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Sample records for atmospheric aerosol particle

  1. Sources and transformations of atmospheric aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Eben Spencer

    Aerosol particles are an important component of the Earth-Atmosphere system because of their influence on the radiation budget both directly (through absorption and scattering) and indirectly (through cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity). The magnitude of the raditaive forcing attributed to the direct and indirect aerosol effects is highly uncertain, leading to large uncertainties in projections of global climate change. Real-time measurements of aerosol properties are a critical step toward constraining the uncertainties in current global climate modeling and understanding the influence that anthropogenic activities have on the climate. The objective of the work presented in this thesis is to gain a more complete understanding of the atmospheric transformations of aerosol particles and how such transformations influence the direct and indirect radiative effects of the particles. The work focuses on real-time measurements of aerosol particles made with the Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) developed in collaboration with the Boston College research group. A key feature of the work described is the development of a light scattering module for the AMS. Here we present the first results obtained with the integrated light scattering - AMS system. The unique and powerful capabilities of this new instrument combination are demonstrated through laboratory experiments and field deployments. Results from two field studies are presented: (1) The Northeast Air Quality Study (NEAQS), in the summer of 2004, conducted at Chebogue Point, Nova Scotia and (2) The Megacity Initiative: Local and Global Research Observations (MILAGRO) field campaign conducted in and around Mexico City, Mexico in March of 2006. Both field studies were designed to study the transformations that occur within pollution plumes as they are transported throughout the atmosphere. During the NEAQS campaign, the pollution plume from the Northeastern United States was intercepted as it was

  2. Vapor scavenging by atmospheric aerosol particles

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, E.

    1996-05-01

    Particle growth due to vapor scavenging was studied using both experimental and computational techniques. Vapor scavenging by particles is an important physical process in the atmosphere because it can result in changes to particle properties (e.g., size, shape, composition, and activity) and, thus, influence atmospheric phenomena in which particles play a role, such as cloud formation and long range transport. The influence of organic vapor on the evolution of a particle mass size distribution was investigated using a modified version of MAEROS (a multicomponent aerosol dynamics code). The modeling study attempted to identify the sources of organic aerosol observed by Novakov and Penner (1993) in a field study in Puerto Rico. Experimentally, vapor scavenging and particle growth were investigated using two techniques. The influence of the presence of organic vapor on the particle`s hydroscopicity was investigated using an electrodynamic balance. The charge on a particle was investigated theoretically and experimentally. A prototype apparatus--the refractive index thermal diffusion chamber (RITDC)--was developed to study multiple particles in the same environment at the same time.

  3. Dispersion of aerosol particles in the atmosphere: Fukushima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haszpra, Tímea; Lagzi, István; Tél, Tamás

    2013-04-01

    Investigation of dispersion and deposition of aerosol particles in the atmosphere is an essential issue, because they have an effect on the biosphere and atmosphere. Moreover, aerosol particles have different transport properties and chemical and physical transformations in the atmosphere compared to gas phase air pollutants. The motion of a particle is described by a set of ordinary differential equations. The large-scale dynamics in the horizontal direction can be described by the equations of passive scalar advection, but in the vertical direction a well-defined terminal velocity should be taken into account as a term added to the vertical wind component. In the planetary boundary layer turbulent diffusion has an important role in the particle dispersion, which is taken into account by adding stochastic terms to the deterministic equations above. Wet deposition is also an essential process in the lower levels of the atmosphere, however, its precise parameterization is a challenge. For the simulations the wind field and other necessary data were taken from the ECMWF ERA-Interim database. In the case of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster (March-April 2011) radioactive aerosol particles were also released in the planetary boundary layer. Simulations (included the continuous and varying emission from the nuclear power plant) will be presented for the period of 14-23 March. Results show that wet deposition also has to be taken into consideration in the lower levels of the atmosphere. Furthermore, dynamical system characteristics are evaluated for the aerosol particle dynamics. The escape rate of particles was estimated both with and without turbulent diffusion, and in both cases when there was no wet deposition and also when wet deposition was taken into consideration.

  4. Power Spectral Densities of Atmospheric Aerosol Particle Counts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    Power Spectral Densities of Atmospheric Aerosol Particle Counts by Chatt C. Williamson, Steven C. Hill, Dennis M. Garvey, Michael L. Larsen...Williamson, Steven C. Hill, Dennis M. Garvey, Michael L. Larsen, and Chrryl L. Klopp Computational and Information Sciences Directorate, ARL...6. AUTHOR(S) Chatt C. Williamson, Steven C. Hill, Dennis M. Garvey, Michael L. Larsen, and Cheryl L. Klipp 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER

  5. Measurement of the nucleation of atmospheric aerosol particles.

    PubMed

    Kulmala, Markku; Petäjä, Tuukka; Nieminen, Tuomo; Sipilä, Mikko; Manninen, Hanna E; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Dal Maso, Miikka; Aalto, Pasi P; Junninen, Heikki; Paasonen, Pauli; Riipinen, Ilona; Lehtinen, Kari E J; Laaksonen, Ari; Kerminen, Veli-Matti

    2012-09-01

    The formation of new atmospheric aerosol particles and their subsequent growth have been observed frequently at various locations all over the world. The atmospheric nucleation rate (or formation rate) and growth rate (GR) are key parameters to characterize the phenomenon. Recent progress in measurement techniques enables us to measure atmospheric nucleation at the size (mobility diameter) of 1.5 (±0.4) nm. The detection limit has decreased from 3 to 1 nm within the past 10 years. In this protocol, we describe the procedures for identifying new-particle-formation (NPF) events, and for determining the nucleation, formation and growth rates during such events under atmospheric conditions. We describe the present instrumentation, best practices and other tools used to investigate atmospheric nucleation and NPF at a certain mobility diameter (1.5, 2.0 or 3.0 nm). The key instruments comprise devices capable of measuring the number concentration of the formed nanoparticles and their size, such as a suite of modern condensation particle counters (CPCs) and air ion spectrometers, and devices for characterizing the pre-existing particle number concentration distribution, such as a differential mobility particle sizer (DMPS). We also discuss the reliability of the methods used and requirements for proper measurements and data analysis. The time scale for realizing this procedure is 1 year.

  6. Atmospheric Condensational Properties of Ultrafine Chain and Fractal Aerosol Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marlow, William H.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose for the research sponsored by this grant was to lay the foundations for qualitative understanding and quantitative description of the equilibrium vapor pressure of water vapor over the irregularly shaped, carbonaceous particles that are present in the atmosphere. This work apparently was the first systematic treatment of the subject. Research was conducted in two complementary components: 1. Calculations were performed of the equilibrium vapor pressure of water over particles comprised of aggregates of spheres in the 50-200 nm radius range. The purposes of this work were two-fold. First, since no systematic treatment of this subject had previously been conducted, its availability would be directly useful for quantitative treatment for a limited range of atmospheric aerosols. Second, it would provide qualitative indications of the effects of highly irregular particle shape on equilibrium vapor pressure of aggregates comprised of smaller spheres.

  7. Global Atmospheric Aerosol Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, Johannes; Aquila, Valentina; Righi, Mattia

    2012-01-01

    Global aerosol models are used to study the distribution and properties of atmospheric aerosol particles as well as their effects on clouds, atmospheric chemistry, radiation, and climate. The present article provides an overview of the basic concepts of global atmospheric aerosol modeling and shows some examples from a global aerosol simulation. Particular emphasis is placed on the simulation of aerosol particles and their effects within global climate models.

  8. Decomposition of Atmospheric Aerosol Phase Function by Particle Size and Morphology via Single Particle Scattering Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aptowicz, K. B.; Pan, Y.; Martin, S.; Fernandez, E.; Chang, R.; Pinnick, R. G.

    2013-12-01

    We report upon an experimental approach that provides insight into how particle size and shape affect the scattering phase function of atmospheric aerosol particles. Central to our approach is the design of an apparatus that measures the forward and backward scattering hemispheres (scattering patterns) of individual atmospheric aerosol particles in the coarse mode range. The size and shape of each particle is discerned from the corresponding scattering pattern. In particular, autocorrelation analysis is used to differentiate between spherical and non-spherical particles, the calculated asphericity factor is used to characterize the morphology of non-spherical particles, and the integrated irradiance is used for particle sizing. We found the fraction of spherical particles decays exponentially with particle size, decreasing from 11% for particles on the order of 1 micrometer to less than 1% for particles over 5 micrometer. The average phase functions of subpopulations of particles, grouped by size and morphology, are determined by averaging their corresponding scattering patterns. The phase functions of spherical and non-spherical atmospheric particles are shown to diverge with increasing size. In addition, the phase function of non-spherical particles is found to vary little as a function of the asphericity factor.

  9. Differential aerosolization of algal and cyanobacterial particles in the atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Naveen K; Singh, Surendra

    2010-10-01

    Aeroalgal sampling at short height (2.5 m) over natural aquatic and terrestrial algal sources revealed that despite of being similar in size (<1 mm), algal groups vary in their atmospheric abundance. Cyanobacteria were the most abundant, while chlorophytes and bacillariophytes though present, but rare. Statistical analysis (Akaike Information Criterion) showed that climatic factors (temperature, relative humidity, rainfall, wind velocity and sunshine hours) acted in concert, and mainly affected the release and subsequent vertical movement (aerosolization) of algae from natural sources. Variation in aerosolization may affect the atmospheric abundance of algae. These findings have important implication as dispersal limitation may influence the biogeography and biodiversity of microbial algae.

  10. Size matters in the water uptake and hygroscopic growth of atmospherically relevant multicomponent aerosol particles.

    PubMed

    Laskina, Olga; Morris, Holly S; Grandquist, Joshua R; Qin, Zhen; Stone, Elizabeth A; Tivanski, Alexei V; Grassian, Vicki H

    2015-05-14

    Understanding the interactions of water with atmospheric aerosols is crucial for determining the size, physical state, reactivity, and climate impacts of this important component of the Earth's atmosphere. Here we show that water uptake and hygroscopic growth of multicomponent, atmospherically relevant particles can be size dependent when comparing 100 nm versus ca. 6 μm sized particles. It was determined that particles composed of ammonium sulfate with succinic acid and of a mixture of chlorides typical of the marine environment show size-dependent hygroscopic behavior. Microscopic analysis of the distribution of components within the aerosol particles show that the size dependence is due to differences in the mixing state, that is, whether particles are homogeneously mixed or phase separated, for different sized particles. This morphology-dependent hygroscopicity has consequences for heterogeneous atmospheric chemistry as well as aerosol interactions with electromagnetic radiation and clouds.

  11. Quantitative ED-EPMA of Individual Particles and its Application for Characterization of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ro, C.

    2008-12-01

    An electron probe X-ray microanalysis (EPMA) technique using an energy-dispersive X-ray detector with an ultra-thin window, named low-Z particle EPMA, has been developed. The low-Z particle EPMA allows the quantitative determination of concentrations of low-Z elements such as C, N, and O, as well as higher-Z elements that can be analyzed by conventional energy-dispersive EPMA (ED-EPMA). The quantitative determination of low-Z elements (using full Monte Carlo simulations, from the electron impact to the X-ray detection) in individual environmental particles has improved the applicability of single-particle analysis, especially in atmospheric environmental aerosol research; many environmentally important atmospheric particles, e.g. sulfates, nitrates, ammonium, and carbonaceous particles, contain low-Z elements. In addition, an expert system that can perform chemical speciation from the elemental composition data obtained by the low-Z particle EPMA has been developed. The low-Z particle EPMA was applied to characterize K-feldspar particle samples of which the chemical compositions are well defined by the use of various bulk analytical methods. Chemical compositions of the K-feldspar samples obtained from the low-Z particle EPMA turn out to be very close to those from bulk analyses. The low-Z particle EPMA technique has been applied for the characterization of atmospheric aerosol particle samples, including Asian dust, urban, and indoor particulate samples: (1) The extent of chemical modification of Asian dust particles sampled in Chuncheon and Incheon, Korea, during several Asian dust storm events occurred in 2002-2006 was investigated. Mixing of Asian dust with air pollutants and sea-salts strongly depends on the characteristics of Asian dust storm events such as air-mass backward trajectories. For instance, no significant chemical modification of mineral dust corresponded to fast moving air-masses at high altitudes. Inversely, extensive chemical modification was

  12. Formation of highly porous aerosol particles by atmospheric freeze-drying in ice clouds.

    PubMed

    Adler, Gabriela; Koop, Thomas; Haspel, Carynelisa; Taraniuk, Ilya; Moise, Tamar; Koren, Ilan; Heiblum, Reuven H; Rudich, Yinon

    2013-12-17

    The cycling of atmospheric aerosols through clouds can change their chemical and physical properties and thus modify how aerosols affect cloud microphysics and, subsequently, precipitation and climate. Current knowledge about aerosol processing by clouds is rather limited to chemical reactions within water droplets in warm low-altitude clouds. However, in cold high-altitude cirrus clouds and anvils of high convective clouds in the tropics and midlatitudes, humidified aerosols freeze to form ice, which upon exposure to subsaturation conditions with respect to ice can sublimate, leaving behind residual modified aerosols. This freeze-drying process can occur in various types of clouds. Here we simulate an atmospheric freeze-drying cycle of aerosols in laboratory experiments using proxies for atmospheric aerosols. We find that aerosols that contain organic material that undergo such a process can form highly porous aerosol particles with a larger diameter and a lower density than the initial homogeneous aerosol. We attribute this morphology change to phase separation upon freezing followed by a glass transition of the organic material that can preserve a porous structure after ice sublimation. A porous structure may explain the previously observed enhancement in ice nucleation efficiency of glassy organic particles. We find that highly porous aerosol particles scatter solar light less efficiently than nonporous aerosol particles. Using a combination of satellite and radiosonde data, we show that highly porous aerosol formation can readily occur in highly convective clouds, which are widespread in the tropics and midlatitudes. These observations may have implications for subsequent cloud formation cycles and aerosol albedo near cloud edges.

  13. Formation of highly porous aerosol particles by atmospheric freeze-drying in ice clouds

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Gabriela; Koop, Thomas; Haspel, Carynelisa; Taraniuk, Ilya; Moise, Tamar; Koren, Ilan; Heiblum, Reuven H.; Rudich, Yinon

    2013-01-01

    The cycling of atmospheric aerosols through clouds can change their chemical and physical properties and thus modify how aerosols affect cloud microphysics and, subsequently, precipitation and climate. Current knowledge about aerosol processing by clouds is rather limited to chemical reactions within water droplets in warm low-altitude clouds. However, in cold high-altitude cirrus clouds and anvils of high convective clouds in the tropics and midlatitudes, humidified aerosols freeze to form ice, which upon exposure to subsaturation conditions with respect to ice can sublimate, leaving behind residual modified aerosols. This freeze-drying process can occur in various types of clouds. Here we simulate an atmospheric freeze-drying cycle of aerosols in laboratory experiments using proxies for atmospheric aerosols. We find that aerosols that contain organic material that undergo such a process can form highly porous aerosol particles with a larger diameter and a lower density than the initial homogeneous aerosol. We attribute this morphology change to phase separation upon freezing followed by a glass transition of the organic material that can preserve a porous structure after ice sublimation. A porous structure may explain the previously observed enhancement in ice nucleation efficiency of glassy organic particles. We find that highly porous aerosol particles scatter solar light less efficiently than nonporous aerosol particles. Using a combination of satellite and radiosonde data, we show that highly porous aerosol formation can readily occur in highly convective clouds, which are widespread in the tropics and midlatitudes. These observations may have implications for subsequent cloud formation cycles and aerosol albedo near cloud edges. PMID:24297908

  14. Atmospheric budget of different elements in aerosol particles over Hungary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molnár, A.; Mészáros, E.; Polyák, K.; Borbély-Kiss, I.; Koltay, E.; Szabó, Gy.; Horváth, Zs.

    The aim of this paper is to present the budget of seven elements (Cd, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, V and Zn) in the atmospheric aerosol over Hungary. The dry deposition is estimated on the basis of concentration and size distribution measurements and on dry deposition velocities available in the literature. The dry deposition velocity of two elements is obtained by transport model calculations. Wet deposition rates are determined by analyzing precipitation samples. The emissions of different elements necessary for budgeting are calculated by using statistical data on fossil fuel and gasoline burning, metallurgy, cement industry and waste incineration as well as on emission factors given by Pacyna (1984, Atmospheric Environment18, 41-50). It is found that the country is a net source for elements produced mostly by fossil fuel combustion while it is a net sink for elements released during industrial processes and automotive transport.

  15. Hygroscopic growth of atmospheric aerosol particles based on active remote sensing and radiosounding measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granados-Muñoz, M. J.; Navas-Guzmán, F.; Bravo-Aranda, J. A.; Guerrero-Rascado, J. L.; Lyamani, H.; Valenzuela, A.; Titos, G.; Fernández-Gálvez, J.; Alados-Arboledas, L.

    2014-10-01

    A new methodology based on combining active and passive remote sensing and simultaneous and collocated radiosounding data to study the aerosol hygroscopic growth effects on the particle optical and microphysical properties is presented. The identification of hygroscopic growth situations combines the analysis of multiespectral aerosol particle backscatter coefficient and particle linear depolarization ratio with thermodynamic profiling of the atmospheric column. We analysed the hygroscopic growth effects on aerosol properties, namely the aerosol particle backscatter coefficient and the volume concentration profiles, using data gathered at Granada EARLINET station. Two study cases, corresponding to different aerosol loads and different aerosol types, are used for illustrating the potential of this methodology. Values of the aerosol particle backscatter coefficient enhancement factors range from 2.10 ± 0.06 to 3.90 ± 0.03, being similar to those previously reported in the literature. Differences in the enhancement factor are directly linked to the composition of the atmospheric aerosol. The largest value of the aerosol particle backscatter coefficient enhancement factor corresponds to the presence of sulphate and marine particles that are more affected by hygroscopic growth. On the contrary, the lowest value of the enhancement factor corresponds to an aerosol mixture containing sulphates and slight traces of mineral dust. The Hänel parameterization is applied to these case studies, obtaining results within the range of values reported in previous studies, with values of the γ exponent of 0.56 ± 0.01 (for anthropogenic particles slightly influenced by mineral dust) and 1.07 ± 0.01 (for the situation dominated by anthropogenic particles), showing the convenience of this remote sensing approach for the study of hygroscopic effects of the atmospheric aerosol under ambient unperturbed conditions. For the first time, the retrieval of the volume concentration profiles

  16. Decomposition of atmospheric aerosol phase function by particle size and asphericity from measurements of single particle optical scattering patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aptowicz, Kevin B.; Pan, Yong-Le; Martin, Sean D.; Fernandez, Elena; Chang, Richard K.; Pinnick, Ronald G.

    2013-12-01

    We demonstrate an experimental approach that provides insight into how particle size and shape affect the scattering phase function of atmospheric aerosol particles. Central to our approach is the design of an apparatus that measures the forward and backward scattering hemispheres (scattering patterns) of individual atmospheric aerosol particles in the coarse mode range. We captured over 30 000 scattering patterns during winter (January 2007) at an urban site in Las Cruces, NM. The size and shape of each particle is discerned from the corresponding scattering pattern. In particular, autocorrelation analysis is used to differentiate between spherical and non-spherical particles, the calculated asphericity factor is used to characterize the morphology of non-spherical particles, and the integrated irradiance is used for particle sizing. We found that the fraction of spherical particles decays exponentially with particle size, decreasing from 11% for particles on the order of 1 μm to less than 1% for particles over 5 μm. The average phase functions of subpopulations of particles, grouped by size and morphology, are determined by averaging their corresponding scattering patterns. The phase functions of spherical and non-spherical atmospheric particles are shown to diverge with increasing size. In addition, the phase function of non-spherical particles is found to vary little as a function of the asphericity factor. Our results support the current remote sensing practice of characterizing atmospheric aerosol particles as a composition of spherical and non-spherical particles with less concern about the diversity of morphology within non-spherical particles. In addition, our results suggest that assuming a constant spherical fraction independent of particle size may not accurately reflect the real morphological distribution of atmospheric aerosol particles.

  17. Atmospheric Chemistry: Nature's plasticized aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziemann, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    The structure of atmospheric aerosol particles affects their reactivity and growth rates. Measurements of aerosol properties over the Amazon rainforest indicate that organic particles above tropical rainforests are simple liquid drops.

  18. Atmospheric Black Carbon: Chemical Bonding and Structural Information of Individual Aerosol Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilles, M. K.; Tivanski, A. V.; Hopkins, R. J.; Marten, B. D.

    2006-12-01

    The formation of aerosols from both natural and anthropogenic sources affects the Earth's temperature and climate by altering the radiative properties of the atmosphere. Aerosols containing black carbon (BC) that are released into the atmosphere from the burning of biomass, natural fires and the combustion of coals, diesel and jet fuels, contribute a large positive component to this radiative forcing, thus causing a heating of the atmosphere. A distinct type of biomass burn aerosol referred to as "tar balls" has recently been reported in the literature and is characterized by a spherical morphology, high carbon content and ability to efficiently scatter and absorb light. At present, very little is known about the exact nature and variation of the range of BC aerosols in the atmosphere with regards to optical, chemical and physical properties. Additionally, the similarity of these aerosols to surrogates used in the laboratory as atmospheric mimics remains unclear. The local chemical bonding, structural ordering and carbon-to-oxygen ratios of a plethora of black carbon standard reference materials (BC SRMs), high molecular mass humic-like substances (HULIS) and atmospheric aerosols from a variety of sources are examined using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) coupled with near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. STXM/NEXAFS enables single aerosol particles of diameter upwards of 100 nm to be studied, which allows the diversity of atmospheric aerosol collected during a variety of field missions to be assessed. We apply a semi-quantitative peak fitting method to the recorded NEXAFS spectral fingerprints allowing comparison of BC SRMs and HULIS to BC aerosol originating from anthropogenic combustion and biomass burning events. This method allows us to distinguish between anthropogenic combustion and biomass burn aerosol using both chemical bonding and structural ordering information. The STXM/NEXAFS technique has also been utilized to

  19. Evidence for the role of organics in aerosol particle formation under atmospheric conditions

    PubMed Central

    Metzger, Axel; Verheggen, Bart; Dommen, Josef; Duplissy, Jonathan; Prevot, Andre S. H.; Weingartner, Ernest; Riipinen, Ilona; Kulmala, Markku; Spracklen, Dominick V.; Carslaw, Kenneth S.; Baltensperger, Urs

    2010-01-01

    New particle formation in the atmosphere is an important parameter in governing the radiative forcing of atmospheric aerosols. However, detailed nucleation mechanisms remain ambiguous, as laboratory data have so far not been successful in explaining atmospheric nucleation. We investigated the formation of new particles in a smog chamber simulating the photochemical formation of H2SO4 and organic condensable species. Nucleation occurs at H2SO4 concentrations similar to those found in the ambient atmosphere during nucleation events. The measured particle formation rates are proportional to the product of the concentrations of H2SO4 and an organic molecule. This suggests that only one H2SO4 molecule and one organic molecule are involved in the rate-limiting step of the observed nucleation process. Parameterizing this process in a global aerosol model results in substantially better agreement with ambient observations compared to control runs. PMID:20133603

  20. Formation of highly porous aerosol particles by atmospheric freeze-drying in ice clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudich, Yinon; Adler, Gabriela; Koop, Thomas; Taraniuk, Ilya; Moise, Tamar; Koren, Ilan; Heiblum, Reuven; Haspel, Carynelisa

    2014-05-01

    In cold high altitude cirrus clouds and anvils of high convective clouds in the tropics and mid-latitudes, ice partciles that are exposed to subsaturation conditions with respect to ice can sublimate, leaving behind residual modified aerosols. This freeze-drying process can occur in various types of clouds. In this talk we will describe experiements that simulate the atmospheric freeze-drying cycle of aerosols. We find that aerosols with high organic content can form highly porous particles (HPA) with a larger diameter and a lower density than the initial homogenous aerosol following ice subliation. We attribute this morphology change to phase separation upon freezing followed by a glass transition of the organic material that can preserve a porous structure follwoing ice sublimation. We find that the highly porous aerosol scatter solar light less efficiently than non-porous aerosol particles. A porous structure may explain the previously observed enhancement in ice nucleation efficiency of glassy organic particles. These observations may have implications for subsequent cloud formation cycles and aerosol albedo near cloud edges.

  1. In situ measurements of heterogeneous reactions on ambient aerosol particles: Impacts on atmospheric chemistry and climate

    SciTech Connect

    Bertram, Timothy

    2015-02-11

    Aerosol particles play a critical role in the Earth’s energy budget through the absorption and scattering of radiation, and/or through their ability to form clouds and alter cloud lifetime. Heterogeneous and multi-phase reactions alter the climate-relevant properties of aerosol particles and catalyze reaction pathways that are energetically unfavorable in the gas phase. The chemical composition of aerosol particles dictates the kinetics of heterogeneous and multi-phase reactions. At present, the vast majority of the molecular level information on these processes has been determined in laboratory investigations on model aerosol systems. The work described here provides a comprehensive investigation into the reactivity of complex, ambient aerosol particles is proposed to determine: 1) how representative laboratory investigations of heterogeneous and multi-phase processes conducted on model, simple systems are of the real atmosphere, and 2) the impact of heterogeneous and multi-phase processes on ambient particle optical properties and their ability to nucleate clouds. This work has focused on the uptake kinetics for ammonia (NH3) and dinitrogen pentoxide (N2O5). The results of these investigations will be used to directly improve the representation of heterogeneous and multi-phase processes in global climate models, by identifying the key mechanistic drivers that control the variability in the observed kinetics.

  2. Coated or Embedded? Organic Matter as a Host for Individual Ambient Atmospheric Aerosol Particles (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buseck, P. R.; Adachi, K.

    2009-12-01

    Organic matter is a prominent form of atmospheric aerosol particle. It commonly occurs with soot, sulfate, metals, or mineral dust in individual, internally mixed particles and is important when estimating radiative and health effects of aerosols. The details of these mini-assemblages are well observed when using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). When organic matter hosts soot particles, it enhances the light absorption of the soot and thus its warming effects. We determined the shapes of organic matter embedding soot using electron tomography (ET) with a transmission electron microscope, calculated the radiative forcing of such particles, and compared them to those of various coating and mixing models. Organic matter in particles collected from the vicinity of Mexico City (as part of the MILAGRO - Megacity Initiative: Local and Global Research Observations - campaign conducted in March 2006) also hosts metal-bearing nanoparticles that can include Fe, Zn, Mn, Pb, Hg, Sn, Cr, Ni, Ti, V, or Ag as major constituents. Nanoparticles of Hg are especially abundant. The nanoparticles are interesting because of their small sizes and high surface-to-volume ratios, both of which make them highly reactive in the human body and can cause negative health effects. In these and samples from other areas, we commonly find organic matter coating or otherwise associated with (hosting) inorganic aerosol particles of all types. Although the atmospheric community commonly speaks of coatings onto aerosol particles, in the case of organic matter, a more apt term might be embedding rather than coating. Finally, such hosting by organic matter can influence the climate and health effects of aerosol particles.

  3. Aerosol and Cloud-Nucleating Particle Observations during an Atmospheric River Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeMott, P. J.; McCluskey, C. S.; Petters, M.; Suski, K. J.; Levin, E. J.; Hill, T. C. J.; Atwood, S. A.; Schill, G. P.; Rocci, K.; Boose, Y.; Martin, A.; Cornwell, G.; Al-Mashat, H.; Moore, K.; Prather, K. A.; Rothfuss, N.; Taylor, H.; Leung, L. R.; Tomlinson, J. M.; Mei, F.; Hubbe, J. M.; Rosenfeld, D.; Spackman, J. R.; Fairall, C. W.; Creamean, J.; White, A. B.; Kreidenweis, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    The multi-agency CalWater 2015 project occurred over North Central CA and the Eastern Pacific during January to March 2015 (Spackman et al., this session). The goals of the campaign were to document the structure of atmospheric rivers (ARs) that deliver much of the water vapor associated with major winter storms along the U.S. West Coast and to investigate the modulating effect of aerosols on precipitation. Aerosol sources that may influence orographic cloud properties for air lifted over the mountains in California in winter include pollution, biomass burning, soil dusts and marine aerosols, but their roles will also be influenced by transport, vertical stratification, and scavenging processes. We present results from a comprehensive study of aerosol distributions, compositions, and cloud nucleating properties during an intense winter storm during February 2015, including data from an NSF-supported measurement site at Bodega Bay, from the DOE-ARM Cloud Aerosol Precipitation Experiment that included sampling on the NOAA RV Ron Brown offshore and the G-1 aircraft over ocean and land, and with context provided by other NOAA aircraft and remote sensing facilities. With a special focus on the coastal site, we discuss changes in aerosol distributions, aerosol hygroscopicity, and number concentrations of fluorescent particles, cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), and ice nucleating particles (INPs) during the AR event. We compare with periods preceding and following the event. For example, total aerosol number and surface area concentrations at below 0.5 μm diameter decreased from typical values of a few thousand cm-3 and 100 μm2 cm-3, respectively, to a few hundred cm-3 and 10 μm2cm-3 at Bodega Bay during the AR event. CCN concentrations were similarly lower, but hygroscopicity parameter (kappa) increased from typical values of 0.2 to values > 0.5 during the AR.INP and fluorescent particle number concentrations were generally lower during the AR event than at any other

  4. Mixing state of particles with secondary species by single particle aerosol mass spectrometer in an atmospheric pollution event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Lingling; Chen, Jinsheng

    2016-04-01

    Single particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SPAMS) was used to characterize size distribution, chemical composition, and mixing state of particles in an atmospheric pollution event during 20 Oct. - 5 Nov., 2015 in Xiamen, Southeast China. A total of 533,012 particle mass spectra were obtained and clustered into six groups, comprising of industry metal (4.5%), dust particles (2.6%), carbonaceous species (70.7%), K-Rich particles (20.7%), seasalt (0.6%) and other particles (0.9%). Carbonaceous species were further divided into EC (70.6%), OC (28.5%), and mixed ECOC (0.9%). There were 61.7%, 58.3%, 4.0%, and 14.6% of particles internally mixed with sulfate, nitrate, ammonium and C2H3O, respectively, indicating that these particles had undergone significant aging processing. Sulfate was preferentially mixed with carbonaceous particles, while nitrate tended to mix with metal-containing and dust particles. Compared to clear days, the fractions of EC-, metal- and dust particles remarkably increased, while the fraction of OC-containing particles decreased in pollution days. The mixing state of particles, excepted for OC-containing particles with secondary species was much stronger in pollution days than that in clear days, which revealed the significant influence of secondary particles in atmospheric pollution. The different activity of OC-containing particles might be related to their much smaller aerodynamic diameter. These results could improve our understanding of aerosol characteristics and could be helpful to further investigate the atmospheric process of particles.

  5. The Effect of Particle Size on Iron Solubility in Atmospheric Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcotte, A. R.; Majestic, B. J.; Anbar, A. D.; Herckes, P.

    2012-12-01

    The long range transport of mineral dust aerosols, which contain approximately 3% iron by mass, results in an estimated 14-16 Tg of iron deposited into the oceans annually; however, only a small percentage of the deposited iron is soluble. In high-nutrient, low chlorophyll ocean regions iron solubility may limit phytoplankton primary productivity. Although the atmospheric transport processes of mineral dust aerosols have been well studied, the role of particle size has been given little attention. In this work, the effect of particle size on iron solubility in atmospheric aerosols is examined. Iron-containing minerals (illite, kaolinite, magnetite, goethite, red hematite, black hematite, and quartz) were separated into five size fractions (10-2.5, 2.5-1, 1-0.5, 0.5-0.25, and <0.25μm) and extracted into buffer solutions simulating environments in the transport of aerosol particles for 150 minutes. Particle size was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Soluble iron content of the extracted mineral solutions was determined by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Extracted mineral solutions were also analyzed for Fe(II) and Fe(III) content using a ferrozine/UV-VIS method. Preliminary results show that differences in solution composition are more important than differences in size. When extracted into acetate and cloudwater buffers (pH 4.25-4.3), < 0.3% of the Fe in iron oxides (hematite, magnetite, and goethite) is transferred to solution as compared to ~0.1-35% for clays (kaolinite and illite). When extracted into a marine aerosol solution (pH 1.7), the percentage of Fe of the iron oxides and clays transferred to solution increases to approximately 0.5-3% and 5-70%, respectively. However, there is a trend of increased %Fe in the minerals transferred to solution in the largest and smallest size fractions (~0.01-0.3% and ~0.5-35% for iron oxides and clays, respectively), and decreased %Fe in the minerals transferred to solution in the mid

  6. Developing a new parameterization framework for the heterogeneous ice nucleation of atmospheric aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullrich, Romy; Hiranuma, Naruki; Hoose, Corinna; Möhler, Ottmar; Niemand, Monika; Steinke, Isabelle; Wagner, Robert

    2014-05-01

    Developing a new parameterization framework for the heterogeneous ice nucleation of atmospheric aerosol particles Ullrich, R., Hiranuma, N., Hoose, C., Möhler, O., Niemand, M., Steinke, I., Wagner, R. Aerosols of different nature induce microphysical processes of importance for the Earth's atmosphere. They affect not only directly the radiative budget, more importantly they essentially influence the formation and life cycles of clouds. Hence, aerosols and their ice nucleating ability are a fundamental input parameter for weather and climate models. During the previous years, the AIDA (Aerosol Interactions and Dynamics in the Atmosphere) cloud chamber was used to extensively measure, under nearly realistic conditions, the ice nucleating properties of different aerosols. Numerous experiments were performed with a broad variety of aerosol types and under different freezing conditions. A reanalysis of these experiments offers the opportunity to develop a uniform parameterization framework of ice formation for many atmospherically relevant aerosols in a broad temperature and humidity range. The analysis includes both deposition nucleation and immersion freezing. The aim of this study is to develop this comprehensive parameterization for heterogeneous ice formation mainly by using the ice nucleation active site (INAS) approach. Niemand et al. (2012) already developed a temperature dependent parameterization for the INAS- density for immersion freezing on desert dust particles. In addition to a reanalysis of the ice nucleation behaviour of desert dust (Niemand et al. (2012)), volcanic ash (Steinke et al. (2010)) and organic particles (Wagner et al. (2010,2011)) this contribution will also show new results for the immersion freezing and deposition nucleation of soot aerosols. The next step will be the implementation of the parameterizations into the COSMO- ART model in order to test and demonstrate the usability of the framework. Hoose, C. and Möhler, O. (2012) Atmos

  7. PD-FiTE - an efficient method for calculating gas / liquid equilibria in atmospheric aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topping, D.; Lowe, D.; McFiggans, G.; Barley, M.

    2009-04-01

    Assessing the impact of atmospheric aerosol particles on the environment requires adequate representation of appropriate key processes within large scale models. In the absence of primary particulate material, interactions between the atmospheric gaseous components and particles means that the chemical nature of the particles is largely determined by the availability of condensable gaseous material, such as sulphuric and nitric acids, and by the ambient environmental conditions. Gas to particle mass transfer of semi-volatile components,driven by a difference in equilibrium and actual partial pressures above an aerosol particle, is an important factor in determining the evolving chemical composition of the particle and is necessary for predicting aerosol loading and composition. The design of an appropriate framework required for parameterizations of key variables is challenging. These thermodynamic frameworks are often numerically very complex, resulting in significant computational expense. Three dimensional chemical and aerosol transport models demand that computational expense be kept at a minimum,resulting in a trade-off between accuracy and efficiency. To calculate the equilibrium vapour pressure above a solution requires treatment of solution nonideality. This is manifest through activity coefficients of components pertinent to each condensing specie. However, activity coefficients are complex functions of the solution composition. Parameterisation of activity coefficients provides the main focus of this work largely because reducing the numerical complexity whilst retaining a good level of accuracy is very challenging. The approach presented here, the hybrid Partial Derivative Fitted Taylor Expansion (PDFiTE) (Topping et al 2008), builds on previously reported work, with an aim to derive parameters for an accurate and computationally efficient framework through coupling with a complex thermodynamic model. Such a reduction in complexity is important as it is

  8. Ice nucleation properties of atmospheric aerosol particles collected during a field campaign in Cyprus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yordanova, Petya; Maier, Stefanie; Lang-Yona, Naama; Tamm, Alexandra; Meusel, Hannah; Pöschl, Ulrich; Weber, Bettina; Fröhlich-Nowoisky, Janine

    2017-04-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles, including desert and soil dust as well as marine aerosols, are well known to act as ice nuclei (IN) and thus have been investigated in numerous ice nucleation studies. Based on their cloud condensation nuclei potential and their impacts on radiative properties of clouds (via scattering and absorption of solar radiation), aerosol particles may significantly affect the cloud and precipitation development. Atmospheric aerosols of the Eastern Mediterranean have been described to be dominated by desert dust, but only little is known on their composition and ice nucleating properties. In this study we investigated the ice nucleating ability of total suspended particles (TSP), collected at the remote site Agia Marina Xyliatou on Cyprus during a field campaign in April 2016. Airborne TSP samples containing air masses of various types such as African (Saharan) and Arabian dust and European and Middle Eastern pollution were collected on glass fiber filters at 24 h intervals. Sampling was performed ˜5 m above ground level and ˜521 m above sea level. During the sampling period, two major dust storms (PM 10max 118 μg/m3 and 66 μg/m3) and a rain event (rainfall amount: 3.4 mm) were documented. Chemical and physical characterizations of the particles were analyzed experimentally through filtration, thermal, chemical and enzyme treatments. Immersion freezing experiments were performed at relatively high subzero temperatures (-1 to -15˚ C) using the mono ice nucleation array. Preliminary results indicate that highest IN particle numbers (INPs) occurred during the second dust storm event with lower particle concentrations. Treatments at 60˚ C lead to a gradual IN deactivation, indicating the presence of biological INPs, which were observed to be larger than 300 kDa. Additional results originating from this study will be shown. Acknowledgement: This work was funded by the DFG Ice Nuclei Research Unit (INUIT).

  9. The generation of diesel exhaust particle aerosols from a bulk source in an aerodynamic size range similar to atmospheric particles

    PubMed Central

    Cooney, Daniel J; Hickey, Anthony J

    2008-01-01

    The influence of diesel exhaust particles (DEP) on the lungs and heart is currently a topic of great interest in inhalation toxicology. Epidemiological data and animal studies have implicated airborne particulate matter and DEP in increased morbidity and mortality due to a number of cardiopulmonary diseases including asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder, and lung cancer. The pathogeneses of these diseases are being studied using animal models and cell culture techniques. Real-time exposures to freshly combusted diesel fuel are complex and require significant infrastructure including engine operations, dilution air, and monitoring and control of gases. A method of generating DEP aerosols from a bulk source in an aerodynamic size range similar to atmospheric DEP would be a desirable and useful alternative. Metered dose inhaler technology was adopted to generate aerosols from suspensions of DEP in the propellant hydrofluoroalkane 134a. Inertial impaction data indicated that the particle size distributions of the generated aerosols were trimodal, with count median aerodynamic diameters less than 100 nm. Scanning electron microscopy of deposited particles showed tightly aggregated particles, as would be expected from an evaporative process. Chemical analysis indicated that there were no major changes in the mass proportion of 2 specific aromatic hydrocarbons (benzo[a]pyrene and benzo[k]fluoranthene) in the particles resulting from the aerosolization process. PMID:19337412

  10. Effect of typhoon on atmospheric aerosol particle pollutants accumulation over Xiamen, China.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jinpei; Chen, Liqi; Lin, Qi; Zhao, Shuhui; Zhang, Miming

    2016-09-01

    Great influence of typhoon on air quality has been confirmed, however, rare data especially high time resolved aerosol particle data could be used to establish the behavior of typhoon on air pollution. A single particle aerosol spectrometer (SPAMS) was employed to characterize the particles with particle number count in high time resolution for two typhoons of Soulik (2013) and Soudelor (2015) with similar tracks. Three periods with five events were classified during the whole observation time, including pre - typhoon (event 1 and event 2), typhoon (event 3 and event 4) and post - typhoon (event 5) based on the meteorological parameters and particle pollutant properties. First pollutant group appeared during pre-typhoon (event 2) with high relative contributions of V - Ni rich particles. Pollution from the ship emissions and accumulated by local processes with stagnant meteorological atmosphere dominated the formation of the pollutant group before typhoon. The second pollutant group was present during typhoon (event 3), while typhoon began to change the local wind direction and increase wind speed. Particle number count reached up to the maximum value. High relative contributions of V - Ni rich and dust particles with low value of NO3(-)/SO4(2-) was observed during this period, indicating that the pollutant group was governed by the combined effect of local pollutant emissions and long-term transports. The analysis of this study sheds a deep insight into understand the relationship between the air pollution and typhoon. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Extractive Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry of Heterogeneous Particles: Implications for Applications to Complex Atmospheric Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longin, T.; Waring-Kidd, C.; Wingen, L. M.; Lyster, K.; Anderson, C.; Kumbhani, S.; Finlayson-Pitts, B. J.

    2015-12-01

    Extractive electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (EESI-MS) is a direct, real time technique for obtaining mass spectra of gases, liquid droplets, solid particles, and aerosols with little sample processing. EESI-MS involves the interaction of charged electrospray droplets with a separate spray containing the analyte of interest, but the exact mechanism by which the solvent droplets extract analyte from the sample is unclear. Possible mechanisms include complete coalescence of the sample particle with the solvent droplet in which all of the analyte is incorporated into the solvent or a more temporary interaction such that only some of the analyte is transferred to the solvent. Previous studies of the mechanism of EESI-MS on homogeneous particles indicate that both mechanisms are possible. We studied the behavior of EESI-MS toward heterogeneous particles created by coating NaCl particles with various thicknesses of organic diacids. Our results indicate that the signal strength depends on the solubility of the organic acid in the electrospray solvent, in agreement with previous studies, and also that the outer 10-15 nm of the particles are most susceptible to extraction into the electrospray droplets. Our results combined with those of previous studies suggest that the mass spectra obtained with EESI will not necessarily reflect the overall particle composition, especially for particles that are spatially inhomogeneous, and hence caution in interpretation of the data is advised for application to complex atmospheric aerosol.

  12. T-matrix calculations of fractal black carbon atmospheric aerosol particle optical scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Anna; Boness, David

    2008-05-01

    To better constrain global climate change computer models, and thereby to more fully understand the full extent of anthropogenic climate change, it is necessary to understand the physics of light scattering from those atmospheric aerosol particles that are caused by human activities. The IPCC AR4 report on the physical basis of climate change lists uncertainty in the effects of black carbon aerosol particles, caused by burning fossil fuels and organic matter, as one of the greatest uncertainties in current climate change understanding. This study hopes to increase the knowledge of how aerosols contribute to radiative forcing by using more realistic modeling of scattering properties. We use D. W. Mackowski's T- matrix code on fractal aggregates of uniform spherical monomers and compare this with fractal scattering predicted by the Raleigh-Debye-Gans approximation. The T-matrix code is checked for accuracy with one spherical particle as found with Mie theory. Scattering properties found using the T-matrix method are performed as a function of fractal dimension and number of monomers. Preliminary results will be presented. Future work will involve comparison with soot particle optical scattering measurements made at Seattle University.

  13. Organic films on atmospheric aerosol particles, fog droplets, cloud droplets, raindrops, and snowflakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, P. S.; Graedel, T. E.; Weschler, C. J.

    1983-05-01

    If surface-active organic molecules are present as surface films, the transfer of gases into the atmospheric water system could be impeded, evaporation could be slowed, and the aqueous chemical reactions could be influenced. The results of new measurements of the surface tension of aqueous solutions of common atmospheric organic compounds (beta-pinene, n-hexanol, eugenol, and anethole) are reported, and it is shown that the compounds produce films with properties similar to those of the better known surfactants. It is concluded that organic films are probably common on atmospheric aerosol particles and that they may occur under certain circumstances on fog droplets, cloud droplets, and snowflakes. If they are present, they will increase the lifetimes of aerosol particles, fog droplets, and cloud droplets, both by inhibiting water vapor evaporation and by reducing the efficiency with which these atmospheric components are scavenged. It is thought likely that the transport of gaseous molecules into and out of the aqueous solution will be impeded by factors of several hundred or more when organic films are present.

  14. Origin of nitrocatechols and alkylated-nitrocatechols in atmospheric aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchand, Nicolas; Sylvestre, Alexandre; Ravier, Sylvain; Detournay, Anais; Bruns, Emily; Temime-Roussel, Brice; Slowik, Jay; El Haddad, Imad; Prevot, Andre

    2013-04-01

    Biomass burning constitutes one of the major sources of aerosol particles in most of the environments during winter. If a lot of information is available in the literature on the primary fraction of biomass burning aerosol particles, almost nothing is known regarding the formation of Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA) from the chemical mixture emitted by this source. Recently methylated nitrocatechol have been identified in atmospheric particles collected in winter. These compounds are strongly associated with biomass burning tracers such as levoglucosan and are suspected to be of secondary origin since they can be formed through the oxidation of cresol significantly emitted by biomass burning. However, nitrocatechols are particularly difficult to analyze using classical techniques like HPLC-MS or GC-MS. In the present study, we adopt a new analytical approach. Direct analysis in real time (DART), introduced by Cody et al. (2005), allows direct analysis of gases, liquids, solids and materials on surfaces. Thus, for particles collected onto filters, the sample preparation step is simplified as much as possible, avoiding losses and reducing to the minimum the analytical procedure time. Two analytic modes can be used. In positive mode, [MH]+ ions are formed by proton transfer reaction ; whereas in negative ionization mode, [MH]-, M- and [MO2]- ions are formed. DART source enables soft ionization and produces simple mass spectra suitable for analysis of complex matrices, like organic aerosol, in only a few seconds. For this study, the DART source was coupled to a Q-ToF mass spectrometer (Synapt G2 HDMS, Waters), with a mass resolution up to 40 000. The analysis of atmospheric aerosol samples, collected in Marseille during winter 2011 (APICE project), with the DART/Q-ToF approach highlighted the abundance of nitrocatechols and alkylated nitrocatechols. Their temporal trends were also very similar to those of levoglucosan or dihydroabietic acid well known tracers of biomass

  15. A new method for assessing the contribution of Primary Biological Atmospheric Particles to the mass concentration of the atmospheric aerosol.

    PubMed

    Perrino, Cinzia; Marcovecchio, Francesca

    2016-02-01

    Primary Biologic Atmospheric Particles (PBAPs) constitute an interesting and poorly investigated component of the atmospheric aerosol. We have developed and validated a method for evaluating the contribution of overall PBAPs to the mass concentration of atmospheric particulate matter (PM). The method is based on PM sampling on polycarbonate filters, staining of the collected particles with propidium iodide, observation at epifluorescence microscope and calculation of the bioaerosol mass using a digital image analysis software. The method has been also adapted to the observation and quantification of size-segregated aerosol samples collected by multi-stage impactors. Each step of the procedure has been individually validated. The relative repeatability of the method, calculated on 10 pairs of atmospheric PM samples collected side-by-side, was 16%. The method has been applied to real atmospheric samples collected in the vicinity of Rome, Italy. Size distribution measurements revealed that PBAPs was mainly in the coarse fraction of PM, with maxima in the range 5.6-10 μm. 24-h samples collected during different period of the year have shown that the concentration of bioaerosol was in the range 0.18-5.3 μg m(-3) (N=20), with a contribution to the organic matter in PM10 in the range 0.5-31% and to the total mass concentration of PM10 in the range 0.3-18%. The possibility to determine the concentration of total PBAPs in PM opens up interesting perspectives in terms of studying the health effects of these components and of increasing our knowledge about the composition of the organic fraction of the atmospheric aerosol. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Contribution of Organics to Atmospheric Particle Formation: Temperature Dependence and Implications to Aerosol Radiative Forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, F.; Luo, G.; Nadykto, A.; Herb, J.

    2016-12-01

    Secondary particles formed via new particle formation (NPF) or nucleation dominate the global total particle number abundance, contributing as high as 80-95% to total particle (larger than 3 nm) and 50-80% to cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) number concentrations in most parts of the troposphere. Numerical simulations indicate that the aerosol indirect radiative forcing (IRF) is quite sensitive to nucleation parameterizations in global models. Low volatile highly oxidized organic compounds have been shown in recent laboratory studies to be able to significantly enhance NPF but the actual contribution of organics to NPF in the real atmosphere and its implications to aerosol IRF remain to be understood. By comparing particle size distributions (PSDs) measured in nine forest areas in North America with those predicted by a global aerosol model, we found in a recent study that the H2SO4-Organics nucleation parameterization derived from laboratory measurements significantly over-predicts NPF and particle number concentrations in summer. The lack of temperature dependence in the nucleation parameterization has been suggested as a possible reason for the over-prediction. Here, we employ H2SO4-Organics clustering thermodynamics from quantum-chemical studies to develop a scheme to incorporate temperature dependence into H2SO4-Organics nucleation parameterization. We show that temperature has a strong impact on H2SO4-Organics nucleation rate and the particle number concentrations in summer over North America based on the revised scheme is a factor of more than two lower, in much better agreement with the observations. With temperature-dependent H2SO4-Organics nucleation parameterization, the summer month CCN concentrations in the lower troposphere in the northern hemisphere are about 10-20% lower and the aerosol first IRF about 0.5 - 1.0 W/m2 less negative. The global distributions of particle first IRF due to anthropogenic emissions based on the temperature-dependent H2SO4

  17. Atmospheric aerosols: Their Optical Properties and Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Measured properties of atmospheric aerosol particles are presented. These include aerosol size frequency distribution and complex retractive index. The optical properties of aerosols are computed based on the presuppositions of thermodynamic equilibrium and of Mie-theory.

  18. Particle-Induced X-Ray Emission Analysis of Atmospheric Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleason, Colin; Harrington, Charles; Schuff, Katie; Battaglia, Maria; Moore, Robert; Turley, Colin; Vineyard, Michael; Labrake, Scott

    2010-11-01

    We are developing a research program in ion-beam analysis (IBA) of atmospheric aerosols at the Union College Ion-Beam Analysis Laboratory to study the transport, transformation, and effects of airborne pollution in Upstate New York. The simultaneous applications of the IBA techniques of particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE), Rutherford back-scattering spectrometry (RBS), particle-induced gamma-ray emission (PIGE), and proton elastic scattering analysis (PESA) is a powerful tool for the study of airborne pollution because they are non-destructive and provide quantitative information on nearly all elements of the periodic table. PIXE is the main IBA technique because it is able to detect nearly all elements from Na to U with high sensitivities and low detection limits. The aerosol samples are collected with cascade impactors that allow for the study of particulate matter as a function of particle size and the samples are analyzed using proton beams with energies around 2 MeV from the Union College 1.1-MV Pelletron Accelerator. The emitted X-rays are measured using a silicon drift detector with a resolution of 136 eV. We will describe how the aerosol samples were collected, discuss the PIXE analysis, and present preliminary results.

  19. Sampling atmospheric carbonaceous aerosols using an integrated organic gas and particle sampler.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xinghua; Brook, Jeffrey R; Mabury, Scott A

    2003-07-15

    Measurement of particle-bound organic carbon (OC) may be complicated by sampling artifacts such as adsorption of gas-phase species onto particles or filters or evaporation of semivolatile compounds off the particles. A denuder-based integrated organic gas and particle sampler (IOGAPS), specifically designed to minimize sampling artifacts, has been developed to sample atmospheric carbonaceous aerosols. IOGAPS is designed to first remove gas-phase chemicals via sorption to the XAD-coated denuder, and subsequently particles are trapped on a quartz filter. A backup sorbent system consisting of sorbent- (XAD-4 resin) impregnated filters (SIFs) was used to capture the semivolatile OC that evaporates from the particles accumulated on the upstream quartz filter. A traditional filter pack (FP) air sampler, which uses a single quartz filter to collect the particles, was employed for comparison in this study. Elemental and organic carbon were determined from filter punches by a thermal optical transmittance aerosol carbon analyzer. Field measurements show that there was no significant difference between the elemental carbon concentrations determined by the FP and IOGAPS, indicating that particle loss during the transit through the denuder tube was negligible. Compared with the OC determined by FP (3.9-12.6 microg of C/m3), the lower OC observed on the quartz filter in the IOGAPS (2.2-6.0 microg of C/m3) was expected because of the removal of gas-phase organics by the denuder. Higher semivolatile organic carbon (SVOC) on the backup SIFs during the night (1.24-8.43 microg of C/m3) suggests that more SVOC, emitted from primary sources or formed as secondary organic compounds, partitions onto the particles during the night because of the decreased ambient temperature. These data illustrate the utility of an IOGAPS system to more accurately determine the particle-bound OC in comparison to FP-based systems.

  20. Biomonitoring of atmospheric pollution: a novel approach for the evaluation of natural and anthropogenic contribution to atmospheric aerosol particles.

    PubMed

    Caggiano, Rosa; Calamita, Giuseppe; Sabia, Serena; Trippetta, Serena

    2017-03-01

    The investigation of the potential natural and anthropogenic contribution to atmospheric aerosol particles by using lichen-bag technique was performed in the Agri Valley (Basilicata region, southern Italy). This is an area of international concern since it houses one of the largest European on-shore reservoirs and the biggest oil/gas pre-treatment plant (i.e., Centro Olio Val d'Agri (COVA)) within an anthropized context. In particular, the concentrations of 17 trace elements (Al, Ca, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Li, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, P, Pb, S, Ti, and Zn) were measured in lichen bags exposed in 59 selected monitoring points over periods of 6 months (from October 2011 to April 2012) and 12 months (from October 2011 to October 2012). The general origin of the main air masses affecting the sampling site during the study period was assessed by the back trajectories clustering calculated using the HYbrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model. The results allowed the identification and characterization of the crustal material, smoke, sea salt, sulfate, and anthropogenic trace element contributions to the atmospheric aerosol particles in the study area. Finally, the application of the trend surface analysis (TSA) allowed the study of the spatial distribution of the considered contributions highlighting the existence of a continuous broad variation of these contributions in the area of interest.

  1. Hygroscopic growth of atmospheric aerosol particles based on active remote sensing and radiosounding measurements: selected cases in southeastern Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granados-Muñoz, M. J.; Navas-Guzmán, F.; Bravo-Aranda, J. A.; Guerrero-Rascado, J. L.; Lyamani, H.; Valenzuela, A.; Titos, G.; Fernández-Gálvez, J.; Alados-Arboledas, L.

    2015-02-01

    A new methodology based on combining active and passive remote sensing and simultaneous and collocated radiosounding data to study the aerosol hygroscopic growth effects on the particle optical and microphysical properties is presented. The identification of hygroscopic growth situations combines the analysis of multispectral aerosol particle backscatter coefficient and particle linear depolarization ratio with thermodynamic profiling of the atmospheric column. We analyzed the hygroscopic growth effects on aerosol properties, namely the aerosol particle backscatter coefficient and the volume concentration profiles, using data gathered at Granada EARLINET station. Two study cases, corresponding to different aerosol loads and different aerosol types, are used for illustrating the potential of this methodology. Values of the aerosol particle backscatter coefficient enhancement factors range from 2.1 ± 0.8 to 3.9 ± 1.5, in the ranges of relative humidity 60-90 and 40-83%, being similar to those previously reported in the literature. Differences in the enhancement factor are directly linked to the composition of the atmospheric aerosol. The largest value of the aerosol particle backscatter coefficient enhancement factor corresponds to the presence of sulphate and marine particles that are more affected by hygroscopic growth. On the contrary, the lowest value of the enhancement factor corresponds to an aerosol mixture containing sulphates and slight traces of mineral dust. The Hänel parameterization is applied to these case studies, obtaining results within the range of values reported in previous studies, with values of the γ exponent of 0.56 ± 0.01 (for anthropogenic particles slightly influenced by mineral dust) and 1.07 ± 0.01 (for the situation dominated by anthropogenic particles), showing the convenience of this remote sensing approach for the study of hygroscopic effects of the atmospheric aerosol under ambient unperturbed conditions. For the first time

  2. Characterization of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles from a Mining City in Southwest China Using Electron Probe microanalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, X.; Huang, Y.; Lu, H., III; Liu, Z., IV; Wang, N. V.

    2015-12-01

    Xin Cheng1, Yi Huang1*, Huilin Lu2, Zaidong Liu2, Ningming Wang21 Key Laboratory of Geological Nuclear Technology of Sichuan Province, College of Earth Science, Chengdu University of Technology, Chengdu 610059, China. ; E-mail:chengxin_cdut@163.com 2 College of Earth Science, Chengdu University of Technology, Chengdu 610059, China. ; *Corresponding author: E-mail: huangyi@cdut.cn Panzhihua is a mining city located at Pan-Xi Rift valley, southwest China. It has a long industrial history of vanadium-titanium magnetite mining, iron and steel smelting, and coal-fired power plants. Atomospheric environment has been seriously contaminated with airborne paticles, which is threatening human health.The harmful effects of aerosols are dependent on certain characteristics such as microphysical properties. However, few studsies have been carried out on morphological information contained on single atmospheric particles in this area. In this study, we provide a detailed morphologically and chemically characterization of airborne particles collected at Panzhihua city in October, 2014, using a quantitative single particle analysis based on EPXMA. The results indicate that based on their chemical composition, five major types of particles were identified. Among these, aluminosilicate particles have typical spherical shapes and are produced during the high-temperature combustion; Fe-containing particles contains high level of Mn, and more likely originated from mineralogical and steel industry; Si-containing particles can originate from mineralogical source; V-Ti-Mn-containing particles are also produced by steel industry; Ca-containing particles,these particles are CaCO3, mainly from the mining of limestone mine. The results help us on tracing and partitioning different sources of atomospheric particles in the industrial area. Fig.1 Fe-rich shperical particles

  3. Quantification of environmentally persistent free radicals and reactive oxygen species in atmospheric aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arangio, Andrea M.; Tong, Haijie; Socorro, Joanna; Pöschl, Ulrich; Shiraiwa, Manabu

    2016-10-01

    Fine particulate matter plays a central role in the adverse health effects of air pollution. Inhalation and deposition of aerosol particles in the respiratory tract can lead to the release of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which may cause oxidative stress. In this study, we have detected and quantified a wide range of particle-associated radicals using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. Ambient particle samples were collected using a cascade impactor at a semi-urban site in central Europe, Mainz, Germany, in May-June 2015. Concentrations of environmentally persistent free radicals (EPFR), most likely semiquinone radicals, were found to be in the range of (1-7) × 1011 spins µg-1 for particles in the accumulation mode, whereas coarse particles with a diameter larger than 1 µm did not contain substantial amounts of EPFR. Using a spin trapping technique followed by deconvolution of EPR spectra, we have also characterized and quantified ROS, including OH, superoxide (O2-) and carbon- and oxygen-centered organic radicals, which were formed upon extraction of the particle samples in water. Total ROS amounts of (0.1-3) × 1011 spins µg-1 were released by submicron particle samples and the relative contributions of OH, O2-, C-centered and O-centered organic radicals were ˜ 11-31, ˜ 2-8, ˜ 41-72 and ˜ 0-25 %, respectively, depending on particle sizes. OH was the dominant species for coarse particles. Based on comparisons of the EPR spectra of ambient particulate matter with those of mixtures of organic hydroperoxides, quinones and iron ions followed by chemical analysis using liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS), we suggest that the particle-associated ROS were formed by decomposition of organic hydroperoxides interacting with transition metal ions and quinones contained in atmospheric humic-like substances (HULIS).

  4. Physical and chemical characterization of marine atmospheric aerosols over the North and South Pacific Oceans using single particle mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furutani, H.; Jung, J.; Miura, K.; Uematsu, M.

    2010-12-01

    Physical and chemical properties of marine atmospheric aerosols were characterized and compared over the North and South Pacific Ocean during two trans-Pacific cruises (from Japan to Chile and Australia to Japan) during the period of January-June 2009, which cover broad region of Pacific Ocean from 40°N to 55°S and 140°E to 70°W. The measured parameters of aerosol properties were single particle size-resolved chemical composition (D = 100 ~ 1500 nm), cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and condensation nuclei (CN) concentrations, size distribution from 10 nm to 5 μm, total aerosol nitrate and sulfate concentrations, and filter-based chemical composition. Trace gas concentrations of O3 and CO were also measured to aid air parcel categorization during the cruises. Reflecting larger anthropogenic emission in the Northern Hemisphere, pronounced concentration gradient between the North and South Pacific Ocean was observed for aerosol nitrate, CO, and O3. Aerosol sulfate also showed a similar concentration drop in the equatorial region, relatively higher sulfate concentration was observed in 30°S-40°S and 55°S regions, which was associated with increased aerosol methanesulfonic acid (MSA) concentration but little increase in local marine chlorophyll concentration, suggesting contribution of long-range transported marine biogenic sulfur from the high primary production area over the South Pacific high latitude region. Aerosol chemical classification by single particle chemical analysis revealed that certain aerosol types, such as biomass burning, elemental carbon, and elemental/organic carbon mixed type, were mainly observed in the North Pacific region, while several specific organic aerosol types with abundant aged organic and disulfur composition were identified in the South Pacific region. Further comparison of aerosol properties, aerosol sources, and atmospheric aerosol processing in the North and South Pacific Oceans will be discussed.

  5. A preliminary analysis of the surface chemistry of atmospheric aerosol particles in a typical urban area of Beijing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhengzheng; Li, Hong; Liu, Hongyan; Ni, Runxiang; Li, Jinjuan; Deng, Liqun; Lu, Defeng; Cheng, Xueli; Duan, Pengli; Li, Wenjun

    2016-09-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particle samples were collected using an Ambient Eight Stage (Non-Viable) Cascade Impactor Sampler in a typical urban area of Beijing from 27th Sep. to 5th Oct., 2009. The surface chemistry of these aerosol particles was analyzed using Static Time of Flight-Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (Static TOF-SIMS). The factors influencing surface compositions were evaluated in conjunction with the air pollution levels, meteorological factors, and air mass transport for the sampling period. The results show that a variety of organic ion groups and inorganic ions/ion groups were accumulated on the surfaces of aerosol particles in urban areas of Beijing; and hydrophobic organic compounds with short- or middle-chain alkyl as well as hydrophilic secondary inorganic compounds were observed. All these compounds have the potential to affect the atmospheric behavior of urban aerosol particles. PM1.1-2.1 and PM3.3-4.7 had similar elements on their surfaces, but some molecules and ionic groups demonstrated differences in Time of Flight-Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry spectra. This suggests that the quantities of elements varied between PM1.1-2.1 and PM3.3-4.7. In particular, more intense research efforts into fluoride pollution are required, because the fluorides on aerosol surfaces have the potential to harm human health. The levels of air pollution had the most significant influence on the surface compositions of aerosol particles in our study. Hence, heavier air pollution was associated with more complex surface compositions on aerosol particles. In addition, wind, rainfall, and air masses from the south also greatly influenced the surface compositions of these urban aerosol particles.

  6. Atmospheric Aerosol Scattering Background Observations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-14

    condensation nuclei in the atmosphere, Nature 51:1259- 1267. 16. Whitby , K.T. (1975) Modeling of Atmospheric Aerosol Particle Size Distribution, Prog. Rep...Meteorol. 18:501-509. 33 15. Went, F.W. (1964) The nature of Aitkin condensation nuclei In the atmosphere, Nature 51:1259- 1267. 16. Whitby . K.T. (1975

  7. Hygroscopicity and CCN activity of atmospheric aerosol particles and their relation to organics: Characteristics of urban aerosols in Nagoya, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawana, Kaori; Nakayama, Tomoki; Mochida, Michihiro

    2016-04-01

    The size-resolved distributions of hygroscopic growth factor g and the ratios of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) to condensation nuclei of atmospheric aerosols were investigated in Nagoya, Japan. The average of the distributions of g at 85% relative humidity was bimodal. The size-resolved mean κ derived from g showed an increasing trend with diameter: 0.17-0.33 at 24-359 nm. The κ values calculated from CCN activation curves were 37% higher than those derived from g. Only 9% of the 37% difference is explained by the difference in the κ of inorganics under subsaturated and supersaturated conditions, suggesting a contribution of organics to the remaining 28% difference. The size-averaged κ of organics (κorg) was calculated as 0.14 and 0.19 by two different methods. The number fractions of CCN predicted from the hygroscopicity data over the range of 24-359 nm are loosely consistent with those observed if the size- and time-averaged g is applied to all particles (differences: -30% to +10%). This consistency improves if size- and time-resolved g and g distribution are used (differences: -19% to -3%). Whereas the number fractions of CCN predicted from the composition data are greatly underestimated if organics are assumed to be insoluble (differences: -64% to -45%), they are more consistent if κorg of 0.14 or 0.19 is applied (differences: -10% to +14%). The results demonstrate the importance of the dependence of the g of particles on time and particle size and the hygroscopicity of organics for CCN number concentrations in the urban atmosphere.

  8. Global distribution of particle phase state in atmospheric secondary organic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraiwa, Manabu; Li, Ying; Tsimpidi, Alexandra P.; Karydis, Vlassis A.; Berkemeier, Thomas; Pandis, Spyros N.; Lelieveld, Jos; Koop, Thomas; Pöschl, Ulrich

    2017-04-01

    Secondary organic aerosols (SOA) are a large source of uncertainty in our current understanding of climate change and air pollution. The phase state of SOA is important for quantifying their effects on climate and air quality, but its global distribution is poorly characterized. We developed a method to estimate glass transition temperatures based on the molar mass and molecular O:C ratio of SOA components, and we used the global chemistry climate model EMAC with the organic aerosol module ORACLE to predict the phase state of atmospheric SOA. For the planetary boundary layer, global simulations indicate that SOA are mostly liquid in tropical and polar air with high relative humidity, semi-solid in the mid-latitudes and solid over dry lands. We find that in the middle and upper troposphere SOA should be mostly in a glassy solid phase state. Thus, slow diffusion of water, oxidants and organic molecules could kinetically limit gas-particle interactions of SOA in the free and upper troposphere, promote ice nucleation and facilitate long-range transport of reactive and toxic organic pollutants embedded in SOA.

  9. Global distribution of particle phase state in atmospheric secondary organic aerosols.

    PubMed

    Shiraiwa, Manabu; Li, Ying; Tsimpidi, Alexandra P; Karydis, Vlassis A; Berkemeier, Thomas; Pandis, Spyros N; Lelieveld, Jos; Koop, Thomas; Pöschl, Ulrich

    2017-04-21

    Secondary organic aerosols (SOA) are a large source of uncertainty in our current understanding of climate change and air pollution. The phase state of SOA is important for quantifying their effects on climate and air quality, but its global distribution is poorly characterized. We developed a method to estimate glass transition temperatures based on the molar mass and molecular O:C ratio of SOA components, and we used the global chemistry climate model EMAC with the organic aerosol module ORACLE to predict the phase state of atmospheric SOA. For the planetary boundary layer, global simulations indicate that SOA are mostly liquid in tropical and polar air with high relative humidity, semi-solid in the mid-latitudes and solid over dry lands. We find that in the middle and upper troposphere SOA should be mostly in a glassy solid phase state. Thus, slow diffusion of water, oxidants and organic molecules could kinetically limit gas-particle interactions of SOA in the free and upper troposphere, promote ice nucleation and facilitate long-range transport of reactive and toxic organic pollutants embedded in SOA.

  10. Global distribution of particle phase state in atmospheric secondary organic aerosols

    PubMed Central

    Shiraiwa, Manabu; Li, Ying; Tsimpidi, Alexandra P.; Karydis, Vlassis A.; Berkemeier, Thomas; Pandis, Spyros N.; Lelieveld, Jos; Koop, Thomas; Pöschl, Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    Secondary organic aerosols (SOA) are a large source of uncertainty in our current understanding of climate change and air pollution. The phase state of SOA is important for quantifying their effects on climate and air quality, but its global distribution is poorly characterized. We developed a method to estimate glass transition temperatures based on the molar mass and molecular O:C ratio of SOA components, and we used the global chemistry climate model EMAC with the organic aerosol module ORACLE to predict the phase state of atmospheric SOA. For the planetary boundary layer, global simulations indicate that SOA are mostly liquid in tropical and polar air with high relative humidity, semi-solid in the mid-latitudes and solid over dry lands. We find that in the middle and upper troposphere SOA should be mostly in a glassy solid phase state. Thus, slow diffusion of water, oxidants and organic molecules could kinetically limit gas–particle interactions of SOA in the free and upper troposphere, promote ice nucleation and facilitate long-range transport of reactive and toxic organic pollutants embedded in SOA. PMID:28429776

  11. Identifying organic aerosol sources by comparing functional group composition in chamber and atmospheric particles.

    PubMed

    Russell, Lynn M; Bahadur, Ranjit; Ziemann, Paul J

    2011-03-01

    Measurements of submicron particles by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in 14 campaigns in North America, Asia, South America, and Europe were used to identify characteristic organic functional group compositions of fuel combustion, terrestrial vegetation, and ocean bubble bursting sources, each of which often accounts for more than a third of organic mass (OM), and some of which is secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from gas-phase precursors. The majority of the OM consists of alkane, carboxylic acid, hydroxyl, and carbonyl groups. The organic functional groups formed from combustion and vegetation emissions are similar to the secondary products identified in chamber studies. The near absence of carbonyl groups in the observed SOA associated with combustion is consistent with alkane rather than aromatic precursors, and the absence of organonitrate groups can be explained by their hydrolysis in humid ambient conditions. The remote forest observations have ratios of carboxylic acid, organic hydroxyl, and nonacid carbonyl groups similar to those observed for isoprene and monoterpene chamber studies, but in biogenic aerosols transported downwind of urban areas the formation of esters replaces the acid and hydroxyl groups and leaves only nonacid carbonyl groups. The carbonyl groups in SOA associated with vegetation emissions provides striking evidence for the mechanism of esterification as the pathway for possible oligomerization reactions in the atmosphere. Forest fires include biogenic emissions that produce SOA with organic components similar to isoprene and monoterpene chamber studies, also resulting in nonacid carbonyl groups in SOA.

