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Sample records for athletic training career

  1. Career Decisions of Senior Athletic Training Students and Recent Graduates of Accredited Athletic Training Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neibert, Peter; Huot, Christopher; Sexton, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    Context: Athletic training students and graduates are faced with many factors that direct them into or away from the athletic training profession as a final career choice. Objective: The purpose of the study was to determine the career decisions made by athletic training students following graduation from an accredited professional athletic…

  2. Career Decisions of Senior Athletic Training Students and Recent Graduates of Accredited Athletic Training Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neibert, Peter; Huot, Christopher; Sexton, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    Context: Athletic training students and graduates are faced with many factors that direct them into or away from the athletic training profession as a final career choice. Objective: The purpose of the study was to determine the career decisions made by athletic training students following graduation from an accredited professional athletic…

  3. Career commitment of postprofessional athletic training program graduates.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Thomas G; Mazerolle, Stephanie M; Goodman, Ashley

    2015-04-01

    Choosing to pursue an advanced degree in athletic training appears to indicate professional commitment and passion for the profession. Currently, there is a paucity of information regarding why some athletic trainers pursue enrollment in a postprofessional athletic training program (PPATP), indicating commitment to the profession, but later depart for another primary role outside of athletic training. To understand why athletic trainers invested in advanced training via a PPATP but then decided to leave the profession. Qualitative study. Online data collection. Twelve graduates (8 women [67%], 4 men [33%], age = 31.58 ± 3.06 years) from PPATPs who no longer had primary employment as an athletic trainer. Recruits responded to an e-mail invitation to participate by completing a confidential online questionnaire. We analyzed data using a general inductive approach and secured trustworthiness using multiple-analyst triangulation, peer review, and member checks. Two higher-order themes emerged regarding the career commitment of former athletic trainers who were PPATP graduates: (1) departure from an athletic training career and (2) partial continuance in athletic training. Two second-order themes emerged from the reasons for departure: (1) decreased recognition of value and (2) work-life imbalance. Finally, we identified 2 third-order themes from the participants' reasons for departure because of a perceived lack of value: (1) low salary and (2) long, inconsistent hours worked. Most of our participants intended to stay in the profession when they chose to attend a PPATP. However, during role inductance in either the clinical experience of the PPATP they attended or early in their careers, they began to have thoughts of leaving mainly because of inadequate financial compensation, challenging work schedules, or both.

  4. Career Commitment of Postprofessional Athletic Training Program Graduates

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, Thomas G.; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Goodman, Ashley

    2015-01-01

    Context: Choosing to pursue an advanced degree in athletic training appears to indicate professional commitment and passion for the profession. Currently, there is a paucity of information regarding why some athletic trainers pursue enrollment in a postprofessional athletic training program (PPATP), indicating commitment to the profession, but later depart for another primary role outside of athletic training. Objective: To understand why athletic trainers invested in advanced training via a PPATP but then decided to leave the profession. Design: Qualitative study. Setting: Online data collection. Patients or Other Participants: Twelve graduates (8 women [67%], 4 men [33%], age = 31.58 ± 3.06 years) from PPATPs who no longer had primary employment as an athletic trainer. Data Collection and Analysis: Recruits responded to an e-mail invitation to participate by completing a confidential online questionnaire. We analyzed data using a general inductive approach and secured trustworthiness using multiple-analyst triangulation, peer review, and member checks. Results: Two higher-order themes emerged regarding the career commitment of former athletic trainers who were PPATP graduates: (1) departure from an athletic training career and (2) partial continuance in athletic training. Two second-order themes emerged from the reasons for departure: (1) decreased recognition of value and (2) work-life imbalance. Finally, we identified 2 third-order themes from the participants' reasons for departure because of a perceived lack of value: (1) low salary and (2) long, inconsistent hours worked. Conclusions: Most of our participants intended to stay in the profession when they chose to attend a PPATP. However, during role inductance in either the clinical experience of the PPATP they attended or early in their careers, they began to have thoughts of leaving mainly because of inadequate financial compensation, challenging work schedules, or both. PMID:25343531

  5. National Athletic Trainers' Association-accredited postprofessional athletic training education: attractors and career intentions.

    PubMed

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M; Dodge, Thomas M

    2012-01-01

    Anecdotally, we know that students select graduate programs based on location, finances, and future career goals. Empirically, however, we lack information on what attracts a student to these programs. To gain an appreciation for the selection process of graduate study. Qualitative study. Postprofessional programs in athletic training (PPATs) accredited by the National Athletic Trainers' Association. A total of 19 first-year PPAT students participated, representing 13 of the 16 accredited PPAT programs. All interviews were conducted via phone and transcribed verbatim. Analysis of the interview data followed the procedures as outlined by a grounded theory approach. Trustworthiness was secured by (1) participant checks, (2) participant verification, and (3) multiple analyst triangulations. Athletic training students select PPAT programs for 4 major reasons: reputation of the program or faculty (or both), career intentions, professional socialization, and mentorship from undergraduate faculty or clinical instructors (or both). Participants discussed long-term professional goals as the driving force behind wanting an advanced degree in athletic training. Faculty and clinical instructor recommendations and the program's prestige helped guide the decisions. Participants also expressed the need to gain more experience, which promoted autonomy, and support while gaining that work experience. Final selection of the PPAT program was based on academic offerings, the assistantship offered (including financial support), advanced knowledge of athletic training concepts and principles, and apprenticeship opportunities. Students who attend PPAT programs are attracted to advancing their entry-level knowledge, are committed to their professional development as athletic trainers, and view the profession of athletic training as a life-long career. The combination of balanced academics, clinical experiences, and additional professional socialization and mentorship from the PPAT program

  6. National Athletic Trainers' Association-Accredited Postprofessional Athletic Training Education: Attractors and Career Intentions

    PubMed Central

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Dodge, Thomas M.

    2012-01-01

    Context Anecdotally, we know that students select graduate programs based on location, finances, and future career goals. Empirically, however, we lack information on what attracts a student to these programs. Objective To gain an appreciation for the selection process of graduate study. Design Qualitative study. Setting Postprofessional programs in athletic training (PPATs) accredited by the National Athletic Trainers' Association. Patients or Other Participants A total of 19 first-year PPAT students participated, representing 13 of the 16 accredited PPAT programs. Data Collection and Analysis All interviews were conducted via phone and transcribed verbatim. Analysis of the interview data followed the procedures as outlined by a grounded theory approach. Trustworthiness was secured by (1) participant checks, (2) participant verification, and (3) multiple analyst triangulations. Results Athletic training students select PPAT programs for 4 major reasons: reputation of the program or faculty (or both), career intentions, professional socialization, and mentorship from undergraduate faculty or clinical instructors (or both). Participants discussed long-term professional goals as the driving force behind wanting an advanced degree in athletic training. Faculty and clinical instructor recommendations and the program's prestige helped guide the decisions. Participants also expressed the need to gain more experience, which promoted autonomy, and support while gaining that work experience. Final selection of the PPAT program was based on academic offerings, the assistantship offered (including financial support), advanced knowledge of athletic training concepts and principles, and apprenticeship opportunities. Conclusions Students who attend PPAT programs are attracted to advancing their entry-level knowledge, are committed to their professional development as athletic trainers, and view the profession of athletic training as a life-long career. The combination of

  7. Factors Influencing Athletic Training Students' Perceptions of the Athletic Training Profession and Career Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benes, Sarah S.; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Successful athletic training programs should help students develop a desire to work within the athletic training profession while providing adequate preparation for them to enter the workforce. Understanding athletic training students' perceptions of the profession as they leave programs and the factors that influence these…

  8. Factors Influencing Athletic Training Students' Perceptions of the Athletic Training Profession and Career Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benes, Sarah S.; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Successful athletic training programs should help students develop a desire to work within the athletic training profession while providing adequate preparation for them to enter the workforce. Understanding athletic training students' perceptions of the profession as they leave programs and the factors that influence these…

  9. Undergraduate athletic training students' influences on career decisions after graduation.

    PubMed

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M; Gavin, Kerri E; Pitney, William A; Casa, Douglas J; Burton, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Career opportunities for athletic training students (ATSs) have increased substantially over the past few years. However, ATSs commonly appear to be opting for a more diversified professional experience after graduation. With the diversity in available options, an understanding of career decision is imperative. To use the theoretical framework of socialization to investigate the influential factors behind the postgraduation decisions of senior ATSs. Qualitative study. Web-based management system and telephone interviews. Twenty-two ATSs (16 females, 6 males; age = 22 ± 2 years) who graduated in May 2010 from 13 different programs accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education. All interviews were transcribed verbatim, and the data were analyzed inductively. Data analysis required independent coding by 2 athletic trainers for specific themes. Credibility of the results was confirmed via peer review, methodologic triangulation, and multiple analyst triangulation. Two higher-order themes emerged from the data analysis: persistence in athletic training (AT) and decision to leave AT. Faculty and clinical instructor support, marketability, and professional growth were supporting themes describing persistence in AT. Shift of interest away from AT, lack of respect for the AT profession, compensation, time commitment, and AT as a stepping stone were themes sustaining the reasons that ATSs leave AT. The aforementioned reasons to leave often were discussed collectively, generating a collective undesirable outlook on the AT profession. Our results highlight the importance of faculty support, professional growth, and early socialization into AT. Socialization of pre-AT students could alter retention rates by providing in-depth information about the profession before students commit in their undergraduate education and by helping reduce attrition before entrance into the workforce.

  10. Undergraduate Athletic Training Students' Influences on Career Decisions After Graduation

    PubMed Central

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Gavin, Kerri E.; Pitney, William A.; Casa, Douglas J.; Burton, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Context Career opportunities for athletic training students (ATSs) have increased substantially over the past few years. However, ATSs commonly appear to be opting for a more diversified professional experience after graduation. With the diversity in available options, an understanding of career decision is imperative. Objective To use the theoretical framework of socialization to investigate the influential factors behind the postgraduation decisions of senior ATSs. Design Qualitative study. Setting Web-based management system and telephone interviews. Patients or Other Participants Twenty-two ATSs (16 females, 6 males; age = 22 ± 2 years) who graduated in May 2010 from 13 different programs accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education. Data Collection and Analysis All interviews were transcribed verbatim, and the data were analyzed inductively. Data analysis required independent coding by 2 athletic trainers for specific themes. Credibility of the results was confirmed via peer review, methodologic triangulation, and multiple analyst triangulation. Results Two higher-order themes emerged from the data analysis: persistence in athletic training (AT) and decision to leave AT. Faculty and clinical instructor support, marketability, and professional growth were supporting themes describing persistence in AT. Shift of interest away from AT, lack of respect for the AT profession, compensation, time commitment, and AT as a stepping stone were themes sustaining the reasons that ATSs leave AT. The aforementioned reasons to leave often were discussed collectively, generating a collective undesirable outlook on the AT profession. Conclusions Our results highlight the importance of faculty support, professional growth, and early socialization into AT. Socialization of pre–AT students could alter retention rates by providing in-depth information about the profession before students commit in their undergraduate education and by helping

  11. Choosing a career in athletic training: exploring the perceptions of potential recruits.

    PubMed

    Mensch, James; Mitchell, Murray

    2008-01-01

    The success of any academic program, including athletic training, depends upon attracting and keeping quality students. Therefore, understanding potential recruits' perceptions of athletic training is important. To (1) gain insight regarding undergraduate students' decisions to enter or not enter an athletic training education program (ATEP), and (2) examine potential athletic training recruits' perceptions of the roles and responsibilities of certified athletic trainers. We used a descriptive study employing a grounded theory approach to explore perceptions of the athletic training profession by college students with various levels of interest in athletic training. Athletic training education program from a National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I research-intensive university. Forty-six undergraduate students (23 interested in applying to an ATEP and 23 who were aware of but not interested in applying to an ATEP). Data from in-depth, semi-structured interviews were transcribed and analyzed using open, axial, and selective coding procedures. Member checks and peer-debriefing techniques were used to ensure trustworthiness of the study. Three contributing factors appeared to influence the recruitment of students to a career in athletic training: (1) a strong affiliation to a sports/team model, (2) initial exposure at the high school level, and (3) an incomplete understanding of athletic training. Awareness of how students are recruited into ATEPs is important information for our profession. Educators and administrators must create a comprehensive recruitment strategy using factors that influence potential recruits' decisions to enter the athletic training profession, specifically their association with sports and their experiences during high school.

  12. Choosing a Career in Athletic Training: Exploring the Perceptions of Potential Recruits

    PubMed Central

    Mensch, James; Mitchell, Murray

    2008-01-01

    Context: The success of any academic program, including athletic training, depends upon attracting and keeping quality students. Therefore, understanding potential recruits' perceptions of athletic training is important. Objective: To (1) gain insight regarding undergraduate students' decisions to enter or not enter an athletic training education program (ATEP), and (2) examine potential athletic training recruits' perceptions of the roles and responsibilities of certified athletic trainers. Design: We used a descriptive study employing a grounded theory approach to explore perceptions of the athletic training profession by college students with various levels of interest in athletic training. Setting: Athletic training education program from a National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I research-intensive university. Patients or Other Participants: Forty-six undergraduate students (23 interested in applying to an ATEP and 23 who were aware of but not interested in applying to an ATEP). Main Outcome Measure(s): Data from in-depth, semi-structured interviews were transcribed and analyzed using open, axial, and selective coding procedures. Member checks and peer-debriefing techniques were used to ensure trustworthiness of the study. Results: Three contributing factors appeared to influence the recruitment of students to a career in athletic training: (1) a strong affiliation to a sports/team model, (2) initial exposure at the high school level, and (3) an incomplete understanding of athletic training. Conclusions: Awareness of how students are recruited into ATEPs is important information for our profession. Educators and administrators must create a comprehensive recruitment strategy using factors that influence potential recruits' decisions to enter the athletic training profession, specifically their association with sports and their experiences during high school. PMID:18335016

  13. Student-Retention and Career-Placement Rates Between Bachelor's and Master's Degree Professional Athletic Training Programs

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, Thomas G.; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Pitney, William A.; Dodge, Thomas M.; Hertel, Jay

    2015-01-01

    Context  The debate over what the entry-level degree should be for athletic training has heightened. A comparison of retention and career-placement rates between bachelor's and master's degree professional athletic training programs may inform the debate. Objective  To compare the retention rates and career-placement rates of students in bachelor's and master's degree professional programs. Design  Cross-sectional study. Setting  Web-based survey. Patients or Other Participants  A total of 192 program directors (PDs) from bachelor's degree (n = 177) and master's degree (n = 15) professional programs. Intervention(s)  The PDs completed a Web-based survey. Main Outcome Measure(s)  We instructed the PDs to provide a retention rate and career-placement rate for the students in the programs they lead for each of the past 5 years. We also asked the PDs if they thought retention of students was a problem currently facing athletic training education. We used independent t tests to compare the responses between bachelor's and master's degree professional programs. Results  We found a higher retention rate for professional master's degree students (88.70% ± 9.02%, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 83.71, 93.69) than bachelor's degree students (80.98% ± 17.86%, 95% CI = 78.30, 83.66) (t25 = −2.86, P = .008, d = 0.55). Similarly, PDs from professional master's degree programs reported higher career-placement percentages (88.50% ± 10.68%, 95% CI = 82.33, 94.67) than bachelor's degree professional PDs (71.32% ± 18.47%, 95% CI = 68.54, 74.10) (t20 = −5.40, P < .001, d = 1.14). Finally, we observed no difference between groups regarding whether retention is a problem facing athletic training (χ21 = 0.720, P = .40, Φ = .061). Conclusions  Professional master's degree education appears to facilitate higher retention rates and greater career-placement rates in athletic training than bachelor's degree education. Professional socialization, program selectivity

  14. Student-Retention and Career-Placement Rates Between Bachelor's and Master's Degree Professional Athletic Training Programs.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Thomas G; Mazerolle, Stephanie M; Pitney, William A; Dodge, Thomas M; Hertel, Jay

    2015-09-01

    The debate over what the entry-level degree should be for athletic training has heightened. A comparison of retention and career-placement rates between bachelor's and master's degree professional athletic training programs may inform the debate. To compare the retention rates and career-placement rates of students in bachelor's and master's degree professional programs. Cross-sectional study. Web-based survey. A total of 192 program directors (PDs) from bachelor's degree (n = 177) and master's degree (n = 15) professional programs. The PDs completed a Web-based survey. We instructed the PDs to provide a retention rate and career-placement rate for the students in the programs they lead for each of the past 5 years. We also asked the PDs if they thought retention of students was a problem currently facing athletic training education. We used independent t tests to compare the responses between bachelor's and master's degree professional programs. We found a higher retention rate for professional master's degree students (88.70% ± 9.02%, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 83.71, 93.69) than bachelor's degree students (80.98% ± 17.86%, 95% CI = 78.30, 83.66) (t25 = -2.86, P = .008, d = 0.55). Similarly, PDs from professional master's degree programs reported higher career-placement percentages (88.50% ± 10.68%, 95% CI = 82.33, 94.67) than bachelor's degree professional PDs (71.32% ± 18.47%, 95% CI = 68.54, 74.10) (t20 = -5.40, P < .001, d = 1.14). Finally, we observed no difference between groups regarding whether retention is a problem facing athletic training (χ(2)1 = 0.720, P = .40, Φ = .061). Professional master's degree education appears to facilitate higher retention rates and greater career-placement rates in athletic training than bachelor's degree education. Professional socialization, program selectivity, and student commitment and motivation levels may help to explain the differences noted.

  15. Exploring Athletic Training Educators' Development as Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Payne, Ellen K.; Walker, Stacy E.; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.

    2017-01-01

    Context: Little research is available on how athletic training educators develop their instructional styles over the course of their careers and what influences their teaching practices. Understanding the development of athletic training educators' teaching practices may help promote effective teaching in athletic training programs and help guide…

  16. Attractors to an athletic training career in the high school setting.

    PubMed

    Gardiner-Shires, Alison; Mensch, James

    2009-01-01

    Employment opportunities for athletic trainers (ATs) in the high school setting have increased greatly in the past few years and will most likely continue to increase. Understanding what attracts individuals to become ATs and work in the high school setting is a complex process. (1) To examine attractors to the athletic training profession and the high school setting, (2) to determine what, if any, differences exist between attractors to the profession and those to the high school setting, and (3) to identify whether differences in attractors can be attributed to sex, time of decision, or job status. For this descriptive study, we designed the survey using the existing socialization literature. A pilot study was conducted and distributed by e-mail. Survey e-mailed to participants. High school ATs (n = 124) in South Carolina. Overall mean scores for attractors to athletic training and to the high school setting were calculated. Overall mean scores were compared with individual attractor mean scores to determine the most influential attractors. Effect sizes were used to determine differences in sex, time of decision, and job status. Of the total population of South Carolina high school ATs, 92 (74%) returned surveys. High school ATs in South Carolina had similar demographics with regard to age, sex, and race. Attractors to athletic training and to the high school setting were similar and included statements consistent with the continuation, service, and interpersonal themes identified in the existing socialization literature. We noted differences, however, between early and late deciders and between full-time and part-time ATs. The findings surrounding attractors to athletic training and the high school setting contribute to the existing socialization literature and help in our understanding of how and why individuals choose to become ATs and to work in the high school setting.

  17. Collegiate Athletes and Career Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murdock, Jennifer L.; Strear, Molly M.; Jenkins-Guarnieri, Michael A.; Henderson, Angela C.

    2016-01-01

    Given the unique experiences of collegiate athletes and the need to facilitate their transition as they complete postsecondary education and join the workforce, the present study sought to evaluate a group-administered career development program at a US university focused on preparing students for the transition into professional life upon…

  18. Collegiate Athletes and Career Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murdock, Jennifer L.; Strear, Molly M.; Jenkins-Guarnieri, Michael A.; Henderson, Angela C.

    2016-01-01

    Given the unique experiences of collegiate athletes and the need to facilitate their transition as they complete postsecondary education and join the workforce, the present study sought to evaluate a group-administered career development program at a US university focused on preparing students for the transition into professional life upon…

  19. Change and Athletic Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ray, Richard

    2006-01-01

    Dr. R. Richard Ray, Jr. is a Professor and Chair of Kinesiology at Hope College in Holland, Michigan. Since 1982 he has served as the Program Director for the Athletic Training Education Program at Hope College. Dr. Ray is the author of several books and over 40 articles. In this article he begins by laying a foundation for the reasons why change…

  20. Female athletic training students' perceptions of motherhood and retention in athletic training.

    PubMed

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M; Gavin, Kerri

    2013-01-01

    Motherhood appears to be a catalyst in job turnover for female athletic trainers, especially those employed at the National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I level. However, most researchers examining this topic have investigated the perspectives of those who are currently employed rather than those who are preparing to enter the profession. To evaluate female athletic training students' perceptions of motherhood and retention. Qualitative study. Athletic training education program. A total of 18 female athletic training students volunteered to participate. They were enrolled in 1 Commission on Accrediting Athletic Training Education-accredited athletic training program and represented 3 levels of academic STUDY. The participants responded to a series of questions related to work-life balance and retention in athletic training. Analysis of the data followed a general inductive process. Credibility was established by interpretive member checks and peer review. The first theme, clinical setting, speaks to the belief that work-life balance and retention in athletic training require an employment setting that fosters a family-friendly atmosphere and a work schedule (including travel) that allows for time at home. The second theme, mentorship, reflects the acknowledgment that a female mentor who is successful in balancing the roles of mother and athletic trainer can serve as a role model. The final theme, work-life balance strategies, illustrates the need to have a plan in place to meet the demands of both home and work life. A female athletic trainer who is successfully balancing her career and family responsibilities may be the most helpful factor in retention, especially for female athletic training students. Young professionals need to be educated on the importance of developing successful work-life balance strategies, which can be helpful in reducing attrition from the profession.

  1. Female Athletic Training Students' Perceptions of Motherhood and Retention in Athletic Training

    PubMed Central

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Gavin, Kerri

    2013-01-01

    Context: Motherhood appears to be a catalyst in job turnover for female athletic trainers, especially those employed at the National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I level. However, most researchers examining this topic have investigated the perspectives of those who are currently employed rather than those who are preparing to enter the profession. Objective: To evaluate female athletic training students' perceptions of motherhood and retention. Design: Qualitative study. Setting: Athletic training education program. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 18 female athletic training students volunteered to participate. They were enrolled in 1 Commission on Accrediting Athletic Training Education–accredited athletic training program and represented 3 levels of academic study. Data Collection and Analysis: The participants responded to a series of questions related to work–life balance and retention in athletic training. Analysis of the data followed a general inductive process. Credibility was established by interpretive member checks and peer review. Results: The first theme, clinical setting, speaks to the belief that work–life balance and retention in athletic training require an employment setting that fosters a family-friendly atmosphere and a work schedule (including travel) that allows for time at home. The second theme, mentorship, reflects the acknowledgment that a female mentor who is successful in balancing the roles of mother and athletic trainer can serve as a role model. The final theme, work–life balance strategies, illustrates the need to have a plan in place to meet the demands of both home and work life. Conclusions: A female athletic trainer who is successfully balancing her career and family responsibilities may be the most helpful factor in retention, especially for female athletic training students. Young professionals need to be educated on the importance of developing successful work–life balance strategies, which can

  2. Factors that Influence Career Decision-Making among Elite Athletes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fogarty, Gerard J.; McGregor-Bayne, Heather

    2008-01-01

    A common belief about elite athletes is that they invest so much effort into the pursuit of their athletic careers that they fail to develop good career decision-making skills. Recent findings challenge that belief. The present study investigated career decision-making difficulties among 117 elite Australian athletes. Participants completed…

  3. Career Guidance Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, John E.

    The 1972 Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) Career Training Program was aimed at placing counselors in actual work situations (as new employees) to enable them to experience that which they must describe to students if they are to do an effective job in career counseling. The overall purpose was to give counselors or teachers and administrators an…

  4. A Career Assistance Program for Elite Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petitpas, Al; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Describes a career assistance program to assist elite athletes (n=142) in coping with the transition out of active sport competition. Uses a lifespan development framework to describe formulation of the program. Presents outline of program and discusses implications for counseling. Notes feedback from participants has been positive and the…

  5. Reflections on the career of Brazilian Paralympic athletes.

    PubMed

    Haiachi, Marcelo de Castro; Cardoso, Vinícius Denardin; Reppold, Alberto Reinaldo; Gaya, Adroaldo Cezar Araújo

    2016-10-01

    The proximity of the Paralympic Games Rio 2016 opens the discussion about the possibility of building a career in Paralympic sport. This study aims to present the characteristics and challenges present in the sporting career of the Brazilian Paralympic athlete. The study was structured under three main guiding topics: the different moments of Paralympic Sport, the career characteristics of paralympians and the consequences of sports results for their careers. Currently, Paralympic sports has its focus on high performance, as the constant necessity for good results is an ever present reality. The characteristics and challenges of sporting careers reveal the current situation for Brazilian Paralympic sports in all of its stages (pre-transition, transition and post-transition). Upon reflecting on the career of the Brazilian paralympic athlete a debate opens up concerning future perspectives and particularly on an understanding of the existing challenges for consolidation. Structural problems such as venues for training, lack of awareness on the part of the private sector and the non-renewal of human resources, seem to be the main obstacles for the consolidation of paralympic careers in Brazil.

  6. Training in the aging athlete.

    PubMed

    Foster, Carl; Wright, Glenn; Battista, Rebecca A; Porcari, John P

    2007-06-01

    The number of healthy older individuals who are active in sports has increased significantly during the past generation. These individuals continue to perform at a high level, although there appears to be a loss in functional capacity that cannot be overcome by training. No accepted theory of aging exists, but older athletes may be limited primarily by the inability to maintain the same volume and intensity of training. Also, older athletes appear to respond more slowly to the same training load than do younger athletes. The principles of training in older athletes are similar to those in young athletes; however, additional days of recovery and cross training may be necessary to prevent orthopedic injuries. Strategies for maintaining exercise intensity, including resistance training, are advisable to prevent sarcopenia and selective loss of type II muscle fibers.

  7. Mental Training for the Distance Athlete: "The Running Values Auction"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osteen, Deborah E.; Phillips, Dennis

    2006-01-01

    Coaches and sports psychologists often say that it is the mind that controls the body, and that once a race begins, it is 90 percent mental and 10 percent physical training. Teaching young athletes to use mental strategies is a skill they will continue to use throughout their athletic career, and best of all, throughout their everyday lives, even…

  8. Mental Training for the Distance Athlete: "The Running Values Auction"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osteen, Deborah E.; Phillips, Dennis

    2006-01-01

    Coaches and sports psychologists often say that it is the mind that controls the body, and that once a race begins, it is 90 percent mental and 10 percent physical training. Teaching young athletes to use mental strategies is a skill they will continue to use throughout their athletic career, and best of all, throughout their everyday lives, even…

  9. Development of the Student-Athlete Career Situation Inventory (SACSI)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandstedt, Scott D.; Cox, Richard H.; Martens, Matthew P.; Ward, D. Gant; Webber, S. Nicole; Ivey, Starla

    2004-01-01

    Currently a sound and reliable measure of a student-athlete's career development does not exist. The purpose of this study was to develop a psychometrically sound instrument that measures the career situation of student athletes. Participants for the study were 204 (138 male and 66 female) student-athletes from a large midwestern Division I…

  10. Implementing Career Education. Career Technician Training Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento.

    Consisting of materials and strategies adapted from California's model projects for the training of career technicians, this document explains how to conduct inservice workshops for these paraprofessionals who provide services in career centers established in nearly all California secondary schools. Twelve training modules cover the following…

  11. The Career Planning, Athletic Identity, and Student Role Identity of Intercollegiate Student Athletes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lally, Patricia S.; Kerr, Gretchen A.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the career planning of university student athletes and relationships between their career planning and athletic and student role identities. Two retrospective in-depth interviews were held with four male and four female university student athletes. Participants entered university with vague or nonexistent…

  12. Training Career Practitioners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niles, Spencer G.; Engels, Dennis; Lenz, Janet

    2009-01-01

    This article summarizes 8 presentations from Group 8 on the theme "Training of Researchers and Practitioners," which were part of the 2007 joint symposium of the International Association for Educational and Vocational Guidance, Society for Vocational Psychology, and National Career Development Association held in Padua, Italy. Three…

  13. Male and Female: Career Development of African American College Athletes and Non-Athletes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Jamie Dowdy

    2015-01-01

    Tendency to foreclose on careers, vocational exploration, and career commitment were examined in relationship to racial-ethnic socialization, parental responsiveness, and career-related verbal encouragement and emotional support among 228 African American male and female college athletes and non-athletes. A number of tests were conducted to test…

  14. Male and Female: Career Development of African American College Athletes and Non-Athletes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Jamie Dowdy

    2015-01-01

    Tendency to foreclose on careers, vocational exploration, and career commitment were examined in relationship to racial-ethnic socialization, parental responsiveness, and career-related verbal encouragement and emotional support among 228 African American male and female college athletes and non-athletes. A number of tests were conducted to test…

  15. Social Support and Career Thoughts in College Athletes and Non-Athletes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Stefanie

    2012-01-01

    The career decision-making process can be a daunting task during the college years for both athletes and non-athletes alike. Understanding factors that influence this process and ways to best support students as they are making career decisions is integral to counselors working with college students. Social support and career thoughts were…

  16. The career planning, athletic identity, and student role identity of intercollegiate student athletes.

    PubMed

    Lally, Patricia S; Kerr, Gretchen A

    2005-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the career planning of university student athletes and relationships between their career planning and athletic and student role identities. Two retrospective in-depth interviews were held with four male and four female university student athletes. Participants entered university with vague or nonexistent career objectives and invested heavily in their athletic roles. In the latter years of their college career, the participants discarded their sport career ambitions and allowed the student role to become more prominent in their identity hierarchies. The current findings support Brown and Hartley's (1998) suggestion that student athletes may invest in both the athlete and student role identities simultaneously and that investing in the latter may permit the exploration of nonsport career options.

  17. Photobiomodulation in athletic training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Timon Cheng-Yi; Liu, Jiang; Wang, Shuang-Xi; Cui, Li-Ping; Xu, Xiao-Yang; Lu, Jian; Deng, Xiao-Yuan; Liu, Song-Hao

    2006-09-01

    Photobiomodulation (PBM) has been mainly used in athlete trauma care. In this paper, the possible applications of PBM in athlete medical care to maintain pro-oxidant-antioxidant homeostasis and in athlete trauma care to treat osteoarthritis and delayed onset of muscular soreness (DOMS) have been discussed. In order to maintain pro-oxidant-antioxidant homeostasis, PBM might be used in an intravascular way, in an endonasal way or in a directly irradiated way. DOMS was supposed to have three phases, z-line disruption, proteolysis of damaged proteins and protein synthesis for myofibril remodeling, each of which might have its own optimum dose of PBM.

  18. Description of Professional Master's Athletic Training Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Thomas G.; Pitney, William A.; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Dodge, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Professional master's (PM) athletic training programs (ATPs) are becoming more popular as the profession debates what the entry-level degree should be for athletic training. More information is needed related to the potential benefits of PM ATPs. Objective: Describe the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE)…

  19. Description of Professional Master's Athletic Training Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Thomas G.; Pitney, William A.; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Dodge, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Professional master's (PM) athletic training programs (ATPs) are becoming more popular as the profession debates what the entry-level degree should be for athletic training. More information is needed related to the potential benefits of PM ATPs. Objective: Describe the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE)…

  20. Frustrations among graduates of athletic training education programs.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Thomas G; Dodge, Thomas M

    2013-01-01

    Although previous researchers have begun to identify sources of athletic training student stress, the specific reasons for student frustrations are not yet fully understood. It is important for athletic training administrators to understand sources of student frustration to provide a supportive learning environment. To determine the factors that lead to feelings of frustration while completing a professional athletic training education program (ATEP). Qualitative study. National Athletic Trainers' Association (NATA) accredited postprofessional education program. Fourteen successful graduates (12 women, 2 men) of accredited professional undergraduate ATEPs enrolled in an NATA-accredited postprofessional education program. We conducted semistructured interviews and analyzed data with a grounded theory approach using open, axial, and selective coding procedures. We negotiated over the coding scheme and performed peer debriefings and member checks to ensure trustworthiness of the results. Four themes emerged from the data: (1) Athletic training student frustrations appear to stem from the amount of stress involved in completing an ATEP, leading to anxiety and feelings of being overwhelmed. (2) The interactions students have with classmates, faculty, and preceptors can also be a source of frustration for athletic training students. (3) Monotonous clinical experiences often left students feeling disengaged. (4) Students questioned entering the athletic training profession because of the fear of work-life balance problems and low compensation. In order to reduce frustration, athletic training education programs should validate students' decisions to pursue athletic training and validate their contributions to the ATEP; provide clinical education experiences with graded autonomy; encourage positive personal interactions between students, faculty, and preceptors; and successfully model the benefits of a career in athletic training.

  1. Frustrations Among Graduates of Athletic Training Education Programs

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, Thomas G; Dodge, Thomas M

    2013-01-01

    ; and successfully model the benefits of a career in athletic training. PMID:23672328

  2. Clinical Education in Athletic Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edler, Jessica R.; Eberman, Lindsey E.; Walker, Stacy

    2017-01-01

    Context: Clinical education is a foundational component of healthcare education by which students acquire, practice, and demonstrate competency in clinical proficiencies through classroom, laboratory, and clinical experiences. Currently, the most common practice of clinical education in athletic training is clinical integration. Objective: The…

  3. Athletic Training and Public Health Summit.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Mark; Bovbjerg, Viktor; Hannigan, Kim; Hootman, Jennifer M; Johnson, Sam T; Kucera, Kristen L; Norcross, Marc F

    2016-07-01

    To introduce athletic trainers to the benefits of using a population-based approach to injury and illness prevention and to explore opportunities for partnering with public health professionals on these initiatives. Athletic trainers play leading roles in individual injury and illness prevention but are less familiar with policy development, evaluation, and implementation from a population-level standpoint. The Athletic Training and Public Health Summit was convened to understand, explore, and develop the intersection of athletic training and public health. To further the integration of athletic training within the public health arena, athletic trainers must expand their professional focus beyond the individual to the population level.

  4. A Proposed Athletic Training Curriculum Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halstead, Sue

    An athletic training curriculum for the training of high school coaches and physical education teachers in Virginia includes courses on: (1) athletic injuries--a basic study of human physiology and anatomy relevant to different athletic injuries; (2) the art and science of sports medicine--prevention, evaluation, treatment, and rehabilitation of…

  5. A Proposed Athletic Training Curriculum Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halstead, Sue

    An athletic training curriculum for the training of high school coaches and physical education teachers in Virginia includes courses on: (1) athletic injuries--a basic study of human physiology and anatomy relevant to different athletic injuries; (2) the art and science of sports medicine--prevention, evaluation, treatment, and rehabilitation of…

  6. Overview of Athletic Training Education Research Publications

    PubMed Central

    Turocy, Paula Sammarone

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To provide an overview of the limited amount of peer-reviewed literature on athletic training education that has been published in athletic training journals. Publications that related specifically to the development of evaluation tools or specific addenda to the required athletic training curriculum were not included. Background: As education reform continues to unfold in athletic training, it is important for all certified athletic trainers to understand the research that undergirds the educational practices in athletic training. Many of the profession's educational practices have been taken from standards and methods developed by the discipline of education, with very little validation for applicability to the discipline of athletic training. A very limited number of comprehensive scientific investigations of the educational standards and practices in athletic training education have been carried out; however, for more research to be conducted, it is essential that the currently available research be reviewed. Description: The summaries of athletic training educational research in this article include the topics of learning styles, facilitation of learning and professional development, instructional methods, clinical instruction and supervision, predictors of success on the National Athletic Trainers' Association Board of Certification certification examination, program administration, and continuing education. The amount of research in athletic training education is limited when compared with the amount and quality of educational research available in other professions, such as medicine, nursing, dentistry, physical therapy, and occupational therapy. In this article, I attempt to describe the existing literature and identify what is needed to expand the breadth and depth of research in athletic training education. Clinical Advantages: This article is intended to help educators identify areas within athletic training education that require further

  7. Fundamentals of Athletic Training. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behling, Fred L.; And Others

    This book provides an authoritative reference on the fundamentals of athletic training for people with varied backgrounds but a common interest in the health and education of the high school athlete. The book is designed especially for the novice athletic trainer. Section 1 of the book concerns the organization and administration of athletic…

  8. Applying Social Cognitive Career Theory to Training Career Counselors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brien, Karen M.; Heppner, Mary J.

    1996-01-01

    Applies the social cognitive career theory to training career counselors. Proposes extending the theory to understand and influence trainees' interest, engagement, and performance in career counseling. Suggestions are made for future research and for training students to be interested, involved, and skilled in providing career counseling. (FC)

  9. Historical Perspective of Athletic Training Clinical Education

    PubMed Central

    Weidner, Thomas G.; Henning, Jolene M.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To present a historical perspective of the development and evolution of clinical education in the medical and allied health professions, with a special interest in athletic training; to gain a better understanding and appreciation of the depth and breadth of the structured and formal clinical education needed in athletic training, for both the present and the future. Data Sources: Information was drawn from the Educational Resources Information Center (1966–2001), MEDLINE (1966–2001), SPORT Discus (1830–2002), and CINAHL (1982–2002) searches of historical literature relating to the development of medical, allied health, and athletic training clinical education. Key words searched were clinical education, clinical instruction, medical education, allied health education, history of medical education, athletic training education, and history of clerkships. We also used reference materials cited in historical textbooks on medical education. Data Synthesis: Clinical education in American medical schools evolved from a primarily didactic process to the clinical-clerkship model. In contrast, athletic training professional preparation was initially more steeped in clinical experiences and less in didactic instruction. Conclusions/Recommendations: Reviewing medical education over the past century and allied health clinical education over the past 30 years provides interesting insights about the past, present, and future of athletic training professional preparation. Athletic training clinical education is undergoing reform and development, which will subsequently enhance the profession. Athletic training has entered an exciting era in its history. PMID:12937549

  10. Historical Perspective of Athletic Training Clinical Education.

    PubMed

    Weidner, Thomas G; Henning, Jolene M

    2002-12-01

    OBJECTIVE: To present a historical perspective of the development and evolution of clinical education in the medical and allied health professions, with a special interest in athletic training; to gain a better understanding and appreciation of the depth and breadth of the structured and formal clinical education needed in athletic training, for both the present and the future. DATA SOURCES: Information was drawn from the Educational Resources Information Center (1966-2001), MEDLINE (1966-2001), SPORT Discus (1830-2002), and CINAHL (1982-2002) searches of historical literature relating to the development of medical, allied health, and athletic training clinical education. Key words searched were clinical education, clinical instruction, medical education, allied health education, history of medical education, athletic training education, and history of clerkships. We also used reference materials cited in historical textbooks on medical education. DATA SYNTHESIS: Clinical education in American medical schools evolved from a primarily didactic process to the clinical-clerkship model. In contrast, athletic training professional preparation was initially more steeped in clinical experiences and less in didactic instruction. CONCLUSIONS/RECOMMENDATIONS: Reviewing medical education over the past century and allied health clinical education over the past 30 years provides interesting insights about the past, present, and future of athletic training professional preparation. Athletic training clinical education is undergoing reform and development, which will subsequently enhance the profession. Athletic training has entered an exciting era in its history.

  11. Learning Professionalism in Athletic Training Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craig, Debbie I.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Student learning of professionalism in athletic training education programs (ATEPs) can be varied and even elusive. The purpose of this article is to define professionalism and discuss its development in athletic training students. Background: Medical professions have studied extensively how students learn professionalism. However, with…

  12. Predictors of Commitment to Athletic Training Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Windee M.; Neibert, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    Context: In order for athletic training students to be successful in any athletic training education program (ATEP), a certain level of commitment to the program and profession is required. Objective: The purpose of this study was to explore the applicability of the sport commitment model (SCM) to an ATEP by applying the SCM in an academic setting…

  13. Learning Professionalism in Athletic Training Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craig, Debbie I.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Student learning of professionalism in athletic training education programs (ATEPs) can be varied and even elusive. The purpose of this article is to define professionalism and discuss its development in athletic training students. Background: Medical professions have studied extensively how students learn professionalism. However, with…

  14. Applying Mastery Learning to Athletic Training Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schellhase, Kristen C.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Historical and current athletic training education literature rarely references any educational theory or instructional model. This article reviews research related to mastery learning and athletic training educational history. It focuses on the possibility that mastery learning was the implicit foundational instructional model of…

  15. Predictors of Commitment to Athletic Training Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Windee M.; Neibert, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    Context: In order for athletic training students to be successful in any athletic training education program (ATEP), a certain level of commitment to the program and profession is required. Objective: The purpose of this study was to explore the applicability of the sport commitment model (SCM) to an ATEP by applying the SCM in an academic setting…

  16. Athletic Training and Public Health Summit

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Mark; Bovbjerg, Viktor; Hannigan, Kim; Hootman, Jennifer M.; Johnson, Sam T.; Kucera, Kristen L.; Norcross, Marc F.

    2016-01-01

    Objective:  To introduce athletic trainers to the benefits of using a population-based approach to injury and illness prevention and to explore opportunities for partnering with public health professionals on these initiatives. Background:  Athletic trainers play leading roles in individual injury and illness prevention but are less familiar with policy development, evaluation, and implementation from a population-level standpoint. The Athletic Training and Public Health Summit was convened to understand, explore, and develop the intersection of athletic training and public health. Conclusions:  To further the integration of athletic training within the public health arena, athletic trainers must expand their professional focus beyond the individual to the population level. PMID:27295487

  17. Student retention in athletic training education programs.

    PubMed

    Dodge, Thomas M; Mitchell, Murray F; Mensch, James M

    2009-01-01

    The success of any academic program, including athletic training, depends upon attracting and keeping quality students. The nature of persistent students versus students who prematurely leave the athletic training major is not known. Understanding the profiles of athletic training students who persist or leave is important. To (1) explore the relationships among the following variables: anticipatory factors, academic integration, clinical integration, social integration, and motivation; (2) determine which of the aforementioned variables discriminate between senior athletic training students and major changers; and (3) identify which variable is the strongest predictor of persistence in athletic training education programs. Descriptive study using a qualitative and quantitative mixed-methods approach. Thirteen athletic training education programs located in District 3 of the National Athletic Trainers' Association. Ninety-four senior-level athletic training students and 31 college students who changed majors from athletic training to another degree option. Data were collected with the Athletic Training Education Program Student Retention Questionnaire (ATEPSRQ). Data from the ATEPSRQ were analyzed via Pearson correlations, multivariate analysis of variance, univariate analysis of variance, and a stepwise discriminant analysis. Open-ended questions were transcribed and analyzed using open, axial, and selective coding procedures. Member checks and peer debriefing techniques ensured trustworthiness of the study. Pearson correlations identified moderate relationships among motivation and clinical integration (r = 0.515, P < .01) and motivation and academic integration (r = 0.509, P < .01). Univariate analyses of variance showed that academic integration (F(1,122) = 8.483, P < .004), clinical integration (F(1,119) = 30.214, P < .001), and motivation (F(1,121) = 68.887, P < .001) discriminated between seniors and major changers. Discriminant analysis indicated that

  18. Student Retention in Athletic Training Education Programs

    PubMed Central

    Dodge, Thomas M; Mitchell, Murray F; Mensch, James M

    2009-01-01

    Context: The success of any academic program, including athletic training, depends upon attracting and keeping quality students. The nature of persistent students versus students who prematurely leave the athletic training major is not known. Understanding the profiles of athletic training students who persist or leave is important. Objective: To (1) explore the relationships among the following variables: anticipatory factors, academic integration, clinical integration, social integration, and motivation; (2) determine which of the aforementioned variables discriminate between senior athletic training students and major changers; and (3) identify which variable is the strongest predictor of persistence in athletic training education programs. Design: Descriptive study using a qualitative and quantitative mixed-methods approach. Setting: Thirteen athletic training education programs located in District 3 of the National Athletic Trainers' Association. Patients or Other Participants: Ninety-four senior-level athletic training students and 31 college students who changed majors from athletic training to another degree option. Data Collection: Data were collected with the Athletic Training Education Program Student Retention Questionnaire (ATEPSRQ). Analysis: Data from the ATEPSRQ were analyzed via Pearson correlations, multivariate analysis of variance, univariate analysis of variance, and a stepwise discriminant analysis. Open-ended questions were transcribed and analyzed using open, axial, and selective coding procedures. Member checks and peer debriefing techniques ensured trustworthiness of the study. Results: Pearson correlations identified moderate relationships among motivation and clinical integration (r  =  0.515, P < .01) and motivation and academic integration (r  =  0.509, P < .01). Univariate analyses of variance showed that academic integration (F1,122  =  8.483, P < .004), clinical integration (F1,119  =  30.214, P < .001), and

  19. Perceptions of athletic training services by collegiate student-athletes: a measurement of athlete satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Unruh, S

    1998-10-01

    I evaluated the perceptions student-athletes had of their athletic trainers and of the medical coverage provided them by the athletic departments at their institutions. My intent was to assess differences between male and female athletes, between athletes of high-profile and low-profile sports, and between athletes who competed at the NCAA Division I and Division II levels. The research design was also directed at identifying any subgroup of student-athletes who demonstrated a significantly different perception toward their athletic trainer(s). Questionnaires were sent to 32 athletic training programs at 28 NCAA Division I and II institutions. Eighteen of the 32 programs participated, yielding a 56% response. A total of 343 student-athletes from 18 selected athletic programs at both the NCAA Division I and II levels participated. One questionnaire contained response errors and was not included in the analysis. A questionnaire was developed and pilot tested at 3 collegiate settings apart from those participating in the study. Validity and reliability analyses were conducted and confirmed by additional professionals in the field of athletic training. Cumulative mean perception scores between groups were measured using independent t tests. Differences in scores between subgroups were measured using a 1-way analysis of variance. I observed significant differences in mean cumulative perception scores between sex and sport-profile groups. Male athletes and athletes in high-profile sports demonstrated a higher mean perception score than did females and athletes in low-profile sports. There was no difference in scores when compared across athletic divisions. Subgroups of all the athletes participating were identified. Several subgroups demonstrated significant differences in mean cumulative perception scores. Males and females in low-profile sports at Division II schools and females in high-profile sports at Division II schools had significantly lower mean perception

  20. Perceptions of Athletic Training Services by Collegiate Student-Athletes: A Measurement of Athlete Satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Unruh, Scott

    1998-01-01

    Objective: I evaluated the perceptions student-athletes had of their athletic trainers and of the medical coverage provided them by the athletic departments at their institutions. My intent was to assess differences between male and female athletes, between athletes of high-profile and low-profile sports, and between athletes who competed at the NCAA Division I and Division II levels. The research design was also directed at identifying any subgroup of student-athletes who demonstrated a significantly different perception toward their athletic trainer(s). Design and Setting: Questionnaires were sent to 32 athletic training programs at 28 NCAA Division I and II institutions. Eighteen of the 32 programs participated, yielding a 56% response. Subjects: A total of 343 student-athletes from 18 selected athletic programs at both the NCAA Division I and II levels participated. One questionnaire contained response errors and was not included in the analysis. Measurements: A questionnaire was developed and pilot tested at 3 collegiate settings apart from those participating in the study. Validity and reliability analyses were conducted and confirmed by additional professionals in the field of athletic training. Cumulative mean perception scores between groups were measured using independent t tests. Differences in scores between subgroups were measured using a 1-way analysis of variance. Results: I observed significant differences in mean cumulative perception scores between sex and sport-profile groups. Male athletes and athletes in high-profile sports demonstrated a higher mean perception score than did females and athletes in low-profile sports. There was no difference in scores when compared across athletic divisions. Subgroups of all the athletes participating were identified. Several subgroups demonstrated significant differences in mean cumulative perception scores. Conclusions: Males and females in low-profile sports at Division II schools and females in high

  1. Factors of Persistence Among Graduates of Athletic Training Education Programs

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, Thomas G.; Dodge, Thomas M.

    2011-01-01

    Context: Previous researchers have indicated that athletic training education programs (ATEPs) appear to retain students who are motivated and well integrated into their education programs. However, no researchers have examined the factors leading to successful persistence to graduation of recent graduates from ATEPs. Objective: To determine the factors that led students enrolled in a postprofessional education program accredited by the National Athletic Trainers' Association (NATA) to persist to graduation from accredited undergraduate ATEPs. Design: Qualitative study. Setting: Postprofessional education program accredited by the NATA. Patients or Other Participants: Fourteen graduates (12 women, 2 men) of accredited undergraduate entry-level ATEPs who were enrolled in an NATA-accredited postprofessional education program volunteered to participate. Data Collection and Analysis: We conducted semistructured interviews and analyzed data through a grounded theory approach. We used open, axial, and selective coding procedures. To ensure trustworthiness, 2 independent coders analyzed the data. The researchers then negotiated over the coding categories until they reached 100% agreement. We also performed member checks and peer debriefing. Results: Four themes emerged from the data. Decisions to persist to graduation from ATEPs appeared to be influenced by students' positive interactions with faculty, clinical instructors, and peers. The environment of the ATEPs also affected their persistence. Participants thought they learned much in both the clinic and the classroom, and this learning motivated them to persist. Finally, participants could see themselves practicing athletic training as a career, and this greatly influenced their eventual persistence. Conclusions: Our study gives athletic training educators insight into the reasons students persist to graduation from ATEPs. Specifically, athletic training programs should strive to develop close-knit learning communities

  2. Factors of persistence among graduates of athletic training education programs.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Thomas G; Dodge, Thomas M

    2011-01-01

    Previous researchers have indicated that athletic training education programs (ATEPs) appear to retain students who are motivated and well integrated into their education programs. However, no researchers have examined the factors leading to successful persistence to graduation of recent graduates from ATEPs. To determine the factors that led students enrolled in a postprofessional education program accredited by the National Athletic Trainers' Association (NATA) to persist to graduation from accredited undergraduate ATEPs. Qualitative study. Postprofessional education program accredited by the NATA. Fourteen graduates (12 women, 2 men) of accredited undergraduate entry-level ATEPs who were enrolled in an NATA-accredited postprofessional education program volunteered to participate. We conducted semistructured interviews and analyzed data through a grounded theory approach. We used open, axial, and selective coding procedures. To ensure trustworthiness, 2 independent coders analyzed the data. The researchers then negotiated over the coding categories until they reached 100% agreement. We also performed member checks and peer debriefing. Four themes emerged from the data. Decisions to persist to graduation from ATEPs appeared to be influenced by students' positive interactions with faculty, clinical instructors, and peers. The environment of the ATEPs also affected their persistence. Participants thought they learned much in both the clinic and the classroom, and this learning motivated them to persist. Finally, participants could see themselves practicing athletic training as a career, and this greatly influenced their eventual persistence. Our study gives athletic training educators insight into the reasons students persist to graduation from ATEPs. Specifically, athletic training programs should strive to develop close-knit learning communities that stress positive interactions between students and instructors. Athletic training educators also must work to

  3. Sexual Harassment Training and Reporting in Athletic Training Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mansell, Jamie; Moffit, Dani M.; Russ, Anne C.; Thorpe, Justin N.

