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Sample records for asynchronous quantal release

  1. Quantal independence and uniformity of presynaptic release kinetics at the frog neuromuscular junction.

    PubMed

    Barrett, E F; Stevens, C F

    1972-12-01

    1. Amplitude and latency fluctuations of the end-plate potential at the frog neuromuscular junction were studied simultaneously at low temperatures, using intracellular or focal extracellular recording techniques and average quantal contents between 0.5 and 3.2. At the release rates studied, the evoked release of one quantum has in most cases no significant effect on the probability of subsequent quantal release to the same stimulus, confirming the mutual independence of quantal releases in this preparation.3. An equation derived from Poisson's law was applied to a histogram of the latencies of the first quantum released on each of a series of trials, to predict the average quantal content of end-plate responses originating at various times after nerve stimulation. The shape of the predicted time distribution of quantal contents usually agreed closely with that of the experimentally observed time distribution of end-plate response amplitudes. This agreement demonstrates that both the amplitude and the latency fluctuations of the end-plate response result from one presynaptic stochastic process that is uniform in magnitude and time course after each stimulus.4. Analysis of extracellular records from synaptic regions with a history of extensive activity often suggested the existence of depressive interaction among quantal releases, perhaps caused by depletion of the supply of releasable quanta.

  2. Ciguatoxin enhances quantal transmitter release from frog motor nerve terminals.

    PubMed Central

    Molgó, J.; Comella, J. X.; Legrand, A. M.

    1990-01-01

    1. Ciguatoxin (CTX), a marine toxin produced by the benthic dinoflagellate Gambierdiscus toxicus, is responsible for a complex endemic disease in man known as ciguatera fish poisoning. In the present study we have investigated the effects of purified CTX extracted for Gymnothorax javanicus moray-eel liver on frog isolated neuromuscular preparations with conventional electrophysiological techniques. 2. CTX (1-2.5 nM) applied to cutaneous pectoris nerve-muscle preparations induced, after a short delay, spontaneous fibrillations of the muscle fibres that could be suppressed with 1 microM tetrodotoxin (TTX) or by formamide to uncouple excitation-contraction. 3. In preparations treated with formamide, CTX (1-2.5 nM) caused either spontaneous or repetitive muscle action potentials (up to frequencies of 60-100 Hz) in response to a single nerve stimulus. Recordings performed at extrajunctional regions of the muscle membrane revealed that during the repetitive firing a prolongation of the repolarizing phase of the action potential occurred. At junctional sites the repetitive action potentials were triggered by repetitive endplate potentials (e.p.ps). 4. CTX (2.5 nM) caused a TTX-sensitive depolarization of the muscle membrane. 5. In junctions equilibrated in solutions containing high Mg2+ + low Ca2+, addition of CTX (1.5 nM) first induced an average increase of 239 +/- 36% in the mean quantal content of e.p.ps. Subsequently CTX reduced and finally blocked nerve-evoked transmitter release irreversibly. 6. CTX (1.5-2.5 nM) increased the frequency of miniature endplate potentials (m.e.p.ps) in junctions bathed either in normal Ringer, low Ca2(+)-high Mg2+ medium or in a nominally Ca2(+)-free solution containing EGTA.2+ Extensive washing with toxin-free solutions did not reverse the effect.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1972891

  3. Bayesian Inference of Synaptic Quantal Parameters from Correlated Vesicle Release

    PubMed Central

    Bird, Alex D.; Wall, Mark J.; Richardson, Magnus J. E.

    2016-01-01

    Synaptic transmission is both history-dependent and stochastic, resulting in varying responses to presentations of the same presynaptic stimulus. This complicates attempts to infer synaptic parameters and has led to the proposal of a number of different strategies for their quantification. Recently Bayesian approaches have been applied to make more efficient use of the data collected in paired intracellular recordings. Methods have been developed that either provide a complete model of the distribution of amplitudes for isolated responses or approximate the amplitude distributions of a train of post-synaptic potentials, with correct short-term synaptic dynamics but neglecting correlations. In both cases the methods provided significantly improved inference of model parameters as compared to existing mean-variance fitting approaches. However, for synapses with high release probability, low vesicle number or relatively low restock rate and for data in which only one or few repeats of the same pattern are available, correlations between serial events can allow for the extraction of significantly more information from experiment: a more complete Bayesian approach would take this into account also. This has not been possible previously because of the technical difficulty in calculating the likelihood of amplitudes seen in correlated post-synaptic potential trains; however, recent theoretical advances have now rendered the likelihood calculation tractable for a broad class of synaptic dynamics models. Here we present a compact mathematical form for the likelihood in terms of a matrix product and demonstrate how marginals of the posterior provide information on covariance of parameter distributions. The associated computer code for Bayesian parameter inference for a variety of models of synaptic dynamics is provided in the Supplementary Material allowing for quantal and dynamical parameters to be readily inferred from experimental data sets. PMID:27932970

  4. Cholinergic regulation of the evoked quantal release at frog neuromuscular junction

    PubMed Central

    Nikolsky, Eugeny E; Vyskočil, František; Bukharaeva, Ella A; Samigullin, Dmitry; Magazanik, Lev G

    2004-01-01

    The effects of cholinergic drugs on the quantal contents of the nerve-evoked endplate currents (EPCs) and the parameters of the time course of quantal release (minimal synaptic latency, main modal value of latency histogram and variability of synaptic latencies) were studied at proximal, central and distal regions of the frog neuromuscular synapse. Acetylcholine (ACh, 5 × 10−4 m), carbachol (CCh, 1 × 10−5 m) or nicotine (5 × 10−6 m) increased the numbers of EPCs with long release latencies mainly in the distal region of the endplate (90–120 μm from the last node of Ranvier), where the synchronization of transmitter release was the most pronounced. The parameters of focally recorded motor nerve action potentials were not changed by either ACh or CCh. The effects of CCh and nicotine on quantal dispersion were reduced substantially by 5 × 10−7 m (+)tubocurarine (TC). The muscarinic agonists, oxotremorine and the propargyl ester of arecaidine, as well as antagonists such as pirenzepine, AF-DX 116 and methoctramine, alone or in combination, did not affect the dispersion of the release. Muscarinic antagonists did not block the dispersion action of CCh. Cholinergic drugs either decreased the quantal content mo (muscarinic agonist, oxotremorine M, and nicotinic antagonist, TC), or decreased mo and dispersed the release (ACh, CCh and nicotine). The effects on mo were not related either to the endplate region or to the initial level of release dispersion. It follows that the mechanisms regulating the amount and the time course of transmitter release are different and that, among other factors, they are altered by presynaptic nicotinic receptors. PMID:15254150

  5. Effect of N-acetylaspartylglutamate (NAAG) on non-quantal and spontaneous quantal release of acetylcholine at the neuromuscular synapse of rat.

    PubMed

    Malomouzh, Artem I; Nikolsky, Eugen E; Lieberman, Edward M; Sherman, Jessica A; Lubischer, Jane L; Grossfeld, Robert M; Urazaev, Albert Kh

    2005-07-01

    N-Acetylaspartylglutamate (NAAG), known to be present in rat motor neurons, may participate in neuronal modulation of non-quantal secretion of acetylcholine (ACh) from motor nerve terminals. Non-quantal release of ACh was estimated by the amplitude of the endplate membrane hyperpolarization (H-effect) caused by inhibition of nicotinic receptors by (+)-tubocurarine and acetylcholinesterase by armin (diethoxy-p-nitrophenyl phosphate). Application of exogenous NAAG decreased the H-effect in a dose-dependent manner. The reduction of the H-effect by NAAG was completely removed when N-acetyl-beta-aspartylglutamate (betaNAAG) or 2-(phosphonomethyl)-pentanedioic acid (2-PMPA) was used to inhibit glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCP II), a presynaptic Schwann cell membrane-associated ectoenzyme that hydrolyzes NAAG to glutamate and N-acetylaspartate. Bath application of glutamate decreased the H-effect similarly to the action of NAAG but N-acetylaspartate was without effect. Inhibition of NMDA receptors by dl-2-amino-5-phosphopentanoic acid, (+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzocyclohepten-5,10-imine (MK801), and 7-chlorokynurenic acid or inhibition of muscle nitric oxide synthase (NO synthase) by N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester and 3-bromo-7-nitroindazole completely prevented the decrease of the H-effect by NAAG. These results suggest that glutamate, produced by enzymatic hydrolysis of bath-applied NAAG, can modulate non-quantal secretion of ACh from the presynaptic terminal of the neuromuscular synapse via activation of postsynaptic NMDA receptors and synthesis of nitric oxide (NO) in muscle fibers. NAAG also increased the frequency of miniature endplate potentials (mEPPs) generated by spontaneous quantal secretion of ACh, whereas the mean amplitude and time constants for rise time and for decay of mEPPs did not change.

  6. Magnetron sputtered diamond-like carbon microelectrodes for on-chip measurement of quantal catecholamine release from cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yuanfang; Chen, Xiaohui; Gupta, Sanju; Gillis, Kevin D; Gangopadhyay, Shubhra

    2008-10-01

    Carbon electrodes are widely used in electrochemistry due to their low cost, wide potential window, and low and stable background noise. Carbon-fiber electrodes (CFE) are commonly used to electrochemically measure "quantal" catecholamine release via exocytosis from individual cells, but it is difficult to integrate CFEs into lab-on-a-chip devices. Here we report the development of nitrogen doped diamond-like carbon (DLC:N) microelectrodes on a chip to monitor quantal release of catecholamines from cells. Advantages of DLC:N microelectrodes are that they are batch producible at low cost, and are harder and more durable than graphite films. The DLC:N microelectrodes were prepared by a magnetron sputtering process with nitrogen doping. The 30 microm by 40 microm DLC:N microelectrodes were patterned onto microscope glass slides by photolithography and lift-off technology. The properties of the DLC:N microelectrodes were characterized by AFM, Raman spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. Quantal catecholamine release was recorded amperometrically from bovine adrenal chromaffin cells on the DLC:N microelectrodes. Amperometric spikes due to quantal release of catecholamines were similar in amplitude and area as those recorded using CFEs and the background current and noise levels of microchip DLC:N electrodes were also comparable to CFEs. Therefore, DLC:N microelectrodes are suitable for microchip-based high-throughput measurement of quantal exocytosis with applications in basic research, drug discovery and cell-based biosensors.

  7. Quantal release of neurotransmitter: an iterative method for the automatic computation of binomial distribution parameters.

    PubMed

    Belluzzi, O

    1984-01-01

    A computational method is presented by which, when the amplitude-frequency histogram of the excitatory post-synaptic potentials shows a binomial distribution, an accurate evaluation of the statistical parameters p and n may be obtained. The entire procedure is a combination of 3 basic methods: steepest descent, parabolic interpolation and Montecarlo technique. The two statistical parameters are evaluated independently with respect to each other, which makes an effective control of the accuracy of the calculation possible by comparing the p by n product with the average number of quanta released in response to each nerve impulse, conventionally computed. Applications to quantal release studies in both rat and guinea-pig superior cervical ganglia are also presented.

  8. Botulinum toxin inhibits quantal acetylcholine release and energy metabolism in the Torpedo electric organ.

    PubMed Central

    Dunant, Y; Esquerda, J E; Loctin, F; Marsal, J; Muller, D

    1987-01-01

    1. Type A Botulinum toxin (BoTX) blocked nerve-electroplaque transmission in small fragments of Torpedo marmorata electric organ incubated in vitro. The effect was observed either with the crystalline toxin complex (associated with haemagglutinin) or with the purified neurotoxin (molecular weight approximately 150,000). 2. The quantal content of the evoked post-synaptic response was reduced by BoTX but the quantum size remained unchanged till complete blockade of the evoked response. 3. Spontaneous electroplaque potentials were composed of two populations: one with a bell-shaped amplitude distribution (miniature potentials or quanta) and a population of small events with a skewed distribution (subminiatures). In BoTX-poisoned tissue, the bell-distributed miniatures progressively disappeared, but the subminiatures kept on occurring. Occasionally, larger spontaneous potentials with a slow time course were recorded; they were also BoTX resistant. 4. A biochemical assay showed that evoked acetylcholine (ACh) release was impaired by BoTX. During the period when evoked transmission was blocked, spontaneous ACh release transiently increased. 5. At the time of transmission blockade, there was no significant change of ACh content, of ACh turnover, of ACh repartition in the vesicle-bound and free compartments, or of the number of synaptic vesicles. 6. The amount of ATP was reduced to 50% by BoTX, and that of creatine phosphate (CrP) to less than 20%. The ATP-CrP-converting enzyme, creatine kinase, was inhibited in BoTX-poisoned tissue. 7. Thus, the electrophysiological effects of BoTX are very similar at the nerve-electroplaque and the neuromuscular junctions. The present work suggests in addition that suppression of quantal release by BoTX is related to marked alterations of the energy metabolism in the tissue. Images Plate 1 PMID:3656169

  9. Quantal release of glutamate generates pure kainate and mixed AMPA/kainate EPSCs in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Cossart, Rosa; Epsztein, Jérôme; Tyzio, Roman; Becq, Hélène; Hirsch, June; Ben-Ari, Yehezkel; Crépel, Valérie

    2002-07-03

    The relative contribution of kainate receptors to ongoing glutamatergic activity is at present unknown. We report the presence of spontaneous, miniature, and minimal stimulation-evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) that are mediated solely by kainate receptors (EPSC(kainate)) or by both AMPA and kainate receptors (EPSC(AMPA/kainate)). EPSC(kainate) and EPSC(AMPA/kainate) are selectively enriched in CA1 interneurons and mossy fibers synapses of CA3 pyramidal neurons, respectively. In CA1 interneurons, the decay time constant of EPSC(kainate) (circa 10 ms) is comparable to values obtained in heterologous expression systems. In both hippocampal neurons, the quantal release of glutamate generates kainate receptor-mediated EPSCs that provide as much as half of the total glutamatergic current. Kainate receptors are, therefore, key players of the ongoing glutamatergic transmission in the hippocampus.

  10. Receptor-mediated presynaptic facilitation of quantal release of acetylcholine induced by pralidoxime in Aplysia.

    PubMed

    Fossier, P; Baux, G; Poulain, B; Tauc, L

    1990-09-01

    1. Possible interactions of contrathion (pralidoxime sulfomethylate), a reactivator of phosphorylated acetylcholinesterase (AChE), with the regulation of cholinergic transmission were investigated on an identified synapse in the buccal ganglion of Aplysia californica. 2. Transmitter release was evoked either by a presynaptic action potential or, under voltage clamp, by a long depolarization of the presynaptic cell. At concentrations higher than 10(-5) M, bath-applied contrathion decreased the amplitude of miniature postsynaptic currents and increased their decay time. At the same time, the quantal release of ACh was transiently facilitated. The facilitatory effect of contrathion was prevented by tubocurarine but not by atropine. Because in this preparation, these drugs block, respectively, the presynaptic nicotinic-like and muscarinic-like receptors involved in positive and negative feedback of ACh release, we proposed that contrathion activates presynaptic nicotinic-like receptors. 3. Differential desensitization of the presynaptic receptors is proposed to explain the transience of the facilitatory action of contrathion on ACh release. 4. The complexity of the synaptic action of contrathion raises the possibility that its therapeutic effects in AChE poisonings are not limited to AChE reactivation.

  11. Integration of asynchronously released quanta prolongs the postsynaptic spike window.

    PubMed

    Iremonger, Karl J; Bains, Jaideep S

    2007-06-20

    Classically, the release of glutamate in response to a presynaptic action potential causes a brief increase in postsynaptic excitability. Previous reports indicate that at some central synapses, a single action potential can elicit multiple, asynchronous release events. This raises the possibility that the temporal dynamics of neurotransmitter release may determine the duration of altered postsynaptic excitability. In response to physiological challenges, the magnocellular neurosecretory cells (MNCs) in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) exhibit robust and prolonged increases in neuronal activity. Although the postsynaptic conductances that may facilitate this form of activity have been investigated thoroughly, the role of presynaptic release has been largely overlooked. Because the specific patterns of activity generated by MNCs require the activation of excitatory synaptic inputs, we sought to characterize the release dynamics at these synapses and determine whether they contribute to prolonged excitability in these cells. We obtained whole-cell recordings from MNCs in brain slices of postnatal day 21-44 rats. Stimulation of glutamatergic inputs elicited large and prolonged postsynaptic events that resulted from the summation of multiple, asynchronously released quanta. Asynchronous release was selectively inhibited by the slow calcium buffer EGTA-AM and potentiated by brief high-frequency stimulus trains. These trains caused a prolonged increase in postsynaptic spike activity that could also be eliminated by EGTA-AM. Our results demonstrate that glutamatergic terminals in PVN exhibit asynchronous release, which is important in generating large postsynaptic depolarizations and prolonged spiking in response to brief, high-frequency bursts of presynaptic activity.

  12. BDNF Enhances Quantal Neurotransmitter Release and Increases the Number of Docked Vesicles at the Active Zones of Hippocampal Excitatory Synapses

    PubMed Central

    Tyler, William J.; Pozzo-Miller, Lucas D.

    2009-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is emerging as a key mediator of activity-dependent modifications of synaptic strength in the CNS. We investigated the hypothesis that BDNF enhances quantal neurotransmitter release by modulating the distribution of synaptic vesicles within presynaptic terminals using organotypic slice cultures of postnatal rat hippocampus. BDNF specifically increased the number of docked vesicles at the active zone of excitatory synapses on CA1 dendritic spines, with only a small increase in active zone size. In agreement with the hypothesis that an increased docked vesicle density enhances quantal neurotransmitter release, BDNF increased the frequency, but not the amplitude, of AMPA receptor-mediated miniature EPSCs (mEPSCs) recorded from CA1 pyramidal neurons in hippocampal slices. Synapse number, independently estimated from dendritic spine density and electron microscopy measurements, was also increased after BDNF treatment, indicating that the actions of BNDF on mEPSC frequency can be partially attributed to an increased synaptic density. Our results further suggest that all these actions were mediated via tyrosine kinase B (TrkB) receptor activation, established by inhibition of plasma membrane tyrosine kinases with K-252a. These results provide additional evidence of a fundamental role of the BDNF–TrkB signaling cascade in synaptic transmission, as well as in cellular models of hippocampus-dependent learning and memory. PMID:11404410

  13. Dynamin-2 Regulates Fusion Pore Expansion and Quantal Release through a Mechanism that Involves Actin Dynamics in Neuroendocrine Chromaffin Cells

    PubMed Central

    González-Jamett, Arlek M.; Momboisse, Fanny; Guerra, María José; Ory, Stéphane; Báez-Matus, Ximena; Barraza, Natalia; Calco, Valerie; Houy, Sébastien; Couve, Eduardo; Neely, Alan; Martínez, Agustín D.; Gasman, Stéphane; Cárdenas, Ana M.

    2013-01-01

    Over the past years, dynamin has been implicated in tuning the amount and nature of transmitter released during exocytosis. However, the mechanism involved remains poorly understood. Here, using bovine adrenal chromaffin cells, we investigated whether this mechanism rely on dynamin’s ability to remodel actin cytoskeleton. According to this idea, inhibition of dynamin GTPase activity suppressed the calcium-dependent de novo cortical actin and altered the cortical actin network. Similarly, expression of a small interfering RNA directed against dynamin-2, an isoform highly expressed in chromaffin cells, changed the cortical actin network pattern. Disruption of dynamin-2 function, as well as the pharmacological inhibition of actin polymerization with cytochalasine-D, slowed down fusion pore expansion and increased the quantal size of individual exocytotic events. The effects of cytochalasine-D and dynamin-2 disruption were not additive indicating that dynamin-2 and F-actin regulate the late steps of exocytosis by a common mechanism. Together our data support a model in which dynamin-2 directs actin polymerization at the exocytosis site where both, in concert, adjust the hormone quantal release to efficiently respond to physiological demands. PMID:23940613

  14. Hdac Activity is Required for Bdnf to Increase Quantal Neurotransmitter Release and Dendritic Spine Density in CA1 Pyramidal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Calfa, Gaston; Chapleau, Christopher A.; Campbell, Susan; Inoue, Takafumi; Morse, Sarah J.; Lubin, Farah D.; Pozzo-Miller, Lucas

    2012-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms involved in the strengthening and formation of synapses include the activation and repression of specific genes or subsets of genes by epigenetic modifications that do not alter the genetic code itself. Chromatin modifications mediated by histone acetylation have been shown to be critical for synaptic plasticity at hippocampal excitatory synapses and hippocampal-dependent memory formation. Considering that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays an important role in synaptic plasticity and behavioral adaptations, it is not surprising that regulation of this gene is subject to histone acetylation changes during synaptic plasticity and hippocampal-dependent memory formation. Whether the effects of BDNF on dendritic spines and quantal transmitter release require histone modifications remains less known. By using two different inhibitors of histone deacetylases (HDAC), we describe here that their activity is required for BDNF to increase dendritic spine density and excitatory quantal transmitter release onto CA1 pyramidal neurons in hippocampal slice cultures. These results suggest that histone acetylation/deacetylation is a critical step in the modulation of hippocampal synapses by BDNF. Thus, mechanisms of epigenetic modulation of synapse formation and function are novel targets to consider for the amelioration of symptoms of intellectual disabilities and neurodegenerative disorders associated with cognitive and memory deficits. PMID:22161912

  15. PROTEIN KINASE B/AKT IS A NOVEL CYSTEINE STRING PROTEIN KINASE THAT REGULATES EXOCYTOSIS RELEASE KINETICS AND QUANTAL SIZE

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Gareth J. O.; Barclay, Jeff W.; Prescott, Gerald R.; Jo, Sung-Ro; Burgoyne, Robert D.; Birnbaum, Morris J.; Morgan, Alan

    2008-01-01

    Protein kinase B/Akt has been implicated in the insulin-dependent exocytosis of GLUT4-containing vesicles, and, more recently, insulin secretion. To determine if Akt also regulates insulin-independent exocytosis, we used adrenal chromaffin cells, a popular neuronal model. Akt1 was the predominant isoform expressed in chromaffin cells, although lower levels of Akt2 and Akt3 were also found. Secretory stimuli in both intact and permeabilized cells induced Akt phosphorylation on serine-473, and the time course of Ca2+-induced Akt phosphorylation was similar to that of exocytosis in permeabilized cells. To determine if Akt modulated exocytosis, we transfected chromaffin cells with Akt constructs and monitored catecholamine release by amperometry. Wild-type Akt had no effect on the overall number of exocytotic events, but slowed the kinetics of catecholamine release from individual vesicles, resulting in an increased quantal size. This effect was due to phosphorylation by Akt, as it was not seen in cells transfected with kinase-dead mutant Akt. As overexpression of cysteine string protein (CSP) results in a similar alteration in release kinetics and quantal size, we determined if CSP was an Akt substrate. In vitro 32P-phosphorylation studies revealed that Akt phosphorylates CSP on serine-10. Using phospho-serine10-specific antisera, we found that both transfected and endogenous cellular CSP is phosphorylated by Akt on this residue. Taken together, these findings reveal a novel role for Akt phosphorylation in regulating the late stages of exocytosis and suggest that this is achieved via the phosphorylation of CSP on serine-10. PMID:16243840

  16. Altered properties of quantal neurotransmitter release at endplates of mice lacking P/Q-type Ca2+ channels

    PubMed Central

    Urbano, Francisco J.; Piedras-Rentería, Erika S.; Jun, Kisun; Shin, Hee-Sup; Uchitel, Osvaldo D.; Tsien, Richard W.

    2003-01-01

    Transmission at the mouse neuromuscular junction normally relies on P/Q-type channels, but became jointly dependent on both N- and R-type Ca2+ channels when the P/Q-type channel α1A subunit was deleted. R-type channels lay close to Ca2+ sensors for exocytosis and IK(Ca) channel activation, like the P/Q-type channels they replaced. In contrast, N-type channels were less well localized, but abundant enough to influence secretion strongly, particularly when action potentials were prolonged. Our data suggested that active zone structures may select among multiple Ca2+ channels in the hierarchy P/Q>R>N. The α1A−/− neuromuscular junction displayed several other differences from wild-type: lowered quantal content but greater ability to withstand reductions in the Ca2+/Mg2+ ratio, and little or no paired-pulse facilitation, the latter findings possibly reflecting compensatory mechanisms at individual release sites. Changes in presynaptic function were also associated with a significant reduction in the size of postsynaptic acetylcholine receptor clusters. PMID:12624181

  17. Intracellular Ca2+ stores and Ca2+ influx are both required for BDNF to rapidly increase quantal vesicular transmitter release.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Michelle D; Pozzo-Miller, Lucas

    2012-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is well known as a survival factor during brain development as well as a regulator of adult synaptic plasticity. One potential mechanism to initiate BDNF actions is through its modulation of quantal presynaptic transmitter release. In response to local BDNF application to CA1 pyramidal neurons, the frequency of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSC) increased significantly within 30 seconds; mEPSC amplitude and kinetics were unchanged. This effect was mediated via TrkB receptor activation and required both full intracellular Ca(2+) stores as well as extracellular Ca(2+). Consistent with a role of Ca(2+)-permeable plasma membrane channels of the TRPC family, the inhibitor SKF96365 prevented the BDNF-induced increase in mEPSC frequency. Furthermore, labeling presynaptic terminals with amphipathic styryl dyes and then monitoring their post-BDNF destaining in slice cultures by multiphoton excitation microscopy revealed that the increase in frequency of mEPSCs reflects vesicular fusion events. Indeed, BDNF application to CA3-CA1 synapses in TTX rapidly enhanced FM1-43 or FM2-10 destaining with a time course that paralleled the phase of increased mEPSC frequency. We conclude that BDNF increases mEPSC frequency by boosting vesicular fusion through a presynaptic, Ca(2+)-dependent mechanism involving TrkB receptors, Ca(2+) stores, and TRPC channels.

  18. Intestinal and peritoneal mast cells differ in kinetics of quantal release.

    PubMed

    Balseiro-Gomez, Santiago; Ramirez-Ponce, M Pilar; Acosta, Jorge; Ales, Eva; Flores, Juan A

    2016-01-15

    5-hydroxytriptamine (5-HT, serotonin) storage and release in mast cell (MC) secretory granules (SG) are dependent on serglycin proteoglycans (PG). This notion is based on the studies of MC of the connective tissue subtype that predominantly contain PG of the heparin type, whereas intestinal mucosal MC, which contain predominantly chondroitin sulfate, have been poorly explored. In the present study, we addressed the possibility that PG contents may differently affect the storage and release of preformed mediators in these two MC subclasses and explain in part their different functional properties. Rat peritoneal (PMC) and intestinal mast cells (IMC) were isolated and purified using a percoll gradient, and the efflux of 5-HT from each SG was measured by amperometric detection. IMC exhibited a ∼34% reduction in the release of 5-HT compared with PMC because of a lower number of exocytotic events, rather than a lower secretion per single exocytotic event. Amperometric spikes from IMC exhibited a slower decay phase and increased half-width but a similar ascending phase and foot parameters, indicating that the fusion pore kinetics are comparable in both MC subclasses. We conclude that both PG subtypes are equally efficient systems, directly involved in serotonin accumulation, and play a crucial role in regulating the kinetics of exocytosis from SG, providing specific secretory properties for the two cellular subtypes.

  19. Vesicles derived via AP-3 dependent recycling contribute to asynchronous release and influence information transfer

    PubMed Central

    Evstratova, Alesya; Chamberland, Simon; Faundez, Victor; Tóth, Katalin

    2014-01-01

    Summary Action potentials trigger synchronous and asynchronous neurotransmitter release. Temporal properties of both types of release could be altered in an activity-dependent manner. While the effects of activity-dependent changes in synchronous release on postsynaptic signal integration have been studied, the contribution of asynchronous release to information transfer during natural stimulus patterns is unknown. Here we find that during trains of stimulations, asynchronous release contributes to the precision of action potential firing. Our data show that this form of release is selectively diminished in AP-3b2 KO animals, which lack functional neuronal AP-3, an adaptor protein regulating vesicle formation from endosomes generated during bulk endocytosis. We find that in the absence of neuronal AP-3, asynchronous release is attenuated and the activity-dependent increase in the precision of action potential timing is compromised. Lack of asynchronous release decreases the capacity of synaptic information transfer and renders synaptic communication less reliable in response to natural stimulus patterns. PMID:25410111

  20. Faster kinetics of quantal catecholamine release in mouse chromaffin cells stimulated with acetylcholine, compared with other secretagogues.

    PubMed

    Calvo-Gallardo, Enrique; López-Gil, Ángela; Méndez-López, Iago; Martínez-Ramírez, Carmen; Padín, Juan Fernando; García, Antonio G

    2016-12-01

    Adrenal chromaffin cells (CCs) have been used extensively in studies aimed at revealing the intricacies of the Ca(2+) -dependent early and late steps of regulated exocytosis. They have also served as invaluable models to study the kinetics of single-vesicle exocytotic events to infer the characteristics of opening and closing of the exocytotic fusion pore. We have here tested the hypothesis that stimulation at room temperature of CCs from mice C57BL/6 with physiological acetylcholine (ACh) and with other secretagogues (dimethylphenylpiperazinium, high K(+) , muscarine, histamine, caffeine), alone or in combination, could trigger amperometric spike events with different kinetics. We found that mean secretory spike events in CCs stimulated with ACh had a fast rise rate of 25 pA/ms and a rapid decay time of 6.2 ms, with a small quantal size (0.31 pC). Surprisingly, these parameters considerably differed from those found in CCs stimulated with all other secretagogues that triggered secretory responses with spike events having smaller rise rates, longer decay times and higher quantal sizes. ACh spikes were unaltered by atropine but mitochondrial protonophore carbonyl cyanide-4-(trifluoromethoxy)phenylhydrazone markedly slowed down the rate rise and decay time, and augmented the quantal size of mean secretory events. We conclude that the physiological neurotransmitter ACh triggers a fast and efficient exocytotic response that cannot be mimicked by other secretagogues; such response is regulated by the mitochondrial circulation of calcium ions.

  1. Illustrating Concepts of Quantal Analysis with an Intuitive Classroom Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu-Friedman, Matthew A.

    2013-01-01

    The quantal hypothesis is central to the modern understanding of how a neurotransmitter is released from synapses. This hypothesis expresses that a neurotransmitter is packaged together in quanta that are released probabilistically. The experiments that led to the quantal hypothesis are often related in introductory neuroscience textbooks, but…

  2. Sr2+ and quantal events at excitatory synapses between mouse hippocampal neurons in culture.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Ghani, M A; Valiante, T A; Pennefather, P S

    1996-08-15

    1. Whole-cell recording from pairs of adjacent mouse hippocampal neurons in culture was used to study the quantal properties of action potential-evoked excitatory synaptic transmission and to demonstrate the use of Sr2+ in quantifying those properties. 2. In the presence of extracellular Sr2+, excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) were followed by an after-discharge of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs) lasting 1-2 s and generated by evoked asynchronous release of presynaptic quanta of transmitter. Like the EPSC of which it is thought to be an extension, the after-discharge was modulated by procedures expected to modulate Sr2+ influx into the nerve terminal. The number of mEPSCs in the after-discharge was decreased by increasing extracellular [Mg2+], and increased by increasing extracellular [Sr2+] or increasing the number of action potentials used to evoke the after-discharge. 3. EPSCs recorded in media containing either 1 mM Ca2+ or 6 mM Sr2+ were of similar amplitude. Adding Sr2+ to low-Ca2+ media increased EPSC amplitude, while adding Sr2+ to high-Ca2+ media lowered EPSC amplitude. These results suggest that extracellular Sr2+ is less effective than Ca2+ in supporting quantal release. 4. The levels of extracellular Ca2+, Mg2+ and Sr2+ were adjusted so that most after-discharge mEPSCs were discrete and comparable in numbers to the quantal events that contributed to the corresponding evoked EPSCs. In a series of twenty-five pairs of neurons, the mean amplitude of mEPSCs recorded at -80 mV was 35 +/- 10 pA and the mean coefficient of variation was 0.50 +/- 0.10 (range, 0.26-0.62). The mEPSC amplitude histogram was positively skewed. 5. In ten pairs of neurons, the mean and variance of EPSCs and mEPSCs and quantal content were determined from samples of more than 100 evoked events (in superfusion solutions containing (mM): 0.5 Ca2+, 2 Sr2+ and 10 Mg2+) and mean quantal content was determined from the ratio of amplitudes of the mean EPSC and m

  3. Isolation of TRPV1 independent mechanisms of spontaneous and asynchronous glutamate release at primary afferent to NTS synapses.

    PubMed

    Fenwick, Axel J; Wu, Shaw-Wen; Peters, James H

    2014-01-01

    Cranial visceral afferents contained within the solitary tract (ST) contact second-order neurons in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) and release the excitatory amino acid glutamate via three distinct exocytosis pathways; synchronous, asynchronous, and spontaneous release. The presence of TRPV1 in the central terminals of a majority of ST afferents conveys activity-dependent asynchronous glutamate release and provides a temperature sensitive calcium conductance which largely determines the rate of spontaneous vesicle fusion. TRPV1 is present in unmyelinated C-fiber afferents and these facilitated forms of glutamate release may underlie the relative strength of C-fibers in activating autonomic reflex pathways. However, pharmacological blockade of TRPV1 signaling eliminates only ~50% of the asynchronous profile and attenuates the temperature sensitivity of spontaneous release indicating additional thermosensitive calcium influx pathways may exist which mediate these forms of vesicle release. In the present study we isolate the contribution of TRPV1 independent forms of glutamate release at ST-NTS synapses. We found ST afferent innervation at NTS neurons and synchronous vesicle release from TRPV1 KO mice was not different to control animals; however, only half of TRPV1 KO ST afferents completely lacked asynchronous glutamate release. Further, temperature driven spontaneous rates of vesicle release were not different from 33 to 37°C between control and TRPV1 KO afferents. These findings suggest additional temperature dependent mechanisms controlling asynchronous and thermosensitive spontaneous release at physiological temperatures, possibly mediated by additional thermosensitive TRP channels in primary afferent terminals.

  4. Quantal release, incremental detection, and long-period Ca2+ oscillations in a model based on regulatory Ca2+-binding sites along the permeation pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Dupont, G; Swillens, S

    1996-01-01

    Quantal release, incremental detection, and oscillations are three types of Ca2+ responses that can be obtained in different conditions, after stimulation of the intracellular Ca2+ stores by submaximum concentrations of inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (InsP3). All three phenomena are thought to occur through the regulatory properties of the InsP3 receptor/Ca2+ channel. In the present study, we perform further analysis of the model (Swillens et al., 1994, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 91:10074-10078) previously proposed for transient InsP3-induced Ca2+ release, based on the bell-shaped dependence of the InsP3 receptor activity on the Ca2+ level and on the existence of an intermediate Ca2+ domain located around the mouth of the channel. We show that Ca2+ oscillations also arise in the latter model. Conditions for the occurrence of the various behaviors are investigated. Numerical simulations also show that the existence of an intermediate Ca2+ domain can markedly increase the period of oscillations. Periods on the order of 1 min can indeed be accounted for by the model when one assigns realistic values to the kinetic constants of the InsP3 receptor, which, in the absence of a domain, lead to oscillations with periods of a few seconds. Finally, theoretical support in favor of a positive cooperativity in the regulation of the InsP3 receptor by Ca2+ is presented. Images FIGURE 7 PMID:8889149

  5. Asynchronous Reductive Release of Iron and Organic Carbon from Hematite-Humic Acid Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, D.; Poulson, S.; Sumaila, S.; Dynes, J.; McBeth, J. M.; Yang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Association with solid-phase iron plays an important role in the accumulation and stabilization of soil organic matter (SOM). Ferric minerals are subject to redox reactions, which can compromise the stability of iron-bound SOM. To date, there is limited information available concerning the fate of iron-bound SOM during redox reactions. In this study, we investigated the release kinetics of hematite-bound organic carbon (OC) during the abiotic reduction of hematite-humic acid (HA) complexes by dithionite, as an analog for the fate of iron-bound SOM in natural redox reactions. Carbon 1s near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy was used to examine the ratio of the aromatic, phenolic and carboxylic/imide functional groups of the adsorbed OC before and after reduction. Our results indicate that the reductive release of iron obeyed first-order kinetics with release rate constants of 6.67×10-3 to 13.0×10-3 min-1. The iron-bound OC was released rapidly during the initial stage with release rate constants of 0.011 to 1.49 min-1, and then became stable with residual fractions of 4.6% to 58.2% between 120 and 240 min. The release rate of aromatic OC was much faster than for the non-aromatic fraction of HA, and 90% of aromatic OC was released within the first hour for most samples. The more rapid release of aromatic OC was attributed to its potential distribution on the outer layer because of steric effects and the possible reduction of quinoids. Our findings show that in the reductive reaction the mobilization of iron-bound organic carbon was asynchronous with the reduction of iron, and aromatic carbon was released more readily than other organic components. This study illustrates the importance of evaluating the stability of iron-bound SOM, especially under aerobic-anaerobic transition conditions.

  6. A study of synchronization of quantal transmitter release from mammalian motor endings by the use of botulinal toxins type A and D.

    PubMed Central

    Molgó, J; Siegel, L S; Tabti, N; Thesleff, S

    1989-01-01

    1. The effects of botulinum toxin (BoTx) types A and D on spontaneous and evoked phasic transmitter release were studied in the isolated extensor digitorum longus muscle of the rat or the levator auris longus muscle of mice. 2. The toxins were injected subcutaneously into the hindleg of adult rats or the dorsal aspect of the neck of mice. At various times after the injection the muscles were removed from the anaesthetized animal and neuromuscular transmission examined in vitro by conventional intracellular techniques. 3. Both toxins reduced spontaneous transmitter release recorded as the frequency of miniature end-plate potentials but BoTx type D was less effective in that respect than the type A toxin. 4. With both toxins the block of evoked phasic transmitter release, recorded as end-plate potentials, was almost complete. As previously reviewed by Simpson (1986) the block produced by BoTx type A was partially reversed by procedures which elevate the intraterminal level of calcium ions. However, in BoTx type D-paralysed muscles such procedures failed to restore phasic transmitter release but caused a period of high-frequency asynchronous transmitter release following each nerve impulse. 5. To investigate if the lack of synchronization of evoked transmitter release observed in BoTx type D-paralysed muscles was due to alterations in presynaptic currents we examined, by perineural recordings, the Na+, fast K+, slow K+, K+-Ca2+-dependent and the Ca2+ currents in BoTx type D-paralysed muscles. These presynaptic currents were not altered as compared to unpoisoned controls. 6. We suggest that there exists a presynaptic process, which in addition to Ca2+ influx participates in transmitter synchronization and which is a main target for BoTx type D action. PMID:2575665

  7. Quantal currents evoked by graded intracellular depolarization of crayfish motor axon terminals.

    PubMed Central

    Atwood, H L; Parnas, H; Parnas, I; Wojtowicz, J M

    1987-01-01

    1. Quantal transmitter release was examined at nerve terminals of the excitatory motor axon of the crayfish opener muscle. The magnitude of synaptic currents, recorded with macro-patch electrodes at a nerve terminal, served as a measure of quantal size. Transmitter release was initiated by pulses of depolarizing current applied intracellularly to the axonal terminals after application of tetrodotoxin. Quantal release was altered by a variety of methods and the resulting quantal output and quantal size were measured. 2. Amplitude distributions of quantal events were obtained during experimental manipulations which altered the rate of quantal release by up to 25-fold. These manipulations consisted of: varying pulse amplitude or pulse duration; facilitating the release by prolonged depolarization; and application of a potassium channel blocker, 4-aminopyridine. 3. The amplitude of quantal events is impervious to marked changes in presynaptic depolarization and is not affected by experimental procedures which promote accumulation of calcium ions in the terminals. The vesicular mechanism of release, in which transmitter substance is prepackaged in vesicles which individually undergo exocytosis at a release zone, could account for the observed results. PMID:2888878

  8. Reliable evaluation of the quantal determinants of synaptic efficacy using Bayesian analysis

    PubMed Central

    Beato, M.

    2013-01-01

    Communication between neurones in the central nervous system depends on synaptic transmission. The efficacy of synapses is determined by pre- and postsynaptic factors that can be characterized using quantal parameters such as the probability of neurotransmitter release, number of release sites, and quantal size. Existing methods of estimating the quantal parameters based on multiple probability fluctuation analysis (MPFA) are limited by their requirement for long recordings to acquire substantial data sets. We therefore devised an algorithm, termed Bayesian Quantal Analysis (BQA), that can yield accurate estimates of the quantal parameters from data sets of as small a size as 60 observations for each of only 2 conditions of release probability. Computer simulations are used to compare its performance in accuracy with that of MPFA, while varying the number of observations and the simulated range in release probability. We challenge BQA with realistic complexities characteristic of complex synapses, such as increases in the intra- or intersite variances, and heterogeneity in release probabilities. Finally, we validate the method using experimental data obtained from electrophysiological recordings to show that the effect of an antagonist on postsynaptic receptors is correctly characterized by BQA by a specific reduction in the estimates of quantal size. Since BQA routinely yields reliable estimates of the quantal parameters from small data sets, it is ideally suited to identify the locus of synaptic plasticity for experiments in which repeated manipulations of the recording environment are unfeasible. PMID:23076101

  9. Probabilistic secretion of quanta at somatic motor-nerve terminals: the fusion-pore model, quantal detection and autoinhibition.

    PubMed

    Thomson, P C; Lavidis, N A; Robinson, J; Bennett, M R

    1995-08-29

    The probability of detecting first, second, and later quanta secreted at release sites of a motor-nerve terminal during the early release period following a nerve impulse has been addressed. The possibility that early quantal release autoinhibits later quantal release during this period has also been ascertained. In this investigation, a model for the secretion of a quantum at a release site is developed in which, following the influx and diffusion of calcium ions to a release site protein associated with synaptic vesicles, kappa steps of association of the ions with the protein then occur at rate alpha. The release site protein then undergoes a conformational change which may not go on to completion if calcium ions dissociate from the protein at rate gamma. If this process does reach completion then a fusion-pore between the vesicle and the presynaptic membrane is created; this happens at rate delta. Key assumptions of this fusion-pore model are that the quantal secretions from each site are independent of each other, and that there is a large number of vesicles, each with a small probability of secretion, so that the number of secretions is Poisson in nature. These assumptions allow analytical expressions to be obtained for predicting the times at which first, second and later quanta are secreted during the early release period following an impulse. To test the model, experiments were performed in which the times of first, second and later quantal releases were determined at discrete regions along the length of visualized motor-terminal branches in toad (Bufo marinus) muscles. Estimates of model rate constants and of kappa from the times for first quantal secretions failed to give satisfactory predictions of the observed times of later secretions. Therefore, either the model fails, or the procedure used for detecting later quantal events as a consequence of their being masked by earlier quantal events is inadequate. To solve this detection problem, a two

  10. Phylogenetically Widespread Polyembryony in Cyclostome Bryozoans and the Protracted Asynchronous Release of Clonal Brood-Mates

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Helen L.; Waeschenbach, Andrea; Okamura, Beth; Bishop, John D. D.

    2017-01-01

    Polyembryony–the production of multiple cloned embryos from a single fertilised egg–is a seemingly paradoxical combination of reproductive modes that nevertheless persists in diverse taxa. We document features of polyembryony in the Cyclostomata (Bryozoa)–an ancient order of modular colonial marine invertebrates–that suggest a substantial reduction in the paradoxical nature of this enigmatic reproductive mode. Firstly, we provide molecular evidence for polyembryony in three exemplar species, supporting the widely cited inference that polyembryony characterises the entire order. Secondly, genotyping demonstrates protracted release of cloned offspring from the primary embryo in a given gonozooid (chamber for embryonic incubation), thus exposing the same genotype to changing environmental conditions over time. Finally, we confirm that each gonozooid produces a distinct genotype, with each primary embryo being the result of a separate fertilisation event. We hypothesise that the sustained release of one or a few genotypes against varying environmental conditions achieves levels of risk-spreading similar to those in organisms that release multiple, unique genotypes at a single time. We argue that polyembryony, specifically with the production of a large number of progeny per fertilisation event, has been favoured in the Cyclostomata over long geological periods. PMID:28095467

  11. Presynaptic recording of quanta from midbrain dopamine neurons and modulation of the quantal size.

    PubMed

    Pothos, E N; Davila, V; Sulzer, D

    1998-06-01

    The observation of quantal release from central catecholamine neurons has proven elusive because of the absence of evoked rapid postsynaptic currents. We adapted amperometric methods to observe quantal release directly from axonal varicosities of midbrain dopamine neurons that predominantly contain small synaptic vesicles. Quantal events were elicited by high K+ or alpha-latrotoxin, required extracellular Ca2+, and were abolished by reserpine. The events indicated the release of 3000 molecules over 200 microsec, much smaller and faster events than quanta associated with large dense-core vesicles previously recorded in vertebrate preparations. The number of dopamine molecules per quantum increased as a population to 380% of controls after glial-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) exposure and to 350% of controls after exposure to the dopamine precursor L-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA). These results introduce a means to measure directly the number of transmitter molecules released from small synaptic vesicles of CNS neurons. Moreover, quantal size was not an invariant parameter in CNS neurons but could be modulated by neurotrophic factors and altered neurotransmitter synthesis.

  12. Quantal transmission at mossy fibre targets in the CA3 region of the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, J Josh; Grinspan, Zachary M; McBain, Chris J

    2004-01-01

    Recent anatomical evidence that inhibitory interneurones receive approximately 10 times more synapses from mossy fibres than do principal neurones (Acsády et al. 1998) has led to the re-examination of the extent to which interneurones are involved in CA3 network excitability. Although many of the anatomical and physiological properties of mossy fibre-CA3 interneurone synapses have been previously described (Acsády et al. 1998; Tóth et al. 2000), an investigation into the quantal nature of transmission at this synapse has not yet been conducted. Here, we employed variance-mean (VM) analysis to compare the release probability, quantal size (q) and number of release sites (n) at mossy fibre target neurones in CA3. At six of seven interneurone synapses in which a high concentration of Ca2+ was experimentally imposed, the variance-mean relationship could be approximated by a parabola. Estimates of n were 1-2, and the weighted release probability in normal Ca2+ conditions ranged from 0.34 to 0.51. At pyramidal cell synapses, the variance-mean relationship approximated a linear relationship, suggesting that release probability was significantly lower. The weighted quantal amplitude was similar at interneurone synapses and pyramidal cell synapses, although the variability in quantal amplitude was larger at interneurone synapses. Mossy fibre transmission at CA3 interneurone synapses can be explained by a lower number of release sites, a broader range of release probabilities, and larger range of quantal amplitudes than at CA3 pyramidal synapses. Finally, quantal events on to interneurones elicited spike transmission, owing in part to the more depolarized membrane potential than pyramidal cells. These results suggest that although mossy fibre synapses on to pyramidal cells are associated with a larger number of release sites per synapse, the higher connectivity, higher initial release probability, and larger relative impact per quantum on to CA3 interneurones generate

  13. Quantal analysis of excitatory synapses in rat hippocampal CA1 in vitro during low-frequency depression.

    PubMed Central

    Larkman, A U; Jack, J J; Stratford, K J

    1997-01-01

    1. We have performed a detailed quantal analysis of excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) evoked by minimal extracellular stimulation in the CA1 region of slices of adult rat hippocampus maintained in vitro. 2. EPSPs were evoked at 2-5 Hz, and the eight that were analysed all showed at least a 50% depression of mean peak amplitude during recording. 3. EPSP amplitude fluctuations were analysed by three methods: the use of amplitude frequency histograms with clear and reliable peaks where available, graphs of the EPSP (coefficient of variation)-2 against EPSP mean, and analysis of EPSP mean and standard deviation assuming simple binomial statistics with the number of release sites (N) kept constant but the quantal size (Q) and the release probability (Pr) allowed to vary over time. 4. The results of the three analysis procedures were in good agreement. Seven EPSPs showed a substantial reduction in the mean number of quanta released per trial, and in three cases this was the predominant mechanism of the depression. Five EPSPs showed a substantial decrease in Q. Values for N ranged between 3 and 18, with a median of 6; Pr ranged between 0.14 and 0.81 and Q between 66 and 275 microV. 5. We used the Q estimates from the binomial method to correct the recorded EPSP amplitudes for changes in quantal size over time. For seven out of the eight EPSPs, this rescaling procedure allowed histograms with clear peaks to be obtained from longer runs of data, or improved the sharpness of the peaks in histograms from all the recorded data. The improvement in peak sharpness was assessed using an autocorrelation-based method. The correction was much less successful if the Q estimates were obtained with a variant of the binomial method in which Pr was held constant and N was allowed to vary. 6. The only simple explanation for the success of the correction procedure is that changes in quantal size were a major factor in obscuring peaks in histograms based on large numbers of trials

  14. Quantal potential fields around individual active zones of amphibian motor-nerve terminals.

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, M R; Farnell, L; Gibson, W G; Macleod, G T; Dickens, P

    2000-01-01

    The release of a quantum from a nerve terminal is accompanied by the flow of extracellular current, which creates a field around the site of transmitter action. We provide a solution for the extent of this field for the case of a quantum released from a site on an amphibian motor-nerve terminal branch onto the receptor patch of a muscle fiber and compare this with measurements of the field using three extracellular electrodes. Numerical solution of the equations for the quantal potential field in cylindrical coordinates show that the density of the field at the peak of the quantal current gives rise to a peak extracellular potential, which declines approximately as the inverse of the distance from the source at distances greater than about 4 microm from the source along the length of the fiber. The peak extracellular potential declines to 20% of its initial value in a distance of about 6 microm, both along the length of the fiber and in the circumferential direction around the fiber. Simultaneous recordings of quantal potential fields, made with three electrodes placed in a line at right angles to an FM1-43 visualized branch, gave determinations of the field strengths in accord with the numerical solutions. In addition, the three electrodes were placed so as to straddle the visualized release sites of a branch. The positions of these sites were correctly predicted on the basis of the theory and independently ascertained by FM1-43 staining of the sites. It is concluded that quantal potential fields at the neuromuscular junction that can be measured with available recording techniques are restricted to regions within about 10 microm of the release site. PMID:10692301

  15. The quantal nature of transmission and spontaneous potentials at the Torpedo electromotor junction.

    PubMed

    Erdélyi, L

    1985-01-01

    Miniature and stimulus evoked electroplaque potentials (mEpPs and EpPs) were recorded in Torpedo electrocytes intracellularly and extracellularly. The quantal release parameters of EpPs and the time course of quantal EpCs were estimated in normal and low Ca2+-high Mg2+ solutions. Amplitude-frequency distribution of mEpPs showed Gaussian or uneven character with an average mean value of 0.3 +/- 0.08 mV (S.D.). The mean coefficient of variation of mEpPs was 26.8 +/- 7.2% (n = 6). Tetrodotoxin reversibly blocked the stimulus evoked EpP but hardly influenced the amplitude-frequency histogram of spontaneous EpPs in 10(-8)-10(-6) M concentration. The quantum content of stimulus evoked EpPs varied between 100-400 in normal solution which decreased in low Ca2+-high Mg2+ solution and the quantal release conformed to binomial statistics and allowed determination of the parameters p and n. Frequency of the spontaneous discharges varied highly from electrocyte to electrocyte but an analysis of the time intervals showed randomness for the events. The decay phase of quantal current composed of non-exponential and exponential sections which was characteristic with 0.75 +/- 0.16 msec (mean, S.D., at 20 degrees C) time constant of exponential decay. Although, two types of mEpCs could be differentiated having significantly slower and faster time courses. Neostigmine prolonged the time constant of decay of mEpCs in dose-dependent manner with a factor of 2 in 10(-6) M and of 4 in 10(-5) M concentrations (at about 20 degrees C).

  16. Quantal nucleon diffusion: Central collisions of symmetric nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayik, S.; Yilmaz, O.; Yilmaz, B.; Umar, A. S.

    2016-10-01

    The quantal diffusion mechanism of nucleon exchange is studied in the central collisions of several symmetric heavy ions in the framework of the stochastic mean-field (SMF) approach. Since, at bombarding energies below the fusion barrier, dinuclear structure is maintained, it is possible to describe nucleon exchange as a diffusion process familiar from deep-inelastic collisions. Quantal diffusion coefficients, including memory effects, for proton and neutron exchanges are extracted microscopically employing the SMF approach. The quantal calculations of neutron and proton variances are compared with the semiclassical results.

  17. A direct potential fitting RKR method: Semiclassical vs. quantal comparisons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tellinghuisen, Joel

    2016-12-01

    Quantal and semiclassical (SC) eigenvalues are compared for three diatomic molecular potential curves: the X state of CO, the X state of Rb2, and the A state of I2. The comparisons show higher levels of agreement than generally recognized, when the SC calculations incorporate a quantum defect correction to the vibrational quantum number, in keeping with the Kaiser modification. One particular aspect of this is better agreement between quantal and SC estimates of the zero-point vibrational energy, supporting the need for the Y00 correction in this context. The pursuit of a direct-potential-fitting (DPF) RKR method is motivated by the notion that some of the limitations of RKR potentials may be innate, from their generation by an exact inversion of approximate quantities: the vibrational energy Gυ and rotational constant Bυ from least-squares analysis of spectroscopic data. In contrast, the DPF RKR method resembles the quantal DPF methods now increasingly used to analyze diatomic spectral data, but with the eigenvalues obtained from SC phase integrals. Application of this method to the analysis of 9500 assigned lines in the I2A ← X spectrum fails to alter the quantal-SC disparities found for the A-state RKR curve from a previous analysis. On the other hand, the SC method can be much faster than the quantal method in exploratory work with different potential functions, where it is convenient to use finite-difference methods to evaluate the partial derivatives required in nonlinear fitting.

  18. A computer system for real-time data acquisition and analysis of biopotentials and quantal content at the neuromuscular junction.

    PubMed

    Liu, H H; Kim, Y I

    1983-06-01

    A computerized data acquisition system for on-line analysis of the parameters of neuromuscular transmission is described. Both hardware usage and software methodologies are discussed with regard to sampling in real-time and analyzing miniature end-plate potentials (MEPPs), end-plate potentials (EPPs) and quantal content of the evoked transmitter release. Significant features of the program include: (1) automatic threshold determination for MEPP detection; (2) the use of a circular buffer to give pre-trigger information; (3) real-time noise spike rejection; (4) an automatic procedure for EPP failure detection; (5) rapid quantal content determinations by several methods as well as complete MEPP and EPP waveform analysis. The system has proven both accurate and reliable during more than two years of use. Advantages of the system over conventional methods include: (1) increased accuracy and efficiency in data analysis; (2) immediate availability of results; (3) conventional data storage; (4) flexibility to meet changing requirements.

  19. Fully automated microchip system for the detection of quantal exocytosis from single and small ensembles of cells.

    PubMed

    Spégel, Christer; Heiskanen, Arto; Pedersen, Simon; Emnéus, Jenny; Ruzgas, Tautgirdas; Taboryski, Rafael

    2008-02-01

    A lab-on-a-chip device that enables positioning of single or small ensembles of cells on an aperture in close proximity to a mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) modified sensing electrode has been developed and characterized. The microchip was used for the detection of Ca(2+)-dependent quantal catecholamine exocytosis from single as well as small assemblies of rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells. The frequency of events increased considerably upon depolarization of the PC12 cell membrane using a high extracelluar concentration of potassium. The number of recorded events could be correlated with the number of cells immobilized on the electrode. Quantal characteristics, such as the number of released molecules per recorded event, are equivalent to data obtained using conventional carbon fiber microelectrodes. The detection sensitivity of the device allows for the detection of less than 10 000 dopamine molecules in a quantal release. The distribution of peak rise-time and full width at half maximum was constant during measurement periods of several minutes demonstrating the stability of the MPA modified surface.

  20. Classical wall formula and quantal one-body dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, J. J.; Dworzecka, M.