  12. The role of biogenic, biomass burning and urban pollution aerosol particles in controlling key atmospheric processes in Amazonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artaxo, P.; Ferreira De Brito, J.; Barbosa, H. M.; Rizzo, L. V.; Sena, E. T.; Cirino, G.; Arana, A.; Yanez-Serrano, A. M.

    2013-05-01

    As part of the LBA (The Large Scale Biosphere Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia) experiment, a research program run in the last 10 years had help to understand critical atmospheric processes in Amazonia. The vegetation in Amazonia is a direct source of aerosol particles to the atmosphere as well as a source of biogenic trace gases that generates particles trough gas-to-particle conversion. Biomass burning is also a large source of particles and trace gases to the atmosphere. Over the last 10 years, the LBA experiment has unveiled several key processes that control Amazonian composition and influence regional climate. A significant fraction (60-80%) of airborne particles can act as Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN), influencing cloud formation and development. The radiation balance is strongly influenced by biomass burning particles, and surface radiative forcing up to -250 w/m2 is measured. A network of 8 sites with AERONET sunphotometers measures aerosol optical depth (AOD) and derive aerosol size distribution and optical properties. Aerosols are composed of more than 70% of organic material, with significant absorption characteristics. The aerosol radiative forcing during the biomass burning season can reach very high values, and the increase in diffuse radiation increases the carbon uptake by the forest for AOD values smaller than 1.2 at 500nm. For large AOD, the solar flux is strongly reduced making the carbon uptake approach zero for AOD larger than 3.0. The composition of aerosols is mostly organic, with contribution of K, Ca, Si, and other trace elements. The aerosol has high capability to serve as Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN), contributing with high water vapor amounts to the significant cloud cover over the region. In the last 20 years, an urbanization process took over for most of the Amazonian region, increasing urban pollution that interacts with forest emissions to produce a quite unique pattern of aerosols and pollutants around large urban areas such

  13. Real-Time Characterization of Aerosol Particle Composition above the Urban Canopy in Beijing: Insights into the Interactions between the Atmospheric Boundary Layer and Aerosol Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yele; Du, Wei; Wang, Qingqing; Zhang, Qi; Chen, Chen; Chen, Yong; Chen, Zhenyi; Fu, Pingqing; Wang, Zifa; Gao, Zhiqiu; Worsnop, Douglas R

    2015-10-06

    Despite extensive efforts into the characterization of air pollution during the past decade, real-time characterization of aerosol particle composition above the urban canopy in the megacity Beijing has never been performed to date. Here we conducted the first simultaneous real-time measurements of aerosol composition at two different heights at the same location in urban Beijing from December 19, 2013 to January 2, 2014. The nonrefractory submicron aerosol (NR-PM1) species were measured in situ by a high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometer at near-ground level and an aerosol chemical speciation monitor at 260 m on a 325 m meteorological tower in Beijing. Secondary aerosol showed similar temporal variations between ground level and 260 m, whereas much weaker correlations were found for the primary aerosol. The diurnal evolution of the ratios and correlations of aerosol species between 260 m and the ground level further illustrated a complex interaction between vertical mixing processes and local source emissions on aerosol chemistry in the atmospheric boundary layer. As a result, the aerosol compositions at the two heights were substantially different. Organic aerosol (OA), mainly composed of primary OA (62%), at the ground level showed a higher contribution to NR-PM1 (65%) than at 260 m (54%), whereas a higher concentration and contribution (15%) of nitrate was observed at 260 m, probably due to the favorable gas-particle partitioning under lower temperature conditions. In addition, two different boundary layer structures were observed, each interacting differently with the evolution processes of aerosol chemistry.

  14. Anthropogenic Influence on Secondary Aerosol Formation and Total Water-Soluble Carbon on Atmospheric Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gioda, Adriana; Mateus, Vinicius; Monteiro, Isabela; Taira, Fabio; Esteves, Veronica; Saint'Pierre, Tatiana

    2013-04-01

    On a global scale, the atmosphere is an important source of nutrients, as well as pollutants, because of its interfaces with soil and water. Important compounds in the gaseous phase are in both organic and inorganic forms, such as organic acids, nitrogen, sulfur and chloride. In spite of the species in gas form, a huge number of process, anthropogenic and natural, are able to form aerosols, which may be transported over long distances. Sulfates e nitrates are responsible for rain acidity; they may also increase the solubility of organic compounds and metals making them more bioavailable, and also can act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Aerosol samples (PM2.5) were collected in a rural and industrial area in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, in order to quantify chemical species and evaluate anthropogenic influences in secondary aerosol formation and organic compounds. Samples were collected during 24 h every six days using a high-volume sampler from August 2010 to July 2011. The aerosol mass was determined by Gravimetry. The water-soluble ionic composition (WSIC) was obtained by Ion Chromatography in order to determine the major anions (NO3-, SO4= and Cl-); total water-soluble carbon (TWSC) was determined by a TOC analyzer. The average aerosol (PM2.5) concentrations ranged from 1 to 43 ug/m3 in the industrial site and from 4 to 35 ug/m3 in the rural area. Regarding anions, the highest concentrations were measured for SO42- (10.6 μg/m3-12.6 μg/m3); where the lowest value was found in the rural site and the highest in the industrial. The concentrations for NO3- and Cl- ranged from 4.2 μg/m3 to 9.3 μg/m3 and 3.1 μg/m3 to 6.4 μg /m3, respectively. Sulfate was the major species and, like nitrate, it is related to photooxidation in the atmosphere. Interestingly sulfate concentrations were higher during the dry period and could be related to photochemistry activity. The correlations between nitrate and non-sea-salt sulfate were weak, suggesting different sources for these

  15. Interactions of mineral dust with pollution and clouds: An individual-particle TEM study of atmospheric aerosol from Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pósfai, Mihály; Axisa, Duncan; Tompa, Éva; Freney, Evelyn; Bruintjes, Roelof; Buseck, Peter R.

    2013-03-01

    Aerosol particles from desert dust interact with clouds and influence climate on regional and global scales. The Riyadh (Saudi Arabia) aerosol campaign was initiated to study the effects of dust particles on cloud droplet nucleation and cloud properties. Here we report the results of individual-particle studies of samples that were collected from an aircraft in April 2007. We used analytical transmission electron microscopy, including energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry, electron diffraction, and imaging techniques for the morphological, chemical, and structural characterization of the particles. Dust storms and regional background conditions were encountered during four days of sampling. Under dusty conditions, the coarse (supermicrometer) fraction resembles freshly crushed rock. The particles are almost exclusively mineral dust grains and include common rock-forming minerals, among which clay minerals, particularly smectites, are most abundant. Unaltered calcite grains also occur, indicating no significant atmospheric processing. The particles have no visible coatings but some contain traces of sulfur. The fine (submicrometer) fraction is dominated by particles of anthropogenic origin, primarily ammonium sulfate (with variable organic coating and some with soot inclusions) and combustion-derived particles (mostly soot). In addition, submicrometer, iron-bearing clay particles also occur, many of which are internally mixed with ammonium sulfate, soot, or both. We studied the relationships between the properties of the aerosol and the droplet microphysics of cumulus clouds that formed above the aerosol layer. Under dusty conditions, when a large concentration of coarse-fraction mineral particles was in the aerosol, cloud drop concentrations were lower and droplet diameters larger than under regional background conditions, when the aerosol was dominated by submicrometer sulfate particles.

  16. Measurements of isoprene-derived organosulfates in ambient aerosols by aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometry - part 1: single particle atmospheric observations in Atlanta.

    PubMed

    Hatch, Lindsay E; Creamean, Jessie M; Ault, Andrew P; Surratt, Jason D; Chan, Man Nin; Seinfeld, John H; Edgerton, Eric S; Su, Yongxuan; Prather, Kimberly A

    2011-06-15

    Organosulfate species have recently been identified as a potentially significant class of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) species, yet little is known about their behavior in the atmosphere. In this work, organosulfates were observed in individual ambient aerosols using single particle mass spectrometry in Atlanta, GA during the 2002 Aerosol Nucleation and Characterization Experiment (ANARChE) and the 2008 August Mini-Intensive Gas and Aerosol Study (AMIGAS). Organosulfates derived from biogenically produced isoprene were detected as deprotonated molecular ions in negative-ion spectra measured by aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometry; comparison to high-resolution mass spectrometry data obtained from filter samples corroborated the peak assignments. The size-resolved chemical composition measurements revealed that organosulfate species were mostly detected in submicrometer aerosols and across a range of aerosols from different sources, consistent with secondary reaction products. Detection of organosulfates in a large fraction of negative-ion ambient spectra - ca. 90-95% during ANARChE and ~65% of submicrometer particles in AMIGAS - highlights the ubiquity of organosulfate species in the ambient aerosols of biogenically influenced urban environments.

  17. Aerosol complexity in megacities: From size-resolved chemical composition to optical properties of the Beijing atmospheric particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roger, Jean-Claude; Guinot, Benjamin; Cachier, Hélène; Mallet, Marc; Dubovik, Oleg; Yu, Tong

    2009-09-01

    Megacities need adapted tools for the accurate modeling of aerosol impacts. For this purpose a new experimental data processing has been worked out for Beijing aerosols as case study. Size-resolved aerosol particles were extensively sampled during winter and summer 2003 and subsequently fully chemically characterized. The product is an aerosol model presenting a new particle pattern (mode number, size and chemistry) without any prerequisite constrain either on the mode number or on each mode chemical composition. Six modes were found and five of them consistently appear as internally mixed particles organized around a black carbon or a dust core coated by organic and/or inorganic material. Data were checked by robust comparisons with other experimental data (particle number, sunphotometer-derived derived data). We found the presence of two accumulation modes in different internal mixing and optical calculations show that the Beijing aerosol single scattering albedo (ω o # 0.90) is significantly higher than expected. Such an approach would allow realistic modeling of atmospheric particle impacts under complex situations.

  18. Massive-scale aircraft observations of giant sea-salt aerosol particle size distributions in atmospheric marine boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, J. B.

    2015-12-01

    iant sea-salt aerosol particles (dry radius, rd > 0.5 μm) occur nearly everywhere in the marine boundary layer and frequently above. This study presents observations of atmospheric sea-salt size distributions in the range 0.7 < rd < 14 μm based on external impaction of sea-spray aerosol particles onto microscope polycarbonate microscope slides. The slides have very large sample volumes, typically about 250 L over a 10-second sampling period. This provides unprecedented sampling of giant sea-salt particles for flights in marine boundary layer air. The slides were subsequently analyzed in a humidified chamber using dual optical digital microscopy. At a relative humidity of 90% the sea-salt aerosol particles form spherical cap drops. Based on measurement the volume of the spherical cap drop and assuming NaCl composition, the Kohler equation is used to derive the dry salt mass of tens of thousands of individual aerosol particles on each slide. Size distributions are given with a 0.2 μm resolution. The slides were exposed from the NSF/NCAR C-130 research aircraft during the 2008 VOCALS project off the coast of northern Chile and the 2011 ICE-T in the Caribbean. In each deployment, size distributions using hundreds of slides are used to relate fitted log-normal size distributions parameters to wind speed, altitude and other atmospheric conditions. The size distributions provide a unique observational set for initializing cloud models with coarse-mode aerosol particle observations for marine atmospheres.

  19. Investigations of Physicochemical Properties of Size-Resolved, Subsaturated, Atmospheric Aerosol Particles: Instrument Development, Field Measurements, and Data Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shingler, Taylor

    Aerosol particle properties and their impact on air quality, clouds, and the hydrologic cycle remain a critically important factor for the understanding of our atmosphere. Particle hygroscopic growth leads to impacts on direct and indirect radiative forcing properties, the likelihood for particles to act as cloud condensation nuclei, and aerosol-cloud interactions. Current instruments measuring hygroscopic growth have a number of limitations, lacking either the ability to measure size-resolved particles or process samples at a fast enough resolution to be suitable for airborne deployment. Advanced in-situ airborne particle retrieval and measurements of aerosol hygroscopic growth and scattering properties are analyzed and discussed. To improve the analysis of cloud nuclei particles, an updated counterflow virtual impact inlet was characterized and deployed during the 2011 E-PEACE field campaign. Theoretical and laboratory based cut size diameters were determined and validated against data collected from an airborne platform. In pursuit of higher quality aerosol particle hygroscopicity measurements, a newer instrument, the differential aerosol sizing and hygroscopicity probe (DASH-SP) has been developed in the recent past and only flown on a handful of campaigns. It has been proven to provide quality, rapid, size-resolved hygroscopic growth factor data, but was further improved into a smaller form factor making it easier for deployment on airborne platforms. It was flown during the 2013 SEAC4RS field campaign and the data was analyzed to composite air mass based hygroscopicity and refractive index (real portion only) statistics. Additionally, a comparison of bulk and size-resolved hygroscopic growth measurements was conducted. Significant findings include a potential particle size bias on bulk scattering measurements as well as a narrow range of ambient real portion of refractive index values. An investigation into the first reported ambient hygroscopicity

  20. Atomic Force Microscopy-Infrared Spectroscopy of Individual Atmospheric Aerosol Particles: Subdiffraction Limit Vibrational Spectroscopy and Morphological Analysis.

    PubMed

    Bondy, Amy L; Kirpes, Rachel M; Merzel, Rachel L; Pratt, Kerri A; Banaszak Holl, Mark M; Ault, Andrew P

    2017-09-05

    Chemical analysis of atmospheric aerosols is an analytical challenge, as aerosol particles are complex chemical mixtures that can contain hundreds to thousands of species in attoliter volumes at the most abundant sizes in the atmosphere (∼100 nm). These particles have global impacts on climate and health, but there are few methods available that combine imaging and the detailed molecular information from vibrational spectroscopy for individual particles <500 nm. Herein, we show the first application of atomic force microscopy with infrared spectroscopy (AFM-IR) to detect trace organic and inorganic species and probe intraparticle chemical variation in individual particles down to 150 nm. By detecting photothermal expansion at frequencies where particle species absorb IR photons from a tunable laser, AFM-IR can study particles smaller than the optical diffraction limit. Combining strengths of AFM (ambient pressure, height, morphology, and phase measurements) with photothermal IR spectroscopy, the potential of AFM-IR is shown for a diverse set of single-component particles, liquid-liquid phase separated particles (core-shell morphology), and ambient atmospheric particles. The spectra from atmospheric model systems (ammonium sulfate, sodium nitrate, succinic acid, and sucrose) had clearly identifiable features that correlate with absorption frequencies for infrared-active modes. Additionally, molecular information was obtained with <100 nm spatial resolution for phase separated particles with a ∼150 nm shell and 300 nm core. The subdiffraction limit capability of AFM-IR has the potential to advance understanding of particle impacts on climate and health by improving analytical capabilities to study water uptake, heterogeneous reactivity, and viscosity.

  1. A method for the direct measurement of surface tension of collected atmospherically relevant aerosol particles using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hritz, Andrew D.; Raymond, Timothy M.; Dutcher, Dabrina D.

    2016-08-01

    Accurate estimates of particle surface tension are required for models concerning atmospheric aerosol nucleation and activation. However, it is difficult to collect the volumes of atmospheric aerosol required by typical instruments that measure surface tension, such as goniometers or Wilhelmy plates. In this work, a method that measures, ex situ, the surface tension of collected liquid nanoparticles using atomic force microscopy is presented. A film of particles is collected via impaction and is probed using nanoneedle tips with the atomic force microscope. This micro-Wilhelmy method allows for direct measurements of the surface tension of small amounts of sample. This method was verified using liquids, whose surface tensions were known. Particles of ozone oxidized α-pinene, a well-characterized system, were then produced, collected, and analyzed using this method to demonstrate its applicability for liquid aerosol samples. It was determined that oxidized α-pinene particles formed in dry conditions have a surface tension similar to that of pure α-pinene, and oxidized α-pinene particles formed in more humid conditions have a surface tension that is significantly higher.

  2. Airborne Atmospheric Aerosol Measurement System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, K.; Park, Y.; Eun, H.; Lee, H.

    2015-12-01

    It is important to understand the atmospheric aerosols compositions and size distributions since they greatly affect the environment and human health. Particles in the convection layer have been a great concern in global climate changes. To understand these characteristics satellite, aircraft, and radio sonde measurement methods have usually been used. An aircraft aerosol sampling using a filter and/or impactor was the method commonly used (Jay, 2003). However, the flight speed particle sampling had some technical limitations (Hermann, 2001). Moreover, the flight legal limit, altitude, prohibited airspace, flight time, and cost was another demerit. To overcome some of these restrictions, Tethered Balloon Package System (T.B.P.S.) and Recoverable Sonde System(R.S.S.) were developed with a very light optical particle counter (OPC), impactor, and condensation particle counter (CPC). Not only does it collect and measure atmospheric aerosols depending on altitudes, but it also monitors the atmospheric conditions, temperature, humidity, wind velocity, pressure, GPS data, during the measurement (Eun, 2013). In this research, atmospheric aerosol measurement using T.B.P.S. in Ansan area is performed and the measurement results will be presented. The system can also be mounted to an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) and create an aerial particle concentration map. Finally, we will present measurement data using Tethered Balloon Package System (T.B.P.S.) and R.S.S (Recoverable Sonde System).

  3. Spatial and temporal distributions of ice nucleating particles during the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Cloud Aerosol Precipitation Experiment (ACAPEX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, E. J.; DeMott, P. J.; Suski, K. J.; Boose, Y.; Hill, T. C. J.; McCluskey, C. S.; Schill, G. P.; Duncan, D.; Al-Mashat, H.; Prather, K. A.; Sedlacek, A. J., III; Tomlinson, J. M.; Mei, F.; Hubbe, J. M.; Pekour, M. S.; Leung, L. R.; Kreidenweis, S. M.

    2016-12-01

    California is currently under drought conditions and changes in precipitation due to future climate change scenarios are uncertain. Thus, understanding the controlling factors for precipitation in this region, and having the capability to accurately model these scenarios, is important. A crucial area in understanding precipitation is in the interplay between atmospheric moisture and aerosols. Specifically, ice nucleation in clouds is an important process controlling precipitation formation. A major component of CA's yearly precipitation comes from wintertime atmospheric river (AR) events which were the focus of the 2015 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Cloud Aerosol Precipitation Experiment (ACAPEX) and CalWater 2 campaigns. These two campaigns provided sampling platforms on four aircraft, including the ARM Aerial Facility G-1, as well as the NOAA Ron Brown research vessel and at a ground station at Bodega Bay, CA. Measurements of ice nucleating particles (INPs) were made with the Colorado State University (CSU) Continuous Flow Diffusion Chamber (CFDC) aboard the G-1 and at Bodega Bay, and using aerosol filter collections on these platforms as well as the Ron Brown for post-processing via immersion freezing in the CSU Ice Spectrometer. Aerosol composition was measured aboard the G-1 with the Aerosol Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (ATOFMS). Both the CFDC and ATOFMS sampled off of an isokinetic inlet when flying in clear air and a counter-flow virtual impactor in clouds to capture ice crystal and cloud droplet residuals. In this presentation we present ice nucleating particle concentrations before, during and after an AR event from air, ground and ocean-based measurements. We also examine INP concentration variability in orographic clouds and in clear air at altitude along the Sierra Nevada range, in the marine boundary layer and through the Central Valley, and relate these INP measurements to other aerosol physical and chemical properties.

  4. Hygroscopicity of aerosol particles and CCN activity of nearly hydrophobic particles in the urban atmosphere over Japan during summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Shuhei; Setoguchi, Yoshitaka; Kawana, Kaori; Nakayama, Tomoki; Ikeda, Yuka; Sawada, Yuuki; Matsumi, Yutaka; Mochida, Michihiro

    2016-06-01

    We investigated the hygroscopicity of 150 nm particles and the number-size distributions and the cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity of nearly hydrophobic particles in aerosols over Nagoya, Japan, during summer. We analyzed the correlations between the number concentrations of particles in specific hygroscopic growth factor (g) ranges and the mass concentrations of chemical components. This analysis suggests the association of nearly hydrophobic particles with hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol, elemental carbon and semivolatile oxygenated organic aerosol (SV-OOA), that of less hygroscopic particles with SV-OOA and nitrate and that of more hygroscopic particles with low-volatile oxygenated organic aerosol (LV-OOA) and sulfate. The hygroscopicity parameter (κ) of organics was derived based on the g distributions and chemical composition of 150 nm particles. The κ of the organics correlated positively with the fraction of the total organic mass spectral signal at m/z 44 and the volume fraction of the LV-OOA to the organics, indicating that organics with highly oxygenated structures including carboxylic acid groups contribute to the water uptake. The number-size distributions of the nearly hydrophobic particles with g around 1.0 and 1.1 correlated with the mass concentrations of chemical components. The results show that the chemical composition of the particles with g around 1.0 was different between the Aitken mode and the accumulation mode size ranges. An analysis for a parameter Fmax of the curves fitted to the CCN efficiency spectra of the particles with g around 1.0 suggests that the coating by organics associated with SV-OOA elevated the CCN activity of these particles.

  5. Gas-particle partitioning of atmospheric aerosols: interplay of physical state, non-ideal mixing and morphology.

    PubMed

    Shiraiwa, Manabu; Zuend, Andreas; Bertram, Allan K; Seinfeld, John H

    2013-07-21

    Atmospheric aerosols, comprising organic compounds and inorganic salts, play a key role in air quality and climate. Mounting evidence exists that these particles frequently exhibit phase separation into predominantly organic and aqueous electrolyte-rich phases. As well, the presence of amorphous semi-solid or glassy particle phases has been established. Using the canonical system of ammonium sulfate mixed with organics from the ozone oxidation of α-pinene, we illustrate theoretically the interplay of physical state, non-ideality, and particle morphology affecting aerosol mass concentration and the characteristic timescale of gas-particle mass transfer. Phase separation can significantly affect overall particle mass and chemical composition. Semi-solid or glassy phases can kinetically inhibit the partitioning of semivolatile components and hygroscopic growth, in contrast to the traditional assumption that organic compounds exist in quasi-instantaneous gas-particle equilibrium. These effects have significant implications for the interpretation of laboratory data and the development of improved atmospheric air quality and climate models.

  6. ISSARS Aerosol Database : an Incorporation of Atmospheric Particles into a Universal Tool to Simulate Remote Sensing Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goetz, Michael B.

    2011-01-01

    The Instrument Simulator Suite for Atmospheric Remote Sensing (ISSARS) entered its third and final year of development with an overall goal of providing a unified tool to simulate active and passive space borne atmospheric remote sensing instruments. These simulations focus on the atmosphere ranging from UV to microwaves. ISSARS handles all assumptions and uses various models on scattering and microphysics to fill the gaps left unspecified by the atmospheric models to create each instrument's measurements. This will help benefit mission design and reduce mission cost, create efficient implementation of multi-instrument/platform Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSE), and improve existing models as well as new advanced models in development. In this effort, various aerosol particles are incorporated into the system, and a simulation of input wavelength and spectral refractive indices related to each spherical test particle(s) generate its scattering properties and phase functions. These atmospheric particles being integrated into the system comprise the ones observed by the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer(MISR) and by the Multiangle SpectroPolarimetric Imager(MSPI). In addition, a complex scattering database generated by Prof. Ping Yang (Texas A&M) is also incorporated into this aerosol database. Future development with a radiative transfer code will generate a series of results that can be validated with results obtained by the MISR and MSPI instruments; nevertheless, test cases are simulated to determine the validity of various plugin libraries used to determine or gather the scattering properties of particles studied by MISR and MSPI, or within the Single-scattering properties of tri-axial ellipsoidal mineral dust particles database created by Prof. Ping Yang.

  7. ISSARS Aerosol Database : an Incorporation of Atmospheric Particles into a Universal Tool to Simulate Remote Sensing Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goetz, Michael B.

    2011-01-01

    The Instrument Simulator Suite for Atmospheric Remote Sensing (ISSARS) entered its third and final year of development with an overall goal of providing a unified tool to simulate active and passive space borne atmospheric remote sensing instruments. These simulations focus on the atmosphere ranging from UV to microwaves. ISSARS handles all assumptions and uses various models on scattering and microphysics to fill the gaps left unspecified by the atmospheric models to create each instrument's measurements. This will help benefit mission design and reduce mission cost, create efficient implementation of multi-instrument/platform Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSE), and improve existing models as well as new advanced models in development. In this effort, various aerosol particles are incorporated into the system, and a simulation of input wavelength and spectral refractive indices related to each spherical test particle(s) generate its scattering properties and phase functions. These atmospheric particles being integrated into the system comprise the ones observed by the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer(MISR) and by the Multiangle SpectroPolarimetric Imager(MSPI). In addition, a complex scattering database generated by Prof. Ping Yang (Texas A&M) is also incorporated into this aerosol database. Future development with a radiative transfer code will generate a series of results that can be validated with results obtained by the MISR and MSPI instruments; nevertheless, test cases are simulated to determine the validity of various plugin libraries used to determine or gather the scattering properties of particles studied by MISR and MSPI, or within the Single-scattering properties of tri-axial ellipsoidal mineral dust particles database created by Prof. Ping Yang.

  8. Sub-micron atmospheric aerosols in the surroundings of Marseille and Athens: physical characterization and new particle formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petäjä, T.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Dal Maso, M.; Junninen, H.; Koponen, I. K.; Hussein, T.; Aalto, P. P.; Andronopoulos, S.; Robin, D.; Hämeri, K.; Bartzis, J. G.; Kulmala, M.

    2007-05-01

    The properties of atmospheric aerosol particles in Marseille and Athens were investigated. The studies were performed in Marseille, France, during July 2002 and in Athens, Greece, during June 2003. The aerosol size distribution and the formation and growth rates of newly formed particles were characterized using Differential Mobility Particle Sizers. Hygroscopic properties were observed using a Hygroscopic Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer setup. During both campaigns, the observations were performed at suburban, almost rural sites, and the sites can be considered to show general regional background behavior depending on the wind direction. At both sites there were clear pattern for both aerosol number concentration and hygroscopic properties. Nucleation mode number concentration increased during the morning hours indicating new particle formation, which was observed during more than 30% of the days. The observed formation rate was typically more than 1 cm-3 s-1, and the growth rate was between 1.2-9.9 nm h-1. Based on hygroscopicity measurements in Athens, the nucleation mode size increase was due to condensation of both water insoluble and water soluble material. However, during a period of less anthropogenic influence, the growth was to a larger extent due to water insoluble components. When urban pollution was more pronounced, growth due to condensation of water soluble material dominated.

  9. Sub-micron atmospheric aerosols in the surroundings of Marseille and Athens: physical characterization and new particle formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petäjä, T.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Dal Maso, M.; Junninen, H.; Koponen, I. K.; Hussein, T.; Aalto, P. P.; Andronopoulos, S.; Robin, D.; Hämeri, K.; Bartzis, J. G.; Kulmala, M.

    2006-09-01

    The properties of atmospheric aerosol particles in Marseille and Athens were investigated. The studies were performed in Marseille, France during July 2002 and in Athens Greece during June 2003. The aerosol size distribution and the formation and growth rates of newly formed particles were characterized using Differential Mobility Particle Sizers. Hygroscopic properties were observed using a Hygroscopic Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer setup. During both campaigns, the observations were performed at suburban, almost rural sites, and the sites can be considered to show general regional background behavior depending on the wind direction. At both sites there were clear pattern for both aerosol number concentration and hygroscopic properties. Nucleation mode number concentration increased during the morning hours indicating new particle formation, which was observed during more than 30% of the days. The observed formation rate was typically more than 1 cm-3 s-1, and the growth rate was between 1.2-9.9 nm h-1. Based on hygroscopicity measurements in Athens, the nucleation mode size increase was due to condensation of both water insoluble and water soluble material. However, during a period of less anthropogenic influence, the growth was to a larger extent due to water insoluble components. When urban pollution was more pronounced, growth due to condensation of water soluble material dominated.

  10. Hygroscopicity of internally mixed multi-component aerosol particles of atmospheric relevance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qifan; Jing, Bo; Peng, Chao; Tong, Shengrui; Wang, Weigang; Ge, Maofa

    2016-01-01

    The hygroscopic properties of two water-soluble organic compounds (WSOCs) relevant to urban haze pollution (phthalic acid and levoglucosan) and their internally mixtures with inorganic salts (ammonium sulfate and ammonium nitrate) are investigated using a hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (H-TDMA) system. The multi-component particles uptake water gradually in the range 5-90% relative humidity (RH). The experimental results are compared with the thermodynamic model predictions. For most mixtures, Extended Aerosol Inorganic Model (E-AIM) predictions agree well with the measured growth factors. The hygroscopic growth of mixed particles can be well described by the Zdanovskii-Stokes-Robinson (ZSR) relation as long as the mixed particles are completely liquid. ZSR calculations underestimate the water uptake of mixed particles at moderate RH due to the partial dissolution of ammonium sulfate in the organic and ammonium nitrate solution in this RH region. The phase of ammonium nitrate in the initial dry particles changes dramatically with the composition of mixtures. The presence of organics in the mixed particles can inhibit the crystallization of ammonium nitrate during the drying process and results in water uptake at low RH (RH < 60%). These results demonstrate that certain representative WSOCs can substantially influence the hygroscopicity of inorganic salts and overall water uptake of particles.

  11. Evaluation of a global aerosol microphysics model against size-resolved particle statistics in the marine atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spracklen, D. V.; Pringle, K. J.; Carslaw, K. S.; Mann, G. W.; Manktelow, P.; Heintzenberg, J.

    2007-04-01

    A statistical synthesis of marine aerosol measurements from experiments in four different oceans is used to evaluate a global aerosol microphysics model (GLOMAP). We compare the model against observed size resolved particle concentrations, probability distributions, and the temporal persistence of different size particles. We attempt to explain the observed sub-micrometre size distributions in terms of sulfate and sea spray and quantify the possible contributions of anthropogenic sulfate and carbonaceous material to the number and mass distribution. The model predicts a bimodal size distribution that agrees well with observations as a grand average over all regions, but there are large regional differences. Notably, observed Aitken mode number concentrations are more than a factor 10 higher than in the model for the N Atlantic but a factor 7 lower than the model in the NW Pacific. We also find that modelled Aitken mode and accumulation mode geometric mean diameters are generally smaller in the model by 10-30%. Comparison with observed free tropospheric Aitken mode distributions suggests that the model underpredicts growth of these particles during descent to the marine boundary layer (MBL). Recent observations of a substantial organic component of free tropospheric aerosol could explain this discrepancy. We find that anthropogenic continental material makes a substantial contribution to N Atlantic MBL aerosol, with typically 60-90% of sulfate across the particle size range coming from anthropogenic sources, even if we analyse air that has spent an average of >120 h away from land. However, anthropogenic primary black carbon and organic carbon particles (at the emission size and quantity assumed here) do not explain the large discrepancies in Aitken mode number. Several explanations for the discrepancy are suggested. The lack of lower atmospheric particle formation in the model may explain low N Atlantic particle concentrations. However, the observed and modelled

  12. Real time analysis of lead-containing atmospheric particles in Beijing during springtime by single particle aerosol mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ma, Li; Li, Mei; Huang, Zhengxu; Li, Lei; Gao, Wei; Nian, Huiqing; Zou, Lilin; Fu, Zhong; Gao, Jian; Chai, Fahe; Zhou, Zhen

    2016-07-01

    Using a single particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SPAMS), the chemical composition and size distributions of lead (Pb)-containing particles with diameter from 0.1 μm to 2.0 μm in Beijing were analyzed in the spring of 2011 during clear, hazy, and dusty days. Based on mass spectral features of particles, cluster analysis was applied to Pb-containing particles, and six major classes were acquired consisting of K-rich, carboneous, Fe-rich, dust, Pb-rich, and Cl-rich particles. Pb-containing particles accounted for 4.2-5.3%, 21.8-22.7%, and 3.2% of total particle number during clear, hazy and dusty days, respectively. K-rich particles are a major contribution to Pb-containing particles, varying from 30.8% to 82.1% of total number of Pb-containing particles, lowest during dusty days and highest during hazy days. The results reflect that the chemical composition and amount of Pb-containing particles has been affected by meteorological conditions as well as the emissions of natural and anthropogenic sources. K-rich particles and carbonaceous particles could be mainly assigned to the emissions of coal combustion. Other classes of Pb-containing particles may be associated with metallurgical processes, coal combustion, dust, and waste incineration etc. In addition, Pb-containing particles during dusty days were first time studied by SPAMS. This method could provide a powerful tool for monitoring and controlling of Pb pollution in real time. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Calcium enrichment in sea spray aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salter, M. E.; Hamacher-Barth, E.; Leck, C.; Werner, J.; Johnson, C. M.; Riipinen, I.; Nilsson, E. D.; Zieger, P.

    2016-08-01

    Sea spray aerosol particles are an integral part of the Earth's radiation budget. To date, the inorganic composition of nascent sea spray aerosol particles has widely been assumed to be equivalent to the inorganic composition of seawater. Here we challenge this assumption using a laboratory sea spray chamber containing both natural and artificial seawater, as well as with ambient aerosol samples collected over the central Arctic Ocean during summer. We observe significant enrichment of calcium in submicrometer (<1 μm in diameter) sea spray aerosol particles when particles are generated from both seawater sources in the laboratory as well as in the ambient aerosols samples. We also observe a tendency for increasing calcium enrichment with decreasing particle size. Our results suggest that calcium enrichment in sea spray aerosol particles may be environmentally significant with implications for our understanding of sea spray aerosol, its impact on Earth's climate, as well as the chemistry of the marine atmosphere.

  14. The impact of particle size, relative humidity, and sulfur dioxide on iron solubility in simulated atmospheric marine aerosols.

    PubMed

    Cartledge, Benton T; Marcotte, Aurelie R; Herckes, Pierre; Anbar, Ariel D; Majestic, Brian J

    2015-06-16

    Iron is a limiting nutrient in about half of the world's oceans, and its most significant source is atmospheric deposition. To understand the pathways of iron solubilization during atmospheric transport, we exposed size segregated simulated marine aerosols to 5 ppm sulfur dioxide at arid (23 ± 1% relative humidity, RH) and marine (98 ± 1% RH) conditions. Relative iron solubility increased as the particle size decreased for goethite and hematite, while for magnetite, the relative solubility was similar for all of the fine size fractions (2.5-0.25 μm) investigated but higher than the coarse size fraction (10-2.5 μm). Goethite and hematite showed increased solubility at arid RH, but no difference (p > 0.05) was observed between the two humidity levels for magnetite. There was no correlation between iron solubility and exposure to SO2 in any mineral for any size fraction. X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) measurements showed no change in iron speciation [Fe(II) and Fe(III)] in any minerals following SO2 exposure. SEM-EDS measurements of SO2-exposed goethite revealed small amounts of sulfur uptake on the samples; however, the incorporated sulfur did not affect iron solubility. Our results show that although sulfur is incorporated into particles via gas-phase processes, changes in iron solubility also depend on other species in the aerosol.

  15. Liquid-liquid phase separation in atmospheric aerosol particles: dependence on organic functionalities and mixture complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, M.; Marcolli, C.; Krieger, U. K.; Zuend, A.; Peter, T.

    2012-04-01

    In the troposphere, aerosol particles undergo phase transitions such as deliquescence and efflorescence during humidity cycles (Marcolli and Krieger, 2006). In addition, interactions between organic and inorganic compounds lead to liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS) (Ciobanu et al., 2009). Recent studies on a limited number of model systems have shown that oxygen-to-carbon ratios (O:C) of the organic aerosol fraction might be a good predictor for LLPS in mixed organic/ammonium sulfate (AS) particles (Bertram et al., 2011; Song et al., 2011). However, in order to corroborate this hypothesis experiments with an organic fraction that consists of a higher number of components with different O:C ratios and functional groups are needed. In order to determine the influence of O:C ratio, the specific organic functionalities and the mixture complexity on LLPS, we subjected organic/AS particles deposited on a hydrophobically coated substrate to relative humidity (RH) cycles and observed phase changes using optical microscopy and micro-Raman spectroscopy. To determine the influence of mixture complexity, we mixed together up to 10 organic compounds. We also prepared mixtures that were rich in different types of functional groups like polyols, aromatics and dicarboxylic acids which were identified from field measurements. We screened for a miscibility gap by varying the organic-to-inorganic ratio from 2:1 to 1:6. AS in the investigated single particles effloresced at 27 - 50 %RH and deliquesced at 72 - 79 %RH during humidity cycles. The occurrence of LLPS is determined to a high degree by the O:C of the organics: there was no LLPS for mixtures with O:C > 0.8 and there was always LLPS for mixtures with O:C < 0.57. In the range in between, we observed a dependence on the specific functional groups: a high share of aromatic functionalities shifts the range of O:C for which LLPS occurs to lower values. A correlation was also found for the onset RH of LLPS as a function of O

  16. Toward Quantifying the Mass-Based Hygroscopicity of Individual Submicron Atmospheric Aerosol Particles with STXM/NEXAFS and SEM/EDX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yancey Piens, D.; Kelly, S. T.; OBrien, R. E.; Wang, B.; Petters, M. D.; Laskin, A.; Gilles, M. K.

    2014-12-01

    The hygroscopic behavior of atmospheric aerosols influences their optical and cloud-nucleation properties, and therefore affects climate. Although changes in particle size as a function of relative humidity have often been used to quantify the hygroscopic behavior of submicron aerosol particles, it has been noted that calculations of hygroscopicity based on size contain error due to particle porosity, non-ideal volume additivity and changes in surface tension. We will present a method to quantify the hygroscopic behavior of submicron aerosol particles based on changes in mass, rather than size, as a function of relative humidity. This method results from a novel experimental approach combining scanning transmission x-ray microscopy with near-edge x-ray absorption fine spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS), as well as scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDX) on the same individual particles. First, using STXM/NEXAFS, our methods are applied to aerosol particles of known composition ‒ for instance ammonium sulfate, sodium bromide and levoglucosan ‒ and validated by theory. Then, using STXM/NEXAFS and SEM/EDX, these methods are extended to mixed atmospheric aerosol particles collected in the field at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility at the Southern Great Planes sampling site in Oklahoma, USA. We have observed and quantified a range of hygroscopic behaviors which are correlated to the composition and morphology of individual aerosol particles. These methods will have implications for parameterizing aerosol mixing state and cloud-nucleation activity in atmospheric models.

  17. Comparative analysis of urban atmospheric aerosol by particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE), proton elastic scattering analysis (PESA), and aerosol mass spectrometry (AMS).

    PubMed

    Johnson, K S; Laskin, A; Jimenez, J L; Shutthanandan, V; Molina, L T; Salcedo, D; Dzepina, K; Molina, M J

    2008-09-01

    A multifaceted approach to atmospheric aerosol analysis is often desirable in field studies where an understanding of technical comparability among different measurement techniques is essential. Herein, we report quantitative intercomparisons of particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and proton elastic scattering analysis (PESA), performed of fline under a vacuum, with analysis by aerosol mass spectrometry (AMS) carried out in real-time during the MCMA-2003 Field Campaign in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area. Good agreement was observed for mass concentrations of PIXE-measured sulfur (assuming it was dominated by SO4(2-)) and AMS-measured sulfate during most of the campaign. PESA-measured hydrogen mass was separated into sulfate H and organic H mass fractions, assuming the only major contributions were (NH4)2SO4 and organic compounds. Comparison of the organic H mass with AMS organic aerosol measurements indicates that about 75% of the mass of these species evaporated under a vacuum. However approximately 25% of the organics does remain under a vacuum, which is only possible with low-vapor-pressure compounds, and which supports the presence of high-molecular-weight or highly oxidized organics consistent with atmospheric aging. Approximately 10% of the chloride detected by AMS was measured by PIXE, possibly in the form of metal-chloride complexes, while the majority of Cl was likely present as more volatile species including NH4Cl. This is the first comparison of PIXE/PESA and AMS and, to our knowledge, also the first report of PESA hydrogen measurements for urban organic aerosols.

  18. Atmospheric Aerosols: Clouds, Chemistry, and Climate.

    PubMed

    McNeill, V Faye

    2017-06-07

    Although too small to be seen with the human eye, atmospheric particulate matter has major impacts on the world around us, from our health to global climate. Understanding the sources, properties, and transformations of these particles in the atmosphere is among the major challenges in air quality and climate research today. Significant progress has been made over the past two decades in understanding atmospheric aerosol chemistry and its connections to climate. Advances in technology for characterizing aerosol chemical composition and physical properties have enabled rapid discovery in this area. This article reviews fundamental concepts and recent developments surrounding ambient aerosols, their chemical composition and sources, light-absorbing aerosols, aerosols and cloud formation, and aerosol-based solar radiation management (also known as solar geoengineering).

  19. Determination of alkyl amines in atmospheric aerosol particles: a comparison of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and ion chromatography approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, R.-J.; Li, W.-B.; Wang, Y.-R.; Wang, Q. Y.; Ho, K.-F.; Cao, J. J.; Wang, G. H.; Chen, X.; Haddad, I. EI; Zhuang, Z. X.; Wang, X. R.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; O'Dowd, C. D.; Hoffmann, T.

    2014-03-01

    In recent years low molecular weight alkyl amines have been recognized to play an important role in particle formation and growth in the lower atmosphere. However, major uncertainties are associated with their atmospheric processes, sources and sinks, mostly due to the lack of ambient measurements and the difficulties in accurate quantification of alkyl amines at trace level. In this study, we present the evaluation and optimization of two analytical approaches, i.e., gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and ion chromatography (IC), for the determination of alkyl amines in aerosol particles. Alkyl amines were converted to carbamates through derivatization with isobutyl chloroformate for GC-MS determination. A set of parameters affecting the analytical performances of the GC-MS approach, including reagent amount, reaction time and pH value, was evaluated and optimized. The accuracy is 84.3-99.1%, and the limits of detection obtained are 1.8-3.9 pg. For the IC approach, a solid phase extraction (SPE) column was used to separate alkyl amines from interfering cations before IC analysis. 1-2% (v/v) of acetone (or 2-4% (v/v) of acetonitrile) was added to the eluent to improve the separation of alkyl amines on the IC column. The limits of detection obtained are 2.1-15.9 ng and the accuracy is 55.1-103.4%. The lower accuracy can be attributed to evaporation losses of amines during the sample concentration procedure. Measurements of ambient aerosol particle samples collected in Hong Kong show that the GC-MS approach is superior to the IC approach for the quantification of primary and secondary alkyl amines due to its lower detection limits and higher accuracy.

  20. Determination of alkylamines in atmospheric aerosol particles: a comparison of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and ion chromatography approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, R.-J.; Li, W.-B.; Wang, Y.-R.; Wang, Q. Y.; Jia, W. T.; Ho, K.-F.; Cao, J. J.; Wang, G. H.; Chen, X.; Haddad, I. EI; Zhuang, Z. X.; Wang, X. R.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; O'Dowd, C. D.; Hoffmann, T.

    2014-07-01

    In recent years low molecular weight alkylamines have been recognized to play an important role in particle formation and growth in the lower atmosphere. However, major uncertainties are associated with their atmospheric processes, sources and sinks, mostly due to the lack of ambient measurements and the difficulties in accurate quantification of alkylamines at trace level. In this study, we present the evaluation and optimization of two analytical approaches, i.e., gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and ion chromatography (IC), for the determination of alkylamines in aerosol particles. Alkylamines were converted to carbamates through derivatization with isobutyl chloroformate for GC-MS determination. A set of parameters affecting the analytical performances of the GC-MS approach, including reagent amount, reaction time and pH value, was evaluated and optimized. The accuracy is 84.3-99.1%, and the limits of detection obtained are 1.8-3.9 pg (or 0.02-0.04 ng m-3). For the IC approach, a solid-phase extraction (SPE) column was used to separate alkylamines from interfering cations before IC analysis. 1-2% (v/v) of acetone (or 2-4% (v/v) of acetonitrile) was added to the eluent to improve the separation of alkylamines on the IC column. The limits of detection obtained are 2.1-15.9 ng (or 0.9-6.4 ng m-3), and the accuracy is 55.1-103.4%. The lower accuracy can be attributed to evaporation losses of amines during the sample concentration procedure. Measurements of ambient aerosol particle samples collected in Hong Kong show that the GC-MS approach is superior to the IC approach for the quantification of primary and secondary alkylamines due to its lower detection limits and higher accuracy.

  1. A study of inter-particle bonds in dry bauxite waste resulting in atmospheric aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagh, Arun S.; Thompson, Bentley

    1988-02-01

    Bauxite and Alumina production are one of the main activities of several third world countries such as Jamaica, Brazil, India, Guinea, eastern European countries such as Hungary and Rumania and advanced countries such as Australia, West Germany, Japan and the United States. The mining operations lead to dust pollution, but the refining of bauxite to alumina yield large amounts of highly caustic sludge waste, called "Red Mud". Millions of tons of the waste produced in every country are stored in containment dams or natural valleys. This leads to ground water pollution, destruction of plant and bird life and is hazardous to human settlement in earthquake prone regions like Jamaica. As a result several companies have been looking into dry mud stacking which involves thickening the mud in the refining plants and sprying it on the slopes to sun dry it. Typically it involves a drying field of about two hundred acres, which could act as a potential source of caustic dust. In Jamaica one company has started disposing of the mud in this way. The aerosol formation from such areas depends mainly on the integrity of the top dry layers. Presently this is done by studying the approximate parameters such as the friability of the mud. However, following the recent advances in powder technology it has been possible for us to develop an instrument to study the average interparticle forces between the red mud particles. The instrument is based on the principle of a tensometer and a split cell is used to load specimens. A load cell is used to measure the force and a chart recorder is used for plotting separation and the force. The present study reports elemental composition of the dust and its health hazards. It also reports the physical measurement of the average interparticle force as a function of their separation in the Jamaican mud. The effect of ultraviolet radiation on the strength of the material is studied to see the effect of sun-drying of the waste. The five-fold increase

  2. Do atmospheric aerosols form glasses?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zobrist, B.; Marcolli, C.; Pedernera, D. A.; Koop, T.

    2008-05-01

    A new process is presented by which water-soluble organics might influence ice nucleation, ice growth, chemical reactions and water uptake of aerosols in the upper troposphere: the formation of glassy aerosol particles. Glasses are disordered amorphous (non-crystalline) solids that form when a liquid is cooled without crystallization until the viscosity increases exponentially and molecular diffusion practically ceases. The glass transition temperatures, Tg, homogeneous ice nucleation temperatures, Thom, and ice melting temperatures, Tm, of various aqueous inorganic, organic and multi-component solutions are investigated with a differential scanning calorimeter. The investigated solutes are: various polyols, glucose, raffinose, levoglucosan, an aromatic compound, sulfuric acid, ammonium bisulphate and mixtures of dicarboxylic acids (M5), of dicarboxylic acids and ammonium sulphate (M5AS), of two polyols, of glucose and ammonium nitrate, and of raffinose and M5AS. The results indicate that aqueous solutions of the investigated inorganic solutes show Tg-values that are too low to be of atmospheric importance. In contrast, aqueous organic and multi-component solutions readily form glasses at low but atmospherically relevant temperatures (≤230 K). To apply the laboratory data to the atmospheric situation, the measured phase transition temperatures were transformed from a concentration to a water activity scale by extrapolating water activities determined between 252 K and 313 K to lower temperatures. The obtained state diagrams reveal that the higher the molar mass of the aqueous organic or multi-component solutes, the higher Tg of their respective solutions at a given water activity. To a lesser extent, Tg also depends on the hydrophilicity of the organic solutes. Therefore, aerosol particles containing larger and more hydrophobic organic molecules (≳150 g mol-1) are more likely to form glasses at intermediate to high relative humidities in the upper troposphere

  3. Do atmospheric aerosols form glasses?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zobrist, B.; Marcolli, C.; Pedernera, D. A.; Koop, T.

    2008-09-01

    A new process is presented by which water soluble organics might influence ice nucleation, ice growth, chemical reactions and water uptake of aerosols in the upper troposphere: the formation of glassy aerosol particles. Glasses are disordered amorphous (non-crystalline) solids that form when a liquid is cooled without crystallization until the viscosity increases exponentially and molecular diffusion practically ceases. The glass transition temperatures, Tg, homogeneous ice nucleation temperatures, Thom, and ice melting temperatures, Tm, of various aqueous inorganic, organic and multi-component solutions are investigated with a differential scanning calorimeter. The investigated solutes are: various polyols, glucose, raffinose, levoglucosan, an aromatic compound, sulfuric acid, ammonium bisulfate and mixtures of dicarboxylic acids (M5), of dicarboxylic acids and ammonium sulfate (M5AS), of two polyols, of glucose and ammonium nitrate, and of raffinose and M5AS. The results indicate that aqueous solutions of the investigated inorganic solutes show Tg values that are too low to be of atmospheric importance. In contrast, aqueous organic and multi-component solutions readily form glasses at low but atmospherically relevant temperatures (≤230 K). To apply the laboratory data to the atmospheric situation, the measured phase transition temperatures were transformed from a concentration to a water activity scale by extrapolating water activities determined between 252 K and 313 K to lower temperatures. The obtained state diagrams reveal that the higher the molar mass of the aqueous organic or multi-component solutes, the higher Tg of their respective solutions at a given water activity. To a lesser extent, Tg also depends on the hydrophilicity of the organic solutes. Therefore, aerosol particles containing larger (≳150 g mol-1) and more hydrophobic organic molecules are more likely to form glasses at intermediate to high relative humidities in the upper troposphere

  4. Measurements of aerosol-cloud interactions, including on-line particle chemical composition, at the Jungfraujoch Global Atmospheric Watch Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coe, H.; Allan, J. D.; Alfarra, M. R.; Williams, P. I.; Bower, K. N.; Gallagher, M. W.; Choularton, T. W.; Weingartner, E.; Corrigan, C.; Baltensperger, U.

    2003-04-01

    The Global Atmospheric Watch research laboratory is located in the Sphinx building, 3580 m asl; 46.55oN, 7.98oE on the Jungfraujoch in the Swiss Alps. The site is exposed to a wide range of conditions and frequently samples long range transported lower free tropospheric air, and is exposed to cloudy conditions. The Paul Scherrer Institute have previously developed a dual inlet system that allows measurements of the total sub-micron aerosol population (dry residuals and interstitial particles) and interstitial particles alone to be made alternately every few minutes. During July 2002 an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer was coupled to the dual inlet and was used to sample the composition of both the total particle distribution and the interstitial fraction and hence derive the mass loadings of the dry droplet residuals. In out of cloud conditions the aerosol composition can be linked to air mass history and age of the air mass. Microphysical measurements include cloud droplet size distributions made using an FSSP and also a new phase Doppler anemometry system. A comparison between these probes will be made. Two different types of cloud droplet spectra were observed. In the first type a large number of cloud droplets were measured with a single, narrow drop size distribution and modal diameter of around 10 um. In the second type, a bimodal cloud droplet spectrum occurred with a smaller mode (by number) at around 20 um, in addition to the 10 um mode. The aerosol mass spectrometry shows that the composition of the residuals from the two spectrum types is very different, the former type being composed mainly of sulphate, the latter a combination of nitrate, sulphate and organic material. We have also shown that the organic material observed is highly oxidized. We argue that the bimodality arises as a result of mixing of cloud droplets below the site that have been activated separately: the larger a less numerous mode in the widespread strato-cumulus forming under low

  5. A review of atmospheric aerosol measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMurry, Peter H.

    Recent developments in atmospheric aerosol measurements are reviewed. The topics included complement those covered in the recent review by Chow (JAWMA 45: 320-382, 1995) which focuses on regulatory compliance measurements and filter measurements of particulate composition. This review focuses on measurements of aerosol integral properties (total number concentration, CCN concentration, optical coefficients, etc.), aerosol physical chemical properties (density, refractive index, equilibrium water content, etc.), measurements of aerosol size distributions, and measurements of size-resolved aerosol composition. Such measurements play an essential role in studies of secondary aerosol formation by atmospheric chemical transformations and enable one to quantify the contributions of various species to effects including light scattering/absorption, health effects, dry deposition, etc. Aerosol measurement evolved from an art to a science in the 1970s following the development of instrumentation to generate monodisperse calibration aerosols of known size, composition, and concentration. While such calibration tools permit precise assessments of instrument responses to known laboratory-generated aerosols, unquantifiable uncertainties remain even when carefully calibrated instruments are used for atmospheric measurements. This is because instrument responses typically depend on aerosol properties including composition, shape, density, etc., which, for atmospheric aerosols, may vary from particle-to-particle and are often unknown. More effort needs to be made to quantify measurement accuracies that can be achieved for realistic atmospheric sampling scenarios. The measurement of organic species in atmospheric particles requires substantial development. Atmospheric aerosols typically include hundreds of organic compounds, and only a small fraction (˜10%) of these can be identified by state-of-the-art analytical methodologies. Even the measurement of the total particulate organic

  6. The effect of particle acidity on secondary organic aerosol formation from α-pinene photooxidation under atmospherically relevant conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yuemei; Stroud, Craig A.; Liggio, John; Li, Shao-Meng

    2016-11-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from photooxidation of α-pinene has been investigated in a photochemical reaction chamber under varied inorganic seed particle acidity levels at moderate relative humidity. The effect of particle acidity on SOA yield and chemical composition was examined under high- and low-NOx conditions. The SOA yield (4.2-7.6 %) increased nearly linearly with the increase in particle acidity under high-NOx conditions. In contrast, the SOA yield (28.6-36.3 %) was substantially higher under low-NOx conditions, but its dependency on particle acidity was insignificant. A relatively strong increase in SOA yield (up to 220 %) was observed in the first hour of α-pinene photooxidation under high-NOx conditions, suggesting that SOA formation was more effective for early α-pinene oxidation products in the presence of fresh acidic particles. The SOA yield decreased gradually with the increase in organic mass in the initial stage (approximately 0-1 h) under high-NOx conditions, which is likely due to the inaccessibility to the acidity over time with the coating of α-pinene SOA, assuming a slow particle-phase diffusion of organic molecules into the inorganic seeds. The formation of later-generation SOA was enhanced by particle acidity even under low-NOx conditions when introducing acidic seed particles after α-pinene photooxidation, suggesting a different acidity effect exists for α-pinene SOA derived from later oxidation stages. This effect could be important in the atmosphere under conditions where α-pinene oxidation products in the gas-phase originating in forested areas (with low NOx and SOx) are transported to regions abundant in acidic aerosols such as power plant plumes or urban regions. The fraction of oxygen-containing organic fragments (CxHyO1+ 33-35 % and CxHyO2+ 16-17 %) in the total organics and the O / C ratio (0.52-0.56) of α-pinene SOA were lower under high-NOx conditions than those under low-NOx conditions (39-40, 17-19, and

  7. Development of an H-TDMA for long-term unattended measurement of the hygroscopic properties of atmospheric aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, E.; Swietlicki, E.; Sjogren, S.; Löndahl, J.; Nyman, M.; Svenningsson, B.

    2009-04-01

    A new hygroscopic tandem differential mobility analyzer (H-TDMA) has been constructed at Lund University within the frameworks of the EU FP6 Infrastructure Project EUSAAR (http://www.eusaar.org/). The aim of this coordinated H-TDMA development is to design and evaluate a new generation of H-TDMAs that are capable of conducting long term measurements of the hygroscopic growth and state of mixing of sub-micrometer atmospheric aerosol particles at the EUSAAR aerosol super-sites across Europe. The H-TDMA constructed for this project has been validated with respect to hygroscopic growth factor, stability of relative humidity (RH), temperature stability and its ability to operate unattended for longer periods of time. When measuring growth factors of ammonium sulphate, the new H-TDMA system was found to measure within a growth factor deviation of ±0.05 compared to previously recorded data by Tang et al. (1994). The long term RH of the system has been found stable at 90.0% with a standard deviation of ±0.23% and an average temperature variability of the second DMA less than ±0.1 K. Daily automated ammonium sulphate measurements have validated the ambient measurements. The instrument is operated at the EMEP/EUSAAR background station Vavihill in the southern part of Sweden.

  8. Development of an H-TDMA for long-term unattended measurement of the hygroscopic properties of atmospheric aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, E.; Swietlicki, E.; Sjogren, S.; Löndahl, J.; Nyman, M.; Svenningsson, B.

    2009-06-01

    A new hygroscopic tandem differential mobility analyzer (H-TDMA) has been constructed at Lund University within the frameworks of the EU FP6 Infrastructure Project EUSAAR (http://www.eusaar.org/). The aim of this coordinated H-TDMA development is to design and evaluate a new generation of H-TDMAs that are capable of conducting long term measurements of the hygroscopic growth and state of mixing of sub-micrometer atmospheric aerosol particles at the EUSAAR aerosol super-sites across Europe. The H-TDMA constructed for this project has been validated with respect to hygroscopic growth factor, stability of relative humidity (RH), temperature stability and its ability to operate unattended for longer periods of time. When measuring growth factors of ammonium sulphate, the new H-TDMA system was found to measure within a growth factor deviation of ±0.05 compared to previously recorded data by Tang et al. (1994). The long term RH of the system has been found stable at 90.0% with a standard deviation of ±0.23% and an average temperature variability of the second DMA less than ±0.1 K. Daily automated ammonium sulphate measurements have validated the ambient measurements. The instrument is operated at the EMEP/EUSAAR background station Vavihill in the southern part of Sweden.

  9. Titan's aerosols. I - Laboratory investigations of shapes, size distributions, and aggregation of particles produced by UV photolysis of model Titan atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scattergood, Thomas W.; Lau, Edmond Y.; Stone, Bradley M.

    1992-01-01

    Experiments in which C2H2, C2H4, and HCN were photolyzed separately and as a mixture in UV light have been conducted in order to ascertain the physical properties of model Titan atmosphere aerosols. Aerosols formed from photolysis of C2H4 were physically similar to those formed from C2H2; protolysis of HCN rapidly generated particles that did not grow to sizes greater than 0.09 microns. While the formation of particles from C4H2 was observed within minutes, formation was slowed by a factor of 4 when C2H2 and HCN were added.

  10. The global atmospheric loading of dust aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kok, J. F.; Ridley, D. A.; Haustein, K.; Miller, R. L.; Zhao, C.

    2015-12-01

    Mineral dust is one of the most ubiquitous aerosols in the atmosphere, with important effects on human health and the climate system. But despite its importance, the global atmospheric loading of dust has remained uncertain, with model results spanning about a factor of five. Here we constrain the particle size-resolved atmospheric dust loading and global emission rate, using a novel theoretical framework that uses experimental constraints on the optical properties and size distribution of dust to eliminate climate model errors due to assumed dust properties. We find that most climate models underestimate the global atmospheric loading and emission rate of dust aerosols.

  11. Atmospheric aerosol measurements from satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borodai, Nataliia

    Satellite instruments are commonly used for measurements of aerosol optical properties in the atmosphere. In this work we use such measurements for ultra-high energy cosmic ray studies. We introduce a method of preparation of aerosol maps for the location of the Pierre Auger Observatory. For these maps the data from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) of the Aura satellite were analyzed for the period 2004-2016. Such aerosol properties as the aerosol optical depth (AOD) and aerosol types were retrieved. The seasonal dependence of aerosol distribution is also studied.

  12. Surface Tension and Critical Supersaturations for Mixed Aerosol Particles Composed of Inorganic and Organic Compounds of Atmospheric Relevance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamora, I. R.; Jacobson, M. Z.

    2012-12-01

    The interaction between water vapor and aerosol particles in the atmosphere has implications on important processes. Among these are cloud droplet formation and growth, which impact cloud properties and therefore have an indirect effect on climate. A significant fraction of the dry submicron mass of atmospheric aerosols is composed of water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC). Although the WSOC fraction contains a large amount of compounds, most yet unidentified, it can be partitioned into three main categories in order to use a set of model substances to reproduce its behavior. In this study, we chose levoglucosan, succinic acid and Nordic Reference fulvic acid (NRFA) to represent the WSOC categories of neutral compounds, mono-/di-carboxylic acids, and polycarboxylic acids, respectively. We measured the surface tension of aqueous pure NRFA and of five of its mixtures at 298 K using the Wilhemy plate method. Langmuir adsorption parameters for the organic mixtures were extracted by fitting the surface tension measurements and corresponding solute concentrations to the Szyszkowski-Langmuir equation. The measured surface tension as a function of aqueous NRFA concentration was identical to that of Suwannee River (SR) and Waskish Peat fulvic acids below 0.02 g/L but up to 12% and 15% higher, respectively, at higher concentrations. Similar to previous findings by Aumann et al. (2010) with SRFA, the surface tension of a NRFA/inorganic salt solution was mainly controlled by the organic compound even when the salt comprised 75% of the added solute mass. This effect was observed for mixtures of NRFA with both sodium chloride and ammonium sulfate salts up to 5 g/L of NRFA. From 5 g/L to about 50 g/L of NRFA, the surface tension for both NRFA/salt mixtures stopped decreasing, remained constant at 52-53 mN/m and then started slowly increasing indicating that the salt component might start dominating at higher concentrations. For a solution of 25% NRFA / 75% levoglucosan, the surface

  13. Thermal Infrared Radiative Forcing By Atmospheric Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Narayan

    The work mainly focuses on the study of thermal infrared (IR) properties of atmospheric greenhouse gases and aerosols, and the estimation of the aerosol-induced direct longwave (LW) radiative forcing in the spectral region 5-20 mum at the Earth's surface (BOA; bottom of the atmosphere) and the top of the atmosphere (TOA) in cloud-free atmospheric conditions. These objectives were accomplished by conducting case studies on clear sky, smoky, and dusty conditions that took place in the Great Basin of the USA in 2013. Both the solar and thermal IR measurements and a state-of-the-science radiative transfer model, the LBLDIS, a combination of the Line-By-Line Radiative Transfer Model and the Discrete Ordinate Radiative Transfer (DISORT) solver were employed for the study. The LW aerosol forcing is often not included in climate models because the aerosol effect on the LW is often assumed to be negligible. We lack knowledge of aerosol characteristics in the LW region, and aerosol properties exhibit high variability. We have found that the LW TOA radiative forcing due to fine mode aerosols, mainly associated with small biomass burning smoke particles, is + 0.4 W/m2 which seems to be small, but it is similar to the LW radiative forcing due to increase in CO2 concentration in the Earth's atmosphere since the preindustrial era of 1750 (+ 1.6 W/m 2). The LW radiative forcing due to coarse mode aerosols, associated with large airborne mineral dust particles, was found to be as much as + 5.02 W/m2 at the surface and + 1.71 W/m2 at the TOA. All of these significant positive values of the aerosol radiative forcing both at the BOA and TOA indicate that the aerosols have a heating effect in the LW range, which contributes to counterbalancing the cooling effect associated with the aerosol radiative forcing in the shortwave (SW) spectral region. In the meantime, we have found that LW radiative forcing by aerosols is highly sensitive to particle size and complex refractive indices of

  14. Single-particle characterization of atmospheric aerosols collected at Gosan, Korea, during the Asian Pacific Regional Aerosol Characterization Experiment field campaign using low-Z (atomic number) particle electron probe X-ray microanalysis.

    PubMed

    Geng, Hong; Cheng, Fangqin; Ro, Chul-Un

    2011-11-01

    A quantitative energy-dispersive electron probe X-ray microanalysis (ED-EPMA), namely low-Z (atomic number) particle EPMA, was used to characterize the chemical compositions of the individual aerosol particles collected at the Gosan supersite, Jeju Island, Korea, as a part of the Asian Pacific Regional Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-Asia). On 4-10 April 2001 just before a severe dust storm arrived, seven sets of aerosol samples were obtained by a seven-stage May cascade impactor with a flow rate of 20 L/min. Overall 11,200 particles on stages 1-6 with cutoff diameters of 16, 8, 4, 2, 1, and 0.5 microm, respectively, were examined and classified based on their secondary electron images and X-ray spectra. In general, sea salt particles were the most frequently encountered, followed by mineral dust, organic carbon (OC)-like, (NH4)2SO4/NH4HSO4-containing, elemental carbon (EC)-like, Fe-rich, and K-rich particles. Sea salt and mineral dust particles had a higher relative abundance on stages 1-5, whereas OC-like, (NH4)2SO4/NH4HSO4-containing, Fe-rich, and K-rich particles were relatively abundant on stage 6. The analysis on relative number abundances of various particle types combined with 72-hr backward air mass trajectories indicated that a lot of reacted sea salt and reacted mineral dust (with airborne NOx and SO2 or their acidic products) and OC-like particles were carried by the air masses passing over the Yellow Sea (for sample "10 April") and many NH4HSO4/ (NH4)2SO4-containing particles were carried by the air masses passing over the Sea of Japan and Korea Strait (for samples "4-9 April"). It was concluded that the atmosphere over Jeju Island was influenced by anthropogenic SO2 and NOx, organic compounds, and secondary aerosols when Asian dust was absent.

  15. Atmospheric Aerosol Chemistry Analyzer: Demonstration of feasibility

    SciTech Connect

    Mroz, E.J.; Olivares, J.; Kok, G.

    1996-04-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project objective was to demonstrate the technical feasibility of an Atmospheric Aerosol Chemistry Analyzer (AACA) that will provide a continuous, real-time analysis of the elemental (major, minor and trace) composition of atmospheric aerosols. The AACA concept is based on sampling the atmospheric aerosol through a wet cyclone scrubber that produces an aqueous suspension of the particles. This suspension can then be analyzed for elemental composition by ICP/MS or collected for subsequent analysis by other methods. The key technical challenge was to develop a wet cyclone aerosol sampler suitable for respirable particles found in ambient aerosols. We adapted an ultrasonic nebulizer to a conventional, commercially available, cyclone aerosol sampler and completed collection efficiency tests for the unit, which was shown to efficiently collect particles as small as 0.2 microns. We have completed the necessary basic research and have demonstrated the feasibility of the AACA concept.

  16. Hazardous components and health effects of atmospheric aerosol particles: reactive oxygen species, soot, polycyclic aromatic compounds and allergenic proteins.

    PubMed

    Shiraiwa, Manabu; Selzle, Kathrin; Pöschl, Ulrich

    2012-08-01

    This review outlines recent advances in the investigation of the chemical properties, molecular interactions and health effects of hazardous compounds in atmospheric aerosols, in particular reactive oxygen species (ROS), soot, polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs) and allergenic proteins. Epidemiological studies show correlations between air particulate matter and adverse health effects of air pollution including allergy, asthma, cardiovascular and respiratory diseases, but the causative relations and mechanisms of interaction on the molecular level are still unclear. ROS generated by photochemical and heterogeneous reactions in the atmosphere seem to play a key role in aerosol health effects and provide a direct link between atmospheric and physiological multiphase processes. Soot and PACs can trigger formation of ROS in vivo, leading to inflammation and cellular damage. PACs as well as allergenic proteins are efficiently oxygenated and nitrated upon exposure to ozone and nitrogen dioxide, which leads to an enhancement of their toxicity and allergenicity.

  17. Hygroscopic growth of atmospheric aerosol particles based on lidar, radiosonde, and in situ measurements: Case studies from the Xinzhou field campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Min; Liu, Dong; Li, Zhanqing; Mao, Jietai; Sun, Yele; Wang, Zhenzhu; Wang, Yingjian; Xie, Chenbo

    2017-02-01

    Lidar, radiosonde, and ground-based in situ nephelometer measurements made during an intensive field campaign carried out from July to September 2014 at the Xinzhou meteorological station were used to determine the aerosol hygroscopic growth effect in a cloud-capped, well-mixed boundary layer. Aerosol hygroscopic properties at 355 and 532 nm were examined for two cases with distinct aerosol layers. Lidar-derived maximum enhancement factors in terms of aerosol backscatter coefficient derived using a relative humidity (RH) reference value of 85% were 1.19 at 532 nm and 1.10 at 355 nm for Case I and 2.32 at 532 nm and 1.94 at 355 nm for Case II. To derive the aerosol particle hygroscopic growth factor at specific RH values, the Kasten and Hänel models were used. A comparison of the goodness of fit for the two models showed that the Kasten model performed better. The hygroscopic growth curve for RH>90% was much steeper than that for RH in the range of 85-90%. The slopes of the lidar-derived enhancement factor curve (measured from 85% to 95% RH) and the nephelometer-derived enhancement factor curve (measured from 40% to 62% RH) in Case I show similar trends, which lends confidence to using lidar measurements for studying aerosol particle hygroscopic growth. Data from a ground aerosol chemical speciation monitor showed that the larger values of aerosol hygroscopic enhancement factor in Case II corresponded to greater mass concentrations of sulfate and nitrate in the atmosphere.