    2017-01-01

    Context: Sexual harassment is a growing concern in higher education. Athletic training students should feel safe in their programs, whether in the didactic or clinical setting. Though the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education creates standards to keep the students safe, there are none regarding sexual harassment training for…

  4. Dance Dynamics. Athletes & Dancers Training & Moving Together.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pruett, Diane Milhan, Ed.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    This series of articles explores the various ways in which training procedures in both dance and athletics are compatible. Topics include: traditional and adapted dance class structures and materials; the inclusion of dance in the physical education curriculum; and the physical fitness of dancers as compared to athletes. (JN)

  5. Perceptions of Sexual Harassment in Athletic Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shingles, René Revis; Smith, Yevonne

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To describe and analyze the experiences of ethnically diverse female certified athletic trainers (ATCs) in order to discern the perceived nature of sexual harassment in the athletic training profession. Design and Setting: Both quantitative and qualitative methods were used for a larger study; however, only the qualitative data are…

  6. Perceptions of Sexual Harassment in Athletic Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shingles, René Revis; Smith, Yevonne

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To describe and analyze the experiences of ethnically diverse female certified athletic trainers (ATCs) in order to discern the perceived nature of sexual harassment in the athletic training profession. Design and Setting: Both quantitative and qualitative methods were used for a larger study; however, only the qualitative data are…

  7. Dance Dynamics. Athletes & Dancers Training & Moving Together.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pruett, Diane Milhan, Ed.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    This series of articles explores the various ways in which training procedures in both dance and athletics are compatible. Topics include: traditional and adapted dance class structures and materials; the inclusion of dance in the physical education curriculum; and the physical fitness of dancers as compared to athletes. (JN)

  8. Female and Male Student Athletes' Perceptions of Career Transition in Sport and Higher Education: A Visual Elicitation and Qualitative Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, C. Keith; Lawrence, Suzanne Malia

    2004-01-01

    The termination of a collegiate athletic career is inevitable for all student athletes. The purpose of this study was to explore student athletes' perceptions of the athletic career transition process. One-hundred-and-forty-three (n = 143) National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division II student athletes were administered the Life After…

  9. Female and Male Student Athletes' Perceptions of Career Transition in Sport and Higher Education: A Visual Elicitation and Qualitative Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, C. Keith; Lawrence, Suzanne Malia

    2004-01-01

    The termination of a collegiate athletic career is inevitable for all student athletes. The purpose of this study was to explore student athletes' perceptions of the athletic career transition process. One-hundred-and-forty-three (n = 143) National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division II student athletes were administered the Life After…

  10. Athletic Training: Instructors Perceived Preparedness for Teaching in an Athletic Training Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rooney, Kevin F.

    2013-01-01

    Athletic trainers work in clinical settings such as secondary schools, colleges and universities, sports medicine clinics, professional sports, hospitals, and other healthcare environments. However, with the rapid expansion of athletic training education programs (ATEP) over the years, another role for the athletic trainer has developed, the…

  11. Athletic Training: Instructors Perceived Preparedness for Teaching in an Athletic Training Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rooney, Kevin F.

    2013-01-01

    Athletic trainers work in clinical settings such as secondary schools, colleges and universities, sports medicine clinics, professional sports, hospitals, and other healthcare environments. However, with the rapid expansion of athletic training education programs (ATEP) over the years, another role for the athletic trainer has developed, the…

  12. Managing the Training Load in Adolescent Athletes.

    PubMed

    Murray, Andrew

    2017-01-04

    While historically adolescents were removed from their parents to prepare to become warriors, this process repeats itself in modern times but with the outcome being athletic performance. This review considers the process of developing athletes and managing load against the backdrop of differing approaches of conserving and maximizing the talent available. It acknowledges the typical training 'dose' that adolescent athletes receive across a number of sports and the typical 'response' when it is excessive or not managed appropriately. It also examines the best approaches to quantifying load and injury risk acknowledging the relative strengths and weaknesses of subjective and objective approaches. Making evidence based decisions is emphasized, while choosing the appropriate monitoring techniques is determined by both the sporting context and individual situation. Ultimately a systematic approach to training load monitoring is recommended for adolescent athletes to both maximize their athletic development and to allow an opportunity for learning, reflection and the enhancement of performance knowledge of coaches and practitioners.

  13. Retention Initiatives Used by Professional Bachelor's Athletic Training Program Directors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Thomas G.; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Dodge, Thomas M.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Retaining athletic training students has been identified as problematic by approximately half of athletic training program (ATP) directors. It is unknown what ATP directors do to improve athletic training student retention. Objective: To identify initiatives that ATP directors use to improve the retention rates of athletic training…

  14. Retention Initiatives Used by Professional Bachelor's Athletic Training Program Directors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Thomas G.; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Dodge, Thomas M.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Retaining athletic training students has been identified as problematic by approximately half of athletic training program (ATP) directors. It is unknown what ATP directors do to improve athletic training student retention. Objective: To identify initiatives that ATP directors use to improve the retention rates of athletic training…

  15. African American Male Student-Athletes: Career Maturity Differences at High School Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Chris

    1999-01-01

    Investigates career maturity differences among 133 African American male high school student-athletes. Findings revealed no significant differences between student-athletes and their nonathlete peers on the career maturity attitude and competence variables. Findings further indicated that 94% of student-athletes as compared to 72% of nonathletes…

  16. Determination of Career Planning Profiles of Turkish Athletes Who Are Ranked in the Olympics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hulya, Bingol; Cemal, Gundogdu; Sukru, Bingol

    2012-01-01

    This study researched in the level of career planning of Turkish athletes ranked in the Olympics during the time they were active in sports and after they retired. This study which aimed to determine the career planning efficiency of Turkish athletes ranked in the Olympics based on the viewpoints of the athletes holding Olympic degree is scanning…

  17. Construction of the integrated model for practical career support to the professional athletes.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Motoki; Hochi, Yasuyuki; Inoue, Mami; Kaneko, Ikuyo; Yamada, Yasuyuki

    2012-01-01

    Recently, along with the enhancement of the argument for career of athletes, many researchers who major in sports psychology focus mainly on athletic retirement, a coordination of transitions in sport or and outside sport, social support and professional assistance in career transition, in the context of the second career concerning to professional athletes in Japan. However, when it comes to career transition of professional athletes, it is necessary to consider "career" from the whole perspectives of human life. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to clarify the career transition of professional athletes by the way of questionnaire and interview survey, which is approached from the view point of industrial/organizational psychology. For this purpose, we implemented the interview survey to professional athletes in 2008. In addition, we carried out the investigation to professional football players (interview survey: 5 players, questionnaire survey: 102 players) in 2009. Consequently, three following findings were led in conclusion. (1)Career intervention to professional athletes should be performed before the turning point of the career (career transition). (2)It is important to assess the career intervention to professional athletes. (3)It is an important stance to watch the processes when professional athletes open up one's career by oneself.

  18. Athletic Training Student Socialization Part II: Socializing the Professional Master's Athletic Training Student

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Bowman, Thomas G.; Dodge, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Professional socialization is a key process in the professional development of athletic training students. Literature has focused on many perspectives regarding socialization and has primarily focused on the undergraduate level. Objective: Gain insights from the program director at professional master's (PM) athletic training programs on…

  19. Athletic Training Student Socialization Part II: Socializing the Professional Master's Athletic Training Student

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Bowman, Thomas G.; Dodge, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Professional socialization is a key process in the professional development of athletic training students. Literature has focused on many perspectives regarding socialization and has primarily focused on the undergraduate level. Objective: Gain insights from the program director at professional master's (PM) athletic training programs on…

  20. Athletic Training Student Socialization Part I: Socializing Students in Undergraduate Athletic Training Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Bowman, Thomas G.; Dodge, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Professional socialization is a key process in the professional development of athletic training students. The published athletic training education research has focused on many perspectives regarding socialization; however, it has yet to investigate the program director's (PD's) opinion. Objective: To gain insights from the PD on methods…

  1. Program Director Perspectives on Athletic Training Student Motivation to Complete Their Professional Athletic Training Degrees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Bowman, Thomas G.; Dodge, Thomas M.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Student motivation has been linked to persistence until graduation for athletic training students. There is little research, however on ways athletic training programs (ATPs) foster student motivation. Objective: To expand upon the existing literature regarding retention of students in ATPs, specifically examining the concept of student…

  2. Program Director Perspectives on Athletic Training Student Motivation to Complete Their Professional Athletic Training Degrees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Bowman, Thomas G.; Dodge, Thomas M.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Student motivation has been linked to persistence until graduation for athletic training students. There is little research, however on ways athletic training programs (ATPs) foster student motivation. Objective: To expand upon the existing literature regarding retention of students in ATPs, specifically examining the concept of student…

  3. The 3-I Career Advising Process and Athletes with Foreclosed Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menke, Donna J.

    2015-01-01

    Student-athletes who identify more strongly with their athletic role than their academic life may neither encounter nor embrace the chance to explore career options. Their lack of exposure or interest to career advising may compound career immaturity and development. Gordon's (2006) 3-I (inquire, inform, integrate) decision-making process applied…

  4. Career Maturity and Foreclosure in Student Athletes, Fine Arts Students, and General College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linnemeyer, Rachel McQuown; Brown, Chris

    2010-01-01

    Three groups of undergraduate students, fine arts students (n = 121), general college students (n = 104), and student athletes (n = 101), were compared on career maturity attitudes, identity foreclosure, and career foreclosure. Findings indicated that student athletes, but not fine arts students, scored lower on career maturity as compared to…

  5. African American Student Athletes' Perceptions of Career Transition in Sport: A Qualitative and Visual Elicitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, C. Keith; Lawrence, Suzanne Malia

    2003-01-01

    This study focuses on 26 African American athletes and explores their perceptions of athletic career transition. Participants consisted of student athletes from a United States National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division IIA institution in the Southeastern region. Participants completed the Life After Sports Scale (LASS), a 58-item…

  6. Motivation towards dual career of European student-athletes.

    PubMed

    Lupo, Corrado; Guidotti, Flavia; Goncalves, Carlos E; Moreira, Liliana; Doupona Topic, Mojca; Bellardini, Helena; Tonkonogi, Michail; Colin, Allen; Capranica, Laura

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate motivations for the dual career of European student-athletes living in countries providing different educational services for elite athletes: State-centric regulation-State as sponsor/facilitator (State), National Sporting Federations/Institutes as intermediary (Federation) and Laisser Faire, no formal structures (No Structure). Therefore, the European Student-athletes' Motivation towards Sports and Academics Questionnaire (SAMSAQ-EU) was administered to 524 European student-athletes. Exploratory Factor Analysis, and Confirmatory Factor Analysis were applied to test the factor structure, and the reliability and validity of the SAMSAQ-EU, respectively. A multivariate approach was applied to verify subgroup effects (P ≤ 0.05) according to gender (i.e., female and male), age (i.e., ≤ 24 years, > 24 years), type of sport (i.e., individual sport and team sport) and competition level (i.e., national and international). Insufficient confirmatory indexes were reported for the whole European student-athlete group, whereas distinct three factor models [i.e., Student Athletic Motivation (SAM); Academic Motivation (AM); Career Athletic Motivation (CAM)] emerged, with acceptable reliability estimates, for State (SAM = 0.82; AM = 0.75; and CAM = 0.75), Federation (SAM = 0.82; AM = 0.66; and CAM = 0.87) and No Structure (SAM = 0.78; AM = 0.74; and CAM = 0.79) subgroups. Differences between subgroups were found only for competition level (P < 0.001) in relation to SAM (P = 0.001) and CAM (P < 0.001). For SAM, the highest and lowest values emerged for Federation (national, 5.1 ± 0.5; international, 5.4 ± 0.5) and State (national, 4.5 ± 0.9; international, 4.8 ± 0.7). The opposite picture emerged for CAM (Federation: national, 3.3 ± 0.7; international, 3.5 ± 0.9; State: national, 5.0 ± 0.8; international, 5.0 ± 0.9). Therefore, despite SAMSAQ-EU demonstrated to be a useful tool, results showed that European student-athletes

  7. Mapping the literature of athletic training.

    PubMed

    Delwiche, Frances A; Hall, Ellen F

    2007-04-01

    This paper identifies the core literature of athletic training and determines which major databases provide the most thorough intellectual access to this literature. This study collected all cited references from 2002 to 2004 of three journals widely read by those in the athletic training field. Bradford's Law of Scattering was applied to the resulting list to determine the core journal titles in the discipline. Three major databases were reviewed for extent of their coverage of these core journals. Of the total 8,678 citations, one-third referenced a compact group of 6 journals; another third of the citations referenced an additional 40 titles. The remaining 2,837 citations were scattered across 1,034 additional journal titles. The number and scatter of citations over a three-year period identified forty-six key journals in athletic training. The study results can inform athletic trainers of the core literature in their field, encourage database producers (e.g., MEDLINE, SPORTDiscus, CINAHL) to increase coverage of titles that are not indexed or underindexed, and guide purchasing decisions for libraries serving athletic training programs.

  8. Mapping the literature of athletic training

    PubMed Central

    Delwiche, Frances A.; Hall, Ellen F.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This paper identifies the core literature of athletic training and determines which major databases provide the most thorough intellectual access to this literature. Methods: This study collected all cited references from 2002 to 2004 of three journals widely read by those in the athletic training field. Bradford's Law of Scattering was applied to the resulting list to determine the core journal titles in the discipline. Three major databases were reviewed for extent of their coverage of these core journals. Results: Of the total 8,678 citations, one-third referenced a compact group of 6 journals; another third of the citations referenced an additional 40 titles. The remaining 2,837 citations were scattered across 1,034 additional journal titles. Conclusions: The number and scatter of citations over a three-year period identified forty-six key journals in athletic training. The study results can inform athletic trainers of the core literature in their field, encourage database producers (e.g., MEDLINE, SPORTDiscus, CINAHL) to increase coverage of titles that are not indexed or underindexed, and guide purchasing decisions for libraries serving athletic training programs. PMID:17443253

  9. Performance changes during a college playing career in NCAA division III football athletes.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Jay R; Ratamess, Nicholas A; Kang, Jie

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare anthropometric and athletic performance variables during the playing career of NCAA Division III college football players. Two hundred and eighty-nine college football players were assessed for height, body mass, body composition, 1-repetition-maximum (1RM) bench press, 1RM squat, vertical jump height (VJ), vertical jump peak, and vertical jump mean (VJMP) power, 40-yd sprint speed (40S), agility, and line drill (LD) over an 8-year period. All testing occurred at the beginning of summer training camp in each of the seasons studied. Data from all years of testing were combined. Players in their fourth and fifth (red-shirt year) seasons of competition were significantly (p < 0.05) heavier than first-year players. Significant increases in strength were seen during the course of the athletes' collegiate career (31.0% improvement in the 1RM bench press and 36.0% increase in squat strength). The VJ was significantly greater during the fourth year of competition compared to in the previous 3 years of play. Vertical jump peak and VJMP were significantly elevated from years 1 and 2 and were significantly higher during year 4 than during any previous season of competition. No significant changes in 40S or LD time were seen during the athletes playing career. Fatigue rate for the LD (fastest time/slowest time of 3 LD) significantly improved from the first (83.4 ± 6.4%) to second season (85.1 ± 6.5%) of competition. Fatigue rates in the fourth (88.3 ± 4.8%) and fifth (91.2 ± 5.2%) seasons were significantly greater than in any previous season. Strength and power performance improvements appear to occur throughout the football playing career of NCAA Division III athletes. However, the ability to significantly improve speed and agility may be limited.

  10. Environmental Education Training and Career Development,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-04-24

    This Instruction implement policy, assigns responsibilities, and prescribes procedures to ensure effective and efficient environmental education , training, and career development programs for DoD personnel.

  11. Somatotype, training and performance in Ironman athletes.

    PubMed

    Kandel, Michel; Baeyens, Jean Pierre; Clarys, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the physiques of Ironman athletes and the relationship between Ironman's performance, training and somatotype. A total of 165 male and 22 female competitors of the Ironman Switzerland volunteered in this study. Ten anthropometric dimensions were measured, and 12 training and history variables were recorded with a questionnaire. The variables were compared with the race performance. The somatotype was a strong predictor of Ironman performance (R=0.535; R(2)=0.286; sign. p<0.001) in male athletes. The endomorphy component was the most substantial predictor. Reductions in endomorphy by one standard deviation as well as an increased ectomorphy value by one standard deviation lead to significant and substantial improvement in Ironman performance (28.1 and 29.8 minutes, respectively). An ideal somatotype of 1.7-4.9-2.8 could be established. Age and quantitative training effort were not significant predictors on Ironman performance. In female athletes, no relationship between somatotype, training and performance was found. The somatotype of a male athlete defines for 28.6% variance in Ironman performance. Athletes not having an ideal somatotype of 1.7-4.9-2.8 could improve their performance by altering their somatotype. Lower rates in endomorphy, as well as higher rates in ectomorphy, resulted in a significant better race performance. The impact of somatotype was the most distinguished on the run discipline and had a much greater impact on the total race time than the quantitative training effort. These findings could not be found in female athletes.

  12. Aligning Athletes' Career Choices and Graduate Degree Pathways: Implications for 21st-Century Career Development Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haslerig, Siduri J.; Navarro, Kristina M.

    2016-01-01

    Higher education career development professionals are charged with more than understanding the challenges and needs of a diverse student body, and they must also prepare students for career fields in life after higher education. This empirical study explored the graduate degree choices and career aspirations of 14 college athletes who competed in…

  13. Aligning Athletes' Career Choices and Graduate Degree Pathways: Implications for 21st-Century Career Development Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haslerig, Siduri J.; Navarro, Kristina M.

    2016-01-01

    Higher education career development professionals are charged with more than understanding the challenges and needs of a diverse student body, and they must also prepare students for career fields in life after higher education. This empirical study explored the graduate degree choices and career aspirations of 14 college athletes who competed in…

  14. Self Reported Perceptions of Physical Demands on Athletic Training Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kawaguchi, Jeffrey K.; Babcock, Garth; Little, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Context: According to the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE) Standards for the Accreditation of Entry-Level Athletic Training Education Programs, athletic training students (ATSs) must complete clinical experiences that provide opportunities to integrate cognitive function, psychomotor skills, and affective…

  15. Characteristics of Athletic Training Students That Preceptors Find Desirable

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, W. David; Thomas, Spencer; Paulsen, Jenica; Chiu, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Context: Athletic training students acquire clinical hours under the direct supervision of athletic training preceptors. Objective: The purpose of this project was to explore what characteristics preceptors desire in their athletic training students. Design and Setting: Online survey instrument. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 286…

  16. Self Reported Perceptions of Physical Demands on Athletic Training Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kawaguchi, Jeffrey K.; Babcock, Garth; Little, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Context: According to the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE) Standards for the Accreditation of Entry-Level Athletic Training Education Programs, athletic training students (ATSs) must complete clinical experiences that provide opportunities to integrate cognitive function, psychomotor skills, and affective…

  17. Characteristics of Athletic Training Students That Preceptors Find Desirable

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, W. David; Thomas, Spencer; Paulsen, Jenica; Chiu, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Context: Athletic training students acquire clinical hours under the direct supervision of athletic training preceptors. Objective: The purpose of this project was to explore what characteristics preceptors desire in their athletic training students. Design and Setting: Online survey instrument. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 286…

  18. The Athletic Health Care and Training Program

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Stephen G.; Schlotfeldt, John D.; Foley, Wayne E.

    1985-01-01

    The Athletic Health Care and Training Program was developed to meet the educational, organizational and record-keeping needs of the interscholastic athletic program of the Seattle Public Schools. The program components were the education of coaches, school nurses and student trainers; development of a centralized training room; implementation of written procedures, and establishment of a record-keeping system. At the end of the three-year study period, schools involved in the program were better prepared to handle emergencies than were control schools. Schools involved in the program were found to have an injury-recognition rate comparable to that previously reported for high schools that had athletic trainers, a rate substantially higher than that in the control schools. The experimental schools were judged to have managed these injuries satisfactorily 95% of the time, compared with a satisfactory management rate of 14% for the control schools. PMID:3993012

  19. Situational Supervision for Athletic Training Clinical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Linda S.; Gardner, Greg; Barnum, Mary G.; Willeford, K. Sean; Sexton, Patrick; Guyer, M. Susan; Fincher, A. Louise

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: The medical education model provides the basis for athletic training students to learn theoretical and practical skills. Clinical rotations are completed where they apply what they have learned under the direct supervision of a clinical instructor (CI) or approved clinical instructor (ACI). Approved clinical instructors are taught…

  20. Where Should Athletic Training Programs Be Housed?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eaves, Ted

    2010-01-01

    Context: Where a professional athletic training education program (ATEP) should be housed within a college/university has been a topic of discussion for many years. While individual institutions have unique preferences and priorities that suit its specific situation, it is essential that the field as a whole develops a consistent and cohesive…

  1. Situational Supervision for Athletic Training Clinical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Linda S.; Gardner, Greg; Barnum, Mary G.; Willeford, K. Sean; Sexton, Patrick; Guyer, M. Susan; Fincher, A. Louise

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: The medical education model provides the basis for athletic training students to learn theoretical and practical skills. Clinical rotations are completed where they apply what they have learned under the direct supervision of a clinical instructor (CI) or approved clinical instructor (ACI). Approved clinical instructors are taught…

  2. Interprofessional Education and Practice in Athletic Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breitbach, Anthony P.; Richardson, Russ

    2015-01-01

    Professional preparation in athletic training has grown from modest roots based in physical education in the 1960s to its emergence as a recognized health profession today. The profession has long embraced interprofessional practice (IPP), but many times has not been included in discussions held at the institutional, governmental, and…

  3. Incorporating Mobile Learning into Athletic Training Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davie, Emily

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To introduce and present techniques for incorporating mobile learning into athletic training education. Background: The matriculation of digital natives into college has stimulated the identification and development of new teaching and learning strategies. Electronic learning (e-learning), including the use of learning management…

  4. Interprofessional Education and Practice in Athletic Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breitbach, Anthony P.; Richardson, Russ

    2015-01-01

    Professional preparation in athletic training has grown from modest roots based in physical education in the 1960s to its emergence as a recognized health profession today. The profession has long embraced interprofessional practice (IPP), but many times has not been included in discussions held at the institutional, governmental, and…

  5. Incorporating Mobile Learning into Athletic Training Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davie, Emily

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To introduce and present techniques for incorporating mobile learning into athletic training education. Background: The matriculation of digital natives into college has stimulated the identification and development of new teaching and learning strategies. Electronic learning (e-learning), including the use of learning management…

  6. Academic Support Services and Career Decision-Making Self-Efficacy in Student Athletes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Gary N.; Jasinski, Dale; Dunn, Steve; Fletcher, Duncan

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between evaluations of academic support services and student athletes' career decision-making self-efficacy. One hundred and fifty-eight NCAA athletes (68% male) from 11 Division I teams completed measures of satisfaction with their academic support services, career decision-making self-efficacy, general…

  7. Academic Support Services and Career Decision-Making Self-Efficacy in Student Athletes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Gary N.; Jasinski, Dale; Dunn, Steve; Fletcher, Duncan

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between evaluations of academic support services and student athletes' career decision-making self-efficacy. One hundred and fifty-eight NCAA athletes (68% male) from 11 Division I teams completed measures of satisfaction with their academic support services, career decision-making self-efficacy, general…

  8. Qualitative Research Applications in Athletic Training

    PubMed Central

    Pitney, William A.; Parker, Jenny

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To explain the ethnographic, phenomenologic, and grounded theory approaches to qualitative research and to describe how these approaches can be applied to contemporary topics related to athletic training education. Background: Athletic training education has recently experienced an increase in the use of qualitative methods, and various qualitative approaches are viable for answering many questions related to athletic training education. Ethnography focuses on describing a culture or subculture. Phenomenology focuses on the meaning of lived human experience. Grounded theory focuses on developing theory related to social processes. Each approach is contextual and attempts to facilitate insight and understanding related to the human condition. Description: We provide an in-depth discussion of each of the selected qualitative approaches and explain the focus and unique data-collection and data-analysis strategies and identify the distinctive outcomes of each approach. Each research approach has a distinct purpose, and the specific application is driven by the questions asked. We also identify questions that are amenable to a specific method. Applications: To better understand the interactive nature of education and learning, athletic training researchers are beginning to ask questions that require information to be gathered about meaning, contexts, culture, and processes. Such questions are best answered through the use of qualitative research methods that most commonly include ethnography, phenomenology, and grounded theory. In order for athletic training professionals to gain the most from the research conducted, it is essential that they have an understanding of the theoretic underpinnings of these methods and when each should be used. PMID:12937540

  9. BALANCE TRAINING FOR THE OLDER ATHLETE

    PubMed Central

    Page, Phil; Takeshima, Nobuo

    2013-01-01

    As the older adult population increases in size, the number of older adults participating in sport activities will also likely increase proportionally with a concomitant increase in musculoskeletal injuries. Age-associated functional declines in muscle strength and the sensory systems, in addition to several other issues, contribute to reductions in balance that may increase fall risk There are a variety of ways to evaluate balance and fall-risk, and each older adult should be regularly screened in order to evaluate any changes in the ability to maintain postural stability. Balance training is a useful intervention in rehabilitation of postural stability impairments as well as in training programs for performance enhancement. One scientifically-based approach is Sensorimotor Training (SMT) which can be characterized as a progressive balance training program using labile surfaces to provide adequate and safe challenges to the older athlete's balance. SMT addresses both static and dynamic components of balance as well as the multitude of systems that control balance in order to train effective strategies and elicit automatic postural responses in order to enhance postural stability. The authors believe that SMT should become part of the regular training regimen for the aging athlete. For the sport and orthopedic healthcare professional, an understanding of the physiologic changes that occur with age, the means by which balance can be assessed, and how SMT programs can be developed and implemented is crucial in addressing the growing number of older athletes that they will see. Level of Evidence: 5 PMID:24175135

  10. College and Career Counseling Training Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), 2014

    2014-01-01

    The Southern Regional Education Board's (SREB) College and Career Counseling Training Initiative works to increase the knowledge and skills of counselors who advise students on their postsecondary aspirations. Membership in the initiative provides access to Strategies in College and Career Counseling, a series of online training modules that can…

  11. College and Career Counseling Training Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), 2014

    2014-01-01

    The Southern Regional Education Board's (SREB) College and Career Counseling Training Initiative works to increase the knowledge and skills of counselors who advise students on their postsecondary aspirations. Membership in the initiative provides access to Strategies in College and Career Counseling, a series of online training modules that can…

  12. Athletic Trainers' Perceptions of the Importance, Preparation and Time Spent in the Athletic Training Content Areas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donahue, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Context: Graduates of professional programs accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education are expected to be competent and proficient in the athletic training content areas. Objective: The unique skills and knowledge that an athletic trainer (AT) must possess may have more importance in one clinical setting than in…

  13. Athletic Trainers' Perceptions of the Importance, Preparation and Time Spent in the Athletic Training Content Areas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donahue, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Context: Graduates of professional programs accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education are expected to be competent and proficient in the athletic training content areas. Objective: The unique skills and knowledge that an athletic trainer (AT) must possess may have more importance in one clinical setting than in…

  14. Undergraduate Athletic Training Education Program Directors' Perceptions of the Nature of Coupling with Intercollegiate Athletic Departments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roiger, Trevor

    2009-01-01

    Some research exists relative to the personnel relationship between athletic training education programs (ATEPs) and intercollegiate athletic departments, yet little research has examined program directors' general perceptions of coupling or coupling related to the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE) standards of…

  15. Career Decision Making for Young Elite Athletes: Are We Ahead on Points?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albion, Majella J.; Fogarty, Gerard J.

    2005-01-01

    A comparison is made between the career decision making of secondary school students who are also elite athletes and a sample of non-athlete students. The 226 athletes (111 females, 115 males) in the study were on sporting scholarships with the Australian Institute of Sport or state/territory institutions. Measures used included the "Career…

  16. Teacher Certification Among Athletic Training Students

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Neil

    1995-01-01

    Researchers have reported that athletic training students who earn teacher certification enhance their job marketability. The purpose of this study was to determine the number of athletic training students who pursue teacher certification. A survey was mailed to the directors of the 78 NATA undergraduate programs in 1992. Data from the returned surveys showed that 177 of the 703 expected graduates in 1992 and 148 of the 640 graduates in 1991 pursued teacher certification. The most common teacher certification subject area was Physical Education, followed by Health, and Science or Biology. These students should expect to take an additional 1.6 semesters (range 0 to 4) to complete teacher certification requirements. Program directors cited increased job opportunities as the main advantage, and increased time in school and financial burden as the main disadvantages of pursuing teacher certification. Although the potential for high school jobs seems enormous, there is little indication that high schools are increasingly hiring athletic trainers. Formal counseling and advising for athletic training students regarding teacher certification and job opportunities should occur in the first year of study. Additional research should assess the job market. Imagesp350-a PMID:16558362

  17. Teacher certification among athletic training students.

    PubMed

    Curtis, N

    1995-10-01

    Researchers have reported that athletic training students who earn teacher certification enhance their job marketability. The purpose of this study was to determine the number of athletic training students who pursue teacher certification. A survey was mailed to the directors of the 78 NATA undergraduate programs in 1992. Data from the returned surveys showed that 177 of the 703 expected graduates in 1992 and 148 of the 640 graduates in 1991 pursued teacher certification. The most common teacher certification subject area was Physical Education, followed by Health, and Science or Biology. These students should expect to take an additional 1.6 semesters (range 0 to 4) to complete teacher certification requirements. Program directors cited increased job opportunities as the main advantage, and increased time in school and financial burden as the main disadvantages of pursuing teacher certification. Although the potential for high school jobs seems enormous, there is little indication that high schools are increasingly hiring athletic trainers. Formal counseling and advising for athletic training students regarding teacher certification and job opportunities should occur in the first year of study. Additional research should assess the job market.

  18. Athletic Training Clinical Instructors as Situational Leaders.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Linda Platt

    2002-12-01

    OBJECTIVE: To present Situational Leadership as a model that can be implemented by clinical instructors during clinical education. Effective leadership occurs when the leadership style is matched with the observed followers' characteristics. Effective leaders anticipate and assess change and adapt quickly and grow with the change, all while leading followers to do the same. As athletic training students' levels of readiness change, clinical instructors also need to transform their leadership styles and strategies to match the students' ever-changing observed needs in different situations. DATA SOURCES: CINAHL (1982-2002), MEDLINE (1990-2001), SPORT Discus (1949-2002), ERIC (1966-2002), and Internet Web sites were searched. Search terms included leadership, situational leadership, clinical instructors and leadership, teachers as leaders, and clinical education. DATA SYNTHESIS: Situational Leadership is presented as a leadership model to be used by clinical instructors while teaching and supervising athletic training students in the clinical setting. This model can be implemented to improve the clinical-education process. Situational leaders, eg, clinical instructors, must have the flexibility and range of skills to vary their leadership styles to match the challenges that occur while teaching athletic training students. CONCLUSIONS/RECOMMENDATIONS: This leadership style causes the leader to carry a substantial responsibility to lead while giving power away. Communication is one of the most important leadership skills to develop to become an effective leader. It is imperative for the future of the profession that certified athletic trainers continue to develop effective leadership skills to address the changing times in education and expectations of the athletic training profession.

  19. Athletic Training Clinical Instructors as Situational Leaders

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Linda Platt

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To present Situational Leadership as a model that can be implemented by clinical instructors during clinical education. Effective leadership occurs when the leadership style is matched with the observed followers' characteristics. Effective leaders anticipate and assess change and adapt quickly and grow with the change, all while leading followers to do the same. As athletic training students' levels of readiness change, clinical instructors also need to transform their leadership styles and strategies to match the students' ever-changing observed needs in different situations. Data Sources: CINAHL (1982–2002), MEDLINE (1990–2001), SPORT Discus (1949–2002), ERIC (1966–2002), and Internet Web sites were searched. Search terms included leadership, situational leadership, clinical instructors and leadership, teachers as leaders, and clinical education. Data Synthesis: Situational Leadership is presented as a leadership model to be used by clinical instructors while teaching and supervising athletic training students in the clinical setting. This model can be implemented to improve the clinical-education process. Situational leaders, eg, clinical instructors, must have the flexibility and range of skills to vary their leadership styles to match the challenges that occur while teaching athletic training students. Conclusions/Recommendations: This leadership style causes the leader to carry a substantial responsibility to lead while giving power away. Communication is one of the most important leadership skills to develop to become an effective leader. It is imperative for the future of the profession that certified athletic trainers continue to develop effective leadership skills to address the changing times in education and expectations of the athletic training profession. PMID:12937555

  20. Strength Training. A Key to Athletic Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whiteside, Patricia W.

    Characteristics of an effective strength training program are analyzed and descriptions are offered of different kinds of weight training activities. Comparisons are made between concentric, isometric, eccentric, and isokinetic training methods. The fundamentals and techniques of an exemplary training program are outlined and the organization and…

  1. Strength Training. A Key to Athletic Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whiteside, Patricia W.

    Characteristics of an effective strength training program are analyzed and descriptions are offered of different kinds of weight training activities. Comparisons are made between concentric, isometric, eccentric, and isokinetic training methods. The fundamentals and techniques of an exemplary training program are outlined and the organization and…

  2. Self-Directed Learning and the Millennial Athletic Training Student

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Brian J.; Berry, David C.

    2011-01-01

    Athletic training educators (ATEs) have a responsibility to remain aware of the current student population, particularly how they learn and give meaning to what they have learned. Just as clinical athletic trainers (ATs) must adapt to ever changing work schedules and demands, so too must athletic training educators. In addition to adapting to…

  3. Athletic Training: From Physical Education to Allied Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perrin, David H.

    2007-01-01

    Athletic training was spawned from physical education in the 1960s, and since that time has evolved into a recognized health care profession. The majority of accredited athletic training education programs (ATEPs) are housed within academic units of kinesiology. However, the National Athletic Trainers' Association (NATA) has recommended that ATEPs…

  4. Self-Directed Learning and the Millennial Athletic Training Student

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Brian J.; Berry, David C.

    2011-01-01

    Athletic training educators (ATEs) have a responsibility to remain aware of the current student population, particularly how they learn and give meaning to what they have learned. Just as clinical athletic trainers (ATs) must adapt to ever changing work schedules and demands, so too must athletic training educators. In addition to adapting to…

  5. Strength Training for Young Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraemer, William J.; Fleck, Steven J.

    This guide is designed to serve as a resource for developing strength training programs for children. Chapter 1 uses research findings to explain why strength training is appropriate for children. Chapter 2 explains some of the important physiological concepts involved in children's growth and development as they apply to developing strength…

  6. Strength Training for Young Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraemer, William J.; Fleck, Steven J.

    This guide is designed to serve as a resource for developing strength training programs for children. Chapter 1 uses research findings to explain why strength training is appropriate for children. Chapter 2 explains some of the important physiological concepts involved in children's growth and development as they apply to developing strength…

  7. Career and Family Aspirations of Female Athletic Trainers Employed in the National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I Setting

    PubMed Central

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Eason, Christianne M.; Ferraro, Elizabeth M.; Goodman, Ashley

    2015-01-01

    Context: Female athletic trainers (ATs) tend to depart the profession of athletic training after the age of 30. Factors influencing departure are theoretical. Professional demands, particularly at the collegiate level, have also been at the forefront of anecdotal discussion on departure factors. Objective: To understand the career and family intentions of female ATs employed in the collegiate setting. Design: Qualitative study. Setting: National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I. Patients or Other Participants: Twenty-seven female ATs (single = 14, married with no children = 6, married with children = 7) employed in the National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I setting. Data Collection and Analysis: All female ATs responded to a series of open-ended questions via reflective journaling. Data were analyzed via a general inductive approach. Trustworthiness was established by peer review, member interpretive review, and multiple-analyst triangulation. Results: Our participants indicated a strong desire to focus on family or to start a family as part of their personal aspirations. Professionally, many female ATs were unsure of their longevity within the Division I collegiate setting or even the profession itself, with 2 main themes emerging as factors influencing decisions to depart: family planning persistence and family planning departure. Six female ATs planned to depart the profession entirely because of conflicts with motherhood and the role of the AT. Only 3 female ATs indicated a professional goal of persisting at the Division I setting regardless of their family or marital status, citing their ability to maintain work-life balance because of support networks. The remaining 17 female ATs planned to make a setting change to balance the roles of motherhood and AT because the Division I setting was not conducive to parenting. Conclusions: Our results substantiate those of previous researchers, which indicate the Division I setting can be

  8. Career and family aspirations of female athletic trainers employed in the National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I setting.

    PubMed

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M; Eason, Christianne M; Ferraro, Elizabeth M; Goodman, Ashley

    2015-02-01

    Female athletic trainers (ATs) tend to depart the profession of athletic training after the age of 30. Factors influencing departure are theoretical. Professional demands, particularly at the collegiate level, have also been at the forefront of anecdotal discussion on departure factors. To understand the career and family intentions of female ATs employed in the collegiate setting. Qualitative study. National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I. Twenty-seven female ATs (single = 14, married with no children = 6, married with children = 7) employed in the National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I setting. All female ATs responded to a series of open-ended questions via reflective journaling. Data were analyzed via a general inductive approach. Trustworthiness was established by peer review, member interpretive review, and multiple-analyst triangulation. Our participants indicated a strong desire to focus on family or to start a family as part of their personal aspirations. Professionally, many female ATs were unsure of their longevity within the Division I collegiate setting or even the profession itself, with 2 main themes emerging as factors influencing decisions to depart: family planning persistence and family planning departure. Six female ATs planned to depart the profession entirely because of conflicts with motherhood and the role of the AT. Only 3 female ATs indicated a professional goal of persisting at the Division I setting regardless of their family or marital status, citing their ability to maintain work-life balance because of support networks. The remaining 17 female ATs planned to make a setting change to balance the roles of motherhood and AT because the Division I setting was not conducive to parenting. Our results substantiate those of previous researchers, which indicate the Division I setting can be problematic for female ATs and stimulate departure from the setting and even the profession.

  9. Accreditation and continuous quality improvement in athletic training education.

    PubMed

    Peer, K S; Rakich, J S

    2000-04-01

    To apply the continuous quality improvement model commonly associated with the business sector to entrylevel athletic training education program accreditation. We applied athletic training educational program accreditation as a tool for ensuring quality in the entrylevel athletic training education programs accredited by the Commission on the Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs. Literature from the business, education, and athletic training fields is integrated to support this paradigm shift in athletic training education. The advent of mandated entry-level athletic training educational program accreditation has forced institutions to evaluate their educational programs. Accreditation will promote continuous quality improvement in athletic training education through mechanisms such as control measures and process improvement. Although accreditation of entry-level athletic training education programs has created some dissonance among athletic training professionals, it will strengthen the profession as a whole. Athletic training educators must capture the synergy generated from this change to ensure quality educational experiences for all our students as we move forward to secure a strong position in the allied health care market.

  10. Accreditation and Continuous Quality Improvement In Athletic Training Education

    PubMed Central

    Peer, Kimberly S.; Rakich, Jonathon S.

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To apply the continuous quality improvement model commonly associated with the business sector to entrylevel athletic training education program accreditation. Data Sources: We applied athletic training educational program accreditation as a tool for ensuring quality in the entrylevel athletic training education programs accredited by the Commission on the Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs. Literature from the business, education, and athletic training fields is integrated to support this paradigm shift in athletic training education. Data Synthesis: The advent of mandated entry-level athletic training educational program accreditation has forced institutions to evaluate their educational programs. Accreditation will promote continuous quality improvement in athletic training education through mechanisms such as control measures and process improvement. Conclusions/Recommendations: Although accreditation of entry-level athletic training education programs has created some dissonance among athletic training professionals, it will strengthen the profession as a whole. Athletic training educators must capture the synergy generated from this change to ensure quality educational experiences for all our students as we move forward to secure a strong position in the allied health care market. PMID:16558629

  11. Job Search and Employment-Related Issues in Athletic Training Education Programs

    PubMed Central

    Stilger, Vincent G.; Meador, Randy; Tsuchiya, Makoto

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the amount of classroom instruction appropriated for employment-related issues and how career service centers were used by students in National Athletic Trainers' Association (NATA)-approved/Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP)-accredited undergraduate athletic training curriculums. Design and Setting: We developed a job placement survey and mailed it to subjects. The study was conducted through the School of Physical Education at West Virginia University. Subjects: The subjects were all undergraduate athletic training curriculum directors employed in an NATA-approved or CAAHEP-accredited program. Measurements: We developed a survey instrument based on our experiences with instructional and educational issues in athletic training. The survey instrument consisted of items that investigated the amount of classroom time and education devoted to different aspects of preparing athletic training students for the job market. Results: A total of 74 surveys were returned, for an 88% return rate. Eighty-six percent of the curriculum directors spent an average of 116 minutes (mean = 116 ± 142.09; range, 5 to 780) instructing students about employment issues. Curriculum directors spent 63 minutes (mean = 63 ± 47.86; range, 10 to 270) instructing students on how to develop a résumé. Most curriculum directors (74%) spent time with students discussing how to prepare for an interview (mean = 51 ± 47.07 minutes; range, 1 to 270). Nearly all curriculum directors (97%) responded that students learned about recognizing allied health postgraduate career options other than athletic training. College or university career service centers were available to 96% of students, but only 53% sought instructional assistance from them. Curriculum directors spent an average of 38 ± 49.31 minutes (range, 15 to 120) discussing programs available at career service centers. Conclusions: Athletic training curriculum directors were

  12. Self-Funding a Postprofessional Athletic Training Residency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wetherington, Jefferson J.; Pecha, Forrest Q.; Homaechevarria, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    Context: Postprofessional athletic training residencies (PP-ATRs) are formal educational programs that provide advanced professional preparation for an athletic trainer. These programs are intended to provide clinical and didactic education in a focused area of clinical practice. Identifying and procuring funding to support athletic training…

  13. Self-Funding a Postprofessional Athletic Training Residency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wetherington, Jefferson J.; Pecha, Forrest Q.; Homaechevarria, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    Context: Postprofessional athletic training residencies (PP-ATRs) are formal educational programs that provide advanced professional preparation for an athletic trainer. These programs are intended to provide clinical and didactic education in a focused area of clinical practice. Identifying and procuring funding to support athletic training…

  14. Sociocultural Learning Theory in Practice: Implications for Athletic Training Educators.

    PubMed

    Peer, Kimberly S; McClendon, Ronald C

    2002-12-01

    OBJECTIVE: To discuss cognitive and sociocultural learning theory literature related to athletic training instructional and evaluation strategies while providing support for the application of these practices in the didactic and clinical components of athletic training education programs. DATA SOURCES: We searched Educational Resources Information Center (ERIC) and Education Abstracts from 1975-2001 using the key words social cognitive, sociocultural learning theory, constructivism, and athletic training education. Current literature in the fields of educational psychology and athletic training education provides the foundation for applying theory to practice with specific emphasis on the theoretic framework and application of sociocultural learning theory strategies in athletic training education. DATA SYNTHESIS: Athletic training educators must have a strong fundamental knowledge of learning theory and a commitment to incorporate theory into educational practice. We integrate literature from both fields to generate practical strategies for using sociocultural learning theory in athletic training education. CONCLUSIONS/RECOMMENDATIONS: Social cognitive and sociocultural learning theory advocates a constructive, self-regulated, and goal-oriented environment with the student at the center of the educational process. Although a shift exists in athletic training education toward more active instructional strategies with the implementation of competency-based education, many educational environments are still dominated by traditional didactic instructional methods promoting student passivity. As athletic training education programs strive to increase accountability, educators in the field must critically analyze teaching and evaluation methods and integrate new material to ensure that learning is maximized.

  15. Sociocultural Learning Theory in Practice: Implications for Athletic Training Educators

    PubMed Central

    Peer, Kimberly S.; McClendon, Ronald C.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To discuss cognitive and sociocultural learning theory literature related to athletic training instructional and evaluation strategies while providing support for the application of these practices in the didactic and clinical components of athletic training education programs. Data Sources: We searched Educational Resources Information Center (ERIC) and Education Abstracts from 1975–2001 using the key words social cognitive, sociocultural learning theory, constructivism, and athletic training education. Current literature in the fields of educational psychology and athletic training education provides the foundation for applying theory to practice with specific emphasis on the theoretic framework and application of sociocultural learning theory strategies in athletic training education. Data Synthesis: Athletic training educators must have a strong fundamental knowledge of learning theory and a commitment to incorporate theory into educational practice. We integrate literature from both fields to generate practical strategies for using sociocultural learning theory in athletic training education. Conclusions/Recommendations: Social cognitive and sociocultural learning theory advocates a constructive, self-regulated, and goal-oriented environment with the student at the center of the educational process. Although a shift exists in athletic training education toward more active instructional strategies with the implementation of competency-based education, many educational environments are still dominated by traditional didactic instructional methods promoting student passivity. As athletic training education programs strive to increase accountability, educators in the field must critically analyze teaching and evaluation methods and integrate new material to ensure that learning is maximized. PMID:12937534

  16. Career Experiences and Intentions of Women in Senior Level Intercollegiate Athletic Administration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veraldo, Cynthia Miller

    2013-01-01

    Women are underrepresented in the most senior level administrative positions in intercollegiate athletics. This qualitative study is an analysis of the professional lives of nine women who hold Senior Associate AD positions in Division I intercollegiate athletics. They were interviewed about their career experiences and their intentions to pursue…

  17. Career Experiences and Intentions of Women in Senior Level Intercollegiate Athletic Administration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veraldo, Cynthia Miller

    2013-01-01

    Women are underrepresented in the most senior level administrative positions in intercollegiate athletics. This qualitative study is an analysis of the professional lives of nine women who hold Senior Associate AD positions in Division I intercollegiate athletics. They were interviewed about their career experiences and their intentions to pursue…

  18. Career Pathways of Athletic Directors: Consideration of the Impact of Diversity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, Lenora E.

    2011-01-01

    This study explored career pathways for becoming an athletic director (AD) at National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Divisions I, II, and, III member institutions with consideration of gender and race/ethnicity. The study employed an exploratory, descriptive research design using a quantitative electronic survey tapping a census of all…

  19. Career Pathways of Athletic Directors: Consideration of the Impact of Diversity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, Lenora E.

    2011-01-01

    This study explored career pathways for becoming an athletic director (AD) at National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Divisions I, II, and, III member institutions with consideration of gender and race/ethnicity. The study employed an exploratory, descriptive research design using a quantitative electronic survey tapping a census of all…

  20. Strength training for athletes: does it really help sports performance?

    PubMed

    McGuigan, Michael R; Wright, Glenn A; Fleck, Steven J

    2012-03-01

    The use of strength training designed to increase underlying strength and power qualities in elite athletes in an attempt to improve athletic performance is commonplace. Although the extent to which strength and power are important to sports performance may vary depending on the activity, the associations between these qualities and performance have been well documented in the literature. The purpose of this review is to provide a brief overview of strength training research to determine if it really helps improve athletic performance. While there is a need for more research with elite athletes to investigate the relationship between strength training and athletic performance, there is sufficient evidence for strength training programs to continue to be an integral part of athletic preparation in team sports.

  1. Effectiveness of Mobile Learning on Athletic Training Psychomotor Skill Acquisition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davie, Emily; Martin, Malissa; Cuppett, Micki; Lebsack, Denise

    2015-01-01

    Context: Instruction of psychomotor skills is an important component of athletic training education. Accommodating the varied learning abilities and preferences of athletic training students can be challenging for an instructor initiating skill acquisition in a traditional face-to-face (F2F) environment. Video instruction available on mobile…

  2. A Subjective and Objective Process for Athletic Training Student Selection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, Jeremy R.; McLoda, Todd A.; Stanek, Justin M.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Admission decisions are made annually concerning whom to accept into athletic training programs. Objective: To present an approach used to make admissions decisions at an undergraduate athletic training program and to corroborate this information by comparing each aspect to nursing program admission processes. Background: Annually,…

  3. Clinical Reasoning in Athletic Training Education: Modeling Expert Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geisler, Paul R.; Lazenby, Todd W.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To address the need for a more definitive approach to critical thinking during athletic training educational experiences by introducing the clinical reasoning model for critical thinking. Background: Educators are aware of the need to teach students how to think critically. The multiple domains of athletic training are comprehensive and…

  4. A Subjective and Objective Process for Athletic Training Student Selection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, Jeremy R.; McLoda, Todd A.; Stanek, Justin M.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Admission decisions are made annually concerning whom to accept into athletic training programs. Objective: To present an approach used to make admissions decisions at an undergraduate athletic training program and to corroborate this information by comparing each aspect to nursing program admission processes. Background: Annually,…

  5. Educating the Educator: Teaching Airway Adjunct Techniques in Athletic Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, David C.; Seitz, S. Robert

    2011-01-01

    The 5th edition of the "Athletic Training Education Competencies" ("Competencies") now requires athletic training educators (ATEs) to introduce into the curriculum various types of airway adjuncts including: (1) oropharyngeal airways (OPA), (2) nasopharyngeal airways (NPA), (3) supraglottic airways (SGA), and (4) suction. The addition of these…

  6. Clinical Reasoning in Athletic Training Education: Modeling Expert Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geisler, Paul R.; Lazenby, Todd W.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To address the need for a more definitive approach to critical thinking during athletic training educational experiences by introducing the clinical reasoning model for critical thinking. Background: Educators are aware of the need to teach students how to think critically. The multiple domains of athletic training are comprehensive and…

  7. Athletic Training Preceptors' Perceived Learning Needs Regarding Preceptor Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hankemeier, Dorice A.; Kirby, Jessica L.; Walker, Stacy E.; Thrasher, Ashley B.

    2017-01-01

    Context: Athletic training programs can develop their own content and mechanisms for developing preceptors. Ideally, preceptor development sessions should meet the needs of both the educational program and the preceptor; however, there is a gap in the existing literature regarding athletic training preceptors' perceived learning needs. Objective:…

  8. Effectiveness of Mobile Learning on Athletic Training Psychomotor Skill Acquisition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davie, Emily; Martin, Malissa; Cuppett, Micki; Lebsack, Denise

    2015-01-01

    Context: Instruction of psychomotor skills is an important component of athletic training education. Accommodating the varied learning abilities and preferences of athletic training students can be challenging for an instructor initiating skill acquisition in a traditional face-to-face (F2F) environment. Video instruction available on mobile…

  9. The Use of Cloud Technology in Athletic Training Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkey, Dennis

    2012-01-01

    As technology advances and becomes more portable, athletic training educators (ATEs) have many options available to them. Whether attempting to streamline efforts in courses, or operate a more efficient athletic training education program, portable technology is becoming an important tool that will assist the ATE. One tool that allows more…

  10. Retention Initiatives Used by Professional Master's Athletic Training Program Directors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Thomas G.; Dodge, Thomas M.; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Many professional master's athletic training program directors believe retention is a problem facing athletic training education. However, it remains unknown what steps, if any, are taken to improve retention. Objective: To inquire with program directors about their respective methods and interventions aimed at increasing retention rates.…

  11. The Use of Cloud Technology in Athletic Training Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkey, Dennis

    2012-01-01

    As technology advances and becomes more portable, athletic training educators (ATEs) have many options available to them. Whether attempting to streamline efforts in courses, or operate a more efficient athletic training education program, portable technology is becoming an important tool that will assist the ATE. One tool that allows more…

  12. Educating the Educator: Teaching Airway Adjunct Techniques in Athletic Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, David C.; Seitz, S. Robert

    2011-01-01

    The 5th edition of the "Athletic Training Education Competencies" ("Competencies") now requires athletic training educators (ATEs) to introduce into the curriculum various types of airway adjuncts including: (1) oropharyngeal airways (OPA), (2) nasopharyngeal airways (NPA), (3) supraglottic airways (SGA), and (4) suction. The addition of these…

  13. Where Are the Women in Women's Sports? Predictors of Female Athletes' Interest in a Coaching Career

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moran-Miller, Kelli; Flores, Lisa Y.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we used social cognitive career theory (Lent, Brown, & Hackett, 1994) to examine the development of female athletes' career interest in coaching and, specifically, the impact of contextual factors (female coaching role models, working hours, and perceived discrimination) on coaching self-efficacy and outcome expectations.…

  14. Where Are the Women in Women's Sports? Predictors of Female Athletes' Interest in a Coaching Career

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moran-Miller, Kelli; Flores, Lisa Y.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we used social cognitive career theory (Lent, Brown, & Hackett, 1994) to examine the development of female athletes' career interest in coaching and, specifically, the impact of contextual factors (female coaching role models, working hours, and perceived discrimination) on coaching self-efficacy and outcome expectations.…

  15. Physical activity participation and constraints among athletic training students.

    PubMed

    Stanek, Justin; Rogers, Katherine; Anderson, Jordan

    2015-02-01

    Researchers have examined the physical activity (PA) habits of certified athletic trainers; however, none have looked specifically at athletic training students. To assess PA participation and constraints to participation among athletic training students. Cross-sectional study. Entry-level athletic training education programs (undergraduate and graduate) across the United States. Participants were 1125 entry-level athletic training students. Self-reported PA participation, including a calculated PA index based on a typical week. Leisure constraints and demographic data were also collected. Only 22.8% (252/1105) of athletic training students were meeting the American College of Sports Medicine recommendations for PA through moderate-intensity cardiorespiratory exercise. Although 52.3% (580/1105) were meeting the recommendations through vigorous-intensity cardiorespiratory exercise, 60.5% (681/1125) were meeting the recommendations based on the combined total of moderate or vigorous cardiorespiratory exercise. In addition, 57.2% (643/1125) of respondents met the recommendations for resistance exercise. Exercise habits of athletic training students appear to be better than the national average and similar to those of practicing athletic trainers. Students reported structural constraints such as lack of time due to work or studies as the most significant barrier to exercise participation. Athletic training students experienced similar constraints to PA participation as practicing athletic trainers, and these constraints appeared to influence their exercise participation during their entry-level education. Athletic training students may benefit from a greater emphasis on work-life balance during their entry-level education to promote better health and fitness habits.

