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Sample records for atlantic herring clupea

  1. Fourteen new microsatellite markers for Atlantic herring Clupea harengus.

    PubMed

    Libungan, L A; Ólafsdóttir, G; Skírnisdóttir, S; Pálsson, S; Pampoulie, C; Björnsdóttir, S H; Ólafsson, K; Óskarsson, G J; Daníelsdóttir, A K

    2012-09-01

    Fourteen new microsatellite loci were developed and tested on Atlantic herring Clupea harengus with 39 individuals from Iceland and 49 individuals from Norway. The microsatellites, which contain di, tri and tetranucleotide repeats, are polymorphic (7-30 alleles), with observed heterozygosity ranging between 0·69 and 1·00 and expected heterozygosity between 0·55 and 0·97. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Fish Biology © 2012 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  2. Otolith shape: a population marker for Atlantic herring Clupea harengus.

    PubMed

    Libungan, L A; Óskarsson, G J; Slotte, A; Jacobsen, J A; Pálsson, S

    2015-04-01

    Otolith shape variation of seven Atlantic herring Clupea harengus populations from Canada, the Faroe Islands, Iceland, Ireland, Norway and Scotland, U.K., covering a large area of the species' distribution, was studied in order to see if otolith shape can be used to discriminate between populations. The otolith shape was obtained using quantitative shape analysis, transformed with Wavelet and analysed with multivariate methods. Significant differences were detected among the seven populations, which could be traced to three morphological structures in the otoliths. The differentiation in otolith shape between populations was not only correlated with their spawning time, indicating a strong environmental effect, but could also be due to differing life-history strategies. A model based on the shape differences discriminates with 94% accuracy between Icelandic summer spawners and Norwegian spring spawners, which are known to mix at feeding grounds. This study shows that otolith shape could become an accurate marker for C. harengus population discrimination. © 2015 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  3. Latitudinal Gradient in Otolith Shape among Local Populations of Atlantic Herring (Clupea harengus L.) in Norway

    PubMed Central

    Libungan, Lísa Anne; Slotte, Aril; Husebø, Åse; Godiksen, Jane A.; Pálsson, Snæbjörn

    2015-01-01

    Otolith shape analysis of Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus) in Norwegian waters shows significant differentiation among fjords and a latitudinal gradient along the coast where neighbouring populations are more similar to each other than to those sampled at larger distances. The otolith shape was obtained using quantitative shape analysis, the outlines were transformed with Wavelet and analysed with multivariate methods. The observed morphological differences are likely to reflect environmental differences but indicate low dispersal among the local herring populations. Otolith shape variation suggests also limited exchange between the local populations and their oceanic counterparts, which could be due to differences in spawning behaviour. Herring from the most northerly location (69°N) in Balsfjord, which is genetically more similar to Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii), differed in otolith shape from all the other populations. Our results suggest that the semi-enclosed systems, where the local populations live and breed, are efficient barriers for dispersal. Otolith shape can thus serve as a marker to identify the origin of herring along the coast of Norway. PMID:26101885

  4. Latitudinal Gradient in Otolith Shape among Local Populations of Atlantic Herring (Clupea harengus L.) in Norway.

    PubMed

    Libungan, Lísa Anne; Slotte, Aril; Husebø, Åse; Godiksen, Jane A; Pálsson, Snæbjörn

    2015-01-01

    Otolith shape analysis of Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus) in Norwegian waters shows significant differentiation among fjords and a latitudinal gradient along the coast where neighbouring populations are more similar to each other than to those sampled at larger distances. The otolith shape was obtained using quantitative shape analysis, the outlines were transformed with Wavelet and analysed with multivariate methods. The observed morphological differences are likely to reflect environmental differences but indicate low dispersal among the local herring populations. Otolith shape variation suggests also limited exchange between the local populations and their oceanic counterparts, which could be due to differences in spawning behaviour. Herring from the most northerly location (69°N) in Balsfjord, which is genetically more similar to Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii), differed in otolith shape from all the other populations. Our results suggest that the semi-enclosed systems, where the local populations live and breed, are efficient barriers for dispersal. Otolith shape can thus serve as a marker to identify the origin of herring along the coast of Norway.

  5. Species profiles: life histories and environmental requirements of coastal fishes and invertebrates (North Atlantic). Atlantic herring. [Clupea harengus

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, K.H.; Moring, J.R.

    1986-04-01

    Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus) spawn offshore, depositing sheets of eggs on the bottom. They usually spawn in late summer or in fall. Fecundity of Atlantic herring in the Gulf of Maine ranged from 33,000 to 185,000 eggs/female. After spawning, adults usually migrate to warmer areas to overwinter. All life stages feed on zooplankton. Adult herring reach their peak weight in August or September. The Atlantic herring supports a major fishery in Massachusetts and Maine; the average annual value of Maine landings was $4.3 million for 1976-1982. Atlantic herring are significant in the diet of many predators. For juvenile herring, the lower level of salinity tolerance is about 5 ppt; older herring probably prefer higher salinities, and spawning occurs only at 32-33 ppt. Sediment deposition may cause egg mortality. Copper concentrations of greater than or equal to1000 mg/1 and sulfuric acid and ferrous sulfate at dilutions greater than or equal to1:8,000 cause heavy larval mortality.

  6. Transcriptional effects of dietary exposure of oil-contaminated Calanus finmarchicus in Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus).

    PubMed

    Olsvik, Pål A; Waagbø, Rune; Pedersen, Sindre A; Meier, Sonnich

    2011-01-01

    Suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) cDNA library construction and characterization was used to identify differentially regulated transcripts from oil exposure in liver of male Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus) fed a diet containing 900 mg crude oil/kg for 2 mo. In total, 439 expressed sequence tags (EST) were sequenced, 223 from the forward subtracted library (enriched for genes putatively upregulated by oil exposure) and 216 from the reverse subtracted library (enriched for genes putatively downregulated by oil exposure). Follow-up reverse-transcription (RT) quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analyses of gene transcription were conducted on additional herring exposed to food containing 9 (low), 90 (medium), and 900 (high) mg crude oil/kg feed for 2 mo. Chronic exposure of Atlantic herring to an oil-contaminated diet mediated upregulation of transcripts encoding antifreeze proteins, proteins in the classical complement pathway (innate immunity), and iron-metabolism proteins. Gene ontology (GO) analysis showed that "cellular response to stress," "regulation to biological quality," "response to abiotic stimuli," and "temperature homeostasis" were the most affected go at the biological processes level, and "carbohydrate binding," "water binding," and "ion binding" at the molecular function level. Of the genes examined with RT-qPCR, CYP1A, antifreeze protein, retinol binding protein 1, deleted in malignant brain tumor 1, and ovary-specific C1q-like factor demonstrated a significant upregulation. Myeloid protein 1, microfibrillar-associated protein 4, WAP65, and pentraxin were downregulated in liver of fish from the high exposure group. In conclusion, this study suggests that 2 mo of oil exposure affected genes encoding proteins involved in temperature homeostasis and possible membrane stability in addition to immune-responsive proteins in Atlantic herring.

  7. Sublethal effects of Orimulsion-400 on eggs and larvae of Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus L.).

    PubMed

    Williams, Jim; Roderick, Carol; Alexander, Ross

    2003-12-01

    Orimulsion-400 is a novel bitumen-emulsion power plant fuel. We exposed Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus L.) eggs to 0, 0.1, 1.0, 10, 100, and 1,000 mg/L concentrations of an oil-in-water dispersion of Orimulsion-400 for a 24-h period. No significant differences were found in daily mortality or percent hatch. The 1,000 mg/L exposure resulted in a significantly higher incidence of premature hatch, indicated by significantly shorter incubation time, significantly smaller total length and notochord length, and significantly greater yolk sac depth. The larvae exposed to the 1,000 mg/L treatment also had a significantly higher incidence of abnormalities than all other treatments.

  8. Effect of ocean acidification on early life stages of Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus L.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franke, A.; Clemmesen, C.

    2011-12-01

    Due to atmospheric accumulation of anthropogenic CO2 the partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2) in surface seawater increases and the pH decreases. This process known as ocean acidification might have severe effects on marine organisms and ecosystems. The present study addresses the effect of ocean acidification on early developmental stages, the most sensitive stages in life history, of the Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus L.). Eggs of the Atlantic herring were fertilized and incubated in artificially acidified seawater (pCO2 1260, 1859, 2626, 2903, 4635 μatm) and a control treatment (pCO2 480 μatm) until the main hatch of herring larvae occurred. The development of the embryos was monitored daily and newly hatched larvae were sampled to analyze their morphometrics, and their condition by measuring the RNA/DNA ratios. Elevated pCO2 neither affected the embryogenesis nor the hatch rate. Furthermore the results showed no linear relationship between pCO2 and total length, dry weight, yolk sac area and otolith area of the newly hatched larvae. For pCO2 and RNA/DNA ratio, however, a significant negative linear relationship was found. The RNA concentration at hatching was reduced at higher pCO2 levels, which could lead to a decreased protein biosynthesis. The results indicate that an increased pCO2 can affect the metabolism of herring embryos negatively. Accordingly, further somatic growth of the larvae could be reduced. This can have consequences for the larval fish, since smaller and slow growing individuals have a lower survival potential due to lower feeding success and increased predation mortality. The regulatory mechanisms necessary to compensate for effects of hypercapnia could therefore lead to lower larval survival. Since the recruitment of fish seems to be determined during the early life stages, future research on the factors influencing these stages are of great importance in fisheries science.

  9. Temporally stable genetic structure of heavily exploited Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus) in Swedish waters.

    PubMed

    Larsson, L C; Laikre, L; André, C; Dahlgren, T G; Ryman, N

    2010-01-01

    Information on the temporal stability of genetic structures is important to permit detection of changes that can constitute threats to biological resources. Large-scale harvesting operations are known to potentially alter the composition and reduce the variability of populations, and Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus) has a long history of heavy exploitation. In the Baltic Sea and Skagerrak waters, the census population sizes have declined by 35-50% over the last three decades. We compared the genetic structure of Atlantic herring in these waters sampled at least two different times between 1979 and 2003 by assaying 11 allozyme and nine microsatellite loci. We cannot detect any changes in the amount of genetic variation or spatial structure, and differentiation is weak with overall F(ST)=0.003 among localities for the older samples and F(ST)=0.002 for the newer ones. There are indications of temporal allele frequency changes, particularly in one of five sampling localities that is reflected in a relatively small local N(e) estimate of c. 400. The previously identified influence of selection at the microsatellite locus Cpa112 remains stable over the 24-year period studied here. Despite little genetic differentiation, migration among localities appears small enough to permit demographic independence between populations.

  10. Cholecystokinin (CCK) in Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus L.) - ontogeny and effects of feeding and diurnal rhythms.

    PubMed

    Rojas-García, Carlos R; Morais, Sofia; Rønnestad, Ivar

    2011-04-01

    Neural and alimentary cholecystokinin (CCK) levels in Atlantic herring, Clupea harengus, were analyzed from hatching to 40days after hatching (DAH). The head compartment representing the neural pool was quantitatively dominant (>80% of the total CCK content) while the digestive tract pool represented 6-10%. During ontogeny the CCK level in whole larvae increased almost 15-fold from 0 to 40 DAH, being particularly marked from 14 to 20 DAH. Larvae of 24 to 26 DAH were examined for potential occurrence of a circadian rhythm and to analyze the effects of feeding. Fed and fasted larvae were significantly different, where fed larvae showed higher CCK levels. There were large fluctuations in CCK levels analyzed at 3h intervals without an apparent diurnal pattern. Shorter sampling intervals of 1h in the morning when lights were switched gradually on and food was offered to the larvae demonstrated a marked drop in the relative gut CCK levels and a concurrent increase in the CCK carcass to gut ratio, 1h after introduction of food followed by a return to prefeeding levels after 2h. This response probably results from a release and re-synthesis of CCK in the gut after initiation of feeding. Taken together, these results support earlier reports that CCK participates in the regulation of digestive processes in herring larvae, but CCK does not seem to have a circadian rhythm independent of feeding. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of ocean acidification on early life stages of Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus L.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franke, A.; Clemmesen, C.

    2011-07-01

    Due to atmospheric accumulation of anthropogenic CO2 the partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2 in surface seawater increases and the pH decreases. This process known as ocean acidification might have severe effects on marine organisms and ecosystems. The present study addresses the effect of ocean acidification on the early developmental stages, the most sensitive stages in the life history, of the Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus L.). Eggs of the Atlantic herring were fertilized and incubated in artificially acidified seawater (pCO2 1260, 1859, 2626, 2903, 4635 μatm) and a control treatment (pCO2 480 μatm) until the main hatch of herring larvae occurred. The development of the embryos was monitored daily and newly hatched larvae were sampled to analyze their morphometrics, and their condition by measuring the RNA/DNA ratios. Elevated pCO2 neither affected the embryogenesis nor the hatch rate. Furthermore the results showed no linear relationship between pCO2 and total length, dry weight, yolk sac area and otolith area of the newly hatched larvae. For pCO2 and RNA/DNA ratio, however, a significant negative linear relationship was found. The RNA concentration at hatching was reduced at higher pCO2 levels, which consequently should lead to a decreased protein biosynthesis. The results indicate that an increased pCO2 can affect the metabolism of herring embryos negatively. Accordingly, further somatic growth of the larvae could be reduced. This can have consequences for the larval fish, since smaller and slow growing individuals have a lower survival potential due to lower feeding success and increased predation mortality. The regulatory mechanisms necessary to compensate for effects of hypercapnia could therefore lead to lower larval survival and could affect the ecosystem and fisheries. Since the recruitment of fish seems to be determined during the early life stages, future research on the factors influencing these stages are of great importance in fisheries

  12. Seasonal dynamics of Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus L.) populations spawning in the vicinity of marginal habitats.

    PubMed

    Eggers, Florian; Slotte, Aril; Libungan, Lísa Anne; Johannessen, Arne; Kvamme, Cecilie; Moland, Even; Olsen, Esben M; Nash, Richard D M

    2014-01-01

    Gillnet sampling and analyses of otolith shape, vertebral count and growth indicated the presence of three putative Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus L.) populations mixing together over the spawning season February-June inside and outside an inland brackish water lake (Landvikvannet) in southern Norway. Peak spawning of oceanic Norwegian spring spawners and coastal Skagerrak spring spawners occurred in March-April with small proportions of spawners entering the lake. In comparison, spawning of Landvik herring peaked in May-June with high proportions found inside the lake, which could be explained by local adaptations to the environmental conditions and seasonal changes of this marginal habitat. The 1.85 km(2) lake was characterized by oxygen depletion occurring between 2.5 and 5 m depth between March and June. This was followed by changes in salinity from 1-7‰ in the 0-1 m surface layer to levels of 20-25‰ deeper than 10 m. In comparison, outside the 3 km long narrow channel connecting the lake with the neighboring fjord, no anoxic conditions were found. Here salinity in the surface layer increased over the season from 10 to 25‰, whereas deeper than 5 m it was stable at around 35‰. Temperature at 0-5 m depth increased significantly over the season in both habitats, from 7 to 14 °C outside and 5 to 17 °C inside the lake. Despite differences in peak spawning and utilization of the lake habitat between the three putative populations, there was an apparent temporal and spatial overlap in spawning stages suggesting potential interbreeding in accordance with the metapopulation concept.

  13. Seasonal Dynamics of Atlantic Herring (Clupea harengus L.) Populations Spawning in the Vicinity of Marginal Habitats

    PubMed Central

    Eggers, Florian; Slotte, Aril; Libungan, Lísa Anne; Johannessen, Arne; Kvamme, Cecilie; Moland, Even; Olsen, Esben M.; Nash, Richard D. M.

    2014-01-01

    Gillnet sampling and analyses of otolith shape, vertebral count and growth indicated the presence of three putative Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus L.) populations mixing together over the spawning season February–June inside and outside an inland brackish water lake (Landvikvannet) in southern Norway. Peak spawning of oceanic Norwegian spring spawners and coastal Skagerrak spring spawners occurred in March–April with small proportions of spawners entering the lake. In comparison, spawning of Landvik herring peaked in May–June with high proportions found inside the lake, which could be explained by local adaptations to the environmental conditions and seasonal changes of this marginal habitat. The 1.85 km2 lake was characterized by oxygen depletion occurring between 2.5 and 5 m depth between March and June. This was followed by changes in salinity from 1–7‰ in the 0–1 m surface layer to levels of 20–25‰ deeper than 10 m. In comparison, outside the 3 km long narrow channel connecting the lake with the neighboring fjord, no anoxic conditions were found. Here salinity in the surface layer increased over the season from 10 to 25‰, whereas deeper than 5 m it was stable at around 35‰. Temperature at 0–5 m depth increased significantly over the season in both habitats, from 7 to 14°C outside and 5 to 17°C inside the lake. Despite differences in peak spawning and utilization of the lake habitat between the three putative populations, there was an apparent temporal and spatial overlap in spawning stages suggesting potential interbreeding in accordance with the metapopulation concept. PMID:25372461

  14. Detection of small bioactive peptides from Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus L.).

    PubMed

    Pampanin, Daniela M; Larssen, Eivind; Provan, Fiona; Sivertsvik, Morten; Ruoff, Peter; Sydnes, Magne O

    2012-04-01

    Recent research has shown that fish residual materials contain a range of components with interesting biological activity. Therefore, there is a great potential in the marine bioprocess industry to utilize these by-products as starting material for generating more valuable products. The aim of the present study was to search for bioactive peptides (in particular small natural bioactive peptides with molecular weight lower than 10 kDa) in Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus L.) by-products such as skin and more general residual materials. By such means a range of peptides with claimed interesting biological activities was found. Herein the activity of the detected bioactive peptides and strategies for isolating peptide fragments containing the bioactive motif is discussed. Identification of bioactive peptides in crude peptide/protein sources (skin and residual materials) was performed directly using a combination of mass spectrometry (Orbitrap), bioinformatics and database search. This method was a good angle of approach in order to map the potential in new species and species that have been very little studied. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Toxicity of dispersed weathered crude oil to early life stages of Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus).

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Stephen; King, Tom; Wu, Dongmei; Hodson, Peter V

    2010-05-01

    Reports of the chronic toxicity of dispersed crude oil to early life stages of fish perpetuate uncertainty about dispersant use. However, realistic exposures to dispersed oil in the water column are thought to be much briefer than exposures associated with chronic toxicity testing. To address this issue, the toxicity of dispersed weathered oil to early life stages of Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus) was tested for short exposure durations, ranging from 1 to 144 h. Toxicity was a function of concentration and duration of exposure, as well as of the life stage exposed. Medium South American crude oil dispersed with Corexit 9500 caused blue sac disease in embryos, but not in free-swimming embryos. The age of embryos was negatively correlated with their sensitivity to oil; those freshly fertilized were most sensitive. Sensitivity increased after hatch, with free-swimming embryos showing signs of narcosis. Gametes were also tested; dispersed oil dramatically impaired fertilization success. For exposures of less than 24 h, gametes and free-swimming embryos were the most sensitive life stages. For those of more than 24 h, young embryos (<1 d old) were most sensitive. The results are presented as statistical models that could assist decisions about dispersant use in the vicinity of fish spawning habitats. Copyright (c) 2010 SETAC.

  16. SNP Discovery Using Next Generation Transcriptomic Sequencing in Atlantic Herring (Clupea harengus)

    PubMed Central

    Bekkevold, Dorte; Babbucci, Massimiliano; van Houdt, Jeroen; Maes, Gregory E.; Bargelloni, Luca; Nielsen, Rasmus O.; Taylor, Martin I.; Ogden, Rob; Cariani, Alessia; Carvalho, Gary R.; Consortium, FishPopTrace; Panitz, Frank

    2012-01-01

    The introduction of Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) has revolutionised population genetics, providing studies of non-model species with unprecedented genomic coverage, allowing evolutionary biologists to address questions previously far beyond the reach of available resources. Furthermore, the simple mutation model of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) permits cost-effective high-throughput genotyping in thousands of individuals simultaneously. Genomic resources are scarce for the Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus), a small pelagic species that sustains high revenue fisheries. This paper details the development of 578 SNPs using a combined NGS and high-throughput genotyping approach. Eight individuals covering the species distribution in the eastern Atlantic were bar-coded and multiplexed into a single cDNA library and sequenced using the 454 GS FLX platform. SNP discovery was performed by de novo sequence clustering and contig assembly, followed by the mapping of reads against consensus contig sequences. Selection of candidate SNPs for genotyping was conducted using an in silico approach. SNP validation and genotyping were performed simultaneously using an Illumina 1,536 GoldenGate assay. Although the conversion rate of candidate SNPs in the genotyping assay cannot be predicted in advance, this approach has the potential to maximise cost and time efficiencies by avoiding expensive and time-consuming laboratory stages of SNP validation. Additionally, the in silico approach leads to lower ascertainment bias in the resulting SNP panel as marker selection is based only on the ability to design primers and the predicted presence of intron-exon boundaries. Consequently SNPs with a wider spectrum of minor allele frequencies (MAFs) will be genotyped in the final panel. The genomic resources presented here represent a valuable multi-purpose resource for developing informative marker panels for population discrimination, microarray development and for population

  17. SNP discovery using Next Generation Transcriptomic Sequencing in Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus).

    PubMed

    Helyar, Sarah J; Limborg, Morten T; Bekkevold, Dorte; Babbucci, Massimiliano; van Houdt, Jeroen; Maes, Gregory E; Bargelloni, Luca; Nielsen, Rasmus O; Taylor, Martin I; Ogden, Rob; Cariani, Alessia; Carvalho, Gary R; Panitz, Frank

    2012-01-01

    The introduction of Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) has revolutionised population genetics, providing studies of non-model species with unprecedented genomic coverage, allowing evolutionary biologists to address questions previously far beyond the reach of available resources. Furthermore, the simple mutation model of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) permits cost-effective high-throughput genotyping in thousands of individuals simultaneously. Genomic resources are scarce for the Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus), a small pelagic species that sustains high revenue fisheries. This paper details the development of 578 SNPs using a combined NGS and high-throughput genotyping approach. Eight individuals covering the species distribution in the eastern Atlantic were bar-coded and multiplexed into a single cDNA library and sequenced using the 454 GS FLX platform. SNP discovery was performed by de novo sequence clustering and contig assembly, followed by the mapping of reads against consensus contig sequences. Selection of candidate SNPs for genotyping was conducted using an in silico approach. SNP validation and genotyping were performed simultaneously using an Illumina 1,536 GoldenGate assay. Although the conversion rate of candidate SNPs in the genotyping assay cannot be predicted in advance, this approach has the potential to maximise cost and time efficiencies by avoiding expensive and time-consuming laboratory stages of SNP validation. Additionally, the in silico approach leads to lower ascertainment bias in the resulting SNP panel as marker selection is based only on the ability to design primers and the predicted presence of intron-exon boundaries. Consequently SNPs with a wider spectrum of minor allele frequencies (MAFs) will be genotyped in the final panel. The genomic resources presented here represent a valuable multi-purpose resource for developing informative marker panels for population discrimination, microarray development and for population

  18. Toxicity of Orimulsion-400 to early life stages of Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus) and mummichog (Fundulus heteroclitus).

    PubMed

    Boudreau, Monica; Sweezey, Michael J; Lee, Kenneth; Hodson, Peter V; Courtenay, Simon C

    2009-06-01

    The toxicity of Orimulsion-400 (PDVSA-BITOR), an emulsion of 70% bitumen in 30% water, was tested during the embryonic development of Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus) and mummichog (Fundulus heteroclitus) in duplicate experiments. Air injection and different salinities were included in the herring assays to examine their effects on Orimulsion-400 toxicity. Water-accommodated fractions (WAFs) of no. 6 fuel oil were tested in the mummichog assays to compare Orimulsion-400 toxicity with that of a heavy fuel oil. Concentrations of Orimulsion-400 as low as 0.001% (v/v) were harmful to both species. In herring, the more sensitive of the two species, this concentration produced 100% abnormal larvae. Similar abnormalities, including pericardial edema and spinal deformities, the same signs of toxicity caused by heavy fuel oils and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), were produced in both herring and mummichog. Fish exposed to Orimulsion-400 also suffered from increased mortality, reduced heart rates, premature hatch, and reduced lengths compared to control fish. Orimulsion-400 was approximately 300-fold more toxic than the WAFs of no. 6 fuel oil. Salinity had few clear effects on Orimulsion-400 toxicity, but aeration of test solutions greatly reduced toxicity by causing bitumen to coalesce and float. Aeration also removed toxic chemicals such as PAHs. The present study suggests that in the event of a spill, Orimulsion-400 could impair fish recruitment, but that strong wave action would reduce toxicity by accelerating the removal of emulsified bitumen from the water column.

  19. Identification of genes for dimethyl sulfide production in bacteria in the gut of Atlantic Herring (Clupea harengus).

    PubMed

    Curson, Andrew R J; Sullivan, Matthew J; Todd, Jonathan D; Johnston, Andrew W B

    2010-01-01

    Phytoplankton are the primary producers of the sulfur-containing compatible solute dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP). These cells are consumed by mesozooplankton, which, in turn, may be eaten by marine vertebrates. From the gut of one such animal, the Atlantic Herring Clupea harengus, we isolated strains of the gamma-proteobacteria Pseudomonas and Psychrobacter that grew on DMSP as sole carbon source, and which produced the environmentally important sulfurous volatile dimethyl sulfide (DMS). In both bacterial genera, this ability was because of the previously identified gene dddD, which specifies an enzyme that liberates DMS from DMSP. DMS production was stimulated by pre-growth of cells on the substrate DMSP. This is the first identification of DMSP-degrading bacteria and their relevant genes in the gut microflora of any vertebrate.

  20. Environmental selection on transcriptome-derived SNPs in a high gene flow marine fish, the Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus).

    PubMed

    Limborg, Morten T; Helyar, Sarah J; De Bruyn, Mark; Taylor, Martin I; Nielsen, Einar E; Ogden, Rob; Carvalho, Gary R; Bekkevold, Dorte

    2012-08-01

    High gene flow is considered the norm for most marine organisms and is expected to limit their ability to adapt to local environments. Few studies have directly compared the patterns of differentiation at neutral and selected gene loci in marine organisms. We analysed a transcriptome-derived panel of 281 SNPs in Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus), a highly migratory small pelagic fish, for elucidating neutral and selected genetic variation among populations and to identify candidate genes for environmental adaptation. We analysed 607 individuals from 18 spawning locations in the northeast Atlantic, including two temperature clines (5-12 °C) and two salinity clines (5-35‰). By combining genome scan and landscape genetic analyses, four genetically distinct groups of herring were identified: Baltic Sea, Baltic-North Sea transition area, North Sea/British Isles and North Atlantic; notably, samples exhibited divergent clustering patterns for neutral and selected loci. We found statistically strong evidence for divergent selection at 16 outlier loci on a global scale, and significant correlations with temperature and salinity at nine loci. On regional scales, we identified two outlier loci with parallel patterns across temperature clines and five loci associated with temperature in the North Sea/North Atlantic. Likewise, we found seven replicated outliers, of which five were significantly associated with low salinity across both salinity clines. Our results reveal a complex pattern of varying spatial genetic variation among outlier loci, likely reflecting adaptations to local environments. In addition to disclosing the fine scale of local adaptation in a highly vagile species, our data emphasize the need to preserve functionally important biodiversity. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. The effect of progressive hypoxia on school structure and dynamics in Atlantic herring Clupea harengus.

    PubMed

    Domenici, Paolo; Ferrari, R Silvana; Steffensen, John F; Batty, Robert S

    2002-10-22

    The effect of progressive hypoxia on the structure and dynamics of herring (Clupea harengus) schools in laboratory conditions was investigated. The length, width and depth of schools of about 20 individuals were measured from video recordings to test the hypothesis that during hypoxia fish schools change their shape and volume. School shape (calculated as the ratios of length/depth, width/depth and length/width) did not change significantly during hypoxia. School length, width, depth, area and volume were all significantly increased at 20% oxygen saturation. Volume, area and width were more sensitive to hypoxia; volume and width were also increased at 25% and area at 30% oxygen saturation. The degree of position changing (shuffling) of individuals within the school was also analysed. Shuffling in normoxia was observed to occur largely through 'O-turn' manoeuvres, a 360( degrees )turn executed laterally to the school that allowed fishes in the front to move to the back. O-turn frequency during normoxia was 0.69 O-turns fish(-1) min(-1) but significantly decreased with hypoxia to 0.37 O-turns fish(-1) min(-1) at 30% oxygen saturation. Shuffling was also investigated by measuring the persistence time of individual herring in leading positions (i.e. the first half of the school). No significant changes occurred during hypoxia, indicating that the decrease in O-turn frequency does not affect shuffling rate during hypoxia, and that position shuffling in hypoxic conditions is mainly due to overtaking or falling back by individual fishes. School integrity and positional dynamics are the outcome of trade-offs among a number of biotic factors, such as food, predator defence, mating behaviour and various physical factors that may impose certain limits. Among these, our results indicate that oxygen level modulates schooling behaviour. Oxygen alters whole-school parameters at oxygen saturation values that can be encountered by herring in the field, indicating that oxygen

  2. The effect of progressive hypoxia on school structure and dynamics in Atlantic herring Clupea harengus.

    PubMed Central

    Domenici, Paolo; Ferrari, R Silvana; Steffensen, John F; Batty, Robert S

    2002-01-01

    The effect of progressive hypoxia on the structure and dynamics of herring (Clupea harengus) schools in laboratory conditions was investigated. The length, width and depth of schools of about 20 individuals were measured from video recordings to test the hypothesis that during hypoxia fish schools change their shape and volume. School shape (calculated as the ratios of length/depth, width/depth and length/width) did not change significantly during hypoxia. School length, width, depth, area and volume were all significantly increased at 20% oxygen saturation. Volume, area and width were more sensitive to hypoxia; volume and width were also increased at 25% and area at 30% oxygen saturation. The degree of position changing (shuffling) of individuals within the school was also analysed. Shuffling in normoxia was observed to occur largely through 'O-turn' manoeuvres, a 360( degrees )turn executed laterally to the school that allowed fishes in the front to move to the back. O-turn frequency during normoxia was 0.69 O-turns fish(-1) min(-1) but significantly decreased with hypoxia to 0.37 O-turns fish(-1) min(-1) at 30% oxygen saturation. Shuffling was also investigated by measuring the persistence time of individual herring in leading positions (i.e. the first half of the school). No significant changes occurred during hypoxia, indicating that the decrease in O-turn frequency does not affect shuffling rate during hypoxia, and that position shuffling in hypoxic conditions is mainly due to overtaking or falling back by individual fishes. School integrity and positional dynamics are the outcome of trade-offs among a number of biotic factors, such as food, predator defence, mating behaviour and various physical factors that may impose certain limits. Among these, our results indicate that oxygen level modulates schooling behaviour. Oxygen alters whole-school parameters at oxygen saturation values that can be encountered by herring in the field, indicating that oxygen

  3. Effects of different concentrations of crude oil on first feeding larvae of Atlantic herring ( Clupea harengus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingvarsdóttir, A.; Bjørkblom, C.; Ravagnan, E.; Godal, B. F.; Arnberg, M.; Joachim, D. L.; Sanni, S.

    2012-05-01

    Studies have shown that exposure to Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) and other oil related components alter normal fish larvae development and can cause increased mortality in early life stages. Modelling of results from controlled laboratory exposure experiments will help relate typical oil exposure parameters (biomarkers) to field observations and are valuable tools for oil exposure monitoring and risk assessment. Post yolk sack larval stages of Atlantic herring were exposed to different concentrations of dispersed Arctic crude oil. The selected nominal concentrations were 0.015, 0.040, 0.060, 0.250 and 0.750 mg l - 1 raw dispersed oil (0.129, 0.373, 0.496, 2.486 and 6.019 μg l - 1 Total Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (TPAH) respectively), and control seawater in flow through systems. The larvae were exposed for 12 days and daily mortality recorded in all treatments. Thereafter, the larvae were transported to two large (300 l) rearing tanks, one for control/trace oil and one for oil exposed larvae. The larvae were allowed to recover for 8 weeks after exposure, and mortality and morphological factors then assessed, giving preliminary information on recovery of Atlantic herring larvae after oil exposure. Throughout the testing period, there was a general trend for higher mortality of herring larvae in the oil exposure concentrations than in control, and significantly higher mortality was found in all oil concentrations than in the control after 12 days. We did not detect a clear dose related mortality for our test concentrations, except for the highest concentration. There was no difference found in mortality rates of the herring larvae from either the oil or control/trace oil batch during the recovery phase during the following 60 days. Morphological observations of the herring larvae after 2 months recovery in clean seawater showed that the oil exposed larvae had morphological features that could be described as deformities, and growth was found to be

  4. Toxicity of crude oil chemically dispersed in a wave tank to embryos of Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus).

    PubMed

    Greer, Colleen D; Hodson, Peter V; Li, Zhengkai; King, Thomas; Lee, Kenneth

    2012-06-01

    Tests of crude oil toxicity to fish are often chronic, exposing embryos from fertilization to hatch to oil solutions prepared using standard mixing procedures. However, during oil spills, fish are not often exposed for long periods and the dynamic nature of the ocean is not easily replicated in the lab. Our objective was to determine if brief exposures of Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus) embryos to dispersed oil prepared by standard mixing procedures was as toxic as oil dispersed in a more realistic model system. Embryos were first exposed to chemically dispersed Alaska North Slope crude and Arabian light crude oil for 2.4 h to 14 d from fertilization to determine if exposure time affected toxicity. Toxicity increased with exposure time, but 2.4-h exposures at realistic concentrations of oil induced blue-sac disease and reduced the percentage of normal embryos at hatch; there was little difference in toxicity between the two oils. Secondly, oil was chemically dispersed in a wave tank to determine if the resultant oil solutions were as toxic to herring embryos as laboratory-derived dispersed oil using a single exposure period of 24 h. Samples taken 15 min postdispersion were more toxic than laboratory-prepared solutions, but samples taken at 5, 30, and 60 min postdispersion were less toxic. Overall, the laboratory- and wave tank-derived solutions of dispersed oil provided similar estimates of toxicity despite differences in the methods for preparing test solutions, suggesting that laboratory and wave tank data are a reliable basis for ecological risk assessments of spilled oil.

  5. Mortalities of Atlantic herring, Clupea h. harengus, smooth flounder, Liopsetta putnami, and rainbow smelt, Osmerus mordax, larvae exposed to acute thermal shock

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, S.L.; Townsend, D.W.; Hacunda, J.S.

    1981-01-01

    Experiments were designed to evaluate the thermal tolerances of three species of larval fish occurring in the Gulf of Maine and its estuaries: Atlantic herring, Clupea h. harengus, smooth flounder, Liopsetta putnami, and rainbow smelt, Osmerus mordax. These fish, although differing somewhat in their life histories, are all common in inshore areas during some part of their larval life, and are therefore subject to power plant entrainment. This paper presents the results of thermal tolerance experiments which encompassed the range of temperatures planktonic organisms encounter in condenser cooling systems.

  6. Low-frequency target strength and abundance of shoaling Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus) in the Gulf of Maine during the Ocean Acoustic Waveguide Remote Sensing 2006 Experiment.

    PubMed

    Gong, Zheng; Andrews, Mark; Jagannathan, Srinivasan; Patel, Ruben; Jech, J Michael; Makris, Nicholas C; Ratilal, Purnima

    2010-01-01

    The low-frequency target strength of shoaling Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus) in the Gulf of Maine during Autumn 2006 spawning season is estimated from experimental data acquired simultaneously at multiple frequencies in the 300-1200 Hz range using (1) a low-frequency ocean acoustic waveguide remote sensing (OAWRS) system, (2) areal population density calibration with several conventional fish finding sonar (CFFS) systems, and (3) low-frequency transmission loss measurements. The OAWRS system's instantaneous imaging diameter of 100 km and regular updating enabled unaliased monitoring of fish populations over ecosystem scales including shoals of Atlantic herring containing hundreds of millions of individuals, as confirmed by concurrent trawl and CFFS sampling. High spatial-temporal coregistration was found between herring shoals imaged by OAWRS and concurrent CFFS line-transects, which also provided fish depth distributions. The mean scattering cross-section of an individual shoaling herring is found to consistently exhibit a strong, roughly 20 dB/octave roll-off with decreasing frequency in the range of the OAWRS survey over all days of the roughly 2-week experiment, consistent with the steep roll-offs expected for sub-resonance scattering from fish with air-filled swimbladders.

  7. Cholecystokinin mRNA in Atlantic herring, Clupea harengus--molecular cloning, characterization, and distribution in the digestive tract during the early life stages.

    PubMed

    Kamisaka, Yuko; Drivenes, Oyvind; Kurokawa, Tadahide; Tagawa, Masatomo; Rønnestad, Ivar; Tanaka, Masaru; Helvik, Jon Vidar

    2005-03-01

    The mRNA of the peptide hormone cholecystokinin (CCK) was isolated from juvenile Atlantic herring, Clupea harengus, by RT-PCR. The open reading frame encodes a 137 amino acid-long precursor protein. The peptide sequence of herring CCK-8, DYMGWMDF, is identical to that of higher vertebrates and elasmobranchs, and contains methionine in the sixth position from the C-terminus, which has not been reported previously in teleosts. Expression analysis by in situ hybridization shows that positive endocrine-like cells were mainly located in the pyloric caeca and to a less extent in the rectum of the juvenile. A few positive cells were also found in the pyloric portion of the stomach and the intestine. CCK cells were present in all the larvae examined from the day of hatching onwards. Although the CCK cells were scattered throughout the whole midgut, no signals were detected in either the foregut or the hindgut. Since herring larvae have a straight gut, the distribution pattern of CCK cells seems to be reflected in the anatomy of the gut.

  8. The proteome of Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus L.) larvae is resistant to elevated pCO2.

    PubMed

    Maneja, Rommel H; Dineshram, R; Thiyagarajan, Vengatesen; Skiftesvik, Anne Berit; Frommel, Andrea Y; Clemmesen, Catriona; Geffen, Audrey J; Browman, Howard I

    2014-09-15

    Elevated anthropogenic pCO2 can delay growth and impair otolith structure and function in the larvae of some fishes. These effects may concurrently alter the larva's proteome expression pattern. To test this hypothesis, Atlantic herring larvae were exposed to ambient (370 μatm) and elevated (1800 μatm) pCO2 for one-month. The proteome structure of the larvae was examined using a 2-DE and mass spectrometry. The length of herring larvae was marginally less in the elevated pCO2 treatment compared to the control. The proteome structure was also different between the control and treatment, but only slightly: the expression of a small number of proteins was altered by a factor of less than 2-fold at elevated pCO2. This comparative proteome analysis suggests that the proteome of herring larvae is resilient to elevated pCO2. These observations suggest that herring larvae can cope with levels of CO2 projected for near future without significant proteome-wide changes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. School density affects the strength of collective avoidance responses in wild-caught Atlantic herring Clupea harengus: a simulated predator encounter experiment.

    PubMed

    Rieucau, G; De Robertis, A; Boswell, K M; Handegard, N O

    2014-11-01

    An experimental study in a semi-controlled environment was conducted to examine whether school density in wild-caught Atlantic herring Clupea harengus affects the strength of their collective escape behaviours. Using acoustics, the anti-predator diving responses of C. harengus in two schools that differed in density were quantified by exposing them to a simulated threat. Due to logistical restrictions, the first fish was tested in a low-density school condition (four trials; packing density = 1.5 fish m(-3); c. 6000 fish) followed by fish in a high-density school condition (five trials; packing density = 16 fish m(-3); c. 60 000 fish). The C. harengus in a high-density school exhibited stronger collective diving avoidance responses to the simulated predators than fish in the lower-density school. The findings suggest that the density (and thus the internal organization) of a fish school affects the strength of collective anti-predatory responses, and the extent to which information about predation risk is transferred through the C. harengus school. Therefore, the results challenge the common notion that information transfer within animal groups may not depend on group size and density. © 2014 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  10. Detecting population structure in a high gene-flow species, Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus): direct, simultaneous evaluation of neutral vs putatively selected loci

    PubMed Central

    André, C; Larsson, L C; Laikre, L; Bekkevold, D; Brigham, J; Carvalho, G R; Dahlgren, T G; Hutchinson, W F; Mariani, S; Mudde, K; Ruzzante, D E; Ryman, N

    2011-01-01

    In many marine fish species, genetic population structure is typically weak because populations are large, evolutionarily young and have a high potential for gene flow. We tested whether genetic markers influenced by natural selection are more efficient than the presumed neutral genetic markers to detect population structure in Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus), a migratory pelagic species with large effective population sizes. We compared the spatial and temporal patterns of divergence and statistical power of three traditional genetic marker types, microsatellites, allozymes and mitochondrial DNA, with one microsatellite locus, Cpa112, previously shown to be influenced by divergent selection associated with salinity, and one locus located in the major histocompatibility complex class IIA (MHC-IIA) gene, using the same individuals across analyses. Samples were collected in 2002 and 2003 at two locations in the North Sea, one location in the Skagerrak and one location in the low-saline Baltic Sea. Levels of divergence for putatively neutral markers were generally low, with the exception of single outlier locus/sample combinations; microsatellites were the most statistically powerful markers under neutral expectations. We found no evidence of selection acting on the MHC locus. Cpa112, however, was highly divergent in the Baltic samples. Simulations addressing the statistical power for detecting population divergence showed that when using Cpa112 alone, compared with using eight presumed neutral microsatellite loci, sample sizes could be reduced by up to a tenth while still retaining high statistical power. Our results show that the loci influenced by selection can serve as powerful markers for detecting population structure in high gene-flow marine fish species. PMID:20551979

  11. Detecting population structure in a high gene-flow species, Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus): direct, simultaneous evaluation of neutral vs putatively selected loci.

    PubMed

    André, C; Larsson, L C; Laikre, L; Bekkevold, D; Brigham, J; Carvalho, G R; Dahlgren, T G; Hutchinson, W F; Mariani, S; Mudde, K; Ruzzante, D E; Ryman, N

    2011-02-01

    In many marine fish species, genetic population structure is typically weak because populations are large, evolutionarily young and have a high potential for gene flow. We tested whether genetic markers influenced by natural selection are more efficient than the presumed neutral genetic markers to detect population structure in Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus), a migratory pelagic species with large effective population sizes. We compared the spatial and temporal patterns of divergence and statistical power of three traditional genetic marker types, microsatellites, allozymes and mitochondrial DNA, with one microsatellite locus, Cpa112, previously shown to be influenced by divergent selection associated with salinity, and one locus located in the major histocompatibility complex class IIA (MHC-IIA) gene, using the same individuals across analyses. Samples were collected in 2002 and 2003 at two locations in the North Sea, one location in the Skagerrak and one location in the low-saline Baltic Sea. Levels of divergence for putatively neutral markers were generally low, with the exception of single outlier locus/sample combinations; microsatellites were the most statistically powerful markers under neutral expectations. We found no evidence of selection acting on the MHC locus. Cpa112, however, was highly divergent in the Baltic samples. Simulations addressing the statistical power for detecting population divergence showed that when using Cpa112 alone, compared with using eight presumed neutral microsatellite loci, sample sizes could be reduced by up to a tenth while still retaining high statistical power. Our results show that the loci influenced by selection can serve as powerful markers for detecting population structure in high gene-flow marine fish species.

  12. Environmental genotoxicity and cytotoxicity in flounder (Platichthys flesus), herring (Clupea harengus) and Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) from chemical munitions dumping zones in the southern Baltic Sea.

    PubMed

    Baršienė, Janina; Butrimavičienė, Laura; Grygiel, Wlodzimierz; Lang, Thomas; Michailovas, Aleksandras; Jackūnas, Tomas

    2014-05-01

    The data on environmental genotoxicity and cytotoxicity levels as well as on genotoxicity risk in flounder (Platichthys flesus), herring (Clupea harengus) and cod (Gadus morhua) collected in 2010-2012 at 42 stations located in chemical munitions dumping areas of the southern Baltic Sea are presented. The frequency of micronuclei, nuclear buds and nucleoplasmic bridges in erythrocytes was used as genotoxicity endpoint and the induction of fragmented-apoptotic, bi-nucleated and 8-shaped erythrocytes as cytotoxicity endpoint. The most significantly increased geno-cytotoxicity levels were determined in fish collected near known chemical munitions dumpsites. Extremely high genotoxicity risk for flounder were identified at 21 out of 24 stations, for herring at 29 out of 31 and for cod at 5 out of 10 stations studied. The reference level of genotoxicity was not recorded at any of the stations revealing that in the sampling area fish were affected generally.

  13. Depth-dependent swimbladder compression in herring Clupea harengus observed using magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Fässler, S M M; Fernandes, P G; Semple, S I K; Brierley, A S

    2009-01-01

    Changes in swimbladder morphology in an Atlantic herring Clupea harengus with pressure were examined by magnetic resonance imaging of a dead fish in a purpose-built pressure chamber. Swimbladder volume changed with pressure according to Boyle's Law, but compression in the lateral aspect was greater than in the dorsal aspect. This uneven compression has a reduced effect on acoustic backscattering than symmetrical compression and would elicit less pronounced effects of depth on acoustic biomass estimates of C. harengus.

  14. Diet of red-throated divers Gavia stellata reflects the seasonal availability of Atlantic herring Clupea harengus in the southwestern Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guse, Nils; Garthe, Stefan; Schirmeister, Bernd

    2009-11-01

    Red-throated divers are piscivorous seabirds considered to be opportunistic feeders. The overall knowledge about their diet at sea is scarce. A large sample size of 82 by-caught red-throated divers from two winter (2001-02 and 2002-03) and three spring periods (2003, 2004 and 2005) offered the unique opportunity to analyse their dietary composition in the Pomeranian Bight. This area represents a hot spot in their winter distribution in the southwestern Baltic Sea and a marine protected area has been established due to its importance for the divers and other seabird species. Diet composition was analysed based on stomach and gut contents. The comparison of the different prey species was mainly based on reconstructed biomass using regressions between skeletal hard parts such as otoliths and original fish length and weight. The diet of the divers comprised eleven different fish species and nine different families. No interannual differences in the consumption of the nine most important prey species could be observed. However, in contrast to the other fish species the consumption of Atlantic herring and zander differed significantly between seasons. Herring supplied the majority of prey biomass in all three spring periods and zander in both winter periods. Moreover, the average length of herring consumed differed significantly between seasons. In winter, smaller herring was consumed compared to spring. The distinct seasonal changes in the diet composition were paralleled and most probably evoked by the migration pattern of the Western Baltic spring spawning herring which has its main spawning grounds adjacent to the study area. Based on the habitat requirements of the different prey species it could be inferred that mostly the coastal waters of the bight were used for foraging. Its function as spawning, nursery area and feeding ground with numerous resident and migrating fish species available might explain the important role of the Pomeranian Bight as wintering and

  15. Production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies to IgM of Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Purcell, Maureen K.; Bromage, Erin S.; Silva, Jessica; Hansen, John D.; Badil, Samantha M.; Woodson, James C.; Hershberger, Paul K.

    2012-01-01

    Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii) have a central role in the North Pacific ecosystem as a forage fish species and are natural reservoirs of several important finfish pathogens, including Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV). Here, we report the identification of the gene encoding the immunoglobulin mu (IgM) heavy chain, as well as the development and characterization of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) that specifically react with Pacific herring IgM. Pacific herring immunoglobulin was purified and consisted of heavy and light chains of approximately 80 and 25 kDa. Three hybridoma clones were initially identified by ELISA as reactive with purified immunoglobulin but only one clone was able to detect an 80 kDa protein in Pacific and Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus) whole plasma by denaturing western blot. However, all three MAbs were able to precipitate an 80 kDa protein from Pacific herring and LCMS sequencing of peptide fragments derived from this protein matched the predicted amino acid sequence of the cloned, heavy chain gene. In addition, two of the MAbs stained cells within the putative lymphocyte gates for the spleen, anterior kidney and posterior kidney but were not reactive for myeloid/granulocyte gates, which is consistent with these MAbs reacting with surface IgM+ B-cells. To our knowledge, this is the first report of IgM-related gene sequences and anti-IgM monoclonal antibodies from any member of the family Clupeidae. The antibodies produced in this study are critical for achieving our long-term goal of conducting serological surveillance to assess pathogen exposure in natural populations of Pacific herring.

  16. Production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies to IgM of Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii).

    PubMed

    Purcell, Maureen K; Bromage, Erin S; Silva, Jessica; Hansen, John D; Badil, Samantha M; Woodson, James C; Hershberger, Paul K

    2012-09-01

    Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii) have a central role in the North Pacific ecosystem as a forage fish species and are natural reservoirs of several important finfish pathogens, including Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV). Here, we report the identification of the gene encoding the immunoglobulin mu (IgM) heavy chain, as well as the development and characterization of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) that specifically react with Pacific herring IgM. Pacific herring immunoglobulin was purified and consisted of heavy and light chains of approximately 80 and 25 kDa. Three hybridoma clones were initially identified by ELISA as reactive with purified immunoglobulin but only one clone was able to detect an 80 kDa protein in Pacific and Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus) whole plasma by denaturing western blot. However, all three MAbs were able to precipitate an 80 kDa protein from Pacific herring and LCMS sequencing of peptide fragments derived from this protein matched the predicted amino acid sequence of the cloned, heavy chain gene. In addition, two of the MAbs stained cells within the putative lymphocyte gates for the spleen, anterior kidney and posterior kidney but were not reactive for myeloid/granulocyte gates, which is consistent with these MAbs reacting with surface IgM⁺ B-cells. To our knowledge, this is the first report of IgM-related gene sequences and anti-IgM monoclonal antibodies from any member of the family Clupeidae. The antibodies produced in this study are critical for achieving our long-term goal of conducting serological surveillance to assess pathogen exposure in natural populations of Pacific herring.

  17. Oocyte growth and fecundity regulation by atresia of Atlantic herring ( Clupea harengus) in relation to body condition throughout the maturation cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurita, Y.; Meier, S.; Kjesbu, O. S.

    2003-05-01

    Oocyte growth, fecundity regulation by resorption of vitellogenic oocytes (atresia), and condition effects on fecundity for repeat spawners (≥32 cm in total length (TL)) of Norwegian spring-spawning (NSS) herring, Clupea harengus, were examined using samples collected periodically from July 1998 to February/March 1999. This period almost covered the maturation cycle of the fish, i.e., 67% (30/45) of the examined fish had started vitellogenesis as early as in July and 18% (7/40) showed hydrated oocytes in February/March. Oocyte diameter increased linearly over time. Average fecundity of 34 cm TL fish decreased by about 56% from 113 000 in July to 49 200 in February/March. Both prevalence of atresia (portion of fish with atresia) and average relative intensity of atresia (prevalence multiplied by geometric mean of relative intensity of atresia among only fish with atresia) were highest in October and November, i.e., following the summer feeding season when fish started to rely on accumulated body reserves. Estimated duration of atresia was 4.5, 6.8, 6.1 and 7.2 d for July-October, October-November, November-January and January-February/March, respectively. Atresia seemed to be limited to oocytes smaller than 1100 μm, which had lipid and solids (protein, ash and carbohydrates) contents that were only half of the values observed for fully matured oocytes (1400-1550 μm). Both the timing of intensive resorption and size of atretic oocytes seemed to optimise fecundity given available energetic reserves. There appeared a highly significant, positive correlation between ovary dry weight, a proxy of reproductive investment, and muscle dry weight condition factor (MDCF; 100×muscle dry weight/TL 3) in the later maturation cycle. Relative fecundity also showed a significant, positive correlation with MDCF in February/March. In conclusion, this study demonstrates important energetic and cellular mechanisms for regulation of reproductive investment in NSS herring females, a

  18. Evidence for an ontogenetic change from pre-programmed to meal-responsive cck production in Atlantic herring, Clupea harengus L.

    PubMed

    Kamisaka, Yuko; Helvik, Jon Vidar; Tagawa, Masatomo; Tanaka, Masaru; Rønnestad, Ivar

    2013-01-01

    The effects of up to three days of food deprivation on the cholecystokinin (CCK)-producing cells in the Atlantic herring gut were assessed by quantifying the number of cells detected by in situ hybridization at three ontogenetic stages. In feeding larvae that still possessed yolk-sacs (2 and 8days after hatch, DAH), intestinal cck expression appeared to be maintained regardless of external nutritional conditions. In 30 DAH-old herring larvae with well-established exogenous feeding only, very few CCK-producing cells could be identified, indicating that cck production in the gut had shut down after three days of starvation. This suggests that cck transcription is pre-programmed by a local timer in the midgut during the yolk-sac stage, regardless of the nutritional status and presence of nutrients in the gut lumen; however, it becomes strongly influenced by the external nutritional conditions after the yolk has been completely absorbed. Our results suggest that CCK-producing cells in the gut develop "meal-responsiveness" later in post-hatch development. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The high diversity of arsenolipids in herring fillet (Clupea harengus).

    PubMed

    Lischka, S; Arroyo-Abad, U; Mattusch, J; Kühn, A; Piechotta, Ch

    2013-06-15

    Arsenolipids represent a relevant step in the biosynthesis of organoarsenicals from inorganic arsenic compounds. Their fate after human consumption is still uncertain. By means of a HPLC-ICP-MS/ESI-Q-TOF-MS method, 16 lipid soluble arsenic compounds, including seven formerly unknown organoarsenicals, have been identified in commercial herring fillet. The structural assignment was done by exact mass and high resolution MS/MS data. This is the first identification of arsenolipids in herring (Clupea harengus). They contribute with (3.6±0.2) mg kg(-1) arsenic to 62.3% of the total arsenic content of (5.7±0.3) mg of arsenic per kg dry mass. Current studies indicate that a metabolization by humans to cancerous dimethylarsinic acid is very likely. The presented results are highly relevant as herring is a very popular food fish species in Europe. Moreover, the screening of different fish species revealed that arsenolipids are more widespread than previously assumed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Parasites of fingerling herring Clupea harengus L.: ecology and fine morphology.

    PubMed

    Rahimian, Hassan

    2007-06-01

    The parasite fauna of young-of-the-year herring Clupea harengus L., off Gullmarsfjord and Brofjorden, west coast of Sweden, was studied between May and October for 4 years, from 1994 to 1997. Fifteen species of parasites were found: two Protozoa - Trichodina sp. and Ceratomyxa auerbachi; one species of uncertain affinity - Ichthyophonus hoferi; two Monogenea - Gyrodactylus harengi and Pseudanthocotyloides heterocotyle; five Digenea - Cryptocotyle lingua metacercariae, Cercaria pythionike metacercariae, Hemiurus luehei, Lecithaster confusus and Pseudobacciger harengulae; three Cestoda plerocercoids - Bothriocephalus sp., an acrobothriid and a tetraphyllid; one Nematoda - Hysterothylacium aduncum larva; and one Copepoda - Caligus elongatus. The number of species found in this study represents more than one-sixth of all parasites reported in herring worldwide and all parasites were acquired locally. The parasite fauna of herring from the west coast of Sweden is compared with that of herring from the Baltic Sea and other areas of the north-east Atlantic. The prevalence and intensity of parasites are presented and discussed. Morphological descriptions are based on both light and scanning electron microscopy and new features are described. Possible applications of this new information about the parasite fauna, in different areas of fisheries and fish biology studies, are discussed.

  1. Pacific and Atlantic herring produce burst pulse sounds.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Ben; Batty, Robert S; Dill, Lawrence M

    2004-02-07

    The commercial importance of Pacific and Atlantic herring (Clupea pallasii and Clupea harengus) has ensured that much of their biology has received attention. However, their sound production remains poorly studied. We describe the sounds made by captive wild-caught herring. Pacific herring produce distinctive bursts of pulses, termed Fast Repetitive Tick (FRT) sounds. These trains of broadband pulses (1.7-22 kHz) lasted between 0.6 s and 7.6 s. Most were produced at night; feeding regime did not affect their frequency, and fish produced FRT sounds without direct access to the air. Digestive gas or gulped air transfer to the swim bladder, therefore, do not appear to be responsible for FRT sound generation. Atlantic herring also produce FRT sounds, and video analysis showed an association with bubble expulsion from the anal duct region (i.e. from the gut or swim bladder). To the best of the authors' knowledge, sound production by such means has not previously been described. The function(s) of these sounds are unknown, but as the per capita rates of sound production by fish at higher densities were greater, social mediation appears likely. These sounds may have consequences for our understanding of herring behaviour and the effects of noise pollution.

  2. Molecular identification of erythrocytic necrosis virus (ENV) from the blood of Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Emmenegger, Eveline J.; Glenn, Jolene A.; Winton, James R.; Batts, William N.; Gregg, Jacob L.; Hershberger, Paul K.

    2014-01-01

    Viral erythrocytic necrosis (VEN) is a condition affecting the red blood cells of more than 20 species of marine and anadromous fishes in the North Atlantic and North Pacific Oceans. Among populations of Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii) on the west coast of North America the disease causes anemia and elevated mortality in periodic epizootics. Presently, VEN is diagnosed by observation of typical cytoplasmic inclusion bodies in stained blood smears from infected fish. The causative agent, erythrocytic necrosis virus (ENV), is unculturable and a presumed iridovirus by electron microscopy. In vivo amplification of the virus in pathogen-free laboratory stocks of Pacific herring with subsequent virus concentration, purification, DNA extraction, and high-throughput sequencing were used to obtain genomic ENV sequences. Fragments with the highest sequence identity to the family Iridoviridae were used to design four sets of ENV-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers. Testing of blood and tissue samples from experimentally and wild infected Pacific herring as well as DNA extracted from other amphibian and piscine iridoviruses verified the assays were specific to ENV with a limit of detection of 0.0003 ng. Preliminary phylogenetic analyses of a 1448 bp fragment of the putative DNA polymerase gene supported inclusion of ENV in a proposed sixth genus of the family Iridoviridae that contains other erythrocytic viruses from ectothermic hosts. This study provides the first molecular evidence of ENV's inclusion within the Iridoviridae family and offers conventional PCR assays as a means of rapidly surveying the ENV-status of wild and propagated Pacific herring stocks.

  3. Molecular identification of erythrocytic necrosis virus (ENV) from the blood of Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii).

    PubMed

    Emmenegger, Eveline J; Glenn, Jolene A; Winton, James R; Batts, William N; Gregg, Jacob L; Hershberger, Paul K

    2014-11-07

    Viral erythrocytic necrosis (VEN) is a condition affecting the red blood cells of more than 20 species of marine and anadromous fishes in the North Atlantic and North Pacific Oceans. Among populations of Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii) on the west coast of North America the disease causes anemia and elevated mortality in periodic epizootics. Presently, VEN is diagnosed by observation of typical cytoplasmic inclusion bodies in stained blood smears from infected fish. The causative agent, erythrocytic necrosis virus (ENV), is unculturable and a presumed iridovirus by electron microscopy. In vivo amplification of the virus in pathogen-free laboratory stocks of Pacific herring with subsequent virus concentration, purification, DNA extraction, and high-throughput sequencing were used to obtain genomic ENV sequences. Fragments with the highest sequence identity to the family Iridoviridae were used to design four sets of ENV-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers. Testing of blood and tissue samples from experimentally and wild infected Pacific herring as well as DNA extracted from other amphibian and piscine iridoviruses verified the assays were specific to ENV with a limit of detection of 0.0003 ng. Preliminary phylogenetic analyses of a 1448 bp fragment of the putative DNA polymerase gene supported inclusion of ENV in a proposed sixth genus of the family Iridoviridae that contains other erythrocytic viruses from ectothermic hosts. This study provides the first molecular evidence of ENV's inclusion within the Iridoviridae family and offers conventional PCR assays as a means of rapidly surveying the ENV-status of wild and propagated Pacific herring stocks.

  4. Broad-Scale Climate Influences on Spring-Spawning Herring (Clupea harengus, L.) Recruitment in the Western Baltic Sea

    PubMed Central

    Gröger, Joachim P.; Hinrichsen, Hans-Harald; Polte, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Climate forcing in complex ecosystems can have profound implications for ecosystem sustainability and may thus challenge a precautionary ecosystem management. Climatic influences documented to affect various ecological functions on a global scale, may themselves be observed on quantitative or qualitative scales including regime shifts in complex marine ecosystems. This study investigates the potential climatic impact on the reproduction success of spring-spawning herring (Clupea harengus) in the Western Baltic Sea (WBSS herring). To test for climate effects on reproduction success, the regionally determined and scientifically well-documented spawning grounds of WBSS herring represent an ideal model system. Climate effects on herring reproduction were investigated using two global indices of atmospheric variability and sea surface temperature, represented by the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) and the Atlantic Multi-decadal Oscillation (AMO), respectively, and the Baltic Sea Index (BSI) which is a regional-scale atmospheric index for the Baltic Sea. Moreover, we combined a traditional approach with modern time series analysis based on a recruitment model connecting parental population components with reproduction success. Generalized transfer functions (ARIMAX models) allowed evaluating the dynamic nature of exogenous climate processes interacting with the endogenous recruitment process. Using different model selection criteria our results reveal that in contrast to NAO and AMO, the BSI shows a significant positive but delayed signal on the annual dynamics of herring recruitment. The westward influence of the Siberian high is considered strongly suppressing the influence of the NAO in this area leading to a higher explanatory power of the BSI reflecting the atmospheric pressure regime on a North-South transect between Oslo, Norway and Szczecin, Poland. We suggest incorporating climate-induced effects into stock and risk assessments and management strategies as part

  5. Broad-scale climate influences on spring-spawning herring (Clupea harengus, L.) recruitment in the Western Baltic Sea.

    PubMed

    Gröger, Joachim P; Hinrichsen, Hans-Harald; Polte, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Climate forcing in complex ecosystems can have profound implications for ecosystem sustainability and may thus challenge a precautionary ecosystem management. Climatic influences documented to affect various ecological functions on a global scale, may themselves be observed on quantitative or qualitative scales including regime shifts in complex marine ecosystems. This study investigates the potential climatic impact on the reproduction success of spring-spawning herring (Clupea harengus) in the Western Baltic Sea (WBSS herring). To test for climate effects on reproduction success, the regionally determined and scientifically well-documented spawning grounds of WBSS herring represent an ideal model system. Climate effects on herring reproduction were investigated using two global indices of atmospheric variability and sea surface temperature, represented by the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) and the Atlantic Multi-decadal Oscillation (AMO), respectively, and the Baltic Sea Index (BSI) which is a regional-scale atmospheric index for the Baltic Sea. Moreover, we combined a traditional approach with modern time series analysis based on a recruitment model connecting parental population components with reproduction success. Generalized transfer functions (ARIMAX models) allowed evaluating the dynamic nature of exogenous climate processes interacting with the endogenous recruitment process. Using different model selection criteria our results reveal that in contrast to NAO and AMO, the BSI shows a significant positive but delayed signal on the annual dynamics of herring recruitment. The westward influence of the Siberian high is considered strongly suppressing the influence of the NAO in this area leading to a higher explanatory power of the BSI reflecting the atmospheric pressure regime on a North-South transect between Oslo, Norway and Szczecin, Poland. We suggest incorporating climate-induced effects into stock and risk assessments and management strategies as part

  6. Archaeological data provide alternative hypotheses on Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii) distribution, abundance, and variability.

    PubMed

    McKechnie, Iain; Lepofsky, Dana; Moss, Madonna L; Butler, Virginia L; Orchard, Trevor J; Coupland, Gary; Foster, Fredrick; Caldwell, Megan; Lertzman, Ken

    2014-03-04

    Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii), a foundation of coastal social-ecological systems, is in decline throughout much of its range. We assembled data on fish bones from 171 archaeological sites from Alaska, British Columbia, and Washington to provide proxy measures of past herring distribution and abundance. The dataset represents 435,777 fish bones, dating throughout the Holocene, but primarily to the last 2,500 y. Herring is the single-most ubiquitous fish taxon (99% ubiquity) and among the two most abundant taxa in 80% of individual assemblages. Herring bones are archaeologically abundant in all regions, but are superabundant in the northern Salish Sea and southwestern Vancouver Island areas. Analyses of temporal variability in 50 well-sampled sites reveals that herring exhibits consistently high abundance (>20% of fish bones) and consistently low variance (<10%) within the majority of sites (88% and 96%, respectively). We pose three alternative hypotheses to account for the disjunction between modern and archaeological herring populations. We reject the first hypothesis that the archaeological data overestimate past abundance and underestimate past variability. We are unable to distinguish between the second two hypotheses, which both assert that the archaeological data reflect a higher mean abundance of herring in the past, but differ in whether variability was similar to or less than that observed recently. In either case, sufficient herring was consistently available to meet the needs of harvesters, even if variability is damped in the archaeological record. These results provide baseline information prior to herring depletion and can inform modern management.

  7. Larval and juvenile Pacific herring Clupea pallasii are not susceptible to infectious hematopoietic necrosis under laboratory conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hart, L.M.; Traxler, G.S.; Garver, K.A.; Richard, J.; Gregg, J.L.; Grady, C.A.; Kurath, G.; Hershberger, P.K.

    2011-01-01

    Infectious hematopoietic necrosis (IHN) leads to periodic epidemics among certain wild and farmed fish species of the Northeast (NE) Pacific. The source of the IHN virus (IHNV) that initiates these outbreaks remains unknown; however, a leading hypothesis involves viral persistence in marine host species such as Pacific herring Clupea pallasii. Under laboratory conditions we exposed specific pathogen-free (SPF) larval and juvenile Pacific herring to 103 to 104 plaque-forming units (pfu) of IHNV ml–1 by waterborne immersion. Cumulative mortalities among exposed groups were not significantly different from those of negative control groups. After waterborne exposure, IHNV was transiently recovered from the tissues of larvae but absent in tissues of juveniles. Additionally, no evidence of viral shedding was detected in the tank water containing exposed juveniles. After intraperitoneal (IP) injection of IHNV in juvenile herring with 103 pfu, IHNV was recovered from the tissues of sub-sampled individuals for only the first 5 d post-exposure. The lack of susceptibility to overt disease and transient levels of IHNV in the tissues of exposed fish indicate that Pacific herring do not likely serve a major epizootiological role in perpetuation of IHNV among free-ranging sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka and farmed Atlantic salmon Salmo salar in the NE Pacific.

  8. Projected habitat loss for Atlantic herring in the Baltic Sea.

    PubMed

    Illing, Björn; Moyano, Marta; Hufnagl, Marc; Peck, Myron A

    2016-02-01

    Projected, climate-driven changes in rainfall patterns are expected to alter the salinity (S) of estuaries and larger brackish water bodies, such as the Baltic Sea. Some marine fish larvae are potentially more sensitive to low salinity than older stages, hence we compared the low salinity tolerance of Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus) larvae at the individual and population levels including four populations in the North and Baltic Seas. Acute low salinity tolerance was similar (S = 1.9-2.7) across populations and increased with increasing body size. Based on this physiological threshold and a regionally down-scaled climate model, spawning habitats in the northern and eastern Baltic Sea are projected to be largely unsuitable for herring by 2100. Although adaptive mechanisms may attenuate the effect in some species, the limited physiological tolerance of fish larvae will remain an important bottleneck for the persistence of marine fish populations in brackish waters undergoing climate-driven freshening.

  9. Direct Effects of Microalgae and Protists on Herring (Clupea harengus) Yolk Sac Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Illing, Björn; Moyano, Marta; Niemax, Jan; Peck, Myron A.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated effects of microalgae (Rhodomonas baltica) and heterotrophic protists (Oxyrrhis marina) on the daily growth, activity, condition and feeding success of Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus) larvae from hatch, through the end of the endogenous (yolk sac) period. Yolk sac larvae were reared in the presence and absence of microplankton and, each day, groups of larvae were provided access to copepods. Larvae reared with microalgae and protists exhibited precocious (2 days earlier) and ≥ 60% increased feeding incidence on copepods compared to larvae reared in only seawater (SW). In the absence and presence of microalgae and protists, life span and growth trajectories of yolk sac larvae were similar and digestive enzyme activity (trypsin) and nutritional condition (RNA-DNA ratio) markedly declined in all larvae directly after yolk sac depletion. Thus, microplankton promoted early feeding but was not sufficient to alter life span and growth during the yolk sac phase. Given the importance of early feeding, field programs should place greater emphasis on the protozooplankton-ichthyoplankton link to better understand match-mismatch dynamics and bottom-up drivers of year class success in marine fish. PMID:26035592

  10. Direct Effects of Microalgae and Protists on Herring (Clupea harengus) Yolk Sac Larvae.

    PubMed

    Illing, Björn; Moyano, Marta; Niemax, Jan; Peck, Myron A

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated effects of microalgae (Rhodomonas baltica) and heterotrophic protists (Oxyrrhis marina) on the daily growth, activity, condition and feeding success of Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus) larvae from hatch, through the end of the endogenous (yolk sac) period. Yolk sac larvae were reared in the presence and absence of microplankton and, each day, groups of larvae were provided access to copepods. Larvae reared with microalgae and protists exhibited precocious (2 days earlier) and ≥ 60% increased feeding incidence on copepods compared to larvae reared in only seawater (SW). In the absence and presence of microalgae and protists, life span and growth trajectories of yolk sac larvae were similar and digestive enzyme activity (trypsin) and nutritional condition (RNA-DNA ratio) markedly declined in all larvae directly after yolk sac depletion. Thus, microplankton promoted early feeding but was not sufficient to alter life span and growth during the yolk sac phase. Given the importance of early feeding, field programs should place greater emphasis on the protozooplankton-ichthyoplankton link to better understand match-mismatch dynamics and bottom-up drivers of year class success in marine fish.

  11. Energetic cost of ichthyophonus infection in Juvenile Pacific Herring (Clupea pallasii)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vollenweider, Johanna J.; Gregg, J.L.; Heintz, R.A.; Hershberger, P.K.

    2011-01-01

    The energetic costs of fasting and Ichthyophonus infection were measured in juvenile Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii) in a lab setting at three temperatures. Infected herring incurred significant energetic costs, the magnitude of which depended on fish condition at the time of infection (fat versus lean). Herring that were fed continually and were in relatively good condition at the time of infection (fat) never stored lipid despite ad libitum feeding. In feeding herring, the energetic cost of infection was a 30 reduction in total energy content relative to controls 52 days post infection. Following food deprivation (lean condition), infection caused an initial delay in the compensatory response of herring. Thirty-one days after re-feeding, the energetic cost of infection in previously-fasted fish was a 32 reduction in total energy content relative to controls. Body composition of infected herring subsequently recovered to some degree, though infected herring never attained the same energy content as their continuously fed counterparts. Fifty-two days after re-feeding, the energetic cost of infection in previously-fasted fish was a 6 reduction in total energy content relative to controls. The greatest impacts of infection occurred in colder temperatures, suggesting Ichthyophonus-induced reductions in body condition may have greater consequences in the northern extent of herring's range, where juveniles use most of their energy reserves to survive their first winter. Copyright ?? 2011 Johanna J. Vollenweider et al.

  12. Sensory properties of frozen herring (Clupea harengus) from different catch seasons and locations.

    PubMed

    Hyldig, Grethe; Jørgensen, Bo M; Undeland, Ingrid; Olsen, Rolf E; Jónsson, Asbjörn; Nielsen, Henrik H

    2012-09-01

    Freezing of herring (Clupea harengus) for human consumption is increasing in the Nordic herring industry, either onboard the fishing vessels or right after landing. The quality of frozen herring as a raw material does not only depend on the frozen storage conditions applied, but also on compositional features, something which in turn can vary with season and catching ground. To unravel the link between biological variations, basic muscle composition, and sensory properties of frozen herring, a unique herring raw material was caught by commercial fishing vessels at three locations: around Iceland, outside the Norwegian coast, and in Kattegat/Skagerrak. The samplings were done according to a specific scheme and conducted over several seasons and 2 years. The herring was converted into butterfly fillets, packed in cardboard boxes, frozen, and then stored at -20 °C or -80 °C for up to 18 mo. The sensory quality was characterized by objective sensory profiling. It was shown that two generalized sensory variables could be defined from a principal component analysis of the sensory data. Except for the expected pronounced effect from storage time, the most distinct variation followed the lipid content, which in turn varied with season. An unexpected conclusion was that catching location only had a minor affect on the changes in sensory quality of herring during frozen storage. Knowledge about how season and catching location affect herring during frozen storage will be useful for optimizing the utilization of herring for frozen storage for human consumption. The results of this study constitute important information for the herring processing industry when handling raw materials with different geographical and seasonal history. The reported information on a highly equal sensory quality of geographically diverse raw materials will give consumers and retailers valuable knowledge on the changes in eating quality to expect after long-term frozen storage under conditions

  13. Archaeological data provide alternative hypotheses on Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii) distribution, abundance, and variability

    PubMed Central

    McKechnie, Iain; Lepofsky, Dana; Moss, Madonna L.; Butler, Virginia L.; Orchard, Trevor J.; Coupland, Gary; Foster, Fredrick; Caldwell, Megan; Lertzman, Ken

    2014-01-01

    Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii), a foundation of coastal social-ecological systems, is in decline throughout much of its range. We assembled data on fish bones from 171 archaeological sites from Alaska, British Columbia, and Washington to provide proxy measures of past herring distribution and abundance. The dataset represents 435,777 fish bones, dating throughout the Holocene, but primarily to the last 2,500 y. Herring is the single-most ubiquitous fish taxon (99% ubiquity) and among the two most abundant taxa in 80% of individual assemblages. Herring bones are archaeologically abundant in all regions, but are superabundant in the northern Salish Sea and southwestern Vancouver Island areas. Analyses of temporal variability in 50 well-sampled sites reveals that herring exhibits consistently high abundance (>20% of fish bones) and consistently low variance (<10%) within the majority of sites (88% and 96%, respectively). We pose three alternative hypotheses to account for the disjunction between modern and archaeological herring populations. We reject the first hypothesis that the archaeological data overestimate past abundance and underestimate past variability. We are unable to distinguish between the second two hypotheses, which both assert that the archaeological data reflect a higher mean abundance of herring in the past, but differ in whether variability was similar to or less than that observed recently. In either case, sufficient herring was consistently available to meet the needs of harvesters, even if variability is damped in the archaeological record. These results provide baseline information prior to herring depletion and can inform modern management. PMID:24550468

  14. High-speed weight estimation of whole herring (Clupea harengus) using 3D machine vision.

    PubMed

    Mathiassen, John Reidar; Misimi, Ekrem; Toldnes, Bendik; Bondø, Morten; Østvik, Stein Ove

    2011-08-01

    Weight is an important parameter by which the price of whole herring (Clupea harengus) is determined. Current mechanical weight graders are capable of a high throughput but have a relatively low accuracy. For this reason, there is a need for a more accurate high-speed weight estimation of whole herring. A 3-dimensional (3D) machine vision system was developed for high-speed weight estimation of whole herring. The system uses a 3D laser triangulation system above a conveyor belt moving at a speed of 1000 mm/s. Weight prediction models were developed for several feature sets, and a linear regression model using several 2-dimensional (2D) and 3D features enabled more accurate weight estimation than using 3D volume only. Using the combined 2D and 3D features, the root mean square error of cross-validation was 5.6 g, and the worst-case prediction error, evaluated by cross-validation, was ±14 g, for a sample (n = 179) of fresh whole herring. The proposed system has the potential to enable high-speed and accurate weight estimation of whole herring in the processing plants. The 3D machine vision system presented in this article enables high-speed and accurate weight estimation of whole herring, thus enabling an increase in profitability for the pelagic primary processors through a more accurate weight grading. © 2011 Institute of Food Technologists®

  15. Enzyme activities in fish spermatozoa with focus on lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes from herring Clupea harengus.