    1986-07-01

    Within the quantal, self-consistent RPA description of the dissipation of nuclear collective energy, a specific set of assumptions is shown to reduce the RPA system to a vibrating potential model which, with the stipulation of certain additional assumptions, yields precisely the dissipation rate given by the Swiatecki wall formula. This correspondence is utilized to explore the explicit and the implicit assumptions of the wall model. Various implications emerge, the most important of which is the fact that, for finite nucleonic binding energy, the true one-body dissipation rate of giant resonance states is reduced by about an order of magnitude from the wall formula value. The wall formula overestimate is due mostly to the fiction it assumes ab initio that all particles are totally reflected at the wall, whereas realistically only bound particles can be totally reflected. In addition, the self-consistency of the quantal description implies that no dissipation occurs to the bound one-particle one-hole subspace from which the RPA phonon is constructed, imposing an absolute prohibition of one-body dissipation for phonon energies less than the nucleonic binding energy. Finally, the quantal dissipation rate exhibits an explicit, but relatively weak, dependence upon the collective phonon energy, ħω. The result is that the wall formula yields a gross overestimate of the quantal one-body dissipation rate over the whole range of realistic nuclear situations.

  1. Computer Simulation of Quantal Dose-Response Relationships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGilliard, Kip L.

    1985-01-01

    Describes a program which simulates animal pharmacology experiments involving "all-or-none" responses. Use of the Applesoft BASIC program in the pharmacology teaching laboratory provides students with a rapid and economical way to gain experience in the design and statistical analysis of quantal dose-response experiments. Information on…

  2. [Calcium modulation of the release kinetics of the acetylcholine quanta generating multiquantal postsynaptic response].

    PubMed

    Khuzakhmetova, V F; Fatikhov, N F; Bukharaeva, E A; Nikol'skiĭ, E E

    2011-10-01

    The effects of calcium on the quantal content of nerve-evoked endplate currents (EPC) and on the temporal parameters of quantal release were studied in the frog neuromuscular synapse using the method of "subtractions". It was shown that under physiological conditions quanta generating multiquantal postsynaptic responses were released nonsynchronously because of a considerable variability of latencies of the uniquantal responses forming multiquantal EPC. Different calcium dependences for EPCs quantal content and time course of the quantal release were revealed. The average quantal content grew exponentially with the increase in calcium concentration from 0.4 to 1.8 mmol/L, whereas the release synchronicity reached the maximum at 1 mmol/L calcium. It was suggested that the changes in the synchronicity of the evoked release were one of the mechanisms of the synaptic plasticity.

  3. Channeling satiation: a primer on the role of TRP channels in the control of glutamate release from vagal afferent neurons.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shaw-wen; Fenwick, Axel J; Peters, James H

    2014-09-01

    Obesity results from the chronic imbalance between food intake and energy expenditure. To maintain homeostasis, the brainstem nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) integrates peripheral information from visceral organs and initiates reflex pathways that control food intake and other autonomic functions. This peripheral-to-central neural communication occurs through activation of vagal afferent neurons which converge to form the solitary tract (ST) and synapse with strong glutamatergic contacts onto NTS neurons. Vagal afferents release glutamate containing vesicles via three distinct pathways (synchronous, asynchronous, and spontaneous) providing multiple levels of control through fast synaptic neurotransmission at ST-NTS synapses. While temperature at the NTS is relatively constant, vagal afferent neurons express an array of thermosensitive ion channels named transient receptor potential (TRP) channels. Here we review the evidence that TRP channels pre-synaptically control quantal glutamate release and examine the potential roles of TRP channels in vagally mediated satiety signaling. We summarize the current literature that TRP channels contribute to asynchronous and spontaneous release of glutamate which can distinctly influence the transfer of information across the ST-NTS synapse. In other words, multiple glutamate vesicle release pathways, guided by afferent TRP channels, provide for robust while adaptive neurotransmission and expand our understanding of vagal afferent signaling.

  4. Synaptic Consolidation Normalizes AMPAR Quantal Size following MAGUK Loss.

    PubMed

    Levy, Jonathan M; Chen, Xiaobing; Reese, Thomas S; Nicoll, Roger A

    2015-08-05

    The mechanisms controlling synapse growth and maintenance are of critical importance for learning and memory. The MAGUK family of synaptic scaffolding proteins is abundantly expressed at glutamatergic central synapses, but their importance in controlling the synaptic content of glutamate receptors is poorly understood. Here, we use a chained RNAi-mediated knockdown approach to simultaneously remove PSD-93, PSD-95, and SAP102, the MAGUKs previously shown to be responsible for synaptic localization of glutamate receptors. We find that MAGUKs are specifically responsible for creating functional synapses after initial spine formation by filling functionally silent spines with glutamate receptors. Removal of the MAGUKs causes a transient reduction in AMPA receptor quantal size followed by synaptic consolidation resulting in a normalization of quantal size at the few remaining functional synapses. Consolidation requires signaling through L-type calcium channels, CaM kinase kinase, and the GluA2 AMPA receptor subunit, akin to a homeostatic process.

  5. Mixed quantal-semiquantal dynamics with stochastic particles for backreaction

    SciTech Connect

    Ando, Koji

    2014-10-14

    A mixed quantal-semiquantal theory is presented in which the semiquantal squeezed-state wave packet describes the heavy degrees of freedom. Starting from the mean-field equations of motion that are naturally derived from the time-dependent variational principle, we introduce the stochastic particle description for both the quantal and semiquantal parts in an aim to take into account the interparticle correlation, in particular the “quantum backreaction” beyond the mean-field approximation. A numerical application on a model of O{sub 2} scattering from a Pt surface demonstrates that the proposed scheme gives correct asymptotic behavior of the scattering probability, with improvement over the mixed quantum-classical scheme with Bohmian particles, which is comprehended by comparing the Bohmian and the stochastic trajectories.

  6. Quantal Heating of Conducting Electrons with Discrete Spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Vitkalov, S. A.; Bykov, A. A.

    2011-12-23

    Usually heating of conducting electrons by dc electric field results in an increase of electron temperature. In this paper we show that the dc heating of 2D electrons, placed in quantized magnetic fields, results in a peculiar electron distribution, which has the same broadening or an effective 'temperature' as the unbiased electron system. The quantal heating, however, violates strongly the Ohm's Law. In the conducting system with discrete electron spectrum the quantal heating results in spectacular decrease of electron resistance and transition of the electrons into a state with zero differential resistance (ZDR). Finally the heating leads to apparent dc driven metal-insulator transition, which correlates with the transition into the ZDR state. The correlation is very unexpected and is not understood.

  7. Quantal basis of photoreceptor spectral sensitivity of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    1975-01-01

    Small potential fluctuations ("bumps"), boyh spontaneous and light induced, can be recorded intracellularly from the photoreceptors of Drosophila melanogaster. Statistical analyses of these bumps in the spectral range, 400-600 nm, lead to the following interpretations; (a) For weak stimuli at least, these bumps are the quantal units of the receptor potential. (b) Quanta of various wavelengths, when effectively absorbed, will elicit bumps of the same average size. (c) The spectral sensitivity of the receptor potential appears to have its origin in the relative efficiency of quantum bump production at different wavelengths, and not in the intrinsic difference in the properties of bumps produced by quanta of differenct wavelengths. PMID:809537

  8. Dose-response model for teratological experiments involving quantal responses

    SciTech Connect

    Rai, K.; Van Ryzin, J.

    1985-03-01

    This paper introduces a dose-response model for teratological quantal response data where the probability of response for an offspring from a female at a given dose varies with the litter size. The maximum likelihood estimators for the parameters of the model are given as the solution of a nonlinear iterative algorithm. Two methods of low-dose extrapolation are presented, one based on the litter size distribution and the other a conservative method. The resulting procedures are then applied to a teratological data set from the literature.

  9. Quantal analysis reveals a functional correlation between presynaptic and postsynaptic efficacy in excitatory connections from rat neocortex.

    PubMed

    Hardingham, Neil R; Read, Jenny C A; Trevelyan, Andrew J; Nelson, J Charmaine; Jack, J Julian B; Bannister, Neil J

    2010-01-27

    At many central synapses, the presynaptic bouton and postsynaptic density are structurally correlated. However, it is unknown whether this correlation extends to the functional properties of the synapses. To investigate this, we made recordings from synaptically coupled pairs of pyramidal neurons in rat visual cortex. The mean peak amplitude of EPSPs recorded from pairs of L2/3 neurons ranged between 40 microV and 2.9 mV. EPSP rise times were consistent with the majority of the synapses being located on basal dendrites; this was confirmed by full anatomical reconstructions of a subset of connected pairs. Over a third of the connections could be described using a quantal model that assumed simple binomial statistics. Release probability (P(r)) and quantal size (Q), as measured at the somatic recording site, showed considerable heterogeneity between connections. However, across the population of connections, values of P(r) and Q for individual connections were positively correlated with one another. This correlation also held for inputs to layer 5 pyramidal neurons from both layer 2/3 and neighboring layer 5 pyramidal neurons, suggesting that during development of cortical connections presynaptic and postsynaptic strengths are dependently scaled. For 2/3 to 2/3 connections, mean EPSP amplitude was correlated with both Q and P(r) values but uncorrelated with N, the number of functional release sites mediating the connection. The efficacy of a cortical connection is thus set by coordinated presynaptic and postsynaptic strength.

  10. Dynamics of Quantal Heating in Electron Systems with Discrete Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, William; Dietrich, Scott; Vitkalov, Sergey; Bykov, Alexey

    2015-03-01

    The temporal evolution of quantal Joule heating of 2D electrons in GaAs quantum well placed in quantizing magnetic fields is studied using a difference frequency method. The method is based on measurements of the electron conductivity oscillating at the beat frequency f =f1 -f2 between two microwaves applied to 2D system at frequencies f1 and f2. The method provides direct access to the dynamical characteristics of the heating and yields the inelastic scattering time τin of 2D electrons. The obtained τin is strongly temperature dependent, varying from 0.13 ns at 5.5K to 1 ns at 2.4K in magnetic field B=0.333T. When temperature T exceeds the Landau level separation the relaxation rate 1 /τin is proportional to T2, indicating the electron-electron interaction as the dominant mechanism limiting the quantal heating. At lower temperatures the rate tends to be proportional to T3, indicating considerable contribution from electron-phonon scattering. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation (DMR 1104503), the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (project no.14-02-01158) and the Ministry of Education and Science of the Russian Federation.

  11. A Microscopic Quantal Model for Nuclear Collective Rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Gulshani, P.

    2007-10-26

    A microscopic, quantal model to describe nuclear collective rotation in two dimensions is derived from the many-nucleon Schrodinger equation. The Schrodinger equation is transformed to a body-fixed frame to decompose the Hamiltonian into a sum of intrinsic and rotational components plus a Coriolis-centrifugal coupling term. This Hamiltonian (H) is expressed in terms of space-fixed-frame particle coordinates and momenta by using commutator of H with a rotation angle. A unified-rotational-model type wavefunction is used to obtain an intrinsic Schrodinger equation in terms of angular momentum quantum number and two-body operators. A Hartree-Fock mean-field representation of this equation is then obtained and, by means of a unitary transformation, is reduced to a form resembling that of the conventional semi-classical cranking model when exchange terms and intrinsic spurious collective excitation are ignored.

  12. Quantal regulation and exocytosis of platelet dense-body granules.

    PubMed

    Ge, Shencheng; Woo, Emily; Haynes, Christy L

    2011-11-16

    This study reports how quantal size, or the quantity of chemical messengers within a storage granule, is regulated in platelet dense-body granules via dynamic adaption of granule size according to changing levels of granule contents. Mechanistic studies using carbon-fiber microelectrode fast-scan cyclic voltammetry and amperometry methods correlated with transmission electron microscopy analysis reveal the impact of granule structural changes on granular content secretion kinetics and highlight the dynamic interplay between soluble granule contents and membrane components in exocytosis. Despite the distinct chemical profile of platelet dense-body granules, these secretory granules act according to general biochemical/biophysical phenomena using charge-charge interactions to sequester chemical messengers and employ known conserved exocytotic machinery to deliver them; therefore, the mechanistic information obtained herein further advances the general understanding of exocytosis while revealing fundamental details about blood platelets.

  13. BDNF has opposite effects on the quantal amplitude of pyramidal neuron and interneuron excitatory synapses.

    PubMed

    Rutherford, L C; Nelson, S B; Turrigiano, G G

    1998-09-01

    Recently, we have identified a novel form of synaptic plasticity that acts to stabilize neocortical firing rates by scaling the quantal amplitude of AMPA-mediated synaptic inputs up or down as a function of neuronal activity. Here, we show that the effects of activity blockade on quantal amplitude are mediated through the neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Exogenous BDNF prevented, and a TrkB-IgG fusion protein reproduced, the effects of activity blockade on pyramidal quantal amplitude. BDNF had opposite effects on pyramidal neuron and interneuron quantal amplitudes and modified the ratio of pyramidal neuron to interneuron firing rates. These data demonstrate a novel role for BDNF in the homeostatic regulation of excitatory synaptic strengths and in the maintenance of the balance of cortical excitation and inhibition.

  14. The quantal component of synaptic transmission from sensory hair cells to the vestibular calyx.

    PubMed

    Highstein, Stephen M; Mann, Mary Anne; Holstein, Gay R; Rabbitt, Richard D

    2015-06-01

    Spontaneous and stimulus-evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) were recorded in calyx nerve terminals from the turtle vestibular lagena to quantify key attributes of quantal transmission at this synapse. On average, EPSC events had a magnitude of ∼ 42 pA, a rise time constant of τ(0) ∼ 229 μs, decayed to baseline with a time constant of τ(R) ∼ 690 μs, and carried ∼ 46 fC of charge. Individual EPSCs varied in magnitude and decay time constant. Variability in the EPSC decay time constant was hair cell dependent and due in part to a slow protraction of the EPSC in some cases. Variability in EPSC size was well described by an integer summation of unitary quanta, with each quanta of glutamate gating a unitary postsynaptic current of ∼ 23 pA. The unitary charge was ∼ 26 fC for EPSCs with a simple exponential decay and increased to ∼ 48 fC for EPSCs exhibiting a slow protraction. The EPSC magnitude and the number of simultaneous unitary quanta within each event increased with presynaptic stimulus intensity. During tonic hair cell depolarization, both the EPSC magnitude and event rate exhibited adaptive run down over time. Present data from a reptilian calyx are remarkably similar to noncalyceal vestibular synaptic terminals in diverse species, indicating that the skewed EPSC size distribution and multiquantal release might be an ancestral property of inner ear ribbon synapses.

  15. Quantal Aspects of - Energy Transfer and Photodissociation of Oscillators.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, John Joseph

    1988-12-01

    Our first chapter examines the mechanism by which molecular rotation enhances vibrational relaxation of a diatomic molecule. Three factors are discussed, lowering by rotational transitions of the vibrational energy defect, coupling due to potential matrix elements off diagonal in rotational state, and additional phase shifts introduced into the incoming and outgoing waves by anisotropy in the intermolecular potential. The distorted wave solution of the coupled states scattering equations elucidates the importance of each factor for H_2(v = 1) - He, CO(v = 1) - H_2, and for vibrational energy transfer from H_2 (v = 1) to CO(v = 0,1,2). Rotation is found to play both an energetic and a dynamical role. In the energetic role, rotation lowers the vibrational energy defect and thereby enhances vibrational relaxation, while the dynamic contribution takes the form of additional phase shifts introduced into the incoming and outgoing waves by the potential anisotropy. Our results suggest that molecular anisotropy in the region of the classical turning point is an important factor in the rotational enhancement observed in recent comparisons of CSA and IOSA vibrational relaxation rate constants for the N_2-He and CO-He systems. In the second chapter we study the response of a highly excited Morse oscillator with 179 bound states to an intense, below resonance electromagnetic field. A dynamic, quantal description of dissociation is obtained from an inspection of the time dependent wavefunction. The bound to continuum transitions which occur during dissociation involve the emission of a high energy, coherent wave which propagates to infinity--a feature not observed in other studies of the periodically driven Morse oscillator. Initially, the exodus of this wave results in a rapid increase in the dissociation probability. However, at longer times the dissociation slows down and concurrently the system is localized in the bound state basis, indicating that even though the classical

  16. Asynchronous interpretation of parallel microprograms

    SciTech Connect

    Bandman, O.L.

    1984-03-01

    In this article, the authors demonstrate how to pass from a given synchronous interpretation of a parallel microprogram to an equivalent asynchronous interpretation, and investigate the cost associated with the rejection of external synchronization in parallel microprogram structures.

  17. COMPUTATIONAL METHODS FOR ASYNCHRONOUS BASINS

    PubMed Central

    Dinwoodie, Ian H

    2016-01-01

    For a Boolean network we consider asynchronous updates and define the exclusive asynchronous basin of attraction for any steady state or cyclic attractor. An algorithm based on commutative algebra is presented to compute the exclusive basin. Finally its use for targeting desirable attractors by selective intervention on network nodes is illustrated with two examples, one cell signalling network and one sensor network measuring human mobility. PMID:28154501

  18. Classical study of rotational excitation of a rigid rotor - Li/+/ + H2. II - Correspondence with quantal results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labudde, R. A.; Bernstein, R. B.

    1973-01-01

    Further classical trajectory calculations of the rotational excitation of H2 in collision with Li(+) have been carried out in order to assess several alternative classical-quantal correspondence relationships. The results are compared with exact quantal cross sections computed for the same model system by Lester and Schaefer (1973).

  19. Asynchronous parallel status comparator

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, J.W.; Hart, M.M.

    1992-12-15

    Disclosed is an apparatus for matching asynchronously received signals and determining whether two or more out of a total number of possible signals match. The apparatus comprises, in one embodiment, an array of sensors positioned in discrete locations and in communication with one or more processors. The processors will receive signals if the sensors detect a change in the variable sensed from a nominal to a special condition and will transmit location information in the form of a digital data set to two or more receivers. The receivers collect, read, latch and acknowledge the data sets and forward them to decoders that produce an output signal for each data set received. The receivers also periodically reset the system following each scan of the sensor array. A comparator then determines if any two or more, as specified by the user, of the output signals corresponds to the same location. A sufficient number of matches produces a system output signal that activates a system to restore the array to its nominal condition. 4 figs.

  20. Asynchronous parallel status comparator

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, Jeffrey W.; Hart, Mark M.

    1992-01-01

    Apparatus for matching asynchronously received signals and determining whether two or more out of a total number of possible signals match. The apparatus comprises, in one embodiment, an array of sensors positioned in discrete locations and in communication with one or more processors. The processors will receive signals if the sensors detect a change in the variable sensed from a nominal to a special condition and will transmit location information in the form of a digital data set to two or more receivers. The receivers collect, read, latch and acknowledge the data sets and forward them to decoders that produce an output signal for each data set received. The receivers also periodically reset the system following each scan of the sensor array. A comparator then determines if any two or more, as specified by the user, of the output signals corresponds to the same location. A sufficient number of matches produces a system output signal that activates a system to restore the array to its nominal condition.

  1. Reversible Recruitment of a Homeostatic Reserve Pool of Synaptic Vesicles Underlies Rapid Homeostatic Plasticity of Quantal Content

    PubMed Central

    Pinter, Martin J.; Rich, Mark M.

    2016-01-01

    Homeostatic regulation is essential for the maintenance of synaptic strength within the physiological range. The current study is the first to demonstrate that both induction and reversal of homeostatic upregulation of synaptic vesicle release can occur within seconds of blocking or unblocking acetylcholine receptors at the mouse neuromuscular junction. Our data suggest that the homeostatic upregulation of release is due to Ca2+-dependent increase in the size of the readily releasable pool (RRP). Blocking vesicle refilling prevented upregulation of quantal content (QC), while leaving baseline release relatively unaffected. This suggested that the upregulation of QC was due to mobilization of a distinct pool of vesicles that were rapidly recycled and thus were dependent on continued vesicle refilling. We term this pool the “homeostatic reserve pool.” A detailed analysis of the time course of vesicle release triggered by a presynaptic action potential suggests that the homeostatic reserve pool of vesicles is normally released more slowly than other vesicles, but the rate of their release becomes similar to that of the major pool during homeostatic upregulation of QC. Remarkably, instead of finding a generalized increase in the recruitment of vesicles into RRP, we identified a distinct homeostatic reserve pool of vesicles that appear to only participate in synchronized release following homeostatic upregulation of QC. Once this small pool of vesicles is depleted by the block of vesicle refilling, homeostatic upregulation of QC is no longer observed. This is the first identification of the population of vesicles responsible for the blockade-induced upregulation of release previously described. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The current study is the first to demonstrate that both the induction and reversal of homeostatic upregulation of synaptic vesicle release can occur within seconds. Our data suggest that homeostatic upregulation of release is due to Ca2+-dependent

  2. Bayesian Analysis for Linearized Multi-Stage Models in Quantal Bioassay.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuo, Lynn; Cohen, Michael P.

    Bayesian methods for estimating dose response curves in quantal bioassay are studied. A linearized multi-stage model is assumed for the shape of the curves. A Gibbs sampling approach with data augmentation is employed to compute the Bayes estimates. In addition, estimation of the "relative additional risk" and the "risk specific…

  3. Student Satisfaction with Asynchronous Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dziuban, Charles; Moskal, Patsy; Brophy, Jay; Shea, Peter

    2007-01-01

    The authors discuss elements that potentially impact student satisfaction with asynchronous learning: the media culture, digital, personal and mobile technologies, student learning preferences, pedagogy, complexities of measurement, and the digital generation. They describe a pilot study to identify the underlying dimensions of student…

  4. Asynchronous Distributed Flow Control Algorithms.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-10-01

    by deleting that link and its sessions from the original network, and reducing the capacity of the remaining links by the appropriate amount. We repeat...the other links, this network is indistinguishable from a reduced network obtained by deleting link j and all its sessions from the original network...more general result. 4.3 Gene ~ral Asynchronous Algori.thbm. wit Upat Prte In Chapter 3, we introduced the idea of an update protocol as a way of

  5. Process membership in asynchronous environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricciardi, Aleta M.; Birman, Kenneth P.

    1993-01-01

    The development of reliable distributed software is simplified by the ability to assume a fail-stop failure model. The emulation of such a model in an asynchronous distributed environment is discussed. The solution proposed, called Strong-GMP, can be supported through a highly efficient protocol, and was implemented as part of a distributed systems software project at Cornell University. The precise definition of the problem, the protocol, correctness proofs, and an analysis of costs are addressed.

  6. The VERITAS Digital Asynchronous Transceiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, R.J.; Rose, H.J.; Bradbury, S.M.; Daniel, M.; Marshall, P.

    The VERITAS array trigger requires a simultaneous coincidence between multiple telescopes to initiate the readout of data and is essential to reducing the overwhelming background of local muons whilst efficiently recording light from VHE gamma ray initiated air showers. The selection of coincident events in hardware reduces the overall trigger rate allowing the individual telescopes to trigger at lower thresholds, decreasing the energy threshold of the system. Short asynchronous pulses, serial event-numbers and long status flags must be distributed over hundreds of meters between the central building and each telescope and at least 5 channels of communication are needed in each direction. Coaxial cable cannot be utilised over the required distances and a serial, sequentially implemented, distribution scheme is undesirable as the dead time of the trigger system must be kept to a minimum. Instead a digital asynchronous transceiver (DAT) employing parallel optical link technology has been developed. Combinatorial logic functions are implemented in Xilinx Spartan-3 FPGAs, providing a versatile solution capable of transmitting data asynchronously on each of 11 channels with nanosecond accuracy and incurring no dead-time. The laboratory performance and integration of the DAT modules into VERITAS are presented and the benefits and draw-backs of this novel approach discussed.

  7. Synaptophysin (p38) at the frog neuromuscular junction: its incorporation into the axolemma and recycling after intense quantal secretion

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    Recycling of synaptophysin (p38), a synaptic vesicle integral membrane protein, was studied by the use of antisera raised against the protein purified from frog brain. When frog cutaneous pectoris muscles were fixed at rest, a bright, specific immunofluorescent signal was observed in nerve-terminal regions only if their plasma membranes had been previously permeabilized. When muscles were fixed after they had been treated for 1 h with a low dose of alpha-latrotoxin in Ca2+-free medium, an equally intense fluorescence could be observed without previous permeabilization. Under this condition, alpha-latrotoxin depletes nerve terminals of their quantal store of acetylcholine and of synaptic vesicles. These results indicate that fusion of synaptic vesicles leads to the exposure of intravesicular antigenic determinants of synaptophysin on the outer surface of the axolemma, and provide direct support for the vesicle hypothesis of neurotransmitter release. After 1 h treatment with the same dose of alpha-latrotoxin in the presence of 1.8 mM extracellular Ca2+, immunofluorescent images were obtained only after permeabilization with detergents. Under this condition, the vesicle population was maintained by an active process of recycling and more than two times the initial store of quanta were secreted. Thus, despite the active turnover of synaptic vesicles and of quanta of neurotransmitter, no extensive intermixing occurs between components of the vesicle and presynaptic plasma membrane. PMID:3144557

  8. Thermal and quantal isospin and spin fluctuations in heavy ion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Moretto, L.G.

    1980-01-01

    The isobaric charge distributions are discussed in terms of quantal and classical isospin fluctuations. The roles of mass asymmetry and of the higher giant isovector modes are treated within the framework of a cylinder model that is worked out exactly. Spin fluctuations are considered first in terms of quantal fluctuations in a cylinder model and second in terms of thermal fluctuations in a two-sphere model. The results are applied to the calculation of in- and out-of-plane angular distributions for sequential fission, alpha and gamma decay. Analytical expressions are obtained for the angular distributions. The theoretical predictions are compared with experimental results for sequential fission, alpha, and gamma angular distributions. 23 figures.

  9. Stability of mixed-strategy-based iterative logit quantal response dynamics in game theory.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Qian; Di, Zengru; Wu, Jinshan

    2014-01-01

    Using the Logit quantal response form as the response function in each step, the original definition of static quantal response equilibrium (QRE) is extended into an iterative evolution process. QREs remain as the fixed points of the dynamic process. However, depending on whether such fixed points are the long-term solutions of the dynamic process, they can be classified into stable (SQREs) and unstable (USQREs) equilibriums. This extension resembles the extension from static Nash equilibriums (NEs) to evolutionary stable solutions in the framework of evolutionary game theory. The relation between SQREs and other solution concepts of games, including NEs and QREs, is discussed. Using experimental data from other published papers, we perform a preliminary comparison between SQREs, NEs, QREs and the observed behavioral outcomes of those experiments. For certain games, we determine that SQREs have better predictive power than QREs and NEs.

  10. The quantal theory of how the immune system discriminates between "self and non-self"

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Kendall A

    2004-01-01

    In the past 50 years, immunologists have accumulated an amazing amount of information as to how the immune system functions. However, one of the most fundamental aspects of immunity, how the immune system discriminates between self vs. non-self, still remains an enigma. Any attempt to explain this most intriguing and fundamental characteristic must account for this decision at the level of the whole immune system, but as well, at the level of the individual cells making up the immune system. Moreover, it must provide for a molecular explanation as to how and why the cells behave as they do. The "Quantal Theory", proposed herein, is based upon the "Clonal Selection Theory", first proposed by Sir McFarland Burnet in 1955, in which he explained the remarkable specificity as well as diversity of recognition of everything foreign in the environment. The "Quantal Theory" is built upon Burnet's premise that after antigen selection of cell clones, a proliferative expansion of the selected cells ensues. Furthermore, it is derived from experiments which indicate that the proliferation of antigen-selected cell clones is determined by a quantal, "all-or-none", decision promulgated by a critical number of cellular receptors triggered by the T Cell Growth Factor (TCGF), interleukin 2 (IL2). An extraordinary number of experiments reported especially in the past 20 years, and detailed herein, indicate that the T cell Antigen Receptor (TCR) behaves similarly, and also that there are several critical numbers of triggered TCRs that determine different fates of the T cells. Moreover, the fates of the cells appear ultimately to be determined by the TCR triggering of the IL2 and IL2 receptor (IL2R) genes, which are also expressed in a very quantal fashion. The "Quantal Theory" states that the fundamental decisions of the T cell immune system are dependent upon the cells receiving a critical number of triggered TCRs and IL2Rs and that the cells respond in an all-or-none fashion. The

  11. Partition algebraic design of asynchronous sequential circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maki, Gary K.; Chen, Kristen Q.; Gopalakrishnan, Suresh K.

    1993-01-01

    Tracey's Theorem has long been recognized as essential in generating state assignments for asynchronous sequential circuits. This paper shows that partitioning variables derived from Tracey's Theorem also has a significant impact in generating the design equations. Moreover, this theorem is important to the fundamental understanding of asynchronous sequential operation. The results of this work simplify asynchronous logic design. Moreover, detection of safe circuits is made easier.

  12. Synaptic vesicle exocytosis captured by quick freezing and correlated with quantal transmitter release

    PubMed Central

    1979-01-01

    We describe the design and operation of a machine that freezes biological tissues by contact with a cold metal block, which incorporates a timing circuit that stimulates frog neuromuscular junctions in the last few milliseconds before thay are frozen. We show freeze-fracture replicas of nerve terminals frozen during transmitter discharge, which display synpatic vesicles caught in the act of exocytosis. We use 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) to increase the number of transmitter quanta discharged with each nerve impulse, and show that the number of exocytotic vesicles caught by quick-freezing increases commensurately, indicating that one vesicle undergoes exocytosis for each quantum that is discharged. We perform statistical analyses on the spatial distribution of synaptic vesicle discharge sites along the "active zones" that mark the secretory regions of these nerves, and show that individual vesicles fuse with the plasma membrane independent of one another, as expected from physiological demonstrations that quanta are discharged independently. Thus, the utility of quick- freezing as a technique to capture biological processes as evanescent as synaptic transmission has been established. An appendix describes a new capacitance method to measure freezing rates, which shows that the "temporal resolution" of our quick-freezing technique is 2 ms or better. PMID:38256

  13. Maintaining High Assurance in Asynchronous Messaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-24

    assurance environment. Index Terms—Asynchronous Communication, Publish Subscribe, IT Security, Encryption, Key Management I. INTRODUCTION...synchronous communication take place in or how these relate to each other. It is possible to implement synchronous communication using an asynchronous...continuing its processing. At the completion of message transmission, the sender does not know when or whether the receiver received it . The message

  14. Improved self arbitrated VLSI asynchronous circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winterrowd, P.

    1991-01-01

    This paper introduces an improved method for designing the class of CMOS VLSI asynchronous sequential circuits introduced in the paper by Sterling R. Whitaker and Gary K. Maki, 'Self Arbitrated VLSI Asynchronous Circuits.' Of main interest here is the simple design by inspection rules that arise from these circuits. This paper presents a variation on these circuits which reduces the number of transistors required.

  15. An Asynchronous Augmentation to Traditional Course Delivery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolverton, Marvin L.; Wolverton, Mimi

    Asynchronous augmentation facilitates distributed learning, which relies heavily on technology and self-learning. This paper reports the results of delivering a real estate principles course using an asynchronous course delivery format. It highlights one of many ways to enhance learning using technology, and it provides information concerning how…

  16. Asynchronous Learning Forums for Business Acculturation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pence, Christine Cope; Wulf, Catharina

    2009-01-01

    The use of IT as a facilitator for student collaboration in higher business education has grown rapidly since 2000. Asynchronous discussion forums are used abundantly for collaborative training purposes and for teaching students business-relevant tools for their future careers. This article presents an analysis of the asynchronous discussion forum…

  17. Automatic defensive control of asynchronous sequential machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Control theoretic techniques are utilised to develop automatic controllers that counteract robotic adversarial interventions in the operation of asynchronous sequential machines. The scenario centres on automatic protection against pre-programmed adversarial agents that attempt to subvert the operation of an asynchronous computing system. Necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence of defensive controllers that automatically defeat such adversarial agents are derived. These conditions are stated in terms of skeleton matrices - matrices of zeros and ones obtained directly from the given description of the asynchronous sequential machine being protected. When defensive controllers exist, a procedure for their design is outlined.

  18. Carrying Synchronous Voice Data On Asynchronous Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergman, Larry A.

    1990-01-01

    Buffers restore synchronism for internal use and permit asynchronism in external transmission. Proposed asynchronous local-area digital communication network (LAN) carries synchronous voice, data, or video signals, or non-real-time asynchronous data signals. Network uses double buffering scheme that reestablishes phase and frequency references at each node in network. Concept demonstrated in token-ring network operating at 80 Mb/s, pending development of equipment operating at planned data rate of 200 Mb/s. Technique generic and used with any LAN as long as protocol offers deterministic (or bonded) access delays and sufficient capacity.

  19. Asynchronous networks and event driven dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bick, Christian; Field, Michael

    2017-02-01

    Real-world networks in technology, engineering and biology often exhibit dynamics that cannot be adequately reproduced using network models given by smooth dynamical systems and a fixed network topology. Asynchronous networks give a theoretical and conceptual framework for the study of network dynamics where nodes can evolve independently of one another, be constrained, stop, and later restart, and where the interaction between different components of the network may depend on time, state, and stochastic effects. This framework is sufficiently general to encompass a wide range of applications ranging from engineering to neuroscience. Typically, dynamics is piecewise smooth and there are relationships with Filippov systems. In this paper, we give examples of asynchronous networks, and describe the basic formalism and structure. In the following companion paper, we make the notion of a functional asynchronous network rigorous, discuss the phenomenon of dynamical locks, and present a foundational result on the spatiotemporal factorization of the dynamics for a large class of functional asynchronous networks.

  20. Protein-assisted pericyclic reactions: an alternate hypothesis for the action of quantal receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Radding, W; Romo, T; Phillips, G N

    1999-01-01

    The rules for allowable pericyclic reactions indicate that the photoisomerizations of retinals in rhodopsins can be formally analogous to thermally promoted Diels-Alder condensations of monoenes with retinols. With little change in the seven-transmembrane helical environment these latter reactions could mimic the retinal isomerization while providing highly sensitive chemical reception. In this way archaic progenitors of G-protein-coupled chemical quantal receptors such as those for pheromones might have been evolutionarily plagiarized from the photon quantal receptor, rhodopsin, or vice versa. We investigated whether the known structure of bacteriorhodopsin exhibited any similarity in its active site with those of the two known antibody catalysts of Diels-Alder reactions and that of the photoactive yellow protein. A remarkable three-dimensional motif of aromatic side chains emerged in all four proteins despite the drastic differences in backbone structure. Molecular orbital calculations supported the possibility of transient pericyclic reactions as part of the isomerization-signal transduction mechanisms in both bacteriorhodopsin and the photoactive yellow protein. It appears that reactions in all four of the proteins investigated may be biological analogs of the organic chemists' chiral auxiliary-aided Diels-Alder reactions. Thus the light receptor and the chemical receptor subfamilies of the heptahelical receptor family may have been unified at one time by underlying pericyclic chemistry. PMID:10585916

  1. Asynchronous networks: modularization of dynamics theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bick, Christian; Field, Michael

    2017-02-01

    Building on the first part of this paper, we develop the theory of functional asynchronous networks. We show that a large class of functional asynchronous networks can be (uniquely) represented as feedforward networks connecting events or dynamical modules. For these networks we can give a complete description of the network function in terms of the function of the events comprising the network: the modularization of dynamics theorem. We give examples to illustrate the main results.

  2. Release properties of individual presynaptic boutons expressed during homosynaptic depression and heterosynaptic facilitation of the Aplysia sensorimotor synapse

    PubMed Central

    Malkinson, Guy; Spira, Micha E.

    2013-01-01

    Much of what we know about the mechanisms underlying Homosynaptic Depression (HSD) and heterosynaptic facilitation is based on intracellular recordings of integrated postsynaptic potentials (PSPs). This methodological approach views the presynaptic apparatus as a single compartment rather than taking a more realistic representation reflecting the fact that it is made up of tens to hundreds of individual and independent Presynaptic Release Boutons (PRBs). Using cultured Aplysia sensorimotor synapses, we reexamined HSD and its dishabituation by imaging the release properties of individual PRBs. We find that the PRB population is heterogeneous and can be clustered into three groups: ~25% of the PRBs consistently release neurotransmitter throughout the entire habituation paradigm (35 stimuli, 0.05 Hz) and have a relatively high quantal content, 36% of the PRBs display intermittent failures only after the tenth stimulation, and 39% are low quantal-content PRBs that exhibit intermittent release failures from the onset of the habituation paradigm. 5HT-induced synaptic dishabituation by a single 5HT application was generated by the enhanced recovery of the quantal content of the habituated PRBs and did not involve the recruitment of new release boutons. The characterization of the PRB population as heterogeneous in terms of its temporal pattern of release-probability and quantal content provides new insights into the mechanisms underlying HSD and its dishabituation. PMID:24068986

  3. Loss of Local Astrocyte Support Disrupts Action Potential Propagation and Glutamate Release Synchrony from Unmyelinated Hippocampal Axon Terminals In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Sobieski, Courtney; Jiang, Xiaoping; Crawford, Devon C.

    2015-01-01

    Neuron–astrocyte interactions are critical for proper CNS development and function. Astrocytes secrete factors that are pivotal for synaptic development and function, neuronal metabolism, and neuronal survival. Our understanding of this relationship, however, remains incomplete due to technical hurdles that have prevented the removal of astrocytes from neuronal circuits without changing other important conditions. Here we overcame this obstacle by growing solitary rat hippocampal neurons on microcultures that were comprised of either an astrocyte bed (+astrocyte) or a collagen bed (−astrocyte) within the same culture dish. −Astrocyte autaptic evoked EPSCs, but not IPSCs, displayed an altered temporal profile, which included increased synaptic delay, increased time to peak, and severe glutamate release asynchrony, distinct from previously described quantal asynchrony. Although we observed minimal alteration of the somatically recorded action potential waveform, action potential propagation was altered. We observed a longer latency between somatic initiation and arrival at distal locations, which likely explains asynchronous EPSC peaks, and we observed broadening of the axonal spike, which likely underlies changes to evoked EPSC onset. No apparent changes in axon structure were observed, suggesting altered axonal excitability. In conclusion, we propose that local astrocyte support has an unappreciated role in maintaining glutamate release synchrony by disturbing axonal signal propagation. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Certain glial cell types (oligodendrocytes, Schwann cells) facilitate the propagation of neuronal electrical signals, but a role for astrocytes has not been identified despite many other functions of astrocytes in supporting and modulating neuronal signaling. Under identical global conditions, we cultured neurons with or without local astrocyte support. Without local astrocytes, glutamate transmission was desynchronized by an alteration of the waveform

  4. Remote Asynchronous Message Service Gateway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Shin-Ywan; Burleigh, Scott C.

    2011-01-01

    The Remote Asynchronous Message Service (RAMS) gateway is a special-purpose AMS application node that enables exchange of AMS messages between nodes residing in different AMS "continua," notionally in different geographical locations. JPL s implementation of RAMS gateway functionality is integrated with the ION (Interplanetary Overlay Network) implementation of the DTN (Delay-Tolerant Networking) bundle protocol, and with JPL s implementation of AMS itself. RAMS protocol data units are encapsulated in ION bundles and are forwarded to the neighboring RAMS gateways identified in the source gateway s AMS management information base. Each RAMS gateway has interfaces in two communication environments: the AMS message space it serves, and the RAMS network - the grid or tree of mutually aware RAMS gateways - that enables AMS messages produced in one message space to be forwarded to other message spaces of the same venture. Each gateway opens persistent, private RAMS network communication channels to the RAMS gateways of other message spaces for the same venture, in other continua. The interconnected RAMS gateways use these communication channels to forward message petition assertions and cancellations among themselves. Each RAMS gateway subscribes locally to all subjects that are of interest in any of the linked message spaces. On receiving its copy of a message on any of these subjects, the RAMS gateway node uses the RAMS network to forward the message to every other RAMS gateway whose message space contains at least one node that has subscribed to messages on that subject. On receiving a message via the RAMS network from some other RAMS gateway, the RAMS gateway node forwards the message to all subscribers in its own message space.

  5. Synchronization of Asynchronous Switched Boolean Network.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hao; Wang, Xingyuan; Lin, Xiaohui

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the complete synchronizations for asynchronous switched Boolean network with free Boolean sequence controllers and close-loop controllers are studied. First, the basic asynchronous switched Boolean network model is provided. With the method of semi-tensor product, the Boolean dynamics is translated into linear representation. Second, necessary and sufficient conditions for ASBN synchronization with free Boolean sequence control and close-loop control are derived, respectively. Third, some illustrative examples are provided to show the efficiency of the proposed methods.

  6. Processor arrays with asynchronous TDM optical buses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Zheng, S. Q.

    1997-04-01

    We propose a pipelined asynchronous time division multiplexing optical bus. Such a bus can use one of the two hardwared priority schemes, the linear priority scheme and the round-robin priority scheme. Our simulation results show that the performances of our proposed buses are significantly better than the performances of known pipelined synchronous time division multiplexing optical buses. We also propose a class of processor arrays connected by pipelined asynchronous time division multiplexing optical buses. We claim that our proposed processor array not only have better performance, but also have better scalabilities than the existing processor arrays connected by pipelined synchronous time division multiplexing optical buses.

  7. Asynchronous Message Service Reference Implementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burleigh, Scott C.

    2011-01-01

    This software provides a library of middleware functions with a simple application programming interface, enabling implementation of distributed applications in conformance with the CCSDS AMS (Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems Asynchronous Message Service) specification. The AMS service, and its protocols, implement an architectural concept under which the modules of mission systems may be designed as if they were to operate in isolation, each one producing and consuming mission information without explicit awareness of which other modules are currently operating. Communication relationships among such modules are self-configuring; this tends to minimize complexity in the development and operations of modular data systems. A system built on this model is a society of generally autonomous, inter-operating modules that may fluctuate freely over time in response to changing mission objectives, modules functional upgrades, and recovery from individual module failure. The purpose of AMS, then, is to reduce mission cost and risk by providing standard, reusable infrastructure for the exchange of information among data system modules in a manner that is simple to use, highly automated, flexible, robust, scalable, and efficient. The implementation is designed to spawn multiple threads of AMS functionality under the control of an AMS application program. These threads enable all members of an AMS-based, distributed application to discover one another in real time, subscribe to messages on specific topics, and to publish messages on specific topics. The query/reply (client/server) communication model is also supported. Message exchange is optionally subject to encryption (to support confidentiality) and authorization. Fault tolerance measures in the discovery protocol minimize the likelihood of overall application failure due to any single operational error anywhere in the system. The multi-threaded design simplifies processing while enabling application nodes to

  8. Acceptability of an Asynchronous Learning Forum on Mobile Devices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Chih-Kai

    2010-01-01

    Mobile learning has recently become noteworthy because mobile devices have become popular. To construct an asynchronous learning forum on mobile devices is important because an asynchronous learning forum is always an essential part of networked asynchronous distance learning. However, the input interface in handheld learning devices, which is…

  9. Evidence for the role of non-quantal acetylcholine in the maintenance of the membrane potential of rat skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Bray, J. J.; Forrest, J. W.; Hubbard, J. I.

    1982-01-01

    1. Resting membrane potentials of rat diaphragm muscles cultured in Trowell T8 medium were measured in vitro. After 3 hr in culture the resting membrane potential of muscle fibres within 2·5 mm of nerve section (`near') was -68·3 ± 0·4 mV (nineteen preparations). This was significantly lower (P < 0·001) than the resting potential (-74·0 ± 0·4 mV) measured in muscle fibres 8-10 mm from the site of nerve section (`far') in the same preparations. A difference between the `near' and the `far' fibres was maintained in muscles cultured for 6 and 12 hr. Miniature end-plate potentials were present in both `near' and `far' fibres cultured for 3 and 6 hr and ceased after 12-15 hr. 2. The presence of carbamylcholine (10-7 or 10-8 M) maintained the resting membrane potential of `near' fibres close to that of `far' fibres at 3, 6 and 12 hr. For example, at 3 hr in the presence of 10-8 M-carbamylcholine the mean resting potential was 75·6 ± 0·5 mV in `near' fibres and 76·1 ± 0·4 mV in `far' fibres (four preparations). A similar effect was produced in preparations exposed to anticholinesterases: diisopropylphosphorofluoridate (DFP) (10-7 M), neostigmine (10-7 M) or physostigmine (10-5 M). 3. Agents that blocked acetylcholine receptors had the reverse effect. In the presence of α-bungarotoxin (1 μg/ml.) or d-tubocurarine (10-5 M) the resting membrane potential of `far' fibres was reduced to the level of `near' fibres over the 24 hr period of observation. For example, at 3 hr in the presence of α-bungarotoxin the mean resting potential was 67·2 ± 0·5 mV in `near' fibres and 68·5 ± 0·6 mV in `far' fibres (six preparations). The effect of d-tubocurarine was reversible. 4. When muscles were cultured in Ca2+-free medium containing 1 mM-EGTA and 10 mM-Mg2+, there was no difference in membrane potential between `near' and `far' fibres and physostigmine (10-5 M) was ineffective in raising the membrane potential of `near' fibres. 5. It is suggested that non-quantal

  10. FIFO Buffer for Asynchronous Data Streams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bascle, K. P.

    1985-01-01

    Variable-rate, asynchronous data signals from up to four measuring instruments or other sources combined in first-in/first-out (FIFO) buffer for transmission on single channel. Constructed in complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) logic, buffer consumes low power (only 125 mW at 5V) and conforms to aerospace standards of reliability and maintainability.

  11. Interaction and Cognition in Asynchronous Computer Conferencing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schrire, Sarah

    2004-01-01

    This paper is based on a multiple-case study of the learning process in three asynchronous computer conferences. The conferences were part of the distance learning component in doctoral degree courses in computing technology in education offered at an American university. The conferences were analyzed from a number of perspectives, the emphasis in…

  12. An Agent Architecture for Asynchronous Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rochefort, Stephen

    Education delivery systems have evolved from content delivery mechanisms to collaborative environments. The next step in this evolution is to provide greater support for asynchronous learners, those that progress through course material with little or no support from the instructional team. The integration of Web technologies with artificial…

  13. Increasing Student Engagement Using Asynchronous Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northey, Gavin; Bucic, Tania; Chylinski, Mathew; Govind, Rahul

    2015-01-01

    Student engagement is an ongoing concern for educators because of its positive association with deep learning and educational outcomes. This article tests the use of a social networking site (Facebook) as a tool to facilitate asynchronous learning opportunities that complement face-to-face interactions and thereby enable a stronger learning…

  14. Asynchronous ASCII Event Count Status Code

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    IRIG STANDARD 215-12 TELECOMMUNICATIONS AND TIMING GROUP ASYNCHRONOUS ASCII EVENT COUNT STATUS CODES...Inter-range Instrumentation Group ( IRIG ) Standard for American Standard Code for Information Interchange (ASCII)-formatted EC status transfer which can be...circuits and Ethernet networks. Provides systems engineers and equipment vendors with an Inter-range Instrumentation Group ( IRIG ) Standard for American

  15. Ensuring Rapid Mixing and Low Bias for Asynchronous Gibbs Sampling

    PubMed Central

    De Sa, Christopher; Olukotun, Kunle; Ré, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Gibbs sampling is a Markov chain Monte Carlo technique commonly used for estimating marginal distributions. To speed up Gibbs sampling, there has recently been interest in parallelizing it by executing asynchronously. While empirical results suggest that many models can be efficiently sampled asynchronously, traditional Markov chain analysis does not apply to the asynchronous case, and thus asynchronous Gibbs sampling is poorly understood. In this paper, we derive a better understanding of the two main challenges of asynchronous Gibbs: bias and mixing time. We show experimentally that our theoretical results match practical outcomes. PMID:28344730

  16. The analysis of dose-response curve from bioassays with quantal response: Deterministic or statistical approaches?

    PubMed

    Mougabure-Cueto, G; Sfara, V

    2016-04-25

    Dose-response relations can be obtained from systems at any structural level of biological matter, from the molecular to the organismic level. There are two types of approaches for analyzing dose-response curves: a deterministic approach, based on the law of mass action, and a statistical approach, based on the assumed probabilities distribution of phenotypic characters. Models based on the law of mass action have been proposed to analyze dose-response relations across the entire range of biological systems. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the principles that determine the dose-response relations. Dose-response curves of simple systems are the result of chemical interactions between reacting molecules, and therefore are supported by the law of mass action. In consequence, the shape of these curves is perfectly sustained by physicochemical features. However, dose-response curves of bioassays with quantal response are not explained by the simple collision of molecules but by phenotypic variations among individuals and can be interpreted as individual tolerances. The expression of tolerance is the result of many genetic and environmental factors and thus can be considered a random variable. In consequence, the shape of its associated dose-response curve has no physicochemical bearings; instead, they are originated from random biological variations. Due to the randomness of tolerance there is no reason to use deterministic equations for its analysis; on the contrary, statistical models are the appropriate tools for analyzing these dose-response relations.

  17. QUAD: a computer package for the analysis of QUantal Assay Data.

    PubMed

    Morgan, B J; Pack, S E; Smith, D M

    1989-12-01

    The computer package QUAD has been developed at the University of Kent, U.K. It is menu driven and written in Advanced BASIC. It runs on IBM PC compatible machines equipped with a suitable graphics facility such as CGA or simulated CGA. QUAD is available on a floppy disk, for a small handling charge. QUAD has four main functions: it performs a logit analysis of quantal assay data; it provides a flexible way of analysing the data, allowing dose transformations and providing alternative confidence intervals for EDp values; it produces a range of diagnostics for assessing the fit of models to data; it provides and fits two families of extended models, each containing the logit as a special case. The package makes use of the latest statistical research, and fitted models are displayed by means of the good graphics facilities available on microcomputers. This document describes the facilities available in detail, and provides and discusses, illustrations of the package at work. QUAD has been designed as a pilot package. Further additions and developments are planned and described later.

  18. Asynchronous file transfer to IBM PC's

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoerger, J.

    1984-01-01

    The Asynchronous File Transfer System is used for interactively selecting and tramsmitting text files from the Langley Research Center's Business Data Systems Division (BDSD) host processor to an IBM Personal Computer. The IBM asynchronous communications support package is used for handling the communications on the personal computer. An application program (NATURAL, COBOL, etc.) is used for selecting and formatting the records to be transmitted, and three subroutine modules residing on the BDSD host processor are used for interfacing the application program and the communications software. Each record transmitted to the Personal Computer must be in the standard ASCII format. This record format is directly accessible by BASIC and many of the personal computer software packages provide utility programs for converting them to the format required for the particular package in question.

  19. Inhibition Controls Asynchronous States of Neuronal Networks

    PubMed Central

    Treviño, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Computations in cortical circuits require action potentials from excitatory and inhibitory neurons. In this mini-review, I first provide a quick overview of findings that indicate that GABAergic neurons play a fundamental role in coordinating spikes and generating synchronized network activity. Next, I argue that these observations helped popularize the notion that network oscillations require a high degree of spike correlations among interneurons which, in turn, produce synchronous inhibition of the local microcircuit. The aim of this text is to discuss some recent experimental and computational findings that support a complementary view: one in which interneurons participate actively in producing asynchronous states in cortical networks. This requires a proper mixture of shared excitation and inhibition leading to asynchronous activity between neighboring cells. Such contribution from interneurons would be extremely important because it would tend to reduce the spike correlation between neighboring pyramidal cells, a drop in redundancy that could enhance the information-processing capacity of neural networks. PMID:27274721

  20. Asynchronous Communication Scheme For Hypercube Computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madan, Herb S.

    1988-01-01

    Scheme devised for asynchronous-message communication system for Mark III hypercube concurrent-processor network. Network consists of up to 1,024 processing elements connected electrically as though were at corners of 10-dimensional cube. Each node contains two Motorola 68020 processors along with Motorola 68881 floating-point processor utilizing up to 4 megabytes of shared dynamic random-access memory. Scheme intended to support applications requiring passage of both polled or solicited and unsolicited messages.

  1. Quantitative phase microscopy with asynchronous digital holography.

    PubMed

    Chalut, Kevin J; Brown, William J; Wax, Adam

    2007-03-19

    We demonstrate a new method of measuring quantitative phase in imaging of biological materials. This method, asynchronous digital holography, employs knowledge of a moving fringe created by acousto-optic modulators to execute phase-shifting interferometry using two near-simultaneous interferograms. The method can be used to obtain quantitative phase images of dynamic biological samples on millisecond time scales. We present results on a standard sample, and on live cell samples.

  2. Overview of AMS (CCSDS Asynchronous Message Service)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burleigh, Scott

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives an overview of the Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) Asynchronous Message Service (AMS). The topics include: 1) Key Features; 2) A single AMS continuum; 3) The AMS Protocol Suite; 4) A multi-continuum venture; 5) Constraining transmissions; 6) Security; 7) Fault Tolerance; 8) Performance of Reference Implementation; 9) AMS vs Multicast (1); 10) AMS vs Multicast (2); 11) RAMS testing exercise; and 12) Results.

  3. Fast Asynchronous Data Communication Via Fiber Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergman, Larry A.; Tell, Robert G.

    1989-01-01

    Transmitter and receiver devised for asynchronous digital communication via optical fiber at rates above 100 Mb/s. Transmitter converts parallel data to serial for high-speed transmission; receiver recovers clock signal and converts data back to parallel. No phase-lock loops used. New receiver design avoids over-sampling altogether. Local sampling oscillator operating nominally at clock frequency generates N clock signals of equally spaced phase, used to clock incoming data into N separate shift registers.

  4. Asynchronous event-based binocular stereo matching.

    PubMed

    Rogister, Paul; Benosman, Ryad; Ieng, Sio-Hoi; Lichtsteiner, Patrick; Delbruck, Tobi

    2012-02-01

    We present a novel event-based stereo matching algorithm that exploits the asynchronous visual events from a pair of silicon retinas. Unlike conventional frame-based cameras, recent artificial retinas transmit their outputs as a continuous stream of asynchronous temporal events, in a manner similar to the output cells of the biological retina. Our algorithm uses the timing information carried by this representation in addressing the stereo-matching problem on moving objects. Using the high temporal resolution of the acquired data stream for the dynamic vision sensor, we show that matching on the timing of the visual events provides a new solution to the real-time computation of 3-D objects when combined with geometric constraints using the distance to the epipolar lines. The proposed algorithm is able to filter out incorrect matches and to accurately reconstruct the depth of moving objects despite the low spatial resolution of the sensor. This brief sets up the principles for further event-based vision processing and demonstrates the importance of dynamic information and spike timing in processing asynchronous streams of visual events.

  5. The Role of Neurotrophins in Neurotransmitter Release

    PubMed Central

    Tyler, William J.; Perrett, Stephen P.; Pozzo-Miller, Lucas D.

    2009-01-01

    The neurotrophins (NTs) have recently been shown to elicit pronounced effects on quantal neurotransmitter release at both central and peripheral nervous system synapses. Due to their activity-dependent release, as well as the subcellular localization of both protein and receptor, NTs are ideally suited to modify the strength of neuronal connections by “fine-tuning” synaptic activity through direct actions at presynaptic terminals. Here, using BDNF as a prototypical example, the authors provide an update of recent evidence demonstrating that NTs enhance quantal neurotransmitter release at synapses through presynaptic mechanisms. The authors further propose that a potential target for NT actions at presynaptic terminals is the mechanism by which terminals retrieve synaptic vesicles after exocytosis. Depending on the temporal demands placed on synapses during high-frequency synaptic transmission, synapses may use two alternative modes of synaptic vesicle retrieval, the conventional slow endosomal recycling or a faster rapid retrieval at the active zone, referred to as “kiss-and-run.” By modulating Ca2+ microdomains associated with voltage-gated Ca2+ channels at active zones, NTs may elicit a switch from the slow to the fast mode of endocytosis of vesicles at presynaptic terminals during high-frequency synaptic transmission, allowing more reliable information transfer and neuronal signaling in the central nervous system. PMID:12467374

  6. Quantal density-functional theory of excited states: The state arbitrariness of the model noninteracting system

    SciTech Connect

    Slamet, Marlina; Singh, Ranbir; Sahni, Viraht; Massa, Lou

    2003-10-01

    The quantal density-functional theory (Q-DFT) of nondegenerate excited-states maps the pure state of the Schroedinger equation to one of noninteracting fermions such that the equivalent excited state density, energy, and ionization potential are obtained. The state of the model S system is arbitrary in that it may be in a ground or excited state. The potential energy of the model fermions differs as a function of this state. The contribution of correlations due to the Pauli exclusion principle and Coulomb repulsion to the potential and total energy of these fermions is independent of the state of the S system. The differences are solely a consequence of correlation-kinetic effects. Irrespective of the state of the S system, the highest occupied eigenvalue of the model fermions is the negative of the ionization potential. In this paper we demonstrate the state arbitrariness of the model system by application of Q-DFT to the first excited singlet state of the exactly solvable Hookean atom. We construct two model S systems: one in a singlet ground state (1s{sup 2}), and the other in a singlet first excited state (1s2s). In each case, the density and energy determined are equivalent to those of the excited state of the atom, with the highest occupied eigenvalues being the negative of the ionization potential. From these results we determine the corresponding Kohn-Sham density-functional theory (KS-DFT) 'exchange-correlation' potential energy for the two S systems. Further, based on the results of the model calculations, suggestions for the KS-DFT of excited states are made.