  18. Atmospheric aerosols as prebiotic chemical reactors

    PubMed Central

    Dobson, Christopher M.; Ellison, G. Barney; Tuck, Adrian F.; Vaida, Veronica

    2000-01-01

    Aerosol particles in the atmosphere have recently been found to contain a large number of chemical elements and a high content of organic material. The latter property is explicable by an inverted micelle model. The aerosol sizes with significant atmospheric lifetimes are the same as those of single-celled organisms, and they are predicted by the interplay of aerodynamic drag, surface tension, and gravity. We propose that large populations of such aerosols could have afforded an environment, by means of their ability to concentrate molecules in a wide variety of physical conditions, for key chemical transformations in the prebiotic world. We also suggest that aerosols could have been precursors to life, since it is generally agreed that the common ancestor of terrestrial life was a single-celled organism. The early steps in some of these initial transformations should be accessible to experimental investigation. PMID:11035775

  19. Biological aerosol particles in the atmosphere and their impact on clouds (BIOCLOUDS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amato, Pierre; Attard, Eleonore; Deguillaume, Laurent; Delort, Anne-Marie; Flossmann, Andrea; Good, Nicholas; Joly, Muriel; Koop, Thomas; Möhler, Ottmar; Monier, Marie; Morris, Cindy; Oehm, Caroline; Pöschl, Ulrich; Sancelme, Martine

    2015-04-01

    The project BIOCLOUDS aimed at investigating and quantifying the role of bioaerosols in tropospheric clouds. We focused on the studies on microorganisms, mainly bacteria. To reach our objective we (1) isolated and identified INA bacterial strains in cloud waters, (2) studied in more details IN properties of bacteria isolated from cloud waters in laboratories and cloud chamber, (3) used new data as input to cloud models. 1. Isolation and Identification of INA bacterial strains in cloud waters Cloud water samples were collected at the puy de Dôme station under sterile conditions, microorganisms were cultured on agar plates and further identified by DNA sequencing coding for16SrRNA. 257 bacterial strains isolated from 25 cloud events were screened and 44 isolates were selected as they belonged to Pseudomonas, Xanthomonas and Erwinia genera which are potential INA candidates. Using the classical "Droplet Freezing method" as ice nucleation test, 7 strains were shown INA+. Their cumulative IN frequency profiles were established and showed that some of them are very efficient, for example the strain Pseudomonas syringae 13b74 started to nucleate a t-3°C and 4% of the cells were active at- 5°C. 2. Further laboratory investigations of IN properties of cloud bacterial strains All the experiments presented in this section were carried out with 3 Pseudomonas syringae strains. We tested the influence of O3, NO, UV and pH, which are atmospheric markers of anthropogenic activity, on the IN activity of the Pseudomonas strains. It was clearly shown that pH had a main influence, acidic pHs decreased the IN activity of the strains. This suggests a negative impact of human emissions on the natural capacity of bacteria to precipitate with rain. The 3 Pseudomas strains were sprayed in the AIDA cloud chamber. The survival of these strains with time before cloud formation was measured and will be used in the future to parameterize models for bacterial transport. After cloud formation

  20. Atmosphere aerosol satellite project Aerosol-UA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milinevsky, Gennadi; Yatskiv, Yaroslav; Syniavskyi, Ivan; Bovchaliuk, Andrii; Degtyaryov, Oleksandr; Sosonkin, Mikhail; Mishchenko, Michael; Danylevsky, Vassyl; Ivanov, Yury; Oberemok, Yevgeny; Masley, Volodymyr; Rosenbush, Vera; Moskalev, Sergii

    2017-04-01

    The experiment Aerosol-UA is Ukrainian space mission aimed to the terrestrial atmospheric aerosol spatial distribution and microphysics investigations. The experiment concept is based on idea of Glory/APS mission of precise orbital measurements of polarization and intensity of the sunlight scattered by the atmosphere, aerosol and the surface the multichannel Scanning Polarimeter (ScanPol) with narrow field-of-view. ScanPol measurements will be accompanied by the wide-angle MultiSpectral Imager-Polarimeter (MSIP). The ScanPol is designed to measure Stokes parameters I, Q, U within the spectral range from the UV to the SWIR in a wide range of phase angles along satellite ground path. Expected ScanPol polarimetric accuracy is 0.15%. A high accuracy measurement of the degree of linear polarization is provided by on-board calibration of the ScanPol polarimeter. On-board calibration is performed for each scan of the mirror scanning system. A set of calibrators is viewed during the part of the scan range when the ScanPol polarimeter looks in the direction opposite to the Earth's surface. These reference assemblies provide calibration of the zero of the polarimetric scale (unpolarized reference assembly) and the scale factor for the polarimetric scale (polarized reference assembly). The zero of the radiometric scale is provided by the dark reference assembly.The spectral channels of the ScanPol are used to estimate the tropospheric aerosol absorption, the aerosol over the ocean and the land surface, the signals from cirrus clouds, stratospheric aerosols caused by major volcanic eruptions, and the contribution of the Earth's surface. The imager-polarimeter MSIP will collect 60°x60° field-of-view images on the state of the atmosphere and surface in the area, where the ScanPol polarimeter will measure, to retrieve aerosol optical depth and polarization properties of aerosol by registration of three Stokes parameters simultaneously in three spectral channels. The two more

  1. Atmospheric aerosol and Doppler lidar studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothermel, Jeff; Bowdle, D. A.; Srivastava, V.; Jarzembski, M.; Cutten, D.; Mccaul, E. W., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies were performed of atmospheric aerosol backscatter and atmospheric dynamics with Doppler lidar as a primary tool. Activities include field and laboratory measurement and analysis efforts. The primary focus of activities related to understanding aerosol backscatter is the GLObal Backscatter Experiment (GLOBE) program. GLOBE is a multi-element effort designed toward developing a global aerosol model to describe tropospheric clean background backscatter conditions that Laser Atmospheric Wind Sounder (LAWS) is likely to encounter. Two survey missions were designed and flown in the NASA DC-8 in November 1989 and May to June 1990 over the remote Pacific Ocean, a region where backscatter values are low and where LAWS wind measurements could make a major contribution. The instrument complement consisted of pulsed and continuous-wave (CW) CO2 gas and solid state lidars measuring aerosol backscatter, optical particle counters measuring aerosol concentration, size distribution, and chemical composition, a filter/impactor system collecting aerosol samples for subsequent analysis, and integrating nephelometers measuring visible scattering coefficients. The GLOBE instrument package and survey missions were carefully planned to achieve complementary measurements under clean background backscatter conditions.

  2. Mechanism for production of secondary organic aerosols and their representation in atmospheric models. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Seinfeld, J.H.; Flagan, R.C.

    1999-06-07

    This document contains the following: organic aerosol formation from the oxidation of biogenic hydrocarbons; gas/particle partitioning of semivolatile organic compounds to model inorganic, organic, and ambient smog aerosols; and representation of secondary organic aerosol formation in atmospheric models.

  3. Dust in the Sky: Atmospheric Composition. Modeling of Aerosol Optical Thickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Mian; Ginoux, Paul; Kinne, Stefan; Torres, Omar; Holben, Brent; Duncan, Bryan; Martin, Randall; Logan, Jennifer; Higurashi, Akiko; Nakajima, Teruyuki

    2000-01-01

    Aerosol is any small particle of matter that rests suspended in the atmosphere. Natural sources, such as deserts, create some aerosols; consumption of fossil fuels and industrial activity create other aerosols. All the microscopic aerosol particles add up to a large amount of material floating in the atmosphere. You can see the particles in the haze that floats over polluted cities. Beyond this visible effect, aerosols can actually lower temperatures. They do this by blocking, or scattering, a portion of the sun's energy from reaching the surface. Because of this influence, scientists study the physical properties of atmospheric aerosols. Reliable numerical models for atmospheric aerosols play an important role in research.

  4. Evaluating the Roles of Topography and Aerosols in Atmospheric River Rainout Using a Paired Stable Isotope and Ice Nucleating Particle Time Series Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reilly, S.; Ahmed, A.; Fogarty, M.; Beall, C.; Creamean, J.; Martin, A.; Mix, H.

    2016-12-01

    Accurate modeling and forecasting of atmospheric rivers depends on disentangling the complex interactions between aerosols, event meteorological structure and local topography that drive precipitation. Here, we seek to address three questions: 1) What are the relationships between aerosols and precipitation amount, efficiency and phase? 2) What are the stable isotope signatures of extreme precipitation events and which macro- and micro-scale dynamics are responsible for producing them? and 3) What are the moisture and aerosol sources during extreme precipitation events and how do these change within storms? We produced simultaneous hourly time series of precipitation ice nucleating particle (INP) concentrations and isotopic composition at five sites throughout Northern California between February 1 and March 14, 2016. Additionally, we used Lagrangian backtrajectory analyses to evaluate variations in air mass trajectories and aerosol loadings at our sites. Our sampling network consisted of two pairs of coastal and inland/upslope sites (Bodega Bay-Cazadero, Santa Cruz-Santa Clara) and one interior site (Shasta Lake). We constrained the influence of post-condensation exchange and evaporation through real-time measurements of water vapor isotopes at Bodega Bay. Our results quantify the rainout between coastal and interior sites and the corresponding changes in INP concentration in order to evaluate the role of INPs and topography in precipitation. These results can improve forecasting through enhanced understanding of the processes that enhance or suppress the rainout of atmospheric moisture.

  5. The effects of particle-size distribution and chloride depletion of sea-salt aerosols on estimating atmospheric deposition at a coastal site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harkel, M. J. Ten

    Estimating atmospheric deposition in a coastal region cannot be done without taking care of the size distribution and amount of chloride depletion of sea-salt aerosols. Size distribution of the dry deposition particles is important when the approach of Ulrich (1983, Effects of Accumulation of Air Pollutants in Forest Ecosystems, pp. 33-45. Reidel, Dordrecht) is used to estimate total atmospheric deposition levels in a coastal area. A sodium deposition model demonstrated that the presumption of an equal size of sodium aerosols and chloride, potassium, magnesium and calcium aerosols is not valid in the coastal zone. Modelled aerosol diameter distribution showed that more than 50% of the aerosols deposited in this zone is larger than 20 μm. Besides an anthropogenic source, the reaction of nitric or sulphuric acid with sea-salt aerosols, by which HCl (g) is formed, can be a second source of an excess of chloride in throughflow compared to sodium. The newly formed HCl can deposit as dry deposition on a vegetation, and not as dry bulk deposition. Chloride loss in the bulk deposition at the coastal sites was up to 35% in summertime. Chloride depletion also affects the calculation of potential acid deposition (PAD) in the coastal zone. Part of the NO 3- and excess SO 42- deposition should not be taken into account when calculating the PAD, because it is neutralized by the sea-salt. This effect decreases very soon with increasing distance to the sea. Implementing chloride depletion in calculating yearly PAD at 500 m from the coastline decreased the PAD with 26%. At 2000 m this decrease was 14%. However, in some cases PAD values on a fortnightly base were observed to decrease more than 50% after implementing chloride depletion.

  6. Phase transition behaviour of sodium oleate aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nájera, Juan J.

    Field measurements have shown that organic surfactants are significant components of atmospheric aerosols. While fatty acids, among other surfactants, are prevalent in the atmosphere, the influence of these species on the chemical and physical properties of atmospheric aerosols remains not fully characterized. In order to assess the phase in which particles may exist, a detailed study of the deliquescence of a model surfactant aerosol has been carried out. Sodium oleate was chosen as a surfactant proxy relevant in atmospheric aerosol. Sodium oleate micelle aerosol particles were generated nebulizing a sodium oleate aqueous solution. In this study, the water uptake and phase transition of sodium oleate aerosol particles have been studied in a room temperature aerosol flow tube system (AFT) using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Aerosol morphology and elemental composition were also analysed using scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM/EDX) techniques. The particles are homogeneously distributed as ellipsoidal-shape aggregates of micelles particles with an average size of ˜1.1 μm. The deliquescence by the sodium oleate aerosol particles was monitored by infrared extinction spectroscopy, where the dried aerosol particles were exposed to increasing relative humidity as they passed through the AFT. Observations of the infrared absorption features of condensed phase liquid water enable to determine the sodium oleate deliquescence phase transition at 88±2%.

  7. Evolution of Organic Aerosols in the Atmosphere.

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez, J. L.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Donahue, N. M.; Prevot, A. S. H.; Zhang, Qi; Kroll, Jesse H.; DeCarlo, Peter F.; Allan, James D.; Coe, H.; Ng, N. L.; Aiken, Allison; Docherty, Kenneth S.; Ulbrich, Ingrid M.; Grieshop, A. P.; Robinson, A. L.; Duplissy, J.; Smith, J. D.; Wilson, K. R.; Lanz, V. A.; Hueglin, C.; Sun, Y. L.; Tian, J.; Laaksonen, A.; Raatikainen, T.; Rautiainen, J.; Vaattovaara, P.; Ehn, M.; Kulmala, M.; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Collins, Donald R.; Cubison, Michael J.; Dunlea, E. J.; Huffman, John A.; Onasch, Timothy B.; Alfarra, M. R.; Williams, Paul I.; Bower, K.; Kondo, Yutaka; Schneider, J.; Drewnick, F.; Borrmann, S.; Weimer, S.; Demerjian, K.; Salcedo, D.; Cottrell, L.; Griffin, Robert; Takami, A.; Miyoshi, T.; Hatakeyama, S.; Shimono, A.; Sun, J. Y.; Zhang, Y. M.; Dzepina, K.; Kimmel, Joel; Sueper, D.; Jayne, J. T.; Herndon, Scott C.; Trimborn, Achim; Williams, L. R.; Wood, Ezra C.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Kolb, C. E.; Baltensperger, Urs; Worsnop, Douglas R.

    2009-12-11

    Organic aerosol (OA) particles affect climate forcing and human health, but their sources and evolution remain poorly characterized. We present a unifying model framework that describes the atmospheric evolution of OA and is constrained and motivated by new, high time resolution, experimental characterizations of their composition, volatility, and oxidation state. OA and OA-precursor gases evolve by becoming increasingly oxidized, less volatile, and more hygroscopic, leading to the formation of large amounts of oxygenated organic aerosol (OOA) mass that has comparable concentrations to sulfate aerosol over the Northern Hemisphere. Our new model framework captures the dynamic aging behavior observed in the atmosphere and the laboratory and can serve as a basis for improving parameterizations in regional and global models.

  8. Differentiation of hydrophobic from hydrophilic submicrometer aerosol particles

    SciTech Connect

    Juozaitis, A.; Ulevicius, V.; Girgzdys, A. ); Willeke, K. )

    1993-02-01

    A method has been developed that differentiates hydrophobic from hydrophilic submicrometer aerosol particles in air environments containing polydisperse aerosols composed of different chemical species. First, a narrow particle size range is extracted from the polydisperse aerosol by an electrostatic aerosol classifier. Then the monodisperse aerosols of different origins are exposed to preselected supersaturation levels and are size-classified again by a second electrostatic classifier. Hydrophobic aerosol particles pass through the second classifier when its size window matches that of the first classifier. Hydrophilic aerosol particles grow to a larger size and are removed by the second classifier. The method has been applied in the field by measuring the fraction of hydrophobic atmospheric particles in a suburb of Vilnius, Lithuania, during a period of high emission of hydrophobic soot particles from residential coal and industrial oil burning in winter. 33 refs., 4 figs.

  9. Atmospheric science: marine aerosols and iodine emissions.

    PubMed

    McFiggans, Gordon

    2005-02-10

    O'Dowd et al. describe the formation of marine aerosols from biogenic iodine and the growth of these aerosols into cloud-condensation nuclei (CCN). Based on chamber and modelling results, the authors suggest that biogenic organic iodine compounds emitted from macroalgae may be responsible for coastal particle bursts and that production of these compounds in the open ocean could increase CCN there too. It has since been shown that coastal particles are more likely to be produced from the photooxidation of molecular iodine. Moreover, I contend that open-ocean particle production and cloud enhancement do not result from emissions of organic iodine at atmospheric levels. For iodine particles to affect cloud properties over the remote ocean, an additional source of iodine is necessary as organic precursors cannot be responsible.

  10. Airborne instruments to measure atmospheric aerosol particles, clouds and radiation: A cook's tour of mature and emerging technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgardner, D.; Brenguier, J. L.; Bucholtz, A.; Coe, H.; DeMott, P.; Garrett, T. J.; Gayet, J. F.; Hermann, M.; Heymsfield, A.; Korolev, A.; Krämer, M.; Petzold, A.; Strapp, W.; Pilewskie, P.; Taylor, J.; Twohy, C.; Wendisch, M.; Bachalo, W.; Chuang, P.

    2011-10-01

    An overview is presented of airborne systems for in situ measurements of aerosol particles, clouds and radiation that are currently in use on research aircraft around the world. Description of the technology is at a level sufficient for introducing the basic principles of operation and an extensive list of references for further reading is given. A number of newer instruments that implement emerging technology are described and the review concludes with a description of some of the most important measurement challenges that remain. This overview is a synthesis of material from a reference book that is currently in preparation and that will be published in 2012 by Wiley.

  11. Ionic surface active compounds in atmospheric aerosols.

    PubMed

    Sukhapan, Jariya; Brimblecombe, Peter

    2002-04-27

    Surfactants in the atmosphere have several potential roles in atmospheric chemistry. They can form films on aqueous surfaces, which lowers the surface tension and possibly delays water evaporation and gaseous transportation across the aqueous interface. They can also increase the solubility of organic compounds in the aqueous phase. Recently, the decrease of surface tension in cloud growing droplets has been suggested as relevant to increases in the number of droplets of smaller size, potentially enhancing cloud albedo. Natural surfactants in the lung aid gas transfer and influence the dissolution rate of aerosol particles, so surfactants in atmospheric aerosols, once inhaled, may interact with pulmonary surfactants. Ambient aerosols were collected from the edge of Norwich, a small city in a largely agricultural region of England, and analysed for surfactants. Methylene blue, a conventional dye for detecting anionic surfactants, has been used as a colorimetric agent. The concentration of surfactants expressed as methylene blue active substances (MBAS) is in the range of 6-170 pmol m(-3)(air). A negative correlation with chloride aerosol indicates that these surfactants are probably not the well-known surfactants derived from marine spray. A more positive correlation with aerosol nitrate and gaseous NOx supports an association with more polluted inland air masses. The surfactants found in aerosols seem to be relatively strong acids, compared with weaker acids such as the long-chain carboxylic acids previously proposed as atmospheric surfactants. Surfactants from the oxidation of organic materials (perhaps vegetation- or soil-derived) seem a likely source of these substances in the atmosphere.

  12. Ageing and hygroscopicity variation of black carbon particles in Beijing measured by a quasi-atmospheric aerosol evolution study (QUALITY) chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Jianfei; Hu, Min; Guo, Song; Du, Zhuofei; Shang, Dongjie; Zheng, Jing; Zheng, Jun; Zeng, Limin; Shao, Min; Wu, Yusheng; Collins, Don; Zhang, Renyi

    2017-09-01

    Measurements of ageing and hygroscopicity variation of black carbon (BC) particles in Beijing were conducted using a 1.2 m3 quasi-atmospheric aerosol evolution study (QUALITY) chamber, which consisted of a bottom flow chamber through which ambient air was pulled continuously and an upper reaction chamber where ageing of BC particles occurred. Within the reaction chamber, transmission of the solar ultraviolet irradiation was approximately 50-60 %, wall loss of primary gaseous pollutants was negligible, and BC exhibited a half-lifetime of about 3-7 h. Typically, equilibrium for the primary gases, temperature and relative humidity between the reaction chamber and ambient air was established within 1 h. Rapid growth of BC particles occurred, with an average total growth of 77 ± 33 nm and average growth rate of 26 ± 11 nm h-1. Secondary organic aerosols (SOA) accounted for more than 90 % of the coating mass. The O / C ratio of SOA was 0.5, lower than the ambient level. The hygroscopic growth factor of BC particles decreased slightly with an initial thin coating layer because of BC reconstruction, but subsequently increased to 1.06-1.08 upon further ageing. The κ (kappa) values for BC particles and coating materials were calculated as 0.035 and 0.040 at the subsaturation and supersaturation conditions, respectively, indicating low hygroscopicity of coated SOA on BC particles. Hence, our results indicate that initial photochemical ageing of BC particles leads to considerable modifications to morphology and optical properties but does not appreciably alter the particle hygroscopicity in Beijing.

  13. Heterogeneous Oxidation of Atmospheric Organic Aerosol: Kinetics of Changes to the Amount and Oxidation State of Particle-Phase Organic Carbon.

    PubMed

    Kroll, Jesse H; Lim, Christopher Y; Kessler, Sean H; Wilson, Kevin R

    2015-11-05

    Atmospheric oxidation reactions are known to affect the chemical composition of organic aerosol (OA) particles over timescales of several days, but the details of such oxidative aging reactions are poorly understood. In this study we examine the rates and products of a key class of aging reaction, the heterogeneous oxidation of particle-phase organic species by the gas-phase hydroxyl radical (OH). We compile and reanalyze a number of previous studies from our laboratories involving the oxidation of single-component organic particles. All kinetic and product data are described on a common basis, enabling a straightforward comparison among different chemical systems and experimental conditions. Oxidation chemistry is described in terms of changes to key ensemble properties of the OA, rather than to its detailed molecular composition, focusing on two quantities in particular, the amount and the oxidation state of the particle-phase carbon. Heterogeneous oxidation increases the oxidation state of particulate carbon, with the rate of increase determined by the detailed chemical mechanism. At the same time, the amount of particle-phase carbon decreases with oxidation, due to fragmentation (C-C scission) reactions that form small, volatile products that escape to the gas phase. In contrast to the oxidation state increase, the rate of carbon loss is nearly uniform among most systems studied. Extrapolation of these results to atmospheric conditions indicates that heterogeneous oxidation can have a substantial effect on the amount and composition of atmospheric OA over timescales of several days, a prediction that is broadly in line with available measurements of OA evolution over such long timescales. In particular, 3-13% of particle-phase carbon is lost to the gas phase after one week of heterogeneous oxidation. Our results indicate that oxidative aging represents an important sink for particulate organic carbon, and more generally that fragmentation reactions play a major

  14. The Impact of Aerosol Particle Mixing State on the Hygroscopicity of Sea Spray Aerosol.

    PubMed

    Schill, Steven R; Collins, Douglas B; Lee, Christopher; Morris, Holly S; Novak, Gordon A; Prather, Kimberly A; Quinn, Patricia K; Sultana, Camille M; Tivanski, Alexei V; Zimmermann, Kathryn; Cappa, Christopher D; Bertram, Timothy H

    2015-06-24

    Aerosol particles influence global climate by determining cloud droplet number concentrations, brightness, and lifetime. Primary aerosol particles, such as those produced from breaking waves in the ocean, display large particle-particle variability in chemical composition, morphology, and physical phase state, all of which affect the ability of individual particles to accommodate water and grow into cloud droplets. Despite such diversity in molecular composition, there is a paucity of methods available to assess how particle-particle variability in chemistry translates to corresponding differences in aerosol hygroscopicity. Here, an approach has been developed that allows for characterization of the distribution of aerosol hygroscopicity within a chemically complex population of atmospheric particles. This methodology, when applied to the interpretation of nascent sea spray aerosol, provides a quantitative framework for connecting results obtained using molecular mimics generated in the laboratory with chemically complex ambient aerosol. We show that nascent sea spray aerosol, generated in situ in the Atlantic Ocean, displays a broad distribution of particle hygroscopicities, indicative of a correspondingly broad distribution of particle chemical compositions. Molecular mimics of sea spray aerosol organic material were used in the laboratory to assess the volume fractions and molecular functionality required to suppress sea spray aerosol hygroscopicity to the extent indicated by field observations. We show that proper accounting for the distribution and diversity in particle hygroscopicity and composition are important to the assessment of particle impacts on clouds and global climate.

  15. Detection and quantification of levoglucosan in atmospheric aerosols: a review.

    PubMed

    Schkolnik, Gal; Rudich, Yinon

    2006-05-01

    Levoglucosan is a tracer for biomass burning sources in atmospheric aerosol particles. Therefore, much effort has been recently put into developing methods for its quantification. This review describes and compares both established and emerging analytical methods for levoglucosan quantification in ambient aerosol samples, with the special needs of the environmental analytical chemist in mind.

  16. Overview of atmospheric aerosol studies in Malaysia: Known and unknown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanniah, Kasturi Devi; Kaskaoutis, Dimitris G.; San Lim, Hwee; Latif, Mohd Talib; Kamarul Zaman, Nurul Amalin Fatihah; Liew, Juneng

    2016-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols particularly those originated from anthropogenic sources can affect human health, air quality and the regional climate system of Southeast Asia (SEA). Population growth, and rapid urbanization associated with economic development in the SEA countries including Malaysia have resulted in high aerosol concentrations. Moreover, transboundary smoke plumes add more aerosols to the atmosphere in Malaysia. Nevertheless, the aerosol monitoring networks and/or field studies and research campaigns investigating the various aerosol properties are not so widespread over Malaysia. In the present work, we summarize and discuss the results of previous studies that investigated the aerosol properties over Malaysia by means of various instrumentation and techniques, focusing on the use of remote sensing data to examine atmospheric aerosols. Furthermore, we identify gaps in this research field and recommend further studies to bridge these knowledge gaps. More specifically gaps are identified in (i) monitoring aerosol loading and composition over urban areas, (ii) examining the influence of dust, (iii) assessing radiative effects of aerosols, (iv) measuring and modelling fine particles and (v) quantifying the contribution of long range transport of aerosols. Such studies are crucial for understanding the optical, physical and chemical properties of aerosols and their spatio-temporal characteristics over the region, which are useful for modelling and prediction of aerosols' effects on air quality and climate system.

  17. On the gas-particle partitioning of soluble organic aerosol in two urban atmospheres with contrasting emissions: 2. Gas and particle phase formic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiumeng; Zhang, Xiaolu; Parker, Eric T.; Veres, Patrick R.; Roberts, James M.; de Gouw, Joost A.; Hayes, Patrick L.; Jimenez, Jose L.; Murphy, Jennifer G.; Ellis, Raluca A.; Huey, L. Greg; Weber, Rodney J.

    2012-10-01

    Gas and fine particle (PM2.5) phase formic acid concentrations were measured with online instrumentation during separate one-month studies in the summer of 2010 in Los Angeles (LA), CA, and Atlanta, GA. In both urban environments, median gas phase concentrations were on the order of a few ppbv (LA 1.6 ppbv, Atlanta 2.3 ppbv) and median particle phase concentrations were approximately tens of ng/m3 (LA 49 ng/m3, Atlanta 39 ng/m3). LA formic acid gas and particle concentrations had consistent temporal patterns; both peaked in the early afternoon and generally followed the trends in photochemical secondary gases. Atlanta diurnal trends were more irregular, but the mean diurnal profile had similar afternoon peaks in both gas and particle concentrations, suggesting a photochemical source in both cities. LA formic acid particle/gas (p/g) ratios ranged between 0.01 and 12%, with a median of 1.3%. No clear evidence that LA formic acid preferentially partitioned to particle water was observed, except on three overcast periods of suppressed photochemical activity. Application of Henry's Law to predict partitioning during these periods greatly under-predicted particle phase formate concentrations based on bulk aerosol liquid water content (LWC) and pH estimated from thermodynamic models. In contrast to LA, formic acid partitioning in Atlanta appeared to be more consistently associated with elevated relative humidity (i.e., aerosol LWC), although p/g ratios were somewhat lower, ranging from 0.20 to 5.8%, with a median of 0.8%. Differences in formic acid gas absorbing phase preferences between these two cities are consistent with that of bulk water-soluble organic carbon reported in a companion paper.

  18. Size distribution of ions in atmospheric aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivácsy, Z.; Molnár, Á.

    The aim of this paper is to present data about the concentration and size distribution of ions in atmospheric aerosol under slightly polluted urban conditions in Hungary. Concentration of inorganic cations (ammonium, sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium), inorganic anions (sulfate, nitrate, chloride, carbonate) and organic acids (oxalic, malonic, succinic, formic and acetic acid) for 8 particle size range between 0.0625 and 16 μm were determined. As was the case for ammonium, sulfate and nitrate, the organic acids were mostly found in the fine particle size range. Potassium and chloride were rather uniformly distributed between fine and coarse particles. Sodium, calcium, magnesium and carbonate were practically observed in the coarse mode. The results obtained for the summer and the winter half-year were also compared. The mass concentrations were recalculated in equivalents, and the ion balance was found to be reasonable in most cases. Measurement of the pH of the aerosol extracts indicates that the aerosol is acidic in the fine mode, but alkaline in the coarse particle size range.

  19. DOE research on atmospheric aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, S.E.

    1995-11-01

    Atmospheric aerosols are the subject of a significant component of research within DOE`s environmental research activities, mainly under two programs within the Department`s Environmental Sciences Division, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program and the Atmospheric Chemistry Program (ACP). Research activities conducted under these programs include laboratory experiments, field measurements, and theoretical and modeling studies. The objectives and scope of these programs are briefly summarized. The ARM Program is the Department`s major research activity focusing on atmospheric processes pertinent to understanding global climate and developing the capability of predicting global climate change in response to energy related activities. The ARM approach consists mainly of testing and improving models using long-term measurements of atmospheric radiation and controlling variables at highly instrumented sites in north central Oklahoma, in the Tropical Western Pacific, and on the North Slope of Alaska. Atmospheric chemistry research within DOE addresses primarily the issue of atmospheric response to emissions from energy-generation sources. As such this program deals with the broad topic known commonly as the atmospheric source-receptor sequence. This sequence consists of all aspects of energy-related pollutants from the time they are emitted from their sources to the time they are redeposited at the Earth`s surface.

  20. The Impact of Aerosol Particle Mixing State on the Hygroscopicity of Sea Spray Aerosol

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Aerosol particles influence global climate by determining cloud droplet number concentrations, brightness, and lifetime. Primary aerosol particles, such as those produced from breaking waves in the ocean, display large particle–particle variability in chemical composition, morphology, and physical phase state, all of which affect the ability of individual particles to accommodate water and grow into cloud droplets. Despite such diversity in molecular composition, there is a paucity of methods available to assess how particle–particle variability in chemistry translates to corresponding differences in aerosol hygroscopicity. Here, an approach has been developed that allows for characterization of the distribution of aerosol hygroscopicity within a chemically complex population of atmospheric particles. This methodology, when applied to the interpretation of nascent sea spray aerosol, provides a quantitative framework for connecting results obtained using molecular mimics generated in the laboratory with chemically complex ambient aerosol. We show that nascent sea spray aerosol, generated in situ in the Atlantic Ocean, displays a broad distribution of particle hygroscopicities, indicative of a correspondingly broad distribution of particle chemical compositions. Molecular mimics of sea spray aerosol organic material were used in the laboratory to assess the volume fractions and molecular functionality required to suppress sea spray aerosol hygroscopicity to the extent indicated by field observations. We show that proper accounting for the distribution and diversity in particle hygroscopicity and composition are important to the assessment of particle impacts on clouds and global climate. PMID:27162963

  1. Scattering by Atmospheric Particles: From Aerosols to Clouds with the Point-Spread Function ... using Water, Milk, Plastic Cups, and a Laser Pointer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, A. B.

    2015-12-01

    Planetary atmospheres are made primarily of molecules, and their optical properties are well known. They scatter sunlight across the spectrum, but far more potently at shorter wavelengths. Consequently, they redden the Sun as it sets and, at the same time, endow the daytime sky with its characteristic blue hue. There are also microscopic atmospheric particulates that are equally omnipresent because small enough (up to ~10s of microns) to remain lofted for long periods of time. However, in contrast with molecules of the major gases, their concentrations are highly variable in space and time. Their optical properties are also far more interesting. These airborne particles are either solid---hence the word "aerosols"---or liquid, most notably in the form of cloud droplets. Needless to say that both aerosols and clouds have major impacts on the balance of the Earth's climate system. Harder to understand, but nonetheless true, is that their climate impacts are much harder to assess by Earth system modelers than those of greenhouse gases such as CO2. That makes them prime targets of study by multiple approaches, including ground- and space-based remote sensing. To characterize aerosols and clouds quantitatively by optical remote sensing methods, either passive (sunlight-based) or active (laser-based), we need predictive capability for the signals recorded by sensors, whether ground-based, airborne, or carried by satellites. This in turn draws on the physical theory of "radiative transfer" that describes how the light propagates and scatters in the molecular-and-particulate atmosphere. This is a challenge for remote sensing scientists. I will show why by simulating with simple means the point spread function or "PSF" of scattering particulate atmospheres with varying opacity, thus covering tabletop analogs of the pristine air, the background aerosol, all the way to optically thick cloudy airmasses. I will also show PSF measurements of real clouds over New Mexico and

  2. Metaproteomic analysis of atmospheric aerosol samples.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fobang; Lai, Senchao; Reinmuth-Selzle, Kathrin; Scheel, Jan Frederik; Fröhlich-Nowoisky, Janine; Després, Viviane R; Hoffmann, Thorsten; Pöschl, Ulrich; Kampf, Christopher J

    2016-09-01

    Metaproteomic analysis of air particulate matter provides information about the abundance and properties of bioaerosols in the atmosphere and their influence on climate and public health. We developed and applied efficient methods for the extraction and analysis of proteins from glass fiber filter samples of total, coarse, and fine particulate matter. Size exclusion chromatography was applied to remove matrix components, and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) was applied for protein fractionation according to molecular size, followed by in-gel digestion and LC-MS/MS analysis of peptides using a hybrid Quadrupole-Orbitrap MS. Maxquant software and the Swiss-Prot database were used for protein identification. In samples collected at a suburban location in central Europe, we found proteins that originated mainly from plants, fungi, and bacteria, which constitute a major fraction of primary biological aerosol particles (PBAP) in the atmosphere. Allergenic proteins were found in coarse and fine particle samples, and indications for atmospheric degradation of proteins were observed. Graphical abstract Workflow for the metaproteomic analysis of atmospheric aerosol samples.

  3. Aerosol Properties of the Atmospheres of Extrasolar Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavvas, P.; Koskinen, T.

    2017-09-01

    We use a model of aerosol microphysics to investigate the impact of high-altitude photochemical aerosols on the transmission spectra and atmospheric properties of close-in exoplanets, such as HD 209458 b and HD 189733 b. The results depend strongly on the temperature profiles in the middle and upper atmospheres, which are poorly understood. Nevertheless, our model of HD 189733 b, based on the most recently inferred temperature profiles, produces an aerosol distribution that matches the observed transmission spectrum. We argue that the hotter temperature of HD 209458 b inhibits the production of high-altitude aerosols and leads to the appearance of a clearer atmosphere than on HD 189733 b. The aerosol distribution also depends on the particle composition, photochemical production, and atmospheric mixing. Due to degeneracies among these inputs, current data cannot constrain the aerosol properties in detail. Instead, our work highlights the role of different factors in controlling the aerosol distribution that will prove useful in understanding different observations, including those from future missions. For the atmospheric mixing efficiency suggested by general circulation models, we find that the aerosol particles are small (∼nm) and probably spherical. We further conclude that a composition based on complex hydrocarbons (soots) is the most likely candidate to survive the high temperatures in hot-Jupiter atmospheres. Such particles would have a significant impact on the energy balance of HD 189733 b’s atmosphere and should be incorporated in future studies of atmospheric structure. We also evaluate the contribution of external sources to photochemical aerosol formation and find that their spectral signature is not consistent with observations.

  4. Single-particle laser-induced-fluorescence spectra of biological and other organic-carbon aerosols in the atmosphere: Measurements at New Haven, Connecticut, and Las Cruces, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yong-Le; Pinnick, Ronald G.; Hill, Steven C.; Rosen, James M.; Chang, Richard K.

    2007-12-01

    This study focuses on organic carbon (OC) aerosols, including natural biological aerosols, in the Earth's troposphere, and on laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectral methods for studying these aerosols. LIF spectra of atmospheric OC and biological aerosols (having diameters greater than approximately 3 μm) measured at New Haven, Connecticut, and Las Cruces, New Mexico, are reported. A hierarchical clustering method was used to cluster approximately 90% of the single-particle LIF spectra into 8-10 groups. Some of these groups have spectra that are similar to spectra of some important classes of atmospheric aerosol, such as humic/fulvic acids and humic-like substances, bacteria, cellulose, marine aerosol, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). A comparison with previous measurements made at Adelphi, Maryland, reveals that the most highly populated clusters found at Adelphi, and some of the less populated ones, also appear in the LIF spectra at New Haven and Las Cruces, even though the regional climates at these locations is different (New England/Atlantic Coastal, for New Haven and Adelphi, and Chihuahuan Desert for Las Cruces), and the measurements were made in different seasons. The results are consistent with some (perhaps most) of the fluorors in OC and biological atmospheric aerosols being common to these three sites. On average, spectra characteristic of humic/fulvic acids and humic-like substances (HULIS) comprise 28-43% of fluorescent particles at all three sites; whereas cellulose-like spectra contribute only 1-3%.

  5. Fluorescence spectra and elastic scattering characteristics of atmospheric aerosol in Las Cruces, New Mexico, USA: Variability of concentrations and possible constituents and sources of particles in various spectral clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinnick, R. G.; Fernandez, E.; Rosen, J. M.; Hill, S. C.; Wang, Y.; Pan, Y. L.

    2013-02-01

    The UV-excited laser-induced-fluorescence (UV-LIF) spectra of single atmospheric particles and the three-band integrating-nephelometer elastic scattering of atmospheric aerosol were measured during four approximately 24-h periods on May 2007 in Las Cruces, New Mexico, USA. Aerosol scattering measurements in the nephelometer red channel (50-nm band centered at 700-nm) ranged from around 3-10 times the molecular (Rayleigh) scattering background. On average 22.8% of particles with size greater than about 1 μm diameter have fluorescence above a preset fluorescence threshold. A hierarchical cluster analysis indicates that most of the single-particle UV-LIF spectra fall into about 10 categories (spectral clusters) as found previously at other geographic sites (Pinnick et al., 2004; Pan et al., 2007). The clusters include spectra characteristic of various humic/fulvic acids, humic-like-substances (HULIS), chemically aged terpenes, fungal spores, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, bacteria, cellulose/pollens, and mixtures of various organic carbon compounds. By far the most populated cluster category is similar to those of chemically aged terpenes/humic-materials; on average this population comprises about 62% of fluorescent particles. Clusters with spectra similar to that of some HULIS aerosol contain on average 10.0% of particles; those characteristic of some fungal spores (or perhaps mixtures of aromatic organic compounds) 8.4% of particles; bacteria-like spectra 1.6% of particles; and cellulose/pollen-like spectra 0.8% of particles. Measurements of fluorescent particles over relatively short (24 min) periods reveal that the concentrations of particles in the most populated clusters are highly correlated, suggesting that the particles populating them derive from the same region; these particles might be composed of crustal material coated with secondary organic carbon. On the other hand, concentrations of particles having cellulose-like spectra are generally

  6. Physicochemical variations in atmospheric aerosols recorded at sea onboard the Atlantic-Mediterranean 2008 Scholar Ship cruise (Part I): Particle mass concentrations, size ratios, and main chemical components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, Noemí; Moreno, Teresa; Querol, Xavier; Alastuey, Andrés; Bhatia, Ravinder; Spiro, Baruch; Hanvey, Melanie

    2010-07-01

    We report on ambient atmospheric aerosols present at sea during the Atlantic-Mediterranean voyage of Oceanic II (The Scholar Ship) in spring 2008. A record was obtained of hourly PM 10, PM 2.5, and PM 1 particle size fraction concentrations and 24-h filter samples for chemical analysis which allowed for comparison between levels of crustal particles, sea spray, total carbon, and secondary inorganic aerosols. On-board monitoring was continuous from the equatorial Atlantic to the Straits of Gibraltar, across the Mediterranean to Istanbul, and back via Lisbon to the English Channel. Initially clean air in the open Atlantic registered PM 10 levels <10 μg m -3 but became progressively polluted by increasingly coarse PM as the ship approached land. Away from major port cities, the main sources of atmospheric contamination identified were dust intrusions from North Africa (NAF), smoke plumes from biomass burning in sub-Saharan Africa and Russia, industrial sulphate clouds and other regional pollution sources transported from Europe, sea spray during rough seas, and plumes emanating from islands. Under dry NAF intrusions PM 10 daily mean levels averaged 40-60 μg m -3 (30-40 μg m -3 PM 2.5; c. 20 μg m -3 PM 1), peaking briefly to >120 μg m -3 (hourly mean) when the ship passed through curtains of higher dust concentrations amassed at the frontal edge of the dust cloud. PM 1/PM 10 ratios ranged from very low during desert dust intrusions (0.3-0.4) to very high during anthropogenic pollution plume events (0.8-1).

  7. Two-Dimensional Offline Chromatographic Fractionation for the Characterization of Humic-Like Substances in Atmospheric Aerosol Particles.

    PubMed

    Spranger, Tobias; van Pinxteren, Dominik; Herrmann, Hartmut

    2017-05-02

    Organic carbon in atmospheric particles comprises a large fraction of chromatographically unresolved compounds, often referred to as humic-like substances (HULIS), which influence particle properties and impact climate, human health, and ecosystems. To better understand its composition, a two-dimensional (2D) offline method combining size-exclusion (SEC) and reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) using a new spiked gradient profile is presented. It separates HULIS into 55 fractions of different size and polarity, with estimated ranges of molecular weight and octanol/water partitioning coefficient (log P) from 160-900 g/mol and 0.2-3.3, respectively. The distribution of HULIS within the 2D size versus polarity space is illustrated with heat maps of ultraviolet absorption at 254 nm. It is found to strongly differ in a small example set of samples from a background site near Leipzig, Germany. In winter, the most intense signals were obtained for the largest molecules (>520 g/mol) with low polarity (log P ∼ 1.9), whereas in summer, smaller (225-330 g/mol) and more polar (log P ∼ 0.55) molecules dominate. The method reveals such differences in HULIS composition in a more detailed manner than previously possible and can therefore help to better elucidate the sources of HULIS in different seasons or at different sites. Analyzing Suwannee river fulvic acid as a common HULIS surrogate shows a similar polarity range, but the sizes are clearly larger than those of atmospheric HULIS.

  8. Statistical characteristics of atmospheric aerosol as determined from AERONET measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Jongmin; Kokhanovsky, Alexander

    2015-04-01

    Seasonal means and standard deviations of column-integrated aerosol optical properties (e.g. spectral aerosol optical thickness (AOT), single scattering albedo, phase function, Ångström exponent, volume particle size distribution, complex refractive index, absorbing aerosol optical thickness) from several Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sites located in typical aerosol source and background regions are investigated (Holben et al., 1998). The AERONET program is an inclusive network of ground-based sun-photometers that measure atmospheric aerosol optical properties (http://aeronet.gsfc.nasa.gov/). The results can be used for improving the accuracy of satellite-retrieved AOT, assessments of the global aerosol models, studies of atmospheric pollution and aerosol radiative forcing on climate. We have paid a special attention to several AERONET sites that are Mexico_City (Mexico), Alta_Floresta (Brazil), Avignon (France), Solar_Village (Saudi Arabia), and Midway_Island (Pacific) representative for industrial/urban, biomass burning, rural, desert dust and oceanic aerosols, respectively. We have found that the optical and microphysical aerosol properties are highly dependent on the local aerosol emission sources and seasonal meteorological conditions.

  9. Single Particle Analysis of Ice Forming Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cziczo, Daniel J.; Kulkarni, Gourihar; Pratt, Kerri; Pekour, Mikahil; Hallar, Gannet; McCubbin, Ian

    2010-05-01

    During January and February of 2010 ice forming aerosol particles were analyzed at Storm Peak Laboratory in north-central Colorado in the USA. Atmospheric particles were acquired through an isokinetic inlet during periods when free-tropospheric conditions with minimal local influence existed. The particles were then subject to low temperature and high relative humidity in order to mimic cloud formation conditions. Particles which nucleated ice were separated using a counterflow virtual impactor. The size and chemical composition of the ice nuclei was then characterized in situ using a single particle mass spectrometer . Samples were also collected for off line electron microscopic analysis. A particular emphasis was placed on determination of fractions associated with anthropogenic activity and biogenic components.

  10. Atmospheric Ion-induced Aerosol Nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtius, J.; Lovejoy, E. R.; Froyd, K. D.

    2006-08-01

    Ion-induced nucleation has been suggested to be a potentially important mechanism for atmospheric aerosol formation. Ions are formed in the background atmosphere by galactic cosmic rays. A possible connection between galactic cosmic rays and cloudiness has been However, the predictions of current atmospheric nucleation models are highly uncertain because the models are usually based on the liquid drop model that estimates cluster thermodynamics based on bulk properties (e.g., liquid drop density and surface tension). Sulfuric acid (H2SO4) and water are assumed to be the most important nucleating agents in the free troposphere. Measurements of the molecular thermodynamics for the growth and evaporation of cluster ions containing H2SO4 and H2O were performed using a temperature-controlled laminar flow reactor coupled to a linear quadrupole mass spectrometer as well as a temperature-controlled ion trap mass spectrometer. The measurements were complemented by quantum chemical calculations of the cluster ion structures. The analysis yielded a complete set of H2SO4 and H2O binding thermodynamics extending from molecular cluster ions to the bulk, based on experimental thermodynamics for the small clusters. The data were incorporated into a kinetic aerosol model to yield quantitative predictions of the rate of ion-induced nucleation for atmospheric conditions. The model predicts that the negative ion-H2SO4-H2O nucleation mechanism is an efficient source of new particles in the middle and upper troposphere.

  11. Formation and growth of photochemical aerosols in Titan's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabane, M.; Chassefiere, E.; Israel, Guy

    1992-04-01

    Recent development in the understanding of the morphology of haze aerosols in Titan's atmosphere, aggregate particles, and their associated optical properties are considered in the flight of a microphysical model of aerosols. Two different phases of the formation process are identified: initial growth of aerosols near the formation altitude by accretion of very small elementary particles; and (2) settling during which particles of about the same size stock together, leading to the formation of aggregates which contain some tens to several hundred monomers. The first phase leads to the formation of nearly spherical 'monomers' (radius approximately equal to 0.05 micrometers). An eulerian microphysical model is used. It is shown that the monomer radius is extremely sensitive to the altitude where aerosols are created. The formation altitude of aerosols is found to lie in the range from 350 to 400 km.

  12. Thermophoretic separation of aerosol particles from a sampled gas stream

    DOEpatents

    Postma, Arlin K.

    1986-01-01

    A method for separating gaseous samples from a contained atmosphere that includes aerosol particles uses the step of repelling particles from a gas permeable surface or membrane by heating the surface to a temperature greater than that of the surrounding atmosphere. The resulting thermophoretic forces maintain the gas permeable surface clear of aerosol particles. The disclosed apparatus utilizes a downwardly facing heated plate of gas permeable material to combine thermophoretic repulsion and gravity forces to prevent particles of any size from contacting the separating plate surfaces.

  13. The Regional Environmental Impacts of Atmospheric Aerosols over Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakey, Ashraf; Ibrahim, Alaa

    2015-04-01

    Identifying the origin (natural versus anthropogenic) and the dynamics of aerosols over Egypt at varying temporal and spatial scales provide valuable knowledge on the regional climate impacts of aerosols and their ultimate connections to the Earth's regional climate system at the MENA region. At regional scale, Egypt is exposed to air pollution with levels exceeding typical air-quality standards. This is particularly true for the Nile Delta region, being at the crossroads of different aerosol species originating from local urban-industrial and biomass-burning activities, regional dust sources, and European pollution from the north. The Environmental Climate Model (EnvClimA) is used to investigate both of the biogenic and anthropogenic aerosols over Egypt. The dominant natural aerosols over Egypt are due to the sand and dust storms, which frequently occur during the transitional seasons (spring and autumn). In winter, the maximum frequency reaches 2 to 3 per day in the north, which decreases gradually southward with a frequency of 0.5-1 per day. Monitoring one of the most basic aerosol parameters, the aerosol optical depth (AOD), is a main experimental and modeling task in aerosol studies. We used the aerosol optical depth to quantify the amount and variability of aerosol loading in the atmospheric column over a certain areas. The aerosols optical depth from the model is higher in spring season due to the impacts of dust activity over Egypt as results of the westerly wind, which carries more dust particles from the Libyan Desert. The model result shows that the mass load of fine aerosols has a longer life-time than the coarse aerosols. In autumn season, the modelled aerosol optical depth tends to increase due to the biomass burning in the delta of Egypt. Natural aerosol from the model tends to scatter the solar radiation while most of the anthropogenic aerosols tend to absorb the longwave solar radiation. The overall results indicate that the AOD is lowest in winter

  14. Traffic is a major source of atmospheric nanocluster aerosol

    PubMed Central

    Kuuluvainen, Heino; Karjalainen, Panu; Keskinen, Jorma; Hillamo, Risto; Niemi, Jarkko V.; Pirjola, Liisa; Timonen, Hilkka J.; Saarikoski, Sanna; Saukko, Erkka; Järvinen, Anssi; Silvennoinen, Henna; Rostedt, Antti; Olin, Miska; Yli-Ojanperä, Jaakko; Nousiainen, Pekka; Kousa, Anu; Dal Maso, Miikka

    2017-01-01

    In densely populated areas, traffic is a significant source of atmospheric aerosol particles. Owing to their small size and complicated chemical and physical characteristics, atmospheric particles resulting from traffic emissions pose a significant risk to human health and also contribute to anthropogenic forcing of climate. Previous research has established that vehicles directly emit primary aerosol particles and also contribute to secondary aerosol particle formation by emitting aerosol precursors. Here, we extend the urban atmospheric aerosol characterization to cover nanocluster aerosol (NCA) particles and show that a major fraction of particles emitted by road transportation are in a previously unmeasured size range of 1.3–3.0 nm. For instance, in a semiurban roadside environment, the NCA represented 20–54% of the total particle concentration in ambient air. The observed NCA concentrations varied significantly depending on the traffic rate and wind direction. The emission factors of NCA for traffic were 2.4·1015 (kgfuel)−1 in a roadside environment, 2.6·1015 (kgfuel)−1 in a street canyon, and 2.9·1015 (kgfuel)−1 in an on-road study throughout Europe. Interestingly, these emissions were not associated with all vehicles. In engine laboratory experiments, the emission factor of exhaust NCA varied from a relatively low value of 1.6·1012 (kgfuel)−1 to a high value of 4.3·1015 (kgfuel)−1. These NCA emissions directly affect particle concentrations and human exposure to nanosized aerosol in urban areas, and potentially may act as nanosized condensation nuclei for the condensation of atmospheric low-volatile organic compounds. PMID:28674021

  15. Atmospheric aerosol variability and properties in lowermost tropical free troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krejci, Radovan; Hamburger, Thomas; Ström, Johan; Tunved, Peter; Schmeissner, Tina; Matisans, Modris; Calderon, Silvia; Hoffman, Pedro

    2013-05-01

    The long-term measurements of aerosol number and size distributions in tropical free troposphere (FT) were carried out from 2007 until 2009. The measurements took place at the high altitude Atmospheric Research Station Pico Espejo located on top of the Sierra Nevada mountain ridge at 4765 m a.s.l. nearby the city of Mérida, Venezuela. Analysis of aerosol number concentration, size distribution and light absorbing aerosol focuses mainly on possible links to the atmospheric general circulation in the tropics and seasonality driven changes in biomass burning activity. Repeatable annual and diurnal cycles of the particle number concentration were observed.

  16. Present role of PIXE in atmospheric aerosol research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maenhaut, Willy

    2015-11-01

    In the 1980s and 1990s nearly half of the elemental analyses of atmospheric aerosol samples were performed by PIXE. Since then, other techniques for elemental analysis became available and there has been a steady increase in studies on organic aerosol constituents and other aspects of aerosols, especially in the areas of nucleation (new particle formation), optical properties, and the role of aerosol particles in cloud formation and properties. First, a brief overview and discussion is given of the developments and trends in atmospheric aerosol analysis and research of the past three decades. Subsequently, it is indicated that there is still invaluable work to be done by PIXE in atmospheric aerosol research, especially if one teams up with other aerosol researchers and performs complementary measurements, e.g., on small aerosol samples that are taken with high-time resolution. Fine examples of such research are the work done by the Lund group in the CARIBIC aircraft studies and the analysis of circular streaker samples by the Florence PIXE group. These and other examples are presented and other possibilities of PIXE are indicated.

  17. Study of atmospheric aerosols and mixing layer by LIDAR.

    PubMed

    Angelini, Federico; Barnaba, Francesca; Landi, Tony Christian; Caporaso, Luca; Gobbi, Gian Paolo

    2009-12-01

    The LIDAR (laser radar) is an active remote sensing technique, which allows for the altitude-resolved observation of several atmospheric constituents. A typical application is the measurement of the vertically resolved aerosol optical properties. By using aerosol particles as a marker, continuous determination of the mixing layer height (MLH) can also be obtained by LIDAR. Some examples of aerosol extinction coefficient profiles and MLH extracted from a 1-year LIDAR data set collected in Milan (Italy) are discussed and validated against in situ data (from a balloon-borne optical particle counter). Finally a comparison of the observation-based MLH with relevant numerical simulations (mesoscale model MM5) is provided.

  18. Improving estimates of aerosol radiative forcing through a particle-based aerosol microphysical scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fierce, L.; McGraw, R. L.

    2016-12-01

    Forcing by atmospheric aerosols remains a large source of uncertainty in assessing human influences on the climate. Although global models have moved toward including more detailed representations of aerosol populations, aerosol microphysical schemes have been evaluated against benchmark models in only limited cases. Here we introduce a new framework for simulating atmospheric aerosols based on the Quadrature Method of Moments. This new aerosol model has been designed to reproduce key features of benchmark populations simulated by the particle-resolved model PartMC-MOSAIC, while tracking as little information about aerosol distributions as is necessary. The quadrature-based model simulates the aerosol evolution using a small number of weighted particles and is, therefore, decided as a reduced particle-based model. By applying principles of maximum entropy, the quadrature-based model efficiently reproduces distributions with respect to key aerosol properties, such as critical supersaturation for cloud condensation nuclei activation and optical cross sections, with high accuracy. In addition to providing an optimized aerosol model, the present study also describes how multi-scale modeling can be used as a tool for development of advanced aerosol microphysical schemes.

  19. Nozzles for Focusing Aerosol Particles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE ( DD -MM-YYYY) October 2009 2. REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES...Figures Figure 1. The design of the first-generation aerodynamic focusing nozzle for aerosol particles used for SPFS and TAOS instrument prototypes...Some nozzles were fabricated in aluminum and some in steel. It has been used for SPFS and TAOS measurement technologies both in the laboratory and

  20. Anthropogenic iron oxide aerosols enhance atmospheric heating

    PubMed Central

    Moteki, Nobuhiro; Adachi, Kouji; Ohata, Sho; Yoshida, Atsushi; Harigaya, Tomoo; Koike, Makoto; Kondo, Yutaka

    2017-01-01

    Combustion-induced carbonaceous aerosols, particularly black carbon (BC) and brown carbon (BrC), have been largely considered as the only significant anthropogenic contributors to shortwave atmospheric heating. Natural iron oxide (FeOx) has been recognized as an important contributor, but the potential contribution of anthropogenic FeOx is unknown. In this study, we quantify the abundance of FeOx over East Asia through aircraft measurements using a modified single-particle soot photometer. The majority of airborne FeOx particles in the continental outflows are of anthropogenic origin in the form of aggregated magnetite nanoparticles. The shortwave absorbing powers (Pabs) attributable to FeOx and to BC are calculated on the basis of their size-resolved mass concentrations and the mean Pabs(FeOx)/Pabs(BC) ratio in the continental outflows is estimated to be at least 4–7%. We demonstrate that in addition to carbonaceous aerosols the aggregate of magnetite nanoparticles is a significant anthropogenic contributor to shortwave atmospheric heating. PMID:28508863

  1. Microphysical processing of aerosol particles in orographic clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pousse-Nottelmann, S.; Zubler, E. M.; Lohmann, U.

    2015-01-01

    An explicit and detailed treatment of cloud-borne particles allowing for the consideration of aerosol cycling in clouds has been implemented in the regional weather forecast and climate model COSMO. The effects of aerosol scavenging, cloud microphysical processing and regeneration upon cloud evaporation on the aerosol population and on subsequent cloud formation are investigated. For this, two-dimensional idealized simulations of moist flow over two bell-shaped mountains were carried out varying the treatment of aerosol scavenging and regeneration processes for a warm-phase and a mixed-phase orographic cloud. The results allowed to identify different aerosol cycling mechanisms. In the simulated non-precipitating warm-phase cloud, aerosol mass is incorporated into cloud droplets by activation scavenging and released back to the atmosphere upon cloud droplet evaporation. In the mixed-phase cloud, a first cycle comprises cloud droplet activation and evaporation via the Wegener-Bergeron-Findeisen process. A second cycle includes below-cloud scavenging by precipitating snow particles and snow sublimation and is connected to the first cycle via the riming process which transfers aerosol mass from cloud droplets to snow flakes. In the simulated mixed-phase cloud, only a negligible part of the total aerosol mass is incorporated into ice crystals. Sedimenting snow flakes reaching the surface remove aerosol mass from the atmosphere. The results show that aerosol processing and regeneration lead to a vertical redistribution of aerosol mass and number. However, the processes not only impact the total aerosol number and mass, but also the shape of the aerosol size distributions by enhancing the internally mixed/soluble accumulation mode and generating coarse mode particles. Concerning subsequent cloud formation at the second mountain, accounting for aerosol processing and regeneration increases the cloud droplet number concentration with possible implications for the ice

  2. Microphysical processing of aerosol particles in orographic clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pousse-Nottelmann, S.; Zubler, E. M.; Lohmann, U.

    2015-08-01

    An explicit and detailed treatment of cloud-borne particles allowing for the consideration of aerosol cycling in clouds has been implemented into COSMO-Model, the regional weather forecast and climate model of the Consortium for Small-scale Modeling (COSMO). The effects of aerosol scavenging, cloud microphysical processing and regeneration upon cloud evaporation on the aerosol population and on subsequent cloud formation are investigated. For this, two-dimensional idealized simulations of moist flow over two bell-shaped mountains were carried out varying the treatment of aerosol scavenging and regeneration processes for a warm-phase and a mixed-phase orographic cloud. The results allowed us to identify different aerosol cycling mechanisms. In the simulated non-precipitating warm-phase cloud, aerosol mass is incorporated into cloud droplets by activation scavenging and released back to the atmosphere upon cloud droplet evaporation. In the mixed-phase cloud, a first cycle comprises cloud droplet activation and evaporation via the Wegener-Bergeron-Findeisen (WBF) process. A second cycle includes below-cloud scavenging by precipitating snow particles and snow sublimation and is connected to the first cycle via the riming process which transfers aerosol mass from cloud droplets to snowflakes. In the simulated mixed-phase cloud, only a negligible part of the total aerosol mass is incorporated into ice crystals. Sedimenting snowflakes reaching the surface remove aerosol mass from the atmosphere. The results show that aerosol processing and regeneration lead to a vertical redistribution of aerosol mass and number. Thereby, the processes impact the total aerosol number and mass and additionally alter the shape of the aerosol size distributions by enhancing the internally mixed/soluble Aitken and accumulation mode and generating coarse-mode particles. Concerning subsequent cloud formation at the second mountain, accounting for aerosol processing and regeneration increases

  3. Fatty Acids as Surfactants on Aerosol Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tervahattu, H.; Juhanoja, J.; Niemi, J.

    2003-12-01

    Fatty acids (n-alcanoic acids) are common compounds in numerous anthropogenic and natural emissions. According to Rogge et al. (1993), catalyst-equipped automobiles emitted more than 600 μg km-1 of fatty acids which was over 50% of all identified organics in fine aerosol emissions. Coal burning produces fatty acids ranging from about 1700 mg kg-1 for bituminous coal to over 10000 mg kg-1 for lignite (Oros and Simoneit, 2000). Similarly, biomass burning is an important source for aerosol fatty acids. They are the major identified compound group in deciduous tree smoke, their total emission factor being measured as 1589 mg kg-1 which was 56% of all identified organic compounds (Oros and Simoneit, 2001a). Large amounts of fatty acid are also emitted from burning of conifer trees and grass (Oros and Simoneit, 2001a; Simoneit, 2002). Fatty acids have been reported to be major constituents of marine aerosols in many investigations (Barger and Garrett, 1976; Gagosian et. al, 1981; Sicre et al., 1990; Stephanou, 1992). It has been suggested that as the marine aerosol particles form, they acquire a coating of organic surfactants (Blanchard, 1964; Gill et al., 1983; Middlebrook et al., 1998; Ellison et al., 1999). Amphiphilic molecules, including lipids, can be assembled as monomolecular layers at air/water interfaces as well as transported to a solid support. Recently, we could show by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry that fatty acids are important ingredients of the outermost surface layer of the sea-salt aerosol particles (Tervahattu et al., 2002). In their TOF-SIMS studies on the surface composition of atmospheric aerosols, Peterson and Tyler (2002) found fatty acids on the surface of Montana forest fire particles. In this work we have studied by TOF-SIMS the surface chemical composition of aerosol particles emitted from field fires in the Baltic and other East European countries and transported to Finland as well as aerosol particles transported from

  4. Alternative pathway for atmospheric particles growth

    PubMed Central

    Monge, Maria Eugenia; Rosenørn, Thomas; Favez, Olivier; Müller, Markus; Adler, Gabriela; Abo Riziq, Ali; Rudich, Yinon; Herrmann, Hartmut; George, Christian; D’Anna, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Credible climate change predictions require reliable fundamental scientific knowledge of the underlying processes. Despite extensive observational data accumulated to date, atmospheric aerosols still pose key uncertainties in the understanding of Earth’s radiative balance due to direct interaction with radiation and because they modify clouds’ properties. Specifically, major gaps exist in the understanding of the physicochemical pathways that lead to aerosol growth in the atmosphere and to changes in their properties while in the atmosphere. Traditionally, the driving forces for particle growth are attributed to condensation of low vapor pressure species following atmospheric oxidation of volatile compounds by gaseous oxidants. The current study presents experimental evidence of an unaccounted-for new photoinduced pathway for particle growth. We show that heterogeneous reactions activated by light can lead to fast uptake of noncondensable Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) at the surface of particles when only traces of a photosensitizer are present in the seed aerosol. Under such conditions, size and mass increase; changes in the chemical composition of the aerosol are also observed upon exposure to volatile organic compounds such as terpenes and near-UV irradiation. Experimentally determined growth rate values match field observations, suggesting that this photochemical process can provide a new, unaccounted-for pathway for atmospheric particle growth and should be considered by models. PMID:22517749

  5. Automated aerosol Raman spectrometer for semi-continuous sampling of atmospheric aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doughty, David C.; Hill, Steven C.

    2017-02-01

    Raman spectroscopy (RS) is useful in characterizing atmospheric aerosol. It is not commonly used in studying ambient particles partly because automated instrumentation for aerosol RS has not been available. Battelle (Columbus, Ohio, USA) has developed the Resource Effective Bioidentification System (REBS) for automated detection of airborne bioagents based on RS. We use a version of the REBS that measures Raman spectra of one set of particles while the next set of particles is collected from air, then moves the newly collected particles to the analysis region and repeats. Here we investigate the use of the REBS as the core of a general-purpose automated Aerosol Raman Spectrometer (ARS) for atmospheric applications. This REBS-based ARS can be operated as a line-scanning Raman imaging spectrometer. Spectra measured by this ARS for single particles made of polystyrene, black carbon, and several other materials are clearly distinguishable. Raman spectra from a 15 min ambient sample (approximately 35-50 particles, 158 spectra) were analyzed using a hierarchical clustering method to find that the cluster spectra are consistent with soot, inorganic aerosol, and other organic compounds. The ARS ran unattended, collecting atmospheric aerosol and measuring spectra for a 7 hr period at 15-min intervals. A total of 32,718 spectra were measured; 5892 exceeded a threshold and were clustered during this time. The number of particles exhibiting the D-G bands of amorphous carbon plotted vs time (at 15-min intervals) increases during the morning commute, then decreases. This data illustrates the potential of the ARS to measure thousands of time resolved aerosol Raman spectra in the ambient atmosphere over the course of several hours. The capability of this ARS for automated measurements of Raman spectra should lead to more extensive RS-based studies of atmospheric aerosols.

  6. AEROSOL PARTICLE COLLECTOR DESIGN STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S; Richard Dimenna, R

    2007-09-27

    A computational evaluation of a particle collector design was performed to evaluate the behavior of aerosol particles in a fast flowing gas stream. The objective of the work was to improve the collection efficiency of the device while maintaining a minimum specified air throughput, nominal collector size, and minimal power requirements. The impact of a range of parameters was considered subject to constraints on gas flow rate, overall collector dimensions, and power limitations. Potential improvements were identified, some of which have already been implemented. Other more complex changes were identified and are described here for further consideration. In addition, fruitful areas for further study are proposed.

  7. Photochemical aerosols in warm exoplanetary atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imanaka, Hiroshi; Smith, Mark A.; McKay, Christopher P.; Cruikshank, Dale P.; Marley, Mark S.

    2016-10-01

    Recent transit observations of exoplanets have demonstrated the possibility of a wide prevalence of haze/cloud layers at high altitudes. Hydrocarbon photochemical haze could be the candidate for such haze particles on warm sub-Neptunes, but the lack of evidence for methane poses a puzzle for such hydrocarbon photochemical haze. The CH4/CO ratios in planetary atmospheres vary substantially from their temperature and dynamics. We have conducted a series of laboratory simulations to investigate how atmospheric compositions, specifically CH4/CO ratios, affect the haze production rates and their optical properties. The mass production rates in the H2-CH4-CO gas mixtures are rather insensitive to the CH4/CO ratios larger than at 0.3. Significant formation of solid material is observed in a H2-CO gas mixture even without CH4. The complex refractive indices of the aerosol analogue from the H2-CO gas mixture show strong absorption at the visible/near-IR wavelengths. These experimental facts imply that substantial carbonaceous aerosols may be generated in warm H2-CO-CH4 exoplanetary atmospheres, and that it might be responsible for the observed dark albedos at the visible wavelengths.

  8. Equilibration timescale of atmospheric secondary organic aerosol partitioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraiwa, Manabu; Seinfeld, John H.

    2012-12-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formed from partitioning of oxidation products of anthropogenic and biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) accounts for a substantial portion of atmospheric particulate matter. In describing SOA formation, it is generally assumed that VOC oxidation products rapidly adopt gas-aerosol equilibrium. Here we estimate the equilibration timescale, τeq, of SOA gas-particle partitioning using a state-of-the-art kinetic flux model. τeq is found to be of order seconds to minutes for partitioning of relatively high volatility organic compounds into liquid particles, thereby adhering to equilibrium gas-particle partitioning. However, τeq increases to hours or days for organic aerosol associated with semi-solid particles, low volatility, large particle size, and low mass loadings. Instantaneous equilibrium partitioning may lead to substantial overestimation of particle mass concentration and underestimation of gas-phase concentration.

  9. Toxicity of atmospheric aerosols on marine phytoplankton

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paytan, A.; Mackey, K.R.M.; Chen, Y.; Lima, I.D.; Doney, S.C.; Mahowald, N.; Labiosa, R.; Post, A.F.

    2009-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosol deposition is an important source of nutrients and trace metals to the open ocean that can enhance ocean productivity and carbon sequestration and thus influence atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations and climate. Using aerosol samples from different back trajectories in incubation experiments with natural communities, we demonstrate that the response of phytoplankton growth to aerosol additions depends on specific components in aerosols and differs across phytoplankton species. Aerosol additions enhanced growth by releasing nitrogen and phosphorus, but not all aerosols stimulated growth. Toxic effects were observed with some aerosols, where the toxicity affected picoeukaryotes and Synechococcus but not Prochlorococcus.We suggest that the toxicity could be due to high copper concentrations in these aerosols and support this by laboratory copper toxicity tests preformed with Synechococcus cultures. However, it is possible that other elements present in the aerosols or unknown synergistic effects between these elements could have also contributed to the toxic effect. Anthropogenic emissions are increasing atmospheric copper deposition sharply, and based on coupled atmosphere-ocean calculations, we show that this deposition can potentially alter patterns of marine primary production and community structure in high aerosol, low chlorophyll areas, particularly in the Bay of Bengal and downwind of South and East Asia.

