivariate Hermite-Birkhoff polynomial interpolation with asymptotic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carnicer, J. M.; Gasca, M.

    2000-07-01

    Some asymptotic conditions along prescribed directions are added to the usual interpolation data in bivariate problems. These asymptotic conditions are written in terms of interpolation and then the new problem is studied in the frame of the interpolation systems introduced by Gasca and Maeztu some years ago. A Newton type interpolation formula is obtained for the enlarged problem and then some particular cases are studied.

  4. Globally uniformly asymptotical stabilisation of time-delay nonlinear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Xiushan; Han, Zhengzhi; Zhang, Wei

    2011-07-01

    Globally uniformly asymptotical stabilisation of nonlinear systems in feedback form with a delay arbitrarily large in the input is dealt with based on the backstepping approach in this article. The design strategy depends on the construction of a Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional. A continuously differentiable control law is obtained to globally uniformly asymptotically stabilise the closed-loop system. The simulation shows the effectiveness of the method.

  5. Asymptotic proportionality (weak ergodicity) and conditional asymptotic equality of solutions to time-heterogeneous sublinear difference and differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thieme, Horst R.

    The concept of asymptotic proportionality and conditional asymptotic equality which is presented here aims at making global asymptotic stability statements for time-heterogeneous difference and differential equations. For such non-autonomous problems (apart from special cases) no prominent special solutions (equilibra, periodic solutions) exist which are natural candidates for the asymptotic behaviour of arbitrary solutions. One way out of this dilemma consists in looking for conditions under which any two solutions to the problem (with different initial conditions) behave in a similar or even the same way as time tends to infinity. We study a general sublinear difference equation in an ordered Banach space and, for illustration, time-heterogeneous versions of several well-known differential equations modelling the spread of gonorrhea in a heterogeneous population, the spread of a vector-borne infectious disease, and the dynamics of a logistically growing spatially diffusing population.

  6. Inference for occupancy and occupancy dynamics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Connell, Allan F.; Bailey, Larissa L.; O'Connell, Allan F.; Nichols, James D.; Karanth, K. Ullas

    2011-01-01

    This chapter deals with the estimation of occupancy as a state variable to assess the status of, and track changes in, species distributions when sampling with camera traps. Much of the recent interest in occupancy estimation and modeling originated from the models developed by MacKenzie et al. (2002, 2003), although similar methods were developed independently (Azuma et al. 1990; Bayley and Petersen 2001; Nichols and Karanth, 2002; Tyre et al. 2003), all of which deal with species occurrence information and imperfect detection. Less than a decade after these publications, the modeling and estimation of species occurrence and occupancy dynamics have increased significantly. Special features of scientific journals have explored innovative uses of detection–nondetection data with occupancy models (Vojta 2005), and an entire volume has synthesized the use and application of occupancy estimation methods (MacKenzie et al. 2006). Reviews of the topical concepts, philosophical considerations, and various sampling designs that can be used for occupancy estimation are now readily available for a range of audiences (MacKenzie and Royle 2005; MacKenzie et al. 2006; Bailey et al. 2007; Royle and Dorazio 2008; Conroy and Carroll 2009; Kendall and White 2009; Hines et al. 2010; Link and Barker 2010). As a result, it would be pointless here to recast all that these publications have so eloquently articulated, but that said, a review of any scientific topic requires sufficient context and relevant background information, especially when relatively new methodologies and techniques such as occupancy estimation and camera traps are involved. This is especially critical in a digital age where new information is published at warp speed, making it increasingly difficult to stay abreast of theoretical advances and research developments.

  7. Estimation of an Occupational Choice Model when Occupations Are Misclassified

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Paul

    2009-01-01

    This paper develops an empirical occupational choice model that corrects for misclassification in occupational choices and measurement error in occupation-specific work experience. The model is used to estimate the extent of measurement error in occupation data and quantify the bias that results from ignoring measurement error in occupation codes…

  8. Estimation of an Occupational Choice Model when Occupations Are Misclassified

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Paul

    2009-01-01

    This paper develops an empirical occupational choice model that corrects for misclassification in occupational choices and measurement error in occupation-specific work experience. The model is used to estimate the extent of measurement error in occupation data and quantify the bias that results from ignoring measurement error in occupation codes…