    PubMed

    Gronczewska, Jadwiga; Zietara, Marek S; Biegniewska, Anna; Skorkowski, Edward F

    2003-03-01

    The activities of NAD- and NADP-dependent dehydrogenases and creatine kinase were compared in extracts of spermatozoa from herring (Clupea harengus), carp (Cyprinus carpio) and catfish (Clarias gariepinus). The activity of malic enzyme in herring spermatozoa was approximately 5 and 36 times higher than in carp and catfish spermatozoa. In contrast, lactate dehydrogenase activity in herring spermatozoa was very low. Herring spermatozoa possess two isoenzymes of lactate dehydrogenase: LDH-A(2)B(2) and LDH-B(4). Both herring spermatozoa isozymes were separated, partly purified and characterized by kinetic and physico-chemical properties. The pH optima and K(m) values for pyruvate reduction were 7.1, 7.25, 7.6 and 0.22, 0.07, 0.09 mM for LDH-A(4), LDH-A(2)B(2) and LDH-B(4), respectively. The isoenzymes also have different thermostabilities. High activity of malic enzyme in herring spermatozoa suggests adaptation to metabolism at high oxygen tension.

  16. Metazoan parasites from herring (Clupea harengus L.) as biological indicators in the Baltic Sea.

    PubMed

    Unger, Patrick; Klimpel, Sven; Lang, Thomas; Palm, Harry Wilhelm

    2014-09-01

    Zoographical distribution of metazoan fish parasites in herring, Clupea harengus, from the Baltic Sea was analysed in order to use them as potential biological indicators. A total of 210 herring from six different sampling sites were investigated, harbouring 12 different parasite species [five digeneans (D), one cestode (C), three nematodes (N) and three acanthocephalans (A)]. The distribution of the parasite species differed according to region, with a distinct gradient of decreasing species richness towards the east of the Baltic Sea. The western localities at Kiel Bay, Rügen and Poland had the highest parasite diversity, including the marine parasite species Anisakis simplex (s.s.) (N), Brachyphallus crenatus and Hemiurus luehei (both D). The eastern localities had low parasite species richness, predominated by the freshwater digenean Diplostomum spathaceum. We could identify three different Baltic herring stocks, the spring-spawning herring of the western Baltic reaching from the Kattegat to the German and Polish coast, the stock of the central Baltic proper and the northern stock of C. harengus var. membras of the Gulf of Finland. The limited distribution of the herring parasites within the Baltic Sea enables their use as biological indicators for migration patterns and stock separation. The acanthocephalan Pomphorhynchus laevis that has already been used as an accumulation bioindicator for heavy metals was only recorded for the western herring stocks. However, the presence of mainly generalistic parasites and their uneven distribution patterns make their use as indicators for regional environmental and global change more difficult.

  17. Allometry of Herring mortality

    SciTech Connect

    McGurk, M.D. )

    1993-11-01

    The author calculated the relationship between instantaneous natural mortality, M (d[sup [minus]1]), and dry body weight, W ([mu]g), for herring larvae and adults using data from the scientific literature. Geometric mean mortality of adult Pacific herring Clupea pallasi (0.52[center dot]year[sup [minus]1]), was about three times greater than that of adult Atlantic herring Clupea harengus (0.18 year[sup [minus]1]), which may reflect greater reproductive effort per unit size by Pacific herring than by Atlantic herring. Geometric mean mortality of Pacific herring larvae (0.083[center dot]d[sup [minus]1]) was 30% greater than that of Atlantic herring larvae (0.064[center dot]d[sup [minus]1]), but the difference was not significant. The functional regression for Atlantic herring was log[sub e](M) = -0.4924 - 0.4064[center dot]log[sub e](W), and the regression for Pacific herring was log[sub e](M) = 0.1553 0.3935[center dot]log[sub e](W). The regressions provide preliminary estimates of average M of herring eggs and juveniles, life history stages for which there are few direct estimates of mortality. They also indicate that the weight exponent of instantaneous growth of herring should be greater than -0.4. Allometry of herring mortality implies that year-class strength of herring should be positively correlated with size at recruitment. 78 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  18. Female Baltic herring Clupea harengus allocate resources from growth to reproduction in poor feeding conditions.

    PubMed

    Rajasilta, M; Eklund, J; Hänninen, J; Vuorinen, I; Laine, P

    2015-01-22

    The trade-off between somatic growth and reproduction in the female Baltic herring Clupea harengus was investigated from 1984 to 2002. During the study period, growth decreased, as a consequence of decreasing salinity and weakening of feeding conditions. Production of muscle and ovarian tissue decreased in repeat spawners, but investment in reproduction took an increasing amount of the total production of new tissues. This suggested that a shift in allocation to reproduction takes precedence over body growth in the reproductive strategy of C. harengus. The process also indicated one possible mechanism leading to dwarf forms in fish populations. © 2015 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  19. Effects of suspended sediment on development and hatching of herring ( Clupea harengus) eggs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiørboe, Thomas; Frantsen, Erik; Jensen, Carsten; Sørensen, Gorm

    1981-07-01

    Eggs of herring ( Clupea harengus), artificially fertilized in the laboratory, were exposed either to different constant concentrations of suspended silt (about 5-300 mg l -1) or to a short-term high concentration (500 mg l -1) at different times during embryonic development. These experiments were made to test the effect of the increased turbidity near marine mining, spoil disposal or dredging operations. Embryonic development was unaffected by suspended silt. Mortality rates varied significantly between aquaria, but the variation was unrelated to the experimental treatment with silt. It is thus concluded, that, as far as the suspended particles are concerned, no harmful effects of dredging and similar operations to herring spawning grounds are likely to occur.

  20. Viability and infectivity of Ichthyophonus sp. in post-mortem Pacific herring, Clupea pallasii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kocan, Richard M.; Hart, Lucas M.; Lewandowski, Naomi; Hershberger, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Ichthyophonus-infected Pacific herring, Clupea pallasii, were allowed to decompose in ambient seawater then serially sampled for 29 days to evaluate parasite viability and infectivity for Pacific staghorn sculpin, Leptocottus armatus. Ichthyophonus sp. was viable in decomposing herring tissues for at least 29 days post-mortem and could be transmitted via ingestion to sculpin for up to 5 days. The parasite underwent morphologic changes during the first 48 hr following death of the host that were similar to those previously reported, but as host tissue decomposition progressed, several previously un-described forms of the parasite were observed. The significance of long-term survival and continued morphologic transformation in the post-mortem host is unknown, but it could represent a saprozoic phase of the parasite life cycle that has survival value for Ichthyophonus sp.

  1. Effects of Environmental Temperature on the Dynamics of Ichthyophoniasis in Juvenile Pacific Herring (Clupea pallasii)

    PubMed Central

    Gregg, Jake L.; Vollenweider, Johanna J.; Grady, Courtney A.; Heintz, Ron A.; Hershberger, Paul K.

    2011-01-01

    The effects of temperature and infection by Ichthyophonus were examined in juvenile Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii) maintained under simulated overwinter fasting conditions. In addition to defining parameters for a herring bioenergetics model (discussed in Vollenweider et al. this issue), these experiments provided new insights into factors influencing the infectivity and virulence of the parasite Ichthyophonus. In groups of fish with established disease, temperature variation had little effect on disease outcome. Ichthyophonus mortality outpaced that resulting from starvation alone. In newly infected fish, temperature variation significantly changed the mortality patterns related to disease. Both elevated and lowered temperatures suppressed disease-related mortality relative to ambient treatments. When parasite exposure dose decreased, an inverse relationship between infection prevalence and temperature was detected. These findings suggest interplay between temperature optima for parasite growth and host immune function and have implications for our understanding of how Ichthyophonus infections are established in wild fish populations. PMID:21603200

  2. Effects of environmental temperature on the dynamics of ichthyophoniasis in Juvenile Pacific Herring (Clupea pallasii)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gregg, J.L.; Vollenweider, Johanna J.; Grady, C.A.; Heintz, R.A.; Hershberger, P.K.

    2011-01-01

    The effects of temperature and infection by Ichthyophonus were examined in juvenile Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii) maintained under simulated overwinter fasting conditions. In addition to defining parameters for a herring bioenergetics model (discussed in Vollenweider et al. this issue), these experiments provided new insights into factors influencing the infectivity and virulence of the parasite Ichthyophonus. In groups of fish with established disease, temperature variation had little effect on disease outcome. Ichthyophonus mortality outpaced that resulting from starvation alone. In newly infected fish, temperature variation significantly changed the mortality patterns related to disease. Both elevated and lowered temperatures suppressed disease-related mortality relative to ambient treatments. When parasite exposure dose decreased, an inverse relationship between infection prevalence and temperature was detected. These findings suggest interplay between temperature optima for parasite growth and host immune function and have implications for our understanding of how Ichthyophonus infections are established in wild fish populations.

  3. Protein isolation from gutted herring (Clupea harengus) using pH-shift processes.

    PubMed

    Marmon, Sofia K; Undeland, Ingrid

    2010-10-13

    Herring ( Clupea harengus ) and other pelagic fish species are mainly used for fish meal and oil production and not for human consumption. In this study, acid pH-shift processing and alkaline pH-shift processing were used to isolate proteins from whole gutted herring with the aim to investigate the potential use of herring proteins as a food ingredient. The acid and alkaline processes gave rise to similar protein yields, 59.3 and 57.3%. The protein isolates from both processes had a significantly (p < 0.05) whiter color and higher protein and lower lipid contents than the starting material. The removal of ash was >80% for both processes, with a trend (p = 0.07) toward higher removal during the alkaline process. Also, Ca and Mg removal was significantly (p < 0.05) higher during the alkaline process. The isolated proteins from the acid process contained myosin degradation products and had a lower salt solubility than proteins from the alkaline process. Both protein isolates had an amino acid profile meeting the recommendations for adults according to FAO/WHO/UNU and could produce a surimi gel of medium strength. The results show that pH-shift processing could be a valuable method for the production of functional food proteins from gutted herring.

  4. Comparison of fatty acid profiles of spawning and non-spawning Pacific herring, Clupea harengus pallasi.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Minh Dieu; Kitts, David D; Hu, Chun; Trites, Andrew W

    2007-04-01

    Crude lipid and fatty acid composition from liver, intestine, roe, milt and flesh of spawning and non-spawning Pacific herring (Clupea harengus pallasi) were examined to determine the relative effects of spawning on the nutritional value of herring. Depletion of lipid due to spawning condition was significant (P<0.01) in all organ tissues and flesh of spawning herring. The lipid content ranged from an average of 1.9 to 3.4% (wet weight basis) in different organ tissues of spawning herring, to 10.5 to 16% in non-spawning fish. The fatty acid profile exhibited many differences in the relative distribution of individual fatty acids among organ tissues and between the two fish groups. Oleic acid (C18:1n-9), a major monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA) found in all tissue lipids, decreased significantly (P<0.01) in spawning fish. The two monoenes, C20:1n-9 and C22:1n-11, occurred at high concentrations in the flesh but at only minor proportion in the digestive organs and gonads. Spawning herring also had significantly (P<0.01) higher polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) content in the organ tissues, particularly in the milt and ovary, with docosahexaenoic acid (C22:6n-3, DHA) having the greatest proportion. Among the n-6 fatty acids, only C18:2n-6 and C20:4n-6 occurred at notable amounts and were present in higher proportions in spawning fish. We concluded that although relatively higher n-3 fatty acid content was found in the organ lipids of spawning herring, they are not an energy-dense prey food source due to the fact that both flesh and gonads contain a very low amount of lipid.

  5. Detecting Atlantic herring by parametric sonar.

    PubMed

    Godo, Olav Rune; Foote, Kenneth G; Dybedal, Johnny; Tenningen, Eirik; Patel, Ruben

    2010-04-01

    The difference-frequency band of the Kongsberg TOPAS PS18 parametric sub-bottom profiling sonar, nominally 1-6 kHz, is being used to observe Atlantic herring. Representative TOPAS echograms of herring layers and schools observed in situ in December 2008 and November 2009 are presented. These agree well with echograms of volume backscattering strength derived simultaneously with the narrowband Simrad EK60/18- and 38-kHz scientific echo sounder, also giving insight into herring avoidance behavior in relation to survey vessel passage. Progress in rendering the TOPAS echograms quantitative is described.

  6. Purification and properties of malic enzyme from herring Clupea harengus spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Niedźwiecka, Natalia; Skorkowski, Edward F

    2013-03-01

    Herring spermatozoa exhibit higher activity of malic enzyme (ME) than Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar), brown trout (Salmo trutta), carp (Cyprinus carpio) and African catfish (Clarias gariepinus) spermatozoa. Two molecular forms of ME are present in herring spermatozoa: an NAD-preferring malic enzyme with very high activity and an NADP-specific malic enzyme with much lower activity (ratio about 33:1). NAD-preferring ME was purified by chromatography on DEAE-Sepharose, Red Agarose and Sephadex G-200 to a specific activity of 36 μmol/min/mg protein and NADP-specific ME on DEAE-Sepharose and 2'5'-ADP Sepharose. The molecular mass for NAD-preferring and NADP-specific ME determined by SDS-PAGE was equal to 61 and 64 kDa, respectively. High activity of ME suggests adaptation of herring spermatozoa to metabolism at high oxygen tension for herring spawn. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Influence of temperature on viral hemorrhagic septicemia (Genogroup IVa) in Pacific herring, Clupea pallasii Valenciennes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hershberger, P.K.; Purcell, M.K.; Hart, L.M.; Gregg, J.L.; Thompson, R.L.; Garver, K.A.; Winton, J.R.

    2013-01-01

    An inverse relationship between water temperature and susceptibility of Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii) to viral hemorrhagic septicemia, genogroup IVa (VHS) was indicated by controlled exposure studies where cumulative mortalities, viral shedding rates, and viral persistence in survivors were greatest at the coolest exposure temperatures. Among groups of specific pathogen-free (SPF) Pacific herring maintained at 8, 11, and 15 °C, cumulative mortalities after waterborne exposure to viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) were 78%, 40%, and 13%, respectively. The prevalence of survivors with VHSV-positive tissues 25 d post-exposure was 64%, 16%, and 0% (at 8, 11 and 15 °C, respectively) with viral prevalence typically higher in brain tissues than in kidney/spleen tissue pools at each temperature. Similarly, geometric mean viral titers in brain tissues and kidney/spleen tissue pools decreased at higher temperatures, and kidney/spleen titers were generally 10-fold lower than those in brain tissues at each temperature. This inverse relationship between temperature and VHS severity was likely mediated by an enhanced immune response at the warmer temperatures, where a robust type I interferon response was indicated by rapid and significant upregulation of the herring Mx gene. The effect of relatively small temperature differences on the susceptibility of a natural host to VHS provides insights into conditions that preface periodic VHSV epizootics in wild populations throughout the NE Pacific.

  8. High degree of cryptic population differentiation in the Baltic Sea herring Clupea harengus.

    PubMed

    Corander, Jukka; Majander, Kerttu K; Cheng, Lu; Merilä, Juha

    2013-06-01

    Marine fish species are characterized by a low degree of population differentiation at putatively neutral marker genes. This has been traditionally attributed to ecological homogeneity and a lack of obvious dispersal barriers in marine habitats, as well as to the large (effective) population sizes of most marine fish species. The herring (Clupea harengus) is a case in point - the levels of population differentiation at neutral markers, even across vast geographic areas, are typically very low (FST ≈ 0.005). We used a RAD-sequencing approach to identify 5985 novel single-nucleotide polymorphism markers (SNPs) in herring and estimated genome-wide levels of divergence using pooled DNA samples between two Baltic Sea populations separated by 387 km. We found a total of 4756 divergent SNPs (79% of all SNPs) between the populations, of which 117 showed evidence of substantial divergence, corresponding to F(ST) = 0.128 (0.125, 0.131) after accounting for possible biases due to minor alleles and uneven DNA amplification over the pooled samples. This estimate - based on screening many genomic polymorphisms - suggests the existence of hitherto unrecognized levels of genetic differentiation in this commercially important species, challenging the view of genetic homogeneity in marine fish species, and in that of the Baltic Sea herring in particular. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Persistence of external signs in Pacific herring Clupea pallasii Valenciennes with ichthyophoniasis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hart, Lucas M.; Conway, Carla M.; Elliott, Diane G.; Hershberger, Paul K.

    2016-01-01

    The progression of external signs of Ichthyophonus infection in Pacific herring Clupea pallasii Valenciennes was highly variable and asynchronous after intraperitoneal injection with pure parasite preparations; however, external signs generally persisted through the end of the study (429 days post-exposure). Observed signs included papules, erosions and ulcers. The prevalence of external signs plateaued 35 days post-exposure and persisted in 73–79% of exposed individuals through the end of the first experiment (147 days post-exposure). Among a second group of infected herring, external signs completely resolved in only 10% of the fish after 429 days. The onset of mortality preceded the appearance of external signs. Histological examination of infected skin and skeletal muscle tissues indicated an apparent affinity of the parasite for host red muscle. Host responses consisted primarily of granulomatous inflammation, fibrosis and necrosis in the skeletal muscle and other tissues. The persistence and asynchrony of external signs and host response indicated that they were neither a precursor to host mortality nor did they provide reliable metrics for hindcasting on the date of exposure. However, the long-term persistence of clinical signs in Pacific herring may be useful in ascertaining the population-level impacts of ichthyophoniasis in regularly observed populations.

  10. Persistent organic pollutants in Baltic herring (Clupea harengus)-an aspect of gender.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Sophia; Keddig, Nadia; Gerwinski, Wolfgang; Neukirchen, Jan; Kammann, Ulrike; Haarich, Michael; Hanel, Reinhold; Theobald, Norbert

    2016-06-01

    Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) are monitored regularly in water, sediment, and biota in the Baltic Sea. Lipophilic substances are measured in remarkable concentrations especially in the fatty parts of fish, such as herring (Clupea harengus). However, less lipophilic POPs, e.g. perfluorinated compounds (PFCs), can also be detected. For the first time to our knowledge, this study provides a broad range of contaminant concentrations simultaneously measured in filet, liver, and gonads of both sexes of Baltic herring. We analysed organochlorines, polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), and PFCs in mature autumn-spawning individuals and found distinct organ pollutant pattern for all POPs in both sexes. POP concentrations found in the gonads of both sexes indicate that not only females but also males tend to reduce contaminants via reproduction. However, sex-dependent differences could be identified for hexachlorobenzene, PBDEs, and were most remarkable for PFCs. This transfer of contaminants to the gonads in both male and female herring is being underestimated, as it may directly affect the general reproduction success as well as the healthy development of the next generation. Hence, the accumulation of contaminants in the gonads should be considered one possible threat to a healthy wildlife as its achievement is stated by the Baltic Sea Action Plan. Inclusion of a periodic monitoring of POP concentrations in gonads of fish may be an important bioeffect measure to assess the environmental status of biota in the Baltic Sea.

  11. Migration dynamics of Pacific herring ( Clupea pallasii) and response to spring environmental variability in the southeastern Bering Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tojo, Naoki; Kruse, Gordon H.; Funk, Fritz C.

    2007-11-01

    In the southeastern Bering Sea, Pacific herring ( Clupea pallasii) migrate from the Pribilof Islands region where they overwinter, to the Alaska coast where they spawn in spring. The migration sustains a nearshore commercial fishery that targets roe-bearing females just prior to spawning. Herring also are taken as bycatch in groundfish trawl fisheries, where time and area closures in these fisheries are triggered by herring bycatch caps. Using herring bycatch data collected since the 1970s by National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) observers aboard groundfish fishing vessels, a retrospective analysis was conducted to describe the seasonal migration pattern of Pacific herring in the southeastern Bering Sea and to study its spatial and temporal variability. Observed changes in herring catch per unit of effort were compared with variability in climate and oceanographic conditions. The seasonal migration is complex, but annual shifts in migration routes and a possible northward shift of the overwintering grounds was identified. Pre-spawning herring aggregated in different areas depending on whether spawning occurred early or late in spring. The thermal structure of the ocean around the ice edge appears to influence herring migration timing and route as well as spawning date. Thus, on the basis of recent changes in sea-ice extent and duration, we suggest that the herring bycatch savings area that was developed from data collected in the 1980s should be revised to reflect prevailing conditions.

  12. Feeding strategy of Downs herring larvae (Clupea harengus L.) in the English Channel and North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denis, Jeremy; Vallet, Carole; Courcot, Lucie; Lefebvre, Valérie; Caboche, Josselin; Antajan, Elvire; Marchal, Paul; Loots, Christophe

    2016-09-01

    This study aims to characterize the larval feeding strategy of the Downs sub-population of North Sea herring (Clupea harengus L.). Diet composition, vacuity rate and prey selectivity of larvae from 8 to 15 mm collected during the International Bottom Trawl Survey (IBTS) - MIK sampling from 2008 to 2013 were assessed by direct observation of their gut contents using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The high contribution of protists and small zooplanktonic prey observed in the gut contents proved the relevance of SEM to study the diet of first feeding larvae. The relatively low vacuity rate of 45% suggests that food may not be a limiting factor for Downs herring larvae in winter. These larvae appeared to be omnivorous and there was a clear shift in term of prey composition at a size of 13 mm. Smaller larvae (8-12 mm) fed on a higher diversity of small prey, mainly small copepods (Oncaea spp. and Euterpina acutifrons), invertebrate eggs, diatoms (Psammodicthyon panduriforme and Coscinodiscus spp.) and dinoflagellates (Dinophysis acuminate and Prorocentrum micans) whereas bigger larvae (13-15 mm) fed on a lower diversity of larger prey, mainly copepods (Temora longicornis and Paracalanus parvus) and dinoflagellates (Gonyaulax spp.). Downs herring larvae had clear prey preferences as some dinoflagellates (Pyrophacus spp., Gonyaulax spp., P. micans and Porocentrum lima), invertebrate eggs, copepods (Oncaea spp. and nauplii) and diatoms (Thalassiosira curviseriata) were positively selected and other diatoms (Nitzschia spp., Thalassiosira tenera, Thalassiosira spp. and Chaetoceros spp.) and copepods (Pseudocalanus elongatus, T. longicornis and Unidentified calanoid) were negatively selected. We argue that this shift in term of prey preferences occurring at a size of 13 mm constitutes the critical period for Downs herring larvae.

  13. Variation in fat content and fatty-acid composition of the Baltic herring Clupea harengus membras.

    PubMed

    Szlinder-Richert, J; Usydus, Z; Wyszyński, M; Adamczyk, M

    2010-08-01

    The fat content and fatty-acid profiles of herring, Clupea harengus membras, from the southern Baltic Sea varied depending on when (fishing season) and where (fishing grounds) the fish were caught as well as on their size and sex. The fat, protein and dry matter content and the fatty-acid profiles were assayed in C. h. membras muscle tissue. The changes observed in fatty-acid profiles were determined by factors such as specimen mass and fat content, which, in turn, depended on fishing season. This is explained by dietary differences between juvenile and older fish. Gonad maturation and spawning in the latter are also factors. The study results provide confirmation of the hypothesis that polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), in particular docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), play vital roles in the sexual maturation of C. h. membras.

  14. Investigating the Effect of Tones and Frequency Sweeps on the Collective Behavior of Penned Herring (Clupea harengus).

    PubMed

    Handegard, Nils Olav; Boswell, Kevin; De Robertis, Alex; Macaulay, Gavin John; Rieucau, Guillaume; Sivle, Lise Doksæter

    2016-01-01

    We experimentally played back tones and sweeps to captive herring (Clupea harengus) in a net pen and measured the collective response of a large and a small group of fish using a camera, echo sounder, and multibeam sonar. The playbacks ranged in frequency from 160 to 500 Hz and 131 to 147 dB re 1 μPa in received sound pressure level. Herring behavior was scored by a team that blindly evaluated the observations. Overall, the responses were modest. Stronger reactions were observed at higher source levels, lower frequencies, and smaller school sizes, but there was no effect on signal rise time.

  15. Marine landscapes and population genetic structure of herring (Clupea harengus L.) in the Baltic Sea.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, Hanne B H; Hansen, Michael M; Bekkevold, Dorte; Ruzzante, Daniel E; Loeschcke, Volker

    2005-09-01

    Numerically small but statistically significant genetic differentiation has been found in many marine fish species despite very large census population sizes and absence of obvious barriers to migrating individuals. Analyses of morphological traits have previously identified local spawning groups of herring (Clupea harengus L.) in the environmentally heterogeneous Baltic Sea, whereas allozyme markers have not revealed differentiation. We analysed variation at nine microsatellite loci in 24 samples of spring-spawning herring collected at 11 spawning locations throughout the Baltic Sea. Significant temporal differentiation was observed at two locations, which we ascribe to sympatrically spawning but genetically divergent 'spawning waves'. Significant differentiation was also present on a geographical scale, though pairwise F(ST) values were generally low, not exceeding 0.027. Partial Mantel tests showed no isolation by geographical distance, but significant associations were observed between genetic differentiation and environmental parameters (salinity and surface temperature) (0.001 < P < or = 0.099), though these outcomes were driven mainly by populations in the southwestern Baltic Sea, which also exhibits the steepest environmental gradients. Application of a novel method for detecting barriers to gene flow by combining geographical coordinates and genetic differentiation allowed us to identify two zones of lowered gene flow. These zones were concordant with the separation of the Baltic Sea into major basins, with environmental gradients and with differences in migration behaviour. We suggest that similar use of landscape genetics approaches may increase the understanding of the biological significance of genetic differentiation in other marine fishes.

  16. Effect of different holding regimens on the intestinal microflora of herring (Clupea harengus) larvae.

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, G H; Strøm, E; Olafsen, J A

    1992-01-01

    The aerobic intestinal microflora of 2-week-old herring (Clupea harengus) larvae was characterized by using conventional microbiological methods and electron microscopy. Larvae were hatched and kept in filtered seawater or in seawater with penicillin and streptomycin. The gastrointestinal tract of herring larvae is essentially a straight tube divided into two compartments. Light microscopy revealed bacteria present in a progressively increasing amount throughout the length of the gastrointestinal tract from esophagus to anus. The posterior region of the intestinal lumen appeared completely occluded with bacteria. The intestinal microflora consisted mainly of members of the genera Pseudomonas and Alteromonas in the larvae incubated in filtered seawater, whereas Flavobacterium spp. dominated in larvae exposed to antibiotics. The intestinal microflora of untreated fish larvae was sensitive to all tested antibiotics, whereas multiple resistance was found in the intestinal microflora of the group given antibiotics. Thus, a dramatic change in the microflora resulted from incubation with antibiotics. Nonpigmented yeasts were detected in both larval groups. Ciliated epithelial cells were observed in the midgut, probably propeling bacteria towards the hindgut, where endocytosis of bacteria has been demonstrated. These findings suggest that transport and sequestering mechanisms resembling those of invertebrates may be found in the gut of fish larvae. The possible significance for larval health and nutrition is discussed. Images PMID:1610170

  17. Characterization of creatine kinase isoforms in herring (Clupea harengus) skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Grzyb, Katarzyna; Skorkowski, Edward F

    2005-04-01

    It is known that mitochondrial creatine kinase (MtCK) in mammals is always expressed in conjunction with one of the cytosolic forms of creatine kinase (CK), either muscle-type (MM-CK) or brain-type (BB-CK) in tissues of high, sudden energy demand. The two creatine kinase (CK) isoforms were detected in herring (Clupea harengus) skeletal muscle: cytosolic CK and mitochondrial CK (MtCK) that displayed the different electrophoretic mobility. These isoforms differ in molecular weight and some biochemical properties. Isolation and purification procedures allowed to obtain purified enzymes with specific activity of the 206 micromol/min/mg for cytosolic CK and 240 micromol/min/mg for MtCK. Native M(r)s of the cytosolic CK and MtCK determined by gel permeation chromatography were 86.000 and 345.000, respectively. The results indicate that one of isoforms found in herring skeletal muscle is a cytosolic dimer and the other one, is a mitochondrial octamer. Octamerization of MtCK is not an advanced feature and also exists in fish. These values correspond well with published values for MtCKs and cytosolic CK isoforms from higher vertebrate classes and even from lower invertebrates.

  18. Role of egg predation by haddock in the decline of an Atlantic herring population.

    PubMed

    Richardson, David E; Hare, Jonathan A; Fogarty, Michael J; Link, Jason S

    2011-08-16

    Theoretical studies suggest that the abrupt and substantial changes in the productivity of some fisheries species may be explained by predation-driven alternate stable states in their population levels. With this hypothesis, an increase in fishing or a natural perturbation can drive a population from an upper to a lower stable-equilibrium population level. After fishing is reduced or the perturbation ended, this low population level can persist due to the regulatory effect of the predator. Although established in theoretical studies, there is limited empirical support for predation-driven alternate stable states in exploited marine fish populations. We present evidence that egg predation by haddock (Melanogrammus aeglefinus) can cause alternate stable population levels in Georges Bank Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus). Egg predation by haddock explains a substantial decoupling of herring spawning stock biomass (an index of egg production) from observed larval herring abundance (an index of egg hatching). Estimated egg survival rates ranged from <2-70% from 1971 to 2005. A population model incorporating egg predation and herring fishing explains the major population trends of Georges Bank herring over four decades and predicts that, when the haddock population is high, seemingly conservative levels of fishing can still precipitate a severe decline in the herring population. These findings illustrate how efforts to rebuild fisheries can be undermined by not incorporating ecological interactions into fisheries models and management plans.

  19. Role of egg predation by haddock in the decline of an Atlantic herring population

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, David E.; Hare, Jonathan A.; Fogarty, Michael J.; Link, Jason S.

    2011-01-01

    Theoretical studies suggest that the abrupt and substantial changes in the productivity of some fisheries species may be explained by predation-driven alternate stable states in their population levels. With this hypothesis, an increase in fishing or a natural perturbation can drive a population from an upper to a lower stable-equilibrium population level. After fishing is reduced or the perturbation ended, this low population level can persist due to the regulatory effect of the predator. Although established in theoretical studies, there is limited empirical support for predation-driven alternate stable states in exploited marine fish populations. We present evidence that egg predation by haddock (Melanogrammus aeglefinus) can cause alternate stable population levels in Georges Bank Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus). Egg predation by haddock explains a substantial decoupling of herring spawning stock biomass (an index of egg production) from observed larval herring abundance (an index of egg hatching). Estimated egg survival rates ranged from <2–70% from 1971 to 2005. A population model incorporating egg predation and herring fishing explains the major population trends of Georges Bank herring over four decades and predicts that, when the haddock population is high, seemingly conservative levels of fishing can still precipitate a severe decline in the herring population. These findings illustrate how efforts to rebuild fisheries can be undermined by not incorporating ecological interactions into fisheries models and management plans. PMID:21825166

  20. 76 FR 68657 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Temporary Removal of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-07

    ... United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Temporary Removal of Herring Trip Limit in Atlantic Herring... removal of the 2,000-lb (907.2 kg) trip limit for the Atlantic herring fishery in Management Area 3... more than 2,000 lb (907.2-kg) of Atlantic herring per trip or calendar day. DATES: Effective 0001 hr...

  1. Modeling relationships between Baltic Sea herring (Clupea harengus) biology and contaminant concentrations using multivariate data analysis.

    PubMed

    Lundstedt-Enkel, Katrin; Bjerselius, Rickard; Asplund, Lillemor; Nylund, Kerstin; Liu, Yang; Södervall, Mathias

    2010-12-01

    Baltic Sea herring (Clupea harengus) is a pelagic, zoo-planktivorous fish and young (2-5 years old) individuals of this species are sampled annually in the Swedish marine monitoring program. This study determined concentrations of organochlorines (OCs) and brominated flame retardants (BFRs) in dorsal muscle from herring (n = 60) of varying age (2-13 years), weight (25-200 g), and body length (16-29 cm) caught at three locations in the Swedish part of the Baltic Proper. In order to ensure that the fish biology was as varied as possible, though still similar from all sampling sites, the fish to be chemically analyzed were selected from a large number of fish with determined biology using Multivariate Design. In statistical evaluation of the data, univariate and multivariate data analysis techniques, e.g. principal components analysis (PCA), partial least-squares regression (PLS), and orthogonal PLS (OPLS), were used. The results showed that the fish are exposed to a cocktail of contaminants and levels are presented. Significant OPLS models were found for all biological variables versus concentrations of OCs and BFRs, showing that fish biology covaries with fish contaminant concentrations. Correlation coefficients were as high as 0.98 for e.g. βHCH concentration (wet weight) versus the lipid content. Lastly, the OC concentrations in herring muscle were modeled against the BFR concentrations to determine whether concentrations of either could be used to predict the other. It was found that OPLS models allowed BFR concentrations to be predicted from OC concentrations with high, but varying, accuracy (R(2)Ys between 0.93 to 0.75). Thus, fish biology and contaminant concentrations are interwoven, and fish biological parameters can be used to calculate (predict) contaminant concentrations. It is also possible to predict the BFR concentrations in an individual fish from its concentrations of OCs with very high accuracy.

  2. Epidemiological aspects of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus genotype II isolated from Baltic herring, Clupea harengus membras L.

    PubMed

    Gadd, T; Jakava-Viljanen, M; Tapiovaara, H; Koski, P; Sihvonen, L

    2011-07-01

    This study was carried out to clarify the role of wild fish, especially Baltic herring, Clupea harengus membras L., in the epidemiology of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) in brackish water in Finland. Baltic herring with no visible signs of disease were collected from the Archipelago Sea, the Gulf of Bothnia and the eastern Gulf of Finland. In total, 7580 herring were examined by virus isolation as 758 pooled samples and 3029 wild salmonid broodfish as pooled samples during 2004-2006. VHSV was isolated from 51 pooled herring samples in bluegill fibroblast-2 cells, but not in epithelioma papulosum cyprini cells. The majority of isolations were from the coastal archipelago and from fish caught during the spawning season. Based on glycoprotein (G) gene sequences, the virus was classified as a member of genotype II of VHSV. Pairwise comparisons of the G gene regions of herring isolates revealed that all the isolates were closely related, with 98.8-100% nucleotide homology. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that they were closely related to the strains isolated previously from herring and sprat, Sprattus sprattus (L.), in Gotland and to the VHSV isolates from European river lamprey, Lampetra fluviatilis (L.), in the rivers that flow into the Bothnian Bay. The infection in Baltic herring is likely to be independent of the VHSV Id epidemic in farmed rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss (Walbaum). © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. Killer whales (Orcinus orca) feeding on schooling herring (Clupea harengus) using underwater tail-slaps: kinematic analyses of field observations.

    PubMed

    Domenici, P; Batty, R S; Similä, T; Ogam, E

    2000-01-01

    Killer whales (Orcinus orca) feeding on herring (Clupea harengus) in a fjord in northern Norway were observed using underwater video. The whales cooperatively herded herring into tight schools close to the surface. During herding and feeding, killer whales swam around and under a school of herring, periodically lunging at it and stunning the herring by slapping them with the underside of their flukes while completely submerged. The kinematics of tail-slapping were analysed in detail. Tail-slaps were made up of a biphasic behaviour consisting of two phases with opposite angles of attack, a preparatory phase (negative angles of attack) and a slap phase (positive angles of attack). During the slap phase, the mean maximum angle of attack of the flukes was 47 degrees. The maximum speed of the flukes, measured at the notch, increased with whale length (L(w)) and was 2.2 L(w )s(-)(1), while the maximum acceleration of the flukes was size-independent and was 48 m s(-)(2). When killer whales slapped the herring successfully, disoriented herring appeared on the video at approximately the time of maximum fluke velocity, in synchrony with a loud noise. This noise was not heard when the tail-slaps 'missed' the target, suggesting that the herring were stunned by physical contact. Killer whales then ate the stunned herring one by one. Of the tail-slaps observed, 61 % were preceded by lunges into the school. We suggest that lunging was aimed at directing the school rather than at capturing the herring, since it occurred at a relatively low speed and there were no observations of the killer whales attempting to capture the herring during lunging behaviour. Given the high performance of the tail-slaps in terms of speed and acceleration, we suggest that tail-slapping by killer whales is a more efficient strategy of prey capture than whole-body attacks, since acceleration and manoeuvrability are likely to be poor in such large vertebrates.

  4. Anisakis simplex third stage larvae in Norwegian spring spawning herring (Clupea harengus L.), with emphasis on larval distribution in the flesh.

    PubMed

    Levsen, Arne; Lunestad, Bjørn Tore

    2010-08-04

    The third stage larvae of the parasitic nematode Anisakis simplex commonly occur in most commercially important fish species of the North Atlantic, including Norwegian spring spawning herring (Clupea harengus L.). The presence of nematode larvae in the flesh of fish may significantly lower the aesthetical quality of the product, or even pose a consumer health risk, especially with regard to the possible allergenic nature of the larvae or molecular traces thereof. In this study, the occurrence and spatial distribution of A. simplex larvae in comparable size groups of Norwegian spring spawning herring caught in the north-eastern Norwegian Sea in October 2004 and in the outer basin of Vestfjorden, northern Norway, in November 2007, was investigated. Emphasis was put on manually- and industrially produced, i.e. automatically trimmed and skinned fillets of herring. The overall larval prevalence was 98-100% in the herring of all size groups and the abundance increased with increasing body weight in both sampling years. On an average 3.5% of the larvae were found in the belly flaps, i.e. the ventral portion of the body musculature covering the visceral cavity on both sides, while 0.5% occurred in the dorsal part of the fillets. The larval prevalence varied from 42 to 70% and 8 to 10% in the manually- and industrially produced fillets, respectively. Thus, any product that is based on industrially produced fillets of Norwegian spring spawning herring may still carry nematode larvae when put on the market. However, compared to the manually produced ones, especially those untrimmed, the probability of A. simplex larvae to be present in industrially produced fillets appears to be approximately 5-8 times lower.

  5. Phylogeography of amphi-boreal fish: tracing the history of the Pacific herring Clupea pallasii in North-East European seas

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The relationships between North Atlantic and North Pacific faunas through times have been controlled by the variation of hydrographic circumstances in the intervening Arctic Ocean and Bering Strait. We address the history of trans-Arctic connections in a clade of amphi-boreal pelagic fishes using genealogical information from mitochondrial DNA sequence data. The Pacific and Atlantic herrings (Clupea pallasii and C. harengus) have basically vicarious distributions in the two oceans since pre-Pleistocene times. However, remote populations of C. pallasii are also present in the border waters of the North-East Atlantic in Europe. These populations show considerable regional and life history differentiation and have been recognized in subspecies classification. The chronology of the inter-oceanic invasions and genetic basis of the phenotypic structuring however remain unclear. Results The Atlantic and Pacific herrings both feature high mtDNA diversities (large long-term population sizes) in their native basins, but an ocean-wide homogeneity of C. harengus is contrasted by deep east-west Pacific subdivision within Pacific C. pallasii. The outpost populations of C. pallasii in NE Europe are identified as members of the western Pacific C. pallasii clade, with some retained inter-oceanic haplotype sharing. They have lost diversity in colonization bottlenecks, but have also thereafter accumulated abundant new variation. The data delineate three phylogeographic groups within the European C. pallasii: herring from the inner White Sea; herring from the Mezen and Chesha Bays; and a strongly bottlenecked peripheral population in Balsfjord of the Norwegian Sea. Conclusions The NE European outposts of C. pallasii are judged to be early post-glacial colonists from the NW Pacific. A strong regional substructure has evolved since that time, in contrast to the apparent broad-scale uniformity maintained by herrings in their native basins. The structure only partly matches the

  6. Inability to demonstrate fish-to-fish transmission of Ichthyophonus from laboratory infected Pacific herring Clupea pallasii to naïve conspecifics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gregg, J.L.; Grady, C.A.; Friedman, C.S.; Hershberger, P.K.

    2012-01-01

    The parasite Ichthyophonus is enzootic in many marine fish populations of the northern Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. Forage fishes are a likely source of infection for higher trophic level predators; however, the processes that maintain Ichthyophonus in forage fish populations (primarily clupeids) are not well understood. Lack of an identified intermediate host has led to the convenient hypothesis that the parasite can be maintained within populations of schooling fishes by waterborne fish-to-fish transmission. To test this hypothesis we established Ichthyophonus infections in Age-1 and young-of-the-year (YOY) Pacific herring Clupea pallasii (Valenciennes) via intraperitoneal (IP) injection and cohabitated these donors with naïve conspecifics (sentinels) in the laboratory. IP injections established infection in 75 to 84% of donor herring, and this exposure led to clinical disease and mortality in the YOY cohort. However, after cohabitation for 113 d no infections were detected in naïve sentinels. These data do not preclude the possibility of fish-to-fish transmission, but they do suggest that other transmission processes are necessary to maintain Ichthyophonus in wild Pacific herring populations.

  7. Predictions of realised fecundity and spawning time in Norwegian spring-spawning herring ( Clupea harengus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Óskarsson, G. J.; Kjesbu, O. S.; Slotte, A.

    2002-08-01

    Maturing Norwegian spring-spawning (NSS) herring, Clupea harengus, were collected for reproductive analyses along the Norwegian coast prior to the spawning seasons of 1997-2000. Over this time period there was a marked change in weight (W) at length (TL) with 1998 showing extremely low values and 2000 high values in a historical perspective. Potential fecundity, amounting to about 20 000-100 000 developing (vitellogenic) oocytes per fish and positively related to fish size, increased significantly with fish condition. Relative somatic potential fecundity (RF P, number of oocytes per g ovary-free body weight) in NSS herring was found to vary by 35-55% between years. Unexpectedly, females in 2000 showed low RF P-values, possibly due to negative feedback from previous reproductive investments at low condition. A clear threshold value for Fulton's condition factor, K (K=100×W/TL 3), of 0.65-0.70 existed below which there was considerable atresia (resorption of vitellogenic oocytes). Thus, these components of the spawning stock, amounting to 1-46% in the period 1980-1999, obviously contributed relatively little to the total egg production. This was confirmed by low ovary weights and examples of delayed oocyte development in these individuals. An up-to-date atresia model is presented. The established oocyte growth curve, and to a lesser degree the assumed atretic oocytic turnover rate, was critical for the estimation of realised fecundity (number of eggs spawned). Modelled realised fecundity was significantly below observed potential fecundity. Females that had migrated the shortest distance from the over-wintering area, Vestfjorden, northern Norway, were in the poorest condition, had the least developed oocytes and the lowest potential and realised fecundities. In agreement with previously published studies on temporal and spatial changes in gonad weights, those females reaching the main spawning grounds in the south-western part of the coast (Møre) were the most

  8. 77 FR 65498 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Adjustment to the Atlantic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-29

    ... Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Adjustment to the Atlantic Herring Management Area 1A Sub... fishing year sub-annual catch limit for Atlantic Herring Management Area 1A due to an under-harvest in the... processing, U.S. at-sea processing, border transfer and sub-ACLs for each management area. The 2012...

  9. Biocomplexity in a highly migratory pelagic marine fish, Atlantic herring

    PubMed Central

    Ruzzante, Daniel E; Mariani, Stefano; Bekkevold, Dorte; André, Carl; Mosegaard, Henrik; Clausen, Lotte A.W; Dahlgren, Thomas G; Hutchinson, William F; Hatfield, Emma M.C; Torstensen, Else; Brigham, Jennifer; Simmonds, E. John; Laikre, Linda; Larsson, Lena C; Stet, René J.M; Ryman, Nils; Carvalho, Gary R

    2006-01-01

    The existence of biologically differentiated populations has been credited with a major role in conferring sustainability and in buffering overall productivity of anadromous fish population complexes where evidence for spatial structure is uncontroversial. Here, we describe evidence of correlated genetic and life history (spawning season linked to spawning location) differentiation in an abundant and highly migratory pelagic fish, Atlantic herring, Clupea harengus, in the North Sea (NS) and adjacent areas. The existence of genetically and phenotypically diverse stocks in this region despite intense seasonal mixing strongly implicates natal homing in this species. Based on information from genetic markers and otolith morphology, we estimate the proportional contribution by NS, Skagerrak (SKG) and Kattegat and western Baltic (WBS) fish to mixed aggregations targeted by the NS fishery. We use these estimates to identify spatial and temporal differences in life history (migratory behaviour) and habitat use among genetically differentiated migratory populations that mix seasonally. Our study suggests the existence of more complex patterns of intraspecific diversity than was previously recognized. Sustainability may be compromised if such complex patterns are reduced through generalized management (e.g. area closures) that overlooks population differences in spatial use throughout the life cycle. PMID:16777738

  10. Oceanographic connectivity and environmental correlates of genetic structuring in Atlantic herring in the Baltic Sea

    PubMed Central

    Teacher, Amber GF; André, Carl; Jonsson, Per R; Merilä, Juha

    2013-01-01

    Marine fish often show little genetic structuring in neutral marker genes, and Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus) in the Baltic Sea are no exception; historically, very low levels of population differentiation (FST ≍ 0.002) have been found, despite a high degree of interpopulation environmental heterogeneity in salinity and temperature. Recent exome sequencing and SNP studies have however shown that many loci are under selection in this system. Here, we combined population genetic analyses of a large number of transcriptome-derived microsatellite markers with oceanographic modelling to investigate genetic differentiation and connectivity in Atlantic herring at a relatively fine scale within the Baltic Sea. We found evidence for weak but robust and significant genetic structuring (FST = 0.008) explainable by oceanographic connectivity. Genetic differentiation was also associated with site differences in temperature and salinity, with the result driven by the locus Her14 which appears to be under directional selection (FST = 0.08). The results show that Baltic herring are genetically structured within the Baltic Sea, and highlight the role of oceanography and environmental factors in explaining this structuring. The results also have implications for the management of herring fisheries, the most economically important fishery in the Baltic Sea, suggesting that the current fisheries management units may be in need of revision. PMID:23745145

  11. Effect of alkaline pH-shift processing on in vitro gastrointestinal digestion of herring (Clupea harengus) fillets.

    PubMed

    Marmon, Sofia K; Undeland, Ingrid

    2013-05-01

    The effect of alkaline pH-shift processing on herring (Clupea harengus) protein oxidation, salt solubility and digestibility, has been evaluated. For the latter, herring mince and pH-shift produced herring protein isolate, both raw and heat-treated, were digested using a static gastrointestinal in vitro model. The pH-shift process resulted in drastically lowered protein salt solubility and increased lipid oxidation while protein carbonyl formation was unaffected. Yet, no significant differences in the degree of hydrolysis (DH) were observed between mince and isolates after completed gastrointestinal digestion, something which was confirmed by a similar release of proteinaceous material <3 kDa and similar free amino acid profiles. The polypeptide profiles of digested samples however revealed that two peptides (33 and 36 kDa) were present in larger amounts in the digested protein isolate compared to the digested herring mince. The results indicate that alkaline pH-shift processing had limited quantitative influence on the gastrointestinal digestibility of herring proteins despite its negative effects on protein salt solubility and lipid oxidation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Influence of herring (Clupea harengus) and herring fractions on metabolic status in rats fed a high energy diet.

    PubMed

    Lindqvist, H; Sandberg, A-S; Undeland, I; Stener-Victorin, E; Larsson, B M; Sannaveerappa, T; Lönn, M; Holmäng, A

    2009-07-01

    Few dietary studies have looked beyond fish oil to explain the beneficial metabolic effects of a fish-containing diet. Our aim was to study whether addition of herring, or sub-fractions of herring, could counteract negative metabolic effects known to be induced by a high-fat, high-sugar diet. Rats were given six different diets: standard pellets; high energy diet with chicken mince (HiE control); high energy diet with herring mince (HiE herring); and high energy diet with chicken mince and either herring oil (HiE herring oil), herring press juice, PJ (HiE PJ) or herring low molecular weight PJ (HiE LMW-PJ). Factors associated with the metabolic syndrome were measured. There were no differences in energy intake or body weight between the groups, but animals fed high energy diets had a higher body fat content compared with the pellet group, although not statistically significant in all groups. Mesenteric adipocyte size was smaller in the HiE herring oil group compared with the HiE control. Glucose clamp studies showed that, compared with the pellet group, the HiE control and HiE herring diets, but not the HiE herring oil diet, induced insulin resistance. Addition of herring or herring oil to the high energy diet decreased total cholesterol levels, triacylglycerols and the atherogenic index compared with the HiE control group. The results suggest that addition of herring or herring oil counteracts negative effects on blood lipids induced by a high energy diet. The lipid component of herring thus seems to be responsible for these beneficial effects.

  13. Effect of temperature under unfavourable conditions on oxygen uptake of larval herring, Clupea harengus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Ming-Cheng; Batty, R. S.

    1995-09-01

    Oxygen uptake under starvation and short periods of sudden temperature change was measured for larval herring ( Clupea harengus L.) reared at average temperature of 7.3, 11 and 12.9°C. Larval stages between first feeding and premetamorphosis were used. For comparison, the routine oxygen uptake (ROU) was also investigated and followed the relationship Q=0.974+0.174 tW -0.210, where Q is in μg/(mg·h), W is dry body weight in mg and t is temperature in °C. The oxygen uptake under starvation (SOU, deprived of food for 24 h) was different from the routine when the larval dry weight was less than 0.6 0.8 mg; it increased with temperature and body weight giving the relationship Q=1.568+0.110 tW 0.380; if the larval dry weight was more than 0.6 0.8 mg, it reverted to the norm ( Q=1.704+0.078 tW -0.349). The oxygen uptake was tested in short periods (3 h) of sudden temperature changes in six groups: 7.3 to 11, 7.3 to 12.9, 11 to 7.3, 11 to 12.9, 12.9 to 7.3 and 1.29 to 11°C. The oxygen uptake in the 7.3 to 12.9 and 12.9 to 7.3°C groups varied in a way similar to that of the larvae under starvation. The other four groups' oxygen uptake were more or less normal.

  14. Association of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus with epizootic hemorrhages of the skin in Pacific herring Clupea harengus pallasi from Prince William Sound and Kodiak Island, Alaska, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meyers, T.R.; Short, S.; Lipson, K.; Batts, W.N.; Winton, J.R.; Wilcock, J.; Brown, E.

    1994-01-01

    Only one-third of the Pacific hernng Clupea harengus pallasi expected to spawn in Prince William Sound (PWS), Alaska, USA, in sprlng 1993 were observed. Of these herring, 15 to 43 '% had external ulcers or subdermal hemorrhages of the skln and fins. A rhabdovirus identified as the North American strain of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) was isolated from affected herring and 1 Pacific cod Gadus macrocephalus with skin lesions from PWS, and from herring with similar lesions collected near Kodiak Island. No other pathogens were detected in the herring examined. Although VHSV may have been responsible for the skin lesions, there was no confirmed mass herring mortality observed in PWS; hence the actual cause of the reduced herring numbers is still unknown. The same strain of VHSV was subsequently isolated from captive juvenile herring collected from Auke Bay, Alaska, near Juneau, from herring in British Columbia, Canada, and from Puget Sound, Washington, USA. These findings suggest the virus is an opportunistic pathogen that is widely indigenous to Pacific herring populations in the Pacific Northwest and that herring are a significant marine reservoir for North American VHSV.

  15. Characteristics of the Norwegian Coastal Current during Years with High Recruitment of Norwegian Spring Spawning Herring (Clupea harengus L.)

    PubMed Central

    Skagseth, Øystein; Slotte, Aril; Stenevik, Erling Kåre; Nash, Richard D. M.

    2015-01-01

    Norwegian Spring Spawning herring (NSSH) Clupea harengus L. spawn on coastal banks along the west coast of Norway. The larvae are generally transported northward in the Norwegian Coastal Current (NCC) with many individuals utilizing nursery grounds in the Barents Sea. The recruitment to this stock is highly variable with a few years having exceptionally good recruitment. The principal causes of recruitment variability of this herring population have been elusive. Here we undertake an event analysis using data between 1948 and 2010 to gain insight into the physical conditions in the NCC that coincide with years of high recruitment. In contrast to a typical year when northerly upwelling winds are prominent during spring, the years with high recruitment coincide with predominantly southwesterly winds and weak upwelling in spring and summer, which lead to an enhanced northward coastal current during the larval drift period. Also in most peak recruitment years, low-salinity anomalies are observed to propagate northward during the spring and summer. It is suggested that consistent southwesterly (downwelling) winds and propagating low-salinity anomalies, both leading to an enhanced northward transport of larvae, are important factors for elevated recruitment. At the same time, these conditions stabilize the coastal waters, possibly leading to enhanced production and improved feeding potential along the drift route to Barents Sea. Further studies on the drivers of early life history mortality can now be undertaken with a better understanding of the physical conditions that prevail during years when elevated recruitment occurs in this herring stock. PMID:26636759

  16. Characteristics of the Norwegian Coastal Current during Years with High Recruitment of Norwegian Spring Spawning Herring (Clupea harengus L.).

    PubMed

    Skagseth, Øystein; Slotte, Aril; Stenevik, Erling Kåre; Nash, Richard D M

    2015-01-01

    Norwegian Spring Spawning herring (NSSH) Clupea harengus L. spawn on coastal banks along the west coast of Norway. The larvae are generally transported northward in the Norwegian Coastal Current (NCC) with many individuals utilizing nursery grounds in the Barents Sea. The recruitment to this stock is highly variable with a few years having exceptionally good recruitment. The principal causes of recruitment variability of this herring population have been elusive. Here we undertake an event analysis using data between 1948 and 2010 to gain insight into the physical conditions in the NCC that coincide with years of high recruitment. In contrast to a typical year when northerly upwelling winds are prominent during spring, the years with high recruitment coincide with predominantly southwesterly winds and weak upwelling in spring and summer, which lead to an enhanced northward coastal current during the larval drift period. Also in most peak recruitment years, low-salinity anomalies are observed to propagate northward during the spring and summer. It is suggested that consistent southwesterly (downwelling) winds and propagating low-salinity anomalies, both leading to an enhanced northward transport of larvae, are important factors for elevated recruitment. At the same time, these conditions stabilize the coastal waters, possibly leading to enhanced production and improved feeding potential along the drift route to Barents Sea. Further studies on the drivers of early life history mortality can now be undertaken with a better understanding of the physical conditions that prevail during years when elevated recruitment occurs in this herring stock.

  17. Current growth, fat reserves and somatic condition of juvenile Baltic herring ( Clupea harengus membras) reared in different salinities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajasilta, Marjut; Laine, Päivi; Paranko, Jorma

    2011-03-01

    We studied the effect of salinity on growth, fat reserves and condition of the Baltic herring ( Clupea harengus membras) juveniles in order to determine their optimum salinity. About 5 months old fish were reared in four salinities (5.7, 8, 12 and 15 psu) over a period of 1.5 months in constant temperature (+6°C) and photoperiod (light:dark = 12 h:12 h). Uptake of radioactively labelled glycine (14C-glycine) by the scales was used as an indicator of growth rate. The amount of mesenteric fat varied among individuals, but fish kept in 12 psu had significantly more fat in their body cavity and also their somatic condition was better ( P < 0.05) than in juveniles kept in the other salinities. Incorporation of 14C-glycine by the scales was dependent not only on salinity, but also on the method of scale sampling. Part of the scales sampled was non-growing and therefore unsuitable for the analysis of growth. Using the growing scales in the analysis, the current growth rate of herring juveniles was highest in salinities of 8 and 12 psu. Fat reserves, somatic condition and growth rate suggested that Baltic herring juveniles have their optimum salinity in 8-12 psu, which is somewhat higher than the salinity in most of the nursery grounds in the Baltic Sea.

  18. Lipid oxidation in herring fillets (Clupea harengus) during ice storage measured by a commercial hybrid gas-sensor array system.

    PubMed

    Haugen, John-Erik; Undeland, Ingrid

    2003-01-29

    Volatile compounds released from herring fillets (Clupea harengus) during 15 days of storage on ice have been measured with a commercial hybrid gas-sensor array system. Using partial least-squares regression modeling, the sensor responses were correlated with data from chemical analyses (lipid oxidation products and antioxidants) and sensory analyses (odor). Eight of the 16 sensors proved significant in the correlation studies: 6 metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) sensors and 2 Taguchi type sensors. Correlation coefficients for chemical and sensory data ranged from 0.9 to 0.98 and from 0.49 to 0.92, respectively, with 0.92 referring to both "sharp/acrid" and "rancid" odors. Prediction errors ranged from 8 to 14% and from 11 to 25% for the chemical and sensory measures, respectively. That the prediction errors for oxidation product formation (5-9%) were close to the analytical errors of the chemical reference methods indicated close to "optimum" performance of the gas-sensor system. The sensor system predicted the storage time of the herring with a 1-day error. Results illustrate high potential of the gas-sensor technology in rapid nondestructive quality determination of ice-stored herring.

  19. 77 FR 67624 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Adjustment to 2013 Annual...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-13

    ... Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Adjustment to 2013 Annual Catch Limits AGENCY: National... catch limits (ACLs) for the Atlantic herring (herring) fishery to account for catch overages in 2011 and... ``Comments on Adjustment to 2013 Herring Catch Limits.'' Fax: (978) 281-9135, Attn: Lindsey Feldman...

  20. Changes in salt solubility and microstructure of proteins from herring (Clupea harengus) after pH-shift processing.

    PubMed

    Marmon, Sofia K; Krona, Annika; Langton, Maud; Undeland, Ingrid

    2012-08-15

    Salt solubility of pH-shift isolated herring (Clupea harengus) muscle proteins was studied in relation to pH exposure and microstructure using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Using protein solubilization at pH 11.2 with subsequent precipitation at pH 5.5, salt solubility of the proteins decreased from 78 to 17%. By precipitating the alkali-solubilized proteins at the pH of native herring muscle, 6.5, salt solubility only decreased to 59%, proving that pH values between 6.5 and 5.5 affected protein salt solubility more than the pH cycle 6.5 → 11.2 → 6.5. Precipitation at pH 5.5 resulted in hydrogen bonds, hydrophobic interactions, and S-S bridges, whereas precipitation at pH 6.5 resulted only in the formation of hydrophobic interactions. The alkaline pH-shift isolation process severely rearranged the protein microstructure, with precipitation at pH 6.5 forming a finer, more homogeneous network than precipitation at pH 5.5. The former protein isolate also contained less lipid oxidation products and formed more deformable gels, without affecting protein yield.

  1. Whole mitochondrial genome scan for population structure and selection in the Atlantic herring.

    PubMed

    Teacher, Amber Gf; André, Carl; Merilä, Juha; Wheat, Christopher W

    2012-12-22

    Marine fish, such as the Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus), often show a low degree of differentiation over large geographical regions. Despite strong environmental gradients (salinity and temperature) in the Baltic Sea, population genetic studies have shown little genetic differentiation among herring in this area, but some evidence for environmentally-induced selection has been uncovered. The mitochondrial genome is a likely target for selection in this system due to its functional role in metabolism. We sequenced whole mitochondrial genomes for herring from throughout the Baltic region (n=98) in order to investigate evidence for geographical structuring, selection, and associations between genetic and environmental variation. Three well-supported clades that predate the formation of the Baltic Sea were identified, but geographic structuring of this variation was weak (ΦST = 0.036). There was evidence for significant positive selection, particularly in the ND2, ND4 and ND5 genes, and amino acids under significant selection in these genes explained some of the clade formation. Despite uncovering evidence for selection, correlations between genetic diversity or differentiation with environmental factors (temperature, salinity, latitude) were weak. The results indicate that most of the current mtDNA diversity in herring predates the formation of the Baltic Sea, and that little structuring has evolved since. Thus, fisheries management units in this region cannot be determined on the basis of mtDNA variability. Preliminary evidence for selection underlying clade formation indicates that the NADH complex may be useful for examining adaptation and population structuring at a broader geographical scale.

  2. Whole mitochondrial genome scan for population structure and selection in the Atlantic herring

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Marine fish, such as the Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus), often show a low degree of differentiation over large geographical regions. Despite strong environmental gradients (salinity and temperature) in the Baltic Sea, population genetic studies have shown little genetic differentiation among herring in this area, but some evidence for environmentally-induced selection has been uncovered. The mitochondrial genome is a likely target for selection in this system due to its functional role in metabolism. Results We sequenced whole mitochondrial genomes for herring from throughout the Baltic region (n=98) in order to investigate evidence for geographical structuring, selection, and associations between genetic and environmental variation. Three well-supported clades that predate the formation of the Baltic Sea were identified, but geographic structuring of this variation was weak (ΦST = 0.036). There was evidence for significant positive selection, particularly in the ND2, ND4 and ND5 genes, and amino acids under significant selection in these genes explained some of the clade formation. Despite uncovering evidence for selection, correlations between genetic diversity or differentiation with environmental factors (temperature, salinity, latitude) were weak. Conclusions The results indicate that most of the current mtDNA diversity in herring predates the formation of the Baltic Sea, and that little structuring has evolved since. Thus, fisheries management units in this region cannot be determined on the basis of mtDNA variability. Preliminary evidence for selection underlying clade formation indicates that the NADH complex may be useful for examining adaptation and population structuring at a broader geographical scale. PMID:23259908

  3. Antioxidative properties of press juice from herring (Clupea harengus) against hemoglobin (Hb) mediated oxidation of washed cod mince.

    PubMed

    Sannaveerappa, Thippeswamy; Carlsson, Nils-Gunnar; Sandberg, Ann-Sofie; Undeland, Ingrid

    2007-11-14

    The antioxidative effect of herring (Clupea harengus) light muscle press juice (PJ) against hemoglobin-(Hb-) mediated oxidation of washed cod mince during ice storage was tested. The PJ was fractionated into low-molecular-weight (LMW; <1 [corrected] kDa) and high-molecular-weight (HMW; >1, >3.5, and > 50 kDa) fractions; it was preheated (10 min, 100 degrees C) and tested with or without removing heat coagulated proteins. Its antioxidative effect was compared with that given by endogenous levels of two tentative antioxidant candidates: ascorbic acid and uric acid. Oxidation was followed by determining rancid odor, peroxide value, and redness. Whole herring PJ and the LMW-PJ fraction significantly (p < 0.001) extended the oxidation lag phase of controls, from 2 up to 8 and 7 days, respectively. The HWM-PJ fractions were significantly (p < 0.05) less efficient than the whole and LMW-PJ samples, giving only 3.5-4.5 days of lag phase. Heat-treated PJ, with and without the heat-coagulated proteins, gave 7 and 5 days of oxidation lag phase, respectively. Heating different batches of the LMW-PJ fraction grouped the results into two categories: one where heating almost fully destroyed the antioxidative activity (fractions prepared from spring-caught herring) and another where heating had no or a minor effect (fractions prepared from fall-caught herring). The spring LMW-PJ had low ascorbic acid levels (18-42.6 microM), and 50-100% were destroyed by the heating. In fall LMW-PJ, the levels were 76.2-137.6 microM, and only 43-51% were destroyed. Ascorbic acid fortification of heated spring LMW-PJ to reach the levels found in the corresponding unheated spring LMW-PJ sample and the heated fall LMW-PJ gave back most of the antioxidative activity, which proved an important role of ascorbic acid for the antioxidative activity of LMW-herring PJ. This conclusion is drawn despite the fact that pure solutions with endogenous levels of ascorbic acid (giving 8.4-19.6 microM in final model

  4. Effect of hot smoking on the content of selected polychlorinated biphenyl congeners in herring (Clupea harengus) slices.

    PubMed

    Witczak, Agata; Ciereszko, Władysław

    2008-06-11

    Herring ( Clupea harengus) (as well as sprat and mackerel) is a fish species intensively harvested by the Polish fishing fleet. Its relatively low price and the habits of Polish consumers contribute to its high economic importance in Poland. Among 125.6 thousand tons of marine fish harvested in 2006, herring constituted 22.2 thousand tons (including 7.6 thousand tons harvested from the North Sea). Fish are usually subjected to various culinary treatments, which can influence the concentrations of contaminants in final products. Therefore, the present study aimed at determining the effect of three non- ortho-polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners (PCB 77, PCB 126, and PCB 169) and three mono- ortho-PCB congeners (PCB 114, PCB 156, and PCB 157) in the tissues of herring slices. Concentrations of dry matter and lipids in the final product were increased by 15.9 and 20.5%, respectively. Brining, which preceded the process of smoking, did not significantly influence concentrations of PCB congeners in herring slices. However, smoking resulted in significant ( p < 0.05) changes in concentrations of three non- -ortho PCBs. The biggest dynamics of losses in relation to smoking duration was observed for PCB 77 (30.2%). For PCB 126, the biggest losses occurred after 1 h of drying, followed by slight changes after 1.5 and 2 h of proper smoking and another increase of losses in the final product after 2.5 h. The duration of smoking did not significantly influence PCB concentrations in wet weigh, as their losses in lipids were much bigger. The observation is derived from strong negative correlations between concentrations of the congeners in lipids and lipid concentrations in herring slices during hot smoking ( r ranging from -0.824 to -0.950). Although the lipid concentration in the smoked fish increased, the PCB content diminished. It shows that during drying of the fish slices, PCBs codistilled with water vapor, settling on the walls of the smoking chamber and smoking

  5. Lethal and sublethal effects of the water-soluble fraction of Cook Inlet crude oil on Pacific herring (clupea harengus pallasi) reproduction. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, S.D.; Babcock, M.M.; Brodersen, C.C.; Carls, M.G.; Gharrett, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    The proposed sale of continental shelf leases for petroleum development in Bristol Bay, Alaska, is generating concern about the possible effects on valuable fishery resources, such as Pacific herring (Clupea harengus pallasi), in the area. The inshore spawning strategy of herring makes them particularly vulnerable to the effects of an oil spill. Using the water-soluble fraction (WSF) of Cook Inlet crude oil, the effects of lethal and sublethal exposures on prespawn adult Pacific herring, eggs, yolk-sac larvae, and feeding larvae as well as on hatching success of eggs from exposed adults were studied. The effects of feeding oil-contaminated prey to herring larvae were also examined. The life stage at which the reproductive success of Pacific herring seems most likely to be impaired by oil is feeding larvae. Even if oil is present at levels too low to threaten the survival of herring, the fisheries could be impacted because the rapid bioaccumulation of oil hydrocarbons in the edible muscle and ovarian tissues could make the herring unmarketable.

  6. Behavioral responses of herring (Clupea harengus) to 1-2 and 6-7 kHz sonar signals and killer whale feeding sounds.

    PubMed

    Doksaeter, Lise; Rune Godo, Olav; Olav Handegard, Nils; Kvadsheim, Petter H; Lam, Frans-Peter A; Donovan, Carl; Miller, Patrick J O

    2009-01-01

    Military antisubmarine sonars produce intense sounds within the hearing range of most clupeid fish. The behavioral reactions of overwintering herring (Clupea harengus) to sonar signals of two different frequency ranges (1-2 and 6-7 kHz), and to playback of killer whale feeding sounds, were tested in controlled exposure experiments in Vestfjorden, Norway, November 2006. The behavior of free ranging herring was monitored by two upward-looking echosounders. A vessel towing an operational naval sonar source approached and passed over one of them in a block design setup. No significant escape reactions, either vertically or horizontally, were detected in response to sonar transmissions. Killer whale feeding sounds induced vertical and horizontal movements of herring. The results indicate that neither transmission of 1-2 kHz nor 6-7 kHz have significant negative influence on herring on the received sound pressure level tested (127-197 and 139-209 dB(rms) re 1 microPa, respectively). Military sonars of such frequencies and source levels may thus be operated in areas of overwintering herring without substantially affecting herring behavior or herring fishery. The avoidance during playback of killer whale sounds demonstrates the nature of an avoidance reaction and the ability of the experimental design to reveal it.

  7. Properties of protein powders from arrowtooth flounder (Atheresthes stomias) and herring (Clupea harengus) byproducts.

    PubMed

    Sathivel, Subramaniam; Bechtel, Peter J; Babbitt, Jerry; Prinyawiwatkul, Witoon; Negulescu, Ioan I; Reppond, Kermit D

    2004-08-11

    Functional, nutritional, and thermal properties of freeze-dried protein powders (FPP) from whole herring (WHP), herring body (HBP), herring head (HHP), herring gonad (HGP), and arrowtooth flounder fillets (AFP) were evaluated. The FPP samples have desirable nutritional and functional properties and contained 63-81.4% protein. All FPP samples had desirable essential amino acid profiles and mineral contents. The emulsifying and fat adsorption capacities of all FPP samples were higher than those of soy protein concentrate. The emulsifying stability of WHP was lower than that of egg albumin but greater than that of soy protein concentrate. Thermal stability of the FPP samples is in the following order: HGP > HBP > WHP > HHP > AFP.

  8. Effect of various electric field strengths and current durations on stunning and spinal injuries of Atlantic herring.

    PubMed

    Nordgreen, Andreas Hoel; Slinde, Erik; Møller, Dag; Roth, Bjorn

    2008-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of electric field strength and current duration on wild-caught Atlantic herring Clupea harengus stunned with sinusoidal 50-Hz AC in seawater. The fish were exposed to electric field strengths ranging from 16 to 142 V/m and current durations from 1 to 12 s. We recorded the elapsed times between the point at which each fish became unconscious and the points at which it resumed normal behavioral functions. We also investigated injuries such as broken spinal columns and hematomas after the fish were filleted. The threshold electric field strength required to stun all of the fish to unconsciousness was 33 V/m for 1 s. The duration of the unconscious condition increased as both electric field strength and current duration increased. Of a total of 260 Atlantic herring, 60% had broken spinal columns. The proportion of fish with fractured spines was independent of field strength and duration, but the number of fractures per fish increased with field strength. We conclude that electrical stunning would promote the welfare of Atlantic herring that are landed alive but negatively affect fillet quality owing to hematomas associated with the fractures.

  9. Seasonal variation in the levels of organohalogen compounds in herring (Clupea harengus) from the Norwegian Sea.

    PubMed

    Frantzen, Sylvia; Måge, Amund; Iversen, Svein Arnholt; Julshamn, Kåre

    2011-09-01

    The Norwegian spring spawning (NSS) herring is an ecologically important fish stock in the Norwegian Sea, and with a catch volume exceeding one million tons a year it is also economically important and a valuable food source. In order to provide a baseline of the levels of contaminants in this fish stock, the levels of organohalogen compounds were determined in 800 individual herring sampled at 29 positions in the Norwegian Sea and off the coast of Norway. Due to seasonal migration, the herring were sampled where they were located during the different seasons. Concentrations of dioxins and dioxin-like PCBs, non-dioxin-like PCBs (PCB(7)) and PBDEs were determined in fillet samples of individual herring, and found to be relatively low, with means (min-max) of 0.77 (0.24-3.5) ng TEQ kg(-1) wet weight (ww), 5.0 (1.4-24) μg kg(-1) ww and 0.47 (0.091-3.1) μg kg(-1) ww, respectively. The concentrations varied throughout the year due to the feeding- and spawning cycle: Starved, pre-spawning herring caught off the Norwegian coast in January-February had the highest levels and those caught in the Norwegian Sea in April-June, after further starvation and spawning, had the lowest levels. These results show that the concentrations of organohalogen compounds in NSS herring are relatively low and closely tied to their physiological condition, and that in the future regular monitoring of NSS herring should be made in the spawning areas off the Norwegian coast in late winter.

  10. Herring (Clupea harengus) supplemented diet influences risk factors for CVD in overweight subjects.

    PubMed

    Lindqvist, H; Langkilde, A M; Undeland, I; Rådendal, T; Sandberg, A S

    2007-09-01

    To assess the effect of a 4-week herring diet compared to a reference diet on biomarkers for cardiovascular disease in obese subjects. Randomized crossover trial. Department of Internal Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital. Fifteen healthy obese men and women (age 24-70 years) included, 13 completed. Subjects were randomly assigned to four weeks of herring diet (150 g baked herring fillets/day 5, days/week) or reference diet (pork and chicken fillets) and switched diets after 2 weeks washout. P-total cholesterol, p-TAG, p-HDL, p-HDL(2), p-HDL(3), p-LDL, p-apolipoprotein A, p-apolipoprotein B, p-Lipoprotein (a), p-fibrinogen, p-C- reactive protein and p-antioxidative capacity were analysed at 0,2,4,6,8 and 10 weeks. P-HDL was significantly higher after the herring diet period compared to after the reference diet period; 1.22 vs 1.13 mmol/l (P=0.036). There was a small, but not statistically significant, decrease in TAG but no effect on other biomarkers. TEAC and FRAP, but not ORAC-values, indicated that plasma antioxidants may have been reduced. CRP tended to be lower after the herring diet compared to after the reference diet. Consumption of oven-baked herring (150 g/day, 5 days/week) for 4 weeks, compared to consumption of pork and chicken fillets, significantly increased p-HDL. Patients with insulin resistance and obesity, who commonly have low HDL, may therefore benefit from addition of herring to the diet.

