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Sample records for atmospheric models final

  1. Regional forecasting with global atmospheric models; Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Crowley, T.J.; Smith, N.R.

    1994-05-01

    The purpose of the project was to conduct model simulations for past and future climate change with respect to the proposed Yucca Mtn. repository. The authors report on three main topics, one of which is boundary conditions for paleo-hindcast studies. These conditions are necessary for the conduction of three to four model simulations. The boundary conditions have been prepared for future runs. The second topic is (a) comparing the atmospheric general circulation model (GCM) with observations and other GCMs; and (b) development of a better precipitation data base for the Yucca Mtn. region for comparisons with models. These tasks have been completed. The third topic is preliminary assessments of future climate change. Energy balance model (EBM) simulations suggest that the greenhouse effect will likely dominate climate change at Yucca Mtn. for the next 10,000 years. The EBM study should improve rational choice of GCM CO{sub 2} scenarios for future climate change.

  2. Mechanism for production of secondary organic aerosols and their representation in atmospheric models. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Seinfeld, J.H.; Flagan, R.C.

    1999-06-07

    This document contains the following: organic aerosol formation from the oxidation of biogenic hydrocarbons; gas/particle partitioning of semivolatile organic compounds to model inorganic, organic, and ambient smog aerosols; and representation of secondary organic aerosol formation in atmospheric models.

  3. Predicting Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Modes with a Climate Modeling Hierarchy -- Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Ghil, UCLA; Andrew W. Robertson, IRI, Columbia Univ.; Sergey Kravtsov, U. of Wisconsin, Milwaukee; Padhraic Smyth, UC Irvine

    2006-08-04

    The goal of the project was to determine midlatitude climate predictability associated with tropical-extratropical interactions on interannual-to-interdecadal time scales. Our strategy was to develop and test a hierarchy of climate models, bringing together large GCM-based climate models with simple fluid-dynamical coupled ocean-ice-atmosphere models, through the use of advanced probabilistic network (PN) models. PN models were used to develop a new diagnostic methodology for analyzing coupled ocean-atmosphere interactions in large climate simulations made with the NCAR Parallel Climate Model (PCM), and to make these tools user-friendly and available to other researchers. We focused on interactions between the tropics and extratropics through atmospheric teleconnections (the Hadley cell, Rossby waves and nonlinear circulation regimes) over both the North Atlantic and North Pacific, and the ocean’s thermohaline circulation (THC) in the Atlantic. We tested the hypothesis that variations in the strength of the THC alter sea surface temperatures in the tropical Atlantic, and that the latter influence the atmosphere in high latitudes through an atmospheric teleconnection, feeding back onto the THC. The PN model framework was used to mediate between the understanding gained with simplified primitive equations models and multi-century simulations made with the PCM. The project team is interdisciplinary and built on an existing synergy between atmospheric and ocean scientists at UCLA, computer scientists at UCI, and climate researchers at the IRI.

  4. MULTIRESOLUTION FEATURE ANALYSIS AND OTHER TECHNIQUES FOR UNDERSTANDING AND MODELING TURBULENCE IN STABLE ATMOSPHERES Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    R. L. Street; F. L. Ludwig; Y. Chen

    2005-04-11

    Our DOE project is one of the efforts comprising the Vertical Transport and Mixing Program of the Environmental Sciences Division of the Office of Biological and Environmental Research in Department of Energy. We used ARPS to simulate flow in the Salt Lake Valley. We simulated the physical processes more accurately so that we can better understand the physics of flow in complex terrain and its effects at larger scales. The simulations provided evidence that atmospheric forcing interacts with the Jordan Narrows, the Traverse Range and other complex mountain terrain at the south end of the Salt Lake Valley to produce lee rotors, hydraulic jumps and other effects. While we have successfully used ARPS to simulate VTMX 2000 flows, we have also used observed data to test the model and identify some of its weaknesses. Those are being addressed in a continuation project supported by DOE.

  5. Modeling the Pan-Arctic terrestrial and atmospheric water cycle. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gutowski, W.J., Jr.

    2001-03-30

    This report describes results of DOE grant DE-FG02-96ER61473 to Iowa State University (ISU). Work on this grant was performed at Iowa State University and at the University of New Hampshire in collaboration with Dr. Charles Vorosmarty and fellow scientists at the University of New Hampshire's (UNH's) Institute for the Study of the Earth, Oceans, and Space, a subcontractor to the project. Research performed for the project included development, calibration and validation of a regional climate model for the pan-Arctic, modeling river networks, extensive hydrologic database development, and analyses of the water cycle, based in part on the assembled databases and models. Details appear in publications produced from the grant.

  6. Atmospheric Modeling

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although air quality models have been applied historically to address issues specific to ambient air quality standards (i.e., one criteria pollutant at a time) or welfare (e.g.. acid deposition or visibility impairment). they are inherently multipollutant based. Therefore. in pri...

  7. Final Report - From Measurements to Models: Cross-Comparison of Measured and Simulated Behavioral States of the Atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Del Genio, Anthony D; Hoffman, Forrest M; Hargrove, Jr, William W

    2007-10-22

    The ARM sites and the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) were constructed to make measurements of the atmosphere and radiation system in order to quantify deficiencies in the simulation of clouds within models and to make improvements in those models. While the measurement infrastructure of ARM is well-developed and a model parameterization testbed capability has been established, additional effort is needed to develop statistical techniques which permit the comparison of simulation output from atmospheric models with actual measurements. Our project establishes a new methodology for objectively comparing ARM measurements to the outputs of leading global climate models and reanalysis data. The quantitative basis for this comparison is provided by a statistical procedure which establishes an exhaustive set of mutually-exclusive, recurring states of the atmosphere from sets of multivariate atmospheric and cloud conditions, and then classifies multivariate measurements or simulation outputs into those states. Whether measurements and models classify the atmosphere into the same states at specific locations through time provides an unequivocal comparison result. Times and locations in both geographic and state space of model-measurement agreement and disagreement will suggest directions for the collection of additional measurements at existing sites, provide insight into the global representativeness of the current ARM sites (suggesting locations and times for use of the AMF), and provide a basis for improvement of models. Two different analyses were conducted: One, using the Parallel Climate Model, focused on an IPCC climate change scenario and clusters that characterize long-term changes in the hydrologic cycle. The other, using the GISS Model E GCM and the ARM Active Remotely Sensed Cloud Layers product, explored current climate cloud regimes in the Tropical West Pacific.

  8. Scientific Final Report: COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH: CONTINUOUS DYNAMIC GRID ADAPTATION IN A GLOBAL ATMOSPHERIC MODEL: APPLICATION AND REFINEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    William J. Gutowski; Joseph M. Prusa, Piotr K. Smolarkiewicz

    2012-04-09

    This project had goals of advancing the performance capabilities of the numerical general circulation model EULAG and using it to produce a fully operational atmospheric global climate model (AGCM) that can employ either static or dynamic grid stretching for targeted phenomena. The resulting AGCM combined EULAG's advanced dynamics core with the 'physics' of the NCAR Community Atmospheric Model (CAM). Effort discussed below shows how we improved model performance and tested both EULAG and the coupled CAM-EULAG in several ways to demonstrate the grid stretching and ability to simulate very well a wide range of scales, that is, multi-scale capability. We leveraged our effort through interaction with an international EULAG community that has collectively developed new features and applications of EULAG, which we exploited for our own work summarized here. Overall, the work contributed to over 40 peer-reviewed publications and over 70 conference/workshop/seminar presentations, many of them invited.

  9. Final Technical Report: Development of the DUSTRAN GIS-Based Complex Terrain Model for Atmospheric Dust Dispersion

    SciTech Connect

    Allwine, K Jerry; Rutz, Frederick C.; Shaw, William J.; Rishel, Jeremy P.; Fritz, Brad G.; Chapman, Elaine G.; Hoopes, Bonnie L.; Seiple, Timothy E.

    2007-05-01

    Activities at U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) training and testing ranges can be sources of dust in local and regional airsheds governed by air-quality regulations. The U.S. Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory just completed a multi-year project to develop a fully tested and documented atmospheric dispersion modeling system (DUST TRANsport or DUSTRAN) to assist the DoD in addressing particulate air-quality issues at military training and testing ranges.

  10. Development of an atmospheric model based on a generalized vertical coordinate. Final report, September 12, 1991--August 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Arakawa, Akio; Konor, C.S.

    1997-12-31

    There are great conceptual advantages in the use of an isentropic vertical coordinate in atmospheric models. Design of such a model, however, requires to overcome computational problems due to intersection of coordinate surfaces with the earth`s surface. Under this project, the authors have completed the development of a model based on a generalized vertical coordinate, {zeta} = F({Theta}, p, p{sub s}), in which an isentropic coordinate can be combined with a terrain-following {sigma}-coordinate a smooth transition between the two. One of the key issues in developing such a model is to satisfy the consistency between the predictions of pressure and potential temperature. In the model, the consistency is satisfied by the use of an equation that determines the vertical mass flux. A procedure to properly choose {zeta} = F({Theta}, p, p{sub s}) is also developed, which guarantees that {zeta} is a monotonic function of height even when unstable stratification occurs. There are two versions of the model constructed in parallel: one is the middle-latitude {beta}-plane version and the other is the global version. Both of these versions include moisture prediction, relaxed large-scale condensation and relaxed moist-convective adjustment schemes. A well-mixed planetary boundary layer (PBL) is also added.

  11. Atmospheric density models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, A. C.

    1977-01-01

    An atmospheric model developed by Jacchia, quite accurate but requiring a large amount of computer storage and execution time, was found to be ill-suited for the space shuttle onboard program. The development of a simple atmospheric density model to simulate the Jacchia model was studied. Required characteristics including variation with solar activity, diurnal variation, variation with geomagnetic activity, semiannual variation, and variation with height were met by the new atmospheric density model.

  12. Validation of first-principles model calculations of the upper atmosphere. Final report, 1 October 1992-30 September 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Wickwar, V.B.

    1996-05-21

    Because of its effects on human activity, mostly through effects on every type of radio signal, it is important to understand the ionosphere and to understand its coupling with the Thermosphere and other atmospheric regions. These effects are often considered under the umbrella of space weather. The purpose of this project was to extend several aspects of our understanding of the ionospheric F region. The techniques used were a combination of comprehensive observations with incoherent scatter radars and detailed comparisons of such observations to simulations made with first principles models of the ionosphere. Three inputs to these models were examined: electron heat flux, soft particle precipitation, and meridional winds. Procedures were developed to obtain, manipulate, and display the radar data. A first principles model was developed that places more emphasis on the topside F region than previously. This model was used to examine the cause of an anomalous F region maximum sometimes reported at mid latitudes. The cause was found to be particularly strong meridional winds. However, to properly account for the maximum, the rate of collisions between the dominant ions and neutrals had to be increased by 70%. The tools are now in place to perform a number more detailed comparisons.

  13. Global Atmospheric Aerosol Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, Johannes; Aquila, Valentina; Righi, Mattia

    2012-01-01

    Global aerosol models are used to study the distribution and properties of atmospheric aerosol particles as well as their effects on clouds, atmospheric chemistry, radiation, and climate. The present article provides an overview of the basic concepts of global atmospheric aerosol modeling and shows some examples from a global aerosol simulation. Particular emphasis is placed on the simulation of aerosol particles and their effects within global climate models.

  14. Nonisothermal Pluto atmosphere models

    SciTech Connect

    Hubbard, W.B.; Yelle, R.V.; Lunine, J.I. )

    1990-03-01

    The present thermal profile calculation for a Pluto atmosphere model characterized by a high number fraction of CH4 molecules encompasses atmospheric heating by solar UV flux absorption and conductive transport cooling to the surface of Pluto. The stellar occultation curve predicted for an atmosphere of several-microbar surface pressures (which entail the existence of a substantial temperature gradient close to the surface) agrees with observations and implies that the normal and tangential optical depth of the atmosphere is almost negligible. The minimum period for atmospheric methane depletion is calculated to be 30 years. 29 refs.

  15. Atmospheric Models for Aerocapture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justus, C. G.; Duvall, Aleta L.; Keller, Vernon W.

    2004-01-01

    There are eight destinations in the solar System with sufficient atmosphere for aerocapture to be a viable aeroassist option - Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn and its moon Titan, Uranus, and Neptune. Engineering-level atmospheric models for four of these targets (Earth, Mars, Titan, and Neptune) have been developed for NASA to support systems analysis studies of potential future aerocapture missions. Development of a similar atmospheric model for Venus has recently commenced. An important capability of all of these models is their ability to simulate quasi-random density perturbations for Monte Carlo analyses in developing guidance, navigation and control algorithm, and for thermal systems design. Similarities and differences among these atmospheric models are presented, with emphasis on the recently developed Neptune model and on planned characteristics of the Venus model. Example applications for aerocapture are also presented and illustrated. Recent updates to the Titan atmospheric model are discussed, in anticipation of applications for trajectory and atmospheric reconstruct of Huygens Probe entry at Titan.

  16. Solar Atmosphere Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutten, R. J.

    2002-12-01

    This contribution honoring Kees de Jager's 80th birthday is a review of "one-dimensional" solar atmosphere modeling that followed on the initial "Utrecht Reference Photosphere" of Heintze, Hubenet & de Jager (1964). My starting point is the Bilderberg conference, convened by de Jager in 1967 at the time when NLTE radiative transfer theory became mature. The resulting Bilderberg model was quickly superseded by the HSRA and later by the VAL-FAL sequence of increasingly sophisticated NLTE continuum-fitting models from Harvard. They became the "standard models" of solar atmosphere physics, but Holweger's relatively simple LTE line-fitting model still persists as a favorite of solar abundance determiners. After a brief model inventory I discuss subsequent work on the major modeling issues (coherency, NLTE, dynamics) listed as to-do items by de Jager in 1968. The present conclusion is that one-dimensional modeling recovers Schwarzschild's (1906) finding that the lower solar atmosphere is grosso modo in radiative equilibrium. This is a boon for applications regarding the solar atmosphere as one-dimensional stellar example - but the real sun, including all the intricate phenomena that now constitute the mainstay of solar physics, is vastly more interesting.

  17. Pulsed atmospheric fluidized bed combustion. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-03-01

    ThermoChem, under contract to the Department of Energy, conducted extensive research, development and demonstration work on a Pulsed Atmospheric Fluidized Bed Combustor (PAFBC) to confirm that advanced technology can meet these performance objectives. The ThermoChem/MTCI PAFBC system integrates a pulse combustor with an atmospheric bubbling-bed type fluidized bed combustor (BFBC) In this modular configuration, the pulse combustor burns the fuel fines (typically less than 30 sieve or 600 microns) and the fluidized bed combusts the coarse fuel particles. Since the ThermoChem/MTCI PAFBC employs both the pulse combustor and the AFBC technologies, it can handle the full-size range of coarse and fines. The oscillating flow field in the pulse combustor provides for high interphase and intraparticle mass transfer rates. Therefore, the fuel fines essentially burn under kinetic control. Due to the reasonably high temperature (>1093 C but less than the temperature for ash fusion to prevent slagging), combustion of fuel fines is substantially complete at the exit of the pulse combustor. The additional residence time of 1 to 2 seconds in the freeboard of the PAFBC unit then ensures high carbon conversion and, in turn, high combustion efficiency. A laboratory unit was successfully designed, constructed and tested for over 600 hours to confirm that the PAFBC technology could meet the performance objectives. Subsequently, a 50,000 lb/hr PAFBC demonstration steam boiler was designed, constructed and tested at Clemson University in Clemson, South Carolina. This Final Report presents the detailed results of this extensive and successful PAFBC research, development and demonstration project.

  18. Atmospheric prediction model survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wellck, R. E.

    1976-01-01

    As part of the SEASAT Satellite program of NASA, a survey of representative primitive equation atmospheric prediction models that exist in the world today was written for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Seventeen models developed by eleven different operational and research centers throughout the world are included in the survey. The surveys are tutorial in nature describing the features of the various models in a systematic manner.

  19. Upper ocean model of dissolved atmospheric gases. Final report for the period 1 August 1991--31 May 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Schudlich, R.; Emerson, S.

    1996-05-01

    This report summarizes results from three years of funding for a modelling study of processes controlling the distribution of metabolic chemical tracers in surface waters. We determined concentrations of the gases O{sub 2}, Ar, N{sub 2}, and the stable isotope ratio ({sup 18}O/{sup 16}O) of molecular oxygen in surface waters at Station ALOHA in conjunction with the Global Ocean Flux Study (GOFS) Hawaiian Ocean Time-series project during the years 1989- 90 and 1992-93. Under this contract we have incorporated chemical tracers into an existing ocean mixed-layer model to simulate the physical processes controlling the distribution and seasonal cycle of dissolved gases in the upper ocean. The broad background of concurrent chemical, physical, and biological measurements at Station ALOHA provides enough redundancy of ``ground truth`` to assess the model`s accuracy. Biological oxygen production estimated from modelled chemical tracers agrees with estimates based on measurement of carbon fluxes into the deep ocean and nitrate fluxes into the upper ocean during 1989-90 and 1992-93, verifying for the first time the utility of chemical tracers for determining biological fluxes in the ocean. Our results suggest that in the euphotic zone (the upper 100 m of the ocean), the net biological O{sub 2} production is 1.0-2. 0 moles m{sup -2}yr{sup - 1}. Inert gas (Ar, N{sub 2}) supersaturation levels show that air and bubble injection are important modes of air-sea gas transfer in the Station ALOHA region.

  20. Atmospheric chemistry of methylglyoxal. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Orlando, J.; Tyndall, G.; Staffelbach, T.; Cantrell, C.; Shetter, R.

    1993-06-01

    The purpose of the study is to determine, through a set of laboratory experiments, the fate of methylglyoxal (CH3COCHO) in the troposphere, Methylglyoxal is an oxidation product of numerous non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs), including isoprene and toluene. Hence, the determination of the contribution of these NMHCs to regional ozone production requires a quantitative knowledge of the fate of methylglyoxal. Although it is generally accepted that the two main loss processes for methylglyoxal are photolysis and reaction with OH, large discrepancies or gaps existed in the data base regarding the rate and mechanism of these two processes. The measurements reported here resolve quantitative discrepancies that existed in the literature regarding the UV/visible absorption cross section of methylglyoxal and the rate constant for its reaction with OH, and should provide the necessary kinetic and mechanistic information required to accurately model its atmospheric chemistry.

  1. Modeling of Cometary Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gombosi, Tamas

    2004-01-01

    The NASA supported project 'Modeling of Cometary Atmospheres' has been quite successful in broadening our understanding of the cometary environment. We list peer reviewed publications and conference presentation that have been made as a result of studies performed under this project. Following the list we present details of a selection of the results.

  2. Solar flare model atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawley, Suzanne L.; Fisher, George H.

    1993-01-01

    Solar flare model atmospheres computed under the assumption of energetic equilibrium in the chromosphere are presented. The models use a static, one-dimensional plane parallel geometry and are designed within a physically self-consistent coronal loop. Assumed flare heating mechanisms include collisions from a flux of non-thermal electrons and x-ray heating of the chromosphere by the corona. The heating by energetic electrons accounts explicitly for variations of the ionized fraction with depth in the atmosphere. X-ray heating of the chromosphere by the corona incorporates a flare loop geometry by approximating distant portions of the loop with a series of point sources, while treating the loop leg closest to the chromospheric footpoint in the plane-parallel approximation. Coronal flare heating leads to increased heat conduction, chromospheric evaporation and subsequent changes in coronal pressure; these effects are included self-consistently in the models. Cooling in the chromosphere is computed in detail for the important optically thick HI, CaII and MgII transitions using the non-LTE prescription in the program MULTI. Hydrogen ionization rates from x-ray photo-ionization and collisional ionization by non-thermal electrons are included explicitly in the rate equations. The models are computed in the 'impulsive' and 'equilibrium' limits, and in a set of intermediate 'evolving' states. The impulsive atmospheres have the density distribution frozen in pre-flare configuration, while the equilibrium models assume the entire atmosphere is in hydrostatic and energetic equilibrium. The evolving atmospheres represent intermediate stages where hydrostatic equilibrium has been established in the chromosphere and corona, but the corona is not yet in energetic equilibrium with the flare heating source. Thus, for example, chromospheric evaporation is still in the process of occurring.

  3. Final Report: Process Models of the Equilibrium Size & State of Organic/Inorganic Aerosols for the Development of Large Scale Atmospheric Models & the Analysis of Field Data

    SciTech Connect

    Wexler, Anthony Stein; Clegg, Simon Leslie

    2013-10-26

    Our work addressed the following elements of the Call for Proposals: (i) “to improve the theoretical representation of aerosol processes studied in ASP laboratory or field studies”, (ii) “to enhance the incorporation of aerosol process information into modules suitable for large-scale or global atmospheric models”, and (iii) “provide systematic experimental validation of process model predictions ... using data from targeted laboratory and field experiments”. Achievements to the end of 2012 are described in four previous reports, and include: new models of densities and surface tensions of pure (single solute) and mixed aqueous solutions of typical aerosol composition under all atmospheric conditions (0 to 100% RH and T > 150 K); inclusion of these models into the widely used Extended Aerosol Inorganics model (E-AIM, http://www.aim.env.uea.ac.uk/aim/aim.php); the addition of vapor pressure calculators for organic compounds to the E-AIM website; the ability of include user-defined organic compounds and/or lumped surrogates in gas/aerosol partitioning calculations; the development of new equations to represent the properties of soluble aerosols over the entire concentration range (using methods based upon adsorption isotherms, and derived using statistical mechanics), including systems at close to zero RH. These results are described in publications 1-6 at the end of this report, and on the “News” page of the E-AIM website (http://www.aim.env.uea.ac.uk/aim/info/news.html). During 2012 and 2013 we have collaborated in a combined observation and lab-based study of the water uptake of the organic component of atmospheric aerosols (PI Gannet Hallar, of the Desert Research Institute). The aerosol samples were analyzed using several complementary techniques (GC/MS, FT-ICR MS, and ion chromatography) to produce a very complete organic “speciation” including both polar and non-polar compounds. Hygroscopic growth factors of the samples were measured, and

  4. Reference and Standard Atmosphere Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Dale L.; Roberts, Barry C.; Vaughan, William W.; Parker, Nelson C. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the development of standard and reference atmosphere models along with the history of their origin and use since the mid 19th century. The first "Standard Atmospheres" were established by international agreement in the 1920's. Later some countries, notably the United States, also developed and published "Standard Atmospheres". The term "Reference Atmospheres" is used to identify atmosphere models for specific geographical locations. Range Reference Atmosphere Models developed first during the 1960's are examples of these descriptions of the atmosphere. This paper discusses the various models, scopes, applications and limitations relative to use in aerospace industry activities.

  5. Atmospheric Models for Engineering Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Dale L.; Roberts, Barry C.; Vaughan, William W.; Justus, C. G.

    2002-01-01

    This paper will review the historical development of reference and standard atmosphere models and their applications. The evolution of the U.S. Standard Atmosphere will be addressed, along with the Range Reference Atmospheres and, in particular, the NASA Global Reference Atmospheric Model (GRAM). The extensive scope and content of the GRAM will be addressed since it represents the most extensive and complete 'Reference' atmosphere model in use today. Its origin was for engineering applications and that remains today as its principal use.

  6. High altitude atmospheric modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedin, Alan E.

    1988-01-01

    Five empirical models were compared with 13 data sets, including both atmospheric drag-based data and mass spectrometer data. The most recently published model, MSIS-86, was found to be the best model overall with an accuracy around 15 percent. The excellent overall agreement of the mass spectrometer-based MSIS models with the drag data, including both the older data from orbital decay and the newer accelerometer data, suggests that the absolute calibration of the (ensemble of) mass spectrometers and the assumed drag coefficient in the atomic oxygen regime are consistent to 5 percent. This study illustrates a number of reasons for the current accuracy limit such as calibration accuracy and unmodeled trends. Nevertheless, the largest variations in total density in the thermosphere are accounted for, to a very high degree, by existing models. The greatest potential for improvements is in areas where we still have insufficient data (like the lower thermosphere or exosphere), where there are disagreements in technique (such as the exosphere) which can be resolved, or wherever generally more accurate measurements become available.

  7. Pulsed atmospheric fluidized bed combustion. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-11-01

    In order to verify the technical feasibility of the MTCI Pulsed Atmospheric Fluidized Bed Combustor technology, a laboratory-scale system was designed, built and tested. Important aspects of the operational and performance parameters of the system were established experimentally. A considerable amount of the effort was invested in the initial task of constructing an AFBC that would represent a reasonable baseline against which the performance of the PAFBC could be compared. A summary comparison of the performance and emissions data from the MTCI 2 ft {times} 2 ft facility (AFBC and PAFBC modes) with those from conventional BFBC (taller freeboard and recycle operation) and circulating fluidized bed combustion (CFBC) units is given in Table ES-1. The comparison is for typical high-volatile bituminous coals and sorbents of average reactivity. The values indicated for BFBC and CFBC were based on published information. The AFBC unit that was designed to act as a baseline for the comparison was indeed representative of the larger units even at the smaller scale for which it was designed. The PAFBC mode exhibited superior performance in relation to the AFBC mode. The higher combustion efficiency translates into reduced coal consumption and lower system operating cost; the improvement in sulfur capture implies less sorbent requirement and waste generation and in turn lower operating cost; lower NO{sub x} and CO emissions mean ease of site permitting; and greater steam-generation rate translates into less heat exchange surface area and reduced capital cost. Also, the PAFBC performance generally surpasses those of conventional BFBC, is comparable to CFBC in combustion and NO{sub x} emissions, and is better than CFBC in sulfur capture and CO emissions even at the scaled-down size used for the experimental feasibility tests.

  8. Climate and atmospheric modeling studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The climate and atmosphere modeling research programs have concentrated on the development of appropriate atmospheric and upper ocean models, and preliminary applications of these models. Principal models are a one-dimensional radiative-convective model, a three-dimensional global model, and an upper ocean model. Principal applications were the study of the impact of CO2, aerosols, and the solar 'constant' on climate.

  9. Thermal atmospheric models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Hollis Ralph

    1987-01-01

    The static thermal atmosphere is described and its predictions are compared to observations both to test the validity of the classic assumptions and to distinguish and describe those spectral features with diagnostic value.

  10. Atmospheric 14CO2 Constraints on and Modeling of Net Carbon Fluxes 06-ERD-031 An LLNL Exploratory Research in the Directorate's Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Guilderson, T P; Cameron-Smith, P; Bergmann, D; Graven, H D; Keeling, R; Boering, K; Caldeira, K

    2009-03-18

    A critical scientific question is: 'what are the present day sources and sinks of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) in the natural environment, and how will these sinks evolve under rising CO{sub 2} concentrations and expected climate change and ecosystem response'? Sources and sinks of carbon dioxide impart their signature on the distribution, concentration, and isotopic composition of CO{sub 2}. Spatial and temporal trends (variability) provide information on the net surface (atmosphere to ocean, atmosphere to terrestrial biosphere) fluxes. The need to establish more reliable estimates of sources and sinks of CO{sub 2} has lead to an expansion of CO{sub 2} measurement programs over the past decade and the development of new methodologies for tracing carbon flows. These methodologies include high-precision pCO{sub 2}, {delta}{sup 13}CO{sub 2}, and [O{sub 2}/N{sub 2}] measurements on atmospheric constituents that, when combined, have allowed estimates of the net terrestrial and oceanic fluxes at decadal timescales. Major gaps in our understanding remain however, and resulting flux estimates have large errors and are comparatively unconstrained. One potentially powerful approach to tracking carbon flows is based on observations of the {sup 14}C/{sup 12}C ratio of atmospheric CO{sub 2}. This ratio can be used to explicitly distinguish fossil-fuel CO{sub 2} from other sources of CO{sub 2} and also provide constraints on the mass and turnover times of carbon in land ecosystems and on exchange rates of CO{sub 2} between air and sea. Here we demonstrated measurement of {sup 14}C/{sup 12}C ratios at 1-2{per_thousand} on archived and currently collected air samples. In parallel we utilized the LLNL-IMPACT global atmospheric chemistry transport model and the TransCom inversion algorithm to utilize these data in inversion estimates of carbon fluxes. This project has laid the foundation for a more expanded effort in the future, involving collaborations with other air

  11. Models of Mars' atmosphere (1974)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Atmospheric models for support of design and mission planning of space vehicles that are to orbit the planet Mars, enter its atmosphere, or land on the surface are presented. Quantitative data for the Martian atmosphere were obtained from Earth-base observations and from spacecraft that have orbited Mars or passed within several planetary radii. These data were used in conjunction with existing theories of planetary atmospheres to predict other characteristics of the Martian atmosphere. Earth-based observations provided information on the composition, temperature, and optical properties of Mars with rather coarse spatial resolution, whereas spacecraft measurements yielded data on composition, temperature, pressure, density, and atmospheric structure with moderately good spatial resolution. The models provide the temperature, pressure, and density profiles required to perform basic aerodynamic analyses. The profiles are supplemented by computed values of viscosity, specific heat, and speed of sound.

  12. Modeling of Atmosphere Revitalization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coker, Robert; Knox, James; Kittredge, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    NASA's AES is pioneering new approaches for future human missions beyond Earth orbit. All spacecraft systems must be minimized with respect to mass, power, and volume. Here, we show work related to improving system efficiency and reliability for water separation systems on crewed vehicles and the initial development of COMSOL simulations in support of the Atmosphere Revitalization Recovery and Environmental Monitoring (ARREM) project

  13. Global 3-D modeling of atmospheric ozone in the free troposphere and the stratosphere with emphasis on midlatitude regions. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Brasseur, G.; Tie, X.; Walters, S.

    1999-03-01

    The authors have used several global chemical/transport models (1) to study the contribution of various physical, chemical, and dynamical processes to the budget of mid-latitude ozone in the stratosphere and troposphere; (2) to analyze the potential mechanisms which are responsible for the observed ozone perturbations at mid-latitudes of the lower stratosphere and in the upper troposphere; (3) to calculate potential changes in atmospheric ozone response to anthropogenic changes (e.g., emission of industrially manufactured CFCs, CO, and NO{sub x}) and to natural perturbations (e.g., volcanic eruptions and biomass burning); and (4) to estimate the impact of these changes on the radiative forcing to the climate system and on the level of UV-B radiation at the surface.

  14. Lagrangian Modeling of the Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Colin

    2013-08-01

    Like watching a balloon borne by the breeze, a Lagrangian model tracks a parcel of air as it flows through the atmosphere. Whether running forward or backward in time, Lagrangian models offer a powerful tool for tracking and understanding the fates, or origins, of atmospheric flows. In the AGU monograph Lagrangian Modeling of the Atmosphere, editors John Lin, Dominik Brunner, Christoph Gerbig, Andreas Stohl, Ashok Luhar, and Peter Webley explore the nuances of the modeling technique. In this interview Eos talks to Lin about the growing importance of Lagrangian modeling as the world settles on climate change mitigation strategies, the societal value of operational modeling, and how recent advances are making it possible to run these complex calculations at home.

  15. Final Report. "Collaborative Project. Contributions of organic compounds to the growth of freshly nucleated atmospheric nanoparticles"

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, James N

    2015-12-23

    This is the final technical report for the portion of the project that took place at the National Center for Atmospheric Research, which covers approximately the first year of the three-year project. During this time we focused primarily on analysis and modeling of DOE-funded observations as well as preparation for laboratory studies of individual processes that contribute to atmospheric new particle formation.

  16. Models for infrared atmospheric radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, S. N.

    1976-01-01

    Line and band models for infrared spectral absorption are discussed. Radiative transmittance and integrated absorptance of Lorentz, Doppler, and voigt line profiles were compared for a range of parameters. It was found that, for the intermediate path lengths, the combined Lorentz-Doppler (Voigt) profile is essential in calculating the atmospheric transmittance. Narrow band model relations for absorptance were used to develop exact formulations for total absorption by four wide band models. Several continuous correlations for the absorption of a wide band model were compared with the numerical solutions of the wide band models. By employing the line-by-line and quasi-random band model formulations, computational procedures were developed for evaluating transmittance and upwelling atmospheric radiance. Homogeneous path transmittances were calculated for selected bands of CO, CO2, and N2O and compared with experimental measurements. The upwelling radiance and signal change in the wave number interval of the CO fundamental band were also calculated.

  17. Modeling oceanic and atmospheric vortices

    SciTech Connect

    Dritschel, D.G.; Legras, B. CNRS, Lab. de Meteorologie Dynamique, Paris )

    1993-03-01

    Numerical modeling and prediction of coherent structures in geophysical fluid dynamics is reviewed. Numerical computation is widely used in geophysical fluid dynamics due to the nonlinear behaviour of the systems studied and the complexity of the mathematical models used. Idealized systems and the determination of potential vorticity in simplified atmospheric models are discussed. Atmospheric vortex structures, their interactions, and the effects on weather are described. A quasigeostrophic model is used to illustrate the effect of trophospherically generated disturbances on the polar vortex using the contour dynamics numerical method. A comparison of numerical techniques for simulating the evolution of neighboring vortices of unequal size is given. Future developments in the use of numerical models in geophysical fluid dynamics and weather prediction are discussed. 15 refs.

  18. Solar cycle effect on atmospheric carbon dioxide levels. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kirk, B.L.; Rust, B.W.

    1983-01-01

    The authors present a causal time-series model for the Mauna Loa atmospheric CO2 record which supersedes a mathematical model consisting of four effects represented by exponential and sine functions. One effect is a 142-month oscillation which trails the sunspot numbers by exactly a quarter-cycle. This suggests that solar activity affects the rate of change in the atmospheric CO2 abundance. The new model replaces the mathematical functions with four measured time series representing proposed physical causes and reduces the number of adjustable parameters from 13 to 5 with no significant deterioration in the fit. The authors present evidence that solar activity affects the CO2 abundance through variations in ocean temperature or circulation.

  19. Atmospheric and wind modeling for ATC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, Gary L.

    1990-01-01

    The section on atmospheric modeling covers the following topics: the standard atmosphere, atmospheric variations, atmosphere requirements for ATC, and implementation of a software model for Center/Tracon Advisory System (CTAS). The section on wind modeling covers the following topics: wind data -- NOAA profiler system; wind profile estimation; incorporation of various data types into filtering scheme; spatial and temporal variation; and software implementation into CTAS. The appendices contain Matlab codes for atmospheric routines and for wind estimation.