  7. Time-coded neurotransmitter release at excitatory and inhibitory synapses

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Serafim; Desroches, Mathieu; Krupa, Martin; Cortes, Jesus M.; Sejnowski, Terrence J.; Ali, Afia B.

    2016-01-01

    Communication between neurons at chemical synapses is regulated by hundreds of different proteins that control the release of neurotransmitter that is packaged in vesicles, transported to an active zone, and released when an input spike occurs. Neurotransmitter can also be released asynchronously, that is, after a delay following the spike, or spontaneously in the absence of a stimulus. The mechanisms underlying asynchronous and spontaneous neurotransmitter release remain elusive. Here, we describe a model of the exocytotic cycle of vesicles at excitatory and inhibitory synapses that accounts for all modes of vesicle release as well as short-term synaptic plasticity (STSP). For asynchronous release, the model predicts a delayed inertial protein unbinding associated with the SNARE complex assembly immediately after vesicle priming. Experiments are proposed to test the model’s molecular predictions for differential exocytosis. The simplicity of the model will also facilitate large-scale simulations of neural circuits. PMID:26858411

  8. Facilitating Asynchronous Distance Learning: Exploiting Opportunities for Knowledge Building in Asynchronous Distance Learning Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prestera, Gustavo E.; Moller, Leslie A.

    Computer mediated communication tools enable today's distance learners to engage in collaborative problem solving, threaded discussions, and peer tutoring through asynchronous distance learning environments. This paper suggests that these are best accomplished by establishing virtual learning communities, which break down traditional…

  9. Extracellular Ionic Composition Alters Kinetics of Vesicular Release of Catecholamines and Quantal Size During Exocytosis at Adrenal Medullary Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-07-05

    cytosolic calcium concentration in single bovine adrenal chromaffin cells form video imaging of fura - 2 , EMBO J. 8, 401-411. Pollard, H. B., Ornberg, R...Key words: chromaffin cells, catecholamine, barium induced exocytosis, fura - 2 , calcium independent exocytosis Running title: Effects of extracellular...calibration of the fluorescent calcium indicator Fura - 2 , Cell Calcium 11, 75-83. Winkler, H. (1976) The Composition of Adrenal Chromaffin Granules

  10. Asynchronous Event-Driven Particle Algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Donev, A

    2007-08-30

    We present, in a unifying way, the main components of three asynchronous event-driven algorithms for simulating physical systems of interacting particles. The first example, hard-particle molecular dynamics (MD), is well-known. We also present a recently-developed diffusion kinetic Monte Carlo (DKMC) algorithm, as well as a novel stochastic molecular-dynamics algorithm that builds on the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC). We explain how to effectively combine event-driven and classical time-driven handling, and discuss some promises and challenges for event-driven simulation of realistic physical systems.

  11. Asynchronous Event-Driven Particle Algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Donev, A

    2007-02-28

    We present in a unifying way the main components of three examples of asynchronous event-driven algorithms for simulating physical systems of interacting particles. The first example, hard-particle molecular dynamics (MD), is well-known. We also present a recently-developed diffusion kinetic Monte Carlo (DKMC) algorithm, as well as a novel event-driven algorithm for Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC). Finally, we describe how to combine MD with DSMC in an event-driven framework, and discuss some promises and challenges for event-driven simulation of realistic physical systems.

  12. DAI-CLIPS: Distributed, Asynchronous, Interacting CLIPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gagne, Denis; Garant, Alain

    1994-01-01

    DAI-CLIPS is a distributed computational environment within which each CLIPS is an active independent computational entity with the ability to communicate freely with other CLIPS. Furthermore, new CLIPS can be created, others can be deleted or modify their expertise, all dynamically in an asynchronous and independent fashion during execution. The participating CLIPS are distributed over a network of heterogeneous processors taking full advantage of the available processing power. We present the general framework encompassing DAI-CLIPS and discuss some of its advantages and potential applications.

  13. Integrating Asynchronous Digital Design Into the Computer Engineering Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, S. C.; Al-Assadi, W. K.; Di, J.

    2010-01-01

    As demand increases for circuits with higher performance, higher complexity, and decreased feature size, asynchronous (clockless) paradigms will become more widely used in the semiconductor industry, as evidenced by the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors' (ITRS) prediction of a likely shift from synchronous to asynchronous design…

  14. Teaching Presence and Communication Timeliness in Asynchronous Online Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skramstad, Erik; Schlosser, Charles; Orellana, Anymir

    2012-01-01

    This study examined student perceptions of teaching presence and communication timeliness in asynchronous online courses. Garrison, Anderson, and Archer's (2000) community of inquiry model provided the framework for the survey research methodology used. Participants were 59 student volunteers taking 1 or more asynchronous online graduate courses.…

  15. Localized radio frequency communication using asynchronous transfer mode protocol

    DOEpatents

    Witzke, Edward L.; Robertson, Perry J.; Pierson, Lyndon G.

    2007-08-14

    A localized wireless communication system for communication between a plurality of circuit boards, and between electronic components on the circuit boards. Transceivers are located on each circuit board and electronic component. The transceivers communicate with one another over spread spectrum radio frequencies. An asynchronous transfer mode protocol controls communication flow with asynchronous transfer mode switches located on the circuit boards.

  16. Using Asynchronous Online Discussions in Primary School Project Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jamaludin, Azilawati; Lang, Quek Choon

    2006-01-01

    Using asynchronous online discussions for interschool collaborative project work represents one of the innovative practices in the Singapore classroom. With anytime, anywhere access to interactions among the students and teachers, the asynchronous nature of these interactions leads to new paradigms for teaching and learning, with both unique…

  17. 40 Gbit/s asynchronous digital optical regenerator.

    PubMed

    Hillerkuss, D; Ellis, A; Zarris, G; Simeonidou, D; Leuthold, J; Cotter, D

    2008-11-10

    We present the first experimental demonstration of an asynchronous digital optical regenerator at 42.67 Gbit/s. The system effectively retimes incoming asynchronous data bursts to a local clock without burst mode clock recovery and converts the signal to a desired wavelength and duty cycle.

  18. Experimental 3D Asynchronous Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    microprocessor . 3.1. Asynchronous FPGA Overview In terms of the major building blocks, the asynchronous FPGA (AFPGA) architecture looks like a traditional...devices—from O(N1/2) to O(N1/3), where N is the number of devices in the system. 3D chip stacking has been proposed as a way to improve microprocessor

  19. Two Studies Examining Argumentation in Asynchronous Computer Mediated Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joiner, Richard; Jones, Sarah; Doherty, John

    2008-01-01

    Asynchronous computer mediated communication (CMC) would seem to be an ideal medium for supporting development in student argumentation. This paper investigates this assumption through two studies. The first study compared asynchronous CMC with face-to-face discussions. The transactional and strategic level of the argumentation (i.e. measures of…

  20. Case-Based Instruction Using Asynchronous Online Discussions: A Synthesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pena-Shaff, Judith B.; Altman, William S.

    2009-01-01

    The authors describe the implementation of a teaching strategy combining case-based instruction (CBI) and asynchronous online discussions in two large educational psychology classes. Based on previous use of case studies and on recommendations developed through previous research on asynchronous online discussions, they predicted that students…

  1. Interactional Coherence in Asynchronous Learning Networks: A Rhetorical Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potter, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Numerous studies have affirmed the value of asynchronous online communication as a learning resource. Several investigations, however, have indicated that discussions in asynchronous environments are often neither interactive nor coherent. The research reported sought to develop an enhanced understanding of interactional coherence, argumentation,…

  2. Effects of trifluoperazine and promethazine on the release of transmitter quanta at the mouse neuromuscular junction.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, M; Komatsu, R; Taquahashi, Y; Shimizu, Y; Satoh, E

    1998-01-01

    The present experiments examined the effects of phenothiazine derivatives, such as trifluoperazine and promethazine, on the release of transmitter quanta in preparations of the mouse diaphragm. The frequency (F, s-1) of miniature end-plate potentials and the quantal content (m) of endplate potentials were measured intracellularly at the same endplate in a bathing solution that contained 0.5-0.8 mM Ca2+ ions and 5 mM Mg2+ ions. Trifluoperazine (4 microM) significantly reduced both F and m. The inhibitory effect on m, but not on F, was subject to competition by Ca2+ ions. Promethazine at 48 microM, but not at 16 microM, reduced the quantal release. It was apparent that the effect of trifluoperazine was competitively antagonized by Ca2+ ions at motor nerve terminals.

  3. Resynchronization of the Asynchronous Polar CD Ind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, Gordon; Patterson, Joseph; de Miguel, Enrique; Hambsch, Franz-Josef; Monard, Berto; Bolt, Greg; McCormick, Jennie; Rea, Robert; Allen, William

    2017-04-01

    CD Ind is one of only four confirmed asynchronous polars (APs). APs are strongly magnetic cataclysmic variables of the AM Herculis subclass with the characteristic that their white dwarfs rotate a few percent out of synchronism with their binary orbit. Theory suggests that nova eruptions disrupt previously synchronized states. Following the eruption, the system is expected to rapidly resynchronize over a timescale of centuries. The other three asynchronous polars—V1432 Aql, BY Cam, and V1500 Cyg—have resynchronization time estimates ranging from 100 to more than 3500 years, with all but one being less than 1200 years. We report on the analysis of over 46,000 observations of CD Ind taken between 2007 and 2016, combined with previous observations from 1996, and estimate a CD Ind resynchronization time of 6400 ± 800 years. We also estimate an orbital period of 110.820(1) minutes and a current (2016.4) white dwarf spin period of 109.6564(1) minutes.

  4. Forming the wide asynchronous binary asteroid population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, S.; Scheeres, D.; McMahon, J.

    2014-07-01

    We propose and analyze a new mechanism for the formation of the wide asynchronous binary population. These binary asteroids have wide semi-major axes relative to most near-Earth-asteroid and main-belt-asteroid systems as shown in the attached table. Confirmed members have rapidly rotating primaries and satellites that are not tidally locked. Previously suggested formation mechanisms from impact ejecta, from planetary flybys, and directly from rotational-fission events cannot satisfy all of the observations. The newly hypothesized mechanism works as follows: (1) these systems are formed from rotational fission, (2) their satellites are tidally locked, (3) their orbits are expanded by the binary Yarkovsky-O'Keefe-Radzievskii-Paddack (BYORP) effect, (4) their satellites desynchronize as a result of the adiabatic invariance between the libration of the secondary and the mutual orbit, and (5) the secondary avoids resynchronization because of the YORP effect. This seemingly complex chain of events is a natural pathway for binaries with satellites that have particular shapes, which define the BYORP effect torque that acts on the system. After detailing the theory, we analyze each of the wide-asynchronous-binary members and candidates to assess their most likely formation mechanism. Finally, we suggest possible future observations to check and constrain our hypothesis.

  5. Controllability of asynchronous Boolean multiplex control networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Chao; Wang, Xingyuan; Liu, Hong

    2014-09-01

    In this article, the controllability of asynchronous Boolean multiplex control networks (ABMCNs) is studied. First, the model of Boolean multiplex control networks under Harvey' asynchronous update is presented. By means of semi-tensor product approach, the logical dynamics is converted into linear representation, and a generalized formula of control-depending network transition matrices is achieved. Second, a necessary and sufficient condition is proposed to verify that only control-depending fixed points of ABMCNs can be controlled with probability one. Third, using two types of controls, the controllability of system is studied and formulae are given to show: (a) when an initial state is given, the reachable set at time s under a group of specified controls; (b) the reachable set at time s under arbitrary controls; (c) the specific probability values from a given initial state to destination states. Based on the above formulae, an algorithm to calculate overall reachable states from a specified initial state is presented. Moreover, we also discuss an approach to find the particular control sequence which steers the system between two states with maximum probability. Examples are shown to illustrate the feasibility of the proposed scheme.

  6. Asynchronicity of facial blood perfusion in migraine.

    PubMed

    Zaproudina, Nina; Teplov, Victor; Nippolainen, Ervin; Lipponen, Jukka A; Kamshilin, Alexei A; Närhi, Matti; Karjalainen, Pasi A; Giniatullin, Rashid

    2013-01-01

    Asymmetrical changes in blood perfusion and asynchronous blood supply to head tissues likely contribute to migraine pathophysiology. Imaging was widely used in order to understand hemodynamic variations in migraine. However, mapping of blood pulsations in the face of migraineurs has not been performed so far. We used the Blood Pulsation Imaging (BPI) technique, which was recently developed in our group, to establish whether 2D-imaging of blood pulsations parameters can reveal new biomarkers of migraine. BPI characteristics were measured in migraineurs during the attack-free interval and compared to healthy subjects with and without a family history of migraine. We found a novel phenomenon of transverse waves of facial blood perfusion in migraineurs in contrast to healthy subjects who showed synchronous blood delivery to both sides of the face. Moreover, the amplitude of blood pulsations was symmetrically distributed over the face of healthy subjects, but asymmetrically in migraineurs and subjects with a family history of migraine. In the migraine patients we found a remarkable correlation between the side of unilateral headache and the direction of the blood perfusion wave. Our data suggest that migraine is associated with lateralization of blood perfusion and asynchronous blood pulsations in the facial area, which could be due to essential dysfunction of the autonomic vascular control in the face. These findings may further enhance our understanding of migraine pathophysiology and suggest new easily available biomarkers of this pathology.

  7. Selective particle capture by asynchronously beating cilia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Yang; Kanso, Eva

    2015-12-01

    Selective particle filtration is fundamental in many engineering and biological systems. For example, many aquatic microorganisms use filter feeding to capture food particles from the surrounding fluid, using motile cilia. One of the capture strategies is to use the same cilia to generate feeding currents and to intercept particles when the particles are on the downstream side of the cilia. Here, we develop a 3D computational model of ciliary bands interacting with flow suspended particles and calculate particle trajectories for a range of particle sizes. Consistent with experimental observations, we find optimal particle sizes that maximize capture rate. The optimal size depends nonlinearly on cilia spacing and cilia coordination, synchronous vs. asynchronous. These parameters affect the cilia-generated flow field, which in turn affects particle trajectories. The low capture rate of smaller particles is due to the particles' inability to cross the flow streamlines of neighboring cilia. Meanwhile, large particles have difficulty entering the sub-ciliary region once advected downstream, also resulting in low capture rates. The optimal range of particle sizes is enhanced when cilia beat asynchronously. These findings have potentially important implications on the design and use of biomimetic cilia in processes such as particle sorting in microfluidic devices.

  8. Asynchronicity of Facial Blood Perfusion in Migraine

    PubMed Central

    Zaproudina, Nina; Teplov, Victor; Nippolainen, Ervin; Lipponen, Jukka A.; Kamshilin, Alexei A.; Närhi, Matti; Karjalainen, Pasi A.; Giniatullin, Rashid

    2013-01-01

    Asymmetrical changes in blood perfusion and asynchronous blood supply to head tissues likely contribute to migraine pathophysiology. Imaging was widely used in order to understand hemodynamic variations in migraine. However, mapping of blood pulsations in the face of migraineurs has not been performed so far. We used the Blood Pulsation Imaging (BPI) technique, which was recently developed in our group, to establish whether 2D-imaging of blood pulsations parameters can reveal new biomarkers of migraine. BPI characteristics were measured in migraineurs during the attack-free interval and compared to healthy subjects with and without a family history of migraine. We found a novel phenomenon of transverse waves of facial blood perfusion in migraineurs in contrast to healthy subjects who showed synchronous blood delivery to both sides of the face. Moreover, the amplitude of blood pulsations was symmetrically distributed over the face of healthy subjects, but asymmetrically in migraineurs and subjects with a family history of migraine. In the migraine patients we found a remarkable correlation between the side of unilateral headache and the direction of the blood perfusion wave. Our data suggest that migraine is associated with lateralization of blood perfusion and asynchronous blood pulsations in the facial area, which could be due to essential dysfunction of the autonomic vascular control in the face. These findings may further enhance our understanding of migraine pathophysiology and suggest new easily available biomarkers of this pathology. PMID:24324592

  9. Presynaptic kainate receptors that enhance the release of GABA on CA1 hippocampal interneurons.

    PubMed

    Cossart, R; Tyzio, R; Dinocourt, C; Esclapez, M; Hirsch, J C; Ben-Ari, Y; Bernard, C

    2001-02-01

    We report that kainate receptors are present on presynaptic GABAergic terminals contacting interneurons and that their activation increases GABA release. Application of kainate increased the frequency of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents recorded in CA1 interneurons. Local applications of glutamate but not of AMPA or NMDA also increased GABA quantal release. Application of kainate as well as synaptically released glutamate reduced the number of failures of GABAergic neurotransmission between interneurons. Thus, activation of presynaptic kainate receptors increases the probability of GABA release at interneuron-interneuron synapses. Glutamate may selectively control the communication between interneurons by increasing their mutual inhibition.

  10. Asynchronous and corrected-asynchronous numerical solutions of parabolic PDES on MIMD multiprocessors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amitai, Dganit; Averbuch, Amir; Itzikowitz, Samuel; Turkel, Eli

    1991-01-01

    A major problem in achieving significant speed-up on parallel machines is the overhead involved with synchronizing the concurrent process. Removing the synchronization constraint has the potential of speeding up the computation. The authors present asynchronous (AS) and corrected-asynchronous (CA) finite difference schemes for the multi-dimensional heat equation. Although the discussion concentrates on the Euler scheme for the solution of the heat equation, it has the potential for being extended to other schemes and other parabolic partial differential equations (PDEs). These schemes are analyzed and implemented on the shared memory multi-user Sequent Balance machine. Numerical results for one and two dimensional problems are presented. It is shown experimentally that the synchronization penalty can be about 50 percent of run time: in most cases, the asynchronous scheme runs twice as fast as the parallel synchronous scheme. In general, the efficiency of the parallel schemes increases with processor load, with the time level, and with the problem dimension. The efficiency of the AS may reach 90 percent and over, but it provides accurate results only for steady-state values. The CA, on the other hand, is less efficient, but provides more accurate results for intermediate (non steady-state) values.

  11. A Block-Asynchronous Relaxation Method for Graphics Processing Units

    SciTech Connect

    Antz, Hartwig; Tomov, Stanimire; Dongarra, Jack; Heuveline, Vincent

    2011-11-30

    In this paper, we analyze the potential of asynchronous relaxation methods on Graphics Processing Units (GPUs). For this purpose, we developed a set of asynchronous iteration algorithms in CUDA and compared them with a parallel implementation of synchronous relaxation methods on CPU-based systems. For a set of test matrices taken from the University of Florida Matrix Collection we monitor the convergence behavior, the average iteration time and the total time-to-solution time. Analyzing the results, we observe that even for our most basic asynchronous relaxation scheme, despite its lower convergence rate compared to the Gauss-Seidel relaxation (that we expected), the asynchronous iteration running on GPUs is still able to provide solution approximations of certain accuracy in considerably shorter time then Gauss- Seidel running on CPUs. Hence, it overcompensates for the slower convergence by exploiting the scalability and the good fit of the asynchronous schemes for the highly parallel GPU architectures. Further, enhancing the most basic asynchronous approach with hybrid schemes – using multiple iterations within the ”subdomain” handled by a GPU thread block and Jacobi-like asynchronous updates across the ”boundaries”, subject to tuning various parameters – we manage to not only recover the loss of global convergence but often accelerate convergence of up to two times (compared to the effective but difficult to parallelize Gauss-Seidel type of schemes), while keeping the execution time of a global iteration practically the same. This shows the high potential of the asynchronous methods not only as a stand alone numerical solver for linear systems of equations fulfilling certain convergence conditions but more importantly as a smoother in multigrid methods. Due to the explosion of parallelism in todays architecture designs, the significance and the need for asynchronous methods, as the ones described in this work, is expected to grow.

  12. Asynchronous parallel pattern search for nonlinear optimization

    SciTech Connect

    P. D. Hough; T. G. Kolda; V. J. Torczon

    2000-01-01

    Parallel pattern search (PPS) can be quite useful for engineering optimization problems characterized by a small number of variables (say 10--50) and by expensive objective function evaluations such as complex simulations that take from minutes to hours to run. However, PPS, which was originally designed for execution on homogeneous and tightly-coupled parallel machine, is not well suited to the more heterogeneous, loosely-coupled, and even fault-prone parallel systems available today. Specifically, PPS is hindered by synchronization penalties and cannot recover in the event of a failure. The authors introduce a new asynchronous and fault tolerant parallel pattern search (AAPS) method and demonstrate its effectiveness on both simple test problems as well as some engineering optimization problems

  13. Ultrawideband asynchronous tracking system and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, G. Dickey (Inventor); Ngo, Phong H. (Inventor); Phan, Chau T. (Inventor); Gross, Julia A. (Inventor); Ni, Jianjun (Inventor); Dusl, John (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A passive tracking system is provided with a plurality of ultrawideband (UWB) receivers that is asynchronous with respect to a UWB transmitter. A geometry of the tracking system may utilize a plurality of clusters with each cluster comprising a plurality of antennas. Time Difference of Arrival (TDOA) may be determined for the antennas in each cluster and utilized to determine Angle of Arrival (AOA) based on a far field assumption regarding the geometry. Parallel software communication sockets may be established with each of the plurality of UWB receivers. Transfer of waveform data may be processed by alternately receiving packets of waveform data from each UWB receiver. Cross Correlation Peak Detection (CCPD) is utilized to estimate TDOA information to reduce errors in a noisy, multipath environment.

  14. Scalable asynchronous execution of cellular automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folino, Gianluigi; Giordano, Andrea; Mastroianni, Carlo

    2016-10-01

    The performance and scalability of cellular automata, when executed on parallel/distributed machines, are limited by the necessity of synchronizing all the nodes at each time step, i.e., a node can execute only after the execution of the previous step at all the other nodes. However, these synchronization requirements can be relaxed: a node can execute one step after synchronizing only with the adjacent nodes. In this fashion, different nodes can execute different time steps. This can be a notable advantageous in many novel and increasingly popular applications of cellular automata, such as smart city applications, simulation of natural phenomena, etc., in which the execution times can be different and variable, due to the heterogeneity of machines and/or data and/or executed functions. Indeed, a longer execution time at a node does not slow down the execution at all the other nodes but only at the neighboring nodes. This is particularly advantageous when the nodes that act as bottlenecks vary during the application execution. The goal of the paper is to analyze the benefits that can be achieved with the described asynchronous implementation of cellular automata, when compared to the classical all-to-all synchronization pattern. The performance and scalability have been evaluated through a Petri net model, as this model is very useful to represent the synchronization barrier among nodes. We examined the usual case in which the territory is partitioned into a number of regions, and the computation associated with a region is assigned to a computing node. We considered both the cases of mono-dimensional and two-dimensional partitioning. The results show that the advantage obtained through the asynchronous execution, when compared to the all-to-all synchronous approach is notable, and it can be as large as 90% in terms of speedup.

  15. Selective-field-ionization dynamics of a lithium m=2 Rydberg state: Landau-Zener model versus quantal approach

    SciTech Connect

    Foerre, M.; Hansen, J.P.

    2003-05-01

    The selective-field-ionization (SFI) dynamics of a Rydberg state of lithium with magnetic quantum number m=2 is studied in detail based on two different theoretical models: (1) a close coupling integration of the Schroedinger equation and (2) the multichannel (incoherent) Landau-Zener (MLZ) model. The m=2 states are particularly interesting, since they define a border zone between fully adiabatic (m=0,1) and fully diabatic (m>2) ionization dynamics. Both sets of calculations are performed up to, and above, the classical ionization limit. It is found that the MLZ model is excellent in the description of the fully diabatic dynamics while certain discrepancies between the time dependent quantal amplitudes appear when the dynamics become involved. Thus, in this region, the analysis of experimental SFI spectra should be performed with care.

  16. Modeling and Analysis of Mixed Synchronous/Asynchronous Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Driscoll, Kevin R.; Madl. Gabor; Hall, Brendan

    2012-01-01

    Practical safety-critical distributed systems must integrate safety critical and non-critical data in a common platform. Safety critical systems almost always consist of isochronous components that have synchronous or asynchronous interface with other components. Many of these systems also support a mix of synchronous and asynchronous interfaces. This report presents a study on the modeling and analysis of asynchronous, synchronous, and mixed synchronous/asynchronous systems. We build on the SAE Architecture Analysis and Design Language (AADL) to capture architectures for analysis. We present preliminary work targeted to capture mixed low- and high-criticality data, as well as real-time properties in a common Model of Computation (MoC). An abstract, but representative, test specimen system was created as the system to be modeled.

  17. A Comparison of Distance Education Competencies Delivered Synchronously and Asynchronously.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dooley, Kim E.; Lindner, James R.; Richards, Lance J.

    2003-01-01

    Comparison of agriculture courses delivered synchronously via interactive television (20 students) and asynchronously via the Web (22 students) showed similar achievement of core distance education competencies: adult learning, technology knowledge, instructional design, communication skills, graphic design, administration) regardless of delivery…

  18. Calmodulin increases transmitter release by mobilizing quanta at the frog motor nerve terminal.

    PubMed

    Brailoiu, Eugen; Miyamoto, Michael D; Dun, Nae J

    2002-11-01

    The role of calmodulin (CaM) in transmitter release was investigated using liposomes to deliver CaM and monoclonal antibodies against CaM (antiCaM) directly into the frog motor nerve terminal. Miniature endplate potentials (MEPPs) were recorded in a high K+ solution, and effects on transmitter release were monitored using estimates of the quantal release parameters m (number of quanta released), n (number of functional transmitter release sites), p (mean probability of release), and var(s) p (spatial variance in p). Administration of CaM, but not heat-inactivated CaM, encapsulated in liposomes (1000 units ml(-1)) produced an increase in m (25%) that was due to an increase in n. MEPP amplitude was not altered by CaM. Administration of antiCaM, but not heat-inactivated antiCaM, in liposomes (50 microl ml(-1)) produced a progressive decrease in m (40%) that was associated with decreases in n and p. MEPP amplitude was decreased (15%) after a 25 min lag time, suggesting a separation in time between the decreases in quantal release and quantal size. Bath application of the membrane-permeable CaM antagonist W7 (28 microM) produced a gradual decrease in m (25%) that was associated with a decrease in n. W7 also produced a decrease in MEPP amplitude that paralleled the decrease in m. The decreases in MEPP size and m produced by W7 were both reversed by addition of CaM. Our results suggest that CaM increases transmitter release by mobilizing synaptic vesicles at the frog motor nerve terminal.

  19. Asynchronous origins of ectomycorrhizal clades of Agaricales.

    PubMed

    Ryberg, Martin; Matheny, P Brandon

    2012-05-22

    The ectomycorrhizal (ECM) symbiosis is the most widespread biotrophic nutritional mode in mushroom-forming fungi. ECM fungi include, though are not limited to, about 5000 described species of Agaricales from numerous, independently evolved lineages. Two central hypotheses suggest different explanations for the origin of ECM fungal diversity: (i) dual origins, initially with the Pinaceae in the Jurassic and later with angiosperms during the Late Cretaceous, and (ii) a simultaneous and convergent radiation of ECM lineages in response to cooling climate during the Palaeogene and advancing temperate ECM plant communities. Neither of these hypotheses is supported here. While we demonstrate support for asynchronous origins of ECM Agaricales, the timing of such events appears to have occurred more recently than suggested by the first hypothesis, first during the Cretaceous and later during the Palaeogene. We are also unable to reject models of rate constancy, which suggests that the diversity of ECM Agaricales is not a consequence of convergent rapid radiations following evolutionary transitions from saprotrophic to ECM habits. ECM lineages of Agaricales differ not only in age, but also in rates of diversification and rate of substitution at nuclear ribosomal RNA loci. These results question the biological uniformity of the ECM guild.

  20. Parallel asynchronous systems and image processing algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coon, D. D.; Perera, A. G. U.

    1989-01-01

    A new hardware approach to implementation of image processing algorithms is described. The approach is based on silicon devices which would permit an independent analog processing channel to be dedicated to evey pixel. A laminar architecture consisting of a stack of planar arrays of the device would form a two-dimensional array processor with a 2-D array of inputs located directly behind a focal plane detector array. A 2-D image data stream would propagate in neuronlike asynchronous pulse coded form through the laminar processor. Such systems would integrate image acquisition and image processing. Acquisition and processing would be performed concurrently as in natural vision systems. The research is aimed at implementation of algorithms, such as the intensity dependent summation algorithm and pyramid processing structures, which are motivated by the operation of natural vision systems. Implementation of natural vision algorithms would benefit from the use of neuronlike information coding and the laminar, 2-D parallel, vision system type architecture. Besides providing a neural network framework for implementation of natural vision algorithms, a 2-D parallel approach could eliminate the serial bottleneck of conventional processing systems. Conversion to serial format would occur only after raw intensity data has been substantially processed. An interesting challenge arises from the fact that the mathematical formulation of natural vision algorithms does not specify the means of implementation, so that hardware implementation poses intriguing questions involving vision science.

  1. Asynchronous electrical activity in epileptic seizures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holman, Katherine; Lim, Eugene; Gliske, Stephen; Stacey, William; Fink, Christian

    High-frequency oscillations (HFOs) have been postulated to be potential biomarkers for focal epileptic seizures, with fast ripples (>250 Hz) as the most interesting candidate. The mechanisms underlying the generation of fast ripples, however, are not well understood. In this study, we draw upon results from previous computational studies on HFOs to develop a new mathematical model from first principles describing the generation of HFOs through asynchronous neuronal firing. Asynchrony in the model is obtained with the introduction of two parameters of heterogeneity: variability in the inter-spike interval (ISI) and jitter. The model predicts the generation of harmonic narrow-band oscillations if the heterogeneity-governing parameters do not differ from the predefined ISI by more than 20%. Comparisons against results from a separately constructed computational model verify the accuracy of the model in study. These results provide us with a rigorous framework in which we may investigate the mechanisms driving the generation of abnormal HFOs, and may serve as groundwork for future research in epileptogenesis. Nsf Grant 1003992, Ohio Wesleyan University SSRP.

  2. Asynchronous event-based hebbian epipolar geometry.

    PubMed

    Benosman, Ryad; Ieng, Sio-Hoï; Rogister, Paul; Posch, Christoph

    2011-11-01

    Epipolar geometry, the cornerstone of perspective stereo vision, has been studied extensively since the advent of computer vision. Establishing such a geometric constraint is of primary importance, as it allows the recovery of the 3-D structure of scenes. Estimating the epipolar constraints of nonperspective stereo is difficult, they can no longer be defined because of the complexity of the sensor geometry. This paper will show that these limitations are, to some extent, a consequence of the static image frames commonly used in vision. The conventional frame-based approach suffers from a lack of the dynamics present in natural scenes. We introduce the use of neuromorphic event-based--rather than frame-based--vision sensors for perspective stereo vision. This type of sensor uses the dimension of time as the main conveyor of information. In this paper, we present a model for asynchronous event-based vision, which is then used to derive a general new concept of epipolar geometry linked to the temporal activation of pixels. Practical experiments demonstrate the validity of the approach, solving the problem of estimating the fundamental matrix applied, in a first stage, to classic perspective vision and then to more general cameras. Furthermore, this paper shows that the properties of event-based vision sensors allow the exploration of not-yet-defined geometric relationships, finally, we provide a definition of general epipolar geometry deployable to almost any visual sensor.

  3. Asynchronous Rate Chaos in Spiking Neuronal Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Harish, Omri; Hansel, David

    2015-01-01

    The brain exhibits temporally complex patterns of activity with features similar to those of chaotic systems. Theoretical studies over the last twenty years have described various computational advantages for such regimes in neuronal systems. Nevertheless, it still remains unclear whether chaos requires specific cellular properties or network architectures, or whether it is a generic property of neuronal circuits. We investigate the dynamics of networks of excitatory-inhibitory (EI) spiking neurons with random sparse connectivity operating in the regime of balance of excitation and inhibition. Combining Dynamical Mean-Field Theory with numerical simulations, we show that chaotic, asynchronous firing rate fluctuations emerge generically for sufficiently strong synapses. Two different mechanisms can lead to these chaotic fluctuations. One mechanism relies on slow I-I inhibition which gives rise to slow subthreshold voltage and rate fluctuations. The decorrelation time of these fluctuations is proportional to the time constant of the inhibition. The second mechanism relies on the recurrent E-I-E feedback loop. It requires slow excitation but the inhibition can be fast. In the corresponding dynamical regime all neurons exhibit rate fluctuations on the time scale of the excitation. Another feature of this regime is that the population-averaged firing rate is substantially smaller in the excitatory population than in the inhibitory population. This is not necessarily the case in the I-I mechanism. Finally, we discuss the neurophysiological and computational significance of our results. PMID:26230679

  4. The effect of calcium ions on the binomial statistic parameters that control acetylcholine release at preganglionic nerve terminals.

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, M R; Florin, T; Pettigrew, A G

    1976-01-01

    1. A study has been made of the effects of changing [Ca]O and [Mg]O on the binomial statistic parameters p and n that control the average quantal content (m) of the excitatory post-synaptic potential (e.p.s.p.) due to acetylcholine release at preganglionic nerve terminals. 2. When [Ca]O was increased in the range from 0-2 to 0-5 mM, p increased as the first power of [Ca]O whereas n increased as the 0-5 power of [Ca]O; when [Mg]O was increased in the range from 5 to 200 mM, p decreased as the first power of [Mg]O whereas n decreased as the 0-5 power of [Mg]O. 3. The increase in quantal release of a test impulse following a conditioning impulse was primarily due to an increase in n; the increase in quantal content of successive e.p.s.p.s in a short train was due to an increase in n and p, and the increase in n was quantitatively described in terms of the accumulation of a Ca-receptor complex in the nerve terminal. 4. The decrease in quantal content of successive e.p.s.p.s during long trains of impulses over several minutes was primarily due to a decrease in n. These results are discussed in terms of an hypothesis concerning the physical basis of n and p in the release process. PMID:181562

  5. Gigabit Ethernet Asynchronous Clock Compensation FIFO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duhachek, Jeff

    2012-01-01

    Clock compensation for Gigabit Ethernet is necessary because the clock recovered from the 1.25 Gb/s serial data stream has the potential to be 200 ppm slower or faster than the system clock. The serial data is converted to 10-bit parallel data at a 125 MHz rate on a clock recovered from the serial data stream. This recovered data needs to be processed by a system clock that is also running at a nominal rate of 125 MHz, but not synchronous to the recovered clock. To cross clock domains, an asynchronous FIFO (first-in-first-out) is used, with the write pointer (wprt) in the recovered clock domain and the read pointer (rptr) in the system clock domain. Because the clocks are generated from separate sources, there is potential for FIFO overflow or underflow. Clock compensation in Gigabit Ethernet is possible by taking advantage of the protocol data stream features. There are two distinct data streams that occur in Gigabit Ethernet where identical data is transmitted for a period of time. The first is configuration, which happens during auto-negotiation. The second is idle, which occurs at the end of auto-negotiation and between every packet. The identical data in the FIFO can be repeated by decrementing the read pointer, thus compensating for a FIFO that is draining too fast. The identical data in the FIFO can also be skipped by incrementing the read pointer, which compensates for a FIFO draining too slowly. The unique and novel features of this FIFO are that it works in both the idle stream and the configuration streams. The increment or decrement of the read pointer is different in the idle and compensation streams to preserve disparity. Another unique feature is that the read pointer to write pointer difference range changes between compensation and idle to minimize FIFO latency during packet transmission.

  6. Simulating fail-stop in asynchronous distributed systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabel, Laura; Marzullo, Keith

    1994-01-01

    The fail-stop failure model appears frequently in the distributed systems literature. However, in an asynchronous distributed system, the fail-stop model cannot be implemented. In particular, it is impossible to reliably detect crash failures in an asynchronous system. In this paper, we show that it is possible to specify and implement a failure model that is indistinguishable from the fail-stop model from the point of view of any process within an asynchronous system. We give necessary conditions for a failure model to be indistinguishable from the fail-stop model, and derive lower bounds on the amount of process replication needed to implement such a failure model. We present a simple one-round protocol for implementing one such failure model, which we call simulated fail-stop.

  7. Towards mitigating Asynchronous Computing effects in largescale simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittal, Ankita; Girimaji, Sharath

    2016-11-01

    Synchronization of processing elements (PEs) in massively parallel simulations has shown to significantly affect scalability of scientific applications. Relaxing this synchronization among PEs (asynchronous) conserves the stability condition but severely affects the accuracy reducing the average error to first-order regardless of the original scheme. At the present time, several approaches are under consideration to improve the order of asynchronous computations. In this work, we propose to modify the original governing equation to obtain a Proxy-Equation which when solved asynchronously recovers the order of accuracy of the original numerical scheme. Performing 1D simulations for the Advection Diffusion Equation, we observe that the wave speed and the viscosity must be increased in the vicinity of PE boundaries in order to counteract the effect of asynchrony. In addition to recovering accuracy, this method shows lower magnitudes of average error when compared to existing asynchrony-tolerant methods. Similar results are also presented for a 1D viscous Burgers equation.

  8. Dynamic modelling and estimation of the error due to asynchronism in a redundant asynchronous multiprocessor system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huynh, Loc C.; Duval, R. W.

    1986-01-01

    The use of Redundant Asynchronous Multiprocessor System to achieve ultrareliable Fault Tolerant Control Systems shows great promise. The development has been hampered by the inability to determine whether differences in the outputs of redundant CPU's are due to failures or to accrued error built up by slight differences in CPU clock intervals. This study derives an analytical dynamic model of the difference between redundant CPU's due to differences in their clock intervals and uses this model with on-line parameter identification to idenitify the differences in the clock intervals. The ability of this methodology to accurately track errors due to asynchronisity generate an error signal with the effect of asynchronisity removed and this signal may be used to detect and isolate actual system failures.

  9. Significance of microbial asynchronous anabolism to soil carbon dynamics driven by litter inputs

    DOE PAGES

    Fan, Zhaosheng; Liang, Chao

    2015-04-02

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) plays an important role in the global carbon cycle. However, it remains largely unknown how plant litter inputs impact magnitude, composition and source configuration of the SOC stocks over long term through microbial catabolism and anabolism, mostly due to uncoupled research on litter decomposition and SOC formation. This limits our ability to predict soil system responses to changes in land-use and climate. Here, we examine how microbes act as a valve controlling carbon sequestrated from plant litters versus released to the atmosphere in natural ecosystems amended with plant litters varying in quantity and quality. We findmore » that litter quality – not quantity – regulates long-term SOC dynamics under different plausible scenarios. Long-term changes in bulk SOC stock occur only when the quality of carbon inputs causes asynchronous change in a microbial physiological trait, defined as ‘‘microbial biosynthesis acceleration’’ (MBA). This is the first theoretical demonstration that the response of the SOC stocks to litter inputs is critically determined by the microbial physiology. Our work suggests that total SOC at an equilibrium state may be an intrinsic property of a given ecosystem, which ultimately is controlled by the asynchronous MBA between microbial functional groups.« less

  10. Significance of microbial asynchronous anabolism to soil carbon dynamics driven by litter inputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Zhaosheng; Liang, Chao

    2015-04-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) plays an important role in the global carbon cycle. However, it remains largely unknown how plant litter inputs impact magnitude, composition and source configuration of the SOC stocks over long term through microbial catabolism and anabolism, mostly due to uncoupled research on litter decomposition and SOC formation. This limits our ability to predict soil system responses to changes in land-use and climate. Here, we examine how microbes act as a valve controlling carbon sequestrated from plant litters versus released to the atmosphere in natural ecosystems amended with plant litters varying in quantity and quality. We find that litter quality - not quantity - regulates long-term SOC dynamics under different plausible scenarios. Long-term changes in bulk SOC stock occur only when the quality of carbon inputs causes asynchronous change in a microbial physiological trait, defined as ``microbial biosynthesis acceleration'' (MBA). This is the first theoretical demonstration that the response of the SOC stocks to litter inputs is critically determined by the microbial physiology. Our work suggests that total SOC at an equilibrium state may be an intrinsic property of a given ecosystem, which ultimately is controlled by the asynchronous MBA between microbial functional groups.

  11. Significance of microbial asynchronous anabolism to soil carbon dynamics driven by litter inputs

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Zhaosheng; Liang, Chao

    2015-04-02

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) plays an important role in the global carbon cycle. However, it remains largely unknown how plant litter inputs impact magnitude, composition and source configuration of the SOC stocks over long term through microbial catabolism and anabolism, mostly due to uncoupled research on litter decomposition and SOC formation. This limits our ability to predict soil system responses to changes in land-use and climate. Here, we examine how microbes act as a valve controlling carbon sequestrated from plant litters versus released to the atmosphere in natural ecosystems amended with plant litters varying in quantity and quality. We find that litter quality – not quantity – regulates long-term SOC dynamics under different plausible scenarios. Long-term changes in bulk SOC stock occur only when the quality of carbon inputs causes asynchronous change in a microbial physiological trait, defined as ‘‘microbial biosynthesis acceleration’’ (MBA). This is the first theoretical demonstration that the response of the SOC stocks to litter inputs is critically determined by the microbial physiology. Our work suggests that total SOC at an equilibrium state may be an intrinsic property of a given ecosystem, which ultimately is controlled by the asynchronous MBA between microbial functional groups.

  12. Quantal Study of the Exchange Reaction for N + N2 using an ab initio Potential Energy Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Dunyou; Stallcop, James R.; Huo, Winifred M.; Dateo, Christopher E.; Schwenke, David W.; Partridge, Harry; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The N + N2 exchange rate is calculated using a time-dependent quantum dynamics method on a newly determined ab initio potential energy surface (PES) for the ground A" state. This ab initio PES shows a double barrier feature in the interaction region with the barrier height at 47.2 kcal/mol, and a shallow well between these two barriers, with the minimum at 43.7 kcal/mol. A quantum dynamics wave packet calculation has been carried out using the fitted PES to compute the cumulative reaction probability for the exchange reaction of N + N2(J=O). The J - K shift method is then employed to obtain the rate constant for this reaction. The calculated rate constant is compared with experimental data and a recent quasi-classical calculation using a LEPS PES. Significant differences are found between the present and quasiclassical results. The present rate calculation is the first accurate 3D quantal dynamics study for N + N2 reaction system and the ab initio PES reported here is the first such surface for N3.

  13. Design issues in the semantics and scheduling of asynchronous tasks.

    SciTech Connect

    Olivier, Stephen L.

    2013-07-01

    The asynchronous task model serves as a useful vehicle for shared memory parallel programming, particularly on multicore and manycore processors. As adoption of model among programmers has increased, support has emerged for the integration of task parallel language constructs into mainstream programming languages, e.g., C and C++. This paper examines some of the design decisions in Cilk and OpenMP concerning semantics and scheduling of asynchronous tasks with the aim of informing the efforts of committees considering language integration, as well as developers of new task parallel languages and libraries.

  14. Asynchronous parallel generating set search for linearly-constrained optimization.

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Robert Michael; Griffin, Joshua D.; Kolda, Tamara Gibson

    2006-08-01

    Generating set search (GSS) is a family of direct search methods that encompasses generalized pattern search and related methods. We describe an algorithm for asynchronous linearly-constrained GSS, which has some complexities that make it different from both the asynchronous bound-constrained case as well as the synchronous linearly-constrained case. The algorithm has been implemented in the APPSPACK software framework and we present results from an extensive numerical study using CUTEr test problems. We discuss the results, both positive and negative, and conclude that GSS is a reliable method for solving small-to-medium sized linearly-constrained optimization problems without derivatives.

  15. The Influence of Asynchronous Video Communication on Learner Social Presence: A Narrative Analysis of Four Cases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borup, Jered; West, Richard E.; Graham, Charles R.

    2013-01-01

    Online courses are increasingly using asynchronous video communication. However, little is known about how asynchronous video communication influences students' communication patterns. This study presents four narratives of students with varying characteristics who engaged in asynchronous video communication. The extrovert valued the efficiency of…

  16. Striatal dopamine neurotransmission: regulation of release and uptake

    PubMed Central

    Sulzer, David; Cragg, Stephanie J.; Rice, Margaret E.

    2016-01-01

    Dopamine (DA) transmission is governed by processes that regulate release from axonal boutons in the forebrain and the somatodendritic compartment in midbrain, and by clearance by the DA transporter, diffusion, and extracellular metabolism. We review how axonal DA release is regulated by neuronal activity and by autoreceptors and heteroreceptors, and address how quantal release events are regulated in size and frequency. In brain regions densely innervated by DA axons, DA clearance is due predominantly to uptake by the DA transporter, whereas in cortex, midbrain, and other regions with relatively sparse DA inputs, the norepinephrine transporter and diffusion are involved. We discuss the role of DA uptake in restricting the sphere of influence of DA and in temporal accumulation of extracellular DA levels upon successive action potentials. The tonic discharge activity of DA neurons may be translated into a tonic extracellular DA level, whereas their bursting activity can generate discrete extracellular DA transients. PMID:27141430

  17. Readily releasable pool of synaptic vesicles measured at single synaptic contacts.

    PubMed

    Trigo, Federico F; Sakaba, Takeshi; Ogden, David; Marty, Alain

    2012-10-30

    To distinguish between different models of vesicular release in brain synapses, it is necessary to know the number of vesicles of transmitter that can be released immediately at individual synapses by a high-calcium stimulus, the readily releasable pool (RRP). We used direct stimulation by calcium uncaging at identified, single-site inhibitory synapses to investigate the statistics of vesicular release and the size of the RRP. Vesicular release, detected as quantal responses in the postsynaptic neuron, showed an unexpected stochastic variation in the number of quanta from stimulus to stimulus at high intracellular calcium, with a mean of 1.9 per stimulus and a maximum of three or four. The results provide direct measurement of the RRP at single synaptic sites. They are consistent with models in which release proceeds from a small number of vesicle docking sites with an average occupancy around 0.7.

  18. Analysis of the Relevance of Posts in Asynchronous Discussions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Azevedo, Breno T.; Reategui, Eliseo; Behar, Patrícia A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents ForumMiner, a tool for the automatic analysis of students' posts in asynchronous discussions. ForumMiner uses a text mining system to extract graphs from texts that are given to students as a basis for their discussion. These graphs contain the most relevant terms found in the texts, as well as the relationships between them.…

  19. An Investigation of Student Practices in Asynchronous Computer Conferencing Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Vanessa L.; Hewitt, Jim

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the online practices of students enrolled in graduate-level distance education courses. Using interviews and a questionnaire as data sources, the study sought to: (a) identify common practices that students adopt in asynchronous discussions, and (b) gain an understanding of why students adopt them. An analysis of the data…

  20. Reconceptualising Moderation in Asynchronous Online Discussions Using Grounded Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vlachopoulos, Panos; Cowan, John

    2010-01-01

    This article reports a grounded theory study of the moderation of asynchronous online discussions, to explore the processes by which tutors in higher education decide when and how to moderate. It aims to construct a theory of e-moderation based on some key factors which appear to influence e-moderation. It discusses previous research on the…

  1. Designs, Management Tactics, and Strategies in Asynchronous Learning Discussions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tu, Chih-Hsiung; Corry, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Discusses effective designs, management tactics, and strategies to produce ideal asynchronous network discussions that allow contemplation and encourage the development of critical thinking. A model of an online collaborative learning community is applied to implement the designs. A sample of online collaborative moderation guidelines is…

  2. Principles for Effective Asynchronous Online Instruction in Religious Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGuire, Beverley

    2017-01-01

    Asynchronous online instruction has become increasingly popular in the field of religious studies. However, despite voluminous research on online learning in general and numerous articles on online theological instruction, there has been little discussion of how to effectively design and deliver online undergraduate courses in religious studies.…

  3. Superconducting magnetic energy storage for asynchronous electrical systems

    DOEpatents

    Boenig, H.J.

    1984-05-16

    It is an object of the present invention to provide superconducting magnetic energy storage for a plurality of asynchronous electrical systems. It is a further object of the present invention to provide load leveling and stability improvement in a plurality of independent ac systems using a single superconducting magnetic energy storage coil.

  4. Toward a Classification of Discourse Patterns in Asynchronous Online Discussions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fu, Ella L. F.; van Aalst, Jan; Chan, Carol K. K.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study was to develop a classification for a range of discourse patterns that occur in text-based asynchronous discussion forums, and that can aid in the distinction of three modes of discourse: knowledge sharing, knowledge construction, and knowledge building. The dataset was taken from Knowledge Forum® databases in the Knowledge…

  5. How Do Students Participate in Synchronous and Asynchronous Online Discussions?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidson-Shivers, Gayle V.; Muilenburg, Lin Y.; Tanner, Erica J.

    2001-01-01

    Investigates how graduate students participated in online discussions over a two-week period to determine the utility of synchronous and asynchronous modes of discussion. Types and amounts of communication statements participants made in chats and threaded discussions were analyzed. Results indicate that both types of discussion are liked and…

  6. Student Moderators in Asynchronous Online Discussion: A Question of Questions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zingaro, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Much current research exalts the benefits of having students facilitate weekly discussions in asynchronous online courses. This study seeks to add to what is known about student moderation through an analysis of the types of questions students use to spur each discussion. Prior experimental work has demonstrated that the types of questions posed…

  7. Comparison of the Asynchronous Differential Evolution and JADE Minimization Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhabitsky, Mikhail

    2016-02-01

    Differential Evolution (DE) is an efficient evolutionary algorithm to solve global optimization problems. In this work we compare performance of the recently proposed Asynchronous Differential Evolution with Adaptive Correlation Matrix (ADEACM) to the widely used JADE algorithm, a DE variant with adaptive control parameters.

  8. Investigating Asynchronous Online Communication: A Connected Stance Revealed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wegmann, Susan J.; McCauley, Joyce K.

    2014-01-01

    This research project explores the effects of altering the structure of discussion board formats to increase students' engagement and participation. This paper will present the findings of a two-university, two-class research project in which asynchronous discussion board entries were analyzed for substance. By using oral discourse analysis…

  9. Language Use in Asynchronous Computer-Mediated Communication in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Daphne Li-jung

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes how Chinese-English bilinguals in Taiwan use their languages in asynchronous computer-mediated communication, specifically, via Bulletin Board System (BBS) and email. The main data includes two types: emails collected from a social network and postings collected from two BBS websites. By examining patterns of language choice…

  10. Group Learning Environment Linking Synchronous and Asynchronous Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayashi, Toshihiro; Nakanishi, Yoshinari; Hayashida, Yukuo

    This paper describes the design and features of LEA (Learning Environment with Agent), an educational system which has the features of both synchronous and asynchronous group learning environments. The first section discusses group learning environments, including differences between individual learning and group learning, and the classification…

  11. Cyber Asynchronous versus Blended Cyber Approach in Distance English Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ge, Zi-Gang

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to compare the single cyber asynchronous learning approach with the blended cyber learning approach in distance English education. Two classes of 70 students participated in this study, which lasted one semester of about four months, with one class using the blended approach for their English study and the other only using the…

  12. Experience-Based Language Learning through Asynchronous Discussion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Chi-Fen Emily

    2005-01-01

    From a social-interactionist's view of language learning, "reflective conversation" via CMC, particularly through the asynchronous mode, has been advocated (Lamy & Goodfellow, 1999). It emphasizes learning through reflection on experience and through the exchange of thoughts with others. Guided by this pedagogical model, asynchronous…

  13. Asynchronous Assessment in a Large Lecture Marketing Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downey, W. Scott; Schetzsle, Stacey

    2012-01-01

    Asynchronous assessment, which includes quizzes or exams online or outside class, offers marketing educators an opportunity to make more efficient use of class time and to enhance students' learning experiences by giving them more flexibility and choice in their assessment environment. In this paper, we examine the performance difference between…

  14. Developing a Successful Asynchronous Online Extension Program for Forest Landowners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zobrist, Kevin W.

    2014-01-01

    Asynchronous online Extension classes can reach a wide audience, is convenient for the learner, and minimizes ongoing demands on instructor time. However, producing such classes takes significant effort up front. Advance planning and good communication with contributors are essential to success. Considerations include delivery platforms, content…

  15. Reflections of Students in Their Use of Asynchronous Online Seminars

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groves, Mark; O'Donoghue, John

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on research that has been carried out into the use, process, and effectiveness of an asynchronous online seminar within an undergraduate sports studies degree programme. Contemporary sources are used to justify the use of technology supported learning (TSL) in higher education and to inform a reflective and critical account of…

  16. Asynchronous Message Passing in the JPL Flight System Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burleigh, Scott

    1996-01-01

    The flight mission simulation software in the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Flight System Testbed (FST) is a heterogeneous, distributed system that is built on an interprocess communication model of asynchronous message passing rather than remote procedure calls (RPCs). The reasoning behind this design decision is discussed; the mechanism used to implement it (.

  17. The Socratic Dialogue in Asynchronous Online Discussions: Is Constructivism Redundant?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kingsley, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to examine Socratic dialogue in asynchronous online discussions in relation to constructivism. The links between theory and practice in teaching are to be discussed whilst tracing the origins of Socratic dialogue and recent trends and use of seminar in research based institutions. Design/methodology/approach: Many online…

  18. Marital Relationships in Late Adulthood: Synchronous versus Asynchronous Couples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulik, Liat

    2001-01-01

    Studies marital relations of 469 Israeli couples, in late adulthood, categorized as synchronous (either both pre-retired or both retired) and asynchronous (one spouse working and one retired). Examines differences between the groups for division of household tasks, power relations, and quality of marriage. Martial power relations were generally…

  19. Improving the Asynchronous Online Learning Environment Using Discussion Boards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ringler, Ilene; Schubert, Carol; Deem, Jack; Flores, Jimmie; Friestad-Tate, Jill; Lockwood, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Discussion Boards are at the heart of an Asynchronous Online Learning or Distance Education Environment and can have a great impact on the learning experience. Understanding the individual factors that create a high quality discussion board experience for students and their interrelationships is critical to continuous improvement in distance…

  20. Online Graduate Education: Developing Scholars through Asynchronous Discussion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowden, Randall

    2012-01-01

    Considerable effort has been placed on understanding and enhancing online interaction to increase student learning, examine teaching strategies, and build learning communities. This research explored another aspect of interaction: the emergence of scholarship by graduate students through asynchronous discussion. Qualitative analysis of archived…

  1. Fostering Knowledge Construction in University Students through Asynchronous Discussion Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schellens, Tammy; Valcke, Martin

    2006-01-01

    Does collaborative learning in asynchronous discussion groups result in enhancing academic discourse and knowledge construction? This general research question has been researched in a study involving 300 students, working during six months in 38 electronic discussion groups. The transcripts of the discussions were coded and analysed to test…

  2. Students' Use of Asynchronous Discussions for Academic Discourse Socialization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beckett, Gulbahar H.; Amaro-Jimenez, Carla; Beckett, Kelvin S.

    2010-01-01

    Our universities are becoming increasingly diverse at the same time as online asynchronous discussions (OADs) are emerging as the most important forum for computer mediated communication (CMC) in distance education. But there is shortage of studies that explore how graduate students from different ethnic, linguistic and cultural backgrounds use…

  3. New group demodulator for bandlimited and bit asynchronous FDMA signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, K.; Kumagai, T.; Kato, S.

    1994-05-01

    The authors propose a group demodulator that employs the multisymbol chirp Fourier transform to demodulate pulse-shaped and time-asynchronous signals. Computer simulation results show that the bit error rate degradation of the proposed group demodulator at BER = 10(exp -3) is less than 0.3 dB with a 7 symbol chirp Fourier transform.

  4. Extracellular protons reduce quantal content and prolong synaptic currents at the Drosophila larval neuromuscular junction.