  11. Herring ( Clupea harengus) intake influences lipoproteins but not inflammatory and oxidation markers in overweight men.

    PubMed

    Lindqvist, Helen M; Langkilde, Anna Maria; Undeland, Ingrid; Sandberg, Ann-Sofie

    2009-02-01

    Fish consumption is associated with a lower incidence of CVD and decreases in risk factors for atherosclerosis. Although fish contains other interesting components than fish oil, few studies focus on total fish composition and the influence food preparation might have on health-beneficial components. In the present cross-over intervention study the effect of a 6-week herring diet compared with a reference diet on CVD risk factors was investigated. Thirty-five healthy, but overweight, men (mean BMI 28.3 kg/m2) were randomised to a 6-week herring diet (150 g baked herring fillets/d, 5 d/week) or a reference diet (150 g baked lean pork and chicken fillets/d, 5 d/week). Diets were switched after a 12-week washout period. Plasma total cholesterol, TAG, HDL, HDL2, HDL3, LDL, C-reactive protein, IL-6, IL-18, intercellular adhesion molecule-1, oxidised LDL, oxygen radical absorbance capacity using perchloric acid (ORACPCA), whole-blood fatty acids, bleeding time and blood pressure were measured at the beginning and end of each dietary period. HDL was significantly higher after the herring diet period compared with after the reference diet period: 1.04 v. 0.99 mmol/l. TAG decreased after both diets, with no significant difference between the two diets. ORACPCA values did not indicate lower concentrations of non-protein plasma antioxidants, and oxidised LDL was not higher after the herring diet than after the reference diet. To conclude, a 6-week herring-rich diet significantly raised HDL compared with a diet of matched lean pork and chicken dishes. No adverse effects on in vivo oxidation or serum antioxidants were found after herring intake.

  12. 75 FR 20550 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Specifications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-20

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 50 CFR Part 648 RIN 0648-AY14 Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Specifications AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS... comments. SUMMARY: NMFS proposes 2010-2012 specifications for the Atlantic herring (herring) fishery....

  13. Dissolved saxitoxin causes transient inhibition of sensorimotor function in larval Pacific herring (Clupea harengus pallasi) Kathi A. Lefebvre , N

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lefebvre, Kathi A.; Elder, Nancy E.; Hershberger, Paul K.; Trainer, Vera L.; Stehr, Carla M.; Scholz, Nathaniel L.

    2005-01-01

    Herring (Clupea harengus pallasi) spawning sites in Puget Sound, Washington overlap spatially and temporally with blooms of Alexandrium catenella, a toxic dinoflagellate species responsible for paralytic shellfish poisoning. Consequently, newly hatched herring larvae may be regularly exposed to the suite of dissolved paralytic shellfish toxins that are released into the water column from toxic cells during blooms. To date, virtually nothing is known about the impacts of these neurotoxins on early developmental stages of marine fish. In the present study, herring larvae at three ages, 0 days post hatch (dph), 4 dph, and 11 dph, were exposed to dissolved saxitoxin (STX) in 24-h and multi-day exposures. All larvae were examined for sensorimotor function (i.e. spontaneous swimming behavior and touch response). Significant reductions in spontaneous and touch-activated swimming behavior occurred within 1 h of exposure. EC50s at 1 h of exposure were 1,500, 840, and 700 μg STX equiv. l−1 for larvae introduced to STX at 0, 4, and 11 dph, respectively. This progressive age-specific increase in STX-induced paralysis suggests that older larvae were more sensitive to the toxin than younger larvae. Interestingly, herring larvae at all ages exhibited a significant degree of neurobehavioral recovery within 4–24 h of continuous exposure relative to the 1-h time point. This recovery of normal motor behaviors was not observed in previous studies with freshwater zebrafish (Danio rerio) larvae under the same continuous exposure conditions, suggesting that an adaptive detoxification or toxin sequestration mechanism may have evolved in some species of marine fish larvae. Our data reveal that (1) dissolved STX is bioavailable to marine finfish larvae, (2) the toxin is a paralytic agent with potencies that differ between developmental stages, and (3) STX-induced sensorimotor inhibition occurs rapidly but is transient in marine larvae. Collectively, these results suggest that

  14. The North American strain of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus is highly pathogenic for laboratory-reared Pacific herring (Clupea pallasi)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kocan, R.; Bradley, M.; Elder, N.; Meyers, T.; Batts, W.; Winton, J.

    1997-01-01

    Specific-pathogen-free Pacific herring Clupea pallasi were reared in the laboratory from eggs and then challenged at 5, 9, and 13 months of age by waterborne exposure to low (101.5–2.5 plaque-forming units [PFU] per milliliter), medium (103.5–4.5 PFU/mL), or high (105.5–6.5 PFU/mL) levels of a North American isolate of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV). The fish were extremely susceptible to the virus, showing clinical disease, mortality approaching 100%, and only a limited increase in resistance with age. Mortality began 4–6 d after exposure and peaked at approximately day 7 in fish exposed to high levels of virus. Whereas the mean time to death showed a significant dose response (P < 0.001), the percent mortality and virus titers in dead fish were generally high in all groups regardless of initial challenge dose. External signs of disease were usually limited to 1–2-mm hemorrhagic areas on the lower jaw and isthmus and around the eye, but 2 of 130 infected fish exhibited extensive cutaneous hemorrhaging. Histopathologic examination of tissues from moribund fish sampled at 2–8 d after exposure revealed multifocal coagulative necrosis of hepatocytes, diffuse necrosis of interstitial hematopoietic tissues in the kidney, diffuse necrosis of the spleen, epidermis, and subcutis, and occasional necrosis of pancreatic acinar cells. Virus titers in tissues of experimentally infected herring were first detected 48 h after exposure and peaked 6-8 d after exposure at 107.7 PFU/g. Fish began shedding virus at 48 h after exposure with titers in the flow-through aquaria reaching 102.5 PFU/mL at 4–5 d after exposure, just before peak mortality. When the water flow was turned off for 3 h, titers in the water rose to 103.5 PFU/mL, and the amount of virus shed by infected fish (on average, greater than 106.5 PFU/h per fish) appeared sufficient to sustain a natural epizootic among schooling herring. Taken together, these data suggest that VHSV could be a

  15. Effect of Microcystis aeruginosa and Nodularia spumigena on survival of Eurytemora affinis and the embryonic and larval development of the Baltic herring Clupea harengus membras.

    PubMed

    Ojaveer, Evald; Simm, Mart; Balode, Maija; Purina, Ingrida; Suursaar, Ulo

    2003-08-01

    Laboratory experiments were carried out to investigate the effect of two strains of Microcystis aeruginosa and a strain of Nodularia spumigena on the survival of Eurytemora affinis (Copepoda) and on the embryonic and larval development of the Baltic spring-spawning herring Clupea harengus membras. The trials were made in water taken from Pärnu Bay, at a salinity of 3.7-5.1 psu, a constant temperature (15 degrees C +/- 1 degrees C in trials with Eurytemora and herring embryos; 18 degrees C +/- 2 degrees C with herring larvae), and an oxygen concentration of 8.8-10.4 ppm. The strains tested had a negative impact on the survival of Eurytemora, as well as on the embryonic development and hatching regime of the Baltic herring. In Eurytemora the response depended on the sex of the animals: the survival was clearly higher in females. In the embryonic stages of herring, the influence resulted in an increase in deviations from the normal pattern of development and a higher mortality. The impact of the strains on the larval development of herring was rather moderate. Copyright 2003 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 18: 236-242, 2003.

  16. Population-scale sequencing reveals genetic differentiation due to local adaptation in Atlantic herring

    PubMed Central

    Lamichhaney, Sangeet; Barrio, Alvaro Martinez; Rafati, Nima; Sundström, Görel; Rubin, Carl-Johan; Gilbert, Elizabeth R.; Berglund, Jonas; Wetterbom, Anna; Laikre, Linda; Webster, Matthew T.; Grabherr, Manfred; Ryman, Nils; Andersson, Leif

    2012-01-01

    The Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus), one of the most abundant marine fishes in the world, has historically been a critical food source in Northern Europe. It is one of the few marine species that can reproduce throughout the brackish salinity gradient of the Baltic Sea. Previous studies based on few genetic markers have revealed a conspicuous lack of genetic differentiation between geographic regions, consistent with huge population sizes and minute genetic drift. Here, we present a cost-effective genome-wide study in a species that lacks a genome sequence. We first assembled a muscle transcriptome and then aligned genomic reads to the transcripts, creating an “exome assembly,” capturing both exons and flanking sequences. We then resequenced pools of fish from a wide geographic range, including the Northeast Atlantic, as well as different regions in the Baltic Sea, aligned the reads to the exome assembly, and identified 440,817 SNPs. The great majority of SNPs showed no appreciable differences in allele frequency among populations; however, several thousand SNPs showed striking differences, some approaching fixation for different alleles. The contrast between low genetic differentiation at most loci and striking differences at others implies that the latter category primarily reflects natural selection. A simulation study confirmed that the distribution of the fixation index FST deviated significantly from expectation for selectively neutral loci. This study provides insights concerning the population structure of an important marine fish and establishes the Atlantic herring as a model for population genetic studies of adaptation and natural selection. PMID:23134729

  17. Purification and some properties of two creatine kinase isoforms from herring (Clupea harengus) spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Grzyb, Katarzyna; Skorkowski, Edward F

    2006-06-01

    Creatine kinase (CK, EC 2.7.3.2) isoforms play important role in energy homeostasis and together with easily diffusible compounds like creatine and phosphocreatine maintain a cellular energy buffer and intracellular energy transport system. The CK activity in spermatozoa is the highest from all studied tissues in herring. It was detected that the two CK isoforms, CK1 and CK2, are characteristic only for spermatozoa and are not expressed in other herring tissues. Isolation and purification procedures allowed obtaining purified enzymes with specific activity of the 345 micromol/min/mg for CK1 and 511 micromol/min/mg for CK2. Native Mr's of the CK1 and CK2 determined by gel permeation chromatography were about 330,000 and 90,000, respectively. These results indicate that CK1 form has octameric structure and CK2 is a dimer mostly characteristic for cytosolic CK enzymes. In immunoblotting studies with antisera against CK2, the response was observed for CK2 and there was no response for CK1 and two other isoforms from herring skeletal muscle. These findings make the herring isoforms an interesting model for studies on the fish CK biochemical properties.

  18. Changes in the antioxidative property of herring (Clupea harengus) press juice during a simulated gastrointestinal digestion.

    PubMed

    Sannaveerappa, Thippeswamy; Westlund, Sofia; Sandberg, Ann-Sofie; Undeland, Ingrid

    2007-12-26

    The aqueous fraction (press juice, PJ) from herring muscle was recently shown to inhibit hemoglobin-mediated oxidation of washed fish mince lipids during ice storage. As a first step to evaluate potential in vivo antioxidative effects from herring PJ, the aim of this study was to investigate whether herring PJ retains its antioxidative capacity during a simulated gastrointestinal (GI) digestion. Press juice from whole muscle (WMPJ) and light muscle (LMPJ) was mixed with pepsin solution followed by stepwise pH adjustments and additions of pancreatin and bile solutions. Digestive enzymes were removed from samples by ultrafiltration (10 kDa). Before, during, and after digestion, samples were analyzed for their peptide content and for antioxidative properties with the oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) and the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation assays. From 0 to 165 min of digestion, the content of <10 kDa peptides in WMPJ and LMPJ samples increased 12- and 7-fold, respectively. Further, both samples got approximately 12.5 times higher ORAC values and gave rise to approximately 1.3-fold increased lag phase in Cu2+-induced LDL oxidation. The largest changes in peptide content, ORAC values, and LDL oxidation inhibition occurred between 30 and 75 min of digestion, indicating that these parameters might be interrelated. When comparing analytical data obtained after 165 min of digestion with data obtained from analyses of native nondigested PJs, it was found that the data on peptide content, ORAC, and LDL oxidation from digested PJs were 64-69%, 121-161%, and 112-115%, respectively, of those of nondigested PJs. The study thus showed that enzymatic breakdown of PJ proteins under GI-like conditions increases the peroxyl radical scavenging activity and the potential to inhibit LDL oxidation of herring PJs. These data provide a solid basis for further studies of uptake and in vivo activities of herring-derived aqueous antioxidants.

  19. Recovery of functional proteins from herring (Clupea harengus) light muscle by an acid or alkaline solubilization process.

    PubMed

    Undeland, Ingrid; Kelleher, Stephen D; Hultin, Herbert O

    2002-12-04

    Proteins from herring (Clupea harengus) light muscle were extracted using acidic or alkaline solubilization; 92 and 89% of the initial muscle proteins were solubilized at pH 2.7 and 10.8, respectively, of which 96 and 94% were recovered during precipitation at pH 5.5. Consistency of the pH-adjusted muscle homogenates increased with increased raw material age and homogenization intensity; it declined following holding on ice. Some hydrolytic myofibrillar protein degradation occurred during cold storage of the acidified (pH 2.7) homogenates. With alkalized homogenates, hydrolysis was negligible. The total lipid content changed from 0.13 g/g of protein in the muscle to 0.04 g/g of protein in both the acid- and alkali-produced protein isolates. Corresponding values for the phospholipid content were from 0.037 to 0.02 g/g of proteins. Acid- and alkali-produced proteins made gels with equal strain and color. Stress values were equal or lower in acid- versus alkali-produced protein gels. When ice-stored raw material was used, strain and stress values of gels were reduced.

  20. Analysis of the soluble matrix of vaterite otoliths of juvenile herring (Clupea harengus): do crystalline otoliths have less protein?

    PubMed

    Tomás, Javier; Geffen, Audrey J; Allen, Ian S; Berges, John

    2004-11-01

    Otoliths are calcium carbonate concretions laid down in the inner ear of fish and used in fish age estimation. Otoliths precipitate in the form of aragonite but aberrant precipitation may result in vaterite formation instead of aragonite. Vaterite otoliths are more translucent than aragonite. The quantity of HCl-soluble proteins (SP) was measured in the vaterite otoliths and their aragonite pairs of one year old reared herring Clupea harengus to assess the changes induced by the precipitation of vaterite in the amount of soluble proteins in the otolith. Results showed that vaterite otoliths had as much soluble proteins as their aragonite pairs (p>0.05). Due to the lower density of the vaterite, vaterite otoliths were lighter than their aragonite pairs (p<0.05) which explained that protein concentrations were significantly higher (p<0.05) than in aragonite otoliths. These results indicate that the precipitation of vaterite in otoliths did not affect the inclusion of soluble proteins. Furthermore, they suggest that soluble proteins do not affect the translucent or opaque appearance of otoliths. Differences in translucency may instead be caused by the amounts of insoluble proteins or by differences in the physical properties of proteins. Sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) of the otolith proteins revealed two bands at 50 and 62 kDa in both aragonite and vaterite otoliths suggesting that the precipitation of vaterite in the otolith is not controlled by either of these two proteins present in the otolith.

  1. Dynamics of viral hemorrhagic septicemia, viral erythrocytic necrosis and ichthyophoniasis in confined juvenile Pacific herring Clupea pallasii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hershberger, P.; Hart, A.; Gregg, J.; Elder, N.; Winton, J.

    2006-01-01

    Capture of wild, juvenile herring Clupea pallasii from Puget Sound (Washington, USA) and confinement in laboratory tanks resulted in outbreaks of viral hemorrhagic septicemia (VHS), viral erythrocytic necrosis (VEN) and ichthyophoniasis; however, the timing and progression of the 3 diseases differed. The VHS epidemic occurred first, characterized by an initially low infection prevalence that increased quickly with confinement time, peaking at 93 to 98% after confinement for 6 d, then decreasing to negligible levels after 20 d. The VHS outbreak was followed by a VEN epidemic that, within 12 d of confinement, progressed from undetectable levels to 100% infection prevalence with >90% of erythrocytes demonstrating inclusions. The VEN epidemic persisted for 54 d, after which the study was terminated, and was characterized by severe blood dyscrasias including reduction of mean hematocrit from 42 to 6% and replacement of mature erythrocytes with circulating erythroblasts and ghost cells. All fish with ichthyophoniasis at capture died within the first 3 wk of confinement, probably as a result of the multiple stressors associated with capture, transport, confinement, and progression of concomitant viral diseases. The results illustrate the differences in disease ecology and possible synergistic effects of pathogens affecting marine fish and highlight the difficulty in ascribing a single causation to outbreaks of disease among populations of wild fishes. ?? Inter-Research 2006.

  2. 78 FR 61838 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Removal of 2,000-lb (907.2...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-04

    ...; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Removal of 2,000-lb (907.2-kg) Herring Trip Limit in Atlantic Herring Management...-lb (907.2 kg) trip limit for the Atlantic herring fishery in Management Area 2 (Area 2) because catch... Atlantic herring permit categories, effective 0001 hrs, October 1, 2013. DATES: Effective 0001 hours...

  3. Age dependence of the concentrations of harmful substances in Baltic herring (Clupea harengus)

    SciTech Connect

    Perttila, M.; Tervo, V.; Parmanne, R.

    1982-01-01

    The age dependence of Zn, Cu, Pb, Cd, Hg, CH/sub 3/-Hg, DDT, DDD, DDE, HCH, HCB and the PCBs have been studied in Baltic herring of 1 to 6 years of age. Lead, cadmium, mercury and the organochlorine concentrations increase significantly with age. In the case of the DDTs and the PCBs, the variations can be attributed almost totally to the combined effect of age and variations in the lipid percentage.

  4. Dispersion and feeding of larval herring ( Clupea harengus L.) in the Moray Firth during September 1985

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heath, M.; Leaver, M.; Matthews, A.; Nicoll, N.

    1989-06-01

    A plume of herring larvae dispersing from a spawning site at Clythness in the Moray Firth (northern Scotland) was surveyed during early September 1985. Several cohorts of larvae were evident from the length distributions, and these were arranged in order of increasing length (age) towards the south-west. The spacing of cohort centres indicated a drift rate of 1-2 km day -1. Calanoid copepod nauplii constituted the major proportion of the diet of larvae <10 mm sampled during the study. Cyclopoid copepod nauplii and gastropod veligers were not found in the diet although they were present in the water. The distribution of nauplii in the region was inversely correlated with the concentration of phytoplankton chlorophyll, and nauplii concentrations were above average in the vicinity of the herring spawning site. The drift trajectory of the herring larvae took them towards an area of high copepodite and adult copepod concentration—items which formed an increasing part of the diet of larger (older) larvae.

  5. Induction of anti-viral genes during acute infection with Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) genogroup IVa in Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii).

    PubMed

    Hansen, John D; Woodson, James C; Hershberger, Paul K; Grady, Courtney; Gregg, Jacob L; Purcell, Maureen K

    2012-02-01

    Infection with the aquatic rhabdovirus Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) genogroup IVa results in high mortality in Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii) and is hypothesized to be a potential limiting factor for herring recovery. To investigate anti-viral immunity in the Pacific herring, four immune response genes were identified: the myxovirus resistance (Clpa-Mx), a major histocompatibility complex IB (named Clpa-UAA.001), the inducible immunoproteosome subunit 9 (Clpa-PSMB9) and the neutrophil chemotactic factor (Clpa-LECT2). Reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) assays were developed based on these gene sequences to investigate the host immune response to acute VHSV infection following both injection and immersion challenge. Virus levels were measured by both plaque assay and RT-qPCR and peaked at day 6 during the 10-day exposure period for both groups of fish. The interferon stimulated genes (Clpa-Mx, -UAA.001, and -PSMB9) were significantly up-regulated in response to VHSV infection at both 6 and 10 days post-infection in both spleen and fin. Results from this study indicate that Pacific herring mount a robust, early antiviral response in both fin and spleen tissues. The immunological tools developed in this study will be useful for future studies to investigate antiviral immunity in Pacific herring.

  6. Viral replication in excised fin tissues (VREFT) corresponds with prior exposure of Pacific herring, Clupea pallasii (Valenciennes), to viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV).

    PubMed

    Grady, C A; Gregg, J L; Wade, R M; Winton, J R; Hershberger, P K

    2011-01-01

    Procedures for a viral replication in excised fin tissue (VREFT) assay were adapted to Pacific herring, Clupea pallasii, and optimized both to reduce processing time and to provide the greatest resolution between naïve herring and those previously exposed to viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV), Genogroup IVa. The optimized procedures included removal of the left pectoral fin from a euthanized fish, inoculation of the fin with >10(5) plaque-forming units (PFU) mL(-1) VHSV for 1 h, rinsing the fin in fresh medium six times to remove unadsorbed virions, incubation of the fin in fresh medium for 4 days and enumeration of the viral titre in a sample of the incubation medium by plaque assay. The optimized VREFT assay was effective at identifying the prior exposure history of laboratory-reared Pacific herring to VHSV. The geometric mean VREFT value was significantly greater (P < 0.01) among naïve herring (1.2 × 10(3) PFU mL(-1) ) than among groups that survived exposure to VHSV (1.0-2.9 × 10(2) PFU mL(-1) ); additionally, the proportion of cultures with no detectable virus was significantly greater (P = 0.0002) among fish that survived exposure to VHSV (39-47%) than among naïve fish (3.3%). The optimized VREFT assay demonstrates promise for identifying VHSV exposure history and forecasting disease potential in populations of wild Pacific herring.

  7. Viral replication in excised fin tissues (VREFT) corresponds with prior exposure of Pacific herring, Clupea pallasii (Valenciennes), to viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grady, C.A.; Gregg, J.L.; Wade, R.M.; Winton, J.R.; Hershberger, P.K.

    2011-01-01

    Procedures for a viral replication in excised fin tissue (VREFT) assay were adapted to Pacific herring, Clupea pallasii, and optimized both to reduce processing time and to provide the greatest resolution between na??ve herring and those previously exposed to viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV), Genogroup IVa. The optimized procedures included removal of the left pectoral fin from a euthanized fish, inoculation of the fin with >105 plaque-forming units (PFU) mL-1 VHSV for 1 h, rinsing the fin in fresh medium six times to remove unadsorbed virions, incubation of the fin in fresh medium for 4 days and enumeration of the viral titre in a sample of the incubation medium by plaque assay. The optimized VREFT assay was effective at identifying the prior exposure history of laboratory-reared Pacific herring to VHSV. The geometric mean VREFT value was significantly greater (P < 0.01) among na??ve herring (1.2 ?? 103 PFU mL-1) than among groups that survived exposure to VHSV (1.0-2.9 ?? 102 PFU mL-1); additionally, the proportion of cultures with no detectable virus was significantly greater (P = 0.0002) among fish that survived exposure to VHSV (39-47%) than among na??ve fish (3.3%). The optimized VREFT assay demonstrates promise for identifying VHSV exposure history and forecasting disease potential in populations of wild Pacific herring. ?? 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Induction of anti-viral genes during acute infection with Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) genogroup IVa in Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansen, John D.; Woodson, James C.; Hershberger, Paul K.; Grady, Courtney; Gregg, Jacob L.; Purcell, Maureen K.

    2012-01-01

    Infection with the aquatic rhabdovirus Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) genogroup IVa results in high mortality in Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii) and is hypothesized to be a potential limiting factor for herring recovery. To investigate anti-viral immunity in the Pacific herring, four immune response genes were identified: the myxovirus resistance (Clpa-Mx), a major histocompatibility complex IB (named Clpa-UAA.001), the inducible immunoproteosome subunit 9 (Clpa-PSMB9) and the neutrophil chemotactic factor (Clpa-LECT2). Reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) assays were developed based on these gene sequences to investigate the host immune response to acute VHSV infection following both injection and immersion challenge. Virus levels were measured by both plaque assay and RT-qPCR and peaked at day 6 during the 10-day exposure period for both groups of fish. The interferon stimulated genes (Clpa-Mx, −UAA.001, and −PSMB9) were significantly up-regulated in response to VHSV infection at both 6 and 10 days post-infection in both spleen and fin. Results from this study indicate that Pacific herring mount a robust, early antiviral response in both fin and spleen tissues. The immunological tools developed in this study will be useful for future studies to investigate antiviral immunity in Pacific herring.

  9. Thermal impacts on the growth, development and ontogeny of critical swimming speed in Atlantic herring larvae.

    PubMed

    Moyano, Marta; Illing, Björn; Peschutter, Philip; Huebert, Klaus B; Peck, Myron A

    2016-07-01

    Increases in swimming ability have a profound influence on larval fish growth and survival by increasing foraging success, predator avoidance and the ability to favorably influence transport. Understanding how development and environmental factors combine to influence swimming performance in aquatic organisms is particularly important during the transition from viscous to inertial environments. We measured the growth, development and ontogenetic changes in critical swimming speed (Ucrit) in Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus) larvae reared at three temperatures (7, 11, 15°C). Temperature had a significant effect on growth rates (from 0.21 at 7°C to 0.34mm·d(-1) at 15°C), and larval morphology-at-length (increased dry weight (DW), body height and developmental rate at warmer temperatures). Temperature-dependent differences in morphology influenced swimming performance (e.g. the exponential increase in Ucrit with increasing body size was faster at warmer temperatures). Larvae entered the transition to an inertial environment (Reynolds numbers ≥300) at body lengths between 15 (15°C) and 17mm (7°C). Inter-individual differences in Ucrit were not related to nutritional condition (RNA·DNA(-1) or DNA·DW(-1)), but were negatively correlated to length-at-age, suggesting a trade-off between growth rate and locomotor activity. The Ucrit data from this and previously published studies suggest that Atlantic herring pass through four activity phases: 1) yolk-sac (<0.6cm·s(-1)), 2) pre-flexion (0.6-3.0cm·s(-1), temperature effect changes with body size), 3) post-flexion (up to 6-8cm·s(-1), Q10~1.8-2.0), 4) juvenile-adult period (20-170cm·s(-1)).

  10. 75 FR 72734 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Temporary Removal of 2,000...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-26

    ... Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Temporary Removal of 2,000-lb (907.2-kg) Herring Trip... temporary removal of the 2,000-lb (907.2 kg) trip limit for the Atlantic herring fishery in Management Area... herring per trip or calendar day. DATES: Effective 0001 hours, November 29, 2010, through 0001 hours...

  11. Solubility and viscosity of herring (Clupea harengus) proteins as affected by freezing and frozen storage.

    PubMed

    Geirsdottir, M; Hlynsdottir, H; Thorkelsson, G; Sigurgisladottir, S

    2007-09-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of freezing and frozen storage at -24 degrees C on the quality of Icelandic herring fillets, focusing on protein solubility and viscosity at pH 2.7 and 11 used for pH-aided protein isolation. The evaluation of quality was based on chemical analyses, protein degradation measurements, and changes in protein solubility and viscosity at pH 2.7 and 11 after up to 6-mo frozen storage of the herring fillets. Lipid oxidation measured as TBARS values increased significantly during the frozen storage (P < 0.05). Protein solubility at pH 2.7 decreased during frozen storage for 6 mo, where the solubility was about 10% lower after 6-mo frozen storage compared to the beginning (P < 0.05). At pH 11, the solubility became approximately 15% lower after 6-mo frozen storage compared to initial solubility (P < 0.05). Viscosity, measured at pH 2.7, increased after 3 mo of frozen storage (P < 0.05). At pH 11, the viscosity increased significantly after 1-wk frozen storage, compared to fresh herring fillets, but did not increase significantly with further storage (P < 0.05). Changes found in solubility and viscosity indicated protein degradation due to freezing and frozen storage. SDS-PAGE analysis did not reveal any protein cross-linking or aggregation formation, either with frozen storage or due to exposure to low pH.

  12. Fatty acids and fat-soluble vitamins in salted herring (Clupea harengus) products.

    PubMed

    Aro, Tarja L; Larmo, Petra S; Bäckman, Christina H; Kallio, Heikki P; Tahvonen, Raija L

    2005-03-09

    The fatty acid composition and contents of fat and fat-soluble vitamins of three salted products prepared from Icelandic herring were analyzed. The effects of storage on the products over their shelf life, 6 or 12 months, were investigated. The average oil content of salted, gutted herring and salted fillets in vacuum remained constant, 17 and 12% of wet weight, respectively. In the pickled product the oil content decreased during the 12 months of storage from 13 to 12%. The composition of the products was typical for herring, the most abundant fatty acids being oleic (18:1n-9), palmitic (16:0), cetoleic (22:1n-11), and gadoleic (20:1n-9) acids. Monounsaturated acids constituted clearly the main group with a proportion of >50% of all fatty acids. Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5n-3) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3) comprised together >12% of all fatty acids. During storage, some hydrolysis of triacylglycerol (TAG) occurred, causing a slight reduction in practically all esterified fatty acids. In none of the three products was the loss of polyunsaturated fatty acids from TAG greater than the loss of saturated ones, indicating that the loss of EPA and DHA was not due to oxidation. After packing, the average content of vitamins A, D, and E in the products varied between 27 and 87 microg/100 g (wet weight), between 17-28 microg/100 g (wet weight), and between 77-120 microg/100 g (wet weight), respectively. During storage, the level of vitamin A decreased significantly, whereas no loss of vitamin D was observed. The content of vitamin E was low in all products and showed wide variation. When compared to the recommended daily intake, it could be concluded that the products investigated were good and stable sources of long-chain n-3 fatty acids (EPA, DHA) and vitamin D.

  13. Feeding Ecology of Northeast Atlantic Mackerel, Norwegian Spring-Spawning Herring and Blue Whiting in the Norwegian Sea

    PubMed Central

    Bachiller, Eneko; Skaret, Georg; Nøttestad, Leif; Slotte, Aril

    2016-01-01

    The Norwegian spring-spawning (NSS) herring (Clupea harengus), blue whiting (Micromesistius poutassou) and Northeast Atlantic (NEA) mackerel (Scomber scombrus) are extremely abundant pelagic planktivores that feed in the Norwegian Sea (NS) during spring and summer. This study investigated the feeding ecology and diet composition of these commercially important fish stocks on the basis of biological data, including an extensive set of stomach samples in combination with hydrographical data, zooplankton samples and acoustic abundance data from 12 stock monitoring surveys carried out in 2005–2010. Mackerel were absent during the spring, but had generally high feeding overlap with herring in the summer, with a diet mainly based on calanoid copepods, especially Calanus finmarchicus, as well as a similar diet width. Stomach fullness in herring diminished from spring to summer and feeding incidence was lower than that of mackerel in summer. However, stomach fullness did not differ between the two species, indicating that herring maintain an equally efficient pattern of feeding as mackerel in summer, but on a diet that is less dominated by copepods and is more reliant on larger prey. Blue whiting tended to have a low dietary overlap with mackerel and herring, with larger prey such as euphausiids and amphipods dominating, and stomach fullness and feeding incidence increasing with length. For all the species, feeding incidence increased with decreasing temperature, and for mackerel so did stomach fullness, indicating that feeding activity is highest in areas associated with colder water masses. Significant annual effects on diet composition and feeding-related variables suggested that the three species are able to adapt to different food and environmental conditions. These annual effects are likely to have an important impact on the predation pressure on different plankton groups and the carrying capacity of individual systems, and emphasise the importance of regular

  14. Feeding Ecology of Northeast Atlantic Mackerel, Norwegian Spring-Spawning Herring and Blue Whiting in the Norwegian Sea.

    PubMed

    Bachiller, Eneko; Skaret, Georg; Nøttestad, Leif; Slotte, Aril

    2016-01-01

    The Norwegian spring-spawning (NSS) herring (Clupea harengus), blue whiting (Micromesistius poutassou) and Northeast Atlantic (NEA) mackerel (Scomber scombrus) are extremely abundant pelagic planktivores that feed in the Norwegian Sea (NS) during spring and summer. This study investigated the feeding ecology and diet composition of these commercially important fish stocks on the basis of biological data, including an extensive set of stomach samples in combination with hydrographical data, zooplankton samples and acoustic abundance data from 12 stock monitoring surveys carried out in 2005-2010. Mackerel were absent during the spring, but had generally high feeding overlap with herring in the summer, with a diet mainly based on calanoid copepods, especially Calanus finmarchicus, as well as a similar diet width. Stomach fullness in herring diminished from spring to summer and feeding incidence was lower than that of mackerel in summer. However, stomach fullness did not differ between the two species, indicating that herring maintain an equally efficient pattern of feeding as mackerel in summer, but on a diet that is less dominated by copepods and is more reliant on larger prey. Blue whiting tended to have a low dietary overlap with mackerel and herring, with larger prey such as euphausiids and amphipods dominating, and stomach fullness and feeding incidence increasing with length. For all the species, feeding incidence increased with decreasing temperature, and for mackerel so did stomach fullness, indicating that feeding activity is highest in areas associated with colder water masses. Significant annual effects on diet composition and feeding-related variables suggested that the three species are able to adapt to different food and environmental conditions. These annual effects are likely to have an important impact on the predation pressure on different plankton groups and the carrying capacity of individual systems, and emphasise the importance of regular

  15. Echolocation clicks from killer whales (Orcinus orca) feeding on herring (Clupea harengus).

    PubMed

    Simon, Malene; Wahlberg, Magnus; Miller, Lee A

    2007-02-01

    Echolocation clicks from Norwegian killer whales feeding on herring schools were recorded using a four-hydrophone array. The clicks had broadband bimodal frequency spectra with low and high frequency peaks at 24 and 108 kHz, respectively. The -10 dB bandwidth was 35 kHz. The average source level varied from 173 to 202 dB re 1 microPa (peak-to-peak) at 1 m. This is considerably lower than source levels described for Canadian killer whales foraging on salmon. It is suggested that biosonar clicks of Norwegian killer whales are adapted for localization of prey with high target strength and acute hearing abilities.

  16. Transfer of nodularin to three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus L.), herring (Clupea harengus L.), and salmon (Salmo salar L.) in the northern Baltic Sea.

    PubMed

    Sipiä, V; Kankaanpää, H; Peltonen, H; Vinni, M; Meriluoto, J

    2007-03-01

    Nodularin (NODLN) is a hepatotoxin produced by the cyanobacterium Nodularia spumigena, which occurs regularly in the Baltic Sea. The primary aim of this study was to study the transfer of NODLN to three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus L.), herring (Clupea harengus membras L.), and salmon (Salmo salar L.), which were caught from the northern Baltic Sea between August 2002 and August 2003. Liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) was used for NODLN analysis. NODLN was found in both herring (0-90 microgkg(-1)dw) and three-spined sticklebacks samples (2.8-700 microgkg(-1)dw). The recovery for the spiked stickleback samples in vitro was 28%. Only 1 salmon of a total of 10 contained a small amount of NODLN (10 microgkg(-1)dw). However, the high concentrations in individual stickleback suggest that possible transfer to higher trophic levels deserves more research.

  17. Vertical distributions of autumn spawned larval herring ( Clupea harengus L.) in the North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heath, M.; Brander, K.; Munk, P.; Rankine, P.

    1991-12-01

    Vertical distributions of autumn spawned herring larvae were sampled at 10 sites in the North Sea between October 1987 and March 1988 during the Autumn Circulation Experiment (ACE). Several different patterns of vertical migrations occurred. Diel variations in the vertical distributions were found in all stages of development, from yolk-sac to pre-metamorphosis (35 mm). During diel migrations larvae were closer to the surface during daylight than at night. The amplitude of diel vertical migrations increased with the length of the larvae. Semi-diel cycles in the vertical distributions were rare, and appeared to be related to the tidal cycle rather than crepuscular periods. Diel cycles in vertical distribution could not be detected at sites in the southeastern North Sea, characterized by water depths less than 45 m, high vertical shear and high light attenuation coefficients. It is suggested that strong turbulence inhibits diel vertical migrations by herring larvae. This feature has important consequences for the advection of larvae in the North Sea.

  18. Characterization of oxidative changes in salted herring (Clupea harengus) during ripening.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Eva; Andersen, Mogens L; Baron, Caroline P

    2007-11-14

    Salted herring were prepared in barrels according to a traditional recipe. The biochemical changes in the fish and in the brine were monitored during a prolonged ripening period (12 months). The process was followed by measuring pH, protein, salt, dry matter, free fatty acids, and lipid content in the brine and in the fish according to standard protocols. The results showed that most of the biochemical changes occurred at an early stage in the ripening process. Lipid oxidation was followed in the fish muscle using spectroscopic determination for lipid hydroperoxide (PV) and by GC-MS for determination of secondary oxidation products. Protein oxidation was determined using spectrophotometric determination of protein carbonyl groups. To follow protein degradation (proteolysis) and protein oxidation SDS-PAGE and immunoblotting for protein carbonyl were performed on both brine and fish during the ripening period. Results revealed that no lipid oxidation occurred in fish muscle during ripening but a significant level of protein oxidation was detected. Finally, iron alpha-tocopherol, and 3-methylbutanal levels were also measured. Alpha-tocopherol levels decreased during ripening, further supporting that oxidative reactions took place. Peroxidase activity was demonstrated in the brine, suggesting that hemoglobin might be a crucial parameter, which might trigger protein oxidation. This indicates that protein oxidation might be important for the development of the characteristic organoleptic properties of salted herring.

  19. Antioxidative low molecular weight compounds in marinated herring (Clupea harengus) salt brine.

    PubMed

    Gringer, Nina; Safafar, Hamed; du Mesnildot, Axelle; Nielsen, Henrik H; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina; Undeland, Ingrid; Baron, Caroline P

    2016-03-01

    This study aimed at unravelling the antioxidative capacity of low molecular weight compounds (LMWC) (peptides, amino acids and phenolic acids) present in salt brines from the marinated herring production. Brines were fractionated into <10kDa fractions using dialysis and further into 94 fractions using size exclusion chromatography. All samples were analysed for protein, total phenolic content (TPC) and antioxidant activities. Protein-enriched samples were pooled (P1, P2 and P3) and analysed for phenolic acids, total amino acids and peptide/protein sequence using advanced mass spectrometry. All salt brines contain LMWC holding ABTS-radical scavenging activity, reducing power and iron chelating activity. Generally, a strong correlation between TPC and ABTS-radical scavenging was found. In contrast, reducing power and iron chelating activity seemed to be caused by peptides. Protein/peptide sequencing revealed 1kDa peptides with the presence of HDF-motif which could be responsible for some of the antioxidant capacity observed in marinated herring salt brine. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Effect of spatial differences in growth on distribution of seasonally co-occurring herring Clupea harengus stocks.

    PubMed

    Clausen, L A W; Stæhr, K-J; Rindorf, A; Mosegaard, H

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms most likely to determine the distribution of the two major herring Clupea harengus stocks in their common early summer feeding ground in the eastern North Sea, Skagerrak and Kattegat were investigated through analysis of acoustic survey data from six consecutive years. No change was detected in biomass of North Sea autumn spawning C. harengus (NSAS) over time, whereas the biomass of western Baltic spring spawning C. harengus (WBSS) declined severely. Analyses of centre of abundance by stock showed no change in NSAS distribution, whereas the WBSS changed to a more western distribution over time. Contrary to previous perception of the juvenile migration, NSAS were found to leave the study area at the age between 1 and 2 years and WBSS 1 year olds were encountered in the Skagerrak. The estimated parameters of von Bertalanffy growth equations showed marked differences between areas with fish in the eastern part of the area having the lowest size at age at all ages. Further, their growth conditions appeared to deteriorate progressively over the period studied. Both NSAS and WBSS showed the highest condition in the North Sea and Skagerrak while condition was substantially lower in age Kattegat. The westward movement of spring spawners over time suggests that growth rate and possibly density of conspecifics influence the migration pattern and distribution of C. harengus in the area. In contrast, there was no evidence to suggest that distribution was constant over time within stocks or that distribution reflected size-dependent limitations on migration distance. © 2014 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  1. Comparison of physicochemical and sensory changes in fresh and frozen herring (Clupea harrengus L.) during marinating.

    PubMed

    Szymczak, Mariusz

    2011-01-15

    The influence of freezing on the changes during ripening is better described for salted fish than marinades. Therefore in the present study the effect of preliminary freezing of raw material on the ripening of carcasses and fillets marinated during 18 days at a temperature of 10 °C, in brine with 6% salt and 5% acetic acid was examined. In both cases the marinating of thawed frozen material resulted in larger mass losses and decrease of the value of meat colour parameters. The semi-marinades from raw herring were characterised by higher values of total estimation based on sensory analysis. The statistical analysis showed weak correlation between the discriminants of sensory assessment and the studied physicochemical parameters of semi-marinades. These results suggest that the semi-marinades from raw fish are characterised by higher sensory quality, better colour parameters and higher yield than those from frozen thawed fish. Copyright © 2010 Society of Chemical Industry.

  2. Purification and stability of octameric mitochondrial creatine kinase isoform from herring (Clupea harengus) organ of vision.

    PubMed

    Niedźwiecka, Natalia; Grzyb, Katarzyna; Nona-Mołdawa, Agnieszka; Gronczewska, Jadwiga; Skorkowski, Edward F

    2015-07-01

    Creatine kinases (CKs) constitute a large family of isoenzymes that are involved in intracellular energy homeostasis. In cells with high and fluctuating energy requirements ATP level is maintained via phosphocreatine hydrolysis catalyzed by creatine kinase. In contrast to invertebrates and higher vertebrates, in poikilothermic vertebrates the adaptations for the regulation of energy metabolism by changes in the oligomeric state of CK isoforms are not well known. The present study aimed at identification of herring eye CK isoforms and focuses on factors affecting the CK-octamer stability. In addition to the CK octamer, three different dimeric isoforms of CK were detected by cellulose acetate native electrophoresis. Destabilization of octamer was studied in the presence of TSAC substrates and about 50% of octamers dissociated into dimers within 24h. Moreover, we found that the increase of temperature from 4 °C to 30 °C caused rapid inactivation of dimers in TSAC-treated samples but did not affect octameric structures. In a thermostability assay we demonstrated that octamers retain their activity even at 50 °C. Our results indicate that destabilization of the octameric structure can lead to loss of enzyme activity at higher temperatures (above 30 °C). Furthermore, our results based on N-terminal sequence analysis suggest that probably the mitochondrial s-type CK, rather than u-type, is predominantly expressed in herring eye. In conclusion the existence of four various CK isoforms in one organ may reflect complex regulation of energy metabolism in the phototransduction process in teleost fishes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Laboratory evaluation of Pacific herring (Clupea pallasi) embryo sensitivity to Prudhoe Bay crude oil

    SciTech Connect

    Kocan, R.; Hose, J.E.; Brown, E.; Baker, T.

    1995-12-31

    Pacific herring were collected in Prince William Sound and artificially spawned onto glass slides. The fertile eggs were exposed to a seawater extract of Prudhoe Bay crude oil (9.67 mg*L HMW and 64 mg*L{sup {minus}1} LMW) in artificial seawater in a static renewal system beginning about 18 h post fertilization. From the stock, a series of exposure concentrations of hydrocarbons was made down to 0.01 mg*L{sup {minus}1}. Chemical analyses demonstrated that over 85% of the LMW hydrocarbons evaporated during the first 24 h of each exposure. Incubation of seawater with and without petroleum extract had constant values of 10.2--10.4 mg O{sup 2}*L{sup {minus}1}, pH of 8.4 and salinity of 29.7--30.3 ppt. Genetic damage was the most sensitive biomarker for oil exposure, followed by physical deformities, reduced mitotic activity, lower hatch weight and precocious hatching. A doubling of background genetic damage occurred at 0.01 mg*L{sup {minus}1} petroleum extract and significant increases in damage occurred in proportion to increasing amounts of extract. The EC{sub 50} for larval deformities was < 0.48 mg*L{sup {minus}1}, mitoses were significantly reduced at 0.1 mg*L{sup {minus}1} , and larval weights were depressed at all exposure concentrations. Premature hatching occurred in embryos exposed to concentrations of petroleum hydrocarbons above 0.24 mg*L{sup {minus}1}. The types of genetic damage, physical deformities, precocious hatch and low hatch weight were similar to that observed in wild Prince William Sound herring larvae immediately following the Exxon Valdez oil spill in 1989.

  4. 78 FR 46897 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Framework Adjustment 2 and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-02

    ...NMFS proposes regulations to implement Framework Adjustment 2 to the Atlantic herring Fishery Management Plan and the 2013-2015 fishery specifications for the Atlantic herring fishery. Framework 2 would allow the New England Fishery Management Council to split annual catch limits seasonally for the four Atlantic herring management areas, and the carryover of unharvested catch, up to 10 percent for each area's annual catch limit. The specifications would set catch specifications for the herring fishery for the 2013-2015 fishing years and would establish seasonal splits for management areas 1A and 1B as recommended to NMFS by the New England Fishery Management Council.

  5. Chitosan as an edible invisible film for quality preservation of herring and atlantic cod.

    PubMed

    Jeon, You-Jin; Kamil, Janak Y V A; Shahidi, Fereidoon

    2002-08-28

    The effect of chitosan with different molecular weights as coatings for shelf-life extension of fresh fillets of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) and herring (Clupea harengus) was evaluated over a 12-day storage at refrigerated temperature (4 +/- 1 degrees C). Three chitosan preparations from snow crab (Chinoecetes opilio) processing wastes, differing in viscosities and molecular weights, were prepared; their apparent viscosities (360, 57, and 14 cP) depended on the deacetylation time (4, 10, and 20 h, respectively) of the chitin precursor. Upon coating with chitosans, a significant (p < or = 0.05) reduction in relative moisture losses of 37, 29, 29, 40, and 32% was observed for cod samples coated with 360 cP chitosan after 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12 days of storage, respectively. Chitosan coating significantly (p < or = 0.05) reduced lipid oxidation as displayed in peroxide value, conjugated dienes, 2-thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and headspace volatiles, chemical spoilage as reflected in total volatile basic nitrogen, trimethylamine, and hypoxanthine, and growth of microorganisms as reflected in total plate count in both fish model systems compared to uncoated samples. The preservative efficacy and the viscosity of chitosan were inter-related; the efficacy of chitosans with viscosities of 57 and 360 cP was superior to that of chitosan with a 14 cP viscosity. Thus, chitosan as edible coating would enhance the quality of seafoods during storage.

  6. 75 FR 69903 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Temporary Removal of 2,000...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-16

    ... Limit in Atlantic Herring Management Area 1A AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National... temporary removal of the 2,000-lb (907.2 kg) trip limit for the Atlantic herring fishery in Management Area....2 kg), consistent with their respective Atlantic herring permit categories, effective 0001 hrs...

  7. Growth and advection of larval herring ( Clupea harengus L.) in the vicinity of the Orkney Isles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heath, M.; Rankine, P.

    1988-11-01

    A patch of larval herring was located off the north coast of Scotland during early September 1986 and tracked for a period of 13 days by intensive surveying and deployments of drifting marker buoys. Two distinct cohorts of larvae were identified in the original patch, and a third, more recently hatched cohort became mixed with the other two along the drift trajectory. The length distributions of the larvae were analysed to produce growth rate estimates which were different for each cohort. Wind drag on the surface markers was shown to cause significant deviations between the trajectories of the larvae and the drifting buoys. A correction was applied to the buoy data to account for the wind drag, and, combined with data from a satellite-tracked 'Argos' buoy, indicated an average drift rate for the larvae of 9 km day -1 over a one-month period. The Argos buoy was carried from its release point off the west side of the Orkney Isles into the North Sea, passing through the Fair Isle Channel.

  8. Temporal trends in dioxins (polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin and dibenzofurans) and dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls in Baltic herring (Clupea harengus).

    PubMed

    Miller, Aroha; Hedman, Jenny E; Nyberg, Elisabeth; Haglund, Peter; Cousins, Ian T; Wiberg, Karin; Bignert, Anders

    2013-08-15

    Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) and dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyl (dl-PCBs) concentrations in Baltic herring (Clupea harengus) have been relatively stable since the mid to late 1990s. It is unclear why concentrations in Baltic herring are not following the observed decreases in other environmental matrices. Here, changes in long-term temporal trends in Baltic herring were examined. A number of biological variables were examined alongside the temporal trends to investigate whether fish biology e.g., growth (length, weight, age), lipid content, reproductive phase or fishing date may provide an explanation for the temporal trends observed. Significant (p<0.05) decreasing trends were observed for PCDD/F toxic equivalents (TEQPCDD/F) at three of the four sites (lipid weight (lw) and wet weight (ww), Swedish west coast lw only); however, other TEQ values e.g., TEQPCDD, TEQPCDF, TEQdl-PCB, TEQPCDD/F+dl-PCB were inconsistent, decreasing at some sites but not others. In the most recent 10 years of data, fewer significant decreases were seen overall. Over the examined time period, significant decreases (Bothnian Bay, p<0.01, southern Baltic Proper, p<0.02) and increases (Swedish west coast, p<0.02) in lipid content, growth dilution or lack thereof, and significant changes in age were observed. However herring were not randomly selected which biases this result. Continual efforts to decrease PCDD/F and dl-PCB emissions and to locate/reduce hotspots are necessary, while bearing in mind that herring biology may be impeding faster decreases of these chemicals. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The effects of diffusible creosote-derived compounds on development in Pacific herring (Clupea pallasi).

    PubMed

    Vines, C A; Robbins, T; Griffin, F J; Cherr, G N

    2000-12-01

    The effects of diffusible creosote-derived compounds from weathered creosote-treated pilings on embryonic development in the Pacific herring were investigated. Parameters used to evaluate toxicity included embryonic development, cardiac function, embryo/larval activity (movement of developing embryos), hatching success, and larval morphology at hatch. For acute exposures, embryos were incubated in seawater containing either creosote-treated wood (creosote) or untreated wood (wood control), or seawater alone (control). All embryos adhering directly to creosote-treated wood and 40-50% of embryos not adhering to the creosote-treated wood failed to develop beyond the first few days of incubation. For surviving embryos, a 93% reduction in heart rate, and moderate to marked arrhythmia was observed. Surviving embryos also exhibited both an increase in frequency and an alteration in pattern of embryo/larval movement, with most embryos exhibiting tremors as compared with the vigorous movements of the control embryos. Cardiac function and embryo/larval movements of embryos exposed to untreated wood were not significantly different from controls. The hatching rate of embryos exposed to creosote was 90% lower than control embryos and 72.4% lower than embryos exposed to untreated wood, and the LC(50) for hatching success was 0.05 mg/l. Partial hatching (incomplete hatch) was observed in 15-20% of embryos exposed to creosote. All of the hatched larvae exposed as embryos to creosote exhibited morphological deformities, including scoliosis, pericardial edema and/or ascites. Similar effects were observed in embryos collected from creosoted pilings in San Francisco Bay, with a 72% decrease in hatching success compared with embryos collected from the Bay and severely deformed larvae. To investigate the combined effects of creosote and salinity on hatching success, larval morphology, and cardiac function, embryos were exposed to a sublethal concentration of creosote (0.003 mg/l) at

  10. Acetylcholinesterase secreted by Anisakis simplex larvae (Nematoda: Anisakidae) parasitizing herring, Clupea harengus: an inverse relationship of enzyme activity in the host-parasite system.

    PubMed

    Podolska, Magdalena; Nadolna, Katarzyna

    2014-06-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is a key enzyme involved in nerve impulse transmission in both vertebrates and invertebrates. In addition to neuromuscular AChE, many parasitic nematodes synthesize AChE in secretory glands and release the enzyme into their external environment. In this study, we evaluate the activities of both somatic and secreted AChE from larvae (L3) of the parasitic nematode Anisakis simplex, and compare these to the AChE activity in its host, herring, Clupea harengus. A. simplex larvae were obtained from a herring sampled in three areas of the southern Baltic. Enzyme kinetics were determined for excretory/secretory (E/S) products and somatic extracts of larvae as well as for herring muscle tissue. The results reveal that mean AChE activity is approximately fourfold higher in E/S products and eightfold higher in somatic extracts of post-secretory A. simplex larvae than in host muscle tissue. The level of AChE activity in nematodes is inversely related to the enzyme activity in their hosts, i.e. reduced AChE activity in herring was accompanied by increased enzyme activity in its parasites. The physiological function of AChE secreted by parasitic nematodes has been widely discussed in the literature, and numerous roles for this form of enzyme have been suggested. The results of our investigation indicate that AChE secretion by A. simplex larvae may constitute an adaptive mechanism that promotes survival under adverse environmental conditions. Larvae probably increase secretion of AChE in response to a direct and/or indirect effect of neurotoxic compounds. This is the first report of such a phenomenon in A. simplex.

  11. Feeding of the Norwegian spring spawning herring Clupea harengus (Linne) at the different stages of its life cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokopchuk, Irina

    2009-10-01

    The aim of the research was to investigate the diet of herring at different stages of its life cycle. For that purpose feeding of 0-group and immature herring in the Barents Sea, as well as of mature fish from the Norwegian Sea, was studied. 0-Group herring was sampled in the Barents Sea in August-September 2002-2005 during the international 0-group and trawl-acoustic survey of pelagic fish, as well as during the trawl-acoustic survey of demersal fish in November-December 2003-2004. Stomach samples of immature herring (1-3 years) were collected in late May and early of June 2001 and 2005 in the south-western part of the Barents Sea during the trawl-acoustic survey for young herring. Stomach samples of mature herring were collected in the Norwegian Sea in 1996, 1998, 1999, 2001, and 2002 in the course of the international trawl-acoustic survey of pelagic fish. Feeding intensity of herring of all age groups varied considerably between years and this was probably associated with availability and accessibility of their prey. The 0-group herring was found to have the most diverse diet, including 31 different taxa. In August-September, copepods, euphausiids, Cladocera, and larvae Bivalvia were most frequent in the diet of 0-group herring, but euphausiids and Calanus finmarchicus were the main prey taken. In November-December, euphausiids and tunicates were major prey groups. It was found that C. finmarchicus in the diet of 0-group herring was replaced by larval and adult euphausiids with increasing fish length. C. finmarchicus was the principal prey of immature herring and dominated in the diet of both small and large individuals and mainly older copepodites of C. finmarchicus were taken. Larval and adult euphausiids were found in stomachs of immature herring as well, but their share was not large. The importance of different prey for mature herring in the Norwegian Sea varied depending on the feeding area and length of the herring. On the whole C. finmarchicus and 0

  12. 75 FR 69014 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Total Allowable Catch...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-10

    .... ACTION: Temporary rule; notification of trip limit reduction in Area 1A of the Atlantic Herring Fishery...), per trip or calendar day, in or from Management Area 1A (Area 1A) until January 1, 2011, except for... herring, per trip or calendar day, in or from the specified management area for the remainder of the...

  13. 76 FR 79610 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Adjustment to 2012 Annual...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-22

    ... United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Adjustment to 2012 Annual Catch Limits AGENCY: National Marine... rule; request for comments. SUMMARY: This action proposes to reduce the 2012 annual catch limits (ACLs... on Adjustment to 2012 Herring Catch Limits.'' Fax: (978) 281-9135, Attn: Carrie Nordeen. Instructions...

  14. Hemoglobin-mediated lipid oxidation and compositional characteristics of washed fish mince model systems made from cod (Gadus morhua), herring (Clupea harengus), and salmon (Salmo salar) muscle.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Karin; Almgren, Annette; Undeland, Ingrid

    2007-10-31

    The use of washed cod light muscle minces in mechanistic studies of hemoglobin (Hb)-mediated fish lipid oxidation has largely increased in the past 5 years. Although cod light muscle has a low level of intrinsic lipid oxidation catalysts, a prerequisite for a good oxidation model system, we believe it cannot fully mimic the oxidation kinetics taking place in other fish species being more susceptible to lipid oxidation. The aim of this study was to systematically investigate whether washed mince model systems useful in Hb-mediated oxidation studies could be prepared also from herring (Clupea harengus) and salmon (Salmo salar) light muscles. The kinetics of oxidation in the washed models was measured during ice storage (+/-Hb), and the results were related to compositional differences. Minces from cod, herring, and salmon light muscles were washed 3 times with 3 volumes of water and buffer. A 20 microM portion of Hb and 200 ppm streptomycin was then added, followed by adjustment of pH and moisture to 6.3 and 86%, respectively. Samples with or without Hb were then stored on ice, and oxidation was followed as peroxide value (PV), rancid odor, redness (a*) loss and yellowness (b*). Prior to storage, all minces and models were also analyzed for total lipids, fatty acids, alpha-tocopherol, proteins, Hb, Fe, Cu, and Zn. Hb-mediated lipid oxidation appeared within 2 days on ice in all models. Small differences in the oxidation rates ranked the models as herring > cod > salmon. These differences were ascribed to more preformed peroxides and trace elements in the herring model, and more antioxidants in the salmon model. Controls, without Hb, stayed stable in all cases except herring, where a very slight oxidation appeared, especially if the herring raw material had been prefrozen. In conclusion, fattier fish like dark muscle species and salmonoids are useful for making washed mince model systems and would be a better choice than cod if there is an interest in the oxidation

  15. Pathogenicity of Ichthyophonus hoferi for laboratory-reared Pacific herring Clupea pallasi and its early appearance in wild Puget Sound herring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kocan, R.M.; Hershberger, P.; Mehl, T.; Elder, N.; Bradley, M.; Wildermuth, D.; Stick, K.

    1999-01-01

    Laboratory-reared pathogen-free Pacific herring were exposed to pure cultures of Ichthyophonus hoferi, and reproduced the disease seen in naturally infected fish - thus fulfilling Koch's Postulates. Pathogen-free herring used in this study were reared from artificially spawned eggs incubated in filtered, UV-sterilized seawater, eliminating the variables associated with multiple infections, which are common in wild herring. Wild free-ranging herring were captured monthly from June through October by dip net from 'herring balls' located in the northern Puget Sound. I. hoferi infections were identified in these fish soon after metamorphoses, about 4 mo post-hatch. The prevalence increased from 5 to 6% in 0-yr fish to 24% in 1-yr-old fish to 50 to 70% in fish over 2 yr old, with no associated increase in mortality. The route of natural transmission to wild herring was not determined, but carnivorous fish became infected and died when they were experimentally fed tissues infected with the organism. In vitro culture of tissues was the most sensitive method for identifying both clinical and subclinical infections.

  16. Pathogenecity of Ichthyophonus hoferi for laboratory-reared Pacific herring (Clupea pallasi) and its early appearance in wild Puget Sound herring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kocan, R.; Hershberger, P.; Mehl, T.; Elder, N.; Bradley, M.; Wildermuth, D.; Stick, K.

    1999-01-01

    Laboratory-reared pathogen-free Pacific herring were exposed to pure cultures of Ichthyophonus hoferi, and reproduced the disease seen in naturally infected fish--thus fulfilling Koch's Postulates. Pathogen-free herring used in this study were reared from artificially spawned eggs incubated in filtered, UV-sterilized seawater, eliminating the variables associated with multiple infections, which are common in wild herring. Wild free-ranging herring were captured monthly from June through October by dip net from 'herring balls' located in the northern Puget Sound. I. hoferi infections were identified in these fish soon after metamorphoses, about 4 mo post-hatch. The prevalence increased from 5 to 6% in 0-yr fish to 24% in 1-yr-old fish to 50 to 70% in fish over 2 yr old, with no associated increase in mortality. The route of natural transmission to wild herring was not determined, but carnivorous fish became infected and died when they were experimentally fed tissues infected with the organism. In vitro culture of tissues was the most sensitive method for identifying both clinical and subclinical infections.

  17. Impact of extreme climate and bioinvasion on temporal coupling of spring herring (Clupea harengus m.) larvae and their prey.

    PubMed

    Arula, T; Ojaveer, H; Klais, R

    2014-12-01

    We used weekly observational data from mid-May to end of July in 1958-2012 in Gulf of Riga to investigate temporal coupling between spring herring larvae and their first prey - copepod nauplii, under the extreme hydroclimatic conditions. We focused on a small shallow estuary that is important nursery ground for larvae of the Gulf of Riga (Baltic Sea) herring population. We quantified the effect of extreme values of the winter air temperatures, time of ice retreat and spring water temperatures on the timing of peak abundance of herring larvae and copepod nauplii. We also assessed whether the invasion of the non-native cladoceran Cercopagis pengoi had notable effect on timing and abundance of copepod nauplii during the peak occurrence of herring larvae. In the years of earliest ice retreat the peak abundance of herring larvae was five weeks earlier than in the years of latest ice retreat, while the timing of nauplii remained unchanged. Abundant presence of the C. pengoi affected neither timing nor maximum abundance of copepod nauplii during the herring larvae first feeding period. Thus, we conclude that processes induced by climate variability are superior to invasion of C. pengoi in determining the timing and coupling of larval herring and copepod nauplii.

  18. Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus, Ichthyophonus hoferi, and other causes of morbidity in Pacific herring Clupea pallasi spawning in Prince William Sound, Alaska, USA.

    PubMed

    Marty, G D; Freiberg, E F; Meyers, T R; Wilcock, J; Farver, T B; Hinton, D E

    1998-02-26

    Pacific herring Clupea pallasi populations in Prince William Sound, Alaska, USA, declined from an estimated 9.8 x 10(7) kg in 1992 to 1.5 x 10(7) kg in 1994. To determine the role of disease in population decline, 233 Pacific herring from Prince William Sound were subjected to complete necropsy during April 1994. The North American strain of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) was isolated from 11 of 233 fish (4.7%). VHSV was significantly related to myocardial mineralization, hepatocellular necrosis, submucosal gastritis, and meningoencephalitis. Ichthyophonus hoferi infected 62 of 212 (29%) fish. I. hoferi infections were associated with severe, disseminated, granulomatous inflammation and with increased levels of plasma creatine phosphokinase (CPK) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST). I. hoferi prevalence in 1994 was more than double that of most previous years (1989 to 1993). Plasma chemistry values significantly greater (p < 0.01) in males than females included albumin, total protein, cholesterol, chloride, glucose, and potassium; only alkaline phosphatase was significantly greater in females. Hypoalbuminemia was relatively common in postspawning females; other risk factors included VHSV and moderate or severe focal skin reddening. Pacific herring had more than 10 species of parasites, but they were not associated with significant lesions. Two of the parasites have not previously been described: a renal intraductal myxosporean (11% prevalence) and an intestinal coccidian (91% prevalence). Transmission electron microscopy of a solitary mesenteric lesion revealed viral particles consistent with lymphocystis virus. No fish had viral erythrocytic necrosis (VEN). Prevalence of external gross lesions and major parasites was not related to fish age, and fish that were year-lings at the time of the 1989 'Exxon Valdez' oil spill (1988 year class) had no evidence of increased disease prevalence.

  19. Morphological abnormalities in gonads of the Baltic herring (Clupea harengus membras): Description of types and prevalence in the northern Baltic Sea.

    PubMed

    Rajasilta, Marjut; Elfving, Mikael; Hänninen, Jari; Laine, Päivi; Vuorinen, Ilppo; Paranko, Jorma

    2016-03-01

    Due to heavy anthropogenic influence and variation of the environmental conditions in the Baltic Sea, reproductive disorders are becoming a major environmental concern. We show here an increasing prevalence of gonadal malformations in the Baltic herring (Clupea harengus membras), a key species of the Baltic ecosystem and important in commercial fishery. During 1987-2014, the spawning herring population in the Archipelago Sea (AS) (North Baltic Sea, Finland) was monitored annually and analyzed for gross morphology of the gonads [total number (n) of analyzed fish = 38 284]. Four different types of malformations were repeatedly found and named as asymmetric, rudimentary, segmented, and branched gonads, but also hermaphroditic gonads and miscellaneous (unidentified) disorders were recorded. In 2013, additional samplings (n of fish analyzed = 541) showed similar malformations in herring from the Bothnian Sea. In some gonad types, histological examination revealed disintegration of seminiferous tubules and hyperplasia of the interstitial tissue. In 2014, the overall prevalence of malformations was still relatively low in the AS (frequency = 0-3.4 %; n = 750) and had apparently minimal effect on population recruitment. However, an increasing trend in the time-series (GLM; F = 32.65; p < 0.001) and a significantly higher prevalence in the Bothnian Sea (frequency = 0.7-5.0 %; n = 541; χ (2) = 6.24; p < 0.05) suggest that gonadal malformations may become a new threat for fish in the Baltic Sea. The observed gonad atrophies may be due to environmental endocrine disruption; however, also other explanations may exist and potential explanations are discussed.

  20. 78 FR 21071 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Sub-ACL (Annual Catch...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-09

    ... land more than 2,000 lb (907.2 kg) of Atlantic herring (herring) per trip or calendar day in or from...) of herring caught within Management Area 2 per trip or calendar day. DATES: Effective 0001 hr local... trip or calendar day in, or from Area 2 per calendar day through December 31, 2013. A vessel may...

  1. Application of a sensitive, specific and controlled real-time PCR assay to surveillance indicates a low prevalence of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) in wild herring, Clupea harengus L., in Scottish waters.

    PubMed

    Matejusova, I; McKay, P; Bland, F; Snow, M

    2010-10-01

    Surveillance data on the distribution of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) in the North Sea (UK), targeting Atlantic herring in areas with previous virus detection, were obtained from research cruises conducted during 2005. The sensitive molecular approach of real-time RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) was applied alongside a newly developed endogenous positive control assay specific for herring (elongation factor 1α) to ensure integrity of template. Three hundred and five pools from 1937 individual herring were tested, and no evidence of VHSV in association with wild Atlantic herring was detected. Samples were obtained from Scottish waters where marine aquaculture is conducted. The results confirm that previous tissue culture studies have most likely not significantly underestimated the prevalence of carrier herring in this area. The significance of migratory species such as herring as a reservoir species for VHSV, with the potential to translocate virus genotypes between geographical areas, is discussed.

  2. A statistical resampling method to calculate biomagnification factors exemplified with organochlorine data from herring (Clupea harengus) muscle and guillemot (Uria aalge) egg from the Baltic sea.

    PubMed

    Lundstedt-Enkel, Katrin; Tysklind, Mats; Trygg, Johan; Schüller, Peter; Asplund, Lillemor; Eriksson, Ulla; Häggberg, Lisbeth; Odsjö, Tjelvar; Hjelmberg, Mats; Olsson, Mats; Orberg, Jan

    2005-11-01

    A novel method for calculating biomagnification factors is presented and demonstrated using contaminant concentration data from the Swedish national monitoring program regarding organochlorine contaminants (OCs) in herring (Clupea harengus) muscle and guillemot (Uria aalge) egg, sampled from 1996 to 1999 from the Baltic Sea. With this randomly sampled ratios (RSR) method, biomagnification factors (BMF(RSR)) were generated and denoted with standard deviation (SD) as a measure of the variation. The BMFRsR were calculated by randomly selecting one guillemot egg out of a total of 29 and one herring out of a total of 74, and the ratio was determined between the concentration of a given OC in that egg and the concentration of the same OC in that herring. With the resampling technique, this was performed 50 000 times for any given OC, and from this new distribution of ratios, BMF(RSR) for each OC were calculated and given as geometric mean (GM) with GM standard deviation (GMSD) range, arithmetic mean (AM) with AMSD range, and minimum (BMF(MIN)) as well as maximum (BMF(MAX)) biomagnification factors. The 14 analyzed OCs were p,p'DDT and its metabolites p,p'DDE and p,p'DDD, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB congeners: CB28, CB52, CB101, CB118, CB138, CB153, and CB180), hexachlorocyclohexane isomers (alpha-, beta-, and gammaHCH), and hexachlorobenzene (HCB). Multivariate data analysis (MVDA) methods, including principal components analysis (PCA), partial least squares regression (PLS), and PLS discriminant analyses (PLS-DA), were first used to extract information from the complex biological and chemical data generated from each individual animal. MVDA were used to model similarities/dissimilarities regarding species (PCA, PLS-DA), sample years (PLS), and sample location (PLS-DA) to give a deeper understanding of the data that the BMF modeling was based upon. Contaminants that biomagnify, that had BMF(RSR) significantly higher than one, were p,p'DDE, CB118, HCB, CB138, CB180, CB

  3. NAD-preferring malic enzyme: localization, regulation and its potential role in herring (Clupea harengus) sperm cells.

    PubMed

    Niedźwiecka, Natalia; Gronczewska, Jadwiga; Skorkowski, Edward F

    2017-04-01

    Herring spermatozoa exhibit a high activity of NAD-preferring malic enzyme (NAD-ME). This enzyme is involved in the generation of NADH or NADPH in the decarboxylation of malate to form pyruvate and requires some divalent cations to express its activity. In order to confirm that NAD-ME isolated from herring sperm cells is localized in mitochondria, we performed immunofluorescent analysis and assayed spectrophotometrically the malic enzyme reaction. Production of polyclonal rabbit antibodies against NAD-ME from herring spermatozoa enabled identification of mitochondrial localization of this enzyme inside herring spermatozoa. The kinetic studies revealed that NAD-ME was competitively inhibited by ATP up to tenfold. Addition of fumarate reversed ATP-dependent inhibition of NAD-ME to 55 % of its maximum activity. The pH-dependent regulation of malic enzyme activity was also examined. Malic enzyme showed maximum activity at pH near 7.0 in all studied conditions. Finally, the role of malic enzyme activity regulation in mitochondria of herring sperm cells was discussed.

  4. Climate change and condition of herring (Clupea harengus) explain long-term trends in extent of skipped reproduction.

    PubMed

    Engelhard, Georg H; Heino, Mikko

    2006-10-01

    It is commonly assumed that iteroparous fish, once mature, normally reproduce in all consecutive seasons. Recent work has suggested, however, that in Norwegian spring-spawning herring-a population that undertakes extensive spawning migrations-almost one in two adults may skip their second spawning migration. Why should herring not return to spawn the year after first spawning, but instead wait an extra year? For herring, participation in distant, energetically costly, and risky spawning migrations will only pay off in terms of fitness if individuals are sufficiently large, and in sufficient condition, to both successfully migrate and spawn. Changes in the environment and individual condition should therefore affect the likelihood of skipped spawning. This paper describes long-term changes in the extent to which the second reproductive season is skipped in this herring population. These are shown to be linked to the size and condition of herring as first-time spawners, and to climatic factors possibly related to food availability. The findings corroborate the hypothesis that skipped reproduction results from trade-offs between current and future reproduction, growth and survival.

  5. Differences in growth and survival between cod Gadus morhua and herring Clupea harengus early stages co-reared at variable prey concentrations.

    PubMed

    Folkvord, A; Vollset, K W; Catalán, I A

    2015-11-01

    It was hypothesized that the survival and growth strategies of herring Clupea harengus, displaying a flexible reproductive activity, are adapted to coping with longer periods of prey deprivation (i.e. more variable prey availability), in contrast to cod Gadus morhua, which are adapted to match growth and survival at high prey concentrations. Experimental larval growth and survival data for the two naturally co-occurring species reared either in separate tanks or in combination are presented to test this hypothesis. Natural zooplankton was supplied either ad libitum or in a periodically restricted manner to mimic natural suboptimal conditions. Periodically restricted feeding significantly reduced initial growth of G. morhua larvae co-reared with C. harengus, while no such initial effect was seen for co-reared C. harengus. Overall survival of G. morhua was higher when reared together with C. harengus (32 v. 24%), while C. harengus had higher survival without the presence of G. morhua (59 v. 44%), indicating that both species were affected by higher densities of G. morhua larvae. Furthermore, the final survival in G. morhua was inversely related to average final size, while in C. harengus an opposite trend was observed. How potential behavioural interactions may drive the present results are discussed and contended that a better insight into field vital rates may be gained from further exploration of co-rearing experiments. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Fish Biology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  6. Foraging, bioenergetic and predation constraints on diel vertical migration: field observations and modelling of reverse migration by young-of-the-year herring Clupea harengus.

    PubMed

    Jensen, O P; Hansson, S; Didrikas, T; Stockwell, J D; Hrabik, T R; Axenrot, T; Kitchell, J F

    2011-02-01

    Diel vertical migration (DVM) of young-of-the-year (YOY) herring Clupea harengus and one of their major predators, pikeperch Sander lucioperca, was examined using bottom-mounted hydroacoustics in Himmerfjärden, a brackish bay of the Baltic Sea, in summer. In contrast to previous studies on DVM of C. harengus aggregated across size and age classes, YOY C. harengus showed a reverse DVM trajectory, deeper at night and, on average, shallower during the day. This pattern was observed consistently on five acoustic sampling occasions in 3 years and was corroborated by two out of three trawl surveys. Large acoustic targets (target strength >-33 dB, probably piscivorous S. lucioperca >45 cm) showed a classic DVM trajectory, shallow at night and deeper during the day. Variability in YOY C. harengus vertical distribution peaked at dawn and dusk, and their vertical distribution at midday was distinctly bimodal. This reverse DVM pattern was consistent with bioenergetic model predictions for YOY C. harengus which have rapid gut evacuation rates and do not feed at night. Reverse DVM also resulted in low spatial overlap with predators. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Fish Biology © 2011 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  7. 77 FR 10977 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Sub-Annual Catch Limit...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-24

    ... Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Sub-Annual Catch Limit (ACL) Harvested for Management... January 1, 2013, when the 2013 sub-ACL for Area 1B becomes available, except when transiting as described in this notice. This action is based on the determination that the revised Atlantic herring...

  8. 76 FR 61059 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Sub-ACL (Annual Catch...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-03

    ... Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Sub-ACL (Annual Catch Limit) Harvested for Management... calendar day until January 1, 2012, when the 2012 sub-ACL for Area 1B becomes available, except when... Atlantic herring sub-ACL allocated to Area 1B for 2011 is projected to be harvested by October 1,...

  9. Anthropogenic and naturally produced brominated substances in Baltic herring (Clupea harengus membras) from two sites in the Baltic Sea.