  20. Multiwavelength Modeling of Nove Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huschildt, P. H.

    2001-01-01

    LMC 1988 #1 was a slow, CO type, dust forming classical nova. It was the first extragalactic nova to be observed with the IUE satellite. We have successfully fitted observed ultraviolet and optical spectra of LMC 1988 #1 taken within the first two months of its outburst (when the atmosphere was still optically thick) with synthetic spectra computed using PHOENIX nova model atmospheres. The synthetic spectra reproduce most of the features seen in the spectra and provide V band magnitudes consistent with the observed light curve. The fits are improved by increasing the CNO abundances to 10 times the solar values. The bolometric luminosity of LMC 1988 #1 was approximately constant at 2 x 10(exp 38) ergs per second at a distance of 47.3 kpc for the first 2 months of the outburst until the formation of the dust shell.

  1. Model Atmospheres for Novae in Outburst: Summary of Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hauschildt, Peter H.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents a final report and summary of research on Model Atmospheres for Novae in Outburst. Some of the topics include: 1) Detailed NLTE (non-local thermodynamic equilibrium) Model Atmospheres for Novae during Outburst: II. Modeling optical and ultraviolet observations of Nova LMC 1988 #1; 2) A Non-LTE Line-Blanketed Stellar Atmosphere Model of the Early B Giant epsilon CMa; 3) Spectroscopy of Low Metallicity Stellar atmospheres; 4) Infrared Colors at the Stellar/Substellar Boundary; 5) On the abundance of Lithium in T CrB; 6) Numerical Solution of the Expanding Stellar Atmosphere Problem; and 7) The NextGen Model Atmosphere grid for 3000 less than or equal to T (sub eff) less than or equal to 10000K.

  2. Atmospheric models for post- giant impact planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupu, R.; Zahnle, K. J.; Marley, M. S.; Schaefer, L. K.; Fegley, B.; Morley, C.; Cahoy, K.; Freedman, R. S.; Fortney, J. J.

    2013-12-01

    the reflected and emergent flux. We find that these atmospheres are dominated by H2O and CO2, while the formation of CH4, and NH3 is quenched due to short dynamical timescales. Other important constituents are HF, HCl, NaCl, and SO2. These are apparent in the emerging spectra, and can be indicative that an impact has occurred. Estimates including photochemistry and vertical mixing show that these atmospheres are enhanced in sulfur-bearing species, particularly SO2, one of the most important absorbers. At this stage we do not address cloud formation and aerosol opacity. Estimated luminosities for post-impact planets, although lower than predicted by previous models, show that the hottest post-giant-impact planets will be detectable with the planned 30 m-class telescopes. Finally, we use the models to describe the cooling of a post-impact terrestrial planet and briefly investigate its time evolution, which ends as the planet transitions into a more conventional steam atmosphere runaway greenhouse. This calculation brings a significant improvement over previous runaway greenhouse models, by including additional opacity sources and comprehensive line lists for H2O and CO2. We find that the cooling timescale for post-giant impact Earths ranges between about 10^5 and 10^6 years, where the slower cooling is associated with the planet going through a runaway greenhouse stage.

  3. Global 3-d modeling of atmospheric ozone in the free troposphere and the stratosphere with emphasis on midlatitude regions. Final report, July 1, 1994--June 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Brasseur, G.; Erickson, D.; Tie, X.; Walter, S.

    1997-12-01

    The objective of this research is to use global chemical-transport models to study the chemical and dynamical processes that affect midlatitude stratospheric ozone and to quantify the budget of tropospheric ozone. Four models will be improved and used: (1) a new version of the two-dimensional chemical-radiative-dynamical model with microphysical process of sulfate aerosols and polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs), and heterogeneous conversions on the surfaces of sulfate aerosols and PSCs; (2) the stratospheric version of three-dimensional off-line chemical-transport model (STARS) with a relatively high horizontal resolution (2.8 degree in latitudes) with a microphysical formation of PSCs; (3) the tropospheric version of three-dimensional off-line chemical-transport model (MOZART) with details in the surface emissions and hydrocarbon reactions to estimate the tropospheric ozone budget and perturbations; (4) the intermediate model of the global and annual evolution of species (IMAGES) with a detailed chemical reactions but relatively lower resolutions. Model results will be compared with available data.

  4. Atmospheric modeling in complex terrain

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, M. D.; Streit, G. E.

    1990-05-01

    Los Alamos investigators have developed several models which are relevant to modeling Mexico City air quality. The collection of models includes: meteorological models, dispersion models, air chemistry models, and visibility models. The models have been applied in several different contexts. They have been developed primarily to address the complexities posed by complex terrain. HOTMAC is the meteorological model which requires terrain and limited meteorological information. HOTMAC incorporates a relatively complete description of atmospheric physics to give good descriptions of the wind, temperature, and turbulence fields. RAPTAD is a dispersion code which uses random particle transport and kernel representations to efficiently provide accurate pollutant concentration fields. RAPTAD provides a much better description of tracer dispersion than do Gaussian puff models which fail to properly represent the effects of the wind profile near the surface. ATMOS and LAVM treat photochemistry and visibility respectively. ATMOS has been used to describe wintertime chemistry of the Denver brown cloud. Its description provided reasonable agreement with measurements for the high altitude of Denver. LAVM can provide both numerical indices or pictoral representations of visibility effects of pollutants. 15 refs., 74 figs.

  5. Atmospheric Backscatter Model Development for CO Sub 2 Wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deepak, A.; Kent, G.; Yue, G. K.

    1982-01-01

    The results of investigations into the problems of modeling atmospheric backscatter from aerosols, in the lowest 20 km of the atmosphere, at CO2 wavelengths are presented, along with a summary of the relevant aerosol characteristics and their variability, and a discussion of the measurement techniques and errors involved. The different methods of calculating the aerosol backscattering function, both from measured aerosol characteristics and from optical measurements made at other wavelengths, are discussed in detail, and limits are placed on the accuracy of these methods. The effects of changing atmospheric humidity and temperature on the backscatter are analyzed and related to the actual atmosphere. Finally, the results of modeling CO2 backscatter in the atmosphere are presented and the variation with height and geographic location discussed, and limits placed on the magnitude of the backscattering function. Conclusions regarding modeling techniques and modeled atmospheric backscatter values are presented in tabular form.

  6. Atmospheric ammonia - Measurements and modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoell, J. M., Jr.; Levine, J. S.; Augustsson, T. R.; Harward, C. N.

    1981-01-01

    Ammonia possesses a unique position in the terrestrial atmosphere in that it is the only gaseous basic constituent. Ammonia readily forms aerosols, and by virtue of its high solubility controls the pH of cloud droplets and precipitation. Over the past year a ground-based solar viewing Infrared Heterodyne Radiometer has been used at Langley Research Center to infer the vertical distribution of ammonia. Ground level in situ measurements of ammonia have also been obtained to supplement the profile data. The ammonia profiles have been analyzed and interpreted with a one-dimensional photochemical model of the troposphere to assess the sources and sinks of NH3.

  7. Atmospheric Models for Mars Aerocapture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justus, C. G.; Duvall, Aleta; Keller, Vernon W.

    2005-01-01

    level Mars atmospheric model. Applications include systems design, performance analysis, and operations planning for aerobraking, entry descent and landing, and aerocapture. Typical Mars aerocapture periapsis altitudes (for systems with rigid- aeroshell heat shields) are about 50 km. This altitude is above the 0-40 km height range covered by Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) nadir observations. Recently, TES limb sounding data have been made available, spanning more than two Mars years (more than 200,000 data profiles) with altitude coverage up to about 60 km, well within the height range of interest for aerocapture. Results are presented comparing Mars-GRAM atmospheric density with densities from TES nadir and limb sounding observations. A new Mars-GRAM feature is described which allows individual TES nadir or limb profiles to be extracted from the large TES databases, and to be used as an optional replacement for standard Mars-GRAM background (climatology) conditions. For Monte-Carlo applications such as aerocapture guidance and control studies, Mars-GRAM perturbations are available using these TES profile background conditions.

  8. Atmospheric Models for Aeroentry and Aeroassist

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justus, C. G.; Duvall, Aleta; Keller, Vernon W.

    2004-01-01

    Eight destinations in the Solar System have sufficient atmosphere for aeroentry, aeroassist, or aerobraking/aerocapture: Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune, plus Saturn's moon Titan. Engineering-level atmospheric models for Earth, Mars, Titan, and Neptune have been developed for use in NASA s systems analysis studies of aerocapture applications. Development has begun on a similar atmospheric model for Venus. An important capability of these models is simulation of quasi-random perturbations for Monte Carlo analyses in developing guidance, navigation and control algorithms, and for thermal systems design. Characteristics of these atmospheric models are compared, and example applications for aerocapture are presented. Recent Titan atmospheric model updates are discussed, in anticipation of applications for trajectory and atmospheric reconstruct of Huygens Probe entry at Titan. Recent and planned updates to the Mars atmospheric model, in support of future Mars aerocapture systems analysis studies, are also presented.

  9. Atmospheric Models for Aeroentry and Aeroassist

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justus, C. G.; Duvall, Aleta; Keller, Vernon W.

    2005-01-01

    Eight destinations in the Solar System have sufficient atmosphere for aeroentry, aeroassist, or aerobraking/aerocapture: Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune, plus Saturn's moon Titan. Engineering-level atmospheric models for Earth, Mars, Titan, and Neptune have been developed for use in NASA's systems analysis studies of aerocapture applications. Development has begun on a similar atmospheric model for Venus. An important capability of these models is simulation of quasi-random perturbations for Monte Carlo analyses in developing guidance, navigation and control algorithms, and for thermal systems design. Characteristics of these atmospheric models are compared, and example applications for aerocapture are presented. Recent Titan atmospheric model updates are discussed, in anticipation of applications for trajectory and atmospheric reconstruct of Huygens Probe entry at Titan. Recent and planned updates to the Mars atmospheric model, in support of future Mars aerocapture systems analysis studies, are also presented.

  10. Trajectory Software With Upper Atmosphere Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Charles

    2012-01-01

    The Trajectory Software Applications 6.0 for the Dec Alpha platform has an implementation of the Jacchia-Lineberry Upper Atmosphere Density Model used in the Mission Control Center for International Space Station support. Previous trajectory software required an upper atmosphere to support atmosphere drag calculations in the Mission Control Center. The Functional operation will differ depending on the end-use of the module. In general, the calling routine will use function-calling arguments to specify input to the processor. The atmosphere model will then compute and return atmospheric density at the time of interest.

  11. Atmospheric Line of Site Experiment (ALOSE) Final Campaign Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, W.; Green, S.; Howard, M.; Yesalusky, M.; Modlin, N.

    2016-03-01

    The Atmospheric Line of Site Experiment (ALOSE) was a project to produce best-estimate atmospheric state measurements at the: 1. DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Clouds and Radiation Test-bed (CART) site located in Lamont, Oklahoma (11–14 December 2012) 2. Poker Flat Alaska Research Range (PFRR) located in Poker Flat, Alaska (19–26 February 2013) 3. DOE ARM CART site located in Lamont, Oklahoma (24–28 April 2013) 4. DOE ARM CART site located in Lamont, Oklahoma (9–15 July 2013) 5. DOE ARM Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) site located in Darwin, Australia (27 September–3 October 2013).

  12. Optical models of the molecular atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuev, V. E.; Makushkin, Y. S.; Mitsel, A. A.; Ponomarev, Y. N.; Rudenko, V. P.; Firsov, K. M.

    1986-01-01

    The use of optical and laser methods for performing atmospheric investigations has stimulated the development of the optical models of the atmosphere. The principles of constructing the optical models of molecular atmosphere for radiation with different spectral composition (wideband, narrowband, and monochromatic) are considered in the case of linear and nonlinear absorptions. The example of the development of a system which provides for the modeling of the processes of optical-wave energy transfer in the atmosphere is presented. Its physical foundations, structure, programming software, and functioning were considered.

  13. Performance Engineering in the Community Atmosphere Model

    SciTech Connect

    Worley, P; Mirin, A; Drake, J; Sawyer, W

    2006-05-30

    The Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) is the atmospheric component of the Community Climate System Model (CCSM) and is the primary consumer of computer resources in typical CCSM simulations. Performance engineering has been an important aspect of CAM development throughout its existence. This paper briefly summarizes these efforts and their impacts over the past five years.

  14. Simulation Tool for Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma Actuators at Atmospheric and Sub-Atmospheric Pressures: SBIR Phase I Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Likhanskii, Alexandre

    2012-01-01

    This report is the final report of a SBIR Phase I project. It is identical to the final report submitted, after some proprietary information of administrative nature has been removed. The development of a numerical simulation tool for dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma actuator is reported. The objectives of the project were to analyze and predict DBD operation at wide range of ambient gas pressures. It overcomes the limitations of traditional DBD codes which are limited to low-speed applications and have weak prediction capabilities. The software tool allows DBD actuator analysis and prediction for subsonic to hypersonic flow regime. The simulation tool is based on the VORPAL code developed by Tech-X Corporation. VORPAL's capability of modeling DBD plasma actuator at low pressures (0.1 to 10 torr) using kinetic plasma modeling approach, and at moderate to atmospheric pressures (1 to 10 atm) using hydrodynamic plasma modeling approach, were demonstrated. In addition, results of experiments with pulsed+bias DBD configuration that were performed for validation purposes are reported.

  15. Lower Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment (LABLE) Final Campaign Report

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, P; Bonin, TA; Newman, JF; Turner, DD; Chilson, P; Blumberg, WG; Mishra, S; Wainwright, CE; Carney, M; Jacobsen, EP; Wharton, S

    2015-11-01

    The Lower Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment (LABLE) included two measurement campaigns conducted at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains site in Oklahoma during 2012 and 2013. LABLE was designed as a multi-phase, low-cost collaboration among the University of Oklahoma, the National Severe Storms Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and the ARM program. A unique aspect was the role of graduate students in LABLE. They served as principal investigators and took the lead in designing and conducting experiments using different sampling strategies to best resolve boundary-layer phenomena.

  16. Forward Models of Exoplanets for Atmosphere Retrievals with JWST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howe, Alex; Burrows, Adam Seth

    2016-01-01

    We present models of extrasolar planets incorporating self-consistent treatment of internal structures, radiative cooling and XUV-driven mass loss over time, and over a range of masses. We also present new atmosphere models with 1-D radiative transfer and a range of compositions and cloud structures, with both theoretical transit and secondary eclipse spectra. These complimentary model sets are designed for performing retrievals of atmosphere parameters with data from the upcoming JWST mission. Finally, we present preliminary results with new theoretical spectra fit to well-observed transiting exoplanets.

  17. AN ANALYTIC RADIATIVE-CONVECTIVE MODEL FOR PLANETARY ATMOSPHERES

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Tyler D.; Catling, David C.

    2012-09-20

    We present an analytic one-dimensional radiative-convective model of the thermal structure of planetary atmospheres. Our model assumes that thermal radiative transfer is gray and can be represented by the two-stream approximation. Model atmospheres are assumed to be in hydrostatic equilibrium, with a power-law scaling between the atmospheric pressure and the gray thermal optical depth. The convective portions of our models are taken to follow adiabats that account for condensation of volatiles through a scaling parameter to the dry adiabat. By combining these assumptions, we produce simple, analytic expressions that allow calculations of the atmospheric-pressure-temperature profile, as well as expressions for the profiles of thermal radiative flux and convective flux. We explore the general behaviors of our model. These investigations encompass (1) worlds where atmospheric attenuation of sunlight is weak, which we show tend to have relatively high radiative-convective boundaries; (2) worlds with some attenuation of sunlight throughout the atmosphere, which we show can produce either shallow or deep radiative-convective boundaries, depending on the strength of sunlight attenuation; and (3) strongly irradiated giant planets (including hot Jupiters), where we explore the conditions under which these worlds acquire detached convective regions in their mid-tropospheres. Finally, we validate our model and demonstrate its utility through comparisons to the average observed thermal structure of Venus, Jupiter, and Titan, and by comparing computed flux profiles to more complex models.

  18. ATMOSPHERIC DEPOSITION MODELING AND MONITORING OF NUTRIENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This talk presents an overview of the capabilities and roles that regional atmospheric deposition models can play with respect to multi-media environmental problems. The focus is on nutrient deposition (nitrogen). Atmospheric deposition of nitrogen is an important contributor to...

  19. Modeling the atmospheric chemistry of TICs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henley, Michael V.; Burns, Douglas S.; Chynwat, Veeradej; Moore, William; Plitz, Angela; Rottmann, Shawn; Hearn, John

    2009-05-01

    An atmospheric chemistry model that describes the behavior and disposition of environmentally hazardous compounds discharged into the atmosphere was coupled with the transport and diffusion model, SCIPUFF. The atmospheric chemistry model was developed by reducing a detailed atmospheric chemistry mechanism to a simple empirical effective degradation rate term (keff) that is a function of important meteorological parameters such as solar flux, temperature, and cloud cover. Empirically derived keff functions that describe the degradation of target toxic industrial chemicals (TICs) were derived by statistically analyzing data generated from the detailed chemistry mechanism run over a wide range of (typical) atmospheric conditions. To assess and identify areas to improve the developed atmospheric chemistry model, sensitivity and uncertainty analyses were performed to (1) quantify the sensitivity of the model output (TIC concentrations) with respect to changes in the input parameters and (2) improve, where necessary, the quality of the input data based on sensitivity results. The model predictions were evaluated against experimental data. Chamber data were used to remove the complexities of dispersion in the atmosphere.

  20. GLOBAL REFERENCE ATMOSPHERIC MODELS FOR AEROASSIST APPLICATIONS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duvall, Aleta; Justus, C. G.; Keller, Vernon W.

    2005-01-01

    Aeroassist is a broad category of advanced transportation technology encompassing aerocapture, aerobraking, aeroentry, precision landing, hazard detection and avoidance, and aerogravity assist. The eight destinations in the Solar System with sufficient atmosphere to enable aeroassist technology are Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and Saturn's moon Titan. Engineering-level atmospheric models for five of these targets - Earth, Mars, Titan, Neptune, and Venus - have been developed at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. These models are useful as tools in mission planning and systems analysis studies associated with aeroassist applications. The series of models is collectively named the Global Reference Atmospheric Model or GRAM series. An important capability of all the models in the GRAM series is their ability to simulate quasi-random perturbations for Monte Carlo analysis in developing guidance, navigation and control algorithms, for aerothermal design, and for other applications sensitive to atmospheric variability. Recent example applications are discussed.

  1. Model atmospheres, predicted spectra, and colors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Theoretical models of stellar atmospheres and the process of forming a spectrum are reviewed with particular reference to the spectra of B stars. In the case of classical models the stellar atmosphere is though to consist of plane parallel layers of gas in which radiative and hydrostatic equilibrium exists. No radiative energy is lost or gained in the model atmosphere, but the detailed shape of the spectrum is changed as a result of the interactions with the ionized gas. Predicted line spectra using statistical equilibrium local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE), and non-LTE physics are compared and the determination of abundances is discussed. The limitations of classical modeling are examined. Models developed to demonstrate what motions in the upper atmosphere will do to the spectrum and to explore the effects of using geometries different from plane parallel layer are reviewed. In particular the problem of radiative transfer is addressed.

  2. Combined eye-atmosphere visibility model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Y. J.

    1981-01-01

    Existing models of the optical characteristics of the eye are combined with a recent model of optical characteristics of the atmosphere given by its modulation transfer function. This combination results in the combined eye-atmosphere performance given by the product of their modulation transfer functions. An application for the calculation of visibility thresholds in the case of a two-halves field is given.

  3. Modeling Callisto's Ionosphere: Insight Into Callisto's Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartkorn, O. A.; Saur, J.; Strobel, D. F.

    2015-12-01

    We develop a kinetic model of the ionosphere of Jupiter's moon Callisto within a prescribed neutral atmosphere composed of O2 and CO2. We calculate the electron energy distribution as a function of space by solving the Boltzmann equation and assuming a stationary balance between local sources and sinks of electrons and electron energy. Electron transport within the ionosphere is neglected, whereas we approximate the electron transport out of the ionosphere into the Jovian magnetosphere. Photoionization is believed to be the major electron source within Callisto's atmosphere. Therefore, we calculate the energy dependent photoelectron spectrum as source term of the Boltzmann equation. The resulting Boltzmann equation is solved rigorously delivering electron distribution functions at every point of Callisto's atmosphere. From these distribution functions, we calculate electron densities and electron impact generated UV emissions from Callisto's atmosphere. The calculated electron densities and UV emissions are compared with observations of the Galileo spacecraft [Kliore et al., 2002] and the Hubble Space Telescope [Cunningham et al., 2015]. Based on these comparisons, we test a physically motivated atmosphere model including asymmetries that depend on Callisto's orbital phase, similar to Europa's atmosphere [Plainaki et al., 2013]. As a result, we gain knowledge about Callisto's atmospheric density and its atmospheric asymmetries.

  4. Atmosphere of Mars: Mariner IV Models Compared.

    PubMed

    Fjeldbo, G; Fjeldbo, W C; Eshleman, V R

    1966-09-23

    Three classes of models for the atmosphere of Mars differ in identifying the main ionospheric layer measured by Mariner IV as being analogous to a terrestrial F(2), F(1), or E layer. At an altitude of several hundred kilometers, the relative atmospheric mass densities for these models (in the order named) are approximately 1, 10(2), and 10(4), and the temperatures are roughly 100 degrees , 200 degrees , and 400 degrees K. Theory and observation are in best agreement for an F, s model, for which photodissociation of CO(2), and diffusive separation result in an atomic-oxygen upper atmosphere, with O(+) being the principal ion in the isothermal topside of the ionosphere. The mesopause temperature minimum would be at or below the freezing point of CO(2), and dry ice particles would be expected to form. However, an F(1) model, with molecular ions in a mixed and warmer upper atmosphere, might result if photodissociation and diffusive separation are markedly less than would be expected from analogy with Earth's upper atmosphere. The E model proposed by Chamberlain and McElroy appears very unlikely; it is not compatible with the measured ionization profile unless rather unlikely assumptions are made about the values, and changes with height, of the effective recombination coefficient and the average ion mass. Moreover our theoretical heat-budget computations for the atmospheric region probed by Mariner IV indicate markedly lower temperatures and temperature gradients than were obtained for the E model.

  5. An assessment model for atmospheric composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prather, Michael J. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    Predicting future perturbations to global air quality and climate requires, as a prerequisite, prognostic models for the composition of the Earth's atmosphere. Such assessment models are needed to evaluate the impact on our environment of different social choices that affect emissions of the photochemically and radiatively important trace gases. Our presentation here of a prototype assessment model is intended to encourage public scientific discussions of the necessary components of the model and their interactions, with the recognition that models similar to this will likely be used by the Environmental Protection Agency and other regulatory agencies in order to assess the effect of changes in atmospheric composition on climate over the next century.

  6. Scale Dependence Between Hydrologic and Atmospheric Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morehead, M. D.; Marks, D.; Winstral, A.

    2003-12-01

    A disparity tends to exist between the scales simulated by atmospheric models intended as input for hydrologic modeling and those at which hydrologic modelers simulate processes especially snow accumulation and depletion in mountainous terrain. Two different models are used to generate input atmospheric data at various scales to drive a snow hydrology model and test the sensitivity of the snow processes at various forcing scales. One of the input atmospheric models is the nested grid atmospheric model, RAMS, developed at Colorado State University. The second input model uses IPW (Image Processing Workbench) to distribute measured climatic variables over complex landscapes. The snow energy balance model is the grid based ISNOBAL. The simulations are performed in the Reynolds Creek Experimental Watershed (RCEW) in the Owyhee Mountains of South-Western Idaho. RCEW is well instrumented with distributed rain gauges, meteorological sites, snow pillows, and discharge weirs. A Rain-on-Snow flooding event is used for the simulations which occurred during the end of December 1996 and the beginning of January 1997. The analysis is showing that atmospheric grids on the order of tens of kilometers miss much of the detailed atmospheric dynamics controlling snowfall in the complex terrain of the Owyhee Mountains and lead to incorrect hydrologic results if simplistic downscaling techniques are used. The detailed variability in the precipitation gauges is on the order of a kilometer or less and the snow pack variability is on even smaller scales. It is hypothesized that atmospheric forcing need to be modeled down to scales on the order of 1 kilometer and then redistributed by wind effects to accurately depict the complex conditions in mountainous terrain.

  7. Nucla circulating atmospheric fluidized bed demonstration project. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    Colorado-Ute Electric Association began a study to evaluate options for upgrading and extending the life of its Nucla power station in 1982. Located in southwestern Colorado near the town of Nucla, this station was commissioned in 1959 with a local bituminous coal as its design fuel for three identical stoker-fired units, each rated at 12.6 MW(e). Poor station efficiency, high fuel costs, and spiraling boiler maintenance costs forced the Nucla Station into low priority in the CUEA dispatch order as early as 1981. Among the options CUEA considered was to serve as a host utility to demonstrate Atmospheric Fluidized Bed Combustion (AFBC) technology. The anticipated environmental benefits and apparent attractive economics of a circulating AFBC led to Colorado-Ute`s decision to proceed with the design and construction of a demonstration project in 1984 at the Nucla facility.

  8. THE ATMOSPHERIC MODEL EVALUATION TOOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    This poster describes a model evaluation tool that is currently being developed and applied for meteorological and air quality model evaluation. The poster outlines the framework and provides examples of statistical evaluations that can be performed with the model evaluation tool...

  9. Atmospheric radiation model for water surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, R. E.; Gaskill, D. W.; Lierzer, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    An atmospheric correction model was extended to account for various atmospheric radiation components in remotely sensed data. Components such as the atmospheric path radiance which results from singly scattered sky radiation specularly reflected by the water surface are considered. A component which is referred to as the virtual Sun path radiance, i.e. the singly scattered path radiance which results from the solar radiation which is specularly reflected by the water surface is also considered. These atmospheric radiation components are coded into a computer program for the analysis of multispectral remote sensor data over the Great Lakes of the United States. The user must know certain parameters, such as the visibility or spectral optical thickness of the atmosphere and the geometry of the sensor with respect to the Sun and the target elements under investigation.

  10. REGIONAL-SCALE ATMOSPHERIC MERCURY MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    This PowerPoint presentation gives a short synopsis of the state of the science of atmospheric mercury modeling, including a description of recent publications of model codes by EPA, a description of a recent mercury model intercomparison study, and a description of a synthesis p...

  11. New Atmospheric Turbulence Model for Shuttle Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justus, C. G.; Campbell, C. W.; Doubleday, M. K.; Johnson, D. L.

    1990-01-01

    An updated NASA atmospheric turbulence model, from 0 to 200 km altitude, which was developed to be more realistic and less conservative when applied to space shuttle reentry engineering simulation studies involving control system fuel expenditures is presented. The prior model used extreme turbulence (3 sigma) for all altitudes, whereas in reality severe turbulence is patchy within quiescent atmospheric zones. The updated turublence model presented is designed to be more realistic. The prior turbulence statistics (sigma and L) were updated and were modeled accordingly.

  12. A Community Atmosphere Model with Superparameterized Clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Randall, David; Branson, Mark; Wang, Minghuai; Ghan, Steven J.; Craig, Cheryl; Gettelman, A.; Edwards, Jim

    2013-06-18

    In 1999, National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) scientists Wojciech Grabowski and Piotr Smolarkiewicz created a "multiscale" atmospheric model in which the physical processes associated with clouds were represented by running a simple high-resolution model within each grid column of a lowresolution global model. In idealized experiments, they found that the multiscale model produced promising simulations of organized tropical convection, which other models had struggled to produce. Inspired by their results, Colorado State University (CSU) scientists Marat Khairoutdinov and David Randall created a multiscale version of the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM). They removed the cloud parameterizations of the CAM, and replaced them with Khairoutdinov's high-resolution cloud model. They dubbed the embedded cloud model a "super-parameterization," and the modified CAM is now called the "SP-CAM." Over the next several years, many scientists, from many institutions, have explored the ability of the SP-CAM to simulate tropical weather systems, the day-night changes of precipitation, the Asian and African monsoons, and a number of other climate processes. Cristiana Stan of the Center for Ocean-Land-Atmosphere Interactions found that the SP-CAM gives improved results when coupled to an ocean model, and follow-on studies have explored the SP-CAM's utility when used as the atmospheric component of the Community Earth System Model. Much of this research has been performed under the auspices of the Center for Multiscale Modeling of Atmospheric Processes, a National Science Foundation (NSF) Science and Technology Center for which the lead institution is CSU.

  13. Infrared radiation models for atmospheric methane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cess, R. D.; Kratz, D. P.; Caldwell, J.; Kim, S. J.

    1986-01-01

    Mutually consistent line-by-line, narrow-band and broad-band infrared radiation models are presented for methane, a potentially important anthropogenic trace gas within the atmosphere. Comparisons of the modeled band absorptances with existing laboratory data produce the best agreement when, within the band models, spurious band intensities are used which are consistent with the respective laboratory data sets, but which are not consistent with current knowledge concerning the intensity of the infrared fundamental band of methane. This emphasizes the need for improved laboratory band absorptance measurements. Since, when applied to atmospheric radiation calculations, the line-by-line model does not require the use of scaling approximations, the mutual consistency of the band models provides a means of appraising the accuracy of scaling procedures. It is shown that Curtis-Godson narrow-band and Chan-Tien broad-band scaling provide accurate means of accounting for atmospheric temperature and pressure variations.

  14. Users of middle atmosphere models remarks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gamble, Joe

    1987-01-01

    The procedure followed for shuttle operations is to calculate descent trajectories for each potential shuttle landing site using the Global Reference Atmosphere Model (GRAM) to interactively compute density along the flight path 100 times to bound the statistics. The purpose is to analyze the flight dynamics, along with calculations of heat loads during reentry. The analysis program makes use of the modified version of the Jacchia-70 atmosphere, which includes He bulges over the poles and seasonal latitude variations at lower altitudes. For the troposphere, the 4-D Model is used up to 20 km, Groves from 30 km up to 90 km. It is extrapolated over the globe and faired into the Jacchia atmosphere between 90 and 115 km. Since data on the Southern Hemisphere was lacking, what was done was that the data was flipped over and lagged 6 months. Sometimes when winds are calculated from pressure data in the model there appear to be discontinuities. Modelers indicated that the GRAM was not designed to produce winds, but good wind data is needed for the landing phase of shuttle operations. Use of atmospheric models during reentry is one application where it is obvious that a single integrated atmosphere model is required.

  15. Final Report for LDRD project 03-ERD-021: ''Analyzing the Long-Range Transport of Asian Aerosols Using an LLNL Atmospheric Model and CAMS/NOAA Measurements from Northern California''

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron-Smith, P

    2005-02-10

    The primary purposes of this project were to (1) improve and validate the LLNL/IMPACT atmospheric chemistry and aerosol transport model, (2) experimentally analyze size- and time-resolved aerosol measurements taken during spring 2001 in Northern California, and (3) understand the origin of dust impacting Northern California. Under this project, we (1) more than doubled the resolution of the LLNL-IMPACT global atmospheric chemistry and aerosol model (to 1 x 1 degree), (2) added an interactive dust emission algorithm to the IMPACT model in order to simulate observed events, (3) added detailed microphysics to the IMPACT model to calculate the size-distribution of aerosols in terms of mass, (4) analyzed the aerosol mass and elemental composition of the size- and time-resolved aerosol measurements made by our UC Davis collaborators, and (5) determined that the majority of the observed soil dust is from intercontinental transport across the Pacific. A detailed report on this project is in the attached document ''Impact of Long-Range Dust Transport on Northern California in Spring 2002'' (UCRL-TR-209597), except for the addition of aerosol microphysics, which is covered in the attached document ''Implementation of the Missing Aerosol Physics into LLNL IMPACT'' (UCRL-TR-209568). In addition to the technical results, this project has (1) produced a journal article presenting our results that will be submitted shortly, (2) enabled collaborations with UC Davis and the California Air Resources Board, (3) generated a direct DOE request and large computer allocation to simulate the radiative impact of sulfate aerosols at high-resolution over the last 50 years, and (4) contributed to successful LLNL responses to requests for proposals from (a) the DOE Atmospheric Science Program ($780k), (b) the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program ($720k), and (c) the NASA Global Modeling and Analysis Program ($525k). The journal article will be based on the report listed above

  16. Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program: Atmospheric Remote Sensing and Assessment Program -- Final Report. Part 1: The lower atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Tooman, T.P.

    1997-01-01

    This report documents work done between FY91 and FY95 for the lower atmospheric portion of the joint Department of Defense (DoD) and Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Remote Sensing and Assessment Program (ARSAP) within the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP). The work focused on (1) developing new measurement capabilities and (2) measuring atmospheric heating in a well-defined layer and then relating it to cloud properties an water vapor content. Seven new instruments were develop3ed for use with Unmanned Aerospace Vehicles (UAVs) as the host platform for flux, radiance, cloud, and water vapor measurements. Four major field campaigns were undertaken to use these new as well as existing instruments to make critically needed atmospheric measurements. Scientific results include the profiling of clear sky fluxes from near surface to 14 km and the strong indication of cloudy atmosphere absorption of solar radiation considerably greater than predicted by extant models.

  17. Hydrodynamic models of a Cepheid atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karp, A. H.

    1975-01-01

    Instead of computing a large number of coarsely zoned hydrodynamic models covering the entire atmospheric instability strip, the author computed a single model as well as computer limitations allow. The implicit hydrodynamic code of Kutter and Sparks was modified to include radiative transfer effects in optically thin zones.