  9. Asymptotic similarity in turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, Richard D.

    The turbulent boundary layer is one of the most fundamental and important applications of fluid mechanics. Despite great practical interest and its direct impact on frictional drag among its many important consequences, no theory absent of significant inference or assumption exists. Numerical simulations and empirical guidance are used to produce models and adequate predictions, but even minor improvements in modeling parameters or physical understanding could translate into significant improvements in the efficiency of aerodynamic and hydrodynamic vehicles. Classically, turbulent boundary layers and fully-developed turbulent channels and pipes are considered members of the same "family," with similar "inner" versus "outer" descriptions. However, recent advances in experiments, simulations, and data processing have questioned this, and, as a result, their fundamental physics. To address a full range of pressure gradient boundary layers, a new approach to the governing equations and physical description of wall-bounded flows is formulated, using a two variable similarity approach and many of the tools of the classical method with slight but significant variations. A new set of similarity requirements for the characteristic scales of the problem is found, and when these requirements are applied to the classical "inner" and "outer" scales, a "similarity map" is developed providing a clear prediction of what flow conditions should result in self-similar forms. An empirical model with a small number of parameters and a form reminiscent of Coles' "wall plus wake" is developed for the streamwise Reynolds stress, and shown to fit experimental and numerical data from a number of turbulent boundary layers as well as other wall-bounded flows. It appears from this model and its scaling using the free-stream velocity that the true asymptotic form of u'2 may not become self-evident until Retheta ≈ 275,000 or delta+ ≈ 105, if not higher. A perturbation expansion made possible

  10. INFECTION AS OCCUPATIONAL RISK,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The percentage of the job-connected infectious diseases of the total number of occupational diseases has been subject to only minor fluctuations...since 1949. Of the occupational infections of medical personnel, tuberculosis and infectious hepatitis are the most important; among diseases that can be...importance in the recognition of an infectious disease as an occupational disease. The article discusses the sources of infection, the manner of

  11. Occupational cancer in Italy.

    PubMed Central

    Merler, E; Vineis, P; Alhaique, D; Miligi, L

    1999-01-01

    This article is a discussion of occupational cancer in Italy. The introduction provides the necessary context of Italian industrialization and occupational health regulation. This is followed by a review of Italian epidemiologic studies of occupational cancer risks considered in terms of relative measures of risk and attributable risk of carcinogenic agents or exposure circumstances. We attempt to establish the number of workers exposed to carcinogens in Italy and the intensity of their exposures. Finally, the Italian system of compensation for occupational cancer is discussed. Several cohort and case-control studies have addressed the issue of occupational risks, mostly among male workers. The results of these studies suggest that the growing incidence of and mortality by mesothelioma is explained by the widespread and intense exposure to asbestos in some Italian industrial settings. A high attributable risk of lung tumors among male populations in industrial areas of northern Italy is explained by occupational exposures. However, insufficient data are available for clear definition of the extent and intensity of occupational exposure to carcinogenic substances. In Italy, we must prioritize and maximize resources in occupational cancer epidemiology and revitalize the role of national institutions. Recent legislation has established new regulations on the handling of carcinogenic substances in industrial settings, a new list of occupational diseases, and a national registry of mesothelioma linked to asbestos exposure. These legislative changes are expected to have positive effects. PMID:10350509

  12. Image Processing Occupancy Sensor

    SciTech Connect

    2016-07-14

    The Image Processing Occupancy Sensor, or IPOS, is a novel sensor technology developed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). The sensor is based on low-cost embedded microprocessors widely used by the smartphone industry and leverages mature open-source computer vision software libraries. Compared to traditional passive infrared and ultrasonic-based motion sensors currently used for occupancy detection, IPOS has shown the potential for improved accuracy and a richer set of feedback signals for occupant-optimized lighting, daylighting, temperature setback, ventilation control, and other occupancy and location-based uses. Unlike traditional passive infrared (PIR) or ultrasonic occupancy sensors, which infer occupancy based only on motion, IPOS uses digital image-based analysis to detect and classify various aspects of occupancy, including the presence of occupants regardless of motion, their number, location, and activity levels of occupants, as well as the illuminance properties of the monitored space. The IPOS software leverages the recent availability of low-cost embedded computing platforms, computer vision software libraries, and camera elements.