    PubMed

    Dahlberg, Anna-Karin; Bignert, Anders; Legradi, Jessica; Legler, Juliette; Asplund, Lillemor

    2016-02-01

    In the eutrophicated Baltic Sea, several naturally produced hydroxylated polybrominated diphenyl ethers (OH-PBDEs) have been found in marine biota. OH-PBDEs are toxic to adult and developing zebrafish and shown to be potent disruptors of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). Disturbed OXPHOS can result in altered energy metabolism and weight loss. In herring, the concentration of OH-PBDEs (i.e. 2'-OH-BDE68 and 6-OH-BDE47) has increased during the period 1980-2010 in the Baltic Proper. Over the same time period, the condition and fat content in Baltic herring have decreased. Given the toxicity and increasing trends of OH-PBDEs in Baltic herring it is important to further assess the exposure to OH-PBDEs in Baltic herring. In this study, the concentrations of OH-PBDEs and related brominated substances i.e. polybrominated phenols (PBPs), polybrominated anisoles (PBAs), methoxylated polybrominated diphenyl ethers (MeO-PBDEs) and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) were measured in herring sampled in the northern Baltic Proper (Askö, n = 12) and the southern Bothnian Sea (Ängskärsklubb, n = 12). The geometric mean (GM) concentrations (ng/g l.w.) at Askö and Ängskärsklubb were; Σ2PBPs: 4.3 and 9.6, Σ(2)PBAs: 34 and 20, Σ(6)OH-PBDEs: 9.4 and 10, Σ(7)MeO-PBDEs: 42 and 150, Σ(6)PBDEs: 54 and 27, respectively. 6-OH-BDE47 dominated the OH-PBDE profile and comprised 87% (Askö) and 91% (Ängskärsklubb) of the ΣOH-PBDEs. At Ängskärsklubb the mean concentration of ΣMeO-PBDEs (150 ng/g l.w.) was 15 times higher than ΣOH-PBDEs. As other fish species are known to metabolically transform MeO-PBDEs to OH-PBDEs, high levels of MeO-PBDEs can be of concern as a precursor for more toxic OH-PBDEs in herring and their roe.

  10. Oogenesis and reproductive investment of Atlantic herring are functions of not only present but long-ago environmental influences as well

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos Schmidt, Thassya C.; Slotte, Aril; Kennedy, James; Sundby, Svein; Johannessen, Arne; Óskarsson, Gudmundur J.; Kurita, Yutaka; Stenseth, Nils C.; Kjesbu, Olav Sigurd

    2017-01-01

    Following general life history theory, immediate reproductive investment (egg mass × fecundity/body mass) in oviparous teleosts is a consequence of both present and past environmental influences. This clarification questions the frequent use of season-independent (general) fecundity formulas in marine fish recruitment studies based on body metrics only. Here we test the underlying assumption of no lag effect on gametogenesis in the planktivorous, determinate-fecundity Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus) displaying large plasticity in egg mass and fecundity, examining Norwegian summer–autumn spawning herring (NASH), North Sea autumn-spawning herring (NSAH), and Norwegian spring-spawning herring (NSSH). No prior reproductive information existed for NASH. Compared with the 1960s, recent reproductive investment had dropped markedly, especially for NSAH, likely reflecting long-term changes in zooplankton biography and productivity. As egg mass was characteristically small for autumn spawners, although large for spring spawners (cf. different larval feeding conditions), fecundity was the most dynamic factor within reproductive investment. For the data-rich NSSH, we showed evidence that transient, major declines in zooplankton abundance resulted in low fecundity over several subsequent seasons, even if Fulton’s condition factor (K) turned high. Temporal trends in Kslope (K on total length) were, however, informative. These results clarify that fecundity is defined by (i) dynamics of primary (standing stock) oocytes and (ii) down-regulation of secondary oocytes, both processes intimately linked to environmental conditions but operating at different timescales. Thus, general fecundity formulas typically understate interannual variability in actual fecundity. We therefore argue for the use of segmented fecundity formulas linked to dedicated monitoring programs. PMID:28223491

  11. A simple method for weight estimation of whole herring (Clupea harengus) using planar X-ray imaging.

    PubMed

    Veliyulin, Emil; Misimi, Ekrem; Bondø, Morten; Vebenstad, Petter Aaby; Østvik, Stein Ove

    2011-04-01

    Fish weight is one of the key parameters used in commercial sorting of fresh fish. The capability of on-line and accurate estimation of the weight of each individual fish has a direct impact on profitability for the fish processors. Planar X-ray images of whole herring (n=16) were taken using a commercial medical X-ray apparatus. The integral intensity of all pixels in each image was calculated and correlated with the weight of the respective fish producing a linear relationship with a high correlation factor (R2=0.992) and a calculated mean prediction error of 2.5%. Planar X-ray imaging combined with simple image processing was successfully used to predict weight of whole herring. The technique has a potential to be used industrially for on-line weight estimation in sorting/grading systems.

  12. Dioxins, dioxin-like PCBs and chloroorganic contaminants in herring, Clupea harengus, from different fishing grounds of the Baltic Sea.

    PubMed

    Karl, H; Ruoff, U

    2007-04-01

    The contaminant levels of dioxins, dioxin-like PCBs and a range of chloroorganic compounds have been determined in relation to various fishing grounds of the Baltic Sea. Sampling covered an area from the Skagerrak to the coast of Latvia. The data are compared with herring from fishing grounds in the North Sea and west of the British Isles. Also the temporal trend of the dioxin levels in the edible part of herring landed around the Island of Rügen is given from commercial samples collected between 1996 and 2004. A continuous increase of the dioxin concentrations was observed from west to east. Lowest concentrations of 0.199 ng WHO-PCDD/F-TEQ kg(-1)wet weight were found in herring fillets west of the British Isles. Highest level of 6.972 ng WHO-PCCD/F-TEQ kg(-1)w.w. was analysed in fillets off the coast of Latvia. Results showed also a spatial dependence of the WHO-TEQ ratio dioxins:dioxin-like PCBs and of the dioxin congener profile. Only the DDT group of various chloroorganic compounds determined, showed a dependence from the fishing ground. A clear temporal tendency could not be deduced from the data.

  13. Spatial and temporal variations in parasite prevalence and infracommunity structure in herring (Clupea harengus L.) caught to the west of the British Isles and in the North and Baltic Seas: implications for fisheries science.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Neil; Cross, Marcus A; Chubb, James C; Cunningham, Carey O; Hatfield, Emma M C; MacKenzie, Ken

    2007-06-01

    Herring Clupea harengus L. viscera were examined for endoparasitic infections as part of a multidisciplinary stock identification project (WESTHER, EU Contract no. Q5RS-2002-01 056) which applied a range of stock discrimination techniques to the same individual fishes to obtain comparable results for multivariate analysis. Spawning and non-spawning adults, and juvenile herring were caught, over 3 years, by commercial and research vessels from numerous locations to the west of the UK and Ireland, along with control samples of spawning fish from the eastern Baltic Sea, and juveniles from sites in the eastern and western North Sea, and the north of Norway. The metacercariae of two renicolid digeneans (Cercaria pythionike and Cercaria doricha), one larval nematode (Anisakis simplex s.s.) and one larval cestode (Lacistorhynchus tenuis) were selected as tag species. Results were compared with those from herring collected between 1973 and 1982, which suggested remarkable stability in the parasite fauna of herring in the study area. These species were used to compare the parasite infracommunities of spawning herring. A significant variation in infracommunity structure was observed between different spawning grounds. These results suggest that the parasite fauna of herring are spatially variable but remain temporally stable in both the short and long term. Significant differences in prevalence and abundance of infections and comparisons of parasite infracommunity enabled the separation of putative herring stocks west of the British Isles. Distinctive patterns of parasite infection in two different spawning groups off the north coast of Scotland suggest that this area is occupied by two spawning populations, one recruiting from the west of Scotland, the other from outside this area, and most likely from the eastern North Sea. The distribution patterns of L. tenuis, C. doricha and C. pythionike suggest the potential for fish that spawn in three distinct International Council

  14. Predicting effects of exploitation rate on weight-at-age, population dynamics, and bioaccumulation of PCDD/Fs and PCBs in herring (Clupea harengus L.) in the Northern Baltic Sea.

    PubMed

    Peltonen, Heikki; Kiljunen, Mikko; Kiviranta, Hannu; Vuorinen, Pekka J; Verta, Matti; Karjalainen, Juha

    2007-03-15

    The Baltic Sea ecosystem and fish stocks contain high concentrations of environmental chemicals such as polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs), and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). This study forecasts how changes in fishing or natural mortality would probably influence concentrations of PCDD/F and PCB in the Bothnian Sea (Northern Baltic) herring (Clupea harengus L.). An age-structured simulation model was developed to forecast herring stock dynamics, catches, and weight-at-age under different assumptions about exploitation and natural mortality. The simulated herring weight-at-age estimates were employed in a bioenergetics model capable of simultaneous estimation of bioaccumulation of 17 PCDD/F and 37 PCB congeners. Although the natural variability in recruitment greatly influences the stock dynamics, considerable changes in weight-at-age would ensue changes in exploitation rate or in natural mortality rate. If exploitation rates increase, growth rates would be higher and herring in the weight categories of commercial fisheries would be younger and contain less PCDD/F and PCB. Hence, the average toxicant concentrations in catches would also decline. However, it is likely that only fairly small changes would occur in toxicant concentrations-at-age. On the other hand, a drastic decrease in herring fishing would substantially increase PCDD/F and PCB concentrations in herring. The study indicated that, in spite of the clear influences of fishing on the toxicant concentrations, fishing alone cannot resolve the problems associated with a high concentration of toxicants in herring; further decreases in loading are still required.

  15. Acoustic characteristics of underwater tail slaps used by Norwegian and Icelandic killer whales (Orcinus orca) to debilitate herring (Clupea harengus).

    PubMed

    Simon, Malene; Wahlberg, Magnus; Ugarte, Fernando; Miller, Lee A

    2005-06-01

    Norwegian killer whales debilitate prey by slapping their tails into herring schools. These underwater tail slaps produce a thud-like sound. It is unclear whether this sound is caused by cavitation and/or physical contact between herring and whale tail. Also the forces causing debilitation of the fish are not understood. Here we present an acoustic analysis of underwater tail slaps using a multi-channel wide (150 kHz) band recording system. Underwater tail slaps produced by Norwegian killer whales generated sounds consisting of multiple pulses with source levels of 186+/-5.4 dB (pp) re.1 microPa at 1 m (+/-1 s.d., N = 4). The -3 dB and 97% energy bandwidths were 36.8+/-22.5 kHz and 130.5+/-17.5 kHz (+/-1 s.d., N = 13), respectively, with a centre frequency of 46.1+/-22.3 kHz. The similarities between the acoustic properties of underwater tail slaps recorded from killer whales in Norway, and thud-like sounds recorded from killer whales in Iceland suggest that Norwegian and Icelandic killer whales use similar hunting techniques. The acoustic characteristics of sounds produced by underwater tail slaps were similar to the ones from other cavitation sound sources described in the literature, both in term of temporal and frequency features as well as in source level. We suggest that multiple factors generated by the tail slaps like particle fluctuations, turbulence, pressure changes and physical impact cause debilitation of herring.

  16. Cardiac arrhythmia is the primary response of embryonic Pacific herring (Clupea pallasi) exposed to crude oil during weathering.

    PubMed

    Incardona, John P; Carls, Mark G; Day, Heather L; Sloan, Catherine A; Bolton, Jennie L; Collier, Tracy K; Scholz, Nathaniel L

    2009-01-01

    Teleost embryos develop a syndrome characterized by edema when exposed to water that weathers substrates contaminated with crude oil. Previous studies using zebrafish demonstrated that crude oil exposure causes cardiogenic edema, and that the most abundant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in weathered crude oils (tricyclic fluorenes, dibenzothiophenes, and phenanthrenes) are cardiotoxic, causing arrhythmia through a pathway that does not require activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR). We demonstrate here for Pacific herring, a species impacted by the Exxon Valdez oil spill, that the developing heart is the primary target of crude oil exposure. Herring embryos exposed to the effluent of oiled gravel columns developed dose-dependent edema and irregular cardiac arrhythmia soon afterthe heartbeat was established. At a dose that produced cardiac dysfunction in 100% of exposed embryos, tissue levels of tricyclic PAHs were below 1 micromol/kg, suggesting a specific, high affinity target in the heart. These findings have implications for understanding the mechanism of tricyclic PAH cardiotoxicity, the development of biomarkers for the effects of PAH exposure in fish, and understanding the long-term impacts of oil spills and other sources of PAH pollution in aquatic environments.

  17. Two egg-derived molecules in sperm motility initiation and fertilization in the Pacific herring (Clupea pallasi).

    PubMed

    Cherr, Gary N; Morisawa, Masaaki; Vines, Carol A; Yoshida, Kaoru; Smith, Edmund H; Matsubara, Takahiro; Pillai, Murali C; Griffin, Frederick J; Yanagimachi, Ryuzo

    2008-01-01

    Sperm of the Pacific herring are immotile at spawning. Two egg-derived molecules are capable of initiating sperm motility. One is herring sperm activating protein(s) (HSAPs) and the other is sperm motility initiation factor (SMIF). These two motility initiators differ in their location and association with the chorion, and in their isoelectric points and molecular weights. In this study we have investigated the roles of these two inducers with respect to motility and fertilization. Using computer analysis of sperm motility, we found that HSAPs, as well as the C-terminal HSAPs peptide, elicit a linear motility pattern, while SMIF induced a highly circular and asymmetric pattern. HSAPs induced a two-fold increase in intracellular calcium, whereas SMIF induced a four-fold increase of motility initiation. SMIF-exposed sperm, preloaded with BAPTA-AM, showed a more linear motility and this motility trajectory decreased with their fertilizing capability. The difference in intracellular calcium levels between HSAPs and SMIF is consistent with the observed linear and circular motility. In the absence of SMIF, HSAPs do not support fertilization. Fertilization is rescued in these experiments if SMIF is reintroduced. We propose that diffusible HSAPs are not essential for fertilization, but enhance sperm-egg collisions via linear motility. SMIF, which is bound to the micropylar region of the chorion, is required for fertilization and induces circular motility that is a prerequisite for sperm to enter the micropylar canal and fertilize the egg.

  18. Regional and seasonal differences in growth of larval North Sea herring ( Clupea harengus L.) estimated by otolith microstructure analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munk, Peter; Heath, Mike; Skaarup, Bo

    1991-07-01

    The ecology processes of the larval life of autumn-spawned North Sea herring have been studied in a multidisciplinary and internationally coordinated research programme (ACE). The programme focused on larval advection and the importance of the autumn/winter circulation in determining larval distribution. In order to evaluate the effect of potential changes in spatial distribution of larvae through time, the growth pattern of spatially separated groups of larvae has been analysed. Growth of larvae was estimated by comparing mean length of groups in four surveys and by examining the relationship between larval length and otolith ring structure within defined geographical regions and restricted periods of time. The analysis indicates a 45% decrease in growth rates through the autumn/winter period along with a substantial difference between southern and northern areas, the growth rates in the south being about 50% higher. The significance of differences is evaluated in relation to method of analysis and assumptions on ring deposition rates. The findings point to the importance of spatial distribution pattern in determining overall growth and survival of herring larvae.

  19. 75 FR 56016 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Total Allowable Catch...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-15

    .... ACTION: Temporary rule; closure. SUMMARY: NMFS announces that, effective 0001 hours, September 14, 2010...) of Atlantic herring in or from Management Area 1B (Area 1B) per trip or calendar day until January 1... TAC allocated to Area 1B for 2010 is projected to be harvested by September 14, 2010....

  20. 78 FR 62471 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Framework Adjustment 2 and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 50 CFR Part 648 RIN 0648-BD17 Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Framework Adjustment 2 and Specifications Correction In rule...

  1. Preventing lipid oxidation during recovery of functional proteins from herring (Clupea harengus) fillets by an acid solubilization process.

    PubMed

    Undeland, Ingrid; Hall, Gunnar; Wendin, Karin; Gangby, Ingela; Rutgersson, Annika

    2005-07-13

    It has previously been found that a process based on solubilization at pH 2.7 gives high yields of herring muscle proteins with good functionality. In this study, the development of lipid oxidation during acid processing of herring mince was studied. It was tested how modifications of the process conditions and/or additions of antioxidants could prevent lipid oxidation during the actual process and then during ice storage of the protein isolates. Processing parameters evaluated were prewash of the mince, exposure time to pH 2.7, inclusion or exclusion of a high-speed centrifugation, and addition of antioxidants. Antioxidants tested were erythorbate (0.2%, 9.3 mM), sodium tripolyphosphate (STPP; 0.2%, 5.4 mM), ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA; 0.044%, 1.5 mM), and milk proteins (4%). The first three antioxidants were added in the prewash or during the homogenization step, whereas milk proteins were added to the final precipitate. At time 0, all isolates were analyzed for pH, moisture content, and thiobarbituric reactive substances (TBARS). Selected isolates were also analyzed for lipid and protein content. Stability during ice storage was followed in terms of odor, TBARS, and color (a/b values). Extensive lipid oxidation took place using the "control" process without high-speed centrifugation. This was not significantly (p < or = 0.05) affected by a prewash or varied exposure time to pH 2.7. Including high-speed centrifugation (20 min, 10,000g) significantly (p < or = 0.05) reduced TBARS values, total lipids, a values and b values. Erythorbate alone, or in combination with STPP/EDTA, significantly (p < or = 0.05) reduced lipid oxidation during processing if added in the prewash or homogenization step. During ice storage, better stability was gained when antioxidants were added in both of these steps and when EDTA was used instead of STPP.

  2. 76 FR 61061 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Sub-ACL (Annual Catch...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-03

    ... Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Sub-ACL (Annual Catch Limit) Harvested for Management... day until January 1, 2012, when the 2012 sub-ACL (annual catch limit) for Area 3 becomes available... percent of the herring sub-ACL allocated to Area 3 for 2011 is projected to be harvested by October...

  3. Parallel adaptive evolution of geographically distant herring populations on both sides of the North Atlantic Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Lamichhaney, Sangeet; Fuentes-Pardo, Angela P.; Rafati, Nima; Ryman, Nils; McCracken, Gregory R.; Bourne, Christina; Singh, Rabindra; Ruzzante, Daniel E.; Andersson, Leif

    2017-01-01

    Atlantic herring is an excellent species for studying the genetic basis of adaptation in geographically distant populations because of its characteristically large population sizes and low genetic drift. In this study we compared whole-genome resequencing data of Atlantic herring populations from both sides of the Atlantic Ocean. An important finding was the very low degree of genetic differentiation among geographically distant populations (fixation index = 0.026), suggesting lack of reproductive isolation across the ocean. This feature of the Atlantic herring facilitates the detection of genetic factors affecting adaptation because of the sharp contrast between loci showing genetic differentiation resulting from natural selection and the low background noise resulting from genetic drift. We show that genetic factors associated with timing of reproduction are shared between genetically distinct and geographically distant populations. The genes for thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR), the SOX11 transcription factor (SOX11), calmodulin (CALM), and estrogen receptor 2 (ESR2A), all with a significant role in reproductive biology, were among the loci that showed the most consistent association with spawning time throughout the species range. In fact, the same two SNPs located at the 5′ end of TSHR showed the most significant association with spawning time in both the east and west Atlantic. We also identified unexpected haplotype sharing between spring-spawning oceanic herring and autumn-spawning populations across the Atlantic Ocean and the Baltic Sea. The genomic regions showing this pattern are unlikely to control spawning time but may be involved in adaptation to ecological factor(s) shared among these populations. PMID:28389569

  4. Parallel adaptive evolution of geographically distant herring populations on both sides of the North Atlantic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Lamichhaney, Sangeet; Fuentes-Pardo, Angela P; Rafati, Nima; Ryman, Nils; McCracken, Gregory R; Bourne, Christina; Singh, Rabindra; Ruzzante, Daniel E; Andersson, Leif

    2017-04-25

    Atlantic herring is an excellent species for studying the genetic basis of adaptation in geographically distant populations because of its characteristically large population sizes and low genetic drift. In this study we compared whole-genome resequencing data of Atlantic herring populations from both sides of the Atlantic Ocean. An important finding was the very low degree of genetic differentiation among geographically distant populations (fixation index = 0.026), suggesting lack of reproductive isolation across the ocean. This feature of the Atlantic herring facilitates the detection of genetic factors affecting adaptation because of the sharp contrast between loci showing genetic differentiation resulting from natural selection and the low background noise resulting from genetic drift. We show that genetic factors associated with timing of reproduction are shared between genetically distinct and geographically distant populations. The genes for thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR), the SOX11 transcription factor (SOX11), calmodulin (CALM), and estrogen receptor 2 (ESR2A), all with a significant role in reproductive biology, were among the loci that showed the most consistent association with spawning time throughout the species range. In fact, the same two SNPs located at the 5' end of TSHR showed the most significant association with spawning time in both the east and west Atlantic. We also identified unexpected haplotype sharing between spring-spawning oceanic herring and autumn-spawning populations across the Atlantic Ocean and the Baltic Sea. The genomic regions showing this pattern are unlikely to control spawning time but may be involved in adaptation to ecological factor(s) shared among these populations.

  5. Efficacy of a glycoprotein DNA vaccine against viral haemorrhagic septicaemia (VHS) in Pacific herring, Clupea pallasii Valenciennes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hart, L.M.; Lorenzen, Niels; LaPatra, S.E.; Grady, C.A.; Roon, S.E.; O’Reilly, J.; Gregg, J.L.; Hershberger, P.K.

    2012-01-01

    Viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) and its associated disease state, viral haemorrhagic septicaemia (VHS), is hypothesized to be a proximate factor accounting for the decline and failed recovery of Pacific herring populations in Prince William Sound, AK (Marty et al. 1998, 2003, 2010). Survivors of laboratory-induced VHSV epizootics develop resistance to subsequent viral exposure (Kocan et al. 2001; Hershberger et al. 2007, 2010), which is likely the result of immune system recognition of the viral glycoprotein (G) (Lecocq-Xhonneux et al. 1994), a surface antigen that contains neutralizing epitopes (Lorenzen, Olesen & Jorgensen 1990; Jørgensen et al. 1995) and cell attachment domains (Lecocq-Xhonneux et al. 1994; Estepa & Coll 1996). These properties have proven useful in the development of G-gene-based DNA vaccines for VHSV and a related rhabdovirus, infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) (Anderson et al. 1996; Heppell et al. 1998; Corbeil et al. 1999; Einer-Jensen et al. 2009). Rainbow trout fingerlings, Oncorhynchus mykiss (Walbaum), vaccinated with 1 µg of either the VHS or IHN vaccine are protected from VHS when exposed to virus as early as 4 days (44 degree days) post-vaccination (p.v.) (Lorenzen et al. 2002). At later time points (80 days p.v.; 880 degree days), the level of cross-protection against VHS by IHN vaccination is either completely lost (60 days p.v.; 660 degree days) (3 g rainbow trout; 1 µg vaccine dose) (Lorenzen et al. 2002) or present at intermediate levels (6.5 g rainbow trout; 1 µg vaccine dose) (Einer-Jensen et al. 2009). Comparatively, VHS vaccination remains effective as long as 9 months (2520 degree days) p.v. (100 g rainbow trout; 0.5 µg vaccine dose) (McLauchlan et al. 2003). These results suggest that IHN and VHS vaccination activate a rapid transitory innate immune response against VHSV that is followed by long-term adaptive immunity in VHS-vaccinated trout (Lorenzen et al. 2002).

  6. Risk of environmental genotoxicity in the Baltic Sea over the period of 2009-2011 assessed by micronuclei frequencies in blood erythrocytes of flounder (Platichthys flesus), herring (Clupea harengus) and eelpout (Zoarces viviparus).

    PubMed

    Baršienė, Janina; Rybakovas, Aleksandras; Lang, Thomas; Grygiel, Wlodzimierz; Andreikėnaitė, Laura; Michailovas, Aleksandras

    2012-06-01

    Environmental genotoxicity was investigated at 82 locations encompassing different regions of the Baltic Sea. Micronuclei (MN) analysis was performed in erythrocytes of 1892 specimens of flounder Platichthys flesus, herring Clupea harengus and eelpout Zoarces viviparus, three of the most common native fish species of the Baltic Sea collected in 2009-2011. MN background levels in fish were determined using data obtained in 2001-2011 from 107 Baltic sites. Extremely high genotoxicity risk zones were found for flounder at 11 stations out of 16 in 2009 and 33 stations of 41 in 2010-2011, for herring, at 5 of 18 stations in 2009 and 20 of 43 stations in 2010-2011, in eelpout only at one out of 29 stations. The sampling stations were restricted mainly to the southern and eastern Baltic Sea offshore zones and in most of them, MN frequencies in flounder and herring significantly exceeded the reference and background levels of micronuclei. This is a first attempt to evaluate the background MN responses, as well as low, high and extremely high genotoxicity risk levels for native fish species.

  7. Lethal and sublethal effects of the water-soluble fraction of Cook Inlet crude oil on Pacific herring (Clupea harengus pallasi) reproduction. Technical memo

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, S.D.; Babcock, M.M.; Brodersen, C.C.; Carls, M.G.; Gharrett, J.A.

    1987-02-01

    The objectives of the study was to determine the median concentration of Cook Inlet crude oil Water Soluble Fraction that would kill 50% of prespawning adult Pacific herring exposed (LC50); the uptake and depuration of aromatic hydrocarbons in gonads, liver, and muscle of mature herring.

  8. Species Profiles. Life Histories and Environmental Requirements of Coastal Fishes and Invertebrates (North Atlantic). Atlantic Herring,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-04-01

    from alewives (Alosa pseudoharengus) economy (Briggs et al. 1982). The and shads (Alosa spp.): the point of average annual value of Maine herring origin...D.J. Wildish, and R.H. pp. Peterson. 1981. Possible impact 20 .. .. , ,,n ,nnmm, m mm • ~ mlm mBNIN - - !| from dredging and spoil disposal on...a herring (Clu__ a No. 1008. 33 pp. harengus L.) spawning bed in Miramichi Bay, New Brunswick. Can. Meyer, H.A. 1878. Beobachtungen uber Tech. Rep

  9. The genetic basis for ecological adaptation of the Atlantic herring revealed by genome sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Martinez Barrio, Alvaro; Lamichhaney, Sangeet; Fan, Guangyi; Rafati, Nima; Pettersson, Mats; Zhang, He; Dainat, Jacques; Ekman, Diana; Höppner, Marc; Jern, Patric; Martin, Marcel; Nystedt, Björn; Liu, Xin; Chen, Wenbin; Liang, Xinming; Shi, Chengcheng; Fu, Yuanyuan; Ma, Kailong; Zhan, Xiao; Feng, Chungang; Gustafson, Ulla; Rubin, Carl-Johan; Sällman Almén, Markus; Blass, Martina; Casini, Michele; Folkvord, Arild; Laikre, Linda; Ryman, Nils; Ming-Yuen Lee, Simon; Xu, Xun; Andersson, Leif

    2016-01-01

    Ecological adaptation is of major relevance to speciation and sustainable population management, but the underlying genetic factors are typically hard to study in natural populations due to genetic differentiation caused by natural selection being confounded with genetic drift in subdivided populations. Here, we use whole genome population sequencing of Atlantic and Baltic herring to reveal the underlying genetic architecture at an unprecedented detailed resolution for both adaptation to a new niche environment and timing of reproduction. We identify almost 500 independent loci associated with a recent niche expansion from marine (Atlantic Ocean) to brackish waters (Baltic Sea), and more than 100 independent loci showing genetic differentiation between spring- and autumn-spawning populations irrespective of geographic origin. Our results show that both coding and non-coding changes contribute to adaptation. Haplotype blocks, often spanning multiple genes and maintained by selection, are associated with genetic differentiation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12081.001 PMID:27138043

  10. Thermal stratification influences maturation and timing of spawning in a local Clupea harengus population.

    PubMed

    Langård, L; Slotte, A; Skaret, G; Johannessen, A

    2014-04-01

    Maturation and timing of spawning in relation to temperature were studied in a local Atlantic herring Clupea harengus population inhabiting a small semi-enclosed ecosystem (7 km(2)) separated from the larger outer fjord system by narrow sills on the west coast of Norway. Ambient temperatures varied annually up to 4° C during both the pre-spawning and spawning periods from February to April, but without affecting the spawning time. Instead, the timing of spawning was found to be related to thermal stratification in response to spring warming, which occurred about the same time every year regardless of initial temperatures. © 2014 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  11. 78 FR 62331 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Sub-Annual Catch Limit...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-17

    ... Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Sub-Annual Catch Limit (ACL) Harvested for Management...), optimum yield, domestic harvest and processing, U.S. at-sea processing, border transfer, and sub-ACLs for each management area. The 2013 Domestic Annual Harvest is 107,800 metric tons (mt); the 2013...

  12. 77 FR 10668 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Sub-ACL (Annual Catch...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-23

    ... Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Sub-ACL (Annual Catch Limit) Harvested for Management... harvest and processing, U.S. at-sea processing, border transfer, and sub-ACLs for each management area. The 2012 Domestic Annual Harvest is 91,200 metric tons (mt); the 2012 sub-ACL allocated to Area 2...

  13. 78 FR 63406 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Sub-Annual Catch Limit...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-24

    ... Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Sub-Annual Catch Limit (ACL) Harvested for Management..., and sub-ACLs for each management area. The 2013 Domestic Annual Harvest is 107,800 metric tons (mt); the 2013 sub-ACL allocated to Area 3 is 42,000 mt, and 0 mt of the sub-ACL is set aside for...

  14. 77 FR 61299 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Sub-ACL (Annual Catch...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-09

    ... Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Sub-ACL (Annual Catch Limit) Harvested for Management..., domestic harvest and processing, U.S. at-sea processing, border transfer, and the sub-ACL for each management area. The 2012 Domestic Annual Harvest was set as 91,200 metric tons (mt); the sub-ACL...

  15. 77 FR 66746 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Sub-ACL (Annual Catch...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-07

    ... Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Sub-ACL (Annual Catch Limit) Harvested for Management..., domestic harvest and processing, U.S. at-sea processing, border transfer, and the sub-ACL for each management area. The 2012 Domestic Annual Harvest was set as 91,200 metric tons (mt); the sub-ACL...

  16. 76 FR 66654 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Sub-ACL (Annual Catch...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-27

    ... Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Sub-ACL (Annual Catch Limit) Harvested for Management..., domestic harvest and processing, U.S. at-sea processing, border transfer, and sub-ACLs for each management area. The 2011 Domestic Annual Harvest is 91,200 metric tons (mt); the 2011 sub-ACL allocated to...

  17. 76 FR 54385 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Regulatory Amendment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-01

    ... daily via vessel monitoring systems (VMS), open access herring vessels to report catch weekly via the... report herring catch daily via VMS; open access herring vessels report catch weekly via IVR; and all... VTR would be unchanged. Reporting Requirements for Open Access Herring Vessels In an effort to...

  18. Disease surveillance of Atlantic herring: molecular characterization of hepatic coccidiosis and a morphological report of a novel intestinal coccidian

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friend, Sarah E; Lovey, J; Hershberger, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Surveillance for pathogens of Atlantic herring, including viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV),Ichthyophonus hoferi, and hepatic and intestinal coccidians, was conducted from 2012 to 2016 in the NW Atlantic Ocean, New Jersey, USA. Neither VHSV nor I. hoferi was detected in any sample. Goussia clupearum was found in the livers of 40 to 78% of adult herring in varying parasite loads; however, associated pathological changes were negligible. Phylogenetic analysis based on small subunit 18S rRNA gene sequences placed G. clupearum most closely with other extraintestinal liver coccidia from the genus Calyptospora, though the G. clupearum isolates had a unique nucleotide insertion between 604 and 729 bp that did not occur in any other coccidian species. G. clupearum oocysts from Atlantic and Pacific herring were morphologically similar, though differences occurred in oocyst dimensions. Comparison of G. clupearum genetic sequences from Atlantic and Pacific herring revealed 4 nucleotide substitutions and 2 gaps in a 1749 bp region, indicating some divergence in the geographically separate populations. Pacific G. clupearum oocysts were not directly infective, suggesting that a heteroxenous life cycle is likely. Intestinal coccidiosis was described for the first time from juvenile and adult Atlantic herring. A novel intestinal coccidian species was detected based on morphological characteristics of exogenously sporulated oocysts. A unique feature in these oocysts was the presence of 3 long (15.1 ± 5.1 µm, mean ±SD) spiny projections on both ends of the oocyst. The novel morphology of this coccidian led us to tentatively name this parasite G. echinata n. sp.

  19. Disease surveillance of Atlantic herring: molecular characterization of hepatic coccidiosis and a morphological report of a novel intestinal coccidian.

    PubMed

    Friend, Sarah E; Lovy, Jan; Hershberger, Paul K

    2016-07-07

    Surveillance for pathogens of Atlantic herring, including viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV), Ichthyophonus hoferi, and hepatic and intestinal coccidians, was conducted from 2012 to 2016 in the NW Atlantic Ocean, New Jersey, USA. Neither VHSV nor I. hoferi was detected in any sample. Goussia clupearum was found in the livers of 40 to 78% of adult herring in varying parasite loads; however, associated pathological changes were negligible. Phylogenetic analysis based on small subunit 18S rRNA gene sequences placed G. clupearum most closely with other extraintestinal liver coccidia from the genus Calyptospora, though the G. clupearum isolates had a unique nucleotide insertion between 604 and 729 bp that did not occur in any other coccidian species. G. clupearum oocysts from Atlantic and Pacific herring were morphologically similar, though differences occurred in oocyst dimensions. Comparison of G. clupearum genetic sequences from Atlantic and Pacific herring revealed 4 nucleotide substitutions and 2 gaps in a 1749 bp region, indicating some divergence in the geographically separate populations. Pacific G. clupearum oocysts were not directly infective, suggesting that a heteroxenous life cycle is likely. Intestinal coccidiosis was described for the first time from juvenile and adult Atlantic herring. A novel intestinal coccidian species was detected based on morphological characteristics of exogenously sporulated oocysts. A unique feature in these oocysts was the presence of 3 long (15.1 ± 5.1 µm, mean ±SD) spiny projections on both ends of the oocyst. The novel morphology of this coccidian led us to tentatively name this parasite G. echinata n. sp.

  20. A baseline study of metals in herring (Clupea harengus) from the Norwegian Sea, with focus on mercury, cadmium, arsenic and lead.

    PubMed

    Frantzen, Sylvia; Maage, Amund; Duinker, Arne; Julshamn, Kaare; Iversen, Svein A

    2015-05-01

    The Norwegian spring spawning (NSS) herring is an ecologically and economically important fish population in the Norwegian Sea. It was the first of several Norwegian fish stocks subject to a baseline study designed to give a comprehensive account of the levels of contaminants in a fish species from most of its area of distribution and during different seasons. During 2006 and 2007, 800 individual herring were sampled in their feeding areas in the Norwegian Sea in spring and autumn and at their spawning grounds off the coast of Norway during late winter. Metals including Hg, Cd, As and Pb were determined in muscle samples of individual herring, and mean concentrations±sd (mg kg(-1) ww) were: Hg: 0.04±0.03, Cd: 0.010±0.006, As: 2.2±0.6 and Pb: <0.01-0.10. Apart from one sample, no individual herring exceeded the EU's maximum level for any of these elements, as has been seen also in previous monitoring. Hg and Cd concentration increased with increasing fish age and As concentration varied seasonally, possibly due to uptake during feeding (summer), elimination during starvation (winter) and up-concentration during spawning (spring).

  1. Release of infectious cells from epidermal ulcers in Ichthyophonus sp.–infected Pacific Herring (Clupea pallasii): Evidence for multiple mechanisms of transmission

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hershberger, Paul K.; Gregg, Jacob L.; Kocan, R.M.

    2010-01-01

    A common clinical sign of ichthyophoniasis in herring and trout is “sandpaper” skin, a roughening of the epidermis characterized by the appearance of small papules, followed by ulceration and sloughing of the epithelium; early investigators hypothesized that these ulcers might be a means of transmitting the parasite, Ichthyophonus sp., without the necessity of ingesting an infected host. We examined the cells associated with the epidermal lesions and confirmed that they were viable Ichthyophonus sp. cells that were readily released from the skin into the mucous layer and ultimately into the aquatic environment. The released cells were infectious when injected into the body cavity of specific-pathogen-free herring. Our hypothesis is that different mechanisms of transmission occur in carnivorous and planktivorous hosts: Planktonic feeders become infected by ingestion of ulcer-derived cells, while carnivores become infected by ingestion of whole infected fish.

  2. Distribution of cadmium, mercury, and lead in different body parts of Baltic herring (Clupea harengus) and perch (Perca fluviatilis): implications for environmental status assessments.

    PubMed

    Boalt, Elin; Miller, Aroha; Dahlgren, Henrik

    2014-01-15

    For heavy metals, quality standards indicating good environmental status are designed to evaluate concentrations in the whole fish body, whereas monitoring of metals is often conducted using muscle or liver tissue. As most metals accumulate at different rates in different parts of fish, data should be adjusted to reflect whole fish body concentrations; however, this requires knowledge on distribution of metal concentrations within fish. Here, concentrations of cadmium, mercury, and lead were analyzed in the liver, muscle and whole fish of herring and perch to create conversion factors for transformation of heavy metal concentrations between these tissues. Species-specific accumulation of metals between muscle, liver, and whole fish were observed. Relationships between different tissues were used to recalculate data from monitoring programs in the Baltic Sea region. Based on whole fish concentrations, environmental status for cadmium and mercury in herring improved compared to assessments based on muscle or liver concentrations alone. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Shifts in the Spring Herring (Clupea harengus membras) Larvae and Related Environment in the Eastern Baltic Sea over the Past 50 Years

    PubMed Central

    Arula, Timo; Gröger, Joachim; Ojaveer, Henn; Simm, Mart

    2014-01-01

    Because of the high management relevance, commercial fish related aspects have often been central in marine ecosystem investigations. The iterative shiftogram method was applied to detect occurrence, type and timing of shifts in the single and multivariate time series linked to the spring spawning herring larvae in the Gulf of Riga (Baltic Sea). Altogether nineteen larval herring and related environmental variables were utilized during the period of 1957–2010. All the time series investigated, either single or multivariate, exhibited one or more shifts with variable type and timing. Multivariate shiftogram based on all time series identified two distinct states (1957–1983 and 1992–2010) in studied variables, separated by a smooth transition period lasting almost ten years. The observed shift was mainly related to hydroclimate and not to phenology or biota. Significantly increased variability was found in larval herring and recruitment abundances after the shift. While the shift in hydroclimate (1985–1991) was followed by the shift in phenology (1991–1997), the shift in biota occurred remarkably later (2003). It is likely that the dynamics in biota were affected by other drivers than those investigated in the current paper. PMID:24637830

  4. Mitochondrial DNA control region diversity and population structure of Pacific herring ( Clupea pallasii) in the Yellow Sea and the Sea of Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ming; Gao, Tianxia; Sakurai, Yasunori; Jia, Ning; Zhao, Linlin; Du, Xiao; Jiang, Qun; Lu, Zhichuan

    2011-03-01

    To investigate the genetic variation and population structure of Pacific herring in the Yellow Sea and the genetic differentiation between the Yellow Sea and the Sea of Japan, fragments of 479-bp mitochondrial DNA control region were sequenced for 110 individuals collected from three different periods in the Yellow Sea and one locality in the Sea of Japan. High haplotype diversity and moderate nucleotide diversity were observed in Pacific herring. AMOVA and exact test of population differentiation showed no significant genetic differentiations among the three populations of the Yellow Sea and suggested the populations can be treated as a single panmictic stock in the Yellow Sea. However, a large and significant genetic differentiation ( Φ ST=0.11; P=0.00) was detected between the populations in the Yellow Sea and the Sea of Japan. The high sea water temperature in the Tsushima Strait was thought a barrier to block the gene exchange between populations of the two sea areas. The neutrality tests and mismatch distribution indicated recent population expansion in Pacific herring.

  5. Shifts in the spring herring (Clupea harengus membras) larvae and related environment in the eastern Baltic Sea over the past 50 years.

    PubMed

    Arula, Timo; Gröger, Joachim; Ojaveer, Henn; Simm, Mart

    2014-01-01

    Because of the high management relevance, commercial fish related aspects have often been central in marine ecosystem investigations. The iterative shiftogram method was applied to detect occurrence, type and timing of shifts in the single and multivariate time series linked to the spring spawning herring larvae in the Gulf of Riga (Baltic Sea). Altogether nineteen larval herring and related environmental variables were utilized during the period of 1957-2010. All the time series investigated, either single or multivariate, exhibited one or more shifts with variable type and timing. Multivariate shiftogram based on all time series identified two distinct states (1957-1983 and 1992-2010) in studied variables, separated by a smooth transition period lasting almost ten years. The observed shift was mainly related to hydroclimate and not to phenology or biota. Significantly increased variability was found in larval herring and recruitment abundances after the shift. While the shift in hydroclimate (1985-1991) was followed by the shift in phenology (1991-1997), the shift in biota occurred remarkably later (2003). It is likely that the dynamics in biota were affected by other drivers than those investigated in the current paper.

  6. 76 FR 34947 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Regulatory Amendment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-15

    ... require limited access herring vessels to report catch daily via vessel monitoring systems (VMS), open...-C) report catch weekly via IVR, and owners/ operators of vessels issued an open access permit... via VMS, open access herring vessels report catch weekly via IVR, and all herring-permitted vessels...

  7. Inhibitory effect of known antioxidants and of press juice from herring (Clupea harengus) light muscle on the generation of free radicals in human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Gunnarsson, Gujón; Undeland, Ingrid; Sannaveerappa, Thippeswamy; Sandberg, Ann-Sofie; Lindgård, Ann; Mattsson-Hultén, Lillemor; Soussi, Bassam

    2006-10-18

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) can cause oxidative stress, which has been linked to various diseases. It has been suggested that antioxidant-rich foods can reduce such oxidative stress. However, the lack of suitable model systems to screen for in vivo effects of food-derived antioxidants has prevented a clear consensus in this area. In this study, the aim was to use a single-cell model system (human monocyte) to evaluate whether certain pure antioxidants and complex muscle extracts (herring light muscle press juice, PJ) could prevent ROS formation under in vivo like conditions. ROS were excreted from the monocytes upon stimulation with phorbol myristate acetate and were then detected as isoluminol-enhanced chemiluminescence (CL). Adding 2000 units of catalase and 50 units of superoxide dismutase to the monocytes model lowered the CL response by 35 and 86%, respectively. Ascorbate (14.1 mM) lowered the response by 99%, alpha-tocoperhol (188 microM) by 37%, and Trolox (50 microM) by almost 100%. Crude herring PJ gave a dose-dependent reduction in the CL response. At 10, 100, and 1000 times dilution, the PJ reduced the CL signal by 93, 60.5, and 10.6%. PJ fractionated into low molecular weight (LMW) (<1000 Da) and high molecular weight (>3500 Da) fractions decreased the CL response by 52.9 and 71.4%, respectively, at a 100-fold dilution. Evaluation of the PJ samples in the oxygen radical absorbance capacity test indicated that proteins may be the primary radical scavenging compounds of PJ, whereas the ROS-preventing effect obtained from the LMW fraction may also be attributed to other mechanisms. Thus, this study proved that the monocyte assay can be a useful tool for studying whether food-derived antioxidants can limit ROS production under physiologically relevant conditions. It also showed that herring contains numerous aqueous compounds demonstrating antioxidative effects in the monocyte model system.

  8. Development and characterization of a cell line from Pacific herring, Clupea harengus pallasi, sensitive to both naphthalene cytotoxicity and infection by viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus.

    PubMed

    Ganassin, R C; Sanders, S M; Kennedy, C J; Joyce, E M; Bols, N C

    1999-01-01

    A cell line, PHL, has been successfully established from newly hatched herring larvae. The cells are maintained in growth medium consisting of Leibovitz's L-15 supplemented with 15% fetal bovine serum (FBS), and have been cryopreserved and maintain viability after thawing. These cells retain a diploid karotype after 65 population doublings. PHL are susceptible to infection by the North American strain of viral hemorrhagic septicemia (VHS) virus, and are sensitive to the cytotoxic effects of naphthalene, a common environmental contaminant. Naphthalene is a component of crude and refined oil, and may be found in the marine environment following acute events such as oil spills. In addition, chronic sources of naphthalene contamination include offshore drilling and petroleum contamination from areas such as docks and marinas that have creosote-treated docks and pilings and also receive constant small inputs of petroleum products. This cell line should be useful for investigations of the toxicity of naphthalene and other petroleum components to juvenile herring. In addition, studies of the VHS virus will be facilitated by the availability of a susceptible cell line from an alternative species.

  9. Effect of milk protein concentrate on lipid oxidation and formation of fishy volatiles in herring mince (Clupea harengus) during frozen storage.

    PubMed

    Joaquin, H J F; Tolasa, S; Oliveira, A C M; Lee, C M; Lee, K H

    2008-01-09

    The effect of milk protein concentrate (MPC) at 0, 2, 4, and 6% on lipid oxidation and volatile formation in frozen stored herring mince (-18 degrees C) was evaluated by analyzing samples at 0, 2, and 4 months for fatty acid composition, volatiles, and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS). Sensory evaluation was also conducted to assess the intensity of fishy odor, and the volatiles were analyzed using static headspace gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (SHGC-MS). The addition of 4 and 6% MPC to herring mince resulted in a 33% and 50% reduction of TBARS, respectively, at month 4 and lessened the intensity of fishy odor throughout storage. However, MPC did not protect fatty acids from enzymatic degradation unless it was added immediately after mincing. Volatile analysis using SHGC-MS showed that 4% MPC was able to reduce headspace volatiles associated with fishy odor. MPC is most effective for reducing 4-heptenal, 3-methyl-1-butanol, 2-hexenal, and 1-penten-3-ol, which are known to be potent odorants associated with lipid oxidation.

  10. Removal of lipids, dioxins, and polychlorinated biphenyls during production of protein isolates from baltic herring ( Clupea harengus ) using pH-shift processes.

    PubMed

    Marmon, Sofia K; Liljelind, Per; Undeland, Ingrid

    2009-09-09

    Dioxins and PCBs are toxic, lipophilic, and persistent substances that impose a serious health threat. A major risk of exposure to these toxic substances is consumption of fish from polluted waters, such as the Baltic Sea. The aim of this study was to investigate if pH-shift processing of Baltic herring with elevated toxicity levels could be used to produce a protein isolate with low fat content and, thereby, reduced dioxin and PCB levels. Both acid (pH 2.7) and alkaline (pH 11.2) pH-shift processing were investigated and resulted in efficient reduction of fat, dioxin, and PCB levels. A reduction of 70-80% per amount of protein was determined for all of these parameters. The amounts, and thus the removal, of lipids and dioxins (R(2) = 0.952) as well as lipids and PCBs (R(2) = 0.996) were highly correlated (p < 0.01). A mass balance of the alkaline pH-shift process showed that most of the fat and pollutants were found in the floating fat emulsion layer of the first centrifugation, followed by the pellet of the first centrifugation. These data show that the pH-shift protein isolation technique can be used to process herring with elevated dioxin and PCB levels and thereby increase the usage possibilities of such fish.

  11. 78 FR 61828 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Framework Adjustment 2 and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-04

    ... of the 54th Northeast Regional Stock Assessment Workshop estimated the 2011 herring biomass at 517,930 mt (biomass supporting maximum sustainable yield (B MSY ) = 157,000 mt) and the 2011 fishing... perspective, as they are expected to produce similar spawning stock biomass values for the herring stock in...

  12. 77 FR 10978 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Adjustment to 2012 Annual...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-24

    ... (herring) fishery to account for catch overages in 2010 and to prevent overfishing. DATES: Effective... not experiencing overfishing, the herring annual acceptable biological catch for fishing years 2010..., ACLs must be set at a level that prevents overfishing. The sub-ACLs overages in 2010 did not result...

  13. Larval Pacific herring, Clupea pallasii (Valenciennes), are highly susceptible to viral haemorrhagic septicaemia and survivors are partially protected after their metamorphosis to juveniles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hershberger, P.K.; Gregg, J.; Pacheco, C.; Winton, J.; Richard, J.; Traxler, G.

    2007-01-01

    Pacific herring were susceptible to waterborne challenge with viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) throughout their early life history stages, with significantly greater cumulative mortalities occurring among VHSV-exposed groups of 9-, 44-, 54- and 76-day-old larvae than among respective control groups. Similarly, among 89-day-1-year-old and 1+year old post-metamorphosed juveniles, cumulative mortality was significantly greater in VHSV-challenged groups than in respective control groups. Larval exposure to VHSV conferred partial protection to the survivors after their metamorphosis to juveniles as shown by significantly less cumulative mortalities among juvenile groups that survived a VHS epidemic as larvae than among groups that were previously nai??ve to VHSV. Magnitude of the protection, measured as relative per cent survival, was a direct function of larval age at first exposure and was probably a reflection of gradual developmental onset of immunocompetence. These results indicate the potential for easily overlooked VHS epizootics among wild larvae in regions where the virus is endemic and emphasize the importance of early life history stages of marine fish in influencing the ecological disease processes. ?? 2007 The Authors.

  14. 75 FR 48874 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Specifications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-12

    ... overly conservative reaction to the uncertainty in the stock assessment. They noted that there are three... harvested in light of the scientific uncertainty about the results of the TRAC's stock assessment. Herring...

  15. 78 FR 33020 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Amendment 5

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-03

    ... long-term health and stability of the herring resource, monitors the fishery, facilitates inseason... catch apply uniformly to all vessels under the Closed Area I requirements, inequality among the fleet is...

  16. Use of Herring Bait to Farm Lobsters in the Gulf of Maine

    PubMed Central

    Grabowski, Jonathan H.; Clesceri, Erika J.; Baukus, Adam J.; Gaudette, Julien; Weber, Matthew; Yund, Philip O.

    2010-01-01

    Background Ecologists, fisheries scientists, and coastal managers have all called for an ecosystem approach to fisheries management, yet many species such as the American lobster (Homarus americanus) are still largely managed individually. One hypothesis that has yet to be tested suggests that human augmentation of lobster diets via the use of Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus) as bait may contribute to recent increases in lobster landings. Currently 70% of Atlantic herring landings in the Gulf of Maine are used as bait to catch lobsters in traps throughout coastal New England. Methodology/Principal Findings We examined the effects of this herring bait on the diet composition and growth rate of lobsters at heavily baited vs. seasonally closed (i.e., bait free) sites in coastal Maine. Our results suggest that human use of herring bait may be subsidizing juvenile lobster diets, thereby enhancing lobster growth and the overall economic value and yield of one of the most valuable fisheries in the U.S. Conclusions/Significance Our study illustrates that shifting to an ecosystem approach to fisheries management should require consideration of cross-fishery interactions. PMID:20419167

  17. 78 FR 70009 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Adjustments to 2014 Sub...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-22

    ... herring landings in the VTR database for accuracy against the scanned image of the paper VTRs submitted by... corrected VTRs with missing or invalid latitude/longitude coordinates using the statistical area reported on the VTR. If the fisherman did not report statistical area on the VTR, then we used a combination of...

  18. Potential Population Consequences of Active Sonar Disturbance in Atlantic Herring: Estimating the Maximum Risk.

    PubMed

    Sivle, Lise Doksæter; Kvadsheim, Petter Helgevold; Ainslie, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Effects of noise on fish populations may be predicted by the population consequence of acoustic disturbance (PCAD) model. We have predicted the potential risk of population disturbance when the highest sound exposure level (SEL) at which adult herring do not respond to naval sonar (SEL(0)) is exceeded. When the population density is low (feeding), the risk is low even at high sonar source levels and long-duration exercises (>24 h). With densely packed populations (overwintering), a sonar exercise might expose the entire population to levels >SEL(0) within a 24-h exercise period. However, the disturbance will be short and the response threshold used here is highly conservative. It is therefore unlikely that naval sonar will significantly impact the herring population.

  19. Pacific herring: Species profiles, life histories and environmental requirements of coastal fishes and invertebrates (Pacific Southwest)

    SciTech Connect

    Barnhart, R.A.

    1988-02-01

    Species profiles are literature summaries of the taxonomy, morphology, distribution, life history, and environmental requirements of coastal aquatic species. They are prepared to assist in environmental impact assessment. The Pacific herring, Clupea harengus pallasi, spawns in intertidal and subtidal waters of the Pacific coast during the winter-spring season. In California, female herring average about 220 eggs per gram body weight. Herring are fished commercially primarily during the spawning season to obtain herring roe for export to Japan. Herring have a significant ecological role; herring spawn deposits attract many predators, and the abundant herring larvae and juveniles found in estuaries and nearshore waters serve as food for larger sea life. Herring embryos and larvae are fairly plastic regarding temperature and salinity, and survival probably depends largely on extent of predation and food supply. Excessive turbidity hinders the spawning and incubation of herring. Herring embryos, larvae, and juveniles are subject to various pollutants introduced into the estuarine environment. 60 refs., 4 figs.

  20. Behavior of captive herring exposed to naval sonar transmissions (1.0-1.6 kHz) throughout a yearly cycle.

    PubMed

    Doksæter, Lise; Handegard, Nils Olav; Godø, Olav Rune; Kvadsheim, Petter H; Nordlund, Nina

    2012-02-01

    Atlantic herring, Clupea harengus, is a hearing specialist, and several studies have demonstrated strong responses to man-made noise, for example, from an approaching vessel. To avoid negative impacts from naval sonar operations, a set of studies of reaction patters of herring to low-frequency (1.0-1.5 kHz) naval sonar signals has been undertaken. This paper presents herring reactions to sonar signals and other stimuli when kept in captivity under detailed acoustic and video monitoring. Throughout the experiment, spanning three seasons of a year, the fish did not react significantly to sonar signals from a passing frigate, at received root-mean-square sound-pressure level (SPL) up to 168 dB re 1 μPa. In contrast, the fish did exhibit a significant diving reaction when exposed to other sounds, with a much lower SPL, e.g., from a two-stroke engine. This shows that the experimental setup is sensitive to herring reactions when occurring. The lack of herring reaction to sonar signals is consistent with earlier in situ behavioral studies. The complexity of the behavioral reactions in captivity underline the need for better understanding of the causal relationship between stimuli and reaction patterns of fish.

  1. Low-frequency Target Strength and Abundance of Shoaling Atlantic Herring (Clupea harengus) in the Gulf of Maine during the Ocean Acoustic Waveguide Remote Sensing 2006 Experiment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    range using 1 a low-frequency ocean acoustic waveguide remote sensing OAWRS system, 2 areal population density calibration with several...and around Georges Bank dur- ing their Autumn spawning season,1 an experiment using ocean acoustic waveguide remote sensing OAWRS was conducted in...matched filtering with angular resolution shown in Table I. The receiving array also contained one desensitized hydrophone which was used to measure

  2. Effect of technological factors on the activity and losses of cathepsins B, D and L during the marinating of Atlantic and Baltic herrings.

    PubMed

    Szymczak, Mariusz

    2017-03-01

    This study analyzes the effect of salt and acetic acid concentration, time, temperature and fish freezing on the activity and losses of cathepsins during the marinating of Atlantic and Baltic herrings. The highest contribution to meat general proteolytic activity was found for cathepsin D-like activity. This contribution decreased during the marinating process as a result of, among other things, cathepsin losses to brine. The methods of marinating had a significant impact on cathepsin activity losses. The average ratio of cathepsin D-like activity to L and B in brine accounted for 15:3.5:1.5, respectively. Depending on the method of calculation, cathepsin activity in brine was similar (per gram of tissue/milliliter of brine) or multiply higher (per gram protein in tissue/brine) than in the marinated herring meat. Statistical analysis demonstrated that the extent and structure of cathepsin losses were significantly correlated with the quantitative and qualitative composition of protein hydrolysis products in marinades. The presented results depict new phenomena of cathepsin losses and explain their impact on the process of fish marinating. Results allow better optimization of the process of meat ripening. The high activity of aspartyl and cysteine cathepsins in brine indicates the real feasibility of their application in the food industry for novel food design. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  3. The importance of both potency and mechanism in dose-response analysis: an example from exposure of Pacific herring (Clupea pallasi) embryos to low concentrations of weathered crude oil.

    PubMed

    Neff, Jerry M; Page, David S; Landrum, Peter F; Chapman, Peter M

    2013-02-15

    This paper reanalyzes data from an earlier study that used effluents from oiled-gravel columns to assess the toxicity of aqueous fractions of weathered crude oil to Pacific herring embryos and larvae. This reanalysis has implications for future similar investigations, including the observance of two distinct dose-response curves for lethal and sublethal endpoints for different exposures in the same experiment, and the need to consider both potency and slope of dose-response curves for components of a toxicant mixture that shows potentially different toxicity mechanisms/causation. Contrary to conclusions of the original study, the aqueous concentration data cannot support the hypothesis that polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were the sole cause of toxicity and that oil toxicity increased with weathering. Confounding issues associated with the oiled gravel columns include changes in the concentration and composition of chemicals in exposure water, which interfere with the production of reliable and reproducible results relevant to the field. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Atlantic coast feeding habits of striped bass: A synthesis supporting a coast-wide understanding of trophic biology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walter, J. F.; Overton, A.S.; Ferry, K.H.; Mather, M. E.

    2003-01-01

    The recent increase in the Atlantic coast population of striped bass, Morone saxatilis (Walbaum), prompted managers to re-evaluate their predatory impact. Published and unpublished diet data for striped bass on the Atlantic Coast of North America were examined for geographical, ontogenetic and seasonal patterns in the diet and to assess diet for this species. Diets of young-of-the-year (YOY) striped bass were similar across the Upper Atlantic (UPATL), Chesapeake and Delaware Bays (CBDEL) and North Carolina (NCARO) areas of the Atlantic coast where either fish or mysid shrimp dominate the diet. For age one and older striped bass, cluster analysis partitioned diets based on predominance of either Atlantic menhaden, Brevoortia tyrannus (Latrobe), characteristic of striped bass from the CBDEL and NCARO regions, or non-menhaden fishes or invertebrates, characteristic of fish from the UPATL, in the diet. The predominance of invertebrates in the diets of striped bass in the UPATL region can be attributed to the absence of several important species groups in Northern waters, particularly sciaenid fishes, and to the sporadic occurrences of Atlantic menhaden to UPATL waters. In all regions, across most seasons and in most size classes of striped bass, the clupeiod fishes; menhaden, anchovies (Anchoa spp.) and river herrings (Alosa spp,) and Atlantic herring, Clupea harengus L., dominated the diets of striped bass above the first year of life.

  5. A parvicapsulid (Myxozoa) infecting Sprattus sprattus and Clupea harengus (Clupeidae) in the Northeast Atlantic uses Hydroides norvegicus (Serpulidae) as invertebrate host.

    PubMed

    Køie, Marianne; Karlsbakk, Egil; Einen, Ann-Cathrine Bårdsgjtere; Nylund, Are

    2013-05-01

    A myxosporean producing actinospores of the tetractinomyxon type in Hydroides norvegicus Gunnerus (Serpulidae) in Denmark was identified as a member of the family Parvicapsulidae based on small-subunit ribosomal DNA (SSU rDNA) sequences. Myxosporean samples from various Danish and Norwegian marine fishes were examined with primers that detect the novel myxosporean. Sprattus sprattus (Linnaeus) and Clupea harengus Linnaeus (Teleostei, Clupeidae) were found to be infected. The sequences of this parvicapsulid from these hosts were consistently slightly different (0.8% divergence), but both these genotypes were found in H. norvegicus. Disporic trophozoites and minute spores of a novel myxosporean type were observed in the renal tubules of some of the hosts found infected through PCR. The spores appear most similar to those of species of Gadimyxa Køie, Karlsbakk et Nylund, 2007, but are much smaller. The actinospores of the tetractinomyxon type from H. norvegicus have been described previously. In GenBank, the SSU rDNA sequences of Parvicapsulidae gen. sp. show highest identity (82%) with Parvicapsula minibicornis Kent, Whitaker et Dawe, 1997 infecting salmonids (Oncorhynchus spp.) in fresh water in the western North America. A phylogenetic analysis places P. minibicornis and Parvicapsulidae gen. sp. in a sister clade to the other parvicapsulids (Parvicapsula spp. and Gadimyxa spp.).

  6. Evaluation of the frequency of skipped spawning in Norwegian spring-spawning herring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, James; Skjæraasen, Jon Egil; Nash, Richard D. M.; Slotte, Aril; Geffen, Audrey J.; Kjesbu, Olav S.

    2011-04-01

    Based upon an under-representation of second time spawners on the spawning grounds between 1935 and 1973, researchers have suggested that Norwegian spring-spawning (NSS) herring ( Clupea harengus) frequently skip their second spawning event. In order to evaluate this claim with direct evidence, herring were collected over a period of three years from statutory surveys and commercial catches over a wide area covering the feeding, over-wintering and spawning grounds. The development stage of the ovaries was assessed and the intensity of atresia quantified. Only a negligible number of the analysed herring caught were considered likely to skip spawning, thus this phenomenon does not appear to be a common feature of the NSS herring stock at present. In addition, considering the reproductive strategy of herring, it seems doubtful that skipping the second spawning event has ever frequently occurred in this stock.

  7. Feasibility of Surgically Implanting Acoustic Tags into Pacific Herring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hershberger, Paul K.; Gregg, Jacob L.; Seitz, A.C.; Norcross, Brenda L.; Payne, J.C.; Kagley, A.N.; Meloy, B

    2010-01-01

    Internally implanted acoustic tags represent a potentially valuable approach to assessing the seasonal migration and distribution patterns of Pacific herring Clupea palasii. We examined the feasibility of implanting two sizes of dummy acoustic tags (9 mm in diameter × 21 mm long, 1.6 g; and 7 mm in diameter × 18 mm long, 0.7 g) in Pacific herring that had been held in captivity for nearly a year and that ranged from 165 to 215 mm in fork length (FL) and from 41.6 to 142.6 g. Relatively low mortality (4%) and tag shedding (4%), as well as growth similar to that observed in control fish after 135 d, indicate that, with proper handling, Pacific herring are amenable to surgical implantation of acoustic tags.

  8. Population diversity in Pacific herring of the Puget Sound, USA.

    PubMed

    Siple, Margaret C; Francis, Tessa B

    2016-01-01

    Demographic, functional, or habitat diversity can confer stability on populations via portfolio effects (PEs) that integrate across multiple ecological responses and buffer against environmental impacts. The prevalence of these PEs in aquatic organisms is as yet unknown, and can be difficult to quantify; however, understanding mechanisms that stabilize populations in the face of environmental change is a key concern in ecology. Here, we examine PEs in Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii) in Puget Sound (USA) using a 40-year time series of biomass data for 19 distinct spawning population units collected using two survey types. Multivariate auto-regressive state-space models show independent dynamics among spawning subpopulations, suggesting that variation in herring production is partially driven by local effects at spawning grounds or during the earliest life history stages. This independence at the subpopulation level confers a stabilizing effect on the overall Puget Sound spawning stock, with herring being as much as three times more stable in the face of environmental perturbation than a single population unit of the same size. Herring populations within Puget Sound are highly asynchronous but share a common negative growth rate and may be influenced by the Pacific Decadal Oscillation. The biocomplexity in the herring stock shown here demonstrates that preserving spatial and demographic diversity can increase the stability of this herring population and its availability as a resource for consumers.

  9. 50 CFR 648.207 - Herring Research Set-Aside (RSA).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Herring Research Set-Aside (RSA). 648.207... Measures for the Atlantic Herring Fishery § 648.207 Herring Research Set-Aside (RSA). (a) NMFS shall... of the set-asides, the unutilized portion of the set-aside shall be reallocated back to...

  10. 50 CFR 648.207 - Herring Research Set-Aside (RSA).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Herring Research Set-Aside (RSA). 648.207... Measures for the Atlantic Herring Fishery § 648.207 Herring Research Set-Aside (RSA). (a) NMFS shall... of the set-asides, the unutilized portion of the set-aside shall be reallocated back to...

  11. 50 CFR 648.207 - Herring Research Set-Aside (RSA).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... research priorities and/or management needs, project design, participants other than the applicant, funding... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Herring Research Set-Aside (RSA). 648.207... Measures for the Atlantic Herring Fishery § 648.207 Herring Research Set-Aside (RSA). (a) NMFS...

  12. Habitat Suitability Index Models: Alewife and blueback herring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pardue, Garland B.

    1983-01-01

    Alewives and blueback herring are anadromous clupeids found along the Atlantic coast in marine, estuarine, and riverine habitats, depending upon life stage. Both are important commercial species, used fresh or salted for human consumption, and used as crab bait, fish meal (particularly in animal food manufacturing), and fish oil. Alewife and blueback herring are marketed collectively as 'river herring,' a term that will be used for both species in this report. River herring play important ecological roles. In marine, estuarine, and riverine food webs, they occupy a level between zooplankton, their principal food, and piscivores.

  13. Definition and characterization of data needs to describe the potential effects of increased atmospheric CO2 on marine fisheries from the northeast Pacific Ocean. [Theragra chalcogramma; Clupea harengus pallasi; Pandalus borealis; Limanda aspera

    SciTech Connect

    Strickland, R.M.; Grosse, D.J.; Stubin, A.I.; Ostrander, G.K.; Sibley, T.H.

    1985-12-01

    Four northeast Pacific region case study species were studied to determine individual fishery responses to climate change. These fishes (Alaska pollock, Theragra chalcogramma; Pacific herring, Clupea harengus pallasi; pink shrimp, Pandalus borealis; and yellowfin sole, Limanda aspera) represent a spectrum of habitats and life cycles among commercially important species, and the northeast Pacific (including the eastern Bering Sea) is relatively well-studied and representative of subpolar continental shelf areas that also are important in the North Atlantic. In addition to the general effects of climate, these fisheries have specific climate-related environmental sensitivities: (a) pollock sensitivity to ice extent, cannibalism, and bird and mammal predation in the Bering Sea, and to coastal currents in the Gulf of Alaska; (b) sensitivity of herring to waves, dessication, and probably currents in the immediate vicinity of discrete spawning beaches along the British Columbia coast; (c) the relative insensitivity of bottom-dwelling shrimp to temperature changes; and (d) the probable sensitivity of yellowfin sole to ice extent and to associated changes in food supply caused by alterations in plankton species composition. It is difficult to extrapolate from the results of the present case studies to other fisheries. These results are particularly inapplicable to other major categories of fisheries, including open-ocean, upwelling, and tropical and subtropical shelf fisheries. Such fisheries should be the focus of additional case studies. Possible temperature effects on the incidence of disease and parasitism in fish also should be investigated.

  14. High potential for using DNA from ancient herring bones to inform modern fisheries management and conservation.

    PubMed

    Speller, Camilla F; Hauser, Lorenz; Lepofsky, Dana; Moore, Jason; Rodrigues, Antonia T; Moss, Madonna L; McKechnie, Iain; Yang, Dongya Y

    2012-01-01

    Pacific herring (Clupea pallasi) are an abundant and important component of the coastal ecosystems for the west coast of North America. Current Canadian federal herring management assumes five regional herring populations in British Columbia with a high degree of exchange between units, and few distinct local populations within them. Indigenous traditional knowledge and historic sources, however, suggest that locally adapted, distinct regional herring populations may have been more prevalent in the past. Within the last century, the combined effects of commercial fishing and other anthropogenic factors have resulted in severe declines of herring populations, with contemporary populations potentially reflecting only the remnants of a previously more abundant and genetically diverse metapopulation. Through the analysis of 85 archaeological herring bones, this study attempted to reconstruct the genetic diversity and population structure of ancient herring populations using three different marker systems (mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), microsatellites and SNPs). A high success rate (91%) of DNA recovery was obtained from the extremely small herring bone samples (often <10 mg). The ancient herring mtDNA revealed high haplotype diversity comparable to modern populations, although population discrimination was not possible due to the limited power of the mtDNA marker. Ancient microsatellite diversity was also similar to modern samples, but the data quality was compromised by large allele drop-out and stuttering. In contrast, SNPs were found to have low error rates with no evidence for deviations from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, and simulations indicated high power to detect genetic differentiation if loci under selection are used. This study demonstrates that SNPs may be the most effective and feasible approach to survey genetic population structure in ancient remains, and further efforts should be made to screen for high differentiation markers.This study provides the much

  15. High Potential for Using DNA from Ancient Herring Bones to Inform Modern Fisheries Management and Conservation

    PubMed Central

    Speller, Camilla F.; Hauser, Lorenz; Lepofsky, Dana; Moore, Jason; Rodrigues, Antonia T.; Moss, Madonna L.; McKechnie, Iain; Yang, Dongya Y.

    2012-01-01

    Pacific herring (Clupea pallasi) are an abundant and important component of the coastal ecosystems for the west coast of North America. Current Canadian federal herring management assumes five regional herring populations in British Columbia with a high degree of exchange between units, and few distinct local populations within them. Indigenous traditional knowledge and historic sources, however, suggest that locally adapted, distinct regional herring populations may have been more prevalent in the past. Within the last century, the combined effects of commercial fishing and other anthropogenic factors have resulted in severe declines of herring populations, with contemporary populations potentially reflecting only the remnants of a previously more abundant and genetically diverse metapopulation. Through the analysis of 85 archaeological herring bones, this study attempted to reconstruct the genetic diversity and population structure of ancient herring populations using three different marker systems (mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), microsatellites and SNPs). A high success rate (91%) of DNA recovery was obtained from the extremely small herring bone samples (often <10 mg). The ancient herring mtDNA revealed high haplotype diversity comparable to modern populations, although population discrimination was not possible due to the limited power of the mtDNA marker. Ancient microsatellite diversity was also similar to modern samples, but the data quality was compromised by large allele drop-out and stuttering. In contrast, SNPs were found to have low error rates with no evidence for deviations from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, and simulations indicated high power to detect genetic differentiation if loci under selection are used. This study demonstrates that SNPs may be the most effective and feasible approach to survey genetic population structure in ancient remains, and further efforts should be made to screen for high differentiation markers.This study provides the much

  16. Experimental infection studies demonstrating Atlantic salmon as a host and reservoir of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus type IVa with insights into pathology and host immunity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovy, Jan; Piesik, P.; Hershberger, P.K.; Garver, K.A.

    2013-01-01

    In British Columbia, Canada (BC), aquaculture of finfish in ocean netpens has the potential for pathogen transmission between wild and farmed species due to the sharing of an aquatic environment. Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) is enzootic in BC and causes serious disease in wild Pacific herring, Clupea pallasii, which often enter and remain in Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar, netpens. Isolation of VHSV from farmed Atlantic salmon has been previously documented, but the effects on the health of farmed salmon and the wild fish sharing the environment are unknown. To determine their susceptibility, Atlantic salmon were exposed to a pool of 9 isolates of VHSV obtained from farmed Atlantic salmon in BC by IP-injection or by waterborne exposure and cohabitation with diseased Pacific herring. Disease intensity was quantified by recording mortality, clinical signs, histopathological changes, cellular sites of viral replication, expression of interferon-related genes, and viral tissue titers. Disease ensued in Atlantic salmon after both VHSV exposure methods. Fish demonstrated gross disease signs including darkening of the dorsal skin, bilateral exophthalmia, light cutaneous hemorrhage, and lethargy. The virus replicated within endothelial cells causing endothelial cell necrosis and extensive hemorrhage in anterior kidney. Infected fish demonstrated a type I interferon response as seen by up-regulation of genes for IFNα, Mx, and ISG15. In a separate trial infected salmon transmitted the virus to sympatric Pacific herring. The results demonstrate that farmed Atlantic salmon can develop clinical VHS and virus can persist in the tissues for at least 10 weeks. Avoiding VHS epizootics in Atlantic salmon farms would limit the potential of VHS in farmed Atlantic salmon, the possibility for further host adaptation in this species, and virus spillback to sympatric wild fishes.

  17. Experimental infection studies demonstrating Atlantic salmon as a host and reservoir of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus type IVa with insights into pathology and host immunity.

    PubMed

    Lovy, J; Piesik, P; Hershberger, P K; Garver, K A

    2013-09-27

    In British Columbia, Canada (BC), aquaculture of finfish in ocean netpens has the potential for pathogen transmission between wild and farmed species due to the sharing of an aquatic environment. Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) is enzootic in BC and causes serious disease in wild Pacific herring, Clupea pallasii, which often enter and remain in Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar, netpens. Isolation of VHSV from farmed Atlantic salmon has been previously documented, but the effects on the health of farmed salmon and the wild fish sharing the environment are unknown. To determine their susceptibility, Atlantic salmon were exposed to a pool of 9 isolates of VHSV obtained from farmed Atlantic salmon in BC by IP-injection or by waterborne exposure and cohabitation with diseased Pacific herring. Disease intensity was quantified by recording mortality, clinical signs, histopathological changes, cellular sites of viral replication, expression of interferon-related genes, and viral tissue titers. Disease ensued in Atlantic salmon after both VHSV exposure methods. Fish demonstrated gross disease signs including darkening of the dorsal skin, bilateral exophthalmia, light cutaneous hemorrhage, and lethargy. The virus replicated within endothelial cells causing endothelial cell necrosis and extensive hemorrhage in anterior kidney. Infected fish demonstrated a type I interferon response as seen by up-regulation of genes for IFNα, Mx, and ISG15. In a separate trial infected salmon transmitted the virus to sympatric Pacific herring. The results demonstrate that farmed Atlantic salmon can develop clinical VHS and virus can persist in the tissues for at least 10 weeks. Avoiding VHS epizootics in Atlantic salmon farms would limit the potential of VHS in farmed Atlantic salmon, the possibility for further host adaptation in this species, and virus spillback to sympatric wild fishes.