  18. Chemical kinetics and modeling of planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yung, Yuk L.

    1990-01-01

    A unified overview is presented for chemical kinetics and chemical modeling in planetary atmospheres. The recent major advances in the understanding of the chemistry of the terrestrial atmosphere make the study of planets more interesting and relevant. A deeper understanding suggests that the important chemical cycles have a universal character that connects the different planets and ultimately link together the origin and evolution of the solar system. The completeness (or incompleteness) of the data base for chemical kinetics in planetary atmospheres will always be judged by comparison with that for the terrestrial atmosphere. In the latter case, the chemistry of H, O, N, and Cl species is well understood. S chemistry is poorly understood. In the atmospheres of Jovian planets and Titan, the C-H chemistry of simple species (containing 2 or less C atoms) is fairly well understood. The chemistry of higher hydrocarbons and the C-N, P-N chemistry is much less understood. In the atmosphere of Venus, the dominant chemistry is that of chlorine and sulfur, and very little is known about C1-S coupled chemistry. A new frontier for chemical kinetics both in the Earth and planetary atmospheres is the study of heterogeneous reactions. The formation of the ozone hole on Earth, the ubiquitous photochemical haze on Venus and in the Jovian planets and Titan all testify to the importance of heterogeneous reactions. It remains a challenge to connect the gas phase chemistry to the production of aerosols.

  19. Global emissions inventories to aid atmospheric modelers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graedel, T. E.

    Computer projections of changes in global atmospheric chemistry could become more accurate and more easily compared with the availability of standard global emissions inventories. Starting in 1994, the Global Emissions Inventory Activity (GEIA) began to finalize gridded global emissions inventories and distribute them to atmospheric scientists. GEIA operates under the auspices of the International Global Atmospheric Chemistry (IGAC) Project, a cooperative effort of several hundred atmospheric scientists from more than 30 countries. The purpose of the IGAC Project is to measure, understand, and predict changes in global atmospheric chemistry, particularly those contributing to global problems such as acid rain, depletion of stratospheric ozone, greenhouse warming, and increased oxidant levels that damage biota.A 1992 survey by participants in the GEIA project [Graedel et al., 1993] showed that suitable emissions inventories are rarely available. The chlorofluorocarbon inventory, regarded as well quantified, was unavailable in gridded form. Inventories for CO2, CH4, NOx, SO2, reduced sulfur, and radon were regarded as having excess uncertainty, inadequate spatial resolution, or both; inventories for other chemical species were sketchy or nonexistent. Temporal resolution was almost uniformly poor. The survey made it clear that internally consistent, rigorously developed, gridded inventories with adequate spatial and temporal resolution would be valuable.

  20. Radiative and dynamical modeling of Jupiter's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerlet, Sandrine; Spiga, Aymeric

    2016-04-01

    Jupiter's atmosphere harbours a rich meteorology, with alternate westward and eastward zonal jets, waves signatures and long-living storms. Recent ground-based and spacecraft measurements have also revealed a rich stratospheric dynamics, with the observation of thermal signatures of planetary waves, puzzling meridional distribution of hydrocarbons at odds with predictions of photochemical models, and a periodic equatorial oscillation analogous to the Earth's quasi-biennal oscillation and Saturn's equatorial oscillation. These recent observations, along with the many unanswered questions (What drives and maintain the equatorial oscillations? How important is the seasonal forcing compared to the influence of internal heat? What is the large-scale stratospheric circulation of these giant planets?) motivated us to develop a complete 3D General Circulation Model (GCM) of Saturn and Jupiter. We aim at exploring the large-scale circulation, seasonal variability, and wave activity from the troposphere to the stratosphere of these giant planets. We will briefly present how we adapted our existing Saturn GCM to Jupiter. One of the main change is the addition of a stratospheric haze layer made of fractal aggregates in the auroral regions (poleward of 45S and 30N). This haze layer has a significant radiative impact by modifying the temperature up to +/- 15K in the middle stratosphere. We will then describe the results of radiative-convective simulations and how they compare to recent Cassini and ground-based temperature measurements. These simulations reproduce surprisingly well some of the observed thermal vertical and meridional gradients, but several important mismatches at low and high latitudes suggest that dynamics also plays an important role in shaping the temperature field. Finally, we will present full GCM simulations and discuss the main resulting features (waves and instabilities). We will also and discuss the impact of the choice of spatial resolution and

  1. Radiative cooling computed for model atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksson, T. S.; Granqvist, C. G.

    1982-12-01

    The radiative cooling power and temperature drop of horizontal surfaces are evaluated on the basis of calculations of spectral radiance from model atmospheres representative of various climatic conditions. Calculations of atmospheric radiance from the zenith and from off-zenith angles were performed with the LOWTRAN 5 atmospheric transmittance/radiance computer code (Kneizys et al., 1980) for model atmospheres corresponding to the tropics, midlatitude summer, midlatitude winter, subarctic summer, subarctic winter and the 1962 U.S. standard atmosphere. Comparison of the computed spectral radiance curves with the radiative fluxes from blackbody surfaces and ideal infrared-selective surfaces (having reflectance in the 8-13 micron range and unity reflectance elsewhere) at various ambient-surface temperature differences shows cooling powers to lie between 58 and 113 W/sq m at ambient temperature for a freely radiating surface, with maximum temperature differences of 11-21 C for a blackbody and 18-33 C for an infrared-selective surface. Both cooling powers and temperature differences were higher for surfaces exposed only to atmospheric zenith radiance. In addition, water vapor content is found to affect strongly the radiative cooling, while ozone and aerosol contents had little effect.

  2. Infrared radiation models for atmospheric ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kratz, David P.; Ces, Robert D.

    1988-01-01

    A hierarchy of line-by-line, narrow-band, and broadband infrared radiation models are discussed for ozone, a radiatively important atmospheric trace gas. It is shown that the narrow-band (Malkmus) model is in near-precise agreement with the line-by-line model, thus providing a means of testing narrow-band Curtis-Godson scaling, and it is found that this scaling procedure leads to errors in atmospheric fluxes of up to 10 percent. Moreover, this is a direct consequence of the altitude dependence of the ozone mixing ratio. Somewhat greater flux errors arise with use of the broadband model, due to both a lesser accuracy of the broadband scaling procedure and to inherent errors within the broadband model, despite the fact that this model has been tuned to the line-by-line model.

  3. Model Learning Center. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daviess County School District, Owensboro, KY.

    This handbook describes the model learning resources center in operation at Daviess County (Kentucky) State Vocational-Technical School and details its objectives, materials, and methods of operation. The manual is organized in six sections. The first section describes the learning resources center, and details its philosophy, purpose, objectives,…

  4. Workshop on Atmospheric Transmission Modeling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-12-01

    trans- mission modeling. The workshop was divided into a morning rsession in which paper’s relating to the topic were pre- sented and an afternoon...a quantitative sense until Rosell’s work referenced above, Here it became clear that the work done by Johnson related the number of line pairs of a...needs to be adjusted according to the gaussian form shown in Fig. 2. Here the value of 50 percent probability is related to a normalized value of 1.0

  5. Geophysical Plasmas and Atmospheric Modeling.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-07-01

    60 0.11 0. 0. e-0.3. u -k,/k, -0.001, and -rnm,/n = 1837. The M0. . A pin aft ,n ml in*wy pan ofte wv frequency .,/a, instability exists only for a...evolution of the one pass gain factor for a whistler . wave packet and find that for parameters accessible to AMPTE type experiments the pin factor is...models analyzed so far do not ac- field ripples, but was not detected near the other end, al- count for the failure of the solid beam to emerge from the

  6. Wideband model of HF atmospheric radio noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemmon, John J.

    2001-01-01

    A model of the waveform generated by high-frequency atmospheric radio noise is presented. Cumulative probability distributions of the noise envelope are derived and shown to be in good agreement with a large database collected from a wide range of noise environments. The model includes correlations in the waveforms that simulate the burst structure of measured atmospheric noise. The bandwidth dependence of the voltage deviation parameter, which parameterizes the impulsiveness of the noise, shows behavior that is qualitatively similar to a limited amount of measured data.

  7. Model atmospheres for cool supergiant stars.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, D. R.; Johnson, H. R.

    1972-01-01

    The results of an exploratory grid of model atmospheres for cool giant stars are used to illustrate the effect of varying the chemical composition of the atmosphere. The effects of composition changes (depletion of C and O, enrichment of N, and increase in the ratio C/O), which might be expected from processing of the original material of a star through the CNO cycle of nuclear burning, are studied. The models also include the important CN opacity. They are illustrated by giving several representative T-P and T-tau diagrams, spectral energy curves, and column density tables of molecules.

  8. Physics modeling support contract: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-09-30

    This document is the final report for the Physics Modeling Support contract between TRW, Inc. and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for fiscal year 1987. It consists of following projects: TIBER physics modeling and systems code development; advanced blanket modeling task; time dependent modeling; and free electron maser for TIBER II.

  9. Coupling approaches used in atmospheric entry models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gritsevich, M. I.

    2012-09-01

    While a planet orbits the Sun, it is subject to impact by smaller objects, ranging from tiny dust particles and space debris to much larger asteroids and comets. Such collisions have taken place frequently over geological time and played an important role in the evolution of planets and the development of life on the Earth. Though the search for near-Earth objects addresses one of the main points of the Asteroid and Comet Hazard, one should not underestimate the useful information to be gleaned from smaller atmospheric encounters, known as meteors or fireballs. Not only do these events help determine the linkages between meteorites and their parent bodies; due to their relative regularity they provide a good statistical basis for analysis. For successful cases with found meteorites, the detailed atmospheric path record is an excellent tool to test and improve existing entry models assuring the robustness of their implementation. There are many more important scientific questions meteoroids help us to answer, among them: Where do these objects come from, what are their origins, physical properties and chemical composition? What are the shapes and bulk densities of the space objects which fully ablate in an atmosphere and do not reach the planetary surface? Which values are directly measured and which are initially assumed as input to various models? How to couple both fragmentation and ablation effects in the model, taking real size distribution of fragments into account? How to specify and speed up the recovery of a recently fallen meteorites, not letting weathering to affect samples too much? How big is the pre-atmospheric projectile to terminal body ratio in terms of their mass/volume? Which exact parameters beside initial mass define this ratio? More generally, how entering object affects Earth's atmosphere and (if applicable) Earth's surface? How to predict these impact consequences based on atmospheric trajectory data? How to describe atmospheric entry

  10. THE Antarctic Atmospheric Energy Budget: Observations and Model Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Previdi, M. J.; Smith, K. L.; Polvani, L. M.

    2014-12-01

    We present a new, observationally-based estimate of the atmospheric energy budget for the Antarctic polar cap (the region poleward of 70°S). This energy budget is constructed using state-of-the-art reanalysis products from ECMWF [the ECMWF Interim Re-Analysis (ERA-Interim)] and Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiative fluxes. We find that the climatological mean Antarctic energy budget is characterized by an approximate balance between the TOA net outgoing radiation and the horizontal convergence of atmospheric energy transport, with the net surface energy flux and atmospheric energy storage generally being small in comparison. We compare these observationally-based results with coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation model simulations that have been made available as part of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project, phase 5 (CMIP5). While CMIP5 models generally perform well in simulating the observed climatological mean energy budget, some notable model biases are apparent. These biases are most pronounced during the austral summer and fall seasons, with the largest biases (approaching 30 W m-2 for some models) occurring for the TOA net incoming shortwave radiation during summer. Finally, we examine the causes of model biases (e.g., deficiencies in the simulated cloud cover and sea ice), as well as their relationship to the simulated twenty-first century trends in the energy budget. We find a statistically significant inverse correlation across the CMIP5 models between the present-day biases in atmospheric energy transport into the polar cap, and the simulated future changes in energy transport over the twenty-first century. Possible reasons for this relationship are discussed.

  11. Coupled land surface/hydrologic/atmospheric models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pielke, Roger; Steyaert, Lou; Arritt, Ray; Lahtakia, Mercedes; Smith, Chris; Ziegler, Conrad; Soong, Su Tzai; Avissar, Roni; Wetzel, Peter; Sellers, Piers

    1993-01-01

    The topics covered include the following: prototype land cover characteristics data base for the conterminous United States; surface evapotranspiration effects on cumulus convection and implications for mesoscale models; the use of complex treatment of surface hydrology and thermodynamics within a mesoscale model and some related issues; initialization of soil-water content for regional-scale atmospheric prediction models; impact of surface properties on dryline and MCS evolution; a numerical simulation of heavy precipitation over the complex topography of California; representing mesoscale fluxes induced by landscape discontinuities in global climate models; emphasizing the role of subgrid-scale heterogeneity in surface-air interaction; and problems with modeling and measuring biosphere-atmosphere exchanges of energy, water, and carbon on large scales.

  12. Improved reference models for middle atmosphere ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keating, G. M.; Pitts, M. C.; Chen, C.

    This paper describes the improvements introduced into the original version of ozone reference model of Keating and Young (1985, 1987) which is to be incorporated in the next COSPAR International Reference Atmosphere (CIRA). The ozone reference model will provide information on the global ozone distribution (including the ozone vertical structure as a function of month and latitude from 25 to 90 km) combining data from five recent satellite experiments: the Nimbus 7 LIMS, Nimbus 7 SBUV, AE-2 Stratospheric Aerosol Gas Experiment (SAGE), Solar Mesosphere Explorer (SME) UV Spectrometer, and SME 1.27 Micron Airglow. The improved version of the reference model uses reprocessed AE-2 SAGE data (sunset) and extends the use of SAGE data from 1981 to the 1981-1983 time period. Comparisons are presented between the results of this ozone model and various nonsatellite measurements at different levels in the middle atmosphere.

  13. Dynamic model of the Earth's upper atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slowey, J. W.

    1984-01-01

    An initial modification to the MSF/J70 Thermospheric Model, in which the variations due to sudden geomagnetic disturbances upon the Earth's upper atmospheric density structure were modeled is presented. This dynamic model of the geomagnetic variation included is an improved version of one which SAO developed from the analysis of the ESRO 4 mass spectrometer data that was incorporated in the Jacchia 1977 model. The variation with geomagnetic local time as well as with geomagnetic latitude are included, and also the effects due to disturbance of the temperature profiles in the region of energy deposition.

  14. Molecular column densities in selected model atmospheres. [stellar atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, H. R.; Sneden, C.; Beebe, R. F.

    1975-01-01

    Molecular column densities are presented for 35 molecules in a variety of cool stellar model atmospheres. From an examination of the predicted column densities, we draw the following conclusions: (1) OH might be visible in carbon stars which have been generated from triplet-alpha burning, but will be absent from carbon stars generated from the CNO bi-cycle; (2) the TiO/ZrO ratio shows small but interesting variations as C/O is changed and as the effective temperature is changed; (3) the column density of silicon dicarbide (SiC2) is sensitive to abundance, temperature, and gravity; hence, all relationships between the strength of SiC2 and other stellar parameters will show appreciable scatter. There is, however, a substantial luminosity effect present in the SiC2 column densities; (4) unexpectedly, SiC2 is anticorrelated with C2; (5) the presence of SiC2 in a carbon star allows us to eliminate the possibility that these stars are both 'hot' (T sub eff greater than or equal to 3000 K) and have been produced through the CNO bi-cycle (so that C/H is less than solar).

  15. High-resolution Martian atmosphere modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egan, W. G.; Fischbein, W. L.; Smith, L. L.; Hilgeman, T.

    1980-01-01

    A multilayer radiative transfer, high-spectral-resolution infrared model of the lower atmosphere of Mars has been constructed to assess the effect of scattering on line profiles. The model takes into accout aerosol scattering and absorption and includes a line-by-line treatment of scattering and absorption by CO2 and H2O. The aerosol complex indices of refraction used were those measured on montmorillonite and basalt chosen on the basis of Mars ir data from the NASA Lear Airborne Observatory. The particle sizes and distribution were estimated using Viking data. The molecular line treatment employs the AFGL line parameters and Voigt profiles. The modeling results indicate that the line profiles are only slightly affected by normal aerosol scattering and absorption, but the effect could be appreciable for heavy loading. The technique described permits a quantitative approach to assessing and correcting for the effect of aerosols on lineshapes in planetary atmospheres.

  16. A global atmospheric model of meteoric iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Wuhu; Marsh, Daniel R.; Chipperfield, Martyn P.; Janches, Diego; Höffner, Josef; Yi, Fan; Plane, John M. C.

    2013-08-01

    The first global model of meteoric iron in the atmosphere (WACCM-Fe) has been developed by combining three components: the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM), a description of the neutral and ion-molecule chemistry of iron in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT), and a treatment of the injection of meteoric constituents into the atmosphere. The iron chemistry treats seven neutral and four ionized iron containing species with 30 neutral and ion-molecule reactions. The meteoric input function (MIF), which describes the injection of Fe as a function of height, latitude, and day, is precalculated from an astronomical model coupled to a chemical meteoric ablation model (CABMOD). This newly developed WACCM-Fe model has been evaluated against a number of available ground-based lidar observations and performs well in simulating the mesospheric atomic Fe layer. The model reproduces the strong positive correlation of temperature and Fe density around the Fe layer peak and the large anticorrelation around 100 km. The diurnal tide has a significant effect in the middle of the layer, and the model also captures well the observed seasonal variations. However, the model overestimates the peak Fe+concentration compared with the limited rocket-borne mass spectrometer data available, although good agreement on the ion layer underside can be obtained by adjusting the rate coefficients for dissociative recombination of Fe-molecular ions with electrons. Sensitivity experiments with the same chemistry in a 1-D model are used to highlight significant remaining uncertainties in reaction rate coefficients, and to explore the dependence of the total Fe abundance on the MIF and rate of vertical transport.

  17. A Global Atmospheric Model of Meteoric Iron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feng, Wuhu; Marsh, Daniel R.; Chipperfield, Martyn P.; Janches, Diego; Hoffner, Josef; Yi, Fan; Plane, John M. C.

    2013-01-01

    The first global model of meteoric iron in the atmosphere (WACCM-Fe) has been developed by combining three components: the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM), a description of the neutral and ion-molecule chemistry of iron in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT), and a treatment of the injection of meteoric constituents into the atmosphere. The iron chemistry treats seven neutral and four ionized iron containing species with 30 neutral and ion-molecule reactions. The meteoric input function (MIF), which describes the injection of Fe as a function of height, latitude, and day, is precalculated from an astronomical model coupled to a chemical meteoric ablation model (CABMOD). This newly developed WACCM-Fe model has been evaluated against a number of available ground-based lidar observations and performs well in simulating the mesospheric atomic Fe layer. The model reproduces the strong positive correlation of temperature and Fe density around the Fe layer peak and the large anticorrelation around 100 km. The diurnal tide has a significant effect in the middle of the layer, and the model also captures well the observed seasonal variations. However, the model overestimates the peak Fe+ concentration compared with the limited rocket-borne mass spectrometer data available, although good agreement on the ion layer underside can be obtained by adjusting the rate coefficients for dissociative recombination of Fe-molecular ions with electrons. Sensitivity experiments with the same chemistry in a 1-D model are used to highlight significant remaining uncertainties in reaction rate coefficients, and to explore the dependence of the total Fe abundance on the MIF and rate of vertical transport.

  18. Models for some aspects of atmospheric vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deissler, R. G.

    1977-01-01

    A frictionless adiabatic model is used to study the growth of random vortices in an atmosphere with buoyant instability and vertical wind shear, taking account of the effects of axial drag, heat transfer and precipitation-induced downdrafts. It is found that downdrafts of tornadic magnitude may occur in negatively buoyant columns. The radial-inflow velocity required to maintain a given maximum tangential velocity in a tornado is determined by using a turbulent vortex model. A tornado model which involves a rotating parent cloud as well as buoyancy and precipitation effects is also discussed.

  19. Parallel computing in atmospheric chemistry models

    SciTech Connect

    Rotman, D.

    1996-02-01

    Studies of atmospheric chemistry are of high scientific interest, involve computations that are complex and intense, and require enormous amounts of I/O. Current supercomputer computational capabilities are limiting the studies of stratospheric and tropospheric chemistry and will certainly not be able to handle the upcoming coupled chemistry/climate models. To enable such calculations, the authors have developed a computing framework that allows computations on a wide range of computational platforms, including massively parallel machines. Because of the fast paced changes in this field, the modeling framework and scientific modules have been developed to be highly portable and efficient. Here, the authors present the important features of the framework and focus on the atmospheric chemistry module, named IMPACT, and its capabilities. Applications of IMPACT to aircraft studies will be presented.

  20. A quasi-static model of global atmospheric electricity. II - Electrical coupling between the upper and lower atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roble, R. G.; Hays, P. B.

    1979-01-01

    The paper presents a model of global atmospheric electricity used to examine the effect of upper atmospheric generators on the global electrical circuit. The model represents thunderstorms as dipole current generators randomly distributed in areas of known thunderstorm frequency; the electrical conductivity in the model increases with altitude, and electrical effects are coupled with a passive magnetosphere along geomagnetic field lines. The large horizontal-scale potential differences at ionospheric heights map downward into the lower atmosphere where the perturbations in the ground electric field are superimposed on the diurnal variation. Finally, changes in the upper atmospheric conductivity due to solar flares, polar cap absorptions, and Forbush decreases are shown to alter the downward mapping of the high-latitude potential pattern and the global distribution of fields and currents.

  1. Development of Atmospheric Infrared Emission Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    spectral radiance may be calculated for an arbitrary line -of-sight (LOS) passing through up to seven profiles . Interpolation is used to... Spectral Line with the Voigt Profile ," J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Transfer, 14, 319 (1974). 34. "U. S. Standard Atmosphere 1976," National Oceanic... Spectral Radiance Model 7 2.4.1 Calculation for a Single Line 7 2.4.2 Illustrative Calculations 9 2.5 Data Comparisons 11 3. DEVELOPMENT OF

  2. Observations and Modeling of Tropical Planetary Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laraia, Anne

    2016-01-01

    This thesis is a comprised of three different projects within the topic of tropical atmospheric dynamics. First, I analyze observations of thermal radiation from Saturn's atmosphere and from them, determine the latitudinal distribution of ammonia vapor near the 1.5-bar pressure level. The most prominent feature of the observations is the high brightness temperature of Saturn's subtropical latitudes on either side of the equator. After comparing the observations to a microwave radiative transfer model, I find that these subtropical bands require very low ammonia relative humidity below the ammonia cloud layer in order to achieve the high brightness temperatures observed. We suggest that these bright subtropical bands represent dry zones created by a meridionally overturning circulation. Second, I use a dry atmospheric general circulation model to study equatorial superrotation in terrestrial atmospheres. A wide range of atmospheres are simulated by varying three parameters: the pole-equator radiative equilibrium temperature contrast, the convective lapse rate, and the planetary rotation rate. A scaling theory is developed that establishes conditions under which superrotation occurs in terrestrial atmospheres. The scaling arguments show that superrotation is favored when the off-equatorial baroclinicity and planetary rotation rates are low. Similarly, superrotation is favored when the convective heating strengthens, which may account for the superrotation seen in extreme global-warming simulations. Third, I use a moist slab-ocean general circulation model to study the impact of a zonally-symmetric continent on the distribution of monsoonal precipitation. I show that adding a hemispheric asymmetry in surface heat capacity is sufficient to cause symmetry breaking in both the spatial and temporal distribution of precipitation. This spatial symmetry breaking can be understood from a large-scale energetic perspective, while the temporal symmetry breaking requires

  3. Seasonal Predictability in a Model Atmosphere.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hai

    2001-07-01

    The predictability of atmospheric mean-seasonal conditions in the absence of externally varying forcing is examined. A perfect-model approach is adopted, in which a global T21 three-level quasigeostrophic atmospheric model is integrated over 21 000 days to obtain a reference atmospheric orbit. The model is driven by a time-independent forcing, so that the only source of time variability is the internal dynamics. The forcing is set to perpetual winter conditions in the Northern Hemisphere (NH) and perpetual summer in the Southern Hemisphere.A significant temporal variability in the NH 90-day mean states is observed. The component of that variability associated with the higher-frequency motions, or climate noise, is estimated using a method developed by Madden. In the polar region, and to a lesser extent in the midlatitudes, the temporal variance of the winter means is significantly greater than the climate noise, suggesting some potential predictability in those regions.Forecast experiments are performed to see whether the presence of variance in the 90-day mean states that is in excess of the climate noise leads to some skill in the prediction of these states. Ensemble forecast experiments with nine members starting from slightly different initial conditions are performed for 200 different 90-day means along the reference atmospheric orbit. The serial correlation between the ensemble means and the reference orbit shows that there is skill in the 90-day mean predictions. The skill is concentrated in those regions of the NH that have the largest variance in excess of the climate noise. An EOF analysis shows that nearly all the predictive skill in the seasonal means is associated with one mode of variability with a strong axisymmetric component.

  4. Modeling of Revitalization of Atmospheric Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coker, Robert; Knox, Jim

    2014-01-01

    The Atmosphere Revitalization Recovery and Environmental Monitoring (ARREM) project was initiated in September of 2011 as part of the Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) program. Under the ARREM project, testing of sub-scale and full-scale systems has been combined with multiphysics computer simulations for evaluation and optimization of subsystem approaches. In particular, this paper describes the testing and modeling of the water desiccant subsystem of the carbon dioxide removal assembly (CDRA). The goal is a full system predictive model of CDRA to guide system optimization and development.

  5. Organic chemistry in the atmosphere. [laboratory modeling of Titan atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sagan, C.

    1974-01-01

    The existence of an at least moderately complex organic chemistry on Titan is stipulated based on clear evidence of methane, and at least presumptive evidence of hydrogen in its atmosphere. The ratio of methane to hydrogen is the highest of any atmosphere in the solar system. Irradiation of hydrogen/methane mixtures produces aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons. A very reasonable hypothesis assumes that the red cloud cover of Titan is made of organic chemicals. Two-carbon hydrocarbons experimentally produced from irradiated mixtures of methane, ammonia, water, and hydrogen bear out the possible organic chemistry of the Titanian environment.

  6. Observation and Modeling of Atmospheric Peroxyformic Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Z.; Liang, H.; Huang, D.; Huang, L.; Wu, Q.; Wu, H.

    2015-12-01

    The existence and importance of peroxyformic acid (PFA) in the atmosphere has been under controversy. We present here, for the first time, the observation data for PFA from four field measurements carried out in China. These data provided powerful evidence that PFA can stay in the atmosphere, typically in dozens of pptv level. The relationship between PFA and other detected peroxides was examined. The results showed that PFA had a strong positive correlation with its homolog, peroxyacetic acid, due to their similar sources and sinks. Through an evaluation of PFA production and removal rates, we proposed that the reactions between peroxyformyl radical (HC(O)O2) and formaldehyde or the hydroperoxyl radical (HO2) were likely to be the major source and degradation into formic acid (FA) was likely to be the major sink for PFA. Based on a box model evaluation, we proposed that the HC(O)O2 and PFA chemistry was a major source for FA under low NOx conditions. Furthermore, it is found that the impact of the HC(O)O2 and PFA chemistry on radical cycling was dependent on the yield of HC(O)O2 radical from HC(O) + O2 reaction. When this yield exceeded 50%, the HC(O)O2 and PFA chemistry should not be neglected for calculating the radical budget. To make clear the exact importance of HC(O)O2 and PFA chemistry in the atmosphere, further kinetic, field and modeling studies are required.

  7. Atmospheric transmittance model for photosynthetically active radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Paulescu, Marius; Stefu, Nicoleta; Gravila, Paul; Paulescu, Eugenia; Boata, Remus; Pacurar, Angel; Mares, Oana; Pop, Nicolina; Calinoiu, Delia

    2013-11-13

    A parametric model of the atmospheric transmittance in the PAR band is presented. The model can be straightforwardly applied for calculating the beam, diffuse and global components of the PAR solar irradiance. The required inputs are: air pressure, ozone, water vapor and nitrogen dioxide column content, Ångström's turbidity coefficient and single scattering albedo. Comparison with other models and ground measured data shows a reasonable level of accuracy for this model, making it suitable for practical applications. From the computational point of view the calculus is condensed into simple algebra which is a noticeable advantage. For users interested in speed-intensive computation of the effective PAR solar irradiance, a PC program based on the parametric equations along with a user guide are available online at http://solar.physics.uvt.ro/srms.

  8. CIDGA - Coupling of Interior Dynamic models with Global Atmosphere models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noack, Lena; Plesa, Ana-Catalina; Breuer, Doris

    2010-05-01

    Atmosphere temperatures and in particular the surface temperatures mostly depend on the solar heat flux and the atmospheric composition. The latter can be influenced by interior processes of the planet, i.e. volcanism that releases greenhouse gases such as H2O, CO2 and methane into the atmosphere and plate tectonics through which atmospheric CO2 is recycled via carbonates into the mantle. An increasing concentration of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere results in an increase of the surface temperature. Changes in the surface temperature on the other hand may influence the cooling behaviour of the planet and hence influence its volcanic activity [Phillips et al., 2001]. This feedback relation between mantle convection and atmosphere is not very well understood, since until now mostly either the interior dynamic of a planet or its atmosphere was investigated separately. 2D or 3D mantle convection models to the authors' knowledge haven't been coupled to the atmosphere so far. We have used the 3D spherical simulation code GAIA [Hüttig et al., 2008] including partial melt production and coupled it with the atmosphere module CIDGA using a gray greenhouse model for varying H2O concentrations. This way, not only the influence of mantle dynamics on the atmosphere can be investigated, but also the recoupling effect, that the surface temperature has on the mantle dynamics. So far, we consider one-plate planets without crustal and thus volatile recycling. Phillips et al. [2001] already investigated the coupling effect of the surface temperature on mantle dynamics by using simple parameterized convection models for Venus. In their model a positive feedback mechanism has been observed, i.e., an increase of the surface temperature leads to an increase of partial melt and hence an increase of atmosphere density and surface temperature. Applying our model to Venus, we show that an increase of surface temperature leads not only to an increase of partial melt in the mantle; it also

  9. Jacchia-Lineberry upper atmosphere density model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, A. C.

    1982-01-01

    A series of increasingly accurate models which are a careful blend of empirical and theoretical formulae were developed. The exospheric temperature is assumed to be a function of: (1) the average and daily variations in the solar flux, (2) the average and three hourly variations in the geomagnetic index, (3) the angle between the position vector and the axis of the unsymmetric atmospheric bulge, and (4) the angle between the position vector and the geomagnetic pole. The exospheric temperature is related to the density by the solution of the diffusion equilibrium equations for the different constituents of the atmosphere as a function of altitude. Other variations are modeled directly as changes in the density. They are: (1) changes due to the semiannual effect, and (2) changes due to the seasonal latitudinal effect. The causes for these variations are not exactly known but may be modeled sufficiently by empirical formulae. The Jacchia model is assumed to be valid over the altitude range of 90 to 2500 km. The residuals between the observed density from satellite drag observations and the computed densities show the mean relative error to be generally less than 10 percent with occasional peak errors near 50 percent.

  10. Exploitation of parallelism in climate models. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, Ferdinand; Tribbia, Joseph J.; Williamson, David L.

    2001-02-05

    This final report includes details on the research accomplished by the grant entitled 'Exploitation of Parallelism in Climate Models' to the University of Maryland. The purpose of the grant was to shed light on (a) how to reconfigure the atmospheric prediction equations such that the time iteration process could be compressed by use of MPP architecture; (b) how to develop local subgrid scale models which can provide time and space dependent parameterization for a state-of-the-art climate model to minimize the scale resolution necessary for a climate model, and to utilize MPP capability to simultaneously integrate those subgrid models and their statistics; and (c) how to capitalize on the MPP architecture to study the inherent ensemble nature of the climate problem. In the process of addressing these issues, we created parallel algorithms with spectral accuracy; we developed a process for concurrent climate simulations; we established suitable model reconstructions to speed up computation; we identified and tested optimum realization statistics; we undertook a number of parameterization studies to better understand model physics; and we studied the impact of subgrid scale motions and their parameterization in atmospheric models.

  11. New Data for Early Earth Atmospheric Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackie, D.; Stark, G.; Lyons, J. R.; Pickering, J.; Smith, P. L.; Thorne, A.

    2010-12-01

    The timing of the oxygenation of the Earth’s atmosphere is a central issue in understanding the Earth’s paleoclimate. The discovery of mass-independent fractionation (MIF) of sulphur isotopes deposited within Archean and Paleoproterozoic rock samples (> 2.4 Gyrs) and the transition to mass-dependent fractionation found in younger samples, could provide a marker for the rise in oxygen concentrations in the Earth’s atmosphere [1]. Laboratory experiments [2; 3] suggest isotopic self shielding during gas phase photolysis of SO2 present at wavelengths shorter than 220 nm as the dominant mechanism for MIF. The UV absorption of SO2 is dominated by the C1B2-X1A1 electronic system which comprises strong vibrational bands extending from 170 - 230 nm. Within an atmosphere consisting of low O2 and O3 concentrations, such as that predicted for the early Earth, UV radiation would penetrate deep into the ancient Earth’s atmosphere in the 180 - 220 nm range driving the photolysis of SO2. We have conducted the first ever high resolution measurements of the photo absorption cross sections of several isotopologues of SO2, namely 32SO2, 33SO2, 34SO2 and 36SO2, using the Imperial College UV Fourier transform spectrometer [4] which is ideal for high resolution, broad-band, VIS/UV measurements. The cross sections are being measured at Imperial College at initial resolutions of 1.0 cm-1 which will be increased to resolutions < 0.5 cm-1 for inclusion in photochemical models of the early Earth’s atmosphere in order to more reliably interpret the sulphur isotope ratios found in ancient rock samples [5]. For discussion and interpretation of the photochemical models see the abstract by Lyons et al.(this meeting). References [1] J. Farquhar and B.A. Wing. Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 213:1-13, 2003. [2] J. Farquhar, J. Savarino, S. Airieau, and M.H Thiemens. Journal of Geophysical Research,106:32829-32839, 2001. [3] A. Pen and R. N. Clayton.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta

  12. The PHOENIX Model Atmosphere Grid for Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allard, F.

    2016-12-01

    We present a new project for a 1D static though full NLTE model atmosphere grid ranging T_{eff}= 15,000 to 1500 K in 100K steps, surface gravities ranging from log g= -0.5 to 6.0 in steps of 0.25 dex, and metallicity ranging from [M/H]=-2.5 to +0.5 in steps of 0.25 dex accounting for alpha element enrichment of [α/H]= +0.0, +0.2, +0.4 and C/O enhancement.