  16. Longitudinal evaluation of Journal of Athletic Training author credentials: implications for future research engagement in athletic training.

    PubMed

    Myer, Gregory D; Kreiswirth, Ethan M; Kahanov, Leamor; Martin, Malissa

    2009-01-01

    To employ retrospective trend analysis in an attempt to provide a layered description of the relative contribution (per credential) of clinical athletic trainers (those without terminal degrees) to authoring scientific literature in the Journal of Athletic Training (JAT). From these data, our secondary purpose was to evaluate trends relative to changes in journal policy and increased educational rigor or professional limitations over the past decade, discussing how they may affect the potential for clinical athletic trainers to contribute to JAT. Exploratory study design with trend analysis. Data collection and analysis included a trend evaluation of the credentials of clinical athletic trainer authors in JAT and the teams (by credential) of authorship to determine the credentials of authors who published in JAT. Longitudinal tabulation of JAT author credentials from 1995 through 2007. We noted increases in the absolute number of research articles per volume and the number of authors per article and a decrease in the relative percentage of authors who were athletic trainers. The results also suggested that the bachelor of science degree (BS-ATC, representative of clinical athletic trainers without advanced degrees) and Doctor of Medicine (MD) credential may be underrepresented in JAT authorship. Postgraduate research training may facilitate scientific article contribution by athletic trainers. Continued evolution in the athletic training evidence-based medicine movement should foster research-based mentorship during education. Cultivating collaborations between clinical athletic trainers and research teams may also promote outcomes assessment trials, which will benefit athletic training practices.

  17. The impact of a cervical spine diagnosis on the careers of National Football League athletes.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Gregory D; Lynch, T Sean; Gibbs, Daniel B; Chow, Ian; LaBelle, Mark W; Patel, Alpesh A; Savage, Jason W; Nuber, Gordon W; Hsu, Wellington K

    2014-05-20

    Cohort study. To determine the effect of cervical spine pathology on athletes entering the National Football League. The association of symptomatic cervical spine pathology with American football athletes has been described; however, it is unknown how preexisting cervical spine pathology affects career performance of a National Football League player. The medical evaluations and imaging reports of American football athletes from 2003 to 2011 during the combine were evaluated. Athletes with a cervical spine diagnosis were matched to controls and career statistics were compiled. Of a total of 2965 evaluated athletes, 143 players met the inclusion criteria. Athletes who attended the National Football League combine without a cervical spine diagnosis were more likely to be drafted than those with a diagnosis (P = 0.001). Players with a cervical spine diagnosis had a decreased total games played (P = 0.01). There was no difference in the number of games started (P = 0.08) or performance score (P = 0.38). In 10 athletes with a sagittal canal diameter of less than 10 mm, there was no difference in years, games played, games started, or performance score (P > 0.24). No neurological injury occurred during their careers. In 7 players who were drafted with a history of cervical spine surgery (4 anterior cervical discectomy and fusion, 2 foraminotomy, and 1 suboccipital craniectomy with a C1 laminectomy), there was no difference in career longevity or performance when compared with matched controls. This study suggests that athletes with preexisting cervical spine pathology were less likely to be drafted than controls. Players with preexisting cervical spine pathology demonstrated a shorter career than those without; however, statistically based performance and numbers of games started were not different. Players with cervical spinal stenosis and those with a history of previous surgery demonstrated no difference in performance-based outcomes and no reports of neurological

  18. The multi-factorial origins of Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) symptomology in post-career athletes: The athlete post-career adjustment (AP-CA) model.

    PubMed

    Gaetz, Michael

    2017-05-01

    CTE has two prominent components: the pathophysiology that is detected in the brain postmortem and the symptomology that is present in the interval between retirement and end of life. CTE symptomology has been noted to include memory difficulties, aggression, depression, explosivity, and executive dysfunction at early stages progressing to problems with attention, mood swings, visuospatial difficulties, confusion, progressive dementia, and suicidality (e.g. McKee et al. (2012), Omalu et al. (2010a-c), McKee et al. (2009)). There are a number of assumptions embedded within the current CTE literature: The first is the assumption that CTE symptomology reported by athletes and their families is the product of the pathophysiology change detected post-mortem (e.g. McKee et al. (2009)). At present, there is little scientific evidence to suggest that all CTE symptomology is the product of CTE pathophysiology. It has been assumed that CTE pathophysiology causes CTE symptomology (Meehan et al. (2015), Iverson et al. (2016)) but this link has never been scientifically validated. The purpose of the present work is to provide a multi-factorial theoretical framework to account for the symptomology reported by some athletes who sustain neurotrauma during their careers that will lead to a more systematic approach to understanding post-career symptomology. There is significant overlap between the case reports of athletes with post-mortem diagnoses of CTE, and symptom profiles of those with a history of substance use, chronic pain, and athlete career transition stress. The athlete post-career adjustment (AP-CA) model is intended to explain some of the symptoms that athletes experience at the end of their careers or during retirement. The AP-CA model consists of four elements: neurotrauma, chronic pain, substance use, and career transition stress. Based on the existing literature, it is clear that any one of the four elements of the AP-CA model can account for a significant number of

  19. Qualitative Inquiry in Athletic Training: Principles, Possibilities, and Promises.

    PubMed

    Pitney, William A.; Parker, Jenny

    2001-06-01

    OBJECTIVE: To discuss the principles of qualitative research and provide insights into how such methods can benefit the profession of athletic training. BACKGROUND: The growth of a profession is influenced by the type of research performed by its members. Although qualitative research methods can serve to answer many clinical and professional questions that help athletic trainers navigate their socioprofessional contexts, an informal review of the Journal of Athletic Training reveals a paucity of such methods. DESCRIPTION: We provide an overview of the characteristics of qualitative research and common data collection and analysis techniques. Practical examples related to athletic training are also offered. APPLICATIONS: Athletic trainers interact with other professionals, patients, athletes, and administrators and function in a larger society. Consequently, they are likely to face critical influences and phenomena that affect the meaning they give to their experiences. Qualitative research facilitates a depth of understanding related to our contexts that traditional research may not provide. Furthermore, qualitative research complements traditional ways of thinking about research itself and promotes a greater understanding related to specific phenomena. As the profession of athletic training continues to grow, qualitative research methods will assume a more prominent role. Thus, it will be necessary for consumers of athletic training research to understand the functional aspects of the qualitative paradigm.

  20. Training environment and Vitamin D status in athletes.

    PubMed

    Peeling, P; Fulton, S K; Binnie, M; Goodman, C

    2013-03-01

    This study assessed the associations between gender, anthropometry, predominant training environment and Vitamin D status in 72 elite athletes. Additionally, any links between Vitamin D status and recent injury/health status, or sun protection practices were investigated. Athletes underwent an anthropometric assessment and provided venous blood samples for the determination of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D), the accepted biological marker of Vitamin D status. Finally, athletes completed a questionnaire relating to their recent training and injury history, and their sun protection practices. The athlete cohort were divided by predominant training environment as either indoor, outdoor, or mixed training environment athletes. The average ( ± SD) 25(OH)D levels of the group were 111 ± 37 nmol/L, with the indoor training group (90 ± 28 nmol/L) significantly lower than the outdoor (131 ± 35 nmol/L), and mixed (133 ± 29 nmol/L) training groups (p = 0.0001). Anthropometrical measures were positively associated with 25(OH)D levels; however, recent injury status or sun protection practice showed no association. Given the significant differences in 25(OH)D levels between the outdoor and indoor predominant training environments, coaches of indoor athletes may wish to monitor their athletes' Vitamin D levels throughout the year, in order to avoid any possibilities of a deficiency occurring.

  1. Musculoskeletal Injuries and Training Patterns in Junior Elite Orienteering Athletes.

    PubMed

    Roos, Lilian; Taube, Wolfgang; Zuest, Peter; Clénin, German; Wyss, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Findings about the relation between musculoskeletal injuries and training patterns in orienteering athletes are sparse. Therefore, the musculoskeletal injuries and training patterns of 31 Swiss elite orienteering athletes aged 18-19 years were analyzed in a retrospective study. Individual training diaries and medical records were used to assess training data and injury history, respectively. Group comparisons and a multiple linear regression (MLR) were performed for statistical analysis. The junior elite orienteering athletes performed 7.38 ± 2.00 training sessions weekly, with a total duration of 455.75 ± 98.22 minutes. An injury incidence rate (IIR) of 2.18 ± 2.13 injuries per 1000 hours of training was observed. The lower extremity was affected in 93% of all injuries, and the knee (33%) was the most commonly injured location. The MLR revealed that gender and six training variables explained 60% of the variance in the injury severity index in this study. Supported by the low IIR in the observed age group, the training protocol of the junior elite orienteering athletes was generally adequate. In comparison to elite track, marathon, and orienteering athletes, the junior elite athletes performed less high-intensity interval training (HIIT). However, more frequent HIIT seems to be a protective factor against injuries.

  2. Musculoskeletal Injuries and Training Patterns in Junior Elite Orienteering Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Taube, Wolfgang; Zuest, Peter; Clénin, German; Wyss, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Findings about the relation between musculoskeletal injuries and training patterns in orienteering athletes are sparse. Therefore, the musculoskeletal injuries and training patterns of 31 Swiss elite orienteering athletes aged 18-19 years were analyzed in a retrospective study. Individual training diaries and medical records were used to assess training data and injury history, respectively. Group comparisons and a multiple linear regression (MLR) were performed for statistical analysis. The junior elite orienteering athletes performed 7.38 ± 2.00 training sessions weekly, with a total duration of 455.75 ± 98.22 minutes. An injury incidence rate (IIR) of 2.18 ± 2.13 injuries per 1000 hours of training was observed. The lower extremity was affected in 93% of all injuries, and the knee (33%) was the most commonly injured location. The MLR revealed that gender and six training variables explained 60% of the variance in the injury severity index in this study. Supported by the low IIR in the observed age group, the training protocol of the junior elite orienteering athletes was generally adequate. In comparison to elite track, marathon, and orienteering athletes, the junior elite athletes performed less high-intensity interval training (HIIT). However, more frequent HIIT seems to be a protective factor against injuries. PMID:26258134

  3. Generalized training effects induced by athletic preparation. A review.

    PubMed

    Issurin, V B

    2009-12-01

    The present review deals with training effects produced by training pieces of different duration. Athletes' responses to training workloads can be considered hierarchically, where the most intimate level encompasses changes produced at the cellular and molecular levels, while the generalized level summarizes the most integrative training outcomes, which characterize athletes' adaptability, preparedness and readiness for forthcoming workloads. These training outcomes, called generalized training effects (GTE) are considered to be closely linked with duration and mode of training workloads. Summarizing earlier and more recent publications, GTEs are categorized as acute, immediate, cumulative, delayed and residual training effects, which encompass changes induced by 1) a single exercise; 2) a single workout or training day; 3) a series of workouts; or 4) obtained over a given time interval after a program completion ; or (5) changes retained after cessation of training beyond a give time period. Each one these GTEs has a three-fold characterization:1) variables of executed workloads; 2) athletes' responses to workloads and training-induced changes in their state; 3) changes in athletic performance as described by sport specific indicators. Although the concept of GTE is far from complete in terms of an understanding of the physiological mechanisms underlying the short-, medium-, and long-term changes caused by athletic training, a number of fundamental theories and statements contribute to its scientific background. They are Cannon's theory of homeostasis; Salye's theory of stress adaptation; Weigert's law of supercompensation; and Lamarck's classic theory of evolution regarding the "use" and "disuse" of any organ or function.

  4. Educating the Educator: Use of Pulse Oximetry in Athletic Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, David C.; Seitz, S. Robert

    2012-01-01

    The 5th edition of the "Athletic Training Education Competencies" expanded the scope of knowledge and skill set of entry-level athletic trainers related to the domain of "Acute Care of Injuries and Illnesses." One of these major changes includes the introduction of adjunct airway techniques, such as oropharyngeal and nasopharyngeal airways and…

  5. Educating the Educator: Use of Pulse Oximetry in Athletic Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, David C.; Seitz, S. Robert

    2012-01-01

    The 5th edition of the "Athletic Training Education Competencies" expanded the scope of knowledge and skill set of entry-level athletic trainers related to the domain of "Acute Care of Injuries and Illnesses." One of these major changes includes the introduction of adjunct airway techniques, such as oropharyngeal and nasopharyngeal airways and…

  6. Plyometric Training Effects on Athletic Performance in Youth Soccer Athletes: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Bedoya, Abigail A; Miltenberger, Matthew R; Lopez, Rebecca M

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this systematic review was to critically analyze the literature to determine the effectiveness of plyometric training on athletic performance in youth soccer athletes. A total of 7 studies were included in this review after meeting the following criteria: (a) used plyometric training programs to assess athletic performance, (b) subjects were soccer athletes aged preadolescent up to 17 years, and (c) were published from 2000 to January 2014. Study methods were assessed using the PEDro scale with scores ranging from 4 to 6. Results showed similarities and differences in methodologies and procedures among the included studies. Athletic performance consisting of kicking distance, speed, jumping ability, and agility significantly improved because of plyometric training interventions. The current evidence suggests that plyometric training should be completed 2 days per week for 8-10 weeks during soccer practice with a 72-hour rest period between plyometric training days. The initial number of foot contacts should be 50-60 per session and increase to no more than 80-120 foot contacts per session for this age group to prevent overuse injuries. A total of 3-4 plyometric training exercises should be performed 2-4 sets for 6-15 repetitions per training session. The evidence and the literature suggest that plyometric training for this age group should only be implemented using recommended safety guidelines such as those published by the Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology and the National Strength and Conditioning Association and under appropriate supervision by trained personnel.

  7. Monitoring training in athletes with reference to overtraining syndrome.

    PubMed

    Foster, C

    1998-07-01

    Overtraining is primarily related to sustained high load training, often coupled with other stressors. Studies in animal models have suggested that unremittingly heavy training (monotonous training) may increase the likelihood of developing overtraining syndrome. The purpose of this study was to extend our preliminary observations by relating the incidence of illnesses and minor injuries to various indices of training. We report observations of the relationship of banal illnesses (a frequently cited marker of overtraining syndrome) to training load and training monotony in experienced athletes (N = 25). Athletes recorded their training using a method that integrates the exercise session RPE and the duration of the training session. Illnesses were noted and correlated with indices of training load (rolling 6 wk average), monotony (daily mean/standard deviation), and strain (load x monotony). It was observed that a high percentage of illnesses could be accounted for when individual athletes exceeded individually identifiable training thresholds, mostly related to the strain of training. These suggest that simple methods of monitoring the characteristics of training may allow the athlete to achieve the goals of training while minimizing undesired training outcomes.

  8. Evaluation of the Career Planning of Athletes, Who Succeeded in Olympics, in the Light of Different Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gundogdu, Cemal

    2011-01-01

    In this study, career planning of Turkish athletes, who won medals in olympics for the periods they played and left sport, are investigated; however, differentiation of career planning dimensions of athletes in terms of demographic and sportive variables is examined as well. This study, which aimed at determining the effectiveness of career…

  9. Navigational strategies during fast walking: a comparison between trained athletes and non-athletes.

    PubMed

    Gérin-Lajoie, Martin; Ronsky, Janet L; Loitz-Ramage, Barbara; Robu, Ion; Richards, Carol L; McFadyen, Bradford J

    2007-10-01

    Many common activities such as walking in a shopping mall, moving in a busy subway station, or even avoiding opponents during sports, all require different levels of navigational skills. Obstacle circumvention is beginning to be understood across age groups, but studying trained athletes with greater levels of motor ability will further our understanding of skillful adaptive locomotor behavior. The objective of this work was to compare navigational skills during fast walking between elite athletes (e.g. soccer, field hockey, basketball) and aged-matched non-athletes under different levels of environmental complexity in relation to obstacle configuration and visibility. The movements of eight women athletes and eight women non-athletes were measured as they walked as fast as possible through different obstacle courses in both normal and low lighting conditions. Results showed that athletes, despite similar unobstructed maximal speeds to non-athletes, had faster walking times during the navigation of all obstructed environments. It appears that athletes can process visuo-spatial information faster since both groups can make appropriate navigational decisions, but athletes can navigate through complex, novel, environments at greater speeds. Athletes' walking times were also more affected by the low lighting conditions suggesting that they normally scan the obstructed course farther ahead. This study also uses new objective measures to assess functional locomotor capacity in order to discriminate individuals according to their level of navigational ability. The evaluation paradigm and outcome measures developed may be applicable to the evaluation of skill level in athletic training and selection, as well as in gait rehabilitation following impairment.

  10. Where are the women in women's sports? Predictors of female athletes' interest in a coaching career.

    PubMed

    Moran-Miller, Kelli; Flores, Lisa Y

    2011-03-01

    In this study, we used social cognitive career theory (Lent, Brown, & Hackett, 1994) to examine the development of female athletes' career interest in coaching and, specifically, the impact of contextual factors (female coaching role models, working hours, and perceived discrimination) on coaching self-efficacy and outcome expectations. Participants were 205 predominantly White, heterosexual female student athletes. A path analysis indicated that role models and working hours predicted coaching self-efficacy, which predicted coaching outcome expectations. Additionally, coaching self-efficacy, coaching outcome expectations, and contextual factors predicted coaching interest. Practical implications are discussed as well as suggestions for further research in this relatively unexplored area.

  11. Certified athletic trainers' perspectives on rehabilitation adherence in collegiate athletic training settings.

    PubMed

    Granquist, Megan D; Podlog, Leslie; Engel, Joanna R; Newland, Aubrey

    2014-05-01

    Adherence to sport-injury rehabilitation protocols may be pivotal in ensuring successful rehabilitation and return-to-play outcomes. To investigate athletic trainers' perspectives related to the degree to which rehabilitation adherence is an issue in collegiate athletic training settings, gain insight from certified athletic trainers regarding the factors contributing to rehabilitation nonadherence (underadherence and overadherence), and ascertain views on the most effective means for promoting adherence. Cross-sectional, mixed methods. Collegiate athletic training in the United States. Certified athletic trainers (n = 479; 234 male, 245 female). Online survey consisting of 3 questions regarding rehabilitation adherence, each followed by an open-ended comments section. Descriptive statistics were calculated for quantitative items; hierarchical content analyses were conducted for qualitative items. Most (98.3%) participants reported poor rehabilitation adherence to be a problem (1.7% = no problem, 29.2% = minor problem, 49.7% = problem, 19.4% = major problem), while most (98.96%) participants reported that they had athletes who exhibited poor rehabilitation adherence (1% = never, 71.4% = occasionally, 22.5% = often, 5% = always). In addition, the majority (97.91%) of participants reported that overadherence (eg, doing too much, failing to comply with activity restrictions, etc) was at least an occasional occurrence (2.1% = never, 69.3% = occasionally, 26.3% = often, 1.9% = always). Hierarchical content analyses regarding the constructs of poor adherence and overadherence revealed 4 major themes: the motivation to adhere, the development of good athletic trainer-athlete rapport and effective communication, athletic trainers' perception of the coaches' role in fostering adherence, and the influence of injury- or individual- (eg, injury severity, sport type, gender) specific characteristics on rehabilitation adherence. These results suggest that participants believe

  12. Academic career development in geriatric fellowship training.

    PubMed

    Medina-Walpole, Annette; Fonzi, Judith; Katz, Paul R

    2007-12-01

    Career development is rarely formalized in the curricula of geriatric fellowship programs, and the training of new generations of academic leaders is challenging in the 1 year of fellowship training. To effectively prepare fellows for academic leadership, the University of Rochester's Division of Geriatrics, in collaboration with the Warner School of Graduate Education, created a yearlong course to achieve excellence in teaching and career development during the 1-year geriatric fellowship. Nine interdisciplinary geriatric medicine, dentistry, and psychiatry fellows completed the course in its initial year (2005/06). As participants, fellows gained the knowledge and experience to successfully develop and implement educational initiatives in various formats. Fellows acquired teaching and leadership skills necessary to succeed as clinician-educators in an academic setting and to communicate effectively with patients, families, and colleagues. Fellows completed a series of individual and group education projects, including academic portfolio development, curriculum vitae revision, abstract submission and poster presentation at national meetings, lay lecture series development, and geriatric grand rounds presentation. One hundred percent of fellows reported that the course positively affected their career development, with six of nine fellows choosing academic careers. The course provided opportunities to teach and assess all six of the Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education core competencies. This academic career development course was intended to prepare geriatric fellows as the next generation of academic leaders as clinician-teacher-scholars. It could set a new standard for academic development during fellowship training and provide a model for national dissemination in other geriatric and subspecialty fellowship programs.

  13. An assessment of learning styles among undergraduate athletic training students.

    PubMed

    Harrelson, G L; Leaver-Dunn, D; Wright, K E

    1998-01-01

    Increased attention has been directed toward assessing and improving academic quality in athletic training education. The educational process has been assessed from a global level, but little is known about how athletic training students learn. The purpose of this investigation was to assess the learning styles of undergraduate athletic training students. Undergraduate students enrolled in a Committee on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP)-accredited athletic training education program completed a learning styles inventory during a regularly scheduled athletic training class at the start of the spring semester. Twenty-seven student athletic trainers (age range, 19-30 yrs, mean age = 20.5 yrs) served as subjects. Sixteen subjects (7 male, 9 female) were in the first year of this 3-year program. Eleven subjects (7 male, 4 female) were second-year students. Learning style was assessed using the Productivity Environmental Preference Survey. Parametric and nonparametric one-way analyses of variance for each learning subscale by sex and by year in program revealed significant differences (P < .05) in light preferences for male and female students. There were also significant differences (P < .05) between first-and second-year students in preferences for afternoon learning activities. These findings suggest that undergraduate athletic training students function best as leamers in a well-lit leaming environment. The significance of aftemoon as the preferred time for learning reinforces the importance of the clinical setting in the introduction and mastery of skills. Athletic training educators and clinical instructors can use these results as they examine their teaching strategies and educational environments.

  14. Critical-Thinking Predisposition Among Undergraduate Athletic Training Students

    PubMed Central

    Leaver-Dunn, Deidre; Harrelson, Gary L.; Martin, Malissa; Wyatt, Tom

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the tendency of undergraduate athletic training students to think critically, to assess their likelihood of using specific components of critical thinking, and to study the effect of selected demographic and educational variables on critical-thinking tendencies in this sample of students. Design and Setting: Data were collected before regularly scheduled athletic training classes at the beginning of the spring semester. Subjects: Ninety-one students enrolled in 3 Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs-accredited undergraduate athletic training education programs in the southeast. The subjects ranged in age from 19 to 29 years (mean age = 22.33 ± 1.94). Forty-six (50.5%) of the subjects were men and 45 (49.5%) were women. Measurements: The California Critical Thinking Disposition Inventory contains 75 Likert-type items assessing 7 components of critical thinking: truth seeking, open mindedness, analyticity, systematicity, inquisitiveness, cognitive maturity, and critical-thinking self-confidence. Results: The overall mean indicated a general but mild trend toward critical thinking, with weak scores on the truth-seeking subscale. One-way analysis of variance reflected significant differences among the schools for truth seeking, open mindedness, and maturity subscales and for the overall mean score for the entire inventory. Only the open-mindedness difference persisted between 2 of the schools after post hoc testing. Correlation analyses indicated no significant relationship between total score and age, sex, ethnicity, year in athletic training program, cumulative grade point average, completed semester hours, or clinical-experience hours. Conclusions: Athletic training students are inclined toward critical thinking, but this tendency is relatively weak. Classroom and clinical instructors should use teaching methods and techniques that facilitate the components of critical thinking. The promotion of critical thinking

  15. Critical-Thinking Predisposition Among Undergraduate Athletic Training Students.

    PubMed

    Leaver-Dunn, Deidre; Harrelson, Gary L; Martin, Malissa; Wyatt, Tom

    2002-12-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the tendency of undergraduate athletic training students to think critically, to assess their likelihood of using specific components of critical thinking, and to study the effect of selected demographic and educational variables on critical-thinking tendencies in this sample of students. DESIGN AND SETTING: Data were collected before regularly scheduled athletic training classes at the beginning of the spring semester. SUBJECTS: Ninety-one students enrolled in 3 Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs-accredited undergraduate athletic training education programs in the southeast. The subjects ranged in age from 19 to 29 years (mean age = 22.33 +/- 1.94). Forty-six (50.5%) of the subjects were men and 45 (49.5%) were women. MEASUREMENTS: The California Critical Thinking Disposition Inventory contains 75 Likert-type items assessing 7 components of critical thinking: truth seeking, open mindedness, analyticity, systematicity, inquisitiveness, cognitive maturity, and critical-thinking self-confidence. RESULTS: The overall mean indicated a general but mild trend toward critical thinking, with weak scores on the truth-seeking subscale. One-way analysis of variance reflected significant differences among the schools for truth seeking, open mindedness, and maturity subscales and for the overall mean score for the entire inventory. Only the open-mindedness difference persisted between 2 of the schools after post hoc testing. Correlation analyses indicated no significant relationship between total score and age, sex, ethnicity, year in athletic training program, cumulative grade point average, completed semester hours, or clinical-experience hours. CONCLUSIONS: Athletic training students are inclined toward critical thinking, but this tendency is relatively weak. Classroom and clinical instructors should use teaching methods and techniques that facilitate the components of critical thinking. The promotion of critical

  16. An Assessment of Learning Styles Among Undergraduate Athletic Training Students

    PubMed Central

    Harrelson, Gary L.; Leaver-Dunn, Deidre; Wright, Kenneth E.

    1998-01-01

    Objective: Increased attention has been directed toward assessing and improving academic quality in athletic training education. The educational process has been assessed from a global level, but little is known about how athletic training students learn. The purpose of this investigation was to assess the learning styles of undergraduate athletic training students. Design and Setting: Undergraduate students enrolled in a Committee on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP)-accredited athletic training education program completed a learning styles inventory during a regularly scheduled athletic training class at the start of the spring semester. Subjects: Twenty-seven student athletic trainers (age range, 19-30 yrs, mean age = 20.5 yrs) served as subjects. Sixteen subjects (7 male, 9 female) were in the first year of this 3-year program. Eleven subjects (7 male, 4 female) were second-year students. Measurements: Learning style was assessed using the Productivity Environmental Preference Survey. Results: Parametric and nonparametric one-way analyses of variance for each learning subscale by sex and by year in program revealed significant differences (P < .05) in light preferences for male and female students. There were also significant differences (P < .05) between first-and second-year students in preferences for afternoon learning activities. Conclusions: These findings suggest that undergraduate athletic training students function best as leamers in a well-lit leaming environment. The significance of aftemoon as the preferred time for learning reinforces the importance of the clinical setting in the introduction and mastery of skills. Athletic training educators and clinical instructors can use these results as they examine their teaching strategies and educational environments. PMID:16558485

  17. Correlation between athlete training intensity and cardiac performance.

    PubMed

    Xiao, T; Zhang, Y

    2017-02-01

    An effective analysis of correlation between training intensity of athletes and cardiac performance is done to develop scientific and reasonable exercise program and to promote health of athletes. During December 2013-December 2015, 3600 students from different sports schools were selected for the test. All the athletes were randomly grouped, that is half-hour running group, one-hour running group and 90 -minute running group, which are named A, B, C groups respectively. The three groups of athletes received 5 days of testing per week, and took rest in the remaining two days, maintaining a total of 10 days. Exercise intensity of personnel accepting test was detected by RPE, and effective analysis was made on cardiac function change before and after test of three groups of the college students. Resting heart rates of B, C group students were considerably decreased after exercise. In comparison of falling range of group C and group A, there is a statistically significant difference, P <0.05. By strengthening athletes' training intensity, we can effectively enhance athletes' cardiac performance. t As a result, athletes' body becomes healthier, which is conducive to athletes' physical and mental development.

  18. No effect of weight cycling on the post-career BMI of weight class elite athletes.

    PubMed

    Marquet, Laurie-anne; Brown, Morgan; Tafflet, Muriel; Nassif, Hala; Mouraby, Rémy; Bourhaleb, Samir; Toussaint, Jean-François; Desgorces, François-Denis

    2013-05-27

    Repetitions of pre-competition weight-loss diets done by athletes participating in weight class sports can be regarded as periods of weight cycling. The aim of the present study is to identify the long term post-career (22 years) evolutionary profile of athletes' BMI after such weight cycling. One hundred and thirty-six retired French athletes who participated in major international competitions in weight class sports (rowers, wrestlers, boxers, and judokas) were included. Former and current body mass, height, dietary characteristics during the career (annual frequency, amount of weight lost), current physical activity, and answers on the eating-attitude test were collected by phone interview (consistency was tested by comparison with measured weight). We performed ANOVA tests for comparison between groups (sport, dieting), post-hoc tests (Bonferroni test) to identify differences within groups. BMI's changes were treated using a mixed model. The recorded weight changes did not depend upon time since retirement. Between 18 y and 50 y, athletes' BMI increased by 3.2 kg/m(2) compared to the 4.2 kg/m(2) increase in the general population. This increase was independent of the number of diets during the career. Retired athletes declared a mean weekly physical activity of 4.8 h ± 4.3. The eating-attitude test showed low scores for all sports without any correlation to diet characteristics. Weight cycling during an athletic career does not induce a massive weight gain after retirement, probably due to the high level of physical activity still practiced after retirement by these athletes.

  19. The Experience of Depression during the Careers of Elite Male Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Doherty, Steve; Hannigan, Barbara; Campbell, Mark J.

    2016-01-01

    The topic of depression during the career of elite male athletes has been the subject of much public interest and attention in recent years. Despite numerous debates and personal disclosures within the media, there is a dearth of published research directly exploring the phenomenon. This study sought to explore how elite male athletes experience depression during their sporting careers. Eight former/current elite male athletes who had previously publically self-identified as having experienced depression while participating in sport were recruited for this study. A qualitative methodology was employed and each participant was interviewed using semi-structured interviews. Data analysis which was conducted using descriptive and interpretive thematic analysis uncovered three domains: (1) The emergence of depression, (2) The manifestation of symptoms of depression, and (3) Adaptive and Maladaptive proceesses of recovery. Findings from the current study reveal the nature of how male athletes experience, express, and respond to depression during their careers. Additionally, this is influenced by a myriad of factors embedded in the masculine elite sport environment. Implications are discussed particularly in relation to atypical expressions of depression not necessarily reflected on or in standard diagnostic criteria. Future research is encouraged to examine in depth moderating factors (e.g., athletic sense of identity and masculine elite sport environments) for the relationship between depression and participation in elite sport. PMID:27486418

  20. The Experience of Depression during the Careers of Elite Male Athletes.

    PubMed

    Doherty, Steve; Hannigan, Barbara; Campbell, Mark J

    2016-01-01

    The topic of depression during the career of elite male athletes has been the subject of much public interest and attention in recent years. Despite numerous debates and personal disclosures within the media, there is a dearth of published research directly exploring the phenomenon. This study sought to explore how elite male athletes experience depression during their sporting careers. Eight former/current elite male athletes who had previously publically self-identified as having experienced depression while participating in sport were recruited for this study. A qualitative methodology was employed and each participant was interviewed using semi-structured interviews. Data analysis which was conducted using descriptive and interpretive thematic analysis uncovered three domains: (1) The emergence of depression, (2) The manifestation of symptoms of depression, and (3) Adaptive and Maladaptive proceesses of recovery. Findings from the current study reveal the nature of how male athletes experience, express, and respond to depression during their careers. Additionally, this is influenced by a myriad of factors embedded in the masculine elite sport environment. Implications are discussed particularly in relation to atypical expressions of depression not necessarily reflected on or in standard diagnostic criteria. Future research is encouraged to examine in depth moderating factors (e.g., athletic sense of identity and masculine elite sport environments) for the relationship between depression and participation in elite sport.

  1. [Endurance training and cardial adaptation (athlete's heart)].

    PubMed

    Dickhuth, Hans-Hermann; Röcker, Kai; Mayer, Frank; König, Daniel; Korsten-Reck, Ulrike

    2004-06-01

    One essential function of the cardiovascular system is to provide an adequate blood supply to all organs, including the skeletal muscles at rest and during exercise. Adaptation to chronic exercise proceeds mainly via the autonomic nervous system. On the one hand, peripheral muscles influence the autonomic reactions through "feedback" control via ergoreceptors, in particular, mechano- and chemoreceptors. On the other hand, there is central control in the sense of a "feed forward" regulation, e. g., the reaction of an athlete before competition. Along with other influential factors, such as circulatory presso-, chemo-, and volume receptors, the incoming impulses are processed in vegetative centers.A cardiovascular reaction, then, is the result of nerval and humoral sympathetic and parasympathetic activity. At rest, the parasympathetic tone dominates. It reduces heart frequency and conduction velocity. The high vagal tone is initially reduced with increasing physical exertion and switches at higher intensity to increasingly sympathetic activation. This mechanism of reaction to exercise is supported by inverse central and peripheral transmissions.Chronic endurance training leads to an improved local aerobic capacity of the exercised musculature. At rest, it augments parasympathetic activity when the muscle mass is sufficiently large, i. e., 20-30% of the skeletal musculature. The extent of the adaptation depends on individual factors, such as scope, intensity of training, and type of muscle fiber. A higher vagal tone delays the increase in the sympathetic tone during physical exertion. The regulatory range of heart rate, contractility, diastolic function, and blood pressure is increased. In addition, adaptation results in functional and structural changes in the vascular system. Cardiocirculatory work is economized, and maximum performance and oxygen uptake are improved. Endurance training exceeding an individual limit causes harmonic enlargement and hypertrophy of the

  2. Structural Support of High-Performance Athletes' Education: Supporting Dual Careers in Greece

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pavlidis, George; Gargalianos, Dimitris

    2014-01-01

    This article describes how the current Greek sport-education context seems to offer relatively poor dual-career support in comparison to other available structures in the world. This results in additional obstacles for Greek athletes who wish to educate themselves and an ambiguous prospect for their future. Consequently, the Greek…

  3. Structural Support of High-Performance Athletes' Education: Supporting Dual Careers in Greece

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pavlidis, George; Gargalianos, Dimitris

    2014-01-01

    This article describes how the current Greek sport-education context seems to offer relatively poor dual-career support in comparison to other available structures in the world. This results in additional obstacles for Greek athletes who wish to educate themselves and an ambiguous prospect for their future. Consequently, the Greek…

  4. Communicative Acts in Coach-Athlete Interactions: When Losing Competitions and when Making Mistakes in Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sagar, Sam S.; Jowett, Sophia

    2012-01-01

    Athletes' perceptions of coaches' communicative acts of interaction in two key interpersonal situations were examined, and their impact on the athletes: (a) when athletes lose competitions; and, (b) when athletes make mistakes in training. Athletes (N = 324, M age = 20.11) completed an open-ended survey. Data were deductively and inductively…

  5. Communicative Acts in Coach-Athlete Interactions: When Losing Competitions and when Making Mistakes in Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sagar, Sam S.; Jowett, Sophia

    2012-01-01

    Athletes' perceptions of coaches' communicative acts of interaction in two key interpersonal situations were examined, and their impact on the athletes: (a) when athletes lose competitions; and, (b) when athletes make mistakes in training. Athletes (N = 324, M age = 20.11) completed an open-ended survey. Data were deductively and inductively…

  6. The Electrocardiogram in Highly Trained Athletes.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Keerthi; Sharma, Sanjay

    2015-07-01

    Regular intensive exercise is associated with a constellation of several structural and functional adaptations within the heart that permit the generation of a large and sustained increase in cardiac output and/or increase in blood pressure. The magnitude with which these markers of physiological remodeling manifest on the surface electrocardiogram is governed by several factors and some athletes show electrical and structural changes that overlap with those observed in cardiomyopathy and in ion channel diseases, which are recognized causes of sudden cardiac death in young athletes. This article provides a critical appraisal of the athlete's ECG.

  7. Key factors for providing appropriate medical care in secondary school athletics: athletic training services and budget.

    PubMed

    Wham, George S; Saunders, Ruth; Mensch, James

    2010-01-01

    Research suggests that appropriate medical care for interscholastic athletes is frequently lacking. However, few investigators have examined factors related to care. To examine medical care provided by interscholastic athletics programs and to identify factors associated with variations in provision of care. Cross-sectional study. Mailed and e-mailed survey. One hundred sixty-six South Carolina high schools. The 132-item Appropriate Medical Care Assessment Tool (AMCAT) was developed and pilot tested. It included 119 items assessing medical care based on the Appropriate Medical Care for Secondary School-Age Athletes (AMCSSAA) Consensus Statement and Monograph (test-retest reliability: r = 0.89). Also included were items assessing potential influences on medical care. Presence, source, and number of athletic trainers; school size; distance to nearest medical center; public or private status; sports medicine supply budget; and varsity football regional championships served as explanatory variables, whereas the school setting, region of state, and rate of free or reduced lunch qualifiers served as control variables. The Appropriate Care Index (ACI) score from the AMCAT provided a quantitative measure of medical care and served as the response variable. The ACI score was determined based on a school's response to items relating to AMCSSAA guidelines. Regression analysis revealed associations with ACI score for athletic training services and sports medicine supply budget (both P < .001) when controlling for the setting, region, and rate of free or reduced lunch qualifiers. These 2 variables accounted for 30% of the variance in ACI score (R(2) = 0.302). Post hoc analysis showed differences between ACI score based on the source of the athletic trainer and the size of the sports medicine supply budget. The AMCAT offers an evaluation of medical care provided by interscholastic athletics programs. In South Carolina schools, athletic training services and the sports medicine

  8. Sports Specialization and Intensive Training in Young Athletes.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Joel S

    2016-09-01

    Sports specialization is becoming the norm in youth sports for a variety of reasons. When sports specialization occurs too early, detrimental effects may occur, both physically and psychologically. If the timing is correct and sports specialization is performed under the correct conditions, the athlete may be successful in reaching specific goals. Young athletes who train intensively, whether specialized or not, can also be at risk of adverse effects on the mind and body. The purpose of this clinical report is to assist pediatricians in counseling their young athlete patients and their parents regarding sports specialization and intensive training. This report supports the American Academy of Pediatrics clinical report "Overuse Injuries, Overtraining, and Burnout in Child and Adolescent Athletes." Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  9. Athletic training services in public secondary schools: a benchmark study.

    PubMed

    Pryor, Riana R; Casa, Douglas J; Vandermark, Lesley W; Stearns, Rebecca L; Attanasio, Sarah M; Fontaine, Garrett J; Wafer, Alex M

    2015-02-01

    Authors of the most recent study of athletic training (AT) services have suggested that only 42% of secondary schools have access to athletic trainers. However, this study was limited by a small sample size and was conducted more than 10 years ago. To determine current AT services in public secondary schools. Cross-sectional study. Public secondary schools in the United States. A total of 8509 (57%) of 14,951 secondary schools from all 50 states and Washington, DC, responded to the survey. Data on AT services were collected for individual states, National Athletic Trainers' Association districts, and the nation. Of the 8509 schools that responded, 70% (n = 5930) had AT services, including full-time (n = 3145, 37%), part-time (n = 2619, 31%), and per diem (n = 199, 2%) AT services, and 27% (n = 2299) had AT services from a hospital or physical therapy clinic. A total of 4075 of 8509 schools (48%) provided coverage at all sports practices. Eighty-six percent (2,394,284/2,787,595) of athletes had access to AT services. Since the last national survey, access to AT services increased such that 70% of respondent public secondary schools provided athletic trainers at sports games or practices. Approximately one-third of all public secondary schools had full-time athletic trainers. This number must increase further to provide appropriate medical coverage at athletic practices and games for secondary school athletes.

  10. Training principles and issues for ultra-endurance athletes.

    PubMed

    Zaryski, Calvin; Smith, David J

    2005-06-01

    Ultra-endurance competition is defined as events that exceed than 6 hours in duration. The longer events rely on long-term preparation, sufficient nutrition, accommodation of environmental stressors, and psychologic toughness. Successful ultra-endurance performance is characterized by the ability to sustain a higher absolute speed for a given distance than other competitors. This can be achieved through a periodized training plan and by following key principles of training. Periodization is an organization of training into large, medium and small training blocks which are referred to as macro-, meso-, and microcycles, respectively. When the sequencing of training is correctly applied, athletes can achieve a high state of competition readiness and during the months of hard training, avoid the overtraining syndrome. A plan is executed in accordance with the following principles of training: all-around development, overload, specificity, individualization, consistent training, and structural tolerance. Training relies heavily on the athlete's tolerance to repetitive strain. Today's ultra-endurance athlete must also follow appropriate nutritional practices in order to recover and prepare for daily training and remain injury free and healthy. Rehydration after exercise, together with the timing and method of increased food intake to cope with heavy training, are essential for optimal performance. Furthermore, the treatment of soft tissue after training or racing is necessary to control inflammation.

  11. Absence of Training-Specific Cardiac Adaptation in Paraplegic Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gates, Phillip E.; Campbell, Ian G.; George, Keith P.

    2002-01-01

    Tested the hypothesis that wall thickness, but not chamber dimension, would be larger in endurance- and power-trained athletes with spinal cord injuries than in sedentary people with spinal cord injuries. Data on 11 power-trained and 5 sedentary participants showed no statistically significant differences between groups, though there was a trend…

  12. Resistance training and elite athletes: adaptations and program considerations.

    PubMed

    Kraemer, W J; Duncan, N D; Volek, J S

    1998-08-01

    The skepticism surrounding the potential benefits of resistance exercise training prevalent just decades ago has evolved over the years to an understanding of the integral nature muscular overload plays in the training programs for athletes. The science of training elite athletes is progressing rapidly, as insights into the physiological adaptations resulting from varying program configurations become available. Resistance training impacts several body systems, including muscular, endocrine, skeletal, metabolic, immune, neural, and respiratory. An understanding and appreciation of basic scientific principles related to resistance training is necessary in order to optimize training responses. Careful selection of the acute program variables in a workout to simulate sports-specific movements is required for optimal transfer of gains made in training to competition. Thus, whether athletes require predominantly eccentric, isometric, slow-velocity, or high-velocity strength or power in their athletic event will dictate the time commitment to each component and form the basis for designing individual workouts. Program variation over a training period is essential to maximize gains and prevent overtraining.

  13. Absence of Training-Specific Cardiac Adaptation in Paraplegic Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gates, Phillip E.; Campbell, Ian G.; George, Keith P.

    2002-01-01

    Tested the hypothesis that wall thickness, but not chamber dimension, would be larger in endurance- and power-trained athletes with spinal cord injuries than in sedentary people with spinal cord injuries. Data on 11 power-trained and 5 sedentary participants showed no statistically significant differences between groups, though there was a trend…

  14. A Nationwide Learning-Style Assessment of Undergraduate Athletic Training Students in CAAHEP-Accredited Athletic Training Programs

    PubMed Central

    Stradley, Stephanie L.; Buckley, Bernadette D.; Kaminski, Thomas W.; Horodyski, MaryBeth; Fleming, David; Janelle, Christopher M.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To identify the learning styles and preferred environmental characteristics of undergraduate athletic training students in Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP)-accredited athletic training education programs and to determine if learning-style differences existed among geographic regions of the country. Design and Setting: Fifty CAAHEP-accredited athletic training programs were randomly selected in proportion to the number of programs in each geographic region. Ten students from each school were selected to complete the Kolb Learning Style Inventory (LSI) and the Productivity Environmental Preference Survey (PEPS). Subjects: A total of 193 undergraduate athletic training students (84 men, 109 women) with a mean age of 22.3 ± 2.8 years completed the PEPS, while 188 students completed the LSI. Measurements: We used chi-square analyses to determine if differences existed in learning-style type and if these differences were based on geographic location. We calculated analysis of variance to determine if there were any geographic differences in the mean overall combination scores of the LSI. Descriptive statistics were used to evaluate the PEPS. Results: The overall return rate was 38%. The chi-square analyses revealed no significant difference in learning-style type for athletic training students, regardless of the geographic region. The LSI yielded a relatively even distribution of learning styles: 29.3% of the students were accommodators, 19.7% were divergers, 21.8% were convergers, and 29.3% were assimilators. The overall mean combination scores were 4.9 (abstract-concrete) and 4.9 (active-reflective), and analysis of variance indicated no significant difference in the mean combination scores among the geographic regions. The PEPS revealed that undergraduate athletic training students demonstrated a strong preference for learning in the afternoon. Conclusions: Undergraduate athletic training students demonstrated great

  15. Endurance training, overtraining and baroreflex sensitivity in female athletes.

    PubMed

    Uusitalo, A L; Uusitalo, A J; Rusko, H K

    1998-11-01

    We examined heavy training-induced changes in baroreflex sensitivity, plasma volume and resting heart rate and blood pressure variability in female endurance athletes. Nine athletes (experimental training group, ETG) increased intense training (70-90% VO2max) volume by 130% and low-intensity training (< 70% Vo2max) volume by 100% during 6-9 weeks, whereas the corresponding increases in six control athletes (CG) were 5% and 10% respectively. Maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) in the ETG and CG did not change, but in five ETG athletes VO2max decreased from 53.0 +/- 2.2 (mean +/- SEM) (CI 46.8-59.2) ml kg-1 min-1 to 50.2 +/- 2.3 (43.8-56.6) ml kg-1 min-1 (P < 0.01), indicating overtraining. Baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) measured using the phenylephrine technique and blood pressure variability (BPV) did not change, but the low-frequency power of the R-R interval variability increased in the ETG (P < 0.05). The relative change in plasma volume was 7% in the ETG and 3% in the CG. The changes in BRS did not correlate with the changes in plasma volume, heart rate variability and BPV. We conclude that heavy endurance training and overtraining did not change baroreflex sensitivity or BPV but significantly increased the low-frequency power of the R-R interval variability during supine rest in female athletes as a marker of increased cardiac sympathetic modulation.

  16. Enhancing team-sport athlete performance: is altitude training relevant?

    PubMed

    Billaut, François; Gore, Christopher J; Aughey, Robert J

    2012-09-01

    Field-based team sport matches are composed of short, high-intensity efforts, interspersed with intervals of rest or submaximal exercise, repeated over a period of 60-120 minutes. Matches may also be played at moderate altitude where the lower oxygen partial pressure exerts a detrimental effect on performance. To enhance run-based performance, team-sport athletes use varied training strategies focusing on different aspects of team-sport physiology, including aerobic, sprint, repeated-sprint and resistance training. Interestingly, 'altitude' training (i.e. living and/or training in O(2)-reduced environments) has only been empirically employed by athletes and coaches to improve the basic characteristics of speed and endurance necessary to excel in team sports. Hypoxia, as an additional stimulus to training, is typically used by endurance athletes to enhance performance at sea level and to prepare for competition at altitude. Several approaches have evolved in the last few decades, which are known to enhance aerobic power and, thus, endurance performance. Altitude training can also promote an increased anaerobic fitness, and may enhance sprint capacity. Therefore, altitude training may confer potentially-beneficial adaptations to team-sport athletes, which have been overlooked in contemporary sport physiology research. Here, we review the current knowledge on the established benefits of altitude training on physiological systems relevant to team-sport performance, and conclude that current evidence supports implementation of altitude training modalities to enhance match physical performances at both sea level and altitude. We hope that this will guide the practice of many athletes and stimulate future research to better refine training programmes.

  17. Athletic Training Education Programs: To Rank or Not To Rank?

    PubMed Central

    Voll, Craig A.; Goodwin, Jeff E.; Pitney, William A.

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the literature regarding educational program ranking and to provide insights concerning undergraduate and graduate athletic training education ranking systems. Background: The demand for accountability and the need to evaluate the quality of educational programs have led to program ranking in many academic disciplines. As athletic training becomes more recognized within the medical community, determining a program's quality will become increasingly important. Description: We describe program rankings used in other disciplines for determining quality and providing measures of accountability. We discuss the strengths and weaknesses of both subjective and objective ranking systems, as well as the arguments for using program rankings in athletic training. Future directions for program ranking and potential research questions are suggested. Applications: Ranking systems on the basis of levels of perceived quality and academic productivity of programs that prepare future professionals will help potential undergraduate and graduate students make informed decisions when selecting an educational program. PMID:16558548

  18. Rehabilitation compliance in an athletic training environment.

    PubMed

    Byerly, P N; Worrell, T; Gahimer, J; Domholdt, E

    1994-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between the rehabilitation adherence of athletes and their self-reported assessment of six variables that might influence rehabilitation adherence: pain, support from others, exertion, scheduling, motivation, and environment. Each of 44 Division II athletes sustained a musculoskeletal injury and was placed on a rehabilitation program. Adherence to the program was measured by attendance at and participation in scheduled rehabilitation sessions. Each athlete was classified as adherent (n = 27) or nonadherent (n = 17). Pain and support were significantly correlated to adherence. Pain and support from others were significantly different between the adherent and nonadherent groups. Principal components analysis was also performed and confirmed the t-test results that pain and support are the only subscales strongly associated with adherence scores. We conclude that controlling pain and providing emotional support is associated with sport rehabilitation adherence.

  19. Legislative Funding of Athletic Training Positions in Public Secondary Schools

    PubMed Central

    Buxton, Barton P.; Okasaki, Eric M.; McCarthy, Michael R.; Ho, Kwok W.