  18. Expression of vasa and nanos3 during primordial germ cell formation and migration in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua L.).

    PubMed

    Presslauer, C; Nagasawa, K; Fernandes, J M O; Babiak, I

    2012-10-01

    Primordial germ cells (PGCs), progenitors of gametes, are specified very early in embryonic development and undergo an active migration to the site where the future gonads will form. While the developmental pattern of PGCs during embryogenesis has been documented in few model teleost fishes, there is currently no information available for any representative of Superorder Paracanthopterygii. This includes Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua), which is a historically important food fish in both fisheries and aquaculture industries. In the present study, we cloned and characterized vasa and nanos3 and used them as germ cell markers in Atlantic cod. Sequencing results showed prospective vasa and nanos3 mRNA contained the domains used to describe their respective protein family. Furthermore, phylogenetic analysis using the amino acid sequence placed Atlantic cod Vasa distinct from representatives of three other taxonomic Superorders. Atlantic cod Nanos3 was placed with other homologues from the Nanos3 subfamily. Expression of both genes was detected from the first cleavage division; both were specifically expressed in Atlantic cod PGCs from the 32-cell stage. While nanos3 expression ceased during early somitogenesis, vasa was strongly expressed throughout embryonic development. Using vasa as a marker, we described the Atlantic cod PGC migration pattern. We demonstrated that Atlantic cod PGCs migrate ventral to the trunk mesoderm. With the exception of Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii), PGCs in other described teleost fishes migrate lateral to the trunk. The results from this study are the first step toward understanding germ line formation in Atlantic cod.

  19. Kinetics of viral load and erythrocytic inclusion body formation in Pacific herring artificially infected with erythrocytic necrosis virus.

    PubMed

    Glenn, Jolene A; Emmenegger, Eveline J; Grady, Courtney A; Roon, Sean R; Gregg, Jacob L; Conway, Carla M; Winton, James R; Hershberger, Paul K

    2012-09-01

    Viral erythrocytic necrosis (VEN) is a condition that affects marine and anadromous fish species, including herrings and salmonids, in the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. Infection is frequently associated with severe anemia and causes episodic mortality among wild and hatchery fish when accompanied by additional stressors; VEN can be presumptively diagnosed by (1) light microscopic identification of a single characteristic-a round, magenta-colored, 0.8-μm-diameter inclusion body (IB) within the cytoplasm of erythrocytes and their precursors on Giemsa-stained blood films; or (2) observation (via transmission electron microscopy [TEM]) of the causative iridovirus, erythrocytic necrosis virus (ENV), within erythrocytes or their precursors. To better understand the kinetics of VEN, specific-pathogen-free Pacific herring Clupea pallasii were infected with ENV by intraperitoneal injection. At 1, 4, 7, 10, 14, 21, and 28 d postexposure, samples of blood, spleen, and kidney were collected and assessed (1) via light microscopy for the number of intracytoplasmic IBs in blood smears and (2) via TEM for the number of virions within erythrocytes. The mean prevalence of intracytoplasmic IBs in the blood cells increased from 0% at 0-4 d postexposure to 94% at 28 d postexposure. Viral load within circulating red blood cells peaked at 7 d postexposure, fell slightly, and then reached a plateau. However, blood cells observed within the kidney and spleen tissues demonstrated high levels of ENV between 14 and 28 d postexposure. The results indicate that the viral load within erythrocytes does not correlate well with IB prevalence and that the virus can persist in infected fish for more than 28 d.

  20. Kinetics of viral load and erythrocytic inclusion body formation in pacific herring artificially infected with erythrocytic necrosis virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Glenn, Jolene A.; Emmenegger, Eveline J.; Grady, Courtney A.; Roon, Sean R.; Gregg, Jacob L.; Conway, Carla M.; Winton, James R.; Hershberger, Paul K.

    2012-01-01

    Viral erythrocytic necrosis (VEN) is a condition that affects marine and anadromous fish species, including herrings and salmonids, in the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. Infection is frequently associated with severe anemia and causes episodic mortality among wild and hatchery fish when accompanied by additional stressors; VEN can be presumptively diagnosed by (1) light microscopic identification of a single characteristic—a round, magenta-colored, 0.8-μm-diameter inclusion body (IB) within the cytoplasm of erythrocytes and their precursors on Giemsa-stained blood films; or (2) observation (via transmission electron microscopy [TEM]) of the causative iridovirus, erythrocytic necrosis virus (ENV), within erythrocytes or their precursors. To better understand the kinetics of VEN, specific-pathogen-free Pacific herring Clupea pallasii were infected with ENV by intraperitoneal injection. At 1, 4, 7, 10, 14, 21, and 28 d postexposure, samples of blood, spleen, and kidney were collected and assessed (1) via light microscopy for the number of intracytoplasmic IBs in blood smears and (2) via TEM for the number of virions within erythrocytes. The mean prevalence of intracytoplasmic IBs in the blood cells increased from 0% at 0–4 d postexposure to 94% at 28 d postexposure. Viral load within circulating red blood cells peaked at 7 d postexposure, fell slightly, and then reached a plateau. However, blood cells observed within the kidney and spleen tissues demonstrated high levels of ENV between 14 and 28 d postexposure. The results indicate that the viral load within erythrocytes does not correlate well with IB prevalence and that the virus can persist in infected fish for more than 28 d.

  1. Susceptibility of Pacific herring to viral hemorrhagic septicemia is influenced by diet

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beaulaurier, Joshua; Bickford, N.; Gregg, J.L.; Grady, C.A.; Gannam, A.L.; Winton, J.R.; Hershberger, P.K.

    2012-01-01

    Groups of specific-pathogen-free Pacific herring Clupea pallasii were highly susceptible to infection by viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV); however, the level of mortality was influenced by diet during the 40–71 d before, during, and after the first exposure to the virus. Cumulative mortality was highest among the herring maintained on an experimental soy-based pellet, intermediate among those maintained on a commercially available fish-meal-based pellet, and lowest among those maintained on a second commercially available fish-meal-based pellet containing ß-glucans. Additionally, the herring maintained on the experimental soy-based feed demonstrated less growth than those on the commercially available feeds. The results indicate the importance of standardizing diet during empirical determinations of disease susceptibility and provide insights into the risk factors affecting VHS susceptibility in wild populations.

  2. Incidence of Ichthyophonus hoferi in Puget Sound fishes and its increase with age of Pacific herring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hershberger, P.K.; Stick, K.; Bui, B.; Carroll, C.; Fall, B.; Mork, C.; Perry, J.A.; Sweeney, E.; Wittouck, J.; Winton, J.; Kocan, R.

    2002-01-01

    A recent decrease in the mean age of adult Pacific herring Clupea pallasi in Puget Sound was associated with a high prevalence of Ichthyophonus hoferi, a protistan parasite that can be highly pathogenic to Pacific herring. In Puget Sound, high intensities of I. hoferiinfection may be maintained in older cohorts of Pacific herring because the prevalence ofI. hoferi increased with age from 12% among juveniles to 58% among the oldest, age-6 and older cohorts. Low intensities of I. hoferi infection in the region may be maintained in alternative fish hosts, such as surf smelt Hypomesus pretiosus, Puget Sound rockfishSebastes emphaeus, Pacific tomcod Microgadus proximus, and speckled sanddabCithanichthys stigmaeus.

  3. Species Profiles: Life Histories and Environmental Requirements of Coastal Fishes and Invertebrates (North Atlantic). Sand Lance.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-06-01

    biomass estimates of sand lance, schooling of postlarvae of Ammody- Ammodytes sp., off northeastern tes hexapterus and Clupea harengus United States...found occurrence of heterotypic schools of over sandy substrates. Sand is used sand lance and herring ( Clupea as a refuge. Individual fish have harenqus... harengus ) postlarvae. The been observed to burrow into the sand ubiquity of this behavior is unknown, and remain either partly buried (with Heterotypic

  4. Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO) modulates dynamics of small pelagic fishes and ecosystem regime shifts in the eastern North and Central Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alheit, Jürgen; Licandro, Priscilla; Coombs, Steve; Garcia, Alberto; Giráldez, Ana; Santamaría, Maria Teresa Garcia; Slotte, Aril; Tsikliras, Athanassios C.

    2014-03-01

    Dynamics of abundance and migrations of populations of small pelagic clupeoid fish such as anchovy (Engraulis encrasicolus), sardine (Sardina pilchardus), sardinella (Sardinella aurita), sprat (Sprattus sprattus) and herring (Clupea harengus) in the eastern North and Central Atlantic between Senegal and Norway vary in synchrony with the warm and cool phases of the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO). This is shown by compiling retrospective data on fish catches and anecdotal observations, which in some cases date back to the mid-19th century. The AMO is defined as the de-trended mean of North Atlantic (0-60°N) sea surface temperature anomalies. However, it is not primarily the temperature which drives the dynamics of the small pelagic fish populations. Instead, the AMO seems to be a proxy for complex processes in the coupled atmosphere-ocean system of the North Atlantic. This is manifested in large-scale changes in strength and direction of the current system that move water masses around the North Atlantic and likely involves the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC), the Mediterranean Overflow Water (MOW) and the subpolar gyre (SPG). The contractions and expansions of the SPG apparently play a key role. This was particularly obvious in the mid-1990s, when the SPG abruptly contracted with the result that warm subtropical water masses moved to the north and east. Small pelagic fish populations in the eastern North and Central Atlantic, including those in the Mediterranean responded quickly by changing abundances and migrating northwards. It seems that the complex ocean-atmosphere changes in the mid-1990s, which are described in the text in detail, caused a regime shift in the ecosystems of the eastern North and Central Atlantic and the small pelagic clupeoid fish populations are the sentinels of this shift.

  5. Passive immunization of Pacific herring against viral hemorrhagic septicemia.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hershberger, P.K.; Gregg, J.L.; Grady, C.A.; LaPatra, S.E.; Winton, J.R.

    2011-01-01

    The plasma of Pacific herring Clupea pallasii that survived laboratory-induced viral hemorrhagic septicemia (VHS) epizootics contained humoral substances that, when injected into naive animals, conferred passive immunity against the disease. Among groups exposed to viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV), injection of donor plasma from VHS survivors resulted in significantly greater survival (50%) and significantly lower tissue titers (1.5 x 10(5) plaque-forming units [PFU]/g) than the injection of plasma from VHSV-naive donors (6% survival; 3.7 x 10(6) PFU/g). Additionally, the magnitude of the protective immune response increased during the postexposure period; plasma that was collected from survivors at 123 d postexposure (931 degree-days) provided greater protection than plasma collected from survivors at 60 d postexposure (409 degree-days). These results provide proof of concept that the VHSV exposure history of Pacific herring populations can be determined post hoc; furthermore, the results can be used as the foundation for developing additional high-throughput diagnostic techniques that may be effective at quantifying herd immunity and forecasting the potential for future VHS epizootics in populations of wild Pacific herring.

  6. Unravelling the Gordian knot! Key processes impacting overwintering larval survival and growth: A North Sea herring case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hufnagl, Marc; Peck, Myron A.; Nash, Richard D. M.; Dickey-Collas, Mark

    2015-11-01

    Unraveling the key processes affecting marine fish recruitment will ultimately require a combination of field, laboratory and modelling studies. We combined analyzes of long-term (30-year) field data on larval fish abundance, distribution and length, and biophysical model simulations of different levels of complexity to identify processes impacting the survival and growth of autumn- and winter-spawned Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus) larvae. Field survey data revealed interannual changes in intensity of utilization of the five major spawning grounds (Orkney/Shetland, Buchan, Banks north, Banks south, and Downs) as well as spatio-temporal variability in the length and abundance of overwintered larvae. The mean length of larvae captured in post-winter surveys was negatively correlated to the proportion of larvae from the southern-most (Downs) winter-spawning component. Furthermore, the mean length of larvae originating from all spawning components has decreased since 1990 suggesting ecosystem-wide changes impacting larval growth potential, most likely due to changes in prey fields. A simple biophysical model assuming temperature-dependent growth and constant mortality underestimated larval growth rates suggesting that larval mortality rates steeply declined with increasing size and/or age during winter as no match with field data could be obtained. In contrast better agreement was found between observed and modelled post-winter abundance for larvae originating from four spawning components when a more complex, physiological-based foraging and growth model was employed using a suite of potential prey field and size-based mortality scenarios. Nonetheless, agreement between field and model-derived estimates was poor for larvae originating from the winter-spawned Downs component. In North Sea herring, the dominant processes impacting larval growth and survival appear to have shifted in time and space highlighting how environmental forcing, ecosystem state and other

  7. Outlier Loci Detect Intraspecific Biodiversity amongst Spring and Autumn Spawning Herring across Local Scales

    PubMed Central

    Bekkevold, Dorte; Gross, Riho; Arula, Timo; Helyar, Sarah J.; Ojaveer, Henn

    2016-01-01

    Herring, Clupea harengus, is one of the ecologically and commercially most important species in European northern seas, where two distinct ecotypes have been described based on spawning time; spring and autumn. To date, it is unknown if these spring and autumn spawning herring constitute genetically distinct units. We assessed levels of genetic divergence between spring and autumn spawning herring in the Baltic Sea using two types of DNA markers, microsatellites and Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms, and compared the results with data for autumn spawning North Sea herring. Temporally replicated analyses reveal clear genetic differences between ecotypes and hence support reproductive isolation. Loci showing non-neutral behaviour, so-called outlier loci, show convergence between autumn spawning herring from demographically disjoint populations, potentially reflecting selective processes associated with autumn spawning ecotypes. The abundance and exploitation of the two ecotypes have varied strongly over space and time in the Baltic Sea, where autumn spawners have faced strong depression for decades. The results therefore have practical implications by highlighting the need for specific management of these co-occurring ecotypes to meet requirements for sustainable exploitation and ensure optimal livelihood for coastal communities. PMID:27050440

  8. Foraging behaviors of Surf Scoters and White-Winged Scoters during spawning of Pacific herring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Esler, Daniel N.; Boyd, Sean

    2007-01-01

    Winter diets of Surf (Melanitta perspicillata) and White-winged Scoters (M. fusca) are composed primarily of bivalves. During spawning of Pacific herring (Clupea pallasi) in early spring, scoters shift their diets to herring eggs. Using radio-telemetry, we contrasted scoter foraging behaviorsbetween winter and herring spawning periods. Scoters increased their dive durations during herring spawning, likely to maximize the amount of roe consumed per dive; in winter, dives were typically terminated upon clam capture. Scoters spent approximately 50% less time foraging ( $min underwater hr^{-1}$ ) and decreased their dive rate (dives hr -1 ) by 70% when feeding on roe. The observed reduction in time spent foraging was presumably caused by the abundance of herring eggs, and thus a reduction in prey search-time. Scoters were able to meet energetic requirements with reduced effort, despite potentially increased demands related to spring fattening. Less time spentforaging may also allow more time for premigratory courtship behaviors

  9. Seasonal plankton-fish interactions: light regime, prey phenology, and herring foraging.

    PubMed

    Varpe, Øystein; Fiksen, Øyvind

    2010-02-01

    When prey and predator are seasonal migrants, encounters depend on migration phenologies and environmental constraints on predation. Here we investigate the relative contribution of seasonality in irradiance and prey abundance in shaping the rapid seasonal body condition increase of a migrating predator searching visually for its prey: the Norwegian spring-spawning herring, Clupea harengus, feeding on the copepod Calanus finmarchicus. Two main seasonal pulses of prey are available to herring: (1) the parent generation of C. finmarchicus, with peak abundance in March-April, which appear too early to cause the main increase in herring condition; and (2) the abundant offspring generation of C. finmarchicus, with peak abundance in June-July, too late to explain the main increase in body condition. However, a mechanistic model of ingestion rate, including both solar irradiance and prey abundance, predicted seasonal food intake in good accordance with observed herring body condition. This suggests that the seasonality in herring foraging and energy storage is closely linked to the return of longer days in spring, and less dependent on a match or mismatch with seasonal peaks in abundance of their zooplankton prey. Consequently, light related constraints on foraging may make visually searching predators at high latitudes resilient to changes and fluctuations in prey phenology and abundance, but vulnerable to changes in the light regime, such as water clarity.

  10. Epizootiology of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus in Pacific herring from the spawn-on-kelp fishery in Prince William Sound, Alaska, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hershberger, P.K.; Kocan, R.M.; Elder, N.E.; Meyers, T.R.; Winton, J.R.

    1999-01-01

    Both the prevalence and tissue titer of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) increased in Pacific herring Clupea pallasi following their introduction into net pens (pounds) used in the closed pound spawn-on-kelp (SOK) fishery in Prince William Sound, Alaska. VHSV was also found in water samples from inside and outside the SOK pounds after herring had been confined for several days; however, water samples taken near wild free-ranging, spawning herring either failed to test positive or tested weakly positive for virus. Little or no virus was found in tissue samples from free-ranging, spawning herring captured from the vicinity of the pounds, nor did the prevalence of VHSV increase following spawning as it did in impounded herring. The data indicated that increased prevalences of VHSV were correlated with confinement of herring for the closed pound SOK fishery and that infection was spread within the pounds through waterborne exposure to virus particles originating from impounded fish. In addition, pounds containing predominantly young fish had higher prevalences of VHSV, suggesting that older fish may be partially immune, perhaps as a result of previous infection with the virus. Operation of SOK pounds during spawning seasons in which young herring predominate may amplify the disease and possibly exacerbate the population fluctuations observed in wild herring stocks.

  11. Episootiology of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus in Pacific herring from the spawn-on-kelp fishery in Prince William Sound, Alaska, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hershberger, P.K.; Kocan, R.M.; Elder, N.E.; Meyers, T.R.; Winton, J.R.

    1999-01-01

    Both the prevalence and tissue titer of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) increased in Pacific herring Clupea pallasi following their introduction into net pens (pounds) used in the closed pound spawn-on-kelp (SOK) fishery in Prince William Sound, Alaska. VHSV was also found in water samples from inside and outside the SOK pounds after herring had been confined for several days; however, water samples taken near wild free-ranging, spawning herring either failed to test positive or tested weakly positive for virus. Little or no virus was found in tissue samples from free-ranging, spawning herring captured from the vicinity of the pounds, nor did the prevalence of VHSV increase following spawning as it did in impounded herring. The data indicated that increased prevalences of VHSV were correlated with confinement of herring for the closed pound SOK fishery and that infection was spread within the pounds through waterborne exposure to virus particles originating from impounded fish. In addition, pounds containing predominantly young fish had higher prevalences of VHSV, suggesting that older fish may be partially immune, perhaps as a result of previous infection with the virus. Operation of SOK pounds during spawning seasons in which young herring predominate may amplify the disease and possibly exacerbate the population fluctuations observed in wild herring stocks.

  12. Ultrastructural effects of crude oil on early life stages of Pacific herring

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron, J.A.; Smith, R.L.

    1980-03-01

    Eggs of Pacific herring, Clupea harengus pallasi, collected from Prince William Sound, Alaska were exposed to Prudhoe Bay crude oil for 4 to 144 hours, then returned to uncontaminated seawater for further development. Newly hatched larvae from both control and experimental groups showed no gross abnormalities. Transmission electron microscopy revealed inter- and intracellular spaces in brain and muscle tissues of exposed organisms but not in those of controls. Many mitochondria in the body muscle of exposed organisms were swollen, some with deteriorating cristae structure.

  13. RNA:DNA ratios of Baltic Sea herring larvae and copepods in embayment and open sea habitats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höök, Tomas O.; Gorokhova, Elena; Hansson, Sture

    2008-01-01

    Elucidation of important nursery habitats for young fish can aid in the management and assessment of fish stocks. Herring ( Clupea harengus) in the Baltic Sea primarily spawn in coastal areas, but larvae are also present in off-shore, open sea areas. To investigate if sheltered coastal habitats provide a better growth environment for larval herring, we compared short-term growth (as indexed by whole body RNA:DNA ratios) of larval herring from three habitat types of the northwest Baltic proper (sheltered inner bay, exposed outer bay, and open sea). In addition, we compared individual RNA content of adult female Eurytemora affinis (a common Baltic copepod) among these different habitats. High RNA levels in these copepods indicate high production of nauplii, which are important food for larval herring. Both RNA:DNA ratios of larval herring and RNA content of E. affinis were significantly greater in embayment habitats, suggesting that the sheltered coastal areas are high quality nursery habitats for young Baltic herring.

  14. Determining the Characteristics and Mechanisms for Clutter and Environmental Reverberation and their Impact on Long Range Sonar Performance in Range-Dependent Fluctuating Ocean Waveguides

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-30

    Experiment The low-frequency target strength of shoaling Atlantic herring ( Clupea harengus ) in the Gulf of Maine during the autumn 2006 spawning...and P. Ratilal, “Low-frequency target strength and abundance of shoaling Atlantic herring ( Clupea harengus ) in the Gulf of Maine during the Ocean

  15. Comparative ecology of widely distributed pelagic fish species in the North Atlantic: Implications for modelling climate and fisheries impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trenkel, V. M.; Huse, G.; MacKenzie, B. R.; Alvarez, P.; Arrizabalaga, H.; Castonguay, M.; Goñi, N.; Grégoire, F.; Hátún, H.; Jansen, T.; Jacobsen, J. A.; Lehodey, P.; Lutcavage, M.; Mariani, P.; Melvin, G. D.; Neilson, J. D.; Nøttestad, L.; Óskarsson, G. J.; Payne, M. R.; Richardson, D. E.; Senina, I.; Speirs, D. C.

    2014-12-01

    This paper reviews the current knowledge on the ecology of widely distributed pelagic fish stocks in the North Atlantic basin with emphasis on their role in the food web and the factors determining their relationship with the environment. We consider herring (Clupea harengus), mackerel (Scomber scombrus), capelin (Mallotus villosus), blue whiting (Micromesistius poutassou), and horse mackerel (Trachurus trachurus), which have distributions extending beyond the continental shelf and predominantly occur on both sides of the North Atlantic. We also include albacore (Thunnus alalunga), bluefin tuna (Thunnus thynnus), swordfish (Xiphias gladius), and blue marlin (Makaira nigricans), which, by contrast, show large-scale migrations at the basin scale. We focus on the links between life history processes and the environment, horizontal and vertical distribution, spatial structure and trophic role. Many of these species carry out extensive migrations from spawning grounds to nursery and feeding areas. Large oceanographic features such as the North Atlantic subpolar gyre play an important role in determining spatial distributions and driving variations in stock size. Given the large biomasses of especially the smaller species considered here, these stocks can exert significant top-down pressures on the food web and are important in supporting higher trophic levels. The review reveals commonalities and differences between the ecology of widely distributed pelagic fish in the NE and NW Atlantic basins, identifies knowledge gaps and modelling needs that the EURO-BASIN project attempts to address.

  16. Infecting Pacific Herring with Ichthyophonus sp. in the laboratory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hershberger, Paul; Hart, Lucas; Mackenzie, Ashley; Yanney, M.L.; Conway, Carla M.; Elliott, Diane G.

    2015-01-01

    The protistan parasite Ichthyophonus sp. occurs in coastal populations of Pacific Herring Clupea pallasii throughout the northeast Pacific region, but the route(s) by which these planktivorous fish become infected is unknown. Several methods for establishing Ichthyophonus infections in laboratory challenges were examined. Infections were most effectively established after intraperitoneal (IP) injections with suspended parasite isolates from culture or after repeated feedings with infected fish tissues. Among groups that were offered the infected tissues, infection prevalence was greater after multiple feedings (65%) than after a single feeding (5%). Additionally, among groups that were exposed to parasite suspensions prepared from culture isolates, infection prevalence was greater after exposure by IP injection (74%) than after exposure via gastric intubation (12%); the flushing of parasite suspensions over the gills did not lead to infections in any of the experimental fish. Although the consumption of infected fish tissues is unlikely to be the primary route of Ichthyophonus sp. transmission in wild populations of Pacific Herring, this route may contribute to abnormally high infection prevalence in areas where juveniles have access to infected offal.

  17. Modelling the advection of herring larvae in the North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartsch, J.; Brander, K.; Heath, M.; Munk, P.; Richardson, K.; Svendsen, E.

    1989-08-01

    THE number of fish at the age of first capture in a fishery (recruitment) is dependent on the production of eggs by the parent stock and the survival of early life stages (eggs, larvae and juveniles). In many pelagic fish species the survival of larvae depends on transport from spawning to nursery areas1. To investigate larval transport processes for North Sea herring (Clupea harengus L.) we have modelled in three dimensions the advection of autumn-spawned larvae during the winter of 1987-1988 and compared the results with sequential field data on the actual distribution of larvae. Circulation in the North Sea is pre-dominantly wind-driven during the winter, and in 1987-1988 anomalous atmospheric conditions caused a reduction in cyclonic circulation and unusual transport of larvae from northern North Sea and west of Scotland spawning areas. Predicting variations in recruitment in advance of fishery legislation has always been difficult and the collapse of North Sea herring populations during the mid-1970s is believed to have been due to a period of several years of low recruitment coupled with high fishing activity2. Our results suggest that a better understanding can be achieved with the aid of environmental modelling.

  18. Bayesian stock assessment of Pacific herring in Prince William Sound, Alaska

    PubMed Central

    Moffitt, Steven D.; Hulson, Peter-John F.

    2017-01-01

    The Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii) population in Prince William Sound, Alaska crashed in 1993 and has yet to recover, affecting food web dynamics in the Sound and impacting Alaskan communities. To help researchers design and implement the most effective monitoring, management, and recovery programs, a Bayesian assessment of Prince William Sound herring was developed by reformulating the current model used by the Alaska Department of Fish and Game. The Bayesian model estimated pre-fishery spawning biomass of herring age-3 and older in 2013 to be a median of 19,410 mt (95% credibility interval 12,150–31,740 mt), with a 54% probability that biomass in 2013 was below the management limit used to regulate fisheries in Prince William Sound. The main advantages of the Bayesian model are that it can more objectively weight different datasets and provide estimates of uncertainty for model parameters and outputs, unlike the weighted sum-of-squares used in the original model. In addition, the revised model could be used to manage herring stocks with a decision rule that considers both stock status and the uncertainty in stock status. PMID:28222151

  19. The parasite Ichthyophonus sp. in Pacific herring from the coastal NE Pacific

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hershberger, Paul K.; Gregg, Jacob L.; Hart, Lucas M.; Moffitt, Steve; Brenner, Richard L.; Stick, K.; Coonradt, Eric; Otis, E. O.; Vollenweider, Johanna J.; Garver, Kyle A.; Lovy, Jan; Meyers, Tilden R.

    2016-01-01

    The protistan parasite Ichthyophonus occurred in populations of Pacific herring Clupea pallasii Valenciennes throughout coastal areas of the NE Pacific, ranging from Puget Sound, WA north to the Gulf of Alaska, AK. Infection prevalence in local Pacific herring stocks varied seasonally and annually, and a general pattern of increasing prevalence with host size and/or age persisted throughout the NE Pacific. An exception to this zoographic pattern occurred among a group of juvenile, age 1+ year Pacific herring from Cordova Harbor, AK in June 2010, which demonstrated an unusually high infection prevalence of 35%. Reasons for this anomaly were hypothesized to involve anthropogenic influences that resulted in locally elevated infection pressures. Interannual declines in infection prevalence from some populations (e.g. Lower Cook Inlet, AK; from 20–32% in 2007 to 0–3% during 2009–13) or from the largest size cohorts of other populations (e.g. Sitka Sound, AK; from 62.5% in 2007 to 19.6% in 2013) were likely a reflection of selective mortality among the infected cohorts. All available information for Ichthyophonus in the NE Pacific, including broad geographic range, low host specificity and presence in archived Pacific herring tissue samples dating to the 1980s, indicate a long-standing host–pathogen relationship.

  20. Bayesian stock assessment of Pacific herring in Prince William Sound, Alaska.

    PubMed

    Muradian, Melissa L; Branch, Trevor A; Moffitt, Steven D; Hulson, Peter-John F

    2017-01-01

    The Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii) population in Prince William Sound, Alaska crashed in 1993 and has yet to recover, affecting food web dynamics in the Sound and impacting Alaskan communities. To help researchers design and implement the most effective monitoring, management, and recovery programs, a Bayesian assessment of Prince William Sound herring was developed by reformulating the current model used by the Alaska Department of Fish and Game. The Bayesian model estimated pre-fishery spawning biomass of herring age-3 and older in 2013 to be a median of 19,410 mt (95% credibility interval 12,150-31,740 mt), with a 54% probability that biomass in 2013 was below the management limit used to regulate fisheries in Prince William Sound. The main advantages of the Bayesian model are that it can more objectively weight different datasets and provide estimates of uncertainty for model parameters and outputs, unlike the weighted sum-of-squares used in the original model. In addition, the revised model could be used to manage herring stocks with a decision rule that considers both stock status and the uncertainty in stock status.

  1. Chronic and persistent viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus infections in Pacific herring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hershberger, P.K.; Gregg, J.L.; Grady, C.A.; Taylor, L.; Winton, J.R.

    2010-01-01

    Chronic viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) infections were established in a laboratory stock of Pacific herring Clupea pallasii held in a large-volume tank supplied with pathogenfree seawater at temperatures ranging from 6.8 to 11.6??C. The infections were characterized by viral persistence for extended periods and near-background levels of host mortality. Infectious virus was recovered from mortalities occurring up to 167 d post-exposure and was detected in normal-appearing herring for as long as 224 d following initial challenge. Geometric mean viral titers were generally as high as or higher in brain tissues than in pools of kidney and spleen tissues, with overall prevalence of infection being higher in the brain. Upon re-exposure to VHSV in a standard laboratory challenge, negligible mortality occurred among groups of herring that were either chronically infected or fully recovered, indicating that survival from chronic manifestations conferred protection against future disease. However, some survivors of chronic VHS infections were capable of replicating virus upon re-exposure. Demonstration of a chronic manifestation of VHSV infection among Pacific herring maintained at ambient seawater temperatures provides insights into the mechanisms by which the virus is maintained among populations of endemic hosts. ?? 2010 Inter-Research.

  2. Chronic and persistent viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus infections in Pacific herring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hershberger, Paul K.; Gregg, Jacob L.; Winton, James R.; Grady, Cortney A.; Taylor, L.

    2010-01-01

    Chronic viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) infections were established in a laboratory stock of Pacific herring Clupea pallasii held in a large-volume tank supplied with pathogen-free seawater at temperatures ranging from 6.8 to 11.6°C. The infections were characterized by viral persistence for extended periods and near-background levels of host mortality. Infectious virus was recovered from mortalities occurring up to 167 d post-exposure and was detected in normal-appearing herring for as long as 224 d following initial challenge. Geometric mean viral titers were generally as high as or higher in brain tissues than in pools of kidney and spleen tissues, with overall prevalence of infection being higher in the brain. Upon re-exposure to VHSV in a standard laboratory challenge, negligible mortality occurred among groups of herring that were either chronically infected or fully recovered, indicating that survival from chronic manifestations conferred protection against future disease. However, some survivors of chronic VHS infections were capable of replicating virus upon re-exposure. Demonstration of a chronic manifestation of VHSV infection among Pacific herring maintained at ambient seawater temperatures provides insights into the mechanisms by which the virus is maintained among populations of endemic hosts.

  3. Reprint of “Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO) modulates dynamics of small pelagic fishes and ecosystem regime shifts in the eastern North and Central Atlantic”

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alheit, Jürgen; Licandro, Priscilla; Coombs, Steve; Garcia, Alberto; Giráldez, Ana; Santamaría, Maria Teresa Garcia; Slotte, Aril; Tsikliras, Athanassios C.

    2014-05-01

    Dynamics of abundance and migrations of populations of small pelagic clupeoid fish such as anchovy (Engraulis encrasicolus), sardine (Sardina pilchardus), sardinella (Sardinella aurita), sprat (Sprattus sprattus) and herring (Clupea harengus) in the eastern North and Central Atlantic between Senegal and Norway vary in synchrony with the warm and cool phases of the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO). This is shown by compiling retrospective data on fish catches and anecdotal observations, which in some cases date back to the mid-19th century. The AMO is defined as the de-trended mean of North Atlantic (0-60°N) sea surface temperature anomalies. However, it is not primarily the temperature which drives the dynamics of the small pelagic fish populations. Instead, the AMO seems to be a proxy for complex processes in the coupled atmosphere-ocean system of the North Atlantic. This is manifested in large-scale changes in strength and direction of the current system that move water masses around the North Atlantic and likely involves the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC), the Mediterranean Overflow Water (MOW) and the subpolar gyre (SPG). The contractions and expansions of the SPG apparently play a key role. This was particularly obvious in the mid-1990s, when the SPG abruptly contracted with the result that warm subtropical water masses moved to the north and east. Small pelagic fish populations in the eastern North and Central Atlantic, including those in the Mediterranean responded quickly by changing abundances and migrating northwards. It seems that the complex ocean-atmosphere changes in the mid-1990s, which are described in the text in detail, caused a regime shift in the ecosystems of the eastern North and Central Atlantic and the small pelagic clupeoid fish populations are the sentinels of this shift.

  4. Icelandic herring-eating killer whales feed at night.

    PubMed

    Richard, Gaëtan; Filatova, Olga A; Samarra, Filipa I P; Fedutin, Ivan D; Lammers, Marc; Miller, Patrick J

    2017-01-01

    Herring-eating killer whales debilitate herring with underwater tail slaps and likely herd herring into tighter schools using a feeding-specific low-frequency pulsed call ('herding' call). Feeding on herring may be dependent upon daylight, as the whales use their white underside to help herd herring; however, feeding at night has not been investigated. The production of feeding-specific sounds provides an opportunity to use passive acoustic monitoring to investigate feeding behaviour at different times of day. We compared the acoustic behaviour of killer whales between day and night, using an autonomous recorder deployed in Iceland during winter. Based upon acoustic detection of underwater tail slaps used to feed upon herring we found that killer whales fed both at night and day: they spent 50% of their time at night and 73% of daytime feeding. Interestingly, there was a significant diel variation in acoustic behaviour. Herding calls were significantly associated with underwater tail slap rate and were recorded significantly more often at night, suggesting that in low-light conditions killer whales rely more on acoustics to herd herring. Communicative sounds were also related to underwater tail slap rate and produced at different rates during day and night. The capability to adapt feeding behaviour to different light conditions may be particularly relevant for predator species occurring in high latitudes during winter, when light availability is limited.

  5. Experimental evidence of threat-sensitive collective avoidance responses in a large wild-caught herring school.

    PubMed

    Rieucau, Guillaume; Boswell, Kevin M; De Robertis, Alex; Macaulay, Gavin J; Handegard, Nils Olav

    2014-01-01

    Aggregation is commonly thought to improve animals' security. Within aquatic ecosystems, group-living prey can learn about immediate threats using cues perceived directly from predators, or from collective behaviours, for example, by reacting to the escape behaviours of companions. Combining cues from different modalities may improve the accuracy of prey antipredatory decisions. In this study, we explored the sensory modalities that mediate collective antipredatory responses of herring (Clupea harengus) when in a large school (approximately 60,000 individuals). By conducting a simulated predator encounter experiment in a semi-controlled environment (a sea cage), we tested the hypothesis that the collective responses of herring are threat-sensitive. We investigated whether cues from potential threats obtained visually or from the perception of water displacement, used independently or in an additive way, affected the strength of the collective avoidance reactions. We modified the sensory nature of the simulated threat by exposing the herring to 4 predator models differing in shape and transparency. The collective vertical avoidance response was observed and quantified using active acoustics. The combination of sensory cues elicited the strongest avoidance reactions, suggesting that collective antipredator responses in herring are mediated by the sensory modalities involved during threat detection in an additive fashion. Thus, this study provides evidence for magnitude-graded threat responses in a large school of wild-caught herring which is consistent with the "threat-sensitive hypothesis".

  6. Experimental Evidence of Threat-Sensitive Collective Avoidance Responses in a Large Wild-Caught Herring School

    PubMed Central

    Rieucau, Guillaume; Boswell, Kevin M.; De Robertis, Alex; Macaulay, Gavin J.; Handegard, Nils Olav

    2014-01-01

    Aggregation is commonly thought to improve animals' security. Within aquatic ecosystems, group-living prey can learn about immediate threats using cues perceived directly from predators, or from collective behaviours, for example, by reacting to the escape behaviours of companions. Combining cues from different modalities may improve the accuracy of prey antipredatory decisions. In this study, we explored the sensory modalities that mediate collective antipredatory responses of herring (Clupea harengus) when in a large school (approximately 60 000 individuals). By conducting a simulated predator encounter experiment in a semi-controlled environment (a sea cage), we tested the hypothesis that the collective responses of herring are threat-sensitive. We investigated whether cues from potential threats obtained visually or from the perception of water displacement, used independently or in an additive way, affected the strength of the collective avoidance reactions. We modified the sensory nature of the simulated threat by exposing the herring to 4 predator models differing in shape and transparency. The collective vertical avoidance response was observed and quantified using active acoustics. The combination of sensory cues elicited the strongest avoidance reactions, suggesting that collective antipredator responses in herring are mediated by the sensory modalities involved during threat detection in an additive fashion. Thus, this study provides evidence for magnitude-graded threat responses in a large school of wild-caught herring which is consistent with the “threat-sensitive hypothesis”. PMID:24489778

  7. Novel species interactions: American black bears respond to Pacific herring spawn.

    PubMed

    Fox, Caroline Hazel; Paquet, Paul Charles; Reimchen, Thomas Edward

    2015-05-26

    In addition to the decline and extinction of the world's species, the decline and eventual loss of species interactions is one of the major consequences of the biodiversity crisis. On the Pacific coast of North America, diminished runs of salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) drive numerous marine-terrestrial interactions, many of which have been intensively studied, but marine-terrestrial interactions driven by other species remain relatively unknown. Bears (Ursus spp.) are major vectors of salmon into terrestrial ecosystems, but their participation in other cross-ecosystem interactions is similarly poorly described. Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii), a migratory forage fish in coastal marine ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean and the dominant forage fish in British Columbia (BC), spawn in nearshore subtidal and intertidal zones. Spawn resources (eggs, milt, and spawning adults) at these events are available to coastal predators and scavengers, including terrestrial species. In this study, we investigated the interaction between American black bears (Ursus americanus) and Pacific herring at spawn events in Quatsino Sound, BC, Canada. Using remote cameras to monitor bear activity (1,467 camera days, 29 sites, years 2010-2012) in supratidal and intertidal zones and a machine learning approach, we determined that the quantity of Pacific herring eggs in supratidal and intertidal zones was a leading predictor of black bear activity, with bears positively responding to increasing herring egg masses. Other important predictors included day of the year and Talitrid amphipod (Traskorchestia spp.) mass. A complementary analysis of black bear scats indicated that Pacific herring egg mass was the highest ranked predictor of egg consumption by bears. Pacific herring eggs constituted a substantial yet variable component of the early springtime diet of black bears in Quatsino Sound (frequency of occurrence 0-34%; estimated dietary content 0-63%). Other major dietary items included

  8. Multifrequency analyses of fish distributions in the northwest Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jech, J. Michael

    2004-05-01

    Routine acoustical surveys for estimating Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus) population abundance have been conducted on Georges Bank during the autumn spawning season from 1998 to present. Acoustical data are collected with a Simrad EK500 scientific echo sounder operating at 12 or 18, 38, and 120 kHz, and split-beam (the 12-kHz system is a single beam) transducers. Biological measurements and verification of acoustical scatterers are obtained with a pelagic trawl. Acoustical data are evaluated (scrutinized) manually to remove noise, faulty bottom detections, and to classify acoustical backscattering to species. Species classification is currently subjective, and is based on the experience of the scientists and trawl catches. Objective species classification and automated fish density and abundance estimates are an obvious goal for fisheries surveys using advanced technologies. Classification methods using relationships among frequency-dependent volume backscattering strengths, such as presence-absence and combination-permutation, are described and presented. Results indicate that while classification using these methods and acoustical information alone is not robust, these methods highlight backscattering patterns within aggregations and have the potential to characterize backscattering patterns observed in fisheries acoustics data. [Work supported by NOAA Fisheries and ONR.

  9. The Use of Peptide Markers of Carp and Herring Allergens as an Example of Detection of Sequenced and Non-Sequenced Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Minkiewicz, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Summary The objective of this study is to identify fish protein markers for detecting multiple species based on a comparative proteomic approach that relies on fragments with identical sequences. The possibilities and challenges of the use of peptides obtained from carp (Cyprinus carpio) and herring (Clupea harengus) proteins are discussed. A bioinformatic analysis was followed by an LC-MS/MS experiment to identify markers predicting the presence of fish allergenic proteins. Selected myosin peptides were found in carp protein hydrolysates with known sequences and in herring protein hydrolysates with unknown sequences. The results obtained for carp and herring proteins myosin and parvalbumin indicate that proteins with unknown sequences can be identified by peptide markers. Such markers can be designed by disregarding the principle that peptides should be unique (present in one sequence). The challenge is to determine a group of proteins that can be detected by peptide identification. PMID:27956857

  10. Parasites as biological tags in marine fisheries research: European Atlantic waters.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, K; Hemmingsen, W

    2015-01-01

    Studies of the use of parasites as biological tags for stock identification and to follow migrations of marine fish, mammals and invertebrates in European Atlantic waters are critically reviewed and evaluated. The region covered includes the North, Baltic, Barents and White Seas plus Icelandic waters, but excludes the Mediterranean and Black Seas. Each fish species or ecological group of species is treated separately. More parasite tag studies have been carried out on Atlantic herring Clupea harengus than on any other species, while cod Gadus morhua have also been the subject of many studies. Other species that have been the subjects of more than one study are: blue whiting Micromesistius poutassou, whiting Merlangius merlangus, haddock Melanogrammus aeglefinus, Norway pout Trisopterus esmarkii, horse mackerel Trachurus trachurus and mackerel Scomber scombrus. Other species are dealt with under the general headings redfishes, flatfish, tunas, anadromous fish, elasmobranchs, marine mammals and invertebrates. A final section highlights how parasites can be, and have been, misused as biological tags, and how this can be avoided. It also reviews recent developments in methodology and parasite genetics, considers the potential effects of climate change on the distributions of both hosts and parasites, and suggests host-parasite systems that should reward further research.

  11. Improving and Developing Predictive Backscatter Models of Fish

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-09-30

    swimbladder volume of Atlantic herring, Clupea harengus ICES Journal of Marine Science (accepted). 6 Towler, R.L., J.M. Jech, and J.K. Horne...efforts are being used by researchers at the Alaska Fisheries Science Center to improve Pacific herring ( Clupea pallasi) and walleye pollock abundance

  12. Management of Pacific herring closed pound spawn-on-kelp fisheries to optimize fish health and product quality

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hershberger, P.K.; Elder, N.E.; Marty, G.D.; Johnson, J.; Kocan, R.M.

    2001-01-01

    Use of high densities of newly recruited Pacific herring Clupea pallasi for the closed-pound spawn-on-kelp (PPSOK) fishery in Prince William Sound, Alaska, was associated with increased gamete retention, decreased product quality, and increased prevalence of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) relative to the confinement of older cohorts at lower densities. To maximize product quality and reduce the potential for disease outbreaks, three management alternatives are proposed for the PPSOK fishery: (1) establish minimum pound volumes per permit holder; (2) prohibit PPSOK fisheries during years predominated by newly recruited cohorts; and (3) develop effective open-pounding techniques.

  13. Spatial distribution of herring in the orkney/shetland area (northern north sea): A geostatistical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maravelias, Christos D.; Haralabous, John

    Geostatistical methodology was used to analyse the structure and describe the spatial patterns of North Sea herring ( Clupea harengus L.), using data from the 1992 ICES (Division IVa) acoustic survey. Three different scales of spatial structures were identified: an unresolved small-scale variability, which accounted for 48% of the total variance, and two structure components, the first being a meso-scale of ≈9 nmi (nautical miles) (≈30%) and the second a large-scale of ≈17 nmi (22%). Geostatistical analysis permitted the determination of spatial density gradients as well as patch sizes (range from 9 to 17 nmi). The use of the truncated data and the robust variogram on the raw data provided additional information for the structure. The utilization of this information in the variographic analysis resulted in better estimations. The best unbiased predictor was used to objectively map the herring population distribution by kriging. The kriging estimates were better with interpolation of a large number of points. Herring tended to aggregate mainly in meso-scale patches with a diameter of 9 nmi and to a lesser extent in large-scale patches of 17 nmi diameter. Environmental factors (depth, salinity and temperature) partly explained the spatial distribution of herring, despite the absence of a trend in the variogram structure. The study demonstrates the existence of spatial correlation and an objective way of optimal mapping of the population. Geostatistics provided additional information on herring spatial organization which is important to understand the behaviour of the species and to study its relationship with the environment.

  14. Primary productivity and the carrying capacity for herring in NE Pacific marine ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, R. Ian; Schweigert, Jacob F.

    2008-05-01

    The carrying capacity for Pacific herring ( Clupea pallasi) and its relationship to primary productivity was examined for eight populations in the NE Pacific and eastern Bering Sea. Data on biomass (ages 3 and older) and catches of herring in British Columbia (Georgia Strait, west coast Vancouver Island, Central Coast, Queen Charlotte Islands, Prince Rupert) and Alaska (Sitka, Prince William Sound, eastern Bering Sea) during the second half of the 20th Century derived from analytical stock assessments were used to calculate annual surplus production of herring. There was considerable interannual variability in herring productivity among all populations, however, only three (Georgia Strait, Prince Rupert, Prince William Sound) showed significant differences in mean productivity on decadal time scales (productivity regimes). Carrying capacity for the most recent productivity regime for each population was estimated using the Schaefer surplus production model. Mean annual primary productivity was estimated from remotely-sensed (SeaWiFS) chlorophyll data for British Columbia and Sitka ecosystems, and from in situ chlorophyll data for Prince William Sound and the eastern Bering Sea. The carrying capacity for herring populations in the NE Pacific ranged from 28,000 to 250,000 tonnes, and to 325,000 tonnes in the eastern Bering Sea. When considered on the basis of their distributional area, the west coast of Vancouver Island and Georgia Strait populations had the highest carrying capacity per unit area (9.3-13.8 tonnes km -2) and the eastern Bering Sea had the lowest (0.7 tonnes km -2). There is a significant positive linear relationship between the productivity of herring populations at carrying capacity and primary productivity on a per unit area basis. Although similar direct relationships have been observed between phytoplankton standing stock (as chlorophyll biomass) and total catches of resident fish populations from these regions, such a direct relationship was

  15. Blueback herring (Alosa aestivalis) in Lake Ontario: First record, entry route, and colonization potential

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Owens, Randall W.; O'Gorman, Robert; Mills, Edward L.; Rudstam, Lars G.; Hasse, John J.; Kulik, Brandon H.; MacNeill, David B.

    1998-01-01

    Two juvenile blueback herring (Alosa aestivalis) were caught in Lake Ontario in October 1995, the first record of this anadromous marine clupeid in the Great Lakes. Blueback herring most likely gained entry to Lake Ontario via the Erie Barge Canal, a navigation canal that links the Mohawk-Hudson rivers, which drain to the Atlantic Ocean, to Oneida Lake, which drains to Lake Ontario through the Oneida-Oswego rivers. Blueback herring ascend the Hudson River to spawn and were first reported from the upper Mohawk River in 1978. They currently spawn in several of the upper Mohawk's tributaries, including one about 430 km from the ocean but only 25 km from Oneida Lake. They were first found in Oneida Lake in 1982 and, in fall 1994, large numbers of juvenile blueback herring were found moving down the Oswego River. In the southern United States, blueback herring established self-reproducing populations in several reservoirs, and thus they have the potential to colonize Lake Ontario. If blueback herring became established in Lake Ontario, they could spread to other Great Lakes and impede recovery of depressed populations of indigenous fishes, like lake herring (Coregonus artedi) and lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush), through competition with, or predation on, their larvae.

  16. Low level exposure to weathered crude oil causes genetic damage and malformations in larval herring

    SciTech Connect

    Carls, M.; Rice, S.D.; Hose, J.E.

    1995-12-31

    An initial concentration of 0.7 ppb polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in weathered Alaska North Slope crude oil caused genetic damage in newly hatched Pacific herring (Clupea pallasi) exposed for 16 days during incubation. The endpoint for genetic damage was a significant increase in the percentage of anaphase aberrations in pectoral fin cells, a response that has been previously shown to be a highly sensitive indicator of crude oil exposure in larval herring. At this exposure level, there were also significant decreases in the percentages of larval survival, normal development and competent swimming, and increased percentages of yolk sac edema. Composition of the PAH, which ranged from naphthalenes through chrysenes, was weighted toward the larger ring compounds, particularly phenanthrenes. Genetic response was not as sensitive an indicator of oil exposure as yolk sac edema, jaw size, and formation of pectoral fin rays. The consequences of chromosomal aberrations in larval herring are not clear. Other experiments have shown that although the frequency of genetic damage decreases with age, malformations persist and are coupled with growth reductions. It is likely that malformed larvae die; evidence for this comes from simultaneous measurements of mortality, malformations and genetic damage in the field.

  17. Kinetics of viral shedding provide insights into the epidemiology of viral hemorrhagic septicemia in Pacific herring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hershberger, P.; Gregg, J.; Grady, C.; Collins, R.; Winton, J.

    2010-01-01

    Losses from infectious diseases are an important component of natural mortality among marine fish species, but factors controlling the ecology of these diseases and their potential responses to anthropogenic changes are poorly understood. We used viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) and a laboratory stock of Pacific herring Clupea pallasii to investigate the kinetics of viral shedding and its effect on disease transmission and host mortality. Outbreaks of acute disease, accompanied by mortality and viral shedding, were initiated after waterborne exposure of herring to concentrations of VHSV as low as 10 1 plaque-forming units (pfu) ml-1. Shed virus in flow-through tanks was first detected 4 to 5 d post-exposure, peaked after 6 to 10 d, and was no longer detected after 16 d. Shedding rates, calculated from density, flow and waterborne virus titer reached 1.8 to 5.0 ?? ?10 8 pfu fish-1 d-1. Onset of viral shedding was dose-dependent and preceded initial mortality by 2 d. At 21 d, cumulative mortality in treatment groups ranged from 81 to 100% and was dependent not on challenge dose, but on the kinetics and level of viral shedding by infected fish in the tank. Possible consequences of the viral shedding and disease kinetics are discussed in the context of epizootic initiation and perpetuation among populations of wild Pacific herring. ?? Inter-Research 2010.

  18. Prevalence of viral erythrocytic necrosis in Pacific herring and epizootics in Skagit Bay, Puget Sound, Washington.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hershberger, P.K.; Elder, N.E.; Grady, C.A.; Gregg, J.L.; Pacheco, C.A.; Greene, C.; Rice, C.; Meyers, T.R.

    2009-01-01

    Epizootics of viral erythrocytic necrosis (VEN) occurred among juvenile Pacific herring Clupea pallasii in Skagit Bay, Puget Sound, Washington, during 2005-2007 and were characterized by high prevalences and intensities of cytoplasmic inclusion bodies within circulating erythrocytes. The prevalence of VEN peaked at 67% during the first epizootic in October 2005 and waned to 0% by August 2006. A second VEN epizootic occurred throughout the summer of 2007; this was characterized by disease initiation and perpetuation in the age-1, 2006 year-class, followed by involvement of the age-0, 2007 year-class shortly after the latter's metamorphosis to the juvenile stage. The disease was detected in other populations of juvenile Pacific herring throughout Puget Sound and Prince William Sound, Alaska, where the prevalences and intensities typically did not correspond to those observed in Skagit Bay. The persistence and recurrence of VEN epizootics indicate that the disease is probably common among juvenile Pacific herring throughout the eastern North Pacific Ocean, and although population-level impacts probably occur they are typically covert and not easily detected.

  19. Kinetics of viral shedding provide insights into the epidemiology of viral hemorrhagic septicemia in Pacific herring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hershberger, Paul K.; Gregg, Jacob L.; Winton, James R.; Grady, Courtney; Collins, Rachael

    2010-01-01

    Losses from infectious diseases are an important component of natural mortality among marine fish species, but factors controlling the ecology of these diseases and their potential responses to anthropogenic changes are poorly understood. We used viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) and a laboratory stock of Pacific herring Clupea pallasii to investigate the kinetics of viral shedding and its effect on disease transmission and host mortality. Outbreaks of acute disease, accompanied by mortality and viral shedding, were initiated after waterborne exposure of herring to concentrations of VHSV as low as 101 plaque-forming units (pfu) ml–1. Shed virus in flow-through tanks was first detected 4 to 5 d post-exposure, peaked after 6 to 10 d, and was no longer detected after 16 d. Shedding rates, calculated from density, flow and waterborne virus titer reached 1.8 to 5.0 × 108 pfu fish–1 d–1. Onset of viral shedding was dose-dependent and preceded initial mortality by 2 d. At 21 d, cumulative mortality in treatment groups ranged from 81 to 100% and was dependent not on challenge dose, but on the kinetics and level of viral shedding by infected fish in the tank. Possible consequences of the viral shedding and disease kinetics are discussed in the context of epizootic initiation and perpetuation among populations of wild Pacific herring.

  20. Diet composition and feeding activity of larval spring-spawning herring: Importance of environmental variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arula, T.; Kotta, J.; Lankov, A.; Simm, M.; Põlme, S.

    2012-02-01

    Availability of suitable prey in sufficient quantities during the shift to exogenous feeding is an important factor determining survival and growth of larval fish. The question of what factors regulate prey consumption in larval fish has remained a focus of fisheries oceanography. In this paper feeding ecology of the larval spring-spawning herring Clupea harengus membras was studied in relation to selected environmental abiotic and biotic parameters in the shallow sheltered Pärnu Bay during the 1970s and 2000s. The copepod Eurytemora affinis was the strongly dominating dietary item during all the years while other prey items were ingested only sporadically. Feeding activity of herring larvae was governed by different environmental variables and the relationships varied amongst the size classes of herring larvae. The studied abiotic (i.e., wind speed, water temperature, water transparency) or biotic variables (i.e., density of copepod nauplii, copepodite stages I-V and adults of E. affinis, mean developmental stage of copepods and density of fish larvae) had no significant effects on the feeding activity of small larvae. The feeding activity of medium larvae was only affected by water transparency and that of large larvae by a combination of water temperature, wind speed and the structure of local copepod community, respectively. On the other hand, the diet composition of all herring larvae was best described by the density of copepod nauplii. In addition, the density of fish larvae improved the model of small larvae and the density of adult copepods that of medium larvae, respectively. Time was significant for the feeding activity of medium larvae indicating some unexplained variability that was not taken into account by the studied abiotic and biotic variables.

  1. A survey of wild marine fish identifies a potential origin of an outbreak of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia in wrasse, Labridae, used as cleaner fish on marine Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar L., farms.

    PubMed

    Wallace, I S; Donald, K; Munro, L A; Murray, W; Pert, C C; Stagg, H; Hall, M; Bain, N

    2015-06-01

    Viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) was isolated from five species of wrasse (Labridae) used as biological controls for parasitic sea lice predominantly, Lepeophtheirus salmonis (Krøyer, 1837), on marine Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar L., farms in Shetland. As part of the epidemiological investigation, 1400 wild marine fish were caught and screened in pools of 10 for VHSV using virus isolation. Eleven pools (8%) were confirmed VHSV positive from: grey gurnard, Eutrigla gurnardus L.; Atlantic herring, Clupea harengus L.; Norway pout, Trisopterus esmarkii (Nilsson); plaice, Pleuronectes platessa L.; sprat, Sprattus sprattus L. and whiting, Merlangius merlangus L. The isolation of VHSV from grey gurnard is the first documented report in this species. Nucleic acid sequencing of the partial nucleocapsid (N) and glycoprotein (G) genes was carried out for viral characterization. Sequence analysis confirmed that all wild isolates were genotype III the same as the wrasse and there was a close genetic similarity between the isolates from wild fish and wrasse on the farms. Infection from these local wild marine fish is the most likely source of VHSV isolated from wrasse on the fish farms. © 2014 Crown Copyright. Journal of Fish Diseases © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. In situ exposure of herring embryos in Prince William Sound two years after the Exxon Valdez oil spill

    SciTech Connect

    Kocan, R.; Brown, E.; Baker, T.

    1995-12-31

    In order to evaluate long-term residual toxicity, artificially spawned Pacific herring (Clupea pallasl) embryos were deployed at 5 oiled and 5 unoiled sites in Prince William Sound two years after the Exxon Valdez oil spill. Embryos were exposed at 1.5 m and 4.5 m below mean low water for 8--10 d post fertilization. The embryos were then retrieved and transported to the laboratory for hatching and evaluation under controlled conditions, Endpoints were (1) embryo survival, (2) live hatch, (3) deformed larvae and (4) larval dry weight. The oiled sites produced significantly (P < 0.01) more deformed larvae (63.3%) than did the unoiled sites (51.3%), but there was a lower hatching success at the unoiled sites which resulted in no overall difference in normal live larvae produced between oiled and unoiled sites. The mean dry weight of newly hatched larvae from the oiled sites (78 {micro}g/larva) was significantly lower than those from the unoiled sites (97 {micro}g/larva) at all depths (P < 0.01). Increased larval deformities and reduced hatching weight is consistent with what has been reported by several investigators for herring larvae experimentally and naturally exposed to petroleum hydrocarbons. Based on the data, there appeared to be differences between the previously oiled and unoiled sites relative to herring development, but it is not clear whether this was due to residual oil effects or parental effects.

  3. Quantitative risk model for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon photoinduced toxicity in Pacific herring following the Exxon Valdez oil spill.

    PubMed

    Sellin Jeffries, Marlo K; Claytor, Carrie; Stubblefield, William; Pearson, Walter H; Oris, James T

    2013-05-21

    Phototoxicity occurs when exposure to ultraviolet radiation increases the toxicity of certain contaminants, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). This study aimed to (1) develop a quantitative model to predict the risk of PAH phototoxicity to fish, (2) assess the predictive value of the model, and (3) estimate the risk of PAH phototoxicity to larval and young of year Pacific herring (Clupea pallasi) following the Exxon Valdez oil spill (EVOS) in Prince William Sound, Alaska. The model, in which median lethal times (LT50 values) are estimated from whole-body phototoxic PAH concentrations and ultraviolet A (UVA) exposure, was constructed from previously reported PAH phototoxicity data. The predictive value of this model was confirmed by the overlap of model-predicted and experimentally derived LT50 values. The model, along with UVA characterization data, was used to generate estimates for depths of de minimiz risk for PAH phototoxicity in young herring in 2003/2004 and immediately following the 1989 EVOS, assuming average and worst case conditions. Depths of de minimiz risk were estimated to be between 0 and 2 m deep when worst case UVA and PAH conditions were considered. A post hoc assessment determined that <1% of the young herring population would have been present at depths associated with significant risk of PAH phototoxicity in 2003/2004 and 1989.

  4. Influence of temperature on the efficacy of homologous and heterologous DNA vaccines against viral hemorrhagic septicemia in Pacific Herring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hart, Lucas; Lorenzen, Niels; Einer-Jensen, Katja; Purcell, Maureen; Hershberger, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Homologous and heterologous (genogroup Ia) DNA vaccines against viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (genogroup IVa) conferred partial protection in Pacific Herring Clupea pallasii. Early protection at 2 weeks postvaccination (PV) was low and occurred only at an elevated temperature (12.6°C, 189 degree days), where the relative percent survival following viral exposure was similar for the two vaccines (IVa and Ia) and higher than that of negative controls at the same temperature. Late protection at 10 weeks PV was induced by both vaccines but was higher with the homologous vaccine at both 9.0°C and 12.6°C. Virus neutralization titers were detected among 55% of all vaccinated fish at 10 weeks PV. The results suggest that the immune response profile triggered by DNA vaccination of herring was similar to that reported for Rainbow Trout Oncorhynchus mykiss by Lorenzen and LaPatra in 2005, who found interferon responses in the early days PV and the transition to adaptive response later. However, the protective effect was far less prominent in herring, possibly reflecting different physiologies or adaptations of the two fish species.

  5. Susceptibility of three stocks of pacific herring to viral hemorrhagic septicemia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hershberger, P.K.; Gregg, J.L.; Grady, C.A.; Collins, R.M.

    2010-01-01

    Laboratory challenges using specific-pathogen-free Pacific herring Clupea pallasii from three distinct populations indicated that stock origin had no effect on susceptibility to viral hemorrhagic septicemia (VHS). All of the populations were highly susceptible to the disease upon initial exposure, with significantly greater cumulative mortalities occurring in the exposed treatment groups (56.3-64.3%) than in the unexposed control groups (0.8-9.0%). Interstock differences in cumulative mortality were not significant. The virus loads in the tissues of fish experiencing mortality were 10-10,000 times higher during the acute phase of the epizootics (day 13 postexposure) than during the recovery phase (days 30-42). Survivors of the epizootics were refractory to subsequent VHS, with reexposure of VHS survivors resulting in significantly less cumulative mortality (1.2-4.0%) than among positive controls (38.1-64.4%); interstock differences in susceptibility did not occur after reexposure. These results indicate that data from experiments designed to understand the ecology of VHS virus in a given stock of Pacific herring are broadly applicable to stocks throughout the northeastern Pacific.

  6. Epidemiology of viral hemorrhagic septicemia (VHS) among juvenile Pacific herring and Pacific sandlances in Puget Sound, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kocan, R.M.; Hershberger, P.K.; Elder, N.E.; Winton, J.R.

    2001-01-01

    Viral hemorrhagic septicemia (VHS) and the associated virus (VHSV) were identified in newly metamorphosed Pacific herring Clupea pallasi and Pacific sand lances Ammodytes hexapterus captured from Puget Sound, Washington, between 1995 and 1998. During that 4-year period, virus was detected in less than 1% of free-ranging, age-0 Pacific herring; however, when groups of these fish were confined in the laboratory, they experienced severe mortality, occasionally exceeding 50%, with the prevalence of VHSV reaching 100% by 14 d postcapture. At 7–21 d postcapture, VHSV titers peaked in excess of 108 plaque-forming units/g of tissue; by 30 d postcapture, however, the virus could no longer be isolated. Fish surviving beyond 30 d eliminated the virus from their tissues, but some remained lethargic and continued to show signs of hemorrhage around the mouth, skin, and fins until about 6 weeks postcapture. No cutaneous ulcers were observed during either the acute or the recovery phases of infection. Eighteen-month-old Pacific herring captured from the same area were also negative for VHSV but developed active infections after confinement for 7 d. Unlike younger fish, only 8.4% of these older fish died of VHS, and 7.7% of survivors were positive for VHSV at 7–10 d postcapture, which suggests that a higher proportion of the older fish had developed resistance to VHSV from prior exposure to it. Three months after fatalities ceased in the laboratory-held fish, the surviving fish were challenged with 5 3 103 plaque-forming units/mL of VHSV for 1 h. No mortality was observed during the next 30 d, and virus was recoverable at very low titers in fewer than 5% of the challenged fish, indicating the development of an active immunity to VHSV. Laboratory cohabitation of infected wild Pacific herring with laboratory-reared, specific-pathogen-free Pacific herring resulted in transmission of VHSV to the nonimmune fish, with the resulting course of disease resembling that seen in wild

  7. Potent Phototoxicity of Marine Bunker Oil to Translucent Herring Embryos after Prolonged Weathering

    PubMed Central

    Incardona, John P.; Vines, Carol A.; Linbo, Tiffany L.; Myers, Mark S.; Sloan, Catherine A.; Anulacion, Bernadita F.; Boyd, Daryle; Collier, Tracy K.; Morgan, Steven; Cherr, Gary N.; Scholz, Nathaniel L.

    2012-01-01

    Pacific herring embryos (Clupea pallasi) spawned three months following the Cosco Busan bunker oil spill in San Francisco Bay showed high rates of late embryonic mortality in the intertidal zone at oiled sites. Dead embryos developed to the hatching stage (e.g. fully pigmented eyes) before suffering extensive tissue deterioration. In contrast, embryos incubated subtidally at oiled sites showed evidence of sublethal oil exposure (petroleum-induced cardiac toxicity) with very low rates of mortality. These field findings suggested an enhancement of oil toxicity through an interaction between oil and another environmental stressor in the intertidal zone, such as higher levels of sunlight-derived ultraviolet (UV) radiation. We tested this hypothesis by exposing herring embryos to both trace levels of weathered Cosco Busan bunker oil and sunlight, with and without protection from UV radiation. Cosco Busan oil and UV co-exposure were both necessary and sufficient to induce an acutely lethal necrotic syndrome in hatching stage embryos that closely mimicked the condition of dead embryos sampled from oiled sites. Tissue levels of known phototoxic polycyclic aromatic compounds were too low to explain the observed degree of phototoxicity, indicating the presence of other unidentified or unmeasured phototoxic compounds derived from bunker oil. These findings provide a parsimonious explanation for the unexpectedly high losses of intertidal herring spawn following the Cosco Busan spill. The chemical composition and associated toxicity of bunker oils should be more thoroughly evaluated to better understand and anticipate the ecological impacts of vessel-derived spills associated with an expanding global transportation network. PMID:22312421

  8. Potent phototoxicity of marine bunker oil to translucent herring embryos after prolonged weathering.

    PubMed

    Incardona, John P; Vines, Carol A; Linbo, Tiffany L; Myers, Mark S; Sloan, Catherine A; Anulacion, Bernadita F; Boyd, Daryle; Collier, Tracy K; Morgan, Steven; Cherr, Gary N; Scholz, Nathaniel L

    2012-01-01

    Pacific herring embryos (Clupea pallasi) spawned three months following the Cosco Busan bunker oil spill in San Francisco Bay showed high rates of late embryonic mortality in the intertidal zone at oiled sites. Dead embryos developed to the hatching stage (e.g. fully pigmented eyes) before suffering extensive tissue deterioration. In contrast, embryos incubated subtidally at oiled sites showed evidence of sublethal oil exposure (petroleum-induced cardiac toxicity) with very low rates of mortality. These field findings suggested an enhancement of oil toxicity through an interaction between oil and another environmental stressor in the intertidal zone, such as higher levels of sunlight-derived ultraviolet (UV) radiation. We tested this hypothesis by exposing herring embryos to both trace levels of weathered Cosco Busan bunker oil and sunlight, with and without protection from UV radiation. Cosco Busan oil and UV co-exposure were both necessary and sufficient to induce an acutely lethal necrotic syndrome in hatching stage embryos that closely mimicked the condition of dead embryos sampled from oiled sites. Tissue levels of known phototoxic polycyclic aromatic compounds were too low to explain the observed degree of phototoxicity, indicating the presence of other unidentified or unmeasured phototoxic compounds derived from bunker oil. These findings provide a parsimonious explanation for the unexpectedly high losses of intertidal herring spawn following the Cosco Busan spill. The chemical composition and associated toxicity of bunker oils should be more thoroughly evaluated to better understand and anticipate the ecological impacts of vessel-derived spills associated with an expanding global transportation network.

  9. Principles underlying the epizootiology of viral hemorrhagic septicemia in Pacific herring and other fishes throughout the North Pacific Ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hershberger, Paul K.; Garver, Kyle A.; Winton, James R.

    2016-01-01

    Although viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) typically occurs at low prevalence and intensity in natural populations of Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii) and other marine fishes in the Northeast Pacific Ocean, epizootics of the resulting disease (VHS) periodically occur, often in association with observed fish kills. Here we identify a list of principles, based on a combination of field studies, controlled laboratory experiments, and previously unpublished observations, that govern the epizootiology of VHS in Pacific herring. A thorough understanding of these principles provides the basis for identifying risk factors that predispose certain marine fish populations to VHS epizootics, including the lack of population resistance, presence of chronic viral carriers in a population, copious viral shedding by infected individuals, cool water temperatures, limited water circulation patterns, and gregarious host behavioral patterns. Further, these principles are used to define the epizootiological stages of the disease in Pacific herring, including the susceptible (where susceptible individuals predominate a school or subpopulation), enzootic (where infection prevalence and intensity are often below the limits of reasonable laboratory detection), disease amplification (where infection prevalence and intensity increase rapidly), outbreak (often accompanied by host mortalities with high virus loads and active shedding), recovery (in which the mortality rate and virus load decline owing to an active host immune response), and refractory stages (characterized by little or no susceptibility and where viral clearance occurs in most VHS survivors). In addition to providing a foundation for quantitatively assessing the potential risks of future VHS epizootics in Pacific herring, these principles provide insights into the epizootiology of VHS in other fish communities where susceptible species exist.

  10. Meta-ecosystems and biological energy transport from ocean to coast: the ecological importance of herring migration.

    PubMed

    Varpe, Oystein; Fiksen, Oyvind; Slotte, Aril

    2005-12-01

    Ecosystems are not closed, but receive resource subsidies from other ecosystems. Energy, material and organisms are moved between systems by physical vectors, but migrating animals also transport resources between systems. We report on large scale energy transport from ocean to coast by a migrating fish population, the Norwegian spring-spawning (NSS) herring Clupea harengus. We observe a rapid body mass increase during parts of the annual, oceanic feeding migration and we use a bioenergetics model to quantify energy consumption. The model predicts strong seasonal variation in food consumption with a marked peak in late May to July. The copepod Calanus finmarchicus is the most important prey and 23 x 10(6) tones (wet weight) of C. finmarchicus is consumed annually. The annual consumption-biomass ratio is 5.2. During the feeding migration 17% of consumed energy is converted to body mass. The biomass transported to the coast and left as reproductive output is estimated from gonad weight and is about 1.3 x 10(6) tones for the current population. This transport is to our knowledge the world's largest flux of energy caused by a single population. We demonstrate marked temporal variation in transport during the last century and discuss the effects of NSS herring in the ocean, as a major consumer, and at the coast, where eggs and larvae are important for coastal predators. In particular, we suggest that the rapid decline of lobster Homarus gammarus landings in Western Norway during the 1960s was related to the collapse of NSS herring. We also discuss spatial variation in energy transport caused by changed migration patterns. Both climate and fisheries probably triggered historical changes in the migration patterns of NSS herring. New migration routes emerge at the level of individuals, which in turn determines where resources are gathered and delivered, and therefore, how meta-ecosystems function.

  11. Infection of larval herring by helminth parasites in the North Sea and the effect on feeding incidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heath, M.; Nicoll, N.

    1991-12-01

    Specimens of larval herring ( Clupea harengus L.) collected during the Autumn Circulation Experiment in the North Sea were found to be infected with two species of helminth parasites—a trematode Hemiurus sp. and a cestode Scolex pleuronectis. The prevalence of both parasites was significantly dependent on larval length, sampling month and sampling area. Analysis of larval stomach contents indicated that feeding incidence was significantly lower in larvae which were infected with S. pleuronectis. The difference in feeding incidence between parasitized and non-parasitized larvae represented up to 50% reduction in prey uptake rate. Up to 40% of larvae were infected with S. pleuronectis and the consequences of infection for the mean growth rate in the population could therefore be significant. The geographical variation in the distribution of S. pleuronectis infection suggests the possibility of an interaction between larval advection routes and growth rate, which could influence recruitment.

  12. Optimization of a Plaque Neutralization Test (PNT) to Identify the Exposure History of Pacific Herring to Viral Hemorrhagic Septicemia Virus (VHSV).

    PubMed

    Hart, Lucas M; MacKenzie, Ashley; Purcell, Maureen K; Powers, Rachel L; Hershberger, Paul K

    2017-06-01

    Methods for a plaque neutralization test (PNT) were optimized for the detection and quantification of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) neutralizing activity in the plasma of Pacific Herring Clupea pallasii. The PNT was complement dependent, as neutralizing activity was attenuated by heat inactivation; further, neutralizing activity was mostly restored by the addition of exogenous complement from specific-pathogen-free Pacific Herring. Optimal methods included the overnight incubation of VHSV aliquots in serial dilutions (starting at 1:16) of whole test plasma containing endogenous complement. The resulting viral titers were then enumerated using a viral plaque assay in 96-well microplates. Serum neutralizing activity was virus-specific as plasma from viral hemorrhagic septicemia (VHS) survivors demonstrated only negligible reactivity to infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus, a closely related rhabdovirus. Among Pacific Herring that survived VHSV exposure, neutralizing activity was detected in the plasma as early as 37 d postexposure and peaked at approximately 64 d postexposure. The onset of neutralizing activity was slightly delayed in fish reared at 7.4°C relative to those in warmer temperatures (9.9°C and 13.1°C); however, neutralizing activity persisted for at least 345 d postexposure in all temperature treatments. It is anticipated that this novel ability to assess VHSV neutralizing activity in Pacific Herring will enable retrospective comparisons between prior VHS infections and year-class recruitment failures. Additionally, the optimized PNT could be employed as a forecasting tool capable of identifying the potential for future VHS epizootics in wild Pacific Herring populations. Received November 7, 2016; accepted January 14, 2017.

  13. Evaluating signals of oil spill impacts, climate, and species interactions in Pacific herring and Pacific salmon populations in Prince William Sound and Copper River, Alaska.