  13. The Atmospheric Radionuclide Transport Model (ARTM) - Validation of a long-term atmospheric dispersion model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hettrich, Sebastian; Wildermuth, Hans; Strobl, Christopher; Wenig, Mark

    2016-04-01

    In the last couple of years, the Atmospheric Radionuclide Transport Model (ARTM) has been developed by the German Federal Office for Radiation Protection (BfS) and the Society for Plant and Reactor Security (GRS). ARTM is an atmospheric dispersion model for continuous long-term releases of radionuclides into the atmosphere, based on the Lagrangian particle model. This model, developed in the first place as a more realistic replacement for the out-dated Gaussian plume models, is currently being optimised for further scientific purposes to study atmospheric dispersion in short-range scenarios. It includes a diagnostic wind field model, allows for the application of building structures and multiple sources (including linear, 2-and 3-dimensional source geometries), and considers orography and surface roughness. As an output it calculates the activity concentration, dry and wet deposition and can model also the radioactive decay of Rn-222. As such, ARTM requires to undergo an intense validation process. While for short-term and short-range models, which were mainly developed for examining nuclear accidents or explosions, a few measurement data-sets are available for validation, data-sets for validating long-term models are very sparse and the existing ones mostly prove to be not applicable for validation. Here we present a strategy for the validation of long-term Lagrangian particle models based on the work with ARTM. In our validation study, the first part we present is a comprehensive analysis of the model sensitivities on different parameters like e.g. (simulation grid size resolution, starting random number, amount of simulation particles, etc.). This study provides a good estimation for the uncertainties of the simulation results and consequently can be used to generate model outputs comparable to the available measurements data at various distances from the emission source. This comparison between measurement data from selected scenarios and simulation results

  14. Comparing the Degree of Land-Atmosphere Interaction in Four Atmospheric General Circulation Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koster, Randal D.; Dirmeyer, Paul A.; Hahmann, Andrea N.; Ijpelaar, Ruben; Tyahla, Lori; Cox, Peter; Suarez, Max J.; Houser, Paul R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Land-atmosphere feedback, by which (for example) precipitation-induced moisture anomalies at the land surface affect the overlying atmosphere and thereby the subsequent generation of precipitation, has been examined and quantified with many atmospheric general circulation models (AGCMs). Generally missing from such studies, however, is an indication of the extent to which the simulated feedback strength is model dependent. Four modeling groups have recently performed a highly controlled numerical experiment that allows an objective inter-model comparison of land-atmosphere feedback strength. The experiment essentially consists of an ensemble of simulations in which each member simulation artificially maintains the same time series of surface prognostic variables. Differences in atmospheric behavior between the ensemble members then indicates the degree to which the state of the land surface controls atmospheric processes in that model. A comparison of the four sets of experimental results shows that feedback strength does indeed vary significantly between the AGCMs.

  15. Developments in Atmosphere Revitalization Modeling and Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knox, James C.; Kittredge, Kenneth; Xoker, Robert F.; Cummings, Ramona; Gomez, Carlos F.

    2012-01-01

    "NASA's Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) program is pioneering new approaches for rapidly developing prototype systems, demonstrating key capabilities, and validating operational concepts for future human missions beyond Earth orbit" (NASA 2012). These forays beyond the confines of earth's gravity will place unprecedented demands on launch systems. They must not only blast out of earth's gravity well as during the Apollo moon missions, but also launch the supplies needed to sustain a crew over longer periods for exploration missions beyond earth's moon. Thus all spacecraft systems, including those for the separation of metabolic carbon dioxide and water from a crewed vehicle, must be minimized with respect to mass, power, and volume. Emphasis is also placed on system robustness both to minimize replacement parts and ensure crew safety when a quick return to earth is not possible. Current efforts are focused on improving the current state-of-the-art systems utilizing fixed beds of sorbent pellets by evaluating structured sorbents, seeking more robust pelletized sorbents, and examining alternate bed configurations to improve system efficiency and reliability. These development efforts combine testing of sub-scale systems and multi-physics computer simulations to evaluate candidate approaches, select the best performing options, and optimize the configuration of the selected approach, which is then implemented in a full-scale integrated atmosphere revitalization test. This paper describes the development of atmosphere revitalization models and simulations. A companion paper discusses the hardware design and sorbent screening and characterization effort in support of the Atmosphere Revitalization Recovery and Environmental Monitoring (ARREM) project within the AES program.

  16. Description of the Russian Upper Atmosphere Density Model GOST-2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cefola, Paul; Volkov, I. I.; Suevalov, V. V.

    , position of the sun, time of year and time of day, and also solar activity and its geomagnetic strength. The model's parameters were defined based on processed data from 1964-2000 on the evolution of orbital parameters of Kosmos-family AES and a number of foreign AES having simple aerodynamic forms. Model coefficients were calculated for two altitude ranges. The boundaries of the altitude ranges encompassed by the model's coefficients are floating - the lower boundary of the second range is defined as the upper boundary of the first range. The upper boundary of the second range is defined as 1500 km. The model is oriented toward practical application during operational navigational-ballistic support of AES flight. Comparison and evaluation of the GOST-2004 and NRLMSIS-2000 density models was accomplished through the use of experimental data on atmospheric density measurement using the CACTUS micro-accelerometer and data on drag on artificial earth satellites having nearly spherical forms. At the present time a comparison has also been done on the models of drag (changes in orbit period), both versus each other as well as versus experimental data from NORAD TLE over an interval spanning several full solar cycles. Initial perigees of the selected satellites ranged from 197 to 2800 km. Finally, we discuss several paths to increasing the accuracy of the atmospheric density models: (1) Correction of the models' structure to account for the effect of changes in both the disc component and the active regions component of solar radiation, (2) Definition of the parameters of lunar-solar tidal variations in atmospheric density, (3) Testing and use in the models of new solar activity indices, (4) Refinement of the parameters of short-term density variations using precise, highly reliable data, and (5) Incorporation into atmospheric models intended for ballistic support to space flight of recommendations for calculating the coefficient of aerodynamic drag dependent upon altitude and

  17. Radiation Belt Electron Dynamics: Modeling Atmospheric Losses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selesnick, R. S.

    2003-01-01

    The first year of work on this project has been completed. This report provides a summary of the progress made and the plan for the coming year. Also included with this report is a preprint of an article that was accepted for publication in Journal of Geophysical Research and describes in detail most of the results from the first year of effort. The goal for the first year was to develop a radiation belt electron model for fitting to data from the SAMPEX and Polar satellites that would provide an empirical description of the electron losses into the upper atmosphere. This was largely accomplished according to the original plan (with one exception being that, for reasons described below, the inclusion of the loss cone electrons in the model was deferred). The main concerns at the start were to accurately represent the balance between pitch angle diffusion and eastward drift that determines the dominant features of the low altitude data, and then to accurately convert the model into simulated data based on the characteristics of the particular electron detectors. Considerable effort was devoted to achieving these ends. Once the model was providing accurate results it was applied to data sets selected from appropriate periods in 1997, 1998, and 1999. For each interval of -30 to 60 days, the model parameters were calculated daily, thus providing good short and long term temporal resolution, and for a range of radial locations from L = 2.7 to 3.9. .

  18. CURRENT METHODS AND RESEARCH STRATEGIES FOR MODELING ATMOSPHERIC MERCURY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The atmospheric pathway of the global mercury cycle is known to be the primary source of mercury contamination to most threatened aquatic ecosystems. Current efforts toward numerical modeling of atmospheric mercury are hindered by an incomplete understanding of emissions, atmosp...

  19. Model atmospheres for cool stars. [varying chemical composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, H. R.

    1974-01-01

    This report contains an extensive series of model atmospheres for cool stars having a wide range in chemical composition. Model atmospheres (temperature, pressure, density, etc.) are tabulated, along with emergent energy flux distributions, limb darkening, and information on convection for selected models. The models are calculated under the usual assumptions of hydrostatic equilibrium, constancy of total energy flux (including transport both by radiation and convection) and local thermodynamic equilibrium. Some molecular and atomic line opacity is accounted for as a straight mean. While cool star atmospheres are regimes of complicated physical conditions, and these atmospheres are necessarily approximate, they should be useful for a number of kinds of spectral and atmospheric analysis.

  20. Lithosphere-Atmosphere-Ionosphere coupling model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kachakhidze, M. K., III

    2015-12-01

    The present work offers interpretation of a mechanism of formation of hypothetic ideal electromagnetic contour, creation of which is envisaged in incoming earthquake focal zone. Model of generation of EM emissions detected before earthquake is based on physical analogues of distributed and conservative systems and focal zones. According to the model the process of earthquake preparation from the moment of appearance of cracks in the system, including completion of series of foreshocks, earthquake and aftershocks, are entirely explained by oscillating systems.According to the authors of the work electromagnetic emissions in radio diapason is more universal and reliable than other anomalous variations of various geophysical phenomena in earthquake preparation period; Besides, VLF/LF electromagnetic emissions might be declared as the main precursor of earthquake because it might turn out very useful with the view of prediction of large (M5) inland earthquakes and to govern processes going on in lithosphere-atmosphere-ionosphere coupling (LAIC) system. Based on this model, in case of electromagnetic emissions spectrum monitoring in the period that precedes earthquake it is possible to determine, with certain accuracy, the time, location and magnitude of an incoming earthquake simultaneously.The present item considers possible physical mechanisms of the geophysical phenomena, which may accompany earthquake preparation process and expose themselves several months, weeks or days prior to earthquakes. Such as: Changing of intensity of electro-telluric current in focal area; Perturbations of geomagnetic field in forms of irregular pulsations or regular short-period pulsations; Perturbations of atmospheric electric field; Irregular changing of characteristic parameters of the lower ionosphere (plasma frequency, electron concentration, height of D layer, etc.); Irregular perturbations reaching the upper ionosphere, namely F2-layer, for 2-3 days before the earthquake

  1. Aeras: A next generation global atmosphere model

    SciTech Connect

    Spotz, William F.; Smith, Thomas M.; Demeshko, Irina P.; Fike, Jeffrey A.

    2015-06-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is developing a new global atmosphere model named Aeras that is performance portable and supports the quantification of uncertainties. These next-generation capabilities are enabled by building Aeras on top of Albany, a code base that supports the rapid development of scientific application codes while leveraging Sandia's foundational mathematics and computer science packages in Trilinos and Dakota. Embedded uncertainty quantification (UQ) is an original design capability of Albany, and performance portability is a recent upgrade. Other required features, such as shell-type elements, spectral elements, efficient explicit and semi-implicit time-stepping, transient sensitivity analysis, and concurrent ensembles, were not components of Albany as the project began, and have been (or are being) added by the Aeras team. We present early UQ and performance portability results for the shallow water equations.

  2. Greenhouse models of the atmosphere of Titan.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollack, J. B.

    1973-01-01

    The greenhouse effect is calculated for a series of Titanian atmosphere models with different proportions of methane, hydrogen, helium, and ammonia. A computer program is used in temperature-structure calculations based on radiative-convective thermal transfer considerations. A brightness temperature spectrum is derived for Titan and is compared with available observational data. It is concluded that the greenhouse effect on Titan is generated by pressure-induced transitions of methane and hydrogen. The helium-to-hydrogen ratio is found to have a maximum of about 1.5. The surface pressure is estimated to be at least 0.4 atm, with a daytime temperature of about 155 K at the surface. The presence of methane clouds in the upper troposphere is indicated. The clouds have a significant optical depth in the visible, but not in the thermal, infrared.

  3. Aeras: A next generation global atmosphere model

    DOE PAGES

    Spotz, William F.; Smith, Thomas M.; Demeshko, Irina P.; ...

    2015-06-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is developing a new global atmosphere model named Aeras that is performance portable and supports the quantification of uncertainties. These next-generation capabilities are enabled by building Aeras on top of Albany, a code base that supports the rapid development of scientific application codes while leveraging Sandia's foundational mathematics and computer science packages in Trilinos and Dakota. Embedded uncertainty quantification (UQ) is an original design capability of Albany, and performance portability is a recent upgrade. Other required features, such as shell-type elements, spectral elements, efficient explicit and semi-implicit time-stepping, transient sensitivity analysis, and concurrent ensembles, were not componentsmore » of Albany as the project began, and have been (or are being) added by the Aeras team. We present early UQ and performance portability results for the shallow water equations.« less

  4. Middle atmosphere density and models. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Champion, K.

    1987-04-09

    The 80 to 130 km altitude region is our old ionosphere - the region of the atmosphere that no one seems to be interested in, and yet the critical region for shuttle entry and atmospheric braking. Comparison between the Air Force reference atmosphere and Shuttle IMU data shows large fluctuations at high latitudes. New data sources are available now, such as the Arecibo and Millstone Hill ionospheric scatter radars.

  5. Numerical analysis and modeling of atmospheric phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, Peter H.

    1994-01-01

    For the past 22 years Grant NGR 22-009-727 has been supporting research in the Center for Meteorology and Physical Oceanography (and its predecessors) in a wide variety of diagnostic and modeling studies of atmospheric and ocean phenomena. Professor Jule Charney was the initial Principal Investigator. Professor Peter Stone joined him as co-Principal Investigator in 1975 and became the sole Principal Investigator in 1981. During its lifetime the Grant has supported in whole or in part 11 Master's theses, 14 Ph.D. theses, and 45 papers published in refereed scientific journals. All of these theses and papers (with bibliographic references) are listed below. All but one of the theses were used to fulfill the requirements for MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) degrees and are available from the MIT libraries. The one exception is F. Chen's Ph.D. thesis which was for a Harvard degree and is available from the Harvard libraries. In addition to the work described in the citations listed below, the Grant has supported Research Assistant Amy Solomon during the past two years to carry out a study of how baroclinic adjustment is affected by vertical resolution, vertical temperature structure, and dissipation. Ms. Solomon plans to use this project for her Ph.D. thesis. Support for this project will continue under NASA Grant NAG 5-2490, 'The Factors Controlling Poleward Heat Transport in Climate Models.'

  6. DESCRIPTION OF ATMOSPHERIC TRANSPORT PROCESSES IN EULERIAN AIR QUALITY MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Key differences among many types of air quality models are the way atmospheric advection and turbulent diffusion processes are treated. Gaussian models use analytical solutions of the advection-diffusion equations. Lagrangian models use a hypothetical air parcel concept effecti...

  7. Modeled atmospheric radon concentrations from uranium mines

    SciTech Connect

    Droppo, J.G.

    1985-04-01

    Uranium mining and milling operations result in the release of radon from numerous sources of various types and strengths. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) under the Clean Air Act, is assessing the health impact of air emissions of radon from underground uranium mines. In this case, the radon emissions may impact workers and residents in the mine vicinity. To aid in this assessment, the EPA needs to know how mine releases can affect the radon concentrations at populated locations. To obtain this type of information, Pacific Northwest Laboratory used the radon emissions, release characteristics and local meterological conditions for a number of mines to model incremental radon concentrations. Long-term, average, incremental radon concentrations were computed based on the best available information on release rates, plume rise parameters, number and locations of vents, and local dispersion climatology. Calculations are made for a model mine, individual mines, and multiple mines. Our approach was to start with a general case and then consider specific cases for comparison. A model underground uranium mine was used to provide definition of the order of magnitude of typical impacts. Then computations were made for specific mines using the best mine-specific information available for each mine. These case study results are expressed as predicted incremental radon concentration contours plotted on maps with local population data from a previous study. Finally, the effect of possible overlap of radon releases from nearby mines was studied by calculating cumulative radon concentrations for multiple mines in a region with many mines. The dispersion model, modeling assumptions, data sources, computational procedures, and results are documented in this report. 7 refs., 27 figs., 18 tabs.

  8. Application of the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System to the Martian Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rafkin, Scot C. R.

    1998-01-01

    The core dynamics of the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS), a widely used and powerful mesoscale Earth model, is adapted to the Martian Atmosphere and applied in the study of aeolian surface features. In particular, research efforts focused on the substitution of Martian planetary and atmospheric properties such as rotation rate, and thermodynamic constants in place of hard-wired Earth properties. Application of the model was restricted to three-dimensional flow impinging upon impact craters, and the search for plausible wind patterns that could produce the so-called light and dark streaks downwind of topographic barriers.

  9. Scale-consistent two-way coupling of land-surface and atmospheric models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schomburg, A.; Venema, V.; Ament, F.; Simmer, C.

    2009-04-01

    climate model) of the German and other European Weather Services. Training and validation of the scheme is based on high-resolution model runs (400 m grid spacing) with the fully coupled model, this fine-scale information is compared with averaged coarser scale information (2.8 km). The final model will run with a horizontal resolution of 2.8 km for the atmosphere, coupled to a 400 m SVAT module. This research is part of the Transregional Collaborative Research Centre 32 (SFB/TR32): "Patterns in Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere Systems: Monitoring, Modelling and Data Assimilation", that aims to improve the modelling of geophysical systems by explicitly considering their structure. For more information see: http://www.meteo.uni-bonn.de/tr32

  10. A preliminary weather model for optical communications through the atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaik, K. S.

    1988-01-01

    A preliminary weather model is presented for optical propagation through the atmosphere. It can be used to compute the attenuation loss due to the atmosphere for desired link availability statistics. The quantitative results that can be obtained from this model provide good estimates for the atmospheric link budget necessary for the design of an optical communication system. The result is extended to provide for the computation of joint attenuation probability for n sites with uncorrelated weather patterns.

  11. Modelling atmospheric turbulence for a motion-based simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, I. D.; Joshi, D.

    1975-01-01

    The background information in establishing several proposed atmospheric turbulence models for use on motion based aircraft simulators was documented. A specific model was proposed which, in addition to varying turbulence intensity (rms velocity), varies the atmospheric turbulence scale length to achieve compatibility with real atmospheric turbulence. With a suitable combination of scale length and intensity distribution, the model will simulate various atmospheric conditions characterized by altitude, stability, and terrain. The model is mechanized to be included in a flight simulator experiment in order to determine to what extent the pilots are sensitive to changes in atmospheric conditions and the realism of the model. The following topics were covered: literature survey, presently used techniques, proposed model, and simulation details.

  12. 1-D Radiative-Convective Model for Terrestrial Exoplanet Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Cecilia W. S.; Robinson, Tyler D.

    2016-10-01

    We present a one dimensional radiative-convective model to study the thermal structure of terrestrial exoplanetary atmospheres. The radiative transfer and equilibrium chemistry in our model is based on similar methodologies in models used for studying Extrasolar Giant Planets (Fortney et al. 2005b.) We validated our model in the optically thin and thick limits, and compared our pressure-temperature profiles against the analytical solutions of Robinson & Catling (2012). For extrasolar terrestrial planets with pure hydrogen atmospheres, we evaluated the effects of H2-H2 collision induced absorption and identified the purely roto-translational band in our modeled spectra. We also examined how enhanced atmospheric metallicities affect the temperature structure, chemistry, and spectra of terrestrial exoplanets. For a terrestrial extrasolar planet whose atmospheric compostion is 100 times solar orbiting a sun-like star at 2 AU, our model resulted in a reducing atmosphere with H2O, CH4, and NH3 as the dominant greenhouse gases.

  13. Ultraviolet radiation climatology of the Earth`s surface and lower atmosphere. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Madronich, S.; Stamnes, K.

    1999-03-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is the driving force of tropospheric chemistry and is furthermore detrimental to most living tissues. A three year modeling program was carried out to characterize the UV radiation in the lower atmosphere, with the objective of development a climatology of UV biologically active radiation, and of photo-dissociation reaction rates that are key to tropospheric chemistry. A comprehensive model, the Tropospheric Ultraviolet-Visible (TUV) model, was developed and made available to the scientific community. The model incorporates updated spectroscopic data, recent advances in radiative transfer theory, and allows flexible customization for the needs of different users. The TUV model has been used in conjunction with satellite-derived measurements of total atmospheric ozone and cloud amount, to develop a global climatology of UV radiation reaching the surface of the Earth. Initial validation studies are highly encouraging, showing that model predictions agree with direct measurements to ca. 5--10% at times when environmental conditions are well known, and to 10--30% for monthly averages when local environmental conditions can only be estimated remotely from satellite-based measurements. Additional validation studies are continuing.

  14. Atomic hydrogen distribution. [in Titan atmospheric model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabarie, N.

    1974-01-01

    Several possible H2 vertical distributions in Titan's atmosphere are considered with the constraint of 5 km-A a total quantity. Approximative calculations show that hydrogen distribution is quite sensitive to two other parameters of Titan's atmosphere: the temperature and the presence of other constituents. The escape fluxes of H and H2 are also estimated as well as the consequent distributions trapped in the Saturnian system.

  15. Atmospheric Modeling Using Accelerometer Data During Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN) Flight Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolson, Robert H.; Lugo, Rafael A.; Baird, Darren T.; Cianciolo, Alicia D.; Bougher, Stephen W.; Zurek, Richard M.

    2017-01-01

    The Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) spacecraft is a NASA orbiter designed to explore the Mars upper atmosphere, typically from 140 to 160 km altitude. In addition to the nominal science mission, MAVEN has performed several Deep Dip campaigns in which the orbit's closest point of approach, also called periapsis, was lowered to an altitude range of 115 to 135 km. MAVEN accelerometer data were used during mission operations to estimate atmospheric parameters such as density, scale height, along-track gradients, and wave structures. Density and scale height estimates were compared against those obtained from the Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model and used to aid the MAVEN navigation team in planning maneuvers to raise and lower periapsis during Deep Dip operations. This paper describes the processes used to reconstruct atmosphere parameters from accelerometers data and presents the results of their comparison to model and navigation-derived values.

  16. CROW{trademark} process modeling. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-01

    The Western Research Institute (WRI) has patented a technology (CROW{trademark}) for the recovery of oily contaminants from water-saturated formations. The CROW process uses either hot water or low-pressure steam to flush contaminants to the surface by means of production wells. CROW is typically applied to highly permeable aquifers that have been invaded by organics such as coal tars or chemical solvents. In conceptualizing a model of the CROW process, we draw an analogy between flushing organics from an organic-contaminated aquifer and producing oil from a petroleum reservoir. The organic-contaminated aquifer can be represented as a petroleum reservoir. The injection of water or steam and production of water/organic admixtures can be described by standard reservoir well equations. Finally, the movement of organic and water within the aquifer can be represented by Darcy flow of the individual phases. Thus, in modeling the CROW process, it is reasonable to assume that a petroleum reservoir simulator would accurately portray the recovery of organics from a contaminated aquifer. Of course, the reservoir simulator would need to incorporate thermal aspects of Darcy flow to accurately represent recovery during CROW processing.

  17. Grassland/atmosphere response to changing climate: Coupling regional and local scales. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Coughenour, M.B.; Kittel, T.G.F.; Pielke, R.A.; Eastman, J.

    1993-10-01

    The objectives of the study were: to evaluate the response of grassland ecosystems to atmospheric change at regional and site scales, and to develop multiscaled modeling systems to relate ecological and atmospheric models with different spatial and temporal resolutions. A menu-driven shell was developed to facilitate use of models at different temporal scales and to facilitate exchange information between models at different temporal scales. A detailed ecosystem model predicted that C{sub 3} temperate grasslands wig respond more strongly to elevated CO{sub 2} than temperate C{sub 4} grasslands in the short-term while a large positive N-PP response was predicted for a C{sub 4} Kenyan grassland. Long-term climate change scenarios produced either decreases or increases in Colorado plant productivity (NPP) depending on rainfall, but uniform increases in N-PP were predicted in Kenya. Elevated CO{sub 2} is likely to have little effect on ecosystem carbon storage in Colorado while it will increase carbon storage in Kenya. A synoptic climate classification processor (SCP) was developed to evaluate results of GCM climate sensitivity experiments. Roughly 80% agreement was achieved with manual classifications. Comparison of lx and 2xCO{sub 2} GCM Simulations revealed relatively small differences.

  18. Atmospheric transport and dispersion modeling for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsdell, J.V.

    1991-07-01

    Radiation doses that may have resulted from operations at the Hanford Site are being estimated in the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project. One of the project subtasks, atmospheric transport, is responsible for estimating the transport, diffusion and deposition of radionuclides released to the atmosphere. This report discusses modeling transport and diffusion in the atmospheric pathway. It is divided into three major sections. The first section of the report presents the atmospheric modeling approach selected following discussion with the Technical Steering Panel that directs the HEDR Project. In addition, the section discusses the selection of the MESOI/MESORAD suite of atmospheric dispersion models that form the basis for initial calculations and future model development. The second section of the report describes alternative modeling approaches that were considered. Emphasis is placed on the family of plume and puff models that are based on Gaussian solution to the diffusion equations. The final portion of the section describes the performance of various models. The third section of the report discusses factors that bear on the selection of an atmospheric transport modeling approach for HEDR. These factors, which include the physical setting of the Hanford Site and the available meteorological data, serve as constraints on model selection. Five appendices are included in the report. 39 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Proposed reference models for atomic oxygen in the terrestrial atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Llewellyn, E. J.; Mcdade, I. C.; Lockerbie, M. D.

    1989-01-01

    A provisional Atomic Oxygen Reference model was derived from average monthly ozone profiles and the MSIS-86 reference model atmosphere. The concentrations are presented in tabular form for the altitude range 40 to 130 km.

  20. Inverse modeling of global atmospheric carbon dioxide by Global Eulerian-Lagrangian Coupled Atmospheric Model (GELCA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirai, T.; Ishizawa, M.; Zhuravlev, R.; Ganshin, A.; Belikov, D.; Saito, M.; Oda, T.; Valsala, V.; Dlugokencky, E. J.; Tans, P. P.; Maksyutov, S. S.

    2013-12-01

    Global monthly CO2 flux distributions for 2001-2011 were estimated using an atmospheric inverse modeling system, which is based on combination of two transport models, called GELCA (Global Eulerian-Lagrangian Coupled Atmospheric model). This coupled model approach has several advantages over inversions to a single model alone: the use of Lagrangian particle dispersion model (LPDM) to simulate the transport in the vicinity of the observation points enables us to avoid numerical diffusion of Eulerian models, and is suitable to represent observations at high spatial and temporal resolutions. The global background concentration field generated by an Eulerian model is used as time-variant boundary conditions for an LPDM that performs backward simulations from each receptor point (observation event). In the GELCA inversion system, National Institute for Environmental Studies-Transport Model (NIES-TM) version 8.1i was used as an Eulerian global transport model coupled with FLEXPART version 8.0 as an LPDM. The meteorological fields for driving both models were taken from JMA Climate Data Assimilation System (JCDAS) with a spatial resolution of 1.25° x 1.25°, 40 vertical levels and a temporal resolution of 6 hours. Our prior CO2 fluxes consist of daily terrestrial biospheric fluxes, monthly oceanic fluxes, monthly biomass burning emissions, and monthly fossil fuel CO2 emissions. We employed a Kalman Smoother optimization technique with fixed lag of 3 months, estimating monthly CO2 fluxes for 42 land and 22 ocean regions. We have been using two different global networks of CO2 observations. The Observation Package (ObsPack) data products contain more measurement information in space and time than the NOAA global cooperative air sampling network which basically consists of approximately weekly sampling at background sites. The global total flux and its large-scale distribution optimized with two different global observation networks agreed overall with other previous

  1. Analysis and modeling of atmospheric turbulence on the high-resolution space optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lili, Jiang; Chen, Xiaomei; Ni, Guoqiang

    2016-09-01

    Modeling and simulation of optical remote sensing system plays an unslightable role in remote sensing mission predictions, imaging system design, image quality assessment. It has already become a hot research topic at home and abroad. Atmospheric turbulence influence on optical systems is attached more and more importance to as technologies of remote sensing are developed. In order to study the influence of atmospheric turbulence on earth observation system, the atmospheric structure parameter was calculated by using the weak atmospheric turbulence model; and the relationship of the atmospheric coherence length and high resolution remote sensing optical system was established; then the influence of atmospheric turbulence on the coefficient r0h of optical remote sensing system of ground resolution was derived; finally different orbit height of high resolution optical system imaging quality affected by atmospheric turbulence was analyzed. Results show that the influence of atmospheric turbulence on the high resolution remote sensing optical system, the resolution of which has reached sub meter level meter or even the 0.5m, 0.35m and even 0.15m ultra in recent years, image quality will be quite serious. In the above situation, the influence of the atmospheric turbulence must be corrected. Simulation algorithms of PSF are presented based on the above results. Experiment and analytical results are posted.

  2. Optimization of atmospheric transport models on HPC platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Cruz, Raúl; Folch, Arnau; Farré, Pau; Cabezas, Javier; Navarro, Nacho; Cela, José María

    2016-12-01

    The performance and scalability of atmospheric transport models on high performance computing environments is often far from optimal for multiple reasons including, for example, sequential input and output, synchronous communications, work unbalance, memory access latency or lack of task overlapping. We investigate how different software optimizations and porting to non general-purpose hardware architectures improve code scalability and execution times considering, as an example, the FALL3D volcanic ash transport model. To this purpose, we implement the FALL3D model equations in the WARIS framework, a software designed from scratch to solve in a parallel and efficient way different geoscience problems on a wide variety of architectures. In addition, we consider further improvements in WARIS such as hybrid MPI-OMP parallelization, spatial blocking, auto-tuning and thread affinity. Considering all these aspects together, the FALL3D execution times for a realistic test case running on general-purpose cluster architectures (Intel Sandy Bridge) decrease by a factor between 7 and 40 depending on the grid resolution. Finally, we port the application to Intel Xeon Phi (MIC) and NVIDIA GPUs (CUDA) accelerator-based architectures and compare performance, cost and power consumption on all the architectures. Implications on time-constrained operational model configurations are discussed.

  3. Modeling the effects of atmospheric emissions on groundwater composition

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Theresa Jean

    1994-01-01

    A composite model of atmospheric, unsaturated and groundwater transport is developed to evaluate the processes determining the distribution of atmospherically derived contaminants in groundwater systems and to test the sensitivity of simulated contaminant concentrations to input parameters and model linkages. One application is to screen specific atmospheric emissions for their potential in determining groundwater age. Temporal changes in atmospheric emissions could provide a recognizable pattern in the groundwater system. The model also provides a way for quantifying the significance of uncertainties in the tracer source term and transport parameters on the contaminant distribution in the groundwater system, an essential step in using the distribution of contaminants from local, point source atmospheric emissions to examine conceptual models of groundwater flow and transport.

  4. A Atmospheric Dispersion Model for the Sudbury, Ontario, Area.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huhn, Frank Jones

    1982-03-01

    A mathematical model was developed and tested to predict the relationship between sulphur oxide and trace metal emissions from smelters in the Sudbury, Ontario area, and atmospheric, precipitation, lake water and sediment chemistry. The model consists of atmospheric and lake chemistry portions. The atmospheric model is a Gaussian crosswind concentration distribution modification to a box model with a uniform vertical concentration gradient limited by a mixing height. In the near-field Briggs' plume rise and vertical dispersion terms are utilized. Oxidation, wet and dry deposition mechanisms are included to account for the gas, liquid and solid phases separately. Important improvements over existing models include (1) near- and far-field conditions treated in a single model; (2) direct linkage of crosswind dispersion to hourly meteorological observations; (3) utilization of maximum to minimum range of input parameters to realistically model the range of outputs; (4) direct linkage of the atmospheric model to a lake model. Precipitation chemistry as calculated by the atmospheric model is related to lake water and sediment chemistry utilizing a mass balance approach and assuming a continuously stirred reactor (CSTR) model to describe lake circulation. All inputs are atmospheric, modified by hydrology, soil chemistry and sedimentation. Model results were tested by comparison with existing atmospheric and precipitation chemistry measurements, supplemented with analyses of lake water and sediment chemistry collected in a field program. Eight pollutant species were selected for modeling: sulphur dioxide, sulphate ion, hydrogen ion, copper, nickel, lead, zinc, and iron. The model effectively predicts precipitation chemistry within 150 km of Sudbury, with an average prediction to measurement ratio of 90 percent. Atmospheric concentrations are effectively predicted within 80 km, with an average prediction to measurement ratio of 81 percent. Lake chemistry predictions are

  5. Atomic Oscillator Strengths for Stellar Atmosphere Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruffoni, Matthew; Pickering, Juliet C.

    2015-08-01

    In order to correctly model stellar atmospheres, fundamental atomic data must be available to describe atomic lines observed in their spectra. Accurate, laboratory-measured oscillator strengths (f-values) for Fe peak elements in neutral or low-ionisation states are particularly important for determining chemical abundances.However, advances in astronomical spectroscopy in recent decades have outpaced those in laboratory astrophysics, with the latter frequently being overlooked at the planning stages of new projects. As a result, numerous big-budget astronomy projects have been, and continue to be hindered by a lack of suitable, accurately-measured reference data to permit the analysis of expensive astronomical spectra; a problem only likely to worsen in the coming decades as spectrographs at new facilities increasingly move to infrared wavelengths.At Imperial College London - and in collaboration with NIST, Wisconsin University and Lund University - we have been working with the astronomy community in an effort to provide new accurately-measured f-values for a range of projects. In particular, we have been working closely with the Gaia-ESO (GES) and SDSS-III/APOGEE surveys, both of which have discovered that many lines that would make ideal candidates for inclusion in their analyses have poorly defined f-values, or are simply absent from the database. Using high-resolution Fourier transform spectroscopy (R ~ 2,000,000) to provide atomic branching fractions, and combining these with level lifetimes measured with laser induced fluorescence, we have provided new laboratory-measured f-values for a range of Fe-peak elements, most recently including Fe I, Fe II, and V I. For strong, unblended lines, uncertainties are as low as ±0.02 dex.In this presentation, I will describe how experimental f-values are obtained in the laboratory and present our recent work for GES and APOGEE. In particular, I will also discuss the strengths and limitations of current laboratory

  6. Modelling Atmospheric Scattering Using Spacecraft Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rages, Kathy A.

    1999-01-01

    The period covered by this cooperative agreement included the analysis of data from the Voyager encounter with Neptune and Triton and the primary Galileo mission to Jupiter (including the Galileo Probe entry into Jupiter's atmosphere), as well as continued work on Uranus' seasonal variability using the Voyager encounter data as a baseline.