  13. American Occupational Therapy Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... AOTA Education Summit AOTA/NBCOT National Student Conclave School Based Specialty Conference Member Appreciation Celebration Older Driver Safety Awareness Week Occupational Therapy Month Mental Health Specialty ...

  14. About Occupational Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... to improve your documentation. Children & Youth Health & Wellness Mental Health Productive Aging Rehabilitation & Disability Work & Industry Manage Your Practice Evidence-Based Practice & Research Ethics Occupational Therapy Assistants ...

  15. Teacher's Guide to Occupational Orientation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Evaluation Systems, Inc., Amherst, MA.

    This guide is specifically designed to accompany materials developed for occupational orientation (particularly in Illinois) in the following five cluster areas: Applied biological and agricultural occupations; personal and public service occupations; health occupations; business, marketing, and management occupations; and industrial oriented…

  16. Welding. Occupational Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This Occupational Competency Analysis Profile (OCAP), which is one of a series of OCAPs developed to identify the skills that Ohio employers deem necessary to entering a given occupation/occupational area, lists the occupational, academic, and employability skills required of individuals entering the occupation of welder. The introduction explains…

  17. Teacher's Guide to Occupational Orientation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Evaluation Systems, Inc., Amherst, MA.

    This guide is specifically designed to accompany materials developed for occupational orientation (particularly in Illinois) in the following five cluster areas: Applied biological and agricultural occupations; personal and public service occupations; health occupations; business, marketing, and management occupations; and industrial oriented…

  18. Asymptotic giant branch and super-asymptotic giant branch stars: modelling dust production at solar metallicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dell'Agli, F.; García-Hernández, D. A.; Schneider, R.; Ventura, P.; La Franca, F.; Valiante, R.; Marini, E.; Di Criscienzo, M.

    2017-06-01

    We present dust yields for asymptotic giant branch (AGB) and super-asymptotic giant branch (SAGB) stars of solar metallicity. Stars with initial mass 1.5 M⊙ ≤ Mini ≤ 3 M⊙ reach the carbon star stage during the AGB phase and produce mainly solid carbon and SiC. The size and the amount of the carbon particles formed follows a positive trend with the mass of the star; the carbon grains with the largest size (aC ˜ 0.2 μm) are produced by AGB stars with Mini = 2.5-3 M⊙, as these stars are those achieving the greatest enrichment of carbon in the surface regions. The size of SiC grains, being sensitive to the surface silicon abundance, remains at about aSiC ˜ 0.1μm. The mass of carbonaceous dust formed is in the range 10-4-5 × 10-3 M⊙, whereas the mass of SiC produced is 2 × 10-4-10-3 M⊙. Massive AGB/SAGB stars with Mini > 3 M⊙ experience hot bottom burning, which inhibits the formation of carbon stars. The most relevant dust species formed in these stars are silicate and alumina dust, with grain sizes in the range 0.1 < aol < 0.15 μm and a_Al_2O_3 ˜ 0.07 μm, respectively. The mass of silicates produced spans the interval 3.4 × 10-3 M⊙ ≤ Mdust ≤ 1.1 × 10-2 M⊙ and increases with the initial mass of the star.

  19. Asymptotics of bivariate generating functions with algebraic singularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwood, Torin

    Flajolet and Odlyzko (1990) derived asymptotic formulae the coefficients of a class of uni- variate generating functions with algebraic singularities. Gao and Richmond (1992) and Hwang (1996, 1998) extended these results to classes of multivariate generating functions, in both cases by reducing to the univariate case. Pemantle and Wilson (2013) outlined new multivariate ana- lytic techniques and used them to analyze the coefficients of rational generating functions. After overviewing these methods, we use them to find asymptotic formulae for the coefficients of a broad class of bivariate generating functions with algebraic singularities. Beginning with the Cauchy integral formula, we explicity deform the contour of integration so that it hugs a set of critical points. The asymptotic contribution to the integral comes from analyzing the integrand near these points, leading to explicit asymptotic formulae. Next, we use this formula to analyze an example from current research. In the following chapter, we apply multivariate analytic techniques to quan- tum walks. Bressler and Pemantle (2007) found a (d + 1)-dimensional rational generating function whose coefficients described the amplitude of a particle at a position in the integer lattice after n steps. Here, the minimal critical points form a curve on the (d + 1)-dimensional unit torus. We find asymptotic formulae for the amplitude of a particle in a given position, normalized by the number of steps n, as n approaches infinity. Each critical point contributes to the asymptotics for a specific normalized position. Using Groebner bases in Maple again, we compute the explicit locations of peak amplitudes. In a scaling window of size the square root of n near the peaks, each amplitude is asymptotic to an Airy function.