    1995-01-01

    In 1991, approximately 21 000 student athletes were actively participating in organized athletics in Hawaii's 61 (38 public and 23 private) secondary schools. Of the 61 schools, only 5 (all private) employed full-time, NATABOC-certified athletic trainers (ATCs) to facilitate the sports health care of their respective student athletes. In an attempt to convince the state legislature that providing funding to hire ATCs was a primary health and safety issue in the state, a community-based educational platform was established and a twofold needs-assessment study was implemented statewide. The educational platform was aimed at parents, coaches, athletic directors, and school administrators. The needs-assessment studies consisted of a 30-question survey on the current practices of sports health care and a year-long injury surveillance survey within the 38 public secondary schools. There were significant differences between the public and private schools with respect to the practice of sports health care. The public school student athletes demonstrated a normative incidence of injury rate. These findings definitively quantified and qualified the need to hire ATCs in the public secondary schools. In July of 1993, the State of Hawaii funded a 2-year athletic training pilot program for approximately $1.2 million, following an extensive lobbying effort and media campaign. PMID:16558321

  20. No effect of weight cycling on the post-career BMI of weight class elite athletes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Repetitions of pre-competition weight-loss diets done by athletes participating in weight class sports can be regarded as periods of weight cycling. The aim of the present study is to identify the long term post-career (22 years) evolutionary profile of athletes’ BMI after such weight cycling. Methods One hundred and thirty-six retired French athletes who participated in major international competitions in weight class sports (rowers, wrestlers, boxers, and judokas) were included. Former and current body mass, height, dietary characteristics during the career (annual frequency, amount of weight lost), current physical activity, and answers on the eating-attitude test were collected by phone interview (consistency was tested by comparison with measured weight). We performed ANOVA tests for comparison between groups (sport, dieting), post-hoc tests (Bonferroni test) to identify differences within groups. BMI’s changes were treated using a mixed model. Results The recorded weight changes did not depend upon time since retirement. Between 18 y and 50 y, athletes’ BMI increased by 3.2 kg/m2 compared to the 4.2 kg/m2 increase in the general population. This increase was independent of the number of diets during the career. Retired athletes declared a mean weekly physical activity of 4.8 h ± 4.3. The eating-attitude test showed low scores for all sports without any correlation to diet characteristics. Conclusion Weight cycling during an athletic career does not induce a massive weight gain after retirement, probably due to the high level of physical activity still practiced after retirement by these athletes. PMID:23711106

  1. Case-Based Learning in Athletic Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, David C.

    2013-01-01

    The National Athletic Trainers' Association (NATA) Executive Committee for Education has emphasized the need for proper recognition and management of orthopaedic and general medical conditions through their support of numerous learning objectives and the clinical integrated proficiencies. These learning objectives and integrated clinical…

  2. Case-Based Learning in Athletic Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, David C.

    2013-01-01

    The National Athletic Trainers' Association (NATA) Executive Committee for Education has emphasized the need for proper recognition and management of orthopaedic and general medical conditions through their support of numerous learning objectives and the clinical integrated proficiencies. These learning objectives and integrated clinical…

  3. Mucosal immune responses during court training in elite tetraplegic athletes.

    PubMed

    Leicht, C A; Bishop, N C; Goosey-Tolfrey, V L

    2012-10-01

    Experimental study. To examine salivary secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA) responses and α-amylase activity during court training in highly trained tetraplegic athletes. Loughborough, UK. Seven highly trained wheelchair rugby athletes with tetraplegia performed two separate wheelchair rugby court training sessions, lasting 23 and 41.5 min, respectively, with either an aerobic or an interval focus. Timed, unstimulated saliva samples were obtained pre, post and 30 min post exercise and analysed for sIgA and α-amylase. Furthermore, blood lactate concentration and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) immediately after training were measured. sIgA secretion rate and α-amylase were unaffected by exercise during both sessions. However, the increases of sIgA concentration (30 min post exercise: +67 ± 29%) during the aerobic session were accompanied by decreases in saliva flow rate (-35 ± 22%). Athletes' physiological responses to exercise document the highly strenuous nature of the sessions, with blood lactate concentrations reaching 8.1 ± 1.0 and 8.7 ± 1.6 mmol l(-1) and RPE reaching 18(17,18) and 16(15,17) for the aerobic and the interval session, respectively. Acute bouts of highly strenuous exercise do not have negative impacts on the mucosal immune response in tetraplegic athletes, nor do they influence the production of α-amylase, a marker of sympathetic nervous activity. This contrasts responses previously observed in able-bodied athletes. The disruption of the sympathetic nervous system may prevent the downregulation of sIgA secretion rate following intense exercise, which is a response previously observed in able-bodied athletes.

  4. Habitual Dietary Nitrate Intake in Highly Trained Athletes.

    PubMed

    Jonvik, Kristin L; Nyakayiru, Jean; Van Dijk, Jan-Willem; Wardenaar, Floris C; Van Loon, Luc J C; Verdijk, Lex B

    2016-10-21

    Although beetroot juice, as a nitrate carrier, is a popular ergogenic supplement amongst athletes, nitrate is consumed through the regular diet as well. We aimed to assess the habitual dietary nitrate intake and identify the main contributing food sources in a large group of highly trained athletes. Dutch highly trained athletes (226 women and 327 men) completed 2-4 web-based 24-h dietary recalls and questionnaires within a 2-4 week period. The nitrate content of food products and food groups was determined systematically based on values found in regulatory reports and scientific literature. These were then used to calculate each athlete's dietary nitrate intake from the web-based recalls. The median[IQR] habitual nitrate intake was 106[75-170] mg/d (range 19-525 mg/d). Nitrate intake correlated with energy intake (ρ=0.28, P<0.001), and strongly correlated with vegetable intake (ρ=0.78, P<0.001). In accordance, most of the dietary nitrate was consumed through vegetables, potatoes and fruit, accounting for 74% of total nitrate intake, with lettuce and spinach contributing most. When corrected for energy intake, nitrate intake was substantially higher in female vs male athletes (12.8[9.2-20.0] vs 9.4[6.2-13.8] mg/MJ; P<0.001). This difference was attributed to the higher vegetable intake in female vs male athletes (150[88-236] vs 114[61-183] g/d; P<0.001). In conclusion, median daily intake of dietary nitrate in highly trained athletes was 106 mg, with large inter-individual variation. Dietary nitrate intake was strongly associated with the intake of vegetables. Increasing the intake of nitrate-rich vegetables in the diet might serve as an alternative strategy for nitrate supplementation.

  5. High-intensity and resistance training and elite young athletes.

    PubMed

    Ratel, Sébastien

    2011-01-01

    Although in the past resistance and high-intensity exercise training among young children was the subject of numerous controversies, it is now well-documented that this training mode is a safe and effective means of developing maximal strength, maximal power output and athletic performance in youth, provided that exercises are performed with appropriate supervision and precautions. Muscular strength and power output values measured from vertical jump and Wingate anaerobic tests are higher in elite than in non-elite young athletes and normal children, and the specific training effects on maximal power output normalised for body size are clearly more distinct before puberty. At present, there is no scientific evidence to support the view that high-intensity and/or resistance training might hinder growth and maturation in young children. Pre-pubertal growth is not adversely affected by sport at a competitive level and anthropometric factors are of importance for choice of sport in children. However, coaches, teachers and parents should be aware that unsupervised high-intensity and resistance training programmes involving maximal loads or too frequently repeated resistance exercises increase the risk of injury. Resistance training alone is an effective additional means of developing athletic performance throughout planned youth sports training programmes. Strategies for enhancing the effectiveness and safety of youth resistance and high-intensity exercise training are discussed in this chapter.

  6. Master's Level Professional Athletic Training Programs: Program Characteristics, Graduation Requirements, and Outcome Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ostrowski, Jennifer Lynn; Marshall, Brent

    2015-01-01

    Context: While currently there are 2 curriculum route options leading to athletic training certification, the future of athletic training education is being heavily debated. While master's-level professional (MLP) athletic training programs account for less than 8% of all accredited programs, these programs have seen tremendous growth in the past…

  7. An Examination of Feedback Interactions between Athletic Training Students and Clinical Instructors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nottingham, Sara Lynn

    2011-01-01

    Feedback has been established as an important educational tool in athletic training clinical education. However, there is currently minimal understanding of the feedback provided during athletic training clinical education experiences. The purpose of this study was to examine the characteristics of feedback in athletic training clinical education,…

  8. Distinctions between Athletic Training Education Programs at the Undergraduate and Graduate Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkerson, Gary B.; Colston, Marisa A.; Bogdanowicz, Brian T.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To provide a historical perspective on factors that have shaped the current structure of athletic training education, and to advocate development of a new conceptual framework for a continuum of professional education in athletic training. Background: Athletic training is a relatively young profession that has undergone significant…

  9. The Socialization of First-Time Athletic Training Education Program Directors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viesselman, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Starting in 2004 athletic training students had to graduate from accredited athletic training education programs to become certified. Institutions had to accredit their athletic training education programs to continue offering students the opportunity to become certified. These institutions needed to transition current employees or hire new…

  10. Program Directors' Perceptions of Professional Bachelor's Athletic Training Student Decisions to Persist and Depart

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Thomas G.; Hertel, Jay; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Dodge, Thomas M.; Wathington, Heather D.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Recent literature has focused on reasons for athletic training student persistence and departure. However, accredited professional bachelor's athletic training program (ATP) directors' opinions regarding student retention have yet to be studied, to our knowledge. Objective: To determine reasons for athletic training student persistence…

  11. Promoting Athletic Training through a General Education Course in Psychosocial Aspects of Sports Injuries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardiner-Shires, Alison Marie; Heinerichs, Scott

    2012-01-01

    Context: A general education course taught by athletic training education faculty has the potential to expose the entire student body to the athletic training profession in a unique way while also meeting requirements of the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education. Objective: To introduce a detailed case study of a general…

  12. Program Directors' Perceptions of Professional Bachelor's Athletic Training Student Decisions to Persist and Depart

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Thomas G.; Hertel, Jay; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Dodge, Thomas M.; Wathington, Heather D.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Recent literature has focused on reasons for athletic training student persistence and departure. However, accredited professional bachelor's athletic training program (ATP) directors' opinions regarding student retention have yet to be studied, to our knowledge. Objective: To determine reasons for athletic training student persistence…

  13. Master's Level Professional Athletic Training Programs: Program Characteristics, Graduation Requirements, and Outcome Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ostrowski, Jennifer Lynn; Marshall, Brent

    2015-01-01

    Context: While currently there are 2 curriculum route options leading to athletic training certification, the future of athletic training education is being heavily debated. While master's-level professional (MLP) athletic training programs account for less than 8% of all accredited programs, these programs have seen tremendous growth in the past…

  14. The Socialization of First-Time Athletic Training Education Program Directors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viesselman, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Starting in 2004 athletic training students had to graduate from accredited athletic training education programs to become certified. Institutions had to accredit their athletic training education programs to continue offering students the opportunity to become certified. These institutions needed to transition current employees or hire new…

  15. Promoting Athletic Training through a General Education Course in Psychosocial Aspects of Sports Injuries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardiner-Shires, Alison Marie; Heinerichs, Scott

    2012-01-01

    Context: A general education course taught by athletic training education faculty has the potential to expose the entire student body to the athletic training profession in a unique way while also meeting requirements of the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education. Objective: To introduce a detailed case study of a general…

  16. Athletic Training Educators' Knowledge, Comfort, and Perceived Importance of Evidence-Based Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welch, Cailee E.; Van Lunen, Bonnie L.; Walker, Stacy E.; Manspeaker, Sarah A.; Hankemeier, Dorice A.; Brown, Sara D.; Laursen, R. Mark; Onate, James A.

    2011-01-01

    Context: Before new strategies and effective techniques for implementation of evidence-based practice (EBP) into athletic training curricula can occur, it is crucial to recognize the current knowledge and understanding of EBP concepts among athletic training educators. Objective: To assess athletic training educators' current knowledge, comfort,…

  17. High-intensity interval training and athletic performance in Taekwondo athletes.

    PubMed

    Monks, Lynne; Seo, Myong-Won; Kim, Hyun-Bae; Jung, Hyun C; Song, Jong K

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) on athletic performance in Taekwondo athletes. Thirty-three male and female collegiate Taekwondo athletes were randomly divided into a HIIT group (N.=16) or a high-intensity continuous running (HICR) group (N.=17). The HIIT group undertook training of high-intensity sprints interspersed with active rest periods whilst the HICR group participated in high-intensity running for a continuous period. Both groups completed 11 sessions over 4 weeks. Physique, body composition, Wingate anaerobic test and VO2max test were measured. The vertical jump test, agility T-test and sit-ups were used to assess physical fitness. Repeated measures ANCOVAs with sex as a covariate were applied and significant level was set at 0.05. Following 11 sessions of training, significant improvements in anaerobic peak power (P<0.05), relative peak power (P<0.05), and mean power (P<0.05) were observed only in HIIT group compared to HICR group. A greater improvement of aerobic capacity was observed in HIIT group (8.8%) compared to the HICR group (1.7%). In relation to physical fitness, the HIIT group improved in the vertical jump while the HICR group did not change. Both the HIIT and HICR groups showed greater improvements in T-test and sit-ups during the intervention period. This study shows the effectiveness of eleven sessions of HIIT in producing significant improvements in anaerobic capacity relevant to successful Taekwondo competition performance in collegiate Taekwondo athletes. This could inform the future planning of Taekwondo athletes' pre-competition training, specifically the influence of training intensity on anaerobic capacity.

  18. Tennis physiology: training the competitive athlete.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, Mark S

    2007-01-01

    The game of tennis has evolved from the wooden-racket era of long, crafty points based on style and finesse, to the current fast paced, explosive sport based on power, strength and speed, where 210 km/h serves are common. This evolution over the last 20 years has led to an increased interest in tennis research. Competitive tennis athletes need a mixture of anaerobic skills, such as speed, agility and power, combined with high aerobic capabilities. The work-to-rest ratios of competitive tennis athletes range between 1 : 3 and 1 : 5, and fatigue has been shown to greatly reduce the hitting accuracy. Competitive male tennis athletes maintain body fat <12% and have maximal oxygen uptake values >50 mL/kg/min, and as high as 70 mL/kg/min. Results from lactate testing in tennis players are inconclusive as some studies have shown increased levels, whilst other studies have shown little or no change. Further investigation is required to determine the production and utilisation effects of lactate from playing tennis. The average length of time to play a point in tennis is <10 seconds and this has declined substantially in the last 20 years. Further research is needed to investigate tournament performance and its effect on fatigue, recovery, hormonal and injury levels. As the game of tennis continues to change, the physiological parameters must be continually investigated to help provide athletes, coaches and trainers with information that will aid in the development of efficient and productive tennis performance and injury prevention programmes.

  19. Applying Brain-Based Learning Principles to Athletic Training Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craig, Debbie I.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To present different concepts and techniques related to the application of brain-based learning principles to Athletic Training clinical education. Background: The body of knowledge concerning how our brains physically learn continues to grow. Brain-based learning principles, developed by numerous authors, offer advice on how to…

  20. Descriptive Qualities of Athletic Training Education Program Directors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leone, James E.; Judd, Michael R.; Colandreo, Robert M.

    2008-01-01

    Context: Limited literature explores professional preparation of program directors (PD) to lead an athletic training education program (ATEP). Objective: To explore challenges, effectiveness, leadership, and PD role selection. Design: Descriptive and qualitative exploratory email survey. Setting: Educational. Participants: Emails were sent to 345…

  1. A Conceptual Framework for Clinical Education in Athletic Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radtke, Sarah

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To develop a model for clinical education in athletic training education based on integration of various allied health professional clinical education models. Background: Clinical education is a critical component of allied health education programs. It allows for the transfer of knowledge and skills from classroom to practical…

  2. Designing Simulations for Athletic Training Students through Interprofessional Teaching Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tivener, Kristin Ann; Gloe, Donna Sue

    2015-01-01

    Context: While multidisciplinary team approaches to education and practice have been promoted for decades, literature on collaborative efforts in athletic training and nursing remains sparse. Objective: The goal of this article is to provide an example of an interprofessional teaching collaboration in which a simulation scenario was developed…

  3. Enhance Learning in Athletic Training Education with Audience Response Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harman, Chris T.

    2010-01-01

    Audience Response Systems (ARS) are now being used to enhance learning in various higher education disciplines. With several ARS brands available, it is most important to consider various facets of this interactive technology prior to implementing it into athletic training courses. This article will outline strategies to incorporate this learning…

  4. Delegation and Empowerment in CAATE Accredited Athletic Training Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoch, Johanna; White, Kristi; Starkey, Chad; Krause, B. Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Context: The use of delegation can potentially alleviate some of the stress with administering an athletic training education program (ATEP) and allow program directors (PDs) to focus on other aspects of their academic role. Objectives: To determine the reasons PDs delegate and do not delegate tasks to other faculty of ATEPs accredited by the…

  5. Immediate Feedback and Learning in Athletic Training Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Thomas G.; Laurent, Tim

    2011-01-01

    Context: Immediate feedback has been shown to improve student learning more efficiently than delayed feedback in lower-level general education courses. No research exists examining the effects of immediate feedback on learning in higher-level athletic training coursework. Objective: To determine if using the Immediate Feedback Assessment Technique…

  6. Spirituality in the Curricula of Accredited Athletic Training Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Udermann, Brian E.; Schutte, Greta E.; Reineke, David M.; Pitney, William A.; Gibson, Mark H.; Murray, Steven R.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The objectives of this study were to examine if topics related to spirituality were being addressed in the curricula of athletic training education programs (ATEPs) and to investigate whether program directors (PDs) believed this to be a topic worthy of inclusion in ATEP experiences. Design and Setting: A descriptive mixed method study…

  7. Athletic Training Students' Perceptions of Mentorship in Clinical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Eason, Christianne M.; Nottingham, Sara; Barrett, Jessica L.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Mentorship is a developmental process whereby a novice individual, as he/she becomes inducted into his/her area of expertise, is guided by a more experienced person. Speculation exists that years of experience can impact this relationship. Objective: To determine the impact mentoring can have on athletic training student development and…

  8. The Use of Standardized Patients in Athletic Training Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Stacy E.; Weidner, Thomas G.

    2010-01-01

    Context: Standardized patients are widely used in health care programs to both teach and evaluate the communication and clinical skills of students. Although athletic training education programs (ATEPs) commonly use simulations, little information exists related to the use and implementation of standardized patients (SPs). Objective: To provide…

  9. Satisfaction and Importance Factors in Athletic Training Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, W. David; Swann, Elizabeth; Frey, Bruce B.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To examine various institution and student demographics and the ratings of Satisfaction (SAT) and Importance (IMP) for several programmatic variables within Athletic Training Education Programs (ATEPs). Design and Setting: A survey of SAT and IMP ratings of programmatic variables conducted with accredited, entry-level ATEPs. Subjects:…

  10. Enhance Learning in Athletic Training Education with Audience Response Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harman, Chris T.

    2010-01-01

    Audience Response Systems (ARS) are now being used to enhance learning in various higher education disciplines. With several ARS brands available, it is most important to consider various facets of this interactive technology prior to implementing it into athletic training courses. This article will outline strategies to incorporate this learning…

  11. Perceived Cultural Competence Levels in Undergraduate Athletic Training Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Volberding, Jennifer L.

    2013-01-01

    Context: As the patient population continues to diversify, it is essential that athletic training students (ATSs) are educated to provide culturally competent care. This high-quality health care within the context of a patient's race, ethnicity, language, religious beliefs, or behaviors is a foundation of professional practice. Objective:…

  12. Designing Simulations for Athletic Training Students through Interprofessional Teaching Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tivener, Kristin Ann; Gloe, Donna Sue

    2015-01-01

    Context: While multidisciplinary team approaches to education and practice have been promoted for decades, literature on collaborative efforts in athletic training and nursing remains sparse. Objective: The goal of this article is to provide an example of an interprofessional teaching collaboration in which a simulation scenario was developed…

  13. Delegation and Empowerment in CAATE Accredited Athletic Training Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoch, Johanna; White, Kristi; Starkey, Chad; Krause, B. Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Context: The use of delegation can potentially alleviate some of the stress with administering an athletic training education program (ATEP) and allow program directors (PDs) to focus on other aspects of their academic role. Objectives: To determine the reasons PDs delegate and do not delegate tasks to other faculty of ATEPs accredited by the…

  14. Athletic Training Students' Perceptions of Mentorship in Clinical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Eason, Christianne M.; Nottingham, Sara; Barrett, Jessica L.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Mentorship is a developmental process whereby a novice individual, as he/she becomes inducted into his/her area of expertise, is guided by a more experienced person. Speculation exists that years of experience can impact this relationship. Objective: To determine the impact mentoring can have on athletic training student development and…

  15. Key Factors for Providing Appropriate Medical Care in Secondary School Athletics: Athletic Training Services and Budget

    PubMed Central

    Wham, George S.; Saunders, Ruth; Mensch, James

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Context: Research suggests that appropriate medical care for interscholastic athletes is frequently lacking. However, few investigators have examined factors related to care. Objective: To examine medical care provided by interscholastic athletics programs and to identify factors associated with variations in provision of care. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Mailed and e-mailed survey. Patients or Other Participants: One hundred sixty-six South Carolina high schools. Intervention(s): The 132-item Appropriate Medical Care Assessment Tool (AMCAT) was developed and pilot tested. It included 119 items assessing medical care based on the Appropriate Medical Care for Secondary School-Age Athletes (AMCSSAA) Consensus Statement and Monograph (test-retest reliability: r  =  0.89). Also included were items assessing potential influences on medical care. Presence, source, and number of athletic trainers; school size; distance to nearest medical center; public or private status; sports medicine supply budget; and varsity football regional championships served as explanatory variables, whereas the school setting, region of state, and rate of free or reduced lunch qualifiers served as control variables. Main Outcome Measure(s): The Appropriate Care Index (ACI) score from the AMCAT provided a quantitative measure of medical care and served as the response variable. The ACI score was determined based on a school's response to items relating to AMCSSAA guidelines. Results: Regression analysis revealed associations with ACI score for athletic training services and sports medicine supply budget (both P < .001) when controlling for the setting, region, and rate of free or reduced lunch qualifiers. These 2 variables accounted for 30% of the variance in ACI score (R2  =  0.302). Post hoc analysis showed differences between ACI score based on the source of the athletic trainer and the size of the sports medicine supply budget. Conclusions: The AMCAT offers an

  16. Athletic Training Services During Daily Patient Encounters: A Report From the Athletic Training Practice-Based Research Network.

    PubMed

    Lam, Kenneth C; Valier, Alison R Snyder; Anderson, Barton E; McLeod, Tamara C Valovich

    2016-06-02

    Athletic training services such as taping, wrapping, and stretching are common during routine care but rarely captured in traditional patient documentation. These clinical data are vital when determining appropriate medical coverage and demonstrating the value and worth of athletic trainers (ATs). To analyze clinical data from daily encounter forms within the Athletic Training Practice-Based Research Network (AT-PBRN). Descriptive study. Secondary school athletic training clinics. Adolescent patients (n = 4888; age = 16.3 ± 1.4 years) seeking care from ATs. We used Web-based electronic medical records from December 1, 2009, to July 1, 2015, to obtain patient characteristics via deidentified data. Descriptive data regarding practice characteristics from patient encounter forms were analyzed and reported as percentages and frequencies. A total of 36 245 patient encounters (mean = 7.5 ± 11.6 encounters per patient) were recorded. Football, basketball, soccer, track, and volleyball accounted for 85.1% of all encounters. Most encounters were for preventive services (48.8%, n = 22 329), followed by care for a current injury (37.2%, n = 17 027) and care for a new injury (13.9%, n = 6368). Of the preventive encounters, taping (52.7%) was the most common service provided, followed by ice- or hot-pack application (25.4%) and treatment (9.6%). Taping (28.7%) was also the most common service for current injuries, followed by treatment (26.7%) and ice- or hot-pack application (26.2%). Our findings highlight the unique role of ATs as health care providers who provide substantial preventive services to their patients. Further, these results represent one of the first attempts to describe athletic training services related to nontime-loss injuries, emphasizing the significant role that ATs play in the health care of secondary school athletes. These findings should help clinicians and administrators make more informed decisions regarding appropriate medical coverage.

  17. An Examination of the Alignment of Student-Athletes' Undergraduate Major Choices and Career Field Aspirations in Life after Sports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Navarro, Kristina M.

    2015-01-01

    Today higher education student affairs professionals are charged with not only understanding the challenges and needs of a diverse student body, they must also prepare students for careers in life after college. For this empirical study I explored the undergraduate major choices and career aspirations of 29 senior student-athletes at a large,…

  18. Popularity of hypoxic training methods for endurance-based professional and amateur athletes.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Herms, J; Julià-Sánchez, S; Hamlin, M J; Corbi, F; Pagès, T; Viscor, G

    2015-05-01

    Scientific debate continues into whether hypoxic training has any performance benefit for athletes, and although this type of training seems popular, to our knowledge little empirical evidence on its popularity with endurance-based athletes exists. To quantify the usage of hypoxic training in endurance-based athletes we asked 203 athletes (amateur = 108, professional = 95) to complete a 17-question survey during 2013-2014 season. Compared to amateurs, professional athletes were 4.5 times (3.0-6.8, odds ratio, 95% confidence limits) more likely to undertake hypoxic training. Live-high train-low was the most popular hypoxic training protocol for athletes (52% professional and 80% amateur) with live-high train-high also used (38% professional, 20% amateur). Compared to amateurs, professional athletes tended to use evidence-based hypoxic training methods, seek advice on hypoxic training from reliable sources and were generally more realistic about the potential performance gains as a result of hypoxic training. Almost one third (25-30%) of all athletes suffered illness during their hypoxic training. Compared to amateurs, professional athletes are more likely to undertake hypoxic training and tend to follow current scientific guidelines. Attenuation of the ill effects that occur during hypoxic training may be accomplished if athletes give more attention to monitoring stress and training levels.

  19. Preceptors' Influence on Athletic Training Students' Development of Excitement and Commitment to the Field of Athletic Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodge, Thomas M.; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Athletic training students (ATS) who are excited about their chosen profession are likely to persist to graduation. Preceptors exert significant influence on ATS; however, little is known about the methods that preceptors use to help ATS develop their own professional commitments. Objective: To investigate the methods used by preceptors…

  20. Organizational Infrastructure in the Collegiate Athletic Training Setting, Part II: Benefits of and Barriers in the Athletics Model.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Ashley; Mazerolle, Stephanie M; Eason, Christianne M

    2017-01-01

     The athletics model, in which athletic training clinical programs are part of the athletics department, is the predominant model in the collegiate athletic training setting. Little is known about athletic trainers' (ATs') perceptions of this model, particularly as it relates to organizational hierarchy.  To explore the perceived benefits of and barriers in the athletics model.  Qualitative study.  National Collegiate Athletic Association Divisions I and III.  Eight full-time ATs (5 men, 3 women; age = 41 ± 13 years, time employed at the current institution = 14 ± 14 years, experience as a certified AT = 18 ± 13 years) working in the collegiate setting using the athletics model.  We conducted semistructured interviews via telephone or in person and used a general inductive approach to analyze the qualitative data. Multiple-analyst triangulation and peer review established trustworthiness.  Two benefits and 3 barriers emerged from the data. Role identity emerged as a benefit that occurred with role clarity, validation, and acceptance of the collegiate AT personality. Role congruence emerged as a benefit of the athletics model that occurred with 2 lower-order themes: relationship building and physician alignment and support. Role strain, staffing concerns, and work-life conflict emerged as barriers in the athletics model. Role strain occurred with 2 primary lower-order themes: role incongruity and role conflict.  The athletics model is the most common infrastructure for employing ATs in collegiate athletics. Participants expressed positive experiences via character identity, support, trust relationships, and longevity. However, common barriers remain. To reduce role strain, misaligning values, and work-life conflict, ATs working in the athletics model are encouraged to evaluate their relationships with coaches and their supervisor and consider team physician alignment. Moreover, measures to increase quality athletic training staff from a care

  1. The National Sports Safety in Secondary Schools Benchmark (N4SB) Study: Defining Athletic Training Practice Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    McLeod, Tamara C. Valovich; Bliven, Kellie C. Huxel; Lam, Kenneth C.; Bay, R. Curtis; Valier, Alison R. Snyder; Parsons, John T.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Increased rates of sport participation and sport-related injury have led to greater emphasis on and attention to medical care of student-athletes in the secondary school setting. Access to athletic training services is seen as a critical factor for delivering adequate injury prevention and medical care to student-athletes. However, few data are available regarding practice characteristics of athletic trainers (ATs) in this setting. Objective: To characterize the practices of secondary school athletic trainers (ATs). Design:  Descriptive study. Setting: Web-based survey. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 17 558 ATs with current National Athletic Trainers' Association membership were identified for survey distribution. Of these, 4232 ATs indicated that they practiced in the secondary school setting, and 4045 completed some part of the survey. Main Outcome Measure(s):  A Web-based survey was used to obtain demographic information about ATs and their secondary schools and characteristics of athletic training practice. Descriptive data regarding the athletic trainer's personal characteristics, secondary school characteristics, and practice patterns are reported as percentages and frequencies. Results: Most respondents were in the early stages of their careers and relatively new to the secondary school practice setting. Nearly two-thirds (62.4%; n = 2522) of respondents had 10 or fewer years of experience as secondary school ATs, 52% (n = 2132) had been certified for 10 or fewer years, and 53.4% (n = 2164) had 10 or fewer years of experience in any practice setting. The majority of respondents (85%) worked in public schools with enrollment of 1000 to 1999 (35.5%) and with football (95.5%). More than half of respondents were employed directly by their school. Most respondents (50.6%) reported an athletic training budget of less than $4000. The majority of ATs performed evaluations (87.5%) on-site all of the time, with a smaller percentage providing

  2. The national sports safety in secondary schools benchmark (N4SB) study: defining athletic training practice characteristics.

    PubMed

    McLeod, Tamara C Valovich; Bliven, Kellie C Huxel; Lam, Kenneth C; Bay, R Curtis; Valier, Alison R Snyder; Parsons, John T

    2013-01-01

    Increased rates of sport participation and sport-related injury have led to greater emphasis on and attention to medical care of student-athletes in the secondary school setting. Access to athletic training services is seen as a critical factor for delivering adequate injury prevention and medical care to student-athletes. However, few data are available regarding practice characteristics of athletic trainers (ATs) in this setting. To characterize the practices of secondary school athletic trainers (ATs). Descriptive study. Web-based survey. A total of 17 558 ATs with current National Athletic Trainers' Association membership were identified for survey distribution. Of these, 4232 ATs indicated that they practiced in the secondary school setting, and 4045 completed some part of the survey. A Web-based survey was used to obtain demographic information about ATs and their secondary schools and characteristics of athletic training practice. Descriptive data regarding the athletic trainer's personal characteristics, secondary school characteristics, and practice patterns are reported as percentages and frequencies. Most respondents were in the early stages of their careers and relatively new to the secondary school practice setting. Nearly two-thirds (62.4%; n = 2522) of respondents had 10 or fewer years of experience as secondary school ATs, 52% (n = 2132) had been certified for 10 or fewer years, and 53.4% (n = 2164) had 10 or fewer years of experience in any practice setting. The majority of respondents (85%) worked in public schools with enrollment of 1000 to 1999 (35.5%) and with football (95.5%). More than half of respondents were employed directly by their school. Most respondents (50.6%) reported an athletic training budget of less than $4000. The majority of ATs performed evaluations (87.5%) on-site all of the time, with a smaller percentage providing treatments (73.3%) or rehabilitation (47.4%) services all of the time. This is the first study to describe

  3. Application of altitude/hypoxic training by elite athletes.

    PubMed

    Wilber, Randall L

    2007-09-01

    At the Olympic level, differences in performance are typically less than 0.5%. This helps explain why many contemporary elite endurance athletes in summer and winter sport incorporate some form of altitude/hypoxic training within their year-round training plan, believing that it will provide the "competitive edge" to succeed at the Olympic level. The purpose of this paper is to describe the practical application of altitude/hypoxic training as used by elite athletes. Within the general framework of the paper, both anecdotal and scientific evidence will be presented relative to the efficacy of several contemporary altitude/hypoxic training models and devices currently used by Olympic-level athletes for the purpose of legally enhancing performance. These include the three primary altitude/hypoxic training models: 1) live high+train high (LH+TH), 2) live high+train low (LH+TL), and 3) live low+train high (LL+TH). The LH+TL model will be examined in detail and will include its various modifications: natural/terrestrial altitude, simulated altitude via nitrogen dilution or oxygen filtration, and hypobaric normoxia via supplemental oxygen. A somewhat opposite approach to LH+TL is the altitude/hypoxic training strategy of LL+TH, and data regarding its efficacy will be presented. Recently, several of these altitude/hypoxic training strategies and devices underwent critical review by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) for the purpose of potentially banning them as illegal performance-enhancing substances/methods. This paper will conclude with an update on the most recent statement from WADA regarding the use of simulated altitude devices.

  4. Program directors' perceptions of undergraduate athletic training student retention.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Thomas G; Hertel, Jay; Mazerolle, Stephanie M; Dodge, Thomas M; Wathington, Heather D

    2015-02-01

    The average retention rate for students enrolled in undergraduate athletic training programs (ATPs) nationwide has been reported to be 81%, and slightly more than half of program directors (PDs) have indicated that retention of athletic training students (ATSs) is a problem. However, why PDs do or do not believe ATS retention is problematic is unknown. To determine why PDs do or do not believe ATS retention is problematic. Qualitative study. Undergraduate ATPs. We obtained responses from 177 of the 343 PDs (51.6%). Using data saturation as a guide, we randomly selected 16 PDs from the survey responses to participate in follow-up telephone interviews; 8 believed retention was a problem and 8 did not. During audio-recorded telephone interviews, we asked PDs why they thought retention was or was not a problem for athletic training education. Following verbatim transcription, we used grounded theory to analyze the interview data and maintained trustworthiness by using intercoder agreement, member checks, and peer review. Program directors believed that retaining ATSs was a problem because students lack information regarding athletic training and the rigor of the ATP. Program directors were consistent in their perception that ATPs do not have a retention challenge because of the use of a secondary admissions process. This finding was likely based on personal use of a secondary admissions process in the ATPs these PDs lead. Program directors who lead ATPs that struggle to retain ATSs should consider using a secondary admissions process. During the preprofessional phase of the ATP, faculty and staff should work to socialize students to the demands of the ATP and the professional lives of athletic trainers.

  5. Program Directors' Perceptions of Undergraduate Athletic Training Student Retention

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, Thomas G.; Hertel, Jay; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Dodge, Thomas M.; Wathington, Heather D.

    2015-01-01

    Context: The average retention rate for students enrolled in undergraduate athletic training programs (ATPs) nationwide has been reported to be 81%, and slightly more than half of program directors (PDs) have indicated that retention of athletic training students (ATSs) is a problem. However, why PDs do or do not believe ATS retention is problematic is unknown. Objective: To determine why PDs do or do not believe ATS retention is problematic. Design: Qualitative study. Setting: Undergraduate ATPs. Patients or Other Participants: We obtained responses from 177 of the 343 PDs (51.6%). Using data saturation as a guide, we randomly selected 16 PDs from the survey responses to participate in follow-up telephone interviews; 8 believed retention was a problem and 8 did not. Data Collection and Analysis: During audio-recorded telephone interviews, we asked PDs why they thought retention was or was not a problem for athletic training education. Following verbatim transcription, we used grounded theory to analyze the interview data and maintained trustworthiness by using intercoder agreement, member checks, and peer review. Results: Program directors believed that retaining ATSs was a problem because students lack information regarding athletic training and the rigor of the ATP. Program directors were consistent in their perception that ATPs do not have a retention challenge because of the use of a secondary admissions process. This finding was likely based on personal use of a secondary admissions process in the ATPs these PDs lead. Conclusions: Program directors who lead ATPs that struggle to retain ATSs should consider using a secondary admissions process. During the preprofessional phase of the ATP, faculty and staff should work to socialize students to the demands of the ATP and the professional lives of athletic trainers. PMID:25259613

  6. Clinical integration and how it affects student retention in undergraduate athletic training programs.

    PubMed

    Young, Allison; Klossner, Joanne; Docherty, Carrie L; Dodge, Thomas M; Mensch, James M

    2013-01-01

    A better understanding of why students leave an undergraduate athletic training education program (ATEP), as well as why they persist, is critical in determining the future membership of our profession. To better understand how clinical experiences affect student retention in undergraduate ATEPs. Survey-based research using a quantitative and qualitative mixed-methods approach. Three-year undergraduate ATEPs across District 4 of the National Athletic Trainers' Association. Seventy-one persistent students and 23 students who left the ATEP prematurely. Data were collected using a modified version of the Athletic Training Education Program Student Retention Questionnaire. Multivariate analysis of variance was performed on the quantitative data, followed by a univariate analysis of variance on any significant findings. The qualitative data were analyzed through inductive content analysis. A difference was identified between the persister and dropout groups (Pillai trace = 0.42, F(1,92) = 12.95, P = .01). The follow-up analysis of variance revealed that the persister and dropout groups differed on the anticipatory factors (F(1,92) = 4.29, P = .04), clinical integration (F(1,92) = 6.99, P = .01), and motivation (F(1,92) = 43.12, P = .01) scales. Several themes emerged in the qualitative data, including networks of support, authentic experiential learning, role identity, time commitment, and major or career change. A perceived difference exists in how athletic training students are integrated into their clinical experiences between those students who leave an ATEP and those who stay. Educators may improve retention by emphasizing authentic experiential learning opportunities rather than hours worked, by allowing students to take on more responsibility, and by facilitating networks of support within clinical education experiences.

  7. Clinical Integration and How It Affects Student Retention in Undergraduate Athletic Training Programs

    PubMed Central

    Young, Allison; Klossner, Joanne; Docherty, Carrie L; Dodge, Thomas M; Mensch, James M

    2013-01-01

    Context A better understanding of why students leave an undergraduate athletic training education program (ATEP), as well as why they persist, is critical in determining the future membership of our profession. Objective To better understand how clinical experiences affect student retention in undergraduate ATEPs. Design Survey-based research using a quantitative and qualitative mixed-methods approach. Setting Three-year undergraduate ATEPs across District 4 of the National Athletic Trainers' Association. Patients or Other Participants Seventy-one persistent students and 23 students who left the ATEP prematurely. Data Collection and Analysis Data were collected using a modified version of the Athletic Training Education Program Student Retention Questionnaire. Multivariate analysis of variance was performed on the quantitative data, followed by a univariate analysis of variance on any significant findings. The qualitative data were analyzed through inductive content analysis. Results A difference was identified between the persister and dropout groups (Pillai trace = 0.42, F1,92 = 12.95, P = .01). The follow-up analysis of variance revealed that the persister and dropout groups differed on the anticipatory factors (F1,92 = 4.29, P = .04), clinical integration (F1,92 = 6.99, P = .01), and motivation (F1,92 = 43.12, P = .01) scales. Several themes emerged in the qualitative data, including networks of support, authentic experiential learning, role identity, time commitment, and major or career change. Conclusions A perceived difference exists in how athletic training students are integrated into their clinical experiences between those students who leave an ATEP and those who stay. Educators may improve retention by emphasizing authentic experiential learning opportunities rather than hours worked, by allowing students to take on more responsibility, and by facilitating networks of support within clinical education experiences. PMID:23672327

  8. The history and evolution of athletic training education in the United States.

    PubMed

    Delforge, G D; Behnke, R S

    1999-01-01

    To present a chronologic review of the history and evolution of athletic training education in the United States as related to the professional growth of athletic training and the National Athletic Trainers' Association. Commonly accepted characteristics of a profession are an identifiable body of knowledge, the emergence of practitioners as professional authorities, and community recognition. These characteristics establish the criteria by which the professional growth, or professionalization, of athletic training can be judged. With guidance from the National Athletic Trainers' Association, the development of athletic training education programs and credentialing of athletic trainers during the past 50 years have contributed to the professionalization of athletic training. We present a chronology of the contributions of the National Athletic Trainers' Association to the development of athletic training education in the United States. The activities of various committees, task forces, and Association members are reviewed and traced through the past 5 decades. Early curriculum models and the development of education programs in colleges and universities are discussed. The historical review of athletic training education in this article will enhance the reader's understanding of the relationships among education, credentialing of practitioners, and professionalism in athletic training.

  9. Role of Clinical Education Experiences on Athletic Training Students' Development of Professional Commitment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Dodge, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Context: Limited evidence exists on the role clinical education can play in the development of athletic training student commitment for the profession. Objective: Investigating the role clinical education experiences play on the development of passion for athletic training. Design: Exploratory qualitative study. Setting: Athletic training…

  10. Factors Influencing Senior Athletic Training Students' Preparedness to Enter the Workforce

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Benes, Sarah S.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Athletic training education programs must provide the student with opportunities to learn the roles and responsibilities of the athletic trainer. Objective: Investigate factors that help prepare the athletic training student (ATS) to successfully enter the workplace upon graduation from her undergraduate program. Design: Exploratory…

  11. Critical-Thinking Skills of First-Year Athletic Training Students Enrolled in Professional Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Dana K.; Sikkema, Jill A.; Nynas, Suzette M.; Culp, Clinton

    2017-01-01

    Context: The Examination of Professional Degree Level document presented to the National Athletic Trainers' Association Board of Directors states that research in athletic training education has not investigated differences in the critical-thinking skills of professional athletic training students. Objective: Investigate the differences in…

  12. Institutional Profiles of CAATE Accredited Entry-Level Athletic Training Education Programs in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rich, Valerie J.; Kedrowski, Jonathan J.; Richter, Scott

    2008-01-01

    Context: Educational reform has recently become common thread in athletic training education. The National Athletic Trainers' Association (NATA) Education Task force suggests that Athletic Training Education Programs (ATEPs) align within colleges of health-related professions and offer academic majors. Objective: To provide a current profile of…

  13. Programmatic Factors Associated with Undergraduate Athletic Training Student Retention and Attrition Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Thomas G.; Hertel, Jay; Wathington, Heather D.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Athletic training programs (ATPs) are charged with meeting an increased demand for athletic trainers with adequate graduates. Currently, the retention rate of athletic training students in ATPs nationwide and the programmatic factors associated with these retention rates remain unknown. Objective: Determine the retention rate for athletic…

  14. Mentoring and Personal Relationships Are Perceived Benefits of Serving as an Athletic Training Preceptor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Thomas G.; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Dodge, Thomas M.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Preceptors play a vital role in athletic training education as they mentor and socialize athletic training students into their professional role. Exploring the benefits to serving as a preceptor is important to secure appropriate professional role models for students. Objective: To determine the benefits of serving as an athletic training…

  15. Institutional Profiles of CAATE Accredited Entry-Level Athletic Training Education Programs in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rich, Valerie J.; Kedrowski, Jonathan J.; Richter, Scott

    2008-01-01

    Context: Educational reform has recently become common thread in athletic training education. The National Athletic Trainers' Association (NATA) Education Task force suggests that Athletic Training Education Programs (ATEPs) align within colleges of health-related professions and offer academic majors. Objective: To provide a current profile of…

  16. Programmatic Factors Associated with Undergraduate Athletic Training Student Retention and Attrition Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Thomas G.; Hertel, Jay; Wathington, Heather D.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Athletic training programs (ATPs) are charged with meeting an increased demand for athletic trainers with adequate graduates. Currently, the retention rate of athletic training students in ATPs nationwide and the programmatic factors associated with these retention rates remain unknown. Objective: Determine the retention rate for athletic…

  17. Mentoring and Personal Relationships Are Perceived Benefits of Serving as an Athletic Training Preceptor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Thomas G.; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Dodge, Thomas M.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Preceptors play a vital role in athletic training education as they mentor and socialize athletic training students into their professional role. Exploring the benefits to serving as a preceptor is important to secure appropriate professional role models for students. Objective: To determine the benefits of serving as an athletic training…

  18. Role of Clinical Education Experiences on Athletic Training Students' Development of Professional Commitment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Dodge, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Context: Limited evidence exists on the role clinical education can play in the development of athletic training student commitment for the profession. Objective: Investigating the role clinical education experiences play on the development of passion for athletic training. Design: Exploratory qualitative study. Setting: Athletic training…

  19. Athletic training students in the college/ university setting and the scope of clinical education.

    PubMed

    Weidner, Thomas G; Noble, Gary L; Pipkin, Jennifer B

    2006-01-01

    Athletic training education programs must provide the proper type and amount of clinical supervision in order for athletic training students to obtain appropriate clinical education and to meet Board of Certification examination requirements. To assess athletic training students' perceptions of the type and amount of clinical supervision received during clinical education. Cross-sectional design. 124 CAAHEP-accredited NCAA institutions. We obtained a national stratified random sample (by National Athletic Trainers' Association district) of undergraduate athletic training students from 61 Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs-accredited athletic training education programs. A total of 851 athletic training students participated in the study. Differences among athletic training students with first-aider/provider qualifications, student supervision during moderate-risk and increased-risk sports, program/institutional characteristics, type and amount of clinical supervision, and students' academic level and mean percentage of time spent in different types of clinical supervision. A total of 276 (32.4%) of the students reported that they supplied medical care and athletic training-related coverage beyond that of a first aider/provider. Athletic training students stating that they traveled with teams without supervision numbered 342 (40.2%). A significant difference was noted between the amount of supervision reported by sophomore and senior students ( P < .01). Athletic training students do not seem to be receiving appropriate clinical supervision and are often acting outside the scope of clinical education.

  20. Coaching Peripheral Vision Training for Soccer Athletes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marques, Nelson Kautzner, Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Brazilian Soccer began developing its current emphasis on peripheral vision in the late 1950s, by initiative of coach of the Canto do Rio Football Club, in Niteroi, Rio de Janeiro, a pioneer in the development of peripheral vision training in soccer players. Peripheral vision training gained world relevance when a young talent from Canto do Rio,…

  1. Coaching Peripheral Vision Training for Soccer Athletes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marques, Nelson Kautzner, Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Brazilian Soccer began developing its current emphasis on peripheral vision in the late 1950s, by initiative of coach of the Canto do Rio Football Club, in Niteroi, Rio de Janeiro, a pioneer in the development of peripheral vision training in soccer players. Peripheral vision training gained world relevance when a young talent from Canto do Rio,…

  2. Perceived importance of weight training to selected NCAA Division III men and women student-athletes.

    PubMed

    Poiss, Candice C; Sullivan, Patricia A; Paup, Donald C; Westerman, Beverly J

    2004-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine differences in perception of the importance of weight training as a part of general and sport-specific training for selected collegiate men and women student-athletes. Subjects included 139 men and 165 women varsity National Collegiate Athletic Association Division III student-athletes who participated in the following sports: baseball, basketball, field hockey, football, lacrosse, soccer, softball, swimming, tennis, track & field, or volleyball. Men student-athletes were significantly more likely to consider weight training essential to their general and sport-specific training than women student-athletes, as measured by the Training Information Survey. Additionally, men student-athletes were found to be significantly more competitive and win-oriented than women student-athletes (p < 0.001) as measured by the Sport Orientation Questionnaire, which is consistent with previous research. Results also showed that only highly goal-oriented student-athletes perceived weight training as: (a) important to both men and women and (b) having both feminine and masculine traits. It was concluded that significant gender differences exist in the perceived importance of weight training and that the constructs of competitiveness, win and goal orientation, may influence a student-athlete's perception of the importance of weight training. Coaches of both men and women student-athletes must teach that weight training is important for female and male student-athletes.

  3. Balance Training Programs in Athletes - a Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Brachman, Anna; Kamieniarz, Anna; Michalska, Justyna; Pawłowski, Michał; Słomka, Kajetan J; Juras, Grzegorz

    2017-09-01

    It has become almost routine practice to incorporate balance exercises into training programs for athletes from different sports. However, the type of training that is most efficient remains unclear, as well as the frequency, intensity and duration of the exercise that would be most beneficial have not yet been determined. The following review is based on papers that were found through computerized searches of PubMed and SportDiscus from 2000 to 2016. Articles related to balance training, testing, and injury prevention in young healthy athletes were considered. Based on a Boolean search strategy the independent researchers performed a literature review. A total of 2395 articles were evaluated, yet only 50 studies met the inclusion criteria. In most of the reviewed articles, balance training has proven to be an effective tool for the improvement of postural control. It is difficult to establish one model of training that would be appropriate for each sport discipline, including its characteristics and demands. The main aim of this review was to identify a training protocol based on most commonly used interventions that led to improvements in balance. Our choice was specifically established on the assessment of the effects of balance training on postural control and injury prevention as well as balance training methods. The analyses including papers in which training protocols demonstrated positive effects on balance performance suggest that an efficient training protocol should last for 8 weeks, with a frequency of two training sessions per week, and a single training session of 45 min. This standard was established based on 36 reviewed studies.

  4. Balance Training Programs in Athletes – a Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Brachman, Anna; Kamieniarz, Anna; Michalska, Justyna; Pawłowski, Michał; Słomka, Kajetan J.; Juras, Grzegorz

    2017-01-01

    Abstract It has become almost routine practice to incorporate balance exercises into training programs for athletes from different sports. However, the type of training that is most efficient remains unclear, as well as the frequency, intensity and duration of the exercise that would be most beneficial have not yet been determined. The following review is based on papers that were found through computerized searches of PubMed and SportDiscus from 2000 to 2016. Articles related to balance training, testing, and injury prevention in young healthy athletes were considered. Based on a Boolean search strategy the independent researchers performed a literature review. A total of 2395 articles were evaluated, yet only 50 studies met the inclusion criteria. In most of the reviewed articles, balance training has proven to be an effective tool for the improvement of postural control. It is difficult to establish one model of training that would be appropriate for each sport discipline, including its characteristics and demands. The main aim of this review was to identify a training protocol based on most commonly used interventions that led to improvements in balance. Our choice was specifically established on the assessment of the effects of balance training on postural control and injury prevention as well as balance training methods. The analyses including papers in which training protocols demonstrated positive effects on balance performance suggest that an efficient training protocol should last for 8 weeks, with a frequency of two training sessions per week, and a single training session of 45 min. This standard was established based on 36 reviewed studies. PMID:28828077

  5. Adaptations in athletic performance after ballistic power versus strength training.

    PubMed

    Cormie, Prue; McGuigan, Michael R; Newton, Robert U

    2010-08-01

    To determine whether the magnitude of improvement in athletic performance and the mechanisms driving these adaptations differ in relatively weak individuals exposed to either ballistic power training or heavy strength training. Relatively weak men (n = 24) who could perform the back squat with proficient technique were randomized into three groups: strength training (n = 8; ST), power training (n = 8; PT), or control (n = 8). Training involved three sessions per week for 10 wk in which subjects performed back squats with 75%-90% of one-repetition maximum (1RM; ST) or maximal-effort jump squats with 0%-30% 1RM (PT). Jump and sprint performances were assessed as well as measures of the force-velocity relationship, jumping mechanics, muscle architecture, and neural drive. Both experimental groups showed significant (P < or = 0.05) improvements in jump and sprint performances after training with no significant between-group differences evident in either jump (peak power: ST = 17.7% +/- 9.3%, PT = 17.6% +/- 4.5%) or sprint performance (40-m sprint: ST = 2.2% +/- 1.9%, PT = 3.6% +/- 2.3%). ST also displayed a significant increase in maximal strength that was significantly greater than the PT group (squat 1RM: ST = 31.2% +/- 11.3%, PT = 4.5% +/- 7.1%). The mechanisms driving these improvements included significant (P < or = 0.05) changes in the force-velocity relationship, jump mechanics, muscle architecture, and neural activation that showed a degree of specificity to the different training stimuli. Improvements in athletic performance were similar in relatively weak individuals exposed to either ballistic power training or heavy strength training for 10 wk. These performance improvements were mediated through neuromuscular adaptations specific to the training stimulus. The ability of strength training to render similar short-term improvements in athletic performance as ballistic power training, coupled with the potential long-term benefits of improved maximal strength

  6. Training in Community-School Collaboration for Career Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin State Dept. of Public Instruction, Madison.

    Based on the practical training experience of sixteen school districts and two universities which comprise the Wisconsin Career Education Consortium, this report presents training strategies for a variety of community-school collaboration efforts. Eleven training strategies are presented: (1) providing an in-school visitation day for business…

  7. Opportunities in Training & Development Careers. VGM Opportunities Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Edward E.; Petrini, Catherine M.; Campagna, Ann P.