  7. High resolution transmission spectroscopy as a diagnostic for Jovian exoplanet atmospheres: constraints from theoretical models

    SciTech Connect

    Kempton, Eliza M.-R.; Perna, Rosalba; Heng, Kevin

    2014-11-01

    We present high resolution transmission spectra of giant planet atmospheres from a coupled three-dimensional (3D) atmospheric dynamics and transmission spectrum model that includes Doppler shifts which arise from winds and planetary motion. We model Jovian planets covering more than two orders of magnitude in incident flux, corresponding to planets with 0.9-55 day orbital periods around solar-type stars. The results of our 3D dynamical models reveal certain aspects of high resolution transmission spectra that are not present in simple one-dimensional (1D) models. We find that the hottest planets experience strong substellar to anti-stellar (SSAS) winds, resulting in transmission spectra with net blueshifts of up to 3 km s{sup –1}, whereas less irradiated planets show almost no net Doppler shifts. We find only minor differences between transmission spectra for atmospheres with temperature inversions and those without. Compared to 1D models, peak line strengths are significantly reduced for the hottest atmospheres owing to Doppler broadening from a combination of rotation (which is faster for close-in planets under the assumption of tidal locking) and atmospheric winds. Finally, high resolution transmission spectra may be useful in studying the atmospheres of exoplanets with optically thick clouds since line cores for very strong transitions should remain optically thick to very high altitude. High resolution transmission spectra are an excellent observational test for the validity of 3D atmospheric dynamics models, because they provide a direct probe of wind structures and heat circulation. Ground-based exoplanet spectroscopy is currently on the verge of being able to verify some of our modeling predictions, most notably the dependence of SSAS winds on insolation. We caution that interpretation of high resolution transmission spectra based on 1D atmospheric models may be inadequate, as 3D atmospheric motions can produce a noticeable effect on the absorption

  8. A quasi-static model of global atmospheric electricity. I - The lower atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hays, P. B.; Roble, R. G.

    1979-01-01

    A quasi-steady model of global lower atmospheric electricity is presented. The model considers thunderstorms as dipole electric generators that can be randomly distributed in various regions and that are the only source of atmospheric electricity and includes the effects of orography and electrical coupling along geomagnetic field lines in the ionosphere and magnetosphere. The model is used to calculate the global distribution of electric potential and current for model conductivities and assumed spatial distributions of thunderstorms. Results indicate that large positive electric potentials are generated over thunderstorms and penetrate to ionospheric heights and into the conjugate hemisphere along magnetic field lines. The perturbation of the calculated electric potential and current distributions during solar flares and subsequent Forbush decreases is discussed, and future measurements of atmospheric electrical parameters and modifications of the model which would improve the agreement between calculations and measurements are suggested.

  9. Final Report - Ion Production and Transport in Atmospheric Pressure Ion Source Mass Spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Farnsworth, Paul B.; Spencer, Ross L.

    2014-05-14

    This document is the final report on a project that focused in the general theme of atmospheric-pressure ion production and transport for mass spectrometry. Within that general theme there were two main projects: the fundamental study of the transport of elemental ions through the vacuum interface of an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICPMS), and fundamental studies of the ionization mechanisms in ambient desorption/ionization (ADI) sources for molecular mass spectrometry. In both cases the goal was to generate fundamental understanding of key instrumental processes that would lead to the development of instruments that were more sensitive and more consistent in their performance. The emphasis on consistency derives from the need for instruments that have the same sensitivity, regardless of sample type. In the jargon of analytical chemistry, such instruments are said to be free from matrix effects. In the ICPMS work each stage of ion production and of ion transport from the atmospheric pressure to the high-vacuum mass analyzer was studied. Factors controlling ion transport efficiency and consistency were identified at each stage of pressure reduction. In the ADI work the interactions between an electrospray plume and a fluorescent sample on a surface were examined microscopically. A new mechanism for analyte ion production in desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) was proposed. Optical spectroscopy was used to track the production of reactive species in plasmas used as ADI sources. Experiments with mixed-gas plasmas demonstrated that the addition of a small amount of hydrogen to a helium ADI plasma could boost the sensitivity for some analytes by over an order of magnitude.

  10. Clouds and ocean-atmosphere interactions. Final report, September 15, 1992--September 14, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Randall, D.A.; Jensen, T.G.

    1995-10-01

    Predictions of global change based on climate models are influencing both national and international policies on energy and the environment. Existing climate models show some skill in simulating the present climate, but suffer from many widely acknowledged deficiencies. Among the most serious problems is the need to apply ``flux corrections`` to prevent the models from drifting away from the observed climate in control runs that do not include external perturbing influences such as increased carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) concentrations. The flux corrections required to prevent climate drift are typically comparable in magnitude to the observed fluxes themselves. Although there can be many contributing reasons for the climate drift problem, clouds and their effects on the surface energy budget are among the prime suspects. The authors have conducted a research program designed to investigate global air-sea interaction as it relates to the global warming problem, with special emphasis on the role of clouds. Their research includes model development efforts; application of models to simulation of present and future climates, with comparison to observations wherever possible; and vigorous participation in ongoing efforts to intercompare the present generation of atmospheric general circulation models.

  11. Memory efficient atmospheric effects modeling for infrared scene generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavak, Çaǧlar; Özsaraç, Seçkin

    2015-05-01

    The infrared (IR) energy radiated from any source passes through the atmosphere before reaching the sensor. As a result, the total signature captured by the IR sensor is significantly modified by the atmospheric effects. The dominant physical quantities that constitute the mentioned atmospheric effects are the atmospheric transmittance and the atmospheric path radiance. The incoming IR radiation is attenuated by the transmittance and path radiance is added on top of the attenuated radiation. In IR scene simulations OpenGL is widely used for rendering purposes. In the literature there are studies, which model the atmospheric effects in an IR band using OpenGLs exponential fog model as suggested by Beers law. In the standard pipeline of OpenGL, the related fog model needs single equivalent OpenGL variables for the transmittance and path radiance, which actually depend on both the distance between the source and the sensor and also on the wavelength of interest. However, in the conditions where the range dependency cannot be modeled as an exponential function, it is not accurate to replace the atmospheric quantities with a single parameter. The introduction of OpenGL Shading Language (GLSL) has enabled the developers to use the GPU more flexible. In this paper, a novel method is proposed for the atmospheric effects modeling using the least squares estimation with polynomial fitting by programmable OpenGL shader programs built with GLSL. In this context, a radiative transfer model code is used to obtain the transmittance and path radiance data. Then, polynomial fits are computed for the range dependency of these variables. Hence, the atmospheric effects model data that will be uploaded in the GPU memory is significantly reduced. Moreover, the error because of fitting is negligible as long as narrow IR bands are used.

  12. Ensemble data assimilation in the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedatella, N. M.; Raeder, K.; Anderson, J. L.; Liu, H.-L.

    2014-08-01

    We present results pertaining to the assimilation of real lower, middle, and upper atmosphere observations in the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM) using the Data Assimilation Research Testbed (DART) ensemble adjustment Kalman filter. The ability to assimilate lower atmosphere observations of aircraft and radiosonde temperature and winds, satellite drift winds, and Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate refractivity along with middle/upper atmosphere temperature observations from SABER and Aura MLS is demonstrated. The WACCM+DART data assimilation system is shown to be able to reproduce the salient features, and variability, of the troposphere present in the National Centers for Environmental Prediction/National Center for Atmospheric Research Re-Analysis. In the mesosphere, the fit of WACCM+DART to observations is found to be slightly worse when only lower atmosphere observations are assimilated compared to a control experiment that is reflective of the model climatological variability. This differs from previous results which found that assimilation of lower atmosphere observations improves the fit to mesospheric observations. This discrepancy is attributed to the fact that due to the gravity wave drag parameterizations, the model climatology differs significantly from the observations in the mesosphere, and this is not corrected by the assimilation of lower atmosphere observations. The fit of WACCM+DART to mesospheric observations is, however, significantly improved compared to the control experiment when middle/upper atmosphere observations are assimilated. We find that assimilating SABER observations reduces the root-mean-square error and bias of WACCM+DART relative to the independent Aura MLS observations by ˜50%, demonstrating that assimilation of middle/upper atmosphere observations is essential for accurate specification of the mesosphere and lower thermosphere region in WACCM+DART. Last, we demonstrate that

  13. Comparison of modelled and empirical atmospheric propagation data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schott, J. R.; Biegel, J. D.

    1983-01-01

    The radiometric integrity of TM thermal infrared channel data was evaluated and monitored to develop improved radiometric preprocessing calibration techniques for removal of atmospheric effects. Modelled atmospheric transmittance and path radiance were compared with empirical values derived from aircraft underflight data. Aircraft thermal infrared imagery and calibration data were available on two dates as were corresponding atmospheric radiosonde data. The radiosonde data were used as input to the LOWTRAN 5A code which was modified to output atmospheric path radiance in addition to transmittance. The aircraft data were calibrated and used to generate analogous measurements. These data indicate that there is a tendancy for the LOWTRAN model to underestimate atmospheric path radiance and transmittance as compared to empirical data. A plot of transmittance versus altitude for both LOWTRAN and empirical data is presented.

  14. Modeling The Atmosphere As An Unguided Optical Communications Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuber, Raymond M.

    1989-07-01

    Due to the increasing number of applications for optical communications, methods such as computer simulation are needed for the performance analysis of these systems. The objective of this paper is to propose a system level model for simulating the Earth's atmosphere as an unguided optical communications channel. The major degradations in received optical intensity introduced by the atmosphere are scintillation, beam spreading, beam wander, and atmospheric transmissivity. The model presented here considers scintillation and beam wander to impose random fading in the received signal while beam spreading is a constant loss in intensity. Atmospheric transmissivity is treated as a filter-like channel transfer function. Relationships for the parameters of the model are given in terms of parameters which characterize the optical link. Also included is a description of an implementation of the model.

  15. Basic Modeling of the Solar Atmosphere and Spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avrett, Eugene H.; Wagner, William J. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    During the last three years we have continued the development of extensive computer programs for constructing realistic models of the solar atmosphere and for calculating detailed spectra to use in the interpretation of solar observations. This research involves two major interrelated efforts: work by Avrett and Loeser on the Pandora computer program for optically thick non-LTE modeling of the solar atmosphere including a wide range of physical processes, and work by Kurucz on the detailed high-resolution synthesis of the solar spectrum using data for over 58 million atomic and molecular lines. Our objective is to construct atmospheric models from which the calculated spectra agree as well as possible with high-and low-resolution observations over a wide wavelength range. Such modeling leads to an improved understanding of the physical processes responsible for the structure and behavior of the atmosphere.

  16. GrayStarServer: Stellar atmospheric modeling and spectrum synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Short, C. Ian

    2017-01-01

    GrayStarServer is a stellar atmospheric modeling and spectrum synthesis code of pedagogical accuracy that is accessible in any web browser on commonplace computational devices and that runs on a timescale of a few seconds.

  17. Final Report for Wetlands as a Source of Atmospheric Methane: A Multiscale and Multidisciplinary Approach

    SciTech Connect

    McFarlane, Karis J.

    2016-10-28

    Boreal peatlands contain large amounts of old carbon, protected by anaerobic and cold conditions. Climate change could result in favorable conditions for the microbial decomposition and release of this old peat carbon as CO2 or CH4 back into the atmosphere. Our goal was to test the potential for this positive biological feedback to climate change at SPRUCE (Spruce and Peatland Response Under Climatic and Environmental Change), a manipulation experiment funded by DOE and occurring in a forested bog in Minnesota. Taking advantage of LLNL’s capabilities and expertise in chemical and isotopic signatures we found that carbon emissions from peat were dominated by recently fixed photosynthates, even after short-term experimental warming. We also found that subsurface hydrologic transport was surprisingly rapid at SPRUCE, supplying microbes with young dissolved organic carbon (DOC). We also identified which microbes oxidize CH4 to CO2 at SPRUCE and found that the most active of these also fix N2 (which means they can utilize atmospheric N, making it accessible for other microbes and plants). These results reflect important interactions between hydrology, carbon cycling, and nitrogen cycling present at the bog and relevant to interpreting experimental results and modeling the wetland response to experimental treatments. LLNL involvement at SPRUCE continues through collaborations and a small contract with ORNL, the lead lab for the SPRUCE experiment.

  18. Pluto: Modeling of 3-D Atmosphere-Surface Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaels, Timothy I.

    2015-11-01

    Atmosphere-surface interactions on Pluto are of great importance to creating and maintaining the atmospheric variations and heterogeneous surface that have been observed by New Horizons and two decades' prior work. Publicly released images/data from New Horizons contain numerous fascinating surface features and constrasts. Insights into their origin, maintenance, and/or evolution may be gleaned through multidisciplinary climate modeling. Some results from such modeling will be presented, with an emphasis on shorter-timescale interactions.

  19. Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model 2010 Version: Users Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justh, H. L.

    2014-01-01

    This Technical Memorandum (TM) presents the Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model 2010 (Mars-GRAM 2010) and its new features. Mars-GRAM is an engineering-level atmospheric model widely used for diverse mission applications. Applications include systems design, performance analysis, and operations planning for aerobraking, entry, descent and landing, and aerocapture. Additionally, this TM includes instructions on obtaining the Mars-GRAM source code and data files as well as running Mars-GRAM. It also contains sample Mars-GRAM input and output files and an example of how to incorporate Mars-GRAM as an atmospheric subroutine in a trajectory code.

  20. A radiative model for Titan's atmosphere in the IR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cofano, A.; Sindoni, G.

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this work is the development of a model of Titan atmosphere between 1 and 5 micron, using data from Cassini-Huygens mission. The simulations will be useful to remove the atmospheric features from the measured spectrum, to study the surface. The radiative transfer model is performed with ARS (Atmosphere Radiation Spectrum), a a group of Fortran 77 routines, able to calculate absorption coefficients, radiance and other parameters about gas and aerosols at LTE (Local Thermal Equilibrium) [5] and considering multiple scattering in nadir geometry. Our study covers the IR spectral range but it would be extended also to the visible spectrum.

  1. Modelling the soil-atmosphere exchange of POPs: Long-term steady state and diurnal fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Z.; Beckingham, B.; Maier, U.; Haberer, C.; Grathwohl, P.

    2014-12-01

    Soil-atmosphere exchange is an important transport process influencing environmental fate and transport of many persistent organic pollutants (POPs). This study focuses on modelling the gaseous exchange of a semi-volatile polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (phenanthrene) between soil and the atmosphere using the multicomponent reactive transport code MIN3P. MIN3P is typically applied to simulate aqueous and vapor phase subsurface transport and reaction processes. We extended the code to also include an atmospheric boundary layer where eddy diffusion and photodegradation take place. The relevant processes and parameters affecting soil-atmosphere exchange were investigated in several scenarios and at various time scales. We found that phenanthrene is well-mixed in the atmospheric boundary layer under neutral or stable atmospheric conditions due to fast eddy diffusion. Uptake of airborne phenanthrene to soils is limited by the soil properties and initially depends on diffusion in soil gas and sorption to the solids. On the long term seepage water dominates transport into deeper soil layers; biodegradation finally leads to steady-state concentration profiles in the subsurface typically achieved after a few centuries. If concentrations in the atmosphere decrease, e.g. due to environmental legislation, then soils become sources for the POPs for the first two months and function as sinks again for the POPs until new steady state concentrations are reached (after decades to centuries). MIN3P was also used to simulate diurnal soil-atmosphere exchanges of airborne pollutants due to temperature changes and photodegradation, both which cause fluctuations in atmospheric concentrations and therefore affect mass transfer between soil and the atmosphere. The model can further be applied to estimate the environmental fate of other POPs between soil and the atmosphere under different environmental pollution and climate change scenarios.

  2. ANALYTICAL MODELS OF EXOPLANETARY ATMOSPHERES. I. ATMOSPHERIC DYNAMICS VIA THE SHALLOW WATER SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Heng, Kevin; Workman, Jared E-mail: jworkman@coloradomesa.edu

    2014-08-01

    Within the context of exoplanetary atmospheres, we present a comprehensive linear analysis of forced, damped, magnetized shallow water systems, exploring the effects of dimensionality, geometry (Cartesian, pseudo-spherical, and spherical), rotation, magnetic tension, and hydrodynamic and magnetic sources of friction. Across a broad range of conditions, we find that the key governing equation for atmospheres and quantum harmonic oscillators are identical, even when forcing (stellar irradiation), sources of friction (molecular viscosity, Rayleigh drag, and magnetic drag), and magnetic tension are included. The global atmospheric structure is largely controlled by a single key parameter that involves the Rossby and Prandtl numbers. This near-universality breaks down when either molecular viscosity or magnetic drag acts non-uniformly across latitude or a poloidal magnetic field is present, suggesting that these effects will introduce qualitative changes to the familiar chevron-shaped feature witnessed in simulations of atmospheric circulation. We also find that hydrodynamic and magnetic sources of friction have dissimilar phase signatures and affect the flow in fundamentally different ways, implying that using Rayleigh drag to mimic magnetic drag is inaccurate. We exhaustively lay down the theoretical formalism (dispersion relations, governing equations, and time-dependent wave solutions) for a broad suite of models. In all situations, we derive the steady state of an atmosphere, which is relevant to interpreting infrared phase and eclipse maps of exoplanetary atmospheres. We elucidate a pinching effect that confines the atmospheric structure to be near the equator. Our suite of analytical models may be used to develop decisively physical intuition and as a reference point for three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations of atmospheric circulation.

  3. Modeling of GE Appliances: Final Presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, Jason C.; Vyakaranam, Bharat; Leistritz, Sean M.; Parker, Graham B.

    2013-01-31

    This report is the final in a series of three reports funded by U.S. Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (DOE-OE) in collaboration with GE Appliances’ through a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) to describe the potential of GE Appliances’ DR-enabled appliances to provide benefits to the utility grid.

  4. Evaluation protocol for the WIND system atmospheric models

    SciTech Connect

    Fast, J.D.

    1991-12-31

    Atmospheric transport and diffusion models have been developed for real-time calculations of the location and concentration of toxic or radioactive materials during a accidental release at the Savannah River Site (SRS). These models are have been incorporated into an automated menu-driven computer based system called the WIND (Weather INformation and Display) system. In an effort to establish more formal quality assurance procedures for the WIND system atmospheric codes, a software evaluation protocol is being developed. An evaluation protocol is necessary to determine how well they may perform in emergency response (real-time) situations. The evaluation of high-impact software must be conducted in accordance with WSRC QA Manual, 1Q, QAP 20-1. This report will describe the method that will be used to evaluate the atmospheric models. The evaluation will determine the effectiveness of the atmospheric models in emergency response situations, which is not necessarily the same procedure used for research purposes. The format of the evaluation plan will provide guidance for the evaluation of atmospheric models that may be added to the WIND system in the future. The evaluation plan is designed to provide the user with information about the WIND system atmospheric models that is necessary for emergency response situations.

  5. Evaluation protocol for the WIND system atmospheric models

    SciTech Connect

    Fast, J.D.

    1991-01-01

    Atmospheric transport and diffusion models have been developed for real-time calculations of the location and concentration of toxic or radioactive materials during a accidental release at the Savannah River Site (SRS). These models are have been incorporated into an automated menu-driven computer based system called the WIND (Weather INformation and Display) system. In an effort to establish more formal quality assurance procedures for the WIND system atmospheric codes, a software evaluation protocol is being developed. An evaluation protocol is necessary to determine how well they may perform in emergency response (real-time) situations. The evaluation of high-impact software must be conducted in accordance with WSRC QA Manual, 1Q, QAP 20-1. This report will describe the method that will be used to evaluate the atmospheric models. The evaluation will determine the effectiveness of the atmospheric models in emergency response situations, which is not necessarily the same procedure used for research purposes. The format of the evaluation plan will provide guidance for the evaluation of atmospheric models that may be added to the WIND system in the future. The evaluation plan is designed to provide the user with information about the WIND system atmospheric models that is necessary for emergency response situations.

  6. Development of an engineering model atmosphere for Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justus, C. G.

    1988-01-01

    An engineering model atmosphere for Mars is being developed with many of the same features and capabilities for the highly successful Global Reference Atmospheric Model (GRAM) program for Earth's atmosphere. As an initial approach, the model is being built around the Martian atmosphere model computer subroutine (ATMOS) of Culp and Stewart (1984). In a longer-term program of research, additional refinements and modifications will be included. ATMOS includes parameterizations to stimulate the effects of solar activity, seasonal variation, diurnal variation magnitude, dust storm effects, and effects due to the orbital position of Mars. One of the current shortcomings of ATMOS is the neglect of surface variation effects. The longer-term period of research and model building is to address some of these problem areas and provide further improvements in the model (including improved representation of near-surface variations, improved latitude-longitude gradient representation, effects of the large annual variation in surface pressure because of differential condensation/sublimation of the CO2 atmosphere in the polar caps, and effects of Martian atmospheric wave perturbations on the magnitude of the expected density perturbation.

  7. Studying urban land-atmospheric interactions by coupling an urban canopy model with a single column atmospheric models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, J.; Wang, Z.

    2013-12-01

    Studying urban land-atmospheric interactions by coupling an urban canopy model with a single column atmospheric models Jiyun Song and Zhi-Hua Wang School of Sustainable Engineering and the Built Environment, Arizona State University, PO Box 875306, Tempe, AZ 85287-5306 Landuse landcover changes in urban area will modify surface energy budgets, turbulent fluxes as well as dynamic and thermodynamic structures of the overlying atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). In order to study urban land-atmospheric interactions, we coupled a single column atmospheric model (SCM) to a cutting-edge single layer urban canopy model (SLUCM). Modification of surface parameters such as the fraction of vegetation and engineered pavements, thermal properties of building and pavement materials, and geometrical features of street canyon, etc. in SLUCM dictates the evolution of surface balance of energy, water and momentum. The land surface states then provide lower boundary conditions to the overlying atmosphere, which in turn modulates the modification of ABL structure as well as vertical profiles of temperature, humidity, wind speed and tracer gases. The coupled SLUCM-SCM model is tested against field measurements of surface layer fluxes as well as profiles of temperature and humidity in the mixed layer under convective conditions. After model test, SLUCM-SCM is used to simulate the effect of changing urban land surface conditions on the evolution of ABL structure and dynamics. Simulation results show that despite the prescribed atmospheric forcing, land surface states impose significant impact on the physics of the overlying vertical atmospheric layer. Overall, this numerical framework provides a useful standalone modeling tool to assess the impacts of urban land surface conditions on the local hydrometeorology through land-atmospheric interactions. It also has potentially far-reaching implications to urban ecohydrological services for cities under future expansion and climate challenges.

  8. INTERCOMPARISON STUDY OF ATMOSPHERIC MERCURY MODELS: 2. MODELING RESULTS VS. LONG-TERM OBSERVATIONS AND COMPARISON OF COUNTRY ATMOSPHERIC BALANCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Five regional scale models with a horizontal domain covering the European continent and its surrounding seas, two hemispheric and one global scale model participated in the atmospheric Hg modelling intercomparison study. The models were compared between each other and with availa...

  9. PCBs in the Arctic atmosphere: determining important driving forces using a global atmospheric transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, C. L.; Selin, N. E.

    2015-11-01

    We present a spatially and temporally resolved global atmospheric PCB model, driven by meteorological data, that is skilled at simulating mean atmospheric PCB concentrations and seasonal cycles in the Northern Hemisphere mid-latitudes, and mean Arctic concentrations. However, the model does not capture the observed Arctic summer maximum in atmospheric PCBs. We use the model to estimate global budgets for the International Council for the Exploration of the Sea 7 PCBs, and demonstrate that congeners that deposit more readily show lower potential for long-range transport, consistent with a recently-described "differential removal hypothesis" regarding the hemispheric transport of PCBs. Using sensitivity simulations to assess processes within, outside, or transport to the Arctic, we examine the influence of climate- and emissions-driven processes on Arctic concentrations and their effect on improving the simulated Arctic seasonal cycle. We find evidence that processes occurring outside the Arctic have a greater influence on Arctic atmospheric PCB levels than processes that occur within the Arctic. Our simulations suggest that re-emissions from sea ice melting or from the Arctic Ocean during summer would have to be unrealistically high in order to capture observed temporal trends of PCBs in the Arctic atmosphere. We conclude that mid-latitude processes are likely to have a greater effect on the Arctic under global change scenarios than re-emissions within the Arctic.

  10. Support Center for Regulatory Atmospheric Modeling (SCRAM)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This technical site provides access to air quality models (including computer code, input data, and model processors) and other mathematical simulation techniques used in assessing air emissions control strategies and source impacts.

  11. Atmospheric Dispersion Model Validation in Low Wind Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Sawyer, Patrick

    2007-11-01

    Atmospheric plume dispersion models are used for a variety of purposes including emergency planning and response to hazardous material releases, determining force protection actions in the event of a Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD) attack and for locating sources of pollution. This study provides a review of previous studies that examine the accuracy of atmospheric plume dispersion models for chemical releases. It considers the principles used to derive air dispersion plume models and looks at three specific models currently in use: Aerial Location of Hazardous Atmospheres (ALOHA), Emergency Prediction Information Code (EPIcode) and Second Order Closure Integrated Puff (SCIPUFF). Results from this study indicate over-prediction bias by the EPIcode and SCIPUFF models and under-prediction bias by the ALOHA model. The experiment parameters were for near field dispersion (less than 100 meters) in low wind speed conditions (less than 2 meters per second).

  12. Statistical analysis of a global photochemical model of the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frol'Kis, V. A.; Karol', I. L.; Kiselev, A. A.; Ozolin, Yu. E.; Zubov, V. A.

    2007-08-01

    This is a study of the sensitivity of model results (atmospheric content of main gas constituents and radiative characteristics of the atmosphere) to errors in emissions of a number of atmospheric gaseous pollutants. Groups of the model variables most dependent on these errors are selected. Two variants of emissions are considered: one without their evolution and the other with their variation according to the IPCC scenario. The estimates are made on the basis of standard statistical methods for the results obtained with the detailed onedimensional radiative—photochemical model of the Main Geophysical Observatory (MGO). Some approaches to such estimations with models of higher complexity and to the solution of the inverse problem (i.e., the estimation of the necessary accuracy of external model parameters for obtaining the given accuracy of model results) are outlined.

  13. Modeling atmospheric transport to the Marshall Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrill, John T.; Bleck, Rainer; Avila, Lixion

    1985-12-01

    Isentropic trajectory analyses are presented which support the hypothesis that atmospheric continental material found at Enewetak Atoll (11.3°N, 162.3°E) during the Sea-Air Exchange (SEAREX) experiments in 1979 had its origin primarily in Asia in the springtime (dry season experiment) and in North and Central America in the summer (wet season experiment). Fields of wind, Montgomery potential, and pressure on isentropic surfaces are obtained from global isobaric analyses by vertical interpolation. Trajectories backward in time from the area at and upwind of the experiment site were calculated using these fields. In April and May 1979 the atmospheric chemistry at Enewetak was influenced strongly by long-range transport from Asia; this transport was primarily in the potential temperature range 305-315 K with travel times of 8-13 days. Westerly winds over Asia at 350-600 mbar carry continental materials over the ocean, and as the air moves southward, subsidence occurs until the air is entrained in the trade wind flow. During July and August 1979 the transport paths were from open ocean areas and from near North and Central America at 305-310 K with travel times of 17-21 days. The trajectories remained at low levels within the boundary layer during this period. Also discussed is a meteorological analysis of dust storms in China, which shows that a mechanism exists for lifting eolian material to the upper troposphere. There is substantial uncertainty in the individual trajectories, and the factors limiting their accuracy are discussed. Given the consistency of the trajectory analyses with the chemical results, we now have a coherent picture of some of the processes responsible for long-range transport to the subtropical open ocean.

  14. Coupled atmospheric, land surface, and subsurface modeling: Exploring water and energy feedbacks in three-dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davison, Jason H.; Hwang, Hyoun-Tae; Sudicky, Edward A.; Lin, John C.

    2015-12-01

    Human activities amplified by climate change pose a significant threat to the sustainability of water resources. Coupled climate-hydrologic simulations commonly predict these threats by combining shallow 1-D land surface models (LSMs) with traditional 2-D and 3-D hydrology models. However, these coupled models limit the moisture and energy-feedback dynamics to the shallow near-surface. This paper presents a novel analysis by applying an integrated variably-saturated subsurface/surface hydrology and heat transport model, HydroGeoSphere (HGS), as a land surface model (LSM). Furthermore, this article demonstrates the coupling of HGS to a simple 0-D atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) model. We then applied our coupled HGS-ABL model to three separate test cases and reproduced the strong correlation between the atmospheric energy balance to the depth of the groundwater table. From our simulations, we found that conventional LSMs may overestimate surface temperatures for extended drought periods because they underestimate the heat storage in the groundwater zone. Our final test case of the atmospheric response to drought conditions illustrated that deeper roots buffered the atmosphere better than shallow roots by maintaining higher latent heat fluxes, lower sensible heat fluxes, and lower surface and atmospheric temperatures.

  15. Measuring the basic parameters of neutron stars using model atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suleimanov, V. F.; Poutanen, J.; Klochkov, D.; Werner, K.

    2016-02-01

    Model spectra of neutron star atmospheres are nowadays widely used to fit the observed thermal X-ray spectra of neutron stars. This fitting is the key element in the method of the neutron star radius determination. Here, we present the basic assumptions used for the neutron star atmosphere modeling as well as the main qualitative features of the stellar atmospheres leading to the deviations of the emergent model spectrum from blackbody. We describe the properties of two of our model atmosphere grids: i) pure carbon atmospheres for relatively cool neutron stars (1-4MK) and ii) hot atmospheres with Compton scattering taken into account. The results obtained by applying these grids to model the X-ray spectra of the central compact object in supernova remnant HESS 1731-347, and two X-ray bursting neutron stars in low-mass X-ray binaries, 4U 1724-307 and 4U 1608-52, are presented. Possible systematic uncertainties associated with the obtained neutron star radii are discussed.

  16. Information Flow in an Atmospheric Model and Data Assimilation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoon, Young-noh

    2011-01-01

    Weather forecasting consists of two processes, model integration and analysis (data assimilation). During the model integration, the state estimate produced by the analysis evolves to the next cycle time according to the atmospheric model to become the background estimate. The analysis then produces a new state estimate by combining the background…

  17. Models of earth's atmosphere (90 to 2500 km)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    This monograph replaces a monograph on the upper atmosphere which was a computerized version of Jacchia's model. The current model has a range from 90 to 2500 km. In addition to the computerized model, a quick-look prediction method is given that may be used to estimate the density for any time and spatial location without using a computer.

  18. Session on coupled atmospheric/chemistry coupled models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Anne

    1993-01-01

    The session on coupled atmospheric/chemistry coupled models is reviewed. Current model limitations, current issues and critical unknowns, and modeling activity are addressed. Specific recommendations and experimental strategies on the following are given: multiscale surface layer - planetary boundary layer - chemical flux measurements; Eulerian budget study; and Langrangian experiment. Nonprecipitating cloud studies, organized convective systems, and aerosols - heterogenous chemistry are also discussed.

  19. Initial Results from SQUID Sensor: Analysis and Modeling for the ELF/VLF Atmospheric Noise

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Huan; Wang, Huali; Chen, Liang; Wu, Jun; Qiu, Longqing; Rong, Liangliang

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, the amplitude probability density (APD) of the wideband extremely low frequency (ELF) and very low frequency (VLF) atmospheric noise is studied. The electromagnetic signals from the atmosphere, referred to herein as atmospheric noise, was recorded by a mobile low-temperature superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) receiver under magnetically unshielded conditions. In order to eliminate the adverse effect brought by the geomagnetic activities and powerline, the measured field data was preprocessed to suppress the baseline wandering and harmonics by symmetric wavelet transform and least square methods firstly. Then statistical analysis was performed for the atmospheric noise on different time and frequency scales. Finally, the wideband ELF/VLF atmospheric noise was analyzed and modeled separately. Experimental results show that, Gaussian model is appropriate to depict preprocessed ELF atmospheric noise by a hole puncher operator. While for VLF atmospheric noise, symmetric α-stable (SαS) distribution is more accurate to fit the heavy-tail of the envelope probability density function (pdf). PMID:28216590

  20. Initial Results from SQUID Sensor: Analysis and Modeling for the ELF/VLF Atmospheric Noise.

    PubMed

    Hao, Huan; Wang, Huali; Chen, Liang; Wu, Jun; Qiu, Longqing; Rong, Liangliang

    2017-02-14

    In this paper, the amplitude probability density (APD) of the wideband extremely low frequency (ELF) and very low frequency (VLF) atmospheric noise is studied. The electromagnetic signals from the atmosphere, referred to herein as atmospheric noise, was recorded by a mobile low-temperature superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) receiver under magnetically unshielded conditions. In order to eliminate the adverse effect brought by the geomagnetic activities and powerline, the measured field data was preprocessed to suppress the baseline wandering and harmonics by symmetric wavelet transform and least square methods firstly. Then statistical analysis was performed for the atmospheric noise on different time and frequency scales. Finally, the wideband ELF/VLF atmospheric noise was analyzed and modeled separately. Experimental results show that, Gaussian model is appropriate to depict preprocessed ELF atmospheric noise by a hole puncher operator. While for VLF atmospheric noise, symmetric α-stable (SαS) distribution is more accurate to fit the heavy-tail of the envelope probability density function (pdf).

  1. [Mid-infrared atmosphere radiation transfer analytic model and remote sensing images simulation].

    PubMed

    Yang, Gui-Jun; Liu, Qin-Huo; Liu, Qiang; Xiao, Qing; Gu, Xing-Fa; Huang, Wen-Jiang

    2009-03-01

    In order to establish a complete set of simulation system for high-resolution mid-infrared remote sensing and provide a powerful reference for spacecraft design and related works, the importance of atmospheric radiative transfer simulation in this system was considered, and a reasonable and high precision imaging numerical simulation method was expected. Taking into account the characteristics of MIR, including scattering and thermal emission, terms of atmospheric radiative transfer were decomposed based on radiative transfer principle, and images of top of atmosphere (TOA) were simulated according to MODTRAN4 and look-up table method. Besides, adjacency effect caused by atmospheric scattering of neighboring pixels radiation was considered, and an extended point spread function in mid-infrared was coupled with analytical model of atmospheric radiative transfer to simulate TOA images. Finally, a preliminary test and simulation results show that the simulation model has better accuracy. If parameters of observation geometry and atmosphere were given and the land surface temperature/emissivity was determined, the calculation of pixel-level atmospheric radiative transfer was to be achieved.