  20. Size Matters: Individual Variation in Ectotherm Growth and Asymptotic Size

    PubMed Central

    King, Richard B.

    2016-01-01

    Body size, and, by extension, growth has impacts on physiology, survival, attainment of sexual maturity, fecundity, generation time, and population dynamics, especially in ectotherm animals that often exhibit extensive growth following attainment of sexual maturity. Frequently, growth is analyzed at the population level, providing useful population mean growth parameters but ignoring individual variation that is also of ecological and evolutionary significance. Our long-term study of Lake Erie Watersnakes, Nerodia sipedon insularum, provides data sufficient for a detailed analysis of population and individual growth. We describe population mean growth separately for males and females based on size of known age individuals (847 captures of 769 males, 748 captures of 684 females) and annual growth increments of individuals of unknown age (1,152 males, 730 females). We characterize individual variation in asymptotic size based on repeated measurements of 69 males and 71 females that were each captured in five to nine different years. The most striking result of our analyses is that asymptotic size varies dramatically among individuals, ranging from 631–820 mm snout-vent length in males and from 835–1125 mm in females. Because female fecundity increases with increasing body size, we explore the impact of individual variation in asymptotic size on lifetime reproductive success using a range of realistic estimates of annual survival. When all females commence reproduction at the same age, lifetime reproductive success is greatest for females with greater asymptotic size regardless of annual survival. But when reproduction is delayed in females with greater asymptotic size, lifetime reproductive success is greatest for females with lower asymptotic size when annual survival is low. Possible causes of individual variation in asymptotic size, including individual- and cohort-specific variation in size at birth and early growth, warrant further investigation. PMID

  1. Size Matters: Individual Variation in Ectotherm Growth and Asymptotic Size.

    PubMed

    King, Richard B; Stanford, Kristin M; Jones, Peter C; Bekker, Kent

    2016-01-01

    Body size, and, by extension, growth has impacts on physiology, survival, attainment of sexual maturity, fecundity, generation time, and population dynamics, especially in ectotherm animals that often exhibit extensive growth following attainment of sexual maturity. Frequently, growth is analyzed at the population level, providing useful population mean growth parameters but ignoring individual variation that is also of ecological and evolutionary significance. Our long-term study of Lake Erie Watersnakes, Nerodia sipedon insularum, provides data sufficient for a detailed analysis of population and individual growth. We describe population mean growth separately for males and females based on size of known age individuals (847 captures of 769 males, 748 captures of 684 females) and annual growth increments of individuals of unknown age (1,152 males, 730 females). We characterize individual variation in asymptotic size based on repeated measurements of 69 males and 71 females that were each captured in five to nine different years. The most striking result of our analyses is that asymptotic size varies dramatically among individuals, ranging from 631-820 mm snout-vent length in males and from 835-1125 mm in females. Because female fecundity increases with increasing body size, we explore the impact of individual variation in asymptotic size on lifetime reproductive success using a range of realistic estimates of annual survival. When all females commence reproduction at the same age, lifetime reproductive success is greatest for females with greater asymptotic size regardless of annual survival. But when reproduction is delayed in females with greater asymptotic size, lifetime reproductive success is greatest for females with lower asymptotic size when annual survival is low. Possible causes of individual variation in asymptotic size, including individual- and cohort-specific variation in size at birth and early growth, warrant further investigation.