    PubMed

    Ward, Eric J; Adkison, Milo; Couture, Jessica; Dressel, Sherri C; Litzow, Michael A; Moffitt, Steve; Hoem Neher, Tammy; Trochta, John; Brenner, Rich

    2017-01-01

    The Exxon Valdez oil spill occurred in March 1989 in Prince William Sound, Alaska, and was one of the worst environmental disasters on record in the United States. Despite long-term data collection over the nearly three decades since the spill, tremendous uncertainty remains as to how significantly the spill affected fishery resources. Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii) and some wild Pacific salmon populations (Oncorhynchus spp.) in Prince William Sound declined in the early 1990s, and have not returned to the population sizes observed in the 1980s. Discerning if, or how much of, this decline resulted from the oil spill has been difficult because a number of other physical and ecological drivers are confounded temporally with the spill; some of these drivers include environmental variability or changing climate regimes, increased production of hatchery salmon in the region, and increases in populations of potential predators. Using data pre- and post-spill, we applied time-series methods to evaluate support for whether and how herring and salmon productivity has been affected by each of five drivers: (1) density dependence, (2) the EVOS event, (3) changing environmental conditions, (4) interspecific competition on juvenile fish, and (5) predation and competition from adult fish or, in the case of herring, humpback whales. Our results showed support for intraspecific density-dependent effects in herring, sockeye, and Chinook salmon, with little overall support for an oil spill effect. Of the salmon species, the largest driver was the negative impact of adult pink salmon returns on sockeye salmon productivity. Herring productivity was most strongly affected by changing environmental conditions; specifically, freshwater discharge into the Gulf of Alaska was linked to a series of recruitment failures-before, during, and after EVOS. These results highlight the need to better understand long terms impacts of pink salmon on food webs, as well as the interactions between

  14. Optimization of a Plaque Neutralization Test (PNT) to identify the exposure history of Pacific Herring to viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hart, Lucas; Mackenzie, Ashley; Purcell, Maureen; Thompson, Rachel L.; Hershberger, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Methods for a plaque neutralization test (PNT) were optimized for the detection and quantification of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) neutralizing activity in the plasma of Pacific Herring Clupea pallasii. The PNT was complement dependent, as neutralizing activity was attenuated by heat inactivation; further, neutralizing activity was mostly restored by the addition of exogenous complement from specific-pathogen-free Pacific Herring. Optimal methods included the overnight incubation of VHSV aliquots in serial dilutions (starting at 1:16) of whole test plasma containing endogenous complement. The resulting viral titers were then enumerated using a viral plaque assay in 96-well microplates. Serum neutralizing activity was virus-specific as plasma from viral hemorrhagic septicemia (VHS) survivors demonstrated only negligible reactivity to infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus, a closely related rhabdovirus. Among Pacific Herring that survived VHSV exposure, neutralizing activity was detected in the plasma as early as 37 d postexposure and peaked at approximately 64 d postexposure. The onset of neutralizing activity was slightly delayed in fish reared at 7.4°C relative to those in warmer temperatures (9.9°C and 13.1°C); however, neutralizing activity persisted for at least 345 d postexposure in all temperature treatments. It is anticipated that this novel ability to assess VHSV neutralizing activity in Pacific Herring will enable retrospective comparisons between prior VHS infections and year-class recruitment failures. Additionally, the optimized PNT could be employed as a forecasting tool capable of identifying the potential for future VHS epizootics in wild Pacific Herring populations.

  15. Evaluating signals of oil spill impacts, climate, and species interactions in Pacific herring and Pacific salmon populations in Prince William Sound and Copper River, Alaska

    PubMed Central

    Adkison, Milo; Couture, Jessica; Dressel, Sherri C.; Litzow, Michael A.; Moffitt, Steve; Hoem Neher, Tammy; Trochta, John

    2017-01-01

    The Exxon Valdez oil spill occurred in March 1989 in Prince William Sound, Alaska, and was one of the worst environmental disasters on record in the United States. Despite long-term data collection over the nearly three decades since the spill, tremendous uncertainty remains as to how significantly the spill affected fishery resources. Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii) and some wild Pacific salmon populations (Oncorhynchus spp.) in Prince William Sound declined in the early 1990s, and have not returned to the population sizes observed in the 1980s. Discerning if, or how much of, this decline resulted from the oil spill has been difficult because a number of other physical and ecological drivers are confounded temporally with the spill; some of these drivers include environmental variability or changing climate regimes, increased production of hatchery salmon in the region, and increases in populations of potential predators. Using data pre- and post-spill, we applied time-series methods to evaluate support for whether and how herring and salmon productivity has been affected by each of five drivers: (1) density dependence, (2) the EVOS event, (3) changing environmental conditions, (4) interspecific competition on juvenile fish, and (5) predation and competition from adult fish or, in the case of herring, humpback whales. Our results showed support for intraspecific density-dependent effects in herring, sockeye, and Chinook salmon, with little overall support for an oil spill effect. Of the salmon species, the largest driver was the negative impact of adult pink salmon returns on sockeye salmon productivity. Herring productivity was most strongly affected by changing environmental conditions; specifically, freshwater discharge into the Gulf of Alaska was linked to a series of recruitment failures—before, during, and after EVOS. These results highlight the need to better understand long terms impacts of pink salmon on food webs, as well as the interactions between

  16. The herring gull complex is not a ring species.

    PubMed Central

    Liebers, Dorit; de Knijff, Peter; Helbig, Andreas J.

    2004-01-01

    Under what circumstances speciation in sexually reproducing animals can occur without geographical disjunction is still controversial. According to the ring-species model, a reproductive barrier may arise through 'isolation by distance' when peripheral populations of a species meet after expanding around some uninhabitable barrier. The classical example of this kind of speciation is the herring gull (Larus argentatus) complex, with a circumpolar distribution in the Northern Hemisphere. Based on mitochondrial DNA variation among 21 gull taxa, we show that members of this complex differentiated largely in allopatry following multiple vicariance and long-distance-colonization events, not primarily through isolation by distance. Reproductive isolation evolved more rapidly between some lineages than between others, irrespective of their genetic distance. Extant taxa are the result of divergent as well as reticulate evolution between two ancestral lineages originally separated in a North Atlantic refugium and a continental Eurasian refugium, respectively. Continental birds expanded along the entire north Eurasian coast and via Beringia into North America. Contrary to the ring-species model, we find no genetic evidence for a closure of the circumpolar ring through colonization of Europe by North American herring gulls. However, closure of the ring in the opposite direction may be imminent, with lesser black-backed gulls about to colonize North America. PMID:15255043

  17. Abnormalities in larvae from the once-largest Pacific herring population in Washington State result primarily from factors independent of spawning location

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hershberger, P.K.; Elder, N.E.; Wittouck, J.; Stick, K.; Kocan, R.M.

    2005-01-01

    Among larvae from populations of Pacific herring Clupea pallasii in Washington State those from Cherry Point have consistently demonstrated abnormalities indicative of distress, including low weights and lengths at hatch, increased prevalences of skeletal abnormalities, and shorter survival times in food deprivation studies. The biomass of adult, prespawn Pacific herring at Cherry Point declined from 13,606 metric tons in 1973 to a record low 733 metric tons in 2000. However, correlation of larval abnormalities with adult recruitment was weak, indicating that the larval abnormalities did not directly cause the decline. Larval abnormalities originated primarily from factors independent of conditions at the spawning location because they were not reproduced by incubation of foreign zygotes along the Cherry Point shoreline but were reproduced after the development of indigenous zygotes in controlled laboratory conditions. Although the precise cause of the abnormalities was not determined, recent zoographic trends in elevated natural mortality among adult Pacific herring and resulting reduced age structures may be involved. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2005.

  18. Development of Genomic Resources for Pacific Herring through Targeted Transcriptome Pyrosequencing

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Steven B.; Hauser, Lorenz; Seeb, Lisa W.; Seeb, James E.

    2012-01-01

    Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii) support commercially and culturally important fisheries but have experienced significant additional pressure from a variety of anthropogenic and environmental sources. In order to provide genomic resources to facilitate organismal and population level research, high-throughput pyrosequencing (Roche 454) was carried out on transcriptome libraries from liver and testes samples taken in Prince William Sound, the Bering Sea, and the Gulf of Alaska. Over 40,000 contigs were identified with an average length of 728 bp. We describe an annotated transcriptome as well as a workflow for single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) discovery and validation. A subset of 96 candidate SNPs chosen from 10,933 potential SNPs, were tested using a combination of Sanger sequencing and high-resolution melt-curve analysis. Five SNPs supported between-ocean-basin differentiation, while one SNP associated with immune function provided high differentiation between Prince William Sound and Kodiak Island within the Gulf of Alaska. These genomic resources provide a basis for environmental physiology studies and opportunities for marker development and subsequent population structure analysis. PMID:22383979

  19. Synthetic biology as red herring.

    PubMed

    Preston, Beth

    2013-12-01

    It has become commonplace to say that with the advent of technologies like synthetic biology the line between artifacts and living organisms, policed by metaphysicians since antiquity, is beginning to blur. But that line began to blur 10,000 years ago when plants and animals were first domesticated; and has been thoroughly blurred at least since agriculture became the dominant human subsistence pattern many millennia ago. Synthetic biology is ultimately only a late and unexceptional offshoot of this prehistoric development. From this perspective, then, synthetic biology is a red herring, distracting us from more thorough philosophical consideration of the most truly revolutionary human practice-agriculture. In the first section of this paper I will make this case with regard to ontology, arguing that synthetic biology crosses no ontological lines that were not crossed already in the Neolithic. In the second section I will construct a parallel case with regard to cognition, arguing that synthetic biology as biological engineering represents no cognitive advance over what was required for domestication and the new agricultural subsistence pattern it grounds. In the final section I will make the case with regard to human existence, arguing that synthetic biology, even if wildly successful, is not in a position to cause significant existential change in what it is to be human over and above the massive existential change caused by the transition to agriculture. I conclude that a longer historical perspective casts new light on some important issues in philosophy of technology and environmental philosophy.

  20. Temporal trends in the bioaccumulation of trace metals in herring, sprat, and cod from the southern Baltic Sea in the 1994-2003 period.

    PubMed

    Polak-Juszczak, Lucyna

    2009-09-01

    This study is based on raw data obtained from 1 225 samples of herring (Clupea harengus), sprat (Sprattus sprattus), and cod (Gadus morhua) collected in the 1994-2003 period from the Polish coastal zone of the Baltic Sea. This paper presents the results of investigations of the contents of Cu, Zn, Cd, Pb, Hg, and As in fish. The aim was to identify temporal trends in trace metal contamination and variations in the concentrations of Hg in the flesh of herring, sprat, and cod of different lengths. A positive correlation between fish length and Hg concentration was noted for cod, sprat, and herring. The temporal trend analyses of heavy metal concentrations in the fish in the 1994-2003 period indicated ten significant downward trends out of eighteen tests; these referred to concentrations of Cd, Hg, and Pb in all the species studied, and to As in sprat. Concentrations of Cu and Zn remained stable in all the species studied, as did As in herring and cod. No upward trends were detected in the concentration of trace metals in the fish studied. Smaller scale temporal variations in concentrations of some elements were also observed and were associated with natural events, such as increased river discharge resulting from floods. The most likely factors which contributed to the observed downward trends in heavy metals concentrations in fish could possibly stem from lesser quantities of Cd, Pb, and Hg being introduced to the Baltic Sea with the waters of rivers from Baltic countries, including Poland, and atmospheric depositions in the 1994-2003 period. Diminishing trends of concentrations of these elements in Baltic Sea waters are also evidence of this. These facts might indicate that advantageous changes are occurring in the concentrations of heavy metals in the southern Baltic environment.

  1. Combining genetic and demographic information to prioritize conservation efforts for anadromous alewife and blueback herring

    PubMed Central

    Palkovacs, Eric P; Hasselman, Daniel J; Argo, Emily E; Gephard, Stephen R; Limburg, Karin E; Post, David M; Schultz, Thomas F; Willis, Theodore V

    2014-01-01

    A major challenge in conservation biology is the need to broadly prioritize conservation efforts when demographic data are limited. One method to address this challenge is to use population genetic data to define groups of populations linked by migration and then use demographic information from monitored populations to draw inferences about the status of unmonitored populations within those groups. We applied this method to anadromous alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus) and blueback herring (Alosa aestivalis), species for which long-term demographic data are limited. Recent decades have seen dramatic declines in these species, which are an important ecological component of coastal ecosystems and once represented an important fishery resource. Results show that most populations comprise genetically distinguishable units, which are nested geographically within genetically distinct clusters or stocks. We identified three distinct stocks in alewife and four stocks in blueback herring. Analysis of available time series data for spawning adult abundance and body size indicate declines across the US ranges of both species, with the most severe declines having occurred for populations belonging to the Southern New England and the Mid-Atlantic Stocks. While all alewife and blueback herring populations deserve conservation attention, those belonging to these genetic stocks warrant the highest conservation prioritization. PMID:24567743

  2. Rainbow smelt - larval lake herring interactions: competitors or casual acquaintances?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Selgeby, James H.; MacCallum, Wayne R.; Hoff, Michael H.

    1994-01-01

    We examined the hypothesis that competition for food between rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax) and larval lake herring (Coregonus artedi) was a cause for the declines of lake herring stocks in Lake Superior. We studied the diet of larval lake herring and of larval, juvenile, and adult rainbow smelt during 1974 in Black Bay, Ontario, where both species were abundant, and in the Apostle Islands Region, Wisconsin, where rainbow smelt was abundant but lake herring was scarce. No evidence of competition for food was found between larval lake herring and rainbow smelt. Spawning and hatching times of the two species were separate enough that most larvae of the two species did not occupy the study areas simultaneously. Juvenile and adult rainbow smelt were found with lake herring larvae, but their diets differed. Therefore, we concluded that rainbow smelt did not compete with lake herring larvae for food and that competition for food between rainbow smelt and lake herring larvae was not the factor that caused lake herring population declines in Lake Superior.

  3. 77 FR 22285 - Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council; Public Hearings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-13

    ... Amendment 14 to the Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish (MSB) Fishery Management Plan (FMP). DATES...://www.mafmc.org/fmp/msb.htm . Council address: Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council, 800 N. State... shad (river herrings and shads or ``RH/S'') in the MSB FMP. The Amendment has three purposes:...

  4. Is disease an important mortality factor for Pacific herring?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hershberger, Paul

    2005-01-01

    Marine pelagic forage fishes, including sardines, anchovies, and herring, undergo large oscillations in population abundance. Although over-fishing can have a dramatic impact in reducing population size, this anthropogenic perturbation cannot fully account for all population declines because natural oscillations in marine pelagic fish biomasses occurred prior to the onset of commercial fishing. Among the herring metapopulation in Puget Sound / Straight of Georgia, the mean estimated annual mortality, exclusive of commercial fishing, increased from 20% in the late 1970’s and early 1980’s to 64-87% during 1996-1999. This natural mortality affects primarily the older age cohorts and resulted in recent decreased median ages of adult herring from age 4-6 cohorts to age 2-3 cohorts that die prior to iteroparous spawning. Surveys of wild herring from the region indicate that the protozoan parasite Ichthyophonus sp., is currently ubiquitous among Pacific herring populations in Washington and British Columbia, and prevalence of infection increase directly with herring age, from 12% among juveniles to 58% among the underrepresented age 6+ cohorts. Ichthyophonus can be highly pathogenic to immunologically naïve Pacific herring, causing 80% mortality 2 mo. after exposure in the laboratory. Current laboratory-based studies are underway to determine whether natural Ichthyophonus infections are terminal for the host, and whether these infections account for the decreasing median age of wild Pacific herring populations in recent years.

  5. Acoustic Resonance Classification of Swimbladder-Bearing Fish at Multiple Scales

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-30

    Clupea harengus ). Red: Acadian redfish (Sebastes fasciatus). 12 Franklin Swell 2011: Individual fish at 1-6 kHz...trawl hauls. Trawls were conducted on an ad hoc basis, when aggregations of fish were observed in the echo-sounder data. Atlantic herring ( Clupea ... harengus ), Acadian redfish (Sebastes fasciatus), and silver hake (Merluccius bilinearis) comprised the majority of the trawl catches. Other finfish and

  6. Relationships between environmental organochlorine contaminant residues, plasma corticosterone concentrations, and intermediary metabolic enzyme activities in Great Lakes herring gull embryos.

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzen, A; Moon, T W; Kennedy, S W; Glen, G A

    1999-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to survey and detect differences in plasma corticosterone concentrations and intermediary metabolic enzyme activities in herring gull (Larus argentatus) embryos environmentally exposed to organochlorine contaminants in ovo. Unincubated fertile herring gull eggs were collected from an Atlantic coast control site and various Great Lakes sites in 1997 and artificially incubated in the laboratory. Liver and/or kidney tissues from approximately half of the late-stage embryos were analyzed for the activities of various intermediary metabolic enzymes known to be regulated, at least in part, by corticosteroids. Basal plasma corticosterone concentrations were determined for the remaining embryos. Yolk sacs were collected from each embryo and a subset was analyzed for organochlorine contaminants. Regression analysis of individual yolk sac organochlorine residue concentrations, or 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin equivalents (TEQs), with individual basal plasma corticosterone concentrations indicated statistically significant inverse relationships for polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins/polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDDs/PCDFs), total polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), non-ortho PCBs, and TEQs. Similarly, inverse relationships were observed for the activities of two intermediary metabolic enzymes (phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and malic enzyme) when regressed against PCDDs/PCDFs. Overall, these data suggest that current levels of organochlorine contamination may be affecting the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis and associated intermediary metabolic pathways in environmentally exposed herring gull embryos in the Great Lakes. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:10064546

  7. Possible effects of pollock and herring on the growth and reproductive success of Steller sea lions (Eumetopias jubatus): insights from feeding experiments using an alternative animal model, Rattus norvegicus.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, Carolyn P; Trites, A W; Kitts, D D

    2003-01-01

    The decline of Steller sea lions (Eumetopias jubatus) in the Gulf of Alaska appears to have been associated with a switch of diet from one dominated by fatty forage fishes (such as herring; Clupea pallasi) to one dominated by low-fat fish (such as pollock; Theragra chalcogramma). Observations made during the decline include reduced body size of sea lions, low pregnancy rates, and high mortality. We used the general mammalian model, the laboratory rat (Rattus norvegicus), to test whether changing the quality of prey consumed could cause changes in size and reproductive performance. Five groups of twelve female, weanling rats were fed diets composed of herring (H), pollock (P), pollock supplemented with herring oil (PH), pollock supplemented with pollock oil (PP), or a semi-purified diet (ICN). Mean body weights were greatest for H, followed by PH, P, PP and finally ICN, although ICN was the only group significantly different from the others (P<0.05). Food intakes before mating were 10 % higher for groups on the lower-fat diets (P and ICN), resulting in similar energy intakes in all groups. The protein efficiency ratio was highest for the H diet, slightly lower for all pollock diets, and significantly lower for ICN (P<0.05). The fetal weights for mothers fed P were significantly reduced (P<0.05). The present study shows that the energy content was a major limiting factor in the nutritional quality of pollock. When food intake was adjusted to meet energetic requirements, there were no detrimental consequences from eating pollock. However, supplementation of pollock meal with additional pollock oil may reduce growth and reproductive performance, although the reasons for this were not apparent.

  8. A Unified Approach to Passive and Active Ocean Acoustic Waveguide Remote Sensing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-30

    Jagannathan, R. Patel, J. M. Jech, N. C. Makris, and P. Ratilal, (2010) “Low- frequency target strength and abundance of shoaling Atlantic herring Clupea ... harengus in the Gulf of Maine during the Ocean Acoustic Waveguide Remote Sensing (OAWRS) 2006 Experiment” J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 127: 104-123. 7. E. T

  9. Enhancing Long Range Sonar Performance in Range-Dependent Fluctuating Ocean Waveguides by Mitigating Biological Clutter and Environmental Reverberation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-30

    S. Jagannathan, R. Patel, J.M. Jech, N.C. Makris and P. Ratilal, “Low- frequency target strength and abundance of shoaling Atlantic herring ( Clupea ... harengus ) in the Gulf of Maine during the Ocean Acoustic Waveguide Remote Sensing (OAWRS) 2006 Experiment,” J. Acoust. Soc. Am. Vol. 127, 104–123

  10. Losses of nitrogen fractions from herring to brine during marinating.

    PubMed

    Szymczak, Mariusz; Kołakowski, Edward

    2012-05-01

    Fish meat is characterized by a high content of valuable nutrients. During the marinating process, however, the process of proteins diffusion and other nitrogen fractions from fish to the surrounding brine is commonly observed. It was determined that the total nitrogen loss from herring meat of industrial maturity (4-5day) amounted to 6-19% of raw material nitrogen. Extension of the marinating time to 16-18days increases nitrogen losses even to 18-27%. Less loss was observed during marinating of fresh than of frozen herring and during marinating of carcasses, as opposite to fillets. Higher nitrogen content in fish was not proved to influence higher nitrogen losses in a brine. The majority of loss consisted of nitrogen fractions soluble in TCA, of which one third was formed by α-amine nitrogen. Nitrogen contained in brine suspension accounted for only 1.5-4% of total nitrogen losses. With increasing salt or acid concentration the amount of total nitrogen loss was lower from fresh herring and higher from frozen one. Higher salt concentration significantly reduced the amount of non-protein nitrogen and all its fractions during marinating of fresh and frozen herring. In case of acetic acid, the influence of its concentration was diverse and depended on type of herring and its dressing. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The toxicity of creosote-treated wood to Pacific herring embryos and characterization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons near creosoted pilings in Juneau, Alaska.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Danielle L; Carls, Mark G; Rice, Stanley D; Stekoll, Michael S

    2016-10-14

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from creosote exposure in the laboratory resulted in deleterious effects in developing Pacific herring (Clupea pallasi) embryos, and potentially toxic concentrations of PAHs were measured using passive water samplers at 1 of 3 harbor field sites in Juneau, Alaska, USA. Aqueous total PAH concentrations of 4.6 μg/L and 8.4 μg/L from creosote exposure resulted in skeletal defects and ineffective swimming in hatched larvae in the laboratory (10% effective concentrations) and were the most sensitive parameters measured. Hatch rates also suffered from creosote exposure in a dose-dependent manner: at exposures between 5 μg/L and 50 μg/L total PAH, 50% of the population failed to hatch. Comparisons between laboratory and field deployed passive samplers suggested that for at least 1 harbor in Juneau, concentrations sufficient to induce teratogenic effects were found directly on creosoted pilings, within 10 cm of them, and sometimes at a distance of 10 m. Total PAH concentrations generally decreased with distance from creosoted pilings. Creosote pilings contribute to the PAH load within a marina and can rise to PAH concentrations that are harmful to fish embryos, but at a scale that is localized in the environment. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;9999:1-9. © 2016 SETAC.

  12. Red herring in acid rain research

    SciTech Connect

    Havas, M.; Hutchinson, T.C.; Likens, G.E.

    1984-06-01

    Five common misconceptions, red herrings, regarding the effects of acid deposition on aquatic ecosystems are described in an attempt to clarify some of the confusion they have created. These misconceptions are the following: Bog lakes have been acidic for thousands of years; thus the acidification of lakes is not a recent phenomenon. The early methods for measuring pH are in error; therfore, no statements can be made regarding historical trends. Acidification of lakes and streams results from changed land use practices (forestry, agriculture, animal husbandry) and not acid deposition. The decrease in fish populations is caused by overfishing, disease, and water pollution, not acidification. Because lakes that receive identical rainfall can have considerable different pHs, regional lake acidification cannot be due to acid precipitation. It is easy to suggest a whole series of alternative, and often unlikely, explanations of the causes and consequences of acid deposition. These keep scientists busy for years assembling and examining data only to conclude that the explanation is not valid. These tactics cause, and perhaps are designed to cause, continuous delay in remedial action. They fail to take into account the large body of information that deals with the sources of the acid deposition and the seriousness of its effects.

  13. Feeding competition between larval lake whitefish and lake herring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savino, Jacqueline F.; Hudson, Patrick L.

    1995-01-01

    The potential for competition for food between larval lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) and lake herring (C. artedi) 1- to 8-wk of age was explored in a series of 1-h laboratory feeding studies. Feeding started at 2-wk post-hatch. Learning and fish size appear to be more important than prey density at the onset of feeding. Species differed in their feeding behavior and consumption noticeably by 5-wk and substantially by 8-wk. Lake whitefish generally were more aggressive foragers than lake herring, attacking and capturing more prey. At high plankton density at 8-wk, lake herring feeding was depressed in mixed-fish treatments. This difference in competitive food consumption between the two coregonids occurs at a critical life stage, and when combined with other biotic and abiotic factors, may have a significant impact on recruitment.

  14. 76 FR 65971 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Adjustment to the Atlantic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-25

    ... Canadian catch in the New Brunswick weir fishery, a portion of the buffer between ABC and OY (the buffer to... the amount specified in the buffer. The NMFS Regional Administrator is required to monitor the fishery...

  15. Ecosystem Scale Acoustic Sensing Reveals Humpback Whale Behavior Synchronous with Herring Spawning Processes and Re-Evaluation Finds No Effect of Sonar on Humpback Song Occurrence in the Gulf of Maine in Fall 2006

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Zheng; Jain, Ankita D.; Tran, Duong; Yi, Dong Hoon; Wu, Fan; Zorn, Alexander; Ratilal, Purnima; Makris, Nicholas C.

    2014-01-01

    We show that humpback-whale vocalization behavior is synchronous with peak annual Atlantic herring spawning processes in the Gulf of Maine. With a passive, wide-aperture, densely-sampled, coherent hydrophone array towed north of Georges Bank in a Fall 2006 Ocean Acoustic Waveguide Remote Sensing (OAWRS) experiment, vocalizing whales could be instantaneously detected and localized over most of the Gulf of Maine ecosystem in a roughly 400-km diameter area by introducing array gain, of 18 dB, orders of magnitude higher than previously available in acoustic whale sensing. With humpback-whale vocalizations consistently recorded at roughly 2000/day, we show that vocalizing humpbacks (i) were overwhelmingly distributed along the northern flank of Georges Bank, coinciding with the peak spawning time and location of Atlantic herring, and (ii) their overall vocalization behavior was strongly diurnal, synchronous with the formation of large nocturnal herring shoals, with a call rate roughly ten-times higher at night than during the day. Humpback-whale vocalizations were comprised of (1) highly diurnal non-song calls, suited to hunting and feeding behavior, and (2) songs, which had constant occurrence rate over a diurnal cycle, invariant to diurnal herring shoaling. Before and during OAWRS survey transmissions: (a) no vocalizing whales were found at Stellwagen Bank, which had negligible herring populations, and (b) a constant humpback-whale song occurrence rate indicates the transmissions had no effect on humpback song. These measurements contradict the conclusions of Risch et al. Our analysis indicates that (a) the song occurrence variation reported in Risch et al. is consistent with natural causes other than sonar, (b) the reducing change in song reported in Risch et al. occurred days before the sonar survey began, and (c) the Risch et al. method lacks the statistical significance to draw the conclusions of Risch et al. because it has a 98–100% false-positive rate and

  16. Ecosystem scale acoustic sensing reveals humpback whale behavior synchronous with herring spawning processes and re-evaluation finds no effect of sonar on humpback song occurrence in the Gulf of Maine in fall 2006.

    PubMed

    Gong, Zheng; Jain, Ankita D; Tran, Duong; Yi, Dong Hoon; Wu, Fan; Zorn, Alexander; Ratilal, Purnima; Makris, Nicholas C

    2014-01-01

    We show that humpback-whale vocalization behavior is synchronous with peak annual Atlantic herring spawning processes in the Gulf of Maine. With a passive, wide-aperture, densely-sampled, coherent hydrophone array towed north of Georges Bank in a Fall 2006 Ocean Acoustic Waveguide Remote Sensing (OAWRS) experiment, vocalizing whales could be instantaneously detected and localized over most of the Gulf of Maine ecosystem in a roughly 400-km diameter area by introducing array gain, of 18 dB, orders of magnitude higher than previously available in acoustic whale sensing. With humpback-whale vocalizations consistently recorded at roughly 2000/day, we show that vocalizing humpbacks (i) were overwhelmingly distributed along the northern flank of Georges Bank, coinciding with the peak spawning time and location of Atlantic herring, and (ii) their overall vocalization behavior was strongly diurnal, synchronous with the formation of large nocturnal herring shoals, with a call rate roughly ten-times higher at night than during the day. Humpback-whale vocalizations were comprised of (1) highly diurnal non-song calls, suited to hunting and feeding behavior, and (2) songs, which had constant occurrence rate over a diurnal cycle, invariant to diurnal herring shoaling. Before and during OAWRS survey transmissions: (a) no vocalizing whales were found at Stellwagen Bank, which had negligible herring populations, and (b) a constant humpback-whale song occurrence rate indicates the transmissions had no effect on humpback song. These measurements contradict the conclusions of Risch et al. Our analysis indicates that (a) the song occurrence variation reported in Risch et al. is consistent with natural causes other than sonar, (b) the reducing change in song reported in Risch et al. occurred days before the sonar survey began, and (c) the Risch et al. method lacks the statistical significance to draw the conclusions of Risch et al. because it has a 98-100% false-positive rate and lacks

  17. HD 65949: Rosetta stone or red herring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowley, C. R.; Hubrig, S.; Palmeri, P.; Quinet, P.; Biémont, É.; Wahlgren, G. M.; Schütz, O.; González, J. F.

    2010-06-01

    HD 65949 is a late B star with exceptionally strong HgII λ3984, but it is not a typical HgMn star. The ReII spectrum is of extraordinary strength. Abundances or upper limits are derived here for 58 elements based on a model with Teff = 13100K and log (g) = 4.0. Even-Z elements through nickel show minor deviations from solar abundances. Anomalies among the odd-Z elements through copper are mostly small. Beyond the iron peak, a huge scatter is found. Enormous enhancements are found for the elements rhenium through mercury (Z = 75-80). We note the presence of ThIII in the spectrum. The abundance pattern of the heaviest elements resembles the N = 126 r-process peak of solar material, though not in detail. An odd-Z anomaly appears at the triplet (Zr Nb Mo), and there is a large abundance jump between Xe (Z = 54) and Ba (Z = 56). These are signatures of chemical fractionation. We find a significant correlation of the abundance excesses with second ionization potentials for elements with Z > 30. If this is not a red herring (false lead), it indicates the relevance of photospheric or near-photospheric processes. Large excesses (4-6 dex) require diffusion from deeper layers with the elements passing through a number of ionization stages. That would make the correlation with second ionization potential puzzling. We explore a model with mass accretion of exotic material followed by the more commonly accepted differentiation by diffusion. That model leads to a number of predictions which challenge future work. New observations confirm the orbital elements of Gieseking and Karimie, apart from the systemic velocity, which has increased. Likely primary and secondary masses are near 3.3 and 1.6 Msolar, with a separation of ca. 0.25 au. New atomic structure calculations are presented in two appendices. These include partition functions for the first through third spectra of Ru, Re and Os, as well as oscillator strengths in the ReII spectrum. Based on observations obtained at the

  18. Life history of lake herring of Green Bay, Lake Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Stanford H.

    1956-01-01

    Although the lake herring has been an important contributor to the commercial fish production of Green Bay, little has been known about it. This study is based on field observations and data from about 6,500 lake herring collected over the period 1948 to 1952. Relatively nonselective commercial pound nets were a primary source of material for the study of age and growth. Commercial and experimental gill nets were used to obtain data on gear selectivity and vertical distribution. Scales were employed to investigate age and growth. Age group IV normally dominated commercial catches during the first half of the calendar year and age group III the last half. At these ages the fish averaged about 10.5 inches in length. The season's growth started in May, was most rapid in July, and terminated near the end of October. The sexes grew at the same rate. Selectivity of fishing gear was found to influence the estimation of growth. Geographical and annual differences in growth are shown. Factors that might contribute to discrepancies in calculated growth are evaluated. Possible real and apparent causes of growth compensation are given. The relation between length and weight is shown to vary with sex, season, year, and method of capture. Females were relatively more plentiful in commercial catches in February than in May through December. The percentage of females decreased with increase in age in pound-net catches but increased with age in gill-net samples. Within a year class the percentage of females decreased with increase in age. Most Green Bay lake herring mature during their second or third year of life. They are pelagic spawners with most intensive spawning over shallow areas. Spawning takes place between mid-November and mid-December, and eggs hatch in April and May. Lake herring ovaries contained from 3,500 to 11,200 eggs (averaged 6,375). Progress of spawning by age, sex, and length is given. Lake herring were distributed at all depths in Green Bay in early May, were

  19. Chirocentrodon bleekerianus (Teleostei: Clupeiformes: Pristigasteridae), a small predaceous herring with folded and distinctively oriented prey in stomach.

    PubMed

    Sazima, C; Moura, R L; Sazima, I

    2004-02-01

    Predaceous fish-eating species of the order Clupeiformes have a large mouth with well-developed teeth, and reach the greatest sizes within their families (up to 90 cm). We found that the pristigasterid Chirocentrodon bleekerianus, a small clupeiform (about 10 cm) from the tropical SW Atlantic, is able to prey on proportionally large clupeoid fishes and caridean shrimps. Fish preys are folded in the stomach of this herring, their heads and tails pointing toward the predator's head. This distinctive orientation of fish prey is also recorded for some small to medium-sized, fish-eating species of the tropical freshwater order Characiformes with canine-like teeth similar to those found in C. bleekerianus.

  20. Status of river herring stocks in large rivers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schmidt, R.E.; Jessop, B.M.; Hightower, J.E.

    2003-01-01

    We examined long-term data sets from large rivers in the northern, central, and southern parts of the ranges of anadromous river herring (alewife Alosa pseudoharengus and blueback herring A. aestivalis) to assess the current status of these species and for evidence of fishery-induced effects on their demographic characteristics. Both species show signs of overexploitation in all rivers examined, such as reductions in mean age, decreases in percentage of returning spawners, and decreases in abundance. These two species should be managed separately since exploitation within a given river is often biased toward one or the other and there are enough differences in their biology so that a single management option will affect them differently. These species are not distinguished in commercial catches, which hinders understanding of their exploitation. ?? 2003 by the American Fisheries Society.

  1. Roost site selection by ring-billed and herring gulls

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Daniel E.; Destefano, Stephen; MacKenzie, Kenneth G.; Koenen, Kiana K. G.; Whitney, Jillian J.

    2016-01-01

    Gulls (Larus spp.) commonly roost in large numbers on inland and coastal waters, yet there is little information on how or where gulls choose sites for roosting. Roost site selection can lead to water quality degradation or aviation hazards when roosts are formed on water supply reservoirs or are close to airports. Harassment programs are frequently initiated to move or relocate roosting gulls but often have mixed results because gulls are reluctant to leave or keep returning. As such, knowledge of gull roost site selection and roosting ecology has applied and ecological importance. We used satellite telemetry and an information-theoretic approach to model seasonal roost selection of ring-billed (L. delawarensis) and herring gulls (L. argentatus) in Massachusetts, USA. Our results indicated that ring-billed gulls preferred freshwater roosts and will use a variety of rivers, lakes, and reservoirs. Herring gulls regularly roosted on fresh water but used salt water roosts more often than ring-billed gulls and also roosted on a variety of land habitats. Roost modeling showed that herring and ring-billed gulls selected inland fresh water roosts based on size of the water body and proximity to their last daytime location; they selected the largest roost closest to where they ended the day. Management strategies to reduce or eliminate roosting gulls could identify and try to eliminate other habitat variables (e.g., close-by foraging sites) that are attracting gulls before attempting to relocate or redistribute (e.g., through hazing programs) roosting birds.

  2. Decline of lake herring (Coregonus artedii) in Lake Superior: an analysis of the Wisconsin herring fishery, 1936-78

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Selgeby, James H.

    1982-01-01

    Annual harvests of lake herring (Coregonus artedii) in American waters of Lake Superior declined from an average of 2 million kg in 1936–62 to less than 25 000 kg in 1978. Analysis of commercial fishing records revealed that the sequential overexploitation of discrete unit stocks caused the collapse of the herring population in Wisconsin waters. In each of six major spawning areas, catch exceeded the productive capacity of the stock and the stock failed. Because stocks in the six areas were exploited sequentially, mostly in groups of two or three simultaneously, the demise of the stocks was not readily apparent until the last two failed in the early 1960s. After the collapse of the last major spawning stock, the fishery dwindled but may have continued to overexploit the remaining small stocks. The residual populations were apparently able only to replace themselves. Some form of density-independent mortality was apparently operating to prevent their recovery during the 1960s and 1970s.Key words: lake herring, overfishing, Lake Superior

  3. 50 CFR Figure 4 to Part 679 - BSAI Herring Savings Areas in the BSAI

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false BSAI Herring Savings Areas in the BSAI 4 Figure 4 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND... ALASKA Pt. 679, Fig. 4 Figure 4 to Part 679—BSAI Herring Savings Areas in the BSAI ER15NO99.003 b...

  4. 50 CFR Figure 4 to Part 679 - BSAI Herring Savings Areas in the BSAI

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false BSAI Herring Savings Areas in the BSAI 4 Figure 4 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND... ALASKA Pt. 679, Fig. 4 Figure 4 to Part 679—BSAI Herring Savings Areas in the BSAI ER15NO99.003 b...

  5. Effects of pulsed turbidity and vessel traffic on lake herring eggs and larvae

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savino, Jacqueline F.; Blouin, Marc A.; Davis, Bruce M.; Hudson, Patrick L.; Todd, Thomas N.; Fleischer, Guy W.

    1994-01-01

    Proposals to extend commercial shipping in the St. Marys River (connecting Lakes Superior and Huron) to include winter months have raised concerns regarding its effect on lake herring (Coregonus artedi). Because lake herring spawn in fall and their eggs overwinter in the river and hatch in spring, their hatching success could be impacted by early opening of the locks in spring. Our laboratory studies showed that under the range of turbidities expected in the river due to vessel traffic, lake herring eggs hatched and larvae fed adequately. Field incubation studies produced about 75% survival and 70% hatching success of lake herring eggs at two of three study sites. Collections in the river throughout the month following ice-out showed that sufficient plankton of appropriate size were available to ensure growth and survival of larval lake herring. We did not detect any negative impacts on the early life stages of lake herring as a result of sedimentation in the laboratory or field. However, detailing the spawning sites of lake herring and defining the normal survival-to-hatch in these areas are necessary before making accurate predictions of the effects of early season vessel traffic on lake herring hatching success.

  6. Competition between larval lake herring (Coregonus artedi) and lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) for zooplankton

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, Bruce M.; Todd, Thomas N.

    1998-01-01

    Diet and growth of larval lake herring (Coregonus artedi) and lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) were compared in mesocosm experiments in a small mesotrophic lake in southeastern Michigan. Fish were sampled from single-species and mixed assemblages in 2-m3 cages for 8 weeks during April and May. Both species initially ate mostly cyclopoid copepodites and small cladocerans (Bosmia spp.). Schoener's index of diet overlap showed considerable overlap (70-90%). Lake whitefish ate Daphnia spp. and adult copepods about 2 weeks earlier than did lake herring, perhaps related to their larger mean mouth gape. Lake whitefish were consistently larger than lake herring until the eighth week, especially in the sympatric treatments. Lake whitefish appeared to have a negative effect on the growth of lake herring, as lake herring in mixed-species treatments were smaller and weighed less than lake herring reared in single-species treatments. The diet similarities of lake whitefish and lake herring larvae could make them competitors for food in the Great Lakes. The greater initial size of lake whitefish could allow them to eat larger prey earlier and thereby limit availability of these prey to lake herring at a crucial period of development.

  7. Winter diet of lake herring (Coregonus artedi) in western Lake Superior

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Link, Jason; Selgeby, James H.; Hoff, Michael H.; Haskell, Craig

    1995-01-01

    Lake herring (Coregonus artedi) and zooplankton samples were simultaneously collected through the ice in the Apostle Islands region of western Lake Superior to provide information on the winter feeding ecology of lake herring. Zooplankton constituted the entire diet of the 38 lake herring collected for this study. We found no evidence of piscivory, although it has been reported by anglers. Diet selectivities were calculated using a Wilcoxon signed-ranks test and showed a preference of lake herring for larger zooplankton, especially Diaptomus sicilis, whereas the smaller copepod,Cyclops bicuspidatus thomasi, and immature copepod stages were selected against. These data document that overwintering copepods are food for a broad size range of lake herring in winter.

  8. Structure of the New England herring gull population

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kadlec, J.A.; Drury, W.H.

    1968-01-01

    Measurements of the rates of population increase, reproduction, and mortality together with an observed age ratio, were used to analyze the population of the Herring Gull in New England. Data from sporadic censuses prior to this study, aerial censuses by the authors, and National Audubon Society Christmas Bird Count indicated that the New England breeding population has been doubling every 12 to 15 years since the early 1900's. This increase has involved founding new colonies and expanding the breeding range There is evidence that 15 to 30% of the adults do not breed in any given year. Sixty-one productivity measurements on 43 islands from 1963 through 1966, involving almost 13,000 nests, showed that from 0.8 to 1.4 young/breeding pair/year is the usual range of rate of production. The age distribution in the population was determined by classifying Herring Gulls by plumage category on an aerial census of the coast from Tampico, Mexico, to Cape Sable, Nova Scotia. Of the 622,000 gulls observed, 68% were adults, 17% were second- and third-year birds, and 15% were first-year birds. Mortality rates derived from band recovery data were too high to be consistent with the observed rate of population growth, productivity, and age structure. Loss of bands increasing to the rate of about 20%/year 5 years after banding eliminates most of the discrepancy. The age structure and rate of population increase indicate a mortality rate of 4 to 9% for gulls 2 years old or older, compared with the 25 to 30% indicated by band recoveries. The population structure we have developed fits everything we have observed about Herring Gull population dynamics, except mortality based on band recoveries.

  9. Herring gull eggs indicate stabilizing Great Lakes PCB concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Stow, C.

    1995-12-31

    The author evaluated the fit of 3 alternative models to herring gull (Larus argentatus) egg PCB concentration data from 1978--1992 to examine whether PCB levels were decreasing or had ceased to decline. The best fit models indicate that, following initial declines, no discernible PCB decreases are occurring in 4 of the 5 lakes. Only Lake Erie indicates a continued PCB decline, though the Erie data may be too noisy to differentiate model fits. These results are consistent with previous analyses indicating stable PCB concentrations in Lake Michigan fishes and suggest that further improvements may be too slow to be of practical importance from a management perspective.

  10. Retraction of a longevity record for a 36-year-old herring gull

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jonkel, G.M.; Pettingill, O.S.

    1974-01-01

    Full text: The longevity record for a 36-year-old Herring Gull, Larus argentatus (Pettingill 1967, Auk 84: 123), is erroneous. Herring Gull with band number A-676871, the basis of the record, was found dead on 20 June 1966 on the shore of Little Traverse Bay near Petoskey, Michigan, and reported to the Bird Banding Laboratory. The laboratory then mistakenly advised Pettingill that this gull was banded by him on 29 June 1930 on coastal Maine. He actually banded Herring Gull number A-676871 as a young bird on one of the Beaver Islands in Lake Michigan on 8 July 1948. The gull was thus 18 instead of 36 years old.

  11. Changes in the Distribution of Atlantic Bluefin Tuna (Thunnus thynnus) in the Gulf of Maine 1979-2005

    PubMed Central

    Golet, Walter J.; Galuardi, Benjamin; Cooper, Andrew B.; Lutcavage, Molly E.

    2013-01-01

    The Gulf of Maine, NW Atlantic Ocean, is a productive, seasonal foraging ground for Atlantic bluefin tuna (Thunnus thynnus), but commercial landings of adult size classes were up to 40% below the allocated total allowable catch between 2004 to 2008 for the rod and reel, harpoon, and purse seine categories in the Gulf of Maine. Reduction in Atlantic bluefin tuna catches in the Gulf of Maine could represent a decline in spawning stock biomass, but given wide-ranging, complex migration patterns, and high energetic requirements, an alternative hypothesis is that their dispersal patterns shifted to regions with higher prey abundance or profitability, reducing availability to U.S. fishing fleets. This study fit generalized linear models to Atlantic bluefin tuna landings data collected from fishermen’s logbooks (1979-2005) as well as the distances between bluefin tuna schools and Atlantic herring (Clupeaharengus), a primary prey species, to test alternative hypotheses for observed shifts in Atlantic bluefin tuna availability in the Gulf of Maine. For the bluefin model, landings varied by day of year, latitude and longitude. The effect of latitude differed by day of year and the effect of longitude differed by year. The distances between Atlantic bluefin tuna schools and Atlantic herring schools were significantly smaller (p<0.05) than would be expected from a randomly distributed population. A time series of average bluefin tuna school positions was positively correlated with the average number of herring captured per tow on Georges Bank in spring and autumn surveys respectively (p<0.01, r2=0.24, p<0.01, r2=0.42). Fishermen’s logbooks contributed novel spatial and temporal information towards testing these hypotheses for the bluefin tuna fishery. PMID:24069420

  12. Changes in the distribution of atlantic bluefin tuna (Thunnus thynnus) in the Gulf of Maine 1979-2005.

    PubMed

    Golet, Walter J; Galuardi, Benjamin; Cooper, Andrew B; Lutcavage, Molly E

    2013-01-01

    The Gulf of Maine, NW Atlantic Ocean, is a productive, seasonal foraging ground for Atlantic bluefin tuna (Thunnus thynnus), but commercial landings of adult size classes were up to 40% below the allocated total allowable catch between 2004 to 2008 for the rod and reel, harpoon, and purse seine categories in the Gulf of Maine. Reduction in Atlantic bluefin tuna catches in the Gulf of Maine could represent a decline in spawning stock biomass, but given wide-ranging, complex migration patterns, and high energetic requirements, an alternative hypothesis is that their dispersal patterns shifted to regions with higher prey abundance or profitability, reducing availability to U.S. fishing fleets. This study fit generalized linear models to Atlantic bluefin tuna landings data collected from fishermen's logbooks (1979-2005) as well as the distances between bluefin tuna schools and Atlantic herring (Clupeaharengus), a primary prey species, to test alternative hypotheses for observed shifts in Atlantic bluefin tuna availability in the Gulf of Maine. For the bluefin model, landings varied by day of year, latitude and longitude. The effect of latitude differed by day of year and the effect of longitude differed by year. The distances between Atlantic bluefin tuna schools and Atlantic herring schools were significantly smaller (p<0.05) than would be expected from a randomly distributed population. A time series of average bluefin tuna school positions was positively correlated with the average number of herring captured per tow on Georges Bank in spring and autumn surveys respectively (p<0.01, r(2)=0.24, p<0.01, r(2)=0.42). Fishermen's logbooks contributed novel spatial and temporal information towards testing these hypotheses for the bluefin tuna fishery.

  13. The analysis and composition of fatty material produced by the decomposition of herring in sea water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wells, R.C.; Erickson, E.T.

    1933-01-01

    This paper describes the analysis of calcium and magnesium salts of fatty acids derived from herring buried under sea water, and discusses some geochemical possibilities related to the origin of petroleum in sedimentary deposits.

  14. Infectious bursal disease virus antibodies in eider ducks and Herring Gulls

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hollmen, T.; Franson, J. Christian; Docherty, Douglas E.; Kilpi, Mikael; Hario, Martti; Creekmore, Lynn H.; Petersen, Margaret R.

    2000-01-01

    We measured antibodies to infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) in blood of nesting Common Eider (Somateria mollissima) females and immature Herring Gulls (Larus argentatus) in the Baltic Sea, and in blood of Spectacled Eider (Somateria fischeri) females nesting in a remote area of western Alaska. Positive (??? 1:16) IBDV titers occurred in 75% of the eiders and 45% of the Herring Gull chicks. In eiders, the prevalence of positive titers differed among locations. We found no evidence that IBDV exposure impaired the immune function of Herring Gull chicks, based on their response to inoculation of sheep red blood cells. We suggest that eider ducks and Herring Gulls have been exposed to IBDV, even in locations where contact with poultry is unlikely. The presence of this virus in wild bird populations is of concern because it causes mortality of up to 30% in susceptible poultry.

  15. Colony site dynamics and habitat use in Atlantic coast seabirds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Erwin, R.M.; Galli, J.; Burger, J.

    1981-01-01

    Seabird colony sizes and movements were documented in the DelMarVa coastal region in 1976-1977 and in New Jersey in 1978-1979. Most colonies were found on marsh and dredge deposition islands and on barrier island beaches. For the 'traditionally' beach-nesting Herring Gull, Common Tern, and Black Skimmer, larger, more stable colonies were found on barrier beaches than on marsh islands. In marsh habitats, rates of colony-site change of marshnesting Forster's Tern and Laughing Gulls were similar to those of the former beach nesters. Several adaptations have evolved in marsh specialists to cope with a high risk of reproductive failure due to flooding, but both Herring Gulls and Common Terns also appear to be very adaptable in nesting under various habitat conditions. New colonies and those abandoned between years may be pioneering attempts by younger or inexperienced birds, because they are often smaller than persistent colonies, although patterns differ among areas and habitats. Colony-site dynamics are complex and result from many selective factors including competition, predation, physical changes in site structure, and flooding. The invasion of Herring Gulls into marshes along the mid-Atlantic coast has had an impact on new colony-site choice by associated seabirds. Calculating colony-site turnover rates allows for comparisons among species, habitats, and regions and may give useful insights into habitat quality and change and alternative nesting strategies

  16. Evaluation of methods to estimate lake herring spawner abundance in Lake Superior

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yule, D.L.; Stockwell, J.D.; Cholwek, G.A.; Evrard, L.M.; Schram, S.; Seider, M.; Symbal, M.

    2006-01-01

    Historically, commercial fishers harvested Lake Superior lake herring Coregonus artedi for their flesh, but recently operators have targeted lake herring for roe. Because no surveys have estimated spawning female abundance, direct estimates of fishing mortality are lacking. The primary objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of using acoustic techniques in combination with midwater trawling to estimate spawning female lake herring densities in a Lake Superior statistical grid (i.e., a 10′ latitude × 10′ longitude area over which annual commercial harvest statistics are compiled). Midwater trawling showed that mature female lake herring were largely pelagic during the night in late November, accounting for 94.5% of all fish caught exceeding 250 mm total length. When calculating acoustic estimates of mature female lake herring, we excluded backscattering from smaller pelagic fishes like immature lake herring and rainbow smelt Osmerus mordax by applying an empirically derived threshold of −35.6 dB. We estimated the average density of mature females in statistical grid 1409 at 13.3 fish/ha and the total number of spawning females at 227,600 (95% confidence interval = 172,500–282,700). Using information on mature female densities, size structure, and fecundity, we estimate that females deposited 3.027 billion (109) eggs in grid 1409 (95% confidence interval = 2.356–3.778 billion). The relative estimation error of the mature female density estimate derived using a geostatistical model—based approach was low (12.3%), suggesting that the employed method was robust. Fishing mortality rates of all mature females and their eggs were estimated at 2.3% and 3.8%, respectively. The techniques described for enumerating spawning female lake herring could be used to develop a more accurate stock–recruitment model for Lake Superior lake herring.

  17. The effect of light on lake herring (Coregonus artedi) reactive volume

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Link, Jason; Edsall, Thomas A.

    1996-01-01

    The lake herring (Coregonus artedi) is an important coldwater planktivore in the Laurentian Great Lakes and in smaller inland lakes in portions of Canada and the northern United States. Lake herring cruise the pelagia and feed selectively in both gulping and particulate modes. They are visual predators in environments with adequate illumination. Visual predation by fish consists of a series of discrete steps. We studied the first step in the predation sequence, reaction to prey, at light intensities of 2–1500 Lx in a simulated pelagic environment at 10–13°C. We measured lake herring reactive distances, the distance at which a prey item will be detected and attacked, to liveLimnocalanus macrurus, a natural prey of lake herring in Lake Superior. We used the reactive distances and associated angles of bearing and elevation, which described the location of the prey relative to the lake herring, to calculate reactive volume. This reactive volume can be envisioned as an irregular sphere surrounding the fish, within which prey are detected and attacked. All of the attacks on prey occurred in the anterior portions of the sagittal and lateral planes of the lake herring, as would be expected for a pelagic, cruising fish. The reactive volume surrounding the lake herring was generally spherical, but was more irregular than the simple spheres, hemispheres, cylinders, cones or other geometries assumed in previous studies. The reactive distances and the reactive volume changed with light intensity and were significantly smaller at 2–10 Lx than at 40–1500 Lx. At 40–1500 Lx, the reactive volume was expanded over that observed at 2–10 Lx laterally and caudally. Collectively our results indicate that lake herring can visually forage most effectively in environments with light levels >10 Lx.

  18. LANDSAT menhaden and thread herring resources investigation. [Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kemmerer, A. J. (Principal Investigator); Brucks, J. T.; Butler, J. A.; Faller, K. H.; Holley, H. J.; Leming, T. D.; Savastano, K. J.; Vanselous, T. M.

    1977-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The relationship between the distribution of menhaden and selected oceanographic parameters (water color, turbidity, and possibly chlorophyll concentrations) was established. Similar relationships for thread herring were not established nor were relationships relating to the abundance of either species. Use of aircraft and LANDSAT remote sensing instruments to measure or infer a set of basic oceanographic parameters was evaluated. Parameters which could be accurately inferred included surface water temperature, salinity, and color. Water turbidity (Secchi disk) was evaluated as marginally inferrable from the LANDSAT MSS data and chlorophyll-a concentrations as less than marginal. These evaluations considered the parameters only as experienced in the two test areas using available sensors and statistical techniques.

  19. Effects of introducing foxes and raccoons on herring gull colonies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kadlec, J.A.

    1971-01-01

    Red foxes (Vulpes fulva) and raccoons (Procyon lotor) released at colonies of herring gulls (Larus argentatus) on islands off the Massachusetts coast effectively eliminated the production of young gulls. Annual predator introductions for 2-4 years caused major reductions in colony size and occasionally total abandonment of the island as a colony site. Observations of the experimental islands for 2 years after cessation of predator introductions showed slow repopulation of the islands and lower breeding success than on control islands. The size of the regional population was reduced largely because of the movements of gulls off the experimental islands. The introduced predators are, in most cases, difficult to maintain on the islands; this restricts their utility in population management.

  20. Spawning characteristics of Clupea pallasii in the coastal waters off Gyeongnam, Korea, during spawning season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yong-Deuk; Choi, Jung Hwa; Moon, Seong Yong; Lee, Sun Kil; Gwak, Woo-Seok

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to research the characteristics of spawning grounds of Clupea pallasii found at 1 spawning ground located in the coast of Yeongun-ri, Tongyeong, Gyeongnam, and 3 stations in Jinhae Bay. Diving observation was performed from January to June, 2014 at the coast of Yeongun-ri, and from February to June, 2016 at Jinhae Bay after total 4 stations (A: Gusan-myeon, B: Haengamdong, C: Hacheong-myeon, D: Jam-do) were constituted. During observation period, 1 spawning ground was found in Tongyeong area in January. In Jinhae Bay spawning grounds were found at 3 stations (A, B, D) out of 4 stations in February. Regarding the surrounding environment of spawning ground found at Yeongunri, Tongyeong, various kinds of seaweeds were distributed up to 1-5 m depth, and many branch type red algae were distributed. In case of Jinhae Bay, seaweeds were widely distributed from shallow water to 5 m depth. In addition, the scope that eggs were attached was considerably wide compared to Tongyeong area, and they were found at all the 3 spots, so C. pallasii is thought to use Jinhae Bay for its spawning ground widely. Eggs were attached from the surface to 3-4 m, and like Tongyeong area, eggs were attached to mostly branch type of red algae. The results of this study suggest that the spawning season of the C. pallasii in coast waters off Gyeongnam is until mid-February.

  1. The Adopt-a-Herring program as a fisheries conservation tool

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frank, Holly J.; Mather, Martha E.; Muth, Robert M.; Pautzke, Sarah M.; Smith, Joseph M.; Finn, John T.

    2009-01-01

    Successful conservation depends on a scientifically literate public. We developed the adopt-a-Herring program to educate nonscientists about fisheries and watershed restoration. this interactive educational and outreach project encouraged coastal residents to be involved in local watershed restoration. In the northeastern United States, river herring (Alosa spp.) are an important component of many coastal watersheds and often are the object of conservation efforts. In order to understand river herring spawning behavior and to improve the effectiveness of restoration efforts, our research tracked these fish via radiotelemetry in the Ipswich River, Massachusetts. In our adopt-a-Herring Program, participating stakeholder organizations adopted and named individual tagged river herring and followed their movements online. We also made information available to our adopters on our larger research goals, the mission and activities of other research and management agencies, examples of human actions that adversely affect watersheds, and opportunities for proactive conservation. Research results were communicated to adopters through our project web page and end-of-the-season summary presentations. Both tools cultivated a personal interest in river herring, stimulated discussion about fisheries and watershed restoration, educated participants about the goals and methods of scientists in general, and initiated critical thinking about human activities that advance or impede sustainability.

  2. Lake whitefish and lake herring population structure and niche in ten south-central Ontario lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carl, Leon M.; McGuiness, Fiona

    2006-01-01

    This study compares simple fish communities of ten oligotrophic lakes in south-central Ontario. Species densities and population size structure vary significantly among these lake communities depending on fish species present beyond the littoral zone. Lake whitefish are fewer and larger in the presence of lake herring than in their absence. Diet analysis indicates that lake whitefish shift from feeding on both plankton and benthic prey when lake herring are absent to a primarily benthic feeding niche in the presence of lake herring. When benthic round whitefish are present, lake whitefish size and density decline and they move lower in the lake compared to round whitefish. Burbot are also fewer and larger in lakes with lake herring than in lakes without herring. Burbot, in turn, appear to influence the population structure of benthic coregonine species. Lower densities of benthic lake whitefish and round whitefish are found in lakes containing large benthic burbot than in lakes with either small burbot or where burbot are absent. Predation on the pelagic larvae of burbot and lake whitefish by planktivorous lake herring alters the size and age structure of these populations. As life history theory predicts, those species with poor larval survival appear to adopt a bet-hedging life history strategy of long-lived individuals as a reproductive reserve.

  3. 76 FR 11373 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring; Amendment 4

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-02

    ..., management uncertainty is to be considered. The stock- wide ACL may be reduced from the ABC to account for... establish a specific deduction between the ABC and stock-wide ACL, to account for management uncertainty... does not establish a specific deduction between the ABC and stock-wide ACL to account for...

  4. 78 FR 12625 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Adjustment to 2013 Annual...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-25

    ... management area 1A to account for catch overages in 2011, and to prevent overfishing. DATES: This rule is... is neither overfished nor subject to overfishing at this time. Comment 4: Earthjustice...

  5. 75 FR 63791 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Amendment 4

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-18

    ... by 2011, so it decided to split Amendment 4 into two separate actions. The Council determined that... processing operations to accept catch from U.S. vessels; TALFF was allocated to ensure fish were available to... components. These stock components segregate during spawning and mix during feeding and migration....

  6. Biotic and abiotic factors related to lake herring recruitment in the Wisconsin waters of Lake Superior, 1984-1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoff, Michael H.

    2004-01-01

    Lake Superior lake herring (Coregonus artedi) recruitment to 13-14 months of age in the Wisconsin waters of Lake Superior varied by a factor of 5,233 during 1984-1998. Management agencies have sought models that accurately predict recruitment, but no satisfactory model had previously been developed. Lake herring recruitment was modeled to determine which factors most explained recruitment variability. The Ricker stock-recruitment model derived from only the paired stock and recruit data explained 35% of the variability in the recruitment data. The functional relationship that explained the greatest amount of recruitment variation (93%) included lake herring stock size, lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) population size, slimy sculpin (Cottus cognatus) biomass, the interaction of mean daily wind speed in April (month of hatch) and lake herring stock size, and mean air temperature in April (when lake herring are 12-months old). Model results were interpreted to mean that lake herring recruitment was affected negatively by: slimy sculpin predation on lake herring ova; predation on age-0 lake herring by lake trout; and adult cannibalism on lake herring larvae, which was reduced by increased wind speed. April temperature was the variable that explained the least amount of variability in recruitment, but lake herring recruitment was positively affected by a warm April, which shortened winter and apparently reduced first-winter mortality. Stock size caused compensatory, density-dependent mortality on lake herring recruits. Management efforts appear best targeted at stock size protection, and empirical data implies that stock size in the Wisconsin waters of the lake should be maintained at 2.1-15.0 adults/ha in spring, bottom-trawl surveys.

  7. A comparison of diets of blueback herring (Alosa aestivalis) and threadfin shad (Dorosoma petenense) in a large southeastern U.S. Reservoir

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winkelman, D.L.; Van Den Avyle, M.J.

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine dietary overlap between blueback herring and threadfin shad in J. Strom Thrumond Reservoir, South Carolina/Georgia. We also evaluated prey selectivity for each speices and diet differences between two size categories of blueback herring. Diet and zooplankton samples were collected every other month from April 1992 to February 1994. We examined stomachs containing prey from 170 large blueback herring (>140mm), 96 small blueback herring (<140mm), and 109 threadfin shad, and we also examined 45 zooplankton samples. Large blueback herring diets differed significantly from threadfin shad diets on 11 of 12 sampling dates, and small blueback herring diets differed from threadfin shad diets on all sampling dates. In general, blueback herring consumed proportionally more copepods and fewer Bosmina sp. and rotifers than threadfin shad. Large and small blueback herring diets were significantly different on five of eight sampling dates, primarily due to the tendency of small blueback herring to eat proportionally more Bosmina sp. than large blueback herring. Both blueback herring and threadfin shad fed selectively during some periods of the year. Diet differences between the species may contribute to their coexistence; however, both blueback herring and threadfin shad showed a strong preference for Bosmina sp., increasing the chance that they may negatively influence one another.

  8. Food of blueback herring and threadfin shad in Jocassee Reservoir, South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, Bruce M.; Foltz, Jeffrey W.

    1991-01-01

    Threadfin shad Dorosoma petenense and blueback herring Alosa aestivalis were introduced into Jocassee Reservoir, South Carolina, in the early 1970s as prey for large piscivores. To assess the potential for trophic competition between these clupeids, we examined their diets and the extent of diet overlap in May, August, and December 1982 and February 1983. The diet of blueback herring consisted mainly of large species of cladocerans and copepods supplemented in August with Chaoborus punctipennis and young fish. Mean length of the organisms eaten by blueback herring was 1.4 mm. Threadfin shad fed on smaller species of cladocerans and copepods, as well as on rotifers and copepod nauplii. The mean length of the organisms eaten by threadfin shad was 0.4 mm, which differed significantly from the mean length of the zooplankton population in Jocassee Reservoir (0.6 mm). Phytoplankton contributed 24 and 32% of the stomach contents of threadfin shad in August and December. Bosmina longirostris was important in the diet of both species, although blueback herring showed negative selection for it. Diet overlap between the two clupeids was low on all four dates. Although we found no evidence of trophic competition between the two species in Jocassee Reservoir, we do not recommend stocking them together, because both species are voracious planktivores and blueback herring are piscivorous.

  9. Occurrence of aspartyl proteases in brine after herring marinating.

    PubMed

    Szymczak, Mariusz; Lepczyński, Adam

    2016-03-01

    Herrings are marinated in a brine consisting of salt and acetic acid. During marinating, various nitrogen fractions diffuse from fish flesh to the brine, causing significant nutritional quality losses of the raw material. In this study, it has been demonstrated for the first time that proteases diffuse from the fish to the marinating brine. Using ammonium sulphate precipitation and affinity chromatography on pepstatin-A agarose bed the aspartyl proteases were purified and concentrated over 2600-fold from a marinating brine. Pepstatin-A completely inhibited the activity of the purified preparation. The preparation was active against fluorogenic substrates specific for cathepsin D and E and inactive against substrates specific for cysteine cathepsins. Depending on incubation time, the preparation showed pH-optimum at 2.0 or 4.5. The 2D SDS-PAGE separation demonstrated the presence of a few proteins with molecular weights and pI values typical of cathepsin D, E and pepsin. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Lake herring (Coregonus artedi) and rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax) diets in western Lake Superior

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Timothy B.; Brown, William P.; Corry, Timothy D.; Hoff, Michael H.; Scharold, Jill V.; Trebitz, Anett S.

    2004-01-01

    We describe the diets of lake herring (Coregonus artedi) and rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax) in western Lake Superior during the summers of 1996 and 1997. Both species consumed predominantly (> 71% by number) zooplankton, showing a preference for larger taxa. Diet overlap between the two species was low (Schoener's index = 0.42). Mysis was most important in rainbow smelt diets, whereas Diaptomus sicilis was most important in lake herring diets. Rainbow smelt selected larger taxa, and larger individuals within a taxon when compared to lake herring, although rainbow smelt tended to be smaller fish. Fish diets have changed relative to previous studies and may be reflecting changes in the zooplankton community. Continued changes in the fish and zooplankton community will alter predatorprey and energetic pathways, ultimately affecting growth and production of the ecosystem.

  11. [Determination of sodium chlorite in processed herring roe by ion chromatography with a conductivity detector].

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Yoko; Kubota, Hiroki; Yomota, Chikako; Tanamoto, Kenichi

    2005-08-01

    An analytical method for residual sodium chlorite in several kinds of processed herring roe treated with sodium chlorite was studied. Sodium chlorite was extracted with 9 mmol/L sodium carbonate. After centrifugation, the supernatant was filtered through a 0.2 microm nylon filter. The filtrate was deproteinized by ultrafiltration and chloride ion was removed with an On-Guard Ag cartridge column. The eluate was subjected to conductivity detector-ion chromatography. Recoveries of sodium chlorite from herring roe spiked at the level of 5 mg/kg were 88 +/- 3.7% (n = 5, CV 4.2%). The method had a quantitation limit of 5 mg/kg for processed herring roes.

  12. Exxon Valdez oil spill restoration project final report: Prince William Sound Herring disease program (HDP), restoration project 070819

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hershberger, Paul; Elliott, Diane G.; Emmenegger, Eveline J.; Hansen, John D.; Kurath, Gael; Winton, James R.; Kocan, Richard; LaPatra, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Surveys of pathogens in Pacific herring from 2007 – 2010 indicated that Ichthyophonus, viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus, and erythrocytic necrosis virus are endemic in Prince William Sound and throughout the NE Pacific. Laboratory studies with VHSV indicated that multiple herring stocks are equally susceptible to the resulting disease, Pacific herring shed copious levels of VHSV (as high at 5x108 plaque-forming units/day) shortly after exposure, chronic and persistent infections can occur in Pacific herring, susceptibility of Pacific herring to VHS extends to the larval life stages but not the embryonic stages, and the prior exposure history of Pacific herring to VHSV can be determined post hoc. Laboratory studies involving Ichthyophonus indicated that schizonts can be inactivated with chlorine and iodine solutions, the parasite can survive for extended periods in saltwater but not freshwater, a low potential exists for cross contamination between in vitro explant cultures, infectious schizonts are released from the skin surface of infected herring, schizonts are not uniformly distributed throughout the skeletal muscle of infected Pacific herring, multiple types of Ichthyophonus exist with different genotypes and phenotypic traits, and temperature is an important factor influencing the infectivity of Ichthyophonus. Additional field and laboratory studies indicated that Ichthyophonus negatively influences the swimming performance of infected hosts and the negative impacts effects are exacerbated by increasing temperatures, American shad are an important reservoir of Ichthyophonus in the NE Pacific, Pacific herring are not susceptible to infectious hematopoietic necrosis (IHN), and Pacific herring will accept surgically implanted acoustic tags with negligible impacts on survival.

  13. The growth-temperature relation and preferred temperatures of juvenile lake herring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edsall, T.A.; Desorcie, T.J.

    2002-01-01

    Lake herring, Coregonus artedi, were once extremely abundant in the Great Lakes where they functioned as a major trophic integrator, directly linking the planktonic crustacean resource to lake trout. Salvelinus namaycush. Lake herring populations in the Great Lakes collapsed during the middle third of the 20th century due to overfishing, degradation of critical habitat in major production areas, and interaction with exotic species. Fishery and habitat impediments to the recovery of lake herring have been removed, and it may now be possible to reestablish the species in its former habitats in the Great Lakes if adverse interactions with exotic species can be controlled within acceptable limits. To determine the potential for thermal niche overlap and adverse interaction with exotic fishes, juvenile (age-0) lake herring were held in the laboratory at 5, 10, 15, 18, and 21 C, and fed ad libitum for 54 days. The optimum temperature for growth in weight was about 14.5 C, indicating the fundamental thermal niche was 12.5-16.5 C. Fish used in the growth study were also tested in a vertical thermal gradient tank to measure their final preferendum. The final preferendum, 16.5 C, was in close agreement with the optimum temperature for growth and within the fundamental thermal niche. Both the optimum temperature for growth and the final preferendum have been used as measures of thermal niche, but this is the first time both measures were made on the same group of fish. Published information on the fundamental thermal niche, preferred temperatures, thermal habitat use, and feeding habits of alewives, rainbow smelt, and ruffe, indicates they will co-occur in spring, or summer with age-0 lake herring and that collectively they pose a predation threat to small, age-0 lake herring.

  14. What Maintains the Central North Pacific Genetic Discontinuity in Pacific Herring?

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ming; Lin, Longshan; Gao, Tianxiang; Yanagimoto, Takashi; Sakurai, Yasunori; Grant, W. Stewart

    2012-01-01

    Pacific herring show an abrupt genetic discontinuity in the central North Pacific that represents secondary contact between refuge populations previously isolated during Pleistocene glaciations. Paradoxically, high levels of gene flow produce genetic homogeneity among ocean-type populations within each group. Here, we surveyed variability in mtDNA control-region sequences (463 bp) and nine microsatellite loci in Pacific herring from sites across the North Pacific to further explore the nature of the genetic discontinuity around the Alaska Peninsula. Consistent with previous studies, little divergence (ΦST  = 0.011) was detected between ocean-type populations of Pacific herring in the North West Pacific, except for a population in the Yellow Sea (ΦST  = 0.065). A moderate reduction in genetic diversity for both mtDNA and microsatellites in the Yellow Sea likely reflects founder effects during the last colonization of this sea. Reciprocal monophyly between divergent mtDNA lineages (ΦST  = 0.391) across the Alaska Peninsula defines the discontinuity across the North Pacific. However, microsatellites did not show a strong break, as eastern Bering Sea (EBS) herring were more closely related to NE Pacific than to NW Pacific herring. This discordance between mtDNA and microsatellites may be due to microsatellite allelic convergence or to sex-biased dispersal across the secondary contact zone. The sharp discontinuity between Pacific herring populations may be maintained by high-density blocking, competitive exclusion or hybrid inferiority. PMID:23300525

  15. Geographic variation in Pacific herring growth in response to regime shifts in the North Pacific Ocean.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, S. I.; Rose, K.; Schweigert, J.; Hay, D.; Werner, F.; Aita, M. N.

    2016-02-01

    Pacific herring populations at eight North Pacific Rim locations were simulated to compare basin-wide geographic variations in age-specific growth due to environmental influences on marine productivity and population-specific responses to regime shifts. Temperature and zooplankton abundance from a 3D lower-trophic level ecosystem model (NEMURO) simulation were used as inputs to a herring bioenergetics growth model. Herring in California, the west coast of Vancouver Island (WCVI), Prince William Sound (PWS), Togiak, Alaska, the western Bering Sea (WBS), the Sea of Okhotsk (SO), Sakhalin, and Peter the Great Bay (PGB) were examined. The half-saturation coefficients of herring feeding were calibrated to climatological conditions at each of the eight locations to reproduce averaged size-at-age data. Using the calibrated half-saturation coefficients, the 1948 to 2002 period was then simulated. The detected shifts of herring age-5 growth showed a close match (69%) to the climate regime shift years (1957/58, 1970/71, 1976/77, 1988/89, 1998/99). The first principal component of herring growth rate showed decreased growth at the SO, PWS, WCVI and California locations and increased growth at the Sakhalin, WBS and Togiak locations after 1977. The calibrated half-saturation coefficients affected the degree to which growth was sensitive to interannual variation in water temperature versus zooplankton. For sustainable use of marine resources, knowledge of the local and regional responses of the marine resources is essential. The model results demonstrate how geographic specificity of bioenergetics parameters, coupled with location-specific variation in temperature and food, can combine to determine local and regional responses of a marine resource to climate forcing. The contents are in press on Progress in Oceanography.

  16. Viral tropism and pathology associated with viral hemorrhagic septicemia in larval and juvenile Pacific herring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovy, Jan; Lewis, N.L.; Hershberger, P.K.; Bennett, W.; Meyers, T.R.; Garver, K.A.

    2012-01-01

    Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) genotype IVa causes mass mortality in wild Pacific herring, a species of economic value, in the Northeast Pacific Ocean. Young of the year herring are particularly susceptible and can be carriers of the virus. To understand its pathogenesis, tissue and cellular tropisms of VHSV in larval and juvenile Pacific herring were investigated with immunohistochemistry, transmission electron microscopy, and viral tissue titer. In larval herring, early viral tropism for epithelial tissues (6d post-exposure) was indicated by foci of epidermal thickening that contained heavy concentrations of virus. This was followed by a cellular tropism for fibroblasts within the fin bases and the dermis, but expanded to cells of the kidney, liver, pancreas, gastrointestinal tract and meninges in the brain. Among wild juvenile herring that underwent a VHS epizootic in the laboratory, the disease was characterized by acute and chronic phases of death. Fish that died during the acute phase had systemic infections in tissues including the submucosa of the gastrointestinal tract, spleen, kidney, liver, and meninges. The disease then transitioned into a chronic phase that was characterized by the appearance of neurological signs including erratic and corkscrew swimming and darkening of the dorsal skin. During the chronic phase viral persistence occurred in nervous tissues including meninges and brain parenchymal cells and in one case in peripheral nerves, while virus was mostly cleared from the other tissues. The results demonstrate the varying VHSV tropisms dependent on the timing of infection and the importance of neural tissues for the persistence and perpetuation of chronic infections in Pacific herring.