    This volume is a resource for those who want to explore opportunities in training and development careers. Chapter 1 covers the evolution of training and the future of education at work. Chapter 2 considers trainers' roles; program design and development; needs assessment; development of program objectives; program content, training methods,…

  8. Extramural Training and Career Opportunities in Aging Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. on Aging (DHHS/NIH), Bethesda, MD.

    The rapid growth of the older population heightens the urgency for training in aging research. This publication outlines the opportunities for extramural research training and career development that exist within the National Institute on Aging (NIA). The NIA supports research and research training primarily through the award of grants and…

  9. Opportunities in Training & Development Careers. VGM Opportunities Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Edward E.; Petrini, Catherine M.; Campagna, Ann P.

    This volume is a resource for those who want to explore opportunities in training and development careers. Chapter 1 covers the evolution of training and the future of education at work. Chapter 2 considers trainers' roles; program design and development; needs assessment; development of program objectives; program content, training methods,…

  10. Entrepreneurship Training for Females Offers New Challenges to Career Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eliason, Carol

    1981-01-01

    Recent efforts in entrepreneurship training for women are described. These include research and development efforts, opportunities in the public schools, and the development of guidelines for career counseling to potential female entrepreneurs. (CT)

  11. The Athlete Biological Passport: How to Personalize Anti-Doping Testing across an Athlete's Career?

    PubMed

    Robinson, Neil; Sottas, Pierre-Edouard; Schumacher, Yorck Olaf

    2017-01-01

    For decades, drug testing has been the main instrument at the disposal of anti-doping authorities. The availability in the 1980s of substances identical to those produced by the human body, including the "big 3" (erythropoietin, testosterone, and growth hormone), necessitated a new paradigm in anti-doping. The athlete biological passport (ABP) is a new paradigm, complementary to traditional drug testing, based on the personalized monitoring of doping biomarkers. Athletes who abuse doping substances do so to trigger physiological changes that provide performance enhancement. The ABP aims to detect these changes through its 3 hematological, steroidal, and endocrine modules. Any deviation of a biomarker from what is expected in a healthy physiological condition can be attributable to doping or a medical condition, which, interestingly, is also the criterion used to define a banned substance. Recent advances in proteomics and metabolomics offer immense opportunities to enhance the ABP. The ABP shares multiple aspects with the present customization of health care and personalized medicine. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Brain-compatible learning: principles and applications in athletic training.

    PubMed

    Craig, Debbie I

    2003-10-01

    To discuss the principles of brain-compatible learning research and provide insights into how this research may be applied in athletic training education to benefit the profession. In the past decade, new brain-imaging techniques have allowed us to observe the brain while it is learning. The field of neuroscience has produced a body of empirical data that provides a new understanding of how we learn. This body of data has implications in education, although the direct study of these implications is in its infancy. An overview of how the brain learns at a cellular level is provided, followed by a discussion of the principles of brain-compatible learning. Applications of these principles and implications for the field of athletic training education are also offered. Many educational-reform fads have garnered attention in the past. Brain-compatible learning will not likely be one of those, as its origin is in neuroscience, not education. Brain-compatible learning is not an educational-reform movement. It does not prescribe how to run your classroom or offer specific techniques to use. Rather, it provides empirical data about how the brain learns and suggests guidelines to be considered while preparing lessons for your students. These guidelines may be incorporated into every educational setting, with every type of curriculum and every age group. The field of athletic training lends itself well to many of the basic principles of brain-compatible learning.

  13. Using athletic training clinical education standards in radiography.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Shelley; Harris, Katherine

    2012-01-01

    The selection of clinical education sites for radiography students is based on availability, access to radiographic examinations, and appropriate student-to-technologist ratio. Radiography program directors are not required to evaluate sites based on their educational validity (eg, the clinical instructor's knowledge of basic teaching and learning principles, how well the site communicates with the program, or the clinical instructor's involvement in professional organizations). The purpose of this study was to determine if a set of 12 clinical education standards used in athletic training would be applicable and beneficial to radiography program directors when selecting clinical sites for students. A survey concerning the applicability of the athletic training standards to radiography site selection was completed by 270 directors of radiography programs accredited by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology. The survey results indicated the athletic training clinical education standards were considered applicable to the selection of clinical sites for radiography students and would be beneficial to radiography program directors when selecting sites.

  14. Brain-Compatible Learning: Principles and Applications in Athletic Training

    PubMed Central

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the principles of brain-compatible learning research and provide insights into how this research may be applied in athletic training education to benefit the profession. Background: In the past decade, new brain-imaging techniques have allowed us to observe the brain while it is learning. The field of neuroscience has produced a body of empirical data that provides a new understanding of how we learn. This body of data has implications in education, although the direct study of these implications is in its infancy. Description: An overview of how the brain learns at a cellular level is provided, followed by a discussion of the principles of brain-compatible learning. Applications of these principles and implications for the field of athletic training education are also offered. Application: Many educational-reform fads have garnered attention in the past. Brain-compatible learning will not likely be one of those, as its origin is in neuroscience, not education. Brain-compatible learning is not an educational-reform movement. It does not prescribe how to run your classroom or offer specific techniques to use. Rather, it provides empirical data about how the brain learns and suggests guidelines to be considered while preparing lessons for your students. These guidelines may be incorporated into every educational setting, with every type of curriculum and every age group. The field of athletic training lends itself well to many of the basic principles of brain-compatible learning. PMID:16558681

  15. Training theory and taper: validation in triathlon athletes.

    PubMed

    Banister, E W; Carter, J B; Zarkadas, P C

    1999-01-01

    This paper defines a training theory with which to predict the effectiveness of various formats of taper in optimizing physical performance from a standardized period of training and taper. Four different taper profiles: step reduction vs exponential (exp) decay and fast vs slow exp decay tapers, were simulated in a systems model to predict performance p(t) resulting from a standard square-wave quantity of training for 28 days. The relative effectiveness of each of the profiles in producing optimal physical improvement above pre-taper criterion physical test standards (running and cycle ergometry) was determined. Simulation showed that an exp taper was better than a step-reduction taper, and a fast exp decay taper was superior to a slow exp decay taper. The results of the simulation were tested experimentally in field trials to assess the correspondence between simulation and real-training criterion physical tests in triathlon athletes. The results showed that the exp taper (tau = 5 days) group made a significantly greater improvement above a pre-taper standard (P < or = 0.05) than the step-reduction taper group in cycle ergometry, and was better, but not significantly so, in a 5-km run. A fast exp taper group B (tau = 4 days) performed significantly better (P < or = 0.05) in maximal, cycle ergometry above a pre-taper training standard than a slow exp taper group A (tau = 8 days) and was improved more, but not significantly so, than group A in a 5-km criterion run. The mean improvement on both physical tests by exp decay taper groups all increased significantly (P < or = 0.05) above their pre-taper training standard. Maximum oxygen uptake increased significantly in a group of eight remaining athletes during 2 weeks of final taper after three athletes left early for final preparations at the race site.

  16. Effects of Resistance Training in Youth Athletes on Muscular Fitness and Athletic Performance: A Conceptual Model for Long-Term Athlete Development

    PubMed Central

    Granacher, Urs; Lesinski, Melanie; Büsch, Dirk; Muehlbauer, Thomas; Prieske, Olaf; Puta, Christian; Gollhofer, Albert; Behm, David G.

    2016-01-01

    During the stages of long-term athlete development (LTAD), resistance training (RT) is an important means for (i) stimulating athletic development, (ii) tolerating the demands of long-term training and competition, and (iii) inducing long-term health promoting effects that are robust over time and track into adulthood. However, there is a gap in the literature with regards to optimal RT methods during LTAD and how RT is linked to biological age. Thus, the aims of this scoping review were (i) to describe and discuss the effects of RT on muscular fitness and athletic performance in youth athletes, (ii) to introduce a conceptual model on how to appropriately implement different types of RT within LTAD stages, and (iii) to identify research gaps from the existing literature by deducing implications for future research. In general, RT produced small-to-moderate effects on muscular fitness and athletic performance in youth athletes with muscular strength showing the largest improvement. Free weight, complex, and plyometric training appear to be well-suited to improve muscular fitness and athletic performance. In addition, balance training appears to be an important preparatory (facilitating) training program during all stages of LTAD but particularly during the early stages. As youth athletes become more mature, specificity, and intensity of RT methods increase. This scoping review identified research gaps that are summarized in the following and that should be addressed in future studies: (i) to elucidate the influence of gender and biological age on the adaptive potential following RT in youth athletes (especially in females), (ii) to describe RT protocols in more detail (i.e., always report stress and strain-based parameters), and (iii) to examine neuromuscular and tendomuscular adaptations following RT in youth athletes. PMID:27242538

  17. Adult Career Advocates Training Project. Interim Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Marilyn D.

    The first year's activities of the Adult Career Advocates Project are described in this interim report, a national study of what counseling services are available for out-of-school youth and adults. Focus is on administrative structure, programming, staffing, and funding of the 353 centers identified as providing career and educational guidance to…

  18. Employment Characteristics, Educational Histories, and Pedagogical Training of Educators in CAATE-Accredited Athletic Training Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rich, Valerie

    2009-01-01

    Context: With the rapid expansion of ATEPs in the last decade, the demand for doctoral-trained athletic training educators has increased exponentially. As more athletic training educators enter higher education, it is important to fully understand how well prepared these educators are for life in academe. Objective: To describe employment…

  19. Effects of High-Velocity Resistance Training on Athletic Performance in Prepuberal Male Soccer Athletes.

    PubMed

    Negra, Yassine; Chaabene, Helmi; Hammami, Mehréz; Hachana, Younés; Granacher, Urs

    2016-12-01

    Negra, Y, Chaabene, H, Hammami, M, Hachana, Y, and Granacher, U. Effects of high-velocity resistance training on athletic performance in prepuberal male soccer athletes. J Strength Cond Res 30(12): 3290-3297, 2016-The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a 12-week in-season low-to-moderate load high-velocity resistance training (HVRT) in addition to soccer training as compared with soccer training only on proxies of athletic performance in prepubertal soccer players. Twenty-four male soccer players performed 2 different protocols: (a) regular soccer training with 5 sessions per week (n = 11; age = 12.7 ± 0.3 years) and (b) regular soccer training with 3 sessions per week and HVRT with 2 sessions per week (n = 13; age = 12.8 ± 0.2 years). The outcome measures included tests for the assessment of muscle strength (e.g., 1 repetition maximum [1RM] half-squat tests), jump ability (e.g., countermovement jump, squat jump [SJ], standing long jump [SLJ], and multiple 5-bound tests [MB5s]), linear speed (e.g., 5-, 10-, 20-, and 30-m sprint tests), and change of direction (e.g., T-test and Illinois change of direction test). Results revealed significant group × test interactions for the SJ test (p ≤ 0.05, d = 0.59) and the SLJ test (p < 0.01, d = 0.83). Post hoc tests illustrated significant pre-post changes in the HVRT group (SJ: [INCREMENT]22%, p < 0.001, d = 1.26; SLJ: [INCREMENT]15%, p < 0.001, d = 1.30) but not in the control group. In addition, tendencies toward significant interaction effects were found for the 1RM half-squat (p = 0.08, d = 0.54) and the 10-m sprint test (p = 0.06, d = 0.57). Significant pre-post changes were found for both parameters in the HVRT group only (1RM: [INCREMENT]25%, p < 0.001, d = 1.23; 10-m sprint: [INCREMENT]7%, p < 0.0001, d = 1.47). In summary, in-season low-to-moderate load HVRT conducted in combination with regular soccer training is a safe and feasible intervention that has positive effects on maximal strength

  20. Scaling behavior of VO2peak in trained wheelchair athletes.

    PubMed

    Goosey-Tolfrey, Victoria L; Batterham, Alan M; Tolfrey, Keith

    2003-12-01

    To examine the scaling behavior of peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak) in wheelchair athletes, adjusting for known covariates. Body mass, VO2peak, and an estimate of adiposity (sum of four skinfolds) were determined in a sample of 45 highly trained wheelchair basketball and racing athletes. The participants were classified as possessing either "high" or "low" trunk stability and balance using recognized sporting classifications. A wheelchair ergometer was used to obtain the VO2peak measurements. The relationship between VO2peak and body mass was obtained via a nonlinear allometric model with the sum of four skinfolds, trunk stability and balance, and chronological age entered as covariates. The point estimate exponent for body mass was 0.82 (95% CI, 0.54-1.10). After controlling for the influence of body mass, adiposity, and age, the wheelchair athletes with greater trunk stability and balance had on average an 11% greater VO2peak. The regression model explained 54% of the sample variance in VO2peak. The obtained mass exponent of 0.82 is congruent with that predicted from the multiple-causes allometric cascade model and consideration of the physiological characteristics of spinal cord injured athletes. To compare the body size-independent VO2peak values of athletes within the study sample, the mass exponent of 0.82 may be adopted (i.e., mL x kg(-0.82) x min(-1)). The uncertainty in the point estimate, reflected in the relatively wide 95% CI, highlights the need for further research with larger samples to increase the precision of estimation.

  1. Science and Practice of Coaching a Strength Training Program for Novice and Intermediate-Level Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Daniel

    2001-01-01

    Addresses various aspects of the athletic coaching process in strength training, including: teaching and coaching exercises to novice and intermediate level athletes (typical high school and younger college aged athletes); technical analysis and modification of student technique; student motivation; goal setting; reinforcement; and the overall…

  2. Development of Measurability and Importance Scales for the NATA Athletic Training Educational Competencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolfe, Edward W.; Nogle, Sally

    2002-01-01

    Developed and validated an instrument designed to measure the perceived measurability and importance of the National Athletic Trainers' Association Athletic Training Educational Competencies. Data from 931 athletic trainers and sport medicine physicians support 6 constructs, each of which demonstrates high reliability. (SLD)

  3. Development of Measurability and Importance Scales for the NATA Athletic Training Educational Competencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolfe, Edward W.; Nogle, Sally

    2002-01-01

    Developed and validated an instrument designed to measure the perceived measurability and importance of the National Athletic Trainers' Association Athletic Training Educational Competencies. Data from 931 athletic trainers and sport medicine physicians support 6 constructs, each of which demonstrates high reliability. (SLD)

  4. Science and Practice of Coaching a Strength Training Program for Novice and Intermediate-Level Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Daniel

    2001-01-01

    Addresses various aspects of the athletic coaching process in strength training, including: teaching and coaching exercises to novice and intermediate level athletes (typical high school and younger college aged athletes); technical analysis and modification of student technique; student motivation; goal setting; reinforcement; and the overall…

  5. Student-Athletes' Perceptions of Their Academic and Athletic Roles: Intersections Amongst Their Athletic Role, Academic Motivation, Choice of Major, and Career Decision Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahoney, Michelle L.

    2011-01-01

    Student-athletes' academic and athletic roles both require commitment, time, energy, and effort. Managing and balancing these multiple roles not only impacts student-athletes' use of time, but also their overall college experience. The purpose of this study was to explore how collegiate student-athletes perceive their academic and athletic roles.…

  6. Student-Athletes' Perceptions of Their Academic and Athletic Roles: Intersections Amongst Their Athletic Role, Academic Motivation, Choice of Major, and Career Decision Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahoney, Michelle L.

    2011-01-01

    Student-athletes' academic and athletic roles both require commitment, time, energy, and effort. Managing and balancing these multiple roles not only impacts student-athletes' use of time, but also their overall college experience. The purpose of this study was to explore how collegiate student-athletes perceive their academic and athletic roles.…

  7. Career Education and Training for Teen Parents Program. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whipple, Vicky

    The Career Education and Training for Teen Parents Program was implemented at Kishwaukee College (Malta, Illinois) to provide educational and vocational services to teen parents (ages 14 to 21) and to establish a regional delivery system and community linkages that would integrate training, education, and support services for teen parents in the…

  8. Career Orientation and Pedagogical Training: Conservatoire Undergraduates' Insights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, John; Baker, David

    2007-01-01

    This article explores music conservatoire undergraduates' career aspirations and notions of their pedagogical training, through biographical interviews with 16 students from the School of Wind and Percussion, Royal Northern College of Music. Findings suggest that pedagogical training, which begins in the second college year, serves as a catalyst…

  9. Relation between muscle mass, motor units and type of training in master athletes.

    PubMed

    Drey, Michael; Sieber, Cornel C; Degens, Hans; McPhee, Jamie; Korhonen, Marko T; Müller, Klaus; Ganse, Bergita; Rittweger, Jörn

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the number of motor units and muscle mass in power-trained and endurance-trained master athletes compared with community-dwelling older adults. Seventy-five master athletes (52 power- and 23 endurance-trained athletes) were recruited at the 2012 European Veteran Athletics Championships in Zittau (Germany). One hundred and forty-nine community-dwelling older adults served as controls. In all participants, the motor unit number index (MUNIX) in the hypothenar muscle and whole body muscle mass was determined by bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA). In both male and female master athletes, there were significant negative correlations between age and muscle mass (female: r = -0·510, P = 0·002; male: r = -0·714, P<0·001). Master athletes showed a weak correlation (r = -0·295, P = 0·010) between MUNIX and age. Master athletes exhibited significantly higher values than the control group with regard to both muscle mass (P = 0·002) and motor units (P = 0·004). Subanalysis showed that only power trained master athletes had both a larger muscle mass (P<0·001) and a higher MUNIX (P = 0·014) than the control group. Among the master athletes, power-trained athletes had a larger (P<0·001) muscle mass than endurance-trained athletes. The present data of master athletes are compatible with the hypothesis of an age-related decline in whole body muscle mass and motor units. Nevertheless, the data suggest that the master athletes' high level of physical activity may protect motoneurons. In addition, power training seems to have a positive effect on muscle mass and could therefore be an effective method of training to prevent sarcopenia. © 2014 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Effects of athletic training on the spinal curvature in child athletes.

    PubMed

    Betsch, Marcel; Furian, Thimm; Quack, Valentin; Rath, Björn; Wild, Michael; Rapp, Walter

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the spinal posture in young athletes depending on training intensity. The spinal curvature of 245 children, age 8 to 12 years, was evaluated using rasterstereography. According to their weekly training time group 1 (mean age: 9.54 ± 1.18) did 2-6, group 2 (mean age: 9.49 ± 0.87) did 6-15 and group 3 (mean age: 9.68 ± 0.87) did over 15 hours of training. Group 1 had a significantly higher weight (p = 0.028) (33.86 ± 7. kg) than those of the more active groups (30.67 ± 6.49 kg and 29.46 ± 4.33 kg). The mean kyphotic angle decreased significantly (p < 0.001) with the amount of training per week from 46.86 ± 8.2° in group 1 to 40.08 ± 8° in group 3. We also found a significant decrease (p = 0.047) in lateral deviation with training from group 1 with 5.3 ± 3 mm to group 2 with 4.1 ± 1.6 mm. The results of our study suggest that higher training time can be associated with lower weight and decreases in thoracic kyphosis and lateral deviation of the spine.

  11. Epidemiology of training injuries in amateur taekwondo athletes: a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Lystad, R P; Graham, P L; Poulos, R G

    2015-09-01

    The objectives of this study were to estimate the incidence and describe the pattern and severity of training injuries in taekwondo, and to compare pattern and severity of training injuries with competition injuries. One hundred and fifty-two active Australian amateur taekwondo athletes, aged 12 years or over, completed an online survey comprising questions on training exposure and injury history over the preceding 12 months. The main outcome measures were: overall injury incidence rate per athlete-year; training injury incidence rate per athlete-year, per 1000 athlete-training-sessions, and per 1000 athlete-hours of training; injury severity; and injury proportions by anatomical region and by type of injury. Injury incidence rates were calculated with 95% confidence intervals using standard methods, while injury proportions were compared using Fisher's exact test. The vast majority (81.5%) of taekwondo injuries in an average athlete-year occurred during training. The training injury incidence rate was estimated to be 1.6 (95% CI: 1.4, 1.9) per athlete-year, 11.8 (95% CI: 10.4, 13.4) per 1000 athlete-training-sessions, and 7.0 (95% CI: 6.1, 7.9) per 1000 athlete-hours of training. Among athletes with five or fewer injuries, the severity and injury pattern of training injuries were, by and large, the same as for competition injuries. Approximately sixty percent (60.3%) of training injuries required treatment by a health professional. Considering the burden of training injuries exceeds that of competition injuries, taekwondo governing bodies and stakeholders are encouraged to devote more efforts towards the identification of risk factors for, and prevention of, training injuries in the sport of taekwondo.

  12. Epidemiology of training injuries in amateur taekwondo athletes: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Graham, PL; Poulos, RG

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to estimate the incidence and describe the pattern and severity of training injuries in taekwondo, and to compare pattern and severity of training injuries with competition injuries. One hundred and fifty-two active Australian amateur taekwondo athletes, aged 12 years or over, completed an online survey comprising questions on training exposure and injury history over the preceding 12 months. The main outcome measures were: overall injury incidence rate per athlete-year; training injury incidence rate per athlete-year, per 1000 athlete-training-sessions, and per 1000 athlete-hours of training; injury severity; and injury proportions by anatomical region and by type of injury. Injury incidence rates were calculated with 95% confidence intervals using standard methods, while injury proportions were compared using Fisher's exact test. The vast majority (81.5%) of taekwondo injuries in an average athlete-year occurred during training. The training injury incidence rate was estimated to be 1.6 (95% CI: 1.4, 1.9) per athlete-year, 11.8 (95% CI: 10.4, 13.4) per 1000 athlete-training-sessions, and 7.0 (95% CI: 6.1, 7.9) per 1000 athlete-hours of training. Among athletes with five or fewer injuries, the severity and injury pattern of training injuries were, by and large, the same as for competition injuries. Approximately sixty percent (60.3%) of training injuries required treatment by a health professional. Considering the burden of training injuries exceeds that of competition injuries, taekwondo governing bodies and stakeholders are encouraged to devote more efforts towards the identification of risk factors for, and prevention of, training injuries in the sport of taekwondo. PMID:26424924

  13. Athletes' use of exercise imagery during weight training.

    PubMed

    Silbernagel, Michael S; Short, Sandra E; Ross-Stewart, Lindsay C

    2007-11-01

    Imagery is a cognitive process during which people use their minds to create (or recreate) experiences that are similar to real-life situations. This study examined how college athletes used imagery during weight training. Subjects were 295 Division I (n = 163) and Division II (n = 132) college student athletes (men: n = 138, women: n = 157) who participated in a weight training program as a requirement of their sport. They completed a slightly modified version of the "Weight Lifting Imagery Questionnaire." Results showed that appearance imagery (i.e., images related to the attainment of a fit-looking body) was used and considered the most effective followed by technique imagery (i.e., images related to performing the skill and techniques correctly with good form) and energy imagery (i.e., images related to getting "psyched up" or feeling energized). Other variables that effected imagery use were gender, age, time of season, and levels of motivation. In addition, gender, previous imagery training, and level of motivation had an effect on the perceptions of imagery effectiveness. Confidence in the ability to image was associated with both imagery use and effectiveness, and imagery use and effectiveness were associated with confidence in the weight room. The findings support previous research in exercise imagery that appearance imagery is most used followed by technique and energy imagery and extend them in such a way that strength coaches have practical advice on how to use imagery in a positive way with their athletes. Suggestions about how strength coaches can use imagery with their clients are provided.

  14. Curricular Satisfaction Levels of National Athletic Trainers' Association–Accredited Postprofessional Athletic Training Graduates

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Kevin J; Van Lunen, Bonnie L; Udermann, Brian; Oñate, James A

    2009-01-01

    Context: Academic programs rely on outcomes assessments to determine if changes in the curriculum are necessary. Objective: To examine the overall satisfaction levels of graduates (2005–2006) of National Athletic Trainers' Association–accredited postprofessional athletic training education programs as related to the 2002 Standards and Guidelines for Development and Implementation of NATA-Accredited Post-Professional Graduate Athletic Training Education Programs. Design: Original survey instrument and demographic questionnaire. Setting: Online survey instrument. Patients or Other Participants: Of 211 survey recipients, 123 returned surveys (58.29% response rate). Main Outcome Measure(s): Demographic information and satisfaction levels in 10 standard areas (depth of learning, breadth of learning, critical thinking, instructor availability, theoretic basis, writing skills, scholarly growth, community return, leadership, and overall program satisfaction) were obtained. Satisfaction scores were categorized into 10 percentage brackets (eg, 80%–89%) for each standard area. Results: No differences were noted in relation to any of the standard satisfaction areas for evaluation of time off from school. However, graduates who required more than the allotted amount of time to complete their degree were less satisfied in the areas of depth of learning (P  =  .027), breadth of learning (P  =  .001), instructor availability (P  =  .005), writing (P  =  .022), and overall program satisfaction (P  =  .016). Conclusions: Graduates were generally satisfied across all areas of their didactic curriculum. However, satisfaction levels were affected if graduates required more than the allotted amount of time to complete their degrees. PMID:19593421

  15. Training and equipment to prevent athletic head and neck injuries.

    PubMed

    Cross, Kevin M; Serenelli, Catherine

    2003-07-01

    Due to the potential for catastrophic neurotraumas and cervical spine injuries in sport, the sports health care professional must take proper measures to prevent such injuries. Strength training of the cervical spine, teaching of proper sporting techniques, and use of protective sports equipment are three primary means of attempting to prevent neurotraumas and cervical spine injuries in sports. There are other avenues to assist in preventing these injuries, such as flexibility programs. The sports health care professional, therefore, must be knowledgeable of the needs of each individual athlete when developing prevention plans.

  16. Reduction in left ventricular wall thickness after deconditioning in highly trained Olympic athletes.

    PubMed Central

    Maron, B J; Pelliccia, A; Spataro, A; Granata, M

    1993-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Clinical distinction between athlete's heart and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in a trained athlete is often difficult. In an effort to identify variables that may aid in this differential diagnosis, the effects of deconditioning on left ventricular wall thickness were assessed in six highly trained elite athletes who had competed in rowing or canoeing at the 1988 Seoul Olympic Games. Each of these athletes showed substantial ventricular septal thickening associated with training (13-15 mm) which resembled that of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. METHODS--The athletes voluntarily reduced their training substantially for 6-34 weeks (mean 13) after the Olympic competition. Echocardiography was performed at peak training and also after deconditioning, and cardiac dimensions were assessed blindly. RESULTS--Maximum ventricular septal thickness was 13.8 (0.9) mm in the trained state and 10.5 (0.5) in the deconditioned state (p < 0.005) (change 15-33%). CONCLUSIONS--The finding that deconditioning may be associated with a considerable reduction in ventricular septal thickness in elite athletes over short periods strongly suggests that these athletes had a physiological form of left ventricular hypertrophy induced by training. Such a reduction in wall thickness with deconditioning may help to distinguish between the physiological hypertrophy of athlete's heart and primary pathological hypertrophy (for example, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy) in selected athletes with increased left ventricular wall thickness. Images PMID:8435237

  17. Economic impact of training and career decisions on urological surgery.

    PubMed

    Langston, Joshua P; Kirby, E Will; Nielsen, Matthew E; Smith, Angela B; Woods, Michael E; Wallen, Eric M; Pruthi, Raj S

    2014-03-01

    Medical students and residents make career decisions at a relatively young age that have significant implications for their future income. While most of them attempt to estimate the impact of these decisions, there has been little effort to use economic principles to illustrate the impact of certain variables. The economic concept of net present value was paired with available Medical Group Management Association and Association of American Medical Colleges income data to calculate the value of career earnings based on variations in the choice of specialty, an academic vs a private practice career path and fellowship choices for urology and other medical fields. Across all specialties academic careers were associated with lower career earnings than private practice. However, among surgical specialties the lowest difference in value between these 2 paths was for urologists at only $334,898. Fellowship analysis showed that training in pediatric urology was costly in forgone attending salary and it also showed a lower future income than nonfellowship trained counterparts. An additional year of residency training (6 vs 5 years) caused a $201,500 decrease in the value of career earnings. Choice of specialty has a dramatic impact on future earnings, as does the decision to pursue a fellowship or choose private vs academic practice. Additional years of training and forgone wages have a tremendous impact on monetary outcomes. There is also no guarantee that fellowship training will translate into a more financially valuable career. The differential in income between private practice and academics was lowest for urologists. Copyright © 2014 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Neuromuscular adaptations to 4 weeks of intensive drop jump training in well-trained athletes.

    PubMed

    Alkjaer, Tine; Meyland, Jacob; Raffalt, Peter C; Lundbye-Jensen, Jesper; Simonsen, Erik B

    2013-10-01

    This study examined the effects of 4 weeks of intensive drop jump training in well-trained athletes on jumping performance and underlying changes in biomechanics and neuromuscular adaptations. Nine well-trained athletes at high national competition level within sprinting and jumping disciplines participated in the study. The training was supervised and augmented feedback on performance was used to ensure maximal training intensity. The drop jumps were performed with minimal contact time and maximal jumping height. Assessment of performance during training showed effects of motor learning. Before and after the training intervention maximal isometric muscle strength, the biomechanics, muscle activity pattern of the lower extremities and the soleus H-reflex and V-wave during drop jumping were measured. Maximal jump height and performance index (PI) defined as jumping height divided by contact time improved significantly by 11.9% (P = 0.024) and 16.2% (P = 0.009), respectively. Combined ankle and knee joint peak power was significantly increased by 7% after training (P = 0.047). The preactivity in the soleus muscle decreased 16% (P = 0.015). The soleus H-reflex was unchanged after training, while the soleus V-wave increased significantly at 45 msec after touchdown. This may indicate an increased drive to the α-motor neuron pool following training. Muscle strength parameters were unaffected by the training. The results demonstrate that 4 weeks of intensive drop jump training can improve jumping performance also in well-trained athletes without concomitant changes in muscle strength. It is suggested that the behavioral improvement is primarily due to neural factors regulating the activation pattern controlling the drop jump movement.

  19. Neuromuscular adaptations to 4 weeks of intensive drop jump training in well-trained athletes

    PubMed Central

    Alkjaer, Tine; Meyland, Jacob; Raffalt, Peter C; Lundbye-Jensen, Jesper; Simonsen, Erik B

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the effects of 4 weeks of intensive drop jump training in well-trained athletes on jumping performance and underlying changes in biomechanics and neuromuscular adaptations. Nine well-trained athletes at high national competition level within sprinting and jumping disciplines participated in the study. The training was supervised and augmented feedback on performance was used to ensure maximal training intensity. The drop jumps were performed with minimal contact time and maximal jumping height. Assessment of performance during training showed effects of motor learning. Before and after the training intervention maximal isometric muscle strength, the biomechanics, muscle activity pattern of the lower extremities and the soleus H-reflex and V-wave during drop jumping were measured. Maximal jump height and performance index (PI) defined as jumping height divided by contact time improved significantly by 11.9% (P = 0.024) and 16.2% (P = 0.009), respectively. Combined ankle and knee joint peak power was significantly increased by 7% after training (P = 0.047). The preactivity in the soleus muscle decreased 16% (P = 0.015). The soleus H-reflex was unchanged after training, while the soleus V-wave increased significantly at 45 msec after touchdown. This may indicate an increased drive to the α-motor neuron pool following training. Muscle strength parameters were unaffected by the training. The results demonstrate that 4 weeks of intensive drop jump training can improve jumping performance also in well-trained athletes without concomitant changes in muscle strength. It is suggested that the behavioral improvement is primarily due to neural factors regulating the activation pattern controlling the drop jump movement. PMID:24303171

  20. Training-specific muscle architecture adaptation after 5-wk training in athletes.

    PubMed

    Blazevich, Anthony J; Gill, Nicholas D; Bronks, Roger; Newton, Robert U

    2003-12-01

    This study examined changes in the muscle size, muscle architecture, strength, and sprint/jump performances of concurrently training athletes during 5 wk of "altered" resistance training (RT). Eight female and 15 male athletes performed 4 wk of sprint, jump, and resistance training in addition to their sports training (standardization) before adopting one of three different programs for 5 wk: 1) squat lift training (SQ, N = 8) with sprint/jump training; 2) forward hack squat training (FHS, N = 7) with sprint/jump training; or 3) sprint/jump training only (SJ, N = 8). Muscle size, fascicle angle, and fascicle length of the vastus lateralis (VL) and rectus femoris (RF) muscles (using ultrasound procedures) as well as 20-m sprint run, vertical jump, and strength performance changes were examined. A small increase in VL fascicle angle in SQ and FHS was statistically different to the decrease in SJ subjects (P < 0.05 at distal, P < 0.1 at proximal). VL fascicle length increased for SJ only (P < 0.05 at distal, P < 0.1 at proximal) and increased in RF in SQ subjects (P < 0.05). Muscle thickness of VL and RF increased in all training groups (P < 0.05) but only at proximal sites. There were no between-group differences in squat, forward hack squat, or isokinetic strength performances, or in sprint or jump performances, despite improvements in some of the tests across the groups. Significant muscle size and architectural adaptations can occur in concurrently training athletes in response to a 5-wk training program. These adaptations were possibly associated with the force and velocity characteristics of the training exercises but not the movement patterns. Factors other than, or in addition to, muscle architecture must mediate changes in strength, sprint, and jump performance.

  1. Deaflympians' Satisfaction With Athletic Training Services at the 2013 Deaflympic Summer Games.

    PubMed

    Brancaleone, Matthew Paul; Shingles, René Revis; DeLellis, Nailya

    2017-07-01

    Athletic trainers have the opportunity to treat unique populations. Determining athletes' satisfaction with the athletic training services supplied can offer insights into how to improve the health care provided to athletes.   To explore Deaflympians' satisfaction with athletic training services at the 2013 Deaflympic Summer Games.   Cross-sectional survey.   The 2013 Deaflympic Summer Games in Sofia, Bulgaria.   Of the 115 Deaflympians contacted, 55 completed the questionnaire, for a 48% response rate (women = 33, men = 22).   The Medical Interview Satisfaction Survey-Athletic Training was used. The questionnaire gathered demographic data and included 25 Likert-scale items that assessed 6 components of athletic training. Descriptive statistics were calculated as normalized scores to adjust for the different numbers of questions for each item. On a 5-point scale, the scores ranged from 3.82 (management) to 4.24 (environment), with an overall satisfaction score of 3.89. We conducted comparison tests to assess possible differences in overall satisfaction and satisfaction components. Satisfaction with frequency of use of the athletic training room and knowledge were the only areas that showed statistically significant differences. Other differences were in perceptions of medical coverage among age groups and management between sexes.   Satisfaction with the athletic training services provided was lower among these Deaflympians than among collegiate athletes in other studies. However, we observed no differences in overall satisfaction scores by age, sex, race, previous Deaflympic experience, or individual or team sport. Deaflympians who used and visited the athletic training facility more often had higher overall satisfaction scores than individuals who used and visited the facility less.   Deaflympians were satisfied with the athletic training services provided at the 2013 Deaflympic Summer Games.

  2. Clinical instructors' and athletic training students' perceptions of teachable moments in an athletic training clinical education setting.

    PubMed

    Rich, Valerie J

    2009-01-01

    For some time, educators have advised clinical instructors (CIs) to capture the elusive teachable moment in clinical education. However, a universal definition of a teachable moment does not exist. Without a clear understanding of this concept, CIs and athletic training students (ATSs) may have difficulty facilitating the teachable moment. To recognize and define a teachable moment as it relates to the athletic training clinical education setting and to identify potential barriers to creating the teachable moment. Mixed-methods design employing grounded theory and quantitative analysis. Collegiate sports medicine clinic affiliated with a Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs-accredited athletic training education program. 11 CIs (6 men, 5 women) and 11 ATSs (3 men, 8 women). Participants completed a teachable moment questionnaire to define and identify teachable moments. Follow-up semistructured interviews were conducted after data collection. A qualitative analysis was conducted on responses using open, axial, and selective coding. Member checking was conducted to establish trustworthiness. Qualitative data were quantified to descriptively report the findings. Engaged clinical experiences were the overarching theme. Three major themes that defined a teachable moment emerged: (1) professional discourse about skills, techniques, research, and special cases; (2) authentic experience or actual hands-on experience; and (3) skill development or time for skill instruction, practice, role playing, and simulations. Participants reported 158 teachable moments (CIs = 75, ATSs = 83). Lack of time and other duties were examples of barriers hindering the teachable moment. The teachable moment occurs when a CI and an ATS actively participate and interact with each other to enhance learning and foster intellectual curiosity in the clinical education environment. An underlying barrier to the teachable moment is perceived to be the CI's day

  3. Physiological characteristics of well-trained junior sprint kayak athletes.

    PubMed

    Borges, Thiago Oliveira; Dascombe, Ben; Bullock, Nicola; Coutts, Aaron J

    2015-07-01

    This study aimed to profile the physiological characteristics of junior sprint kayak athletes (n=21, VO2max 4.1±0.7 L/min, training experience 2.7±1.2 y) and to establish the relationship between physiological variables (VO2max, VO2 kinetics, muscle-oxygen kinetics, paddling efficiency) and sprint kayak performance. VO2max, power at VO2max, power:weight ratio, paddling efficiency, VO2 at lactate threshold, and whole-body and muscle oxygen kinetics were determined on a kayak ergometer in the laboratory. Separately, on-water time trials (TT) were completed over 200 m and 1000 m. Large to nearly perfect (-.5 to -.9) inverse relationships were found between the physiological variables and on-water TT performance across both distances. Paddling efficiency and lactate threshold shared moderate to very large correlations (-.4 to -.7) with 200- and 1000-m performance. In addition, trivial to large correlations (-.11 to -.5) were observed between muscle-oxygenation parameters, muscle and whole-body oxygen kinetics, and performance. Multiple regression showed that 88% of the unadjusted variance for the 200-m TT performance was explained by VO2max, peripheral muscle deoxygenation, and maximal aerobic power (P<.001), whereas 85% of the unadjusted variance in 1000-m TT performance was explained by VO2max and deoxyhemoglobin (P<.001). The current findings show that well-trained junior sprint kayak athletes possess a high level of relative aerobic fitness and highlight the importance of the peripheral muscle metabolism for sprint kayak performance, particularly in 200-m races, where finalists and nonfinalists are separated by very small margins. Such data highlight the relative aerobic-fitness variables that can be used as benchmarks for talent-identification programs or monitoring longitudinal athlete development. However, such approaches need further investigation.

  4. Epidemiologic Comparison of Injured High School Basketball Athletes Reporting to Emergency Departments and the Athletic Training Setting

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Erica N.; McKenzie, Lara B.; Comstock, R. Dawn

    2014-01-01

    Context: Basketball is a popular US high school sport with more than 1 million participants annually. Objective: To compare patterns of athletes with basketball-related injuries presenting to US emergency departments from 2005 through 2010 and the high school athletic training setting from the 2005–2011 seasons. Design: Descriptive epidemiology study. Setting: Data from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System of the US Consumer Product Safety Commission and the High School Reporting Information Online database. Main Outcome Measure(s): Complex sample weights were used to calculate national estimates of basketball-related injuries for comparison. Patients or Other Participants: Adolescents from 13 to 19 years of age treated in US emergency departments for basketball-related injuries and athletes from 13 to 19 years of age from schools participating in High School Reporting Information Online who were injured while playing basketball. Results: Nationally, an estimated 1 514 957 (95% confidence interval = 1 337 441, 1 692 474) athletes with basketball-related injuries reported to the emergency department and 1 064 551 (95% confidence interval = 1 055 482, 1 073 620) presented to the athletic training setting. Overall, the most frequent injuries seen in the emergency department were lacerations and fractures (injury proportion ratios [IPRs] = 3.45 and 1.72, respectively), whereas those seen in the athletic training setting were more commonly concussions and strains/sprains (IPRs = 2.23 and 1.19, respectively; all P values < .0001). Comparisons of body site and diagnosis combinations revealed additional differences. For example, athletes with lower leg fractures more often presented to the emergency department (IPR = 6.53), whereas those with hand fractures more frequently presented to the athletic training setting (IPR = 1.18; all P values < .0001). Conclusions: Patterns of injury differed among high school basketball players

  5. Epidemiologic comparison of injured high school basketball athletes reporting to emergency departments and the athletic training setting.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Erica N; McKenzie, Lara B; Comstock, R Dawn

    2014-01-01

    Basketball is a popular US high school sport with more than 1 million participants annually. To compare patterns of athletes with basketball-related injuries presenting to US emergency departments from 2005 through 2010 and the high school athletic training setting from the 2005-2011 seasons. Descriptive epidemiology study. Data from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System of the US Consumer Product Safety Commission and the High School Reporting Information Online database. Complex sample weights were used to calculate national estimates of basketball-related injuries for comparison. Adolescents from 13 to 19 years of age treated in US emergency departments for basketball-related injuries and athletes from 13 to 19 years of age from schools participating in High School Reporting Information Online who were injured while playing basketball. Nationally, an estimated 1,514,957 (95% confidence interval = 1,337,441, 1,692,474) athletes with basketball-related injuries reported to the emergency department and 1,064,551 (95% confidence interval = 1,055,482, 1,073,620) presented to the athletic training setting. Overall, the most frequent injuries seen in the emergency department were lacerations and fractures (injury proportion ratios [IPRs] = 3.45 and 1.72, respectively), whereas those seen in the athletic training setting were more commonly concussions and strains/sprains (IPRs = 2.23 and 1.19, respectively; all P values < .0001). Comparisons of body site and diagnosis combinations revealed additional differences. For example, athletes with lower leg fractures more often presented to the emergency department (IPR = 6.53), whereas those with hand fractures more frequently presented to the athletic training setting (IPR = 1.18; all P values < .0001). Patterns of injury differed among high school basketball players presenting for treatment in the emergency department and the athletic training setting. Understanding differences specific to clinical settings is

  6. Defining the Engaging Learning Experience from the Athletic Training Student Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Bowman, Thomas G.; Benes, Sarah S.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Clinical experiences are an integral part of athletic training education and are where students gain the hands-on, practical knowledge and skills necessary to provide quality patient care in the field. However, some clinical education experiences may not allow athletic training students to become clinically integrated. Objective: To…

  7. Four-Corner Model for Curricular Development in Athletic Training Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kutz, Matthew; Scialli, Joan

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To present a model for an educational continuum that identifies entry-level to advance practice competencies and content for athletic training education. Background: Specific degree-level purposes within the context of higher education, in conjunction with professional needs should be addressed in athletic training education.…

  8. On the Need to Move toward an Evidence-Based Athletic Training (EBAT)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geisler, Paul R.; McKeon, Patrick O.; Medina McKeon, Jennifer M.

    2017-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) is now a well-known paradigm for the athletic training (AT) profession. The Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education accredited programs have required EBP as an explicit focus for professional education, and researchers are gradually producing insightful and relevant evidence concerning the education…

  9. Instilling Foundation Behaviors of Professional Practice in Undergraduate Athletic Training Students: A Grounded Theory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brien, Christopher W.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this grounded theory study was to investigate the implementation of the "Foundational Behaviors of Professional Practice" in undergraduate athletic training education program curriculums accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education [CAATE]. Specifically, this study examined the educational and…

  10. Implementation of Evidence-Based Practice Concepts in Undergraduate Athletic Training Education: Experiences of Select Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manspeaker, Sarah A.; Van Lunen, Bonnie

    2010-01-01

    Context: Professional athletic training education must transition toward instruction of evidence-based practice in order to maintain progress with other health professions' clinical practices and educational standards. Objective: To evaluate athletic training educators' experience with implementation of evidence-based practice concepts in CAATE…

  11. What Traits Make for an Effective Athletic Training Educator and Mentor?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burningham, Danielle S.; Deru, Landon; Berry, David C.

    2010-01-01

    The educational preparation of athletic training students is a daunting experience for athletic training educators (ATEs) as they are often faced with many external (eg, accreditation, lack of resources) and internal (eg, lack of comfort with a subject area, role strain) challenges. Regardless of these challenges, the success of an athletic…

  12. Perceptions of Athletic Training Education Program Directors on Their Students' Persistence and Departure Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Thomas G.

    2012-01-01

    The athletic training profession is in the midst of a large increase in demand for health care professionals for the physically active. In order to meet demand, directors of athletic training education programs (ATEPs) are challenged with providing sufficient graduates. There has been a large increase in ATEPs nationwide since educational reform…

  13. Should Athletic Training Educators Utilize Grades When Evaluating Student Clinical Performance?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scriber, Kent; Gray, Courtney; Millspaugh, Rose

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To explore and address some of the challenges for assessing, interpreting, and grading athletic training students' clinical performance and to suggest athletic training educators consider using a more universal assessment method for professional consistency. Background: In years past students learned from teachers or mentors on an…

  14. Sampling Methods and the Accredited Population in Athletic Training Education Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, W. David; Volberding, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    Context: We describe methods of sampling the widely-studied, yet poorly defined, population of accredited athletic training education programs (ATEPs). Objective: There are two purposes to this study; first to describe the incidence and types of sampling methods used in athletic training education research, and second to clearly define the…

  15. Implementation of Evidence-Based Practice Concepts in Undergraduate Athletic Training Education: Experiences of Select Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manspeaker, Sarah A.; Van Lunen, Bonnie

    2010-01-01

    Context: Professional athletic training education must transition toward instruction of evidence-based practice in order to maintain progress with other health professions' clinical practices and educational standards. Objective: To evaluate athletic training educators' experience with implementation of evidence-based practice concepts in CAATE…

  16. Evaluating Perceptions of Culminating Clinical Education Experiences of Senior Athletic Training Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aronson, Patricia A.; Bowman, Thomas G.; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.

    2015-01-01

    Context: The perceptions of athletic training students (ATSs) regarding their clinical education experiences are not fully understood. It is important to investigate ATS perceptions of clinical education to allow athletic training educators to provide educational experiences that will maximize learning. Objective: To determine what ATSs value…

  17. Who Should Mentor Me? Giving a Voice to Black Women Athletic Training Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siple, Bonnie J.; Hopson, Rodney K.; Sobehart, Helen C.; Turocy, Paula S.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Black women are dramatically underrepresented in the health care profession of athletic training. It may be theorized that one of the reasons more black female students are not entering into the profession of athletic training is that they do not have adequate mentors to successfully guide them. Objective: The purpose of our qualitative…

  18. Evaluating Perceptions of Culminating Clinical Education Experiences of Senior Athletic Training Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aronson, Patricia A.; Bowman, Thomas G.; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.

    2015-01-01

    Context: The perceptions of athletic training students (ATSs) regarding their clinical education experiences are not fully understood. It is important to investigate ATS perceptions of clinical education to allow athletic training educators to provide educational experiences that will maximize learning. Objective: To determine what ATSs value…

  19. Defining the Engaging Learning Experience from the Athletic Training Student Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Bowman, Thomas G.; Benes, Sarah S.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Clinical experiences are an integral part of athletic training education and are where students gain the hands-on, practical knowledge and skills necessary to provide quality patient care in the field. However, some clinical education experiences may not allow athletic training students to become clinically integrated. Objective: To…

  20. Preferred Learning Styles of Professional Undergraduate and Graduate Athletic Training Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thon, Sarah; Hansen, Pamela

    2015-01-01

    Context: Recognizing the preferred learning style of professional undergraduate and graduate athletic training students will equip educators to more effectively improve their teaching methods and optimize student learning. Objective: To determine the preferred learning style of professional undergraduate and graduate athletic training students…

  1. Professional Master's Athletic Training Programs Use Clinical Education to Facilitate Transition to Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Thomas G.; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Barrett, Jessica L.

    2017-01-01

    Context: Athletic training students' ability to transition into professional practice is a critical component for the future of the profession. However, research on professional master's students' transition to practice and readiness to provide autonomous care is lacking. Objective: To determine professional master's athletic training students'…

  2. Program Directors' Perceptions of Programmatic Attributes Contributing to Athletic Training Student Persistence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Thomas G.; Dodge, Thomas M.; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Graduates of athletic training programs (ATPs) have identified factors contributing to their persistence through professional education. However, program directors have yet to elaborate on programmatic attributes that might contribute to athletic training student retention in their respective ATPs. Objective: To determine program…

  3. Is Direct Supervision in Clinical Education for Athletic Training Students Always Necessary to Enhance Student Learning?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scriber, Kent; Trowbridge, Cindy

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To present an alternative model of supervision within clinical education experiences. Background: Several years ago direct supervision was defined more clearly in the accreditation standards for athletic training education programs (ATEPs). Currently, athletic training students may not gain any clinical experience without their clinical…

  4. Predictors of Success on Professional Credentialing Examinations of Athletic Training Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esparza, Shandra Dawn

    2012-01-01

    Compared to other allied health programs, graduates of athletic training (AT) programs have lower pass rates on their national credentialing examination (48%). In 2013, the new Standards for Entry Level AT Programs from the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE) will require AT education programs to be accountable for…

  5. Program Directors' Perceptions of Reasons Professional Master's Athletic Training Students Persist and Depart

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Thomas G.; Pitney, William A.; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Dodge, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Student retention is a key issue in higher education. With the increasing number of professional master's (PM) athletic training programs (ATPs), understanding student retention is necessary to maintain viable programs. Objective: Explore program directors' perceptions of the reasons athletic training students persist and depart from PM…

  6. Program Directors' Perceptions of Programmatic Attributes Contributing to Athletic Training Student Persistence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Thomas G.; Dodge, Thomas M.; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Graduates of athletic training programs (ATPs) have identified factors contributing to their persistence through professional education. However, program directors have yet to elaborate on programmatic attributes that might contribute to athletic training student retention in their respective ATPs. Objective: To determine program…

  7. Engagement Theory in Action: An Investigation of Athletic Training Program Directors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peer, Kimberly S.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To examine the use of good practice indicators by athletic training program directors and to provide a theoretical framework using engagement theory, a learner-centered process focusing on program improvement through continuous planning and evaluation, as a foundation for implementing good practices in athletic training education…

  8. Peer Assessment of Clinical Skills and Professional Behaviors among Undergraduate Athletic Training Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engelmann, Jeanine E.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Peer assessment is widely used in medical education as a formative evaluation and preparatory tool for students. Athletic training students learn similar knowledge, skills, and affective traits as medical students. Peer assessment has been widely studied with beneficial results in medical education, yet athletic training education has…

  9. Program Directors' Perceptions of Reasons Professional Master's Athletic Training Students Persist and Depart

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Thomas G.; Pitney, William A.; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Dodge, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Student retention is a key issue in higher education. With the increasing number of professional master's (PM) athletic training programs (ATPs), understanding student retention is necessary to maintain viable programs. Objective: Explore program directors' perceptions of the reasons athletic training students persist and depart from PM…

  10. Peer Assessment of Clinical Skills and Professional Behaviors among Undergraduate Athletic Training Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engelmann, Jeanine E.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Peer assessment is widely used in medical education as a formative evaluation and preparatory tool for students. Athletic training students learn similar knowledge, skills, and affective traits as medical students. Peer assessment has been widely studied with beneficial results in medical education, yet athletic training education has…

  11. Engagement Theory in Action: An Investigation of Athletic Training Program Directors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peer, Kimberly S.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To examine the use of good practice indicators by athletic training program directors and to provide a theoretical framework using engagement theory, a learner-centered process focusing on program improvement through continuous planning and evaluation, as a foundation for implementing good practices in athletic training education…

  12. The Role and Load of the Athletic Training Clinical Education Coordinator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radtke, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    Context: The position of clinical education coordinator has been identified as a required one in athletic training education. However, the literature has yet to address the job responsibilities of clinical education coordinators and the commensurate work load/release time needed to accomplish these responsibilities in athletic training education.…

  13. Preparing Proficient Practitioners: Problem-Based Learning in Athletic Training Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillette, Cordial M.