  2. Occupational fatalities in Jordan.

    PubMed

    Al-Abdallat, Emad M; Oqailan, Ahmad Mohammad A; Al Ali, Rayyan; Hudaib, Arwa A; Salameh, Ghada A M

    2015-01-01

    Occupational fatalities are a worldwide problem. Certain occupations pose a greater risk than others. Recent statistics on global occupational injuries and diseases that might lead to temporary or permanent disability and even worse might lead to death, are staggering. The purpose of this study was to estimate the death rates from occupational injuries in Jordan over a period of four years; to estimate occupational fatality rate that results from accidental injuries and identify the most risky concurrent occupations with the type of injuries, the age and nationality of the victims. A total of 88 work related fatalities were admitted to three hospitals in Amman through 2008-2012 and were examined by a forensic (occupational) physician at the time. They were categorized according to, age, nationality, occupation, type of injury and were all tested for toxic substances. The occupation with the most fatalities was construction (44%); falling from a height was the commonest type of accident (44%) and head injuries were the leading injury type (21.6%); 9.1% of the deaths were positive for alcohol. Moreover, 22.7% of deaths were between ages of 25-29. Consequently, the mean occupational fatality rate was 2 per 100.000 workers during 2008-2012. Constructions and other types of occupations are more extensive problems than what is usually anticipated, especially when safety precautions are not effective or implemented. They may cause injuries and death, which will have a socioeconomic burden on families, society, governments and industries. Not to mention the grief that is associated with the death of a worker at his work site to all concerned parties. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  3. Occupation and Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Aschebrook-Kilfoy, Briseis; Ward, Mary H.; Valle, Curt T. Della; Friesen, Melissa C.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Numerous occupational and environmental exposures have been shown to disrupt thyroid hormones, but much less is known about their relationships with thyroid cancer. Here we review the epidemiology studies of occupations and occupational exposures and thyroid cancer incidence to provide insight into preventable risk factors for thyroid cancer. Methods The published literature was searched using the Web of Knowledge database for all articles through August 2013 that had in their text “occupation” “job” ”employment” or “work” and “thyroid cancer”. After excluding 10 mortality studies and 4 studies with less than 5 exposed incident cases, we summarized the findings of 30 articles that examined thyroid cancer incidence in relation to occupations or occupational exposure. The studies were grouped by exposure/occupation category, study design, and exposure assessment approach. Where available, gender stratified results are reported. Results The most studied (19 of 30 studies) and the most consistent associations were observed for radiation-exposed workers and health care occupations. Suggestive, but inconsistent, associations were observed in studies of pesticide-exposed workers and agricultural occupations. Findings for other exposures and occupation groups were largely null. The majority of studies had few exposed cases and assessed exposure based on occupation or industry category, self-report, or generic (population-based) job exposure matrices. Conclusion The suggestive, but inconsistent findings for many of the occupational exposures reviewed here indicate that more studies with larger numbers of cases and better exposure assessment are necessary, particularly for exposures known to disrupt thyroid homeostasis. PMID:24604144

  4. OCCUPATION EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS ANALYSIS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    GRIEST, JEANNE; MORSCH, WILLIAM C.

    THE OCCUPATIONAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS ANALYSIS (OERA) SYSTEM IS A RESEARCH EFFORT DESIGNED TO DEVELOP A FEASIBLE METHOD OF PROJECTING VOCATIONAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS THAT WILL SATISFY LABOR MARKET NEEDS. THE OUTPUTS OF THE OERA WILL BE ANNUAL PROJECTIONS OF EMPLOYMENT DEMANDS IN OCCUPATIONS CLASSIFIED BY VOCATIONAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS. THESE…

  5. Counselling for Occupational Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nwamuo, P. A.; Ugonna, C. E.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to ascertain the general attitude which senior secondary school students display towards counselling for occupational development while determining gender difference in students' attitude towards occupational information. It is also aimed at discovering whether these students seek vocational guidance in their choice of…

  6. Occupational asthma: a review.

    PubMed Central

    Lombardo, L J; Balmes, J R

    2000-01-01

    Occupational asthma is the most common form of occupational lung disease in the developed world at the present time. In this review, the epidemiology, pathogenesis/mechanisms, clinical presentations, management, and prevention of occupational asthma are discussed. The population attributable risk of asthma due to occupational exposures is considerable. Current understanding of the mechanisms by which many agents cause occupational asthma is limited, especially for low-molecular-weight sensitizers and irritants. The diagnosis of occupational asthma is generally established on the basis of a suggestive history of a temporal association between exposure and the onset of symptoms and objective evidence that these symptoms are related to airflow limitation. Early diagnosis, elimination of exposure to the responsible agent, and early use of inhaled steroids may play important roles in the prevention of long-term persistence of asthma. Persistent occupational asthma is often associated with substantial disability and consequent impacts on income and quality of life. Prevention of new cases is the best approach to reducing the burden of asthma attributable to occupational exposures. Future research needs are identified. PMID:10931788