  10. The Organic Aerosols of Titan's Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sotin, Christophe; Lawrence, Kenneth; Beauchamp, Patricia M.; Zimmerman, Wayne

    2012-01-01

    One of Titan's many characteristics is the presence of a haze that veils its surface. This haze is composed of heavy organic particles and determining the chemical composition of these particles is a primary objective for future probes that would conduct in situ analysis. Meanwhile, solar occultations provide constraints on the optical characteristics of the haze layer. This paper describes solar occultation observations obtained by the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) onboard the Cassini spacecraft. These observations strongly constrain the optical characteristics of the haze layer. We detail the different steps involved in the processing of these data and apply them to two occultations that were observed at the South Pole and at the equator in order to investigate the latitudinal dependence of optical properties. The light curves obtained in seven atmospheric windows between 0.933-microns to 5-microns allow us to characterize atmospheric layers from 300 km to the surface. Very good fits of the light curves are obtained using a simple profile of number density of aerosols that is characterized by a scale height. The main difference between the South Pole and the equator is that the value of the scale height increases with altitude at the South Pole whereas it decreases at the equator. The vertically integrated amount of aerosols is similar at the two locations. The curve describing the cross-section versus wavelength is identical at the two locations suggesting that the aerosols have similar characteristics. Finally, we find that the two-way vertical transmission at 5-microns is as large as 80% at both locations.

  11. Spectroscopic Studies of Atmospheric Aerosol Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wamsley, R.; Leather, K.; Horn, A. B.; Percival, C.

    2008-12-01

    Particles are ubiquitous in the troposphere and are involved in chemical and physical processes affecting the composition of the atmosphere, climate, cloud albedo and human health (Finlayson-Pitts and Pitts, 2000). Organic species, such as alcohols, carboxylic acids, ketones, aldehydes, aromatics, alkenes and alkanes, originate both from anthropogenic and natural sources and comprise a large component of atmospheric particles. Gas-phase species, such as ozone, can oxidize these organics, changing the particle's oxygen-to carbon ratio and potentially altering its hygroscopicity, viscosity, morphology and reactivity. One reaction in particular, that between ozone and oleic acid, has been the focus of several recent studies and extensively researched by Ziemann (2005). Oleic acid reacts readily with ozone and has a low vapor pressure making this reaction convenient to study in the laboratory and has become the benchmark for studying heterogeneous reactions representing the oxidative processing of atmospheric organic aerosols. A critical source of uncertainty in reactivity estimates is a lack of understanding of the mechanism through which some VOCs are oxidized. This knowledge gap is especially critical for aromatic compounds. Because the intermediate reaction steps and products of aromatics oxidation are unknown, chemical mechanisms incorporate parameters estimated from environmental chamber experiments to represent their overall contribution to ozone formation, e.g. Volkamer et al. ( 2006). Previous studies of uncertainties in incremental reactivity estimates for VOCs found that the representation of aromatics chemistry contributed significantly to the estimated 40 - 50% uncertainties in the incremental reactivities of common aromatic compounds Carter et al. (2002). This study shows development of an effective IR method that can monitor the reaction and hence obtain the kinetics of the ozonolysis of an aromatic compound in the aerosol phase. The development of such

  12. Sources of optically active aerosol particles over the Amazon forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guyon, Pascal; Graham, Bim; Roberts, Gregory C.; Mayol-Bracero, Olga L.; Maenhaut, Willy; Artaxo, Paulo; Andreae, Meinrat O.

    Size-fractionated ambient aerosol samples were collected at a pasture site and a primary rainforest site in the Brazilian Amazon Basin during two field campaigns (April-May and September-October 1999), as part of the European contribution to the Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA-EUSTACH). The samples were analyzed for up to 19 trace elements by particle-induced X-ray emission analysis (PIXE), for equivalent black carbon (BC e) by a light reflectance technique and for mass concentration by gravimetric analysis. Additionally, we made continuous measurements of absorption and light scattering by aerosol particles. The vertical chemical composition gradients at the forest site have been discussed in a companion article (Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres 108 (D18), 4591 (doi:4510.1029/2003JD003465)). In this article, we present the results of a source identification and quantitative apportionment study of the wet and dry season aerosols, including an apportionment of the measured scattering and absorption properties of the total aerosol in terms of the identified aerosol sources. Source apportionments (obtained from absolute principal component analysis) revealed that the wet and dry season aerosols contained the same three main components, but in different (absolute and relative) amounts: the wet season aerosol consisted mainly of a natural biogenic component, whereas pyrogenic aerosols dominated the dry season aerosol mass. The third component identified was soil dust, which was often internally mixed with the biomass-burning aerosol. All three components contributed significantly to light extinction during both seasons. At the pasture site, up to 47% of the light absorption was attributed to biogenic particles during the wet season, and up to 35% at the tower site during the wet-to-dry transition period. The results from the present study suggest that, in addition to pyrogenic particles, biogenic and soil dust aerosols must be

  13. Carbonaceous aerosols influencing atmospheric radiation: Black and organic carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Penner, J.E.

    1994-09-01

    Carbonaceous particles in the atmosphere may both scatter and absorb solar radiation. The fraction associated with the absorbing component is generally referred to as black carbon (BC) and is mainly produced from incomplete combustion processes. The fraction associated with condensed organic compounds is generally referred to as organic carbon (OC) or organic matter and is mainly scattering. Absorption of solar radiation by carbonaceous aerosols may heat the atmosphere, thereby altering the vertical temperature profile, while scattering of solar radiation may lead to a net cooling of the atmosphere/ocean system. Carbonaceous aerosols may also enhance the concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei. This paper summarizes observed concentrations of aerosols in remote continental and marine locations and provides estimates for the fine particle (D < 2.5 {mu}m) source rates of both OC and BC. The source rates for anthropogenic organic aerosols may be as large as the source rates for anthropogenic sulfate aerosols, suggesting a similar magnitude of direct forcing of climate. The role of BC in decreasing the amount of reflected solar radiation by OC and sulfates is discussed. The total estimated forcing depends on the source estimates for organic and black carbon aerosols which are highly uncertain. The role of organic aerosols acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) is also described.

  14. Optimized sparse-particle aerosol representations for modeling cloud-aerosol interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fierce, Laura; McGraw, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Sparse representations of atmospheric aerosols are needed for efficient regional- and global-scale chemical transport models. Here we introduce a new framework for representing aerosol distributions, based on the method of moments. Given a set of moment constraints, we show how linear programming can be used to identify collections of sparse particles that approximately maximize distributional entropy. The collections of sparse particles derived from this approach reproduce CCN activity of the exact model aerosol distributions with high accuracy. Additionally, the linear programming techniques described in this study can be used to bound key aerosol properties, such as the number concentration of CCN. Unlike the commonly used sparse representations, such as modal and sectional schemes, the maximum-entropy moment-based approach is not constrained to pre-determined size bins or assumed distribution shapes. This study is a first step toward a new aerosol simulation scheme that will track multivariate aerosol distributions with sufficient computational efficiency for large-scale simulations.

  15. On the gas-particle partitioning of soluble organic aerosol in two urban atmospheres with contrasting emissions: 1. Bulk water-soluble organic carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaolu; Liu, Jiumeng; Parker, Eric T.; Hayes, Patrick L.; Jimenez, Jose L.; de Gouw, Joost A.; Flynn, James H.; Grossberg, Nicole; Lefer, Barry L.; Weber, Rodney J.

    2012-09-01

    The partitioning of semi-volatile compounds between the gas and particle phase influences the mass, size and chemical composition of the secondary organic aerosols (SOA) formed. Here we investigate the partitioning of water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) and the formation of SOA in Los Angeles (LA), California and Atlanta, Georgia; urban regions where anthropogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions are dominated by vehicles, but are contrasted by an additional large source of biogenic VOCs exclusive to Atlanta. In Atlanta, evidence for WSOC partitioning to aerosol water is observed throughout the day, but is most prevalent in the morning. During drier periods (RH < 70%), the WSOC partitioning coefficient (Fp) was in proportion to the organic mass, suggesting that both particle water and organic aerosol (OA) can serve as an absorbing phase. In contrast, despite the higher average RH, in LA the aerosol water was not an important absorbing phase, instead, Fp was correlated with OA mass. Particle water concentrations from thermodynamic predictions based on measured inorganic aerosol components do not indicate significant differences in aerosol hygroscopicity. The observed different WSOC partitioning behaviors may be attributed to the contrasting VOC mixture between the two cities. In addition, different OA composition may also play a role, as Atlanta OA is expected to have a substantially more aged regional character. These results are consistent with our companion studies that find similar partitioning differences for formic acid and additional contrasts in SOA optical properties. The findings provide direct evidence for SOA formation through an equilibrium partitioning process.

  16. On the gas-particle partitioning of soluble organic aerosol in two urban atmospheres with contrasting emissions: 1. Bulk water-soluble organic carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaolu; Liu, Jiumeng; Parker, Eric T.; Hayes, Patrick L.; Jimenez, Jose L.; Gouw, Joost A.; Flynn, James H.; Grossberg, Nicole; Lefer, Barry L.; Weber, Rodney J.

    2011-11-01

    The partitioning of semi-volatile compounds between the gas and particle phase influences the mass, size and chemical composition of the secondary organic aerosols (SOA) formed. Here we investigate the partitioning of water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) and the formation of SOA in Los Angeles (LA), California and Atlanta, Georgia; urban regions where anthropogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions are dominated by vehicles, but are contrasted by an additional large source of biogenic VOCs exclusive to Atlanta. In Atlanta, evidence for WSOC partitioning to aerosol water is observed throughout the day, but is most prevalent in the morning. During drier periods (RH < 70%), the WSOC partitioning coefficient (Fp) was in proportion to the organic mass, suggesting that both particle water and organic aerosol (OA) can serve as an absorbing phase. In contrast, despite the higher average RH, in LA the aerosol water was not an important absorbing phase, instead, Fp was correlated with OA mass. Particle water concentrations from thermodynamic predictions based on measured inorganic aerosol components do not indicate significant differences in aerosol hygroscopicity. The observed different WSOC partitioning behaviors may be attributed to the contrasting VOC mixture between the two cities. In addition, different OA composition may also play a role, as Atlanta OA is expected to have a substantially more aged regional character. These results are consistent with our companion studies that find similar partitioning differences for formic acid and additional contrasts in SOA optical properties. The findings provide direct evidence for SOA formation through an equilibrium partitioning process.

  17. Toxicity of atmospheric aerosols on marine phytoplankton

    PubMed Central

    Paytan, Adina; Mackey, Katherine R. M.; Chen, Ying; Lima, Ivan D.; Doney, Scott C.; Mahowald, Natalie; Labiosa, Rochelle; Post, Anton F.

    2009-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosol deposition is an important source of nutrients and trace metals to the open ocean that can enhance ocean productivity and carbon sequestration and thus influence atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations and climate. Using aerosol samples from different back trajectories in incubation experiments with natural communities, we demonstrate that the response of phytoplankton growth to aerosol additions depends on specific components in aerosols and differs across phytoplankton species. Aerosol additions enhanced growth by releasing nitrogen and phosphorus, but not all aerosols stimulated growth. Toxic effects were observed with some aerosols, where the toxicity affected picoeukaryotes and Synechococcus but not Prochlorococcus. We suggest that the toxicity could be due to high copper concentrations in these aerosols and support this by laboratory copper toxicity tests preformed with Synechococcus cultures. However, it is possible that other elements present in the aerosols or unknown synergistic effects between these elements could have also contributed to the toxic effect. Anthropogenic emissions are increasing atmospheric copper deposition sharply, and based on coupled atmosphere–ocean calculations, we show that this deposition can potentially alter patterns of marine primary production and community structure in high aerosol, low chlorophyll areas, particularly in the Bay of Bengal and downwind of South and East Asia. PMID:19273845

  18. Nonequilibrium atmospheric secondary organic aerosol formation and growth

    PubMed Central

    Perraud, Véronique; Bruns, Emily A.; Ezell, Michael J.; Johnson, Stanley N.; Yu, Yong; Alexander, M. Lizabeth; Zelenyuk, Alla; Imre, Dan; Chang, Wayne L.; Dabdub, Donald; Pankow, James F.; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J.

    2012-01-01

    Airborne particles play critical roles in air quality, health effects, visibility, and climate. Secondary organic aerosols (SOA) formed from oxidation of organic gases such as α-pinene account for a significant portion of total airborne particle mass. Current atmospheric models typically incorporate the assumption that SOA mass is a liquid into which semivolatile organic compounds undergo instantaneous equilibrium partitioning to grow the particles into the size range important for light scattering and cloud condensation nuclei activity. We report studies of particles from the oxidation of α-pinene by ozone and NO3 radicals at room temperature. SOA is primarily formed from low-volatility ozonolysis products, with a small contribution from higher volatility organic nitrates from the NO3 reaction. Contrary to expectations, the particulate nitrate concentration is not consistent with equilibrium partitioning between the gas phase and a liquid particle. Rather the fraction of organic nitrates in the particles is only explained by irreversible, kinetically determined uptake of the nitrates on existing particles, with an uptake coefficient that is 1.6% of that for the ozonolysis products. If the nonequilibrium particle formation and growth observed in this atmospherically important system is a general phenomenon in the atmosphere, aerosol models may need to be reformulated. The reformulation of aerosol models could impact the predicted evolution of SOA in the atmosphere both outdoors and indoors, its role in heterogeneous chemistry, its projected impacts on air quality, visibility, and climate, and hence the development of reliable control strategies. PMID:22308444

  19. Measurement of the atmospheric aerosol particle size distribution in a highly polluted mega-city in Southeast Asia (Dhaka-Bangladesh)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salam, Abdus; Mamoon, Hassan Al; Ullah, Md. Basir; Ullah, Shah M.

    2012-11-01

    Aerosol particle size distribution was measured with an aerodynamic particle sizer (APS) spectrometer continuously from January 21 to April 24, 2006 in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Particles number, surface and mass distributions data were stored automatically with Aerosol Instrument Manager (AIM) software on average every half an hour in a computer attached to the APS. The grand total average of number, surface and mass concentrations were 8.2 × 103 ± 7.8 × 103 particles cm-3, 13.3 × 103 ± 11.8 × 103 μm2 cm-3 and 3.04 ± 2.10 mg m-3, respectively. Fine particles with diameter smaller than 1.0 μm aerodynamic diameter (AD) dominated the number concentration, accounted for 91.7% of the total particles indicating vehicular emissions were dominating in Dhaka air either from fossil fuel burning or compressed natural gas (CNGs). The surface and mass concentrations between 0.5 and 1.0 μm AD were about 56.0% and 26.4% of the total particles, respectively. Remarkable seasonal differences were observed between winter and pre-monsoon seasons with the highest monthly average in January and the lowest in April. Aerosol particles in winter were 3.79 times higher for number, 3.15 times for surface and 2.18 times for mass distributions than during the pre-monsoon season. Weekends had lower concentrations than weekdays due to less vehicular traffic in the streets. Aerosol particles concentrations were about 15.0% (ranging from 9.4% to 17.3%) higher during traffic peak hours (6:00am-8:00pm) than off hours (8:00pm-6:00am). These are the first aerosol size distribution measurements with respect to number, surface and mass concentrations in real time at Dhaka, Bangladesh.

  20. Test-Aerosol Generator For Calibrating Particle Counters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mogan, Paul A.; Adams, Alois J.; Schwindt, Christian J.; Hodge, Timothy R.; Mallow, Tim J.; Duong, Anh A.; Bukauskas, Vyto V.

    1996-01-01

    Apparatus generates clean, stable aerosol stream for use in testing and calibrating laser-based aerosol-particle counter. Size and concentration of aerosol particles controlled to ensure accurate calibration. Cheap, widely available medical nebulizers used to generate aerosols.

  1. Heterogeneous Uptake of HO2 Radicals onto Atmospheric Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, I. J.; Matthews, P. S.; Brooks, B.; Goddard, A.; Whalley, L. K.; Baeza-Romero, M. T.; Heard, D. E.

    2011-12-01

    The hydroxyl (OH) and hydroperoxyl (HO2) radicals, together known as HOx, play a vital role in atmospheric chemistry by controlling the oxidative capacity of the troposphere. The atmospheric lifetime and concentrations of many trace reactive species, such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs), are determined by HOx radical levels. Therefore, the ability to accurately predict atmospheric HOx concentrations from a detailed knowledge of their sources and sinks is a very useful diagnostic tool to assess our current understanding of atmospheric chemistry. Several recent field studies have observed significantly lower concentrations of HO2 radicals than predicted using box models, where HO2 loss onto aerosols was suggested as a possible missing sink [1, 2]. However, the mechanism on HO2 uptake onto aerosols and its impact on ambient HOx levels are currently not well understood. To improve our understanding of this process, we have conducted laboratory experiments to measure HO2 uptake coefficients onto submicron aerosol particles. The FAGE (Fluorescence Assay by Gas Expansion) technique, a highly sensitive laser induced fluorescence based detection method, was used to monitor HO2 uptake kinetics onto aerosol particles in an aerosol flow tube. The application of the FAGE technique allowed for kinetic experiments to be performed under low HO2 concentrations, i.e. [HO2] < 109 molecules cm-3. HO2 radicals were produced by the photolysis of water vapour in the presence of O2 and aerosol particles were produced either by atomizing dilute salt solutions or by homogeneous nucleation. HO2 uptake coefficients (γ) have been measured for single-component solid and aqueous inorganic salt and organic aerosol particles with a wide range of hygroscopicities. HO2 uptake coefficients on solid particles were below the detection limit (γ < 0.001), whereas on aqueous aerosols uptake coefficients were somewhat larger (γ = 0.001 - 0.008). HO2 uptake coefficients were highest on aerosols

  2. Spatial Variability of CCN Sized Aerosol Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asmi, A.; Väänänen, R.

    2014-12-01

    The computational limitations restrict the grid size used in GCM models, and for many cloud types they are too large when compared to the scale of the cloud formation processes. Several parameterizations for e.g. convective cloud formation exist, but information on spatial subgrid variation of the cloud condensation nuclei (CCNs) sized aerosol concentration is not known. We quantify this variation as a function of the spatial scale by using datasets from airborne aerosol measurement campaigns around the world including EUCAARI LONGREX, ATAR, INCA, INDOEX, CLAIRE, PEGASOS and several regional airborne campaigns in Finland. The typical shapes of the distributions are analyzed. When possible, we use information obtained by CCN counters. In some other cases, we use particle size distribution measured by for example SMPS to get approximated CCN concentration. Other instruments used include optical particle counters or condensational particle counters. When using the GCM models, the CCN concentration used for each the grid-box is often considered to be either flat, or as an arithmetic mean of the concentration inside the grid-box. However, the aircraft data shows that the concentration values are often lognormal distributed. This, combined with the subgrid variations in the land use and atmospheric properties, might cause that the aerosol-cloud interactions calculated by using mean values to vary significantly from the true effects both temporary and spatially. This, in turn, can cause non-linear bias into the GCMs. We calculate the CCN aerosol concentration distribution as a function of different spatial scales. The measurements allow us to study the variation of these distributions within from hundreds of meters up to hundreds of kilometers. This is used to quantify the potential error when mean values are used in GCMs.

  3. Laboratory Experiments and Instrument Intercomparison Studies of Carbonaceous Aerosol Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Davidovits, Paul

    2015-10-20

    Aerosols containing black carbon (and some specific types of organic particulate matter) directly absorb incoming light, heating the atmosphere. In addition, all aerosol particles backscatter solar light, leading to a net-cooling effect. Indirect effects involve hydrophilic aerosols, which serve as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) that affect cloud cover and cloud stability, impacting both atmospheric radiation balance and precipitation patterns. At night, all clouds produce local warming, but overall clouds exert a net-cooling effect on the Earth. The effect of aerosol radiative forcing on climate may be as large as that of the greenhouse gases, but predominantly opposite in sign and much more uncertain. The uncertainties in the representation of aerosol interactions in climate models makes it problematic to use model projections to guide energy policy. The objective of our program is to reduce the uncertainties in the aerosol radiative forcing in the two areas highlighted in the ASR Science and Program Plan. That is, (1) addressing the direct effect by correlating particle chemistry and morphology with particle optical properties (i.e. absorption, scattering, extinction), and (2) addressing the indirect effect by correlating particle hygroscopicity and CCN activity with particle size, chemistry, and morphology. In this connection we are systematically studying particle formation, oxidation, and the effects of particle coating. The work is specifically focused on carbonaceous particles where the uncertainties in the climate relevant properties are the highest. The ongoing work consists of laboratory experiments and related instrument inter-comparison studies both coordinated with field and modeling studies, with the aim of providing reliable data to represent aerosol processes in climate models. The work is performed in the aerosol laboratory at Boston College. At the center of our laboratory setup are two main sources for the production of aerosol particles: (a

  4. Ultrafine aerosol size distributions and sulfuric acid vapor pressures: Implications for new particle formation in the atmosphere. Year 2 progress report

    SciTech Connect

    McMurry, P.H.

    1993-07-01

    This project has two components: (1) measurement of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} vapor pressures in air under temperature/relative humidity conditions similar to atmospheric, and (2) measurement of ultrafine aerosol size distributions. During Year 2, more effort was put on size distribution measurements. 4 figs.

  5. A numerical determination of the evolution of cloud drop spectra due to condensation on natural aerosol particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, I. Y.; Haenel, G.; Pruppacher, H. R.

    1980-01-01

    The time variation in size of aerosol particles growing by condensation is studied numerically by means of an air parcel model which allows entrainment of air and aerosol particles. Particles of four types of aerosols typically occurring in atmospheric air masses were considered. The present model circumvents any assumption about the size distribution and chemical composition of the aerosol particles by basing the aerosol particle growth on actually observed size distributions and on observed amounts of water taken up under equilibrium by a deposit of the aerosol particles. Characteristic differences in the drop size distribution, liquid water content and supersaturation were found for the clouds which evolved from the four aerosol types considered.

  6. The colors of biomass burning aerosols in the atmosphere

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chao; Chung, Chul Eddy; Zhang, Feng; Yin, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Biomass burning aerosols mainly consist of black carbon (BC) and organic aerosols (OAs), and some of OAs are brown carbon (BrC). This study simulates the colors of BrC, BC and their mixture with scattering OAs in the ambient atmosphere by using a combination of light scattering simulations, a two-stream radiative transfer model and a RGB (Red, Green, Blue) color model. We find that both BCs and tar balls (a class of BrC) appear brownish at small particle sizes and blackish at large sizes. This is because the aerosol absorption Ångström exponent (AAE) largely controls the color and larger particles give smaller AAE values. At realistic size distributions, BCs look more blackish than tar balls, but still exhibit some brown color. However, when the absorptance of aerosol layer at green wavelength becomes larger than approximately 0.8, all biomass burning aerosols look blackish. The colors for mixture of purely scattering and absorptive carbonaceous aerosol layers in the atmosphere are also investigated. We suggest that the brownishness of biomass burning aerosols indicates the amount of BC/BrC as well as the ratio of BC to BrC. PMID:27306230

  7. The colors of biomass burning aerosols in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chao; Chung, Chul Eddy; Zhang, Feng; Yin, Yan

    2016-06-01

    Biomass burning aerosols mainly consist of black carbon (BC) and organic aerosols (OAs), and some of OAs are brown carbon (BrC). This study simulates the colors of BrC, BC and their mixture with scattering OAs in the ambient atmosphere by using a combination of light scattering simulations, a two-stream radiative transfer model and a RGB (Red, Green, Blue) color model. We find that both BCs and tar balls (a class of BrC) appear brownish at small particle sizes and blackish at large sizes. This is because the aerosol absorption Ångström exponent (AAE) largely controls the color and larger particles give smaller AAE values. At realistic size distributions, BCs look more blackish than tar balls, but still exhibit some brown color. However, when the absorptance of aerosol layer at green wavelength becomes larger than approximately 0.8, all biomass burning aerosols look blackish. The colors for mixture of purely scattering and absorptive carbonaceous aerosol layers in the atmosphere are also investigated. We suggest that the brownishness of biomass burning aerosols indicates the amount of BC/BrC as well as the ratio of BC to BrC.

  8. The colors of biomass burning aerosols in the atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao; Chung, Chul Eddy; Zhang, Feng; Yin, Yan

    2016-06-16

    Biomass burning aerosols mainly consist of black carbon (BC) and organic aerosols (OAs), and some of OAs are brown carbon (BrC). This study simulates the colors of BrC, BC and their mixture with scattering OAs in the ambient atmosphere by using a combination of light scattering simulations, a two-stream radiative transfer model and a RGB (Red, Green, Blue) color model. We find that both BCs and tar balls (a class of BrC) appear brownish at small particle sizes and blackish at large sizes. This is because the aerosol absorption Ångström exponent (AAE) largely controls the color and larger particles give smaller AAE values. At realistic size distributions, BCs look more blackish than tar balls, but still exhibit some brown color. However, when the absorptance of aerosol layer at green wavelength becomes larger than approximately 0.8, all biomass burning aerosols look blackish. The colors for mixture of purely scattering and absorptive carbonaceous aerosol layers in the atmosphere are also investigated. We suggest that the brownishness of biomass burning aerosols indicates the amount of BC/BrC as well as the ratio of BC to BrC.

  9. Radiation Transfer Model for Aerosol Events in the Earth Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukai, Sonoyo; Yokomae, Takuma; Nakata, Makiko; Sano, Itaru

    Recently large scale-forest fire, which damages the Earth environment as biomass burning and emission of carbonaceous particles, frequently occurs due to the unstable climate and/or global warming tendency. It is also known that the heavy soil dust is transported from the China continent to Japan on westerly winds, especially in spring. Furthermore the increasing emis-sions of anthropogenic particles associated with continuing economic growth scatter serious air pollutants. Thus atmospheric aerosols, especially in Asia, are very complex and heavy loading, which is called aerosol event. In the case of aerosol events, it is rather difficult to do the sun/sky photometry from the ground, however satellite observation is an effective for aerosol monitoring. Here the detection algorithms from space for such aerosol events as dust storm or biomass burn-ing are dealt with multispectral satellite data as ADEOS-2/GLI, Terra/Aqua/MODIS and/or GOSAT/CAI first. And then aerosol retrieval algorithms are examined based on new radiation transfer code for semi-infinite atmosphere model. The derived space-based results are validated with ground-based measurements and/or model simulations. Namely the space-or surface-based measurements, multiple scattering calculations and model simulations are synthesized together for aerosol retrieval in this work.

  10. Glassy aerosols heterogeneously nucleate cirrus ice particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Theodore W.; Murray, Benjamin J.; Dobbie, Steven; Cui, Zhiqiang; Al-Jumur, Sardar M. R. K.; Möhler, Ottmar; Schnaiter, Martin; Wagner, Robert; Benz, Stefan; Niemand, Monika; Saathoff, Harald; Ebert, Volker; Wagner, Steven; Kärcher, Bernd

    2010-05-01

    Ice clouds in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL, ~12-18 km, ~180-200 K) play a key role in dehydrating air entering the stratosphere. However, in-situ measurements show that air within these clouds is unexpectedly supersaturated(1); normally the growth of ice crystals rapidly quenches any supersaturation. A number of explanations for high in-cloud humidity have been put forward, but recent research suggests high humidity may be related to the low numbers of ice crystals found within these clouds(1). Low ice number densities can be produced through selective nucleation by a small subset of aerosol particles. This is inconsistent with homogeneous nucleation of ice in liquid aerosols. However, droplets rich in organic material, ubiquitous in the TTL, are known to become glassy (amorphous, non-crystalline solid) under TTL conditions(2,3). Here we show, using a large cloud simulation chamber, that glassy solution droplets nucleate ice heterogeneously at low supersaturations. Using a one-dimensional cirrus model we also show that nucleation by glassy aerosol in the TTL may explain low TTL ice number densities and high in-cloud humidity. Recent measurements of the composition of TTL cirrus residues are consistent with our findings(4). (1) Krämer, M. et al. Ice supersaturations and cirrus cloud crystal numbers. Atm. Chem. Phys. 9, 3505-3522 (2009). (2) Murray, B. J. Inhibition of ice crystallisation in highly viscous aqueous organic acid droplets. Atm. Chem. Phys. 8, 5423-5433 (2008). (3) Zobrist, B., Marcolli, C., Pedernera, D. A. & Koop, T. Do atmospheric aerosols form glasses? Atm. Chem. Phys. 8, 5221-5244 (2008). (4) Froyd, K. D., Murphy, D. M., Lawson, P., Baumgardner, D. & Herman, R. L. Aerosols that form subvisible cirrus at the tropical tropopause. Atmos. Chem. Phys. 10, 209-218 (2010).

  11. Accelerated simulation of stochastic particle removal processes in particle-resolved aerosol models

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, J.H.; Michelotti, M.D.; Riemer, N.; Heath, M.T.; West, M.

    2016-10-01

    Stochastic particle-resolved methods have proven useful for simulating multi-dimensional systems such as composition-resolved aerosol size distributions. While particle-resolved methods have substantial benefits for highly detailed simulations, these techniques suffer from high computational cost, motivating efforts to improve their algorithmic efficiency. Here we formulate an algorithm for accelerating particle removal processes by aggregating particles of similar size into bins. We present the Binned Algorithm for particle removal processes and analyze its performance with application to the atmospherically relevant process of aerosol dry deposition. We show that the Binned Algorithm can dramatically improve the efficiency of particle removals, particularly for low removal rates, and that computational cost is reduced without introducing additional error. In simulations of aerosol particle removal by dry deposition in atmospherically relevant conditions, we demonstrate about 50-times increase in algorithm efficiency.

  12. The optical manipulation and characterisation of aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Jonathan P.

    2008-08-01

    Aerosols play a crucial role in many areas of science, ranging from atmospheric chemistry and physics, to pharmaceutical aerosols and drug delivery to the lungs, to combustion science and spray drying. The development of new methods for characterising the properties and dynamics of aerosol particles is of crucial importance if the complex role that particles play is to be more fully understood. Optical tweezers provide a valuable new tool to address fundamental questions in aerosol science. Single or multiple particles 1-15 μm in diameter can be manipulated for indefinite timescales. Linear and non-linear Raman and fluorescence spectroscopies can be used to probe particle composition, phase, component mixing state, and size. In particular, size can be determined with nanometre accuracy, allowing accurate measurements of the thermodynamic properties of aerosols, the kinetics of particle transformation and of light absorption. Further, the simultaneous manipulation of multiple particles in parallel optical traps provides a method for performing comparative measurements on particles of different composition. We will present some latest work in which optical tweezers are used to characterise aerosol dynamics, demonstrating that optical tweezers can find application in studies of hygroscopicity, the mixing state of different chemical components, including the phase separation of immiscible phases, and the kinetics of chemical transformation.

  13. Carbonaceous aerosol particles from common vegetation in the Grand Canyon

    SciTech Connect

    Hallock, K.A.; Mazurek, M.A. ); Cass, G.R. . Dept. of Environmental Engineering Science)

    1992-05-01

    The problem of visibility reduction in the Grand Canyon due to fine organic aerosol particles in the atmosphere has become an area of increased environmental concern. Aerosol particles can be derived from many emission sources. In this report, we focus on identifying organic aerosols derived from common vegetation in the Grand Canyon. These aerosols are expected to be significant contributors to the total atmospheric organic aerosol content. Aerosol samples from living vegetation were collected by resuspension of surface wax and resin components liberated from the leaves of vegetation common to areas of the Grand Canyon. The samples were analyzed using high-resolution gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Probable identification of compounds was made by comparison of sample spectra with National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) mass spectral references and positive identification of compounds was made when possible by comparison with authentic standards as well as NIST references. Using these references, we have been able to positively identify the presence of n-alkane and n-alkanoic acid homolog series in the surface waxes of the vegetation sampled. Several monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, and diterpenes were identified also as possible biogenic aerosols which may contribute to the total organic aerosol abundance leading to visibility reduction in the Grand Canyon.

  14. Carbonaceous aerosol particles from common vegetation in the Grand Canyon

    SciTech Connect

    Hallock, K.A.; Mazurek, M.A.; Cass, G.R.

    1992-05-01

    The problem of visibility reduction in the Grand Canyon due to fine organic aerosol particles in the atmosphere has become an area of increased environmental concern. Aerosol particles can be derived from many emission sources. In this report, we focus on identifying organic aerosols derived from common vegetation in the Grand Canyon. These aerosols are expected to be significant contributors to the total atmospheric organic aerosol content. Aerosol samples from living vegetation were collected by resuspension of surface wax and resin components liberated from the leaves of vegetation common to areas of the Grand Canyon. The samples were analyzed using high-resolution gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Probable identification of compounds was made by comparison of sample spectra with National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) mass spectral references and positive identification of compounds was made when possible by comparison with authentic standards as well as NIST references. Using these references, we have been able to positively identify the presence of n-alkane and n-alkanoic acid homolog series in the surface waxes of the vegetation sampled. Several monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, and diterpenes were identified also as possible biogenic aerosols which may contribute to the total organic aerosol abundance leading to visibility reduction in the Grand Canyon.

  15. Characterization of Atmospheric Organic Nitrates in Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruns, E. A.; Alexander, M. L.; Perraud, V.; Yu, Y.; Ezell, M.; Johnson, S. N.; Zellenyuk, A.; Imre, D.; Finlayson-Pitts, B. J.

    2008-12-01

    Aerosols in the atmosphere significantly affect climate, human health and visibility. Knowledge of aerosol composition is necessary to understand and then predict the specific impacts of aerosols in the atmosphere. It is known that organic nitrates are present in particles, but there is limited knowledge of the individual compounds and quantity. This is in part due to the lack of a wide variety of proven analytical techniques for particulate organic nitrates. In this study, several known organic nitrates, as well as those present in complex mixtures formed from oxidation of "Ñ-pinene, were studied using a variety of techniques. These include Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) of samples collected by impaction on ZnSe discs. Samples were also collected on quartz fiber filters and the extracts analyzed by electrospray mass spectrometry (ESI- MS), atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (APCI-MS), HPLC-UV, LC-MS and GC-MS. In addition, real-time analysis was provided by SPLAT-II and aerosol mass spectrometry (AMS). FTIR analysis of particles collected on ZnSe discs provides information on the ratio of organic nitrate to total organic content, while the analysis of filter extracts allows identification of specific organic nitrates. These are compared to the particle mass spectrometry data and the implications for detecting and measuring particulate organic nitrate in air is discussed.

  16. FTIR Analysis of Functional Groups in Aerosol Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shokri, S. M.; McKenzie, G.; Dransfield, T. J.

    2012-12-01

    Secondary organic aerosols (SOA) are suspensions of particulate matter composed of compounds formed from chemical reactions of organic species in the atmosphere. Atmospheric particulate matter can have impacts on climate, the environment and human health. Standardized techniques to analyze the characteristics and composition of complex secondary organic aerosols are necessary to further investigate the formation of SOA and provide a better understanding of the reaction pathways of organic species in the atmosphere. While Aerosol Mass Spectrometry (AMS) can provide detailed information about the elemental composition of a sample, it reveals little about the chemical moieties which make up the particles. This work probes aerosol particles deposited on Teflon filters using FTIR, based on the protocols of Russell, et al. (Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 114, 2009) and the spectral fitting algorithm of Takahama, et al (submitted, 2012). To validate the necessary calibration curves for the analysis of complex samples, primary aerosols of key compounds (e.g., citric acid, ammonium sulfate, sodium benzoate) were generated, and the accumulated masses of the aerosol samples were related to their IR absorption intensity. These validated calibration curves were then used to classify and quantify functional groups in SOA samples generated in chamber studies by MIT's Kroll group. The fitting algorithm currently quantifies the following functionalities: alcohols, alkanes, alkenes, amines, aromatics, carbonyls and carboxylic acids.

  17. Novel Measurements of Aerosol Particle Interfaces Using Biphasic Microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metcalf, A. R.; Dutcher, C. S.

    2014-12-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles are nearly ubiquitous in the atmosphere and yet there remains large uncertainties in their formation processes and ambient properties. These particles are complex microenvironments, which can contain multiple interfaces due to internal aqueous-organic phase partitioning and to the external liquid-vapor surface. These aerosol interfaces can profoundly affect the fate of condensable organic compounds emitted into the atmosphere by altering the way in which organic vapors interact with the ambient aerosol. Aerosol interfaces affect particle internal structure, species uptake, equilibrium partitioning, activation to cloud condensation or ice nuclei, and optical properties. For example, organic thin films can shield the core of the aerosol from the ambient environment, which may disrupt equilibrium partitioning and mass transfer. To improve our ability to accurately predict the fate of SOA in the atmosphere, we must improve our knowledge of aerosol interfaces and their interactions with the ambient environment. Few technologies exist to accurately probe aerosol interfaces at atmospherically-relevant conditions. In this talk, a novel method using biphasic microscale flows will be introduced for generating, trapping, and perturbing complex interfaces at atmospherically relevant conditions. These microfluidic experiments utilize high-speed imaging to monitor interfacial phenomena at the microscale and are performed with phase contrast and fluorescence microscopy on a temperature-controlled inverted microscope stage. From these experiments, interfacial thermodynamic properties such as surface tension, rheological properties such as interfacial moduli, and kinetic properties such as mass transfer coefficients can be measured or inferred. Chemical compositions of the liquid phases studied here span a range of viscosities and include electrolyte and water soluble organic acid species often observed in the atmosphere, such as mixtures

  18. African Dust Aerosols as Atmospheric Ice Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeMott, Paul J.; Brooks, Sarah D.; Prenni, Anthony J.; Kreidenweis, Sonia M.; Sassen, Kenneth; Poellot, Michael; Rogers, David C.; Baumgardner, Darrel

    2003-01-01

    Measurements of the ice nucleating ability of aerosol particles in air masses over Florida having sources from North Africa support the potential importance of dust aerosols for indirectly affecting cloud properties and climate. The concentrations of ice nuclei within dust layers at particle sizes below 1 pn exceeded 1/cu cm; the highest ever reported with our device at temperatures warmer than homogeneous freezing conditions. These measurements add to previous direct and indirect evidence of the ice nucleation efficiency of desert dust aerosols, but also confirm their contribution to ice nuclei populations at great distances from source regions.

  19. Ice nucleating particle concentration during a combustion aerosol event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Mike; O'Sullivan, Daniel; Porter, Grace; Sanchez-Marroquin, Alberto; Tarn, Mark; Harrison, Alex; McQuaid, Jim; Murray, Benjamin

    2017-04-01

    The formation of ice in supercooled clouds is important for cloud radiative properties, their lifetime and the formation of precipitation. Cloud water droplets can supercool to below -33oC, but in the presence of Ice Nucleating Particles (INPs) freezing can be initiated at much higher temperatures. The concentration of atmospheric aerosols that are active as INPs depends on a number of factors, such as temperature and aerosol composition and concentration. However, our knowledge of which aerosol types serve as INPs is limited. For example, there has been much discussion over whether aerosol from combustion processes are important as INP. This is significant because combustion aerosol have increased in concentration dramatically since pre-industrial times and therefore have the potential to exert a significant anthropogenic impact on clouds and climate. In this study we made measurements of INP concentrations in Leeds over a specific combustion aerosol event in order to test if there was a correlation between INP concentrations and combustion aerosol. The combustion aerosol event was on the 5th November which is a major bonfire and firework event celebrated throughout the UK. During the event we observed a factor of five increase in aerosol and a factor of 10 increase in black carbon, but observed no significant increase in INP concentration. This implies that black carbon and combustion aerosol did not compete with the background INP during this event.

  20. Characteristics of aerosolized ice forming marine biogenic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alpert, Peter A.

    Ice particles are ubiquitous in the atmosphere existing as the sole constituents of glaciated cirrus clouds or coexisting with supercooled liquid droplets in mixed-phase clouds. Aerosol particles serving as heterogeneous ice nuclei for ice crystal formation impact the global radiative balance by modification of cloud radiative properties, and thus climate. Atmospheric ice formation is not a well understood process and represents great uncertainty for climate prediction. The oceans which cover the majority of the earth's surface host nearly half the total global primary productivity and contribute to the greatest aerosol production by mass. However, the effect of biological activity on particle aerosolization, particle composition, and ice nucleation is not well established. This dissertation investigates the link between marine biological activity, aerosol particle production, physical/chemical particle characteristics, and ice nucleation under controlled laboratory conditions. Dry and humidified aerosol size distributions of particles from bursting bubbles generated by plunging water jets and aeration through frits in a seawater mesocosm containing bacteria and/or phytoplankton cultures, were measured as a function of biological activity. Total particle production significantly increases primarily due to enhanced aerosolization of particles ≤100 nm in diameter attributable to the presence and growth of phytoplankton. Furthermore, hygroscopicity measurements indicate primary organic material associated with the sea salt particles, providing additional evidence for the importance of marine biological activity for ocean derived aerosol composition. Ice nucleation experiments show that these organic rich particles nucleate ice efficiently in the immersion and deposition modes, which underscores their importance in mixed-phase and cirrus cloud formation processes. In separate ice nucleation experiments employing pure cultures of Thalassiosira pseudonana, Nannochloris

  1. Enhanced Volatile Organic Compounds emissions and organic aerosol mass increase the oligomer content of atmospheric aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kourtchev, Ivan; Giorio, Chiara; Manninen, Antti; Wilson, Eoin; Mahon, Brendan; Aalto, Juho; Kajos, Maija; Venables, Dean; Ruuskanen, Taina; Levula, Janne; Loponen, Matti; Connors, Sarah; Harris, Neil; Zhao, Defeng; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid; Mentel, Thomas; Rudich, Yinon; Hallquist, Mattias; Doussin, Jean-Francois; Maenhaut, Willy; Bäck, Jaana; Petäjä, Tuukka; Wenger, John; Kulmala, Markku; Kalberer, Markus

    2016-10-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) accounts for a dominant fraction of the submicron atmospheric particle mass, but knowledge of the formation, composition and climate effects of SOA is incomplete and limits our understanding of overall aerosol effects in the atmosphere. Organic oligomers were discovered as dominant components in SOA over a decade ago in laboratory experiments and have since been proposed to play a dominant role in many aerosol processes. However, it remains unclear whether oligomers are relevant under ambient atmospheric conditions because they are often not clearly observed in field samples. Here we resolve this long-standing discrepancy by showing that elevated SOA mass is one of the key drivers of oligomer formation in the ambient atmosphere and laboratory experiments. We show for the first time that a specific organic compound class in aerosols, oligomers, is strongly correlated with cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activities of SOA particles. These findings might have important implications for future climate scenarios where increased temperatures cause higher biogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions, which in turn lead to higher SOA mass formation and significant changes in SOA composition. Such processes would need to be considered in climate models for a realistic representation of future aerosol-climate-biosphere feedbacks.

  2. Enhanced Volatile Organic Compounds emissions and organic aerosol mass increase the oligomer content of atmospheric aerosols.

    PubMed

    Kourtchev, Ivan; Giorio, Chiara; Manninen, Antti; Wilson, Eoin; Mahon, Brendan; Aalto, Juho; Kajos, Maija; Venables, Dean; Ruuskanen, Taina; Levula, Janne; Loponen, Matti; Connors, Sarah; Harris, Neil; Zhao, Defeng; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid; Mentel, Thomas; Rudich, Yinon; Hallquist, Mattias; Doussin, Jean-Francois; Maenhaut, Willy; Bäck, Jaana; Petäjä, Tuukka; Wenger, John; Kulmala, Markku; Kalberer, Markus

    2016-10-13

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) accounts for a dominant fraction of the submicron atmospheric particle mass, but knowledge of the formation, composition and climate effects of SOA is incomplete and limits our understanding of overall aerosol effects in the atmosphere. Organic oligomers were discovered as dominant components in SOA over a decade ago in laboratory experiments and have since been proposed to play a dominant role in many aerosol processes. However, it remains unclear whether oligomers are relevant under ambient atmospheric conditions because they are often not clearly observed in field samples. Here we resolve this long-standing discrepancy by showing that elevated SOA mass is one of the key drivers of oligomer formation in the ambient atmosphere and laboratory experiments. We show for the first time that a specific organic compound class in aerosols, oligomers, is strongly correlated with cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activities of SOA particles. These findings might have important implications for future climate scenarios where increased temperatures cause higher biogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions, which in turn lead to higher SOA mass formation and significant changes in SOA composition. Such processes would need to be considered in climate models for a realistic representation of future aerosol-climate-biosphere feedbacks.

  3. Enhanced Volatile Organic Compounds emissions and organic aerosol mass increase the oligomer content of atmospheric aerosols

    PubMed Central

    Kourtchev, Ivan; Giorio, Chiara; Manninen, Antti; Wilson, Eoin; Mahon, Brendan; Aalto, Juho; Kajos, Maija; Venables, Dean; Ruuskanen, Taina; Levula, Janne; Loponen, Matti; Connors, Sarah; Harris, Neil; Zhao, Defeng; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid; Mentel, Thomas; Rudich, Yinon; Hallquist, Mattias; Doussin, Jean-Francois; Maenhaut, Willy; Bäck, Jaana; Petäjä, Tuukka; Wenger, John; Kulmala, Markku; Kalberer, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) accounts for a dominant fraction of the submicron atmospheric particle mass, but knowledge of the formation, composition and climate effects of SOA is incomplete and limits our understanding of overall aerosol effects in the atmosphere. Organic oligomers were discovered as dominant components in SOA over a decade ago in laboratory experiments and have since been proposed to play a dominant role in many aerosol processes. However, it remains unclear whether oligomers are relevant under ambient atmospheric conditions because they are often not clearly observed in field samples. Here we resolve this long-standing discrepancy by showing that elevated SOA mass is one of the key drivers of oligomer formation in the ambient atmosphere and laboratory experiments. We show for the first time that a specific organic compound class in aerosols, oligomers, is strongly correlated with cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activities of SOA particles. These findings might have important implications for future climate scenarios where increased temperatures cause higher biogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions, which in turn lead to higher SOA mass formation and significant changes in SOA composition. Such processes would need to be considered in climate models for a realistic representation of future aerosol-climate-biosphere feedbacks. PMID:27733773

  4. Ultrafine aerosol size distribution: A study of new particle formation in the atmosphere. Final report on DOE Grant number: DE-FG02-91ER61205

    SciTech Connect

    McMurry, Peter H.; Eisele, Fred

    1998-12-31

    This project involved studies pertinent to the formation of new particles by homogeneous nucleation in the atmosphere. The research focused on (1) the development of instrumentation to measure size distributions of freshly nucleated particles in the 3 to 10 nm diameter range, (2) laboratory studies of particle thermodynamic and transport properties relevant to nucleation in the atmosphere, and (3) field measurements of new particle formation by homogeneous nucleation. Highlights of the achievements under this grant are summarized briefly. A complete list of publications and presentations supported by the grant is given.

  5. Passive remote sensing of tropospheric aerosol and atmospheric correction for the aerosol effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, Y. J.; Tanré, D.; Gordon, H. R.; Nakajima, T.; Lenoble, J.; Frouin, R.; Grassl, H.; Herman, B. M.; King, M. D.; Teillet, P. M.

    1997-07-01

    the information content and accuracy of the radiative transfer inversion of aerosol information from the satellite data, due to lack of sufficient theoretical analysis and applications to proper field data. This limitation will make the anticipated new data even more interesting and challenging. A main concern is the present inadequate ability to sense aerosol absorption, from space or from the ground. Absorption is a critical parameter for climate studies and atmospheric corrections. Over oceans, main concerns are the effects of white caps and dust on the correction scheme. Future improvement in aerosol retrieval and atmospheric corrections will require better climatology of the aerosol properties and understanding of the effects of mixed composition and shape of the particles. The main ingredient missing in the planned remote sensing of aerosol are spaceborne and ground-based lidar observations of the aerosol profiles.

  6. New satellite project Aerosol-UA: Remote sensing of aerosols in the terrestrial atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milinevsky, G.; Yatskiv, Ya.; Degtyaryov, O.; Syniavskyi, I.; Mishchenko, M.; Rosenbush, V.; Ivanov, Yu.; Makarov, A.; Bovchaliuk, A.; Danylevsky, V.; Sosonkin, M.; Moskalov, S.; Bovchaliuk, V.; Lukenyuk, A.; Shymkiv, A.; Udodov, E.

    2016-06-01

    We discuss the development of the Ukrainian space project Aerosol-UA which has the following three main objectives: (1) to monitor the spatial distribution of key characteristics of terrestrial tropospheric and stratospheric aerosols; (2) to provide a comprehensive observational database enabling accurate quantitative estimates of the aerosol contribution to the energy budget of the climate system; and (3) quantify the contribution of anthropogenic aerosols to climate and ecological processes. The remote sensing concept of the project is based on precise orbital measurements of the intensity and polarization of sunlight scattered by the atmosphere and the surface with a scanning polarimeter accompanied by a wide-angle multispectral imager-polarimeter. Preparations have already been made for the development of the instrument suite for the Aerosol-UA project, in particular, of the multi-channel scanning polarimeter (ScanPol) designed for remote sensing studies of the global distribution of aerosol and cloud properties (such as particle size, morphology, and composition) in the terrestrial atmosphere by polarimetric and spectrophotometric measurements of the scattered sunlight in a wide range of wavelengths and viewing directions from which a scene location is observed. ScanPol is accompanied by multispectral wide-angle imager-polarimeter (MSIP) that serves to collect information on cloud conditions and Earth's surface image. Various components of the polarimeter ScanPol have been prototyped, including the opto-mechanical and electronic assemblies and the scanning mirror controller. Preliminary synthetic data simulations for the retrieval of aerosol parameters over land surfaces have been performed using the Generalized Retrieval of Aerosol and Surface Properties (GRASP) algorithm. Methods for the validation of satellite data using ground-based observations of aerosol properties are also discussed. We assume that designing, building, and launching into orbit a multi

  7. New Satellite Project Aerosol-UA: Remote Sensing of Aerosols in the Terrestrial Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milinevsky, G.; Yatskiv, Ya.; Degtyaryov, O.; Syniavskyi, I.; Mishchenko, Michael I.; Rosenbush, V.; Ivanov, Yu.; Makarov, A.; Bovchaliuk, A.; Danylevsky, V.; Sosonkin, M.; Moskalov, S.; Bovchaliuk, V; Lukenyuk, A.; Shymkiv, A.

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the development of the Ukrainian space project Aerosol-UA which has the following three main objectives: (1) to monitor the spatial distribution of key characteristics of terrestrial tropospheric and stratospheric aerosols; (2) to provide a comprehensive observational database enabling accurate quantitative estimates of the aerosol contribution to the energy budget of the climate system; and (3) quantify the contribution of anthropogenic aerosols to climate and ecological processes. The remote sensing concept of the project is based on precise orbital measurements of the intensity and polarization of sunlight scattered by the atmosphere and the surface with a scanning polarimeter accompanied by a wide-angle multispectral imager-polarimeter. Preparations have already been made for the development of the instrument suite for the Aerosol-UA project, in particular, of the multi-channel scanning polarimeter (ScanPol) designed for remote sensing studies of the global distribution of aerosol and cloud properties (such as particle size, morphology, and composition) in the terrestrial atmosphere by polarimetric and spectrophotometric measurements of the scattered sunlight in a wide range of wavelengths and viewing directions from which a scene location is observed. ScanPol is accompanied by multispectral wide-angle imager-polarimeter (MSIP) that serves to collect information on cloud conditions and Earths surface image. Various components of the polarimeter ScanPol have been prototyped, including the opto-mechanical and electronic assemblies and the scanning mirror controller. Preliminary synthetic data simulations for the retrieval of aerosol parameters over land surfaces have been performed using the Generalized Retrieval of Aerosol and Surface Properties (GRASP) algorithm. Methods for the validation of satellite data using ground-based observations of aerosol properties are also discussed. We assume that designing, building, and launching into orbit a multi

  8. New Satellite Project Aerosol-UA: Remote Sensing of Aerosols in the Terrestrial Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milinevsky, G.; Yatskiv, Ya.; Degtyaryov, O.; Syniavskyi, I.; Mishchenko, Michael I.; Rosenbush, V.; Ivanov, Yu.; Makarov, A.; Bovchaliuk, A.; Danylevsky, V.; hide

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the development of the Ukrainian space project Aerosol-UA which has the following three main objectives: (1) to monitor the spatial distribution of key characteristics of terrestrial tropospheric and stratospheric aerosols; (2) to provide a comprehensive observational database enabling accurate quantitative estimates of the aerosol contribution to the energy budget of the climate system; and (3) quantify the contribution of anthropogenic aerosols to climate and ecological processes. The remote sensing concept of the project is based on precise orbital measurements of the intensity and polarization of sunlight scattered by the atmosphere and the surface with a scanning polarimeter accompanied by a wide-angle multispectral imager-polarimeter. Preparations have already been made for the development of the instrument suite for the Aerosol-UA project, in particular, of the multi-channel scanning polarimeter (ScanPol) designed for remote sensing studies of the global distribution of aerosol and cloud properties (such as particle size, morphology, and composition) in the terrestrial atmosphere by polarimetric and spectrophotometric measurements of the scattered sunlight in a wide range of wavelengths and viewing directions from which a scene location is observed. ScanPol is accompanied by multispectral wide-angle imager-polarimeter (MSIP) that serves to collect information on cloud conditions and Earths surface image. Various components of the polarimeter ScanPol have been prototyped, including the opto-mechanical and electronic assemblies and the scanning mirror controller. Preliminary synthetic data simulations for the retrieval of aerosol parameters over land surfaces have been performed using the Generalized Retrieval of Aerosol and Surface Properties (GRASP) algorithm. Methods for the validation of satellite data using ground-based observations of aerosol properties are also discussed. We assume that designing, building, and launching into orbit a multi

  9. Thermophoretic separation of aerosol particles from a sampled gas stream

    DOEpatents

    Postma, A.K.

    1984-09-07

    This disclosure relates to separation of aerosol particles from gas samples withdrawn from within a contained atmosphere, such as containment vessels for nuclear reactors or other process equipment where remote gaseous sampling is required. It is specifically directed to separation of dense aerosols including particles of any size and at high mass loadings and high corrosivity. The United States Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract DE-AC06-76FF02170 between the US Department of Energy and Westinghouse Electric Corporation.

  10. Aerosols particles properties in Titan's Detached Haze Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seignovert, Benoît; Rannou, Pascal; Lavvas, Panayotis; Cours, Thibaud; West, Robert A.

    2016-06-01

    Titan's Detached Haze Layer (DHL) first observed in 1983 by Rages and Pollack during the Voyager 2 [1] is a consistent spherical haze feature surrounding Titan's upper atmosphere and detached from the main haze. Since 2005, the Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) instrument on board the Cassini mission performs a continu- ous survey of the Titan's atmosphere and confirmed its persistence at 500 km up to the equinox (2009) before its drop and disappearance in 2012 [2]. Previous analyses showed, that this layer corresponds to the transition area between small spherical aerosols and large fractal aggregates and play a key role in the aerosols formation in Titan's atmosphere [3-5]. In this study we perform UV photometric analyses on ISS observations taken from 2005 to 2007 based on radiative transfer inversion to retrieve aerosols particles properties in the DHL (bulk and monomer size, fractal dimension and local density).

  11. A study on major inorganic ion composition of atmospheric aerosols.

    PubMed

    Salve, P R; Krupadam, R J; Wate, S R

    2007-04-01

    Atmospheric aerosol samples were collected from Akola and Buldana region covering around 40 sqkm area during October-November 2002 and were analyzed for ten major inorganic ions namely F-, Cl-, NO3-, SO4(2-), PO4(2-), Na+, K+, Ca2+, Mg2+ and NH4+ using ion chromatographic technique. The average mass of aerosols was found to be 225.81 microg/m3 with standard deviation of 31.29 and average total water soluble load of total cations and anions was found to be 4.32 microg/m3. The concentration of ions in samples showed a general pattern as SO4(2-) > NO3- > Cl- > PO4(2-) > F- for anions and Na+ > Ca2+ > NH4+ > Mg2+ > K+ for cations. The overall composition of the aerosols was taken into account to identify the sources. The trend showed higher concentration of sodium followed by calcium, sulfate, nitrate, phosphate and ammoinum and found to be influenced by terrestrial sources. The presence of SO4(2-) and NO3- in aerosols may be due to re-suspension of soil particles. Ca2+, Mg2+ and Cl- are to be derived from soil materials. The presence of NH4+ may be attributed to the reaction of NH3 vapors with acidic gases may react or condense on an acidic particle surface of anthropogenic origin. The atmospheric aerosol is slightly acidic due to neutralization of basicity by SO2 and NO(x).

  12. Atmospheric responses to stratospheric aerosol geoengineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraro, Angus; Highwood, Eleanor; Charlton-Perez, Andrew

    2013-04-01

    Stratospheric aerosol geoengineering, also called solar radiation management (SRM), involves the injection of aerosol into the stratosphere to increase the planetary albedo. It has been conceieved as a policy option in response to human-induced global warming. It is well-established from modelling studies and observations following volcanic eruptions that stratospheric sulphate aerosols cause global cooling. Some aspects of the climate response, especially those involving large-scale dynamical changes, are more uncertain. This work attempts to identify the physical mechanisms operating in the climate response to stratospheric aerosol geoengineering using idealised model experiments. The radiative forcing produced by the aerosol depends on its type (species) and size. Aerosols absorb terrestrial and solar radiation, which drives stratospheric temperature change. The stratospheric temperature change also depends on aerosol type and size. We calculate the stratospheric temperature change due to geoengineering with sulphate, titania, limestone and soot in a fixed-dynamical-heating radiative model. Sulphate produces tropical heating of up to ~6 K. Titania produces much less heating, whereas soot produces much more. Most aerosols increase the meridional temperature gradient in the lower stratosphere which, by thermal wind balance, would be expected to intensify the zonal winds in the polar vortex. An intermediate-complexity general circulation model is used to investigate the dynamical response to geoengineering aerosols. Atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations are quadrupled. The carbon dioxide forcing is then balanced using stratospheric sulphate aerosol. We assess dynamical changes in the stratosphere, for example, the frequency of stratospheric sudden warmings and the strength of the Brewer-Dobson overturning circulation. We also assess changes in the strength and position of the tropospheric jets. We compare results for sulphate with those for titania.

  13. Trace Element Chemistry in Urban Atmospheric Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhana, B.; Husain, L.

    2006-12-01

    Unlike in the United States, the concentration of trace elements in urban air is still high enough in South Asian cities to study the impact of trace elements on climate and human health. Hence, continuous sampling of PM2.5 (particulate matter of <2.5 μm aerodynamic diameter)was carried out using low volume sampler in winter (2005-2006) in Lahore, the second largest city of Pakistan, which is highly impacted by urban and agricultural emissions and has remained unexplored in terms of atmospheric chemistry. Aerosols collected on this campaign are likely to carry the signatures of emissions from Afghanistan, North and Central Pakistan, North India in addition to the local pollution sources. During sampling from December 2005 to January 2006, it was possible to collect several samples during brief fog episodes. Samples were analyzed for 25 elements (Be, Na, Mg, Al, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Zn, As, Se, Sr, Mo, Ag, Cd, Sn, Sb, Ba, Tl and Pb) using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. High pollutant concentrations were observed throughout the study, for instance, Cr concentrations up to 1.4 μgm-3, As, 135 ngm-3, Cd, 93 ngm-3, Sn, 988 ngm-3 and Sb, 157 ngm-3. Pb and Zn concentrations respectively up to 12 and 48 μgm-3 were observed. Calculation of enrichment factor and crustal correction illustrate the attribution of Cr, Co, Ni, Zn, As, Se, Mo, Ag Cd, Sn, Sb, Tl and Pb to non-crustal sources. Air parcel back trajectories, interelemental relationships and meteorological observations have been used to explain the sources and the impacts of fog chemistry and mixing heights on atmospheric processing of trace elements in PM2.5. Atmospheric stagnation appeared to be one of factors causing episodic high concentrations. Crustal correction and interelemental relationships apparently suggest the emissions from coal and oil combustion, industrial processes, building construction sites and biomass burning as the prime role players in the atmospheric pollution in

  14. Atmospheric Aerosols in a Changing World

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heald, C. L.

    2015-12-01

    Aerosols in the atmosphere impact human and environmental health, visibility, and climate. Exposure to air pollution is the leading environmental cause of premature mortality world-wide. The role of aerosols on the Earth's climate represents the single largest source of uncertainty in our understanding of global radiative forcing. Tremendous strides have been made to clean up the air in recent decades, and yet poor air quality continues to plague many regions of the world, and our understanding of how global change will feedback on to aerosol sources, formation, and impacts is limited. In this talk, I will use recent results from my research group to highlight some of the key uncertainties and research topics in global aerosol lifecycle.

  15. Atmospheric Aerosol Properties and Climate Impacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Mian; Kahn, Ralph A.; Remer, Lorraine A.; Yu, Hongbin; Rind, David; Feingold, Graham; Quinn, Patricia K.; Schwartz, Stephen E.; Streets, David G.; DeCola, Phillip; Halthore, Rangasayi

    2009-01-01

    This report critically reviews current knowledge about global distributions and properties of atmospheric aerosols, as they relate to aerosol impacts on climate. It assesses possible next steps aimed at substantially reducing uncertainties in aerosol radiative forcing estimates. Current measurement techniques and modeling approaches are summarized, providing context. As a part of the Synthesis and Assessment Product in the Climate Change Science Program, this assessment builds upon recent related assessments, including the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC AR4, 2007) and other Climate Change Science Program reports. The objectives of this report are (1) to promote a consensus about the knowledge base for climate change decision support, and (2) to provide a synthesis and integration of the current knowledge of the climate-relevant impacts of anthropogenic aerosols for policy makers, policy analysts, and general public, both within and outside the U.S government and worldwide.

  16. Global distribution of secondary organic aerosol particle phase state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraiwa, M.; Li, Y., Sr.; Tsimpidi, A.; Karydis, V.; Berkemeier, T.; Pandis, S. N.; Lelieveld, J.; Koop, T.; Poeschl, U.

    2016-12-01

    Secondary organic aerosols (SOA) account for a large fraction of submicron particles in the atmosphere and play a key role in aerosol effects on climate, air quality and public health. The formation and aging of SOA proceed through multiple steps of chemical reaction and mass transport in the gas and particle phases, which is challenging for the interpretation of field measurements and laboratory experiments as well as accurate representation of SOA evolution in atmospheric aerosol models. SOA particles can adopt liquid, semi-solid and amorphous solid (glassy) phase states depending on chemical composition, relative humidity and temperature. The particle phase state is crucial for various atmospheric gas-particle interactions, including SOA formation, heterogeneous and multiphase reactions and ice nucleation. We found that organic compounds with a wide variety of functional groups fall into molecular corridors, characterized by a tight inverse correlation between molar mass and volatility. Based on the concept of molecular corridors, we develop a method to estimate glass transition temperatures based on the molar mass and molecular O:C ratio of SOA components, which is a key property for determination of particle phase state. We use the global chemistry climate model EMAC with the organic aerosol module ORACLE to predict the atmospheric SOA phase state. For the planetary boundary layer, global simulations indicate that SOA is mostly liquid in tropical and polar air with high relative humidity, semi-solid in the mid-latitudes, and solid over dry lands. We find that in the middle and upper troposphere (>500 hPa) SOA should be mostly in a glassy solid phase state. Thus, slow diffusion of water, oxidants, and organic molecules could kinetically limit gas-particle interactions of SOA in the free and upper troposphere, promote ice nucleation and facilitate long-range transport of reactive and toxic organic pollutants embedded within SOA.

  17. Predicting the dry deposition of atmospheric aerosol particles onto forests using a size-resolved multi-layer second-order closure model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, C.; Launianen, S.; Gronholm, T.; Katul, G. G.

    2013-12-01

    Biological aerosol particles are now receiving significant attention given their role in air quality, climate change, and spreading of allergens and other communicable diseases. A major uncertainty in their quantification is associated with complex transport processes governing their generation and removal inside canopies. It has been known for some time now that the commonly used first-order closure to link mean concentration gradients with turbulent fluxes is problematic. The presence of a mean counter-gradient momentum transport in an open trunk space exemplifies such failure. Here, instead of employing K-theory, a size-resolved second-order multilayer model for dry particle deposition is proposed. The starting point of the proposed model is a particle flux budget in which the production, transport, and dissipation terms are modeled. Because these terms require higher-order velocity statistics, this flux budget is coupled with a conventional second-order closure scheme for the flow field within the canopy sub-layer. The failure of conventional K-theory for particle fluxes are explicitly linked to the onset of a mean counter or zero - gradient flow attributed to a significant particle flux transport term. The relative importance of these terms in the particle flux budget and their effects on the foliage particle collection terms for also discussed for each particle size. The proposed model is evaluated against published multi-level measurements of sized-resolved particle fluxes and mean concentration profiles collected within and above a tall Scots pine forest in Hyytiala, Southern Finland. The main findings are that (1) first-order closure schemes may be still plausible for modeling particle deposition velocity, especially in the particle size range smaller than 1 μm when the turbulent particle diffusivity is estimated from higher order flow statistics; (2) the mechanisms leading to the increased trend of particle deposition velocity with increasing friction

  18. Heterogeneous Uptake of HO2 Radicals onto Atmospheric Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, I. J.; Brooks, B.; Goddard, A.; Whalley, L. K.; Baeza-Romero, M. T.; Heard, D. E.

    2010-12-01

    The hydroxyl (OH) and hydroperoxyl (HO2) radicals, known collectively as HOx radicals, are the key reactants that control the oxidative capacity of the troposphere and the atmospheric lifetimes and concentrations of most trace reactive species, i.e. NOx, O3 and volatile organic compounds. Therefore, in order to gain an overall understanding of atmospheric chemistry and to predict the fate of atmospheric pollutants, a detailed knowledge of the sources and sinks of HOx species and their steady-state atmospheric concentrations is crucial. To this end, field measurements of atmospheric HOx concentrations have been recently compared to model predictions to gauge our level of understanding of atmospheric chemistry of trace reactive species. Box models incorporating known gas-phase chemistry have significantly overpredicted steady-state HO2 levels in comparison to field observations, suggesting heterogeneous uptake onto aerosols as a possible missing atmospheric sink for HO2 radicals [1-2]. However, relatively few laboratory studies have been performed to determine the kinetic parameters for HO2 loss onto aerosols, and thus the ability to assess the impact of this mechanism on HOx levels is limited. The goal of this laboratory study is to improve our understanding of the tropospheric HOx budget by measuring HO2 uptake kinetics onto aerosol particles. In this work, HO2 radicals were produced by the photolysis of water vapour and the FAGE (Fluorescence Assay by Gas Expansion) technique was used to monitor HO2 loss kinetics onto aerosol particles in an aerosol flow tube setup. FAGE is a highly sensitive laser-induced fluorescence based detection method for HOx radicals that has allowed for kinetic measurements to be performed under low HO2 concentrations minimizing gas-phase HO2 self reaction, i.e. for [HO2] < 109 molecules cm-3. The mass accommodation coefficient was determined by measuring HO2 uptake onto Cu(II)-doped ammonium sulfate aerosols. Reactive uptake coefficients

  19. Atmospheric and environmental impacts of volcanic ash particle emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durant, Adam

    2010-05-01

    Globally, at any one time, there may be 20 volcanoes erupting that collectively emit a constant flux of gases and aerosol, including silicate particles (tephra), to the atmosphere which influences processes including cloud microphysics, heterogeneous chemistry and radiative balance. The nature and impact of atmospheric volcanic particle fluxes depend on total mass erupted, emission rate, emission source location, physical and chemical properties of the particles, and the location and residence time of the particles in the atmosphere. Removal of ash particles from the atmosphere through sedimentation is strongly influenced by particle aggregation through hydrometeor formation, and convective instabilities such as mammatus. I will address the following questions: What are the atmospheric impacts of volcanic ash emissions? What controls the residence time of volcanic particles in the atmosphere? What affects particle accumulation at the surface? And what are the human and environmental impacts of ash fallout?

  20. The radiative effect of aerosols in the earth's atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, W.-C.; Domoto, G. A.

    1974-01-01

    A modified two-flux approximation is employed to compute the transfer of radiation in a finite, inhomogeneous, turbid atmosphere. A perturbation technique is developed to allow the treatment of nongray gaseous absorption with multiple scattering. The perturbation method, which employs a backscatter factor as a parameter, can be used with anisotropic particle scattering as well as Rayleigh scattering. This method is used to study the effect of aerosols on radiative solar heating and infrared cooling as well as the radiative-convective temperature distribution in the earth's atmosphere. It is found that the effect of aerosols in the infrared cannot be neglected; while in the visible, the effect can be of the same order as that due to absorption by water vapor. For a high surface albedo (greater than 0.30) heating of the earth-atmosphere system results due to the presence of aerosols. The aerosols also reduce the amount of convection needed to maintain a stable atmosphere. For the case of a dense haze a temperature inversion is found to exist close to the ground.

  1. Characterization of aerosol particles at the forested site in Lithuania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimselyte, I.; Garbaras, A.; Kvietkus, K.; Remeikis, V.