    PubMed

    Sandstrom, David J

    2011-10-01

    Fluctuations in extracellular pH occur in the nervous system in response to a number of physiological and pathological processes, such as ischemia, hypercapnea, and high-frequency activity. Using the Drosophila larval neuromuscular junction, the author has examined acute effects of low and high pH on excitability and synaptic transmission. Acidification rapidly and reversibly reduces the size of electrically evoked excitatory junctional currents (EJCs) in a concentration-dependent manner, with transmission nearly abolished at pH 5.0. Conversely, raising pH to 7.8 increases EJC amplitude significantly. Further elevation to pH 8.5 causes an initial increase in amplitude, followed by profound, long-lasting depression of the synapse. Amplitudes of spontaneous miniature EJCs (mEJCs) are modestly, but significantly reduced at pH 5.0. It is therefore the number of quanta released per action potential, rather than the size of individual quanta, that is most strongly affected. Decay times of both EJCs and mEJCs are dramatically lengthened at low pH, suggesting that glutamate remains in the synaptic cleft for much longer than normal. Presynaptic excitability is also reduced, as indicated by increased latency between nerve shock and EJC onset. The response to low pH was not altered by mutations in genes encoding Transient Receptor Potential, Mucolipin subfamily (TRPML) and Slowpoke ion channels, which had previously been implicated as possible targets of extracellular protons. The author concludes that extracellular protons have strong effects on the release of glutamate and the time course of synaptic currents. These phenotypes can be exploited to study the mechanisms of acid-mediated changes in neuronal function, and to pursue the way in which pH modulates synaptic function in normal and pathophysiological conditions.

  5. Design of asynchronous phase detection algorithms optimized for wide frequency response.

    PubMed

    Crespo, Daniel; Quiroga, Juan Antonio; Gomez-Pedrero, Jose Antonio

    2006-06-10

    In many fringe pattern processing applications the local phase has to be obtained from a sinusoidal irradiance signal with unknown local frequency. This process is called asynchronous phase demodulation. Existing algorithms for asynchronous phase detection, or asynchronous algorithms, have been designed to yield no algebraic error in the recovered value of the phase for any signal frequency. However, each asynchronous algorithm has a characteristic frequency response curve. Existing asynchronous algorithms present a range of frequencies with low response, reaching zero for particular values of the signal frequency. For real noisy signals, low response implies a low signal-to-noise ratio in the recovered phase and therefore unreliable results. We present a new Fourier-based methodology for designing asynchronous algorithms with any user-defined frequency response curve and known limit of algebraic error. We show how asynchronous algorithms designed with this method can have better properties for real conditions of noise and signal frequency variation.

  6. Asynchronous telehealth: a scoping review of analytic studies

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Amol; Khoja, Shariq; Lorca, Julio; McKibbon, Ann; Rizo, Carlos; Husereau, Donald; Jadad, Alejandro R

    2009-01-01

    Background Asynchronous telehealth captures clinically important digital samples (e.g., still images, video, audio, text files) and relevant data in one location and subsequently transmits these files for interpretation at a remote site by health professionals without requiring the simultaneous presence of the patient involved and his or her health care provider. Its utility in the health care system, however, still remains poorly defined. We conducted this scoping review to determine the impact of asynchronous telehealth on health outcomes, process of care, access to health services, and health resources. Methods A search was performed up to December 2006 of MEDLINE, CINAHL, HealthSTAR, the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effectiveness, and The Cochrane Library. Studies were included if they contained original data on the use of asynchronous telehealth and were published in English in a peer-reviewed journal. Two independent reviewers screened all articles and extracted data, reaching consensus on the articles and data identified. Data were extracted on general study characteristics, clinical domain, technology, setting, category of outcome, and results. Study quality (internal validity) was assessed using the Jadad scale for randomized controlled trials and the Downs and Black index for non-randomized studies. Summary data were categorized by medical specialty and presented qualitatively. Results The scoping review included 52 original studies from 238 citations identified; of these 52, almost half focused on the use of telehealth in dermatology. Included studies were characterized by diverse designs, interventions, and outcomes. Only 16 studies were judged to be of high quality. Most studies showed beneficial effects in terms of diagnostic accuracy, wait times, referral management, and satisfaction with services. Evidence on the impact of asynchronous telehealth on resource use in dermatology suggests a reduction in the number of, or avoidance of, in

  7. Asynchronous threat awareness by observer trials using crowd simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunau, Patrick; Huber, Samuel; Stein, Karin U.; Wellig, Peter

    2016-10-01

    The last few years showed that a high risk of asynchronous threats is given in every day life. Especially in large crowds a high probability of asynchronous attacks is evident. High observational abilities to detect threats are desirable. Consequently highly trained security and observation personal is needed. This paper evaluates the effectiveness of a training methodology to enhance performance of observation personnel engaging in a specific target identification task. For this purpose a crowd simulation video is utilized. The study first provides a measurement of the base performance before the training sessions. Furthermore a training procedure will be performed. Base performance will then be compared to the after training performance in order to look for a training effect. A thorough evaluation of both the training sessions as well as the overall performance will be done in this paper. A specific hypotheses based metric is used. Results will be discussed in order to provide guidelines for the design of training for observational tasks.

  8. Asynchronous Message Service for Deep Space Mission Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burleigh, Scott C.

    2006-01-01

    While the CCSDS (Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems) File Delivery Protocol (CFDP) provides internationally standardized file transfer functionality that can offer significant benefits for deep space mission operations, not all spacecraft communication requirements are necessarily best met by file transfer. In particular, continuous event-driven asynchronous message exchange may also be useful for communications with, among, and aboard spacecraft. CCSDS has therefore undertaken the development of a new Asynchronous Message Service (AMS) standard, designed to provide common functionality over a wide variety of underlying transport services, ranging from shared memory message queues to CCSDS telemetry systems. The present paper discusses the design concepts of AMS, their applicability to deep space mission operations problems, and the results of preliminary performance testing obtained from exercise of a prototype implementation.

  9. Parallel, Asynchronous Executive (PAX): System concepts, facilities, and architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. H.

    1983-01-01

    The Parallel, Asynchronous Executive (PAX) is a software operating system simulation that allows many computers to work on a single problem at the same time. PAX is currently implemented on a UNIVAC 1100/42 computer system. Independent UNIVAC runstreams are used to simulate independent computers. Data are shared among independent UNIVAC runstreams through shared mass-storage files. PAX has achieved the following: (1) applied several computing processes simultaneously to a single, logically unified problem; (2) resolved most parallel processor conflicts by careful work assignment; (3) resolved by means of worker requests to PAX all conflicts not resolved by work assignment; (4) provided fault isolation and recovery mechanisms to meet the problems of an actual parallel, asynchronous processing machine. Additionally, one real-life problem has been constructed for the PAX environment. This is CASPER, a collection of aerodynamic and structural dynamic problem simulation routines. CASPER is not discussed in this report except to provide examples of parallel-processing techniques.

  10. Asynchronous sequential circuit design using pass transistor iterative logic arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, M. N.; Maki, G. K.; Whitaker, S. R.

    1991-01-01

    The iterative logic array (ILA) is introduced as a new architecture for asynchronous sequential circuits. This is the first ILA architecture for sequential circuits reported in the literature. The ILA architecture produces a very regular circuit structure. Moreover, it is immune to both 1-1 and 0-0 crossovers and is free of hazards. This paper also presents a new critical race free STT state assignment which produces a simple form of design equations that greatly simplifies the ILA realizations.

  11. Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) Switch Technology and Vendor Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Noemi

    1995-01-01

    Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) switch and software features are described and compared in order to make switch comparisons meaningful. An ATM switch's performance cannot be measured solely based on its claimed switching capacity; traffic management and congestion control are emerging as the determining factors in an ATM network's ultimate throughput. Non-switch ATM products and experiences with actual installations of ATM networks are described. A compilation of select vendor offerings as of October 1994 is provided in chart form.

  12. Pipelined asynchronous time-division multiplexing optical bus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, S. Q.; Li, Yueming

    1997-12-01

    We propose a pipelined asynchronous time-division multiplexing optical bus. Such a bus can use one of two hardwared priority schemes: the linear priority scheme and the round-robin priority scheme. Our simulation results show that the performance of the proposed bus is significantly better than the performances of known pipelined synchronous time-division multiplexing optical buses. The possibilities of using our buses to construct multichannel switches and multidimensional processor arrays are also discussed.

  13. Asynchronous Stoichiometric Response in Lithium Iron Phosphate Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Paxton, William A.; Akdogan, E. Koray; Savkliyidiz, Ilyas; Choksi, Ankur U.; Silver, Scott X.; Tsakalokos, Thomas; Zhong, Zhong

    2014-11-11

    The operando energy-dispersive x-ray diffraction (EDXRD) was carried out on a newly formed 8 Ah lithium iron phosphate (LiFePO4) battery with the goal of elucidating the origin of asynchronous phase transformation commonly seen with in situ x-ray diffraction studies. The high-energy photons at the NSLS X17B1 beamline allow for penetration into a fully assembled battery and therefore negate any need for a specially designed in situ cell which often uses modified current collectors to minimize x-ray attenuation. Spatially-and-temporally resolved phase-mapping was conducted with a semiquantitative reference intensity ratio (RIR) analysis to estimate the relative abundance of the delithiated phase. The data show an asynchronous response in the stoichiometry versus the electrochemical profile and suggest limited diffusion in the electrode toward the end of discharge. These results confirm that the asynchronous electrode response is not just limited to specially designed cells but occurs in fully assembled cells alike. We attribute this behavior to be a consequence of performing a local measurement over a wide-area heterogeneous reaction.

  14. Non-Detection of Nova Shells Around Asynchronous Polars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagnotta, Ashley; Zurek, David

    2016-01-01

    Asynchronous polars (APs) are accreting white dwarfs (WDs) that have different WD and orbital angular velocities, unlike the rest of the known polars, which rotate synchronously (i.e., their WD and orbital angular velocities are the same). Past nova eruptions are the predicted cause of the asynchronicity, in part due to the fact that one of the APs, V1500 Cyg, was observed to undergo a nova eruption in 1975. We used the SALT 10m-class telescope and the MDM 2.4m Hiltner telescope to search for nova shells around three of the remaining four APs (V1432 Aql, BY Cam, and CD Ind) as well as one Intermediate Polar with a high asynchronicity (EX Hya). We found no evidence of nova shells in any of our images. We therefore cannot say that any of the systems besides V1500 Cyg had nova eruptions, but because not all post-nova systems have detectable shells, we also cannot exclude the possibility of a nova eruption occurring in any of these systems and knocking the rotation out of sync.

  15. Pseudo Asynchronous Level Crossing adc for ecg Signal Acquisition.

    PubMed

    Marisa, T; Niederhauser, T; Haeberlin, A; Wildhaber, R A; Vogel, R; Goette, J; Jacomet, M

    2017-02-07

    A new pseudo asynchronous level crossing analogue-to-digital converter (adc) architecture targeted for low-power, implantable, long-term biomedical sensing applications is presented. In contrast to most of the existing asynchronous level crossing adc designs, the proposed design has no digital-to-analogue converter (dac) and no continuous time comparators. Instead, the proposed architecture uses an analogue memory cell and dynamic comparators. The architecture retains the signal activity dependent sampling operation by generating events only when the input signal is changing. The architecture offers the advantages of smaller chip area, energy saving and fewer analogue system components. Beside lower energy consumption the use of dynamic comparators results in a more robust performance in noise conditions. Moreover, dynamic comparators make interfacing the asynchronous level crossing system to synchronous processing blocks simpler. The proposed adc was implemented in [Formula: see text] complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (cmos) technology, the hardware occupies a chip area of 0.0372 mm(2) and operates from a supply voltage of [Formula: see text] to [Formula: see text]. The adc's power consumption is as low as 0.6 μW with signal bandwidth from [Formula: see text] to [Formula: see text] and achieves an equivalent number of bits (enob) of up to 8 bits.

  16. Asynchronous hatching and food limitation: a test of Lack's hypothesis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Skagen, Susan Knight

    1988-01-01

    Lack’s (1954, 1968) hypothesis that asynchronous hatching of altricial birds is an adaptive response to unpredictable food shortages during the breeding season was examined in the highly granivorous Zebra Finch (Poephila guttata). I compared growth and survival of nestlings in asynchronous and artificially created synchronous brood reared under food-limited and food-abundant conditions in an aviary. I also examined the role of parental experience on survival and growth of nestlings. There was no differential mortality of Zebra Finch nestlings due to either asynchrony or food abundance. Young in abundant food treatments grew more rapidly, however, than those in food restricted treatments. Heaviest Zebra Finch nestlings in a brood grew more quickly than their lightest siblings when food was limited, supporting Lack’s hypothesis. Further, differential survival of light and heavy siblings occurred when food was abundant, suggesting that asynchronous hatching can be maladaptive under some ecological conditions. Nestlings reared by inexperienced parents suffered greater mortality and slower growth when food was abundant than nestlings raised by experienced parents. Prefledging mass was correlated with size at adulthood.

  17. A Synchronous-Asynchronous Particle Swarm Optimisation Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Ab Aziz, Nor Azlina; Mubin, Marizan; Mohamad, Mohd Saberi; Ab Aziz, Kamarulzaman

    2014-01-01

    In the original particle swarm optimisation (PSO) algorithm, the particles' velocities and positions are updated after the whole swarm performance is evaluated. This algorithm is also known as synchronous PSO (S-PSO). The strength of this update method is in the exploitation of the information. Asynchronous update PSO (A-PSO) has been proposed as an alternative to S-PSO. A particle in A-PSO updates its velocity and position as soon as its own performance has been evaluated. Hence, particles are updated using partial information, leading to stronger exploration. In this paper, we attempt to improve PSO by merging both update methods to utilise the strengths of both methods. The proposed synchronous-asynchronous PSO (SA-PSO) algorithm divides the particles into smaller groups. The best member of a group and the swarm's best are chosen to lead the search. Members within a group are updated synchronously, while the groups themselves are asynchronously updated. Five well-known unimodal functions, four multimodal functions, and a real world optimisation problem are used to study the performance of SA-PSO, which is compared with the performances of S-PSO and A-PSO. The results are statistically analysed and show that the proposed SA-PSO has performed consistently well. PMID:25121109

  18. Data Collection for Mobile Group Consumption: An Asynchronous Distributed Approach.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Weiping; Chen, Weiran; Hu, Zhejie; Li, Zuoyou; Liang, Yue; Chen, Jiaojiao

    2016-04-06

    Mobile group consumption refers to consumption by a group of people, such as a couple, a family, colleagues and friends, based on mobile communications. It differs from consumption only involving individuals, because of the complex relations among group members. Existing data collection systems for mobile group consumption are centralized, which has the disadvantages of being a performance bottleneck, having single-point failure and increasing business and security risks. Moreover, these data collection systems are based on a synchronized clock, which is often unrealistic because of hardware constraints, privacy concerns or synchronization cost. In this paper, we propose the first asynchronous distributed approach to collecting data generated by mobile group consumption. We formally built a system model thereof based on asynchronous distributed communication. We then designed a simulation system for the model for which we propose a three-layer solution framework. After that, we describe how to detect the causality relation of two/three gathering events that happened in the system based on the collected data. Various definitions of causality relations based on asynchronous distributed communication are supported. Extensive simulation results show that the proposed approach is effective for data collection relating to mobile group consumption.

  19. Asynchronous signal-dependent non-uniform sampler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Can-Cimino, Azime; Chaparro, Luis F.; Sejdić, Ervin

    2014-05-01

    Analog sparse signals resulting from biomedical and sensing network applications are typically non-stationary with frequency-varying spectra. By ignoring that the maximum frequency of their spectra is changing, uniform sampling of sparse signals collects unnecessary samples in quiescent segments of the signal. A more appropriate sampling approach would be signal-dependent. Moreover, in many of these applications power consumption and analog processing are issues of great importance that need to be considered. In this paper we present a signal dependent non-uniform sampler that uses a Modified Asynchronous Sigma Delta Modulator which consumes low-power and can be processed using analog procedures. Using Prolate Spheroidal Wave Functions (PSWF) interpolation of the original signal is performed, thus giving an asynchronous analog to digital and digital to analog conversion. Stable solutions are obtained by using modulated PSWFs functions. The advantage of the adapted asynchronous sampler is that range of frequencies of the sparse signal is taken into account avoiding aliasing. Moreover, it requires saving only the zero-crossing times of the non-uniform samples, or their differences, and the reconstruction can be done using their quantized values and a PSWF-based interpolation. The range of frequencies analyzed can be changed and the sampler can be implemented as a bank of filters for unknown range of frequencies. The performance of the proposed algorithm is illustrated with an electroencephalogram (EEG) signal.

  20. Inorganic and organic mercury chloride toxicity to Coturnix: Sensitivity related to age and quantal assessment of physiologic responses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hill, E.F.

    1982-01-01

    The toxicities of mercuric chloride (HgCl(,2)) and methylmercuric chloride (CH(,3)HgCl) were compared for coturnix (Coturnix coturnix japonica) from hatching to adulthood. Comparisons were based on: (1) Median lethal dosages (LD50) derived by administering single peroral and single intramuscular dosages of mercury, (2) median lethal concentrations (LC50) derived by feeding mercury for 5 days, (3) median toxic concentrations (TC50) derived by feeding mercury 9 weeks and measuring plasma enzyme activity, plasma electrolytes, and other blood constituents, and (4) transient changes of various blood chemistries following a single peroral dose of mercury. Acute peroral and intramuscular LD50s for HgCl(,2) and CH(,3)HgCl increased by two- to threefold for coturnix chicks from hatching to 4 weeks of age. Concomitantly, the LC50s also increased, but the important difference between test procedures was that with both single dose routes of exposure the toxicity ratios, i.e., HgCl(,2)/CH(,3)HgCl, at each age were about 2 to 2.5 compared to about 100 for the LC50s. For example, at 2 weeks of age the peroral LD50s for HgCl(,2) and CH(,3)HgCl were 42 and 18 mg/kg; the dietary LC50s were 5086 and 47 ppm for HgCl(,2) and CH(,3)HgCl. The 9 week feeding trial was not associated with gross effects from either HgCl(,2) at 0.5 to 32 ppm or CH(,3)HgCl at 0.125 to 8 ppm. However, subtle responses were detected for the plasma enzymes aspartate aminotransferase, lactate dehydrogenase, and ornithine carbamoyl transferase and could be quantified by probit analysis. This quantal procedure was based on establishment of a normal value for each enzyme and classing outliers as respondents. A 'hazard index' based on the TC50 for an enzyme divided by the LD50 or LC50 was introduced. The single oral dosages of HgCl(,2) and CH(,3)HgCl showed that ratios of alanine aminotransferase, lactate dehydrogenase, and orinthine carbamoyl transferase for the liver and kidneys of adult coturnix were opposite from

  1. Inorganic and organic mercury chloride toxicity to Coturnix: sensitivity related to age and quantal assessment of physiologic responses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hill, E.F.

    1981-01-01

    The toxicities of mercuric chloride (HgCl(,2)) and methylmercuric chloride (CH(,3)HgCl) were compared for coturnix (Coturnix coturnix japonica) from hatching to adulthood. Comparisons were based on: (1) Median lethal dosages (LD50) derived by administering single peroral and single intramuscular dosages of mercury, (2) median lethal concentrations (LC50) derived by feeding mercury for 5 days, (3) median toxic concentrations (TC50) derived by feeding mercury 9 weeks and measuring plasma enzyme activity, plasma electrolytes, and other blood constituents, and (4) transient changes of various blood chemistries following a single peroral dose of mercury. Acute peroral and intramuscular LD50s for HgCl(,2) and CH(,3)HgCl increased by two- to threefold for coturnix chicks from hatching to 4 weeks of age. Concomitantly, the LC50s also increased, but the important difference between test procedures was that with both single dose routes of exposure the toxicity ratios, i.e., HgCl(,2)/CH(,3)HgCl, at each age were about 2 to 2.5 compared to about 100 for the LC50s. For example, at 2 weeks of age the peroral LD50s for HgCl(,2) and CH(,3)HgCl were 42 and 18 mg/kg; the dietary LC50s were 5086 and 47 ppm for HgCl(,2) and CH(,3)HgCl. The 9 week feeding trial was not associated with gross effects from either HgCl(,2) at 0.5 to 32 ppm or CH(,3)HgCl at 0.125 to 8 ppm. However, subtle responses were detected for the plasma enzymes aspartate aminotransferase, lactate dehydrogenase, and ornithine carbamoyl transferase and could be quantified by probit analysis. This quantal procedure was based on establishment of a normal value for each enzyme and classing outliers as respondents. A 'hazard index' based on the TC50 for an enzyme divided by the LD50 or LC50 was introduced. The single oral dosages of HgCl(,2) and CH(,3)HgCl showed that ratios of alanine aminotransferase, lactate dehydrogenase, and orinthine carbamoyl transferase for the liver and kidneys of adult coturnix were opposite from

  2. Mechanisms, pools, and sites of spontaneous vesicle release at synapses of rod and cone photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Cork, Karlene M; Van Hook, Matthew J; Thoreson, Wallace B

    2016-08-01

    Photoreceptors have depolarized resting potentials that stimulate calcium-dependent release continuously from a large vesicle pool but neurons can also release vesicles without stimulation. We characterized the Ca(2+) dependence, vesicle pools, and release sites involved in spontaneous release at photoreceptor ribbon synapses. In whole-cell recordings from light-adapted horizontal cells (HCs) of tiger salamander retina, we detected miniature excitatory post-synaptic currents (mEPSCs) when no stimulation was applied to promote exocytosis. Blocking Ca(2+) influx by lowering extracellular Ca(2+) , by application of Cd(2+) and other agents reduced the frequency of mEPSCs but did not eliminate them, indicating that mEPSCs can occur independently of Ca(2+) . We also measured release presynaptically from rods and cones by examining quantal glutamate transporter anion currents. Presynaptic quantal event frequency was reduced by Cd(2+) or by increased intracellular Ca(2+) buffering in rods, but not in cones, that were voltage clamped at -70 mV. By inhibiting the vesicle cycle with bafilomycin, we found the frequency of mEPSCs declined more rapidly than the amplitude of evoked excitatory post-synaptic currents (EPSCs) suggesting a possible separation between vesicle pools in evoked and spontaneous exocytosis. We mapped sites of Ca(2+) -independent release using total internal reflectance fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy to visualize fusion of individual vesicles loaded with dextran-conjugated pHrodo. Spontaneous release in rods occurred more frequently at non-ribbon sites than evoked release events. The function of Ca(2+) -independent spontaneous release at continuously active photoreceptor synapses remains unclear, but the low frequency of spontaneous quanta limits their impact on noise.

  3. Target cell-dependent normalization of transmitter release at neocortical synapses.

    PubMed

    Koester, Helmut J; Johnston, Daniel

    2005-05-06

    The efficacy and short-term modification of neocortical synaptic connections vary with the type of target neuron. We investigated presynaptic Ca2+ and release probability at single synaptic contacts between pairs of neurons in layer 2/3 of the rat neocortex. The amplitude of Ca2+ signals in boutons of pyramids contacting bitufted or multipolar interneurons or other pyramids was dependent on the target cell type. Optical quantal analysis at single synaptic contacts suggested that release probabilities are also target cell-specific. Both the Ca2+ signal and the release probability of different boutons of a pyramid contacting the same target cell varied little. We propose that the mechanisms that regulate the functional properties of boutons of a pyramid normalize the presynaptic Ca2+ influx and release probability for all those boutons that innervate the same target cell.

  4. Mimicking Neurotransmitter Release in Chemical Synapses via Hysteresis Engineering in MoS2 Transistors.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Andrew J; Razavieh, Ali; Nasr, Joseph R; Schulman, Daniel S; Eichfeld, Chad M; Das, Saptarshi

    2017-03-28

    Neurotransmitter release in chemical synapses is fundamental to diverse brain functions such as motor action, learning, cognition, emotion, perception, and consciousness. Moreover, improper functioning or abnormal release of neurotransmitter is associated with numerous neurological disorders such as epilepsy, sclerosis, schizophrenia, Alzheimer's disease, and Parkinson's disease. We have utilized hysteresis engineering in a back-gated MoS2 field effect transistor (FET) in order to mimic such neurotransmitter release dynamics in chemical synapses. All three essential features, i.e., quantal, stochastic, and excitatory or inhibitory nature of neurotransmitter release, were accurately captured in our experimental demonstration. We also mimicked an important phenomenon called long-term potentiation (LTP), which forms the basis of human memory. Finally, we demonstrated how to engineer the LTP time by operating the MoS2 FET in different regimes. Our findings could provide a critical component toward the design of next-generation smart and intelligent human-like machines and human-machine interfaces.

  5. The elusive quantal individual

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groenewold, H. J.

    1985-10-01

    In the formal hedgehog representation of quantum mechanics [5] (ambiguous) weights are derived for hedgehogs with a finite number of questions and answers, in particular applied to spin {1}/{2} and to correlated spin {1}/{2} pairs. Unavoidable negative weights are a clear signal for conceptual difficulties in quantum mechanical interpretation. If these weights had been presupposed to be non-negative, they could have led to Bell-like inequalities inconsistent with quantum mechanics. This is what has happened already in various special models. Owing to the indefinite weights, the hedgehog hypothesis of one-to-one mapping between individual physical samples and individual fictitious hedgehogs cannot be maintained. If no physical interpretation is conceived for the negative weights, the only way to avoid unsolved conceptual difficulties appears to resign (even in the hedgehog representation) to the skeptical ensemble interpretation [1], without theorizing about individual physical samples at all.

  6. Do sympathetic nerves release noradrenaline in "quanta"?

    PubMed

    Stjärne, L

    2000-07-03

    The discovery of excitatory junction potentials (EJPs) in guinea-pig vas deferens by Burnstock and Holman (1960) showed for the first time that a sympathetic transmitter, now known to be ATP, is secreted in "quanta". As it was assumed at the time that EJPS are triggered by noradrenaline, this discovery led to attempts to use the fractional overflow of noradrenaline from sympathetically innervated tissues to assess, indirectly, the number of noradrenaline molecules in the average "quantum". The basic finding was that each pulse released 1/50000 of the tissue content of noradrenaline, when reuptake was blocked and prejunctional alpha(2)-adrenoceptors were intact. This provided the constraints, two extreme alternatives: (i) each pulse releases 0.2-3% of the content of a vesicle from all varicosities, or (ii) each pulse releases the whole content of a vesicle from 0.2 to 3% of the varicosities. New techniques have made it possible to address questions about the release probability in individual sites, or the "quantal" size, more directly. Results by optical (comparison of the labelling of SV2 and synaptotagmin, proteins in the membrane of transmitter vesicles), electrophysiological (excitatory junction currents, EJCs, at single visualized varicosities) and amperometric (the noradrenaline oxidation current at a carbon fibre electrode) methods reveal that transmitter exocytosis in varicosities is intermittent. The EJC and noradrenaline oxidation current responses (in rat arteries) to a train of single pulses were observed to be similar in intermittency and amplitude fluctuation. This suggests that they are caused by exocytosis of single or very few "quanta" of ATP and noradrenaline, respectively, equal to the contents of single vesicles, from a small population of release sites. These findings support, but do not conclusively prove the validity of the "intermittent" model of noradrenaline release. The question if noradrenaline is always secreted in packets of preset size

  7. Quantal components of unitary EPSCs at the mossy fibre synapse on CA3 pyramidal cells of rat hippocampus.

    PubMed Central

    Jonas, P; Major, G; Sakmann, B

    1993-01-01

    2+), excluding failures, was 1 nS. Reducing the Ca2+ concentration and increasing the Mg2+ concentration reduced the mean peak amplitude in a concentration-dependent manner. 6. Peaks in EPSC peak amplitude distributions were apparent in low Ca2+ and high Mg2+. Using the criteria of equidistance and the presence of peaks and dips in the autocorrelation function, five of nine EPSC peak amplitude distributions were judged to be quantal.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) Images Fig. 16 PMID:7908327

  8. Asynchronous Laser Transponders for Precise Interplanetary Ranging and Time Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degnan, John J.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The feasibility of a two-way asynchronous (i.e. independently firing) interplanetary laser transponder pair, capable of decimeter ranging and subnanosecond time transfer from Earth to a spacecraft anywhere within the inner Solar System, is discussed. In the Introduction, we briefly discuss the current state-of-the-art in Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) and Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR) which use single-ended range measurements to a passive optical reflector, and the limitations of this approach in ranging beyond the Moon to the planets. In Section 2 of this paper, we describe two types of transponders (echo and asynchronous), introduce the transponder link equation and the concept of "balanced" transponders, describe how range and time can be transferred between terminals, and preview the potential advantages of photon counting asynchronous transponders for interplanetary applications. In Section 3, we discuss and provide mathematical models for the various sources of noise in an interplanetary transponder link including planetary albedo, solar or lunar illumination of the local atmosphere, and laser backscatter off the local atmosphere. In Section 4, we introduce the key engineering elements of an interplanetary laser transponder and develop an operational scenario for the acquisition and tracking of the opposite terminal. In Section 5, we use the theoretical models of th previous sections to perform an Earth-Mars link analysis over a full synodic period of 780 days under the simplifying assumption of coaxial, coplanar, circular orbits. We demonstrate that, using slightly modified versions of existing space and ground based laser systems, an Earth-Mars transponder link is not only feasible but quite robust. We also demonstrate through analysis the advantages and feasibility of compact, low output power (<300 mW photon-counting transponders using NASA's developmental SLR2000 satellite laser ranging system as the Earth terminal. Section 6 provides a summary of the results

  9. A wavelet approach to binary blackholes with asynchronous multitasking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Hyun; Hirschmann, Eric; Neilsen, David; Anderson, Matthew; Debuhr, Jackson; Zhang, Bo

    2016-03-01

    Highly accurate simulations of binary black holes and neutron stars are needed to address a variety of interesting problems in relativistic astrophysics. We present a new method for the solving the Einstein equations (BSSN formulation) using iterated interpolating wavelets. Wavelet coefficients provide a direct measure of the local approximation error for the solution and place collocation points that naturally adapt to features of the solution. Further, they exhibit exponential convergence on unevenly spaced collection points. The parallel implementation of the wavelet simulation framework presented here deviates from conventional practice in combining multi-threading with a form of message-driven computation sometimes referred to as asynchronous multitasking.

  10. Using process groups to implement failure detection in asynchronous environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricciardi, Aleta M.; Birman, Kenneth P.

    1991-01-01

    Agreement on the membership of a group of processes in a distributed system is a basic problem that arises in a wide range of applications. Such groups occur when a set of processes cooperate to perform some task, share memory, monitor one another, subdivide a computation, and so forth. The group membership problems is discussed as it relates to failure detection in asynchronous, distributed systems. A rigorous, formal specification for group membership is presented under this interpretation. A solution is then presented for this problem.

  11. RAPID COMMUNICATION: Asynchronous data-driven classification of weapon systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Xin; Mukherjee, Kushal; Gupta, Shalabh; Ray, Asok; Phoha, Shashi; Damarla, Thyagaraju

    2009-12-01

    This communication addresses real-time weapon classification by analysis of asynchronous acoustic data, collected from microphones on a sensor network. The weapon classification algorithm consists of two parts: (i) feature extraction from time-series data using symbolic dynamic filtering (SDF), and (ii) pattern classification based on the extracted features using the language measure (LM) and support vector machine (SVM). The proposed algorithm has been tested on field data, generated by firing of two types of rifles. The results of analysis demonstrate high accuracy and fast execution of the pattern classification algorithm with low memory requirements. Potential applications include simultaneous shooter localization and weapon classification with soldier-wearable networked sensors.

  12. A Verification System for Distributed Objects with Asynchronous Method Calls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahrendt, Wolfgang; Dylla, Maximilian

    We present a verification system for Creol, an object-oriented modeling language for concurrent distributed applications. The system is an instance of KeY, a framework for object-oriented software verification, which has so far been applied foremost to sequential Java. Building on KeY characteristic concepts, like dynamic logic, sequent calculus, explicit substitutions, and the taclet rule language, the system presented in this paper addresses functional correctness of Creol models featuring local cooperative thread parallelism and global communication via asynchronous method calls. The calculus heavily operates on communication histories which describe the interfaces of Creol units. Two example scenarios demonstrate the usage of the system.

  13. On the replication of Kristofferson's (1980) quantal timing for duration discrimination: some learning but no quanta and not much of a Weber constant.

    PubMed

    Matthews, William J; Grondin, Simon

    2012-07-01

    This study revisited Kristofferson's (Perception & Psychophysics 27:300-306, 1980) report showing that, with sufficient practice at interval discrimination, the relationship between timing variability and physical time is a step function-in other words, that psychological time is quantized. Two participants completed 260 sessions of a temporal discrimination task, 20 consecutive sessions for each of 13 base durations ranging from 100 to 1,480 ms. The data do not replicate Kristofferson's (Perception & Psychophysics 27:300-306, 1980) quantal finding, and it is argued that the effect Kristofferson reported may have been due to specific methodological decisions. Importantly, the data show (1) some limitation of Weber's law for time, even for the narrow range of the present investigation, and (2) that extensive training provides some modest benefit to temporal discrimination, mainly for longer intervals, and that this benefit primarily occurs in the first few sessions.

  14. Elements that Impact Facilitation of an Asynchronous Professional Learning Community: A Participatory Action Research Exploration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofer, Marilyn

    2009-01-01

    Despite that fact that the demand for asynchronous learning is booming, the literature on distance learning facilitation skills is lacking (Sherry, 1996). This study supports the premise that the use of paraphrasing strategies impacts learners in an asynchronous environment. The research question has been narrowed to inspect the particular…

  15. Integrating the Intangibles into Asynchronous Online Instruction: Strategies for Improving Interaction and Social Presence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGuire, Beverley Foulks

    2016-01-01

    This paper considers how instructors of asynchronous online courses in the Humanities might integrate intangibles associated with face-to-face instruction into their online environments. It presents a case study of asynchronous online instruction in a philosophy and religion department at a midsize public university in the southeastern United…

  16. Designing Asynchronous Online Discussion Environments: Recent Progress and Possible Future Directions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gao, Fei; Zhang, Tianyi; Franklin, Teresa

    2013-01-01

    Asynchronous online discussion environments are important platforms to support learning. Research suggests, however, threaded forums, one of the most popular asynchronous discussion environments, do not often foster productive online discussions naturally. This paper explores how certain properties of threaded forums have affected or constrained…

  17. A Multi-Perspective Investigation into Learners' Interaction in Asynchronous Computer-Mediated Communication (CMC)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Çardak, Çigdem Suzan

    2016-01-01

    This article focusses on graduate level students' interactions during asynchronous CMC activities of an online course about the teaching profession in Turkey. The instructor of the course designed and facilitated a semester-long asynchronous CMC on forum discussions, and investigated the interaction of learners in multiple perspectives: learners'…

  18. An Investigation of the Impact of Asynchronous Online Learning on Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Sylvia

    2009-01-01

    Asynchronous online learning is well documented with adults, but fewer studies of effectiveness have emphasized elementary education learning environments. This study investigated student achievement on the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) test for fifth grade students who had participated in synchronous and asynchronous courses…

  19. Designing Asynchronous, Text-Based Computer Conferences: Ten Research-Based Suggestions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choitz, Paul; Lee, Doris

    2006-01-01

    Asynchronous computer conferencing refers to the use of computer software and a network enabling participants to post messages that allow discourse to continue even though interactions may be extended over days and weeks. Asynchronous conferences are time-independent, adapting to multiple time zones and learner schedules. Such activities as…

  20. Combining Live Video and Audio Broadcasting, Synchronous Chat, and Asynchronous Open Forum Discussions in Distance Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teng, Tian-Lih; Taveras, Marypat

    2004-01-01

    This article outlines the evolution of a unique distance education program that began as a hybrid--combining face-to-face instruction with asynchronous online teaching--and evolved to become an innovative combination of synchronous education using live streaming video, audio, and chat over the Internet, blended with asynchronous online discussions…

  1. Fostering Critical Reflection in a Computer-Based, Asynchronously Delivered Diversity Training Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Givhan, Shawn T.

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation study chronicles the creation of a computer-based, asynchronously delivered diversity training course for a state agency. The course format enabled efficient delivery of a mandatory curriculum to the Massachusetts Department of State Police workforce. However, the asynchronous format posed a challenge to achieving the learning…

  2. Exploring the Effect of Scripted Roles on Cognitive Presence in Asynchronous Online Discussions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olesova, Larisa; Slavin, Margaret; Lim, Jieun

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the effect of scripted roles on students' level of cognitive presence in asynchronous online threaded discussions. A quantitative content analysis was used to investigate: (1) what level of cognitive presence is achieved by students' assigned roles in asynchronous online discussions; (2) differences…

  3. Anonymity and Motivation in Asynchronous Discussions and L2 Vocabulary Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polat, Nihat; Mancilla, Rae; Mahalingappa, Laura

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates L2 attainment in asynchronous online environments, specifically possible relationships among anonymity, L2 motivation, participation in discussions, quality of L2 production, and success in L2 vocabulary learning. It examines, in asynchronous discussions, (a) if participation and (b) motivation contribute to L2 vocabulary…

  4. Using Television Sitcoms to Facilitate Asynchronous Discussions in the Online Communication Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tolman, Elizabeth; Asbury, Bryan

    2012-01-01

    Asynchronous discussions are a useful instructional resource in the online communication course. In discussion groups students have the opportunity to actively participate and interact with students and the instructor. Asynchronous communication allows for flexibility because "participants can interact with significant amounts of time between…

  5. Modeling and measurement of vesicle pools at the cone ribbon synapse: changes in release probability are solely responsible for voltage-dependent changes in release

    PubMed Central

    Thoreson, Wallace B.; Van Hook, Matthew J.; Parmelee, Caitlyn; Curto, Carina

    2015-01-01

    Post-synaptic responses are a product of quantal amplitude (Q), size of the releasable vesicle pool (N), and release probability (P). Voltage-dependent changes in presynaptic Ca2+ entry alter post-synaptic responses primarily by changing P but have also been shown to influence N. With simultaneous whole cell recordings from cone photoreceptors and horizontal cells in tiger salamander retinal slices, we measured N and P at cone ribbon synapses by using a train of depolarizing pulses to stimulate release and deplete the pool. We developed an analytical model that calculates the total pool size contributing to release under different stimulus conditions by taking into account the prior history of release and empirically-determined properties of replenishment. The model provided a formula that calculates vesicle pool size from measurements of the initial post-synaptic response and limiting rate of release evoked by a train of pulses, the fraction of release sites available for replenishment, and the time constant for replenishment. Results of the model showed that weak and strong depolarizing stimuli evoked release with differing probabilities but the same size vesicle pool. Enhancing intraterminal Ca2+ spread by lowering Ca2+ buffering or applying BayK8644 did not increase PSCs evoked with strong test steps showing there is a fixed upper limit to pool size. Together, these results suggest that light-evoked changes in cone membrane potential alter synaptic release solely by changing release probability. PMID:26541100

  6. Modeling and measurement of vesicle pools at the cone ribbon synapse: Changes in release probability are solely responsible for voltage-dependent changes in release.

    PubMed

    Thoreson, Wallace B; Van Hook, Matthew J; Parmelee, Caitlyn; Curto, Carina

    2016-01-01

    Postsynaptic responses are a product of quantal amplitude (Q), size of the releasable vesicle pool (N), and release probability (P). Voltage-dependent changes in presynaptic Ca(2+) entry alter postsynaptic responses primarily by changing P but have also been shown to influence N. With simultaneous whole cell recordings from cone photoreceptors and horizontal cells in tiger salamander retinal slices, we measured N and P at cone ribbon synapses by using a train of depolarizing pulses to stimulate release and deplete the pool. We developed an analytical model that calculates the total pool size contributing to release under different stimulus conditions by taking into account the prior history of release and empirically determined properties of replenishment. The model provided a formula that calculates vesicle pool size from measurements of the initial postsynaptic response and limiting rate of release evoked by a train of pulses, the fraction of release sites available for replenishment, and the time constant for replenishment. Results of the model showed that weak and strong depolarizing stimuli evoked release with differing probabilities but the same size vesicle pool. Enhancing intraterminal Ca(2+) spread by lowering Ca(2+) buffering or applying BayK8644 did not increase PSCs evoked with strong test steps, showing there is a fixed upper limit to pool size. Together, these results suggest that light-evoked changes in cone membrane potential alter synaptic release solely by changing release probability.

  7. A Parallel Particle Swarm Optimization Algorithm Accelerated by Asynchronous Evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venter, Gerhard; Sobieszczanski-Sobieski, Jaroslaw

    2005-01-01

    A parallel Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) algorithm is presented. Particle swarm optimization is a fairly recent addition to the family of non-gradient based, probabilistic search algorithms that is based on a simplified social model and is closely tied to swarming theory. Although PSO algorithms present several attractive properties to the designer, they are plagued by high computational cost as measured by elapsed time. One approach to reduce the elapsed time is to make use of coarse-grained parallelization to evaluate the design points. Previous parallel PSO algorithms were mostly implemented in a synchronous manner, where all design points within a design iteration are evaluated before the next iteration is started. This approach leads to poor parallel speedup in cases where a heterogeneous parallel environment is used and/or where the analysis time depends on the design point being analyzed. This paper introduces an asynchronous parallel PSO algorithm that greatly improves the parallel e ciency. The asynchronous algorithm is benchmarked on a cluster assembled of Apple Macintosh G5 desktop computers, using the multi-disciplinary optimization of a typical transport aircraft wing as an example.

  8. Asynchronous Transfer Mode Quality-of-Service Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, William D.

    1998-01-01

    In support of satellite-ATM interoperability, researchers at the NASA Lewis Research Center performed asynchronous transfer mode (ATM) quality-of-service experiments using MPEG-2 (ATM application layer 5, AAL5) over ATM over an emulated satellite link. The purpose of these experiments was to determine the free-space link quality necessary to use the ATM protocol to transmit high-quality multimedia information. The experimental results have been submitted to various International Telecommunications Union (ITU) study groups in order to improve and modify current standards and recommendations for the telecommunications industry. Quality-of-service parameters for Class I, stringent class requirements for ITU-T I.356 are currently being debated. The experimental results presented will help to establish these quality-of-service thresholds. This material will also be useful in the development of the ITU-R WP-4B's Draft Preliminary New Recommendation on the Transmission of Asynchronous Transfer Mode Traffic via Satellite (Rec. S.atm).

  9. Formation of the wide asynchronous binary asteroid population

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, Seth A.; Scheeres, Daniel J.; McMahon, Jay

    2014-01-01

    We propose and analyze a new mechanism for the formation of the wide asynchronous binary population. These binary asteroids have wide semimajor axes relative to most near-Earth and main belt asteroid systems. Confirmed members have rapidly rotating primaries and satellites that are not tidally locked. Previously suggested formation mechanisms from impact ejecta, from planetary flybys, and directly from rotational fission events cannot satisfy all of the observations. The newly hypothesized mechanism works as follows: (1) these systems are formed from rotational fission, (2) their satellites are tidally locked, (3) their orbits are expanded by the binary Yarkovsky-O'Keefe-Radzievskii-Paddack (BYORP) effect, (4) their satellites desynchronize as a result of the adiabatic invariance between the libration of the secondary and the mutual orbit, and (5) the secondary avoids resynchronization because of the YORP effect. This seemingly complex chain of events is a natural pathway for binaries with satellites that have particular shapes, which define the BYORP effect torque that acts on the system. After detailing the theory, we analyze each of the wide asynchronous binary members and candidates to assess their most likely formation mechanism. Finally, we suggest possible future observations to check and constrain our hypothesis.

  10. Spatiotemporal features for asynchronous event-based data

    PubMed Central

    Lagorce, Xavier; Ieng, Sio-Hoi; Clady, Xavier; Pfeiffer, Michael; Benosman, Ryad B.

    2015-01-01

    Bio-inspired asynchronous event-based vision sensors are currently introducing a paradigm shift in visual information processing. These new sensors rely on a stimulus-driven principle of light acquisition similar to biological retinas. They are event-driven and fully asynchronous, thereby reducing redundancy and encoding exact times of input signal changes, leading to a very precise temporal resolution. Approaches for higher-level computer vision often rely on the reliable detection of features in visual frames, but similar definitions of features for the novel dynamic and event-based visual input representation of silicon retinas have so far been lacking. This article addresses the problem of learning and recognizing features for event-based vision sensors, which capture properties of truly spatiotemporal volumes of sparse visual event information. A novel computational architecture for learning and encoding spatiotemporal features is introduced based on a set of predictive recurrent reservoir networks, competing via winner-take-all selection. Features are learned in an unsupervised manner from real-world input recorded with event-based vision sensors. It is shown that the networks in the architecture learn distinct and task-specific dynamic visual features, and can predict their trajectories over time. PMID:25759637

  11. Continuous EEG signal analysis for asynchronous BCI application.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Wei-Yen

    2011-08-01

    In this study, we propose a two-stage recognition system for continuous analysis of electroencephalogram (EEG) signals. An independent component analysis (ICA) and correlation coefficient are used to automatically eliminate the electrooculography (EOG) artifacts. Based on the continuous wavelet transform (CWT) and Student's two-sample t-statistics, active segment selection then detects the location of active segment in the time-frequency domain. Next, multiresolution fractal feature vectors (MFFVs) are extracted with the proposed modified fractal dimension from wavelet data. Finally, the support vector machine (SVM) is adopted for the robust classification of MFFVs. The EEG signals are continuously analyzed in 1-s segments, and every 0.5 second moves forward to simulate asynchronous BCI works in the two-stage recognition architecture. The segment is first recognized as lifted or not in the first stage, and then is classified as left or right finger lifting at stage two if the segment is recognized as lifting in the first stage. Several statistical analyses are used to evaluate the performance of the proposed system. The results indicate that it is a promising system in the applications of asynchronous BCI work.

  12. Experience with synchronous and asynchronous digital control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Regenie, V. A.; Chacon, C. V.; Lock, W. P.

    1986-01-01

    Flight control systems have undergone a revolution since the days of simple mechanical linkages; presently the most advanced systems are full-authority, full-time digital systems controlling unstable aircraft. With the use of advanced control systems, the aerodynamic design can incorporate features that allow greater performance and fuel savings, as can be seen on the new Airbus design and advanced tactical fighter concepts. These advanced aircraft will be and are relying on the flight control system to provide the stability and handling qualities required for safe flight and to allow the pilot to control the aircraft. Various design philosophies have been proposed and followed to investigate system architectures for these advanced flight control systems. One major area of discussion is whether a multichannel digital control system should be synchronous or asynchronous. This paper addressed the flight experience at the Dryden Flight Research Facility of NASA's Ames Research Center with both synchronous and asynchronous digital flight control systems. Four different flight control systems are evaluated against criteria such as software reliability, cost increases, and schedule delays.

  13. Formation of the Wide Asynchronous Binary Asteroid Population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, Seth A.; Scheeres, Daniel J.; McMahon, Jay

    2014-01-01

    We propose and analyze a new mechanism for the formation of the wide asynchronous binary population. These binary asteroids have wide semimajor axes relative to most near-Earth and main belt asteroid systems. Confirmed members have rapidly rotating primaries and satellites that are not tidally locked. Previously suggested formation mechanisms from impact ejecta, from planetary flybys, and directly from rotational fission events cannot satisfy all of the observations. The newly hypothesized mechanism works as follows: (1) these systems are formed from rotational fission, (2) their satellites are tidally locked, (3) their orbits are expanded by the binary Yarkovsky-O'Keefe-Radzievskii-Paddack (BYORP) effect, (4) their satellites desynchronize as a result of the adiabatic invariance between the libration of the secondary and the mutual orbit, and (5) the secondary avoids resynchronization because of the YORP effect. This seemingly complex chain of events is a natural pathway for binaries with satellites that have particular shapes, which define the BYORP effect torque that acts on the system. After detailing the theory, we analyze each of the wide asynchronous binary members and candidates to assess their most likely formation mechanism. Finally, we suggest possible future observations to check and constrain our hypothesis.

  14. Cooperative and asynchronous stereo vision for dynamic vision sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piatkowska, E.; Belbachir, A. N.; Gelautz, M.

    2014-05-01

    Dynamic vision sensors (DVSs) encode visual input as a stream of events generated upon relative light intensity changes in the scene. These sensors have the advantage of allowing simultaneously high temporal resolution (better than 10 µs) and wide dynamic range (>120 dB) at sparse data representation, which is not possible with clocked vision sensors. In this paper, we focus on the task of stereo reconstruction. The spatiotemporal and asynchronous aspects of data provided by the sensor impose a different stereo reconstruction approach from the one applied for synchronous frame-based cameras. We propose to model the event-driven stereo matching by a cooperative network (Marr and Poggio 1976 Science 194 283-7). The history of the recent activity in the scene is stored in the network, which serves as spatiotemporal context used in disparity calculation for each incoming event. The network constantly evolves in time, as events are generated. In our work, not only the spatiotemporal aspect of the data is preserved but also the matching is performed asynchronously. The results of the experiments prove that the proposed approach is well adapted for DVS data and can be successfully used for disparity calculation.

  15. Emergence of Asynchronous Local Clocks in Excitable Media.

    PubMed

    Gerum, Richard Carl; Fabry, Ben; Metzner, Claus

    2015-01-01

    Excitable media such as the myocardium or the brain consist of arrays of coupled excitable elements, in which the local excitation of a single element can propagate to its neighbors in the form of a non-linear autowave. Since each element has to pass through a refractory period immediately after excitation, the frequency of autowaves is self-limiting. In this work, we consider the case where each element is spontaneously excited at a fixed average rate and thereby initiates a new autowave. Although these spontaneous self-excitation events are modelled as independent Poisson point processes with exponentially distributed waiting times, the travelling autowaves lead collectively to a non-exponential, unimodal waiting time distribution for the individual elements. With increasing system size, a global 'clock' period T emerges as the most probable waiting time for each element, which fluctuates around T with an increasingly small but non-zero variance. This apparent synchronization between asynchronous, temporally uncorrelated point processes differs from synchronization effects between perfect oscillators interacting in a phase-aligning manner. Finally, we demonstrate that asynchronous local clocks also emerge in non-homogeneous systems in which the rates of self-excitation are different for all individuals, suggesting that this novel mechanism can occur in a wide range of excitable media.

  16. Emergence of Asynchronous Local Clocks in Excitable Media

    PubMed Central

    Gerum, Richard Carl; Fabry, Ben; Metzner, Claus

    2015-01-01

    Excitable media such as the myocardium or the brain consist of arrays of coupled excitable elements, in which the local excitation of a single element can propagate to its neighbors in the form of a non-linear autowave. Since each element has to pass through a refractory period immediately after excitation, the frequency of autowaves is self-limiting. In this work, we consider the case where each element is spontaneously excited at a fixed average rate and thereby initiates a new autowave. Although these spontaneous self-excitation events are modelled as independent Poisson point processes with exponentially distributed waiting times, the travelling autowaves lead collectively to a non-exponential, unimodal waiting time distribution for the individual elements. With increasing system size, a global ‘clock’ period T emerges as the most probable waiting time for each element, which fluctuates around T with an increasingly small but non-zero variance. This apparent synchronization between asynchronous, temporally uncorrelated point processes differs from synchronization effects between perfect oscillators interacting in a phase-aligning manner. Finally, we demonstrate that asynchronous local clocks also emerge in non-homogeneous systems in which the rates of self-excitation are different for all individuals, suggesting that this novel mechanism can occur in a wide range of excitable media. PMID:26559528

  17. Asynchronous replica exchange software for grid and heterogeneous computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallicchio, Emilio; Xia, Junchao; Flynn, William F.; Zhang, Baofeng; Samlalsingh, Sade; Mentes, Ahmet; Levy, Ronald M.

    2015-11-01

    Parallel replica exchange sampling is an extended ensemble technique often used to accelerate the exploration of the conformational ensemble of atomistic molecular simulations of chemical systems. Inter-process communication and coordination requirements have historically discouraged the deployment of replica exchange on distributed and heterogeneous resources. Here we describe the architecture of a software (named ASyncRE) for performing asynchronous replica exchange molecular simulations on volunteered computing grids and heterogeneous high performance clusters. The asynchronous replica exchange algorithm on which the software is based avoids centralized synchronization steps and the need for direct communication between remote processes. It allows molecular dynamics threads to progress at different rates and enables parameter exchanges among arbitrary sets of replicas independently from other replicas. ASyncRE is written in Python following a modular design conducive to extensions to various replica exchange schemes and molecular dynamics engines. Applications of the software for the modeling of association equilibria of supramolecular and macromolecular complexes on BOINC campus computational grids and on the CPU/MIC heterogeneous hardware of the XSEDE Stampede supercomputer are illustrated. They show the ability of ASyncRE to utilize large grids of desktop computers running the Windows, MacOS, and/or Linux operating systems as well as collections of high performance heterogeneous hardware devices.

  18. Asynchronous Replica Exchange Software for Grid and Heterogeneous Computing.

    PubMed

    Gallicchio, Emilio; Xia, Junchao; Flynn, William F; Zhang, Baofeng; Samlalsingh, Sade; Mentes, Ahmet; Levy, Ronald M

    2015-11-01

    Parallel replica exchange sampling is an extended ensemble technique often used to accelerate the exploration of the conformational ensemble of atomistic molecular simulations of chemical systems. Inter-process communication and coordination requirements have historically discouraged the deployment of replica exchange on distributed and heterogeneous resources. Here we describe the architecture of a software (named ASyncRE) for performing asynchronous replica exchange molecular simulations on volunteered computing grids and heterogeneous high performance clusters. The asynchronous replica exchange algorithm on which the software is based avoids centralized synchronization steps and the need for direct communication between remote processes. It allows molecular dynamics threads to progress at different rates and enables parameter exchanges among arbitrary sets of replicas independently from other replicas. ASyncRE is written in Python following a modular design conducive to extensions to various replica exchange schemes and molecular dynamics engines. Applications of the software for the modeling of association equilibria of supramolecular and macromolecular complexes on BOINC campus computational grids and on the CPU/MIC heterogeneous hardware of the XSEDE Stampede supercomputer are illustrated. They show the ability of ASyncRE to utilize large grids of desktop computers running the Windows, MacOS, and/or Linux operating systems as well as collections of high performance heterogeneous hardware devices.

  19. Asynchronous Replica Exchange Software for Grid and Heterogeneous Computing

    PubMed Central

    Gallicchio, Emilio; Xia, Junchao; Flynn, William F.; Zhang, Baofeng; Samlalsingh, Sade; Mentes, Ahmet; Levy, Ronald M.

    2015-01-01

    Parallel replica exchange sampling is an extended ensemble technique often used to accelerate the exploration of the conformational ensemble of atomistic molecular simulations of chemical systems. Inter-process communication and coordination requirements have historically discouraged the deployment of replica exchange on distributed and heterogeneous resources. Here we describe the architecture of a software (named ASyncRE) for performing asynchronous replica exchange molecular simulations on volunteered computing grids and heterogeneous high performance clusters. The asynchronous replica exchange algorithm on which the software is based avoids centralized synchronization steps and the need for direct communication between remote processes. It allows molecular dynamics threads to progress at different rates and enables parameter exchanges among arbitrary sets of replicas independently from other replicas. ASyncRE is written in Python following a modular design conducive to extensions to various replica exchange schemes and molecular dynamics engines. Applications of the software for the modeling of association equilibria of supramolecular and macromolecular complexes on BOINC campus computational grids and on the CPU/MIC heterogeneous hardware of the XSEDE Stampede supercomputer are illustrated. They show the ability of ASyncRE to utilize large grids of desktop computers running the Windows, MacOS, and/or Linux operating systems as well as collections of high performance heterogeneous hardware devices. PMID:27103749

  20. Asynchronously sampled blind source separation for coherent optical links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detwiler, Thomas F.; Searcy, Steven M.; Stark, Andrew J.; Ralph, Stephen E.; Basch, Bert E.

    2011-01-01

    Polarization multiplexing is an integral technique for generating spectrally efficient 100 Gb/s and higher optical links. Post coherent detection DSP-based polarization demultiplexing of QPSK links is commonly performed after timing recovery. We propose and demonstrate a method of asynchronous blind source separation using the constant modulus algorithm (CMA) on the asynchronously sampled signal to initially separate energy from arbitrarily aligned polarization states. This method lends well to implementation as it allows for an open-loop sampling frequency for analog-to-digital conversion at less than twice the symbol rate. We show that the performance of subsequent receiver functions is enhanced by the initial pol demux operation. CMA singularity behavior is avoided through tap settling constraints. The method is applicable to QPSK transmissions and many other modulation formats as well, including general QAM signals, offset-QPSK, and CPM, or a combination thereof. We present the architecture and its performance under several different formats and link conditions. Comparisons of complexity and performance are drawn between the proposed architecture and conventional receivers.