    2011-01-01

    Athletic training education is continuing to grow and change as different instructional methods are studied and implemented. Problem-based learning is one instructional method that has been implemented in varying degrees in athletic training education programs but its effectiveness has not been studied extensively. Problem-based learning has been…

  14. Predictors of Success on Professional Credentialing Examinations of Athletic Training Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esparza, Shandra Dawn

    2012-01-01

    Compared to other allied health programs, graduates of athletic training (AT) programs have lower pass rates on their national credentialing examination (48%). In 2013, the new Standards for Entry Level AT Programs from the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE) will require AT education programs to be accountable for…

  15. Instilling Foundation Behaviors of Professional Practice in Undergraduate Athletic Training Students: A Grounded Theory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brien, Christopher W.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this grounded theory study was to investigate the implementation of the "Foundational Behaviors of Professional Practice" in undergraduate athletic training education program curriculums accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education [CAATE]. Specifically, this study examined the educational and…

  16. Using a Web-Based Database to Record and Monitor Athletic Training Students' Clinical Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Kirk W.; Williams, Lisa; Janicki, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this article is to introduce a documentation recording system employing the Microsoft Structured Query Language (MS-SQL) database used by the Athletic Training Education Program (ATEP) for recording and monitoring of athletic training student (ATS) clinical experiences and hours. Background: Monitoring ATSs clinical…

  17. Who Should Mentor Me? Giving a Voice to Black Women Athletic Training Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siple, Bonnie J.; Hopson, Rodney K.; Sobehart, Helen C.; Turocy, Paula S.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Black women are dramatically underrepresented in the health care profession of athletic training. It may be theorized that one of the reasons more black female students are not entering into the profession of athletic training is that they do not have adequate mentors to successfully guide them. Objective: The purpose of our qualitative…

  18. VO2 Max in Variable Type Exercise Among Well-Trained Upper Body Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seals, Douglas R.; Mullin, John P.

    1982-01-01

    The maximal oxygen consumption (VO2 max) of well-trained upper body athletes was compared to that of untrained individuals in four types of exercise: arm cranking, legs only cycling, graded treadmill running, and combined arm cranking and leg cycling. Results of the study showed that well-trained upper body athletes attained a significantly higher…

  19. Using a Web-Based Database to Record and Monitor Athletic Training Students' Clinical Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Kirk W.; Williams, Lisa; Janicki, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this article is to introduce a documentation recording system employing the Microsoft Structured Query Language (MS-SQL) database used by the Athletic Training Education Program (ATEP) for recording and monitoring of athletic training student (ATS) clinical experiences and hours. Background: Monitoring ATSs clinical…

  20. VO2 Max in Variable Type Exercise Among Well-Trained Upper Body Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seals, Douglas R.; Mullin, John P.

    1982-01-01

    The maximal oxygen consumption (VO2 max) of well-trained upper body athletes was compared to that of untrained individuals in four types of exercise: arm cranking, legs only cycling, graded treadmill running, and combined arm cranking and leg cycling. Results of the study showed that well-trained upper body athletes attained a significantly higher…

  1. Should Athletic Training Educators Utilize Grades When Evaluating Student Clinical Performance?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scriber, Kent; Gray, Courtney; Millspaugh, Rose

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To explore and address some of the challenges for assessing, interpreting, and grading athletic training students' clinical performance and to suggest athletic training educators consider using a more universal assessment method for professional consistency. Background: In years past students learned from teachers or mentors on an…

  2. Preferred Learning Styles of Professional Undergraduate and Graduate Athletic Training Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thon, Sarah; Hansen, Pamela

    2015-01-01

    Context: Recognizing the preferred learning style of professional undergraduate and graduate athletic training students will equip educators to more effectively improve their teaching methods and optimize student learning. Objective: To determine the preferred learning style of professional undergraduate and graduate athletic training students…

  3. A Mandala: A Diagram of the Clinical Education Experience in Athletic Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cernohous, Steve; West, Sharon

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this paper is to present the practical use of a Mandala that: 1) provides opportunities for athletic training students to explore, reflect on and appreciate their clinical experiences; 2) provides educators with a model to understand and value athletic training student experiences; 3) organizes and captures factors and…

  4. "Anabolic" effects of methandienone in men undergoing athletic training.

    PubMed

    Hervey, G R; Hutchinson, I; Knibbs, A V; Burkinshaw, L; Jones, P R; Norgan, N G; Levell, M J

    1976-10-02

    After failure to confirm an anabolic action of testosterone and its derivatives in rats, methandienone ('Dianabol', an "anabolic steroid" used by athletes) has been given to 11 athletic men during a course of weight-training, in a double-blind, crossover experiment. The dose of methandienone was 100 mg/day for 6 wk. Body weight and composition, muscular strength and performance, and indices of endocrine function were studied. Compared with the placebo period, on methandienone the subjects gained weight (mean 3-3 kg +/- 0-6 kg) and accumulated a disproportionately large amount of potassium (420+/-68 mmol); the increase in weight was confined to the lean part of the body, and the muscles increased in size. Strength and performance improved over each training period, but not significantly differently on drug and placebo. On the drug, plasma-cortisol concentration and urinary cortisol excretion increased, and plasma-testosterone decreased. Although the weight and body-composition changes may demonstrate an anabolic action of methandienone in man, they may alternatively have been caused by an increase in intracellular fluid, and the question of anabolic action therefore remains open.

  5. Athletic Training Students in the College/ University Setting and the Scope of Clinical Education

    PubMed Central

    Weidner, Thomas G; Noble, Gary L; Pipkin, Jennifer B

    2006-01-01

    Context: Athletic training education programs must provide the proper type and amount of clinical supervision in order for athletic training students to obtain appropriate clinical education and to meet Board of Certification examination requirements. Objective: To assess athletic training students' perceptions of the type and amount of clinical supervision received during clinical education. Design: Cross-sectional design. Setting: 124 CAAHEP-accredited NCAA institutions. Patients or Other Participants: We obtained a national stratified random sample (by National Athletic Trainers' Association district) of undergraduate athletic training students from 61 Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs–accredited athletic training education programs. A total of 851 athletic training students participated in the study. Main Outcome Measure(s): Differences among athletic training students with first-aider/provider qualifications, student supervision during moderate-risk and increased-risk sports, program/institutional characteristics, type and amount of clinical supervision, and students' academic level and mean percentage of time spent in different types of clinical supervision. Results: A total of 276 (32.4%) of the students reported that they supplied medical care and athletic training–related coverage beyond that of a first aider/provider. Athletic training students stating that they traveled with teams without supervision numbered 342 (40.2%). A significant difference was noted between the amount of supervision reported by sophomore and senior students ( P < .01). Conclusions: Athletic training students do not seem to be receiving appropriate clinical supervision and are often acting outside the scope of clinical education. PMID:17273468

  6. Differences in H-reflex between athletes trained for explosive contractions and non-trained subjects.

    PubMed

    Casabona, A; Polizzi, M C; Perciavalle, V

    1990-01-01

    The efficacy of type Ia synapse on alpha-motoneurons of soleus and lateral gastrocnemius muscles has been investigated, using the H-reflex technique, in athletes engaged in sports requiring very rapid and intense contractions (sprinters and volley-ball players) as well as in non-trained subjects. It has been observed, in both muscles, that the ratio between the mean value of the maximal reflex response (Hmax) and the mean value of the maximal direct response (Mmax) elicited upon electrical stimulation of the tibial nerve is significantly smaller in athletes trained for explosive-type movements than in non-trained subjects. This difference in the Hmax: Mmax ratio was dependent on a smaller amplitude of Hmax and not on a greater amplitude of Mmax. No significant differences were observed between sprinters and volley-ball players. In both trained and non-trained subjects, soleus and lateral gastrocnemius muscles displayed significant differences in Hmax: Mmax ratio and Mmax amplitude but not in Hmax amplitude. Since the H-response is considered to be due mainly to activation of the smallest motoneurons in the motoneuronal pools, the difference in Hmax amplitude and Hmax: Mmax ratio between athletes and non-trained subjects could have been dependent on a lower incidence of these motoneurons in the athletes. This is in accord with the mechanical needs of muscles during explosive-type power training. Although this difference may have been wholly determined genetically, the possibility is discussed as to whether the lower incidence in sprinters and volley-ball players of small motoneurons could have been related to a training-induced transformation of small and slow motoneurons into large and fast ones.

  7. Self-reported concussion symptoms and training routines in mixed martial arts athletes.

    PubMed

    Heath, Christopher J; Callahan, Jennifer L

    2013-01-01

    Mixed martial arts (MMA) is a full-contact, fighting sport that has risen in popularity over recent years, resulting in an increase in both training facilities and sport participants. To date, little research has examined the complications and vulnerability to head trauma, or concussive symptomatology, in MMA athletes. In this study, we assessed relationships between training routines and concussive symptoms, as well as medical care, in MMA athletes. A sample (N = 119) of MMA athletes reported concussive symptoms, training routines, and medical histories through an online survey. Nearly 15% of the MMA athletes reported history of a knockout, and nearly one-third reported a technical knockout. Subjective ratings of concussive symptoms were high for these athletes, with many of them waiting only a brief time after such incidents to return to competition. These findings have important implications for informing the medical treatment and safety decision for returning to participation for these athletes.

  8. Echocardiographic dimensions in athletes in relation to their training programs.

    PubMed

    Snoeckx, L H; Abeling, H F; Lambregts, J A; Schmitz, J J; Verstappen, F T; Reneman, R S

    1982-01-01

    The cardiac dimensions of long-distance runners (LDR), cycle racers (CR), and weight lifters (WL) were determined echocardiographically and were compared with those of control subjects (CS). Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) was also assessed from the electrocardiogram. Training information was obtained through a questionnaire. The maximal aerobic performance was assessed on a cycle ergometer. Comparison of the cardiac dimensions revealed that left ventricular mass (LVmass) was significantly increased in LDR and CR as compared to CS. This resulted from thickening of the interventricular septum and left ventricular posterior wall as well as from enlargement of the left ventricular internal diameter. The existence of LVH was confirmed by electrocardiographic investigation. Although the left ventricular wall was enlarged in WL, their LVmass was not significantly increased as compared with CS. These results are in agreement with the training program followed. Weight lifters almost exclusively performed strength training, while LDR and CR were mainly involved in endurance training. The LDR and CR reached significantly higher maximal aerobic performance levels than WL. The present results suggest a close relationship between the type of cardiac enlargement and the training program followed by the athletes.

  9. TRAINING THE POOR FOR NEW CAREERS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SHAFFER, ANATOLE; SPECHT, HARRY

    IN A DISCUSSION OF THE RICHMOND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT DEMONSTRATION PROJECT FOR TRAINING SUBPROFESSIONALS, THE FOLLOWING ACTIVITIES OF THE PROJECT ARE DISCUSSED--(1) RECRUITMENT AND SELECTION OF PERSONNEL, AND (2) BASIC, INSERVICE, AND OTHER TRAINING PROCEDURES. THE PROJECT TRAINS LOW-INCOME INDIVIDUALS FOR SUBPROFESSIONAL JOBS IN THE POLICE…

  10. Altitude training considerations for the winter sport athlete.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Robert F; Stickford, Jonathon L; Levine, Benjamin D

    2010-03-01

    level, the 'live high-train low' model of altitude training can help athletes in endurance events to maximize performance.

  11. National collegiate athletic association division and primary job title of athletic trainers and their job satisfaction or intention to leave athletic training.

    PubMed

    Terranova, Aaron B; Henning, Jolene M

    2011-01-01

    Membership in the National Athletic Trainers' Association (NATA) has declined in recent years, generating much debate about professional commitment. To compare the contributing factors of job satisfaction and intention to leave athletic training of certified athletic trainers (ATs) employed in National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) institutions. Cross-sectional study. A link to a Web-based questionnaire containing the Spector Job Satisfaction Survey (JSS) and an original Intention to Leave Survey (ITLS) was distributed by e-mail to 1003 certified members of the National Athletic Trainers' Association. A total of 191 certified members of the NATA employed in a college or university setting in a primarily clinical capacity; representing all NCAA divisions; and having the job title of head athletic trainer, associate/assistant athletic trainer, or graduate assistant/intern athletic trainer. We used separate 3 x 3 factorial analyses of variance to compare the mean scores of each JSS subscale and of the ITLS with NCAA division and job title. A stepwise multiple regression was used to determine the strength of the relationships between the JSS subscales and the ITLS. We found differences for job title in the subscales of Fringe Benefits (F(2182) = 7.82, P = .001 ) and Operating Conditions (F(2,182) = 12.01, P < .001). The JSS subscale Nature of Work was the'greatest indicator of intention to leave (β = -0.45). We found a strong negative correlation between various facets of job satisfaction and intention to leave athletic training. The NCAA division seemed to have no effect on an individual's job satisfaction or intention to leave the profession. In addition, only Fringe Benefits and Operating Conditions seemed to be affected by job title. The ATs had similar levels of job satisfaction regardless of NCAA division, and their job titles were not a major factor in job satisfaction.

  12. National Collegiate Athletic Association Division and Primary Job Title of Athletic Trainers and Their Job Satisfaction or Intention to Leave Athletic Training

    PubMed Central

    Terranova, Aaron B.; Henning, Jolene M.

    2011-01-01

    Context: Membership in the National Athletic Trainers' Association (NATA) has declined in recent years, generating much debate about professional commitment. Objective: To compare the contributing factors of job satisfaction and intention to leave athletic training of certified athletic trainers (ATs) employed in National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) institutions. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: A link to a Web-based questionnaire containing the Spector Job Satisfaction Survey (JSS) and an original Intention to Leave Survey (ITLS) was distributed by e-mail to 1003 certified members of the National Athletic Trainers' Association. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 191 certified members of the NATA employed in a college or university setting in a primarily clinical capacity; representing all NCAA divisions; and having the job title of head athletic trainer, associate/assistant athletic trainer, or graduate assistant/intern athletic trainer. Main Outcome Measure(s): We used separate 3 × 3 factorial analyses of variance to compare the mean scores of each JSS subscale and of the ITLS with NCAA division and job title. A stepwise multiple regression was used to determine the strength of the relationships between the JSS subscales and the ITLS. Results: We found differences for job title in the subscales of Fringe Benefits (F2,182 = 7.82, P = .001) and Operating Conditions (F2,182 = 12.01, P < .001). The JSS subscale Nature of Work was the greatest indicator of intention to leave (β = −0.45). Conclusions: We found a strong negative correlation between various facets of job satisfaction and intention to leave athletic training. The NCAA division seemed to have no effect on an individual's job satisfaction or intention to leave the profession. In addition, only Fringe Benefits and Operating Conditions seemed to be affected by job title. The ATs had similar levels of job satisfaction regardless of NCAA division, and their job titles were not a

  13. Concussion Nondisclosure During Professional Career Among a Cohort of Former National Football League Athletes.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Zachary Y; Register-Mihalik, Johna K; Kay, Melissa C; DeFreese, J D; Marshall, Stephen W; Guskiewicz, Kevin M

    2017-09-01

    Despite a focus on the incidence and effects of concussion, nondisclosure of sports-related concussions among retired players from the National Football League (NFL) has yet to be examined. Examine the prevalence of and factors associated with nondisclosure of sports-related concussions in former NFL athletes. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. A sample of 829 former NFL players completed a general health survey. This historical cohort included players who had played before World War II to 2001. Respondents retrospectively recalled sports-related concussions that they sustained during their professional careers and whether at least one of these sports-related concussions was not reported to medical staff. We computed the prevalence of nondisclosure among those recalling sport-related concussions during their professional careers. Multivariable binomial regression estimated adjusted prevalence ratios (PR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) controlling for race/ethnicity, number of years played, primary position played, professional career concussion history, and playing era. Playing era was categorized by whether the majority of a player's career was before or after a 1976 rule change to limit contact ("spearing"). Overall, 417 (50.3%) respondents reported they had sustained a concussion and did not inform medical staff at least once during their professional playing career. Nonwhite respondents had a higher prevalence of nondisclosure than white/non-Hispanic respondents (adjusted PR = 1.19; 95% CI, 1.02-1.38). An interaction between professional career concussion history and playing era was also found ( P = .08). Compared with those in the pre-spearing rule change group with 1 or 2 concussions, all other groups had larger prevalences of nondisclosure (increases ranging from 41% to 153% in multivariable models). Across concussion strata, nondisclosure prevalence was generally higher in the post-spearing rule change group than the pre-spearing rule change

  14. Determinants of repeated-sprint ability in well-trained team-sport athletes and endurance-trained athletes.

    PubMed

    Bishop, D; Spencer, M

    2004-03-01

    To examine the importance of peak .VO(2) in determining repeated-sprint ability (RSA), we recruited 20 well-trained females (10 team-sport athletes and 10 endurance-trained runners; mean SD peak .VO(2): 3.3+/-0.2 L x min(-1)) who were homogenous with respect to peak .VO(2) (mean difference = 0.05 L x min(-1)). Tests consisted of a RSA cycle test (5 x 6-s max sprints every 30 s) and a peak .VO(2) test. Venous and capillary blood was sampled immediately before and after the 5 x 6-s cycle test for the determination of hypoxanthine concentration ([Hx]), lactate concentration ([La-]) and pH; blood buffer capacity (beta(blood)) was also estimated. The team-sport athletes had significantly higher peak power for the 1(st) sprint (P(1); W x kg(-1)), total work for 5 x 6-s sprints (W(tot); J x kg(-1)) and power decrement across the 5 sprints (P(dec)), (p<0.05). There were also significant between-group differences for post-test values of [Hx], [La-] and pH (p<0.05). While there was no significant difference in beta(blood) between the 2 groups (p=0.10), there was a moderate effect (d=0.77). These results suggest that factors in addition to peak .VO(2) are likely to be important for RSA.

  15. Relation between training-induced left ventricular hypertrophy and risk for ventricular tachyarrhythmias in elite athletes.

    PubMed

    Biffi, Alessandro; Maron, Barry J; Di Giacinto, Barbara; Porcacchia, Paolo; Verdile, Luisa; Fernando, Fredrick; Spataro, Antonio; Culasso, Francesco; Casasco, Maurizio; Pelliccia, Antonio

    2008-06-15

    The aim of this study was to analyze the relation between the magnitude of training-induced left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy and the frequency and complexity of ventricular tachyarrhythmias in a large population of elite athletes without cardiovascular abnormalities. Ventricular tachyarrhythmias are a common finding in athletes, but it is unresolved as to whether the presence or magnitude of LV hypertrophy is a determinant of these arrhythmias in athletes without cardiovascular abnormalities. From 738 athletes examined at a national center for the evaluation of elite Italian athletes, 175 consecutive elite athletes with 24-hour ambulatory (Holter) electrocardiographic recordings (but without cardiovascular abnormalities and symptoms) were selected for the study group. Echocardiographic studies were performed during periods of peak training. Athletes were arbitrarily divided into 4 groups according to the frequency and complexity of ventricular arrhythmias during Holter electrocardiographic monitoring. No statistically significant relation was evident between LV mass (or mass index) and the grade or frequency of ventricular tachyarrhythmias. In addition, a trend was noted in those athletes with the most frequent and complex ventricular ectopy toward lower calculated LV mass. In conclusion, ventricular ectopy in elite athletes is not directly related to the magnitude of physiologic LV hypertrophy. These data offer a measure of clinical reassurance regarding the benign nature of ventricular tachyarrhythmias in elite athletes and the expression of athlete's heart.

  16. Development and factor analysis of the Coaching and Athletic Training Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Drummond, Jan L; Hostetter, Karen S; Ploeger, Robin L

    2008-08-01

    To explore athletes' perceptions related to coaching and athletic training care, the Coaching and Athletic Training Questionnaire was developed. A 10-item version was administered to 708 varsity athletes from three Division I universities in the National Collegiate Athletic Association. 341 women and 344 men completed questionnaires. Data from half of the sample of 685 were used for an exploratory factor analysis using principal components analysis with oblique rotation and the second half for a confirmatory factor analysis. Analyses yielded three interpretable factors, accounting for 68% of the variance, which were labeled Comfort with Athletic Trainer or Coach, Sex Influence on Quality of Care, and Athletic Trainer Preference. Multivariate analysis of variance indicated that factor scores of women and men differed significantly, and at followup women and men differed significantly on Comfort with Athletic Trainer or Coach, but the small effect size minimizes its meaningfulness. No significant difference was noted for the other two factors. It appears coaches should be sensitive and available in case of injury or other need. Athletes' perceived quality of care by athletic trainers does not appear related to sex of athlete or trainer.

  17. Respiratory muscle endurance after training in athletes and non-athletes: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Sales, Ana Tereza do N; Fregonezi, Guilherme A de F; Ramsook, Andrew H; Guenette, Jordan A; Lima, Illia Nadinne D F; Reid, W Darlene

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this systematic review was to evaluate the effects of respiratory muscle training (RMT) on respiratory muscle endurance (RME) and to determine the RME test that demonstrates the most consistent changes after RMT. Electronic searches were conducted in EMBASE, MEDLINE, COCHRANE CENTRAL, CINHAL and SPORTDiscus. The PEDro scale was used for quality assessment and meta-analysis were performed to compare effect sizes of different RME tests. Twenty studies met the inclusion criteria. Isocapnic hyperpnea training was performed in 40% of the studies. Meta-analysis showed that RMT improves RME in athletes (P = 0.0007) and non-athletes (P = 0.001). Subgroup analysis showed differences among tests; maximal sustainable ventilatory capacity (MSVC) and maximal sustainable threshold loading tests demonstrated significant improvement after RMT (P = 0.007; P = 0.003 respectively) compared to the maximal voluntary ventilation (MVV) (P = 0.11) in athletes whereas significant improvement after RMT was only shown by MSVC in non-athletes. The effect size of MSVC was greater compared to MVV in studies that performed both tests. The meta-analysis results provide evidence that RMT improves RME in athletes and non-athletes and MSVC test that examine endurance over several minutes are more sensitive to improvement after RMT.

  18. Seasonal variations of cough reflex sensitivity in elite athletes training in cold air environment

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Exercise-induced cough is common among athletes. Athletes training in cold air often report an increasingly troublesome cough during the winter season. Chronic airway irritation or inflammation may increase the sensory response of cough receptors. The aim of this study was to evaluate the seasonal variability of cough reflex sensitivity to capsaicin in elite athletes. Methods Fifty-three elite winter athletes and 33 sedentary subjects completed a respiratory questionnaire and a capsaicin provocation test during the summer, fall, and winter. Allergy skin prick tests, spirometry, eucapnic voluntary hyperpnea test (EVH), methacholine inhalation test (MIT), and induced sputum analysis were also performed. Results In athletes, the prevalence of cough immediately after exercise was high, particularly during winter. Athletes often showed a late occurrence of cough between 2-8 h after exercise. The cough reflex sensitivity to capsaicin was unchanged through the seasons in both athletes and non-athlete subjects. No significant correlations were found in groups between cough reflex sensitivity to capsaicin and the number of years in sport training, the number of hours of training per week, EVH response (% fall in FEV1), airway responsiveness to methacholine (PC20), airway inflammation or atopy. Conclusion The prevalence of cough immediately and a few hours after exercise is high in athletes and more frequently reported during winter. However, cough does not seem to be associated with cough reflex hypersensitivity to capsaicin, bronchoconstriction, or airway inflammation in the majority of athletes. PMID:22449054

  19. Seasonal variations of cough reflex sensitivity in elite athletes training in cold air environment.

    PubMed

    Turmel, Julie; Bougault, Valérie; Boulet, Louis-Philippe

    2012-03-26

    Exercise-induced cough is common among athletes. Athletes training in cold air often report an increasingly troublesome cough during the winter season. Chronic airway irritation or inflammation may increase the sensory response of cough receptors. The aim of this study was to evaluate the seasonal variability of cough reflex sensitivity to capsaicin in elite athletes. Fifty-three elite winter athletes and 33 sedentary subjects completed a respiratory questionnaire and a capsaicin provocation test during the summer, fall, and winter. Allergy skin prick tests, spirometry, eucapnic voluntary hyperpnea test (EVH), methacholine inhalation test (MIT), and induced sputum analysis were also performed. In athletes, the prevalence of cough immediately after exercise was high, particularly during winter. Athletes often showed a late occurrence of cough between 2-8 h after exercise. The cough reflex sensitivity to capsaicin was unchanged through the seasons in both athletes and non-athlete subjects. No significant correlations were found in groups between cough reflex sensitivity to capsaicin and the number of years in sport training, the number of hours of training per week, EVH response (% fall in FEV1), airway responsiveness to methacholine (PC20), airway inflammation or atopy. The prevalence of cough immediately and a few hours after exercise is high in athletes and more frequently reported during winter. However, cough does not seem to be associated with cough reflex hypersensitivity to capsaicin, bronchoconstriction, or airway inflammation in the majority of athletes.

  20. Scarred for the Rest of My Career? Career-Long Effects of Abusive Leadership on Professional Athlete Aggression and Task Performance.

    PubMed

    Carleton, Erica L; Barling, Julian; Christie, Amy M; Trivisonno, Melissa; Tulloch, Kelsey; Beauchamp, Mark R

    2016-08-01

    Based on the contention that leadership has sustained effects on followers even after the leader-follower relationship has ended, we investigated the career-long effects of abusive coach leadership on athlete aggression and task performance. Abusive leadership scores were derived from ratings by two independent raters' evaluations of coaches' biographies, and athlete aggression and task performance data were derived from objective sources. Data were obtained from players (N = 693) and coaches (N = 57) involved in the National Basketball Association (NBA) between the 2000-2001 and 2005-2006 seasons. Controlling for tenure, salary, team winning percentage, and absence due to injuries, multilevel modeling showed that exposure to abusive leadership influenced both the trajectory of psychological aggression and task performance over players' careers. These findings suggest that the effects of abusive leadership extend far longer than currently acknowledged, thus furthering our understanding of the nature and effects of abusive leadership.

  1. States Seek High School Pathways Weaving Academic, Career Options

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawchuk, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Every student at Wheeling High School takes a full academic courseload. Many of the graduates of this 2,000-student school in Wheeling, Illinois, however, also emerge with significant experience in a career field. Those interested in health careers, for example, can work with student-athletes in the school's athletic training facility, earn a…

  2. States Seek High School Pathways Weaving Academic, Career Options

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawchuk, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Every student at Wheeling High School takes a full academic courseload. Many of the graduates of this 2,000-student school in Wheeling, Illinois, however, also emerge with significant experience in a career field. Those interested in health careers, for example, can work with student-athletes in the school's athletic training facility, earn a…

  3. Fireman: Naval Rate Training Manual and Nonresident Career Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naval Education and Training Command, Pensacola, FL.

    The Rate Training Manual and the Nonresident Career Course (RTM/NRCC) was prepared to assist the fireman apprentice to qualify and to advance to fireman in the Navy. The manual is designed for individual study and provides subject matter that relates directly to the occupational qualifications of the fireman rating. Fireman is one of the lower…

  4. Career Development of Foreign Trained Immigrants from Regulated Professions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novak, Lydia; Chen, Charles P.

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we aim to examine and understand the career development experiences of foreign-trained immigrants from regulated professions (FTIRPs) in Canada. To provide some background on immigration in a Canadian context, we focus on a myriad of factors that affect the vocational well-being of FTIRPs. We apply key concepts from several major…

  5. The Relationship between Diversity Training, Organizational Commitment, and Career Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yap, Margaret; Holmes, Mark Robert; Hannan, Charity-Ann; Cukier, Wendy

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the association between employees' perceptions of diversity training (DT) existence and effectiveness with organizational commitment (OC), and career satisfaction (CS). Design/methodology/approach: The analyses in this paper utilize survey data collected between 2006 and 2007 from over 11,000…

  6. Career Preparation Program Curriculum Guide for: Metal Fabrication, Machinist Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    British Columbia Dept. of Education, Victoria. Curriculum Development Branch.

    This curriculum outline provides secondary and postsecondary instructors with detailed information on student learning outcomes for completion of the metal fabrication machinist training program requirements. A program overview discusses the aims of education; secondary school philosophy; and career preparation programs and their goals,…

  7. Report to the Career Development Training Institute Board.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lester, Juliette N.

    This report, annually prepared by the Executive Director of National Occupational Information Coordinating Committee (NOICC) for the NOICC Career Development Training Institute, provides current information on its performance. It identifies issues that require attention, and informs the Board of any NOICC management or policy decisions that may…

  8. The Relationship between Diversity Training, Organizational Commitment, and Career Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yap, Margaret; Holmes, Mark Robert; Hannan, Charity-Ann; Cukier, Wendy

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the association between employees' perceptions of diversity training (DT) existence and effectiveness with organizational commitment (OC), and career satisfaction (CS). Design/methodology/approach: The analyses in this paper utilize survey data collected between 2006 and 2007 from over 11,000…

  9. Career Development of Foreign Trained Immigrants from Regulated Professions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novak, Lydia; Chen, Charles P.

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we aim to examine and understand the career development experiences of foreign-trained immigrants from regulated professions (FTIRPs) in Canada. To provide some background on immigration in a Canadian context, we focus on a myriad of factors that affect the vocational well-being of FTIRPs. We apply key concepts from several major…

  10. Valuing Flexibility in Career Training Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yahanpath, Noel; Neal, Mark; McCormack, Shane

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the nature and significance of flexibility in decisions about education and training options. This is done through an examination of the relevance of real options valuation (ROV) to our understanding of educational and training choices. Through this examination, the paper aims to contribute to the…

  11. Valuing Flexibility in Career Training Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yahanpath, Noel; Neal, Mark; McCormack, Shane

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the nature and significance of flexibility in decisions about education and training options. This is done through an examination of the relevance of real options valuation (ROV) to our understanding of educational and training choices. Through this examination, the paper aims to contribute to the…

  12. Does athletic training in volleyball modulate the components of visual evoked potentials? A preliminary investigation.

    PubMed

    Zwierko, Teresa; Lubiński, Wojciech; Lesiakowski, Piotr; Steciuk, Hanna; Piasecki, Leszek; Krzepota, Justyna

    2014-01-01

    This longitudinal study investigated visual evoked potentials (VEPs) in 11 young female volleyball players who participated in extensive training for 2 years. The control group consisted of 7 age-matched female students who were not involved in any regular sports activity. Recordings of VEPs were performed twice: baseline recording (i.e., before training began) and after 2 years of systematic, volleyball-specific athletic training. The effect of athletic training on visual signal conductivity was assessed by recording the latency of N75, P100 and N135 components of the VEPs waveform. Extensive experience with volleyball training reduced signal conductivity time through visual pathway. Specifically, the latency of P100 was reduced on average by 2.2 ms during binocular viewing. Moreover, athletes had reduced N75 latency (difference of 3.3 ms) for visual stimuli that generated greater response from peripheral retina. These results indicate that sport training can affect very early sensory processing in athletes.

  13. The Size and Scope of Collegiate Athletic Training Facilities and Staffing.

    PubMed

    Gallucci, Andrew R; Petersen, Jeffrey C

    2017-08-01

    Athletic training facilities have been described in terms of general design concepts and from operational perspectives. However, the size and scope of athletic training facilities, along with staffing at different levels of intercollegiate competition, have not been quantified.   To define the size and scope of athletic training facilities and staffing levels at various levels of intercollegiate competition. To determine if differences existed in facilities (eg, number of facilities, size of facilities) and staffing (eg, full time, part time) based on the level of intercollegiate competition.   Cross-sectional study.   Web-based survey.   Athletic trainers (ATs) who were knowledgeable about the size and scope of athletic training programs.   Athletic training facility size in square footage; the AT's overall facility satisfaction; athletic training facility component spaces, including satellite facilities, game-day facilities, offices, and storage areas; and staffing levels, including full-time ATs, part-time ATs, and undergraduate students.   The survey was completed by 478 ATs (response rate = 38.7%) from all levels of competition. Sample means for facilities were 3124.7 ± 4425 ft(2) (290.3 ± 411 m(2)) for the central athletic training facility, 1013 ± 1521 ft(2) (94 ± 141 m(2)) for satellite athletic training facilities, 1272 ± 1334 ft(2) (118 ± 124 m(2)) for game-day athletic training facilities, 388 ± 575 ft(2) (36 ± 53 m(2)) for athletic training offices, and 424 ± 884 ft(2) (39 ± 82 m(2)) for storage space. Sample staffing means were 3.8 ± 2.5 full-time ATs, 1.6 ± 2.5 part-time ATs, 25 ± 17.6 athletic training students, and 6.8 ± 7.2 work-study students. Division I schools had greater resources in multiple categories (P < .001). Differences among other levels of competition were not as well defined. Expansion or renovation of facilities in recent years was common, and almost half of ATs reported that upgrades have been approved

  14. Athletic performance and career longevity following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in the National Basketball Association.

    PubMed

    Kester, Benjamin S; Behery, Omar A; Minhas, Shobhit V; Hsu, Wellington K

    2016-03-12

    To identify the impact of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction on performance and career longevity for National Basketball Association (NBA) players. Seventy-nine players (80 knees) with acute ACL tears in the NBA between the 1984-2014 seasons, and 112 age, height, weight, and performance-matched controls were identified. Pre- and post-injury performance outcomes including seasons played, games played, games started, minutes per game, points per game, field goals, 3-point shots, rebounds, assists, steals, blocks, turnovers, personal fouls, usage percentage and player efficiency ratings were compared between cases and controls using independent samples t tests and Fisher's exact tests. Sixty-eight of seventy-nine players (86.1 %) returned to play in the NBA following ACL reconstruction. Mean length of post-operative play was 1.84 years shorter than matched controls (P = 0.001). There was a significantly higher rate of attrition from professional basketball for players with a history of ACL reconstruction (P = 0.014). In the first full season following surgery, players started in 15.5 fewer games (P = 0.001), they played in 17.3 fewer games (P < 0.001), and had combined player efficiency ratings 2.35 points lower (P = 0.001) when compared to matched controls. Over the length of their careers, players competed in 22.2 fewer games per season (P = 0.009). There is a high rate of return to sport in the NBA following ACL reconstruction, although playing time, games played, player efficiency ratings and career lengths are significantly impacted in the post-operative period. These data should be used to manage patients' expectations regarding their abilities to return to elite levels of athletic performance.

  15. Sensorimotor Learning in a Computerized Athletic Training Battery.

    PubMed

    Krasich, Kristina; Ramger, Ben; Holton, Laura; Wang, Lingling; Mitroff, Stephen R; Gregory Appelbaum, L

    2016-01-01

    Sensorimotor abilities are crucial for performance in athletic, military, and other occupational activities, and there is great interest in understanding learning in these skills. Here, behavioral performance was measured over three days as twenty-seven participants practiced multiple sessions on the Nike SPARQ Sensory Station (Nike, Inc., Beaverton, Oregon), a computerized visual and motor assessment battery. Wrist-worn actigraphy was recorded to monitor sleep-wake cycles. Significant learning was observed in tasks with high visuomotor control demands but not in tasks of visual sensitivity. Learning was primarily linear, with up to 60% improvement, but did not relate to sleep quality in this normal-sleeping population. These results demonstrate differences in the rate and capacity for learning across perceptual and motor domains, indicating potential targets for sensorimotor training interventions.

  16. Altitude training for elite endurance athletes: A review for the travel medicine practitioner.

    PubMed

    Flaherty, Gerard; O'Connor, Rory; Johnston, Niall

    2016-01-01

    High altitude training is regarded as an integral component of modern athletic preparation, especially for endurance sports such as middle and long distance running. It has rapidly achieved popularity among elite endurance athletes and their coaches. Increased hypoxic stress at altitude facilitates key physiological adaptations within the athlete, which in turn may lead to improvements in sea-level athletic performance. Despite much research in this area to date, the exact mechanisms which underlie such improvements remain to be fully elucidated. This review describes the current understanding of physiological adaptation to high altitude training and its implications for athletic performance. It also discusses the rationale and main effects of different training models currently employed to maximise performance. Athletes who travel to altitude for training purposes are at risk of suffering the detrimental effects of altitude. Altitude illness, weight loss, immune suppression and sleep disturbance may serve to limit athletic performance. This review provides an overview of potential problems which an athlete may experience at altitude, and offers specific training recommendations so that these detrimental effects are minimised.

  17. Leadership behaviors of athletic training leaders compared with leaders in other fields.

    PubMed

    Laurent, Timothy G; Bradney, Debbie A

    2007-01-01

    Athletic trainers are in positions of leadership. To determine self-reported leadership practices of head athletic trainers (HATCs) and program directors (PDs). Cross-sectional study. Respondents' academic institutions. A total of 238 athletic training leaders completed the Leadership Practices Inventory. Of these, 50.4% (n = 120) were HATCs and 49.6% (n = 118) were PDs; 69.3% (n = 165) were men and 30.7% (n = 73) were women; almost all respondents (97.1%, n = 231) were white. Respondents typically reported having 11 to 15 years of experience as an athletic trainer (n = 57, 23.9%) and being between the ages of 30 and 39 years (n = 109, 45.8%). Categories of leadership behaviors (ie, Model, Inspire, Challenge, Encourage, and Enable) were scored from 1 (almost never) to 10 (almost always). Item scores were summed to compute mean category scores. We analyzed demographic information; used t ratios to compare the data from athletic training leaders (PDs and HATCs) with normative data; compared sex, age, position, ethnicity, and years of experience with leadership practices; and computed mean scores. Athletic training leaders reported using leadership behaviors similar to those of other leaders. The PDs reported using inspiring, challenging, enabling, and encouraging leadership behaviors more often than did the HATCs. No differences were found by ethnicity, age, years of experience, or leadership practices. Athletic training leaders are transformational leaders. Athletic training education program accreditation requirements likely account for the difference in leadership practices between PDs and HATCs.

  18. Hypoxanthine as a predictor of performance in highly trained athletes.

    PubMed

    Zieliński, J; Krasińska, B; Kusy, K

    2013-12-01

    Purine metabolism reflects the exercise-induced muscle adaptations and training status. This study evaluated the utility of plasma hypoxanthine in the prediction of actual sport performance. We studied male athletes: 28 triathletes (21.4±2.9 years), 12 long-distance runners (23.2±1.9 years), 13 middle-distance runners (22.9±1.8 years) and 18 sprinters (22.0±2.7 years). Season-best race times were considered, achieved over standard triathlon, 5 000 m, 1 500 m and 100 m, respectively. Incremental treadmill test was administered to determine maximum and "threshold" oxygen uptake. Resting and post-exercise plasma concentrations of hypoxanthine, xanthine, uric acid and lactate were measured as well as resting erythrocyte hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase activity. Simple and multiple regression analyses were used to identify significant contributors to the variance in performance. Hypoxanthine considered alone explained more variance in triathletes, long-distance runners, middle-distance runners and sprinters (r 2=0.81, 0.81, 0.88 and 0.78, respectively) than models based on aerobic capacity and lactate (R 2=0.51, 0.37, 0.59 and 0.31, respectively). Combining purine metabolites and cardiorespiratory variables resulted in the best prediction (R 2=0.86, 0.93, 0.93 and 0.91; r=0.93, 0.96, 0.96 and 0.95, respectively). In summary, hypoxanthine is a strong predictor of performance in highly trained athletes and its prediction ability is very high regardless of sport specialization, spanning the continuum from speed-power to endurance disciplines. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. A multidisciplinary approach to overreaching detection in endurance trained athletes.

    PubMed

    Le Meur, Yann; Hausswirth, Christophe; Natta, Françoise; Couturier, Antoine; Bignet, Frank; Vidal, Pierre Paul

    2013-02-01

    In sport, high training load required to reach peak performance pushes human adaptation to their limits. In that process, athletes may experience general fatigue, impaired performance, and may be identified as overreached (OR). When this state lasts for several months, an overtraining syndrome is diagnosed (OT). Until now, no variable per se can detect OR, a requirement to prevent the transition from OR to OT. It encouraged us to further investigate OR using a multivariate approach, including physiological, biomechanical, cognitive, and perceptive monitoring. Twenty-four highly trained triathletes were separated into an overload group and a normo-trained group (NT) during 3 wk of training. Given the decrement of their running performance, 11 triathletes were diagnosed as OR after this period. A discriminant analysis showed that the changes of eight parameters measured during a maximal incremental test could explain 98.2% of the OR state (lactatemia, heart rate, biomechanical parameters and effort perception). Variations in heart rate and lactatemia were the two most discriminating factors. When the multifactorial analysis was restricted to these variables, the classification score reached 89.5%. Catecholamines and creatine kinase concentrations at rest did not change significantly in both groups. Running pattern was preserved and cognitive performance decrement was observed only at exhaustion in OR subjects. This study showed that monitoring various variables is required to prevent the transition between NT and OR. It emphasized that an OR index, which combines heart rate and blood lactate concentration changes after a strenuous training period, could be helpful to routinely detect OR.

  20. Changes in Stress and Appetite Responses in Male Power-Trained Athletes during Intensive Training Camp.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Satomi; Takehata, Chisato; Sasahara, Ikuko; Lee, Eunjae; Akama, Takao; Taguchi, Motoko

    2017-08-21

    An intensive consecutive high-volume training camp may induce appetite loss in athletes. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the changes in stress and appetite responses in male power-trained athletes during an intensive training camp. The measurements at Day 2 and at the end of a 9-day intensive training camp (Camp1 and Camp2, respectively) were compared with those of the resting period (Rest) and the regular training period (Regular; n = 13). The stress state was assessed based on plasma cortisol level, salivary immunoglobulin A level, and a profile of mood states score. The sensation of appetite was assessed using visual analog scale scores, and fasting plasma acylated ghrelin, insulin, and glucose were measured. The cortisol concentrations were significantly higher at Camp2 (466.7 ± 60.7 nmol∙L(-1)) than at Rest (356.3 ± 100.9 nmol∙L(-1); p = 0.002) or Regular (361.7 ± 111.4 nmol∙L(-1); p = 0.003). Both prospective and actual food consumption significantly decreased at Camp2, and acylated ghrelin concentration was significantly lower at Camp1 (34.2 ± 8.0 pg∙mL(-1)) and Camp2 (32.0 ± 8.7 pg∙mL(-1)) than at Rest (47.2 ± 11.2 pg∙mL(-1)) or Regular (53.4 ± 12.6 pg∙mL(-1)). Furthermore, the change in acylated ghrelin level was negatively correlated with the change in cortisol concentration. This study's findings suggest that an early-phase physiological stress response may decrease the acylated ghrelin level in male power-trained athletes during an intensive training camp.

  1. Effects of athletic training on heart rate variability triangular index.

    PubMed

    Kouidi, E; Haritonidis, K; Koutlianos, N; Deligiannis, A

    2002-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the heart rate variability triangular index (HRVI) in elite track and field athletes. Sixty healthy males (mean aged 22.1 +/- 3.5 years) -15 long distance runners (group A), 15 speed runners (Group B), 15 throwers (Group C) and 15 non-trained subjects (Group D) were submitted to spiroergometric test, m-mode echocardiography and 24-h ambulatory ECG monitoring. The HRVI, mean heart rate, mean interval between two consecutive R waves of the QRS complexes (R-R interval) and standard deviation of the R-R (SDRR) were assessed through time domain method on computed 24-h Holter recordings. The HRVI and the SDRR were 62.2 +/- 9.6 and 220 +/- 40 ms correspondingly in group A, 52.7 +/- 6.0 and 210 +/- 40 ms in B, 44.5 +/- 5.3 and 180 +/- 40 ms in C, 39.3 +/- 6.4 and 180 +/- 30 ms in D. The HRVI and the mean R-R were found to differ statistically between groups A, B and C versus D (P < 0.05). However, the higher value in HRVI was found in group A. Maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max) was 62.0 +/- 4.4 ml kg-1 min-1 in group A, 52.7 +/- 6.0 in group B, 44.6 +/- 5.3 in C and 41.6 +/- 6.0 in D. The higher value in VO2max was also found in group A. The left ventricular mass index (LVMI) and end-diastolic volume index (EDVI) were 136 g m-2 and 83 ml m-2 correspondingly in group A, 136 and 79 in B, 124 and 56 in C and 88 and 55 in group D. The HRVI was found to have a significant relationship with VO2max and EDVI only in group A. On the other hand, no significant relationships were found between HRVI and LVMI in all groups. It is concluded, that the enhanced HRVI in athletes is affected by exercise training pattern. Moreover, HRVI depends on the level of VO2max in endurance-trained, but is independent from the extent of myocardial hypertrophy in all types of training.

  2. The Stress and Coping Responses of Certified Graduate Athletic Training Students.

    PubMed

    Reed, Sarah; Giacobbi, Peter R.

    2004-06-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the sources of stress and coping responses of certified graduate athletic training students. DESIGN AND SETTING: We interviewed certified graduate athletic training students 3 times over a 9-month period. We transcribed the interviews verbatim and used grounded theory analytic procedures to inductively analyze the participants' sources of stress and coping responses. SUBJECTS: Three male and 3 female certified graduate athletic training students from a postcertification graduate athletic training program volunteered to participate in this investigation. The participants were full-time graduate students, with a mean age of 23 years, who had worked an average of 1.5 years as certified athletic trainers at the time of the first interview. MEASUREMENTS: We used grounded theory analytic procedures to inductively analyze the participants' sources of stress and coping responses. RESULTS: A total of 6 general sources of stress and 11 coping dimensions were revealed. The stress dimensions were labeled athletic training duties, comparing job duties, responsibilities as student, time management, social evaluation, and future concerns. The coping responses were planning, instrumental social support, adjusting to job responsibilities, positive evaluations, emotional social support, humor, wishful thinking, religion, mental or behavioral disengagement, activities outside the profession, and other outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: Certified graduate athletic training students should be encouraged to use problem-focused (eg, seeking advice, planning) and emotion-focused (eg, positive evaluations, humor) forms of coping with stress.

  3. The Stress and Coping Responses of Certified Graduate Athletic Training Students

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Sarah

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To assess the sources of stress and coping responses of certified graduate athletic training students. Design and Setting: We interviewed certified graduate athletic training students 3 times over a 9-month period. We transcribed the interviews verbatim and used grounded theory analytic procedures to inductively analyze the participants' sources of stress and coping responses. Subjects: Three male and 3 female certified graduate athletic training students from a postcertification graduate athletic training program volunteered to participate in this investigation. The participants were full-time graduate students, with a mean age of 23 years, who had worked an average of 1.5 years as certified athletic trainers at the time of the first interview. Measurements: We used grounded theory analytic procedures to inductively analyze the participants' sources of stress and coping responses. Results: A total of 6 general sources of stress and 11 coping dimensions were revealed. The stress dimensions were labeled athletic training duties, comparing job duties, responsibilities as student, time management, social evaluation, and future concerns. The coping responses were planning, instrumental social support, adjusting to job responsibilities, positive evaluations, emotional social support, humor, wishful thinking, religion, mental or behavioral disengagement, activities outside the profession, and other outcomes. Conclusions: Certified graduate athletic training students should be encouraged to use problem-focused (eg, seeking advice, planning) and emotion-focused (eg, positive evaluations, humor) forms of coping with stress. PMID:15173872

  4. Take a Page from Your Coach's Play Book: Teaching Technical and Tactical Skills in Athletic Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, Jeremy R.; Sharp, Elizabeth B.; Williams, Skip M.

    2015-01-01

    Context: The ability to demonstrate sound clinical reasoning is needed for a practicing athletic trainer. However, instruction on how to make a correct clinical decision may be deficient in many athletic training programs. Objective: To provide an overview of how to teach technical and tactical skills, using both a tradition and a nontraditional…

  5. Training and Psychosocial Patterns during the Early Development of Portuguese National Team Athletes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barreiros, Andre; Cote, Jean; Fonseca, Antonio Manuel

    2013-01-01

    This study explored the early development of expert athletes compared to a group of athletes that did not achieve an expert level of performance despite being involved in youth events with their national squads. In particular, the activities, training patterns, and psychosocial influences that characterized their paths in competitive sports were…

  6. Redefining Professional Knowledge in Athletic Training: Whose Knowledge Is It Anyway?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKeon, Patrick O.; Medina McKeon, Jennifer M.; Geisler, Paul R.

    2017-01-01

    Context: As athletic training continues to evolve as a profession, several epistemological considerations must be considered. These include how we generate professional knowledge and how we secure and legitimize it in both professional and public spheres. Objective: The purpose of this commentary is to provide an overview of how athletic training…

  7. Take a Page from Your Coach's Play Book: Teaching Technical and Tactical Skills in Athletic Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, Jeremy R.; Sharp, Elizabeth B.; Williams, Skip M.

    2015-01-01

    Context: The ability to demonstrate sound clinical reasoning is needed for a practicing athletic trainer. However, instruction on how to make a correct clinical decision may be deficient in many athletic training programs. Objective: To provide an overview of how to teach technical and tactical skills, using both a tradition and a nontraditional…

  8. Athletic Training Educators' Instructional Methods and Confidence in Graduating Students' Abilities regarding Psychosocial Intervention and Referral

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamson-Utley, Jennifer Jordan; Stiller-Ostrowski, Jennifer L.

    2011-01-01

    Context: Graduating athletic training students must consider both physical and mental aspects of injury to fully rehabilitate the injured athlete; however, programs may not be preparing students to apply psychosocial strategies that can improve the recovery process. Objective: To examine Psychosocial Intervention and Referral (PIR) content area…

  9. Effects of Stress Inoculation Training on Athletes' Postsurgical Pain and Rehabilitation after Orthopedic Injury.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Michael J.; Berger, R. Scott

    1996-01-01

    Tested the efficacy of a cognitive-behavioral intervention (stress inoculation training; SIT) for postsurgical anxiety, pain and physical rehabilitation in injured athletes. Sixty male athletes who underwent arthroscopic surgery for miniscus injury in one knee were randomly assigned to either treatment (SIT and physical therapy) or control…

  10. An Assessment of Post-Professional Athletic Training Students' Critical Thinking Skills and Dispositions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walter, Jessica Marie

    2013-01-01

    The need for outcome measures in critical thinking skills and dispositions for post-professional athletic training programs (PPATPs) is significant. It has been suggested that athletic trainers who are competent and disposed towards thinking critically will be successful in the profession. The purpose of this study is to assess critical thinking…

  11. Seeking Greater Relevance for Athletic Training Education within American Higher Education and the Health Care Professions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perrin, David H.

    2015-01-01

    This paper addresses several of the challenges facing today's system of higher education, and discusses the implications of these challenges for the athletic training profession. Among the major challenges are cost, accountability, access, and value of a higher education. The paper next focuses on several issues about which athletic training…

  12. Small-Group Standardized Patient Encounter Improves Athletic Training Students' Psychosocial Intervention and Referral Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Stacy E.; Weidner, Thomas G.; Thrasher, Ashley B.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Athletic trainers provide psychological support, counseling, intervention, and referral to patients during clinical practice. However, students are rarely exposed to real-life opportunities to develop these skills. Objective: To determine if a small-group standardized patient (SP) encounter improved athletic training students'…

  13. An Assessment of Post-Professional Athletic Training Students' Critical Thinking Skills and Dispositions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walter, Jessica Marie

    2013-01-01

    The need for outcome measures in critical thinking skills and dispositions for post-professional athletic training programs (PPATPs) is significant. It has been suggested that athletic trainers who are competent and disposed towards thinking critically will be successful in the profession. The purpose of this study is to assess critical thinking…

  14. Financial Resources for Conducting Athletic Training Programs in the Collegiate and High School Settings

    PubMed Central

    Rankin, James M.