    2009-04-01

    Atmospheric particulate matter (PM), especially fine particles (particles with aerodynamic diameter less than 1 m, PM1), has been found to play an important role in global climate change, air quality, and human health. The continuous study of aerosol parameters is therefore imperative for better understanding the environmental effects of the atmospheric particles, as well as their sources, formation and transformation processes. The particle size distribution is particularly important, since this physical parameter determines the mass and number density, lifetime and atmospheric transport, or optical scattering behavior of the particles in the atmosphere (Jaenicke, 1998). Over the years several efforts have been made to improve the knowledge about the chemical composition of atmospheric particles as a function of size (Samara and Voutsa, 2005) and to characterize the relative contribution of different components to the fine particulate matter. It is well established that organic materials constitute a highly variable fraction of the atmospheric aerosol. This fraction is predominantly found in the fine size mode in concentrations ranging from 10 to 70% of the total dry fine particle mass (Middlebrook et al., 1998). Although organic compounds are major components of the fine particles, the composition, formation mechanism of organic aerosols are not well understood. This is because particulate organic matter is part of a complex atmospheric system with hundreds of different compounds, both natural and anthropogenic, covering a wide range of chemical properties. The aim of this study was to characterize the forest PM1, and investigate effects of air mass transport on the aerosol size distribution and chemical composition, estimate and provide insights into the sources and characteristics of carbonaceous aerosols through analysis ^13C/12C isotopic ratio as a function of the aerosol particles size. The measurements were performed at the Rugšteliškis integrated

  2. Subarctic atmospheric aerosol composition: 1. Ambient aerosol characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, Beth; Herich, Hanna; Kammermann, Lukas; Gross, Deborah S.; Ameth, Almut; Holst, Thomas; Lohmann, U.; Cziczo, Daniel J.

    2009-07-10

    Sub-Arctic aerosol was sampled during July 2007 at the Abisko Research Station Stordalen field site operated by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences. Located in northern Sweden at 68º latitude and 385 meters above sea level (msl), this site is classified as a semi-continuous permafrost mire. Number density, size distribution, cloud condensation nucleus properties, and chemical composition of the ambient aerosol were determined. Backtrajectories showed that three distinct airmasses were present over Stordalen during the sampling period. Aerosol properties changed and correlated with airmass origin to the south, northeast, or west. We observe that Arctic aerosol is not compositionally unlike that found in the free troposphere at mid-latitudes. Internal mixtures of sulfates and organics, many on insoluble biomass burning and/or elemental carbon cores, dominate the number density of particles from ~200 to 2000 nm aerodynamic diameter. Mineral dust which had taken up gas phase species was observed in all airmasses. Sea salt, and the extent to which it had lost volatile components, was the aerosol type that most varied with airmass.

  3. A Computational Study of Acid Catalyzed Aerosol Reactions of Atmospherically Relevant Epoxides

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epoxides are important intermediates of atmospheric isoprene oxidation. Their subsequent reactions in the particle phase lead to the production of organic compounds detected in ambient aerosols. We apply density functional theory to determine the important kinetic factors that ...

  4. A Computational Study of Acid Catalyzed Aerosol Reactions of Atmospherically Relevant Epoxides

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epoxides are important intermediates of atmospheric isoprene oxidation. Their subsequent reactions in the particle phase lead to the production of organic compounds detected in ambient aerosols. We apply density functional theory to determine the important kinetic factors that ...

  5. Time Resolved Measurements of Primary Biogenic Aerosol Particles in Amazonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wollny, A. G.; Garland, R.; Pöschl, U.

    2009-04-01

    Biogenic aerosols are ubiquitous in the Earth's atmosphere and they influence atmospheric chemistry and physics, the biosphere, climate, and public health. They play an important role in the spread of biological organisms and reproductive materials, and they can cause or enhance human, animal, and plant diseases. Moreover, they influence the Earth's energy budget by scattering and absorbing radiation, and they can initiate the formation of clouds and precipitation as cloud condensation and ice nuclei. The composition, abundance, and origin of biogenic aerosol particles and components are, however, still not well understood and poorly quantified. Prominent examples of primary biogenic aerosol particles, which are directly emitted from the biosphere to the atmosphere, are pollen, bacteria, fungal spores, viruses, and fragments of animals and plants. During the Amazonian Aerosol Characterization Experiment (AMAZE-08) a large number of aerosol and gas-phase measurements were taken on a remote site close to Manaus, Brazil, during a period of five weeks in February and March 2008. This presented study is focused on data from an ultraviolet aerodynamic particle sizer (UVAPS, TSI inc.) that has been deployed for the first time in Amazonia. In this instrument, particle counting and aerodynamic sizing over the range of 0.5-20 µm are complemented by the measurement of UV fluorescence at 355 nm (excitation) and 420-575 nm (emission), respectively. Fluorescence at these wavelengths is characteristic for reduced pyridine nucleotides (e.g., NAD(P)H) and for riboflavin, which are specific for living cells. Thus particles exhibiting fluorescence signals can be regarded as "viable aerosols" or "fluorescent bioparticles" (FBAP), and their concentration can be considered as lower limit for the actual abundance of primary biogenic aerosol particles. Data from the UVAPS were averaged over 5 minute time intervals. The presence of bioparticles in the observed size range has been

  6. Chemical composition of atmospheric aerosols resolved via positive matrix factorization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Äijälä, Mikko; Junninen, Heikki; Heikkinen, Liine; Petäjä, Tuukka; Kulmala, Markku; Worsnop, Douglas; Ehn, Mikael

    2017-04-01

    Atmospheric particulate matter is a complex mixture of various chemical species such as organic compounds, sulfates, nitrates, ammonia, chlorides, black carbon and sea salt. As aerosol chemical composition strongly influences aerosol climate effects (via cloud condensation nucleus activation, hygroscopic properties, aerosol optics, volatility and condensation) as well as health effects (toxicity, carcinogenicity, particle morphology), detailed understanding of atmospheric fine particle composition is widely beneficial for understanding these interactions. Unfortunately the comprehensive, detailed measurement of aerosol chemistry remains difficult due to the wide range of compounds present in the atmosphere as well as for the miniscule mass of the particles themselves compared to their carrier gas. Aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS; Canagaratna et al., 2007) is an instrument often used for characterization of non-refractive aerosol types: the near-universal vaporization and ionisation technique allows for measurement of most atmospheric-relevant compounds (with the notable exception of refractory matter such as sea salt, black carbon, metals and crustal matter). The downside of the hard ionisation applied is extensive fragmentation of sample molecules. However, the apparent loss of information in fragmentation can be partly offset by applying advanced statistical methods to extract information from the fragmentation patterns. In aerosol mass spectrometry statistical analysis methods, such as positive matrix factorization (PMF; Paatero, 1999) are usually applied for aerosol organic component only, to keep the number of factors to be resolved manageable, to retain the inorganic components for solution validation via correlation analysis, and to avoid inorganic species dominating the factor model. However, this practice smears out the interactions between organic and inorganic chemical components, and hinders the understanding of the connections between primary and

  7. Partial Derivative Fitted Taylor Expansion: An efficient method for calculating gas-liquid equilibria in atmospheric aerosol particles: 1. Inorganic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topping, David; Lowe, Douglas; McFiggans, Gordon

    2009-02-01

    Parameterizations for calculating the equilibrium vapor pressure of the semivolatile inorganic gases, HNO3, HCl, and NH3, above an aqueous aerosol are presented. The hybrid Partial Derivative Fitted Taylor Expansion (PD-FiTE) approach uses optimized model parameters describing the interaction between different inorganic ions, resulting in comparable computational performance with existing reduced methods while remaining accurate. Comparisons with the most accurate inorganic activity coefficient model available indicate that PD-FiTE performs very well over the parameterization space of the system H+-NH4+-Na+-SO42--HSO4--NO3--Cl- at 298.15 K. The linear additive framework allows the inclusion of further species. However, including the ability to describe the interaction between inorganic and organic components will be presented in a future publication. Coupling PD-FiTE to a coupled box model of gaseous chemistry and aerosol microphysics in a test case investigating marine aerosol passing through a polluted environment demonstrates its robustness and ability to capture fine details of important phenomena such as the outgassing of HCl in response to HNO3 uptake by sea-salt particles.

  8. Particle size distributions of organic aerosol constituents during the 2002 Yosemite Aerosol Characterization Study.

    PubMed

    Herckes, Pierre; Engling, Guenter; Kreidenweis, Sonia M; Collett, Jeffrey L

    2006-08-01

    The Yosemite Aerosol Characterization Study (YACS) was conducted in the summer of 2002 to investigate sources of regional haze in Yosemite National Park. Organic carbon and molecular source marker species size distributions were investigated during hazy and clear periods. More than 75% of the organic carbon mass was associated with submicron aerosol particles. Most molecular marker species for wood smoke, an important source of particulate matter during the study, were contained in submicron particles, although on some fire influenced days, levoglucosan shifted toward larger sizes. Various wood smoke marker species exhibited slightly different size distributions in the samples, suggesting different, size dependent emission or atmospheric processing rates of these species. Secondary biogenic compounds including pinic and pinonic acids were associated with smaller particles. Pinonaldehyde, however, exhibited a broader distribution, likely due to its higher volatility. Dicarboxylic acids were associated mainly with submicron particles. Hopanes, molecular markers for vehicle emissions, were mostly contained in smaller particles but exhibited some tailing into larger size classes.

  9. An aerosol particle containing enriched uranium encountered during routine sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Daniel; Froyd, Karl; Evangeliou, NIkolaos; Stohl, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    The composition of single aerosol particles has been measured using a laser ionization mass spectrometer during the global Atmospheric Tomography mission. The measurements were targeting the background atmosphere, not radiochemical emissions. One sub-micron particle sampled at about 7 km altitude near the Aleutian Islands contained uranium with approximately 3% 235U. It is the only particle with enriched uranium out of millions of particles sampled over several decades of measurements with this instrument. The particle also contained vanadium, alkali metals, and organic material similar to that present in emissions from combustion of heavy oil. No zirconium or other metals that might be characteristic of nuclear reactors were present, probably suggesting a source other than Fukushima or Chernobyl. Back trajectories suggest several areas in Asia that might be sources for the particle.

  10. Atmospheric Aerosol Emissions Related to the Mediterranean Seawater Biogeochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellegri, K.; Schwier, A.; Rose, C.; Gazeau, F. P. H.; Guieu, C.; D'anna, B.; Ebling, A. M.; Pey, J.; Marchand, N.; Charriere, B.; Sempéré, R.; Mas, S.

    2016-02-01

    Marine aerosols contribute significantly to the global aerosol load and consequently has an important impact on the Earth's climate. Different factors influence the way they are produced at the air/seawater interface. The sea state (whitecap coverage, temperature, etc. ) influence the size and concentration of primarily produced particles but also biogeochemical characteristics of the seawater influence both the physical and chemical primary fluxes to the atmosphere. An additional aerosol source of marine aerosol to the atmosphere is the formation of new particles by gaz-to-particle conversion, i.e. nucleation. How the seawater and surface microlayer biogeochemical compositions influences the aerosol emissions is still a large debate. In order to study marine emissions, one approach is to use semi-controlled environments such as mesocosms. Within the MedSea and SAM projects, we characterize the primary Sea Spray Aerosol (SSA) during mesocosms experiments performed during different seasons in the Mediteranean Sea. Mesocosms were either left unchanged as control or enriched by addition of nutriments in order to create different levels of phytoplanctonic activities. The mesocosms waters were daily analyzed for their chemical and biological composition (DOC, CDOM, TEP, Chl-a, virus, bacteria, phytoplankton and zooplankton concentrations). SSA production by bubble bursting was daily simulated in a dedicated set-up. The size segregated SSA number fluxes, cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) properties, and chemical composition were determined as a function of the seawater characteristics. We show that the SSA organic content was clearly correlated to the seawater Chl-a level, provided that the mesocosm was not enriched to create an artificial phytoplanctonic bloom. In our experiments, the enrichment of the seawater with natural surface microlayer did not impact the SSA organic content nor its CCN properties. At last, nucleation of secondary particles were observed to occur in

  11. Ship-borne Observations of Atmospheric Black Carbon Aerosol Particles over the Arctic Ocean, Bering Sea, and North Pacific Ocean during September 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taketani, F.; Miyakawa, T.; Takashima, H.; Komazaki, Y.; Kanaya, Y.; PAN, X.; Inoue, J.

    2015-12-01

    Measurements of refractory black carbon (rBC) aerosol particles using a highly sensitive online single particle soot photometer were performed on-board the R/V Mirai during a cruise across the Arctic Ocean, Bering Sea, and the North Pacific Ocean (31 August-9 October 2014). The measured rBC mass concentrations over the Arctic Ocean in the latitudinal region > 70°N were in the range 0-66 ng/m3 for 1-min averages, with an overall mean value of 1.0 ± 1.2 ng/m3. Single-particle-based observations enabled the measurement of such low rBC mass concentrations. The effects of long-range transport from continents to the Arctic Ocean were limited during the observed period, suggesting that such low rBC concentration levels would prevail over the Arctic Ocean. An analysis of rBC mixing states showed that particles with a non-shell/core structure made a significant contribution to the rBC particles detected over the Arctic Ocean.

  12. Chemical evolution of multicomponent aerosol particles during evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zardini, Alessandro; Riipinen, Ilona; Pagels, Joakim; Eriksson, Axel; Worsnop, Douglas; Switieckli, Erik; Kulmala, Markku; Bilde, Merete

    2010-05-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles have an important but not well quantified effect on climate and human health. Despite the efforts made in the last decades, the formation and evolution of aerosol particles in the atmosphere is still not fully understood. The uncertainty is partly due to the complex chemical composition of the particles which comprise inorganic and organic compounds. Many organics (like dicarboxylic acids) can be present both in the gas and in the condensed phase due to their low vapor pressure. Clearly, an understanding of this partition is crucial to address any other issue in atmospheric physics and chemistry. Moreover, many organics are water soluble, and their influence on the properties of aqueous solution droplets is still poorly characterized. The solid and sub-cooled liquid state vapor pressures of some organic compounds have been previously determined by measuring the evaporation rate of single-compound crystals [1-3] or binary aqueous droplets [4-6]. In this work, we deploy the HTDMA technique (Hygroscopicity Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer) coupled with a 3.5m laminar flow-tube and an Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) for determining the chemical evolution during evaporation of ternary droplets made of one dicarboxylic acid (succinic acid, commonly found in atmospheric samples) and one inorganic compound (sodium chloride or ammonium sulfate) in different mixing ratios, in equilibrium with water vapor at a fixed relative humidity. In addition, we investigate the evaporation of multicomponent droplets and crystals made of three organic species (dicarboxylic acids and sugars), of which one or two are semi-volatile. 1. Bilde M. and Pandis, S.N.: Evaporation Rates and Vapor Pressures of Individual Aerosol Species Formed in the Atmospheric Oxidation of alpha- and beta-Pinene. Environmental Science and Technology, 35, 2001. 2. Bilde M., et al.: Even-Odd Alternation of Evaporation Rates and Vapor Pressures of C3-C9 Dicarboxylic Acid Aerosols

  13. Processing of aerosol particles within the Habshan pollution plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semeniuk, T. A.; Bruintjes, R.; Salazar, V.; Breed, D.; Jensen, T.; Buseck, P. R.

    2015-03-01

    The Habshan industrial site in the United Arab Emirates produces a regional-scale pollution plume associated with oil and gas processing, discharging high loadings of sulfates and chlorides into the atmosphere, which interact with the ambient aerosol population. Aerosol particles and trace gas chemistry at this site were studied on two flights in the summer of 2002. Measurements were collected along vertical plume profiles to show changes associated with atmospheric processing of particle and gas components. Close to the outlet stack, particle concentrations were over 10,000 cm-3, dropping to <2000 cm-3 in more dilute plume around 1500 m above the stack. Particles collected close to the stack and within the dilute plume were individually measured for size, morphology, composition, and mixing state using transmission electron microscopy coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Close to the stack, most coarse particles consisted of mineral dust and NaCl crystals from burning oil brines, while sulfate droplets dominated the fine mode. In more dilute plume, at least 1500 m above the stack, the particle spectrum was more diverse, with a significant increase in internally mixed particle types. Dilute plume samples consisted of coarse NaCl/silicate aggregates or NaCl-rich droplets, often with a sulfate component, while fine-fraction particles were of mixed cation sulfates, also internally mixed with nanospherical soot or silicates. Thus, both chloride and sulfate components of the pollution plume rapidly reacted with ambient mineral dust to form coated and aggregate particles, enhancing particle size, hygroscopicity, and reactivity of the coarse mode. The fine-fraction sulfate-bearing particles formed in the plume contribute to regional transport of sulfates, while coarse sulfate-bearing fractions locally reduced the SO2 loading through sedimentation. The chloride- and sulfate-bearing internally mixed particles formed in the plume markedly changed the

  14. Accelerator-based chemical and elemental analysis of atmospheric aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mentes, Besim

    Aerosol particles have always been present in the atmosphere, arising from natural sources. But it was not until recently when emissions from anthropogenic (man made) sources began to dominate, that atmospheric aerosols came into focus and the aerosol science in the environmental perspective started to grow. These sources emit or produce particles with different elemental and chemical compositions, as well as different sizes of the individual aerosols. The effects of increased pollution of the atmosphere are many, and have different time scales. One of the effects known today is acid rain, which causes problems for vegetation. Pollution is also a direct human health risk, in many cities where traffic driven by combustion engines is forbidden at certain times when the meteorological conditions are unfavourable. Aerosols play an important role in the climate, and may have both direct and indirect effect which cause cooling of the planet surface, in contrast to the so-called greenhouse gases. During this work a technique for chemical and elemental analysis of atmospheric aerosols and an elemental analysis methodology for upper tropospheric aerosols have been developed. The elemental analysis is performed by the ion beam analysis (IBA) techniques, PIXE (elements heavier than Al). PESA (C, N and O), cPESA (H) and pNRA (Mg and Na). The chemical speciation of atmospheric aerosols is obtained by ion beam thermography (IBT). During thermography the sample temperature is stepwise increased and the IBA techniques are used to continuously monitor the elemental concentration. A thermogram is obtained for each element. The vaporisation of the compounds in the sample appears as a concentration decrease in the thermograms at characteristic vaporisation temperatures (CVTs). Different aspects of IBT have been examined in Paper I to IV. The features of IBT are: almost total elemental speciation of the aerosol mass, chemical speciation of the inorganic compounds, carbon content

  15. Composition and formation of organic aerosol particles in the Amazon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pöhlker, C.; Wiedemann, K.; Sinha, B.; Shiraiwa, M.; Gunthe, S. S.; Artaxo, P.; Gilles, M. K.; Kilcoyne, A. L. D.; Moffet, R. C.; Smith, M.; Weigand, M.; Martin, S. T.; Pöschl, U.; Andreae, M. O.

    2012-04-01

    We applied scanning transmission X-ray microscopy with near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (STXM-NEXAFS) analysis to investigate the morphology and chemical composition of aerosol samples from a pristine tropical environment, the Amazon Basin. The samples were collected in the Amazonian rainforest during the rainy season and can be regarded as a natural background aerosol. The samples were found to be dominated by secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles in the fine and primary biological aerosol particles (PBAP) in the coarse mode. Lab-generated SOA-samples from isoprene and terpene oxidation as well as pure organic compounds from spray-drying of aqueous solution were measured as reference samples. The aim of this study was to investigate the microphysical and chemical properties of a tropical background aerosol in the submicron size range and its internal mixing state. The lab-generated SOA and pure organic compounds occurred as spherical and mostly homogenous droplet-like particles, whereas the Amazonian SOA particles comprised a mixture of homogeneous droplets and droplets having internal structures due to atmospheric aging. In spite of the similar morphological appearance, the Amazon samples showed considerable differences in elemental and functional group composition. According to their NEXAFS spectra, three chemically distinct types of organic material were found and could be assigned to the following three categories: (1) particles with a pronounced carboxylic acid (COOH) peak similar to those of laboratory-generated SOA particles from terpene oxidation; (2) particles with a strong hydroxy (COH) signal similar to pure carbohydrate particles; and (3) particles with spectra resembling a mixture of the first two classes. In addition to the dominant organic component, the NEXAFS spectra revealed clearly resolved potassium (K) signals for all analyzed particles. During the rainy season and in the absence of anthropogenic influence, active biota is

  16. Measurements of Atmospheric Aerosol Vertical Distributions above Svalbard, Norway using Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, T. S.; Johnson, J. E.; Stalin, S.; Telg, H.; Murphy, D. M.; Burkhart, J. F.; Quinn, P.; Storvold, R.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosol vertical distributions were measured above Svalbard, Norway in April 2015 to investigate the processes controlling aerosol concentrations and radiative effects. The aerosol payload was flown in a NOAA/PMEL MANTA Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) on 9 flights totaling 19 flight hours. Measurements were made of particle number concentration and aerosol light absorption at three wavelengths, similar to those conducted in April 2011 (Bates et al., Atmos. Meas. Tech., 6, 2115-2120, 2013). A filter sample was collected on each flight for analyses of trace elements. Additional measurements in the aerosol payload in 2015 included aerosol size distributions obtained using a Printed Optical Particle Spectrometer (POPS) and aerosol optical depth obtained using a four wavelength miniature Scanning Aerosol Sun Photometer (miniSASP). The data show most of the column aerosol mass and resulting optical depth in the boundary layer but frequent aerosol layers aloft with high particle number concentration (2000 cm-3) and enhanced aerosol light absorption (1 Mm-1). Transport of these aerosol layers was assessed using FLEXPART particle dispersion models. The data contribute to an assessment of sources of BC to the Arctic and potential climate impacts.

  17. Measurements of atmospheric aerosol vertical distributions above Svalbard, Norway, using unmanned aerial systems (UAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, T. S.; Quinn, P. K.; Johnson, J. E.; Corless, A.; Brechtel, F. J.; Stalin, S. E.; Meinig, C.; Burkhart, J. F.

    2013-08-01

    Atmospheric aerosol vertical distributions were measured above Svalbard, Norway, in April 2011 during the Cooperative Investigation of Climate-Cryosphere Interactions campaign (CICCI). Measurements were made of the particle number concentration and the aerosol light absorption coefficient at three wavelengths. A filter sample was collected on each flight at the altitude of maximum particle number concentration. The filters were analyzed for major anions and cations. The aerosol payload was flown in a NOAA/PMEL MANTA Unmanned Aerial System (UAS). A total of 18 flights were flown during the campaign totaling 38 flight hours. The data show frequent aerosol layers aloft with high particle number concentration (1000 cm-3) and enhanced aerosol light absorption (1 Mm-1). Air mass histories of these aerosol layers were assessed using FLEXPART particle dispersion modeling. The data contribute to an assessment of sources of BC to the Arctic and potential climate impacts.

  18. Measurements of atmospheric aerosol vertical distributions above Svalbard, Norway using unmanned aerial systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, T.; Quinn, P.; Johnson, J. E.; Stalin, S.; Meinig, C.; Burkhart, J. F.

    2011-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosol vertical distributions were measured above Svalbard, Norway in April 2011 during the Coordinated Investigation of Climate-Cryosphere Interactions campaign (CICCI). Measurements were made of particle number concentration and aerosol light absorption at three wavelengths. A filter sample was collected on each flight at the altitude of maximum particle number concentration. The filters were analyzed for major anions and cations. The aerosol payload was flown in a NOAA/PMEL MANTA Unmanned Aerial System (UAS). A total of 18 flights were flown during the campaign totaling 38 flight hours. The data show frequent aerosol layers aloft with high particle number concentration (1000 cm-3) and enhanced aerosol light absorption (1 Mm-1). Transport of these aerosol layers was assessed using FLEXPART particle dispersion models. The data contribute to an assessment of sources of BC to the Arctic and potential climate impacts.

  19. Measurements of atmospheric aerosol vertical distributions above Svalbard, Norway using unmanned aerial systems (UAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, T. S.; Quinn, P. K.; Johnson, J. E.; Corless, A.; Brechtel, F. J.; Stalin, S. E.; Meinig, C.; Burkhart, J. F.

    2013-03-01

    Atmospheric aerosol vertical distributions were measured above Svalbard, Norway in April 2011 during the Cooperative Investigation of Climate-Cryosphere Interactions campaign (CICCI). Measurements were made of the particle number concentration and the aerosol light absorption coefficient at three wavelengths. A filter sample was collected on each flight at the altitude of maximum particle number concentration. The filters were analyzed for major anions and cations. The aerosol payload was flown in a NOAA/PMEL MANTA Unmanned Aerial System (UAS). A total of 18 flights were flown during the campaign totaling 38 flight hours. The data show frequent aerosol layers aloft with high particle number concentration (1000 cm-3 and enhanced aerosol light absorption (1 Mm-1). Air mass histories of these aerosol layers were assessed using FLEXPART particle dispersion modeling. The data contribute to an assessment of sources of BC to the Arctic and potential climate impacts.

  20. Study of clouds and dust aerosols in the Martian atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen-Chen, H.; Pérez-Hoyos, S.; Sánchez-Lavega, A.

    2017-03-01

    Observation of Mars’ atmosphere has evolved to a state of permanent monitoring of its main components. In this work, we focus on the study of clouds and dust aerosols in the Martian atmosphere by means of spacecraft observations, particularly VMC on-board Mars Express, and surface vehicles, mainly cameras on the MSL rover. Orbiting instrument observations provide a general view of the planet, which allows covering a huge area in a short time. This is very interesting, for example, to study global dust events in Mars. On the other hand, ground-based instruments are better suited to analyse local properties of dust particles from in-situ acquired first hand data.

  1. MATRIX (Multiconfiguration Aerosol TRacker of mIXing state): an aerosol microphysical module for global atmospheric models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, S. E.; Wright, D. L.; Koch, D.; Lewis, E. R.; McGraw, R.; Chang, L.-S.; Schwartz, S. E.; Ruedy, R.

    2008-10-01

    A new aerosol microphysical module MATRIX, the Multiconfiguration Aerosol TRacker of mIXing state, and its application in the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) climate model (ModelE) are described. This module, which is based on the quadrature method of moments (QMOM), represents nucleation, condensation, coagulation, internal and external mixing, and cloud-drop activation and provides aerosol particle mass and number concentration and particle size information for up to 16 mixed-mode aerosol populations. Internal and external mixing among aerosol components sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, carbonaceous aerosols, dust and sea-salt particles are represented. The solubility of each aerosol population, which is explicitly calculated based on its soluble and insoluble components, enables calculation of the dependence of cloud drop activation on the microphysical characterization of multiple soluble aerosol populations. A detailed model description and results of box-model simulations of various aerosol population configurations are presented. The box model experiments demonstrate the dependence of cloud activating aerosol number concentration on the aerosol population configuration; comparisons to sectional models are quite favorable. MATRIX is incorporated into the GISS climate model and simulations are carried out primarily to assess its performance/efficiency for global-scale atmospheric model application. Simulation results were compared with aircraft and station measurements of aerosol mass and number concentration and particle size to assess the ability of the new method to yield data suitable for such comparison. The model accurately captures the observed size distributions in the Aitken and accumulation modes up to particle diameter 1 μm, in which sulfate, nitrate, black and organic carbon are predominantly located; however the model underestimates coarse-mode number concentration and size, especially in the marine environment. This is more likely due to

  2. The Life Cycle of Stratospheric Aerosol Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamill, Patrick; Jensen, Eric J.; Russell, P. B.; Bauman, Jill J.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the life cycle of the background (nonvolcanic) stratospheric sulfate aerosol. The authors assume the particles are formed by homogeneous nucleation near the tropical tropopause and are carried aloft into the stratosphere. The particles remain in the Tropics for most of their life, and during this period of time a size distribution is developed by a combination of coagulation, growth by heteromolecular condensation, and mixing with air parcels containing preexisting sulfate particles. The aerosol eventually migrates to higher latitudes and descends across isentropic surfaces to the lower stratosphere. The aerosol is removed from the stratosphere primarily at mid- and high latitudes through various processes, mainly by isentropic transport across the tropopause from the stratosphere into the troposphere.

  3. Submicron Aerosol Particle Losses in Metalized Bags.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecinski, Alice

    1980-07-01

    Two new types of conducting bags were tested for aerosol particle storage and sampling, a 3M Company Velostat bag and a bag constructed from 3M Type 2100 Static Shielding Film. The half-lives of unipolar, unit-charged 0.025 m, 0.050 m and 0.090 m sized aerosol particles stored in the Velostat bag and the film bag were 130, 190 and 270 min and 40, 70 and 180 min, respectively. These results depend upon the history of bag filling. The values given here apply to bags which had not previously been filled on the day of experimentation. The lifetimes exhibited by the aerosol particles stored in the Velostat bag are the longest found to data.

  4. In situ UV-VIS-NIR absorbing properties of atmospheric aerosol particles: estimates of the imaginary refractive index and comparison with columnar values.

    PubMed

    Mogo, S; Cachorro, V E; de Frutos, A M

    2012-11-30

    In this work, a novel technique is used to estimate the aerosol complex index of refraction of in situ collected samples. Samples of atmospheric particulate matter were collected in El Arenosillo, southern Spain, on polycarbonate filters during summer 2004 as part of an aerosol characterization campaign. These samples were analyzed for the volumetric absorption coefficient in the 320-800 nm spectral region and an estimation of the effective imaginary refractive index was made. The values of the imaginary part of the complex refractive index ranged between 0.0009-0.0215 at 800 nm and 0.0015-0.0114 at 320 nm. Little dependence on the wavelength was observed. Several intense and long lasting desert outbreaks were registered during the campaign and the complex refractive index almost doubles its value during these dust events. Finally, we present a comparison of data obtained in situ with columnar data obtained from the AERONET network. A correlation factor of 0.64 was obtained between both data, which gives an idea of how accurately the in situ ground data represent the total column. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Metal and Metalloid Contaminants in Atmospheric Aerosols from Mining Operations

    PubMed Central

    Csavina, Janae; Landázuri, Andrea; Wonaschütz, Anna; Rine, Kyle; Rheinheimer, Paul; Barbaris, Brian; Conant, William; Sáez, A. Eduardo; Betterton, Eric A.

    2013-01-01

    Mining operations are potential sources of airborne metal and metalloid contaminants through both direct smelter emissions and wind erosion of mine tailings. The warmer, drier conditions predicted for the Southwestern US by climate models may make contaminated atmospheric dust and aerosols increasingly important, with potential deleterious effects on human health and ecology. Fine particulates such as those resulting from smelting operations may disperse more readily into the environment than coarser tailings dust. Fine particles also penetrate more deeply into the human respiratory system, and may become more bioavailable due to their high specific surface area. In this work, we report the size-fractionated chemical characterization of atmospheric aerosols sampled over a period of a year near an active mining and smelting site in Arizona. Aerosols were characterized with a 10-stage (0.054 to 18 μm aerodynamic diameter) multiple orifice uniform deposit impactor (MOUDI), a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS), and a total suspended particulate (TSP) collector. The MOUDI results show that arsenic and lead concentrations follow a bimodal distribution, with maxima centered at approximately 0.3 and 7.0 μm diameter. We hypothesize that the sub-micron arsenic and lead are the product of condensation and coagulation of smelting vapors. In the coarse size, contaminants are thought to originate as aeolian dust from mine tailings and other sources. Observation of ultrafine particle number concentration (SMPS) show the highest readings when the wind comes from the general direction of the smelting operations site. PMID:23441050

  6. Surface Chemistry at Size-Selected Nano-Aerosol Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Jeffrey

    2005-03-01

    A method has been developed to conduct surface chemistry and extract surface kinetic rates from size-selected aerosol nanoparticles. The measurements encompass broad ranges of particle size, phase, and composition. Results will be presented on the uptake of water by aerosolized soot nanoparticles of radius between 10 and 40 nm. Water uptake was monitored by tandem differential mobility analysis (T-DMA), which is capable of measuring changes in particle diameter as little as 0.2 nm. Soot particles were produced in an ethene diffusion flame and extracted into an atmospheric pressure aerosol flow tube reactor. The particles were subjected to various thermal and oxidative treatments, and the effects of these treatments on the ability of soot to adsorb monolayer quantities of water was determined. The results are important because soot nucleates atmospheric cloud particles. More generally, the results represent one of the first kinetic and mechanistic studies of gas-phase nanoparticle reactivity. Co-author: Henry Ajo, University of Minnesota

  7. Effect of tropospheric aerosols upon atmospheric infrared cooling rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harshvardhan, MR.; Cess, R. D.

    1978-01-01

    The effect of tropospheric aerosols on atmospheric infrared cooling rates is investigated by the use of recent models of infrared gaseous absorption. A radiative model of the atmosphere that incorporates dust as an absorber and scatterer of infrared radiation is constructed by employing the exponential kernel approximation to the radiative transfer equation. Scattering effects are represented in terms of a single scattering albedo and an asymmetry factor. The model is applied to estimate the effect of an aerosol layer made of spherical quartz particles on the infrared cooling rate. Calculations performed for a reference wavelength of 0.55 microns show an increased greenhouse effect, where the net upward flux at the surface is reduced by 10% owing to the strongly enhanced downward emission. There is a substantial increase in the cooling rate near the surface, but the mean cooling rate throughout the lower troposphere was only 10%.

  8. Near-infrared laser desorption/ionization aerosol mass spectrometry for measuring organic aerosol at atmospherically relevant aerosol mass loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geddes, S.; Nichols, B.; Todd, K.; Zahardis, J.; Petrucci, G. A.

    2010-08-01

    A new method, near-infrared laser desorption/ionization aerosol mass spectrometry (NIR-LDI-AMS), is described for the real time analysis of organic aerosols at atmospherically relevant total mass loadings. Particles are sampled with an aerodynamic lens onto an aluminum probe. A moderate energy NIR laser pulse at 1064 nm is directed onto the probe to vaporize and ionize particle components. Delayed pulse extraction is then used to sample the ions into a reflectron time of flight mass spectrometer for chemical analysis. The soft ionization afforded by the NIR photons results in minimal fragmentation (loss of a hydrogen atom) producing intact pseudo-molecular anions at [M-H]-. The limit of detection measured for pure oleic acid particles (geometric mean diameter and standard deviation of 180 nm and 1.3, respectively) was 140 fg (or 1.7 ng m-3 per minute sampling time). As an example of the utility of NIR-LDI-AMS to measurements of atmospheric importance, the method was applied to laboratory chamber measurements of the secondary organic aerosol formation from ozonolysis of α-pinene. High quality mass spectra were recorded with a 2-min time resolution for total aerosol mass loadings ranging from 1.5 to 8.7 μg m-3. These results demonstrate the potential of NIR-LDI-AMS to allow for more accurate measurements of the organic fraction of atmospheric particulate at realistic mass loadings. Measurements at ambient-levels of SOA mass loading are important to improve parameterizations of chamber-based SOA formation for modeling regional and global SOA fluxes and to aid in remediating the discrepancy between modeled and observed atmospheric total SOA production rates and concentrations.

  9. Near-infrared laser desorption/ionization aerosol mass spectrometry for measuring organic aerosol at atmospherically relevant aerosol mass loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geddes, S.; Nichols, B.; Todd, K.; Zahardis, J.; Petrucci, G. A.

    2010-05-01

    A new method, near-infrared laser desorption/ionization aerosol mass spectrometry (NIR-LDI-AMS), is described for the real time analysis of organic aerosols at atmospherically relevant total mass loadings. Particles are sampled with an aerodynamic lens onto an aluminium probe and moderate energy NIR laser pulse at 1064 nm is directed onto the probe to vaporize and ionize particle components. Delayed pulse extraction is then used to sample the ions into a reflectron time of flight mass spectrometer for chemical analysis. The soft ionization afforded by the NIR photons results in minimal fragmentation (loss of a hydrogen atom) producing intact pseudo-molecular anions at [M-H]-. The limit of detection measured for pure oleic acid particles (geometric mean diameter and standard deviation of 180 nm and 1.3, respectively) was 140 fg (or 1.7 ng m-3 per minute sampling time). As an example of the utility of NIR-LDI-AMS to measurements of atmospheric importance, the method was applied to laboratory chamber measurements of the secondary organic aerosol formation from ozonolysis of α-pinene. High quality mass spectra were recorded with a 2-min time resolution for total aerosol mass loadings ranging from 1.5 to 8.7 μg m-3. These results demonstrate the potential of NIR-LDI-AMS to allow for more accurate measurements of the organic fraction of atmospheric particulate at realistic mass loadings. Measurements at ambient-levels of SOA mass loading are important to improve parameterizations of chamber-based SOA formation for modeling regional and SOA fluxes and to aid in remediating the discrepancy between modeled and observed atmospheric total SOA production rates and concentrations.

  10. An amorphous solid state of biogenic secondary organic aerosol particles.

    PubMed

    Virtanen, Annele; Joutsensaari, Jorma; Koop, Thomas; Kannosto, Jonna; Yli-Pirilä, Pasi; Leskinen, Jani; Mäkelä, Jyrki M; Holopainen, Jarmo K; Pöschl, Ulrich; Kulmala, Markku; Worsnop, Douglas R; Laaksonen, Ari

    2010-10-14

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles are formed in the atmosphere from condensable oxidation products of anthropogenic and biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs). On a global scale, biogenic VOCs account for about 90% of VOC emissions and of SOA formation (90 billion kilograms of carbon per year). SOA particles can scatter radiation and act as cloud condensation or ice nuclei, and thereby influence the Earth's radiation balance and climate. They consist of a myriad of different compounds with varying physicochemical properties, and little information is available on the phase state of SOA particles. Gas-particle partitioning models usually assume that SOA particles are liquid, but here we present experimental evidence that they can be solid under ambient conditions. We investigated biogenic SOA particles formed from oxidation products of VOCs in plant chamber experiments and in boreal forests within a few hours after atmospheric nucleation events. On the basis of observed particle bouncing in an aerosol impactor and of electron microscopy we conclude that biogenic SOA particles can adopt an amorphous solid-most probably glassy-state. This amorphous solid state should provoke a rethinking of SOA processes because it may influence the partitioning of semi-volatile compounds, reduce the rate of heterogeneous chemical reactions, affect the particles' ability to accommodate water and act as cloud condensation or ice nuclei, and change the atmospheric lifetime of the particles. Thus, the results of this study challenge traditional views of the kinetics and thermodynamics of SOA formation and transformation in the atmosphere and their implications for air quality and climate.

  11. Aerosol influence on energy balance of the middle atmosphere of Jupiter

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xi; West, Robert A.; Irwin, Patrick G. J.; Nixon, Conor A.; Yung, Yuk L.

    2015-01-01

    Aerosols are ubiquitous in planetary atmospheres in the Solar System. However, radiative forcing on Jupiter has traditionally been attributed to solar heating and infrared cooling of gaseous constituents only, while the significance of aerosol radiative effects has been a long-standing controversy. Here we show, based on observations from the NASA spacecraft Voyager and Cassini, that gases alone cannot maintain the global energy balance in the middle atmosphere of Jupiter. Instead, a thick aerosol layer consisting of fluffy, fractal aggregate particles produced by photochemistry and auroral chemistry dominates the stratospheric radiative heating at middle and high latitudes, exceeding the local gas heating rate by a factor of 5–10. On a global average, aerosol heating is comparable to the gas contribution and aerosol cooling is more important than previously thought. We argue that fractal aggregate particles may also have a significant role in controlling the atmospheric radiative energy balance on other planets, as on Jupiter. PMID:26694318

  12. Aerosol influence on energy balance of the middle atmosphere of Jupiter.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xi; West, Robert A; Irwin, Patrick G J; Nixon, Conor A; Yung, Yuk L

    2015-12-22

    Aerosols are ubiquitous in planetary atmospheres in the Solar System. However, radiative forcing on Jupiter has traditionally been attributed to solar heating and infrared cooling of gaseous constituents only, while the significance of aerosol radiative effects has been a long-standing controversy. Here we show, based on observations from the NASA spacecraft Voyager and Cassini, that gases alone cannot maintain the global energy balance in the middle atmosphere of Jupiter. Instead, a thick aerosol layer consisting of fluffy, fractal aggregate particles produced by photochemistry and auroral chemistry dominates the stratospheric radiative heating at middle and high latitudes, exceeding the local gas heating rate by a factor of 5-10. On a global average, aerosol heating is comparable to the gas contribution and aerosol cooling is more important than previously thought. We argue that fractal aggregate particles may also have a significant role in controlling the atmospheric radiative energy balance on other planets, as on Jupiter.

  13. THEMIS Observations of Atmospheric Aerosol Optical Depth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Michael D.; Bandfield, Joshua L.; Christensen, Philip R.; Richardson, Mark I.

    2003-01-01

    The Mars Odyssey spacecraft entered into Martian orbit in October 2001 and after successful aerobraking began mapping in February 2002 (approximately Ls=330 deg.). Images taken by the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) on-board the Odyssey spacecraft allow the quantitative retrieval of atmospheric dust and water-ice aerosol optical depth. Atmospheric quantities retrieved from THEMIS build upon existing datasets returned by Mariner 9, Viking, and Mars Global Surveyor (MGS). Data from THEMIS complements the concurrent MGS Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) data by offering a later local time (approx. 2:00 for TES vs. approx. 4:00 - 5:30 for THEMIS) and much higher spatial resolution.

  14. THEMIS Observations of Atmospheric Aerosol Optical Depth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Michael D.; Bandfield, Joshua L.; Christensen, Philip R.; Richardson, Mark I.

    2003-01-01

    The Mars Odyssey spacecraft entered into Martian orbit in October 2001 and after successful aerobraking began mapping in February 2002 (approximately Ls=330 deg.). Images taken by the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) on-board the Odyssey spacecraft allow the quantitative retrieval of atmospheric dust and water-ice aerosol optical depth. Atmospheric quantities retrieved from THEMIS build upon existing datasets returned by Mariner 9, Viking, and Mars Global Surveyor (MGS). Data from THEMIS complements the concurrent MGS Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) data by offering a later local time (approx. 2:00 for TES vs. approx. 4:00 - 5:30 for THEMIS) and much higher spatial resolution.

  15. Diesel Aerosol Sampling in the Atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    David Kittelson; Jason Johnson; Winthrop Watts; Qiang Wei; Marcus Drayton; Dwane Paulsen; Nicolas Bukowiecki

    2000-06-19

    The University of Minnesota Center for Diesel Research along with a research team including Caterpillar, Cummins, Carnegie Mellon University, West Virginia University (WVU), Paul Scherrer Institute in Switzerland, and Tampere University in Finland have performed measurements of Diesel exhaust particle size distributions under real-world dilution conditions. A mobile aerosol emission laboratory (MEL) equipped to measure particle size distributions, number concentrations, surface area concentrations, particle bound PAHs, as well as CO 2 and NO x concentrations in real time was built and will be described. The MEL was used to follow two different Cummins powered tractors, one with an older engine (L10) and one with a state-of-the-art engine (ISM), on rural highways and measure particles in their exhaust plumes. This paper will describe the goals and objectives of the study and will describe representative particle size distributions observed in roadway experiments with the truck powered by the ISM engine.

  16. Ice Nucleation Activity of Various Agricultural Soil Dust Aerosol Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiebel, Thea; Höhler, Kristina; Funk, Roger; Hill, Thomas C. J.; Levin, Ezra J. T.; Nadolny, Jens; Steinke, Isabelle; Suski, Kaitlyn J.; Ullrich, Romy; Wagner, Robert; Weber, Ines; DeMott, Paul J.; Möhler, Ottmar

    2016-04-01

    Recent investigations at the cloud simulation chamber AIDA (Aerosol Interactions and Dynamics in the Atmosphere) suggest that agricultural soil dust has an ice nucleation ability that is enhanced up to a factor of 10 compared to desert dust, especially at temperatures above -26 °C (Steinke et al., in preparation for submission). This enhancement might be caused by the contribution of very ice-active biological particles. In addition, soil dust aerosol particles often contain a considerably higher amount of organic matter compared to desert dust particles. To test agricultural soil dust as a source of ice nucleating particles, especially for ice formation in warm clouds, we conducted a series of laboratory measurements with different soil dust samples to extend the existing AIDA dataset. The AIDA has a volume of 84 m3 and operates under atmospherically relevant conditions over wide ranges of temperature, pressure and humidity. By controlled adiabatic expansions, the ascent of an air parcel in the troposphere can be simulated. As a supplement to the AIDA facility, we use the INKA (Ice Nucleation Instrument of the KArlsruhe Institute of Technology) continuous flow diffusion chamber based on the design by Rogers (1988) to expose the sampled aerosol particles to a continuously increasing saturation ratio by keeping the aerosol temperature constant. For our experiments, soil dust was dry dispersed into the AIDA vessel. First, fast saturation ratio scans at different temperatures were performed with INKA, sampling soil dust aerosol particles directly from the AIDA vessel. Then, we conducted the AIDA expansion experiment starting at a preset temperature. The combination of these two different methods provides a robust data set on the temperature-dependent ice activity of various agriculture soil dust aerosol particles with a special focus on relatively high temperatures. In addition, to extend the data set, we investigated the role of biological and organic matter in more

  17. Sources and atmospheric transformations of semivolatile organic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grieshop, Andrew P.

    Fine atmospheric particulate matter (PM2.5) is associated with increased mortality, a fact which led the EPA to promulgate a National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) for PM2.5 in 1997. Organic material contributes a substantial portion of the PM2.5 mass; organic aerosols (OA) are either directly emitted (primary OA or POA) or formed via the atmospheric oxidation of volatile precursor compounds as secondary OA (SOA). The relative contributions of POA and SOA to atmospheric OA are uncertain, as are the contributions from various source classes (e.g. motor vehicles, biomass burning). This dissertation first assesses the importance of organic PM within the context of current US air pollution regulations. Most control efforts to date have focused on the inorganic component of PM. Although growing evidence strongly implicates OA, especially which from motor vehicles, in the health effects of PM, uncertain and complex source-receptor relationships for OA discourage its direct control for NAAQS compliance. Analysis of both ambient data and chemical transport modeling results indicate that OA does not play a dominant role in NAAQS violations in most areas of the country under current and likely future regulations. Therefore, new regulatory approaches will likely be required to directly address potential health impacts associated with OA. To help develop the scientific understanding needed to better regulate OA, this dissertation examined the evolution of organic aerosol emitted by combustion systems. The current conceptual model of POA is that it is non-volatile and non-reactive. Both of these assumptions were experimental investigated in this dissertation. Novel dilution measurements were carried out to investigate the gas-particle partitioning of OA at atmospherically-relevant conditions. The results demonstrate that POA from combustion sources is semivolatile. Therefore its gas-particle partitioning depends on temperature and atmospheric concentrations; heating and

  18. Aerosol detection methods in lidar-based atmospheric profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elbakary, Mohamed I.; Iftekharuddin, Khan M.; De Young, Russell; Afrifa, Kwasi

    2016-09-01

    A compact light detection and ranging (LiDAR) system provides aerosols profile measurements by identifying the aerosol scattering ratio as function of the altitude. The aerosol scattering ratios are used to obtain multiple aerosol intensive ratio parameters known as backscatter color ratio, depolarization ratio and lidar ratio. The aerosol ratio parameters are known to vary with aerosol type, size, and shape. Different methods in the literature are employed for detection and classification of aerosol from the measurements. In this paper, a comprehensive review for aerosol detection methods is presented. In addition, results of implemented methods of quantifying aerosols in the atmosphere on real data are compared and presented showing how the backscatter color, depolarization and lidar ratios vary with presence of aerosols in the atmosphere.

  19. Electronic cigarette aerosol particle size distribution measurements.

    PubMed

    Ingebrethsen, Bradley J; Cole, Stephen K; Alderman, Steven L

    2012-12-01

    The particle size distribution of aerosols produced by electronic cigarettes was measured in an undiluted state by a spectral transmission procedure and after high dilution with an electrical mobility analyzer. The undiluted e-cigarette aerosols were found to have particle diameters of average mass in the 250-450 nm range and particle number concentrations in the 10(9) particles/cm(3) range. These measurements are comparable to those observed for tobacco burning cigarette smoke in prior studies and also measured in the current study with the spectral transmission method and with the electrical mobility procedure. Total particulate mass for the e-cigarettes calculated from the size distribution parameters measured by spectral transmission were in good agreement with replicate determinations of total particulate mass by gravimetric filter collection. In contrast, average particle diameters determined for e-cigarettes by the electrical mobility method are in the 50 nm range and total particulate masses calculated based on the suggested diameters are orders of magnitude smaller than those determined gravimetrically. This latter discrepancy, and the very small particle diameters observed, are believed to result from almost complete e-cigarette aerosol particle evaporation at the dilution levels and conditions of the electrical mobility analysis. A much smaller degree, ~20% by mass, of apparent particle evaporation was observed for tobacco burning cigarette smoke. The spectral transmission method is validated in the current study against measurements on tobacco burning cigarette smoke, which has been well characterized in prior studies, and is supported as yielding an accurate characterization of the e-cigarette aerosol particle size distribution.

  20. Atmospheric aerosols from Mauna Loa Observatory, Hawaii

    SciTech Connect

    Zoller, W.H.; Holmes, J.L. )

    1993-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosols have been collected for chemical analysis at the Mauna Loa Observatory in Hawaii since 1979. The samples were collected in two wind quadrants, a clean [open quotes]down-slope[close quotes] quadrant and a more contaminated [open quotes]up-slope[close quotes] quadrant. Some of the findings of this work have been the identification of Asian dust traveling to the Hawaiian Islands every spring of the year, and this dust dominates the yearly record because it is very intense and contains predominantly crustal dust along with pollutants from the Asian mainland, such as coal combustion in China. Additional interpretation of the data set of weekly samples has shown the presence of pollutants from both North and South America as well as different areas of Asia that are transported by wind systems to the central Pacific Ocean. By subtracting these episodic transport events, one can look at the oceanic background aerosols that are originating from the ocean and look at the occurrence of the natural aerosol generating systems in the oceanic region that are related to climatic change. One of the important groups of elements are the sulfur and halogen families and the naturally occurring volatile elements (selenium, arsenic, antimony, etc.) that are produced by biogenic activity in the world's oceans and affect the chemistry of the atmosphere, particularly clouds in remote marine areas. Investigations such as this work allow one to evaluate the importance of natural versus anthropogenic sources of the volatile elements to the atmosphere, allowing us to have a much better understanding of man's impact on climate. The nuclear analytical techniques are particularly well suited to this type of sample because it consists of aerosols deposited on a clean Teflon or cellulose substrate, which normally offers very little interference with the analysis.

  1. Aerosols and chemistry in the planetary atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xi

    This dissertation is devoted to studying aerosols and their roles in regulating chemistry, radiation, and dynamics of planetary atmospheres. In chapter I, we provided a fundamental mathematical basis for the quasi-equilibrium growth assumption, a well-accepted approach to representing formation of secondary organic aerosols (SOAs) in microphysical simulations in the Earth's atmosphere. Our analytical work not only explains the quasi-equilibrium growth, which emerges as a limiting case in our theory, but also predicts the other types of condensational growth, confirmed by the recent laboratory and field experiments. In chapter II, we presented a new photochemical mechanism in which the evaporation of the aerosols composed of sulfuric acid or polysulfur on the nightside of Venus could provide a sulfur source above 90 km. Our model results imply the enhancements of sulfur oxides such as SO, SO2, and SO3. This is inconsistent with the previous model results but in agreement with the recent ground-based and spacecraft observations. In chapters III and IV, we developed a nonlinear optimization approach to retrieve the aerosol and cloud structure on Jupiter from the visible and ultraviolet images acquired by the Cassini spacecraft, combined with the ground-based near-infrared observations. We produced the first realistic spatial distribution of Jovian stratospheric aerosols in latitudes and altitudes. We also retrieved the stratospheric temperature and hydrocarbon species based on the mid-infrared spectra from the Cassini and Voyager spacecrafts. Based on the above information, the accurate and detailed maps of the instantaneous radiative forcing in Jovian stratosphere are obtained, revealing a significant heating effect from the polar dark aerosols in the high latitude region and therefore a strong modulation on the global meridional circulation in the stratosphere of Jupiter. In chapter V, we study the transport of passive tracers, such as aerosols, acetylene (C2H 2

  2. Field and Laboratory Studies of Atmospheric Organic Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coggon, Matthew Mitchell

    This thesis is the culmination of field and laboratory studies aimed at assessing processes that affect the composition and distribution of atmospheric organic aerosol. An emphasis is placed on measurements conducted using compact and high-resolution Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometers (AMS). The first three chapters summarize results from aircraft campaigns designed to evaluate anthropogenic and biogenic impacts on marine aerosol and clouds off the coast of California. Subsequent chapters describe laboratory studies intended to evaluate gas and particle-phase mechanisms of organic aerosol oxidation. The 2013 Nucleation in California Experiment (NiCE) was a campaign designed to study environments impacted by nucleated and/or freshly formed aerosol particles. Terrestrial biogenic aerosol with > 85% organic mass was observed to reside in the free troposphere above marine stratocumulus. This biogenic organic aerosol (BOA) originated from the Northwestern United States and was transported to the marine atmosphere during periodic cloud-clearing events. Spectra recorded by a cloud condensation nuclei counter demonstrated that BOA is CCN active. BOA enhancements at latitudes north of San Francisco, CA coincided with enhanced cloud water concentrations of organic species such as acetate and formate. Airborne measurements conducted during the 2011 Eastern Pacific Emitted Aerosol Cloud Experiment (E-PEACE) were aimed at evaluating the contribution of ship emissions to the properties of marine aerosol and clouds off the coast of central California. In one study, analysis of organic aerosol mass spectra during periods of enhanced shipping activity yielded unique tracers indicative of cloud-processed ship emissions (m/z 42 and 99). The variation of their organic fraction (f42 and f 99) was found to coincide with periods of heavy (f 42 > 0.15; f99 > 0.04), moderate (0.05 < f42 < 0.15; 0.01 < f99 < 0.04), and negligible (f42 < 0.05; f99 < 0.01) ship influence. Application of

  3. Aerosol particle analysis by Raman scattering technique

    SciTech Connect

    Fung, K.H.; Tang, I.N.

    1992-10-01

    Laser Raman spectroscopy is a very versatile tool for chemical characterization of micron-sized particles. Such particles are abundant in nature, and in numerous energy-related processes. In order to elucidate the formation mechanisms and understand the subsequent chemical transformation under a variety of reaction conditions, it is imperative to develop analytical measurement techniques for in situ monitoring of these suspended particles. In this report, we outline our recent work on spontaneous Raman, resonance Raman and non-linear Raman scattering as a novel technique for chemical analysis of aerosol particles as well as supersaturated solution droplets.

  4. Atmospheric Optical Properties and Spectral Analysis of Desert Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yvgeni, D.; Karnieli, A.; Kaufman, Y. J.; Andreae, M. O.; Holben, B. N.; Maenhaut, W.

    2002-05-01

    Scientific background Aerosols can interact directly with solar and terrestrial radiation by scattering as well as absorption. In addition, they can indirectly alter the planetary albedo by modifying the properties of clouds. Objectives Investigations have been devoted to two main areas: (1) Aerosol climatology situation in the Negev desert, investigations of physical and chemical characteristics of aerosols, and study of the local and long-range transport trajectory of polluted air masses over the Negev desert; and (2) An estimation of the optical properties throughout the atmospheric column by surface measurements via performance of spectral and statistical analysis of the data received from two measurement systems. Results and conclusions Analyzed data from the Sede Boker site, in the Negev Desert of Israel, shows an increase in aerosol optical depth during the summer seasons and a decrease during winter. One of the possible reasons for this characteristic is an increase of the precipitable water (reaches 3.0-3.5 cm) due to a constant wind stream from the Mediterranean Sea in same time. The highest probability distribution of the aerosol optical depth is in the range of 0.15-0.20; and of the Angstrom parameter is in range of 0.83 - 1.07. During dust storm events, the scattering coefficient range at 670 nm and 440 nm wavelengths were inverted. It was discovered that the dust particles in this case had non-spherical character. Comparison between optical depth, measured through all atmospheric column, and scattering coefficient from surface measurements provides correlation coefficient (r) equal to 0.64. The Angstrom parameter, calculated via optical depth and via scattering coefficient, provides a correlation coefficient of 0.66. Thus we can obtain an estimate of the influence of the surface aerosol situation on column optical properties. The combined analysis of dust cloud altitude and optical depth as a function of the time indicates long-term transport and

  5. Transition from Gaseous Compounds to Aerosols in Titan's Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lebonnois, Sebastien; Bakes, E. L. O.; McKay, Christopher P.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We investigate the chemical transition of simple molecules like C2H2 and HCN into aerosol particles in the context of Titan's atmosphere. Experiments that synthesize analogs (tholins) for these aerosols can help understand and constrain these polymerization mechanisms. Using information available from these experiments, we suggest chemical pathways that can link simple molecules to macromolecules, that will be the precursors to aerosol particles: polymers of acetylene and cyanoacetylene, polycyclic aromatics (PAHs), polymers of HCN and other nitriles, and polynes. Although our goal here is not to build a detailed kinetic model for this transition, we propose parameterizations to estimate the production rates of these macromolecules, their C/N and C/H ratios, and the loss of parent molecules (C2H2, HCN, HC3N and other nitriles, C6H6) from the gas phase to the haze. We use a 1-dimensional photochemical model of Titan's atmosphere to estimate the formation rate of precursors macromolecules. We find a production zone slightly lower than 200 km altitude with a total production rate of 4 x 10(exp -14) g/ sq cm s and a C/N approx. = 4. These results are compared with experimental data, and to microphysical models requirements. The Cassini/Huygens mission will bring a detailed picture of the haze distribution and properties, that will be a great challenge for our understanding of those chemical processes.

  6. Visible and infrared extinction of atmospheric aerosol in the marine and coastal environment.

    PubMed

    Kaloshin, Gennady A

    2011-05-10

    The microphysical model Marine Aerosol Extinction Profiles (MaexPro) for surface layer marine and coastal atmospheric aerosols, which is based on long-term observations of size distributions for 0.01-100 μm particles, is presented. The fundamental feature of the model is a parameterization of amplitudes and widths for aerosol modes of the aerosol size distribution function (ASDF) as functions of fetch and wind speed. The shape of the ASDF and its dependence on meteorological parameters, altitudes above the sea level (H), fetch (X), wind speed (U), and relative humidity is investigated. The model is primarily to characterize aerosols for the near-surface layer (within 25 m). The model is also applicable to higher altitudes within the atmospheric boundary layer, where the change in the vertical profile of aerosol is not very large. In this case, it is only valid for "clean" marine environments, in the absence of air pollution or any other major sources of continental aerosols, such desert dust or smoke from biomass burning. The spectral profiles of the aerosol extinction coefficients calculated by MaexPro are in good agreement with observational data and the numerical results obtained by the well-known Navy Aerosol Model and Advanced Navy Aerosol Model codes. Moreover, MaexPro was found to be an accurate and reliable instrument for investigation of the optical properties of atmospheric aerosols.

  7. Selection of quasi-monodisperse super-micron aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rösch, Michael; Pfeifer, Sascha; Wiedensohler, Alfred; Stratmann, Frank

    2014-05-01

    : Knutson, E. O. and Whitby, K. T.: Aerosol classification by electric mobility: apparatus, theory, and applications. Aerosol Science, 6:443--451, 1975 Raddatz, M., Wiedensohler, A., Wex, H., and Stratmann, F.: Size selection of sub- and super-micron clay mineral kaolinite particles using a custom-built Maxi-DMA. Nucleation and Atmospheric Aerosols, Vol. 1527, AIP Conference Proceedings, pages 457-460. AMER INST PHYSICS, 2013 Boulter, J. E., Cziczo, D. J., Middlebrook, A. M., Thomson, D. S., and Murphy, D. M.: Design and performance of a Pumped Counterflow Virtual Impactor. Aerosol Science and Technology, 40(11): 969-976, 2006 Kulkarni, G., Pekour, M., Afchine, A., Murphy, D. M., and Cziczo, D. J.: Comparison of experimental and numerical studies of the performance characteristics of a pumped counterflow virtual impactor. Aerosol Science and Technology, 45:382-392, 2011

  8. Impact of clouds and precipitation on atmospheric aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andronache, Constantin

    2015-04-01

    Aerosols have a significant impact on the dynamics and microphysics of continental mixed-phase convective clouds. High aerosol concentrations provide enhanced cloud condensation nuclei that can lead to the invigoration of convection and increase of surface rainfall. Such effects are dependent on environmental conditions and aerosol properties. Clouds are not only affected by aerosol, they also alter aerosol properties by various processes. Cloud processing of aerosol includes: convective redistribution, modification in the number and size of aerosol particles, chemical processing, new particle formation around clouds, and aerosol removal by rainfall to the surface. Among these processes, the wet removal during intense rain events, in polluted continental regions, can lead to spikes in acidic deposition into environment. In this study, we address the effects of clouds and precipitation on the aerosol distribution in cases of convective precipitation events in eastern US. We examine the effects of clouds and precipitation on various aerosol species, as well as their temporal and spatial variability.

  9. Influence of the external mixing state of atmospheric aerosol on derived CCN number concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wex, H.; McFiggans, G.; Henning, S.; Stratmann, F.

    2010-05-01

    We derived the range of particle hygroscopicities ($\\kappa$) that occurs in the atmosphere, based on literature data of measured hygroscopic growth or based on chemical composition. The derived $\\kappa$-values show that the atmospheric aerosol often is an external mixture with respect to hygroscopicity. Mean $\\kappa$ were derived for urban, rural, and marine aerosols for the different hygroscopic modes. Using these $\\kappa$ and exemplary particle number size distributions for the different aerosols, the number concentration of cloud condensation nuclei (NCCN) was derived for two cases, (1) accounting for the less hygroscopic fraction of particles and (2) assuming all particles to have $\\kappa$ of the more hygroscopic mode. NCCN derived from measured particle hygroscopicity is overestimated for case (2). Overestimation of NCCN is largest for fresh continental aerosol and less pronounced for marine aerosol. With $\\kappa$ derived from bulk aerosol composition data, only the hygroscopicity of more soluble aerosol particles is captured. Bulk or even size-resolved composition data will be insufficient to predict NCCN under many conditions unless independent information about particle mixing state is available.

  10. The hygroscopicity of indoor aerosol particles

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, L.

    1993-07-01

    A system to study the hygroscopic growth of particle was developed by combining a Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (TDMA) with a wetted wall reactor. This system is capable of mimicking the conditions in human respiratory tract, and measuring the particle size change due to the hygroscopic growth. The performance of the system was tested with three kinds of particles of known composition, NaCl, (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4}, and (NH{sub 4})HS0{sub 4} particles. The hygroscopicity of a variety of common indoor aerosol particles was studied including combustion aerosols (cigarette smoking, cooking, incenses and candles) and consumer spray products such as glass cleaner, general purpose cleaner, hair spray, furniture polish spray, disinfectant, and insect killer. Experiments indicate that most of the indoor aerosols show some hygroscopic growth and only a few materials do not. The magnitude of hygroscopic growth ranges from 20% to 300% depending on the particle size and fraction of water soluble components.

  11. Unintended consequences of atmospheric injection of sulphate aerosols.

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, Patrick Vane; Kobos, Peter Holmes; Goldstein, Barry

    2010-10-01

    Most climate scientists believe that climate geoengineering is best considered as a potential complement to the mitigation of CO{sub 2} emissions, rather than as an alternative to it. Strong mitigation could achieve the equivalent of up to -4Wm{sup -2} radiative forcing on the century timescale, relative to a worst case scenario for rising CO{sub 2}. However, to tackle the remaining 3Wm{sup -2}, which are likely even in a best case scenario of strongly mitigated CO{sub 2} releases, a number of geoengineering options show promise. Injecting stratospheric aerosols is one of the least expensive and, potentially, most effective approaches and for that reason an examination of the possible unintended consequences of the implementation of atmospheric injections of sulphate aerosols was made. Chief among these are: reductions in rainfall, slowing of atmospheric ozone rebound, and differential changes in weather patterns. At the same time, there will be an increase in plant productivity. Lastly, because atmospheric sulphate injection would not mitigate ocean acidification, another side effect of fossil fuel burning, it would provide only a partial solution. Future research should aim at ameliorating the possible negative unintended consequences of atmospheric injections of sulphate injection. This might include modeling the optimum rate and particle type and size of aerosol injection, as well as the latitudinal, longitudinal and altitude of injection sites, to balance radiative forcing to decrease negative regional impacts. Similarly, future research might include modeling the optimum rate of decrease and location of injection sites to be closed to reduce or slow rapid warming upon aerosol injection cessation. A fruitful area for future research might be system modeling to enhance the possible positive increases in agricultural productivity. All such modeling must be supported by data collection and laboratory and field testing to enable iterative modeling to increase the

  12. Glyoxal and Methylglyoxal in Atlantic Seawater and marine Aerosol Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Pinxteren, Manuela; Herrmann, Hartmut

    2014-05-01

    The two α-dicarbonyls glyoxal (CHOCHO; GLY) and methylglyoxal (CH3COCHO; MGLY) have attracted increasing attention over the past years because of their potential role in secondary organic aerosol formation. Recently Sinreich et al. (2010) suggested the open ocean as an important (so far unknown) source for GLY in the atmosphere. To date, there are few available field data of these compounds in the marine area. In this study we present measurements of GLY and MGLY in seawater and marine aerosol particles sampled during a transatlantic Polarstern cruise in spring 2011. In seawater we especially investigated the sea surface microlayer (sampled with the glass plate technique) as it is the direct interface between ocean and atmosphere. Analytical measurements were based on derivatisation with o-(2,3,4,5,6-Pentafluorobenzyl)-hydroxylamine reagent, solvent extraction and GC-MS (SIM) analysis. The results show that GLY and MGLY are present in the sea surface microlayer of the ocean and corresponding bulkwater with average concentrations of 228 ng L-1 (GLY) and 196 ng L-1 (MGLY). Significant enrichment (factor of 4) of GLY and MGLY in the sea surface microlayer was found implying photochemical production of the two carbonyls though a clear connection to global radiation was not observed. On aerosol particles, both carbonyls were detected (average concentration 0.2 ng m-3) and are strongly connected to each other, suggesting similar formation mechanisms. Both carbonyls show a very good correlation with particulate oxalate, supporting the idea of a secondary formation of oxalic acid via GLY and MGLY. A slight correlation of the two carbonyls in the sea surface microlayer and in the aerosol particles was found at co-located sampling areas. In summary, the results of GLY and MGLY in marine aerosol particles and in the oceanic water give first insights towards interaction processes of these alpha dicarbonyls between ocean and atmosphere (van Pinxteren and Herrmann (2013

  13. Modeling the aerosols in the atmosphere of Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas-Osip, Joanna Elizabeth

    2001-09-01

    A combination of laboratory experiments, theoretical modeling, and spacecraft in situ observations is employed to characterize the aerosols in the atmosphere of Titan. The scattering properties of model aerosols were measured using the Microwave Analog Light Scattering Facility at the University of Florida and complemented with theoretical modeling of single scattering characteristics and radiative transfer in Titan's atmosphere. This study compares these modeling results with photopolarimetric observations made over a range of phase angles by the Pioneer 11 and Voyagers 1 and 2 spacecraft approximately 20 years ago. Important results of this work include a survey of the scattering properties of different particle shapes necessary to accurately interpret these observations without introducing non-physical assumptions about the particles or requiring additional free parameters to the radiative transfer models. Previous studies use calculation methods which, due to computing memory and processing time requirements, a priori exclude much of the phase space that the microwave analog laboratory is ideal for exploring. The goal of the present work, to directly constrain aerosol physical characteristics, is addressed by studying in a consistent manner how a variety of particle morphologies affect polarization and intensity measurements of Titan's atmosphere. Single liquid drops are modeled using spheres for which scattering patterns can be easily calculated with Mie theory. Cubes are used as a representation of solids with sharp edges due to fragmentation. More complex particle morphologies are modeled as aggregates that are likely formed by collisions between semi-liquid spheres that stick together instead of merging. Radiative transfer calculations for model atmospheres containing these particles are constrained by direct comparison to in situ spacecraft observations. Based on these comparisons, many model morphologies are excluded from further consideration and the

  14. Measurements of Primary Biogenic Aerosol Particles with an Ultraviolet Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (UVAPS) During AMAZE-08

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wollny, A. G.; Garland, R.; Pöschl, U.

    2008-12-01

    Biogenic aerosols are ubiquitous in the Earth's atmosphere and they influence atmospheric chemistry and physics, the biosphere, climate, and public health. They play an important role in the spread of biological organisms and reproductive materials, and they can cause or enhance human, animal, and plant diseases. Moreover, they influence the Earth's energy budget by scattering and absorbing radiation, and they can initiate the formation of clouds and precipitation as cloud condensation and ice nuclei. The composition, abundance, and origin of biogenic aerosol particles and components are, however, still not well understood and poorly quantified. Prominent examples of primary biogenic aerosol particles, which are directly emitted from the biosphere to the atmosphere, are pollen, bacteria, fungal spores, viruses, and fragments of animals and plants. During the AMazonian Aerosol CharacteriZation Experiment (AMAZE-08) a large number of aerosol and gas-phase measurements were taken on a remote site close to Manaus, Brazil, during a period of five weeks in February and March 2008. The presented study is focused on data from an ultraviolet aerodynamic particle sizer (UVAPS, TSI inc.) that has been deployed for the first time in Amazonia. In this instrument, particle counting and aerodynamic sizing over the range of 0.5-20 μm are complemented by the measurement of UV fluorescence at 355 nm (excitation) and 420-575 nm (emission), respectively. Fluorescence at these wavelengths is characteristic for reduced pyridine nucleotides (e.g., NAD(P)H) and for riboflavin, which are specific for living cells. Thus particles exhibiting fluorescence signals can be regarded as 'viable aerosols' or 'fluorescent bioparticles' (FBAP), and their concentration can be considered as lower limit for the actual abundance of primary biogenic aerosol particles. First data analyses show a pronounced peak of FBAP at diameters around 2-3 μm. In this size range the biogenic particle fraction was

  15. Hydrolysis of organonitrate functional groups in aerosol particles

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Shang; Shilling, John E.; Song, Chen; Hiranuma, Naruki; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Russell, Lynn M.