  1. Research on the displacement control method of asynchronous modular contactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Gong; Ming, Zong

    2017-01-01

    Ac contactor is a kind of low voltage electrical appliances with large usage and wide application. Because of the frequent operation, contactor life must be long enough to ensure the reliable operation of power system. The electrical life of the contactor, as the key to affect the service life of the contactor, is mainly affected by the arc developed in the breaking and closing course. This paper concentrates on a new type of asynchronous modular contactor. To get the contactor movement characteristics, the dynamic model of the electromagnetic system is established by MATLAB/SIMULINK. Then, according to the displacement curve of contactor, the breaking process and closing process is planned. The thought of closed loop control, by adjusting the parameters of PID controller, enables the contactor to operate as the planning displacement curve. In addition, to achieve no arc or micro arc breaking and no bounce or micro bounce closing , a displacement closed loop control system for contactor is designed.

  2. Estimation of delays in generalized asynchronous Boolean networks.

    PubMed

    Das, Haimabati; Layek, Ritwik Kumar

    2016-10-20

    A new generalized asynchronous Boolean network (GABN) model has been proposed in this paper. This continuous-time discrete-state model captures the biological reality of cellular dynamics without compromising the computational efficiency of the Boolean framework. The GABN synthesis procedure is based on the prior knowledge of the logical structure of the regulatory network, and the experimental transcriptional parameters. The novelty of the proposed methodology lies in considering different delays associated with the activation and deactivation of a particular protein (especially the transcription factors). A few illustrative examples of some well-studied network motifs have been provided to explore the scope of using the GABN model for larger networks. The GABN model of the p53-signaling pathway in response to γ-irradiation has also been simulated in the current paper to provide an indirect validation of the proposed schema.

  3. A 3-class asynchronous BCI controlling a simulated mobile robot.

    PubMed

    Geng, Tao; Dyson, Matthew; Tsui, Chun S L; Gan, John Q

    2007-01-01

    We present our design and online experiments of a 3-class asynchronous BCI controlling a simulated robot in an indoor environment. Two characteristics of our design have efficiently decreased the false positive rate during the NC (No Control) mode. First, three one-vs-rest LDA classifiers are combined to control the switching between NC and IC (In Control) mode. Second, the hierarchical structure of our controller allows the most reliable class (mental task) in a specific subject to play a dominant role in the robot control. A group of simple rules triggered by local sensor signals are designed for safety and obstacle avoidance in the NC mode. In online experiments, subjects successfully controlled the robot to circumnavigate obstacles and reach small targets in separate rooms.

  4. Asynchronous emergence by loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta) hatchlings.

    PubMed

    Houghton, J D; Hays, G C

    2001-03-01

    For many decades it has been accepted that marine turtle hatchlings from the same nest generally emerge from the sand together. However, for loggerhead turtles (Caretta caretta) nesting on the Greek Island of Kefalonia, a more asynchronous pattern of emergence has been documented. By placing temperature loggers at the top and bottom of nests laid on Kefalonia during 1998, we examined whether this asynchronous emergence was related to the thermal conditions within nests. Pronounced thermal variation existed not only between, but also within, individual nests. These within-nest temperature differences were related to the patterns of hatchling emergence, with hatchlings from nests displaying large thermal ranges emerging over a longer time-scale than those characterised by more uniform temperatures. In many egg-laying animals, parental care of the offspring may continue while the eggs are incubating and also after they have hatched. Consequently, the importance of the nest site for determining incubation conditions may be reduced since the parents themselves may alter the local environment. By contrast, in marine turtles, parental care ceases once the eggs have been laid and the nest site covered. The positioning of the nest site, in both space and time, may therefore have profound effects for marine turtles by affecting, for example, the survival of the eggs and hatchlings as well as their sex (Janzen and Paukstis 1991). During incubation, sea turtle embryos grow from a few cells at oviposition to a self-sufficient organism at hatching some 50-80 days later (Ackerman 1997). After hatching, the young turtles dig up through the sand and emerge typically en masse at the surface 1-7 nights later, with a number of stragglers following over the next few nights (Christens 1990). This contrasts with the frequently observed pattern of hatching asynchrony in birds. It has been suggested that the cause of mass emergence in turtles is that eggs within a clutch are fertilised

  5. Realization of station for testing asynchronous three-phase motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wróbel, A.; Surma, W.

    2016-08-01

    Nowadays, you cannot imagine the construction and operation of machines without the use of electric motors [13-15]. The proposed position is designed to allow testing of asynchronous three-phase motors. The position consists of a tested engine and the engine running as a load, both engines combined with a mechanical clutch [2]. The value of the load is recorded by measuring shaft created with Strain Gauge Bridge. This concept will allow to study the basic parameters of the engines, visualization motor parameters both vector and scalar controlled, during varying load drive system. In addition, registration during the variable physical parameters of the working electric motor, controlled by a frequency converter or controlled by a contactor will be possible. Position is designed as a teaching and research position to characterize the engines. It will be also possible selection of inverter parameters.

  6. Asynchronous extinction of late Quaternary sloths on continents and islands.

    PubMed

    Steadman, David W; Martin, Paul S; MacPhee, Ross D E; Jull, A J T; McDonald, H Gregory; Woods, Charles A; Iturralde-Vinent, Manuel; Hodgins, Gregory W L

    2005-08-16

    Whatever the cause, it is extraordinary that dozens of genera of large mammals became extinct during the late Quaternary throughout the Western Hemisphere, including 90% of the genera of the xenarthran suborder Phyllophaga (sloths). Radiocarbon dates directly on dung, bones, or other tissue of extinct sloths place their "last appearance" datum at approximately 11,000 radiocarbon years before present (yr BP) or slightly less in North America, approximately 10,500 yr BP in South America, and approximately 4,400 yr BP on West Indian islands. This asynchronous situation is not compatible with glacial-interglacial climate change forcing these extinctions, especially given the great elevational, latitudinal, and longitudinal variation of the sloth-bearing continental sites. Instead, the chronology of last appearance of extinct sloths, whether on continents or islands, more closely tracks the first arrival of people.

  7. Reliable Asynchronous Image Transfer Protocol in Wireless Multimedia Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Joa-Hyoung; Jung, In-Bum

    2010-01-01

    In the paper, we propose a reliable asynchronous image transfer protocol, RAIT. RAIT applies a double sliding window method to node-to-node transfer, with one sliding window for the receiving queue, which is used to prevent packet loss caused by communication failure between nodes, and another sliding window for the sending queue, which prevents packet loss caused by network congestion. The routing node prevents packet loss between nodes by preemptive scheduling of multiple packets for a given image. RAIT implements a double sliding window method by means of a cross-layer design between the RAIT layer, routing layer, and queue layer. We demonstrate that RAIT guarantees a higher reliability of image transmission compared to the existing protocols. PMID:22294883

  8. Optimal Deterministic Ring Exploration with Oblivious Asynchronous Robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamani, Anissa; Potop-Butucaru, Maria Gradinariu; Tixeuil, Sébastien

    We consider the problem of exploring an anonymous unoriented ring of size n by k identical, oblivious, asynchronous mobile robots, that are unable to communicate, yet have the ability to sense their environment and take decisions based on their local view. Previous works in this weak scenario prove that k must not divide n for a deterministic solution to exist. Also, it is known that the minimum number of robots (either deterministic or probabilistic) to explore a ring of size n is 4. An upper bound of 17 robots holds in the deterministic case while 4 probabilistic robots are sufficient. In this paper, we close the complexity gap in the deterministic setting, by proving that no deterministic exploration is feasible with less than five robots, and that five robots are sufficient for any n that is coprime with five. Our protocol completes exploration in O(n) robot moves, which is also optimal.

  9. Maximum Likelihood Reconstruction for Ising Models with Asynchronous Updates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Hong-Li; Alava, Mikko; Aurell, Erik; Hertz, John; Roudi, Yasser

    2013-05-01

    We describe how the couplings in an asynchronous kinetic Ising model can be inferred. We consider two cases: one in which we know both the spin history and the update times and one in which we know only the spin history. For the first case, we show that one can average over all possible choices of update times to obtain a learning rule that depends only on spin correlations and can also be derived from the equations of motion for the correlations. For the second case, the same rule can be derived within a further decoupling approximation. We study all methods numerically for fully asymmetric Sherrington-Kirkpatrick models, varying the data length, system size, temperature, and external field. Good convergence is observed in accordance with the theoretical expectations.

  10. Vector control structure of an asynchronous motor at maximum torque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chioncel, C. P.; Tirian, G. O.; Gillich, N.; Raduca, E.

    2016-02-01

    Vector control methods offer the possibility to gain high performance, being widely used. Certain applications require an optimum control in limit operating conditions, as, at maximum torque, that is not always satisfied. The paper presents how the voltage and the frequency for an asynchronous machine (ASM) operating at variable speed are determinate, with an accent on the method that keeps the rotor flux constant. The simulation analyses consider three load types: variable torque and speed, variable torque and constant speed, constant torque and variable speed. The final values of frequency and voltage are obtained through the proposed control schemes with one controller using the simulation language based on the Maple module. The dynamic analysis of the system is done for the case with P and PI controller and allows conclusions on the proposed method, which can have different applications, as the ASM in wind turbines.

  11. Asynchronous Multilateral Control for Simplified Walking Haptic System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okura, Takeshi; Katsura, Seiichiro

    Recently, there has been extensive development in remote communication technologies such as telephone, radio, and television. Haptic information is studied as the third type of multimedia information. Real-world haptics is getting attention not only for the feedback of real-world haptic information in teleoperation but also as the key technology for future human support. Most of the objects of study in haptics are stationary. Therefore, the moving range of such haptic systems is limited. This paper proposes a novel haptic device that receives force feedback of walking motion from a remote environment and manipulates remote system. Thus, its moving range is unrestricted. To drive this haptic system, the paper also proposes asynchronous multilateral control. By using this control, an operator can operate the remote system without changing his/her position. The proposed haptic system is expected to act as an effective interface for virtual reality applications and teleoperation.

  12. Asynchronous extinction of late Quaternary sloths on continents and islands

    PubMed Central

    Steadman, David W.; Martin, Paul S.; MacPhee, Ross D. E.; Jull, A. J. T.; McDonald, H. Gregory; Woods, Charles A.; Iturralde-Vinent, Manuel; Hodgins, Gregory W. L.

    2005-01-01

    Whatever the cause, it is extraordinary that dozens of genera of large mammals became extinct during the late Quaternary throughout the Western Hemisphere, including 90% of the genera of the xenarthran suborder Phyllophaga (sloths). Radiocarbon dates directly on dung, bones, or other tissue of extinct sloths place their “last appearance” datum at ≈11,000 radiocarbon years before present (yr BP) or slightly less in North America, ≈10,500 yr BP in South America, and ≈4,400 yr BP on West Indian islands. This asynchronous situation is not compatible with glacial–interglacial climate change forcing these extinctions, especially given the great elevational, latitudinal, and longitudinal variation of the sloth-bearing continental sites. Instead, the chronology of last appearance of extinct sloths, whether on continents or islands, more closely tracks the first arrival of people. PMID:16085711

  13. Exploring Asynchronous Many-Task Runtime Systems toward Extreme Scales

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, Samuel; Baker, Gavin Matthew; Gamell, Marc; Hollman, David; Sjaardema, Gregor; Kolla, Hemanth; Teranishi, Keita; Wilke, Jeremiah J; Slattengren, Nicole; Bennett, Janine Camille

    2015-10-01

    Major exascale computing reports indicate a number of software challenges to meet the dramatic change of system architectures in near future. While several-orders-of-magnitude increase in parallelism is the most commonly cited of those, hurdles also include performance heterogeneity of compute nodes across the system, increased imbalance between computational capacity and I/O capabilities, frequent system interrupts, and complex hardware architectures. Asynchronous task-parallel programming models show a great promise in addressing these issues, but are not yet fully understood nor developed su ciently for computational science and engineering application codes. We address these knowledge gaps through quantitative and qualitative exploration of leading candidate solutions in the context of engineering applications at Sandia. In this poster, we evaluate MiniAero code ported to three leading candidate programming models (Charm++, Legion and UINTAH) to examine the feasibility of these models that permits insertion of new programming model elements into an existing code base.

  14. High level modelling and design of asynchronous interface logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakovlev, A. V.; Koelmans, A. M.; Lavagno, L.

    1993-11-01

    The authors propose a new methodology to design asynchronous circuits that is divided in two stages: abstract synthesis and logic synthesis. The first state is carried out by refining an abstract model, based on logic predicates describing the correct input-output behavior of the circuit, into a labelled Petri net and then into a formalization of timing diagrams (the Signal Transition Graph). This refinement involves hierarchical decomposition of the initial implementation until its size can be handled by automated logic synthesis tools, as well as replacing symbolic events occurring on the input-output ports of the labelled Petri net with up and down transitions occurring on the input-output wires of a circuit implementation.

  15. Asynchronous learning: student utilization out of sync with their preference

    PubMed Central

    Lew, Edward K.; Nordquist, Erik K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Asynchronous learning is gaining popularity. Data are limited regarding this learning method in medical students rotating in emergency medicine (EM). In EM, faculty time is limited to give in-person lectures. The authors sought to create an online curriculum that students could utilize as an additional learning modality. Objective The goal was to evaluate effectiveness, participation, and preference for this mode of learning. Methods We developed five online, narrated PowerPoint presentations. After orientation, access to the online curriculum was provided to the students, which they could review at their leisure. Results One hundred and seven fourth-year medical students participated. They reported the curriculum to be of high quality. Pretest scores were similar for those that viewed all lectures – compliant group (CG) (9.5 [CI 4.8–14.1]) and those that did not view any – non-compliant group (NCG) (9.6 [CI 5.9–13.4]). There was no statistical significant difference in posttest scores between the groups although there was improvement overall: CG 14.6 (CI 6.9–22.1); NCG 11.4 (CI 5.7–17.1). A majority (69.2%) favored inclusion of asynchronous learning, but less than a quarter (22.4%) reported viewing all five modules and more than a third (36.4%) viewed none. Conclusion Despite student-expressed preference for an online curriculum, they used the online resource less than expected. This should give pause to educators looking to convert core EM topics to an online format. However, when high-quality online lectures are utilized as a learning tool, this study demonstrates that they had neither a positive nor a negative impact on test scores. PMID:27280385

  16. Modeling and Analysis of Asynchronous Systems Using SAL and Hybrid SAL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, Ashish; Dutertre, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    We present formal models and results of formal analysis of two different asynchronous systems. We first examine a mid-value select module that merges the signals coming from three different sensors that are each asynchronously sampling the same input signal. We then consider the phase locking protocol proposed by Daly, Hopkins, and McKenna. This protocol is designed to keep a set of non-faulty (asynchronous) clocks phase locked even in the presence of Byzantine-faulty clocks on the network. All models and verifications have been developed using the SAL model checking tools and the Hybrid SAL abstractor.

  17. Estimates for the pool size of releasable quanta at a single central synapse and for the time required to refill the pool.

    PubMed

    Stevens, C F; Tsujimoto, T

    1995-01-31

    Local superfusion of limited dendritic areas with hypertonic or hyperkalemic solutions stimulates the release of quanta from a small population of synapses made on rodent hippocampal neurons maintained in primary culture, and each quantal event can be detected in the postsynaptic neuron. With maintained stimulation, the initial release rate is about 20 quanta per sec per synapse, and this rate declines exponentially to a final low level. These observations can be interpreted as depletion of available quanta and, with this interpretation, a bouton would contain one to two dozen quanta in its readily releasable pool. Tests with a second application of the solution that produces release reveal that the pool of readily releasable quanta is replenished with a time constant of about 10 sec (36 degrees C). The pool of quanta defined in this way may correspond to the population of vesicles docked at the bouton's active zone.

  18. Distributed Consensus of Stochastic Delayed Multi-agent Systems Under Asynchronous Switching.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaotai; Tang, Yang; Cao, Jinde; Zhang, Wenbing

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, the distributed exponential consensus of stochastic delayed multi-agent systems with nonlinear dynamics is investigated under asynchronous switching. The asynchronous switching considered here is to account for the time of identifying the active modes of multi-agent systems. After receipt of confirmation of mode's switching, the matched controller can be applied, which means that the switching time of the matched controller in each node usually lags behind that of system switching. In order to handle the coexistence of switched signals and stochastic disturbances, a comparison principle of stochastic switched delayed systems is first proved. By means of this extended comparison principle, several easy to verified conditions for the existence of an asynchronously switched distributed controller are derived such that stochastic delayed multi-agent systems with asynchronous switching and nonlinear dynamics can achieve global exponential consensus. Two examples are given to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  19. Operational aspects of asynchronous filtering for improved flood forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakovec, Oldrich; Weerts, Albrecht; Sumihar, Julius; Uijlenhoet, Remko

    2014-05-01

    Hydrological forecasts can be made more reliable and less uncertain by recursively improving initial conditions. A common way of improving the initial conditions is to make use of data assimilation (DA), a feedback mechanism or update methodology which merges model estimates with available real world observations. The traditional implementation of the Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF; e.g. Evensen, 2009) is synchronous, commonly named a three dimensional (3-D) assimilation, which means that all assimilated observations correspond to the time of update. Asynchronous DA, also called four dimensional (4-D) assimilation, refers to an updating methodology, in which observations being assimilated into the model originate from times different to the time of update (Evensen, 2009; Sakov 2010). This study investigates how the capabilities of the DA procedure can be improved by applying alternative Kalman-type methods, e.g., the Asynchronous Ensemble Kalman Filter (AEnKF). The AEnKF assimilates observations with smaller computational costs than the original EnKF, which is beneficial for operational purposes. The results of discharge assimilation into a grid-based hydrological model for the Upper Ourthe catchment in Belgian Ardennes show that including past predictions and observations in the AEnKF improves the model forecasts as compared to the traditional EnKF. Additionally we show that elimination of the strongly non-linear relation between the soil moisture storage and assimilated discharge observations from the model update becomes beneficial for an improved operational forecasting, which is evaluated using several validation measures. In the current study we employed the HBV-96 model built within a recently developed open source modelling environment OpenStreams (2013). The advantage of using OpenStreams (2013) is that it enables direct communication with OpenDA (2013), an open source data assimilation toolbox. OpenDA provides a number of algorithms for model calibration

  20. Comparing face-to-face, synchronous, and asynchronous learning: postgraduate dental resident preferences.

    PubMed

    Kunin, Marc; Julliard, Kell N; Rodriguez, Tobias E

    2014-06-01

    The Department of Dental Medicine of Lutheran Medical Center has developed an asynchronous online curriculum consisting of prerecorded PowerPoint presentations with audio explanations. The focus of this study was to evaluate if the new asynchronous format satisfied the educational needs of the residents compared to traditional lecture (face-to-face) and synchronous (distance learning) formats. Lectures were delivered to 219 dental residents employing face-to-face and synchronous formats, as well as the new asynchronous format; 169 (77 percent) participated in the study. Outcomes were assessed with pretests, posttests, and individual lecture surveys. Results found the residents preferred face-to-face and asynchronous formats to the synchronous format in terms of effectiveness and clarity of presentations. This preference was directly related to the residents' perception of how well the technology worked in each format. The residents also rated the quality of student-instructor and student-student interactions in the synchronous and asynchronous formats significantly higher after taking the lecture series than they did before taking it. However, they rated the face-to-face format as significantly more conducive to student-instructor and student-student interaction. While the study found technology had a major impact on the efficacy of this curricular model, the results suggest that the asynchronous format can be an effective way to teach a postgraduate course.

  1. Hypoxia induces voltage-dependent Ca2+ entry and quantal dopamine secretion in carotid body glomus cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ureña, J; Fernández-Chacón, R; Benot, A R; Alvarez de Toledo, G A; López-Barneo, J

    1994-01-01

    We have investigated the changes of cytosolic [Ca2+] and the secretory activity in single glomus cells dispersed from rabbit carotid bodies during exposure to solutions with variable O2 tension (Po2). In normoxic conditions (Po2 = 145 mmHg; 1 mmHg = 133 Pa), intracellular [Ca2+] was 58 +/- 29 nM, and switching to low Po2 (between 10 and 60 mmHg) led to a reversible increase of [Ca2+] up to 800 nM. The response to hypoxia completely disappeared after removal of external Ca2+ or with the addition of 0.2 mM Cd2+ to the external solution. These same solutions also abolished both the Ca2+ current of the cells and the increase of internal [Ca2+] elicited by high external K+. Elevations of cytosolic [Ca2+] in response to hypoxia or to direct membrane depolarization elicited the release of dopamine, which was detected by amperometric techniques. Dopamine secretion occurred in episodes of spike-like activity that appear to represent the release from single secretory vesicles. From the mean charge of well-resolved secretory events, we estimated the average number of dopamine molecules per vesicle to be approximately 140,000, a value about 15 times smaller than a previous estimate in chromaffin granules of adrenomedullary cells. These results directly demonstrate in a single-cell preparation the secretory response of glomus cells to hypoxia. The data indicate that the enhancement of cellular excitability upon exposure to low Po2 results in Ca2+ entry through voltage-gated channels, which leads to an increase in intracellular [Ca2+] and exocytotic transmitter release. PMID:7937863

  2. Pipeline length optimization in a digital asynchronous trigger controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Antone, I.

    2000-09-01

    This report describes the pipelined architecture of an asynchronous controller designed for a trigger board. To evaluate the suitable depth of the pipelines, the controller has been modelled as a priority queuing system. Some useful parameters have been introduced to estimate the optimal configuration in the static and dynamic priority cases. Nowadays, the hardware controllers are realised into programmable components where, usually, the internal memory resources are limited; to save space the design has been addressed towards the pipeline length optimization. Some analytic results have been reported for the static priority queueing system and, furthermore, the dynamic control of the priorities has been added. The implemented service discipline is a rate-controlled priority queueing discipline; the service rate is controlled with a negative feedback. The stability of this control system has been investigated and some parameters have been highlighted to solve the compromise between the minimum average length of the controlled queues and a suitable margin from the instability. The dynamic scheme requires the design of a more sophisticated system controller, but it shows better performances; it allows to reduce the pipeline depth with the same input rate.

  3. Photonic analog-to-digital converter via asynchronous oversampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carver, Spencer; Reeves, Erin; Siahmakoun, Azad; Granieri, Sergio

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents a hybrid opto-electronic asynchronous delta-sigma modulator, implemented in the form of a fiber-optic Analog-to-Digital converter (ADC). This architecture was chosen for its independence of an external clock and ease of demodulation through a single low-pass filter stage. The fiber-optic prototype consists of an input laser (wavelength λ1) which is modulated with an input RF signal, a high-speed comparator circuit working as bi-stable quantizer, and a fiber-optic loop that includes a SOA and a band-pass filter that act as a leaky integrator. The fiber-optic loop acts as a fiber-ring resonator (FRR), and defines the resonance wavelength λ2 of the system. The gain within this loop is modified through cross-gain modulation (XGM) by the input wavelength λ1, and thus achieves the desired modulation effect. The proposed architecture has been constructed and characterized at a sampling rate of 15.4 MS/s processing input analog signals in the range of dc-3 MHz with a signal-to-noise ratio of 36 dB and an effective number of bits of 5.7.

  4. Obstacle avoidance in social groups: new insights from asynchronous models.

    PubMed

    Croft, Simon; Budgey, Richard; Pitchford, Jonathan W; Wood, A Jamie

    2015-05-06

    For moving animals, the successful avoidance of hazardous obstacles is an important capability. Despite this, few models of collective motion have addressed the relationship between behavioural and social features and obstacle avoidance. We develop an asynchronous individual-based model for social movement which allows social structure within groups to be included. We assess the dynamics of group navigation and resulting collision risk in the context of information transfer through the system. In agreement with previous work, we find that group size has a nonlinear effect on collision risk. We implement examples of possible network structures to explore the impact social preferences have on collision risk. We show that any social heterogeneity induces greater obstacle avoidance with further improvements corresponding to groups containing fewer influential individuals. The model provides a platform for both further theoretical investigation and practical application. In particular, we argue that the role of social structures within bird flocks may have an important role to play in assessing the risk of collisions with wind turbines, but that new methods of data analysis are needed to identify these social structures.

  5. Optical transmission testing based on asynchronous sampling techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrozek, T.; Perlicki, K.; Wilczewski, G.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a method of analysis of images obtained with the Asynchronous Delay Tap Sampling technique, which is used for simultaneous monitoring of a number of phenomena in the physical layer of an optical network. This method allows visualization of results in a form of an optical signal's waveform (characteristics depicting phase portraits). Depending on a specific phenomenon being observed (i.e.: chromatic dispersion, polarization mode dispersion and ASE noise), the shape of the waveform changes. Herein presented original waveforms were acquired utilizing the OptSim 4.0 simulation package. After specific simulation testing, the obtained numerical data was transformed into an image form, that was further subjected to the analysis using authors' custom algorithms. These algorithms utilize various pixel operations and creation of reports each image might be characterized with. Each individual report shows the number of black pixels being present in the specific image segment. Afterwards, generated reports are compared with each other, across the original-impaired relationship. The differential report is created which consists of a "binary key" that shows the increase in the number of pixels in each particular segment. The ultimate aim of this work is to find the correlation between the generated binary keys and the analyzed common phenomenon being observed, allowing identification of the type of interference occurring. In the further course of the work it is evitable to determine their respective values. The presented work delivers the first objective - the ability to recognize interference.

  6. Commande vectorielle d'un moteur asynchrone sans capteur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ourth, T.

    1993-06-01

    A field-oriented control strategy for induction machines which does not use mechanical sensors is presented. The rotor flux is observed by a reduced-order Luenberger-type observer based on a model using a stator-fixed reference frame. An estimate of the rotation speed is derived from the flux vector, the measured stator currents and the field orientation angle. Simulations demonstrate that this control strategy performs well even in the presence of parameter variations up to ± 50% (resistances). Ce papier présente la commande par flux orienté d'une machine asynchrone sans capteur de vitesse ou de position. Le flux rotorique est évalué grâce à un observateur d'ordre réduit d'un type voisin de Luenberger travaillant dans un repère fixe statorique. L'estimation de la vitesse est obtenue à partir du module du flux rotorique, des courants statoriques mesurés et de l'angle d'orientation du flux rotorique. Cette étude basée sur des simulations démontre un comportement acceptable de la commande malgré la variation des paramètres comme les résistances de la machine.

  7. Obstacle avoidance in social groups: new insights from asynchronous models

    PubMed Central

    Croft, Simon; Budgey, Richard; Pitchford, Jonathan W.; Wood, A. Jamie

    2015-01-01

    For moving animals, the successful avoidance of hazardous obstacles is an important capability. Despite this, few models of collective motion have addressed the relationship between behavioural and social features and obstacle avoidance. We develop an asynchronous individual-based model for social movement which allows social structure within groups to be included. We assess the dynamics of group navigation and resulting collision risk in the context of information transfer through the system. In agreement with previous work, we find that group size has a nonlinear effect on collision risk. We implement examples of possible network structures to explore the impact social preferences have on collision risk. We show that any social heterogeneity induces greater obstacle avoidance with further improvements corresponding to groups containing fewer influential individuals. The model provides a platform for both further theoretical investigation and practical application. In particular, we argue that the role of social structures within bird flocks may have an important role to play in assessing the risk of collisions with wind turbines, but that new methods of data analysis are needed to identify these social structures. PMID:25833245

  8. Asynchronous visual event-based time-to-contact.

    PubMed

    Clady, Xavier; Clercq, Charles; Ieng, Sio-Hoi; Houseini, Fouzhan; Randazzo, Marco; Natale, Lorenzo; Bartolozzi, Chiara; Benosman, Ryad

    2014-01-01

    Reliable and fast sensing of the environment is a fundamental requirement for autonomous mobile robotic platforms. Unfortunately, the frame-based acquisition paradigm at the basis of main stream artificial perceptive systems is limited by low temporal dynamics and redundant data flow, leading to high computational costs. Hence, conventional sensing and relative computation are obviously incompatible with the design of high speed sensor-based reactive control for mobile applications, that pose strict limits on energy consumption and computational load. This paper introduces a fast obstacle avoidance method based on the output of an asynchronous event-based time encoded imaging sensor. The proposed method relies on an event-based Time To Contact (TTC) computation based on visual event-based motion flows. The approach is event-based in the sense that every incoming event adds to the computation process thus allowing fast avoidance responses. The method is validated indoor on a mobile robot, comparing the event-based TTC with a laser range finder TTC, showing that event-based sensing offers new perspectives for mobile robotics sensing.

  9. Asynchronous visual event-based time-to-contact

    PubMed Central

    Clady, Xavier; Clercq, Charles; Ieng, Sio-Hoi; Houseini, Fouzhan; Randazzo, Marco; Natale, Lorenzo; Bartolozzi, Chiara; Benosman, Ryad

    2014-01-01

    Reliable and fast sensing of the environment is a fundamental requirement for autonomous mobile robotic platforms. Unfortunately, the frame-based acquisition paradigm at the basis of main stream artificial perceptive systems is limited by low temporal dynamics and redundant data flow, leading to high computational costs. Hence, conventional sensing and relative computation are obviously incompatible with the design of high speed sensor-based reactive control for mobile applications, that pose strict limits on energy consumption and computational load. This paper introduces a fast obstacle avoidance method based on the output of an asynchronous event-based time encoded imaging sensor. The proposed method relies on an event-based Time To Contact (TTC) computation based on visual event-based motion flows. The approach is event-based in the sense that every incoming event adds to the computation process thus allowing fast avoidance responses. The method is validated indoor on a mobile robot, comparing the event-based TTC with a laser range finder TTC, showing that event-based sensing offers new perspectives for mobile robotics sensing. PMID:24570652

  10. Effects of synchronous and asynchronous embryo transfer on postnatal development, adult health, and behavior in mice.

    PubMed

    López-Cardona, Angela P; Fernández-González, Raúl; Pérez-Crespo, Miriam; Alén, Francisco; de Fonseca, Fernando Rodriguez; Orio, Laura; Gutierrez-Adan, Alfonso

    2015-10-01

    Asynchronous embryo transfer (ET) is a common assisted reproduction technique used in several species, but its biological effects on postnatal and early development remain unknown. The aim of this study was to determine whether asynchronous ET produces long-term effects in mice. Postnatal development, animal weight, systolic blood pressure (SBP), relative organ weight (liver, spleen, kidneys, heart, lungs, brain, and testicles), and behavior (assessed in open-field and elevated plus maze tests) were assessed in CD1 mice produced by different ET procedures: 1) the transfer of Day 3.5 (D3.5) blastocysts to the uterus (BL-UT); 2) the transfer of D3.5 blastocysts to the oviduct (BL-OV); or 3) the transfer of D0.5 zygotes to the oviduct (Z-OV). In vivo conceived animals served as controls (CT). The transfer of blastocysts to the uterus or zygotes to the oviduct was defined as synchronous, and transfer of blastocysts to the oviduct was defined as asynchronous. Both synchronous and asynchronous ET resulted in increased weight at birth that normalized thereafter with the exception of asynchronous ET females. In this group, female BL-OV, a clear lower body weight was recorded along postnatal life when compared with controls (P < 0.05). No effects on animal weight were produced during postnatal development in the synchronous ET groups (BL-UT, Z-OV, and CT). Both synchronous and asynchronous ET had impacts on adult (Wk 30) organ weight. SBP was modified in animals derived from blastocyst but not zygote ET. Effects on behavior (anxiety in the plus maze) were only detected in the BL-UT group (P < 0.05). Our findings indicate that zygotes are less sensitive than blastocysts to ET and that both synchronous and asynchronous blastocyst ET may have long-term consequences on health, with possible impacts on weight, arterial pressure, relative organ weight, and behavior.

  11. Influence of cholesterol on catecholamine release from the fusion pore of large dense core chromaffin granules.

    PubMed

    Wang, Nan; Kwan, Christina; Gong, Xiandi; de Chaves, Elena Posse; Tse, Amy; Tse, Frederick W

    2010-03-17

    Changes in cellular cholesterol can affect exocytosis, but the influence of cholesterol in fusion pore kinetics is unclear. Using carbon fiber amperometry, we monitored quantal catecholamine release from rat chromaffin cells. To bypass any possible effect of cholesterol perturbation on ion channels or the colocalization of voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels with sites of exocytosis, exocytosis was stimulated via uniform elevation of cytosolic [Ca(2+)] (with whole-cell dialysis of a Ca(2+)-buffered solution). Under this condition, alterations of cellular cholesterol affected neither the mean number of amperometric events triggered per cell nor their quantal size and the kinetics of their main spike (which reflects the rapid release during and after rapid fusion pore dilation). In contrast, the reduction of cellular cholesterol shortened the "prespike foot" signals (which reflect the leakage of catecholamine via a semi-stable fusion pore) and reduced the proportion of "stand-alone foot" signals (which reflect the release via a flickering fusion pore that may close before it dilates significantly), whereas an oversupply of cholesterol had opposite effects. Acute extraction of cholesterol from the cytosol (via whole-cell dialysis of a cholesterol extractor) also shortened the prespike foot signals and reduced the proportion of stand-alone foot signals, but acute extracellular application of cholesterol extractor or "soluble" cholesterol had no effect. Our data raise the possibility that cholesterol molecules, particularly those in the cytoplasmic leaflet, helps to constrain the narrow waistline of a semi-stable fusion pore while it is flickering or before it starts to dilate rapidly.

  12. Asynchronous population dynamics of Siberian lemmings across the Palaearctic tundra.

    PubMed

    Erlinge, Sam; Danell, Kjell; Frodin, Peter; Hasselquist, Dennis; Nilsson, Patric; Olofsson, Eva-Britt; Svensson, Mikael

    1999-06-01

    The synchrony of Siberian lemming (Lemmus sibiricus L.) population dynamics was investigated during a ship-borne expedition along the Palaearctic tundra coast in the summer of 1994. On 12 sites along the coast from the Kola Peninsula to Wrangel Island, relative densities of lemmings were recorded using a standardised snap-trapping programme. The phase position of the lemming cycle in each of the studied populations was determined based on current density estimates, signs of previous density and the age profile of each population (ageing based on eye lens mass). In addition, dendrochronological methods were used to determine when the last peak in the density of microtine populations occurred at each site. The examined lemming populations were in different phases of the lemming cycle. Some populations were in the peak phase, as indicated by high current densities, an age profile in which older individuals were well represented, and signs of high previous density (abundant old lemming faeces). Other populations were in the decline phase, as reflected in a moderate current density, a predominance of older individuals and signs of high previous density. Populations in the low phase had an extremely low current density and showed signs of high previous density, while populations in the increase phase had a moderate current density, a predominance of younger individuals and showed signs of low previous density. The results of phase determinations based on dendrochronological methods support the findings based on lemming demography. Recent Russian studies carried out on some of the sites also agreed with our phase determination results. Thus, on a regional scale (across the whole Palaearctic tundra), the population dynamics of Siberian lemmings can be considered asynchronous. However, sites situated adjacent to each other were often phase synchronous, suggesting a more fine-grained pattern of dynamics with synchrony over distances as long as 1000 km or so, e.g. the Yamal

  13. Towards Cloud-based Asynchronous Elasticity for Iterative HPC Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Rosa Righi, Rodrigo; Facco Rodrigues, Vinicius; André da Costa, Cristiano; Kreutz, Diego; Heiss, Hans-Ulrich

    2015-10-01

    Elasticity is one of the key features of cloud computing. It allows applications to dynamically scale computing and storage resources, avoiding over- and under-provisioning. In high performance computing (HPC), initiatives are normally modeled to handle bag-of-tasks or key-value applications through a load balancer and a loosely-coupled set of virtual machine (VM) instances. In the joint-field of Message Passing Interface (MPI) and tightly-coupled HPC applications, we observe the need of rewriting source codes, previous knowledge of the application and/or stop-reconfigure-and-go approaches to address cloud elasticity. Besides, there are problems related to how profit this new feature in the HPC scope, since in MPI 2.0 applications the programmers need to handle communicators by themselves, and a sudden consolidation of a VM, together with a process, can compromise the entire execution. To address these issues, we propose a PaaS-based elasticity model, named AutoElastic. It acts as a middleware that allows iterative HPC applications to take advantage of dynamic resource provisioning of cloud infrastructures without any major modification. AutoElastic provides a new concept denoted here as asynchronous elasticity, i.e., it provides a framework to allow applications to either increase or decrease their computing resources without blocking the current execution. The feasibility of AutoElastic is demonstrated through a prototype that runs a CPU-bound numerical integration application on top of the OpenNebula middleware. The results showed the saving of about 3 min at each scaling out operations, emphasizing the contribution of the new concept on contexts where seconds are precious.

  14. The Use of Efficient Broadcast Protocols in Asynchronous Distributed Systems. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmuck, Frank Bernhard

    1988-01-01

    Reliable broadcast protocols are important tools in distributed and fault-tolerant programming. They are useful for sharing information and for maintaining replicated data in a distributed system. However, a wide range of such protocols has been proposed. These protocols differ in their fault tolerance and delivery ordering characteristics. There is a tradeoff between the cost of a broadcast protocol and how much ordering it provides. It is, therefore, desirable to employ protocols that support only a low degree of ordering whenever possible. This dissertation presents techniques for deciding how strongly ordered a protocol is necessary to solve a given application problem. It is shown that there are two distinct classes of application problems: problems that can be solved with efficient, asynchronous protocols, and problems that require global ordering. The concept of a linearization function that maps partially ordered sets of events to totally ordered histories is introduced. How to construct an asynchronous implementation that solves a given problem if a linearization function for it can be found is shown. It is proved that in general the question of whether a problem has an asynchronous solution is undecidable. Hence there exists no general algorithm that would automatically construct a suitable linearization function for a given problem. Therefore, an important subclass of problems that have certain commutativity properties are considered. Techniques for constructing asynchronous implementations for this class are presented. These techniques are useful for constructing efficient asynchronous implementations for a broad range of practical problems.

  15. Features of the Asynchronous Correlation between the China Coal Price Index and Coal Mining Accidental Deaths.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuecheng; Cheng, Wuyi; Luo, Sida; Luo, Yun; Ma, Chengchen; He, Tailin

    2016-01-01

    The features of the asynchronous correlation between accident indices and the factors that influence accidents can provide an effective reference for warnings of coal mining accidents. However, what are the features of this correlation? To answer this question, data from the China coal price index and the number of deaths from coal mining accidents were selected as the sample data. The fluctuation modes of the asynchronous correlation between the two data sets were defined according to the asynchronous correlation coefficients, symbolization, and sliding windows. We then built several directed and weighted network models, within which the fluctuation modes and the transformations between modes were represented by nodes and edges. Then, the features of the asynchronous correlation between these two variables could be studied from a perspective of network topology. We found that the correlation between the price index and the accidental deaths was asynchronous and fluctuating. Certain aspects, such as the key fluctuation modes, the subgroups characteristics, the transmission medium, the periodicity and transmission path length in the network, were analyzed by using complex network theory, analytical methods and spectral analysis method. These results provide a scientific reference for generating warnings for coal mining accidents based on economic indices.

  16. Neurochemical and Neuropharmacological Aspects of Circadian Disruptions: An Introduction to Asynchronization

    PubMed Central

    Kohyama, Jun

    2011-01-01

    Circadian disruptions are common in modern society, and there is an urgent need for effective treatment strategies. According to standard diagnostic criteria, most adolescents showing both insomnia and daytime sleepiness are diagnosed as having behavioral-induced sleep efficiency syndrome resulting from insomnia due to inadequate sleep hygiene. However, a simple intervention of adequate sleep hygiene often fails to treat them. As a solution to this clinical problem, the present review first overviews the basic neurochemical and neuropharmachological aspects of sleep and circadian rhythm regulation, then explains several circadian disruptions from similar viewpoints, and finally introduces the clinical notion of asynchronization. Asynchronization is designated to explain the pathophysiology/pathogenesis of exhibition of both insomnia and hypersomnia in adolescents, which comprises disturbances in various aspects of biological rhythms. The major triggers for asynchronization are considered to be a combination of light exposure during the night, which disturbs the biological clock and decreases melatonin secretion, as well as a lack of light exposure in the morning, which prohibits normal synchronization of the biological clock to the 24-hour cycle of the earth and decreases the activity of serotonin. In the chronic phase of asynchronization, involvement of both wake- and sleep-promoting systems is suggested. Both conventional and alternative therapeutic approaches for potential treatment of asynchronization are suggested. PMID:22131941

  17. Features of the Asynchronous Correlation between the China Coal Price Index and Coal Mining Accidental Deaths

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yuecheng; Cheng, Wuyi; Luo, Sida; Luo, Yun; Ma, Chengchen; He, Tailin

    2016-01-01

    The features of the asynchronous correlation between accident indices and the factors that influence accidents can provide an effective reference for warnings of coal mining accidents. However, what are the features of this correlation? To answer this question, data from the China coal price index and the number of deaths from coal mining accidents were selected as the sample data. The fluctuation modes of the asynchronous correlation between the two data sets were defined according to the asynchronous correlation coefficients, symbolization, and sliding windows. We then built several directed and weighted network models, within which the fluctuation modes and the transformations between modes were represented by nodes and edges. Then, the features of the asynchronous correlation between these two variables could be studied from a perspective of network topology. We found that the correlation between the price index and the accidental deaths was asynchronous and fluctuating. Certain aspects, such as the key fluctuation modes, the subgroups characteristics, the transmission medium, the periodicity and transmission path length in the network, were analyzed by using complex network theory, analytical methods and spectral analysis method. These results provide a scientific reference for generating warnings for coal mining accidents based on economic indices. PMID:27902748

  18. Neurochemical and neuropharmacological aspects of circadian disruptions: an introduction to asynchronization.

    PubMed

    Kohyama, Jun

    2011-06-01

    Circadian disruptions are common in modern society, and there is an urgent need for effective treatment strategies. According to standard diagnostic criteria, most adolescents showing both insomnia and daytime sleepiness are diagnosed as having behavioral-induced sleep efficiency syndrome resulting from insomnia due to inadequate sleep hygiene. However, a simple intervention of adequate sleep hygiene often fails to treat them. As a solution to this clinical problem, the present review first overviews the basic neurochemical and neuropharmachological aspects of sleep and circadian rhythm regulation, then explains several circadian disruptions from similar viewpoints, and finally introduces the clinical notion of asynchronization. Asynchronization is designated to explain the pathophysiology/pathogenesis of exhibition of both insomnia and hypersomnia in adolescents, which comprises disturbances in various aspects of biological rhythms. The major triggers for asynchronization are considered to be a combination of light exposure during the night, which disturbs the biological clock and decreases melatonin secretion, as well as a lack of light exposure in the morning, which prohibits normal synchronization of the biological clock to the 24-hour cycle of the earth and decreases the activity of serotonin. In the chronic phase of asynchronization, involvement of both wake- and sleep-promoting systems is suggested. Both conventional and alternative therapeutic approaches for potential treatment of asynchronization are suggested.

  19. GPU-Accelerated Asynchronous Error Correction for Mixed Precision Iterative Refinement

    SciTech Connect

    Antz, Hartwig; Luszczek, Piotr; Dongarra, Jack; Heuveline, Vinent

    2011-12-14

    In hardware-aware high performance computing, block- asynchronous iteration and mixed precision iterative refinement are two techniques that are applied to leverage the computing power of SIMD accelerators like GPUs. Although they use a very different approach for this purpose, they share the basic idea of compensating the convergence behaviour of an inferior numerical algorithm by a more efficient usage of the provided computing power. In this paper, we want to analyze the potential of combining both techniques. Therefore, we implement a mixed precision iterative refinement algorithm using a block-asynchronous iteration as an error correction solver, and compare its performance with a pure implementation of a block-asynchronous iteration and an iterative refinement method using double precision for the error correction solver. For matrices from theUniversity of FloridaMatrix collection,we report the convergence behaviour and provide the total solver runtime using different GPU architectures.

  20. Dual stator winding variable speed asynchronous generator: magnetic equivalent circuit with saturation, FEM analysis and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tutelea, L. N.; Muntean, N.; Deaconu, S. I.; Cunţan, C. D.

    2016-02-01

    The authors carried out a theoretical and experimental study of dual stator winding squirrel cage asynchronous generator (DSWA) behaviour in the presence of saturation regime (non-sinusoidal) due to the variable speed operation. The main aims are the determination of the relations of calculating the equivalent parameters of the machine windings, FEM validation of parameters and characteristics with free FEMM 4.2 computing software and the practice experimental tests for verifying them. Issue is limited to three phase range of double stator winding cage-asynchronous generator of small sized powers, the most currently used in the small adjustable speed wind or hydro power plants. The tests were carried out using three-phase asynchronous generator having rated power of 6 [kVA].

  1. F-actin and myosin II accelerate catecholamine release from chromaffin granules

    PubMed Central

    Berberian, Khajak; Torres, Alexis J; Fang, Qinghua; Kisler, Kassandra

    2009-01-01

    The roles of non-muscle myosin II and cortical actin filaments in chromaffin granule exocytosis were studied by confocal fluorescence microscopy, amperometry, and cell-attached capacitance measurements. Fluorescence imaging indicated decreased mobility of granules near the plasma membrane following inhibition of myosin II function with Blebbistatin. Slower fusion pore expansion rates and longer fusion pore lifetimes were observed after inhibition of actin polymerization using Cytochalasin-D. Amperometric recordings revealed increased amperometric spike half-widths without change in quantal size after either myosin II inhibition or actin disruption. These results suggest that actin and myosin II facilitate release from individual chromaffin granules by accelerating dissociation of catecholamines from the intragranular matrix possibly through generation of mechanical forces. PMID:19158310

  2. An Examination of the Effectiveness of Embedded Audio Feedback for English as a Foreign Language Students in Asynchronous Online Discussions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olesova, Larisa A.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the effect of asynchronous embedded audio feedback on English as a Foreign Language (EFL) students' higher-order learning and perception of the audio feedback versus text-based feedback when the students participated in asynchronous online discussions. In addition, this study examined how the impact and perceptions differed…

  3. Distributed Teaching Presence and Participants' Activity Profiles: A Theoretical Approach to the Structural Analysis of Asynchronous Learning Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coll, Cesar; Engel, Anna; Bustos, Alfonso

    2009-01-01

    The rapid spread of learning networks based on asynchronous written communication--Asynchronous Learning Networks (ALNs)--makes it crucial to assess the possibilities offered by these new environments to facilitate and promote learning processes and learning outcomes. Our interest in this area is specifically directed towards the study of…

  4. The Effects of Metacognitive Instruction Embedded within an Asynchronous Learning Network on Scientific Inquiry Skills. Research Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zion, Michal; Michalsky, Tova; Mevarech, Zemira R.

    2005-01-01

    The study is aimed at investigating the effects of four learning methods on students' scientific inquiry skills. The four learning methods are: (a) metacognitive-guided inquiry within asynchronous learning networked technology (MINT); (b) an asynchronous learning network (ALN) with no metacognitive guidance; (c) metacognitive-guided inquiry…

  5. The Negotiation Model in Asynchronous Computer-Mediated Communication (CMC): Negotiation in Task-Based Email Exchanges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitade, Keiko

    2006-01-01

    Based on recent studies, computer-mediated communication (CMC) has been considered a tool to aid in language learning on account of its distinctive interactional features. However, most studies have referred to "synchronous" CMC and neglected to investigate how "asynchronous" CMC contributes to language learning. Asynchronous CMC possesses…

  6. Enhancing Discussions in the Asynchronous Online Classroom: The Lack of Face-to-Face Interaction Does Not Lessen the Lesson

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comer, Debra R.; Lenaghan, Janet A.

    2013-01-01

    This article addresses educators' concerns about using asynchronous online discussions in lieu of face-to-face discussions. Drawing from research on asynchronous online education and Bloom's taxonomy, the authors introduce the system of "original examples" and "value-added comments" that they have developed to promote engaging and meaningful…

  7. Differences in Electronic Exchanges in Synchronous and Asynchronous Computer-Mediated Communication: The Effect of Culture as a Mediating Variable

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angeli, Charoula; Schwartz, Neil H.

    2016-01-01

    Two hundred and eighty undergraduates from universities in two countries were asked to read didactic material, and then think and write about potential solutions to an ill-defined problem. The writing was conducted within a synchronous or asynchronous computer-mediated communication (CMC) environment. Asynchronous CMC took the form of email…

  8. Asynchronous hatching provides females with a means for increasing male care but incurs a cost by reducing offspring fitness.

    PubMed

    Ford, L E; Smiseth, P T

    2016-02-01

    In species with biparental care, sexual conflict occurs because the benefit of care depends on the total amount of care provided by the two parents while the cost of care depends on each parent's own contribution. Asynchronous hatching may play a role in mediating the resolution of this conflict over parental care. The sexual conflict hypothesis for the evolution of asynchronous hatching suggests that females adjust hatching patterns in order to increase male parental effort relative to female effort. We tested this hypothesis in the burying beetle Nicrophorus vespilloides by setting up experimental broods with three different hatching patterns: synchronous, asynchronous and highly asynchronous broods. As predicted, we found that males provided care for longer in asynchronous broods whereas the opposite was true of females. However, we did not find any benefit to females of reducing their duration of care in terms of increased lifespan or reduced mass loss during breeding. We found substantial negative effects of hatching asynchrony on offspring fitness as larval mass was lower and fewer larvae survived to dispersal in highly asynchronous broods compared to synchronous or asynchronous broods. Our results suggest that, even though females can increase male parental effort by hatching their broods more asynchronously, females pay a substantial cost from doing so in terms of reducing offspring growth and survival. Thus, females should be under selection to produce a hatching pattern that provides the best possible trade-off between the benefits of increased male parental effort and the costs due to reduced offspring fitness.

  9. Comparison between Synchronous and Asynchronous Instructional Delivery Method of Training Programme on In-Service Physical Educators' Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emmanouilidou, Kyriaki; Derri, Vassiliki; Antoniou, Panagiotis; Kyrgiridis, Pavlos

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare the influences of a training programme's instructional delivery method (synchronous and asynchronous) on Greek in-service physical educators' cognitive understanding on student assessment. Forty nine participants were randomly divided into synchronous, asynchronous, and control group. The experimental groups…

  10. FAST: A fully asynchronous and status-tracking pattern for geoprocessing services orchestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Huayi; You, Lan; Gui, Zhipeng; Gao, Shuang; Li, Zhenqiang; Yu, Jingmin

    2014-09-01

    Geoprocessing service orchestration (GSO) provides a unified and flexible way to implement cross-application, long-lived, and multi-step geoprocessing service workflows by coordinating geoprocessing services collaboratively. Usually, geoprocessing services and geoprocessing service workflows are data and/or computing intensive. The intensity feature may make the execution process of a workflow time-consuming. Since it initials an execution request without blocking other interactions on the client side, an asynchronous mechanism is especially appropriate for GSO workflows. Many critical problems remain to be solved in existing asynchronous patterns for GSO including difficulties in improving performance, status tracking, and clarifying the workflow structure. These problems are a challenge when orchestrating performance efficiency, making statuses instantly available, and constructing clearly structured GSO workflows. A Fully Asynchronous and Status-Tracking (FAST) pattern that adopts asynchronous interactions throughout the whole communication tier of a workflow is proposed for GSO. The proposed FAST pattern includes a mechanism that actively pushes the latest status to clients instantly and economically. An independent proxy was designed to isolate the status tracking logic from the geoprocessing business logic, which assists the formation of a clear GSO workflow structure. A workflow was implemented in the FAST pattern to simulate the flooding process in the Poyang Lake region. Experimental results show that the proposed FAST pattern can efficiently tackle data/computing intensive geoprocessing tasks. The performance of all collaborative partners was improved due to the asynchronous mechanism throughout communication tier. A status-tracking mechanism helps users retrieve the latest running status of a GSO workflow in an efficient and instant way. The clear structure of the GSO workflow lowers the barriers for geospatial domain experts and model designers to

  11. Asynchronous collision integrators: Explicit treatment of unilateral contact with friction and nodal restraints

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Sebastian; Bucher, Christian

    2013-01-01

    This article presents asynchronous collision integrators and a simple asynchronous method treating nodal restraints. Asynchronous discretizations allow individual time step sizes for each spatial region, improving the efficiency of explicit time stepping for finite element meshes with heterogeneous element sizes. The article first introduces asynchronous variational integration being expressed by drift and kick operators. Linear nodal restraint conditions are solved by a simple projection of the forces that is shown to be equivalent to RATTLE. Unilateral contact is solved by an asynchronous variant of decomposition contact response. Therein, velocities are modified avoiding penetrations. Although decomposition contact response is solving a large system of linear equations (being critical for the numerical efficiency of explicit time stepping schemes) and is needing special treatment regarding overconstraint and linear dependency of the contact constraints (for example from double-sided node-to-surface contact or self-contact), the asynchronous strategy handles these situations efficiently and robust. Only a single constraint involving a very small number of degrees of freedom is considered at once leading to a very efficient solution. The treatment of friction is exemplified for the Coulomb model. Special care needs the contact of nodes that are subject to restraints. Together with the aforementioned projection for restraints, a novel efficient solution scheme can be presented. The collision integrator does not influence the critical time step. Hence, the time step can be chosen independently from the underlying time-stepping scheme. The time step may be fixed or time-adaptive. New demands on global collision detection are discussed exemplified by position codes and node-to-segment integration. Numerical examples illustrate convergence and efficiency of the new contact algorithm. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. International Journal for Numerical Methods in

  12. Catecholamine exocytosis during low frequency stimulation in mouse adrenal chromaffin cells is primarily asynchronous and controlled by the novel mechanism of Ca2+ syntilla suppression

    PubMed Central

    Lefkowitz, Jason J; DeCrescenzo, Valerie; Duan, Kailai; Bellve, Karl D; Fogarty, Kevin E; Walsh, John V; ZhuGe, Ronghua

    2014-01-01

    Adrenal chromaffin cells (ACCs), stimulated by the splanchnic nerve, generate action potentials (APs) at a frequency near 0.5 Hz in the resting physiological state, at times described as ‘rest and digest’. How such low frequency stimulation in turn elicits sufficient catecholamine exocytosis to set basal sympathetic tone is not readily explained by the classical mechanism of stimulus–secretion coupling, where exocytosis is synchronized to AP-induced Ca2+ influx. By using simulated action potentials (sAPs) at 0.5 Hz in isolated patch-clamped mouse ACCs, we show here that less than 10% of all catecholaminergic exocytosis, measured by carbon fibre amperometry, is synchronized to an AP. The asynchronous phase, the dominant phase, of exocytosis does not require Ca2+ influx. Furthermore, increased asynchronous exocytosis is accompanied by an AP-dependent decrease in frequency of Ca2+ syntillas (i.e. transient, focal Ca2+ release from internal stores) and is ryanodine sensitive. We propose a mechanism of disinhibition, wherein APs suppress Ca2+ syntillas, which themselves inhibit exocytosis as they do in the case of spontaneous catecholaminergic exocytosis. PMID:25128575

  13. Asynchronous updates can promote the evolution of cooperation on multiplex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, James M.; Hoyle, Rebecca B.

    2017-04-01

    We study the importance to the frequency of cooperation of the choice of updating strategies in a game played asynchronously or synchronously across layers in a multiplex network. Updating asynchronously in the public goods game leads to higher frequencies of cooperation compared to synchronous updates. How large this effect is depends on the sensitivity of the game dynamics to changes in the number of cooperators surrounding a player, with the largest effect observed when players payoffs are small. The discovery of this effect enhances understanding of cooperation on multiplex networks, and demonstrates a new way to maintain cooperation in these systems.

  14. Asynchronous teaching of psychomotor skills through VR annotations: evaluation in digital rectal examination.

    PubMed

    Rissanen, Mikko J; Kume, Naoto; Kuroda, Yoshihiro; Kuroda, Tomohiro; Yoshimura, Koji; Yoshihara, Hiroyuki

    2008-01-01

    Many VR technology based training systems use expert's motion data as the training aid, but would not provide any short-cut to teaching medical skills that do not depend on exact motions. Earlier we presented Annotated Simulation Records (ASRs), which can be used to encapsulate experts' insight on psychomotor skills. Annotations made to behavioural parameters in training simulators enable asynchronous teaching instead of just motion training in a proactive way to the learner. We evaluated ASRs for asynchronous teaching of Digital Rectal Examination (DRE) with 3 urologists and 8 medical students. The ASRs were found more effective than motion-based training with verbal feedback.