    1992-01-01

    The distribution of resources to athletic training programs varies greatly, depending on the size and scope of the athletic program. No research has been found that assesses the differences in dollars allocated within various athletic training settings or assesses whether the different program levels allocate similar proportions of their resources to like categories of expenditures. In this study, I assessed the financial resources available to athletic training programs at major football NCAA Division IA schools, small football NCAA Division IA schools, NCAA Division IAA schools, NCAA Division II schools, NCAA Division III schools, and high schools. All schools had men's and women's sports and football programs. Categories assessed included: size and scope of the athletic program, supplies and equipment, operating expenses, medical expenses, salaries and benefits, malpractice insurance, and use of competitive bids in purchasing. Data supported the conclusion of wide disparities within many categories and in total expenses. Large-scale football NCAA Division IA programs spent $925.86 per athlete, while NCAA Division III programs spent $181.22, and high school programs spent $95.62. However, athletic trainers at all levels are conducting athletic training programs governed by the same professional competencies and standards of care. PMID:16558190

  15. Effects of Stress Inoculation Training on Athletes' Postsurgical Pain and Rehabilitation after Orthopedic Injury.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Michael J.; Berger, R. Scott

    1996-01-01

    Tested the efficacy of a cognitive-behavioral intervention (stress inoculation training; SIT) for postsurgical anxiety, pain and physical rehabilitation in injured athletes. Sixty male athletes who underwent arthroscopic surgery for miniscus injury in one knee were randomly assigned to either treatment (SIT and physical therapy) or control…

  16. Seeking Greater Relevance for Athletic Training Education within American Higher Education and the Health Care Professions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perrin, David H.

    2015-01-01

    This paper addresses several of the challenges facing today's system of higher education, and discusses the implications of these challenges for the athletic training profession. Among the major challenges are cost, accountability, access, and value of a higher education. The paper next focuses on several issues about which athletic training…

  17. Training and Psychosocial Patterns during the Early Development of Portuguese National Team Athletes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barreiros, Andre; Cote, Jean; Fonseca, Antonio Manuel

    2013-01-01

    This study explored the early development of expert athletes compared to a group of athletes that did not achieve an expert level of performance despite being involved in youth events with their national squads. In particular, the activities, training patterns, and psychosocial influences that characterized their paths in competitive sports were…

  18. Financial resources for conducting athletic training programs in the collegiate and high school settings.

    PubMed

    Rankin, J M

    1992-01-01

    The distribution of resources to athletic training programs varies greatly, depending on the size and scope of the athletic program. No research has been found that assesses the differences in dollars allocated within various athletic training settings or assesses whether the different program levels allocate similar proportions of their resources to like categories of expenditures. In this study, I assessed the financial resources available to athletic training programs at major football NCAA Division IA schools, small football NCAA Division IA schools, NCAA Division IAA schools, NCAA Division II schools, NCAA Division III schools, and high schools. All schools had men's and women's sports and football programs. Categories assessed included: size and scope of the athletic program, supplies and equipment, operating expenses, medical expenses, salaries and benefits, malpractice insurance, and use of competitive bids in purchasing. Data supported the conclusion of wide disparities within many categories and in total expenses. Large-scale football NCAA Division IA programs spent $925.86 per athlete, while NCAA Division III programs spent $181.22, and high school programs spent $95.62. However, athletic trainers at all levels are conducting athletic training programs governed by the same professional competencies and standards of care.

  19. Small-Group Standardized Patient Encounter Improves Athletic Training Students' Psychosocial Intervention and Referral Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Stacy E.; Weidner, Thomas G.; Thrasher, Ashley B.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Athletic trainers provide psychological support, counseling, intervention, and referral to patients during clinical practice. However, students are rarely exposed to real-life opportunities to develop these skills. Objective: To determine if a small-group standardized patient (SP) encounter improved athletic training students'…

  20. Vibration training: could it enhance the strength, power, or speed of athletes?

    PubMed

    Wilcock, Ian M; Whatman, Chris; Harris, Nigel; Keogh, Justin W L

    2009-03-01

    The aim of this literature review was to determine whether vibration training could produce chronic improvements in the physical performance of trained athletes. Although the main objective was to analyze any performance benefits, a brief review of possible mechanisms linked to performance enhancement is also included. Vibration causes an increase in the g-forces acting on the muscles, increasing the loading parameters of any exercise. Increased loading should aid muscle hypertrophy, and some authors have suggested that vibration may enhance neuromuscular potentiation. Considering the 6 studies on trained athletes, there does seem to be some evidence to suggest that vibration may provide a small benefit to maximal strength (1-repetition maximum) and power (countermovement jumps) of trained athletes. Speed does not seem to be enhanced by vibration training. There is a lack of evidence to support the theory that long-term vibration training increases neuromuscular potentiation in trained athletes. What mechanism(s) could be responsible for possible strength and power enhancement is unclear. Because whole-body vibration does not seem to be detrimental to performance when used in a controlled manner, it could provide an additional training stimulus for athletes. However, further research is required to determine optimum vibration training protocols and to clarify whether vibration training produces performance benefits greater than those of traditional training methods.

  1. Comparing hybrid hyaluronic acid with PRP in end career athletes with degenerative cartilage lesions of the knee.

    PubMed

    Papalia, R; Zampogna, B; Russo, F; Vasta, S; Tirindelli, M C; Nobile, C; Di Martino, A C; Vadalà, G; Denaro, V

    2016-01-01

    Cartilage lesions are very common causes of chronic knee pain in athletes. Current treatment options consist in conservative strategies, such as viscosupplementation and platelet-rich plasma injections. This randomized controlled trial aims to investigate the effect of intra-articular Hybrid Hyaluronic Acid injections compared to PRP for the treatment of cartilage lesions among athletes at the end of their career. Since March 2015, 48 professional soccer players were randomized into two groups: 24 patients received 3 injections of HHA and 23 patients received 3 intra-articular injections of PRP. All patients achieved a statistically significant clinical improvement from preoperative to postoperative time in both groups. Patients in the HHA group showed a significant superiority compared to PRP group at 3 and 6 months. Intergroup differences decrease gradually until loss of significance at 12 months follow-up. Athletes with chronic degenerative cartilage lesions of the knee responded positively both to HHA and PRP until last follow up.

  2. Training Physicians for Public Health Careers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernandez, Lyla M., Ed.; Munthali, A. Wezi, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    Public health efforts have resulted in tremendous improvements in the health of individuals and communities. The foundation for effective public health interventions rests, in large part, on a well-trained workforce. Unfortunately there is a major shortage of public health physicians who are prepared to face today's public health challenges.…

  3. Training Physicians for Public Health Careers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernandez, Lyla M., Ed.; Munthali, A. Wezi, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    Public health efforts have resulted in tremendous improvements in the health of individuals and communities. The foundation for effective public health interventions rests, in large part, on a well-trained workforce. Unfortunately there is a major shortage of public health physicians who are prepared to face today's public health challenges.…

  4. Statistical mentoring at early training and career stages

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson-Cook, Christine M.; Hamada, Michael S.; Moore, Leslie M.; Wendelberger, Joanne R.

    2016-06-27

    At Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), statistical scientists develop solutions for a variety of national security challenges through scientific excellence, typically as members of interdisciplinary teams. At LANL, mentoring is actively encouraged and practiced to develop statistical skills and positive career-building behaviors. Mentoring activities targeted at different career phases from student to junior staff are an important catalyst for both short and long term career development. This article discusses mentoring strategies for undergraduate and graduate students through internships as well as for postdoctoral research associates and junior staff. Topics addressed include project selection, progress, and outcome; intellectual and social activities that complement the student internship experience; key skills/knowledge not typically obtained in academic training; and the impact of such internships on students’ careers. Experiences and strategies from a number of successful mentorships are presented. Feedback from former mentees obtained via a questionnaire is incorporated. As a result, these responses address some of the benefits the respondents received from mentoring, helpful contributions and advice from their mentors, key skills learned, and how mentoring impacted their later careers.

  5. Statistical mentoring at early training and career stages

    DOE PAGES

    Anderson-Cook, Christine M.; Hamada, Michael S.; Moore, Leslie M.; ...

    2016-06-27

    At Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), statistical scientists develop solutions for a variety of national security challenges through scientific excellence, typically as members of interdisciplinary teams. At LANL, mentoring is actively encouraged and practiced to develop statistical skills and positive career-building behaviors. Mentoring activities targeted at different career phases from student to junior staff are an important catalyst for both short and long term career development. This article discusses mentoring strategies for undergraduate and graduate students through internships as well as for postdoctoral research associates and junior staff. Topics addressed include project selection, progress, and outcome; intellectual and social activitiesmore » that complement the student internship experience; key skills/knowledge not typically obtained in academic training; and the impact of such internships on students’ careers. Experiences and strategies from a number of successful mentorships are presented. Feedback from former mentees obtained via a questionnaire is incorporated. As a result, these responses address some of the benefits the respondents received from mentoring, helpful contributions and advice from their mentors, key skills learned, and how mentoring impacted their later careers.« less

  6. Statistical mentoring at early training and career stages

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson-Cook, Christine M.; Hamada, Michael S.; Moore, Leslie M.; Wendelberger, Joanne R.

    2016-06-27

    At Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), statistical scientists develop solutions for a variety of national security challenges through scientific excellence, typically as members of interdisciplinary teams. At LANL, mentoring is actively encouraged and practiced to develop statistical skills and positive career-building behaviors. Mentoring activities targeted at different career phases from student to junior staff are an important catalyst for both short and long term career development. This article discusses mentoring strategies for undergraduate and graduate students through internships as well as for postdoctoral research associates and junior staff. Topics addressed include project selection, progress, and outcome; intellectual and social activities that complement the student internship experience; key skills/knowledge not typically obtained in academic training; and the impact of such internships on students’ careers. Experiences and strategies from a number of successful mentorships are presented. Feedback from former mentees obtained via a questionnaire is incorporated. As a result, these responses address some of the benefits the respondents received from mentoring, helpful contributions and advice from their mentors, key skills learned, and how mentoring impacted their later careers.

  7. Evidence-Based Medicine: What Is It and How Does It Apply to Athletic Training?

    PubMed

    Steves, Russell; Hootman, Jennifer M.

    2004-03-01

    OBJECTIVE: To introduce the concept of evidence-based medicine (EBM) to athletic trainers. This overview provides information on how EBM can affect the clinical practice of athletic training and enhance the care given to patients. DATA SOURCES: We searched the MEDLINE and CINHAL bibliographic databases using the terms evidence-based medicine and best practice and the online Index to Abstracts of Cochrane Reviews by group (injury, musculoskeletal injuries, and musculoskeletal) to identify reviews on topics pertinent to athletic training. DATA SYNTHESIS: Evidence-based medical practice has 5 components: defining a clinically relevant question, searching for the best evidence, appraising the quality of the evidence, applying the evidence to clinical practice, and evaluating the process. Evidence-based medicine integrates the research evidence, clinician's expertise, and patient's preferences to guide clinical decision making. Critical to this effort is the availability of quality research on the effectiveness of sports medicine techniques. Athletic training outcomes research is lagging behind that of other health care professions. RECOMMENDATIONS: Athletic trainers need to embrace the critical-thinking skills to assess the medical literature and incorporate it into their clinical practice. The profession should encourage more clinically related research and enhance the scientific foundation of athletic training. Evidence-based medicine provides an important next step in the growth of the athletic training profession.

  8. The training intensity distribution among well-trained and elite endurance athletes

    PubMed Central

    Stöggl, Thomas L.; Sperlich, Billy

    2015-01-01

    Researchers have retrospectively analyzed the training intensity distribution (TID) of nationally and internationally competitive athletes in different endurance disciplines to determine the optimal volume and intensity for maximal adaptation. The majority of studies present a “pyramidal” TID with a high proportion of high volume, low intensity training (HVLIT). Some world-class athletes appear to adopt a so-called “polarized” TID (i.e., significant % of HVLIT and high-intensity training) during certain phases of the season. However, emerging prospective randomized controlled studies have demonstrated superior responses of variables related to endurance when applying a polarized TID in well-trained and recreational individuals when compared with a TID that emphasizes HVLIT or threshold training. The aims of the present review are to: (1) summarize the main responses of retrospective and prospective studies exploring TID; (2) provide a systematic overview on TIDs during preparation, pre-competition, and competition phases in different endurance disciplines and performance levels; (3) address whether one TID has demonstrated greater efficacy than another; and (4) highlight research gaps in an effort to direct future scientific studies. PMID:26578968

  9. The training intensity distribution among well-trained and elite endurance athletes.

    PubMed

    Stöggl, Thomas L; Sperlich, Billy

    2015-01-01

    Researchers have retrospectively analyzed the training intensity distribution (TID) of nationally and internationally competitive athletes in different endurance disciplines to determine the optimal volume and intensity for maximal adaptation. The majority of studies present a "pyramidal" TID with a high proportion of high volume, low intensity training (HVLIT). Some world-class athletes appear to adopt a so-called "polarized" TID (i.e., significant % of HVLIT and high-intensity training) during certain phases of the season. However, emerging prospective randomized controlled studies have demonstrated superior responses of variables related to endurance when applying a polarized TID in well-trained and recreational individuals when compared with a TID that emphasizes HVLIT or threshold training. The aims of the present review are to: (1) summarize the main responses of retrospective and prospective studies exploring TID; (2) provide a systematic overview on TIDs during preparation, pre-competition, and competition phases in different endurance disciplines and performance levels; (3) address whether one TID has demonstrated greater efficacy than another; and (4) highlight research gaps in an effort to direct future scientific studies.

  10. Relation of Type and Amount of Training to Career Counseling Self-Efficacy in Italy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soresi, Salvatore; Nota, Laura; Lent, Robert W.

    2004-01-01

    This study examined the relation of self-efficacy to length and type of training in a sample of Italian career counselors. Findings indicated that amount of career counseling training was positively related to counselors' self-efficacy regarding their abilities to conceptualize vocational problems, deal with career indecision concerns, and provide…

  11. Relation of Type and Amount of Training to Career Counseling Self-Efficacy in Italy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soresi, Salvatore; Nota, Laura; Lent, Robert W.

    2004-01-01

    This study examined the relation of self-efficacy to length and type of training in a sample of Italian career counselors. Findings indicated that amount of career counseling training was positively related to counselors' self-efficacy regarding their abilities to conceptualize vocational problems, deal with career indecision concerns, and provide…

  12. An Examination of the Career Development and Decision-Making Process of Female Division I Student-Athletes Attending a Mississippi Institution of Higher Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winstead, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    The career development and decision-making process of student-athletes has been found to be a complex process (Brown, Glastetter-Fender, & Shelton, 2000; Lally & Kerr, 2005; and Sandstedt, Cox, Martens, Ward, Webber, & Ivey, 2004). Intertwined with issues not found within the general student population career development and…

  13. Seasonal fluctuations in body weight during growth of Thoroughbred racehorses during their athletic career.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yuji; Takahashi, Toshiyuki

    2017-08-18

    Domesticated horses adapt to environmental conditions through seasonal fluctuations in their metabolic rate. The seasonal change of metabolic rates of domesticated horses in pastures is documented. However, there are few investigations on seasonal body weight change of domesticated horses housed in stables, which are provided constant energy intake throughout the year. Both seasonal changes and gain in body weight of racehorses during their athletic career is known to a lesser extent because their body weight are not measured in most countries. Here, we used a seasonal-trend decomposition method to conduct a time series analysis of body weight of Thoroughbred racehorses participating in flat races held by the Japan Racing Association from 1 January 2002 to 31 December 2014. We acquired 640,431 body weight measurements for race starts and included 632,540 of these in the time series analysis. Based on seasonal component analysis, the body weight of male and gelding horses peaked in autumn and winter and reached its nadir in summer. In contrast, the body weight of female horses peaked in autumn and reached the nadir in spring. Based on trend component analysis, most of the increase in body weight was observed when all sexes approached 5 years of age. The slope of the body weight gain was smaller after that, and an approximately 30 kg gain was observed during their careers. These results indicate that the body weight of a Thoroughbred racehorse fluctuates seasonally, and that there may be sex differences in energy balance mechanisms. Moreover, the present results suggest that the physiological development of Thoroughbred racehorses is completed just before they reach 5 years of age.

  14. Using recovery modalities between training sessions in elite athletes: does it help?

    PubMed

    Barnett, Anthony

    2006-01-01

    Achieving an appropriate balance between training and competition stresses and recovery is important in maximising the performance of athletes. A wide range of recovery modalities are now used as integral parts of the training programmes of elite athletes to help attain this balance. This review examined the evidence available as to the efficacy of these recovery modalities in enhancing between-training session recovery in elite athletes. Recovery modalities have largely been investigated with regard to their ability to enhance the rate of blood lactate removal following high-intensity exercise or to reduce the severity and duration of exercise-induced muscle injury and delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS). Neither of these reflects the circumstances of between-training session recovery in elite athletes. After high-intensity exercise, rest alone will return blood lactate to baseline levels well within the normal time period between the training sessions of athletes. The majority of studies examining exercise-induced muscle injury and DOMS have used untrained subjects undertaking large amounts of unfamiliar eccentric exercise. This model is unlikely to closely reflect the circumstances of elite athletes. Even without considering the above limitations, there is no substantial scientific evidence to support the use of the recovery modalities reviewed to enhance the between-training session recovery of elite athletes. Modalities reviewed were massage, active recovery, cryotherapy, contrast temperature water immersion therapy, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, compression garments, stretching, electromyostimulation and combination modalities. Experimental models designed to reflect the circumstances of elite athletes are needed to further investigate the efficacy of various recovery modalities for elite athletes. Other potentially important factors associated with recovery, such as the rate of post-exercise glycogen synthesis and the role

  15. FLUID BALANCE DURING TRAINING IN ELITE YOUNG ATHLETES OF DIFFERENT SPORTS

    PubMed Central

    Arnaoutis, Giannis; Kavouras, Stavros A.; Angelopoulou, Athanasia; Skoulariki, Chara; Bismpikou, Stefani; Mourtakos, Stamatis; Sidossis, Labros S.

    2015-01-01

    Although there are many studies demonstrating a high percentage of adult athletes which start exercise in sub-optimal hydration state, limited data concerning hydration levels in athletic youth exists. The purpose of this study was to identify the hydration status of elite young athletes of different sports, during a typical day of training. Fifty-nine young elite men athletes from different sports (basketball, gymnastics, swimming, running, canoeing) participated in the study (age: 15.2±1.3 y, years of training: 7.7±2.0). Hydration status was assessed in the morning, before and immediately after practice. Data collection took place at the same time of the day, with mean environmental temperature and humidity at the time of the measurements at 27.6±0.9 °C and 58±8%, respectively. All athletes trained for approximately 90 min and they were consuming fluids ad libitum throughout their practice. Over 89% of the athletes were hypohydrated (USG≥1.020 mg/dl) based on their first morning urine sample. Pre-training urine samples revealed that 76.3% of the athletes were hypohydrated, while a significant high percent remained hypohydrated even after training according to USG values ≥ 1.020 mg/dl (74.5%) and urine color scale: 5-6 (76.3%). Mean body weight loss during training was −1.1±0.07%. We concluded that the prevalence of hypohydration among elite young athletes is very high, as indicated by the USG and urine color values. The majority of the athletes was hypohydrated throughout the day and dehydrated even more during practice despite fluid availability. PMID:24513625

  16. An examination of the training profiles and injuries in elite youth track and field athletes.

    PubMed

    Huxley, Dianne J; O'Connor, Donna; Healey, Peter A

    2014-01-01

    Australian track and field has a strong focus on State and National elite youth programmes as the development pathway to elite senior international competition. Yet, there are no clearly defined parameters for appropriate training volumes, training intensities or competition schedules for youth athletes. This study sought to examine the training profiles of, and injuries suffered by, elite youth track and field athletes between the ages 13 and 17 years. The participants were 103 elite NSW athletes (age 17.7 ± 2.4 years, 64% girls) who recalled, through a questionnaire, their training profiles (frequency, volume and intensity) and injuries (type, site and severity) at three age groups: 13-14 years, 15-16 years and at 17 years of age. Eighty-one athletes (78.6%) sustained 200 injuries (time loss > 3 weeks) that were predominantly classified as overuse (76%) with 17.3% of athletes retiring due to injuries prior to turning 18 years. The results, analysed using t-test, one-way analysis of variance and chi-square analysis, showed that injured athletes trained at a higher intensity at 13-14 years (p < 0.01), completed more high-intensity training sessions at 13-14 years (p < 0.01) and 15-16 years (p < 0.05) and had a higher yearly training load at 13-14 years (p < 0.01). There was a significant relationship between forced retirement and having sustained an overuse injury (p<0.05). These findings suggest that monitoring by coaches and athletes of training loads, intensity and the number of hard sessions completed each week is warranted to minimise injuries sustained by 13-16 year old athletes.

  17. Citius, Altius, Fortius: beneficial effects of resistance training for young athletes: Narrative review.

    PubMed

    Faigenbaum, Avery D; Lloyd, Rhodri S; MacDonald, James; Myer, Gregory D

    2016-01-01

    The motto of the Olympic Games is Citius, Altius, Fortius which is Latin for 'Faster, Higher, Stronger'. It is a clarion call to all competitors, including the youngest, to engage in training strategies that prepare athletes to be the best in the world. Existing research indicates that various forms of resistance training can elicit performance improvements in young athletes. Stronger young athletes will be better prepared to learn complex movements, master sport tactics, and sustain the demands of training and competition. An integrative training programme grounded in resistance training and motor skill development can optimise a young athlete's potential to maximise their athletic and sporting performance, while reducing the risk of a sports-related injury. Resistance training may be especially important for modern-day young athletes who are more likely to specialise in one sport at an early age at the expense of enhancing general physical fitness and learning diversified sport skills. Structured interventions that include qualified instruction; targeted movement practice; and strength and conditioning activities that are developmentally appropriate, progressive and technique driven are needed to attain a level of athleticism that is consistent with the Olympic motto.

  18. Application of serum CK and BUN determination in monitoring pre-competition training of badminton athletes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yun

    2007-02-01

    In order to investigate the feasibility of serum creatine kinase (CK) and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) in monitoring pre-competition training of badminton athletes, the pre-competition training load of 20 badminton athletes was studied, and serum CK and BUN were determined before, immediate and next morning after training. The results showed that after intensive training for one week, serum CK levels were significantly increased by 57.53 mmol/L (P<0.05). After regulation of the training intensity, average serum CK levels were increased by 21.79 mmol/L (P<0.05). BUN contents were increased by 0.83 mmol/L on average with the difference being not significant (P>0.05). After intermittent training, there was significant difference in the average increased levels of serum CK in athletes (P<0.05). There was significant difference before and after regulation of training (P<0.05). The increased levels of BUN were 0.78 mmol/L without significant difference (P>0.05). It was concluded that serum CK was one of the biochemical indicators monitoring the training load sensitivity of badminton athletes, but BUN was of little value in monitoring the training load. Both serum CK and BUN recovered slowly after one-week intensive training and intermittent training, suggesting the metabolic mechanism of human body in training needs further study.

  19. Athletic Training Educators' Pedagogical Strategies for Preparing Students to Address Sudden Death in Sport

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Pagnotta, Kelly D.; Salvatore, Anthony C.; Casa, Douglas J.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Educational training programs both impart knowledge and allow students to practice skills to gain clinical competence. Objective: Understand the educational training provided to athletic training students regarding sudden death in sport beyond exertional heat stroke. Design: An exploratory, qualitative study using telephone interviews and…

  20. Athletic Training Educators' Pedagogical Strategies for Preparing Students to Address Sudden Death in Sport

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Pagnotta, Kelly D.; Salvatore, Anthony C.; Casa, Douglas J.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Educational training programs both impart knowledge and allow students to practice skills to gain clinical competence. Objective: Understand the educational training provided to athletic training students regarding sudden death in sport beyond exertional heat stroke. Design: An exploratory, qualitative study using telephone interviews and…

  1. Cardiovascular Adaptation and Remodeling to Rigorous Athletic Training.

    PubMed

    Weiner, Rory B; Baggish, Aaron L

    2015-07-01

    Exercise-induced cardiac remodeling is a complex process by which the cardinal hemodynamic stresses of pressure and volume lead to a host of structural or functional adaptations. In aggregate, the constellation of changes that accompany this process serve to facilitate athletic performance by minimizing the cardiac work inherent in athletic activity. Although several key determinants of athletic cardiac adaptation have been described, observed variability across athlete cohorts remains an incompletely understood area. Ongoing and future work are required to further understand this process and ultimately to determine where the boundary lies between adaptive physiology and maladaptive disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Effectiveness of accommodation and constant resistance training on maximal strength and power in trained athletes.

    PubMed

    Ataee, Jalil; Koozehchian, Majid S; Kreider, Richard B; Zuo, Li

    2014-01-01

    Accommodation resistance is a training technique that may improve strength and power gains beyond those achieved by traditional free weights. In this method, chains are either added on a free-weight bar and combined with traditional plates or added to the bar as the entire load. Purpose. The aim of the current study was to compare the effectiveness of accommodation and constant resistance training methods during a four-week period on maximal strength and power in trained athletes. Methods. This study was comprised of 24 trained athletes, including 16 trained males [8 Wushu athletes (Kung-Fu) and 8 wrestlers, age: 20.5 ± 2.00 yrs. old]. Participants were initially tested on weight, body circumference, fat percent, upper and lower body maximal strength, determined by the 1-repetition maximum (1RM) test, which determines the greatest amount of weight a person can successfully lift, and upper and lower body power. Participants were equally randomized to either accommodation or constant resistance training groups. Both groups underwent resistance training for a four-week period that consisted of three sessions per week. Multivariate repeated-measures analyses of variance of the data were used to verify significant differences in strength and power between groups. The modified Bonferroni post hoc test was used to compare the obtained results in pre-, mid-, and post test. Results. In the accommodation resistance group, there was a significant difference in lower body maximal strength compared to the constant group (163.12 ± 18.82 kg in the accommodation group vs. 142.25 ± 20.04 kg in the constant group, P = 0.04). No significant differences were found in upper body power, lower body power, and upper body maximal strength between the two groups (P > 0.05). Conclusion. Although there was only a significant difference in lower body maximal strength between groups, accommodation resistance training may induce a physiological training response by improving the strength and

  3. Comparative study of career development and training programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsao, Alan

    1988-01-01

    Improvement of human capital has been identified as the key to any further increase of productivity for any country engaged in the global economic competition. The same can be said of any organization seeking to enhance its overall performance. This study is aimed at: (1) surveying the current practices of career development and training programs at major corporations and government research organizations; (2) presenting the distributions of various program features among survey respondents; (3) identifying the profile of the training program of a typical research organization, against which each organization can check and identify its relative strengths as well as areas needing further strengthening; (4) conducting an economic analysis of the effectiveness of the training programs at Langley Research Center; and (5) making recommendations as to how to enhance existing training programs.

  4. Comparative study of career development and training programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsao, Alan

    1988-01-01

    Improvement of human capital has been identified as the key to any further increase of productivity for any country engaged in the global economic competition. The same can be said of any organization seeking to enhance its overall performance. This study is aimed at: (1) surveying the current practices of career development and training programs at major corporations and government research organizations; (2) presenting the distributions of various program features among survey respondents; (3) identifying the profile of the training program of a typical research organization, against which each organization can check and identify its relative strengths as well as areas needing further strengthening; (4) conducting an economic analysis of the effectiveness of the training programs at Langley Research Center; and (5) making recommendations as to how to enhance existing training programs.

  5. Fluid Balance During Training in Elite Young Athletes of Different Sports.

    PubMed

    Arnaoutis, Giannis; Kavouras, Stavros A; Angelopoulou, Athanasia; Skoulariki, Chara; Bismpikou, Stefani; Mourtakos, Stamatis; Sidossis, Labros S

    2015-12-01

    Although there are many studies demonstrating a high percentage of adult athletes who start exercise in suboptimal hydration state, limited data concerning hydration levels in athletic youth exist. The purpose of this study was to identify the hydration status of elite young athletes of different sports, during a typical day of training. Fifty-nine young elite male athletes from different sports (basketball, gymnastics, swimming, running, and canoeing) participated in the study (age: 15.2 ± 1.3 years; years of training: 7.7 ± 2.0). Hydration status was assessed in the morning, before and immediately after practice. Data collection took place at the same time of the day, with mean environmental temperature and humidity at the time of the measurements at 27.6 ± 0.9° C and 58 ± 8%, respectively. All athletes trained for approximately 90 minutes, and they were consuming fluids ad libitum throughout their practice. Over 89% of the athletes were hypohydrated (urine specific gravity [USG] ≥1.020 mg·dl) based on their first morning urine sample. Pretraining urine samples revealed that 76.3% of the athletes were hypohydrated, whereas a significant high percent remained hypohydrated even after training according to USG values ≥1.020 mg·dl (74.5%) and urine color scale: 5-6 (76.3%). Mean body weight loss during training was -1.1 ± 0.07%. We concluded that the prevalence of hypohydration among elite young athletes is very high, as indicated by the USG and urine color values. The majority of the athletes was hypohydrated throughout the day and dehydrated even more during practice despite fluid availability.

  6. Oxidative stress and antioxidant status response of handball athletes: implications for sport training monitoring.

    PubMed

    Marin, Douglas Popp; Bolin, Anaysa Paola; Campoio, Thais Regina; Guerra, Beatriz Alves; Otton, Rosemari

    2013-10-01

    The chronic exposure to regular exercise training seems to improve antioxidant defense systems. However, the intense physical training imposed on elite athletes may lead to overtraining associated with oxidative stress. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of different training loads and competition on oxidative stress, biochemical parameters and antioxidant enzymatic defense in handball athletes during 6-months of monitoring. Ten male elite handball athletes were recruited to the study. Blood samples were collected four times every six weeks throughout the season. During most intense periods of training and competitions there were significant changes in plasma indices of oxidative stress (increased TBARS and decreased thiols). Conversely, chronic adaptations to exercise training demonstrated a significant protective effect against oxidative stress in erythrocyte (decrease in TBARs and carbonyl group levels). Erythrocyte antioxidant enzyme activities were significantly increased, suggesting a training-induced antioxidant adaptation. Biomarkers of skeletal muscle damage were significantly increased during high-intensity training period (creatine kinase, lactate dehydrogenase and aspartate aminotransferase). No significant changes were observed in plasma IL-6, TNF-α and uric acid, whereas a significant reduction was found in the IL-1β concentration and gamma-glutamyl transferase activity. Oxidative stress and antioxidant biomarkers can change throughout the season in competitive athletes, reflecting the physical stress and muscle damage that occurs as the result of competitive handball training. In addition, these biochemical measurements can be applied in the physiological follow-up of athletes. © 2013.

  7. Influence of gender and types of sports training on QT variables in young elite athletes.

    PubMed

    Omiya, Kazuto; Sekizuka, Hiromitsu; Kida, Keisuke; Suzuki, Kengo; Akashi, Yoshihiro J; Ohba, Haruo; Musha, Haruki

    2014-01-01

    Influence of gender and sports training on QT variables such as QT interval and dispersion (QT dispersion: QTD) in young elite athletes were evaluated. Subjects included 104 male and 97 female Japanese elite athletes (mean age 21.6 years). Sports included basketball, fencing, gymnastics, judo, swimming, tennis, track and field and volleyball. Age-matched healthy non-athletes (32 men and 20 women) were enrolled as controls. QT measurements were manually obtained from a 12-lead resting electrocardiogram and QTD was calculated as the difference between the longest and shortest QT intervals. A corrected QT interval (QTc) was obtained using Bazett's formula. Subjects were divided into two groups; an endurance training group and a static training group on the basis of their training types. Maximum and minimum QTc were significantly longer in female athletes than in male athletes (max: 414.2 vs. 404.5 ms, min: 375.1 vs. 359.2 ms, p<0.0001 respectively), whereas QTc dispersion (QTcD) was shorter in female athletes than in male athletes (39.2 vs. 45.3 ms, p<0.0001). QTcD was significantly shorter in female athletes than in the female control group (39.2 vs. 45.2 ms, p<0.05). However, no statistically significant difference was observed between male athletes and the male control group. Male gymnasts exhibited significantly longer QTcD than the control group (p<0.01), but female gymnasts had significantly shorter QTcD than the control group (p<0.05). Maximum QTc intervals were prolonged in the male static training group compared with non-athletes, and QTcDs in the static training group were prolonged compared with the endurance training group. However, no significant difference was observed in the female group. In conclusion, both gender and different characteristics of sports training may affect QT variables even in young elite athletes. Vigorous static exercise training may independently prolong QT variables.

  8. Leadership in athletic training: implications for practice and education in allied health care.

    PubMed

    Kutz, Matthew R

    2010-01-01

    Leadership behaviors are an important aspect of athletic training and are needed within all allied health care disciples. A two-phase, exploratory, non-experimental research study using a Delphi technique and a randomly selected sample of athletic trainers (n = 161) was conducted to determine leadership competencies perceived to be important for athletic training practice and education. The Delphi technique (phase one) resulted in the Leadership Development in Athletic Training instrument (LDAT). In the national survey (phase two), respondents used the LDAT to rate the importance of leadership competencies for athletic training practice and for athletic training education. Coefficient alphas ranged from α = 0.83 to 0.97 and provided satisfactory estimates of internal consistency. Concurrent, construct, and convergent validity were established. Forty-nine leadership competencies were rated important for practice and 48 for education (M = 1.5, p ≤ 0.001). Exploratory factor analysis revealed that leadership competencies were organized by four constructs (with six emphases): 1) personality characteristics, 2) diagnosing context and people skills, 3) communication and initiative, and 4) strategic thinking. Repeated measures ANOVA with Sidak post-hoc adjustments indicated each leadership construct significantly increased in importance as the level of the ATEP progressed.

  9. Prediction of Academic Achievement in an NATA-Approved Graduate Athletic Training Education Program

    PubMed Central

    Keskula, Douglas R.; Sammarone, Paula G.; Perrin, David H.

    1995-01-01

    The Purpose of this investigation was to determine which information used in the applicant selection process would best predict the final grade point average of students in a National Athletic Trainers Association (NATA) graduate athletic training education program. The criterion variable used was the graduate grade-point average (GPAg) calculated at the completion of the program of study. The predictor variables included: 1) Graduate Record Examination-Quantitative (GRE-Q) scores; and 2) Graduate Record Examination-Verbal (GRE-V) scores, 3) preadmission grade point average (GPAp), 4) total athletic training hours (hours), and 5) curriculum or internship undergraduate athletic training education (program). Data from 55 graduate athletic training students during a 5-year period were evaluated. Stepwise multiple regression analysis indicated that GPAp was a significant predictor of GPAg, accounting for 34% of the variance. GRE-Q, GRE-V, hours, and program did not significantly contribute individually or in combination to the prediction of GPAg. The results of this investigation suggest that, of the variables examined, GPAp is the best predictor of academic success in an NATA-approved graduate athletic training education program. PMID:16558312

  10. High School Athletes' Perceptions of the Motivational Climate in Their Off-Season Training Programs.

    PubMed

    Chamberlin, Jacob M; Fry, Mary D; Iwasaki, Susumu

    2017-03-01

    Chamberlin, JM, Fry, MD, and Iwasaki, S. High school athletes' perceptions of the motivational climate in their off-season training programs. J Strength Cond Res 31(3): 736-742, 2017-Athletes benefit tremendously from working hard in off-season training (OST) because it sets them up to avoid injuries and perform their best during the season. Ironically, many athletes struggle to stay motivated to participate regularly in this training. Research has highlighted the benefits for athletes perceiving a caring and task-involving climate, where they gauge their success based on their personal effort and improvement, and perceive each member of the team is treated with mutual kindness and respect. Athletes who perceive a caring and task-involving climate on their teams are more likely to report greater adaptive motivational responses. Research has not currently examined athletes' perceptions of the climate in OST programs. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between athletes' perceptions of the climate in an OST program and their motivational responses. High school athletes (N = 128; 90 males 35 females; mean age = 15.3 years) participating in summer OST programs completed a survey that included measures of intrinsic motivation, commitment, their valuing OST, feeling like it is their decision to participate in OST, their perceptions that their teammates take OST seriously, and attendance. A canonical correlation revealed that athletes, who perceived a highly caring and task-involving climate reported higher intrinsic motivation, value of and commitment to OST; attendance; and perceived teammates take OST seriously. Results suggest that creating a caring and task-involving climate in OST programs may help athletes optimize their motivation to participate in important strength and conditioning programs.

  11. A comparison of traditional and block periodized strength training programs in trained athletes.

    PubMed

    Bartolomei, Sandro; Hoffman, Jay R; Merni, Franco; Stout, Jeffrey R

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare 2 different periodization models in strength and power athletes. Twenty-four experienced resistance trained men were randomly assigned to either a block periodization training program (BP; age = 24.2 ± 3.1 years, body mass = 78.5 ± 11.0 kg, height = 177.6 ± 4.9 cm) or to a traditional periodization program (TP; age = 26.2 ± 6.0 years, body mass = 80.5 ± 13.3 kg, height = 179.2 ± 4.6). Participants in both training programs performed 4 training sessions per week. Each training program consisted of the same exercises and same volume of training (total resistance lifted per session). The difference between the groups was in the manipulation of training intensity within each training phase. Strength and power testing occurred before training (PRE) and after 15 weeks (POST) of training. Magnitude-based inferences were used to compare strength and power performance between the groups. Participants in BP were more likely (79.8%) to increase the area under the force-power curve than TP. Participants in BP also demonstrated a likely positive (92.76%) decrease in the load corresponding to maximal power at the bench press compared with TP group, and a possible improvement (∼60%) in maximal strength and power in the bench press. No significant changes were noted between groups in lower-body strength or jump power performance after the 15-week training period. Results of this study indicate that BP may enhance upper-body power expression to a greater extent than TP with equal volume; however, no differences were detected for lower-body performance and body composition measures.

  12. Anterior cruciate ligament injury prevention training in female athletes: a systematic review of injury reduction and results of athletic performance tests.

    PubMed

    Noyes, Frank R; Barber Westin, Sue D

    2012-01-01

    Many anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury prevention training programs have been published, but few have assessed the effects of training on both ACL injury rates and athletic performance tests. To determine if ACL injury prevention programs have a positive influence on both injury rates and athletic performance tests in female athletes. In August 2011, a search was conducted (1995-August 2011) of the PubMed, Science Direct, and CINAHL databases. Selected studies determined the effect of ACL intervention training programs on ACL incidence rates (determined by athlete-exposures) and athletic performance tests, such as isokinetic strength, vertical jump height, speed, agility, and dynamic balance. Because no single article contained both criteria, investigations were cross-referenced to obtain data on both factors from the same training programs. The authors reviewed the selected studies for cohort population numbers, age, sports, duration of study, program components, duration of training, number of athlete-exposures, ACL injury incidence rates, and results of athletic performance tests. Initially, 57 studies were identified that described 42 ACL injury prevention training programs. Of these, 17 studies that investigated 5 programs met the inclusion criteria. Two programs significantly reduced ACL injury rates and improved athletic performance tests: Sportsmetrics and the Prevent Injury and Enhance Performance program (PEP). Sportsmetrics produced significant increases in lower extremity and abdominal strength, vertical jump height, estimated maximal aerobic power, speed, and agility. Prevent Injury and Enhance Performance significantly improved isokinetic knee flexion strength but did not improve vertical jump height, speed, or agility. The other 3 programs (Myklebust, the "11," and Knee Ligament Injury Prevention) did not improve both ACL injury rates and athletic performance tests. Only the Sportsmetrics and PEP ACL intervention training programs had a

  13. The Effects of Isolated and Integrated ‘Core Stability’ Training on Athletic Performance Measures

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Casey A.; Ford, Kevin R.; Myer, Gregory D.; Hewett, Timothy E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Core stability training, operationally defined as training focused to improve trunk and hip control, is an integral part of athletic development, yet little is known about its direct relation to athletic performance. Objective This systematic review focuses on identification of the association between core stability and sports-related performance measures. A secondary objective was to identify difficulties encountered when trying to train core stability with the goal of improving athletic performance. Data sources A systematic search was employed to capture all articles related to athletic performance and core stability training that were identified using the electronic databases MEDLINE, CINAHL and SPORTDiscus™ (1982-June2011). Study selection A systematic approach was used to evaluate 179 articles identified for initial review. Studies that performed an intervention targeted toward the core and measured an outcome related to athletic or sport performances were included, while studies with a participant population aged 65 years or older were excluded. Twenty-four in total met the inclusionary criteria for review. Study appraisal and synthesis methods Studies were evaluated using the Physical Therapy Evidence Database (PEDro) scale. The 24 articles were separated into three groups, general performance (n = 8), lower extremity (n = 10) and upper extremity (n = 6), for ease of discussion. Results In the majority of studies, core stability training was utilized in conjunction with more comprehensive exercise programmes. As such, many studies saw improvements in skills of general strengths such as maximum squat load and vertical leap. Surprisingly, not all studies reported measurable increases in specific core strength and stability measures following training. Additionally, investigations that targeted the core as the primary goal for improved outcome of training had mixed results. Limitations Core stability is rarely the sole component of an athletic

  14. The effects of isolated and integrated 'core stability' training on athletic performance measures: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Reed, Casey A; Ford, Kevin R; Myer, Gregory D; Hewett, Timothy E

    2012-08-01

    Core stability training, operationally defined as training focused to improve trunk and hip control, is an integral part of athletic development, yet little is known about its direct relation to athletic performance. This systematic review focuses on identification of the association between core stability and sports-related performance measures. A secondary objective was to identify difficulties encountered when trying to train core stability with the goal of improving athletic performance. A systematic search was employed to capture all articles related to athletic performance and core stability training that were identified using the electronic databases MEDLINE, CINAHL and SPORTDiscus™ (1982-June 2011). A systematic approach was used to evaluate 179 articles identified for initial review. Studies that performed an intervention targeted toward the core and measured an outcome related to athletic or sport performances were included, while studies with a participant population aged 65 years or older were excluded. Twenty-four in total met the inclusionary criteria for review. Studies were evaluated using the Physical Therapy Evidence Database (PEDro) scale. The 24 articles were separated into three groups, general performance (n = 8), lower extremity (n = 10) and upper extremity (n = 6), for ease of discussion. In the majority of studies, core stability training was utilized in conjunction with more comprehensive exercise programmes. As such, many studies saw improvements in skills of general strengths such as maximum squat load and vertical leap. Surprisingly, not all studies reported measurable increases in specific core strength and stability measures following training. Additionally, investigations that targeted the core as the primary goal for improved outcome of training had mixed results. Core stability is rarely the sole component of an athletic development programme, making it difficult to directly isolate its affect on athletic performance

  15. Analysis of Postdoctoral Training Outcomes That Broaden Participation in Science Careers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rybarczyk, Brian J.; Lerea, Leslie; Whittington, Dawayne; Dykstra, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Postdoctoral training is an optimal time to expand research skills, develop independence, and shape career trajectories, making this training period important to study in the context of career development. Seeding Postdoctoral Innovators in Research and Education (SPIRE) is a training program that balances research, teaching, and professional…

  16. Analysis of Postdoctoral Training Outcomes That Broaden Participation in Science Careers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rybarczyk, Brian J.; Lerea, Leslie; Whittington, Dawayne; Dykstra, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Postdoctoral training is an optimal time to expand research skills, develop independence, and shape career trajectories, making this training period important to study in the context of career development. Seeding Postdoctoral Innovators in Research and Education (SPIRE) is a training program that balances research, teaching, and professional…

  17. The Effect of High-Fidelity Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) Simulation on Athletic Training Student Knowledge, Confidence, Emotions, and Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tivener, Kristin Ann; Gloe, Donna Sue

    2015-01-01

    Context: High-fidelity simulation is widely used in healthcare for the training and professional education of students though literature of its application to athletic training education remains sparse. Objective: This research attempts to address a wide-range of data. This includes athletic training student knowledge acquisition from…

  18. The Effect of High-Fidelity Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) Simulation on Athletic Training Student Knowledge, Confidence, Emotions, and Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tivener, Kristin Ann; Gloe, Donna Sue

    2015-01-01

    Context: High-fidelity simulation is widely used in healthcare for the training and professional education of students though literature of its application to athletic training education remains sparse. Objective: This research attempts to address a wide-range of data. This includes athletic training student knowledge acquisition from…

  19. Monitoring Hydration Status Pre- and Post-Training among University Athletes Using Urine Color and Weight Loss Indicators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, Marquitta C.; Salandy, Sinead T.; Beckford, Safiya E.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the hydration status pre- and post-training among university athletes using urine color and weight loss as indicators. Participants: Participants were 52 university athletes training for campus games in a developing country. Methods: Pre- and post-training urine specimens were compared with a standard urine color scale.…

  20. Monitoring Hydration Status Pre- and Post-Training among University Athletes Using Urine Color and Weight Loss Indicators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, Marquitta C.; Salandy, Sinead T.; Beckford, Safiya E.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the hydration status pre- and post-training among university athletes using urine color and weight loss as indicators. Participants: Participants were 52 university athletes training for campus games in a developing country. Methods: Pre- and post-training urine specimens were compared with a standard urine color scale.…

  1. Can biofeedback training of psychophysiological responses enhance athletes' sport performance? A practitioner's perspective.

    PubMed

    Pusenjak, Nika; Grad, Anton; Tusak, Matej; Leskovsek, Matevz; Schwarzlin, Romina

    2015-07-01

    In recent years, biofeedback has become increasingly popular for its proven success in peak performance training - the psychophysiological preparation of athletes for high-stakes sport competitions, such as the Olympic games. The aim of this research was to test whether an 8-week period of exposure to biofeedback training could improve the psychophysiological control over competitive anxiety and enhance athletic performance in participating subjects. Participants of this study were highly competent athletes, each training in different sport disciplines. The experimental group consisted of 18 athletes (4 women, 14 men), whereas the Control group had 21 athletes (4 women, 17 men). All athletes were between 16 and 34 years old. The biofeedback device, Nexus 10, was used to detect and measure the psychophysiological responses of athletes. Athletes from both groups (control and experimental) were subjected to stress tests at the beginning of the study and once again at its conclusion. In between, the experimental group received training in biofeedback techniques. We then calculated the overall percentage of athletes in the experimental group compared with those in the control group who were able to control respiration, skin conductance, heart rate, blood flow amplitude, heart rate variability, and heart respiration coherence. One year following completion of the initial study, we questioned athletes from the experimental group, to determine whether they continued to use these skills and if they could detect any subsequent enhancement in their athletic performance. We demonstrated that a greater number of participants in the experimental group were able to successfully control their psychophysiological parameters, in comparison to their peers in the control group. Significant results (p < 0.05) were noted in regulation of GSR following short stress test conditions (p = 0.037), in regulation of HR after exposure to STROOP stressor (p = 0.037), in regulation of GSR

  2. Athletic Training Students' Perceptions of and Academic Preparation in the Use of Psychological Skills in Sport Injury Rehabilitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamphoff, Cindra S.; Hamson-Utley, J. Jordan; Antoine, Beth; Knutson, Rebecca; Thomae, Jeffrey; Hoenig, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    Context: Injured athletes rely on athletic trainers to assist them when recovering from injury. Over the last 20 years, the use of psychological skills to speed recovery has become increasingly popular. Objective: Explore athletic training students' perceptions of the importance and effectiveness of psychological skills in the rehabilitation of…

  3. Athletic Training Students' Perceptions of and Academic Preparation in the Use of Psychological Skills in Sport Injury Rehabilitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamphoff, Cindra S.; Hamson-Utley, J. Jordan; Antoine, Beth; Knutson, Rebecca; Thomae, Jeffrey; Hoenig, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    Context: Injured athletes rely on athletic trainers to assist them when recovering from injury. Over the last 20 years, the use of psychological skills to speed recovery has become increasingly popular. Objective: Explore athletic training students' perceptions of the importance and effectiveness of psychological skills in the rehabilitation of…

  4. Absolute and functional iron deficiency in professional athletes during training and recovery.

    PubMed

    Reinke, Simon; Taylor, William R; Duda, Georg N; von Haehling, Stephan; Reinke, Petra; Volk, Hans-Dieter; Anker, Stefan D; Doehner, Wolfram

    2012-04-19

    Iron deficiency (ID) is one of the most important metabolic dysfunctions. Athletic performance depends on oxygen transport and mitochondrial efficiency, thus on optimal iron balance. We hypothesised that physical extremes result in ID in elite athletes and that the short recovery period may be insufficient to allow a lasting replenishment of iron reserves. Iron metabolism was examined in 20 elite rowing athletes and 10 professional soccer players at the end of a competitive season, after recuperation and during pre-season training. Absolute ID values were defined as ferritin <30 μg/L, functional ID as ferritin 30-99 μg/L or 100-299 μg/L+transferrin saturation <20%. At the end of season, 27% of all athletes had absolute ID and 70% showed functional ID. Absolute iron depletion was not generally restored after recuperation and observed at all time points in 14% of the athletes. Although athletes with initially low ferritin levels showed a slight increase during recuperation (p<0.09), these increases remained within borderline levels. Furthermore, 10% showed borderline haemoglobin levels, suggestive of mild anaemia, as defined by the World Health Organisation. A significant proportion of professional athletes have ID, independent of the training mode. Although recuperation seems to allow a certain recovery of iron storage, particularly in athletes with initially low ferritin levels, this retrieval was insufficient to fully normalise reduced iron levels. Therefore, iron status should be carefully monitored during the various training and competitive periods in elite athletes. An adequate iron supplementation may be needed to maintain balanced iron stores. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Voluntary dehydration and cognitive performance in trained college athletes.

    PubMed

    D'anci, Kristen E; Vibhakar, Arjun; Kanter, Jordan H; Mahoney, Caroline R; Taylor, Holly A

    2009-08-01

    Cognitive and mood decrements resulting from mild dehydration and glucose consumption were studied. Men and women (total N = 54; M age = 19.8 yr., SD = 1.2) were recruited from college athletic teams. Euhydration or dehydration was achieved by athletes completing team practices with or without water replacement. Dehydration was associated with higher thirst and negative mood ratings as well as better Digit Span performance. Participants showed better Vigilance Attention with euhydration. Hydration status and athlete's sex interacted with performance on Choice Reaction Time and Vigilance Attention. In a second study, half of the athletes received glucose prior to cognitive testing. Results for negative mood and thirst ratings were similar, but for cognitive performance the results were mixed. Effects of glucose on cognition were independent of dehydration.

  6. Perceived Levels of Frustration During Clinical Situations in Athletic Training Students

    PubMed Central

    Heinerichs, Scott; Curtis, Neil; Gardiner-Shires, Alison

    2014-01-01

    Context: Athletic training students (ATSs) are involved in various situations during the clinical experience that may cause them to express levels of frustration. Understanding levels of frustration in ATSs is important because frustration can affect student learning, and the clinical experience is critical to their development as professionals. Objective:  To explore perceived levels of frustration in ATSs during clinical situations and to determine if those perceptions differ based on sex. Design:  Cross-sectional study with a survey instrument. Setting:  A total of 14 of 19 professional, undergraduate athletic training programs accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education in Pennsylvania. Patients or Other Participants:  Of a possible 438 athletic training students, 318 (72.6%) completed the survey. Main Outcomes Measure(s):  The Athletic Training Student Frustration Inventory was developed and administered. The survey gathered demographic information and included 24 Likert-scale items centering on situations associated with the clinical experience. Descriptive statistics were computed on all items. The Mann-Whitney U was used to evaluate differences between male and female students. Results:  A higher level of frustration was perceived during the following clinical situations: lack of respect by student-athletes and coaching staffs, the demands of the clinical experience, inability of ATSs to perform or remember skills, and ATSs not having the opportunity to apply their skills daily. Higher levels of frustration were perceived in female than male ATSs in several areas. Conclusions:  Understanding student frustration during clinical situations is important to better appreciate the clinical education experience. Low levels of this emotion are expected; however, when higher levels exist, learning can be affected. Whereas we cannot eliminate student frustrations, athletic training programs and preceptors need to be

  7. Perceived levels of frustration during clinical situations in athletic training students.

    PubMed

    Heinerichs, Scott; Curtis, Neil; Gardiner-Shires, Alison

    2014-01-01

    Athletic training students (ATSs) are involved in various situations during the clinical experience that may cause them to express levels of frustration. Understanding levels of frustration in ATSs is important because frustration can affect student learning, and the clinical experience is critical to their development as professionals. To explore perceived levels of frustration in ATSs during clinical situations and to determine if those perceptions differ based on sex. Cross-sectional study with a survey instrument. A total of 14 of 19 professional, undergraduate athletic training programs accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education in Pennsylvania. Of a possible 438 athletic training students, 318 (72.6%) completed the survey. The Athletic Training Student Frustration Inventory was developed and administered. The survey gathered demographic information and included 24 Likert-scale items centering on situations associated with the clinical experience. Descriptive statistics were computed on all items. The Mann-Whitney U was used to evaluate differences between male and female students. A higher level of frustration was perceived during the following clinical situations: lack of respect by student-athletes and coaching staffs, the demands of the clinical experience, inability of ATSs to perform or remember skills, and ATSs not having the opportunity to apply their skills daily. Higher levels of frustration were perceived in female than male ATSs in several areas. Understanding student frustration during clinical situations is important to better appreciate the clinical education experience. Low levels of this emotion are expected; however, when higher levels exist, learning can be affected. Whereas we cannot eliminate student frustrations, athletic training programs and preceptors need to be aware of this emotion in order to create an environment that is more conducive to learning.