    2012-10-19

    Organonitrate (ON) groups are important substituents in secondary organic aerosols. Model simulations and laboratory studies indicate a large fraction of ON groups in aerosol particles, but much lower quantities are observed in the atmosphere. Hydrolysis of ON groups in aerosol particles has been proposed recently. To test this hypothesis, we simulated formation of ON molecules in a reaction chamber under a wide range of relative humidity (0% to 90%). The mass fraction of ON groups (5% to 20% for high-NOx experiments) consistently decreased with increasing relative humidity, which was best explained by hydrolysis of ON groups at a rate of 4 day-1 (lifetime of 6 hours) for reactions under relative humidity greater than 20%. In addition, we found that secondary nitrogen-containing molecules absorb light, with greater absorption under dry and high-NOx conditions. This work provides the first evidence for particle-phase hydrolysis of ON groups, a process that could substantially reduce ON group concentration in the atmosphere.

  16. Continuous measurements of aerosol particles in Arctic Russia and Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asmi, Eija; Kondratyev, Vladimir; Brus, David; Lihavainen, Heikki; Laurila, Tuomas; Aurela, Mika; Hatakka, Juha; Viisanen, Yrjö; Reshetnikov, Alexander; Ivakhov, Victor; Uttal, Taneil; Makshtas, Alexander

    2013-04-01

    The Arctic and northern boreal regions of Eurasia are experiencing rapid environmental changes due to pressures by human activities. The largest anthropogenic climate forcings are due to aerosol particles and greenhouse gases (GHGs). The Arctic environment is highly sensitive to changes in aerosol concentrations or composition, largely due to the high surface reflectance for the most part of the year. Concentrations of aerosols in winter and spring Arctic are affected by 'Arctic Haze', a phenomenon suggested to arise from the transport of pollutants from lower latitudes and further strengthened by the strong stratification of the Arctic wintertime atmosphere. Sources and transport patterns of aerosols into the Arctic are, however, not fully understood. In order to monitor the changes within the Arctic region, as well as to understand the sources and feedback mechanisms, direct measurements of aerosols within the Arctic are needed. So far, direct year-round observations have been inadequate especially within the Russian side of the Arctic. This is the reason why a new climate observatory was founded in Tiksi, Russia. Tiksi meteorological observatory in northern Siberia (71o 36' N; 128o 53' E) on the shore of the Laptev Sea has been operating since 1930s. Recently, it was upgraded and joint in the network of the IASOA, in the framework of the International Polar Year Activity project. The project is run in collaboration between National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) with the support of the National Science Foundation (NSF), Roshydromet (AARI and MGO units), government of the Republic of Sakha (Yakutia) and the Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI). The research activities of FMI in Tiksi include e.g. continuous long-term measurements of aerosol physical properties, which have been successfully continued since summer 2010. These, together with the FMI measurements in Pallas station in northern Finland since 1999, provide important information on the

  17. Dominant Aerosol Particle Type/Mixture Identification at Worldwide Locations Using the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giles, D. M.; Holben, B.; Eck, T. F.; Sinyuk, A.; Smirnov, A.; Slutsker, I.; Dickerson, R. R.; Thompson, A. M.; Schafer, J. S.

    2011-12-01

    Aerosol absorption results in atmospheric heating for various forms of particulate matter - we address means of partitioning mineral dust, pollution (e.g., black and brown carbon), and mixtures of the two using remote sensing techniques. Remotely sensed spectral aerosol optical depth (AOD) and single scattering albedo (SSA) derived from Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sun photometer measurements can be used to calculate the absorption aerosol optical depth (AAOD) at 440, 675, and 870 nm. The spectral change in AAOD with wavelength on logarithmic scales provides the absorption Angstrom exponent (AAE). Recently, a few studies have shown that the relationship between aerosol absorption (i.e., AAE or SSA) and aerosol size [i.e., Angstrom exponent (AE) or fine mode fraction (FMF) of the AOD] can estimate the dominant aerosol particle types/mixtures (i.e., dust, pollution, and dust and pollution mixtures) [Bergstrom et al., 2007; Russell et al., 2010; Lee et al. 2010; Giles et al., 2011]. To evaluate these methods, approximately 20 AERONET sites were grouped into various aerosol categories (i.e., dust, mixed, urban/industrial, and biomass burning) based on aerosol types/mixtures identified in previous studies. For data collected between 1999 and 2010, the long-term data set was analyzed to determine the magnitude of spectral AAOD, perform a sensitivity study on AAE by varying the spectral AOD and SSA, and identify dominant aerosol particle types/mixtures. An assessment of the spectral AAOD showed, on average, that the mixed (dust and pollution) category had the highest absorption (AAE ~1.5) followed by biomass burning (AAE~1.3), dust (AAE~1.7), and urban/industrial (AAE~1.2) categories with AAOD (440 nm) varying between 0.03 and 0.09 among these categories. Perturbing input parameters based on the expected uncertainties for AOD (±0.01) and SSA [±0.03; for cases where AOD(440 nm)>0.4], the sensitivity study showed the perturbed AAE mean varied from the unperturbed

  18. Accommodation coefficient of HOBr on deliquescent sodium bromide aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wachsmuth, M.; Gäggeler, H. W.; von Glasow, R.; Ammann, M.

    2002-06-01

    Uptake of HOBr on sea salt aerosol, sea salt brine or ice is believed to be a key process providing a source of photolabile bromine (Br2) and sustaining ozone depletion cycles in the Arctic troposphere. In the present study, uptake of HOBr on sodium bromide (NaBr) aerosol particles was investigated at an extremely low HOBr concentration of 300 cm-3 using the short-lived radioactive isotopes 83-86Br. Under these conditions, at maximum one HOBr molecule was taken up per particle. The rate of uptake was clearly limited by the mass accommodation coefficient, which was calculated to be 0.6 ± 0.2. This value is a factor of 10 larger than estimates used in earlier models. The atmospheric implications are discussed using the box model "MOCCA'', showing that the increase of the accommodation coefficient of HOBr by a factor of 10 only slightly affects net ozone loss, but significantly increases chlorine release.

  19. Influence of Surface Seawater and Atmospheric Conditions on the Ccn Activity of Ocean-Derived Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, P.; Bates, T. S.; Russell, L. M.; Frossard, A. A.; Keene, W. C.; Kieber, D. J.; Hakala, J. P.

    2012-12-01

    Ocean-derived aerosols are produced from direct injection into the atmosphere (primary production) and gas-to-particle conversion in the atmosphere (secondary production). These different production mechanisms result in a broad range of particle sizes that has implications for the impact of ocean-derived aerosol on climate. The chemical composition of ocean-derived aerosols is a result of a complex mixture of inorganic sea salt and organic matter including polysaccharides, proteins, amino acids, microorganisms and their fragments, and secondary oxidation products. Both production mechanisms and biological processes in the surface ocean impact the ability of ocean-derived aerosol to act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). In addition, CCN activity can be impacted by atmospheric processing that modifies particle size and composition after the aerosol is emitted from the ocean. To understand relationships between production mechanism, surface ocean biology, and atmospheric processing, measurements were made of surface ocean chlorophyll and dissolved organic matter; nascent sea spray aerosol freshly emitted from the ocean surface; and ambient marine aerosol. These measurements were made along the coast of California and in the North Atlantic between the northeast US and Bermuda. These regions include both eutrophic and oligotraphic waters and, thus, provide for observations over a wide range of ocean conditions.

  20. Mass spectrometric approaches for chemical characterisation of atmospheric aerosols: critical review of the most recent advances

    SciTech Connect

    Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia; Nizkorodov, Sergey A.

    2012-06-29

    This manuscript presents an overview of the most recent instrument developments for the field and laboratory applications of mass spectrometry (MS) to investigate the chemistry and physics of atmospheric aerosols. A range of MS instruments, employing different sample introduction methods, ionisation and mass detection techniques are used both for ‘online’ and ‘offline’ characterisation of aerosols. Online MS techniques enable detection of individual particles with simultaneous measurement of particle size distributions and aerodynamic characteristics and are ideally suited for field studies that require high temporal resolution. Offline MS techniques provide a means for detailed molecular-level analysis of aerosol samples, which is essential to gain fundamental knowledge regarding aerosol chemistry, mechanisms of particle formation and atmospheric aging. Combined, complementary MS techniques provide comprehensive information on the chemical composition, size, morphology and phase of aerosols – data of key importance for evaluating hygroscopic and optical properties of particles, their health effects, understanding their origins and atmospheric evolution. Over the last few years, developments and applications of MS techniques in aerosol research have expanded remarkably as evident by skyrocketing publication statistics. Finally, the goal of this review is to present the most recent developments in the field of aerosol mass spectrometry for the time period of late 2010 to early 2012, which have not been conveyed in previous reviews.

  1. Upper-atmosphere Aerosols: Properties and Natural Cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turco, Richard P.

    1992-01-01

    The middle atmosphere is rich in its variety of particulate matter, which ranges from meteorite debris, to sulfate aerosols, to polar stratospheric ice clouds. Volcanic eruptions strongly perturb the stratospheric sulfate (Junge) layer. High-altitude 'noctilucent' ice clouds condense at the summer mesopause. The properties of these particles, including their composition, sizes, and geographical distribution, are discussed, and their global effects, including chemical, radiative, and climatic roles, are reviewed. Polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) are composed of water and nitric acid in the form of micron-sized ice crystals. These particles catalyze reactions of chlorine compounds that 'activate' otherwise inert chlorine reservoirs, leading to severe ozone depletions in the southern polar stratosphere during austral spring. PSCs also modify the composition of the polar stratosphere through complex physiocochemical processes, including dehydration and denitrification, and the conversion of reactive nitrogen oxides into nitric acid. If water vapor and nitric acid concentrations are enhanced by high-altitude aircraft activity, the frequency, geographical range, and duration of PSCs might increase accordingly, thus enhancing the destruction of the ozone layer (which would be naturally limited in geographical extent by the same factors that confine the ozone hole to high latitudes in winter). The stratospheric sulfate aerosol layer reflects solar radiation and increases the planetary albedo, thereby cooling the surface and possibly altering the climate. Major volcanic eruptions, which increase the sulfate aerosol burden by a factor of 100 or more, may cause significant global climate anomalies. Sulfate aerosols might also be capable of activating stratospheric chlorine reservoirs on a global scale (unlike PCSs, which represent a localized polar winter phenomenon), although existing evidence suggests relatively minor perturbations in chlorine chemistry. Nevertheless, if

  2. Fine-Mode Marine Aerosol Composition over the Southern Ocean Exampled by Individual Particle Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Y.; Anderson, J. R.

    2012-12-01

    During a cruise in the Southern Ocean in the austral summer of 2010-2011, the fine-mode aerosol particles (0.1 - 1.0 microns in diameter) were collected on a transect from 55S, 94E to 69S, 76E to characterize marine aerosols, as aerosol particles in that size fraction may effectively serve as cloud condensation nuclei and scatter solar radiation in the marine atmospheric boundary layer. Analyses of individual aerosol particles were performed by automated scanning electron microscopy. Preliminary results indicate that the main components of the aerosol particles examined so far include sodium chloride, calcium sulfate and aluminum oxide (alumina), and the great majority of the particles consist of these components or mixtures of these components. A small percentage of fine particles were detected to have minor Fe. The aerosol samples collected appeared to be impacted by air masses from the Antarctic Peninsula and Patagonia. The presence of fine Al-rich particles suggests transport from a source or sources in Patagonia, such as the complex at Puerto Madryn, Argentina. The presence of Al of industrial origin (and the lack of Al-rich silicates from soil dust) in these fine particles is of interest, since its presence in aerosols is sometimes used as a marker for dust. The possible impact of anthropogenic pollutant aerosols on this remote oceanic region is also striking.

  3. Research highlights: laboratory studies of the formation and transformation of atmospheric organic aerosols.

    PubMed

    Borduas, Nadine; Lin, Vivian S

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric particles are emitted from a variety of anthropogenic and natural precursors and have direct impacts on climate, by scattering solar irradiation and nucleating clouds, and on health, by causing oxidative stress in the lungs when inhaled. They may also form from gaseous precursors, creating complex mixtures of organic and inorganic material. The chemical composition and the physical properties of aerosols will evolve during their one-week lifetime which will consequently change their impact on climate and health. The heterogeneity of aerosols is difficult to model and thus atmospheric aerosol research strives to characterize the mechanisms involved in nucleating and transforming particles in the atmosphere. Recent advances in four laboratory studies of aerosol formation and aging are highlighted here.

  4. Natural sources of atmospheric aerosols influencing air quality across Europe.

    PubMed

    Viana, M; Pey, J; Querol, X; Alastuey, A; de Leeuw, F; Lükewille, Anke

    2014-02-15

    Atmospheric aerosols are emitted by natural and anthropogenic sources. Contributions from natural sources to ambient aerosols vary widely with time (inter-annual and seasonal variability) and as a function of the distance to source regions. This work aims to identify the main natural sources of atmospheric aerosols affecting air quality across Europe. The origin, frequency, magnitude, and spatial and temporal variability of natural events were assessed for the years 2008 and 2009. The main natural sources of atmospheric aerosols identified were African dust, sea spray and wildfires. Primary biological particles were not included in the present work. Volcanic eruptions did not affect air quality significantly in Europe during the study period. The impact of natural episodes on air quality was significant in Southern and Western Europe (Cyprus, Spain, France, UK, Greece, Malta, Italy and Portugal), where they contributed to surpass the PM10 daily and annual limit values. In Central and Northern Europe (Germany, Austria and Latvia) the impact of these events was lower, as it resulted in the exceedance of PM daily but not annual limit values. Contributions from natural sources to mean annual PM10 levels in 2008 and 2009 ranged between 1 and 2 μg/m(3) in Italy, France and Portugal, between 1 and 4 μg/m(3) in Spain (10 μg/m(3) when including the Canary Islands), 5 μg/m(3) in UK, between 3 and 8 μg/m(3) in Greece, and reached up to 13 μg/m(3) in Cyprus. The evaluation of the number of monitoring stations per country reporting natural exceedances of the daily limit value (DLV) is suggested as a potential tool for air quality monitoring networks to detect outliers in the assessment of natural contributions. It is strongly suggested that a reference methodology for the identification and quantification of African dust contributions should be adopted across Europe.

  5. Monitoring of atmospheric particles over an urban area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukai, S.; Sano, I.; Yasumoto, M.

    It is known that optical properties of atmospheric aerosols are important for the Earth s radiation budget and global climate It is also known that Asia is the most complicated region for aerosol study because the dust particles come from continental desert area carbonaceous aerosols are produced by large Siberian biomass-burning plumes and small anthropogenic particles are emitted from the increasing industrial activities Simultaneous measurements of atmospheric aerosols and suspended particulate matter SPM have been undertaken at Kinki University campus in Higashi-Osaka in order to monitor the urban environment during more than two years The sun sky photometry has been made as a NASA AERONET station since 2002 and the SPM-613D Ki-moto Electric has been taking measurements of the SPM concentrations such as TSP PM 10 PM 2 5 and OBC at the same site since March 15 2004 This long term simul-taneous monitoring of aerosols and SPM provides us with typical aerosol types over an industrial city of Higashi-Osaka and the relationship between aerosol properties obtained from radiometry with AERONET and the SPM measurements as 1 The air quality of the Higashi-Osaka site is poor due to not only anthropogenic particles by local emissions such as diesel vehicles and chemical industries but also due to dust particles and biomass-burning aerosols by large scale climatic conditions 2 Fine anthropogenic particles dominate at Higashi-Osaka even during dust events It is of interest to mention that dust events at Higashi-Osaka seem to be

  6. Nucleation and Growth of Atmospheric Particles

    SciTech Connect

    McMurry, P.; Kuang, C.; Barsanti, K.; Eisele, F.; Friedli, H.; Scheckman, J.; Titcombe, M.; Williams, B.; Zhao, J.; Smith, J.

    2010-03-15

    New particle formation (NPF) in the atmospheric is a two-step process: Nucleation leads to the birth of stable nuclei that subsequently grow to sizes that can be detected and affect the atmosphere’s radiative properties. Our group is studying both of these processes. Our nucleation research is largely supported by NSF and involves measurements of neutral molecular clusters formed by nucleation with a new custom-designed mass spectrometer (the Cluster-CIMS) and measurements of nanoparticle size distributions as small as 1 nm with a new aerosol spectrometer (the DEG SMPS). These measurements are providing new insights into aspects of cluster behavior that affect nucleation rates. The U.S. DOE supports our research on nanoparticle growth rates. This research couples physical and chemical measurements of aerosol properties and behavior. The TDCIMS, which enables real-time measurements of composition for freshly nucleated particles as small as 8 nm and was developed with support from DOE, is the most important tool in this work. Our most important discoveries about processes that affect growth rates are summarized in a recent PNAS article (doi:10.1073/pnas.0912127107). In short, this work has shown that alkylammonium-carboxylate salts, formed, for example, by reactions between amines and carboxylic acids, account for 20–50% of the mass of freshly nucleated particles in locations that include Atlanta, Mexico City, Boulder, and Hyytiälä, while sulfates account for only about 10%. These newly discovered compounds help to explain the high growth rates of freshly nucleated particles that have been observed around the globe and help to explain why nucleation is an important atmospheric process, not just a scientific curiosity. Our poster will provide an overview of this work.

  7. Morphology and Optical Properties of Mixed Aerosol Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fard, Mehrnoush M.; Krieger, Ulrich; Rudich, Yinon; Marcolli, Claudia; Peter, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Experiments and modeling studies have shown that deliquesced aerosols can be present not only as one-phase system containing organics, inorganic salts and water, but often as two-phase systems consisting of a predominantly organic and a predominantly inorganic aqueous phase 1,2. Recent laboratory studies conducted with model mixtures representing tropospheric aerosols1,2,3, secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from smog chamber experiments4, and field measurements5 suggest that liquid- liquid phase separations (LLPS) is indeed a common phenomenon in mixed organic/ ammonium sulfate (AS) particles. During LLPS, particles may adopt different morphologies mainly core- shell and partially engulfed. A core- shell configuration will have consequences for heterogeneous chemistry and hygroscopicity and as a result will alter the optical properties of the particles since the aqueous inorganic-rich phase will be totally enclosed by a probably highly viscous organic coating with low diffusivity for reactants and water. The primary objective of this project is to establish a method for investigating the morphology of mixed inorganic and absorbing organic compounds of atmospheric relevance and study their radiative properties before, during, and after phase transitions mainly during LLPS. This will be the first study looking into the radiative effect of LLPS in detail. In this first experiment, the behavior of single droplets of carminic acid (CA)/ AS/ H2O mixture was monitored during relative humidity (RH) cycles using optical microscopy. The same mixture particle was levitated in an electrodynamic balance (EDB) and the change in its absorption properties was measured at varying RH. We also intend to determine the occurrence of LLPS in accumulation- sized particles and the change in their absorption using a cavity ring down aerosol spectrometer. If LLPS alters the absorptive properties of the suggested model aerosols significantly, absorption measurements of accumulation mode

  8. Particle size distribution of indoor aerosol sources

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, K.B.

    1990-10-24

    As concern about Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) has grown in recent years, it has become necessary to determine the nature of particles produced by different indoor aerosol sources and the typical concentration that these sources tend to produce. These data are important in predicting the dose of particles to people exposed to these sources and it will also enable us to take effective mitigation procedures. Further, it will also help in designing appropriate air cleaners. A new state of the art technique, DMPS (Differential Mobility Particle Sizer) System is used to determine the particle size distributions of a number of sources. This system employs the electrical mobility characteristics of these particles and is very effective in the 0.01--1.0 {mu}m size range. A modified system that can measure particle sizes in the lower size range down to 3 nm was also used. Experimental results for various aerosol sources is presented in the ensuing chapters. 37 refs., 20 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. SEMI-VOLATILE SECONDARY AEROSOLS IN URBAN ATMOSPHERES: MEETING A MEASURED CHALLENGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation compares the results from various particle measurement methods as they relate to semi-volatile secondary aerosols in urban atmospheres. The methods include the PM2.5 Federal Reference Method; Particle Concentrator - BYU Organic Sampling System (PC-BOSS); the Re...

  10. Gas uptake and chemical aging of semisolid organic aerosol particles.

    PubMed

    Shiraiwa, Manabu; Ammann, Markus; Koop, Thomas; Pöschl, Ulrich

    2011-07-05

    Organic substances can adopt an amorphous solid or semisolid state, influencing the rate of heterogeneous reactions and multiphase processes in atmospheric aerosols. Here we demonstrate how molecular diffusion in the condensed phase affects the gas uptake and chemical transformation of semisolid organic particles. Flow tube experiments show that the ozone uptake and oxidative aging of amorphous protein is kinetically limited by bulk diffusion. The reactive gas uptake exhibits a pronounced increase with relative humidity, which can be explained by a decrease of viscosity and increase of diffusivity due to hygroscopic water uptake transforming the amorphous organic matrix from a glassy to a semisolid state (moisture-induced phase transition). The reaction rate depends on the condensed phase diffusion coefficients of both the oxidant and the organic reactant molecules, which can be described by a kinetic multilayer flux model but not by the traditional resistor model approach of multiphase chemistry. The chemical lifetime of reactive compounds in atmospheric particles can increase from seconds to days as the rate of diffusion in semisolid phases can decrease by multiple orders of magnitude in response to low temperature or low relative humidity. The findings demonstrate that the occurrence and properties of amorphous semisolid phases challenge traditional views and require advanced formalisms for the description of organic particle formation and transformation in atmospheric models of aerosol effects on air quality, public health, and climate.

  11. The influence of meteoric smoke particles on stratospheric aerosol properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Graham; Brooke, James; Dhomse, Sandip; Plane, John; Feng, Wuhu; Neely, Ryan; Bardeen, Chuck; Bellouin, Nicolas; Dalvi, Mohit; Johnson, Colin; Abraham, Luke

    2016-04-01

    The ablation of metors in the thermosphere and mesosphere introduces a signficant source of particulate matter into the polar upper stratosphere. These meteoric smoke particles (MSP) initially form at nanometre sizes but in the stratosphere have grown to larger sizes (tens of nanometres) following coagulation. The presence of these smoke particles may represent a significant mechanism for the nucleation of polar stratospheric clouds and are also known to influence the properties of the stratospheric aerosol or Junge layer. In this presentation we present findings from experiments to investigate the influence of the MSP on the Junge layer, carried out with the UM-UKCA composition-climate model. The UM-UKCA model is a high-top (up to 80km) version of the general circulation model with well-resolved stratospheric dynamics, includes the aerosol microphysics module GLOMAP and has interactive sulphur chemistry suitable for the stratosphere and troposphere (Dhomse et al., 2014). We have recently added to UM-UKCA a source of meteoric smoke particles, based on prescribing the variation of the smoke particles from previous simulations with the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM). In UM-UKCA, the MSP particles are transported within the GLOMAP aerosol framework, alongside interactive stratospheric sulphuric acid aerosol. For the experiments presented here, we have activated the interaction between the MSP and the stratospheric sulphuric acid aerosol. The MSP provide an important sink term for the gas phase sulphuric acid simulated in the model, with subsequent effects on the formation, growth and temporal evolution of stratospheric sulphuric acid aerosol particles. By comparing simulations with and without the MSP-sulphur interactions we quantify the influence of the meteoric smoke on the properties of volcanically-quiescent Junge layer. We also investigate the extent to which the MSP may modulate the effects from SO2 injected into the stratosphere from volcanic

  12. Parameterization of aerosol scavenging due to atmospheric ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinsley, Brian A.; Zhou, Limin

    2015-08-01

    A new approach to parameterizing the modulation of aerosol scavenging by electric charges on particles and droplets gives improved accuracy and is applied over an extended range of droplet and particle radii relevant to cloud microphysical processes. The base level scavenging rates for small particles are dominated by diffusion and for large particles by intercept, weight, and flow effects. For charged particles encountering uncharged droplets, in all cases there is an increase in the scavenging rates, due to the image force. For droplets with charges of opposite sign to those of the particle charge, the rates are further increased, due to the Coulomb force, whereas for droplet with charges of the same sign, the rates are decreased. Increases above the base level (electroscavenging) predominate for the larger particles and occur in the interior of clouds even when no space charge (net charge) is present. Decreases below the base level (electroantiscavenging) occur for same-sign charges with smaller particles. The rates for uncharged droplets are parameterized, and the effect of charges on the droplets then parameterized as a departure from those rates. The results are convenient for incorporation in models of clouds which include detailed microphysics, to model the electrically induced reductions and increases in cloud condensation nucleus and ice forming nucleus concentrations and size distributions and contact ice nucleation rates that affect coagulation and precipitation and cloud albedo. Implications for effects on weather and climate, due both to externally and internally induced variability in atmospheric ionization, are outlined.

  13. Biodiversity of Aerosolized Particles (Final Report)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    are obtained for each of 96 samples by collaborators at the Edgewood Chemical Biological Center [ECBC] using their Illumina Hi-Seq). 6) Assign each...Gallagher M, Kreidenweis SM, Bertram AK, Pöschl U. High concentrations of biological aerosol particles and ice nuclei during and after rain ...DRI Director’s Research Initiative DRUM Davis Rotating Unit for Monitoring ECBC Edgewood Chemical Biological Center EPA Environmental

  14. A study of the measured aerodynamic diameter of atmospheric Aerosols in Nsukka, Enugu State.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eucharia; Okoro, Chidinma

    This work presents the ground-base measurement of aerodynamic diameter of atmospheric Aerosols captured in Nsukka, Enugu State during the harmattan period of February to nonharmattan period of April 2004. Addition of harmful substances such as aerosols to the atmosphere results in pollution of the environment, bad effects on human health, and quality of life. These effects are quantified when the aerodynamic diameter is determined. A comprehensive research has been carried out on the particle sizes of the captured aerosols in Nsukka Environ. Power-law and Statistical models were employed in the analysis and some control strategies were considered.

  15. Diffusivity measurements of volatile organics in levitated viscous aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastelberger, Sandra; Krieger, Ulrich K.; Luo, Beiping; Peter, Thomas

    2017-07-01

    Field measurements indicating that atmospheric secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles can be present in a highly viscous, glassy state have spurred numerous studies addressing low diffusivities of water in glassy aerosols. The focus of these studies is on kinetic limitations of hygroscopic growth and the plasticizing effect of water. In contrast, much less is known about diffusion limitations of organic molecules and oxidants in viscous matrices. These may affect atmospheric chemistry and gas-particle partitioning of complex mixtures with constituents of different volatility. In this study, we quantify the diffusivity of a volatile organic in a viscous matrix. Evaporation of single particles generated from an aqueous solution of sucrose and small amounts of volatile tetraethylene glycol (PEG-4) is investigated in an electrodynamic balance at controlled relative humidity (RH) and temperature. The evaporative loss of PEG-4 as determined by Mie resonance spectroscopy is used in conjunction with a radially resolved diffusion model to retrieve translational diffusion coefficients of PEG-4. Comparison of the experimentally derived diffusivities with viscosity estimates for the ternary system reveals a breakdown of the Stokes-Einstein relationship, which has often been invoked to infer diffusivity from viscosity. The evaporation of PEG-4 shows pronounced RH and temperature dependencies and is severely depressed for RH ≲ 30 %, corresponding to diffusivities < 10-14 cm2 s-1 at temperatures < 15 °C. The temperature dependence is strong, suggesting a diffusion activation energy of about 300 kJ mol-1. We conclude that atmospheric volatile organic compounds can be subject to severe diffusion limitations in viscous organic aerosol particles. This may enable an important long-range transport mechanism for organic material, including pollutant molecules such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs).

  16. Laboratory simulations of Titan's atmosphere: organic gases and aerosols.

    PubMed

    Cabane, M; Chassefière, E

    1995-01-01

    Titan, the main satellite of Saturn, has been observed by remote sensing for many years, both from interplanetary probes (Pioneer and Voyager's flybys) and from the Earth. Its N2 atmosphere, containing a small fraction of CH4 (approximately 2%), with T approximately 90 K and P approximately 1.5 bar at the ground level, is irradiated by solar UV photons and deeply bombarded by energetic particles, i.e. Saturn mangetospheric electrons and protons, interplanetary electrons and cosmic rays. The resulting energy deposition, which takes place mainly below 1000 km, initiates chemical reactions which yield gaseous hydrocarbons and nitriles and, through polymerisation processes, solid aerosol particles which grow by coagulation and settle down to the ground. At the present time, photochemical models strongly require the results of specific laboratory studies. Chemical rate constants are not well known at low temperatures, charged-particle-induced reactions are difficult to model and laboratory simulations of atmospheric processes are therefore of great interest. Moreover, the synthesis of organic compounds which have not been detected to date provides valuable information for future observations. The origin and chemical composition of aerosols depend on the nature of chemical and energy sources. Their production from gaseous species may be monitored in laboratory chambers and their optical or microphysical properties compared to those deduced from the observations of Titan's atmosphere. The development of simulation chambers of Titan's extreme conditions is necessary for a better understanding of past and future observations. Space probes will sound Titan's atmosphere by remote sensing and in situ analysis in the near future (Cassini-Huygens mission). It appears necessary, as a preliminary step to test on-board experiments in such chambers, and as a final step, when new space data have been acquired, to use them for more general scientific purposes.

  17. Atmospheric aerosol and gas sensing using Scheimpflug lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Liang; Brydegaard, Mikkel

    2015-04-01

    This work presents a new lidar technique for atmospheric remote sensing based on Scheimpflug principle, which describes the relationship between nonparallel image- and object-planes[1]. When a laser beam is transmitted into the atmosphere, the implication is that the backscattering echo of the entire illuminated probe volume can be in focus simultaneously without diminishing the aperture. The range-resolved backscattering echo can be retrieved by using a tilted line scan or two-dimensional CCD/CMOS camera. Rather than employing nanosecond-pulsed lasers, cascade detectors, and MHz signal sampling, all of high cost and complexity, we have developed a robust and inexpensive atmospheric lidar system based on compact laser diodes and array detectors. We present initial applications of the Scheimpflug lidar for atmospheric aerosol monitoring in bright sunlight, with a 3 W, 808 nm CW laser diode. Kilohertz sampling rates are also achieved with applications for wind speed and entomology [2]. Further, a proof-of-principle demonstration of differential absorption lidar (DIAL) based on the Scheimpflug lidar technique is presented [3]. By utilizing a 30 mW narrow band CW laser diode emitting at around 760 nm, the detailed shape of an oxygen absorption line can be resolved remotely with an integration time of 6 s and measurement cycle of 1 minute during night time. The promising results demonstrated in this work show potential for the Scheimpflug lidar technique for remote atmospheric aerosol and gas sensing, and renews hope for robust and realistic instrumentation for atmospheric lidar sensing. [1] F. Blais, "Review of 20 years of range sensor development," Journal of Electronic Imaging, vol. 13, pp. 231-243, Jan 2004. [2] M. Brydegaard, A. Gebru, and S. Svanberg, "Super resolution laser radar with blinking atmospheric particles - application to interacting flying insects " Progress In Electromagnetics Research, vol. 147, pp. 141-151, 2014. [3] L. Mei and M. Brydegaard

  18. The effect of aerosols on the earth-atmosphere albedo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, B. M.; Browning, S. R.

    1975-01-01

    The paper presents calculations of the change in reflected flux by the earth-atmosphere system in response to increases in the atmospheric aerosol loading for a range of complex indices of refraction, solar elevation angle and ground albedo. Results show that, for small values of ground albedo, the reflected solar flux may either increase or decrease with increasing aerosol loadings, depending upon the complex part of the index of refraction of the aerosols. For high ground albedos, an increase in aerosol levels always results in a decrease of reflected flux (i.e., a warming of the earth-atmosphere system).

  19. Morphological properties of atmospheric aerosol aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, C.; Friedlander, S. K.

    2001-01-01

    Ultrafine particles (smaller than about 0.1 μm) are often emitted from combustion and other high-temperature processes in the form of fractal-like aggregates composed of solid nanoparticles. Results of a study of atmospheric aggregates are reported. Particles were collected on transmission electron microscope grids fitted on the last two stages of a single-jet eight-stage low-pressure impactor for periods of a few minutes. Photomicrographs of transmission electron microscope grids from the impactor stages were analyzed to obtain the fractal dimension (Df) and prefactor (A) for aggregates. Df increased from near 1 to above 2 as the number of primary particles making up the aggregates increased from 10 to 180. Total particle concentrations in size ranges roughly equivalent to the low-pressure impactor stages were measured with a mobility analyzer and condensation particle counter. In one set of measurements, the fraction of the particles present as aggregates was about 60% for particles with aerodynamic diameters between 50 and 75 nm and 34% for the range 75 to 120 nm. The total aggregate concentration in the 50- to 120-nm size range was about 400 ml−1. The primary particles that make up atmospheric aggregates are more polydisperse than soot aggregates generated from a single laboratory source, an ethane/oxygen flame. Most measurements were made in the Los Angeles area, where the aggregates may represent a signature for diesel emissions. Rural aggregate concentrations in the size range 50 to 120 nm were less than 1% of the concentrations at urban sites. The data will permit better estimates of atmospheric aggregate residence times, transport, and deposition in the lung, optical extinction, and heterogenous nucleation. PMID:11592995

  20. Morphological properties of atmospheric aerosol aggregates.

    PubMed

    Xiong, C; Friedlander, S K

    2001-10-09

    Ultrafine particles (smaller than about 0.1 microm) are often emitted from combustion and other high-temperature processes in the form of fractal-like aggregates composed of solid nanoparticles. Results of a study of atmospheric aggregates are reported. Particles were collected on transmission electron microscope grids fitted on the last two stages of a single-jet eight-stage low-pressure impactor for periods of a few minutes. Photomicrographs of transmission electron microscope grids from the impactor stages were analyzed to obtain the fractal dimension (D(f)) and prefactor (A) for aggregates. D(f) increased from near 1 to above 2 as the number of primary particles making up the aggregates increased from 10 to 180. Total particle concentrations in size ranges roughly equivalent to the low-pressure impactor stages were measured with a mobility analyzer and condensation particle counter. In one set of measurements, the fraction of the particles present as aggregates was about 60% for particles with aerodynamic diameters between 50 and 75 nm and 34% for the range 75 to 120 nm. The total aggregate concentration in the 50- to 120-nm size range was about 400 ml(-1). The primary particles that make up atmospheric aggregates are more polydisperse than soot aggregates generated from a single laboratory source, an ethane/oxygen flame. Most measurements were made in the Los Angeles area, where the aggregates may represent a signature for diesel emissions. Rural aggregate concentrations in the size range 50 to 120 nm were less than 1% of the concentrations at urban sites. The data will permit better estimates of atmospheric aggregate residence times, transport, and deposition in the lung, optical extinction, and heterogeneous nucleation.

  1. Constraining the atmospheric composition of the day-night terminators of HD 189733b: Atmospheric retrieval with aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jae-Min; Irwin, Patrick G. J.; Fletcher, Leigh N.; Barstow, Joanna K.; Heng, Kevin

    2014-07-01

    A number of observations have shown that Rayleigh scattering by aerosols dominates the transmission spectrum of HD 189733b at wavelengths shortward of 1 μm. In this study, we retrieve a range of aerosol distributions consistent with transmission spectroscopy between 0.3-24 μm that were recently re-analyzed by Pont et al. To constrain the particle size and the optical depth of the aerosol layer, we investigate the degeneracies between aerosol composition, temperature, planetary radius, and molecular abundances that prevent unique solutions for transit spectroscopy. Assuming that the aerosol is composed of MgSiO{sub 3}, we suggest that a vertically uniform aerosol layer over all pressures with a monodisperse particle size smaller than about 0.1 μm and an optical depth in the range 0.002-0.02 at 1 μm provides statistically meaningful solutions for the day/night terminator regions of HD 189733b. Generally, we find that a uniform aerosol layer provide adequate fits to the data if the optical depth is less than 0.1 and the particle size is smaller than 0.1 μm, irrespective of the atmospheric temperature, planetary radius, aerosol composition, and gaseous molecules. Strong constraints on the aerosol properties are provided by spectra at wavelengths shortward of 1 μm as well as longward of 8 μm, if the aerosol material has absorption features in this region. We show that these are the optimal wavelengths for quantifying the effects of aerosols, which may guide the design of future space observations. The present investigation indicates that the current data offer sufficient information to constrain some of the aerosol properties of HD189733b, but the chemistry in the terminator regions remains uncertain.

  2. Understanding atmospheric organic aerosols via factor analysis of aerosol mass spectrometry: a review.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qi; Jimenez, Jose L; Canagaratna, Manjula R; Ulbrich, Ingrid M; Ng, Nga L; Worsnop, Douglas R; Sun, Yele

    2011-12-01

    Organic species are an important but poorly characterized constituent of airborne particulate matter. A quantitative understanding of the organic fraction of particles (organic aerosol, OA) is necessary to reduce some of the largest uncertainties that confound the assessment of the radiative forcing of climate and air quality management policies. In recent years, aerosol mass spectrometry has been increasingly relied upon for highly time-resolved characterization of OA chemistry and for elucidation of aerosol sources and lifecycle processes. Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometers (AMS) are particularly widely used, because of their ability to quantitatively characterize the size-resolved composition of submicron particles (PM(1)). AMS report the bulk composition and temporal variations of OA in the form of ensemble mass spectra (MS) acquired over short time intervals. Because each MS represents the linear superposition of the spectra of individual components weighed by their concentrations, multivariate factor analysis of the MS matrix has proved effective at retrieving OA factors that offer a quantitative and simplified description of the thousands of individual organic species. The sum of the factors accounts for nearly 100% of the OA mass and each individual factor typically corresponds to a large group of OA constituents with similar chemical composition and temporal behavior that are characteristic of different sources and/or atmospheric processes. The application of this technique in aerosol mass spectrometry has grown rapidly in the last six years. Here we review multivariate factor analysis techniques applied to AMS and other aerosol mass spectrometers, and summarize key findings from field observations. Results that provide valuable information about aerosol sources and, in particular, secondary OA evolution on regional and global scales are highlighted. Advanced methods, for example a-priori constraints on factor mass spectra and the application of factor

  3. Vertical profiles of atmospheric fluorescent aerosols observed by a mutil-channel lidar spectrometer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Z.; Huang, J.; Zhou, T.; Sugimoto, N.; Bi, J.

    2015-12-01

    Zhongwei Huang1*, Jianping Huang1, Tian Zhou1, Nobuo Sugimoto2, Jianrong Bi1 and Jinsen Shi11Key Laboratory for Semi-Arid Climate Change of the Ministry of Education, College of Atmospheric Sciences, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, China. 2Atmospheric Environment Division, National Institutes for Environmental Studies, Tsukuba, Japan Email: huangzhongwei@lzu.edu.cn Abstract Atmospheric aerosols have a significant impact on regional and globe climate. The challenge in quantifying aerosol direct radiative forcing and aerosol-cloud interactions arises from large spatial and temporal heterogeneity of aerosol concentrations, compositions, sizes, shape and optical properties (IPCC, 2007). Lidar offers some remarkable advantages for determining the vertical structure of atmospheric aerosols and their related optical properties. To investigate the characterization of atmospheric aerosols (especially bioaerosols) with high spatial and temporal resolution, we developed a Raman/fluorescence/polarization lidar system employed a multi-channel spectrometer, with capabilities of providing measurements of Raman scattering and laser-induced fluorescence excitation at 355 nm from atmospheric aerosols. Meanwhile, the lidar system operated polarization measurements both at 355nm and 532nm wavelengths, aiming to obtain more information of aerosols. It employs a high power pulsed laser and a received telescope with 350mm diameter. The receiver could simultaneously detect a wide fluorescent spectrum about 178 nm with spectral resolution 5.7 nm, mainly including an F/3.7 Crossed Czerny-Turner spectrograph, a grating (1200 gr/mm) and a PMT array with 32 photocathode elements. Vertical structure of fluorescent aerosols in the atmosphere was observed by the developed lidar system at four sites across northwest China, during 2014 spring field observation that conducted by Lanzhou University. It has been proved that the developed lidar could detect the fluorescent aerosols with high temporal and

  4. Aerosol reduction/expansion synthesis (A-RES) for zero valent metal particles

    SciTech Connect

    Leseman, Zayd; Luhrs, Claudia; Phillips, Jonathan; Soliman, Haytham

    2016-04-12

    Various embodiments provide methods of forming zero valent metal particles using an aerosol-reductive/expansion synthesis (A-RES) process. In one embodiment, an aerosol stream including metal precursor compound(s) and chemical agent(s) that produces reducing gases upon thermal decomposition can be introduced into a heated inert atmosphere of a RES reactor to form zero valent metal particles corresponding to metals used for the metal precursor compound(s).

  5. Dimethylsulfide/cloud condensation nuclei/climate system - Relevant size-resolved measurements of the chemical and physical properties of atmospheric aerosol particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, P. K.; Covert, D. S.; Bates, T. S.; Kapustin, V. N.; Ramsey-Bell, D. C.; Mcinnes, L. M.

    1993-01-01

    The mass and number relationships occurring within the atmospheric dimethylsulfide/cloud condensation nuclei (CCN)/climate system, using simultaneous measurements of particulate phase mass size distributions of nss SO4(2-), methanesulfonic acid (MSA), and NH4(+); number size distributions of particles having diameters between 0.02 and 9.6 microns; CCN concentrations at a supersaturation of 0.3 percent; relative humidity; and temperature, obtained for the northeastern Pacific Ocean in April and May 1991. Based on these measurements, particulate nss SO4(2-), MSA, and NH4(+) mass appeared to be correlated with both particle effective surface area and number in the accumulation mode size range (0.16 to 0.5 micron). No correlations were found in the size range below 0.16 micron. A correlation was also found between nss SO4(2-) mass and the CCN number concentration, such that a doubling of the SO4(2-) mass corresponded to a 40 percent increase in the CCN number concentration. However, no correlation was found between MSA mass and CCN concentration.

  6. Dimethylsulfide/cloud condensation nuclei/climate system - Relevant size-resolved measurements of the chemical and physical properties of atmospheric aerosol particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, P. K.; Covert, D. S.; Bates, T. S.; Kapustin, V. N.; Ramsey-Bell, D. C.; Mcinnes, L. M.

    1993-01-01

    The mass and number relationships occurring within the atmospheric dimethylsulfide/cloud condensation nuclei (CCN)/climate system, using simultaneous measurements of particulate phase mass size distributions of nss SO4(2-), methanesulfonic acid (MSA), and NH4(+); number size distributions of particles having diameters between 0.02 and 9.6 microns; CCN concentrations at a supersaturation of 0.3 percent; relative humidity; and temperature, obtained for the northeastern Pacific Ocean in April and May 1991. Based on these measurements, particulate nss SO4(2-), MSA, and NH4(+) mass appeared to be correlated with both particle effective surface area and number in the accumulation mode size range (0.16 to 0.5 micron). No correlations were found in the size range below 0.16 micron. A correlation was also found between nss SO4(2-) mass and the CCN number concentration, such that a doubling of the SO4(2-) mass corresponded to a 40 percent increase in the CCN number concentration. However, no correlation was found between MSA mass and CCN concentration.

  7. Radial inhomogeneities in particle composition of single, levitated aerosol particles observed by Mie resonance spectroscopy (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krieger, U. K.; Steimer, S.; Lienhard, D.; Bastelberger, S.

    2013-12-01

    Recent observations have indicated that organic aerosol particles in the atmosphere may exist in an amorphous semi-solid or even solid (i.e. glassy) state, e.g. [1]. The influence of highly viscous and glassy states on the timescale of aerosol particle equilibration with respect to water vapor have been investigated for some model systems of atmospheric aerosol, e.g. [2,3]. In particular, it has been shown that the kinetics of the water absorption/desorption process is controlled entirely by liquid-phase diffusion of water molecules for a highly viscous aerosol particle. A liquid phase diffusion model based on numerically solving the non-linear diffusion equation predicts strong internal gradients in water concentration when condensed phase diffusion impedes the water uptake from the gas phase [2]. Here we observe and quantify the internal concentration gradients in single, levitated, micron size aerosol particles of aqueous MBTCA (3-methyl-1,2,3-Butanetricarboxylic acid) and shikimic acid using elastic Mie resonance spectroscopy. A single, aqueous particle is levitated in an electro-dynamic balance (for details see [2]), dried for several days at room temperature, cooled to the target temperature and exposed to a rapid change in relative humidity. In addition to measuring the elastically backscattered light of a 'white light ' LED source and recording the full spectrum with a spectrograph as in [2], we use a tunable diode laser (TDL) to scan high resolution TE- and TM spectra. This combination allows observing various Mie resonance mode orders simultaneously. Since we perform the experiment at low temperatures and low humidities the changes in the Mie-spectra due to water uptake are sufficiently slow to resolve the kinetics. Experimental Mie resonance spectra are inverted to concentration profiles of water within the particle by applying the numerical diffusion model [2] in conjunction with Mie calculations of multilayered spheres [4]. Potential implications for

  8. A naming convention for atmospheric organic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, B. N.; Donahue, N. M.; Robinson, A. L.; Pandis, S. N.

    2014-06-01

    While the field of atmospheric organic aerosol scientific research has experienced thorough and insightful progress over the last half century, this progress has been accompanied by the evolution of a communicative and detailed yet, at times, complex and inconsistent language. The menagerie of detailed classification that now exists to describe organic compounds in our atmosphere reflects the wealth of observational techniques now at our disposal as well as the rich information provided by state-of-the-science instrumentation. However, the nomenclature in place to communicate these scientific gains is growing disjointed to the point that effective communication within the scientific community and to the public may be sacrificed. We propose standardizing a naming convention for organic aerosol classification that is relevant to laboratory studies, ambient observations, atmospheric models, and various stakeholders for air-quality problems. Because a critical aspect of this effort is to directly translate the essence of complex physico-chemical phenomena to a much broader, policy-oriented audience, we recommend a framework that maximizes comprehension among scientists and non-scientists alike. For example, to classify volatility, it relies on straightforward alphabetic terms (e.g., semivolatile, SV; intermediate volatility, IV; etc.) rather than possibly ambiguous numeric indices. This framework classifies organic material as primary or secondary pollutants and distinguishes among fundamental features important for science and policy questions including emission source, chemical phase, and volatility. Also useful is the addition of an alphabetic suffix identifying the volatility of the organic material or its precursor for when emission occurred. With this framework, we hope to introduce into the community a consistent connection between common notation for the general public and detailed nomenclature for highly specialized discussion. In so doing, we try to maintain

  9. Atmospheric Observations of Aerosol Sizes, Sulfuric Acid and Ammonia Measured in Kent, Ohio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavuluri, C.; Benson, D. R.; Dailey, B.; Lee, S.

    2008-12-01

    Atmospheric particles affect atmospheric composition, cloud formation, global radiation budget, and human health. Nucleation is a gas-to-particle conversion process in which new particles form directly from gas phase species and is a key process that controls particle number concentrations. The most common feature of the new particle formation events is a substantial increase of number concentrations of nucleation mode particles reaching up to 105-106 cm-3 in the condensable vapor-laden air. There are several nucleation mechanisms for tropopsheric aerosol formation, but it is unclear which nucleation process dominates. In particular, observations and modeling studies show that ammonia can be important for atmospheric nucleation in the boundary layer, but simultaneous measurements of aerosol sizes and precursors including sulfuric acid and ammonia are critically lacking. In order to overcome these shortcomings, we conduct atmospheric observations of new particle formation in Kent, OH. We have measured aerosol sizes and concentrations for particles in the size range from 3-102 nm semi- continuously from December 2005 and for particles from 3-1000 nm continuously from September 2007 in Kent State campus, Kent, OH (with an inlet placed at ~11.5 m above ground level). We also simultaneously measure sulfuric acid and ammonia, two most important inorganic aerosol precursors, with two chemical ionization mass spectrometers (CIMS) from August 2008. Kent, located in Northeastern Ohio, is relatively rural itself, but is also surrounded by several urban cities within 40 miles. Because of the combination of its relatively rural environment (hence low surface areas of aerosol particles), active vegetation (organic and NH3 emissions), and possible transport of aerosol precursors from the surrounding urban and industrialized areas, Kent is a unique location to make new particle formation studies. So far, most of new particle formation observations made typically in US were at

  10. Nonequilibrium Atmospheric Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation and Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Perraud, Veronique M.; Bruns, Emily A.; Ezell, Michael J.; Johnson, Stanley N.; Yu, Yong; Alexander, M. L.; Zelenyuk, Alla; Imre, D.; Chang, W. L.; Dabdub, Donald; Pankow, James F.; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J.

    2012-02-21

    Airborne particles play a critical role in air quality, human health effects, visibility and climate. Secondary organic aerosols (SOA) account for a significant portion of total airborne particles. They are formed in reactions of organic gases that produce low volatility and semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs). Current atmospheric models assume that SOA are liquids into which SVOCs undergo equilibrium partitioning and grow the particles. However a large discrepancy between model predictions and field measurements of SOA is commonly observed. We report here laboratory studies of the oxidation of a-pinene by ozone and nitrate radicals and show that particle composition is actually consistent with a kinetically determined growth mechanism, and not with equilibrium partitioning between the gas phase and liquid particles. If this is indeed a general phenomenon in air, the formulation of atmospheric SOA models will have to be revised to reflect this new paradigm. This will have significant impacts on quantifying the role of SOA in air quality, visibility, and climate.

  11. Formation of the Aerosol of Space Origin in Earth's Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozak, P. M.; Kruchynenko, V. G.

    2011-01-01

    The problem of formation of the aerosol of space origin in Earth s atmosphere is examined. Meteoroids of the mass range of 10-18-10-8 g are considered as a source of its origin. The lower bound of the mass range is chosen according to the data presented in literature, the upper bound is determined in accordance with the theory of Whipple s micrometeorites. Basing on the classical equations of deceleration and heating for small meteor bodies we have determined the maximal temperatures of the particles, and altitudes at which they reach critically low velocities, which can be called as velocities of stopping . As a condition for the transformation of a space particle into an aerosol one we have used the condition of non-reaching melting temperature of the meteoroid. The simplified equation of deceleration without earth gravity and barometric formula for the atmosphere density are used. In the equation of heat balance the energy loss for heating is neglected. The analytical solution of the simplified equations is used for the analysis.

  12. Atmospheric aerosol characterization combining multi-wavelength Raman lidar and MAX-DOAS measurements in Gwanjgu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chong, Jihyo; Shin, Dong Ho; Kim, Kwang Chul; Lee, Kwon-Ho; Shin, Sungkyun; Noh, Young M.; Müller, Detlef; Kim, Young J.

    2011-11-01

    Integrated approach has been adopted at the ADvanced Environmental Research Center (ADEMRC), Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (GIST), Korea for effective monitoring of atmospheric aerosol. Various active and passive optical remote sensing techniques such as multi-wavelength (3β+2α+1δ) Raman LIDAR, sun-photometry, MAX-DOAS, and satellite retrieval have been utilized. This integrated monitoring system approach combined with in-situ surface measurement is to allow better characterization of physical and optical properties of atmospheric aerosol. Information on the vertical distribution and microphysical properties of atmospheric aerosol is important for understanding its transport characteristics as well as radiative effect. The GIST multi-wavelength (3β + 2α+1δ) Raman lidar system can measure vertical profiles of optical properties of atmospheric aerosols such as extinction coefficients at 355 and 532nm, particle backscatter coefficients at 355, 532 and 1064 nm, and depolarization ratio at 532nm. The incomplete overlap between the telescope field-of-view and beam divergence of the transmitting laser significantly affects lidar measurement, resulting in higher uncertainty near the surface where atmospheric aerosols of interest are concentrated. Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) technique is applied as a complementary tool for the detection of atmospheric aerosols near the surface. The passive Multi-Axis DOAS (MAX-DOAS) technique uses scattered sunlight as a light source from several viewing directions. Recently developed aerosol retrieval algorithm based on O4 slant column densities (SCDs) measured at UV and visible wavelengths has been utilized to derive aerosol information (e.g., aerosol optical depth (AOD) and aerosol extinction coefficients (AECs)) in the lower troposphere. The aerosol extinction coefficient at 356 nm was retrieved for the 0-1 and 1-2 km layers based on the MAX-DOAS measurements using the retrieval algorithm

  13. Composition and Particle Size Retrievals for Homogeneous Binary Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedziela, R. F.; Argon, P.; Bejcek, L.

    2014-12-01

    Tropospheric aerosols have widely varying compositions, shapes, and sizes. The ability to measure these physical characteristics, coupled with knowledge about their optical properties, can provide insight as to how these particles might participate in atmospheric processes, including their interaction with light. Over the past several years, our laboratory has been involved in developing methods to determine basic physical properties of laboratory-generated particles based on the analysis of infrared extinction spectra of multi-component aerosols. Here we report the results of a complete study on the applicability of well-known refractive index mixing rules to homogeneous binary liquid organic aerosols in an effort to yield in situ measurements of particle size and composition. In particular, we present results for terpenoid (carvone/nopinone) and long-chain hydrocarbon (squalane/squalene) mixtures. The included image shows model carvone/nopinone extinction spectra that were computed using the Lorentz-Lorenz mixing rule on complex refractive index data for the pure components.

  14. High aerosol acidity despite declining atmospheric sulfate concentrations over the past 15 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Rodney J.; Guo, Hongyu; Russell, Armistead G.; Nenes, Athanasios

    2016-04-01

    Particle acidity affects aerosol concentrations, chemical composition and toxicity. Sulfate is often the main acid component of aerosols, and largely determines the acidity of fine particles under 2.5 μm in diameter, PM2.5. Over the past 15 years, atmospheric sulfate concentrations in the southeastern United States have decreased by 70%, whereas ammonia concentrations have been steady. Similar trends are occurring in many regions globally. Aerosol ammonium nitrate concentrations were assumed to increase to compensate for decreasing sulfate, which would result from increasing neutrality. Here we use observed gas and aerosol composition, humidity, and temperature data collected at a rural southeastern US site in June and July 2013 (ref. ), and a thermodynamic model that predicts pH and the gas-particle equilibrium concentrations of inorganic species from the observations to show that PM2.5 at the site is acidic. pH buffering by partitioning of ammonia between the gas and particle phases produced a relatively constant particle pH of 0-2 throughout the 15 years of decreasing atmospheric sulfate concentrations, and little change in particle ammonium nitrate concentrations. We conclude that the reductions in aerosol acidity widely anticipated from sulfur reductions, and expected acidity-related health and climate benefits, are unlikely to occur until atmospheric sulfate concentrations reach near pre-anthropogenic levels.

  15. Inhomogeneities in particle composition of single, levitated aerosol particles observed by Mie resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krieger, Ulrich; Lienhard, Daniel; Bastelberger, Sandra; Steimer, Sarah

    2014-05-01

    Recent observations have indicated that organic aerosol particles in the atmosphere may exist in an amorphous semi-solid or even solid (i.e. glassy) state, e.g. [1]. The influence of highly viscous and glassy states on the timescale of aerosol particle equilibration with respect to water vapor have been investigated for some model systems of atmospheric aerosol, e.g. [2,3]. In particular, it has been shown that the kinetics of the water absorption/desorption process is controlled entirely by liquid-phase diffusion of water molecules for a highly viscous aerosol particle. A liquid phase diffusion model based on numerically solving the non-linear diffusion equation predicts strong internal gradients in water concentration when condensed phase diffusion impedes the water uptake from the gas phase [2]. Here we observe and quantify the internal concentration gradients in single, levitated, micron size aerosol particles of aqueous shikimic acid using elastic Mie resonance spectroscopy. A single, aqueous particle is levitated in an electro-dynamic balance (for details see [2]), dried for several days at room temperature, cooled to the target temperature and exposed to a rapid change in relative humidity. In addition to measuring the elastically backscattered light of a "white light" LED source and recording the full spectrum with a spectrograph as in [2], we use a tunable diode laser (TDL) to scan high resolution TE- and TM spectra. This combination allows observing various Mie resonance mode orders simultaneously. Since we perform the experiment at low temperatures and low humidities the changes in the Mie-spectra due to water uptake are sufficiently slow to resolve the kinetics. Experimental Mie resonance spectra are inverted to concentration profiles of water within the particle by applying the numerical diffusion model [2] in conjunction with Mie calculations of multilayered spheres [4]. [1] A. Virtanen et al. (2010): An amorphous solid state of biogenic secondary

  16. Single-particle Analyses of Compositions, Morphology, and Viscosity of Aerosol Particles Collected During GoAmazon2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, K.; Gong, Z.; Bateman, A. P.; Martin, S. T.; Cirino, G. G.; Artaxo, P.; Sedlacek, A. J., III; Buseck, P. R.

    2014-12-01

    Single-particle analysis using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) shows composition and morphology of individual aerosol particles collected during the GoAmazon2014 campaign. These TEM results indicate aerosol types and mixing states, both of which are important for evaluating particle optical properties and cloud condensation nuclei activity. The samples were collected at the T3 site, which is located in the Amazon forest with influences from the urban pollution plume from Manaus. Samples were also collected from the T0 site, which is in the middle of the jungle with minimal to no influences of anthropogenic sources. The aerosol particles mainly originated from 1) anthropogenic pollution (e.g., nanosphere soot, sulfate), 2) biogenic emissions (e.g., primary biogenic particles, organic aerosols), and 3) long-range transport (e.g., sea salts). We found that the biogenic organic aerosol particles contain homogeneously distributed potassium. Particle viscosity is important for evaluating gas-particle interactions and atmospheric chemistry for the particles. Viscosity can be estimated from the rebounding behavior at controlled relative humidities, i.e., highly viscous particles display less rebound on a plate than low-viscosity particles. We collected 1) aerosol particles from a plate (non-rebounded), 2) those that had rebounded from the plate and were then captured onto an adjacent sampling plate, and 3) particles from ambient air using a separate impactor sampler. Preliminary results show that more than 90% of non-rebounded particles consisted of nanosphere soot with or without coatings. The coatings mostly consisted of organic matter. Although rebounded particles also contain nanosphere soot (number fraction 64-69%), they were mostly internally mixed with sulfate, organic matter, or their mixtures. TEM tilted images suggested that the rebounded particles were less deformed on the substrate, whereas the non-rebounded particles were more deformed, which could

  17. Tracking Water Diffusion Fronts in a Highly Viscous Aerosol Particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastelberger, Sandra; Krieger, Ulrich; Peter, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Field measurements indicate that atmospheric secondary aerosol particles can be present in a highly viscous, glassy state [1]. In contrast to liquid state particles, the gas phase equilibration is kinetically limited and governed by condensed phase diffusion. In recent water diffusion experiments on highly viscous single aerosol particles levitated in an electrodynamic balance (EDB) we observed a characteristic shift behavior of the Mie whispering gallery modes (WGM) indicative of the changing radial structure of the particle, thus providing us with an experimental method to track the diffusion process inside the particle. When a highly viscous, homogeneous particle is exposed to an abrupt increase in relative humidity, the rapid gas phase diffusion and strong concentration dependence of the diffusion coefficient in the condensed phase lead to extremely steep water concentration gradients inside the particle, reminiscent of diffusion fronts. The resulting quasi step-like concentration profile motivates the introduction of a simple core-shell model describing the morphology of the non-equilibrium particle during humidification. The subsequent particle growth and reduction of the shell refractive index can be observed as red and blueshift behavior of the WGM, respectively. The shift pattern can be attributed to a core-shell radius ratio and particle radius derived from model calculations [2]. If supplemented with growth information obtained from the WGM redshift and thermodynamic equilibrium data, we can infer a comprehensive picture of the time evolution of the diffusion fronts in the framework of our core-shell model. The measured time dependent concentration profile is then compared with simulations solving the non-linear diffusion equation [3] [1] Virtanen, A., et al., Nature, 467, 824-827, 2010 [2] Kaiser, T., Schweiger, G., Computers in Physics, Vol. 7, No. 6, 682-686, Nov/Dec 1993 [3] Zobrist, B., Soonsin, V., Luo, B.P., Peter, T. et al., Phys. Chem. Chem

  18. Real-time characterization of the size and chemical composition of individual particles in ambient aerosol systems in Riverside, California

    SciTech Connect

    Noble, C.A.; Prather, K.A.

    1995-12-31

    Atmospheric aerosols, although ubiquitous, are highly diverse and continually fluctuating systems. A typical aerosol system may consist of particles with diameters between {approximately}0.002 {mu}m and {approximately}200 {mu}m. Even in rural or pristine areas, atmospheric particle concentration is significant, with concentrations up to 10{sup 8} particles/cm{sup 3} not being uncommon. Chemical composition of atmospheric particles vary from simple water droplets or acidic ices to soot particles and cigarette smoke. Due to changes in atmospheric conditions, processes such as nucleation, coagulation or heterogeneous chemistry may effect both physical and chemical properties of individual particles over relatively short time intervals. Recently, aerosol measurement techniques are focusing on determining the size and/or chemical composition of individual aerosol particles. This research group has recently developed aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ATOFMS), a technique which allows for real-time determination of the size and chemical composition of individual aerosol particles. Single particle measurements are performed in one instrument using dual laser aerodynamic particle sizing and time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Aerosol-time-of-flight mass spectrometry is briefly described in several other abstracts in this publication.

  19. The atmospheric aerosol-forming potential of whole gasoline vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Odum, J.R.; Jungkamp, T.P.W.; Griffin, R.J.

    1997-04-04

    A series of sunlight-irradiated, smog-chamber experiments confirmed that the atmosphere organic aerosol formation potential of whole gasoline vapor can be accounted for solely in terms of the aromatic fraction of the fuel. The total amount of secondary organic aerosol produced from the atmospheric oxidation of whole gasoline vapor can be represented as the sum of the contributions of the individual aromatic molecular constituents of the fuel. The urban atmospheric, anthropogenic hydrocarbon profile is approximated well by evaporated whole gasoline, and thus these results suggest that it is possible to model atmospheric secondary organic aerosol formation. 23 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Nucleation and growth processes of atmospheric aerosols and clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, S.E.; McGraw, R.L.

    1995-11-01

    This project seeks to gain enhanced understanding of the rate of formation and growth of new particles and of cloud droplets as a function of pertinent controlling atmospheric variables, thereby permitting accurate representation of these processes in climate models. Aerosol size distributions are shaped by complex nucleation and growth and mixing processes that are difficult to represent in models, due to the need to accurately represent the evaporation/growth kinetics for each of the billions of discrete cluster sizes in the growth sequence, ranging from molecular clusters to particles of radius of several tenths of a micrometer or greater. A potentially very powerful means of solving this problem may be given by the method of moments (MOM), which tracks the time dependence of just the lower-order radial moments of the size distribution without requiring knowledge of the distribution itself.

  1. Individual particle morphology, coatings, and impurities of black carbon aerosols in Antarctic ice and tropical rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Aja; Edwards, Ross; Saunders, Martin; Chakrabarty, Rajan K.; Subramanian, R.; Timms, Nicholas E.; Riessen, Arie; Smith, Andrew M.; Lambrinidis, Dionisia; Nunes, Laurie J.; Vallelonga, Paul; Goodwin, Ian D.; Moy, Andrew D.; Curran, Mark A. J.; Ommen, Tas D.

    2016-11-01

    Black carbon (BC) aerosols are a large source of climate warming, impact atmospheric chemistry, and are implicated in large-scale changes in atmospheric circulation. Inventories of BC emissions suggest significant changes in the global BC aerosol distribution due to human activity. However, little is known regarding BC's atmospheric distribution or aged particle characteristics before the twentieth century. Here we investigate the prevalence and structural properties of BC particles in Antarctic ice cores from 1759, 1838, and 1930 Common Era (C.E.) using transmission electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The study revealed an unexpected diversity in particle morphology, insoluble coatings, and association with metals. In addition to conventionally occurring BC aggregates, we observed single BC monomers, complex aggregates with internally, and externally mixed metal and mineral impurities, tar balls, and organonitrogen coatings. The results of the study show BC particles in the remote Antarctic atmosphere exhibit complexity that is unaccounted for in atmospheric models of BC.

  2. A global average model of atmospheric aerosols for radiative transfer calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toon, O. B.; Pollack, J. B.

    1976-01-01

    A global average model is proposed for the size distribution, chemical composition, and optical thickness of stratospheric and tropospheric aerosols. This aerosol model is designed to specify the input parameters to global average radiative transfer calculations which assume the atmosphere is horizontally homogeneous. The model subdivides the atmosphere at multiples of 3 km, where the surface layer extends from the ground to 3 km, the upper troposphere from 3 to 12 km, and the stratosphere from 12 to 45 km. A list of assumptions made in construction of the model is presented and discussed along with major model uncertainties. The stratospheric aerosol is modeled as a liquid mixture of 75% H2SO4 and 25% H2O, while the tropospheric aerosol consists of 60% sulfate and 40% soil particles above 3 km and of 50% sulfate, 35% soil particles, and 15% sea salt below 3 km. Implications and consistency of the model are discussed.

  3. Size distribution and scattering phase function of aerosol particles retrieved from sky brightness measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, Y. J.; Gitelson, A.; Karnieli, A.; Ganor, E.; Fraser, R. S.; Nakajima, T.; Mattoo, S.; Holben, B. N.

    1994-05-01

    Ground-based measurements of the solar transmission and sky radiance in a horizontal plane through the Sun are taken in several geographical regions and aerosol types: dust in a desert transition zone in Israel, sulfate particles in Eastern and Western Europe, tropical aerosol in Brazil, and mixed continental/maritime aerosol in California. Stratospheric aerosol was introduced after the eruption of Mount Pinatubo in June 1991. Therefore measurements taken before the eruption are used to analyze the properties of tropospheric aerosol; measurements from 1992 are also used to detect the particle size and concentration of stratospheric aerosol. The measurements are used to retrieve the size distribution and the scattering phase function at large scattering angles of the undisturbed aerosol particles. The retrieved properties represent an average on the entire atmospheric column. A comparison between the retrieved phase function for a scattering angle of 120°, with phase function predicted from the retrieved size distribution, is used to test the assumption of particle homogeneity and sphericity in radiative transfer models (Mie theory). The effect was found to be small (20%±15%). For the stratospheric aerosol (sulfates), as expected, the phase function was very well predicted using the Mie theory. A model with a power law size distribution, based on the spectral dependence of the optical thickness, a, cannot estimate accurately the phase function (up to 50% error for λ = 0.87 μm). Before the Pinatubo eruption the ratio between the volumes of sulfate and coarse particles was very well correlated with α. The Pinatubo stratospheric aerosol destroyed this correlation. The aerosol optical properties are compared with analysis of the size, shape, and composition of the individual particles by electron microscopy of in situ samples. The measured volume size distributions before the injection of stratospheric aerosol consistently show two modes, sulfate particles with rm

  4. Laboratory Studies of Processing of Carbonaceous Aerosols by Atmospheric Oxidants/Hygroscopicity and CCN Activity of Secondary & Processed Primary Organic Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Ziemann, P.J.; Arey, J.; Atkinson, R.; Kreidenweis, S.M.; Petters, M.D.

    2012-06-13

    The atmosphere is composed of a complex mixture of gases and suspended microscopic aerosol particles. The ability of these particles to take up water (hygroscopicity) and to act as nuclei for cloud droplet formation significantly impacts aerosol light scattering and absorption, and cloud formation, thereby influencing air quality, visibility, and climate in important ways. A substantial, yet poorly characterized component of the atmospheric aerosol is organic matter. Its major sources are direct emissions from combustion processes, which are referred to as primary organic aerosol (POA), or in situ processes in which volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are oxidized in the atmosphere to low volatility reaction products that subsequent condense to form particles that are referred to as secondary organic aerosol (SOA). POA and VOCs are emitted to the atmosphere from both anthropogenic and natural (biogenic) sources. The overall goal of this experimental research project was to conduct laboratory studies under simulated atmospheric conditions to investigate the effects of the chemical composition of organic aerosol particles on their hygroscopicity and cloud condensation nucleation (CCN) activity, in order to develop quantitative relationships that could be used to more accurately incorporate aerosol-cloud interactions into regional and global atmospheric models. More specifically, the project aimed to determine the products, mechanisms, and rates of chemical reactions involved in the processing of organic aerosol particles by atmospheric oxidants and to investigate the relationships between the chemical composition of organic particles (as represented by molecule sizes and the specific functional groups that are present) and the hygroscopicity and CCN activity of oxidized POA and SOA formed from the oxidation of the major classes of anthropogenic and biogenic VOCs that are emitted to the atmosphere, as well as model hydrocarbons. The general approach for this project was

  5. Methods of analyzing composition of aerosol particles

    DOEpatents

    Reilly, Peter T.A.