  15. Scenario Decomposition for 0-1 Stochastic Programs: Improvements and Asynchronous Implementation

    DOE PAGES

    Ryan, Kevin; Rajan, Deepak; Ahmed, Shabbir

    2016-05-01

    We recently proposed scenario decomposition algorithm for stochastic 0-1 programs finds an optimal solution by evaluating and removing individual solutions that are discovered by solving scenario subproblems. In our work, we develop an asynchronous, distributed implementation of the algorithm which has computational advantages over existing synchronous implementations of the algorithm. Improvements to both the synchronous and asynchronous algorithm are proposed. We also test the results on well known stochastic 0-1 programs from the SIPLIB test library and is able to solve one previously unsolved instance from the test set.

  16. State assignment for asynchronous FSMs with the use of the incompatibility and complement graph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulisz, Józef

    2016-12-01

    The paper presents an application of a novel concept of graph - the Incompatibility and Complement Graph - to state assignment for asynchronous FSMs. A specific feature of the graph is that it contains two kinds of edges: connecting mutually incompatible nodes, and connecting mutually complementing nodes. The graph can be useful in certain class of optimization problems, in which compatibility of bit patterns both in the true, and in the complemented form has to be analyzed. An example of such a problem is covering analysis in state assignment for asynchronous FSMs. The paper presents a simple example explaining the method. Appropriate algorithms for the graph building and coloring are also presented.

  17. Finite-time quantised feedback asynchronously switched control of sampled-data switched linear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ronghao; Xing, Jianchun; Li, Juelong; Xiang, Zhengrong

    2016-10-01

    This paper studies the problem of stabilising a sampled-data switched linear system by quantised feedback asynchronously switched controllers. The idea of a quantised feedback asynchronously switched control strategy originates in earlier work reflecting actual system characteristic of switching and quantising, respectively. A quantised scheme is designed depending on switching time using dynamic quantiser. When sampling time, system switching time and controller switching time are all not uniform, the proposed switching controllers guarantee the system to be finite-time stable by a piecewise Lyapunov function and the average dwell-time method. Simulation examples are provided to show the effectiveness of the developed results.

  18. Real-time imaging of renin release in vitro.

    PubMed

    Peti-Peterdi, János; Fintha, Attila; Fuson, Amanda L; Tousson, Albert; Chow, Robert H

    2004-08-01

    Renin release from juxtaglomerular granular cells is considered the rate-limiting step in activation of the renin-angiotensin system that helps to maintain body salt and water balance. Available assays to measure renin release are complex, indirect, and work with significant internal errors. To directly visualize and study the dynamics of both the release and tissue activity of renin, we isolated and perfused afferent arterioles with attached glomeruli dissected from rabbit kidneys and used multiphoton fluorescence imaging. Acidotropic fluorophores, such as quinacrine and LysoTrackers, clearly and selectively labeled renin granules. Immunohistochemistry of mouse kidney with a specific renin antibody and quinacrine staining colocalized renin granules and quinacrine fluorescence. A low-salt diet for 1 wk caused an approximately fivefold increase in the number of both individual granules and renin-positive granular cells. Time-lapse imaging showed no signs of granule trafficking or any movement, only the dimming and disappearance of fluorescence from individual renin granules within 1 s in response to 100 microM isoproterenol. There appeared to be a quantal release of the granular contents; i.e., an all-or-none phenomenon. Using As4.1 cells, a granular cell line, we observed further classic signs of granule exocytosis, the emptying of granule content associated with a flash of quinacrine fluorescence. Using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based, 5-(2-aminoethylamino)naphthalene-1-sulfonic acid (EDANS)-conjugated renin substrate in the bath, an increase in EDANS fluorescence (renin activity) was observed around granular cells in response to isoproterenol. Fluorescence microscopy is an excellent tool for the further study of the mechanism, regulation, and dynamics of renin release.

  19. Syndactyly Release.

    PubMed

    Braun, Tara L; Trost, Jeffrey G; Pederson, William C

    2016-11-01

    Syndactyly is one of the most common congenital hand anomalies treated by pediatric plastic surgeons. Established principles of syndactyly separation dictate the timing and order of syndactyly release, with the goals of surgery being the creation of an anatomically normal webspace, tension-free closure of soft tissue, and return of function to the fingers. Numerous surgical methods have been described, many of which involve the use of local flaps to reconstruct the commissure and full-thickness skin grafts for coverage of raw areas. Recently, reconstructive techniques without the use of skin grafts have been devised, which work well for certain indications. Special considerations are described for complete, complex, and syndromic syndactylies. Outcomes for simple syndactyly release are typically good when surgical principles are followed, whereas complex syndactyly release tends to have less-favorable outcomes and more complications.

  20. Kinetics of acetylcholine quanta release at the neuromuscular junction during high-frequency nerve stimulation.

    PubMed

    Kovyazina, Irina V; Tsentsevitsky, Andrei N; Nikolsky, Evgeny E; Bukharaeva, Ellya A

    2010-11-01

    The effects of high-frequency nerve stimulation (10-100 Hz) on the kinetics of evoked acetylcholine quanta secretion from frog motor nerve endings were studied. The amplitude and temporal parameters of uni- and multiquantal endplate currents were analysed to estimate the possible changes in the degree of synchrony of quantal release. The frog neuromuscular synapse is unusually long and we have placed special emphasis on evaluating the velocity of propagation of excitation along the nonmyelinated nerve ending as this might influence the synchrony of release from the whole terminal and hence affect the time course of postsynaptic currents. The data show that high-frequency firing leads to the desynchronization of acetylcholine release from motor nerve endings governed by at least two independent factors, namely a reduction of nerve pulse propagation velocity in the nonmyelinated parts of the axon and a change of secretion kinetics at single active zones. A computer reconstruction of the multiquantal synaptic response was performed to estimate any contribution of each of the above factors to the total rate of release and amplitude and time characteristics of the endplate currents. The results indicate that modification of the kinetics of neurotransmitter quanta release during high-frequency firing should be taken into account when mechanisms underlying the plasticity of chemical synapses are under investigation.

  1. Cooperative Learning in Graduate Student Projects: Comparing Synchronous versus Asynchronous Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strang, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Cooperative learning was applied in a graduate project management course to compare the effectiveness of asynchronous versus synchronous online team meetings. An experiment was constructed to allocate students to project teams while ensuring there was a balance of requisite skills, namely systems analysis and design along with HTML/Javascript…

  2. Visual Search in a Multi-Element Asynchronous Dynamic (MAD) World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kunar, Melina A.; Watson, Derrick G.

    2011-01-01

    In visual search tasks participants search for a target among distractors in strictly controlled displays. We show that visual search principles observed in these tasks do not necessarily apply in more ecologically valid search conditions, using dynamic and complex displays. A multi-element asynchronous dynamic (MAD) visual search was developed in…

  3. Participation in Asynchronous Online Discussion Forums Does Improve Student Learning of Gross Anatomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Rodney A.; Farchione, Davide; Hughes, Diane L.; Chan, Siew-Pang

    2014-01-01

    Asynchronous online discussion forums are common in blended learning models and are popular with students. A previous report has suggested that participation in these forums may assist student learning in a gross anatomy subject but it was unclear as to whether more academically able students post more often or whether participation led to…

  4. Student Outcomes Associated with Use of Asynchronous Online Discussion Forums in Gross Anatomy Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Rodney A.; Hughes, Diane L.

    2013-01-01

    Asynchronous online discussion forums are increasingly common in blended learning environments but the relationship to student learning outcomes has not been reported for anatomy teaching. Forums were monitored in two multicampus anatomy courses; an introductory first year course and a second year physiotherapy-specific course. The forums are…

  5. The Effect of Instructor Information Provision on Critical Thinking in Students Using Asynchronous Online Discussion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klisc, Chris; McGill, Tanya; Hobbs, Valerie

    2012-01-01

    The facilitation of critical thinking is one of the most frequently discussed potential benefits of the asynchronous online discussion environment, but many studies have reported that it does not occur to any great extent. This study investigated the effect of information provided to students on the facilitation of their critical thinking outcomes…

  6. Students' Desired and Experienced Levels of Connectivity to an Asynchronous, Online, Distance Degree Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schroeder, Shawnda; Baker, Mary; Terras, Katherine; Mahar, Patti; Chiasson, Kari

    2016-01-01

    This study examined graduate students' desired and experienced levels of connectivity in an online, asynchronous distance degree program. Connectivity was conceptualized as the students' feelings of community and involvement, not their level of access to the Internet. Graduate students enrolled in a distance degree program were surveyed on both…

  7. Using Reflective Peer Assessment to Promote Students' Conceptual Understanding through Asynchronous Discussions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Huann-shyang; Hong, Zuway-R; Wang, Hsin-Hui; Lee, Sung-Tao

    2011-01-01

    This study explores the impact of using assessment items with competing theories to encourage students to practice evaluative reflection and collaborative argumentation in asynchronous discussions. Thirty undergraduate students from various departments worked in small groups and took turns collaboratively discussing the given item's answer,…

  8. Effects of Asynchronous Music on Students' Lesson Satisfaction and Motivation at the Situational Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Digelidis, Nikolaos; Karageorghis, Costas I.; Papapavlou, Anastasia; Papaioannou, Athanasios G.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of asynchronous (background) music on senior students' motivation and lesson satisfaction at the situational level. A counterbalanced mixed-model design was employed with two factors comprising condition (three levels) and gender (two levels). Two hundred students (82 boys, 118 girls; M [subscript…

  9. Time Students Spend Reading Threaded Discussions in Online Graduate Courses Requiring Asynchronous Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Abbie H.; Green, Tim

    2009-01-01

    The authors report the results of a study that provides bases for comparison between the time necessary to participate in courses delivered asynchronously online and courses delivered in a traditional classroom setting. Weekly discussion threads from 21 sections of six courses offered as part of online, degree-granting, accredited, graduate…

  10. Is It Live or Is It Memorex? Students' Synchronous and Asynchronous Communication with Scientists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kubasko, Dennis; Jones, M. Gail; Tretter, Thomas; Andre, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    This study compared students' investigations with an atomic force microscope and viruses in real-time synchronous and asynchronous learning environments. Student interactions with scientists (live videoconference versus email) were examined to see whether communication patterns were different for the different modes of instruction. Students'…

  11. The Role of Technology-Based Scaffolding in Problem-Based Online Asynchronous Discussion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ak, Serife

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the effects of technology-based scaffolds that were composed through the use of the seven-stage, problem-based learning strategy on knowledge construction in a problem-based online asynchronous discussion. In a quasi-experimental setting, 60 students in an undergraduate Instructional Technology and Material Design course were…

  12. Designing a Discussion Environment to Enhance Connectivity and Sustainability in Asynchronous Online Discussion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gao, Fei

    2011-01-01

    Lack of connectivity and sustainability are two common problems in asynchronous online discussions. In this paper, the author proposes that the two problems may have to do with the structure of threaded forums, that is, the design of threaded forums may constrain participants from having well-connected and sustained discussions. A new discussion…

  13. An Examination of Computer Engineering Students' Perceptions about Asynchronous Discussion Forums

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozyurt, Ozcan; Ozyurt, Hacer

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted in order to reveal the usage profiles and perceptions of Asynchronous Discussion Forums (ADFs) of 126 computer engineering students from the Computer Engineering Department in a university in Turkey. By using a mixed methods research design both quantitative and qualitative data were collected and analyzed. Research…

  14. Theoretically Based Pedagogical Strategies Leading to Deep Learning in Asynchronous Online Gerontology Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Majeski, Robin; Stover, Merrily

    2007-01-01

    Online learning has enjoyed increasing popularity in gerontology. This paper presents instructional strategies grounded in Fink's (2003) theory of significant learning designed for the completely asynchronous online gerontology classroom. It links these components with the development of mastery learning goals and provides specific guidelines for…

  15. Asynchronous Replication, Mono-Allelic Expression, and Long Range Cis-Effects of ASAR6

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Leslie; Montagna, Christina; Thayer, Mathew J.

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian chromosomes initiate DNA replication at multiple sites along their length during each S phase following a temporal replication program. The majority of genes on homologous chromosomes replicate synchronously. However, mono-allelically expressed genes such as imprinted genes, allelically excluded genes, and genes on female X chromosomes replicate asynchronously. We have identified a cis-acting locus on human chromosome 6 that controls this replication-timing program. This locus encodes a large intergenic non-coding RNA gene named Asynchronous replication and Autosomal RNA on chromosome 6, or ASAR6. Disruption of ASAR6 results in delayed replication, delayed mitotic chromosome condensation, and activation of the previously silent alleles of mono-allelic genes on chromosome 6. The ASAR6 gene resides within an ∼1.2 megabase domain of asynchronously replicating DNA that is coordinated with other random asynchronously replicating loci along chromosome 6. In contrast to other nearby mono-allelic genes, ASAR6 RNA is expressed from the later-replicating allele. ASAR6 RNA is synthesized by RNA Polymerase II, is not polyadenlyated, is restricted to the nucleus, and is subject to random mono-allelic expression. Disruption of ASAR6 leads to the formation of bridged chromosomes, micronuclei, and structural instability of chromosome 6. Finally, ectopic integration of cloned genomic DNA containing ASAR6 causes delayed replication of entire mouse chromosomes. PMID:23593023

  16. An Efficient Algorithm for Computing Attractors of Synchronous And Asynchronous Boolean Networks

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Desheng; Yang, Guowu; Li, Xiaoyu; Wang, Zhicai; Liu, Feng; He, Lei

    2013-01-01

    Biological networks, such as genetic regulatory networks, often contain positive and negative feedback loops that settle down to dynamically stable patterns. Identifying these patterns, the so-called attractors, can provide important insights for biologists to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying many coordinated cellular processes such as cellular division, differentiation, and homeostasis. Both synchronous and asynchronous Boolean networks have been used to simulate genetic regulatory networks and identify their attractors. The common methods of computing attractors are that start with a randomly selected initial state and finish with exhaustive search of the state space of a network. However, the time complexity of these methods grows exponentially with respect to the number and length of attractors. Here, we build two algorithms to achieve the computation of attractors in synchronous and asynchronous Boolean networks. For the synchronous scenario, combing with iterative methods and reduced order binary decision diagrams (ROBDD), we propose an improved algorithm to compute attractors. For another algorithm, the attractors of synchronous Boolean networks are utilized in asynchronous Boolean translation functions to derive attractors of asynchronous scenario. The proposed algorithms are implemented in a procedure called geneFAtt. Compared to existing tools such as genYsis, geneFAtt is significantly faster in computing attractors for empirical experimental systems. Availability The software package is available at https://sites.google.com/site/desheng619/download. PMID:23585840

  17. Factors Affecting Pre-Service Teachers' Participation in Asynchronous Discussion: The Case of Iran

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ebrahimi, Alice; Faghih, Esmail; Marandi, Seyyedeh Susan

    2016-01-01

    This study reports on a qualitative small-scale exploratory study which examined the factors influencing 32 Iranian pre-service language teachers' participation in online asynchronous text-based discussion forums. By adopting a multiple case study design and analysing data gathered through semi-structured interviews and participants' online…

  18. Does the Medium Dictate the Message? Cultivating E-Communication in an Asynchronous Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiernan, Mary; Thomas, Pete; Woodroffe, Mark

    Virtual learning environments (VLEs) are often perceived by education establishments as an opportunity to widen access without traditional overheads. An integral part of most VLEs is asynchronous computer conferencing and on-line moderators must help students migrate quickly to the new virtual environment to minimize learning disruption. This…

  19. Distributed Teaching Presence and Communicative Patterns in Asynchronous Learning: Name versus Reply Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engel, Anna; Coll, Cesar; Bustos, Alfonso

    2013-01-01

    This work explores some methodological challenges in the application of Social Network Analysis (SNA) to the study of "Asynchronous Learning Networks" (ALN). Our interest in the SNA is situated within the framework of the study of Distributed Teaching Presence (DTP), understood as the exercise of educational influence, through a multi-method…

  20. Socially Shared Metacognitive Regulation in Asynchronous CSCL in Science: Functions, Evolution and Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iiskala, Tuike; Volet, Simone; Lehtinen, Erno; Vauras, Marja

    2015-01-01

    The significance of socially shared metacognitive regulation (SSMR) in collaborative learning is gaining momentum. To date, however, there is still a paucity of research of how SSMR is manifested in asynchronous computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL), and hardly any systematic investigation of SSMR's functions and evolution across…

  1. Thematic Analysis of the "Games" Students Play in Asynchronous Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacMillan, Thalia; Forte, Michele; Grant, Cynthia

    2014-01-01

    The dynamics of the student-student relationship within the asynchronous online classroom, as evidenced by conversations in an online discussion board, is a balancing act potentially more complex than those occurring in real-time. In order for learning to truly be considered effective, a collaborative, safe environment needs to exist among…

  2. Synchronous and Asynchronous E-Language Learning: A Case Study of Virtual University of Pakistan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perveen, Ayesha

    2016-01-01

    This case study evaluated the impact of synchronous and asynchronous E-Language Learning activities (ELL-ivities) in an E-Language Learning Environment (ELLE) at Virtual University of Pakistan. The purpose of the study was to assess e-language learning analytics based on the constructivist approach of collaborative construction of knowledge. The…

  3. Learning about the Literacy Development of English Language Learners in Asynchronous Online Discussions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Oliveira, Luciana C.; Olesova, Larisa

    2013-01-01

    This study examined asynchronous online discussions in the online course "English Language Development" to identify themes related to participants' learning about the language and literacy development of English Language Learners when they facilitated online discussions to determine whether the participants developed sufficient…

  4. Universal filtered multi-carrier system for asynchronous uplink transmission in optical access network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Soo-Min; Kim, Chang-Hun; Han, Sang-Kook

    2016-02-01

    In passive optical network (PON), orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) has been studied actively due to its advantages such as high spectra efficiency (SE), dynamic resource allocation in time or frequency domain, and dispersion robustness. However, orthogonal frequency division multiple access (OFDMA)-PON requires tight synchronization among multiple access signals. If not, frequency orthogonality could not be maintained. Also its sidelobe causes inter-channel interference (ICI) to adjacent channel. To prevent ICI caused by high sidelobes, guard band (GB) is usually used which degrades SE. Thus, OFDMA-PON is not suitable for asynchronous uplink transmission in optical access network. In this paper, we propose intensity modulation/direct detection (IM/DD) based universal filtered multi-carrier (UFMC) PON for asynchronous multiple access. The UFMC uses subband filtering to subsets of subcarriers. Since it reduces sidelobe of each subband by applying subband filtering, it could achieve better performance compared to OFDM. For the experimental demonstration, different sample delay was applied to subbands to implement asynchronous transmission condition. As a result, time synchronization robustness of UFMC was verified in asynchronous multiple access system.

  5. Distributed Training for the Reserve Component: Remote Delivery Using Asynchronous Computer Conferencing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hahn, H. A.; And Others

    The purposes of this research were to evaluate the cost effectiveness of using Asynchronous Computer Conferencing (ACC) and to develop guidelines for effectively conducting high quality military training using ACC. The evaluation used a portion of the Engineer Officer Advanced Course (EOAC) as a test bed. Course materials which taught the same…

  6. The excitation control system of the ASK-100-4 asynchronous compensator

    SciTech Connect

    Dovganyuk, I. Ya.; Labunets, I. A.; Plotnikova, T. V.; Sokur, P. V. Shakaryan, Yu. G.

    2010-12-15

    The excitation regulation system of the ASK-100-4 asynchronous compensator is described. The main modes of operation of the compensators in the Beskudnikovo substation of the 'Mosenergo' JSC are considered. The results of an investigation of an actual sample of an AER-ASC automatic excitation regulator on a computer bench, operating in real time, are presented.

  7. Self-Efficacy for Learning Mathematics Asynchronously: Instrument Refinement and the Relationship to Mathematics Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodges, Charles; Jones, R. Caroline; Prater, Alyssa

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to report the results of a two-part study. Study 1 was conducted to refine and validate a survey instrument, SELMA (Hodges, 2008), used to measure learners' self-efficacy toward learning mathematics in online or technology-intensive, asynchronous learning environments. Study 2 was conducted to investigate the…

  8. Anonymity to Promote Peer Feedback: Pre-Service Teachers' Comments in Asynchronous Computer-Mediated Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Craig D.; Barrett, Andrew F.; Frick, Theodore W.

    2010-01-01

    In this quasi-experimental case study, we compared five sections of a basic undergraduate technology course. Within an asynchronous web forum, pre-service teachers wrote short critiques of websites designed by their classmates. This peer feedback was provided anonymously by students in two classes (n = 35) whereas providers and recipients of peer…

  9. Growth Patterns and E-Moderating Supports in Asynchronous Online Discussions in an Undergraduate Blended Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghadirian, Hajar; Ayub, Ahmad Fauzi Mohd; Bakar, Kamariah Binti Abu; Hassanzadeh, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    This study presents a case study of asynchronous online discussions' (AOD) growth patterns in an undergraduate blended course to address the gap in our current understanding of how threads are developed in peer-moderated AODs. Building on a taxonomy of thread pattern proposed by Chan, Hew and Cheung (2009), growth patterns of thirty-six forums…

  10. An Investigation of Assessment and Feedback Practices in Fully Asynchronous Online Undergraduate Mathematics Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trenholm, Sven; Alcock, Lara; Robinson, Carol

    2015-01-01

    Research suggests it is difficult to learn mathematics in the fully asynchronous online (FAO) instructional modality, yet little is known about associated teaching and assessment practices. In this study, we investigate FAO mathematics assessment and feedback practices in particular consideration of both claims and findings that these practices…

  11. Asynchronous Discussion and Communication Patterns in Online and Hybrid History Courses. Scholarship of Teaching and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vess, Deborah L.

    2005-01-01

    Asynchronous online discussion has been shown to enhance communication between students and to elicit many cognitive indicators. Nevertheless, historians have often been reluctant to make use of such instructional technology. Students enrolled in a fully online world civilization course corroborated qualitative research findings regarding the…

  12. Student Perceptions of Asynchronous and Synchronous Web Based Tools and Perceived Attainment of Academic Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parenti, Melissa A.

    2013-01-01

    With an increasing presence and continual adaptations related to distance learning, there is a recognized need for up-to-date research in the area of effectiveness of online education programs. More specifically, assessing the capacity to attain academic goals by use of asynchronous and synchronous web based tools within Learning Management…

  13. "Intentional Repetition" and Learning Style: Increasing Efficient and Cohesive Interaction in Asynchronous Online Discussions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Topcu, Abdullah

    2008-01-01

    This study verified the efficacy of the intentional repetition technique in improving interaction in asynchronous online discussions by taking into account the learning styles of the participants. A conceptual framework served for the development of the technique, which conceptualises efficient and cohesive interaction on a continuum of process…

  14. A Computational Model for Asynchronous Oocyte Growth Dynamics in Spawning Fish

    EPA Science Inventory

    This manuscript describes the development of a computational model that simulates a time course of oocyte growth and spawning for asynchronous spawning fish, based upon plasma vitellogenin concentrations and a critical oocyte size for spawning. The model provides a framework that...

  15. Constructivist Pedagogy in Asynchronous Online Education: Examining Proactive Behavior and the Impact on Student Engagement Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Linda; Shmerling, Shirley; Karren, Ronald

    2011-01-01

    Asynchronous learning environments have gained popularity over the past decade and have rapidly gained acceptance in both the academic and business worlds. This study investigates the impact that student characteristics of proactive behavior and learning style preference have on student engagement levels when a collaborative learning process such…

  16. Support Services and Learning Styles Influencing Interaction in Asynchronous Online Discussions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kucuk, M.; Genc-Kumtepe, E.; Tasci, D.

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports a case of online classes from the English Language Teaching Programme at Anadolu University, Turkey. The study used an explanatory case oriented research design that assisted to examine relations between students' learning styles and factors influencing students' participation in asynchronous interactions in online courses. The…

  17. Trajectory exploration within asynchronous binary asteroid systems using refined Lagrangian coherent structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Haibin; Wu, Xiaoyu; Cui, Pingyuan

    2017-02-01

    Ground observations have found that asynchronous systems constitute most of the population of the near-Earth binary asteroids. This paper concerns the trajectory of a particle in the asynchronous system which is systematically described using periodic ellipsoidal and spherical body models. Due to the non-autonomous characteristics of the asynchronous system, Lagrangian coherent structures (LCS) are employed to identify the various dynamical behaviors. To enhance the accuracy of LCS, a robust LCS finding algorithm is developed incorporating hierarchical grid refinement, one-dimensional search and variational theory verification. In this way, the intricate dynamical transport boundaries are detected efficiently. These boundaries indicate that a total of 15 types of trajectories exist near asynchronous binary asteroids. According to their Kepler energy variations, these trajectories can be grouped into four basic categories, i.e., transitory, escape, impact and flyby trajectories. Furthermore, the influence of the ellipsoid's spin period on the dynamical behavior is discussed in the context of the change of dynamical regions. We found that the transitory and impact motions occur easily in the synchronous-like binary systems, in which the rotation period of the ellipsoid is nearly equal to that of the mutual orbit. Meanwhile, the results confirm a positive correlation between the spinning rate of the ellipsoid and the probability of the escape and flyby trajectories. The LCS also reveal a marked increase in trajectory diversity after a larger initial energy is selected.

  18. Asynchronous Knowledge Sharing and Conversation Interaction Impact on Grade in an Online Business Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strang, Kenneth David

    2011-01-01

    Student knowledge sharing and conversation theory interactions were coded from asynchronous discussion forums to measure the effect of learning-oriented utterances on academic performance. The sample was 3 terms of an online business course (in an accredited MBA program) at a U.S.-based university. Correlation, stepwise regression, and multiple…

  19. Use of Podcasting as an Innovative Asynchronous E-Learning Tool for Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jalali, Alireza; Leddy, John; Gauthier, Martin; Sun, Rong; Hincke, Maxwell; Carnegie, Jacqueline

    2011-01-01

    Podcasting is an innovative, asynchronous communication tool. A pilot study was conducted to assess the utility of podcasting as an educational tool for undergraduate medical students. A paper-and-pencil questionnaire was developed and distributed to the 40 first-year students enrolled in the francophone stream of the medical curriculum at the…

  20. Using Socratic Questioning to Promote Critical Thinking Skills Through Asynchronous Discussion Forums in Distance Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Ya-Ting C.; Newby, Timothy J.; Bill, Robert L.

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of using Socratic questioning to enhance students' critical thinking (CT) skills in asynchronous discussion forums (ADF) in university-level distance learning courses. The research effort empirically examined two coherent subjects: (a) the efficacy of teaching and modeling Socratic questioning for developing…

  1. Flipping the Online Classroom with Web 2.0: The Asynchronous Workshop

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cummings, Lance

    2016-01-01

    This article examines how Web 2.0 technologies can be used to "flip" the online classroom by creating asynchronous workshops in social environments where immediacy and social presence can be maximized. Using experience teaching several communication and writing classes in Google Apps (Google+, Google Hangouts, Google Drive, etc.), I…

  2. Computer Learner Corpora: Analysing Interlanguage Errors in Synchronous and Asynchronous Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacDonald, Penny; Garcia-Carbonell, Amparo; Carot, Sierra, Jose Miguel

    2013-01-01

    This study focuses on the computer-aided analysis of interlanguage errors made by the participants in the telematic simulation IDEELS (Intercultural Dynamics in European Education through on-Line Simulation). The synchronous and asynchronous communication analysed was part of the MiLC Corpus, a multilingual learner corpus of texts written by…

  3. Effects of asynchronous snowmelt on flushing of dissolved organic carbon: A mixing model approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boyer, E.W.; Hornberger, G.M.; Bencala, K.E.; McKnight, Diane M.

    2000-01-01

    In many snowmelt-dominated catchments, stream dissolved organic carbon (DOC) levels typically increase rapidly as spring melt commences, peak before maximum discharge, and decrease quickly as melting continues. We present data from Deer Creek (Summit County, CO) that shows this distinctive flushing response of DOC during snowmelt runoff, with DOC stored in landscape soils flushed to the stream in response to infiltrating melt waters. Our prior studies show that asynchronous melting of the snowpack across the landscape causes the spring DOC flush to be initiated at different times throughout the catchment. In this study we quantify characteristics of the asynchronous melt and its effect on DOC flushing. We investigated whether a simple mixing model can be used to capture the essentials of the asynchronous melting of a seasonal snowpack and its controls on DOC transport. We divided the catchment into zones of aspect and elevation, which largely determine spatial and temporal variations in the distribution of snow. TOPMODEL was used to simulate the hydrology in each zone, and the simulated flow paths were routed through a simple DOC mixing model to predict contributions of DOC to the stream. The zonal responses were aggregated to give a predicted response of hydrology and DOC fluxes for the entire catchment. Our results indicate that asynchronous melting-which determines the timing of contributions of discharge and DOC to streamflow from different areas of the landscape-can be quantified using a simple modeling approach. Copyright ?? 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Static stability of parallel operation of asynchronized generators in an electrical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plotnikova, T. V.; Sokur, P. V.; Tuzov, P. Yu.; Shakaryan, Yu. G.

    2014-12-01

    The static stability of single and parallel operations of an asynchronized generator (ASG) in a long-distance power transmission line is investigated. The synthesis of the ASG excitation control law at which set of the machine's stable operating conditions G s will comprise sufficiently conservative set of permissible operating conditions G p is considered.

  5. An Integrated Approach to Preempt Cheating on Asynchronous, Objective, Online Assessments in Graduate Business Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Daniel P.

    2016-01-01

    Cheating, left untended, erodes the validity of evaluation and, ultimately, corrupts the legitimacy of a course. We profile an approach to manage, with an eye toward preempting, cheating on asynchronous, objective, online quizzes. This approach taps various technological and social solutions to academic dishonesty, integrating them into a…

  6. Solving Ill-Structured Problems in Asynchronous Online Discussions: Built-in Scaffolds vs. No Scaffolds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng, Connie Siew Ling; Cheung, Wing Sum; Hew, Khe Foon

    2010-01-01

    Solving ill-structured problems is regarded as an important learning outcome in education as it allows learners to apply theories learnt into real practice. An asynchronous online discussion, with extended time for reflection, is an appropriate learning environment to engage learners in solving ill-structured problems. However, scaffolds may be…

  7. Ecological Affordance and Anxiety in an Oral Asynchronous Computer-Mediated Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeil, Levi

    2014-01-01

    Previous research suggests that the affordances (van Lier, 2000) of asynchronous computer-mediated communication (ACMC) environments help reduce foreign language anxiety (FLA). However, FLA is rarely the focus of these studies and research has not adequately addressed the relationship between FLA and the affordances that students use. This study…

  8. Asynchronous Web Discussions in Teacher Training Courses: Promoting Collaborative Learning--Or Not?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biesenbach-Lucas, Sigrun

    2004-01-01

    Over the past few years, asynchronous web-based technologies have been examined for their usefulness in promoting collaborative learning among university students. Variations in implementation of this technology will determine to what extent students' learning is actually collaborative. This article discusses curricular adaptations made in the…

  9. Self-Regulation of Learners in an Asynchronous University Math Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodges, Charles B.

    2009-01-01

    This qualitative research project was conducted to investigate the self-regulation strategies of learners in an asynchronous college-level math course. Seven students participated in the study, which was conducted at a large state university in the mid-Atlantic region of the United States. Transcripts of face-to-face interviews, electronic journal…

  10. Interaction and Critical Inquiry in Asynchronous Computer-Mediated Conferencing: A Research Agenda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopkins, Joseph; Gibson, Will; Ros i. Sole, Cristina; Savvides, Nicola; Starkey, Hugh

    2008-01-01

    This paper reviews research on learner and tutor interaction in asynchronous computer-mediated (ACM) conferences used in distance learning. The authors note claims made for the potential of ACM conferences to promote higher-order critical inquiry and the social construction of knowledge, and argue that there is a general lack of evidence regarding…

  11. Asynchronous remodeling is a driver of failed regeneration in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Dadgar, Sherry; Wang, Zuyi; Johnston, Helen; Kesari, Akanchha; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina; Chen, Yi-Wen; Hill, D. Ashley; Partridge, Terence A.; Giri, Mamta; Freishtat, Robert J.; Nazarian, Javad; Xuan, Jianhua; Wang, Yue

    2014-01-01

    We sought to determine the mechanisms underlying failure of muscle regeneration that is observed in dystrophic muscle through hypothesis generation using muscle profiling data (human dystrophy and murine regeneration). We found that transforming growth factor β–centered networks strongly associated with pathological fibrosis and failed regeneration were also induced during normal regeneration but at distinct time points. We hypothesized that asynchronously regenerating microenvironments are an underlying driver of fibrosis and failed regeneration. We validated this hypothesis using an experimental model of focal asynchronous bouts of muscle regeneration in wild-type (WT) mice. A chronic inflammatory state and reduced mitochondrial oxidative capacity are observed in bouts separated by 4 d, whereas a chronic profibrotic state was seen in bouts separated by 10 d. Treatment of asynchronously remodeling WT muscle with either prednisone or VBP15 mitigated the molecular phenotype. Our asynchronous regeneration model for pathological fibrosis and muscle wasting in the muscular dystrophies is likely generalizable to tissue failure in chronic inflammatory states in other regenerative tissues. PMID:25313409

  12. Using the Community of Inquiry Model to Investigate Students' Knowledge Construction in Asynchronous Online Discussions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Chien-Jen; Yang, Shu Ching

    2014-01-01

    This study used the Community of Inquiry (CoI) model proposed by Garrison to investigate students' level of knowledge construction in asynchronous discussions. The participants included 36 senior students (27 males) majoring in information management. The students attended 18 weeks of an online information ethics course. In this study, four types…

  13. Tagging Thinking Types in Asynchronous Discussion Groups: Effects on Critical Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schellens, T.; Van Keer, H.; De Wever, B.; Valcke, M.

    2009-01-01

    The present study focuses on the use of thinking types as a possible way to structure university students' discourse in asynchronous discussion groups and consequently promote their learning. More specifically, the aim of the study is to determine how requiring students to label their contributions by means of De Bono's (1991) thinking hats…

  14. Effects of Synchronous Lessons on Students in an Asynchronous Online Art Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Werner, Polly D.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine what effects synchronous instruction has on students in an asynchronous online art course. Action research was selected as the research method as it allows the researcher to study his or her own classroom in order to improve their own instruction. Data was collected for a period of one month from five…

  15. The Development of a Content Analysis Model for Assessing Students' Cognitive Learning in Asynchronous Online Discussions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Dazhi; Richardson, Jennifer C.; French, Brian F.; Lehman, James D.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and validate a content analysis model for assessing students' cognitive learning in asynchronous online discussions. It adopted a fully mixed methods design, in which qualitative and quantitative methods were employed sequentially for data analysis and interpretation. Specifically, the design was a…

  16. Facing Off: Comparing an In-Person Library Orientation Lecture with an Asynchronous Online Library Orientation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gall, Dan

    2014-01-01

    A study to compare the effectiveness of an in-person library orientation with an online asynchronous orientation was conducted with three sections of Social Work Research Methods, a required course in the University of Iowa's Master of Social Work program. Two sections of the course received an online orientation involving short videos, text and…

  17. More than Words: Investigating the Format of Asynchronous Discussions as Threaded Discussions or Blogs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Lane W.; Kinne, Lenore

    2012-01-01

    As more courses in teacher education are offered online, it is imperative that we thoughtfully consider how we structure learning activities. This study turned a critical gaze on a common element of online courses--asynchronous discussion. The authors compared two models of discursive interaction--discussion boards versus blogs--to better…

  18. Exploiting Opportunities for Knowledge-Building in Asynchronous Distance Learning Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prestera, Gustavo E.; Moller, Leslie A.

    2001-01-01

    Suggests that asynchronous distance learning environments are best accomplished by establishing virtual learning communities, which break down traditional instructor-as-transmitter, learner-as-receiver roles and instead promote a more learner-driven environment. Instructional strategies for facilitating online distance learning are identified, and…

  19. Three-Dimensional Temperature Field Simulation for the Rotor of an Asynchronous Motor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Yanwu; Fan, Chunli; Yang, Li; Sun, Fengrui

    2010-01-01

    A three-dimensional heat transfer model is built according to the rotor structure of an asynchronous motor, and three-dimensional temperature fields of the rotor under different working conditions, such as the unloaded, rated loaded and that with broken rotor bars, are studied based on the finite element numerical method and experiments. The…

  20. The Effects of Self-Generated Synchronous and Asynchronous Visual Speech Feedback on Overt Stuttering Frequency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Gregory J.; Hough, Monica Strauss; Blanchet, Paul; Ivy, Lennette J.; Waddell, Dwight

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Relatively recent research documents that visual choral speech, which represents an externally generated form of synchronous visual speech feedback, significantly enhanced fluency in those who stutter. As a consequence, it was hypothesized that self-generated synchronous and asynchronous visual speech feedback would likewise enhance…

  1. Asynchronous P300 classification in a reactive brain-computer interface during an outlier detection task

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krumpe, Tanja; Walter, Carina; Rosenstiel, Wolfgang; Spüler, Martin

    2016-08-01

    Objective. In this study, the feasibility of detecting a P300 via an asynchronous classification mode in a reactive EEG-based brain-computer interface (BCI) was evaluated. The P300 is one of the most popular BCI control signals and therefore used in many applications, mostly for active communication purposes (e.g. P300 speller). As the majority of all systems work with a stimulus-locked mode of classification (synchronous), the field of applications is limited. A new approach needs to be applied in a setting in which a stimulus-locked classification cannot be used due to the fact that the presented stimuli cannot be controlled or predicted by the system. Approach. A continuous observation task requiring the detection of outliers was implemented to test such an approach. The study was divided into an offline and an online part. Main results. Both parts of the study revealed that an asynchronous detection of the P300 can successfully be used to detect single events with high specificity. It also revealed that no significant difference in performance was found between the synchronous and the asynchronous approach. Significance. The results encourage the use of an asynchronous classification approach in suitable applications without a potential loss in performance.

  2. The Role of Beliefs and Motivation in Asynchronous Online Learning in College-Level Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xie, Kui; Huang, Kun

    2014-01-01

    Epistemic and learning beliefs were found to affect college students' cognitive engagement and study strategies, as well as motivation in classroom settings. However, the relationships between epistemic and learning beliefs, motivation, learning perception, and students' actual learning participation in asynchronous online settings have been…

  3. Credit Hours with No Set Time: A Study of Credit Policies in Asynchronous Online Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prasuhn, Frederick Carl

    2014-01-01

    U.S. public university system policies were examined to learn how credit hours were determined for asynchronous online education. Findings indicated that (a) credit hour meaning and use are not consistent, (b) primary responsibility for credit hour decisions was at the local level, and (c) no policies exist to guide credit hour application for…

  4. A Survey of Factors Contributing to Learners' "Listening" Behaviors in Asynchronous Online Discussions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wise, Alyssa Friend; Marbouti, Farshid; Hsiao, Ying-Ting; Hausknecht, Simone

    2012-01-01

    Sixty-seven undergraduates taking either a Blended Business Course (BBC) or an Online Education Course (OEC) were surveyed about factors influencing their "listening" behaviors in asynchronous online course discussions. These are the ways they attend to the posts made by others: which posts they open, how they engage with open posts, and…

  5. Scaffolding Collaborative Argumentation in Asynchronous Discussions with Message Constraints and Message Labels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeong, Allan; Joung, Sunyoung

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the effects of message constraints and labels on collaborative argumentation in asynchronous online discussions. Thirty-eight undergraduate students in an introductory educational technology course were assigned to one of three groups. In one group, students posted specific types of messages using a prescribed set of message…

  6. Developing Asynchronous Online Courses: Key Instructional Strategies in a Social Metacognitive Constructivist Learning Trajectory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niess, Margaret; Gillow-Wiles, Henry

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative, design-based research study resulted in a proposal for a comprehensive set of best instructional practices immersed in a learning trajectory, outlining the tools, processes and the content development for online asynchronous, text-based learning in graduate level professional development courses. The outcome provides a rich…

  7. Relationships between Self-Regulation and Social Experiences in Asynchronous Online Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cho, Moon-Heum; Demei, Shen; Laffey, James

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which students' self-regulated learning predicts peer social presence, instructor social presence, sense of connectedness, and sense of learning in asynchronous online learning environments. Self-regulated learning has been measured with self-regulation for learning tasks (SRLT) and…

  8. Using Asynchronous Electronic Surveys to Help In-Class Revision: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tong, Vincent C. H.

    2012-01-01

    Synchronous e-voting systems (commonly known as "clickers") have become increasingly popular as they can be used to enhance interactivity in lectures. Asynchronous electronic surveys (AESs), unlike these voting system, usually serve as a method of gathering feedback before or after teaching sessions. This paper describes and evaluates a project…

  9. Introducing Group-Based Asynchronous Learning to Business Education. Reflections on Effective Course Design and Delivery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Richard; Arnold, Ivo

    2004-01-01

    This paper explores the contribution of virtual tools to student learning within full-time management programmes. More specifically, the paper focuses on asynchronous communication tools, considering the scope they offer for group-based collaborative learning outside the classroom. We report on the effectiveness of this approach for an economics…

  10. Interaction in an Asynchronous Online Course: A Synthesis of Quantitative Predictors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zingaro, Daniel; Oztok, Murat

    2012-01-01

    The effectiveness and potential of asynchronous online courses hinge on sustained, purposeful interaction. And while many factors affecting interaction have been uncovered by prior literature, there are few accounts of the relative importance of these factors when studied in the same online course. In this paper, we develop a literature-informed…

  11. Asynchronous Computer-Mediated Corrective Feedback and the Correct Use of Prepositions: Is It Really Effective?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hosseini, Seyyed Behrooz

    2012-01-01

    An area that has recently attracted increasing attention is providing feedback on learners' writing accuracy through the Internet. However, research in this area has largely focused on synchronous communication, i.e., chatting, with fewer studies assessing asynchronous technologies, i.e., e-mailing. Therefore, this study investigates the…

  12. Toggle release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, Thomas J. (Inventor); Yang, Robert A. (Inventor); Brown, Christopher W. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A pyrotechnic actuated structural release device 10 which is mechanically two fault tolerant for release. The device 10 comprises a fastener plate 11 and fastener body 12, each attachable to a different one of a pair of structures to be joined. The fastener plate 11 and body 12 are fastenable by a toggle 13 supported at one end on the fastener plate and mounted for universal pivotal movement thereon. At its other end which is received in a central opening in the fastener body 12 and adapted for limited pivotal movement therein the toggle 13 is restrained by three retractable latching pins 61 symmetrically disposed in equiangular spacing about the axis of the toggle 13 and positionable in latching engagement with an end fitting on the toggle. Each pin 61 is individually retractable by combustion of a pyrotechnic charge 77, the expanding gases of which are applied to a pressure receiving face 67 on the latch pin 61 to effect its retraction from the toggle. While retraction of all three pins 62 releases the toggle, the fastener is mechanically two fault tolerant since the failure of any single one or pair of the latch pins to retract results in an asymmetrical loading on the toggle and its pivotal movement to effect a release. An annular bolt 18 is mounted on the fastener plate 11 as a support for the socket mounting 30, 37 of the toggle whereby its selective axial movement provides a means for preloading the toggle.

  13. A newly proposed disease condition produced by light exposure during night: asynchronization.

    PubMed

    Kohyama, Jun

    2009-04-01

    The bedtime of preschoolers/pupils/students in Japan has become progressively later with the result sleep duration has become progressively shorter. With these changes, more than half of the preschoolers/pupils/students in Japan recently have complained of daytime sleepiness, while approximately one quarter of junior and senior high school students in Japan reportedly suffer from insomnia. These preschoolers/pupils/students may be suffering from behaviorally induced insufficient sleep syndrome due to inadequate sleep hygiene. If this diagnosis is correct, they should be free from these complaints after obtaining sufficient sleep by avoiding inadequate sleep hygiene. However, such a therapeutic approach often fails. Although social factors are often involved in these sleep disturbances, a novel clinical notion--asynchronization--can further a deeper understanding of the pathophysiology of these disturbances. The essence of asynchronization is a disturbance in various aspects (e.g., cycle, amplitude, phase and interrelationship) of the biological rhythms that normally exhibit circadian oscillation, presumably involving decreased activity of the serotonergic system. The major trigger of asynchronization is hypothesized to be a combination of light exposure during the night and a lack of light exposure in the morning. In addition to basic principles of morning light and an avoidance of nocturnal light exposure, presumable potential therapeutic approaches for asynchronization involve both conventional ones (light therapy, medications (hypnotics, antidepressants, melatonin, vitamin B12), physical activation, chronotherapy) and alternative ones (kampo, pulse therapy, direct contact, control of the autonomic nervous system, respiration (qigong, tanden breathing), chewing, crawling). A morning-type behavioral preference is described in several of the traditional textbooks for good health. The author recommends a morning-type behavioral lifestyle as a way to reduce

  14. Synchronization of Hierarchical Time-Varying Neural Networks Based on Asynchronous and Intermittent Sampled-Data Control.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Wenjun; Patel, Ragini; Cao, Jinde; Zheng, Wei Xing

    2016-09-22

    In this brief, our purpose is to apply asynchronous and intermittent sampled-data control methods to achieve the synchronization of hierarchical time-varying neural networks. The asynchronous and intermittent sampled-data controllers are proposed for two reasons: 1) the controllers may not transmit the control information simultaneously and 2) the controllers cannot always exist at any time t. The synchronization is then discussed for a kind of hierarchical time-varying neural networks based on the asynchronous and intermittent sampled-data controllers. Finally, the simulation results are given to illustrate the usefulness of the developed criteria.

  15. Quantal Response: Estimation and Inference

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    but this is not explicit. 5.1.1.4 Probit Design (for Normal Distributions) The probit design of test involves a number of trials at each of several...21 ; Nuremberg , Germany. Personal Armour Systems Symposium; 2012 Sep 17–21. 23. Silvapulle MJ. On likelihood ratio tests of one-sided hypotheses in

  16. Activity-dependent, homeostatic regulation of neurotransmitter release from auditory nerve fibers

    PubMed Central

    Ngodup, Tenzin; Goetz, Jack A.; McGuire, Brian C.; Sun, Wei; Lauer, Amanda M.; Xu-Friedman, Matthew A.

    2015-01-01

    Information processing in the brain requires reliable synaptic transmission. High reliability at specialized auditory nerve synapses in the cochlear nucleus results from many release sites (N), high probability of neurotransmitter release (Pr), and large quantal size (Q). However, high Pr also causes auditory nerve synapses to depress strongly when activated at normal rates for a prolonged period, which reduces fidelity. We studied how synapses are influenced by prolonged activity by exposing mice to constant, nondamaging noise and found that auditory nerve synapses changed to facilitating, reflecting low Pr. For mice returned to quiet, synapses recovered to normal depression, suggesting that these changes are a homeostatic response to activity. Two additional properties, Q and average excitatory postsynaptic current (EPSC) amplitude, were unaffected by noise rearing, suggesting that the number of release sites (N) must increase to compensate for decreased Pr. These changes in N and Pr were confirmed physiologically using the integration method. Furthermore, consistent with increased N, endbulbs in noise-reared animals had larger VGlut1-positive puncta, larger profiles in electron micrographs, and more release sites per profile. In current-clamp recordings, noise-reared BCs had greater spike fidelity even during high rates of synaptic activity. Thus, auditory nerve synapses regulate excitability through an activity-dependent, homeostatic mechanism, which could have major effects on all downstream processing. Our results also suggest that noise-exposed bushy cells would remain hyperexcitable for a period after returning to normal quiet conditions, which could have perceptual consequences. PMID:25944933

  17. Influence of motor activities on the release of transmitter quanta from motor nerve terminals in mice.

    PubMed

    Taquahashi, Y; Yonezawa, K; Nishimura, M

    1999-05-01

    We investigated the effects of motor activities on transmitter release in mouse nerve-muscle preparations of the diaphragm muscle (DPH), extensor digitorum longus muscle (EDL), and soleus muscle (SOL). Mice were divided into a control group, a motor-restricted (RST) group, and a motor-compelled (CMP) group. The quantal content (m) of endplate potentials was measured intracellularly. In DPH the motor activity was unaffected. In the CMP group the m value of the EDL group increased with increases in the cooperativity of Ca2+ in transmitter release. Compared with the CMP group, the SOL of the RST group had a smaller m value with increases in the cooperativity of Ca2+ in transmitter release. These results suggest that motor activities can influence neuromuscular activity specific to different systems, however, the motor compulsion specifically activated the function of EDL and the motor restriction activated the function of SOL, and these effects might lead to altered activity of the release of transmitter quanta in motor nerve terminals of mice.

  18. Asynchronous State Estimation for Discrete-Time Switched Complex Networks With Communication Constraints.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dan; Wang, Qing-Guo; Srinivasan, Dipti; Li, Hongyi; Yu, Li

    2017-03-29

    This paper is concerned with the asynchronous state estimation for a class of discrete-time switched complex networks with communication constraints. An asynchronous estimator is designed to overcome the difficulty that each node cannot access to the topology/coupling information. Also, the event-based communication, signal quantization, and the random packet dropout problems are studied due to the limited communication resource. With the help of switched system theory and by resorting to some stochastic system analysis method, a sufficient condition is proposed to guarantee the exponential stability of estimation error system in the mean-square sense and a prescribed $H∞ performance level is also ensured. The characterization of the desired estimator gains is derived in terms of the solution to a convex optimization problem. Finally, the effectiveness of the proposed design approach is demonstrated by a simulation example.

  19. Asynchronous update based networked predictive control system using a novel proactive compensation strategy.

    PubMed

    Duan, Yingyao; Zuo, Xin; Liu, Jianwei

    2016-01-01

    Networked predictive control system (NPCS) has been proposed to address random delays and data dropouts in networked control systems (NCSs). A remaining challenge of this approach is that the controller has uncertain information about the actual control inputs, which leads to the predicted control input errors. The main contribution of this paper is to develop an explicit mechanism running in the distributed network nodes asynchronously, which enables the controller node to keep informed of the states of the actuator node without a priori knowledge about the network. Based on this mechanism, a novel proactive compensation strategy is proposed to develop asynchronous update based networked predictive control system (AUBNPCS). The stability criterion of AUBNPCS is derived analytically. A simulation experiment based on Truetime demonstrates the effectiveness of the scheme.

  20. Asynchronous, macrotasked relaxation strategies for the solution of viscous, hypersonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.

    1991-01-01

    A point-implicit, asynchronous macrotasked relaxation of the steady, thin-layer, Navier-Stokes equations is presented. The method employs multidirectional, single-level storage Gauss-Seidel relaxation sweeps, which effectively communicate perturbations across the entire domain in 2n sweeps, where n is the dimension of the domain. In order to enhance convergence the application of relaxation factors to specific components of the Jacobian is examined using a stability analysis of the advection and diffusion equations. Attention is also given to the complications associated with asynchronous multitasking. Solutions are generated for hypersonic flows over blunt bodies in two and three dimensions with chemical reactions, utilizing single-tasked and multitasked relaxation strategies.

  1. Analysis of an FBMC/OQAM scheme for asynchronous access in wireless communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattera, Davide; Tanda, Mario; Bellanger, Maurice

    2015-12-01

    The OFDM/OQAM transceiver belongs to the filter-bank-based multicarrier (FBMC) family and, unlike OFDM schemes, it is particularly able to meet the requirements of the physical layer of cognitive radio networks such as high level of adjacent channel leakage ratio and asynchronous communications. The paper proposes and analyzes a new implementation structure, named frequency spreading, for the OFDM/OQAM transceiver. On flat channels, it is equivalent to the standard one in terms of input-output relations, though more complex. On multipath channels, it offers a crucial advantage in terms of equalization, which is performed in the frequency domain, leading to high performance and no additional delay. With its flexibility and level of performance, the analyzed scheme has the potential to outperform OFDM in the asynchronous access context and in cognitive radio networks.

  2. Asynchronous cellular automaton-based neuron: theoretical analysis and on-FPGA learning.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Takashi; Torikai, Hiroyuki

    2013-05-01

    A generalized asynchronous cellular automaton-based neuron model is a special kind of cellular automaton that is designed to mimic the nonlinear dynamics of neurons. The model can be implemented as an asynchronous sequential logic circuit and its control parameter is the pattern of wires among the circuit elements that is adjustable after implementation in a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) device. In this paper, a novel theoretical analysis method for the model is presented. Using this method, stabilities of neuron-like orbits and occurrence mechanisms of neuron-like bifurcations of the model are clarified theoretically. Also, a novel learning algorithm for the model is presented. An equivalent experiment shows that an FPGA-implemented learning algorithm enables an FPGA-implemented model to automatically reproduce typical nonlinear responses and occurrence mechanisms observed in biological and model neurons.

  3. Dual stator winding variable speed asynchronous generator: optimal design and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tutelea, L. N.; Deaconu, S. I.; Popa, G. N.

    2015-06-01

    In the present paper is carried out a theoretical and experimental study of dual stator winding squirrel cage asynchronous generator (DSWA) behavior in the presence of saturation regime (non-sinusoidal) due to the variable speed operation. The main aims are the determination of the relations of calculating the equivalent parameters of the machine windings to optimal design using a Matlab code. Issue is limited to three phase range of double stator winding cage-induction generator of small sized powers, the most currently used in the small adjustable speed wind or hydro power plants. The tests were carried out using three-phase asynchronous generator having rated power of 6 [kVA].

  4. Event-Based Tone Mapping for Asynchronous Time-Based Image Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Simon Chane, Camille; Ieng, Sio-Hoi; Posch, Christoph; Benosman, Ryad B.

    2016-01-01

    The asynchronous time-based neuromorphic image sensor ATIS is an array of autonomously operating pixels able to encode luminance information with an exceptionally high dynamic range (>143 dB). This paper introduces an event-based methodology to display data from this type of event-based imagers, taking into account the large dynamic range and high temporal accuracy that go beyond available mainstream display technologies. We introduce an event-based tone mapping methodology for asynchronously acquired time encoded gray-level data. A global and a local tone mapping operator are proposed. Both are designed to operate on a stream of incoming events rather than on time frame windows. Experimental results on real outdoor scenes are presented to evaluate the performance of the tone mapping operators in terms of quality, temporal stability, adaptation capability, and computational time. PMID:27642275

  5. Booming during a bust: Asynchronous population responses of arid zone lizards to climatic variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Read, John L.; Kovac, Kelli-Jo; Brook, Barry W.; Fordham, Damien A.

    2012-04-01

    The productivity of arid environments and the reproductive success of vertebrates in these systems, are typically thought to be primarily influenced by rainfall patterns. Data from our 15 year study at an Australian arid zone site reveals asynchronous demographic responses to rainfall and other climatic variables among different lizard species. We show that, in addition to precipitation, key demographic rates (fecundity, recruitment and survival) are correlated strongly with temporal variability in temperature, during and prior to the breeding season, and also to the density of sympatric lizard species. There were nine-fold fluctuations through time in the relative abundance of two similar-sized Ctenotus species, and asynchronous recruitment success and survival among other species, despite the absence of direct anthropogenic affects Understanding the drivers and magnitude of the substantial natural variability in arid-zone lizard assemblages is integral to predicting and interpreting their responses to future land use or climate-change scenarios.

  6. Asynchronous H∞ filtering for linear switched systems with average dwell time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bo; Zhang, Hongbin; Wang, Gang; Dang, Chuangyin

    2016-09-01

    This paper is concerned with the H∞ filtering problem for a class of continuous-time linear switched systems with the asynchronous behaviours, where 'asynchronous' means that the switching of the filters to be designed has a lag to the switching of the system modes. By using the Lyapunov-like functions and the average dwell time technique, a sufficient condition is obtained to guarantee the asymptotic stability with a weighted H∞ performance index for the filtering error system. Moreover, the results are formulated in the form of linear matrix inequalities that are numerical feasible. As a result, the filter design problem is solved. Finally, an illustrative numerical example is presented to show the effectiveness of the results.