  2. Model Atmospheres From Very Low Mass Stars to Brown Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allard, F.; Homeier, D.; Freytag, B.

    2011-12-01

    Since the discovery of brown dwarfs in 1994, and the discovery of dust cloud formation in the latest Very Low Mass Stars (VLMs) and Brown Dwarfs (BDs) in 1996, the most important challenge in modeling their atmospheres as become the understanding of cloud formation and advective mixing. For this purpose, we have developed radiation hydrodynamic 2D model atmosphere simulations to study the formation of forsterite dust in presence of advection, condensation, and sedimentation across the M-L-T VLMs to BDs sequence (Teff = 2800 K to 900 K, Freytag et al. 2010). We discovered the formation of gravity waves as a driving mechanism for the formation of clouds in these atmospheres, and derived a rule for the velocity field versus atmospheric depth and Teff, which is relatively insensitive to gravity. This rule has been used in the construction of the new model atmosphere grid, BT-Settl, to determine the micro-turbulence velocity, the diffusion coefficient, and the advective mixing of molecules as a function of depth. This new model grid of atmospheres and synthetic spectra has been computed for 100,000 K > Teff > 400 K, 5.5 > logg > -0.5, and [M/H]= +0.5 to -1.5, and the reference solar abundances of Asplund et al. (2009). We found that the new solar abundances allow an improved (close to perfect) reproduction of the photometric and spectroscopic VLMs properties, and, for the first time, a smooth transition between stellar and substellar regimes -- unlike the transition between the NextGen models from Hauschildt et al. 1999a,b, and the AMES-Dusty models from Allard et al. 2001. In the BDs regime, the BT-Settl models propose an improved explanation for the M-L-T spectral transition. In this paper, we therefore present the new BT-Settl model atmosphere grid, which explains the entire transition from the stellar to planetary mass regimes.

  3. Constructing an advanced software tool for planetary atmospheric modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, Richard M.; Sims, Michael; Podolak, Ester; Mckay, Christopher

    1990-01-01

    Scientific model building can be an intensive and painstaking process, often involving the development of large and complex computer programs. Despite the effort involved, scientific models cannot be easily distributed and shared with other scientists. In general, implemented scientific models are complex, idiosyncratic, and difficult for anyone but the original scientist/programmer to understand. We believe that advanced software techniques can facilitate both the model building and model sharing process. In this paper, we describe a prototype for a scientific modeling software tool that serves as an aid to the scientist in developing and using models. This tool includes an interactive intelligent graphical interface, a high level domain specific modeling language, a library of physics equations and experimental datasets, and a suite of data display facilities. Our prototype has been developed in the domain of planetary atmospheric modeling, and is being used to construct models of Titan's atmosphere.

  4. Guideline for fluid modeling of atmospheric diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, W. H.

    1981-04-01

    The usefulness of fluid models are evaluated from both scientific and engineering viewpoints. Because many detailed decisions must be made during the design and execution of each model study, and because the fundamental principles frequency do not provide enough guidance, extensive discussion of the details of the most common types of modeling problems are provided. The hardware requirements are also discussed. This guidance is intended to be of use both to scientists and engineering involved in operating fluid modeling facilities and to air pollution control officials in evaluating the quality and credibility of the reports from such studies.

  5. Final Project Report Load Modeling Transmission Research

    SciTech Connect

    Lesieutre, Bernard; Bravo, Richard; Yinger, Robert; Chassin, Dave; Huang, Henry; Lu, Ning; Hiskens, Ian; Venkataramanan, Giri

    2012-03-31

    The research presented in this report primarily focuses on improving power system load models to better represent their impact on system behavior. The previous standard load model fails to capture the delayed voltage recovery events that are observed in the Southwest and elsewhere. These events are attributed to stalled air conditioner units after a fault. To gain a better understanding of their role in these events and to guide modeling efforts, typical air conditioner units were testing in laboratories. Using data obtained from these extensive tests, new load models were developed to match air conditioner behavior. An air conditioner model is incorporated in the new WECC composite load model. These models are used in dynamic studies of the West and can impact power transfer limits for California. Unit-level and systemlevel solutions are proposed as potential solutions to the delayed voltage recovery problem.

  6. Command generator tracker based direct model reference adaptive tracking guidance for Mars atmospheric entry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shuang; Peng, Yuming

    2012-01-01

    In order to accurately deliver an entry vehicle through the Martian atmosphere to the prescribed parachute deployment point, active Mars entry guidance is essential. This paper addresses the issue of Mars atmospheric entry guidance using the command generator tracker (CGT) based direct model reference adaptive control to reduce the adverse effect of the bounded uncertainties on atmospheric density and aerodynamic coefficients. Firstly, the nominal drag acceleration profile meeting a variety of constraints is planned off-line in the longitudinal plane as the reference model to track. Then, the CGT based direct model reference adaptive controller and the feed-forward compensator are designed to robustly track the aforementioned reference drag acceleration profile and to effectively reduce the downrange error. Afterwards, the heading alignment logic is adopted in the lateral plane to reduce the crossrange error. Finally, the validity of the guidance algorithm proposed in this paper is confirmed by Monte Carlo simulation analysis.

  7. Atmosphere-magma ocean modeling of GJ 1132 b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, Laura; Wordsworth, Robin; Berta-Thompson, Zachory K.; Sasselov, Dimitar

    2017-01-01

    GJ 1132 b is a nearby Earth-sized exoplanet transiting an M dwarf, and is amongst the most highly characterizable small exoplanets currently known. Using a coupled atmosphere-magma ocean model, we determine that GJ 1132 b must have begun with more than 5 wt% initial water in order to still retain a water-based atmosphere. We also determine the amount of O2 that can build up in the atmosphere as a result of hydrogen dissociation and loss. We find that the magma ocean absorbs at most ~ 10% of the O2 produced, whereas more than 90% is lost to space through hydrodynamic drag. The results of the model depend strongly on the initial water abundance and the XUV model. The most common outcome for GJ 1132 b from our simulations is a tenuous atmosphere dominated by O2, although for very large initial water abundances, atmospheres with several thousands of bars of O2 are possible. A substantial steam envelope would indicate either the existence of an earlier H2 envelope or low XUV flux over the system's lifetime. A steam atmosphere would also imply the continued existence of a magma ocean on GJ 1132 b. Preliminary modeling with the addition of CO2 gas will be presented.

  8. Using Existing Arctic Atmospheric Mercury Measurements to Refine Global and Regional Scale Atmospheric Transport Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, C. W.; Dastoor, A.; Steffen, A.; Nghiem, S. V.; Agnan, Y.; Obrist, D.

    2015-12-01

    Northern hemisphere background atmospheric concentrations of gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) have been declining by up to 25% over the last ten years at some lower latitude sites. However, this decline has ranged from no decline to 9% over 10 years at Arctic long-term measurement sites. Measurements also show a highly dynamic nature of mercury (Hg) species in Arctic air and snow from early spring to the end of summer when biogeochemical transformations peak. Currently, models are unable to reproduce this variability accurately. Estimates of Hg accumulation in the Arctic and Arctic Ocean by models require a full mechanistic understanding of the multi-phase redox chemistry of Hg in air and snow as well as the role of meteorology in the physicochemical processes of Hg. We will show how findings from ground-based atmospheric Hg measurements like those made in spring 2012 during the Bromine, Ozone and Mercury Experiment (BROMEX) near Barrow, Alaska can be used to reduce the discrepancy between measurements and model output in the Canadian GEM-MACH-Hg model. The model is able to reproduce and to explain some of the variability in Arctic Hg measurements but discrepancies still remain. One improvement involves incorporation of new physical mechanisms such as the one we were able to identify during BROMEX. This mechanism, by which atmospheric mercury depletion events are abruptly ended via sea ice leads opening and inducing shallow convective mixing that replenishes GEM (and ozone) in the near surface atmospheric layer, causing an immediate recovery from the depletion event, is currently lacking in models. Future implementation of this physical mechanism will have to incorporate current remote sensing sea ice products but also rely on the development of products that can identify sea ice leads quantitatively. In this way, we can advance the knowledge of the dynamic nature of GEM in the Arctic and the impact of climate change along with new regulations on the overall

  9. Cloud Feedback in Atmospheric General Circulation Models: An Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cess, R. D.; Zhang, M. H.; Ingram, W. J.; Potter, G. L.; Alekseev, V.; Barker, H. W.; Cohen-Solal, E.; Colman, R. A.; Dazlich, D. A.; DelGenio, A. D.; Dix, M. R.; Dymnikov, V.; Esch, M.; Fowler, L. D.; Fraser, J. R.; Galin, V.; Gates, W. L.; Hack, J. J.; Kiehl, J. T.; LeTreut, H.

    1996-01-01

    Six years ago, we compared the climate sensitivity of 19 atmospheric general circulation models and found a roughly threefold variation among the models; most of this variation was attributed to differences in the models' depictions of cloud feedback. In an update of this comparison, current models showed considerably smaller differences in net cloud feedback, with most producing modest values. There are, however, substantial differences in the feedback components, indicating that the models still have physical disagreements.

  10. Regional forecasting with global atmospheric models; Fourth year report

    SciTech Connect

    Crowley, T.J.; North, G.R.; Smith, N.R.

    1994-05-01

    The scope of the report is to present the results of the fourth year`s work on the atmospheric modeling part of the global climate studies task. The development testing of computer models and initial results are discussed. The appendices contain studies that provide supporting information and guidance to the modeling work and further details on computer model development. Complete documentation of the models, including user information, will be prepared under separate reports and manuals.

  11. The physical theory and propagation model of THz atmospheric propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, R.; Yao, J. Q.; Xu, D. G.; Wang, J. L.; Wang, P.

    2011-02-01

    Terahertz (THz) radiation is extensively applied in diverse fields, such as space communication, Earth environment observation, atmosphere science, remote sensing and so on. And the research on propagation features of THz wave in the atmosphere becomes more and more important. This paper firstly illuminates the advantages and outlook of THz in space technology. Then it introduces the theoretical framework of THz atmospheric propagation, including some fundamental physical concepts and processes. The attenuation effect (especially the absorption of water vapor), the scattering of aerosol particles and the effect of turbulent flow mainly influence THz atmosphere propagation. Fundamental physical laws are illuminated as well, such as Lamber-beer law, Mie scattering theory and radiative transfer equation. The last part comprises the demonstration and comparison of THz atmosphere propagation models like Moliere(V5), SARTre and AMATERASU. The essential problems are the deep analysis of physical mechanism of this process, the construction of atmospheric propagation model and databases of every kind of material in the atmosphere, and the standardization of measurement procedures.

  12. A zonally symmetric model for volcanic influence upon atmospheric circulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schatten, K. H.; Mayr, H. G.; Harris, I.; Taylor, H. A., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of volcanic activity upon zonal wind flow in a model atmosphere are considered. A low latitude volcanic eruption could lower the tropospheric pole to equator temperature difference and thereby affect the atmospheric motions. When the temperature contrast decreases, the zonal wind velocities at high altitudes are reduced. To conserve angular momentum, the velocities in the lower atmosphere near the surface must increase, thus providing a momentum source for ocean currents. It is suggested that this momentum source may have played a role as a trigger for inducing the 1982-83 anomalous El Nino and possibly other climate changes.

  13. A zonally symmetric model for volcanic influence upon atmospheric circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schatten, K. H.; Mayr, H. G.; Harris, I.; Taylor, H. A., Jr.

    1984-04-01

    The effects of volcanic activity upon zonal wind flow in a model atmosphere are considered. A low latitude volcanic eruption could lower the tropospheric pole to equator temperature difference and thereby affect the atmospheric motions. When the temperature contrast decreases, the zonal wind velocities at high altitudes are reduced. To conserve angular momentum, the velocities in the lower atmosphere near the surface must increase, thus providing a momentum source for ocean currents. It is suggested that this momentum source may have played a role as a trigger for inducing the 1982-83 anomalous El Nino and possibly other climate changes.

  14. Atmospheric Turbulence Modeling for Aero Vehicles: Fractional Order Fits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopasakis, George

    2010-01-01

    Atmospheric turbulence models are necessary for the design of both inlet/engine and flight controls, as well as for studying coupling between the propulsion and the vehicle structural dynamics for supersonic vehicles. Models based on the Kolmogorov spectrum have been previously utilized to model atmospheric turbulence. In this paper, a more accurate model is developed in its representative fractional order form, typical of atmospheric disturbances. This is accomplished by first scaling the Kolmogorov spectral to convert them into finite energy von Karman forms and then by deriving an explicit fractional circuit-filter type analog for this model. This circuit model is utilized to develop a generalized formulation in frequency domain to approximate the fractional order with the products of first order transfer functions, which enables accurate time domain simulations. The objective of this work is as follows. Given the parameters describing the conditions of atmospheric disturbances, and utilizing the derived formulations, directly compute the transfer function poles and zeros describing these disturbances for acoustic velocity, temperature, pressure, and density. Time domain simulations of representative atmospheric turbulence can then be developed by utilizing these computed transfer functions together with the disturbance frequencies of interest.

  15. Atmospheric Turbulence Modeling for Aero Vehicles: Fractional Order Fits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopasakis, George

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric turbulence models are necessary for the design of both inlet/engine and flight controls, as well as for studying coupling between the propulsion and the vehicle structural dynamics for supersonic vehicles. Models based on the Kolmogorov spectrum have been previously utilized to model atmospheric turbulence. In this paper, a more accurate model is developed in its representative fractional order form, typical of atmospheric disturbances. This is accomplished by first scaling the Kolmogorov spectral to convert them into finite energy von Karman forms and then by deriving an explicit fractional circuit-filter type analog for this model. This circuit model is utilized to develop a generalized formulation in frequency domain to approximate the fractional order with the products of first order transfer functions, which enables accurate time domain simulations. The objective of this work is as follows. Given the parameters describing the conditions of atmospheric disturbances, and utilizing the derived formulations, directly compute the transfer function poles and zeros describing these disturbances for acoustic velocity, temperature, pressure, and density. Time domain simulations of representative atmospheric turbulence can then be developed by utilizing these computed transfer functions together with the disturbance frequencies of interest.

  16. Atmospheric Turbulence Modeling for Aerospace Vehicles: Fractional Order Fit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopasakis, George (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An improved model for simulating atmospheric disturbances is disclosed. A scale Kolmogorov spectral may be scaled to convert the Kolmogorov spectral into a finite energy von Karman spectral and a fractional order pole-zero transfer function (TF) may be derived from the von Karman spectral. Fractional order atmospheric turbulence may be approximated with an integer order pole-zero TF fit, and the approximation may be stored in memory.

  17. Improved Meteorological Input for Atmospheric Release Decision support Systems and an Integrated LES Modeling System for Atmospheric Dispersion of Toxic Agents: Homeland Security Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, E; Simpson, M; Larsen, S; Gash, J; Aluzzi, F; Lundquist, J; Sugiyama, G

    2010-04-26

    When hazardous material is accidently or intentionally released into the atmosphere, emergency response organizations look to decision support systems (DSSs) to translate contaminant information provided by atmospheric models into effective decisions to protect the public and emergency responders and to mitigate subsequent consequences. The Department of Homeland Security (DHS)-led Interagency Modeling and Atmospheric Assessment Center (IMAAC) is one of the primary DSSs utilized by emergency management organizations. IMAAC is responsible for providing 'a single piont for the coordination and dissemination of Federal dispersion modeling and hazard prediction products that represent the Federal position' during actual or potential incidents under the National Response Plan. The Department of Energy's (DOE) National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC), locatec at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), serves as the primary operations center of the IMAAC. A key component of atmospheric release decision support systems is meteorological information - models and data of winds, turbulence, and other atmospheric boundary-layer parameters. The accuracy of contaminant predictions is strongly dependent on the quality of this information. Therefore, the effectiveness of DSSs can be enhanced by improving the meteorological options available to drive atmospheric transport and fate models. The overall goal of this project was to develop and evaluate new meteorological modeling capabilities for DSSs based on the use of NASA Earth-science data sets in order to enhance the atmospheric-hazard information provided to emergency managers and responders. The final report describes the LLNL contributions to this multi-institutional effort. LLNL developed an approach to utilize NCAR meteorological predictions using NASA MODIS data for the New York City (NYC) region and demonstrated the potential impact of the use of different data sources and data parameterizations on

  18. Statistical modeling of electrical components: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Jolly, R.L.

    1988-07-01

    A method of forecasting production yields based on SPICE (University of California at Berkeley) circuit simulation and Monte Carlo techniques was evaluated. This method involved calculating functionally accurate component models using statistical techniques and using these component models in a SPICE electrical circuit simulation program. The results of the simulation program allow production yields to be calculated using standard statistical techniques.

  19. Chesapeake Bay sediment flux model. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Di Toro, D.M.; Fitzpatrick, J.J.

    1993-06-01

    Formulation and application of a predictive diagenetic sediment model are described in this report. The model considers two benthic sediment layers: a thin aerobic layer in contact with the water column and a thicker anaerobic layer. Processes represented include diagenesis, diffusion, particle mixing, and burial. Deposition of organic matter, water column concentrations, and temperature are treated as independent variables that influence sediment-water fluxes. Sediment oxygen demand and sediment-water fluxes of sulfide, ammonium, nitrate, phosphate, and silica are predicted. The model was calibrated using sediment-water flux observations collected in Chesapeake Bay 1985-1988. When independent variables were specified based on observations, the model correctly represented the time series of sediment-water fluxes observed at eight stations in the Bay and tributaries.... Chesapeake Bay, Models, Sediments, Dissolved oxygen, Nitrogen Eutrophication, Phosphorus.

  20. SEISMIC MODELING ENGINES PHASE 1 FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    BRUCE P. MARION

    2006-02-09

    Seismic modeling is a core component of petroleum exploration and production today. Potential applications include modeling the influence of dip on anisotropic migration; source/receiver placement in deviated-well three-dimensional surveys for vertical seismic profiling (VSP); and the generation of realistic data sets for testing contractor-supplied migration algorithms or for interpreting AVO (amplitude variation with offset) responses. This project was designed to extend the use of a finite-difference modeling package, developed at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratories, to the advanced applications needed by industry. The approach included a realistic, easy-to-use 2-D modeling package for the desktop of the practicing geophysicist. The feasibility of providing a wide-ranging set of seismic modeling engines was fully demonstrated in Phase I. The technical focus was on adding variable gridding in both the horizontal and vertical directions, incorporating attenuation, improving absorbing boundary conditions and adding the optional coefficient finite difference methods.

  1. The Role of Atmospheric Measurements in Wind Power Statistical Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wharton, S.; Bulaevskaya, V.; Irons, Z.; Newman, J. F.; Clifton, A.

    2015-12-01

    The simplest wind power generation curves model power only as a function of the wind speed at turbine hub-height. While the latter is an essential predictor of power output, it is widely accepted that wind speed information in other parts of the vertical profile, as well as additional atmospheric variables including atmospheric stability, wind veer, and hub-height turbulence are also important factors. The goal of this work is to determine the gain in predictive ability afforded by adding additional atmospheric measurements to the power prediction model. In particular, we are interested in quantifying any gain in predictive ability afforded by measurements taken from a laser detection and ranging (lidar) instrument, as lidar provides high spatial and temporal resolution measurements of wind speed and direction at 10 or more levels throughout the rotor-disk and at heights well above. Co-located lidar and meteorological tower data as well as SCADA power data from a wind farm in Northern Oklahoma will be used to train a set of statistical models. In practice, most wind farms continue to rely on atmospheric measurements taken from less expensive, in situ instruments mounted on meteorological towers to assess turbine power response to a changing atmospheric environment. Here, we compare a large suite of atmospheric variables derived from tower measurements to those taken from lidar to determine if remote sensing devices add any competitive advantage over tower measurements alone to predict turbine power response.

  2. Three dimensional global modeling of atmospheric CO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanse, J.; Fung, I.; Rind, D.

    1984-01-01

    The initial attempts to model the atmospheric CO2 distribution, including couplings to the ocean and biosphere as sources and sinks of atmospheric CO2, encourage the notion that this approach will lead to useful quantitative constraints on CO2 fluxes. Realization of this objective will require: (1) continued improvement in the realism of the global transport modeling; (2) extended timeline of atmospheric CO2 monitoring, which improved precision and improved definition of the uncertainties in the measured CO2 amounts; and (3) given an accurate knowledge of model capabilities and limitations and given a good understanding of CO2 observations and their limitations, there is a need for good ideas concerning what quantitative information on the carbon cycle can be inferred from global modeling.

  3. Examining Tatooine: Atmospheric Models of Neptune-like Circumbinary Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, E. M.; Rauscher, E.

    2016-08-01

    Circumbinary planets experience a time-varying irradiation pattern as they orbit their two host stars. In this work, we present the first detailed study of the atmospheric effects of this irradiation pattern on known and hypothetical gaseous circumbinary planets. Using both a one-dimensional energy balance model (EBM) and a three-dimensional general circulation model (GCM), we look at the temperature differences between circumbinary planets and their equivalent single-star cases in order to determine the nature of the atmospheres of these planets. We find that for circumbinary planets on stable orbits around their host stars, temperature differences are on average no more than 1.0% in the most extreme cases. Based on detailed modeling with the GCM, we find that these temperature differences are not large enough to excite circulation differences between the two cases. We conclude that gaseous circumbinary planets can be treated as their equivalent single-star case in future atmospheric modeling efforts.

  4. Predictability of a coupled ocean-atmosphere model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goswami, B. N.; Shukla, J.

    1991-01-01

    A study is presented to determine the limits on the predictability of the coupled ocean-atmosphere system. Following the classical methods developed for atmospheric predictability studies, the model used is one of the simplest that realistically reproduces many of the important features of the observed interannual variability of sea surface temperature in the tropical Pacific Ocean when forced by observed wind stresses. As no reasonable analysis is available for all the fields, initial conditions for these prediction experiments were taken from a model control run in which the ocean model was forced by the observed surface winds. The atmospheric component of the coupled model is not capable of accurately simulating the large-scale components of the observed wind stress.

  5. Semi-Lagrangian integration schemes for atmospheric models - A review

    SciTech Connect

    Staniforth, A.; Cote, J. )

    1991-09-01

    The semi-Lagrangian methodology is described for a hierarchy of applications (passive advection, forced advection, and coupled sets of equation) of increasing complexity, in one, two, and three dimensions. Attention is focused on its accuracy, stability, and efficiency properties. Recent developments in applying semi-Lagrangian methods to 2D and 3D atmospheric flows in both Cartesian and spherical geometries are then reviewed. Finally, the current status of development is summarized, followed by a short discussion of future perspectives. 80 refs.

  6. Engineering-Level Model Atmospheres for Titan & Neptune

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justus, C. G.; Johnson, D. L.

    2003-01-01

    Engineering-level atmospheric models for Titan and Neptune have been developed for use in NASA s systems analysis studies of aerocapture applications in missions to the outer planets. Analogous to highly successful Global Reference Atmospheric Models for Earth (GRAM, Justus et al., 2000) and Mars (Mars-GRAM, Justus and Johnson, 2001, Justus et al., 2002) the new models are called Titan-GRAM and Neptune-GRAM. Like GRAM and Mars-GRAM, an important feature of Titan-GRAM and Neptune-GRAM is their ability to simulate quasi-random perturbations for Monte- Carlo analyses in developing guidance, navigation and control algorithms, and for thermal systems design.

  7. Proposed ozone reference models for the middle atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keating, G. M.; Young, D. F.

    Since the publication of the last COSPAR International Reference Atmosphere (CIRA 72), large amounts of ozone data acquired from satellites have become available in addition to increasing quantities of rocketsonde, balloonsonde, Dobson, M83, and Umkehr measurements. From the available archived satellite data, models are developed for the new CIRA using 5 satellite experiments (Nimbus 7 SBUV and LIMS, AEM-2 SAGE, and SME IR and UVS) of the monthly latitudinal and altitudinal variations in the ozone mixing ratio in the middle atmosphere. Standard deviations and interannual variations are also quantified. The satellite models are shown to agree well with a previous reference model based on rocket and balloon measurements.

  8. Forecast improvement by interactive ensemble of atmospheric models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basnarkov, L.; Duane, G. S.; Kocarev, L.

    2013-12-01

    The advances in weather forecast traditionally have been based on two lines of improvement: 1 - deepening the understanding of physical phenomena that underlies the atmospheric dynamics; and 2 - steady increase in computer power that enables use of finer grid resolution. The meteorological centers model dynamics of the atmosphere with the same basic physical laws, but sometimes take different approaches in capturing small-scale phenomena and generally use different grid sizes. As a result there are dozens operational models around the globe with various parameterizations of the unresolved processes. Newest attempts in forecast improvements are based on using ensemble prediction. Multiple outputs are taken from runs with perturbed initial conditions, or perturbed parameter values. A novel paradigm is exploiting dynamical exchange of variables between simultaneously running models. There are already simulations of models exchanging fluxes between ocean and atmospheric models, but examples with direct coupling of different atmospheric models are rather new. Within this approach the coupling schemes can be different, but as simplest appear those that combine corresponding dynamical variables or tendency components. In this work we present results with an artificial toy model-Lorenz 96 model. To make more faithful example as reality (the atmosphere) is considered one Lorenz 96 class III system, while as its imperfect models are taken three class II systems that have different forcing terms. These resemble the models used in three different meteorological centers. The interactive ensemble has tendency that is weighted combination of the individual models' tendencies. The weights are obtained with statistical techniques based on past observations that target to minimize the mismatch between the truth's and interactive ensemble's tendencies. By means of anomaly correlation it is numerically verified that this ensemble has longer range of forecast than the individual models.

  9. Modeling and simulation of atmosphere interference signal based on FTIR spectroscopy technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yugui; Li, Qiang; Yu, Zhengyang; Liu, Zhengmin

    2016-09-01

    Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy technique, featured with large frequency range and high spectral resolution, is becoming the research focus in spectrum analysis area, and is spreading in atmosphere detection applications in the aerospace field. In this paper, based on FTIR spectroscopy technique, the principle of atmosphere interference signal generation is deduced in theory, and also its mathematical model and simulation are carried out. Finally, the intrinsic characteristics of the interference signal in time domain and frequency domain, which give a theoretical foundation to the performance parameter design of electrical signal processing, are analyzed.

  10. Atmosphere-ocean ozone exchange: A global modeling study of biogeochemical, atmospheric, and waterside turbulence dependencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganzeveld, L.; Helmig, D.; Fairall, C. W.; Hare, J.; Pozzer, A.

    2009-12-01

    The significance of the removal of tropospheric ozone by the oceans, covering ˜2/3 of the Earth's surface, has only been addressed in a few studies involving water tank, aircraft, and tower flux measurements. On the basis of results from these few observations of the ozone dry deposition velocity (VdO3), atmospheric chemistry models generally apply an empirical, constant ocean uptake rate of 0.05 cm s-1. This value is substantially smaller than the atmospheric turbulent transport velocity for ozone. On the other hand, the uptake is higher than expected from the solubility of ozone in clean water alone, suggesting that there is an enhancement in oceanic ozone uptake, e.g., through a chemical destruction mechanism. We present an evaluation of a global-scale analysis with a new mechanistic representation of atmosphere-ocean ozone exchange. The applied atmosphere chemistry-climate model includes not only atmospheric but also waterside turbulence and the role of waterside chemical loss processes as a function of oceanic biogeochemistry. The simulations suggest a larger role of biogeochemistry in tropical and subtropical ozone oceanic uptake with a relative small temporal variability, whereas in midlatitude and high-latitude regions, highly variable ozone uptake rates are expected because of the stronger influence of waterside turbulence. Despite a relatively large range in the explicitly calculated ocean uptake rate, there is a surprisingly small sensitivity of simulated Marine Boundary Layer ozone concentrations compared to the sensitivity for the commonly applied constant ocean uptake approach. This small sensitivity points at compensating effects through inclusion of the process-based ocean uptake mechanisms to consider variability in oceanic O3 deposition consistent with that in atmospheric and oceanic physical, chemical, and biological processes.

  11. Internal atmospheric noise characteristics in twentieth century coupled atmosphere-ocean model simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colfescu, Ioana; Schneider, Edwin K.

    2016-11-01

    The statistical characteristics of the atmospheric internal variability (hereafter internal atmospheric noise) for surface pressure (PS) in twentieth century simulations of a coupled general circulation model are documented. The atmospheric noise is determined from daily post-industrial (1871-1998) Community Climate System Model 3 simulations by removing the SST and externally forced responses from the total fields. The forced responses are found from atmosphere-only simulations forced by the SST and external forcing of the coupled runs. However, we do not address the influence of the SST variability on the synoptic scale high frequency weather noise.The spatial patterns of the main seasonal modes of atmospheric noise variability are found for boreal winter and summer from empirical orthogonal function analyses performed globally and for various regions, including the North Atlantic, the North Pacific, and the equatorial Pacific. The temporal characteristics of the modes are illustrated by power spectra and probability density functions (PDF) of the principal components (PC). Our findings show that, for two different realizations of noise, the variability is dominated by large scale spatial structures of the atmospheric noise that resemble observed patterns, and that their relative amplitudes in the CGCM and AGCM simulations are very similar. The regional expression of the dominant global mode, a seasonally dependent AO-like or AAO-like pattern is also found in the regional analyses, with similar time dependence. The PCs in the CGCM and the corresponding SST forced AGCM simulations are uncorrelated, but the spectra and PDFs of the CGCM and AGCM PCs are similar.The temporal structures of the noise PCs are white at timescales larger than few months, so that these modes can be thought of as stochastic forcings (in time) for the climate system. The PDFs of the noise PCs are not statistically distinguishable from Gaussian distributions with the same standard deviation

  12. Modeling Planetary Atmospheric Energy Deposition By Energetic Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkinson, Christopher; Bougher, Stephen; Gronoff, Guillaume; Barthelemy, Mathieu

    2016-07-01

    The structure, dynamics, chemistry, and evolution of planetary upper atmospheres are in large part determined by the available sources of energy. In addition to the solar EUV flux, the solar wind and solar energetic particle (SEP) events are also important sources. Both of these particle populations can significantly affect an atmosphere, causing atmospheric loss and driving chemical reactions. Attention has been paid to these sources from the standpoint of the radiation environment for humans and electronics, but little work has been done to evaluate their impact on planetary atmospheres. At unmagnetized planets or those with crustal field anomalies, in particular, the solar wind and SEPs of all energies have direct access to the atmosphere and so provide a more substantial energy source than at planets having protective global magnetic fields. Additionally, solar wind and energetic particle fluxes should be more significant for planets orbiting more active stars, such as is the case in the early history of the solar system for paleo-Venus and Mars. Therefore quantification of the atmospheric energy input from the solar wind and SEP events is an important component of our understanding of the processes that control their state and evolution. We have applied a full Lorentz motion particle transport model to study the effects of particle precipitation in the upper atmospheres of Mars and Venus. Such modeling has been previously done for Earth and Mars using a guiding center precipitation model. Currently, this code is only valid for particles with small gyroradii in strong uniform magnetic fields. There is a clear necessity for a Lorentz formulation, hence, a systematic study of the ionization, excitation, and energy deposition has been conducted, including a comparison of the influence relative to other energy sources (namely EUV photons). The result is a robust examination of the influence of energetic ion transport on the Venus and Mars upper atmosphere which

  13. THE ATMOSPHERIC MODEL EVALUATION TOOL (AMET); AIR QUALITY MODULE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation reviews the development of the Atmospheric Model Evaluation Tool (AMET) air quality module. The AMET tool is being developed to aid in the model evaluation. This presentation focuses on the air quality evaluation portion of AMET. Presented are examples of the...

  14. NEAR ROADWAY RESEARCH IN THE ATMOSPHERIC MODELING DIVISION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is a presentation to the CRC Mobile Source Air Toxics Workshop in Phoenix, AZ, on 23 October 2006. The presentation provides an overview of air quality modeling research in the USEPA/ORD/NERL's Atmospheric Modeling Division, with an emphasis on near-road pollutant character...

  15. IMPACT: Integrated Modeling of Perturbations in Atmospheres for Conjunction Tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koller, J.; Brennan, S.; Godinez, H. C.; Higdon, D. M.; Klimenko, A.; Larsen, B.; Lawrence, E.; Linares, R.; McLaughlin, C. A.; Mehta, P. M.; Palmer, D.; Ridley, A. J.; Shoemaker, M.; Sutton, E.; Thompson, D.; Walker, A.; Wohlberg, B.

    2013-12-01

    Low-Earth orbiting satellites suffer from atmospheric drag due to thermospheric density which changes on the order of several magnitudes especially during space weather events. Solar flares, precipitating particles and ionospheric currents cause the upper atmosphere to heat up, redistribute, and cool again. These processes are intrinsically included in empirical models, e.g. MSIS and Jacchia-Bowman type models. However, sensitivity analysis has shown that atmospheric drag has the highest influence on satellite conjunction analysis and empirical model still do not adequately represent a desired accuracy. Space debris and collision avoidance have become an increasingly operational reality. It is paramount to accurately predict satellite orbits and include drag effect driven by space weather. The IMPACT project (Integrated Modeling of Perturbations in Atmospheres for Conjunction Tracking), funded with over $5 Million by the Los Alamos Laboratory Directed Research and Development office, has the goal to develop an integrated system of atmospheric drag modeling, orbit propagation, and conjunction analysis with detailed uncertainty quantification to address the space debris and collision avoidance problem. Now with over two years into the project, we have developed an integrated solution combining physics-based density modeling of the upper atmosphere between 120-700 km altitude, satellite drag forecasting for quiet and disturbed geomagnetic conditions, and conjunction analysis with non-Gaussian uncertainty quantification. We are employing several novel approaches including a unique observational sensor developed at Los Alamos; machine learning with a support-vector machine approach of the coupling between solar drivers of the upper atmosphere and satellite drag; rigorous data assimilative modeling using a physics-based approach instead of empirical modeling of the thermosphere; and a computed-tomography method for extracting temporal maps of thermospheric densities

  16. Final Technical Report for earmark project "Atmospheric Science Program at the University of Louisville"

    SciTech Connect

    Dowling, Timothy Edward

    2014-02-11

    We have completed a 3-year project to enhance the atmospheric science program at the University of Louisville, KY (est. 2008). The goals were to complete an undergraduate atmospheric science laboratory (Year 1) and to hire and support an assistant professor (Years 2 and 3). Both these goals were met on schedule, and slightly under budget.