    2013-02-12

    An aerosol particle analyzer includes a laser ablation chamber, a gas-filled conduit, and a mass spectrometer. The laser ablation chamber can be operated at a low pressure, which can be from 0.1 mTorr to 30 mTorr. The ablated ions are transferred into a gas-filled conduit. The gas-filled conduit reduces the electrical charge and the speed of ablated ions as they collide and mix with buffer gases in the gas-filled conduit. Preferably, the gas filled-conduit includes an electromagnetic multipole structure that collimates the nascent ions into a beam, which is guided into the mass spectrometer. Because the gas-filled conduit allows storage of vast quantities of the ions from the ablated particles, the ions from a single ablated particle can be analyzed multiple times and by a variety of techniques to supply statistically meaningful analysis of composition and isotope ratios.

  6. Biogenic sulfur emissions and aerosols over the tropical South Atlantic: 3. Atmospheric dimethylsulfide, aerosols and cloud condensation nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreae, Meinrat O.; Elbert, Wolfgang; de Mora, Stephen J.

    1995-06-01

    We measured dimethylsulfide in air (DMSa) and the number concentration, size distribution, and chemical composition of atmospheric aerosols, including the concentration of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), during February-March 1991 over the tropical South Atlantic along 19°S (F/S Meteor, cruise 15/3). Aerosol number/size distributions were determined with a laser-optical particle counter, condensation nuclei (CN) concentrations with a TSI 3020, and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) with a Hudson-type supersaturation chamber. Aerosol samples were collected on two-stage stacked filters and analyzed by ion chromatography for soluble ion concentrations. Black carbon in aerosols was measured by visible light absorption and used to identify and eliminate periods with anthropogenic pollution from the data set. Meteorological analysis shows that most of the air masses sampled had spent extended periods over remote marine areas in the tropical and subtropical region. DMSa was closely correlated with the sea-to- air DMS flux calculated from DMS concentrations in seawater and meteorological data. Sea salt made the largest contribution to aerosol mass and volume but provided only a small fraction of the aerosol number concentration. The submicron aerosol had a mean composition close to ammonium bisulfate, with the addition of some methanesulfonate. Aerosol (CN and CCN) number and non-sea-salt sulfate concentrations were significantly correlated with DMS concentration and flux. This suggests that DMS oxidation followed by aerosol nucleation and growth in the marine boundary layer is an important, if not dominating, source of CN and possibly CCN. The degree of correlation between DMS and particle concentrations in the marine boundary layer may be strongly influenced by the different time scales of the processes regulating these concentrations. Our results provide strong support for several aspects of the CLAW hypothesis, which proposes the existence of a feedback loop linking DMS

  7. Characterization of Ribavirin Aerosol With Small Particle Aerosol Generator and Vibrating Mesh Micropump Aerosol Technologies.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Brian K; Betit, Peter; Fink, James B; Pereira, Luis M; Arnold, John

    2016-05-01

    Ribavirin is an antiviral drug that can be administered by inhalation. Despite advancements in the oral delivery of this medication, there has been a renewed interested in delivering ribavirin via the pulmonary system. Although data are not conclusive that inhaled ribavirin improves outcomes, we set out to determine whether delivery by a newer generation nebulizer, the vibrating mesh micropump, was as effective as the recommended small-particle aerosol generator system. We compared the physicochemical makeup and concentrations of ribavirin before and after nebulization with 0.9% NaCl and sterile water. An Andersen cascade impactor was used to determine particle size distribution and mass median aerodynamic diameter, and an absolute filter was used to measure total aerosol emitted output and inhaled dose during mechanical ventilation and spontaneous breathing. Ribavirin was analyzed and quantified using high-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometric detection. Ribavirin was found to be stable in both 0.9% aqueous NaCl and sterile water with an r(2) value of 0.96 and identical coefficients of variation with no difference in drug concentration before and after nebulization with the vibrating mesh micropump. The small-particle aerosol generator produced a smaller mass median aerodynamic diameter (1.84 μm) than the vibrating mesh micropump (3.63 μm, P = .02); however, there was no significant difference in the proportion of drug mass in the 0.7-4.7-μm particle range. Total drug delivery was similar with the small-particle aerosol generator and vibrating mesh micropump in both spontaneously breathing (P = .77) and mechanical ventilation (P = .48) models. The vibrating mesh micropump nebulizer may provide an effective alternative to the small-particle aerosol generator in administration of ribavirin using NaCl or sterile water, both on and off the ventilator. Further clinical studies are needed to compare efficacy. Copyright © 2016 by Daedalus

  8. Hygroscopic growth of urban aerosol particles during the 2009 Mirage-Shanghai Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Xingnan; Tang, Chen; Yin, Zi; Chen, Jianmin; Ma, Zhen; Kong, Lingdong; Yang, Xin; Gao, Wei; Geng, Fuhai

    2013-01-01

    The hygroscopic properties of submicrometer urban aerosol particles were studied during the 2009 Mirage-Shanghai Campaign. The urban aerosols were composed of more-hygroscopic and nearly-hydrophobic particles, together with a trace of less-hygroscopic particles. The mean hygroscopicity parameter κ of the more-hygroscopic mode varied in the range of 0.27-0.39 depending on particle size. The relative abundance of the more-hygroscopic particles at any size was ca. 70%, slightly increasing with particle size. The number fraction of the nearly-hydrophobic particles fluctuated between 0.1 and 0.4 daily, in accordance with traffic emissions and atmospheric diffusion. The results from relative humidity dependence on hygroscopic growth and chemical analysis of fine particles indicated that particulate nitrate formation through the homogenous gas-phase reaction was suppressed under ammonia-deficient atmosphere in summer whereas the equilibrium was broken by more available NH3 during adverse meteorological conditions.

  9. LOAC: a small aerosol optical counter/sizer for ground-based and balloon measurements of the size distribution and nature of atmospheric particles - Part 1: Principle of measurements and instrument evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renard, Jean-Baptiste; Dulac, François; Berthet, Gwenaël; Lurton, Thibaut; Vignelles, Damien; Jégou, Fabrice; Tonnelier, Thierry; Jeannot, Matthieu; Couté, Benoit; Akiki, Rony; Verdier, Nicolas; Mallet, Marc; Gensdarmes, François; Charpentier, Patrick; Mesmin, Samuel; Duverger, Vincent; Dupont, Jean-Charles; Elias, Thierry; Crenn, Vincent; Sciare, Jean; Zieger, Paul; Salter, Matthew; Roberts, Tjarda; Giacomoni, Jérôme; Gobbi, Matthieu; Hamonou, Eric; Olafsson, Haraldur; Dagsson-Waldhauserova, Pavla; Camy-Peyret, Claude; Mazel, Christophe; Décamps, Thierry; Piringer, Martin; Surcin, Jérémy; Daugeron, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    The study of aerosols in the troposphere and in the stratosphere is of major importance both for climate and air quality studies. Among the numerous instruments available, optical aerosol particles counters (OPCs) provide the size distribution in diameter range from about 100 nm to a few tens of µm. Most of them are very sensitive to the nature of aerosols, and this can result in significant biases in the retrieved size distribution. We describe here a new versatile optical particle/sizer counter named LOAC (Light Optical Aerosol Counter), which is light and compact enough to perform measurements not only at the surface but under all kinds of balloons in the troposphere and in the stratosphere. LOAC is an original OPC performing observations at two scattering angles. The first one is around 12°, and is almost insensitive to the refractive index of the particles; the second one is around 60° and is strongly sensitive to the refractive index of the particles. By combining measurement at the two angles, it is possible to retrieve the size distribution between 0.2 and 100 µm and to estimate the nature of the dominant particles (droplets, carbonaceous, salts and mineral particles) when the aerosol is relatively homogeneous. This typology is based on calibration charts obtained in the laboratory. The uncertainty for total concentrations measurements is ±20 % when concentrations are higher than 1 particle cm-3 (for a 10 min integration time). For lower concentrations, the uncertainty is up to about ±60 % for concentrations smaller than 10-2 particle cm-3. Also, the uncertainties in size calibration are ±0.025 µm for particles smaller than 0.6 µm, 5 % for particles in the 0.7-2 µm range, and 10 % for particles greater than 2 µm. The measurement accuracy of submicronic particles could be reduced in a strongly turbid case when concentration of particles > 3 µm exceeds a few particles cm-3. Several campaigns of cross-comparison of LOAC with other particle counting

  10. Chemical mechanisms governing atmospheric new particle formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bzdek, Bryan Richard

    The goal of this dissertation is to understand the chemistry that governs new particle formation, a ubiquitous and important atmospheric process. New particle formation occurs when gas phase precursors condense to create small molecular clusters on the order of 1 nm diameter. Those clusters must then grow rapidly and ultimately may serve as the seeds for cloud droplets. However, modelers have substantial difficulty predicting the frequency and efficiency of new particle formation. This predictive difficulty is an important contributor to the uncertainty in aerosol effects on global climate and therefore also contributes to the large uncertainty in anthropogenic effects on climate. To reduce these uncertainties, a more precise understanding of how particles nucleate and grow in the atmospheric is required. In this dissertation, mass spectrometry is used to determine the chemical processes involved in new particle formation. Gas phase species such as sulfuric acid, ammonia, amines, and organic matter are contributors but exactly how and how much each contributes to the growth of nanoparticles is not well understood. Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS) and Nano Aerosol Mass Spectrometry (NAMS) are used to study the chemical composition and reactivity of clusters < 3 nm diameter and nanoparticles 10-20 nm diameter, respectively. The FTICR-MS studies are laboratory based, whereas the NAMS studies are field based. Measurements of cluster composition and reactivity using FTICR-MS permit prediction of the composition of ambient molecular clusters. For ambient molecular clusters to become relevant to climate by serving as cloud condensation nuclei, they must grow rapidly. NAMS measurements at 20 nm diameter permit determination of nanoparticle growth pathways. This dissertation shows that sulfuric acid adds to both clusters and nanoparticles in a collision limited manner. On the other hand, ammonia uptake in both size regimes may not

  11. Optical and Hygroscopic Studies of Aerosols In Simulated Planetary Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasenkopf, Christa A.

    2011-08-01

    Basic characteristics of the early Earth climate, the only known environment in the Universe in which life has been known to emerge and thrive, remain a mystery. In particular, little is understood about the Earth's atmosphere 2.8 billion years ago. From climate models and laboratory studies, it is postulated that an organic haze, much like that found on Saturn's largest moon Titan, covered the early Earth. This haze, generated from photolysis of carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4), may have had profound climatic consequences. Climate models of the early Earth that include this haze have had to rely upon optical properties of a Titan laboratory analog. Titan haze, though thought to be similar, is formed from a different combination of precursor gases and by different energy sources than early Earth haze. This thesis examines the direct and indirect radiative effects of aerosol on early Earth climate by studying the optical and hygroscopic properties of a laboratory analog. A Titan analog is studied for comparison and to better understand spacecraft-retrieved haze chemical and optical properties from Titan. The properties of the laboratory analogs, generated in a flowing reactor cell with a continuum ultraviolet (UV) light source, were primarily measured using cavity ringdown aerosol extinction spectroscopy and UV-visible (UV-Vis) transmission spectroscopy. We find that the optical properties of our early Earth analog are significantly different than those of the Titan analog from Khare et al. (1984). In both the UV and visible, when modeled as fractals, particles with the optical properties of the early Earth analog have approximately 30% larger extinction efficiencies than particles with Khare et al. (1984) values. This result implies our early Earth haze analog would provide a more efficient UV shield and have a stronger antigreenhouse effect than the Khare et al. (1984) Titan analog. Our Titan analog has significantly smaller imaginary refractive index values

  12. A Global Data Assimilation System for Atmospheric Aerosol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    daSilva, Arlindo

    1999-01-01

    We will give an overview of an aerosol data assimilation system which combines advances in remote sensing of atmospheric aerosols, aerosol modeling and data assimilation methodology to produce high spatial and temporal resolution 3D aerosol fields. Initially, the Goddard Aerosol Assimilation System (GAAS) will assimilate TOMS, AVHRR and AERONET observations; later we will include MODIS and MISR. This data assimilation capability will allows us to integrate complementing aerosol observations from these platforms, enabling the development of an assimilated aerosol climatology as well as a global aerosol forecasting system in support of field campaigns. Furthermore, this system provides an interactive retrieval framework for each aerosol observing satellites, in particular TOMS and AVHRR. The Goddard Aerosol Assimilation System (GAAS) takes advantage of recent advances in constituent data assimilation at DAO, including flow dependent parameterizations of error covariances and the proper consideration of model bias. For its prognostic transport model, GAAS will utilize the Goddard Ozone, Chemistry, Aerosol, Radiation and Transport (GOCART) model developed at NASA/GSFC Codes 916 and 910.3. GOCART includes the Lin-Rood flux-form, semi-Langrangian transport model with parameterized aerosol chemistry and physical processes for absorbing (dust and black carbon) and non-absorbing aerosols (sulfate and organic carbon). Observations and model fields are combined using a constituent version of DAO's Physical-space Statistical Analysis System (PSAS), including its adaptive quality control system. In this talk we describe the main components of this assimilation system and present preliminary results obtained by assimilating TOMS data.

  13. The atmosphere as particle detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanev, Todor

    1990-01-01

    The possibility of using an inflatable, gas-filled balloon as a TeV gamma-ray detector on the moon is considered. By taking an atmosphere of Xenon gas there, or by extracting it on the moon, a layman's detector design is presented. In spite of its shortcomings, the exercise illustrates several of the novel features offered by particle physics on the moon.

  14. The atmosphere as particle detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanev, Todor

    1990-01-01

    The possibility of using an inflatable, gas-filled balloon as a TeV gamma-ray detector on the moon is considered. By taking an atmosphere of Xenon gas there, or by extracting it on the moon, a layman's detector design is presented. In spite of its shortcomings, the exercise illustrates several of the novel features offered by particle physics on the moon.

  15. Validation of The Standard Aerosol Models Used In The Atmospheric Correction Algorithms For Satellite Ocean Observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martiny, N.; Santer, R.

    Over ocean, the total radiance measured by the satellite sensors at the top of the atmo- sphere is mainly atmospheric. In order to access to the water leaving radiance, directly related to the concentration of the different components of the water, we need to cor- rect the satellite measurements from the important atmospheric contribution. In the atmosphere, the light emitted by the sun is scattered by the molecules, absorbed by the gases, and both scattered and absorbed in unknown proportions by the aerosols, particles confined in the first layer of the atmosphere due to their large size. The remote sensing of the aerosols represents then a complex step in the atmospheric correction scheme. Over ocean, the principle of the aerosol remote sensing lies on the assump- tion that the water is absorbent in the red and the near-infrared. The aerosol model is then deduced from these spectral bands and used to extrapolate the aerosol optical properties in the visible wavelengths. For ocean color sensors such as CZCS, OCTS, POLDER, SeaWiFS or MODIS, the atmospheric correction algorithms use standard aerosol models defined by Shettle &Fenn for their look-up-tables. Over coastal wa- ters, are these models still suitable? The goal of this work is to validate the standard aerosol models used in the atmospheric correction algorithms over coastal zones. For this work, we use ground-based in-situ measurements from the CIMEL sunphotome- ter instrument. Using the extinction measurements, we can deduce the aerosol spectral dependency which falls between the spectral dependency of two standard Shettle &Fenn aerosol models. After the interpolation of the aerosol model, we can use it to extrapolate in the visible the optical parameters needed for the atmospheric correction scheme: Latm, the atmospheric radiance and T, the atmospheric transmittance. The simulations are done using a radiative transfer code based on the successive order of scattering. Latm and T are then used for

  16. Size-Segregated Aerosol Composition and Mass Loading of Atmospheric Particles as Part of the Pacific Northwest 2001(PNW2001) Air Quality Study In Puget Sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Disselkamp, R. S.; Barrie, L. A.; Shutthanadan, S.; Cliff, S.; Cahill, T.

    2001-12-01

    In mid-August, 2001, an aircraft-based air-quality study was performed in the Puget Sound, WA, area entitled PNW2001 (http://www.pnl.gov/pnw2001). The objectives of this field campaign were the following: 1. reveal information about the 3-dimensional distribution of ozone, its gaseous precursors and fine particulate matter during weather conditions favoring air pollution; 2. derive information about the accuracy of urban and biogenic emissions inventories that are used to drive the air quality forecast models; and 3. examine the accuracy of modeled ozone concentration with that observed. In support of these efforts, we collected time-averaged ( { ~}10 minute averages), size-segregated, aerosol composition and mass-loading information using ex post facto analysis techniques of synchrotron x-ray fluorescence (s-XRF), proton induced x-ray emissions(PIXE), proton elastic scattering (PESA), and scanning transmission ion microscopy (STIM). This is the first time these analysis techniques have been used together on samples collected from aircraft using an optimized 3-stage rotating drum impactor. In our presentation, we will discuss the aerosol components in three aerosol size fractions as identified by statistical analysis of multielemental data (including total mass, H, Na, Mg, Al, Si, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Pb) and relate variations in these components to physical aerosol properties, other gaseous trace constituents and to air mass origin.

  17. Fine mode aerosol composition at three long-term atmospheric monitoring sites in the Amazon Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Artaxo, P.; Gerab, F.; Yamasoe, M.A.; Martins, J.V.

    1994-11-01

    The Amazon Basin tropical rain forest is a key region to study processes that are changing the composition of the global atmosphere, including the large amount of fine mode aerosol particles emitted during biomass burning that might influence the global atmosphere. Three background monitoring stations, Alta Floresta, Cuiaba, and Serra do Navio, are operating continuously measuring aerosol composition. Fine (particle diameter less than 2.0 microns) and coarse (particle diameter greater than 2.0 microns and less than 10 microns) mode aerosol particles were collected using stacked filter units. Particle-induced X-ray emission was used to measure concentrations of up to 20 elements in the fine mode: Al, Si, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Br, Rb, Sr, Zr, and Pb. Soot carbon and gravimetric mass analysis were also performed. Absolute Principal Factor Analysis (APFA) has derived absolute elemental source profiles. APFA showed four aerosol particle components: soil dust (Al, Ca, Ti, Mn, Fe), biomass burning (soot, fine mode mass concentration, K, Cl), natural primary biogenic particles with gas-to-particle component (K, S, Ca, Mn, Zn), and marine aerosol (Cl). Biogenic and biomass burning aerosol particles dominate the fine mode mass concentration, with the presence of K, P, S, Cl, Zn, Br, and fine mode mass concentration (FPM). At the Alta Floresta and Cuiaba sites, during the dry season, a strong component of biomass burning is observed. Inhalable particulate matter (particle diameter less than 10 microns) mass concentration up to 700 micrograms/cu m was measured. Fine particle mass concentration alone can go as high as 400 micrograms/cu m for large regions.

  18. Size distribution and scattering phase function of aerosol particles retrieved from sky brightness measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Y. J.; Gitelson, A.; Karnieli, A.; Ganor, E. (Editor); Fraser, R. S.; Nakajima, T.; Mattoo, S.; Holben, B. N.

    1994-01-01

    Ground-based measurements of the solar transmission and sky radiance in a horizontal plane through the Sun are taken in several geographical regions and aerosol types: dust in a desert transition zone in Israel, sulfate particles in Eastern and Western Europe, tropical aerosol in Brazil, and mixed continental/maritime aerosol in California. Stratospheric aerosol was introduced after the eruption of Mount Pinatubo in June 1991. Therefore measurements taken before the eruption are used to analyze the properties of tropospheric aerosol; measurements from 1992 are also used to detect the particle size and concentration of stratospheric aerosol. The measurements are used to retrieve the size distribution and the scattering phase function at large scattering angles of the undisturbed aerosol particles. The retrieved properties represent an average on the entire atmospheric column. A comparison between the retrieved phase function for a scattering angle of 120 deg, with phase function predicted from the retrieved size distribution, is used to test the assumption of particle homogeneity and sphericity in radiative transfer models (Mie theory). The effect was found to be small (20% +/- 15%). For the stratospheric aerosol (sulfates), as expected, the phase function was very well predicted using the Mie theory. A model with a power law distribution, based on the spectral dependence of the optical thickness, alpha, cannot estimate accurately the phase function (up to 50% error for lambda = 0.87 microns). Before the Pinatubo eruption the ratio between the volumes of sulfate and coarse particles was very well correlated with alpha. The Pinatubo stratospheric aerosol destroyed this correlation. The aerosol optical properties are compared with analysis of the size, shape, and composition of the individual particles by electron microscopy of in situ samples. The measured volume size distribution before the injection of stratospheric aerosol consistently show two modes, sulfate

  19. Size distribution and scattering phase function of aerosol particles retrieved from sky brightness measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Y. J.; Gitelson, A.; Karnieli, A.; Ganor, E. (Editor); Fraser, R. S.; Nakajima, T.; Mattoo, S.; Holben, B. N.

    1994-01-01

    Ground-based measurements of the solar transmission and sky radiance in a horizontal plane through the Sun are taken in several geographical regions and aerosol types: dust in a desert transition zone in Israel, sulfate particles in Eastern and Western Europe, tropical aerosol in Brazil, and mixed continental/maritime aerosol in California. Stratospheric aerosol was introduced after the eruption of Mount Pinatubo in June 1991. Therefore measurements taken before the eruption are used to analyze the properties of tropospheric aerosol; measurements from 1992 are also used to detect the particle size and concentration of stratospheric aerosol. The measurements are used to retrieve the size distribution and the scattering phase function at large scattering angles of the undisturbed aerosol particles. The retrieved properties represent an average on the entire atmospheric column. A comparison between the retrieved phase function for a scattering angle of 120 deg, with phase function predicted from the retrieved size distribution, is used to test the assumption of particle homogeneity and sphericity in radiative transfer models (Mie theory). The effect was found to be small (20% +/- 15%). For the stratospheric aerosol (sulfates), as expected, the phase function was very well predicted using the Mie theory. A model with a power law distribution, based on the spectral dependence of the optical thickness, alpha, cannot estimate accurately the phase function (up to 50% error for lambda = 0.87 microns). Before the Pinatubo eruption the ratio between the volumes of sulfate and coarse particles was very well correlated with alpha. The Pinatubo stratospheric aerosol destroyed this correlation. The aerosol optical properties are compared with analysis of the size, shape, and composition of the individual particles by electron microscopy of in situ samples. The measured volume size distribution before the injection of stratospheric aerosol consistently show two modes, sulfate

  20. Glass transition measurements in mixed organic and organic/inorganic aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dette, Hans Peter; Qi, Mian; Schröder, David; Godt, Adelheid; Koop, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    The recent proposal of a semi-solid or glassy state of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles has sparked intense research in that area. In particular, potential effects of a glassy aerosol state such as incomplete gas-to-particle partitioning of semi-volatile organics, inhibited chemical reactions and water uptake, and the potential to act as heterogeneous ice nuclei have been identified so far. Many of these studies use well-studied proxies for oxidized organics such as sugars or other polyols. There are, however, few measurements on compounds that do exist in atmospheric aerosol particles. Here, we have performed studies on the phase state of organics that actually occur in natural SOA particles arising from the oxidation of alpha-pinene emitted in boreal forests. We have investigated the two marker compounds pinonic acid and 3-methylbutane-1,2,3-tricarboxylic acid (3-MBTCA) and their mixtures. 3-MBCTA was synthesized from methyl isobutyrate and dimethyl maleate in two steps. In order to transfer these substances into a glassy state we have developed a novel aerosol spray drying technique. Dilute solutions of the relevant organics are atomized into aerosol particles which are dried subsequently by diffusion drying. The dried aerosol particles are then recollected in an impactor and studied by means of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), which provides unambiguous information on the aerosols' phase state, i.e. whether the particles are crystalline or glassy. In the latter case DSC is used to determine the glass transition temperature Tg of the investigated samples. Using the above setup we were able to determine Tg of various mixtures of organic aerosol compounds as a function of their dry mass fraction, thus allowing to infer a relation between Tg and the O:C ratio of the aerosols. Moreover, we also studied the glass transition behavior of mixed organic/inorganic aerosol particles, including the effects of liquid-liquid phase separation upon drying.

  1. Aerosol physical, chemical and optical properties observed in the ambient atmosphere during haze pollution conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhengqiang; Xie, Yisong; Li, Donghui; Li, Kaitao; Zhang, Ying; Li, Li; Lv, Yang; Qie, Lili; Xu, Hua

    Aerosol’s properties in the ambient atmosphere may differ significantly from sampling results due to containing of abundant water content. We performed sun-sky radiometer measurements in Beijing during 2011 and 2012 winter to obtain distribution of spectral and angular sky radiance. The measurements are then used to retrieve aerosol physical, chemical and optical properties, including single scattering albedo, size distribution, complex refractive indices and aerosol component fractions identified as black carbon, brown carbon, mineral dust, ammonium sulfate-like components and water content inside particle matters. We found that during winter haze condition aerosol is dominated by fine particles with center radius of about 0.2 micron. Fine particles contribute about 93% to total aerosol extinction of solar light, and result in serious decrease of atmospheric visibility during haze condition. The percentage of light absorption of haze aerosol can up to about 10% among its total extinction, much higher than that of unpolluted conditions, that causes significant radiative cooling effects suppressing atmospheric convection and dispersion of pollutants. Moreover, the average water content occupies about one third of the ambient aerosol in volume which suggests the important effect of ambient humidity in the formation of haze pollution.

  2. Reduced anthropogenic aerosol radiative forcing caused by biogenic new particle formation.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Hamish; Sengupta, Kamalika; Rap, Alexandru; Duplissy, Jonathan; Frege, Carla; Williamson, Christina; Heinritzi, Martin; Simon, Mario; Yan, Chao; Almeida, João; Tröstl, Jasmin; Nieminen, Tuomo; Ortega, Ismael K; Wagner, Robert; Dunne, Eimear M; Adamov, Alexey; Amorim, Antonio; Bernhammer, Anne-Kathrin; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; Brilke, Sophia; Chen, Xuemeng; Craven, Jill S; Dias, Antonio; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Fischer, Lukas; Flagan, Richard C; Franchin, Alessandro; Fuchs, Claudia; Guida, Roberto; Hakala, Jani; Hoyle, Christopher R; Jokinen, Tuija; Junninen, Heikki; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kim, Jaeseok; Kirkby, Jasper; Krapf, Manuel; Kürten, Andreas; Laaksonen, Ari; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Mathot, Serge; Molteni, Ugo; Monks, Sarah A; Onnela, Antti; Peräkylä, Otso; Piel, Felix; Petäjä, Tuukka; Praplan, Arnaud P; Pringle, Kirsty J; Richards, Nigel A D; Rissanen, Matti P; Rondo, Linda; Sarnela, Nina; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Scott, Catherine E; Seinfeld, John H; Sharma, Sangeeta; Sipilä, Mikko; Steiner, Gerhard; Stozhkov, Yuri; Stratmann, Frank; Tomé, Antonio; Virtanen, Annele; Vogel, Alexander Lucas; Wagner, Andrea C; Wagner, Paul E; Weingartner, Ernest; Wimmer, Daniela; Winkler, Paul M; Ye, Penglin; Zhang, Xuan; Hansel, Armin; Dommen, Josef; Donahue, Neil M; Worsnop, Douglas R; Baltensperger, Urs; Kulmala, Markku; Curtius, Joachim; Carslaw, Kenneth S

    2016-10-25

    The magnitude of aerosol radiative forcing caused by anthropogenic emissions depends on the baseline state of the atmosphere under pristine preindustrial conditions. Measurements show that particle formation in atmospheric conditions can occur solely from biogenic vapors. Here, we evaluate the potential effect of this source of particles on preindustrial cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations and aerosol-cloud radiative forcing over the industrial period. Model simulations show that the pure biogenic particle formation mechanism has a much larger relative effect on CCN concentrations in the preindustrial atmosphere than in the present atmosphere because of the lower aerosol concentrations. Consequently, preindustrial cloud albedo is increased more than under present day conditions, and therefore the cooling forcing of anthropogenic aerosols is reduced. The mechanism increases CCN concentrations by 20-100% over a large fraction of the preindustrial lower atmosphere, and the magnitude of annual global mean radiative forcing caused by changes of cloud albedo since 1750 is reduced by [Formula: see text] (27%) to [Formula: see text] Model uncertainties, relatively slow formation rates, and limited available ambient measurements make it difficult to establish the significance of a mechanism that has its dominant effect under preindustrial conditions. Our simulations predict more particle formation in the Amazon than is observed. However, the first observation of pure organic nucleation has now been reported for the free troposphere. Given the potentially significant effect on anthropogenic forcing, effort should be made to better understand such naturally driven aerosol processes.

  3. Reduced anthropogenic aerosol radiative forcing caused by biogenic new particle formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Hamish; Sengupta, Kamalika; Rap, Alexandru; Duplissy, Jonathan; Frege, Carla; Williamson, Christina; Heinritzi, Martin; Simon, Mario; Yan, Chao; Almeida, João; Tröstl, Jasmin; Nieminen, Tuomo; Ortega, Ismael K.; Wagner, Robert; Dunne, Eimear M.; Adamov, Alexey; Amorim, Antonio; Bernhammer, Anne-Kathrin; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; Brilke, Sophia; Chen, Xuemeng; Craven, Jill S.; Dias, Antonio; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Fischer, Lukas; Flagan, Richard C.; Franchin, Alessandro; Fuchs, Claudia; Guida, Roberto; Hakala, Jani; Hoyle, Christopher R.; Jokinen, Tuija; Junninen, Heikki; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kim, Jaeseok; Kirkby, Jasper; Krapf, Manuel; Kürten, Andreas; Laaksonen, Ari; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Mathot, Serge; Molteni, Ugo; Monks, Sarah A.; Onnela, Antti; Peräkylä, Otso; Piel, Felix; Petäjä, Tuukka; Praplan, Arnaud P.; Pringle, Kirsty J.; Richards, Nigel A. D.; Rissanen, Matti P.; Rondo, Linda; Sarnela, Nina; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Scott, Catherine E.; Seinfeld, John H.; Sharma, Sangeeta; Sipilä, Mikko; Steiner, Gerhard; Stozhkov, Yuri; Stratmann, Frank; Tomé, Antonio; Virtanen, Annele; Vogel, Alexander Lucas; Wagner, Andrea C.; Wagner, Paul E.; Weingartner, Ernest; Wimmer, Daniela; Winkler, Paul M.; Ye, Penglin; Zhang, Xuan; Hansel, Armin; Dommen, Josef; Donahue, Neil M.; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Baltensperger, Urs; Kulmala, Markku; Curtius, Joachim; Carslaw, Kenneth S.

    2016-10-01

    The magnitude of aerosol radiative forcing caused by anthropogenic emissions depends on the baseline state of the atmosphere under pristine preindustrial conditions. Measurements show that particle formation in atmospheric conditions can occur solely from biogenic vapors. Here, we evaluate the potential effect of this source of particles on preindustrial cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations and aerosol-cloud radiative forcing over the industrial period. Model simulations show that the pure biogenic particle formation mechanism has a much larger relative effect on CCN concentrations in the preindustrial atmosphere than in the present atmosphere because of the lower aerosol concentrations. Consequently, preindustrial cloud albedo is increased more than under present day conditions, and therefore the cooling forcing of anthropogenic aerosols is reduced. The mechanism increases CCN concentrations by 20-100% over a large fraction of the preindustrial lower atmosphere, and the magnitude of annual global mean radiative forcing caused by changes of cloud albedo since 1750 is reduced by 0.22 W m-2 (27%) to -0.60 W m-2. Model uncertainties, relatively slow formation rates, and limited available ambient measurements make it difficult to establish the significance of a mechanism that has its dominant effect under preindustrial conditions. Our simulations predict more particle formation in the Amazon than is observed. However, the first observation of pure organic nucleation has now been reported for the free troposphere. Given the potentially significant effect on anthropogenic forcing, effort should be made to better understand such naturally driven aerosol processes.

  4. Heterogeneous Uptake of HO2 Radicals onto Submicron Atmospheric Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, P. S.; George, I. J.; Brooks, B.; Whalley, L. K.; Baeza-Romero, M. T.; Heard, D. E.

    2012-12-01

    OH and HO2 (HOx) radicals are closely coupled and OH is responsible for the majority of the oxidation in the troposphere and controls the concentrations of many trace species. Therefore, it is important to be able to accurately predict HOx concentrations. However, some field measurement studies have reported significantly lower HO2 radical concentrations than calculated by constrained box models using detailed chemical mechanisms. Although the inclusion of halogen chemistry into the mechanisms can explain much of the differences in the marine boundary layer (MBL) (1,2), HO2 uptake by aerosols has been suggested as a possible sink in the MBL (2), the Arctic troposphere (3) and the upper troposphere (4). There have been very few laboratory studies (5,6) on HO2 uptake by aerosols and the rates and mechanism is still uncertain. The HO2 uptake coefficients were measured for a variety of atmospherically relevant inorganic and organic aerosols. The measurements were performed using an aerosol flow tube combined with a Fluorescence Assay by Gas Expansion (FAGE) detector. The sensitive FAGE cell allowed low HO2 concentrations (108-109 molecule cm-3) to be injected into the flow tube using a moveable injector. By moving the injector along the flow tube, position dependent HO2 decays were able to be recorded which when plotted against the total aerosol surface area allowed an uptake coefficient to be obtained. The aerosols were generated using an atomiser or by homogeneous nucleation and the total aerosol surface area was measured using a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer. The HO2 uptake coefficient (γ) was measured at room temperature for dry inorganic salts and dry organics (γ< 0.004), wet inorganic salts and wet organics (γ= 0.002-0.005), wet copper doped ammonium sulfate aerosols (γ= 0.28± 0.05) and ammonium sulfate aerosols doped with different molar amounts of iron (γ= 0.003-0.06). The pH dependence of the HO2 uptake coefficient was investigated, however no

  5. Particle size distribution of the stratospheric aerosol from SCIAMACHY limb measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozanov, Alexei; Malinina, Elizaveta; Bovensmann, Heinrich; Burrows, John

    2017-04-01

    A crucial role of the stratospheric aerosols for the radiative budget of the Earth's atmosphere and the consequences for the climate change are widely recognized. A reliable knowledge on physical and optical properties of the stratospheric aerosols as well as on their vertical and spatial distributing is a key issue to assure a proper initialization and running conditions for climate models. On a global scale this information can only be gained from space borne measurements. While a series of past, present and future instruments provide extensive date sets of such aerosol characteristics as extinction coefficient or backscattering ratio, information on a size distribution of the stratospheric aerosols is sparse. One of the important sources on vertically and spatially resolved information on the particle size distribution of stratospheric aerosols is provided by space borne measurements of the scattered solar light in limb viewing geometry performed in visible, near-infrared and short-wave infrared spectral ranges. SCIAMACHY (SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY) instrument operated on the European satellite Envisat from 2002 to 2102 was capable of providing spectral information needed to retrieve parameters of aerosol particle size distributions. In this presentation we discuss the retrieval method, present first validation results with SAGE II data and analyze first data sets of stratospheric aerosol particle size distribution parameters obtained from SCIAMACHY limb measurements. The research work was performed in the framework of ROMIC (Role of the middle atmosphere in climate) project.

  6. Desorption atmospheric pressure photoionization high-resolution mass spectrometry: a complementary approach for the chemical analysis of atmospheric aerosols.

    PubMed

    Parshintsev, Jevgeni; Vaikkinen, Anu; Lipponen, Katriina; Vrkoslav, Vladimir; Cvačka, Josef; Kostiainen, Risto; Kotiaho, Tapio; Hartonen, Kari; Riekkola, Marja-Liisa; Kauppila, Tiina J

    2015-07-15

    On-line chemical characterization methods of atmospheric aerosols are essential to increase our understanding of physicochemical processes in the atmosphere, and to study biosphere-atmosphere interactions. Several techniques, including aerosol mass spectrometry, are nowadays available, but they all suffer from some disadvantages. In this research, desorption atmospheric pressure photoionization high-resolution (Orbitrap) mass spectrometry (DAPPI-HRMS) is introduced as a complementary technique for the fast analysis of aerosol chemical composition without the need for sample preparation. Atmospheric aerosols from city air were collected on a filter, desorbed in a DAPPI source with a hot stream of toluene and nitrogen, and ionized using a vacuum ultraviolet lamp at atmospheric pressure. To study the applicability of the technique for ambient aerosol analysis, several samples were collected onto filters and analyzed, with the focus being on selected organic acids. To compare the DAPPI-HRMS data with results obtained by an established method, each filter sample was divided into two equal parts, and the second half of the filter was extracted and analyzed by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS). The DAPPI results agreed with the measured aerosol particle number. In addition to the targeted acids, the LC/MS and DAPPI-HRMS methods were found to detect different compounds, thus providing complementary information about the aerosol samples. DAPPI-HRMS showed several important oxidation products of terpenes, and numerous compounds were tentatively identified. Thanks to the soft ionization, high mass resolution, fast analysis, simplicity and on-line applicability, the proposed methodology has high potential in the field of atmospheric research. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Characterizations of atmospheric fungal aerosol in Beijing, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Linlin; Engling, Guenter; He, Kebin; Du, Zhenyu

    2013-04-01

    Fungal aerosols constitute the most abundant fraction of biological aerosols in the atmosphere, influencing human health, the biosphere, atmospheric chemistry and climate. However, the total abundance of fungal spores in the atmosphere is still poorly understood and quantified. PM10 and PM2.5 samples were collected by high volume samplers simultaneously at a rural site (MY) and an urban site (THU) in Beijing, China. Various carbohydrates were quantified by high-performance anion exchange chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection (HPAEC-PAD), including the sugar alcohols mannitol and arabitol, proposed as molecular tracers for fungal aerosol. The annual average concentrations of arabitol in PM2.5 and PM10 at the THU site were 7.4±9.4 ng/m3 and 10.3±9.5 ng/m3, and the respective mannitol concentrations were 21.0±20.4 ng/m3 and 31.9±26.9 ng/m3. Compared to PM10, the monthly average concentrations of arabitol and mannitol in PM2.5 did not vary significantly and were present at nearly consistent levels in the different seasons. Moreover, during summer and autumn higher arabitol and mannitol levels than during spring and winter were observed in coarse particles, probably due to different dominant sources of fungal spores in different seasons. In the dry period (i.e., winter and spring) in Beijing, probably only the suspension from exposed surfaces, (e.g., soil resuspension, transported dust, etc.) can be regarded as the main sources for fungal aerosols. On the other hand, in summer and autumn, fungal spores in the atmosphere can be derived from more complex sources, including plants, vegetation decomposition and agricultural activity, such as ploughing; these fungal spore sources may contribute more to coarse PM. Mannitol and arabitol correlated well with each other, both in PM10 (R2 = 0.71) and PM2.5 (R2 = 0.81). Although fungal spore levels at rural sites were consistently higher than those at urban sites in other studies, the findings in our study were

  8. Strong radiative heating due to the mixing state of black carbon in atmospheric aerosols.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, M Z

    2001-02-08

    Aerosols affect the Earth's temperature and climate by altering the radiative properties of the atmosphere. A large positive component of this radiative forcing from aerosols is due to black carbon--soot--that is released from the burning of fossil fuel and biomass, and, to a lesser extent, natural fires, but the exact forcing is affected by how black carbon is mixed with other aerosol constituents. From studies of aerosol radiative forcing, it is known that black carbon can exist in one of several possible mixing states; distinct from other aerosol particles (externally mixed) or incorporated within them (internally mixed), or a black-carbon core could be surrounded by a well mixed shell. But so far it has been assumed that aerosols exist predominantly as an external mixture. Here I simulate the evolution of the chemical composition of aerosols, finding that the mixing state and direct forcing of the black-carbon component approach those of an internal mixture, largely due to coagulation and growth of aerosol particles. This finding implies a higher positive forcing from black carbon than previously thought, suggesting that the warming effect from black carbon may nearly balance the net cooling effect of other anthropogenic aerosol constituents. The magnitude of the direct radiative forcing from black carbon itself exceeds that due to CH4, suggesting that black carbon may be the second most important component of global warming after CO2 in terms of direct forcing.

  9. Aerosol Forcing of Climate Change and "Anomalous" Atmospheric Absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, James E.

    1999-01-01

    The forcings that drive long-term climate change are not known with an accuracy sufficient to define future climate change. Anthropogenic greenhouse gases (GHGs), which are well-measured, cause a strong positive (warming) forcing. But other, poorly measured, anthropogenic forcings, especially changes of atmospheric aerosols, clouds, and land-use patterns, cause a negative forcing that tends to offset greenhouse warming. We will focus on the role of aerosols as a climate forcing mechanism and the contribution that aerosols might make to the so- called "anomalous" atmospheric absorption that has been inferred from some atmospheric measurements.

  10. Aerosol Forcing of Climate Change and Anomalous Atmospheric Absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, James E.

    2000-01-01

    The forcings that drive long-term climate change are not known with an accuracy sufficient to define future climate change, Anthropogenic greenhouse gases (GHGs), which are well-measured, cause a strong positive (warming) forcing. But other, poorly measured, anthropogenic forcings, especially changes of atmospheric aerosols, clouds, and land-use patterns, cause a negative forcing that tends to offset greenhouse warming. We will focus on the role of aerosols as a climate forcing mechanism and the contribution that aerosols might make to the so-called "anomalous" atmospheric absorption that has been inferred from some atmospheric measurements.

  11. Laser radar measurements of the aerosol content of the atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grams, G. W.

    1969-01-01

    A summary of the results of laser radar observations of atmospheric aerosols is presented along with a description of the laser radar system devised during the study and of the data handling techniques utilized for the analysis of the data of the temporal and spatial distribution of atmospheric aerosols. Current research conducted by the group is directed toward the analysis of the frequency spectrum of laser radar echoes to obtain absolute measurements of the dust content of the atmosphere by resolving the molecular and aerosol contributions to the laser radar echoes.

  12. Aerosol Forcing of Climate Change and "Anomalous" Atmospheric Absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, James E.

    1999-01-01

    The forcings that drive long-term climate change are not known with an accuracy sufficient to define future climate change. Anthropogenic greenhouse gases (GHGs), which are well-measured, cause a strong positive (warming) forcing. But other, poorly measured, anthropogenic forcings, especially changes of atmospheric aerosols, clouds, and land-use patterns, cause a negative forcing that tends to offset greenhouse warming. We will focus on the role of aerosols as a climate forcing mechanism and the contribution that aerosols might make to the so- called "anomalous" atmospheric absorption that has been inferred from some atmospheric measurements.

  13. Aerosol Forcing of Climate Change and Anomalous Atmospheric Absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, James E.

    2000-01-01

    The forcings that drive long-term climate change are not known with an accuracy sufficient to define future climate change, Anthropogenic greenhouse gases (GHGs), which are well-measured, cause a strong positive (warming) forcing. But other, poorly measured, anthropogenic forcings, especially changes of atmospheric aerosols, clouds, and land-use patterns, cause a negative forcing that tends to offset greenhouse warming. We will focus on the role of aerosols as a climate forcing mechanism and the contribution that aerosols might make to the so-called "anomalous" atmospheric absorption that has been inferred from some atmospheric measurements.

  14. Gas-aerosol partitioning of semi volatile carbonyls in polluted atmosphere in Hachioji, Tokyo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsunaga, Sou N.; Kato, Shungo; Yoshino, Ayako; Greenberg, Jim P.; Kajii, Yoshizumi; Guenther, Alex B.

    2005-06-01

    Gaseous and particulate semi volatile carbonyls have been measured in urban air using an annular denuder sampling system. Three dicarbonyls, five aliphatic aldehydes and two hydroxy carbonyls were observed. Concentrations of other biogenic and anthropogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs), SO2, CO, NO2 and particle concentration were also measured. Estimated gas-aerosol equilibrium constants for the carbonyls showed an inverse correlation with the concentrations of anthropogenic pollutants such as benzene, isopentane and SO2. This suggests that the increase in the fraction of non-polar anthropogenic particles in the atmosphere could change the average property of the ambient aerosols and drive the gas particle equilibrium of the carbonyls to the gas phase. This trend is uncommon in remote forest air. In this study, we examined the factors controlling the equilibrium in the polluted atmosphere and show that there is a difference in gas-aerosol partition between polluted and clean air.

  15. The Role of Anthropogenic Aerosol in Atmospheric Circulation Changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcox, L.; Polvani, L. M.; Highwood, E.

    2015-12-01

    Changes in atmospheric circulation patterns play a dominant role in determining the impacts of a changing climate at the continental scale. Using CMIP5 single forcing experiments from an ensemble of models that provided anthropogenic aerosol only simulations to the archive, we quantify the influence of anthropogenic aerosol on several aspects of the atmospheric circulation, including tropical width, jet position, and jet strength. We show that there is a robust circulation response to anthropogenic aerosol in the mid twentieth century, induced by the large increases in emissions at that time. Although most anthropogenic aerosol is found in the Northern Hemisphere, a response is found in both the Northern and Southern hemispheres. We investigate the extent to which diversity in the temperature and circulation responses to aerosol are related to diversity in aerosol loading and radiative forcing.

  16. Organic Aerosols in Rural and Remote Atmospheric Environments: Insights from Aerosol Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q.; Jimenez, J.; Ulbrich, I.; Dunlea, E.; Decarlo, P.; Huffman, A.; Allan, J.; Coe, H.; Alfarra, R.; Canagaratna, M.; Onasch, T.; Jayne, J.; Worsnop, D.; Takami, A.; Miyoshi, T.; Shimono, A.; Hatakeyama, S.; Weimer, S.; Demerjian, K.; Drewnick, F.; Schneider, J.; Middlebrook, A.; Bahreini, R.; Cotrell, L.; Griffin, R.; Leaitch, R.; Li, S.; Hayden, K.; Rautiainen, J.

    2006-12-01

    Organic matter usually accounts for a large fraction of the fine particle mass in rural and remote atmospheres. However, little is known about the sources and properties of this material. Here we report findings on the characteristics and the major types of organic aerosols (OA) in urban downwind, high elevation, forested, and marine atmospheres based on analyses of more than 20 highly time resolved AMS datasets sampled from various locations in the mid-latitude Northern Hemisphere. Organic aerosol components are extracted from these datasets using a custom multiple component mass spectral analysis technique and the Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) method. These components are evaluated according to their extracted mass spectra and correlations to aerosol species, such as sulfate, nitrate, and elemental carbon, and gas-phase tracer compounds, such as CO and NOx. We have identified a hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA) component similar in mass spectra to the hydrocarbon substances observed at urban locations. We have also identified several oxygenated OA (OOA) components that show different fragmentation patterns and oxygen to carbon ratios in their mass spectra. Two OOA components a highly oxygenated that has mass spectrum resembling that of fulvic acid (a model compound representative for highly processed/oxidized organics in the environment) and a less oxygenated OOA component, whose spectrum is dominated with ions that are mainly associated with carbonyls and alcohols, are very frequently observed at various rural/remote sites. The oxygenated OOA component is more prevalent at downwind sites influenced by urban transport and the less oxygenated shows correlation to biogenic chamber OA at some locations. Compared to the total OOA concentration, HOA is generally very small and accounts for < 10% of the total OA mass at rural/remote sites. The comparisons between the concentrations of HOA and primary OA (POA) that would be predicted according to inert

  17. Aerosol Particle Property Comparisons Between MISR and AERONET Retrieved Values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaitley, B. J.; Kahn, R. A.

    2005-12-01

    Aerosol optical depth (AOT) data from the Multi-angle ImagingSpectroRadiometer (MISR) instrument aboard the NASA Earth Observing System's Terra satellite have already been systematically compared with ground-based data from the AERONET network. As a result of that study, MISR data are now being reprocessed with improved aerosol algorithms and aerosol models. The follow-on study reported here systematically compares MISR and AERONET particle micro-physical properties. This project is currently underway. Our goal is to use the statistical power of numerous AERONET measurements to map the behavior of the MISR property retrievals, identify strength and surprises in the MISR data, and use this information both to refine further the MISR retrieval algorithms and to assess the likely error envelopes in the MISR products. Multi-year data from 36 carefully chosen sites having good long-term measurement records are stratified by broad classes of aerosol air mass types: maritime, biomass burning, desert dust, pollution, and continental aerosols. Available AERONET spectral AOT measurements for two-hour windows around MISR overpass times are interpolated to MISR wavelengths and averaged, and AOT variability over the two-hour window is noted. Sky-scan AERONET data, taken only once an hour, are also were interpolated to MISR wavelengths, and are averaged over a four-hour window provided the variability is smaller than MISR sensitivity to particle properties based on previous work. MISR retrievals over the 17.6 km standard retrieval regions that include the AERONET sites are preferentially used for the comparison. The MISR measurements are averages of over all "successful" aerosol type models in the MISR algorithm climatology, where success is measured by the degree to which multi-angle, multi-spectral top-of-atmosphere radiances match modeled radiances, using several chi-squared tests. Angstrom exponent, single scattering albedo, and size distribution mean values and variance

  18. Global atmospheric particle formation from CERN CLOUD measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunne, Eimear M.; Gordon, Hamish; Kürten, Andreas; Almeida, João; Duplissy, Jonathan; Williamson, Christina; Ortega, Ismael K.; Pringle, Kirsty J.; Adamov, Alexey; Baltensperger, Urs; Barmet, Peter; Benduhn, Francois; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; Clarke, Antony; Curtius, Joachim; Dommen, Josef; Donahue, Neil M.; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Flagan, Richard C.; Franchin, Alessandro; Guida, Roberto; Hakala, Jani; Hansel, Armin; Heinritzi, Martin; Jokinen, Tuija; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kirkby, Jasper; Kulmala, Markku; Kupc, Agnieszka; Lawler, Michael J.; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Mann, Graham; Mathot, Serge; Merikanto, Joonas; Miettinen, Pasi; Nenes, Athanasios; Onnela, Antti; Rap, Alexandru; Reddington, Carly L. S.; Riccobono, Francesco; Richards, Nigel A. D.; Rissanen, Matti P.; Rondo, Linda; Sarnela, Nina; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Sengupta, Kamalika; Simon, Mario; Sipilä, Mikko; Smith, James N.; Stozkhov, Yuri; Tomé, Antonio; Tröstl, Jasmin; Wagner, Paul E.; Wimmer, Daniela; Winkler, Paul M.; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Carslaw, Kenneth S.

    2016-12-01

    Fundamental questions remain about the origin of newly formed atmospheric aerosol particles because data from laboratory measurements have been insufficient to build global models. In contrast, gas-phase chemistry models have been based on laboratory kinetics measurements for decades. We built a global model of aerosol formation by using extensive laboratory measurements of rates of nucleation involving sulfuric acid, ammonia, ions, and organic compounds conducted in the CERN CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving Outdoor Droplets) chamber. The simulations and a comparison with atmospheric observations show that nearly all nucleation throughout the present-day atmosphere involves ammonia or biogenic organic compounds, in addition to sulfuric acid. A considerable fraction of nucleation involves ions, but the relatively weak dependence on ion concentrations indicates that for the processes studied, variations in cosmic ray intensity do not appreciably affect climate through nucleation in the present-day atmosphere.

  19. Global atmospheric particle formation from CERN CLOUD measurements.

    PubMed

    Dunne, Eimear M; Gordon, Hamish; Kürten, Andreas; Almeida, João; Duplissy, Jonathan; Williamson, Christina; Ortega, Ismael K; Pringle, Kirsty J; Adamov, Alexey; Baltensperger, Urs; Barmet, Peter; Benduhn, Francois; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; Clarke, Antony; Curtius, Joachim; Dommen, Josef; Donahue, Neil M; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Flagan, Richard C; Franchin, Alessandro; Guida, Roberto; Hakala, Jani; Hansel, Armin; Heinritzi, Martin; Jokinen, Tuija; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kirkby, Jasper; Kulmala, Markku; Kupc, Agnieszka; Lawler, Michael J; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Mann, Graham; Mathot, Serge; Merikanto, Joonas; Miettinen, Pasi; Nenes, Athanasios; Onnela, Antti; Rap, Alexandru; Reddington, Carly L S; Riccobono, Francesco; Richards, Nigel A D; Rissanen, Matti P; Rondo, Linda; Sarnela, Nina; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Sengupta, Kamalika; Simon, Mario; Sipilä, Mikko; Smith, James N; Stozkhov, Yuri; Tomé, Antonio; Tröstl, Jasmin; Wagner, Paul E; Wimmer, Daniela; Winkler, Paul M; Worsnop, Douglas R; Carslaw, Kenneth S

    2016-12-02

    Fundamental questions remain about the origin of newly formed atmospheric aerosol particles because data from laboratory measurements have been insufficient to build global models. In contrast, gas-phase chemistry models have been based on laboratory kinetics measurements for decades. We built a global model of aerosol formation by using extensive laboratory measurements of rates of nucleation involving sulfuric acid, ammonia, ions, and organic compounds conducted in the CERN CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving Outdoor Droplets) chamber. The simulations and a comparison with atmospheric observations show that nearly all nucleation throughout the present-day atmosphere involves ammonia or biogenic organic compounds, in addition to sulfuric acid. A considerable fraction of nucleation involves ions, but the relatively weak dependence on ion concentrations indicates that for the processes studied, variations in cosmic ray intensity do not appreciably affect climate through nucleation in the present-day atmosphere.

  20. Atmospheric aerosol monitoring at the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Cester, R.; Chiosso, M.; Chirin, J.; Clay, R.; Dawson, B.; Fick, B.; Filipcic, A.; Garcia, B.; Grillo, A.; Horvat, M.; Iarlori, M.; Malek, M.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J.A.J.; Melo, D.; Meyhandan, R.; Mostafa, M.; Mussa, R.; Prouza, M.; Raefert, B.; Rizi, V.

    2005-07-01

    For a ground based cosmic-ray observatory the atmosphere is an integral part of the detector. Air fluorescence detectors (FDs) are particularly sensitive to the presence of aerosols in the atmosphere. These aerosols, consisting mainly of clouds and dust, can strongly affect the propagation of fluorescence and Cherenkov light from cosmic-ray induced extensive air showers. The Pierre Auger Observatory has a comprehensive program to monitor the aerosols within the atmospheric volume of the detector. In this paper the aerosol parameters that affect FD reconstruction will be discussed. The aerosol monitoring systems that have been deployed at the Pierre Auger Observatory will be briefly described along with some measurements from these systems.

  1. The effect of like-charge attraction on aerosol growth in the atmosphere of Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindgren, Eric B.; Stamm, Benjamin; Chan, Ho-Kei; Maday, Yvon; Stace, Anthony J.; Besley, Elena

    2017-07-01

    The formation of aerosols in the atmosphere of Titan is based extensively on ion-neutral chemistry and physical condensation processes. Herein it is shown that the formation of aerosols may also occur through an alternative pathway that involves the physical aggregation of negatively charged particles, which are known to be abundant in the satellite's atmosphere. It is shown that, given the right circumstances, like-charged particles with a dielectric constant characteristic of nitrated hydrocarbons have sufficient kinetic energy to overcome any repulsive electrostatic barrier that separates them and can subsequently experience an attractive interaction at very short separation. Aerosol growth can then unfold through a charge scavenging process, whereby nitrated aggregates preferentially grow by assimilating smaller like-charged particles. Since hydrocarbon aerosols have much lower dielectric constants, it is shown that a similar mechanism involving hydrocarbon particles will not be as efficient. As a consequence of this proposed growth mechanism, it is suggested that the lower atmosphere of Titan will be enriched in nitrogen-containing aerosols.

  2. Carbonaceous content of atmospheric aerosols in Lisbon urban atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirante, Fátima; Oliveira, C.; Martins, N.; Pio, C.; Caseiro, A.; Cerqueira, M.; Alves, C.; Oliveira, C.; Oliveira, J.; Camões, F.; Matos, M.; Silva, H.

    2010-05-01

    Lisbon is the capital city of Portugal with about 565,000 residents and a population density of 6,600 inhabitants per square kilometre. The town is surrounded by satellite cities, forming together a region known as "Lisbon Metropolitan Area" with about 3 million inhabitants. It is estimated that more than one million citizens come into the Lisbon area every day from the outskirts, leading to elevated traffic densities and intense traffic jams. Airborne particulate matter limit values are frequently exceeded, with important consequences on air pollution levels and obvious negative impacts on human health. Atmospheric aerosols are known to have in their structure significant amounts of carbonaceous material. The knowledge of the aerosols carbon content, particularly on their several carbon forms (as TC, EC and OC, meaning respectively Total, Elemental and Organic carbon) is often required to provide information for source attribution. In order to assess the vehicles PM input, two sampling campaigns (summer and winter periods) were carried out in 2008 in Lisbon in two contrasting sites, a roadside and an urban background site. Particulate matter was collected in two fractions on quartz fibre filters using Hi-Vol samplers (coarse fraction, 2.5µmatmospheric aerosol sampling campaign was also performed inside an open and a closed tunnel on four size fractions (PM0.49, PM0.49-0.95, PM0.95-2.5 and PM2.5-10). Road dust was also collected in each sampling site. Samples were analysed for elemental carbon (EC) and organic carbon (OC) concentrations by a thermal-optical method. The urban site presented the highest aerosol PM concentrations for the two size ranges, with PM10 average values of about 48 µg.m-3 and 27 µg.m-3 respectively for the roadside and urban background sites in the summer period, and about 44 µg.m-3 and 27 µg.m-3 in the winter season. In general, the concentrations of TC were higher

  3. Atmospheric Aerosol Investigation In Vilnius using Stable Carbon Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masalaite, Agne; Garbaras, Andrius; Remeikis, Vidmantas

    2013-04-01

    The effects of aerosols on the atmosphere, climate, and public health are among the central topics in current environmental research. Spatially urban air pollution is a major public concern world-wide.In this study the results of experimental research are presented, the basis of which is the investigation of 13C/12C variations δ13C of stable carbon isotopes in total carbonaceous aerosols in Vilnius city, Lithuania. The main aim of the work is to identify the origin of carbonaceous aerosols. Two autumns and one spring sampling campaign were designed with the aim to determine the changes in the air caused by the beginning/end of the heating season. The experiment was performed during several sampling periods. The first period lasted from 26 November to 06 December 2010. The second was from 04 April to 16 May 2011. The third was from 12 to 29 October 2012. Atmospheric aerosols, according to their aerodynamic diameters, were collected with an eleven-stage impactor "MOUDI". The stages have 50% aerodynamic diameter cut-offs of 18.0, 10.0, 5.6, 3.2, 1.8, 1.0, 0.56, 0.32, 0.18, 0.1 and 0.056 μm, for stages 1-11, respectively. The analysis proceeds essentially in two stages. In the first, MOUDI foils were analyzed with EA-IRMS (FlashEA 1112 coupled to ThermoFinnigan Delta Plus Advantage). Half of the foil was measured directly (TC δ13C values). The rest was heated in the oven (400 °C) to remove organic part and measured EC+CC δ13C values (carbonates were not removed with acid). During the second stage of the analysis, corrections are made and OC δ13C values were calculated using isotopic balance equation: . As the main aim of the study was to identify the origin of incoming carbonaceous aerosols, air mass back trajectories were calculated using the HYbrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model.

  4. Formic Sulfuric Anhydride: a New Chemical Species with Possible Implications for Atmospheric Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackenzie, Becca; Dewberry, Chris; Leopold, Ken

    2015-06-01

    Aerosols are important players in the Earth's atmosphere, affecting climate, cloud formation, and human health. In this work, we report the discovery of a previously unknown molecule, formic sulfuric anhydride (FSA), that may influence the formation and composition of atmospheric aerosol particles. Five isotopologues of FSA have been observed by microwave spectroscopy and further characterized using DFT calculations. The system has dipole moment components along all three inertial axes, and indeed a, b, and c-type transitions have been observed. A π2 + π2 + σ2 cycloaddition reaction between SO3 and HCOOH is proposed as a possible mechanism for the formation of FSA and calculations indicate that the transformation is effectively barrierless. Facile formation of the anhydride followed by hydrolysis in small water-containing clusters or liquid droplets may provide a mechanism of incorporating volatile organics into atmospheric aerosol. We suggest that FSA and its derivatives be considered in future atmospheric and climate models.

  5. Infrared spectroscopy of homogeneously nucleated hydrazine aerosols - Disordered and crystalline phases. [in planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunder, T.; Clapp, M. L.; Miller, R. E.

    1993-01-01

    It is shown that aerosols generated at low temperatures and high condensation rate spontaneously form in a highly crystalline state. The resonant absorption bands in the IR spectra of these highly crystalline particles are much sharper than any reported previously in the bulk, and reveal details in the N-H vibrational bands that have not been previously observed. A disordered phase is also observed at somewhat higher temperatures. These results are consistent with this being a supercooled liquid. The fact that the spectra associated with these two aerosol phases are quite different is important to any future attempts at detecting hydrazine aerosols in planetary atmospheres by remote sensing techniques.

  6. Atmospheric discharges and particle fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilingarian, A.; Chilingaryan, S.; Reymers, A.

    2015-07-01

    Fluxes of the electrons, gamma rays, and neutrons observed by particle detectors located on the Earth's surface during thunderstorms originate so-called Thunderstorm Ground Enhancements (TGEs). The relativistic runaway electron avalanches giving rise to TGEs originate in the thundercloud's lower dipole between the main negatively charged region in the middle of the thundercloud and transient lower positively charged region. Acceleration of electrons in the upper dipole between main negative and main positive charge regions leads to initiation of the terrestrial gamma flashes (TGFs) intensive researched during the last two decades by orbiting gamma ray observatories. TGFs are exceptionally intense, submillisecond bursts of electromagnetic radiation directed to the open space from the thunderstorm atmosphere. Unlike visible lightning, TGF beams do not create a hot plasma channel and optical flash; hence, in the literature they got name "dark lightning." We investigate the TGEs development in 1 min and 1 s time series of particle detector count rates. Synchronized time series of the near-surface electric field and lightning occurrences allows interconnecting two atmospheric phenomena. Registration of the Extensive Air Showers allows approaching problems of relation of the lightning occurrences and particle fluxes.

  7. Temporal and spatial variation of morphological descriptors for atmospheric aerosols collected in Mexico City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    China, S.; Mazzoleni, C.; Dubey, M. K.; Chakrabarty, R. K.; Moosmuller, H.; Onasch, T. B.; Herndon, S. C.

    2010-12-01

    We present an analysis of morphological characteristics of atmospheric aerosol collected during the MILAGRO (Megacity Initiative: Local and Global Research Observations) field campaign that took place in Mexico City in March 2006. The sampler was installed on the Aerodyne mobile laboratory. The aerosol samples were collected on nuclepore clear polycarbonate filters mounted in Costar pop-top membrane holders. More than one hundred filters were collected at different ground sites with different atmospheric and geographical characteristics (urban, sub-urban, mountain-top, industrial, etc.) over a month period. Selected subsets of these filters were analyzed for aerosol morphology using a scanning electron microscope and image analysis techniques. In this study we investigate spatial and temporal variations of aerosol shape descriptors, morphological parameters, and fractal dimension. We also compare the morphological results with other aerosol measurements such as aerosol optical properties(scattering and absorption) and size distribution data. Atmospheric aerosols have different morphological characteristics depending on many parameters such as emission sources, atmospheric formation pathways, aging processes, and aerosol mixing state. The aerosol morphology influences aerosol chemical and mechanical interactions with the environment, physical properties, and radiative effects. In this study, ambient aerosol particles have been classified in different shape groups as spherical, irregularly shaped, and fractal-like aggregates. Different morphological parameters such as aspect ratio, roundness, feret diameter, etc. have been estimated for irregular shaped and spherical particles and for different kinds of soot particles including fresh soot, collapsed and coated soot. Fractal geometry and image processing have been used to obtain morphological characteristics of different soot particles. The number of monomers constituting each aggregate and their diameters were

  8. Characteristics of individual particles in the atmosphere of Guangzhou by single particle mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guohua; Han, Bingxue; Bi, Xinhui; Dai, Shouhui; Huang, Wei; Chen, Duohong; Wang, Xinming; Sheng, Guoying; Fu, Jiamo; Zhou, Zhen

    2015-02-01

    Continuous ambient measurement of atmospheric aerosols was performed with a single particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SPAMS) in Guangzhou during summer of 2012. The aerosols mainly consisted of carbonaceous particles as major compositions in submicrometer range, including K-rich (29.8%), internally mixed organics and elemental carbon (ECOC, 13.5%), organic carbon-rich (OC, 18.5%), elemental carbon (EC, 12.3%) and high molecular OC (HMOC, 3.2%), and inorganic types (e.g., Na-rich Na-K, Fe-rich, V-rich, and Cu-rich) as major ones in supermicrometer range. Results show that carbonaceous particles were commonly internally mixed with sulfate and nitrate through atmospheric processing, in particular, with sulfate; inorganic types were dominantly internally mixed with nitrate rather than sulfate, indicative of different evolution processes for carbonaceous and inorganic particles in the atmosphere. It was observed that variations of these particle types were significantly influenced by air mass back trajectories (BTs). Under the influence of continental BTs, carbonaceous types were prevalent, while Na-K and Na-rich types considerably increased when the BTs originated from south marine regions. Number fraction of carbonaceous types exhibited obvious diurnal variation throughout the sampling period, which reflects their relatively stable emission and atmospheric processes. Two EC particle types LC-EC and NaK-EC showed different diurnal distributions, suggesting their different origins. The obtained information on the mixing state and the temporal variation of particle types is essential for developing an understanding on the origin and evolution processes of atmospheric aerosols.

  9. Atmospheric Tar Balls: Particles From Biomass and Biofuel Burning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posfai, M.; Gelencser, A.; Simonics, R.; Arato, K.; Li, J.; Hobbs, P. V.; Buseck, P. R.

    2003-12-01

    'Tar balls,' amorphous carbonaceous spherules that are locally abundant in the tropospheric aerosol through biomass and biofuel burning, form a distinct group of particles, readily identifiable with electron microscopy. They differ from soot in lacking a turbostratic microstructure, and their morphology and composition (~90 mol% carbon) renders them distinct from other carbonaceous particles. Tar balls are abundant in slightly aged (minutes to hours) biomass smoke, indicating that they likely form by gas-to-particle conversion within smoke plumes. Although the material of tar balls is initially hygroscopic, the particles become largely insoluble through free radical polymerization of their organic molecules. Tar balls are primarily externally mixed with other particle types, and they do not appreciably increase in size during aging. When they coagulate with water-bearing particles, their material may partly dissolve and no longer be recognizable as distinct particles. Tar balls may slightly absorb sunlight. They are a widespread and previously unrecognized type of carbonaceous (organic) atmospheric particle.

  10. Remote sensing of aerosol in the terrestrial atmosphere from space: "AEROSOL-UA" mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yatskiv, Yaroslav; Milinevsky, Gennadi; Degtyarev, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    The distribution and properties of atmospheric aerosols on a global scale are not well known in terms of determination of their effects on climate. This mostly is due to extreme variability of aerosol concentrations, properties, sources, and types. Aerosol climate impact is comparable to the effect of greenhouse gases, but its influence is more difficult to measure, especially with respect to aerosol microphysical properties and the evaluation of anthropogenic aerosol effect. There are many satellite missions studying aerosol distribution in the terrestrial atmosphere, such as MISR/Terra, OMI/Aura, AVHHR, MODIS/Terra and Aqua, CALIOP/CALIPSO. To improve the quality of data and climate models, and to reduce aerosol climate forcing uncertainties, several new missions are planned. The gap in orbital instruments for studying aerosol microphysics has arisen after the Glory mission failed during launch in 2011. In this review paper, we describe several planned aerosol space missions, including the Ukrainian project AEROSOL-UA that will obtain the data using a multi-channel scanning polarimeter and wide-angle polarimetric camera. The mission is designed for remote sensing of the aerosol microphysics and cloud properties on a global scale.