  7. Occupations, U. S. A.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geneva Area City Schools, OH.

    The booklet divides job titles, selected from the Dictionary of Occupational Titles, into 15 career clusters: agribusiness and natural resources, business and office education, communication and media, construction, consumer and home economics, fine arts and humanities, health occupations, hospitality and recreation, manufacturing, marine science,…

  8. Testosterone and Occupational Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dabbs, James M., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Archival data on 4,462 military veterans linked higher levels of serum testosterone to lower-status occupations. A structural equation model was supported in which higher testosterone, mediated through lower intellectual ability, greater antisocial behavior, and lower education, leads away from white-collar occupations. Contains 49 references.…

  9. The Heath Occupational Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heath, William E.

    1990-01-01

    Career development programs must identify occupational needs of adults. A model based on Maslow's hierarchy develops occupational questions related to individual motivations (physiology, safety, love, esteem, and self-actualization). Individual needs are then compared with characteristics and benefits of proposed jobs, companies, or careers. (SK)

  10. Testosterone and Occupational Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dabbs, James M., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Archival data on 4,462 military veterans linked higher levels of serum testosterone to lower-status occupations. A structural equation model was supported in which higher testosterone, mediated through lower intellectual ability, greater antisocial behavior, and lower education, leads away from white-collar occupations. Contains 49 references.…

  11. Bricklayer. Occupational Analyses Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cap, Orest; Cap, Ihor; Semenovych, Viktor

    This analysis covers tasks performed by a bricklayer, an occupational title some provinces and territories of Canada have also identified as bricklayer-mason, brick and stone mason, and mason. A guide to analysis discusses development, structure, and validation method; scope of the occupation; trends; and safety. To facilitate understanding the…

  12. Leadership and Occupational Stress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stickle, Fred E.; Scott, Kelly

    2016-01-01

    In a leadership position, it is important to understand what stress is and how it affects others. In an occupational setting, stressors vary according to personality types, gender, and occupational rank. The purpose of this manuscript is to review the foundations of stress and to explore how personality characteristics influence stress.…

  13. Leadership and Occupational Stress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stickle, Fred E.; Scott, Kelly

    2016-01-01

    In a leadership position, it is important to understand what stress is and how it affects others. In an occupational setting, stressors vary according to personality types, gender, and occupational rank. The purpose of this manuscript is to review the foundations of stress and to explore how personality characteristics influence stress.…

  14. Occupational Information Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharf, Richard S.

    This three-part book provides an overview of 500 occupations. The book is organized into three parts. Part I introduces the following seven occupational classification systems, along with their manuals and dictionaries: an observational classification system, Roe's Classification System, Holland's Classification System, the Standard Occupational…

  15. Occupational Health Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naval Medical Training Inst., Bethesda, MD.

    This manual is designed to be used for "Administrative Aspects of Occupational Medicine," one of two officer correspondence courses offered by the Naval Medical Training Institute. Part one comprises guidelines for setting up occupational health clinics, covering the areas of staffing, layout, equipment, other services, and records…

  16. Cabinetmaker. Occupational Analysis Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chinien, Chris; Boutin, France

    This document contains the analysis of the occupation of cabinetmaker, or joiner, that is accepted by the Canadian Council of Directors as the national standard for the occupation. The front matter preceding the analysis includes exploration of the development of the analysis, structure of the analysis, validation method, scope of the cabinetmaker…

  17. Preheating in an asymptotically safe quantum field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svendsen, Ole; Moghaddam, Hossein Bazrafshan; Brandenberger, Robert