  17. Assessment of Atmosphere-Ocean General Circulation Model Simulations of Winter Northern Hemisphere Atmospheric Blocking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vial, Jessica; Osborn, Tim

    2010-05-01

    Characterized by their persistence and quasi-stationary features, large-scale atmospheric blocking are often responsible for extreme weather events, which can have enormous impacts on human life, economy and environment e.g. European heat wave in summer 2003. Therefore, diagnostics of the present-day climate and future projections of potential changes in blocking-related extreme events are essential for risk management and adaptation planning. This study focuses on assessing the ability of six coupled Atmosphere-Ocean General Circulation Models (AOGCMs) to simulate large-scale winter atmospheric blocking in the Northern Hemisphere for the present-day climate (1957-1999). A modified version of the Tibaldi and Molteni (1990)'s blocking index, which measures the strength of the average westerly flow in the mid-latitudes, is applied to daily averaged 500 hPa geopotential height output from the climate models. ERA-40 re-analysis atmospheric data have also been used over the same time period to verify the models' results. The two preferred regions of blocking development, in the Euro-Atlantic and North Pacific, are well captured by most of the models. However, the prominent error in blocking simulations, according to a number of previous model assessments, consists of an underestimation of the total frequency of blocking episodes over both regions. A more detailed analysis of blocking frequency as a function of duration revealed that this error was due to an insufficient number of medium spells and long-lasting episodes, and a shift in blocking lifetime distributions towards shorter blocks, while short-lived blocking events (between 5 and 8 days) tend to be overestimated. The impact of models' systematic errors on blocking simulations has been analyzed, and results suggest that there is a primary need to reduce the time-mean bias to improve the representation of blocking in climate models. The underestimated high-frequency variability of the transient eddies embedded in

  18. Interfacing the Urban Land-Atmosphere System Through Coupled Urban Canopy and Atmospheric Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jiyun; Wang, Zhi-Hua

    2015-03-01

    We couple a single column model (SCM) to a cutting-edge single-layer urban canopy model (SLUCM) with realistic representation of urban hydrological processes. The land-surface transport of energy and moisture parametrized by the SLUCM provides lower boundary conditions to the overlying atmosphere. The coupled SLUCM-SCM model is tested against field measurements of sensible and latent heat fluxes in the surface layer, as well as vertical profiles of temperature and humidity in the mixed layer under convective conditions. The model is then used to simulate urban land-atmosphere interactions by changing urban geometry, surface albedo, vegetation fraction and aerodynamic roughness. Results show that changes of landscape characteristics have a significant impact on the growth of the boundary layer as well as on the distributions of temperature and humidity in the mixed layer. Overall, the proposed numerical framework provides a useful stand-alone modelling tool, with which the impact of urban land-surface conditions on the local hydrometeorology can be assessed via land-atmosphere interactions.

  19. GRAM 88 - 4D GLOBAL REFERENCE ATMOSPHERE MODEL-1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, D. L.

    1994-01-01

    The Four-D Global Reference Atmosphere program was developed from an empirical atmospheric model which generates values for pressure, density, temperature, and winds from surface level to orbital altitudes. This program can generate altitude profiles of atmospheric parameters along any simulated trajectory through the atmosphere. The program was developed for design applications in the Space Shuttle program, such as the simulation of external tank re-entry trajectories. Other potential applications are global circulation and diffusion studies; also the generation of profiles for comparison with other atmospheric measurement techniques such as satellite measured temperature profiles and infrasonic measurement of wind profiles. GRAM-88 is the latest version of the software GRAM. The software GRAM-88 contains a number of changes that have improved the model statistics, in particular, the small scale density perturbation statistics. It also corrected a low latitude grid problem as well as the SCIDAT data base. Furthermore, GRAM-88 now uses the U.S. Standard Atmosphere 1976 as a comparison standard rather than the US62 used in other versions. The program is an amalgamation of two empirical atmospheric models for the low (25km) and the high (90km) atmosphere, with a newly developed latitude-longitude dependent model for the middle atmosphere. The Jacchia (1970) model simulates the high atmospheric region above 115km. The Jacchia program sections are in separate subroutines so that other thermosphericexospheric models could easily be adapted if required for special applications. The improved code eliminated the calculation of geostrophic winds above 125 km altitude from the model. The atmospheric region between 30km and 90km is simulated by a latitude-longitude dependent empirical model modification of the latitude dependent empirical model of Groves (1971). A fairing technique between 90km and 115km accomplished a smooth transition between the modified Groves values and

  20. Challenges in Modeling of the Global Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janjic, Zavisa; Djurdjevic, Vladimir; Vasic, Ratko; Black, Tom

    2015-04-01

    The massively parallel computer architectures require that some widely adopted modeling paradigms be reconsidered in order to utilize more productively the power of parallel processing. For high computational efficiency with distributed memory, each core should work on a small subdomain of the full integration domain, and exchange only few rows of halo data with the neighbouring cores. However, the described scenario implies that the discretization used in the model is horizontally local. The spherical geometry further complicates the problem. Various grid topologies will be discussed and examples will be shown. The latitude-longitude grid with local in space and explicit in time differencing has been an early choice and remained in use ever since. The problem with this method is that the grid size in the longitudinal direction tends to zero as the poles are approached. So, in addition to having unnecessarily high resolution near the poles, polar filtering has to be applied in order to use a time step of decent size. However, the polar filtering requires transpositions involving extra communications. The spectral transform method and the semi-implicit semi-Lagrangian schemes opened the way for a wide application of the spectral representation. With some variations, these techniques are used in most major centers. However, the horizontal non-locality is inherent to the spectral representation and implicit time differencing, which inhibits scaling on a large number of cores. In this respect the lat-lon grid with a fast Fourier transform represents a significant step in the right direction, particularly at high resolutions where the Legendre transforms become increasingly expensive. Other grids with reduced variability of grid distances such as various versions of the cubed sphere and the hexagonal/pentagonal ("soccer ball") grids were proposed almost fifty years ago. However, on these grids, large-scale (wavenumber 4 and 5) fictitious solutions ("grid imprinting

  1. Onboard Atmospheric Modeling and Prediction for Autonomous Aerobraking Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolson, Robert H.; Prince, Jill L. H.

    2011-01-01

    Aerobraking has proven to be an effective means of increasing the science payload for planetary orbiting missions and/or for enabling the use of less expensive launch vehicles. Though aerobraking has numerous benefits, large operations cost have been required to maintain the aerobraking time line without violating aerodynamic heating or other constraints. Two operations functions have been performed on an orbit by orbit basis to estimate atmospheric properties relevant to aerobraking. The Navigation team typically solves for an atmospheric density scale factor using DSN tracking data and the atmospheric modeling team uses telemetric accelerometer data to recover atmospheric density profiles. After some effort, decisions are made about the need for orbit trim maneuvers to adjust periapsis altitude to stay within the aerobraking corridor. Autonomous aerobraking would reduce the need for many ground based tasks. To be successful, atmospheric modeling must be performed on the vehicle in near real time. This paper discusses the issues associated with estimating the planetary atmosphere onboard and evaluates a number of the options for Mars, Venus and Titan aerobraking missions.

  2. Mesoscale Modeling of the Atmosphere and Aerosols

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-09-30

    fires, or the dynamical and topographical forcing is small-scale, as in dust storms . A high-resolution COAMPS is needed to simulate the first stages of...context. However, the tightly coupled application is practical only for dynamically driven aerosols (e.g. dust storms ) or for planned (e.g. known...an imbedded aerosol module for COAMPS for use in the design and evaluation of techniques for coupling off-line transport and dispersion models to

  3. INTERCOMPARISON STUDY OF ATMOSPHERIC MERCURY MODELS: 1. COMPARISON OF MODELS WITH SHORT-TERM MEASUREMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Five regional scale models with a horizontal domain covering the European continent and its surrounding seas, one hemispheric and one global scale model participated in an atmospheric mercury modelling intercomparison study. Model-predicted concentrations in ambient air were comp...

  4. Models of ash-laden intrusions in a stratified atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogg, Andrew; Johnson, Chris; Sparks, Steve; Huppert, Herbert; Woodhouse, Mark; Phillips, Jeremy

    2013-04-01

    Recent volcanic eruptions and the associated dispersion of ash through the atmosphere have led to widespread closures of airspace, for example the 2010 eruption of Eyjafjallajokull and 2011 eruption of Puyehue-Cordón Caulle. These episodes bring into sharp focus the need to predict quantitatively the transport and deposition of fine ash and in particular, its interaction with atmospheric wind. Many models of this process are based upon capturing the physics of advection with the wind, turbulence-induced diffusion and gravitational settling. Buoyancy-induced processes, associated with the density of the ash cloud and the background stratification of the atmosphere, are neglected and it is this issue that we address in this contribution. In particular, we suggest that the buoyancy-induced motion may account for the relatively thin distal ash layers that have been observed in the atmosphere and their relatively weak cross-wind spreading. We formulate a new model for buoyancy-driven spreading in the atmosphere in which we treat the evolving ash layer as relatively shallow so that its motion is predominantly horizontal and the pressure locally hydrostatic. The motion is driven by horizontal pressure gradients along with interfacial drag between the flowing ash layer and the surrounding atmosphere. Ash-laden fluid is delivered to this intrusion from a plume source and has risen through the atmosphere to its height of neutral buoyancy. The ash particles are then transported horizontally by the intrusion and progressively settle out of it to sediment through the atmosphere and form the deposit on the ground. This model is integrated numerically and analysed asymptotically in various regimes, including scenarios in which the atmosphere is quiescent and in which there is a sustained wind. The results yield predictions for the variation of the thickness of the intrusion with distance from the source and for how the concentration of ash is reduced due to settling. They

  5. Box models for the evolution of atmospheric oxygen: an update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasting, J. F.

    1991-01-01

    A simple 3-box model of the atmosphere/ocean system is used to describe the various stages in the evolution of atmospheric oxygen. In Stage I, which probably lasted until redbeds began to form about 2.0 Ga ago, the Earth's surface environment was generally devoid of free O2, except possibly in localized regions of high productivity in the surface ocean. In Stage II, which may have lasted for less than 150 Ma, the atmosphere and surface ocean were oxidizing, while the deep ocean remained anoxic. In Stage III, which commenced with the disappearance of banded iron formations around 1.85 Ga ago and has lasted until the present, all three surface reservoirs contained appreciable amounts of free O2. Recent and not-so-recent controversies regarding the abundance of oxygen in the Archean atmosphere are identified and discussed. The rate of O2 increase during the Middle and Late Proterozoic is identified as another outstanding question.

  6. Light self-focusing in the atmosphere: Thin window model

    DOE PAGES

    Vaseva, Irina A.; Fedoruk, Mikhail P.; Rubenchik, Alexander M.; ...

    2016-08-02

    Ultra-high power (exceeding the self-focusing threshold by more than three orders of magnitude) light beams from ground-based laser systems may find applications in space-debris cleaning. The propagation of such powerful laser beams through the atmosphere reveals many novel interesting features compared to traditional light self-focusing. It is demonstrated here that for the relevant laser parameters, when the thickness of the atmosphere is much shorter than the focusing length (that is, of the orbit scale), the beam transit through the atmosphere in lowest order produces phase distortion only. This means that by using adaptive optics it may be possible to eliminatemore » the impact of self-focusing in the atmosphere on the laser beam. Furthermore, the area of applicability of the proposed “thin window” model is broader than the specific physical problem considered here. For instance, it might find applications in femtosecond laser material processing.« less

  7. Light self-focusing in the atmosphere: Thin window model

    SciTech Connect

    Vaseva, Irina A.; Fedoruk, Mikhail P.; Rubenchik, Alexander M.; Turitsyn, Sergei K.

    2016-08-02

    Ultra-high power (exceeding the self-focusing threshold by more than three orders of magnitude) light beams from ground-based laser systems may find applications in space-debris cleaning. The propagation of such powerful laser beams through the atmosphere reveals many novel interesting features compared to traditional light self-focusing. It is demonstrated here that for the relevant laser parameters, when the thickness of the atmosphere is much shorter than the focusing length (that is, of the orbit scale), the beam transit through the atmosphere in lowest order produces phase distortion only. This means that by using adaptive optics it may be possible to eliminate the impact of self-focusing in the atmosphere on the laser beam. Furthermore, the area of applicability of the proposed “thin window” model is broader than the specific physical problem considered here. For instance, it might find applications in femtosecond laser material processing.

  8. Light self-focusing in the atmosphere: thin window model

    PubMed Central

    Vaseva, Irina A.; Fedoruk, Mikhail P.; Rubenchik, Alexander M.; Turitsyn, Sergei K.

    2016-01-01

    Ultra-high power (exceeding the self-focusing threshold by more than three orders of magnitude) light beams from ground-based laser systems may find applications in space-debris cleaning. The propagation of such powerful laser beams through the atmosphere reveals many novel interesting features compared to traditional light self-focusing. It is demonstrated here that for the relevant laser parameters, when the thickness of the atmosphere is much shorter than the focusing length (that is, of the orbit scale), the beam transit through the atmosphere in lowest order produces phase distortion only. This means that by using adaptive optics it may be possible to eliminate the impact of self-focusing in the atmosphere on the laser beam. The area of applicability of the proposed “thin window” model is broader than the specific physical problem considered here. For instance, it might find applications in femtosecond laser material processing. PMID:27480220

  9. Modeling of CWM droplet combustion. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Pandalai, K.; Aggarwal, S.; Sirignano, W.

    1983-10-01

    The objective of the present study was to develop a one-dimensional, unsteady state model for coal-water mixture droplet combustion, and to compare the characteristic times for the various processes, such as water vaporization, devolatilization and char oxidation with available experimental data. A water film surrounding a spherical coal particle is considered to undergo vaporization by heat transfer from the hot air. After the water vaporization is complete, devolatilization begins. This process is assumed to be kinetically controlled. Water vaporization and devolatilization processes are modeled by using a hybrid Eulerian-Lagrangian method to obtain the properties of the gas-phase and the condensed-phase. An explicit finite difference scheme is used to solve the Eulerian gas-phase equation where as a Runga-Kutta scheme is employed to solve the Lagrangian condensed-phase equations. The predicted characteristic times for water vaporization is in good agreement with values proposed in the literature. At the present time there is insufficient data to draw any conclusions on the model. Methods are proposed to refine the simple kinetic model which takes into account pore diffusion and mass transfer for devolatilization and char oxidation. 9 references, 12 figures.

  10. Evaluation Model for Career Programs. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byerly, Richard L.; And Others

    A study was conducted to provide and test an evaluative model that could be utilized in providing curricular evaluation of the various career programs. Two career fields, dental assistant and auto mechanic, were chosen for study. A questionnaire based upon the actual job performance was completed by six groups connected with the auto mechanics and…

  11. MODEL ATMOSPHERES FOR X-RAY BURSTING NEUTRON STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Medin, Zachary James; Steinkirch, Marina von; Calder, Alan C.; Fontes, Christopher J.; Fryer, Chris L.; Hungerford, Aimee L.

    2016-11-21

    The hydrogen and helium accreted by X-ray bursting neutron stars is periodically consumed in runaway thermonuclear reactions that cause the entire surface to glow brightly in X-rays for a few seconds. With models of the emission, the mass and radius of the neutron star can be inferred from the observations. By simultaneously probing neutron star masses and radii, X-ray bursts (XRBs) are one of the strongest diagnostics of the nature of matter at extremely high densities. Accurate determinations of these parameters are difficult, however, due to the highly non-ideal nature of the atmospheres where XRBs occur. Also, observations from X-ray telescopes such as RXTE and NuStar can potentially place strong constraints on nuclear matter once uncertainties in atmosphere models have been reduced. Lastly, here we discuss current progress on modeling atmospheres of X-ray bursting neutron stars and some of the challenges still to be overcome.

  12. Model Atmospheres for X-Ray Bursting Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medin, Zach; von Steinkirch, Marina; Calder, Alan C.; Fontes, Christopher J.; Fryer, Chris L.; Hungerford, Aimee L.

    2016-12-01

    The hydrogen and helium accreted by X-ray bursting neutron stars is periodically consumed in runaway thermonuclear reactions that cause the entire surface to glow brightly in X-rays for a few seconds. With models of the emission, the mass and radius of the neutron star can be inferred from the observations. By simultaneously probing neutron star masses and radii, X-ray bursts (XRBs) are one of the strongest diagnostics of the nature of matter at extremely high densities. Accurate determinations of these parameters are difficult, however, due to the highly non-ideal nature of the atmospheres where XRBs occur. Observations from X-ray telescopes such as RXTE and NuStar can potentially place strong constraints on nuclear matter once uncertainties in atmosphere models have been reduced. Here we discuss current progress on modeling atmospheres of X-ray bursting neutron stars and some of the challenges still to be overcome.

  13. Mars Entry Atmospheric Data System Modeling, Calibration, and Error Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karlgaard, Christopher D.; VanNorman, John; Siemers, Paul M.; Schoenenberger, Mark; Munk, Michelle M.

    2014-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Entry, Descent, and Landing Instrumentation (MEDLI)/Mars Entry Atmospheric Data System (MEADS) project installed seven pressure ports through the MSL Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA) heatshield to measure heatshield surface pressures during entry. These measured surface pressures are used to generate estimates of atmospheric quantities based on modeled surface pressure distributions. In particular, the quantities to be estimated from the MEADS pressure measurements include the dynamic pressure, angle of attack, and angle of sideslip. This report describes the calibration of the pressure transducers utilized to reconstruct the atmospheric data and associated uncertainty models, pressure modeling and uncertainty analysis, and system performance results. The results indicate that the MEADS pressure measurement system hardware meets the project requirements.

  14. The future of stellar model atmospheres: macroscopic nightmares?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asplund, M.

    Stellar atmospheres represent unique windows for understanding stellar, galactic and cosmic evolution by being responsible for the emission of stellar spectra. Much progress has been made over the years in modelling stellar atmospheres but still the modelling efforts are hampered by various, often questionable, assumptions and approximations. This review describes promising avenues for improving the realism of stellar model atmospheres for hot (spectral types O, B, A), cool (F, G, K) and very cool (M and later) stars, respectively, in the coming decade. A common theme will be time-dependent 3D hydrodynamical calculations with a detailed non-LTE treatment of the radiative transfer. It is argued that this is fully within the realm of possibility on this time-scale and indeed will be necessary to complement the expected advances on the observational side.

  15. GEOS Atmospheric Model: Challenges at Exascale

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putman, William M.; Suarez, Max J.

    2017-01-01

    The Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) model at NASA's Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO) is used to simulate the multi-scale variability of the Earth's weather and climate, and is used primarily to assimilate conventional and satellite-based observations for weather forecasting and reanalysis. In addition, assimilations coupled to an ocean model are used for longer-term forecasting (e.g., El Nino) on seasonal to interannual times-scales. The GMAO's research activities, including system development, focus on numerous time and space scales, as detailed on the GMAO website, where they are tabbed under five major themes: Weather Analysis and Prediction; Seasonal-Decadal Analysis and Prediction; Reanalysis; Global Mesoscale Modeling, and Observing System Science. A brief description of the GEOS systems can also be found at the GMAO website. GEOS executes as a collection of earth system components connected through the Earth System Modeling Framework (ESMF). The ESMF layer is supplemented with the MAPL (Modeling, Analysis, and Prediction Layer) software toolkit developed at the GMAO, which facilitates the organization of the computational components into a hierarchical architecture. GEOS systems run in parallel using a horizontal decomposition of the Earth's sphere into processing elements (PEs). Communication between PEs is primarily through a message passing framework, using the message passing interface (MPI), and through explicit use of node-level shared memory access via the SHMEM (Symmetric Hierarchical Memory access) protocol. Production GEOS weather prediction systems currently run at 12.5-kilometer horizontal resolution with 72 vertical levels decomposed into PEs associated with 5,400 MPI processes. Research GEOS systems run at resolutions as fine as 1.5 kilometers globally using as many as 30,000 MPI processes. Looking forward, these systems can be expected to see a 2 times increase in horizontal resolution every two to three years, as well as

  16. Atmospheric Laser and Infrared Transmission Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    simplicity, we maintain separate ALIRT models for 1.3152 μ wavelength iodine and 1.060 μ wavelength neodym - ium/glass lasers. In Chapter 2, we describe...U t is either of E t or H t . With those assumptions, Equations A-1 imply that both electric and magnetic fields are solenoidal and that HiE rr...field that we are considering, the Poynting vector will point along the x3-axis, and the magnetic field, like the electric field, will be perpendicular

  17. Earth Global Reference Atmospheric Model 2007 (Earth-GRAM07)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leslie, Fred

    Engineering models of the atmosphere are used extensively by the aerospace community for design issues related to vehicle ascent and descent. The Earth Global Reference Atmosphere Model version 2007 (Earth-GRAM07) is the latest in this series and includes a number of new features. Like previous versions, Earth-GRAM07 provides both mean values and perturbations for density, temperature, pressure, and winds, as well as monthlyand geographically-varying trace constituent concentrations. From 0 km to 27 km, thermodynamics and winds are based on the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Global Upper Air Climatic Atlas (GUACA) climatology. For altitudes between 20 km and 120 km, the model uses data from the Middle Atmosphere Program (MAP). Above 120 km, Earth-GRAM07 now provides users with a choice of three thermosphere models: the Marshall Engineering Thermosphere (MET-2007) model; the Jacchia-Bowman 2006 thermosphere model (JB2006); and the Naval Research Labs Mass Spectrometer, Incoherent Scatter Radar Extended Model (NRL MSIS E-00) with the associated Harmonic Wind Model (HWM-93). In place of the GUACA and MAP datasets, Earth-GRAM07 has the option of using the new 2006 revised Range Reference Atmosphere (RRA) data, the earlier (1983) RRA data, or the user may provide their own data as an auxiliary profile. Refinements of the perturbation model are also discussed which produce wind shears more similar to those observed at the Kennedy Space Center than the previous version Earth-GRAM99. In addition, the dispersions are more normally distributed, especially at the extremes.

  18. Radon Measurements of Atmospheric Mixing (RAMIX) 2006–2014 Final Campaign Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, ML; Biraud, SC

    2015-05-01

    Uncertainty in vertical mixing between the surface layer, boundary layer, and free troposphere leads to large uncertainty in “top-down” estimates of regional land-atmosphere carbon exchange (i.e., estimates based on measurements of atmospheric CO2 mixing ratios. Radon-222 (222Rn) is a valuable tracer for measuring atmospheric mixing because it is emitted from the land surface and has a short enough half-life (3.8 days) to allow characterization of mixing processes based on vertical profile measurements.

  19. Radon Measurements of Atmospheric Mixing (RAMIX) 2006–2014 Final Campaign Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, ML; Biraud, SC; Hirsch, A

    2015-05-01

    Uncertainty in vertical mixing between the surface layer, boundary layer, and free troposphere leads to large uncertainty in “top-down” estimates of regional land-atmosphere carbon exchange (i.e., estimates based on measurements of atmospheric CO2 mixing ratios). The radioisotope radon-222 (222Rn) is a valuable tracer for measuring atmospheric mixing because it is emitted from the land surface and has a short enough half-life (3.8 days) to allow characterization of mixing processes based on vertical profile measurements.

  20. Analysis of Atmospheric Aerosol Data Sets and Application of Radiative Transfer Models to Compute Aerosol Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, Beat; Bergstrom, Robert W.; Redemann, Jens

    2002-01-01

    This report is the final report for "Analysis of Atmospheric Aerosol Data Sets and Application of Radiative Transfer Models to Compute Aerosol Effects". It is a bibliographic compilation of 29 peer-reviewed publications (published, in press or submitted) produced under this Cooperative Agreement and 30 first-authored conference presentations. The tasks outlined in the various proposals are listed below with a brief comment as to the research performed. Copies of title/abstract pages of peer-reviewed publications are attached.

  1. Study of the atmospheric chemistry of radon progeny in laboratory and real indoor atmospheres. Final project report

    SciTech Connect

    Hopke, P.K.

    1996-09-01

    This report completes Clarkson University`s study of the chemical and physical behavior of the {sup 218}Po atom immediately following its formation by the alpha decay of radon. Because small changes in size for activity in the sub-10 nm size range result in large changes in the delivered dose per unit exposure, this behavior must be understood if the exposure to radon progeny and it dose to the cells in the respiratory tract are to be fully assessed. In order to pursue this general goal, two areas of radon progeny behavior are being pursued; laboratory studies under controlled conditions to better understand the fundamental physical and chemical processes that affect the progeny`s atmospheric behavior and studies in actual indoor environments to develop a better assessment of the exposure of the occupants of that space to the size and concentration of the indoor radioactive aerosol. Thus, two sets of specific goals have been established for this project. The specific tasks of the controlled laboratory studies are (1) Determine the formation rates of {circ}OH radicals formed by the radiolysis of air following radon decay; (2) Examine the formation of particles by the radiolytic oxidation of substances like SO{sub 2}, ethylene, and H{sub 2}S to lower vapor pressure compounds and determine the role of gas phase additives such as H{sub 2}O and NH{sub 3} in determining the particle size; (3) Measure the rate of ion-induced nucleation using a thermal diffusion cloud chamber, and (4) Measure the neutralization rate of {sup 218}PoO{sub x}{sup +} in O{sub 2} at low radon concentrations.

  2. Validation of coupled atmosphere-fire behavior models

    SciTech Connect

    Bossert, J.E.; Reisner, J.M.; Linn, R.R.; Winterkamp, J.L.; Schaub, R.; Riggan, P.J.

    1998-12-31

    Recent advances in numerical modeling and computer power have made it feasible to simulate the dynamical interaction and feedback between the heat and turbulence induced by wildfires and the local atmospheric wind and temperature fields. At Los Alamos National Laboratory, the authors have developed a modeling system that includes this interaction by coupling a high resolution atmospheric dynamics model, HIGRAD, with a fire behavior model, BEHAVE, to predict the spread of wildfires. The HIGRAD/BEHAVE model is run at very high resolution to properly resolve the fire/atmosphere interaction. At present, these coupled wildfire model simulations are computationally intensive. The additional complexity of these models require sophisticated methods for assuring their reliability in real world applications. With this in mind, a substantial part of the research effort is directed at model validation. Several instrumented prescribed fires have been conducted with multi-agency support and participation from chaparral, marsh, and scrub environments in coastal areas of Florida and inland California. In this paper, the authors first describe the data required to initialize the components of the wildfire modeling system. Then they present results from one of the Florida fires, and discuss a strategy for further testing and improvement of coupled weather/wildfire models.

  3. Radiative equilibrium model of Titan's atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samuelson, R. E.

    1983-01-01

    The present global radiative equilibrium model for the Saturn satellite Titan is restricted to the two-stream approximation, is vertically homogeneous in its scattering properties, and is spectrally divided into one thermal and two solar channels. Between 13 and 33% of the total incident solar radiation is absorbed at the planetary surface, and the 30-60 ratio of violet to thermal IR absorption cross sections in the stratosphere leads to the large temperature inversion observed there. The spectrally integrated mass absorption coefficient at thermal wavelengths is approximately constant throughout the stratosphere, and approximately linear with pressure in the troposphere, implying the presence of a uniformly mixed aerosol in the stratosphere. There also appear to be two regions of enhanced opacity near 30 and 500 mbar.

  4. Radiative equilibrium model of Titan's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuelson, R. E.

    1983-02-01

    The present global radiative equilibrium model for the Saturn satellite Titan is restricted to the two-stream approximation, is vertically homogeneous in its scattering properties, and is spectrally divided into one thermal and two solar channels. Between 13 and 33% of the total incident solar radiation is absorbed at the planetary surface, and the 30-60 ratio of violet to thermal IR absorption cross sections in the stratosphere leads to the large temperature inversion observed there. The spectrally integrated mass absorption coefficient at thermal wavelengths is approximately constant throughout the stratosphere, and approximately linear with pressure in the troposphere, implying the presence of a uniformly mixed aerosol in the stratosphere. There also appear to be two regions of enhanced opacity near 30 and 500 mbar.

  5. Improving and applying Lagrangian models of the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, John C.; Brunner, Dominik; Gerbig, Christoph

    2012-01-01

    AGU Chapman Conference on Advances in Lagrangian Modeling of the Atmosphere; Grindelwald, Switzerland, 10-14 October 2011 Under the majestic gaze of the Eiger north face in Switzerland, an international group of researchers met as part of a Chapman Conference to discuss advances in Lagrangian modeling of the atmosphere. Lagrangian models track the movement of air parcels, giving rise to trajectory information and source/receptor linkages that have become increasingly popular as tools used by geoscientists. The conference was an opportunity for a diverse group of researchers developing and applying Lagrangian models to congregate and discuss the use of such models to understand geophysical phenomena and to identify how to further improve the models. The 98 participants (of which 17 were graduate students) hailed from 19 countries around the world.

  6. Fractional Order Modeling of Atmospheric Turbulence - A More Accurate Modeling Methodology for Aero Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopasakis, George

    2014-01-01

    The presentation covers a recently developed methodology to model atmospheric turbulence as disturbances for aero vehicle gust loads and for controls development like flutter and inlet shock position. The approach models atmospheric turbulence in their natural fractional order form, which provides for more accuracy compared to traditional methods like the Dryden model, especially for high speed vehicle. The presentation provides a historical background on atmospheric turbulence modeling and the approaches utilized for air vehicles. This is followed by the motivation and the methodology utilized to develop the atmospheric turbulence fractional order modeling approach. Some examples covering the application of this method are also provided, followed by concluding remarks.

  7. MODELING ATMOSPHERIC EMISSION FOR CMB GROUND-BASED OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Errard, J.; Borrill, J.; Ade, P. A. R.; Akiba, Y.; Chinone, Y.; Arnold, K.; Atlas, M.; Barron, D.; Elleflot, T.; Baccigalupi, C.; Fabbian, G.; Boettger, D.; Chapman, S.; Cukierman, A.; Delabrouille, J.; Ducout, A.; Feeney, S.; Feng, C.; and others

    2015-08-10

    Atmosphere is one of the most important noise sources for ground-based cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiments. By increasing optical loading on the detectors, it amplifies their effective noise, while its fluctuations introduce spatial and temporal correlations between detected signals. We present a physically motivated 3D-model of the atmosphere total intensity emission in the millimeter and sub-millimeter wavelengths. We derive a new analytical estimate for the correlation between detectors time-ordered data as a function of the instrument and survey design, as well as several atmospheric parameters such as wind, relative humidity, temperature and turbulence characteristics. Using an original numerical computation, we examine the effect of each physical parameter on the correlations in the time series of a given experiment. We then use a parametric-likelihood approach to validate the modeling and estimate atmosphere parameters from the polarbear-i project first season data set. We derive a new 1.0% upper limit on the linear polarization fraction of atmospheric emission. We also compare our results to previous studies and weather station measurements. The proposed model can be used for realistic simulations of future ground-based CMB observations.

  8. Modeling Atmospheric Emission for CMB Ground-based Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Errard, J.; Ade, P. A. R.; Akiba, Y.; Arnold, K.; Atlas, M.; Baccigalupi, C.; Barron, D.; Boettger, D.; Borrill, J.; Chapman, S.; Chinone, Y.; Cukierman, A.; Delabrouille, J.; Dobbs, M.; Ducout, A.; Elleflot, T.; Fabbian, G.; Feng, C.; Feeney, S.; Gilbert, A.; Goeckner-Wald, N.; Halverson, N. W.; Hasegawa, M.; Hattori, K.; Hazumi, M.; Hill, C.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Hori, Y.; Inoue, Y.; Jaehnig, G. C.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jeong, O.; Katayama, N.; Kaufman, J.; Keating, B.; Kermish, Z.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T.; Le Jeune, M.; Lee, A. T.; Leitch, E. M.; Leon, D.; Linder, E.; Matsuda, F.; Matsumura, T.; Miller, N. J.; Myers, M. J.; Navaroli, M.; Nishino, H.; Okamura, T.; Paar, H.; Peloton, J.; Poletti, D.; Puglisi, G.; Rebeiz, G.; Reichardt, C. L.; Richards, P. L.; Ross, C.; Rotermund, K. M.; Schenck, D. E.; Sherwin, B. D.; Siritanasak, P.; Smecher, G.; Stebor, N.; Steinbach, B.; Stompor, R.; Suzuki, A.; Tajima, O.; Takakura, S.; Tikhomirov, A.; Tomaru, T.; Whitehorn, N.; Wilson, B.; Yadav, A.; Zahn, O.

    2015-08-01

    Atmosphere is one of the most important noise sources for ground-based cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiments. By increasing optical loading on the detectors, it amplifies their effective noise, while its fluctuations introduce spatial and temporal correlations between detected signals. We present a physically motivated 3D-model of the atmosphere total intensity emission in the millimeter and sub-millimeter wavelengths. We derive a new analytical estimate for the correlation between detectors time-ordered data as a function of the instrument and survey design, as well as several atmospheric parameters such as wind, relative humidity, temperature and turbulence characteristics. Using an original numerical computation, we examine the effect of each physical parameter on the correlations in the time series of a given experiment. We then use a parametric-likelihood approach to validate the modeling and estimate atmosphere parameters from the polarbear-i project first season data set. We derive a new 1.0% upper limit on the linear polarization fraction of atmospheric emission. We also compare our results to previous studies and weather station measurements. The proposed model can be used for realistic simulations of future ground-based CMB observations.

  9. A Conceptual Model for Extratropical Atmosphere-ocean Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, B.; Reichler, T.