  11. Workplace aerosol mass concentration measurement using optical particle counters.

    PubMed

    Görner, Peter; Simon, Xavier; Bémer, Denis; Lidén, Göran

    2012-02-01

    Direct-reading aerosol measurement usually uses the optical properties of airborne particles to detect and measure particle concentration. In the case of occupational hygiene, mass concentration measurement is often required. Two aerosol monitoring methods are based on the principle of light scattering: optical particle counting (OPC) and photometry. The former analyses the light scattered by a single particle, the latter by a cloud of particles. Both methods need calibration to transform the quantity of scattered light detected into particle concentration. Photometers are simpler to use and can be directly calibrated to measure mass concentration. However, their response varies not only with aerosol concentration but also with particle size distribution, which frequently contributes to biased measurement. Optical particle counters directly measure the particle number concentration and particle size that allows assessment of the particle mass provided the particles are spherical and of known density. An integrating algorithm is used to calculate the mass concentration of any conventional health-related aerosol fraction. The concentrations calculated thus have been compared with simultaneous measurements by conventional gravimetric sampling to check the possibility of field OPC calibration with real workplace aerosols with a view to further monitoring particle mass concentration. Aerosol concentrations were measured in the food industry using the OPC GRIMM® 1.108 and the CIP 10-Inhalable and CIP 10-Respirable (ARELCO®) aerosol samplers while meat sausages were being brushed and coated with calcium carbonate. Previously, the original OPC inlet had been adapted to sample inhalable aerosol. A mixed aerosol of calcium carbonate and fungi spores was present in the workplace. The OPC particle-size distribution and an estimated average particle density of both aerosol components were used to calculate the mass concentration. The inhalable and respirable aerosol fractions

  12. The Effect of Aerosol Formation on Stable Isotopes Ratio in Titan's Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautier, Thomas; Trainer, Melissa G.; Sebree, Joshua; Wold, Allison; Stern, Jennifer

    2016-10-01

    The formation of large amounts of aerosol in Titan atmosphere induces a significant sink for carbon and nitrogen in the atmosphere. Due to the high complexity of the chemistry leading to aerosol formation, there may be isotopic fractionation along the formation pathways of the aerosol. So far several stable isotopes have been measured in Titan atmosphere including the 13C/12C, 15N/14N and D/H ratios for different gaseous species. However, the fractionation effect of the aerosol formation and its impact on atmospheric stable isotope ratios has yet to be fully understood. Two experimental studies were recently published on the stable carbon [1] and nitrogen [1,2] isotope fractionation during aerosol formation in N2-CH4 reactant mixture. To better constrain the fractionation effect of aerosol formation on the Titan atmosphere we have measured the isotopic fractionation induced in laboratory aerosol analogues produced exploring the space of parameters that are expected to have an effect on fractionation processes. Parameters studied include pressure and temperature of aerosol formation and the reactant gas phase composition, including the standard "Titan" mixture of CH4/N2 as well as other trace species such as benzene (C6H6).[1] Sebree, J.A., Stern, J.C., Mandt, K.E., Domagal-Goldman, S.D., and Trainer, M.G.: C and N Fractionation of CH /N Mixtures during Photochemical Aerosol Formation: Relevance to Titan, (2016) Icarus 270:421-428[2] Kuga, M., Carrasco, N., Marty, B., Marrochi, Y., Bernard, S., Rigaudier, T., Fleury, B., Tissandier, L.: Nitrogen isotopic fractionation during abiotic synthesis of organic solid particles, (2014) EPSL 393:2-13

  13. [Effects of Relative Humidity and Aerosol Physicochemical Properties on Atmospheric Visibility in Northern Suburb of Nanjing].

    PubMed

    Yu, Xing-na; Ma, Jia; Zhu, Bin; Wang, Hong-lei; Yan, Shu-qi; Xia, Hang

    2015-06-01

    To understand the effects of relative humidity (RH) and aerosol physicochemical properties on the atmospheric visibility in autumn and winter in northern suburb of Nanjing, the relationships between meteorological elements, particulate matter and visibility were analyzed with the data of meteorological elements, aerosol particle spectra, particulate matter concentration and chemical composition. The average visibility was 4.76 km in autumn and winter in northern suburb of Nanjing. There was a certain negative correlation between the particulate matter concentration and the visibility, especially the influence of fine particles on the visibility was more remarkable. The occurrence frequencies of low visibilities showed an increasing trend with the increasing concentration of fine particles and RH. When the visibility decreased from 5-10 km to <5 km, the mass concentrations of PM10 and PM2.5 increased by 7.56% and 37.64%, respectively. Meanwhile, the mass concentrations of SO4(2-) and NO3-increased significantly. Effects of aerosol particle number concentration on the visibility were related with RH. Aerosol number concentration with diameters ranging from 0.5 microm to 2 microm increased slowly with the increase of RH, while those ranging from 2 microm to 10 microm decreased. The correlation analysis between the aerosol surface area concentration and the visibility showed that RH and fine particles between 0.5 microm and 2 microm were the main factors which caused the decrease of atmospheric visibility in autumn and winter in northern suburb of Nanjing.

  14. Diffusivity Measurements of Volatile Organics in Levitated Viscous Aerosol Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastelberger, Sandra; Krieger, Ulrich; Luo, Beiping; Peter, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    Field measurements indicating that atmospheric secondary aerosol (SOA) particles can be present in a highly viscous, glassy state have spurred numerous studies addressing low water diffusivities in glassy aerosols, focusing on kinetic limitations to hygroscopic growth and the plasticizing effect of water. Less is known about diffusion limitations of organic molecules and oxidants in viscous matrices and how these might affect atmospheric chemistry and gas-particle phase partitioning of complex mixtures with constituents of different volatility. Often viscosity data has been used to infer diffusivity via the Stokes- Einstein relationship even though strong deviations from this relationship have been observed for matrices of high viscosity. In this study, we provide a quantitative estimate for the diffusivity of a volatile organic in a viscous matrix. Evaporation of single particles generated from an aqueous solution of sucrose and a small quantity of volatile tetraethylene glycol (PEG-4) is investigated in an electrodynamic balance at controlled relative humidity (RH) and temperature conditions, thereby varying the viscosity of the sucrose matrix. The evaporative loss of tetraethylene glycol as determined by Mie resonance spectroscopy is used in conjunction with a diffusion model to retrieve translational diffusion coefficients of tetraethylene glycol. The evaporation of PEG-4 shows a pronounced RH and temperature dependence and is severely depressed for RH 30% corresponding to diffusivities < 10-14 cm2/s at temperatures as high as 15 °C, implying that atmospheric volatile organic compounds (VOC) can be subject to severe diffusion limitations in glassy SOA. Comparison of the experimentally derived diffusivities with viscosity estimates for the ternary system reveals a breakdown of the Stokes-Einstein relationship.

  15. CCN activity of secondary aerosols from terpene ozonolysis under atmospheric relevant conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Cheng; Ma, Yan; Diao, Yiwei; Yao, Lei; Zhou, Yaoyao; Wang, Xing; Zheng, Jun

    2017-04-01

    Gas-phase ozonolysis of terpenes is an important source of atmospheric secondary organic aerosol. The contribution of terpene-derived aerosols to the atmospheric cloud condensation nucleus (CCN) burden under atmospheric conditions, however, remains highly uncertain. The results obtained in previous studies under simple laboratory conditions may not be applicable to atmospheric relevant conditions. Here we present that CCN activities of aerosols from terpene ozonolysis can be significantly affected by atmospheric relevant species that can act as stabilized Criegee intermediate (SCI) or OH scavengers. Ozonolysis reactions of α-pinene, limonene, α-cedrene, and α-humulene were conducted in a 4.5 m3 collapsible fluoropolymer chamber at near-atmospheric concentrations in the presence of different OH scavengers (cyclohexane, 2-butanol, or CO) and SCI scavengers (CH3COOH, H2O, or SO2). The number size distribution and CCN activity of aerosol particles formed during ozonolysis were simultaneously determined. Additionally, particulate products were chemically analyzed by using a Filter Inlet for Gases and AEROsols High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Chemical-Ionization Mass Spectrometer. Results showed that aerosol CCN activity following monoterpene ozonolysis was more sensitive to the choice of OH scavengers, while that from sesquiterpene ozonolysis was significantly affected by SCI scavengers. Combined with chemical analysis results, it was concluded that the unimolecular decomposition of CIs giving hygroscopic organic products can be largely suppressed by bimolecular reactions during sesquiterpene ozonolysis but was not significantly impacted in monoterpene ozonolysis. Our study underscores the key role of CIs in the CCN activity of terpene ozonolysis-derived aerosols. The effects of atmospheric relevant species (e.g., SO2, H2O, and CO) need to be considered when assessing the contribution of biogenic terpenes to the atmospheric CCN burden under ambient conditions.

  16. Scanning Transmission X-ray microscopy Imaging of Aerosol Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilles, M. K.; Kilcoyne, A.; Tyliszczak, T.; Shuh, D. K.; Fakra, S.; Robinson, M.; Chase, K.

    2003-12-01

    Scanning transmission x-ray microscopes (STXM) are used to image a diversity of carbon and metal containing items such as biofilms in soils, magnetic materials, polymers and meteorites. Studies on particles collected on SiO2 filters from biomass burns in Flagstaff, Arizona and individual aerosols collected in South Africa on TEM grids are underway at beamlines 5.3.2 and 11.0.2 at the Advanced Light Source of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Sub micron particles are imaged in the transmission mode over the energy range of 280 - 1900 eV. Spectromicroscopic studies on individual particles using near edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) probe multiple species within or on the same particle. In (STXM) an X-ray beam is focused with a zone plate onto a sample and the transmitted radiation is detected. Since the signal is obtained in the transmission mode, optically thin samples are required. Hence, atmospheric aerosols with submicron thickness and diameter are well suited for this method. Near edge spectra of various elements were scanned in step sizes from 0.1-0.5 eV around characteristic absorption edges, creating 2 dimensional images at each energy. While STXM images are taken with a lower spatial resolution (currently 40 nm) than microscopies such as scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy, detailed chemical information with spatial distributions, and oxidation states is obtained. A particular focus of this work is to obtain more detailed information on the type of carbons, multiply, or singly bonded and whether or not carbon is bonded to oxygen. The ultimate goal is discrimination between organic and black carbon within individual aerosol particles and determining if organic carbon, black carbon, and metal species are distributed homogeneously throughout aerosol particles. Initial scans of the samples from Flagstaff show spectral evidence of aromatic carbon, without distinct C=O signatures. NEXAFS

  17. Atmospheric aerosol monitoring by an elastic Scheimpflug lidar system.

    PubMed

    Mei, Liang; Brydegaard, Mikkel

    2015-11-30

    This work demonstrates a new approach - Scheimpflug lidar - for atmospheric aerosol monitoring. The atmospheric backscattering echo of a high-power continuous-wave laser diode is received by a Newtonian telescope and recorded by a tilted imaging sensor satisfying the Scheimpflug condition. The principles as well as the lidar equation are discussed in details. A Scheimpflug lidar system operating at around 808 nm is developed and employed for continuous atmospheric aerosol monitoring at daytime. Localized emission, atmospheric variation, as well as the changes of cloud height are observed from the recorded lidar signals. The extinction coefficient is retrieved according to the slope method for a homogeneous atmosphere. This work opens up new possibilities of using a compact and robust Scheimpflug lidar system for atmospheric aerosol remote sensing.

  18. Initial size distributions and hygroscopicity of indoor combustion aerosol particles

    SciTech Connect

    Li, W.; Hopke, P.K.

    1993-10-01

    Cigarette smoke, incense smoke, natural gas flames, propane fuel flames, and candle flames are contributors of indoor aerosol particles. To provide a quantitative basis for the modeling of inhaled aerosol deposition pattern, the hygroscopic growth of particles from these five sources as well as the source size distributions were measured. Because the experiments were performed on the bases of particles of single size, it provided not only the averaged particle`s hygroscopic growth of each source, but also the detailed size change for particles of different sizes within the whole size spectrum. The source particle size distribution measurements found that cigarette smoke and incense smoke contained particles in the size range of 100-700 nm, while the natural gas, propane, and candle flames generated particles between 10 and 100 nm. The hygroscopic growth experiments showed that these combustion aerosol particles could grow 10% to 120%, depending on the particle sizes and origins. 18 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Identifying Metals as Marker for Waste Burning Aerosol Particles in New Delhi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sudhanshu

    2012-07-01

    {Identifying Metals as Marker for Waste Burning Aerosol Particles in New Delhi } Tracing of aerosol sources is an important task helpful for making control strategy, and for climate change study. However, it is a difficult job as aerosols have several sources, involve in complex atmospheric processing, degradation and removal processes. Several approaches have been used for this task, e.g., models, which are based on the input of chemical species; stable- and radio-isotope compositions of certain species; chemical markers in which trace metals are the better options because they persist in atmosphere until the life of a particle. For example, K and Hg are used for biomass and coal burning tracings, respectively. Open waste burning has recently been believed to be a considerable source of aerosols in several mega cities in India and China. To better understand this source contribution in New Delhi aerosols, we have conducted aerosol sampling at a landfill site (Okhla), and in proximity (within 1 km distance) of this site. Aerosol filter samples were acid digested in microwave digestion system and analyzed using inductively coupled plasma -- high resolution mass spectrometry (ICP-HRMS) for getting metal signatures in particles. The metals, e.g., Sn, Sb and As those are found almost negligible in remote aerosols, are maximized in these waste burning aerosols. Sample collected in other location of New Delhi also shows the considerable presence of these metals in particles. Preliminary studies of isotopic ratios of these metals suggested that these metals, especially Sn can be used as marker for tracing the open waste burning sources of aerosols in New Delhi.

  20. A Miniature Aerosol Sensor for Detecting Polydisperse Airborne Ultrafine Particles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Wang, Dingqu; Zhu, Rong; Yang, Wenming; Jiang, Peng

    2017-04-22

    Counting and sizing of polydisperse airborne nanoparticles have attracted most attentions owing to increasing widespread presence of airborne engineered nanoparticles or ultrafine particles. Here we report a miniature aerosol sensor to detect particle size distribution of polydisperse ultrafine particles based on ion diffusion charging and electrical detection. The aerosol sensor comprises a couple of planar electrodes printed on two circuit boards assembled in parallel, where charging, precipitation and measurement sections are integrated into one chip, which can detect aerosol particle size in of 30-500 nm, number concentration in range of 5 × 10²-10⁷ /cm³. The average relative errors of the measured aerosol number concentration and the particle size are estimated to be 12.2% and 13.5% respectively. A novel measurement scheme is proposed to actualize a real-time detection of polydisperse particles by successively modulating the measurement voltage and deducing the particle size distribution through a smart data fusion algorithm. The effectiveness of the aerosol sensor is experimentally demonstrated via measurements of polystyrene latex (PSL) aerosol and nucleic acid aerosol, as well as sodium chloride aerosol particles.

  1. Unraveling the Complexity of Atmospheric Aerosol: Insights from Ultrahigh Resolution Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzoleni, Lynn R.; Zhao, Yunzhu; Samburova, Vera; Gannet Hallar, A.; Lowenthal, Douglas

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric aerosol organic matter (AOM) is a complex mixture of thousands of organic compounds, which may have significant influence on the climate-relevant properties of atmospheric aerosols. An improved understanding of the molecular composition of AOM is needed to evaluate the effect of aerosol composition upon aerosol physical properties. Products of gas, aqueous and particle phase reactions contribute to the aerosol organic mass. Thus, ambient aerosols carry a complex array of AOM components with variable chemical signatures depending upon its origin and aerosol life-cycle processes. In this work, ultrahigh-resolution Fourier transform-ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) was used to characterize ambient aerosol AOM collected at the Storm Peak Laboratory (3210 m a.s.l.) near Steamboat Springs, CO. Thousands of molecular formulas were assigned in the mass range of m/z 100-800 after negative-ion electrospray ionization. Using multivariate statistical analysis, correlations between the site meteorological conditions and specific molecular compositions were identified. For example, days with strong UV radiation and high temperature were found to contain large numbers of biogenic SOA molecular formulas. Similarly, days with high relative humidity and high sulfate concentrations were found to contain many sulfur-containing compounds, suggesting their aqueous phase formation.

  2. Modeling of microphysics and optics of aerosol particles in the marine environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaloshin, Gennady

    2013-05-01

    We present a microphysical model for the surface layer marine and coastal atmospheric aerosols that is based on long-term observations of size distributions for 0.01-100 μm particles. The fundamental feature of the model is a parameterization of amplitudes and widths for aerosol modes of the aerosol size distribution function (ASDF) as functions of fetch and wind speed. The shape of ASDF and its dependence on meteorological parameters, height above sea level (H), fetch (X), wind speed (U) and relative humidity (RH), are investigated. At present, the model covers the ranges H = 0 - 25 m, U = 3 - 18 km s-1, X ≤ 120 km and RH = 40 - 98%. The latest version of the Marine Aerosol Extinction Profiles model (MaexPro) is described and applied for the computation and analysis of the spectral profiles of aerosol extinction coefficients α(λ) in the wavelength band λ = 0.2-12 μm. MaexPro is based on the aforementioned aerosol model assuming spherically shaped aerosol particles and the well-known Mie theory. The spectral profiles of α(λ) calculated by MaexPro are in good agreement with observational data and the numerical results. Moreover, MaexPro was found to be an accurate and reliable tool for investigating the optical properties of atmospheric aerosols.

  3. The Humidity Dependence of N2O5 Uptake to Citric Acid Aerosol Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grzinic, G.; Bartels-Rausch, T.; Tuerler, A.; Ammann, M.

    2013-12-01

    Dinitrogen pentoxide is a significant reactive intermediate in the night time chemistry of nitrogen oxides. Depending on atmospheric conditions it can act either as a NO3 radical reservoir or as a major NOx sink by heterogeneous hydrolysis on aerosol surfaces. As such, it can influence tropospheric ozone production and therefore the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere. The heterogeneous loss of N2O5 to aerosol particles has remained uncertain, and reconciling lab and field data has demonstrated some gaps in our understanding of the detailed mechanism. We used the short-lived radioactive tracer 13N to study N2O5 uptake kinetics on aerosol particles in an aerosol flow reactor at ambient pressure, temperature and relative humidity. Citric acid, representing strongly oxidized polyfunctional organic compounds in atmospheric aerosols, has been chosen as a proxy due to its well established physical properties. Aerosol uptake measurements were performed with citric acid aerosols in a humidity range of 15-75 % RH, within which the uptake coefficient varies between about 0.001 and about 0.02. Taking into account the well established hygroscopic properties of citric acid, we interpret uptake in terms of disproportionation of N2O5 into nitrate ion and nitronium ion and reaction of the latter with liquid water.

  4. Hygroscopic Properties of Atmospheric Aerosol Measured with an HTDMA in an Urban Background Site in Madrid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso-Blanco, E.; Gómez-Moreno, F. J.; Becerril, M.; Coz, E.; Artíñano, B.

    2015-12-01

    The observation of high aerosol hygroscopic growth in Madrid is mainly limited to specific atmospheric conditions, such as local stagnation episodes, which take place in winter time. One of these episodes was identified in December 2014 and the hygroscopic growth factor (GF) measurements obtained in such episode were analysed in order to know the influence of the meteorological conditions on aerosol hygroscopic properties. The prevailing high atmospheric stability triggered an increase of the particle total concentration during the study period, with several peaks that exceeded 4.0 104 particles cm-3, as well as an increase in the inorganic fraction of the aerosol, the NO3- concentration, which in this case corresponded to 25% of the total PM1 non-refractory composition. The aerosol hygroscopic growth distribution was bimodal during the episode, with an average GF around 1.2 for the five dry particle sizes measured and an average GF spread ≥ 0.15. In addition, it is important to note that when a reduction in the concentrations of NO3- is observed, it coincides with a decrease of the GF and its spread. These data suggest, on the one hand, a high degree of external mixing state of the aerosol during the episode and, on the other hand, a notable association between the GF and the inorganic fraction of the aerosol.

  5. Comprehensive chemical comparison of fuel composition and aerosol particles emitted from a ship diesel engine by gas chromatography atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation ultra-high resolution mass spectrometry with improved data processing routines.

    PubMed

    Rüger, Christopher P; Schwemer, Theo; Sklorz, Martin; O'Connor, Peter B; Barrow, Mark P; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2017-02-01

    The analysis of petrochemical materials and particulate matter originating from combustion sources remains a challenging task for instrumental analytical techniques. A detailed chemical characterisation is essential for addressing health and environmental effects. Sophisticated instrumentation, such as mass spectrometry coupled with chromatographic separation, is capable of a comprehensive characterisation, but needs advanced data processing methods. In this study, we present an improved data processing routine for the mass chromatogram obtained from gas chromatography hyphenated to atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation and ultra high resolution mass spectrometry. The focus of the investigation was the primary combustion aerosol samples, i.e. particulate matter extracts, as well as the corresponding fossil fuels fed to the engine. We demonstrate that utilisation of the entire transient and chromatographic information results in advantages including minimisation of ionisation artefacts and a reliable peak assignment. A comprehensive comparison of the aerosol and the feed fuel was performed by applying intensity weighted average values, compound class distribution and principle component analysis. Certain differences between the aerosol generated with the two feed fuels, diesel fuel and heavy fuel oil, as well as between the aerosol and the feed were revealed. For the aerosol from heavy fuel oil, oxidised species from the CHN and CHS class precursors of the feed were predominant, whereas the CHOx class is predominant in the combustion aerosol from light fuel oil. Furthermore, the complexity of the aerosol increases significantly compared to the feed and incorporating a higher chemical space. Coupling of atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation to gas chromatography was found to be a useful additional approach for characterisation of a combustion aerosol, especially with an automated utilisation of the information from the ultra-high resolution mass spectrometer

  6. Improved understanding of atmospheric organic aerosols via innovations in soft ionization aerosol mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zahardis, James; Geddes, Scott; Petrucci, Giuseppe A

    2011-04-01

    Organic molecules are a significant and highly varied component of atmospheric aerosols. Measurement of aerosol composition and improvements in our understanding of the complex chemistry involved in their formation and aging are being aided by innovations in soft ionization aerosol MS. (To listen to a podcast about this feature, please go to the Analytical Chemistry multimedia page at pubs.acs.org/page/ancham/audio/index.html.).

  7. Biogenic Potassium Salt Particles as Seeds for Secondary Organic Aerosol in the Amazon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pöhlker, Christopher; Wiedemann, Kenia T.; Sinha, Bärbel; Shiraiwa, Manabu; Gunthe, Sachin S.; Smith, Mackenzie; Su, Hang; Artaxo, Paulo; Chen, Qi; Cheng, Yafang; Elbert, Wolfgang; Gilles, Mary K.; Kilcoyne, Arthur L. D.; Moffet, Ryan C.; Weigand, Markus; Martin, Scot T.; Pöschl, Ulrich; Andreae, Meinrat O.

    2012-08-01

    The fine particles serving as cloud condensation nuclei in pristine Amazonian rainforest air consist mostly of secondary organic aerosol. Their origin is enigmatic, however, because new particle formation in the atmosphere is not observed. Here, we show that the growth of organic aerosol particles can be initiated by potassium-salt-rich particles emitted by biota in the rainforest. These particles act as seeds for the condensation of low- or semi-volatile organic compounds from the atmospheric gas phase or multiphase oxidation of isoprene and terpenes. Our findings suggest that the primary emission of biogenic salt particles directly influences the number concentration of cloud condensation nuclei and affects the microphysics of cloud formation and precipitation over the rainforest.

  8. On the representation of aerosol-cloud interactions in atmospheric models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barahona, Donifan

    Anthropogenic atmospheric aerosols (suspended particulate matter) can modify the radiative balance (and climate) of the Earth by altering the properties and global distribution of clouds. Current climate models however cannot adequately account for many important aspects of these aerosol-cloud interactions, ultimately leading to a large uncertainty in the estimation of the magnitude of the effect of aerosols on climate. This thesis focuses on the development of physically-based descriptions of aerosol-cloud processes in climate models that help to address some of such predictive uncertainty. It includes the formulation of a new analytical parameterization for the formation of ice clouds, and the inclusion of the effects of mixing and kinetic limitations in existing liquid cloud parameterizations. The parameterizations are analytical solutions to the cloud ice and water particle nucleation problem, developed within a framework that considers the mass and energy balances associated with the freezing and droplet activation of aerosol particles. The new frameworks explicitly account for the impact of cloud formation dynamics, the aerosol size and composition, and the dominant freezing mechanism (homogeneous vs. heterogeneous) on the ice crystal and droplet concentration and size distribution. Application of the new parameterizations is demonstrated in the NASA Global Modeling Initiative atmospheric and chemical and transport model to study the effect of aerosol emissions on the global distribution of ice crystal concentration, and, the effect of entrainment during cloud droplet activation on the global cloud radiative properties. The ice cloud formation framework is also used within a parcel ensemble model to understand the microphysical structure of cirrus clouds at very low temperature. The frameworks developed in this work provide an efficient, yet rigorous, representation of cloud formation processes from precursor aerosol. They are suitable for the study of the

  9. Single-particle characterization of summertime arctic aerosols collected at Ny-Alesund, Svalbard.

    PubMed

    Geng, Hong; Ryu, Jiyeon; Jung, Hae-Jin; Chung, Hyeok; Ahn, Kang-Ho; Ro, Chul-Un

    2010-04-01

    Single-particle characterization of summertime Arctic aerosols is useful to understand the impact of air pollutants on the polar atmosphere. In the present study, a quantitative single particle analytical technique, low-Z particle electron probe X-ray microanalysis, was used to characterize 8100 individual particles overall in 16 sets of aerosol samples collected at Ny-Alesund, Svalbard, Norway on 25-31 July, 2007. Based on their X-ray spectral and secondary electron image data of individual particles, 13 particle types were identified, in which particles of marine origin were the most abundant, followed by carbonaceous and mineral dust particles. A number of aged (reacted) sea salt (and mixture) particles produced by the atmospheric reaction of genuine sea-salts, especially with NO(x) or HNO(3), were significantly encountered in almost all the aerosol samples. They greatly outnumbered genuine sea salt particles, implying that the summertime Arctic atmosphere, generally regarded as a clean background environment, is disturbed by anthropogenic air pollutants. The main sources of airborne NO(x) (or HNO(3)) are probably ship emissions around the Arctic Ocean, industry emission from northern Europe and northwestern Siberia, and renoxification of NO(3)(-) within or on the melting snow/ice surface.

  10. Characteristics of aerosol at a lower atmospheric layer in DRAGON field campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    KUJI, M.; Azuma, Y.; Kitakoga, S.; Sano, I.; Holben, B. N.

    2013-12-01

    Air pollution arises severely over East Asia with the rapid economic development nowadays. Monitoring the atmospheric environment, as one of the purposes, an intensive field campaign, Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observation Networks (DRAGON), was carried out in the spring of year 2012, led by National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). At that time, atmospheric phenomena such as Yellow sand and haze events were observed at Nara in the western part of Japan, as one of the DRAGON observation sites. The atmospheric events were characterized with the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) data. As a result of the data analysis, it was found that more light-absorbing and smaller particles dominated at the lower than upper atmospheric layer for the Kosa event in particular. A backward trajectory analysis suggested that the Yellow sand event traveled over the East Asian industrial cities, which could lead to a mixture of sand and air pollutants with moderate particle size and light-absorptivity. In addition, visibility observation was evaluated quantitatively with AERONET data in the DRAGON campaign since eye observation was inherently semi-quantitative. The extinction coefficient estimated from visibility was compared to that from AERONET. As a result, it was found that the extinction coefficients were generally consistent to each other. But there were some discrepancies, which could be caused with the atmospheric phenomena or aerosol types. It is confirmed that visibility is strongly influenced with aerosols in the case of severe atmospheric phenomena in particular.

  11. Micro-physical properties of carbonaceous aerosol particles generated by laser ablation of a graphite target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajtai, T.; Utry, N.; Pintér, M.; Tápai, Cs.; Kecskeméti, G.; Smausz, T.; Hopp, B.; Bozóki, Z.; Szabó, G.

    2014-09-01

    In this work the authors propose laser ablation as a highly versatile tool for carbonaceous aerosol generation. The generated carbonaceous particles can be used as a model aerosol for atmospheric black carbon. Various microphysical properties including mass concentration, size distribution and morphology of aerosol particles generated by laser ablation of a high purity graphite sample were investigated in detail. These measurements proved that the proposed method can be used to generate both primary particles and fractal aggregates with a high yield. As a further advantage of the method the size distribution of the generated aerosol can cover a wide range, and can be tuned accurately with laser fluence, the ambient composition or with the volumetric flow rate of the carrier gas.

  12. Aerosol retrieval in hazy atmosphere by using polarization and radiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukai, S.; Sano, I.; Nakata, M.

    2014-12-01

    Aerosol retrieval is achieved by radiative transfer simulation in the Earth atmosphere model. This work intends to propose an algorithm for multiple light scattering simulations in the hazy polarized radiation field. We have already solved the scalar radiative transfer problem in the case of haze episodes with dense concentrations of atmospheric aerosols by the method of successive order of scattering, which is named scalar-MSOS. The term "scalar" indicates radiance alone in the treatment of radiative transfer problem against "vector" involving polarized radiation field. The satellite polarimetric sensor POLDER-1, 2, 3 has shown that the spectro-photopolarimetry of terrestrial atmosphere is very useful for observation of the Earth, especially for aerosols. JAXA has been developing the new Earth observing system, GCOM satellite. GCOM-C will board the polarimetric sensor SGLI in 2017. It is highly likely that large-scale aerosol episodes will continue to occur, because the air pollution becomes to be severe due to both the increasing emissions of the anthropogenic aerosols and the complicated behavior of natural aerosols. Then many potential applications for the kind of radiation simulation by MSOS considering the polarization information denoted by Stokes parameters (I, Q, U, V), named vector-MSOS, are desired. It is shown here that dense aerosol episodes can be well simulated by a semi-infinite radiation model composed of the proposed aerosol models. In addition our vector-MSOS is examined in practice by combination use of PARASOL/POLDER, GOSAT/CAI and Aqua/MODIS data.

  13. Two-wavelength lidar characterization of atmospheric aerosol fields at low altitudes over heterogeneous terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peshev, Zahary Y.; Dreischuh, Tanja N.; Toncheva, Eleonora N.; Stoyanov, Dimitar V.

    2012-01-01

    The possibilities for applying multiwavelength elastic lidar probing of the atmosphere to help monitor air-quality over large industrial and densely populated areas, based predominantly on the use and analysis of commonly obtainable backscatter-related lidar quantities, are examined. Presented are two-wavelength (1064/532 nm) lidar observations on the spatial distribution, structure, composition, and temporal evolution of close-to-surface atmospheric aerosol fields over heterogeneous orographic areas (adjacent city, plain, and mountain) near Sofia, Bulgaria. Selected winter-time evening lidar measurements are described. Range profiles, histograms, and evolutional range-time diagrams of the aerosol backscatter coefficients, range-corrected lidar signals, normalized standard deviations, and backscatter-related Ångström exponents (BAE) are analyzed. Near-perfect correlation between the aerosol density distribution and orographic differentiation of the underlying terrain is established, finding expression in a sustained horizontal stratification of the probed atmospheric domains. Distinctive features in the spatial distribution and temporal evolution of both the fine- and coarse aerosol fractions are revealed in correlation with terrain's orography. Zonal aerosol particle size distributions are qualitatively characterized by using an approach based on BAE occurrence frequency distribution analysis. Assumptions are made about the aerosol particle type, origin, and dominating size as connected (by transport-modeling data) to local pollution sources. Specifics and patterns of temporal dynamics of the fine- and coarse aerosol fraction density distributions and movements, revealed by using statistical analysis of lidar data, are discussed. The obtained results prove the capability of the used two-wavelength lidar approach to perform fast-, reliable, and self-consistent characterization of important optical-, micro-physical-, and dynamical properties of atmospheric

  14. Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar Measurements of Atmospheric Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrare, R.; Hostetler, C.; Hair, J.; Cook, A.; Harper, D.; Kleinman, L.; Clarke, A.; Russell, P.; Redemann, J.; Livingston, J.; Szykman, J.; Al-Saadi, J.

    2007-05-01

    NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) recently developed an airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) to measure aerosol distributions and optical properties. The HSRL technique takes advantage of the spectral distribution of the lidar return signal to discriminate aerosol and molecular signals and thereby measure aerosol extinction and backscatter independently. The LaRC instrument employs the HSRL technique to measure aerosol backscatter and extinction profiles at 532 nm and the standard backscatter lidar technique to measure aerosol backscatter profiles at 1064 nm. Depolarization profiles are measured at both wavelengths. Since March 2006, the airborne HSRL has acquired over 215 flight hours of data deployed on the NASA King Air B200 aircraft during several field experiments. Most of the flights were conducted during two major field experiments. The first major experiment was the joint Megacity Initiative: Local and Global Research Observations (MILAGRO) /Megacity Aerosol Experiment in Mexico City (MAX-MEX)/Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment-B (INTEX B) experiment that was conducted during March 2006 to investigate the evolution and transport of pollution from Mexico City. The second major experiment was the Texas Air Quality Study (TEXAQS)/Gulf of Mexico Atmospheric Composition and Climate Study (GoMACCS) that was conducted during August and September 2006 to investigate climate and air quality in the Houston/Gulf of Mexico region. Several flights were also conducted to help validate the Cloud-Aerosol LIdar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) lidar on board the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite (CALIPSO) satellite. In February 2007, several flights were carried out as part of an Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) experiment to assess air quality in central California. Airborne HSRL data acquired during these missions were used to quantify aerosol extinction and optical thickness contributed by various aerosol types

  15. Lidar measurements of wildfire smoke aerosols in the atmosphere above Sofia, Bulgaria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peshev, Zahary Y.; Deleva, Atanaska D.; Dreischuh, Tanja N.; Stoyanov, Dimitar V.

    2016-01-01

    Presented are results of lidar measurements and characterization of wildfire caused smoke aerosols observed in the atmosphere above the city of Sofia, Bulgaria, related to two local wildfires raging in forest areas near the city. A lidar systems based on a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser operated at 532 nm and 1064 nm is used in the smoke aerosol observations. It belongs to the Sofia LIDAR Station (at Laser Radars Laboratory, Institute of Electronics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences), being a part of the European Aerosol Lidar Network. Optical, dynamical, microphysical, and geometrical properties and parameters of the observed smoke aerosol particles and layers are displayed and analyzed, such as: range/height-resolved profiles of the aerosol backscatter coefficient; integral aerosol backscattering; sets of colormaps displaying time series of the height distribution of the aerosol density; topologic, geometric, and volumetric properties of the smoke aerosol layers; time-averaged height profiles of backscatter-related Ångström exponent (BAE). Obtained results of retrieving and profiling smoke aerosols are commented in their relations to available meteorological and air-mass-transport forecasting and modelling data.

  16. Reduced anthropogenic aerosol radiative forcing caused by biogenic new particle formation

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Kamalika; Duplissy, Jonathan; Frege, Carla; Williamson, Christina; Heinritzi, Martin; Simon, Mario; Yan, Chao; Almeida, João; Tröstl, Jasmin; Nieminen, Tuomo; Ortega, Ismael K.; Wagner, Robert; Dunne, Eimear M.; Adamov, Alexey; Amorim, Antonio; Bernhammer, Anne-Kathrin; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; Brilke, Sophia; Chen, Xuemeng; Craven, Jill S.; Dias, Antonio; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Fischer, Lukas; Flagan, Richard C.; Franchin, Alessandro; Fuchs, Claudia; Guida, Roberto; Hakala, Jani; Hoyle, Christopher R.; Jokinen, Tuija; Junninen, Heikki; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kim, Jaeseok; Krapf, Manuel; Kürten, Andreas; Laaksonen, Ari; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Mathot, Serge; Molteni, Ugo; Monks, Sarah A.; Onnela, Antti; Peräkylä, Otso; Piel, Felix; Petäjä, Tuukka; Praplan, Arnaud P.; Pringle, Kirsty J.; Richards, Nigel A. D.; Rissanen, Matti P.; Rondo, Linda; Sarnela, Nina; Scott, Catherine E.; Seinfeld, John H.; Sharma, Sangeeta; Sipilä, Mikko; Steiner, Gerhard; Stozhkov, Yuri; Stratmann, Frank; Tomé, Antonio; Virtanen, Annele; Vogel, Alexander Lucas; Wagner, Andrea C.; Wagner, Paul E.; Weingartner, Ernest; Wimmer, Daniela; Winkler, Paul M.; Ye, Penglin; Zhang, Xuan; Hansel, Armin; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Baltensperger, Urs; Kulmala, Markku; Curtius, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    The magnitude of aerosol radiative forcing caused by anthropogenic emissions depends on the baseline state of the atmosphere under pristine preindustrial conditions. Measurements show that particle formation in atmospheric conditions can occur solely from biogenic vapors. Here, we evaluate the potential effect of this source of particles on preindustrial cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations and aerosol–cloud radiative forcing over the industrial period. Model simulations show that the pure biogenic particle formation mechanism has a much larger relative effect on CCN concentrations in the preindustrial atmosphere than in the present atmosphere because of the lower aerosol concentrations. Consequently, preindustrial cloud albedo is increased more than under present day conditions, and therefore the cooling forcing of anthropogenic aerosols is reduced. The mechanism increases CCN concentrations by 20–100% over a large fraction of the preindustrial lower atmosphere, and the magnitude of annual global mean radiative forcing caused by changes of cloud albedo since 1750 is reduced by 0.22 W m−2 (27%) to −0.60 W m−2. Model uncertainties, relatively slow formation rates, and limited available ambient measurements make it difficult to establish the significance of a mechanism that has its dominant effect under preindustrial conditions. Our simulations predict more particle formation in the Amazon than is observed. However, the first observation of pure organic nucleation has now been reported for the free troposphere. Given the potentially significant effect on anthropogenic forcing, effort should be made to better understand such naturally driven aerosol processes. PMID:27790989

  17. Sensitivity of the atmospheric temperature profile to the aerosol absorption in the presence of dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Amo, J. L.; di Sarra, A.; Meloni, D.

    2014-12-01

    Radiative transfer simulations in the shortwave (SW) and longwave (LW) spectral regions have been carried out to investigate the time evolution of the atmospheric heating/cooling rates and their influence on the temperature profiles under different vertical distributions of the aerosol absorption. The case study is based on measurements made at Rome, Italy, on 20 June 2007, when a dust layer was present above the urban boundary layer (BL) and the column aerosol optical depth at 550 nm was about 0.37. Column-integrated aerosol optical depth and single scattering albedo, as well as vertical profiles of aerosol extinction and meteorological variables have been derived from observations and used in the simulations. Different profiles of the aerosol absorption are considered by varying the absorption of the BL aerosols and of the desert dust, without changing the overall columnar properties. Three scenarios have been considered, with absorbing (ABL) or scattering (SBL) particles in the BL, and with a vertically homogeneous case (HL), which is taken as the reference. Calculations show that, for the selected case, about 25% of the SW heating is offset by the LW cooling within the dust layer. Different longwave/all-wave contributions are observed in the BL, depending on the BL aerosol absorption. Changes of atmospheric temperature induced by aerosol-radiation interactions only, have been investigated, while interactions with the surface through changes of the latent and sensible heat flux have been neglected. The evolution of temperature is similar for the three scenarios within the dust layer, with a daytime increase and a smaller nighttime decrease. After 24 h, the increase of the atmospheric temperature due to the aerosol radiative processes is about 1 K. In the BL, the increase of temperature is strongly dependent on the aerosol absorption capability. The oscillatory behaviour of the temperature with time in the dust layer, and the different evolution in the BL are

  18. Remote sensing for studying atmospheric aerosols in Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanniah, Kasturi D.; Kamarul Zaman, Nurul A. F.

    2015-10-01

    The aerosol system is Southeast Asia is complex and the high concentrations are due to population growth, rapid urbanization and development of SEA countries. Nevertheless, only a few studies have been carried out especially at large spatial extent and on a continuous basis to study atmospheric aerosols in Malaysia. In this review paper we report the use of remote sensing data to study atmospheric aerosols in Malaysia and document gaps and recommend further studies to bridge the gaps. Satellite data have been used to study the spatial and seasonal patterns of aerosol optical depth (AOD) in Malaysia. Satellite data combined with AERONET data were used to delineate different types and sizes of aerosols and to identify the sources of aerosols in Malaysia. Most of the aerosol studies performed in Malaysia was based on station-based PM10 data that have limited spatial coverage. Thus, satellite data have been used to extrapolate and retrieve PM10 data over large areas by correlating remotely sensed AOD with ground-based PM10. Realising the critical role of aerosols on radiative forcing numerous studies have been conducted worldwide to assess the aerosol radiative forcing (ARF). Such studies are yet to be conducted in Malaysia. Although the only source of aerosol data covering large region in Malaysia is remote sensing, satellite observations are limited by cloud cover, orbital gaps of satellite track, etc. In addition, relatively less understanding is achieved on how the atmospheric aerosol interacts with the regional climate system. These gaps can be bridged by conducting more studies using integrated approach of remote sensing, AERONET and ground based measurements.

  19. Formation and Processing of Secondary Organic Aerosol from Catechol as a Model for Atmospheric HULIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ofner, Johannes; Krüger, Heinz-Ulrich; Grothe, Hinrich; Zetzsch, Cornelius

    2010-05-01

    A particular fraction of the secondary organic aerosol (SOA) termed HUmic Like Substances (HULIS) attracted attention only recently in atmospheric aerosol, initiating a discourse about their aromaticity and other properties, such as reactivity and hygroscopicity. A major portion of HULIS originates from volatile organic compounds, which are formed by abiotic oxidation reactions involving mainly OH radicals, ozone, nitrogen oxides and possibly halogens. Subsequently, the particles provide surface for heterogeneous reactions with atmospheric trace gases. Thus, aerosol smog-chamber studies with appropriate precursors are needed to generate SOA with HULIS qualities in situ inside the smog chamber and study their possible interactions. Catechol and guaiacol were chosen as aromatic precursors for synthetic HULIS production. The SOA was produced in a 700 L aerosol smog chamber, equipped with a solar simulator. SOA formation from each precursor was investigated at simulated environmental conditions (humidity, light, and presence of oxidizers) and characterized with respect to HULIS properties by particle classifiers, Fourier Transform IR spectroscopy (by long-path absorption and attenuated total reflection), UV/VIS spectroscopy, high-resolution mass-spectroscopy and temperature-programmed-desorption mass-spectrometry. High-resolution imaging was obtained using Field Emission Gun Scanning Electron Microscopy (FEGSEM). After HULIS formation the aerosol particles were exposed to atmospheric halogen species to study their processing with those trace gases, released by sea salt-activation. Those investigations show that aromatic precursors like catechol and guaiacol are suitable to form synthetic HULIS for laboratory-scale measurements with physical and chemical properties described in literature. However, sunlight and relative humidity play a major role in particle production and composition of functional groups, which are the anchor points for heterogeneous atmospheric

  20. Uptake of HNO3 to Deliquescent Sea-Salt and Mineral Dust Aerosol Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guimbaud, C.; Vlassenko, A.; Gaggeler, H.; Ammann, M.

    2002-12-01

    Uptake of HNO3 to aerosol particles is an important removal pathway of nitrogen oxides in the troposphere. Uptake of HNO3 to deliquescent sea-salt aerosol particles was studied in an aerosol flow reactor. Submicron sea-salt particles were used to avoid diffusion limitation in the gas-phase at atmospheric pressure. To overcome the sensitivity problems associated with low amount of reactants processed in such low aerosol masses, we used the short-lived radioactive tracer 13N to label the trace gas molecules at very low concentration. Uptake of HNO3 to deliquescent sea-salt particles was studied under a wide range of HNO3 concentration. Between 1 and 60 ppbv, the uptake coefficient was constant at 0.5+/-0.2 within the first few seconds, whereas at higher concentrations of about 600ppbv, the uptake coefficient rapidly dropped to 0.1 after about 1 second. This drop was due to complete release of chloride as HCl. The equilibrium conditions for these experiments were explored using the North American Aerosol Inorganics (AIM) model, which accounts for the activities of the concentrated solution of the deliquescent aerosol. It is concluded that the rates of uptake at low concentration were limited by the mass accommodation coefficient as both the diffusion in the liquid phase or the rate of release of HCl were not rate limiting. Using an identical approach, we started to investigate the uptake of HNO3 to mineral dust aerosol particles in a similar flow reactor, and first results will be presented. References Ammann, M, Using 13N as tracer in heterogeneous atmospheric chemistry experiments, Radiochim. Acta., 89, 831-838, 2001 Guimbaud, C., F., Arens, L., Gutzwiller, H.W, Gäggeler, and M. Ammann, Uptake of HNO3 to Deliquescent Sea-Salt Aerosol Particles, Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., 2, 739-763, 2002

  1. Can lipids form crystalline films on atmospheric particles?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aumann, E.; Cabrera, J.; Tabazadeh, A.

    2006-12-01

    Many studies assume that fatty acids or lipids can readily form films on aqueous particles in the atmosphere since fatty acids are known to be very strong film forming agents. Specifically, stearic acid is often used in laboratory and modeling studies to mimic the composition of particle surfaces in the atmosphere. For most industrial and engineering purposes, lipid films are spread over aqueous surfaces by first dissolving the lipid in an organic solvent, such as hexane. When hexane evaporates from the lipid/hexane mixture, a crystalline lipid film is left behind on the aqueous surface. Lipids in atmospheric particles, like stearic acid, are primarily emitted as oil drops that form crystals when cooled. In the atmosphere, lipid crystalline particulate matter can coagulate with aqueous particles to produce mixed aerosols, containing lipids in aqueous solutions. We used laboratory measurements to determine the rate of stearic acid crystal spreading on water in the absence of on organic solvent. From these measurements, we show that the time required to spread a lipid crystal on an aqueous surface to produce a film is much longer than a typical 2-week lifetime of an atmospheric particle. Therefore, we suggest that lipids, capable of forming crystalline, impermeable films on particle surfaces, are most likely tied up in a crystalline phase during their lifecycle in the atmosphere.

  2. Comparison between CARIBIC aerosol samples analysed by accelerator-based methods and optical particle counter measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinsson, B. G.; Friberg, J.; Andersson, S. M.; Weigelt, A.; Hermann, M.; Assmann, D.; Voigtländer, J.; Brenninkmeijer, C. A. M.; van Velthoven, P. J. F.; Zahn, A.

    2014-04-01

    Inter-comparison of results from two kinds of aerosol systems in the CARIBIC (Civil Aircraft for the Regular Investigation of the atmosphere Based on an Instrument Container) passenger aircraft based observatory, operating during intercontinental flights at 9-12 km altitude, is presented. Aerosol from the lowermost stratosphere (LMS), the extra-tropical upper troposphere (UT) and the tropical mid troposphere (MT) were investigated. Aerosol particle volume concentration measured with an optical particle counter (OPC) is compared with analytical results of the sum of masses of all major and several minor constituents from aerosol samples collected with an impactor. Analyses were undertaken with accelerator-based methods particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and particle elastic scattering analysis (PESA). Data from 48 flights during one year are used, leading to a total of 106 individual comparisons. The ratios of the particle volume from the OPC and the total mass from the analyses were in 84% within a relatively narrow interval. Data points outside this interval are connected with inlet-related effects in clouds, large variability in aerosol composition, particle size distribution effects and some cases of non-ideal sampling. Overall, the comparison of these two CARIBIC measurements based on vastly different methods show good agreement, implying that the chemical and size information can be combined in studies of the MT/UT/LMS aerosol.

  3. Comparison between CARIBIC Aerosol Samples Analysed by Accelerator-Based Methods and Optical Particle Counter Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinsson, B. G.; Friberg, J.; Andersson, S. M.; Weigelt, A.; Hermann, M.; Assmann, D.; Voigtländer, J.; Brenninkmeijer, C. A. M.; van Velthoven, P. J. F.; Zahn, A.

    2014-08-01

    Inter-comparison of results from two kinds of aerosol systems in the CARIBIC (Civil Aircraft for the Regular Investigation of the atmosphere Based on a Instrument Container) passenger aircraft based observatory, operating during intercontinental flights at 9-12 km altitude, is presented. Aerosol from the lowermost stratosphere (LMS), the extra-tropical upper troposphere (UT) and the tropical mid troposphere (MT) were investigated. Aerosol particle volume concentration measured with an optical particle counter (OPC) is compared with analytical results of the sum of masses of all major and several minor constituents from aerosol samples collected with an impactor. Analyses were undertaken with the following accelerator-based methods: particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and particle elastic scattering analysis (PESA). Data from 48 flights during 1 year are used, leading to a total of 106 individual comparisons. The ratios of the particle volume from the OPC and the total mass from the analyses were in 84% within a relatively narrow interval. Data points outside this interval are connected with inlet-related effects in clouds, large variability in aerosol composition, particle size distribution effects and some cases of non-ideal sampling. Overall, the comparison of these two CARIBIC measurements based on vastly different methods show good agreement, implying that the chemical and size information can be combined in studies of the MT/UT/LMS aerosol.

  4. Coarse atmospheric aerosol: size distributions of trace elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eleftheriadis, K.; Colbeck, I.

    A sampler, employing nine single stage impactors placed in parallel within a portable wind tunnel, has been used to determine the metal content of coarse atmospheric aerosol. The wind tunnel maintains a constant flow environment for the collectors housed inside it, so that representative sampling conditions are achieved compared to the varied ambient wind conditions. At a flow rate of 8 m s -1 the 50% cut-off diameters of the impactors ranged from 7.8 to 38.8 μm. Measurements were conducted at a rural and urban site near Colchester in south east England. The samplers were analysed by PIXE for P, K, Ca, Fe, Ti, Mn, Cu, V, Co, Cr, Br, Zn, Ni, Sc and Pb. It is found that the sampler can be employed to quantitatively characterise the elemental mass size distribution for aerosol larger than 10 μm. The results indicate that a small fraction of the above earth and trace elements' metal mass is present in particles greater than 10 μm. This fraction for earth metals (Ca, K, Ti) is comparatively greater in the rural site than the urban site, while for trace metals (Mn, V, Cu, Cr) this fraction constitutes a more significant part of the coarse mass at the urban site. Trace element concentrations were of a similar order of magnitude to earlier literature reports. Although the number of measurements was limited it can be concluded that the size distributions obtained were characteristic of an unpolluted area.

  5. TEM study of soot, organic aerosol, and sea-salt particles collected during CalNex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, K.; Buseck, P. R.

    2010-12-01

    Anthropogenic aerosol particles are emitted in abundance from megacities. Those particles can have important effects on both human health and climate. In this study, aerosol particles having aerodynamic diameters between 50 and 300 nm were collected during the CalNex campaign at the Pasadena ground site from May 15 to June 15, 2010, ~15 km northeast of downtown Los Angeles. The samples were analyzed using transmission electron microscopes (TEMs) to characterize particle shapes and compositions. Most samples are dominated by soot, organic aerosol (OA), sulfate, sea salt, or combinations thereof. Sizes and amounts of OA particles increased during the afternoons, and most soot particles were internally mixed with OA and sulfate in the afternoons. The proportion of soot to other material in individual particles increased and soot particles were more compact during the nights and early mornings. Sea-salt particles were commonly internally mixed with other materials. They have high Na contents with lesser N, Mg, S, K, and Ca and almost no Cl, suggesting that the Cl was replaced by sulfate or nitrate in the atmosphere. There is less OA and more sea salt and sulfate in the CalNex samples than in the samples from Mexico City that were collected during the MILAGRO campaign. Our study indicates that compositions of internally mixed aerosol particles and shapes of soot particles change significantly within a day. These changes probably influence the estimates of their effects on human health and climate.

  6. Single particle characterization using a light scattering module coupled to a time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Cross, E.; Onasch, Timothy B.; Canagaratna, Manjula; Jayne, J. T.; Kimmel, Joel; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Alexander, M. L.; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Davidovits, Paul

    2009-10-01

    To accurately model the radiative forcing of aerosol particles, one must measure in real-time the size, shape, density, chemical composition, and mixing state of ambient particles. This is a formidable challenge because the chemical and physical properties of the aerosol particles are highly complex, dependent on the emission sources, the geography and meteorology of the surroundings, and the gas phase composition of the regional atmosphere.

  7. N2O5 oxidizes chloride to Cl2 in acidic atmospheric aerosol.

    PubMed

    Roberts, James M; Osthoff, Hans D; Brown, Steven S; Ravishankara, A R

    2008-08-22

    Molecular chlorine (Cl2) is an important yet poorly understood trace constituent of the lower atmosphere. Although a number of mechanisms have been proposed for the conversion of particle-bound chloride (Cl-) to gas-phase Cl2, the detailed processes involved remain uncertain. Here, we show that reaction of dinitrogen pentoxide (N2O5) with aerosol-phase chloride yields Cl2 at low pH (<2) and should constitute an important halogen activation pathway in the atmosphere.

  8. Photochemical aerosol formation in planetary atmospheres: A comparison between Pluto and Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavvas, Panayotis; Strobel, Darrell F.; Lellouch, Emmanuel; Gurwell, Mark A.; Cheng, Andrew F.; Summers, Michael; Gladstone, Randy

    2016-10-01

    The New Horizons mission observations have revealed us that Pluto's atmosphere is rich in photochemical hazes that extend to high altitudes above its surface [1], apparently similar to those observed in Titan's atmosphere [2].We use detailed models combining photochemistry and microphysics in order to simulate the aerosol formation and growth in Pluto's atmosphere, as performed for Titan's atmosphere [3]. Here we discuss the possible mechanisms leading to the formation of haze particles in Pluto's atmosphere, and we evaluate the contribution of different growth processes (e.g. coagulation vs. condensation) to the resulting particle properties.Moreover we investigate the role of these particles in the radiative balance of Pluto's atmosphere and we compare the resulting particle properties, with those retrieved for Titan's upper atmosphere based on Cassini observations [4]. We discuss the similarities and difference between Pluto's and Titan's aerosols.[1] Gladstone et al., 2016, Science, 351, 6271[2] West et al., 2015, Titan's Haze, in Titan, Interior, Surface, Atmosphere and Space environment, Cambridge University Press[3] Lavvas et al., 2013, PNAS, pnas.1217059110[4] Lavvas et al., 2015, DPS47, id.205.08

  9. A combined particle trap/HTDMA hygroscopicity study of mixed inorganic/organic aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zardini, A. A.; Sjogren, S.; Marcolli, C.; Krieger, U. K.; Gysel, M.; Weingartner, E.; Baltensperger, U.; Peter, T.

    2008-03-01

    Atmospheric aerosols are often mixtures of inorganic and organic material. Organics can represent a large fraction of the total aerosol mass and are comprised of water-soluble and insoluble compounds. Increasing attention was paid in the last decade to the capability of mixed inorganic/organic aerosol particles to take up water (hygroscopicity). We performed hygroscopicity measurements of internally mixed particles containing ammonium sulfate and carboxylic acids (citric, glutaric, adipic acid) in parallel with an electrodynamic balance (EDB) and a hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (HTDMA). The organic compounds were chosen to represent three distinct physical states. During hygroscopicity cycles covering hydration and dehydration measured by the EDB and the HTDMA, pure citric acid remained always liquid, adipic acid remained always solid, while glutaric acid could be either. We show that the hygroscopicity of mixtures of the above compounds is well described by the Zdanovskii-Stokes-Robinson (ZSR) relationship as long as the two-component particle is completely liquid in the ammonium sulfate/citric acid and in the ammonium sulfate/glutaric acid cases. However, we observe significant discrepancies compared to what is expected from bulk thermodynamics when a solid component is present. We explain this in terms of a complex morphology resulting from the crystallization process leading to veins, pores, and grain boundaries which allow for water sorption in excess of bulk thermodynamic predictions caused by the inverse Kelvin effect on concave surfaces.

  10. Aerosol polarization effects on atmospheric correction and aerosol retrievals in ocean color remote sensing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Menghua

    2006-12-10

    The current ocean color data processing system for the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-View Sensor (SeaWiFS) and the moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) uses the Rayleigh lookup tables that were generated using the vector radiative transfer theory with inclusion of the polarization effects. The polarization effects, however, are not accounted for in the aerosol lookup tables for the ocean color data processing. I describe a study of the aerosol polarization effects on the atmospheric correction and aerosol retrieval algorithms in the ocean color remote sensing. Using an efficient method for the multiple vector radiative transfer computations, aerosol lookup tables that include polarization effects are generated. Simulations have been carried out to evaluate the aerosol polarization effects on the derived ocean color and aerosol products for all possible solar-sensor geometries and the various aerosol optical properties. Furthermore, the new aerosol lookup tables have been implemented in the SeaWiFS data processing system and extensively tested and evaluated with SeaWiFS regional and global measurements. Results show that in open oceans (maritime environment), the aerosol polarization effects on the ocean color and aerosol products are usually negligible, while there are some noticeable effects on the derived products in the coastal regions with nonmaritime aerosols.

  11. Particle size distributions of several commonly used seeding aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crosswy, F. L.

    1985-01-01

    During the course of experimentation, no solid particle powder could be found which produced an aerosol with a narrow particle size distribution when fluidization was the only flow process used in producing the aerosol. The complication of adding particle size fractionation processes to the aerosol generation effort appears to be avoidable. In this regard, a simple sonic orifice is found to be effective in reducing the percentage of agglomerates in the several metal oxide powders tested. Marginally beneficial results are obtained for a 0.5/99.5 percent by weight mixture of the flow agent and metal oxide powder. However, agglomeration is observed to be enhanced when the flow agent percentage is increased to 5 percent. Liquid atomization using the Collison nebulizer as well as a version of the Laskin nozzle resulted in polydispersed aerosols with particle size distributions heavily weighted by the small particle end of the size spectrum. The aerosol particle size distributions produced by the vaporization/condensation seeder are closer to the ideal monodispersed aerosol than any of the other aerosols tested. In addition, this seeding approach affords a measure of control over particle size and particle production rate.

  12. Health effects of acid aerosols formed by atmospheric mixtures.

    PubMed Central

    Kleinman, M T; Phalen, R F; Mautz, W J; Mannix, R C; McClure, T R; Crocker, T T

    1989-01-01

    Under ambient conditions, sulfur and nitrogen oxides can react with photochemical products and airborne particles to form acidic vapors and aerosols. Inhalation toxicological studies were conducted, exposing laboratory animals, at rest and during exercise, to multicomponent atmospheric mixtures under conditions favorable to the formation of acidic reaction products. Effects of acid and ozone mixtures on early and late clearance of insoluble radioactive particles in the lungs of rats appeared to be dominated by the oxidant component (i.e., the mixture did cause effects that were significantly different from those of ozone alone). Histopathological evaluations showed that sulfuric acid particles alone did not cause inflammatory responses in centriacinar units of rat lung parenchyma (expressed in terms of percent lesion area) but did cause significant damage (cell killing followed by a wave of cell replication) in nasal respiratory epithelium, as measured by uptake of tritiated thymidine in the DNA of replicating cells. Mixtures of ozone and nitrogen dioxide, which form nitric acid, caused significant inflammatory responses in lung parenchyma (in excess of effects seen in rats exposed to ozone alone), but did not damage nasal epithelium. Mixtures containing acidic sulfate particles, ozone, and nitrogen dioxide damaged both lung parenchyma and nasal epithelia. In rats exposed at rest, the response of the lung appeared to be dominated by the oxidant gas-phase components, while responses in the nose were dominated by the acidic particles. In rats exposed at exercise, however, mixtures of ozone and sulfuric acid particles significantly (2.5-fold) elevated the degree of lung lesion formation over that seen in rats exposed to ozone alone under an identical exercise protocol. PMID:2707193

  13. Spatial and temporal variation of atmospheric particle in local scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukai, S.; Nakata, M.; Sano, I.; Nakano, T.; Okuhara, T.

    2011-12-01

    This work intends to demonstrate the spatial and temporal variation of atmospheric particles around AERONET/Osaka site. Osaka is the second big city in Japan and a typical Asian urban area. It is well known that the aerosol distribution in Asia is complicated due to the increasing emissions of anthropogenic aerosols in association with economic growth and in addition behavior of natural dusts significantly varies with the seasons. Therefore local spatially and temporally resolved measurements of atmospheric particles in Asian urban city are meaningful. The sampling of PM2.5, PM10 and OBC have been undertaken using an Kimoto/SPM sampler at the AERONET/Osaka site since 2004. It is noted that a portable multi-spectral sun-photometer (Solar-Light Company Microtops-II) has been employed since 2010. It is found from the simultaneous measurements of AOT (aerosol optical thickness) at AERONET/Osaka site and several locations in the neighborhood and PM sampling that the local scale spatial and temporal factors influence the characterization of atmospheric particles for sure and vice versa.

  14. Laser velocimeter seed particle sizing by the whisker particle collector and laser aerosol spectrometer methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosswy, F. L.; Kingery, M. K.; Schaefer, H. J.; Pfeifer, H. J.

    1989-07-01

    Two different aerosol particle sizing systems, the Whisker Particle Collector (WPC) and the Laser Aerosol Spectrometer (LAS), were evaluated for sizing aerosol particles in the size range of 0.1 to 3.0 micrometers. The evaluation tests were conducted using an aerosol of alumina (Al2O3) particles, an aerosol commonly used to provide light scattering particles for laser velocimeter measurements in high temperature flows. The LAS and WPC measurements were then compared for samples taken from the alumina particle aerosols. Some difficulty was encountered in directly comparing these measurements. Other operational aspects of the two systems were also compared including on-line/off-line data presentation capabilities, field portability and measurement limitations at the small particle end of the size range of interest.

  15. Metal and metalloid contaminants in atmospheric aerosols from mining operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csavina, Janae

    Mining operations, including crushing, grinding, smelting, refining, and tailings management, are a significant source of airborne metal and metalloid contaminants such as As, Pb, Cd and other potentially toxic elements. Dust particles emitted from mining operations can accumulate in surrounding soils, natural waters and vegetation at relatively high concentrations through wind and water transport. Human exposure to the dust can occur through inhalation and, especially in the case of children, incidental dust ingestion, particularly during the early years when children are likely to exhibit pica. Furthermore, smelting operations release metals and metalloids in the form of fumes and ultra-fine particulate matter, which disperses more readily than coarser soil dusts. Of specific concern, these fine particulates can be transported to the lungs, allowing contaminants to be transferred into the blood stream. The main aim of this research is to assess the role of atmospheric aerosol and dust in the transport of metal and metalloid contaminants from mining operations to assess the deleterious impacts of these emissions to ecology and human health. In a field campaign, ambient particulates from five mining sites and four reference sites were examined utilizing micro-orifice deposit impactors (MOUDI), total suspended particulate (TSP) collectors, a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS), and Dusttrak optical particle counters for an understanding of the fate and transport of atmospheric aerosols. One of the major findings from size-resolved chemical characterization at three mining sites showed that the majority of the contaminant concentrations were found in the fine size fraction (<1 micrometer). Further, metal and metalloids (e.g. As, Cd, and Pb) around smelting activities are significantly enriched in both the coarse and fine size fraction when compared to reference sites. Additionally, with dust events being a growing concern because of predicted climate change and

  16. Influence of particle size and chemistry on the cloud nucleating properties of aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, P. K.; Bates, T. S.; Coffman, D. J.; Covert, D. S.

    2008-02-01

    The ability of an aerosol particle to act as a cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) is a function of the size of the particle, its composition and mixing state, and the supersaturation of the cloud. In-situ data from field studies provide a means to assess the relative importance of these parameters. During the 2006 Texas Air Quality - Gulf of Mexico Atmospheric Composition and Climate Study (TexAQS-GoMACCS), the NOAA RV Ronald H. Brown encountered a wide variety of aerosol types ranging from marine near the Florida panhandle to urban and industrial in the Houston-Galveston area. These varied sources provided an opportunity to investigate the role of aerosol sources and chemistry in the potential activation of particles to form cloud droplets. Measurements were made of CCN concentrations, aerosol chemical composition in the size range relevant for particle activation in warm clouds, and aerosol size distributions. Variability in aerosol composition was parameterized by the mass fraction of Hydrocarbon-like Organic Aerosol (HOA) for particle diameters less than 200 nm (vacuum aerodynamic). The HOA mass fraction in this size range was lowest for marine aerosol and highest for aerosol sampled close to anthropogenic sources. Combining all data from the experiment reveals that composition (defined by HOA mass fraction) explains 40% of the variance in the critical diameter for particle activation at the instrumental supersaturation (S) of 0.44%. Correlations between HOA mass fraction and aerosol mean diameter show that these two parameters are essentially independent of one another for this data set. We conclude that, based on the variability of the HOA mass fraction observed during TexAQS-GoMACCS, variability in particle composition played a significant role in determining the fraction of particles that could activate to form cloud droplets. Using a simple model based on Köhler theory and the assumption that HOA is insoluble, we estimate the degree to which calculated CCN

  17. Variability in morphology, hygroscopicity, and optical properties of soot aerosols during atmospheric processing

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Renyi; Khalizov, Alexei F.; Pagels, Joakim; Zhang, Dan; Xue, Huaxin; McMurry, Peter H.

    2008-01-01

    The atmospheric effects of soot aerosols include interference with radiative transfer, visibility impairment, and alteration of cloud formation and are highly sensitive to the manner by which soot is internally mixed with other aerosol constituents. We present experimental studies to show that soot particles acquire a large mass fraction of sulfuric acid during atmospheric aging, considerably altering their properties. Soot particles exposed to subsaturated sulfuric acid vapor exhibit a marked change in morphology, characterized by a decreased mobility-based diameter but an increased fractal dimension and effective density. These particles experience large hygroscopic size and mass growth at subsaturated conditions (<90% relative humidity) and act efficiently as cloud-condensation nuclei. Coating with sulfuric acid and subsequent hygroscopic growth enhance the optical properties of soot aerosols, increasing scattering by ≈10-fold and absorption by nearly 2-fold at 80% relative humidity relative to fresh particles. In addition, condensation of sulfuric acid is shown to occur at a similar rate on ambient aerosols of various types of a given mobility size, regardless of their chemical compositions and microphysical structures. Representing an important mechanism of atmospheric aging, internal mixing of soot with sulfuric acid has profound implications on visibility, human health, and direct and indirect climate forcing. PMID:18645179

  18. Variability in morphology, hygroscopicity, and optical properties of soot aerosols during atmospheric processing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Renyi; Khalizov, Alexei F; Pagels, Joakim; Zhang, Dan; Xue, Huaxin; McMurry, Peter H

    2008-07-29

    The atmospheric effects of soot aerosols include interference with radiative transfer, visibility impairment, and alteration of cloud formation and are highly sensitive to the manner by which soot is internally mixed with other aerosol constituents. We present experimental studies to show that soot particles acquire a large mass fraction of sulfuric acid during atmospheric aging, considerably altering their properties. Soot particles exposed to subsaturated sulfuric acid vapor exhibit a marked change in morphology, characterized by a decreased mobility-based diameter but an increased fractal dimension and effective density. These particles experience large hygroscopic size and mass growth at subsaturated conditions (<90% relative humidity) and act efficiently as cloud-condensation nuclei. Coating with sulfuric acid and subsequent hygroscopic growth enhance the optical properties of soot aerosols, increasing scattering by approximately 10-fold and absorption by nearly 2-fold at 80% relative humidity relative to fresh particles. In addition, condensation of sulfuric acid is shown to occur at a similar rate on ambient aerosols of various types of a given mobility size, regardless of their chemical compositions and microphysical structures. Representing an important mechanism of atmospheric aging, internal mixing of soot with sulfuric acid has profound implications on visibility, human health, and direct and indirect climate forcing.

  19. Morphology, composition, and atmospheric processing of soot particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slowik, Jay G.

    Combustion-generated soot aerosols play an important role in climate forcing due to their strong light-absorbing properties. Quantitative measurement of BC is challenging because BC often occurs in highly non-spherical soot particles of complex morphology. The task is further complicated because of the lack of an unambiguous chemical definition of the material. Here we present the development and application of a new technique for determining particle morphology and composition. Simultaneous measurements of mobility diameter, vacuum aerodynamic diameter, and non-refractory composition were used to determine the particle mass, volume, density, composition, dynamic shape factor, and fractal dimension. Under certain conditions, particle surface area and the number and size of the primary spherules composing the soot fractal aggregates were also determined. The particle characterization technique described above was applied to the following four studies: (1) Characterization of flame-generated soot particles. Depending on flame conditions, either fractal or near-spherical particles were generated and their properties interpreted in terms of the mechanism for soot formation. (2) Coating and denuding experiments were performed on soot particles. The results yielded information about morphology changes to the entire soot particle and to the internal black carbon structure due to atmospheric processing. The denuding experiments also provided particle surface area, which was used to determine the atmospheric lifetime of fractal soot particles relative to spheres. (3) An inter-comparison study of instruments measuring the black carbon content of soot particles was conducted. The detailed characterization of soot particles enabled a number of assumptions about the operation of the selected instruments to be tested. (4) Ambient particles were sampled in Mexico City. In the early morning, ambient particles were detected with a fractal morphology similar to that of diesel

  20. Physical and chemical study of single aerosol particles using optical trapping cavity ringdown spectroscopy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-08-30

    display time-, particle-, or wavelength-resolved chemical properties such as single aerosol particle extinction . We demonstrate the scope by trapping...chemical properties such as single aerosol particle extinction . We demonstrate the scope by trapping and walking single carbon-nanotube particles of...well-defined single aerosol particles for spatial resolution in a single aerosol manipulation, detection limit of extinction coefficient, detection

  1. Identification of characteristic mass spectrometric markers for primary biological aerosol particles and comparison with field data from submicron pristine aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freutel, F.; Schneider, J.; Zorn, S. R.; Drewnick, F.; Borrmann, S.; Hoffmann, T.; Martin, S. T.

    2009-04-01

    The contribution of primary biological aerosol (PBA) to the total aerosol particle concentration is estimated to range between 25 and 80%, depending on location and season. Especially in the tropical rain forest it is expected that PBA is a major source of particles in the supermicron range, and is also an important fraction of the submicron aerosol. PBA particles like plant fragments, pollen, spores, fungi, viruses etc. contain chemical compounds as proteins, sugars, amino acids, chlorophyll, and cellular material as cellulose. For this reason we have performed mass spectrometric laboratory measurements (Aerodyne C-ToF and W-ToF AMS, sin