    2016-10-01

    We consider reheating in a class of asymptotically safe quantum field theories recently studied in [D. F. Litim and F. Sannino, Asymptotic safety guaranteed, J. High Energy Phys. 12 (2014) 178; D. F. Litim, M. Mojaza, and F. Sannino, Vacuum stability of asymptotically safe gauge-Yukawa theories, J. High Energy Phys. 01 (2016) 081]. These theories allow for an inflationary phase in the very early universe. Inflation ends with a period of reheating. Since the models contain many scalar fields which are intrinsically coupled to the inflaton there is the possibility of parametric resonance instability in the production of these fields, and the danger that the induced curvature fluctuations will become too large. Here we show that the parametric instability indeed arises, and that hence the energy transfer from the inflaton condensate to fluctuating fields is rapid. Demanding that the curvature fluctuations induced by the parametrically amplified entropy modes do not exceed the upper observational bounds puts a lower bound on the number of fields which the model followed in [D. F. Litim and F. Sannino, Asymptotic safety guaranteed, J. High Energy Phys. 12 (2014) 178; D. F. Litim, M. Mojaza, and F. Sannino, Vacuum stability of asymptotically safe gauge-Yukawa theories, J. High Energy Phys. 01 (2016) 081] must contain. This bound also depends on the total number of e -foldings of the inflationary phase.

  18. Superradiant instabilities of asymptotically anti-de Sitter black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Stephen R.; Hollands, Stefan; Ishibashi, Akihiro; Wald, Robert M.

    2016-06-01

    We study the linear stability of asymptotically anti-de Sitter black holes in general relativity in spacetime dimension d≥slant 4. Our approach is an adaptation of the general framework of Hollands and Wald, which gives a stability criterion in terms of the sign of the canonical energy, { E }. The general framework was originally formulated for static or stationary and axisymmetric black holes in the asymptotically flat case, and the stability analysis for that case applies only to axisymmetric perturbations. However, in the asymptotically anti-de Sitter case, the stability analysis requires only that the black hole have a single Killing field normal to the horizon and there are no restrictions on the perturbations (apart from smoothness and appropriate behavior at infinity). For an asymptotically anti-de Sitter black hole, we define an ergoregion to be a region where the horizon Killing field is spacelike; such a region, if present, would normally occur near infinity. We show that for black holes with ergoregions, initial data can be constructed such that { E }\\lt 0, so all such black holes are unstable. To obtain such initial data, we first construct an approximate solution to the constraint equations using the WKB method, and then we use the Corvino-Schoen technique to obtain an exact solution. We also discuss the case of charged asymptotically anti-de Sitter black holes with generalized ergoregions.

  19. Conserved Charges in Asymptotically (Locally) AdS Spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marolf, Donald; Kelly, William; Fischetti, Sebastian

    When a physical system is complicated and nonlinear, global symmetries and the associated conserved quantities provide some of the most powerful analytic tools to understand its behavior. This is as true in theories with a dynamical spacetime metric as for systems defined on a fixed spacetime background. Chapter 17, 10.1007/978-3-642-41992-8_17 has already discussed the so-called Arnowitt-Deser-Misner (ADM) conserved quantities for asymptotically flat dynamical spacetimes, exploring in detail certain subtleties related to diffeomorphism invariance. In particular, it showed that the correct notion of global symmetry is given by the so-called asymptotic symmetries; equivalence classes of diffeomorphisms with the same asymptotic behavior at infinity. It was also noted that the notion of asymptotic symmetry depends critically on the choice of boundary conditions. Indeed, it is the imposition of boundary conditions that causes the true gauge symmetries to be only a subset of the full diffeomorphism group and thus allows the existence of nontrivial asymptotic symmetries at all.

  20. Asymptotic orbits in the ( N+1)-body ring problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadakis, K. E.

    2009-10-01

    In this paper we study the asymptotic solutions of the ( N+1)-body ring planar problem, N of which are finite and ν= N-1 are moving in circular orbits around their center of masses, while the Nth+1 body is infinitesimal. ν of the primaries have equal masses m and the Nth most-massive primary, with m 0= β m, is located at the origin of the system. We found the invariant unstable and stable manifolds around hyperbolic Lyapunov periodic orbits, which emanate from the collinear equilibrium points L 1 and L 2. We construct numerically, from the intersection points of the appropriate Poincaré cuts, homoclinic symmetric asymptotic orbits around these Lyapunov periodic orbits. There are families of symmetric simple-periodic orbits which contain as terminal points asymptotic orbits which intersect the x-axis perpendicularly and tend asymptotically to equilibrium points of the problem spiraling into (and out of) these points. All these families, for a fixed value of the mass parameter β=2, are found and presented. The eighteen (more geometrically simple) families and the corresponding eighteen terminating homo- and heteroclinic symmetric asymptotic orbits are illustrated. The stability of these families is computed and also presented.