  17. Geographic variation in Pacific herring growth in response to regime shifts in the North Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Shin-ichi; Rose, Kenneth A.; Megrey, Bernard A.; Schweigert, Jake; Hay, Douglas; Werner, Francisco E.; Aita, Maki Noguchi

    2015-11-01

    Pacific herring populations at eight North Pacific Rim locations were simulated to compare basin-wide geographic variations in age-specific growth due to environmental influences on marine productivity and population-specific responses to regime shifts. Temperature and zooplankton abundance from a three-dimensional lower-trophic ecosystem model (NEMURO: North Pacific Ecosystem Model for Understanding Regional Oceanography) simulation from 1948 to 2002 were used as inputs to a herring bioenergetics growth model. Herring populations from California, the west coast of Vancouver Island (WCVI), Prince William Sound (PWS), Togiak Alaska, the western Bering Sea (WBS), the Sea of Okhotsk (SO), Sakhalin, and Peter the Great Bay (PGB) were examined. The half-saturation coefficients of herring feeding were calibrated to climatological conditions at each of the eight locations to reproduce averaged size-at-age data. The depth of averaging used for water temperature and zooplankton, and the maximum consumption rate parameter, were made specific to each location. Using the calibrated half-saturation coefficients, the 1948-2002 period was then simulated using daily values of water temperature and zooplankton densities interpolated from monthly model output. To detect regime shifts in simulated temperatures, zooplankton and herring growth rates, we applied sequential t-test analyses on the 54 years of hindcast simulation values. The detected shifts of herring age-5 growth showed closest match (69%) to the regime shift years (1957/58, 1970/71, 1976/77, 1988/89, 1998/99). We explored relationships among locations using cluster and principal component analyses. The first principal component of water temperature showed good correspondence to the Pacific Decadal Oscillation and all zooplankton groups showed a pan-Pacific decrease after the 1976/77 regime shift. However, the first principal component of herring growth rate showed decreased growth at the SO, PWS, WCVI and California

  18. 15 CFR 922.71 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... (Coryphaena hippurus), Pacific herring (Clupea pallasi), jack mackerel (Trachurus symmetricus), Pacific mackerel (Scomber japonicus), salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.), Pacific sardine (Sardinops sagax), blue...

  19. 15 CFR 922.71 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... (Coryphaena hippurus), Pacific herring (Clupea pallasi), jack mackerel (Trachurus symmetricus), Pacific mackerel (Scomber japonicus), salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.), Pacific sardine (Sardinops sagax), blue...

  20. 15 CFR 922.71 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... (Coryphaena hippurus), Pacific herring (Clupea pallasi), jack mackerel (Trachurus symmetricus), Pacific mackerel (Scomber japonicus), salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.), Pacific sardine (Sardinops sagax), blue...

  1. 15 CFR 922.71 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... (Coryphaena hippurus), Pacific herring (Clupea pallasi), jack mackerel (Trachurus symmetricus), Pacific mackerel (Scomber japonicus), salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.), Pacific sardine (Sardinops sagax), blue...

  2. 15 CFR 922.71 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... (Coryphaena hippurus), Pacific herring (Clupea pallasi), jack mackerel (Trachurus symmetricus), Pacific mackerel (Scomber japonicus), salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.), Pacific sardine (Sardinops sagax), blue...

  3. Dynamics of storage of organochlorine pollutants in herring gulls

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, D.W.; Hickey, J.J.

    1976-01-01

    Several organochlorine pollutants were studied over the period of one annual cycle in caged juvenile and wild-collected adult herring gulls (Lagus argentatus) from Lake Michigan. Fish, mostly alewives (Alosa pseudoharengus), comprised the major year-round food items in the wild; alewives were also fed to the caged juveniles. Fish residues averaged around 3 mg/kg of p,p'-DDE, 2 mg/kg p,p'DDT + p,p'-TDE, and 2 mg/kg apparent PCBs. Juvenile body-burdens of DDE and PCBs showed a continual buildup after fledging, then a temporary dynamic equilibrium, related only in part to annual lipid deposition. Maximum body-burdens were reached in both juveniles and adults when winter fat deposits were declining prior to the breeding season?followed by a return to dynamic equilibrium. Residues of DDT and TDE followed closely the annual pattern of lipid deposition in both juveniles and adults. Total body-burdens in both age classes were similar after the buildups to equilibrium in juveniles in their eighth month after fledging. Seasonal variations of residues of DDE and PCBs were characterised by two phases in adults and three in juveniles, which gradually assumed the adult cyclic pattern. The maximum body-burdens attained by caged juveniles fed a diet of Lake Michigan alewives were 290 mg/kg DDE, 19 mg/kg DDT + TDE, and 200 mg/kg apparent PCBs. Residues in wild adults at the same time were 300, 4, and 200 mg/kg of the same residues. Apparent PCBs and DDE were highly accumulative, although DDE levels resulted from dietary DDE, as well as conversion from DDT.

  4. Effect of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus on Pacific herring in Prince William Sound, Alaska, from 1989 to 2005.

    PubMed

    Elston, Ralph A; Meyers, Theodore R

    2009-02-25

    We critically review the role of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) in the 1992-1993 collapse of the Prince William Sound (PWS) herring fishery. VHSV was detected in samples of moribund Pacific herring from PWS in spring 1993 when about 63% of the expected fish failed to appear. A low prevalence and severity of VHSV were observed in adult pre-spawning PWS herring in most of the years from 1994 to 2002. The North American strain of VHSV became established about 500 yr ago in many northeast Pacific marine fish species, including herring. In Alaska, the typical annual prevalence of VHSV in pre-spawning herring ranges from 0 to 17%. New threshold analysis of a 9 yr study indicates that only about half of the virus-infected adult fish in PWS were clinically affected; ulcers formerly attributed to VHS have been overestimated by a factor of about 3. We conclude that VHSV was not a primary causative factor in the PWS herring population collapse or in its failure to recover. Because older age classes of herring were not disproportionately missing in 1993, the protozoan Ichthyophonus hoferi was also not a likely cause of losses. The 'Exxon Valdez' oil spill occurred in PWS, Alaska, U.S.A., in 1989. Evidence for interaction of oil and VHSV expression is also evaluated. A study exposing herring to varying concentrations of weathered crude oil showed increasing prevalences of VHSV correlated with oil concentration; however, repeated experiments with juvenile and adult fish failed to corroborate these results or link oil to VHSV infection in herring.

  5. 50 CFR 648.207 - Herring Research Set-Aside (RSA).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... following information, as well as any other specific information required within the RFP: A project summary that includes the project goals and objectives, the relationship of the proposed research to herring... through written notification to the project proponent. (e) The grant awards approved under the RFPs shall...

  6. 50 CFR 648.207 - Herring Research Set-Aside (RSA).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... following information, as well as any other specific information required within the RFP: A project summary that includes the project goals and objectives, the relationship of the proposed research to herring... through written notification to the project proponent. (e) The grant awards approved under the RFPs shall...

  7. 50 CFR Figure 4 to Part 679 - BSAI Herring Savings Areas in the BSAI

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false BSAI Herring Savings Areas in the BSAI 4 Figure 4 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND... hours, A.l.t. September 1 of the current fishing year through 1200 hours, A.l.t. March 1 of...

  8. 50 CFR Figure 4 to Part 679 - BSAI Herring Savings Areas in the BSAI

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false BSAI Herring Savings Areas in the BSAI 4 Figure 4 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND... hours, A.l.t. September 1 of the current fishing year through 1200 hours, A.l.t. March 1 of...

  9. 50 CFR Figure 4 to Part 679 - BSAI Herring Savings Areas in the BSAI

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false BSAI Herring Savings Areas in the BSAI 4 Figure 4 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND... hours, A.l.t. September 1 of the current fishing year through 1200 hours, A.l.t. March 1 of...

  10. PickleHerring and Marlsite Projects: An Interdisciplinary Approach to Junk Music-Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Matt

    2008-01-01

    This project report describes the way PickleHerring Theatre approaches community music-making with "junk" materials. The report has an emphasis on the group experience, the participants' creativity, and their play. In conclusion a case is presented for the efficacy of junk music-making as a dynamic form of community music. (Contains 5 footnotes…

  11. Very low embryonic crude oil exposures cause lasting cardiac defects in salmon and herring.

    PubMed

    Incardona, John P; Carls, Mark G; Holland, Larry; Linbo, Tiffany L; Baldwin, David H; Myers, Mark S; Peck, Karen A; Tagal, Mark; Rice, Stanley D; Scholz, Nathaniel L

    2015-09-08

    The 1989 Exxon Valdez disaster exposed embryos of pink salmon and Pacific herring to crude oil in shoreline spawning habitats throughout Prince William Sound, Alaska. The herring fishery collapsed four years later. The role of the spill, if any, in this decline remains one of the most controversial unanswered questions in modern natural resource injury assessment. Crude oil disrupts excitation-contraction coupling in fish heart muscle cells, and we show here that salmon and herring exposed as embryos to trace levels of crude oil grow into juveniles with abnormal hearts and reduced cardiorespiratory function, the latter a key determinant of individual survival and population recruitment. Oil exposure during cardiogenesis led to specific defects in the outflow tract and compact myocardium, and a hypertrophic response in spongy myocardium, evident in juveniles 7 to 9 months after exposure. The thresholds for developmental cardiotoxicity were remarkably low, suggesting the scale of the Exxon Valdez impact in shoreline spawning habitats was much greater than previously appreciated. Moreover, an irreversible loss of cardiac fitness and consequent increases in delayed mortality in oil-exposed cohorts may have been important contributors to the delayed decline of pink salmon and herring stocks in Prince William Sound.

  12. LAKE HERRING (COREGONUS ARTEDI) AND RAINBOW SMELT (OSMERUS MORDAX) DIETS IN LAKE SUPERIOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    This manuscript reports on the diets of lake herring and rainbow smelt, currently the two dominant forage fish species (fish that are food for game fishes) in western Lake Superior. Despite the pelagic nature of both these species, they have substantially different diets and henc...

  13. 77 FR 62257 - Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Herring River Restoration Project, Cape Cod National...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-12

    ... of the Herring River to restrict natural tidal flows. Ditches were constructed to drain the normally... released sulfuric acid that kills fish and other aquatic life, and low summertime dissolved oxygen has also... maximum high tide of approximately six feet. At this tide level flood mitigation of sensitive properties...

  14. LAKE HERRING (COREGONUS ARTEDI) AND RAINBOW SMELT (OSMERUS MORDAX) DIETS IN LAKE SUPERIOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    This manuscript reports on the diets of lake herring and rainbow smelt, currently the two dominant forage fish species (fish that are food for game fishes) in western Lake Superior. Despite the pelagic nature of both these species, they have substantially different diets and henc...

  15. Very low embryonic crude oil exposures cause lasting cardiac defects in salmon and herring

    PubMed Central

    Incardona, John P.; Carls, Mark G.; Holland, Larry; Linbo, Tiffany L.; Baldwin, David H.; Myers, Mark S.; Peck, Karen A.; Tagal, Mark; Rice, Stanley D.; Scholz, Nathaniel L.

    2015-01-01

    The 1989 Exxon Valdez disaster exposed embryos of pink salmon and Pacific herring to crude oil in shoreline spawning habitats throughout Prince William Sound, Alaska. The herring fishery collapsed four years later. The role of the spill, if any, in this decline remains one of the most controversial unanswered questions in modern natural resource injury assessment. Crude oil disrupts excitation-contraction coupling in fish heart muscle cells, and we show here that salmon and herring exposed as embryos to trace levels of crude oil grow into juveniles with abnormal hearts and reduced cardiorespiratory function, the latter a key determinant of individual survival and population recruitment. Oil exposure during cardiogenesis led to specific defects in the outflow tract and compact myocardium, and a hypertrophic response in spongy myocardium, evident in juveniles 7 to 9 months after exposure. The thresholds for developmental cardiotoxicity were remarkably low, suggesting the scale of the Exxon Valdez impact in shoreline spawning habitats was much greater than previously appreciated. Moreover, an irreversible loss of cardiac fitness and consequent increases in delayed mortality in oil-exposed cohorts may have been important contributors to the delayed decline of pink salmon and herring stocks in Prince William Sound. PMID:26345607

  16. Relationship of lake herring (Coregonus artedi) gill raker characteristics to retention probabilities of zooplankton prey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Link, Jason; Hoff, Michael H.

    1998-01-01

    We measured morphometric and meristic parameters of gill rakers from the first gill arch of 36 adult lake herring (Coregonus artedi) from Lake Superior that ranged in length from 283–504 mm. These data, coupled with the mean of the smallest two body dimensions (length, width, or breadth) of various zooplankton prey, allowed us to calculate retention probabilities for zooplankton taxa that are common in Lake Superior. The mean of the smallest two body dimensions was positively correlated with body length for cladocerans and copepods. The large cladoceran, Daphnia g. mendotae, is estimated to be retained at a greater probability (74%) than smaller cladocerans (18%-38%). The same is true for the large copepod, Limnocalanus macrurus (60%), when compared to smaller copepods (6–38%). Copepods have a lower probability of being retained than cladocerans of similar length. Lake herring gill rakers and total filtering area are also positively correlated with fish total length. These data provide further evidence that lake herring are primarily planktivores in Lake Superior, and our data show that lake herring can retain a broad range of prey sizes.

  17. Anisakiasis ('herring worm disease') as a cause of acute abdominal crisis.

    PubMed

    Kark, A E; McAlpine, J C

    1994-01-01

    A hazard associated with eating raw fish is presented. The larval nematode Anisakis marina ('herring worm') is a recognised public health problem in Japan, and cases have been reported in the UK. The intestinal burrowing of the larval form causes acute abdominal symptoms clinically resembling acute appendicitis. Operation is required; no antiparasitic agent is available.

  18. Diet overlap in larval lake herring (Coregonus artedi) and bloaters (Coregonus hoyi)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, Bruce M.; Todd, Thomas N.

    1992-01-01

    The food preferences of larval lake herring (Coregonus artedi) and bloater (C.hoyi) were compared in a small mesotrophic lake in southeastern Michigan. Diets of the two were increasingly similar as the experiment progressed until, by the end of 6.5 weeks, they were identical; Schoener's Index of diet overlap averaged 0.35 in the first week and reached 0.96 by the end of the study. In the first few weeks, lake herring ate mostly small cladocerans (Bosmia longirostris) and bloaters ate mostly large cladocerans (Eurycercus lamellatus). Strauss's selection index confirmed that lake herring actively fed on small cladocerans throughout the study and that bloaters relied more on cyclopoid copepods during the early part of the study and shifted to eating small and large cladocerans by the end. Both species had similar growth rates throughout the study and amount of consumed food was identical. The diet similarities of lake herring and bloater larvae could make them competitors for food in the Great Lakes, relieved only by a dissimilarity in hatching times and locations.

  19. Species Profiles. Life Histories and Environmental Requirements of Coastal Fishes and Invertebrates (Pacific Northwest). Pacific Herring

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-12-01

    these times are salmon, seals, abnormalities developed in the lower jaws of sea lions, killer whales, dogfish , and birds larvae from eggs incubated at 4.0...offshore, important predators include Optimal temperatures for juvenile and adult hake, sablefish, dogfish , Pacific cod, and salmon. Pacific herring

  20. Interpreting temporal trends in Great Lakes organochlorine levels: Results from the herring gull surveillance program

    SciTech Connect

    Hebert, C.E.; Shutt, J.L.; Norstrom, R.J.; Weseloh, D.V.

    1995-12-31

    The Canadian Wildlife Service`s herring gull (Larus argentatus) surveillance program has demonstrated the utility of this species as a monitor of spatial and temporal trends in Great Lakes contaminant levels. Organochlorine concentrations in herring gull eggs decreased significantly in the 1970s and early 1980s as a result of control measures. Since the mid-1980s, however, concentrations of many compounds have been relatively constant. In addition, periodic fluctuations in egg contaminant concentrations hamper the ability to interpret more recent temporal trends in organochlorine levels. To evaluate the progress towards achieving the virtual elimination of organochlorines from the Great Lakes the authors must improve their understanding of the factors which regulate organochlorine bioaccumulation. This is particularly important for those species which have been selected as key indicators of ecosystem contamination, such as the herring gull. The goal of this paper is to examine some of the factors which may be responsible for the temporal fluctuations in herring gull egg contaminant concentrations. The regulation of contaminant bioavailability and transfer by changes in weather patterns and food web dynamics will be examined.

  1. Influence of ionizing radiation on the fatty acid composition of herring fillets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, Sieghard; Paul, Gertrud; Ehlermann, Dieter

    The effect of γ-irradiation (absorbed dose: 50 kGy, dose-rate: 2.9 {kGy}/{h}) on the distribution of fatty acid components in herring fillets has been examined using high-resolution gas chromatographic methods. Radiolytic treatment at 0°C and exclusion of atmospheric oxygen caused no significant decrease in the relative amounts of the constituent saturated, monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acid components. Specifically, eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5) and docosahexaenoic acid (22:6), which are of particularly physiological interest were not affected by γ-rays, even after additional storage of the irradiated material at 0°C for 4 weeks. Irradiation of oil extracted from herring fillets or of herring oil/water emulsions under aerobic conditions, however, destroyed eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid significantly. The loss of radio-resistance—as compared to the radiation-induced processes in the fillets—is explained by the absence of proteins, which effectively protect the lipid components from radiolytic decomposition. It is concluded that the commercial radiation processing of herring at the recommended dose levels (1-2 kGy) should not reduce the content of unsaturated fatty acid components.

  2. Formation of biogenic amine in mayonnaise, herring and tuna fish salad by lactobacilli.

    PubMed

    Leuschner, R G; Hammes, W P

    1999-05-01

    The effect of amino acid decarboxylase-positive lactobacilli in mayonnaise, herring and tuna fish salads on formation of biogenic amines (BA) was investigated. Commercial mayonnaise was inoculated with either of five amine-forming lactobacilli which were selected as model contaminants: Lactobacillus curvatus LTH 975 and LTH 1859 (cadaverine, putrescine, tyramine and phenylethylamine producing), L. delbrueckii LTH 1260 (tyramine and phenylethylamine forming) and L. buchneri LTH 1388 and LTH 661 (histamine forming). Low concentrations of tyramine (4.5 ppm) were detected and an addition of precursor amino acids resulted in an increase of amine concentrations to 40 ppm putrescine, 16.5 ppm tyramine and 5.5 ppm cadaverine. Herring and tuna fish salads were inoculated either with L. curvatus LTH 975 or L. Buchneri LTH 1388. In tuna fish salad 1 ppm putrescine, 3 ppm cadaverine, 7 ppm histamine and 28 ppm tyramine were found after 4 days when L. curvatus was added. In the corresponding herring salad putrescine (14 ppm), cadaverine (11.5 ppm), histamine (17 ppm) and tyramine (72 ppm) were detected. Fish salads containing L. buchneri displayed histamine concentrations of 900 ppm in tuna and 670 ppm in herring salad, respectively. Eight lactic acid bacteria and five yeasts, isolates from spoiled delicatessen salads and ingredients, were not able to form putrescine, cadaverine, histamine, tyramine or phenylethylamine.

  3. Ocean climate prior to breeding affects the duration of the nestling period in the Atlantic puffin

    PubMed Central

    Durant, Joël M; Anker-Nilssen, Tycho; Stenseth, Nils Chr

    2006-01-01

    Time-series covering 23 years for a long-lived seabird, the Atlantic puffin (Fratercula arctica L.) at Røst, northern Norway, was used to explore any indirect effects of climatic variations on chick production. By fitting statistical models on the duration of the nestling period, we found that it may be estimated using the average sea temperature and salinity at 0–20 m depth in March (having a positive and a negative effect, respectively). We propose that when the phytoplankton bloom occurs in early spring, adverse oceanographic conditions, i.e. low temperature and high salinity in March, have a negative effect on puffin reproduction by degradation of the prey availability (mainly Clupea harengus) for chick-feeding adults three months later. PMID:17148306

  4. Discrimination among spawning aggregations of lake herring from Lake Superior using whole-body morphometric characters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoff, Michael H.

    2004-01-01

    The lake herring (Coregonus artedi) was one of the most commercially and ecologically valuable Lake Superior fishes, but declined in the second half of the 20th century as the result of overharvest of putatively discrete stocks. No tools were previously available that described lake herring stock structure and accurately classified lake herring to their spawning stocks. The accuracy of discriminating among spawning aggregations was evaluated using whole-body morphometrics based on a truss network. Lake herring were collected from 11 spawning aggregations in Lake Superior and two inland Wisconsin lakes to evaluate morphometrics as a stock discrimination tool. Discriminant function analysis correctly classified 53% of all fish from all spawning aggregations, and fish from all but one aggregation were classified at greater rates than were possible by chance. Discriminant analysis also correctly classified 66% of fish to nearest neighbor groups, which were groups that accounted for the possibility of mixing among the aggregations. Stepwise discriminant analysis showed that posterior body length and depth measurements were among the best discriminators of spawning aggregations. These findings support other evidence that discrete stocks of lake herring exist in Lake Superior, and fishery managers should consider all but one of the spawning aggregations as discrete stocks. Abundance, annual harvest, total annual mortality rate, and exploitation data should be collected from each stock, and surplus production of each stock should be estimated. Prudent management of stock surplus production and exploitation rates will aid in restoration of stocks and will prevent a repeat of the stock collapses that occurred in the middle of the 20th century, when the species was nearly extirpated from the lake.

  5. Maternal beef and postweaning herring diets increase bone mineral density and strength in mouse offspring.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Aysha; Olausson, Hanna; Nilsson, Staffan; Nookaew, Intawat; Khoomrung, Sakda; Andersson, Louise; Koskela, Antti; Tuukkanen, Juha; Ohlsson, Claes; Holmäng, Agneta

    2013-12-01

    The maternal diet during gestation and lactation affects the long-term health of the offspring. We sought to determine whether maternal and postweaning crossover isocaloric diets based on fish or meat affect the geometry, mineral density, and biomechanical properties of bone in mouse offspring in adulthood. During gestation and lactation, C57BL/6 dams were fed a herring- or beef-based diet. After weaning, half of the pups in each group were fed the same diet as their dams, and half were fed the other diet. Areal bone mineral density (aBMD) and bone mineral content (BMC) of the whole body and lumbar spine were measured in the offspring by dual X-ray absorptiometry at 9 and 21 weeks of age. At 22-26 weeks, tibia bone geometry (length, cortical volumetric (v) BMD, BMC, area and thickness) was analyzed by peripheral quantitative computed tomography, and the biomechanical properties of the tibia were analyzed by the three-point bending test. Plasma insulin-like growth factor-1 was analyzed at 12 weeks. In comparison to the maternal herring diet, the maternal beef diet increased aBMD and BMC in the whole body and lumbar spine of adult offspring, as well as cortical vBMD, BMC, bone area, and thickness at the mid-diaphyseal region of the tibia and the biomechanical properties of tibia strength. In contrast, a postweaning beef diet decreased aBMD in the lumbar spine and BMC in the whole body and lumbar spine compared with a postweaning herring diet, which instead increased plasma insulin-like growth factor-1 levels. The change from a maternal beef diet before weaning to a herring diet after weaning decreased body weight and increased the cortical area, vBMD, BMC, thickness, and strength of the tibia. These significant crossover effects indicate that a preweaning maternal beef diet and a postweaning herring diet are optimal for increasing BMC and bone strength in offspring in adulthood.

  6. Antioxidant activities and functional properties of protein and peptide fractions isolated from salted herring brine.

    PubMed

    Taheri, Ali; Sabeena Farvin, K H; Jacobsen, Charlotte; Baron, Caroline P

    2014-01-01

    In the present study proteins isolated from herring brine, which is a by-product of marinated herring production were evaluated for their functional properties and antioxidant activity. Herring brine was collected from the local herring industry and proteins were precipitated by adjusting the pH to 4.5 and the obtained supernatant was further fractionated by using ultrafiltration membranes with molecular weight cut offs of 50, 10 and 1kDa. The obtained >50kDa, 50-10kDa, 10-1kDa fractions and pH precipitated fraction were studied for their functional properties and antioxidant activity. Functional properties revealed that >50kDa polypeptides showed good emulsion activity index when compared to the other fractions. However all fractions had low emulsion stability index. The pH precipitated fraction showed the highest foaming capacity and stability at pH 10. The 50-10kDa and 10-1kDa peptide fractions showed good radical scavenging activity and reducing power at a concentration of 0.5mg protein/ml. All the fractions demonstrated low iron chelating activity and did not inhibit oxidation in a soybean phosphatidylcholine liposome model system. However all the fractions were to some extent able to delay iron catalyzed lipid oxidation in 5% fish oil in water emulsions and the 10-50kDa fraction was the best. These results show the potential of proteins and peptide fractions recovered from waste water from the herring industry as source of natural antioxidants for use in food products. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Controlled field and laboratory studies on VHS and Ichtyophonus in Pacific herring: Section II in Investigations of disease factors affecting declines of Pacific herring populations in Prince William Sound

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kocan, Richard M.; Hershberger, Paul K.; Winton, James R.

    1999-01-01

    No evidence for increased susceptibility, mortality or loss of disease resistance was observed in wild or laboratory-reared herring exposed to oil or synthetic corticosteroids, either prior to or following exposure to VHSV.

  8. Piscivory by Lake Superior lake herring (Coregonis artedi) on Rainbow smelt (Osmerus moradax) in winter, 1993-1995

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoff, M.H.; Link, J.; Haskell, C.

    1997-01-01

    The stomach contents of 31 lake herring (Coregonus artedi), captured by anglers from western Lake Superior in the winters of 1993–1995, were examined to determine if predation on rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax) was occurring as indicated by anglers. Twenty-six (84%) of the stomachs contained rainbow smelt, with an average of 7.0 rainbow smelt/stomach. This was the first documentation of piscivory by lake herring on rainbow smelt in the Great Lakes.

  9. Effects of fish density and relative abundance on competition between larval lake herring and lake whitefish for zooplankton

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Todd, Thomas N.; Davis, Bruce M.

    1995-01-01

    Competition for zooplankton between larval lake herring (Coregonus artedi) and lake whitefish (C. clupeaformis) was compared in mesocosm experiments in a small lake. Both species were combined in test enclosures at relative abundances of 1:1 or 1:4 lake herring to lake whitefish at densities of 500; 1, 000; and 2, 000 fish per cage, and were allowed to feed ad libitum on available zooplankton. After 60 days, at 500 fish per cage and a 1:1 ratio, lake whitfish were significantly larger than lake herring. At 1, 000 and 2, 000 fish per cage, lake herring and lake whitefish exhibited similar depressed growth rates. Survival was lower (30-50%) in the nets with 2, 000 fish than in the lower fish densities. We suspect that diet similarities of juvenile lake herring and lake whitefish in addition to the larger size and more aggressive behavior of larval lake whitefish resulted in the depressed growth and poorer survival for lake herring.

  10. Incorporating covariates into fisheries stock assessment models with application to Pacific herring.

    PubMed

    Deriso, Richard B; Maunder, Mark N; Pearson, Walter H

    2008-07-01

    We present a framework for evaluating the cause of fishery declines by integrating covariates into a fisheries stock assessment model. This allows the evaluation of fisheries' effects vs. natural and other human impacts. The analyses presented are based on integrating ecological science and statistics and form the basis for environmental decision-making advice. Hypothesis tests are described to rank hypotheses and determine the size of a multiple covariate model. We extend recent developments in integrated analysis and use novel methods to produce effect size estimates that are relevant to policy makers and include estimates of uncertainty. Results can be directly applied to evaluate trade-offs among alternative management decisions. The methods and results are also broadly applicable outside fisheries stock assessment. We show that multiple factors influence populations and that analysis of factors in isolation can be misleading. We illustrate the framework by applying it to Pacific herring of Prince William Sound, Alaska (USA). The Pacific herring stock that spawns in Prince William Sound is a stock that has collapsed, but there are several competing or alternative hypotheses to account for the initial collapse and subsequent lack of recovery. Factors failing the initial screening tests for statistical significance included indicators of the 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill, coho salmon predation, sea lion predation, Pacific Decadal Oscillation, Northern Oscillation Index, and effects of containment in the herring egg-on-kelp pound fishery. The overall results indicate that the most statistically significant factors related to the lack of recovery of the herring stock involve competition or predation by juvenile hatchery pink salmon on herring juveniles. Secondary factors identified in the analysis were poor nutrition in the winter, ocean (Gulf of Alaska) temperature in the winter, the viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus, and the pathogen Ichthyophonus hoferi. The

  11. Effect of cover brine type on the quality of meat from herring marinades.

    PubMed

    Szymczak, Mariusz; Szymczak, Barbara; Koronkiewicz, Anna; Felisiak, Katarzyna; Bednarek, Mateusz

    2013-04-01

    Effects of vinegar, oil, and sour cream brines on meat quality of 4 popular cold marinades from herring were investigated in the study. Cover brine type affected the composition and nutritive value of meat as well as the sensory and microbiological quality of marinated herring. Qualitative differences resulted from cover brine penetration into meat, and from diffusion of components from meat to vinegar brine. Compared to oil and sour cream, vinegar brine contributed to increased concentrations of salt and acetic acid, hardness, color brightness of marinades meat and to increased microbial contamination of meat. Furthermore, vinegar caused nitrogen losses to 15%, including valuable products of protein hydrolysis, enzymes, and total volatile bases. The rolling up of fillets reduced diffusion even by 50%. In turn, oil and sour cream were causing mainly a higher fat content and overall sensory evaluation of the marinades. © 2013 Institute of Food Technologists®

  12. A mathematical model of predator-prey interaction between seal-herring and steelhead trout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triharyuni, S.; Aldila, D.

    2017-07-01

    A mathematical model of predator-prey interaction between Seal, Herring and Steelhead Trout will be introduced in this article. The population of Steelhead Trout is divided into two subpopulations according to their living ecosystem, i.e in freshwater and sea ecosystem. Therefore, the model will be developed as a four-dimensional system of differential equation. The migration of Steelhead Trout is assumed to take place all over the year as a constant parameter as well as the harvesting rate in Herring and Steelhead Trout population. Mathematical analysis of the equilibrium points and local stability criteria was done. Some numerical simulation to give an interpretation about the analytical results has been conducted. The result shown that harvesting steelhead trout in fresh water has a significant impact to the ecosystem. Having the periodic harvesting strategy on the steelhead trout allows the population to recover and to ensure the sustainable harvest.

  13. Strictly anaerobic halophiles isolated from canned Swedish fermented herrings (Surströmming).

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, T; Kimura, B; Fujii, T

    2000-03-10

    Strictly anaerobic halophiles were isolated from canned Swedish fermented herrings (Surströmming). All isolates were phenotypically uniform with some exceptions and were identified as the genus Haloanaerobium and assigned to either Haloanaerobium praevalens or Haloanaerobiuim alcaliphilum. A comparative analysis of 16S rDNA sequences revealed that the representative strain S-8 of the isolates was identical to that of Haloanaerobium praevalens DSM 2228T. Furthermore, this strain exhibited high levels (> 80%) of DNA-DNA homology with Haloanaerobium praevalens DSM 2228T. This is a novel report of halophilic anaerobes isolated from a food product. Such anaerobes may contribute to the intense flavor and the swollen can characteristics of Swedish fermented herring.

  14. Potential strategies for recovery of lake whitefish and lake herring stocks in eastern Lake Erie

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oldenburg, K.; Stapanian, M.A.; Ryan, P.A.; Holm, E.

    2007-01-01

    Lake Erie sustained large populations of ciscoes (Salmonidae: Coregoninae) 120 years ago. By the end of the 19th century, abundance of lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) had declined drastically. By 1925, the lake herring (a cisco) population (Coregonus artedii) had collapsed, although a limited lake herring fishery persisted in the eastern basin until the 1950s. In the latter part of the 20th century, the composition of the fish community changed as oligotrophication proceeded. Since 1984, a limited recovery of lake whitefish has occurred, however no recovery was evident for lake herring. Current ecological conditions in Lake Erie probably will not inhibit recovery of the coregonine species. Recovery of walleye (Sander vitreus) and efforts to rehabilitate the native lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) in Lake Erie will probably assist recovery because these piscivores reduce populations of alewife (Alosa psuedoharengus) and rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax), which inhibit reproductive success of coregonines. Although there are considerable spawning substrates available to coregonine species in eastern Lake Erie, eggs and fry would probably be displaced by storm surge from most shoals. Site selection for stocking or seeding of eggs should consider the reproductive life cycle of the stocked fish and suitable protection from storm events. Two potential sites in the eastern basin have been identified. Recommended management procedures, including commercial fisheries, are suggested to assist in recovery. Stocking in the eastern basin of Lake Erie is recommended for both species, as conditions are adequate and the native spawning population in the eastern basin is low. For lake herring, consideration should be given to match ecophenotypes as much as possible. Egg seeding is recommended. Egg seeding of lake whitefish should be considered initially, with fingerling or yearling stocking suggested if unsuccessful. Spawning stocks of whitefish in the western basin of Lake

  15. Could a Mathematics Student Have Prevented the Collapse of the Atlanto-Scandian Herring?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sigurdsson, Thorir

    2006-01-01

    Herring in the ocean between Iceland and Norway was one of the largest fish stocks in the world until the fishery crashed in the late 1960s. The catch in 1971 was only 20 thousand metric tons in contrast with the record of 2 million tons in 1966 and the spawning stock declined from 10 million tons to 10 thousand tons in 20 years. After 25 years of…

  16. Could a Mathematics Student Have Prevented the Collapse of the Atlanto-Scandian Herring?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sigurdsson, Thorir

    2006-01-01

    Herring in the ocean between Iceland and Norway was one of the largest fish stocks in the world until the fishery crashed in the late 1960s. The catch in 1971 was only 20 thousand metric tons in contrast with the record of 2 million tons in 1966 and the spawning stock declined from 10 million tons to 10 thousand tons in 20 years. After 25 years of…

  17. Species profiles: Life histories and environmental requirements of coastal fishes and invertebrates (Pacific Northwest): Pacific herring

    SciTech Connect

    Lassuy, D.R. . Oregon Cooperative Fisheries Research Unit)

    1989-12-01

    Species profiles are literature summaries of the taxonomy, morphology, distribution, life history, ecological role, and environmental requirements of coastal aquatic species. They are prepared to assist coastal managers, engineers, and biologists in the gathering of information pertinent to coastal development activities. The Pacific herring has a long history of exploitation for human consumption, animal feed, and trade. It also provides food for a wide variety of pelagic, intertidal, and avian predators. The herring roe fishery has dominated catches since Japan opened its market to imports in the early 1970's. Pacific herring spawn in quiescent, nearshore areas, primarily on marine vegetation. Spawning peaks in the Pacific Northwest region during February and March. Larvae remain inshore, transform into juveniles after 2--3 months, then move offshore in the fall. Adults move inshore on their spawning migration in late fall and early winter. Optimum physiological performance during the early life history is achieved at about 12--17 ppT salinity at temperatures near 6.5--8.3{degree}C. It is important to avoid siltation at or near the spawning grounds in order to prevent disruption of spawning behavior or smothering of eggs. 65 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. An outbreak of type C botulism in Herring Gulls (Larus argentatus) in Southeastern Sweden

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neimanis, A.; Gavier-Widen, D.; Leighton, F.; Bollinger, T.; Rocke, T.; Morner, T.

    2007-01-01

    From 2000 to 2004, over 10,000 seabirds, primarily Herring Gulls (Larus argentatus), died from an undetermined cause in the Blekinge archipelago in southeastern Sweden. In June 2004, 24 affected Herring Gulls were examined clinically, killed humanely, and 23 were examined by necropsy. Seven and 10 unaffected Herring Gulls collected from a local landfill site and from Iceland, respectively, served as controls. All affected birds showed similar neurologic signs, ranging from mild incoordination and weakness to severe flaccid paralysis of legs and wings, but generally were alert and responsive. All affected gulls were in normal nutritional condition, but were dehydrated and had empty stomachs. No gross or microscopic lesions, and no bacterial or viral pathogens were identified. Type C botulinum toxin was detected in the sera of 11 of 16 (69%) affected gulls by mouse inoculation. Type C botulism was the proximate cause of disease in 2004. Sera from 31% of birds tested from outbreaks in 2000 to 2003 also had detectable type C botulinum toxin by mouse inoculation. No large-scale botulism outbreak has been documented previously in this area. The source of toxin, initiating conditions, and thus, the ultimate cause of this outbreak are not known. This epidemic might signal environmental change in the Baltic Sea. ?? Wildlife Disease Association 2007.

  19. Mercury levels in Great Lakes herring gull eggs, 1972--1992

    SciTech Connect

    Weseloh, D.V.; Koster, M.D.; Ryckman, D.P.; Struger, J.

    1995-12-31

    Since 1971, the herring gull (Larus argentatus) has been used as a sentinel species for monitoring the levels of persistent contaminants in the Great Lakes ecosystem. In this study, 21 herring gull colonies in the Great Lakes and connecting channels were sampled for years 1972--1976, 1981--1983, 1985 and 1992. For each year, 10 eggs (usually) were collected from each colony site and analyzed for total mercury (ppm, wet weight). Results indicated that eggs from Lake Ontario displayed the highest mercury levels, mean = 0.28 (s.d. = 0.08) to 0.73 (0.23). Lake Erie typically displayed the lowest egg mercury levels, 0.18 (0.08) to 0.24 (0.11). Overall, mercury levels ranged from 0.12 (0.02) in 1985 to 0.88 (0.23) in 1982 for Channel-Shelter Island (Lake Huron) and Pigeon Island (Lake Ontario), respectively. Generally, all colony sites showed peak mercury levels in 1982. A significant decline in egg mercury levels was observed in six colony sites between 1972 and 1992 and in three colony sites between 1981 and 1992. The mean herring gull egg mercury levels observed in the early and mid 1970s and in 1982 for some colony sites were within the range found which potentially reduces hatchability in other fish-eating bird species.

  20. Genetic affinities within the herring gull Larus argentatus assemblage revealed by AFLP genotyping.

    PubMed

    de Knijff P; Denkers, F; van Swelm, N D; Kuiper, M

    2001-01-01

    To date, the taxonomic status of circumpolar breeding populations of the Herring Gull Larus argentatus, the Lesser Black-backed Gull Larus fuscus, and the closely related Yellow-legged Gull Larus cachinnans has been based on differences or similarities in phenotype, morphology, and feeding and premating behavior. To shed some new light on the many taxonomic uncertainties surrounding these taxa, we describe the results of a large DNA study based on comparing the distribution of 209 biallelic markers among 109 gulls, representing 11 gull taxa of the Herring Gull assemblage and the Common Gull Larus canus. A detailed phylogenetic analysis failed to show clustering of individuals into groups representing either geographic origin or phenotype. Alternatively, birds were grouped into taxa defined on the basis of phenotype and geographic origin or phenotype alone. Genetic analyses revealed significantly different genetic distances between all pairs of taxa. However, based on these genetic distances, again no consistent phylogenetic tree could be constructed. Analysis of molecular variance indicated that about 77% of the total genetic variability among these gulls could be explained by within-taxon differences. Only 23% of the total genetic variability was due to genetic differences between taxa, irrespective of their species or subspecies status. Although this seems to challenge the current taxonomic treatment of the herring gull assemblage, our results are too premature and too incomplete to recommend a drastic change.

  1. Estimates of Low Frequency Volume Scattering Off the Oregon-Washington Coast

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-04-01

    Sardinops sagax; saury, Cololabis saira; Pacific herring, Clupea harengus pallasi; jack mackerel, Trachurus symmetricus, Pacific mackerel...mostly between 13 and 24 cm length and saury are slightly larger, between 15 and 30 cm length (Brodeur and Pearcy, 1986). Pacific herring, Clupea harengus

  2. Evaluation of bottom trawls as compared to acoustics to assess adult Lake Herring (Coregonus artedi) abundance in Lake Superior

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stockwell, J.D.; Yule, D.L.; Gorman, O.T.; Isaac, E.J.; Moore, S.A.

    2006-01-01

    We compared density estimates from day bottom trawl tows against night midwater trawl tows and acoustic gear to test the hypothesis that adult lake herring (≥250 mm) are underestimated by day bottom trawl tows during the annual USGS spring fish community survey in Lake Superior. We found average density at nine nearshore stations was significantly higher at night (21.3 adult fish/ha) compared to day (1.0 adult fish/ha; p = 0.0119). At nine offshore stations, no lake herring were captured during the day but density averaged 39.6 adult fish/ha at night. At a lakewide scale (n = 18 stations), precision (relative standard error) was much better using night midwater trawls and acoustic gear (37%) compared to day bottom trawls (100%). Moderate sample size increases using the former methodology would likely bring precision within recommended levels (≤30%) for stock-recruit data sets. Our results suggest that 1) population abundances of adult lake herring in Lake Superior are much higher than previously considered, 2) the annual spring fish community survey may not provide a relative index of abundance of adult lake herring, 3) night midwater trawls and acoustic gear are necessary for assessing adult lake herring abundance, and 4) previous studies using lake herring data from the annual spring fish community survey need to be re-evaluated in light of these results. Lake herring appear to become progressively more pelagic and less susceptible to bottom trawling as they mature. Day bottom trawls appear to be an adequate tool for estimating relative density of age-1 recruits, although this method still suffers from relatively poor precision.

  3. Chlamydiaceae in North Atlantic Seabirds Admitted to a Wildlife Rescue Center in Western France

    PubMed Central

    Aaziz, R.; Gourlay, P.; Vorimore, F.; Sachse, K.; Siarkou, V. I.

    2015-01-01

    Birds are the primary hosts of Chlamydia psittaci, a bacterium that can cause avian chlamydiosis in birds and psittacosis in humans. Wild seabirds are frequently admitted to wildlife rescue centers (WRC) at European Atlantic coasts, for example, in connection with oil spills. To investigate the extent of chlamydial shedding by these birds and the resulting risk for animals in care and the medical staff, seabirds from a French WRC were sampled from May 2011 to January 2014. By use of a quantitative PCR (qPCR), 195 seabirds belonging to 4 orders, 5 families and 13 species were examined, of which 18.5% proved to be Chlamydiaceae positive. The highest prevalence of shedders was found in northern gannets (Morus bassanus) (41%), followed by European herring gulls (Larus argentatus) (14%) and common murres (Uria aalge) (7%). Molecular characterization and phylogenetic analysis of qPCR-positive northern gannet samples revealed two variants of a strain closely related to C. psittaci. In European herring gulls and in one common murre, strains showing high sequence similarity to the atypical Chlamydiaceae-like C122 previously found in gulls were detected. Our study shows that seabirds from the northeastern Atlantic Ocean carry several chlamydial organisms, including C. psittaci-related strains. The staff in WRCs should take protective measures, particularly in the case of mass admissions of seabirds. PMID:25934619

  4. Chlamydiaceae in North Atlantic Seabirds Admitted to a Wildlife Rescue Center in Western France.

    PubMed

    Aaziz, R; Gourlay, P; Vorimore, F; Sachse, K; Siarkou, V I; Laroucau, K

    2015-07-01

    Birds are the primary hosts of Chlamydia psittaci, a bacterium that can cause avian chlamydiosis in birds and psittacosis in humans. Wild seabirds are frequently admitted to wildlife rescue centers (WRC) at European Atlantic coasts, for example, in connection with oil spills. To investigate the extent of chlamydial shedding by these birds and the resulting risk for animals in care and the medical staff, seabirds from a French WRC were sampled from May 2011 to January 2014. By use of a quantitative PCR (qPCR), 195 seabirds belonging to 4 orders, 5 families and 13 species were examined, of which 18.5% proved to be Chlamydiaceae positive. The highest prevalence of shedders was found in northern gannets (Morus bassanus) (41%), followed by European herring gulls (Larus argentatus) (14%) and common murres (Uria aalge) (7%). Molecular characterization and phylogenetic analysis of qPCR-positive northern gannet samples revealed two variants of a strain closely related to C. psittaci. In European herring gulls and in one common murre, strains showing high sequence similarity to the atypical Chlamydiaceae-like C122 previously found in gulls were detected. Our study shows that seabirds from the northeastern Atlantic Ocean carry several chlamydial organisms, including C. psittaci-related strains. The staff in WRCs should take protective measures, particularly in the case of mass admissions of seabirds. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  5. Marine Incursion: The Freshwater Herring of Lake Tanganyika Are the Product of a Marine Invasion into West Africa

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Anthony B.; Teugels, Guy G.; Meyer, Axel

    2008-01-01

    The spectacular marine-like diversity of the endemic fauna of Lake Tanganyika, the oldest of the African Great Lakes, led early researchers to suggest that the lake must have once been connected to the ocean. Recent geophysical reconstructions clearly indicate that Lake Tanganyika formed by rifting in the African subcontinent and was never directly linked to the sea. Although the Lake has a high proportion of specialized endemics, the absence of close relatives outside Tanganyika has complicated phylogeographic reconstructions of the timing of lake colonization and intralacustrine diversification. The freshwater herring of Lake Tanganyika are members of a large group of pellonuline herring found in western and southern Africa, offering one of the best opportunities to trace the evolutionary history of members of Tanganyika's biota. Molecular phylogenetic reconstructions indicate that herring colonized West Africa 25–50MYA, at the end of a major marine incursion in the region. Pellonuline herring subsequently experienced an evolutionary radiation in West Africa, spreading across the continent and reaching East Africa's Lake Tanganyika during its early formation. While Lake Tanganyika has never been directly connected with the sea, the endemic freshwater herring of the lake are the descendents of an ancient marine incursion, a scenario which may also explain the origin of other Tanganyikan endemics. PMID:18431469

  6. Spawning cycle and fecundity of a multiple spawner round herring Etrumeus teres off southern Japan: Oocyte growth and maturation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyuji, Mitsuo; Takasuka, Akinori

    2017-04-01

    The spawning characteristics of round herring Etrumeus teres remain unclear despite its commercial and ecological importance. The oocyte growth and maturation during the spawning cycle of round herring were examined based on the samples collected at different hours of the day off southern Japan during their 2015 spawning season. The ovarian histological analysis showed that germinal vesicle migration (GVM) and subsequent germinal vesicle breakdown occurred from the afternoon to the next morning. The appearance of hydrated oocytes indicated that round herring spawned between midday and evening. Degeneration of post-ovulatory follicles and the ovarian developmental stage suggested that individual round herring did not spawn on consecutive days but rather spawned at an interval of at least 2 days. The oocyte diameters of the second clutch (subsequent spawning batch) increased gradually when the first clutch (spawning batch) underwent GVM and hydrated, but oocytes in the second clutch increased significantly in size immediately after spawning, suggesting that vitellogenesis of the second clutch may be accelerated for the next spawning. Size at maturity in all females was estimated to 17.6 cm in body length (BL), and batch fecundity was 1409-21,023 oocytes (15.7-24.0 cm in BL). Our findings provide a foundation for conducting stock assessment studies on round herring using an egg production method.

  7. Marine incursion: the freshwater herring of Lake Tanganyika are the product of a marine invasion into west Africa.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Anthony B; Teugels, Guy G; Meyer, Axel

    2008-04-23

    The spectacular marine-like diversity of the endemic fauna of Lake Tanganyika, the oldest of the African Great Lakes, led early researchers to suggest that the lake must have once been connected to the ocean. Recent geophysical reconstructions clearly indicate that Lake Tanganyika formed by rifting in the African subcontinent and was never directly linked to the sea. Although the Lake has a high proportion of specialized endemics, the absence of close relatives outside Tanganyika has complicated phylogeographic reconstructions of the timing of lake colonization and intralacustrine diversification. The freshwater herring of Lake Tanganyika are members of a large group of pellonuline herring found in western and southern Africa, offering one of the best opportunities to trace the evolutionary history of members of Tanganyika's biota. Molecular phylogenetic reconstructions indicate that herring colonized West Africa 25-50MYA, at the end of a major marine incursion in the region. Pellonuline herring subsequently experienced an evolutionary radiation in West Africa, spreading across the continent and reaching East Africa's Lake Tanganyika during its early formation. While Lake Tanganyika has never been directly connected with the sea, the endemic freshwater herring of the lake are the descendents of an ancient marine incursion, a scenario which may also explain the origin of other Tanganyikan endemics.

  8. [The content of histamine and tyramine dependent of microbiological quality of salted herring stored at different temperatures].

    PubMed

    Fonberg-Broczek, Monika; Sawilska-Rautenstrauch, Dorota; Windyga, Bozena; Sciezyńska, Halina; Jedra, Małgorzata; Badowski, Paweł; Urbanek-Karłowska, Bogumiła

    2003-01-01

    Twenty six samples of salted herring from Warsaw food market were analyzed. Herrings in high-salted brine (with 26% content of salt) were stored for 21 days at temperature of 4 degrees C and 22 degrees C; low-salted (16% content of salt in brine) herring were stored for 42 days at temperature of 4 degrees C and 22 degrees C. Microbiological contamination level was assessed by standard methods for fish products, and biogenic amines--histamine and tyramine content by spectrofluorometric methods. There was no level change of both amines in high-salted herrings. Significant increase of tyramine content was observed in low-salted samples, depending on the time of storage. The highest level of tyramine up to 318 mg/kg--was observed after 6 weeks of storage. Histamine content increased in low-salted sampled up to 35 mg/kg during the period of storage. Aerobic microflora in the amount up to 10(6)/g was detected during storage of low-salted samples. Such level changes were not observed in high-salted herring samples.

  9. Fidelity and persistence of Ring-billed (Larus delawarensis) and Herring (Larus argentatus) gulls to wintering sites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Daniel E.; Koenen, Kiana K. G.; Whitney, Jillian J.; MacKenzie, Kenneth G.; Destefano, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    While the breeding ecology of gulls (Laridae) has been well studied, their movements and spatial organization during the non-breeding season is poorly understood. The seasonal movements, winter-site fidelity, and site persistence of Ring-billed (Larus delawarensis) and Herring (L. argentatus) gulls to wintering areas were studied from 2008–2012. Satellite transmitters were deployed on Ring-billed Gulls (n = 21) and Herring Gulls (n = 14). Ten Ring-billed and six Herring gulls were tracked over multiple winters and > 300 wing-tagged Ring-billed Gulls were followed to determine winter-site fidelity and persistence. Home range overlap for individuals between years ranged between 0–1.0 (95% minimum convex polygon) and 0.31–0.79 (kernel utilization distributions). Ringbilled and Herring gulls remained at local wintering sites during the non-breeding season from 20–167 days and 74–161 days, respectively. The probability of a tagged Ring-billed Gull returning to the same site in subsequent winters was high; conversely, there was a low probability of a Ring-billed Gull returning to a different site. Ring-billed and Herring gulls exhibited high winter-site fidelity, but exhibited variable site persistence during the winter season, leading to a high probability of encountering the same individuals in subsequent winters.

  10. Overwinter survival of juvenile lake herring in relation to body size, physiological condition, energy stores, and food ration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pangle, Kevin L.; Sutton, Trent M.; Kinnunen, Ronald E.; Hoff, Michael H.

    2004-01-01

    Populations of lake herring Coregonus artedi in Lake Superior have exhibited high recruitment variability over the past three decades. To improve our understanding of the mechanisms which influence year-class strength, we conducted a 225-d laboratory experiment to evaluate the effects of body size, physiological condition, energy stores, and food ration on the winter survival of age-0 lake herring. Small (total length (TL) range = 60–85 mm) and large (TL range = 86–110 mm) fish were maintained under thermal and photoperiod regimes that mimicked those in Lake Superior from October through May. Fish in each size-class were maintained at two feeding treatments: brine shrimp Artemiaspp. ad libitum and no food. The mortality of large lake herring (fed, 3.8%; starved, 20.1%) was significantly less than that of small fish (fed, 11.7%; starved, 32.0%). Body condition and crude lipid content declined for all fish over the experiment; however, these variables were significantly greater for large fed (0.68% and 9.8%) and small fed (0.65% and 7.3%) fish than large starved (0.49% and 5.7%) and small starved (0.45% and 4.8%) individuals. Final crude protein and gross energy contents were also significantly greater in large fed lake herring (17.6% and 1,966 cal/g), followed by small fed (17.1% and 1,497 cal/g), large starved (15.4% and 1,125 cal/g), and small starved (13.2% and 799 cal/g) fish. Lake herring that died during the experiment had significantly lower body condition and energy stores relative to those of the surviving fish. These results suggest that the depletion of energy stores contributes to greater winter mortality of small lake herring with limited energy uptake and may partially explain the variability in recruitment observed in Lake Superior.

  11. Arsenic-Containing Phosphatidylcholines: A New Group of Arsenolipids Discovered in Herring Caviar.

    PubMed

    Viczek, Sandra A; Jensen, Kenneth B; Francesconi, Kevin A

    2016-04-18

    A new group of arsenolipids based on cell-membrane phosphatidylcholines has been discovered in herring caviar (fish roe). A combination of HPLC with elemental and molecular mass spectrometry was used to identify five arsenic-containing phosphatidylcholines; the same technique applied to salmon caviar identified an arsenic-containing phosphatidylethanolamine. The arsenic group in these membrane lipids might impart particular properties to the molecules not displayed by their non-arsenic analogues. Additionally, the new compounds have human health implications according to recent results showing high cytotoxicity for some arsenolipids. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Screening for Viral Hemorrhagic Septicemia Virus in Marine Fish along the Norwegian Coastal Line

    PubMed Central

    Sandlund, Nina; Gjerset, Britt; Bergh, Øivind; Modahl, Ingebjørg; Olesen, Niels Jørgen; Johansen, Renate

    2014-01-01

    Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) infects a wide range of marine fish species. To study the occurrence of VHSV in wild marine fish populations in Norwegian coastal waters and fjord systems a total of 1927 fish from 39 different species were sampled through 5 research cruises conducted in 2009 to 2011. In total, VHSV was detected by rRT-PCR in twelve samples originating from Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus), haddock (Melanogrammus aeglefinus), whiting (Merlangius merlangus) and silvery pout (Gadiculus argenteus). All fish tested positive in gills while four herring and one silvery pout also tested positive in internal organs. Successful virus isolation in cell culture was only obtained from one pooled Atlantic herring sample which shows that today's PCR methodology have a much higher sensitivity than cell culture for detection of VHSV. Sequencing revealed that the positive samples belonged to VHSV genotype Ib and phylogenetic analysis shows that the isolate from Atlantic herring and silvery pout are closely related. All positive fish were sampled in the same area in the northern county of Finnmark. This is the first detection of VHSV in Atlantic herring this far north, and to our knowledge the first detection of VHSV in silvery pout. However, low prevalence of VHSV genotype Ib in Atlantic herring and other wild marine fish are well known in other parts of Europe. Earlier there have been a few reports of disease outbreaks in farmed rainbow trout with VHSV of genotype Ib, and our results show that there is a possibility of transfer of VHSV from wild to farmed fish along the Norwegian coast line. The impact of VHSV on wild fish is not well documented. PMID:25248078

  13. Screening for viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus in marine fish along the Norwegian coastal line.

    PubMed

    Sandlund, Nina; Gjerset, Britt; Bergh, Øivind; Modahl, Ingebjørg; Olesen, Niels Jørgen; Johansen, Renate

    2014-01-01

    Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) infects a wide range of marine fish species. To study the occurrence of VHSV in wild marine fish populations in Norwegian coastal waters and fjord systems a total of 1927 fish from 39 different species were sampled through 5 research cruises conducted in 2009 to 2011. In total, VHSV was detected by rRT-PCR in twelve samples originating from Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus), haddock (Melanogrammus aeglefinus), whiting (Merlangius merlangus) and silvery pout (Gadiculus argenteus). All fish tested positive in gills while four herring and one silvery pout also tested positive in internal organs. Successful virus isolation in cell culture was only obtained from one pooled Atlantic herring sample which shows that today's PCR methodology have a much higher sensitivity than cell culture for detection of VHSV. Sequencing revealed that the positive samples belonged to VHSV genotype Ib and phylogenetic analysis shows that the isolate from Atlantic herring and silvery pout are closely related. All positive fish were sampled in the same area in the northern county of Finnmark. This is the first detection of VHSV in Atlantic herring this far north, and to our knowledge the first detection of VHSV in silvery pout. However, low prevalence of VHSV genotype Ib in Atlantic herring and other wild marine fish are well known in other parts of Europe. Earlier there have been a few reports of disease outbreaks in farmed rainbow trout with VHSV of genotype Ib, and our results show that there is a possibility of transfer of VHSV from wild to farmed fish along the Norwegian coast line. The impact of VHSV on wild fish is not well documented.

  14. Geographical distribution of organochlorine contaminants and reproductive parameters in Herring Gulls on Lake Superior in 1983.

    PubMed

    Chip Weseloh, D V; Ewins, P J; Struger, J; Mineau, P; Norstrom, R J

    1994-02-01

    As part of the Great Lakes International Surveillance Plan, 1978-83, egg contaminant levels and reproductive output were determined for Herring Gull colonies on Lake Superior in 1983. Since 1974, the Herring Gull has been widely used in the Great Lakes as a spatial and temporal monitor of organochlorine (OC) contaminant levels and associated biological effects. Most eggs contained a wide range of OCs, the main compounds being DDE, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), dieldrin, heptachlor epoxide, oxychlordane, hexachlorobenzene and mirex. Levels of an additional ten OCs and five polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin (PCDD) congeners were also determined for some sites. Overall, levels varied significantly among colonies, but there was no obvious relationship to spatial distribution of contaminants in sediments or fish species. OC levels in eggs had declined by up to 84% since 1974. Eggshells were only 8% thinner than before the introduction of DDT, and shell thinning was not a cause of breeding failure. Average reproductive output varied from 0.15 to 1.57 young per apparently occupied nest in 1983: at 56% of colonies the value was below that thought necessary to maintain stable populations. The main causes of failure were egg disappearence and cannibalism of chicks. Despite this, the population appeared to have been increasing at about 4% per annum. Reduced availability of forage fish during the early 1980s was the most likely reason for the poor reproductive output in 1983.

  15. What`s normal?: Body condition in Great Lakes herring gulls

    SciTech Connect

    Hebert, C.E.; Shutt, J.L.

    1994-12-31

    The Canadian Wildlife Service`s herring gull (Larus argentatus) surveillance program has demonstrated the usefulness of this species as a monitor of spatial and temporal trends in contaminant levels. However, the effects of environmental contaminants on gulls are difficult to distinguish from the effects of other anthropogenic stressors such as the introduction of exotic species, overfishing and habitat loss. To understand the relative importance of these factors in regulating the success of individual gulls and, hence, gull populations, the authors must first have a better understanding of what constitutes a ``normal`` bird. Improving the ability to differentiate between normal and abnormal birds is crucial in any health assessment of Great Lakes gulls. Body condition has been shown to be an important measure of a bird`s ability to provide energy for egg production, migration etc. Numerous approaches have been used to assess condition, most of which required that the bird be sacrificed. In this study, the authors describe a nonlethal technique to quantify body condition in herring gulls. Multivariate statistics are used to quantify body size, relate body size to total mass and from that, determine relative body condition. Initially, body condition is assessed in gulls from a reference colony where reproductive success is normal and anthropogenic influences are limited. This reference population is then used as a baseline against which other gull populations are compared.

  16. Effects of temperature on embryonic development of lake herring (Coregonus artedii)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Colby, Peter J.; Brooke, L.T.

    1973-01-01

    Embryonic development of lake herring (Coregonus artedii) was observed in the laboratory at 13 constant temperatures from 0.0 to 12.1 C and in Pickerel Lake (Washtenaw County, Michigan) at natural temperature regimes. Rate of development during incubation was based on progression of the embryos through 20 identifiable stages. An equation was derived to predict development stage at constant temperatures, on the general assumption that development stage (DS) is a function of time (days, D) and temperature (T). The equation should also be useful in interpreting estimates from future regressions that include other environmental variables that affect egg development. A second regression model, derived primarily for fluctuating temperatures, related development rate for stage j (DRj), expressed as the reciprocal of time, to temperature (x). The generalized equation for a development stage is: DRj = abx cx2 dx3. In general, time required for embryos to reach each stage of development in Pickerel Lake agreed closely with the time predicted from this equation, derived from our laboratory observations. Hatching time was predicted within 1 day in 1969 and within 2 days in 1970. We used the equations derived with the second model to predict the effect of the superimposition of temperature increases of 1 and 2 C on the measured temperatures in Pickerel Lake. Conceivably, hatching dates could be affected sufficiently to jeopardize the first feeding of lake herring through loss of harmony between hatching date and seasonal food availability.

  17. Bridging the energy gap: Anadromous blueback herring feeding in the Hudson and Mohawk rivers, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simonin, P.W.; Limburg, K.E.; Machut, L.S.

    2007-01-01

    Adult blueback herring Alosa aestivalis (N = 116) were collected during the 1999, 2000, and 2002-2004 spawning runs from sites on the Hudson and Mohawk rivers, and gut contents were analyzed. Thirty-four fish (33% of those examined) were found to contain food material. Food items were present in 41% of Mohawk River samples and 11% of Hudson River samples; all Hudson River fish containing food were captured in small tributaries above the head of tide. Hudson River fish predominantly consumed zooplankton, while Mohawk River fish consumed benthic aquatic insects in large quantities, including Baetidae, Ephemeridae, and Chironomidae. Using stable isotope analysis and a mixing model, we found that fish collected later in the season had significantly decreased marine-derived C. Condition indices of later-season fish were equal to or greater than those of fish collected earlier in the season. Blueback herring in this system may face increased energy requirements as they migrate farther upstream during spawning runs, and feeding may provide energy subsidies needed to maintain fitness over their expanded migratory range. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2007.

  18. Discrimination among spawning concentrations of Lake Superior lake herring based on trace element profiles in sagittae

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bronte, Charles R.; Hesselberg, Robert J.; Shoesmith, John A.; Hoff, Michael H.

    1996-01-01

    Little is known about the stock structure of lake herring Coregonus artedi in Lake Superior, and recent increases in harvestable stock sizes has led to expanded exploitation in some areas. Research on marine teleosts has demonstrated that chemical differences in sagittal otoliths can be used for identification of fish stocks. We used plasma emission spectrophotometry to measure the concentrations of 10 trace elements in the sagittal otoliths from lake herring captured at eight spawning sites in Lake Superior and from Little Star Lake, an inland lake outside the Lake Superior basin. Discriminant function analysis indicated that elemental concentrations provided site-specific information but that considerable overlap existed among some locations, especially those in western Lake Superior. Correct classification rates varied from 12.0% to 86.1% and were generally higher for spawning locations from embayments in eastern Lake Superior and for the outgroup population from Little Star Lake. The results presented here demonstrate the potential usefulness of this technique for strictly freshwater species, especially those that live in highly oligotrophic waters such as Lake Superior.

  19. Changes in food web structure affect rate of PCB decline in herring gull (Larus argentatus) eggs

    SciTech Connect

    Hebert, C.E.; Hobson, K.A.; Shutt, J.L.

    2000-05-01

    Biological monitors provide important information regarding temporal trends in levels of persistent organic pollutants. Correct interpretation of these trends is critical if one is to accurately assess his progress in eliminating these contaminants from the environment. In the Laurentian Great Lakes, polychlorinated biphenyl concentrations in herring gull eggs declined during the 1970s and early 1980s. By the mid-1980s, further declines were not as obvious. An exception to this trend was observed in eggs from Lake Erie. On that lake, egg PCB concentrations continued to decline rapidly during the 1980s/1990s. Evidence from stable isotope analysis indicated that temporal changes in the composition of the herring gull diet occurred on Lake Erie. In the eastern basin, declines in fish availability may have forced the gulls to incorporate a greater proportion of terrestrial food into their diets. Decreases in the proportion of fish in the gull diet would have resulted in reduced PCB exposure. This may be partially responsible for the continuing rapid rate of decline in egg PCB concentrations. This decline should be interpreted with caution. These trends may not be indicative of lake-wide declines in PCB bioavailability but only reflect changes in dietary exposure brought about by alterations in food web structure.

  20. Loss of vitamin B(12) in fish (round herring) meats during various cooking treatments.

    PubMed

    Nishioka, Michiko; Kanosue, Fuki; Yabuta, Yukinori; Watanabe, Fumio

    2011-01-01

    The loss of vitamin B(12) in round herring meats during various cooking treatments was evaluated. Although amounts of vitamin B(12) were three times greater in the viscera (37.5 ± 10.6 µg/100 g fresh weight) than in the meats, about 73% of total vitamin B(12) found in the whole fish body (except for head and bones) were recovered in the meats (5.1 ± 1.0 µg of vitamin B(12)). The vitamin B(12) contents of the round herring's meats were significantly decreased up to ~62% during cooking by grilling, boiling, frying, steaming, and microwaving. There was, however, no loss of vitamin B(12) during vacuum-packed pouch cooking. Model experiment using hydroxocobalamin suggest that loss of vitamin B(12) is dependent on the degree of temperature and time used in conventional cooking, and is further affected by the concomitant ingredients of food. Retention of vitamin B(12) was not dependent on vacuum or temperature (or both) used in the vacuum-packed pouch cooking.

  1. The Red Herring technique: a methodological response to the problem of demand characteristics.

    PubMed

    Laney, Cara; Kaasa, Suzanne O; Morris, Erin K; Berkowitz, Shari R; Bernstein, Daniel M; Loftus, Elizabeth F

    2008-07-01

    In past research, we planted false memories for food related childhood events using a simple false feedback procedure. Some critics have worried that our findings may be due to demand characteristics. In the present studies, we developed a novel procedure designed to reduce the influence of demand characteristics by providing an alternate magnet for subjects' natural suspicions. We used two separate levels of deception. In addition to giving subjects a typical untrue rationale for the study (i.e., normal deceptive cover story), we built in strong indicators (the "Red Herring") that the study actually had another purpose. Later, we told subjects that we had deceived them, and asked what they believed the "real purpose" of the study was. We also interviewed a subset of subjects in depth in order to analyze their subjective experiences of the procedure and any relevant demand. Our Red Herring successfully tricked subjects, and left little worry that our false memory results were due to demand. This "double cross" technique may have widespread uses in psychological research that hopes to conceal its real hypotheses from experimental subjects.

  2. PCB patterns in herring and pike with special regard to co-planar congeners

    SciTech Connect

    Alsberg, T.; Wit, C. de; Eriksson, U.; Jaernberg, U.; Bignert, A.; Olsson, M.

    1995-12-31

    This study investigates the patterns of PCB in two aquatic organisms, herring and pike. The aim is to establish a basis for a model for estimating the levels of co-planar PCBs from the concentrations of nonplanar congeners. The chosen fish populations reflect differences in species, age, habitat (locations) and time of catch, as well as differences in total PCB concentrations. More stable patterns would be presumed, the more homogeneous the population. Herring were sampled at two locations, one in the Bothnian Bay (Harufjaerden) and one in the Southern Baltic (Utlaengan). Two age classes were sampled at each location, 2- and 6-year olds, respectively at Utlaengan, and 2- and 5-year olds, respectively at Harufjaerden. Pike were sampled from Lake Bolmen in southern Sweden in 1992, and pike from the same location but sampled in 1971 were taken from the specimen bank. Ten individuals per population were analyzed. Thirteen PCB congeners were determined, namely PCBs 28, 52, 77, 101, 105, 118, 126, 1 38, 153, 156, 157, 169, 180, thus including the seven PCBs that are measured in the national monitoring program, in addition to three monoortho and three non-ortho PCBs. Regarding the possibility of creating a model for calculating the concentrations of the planar PCBs from those of the non-planar, the results look promising for PCB-126 and PCB-169, whereas PCB-77 shows a lower correlation to the non-planar congeners.

  3. Novel methoxylated polybrominated diphenoxybenzene congeners and possible sources in herring gull eggs from the Laurentian Great Lakes of North America.

    PubMed

    Chen, Da; Letcher, Robert J; Gauthier, Lewis T; Chu, Shaogang; McCrindle, Robert; Potter, Dave

    2011-11-15

    An increasing number of brominated flame retardants and other brominated substances are being reported in herring gull eggs from the Laurentian Great Lakes basin. Yet, in extracts from gulls' eggs, numerous bromide anion response peaks in electron capture negative ion (ECNI) mass chromatograms remain unidentified. Using archived herring gull egg homogenates, we characterize the structures of three major and three minor, new and unique brominated substances. After extensive cleanup and separation to isolate these substances from the extracts, high-quality ECNI and electron impact (EI) mass spectra revealed fragmentation patterns consistent with congeners of methoxylated polybrominated diphenoxybenzene (MeO-PBDPB), where four congeners contained five bromines and the other two contain four and six bromines, respectively. Optimized, semiquantitative analysis revealed sum concentrations of the MeO-PBDBP congeners ranged from <0.2 to 36.8 ng/g ww in pooled egg homogenates (collected in 2009) from fourteen herring gull colony sites across the Great Lakes, with the highest concentration being for Channel-Shelter Island in Saginaw Bay (Lake Huron). To our knowledge, there are no published reports on the environmental presence and sources of MeO-PBDPBs. We hypothesize that these MeO-PBDPBs are degradation products of the polybrominated diphenoxybenzenes, for example, tetradecabromodiphenoxybenzene (currently marketed as SAYTEX 120) or polybromo 3P2E. MeO-PBDPBs in Great Lakes herring gull eggs indicates their bioaccumulation potential, and raises concerns about their origin, environmental behavior and influences on wildlife and environmental health.

  4. Effects of body size, condition, and lipid content on the survival of juvenile lake herring during rapid cooling events

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pangle, K.L.; Sutton, T.M.; Kinnunen, R.E.; Hoff, M.H.

    2005-01-01

    Juvenile lake herring Coregonus artedi were exposed to rapid cooling events during two laboratory experiments to determine the effects of body size, physiological condition, and lipid content on survival. The first experiment was conducted at the onset of winter, exposing small (50 to 85 mm) and large (85 to 129 mm) fish to a decline in water temperature from 12 to 2??C at a rate of 1??C/hr. During this experiment, both large and small individuals exposed to a rapid cooling event experienced no mortality or abnormal behaviors. Separate fish were then maintained under thermal and photoperiod regimes that mimicked those in Lake Superior from October through May. Fish in each size class were maintained at two feeding treatments: Artemia ad libitum and no food. At the completion of the winter period, these lake herring were subjected to the same rapid cooling event conducted in the first experiment. During the experiment, lake herring exhibited no mortality or abnormal behaviors despite treatment-dependent differences in condition and lipid content. Our results indicate that mortality due to rapid cooling events does not appear to contribute to the recruitment variability observed for juvenile lake herring in Lake Superior.

  5. Investigations on the Interactions of 5-Fluorouracil with Herring Sperm DNA: Steady State/Time Resolved and Molecular Modeling Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinnathambi, Shanmugavel; Karthikeyan, Subramani; Velmurugan, Devadasan; Hanagata, Nobutaka; Aruna, Prakasarao; Ganesan, Singaravelu

    2015-04-01

    In the present study, the interaction of 5-Fluorouracil with herring sperm DNA is reported using spectroscopic and molecular modeling techniques. This binding study of 5-FU with hs-DNA is of paramount importance in understanding chemico-biological interactions for drug design, pharmacy and biochemistry without altering the original structure. The challenge of the study was to find the exact binding mode of the drug 5-Fluorouracil with hs-DNA. From the absorption studies, a hyperchromic effect was observed for the herring sperm DNA in the presence of 5-Fluorouracil and a binding constant of 6.153 × 103 M-1 for 5-Fluorouracil reveals the existence of weak interaction between the 5-Fluorouracil and herring sperm DNA. Ethidium bromide loaded herring sperm DNA showed a quenching in the fluorescence intensity after the addition of 5-Fluorouracil. The binding constants for 5-Fluorouracil stranded DNA and competitive bindings of 5-FU interacting with DNA-EB systems were examined by fluorescence spectra. The Stern-Volmer plots and fluorescence lifetime results confirm the static quenching nature of the drug-DNA complex. The binding constant Kb was 2.5 × 104 L mol-1 and the number of binding sites are 1.17. The 5-FU on DNA system was calculated using double logarithmic plot. From the Forster nonradiative energy transfer study it has been found that the distance of 5-FU from DNA was 4.24 nm. In addition to the spectroscopic results, the molecular modeling studies also revealed the major groove binding as well as the partial intercalation mode of binding between the 5-Fluorouracil and herring sperm DNA. The binding energy and major groove binding as -6.04 kcal mol-1 and -6.31 kcal mol-1 were calculated from the modeling studies. All the testimonies manifested that binding modes between 5-Fluorouracil and DNA were evidenced to be groove binding and in partial intercalative mode.

  6. Effects of environmental exposure and diet on levels of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in eggs of a top predator in the North Atlantic in 1980 and 2008.

    PubMed

    Leat, Eliza H K; Bourgeon, Sophie; Borgå, Katrine; Strøm, Hallvard; Hanssen, Sveinn A; Gabrielsen, Geir W; Petersen, Aevar; Olafsdottir, Kristin; Magnusdottir, Ellen; Fisk, Aaron T; Ellis, Sandra; Bustnes, Jan O; Furness, Robert W

    2011-05-01

    Concentrations of POPs in Great skua eggs from Shetland are among the highest in North Atlantic seabirds, with up to 11,600 μg/kg (ww) DDE and up to 17,900 μg/kg ww ∑PCB. Concentrations of legacy POPs were significantly lower in 2008 than 1980. Decreases were greatest for least persistent compounds. Median ∑PBDEs increased from 99 μg/kg ww in 1980 to 173 μg/kg ww in 2008. There were changes in Great skua breeding season diet, with more adult Herring and Mackerel and less Sandeel. These changes increase exposure to POPs, since Herring and Mackerel accumulate more POPs than Sandeels. In both years, eggs with higher δ15N had higher POP concentrations. In 1980, birds feeding more on demersal discard fish from trawl fisheries and less on Sandeels, had higher POP levels in eggs. In 2008, individuals feeding more on Herring and Mackerel, and less on discards, had higher POP levels in eggs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Characterization of AhR agonists reveals antagonistic activity in European herring gull (Larus argentatus) eggs.