  7. Asynchronous switching output feedback control of discrete-time switched linear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Chengzhi; Wu, Fen

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, the problem of dynamic output-feedback control synthesis is addressed for discrete-time switched linear systems under asynchronous switching. The proposed hybrid controller consists of a standard dynamic output-feedback switching control law and an impulsive reset law induced by controller state jumps. Using the average dwell time technique incorporating with multiple quadratic Lyapunov functions, the switching control synthesis conditions for asymptotic stability with guaranteed weighted ℓ2-gain performance are derived as a set of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs). The proposed hybrid synthesis scheme advances existing design methods for output-feedback asynchronous switching control of switched linear systems in two important aspects: LMI formulation of the synthesis problem; and arbitrary order of the controller state. A numerical example is used to illustrate the effectiveness and advantages of the proposed design technique.

  8. All optical contention detection and resolution for asynchronous variable length optical packets switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhat, Rim; Farhat, Amel; Menif, Mourad

    2016-04-01

    We proposed a novel 2×2 all optical packet switching router architecture supporting asynchronous, labelled and variablelength packet. A proof of concept through Matlab Simulink simulation is validated. Then we discussed the three possible scenarios to demonstrate the contention resolution technique based on deflection routing. We have showing that the contending packet is detected and forwarded according FIFO (First In First Out) strategy to another output.

  9. A Novel Approach to Asynchronous MVP Data Interpretation Based on Elliptical-Vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruglyakov, M.; Trofimov, I.; Korotaev, S.; Shneyer, V.; Popova, I.; Orekhova, D.; Scshors, Y.; Zhdanov, M. S.

    2014-12-01

    We suggest a novel approach to asynchronous magnetic-variation profiling (MVP) data interpretation. Standard method in MVP is based on the interpretation of the coefficients of linear relation between vertical and horizontal components of the measured magnetic field.From mathematical point of view this pair of linear coefficients is not a vector which leads to significant difficulties in asynchronous data interpretation. Our approach allows us to actually treat such a pair of complex numbers as a special vector called an ellipse-vector (EV). By choosing the particular definitions of complex length and direction, the basic relation of MVP can be considered as the dot product. This considerably simplifies the interpretation of asynchronous data. The EV is described by four real numbers: the values of major and minor semiaxes, the angular direction of the major semiaxis and the phase. The notation choice is motivated by historical reasons. It is important that different EV's components have different sensitivity with respect to the field sources and the local heterogeneities. Namely, the value of major semiaxis and the angular direction are mostly determined by the field source and the normal cross-section. On the other hand, the value of minor semiaxis and the phase are responsive to local heterogeneities. Since the EV is the general form of complex vector, the traditional Schmucker vectors can be explicitly expressed through its components.The proposed approach was successfully applied to interpretation the results of asynchronous measurements that had been obtained in the Arctic Ocean at the drift stations "North Pole" in 1962-1976.

  10. Asynchronous inputs and flip-flop metastability in the CLAS trigger at CEBAF

    SciTech Connect

    Doughty, D.C. Jr.; Lemon, S. ); Bonneau, P. )

    1993-08-01

    The impact of flip-flop metastability on the pipelined trigger for the CLAS detector at CEBAF has been studied. The authors find that the newest ECL flip-flops (ECLinPS) are much faster than older families (10H) at resolving the metastable condition. This will allow their use in systems with asynchronous inputs without an extra stage of synchronizing flip-flops.

  11. Asynchronous inputs and flip-flop metastability in the CLAS trigger at CEBAF

    SciTech Connect

    Dave Doughty; S. Lemon; P. Bonneau

    1992-10-01

    The impact of flip-flop metastability on the pipelined trigger for the CLAS detector at CEBAF (Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility) has been studied. It is found that the newest ECL (emitter coupled logic) flip-flops (ECLinPS) are much faster than older families at resolving the metastable condition. This will allow their use in systems with asynchronous inputs without an extra stage of synchronizing flip-flops.

  12. AP-IO: asynchronous pipeline I/O for hiding periodic output cost in CFD simulation.

    PubMed

    Xiaoguang, Ren; Xinhai, Xu

    2014-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation often needs to periodically output intermediate results to files in the form of snapshots for visualization or restart, which seriously impacts the performance. In this paper, we present asynchronous pipeline I/O (AP-IO) optimization scheme for the periodically snapshot output on the basis of asynchronous I/O and CFD application characteristics. In AP-IO, dedicated background I/O processes or threads are in charge of handling the file write in pipeline mode, therefore the write overhead can be hidden with more calculation than classic asynchronous I/O. We design the framework of AP-IO and implement it in OpenFOAM, providing CFD users with a user-friendly interface. Experimental results on the Tianhe-2 supercomputer demonstrate that AP-IO can achieve a good optimization effect for the periodical snapshot output in CFD application, and the effect is especially better for massively parallel CFD simulations, which can reduce the total execution time up to about 40%.

  13. Asynchronous data change notification between database server and accelerator controls system

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, W.; Morris, J.; Nemesure, S.

    2011-10-10

    Database data change notification (DCN) is a commonly used feature. Not all database management systems (DBMS) provide an explicit DCN mechanism. Even for those DBMS's which support DCN (such as Oracle and MS SQL server), some server side and/or client side programming may be required to make the DCN system work. This makes the setup of DCN between database server and interested clients tedious and time consuming. In accelerator control systems, there are many well established software client/server architectures (such as CDEV, EPICS, and ADO) that can be used to implement data reflection servers that transfer data asynchronously to any client using the standard SET/GET API. This paper describes a method for using such a data reflection server to set up asynchronous DCN (ADCN) between a DBMS and clients. This method works well for all DBMS systems which provide database trigger functionality. Asynchronous data change notification (ADCN) between database server and clients can be realized by combining the use of a database trigger mechanism, which is supported by major DBMS systems, with server processes that use client/server software architectures that are familiar in the accelerator controls community (such as EPICS, CDEV or ADO). This approach makes the ADCN system easy to set up and integrate into an accelerator controls system. Several ADCN systems have been set up and used in the RHIC-AGS controls system.

  14. A Methodology for the Design and Verification of Globally Asynchronous/Locally Synchronous Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Steven P.; Whalen, Mike W.; O'Brien, Dan; Heimdahl, Mats P.; Joshi, Anjali

    2005-01-01

    Recent advanced in model-checking have made it practical to formally verify the correctness of many complex synchronous systems (i.e., systems driven by a single clock). However, many computer systems are implemented by asynchronously composing several synchronous components, where each component has its own clock and these clocks are not synchronized. Formal verification of such Globally Asynchronous/Locally Synchronous (GA/LS) architectures is a much more difficult task. In this report, we describe a methodology for developing and reasoning about such systems. This approach allows a developer to start from an ideal system specification and refine it along two axes. Along one axis, the system can be refined one component at a time towards an implementation. Along the other axis, the behavior of the system can be relaxed to produce a more cost effective but still acceptable solution. We illustrate this process by applying it to the synchronization logic of a Dual Fight Guidance System, evolving the system from an ideal case in which the components do not fail and communicate synchronously to one in which the components can fail and communicate asynchronously. For each step, we show how the system requirements have to change if the system is to be implemented and prove that each implementation meets the revised system requirements through modelchecking.

  15. Identifying scale-emergent, nonlinear, asynchronous processes of wetland methane exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturtevant, Cove; Ruddell, Benjamin L.; Knox, Sara Helen; Verfaillie, Joseph; Matthes, Jaclyn Hatala; Oikawa, Patricia Y.; Baldocchi, Dennis

    2016-01-01

    Methane (CH4) exchange in wetlands is complex, involving nonlinear asynchronous processes across diverse time scales. These processes and time scales are poorly characterized at the whole-ecosystem level, yet are crucial for accurate representation of CH4 exchange in process models. We used a combination of wavelet analysis and information theory to analyze interactions between whole-ecosystem CH4 flux and biophysical drivers in two restored wetlands of Northern California from hourly to seasonal time scales, explicitly questioning assumptions of linear, synchronous, single-scale analysis. Although seasonal variability in CH4 exchange was dominantly and synchronously controlled by soil temperature, water table fluctuations, and plant activity were important synchronous and asynchronous controls at shorter time scales that propagated to the seasonal scale. Intermittent, subsurface water table decline promoted short-term pulses of methane emission but ultimately decreased seasonal CH4 emission through subsequent inhibition after rewetting. Methane efflux also shared information with evapotranspiration from hourly to multiday scales and the strength and timing of hourly and diel interactions suggested the strong importance of internal gas transport in regulating short-term emission. Traditional linear correlation analysis was generally capable of capturing the major diel and seasonal relationships, but mesoscale, asynchronous interactions and nonlinear, cross-scale effects were unresolved yet important for a deeper understanding of methane flux dynamics. We encourage wider use of these methods to aid interpretation and modeling of long-term continuous measurements of trace gas and energy exchange.

  16. An event-based neural network architecture with an asynchronous programmable synaptic memory.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Saber; Indiveri, Giacomo

    2014-02-01

    We present a hybrid analog/digital very large scale integration (VLSI) implementation of a spiking neural network with programmable synaptic weights. The synaptic weight values are stored in an asynchronous Static Random Access Memory (SRAM) module, which is interfaced to a fast current-mode event-driven DAC for producing synaptic currents with the appropriate amplitude values. These currents are further integrated by current-mode integrator synapses to produce biophysically realistic temporal dynamics. The synapse output currents are then integrated by compact and efficient integrate and fire silicon neuron circuits with spike-frequency adaptation and adjustable refractory period and spike-reset voltage settings. The fabricated chip comprises a total of 32 × 32 SRAM cells, 4 × 32 synapse circuits and 32 × 1 silicon neurons. It acts as a transceiver, receiving asynchronous events in input, performing neural computation with hybrid analog/digital circuits on the input spikes, and eventually producing digital asynchronous events in output. Input, output, and synaptic weight values are transmitted to/from the chip using a common communication protocol based on the Address Event Representation (AER). Using this representation it is possible to interface the device to a workstation or a micro-controller and explore the effect of different types of Spike-Timing Dependent Plasticity (STDP) learning algorithms for updating the synaptic weights values in the SRAM module. We present experimental results demonstrating the correct operation of all the circuits present on the chip.

  17. An Asynchronous Multi-Sensor Micro Control Unit for Wireless Body Sensor Networks (WBSNs)

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chiung-An; Chen, Shih-Lun; Huang, Hong-Yi; Luo, Ching-Hsing

    2011-01-01

    In this work, an asynchronous multi-sensor micro control unit (MCU) core is proposed for wireless body sensor networks (WBSNs). It consists of asynchronous interfaces, a power management unit, a multi-sensor controller, a data encoder (DE), and an error correct coder (ECC). To improve the system performance and expansion abilities, the asynchronous interface is created for handshaking different clock domains between ADC and RF with MCU. To increase the use time of the WBSN system, a power management technique is developed for reducing power consumption. In addition, the multi-sensor controller is designed for detecting various biomedical signals. To prevent loss error from wireless transmission, use of an error correct coding technique is important in biomedical applications. The data encoder is added for lossless compression of various biomedical signals with a compression ratio of almost three. This design is successfully tested on a FPGA board. The VLSI architecture of this work contains 2.68-K gate counts and consumes power 496-μW at 133-MHz processing rate by using TSMC 0.13-μm CMOS process. Compared with the previous techniques, this work offers higher performance, more functions, and lower hardware cost than other micro controller designs. PMID:22164000

  18. Data Collection for Mobile Group Consumption: An Asynchronous Distributed Approach †

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Weiping; Chen, Weiran; Hu, Zhejie; Li, Zuoyou; Liang, Yue; Chen, Jiaojiao

    2016-01-01

    Mobile group consumption refers to consumption by a group of people, such as a couple, a family, colleagues and friends, based on mobile communications. It differs from consumption only involving individuals, because of the complex relations among group members. Existing data collection systems for mobile group consumption are centralized, which has the disadvantages of being a performance bottleneck, having single-point failure and increasing business and security risks. Moreover, these data collection systems are based on a synchronized clock, which is often unrealistic because of hardware constraints, privacy concerns or synchronization cost. In this paper, we propose the first asynchronous distributed approach to collecting data generated by mobile group consumption. We formally built a system model thereof based on asynchronous distributed communication. We then designed a simulation system for the model for which we propose a three-layer solution framework. After that, we describe how to detect the causality relation of two/three gathering events that happened in the system based on the collected data. Various definitions of causality relations based on asynchronous distributed communication are supported. Extensive simulation results show that the proposed approach is effective for data collection relating to mobile group consumption. PMID:27058544

  19. A formal model of asynchronous communication and its use in mechanically verifying a biphase mark protocol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, J. Strother

    1992-01-01

    In this paper we present a formal model of asynchronous communication as a function in the Boyer-Moore logic. The function transforms the signal stream generated by one processor into the signal stream consumed by an independently clocked processor. This transformation 'blurs' edges and 'dilates' time due to differences in the phases and rates of the two clocks and the communications delay. The model can be used quantitatively to derive concrete performance bounds on asynchronous communications at ISO protocol level 1 (physical level). We develop part of the reusable formal theory that permits the convenient application of the model. We use the theory to show that a biphase mark protocol can be used to send messages of arbitrary length between two asynchronous processors. We study two versions of the protocol, a conventional one which uses cells of size 32 cycles and an unconventional one which uses cells of size 18. We conjecture that the protocol can be proved to work under our model for smaller cell sizes and more divergent clock rates but the proofs would be harder.

  20. Self-calibration algorithm in an asynchronous P300-based brain-computer interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schettini, F.; Aloise, F.; Aricò, P.; Salinari, S.; Mattia, D.; Cincotti, F.

    2014-06-01

    Objective. Reliability is a desirable characteristic of brain-computer interface (BCI) systems when they are intended to be used under non-experimental operating conditions. In addition, their overall usability is influenced by the complex and frequent procedures that are required for configuration and calibration. Earlier studies examined the issue of asynchronous control in P300-based BCIs, introducing dynamic stopping and automatic control suspension features. This report proposes and evaluates an algorithm for the automatic recalibration of the classifier's parameters using unsupervised data. Approach. Ten healthy subjects participated in five P300-based BCI sessions throughout a single day. First, we examined whether continuous adaptation of control parameters improved the accuracy of the asynchronous system over time. Then, we assessed the performance of the self-calibration algorithm with respect to the no-recalibration and supervised calibration conditions with regard to system accuracy and communication efficiency. Main results. Offline tests demonstrated that continuous adaptation of the control parameters significantly increased the communication efficiency of asynchronous P300-based BCIs. The self-calibration algorithm correctly assigned labels to unsupervised data with 95% accuracy, effecting communication efficiency that was comparable with that of supervised repeated calibration. Significance. Although additional online tests that involve end-users under non-experimental conditions are needed, these preliminary results are encouraging, from which we conclude that the self-calibration algorithm is a promising solution to improve P300-based BCI usability and reliability.

  1. An asynchronous multi-sensor micro control unit for wireless body sensor networks (WBSNs).

    PubMed

    Chen, Chiung-An; Chen, Shih-Lun; Huang, Hong-Yi; Luo, Ching-Hsing

    2011-01-01

    In this work, an asynchronous multi-sensor micro control unit (MCU) core is proposed for wireless body sensor networks (WBSNs). It consists of asynchronous interfaces, a power management unit, a multi-sensor controller, a data encoder (DE), and an error correct coder (ECC). To improve the system performance and expansion abilities, the asynchronous interface is created for handshaking different clock domains between ADC and RF with MCU. To increase the use time of the WBSN system, a power management technique is developed for reducing power consumption. In addition, the multi-sensor controller is designed for detecting various biomedical signals. To prevent loss error from wireless transmission, use of an error correct coding technique is important in biomedical applications. The data encoder is added for lossless compression of various biomedical signals with a compression ratio of almost three. This design is successfully tested on a FPGA board. The VLSI architecture of this work contains 2.68-K gate counts and consumes power 496-μW at 133-MHz processing rate by using TSMC 0.13-μm CMOS process. Compared with the previous techniques, this work offers higher performance, more functions, and lower hardware cost than other micro controller designs.

  2. An FDES-Based Shared Control Method for Asynchronous Brain-Actuated Robot.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rong; Wang, Yong-Xuan; Zhang, Lin

    2016-06-01

    The asynchronous brain-computer interface (BCI) offers more natural human-machine interaction. However, it is still considered insufficient to control rapid and complex sequences of movements for a robot without any advanced control method. This paper proposes a new shared controller based on the supervisory theory of fuzzy discrete event system (FDES) for brain-actuated robot control. The developed supervisory theory allows the more reliable control mode to play a dominant role in the robot control which is beneficial to reduce misoperation and improve the robustness of the system. The experimental procedures consist of real-time direct manual control and BCI control tests from ten volunteers. Both tests have shown that the proposed method significantly improves the performance and robustness of the robotic control. In an online BCI experiment, eight of the participants successfully controlled the robot to circumnavigate obstacles and reached the target with a three mental states asynchronous BCI while the other two participants failed in all the BCI control sessions. Furthermore, the FDES-based shared control method also helps to reduce the workload. It can be stated that the asynchronous BCI, in combination with FDES-based shared controller, is feasible for the real-time and robust control of robotics.

  3. Asynchronous master-slave parallelization of differential evolution for multi-objective optimization.

    PubMed

    Depolli, Matjaž; Trobec, Roman; Filipič, Bogdan

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present AMS-DEMO, an asynchronous master-slave implementation of DEMO, an evolutionary algorithm for multi-objective optimization. AMS-DEMO was designed for solving time-intensive problems efficiently on both homogeneous and heterogeneous parallel computer architectures. The algorithm is used as a test case for the asynchronous master-slave parallelization of multi-objective optimization that has not yet been thoroughly investigated. Selection lag is identified as the key property of the parallelization method, which explains how its behavior depends on the type of computer architecture and the number of processors. It is arrived at analytically and from the empirical results. AMS-DEMO is tested on a benchmark problem and a time-intensive industrial optimization problem, on homogeneous and heterogeneous parallel setups, providing performance results for the algorithm and an insight into the parallelization method. A comparison is also performed between AMS-DEMO and generational master-slave DEMO to demonstrate how the asynchronous parallelization method enhances the algorithm and what benefits it brings compared to the synchronous method.

  4. Asynchronous Periodic Edge-Event Triggered Control for Double-Integrator Networks With Communication Time Delays.

    PubMed

    Duan, Gaopeng; Xiao, Feng; Wang, Long

    2017-01-23

    This paper focuses on the average consensus of double-integrator networked systems based on the asynchronous periodic edge-event triggered control. The asynchronous property lies in the edge event-detecting procedure. For different edges, their event detections are performed at different times and the corresponding events occur independently of each other. When an event is activated, the two adjacent agents connected by the corresponding link sample their relative state information and update their controllers. The application of incidence matrix facilitates the transformation of control objects from the agent-based to the edge-based. Practically, due to the constraints of network bandwidth and communication distance, agents usually cannot receive the instantaneous information of some others, which has an impact on the system performance. Hence, it is necessary to investigate the presence of communication time delays. For double-integrator multiagent systems with and without communication time delays, the average state consensus can be asynchronously achieved by designing appropriate parameters under the proposed event-detecting rules. The presented results specify the relationship among the maximum allowable time delays, interaction topologies, and event-detecting periods. Furthermore, the proposed protocols have the advantages of reduced communication costs and controller-updating costs. Simulation examples are given to illustrate the proposed theoretical results.

  5. Probabilistic secretion of quanta and the synaptosecretosome hypothesis: evoked release at active zones of varicosities, boutons, and endplates.

    PubMed

    Bennett, M R; Gibson, W G; Robinson, J

    1997-10-01

    A quantum of transmitter may be released upon the arrival of a nerve impulse if the influx of calcium ions through a nearby voltage-dependent calcium channel is sufficient to activate the vesicle-associated calcium sensor protein that triggers exocytosis. A synaptic vesicle, together with its calcium sensor protein, is often found complexed with the calcium channel in active zones to form what will be called a "synaptosecretosome." In the present work, a stochastic analysis is given of the conditions under which a quantum is released from the synaptosecretosome by a nerve impulse. The theoretical treatment considers the rise of calcium at the synaptosecretosome after the stochastic opening of a calcium channel at some time during the impulse, followed by the stochastic binding of calcium to the vesicle-associated protein and the probability of this leading to exocytosis. This allows determination of the probabilities that an impulse will release 0, 1, 2,... quanta from an active zone, whether this is in a varicosity, a bouton, or a motor endplate. A number of experimental observations of the release of transmitter at the active zones of sympathetic varicosities and boutons as well as somatic motor endplates are described by this analysis. These include the likelihood of the secretion of only one quantum at an active zone of endplates and of more than one quantum at an active zone of a sympathetic varicosity. The fourth-power relationship between the probability of transmitter release at the active zones of sympathetic varicosities and motor endplates and the external calcium concentration is also explained by this approach. So, too, is the fact that the time course of the increased rate of quantal secretion from a somatic active zone after an impulse is invariant with changes in the amount of calcium that enters through its calcium channel, whether due to changes consequent on the actions of autoreceptor agents such as adenosine or to facilitation. The increased

  6. The design of circuit for THz time domain spectroscopy system based on asynchronous optical sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ruike; Zhang, Mile; Li, Yihan; He, Jingsuo; Zhang, Cunlin; Cui, Hailin

    2016-11-01

    Terahertz time domain spectroscopy system (THz-TDS) is the most commonly means of measuring terahertz time-domain spectroscopy. The time delay between the pump and probe laser is an important technology to realize THz time domain spectrum measurement. The translation platform with two mirrors and the mechanical structure is the popular means to adjust the optical path difference between the pump and probe laser to get the time delay of femtosecond pulse. Because of the limit of the mechanical structure and the phase-locked amplifier, this technique can't scan spectrum fast. In order to obtain high quality signal, a long time will be taken to scan spectrum. So a more rapid and convenient time delay technology is required to Instead of the machine translation platform and accomplish the Rapid spectral measurement. Asynchronous optical sampling technique is a way to get the time delay by producing a very small frequency difference between the repetition frequency of two femtosecond lasers. The scanner time will be reduced, because of there is no waste of time, due to mechanical inertia, not only by using the asynchronous optical sampling method to replace the mechanical structure without the influence of vibration. It will greatly increase the degree of integration by using the fiber femtosecond laser and highly integrated circuit to realize optical asynchronous sampling. To solve the problem above, a terahertz time-domain spectroscopy system based on asynchronous sampling is designed in this thesis. The system is based of two femtosecond laser whose repetition frequency is 100MHz.In order to realize asynchronous sampling, the control circuit of the two lasers is the most important. This thesis focuses on the researching, designing and experiment of this circuit. Firstly, the circuit is designed overall. Then the selection of the key device and the designing of the circuit principle is done by myself. Secondly, the test of the circuit to phase locked the master and

  7. An asynchronous traversal engine for graph-based rich metadata management

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Dong; Carns, Philip; Ross, Robert B.; Jenkins, John; Muirhead, Nicholas; Chen, Yong

    2016-06-23

    Rich metadata in high-performance computing (HPC) systems contains extended information about users, jobs, data files, and their relationships. Property graphs are a promising data model to represent heterogeneous rich metadata flexibly. Specifically, a property graph can use vertices to represent different entities and edges to record the relationships between vertices with unique annotations. The high-volume HPC use case, with millions of entities and relationships, naturally requires an out-of-core distributed property graph database, which must support live updates (to ingest production information in real time), low-latency point queries (for frequent metadata operations such as permission checking), and large-scale traversals (for provenance data mining). Among these needs, large-scale property graph traversals are particularly challenging for distributed graph storage systems. Most existing graph systems implement a "level synchronous" breadth-first search algorithm that relies on global synchronization in each traversal step. This performs well in many problem domains; but a rich metadata management system is characterized by imbalanced graphs, long traversal lengths, and concurrent workloads, each of which has the potential to introduce or exacerbate stragglers (i.e., abnormally slow steps or servers in a graph traversal) that lead to low overall throughput for synchronous traversal algorithms. Previous research indicated that the straggler problem can be mitigated by using asynchronous traversal algorithms, and many graph-processing frameworks have successfully demonstrated this approach. Such systems require the graph to be loaded into a separate batch-processing framework instead of being iteratively accessed, however. In this work, we investigate a general asynchronous graph traversal engine that can operate atop a rich metadata graph in its native format. We outline a traversal-aware query language and key optimizations (traversal-affiliate caching

  8. An asynchronous traversal engine for graph-based rich metadata management

    DOE PAGES

    Dai, Dong; Carns, Philip; Ross, Robert B.; ...

    2016-06-23

    Rich metadata in high-performance computing (HPC) systems contains extended information about users, jobs, data files, and their relationships. Property graphs are a promising data model to represent heterogeneous rich metadata flexibly. Specifically, a property graph can use vertices to represent different entities and edges to record the relationships between vertices with unique annotations. The high-volume HPC use case, with millions of entities and relationships, naturally requires an out-of-core distributed property graph database, which must support live updates (to ingest production information in real time), low-latency point queries (for frequent metadata operations such as permission checking), and large-scale traversals (for provenancemore » data mining). Among these needs, large-scale property graph traversals are particularly challenging for distributed graph storage systems. Most existing graph systems implement a "level synchronous" breadth-first search algorithm that relies on global synchronization in each traversal step. This performs well in many problem domains; but a rich metadata management system is characterized by imbalanced graphs, long traversal lengths, and concurrent workloads, each of which has the potential to introduce or exacerbate stragglers (i.e., abnormally slow steps or servers in a graph traversal) that lead to low overall throughput for synchronous traversal algorithms. Previous research indicated that the straggler problem can be mitigated by using asynchronous traversal algorithms, and many graph-processing frameworks have successfully demonstrated this approach. Such systems require the graph to be loaded into a separate batch-processing framework instead of being iteratively accessed, however. In this work, we investigate a general asynchronous graph traversal engine that can operate atop a rich metadata graph in its native format. We outline a traversal-aware query language and key optimizations (traversal

  9. Activity-dependent regulation of release probability at excitatory hippocampal synapses: a crucial role of FMRP in neurotransmission

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao-Sheng; Peng, Chun-Zi; Cai, Wei-Jun; Xia, Jian; Jin, Daozhong; Dai, Yuqiao; Luo, Xue-Gang; Klyachko, Vitaly A.; Deng, Pan-Yue

    2014-01-01

    Transcriptional silencing of the Fmr1 gene encoding fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) causes Fragile X Syndrome (FXS), the most common form of inherited intellectual disability and the leading genetic cause of autism. FMRP has been suggested to play important roles in regulating neurotransmission and short-term synaptic plasticity at excitatory hippocampal and cortical synapses. However, the origins and the mechanisms of these FMRP actions remain incompletely understood, and the role of FMRP in regulating synaptic release probability and presynaptic function remains debated. Here we used variance-mean analysis and peak scaled nonstationary variance analysis to examine changes in both pre- and postsynaptic parameters during repetitive activity at excitatory CA3-CA1 hippocampal synapses in a mouse model of FXS. Our analyses revealed that loss of FMRP did not affect the basal release probability or basal synaptic transmission, but caused an abnormally elevated release probability specifically during repetitive activity. These abnormalities were not accompanied by changes in EPSC kinetics, quantal size or postsynaptic AMPA receptor conductance. Our results thus indicate that FMRP regulates neurotransmission at excitatory hippocampal synapses specifically during repetitive activity via modulation of release probability in a presynaptic manner. Our study suggests that FMRP function in regulating neurotransmitter release is an activity-dependent phenomenon that may contribute to the pathophysiology of FXS. PMID:24646437

  10. Hypertonic enhancement of transmitter release from frog motor nerve terminals: Ca2+ independence and role of integrins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kashani, A. H.; Chen, B. M.; Grinnell, A. D.

    2001-01-01

    Hyperosmotic solutions cause markedly enhanced spontaneous quantal release of neurotransmitter from many nerve terminals. The mechanism of this enhancement is unknown. We have investigated this phenomenon at the frog neuromuscular junction with the aim of determining the degree to which it resembles the modulation of release by stretch, which has been shown to be mediated by mechanical tension on integrins.The hypertonicity enhancement, like the stretch effect, does not require Ca2+ influx or release from internal stores, although internal release may contribute to the effect. The hypertonicity effect is sharply reduced (but not eliminated) by peptides containing the RGD sequence, which compete with native ligands for integrin bonds.There is co-variance in the magnitude of the stretch and osmotic effects; that is, individual terminals exhibiting a large stretch effect also show strong enhancement by hypertonicity, and vice versa. The stretch and osmotic enhancements also can partially occlude each other.There remain some clear-cut differences between osmotic and stretch forms of modulation: the larger range of enhancement by hypertonic solutions, the relative lack of effect of osmolarity on evoked release, and the reported higher temperature sensitivity of osmotic enhancement. Nevertheless, our data strongly implicate integrins in a significant fraction of the osmotic enhancement, possibly acting via the same mechanism as stretch modulation.

  11. Human pyramidal to interneuron synapses are mediated by multi-vesicular release and multiple docked vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Molnár, Gábor; Rózsa, Márton; Baka, Judith; Holderith, Noémi; Barzó, Pál; Nusser, Zoltan; Tamás, Gábor

    2016-01-01

    Classic theories link cognitive abilities to synaptic properties and human-specific biophysical features of synapses might contribute to the unparalleled performance of the human cerebral cortex. Paired recordings and multiple probability fluctuation analysis revealed similar quantal sizes, but 4-times more functional release sites in human pyramidal cell to fast-spiking interneuron connections compared to rats. These connections were mediated on average by three synaptic contacts in both species. Each presynaptic active zone (AZ) contains 6.2 release sites in human, but only 1.6 in rats. Electron microscopy (EM) and EM tomography showed that an AZ harbors 4 docked vesicles in human, but only a single one in rats. Consequently, a Katz’s functional release site occupies ~0.012 μm2 in the human presynaptic AZ and ~0.025 μm2 in the rat. Our results reveal a robust difference in the biophysical properties of a well-defined synaptic connection of the cortical microcircuit of human and rodents. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18167.001 PMID:27536876

  12. Human pyramidal to interneuron synapses are mediated by multi-vesicular release and multiple docked vesicles.

    PubMed

    Molnár, Gábor; Rózsa, Márton; Baka, Judith; Holderith, Noémi; Barzó, Pál; Nusser, Zoltan; Tamás, Gábor

    2016-08-18

    Classic theories link cognitive abilities to synaptic properties and human-specific biophysical features of synapses might contribute to the unparalleled performance of the human cerebral cortex. Paired recordings and multiple probability fluctuation analysis revealed similar quantal sizes, but 4-times more functional release sites in human pyramidal cell to fast-spiking interneuron connections compared to rats. These connections were mediated on average by three synaptic contacts in both species. Each presynaptic active zone (AZ) contains 6.2 release sites in human, but only 1.6 in rats. Electron microscopy (EM) and EM tomography showed that an AZ harbors 4 docked vesicles in human, but only a single one in rats. Consequently, a Katz's functional release site occupies ~0.012 μm(2) in the human presynaptic AZ and ~0.025 μm(2) in the rat. Our results reveal a robust difference in the biophysical properties of a well-defined synaptic connection of the cortical microcircuit of human and rodents.

  13. Release probability of hippocampal glutamatergic terminals scales with the size of the active zone

    PubMed Central

    Holderith, Noemi; Lorincz, Andrea; Katona, Gergely; Rózsa, Balázs; Kulik, Akos; Watanabe, Masahiko; Nusser, Zoltan

    2012-01-01

    Cortical synapses display remarkable structural, molecular and functional heterogeneity. Our knowledge regarding the relationship between the ultrastructural and functional parameters is still fragmented. Here we asked how the release probability and presynaptic [Ca2+] transients relate to the ultrastructure of rat hippocampal glutamatergic axon terminals. Two-photon Ca2+ imaging-derived optical quantal analysis and correlated electron microscopic reconstructions revealed a tight correlation between the release probability and the active zone area. The peak amplitude of [Ca2+] transients in single boutons also positively correlated with the active zone area. Freeze-fracture immunogold labeling revealed that the voltage-gated Ca2+ channel subunit Cav2.1 and the presynaptic protein Rim1/2 are confined to the active zone and their numbers scale linearly with the active zone area. Gold particles for Cav2.1 showed a nonrandom distribution within the active zones. Our results demonstrate that the number of several active zone proteins, including presynaptic Ca2+ channels, docked vesicles and the release probability scales linearly with the active zone area. PMID:22683683

  14. An Asymmetric Increase in Inhibitory Synapse Number Underlies the Development of a Direction Selective Circuit in the Retina.

    PubMed

    Morrie, Ryan D; Feller, Marla B

    2015-06-24

    Neural circuits rely upon a precise wiring of their component neurons to perform meaningful computations. To compute the direction of motion in the visual scene, the direction selective circuit in the mouse retina depends on an asymmetry in the inhibitory neurotransmission from starburst amacrine cells (SACs) to direction selective ganglion cells (DSGCs). Specifically, depolarization of a SAC on the null side of a DSGC causes a threefold greater unitary inhibitory conductance than depolarization of a SAC on the preferred side. This asymmetry emerges during the second postnatal week of development, but its basis remains unknown. To determine the source of this asymmetry in inhibitory conductance, we conducted paired recordings between SACs and DSGCs at the beginning and end of the second postnatal week. We replaced calcium with strontium to promote asynchronous neurotransmitter release and produce quantal events. During the second postnatal week the quantal frequency but not the quantal amplitude of synaptic events increased more than threefold for null-side SAC-DSGC pairs but remained constant for preferred-side pairs. In addition, paired-pulse depression did not differ between SACs located on the null and preferred sides of DSGCs, indicating that all inhibitory SAC synapses onto a DSGC exhibit the same probability of release. Thus, the higher quantal frequency seen in null-side pairs results from a greater number of inhibitory synapses, revealing that an asymmetry in synapse number between SACs and DSGCs underlies the development of an essential component in the retina's direction selective circuit.

  15. Investigation on the spectral properties of 2D asynchronous fluorescence spectra generated by using variable excitation wavelengths as a perturbation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jingdan; He, Anqi; Guo, Ran; Wei, Yongju; Feng, Juan; Xu, Yizhuang; Noda, Isao; Wu, Jinguang

    2016-11-01

    Properties of 2D asynchronous spectra generated from a series of fluorescence emission spectra are investigated. Variable excitation wavelengths are utilized as an external perturbation. Based on the results of mathematical analysis and computer simulation, we find that no cross peak will be produced on the 2D asynchronous spectrum if the fluorescent solute under investigation occurs in a single micro-environment. The observation of cross peaks implies that the fluorescent molecule may occur in different micro-environments in a solution. Based on these results, we use 2D asynchronous spectra to investigate the emission spectra of anthracene dissolved in cyclohexane. When the concentration of anthracene is low, no cross peak is produced in the resultant 2D asynchronous spectrum, confirming that anthracene is dissolved as single molecule in the solution. As the concentration elevated, cross peaks appear in the corresponding 2D asynchronous spectra. A plausible explanation of this phenomenon is that anthracene may undergo aggregation via π-π interaction or π-C-H interaction.

  16. An Asynchronous Low Power and High Performance VLSI Architecture for Viterbi Decoder Implemented with Quasi Delay Insensitive Templates

    PubMed Central

    Devi, T. Kalavathi; Palaniappan, Sakthivel

    2015-01-01

    Convolutional codes are comprehensively used as Forward Error Correction (FEC) codes in digital communication systems. For decoding of convolutional codes at the receiver end, Viterbi decoder is often used to have high priority. This decoder meets the demand of high speed and low power. At present, the design of a competent system in Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI) technology requires these VLSI parameters to be finely defined. The proposed asynchronous method focuses on reducing the power consumption of Viterbi decoder for various constraint lengths using asynchronous modules. The asynchronous designs are based on commonly used Quasi Delay Insensitive (QDI) templates, namely, Precharge Half Buffer (PCHB) and Weak Conditioned Half Buffer (WCHB). The functionality of the proposed asynchronous design is simulated and verified using Tanner Spice (TSPICE) in 0.25 µm, 65 nm, and 180 nm technologies of Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacture Company (TSMC). The simulation result illustrates that the asynchronous design techniques have 25.21% of power reduction compared to synchronous design and work at a speed of 475 MHz. PMID:26558289

  17. Clinical outcomes of remote asynchronous telerehabilitation are equivalent to traditional therapy following total knee arthroplasty: A randomized control study.

    PubMed

    Bini, S A; Mahajan, J

    2017-02-01

    Introduction Successful post-operative telerehabilitation following total knee replacement (TKR) has been documented using synchronous (real-time) video. Bandwidth and the need for expensive hardware are cited as barriers to implementation. Web-based asynchronous visual platforms promise to address these problems but have not been evaluated. We performed a randomized control study comparing an asynchronous video-based software platform to in-person outpatient physical therapy visits following TKR. Materials and methods Fifty-one patients were randomized to either the intervention group, using an asynchronous video application on a mobile device, or the traditional group undergoing outpatient physical therapy. Outcome data were collected using validated instruments prior to surgery and at a minimum three-month follow-up. Results Twenty-nine patients completed the study. There were no statistically significant differences in any clinical outcome between groups. The satisfaction with care was equivalent between groups. Overall utilization of hospital-based resources was 60% less than for the traditional group. Discussion We report that clinical outcomes following asynchronous telerehabilitation administered over the web and through a hand-held device were not inferior to those achieved with traditional care. Outpatient resource utilization was lower. Patient satisfaction was high for both groups. The results suggest that asynchronous telerehabilitation may be a more practical alternative to real-time video visits and are clinically equivalent to the in-person care model.

  18. Asynchronous P300-based brain-computer interface to control a virtual environment: initial tests on end users.

    PubMed

    Aloise, Fabio; Schettini, Francesca; Aricò, Pietro; Salinari, Serenella; Guger, Christoph; Rinsma, Johanna; Aiello, Marco; Mattia, Donatella; Cincotti, Febo

    2011-10-01

    Motor disability and/or ageing can prevent individuals from fully enjoying home facilities, thus worsening their quality of life. Advances in the field of accessible user interfaces for domotic appliances can represent a valuable way to improve the independence of these persons. An asynchronous P300-based Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) system was recently validated with the participation of healthy young volunteers for environmental control. In this study, the asynchronous P300-based BCI for the interaction with a virtual home environment was tested with the participation of potential end-users (clients of a Frisian home care organization) with limited autonomy due to ageing and/or motor disabilities. System testing revealed that the minimum number of stimulation sequences needed to achieve correct classification had a higher intra-subject variability in potential end-users with respect to what was previously observed in young controls. Here we show that the asynchronous modality performed significantly better as compared to the synchronous mode in continuously adapting its speed to the users' state. Furthermore, the asynchronous system modality confirmed its reliability in avoiding misclassifications and false positives, as previously shown in young healthy subjects. The asynchronous modality may contribute to filling the usability gap between BCI systems and traditional input devices, representing an important step towards their use in the activities of daily living.

  19. Participation in asynchronous online discussion forums does improve student learning of gross anatomy.

    PubMed

    Green, Rodney A; Farchione, Davide; Hughes, Diane L; Chan, Siew-Pang

    2014-01-01

    Asynchronous online discussion forums are common in blended learning models and are popular with students. A previous report has suggested that participation in these forums may assist student learning in a gross anatomy subject but it was unclear as to whether more academically able students post more often or whether participation led to improved learning outcomes. This study used a path model to analyze the contribution of forum participation, previous academic ability, and student campus of enrolment to final marks in a multicampus gross anatomy course for physiotherapy students. The course has a substantial online learning management system (LMS) that incorporates asynchronous forums as a learning tool, particularly to answer learning objectives. Students were encouraged to post new threads and answer queries in threads started by others. The forums were moderated weekly by staff. Discussion forums were the most used feature of the LMS site with 31,920 hits. Forty-eight percent of the students posted at least once with 186 threads initiated by students and a total of 608 posts. The total number of posts made a significant direct contribution to final mark (P = 0.008) as did previous academic ability (P = 0.002). Although campus did not contribute to final mark, there was a trend for students at the campus where the course coordinator was situated to post more often than those at the other campus (P = 0.073). These results indicate that asynchronous online discussion forums can be an effective tool for improving student learning outcomes as evidenced by final marks in gross anatomy teaching.

  20. Rhythmic and non-rhythmic attractors in asynchronous random Boolean networks.

    PubMed

    Di Paolo, E A

    2001-03-01

    In multi-component, discrete systems, such as Boolean networks and cellular automata, the scheme of updating of the individual elements plays a crucial role in determining their dynamic properties and their suitability as models of complex phenomena. Many interesting properties of these systems rely heavily on the use of synchronous updating of the individual elements. Considerations of parsimony have motivated the claim that, if the natural systems being modelled lack any clear evidence of synchronously driven elements, then random asynchronous updating should be used by default. The introduction of a random element precludes the possibility of strictly cyclic behaviour. In principle, this poses the question of whether asynchronously driven Boolean networks, cellular automata, etc., are inherently bad choices at the time of modelling rhythmic phenomena. This paper focuses on this subsidiary issue for the case of Asynchronous Random Boolean Networks (ARBNs). It defines measures of pseudo-periodicity between states and sufficiently relaxed statistical constraints. These measures are used to guide a genetic algorithm to find appropriate examples. Success in this search for a number of cases, and the subsequent statistical analysis lead to the conclusion that ARBNs can indeed be used as models of co-ordinated rhythmic phenomena, which may be stronger precisely because of their in-built asynchrony. The same technique is used to find non-stationary attractors that show no rhythm. Evidence suggests that the latter are more abundant than rhythmic attractor. The methodology is flexible, and allows for more demanding statistical conditions for defining pseudo-periodicity, and constraining the evolutionary search.

  1. Identification of a New Exo-Endocytic Mechanism Triggered by Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone in Mast Cells.

    PubMed

    Balseiro-Gomez, Santiago; Flores, Juan A; Acosta, Jorge; Ramirez-Ponce, M Pilar; Ales, Eva

    2015-09-01

    The key role of mast cells (MC), either in development of inflammatory pathologies or in response to environmental stress, has been widely reported in recent years. Previous studies have described the effects of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), which is released from inflamed tissues by cellular stress signals, on MC degranulation, a process possibly driven by selective secretion of mediators (piecemeal degranulation). In this study, we introduce a novel granular exo-endocytic pathway induced by CRH on peritoneal MC. We found that CRH triggers substantial exocytosis, which is even stronger than that induced by Ag stimulation and is characterized by large quantal size release events. Membrane fluorescence increases during stimulation in the presence of FM1-43 dye, corroborating the strength of this exocytosis, given that discrete upward fluorescence steps are often observed and suggesting that secretory granules are preferentially released by compound exocytosis. Additionally, the presence of a depot of large tubular organelles in the cytoplasm suggests that the exocytotic process is tightly coupled to a fast compound endocytosis. This CRH-stimulated mechanism is mediated through activation of adenylate cyclase and an increase of cAMP and intracellular Ca(2+), as evidenced by the fact that the effect of CRH is mimicked by forskolin and 8-bromo-cAMP. Thus, these outcomes constitute new evidence for the critical role of MC in pathophysiological conditions within a cellular stress environment and an alternative membrane trafficking route mediated by CRH.

  2. Distributed Computing for Signal Processing: Modeling of Asynchronous Parallel Computation. Appendix A.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-03-01

    Modeling of Asynchronous Parallel Computation 1983 Progress Report L.J. Siegel, H.J. Siegel, PMH . Swain, G.B. Adams 111, W.E. Kuhn III, R .J...used in reduction machines), and vector. A complete and very detailed taxonomy based on these concepts is presented in Ji181]. Its length is too great...representation [(1oL731. A banyan is a directed graph composed of vertices and edges or arcs such that. it is irreflexive, asymmetric , and intransitive (a

  3. Asynchronous RTK precise DGNSS positioning method for deriving a low-latency high-rate output

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Zhang; Hanfeng, Lv; Dingjie, Wang; Yanqing, Hou; Jie, Wu

    2015-07-01

    Low-latency high-rate (1 Hz) precise real-time kinematic (RTK) can be applied in high-speed scenarios such as aircraft automatic landing, precise agriculture and intelligent vehicle. The classic synchronous RTK (SRTK) precise differential GNSS (DGNSS) positioning technology, however, is not able to obtain a low-latency high-rate output for the rover receiver because of long data link transmission time delays (DLTTD) from the reference receiver. To overcome the long DLTTD, this paper proposes an asynchronous real-time kinematic (ARTK) method using asynchronous observations from two receivers. The asynchronous observation model (AOM) is developed based on undifferenced carrier phase observation equations of the two receivers at different epochs with short baseline. The ephemeris error and atmosphere delay are the possible main error sources on positioning accuracy in this model, and they are analyzed theoretically. In a short DLTTD and during a period of quiet ionosphere activity, the main error sources decreasing positioning accuracy are satellite orbital errors: the "inverted ephemeris error" and the integration of satellite velocity error which increase linearly along with DLTTD. The cycle slip of asynchronous double-differencing carrier phase is detected by TurboEdit method and repaired by the additional ambiguity parameter method. The AOM can deal with synchronous observation model (SOM) and achieve precise positioning solution with synchronous observations as well, since the SOM is only a specific case of AOM. The proposed method not only can reduce the cost of data collection and transmission, but can also support the mobile phone network data link transfer mode for the data of the reference receiver. This method can avoid data synchronizing process besides ambiguity initialization step, which is very convenient for real-time navigation of vehicles. The static and kinematic experiment results show that this method achieves 20 Hz or even higher rate output in

  4. Asynchronous BCI and local neural classifiers: an overview of the Adaptive Brain Interface project.

    PubMed

    Millán, José del R; Mouriño, Josep

    2003-06-01

    In this communication, we give an overview of our work on an asynchronous brain-computer interface (where the subject makes self-paced decisions on when to switch from one mental task to the next) that responds every 0.5 s. A local neural classifier tries to recognize three different mental tasks; it may also respond "unknown" for uncertain samples as the classifier has incorporated statistical rejection criteria. We report our experience with 15 subjects. We also briefly describe two brain-actuated applications we have developed: a virtual keyboard and a mobile robot (emulating a motorized wheelchair).

  5. Asynchronous Object Storage with QoS for Scientific and Commercial Big Data

    SciTech Connect

    Brim, Michael J; Dillow, David A; Oral, H Sarp; Settlemyer, Bradley W; Wang, Feiyi

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents our design for an asynchronous object storage system intended for use in scientific and commercial big data workloads. Use cases from the target workload do- mains are used to motivate the key abstractions used in the application programming interface (API). The architecture of the Scalable Object Store (SOS), a prototype object stor- age system that supports the API s facilities, is presented. The SOS serves as a vehicle for future research into scalable and resilient big data object storage. We briefly review our research into providing efficient storage servers capable of providing quality of service (QoS) contracts relevant for big data use cases.

  6. Chroma key without color restrictions based on asynchronous amplitude modulation of background illumination on retroreflective screens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal, Borja; Lafuente, Juan A.

    2016-03-01

    A simple technique to avoid color limitations in image capture systems based on chroma key video composition using retroreflective screens and light-emitting diodes (LED) rings is proposed and demonstrated. The combination of an asynchronous temporal modulation onto the background illumination and simple image processing removes the usual restrictions on foreground colors in the scene. The technique removes technical constraints in stage composition, allowing its design to be purely based on artistic grounds. Since it only requires adding a very simple electronic circuit to widely used chroma keying hardware based on retroreflective screens, the technique is easily applicable to TV and filming studios.

  7. Robust stabilisation and L2 -gain analysis for switched systems with actuator saturation under asynchronous switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Juan; Zhao, Jun

    2016-09-01

    Robust stabilisation and L2-gain analysis for a class of switched systems with actuator saturation are studied in this paper. The switching signal of the controllers lags behind that of the system modes, which leads to the asynchronous switching between the candidate controllers and the subsystems. By combining the piecewise Lyapunov function method with the convex hull technique, sufficient conditions in terms of LMIs for the solvability of the robust stabilisation and weighted L2-gain problems are presented respectively under the dwell time scheme. Finally, a numerical example is given to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed results.

  8. A formal language for the specification and verification of synchronous and asynchronous circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russinoff, David M.

    1993-01-01

    A formal hardware description language for the intended application of verifiable asynchronous communication is described. The language is developed within the logical framework of the Nqthm system of Boyer and Moore and is based on the event-driven behavioral model of VHDL, including the basic VHDL signal propagation mechanisms, the notion of simulation deltas, and the VHDL simulation cycle. A core subset of the language corresponds closely with a subset of VHDL and is adequate for the realistic gate-level modeling of both combinational and sequential circuits. Various extensions to this subset provide means for convenient expression of behavioral circuit specifications.

  9. Stability Analysis of Asynchronous States in Neuronal Networks with Conductance-Based Inhibition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leibold, Christian

    2004-11-01

    Oscillations in networks of inhibitory interneurons have been reported at various sites of the brain and are thought to play a fundamental role in neuronal processing. This Letter provides a self-contained analytical framework that allows numerically efficient calculations of the population activity of a network of conductance-based integrate-and-fire neurons that are coupled through inhibitory synapses. Based on a normalization equation this Letter introduces a novel stability criterion for a network state of asynchronous activity and discusses its perturbations. The analysis shows that, although often neglected, the reversal potential of synaptic inhibition has a strong influence on the stability as well as the frequency of network oscillations.

  10. APPSPACK 4.0 : asynchronous parallel pattern search for derivative-free optimization.

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, Genetha Anne; Kolda, Tamara Gibson

    2004-12-01

    APPSPACK is software for solving unconstrained and bound constrained optimization problems. It implements an asynchronous parallel pattern search method that has been specifically designed for problems characterized by expensive function evaluations. Using APPSPACK to solve optimization problems has several advantages: No derivative information is needed; the procedure for evaluating the objective function can be executed via a separate program or script; the code can be run in serial or parallel, regardless of whether or not the function evaluation itself is parallel; and the software is freely available. We describe the underlying algorithm, data structures, and features of APPSPACK version 4.0 as well as how to use and customize the software.

  11. An asynchronous data acquisition ASIC with a data-push architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mani, S.; Burlingame, E.; Bloom, P.; Glenn, S.; Holbrook, B.; Hopman, P.; Lin, F.; Rojas, S.

    1995-02-01

    We report on a digital circuit for data acquisition that has been developed for high energy physics applications. Its function is to receive asynchronous voltage pulses, time-stamp them individually and transmit them sequentially on an external bus. A 16-channel design has been fabricated as an application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) using the HP 1.2 μm double-metal, single-polysilicon process. Test results made on prototype chips indicate that the circuit performs within specifications for an operating clock frequency of 25 MHz and a working environment temperature of 0°C to 40°C.

  12. Specification and verification of gate-level VHDL models of synchronous and asynchronous circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russinoff, David M.

    1995-01-01

    We present a mathematical definition of hardware description language (HDL) that admits a semantics-preserving translation to a subset of VHDL. Our HDL includes the basic VHDL propagation delay mechanisms and gate-level circuit descriptions. We also develop formal procedures for deriving and verifying concise behavioral specifications of combinational and sequential devices. The HDL and the specification procedures have been formally encoded in the computational logic of Boyer and Moore, which provides a LISP implementation as well as a facility for mechanical proof-checking. As an application, we design, specify, and verify a circuit that achieves asynchronous communication by means of the biphase mark protocol.

  13. Asynchronous Video Interviewing as a New Technology in Personnel Selection: The Applicant’s Point of View

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, Falko S.; Ortner, Tuulia M.; Fay, Doris

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to integrate findings from technology acceptance research with research on applicant reactions to new technology for the emerging selection procedure of asynchronous video interviewing. One hundred six volunteers experienced asynchronous video interviewing and filled out several questionnaires including one on the applicants’ personalities. In line with previous technology acceptance research, the data revealed that perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use predicted attitudes toward asynchronous video interviewing. Furthermore, openness revealed to moderate the relation between perceived usefulness and attitudes toward this particular selection technology. No significant effects emerged for computer self-efficacy, job interview self-efficacy, extraversion, neuroticism, and conscientiousness. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed. PMID:27378969

  14. The Impact of Asynchronous Interactive Participation of Students on Their Learning Outcomes in an Intermediate Chinese Language Course at an Online High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruan, Henry

    2010-01-01

    This descriptive correlational study examined the impact of the levels of asynchronous interactive participation (AlP) on the learning outcomes in an online Chinese course. Three research questions are included in this paper: 1. What is the relationship between the levels of asynchronous interactive participation and the learning outcomes in…

  15. Web-based Cases in Teaching and Learning - the Quality of Discussions and a Stage of Perspective Taking in Asynchronous Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarvela, Sanna; Hakkinen, Paivi

    2002-01-01

    Examines the quality of asynchronous interaction in Web-based conferencing among preservice teachers. The study combines asynchronous conferencing with peer and mentor collaboration to electronically apprentice student learning. Results point out different levels of Web-based discussion: higher-level, progressive, and lower-level discussion. A…

  16. Merging the Forces of Asynchronous Tutoring and Synchronous Conferencing: A Qualitative Study of Arab ESL Academic Writers Using E-Tutoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alqadoumi, Omar Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies in the field of e-tutoring dealt either with asynchronous tutoring or synchronous conferencing as modes for providing e-tutoring services to English learners. This qualitative research study reports the experiences of Arab ESL tutees with both asynchronous tutoring and synchronous conferencing. It also reports the experiences of…

  17. Cannabinoid- and lysophosphatidylinositol-sensitive receptor GPR55 boosts neurotransmitter release at central synapses.

    PubMed

    Sylantyev, Sergiy; Jensen, Thomas P; Ross, Ruth A; Rusakov, Dmitri A

    2013-03-26

    G protein-coupled receptor (GPR) 55 is sensitive to certain cannabinoids, it is expressed in the brain and, in cell cultures, it triggers mobilization of intracellular Ca(2+). However, the adaptive neurobiological significance of GPR55 remains unknown. Here, we use acute hippocampal slices and combine two-photon excitation Ca(2+) imaging in presynaptic axonal boutons with optical quantal analysis in postsynaptic dendritic spines to find that GPR55 activation transiently increases release probability at individual CA3-CA1 synapses. The underlying mechanism involves Ca(2+) release from presynaptic Ca(2+) stores, whereas postsynaptic stores (activated by spot-uncaging of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate) remain unaffected by GPR55 agonists. These effects are abolished by genetic deletion of GPR55 or by the GPR55 antagonist cannabidiol, a constituent of Cannabis sativa. GPR55 shows colocalization with synaptic vesicle protein vesicular glutamate transporter 1 in stratum radiatum. Short-term potentiation of CA3-CA1 transmission after a short train of stimuli reveals a presynaptic, Ca(2+) store-dependent component sensitive to cannabidiol. The underlying cascade involves synthesis of phospholipids, likely in the presynaptic cell, but not the endocannabinoids 2-arachidonoylglycerol or anandamide. Our results thus unveil a signaling role for GPR55 in synaptic circuits of the brain.

  18. PRRT2 Is a Key Component of the Ca(2+)-Dependent Neurotransmitter Release Machinery.

    PubMed

    Valente, Pierluigi; Castroflorio, Enrico; Rossi, Pia; Fadda, Manuela; Sterlini, Bruno; Cervigni, Romina Ines; Prestigio, Cosimo; Giovedì, Silvia; Onofri, Franco; Mura, Elisa; Guarnieri, Fabrizia C; Marte, Antonella; Orlando, Marta; Zara, Federico; Fassio, Anna; Valtorta, Flavia; Baldelli, Pietro; Corradi, Anna; Benfenati, Fabio

    2016-04-05

    Heterozygous mutations in proline-rich transmembrane protein 2 (PRRT2) underlie a group of paroxysmal disorders, including epilepsy, kinesigenic dyskinesia, and migraine. Most of the mutations lead to impaired PRRT2 expression, suggesting that loss of PRRT2 function may contribute to pathogenesis. We show that PRRT2 is enriched in presynaptic terminals and that its silencing decreases the number of synapses and increases the number of docked synaptic vesicles at rest. PRRT2-silenced neurons exhibit a severe impairment of synchronous release, attributable to a sharp decrease in release probability and Ca(2+) sensitivity and associated with a marked increase of the asynchronous/synchronous release ratio. PRRT2 interacts with the synaptic proteins SNAP-25 and synaptotagmin 1/2. The results indicate that PRRT2 is intimately connected with the Ca(2+)-sensing machinery and that it plays an important role in the final steps of neurotransmitter release.