  8. Changes in Body Composition and Strength of Female Athletes on Two Different Training Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oyster, Nancy

    Thirty-one championship caliber women athletes participating on varsity teams at Ohio State University were trained using two different conditioning programs, in an attempt to determine the physiological outcomes of weight training versus cardiovascular-oriented conditioning. Fourteen tennis players followed a program of high-resistance weight…

  9. Rationale and Resources for Teaching the Mathematical Modeling of Athletic Training and Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, David C.; Skiba, Philip F.

    2013-01-01

    A number of professions rely on exercise prescription to improve health or athletic performance, including coaching, fitness/personal training, rehabilitation, and exercise physiology. It is therefore advisable that the professionals involved learn the various tools available for designing effective training programs. Mathematical modeling of…

  10. The 21st-Century College Student: Implications for Athletic Training Education Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Malissa; Buxton, Barton

    1997-01-01

    Discusses impending demographic changes in the 21st-century college-student population, addressing implications for athletic training education programs and the profession. The paper discusses multicultural diversification and nontraditional student status, noting that 21st century higher education must offer multicultural training, flexible…

  11. Pain and Injury Associated with Powerlifting Training in Visually Impaired Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haykowsky, Mark J.; Warburton, Darren E. R.

    1999-01-01

    This study assessed occurrence and level of pain and injury history associated with powerlifting training in 11 adults with visual impairments. Powerlifting training was associated with an elevated occurrence of pain in shoulders, elbows, lower back, and knee regions. Injury rate, however, was lower than for athletes without visual impairments.…

  12. Rationale and Resources for Teaching the Mathematical Modeling of Athletic Training and Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, David C.; Skiba, Philip F.

    2013-01-01

    A number of professions rely on exercise prescription to improve health or athletic performance, including coaching, fitness/personal training, rehabilitation, and exercise physiology. It is therefore advisable that the professionals involved learn the various tools available for designing effective training programs. Mathematical modeling of…

  13. Pain and Injury Associated with Powerlifting Training in Visually Impaired Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haykowsky, Mark J.; Warburton, Darren E. R.

    1999-01-01

    This study assessed occurrence and level of pain and injury history associated with powerlifting training in 11 adults with visual impairments. Powerlifting training was associated with an elevated occurrence of pain in shoulders, elbows, lower back, and knee regions. Injury rate, however, was lower than for athletes without visual impairments.…

  14. Changes in Body Composition and Strength of Female Athletes on Two Different Training Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oyster, Nancy

    Thirty-one championship caliber women athletes participating on varsity teams at Ohio State University were trained using two different conditioning programs, in an attempt to determine the physiological outcomes of weight training versus cardiovascular-oriented conditioning. Fourteen tennis players followed a program of high-resistance weight…

  15. Recent trends in resident career choices after plastic surgery training.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Fernando A; Chang, Eric I; Suliman, Ahmed; Tseng, Charles Y; Bradley, James P

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the initial career choice of plastic surgery residents after completion of training during the last five years and to identify any factors that may influence choice of career path. Demographic data were obtained from graduates of Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME)-accredited US plastic surgery residency programs between the years of 2005 and 2010. The type of practice and pursuit of fellowship were recorded for each graduate. Sex, age at graduation, marital status, dependents, advanced degrees, previous research, type of training program, primary residency, and length of plastic surgery training were also documented. Comparison of outcomes between the two plastic surgery training pathways (integrated vs independent) was analyzed. Data were collected for 424 graduates from 37 different training programs. Of these programs, 11% were from the West coast, 32% from Midwest, 33% from East coast, and 24% from the South. Seventy-nine percent of residents were male, mean age at graduation was 35 (2.89) years. Forty-nine percent of residents were married, 30% had one or more dependents, 6% had advanced degrees, and 18% had previous research experience. Fifty-eight percent of graduates were from independent programs. Forty-eight percent of residents pursued private practice immediately after graduation, 8% pursued academic practice, 41% pursued specialty fellowships, and 3% had military commitments. Most of the residents chose to pursue private practice on completion of residency. Independent residents were significantly more likely to pursue private practice immediately compared to integrated/combined residents. No other factors were significant for practice choice.

  16. Increased intramuscular lipid synthesis and low saturation relate to insulin sensitivity in endurance-trained athletes.

    PubMed

    Bergman, Bryan C; Perreault, Leigh; Hunerdosse, Devon M; Koehler, Mary C; Samek, Ali M; Eckel, Robert H

    2010-05-01

    Intramuscular triglyceride (IMTG) has received considerable attention as a potential mechanism promoting insulin resistance. Endurance-trained athletes have high amounts of IMTG but are insulin sensitive, suggesting IMTG content alone does not change insulin action. Recent data suggest increased muscle lipid synthesis protects against fat-induced insulin resistance. We hypothesized that rates of IMTG synthesis at rest would be increased in athletes compared with controls. Eleven sedentary men and 11 endurance-trained male cyclists participated in this study. An intravenous glucose tolerance test was performed to assess insulin action. After 3 days of dietary control and an overnight fast, [13C16]palmitate was infused at 0.0174 micromol.kg(-1).min(-1) for 4 h, followed by a muscle biopsy to measure isotope incorporation into IMTG and diacylglycerol. Compared with controls, athletes were twice as insulin sensitive (P=0.004) and had a significantly greater resting IMTG concentration (athletes: 20.4+/-1.6 microg IMTG/mg dry wt, controls: 14.5+/-1.8 microg IMTG/mg dry wt, P=0.04) and IMTG fractional synthesis rate (athletes: 1.56+/-0.37%/h, controls: 0.61+/-0.15%/h, P=0.03). Stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 mRNA expression (P=0.02) and protein content (P=0.03) were also significantly greater in athletes. Diacylglycerol, but not IMTG, saturation was significantly less in athletes compared with controls (P=0.002). These data indicate endurance-trained athletes have increased synthesis rates of skeletal muscle IMTG and decreased saturation of skeletal muscle diacylglycerol. Increased synthesis rates are not due to recovery from exercise and are likely adaptations to chronic endurance exercise training.

  17. Development of physical response after athletics training in adolescents with Down's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Perán, S; Gil, J L; Ruiz, F; Fernandez-Pastor, V

    1997-10-01

    Starting in January 1994, a group of 20 adolescents with Down's syndrome began a competition-oriented athletics training program at a public sports stadium twice a week as part of their education towards integration. They were given complete medical examinations beforehand and followed medically and professionally throughout the program. The results showed a significant improvement in the test scores measuring strength, speed and endurance and a tendency towards an athletic morphotype.

  18. Builder 3 & 2. Naval Education and Training Command Rate Training Manual and Nonresident Career Course. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Countryman, Gene L.

    This Rate Training Manual (Textbook) and Nonresident Career Course form a correspondence, self-study package to provide information related to tasks assigned to Builders Third and Second Class. Focus is on constructing, maintaining, and repairing wooden, concrete, and masonry structures, concrete pavement, and waterfront and underwater structures;…

  19. [The medical and psychological support for the child athletes during different periods of the training cycle].

    PubMed

    Stepanenko, N P; Levitskaia, T E; Matveeva, E A; Zaĭtsev, A A; Konovalov, A B; Tren'kaeva, N A; Akimova, K K; Kremeno, S V; Dostovalova, O V; Merzliakova, N V

    2014-01-01

    To study dynamics of the indicators of the hormonal and psychological status as well as psychological features of significance for the sportive performance under conditions of rehabilitative treatment during training and post-training periods in the child athlete engaged in rhythmic gymnastics. The study included 42 child athletes at the age from 8 to 15 years engaged in rhythmic gymnastics. The children of the study group (group 1, n=17) received the combined restorative treatment under conditions of regular training while those comprising group 2 group (n=25) were given a similar treatment in the absence of the training load. All athletes underwent clinical and laboratory examination before and after the treatment for the assessment of their psychological status. The study has demonstrated that additional physical activities were responsible for the development of negative changes in the hormonal and psychological spheres of the child athletes. As a result, they experienced the impairment of certain qualities significant for their sportive performance. The rehabilitative measures during different periods of the training cycle promote normalization of all parameters of the hormonal, psychological, and physical status of the child athletes; moreover, they improve the adaptive capacity of the children.

  20. Effects of heavy resistance training on strength and power in upper extremities in wheelchair athletes.

    PubMed

    Turbanski, Stephan; Schmidtbleicher, Dietmar

    2010-01-01

    Little is known about strength training in subjects with spinal cord injury (SCI), especially in athletes performing competitive sports. Sixteen male subjects participated in this study-8 with SCI and 8 healthy physical education students (control subjects). The 8-week program consisted of heavy-resistance exercise performed twice per week with 10 to 12 repetitions in 5 sets. Subjects' performances were tested in static and in dynamic conditions concerning several strength and power parameters. Furthermore, we tested 10-m sprinting performance in wheelchair athletes. Overall, wheelchair athletes and control subjects achieved similar results; in almost all parameters both groups improved considerably in post-testing. Regarding percentages in most strength and power parameters, wheelchair athletes showed a tendency to benefit more from the strength training performed in the present study. Using analyses of group differences, however, only the comparison of effects on rate of force development (p = 0.010) resulted in a significant higher improvement for wheelchair athletes. In contrast to previous assumptions about minor adaptation capacities to training exercises in patients with SCI, our study proved clear effects of strength training. In conclusion, we suggest that heavy resistance training should be of increasing importance in wheelchair sports.

  1. The impact of exercise training on basal BDNF in athletic adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young Il

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of exercise training on basal brain-derived neurotrophic factor in athletic adolescents. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-two male adolescents participated in this study. The subjects were divided into a control group (n=9) and trained group (n=13). The trained group comprised table tennis athletes with more than 3 years of training who regularly exercised 18 hours per week. [Results] The results of this study show the trained group had significantly lower basal brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels than the control group. Further, platelet levels were significantly higher in the trained group than in the control group. However, no significant differences were observed between the groups in serum nerve growth factor level or physical characteristics (body weight, body mass index, fasting blood glucose). [Conclusion] This study showed that the basal brain-derived neurotrophic factor level of well-trained athletic adolescents was lower than that of the control group. Further research with a larger sample size is required to confirm the finding that lower basal brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels are associated with long-term habitual exercise in athletic adolescents. PMID:27942121

  2. Training adaptation and heart rate variability in elite endurance athletes: opening the door to effective monitoring.

    PubMed

    Plews, Daniel J; Laursen, Paul B; Stanley, Jamie; Kilding, Andrew E; Buchheit, Martin

    2013-09-01

    The measurement of heart rate variability (HRV) is often considered a convenient non-invasive assessment tool for monitoring individual adaptation to training. Decreases and increases in vagal-derived indices of HRV have been suggested to indicate negative and positive adaptations, respectively, to endurance training regimens. However, much of the research in this area has involved recreational and well-trained athletes, with the small number of studies conducted in elite athletes revealing equivocal outcomes. For example, in elite athletes, studies have revealed both increases and decreases in HRV to be associated with negative adaptation. Additionally, signs of positive adaptation, such as increases in cardiorespiratory fitness, have been observed with atypical concomitant decreases in HRV. As such, practical ways by which HRV can be used to monitor training status in elites are yet to be established. This article addresses the current literature that has assessed changes in HRV in response to training loads and the likely positive and negative adaptations shown. We reveal limitations with respect to how the measurement of HRV has been interpreted to assess positive and negative adaptation to endurance training regimens and subsequent physical performance. We offer solutions to some of the methodological issues associated with using HRV as a day-to-day monitoring tool. These include the use of appropriate averaging techniques, and the use of specific HRV indices to overcome the issue of HRV saturation in elite athletes (i.e., reductions in HRV despite decreases in resting heart rate). Finally, we provide examples in Olympic and World Champion athletes showing how these indices can be practically applied to assess training status and readiness to perform in the period leading up to a pinnacle event. The paper reveals how longitudinal HRV monitoring in elites is required to understand their unique individual HRV fingerprint. For the first time, we demonstrate how

  3. Yin and yang, or peas in a pod? Individual-sport versus team-sport athletes and altitude training.

    PubMed

    Aughey, Robert J; Buchheit, Martin; Garvican-Lewis, Laura A; Roach, Gregory D; Sargent, Charli; Billaut, François; Varley, Matthew C; Bourdon, Pitre C; Gore, Christopher J

    2013-12-01

    The question of whether altitude training can enhance subsequent sea-level performance has been well investigated over many decades. However, research on this topic has focused on athletes from individual or endurance sports, with scant number of studies on team-sport athletes. Questions that need to be answered include whether this type of training may enhance team-sport athlete performance, when success in team-sport is often more based on technical and tactical ability rather than physical capacity per se. This review will contrast and compare athletes from two sports representative of endurance (cycling) and team-sports (soccer). Specifically, we draw on the respective competition schedules, physiological capacities, activity profiles and energetics of each sport to compare the similarities between athletes from these sports and discuss the relative merits of altitude training for these athletes. The application of conventional live-high, train-high; live-high, train-low; and intermittent hypoxic training for team-sport athletes in the context of the above will be presented. When the above points are considered, we will conclude that dependent on resources and training objectives, altitude training can be seen as an attractive proposition to enhance the physical performance of team-sport athletes without the need for an obvious increase in training load.

  4. Yin and yang, or peas in a pod? Individual-sport versus team-sport athletes and altitude training

    PubMed Central

    Aughey, Robert J; Buchheit, Martin; Garvican-Lewis, Laura A; Roach, Gregory D; Sargent, Charli; Billaut, François; Varley, Matthew C; Bourdon, Pitre C; Gore, Christopher J

    2013-01-01

    The question of whether altitude training can enhance subsequent sea-level performance has been well investigated over many decades. However, research on this topic has focused on athletes from individual or endurance sports, with scant number of studies on team-sport athletes. Questions that need to be answered include whether this type of training may enhance team-sport athlete performance, when success in team-sport is often more based on technical and tactical ability rather than physical capacity per se. This review will contrast and compare athletes from two sports representative of endurance (cycling) and team-sports (soccer). Specifically, we draw on the respective competition schedules, physiological capacities, activity profiles and energetics of each sport to compare the similarities between athletes from these sports and discuss the relative merits of altitude training for these athletes. The application of conventional live-high, train-high; live-high, train-low; and intermittent hypoxic training for team-sport athletes in the context of the above will be presented. When the above points are considered, we will conclude that dependent on resources and training objectives, altitude training can be seen as an attractive proposition to enhance the physical performance of team-sport athletes without the need for an obvious increase in training load. PMID:24255910

  5. The Nature of Coupling with Intercollegiate Athletic Departments: Undergraduate Athletic Training Education Program Directors' Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roiger, Trevor C.; Card, Karen A.

    2012-01-01

    Context: Coupling theory, based on a tight-loose continuum, describes the nature of a connection, relationship, or interaction between entities. Understanding the nature of an ATEP's relationship with intercollegiate athletic departments is important to their growth and responsiveness to environmental change. Objective: To determine program…

  6. Multistakeholder Perspectives on the Transition to a Graduate-Level Athletic Training Educational Model.

    PubMed

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M; Bowman, Thomas G; Pitney, William A

    2015-09-01

    The decision has been made to move away from the traditional bachelor's degree professional program to a master's degree professional program. Little is known about the perceptions about this transition from those involved with education. To examine multiple stakeholders' perspectives within athletic training education on the effect that a change to graduate-level education could have on the profession and the educational and professional development of the athletic trainer. Qualitative study. Web-based survey. A total of 18 athletic training students (6 men, 12 women; age = 24 ± 5 years), 17 athletic training faculty (6 men, 9 women, 2 unspecified; 7 program directors, 5 faculty members, 3 clinical coordinators, 2 unidentified; age = 45 ± 8 years), and 15 preceptors (7 men, 7 women, 1 unspecified; age = 34 ± 7 years) completed the study. Participants completed a structured Web-based questionnaire. Each cohort responded to questions matching their roles within an athletic training program. Data were analyzed following a general inductive process. Member checks, multiple-analyst triangulation, and peer review established credibility. Thirty-one (62%) participants supported the transition, 14 (28%) were opposed, and 5 (10%) were neutral or undecided. Advantages of and support for transitioning and disadvantages of and against transitioning emerged. The first higher-order theme, advantages, revealed 4 benefits: (1) alignment of athletic training with other health care professions, (2) advanced coursework and curriculum delivery, (3) improved student and professional retention, and (4) student maturity. The second higher-order theme, disadvantages, was defined by 3 factors: (1) limited time for autonomous practice, (2) financial concerns, and (3) lack of evidence for the transition. Athletic training students, faculty, and preceptors demonstrated moderate support for a transition to the graduate-level model. Factors supporting the move were comparable with those

  7. Multistakeholder Perspectives on the Transition to a Graduate-Level Athletic Training Educational Model

    PubMed Central

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Bowman, Thomas G.; Pitney, William A.

    2015-01-01

    Context  The decision has been made to move away from the traditional bachelor's degree professional program to a master's degree professional program. Little is known about the perceptions about this transition from those involved with education. Objective  To examine multiple stakeholders' perspectives within athletic training education on the effect that a change to graduate-level education could have on the profession and the educational and professional development of the athletic trainer. Design  Qualitative study. Setting  Web-based survey. Patients or Other Participants  A total of 18 athletic training students (6 men, 12 women; age = 24 ± 5 years), 17 athletic training faculty (6 men, 9 women, 2 unspecified; 7 program directors, 5 faculty members, 3 clinical coordinators, 2 unidentified; age = 45 ± 8 years), and 15 preceptors (7 men, 7 women, 1 unspecified; age = 34 ± 7 years) completed the study. Data Collection and Analysis  Participants completed a structured Web-based questionnaire. Each cohort responded to questions matching their roles within an athletic training program. Data were analyzed following a general inductive process. Member checks, multiple-analyst triangulation, and peer review established credibility. Results  Thirty-one (62%) participants supported the transition, 14 (28%) were opposed, and 5 (10%) were neutral or undecided. Advantages of and support for transitioning and disadvantages of and against transitioning emerged. The first higher-order theme, advantages, revealed 4 benefits: (1) alignment of athletic training with other health care professions, (2) advanced coursework and curriculum delivery, (3) improved student and professional retention, and (4) student maturity. The second higher-order theme, disadvantages, was defined by 3 factors: (1) limited time for autonomous practice, (2) financial concerns, and (3) lack of evidence for the transition. Conclusions  Athletic training students, faculty, and

  8. Novice to expert practice via postprofessional athletic training education: a grounded theory.

    PubMed

    Neibert, Peter J

    2009-01-01

    To discover the theoretic constructs that confirm, disconfirm, or extend the principles and their applications appropriate for National Athletic Trainers' Association (NATA)-accredited postprofessional athletic training education programs. Interviews at the 2003 NATA Annual Meeting & Clinical Symposia. Qualitative study using grounded theory procedures. Thirteen interviews were conducted with postprofessional graduates. Participants were purposefully selected based on theoretic sampling and availability. The transcribed interviews were analyzed using open coding, axial coding, and selective coding procedures. Member checks, reflective journaling, and triangulation were used to ensure trustworthiness. The participants' comments confirmed and extended the current principles of postprofessional athletic training education programs and offered additional suggestions for more effective practical applications. The emergence of this central category of novice to expert practice is a paramount finding. The tightly woven fabric of the 10 processes, when interlaced with one another, provides a strong tapestry supporting novice to expert practice via postprofessional athletic training education. The emergence of this theoretic position pushes postprofessional graduate athletic training education forward to the future for further investigation into the theoretic constructs of novice to expert practice.

  9. Weekly training volume and hematological status in female top-level athletes of different sports.

    PubMed

    Ostojic, S M; Ahmetovic, Z

    2008-09-01

    The objectives of the present study were: a) to investigate the prevalence of iron depletion and anemia among female top-level athletes from different sports; b) to determine a relationship between serum ferritin levels and training status of female athletes. This study was conducted on 84 female professional athletes who were recruited during preparticipation physical examination. Upon entering the laboratory 10 mL of venous blood was drawn from an antecubital vein into a lavender-top tube for a complete blood count (CBC), serum iron, and transferrin and ferritin levels. No significant differences between any of the hematological variables were found between groups of different sports. The lowest hemoglobin (Hb), mean corpuscular volume (MCV), serum iron, ferritin and transferrin encountered in the study were Hb of 9.1 g/dL, MCV of 64.5 fL, serum iron of 15 microg/dL, ferritin of 5.4 microg/L, transferrin of 210 microg/dL in a 20-year old female distance runner with functional impairment and iron deficiency anemia. No significant differences were found between female athletes from different sports regarding the prevalence of iron depletion, iron deficiency or iron deficiency anemia (IDA). Serum ferritin level poorly correlate with training duration (r = 0.24) and seems to be inadequate indicator of training tolerance. This study has shown a high prevalence of iron depletion and anemia among female athletes from different sports, with similar incidence in individuals independent of their weekly training volume.

  10. Rand Symposium on Pilot Training and the Pilot Career; Recollections of the Chairman.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, W. A.

    Topics discussed in this 1970 symposium included the economics of flight training, careers in flying, college versus high school graduates, defining the trained pilot, motivation and selection, innovation in pilot training, training goals, transfer of training, and the role of simulators. Conferees agreed that the present Air Force undergraduate…

  11. Coming to Terms: Career Development Experiences of NCAA Division I Female Student-Athletes in Transition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Markesha McWilliams

    2013-01-01

    Transitions are defined as "any event or non-event that results in changed relationships, routines, assumptions, and roles" (Goodman, Schlossberg, & Anderson, 2006, p. 33). A particular transition unique to student-athletes in comparison to other college students is the end of their collegiate athletic eligibility. The purpose of…

  12. Coming to Terms: Career Development Experiences of NCAA Division I Female Student-Athletes in Transition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Markesha McWilliams

    2013-01-01

    Transitions are defined as "any event or non-event that results in changed relationships, routines, assumptions, and roles" (Goodman, Schlossberg, & Anderson, 2006, p. 33). A particular transition unique to student-athletes in comparison to other college students is the end of their collegiate athletic eligibility. The purpose of…

  13. Formal and informal continuing education activities and athletic training professional practice.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Kirk J; Weidner, Thomas G

    2010-01-01

    Continuing education (CE) is intended to promote professional growth and, ultimately, to enhance professional practice. To determine certified athletic trainers' participation in formal (ie, approved for CE credit) and informal (ie, not approved for CE credit) CE activities and the perceived effect these activities have on professional practice with regard to improving knowledge, clinical skills and abilities, attitudes toward patient care, and patient care itself. Cross-sectional study. Athletic training practice settings. Of a geographic, stratified random sample of 1000 athletic trainers, 427 (42.7%) completed the survey. The Survey of Formal and Informal Athletic Training Continuing Education Activities was developed and administered electronically. The survey consisted of demographic characteristics and Likert-scale items regarding CE participation and perceived effect of CE on professional practice. Internal consistency of survey items was determined using the Cronbach alpha (alpha = 0.945). Descriptive statistics were computed for all items. An analysis of variance and dependent t tests were calculated to determine differences among respondents' demographic characteristics and their participation in, and perceived effect of, CE activities. The alpha level was set at .05. Respondents completed more informal CE activities than formal CE activities. Participation in informal CE activities included reading athletic training journals (75.4%), whereas formal CE activities included attending a Board of Certification-approved workshop, seminar, or professional conference not conducted by the National Athletic Trainers' Association or affiliates or committees (75.6%). Informal CE activities were perceived to improve clinical skills or abilities and attitudes toward patient care. Formal CE activities were perceived to enhance knowledge. More respondents completed informal CE activities than formal CE activities. Both formal and informal CE activities were perceived to

  14. Formal and Informal Continuing Education Activities and Athletic Training Professional Practice

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Kirk J.; Weidner, Thomas G.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Context: Continuing education (CE) is intended to promote professional growth and, ultimately, to enhance professional practice. Objective: To determine certified athletic trainers' participation in formal (ie, approved for CE credit) and informal (ie, not approved for CE credit) CE activities and the perceived effect these activities have on professional practice with regard to improving knowledge, clinical skills and abilities, attitudes toward patient care, and patient care itself. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Athletic training practice settings. Patients or Other Participants: Of a geographic, stratified random sample of 1000 athletic trainers, 427 (42.7%) completed the survey. Main Outcome Measure(s): The Survey of Formal and Informal Athletic Training Continuing Education Activities was developed and administered electronically. The survey consisted of demographic characteristics and Likert-scale items regarding CE participation and perceived effect of CE on professional practice. Internal consistency of survey items was determined using the Cronbach α (α  =  0.945). Descriptive statistics were computed for all items. An analysis of variance and dependent t tests were calculated to determine differences among respondents' demographic characteristics and their participation in, and perceived effect of, CE activities. The α level was set at .05. Results: Respondents completed more informal CE activities than formal CE activities. Participation in informal CE activities included reading athletic training journals (75.4%), whereas formal CE activities included attending a Board of Certification–approved workshop, seminar, or professional conference not conducted by the National Athletic Trainers' Association or affiliates or committees (75.6%). Informal CE activities were perceived to improve clinical skills or abilities and attitudes toward patient care. Formal CE activities were perceived to enhance knowledge. Conclusions: More

  15. Training room evaluation of chest pain in the adolescent athlete.

    PubMed

    Billups, D; Martin, D; Swain, R A

    1995-06-01

    A physician or athletic trainer will often be faced with an athlete complaining of chest pain during or after an event. Chest pain in children and adolescents is usually of a noncardiac origin; only 5% of cases are due to cardiac problems. With a properly documented history and physical evaluation, one can usually identify the etiology of the chest discomfort or at least rule out any serious difficulties. The various diagnostic possibilities include cardiac, musculoskeletal, pulmonary, gastrointestinal, and psychiatric causes of pain. We discuss several specific conditions, as well as the signs, symptoms, and basic management.

  16. Patterns and Paradoxes of Trainers' Careers: The Implications for the Influence of Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Julia

    1985-01-01

    Describes the structural aspects of trainers' careers, their development as trainers, their development of meta skills and the time period they spend in training; relates this to the career concepts individual trainers have and how this can influence and be influenced by the role the training function performs; and points out implications for…

  17. Benefits and Limitations of Block Periodized Training Approaches to Athletes' Preparation: A Review.

    PubMed

    Issurin, Vladimir B

    2016-03-01

    The present review introduces innovative concepts of training periodization and summarizes a large body of findings characterizing their potential benefits and possible limitations. Evidence-based analysis of the traditional periodization model led to elaboration of alternative versions of athletic preparation. These alternative versions postulated the superiority of training programs with a high concentration of selected workloads compared with traditionally designed plans directed at the concurrent development of many athletic abilities at low/medium workload concentration. The training cycles of highly concentrated specialized workloads were coined "training blocks" by experts and practitioners; correspondingly, the alternative versions were termed "block periodized (BP) preparation systems" by their presenters. Ultimately, two BP training models were proposed: a concentrated unidirectional training model (CU) and a multi-targeted BP approach to athletes' preparation. The first innovative version postulated administration of highly concentrated training means for enhancement of one leading fitness component, whereas the second version proposed the development of many targeted abilities within sequenced block mesocycles containing a minimal number of compatible training modalities. Both versions differ in their methodological background, duration and content of training blocks, possibilities of providing multi-peak performances, and applicability to various sports. In recent decades, many studies have evaluated the effects of both BP training versions in different sports. Examination of the training effects producing by the CU model in combat and team sports has found significant gains in various fitness estimates but not in sport-specific performances. Similarly, utilization of a CU program by elite swimmers did not lead to substantial enhancement of their peak performances. In contrast, studies of multi-targeted BP training programs have revealed their distinct

  18. The importance of state regulation to the promulgation of the athletic training profession.

    PubMed

    Rello, M N

    1996-04-01

    States regulate professions to protect the public from harm by unqualified practitioners. Without regulation of athletic trainers (ATs), there is no legal way to assure quality health care to athletes because there is no legal definition as to what an AT can and cannot do. Problems exist, however; 1) ATs nationwide may not be adequately familiar with state regulations; 2) without regulation, legal support is given to high schools to use less qualified persons to care for student-athletes; 3) more education is needed to familiarize the public and the health care industry with the functions and qualifications of a certified AT; and 4) without uniformity of regulation, athletes may continue to suffer as untrained and/or unqualified persons continue to be perceived as members of the profession and as certified and noncertified ATs continue to practice without legal sanction, perhaps beyond their area of expertise. This article encompasses both a literature review and an opinion survey (of ATs) with regard to state regulation of the athletic training profession. The intent of this article is to help ATs understand the implications of state regulation on our profession. A survey was mailed to 500 ATs across the country soliciting opinions on state regulation and its implication of the profession of athletic training. The intent of the survey results are not to verify the literature review nor to infer information regarding other ATs, but merely to be a gathering tool to solicit information from fellow ATs.

  19. Pediatric training and career intentions, 2003-2009.

    PubMed

    Frintner, Mary Pat; Cull, William L

    2012-03-01

    To examine trends in pediatric residents' training and job search experiences from 2003 through 2009. Annual national random samples of 500 graduating pediatric residents from 2003 through 2005 and 1000 from 2006 through 2009 were surveyed. Responses were compared across years to identify trends. We examined resident demographics, training, satisfaction, career intentions, and job search experiences. Overall response rate was 61%. Between 2003 and 2009, there was an increase in the proportion of female graduating pediatric residents (69%-75%), residents from international medical schools (15%-23%), and levels of educational debt among the subgroup of residents with debt ($139 945 in 2003 to $166 972 in 2009). Residents consistently reported (>90% of residents) that they would choose pediatrics again if they had the choice. By 2009, the majority was very satisfied with the quality of their training in most areas, with ratings improving across years in caring for children with special health care needs, evidence-based medicine, and using information technology in practice. Although primary care remained the most common clinical practice goal, there was a modest decline in interest in primary care practice across survey years, whereas interest in subspecialty practice increased. Residents accepting both general pediatric practice and hospitalist positions reported less difficulty in their job search over time. Despite continually changing demographics of pediatric training programs, residents overall remain very satisfied with their decision to become pediatricians. Pediatricians continue to face difficult financial challenges associated with rising debt, but they also report increasing job search success.

  20. Linking Rhetorical Sensitivity with the Ability of an Athletic Training Student to Successfully Perform a Patient Medical Interview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertoncino, Thomas K.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the extent to which the self-reported rhetorical sensitivity of a sample of athletic training students is positively related to successfully performing a patient medical interview. Particularly, the study focused on if athletic training students' reported communication behaviors is related to their…

  1. Investigating Post-Graduate Athletic Training Education Student Perceptions Following a Purposefully-Implemented Peer-Assisted Learning Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Dana

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to investigate graduates' perceptions of a purposefully-implemented Peer-Assisted Learning (PAL) pedagogy in their undergraduate athletic training education and the impact of that experience in their first job post-graduation. This was the first research in athletic training education that…

  2. Linking Rhetorical Sensitivity with the Ability of an Athletic Training Student to Successfully Perform a Patient Medical Interview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertoncino, Thomas K.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the extent to which the self-reported rhetorical sensitivity of a sample of athletic training students is positively related to successfully performing a patient medical interview. Particularly, the study focused on if athletic training students' reported communication behaviors is related to their…

  3. Investigating Post-Graduate Athletic Training Education Student Perceptions Following a Purposefully-Implemented Peer-Assisted Learning Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Dana

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to investigate graduates' perceptions of a purposefully-implemented Peer-Assisted Learning (PAL) pedagogy in their undergraduate athletic training education and the impact of that experience in their first job post-graduation. This was the first research in athletic training education that…

  4. Defining, Valuing, and Teaching Clinical Outcomes Assessment in Professional and Post-Professional Athletic Training Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Alison R.; McLeod, Tamara C. Valovich; Sauers, Eric L.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To provide a basic introduction for athletic training educators about the importance of clinical outcomes measures and to recommend strategies for implementing clinical outcomes assessment education in professional and post-professional athletic training education programs. Background: Outcomes is a frequently used term amongst…

  5. [Career satisfaction of German medical residents after four years of training].

    PubMed

    Römer, Farina; Ziegler, Stine; Scherer, Martin; van den Bussche, Hendrik

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate German residents' career satisfaction and its dependency on intrinsic and extrinsic factors after four years of postgraduate training. Gender, parental status, training conditions and specialty choice were of particular interest. Postal questionnaires were sent to medical graduates from seven different German faculties annually, starting in 2009. This paper presents cross-sectional data of domestic, working and training conditions four years after graduation. We used descriptive statistics and t-tests. In order to identify factors with an impact on career satisfaction, multiple regression analyses were calculated. Male residents who have children tended to be more satisfied with their career than residents without children. For female residents, however, having children was associated with lower career satisfaction. Those who chose training in general surgery or orthopedic surgery were less satisfied with their career progress. Residents with prolonged specialty training showed lower career satisfaction. Junior doctors who rated the quality of their residency training higher were more satisfied with their career. Those who perceived their job as particularly demanding were less satisfied. Concerning intrinsic factors, occupational self-efficacy and overall satisfaction with life were significantly associated with career satisfaction. Residents in general are quite satisfied with their career after four years of training. Opportunities to work part-time during residency as well as structured training programs should be implemented in order to overcome parenthood as a career obstacle for female residents. The quality of specialty training is particularly important for career satisfaction and has to be ensured across specialties. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  6. Psychological skills training of an elite wheelchair water-skiing athlete: a single-case study.

    PubMed

    de Bressy de Guast, Virginie; Golby, Jim; Van Wersch, Anna; d'Arripe-Longueville, Fabienne

    2013-10-01

    This study presents a complete psychological skills training (PST) program with a wheelchair athlete and examines the program effectiveness using a mixed-method approach. After initial testing, the athlete followed a two-month program of self-confidence building, motivational, visualization/relaxation, and injury management techniques. Quantitative and qualitative methods were used to examine the impacts on performance and psychological abilities. The triangulated results suggest that the PST program was perceived as effective by the athlete in terms of his sporting performances and mental skills. The characteristics and implications of a PST program with this wheelchair athlete are discussed, as well as the study limitations and the perspectives for future research.

  7. Athletic Training Students' Perception of Significant Clinical Instructor Demographic Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulholland, Carlen; Martin, Malissa

    2010-01-01

    Context: Characteristics of a model clinical instructor (CI) continue to be defined. However, certain characteristics are still unknown. Objective: To more fully define and describe quality clinical instruction by examining the impact of employment status, years of experience as a certified athletic trainer (AT), and employment setting on athletic…

  8. Incidence of exercise-induced asthma in adolescent athletes under different training and environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Sidiropoulou, Maria P; Kokaridas, Dimitrios G; Giagazoglou, Paraskevi F; Karadonas, Michalis I; Fotiadou, Eleni G

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to establish if there were differences in the incidence of exercise-induced bronchospasm between athletes in different sports, which take place under different environmental conditions such as open places, closed courses, and swimming pools with similar exercise intensity (football, basketball, water polo) using the free running test. The study included 90 adolescents (3 groups of 30) aged 14-18 years recruited from academies in northern Greece. All the participants were initially subjected to (a) a clinical examination and cardiorespiratory assessment by a physician and (b) free running test of a 6-minute duration and measurement with a microspirometer of the forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV₁). Only the participants who had measured a decrease in FEV₁ ≥ 10% were reevaluated with the microspirometer during a training session. The examination of all the participants during the free running test showed that 22 athletes, that is, 9, 8, and 5 of football, basketball, and water polo athletes, respectively, demonstrated an FEV₁ ≥ 10 drop. Reevaluation of the 22 participants during training showed that 5 out 9 (55%) football athletes, 4 out of 8 basketball athletes (50%), and none of the 5 athletes of the water polo team displayed a drop of FEV₁ ≥ 10%. Despite the absence of any significant statistical differences between the 3 groups, the analysis of variances did show a trend of a lower incidence of EIA in the water polo athletes. It was found that a football or basketball game can induce EIA in young athletes but to a lesser degree than the free running test can induce. The water polo can be a safer sport even for participants with a medical history of asthma or allergies.

  9. Career paths in physicians' postgraduate training - an eight-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Buddeberg-Fischer, Barbara; Stamm, Martina; Klaghofer, Richard

    2010-10-06

    To date, there are hardly any studies on the choice of career path in medical school graduates. The present study aimed to investigate what career paths can be identified in the course of postgraduate training of physicians; what factors have an influence on the choice of a career path; and in what way the career paths are correlated with career-related factors as well as with work-life balance aspirations. The data reported originates from five questionnaire surveys of the prospective SwissMedCareer Study, beginning in 2001 (T1, last year of medical school). The study sample consisted of 358 physicians (197 females, 55%; 161 males, 45%) participating at each assessment from T2 (2003, first year of residency) to T5 (2009, seventh year of residency), answering the question: What career do you aspire to have? Furthermore, personal characteristics, chosen specialty, career motivation, mentoring experience, work-life balance as well as workload, career success and career satisfaction were assessed. Career paths were analysed with cluster analysis, and differences between clusters analysed with multivariate methods. The cluster analysis revealed four career clusters which discriminated distinctly between each other: (1) career in practice, (2) hospital career, (3) academic career, and (4) changing career goal. From T3 (third year of residency) to T5, respondents in Cluster 1-3 were rather stable in terms of their career path aspirations, while those assigned to Cluster 4 showed a high fluctuation in their career plans. Physicians in Cluster 1 showed high values in extraprofessional concerns and often consider part-time work. Cluster 2 and 3 were characterised by high instrumentality, intrinsic and extrinsic career motivation, career orientation and high career success. No cluster differences were seen in career satisfaction. In Cluster 1 and 4, females were overrepresented. Trainees should be supported to stay on the career path that best suits his/her personal and

  10. Leadership content important in athletic training education with implications for allied health care.

    PubMed

    Kutz, Matthew R; Scialli, Joan

    2008-01-01

    A two-phase exploratory and comparative research study using a Delphi technique and a web-based national survey was done to determine leadership content (i.e., theories, styles, or practices) important to include in athletic training education. Eighteen athletic training experts participated in the Delphi technique, followed by 161 athletic trainers completing the national survey. Consensus of experts was reached after two rounds (77% interrater agreement, alpha = 0.80 and alpha = 0.93 per respective round) and identified 31 leadership content items important to include in athletic training education. The national sample then rated importance of each leadership content area for inclusion in four types of athletic training education programs (entry-level baccalaureate, entry-level master's degree, postgraduate certifications, and doctoral degree). The respondents ranked the leadership content in order of importance according to mean (mean = 1.53 +/- 0.84 to 2.55 +/- 0.55; scale, 0-3). Twenty-two content items (63%) were rated at least "very important" (mean > or = 2.0). Exploratory factor analysis established construct validity and organized leadership content by three factors: managerial leadership and knowledge management; leadership theories; and leadership issues, trends, and policies (alpha = 0.84-0.91). Repeated-measures analysis of variance (Sidak post-hoc adjustments) established criterion-related concurrent validity, which found increasing levels of importance as education type progressed (F = 4.88, p = 0.003-32.56, p = 0.000). Adding leadership content within athletic training enhances the professionalization of students, facilitates leadership competency among students and practicing professionals enrolled in postcertification educational programs, and facilitates job placement and role.

  11. Effects of high-intensity training and resumed training on macroelement and microelement of elite basketball athletes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lijuan; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Jiahong; He, Wangxiao; Huang, Hongen

    2012-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of high-intensity training and resumed training in hot and humid environment on plasma macro- and microelements levels of elite Han Chinese basketball players. Ten well-trained elite basketball athletes' plasma macroelements (chlorin, sodium, potassium, and calcium), creatine kinase (CK), and creatine kinase-MB (CK-MB) were measured before and after a 2-h high-intensity training, and microelements (zinc, copper, iron, and selenium) were determined before and after a 1-week high-intensity training and after a 1-week resumed training. The blood CK and CK-MB levels of the elite basketball athletes were significantly increased (P < 0.05) after high-intensity basketball training. The macroelements (chlorin, sodium, and calcium) levels of blood increased significantly except potassium after high-intensity basketball training. No significant differences (P > 0.05) were found in zinc and copper levels; nevertheless, the levels of plasma selenium and plasma iron were significantly lower (P < 0.05) after a 1-week high-intensity training. After a 1-week resumed training, except zinc, all of microelements measured had a trend toward original levels. These results implicated that high-intensity training would provoke the change of macroelements which would lead to electrolyte disturbance. In addition, the present study suggested that a 1-week high-intensity training would have an impact on microelement levels, especially for selenium and iron.

  12. Relationships between training load, injury, and fitness in sub-elite collision sport athletes.

    PubMed

    Gabbett, Tim J; Domrow, Nathan

    2007-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop statistical models that estimate the influence of training load on training injury and physical fitness in collision sport athletes. The incidence of training injuries was studied in 183 rugby league players over two competitive seasons. Participants were assessed for height, body mass, skinfold thickness, vertical jump, 10-m, 20-m and 40-m sprint time, agility, and estimated maximal aerobic power in the off-season, pre-season, mid-season, and end-season. Training load and injury data were summarised into pre-season, early-competition, and late-competition training phases. Individual training load, fitness, and injury data were modelled using a logistic regression model with a binomial distribution and logit link function, while team training load and injury data were modelled using a linear regression model. While physical fitness improved with training, there was no association (P=0.16-0.99) between training load and changes in physical fitness during any of the training phases. However, increases in training load during the early-competition training phase decreased (P= 0.04) agility performance. A relationship (P= 0.01-0.04) was observed between the log of training load and odds of injury during each training phase, resulting in a 1.50 - 2.85 increase in the odds of injury for each arbitrary unit increase in training load. Furthermore, during the pre-season training phase there was a relationship (P= 0.01) between training load and injury incidence within the training load range of 155 and 590 arbitrary units. During the early and late-competition training phases, increases in training load of 175-620 arbitrary units and 145-410 arbitrary units, respectively, resulted in no further increase in injury incidence. These findings demonstrate that increases in training load, particularly during the pre-season training phase, increase the odds of injury in collision sport athletes. However, while increases in training load

  13. Dietary Protein Intake and Distribution Patterns of Well-Trained Dutch Athletes.

    PubMed

    Gillen, Jenna B; Trommelen, Jorn; Wardenaar, Floris C; Brinkmans, Naomi Y J; Versteegen, Joline J; Jonvik, Kristin L; Kapp, Christoph; de Vries, Jeanne; van den Borne, Joost J G C; Gibala, Martin J; van Loon, Luc J C

    2017-04-01

    Dietary protein intake should be optimized in all athletes to ensure proper recovery and enhance the skeletal muscle adaptive response to exercise training. In addition to total protein intake, the use of specific proteincontaining food sources and the distribution of protein throughout the day are relevant for optimizing protein intake in athletes. In the present study, we examined the daily intake and distribution of various proteincontaining food sources in a large cohort of strength, endurance and team-sport athletes. Well-trained male (n=327) and female (n=226) athletes completed multiple web-based 24-hr dietary recalls over a 2-4 wk period. Total energy intake, the contribution of animal- and plant-based proteins to daily protein intake, and protein intake at six eating moments were determined. Daily protein intake averaged 108±33 and 90±24 g in men and women, respectively, which corresponded to relative intakes of 1.5±0.4 and 1.4±0.4 g/kg. Dietary protein intake was correlated with total energy intake in strength (r=0.71, p <.001), endurance (r=0.79, p <.001) and team-sport (r=0.77, p <.001) athletes. Animal and plant-based sources of protein intake was 57% and 43%, respectively. The distribution of protein intake was 19% (19±8 g) at breakfast, 24% (25±13 g) at lunch and 38% (38±15 g) at dinner. Protein intake was below the recommended 20 g for 58% of athletes at breakfast, 36% at lunch and 8% at dinner. In summary, this survey of athletes revealed they habitually consume > 1.2 g protein/kg/d, but the distribution throughout the day may be suboptimal to maximize the skeletal muscle adaptive response to training.

  14. Salivary Hormones Response to Preparation and Pre-competitive Training of World-class Level Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Guilhem, Gaël; Hanon, Christine; Gendreau, Nicolas; Bonneau, Dominique; Guével, Arnaud; Chennaoui, Mounir

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the response of salivary hormones of track and field athletes induced by preparation and pre-competitive training periods in an attempt to comment on the physiological effects consistent with the responses of each of the proteins measured. Salivary testosterone, cortisol, alpha-amylase, immunoglobulin A (IgA), chromogranin A, blood creatine kinase activity, and profile of mood state were assessed at rest in 24 world-class level athletes during preparation (3 times in 3 months) and pre-competitive (5 times in 5 weeks) training periods. Total mood disturbance and fatigue perception were reduced, while IgA (+61%) and creatine kinase activity (+43%) increased, and chromogranin A decreased (−27%) during pre-competitive compared to preparation period. A significant increase in salivary testosterone (+9 to +15%) and a decrease in testosterone/cortisol ratio were associated with a progressive reduction in training load during pre-competitive period (P < 0.05). None of the psycho-physiological parameters were significantly correlated to training load during the pre-competitive period. Results showed a lower adrenocortical response and autonomic activity, and an improvement of immunity status, in response to the reduction in training load and fatigue, without significant correlations of salivary hormones with training load. Our findings suggest that saliva composition is sensitive to training contents (season period) but could not be related to workload resulting from track and field athletics training. PMID:26635619

  15. Innovations in athletic preparation: role of substrate availability to modify training adaptation and performance.

    PubMed

    Hawley, John A; Gibala, Martin J; Bermon, Stéphane

    2007-01-01

    World records for athletic events continue to improve and in the search for superior methods to gain a competitive edge, coaches and athletes are constantly searching for the latest "magic bullet". Although it is assumed that optimal adaptation to the demands of repeated training sessions requires a diet that can sustain muscle energy reserves, this premise does not consider the unsolved longstanding question of whether it is a lack or a surplus of a substrate that triggers the training adaptation. As such, recent scientific enquiry has re-focused attention on the role of substrate availability before, during, and after training to amplify the training adaptation. There has also been a resurgence of interest in the potential for protein ingestion to improve performance and/or promote training-induced adaptations in skeletal muscle. Altitude training (real or simulated) is now an accepted part of competition preparation for many athletic events, and such interventions attract their own nutritional issues. These and other diet-training interactions with the potential to alter training adaptation and performance are discussed.

  16. Athletic Identity, Vocational Identity, and Occupational Engagement in College Student-Athletes and Non-Athletes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hook, Lacole L.

    2012-01-01

    Athletic departments in National Collegiate Athletic Association Football Bowl Subdivision universities provide academic support services to their student-athletes. Even though student-athletes receive help including career assistance from academic counselors, some studies have found that student-athletes are behind non-athletes in career…

  17. Patterns of ventricular tachyarrhythmias associated with training, deconditioning and retraining in elite athletes without cardiovascular abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Biffi, Alessandro; Maron, Barry J; Culasso, Franco; Verdile, Luisa; Fernando, Fredrick; Di Giacinto, Barbara; Di Paolo, Fernando M; Spataro, Antonio; Delise, Pietro; Pelliccia, Antonio

    2011-03-01

    Ventricular tachyarrhythmias commonly occur in trained athletes during ambulatory Holter electrocardiography and are usually associated with a benign course. Such arrhythmias have been demonstrated to be sensitive to short periods of athletic deconditioning; however, their response to retraining is not known. Twenty-four hour Holter electrocardiographic monitoring was performed at peak training and after 3 to 6 months of deconditioning and was repeated in the present study after 2, 6, and 12 months of retraining in 37 athletes with frequent and complex ventricular tachyarrhythmias and without cardiovascular abnormalities. These subjects showed partial (101 to 500 ventricular premature complexes [VPCs]/24 hours) or marked (<100 VPCs) reversibility of arrhythmias after deconditioning. Retraining initially resulted in a significant increase in arrhythmia frequency compared with deconditioning (from 280 ± 475 to 1,542 ± 2,186 VPCs; p = 0.005), couplets (0.14 ± 0.42 to 4.4 ± 8.2; p = 0.005), and nonsustained ventricular tachycardia (from 0 to 0.8 ± 1.8; p = 0.02). Subsequently, a progressive reduction was seen in the frequency of all ventricular arrhythmias during the 1 year of training to well below that at the peak training levels (VPCs 917 ± 1,630, couplets 1.8 ± 4.2, and nonsustained ventricular tachycardia 0.4 ± 1.2). Such annual arrhythmia reduction was significantly greater statistically in those athletes with marked reversibility after deconditioning than in the athletes with partial reversibility (69 ± 139 vs 1,496 ± 1,917 VPCs/24 hours, respectively; p = 0.007). No cardiac events or symptoms occurred during 1 year of follow-up. In conclusion, in elite athletes without cardiovascular disease, a resumption in intense training after deconditioning was associated with variable, but prolonged, suppression of ventricular ectopy. The absence of adverse clinical events or symptoms associated with the resumption of training supports the continued eligibility

  18. Academic and Career Advancement for Black Male Athletes at NCAA Division I Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Ashley R.; Hawkins, Billy J.

    2016-01-01

    This chapter examines the structural arrangements and challenges many Black male athletes encounter as a result of their use of sport for upward social mobility. Recommendations to enhance their preparation and advancement are provided.

  19. Academic and Career Advancement for Black Male Athletes at NCAA Division I Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Ashley R.; Hawkins, Billy J.

    2016-01-01

    This chapter examines the structural arrangements and challenges many Black male athletes encounter as a result of their use of sport for upward social mobility. Recommendations to enhance their preparation and advancement are provided.

  20. Training in élite young athletes (the Training of Young Athletes (TOYA) Study): injuries, flexibility and isometric strength.

    PubMed Central

    Maffulli, N; King, J B; Helms, P

    1994-01-01

    Using a mixed longitudinal design, the incidence of injuries, and the development of flexibility and isometric strength of the upper and lower limbs were studied for 2 years in 453 élite young athletes (aged between 9 and 18 years) practising football, gymnastics, swimming or tennis. The children suffered from a low incidence of injuries. Strength and flexibility did not exert a significant role in determining injuries. The rate of injury was not significantly different between the 2 years of the study. Young swimmers showed a greater generalized flexibility. Girls were more flexible than boys between the ages of 13 to 16 years. Athletic children are able to exert greater isometric strength than normal schoolchildren. Boys diverged from the normal population at 14 years, while athletic girls were stronger at all ages. Girls were stronger than boys up to age 12, who were still increasing their muscle strength at 19 years. The average maximal isometric strength exerted in both upper and lower limbs in the four sports was not significantly different. Male gymnasts over 11 years old were significantly stronger than all other athletes. PMID:7921912