    PubMed

    Muusse, Martine; Christensen, Guttorm; Gomes, Tânia; Kočan, Anton; Langford, Katherine; Tollefsen, Knut Erik; Vaňková, Lenka; Thomas, Kevin V

    2015-05-01

    European herring gull (Larus argentatus) eggs from two Norwegian islands, Musvær in the south east and Reiaren in Northern Norway, were screened for dioxins, furans, and dioxin-like and selected non-dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and subjected to non-target analysis to try to identify the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonists, responsible for elevated levels measured using the dioxin responsive chemically activated luciferase expression (DR-CALUX) assay. Eggs from Musvær contained chemically calculated toxic equivalent (WHO TEQ) levels of between 109 and 483 pg TEQ/g lw, and between 82 and 337 pg TEQ/g lw was determined in eggs from Reiaren. In particular PCB126 contributed highly to the total TEQ (69-82%). In 19 of the 23 samples the calculated WHO TEQ was higher than the TEQCALUX. Using CALUX specific relative effect potencies (REPs), the levels were lower at between 77 and 292 pg/g lw in eggs from Musvær and between 55 and 223 pg/g lw in eggs from Reiaren, which was higher than the TEQCALUX in 16 of the 23 samples. However, the means of the REP values and the TEQCALUX were not significantly different. This suggests the presence of compounds that can elicit antagonist effects, with a low binding affinity to the AhR. Non-target analysis identified the presence of hexachlorobenzene (HCB) (quantified at 9.6-185 pg/g lw) but neither this compound nor high concentrations of PCB126 and non-dioxin-like PCBs could explain the differences between the calculated TEQ or REP values and the TEQCALUX. Even though, for most AhR agonists, the sensitivity of herring gulls is not known, the reported levels can be considered to represent a risk for biological effects in the developing embryo, compared to LC50 values in chicken embryos. For human consumers of herring gull eggs, these eggs contain TEQ levels up to four times higher than the maximum tolerable weekly intake. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. 75 FR 11129 - Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council; Atlantic Mackerel, Butterfish, Atlantic Bluefish, Spiny...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-10

    ...; Atlantic Mackerel, Butterfish, Atlantic Bluefish, Spiny Dogfish, Summer Flounder, Scup, Black Sea Bass... Atlantic mackerel, butterfish, Atlantic bluefish, spiny dogfish, summer flounder, scup, black sea bass... Council has been in the process of developing an Omnibus Amendment to the FMPs for Atlantic...

  9. Herring and Beef Meals Lead to Differences in Plasma 2-Aminoadipic Acid, β-Alanine, 4-Hydroxyproline, Cetoleic Acid, and Docosahexaenoic Acid Concentrations in Overweight Men.

    PubMed

    Ross, Alastair B; Svelander, Cecilia; Undeland, Ingrid; Pinto, Rui; Sandberg, Ann-Sofie

    2015-11-01

    Dietary guidelines generally recommend increasing fish intake and reducing red meat intake for better long-term health. Few studies have compared the metabolic differences between eating meat and fish. The objective of this study was to determine whether there are differences in the postprandial plasma metabolic response to meals containing baked beef, baked herring, and pickled herring. Seventeen overweight men (BMI 25-30 kg/m(2), 41-67 y of age) were included in a randomized crossover intervention study. Subjects ate baked herring-, pickled herring-, and baked beef-based meals in a randomized order and postprandial blood plasma samples were taken over 7 h. Plasma metabolomics were measured with the use of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and areas under the curve for detected metabolites were compared between meals. The plasma postprandial response of 2-aminoadipic acid, a suggested marker of diabetes risk, was 1.6 times higher after the beef meal than after the baked herring meal (P < 0.001). Plasma β-alanine and 4-hydroxyproline both were markedly greater after beef intake than after herring intake (16 and 3.4 times the response of baked herring, respectively; P < 0.001). Herring intake led to a greater plasma postprandial response from docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and cetoleic acid compared with beef (17.6 and 150 times greater, respectively; P < 0.001), whereas hippuric acid and benzoic acid were elevated after pickled herring compared with baked herring (5.4 and 43 times higher; P < 0.001). These results in overweight men confirm that DHA and cetoleic acid reflect herring intake, whereas β-alanine and 4-hydroxyproline are potential biomarkers for beef intake. The greater postprandial rise in 2-aminoadipic acid after the beef meal, coupled to its proposed role in stimulating insulin secretion, may have importance in the context of red meat intake and increased diabetes risk. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT02381613. © 2015 American

  10. Parasites of lake herring (Coregonus artedi) from Lake Superior, with special reference to use of parasites as markers of stock structure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoff, Michael H.; Pronin, Nikolai M.; Baldanova, Darima R.

    1997-01-01

    We examined parasites of 152 lake herring (Coregonus artedi) collected from three locations in Wisconsin waters of Lake Superior in 1994, four locations in Wisconsin waters in 1996, and one location in Minnesota waters in 1996 to determine; 1) the species composition and relative abundances of parasites in lake herring, 2) the differences in parasite relative abundances across locations sampled, and 3) the utility of parasite relative abundances as markers of stock structure. Parasites from 19 taxa infected lake herring collected in 1994 and 1996; Henneguya zschokkei, Chloromyxumsp., and Cyatho-cephalus truncatus were reported in fishes from Lake Superior for the first time, and Clinostomum mar-ginatum was reported in lake herring for the first time. Significant differences in abundances of eight parasite taxa were found across locations sampled in 1996, with most of the differences occurring between fish from Minnesota and Wisconsin waters. Nonparametric discriminant function analyses correctly classified 105 of the 108 fish (97%) from Wisconsin waters in 1994 and 1996 and also correctly classified 9 of the 13 fish (69%) from the one location in Minnesota waters. This indicated that little mixing of lake herring from those regions occurred and that the potential exists to use parasite abundances as a marker of lake herring stock structure. This was the first time that multivariate analysis of parasites have been used in the Great Lakes to assess stock structure of fishes. Because the technique was highly successful at classifying locations of our samples, we recommend that parasite abundances in lake herring from all areas of the lake be analyzed as part of a larger study to determine whether lake herring from populations throughout the lake can be as accurately classified as were fish in our study.

  11. The influence of predation by herring gulls Larus argentatus and oystercatchers Haematopus ostralegus on a newly established mussel Mytilus edulis bed in autumn and winter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilgerloh, G.; Herlyn, M.; Michaelis, H.

    1997-08-01

    Predation by herring gulls Larus argentatus and oystercatchers Haematopus ostralegus was evaluated on a newly established mussel Mytilus edulis bed on tidal flats of the German Wadden Sea. The mussel bed covered an area of 2 ha and showed a decrease in biomass of 40% in the most densely covered parts from August to January. Synchronously, the extent of the mussel bed was reduced, resulting in a decrease of average biomass of 98% over the whole mussel bed. From the beginning of August 1994 to mid January 1995, the average size of mussels increased from 10.7 to 20.3 mm. The P/B-ratio was 0.68 in August and 0.18 between September and November. Herring gulls and oystercatchers were the most important mussel predators. On average, 266 herring gulls and 63 oystercatchers were present on the mussel bed during one low tide; 34% of the herring gulls and 78% of the oystercatchers were observed to be feeding. Herring gulls fed at a rate of 4.2 mussels per minute and oystercatchers at a rate of 1.3 mussels per minute. While herring gulls took the most common mussel sizes (mean: 20 mm), oystercatchers searched for the largest mussels available (mean: 25 mm). Herring gulls consumed 13 mussels/m2 (0.3g AFDW) during one day and oystercatchers 1.7 mussels/m2 (0.1 g AFDW). Predation by birds was compensated by 33% of the production. The proportion removed by bird predation amounted to 10% of abundance and to 16% of biomass (including production). Oystercatchers were responsible for 1% of the reduction in abundance and for 3% of biomass. Removal was highest in the most common size classes of mussels, mainly caused by herring gulls. However, the highest proportion of mussels was eaten in the largest size classes, mainly by oystercatchers. *** DIRECT SUPPORT *** A03B6035 00004

  12. Archaeological Study of CA-VEN-110, Ventura, California: Fish Remains. Supplement,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-08-01

    diamond stingray X Myliobatis californica bat ray x X X X Cluvea harengus Pacific herring X Sardinov s agax Pacific sardine X X X Opshnm p thread herring X...bonefish 5 0.06 Sebastes elongatus green striped rockfish 4 0.05 * Clupea harenaus Pacific herring 3 0.04 *AmDhisticus araenteus barred surfpe:ch 3

  13. Stability of residual levels of polychlorinated biphenyls in cold-extracted herring oil

    SciTech Connect

    Musial, C.J. ); Uthe, J.F. )

    1988-06-01

    The measurement of residual concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) in a variety of foodstuffs and other biological materials has been characterized by a large (up to 50%) interlaboratory variation (bias). An interlaboratory coefficient of variation of 14% was reported for a study in which exact methodological details and quantitative standard solutions were supplied to participants who were asked to determine the levels of a suite of six chlorobiphenyls (CB) present at trace levels in eel fat. Following the completion of the earlier study, remaining vials of fortified (approximately 1 mg Aroclor 1,254/kg herring oil) and control oils were stored and analyzed sporadically to determine if any changes in measured PCB concentrations in the oils resulted from changes in PCB and the oil during storage of approximately eight years.

  14. Organochlorines and heavy metals in Herring Gull (Larus argentatus) eggs and chicks from the same clutch

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, P.H. ); Sperveslage, H. )

    1989-05-01

    In an earlier paper the authors investigated the intraclutch variability in levels of toxic pollutants and compared this contamination with that of the female Herring Gull (Larus argentatus) after production of the clutch in question. In the present study, they examine the concentrations of contaminants in chicks as compared with one egg of the same clutch. Such studies are important with regard to the question as to which ontogenetic stage is most endangered by toxic pollutants. Some investigations concerning this problem have already been carried out, but they don't refer to samples taken from the same clutches. Chicks receive contaminants mainly from two sources: from the egg, which reflects directly the contamination of the breeding female as well as from the food. Moreover the concentrations of pollutants in chicks vary with growth-dependent body distribution and with a decline of the lipid content.

  15. Interaction of drug based copper(II) complexes with Herring Sperm DNA and their biological activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Mohan N.; Patel, Chintan R.; Joshi, Hardik N.

    2012-11-01

    Square pyramidal Cu(II) complexes with NS donor ligand and ciprofloxacin have been synthesized and characterized using analytical and spectral techniques. The synthesized complexes have been tested for their antimicrobial activity using double dilution technique in terms of minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and colony forming unit (CFU). The DNA binding ability of the complexes with Sperm Herring DNA has been performed using absorption titration and viscosity measurement. The nuclease activity of complexes with plasmid DNA (pUC19) has been carried out using agarose gel electrophoresis technique. Synthesized complexes have been tested for their SOD mimic activity using NBT/NADH/PMS system. The cytotoxic properties of metal complexes have been evaluated using brine shrimp lethality bioassay.

  16. Modelling the growth of herring from four different stocks in the North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heath, M.; Scott, B.; Bryant, A. D.

    1997-12-01

    Variations in growth of the 1961-1983 year classes of North Sea herring larvae and juveniles from four different stocks in the North Sea have been modelled in a two-stage process. First, the ERSEM transport model and a database of temperature conditions in the North Sea have been used to simulate the year-specific dispersal and timing of recruitment of larvae to a model of juvenile growth. The juvenile model was forced by temperature and continuous plankton recorder (CPR) data, and migration was modelled from survey data on the relative distribution of stock components in the North Sea. The model explains the observed differences in mean growth from hatching to 1.5 years old of herring of different stock origins over the period 1970-1981, and therefore it has been concluded that the growth differences are generated mainly by the hydrographic conditions and plankton abundance along the drift trajectory of the larvae and migration route of the early juveniles. Comparison of the time series of modelled size-at-age for juveniles from the Shetland stock with observations for the same period shows that the model explains short-term year-to-year variability in growth, correctly identifying extreme years, but fails to explain the longer-term underlying trends. The model performed best over the period 1970-1981 when population biomass was uniformly low, and deviated during 1961-1969 when biomass was declining from high levels. The inclusion of population biomass as an independent explanatory variable in the comparison of model results with the longer-term data accounts for up to 58% of the total variance in the observations. Thus, it is concluded that hydrographic and planktonic conditions in the North Sea account for the short-term year-to-year variability in growth, but the major underlying trends over the last 40 years are due primarily to density dependence.

  17. 3. VIEW LOOKING NORTH WEST OVER CENTRAL ATLANTIC WITH ATLANTIC ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW LOOKING NORTH WEST OVER CENTRAL ATLANTIC WITH ATLANTIC OCEAN IN THE FOREGROUND. DENNIS HOTEL, BLENHEIM HOTEL, AND MARLBOROUGH HOTEL (LEFT TO RIGHT) ARE LOCATED IN THE CENTER OF THE PHOTOGRAPH. THE CLARIDGE HOTEL IS THE HIGHRISE IMMEDIATELY TO THE RIGHT OF THE MARLBOROUGH HOTEL - Marlborough, Blenheim & Dennis Hotels (aerial views), Between Park Place, Michigan Avenue & Boardwalk, Atlantic City, Atlantic County, NJ

  18. Hepatic EROD activity is not a useful biomarker of polychlorinated biphenyl exposure in the adult herring gull (Larus argentatus).

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Sean W; Fox, Glen A; Jones, Stephanie P; Trudeau, Suzanne F

    2003-01-01

    Liver concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and chicken embryo hepatocyte (CEH) bioassay-derived 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin equivalents (TCDD-EQs) were measured in livers of adult herring gulls (Larus argentatus) collected from several locations on the Great Lakes and two reference sites. Total PCB concentrations (sum of 42 congeners) and TCDD-EQ concentrations were compared with hepatic ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) activity, methoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (MROD) activity and immunodetectable cytochrome P4501A (CYP1A) protein concentration. EROD and MROD activity were not significantly correlated with total PCB concentration or TCDD-EQ concentration in liver tissue. CYP1A protein concentration was significantly correlated with total PCB concentration, but the linear relationship had little predictive power. We conclude that EROD is not a useful biomarker of PCB exposure in the adult herring gull.

  19. Introgressive hybridization and the evolutionary history of the herring gull complex revealed by mitochondrial and nuclear DNA

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Based on extensive mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence data, we previously showed that the model of speciation among species of herring gull (Larus argentatus) complex was not that of a ring species, but most likely due more complex speciation scenario's. We also found that two species, herring gull and glaucous gull (L. hyperboreus) displayed an unexpected biphyletic distribution of their mtDNA haplotypes. It was evident that mtDNA sequence data alone were far from sufficient to obtain a more accurate and detailed insight into the demographic processes that underlie speciation of this complex, and that extensive autosomal genetic analysis was warranted. Results For this reason, the present study focuses on the reconstruction of the phylogeographic history of a limited number of gull species by means of a combined approach of mtDNA sequence data and 230 autosomal amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) loci. At the species level, the mtDNA and AFLP genetic data were largely congruent. Not only for argentatus and hyperboreus, but also among a third species, great black-backed gull (L. marinus) we observed two distinct groups of mtDNA sequence haplotypes. Based on the AFLP data we were also able to detect distinct genetic subgroups among the various argentatus, hyperboreus, and marinus populations, supporting our initial hypothesis that complex demographic scenario's underlie speciation in the herring gull complex. Conclusions We present evidence that for each of these three biphyletic gull species, extensive mtDNA introgression could have taken place among the various geographically distinct subpopulations, or even among current species. Moreover, based on a large number of autosomal AFLP loci, we found evidence for distinct and complex demographic scenario's for each of the three species we studied. A more refined insight into the exact phylogeographic history within the herring gull complex is still impossible, and requires detailed autosomal

  20. Mercury levels in herring gulls and fish: 42 years of spatio-temporal trends in the Great Lakes.

    PubMed

    Blukacz-Richards, E Agnes; Visha, Ariola; Graham, Matthew L; McGoldrick, Daryl L; de Solla, Shane R; Moore, David J; Arhonditsis, George B

    2017-04-01

    Total mercury levels in aquatic birds and fish communities have been monitored across the Canadian Great Lakes by Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) for the past 42 years (1974-2015). These data (22 sites) were used to examine spatio-temporal variability of mercury levels in herring gull (Larus argentatus) eggs, lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush), walleye (Sander vitreus), and rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax). Trends were quantified with dynamic linear models, which provided time-variant rates of change of mercury concentrations. Lipid content (in both fish and eggs) and length in fish were used as covariates in all models. For the first three decades, mercury levels in gull eggs and fish declined at all stations. In the 2000s, trends for herring gull eggs reversed at two sites in Lake Erie and two sites in Lake Ontario. Similar trend reversals in the 2000s were observed for lake trout in Lake Superior and at a single station in Lake Ontario. Mercury levels in lake trout continued to slowly decline at all of the remaining stations, except for Lake Huron, where the levels remained stable. A post-hoc Bayesian regression analysis suggests strong trophic interactions between herring gulls and rainbow smelt in Lake Superior and Lake Ontario, but also pinpoints the likelihood of a trophic decoupling in Lake Huron and Lake Erie. Continued monitoring of mercury levels in herring gulls and fish is required to consolidate these trophic shifts and further evaluate their broader implications. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Artificial transmission to and susceptibility of Puget Sound fish to viral erythrocytic necrosis (VEN)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    MacMillian, John R.; Mulcahy, Dan

    1979-01-01

    In Puget Sound, Wash., the incidence of viral erythrocytic necrosis (VEN) varied geographically from 0 to 17% in chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta) and from 4 to 59% in Pacific herring (Clupea harengus pallasi). The disease was experimentally transmitted by intraperitoneal injection to chum, pink (O. gorbuscha), coho (O. kisutch), chinook (O. tshawytscha), sockeye (O. nerka), and Atlantic (Salmo salar) salmon, and rainbow (S. gairdneri), brown (S. trutta), and brook (Salvelinus fontinalis) trout. The disease was transmitted to chum salmon and brook trout by waterborne virus. Virus obtained from herring was experimentally transmitted into chum salmon by intraperitoneal injection. Key words: viral erythrocytic necrosis, fish disease, transmission

  2. The reproductive success of lake herring in habitats near shipping channels and ice-breaking operations in the St. Marys River, Michigan, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blouin, Marc A.; Kostich, M.M.; Todd, T.N.; Savino, J.F.

    1998-01-01

    A study of the reproductive success of lake herring (Coregonus artedi) in the St. Marys River was conducted in the winters and springs of 1994, 1995, and 1996. The St. Marys River connects Lake Superior to the lower Great Lakes making it an important route for ship traffic. Recent pressure by commercial carriers to extend the shipping season by breaking ice earlier in spring, has raised concerns over the possible adverse effects on lake herring reproduction in the river caused by increased turbidity associated with vessel passage. Lake herring spawn in fall and their eggs overwinter under ice cover on the bottom of the St. Marys River. Hatching occurs in the spring after ice-out when water temperatures rise. Specialized incubators were used to hold fertilized lake herring eggs at four experimental sites, chosen to represent the range of various bottom substrate types of the St. Marys River from boulder rock reefs to soft sediments. In winter, incubators were placed under the ice on the bottom of the river at three sites each year. After ice-out, sites were relocated, and the incubators were retrieved and opened to determine the number of live and dead lake herring eggs and larvae. Survival was consistent from year to year at each site with the lowest survival percentage found at the site with the softest sediments, directly adjacent to the St. Marys River channel and downstream of the mouth of the Charlotte River. River bottom type and geographic location were the most important factors in determining egg survival. Sampling for indigenous larval lake herring was done throughout the spring hatching season in the areas adjacent to the incubator sites using nets and a diver-operated suction sampler. Result indicate that a small population (3) of larval lake herring was present throughout the sampling areas during the springs of 1994, 1995, and 1996 in the St. Marys River.

  3. Leuconostoc gelidum and Leuconostoc gasicomitatum strains dominated the lactic acid bacterium population associated with strong slime formation in an acetic-acid herring preserve.

    PubMed

    Lyhs, Ulrike; Koort, Joanna M K; Lundström, Hanna-Saara; Björkroth, K Johanna

    2004-01-15

    Spoilage characterised by strong slime and gas formation affected some manufacture lots of an acetic-acid Baltic herring (Culpea haerengus membras) preserve after few weeks of storage at 0-6 degrees C. The product consisted of herring filets in acetic acid marinade containing sugar, salt, allspice and carrot slices. Microbiological analyses of the spoiled product showed high lactic acid bacterium (LAB) levels ranging from 4.5x10(8) to 2.4x10(9) CFU/g. Yeasts were not detected in any of the herring samples. Since LAB contaminants are seldom associated with fresh fish, LAB populations associated with marinade ingredients (carrots, allspice) were also analyzed. The highest LAB levels exceeding 10(7) CFU/g were detected in equilibrium modified atmosphere packaged baby carrots whereas the levels detected in the allspice samples did not exceed 4.3x10(5). A total of 176 randomly selected LAB isolates originating from herring, carrot and allspice samples were further identified to species level using a 16 and 23S rRNA gene RFLP (ribotyping) database. Leuconostoc gelidum and Leuconostoc gasicomitatum strains dominated both in the spoiled herring and carrot samples. These species are heterofermentative-producing CO(2) from glucose and they also produce dextran from sucrose. Inoculation of some commercial-herring products with spoilage-associated L. gelidum and L. gasicomitatum strains verified that these strains have the capability of producing slime and gas in herring preserves although slime formation was not as strong as in the original samples. Since L. gelidum and L. gasicomitatum strains were commonly detected in carrots, carrot slices used for the fish marinade were considered to be the probable source of these specific spoilage organisms.

  4. Circum-Atlantic Project

    SciTech Connect

    Teleki, P.; Edgar, T. )

    1990-06-01

    Inspired by the success and value of the maps prepared by the Circum-Pacific Council for Energy and Mineral Resources, the International Union of Geological Sciences (IUGS) initiated the Circum-Atlantic Project (CAP) in 1987. The project is co-sponsored by the Commission for the Geological Map of the World (CGMW). Objectives of CAP are to help organize, coordinate, and stimulate the compilation and interpretation of geological, geophysical, and resources data for the Atlantic Ocean basin and adjacent continental areas and to publish these data in an integrated map series. Four regional working groups, one each for the eastern North Atlantic, western North Atlantic, eastern South Atlantic, and western South Atlantic areas have been organized, and within each of these groups specialty teams are being established to compile and interpret various types of geologic data. Based on a digital compilation of these data, a series of geologic thematic maps are planned to be prepared and displayed on a single sheet, at a scale of 1:17,000,000, for the entire Atlantic basin, and on four quadrant sheets, at a scale of 1:10,000,000. The quadrants correspond to the North-, Tethyan-, Central-, and South-Atlantic areas. The thematic series will consist of bathymetric, geologic, tectonic, magnetic, gravity, and mineral and energy resource maps. In addition, several palinspastic maps are planned to be constructed to display the geologic development of the Atlantic basin at eight geologic time periods. Transects will accompany all maps. The CAP plans support pilot projects that fit the scope and objectives of this undertaking.

  5. A new compilation of stomach content data for commercially-important pelagic fish species in the Northeast Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinnegar, J. K.; Goñi, N.; Trenkel, V. M.; Arrizabalaga, H.; Melle, W.; Keating, J.; Óskarsson, G.

    2014-04-01

    There is increasing demand for information on predator-prey interactions in the ocean as a result of legislative commitments aimed at achieving sustainable exploitation. However, comprehensive datasets are lacking for many fish species and this has hampered development of multispecies fisheries models and the formulation of effective food-web indicators. This work describes a new compilation of stomach content data for five pelagic fish species (herring, blue whiting, mackerel, albacore and bluefin tuna) sampled across the northeast Atlantic and submitted to the PANGAEA open-access data portal (www.pangaea.de). We provide detailed descriptions of sample origin and of the corresponding database structures. We describe the main results in terms of diet composition and predator-prey relationships. The feeding preferences of small pelagic fish (herring, blue whiting, mackerel) were sampled over a very broad geographic area within the North Atlantic basin, from Greenland in the west, to the Lofoten Islands in the east and from the Bay of Biscay northwards to the Arctic. This analysis revealed significant differences in the prey items selected in different parts of the region at different times of year. Tunas (albacore and bluefin) were sampled in the Bay of Biscay and Celtic Sea. Dominant prey items for these species varied by location, year and season. This data compilation exercise represents one of the largest and most wide-ranging ever attempted for pelagic fish in the north Atlantic. The earliest data included in the database were collected in 1864, whereas the most recent were collected in 2012.Datasets are available at doi:10.1594/PANGAEA.820041 and doi:10.1594/PANGAEA.826992.

  6. A new compilation of stomach content data for commercially important pelagic fish species in the northeast Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinnegar, J. K.; Goñi, N.; Trenkel, V. M.; Arrizabalaga, H.; Melle, W.; Keating, J.; Óskarsson, G.

    2015-02-01

    There is increasing demand for information on predator-prey interactions in the ocean as a result of legislative commitments aimed at achieving sustainable exploitation. However, comprehensive data sets are lacking for many fish species and this has hampered development of multispecies fisheries models and the formulation of effective food-web indicators. This work describes a new compilation of stomach content data for five pelagic fish species (herring, blue whiting, mackerel, albacore and bluefin tuna) sampled across the northeast Atlantic and submitted to the PANGAEA open-access data portal (www.pangaea.de). We provide detailed descriptions of sample origin and of the corresponding database structures. We describe the main results in terms of diet composition and predator-prey relationships. The feeding preferences of small pelagic fish (herring, blue whiting, mackerel) were sampled over a very broad geographic area within the North Atlantic basin, from Greenland in the west, to the Lofoten Islands in the east and from the Bay of Biscay northwards to the Arctic. This analysis revealed significant differences in the prey items selected in different parts of the region at different times of year. Tunas (albacore and bluefin) were sampled in the Bay of Biscay and Celtic Sea. Dominant prey items for these species varied by location, year and season. This data compilation exercise represents one of the largest and most wide-ranging ever attempted for pelagic fish in the North Atlantic. The earliest data included in the database were collected in 1864, whereas the most recent were collected in 2012. Data sets are available at doi:10.1594/PANGAEA.820041 and doi:10.1594/PANGAEA.826992.

  7. Tectonics of Atlantic Canada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, H.; Dehler, S.A.; Grant, A.C.; Oakey, G.N.

    1999-01-01

    The tectonic history of Atlantic Canada is summarized according to a model of multiple ocean opening-closing cycles. The modern North Atlantic Ocean is in the opening phase of its cycle. It was preceded by an early Paleozoic lapetus Ocean whose cycle led to formation of the Appalachian Orogen. lapetus was preceded by the Neoproterozoic Uranus Ocean whose cycle led to formation of the Grenville Orogen. The phenomenon of coincident, or almost coincident orogens and modern continental margins that relate to repeated ocean opening-closing cycles is called the Accordion Effect. An understanding of the North Atlantic Ocean and its continental margins provides insights into the nature of lapetus and the evolution of the Appalachian Orogen. Likewise, an understanding of lapetus and the Appalachian Orogen raises questions about Uranus and the development of the Grenville Orogen. Modern tectonic patterns in the North Atlantic may have been determined by events that began before 1000 m.y.

  8. South Atlantic interbasin exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rintoul, Stephen Rich

    1991-01-01

    The exchange of mass and heat between the South Atlantic and the neighboring ocean basins was estimated using hydrographic data and inverse methods, in order to gain information on the links between the deep-water formation processes occurring within the Atlantic and the global thermohaline circulation. Results demonstrate that the global thermohaline cell associated with the formation and export of North Atlantic deep water (NADW) is closed primarily by a 'cold water path' in which deep water leaving the Atlantic ultimately returns as intermediate water entering the basin through Drake Passage. This conclusion conflicts with the suggestion by Gordon (1986) that the global thermohaline circulation associated with the formation of NADW is closed primarily by a 'warm water path', in which the export of NADW is compensated by an inflow of warm Indian Ocean thermocline water south of Africa.

  9. South Atlantic interbasin exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rintoul, Stephen Rich

    1991-01-01

    The exchange of mass and heat between the South Atlantic and the neighboring ocean basins was estimated using hydrographic data and inverse methods, in order to gain information on the links between the deep-water formation processes occurring within the Atlantic and the global thermohaline circulation. Results demonstrate that the global thermohaline cell associated with the formation and export of North Atlantic deep water (NADW) is closed primarily by a 'cold water path' in which deep water leaving the Atlantic ultimately returns as intermediate water entering the basin through Drake Passage. This conclusion conflicts with the suggestion by Gordon (1986) that the global thermohaline circulation associated with the formation of NADW is closed primarily by a 'warm water path', in which the export of NADW is compensated by an inflow of warm Indian Ocean thermocline water south of Africa.

  10. Genetic differentiation among North Atlantic killer whale populations.

    PubMed

    Foote, Andrew D; Vilstrup, Julia T; De Stephanis, Renaud; Verborgh, Philippe; Abel Nielsen, Sandra C; Deaville, Robert; Kleivane, Lars; Martín, Vidal; Miller, Patrick J O; Oien, Nils; Pérez-Gil, Monica; Rasmussen, Morten; Reid, Robert J; Robertson, Kelly M; Rogan, Emer; Similä, Tiu; Tejedor, Maria L; Vester, Heike; Víkingsson, Gísli A; Willerslev, Eske; Gilbert, M Thomas P; Piertney, Stuart B

    2011-02-01

    Population genetic structure of North Atlantic killer whale samples was resolved from differences in allele frequencies of 17 microsatellite loci, mtDNA control region haplotype frequencies and for a subset of samples, using complete mitogenome sequences. Three significantly differentiated populations were identified. Differentiation based on microsatellite allele frequencies was greater between the two allopatric populations than between the two pairs of partially sympatric populations. Spatial clustering of individuals within each of these populations overlaps with the distribution of particular prey resources: herring, mackerel and tuna, which each population has been seen predating. Phylogenetic analyses using complete mitogenomes suggested two populations could have resulted from single founding events and subsequent matrilineal expansion. The third population, which was sampled at lower latitudes and lower density, consisted of maternal lineages from three highly divergent clades. Pairwise population differentiation was greater for estimates based on mtDNA control region haplotype frequencies than for estimates based on microsatellite allele frequencies, and there were no mitogenome haplotypes shared among populations. This suggests low or no female migration and that gene flow was primarily male mediated when populations spatially and temporally overlap. These results demonstrate that genetic differentiation can arise through resource specialization in the absence of physical barriers to gene flow. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. High levels of perfluoroalkyl acids in eggs and embryo livers of great cormorant (Phalacrocorax carbo sinensis) and herring gull (Larus argentatus) from Lake Vänern, Sweden.

    PubMed

    Nordén, Marcus; Berger, Urs; Engwall, Magnus

    2013-11-01

    In the eggs and developing chick livers in the two wild bird species, great cormorant and herring gull, the concentrations of a range of 15 perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) were determined. Eggs of the two species were collected from Lake Vänern, Sweden, and analysed either as undeveloped egg (whole egg or separated into yolk and albumen) or incubated until start of the hatching process when the chick liver was removed and analysed. High levels of PFAAs were found in all matrixes except albumen. The predominant PFAA was perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), which was found in the μg/g wet weight (ww) range in some samples of cormorant whole egg, yolk and liver and herring gull egg yolk and liver. The average concentration in yolk was 1,506 ng/g ww in cormorant and 589 ng/g ww in herring gull. The average liver concentrations of PFOS were 583 ng/g ww in cormorant and 508 ng/g ww in herring gull. At these concentrations, biochemical effects in the developing embryo or effects on embryo survival cannot be ruled out. For perfluoroalkyl carboxylates (PFCAs), the liver/egg and liver/yolk concentration ratios increased with PFCA chain length in cormorant but not in herring gull, indicating that chain length could possibly affect egg-to-liver transfer of PFCAs and that species differences may exist.

  12. Comparing temporal trends of organochlorines in guillemot eggs and Baltic herring: advantages and disadvantage for selecting sentinel species for environmental monitoring.

    PubMed

    Miller, Aroha; Nyberg, Elisabeth; Danielsson, Sara; Faxneld, Suzanne; Haglund, Peter; Bignert, Anders

    2014-09-01

    Within Europe, the Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD) is aimed at addressing the chemical status and quality of the marine environment. One of the main goals is to achieve Good Environmental Status (GES) in the marine environment. Environmental monitoring of biota e.g., Baltic herring and guillemot eggs, is conducted annually in Sweden to follow temporal changes in environmental contaminants. To determine the suitability of guillemot eggs as a sentinel species for investigating GES, we compared temporal trends of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) and dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls (dl-PCBs) in these two species from single sampling sites within Sweden. Lipid content from guillemot eggs was consistently high and stable (yearly mean for >40 years, ∼12%) compared to that of herring (yearly mean for >20 years, ∼3%). A significant decreasing trend of ΣPCDD/F in TEQ WHO1998 was observed in guillemot eggs, but no trend was seen in herring. CB118 significantly decreased in both species, but in the last 10 years this decrease was not significant in herring. A number of advantages, such as high lipid content in the egg and a low coefficient of variation make guillemot suitable as a sentinel species. The advantages and disadvantages of using either guillemot eggs or Baltic herring are compared.

  13. Levels of DDT and PCB's in different stages of life cycle of the arctic tern Sterna paradisaea and the herring gull Larus argentatus

    SciTech Connect

    Lemmetyinen, R.; Rantamaki, P.; Karlin, A.

    1982-01-01

    ..sigma..DDT and PCB levels were analyzed in samples of arctic terns and herring gulls collected in the archipelago of southwestern Finland. Special attention was paid to the levels at various stages of the life cycle and in different sexes. The levels were nearly ten times higher in the herring gull. The highest loads were found in adult birds and in newly hatched chicks but the levels were much lower (only 7-12 % in the herring gull) in chicks just before fledgling. The levels in young gulls remained low until the end of August at least. Therefore it is plausible that the high levels found in adult gulls are a consequence of their wintering in the southern Baltic. The levels of ..sigma..DDT and PCB residues were significantly lower in female arctic terns than in male terns. Differences between the sexes were small in the herring gull. Thus it is possible that the female of the arctic tern is able to release pollutants, especially PCB residues, more effectively into eggs than the female of the herring gull. The biochemical mechanisms involved are not clear but a possible explanation may be different lipoprotein structures in the eggs of the species.

  14. Study on the mechanism of action between dimethyl phthalate and herring sperm DNA at molecular level.

    PubMed

    Chi, Zhenxing; Wang, Donglin; You, Hong

    2016-08-02

    Dimethyl phthalate (DMP), a typical phthalic acid ester, is widespread in the environment and causes extensive concern due to its adverse effects on human health. To understand the genotoxicity of DMP at molecular level, the toxic interaction of DMP with herring sperm (hs) deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA; hs-DNA) was investigated in vitro under simulated physiological conditions using multi-spectroscopic techniques and a molecular modeling method. The results of Ultraviolet-Visible absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence emission spectroscopy, and circular dichroism spectra indicated that DMP interacts with hs-DNA in a groove-binding mode that changes the double helical structure of DNA. The binding constant and the number of binding sites calculated from the fluorescence quenching data were 565.718 L mol(-1) and 0.7872, respectively. A molecular modeling study revealed that DMP tends to bind with DNA in the A-T-rich regions of minor groove and that hydrogen bonding and van der Waals forces play main roles in the interaction. This research can help to elucidate the mechanism of DMP toxicity in vivo.

  15. An Unusual Presentation of Gallstone Ileus: A Red-Herring or Missed Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Al-Mudares, Saif; Kurer, Mohamed; Koshy, Renol M.; El-Menyar, Ayman

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 72 Final Diagnosis: Gallstone ileus Symptoms: — Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Laparotomy Specialty: Gastroenterology and Hepatology Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Gallstone ileus is a rare complication of chronic calcular cholecystitis and an uncommon etiological entity responsible for mechanical intestinal obstruction. The most common obstructed part is the narrow terminal ileum, whereas the jejunum is rarely affected. The gallstone is postulated to reach the small bowel by gradual erosion from the gall bladder, most commonly into the duodenum, forming a cholecysto-duodenal fistula. Case Report: Herein, we report a 72-year-old male who presented with intestinal obstruction of a 5-day duration, with a clinical diagnosis of an irreducible inguinal hernia. However, the patient continued to be symptomatic following an uncomplicated hernioplasty. A computerized tomography (CT) scan of the abdomen revealed a small bowel lesion, which intra-operatively was confirmed to be an impacted gallstone in the jejunum with a cholecysto-duodenal fistula. Conclusions: Despite gallstone is uncommon cause of intestinal obstruction, a high index of suspicion with a careful CT scan interpretation is the key to the diagnosis, especially when there is a red-herring distracting the attention, like irreducible hernia in this case. PMID:27133032

  16. Effects of Invasive European Fire Ants (Myrmica rubra) on Herring Gull (Larus argentatus) Reproduction

    PubMed Central

    DeFisher, Luke E.; Bonter, David N.

    2013-01-01

    Various invasive ant species have negatively affected reproductive success in birds by disrupting nest site selection, incubation patterns, food supply, and by direct predation on nestlings. Impacts can be particularly severe when non-native ants colonize seabird nesting islands where thousands of birds may nest in high densities on the ground or in burrows or crevices. Here we report on the first documented effects of Myrmica rubra, the European fire ant, on the reproduction of birds in its non-native range. We documented herring gulls (Larus argentatus) on Appledore Island, Maine, engaging in more erratic incubation behaviors at nests infested by the ants. Newly-hatched chicks in some nests were swarmed by ants, leading to rapid chick death. Due to high overall rates of chick mortality, survival probabilities did not vary between nests with and without ant activity, however chick growth rates were slower at nests with ants than at ant-free nests. Ant infestation likely leads to longer-term fitness consequences because slower growth rates early in life may ultimately lead to lower post-fledging survival probabilities. PMID:23691168

  17. The Prince William Sound herring fishery following the Exxon Valdez oil spill of 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Hose, J.E.; Brown, E.; Marty, G.D.; McGurk, M.D.; Norcross, B.L.; Short, J.

    1995-12-31

    The Exxon Valdez oil (EVO) spill of 1989 occurred a few weeks before herring spawned in Prince William Sound (PWS), AK. An estimated 40% to 50% of the egg biomass sustained exposure during early development, and the majority of pelagic larvae were collected within the oil trajectory path. Sublethal effects observed at hatch (morphologic defects and genetic damage) were related to ambient EVO concentrations. Reduced survival rates, decreased growth, genetic damage and histopathological changes were measured in pelagic larvae from oiled areas. However, because the 1989 year class is one of the smallest cohorts now in PWS, population effects are difficult to assess. From 1990 to 1992, population abundance and reproductive potential remained high. When the 1989 year class was fully recruited (1993--1994), the spawning population decreased by 50% to 75% of the expected abundance. Many of the surviving fish were infected with viral hemorrhagic septicemia (VHS) and failed to spawn. Proposed causes for the VHS epizootic include previous oil exposure, density-dependent effects following the 1989 fishery closure, and reduced food availability from 1990 to 1994.

  18. Spectroscopic studies on the interaction between tryptophan-erbium(III) complex and herring sperm DNA.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Na; Wang, Xingming; Pan, Haizhuan; Hu, Yamin; Ding, Lisheng

    2010-05-01

    By means of UV and fluorescence spectra, the binding ratios between Er(III)-Trp and DNA in physiological pH environment (pH 7.40) were determined as n(Trp):n(Er(III))=3:1 and (n)ER(III)(Trp)(3):(n)(DNA) = 2:1, and the apparent molar absorptivity of epsilon(Er(III)-Trp-DNA) is 4.33 x 10(5) L mol(-1)cm(-1) which was confirmed by molar ratio method. The binding constants at different temperatures K(B25 degrees C)(theta)=1.93 x 10(4)L mol(-1) and K(B37 degrees C)(theta)=5.28 x 10(3)L mol(-1) were obtained by double reciprocal method. Thermodynamic function computation demonstrates that Delta(r)H(m)(theta) is the primary driving power of the interaction between Er(III)(Trp)(3) and DNA. By combination analysis of the Scatchard method and CD spectrometry, we suggested that the interaction mode between Er(III)(Trp)(3) complex and herring sperm DNA is groove and intercalation bindings.

  19. Tunneling splittings in formic acid dimer: An adiabatic approximation to the Herring formula

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Amber; Sibert, Edwin L.

    2015-02-28

    Small symmetric molecules and low-dimensional model Hamiltonians are excellent systems for benchmarking theories to compute tunneling splittings. In this work, we investigate a three dimensional model Hamiltonian coupled to a harmonic bath that describes concerted proton transfer in the formic acid dimer. The three modes include the symmetric proton stretch, the symmetric dimer rock, and the dimer stretch. These modes provide a paradigm for the symmetric and anti-symmetric coupled tunneling pathways, these being recognized in the literature as two of the more important classes of coupling. The effects of selective vibrational excitation and coupling to a bath on the tunneling splittings are presented. The splittings for highly excited states are computed using a novel method that makes an adiabatic approximation to the Herring estimate. Results, which are in excellent agreement with the exact splittings, are compared with those obtained using the Makri-Miller approach. This latter method has been shown to provide quality results for tunneling splittings including highly excited vibrational states.

  20. Supermolecules of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) complexating Herring sperm DNA with bio-multiple hydrogen bonding.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ai-Wei; Hsu, Cheng-Chen; Liu, Yi-Zu; Wei, Po-Li; Chen, Jem-Kun

    2016-12-01

    In this study we used the poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) as a medium to blend with an organic DNA, herring sperm DNA (HSD), to generate PNIPAAm-HSD supramolecular complexes. Bio-multiple hydrogen bonding (BMHB) between PNIPAAm and HSD was investigated that changed the temperature responsiveness of PNIPAAm relatively to the HSD concentrations. With blending the HSD into PNIPAAm matrix, the phase separation in solution is completely opposite from that of neat PNIPAAm. Surface property in static water contact angle (SWCA) is also opposite from that of pure PNIPAAm upon increasing HSD content over 60%. In addition, we found that the PNIPAAm and HSD self-assembled a specific triangle-like structure at a PNIPAAm-to-HSD weight ratio of 1:4 at 25°C; while the triangle-like structure disappeared with increasing temperature to 45°C. Furthermore, both PNIPAAm and HSD could be regarded as insulator, but it transformed into a semiconductive matter after blending with the HSD. Incorporation of organic DNA with hydrogel could significantly change their properties, which might facilitate their use as novel materials in bioelectronics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Structure and Evolutionary Origin of Ca2+-Dependent Herring Type II Antifreeze Protein

    SciTech Connect

    Liu,Y.; Li, Z.; Lin, Q.; Kosinski, J.; Seetharaman, J.; Bujnicki, J.; Sivaraman, J.; Hew, C.

    2007-01-01

    In order to survive under extremely cold environments, many organisms produce antifreeze proteins (AFPs). AFPs inhibit the growth of ice crystals and protect organisms from freezing damage. Fish AFPs can be classified into five distinct types based on their structures. Here we report the structure of herring AFP (hAFP), a Ca2+-dependent fish type II AFP. It exhibits a fold similar to the C-type (Ca2+-dependent) lectins with unique ice-binding features. The 1.7 Angstroms crystal structure of hAFP with bound Ca2+ and site-directed mutagenesis reveal an ice-binding site consisting of Thr96, Thr98 and Ca2+-coordinating residues Asp94 and Glu99, which initiate hAFP adsorption onto the [10-10] prism plane of the ice lattice. The hAFP-ice interaction is further strengthened by the bound Ca2+ through the coordination with a water molecule of the ice lattice. This Ca2+-coordinated ice-binding mechanism is distinct from previously proposed mechanisms for other AFPs. However, phylogenetic analysis suggests that all type II AFPs evolved from the common ancestor and developed different ice-binding modes. We clarify the evolutionary relationship of type II AFPs to sugar-binding lectins.

  2. Development of potential candidate reference materials for drugs in bottom sediment, cod and herring tissues.

    PubMed

    Baranowska, Irena; Buszewski, Bogusław; Namieśnik, Jacek; Konieczka, Piotr; Magiera, Sylwia; Polkowska-Motrenko, Halina; Kościelniak, Paweł; Gadzała-Kopciuch, Renata; Woźniakiewicz, Aneta; Samczyński, Zbigniew; Kochańska, Kinga; Rutkowska, Małgorzata

    2017-02-01

    Regular use of a reference material and participation in a proficiency testing program can improve the reliability of analytical data. This paper presents the preparation of candidate reference materials for the drugs metoprolol, propranolol, carbamazepine, naproxen, and acenocoumarol in freshwater bottom sediment and cod and herring tissues. These reference materials are not available commercially. Drugs (between 7 ng/g and 32 ng/g) were added to the samples, and the spiked samples were freeze-dried, pulverized, sieved, homogenized, bottled, and sterilized by γ-irradiation to prepare the candidate materials. Procedures for extraction and liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry were developed to determine the drugs of interest in the studied material. Each target drug was quantified using two analytical procedures, and the results obtained from these two procedures were in good agreement with each other. Stability and homogeneity assessments were performed, and the relative uncertainties due to instability (for an expiration date of 12 months) and inhomogeneity were 10-25% and 4.0-6.8%, respectively. These procedures will be useful in the future production of reference materials. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. North Atlantic Circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molinari, R.; Bryan, K.; Schott, F.

    The intensity of the North Atlantic winddriven and thermohaline circulation and the close proximity of many oceanographic installations make the North Atlantic a particularly favored region of the world ocean from the standpoint of research in ocean circulation. Recent increases in available data and advances in numerical modeling techniques served as the impetus to convene a joint workshop of modelers and observers working on the North Atlantic with the Scientific Committee on Oceanic Research (SCOR) Working Group (WG) 68 (“North Atlantic Circulation”). Goals of the workshop were to provide an update on data sets and models and to discuss the poleward heat flux problem and possible monitoring strategies. The joint Workshop/SCOR WG-68 meeting was convened by F. Schott (chairman of the working group; Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, Miami, Fla.), K. Bryan (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/ Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (NOAA/GFDL)), and R. Molinari (NOAA/Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (NOAA/AOML)).

  4. Unexpectedly high mortality in Pacific herring embryos exposed to the 2007 Cosco Busan oil spill in San Francisco Bay.

    PubMed

    Incardona, John P; Vines, Carol A; Anulacion, Bernadita F; Baldwin, David H; Day, Heather L; French, Barbara L; Labenia, Jana S; Linbo, Tiffany L; Myers, Mark S; Olson, O Paul; Sloan, Catherine A; Sol, Sean; Griffin, Frederick J; Menard, Karl; Morgan, Steven G; West, James E; Collier, Tracy K; Ylitalo, Gina M; Cherr, Gary N; Scholz, Nathaniel L

    2012-01-10

    In November 2007, the container ship Cosco Busan released 54,000 gallons of bunker fuel oil into San Francisco Bay. The accident oiled shoreline near spawning habitats for the largest population of Pacific herring on the west coast of the continental United States. We assessed the health and viability of herring embryos from oiled and unoiled locations that were either deposited by natural spawning or incubated in subtidal cages. Three months after the spill, caged embryos at oiled sites showed sublethal cardiac toxicity, as expected from exposure to oil-derived polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs). By contrast, embryos from the adjacent and shallower intertidal zone showed unexpectedly high rates of tissue necrosis and lethality unrelated to cardiotoxicity. No toxicity was observed in embryos from unoiled sites. Patterns of PACs at oiled sites were consistent with oil exposure against a background of urban sources, although tissue concentrations were lower than expected to cause lethality. Embryos sampled 2 y later from oiled sites showed modest sublethal cardiotoxicity but no elevated necrosis or mortality. Bunker oil contains the chemically uncharacterized remains of crude oil refinement, and one or more of these unidentified chemicals likely interacted with natural sunlight in the intertidal zone to kill herring embryos. This reveals an important discrepancy between the resolving power of current forensic analytical chemistry and biological responses of keystone ecological species in oiled habitats. Nevertheless, we successfully delineated the biological impacts of an oil spill in an urbanized coastal estuary with an overlapping backdrop of atmospheric, vessel, and land-based sources of PAC pollution.

  5. Current concentrations and spatial and temporal trends in mercury in Great Lakes Herring Gull eggs, 1974-2009.

    PubMed

    Weseloh, D V Chip; Moore, David J; Hebert, Craig E; de Solla, Shane R; Braune, Birgit M; McGoldrick, Daryl J

    2011-10-01

    Current concentrations and spatial and temporal trends of total mercury (Hg) were assessed in eggs of the Herring Gull (Larus argentatus) over the period 1974-2009 at 15 sites in the Great Lakes: 2-3 sites per lake and one site in each of 3 connecting channels. Current (2009) concentrations ranged from 0.064 μg/g (wet weight) at Chantry Island (Lake Huron) to 0.246 μg/g at Middle Island (Lake Erie). There were significant inter-colony differences in mean Hg concentrations (2005-2009). Mercury concentrations at 14 of 15 sites declined from 23 to 86% between when it was first measured (usually 1974) and 2009. Declining temporal trends over the entire period (1974-2009) were significant at 10 of the 15 sites. On the other hand, there were no significant trends in mercury over the last 15 years. In the early years, declines of Hg in Herring Gull eggs tracked those in Rainbow Smelt (Osmerus mordax) in most Great Lakes. More recently, declines in gull eggs were more evident than in smelt and may be partially explained by temporal changes in the gull diet. When gull Hg data were adjusted for temporal changes in the gull diet, as inferred from stable nitrogen isotope values in eggs, significant declines in egg mercury levels were found only at 4 of 15 sites. Overall, Hg concentrations have declined in Great Lakes Herring Gull eggs over the period 1974-2009 but changes in the gull diet may be contributing, in part, to those declines. Examination of contaminant temporal trends in multiple indicator species will ensure accurate inferences regarding contaminant availability in the environment.

  6. DNA fingerprinting reveals elevated mutation rates in herring gulls inhabiting a genotoxically contaminated site

    SciTech Connect

    Yauk, C.L.; Quinn, J.S.

    1995-12-31

    The authors used multi-locus DNA fingerprinting to examine families of herring gulls (Larus argentatus) from a genotoxically contaminated site (Hamilton Harbour) and from a pristine location (Kent Island, Bay of Fundy) to show significant differences in mutation rates between the locations. Overall the authors identified 17 mutant bands from 15 individuals of the 35 examined from Hamilton Harbour, and 7 mutant fragments from 7 individuals, of the 43 examined from Kent Island; a mutation frequency of 0.429 per nestling for Hamilton Harbour and 0.163 for Kent Island. The total number of individuals with mutant bands was significantly higher at Hamilton Harbour than at Kent Island (X{sup 2}=6.734; df = 1; P < 0.01). Ongoing analysis of other less contaminated sites also reveals lower mutation rates than those seen in Hamilton Harbour. With multi-locus DNA fingerprinting many regions of the genome can be surveyed simultaneously. The tandemly repeated arrays of nucleotides examined with DNA fingerprinting are known to have elevated rates of mutation. Furthermore, the mutations seen with DNA fingerprinting are predominantly heritable. Other biomarkers currently used in situ are not able to monitor direct and heritable DNA mutation, or measure biological endpoints that frequently result in spontaneous abortion creating difficulty in observing significantly elevated levels in viable offspring. The authors suggest that multilocus DNA fingerprinting can be used as a biomarker to identify potentially heritable risks before the onset of other types of ecological damage. This approach provides a direct measure of mutation in situ and in vivo in a vertebrate species under ambient conditions.

  7. [Role of layered double hydroxide (LDH) in the protection of herring testis DNA from heavy metals].

    PubMed

    Tang, Yi-Ni; Wu, Ping-Xiao; Zhu, Neng-Wu

    2012-10-01

    The role of layered double hydroxide (LDH) in the protection of herring testis DNA from heavy metals Cd2+ and Pb2+ was studied by X-ray diffraction ( XRD) spectra, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Cyclic Voltammetry and Ultraviolet Spectrometry. Size expansion of the basal spacing (003) from 0. 76 nm in LDH to 2. 30 nm was observed in the resulting DNA-LDH nanohybrids and it gave peaks corresponding to C=O (1 534 cm(-1) and 1488 cm(-1)) in skeleton and bases, C-O stretching vibration (1228 cm(-1)), and P-O symmetrical stretching vibration (1096 cm(-1)) in functional groups of DNA, indicating that DNA were intercalated into the LDH by the ion exchange. However, the displacement of NO3(-) was not fully complete (partial intercalation of DNA). The DNA outside LDH interlayers was absorbed on the surface of LDH. The cyclic voltammetric curves showed that DNA in the composites exhibited a very similar peaks, which corresponded to the two reduction current peaks (E(P) = - 1.2 mV and E(P) = -2.4 mV) of free DNA. Also there was no cathode sag emerging in cyclic voltammetric curves, suggesting that both Cd2+ and Pb2+ cannot insert into the groove of DNA to associate with base pairs or other groups when DNA was bound on LDH. The results showed that, on the one hand, both Cd2+ and Pb2+ were absorbed on the external surface of LDH for immobilization, on the other hand, the layer of LDH provided ideal space for DNA by the action of protecting DNA molecules from Cd2+ and Pb2+.

  8. Development and survival of embryos of lake herring at different constant oxygen concentrations and temperatures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brooke, L.T.; Colby, P.J.

    1980-01-01

    Eggs of lake herring (Coregonus artedii) were incubated in a continuous-flow system at four constant water temperatures (2-8°C) and five dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations (1-12 mg/L). In comparison with incubation time at 12 mg/L DO, time to median hatch was significantly longer (P<0.05) at 2 mg/L at 6°C (no hatch at 1 mg/L), at 3 mg/L or less at 4°C, and at 4 mg/L or less at 2°C. The time between hatching of the first and last eggs varied inversely with temperature. Mean total lengths of newly hatched fry were significantly shortened (P < 0.05) at 1 and 2 mg/L DO. At 6 and 8°C, percent survival through hatching was greater than at 2 and 4°C at DO of 4 mg/L or more, but fell to zero at 1 mg/L. The percentage of normal fry produced decreased noticeably below 4 mg/L DO. The optimum temperature for highest percentage survival of normal fry decreased directly with the level of dissolved oxygen. The temperatures at which the highest percentages of normal fry hatched from eggs incubated at DO concentrations of 4 or 8, 2, and 1 mg/L, were 6, 4, and 2°C, respectively-indicating a decreasing DO demand by embryos incubated at the lower temperatures. Our findings supported a previously published hypothesis that DO concentrations below 4 mg/L can be adverse to survival and development of coregonid embryos in nature.

  9. Influence of photoperiod on Orius thyestes Herring (Hemiptera: Anthocoridae) reproduction and longevity.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Alessandra R; Bueno, Vanda H P; Pedroso, Elizabeth C; Kon, Leonardo I; Diniz, Alexandre J F; Silva, Robson J

    2006-01-01

    Several species of Orius Wolff are used in biological control of thrips in protected cultivations in temperate regions, but some of them show reproductive diapause, compromising the efficiency of these agents of biological control. There are no reports on the biology of the neotropical species Orius thyestes Herring under different environmental conditions. The purpose of this work was to investigate the influence of photoperiod on reproduction and longevity of this predator. Nymphs were kept in petri dishes in climatic chambers at 28+/-1 degree C, 70+/-10% RH and under the photoperiods of 12L:12D, 11L:13D, 10 L:14D e 09L:15D. The mating adults were kept in petri dishes with Bidens pilosa L. Asteraceae inflorescences as oviposition substracts and eggs of Anagasta kuehniella (Zeller) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) as food. The pre-oviposition and oviposition periods, fecundity and longevity were evaluated and O. thyestes did not show reprodutive diapause in all photoperiod conditions established. The mean number of eggs obtained per female decreased with the reduction of the photophase, with a difference (P < 0.05) between the values obtained in 12h and 9h of photophase. Longevity of females and males under 9h photophase was shorter (P < 0.05) than in all other photoperiods tested. The knowledge of the biology of the natural enemy under different conditions allows to optimise the mass rearing and to predict the performance of the predator in different photoperiods which may occur along the year and in greenhouses.

  10. Victims or vectors: a survey of marine vertebrate zoonoses from coastal waters of the Northwest Atlantic.

    PubMed

    Bogomolni, Andrea L; Gast, Rebecca J; Ellis, Julie C; Dennett, Mark; Pugliares, Katie R; Lentell, Betty J; Moore, Michael J

    2008-08-19

    Surveillance of zoonotic pathogens in marine birds and mammals in the Northwest Atlantic revealed a diversity of zoonotic agents. We found amplicons to sequences from Brucella spp., Leptospira spp., Giardia spp. and Cryptosporidium spp. in both marine mammals and birds. Avian influenza was detected in a harp seal and a herring gull. Routine aerobic and anaerobic culture showed a broad range of bacteria resistant to multiple antibiotics. Of 1460 isolates, 797 were tested for resistance, and 468 were resistant to one or more anti-microbials. 73% (341/468) were resistant to 1-4 drugs and 27% (128/468) resistant to 5-13 drugs. The high prevalence of resistance suggests that many of these isolates could have been acquired from medical and agricultural sources and inter-microbial gene transfer. Combining birds and mammals, 45% (63/141) of stranded and 8% (2/26) of by-caught animals in this study exhibited histopathological and/or gross pathological findings associated with the presence of these pathogens. Our findings indicate that marine mammals and birds in the Northwest Atlantic are reservoirs for potentially zoonotic pathogens, which they may transmit to beachgoers, fishermen and wildlife health personnel. Conversely, zoonotic pathogens found in marine vertebrates may have been acquired via contamination of coastal waters by sewage, run-off and agricultural and medical waste. In either case these animals are not limited by political boundaries and are therefore important indicators of regional and global ocean health.

  11. GEMINI-6 - RECOVERY - ATLANTIC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1965-12-16

    S65-61824 (16 Dec. 1965) --- A helicopter hovers over the Gemini-6 spacecraft after it splashed down 12 miles from the aircraft carrier USS Wasp in the western Atlantic recovery area at 10:29 a.m. Dec. 16, 1965. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  12. [Preparative isolation of hexa-, hepta-, octa-, nona- and decapyrimidine oligonucleotides from hydrolysates of depurinated herring sperm DNA].

    PubMed

    Schott, H

    1984-02-03

    The pyrimidine oligonucleotides (dT)5; (dT)6 and the mixtures of sequence isomers (dC, dT5); (dC2, dT5); (dC3, dT4); (dC4, dT3); (dC4, dT4); (dC3, dT5); (dC2, dT6); (dC4, dT5); (dC3, dT6); (dC2, dT7); (dC5, dT5); (dC4, dT6) and (dC3, dT7) with or without terminal phosphate groups have been isolated on a preparative scale from hydrolysates of depurinated herring sperm DNA by the following procedure. Herring sperm DNA (1 kg) is chemically depurinated and partially hydrolysed to a mixture of pyrimidine nucleotides. The partial hydrolysate is first separated into a low- and a high-molecular-weight pyrimidine nucleotide mixture by column chromatography on DEAE-cellulose. The mixture of high-molecular-weight pyrimidine nucleotides is subsequently fractionated on QAE-Sephadex. Impurities which are not fully removed by column chromatography are separated by paper chromatography. The compositions of the mixtures of sequence isomers are determined from the data of column, paper and homochromatography; from absorption characteristics and by enzymatic degradation.

  13. GPS tracking data of Lesser Black-backed Gulls and Herring Gulls breeding at the southern North Sea coast.

    PubMed

    Stienen, Eric W M; Desmet, Peter; Aelterman, Bart; Courtens, Wouter; Feys, Simon; Vanermen, Nicolas; Verstraete, Hilbran; de Walle, Marc Van; Deneudt, Klaas; Hernandez, Francisco; Houthoofdt, Robin; Vanhoorne, Bart; Bouten, Willem; Buijs, Roland-Jan; Kavelaars, Marwa M; Müller, Wendt; Herman, David; Matheve, Hans; Sotillo, Alejandro; Lens, Luc

    2016-01-01

    In this data paper, Bird tracking - GPS tracking of Lesser Black-backed Gulls and Herring Gulls breeding at the southern North Sea coast is described, a species occurrence dataset published by the Research Institute for Nature and Forest (INBO). The dataset (version 5.5) contains close to 2.5 million occurrences, recorded by 101 GPS trackers mounted on 75 Lesser Black-backed Gulls and 26 Herring Gulls breeding at the Belgian and Dutch coast. The trackers were developed by the University of Amsterdam Bird Tracking System (UvA-BiTS, http://www.uva-bits.nl). These automatically record and transmit bird movements, which allows us and others to study their habitat use and migration behaviour in great detail. Our bird tracking network is operational since 2013. It is funded for LifeWatch by the Hercules Foundation and maintained in collaboration with UvA-BiTS and the Flanders Marine Institute (VLIZ). The recorded data are periodically released in bulk as open data (http://dataset.inbo.be/bird-tracking-gull-occurrences), and are also accessible through CartoDB and the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF).

  14. Interpretation of viscous deformation of Zr-based bulk metallic glass alloys based on Nabarro-Herring creep model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, Young-Sang; Lee, Jong-Hoon

    2006-04-01

    Superplastic-like viscous deformation of bulk metallic glass alloys around the glass transition temperature (Tg) was analyzed based on the Nabarro-Herring creep model, a classical creep model, where the diffusional motion of atoms or vacancies through the lattice (atomic configuration) is considered. The amorphous matrix of bulk metallic glasses that has a randomly-packed atomic configuration was assumed to behave in a manner similar to the grain boundary in polycrystalline metals so as to approximate the diffusivity of the major constituent element. In spite of rough approximation of the parameters in the Nabarro-Herring creep equation, a reasonable value of the diffusion path (d) could be obtained from the experimentally-obtained metal flow data, including the steady state stress and the strain rate. Due to the absence of vacancy sources such as grain boundaries in homogeneous metallic glasses, the diffusion path, which, in polycrystalline materials, generally is the average distance between vacancy sources such as grain boundaries, was considered in this work as the average distance between tunneling centers in bulk metallic glass alloys. The calculated diffusion path was comparable to the density of tunneling centers around Tg, proposed by M. H. Cohen and G. S. Grest based on free volume theory. The calculated diffusion path showed monotonous decrease with temperature over Tg for Zr-based bulk metallic glass alloys. Based on this analysis, a schematic model for viscous deformation of bulk metallic glass was proposed.

  15. GPS tracking data of Lesser Black-backed Gulls and Herring Gulls breeding at the southern North Sea coast

    PubMed Central

    Stienen, Eric W.M.; Desmet, Peter; Aelterman, Bart; Courtens, Wouter; Feys, Simon; Vanermen, Nicolas; Verstraete, Hilbran; de Walle, Marc Van; Deneudt, Klaas; Hernandez, Francisco; Houthoofdt, Robin; Vanhoorne, Bart; Bouten, Willem; Buijs, Roland-Jan; Kavelaars, Marwa M.; Müller, Wendt; Herman, David; Matheve, Hans; Sotillo, Alejandro; Lens, Luc

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In this data paper, Bird tracking - GPS tracking of Lesser Black-backed Gulls and Herring Gulls breeding at the southern North Sea coast is described, a species occurrence dataset published by the Research Institute for Nature and Forest (INBO). The dataset (version 5.5) contains close to 2.5 million occurrences, recorded by 101 GPS trackers mounted on 75 Lesser Black-backed Gulls and 26 Herring Gulls breeding at the Belgian and Dutch coast. The trackers were developed by the University of Amsterdam Bird Tracking System (UvA-BiTS, http://www.uva-bits.nl). These automatically record and transmit bird movements, which allows us and others to study their habitat use and migration behaviour in great detail. Our bird tracking network is operational since 2013. It is funded for LifeWatch by the Hercules Foundation and maintained in collaboration with UvA-BiTS and the Flanders Marine Institute (VLIZ). The recorded data are periodically released in bulk as open data (http://dataset.inbo.be/bird-tracking-gull-occurrences), and are also accessible through CartoDB and the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF). PMID:26877689

  16. Herring gulls and great black-backed gulls as indicators of contaminants in bald eagles in Lake Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Weseloh, D Vaughn; Hughes, Kimberly D; Ewins, Peter J; Best, Dave; Kubiak, Timothy; Shieldcastle, Mark C

    2002-05-01

    In 2000, a pair of bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) nested successfully along the shorelines of Lake Ontario in North America for the first time since 1957. However, it is a continuing question whether bald eagles will be able to reproduce successfully as they return to nest on Lake Ontario. Great black-backed gulls (Larus marinus) and herring gulls (L. argentatus) were selected as surrogate species to predict contaminant levels in eggs of bald eagles nesting on Lake Ontario. Because of the suspected overlap in the diets of great black-backed gulls and bald eagles (i.e., fish, gull chicks, and waterfowl), the two species probably occupy a similar trophic level in the Lake Ontario food web and, thus, may have similar contaminant levels. Fresh great black-backed gull and herring gull eggs were collected from three study sites in eastern Lake Ontario in 1993 and 1994 and analyzed for contaminants. Average contaminant levels of dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane (p,p'-DDE), total polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and dieldrin in great black-backed gull eggs were 12.85, 26.27, and 0.27 microg/g, respectively. The mean ratio of contaminant levels in great black-backed gull eggs to contaminant levels in herring gull eggs for these three contaminants was 2.09 (range of means, 1.73-2.38). Predicted levels of contaminants in bald eagle eggs in Lake Ontario would be expected to be similar to the mean levels reported for great black-backed gull eggs. As a comparison, contaminant levels in bald eagle eggs collected from other Great Lakes nesting sites were compared to mean levels reported for herring gull eggs collected from nearby sites in 1986 to 1995. The mean ratio of contaminant levels in bald eagle eggs to contaminant levels in herring gull eggs from these sites for DDE, total PCBs, and dieldrin was 2.40 (range of means, 1.73-3.28). These ratios are very similar to those reported using great black-backed gull eggs, illustrating the apparent similarity in trophic status

  17. Atlantic tropical cyclones revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Michael E.; Emanuel, Kerry A.; Holland, Greg J.; Webster, Peter J.

    Vigorous discussions have taken place recently in Eos [e.g., Mann and Emanuel, 2006; Landsea, 2007] and elsewhere [Emanuel, 2005; Webster et al., 2005; Hoyos et al., 2006; Trenberth and Shea, 2006; Kossin et al., 2007] regarding trends in North Atlantic tropical cyclone (TC) activity and their potential connection with anthropogenic climate change. In one study, for example [Landsea, 2007], it is argued that a substantial underestimate of Atlantic tropical cyclone counts in earlier decades arising from insufficient observing systems invalidates the conclusion that trends in TC behavior may be connected to climate change. Here we argue that such connections are in fact robust with respect to uncertainties in earlier observations.Several recent studies have investigated trends in various measures of TC activity. Emanuel [2005] showed that a measure of total power dissipation by TCs (the power dissipation index, or PDI) is highly correlated with August-October sea surface temperatures (SST) over the main development region (MDR) for Atlantic TCs over at least the past half century. Some support for this conclusion was provided by Sriver and Ruber [2006]. Webster et al. [2005] demonstrated a statistically significant increase in recent decades in both the total number of the strongest category cyclones (categories 4 and 5) and the proportion of storms reaching hurricane intensity. Hoyos et al. [2006] showed that these increases were closely tied to warming trends in tropical Atlantic SST, while, for example, the modest decrease in vertical wind shear played a more secondary role. Kossin et al. [2007] called into question some trends in other basins, based on a reanalysis of past TC data, but they found the North Atlantic trends to be robust.

  18. South Atlantic summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Havran, K.J.; Wiese, J.D.

    1983-12-01

    To date, four Federal offshore oil-and-gas leasing actions have occurred in the South Atlantic Region. Two additional South Atlantic lease offerings remain on the July 1982 final 5-year OCS oil-and-gas leasing schedule before June 1987. The South Atlantic Region consists of three major sedimentary basins: the Carolina Trough, the Blake Plateau, and the Southeast Georgia Embayment. Lease Sale 43, the first in the South Atlantic Region, featured blocks for exploration in the Southeast Georgia Embayment. Offshore operators drilled a total of six exploratory wells on blocks leased in Lease Sale 43. All were dry. The 43 leases from Lease Sale 43 have now expired, some blocks were relinquished earlier by their lease-holders. In the recent Lease Sales 56 and RS-2, and in the South Atlantic Lease Offering (July 1983), blocks leased were largely concentrated in the Carolina Trough Basin. Exploration of these blocks may begin anew in early 1984. The blocks are in deep water and will require careful, long-range planning before drilling can commence. As of July 1983, all 66 leases from the above three sales are active. Two plans of exploration have been approved by Minerals Management Service for exploration on blocks leased in Lease Sale 56. The plans are for Russell Area, Blocks 709 and 710, and Manteo Area, Block 510. Blocks 709 and 710 are held by ARCO, and Block 510 is held by Chevron. Based on current plans of exploration, operations will begin in 1984, first by Chevron, and sometime later by ARCO. Operations will be supported by a temporary service base to be established at Morehead City, North Carolina. 6 references, 4 figures.

  19. Segregation of herring larvae from inshore and offshore spawning grounds in the north-western North Sea — Implications for stock structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heath, M.

    Herring larvae hatching from spawning sites around the Scottish coast are dispersed by water currents during the weeks following hatching. Hydrographic data, observations on the distribution of caesium-137 and measurements of current velocities by moored meters and drifting buoys, suggest that larvae from offshore spawning sites around the north of Scotland should be more rapidly dispersed than those hatching in inshore areas. This has been confirmed by direct observations on the advection of herring larvae in different regions of the north western North Sea. The conclusion is that larvae hatching in inshore areas, especially in the Moray Firth, are most likely to contribute to nearby juvenile populations, whereas larvae from offshore spawning sites should be widely dispersed over the North Sea. Tagging and parasitology investigations have shown that adult herring spawning in the north-western North Sea have been widely dispersed in the North Sea and adjacent waters as juveniles (six months — one and a half years old). However, a high proportion of adult fish caught at inshore spawning sites and in the Moray Firth were found to have been recruited from more local areas. Taken together with the observations on larval drift, these observations suggest that the stock structure of herring in the northern North Sea may in part be a consequence of the physical oceanography of the area.

  20. Geographical distribution of contaminants and productivity measures of herring gulls in the Great Lakes: Lake Erie and connecting channels 1978/79.

    PubMed

    Weseloh, D V; Mineau, P; Struger, J

    1990-02-01

    The distribution and size of colonies, residue levels of DDE, DDT, HCB, dieldrin, mirex and PCBs in eggs, productivity and eggshell thickness were determined for herring gulls at 14 sites in Lake Erie and connecting channels. The centre of distribution for breeding herring gulls was the Western Basin where approximately 90% of the 6200 nests in the study area were located. Seven of 22 colonies showed an average annual population increase of 48.3%. Most of the increase in breeding herring gulls on Lake Erie is directly associated with sites that have undergone habitat modification by man. Levels of PCBs and DDE ranged from 35 to 140 ppm (wet weight) and from 2.8 to 9.4 ppm, respectively; all other residues were less than 0.49 ppm. Most organochlorine residue levels were highest in eggs from colonies in or near the Niagara or Detroit Rivers. Mirex residues were greatest in the Niagara River and decreased significantly to the west. PCB residues were greatest in the Detroit River and decreased significantly to the east. The lowest levels generally came from colonies in the Sandusky Basin and near Pelee Island in western Lake Erie. Discriminant function analysis of six organochlorine contaminants correctly classified 90% or more of the eggs from up to four colonies in one or more years. Levels of PCBs and HCB appeared to have the greatest discriminating power. Herring gull productivity at all colonies (1-1.7 young gulls/pair) was normal and showed no significant geographical variation. Eggshell thickness was greatest in colonies in the Sandusky Basin and least in colonies in the Detroit River and extreme west end of the lake; mean eggshell thickness was 0.350 +/- 0.02 mm (6.7% thinning), which was weakly, but significantly correlated to DDE concentration. The variation in contaminants in herring gull eggs on a Basin basis (i.e., Western, Eastern, Sandusky, etc.) paralleled those known for sediments, water and fish. Thus, we suggest that in addition to its role as an

  1. Atlantic Warm Pool acting as a link between Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation and Atlantic tropical cyclone activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chunzai; Lee, Sang-Ki; Enfield, David B.

    2008-05-01

    Multidecadal variability of Atlantic tropical cyclone activity is observed to relate to the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO), a mode manifesting primarily in sea surface temperature (SST) in the high latitudes of the North Atlantic. In the low latitudes of the North Atlantic, a large body of warm water called the Atlantic Warm Pool (AWP) comprises the Gulf of Mexico, the Caribbean Sea, and the western tropical North Atlantic. AWP variability occurs on both interannual and multidecadal timescales as well as with a secular variation. The AWP multidecadal variability coincides with the signal of the AMO; that is, the warm (cool) phases of the AMO are characterized by repeated large (small) AWPs. Since the climate response to the North Atlantic SST anomalies is primarily forced at the low latitudes and the AWP is in the path of or a birthplace for Atlantic tropical cyclones, the influence of the AMO on Atlantic tropical cyclone activity may operate through the mechanism of the AWP-induced atmospheric changes. The AWP-induced changes related to tropical cyclones that we emphasize here include a dynamical parameter of tropospheric vertical wind shear and a thermodynamical parameter of convective instability. More specifically, an anomalously large (small) AWP reduces (enhances) the vertical wind shear in the hurricane main development region and increases (decreases) the moist static instability of the troposphere, both of which favor (disfavor) Atlantic tropical cyclone activity. This is the most plausible way in which the AMO relationship with Atlantic tropical cyclones can be understood.

  2. Contaminant levels in Herring (Larus argentatus) and Great Black-backed Gull (Larus marinus) eggs from colonies in the New York harbor complex between 2012 and 2013.

    PubMed

    Burger, Joanna; Elbin, Susan

    2015-03-01

    Birds living in coastal areas are exposed to severe storms and tidal flooding during the nesting season, but also to contaminants that move up the food chain from the water column and sediment to their prey items. We examine metals in Herring Gull (Larus argentatus) and Great Black-backed Gull (Larus marinus) eggs collected from the New York/