  19. PRRT2 Is a Key Component of the Ca2+-Dependent Neurotransmitter Release Machinery

    PubMed Central

    Valente, Pierluigi; Castroflorio, Enrico; Rossi, Pia; Fadda, Manuela; Sterlini, Bruno; Cervigni, Romina Ines; Prestigio, Cosimo; Giovedì, Silvia; Onofri, Franco; Mura, Elisa; Guarnieri, Fabrizia C.; Marte, Antonella; Orlando, Marta; Zara, Federico; Fassio, Anna; Valtorta, Flavia; Baldelli, Pietro; Corradi, Anna; Benfenati, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Summary Heterozygous mutations in proline-rich transmembrane protein 2 (PRRT2) underlie a group of paroxysmal disorders, including epilepsy, kinesigenic dyskinesia, and migraine. Most of the mutations lead to impaired PRRT2 expression, suggesting that loss of PRRT2 function may contribute to pathogenesis. We show that PRRT2 is enriched in presynaptic terminals and that its silencing decreases the number of synapses and increases the number of docked synaptic vesicles at rest. PRRT2-silenced neurons exhibit a severe impairment of synchronous release, attributable to a sharp decrease in release probability and Ca2+ sensitivity and associated with a marked increase of the asynchronous/synchronous release ratio. PRRT2 interacts with the synaptic proteins SNAP-25 and synaptotagmin 1/2. The results indicate that PRRT2 is intimately connected with the Ca2+-sensing machinery and that it plays an important role in the final steps of neurotransmitter release. PMID:27052163

  20. Asynchronous vegetation phenology enhances winter body condition of a large mobile herbivore.

    PubMed

    Searle, Kate R; Rice, Mindy B; Anderson, Charles R; Bishop, Chad; Hobbs, N T

    2015-10-01

    Understanding how spatial and temporal heterogeneity influence ecological processes forms a central challenge in ecology. Individual responses to heterogeneity shape population dynamics, therefore understanding these responses is central to sustainable population management. Emerging evidence has shown that herbivores track heterogeneity in nutritional quality of vegetation by responding to phenological differences in plants. We quantified the benefits mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) accrue from accessing habitats with asynchronous plant phenology in northwest Colorado over 3 years. Our analysis examined both the direct physiological and indirect environmental effects of weather and vegetation phenology on mule deer winter body condition. We identified several important effects of annual weather patterns and topographical variables on vegetation phenology in the home ranges of mule deer. Crucially, temporal patterns of vegetation phenology were linked with differences in body condition, with deer tending to show poorer body condition in areas with less asynchronous vegetation green-up and later vegetation onset. The direct physiological effect of previous winter precipitation on mule deer body condition was much less important than the indirect effect mediated by vegetation phenology. Additionally, the influence of vegetation phenology on body fat was much stronger than that of overall vegetation productivity. In summary, changing annual weather patterns, particularly in relation to seasonal precipitation, have the potential to alter body condition of this important ungulate species during the critical winter period. This finding highlights the importance of maintaining large contiguous areas of spatially and temporally variable resources to allow animals to compensate behaviourally for changing climate-driven resource patterns.

  1. The theory of asynchronous relative motion II: universal and regular solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roa, Javier; Peláez, Jesús

    2017-03-01

    Two fully regular and universal solutions to the problem of spacecraft relative motion are derived from the Sperling-Burdet (SB) and the Kustaanheimo-Stiefel (KS) regularizations. There are no singularities in the resulting solutions, and their form is not affected by the type of reference orbit (circular, elliptic, parabolic, or hyperbolic). In addition, the solutions to the problem are given in compact tensorial expressions and directly referred to the initial state vector of the leader spacecraft. The SB and KS formulations introduce a fictitious time by means of the Sundman transformation. Because of using an alternative independent variable, the solutions are built based on the theory of asynchronous relative motion. This technique simplifies the required derivations. Closed-form expressions of the partial derivatives of orbital motion with respect to the initial state are provided explicitly. Numerical experiments show that the performance of a given representation of the dynamics depends strongly on the time transformation, whereas it is virtually independent from the choice of variables to parameterize orbital motion. In the circular and elliptic cases, the linear solutions coincide exactly with the results obtained with the Clohessy-Wiltshire and Yamanaka-Ankersen state-transition matrices. Examples of relative orbits about parabolic and hyperbolic reference orbits are also presented. Finally, the theory of asynchronous relative motion provides a simple mechanism to introduce nonlinearities in the solution, improving its accuracy.

  2. Controllability of time-delayed Boolean multiplex control networks under asynchronous stochastic update

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Chao; Wang, Xingyuan; Liu, Hong

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the controllability of asynchronous Boolean multiplex control networks (ABMCNs) with time delay is studied. Firstly, dynamical model of Boolean multiplex control networks is constructed, which is assumed to be under Harvey' asynchronous update and time delay is introduced both in states and controls. By using of semi-tensor product (STP) approach, the logical dynamics is converted into an equivalent algebraic form by obtaining the control-depending network transition matrices of delayed system. Secondly, a necessary and sufficient condition is proved that only control-depending fixed points of the studied dynamics can be controlled with probability one. Thirdly, respectively for two types of controls, the controllability of dynamical control system is investigated. When initial states and time delay are given, formulae are obtained to show a) the reachable set at time s under specified controls; b) the reachable set at time s under arbitrary controls; c) the reachable probabilities to different destination states. Furthermore, an approach is discussed to find a precise control sequence which can steer dynamical system into a specified target with the maximum reachable probability. Examples are shown to illustrate the feasibility of the proposed scheme. PMID:25516009

  3. Algorithmic scalability in globally constrained conservative parallel discrete event simulations of asynchronous systems.

    PubMed

    Kolakowska, A; Novotny, M A; Korniss, G

    2003-04-01

    We consider parallel simulations for asynchronous systems employing L processing elements that are arranged on a ring. Processors communicate only among the nearest neighbors and advance their local simulated time only if it is guaranteed that this does not violate causality. In simulations with no constraints, in the infinite L limit the utilization scales [Korniss et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 84, 1351 (2000)]; but, the width of the virtual time horizon diverges (i.e., the measurement phase of the algorithm does not scale). In this work, we introduce a moving Delta-window global constraint, which modifies the algorithm so that the measurement phase scales as well. We present results of systematic studies in which the system size (i.e., L and the volume load per processor) as well as the constraint are varied. The Delta constraint eliminates the extreme fluctuations in the virtual time horizon, provides a bound on its width, and controls the average progress rate. The width of the Delta window can serve as a tuning parameter that, for a given volume load per processor, could be adjusted to optimize the utilization, so as to maximize the efficiency. This result may find numerous applications in modeling the evolution of general spatially extended short-range interacting systems with asynchronous dynamics, including dynamic Monte Carlo studies.

  4. Data-Aware Retrodiction for Asynchronous Harmonic Measurement in a Cyber-Physical Energy System

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Youda; Wang, Xue; Liu, Yanchi; Cui, Sujin

    2016-01-01

    Cyber-physical energy systems provide a networked solution for safety, reliability and efficiency problems in smart grids. On the demand side, the secure and trustworthy energy supply requires real-time supervising and online power quality assessing. Harmonics measurement is necessary in power quality evaluation. However, under the large-scale distributed metering architecture, harmonic measurement faces the out-of-sequence measurement (OOSM) problem, which is the result of latencies in sensing or the communication process and brings deviations in data fusion. This paper depicts a distributed measurement network for large-scale asynchronous harmonic analysis and exploits a nonlinear autoregressive model with exogenous inputs (NARX) network to reorder the out-of-sequence measuring data. The NARX network gets the characteristics of the electrical harmonics from practical data rather than the kinematic equations. Thus, the data-aware network approximates the behavior of the practical electrical parameter with real-time data and improves the retrodiction accuracy. Theoretical analysis demonstrates that the data-aware method maintains a reasonable consumption of computing resources. Experiments on a practical testbed of a cyber-physical system are implemented, and harmonic measurement and analysis accuracy are adopted to evaluate the measuring mechanism under a distributed metering network. Results demonstrate an improvement of the harmonics analysis precision and validate the asynchronous measuring method in cyber-physical energy systems. PMID:27548171

  5. Asynchronous timing and Doppler recovery in DSP based DPSK modems for fixed and mobile satellite applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koblents, B.; Belanger, M.; Woods, D.; Mclane, P. J.

    1993-01-01

    While conventional analog modems employ some kind of clock wave regenerator circuit for synchronous timing recovery, in sampled modem receivers the timing is recovered asynchronously to the incoming data stream, with no adjustment being made to the input sampling rate. All timing corrections are accomplished by digital operations on the sampled data stream, and timing recovery is asynchronous with the uncontrolled, input A/D system. A good timing error measurement algorithm is a zero crossing tracker proposed by Gardner. Digital, speech rate (2400 - 4800 bps) M-PSK modem receivers employing Gardner's zero crossing tracker were implemented and tested and found to achieve BER performance very close to theoretical values on the AWGN channel. Nyguist pulse shaped modem systems with excess bandwidth factors ranging from 100 to 60 percent were considered. We can show that for any symmetric M-PSK signal set Gardner's NDA algorithm is free of pattern jitter for any carrier phase offset for rectangular pulses and for Nyquist pulses having 100 percent excess bandwidth. Also, the Nyquist pulse shaped system is studied on the mobile satellite channel, where Doppler shifts and multipath fading degrade the pi/4-DQPSK signal. Two simple modifications to Gardner's zero crossing tracker enable it to remain useful in the presence of multipath fading.

  6. Grid-based asynchronous migration of execution context in Java virtual machines

    SciTech Connect

    von Laszewski, G.; Shudo, K.; Muraoka, Y.

    2000-06-15

    Previous research efforts for building thread migration systems have concentrated on the development of frameworks dealing with a small local environment controlled by a single user. Computational Grids provide the opportunity to utilize a large-scale environment controlled over different organizational boundaries. Using this class of large-scale computational resources as part of a thread migration system provides a significant challenge previously not addressed by this community. In this paper the authors present a framework that integrates Grid services to enhance the functionality of a thread migration system. To accommodate future Grid services, the design of the framework is both flexible and extensible. Currently, the thread migration system contains Grid services for authentication, registration, lookup, and automatic software installation. In the context of distributed applications executed on a Grid-based infrastructure, the asynchronous migration of an execution context can help solve problems such as remote execution, load balancing, and the development of mobile agents. The prototype is based on the migration of Java threads, allowing asynchronous and heterogeneous migration of the execution context of the running code.

  7. When are abrupt onsets found efficiently in complex visual search? Evidence from multielement asynchronous dynamic search.

    PubMed

    Kunar, Melina A; Watson, Derrick G

    2014-02-01

    Previous work has found that search principles derived from simple visual search tasks do not necessarily apply to more complex search tasks. Using a Multielement Asynchronous Dynamic (MAD) visual search task, in which high numbers of stimuli could either be moving, stationary, and/or changing in luminance, Kunar and Watson (M. A Kunar & D. G. Watson, 2011, Visual search in a Multi-element Asynchronous Dynamic (MAD) world, Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, Vol 37, pp. 1017-1031) found that, unlike previous work, participants missed a higher number of targets with search for moving items worse than for static items and that there was no benefit for finding targets that showed a luminance onset. In the present research, we investigated why luminance onsets do not capture attention and whether luminance onsets can ever capture attention in MAD search. Experiment 1 investigated whether blinking stimuli, which abruptly offset for 100 ms before reonsetting--conditions known to produce attentional capture in simpler visual search tasks--captured attention in MAD search, and Experiments 2-5 investigated whether giving participants advance knowledge and preexposure to the blinking cues produced efficient search for blinking targets. Experiments 6-9 investigated whether unique luminance onsets, unique motion, or unique stationary items captured attention. The results found that luminance onsets captured attention in MAD search only when they were unique, consistent with a top-down unique feature hypothesis.

  8. Visual and Auditory Components in the Perception of Asynchronous Audiovisual Speech

    PubMed Central

    Alcalá-Quintana, Rocío

    2015-01-01

    Research on asynchronous audiovisual speech perception manipulates experimental conditions to observe their effects on synchrony judgments. Probabilistic models establish a link between the sensory and decisional processes underlying such judgments and the observed data, via interpretable parameters that allow testing hypotheses and making inferences about how experimental manipulations affect such processes. Two models of this type have recently been proposed, one based on independent channels and the other using a Bayesian approach. Both models are fitted here to a common data set, with a subsequent analysis of the interpretation they provide about how experimental manipulations affected the processes underlying perceived synchrony. The data consist of synchrony judgments as a function of audiovisual offset in a speech stimulus, under four within-subjects manipulations of the quality of the visual component. The Bayesian model could not accommodate asymmetric data, was rejected by goodness-of-fit statistics for 8/16 observers, and was found to be nonidentifiable, which renders uninterpretable parameter estimates. The independent-channels model captured asymmetric data, was rejected for only 1/16 observers, and identified how sensory and decisional processes mediating asynchronous audiovisual speech perception are affected by manipulations that only alter the quality of the visual component of the speech signal. PMID:27551361

  9. Data-Aware Retrodiction for Asynchronous Harmonic Measurement in a Cyber-Physical Energy System.

    PubMed

    Liu, Youda; Wang, Xue; Liu, Yanchi; Cui, Sujin

    2016-08-18

    Cyber-physical energy systems provide a networked solution for safety, reliability and efficiency problems in smart grids. On the demand side, the secure and trustworthy energy supply requires real-time supervising and online power quality assessing. Harmonics measurement is necessary in power quality evaluation. However, under the large-scale distributed metering architecture, harmonic measurement faces the out-of-sequence measurement (OOSM) problem, which is the result of latencies in sensing or the communication process and brings deviations in data fusion. This paper depicts a distributed measurement network for large-scale asynchronous harmonic analysis and exploits a nonlinear autoregressive model with exogenous inputs (NARX) network to reorder the out-of-sequence measuring data. The NARX network gets the characteristics of the electrical harmonics from practical data rather than the kinematic equations. Thus, the data-aware network approximates the behavior of the practical electrical parameter with real-time data and improves the retrodiction accuracy. Theoretical analysis demonstrates that the data-aware method maintains a reasonable consumption of computing resources. Experiments on a practical testbed of a cyber-physical system are implemented, and harmonic measurement and analysis accuracy are adopted to evaluate the measuring mechanism under a distributed metering network. Results demonstrate an improvement of the harmonics analysis precision and validate the asynchronous measuring method in cyber-physical energy systems.

  10. Simple and Flexible Self-Reproducing Structures in Asynchronous Cellular Automata and Their Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xin; Lee, Jia; Yang, Rui-Long; Zhu, Qing-Sheng

    2013-03-01

    Self-reproduction on asynchronous cellular automata (ACAs) has attracted wide attention due to the evident artifacts induced by synchronous updating. Asynchronous updating, which allows cells to undergo transitions independently at random times, might be more compatible with the natural processes occurring at micro-scale, but the dark side of the coin is the increment in the complexity of an ACA in order to accomplish stable self-reproduction. This paper proposes a novel model of self-timed cellular automata (STCAs), a special type of ACAs, where unsheathed loops are able to duplicate themselves reliably in parallel. The removal of sheath cannot only allow various loops with more flexible and compact structures to replicate themselves, but also reduce the number of cell states of the STCA as compared to the previous model adopting sheathed loops [Y. Takada, T. Isokawa, F. Peper and N. Matsui, Physica D227, 26 (2007)]. The lack of sheath, on the other hand, often tends to cause much more complicated interactions among loops, when all of them struggle independently to stretch out their constructing arms at the same time. In particular, such intense collisions may even cause the emergence of a mess of twisted constructing arms in the cellular space. By using a simple and natural method, our self-reproducing loops (SRLs) are able to retract their arms successively, thereby disentangling from the mess successfully.

  11. Visual and Auditory Components in the Perception of Asynchronous Audiovisual Speech.

    PubMed

    García-Pérez, Miguel A; Alcalá-Quintana, Rocío

    2015-12-01

    Research on asynchronous audiovisual speech perception manipulates experimental conditions to observe their effects on synchrony judgments. Probabilistic models establish a link between the sensory and decisional processes underlying such judgments and the observed data, via interpretable parameters that allow testing hypotheses and making inferences about how experimental manipulations affect such processes. Two models of this type have recently been proposed, one based on independent channels and the other using a Bayesian approach. Both models are fitted here to a common data set, with a subsequent analysis of the interpretation they provide about how experimental manipulations affected the processes underlying perceived synchrony. The data consist of synchrony judgments as a function of audiovisual offset in a speech stimulus, under four within-subjects manipulations of the quality of the visual component. The Bayesian model could not accommodate asymmetric data, was rejected by goodness-of-fit statistics for 8/16 observers, and was found to be nonidentifiable, which renders uninterpretable parameter estimates. The independent-channels model captured asymmetric data, was rejected for only 1/16 observers, and identified how sensory and decisional processes mediating asynchronous audiovisual speech perception are affected by manipulations that only alter the quality of the visual component of the speech signal.

  12. Asynchronous Amazon Forest Canopy Phenology Indicates Adaptation to Both Water and Light Availability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, M. O.; Kimball, J. S.; Nemani, R. R.

    2015-12-01

    Amazon forests represent nearly half of all tropical vegetation biomass and, through photosynthesis and respiration, annually process more than twice the amount of estimated carbon (CO2) from fossil fuel emissions. Yet the seasonality of Amazon canopy cover, and the extent to which seasonal fluctuations in water availability and photosynthetically active radiation influence these processes, is still poorly understood. Implementing six remotely sensed data sets spanning nine years (2003-2011), with reported field and flux tower data, we show that southern equatorial Amazon forests exhibit a distinctive seasonal signal. Seasonal timing of water availability, canopy biomass growth and net leaf flush are asynchronous in regions with short dry seasons and become more synchronous across a west-to-east longitudinal moisture gradient of increasing dry season length. Forest cover is responsive to seasonal disparities in both water and solar radiation availability, temporally adjusting net leaf flush to maximize use of these generally abundant resources, while reducing drought susceptibility. An accurate characterization of this asynchronous behavior allows for improved understanding of canopy phenology across contiguous tropical forests and their sensitivity to climate variability and drought. These insights can also inform land surface models to provide a more accurate representation of seasonal forest carbon allocation strategies responsive to environmental drivers.

  13. Interference tables: a useful model for interference analysis in asynchronous multicarrier transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medjahdi, Yahia; Terré, Michel; Ruyet, Didier Le; Roviras, Daniel

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we investigate the impact of timing asynchronism on the performance of multicarrier techniques in a spectrum coexistence context. Two multicarrier schemes are considered: cyclic prefix-based orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (CP-OFDM) with a rectangular pulse shape and filter bank-based multicarrier (FBMC) with physical layer for dynamic spectrum access and cognitive radio (PHYDYAS) and isotropic orthogonal transform algorithm (IOTA) waveforms. First, we present the general concept of the so-called power spectral density (PSD)-based interference tables which are commonly used for multicarrier interference characterization in spectrum sharing context. After highlighting the limits of this approach, we propose a new family of interference tables called `instantaneous interference tables'. The proposed tables give the interference power caused by a given interfering subcarrier on a victim one, not only as a function of the spectral distance separating both subcarriers but also with respect to the timing misalignment between the subcarrier holders. In contrast to the PSD-based interference tables, the accuracy of the proposed tables has been validated through different simulation results. Furthermore, due to the better frequency localization of both PHYDYAS and IOTA waveforms, FBMC technique is demonstrated to be more robust to timing asynchronism compared to OFDM one. Such a result makes FBMC a potential candidate for the physical layer of future cognitive radio systems.

  14. On the method-dependence of transition state asynchronicity in Diels-Alder reactions.

    PubMed

    Linder, Mats; Brinck, Tore

    2013-04-14

    This work discusses the dependence of transition state geometries on the choice of quantum chemical optimization method for the extensively studied Diels-Alder reaction. Rather significant differences are observed between post-Hartree-Fock methods and (hybrid) density functional theory, where the latter predicts larger asynchronicities. The results show that the low MP2 asynchronicity observed is likely artificial. Still, there are significant discrepancies between hybrid and pure density functionals. The role of the exchange functional seems to be most prominent in less activated reacting systems, while the importance of the correlation functional seems to increase as they become more activated by, e.g., an electron-donating group on the diene. To correct the dubious MP2 geometries, we employed the SCS-MP2 protocol for transition state optimization, which leads to significantly better results with respect to CCSD/6-31+G(d) level calculations. We conclude that in order for hybrid functionals to give descriptions consistent with the sample post-Hartree-Fock methods, a balanced combination of both Hartree-Fock exchange (with a couple of exceptions) and a well-behaved correlation functional is required. Given that the benchmark CCSD/6-31+G(d) geometries are sufficient representations, the best geometries were obtained using ωB97X(D), B2PLYP(D) and M06-2X.

  15. Design of resolution/power controllable Asynchronous Sigma-Delta Modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshmukh, Anita Arvind; Deshmukh, Raghvendra B.

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents the design of a Programmable Asynchronous Modulator (PAM) with field control of resolution and power. A novel variable hysteresis Schmitt Trigger (ST) is used for external programmability. Asynchronous Sigma-Delta Modulator (ASDM) implementation with external control voltages is proposed to supervise the resolution and power. This architecture with reduced circuit complexity considerably improves the earlier realizations by eliminating multiple current sources as well switched capacitor circuits and results in power saving up to 87 %. Proposed PAM design demonstrates an improved SNDR of 115 dB, DR of 96 dB, and power consumption below 280 μW. It illustrates Effective Number of Bits (ENOB) to 18.81 and Figure of Merit (FoM) to 0.15 fJ/conversion step. Modulator is implemented in Cadence UMC Hspice 0.18 μm CMOS analog technology. Off-chip PAM control for resolution/power performance has potential applications in battery operated ultra low power applications like IoT; where ADC is one of the major power consuming components. It offers the promise for an efficient performance with power saving.

  16. Torsional stress analysis of the squirrel-cage rotor for three phase asynchronous motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axinte, T.; Nutu, C.

    2015-11-01

    The paper aims to determine the torsional stress occurring in the rotor's shaft of the three phase asynchronous motors for a given rotational speed of the rotor. The three phase asynchronous motor is started using the main starting variants, each variant having its own torque characteristic which produces a certain maximum shear stress. The model uses several hypotheses regarding the geometry of the domain, the dynamic behavior, the friction phenomenon and the mass of the shaft which is disregarded in a model and it is considered in a more accurate model. The maximum shear stress is produced by the shock which occurs in the starting process of the motors. This maximum stress may lead to the failure of the rotor either because it breaks, or because of the fatigue of the material produced by frequent starting of the motor. Information resulted from this study are useful for the selection of the appropriate material, of the according geometry of the design and elaboration of the specifications for the in-service use of the motor.This theoretical study will be followed by the development of more accurate models which will also include experimental studies employed to calibrate the theoretical models and to verify their accuracy.

  17. Defining the restriction point in normal asynchronous human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jianwu; Liu, Liang; Li, Xiaolan; Tao, Deding; Hu, Junbo; Qin, Jichao

    2013-10-01

    Although the restriction point (R-point) was proposed in animal cells several decades ago, its existence in normal cells is still controversial, because, in most studies, long-term cultured cell lines rather than primary normal cells were used. Furthermore, cell synchronization was generally applied, resulting in growth imbalance between DNA synthesis and protein expression in cells. Finally, R-point was originally proposed as a unique arrest point that may be in G0 phase; however, generally believed R-point locates within G1 phase. Thus, up to now, there is no solid experimental evidence that supports the existence of R-point in asynchronous primary normal cells. In this study, we used freshly purified peripheral human blood lymphocytes, as asynchronous primary normal cells, to confirm the existence of restriction point in G1 not G0 phase. Our findings may help uncover the mystery of the deregulation of cell cycle progression in malignant tumors. © 2013 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  18. Asynchronous Event-Based Multikernel Algorithm for High-Speed Visual Features Tracking.

    PubMed

    Lagorce, Xavier; Meyer, Cédric; Ieng, Sio-Hoi; Filliat, David; Benosman, Ryad

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents a number of new methods for visual tracking using the output of an event-based asynchronous neuromorphic dynamic vision sensor. It allows the tracking of multiple visual features in real time, achieving an update rate of several hundred kilohertz on a standard desktop PC. The approach has been specially adapted to take advantage of the event-driven properties of these sensors by combining both spatial and temporal correlations of events in an asynchronous iterative framework. Various kernels, such as Gaussian, Gabor, combinations of Gabor functions, and arbitrary user-defined kernels, are used to track features from incoming events. The trackers described in this paper are capable of handling variations in position, scale, and orientation through the use of multiple pools of trackers. This approach avoids the N(2) operations per event associated with conventional kernel-based convolution operations with N × N kernels. The tracking performance was evaluated experimentally for each type of kernel in order to demonstrate the robustness of the proposed solution.

  19. An asynchronous solver for systems of ODEs linked by a directed tree structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Small, Scott J.; Jay, Laurent O.; Mantilla, Ricardo; Curtu, Rodica; Cunha, Luciana K.; Fonley, Morgan; Krajewski, Witold F.

    2013-03-01

    This paper documents our development and evaluation of a numerical solver for systems of sparsely linked ordinary differential equations in which the connectivity between equations is determined by a directed tree. These types of systems arise in distributed hydrological models. The numerical solver is based on dense output Runge-Kutta methods that allow for asynchronous integration. A partition of the system is used to distribute the workload among different processes, enabling a parallel implementation that capitalizes on a distributed memory system. Communication between processes is performed asynchronously. We illustrate the solver capabilities by integrating flow transport equations for a ˜17,000 km2 river basin subdivided into 305,000 sub-watersheds that are interconnected by the river network. Numerical experiments for a few models are performed and the runtimes and scalability on our parallel computer are presented. Efficient numerical integrators such as the one demonstrated here bring closer to reality the goal of implementing fully distributed real-time flood forecasting systems supported by physics based hydrological models and high-quality/high-resolution rainfall products.

  20. Asynchronous detection of kinesthetic attention during mobilization of lower limbs using EEG measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melinscak, Filip; Montesano, Luis; Minguez, Javier

    2016-02-01

    Objective. Attention is known to modulate the plasticity of the motor cortex, and plasticity is crucial for recovery in motor rehabilitation. This study addresses the possibility of using an EEG-based brain-computer interface (BCI) to detect kinesthetic attention to movement. Approach. A novel experiment emulating physical rehabilitation was designed to study kinesthetic attention. The protocol involved continuous mobilization of lower limbs during which participants reported levels of attention to movement—from focused kinesthetic attention to mind wandering. For this protocol an asynchronous BCI detector of kinesthetic attention and deliberate mind wandering was designed. Main results. EEG analysis showed significant differences in theta, alpha, and beta bands, related to the attentional state. These changes were further pinpointed to bands relative to the frequency of the individual alpha peak. The accuracy of the designed BCI ranged between 60.8% and 68.4% (significantly above chance level), depending on the used analysis window length, i.e. acceptable detection delay. Significance. This study shows it is possible to use self-reporting to study attention-related changes in EEG during continuous mobilization. Such a protocol is used to develop an asynchronous BCI detector of kinesthetic attention, with potential applications to motor rehabilitation.

  1. APFA: Asynchronous Parallel Finite Automaton for Deep Packet Inspection in Cloud Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yang; Li, Zheng; Yu, Nenghai; Ma, Ke

    Security in cloud computing is getting more and more important recently. Besides passive defense such as encryption, it is necessary to implement real-time active monitoring, detection and defense in the cloud. According to the published researches, DPI (deep packet inspection) is the most effective technology to realize active inspection and defense. However, most recent works of DPI aim at space reduction but could not meet the demands of high speed and stability in the cloud. So, it is important to improve regular methods of DPI, making it more suitable for cloud computing. In this paper, an asynchronous parallel finite automaton named APFA is proposed, by introducing the asynchronous parallelization and the heuristically forecast mechanism, which significantly decreases the time consumed in matching while still keeps reducing the memory required. What is more, APFA is immune to the overlapping problem so that the stability is also enhanced. The evaluation results show that APFA achieves higher stability, better performance on time and memory. In short, APFA is more suitable for cloud computing.

  2. Global Exponential Stability for Complex-Valued Recurrent Neural Networks With Asynchronous Time Delays.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiwei; Chen, Tianping

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we investigate the global exponential stability for complex-valued recurrent neural networks with asynchronous time delays by decomposing complex-valued networks to real and imaginary parts and construct an equivalent real-valued system. The network model is described by a continuous-time equation. There are two main differences of this paper with previous works: 1) time delays can be asynchronous, i.e., delays between different nodes are different, which make our model more general and 2) we prove the exponential convergence directly, while the existence and uniqueness of the equilibrium point is just a direct consequence of the exponential convergence. Using three generalized norms, we present some sufficient conditions for the uniqueness and global exponential stability of the equilibrium point for delayed complex-valued neural networks. These conditions in our results are less restrictive because of our consideration of the excitatory and inhibitory effects between neurons; so previous works of other researchers can be extended. Finally, some numerical simulations are given to demonstrate the correctness of our obtained results.

  3. Sensor placement on Canton Tower for health monitoring using asynchronous-climb monkey algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Ting-Hua; Li, Hong-Nan; Zhang, Xu-Dong

    2012-12-01

    Heuristic optimization algorithms have become a popular choice for solving complex and intricate sensor placement problems which are difficult to solve by traditional methods. This paper proposes a novel and interesting methodology called the asynchronous-climb monkey algorithm (AMA) for the optimum design of sensor arrays for a structural health monitoring system. Different from the existing algorithms, the dual-structure coding method is designed and adopted for the representation of the design variables. The asynchronous-climb process is incorporated in the proposed AMA that can adjust the trajectory of each individual dynamically in the search space according to its own experience and other monkeys. The concept of ‘monkey king’ is introduced in the AMA, which reflects the Darwinian principle of natural selection and can create an interaction network to correctly guide the movement of other monkeys. Numerical experiments are carried out using two different objective functions by considering the Canton Tower in China with or without the antenna mast to evaluate the performance of the proposed algorithm. Investigations have indicated that the proposed AMA exhibits faster convergence characteristics and can generate sensor configurations superior in all instances when compared to the conventional monkey algorithm. For structures with stiffness mutation such as the Canton Tower, the sensor placement needs to be considered for each part separately.

  4. Release probability-dependent scaling of the postsynaptic responses at single hippocampal GABAergic synapses.

    PubMed

    Biró, Agota A; Holderith, Noémi B; Nusser, Zoltan

    2006-11-29

    The amount of neurotransmitter released after the arrival of an action potential affects the strength and the trial-to-trial variability of postsynaptic responses. Most studies examining the dependence of synaptic neurotransmitter concentration on the release probability (P(r)) have focused on glutamatergic synapses. Here we asked whether univesicular or multivesicular release characterizes transmission at hippocampal GABAergic synapses. We used multiple probability functional analysis to derive quantal parameters at inhibitory connections between cannabinoid receptor- and cholecystokinin (CCK)-expressing interneurons and CA3 pyramidal cells. After the recordings, the cells were visualized and reconstructed at the light-microscopic level, and the number of boutons mediating the IPSCs was determined using electron microscopy (EM). The number of active zones (AZs) per CCK-immunopositive bouton was determined from three-dimensional EM reconstructions, thus allowing the calculation of the total number of AZs for each pair. Our results reveal an approximate fivefold discrepancy between the numbers of functionally determined release sites (17.4 +/- 3.2) and structurally identified AZs (3.7 +/- 0.9). Channel modeling predicts that a fivefold to sevenfold increase in the peak synaptic GABA concentration is required for the fivefold enhancement of the postsynaptic responses. Kinetic analysis of the unitary IPSCs indicates that the increase in synaptic GABA concentration is most likely attributable to multivesicular release. This change in the synaptic GABA concentration transient together with extremely low postsynaptic receptor occupancy permits a P(r)-dependent scaling of the postsynaptic response generated at a single hippocampal GABAergic synaptic contact.

  5. Fully quantal calculation of H{sub 2} translation-rotation states in the (p-H{sub 2}){sub 2}@5{sup 12}6{sup 4} clathrate hydrate inclusion compound

    SciTech Connect

    Felker, Peter M.

    2014-11-14

    The quantal translation-rotation (TR) states of the (p-H{sub 2}){sub 2}@5{sup 12}6{sup 4} clathrate hydrate inclusion compound have been computed. The ten-dimensional problem (in the rigid-cage and rigid-H{sub 2} approximation) is solved by first approximating the H{sub 2} moieties as spherically symmetric and solving for their 6D translational eigenstates. These are then combined with H{sub 2} free rotational states in a product basis that is used to diagonalize the full TR hamiltonian. The computed low-energy eigenstates have translational components that are essentially identical to the 6D translational eigenstates and rotational components that are 99.9% composed of rotationally unexcited H{sub 2} moieties. In other words, TR coupling is minimal for the low-energy states of the species. The low-energy level structure is found to be substantially more congested than that of the more tightly packed (p-H{sub 2}){sub 4}@5{sup 12}6{sup 4} clathrate species. The level structure is also shown to be understandable in terms of a model of (H{sub 2}){sub 2} as a semirigid diatomic species consisting of two spherically symmetric H{sub 2} pseudo-atoms.

  6. Neurotransmitter release evoked by nerve impulses without Ca2+ entry through Ca2+ channels in frog motor nerve endings.

    PubMed Central

    Silinsky, E M; Watanabe, M; Redman, R S; Qiu, R; Hirsh, J K; Hunt, J M; Solsona, C S; Alford, S; MacDonald, R C

    1995-01-01

    1. The requirement for extracellular Ca2+ in the process of evoked acetylcholine (ACh) release by nerve impulses was tested at endplates in frog skeletal muscle. Ca(2+)-containing lipid vesicles (Ca2+ liposomes) were used to elevate cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentrations under conditions in which Ca2+ entry from the extracellular fluid was prevented. 2. In an extracellular solution containing no added Ca2+ and 1 mM Mg2+ ('Ca(2+)-free' solution), Ca2+ liposomes promoted the synchronous release of ACh quanta, reflected electrophysiologically as endplate potentials (EPPs), in response to temporally isolated nerve impulses. 3. Motor nerve stimulation generated EPPs during superfusion with Ca2+ liposomes in Ca(2+)-free solutions containing the Ca2+ channel blocker Co2+ (1 mM), and the Ca2+ chelator EGTA (2 mM). As a physiological control for Ca2+ leakage from the liposomes to the extracellular fluid, the effect of Ca2+ liposomes on asynchronous evoked ACh release mediated by Ba2+ was examined. In contrast to the effects of 0.2-0.3 mM extracellular Ca2+, which generated EPPs but antagonized Ba(2+)-mediated asynchronous ACh release, Ca2+ liposomes generated EPPs but did not reduce asynchronous release mediated by Ba2+. The effects of Ca2+ liposomes were thus not due to leakage of Ca2+ from the liposome to the extracellular fluid. 4. Morphological studies using fluorescently labelled liposomes in conjunction with a confocal microscope demonstrate that lipid is transferred from the liposomes to nerve endings and liposomal contents are delivered to the nerve terminal cytoplasm. 5. The results suggest that when intracellular Ca2+ is elevated using liposomes as a vehicle, evoked ACh release can occur in the absence of Ca2+ entry via Ca2+ channels. Images Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7738845

  7. Activity-dependent regulation of release probability at excitatory hippocampal synapses: a crucial role of fragile X mental retardation protein in neurotransmission.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Sheng; Peng, Chun-Zi; Cai, Wei-Jun; Xia, Jian; Jin, Daozhong; Dai, Yuqiao; Luo, Xue-Gang; Klyachko, Vitaly A; Deng, Pan-Yue

    2014-05-01

    Transcriptional silencing of the Fmr1 gene encoding fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) causes fragile X syndrome (FXS), the most common form of inherited intellectual disability and the leading genetic cause of autism. FMRP has been suggested to play important roles in regulating neurotransmission and short-term synaptic plasticity at excitatory hippocampal and cortical synapses. However, the origins and mechanisms of these FMRP actions remain incompletely understood, and the role of FMRP in regulating synaptic release probability and presynaptic function remains debated. Here we used variance-mean analysis and peak-scaled nonstationary variance analysis to examine changes in both presynaptic and postsynaptic parameters during repetitive activity at excitatory CA3-CA1 hippocampal synapses in a mouse model of FXS. Our analyses revealed that loss of FMRP did not affect the basal release probability or basal synaptic transmission, but caused an abnormally elevated release probability specifically during repetitive activity. These abnormalities were not accompanied by changes in excitatory postsynaptic current kinetics, quantal size or postsynaptic α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor conductance. Our results thus indicate that FMRP regulates neurotransmission at excitatory hippocampal synapses specifically during repetitive activity via modulation of release probability in a presynaptic manner. Our study suggests that FMRP function in regulating neurotransmitter release is an activity-dependent phenomenon that may contribute to the pathophysiology of FXS.

  8. Transient fusion ensures granule replenishment to enable repeated release after IgE-mediated mast cell degranulation.

    PubMed

    Balseiro-Gomez, Santiago; Flores, Juan A; Acosta, Jorge; Ramirez-Ponce, M Pilar; Ales, Eva

    2016-11-01

    To ensure normal immune function, mast cells employ different pathways to release mediators. Here, we report a thus far unknown capacity of mast cells to recycle and reuse secretory granules after an antigen-evoked degranulation process under physiological conditions; this phenomenon involves the existence of a recycling secretory granule pool that is available for release in a short time scale. Rapid endocytic modes contributed to the recycling of ∼60% of the total secretory granule population, which involved kiss-and-run and cavicapture mechanisms, causing retention of the intragranular matrix. We found the presence of normal-size granules and giant actomyosin- and dynamin-dependent granules, which were characterized by large quantal content. These large structures allowed the recovered mast cells to release a large amount of 5-HT, compensating for the decrease in the number of exocytosed secretory granules. This work uncovers a new physiological role of the exo-endocytosis cycle in the immunological plasticity of mast cells and reveals a new property of their biological secretion.

  9. The Effects of Computer-Mediated Synchronous and Asynchronous Direct Corrective Feedback on Writing: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shintani, Natsuko

    2016-01-01

    This case study investigated the characteristics of computer-mediated synchronous corrective feedback (SCF, provided while students wrote) and asynchronous corrective feedback (ACF, provided after students had finished writing) in an EFL writing task. The task, designed to elicit the use of the hypothetical conditional, was completed by two…

  10. Comparing the Social Knowledge Construction Behavioral Patterns of Problem-Based Online Asynchronous Discussion in E/M-Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lan, Yu-Feng; Tsai, Pei-Wei; Yang, Shih-Hsien; Hung, Chun-Ling

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, researchers have conducted various studies on applying wireless networking technology and mobile devices in education settings. However, research on behavioral patterns in learners' online asynchronous discussions with mobile devices is limited. The purposes of this study are to develop a mobile learning system, mobile interactive…

  11. A Review of Cheating in Fully Asynchronous Online Courses: A Math or Fact-Based Course Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trenholm, Sven

    2007-01-01

    Un-proctored fully asynchronous online courses now appear to be a reality in all discipline areas. With full degree programs being offered online, it has become a badge of honor, to some colleges, to graduate students that have never stepped foot on the physical college campus nor have never before met any college representative, faculty, or…

  12. An Analysis of Peer-Submitted and Peer-Reviewed Answer Rationales, in an Asynchronous Peer Instruction Based Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhatnagar, Sameer; Lasry, Nathaniel; Desmarais, Michel; Dugdale, Michael; Whittaker, Chris; Charles, Elizabeth S.

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on an analyis of data from a novel "Peer Instruction" application, named DALITE. The Peer Instruction paradigm is well suited to take advantage of peer-input in web-based learning environments. DALITE implements an asynchronous instantiation of peer instruction: after submitting their answer to a multiple-choice…

  13. How Day of Posting Affects Level of Critical Discourse in Asynchronous Discussions and Computer-Supported Collaborative Argumentation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeong, Allan; Frazier, Sue

    2008-01-01

    In asynchronous threaded discussions, messages posted near the end of the week provide less time for students to critically examine and respond to ideas presented in the messages than messages posted early in the week. This study examined how the day in which messages are posted (early, midweek and weekend) in computer-supported collaborative…

  14. Analysis of an Asynchronous Online Discussion as a Supportive Model for Peer Collaboration and Reflection in Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plešec Gasparic, Romina; Pecar, Mojca

    2016-01-01

    Professional development of future teachers is based on connecting theory and practice with the aim of supporting and developing critical, independent, responsible decision-making and active teaching. With this aim we designed a blended learning environment with an asynchronous online discussion, enabling collaboration and reflection even when…

  15. A Quantitative Study of Faculty Perceptions and Attitudes on Asynchronous Virtual Teamwork Using the Technology Acceptance Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolusky, G. Anthony

    2016-01-01

    This quantitative study used a web-based questionnaire to assess the attitudes and perceptions of online and hybrid faculty towards student-centered asynchronous virtual teamwork (AVT) using the technology acceptance model (TAM) of Davis (1989). AVT is online student participation in a team approach to problem-solving culminating in a written…

  16. How People Learn in an Asynchronous Online Learning Environment: The Relationships between Graduate Students' Learning Strategies and Learning Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Beomkyu

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between learners' learning strategies and learning satisfaction in an asynchronous online learning environment. In an attempt to shed some light on how people learn in an online learning environment, one hundred and sixteen graduate students who were taking online learning courses…

  17. A Qualitative Analysis of African American Female High School Graduates' Perceptions of Participating in an Asynchronous Credit Recovery Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waters, Eric L.

    2010-01-01

    Asynchronous online credit recovery programs have been implemented in public schools across the United States for a variety of reasons. In this case, African American female students who are deficient in course credits towards high school graduation have taken advantage of this relatively new e-programming mechanism as a means to capture course…

  18. Blending Asynchronous Discussion Groups and Peer Tutoring in Higher Education: An Exploratory Study of Online Peer Tutoring Behaviour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Smet, Marijke; Van Keer, Hilde; Valcke, Martin

    2008-01-01

    In the present study cross-age peer tutoring was implemented in a higher education context. Fourth-year students (N=39) operated as online tutors to support freshmen in discussing cases and solving authentic problems. This study contributes to a better understanding of the supportive interventions of tutors in asynchronous discussion groups. Peer…

  19. Arguing as an Academic Purpose: The Role of Asynchronous Conferencing in Supporting Argumentative Dialogue in School and University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coffin, Caroline; Hewings, Ann; North, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    Learning to argue is a key academic purpose for both first and second language students. It has been claimed that computer mediated asynchronous text-based conferencing is a useful medium for developing argumentation skills (Andriessen, Baker, & Suthers, 2003). This paper reports on two research studies which explore this claim. One study focused…

  20. Using Asynchronous Discussion to Promote Collaborative Problem Solving among Preservice Teachers in Field Experiences: Lessons Learned from Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knowlton, Dave S.

    2004-01-01

    Designers who are charged with creating online environments that support students' problem-solving efforts and instructors who are searching for instructional strategies to support students' asynchronous problem-solving efforts will find this paper useful. The paper describes a systematic approach for using computer-mediated bulletin boards to…

  1. Exploring the Benefits and Disadvantages of Introducing Synchronous to Asynchronous Online Technologies to Facilitate Flexibility in Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papadima-Sophocleous, Salomi; Loizides, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the impact of online synchronous tutorials on eight second language (L2) practitioners enrolled in a Master of Arts (MA) in Computer-Assisted Language Learning (CALL) L2 Curriculum Development and Evaluation module. The module is delivered asynchronously and synchronously (lecture). To accommodate immediate interaction to the…

  2. Minimizing asynchronism to improve the performances of anaerobic co-digestion of food waste and corn stover.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qi; Shen, Fei; Yuan, Hairong; Zou, Dexun; Liu, Yanping; Zhu, Baoning; Jaffu, Muhanmad; Chufo, Akiber; Li, Xiujin

    2014-08-01

    To investigate the existence of the asynchronism during the anaerobic co-digestion of different substrates, two typical substrates of food waste and corn stover were anaerobically digested with altering organic loadings (OL). The results indicated that the biodegradability of food waste and corn stover was calculated to be 81.5% and 55.1%, respectively, which was main reason causing the asynchronism in the co-digestion. The asynchronism was minimized by NaOH-pretreatment for corn stover, which could improve the biodegradability by 36.6%. The co-digestion with pretreatment could increase the biomethane yield by 12.2%, 3.2% and 0.6% comparing with the co-digestion without pretreatment at C/N ratios of 20, 25 and 30 at OL of 35 g-VS/L, respectively. The results indicated that the digestibility synchronism of food waste and corn stover was improved through enhancing the accessibility and digestibility of corn stover. The biomethane production could be increased by minimizing the asynchronism of two substrates in co-digestion.

  3. Computer-Mediated Synchronous and Asynchronous Corrective Feedback Provided by Trainee Teachers to Learners of French: A Preliminary Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vidal, Julie; Thouësny, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate whether trainee teachers' practices, with respect to multimodal feedback, differ from current research, and to what extent it may affect students' language development. More specifically, the goal of the present study is threefold: (1) it observes how trainee teachers responded, whether synchronously, asynchronously,…

  4. Students' Use of Asynchronous Voice Discussion in a Blended-Learning Environment: A Study of Two Undergraduate Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hew, Khe Foon; Cheung, Wing Sum

    2012-01-01

    Contemporary discussions of education in blended-learning environments increasingly emphasize the social nature of learning which emphasizes interactions among students, or among students and instructors. These interactions can occur asynchronously using a text based discussion forum. A text-based discussion forum, however, may not work well for…

  5. Effects of Synchronous and Asynchronous Computer-Mediated Communication (CMC) Oral Conversations on English Language Learners' Discourse Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    AbuSeileek, Ali Farhan; Qatawneh, Khaleel

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the effects of synchronous and asynchronous computer mediated communication (CMC) oral discussions on question types and strategies used by English as a Foreign Language (EFL) learners. The participants were randomly assigned to two treatment conditions/groups; the first group used synchronous CMC, while the second…

  6. The Effect of Asynchronous/Synchronous Approaches on English Vocabulary Achievement: A Study of Iranian EFL Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khodaparast, Fatemeh; Ghafournia, Narjes

    2015-01-01

    The contribution of computer-assisted instructional programs to language learning process has been the focus of researchers for about two decades. However, the effect of synchronous and asynchronous computer-assisted approaches of language teaching on improving L2 vocabulary has been scarcely investigated. This study explored whether synchronous,…

  7. The Effectiveness of Synchronous and Asynchronous Written Corrective Feedback on Grammatical Accuracy in a Computer-Mediated Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shintani, Natsuko; Aubrey, Scott

    2016-01-01

    This study extends research on written corrective feedback (CF) by investigating how timing of CF affects grammar acquisition. Specifically, it examined the relative effects of synchronous and asynchronous CF on the accurate use of the hypothetical conditional structure. Participants were 68 intermediate-level students of English at a university…

  8. Effects of the Asynchronous Web-Based Course: Preservice Teachers' Achievement, Metacognition, and Attitudes towards the Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Topcu, Abdullah; Ubuz, Behiye

    2008-01-01

    This present study aimed to investigate the effects of the asynchronous web-based "General Teaching Methods" course conducted based on direct or indirect instructional methods on pre-service teachers' achievement, metacognition, and attitudes towards web-based course. Two groups, a total of 63 third grade elementary science and mathematics…

  9. Collegiality and Community-Building as a Means for Sustaining Student Persistence in the Computer-Mediated Asynchronous Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivankova, Nataliya V.; Stick, Sheldon L.

    2005-01-01

    Implementation of cutting-edge technology has enabled higher and postsecondary education to create new learning environments by affording greater access to education for more students via virtual classrooms. Although virtual instruction in its asynchronous mode has been reported as to be at least comparable, and sometimes better than conventional…

  10. Online-BSEE (Online Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering): An Asynchronous Online Electrical Engineering Degree Program with Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tang, Wendy; Westgate, Charles; Liu, Pao-Lo; Gouzman, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The Online Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering is a collaborative effort among three University Centers at SUNY (State University of New York), namely Stony Brook, Binghamton, and Buffalo. The program delivers the complete electrical engineering curriculum at the bachelor level to students online and asynchronously. Students, however,…

  11. Developing Students' Metacognitive Awareness in Asynchronous Learning Networks in Comparison to Face-to-Face Discussion Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michalsky, Tova; Zion, Michal; Mevarech, Zemira R.

    2007-01-01

    The main goal of the present study is to investigate empirically the effects of Asynchronic Learning Network (ALN) embedded within metacognitive instruction (META) on two components of metacognitive awareness: Knowledge about Cognition (KC) and Regulation of Cognition (RC). Participants were 202 tenth grade students: 102 students who studied under…

  12. Structuring Asynchronous Discussion Groups: Comparing Scripting by Assigning Roles with Regulation by Cross-Age Peer Tutors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Wever, Bram; Van Keer, Hilde; Schellens, Tammy; Valcke, Martin

    2010-01-01

    The present study focuses on comparing the impact of role assignment and cross-age peer tutors on students' level of knowledge construction in 15 asynchronous discussion groups of nine students each in a first-year university course (N=135). Content analysis was applied to analyse the level of knowledge construction in students' online postings.…

  13. Wireless acoustic modules for real-time data fusion using asynchronous sniper localization algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hengy, S.; De Mezzo, S.; Duffner, P.; Naz, P.

    2012-11-01

    The presence of snipers in modern conflicts leads to high insecurity for the soldiers. In order to improve the soldier's protection against this threat, the French German Research Institute of Saint-Louis (ISL) has been conducting studies in the domain of acoustic localization of shots. Mobile antennas mounted on the soldier's helmet were initially used for real-time detection, classification and localization of sniper shots. It showed good performances in land scenarios, but also in urban scenarios if the array was in the shot corridor, meaning that the microphones first detect the direct wave and then the reflections of the Mach and muzzle waves (15% distance estimation error compared to the actual shooter array distance). Fusing data sent by multiple sensor nodes distributed on the field showed some of the limitations of the technologies that have been implemented in ISL's demonstrators. Among others, the determination of the arrays' orientation was not accurate enough, thereby degrading the performance of data fusion. Some new solutions have been developed in the past year in order to obtain better performance for data fusion. Asynchronous localization algorithms have been developed and post-processed on data measured in both free-field and urban environments with acoustic modules on the line of sight of the shooter. These results are presented in the first part of the paper. The impact of GPS position estimation error is also discussed in the article in order to evaluate the possible use of those algorithms for real-time processing using mobile acoustic nodes. In the frame of ISL's transverse project IMOTEP (IMprovement Of optical and acoustical TEchnologies for the Protection), some demonstrators are developed that will allow real-time asynchronous localization of sniper shots. An embedded detection and classification algorithm is implemented on wireless acoustic modules that send the relevant information to a central PC. Data fusion is then processed and the

  14. Asynchronous combinatorial action of four regulatory factors activates Bcl11b for T cell commitment

    PubMed Central

    Kueh, Hao Yuan; Yui, Mary A.; Ng, Kenneth K.H.; Pease, Shirley S.; Zhang, Jingli A.; Damle, Sagar S.; Freedman, George; Siu, Sharmayne; Bernstein, Irwin D.; Elowitz, Michael B.; Rothenberg, Ellen V.

    2016-01-01

    During T cell development, multipotent progenitors relinquish competence for other fates and commit to the T cell lineage by turning on the transcription factor Bcl11b. To clarify lineage commitment mechanisms, we followed developing T cells at single-cell level using Bcl11b knock-in fluorescent reporter mice. Notch signaling and Notch-activated transcription factors collaborate to activate Bcl11b expression, irrespective of Notch-dependent proliferation. These inputs work via three distinct, asynchronous mechanisms: an early locus poising function dependent on TCF-1 and GATA-3; a stochastic permissivity function dependent on Notch signaling; and a separate amplitude-control function dependent on Runx1, a factor already present in multipotent progenitors. Despite all being necessary for Bcl11b activation, these inputs act in a stage specific manner, providing a multi-tiered mechanism for developmental gene regulation. PMID:27376470

  15. Asynchronous error-correcting secure communication scheme based on fractional-order shifting chaotic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Luo

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, a novel digital secure communication scheme is firstly proposed. Different from the usual secure communication schemes based on chaotic synchronization, the proposed scheme employs asynchronous communication which avoids the weakness of synchronous systems and is susceptible to environmental interference. Moreover, as to the transmission errors and data loss in the process of communication, the proposed scheme has the ability to be error-checking and error-correcting in real time. In order to guarantee security, the fractional-order complex chaotic system with the shifting of order is utilized to modulate the transmitted signal, which has high nonlinearity and complexity in both frequency and time domains. The corresponding numerical simulations demonstrate the effectiveness and feasibility of the scheme.

  16. Asynchronous symmetry-based sequences for homonuclear dipolar recoupling in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Kong Ooi; Rajeswari, M.; Madhu, P. K.; Ernst, Matthias

    2015-02-01

    We show a theoretical framework, based on triple-mode Floquet theory, to analyze recoupling sequences derived from symmetry-based pulse sequences, which have a non-vanishing effective field and are not rotor synchronized. We analyze the properties of one such sequence, a homonuclear double-quantum recoupling sequence derived from the C72 1 sequence. The new asynchronous sequence outperforms the rotor-synchronized version for spin pairs with small dipolar couplings in the presence of large chemical-shift anisotropy. The resonance condition of the new sequence is analyzed using triple-mode Floquet theory. Analytical calculations of second-order effective Hamiltonian are performed to compare the efficiency in suppressing second-order cross terms. Experiments and numerical simulations are shown to corroborate the results of the theoretical analysis.

  17. Comparative study of limited-range wavelength conversion policies for asynchronous optical packet switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogan, Kaan; Gunalay, Yavuz; Akar, Nail

    2007-02-01

    We study an asynchronous optical packet (OP)-switching node equipped with a number of limited range (LR) wavelength converters shared per output link. We study both circular and noncircular LR-wavelength-conversion schemes. A wavelength conversion policy governs the selection of the outgoing wavelength for an OP if the incoming wavelength is in use. Through simulations, we show that the so-called far-conversion policy for which the OP is switched onto the farthest available wavelength in the tuning range, outperforms the other policies we studied. We point out the clustering effect in the use of wavelengths to explain this phenomenon. We also provide an approximate analytical method to find the packet-blocking probability in circular-type LR-wavelength-conversion systems. Based on the simulation results, the approximate method appears to lead to a lower bound for blocking probabilities for all the conversion policies we study.

  18. Dynamics of Random Boolean Networks under Fully Asynchronous Stochastic Update Based on Linear Representation

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Chao; Wang, Xingyuan

    2013-01-01

    A novel algebraic approach is proposed to study dynamics of asynchronous random Boolean networks where a random number of nodes can be updated at each time step (ARBNs). In this article, the logical equations of ARBNs are converted into the discrete-time linear representation and dynamical behaviors of systems are investigated. We provide a general formula of network transition matrices of ARBNs as well as a necessary and sufficient algebraic criterion to determine whether a group of given states compose an attractor of length in ARBNs. Consequently, algorithms are achieved to find all of the attractors and basins in ARBNs. Examples are showed to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed scheme. PMID:23785502

  19. Identification of immobile single molecules using polarization-modulated asynchronous TDI-mode scanning

    PubMed Central

    Jacak, Jaroslaw; Hesch, Clemens; Hesse, Jan; Schütz, Gerhard J.

    2015-01-01

    We report the development of a data acquisition method for identifying single molecules on large surfaces with simultaneous characterization of their absorption dipole. The method is based on a previously described device for microarray readout at single molecule sensitivity1. Here, we introduced asynchronous time delay and integration- (TDI-) mode imaging to record also the time course of fluorescence signals: the images thus contain both spatial and temporal information. We demonstrate the principle by modulating the signals via rotating excitation polarization, which allows for discriminating static absorption dipoles against multiple or freely rotating single absorption dipoles. Experiments on BSA carrying different numbers of fluorophores demonstrate the feasibility of the method. Protein species with average labeling degree of 0.55 and 2.89 fluorophores per protein can be readily distinguished. PMID:20380382

  20. Renewal Approach to the Analysis of the Asynchronous State for Coupled Noisy Oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farkhooi, Farzad; van Vreeswijk, Carl

    2015-07-01

    We develop a framework in which the activity of nonlinear pulse-coupled oscillators is posed within the renewal theory. In this approach, the evolution of the interevent density allows for a self-consistent calculation that determines the asynchronous state and its stability. This framework can readily be extended to the analysis of systems with more state variables and provides a population density treatment to evolve them in their thermodynamical limits. To demonstrate this we study a nonlinear pulse-coupled system, where couplings are dynamic and activity dependent. We investigate its stability and numerically study the nonequilibrium behavior of the system after the bifurcation. We show that this system undergoes a supercritical Hopf bifurcation to collective synchronization.