    2015-12-01

    Equipped with the current understanding for atmosphere-ocean interaction, we build a simple physically-based system of coupled equations to portray the relationships among major atmospheric and oceanic modes, including the NAO, AMO, AMOC, ENSO and stratospheric NAM. The simple model reproduces the strongly timescale-dependent character of the relationships, which changes in strength and direction on scales ranging from days to centuries. Another emphasis is placed on explicitly resolving the air-sea heat fluxes as a function of timescale to provide insight into the coupling between ocean and atmosphere. In constructing and testing the simple model we make use of a multi-millennium-long control integration with a fully coupled climate model. Cross-correlation, spectral analysis and inverse methods are employed to characterize important aspects of the interactions in the full and simple models. It is found that, a) Bjerknes' conjecture on ocean-atmosphere coupling, that is the atmosphere drives climate on high frequencies (days to months) while the ocean acts as the main source of climate variability on interannual and longer timescales, is confirmed; b) the AMOC can be readily understood as a harmonic oscillator driven by the NAO; c) the two-way interaction between NAO and AMO, and also the influence of ENSO on both NAO and AMO are essential for reproducing important correlation features; and d) the consideration of heat fluxes provides additional explanatory power to our model. Our approach not only helps to clarify our understanding for the nature of the atmosphere-ocean interaction problem but also raises new and intriguing questions for future research.

  10. Coupled land-atmosphere modeling of methane emissions with WRF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, D.

    2013-12-01

    This project aims to couple a soil model for methane transport to an atmospheric model to predict methane emissions and dispersion. Methane is a potent greenhouse gas, 20 times as efficient at trapping heat in the atmosphere as the most prevalent greenhouse gas, carbon dioxide. It has been estimated that 60% of methane emissions in the earth's atmosphere come from anthropogenic sources, 17% of which comes from landfills, making landfills the third largest contributor of human-generated methane. Due to high costs and non-ideal weather conditions, field measurements of methane concentration at landfills are difficult and infrequent, so estimates of annual emissions from landfills are not very accurate. We plan to create a coupled land-atmosphere model that takes production and oxidation of methane into account when calculating methane emissions. This model will give a better understanding of how much methane is emitted annually from a given landfill and assist with monitoring efforts. It will also demonstrate the magnitude of diurnal and seasonal variations in methane emissions, which may identify errors in yearly methane emissions estimates made by extrapolating from a small number of field measurements. As a first step, an existing land-surface model, Noah, is modified to compute the transport of oxygen and methane along a 1-D soil column. Surface emissions are calculated using a gradient flux method with a boundary layer conductance that depends on the wind speed. These modifications to the land-surface model will be added to the Weather Research and Forecasting model to predict atmospheric dispersion of methane emitted by landfills. Comparisons to observations are made at two different landfill sites to validate the coupled model.

  11. Kinetic studies of simulated polluted atmospheres. Final report January 1976-April 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Calvert, J.G.

    1980-01-01

    The kinetics and reaction mechanisms of several important atmospheric contaminants - SO2, formaldehyde, nitrous acid, and the nitrosamines - were assessed to help quantify some key aspects of the chemistry of polluted atmospheres. The reactions and lifetimes of excited sulfur dioxide with various atmospheric components including hydroxyl, hydroperoxy, and methylperoxy radicals were studied. These data and other published rate data were reviewed and evaluated. The photolysis of formaldehyde was investigated as a major source of hydroperoxyl radicals, and a quantitative evaluation made of its apparent first order rate constants at various solar zenith angles. The absolute extinction coefficients for nitrous acid were determined, and estimates made of the rates of hydroxyl radical generation in the troposphere by photolysis of nitrous acid. Long path Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was used to help evaluate the potential for nitrosamine formation in the polluted atmosphere.

  12. Model Atmospheres and Transit Spectra for Hot Rocky Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupu, Roxana

    We propose to build a versatile set of self-consistent atmospheric models for hot rocky exoplanets and use them to predict their transit and eclipse spectra. Hot rocky exoplanets will form the majority of small planets in close-in orbits to be discovered by the TESS and Kepler K2 missions, and offer the best opportunity for characterization with current and future instruments. We will use fully non-grey radiative-convective atmospheric structure codes with cloud formation and vertical mixing, combined with a self-consistent treatment of gas chemistry above the magma ocean. Being in equilibrium with the surface, the vaporized rock material can be a good tracer of the bulk composition of the planet. We will derive the atmospheric structure and escape rates considering both volatile-free and volatile bearing compositions, which reflect the diversity of hot rocky planet atmospheres. Our models will inform follow- up observations with JWST and ground-based instruments, aid the interpretation of transit and eclipse spectra, and provide a better understanding of volatile loss in these atmospheres. Such results will help refine our picture of rocky planet formation and evolution. Planets in ultra-short period (USP) orbits are a special class of hot rocky exoplanets. As shown by Kepler, these planets are generally smaller than 2 Earth radii, suggesting that they are likely to be rocky and could have lost their volatiles through photo-evaporation. Being close to their host stars, these planets are ultra-hot, with estimated temperatures of 1000-3000 K. A number of USP planets have been already discovered (e.g. Kepler-78 b, CoRoT-7 b, Kepler-10 b), and this number is expected to grow by confirming additional planet candidates. The characterization of planets on ultra-short orbits is advantageous due to the larger number of observable transits, and the larger transit signal in the case of an evaporating atmosphere. Much advance has been made in understanding and characterizing

  13. Final definition and preliminary design study for the initial atmospheric cloud physics laboratory, a Spacelab mission payload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The following areas related to the final definition and preliminary design study of the initial atmospheric cloud physics laboratory (ACPL) were covered: (1) proposal organization, personnel, schedule, and project management, (2) proposed configurations, (3) study objectives, (4) ACPL experiment program listing and description, (5) mission/flight flexibility and modularity/commonality, (6) study plan, and (7) description of following tasks: requirement analysis and definition task flow, systems analysis and trade studies, subsystem analysis and trade studies, specifications and interface control documents, preliminary design task flow, work breakdown structure, programmatic analysis and planning, and project costs. Finally, an overview of the scientific requirements was presented.

  14. Modeling pollutant transport in the atmosphere boundary layer

    SciTech Connect

    O`Steen, B.L.

    1990-12-31

    The two basic methods for modeling the atmospheric transport of pollutants (diagnostic and prognostic) are examined along with the current models utilized at SRS for emergency response (WINDS). The ability of a limited-area (mesoscale) model, nested within a synoptic scale model, to represent a wide range of flow behavior, makes it the method of choice for predicting pollutant transport. Such a mesoscale model can provide an invaluable research tool and, with a periodic processing strategy for wind field calculation and/or sufficient computer capability, can be utilized in an emergency response capacity. Various models are compared.

  15. Modeling pollutant transport in the atmosphere boundary layer

    SciTech Connect

    O'Steen, B.L.

    1990-01-01

    The two basic methods for modeling the atmospheric transport of pollutants (diagnostic and prognostic) are examined along with the current models utilized at SRS for emergency response (WINDS). The ability of a limited-area (mesoscale) model, nested within a synoptic scale model, to represent a wide range of flow behavior, makes it the method of choice for predicting pollutant transport. Such a mesoscale model can provide an invaluable research tool and, with a periodic processing strategy for wind field calculation and/or sufficient computer capability, can be utilized in an emergency response capacity. Various models are compared.

  16. Computer modeling of the Earth's atmosphere via reflectionless layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batcyna, E.; Petruhin, N.; Pelinovsky, E.

    2012-04-01

    The Earth's atmosphere is highly inhomogeneous and nonisothermal, and waves in inhomogeneous media are known to be reflected and not able to propagate over a long distance generally. However, it is known that in an incompressible inhomogeneous fluid there exist surface and internal traveling waves, which are not reflected on inhomogeneities when the environment parameters satisfy specific conditions. In this paper we study the existence of such waves in a strongly inhomogeneous compressible atmosphere. The mathematical approach for obtaining of such solutions is connected with a transformational change of arguments and functions using the symmetry and the Lie algebra. For example, in this approach the wave equation with variable coefficients is reduced to an equation of hyperbolic type with constant coefficients, so that the existence of traveling waves becomes obvious. We have derived the ordinary differential equations for the vertical distribution of sound speed (temperature) at which the waves are not reflected. Their solutions are obtained analytically and numerically. It is shown that the Standard Earth Atmosphere is modeled by four piecewise reflectionless profiles. Approximation of the real profiles in geophysics will simplify the calculation of wave dynamics, reducing them to solving of algebraic equations in the "junction" of reflectionless profiles. These results can be used for interpretation of the dynamic processes in the Earth's atmosphere, particularly for the interpretation of abnormally large waves in the upper atmosphere, which could be called the "atmospheric rogue waves".

  17. A Vertical Grid Module for Baroclinic Models of the Atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, John B

    2008-04-01

    The vertical grid of an atmospheric model assigns dynamic and thermo- dynamic variables to grid locations. The vertical coordinate is typically not height but one of a class of meteorological variables that vary with atmo- spheric conditions. The grid system is chosen to further numerical approx- imations of the boundary conditions so that the system is terrain following at the surface. Lagrangian vertical coordinates are useful in reducing the numerical errors from advection processes. That the choices will effect the numercial properties and accuracy is explored in this report. A MATLAB class for Lorentz vertical grids is described and applied to the vertical struc- ture equation and baroclinic atmospheric circulation. A generalized meteo- rolgoical coordinate system is developed which can support σ, isentropic θ vertical coordinate, or Lagrangian vertical coordinates. The vertical atmo- spheric column is a MATLAB class that includes the kinematic and ther- modynamic variables along with methods for computing geopoentials and terms relevant to a 3D baroclinc atmospheric model.

  18. Atomistic modeling of carbon Cottrell atmospheres in bcc iron.

    PubMed

    Veiga, R G A; Perez, M; Becquart, C S; Domain, C

    2013-01-16

    Atomistic simulations with an EAM interatomic potential were used to evaluate carbon-dislocation binding energies in bcc iron. These binding energies were then used to calculate the occupation probability of interstitial sites in the vicinity of an edge and a screw dislocation. The saturation concentration due to carbon-carbon interactions was also estimated by atomistic simulations in the dislocation core and taken as an upper limit for carbon concentration in a Cottrell atmosphere. We obtained a maximum concentration of 10 ± 1 at.% C at T = 0 K within a radius of 1 nm from the dislocation lines. The spatial carbon distributions around the line defects revealed that the Cottrell atmosphere associated with an edge dislocation is denser than that around a screw dislocation, in contrast with the predictions of the classical model of Cochardt and colleagues. Moreover, the present Cottrell atmosphere model is in reasonable quantitative accord with the three-dimensional atom probe data available in the literature.

  19. Investigating Earth's Atmospheric Electricity: a Role Model for Planetary Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aplin, K. L.; Harrison, R. G.; Rycroft, M. J.

    The historical development of terrestrial atmospheric electricity is described, from its beginnings with the first observations of the potential gradient to the global electric circuit model proposed by C.T.R. Wilson in the early 20th century. The properties of the terrestrial global circuit are summarised. Concepts originally needed to develop the idea of a global circuit are identified as "central tenets", for example, the importance of radio science in establishing the conducting upper layer. The central tenets are distinguished from additional findings that merely corroborate, or are explained by, the global circuit model. Using this analysis it is possible to specify which observations are preferable for detecting global circuits in extraterrestrial atmospheres. Schumann resonances, the extremely low frequency signals generated by excitation of the surface-ionosphere cavity by electrical discharges, are identified as the most useful single measurement of electrical activity in a planetary atmosphere.

  20. Investigating Earth's Atmospheric Electricity: a Role Model for Planetary Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aplin, K. L.; Harrison, R. G.; Rycroft, M. J.

    2008-06-01

    The historical development of terrestrial atmospheric electricity is described, from its beginnings with the first observations of the potential gradient to the global electric circuit model proposed by C.T.R. Wilson in the early 20th century. The properties of the terrestrial global circuit are summarised. Concepts originally needed to develop the idea of a global circuit are identified as “central tenets”, for example, the importance of radio science in establishing the conducting upper layer. The central tenets are distinguished from additional findings that merely corroborate, or are explained by, the global circuit model. Using this analysis it is possible to specify which observations are preferable for detecting global circuits in extraterrestrial atmospheres. Schumann resonances, the extremely low frequency signals generated by excitation of the surface-ionosphere cavity by electrical discharges, are identified as the most useful single measurement of electrical activity in a planetary atmosphere.

  1. Atmospheric dispersion modeling: Challenges of the Fukushima Daiichi response

    SciTech Connect

    Sugiyama, Gayle; Nasstrom, John; Pobanz, Brenda; Foster, Kevin; Simpson, Matthew; Vogt, Phil; Aluzzi, Fernando; Homann, Steve

    2012-05-01

    In this research, the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) provided a wide range of predictions and analyses as part of the response to the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident including: daily Japanese weather forecasts and atmospheric transport predictions to inform planning for field monitoring operations and to provide U.S. government agencies with ongoing situational awareness of meteorological conditions; estimates of possible dose in Japan based on hypothetical U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission scenarios of potential radionuclide releases to support protective action planning for U.S. citizens; predictions of possible plume arrival times and dose levels at U.S. locations; and source estimation and plume model refinement based on atmospheric dispersion modeling and available monitoring data.

  2. Evaluation of atmospheric density models and preliminary functional specifications for the Langley Atmospheric Information Retrieval System (LAIRS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, T.; Boland, D. F., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    This document presents the results of an extensive survey and comparative evaluation of current atmosphere and wind models for inclusion in the Langley Atmospheric Information Retrieval System (LAIRS). It includes recommended models for use in LAIRS, estimated accuracies for the recommended models, and functional specifications for the development of LAIRS.

  3. Improvements in simulation of atmospheric boundary layer parameters through data assimilation in ARPS mesoscale atmospheric model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subrahamanyam, D. Bala; Ramachandran, Radhika; Kunhikrishnan, P. K.

    2006-12-01

    In a broad sense, 'Data Assimilation' refers to a technique, whereby the realistic observational datasets are injected to a model simulation for bringing accurate forecasts. There are several schemes available for insertion of observational datasets in the model. In this piece of research, we present one of the simplest, yet powerful data assimilation techniques - known as nudging through optimal interpolation in the ARPS (Advanced Regional Prediction System) model. Through this technique, we firstly identify the assimilation window in space and time over which the observational datasets need to be inserted and the model products require to be adjusted. Appropriate model variables are then adjusted for the realistic observational datasets with a proper weightage being given to the observations. Incorporation of such a subroutine in the model that takes care of the assimilation in the model provides a powerful tool for improving the forecast parameters. Such a technique can be very useful in cases, where observational datasets are available at regular intervals. In this article, we demonstrate the effectiveness of this technique for simulation of profiles of Atmospheric Boundary Layer parameters for a tiny island of Kaashidhoo in the Republic of Maldives, where regular GPS Loran Atmospheric Soundings were carried out during the Intensive Field Phase of Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX, IFP-99).

  4. THE LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY ATMOSPHERIC TRANSPORT AND DIFFUSION MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    M. WILLIAMS

    1999-08-01

    The LANL atmospheric transport and diffusion models are composed of two state-of-the-art computer codes. The first is an atmospheric wind model called HOThlAC, Higher Order Turbulence Model for Atmospheric circulations. HOTMAC generates wind and turbulence fields by solving a set of atmospheric dynamic equations. The second is an atmospheric diffusion model called RAPTAD, Random Particle Transport And Diffusion. RAPTAD uses the wind and turbulence output from HOTMAC to compute particle trajectories and concentration at any location downwind from a source. Both of these models, originally developed as research codes on supercomputers, have been modified to run on microcomputers. Because the capability of microcomputers is advancing so rapidly, the expectation is that they will eventually become as good as today's supercomputers. Now both models are run on desktop or deskside computers, such as an IBM PC/AT with an Opus Pm 350-32 bit coprocessor board and a SUN workstation. Codes have also been modified so that high level graphics, NCAR Graphics, of the output from both models are displayed on the desktop computer monitors and plotted on a laser printer. Two programs, HOTPLT and RAPLOT, produce wind vector plots of the output from HOTMAC and particle trajectory plots of the output from RAPTAD, respectively. A third CONPLT provides concentration contour plots. Section II describes step-by-step operational procedures, specifically for a SUN-4 desk side computer, on how to run main programs HOTMAC and RAPTAD, and graphics programs to display the results. Governing equations, boundary conditions and initial values of HOTMAC and RAPTAD are discussed in Section III. Finite-difference representations of the governing equations, numerical solution procedures, and a grid system are given in Section IV.

  5. Source term identification in atmospheric modelling via sparse optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, Lukas; Branda, Martin; Hamburger, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Inverse modelling plays an important role in identifying the amount of harmful substances released into atmosphere during major incidents such as power plant accidents or volcano eruptions. Another possible application of inverse modelling lies in the monitoring the CO2 emission limits where only observations at certain places are available and the task is to estimate the total releases at given locations. This gives rise to minimizing the discrepancy between the observations and the model predictions. There are two standard ways of solving such problems. In the first one, this discrepancy is regularized by adding additional terms. Such terms may include Tikhonov regularization, distance from a priori information or a smoothing term. The resulting, usually quadratic, problem is then solved via standard optimization solvers. The second approach assumes that the error term has a (normal) distribution and makes use of Bayesian modelling to identify the source term. Instead of following the above-mentioned approaches, we utilize techniques from the field of compressive sensing. Such techniques look for a sparsest solution (solution with the smallest number of nonzeros) of a linear system, where a maximal allowed error term may be added to this system. Even though this field is a developed one with many possible solution techniques, most of them do not consider even the simplest constraints which are naturally present in atmospheric modelling. One of such examples is the nonnegativity of release amounts. We believe that the concept of a sparse solution is natural in both problems of identification of the source location and of the time process of the source release. In the first case, it is usually assumed that there are only few release points and the task is to find them. In the second case, the time window is usually much longer than the duration of the actual release. In both cases, the optimal solution should contain a large amount of zeros, giving rise to the

  6. Model Atmospheres and Spectra of Extrasolar Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marley, M. S.; Guillot, T.; Saumon, D.; Freedman, R. S.

    1996-09-01

    Of the known extrasolar giant planets, five have estimated effective temperatures below ~ 800K. We report on the application of a radiative-convective equilibrium model, originally developed to study the atmospheres of the solar jovian planets, to these objects (70 Vir b, 47 UMa b, Gl 411 b, 55 Cnc c, and HD 114762 b). The deposition of incident radiation from the various primaries and the estimated internal heat fluxes are included in the models. Condensible species are removed and clouds inserted where appropriate. To span the likely range of planet masses, a variety of surface gravities are considered for each object. Preliminary results suggest that water clouds are present in all these atmospheres except for 70 Vir b and HD 114762 b. Water marginally condenses in the atmosphere of the former while that of the latter should be essentially cloud free. Condensation of trace species (e.g. NH_4Cl and NH_4H_2PO_4) may produce thin hazes in these two cases. Thermochemical equilibrium favors NH_3 and CH_4 in all these atmospheres while N_2 and CO are favored in the atmospheres of the close-orbit, hot companions like 51 Peg b and upsilon And b. The reflected visible and thermal infrared spectra of these objects are dominated by water, methane, and ammonia absorption. We find that the 4 to 5 microns window in CH_4 and H_2O opacity is open for all of these objects. Consequently, as in the case of Jupiter and the brown dwarf Gliese 229 B, the emitted flux in this region is significantly greater than the blackbody flux for the planetary effective temperature. Thus this spectral region is favorable for the detection of extrasolar giant planets and brown dwarfs. Comparison of model spectra with observations would constrain the vertical temperature and cloud structure of these new atmospheres. Burrows et al. (this meeting) use these and other models to examine the evolution of extrasolar giant planets.

  7. Models of the Solar Atmospheric Response to Flare Heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allred, Joel

    2011-01-01

    I will present models of the solar atmospheric response to flare heating. The models solve the equations of non-LTE radiation hydrodynamics with an electron beam added as a flare energy source term. Radiative transfer is solved in detail for many important optically thick hydrogen and helium transitions and numerous optically thin EUV lines making the models ideally suited to study the emission that is produced during flares. I will pay special attention to understanding key EUV lines as well the mechanism for white light production. I will also present preliminary results of how the model solar atmosphere responds to Fletcher & Hudson type flare heating. I will compare this with the results from flare simulations using the standard thick target model.

  8. New Model Atmospheres: Testing the Solar Spectrum in the UV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Merino, L. H.; Cardona, O.; Bertone, E.; Chávez, M.; Buzzoni, A.

    2009-03-01

    We present preliminary results on the calculation of synthetic spectra obtained with the stellar model atmospheres developed by Cardona, Crivellari, and Simonneau. These new models have been used as input within the Synthe series of codes developed by Kurucz. As a first step we have tested if Synthe is able to handle these models which go down to log{τ_{Ross}}= -13. We have successfully calculated a synthetic solar spectrum in the wavelength region 2000-4500 Å at high resolution (R=522 000). Within this initial test we have found that layers at optical depths with log{τ_{Ross}} < -7 significantly affect the mid-UV properties of a synthetic spectrum computed from a solar model. We anticipate that these new extended models will be a valuable tool for the analysis of UV stellar light arising from the outermost layers of the atmospheres.

  9. Predictive modelling of boiler fouling. Final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Chatwani, A

    1990-12-31

    A spectral element method embodying Large Eddy Simulation based on Re- Normalization Group theory for simulating Sub Grid Scale viscosity was chosen for this work. This method is embodied in a computer code called NEKTON. NEKTON solves the unsteady, 2D or 3D,incompressible Navier Stokes equations by a spectral element method. The code was later extended to include the variable density and multiple reactive species effects at low Mach numbers, and to compute transport of large particles governed by inertia. Transport of small particles is computed by treating them as trace species. Code computations were performed for a number of test conditions typical of flow past a deep tube bank in a boiler. Results indicate qualitatively correct behavior. Predictions of deposition rates and deposit shape evolution also show correct qualitative behavior. These simulations are the first attempts to compute flow field results at realistic flow Reynolds numbers of the order of 10{sup 4}. Code validation was not done; comparison with experiment also could not be made as many phenomenological model parameters, e.g., sticking or erosion probabilities and their dependence on experimental conditions were not known. The predictions however demonstrate the capability to predict fouling from first principles. Further work is needed: use of large or massively parallel machine; code validation; parametric studies, etc.

  10. Atmospheric distribution of methane on Mars: A model study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viscardy, Sébastien; Daerden, Frank; Neary, Lori

    2016-10-01

    In the past decade, the detection of methane (CH4) in the atmosphere of Mars has been reported several times. These observations have strongly drawn the attention of the scientific community and triggered a renewed interest in Mars as their implications for the geochemical or biological activities are remarkable. However, given that methane is expected to have a photochemical lifetime of several centuries, the relatively fast loss rates of methane estimated from Earth-based measurements remain unexplained. Although this gave rise to objections against the validity of those observations, recent in situ measurements confirmed that methane is being occasionally released into the atmosphere from an unknown source (possibly from the ground). Additionally, ExoMars/TGO was launched to Mars in March 2016. NOMAD, one of the instruments onboard TGO, will provide the first global detailed observations of methane on Mars. It is in this context that we present a model study of the behavior of methane plumes.A general circulation model for the atmosphere of Mars is applied to simulate surface emission of methane and to investigate its vertical distribution during the first weeks after the release. Such surface emissions were suggested to explain observations of methane. Previous GCM simulations focused on the horizontal evolution of the methane, but the present study focuses on the three-dimensional dispersion of methane throughout the atmosphere after the surface release. It is found that a highly nonuniform vertical distribution, including distinct vertical layers, can appear throughout the atmosphere during the first weeks after the emission. This is explained by the global circulation patterns in the atmosphere at the time of the emission. Large Hadley cells transport the methane rapidly to other locations over the planet, and methane will be stretched out in layers along the general circulation streamlines at heights corresponding to strong zonal jets.This result changes

  11. Radiative Transfer Modeling of Uranus' Atmospheric Structure at Equinox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norwood, James; Chanover, N.

    2009-09-01

    We acquired near-infrared spectra of Uranus near equinox at NASA's Infrared Telescope Facility in September 2006 and September 2007. These spectra, taken with SpeX (R=2000), probe Uranus' atmosphere between 0.8 and 2.4 microns. The position of the slit over the Uranian disk was varied to obtain spectra from all visible latitudes. Assessment of these observations has revealed that Uranus' atmospheric structure not only changes with latitude, but also underwent notable evolution near its 2007 equinox in the twelve-month time span between datasets (2009, Icarus, in press). We now present results from an in-depth analysis of these observations using a radiative transfer code. This code creates synthetic spectra based on model atmospheres, and utilizes the band-model methane absorption coefficients determined by Irwin et al. (2006, Icarus 181, 309-319). Properties of Uranus' atmosphere, such as methane abundance and vertical structure, are varied to determine which conditions are best able to reproduce the observed spectra. We further determine what physical changes resulted in the temporal and latitudinal variations witnessed in Uranus' atmosphere. This project was funded by a NASA Earth and Space Fellowship.

  12. Aeolian dunes as ground truth for atmospheric modeling on Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hayward, R.K.; Titus, T.N.; Michaels, T.I.; Fenton, L.K.; Colaprete, A.; Christensen, P.R.

    2009-01-01

    Martian aeolian dunes preserve a record of atmosphere/surface interaction on a variety of scales, serving as ground truth for both Global Climate Models (GCMs) and mesoscale climate models, such as the Mars Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (MRAMS). We hypothesize that the location of dune fields, expressed globally by geographic distribution and locally by dune centroid azimuth (DCA), may record the long-term integration of atmospheric activity across a broad area, preserving GCM-scale atmospheric trends. In contrast, individual dune morphology, as expressed in slipface orientation (SF), may be more sensitive to localized variations in circulation, preserving topographically controlled mesoscale trends. We test this hypothesis by comparing the geographic distribution, DCA, and SF of dunes with output from the Ames Mars GCM and, at a local study site, with output from MRAMS. When compared to the GCM: 1) dunes generally lie adjacent to areas with strongest winds, 2) DCA agrees fairly well with GCM modeled wind directions in smooth-floored craters, and 3) SF does not agree well with GCM modeled wind directions. When compared to MRAMS modeled winds at our study site: 1) DCA generally coincides with the part of the crater where modeled mean winds are weak, and 2) SFs are consistent with some weak, topographically influenced modeled winds. We conclude that: 1) geographic distribution may be valuable as ground truth for GCMs, 2) DCA may be useful as ground truth for both GCM and mesoscale models, and 3) SF may be useful as ground truth for mesoscale models. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  13. The NASA MSFC Earth Global Reference Atmospheric Model-2007 Version

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leslie, F.W.; Justus, C.G.

    2008-01-01

    Reference or standard atmospheric models have long been used for design and mission planning of various aerospace systems. The NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Global Reference Atmospheric Model (GRAM) was developed in response to the need for a design reference atmosphere that provides complete global geographical variability, and complete altitude coverage (surface to orbital altitudes) as well as complete seasonal and monthly variability of the thermodynamic variables and wind components. A unique feature of GRAM is that, addition to providing the geographical, height, and monthly variation of the mean atmospheric state, it includes the ability to simulate spatial and temporal perturbations in these atmospheric parameters (e.g. fluctuations due to turbulence and other atmospheric perturbation phenomena). A summary comparing GRAM features to characteristics and features of other reference or standard atmospheric models, can be found Guide to Reference and Standard Atmosphere Models. The original GRAM has undergone a series of improvements over the years with recent additions and changes. The software program is called Earth-GRAM2007 to distinguish it from similar programs for other bodies (e.g. Mars, Venus, Neptune, and Titan). However, in order to make this Technical Memorandum (TM) more readable, the software will be referred to simply as GRAM07 or GRAM unless additional clarity is needed. Section 1 provides an overview of the basic features of GRAM07 including the newly added features. Section 2 provides a more detailed description of GRAM07 and how the model output generated. Section 3 presents sample results. Appendices A and B describe the Global Upper Air Climatic Atlas (GUACA) data and the Global Gridded Air Statistics (GGUAS) database. Appendix C provides instructions for compiling and running GRAM07. Appendix D gives a description of the required NAMELIST format input. Appendix E gives sample output. Appendix F provides a list of available

  14. Assessment of atmospheric models for tele-infrasonic propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenna, Mihan; Hayek, Sylvia

    2005-04-01

    Iron mines in Minnesota are ideally located to assess the accuracy of available atmospheric profiles used in infrasound modeling. These mines are located approximately 400 km away to the southeast (142) of the Lac-Du-Bonnet infrasound station, IS-10. Infrasound data from June 1999 to March 2004 was analyzed to assess the effects of explosion size and atmospheric conditions on observations. IS-10 recorded a suite of events from this time period resulting in well constrained ground truth. This ground truth allows for the comparison of ray trace and PE (Parabolic Equation) modeling to the observed arrivals. The tele-infrasonic distance (greater than 250 km) produces ray paths that turn in the upper atmosphere, the thermosphere, at approximately 120 km to 140 km. Modeling based upon MSIS/HWM (Mass Spectrometer Incoherent Scatter/Horizontal Wind Model) and the NOGAPS (Navy Operational Global Atmospheric Prediction System) and NRL-GS2 (Naval Research Laboratory Ground to Space) augmented profiles are used to interpret the observed arrivals.

  15. Sixth International Workshop on the Mars Atmosphere: Modelling and Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forget, F.; Millour, M.

    2017-01-01

    The scope of this workshop is to bring together experts in observations and modelling of the present and past Mars climate systems and discuss the nature of the atmospheric circulation and the photochemistry (up to the thermosphere), the dust cycle, the water cycle (vapor, clouds and frost) and the carbon dioxide cycle (polar caps).

  16. REGIONAL MODELING OF THE ATMOSPHERIC TRANSPORT AND DEPOSITION OF ATRAZINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A version of the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model has been developed by the U.S. EPA that is capable of addressing the atmospheric fate, transport and deposition of some common trace toxics. An initial, 36-km rectangular grid-cell application for atrazine has been...

  17. THREE-DIMENSIONAL MODELING OF HOT JUPITER ATMOSPHERIC FLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Rauscher, Emily; Menou, Kristen

    2010-05-10

    We present a three-dimensional hot Jupiter model, extending from 200 bar to 1 mbar, using the Intermediate General Circulation Model from the University of Reading. Our horizontal spectral resolution is T31 (equivalent to a grid of 48 x 96), with 33 logarithmically spaced vertical levels. A simplified (Newtonian) scheme is employed for the radiative forcing. We adopt a physical setup nearly identical to the model of HD 209458b by Cooper and Showman to facilitate a direct model inter-comparison. Our results are broadly consistent with theirs but significant differences also emerge. The atmospheric flow is characterized by a super-rotating equatorial jet, transonic wind speeds, and eastward advection of heat away from the dayside. We identify a dynamically induced temperature inversion ('stratosphere') on the planetary dayside and find that temperatures at the planetary limb differ systematically from local radiative equilibrium values, a potential source of bias for transit spectroscopic interpretations. While our model atmosphere is quasi-identical to that of Cooper and Showman and we solve the same meteorological equations, we use different algorithmic methods, spectral-implicit versus grid-explicit, which are known to yield fully consistent results in the Earth modeling context. The model discrepancies identified here indicate that one or both numerical methods do not faithfully capture all of the atmospheric dynamics at work in the hot Jupiter context. We highlight the emergence of a shock-like feature in our model, much like that reported recently by Showman et al., and suggest that improved representations of energy conservation may be needed in hot Jupiter atmospheric models, as emphasized by Goodman.

  18. The Dynamic Atmospheres of Carbon Rich Giants: Constraining Models Via Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rau, Gioia; Hron, Josef; Paladini, Claudia; Aringer, Bernard; Eriksson, Kjell; Marigo, Paola

    2016-07-01

    Dynamic models for the atmospheres of C-rich Asymptotic Giant Branch stars are quite advanced and have been overall successful in reproducing spectroscopic and photometric observations. Interferometry provides independent information and is thus an important technique to study the atmospheric stratification and to further constrain the dynamic models. We observed a sample of six C-rich AGBs with the mid infrared interferometer VLTI/MIDI. These observations, combined with photometric and spectroscopic data from the literature, are compared with synthetic observables derived from dynamic model atmospheres (DMA, Eriksson et al. 2014). The SEDs can be reasonably well modelled and the interferometry supports the extended and multi-component structure of the atmospheres, but some differences remain. We discuss the possible reasons for these differences and we compare the stellar parameters derived from this comparison with stellar evolution models. Finally, we point out the high potential of MATISSE, the second generation VLTI instrument allowing interferometric imaging in the L, M, and N bands, for further progress in this field.

  19. Toward GEOS-6, A Global Cloud System Resolving Atmospheric Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putman, William M.

    2010-01-01

    NASA is committed to observing and understanding the weather and climate of our home planet through the use of multi-scale modeling systems and space-based observations. Global climate models have evolved to take advantage of the influx of multi- and many-core computing technologies and the availability of large clusters of multi-core microprocessors. GEOS-6 is a next-generation cloud system resolving atmospheric model that will place NASA at the forefront of scientific exploration of our atmosphere and climate. Model simulations with GEOS-6 will produce a realistic representation of our atmosphere on the scale of typical satellite observations, bringing a visual comprehension of model results to a new level among the climate enthusiasts. In preparation for GEOS-6, the agency's flagship Earth System Modeling Framework [JDl] has been enhanced to support cutting-edge high-resolution global climate and weather simulations. Improvements include a cubed-sphere grid that exposes parallelism; a non-hydrostatic finite volume dynamical core, and algorithm designed for co-processor technologies, among others. GEOS-6 represents a fundamental advancement in the capability of global Earth system models. The ability to directly compare global simulations at the resolution of spaceborne satellite images will lead to algorithm improvements and better utilization of space-based observations within the GOES data assimilation system

  20. Transmission of atmospherically deposited trace elements through an undeveloped, forested Maryland watershed. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Church, T.M.; Scudlark, J.R.; Conko, K.M.; Bricker, O.P.; Rice, K.C.

    1997-12-31

    Retention and transmission of atmospherically-derived major (H(sup +), Na(sup +), K(sup +), Ca(sup 2+), Mg(sup 2+), HCO(sub 3, sup -), NO(sub 3, sup -), SO(sub 4, sup -2), Cl(sup -), SiO(sub 2)) and trace (Al, As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, Se, and Zn) species were evaluated in an undeveloped forested watershed underlain by a rather inert quartzite lithology (Bear Branch, Catoctin State Forest, Thrumont, Maryland). These comparisons were based on atmospheric input to stream export over a period of 16 months. Both wet (precipitation) and total (bulk, including vegetative throughfall) atmospheric loading to the catchment were determined. Stream export was gauged based on systematic sampling of the stream under varied flow regimes. Additionally, watershed export of both dissolved and particulate trace element phases was examined during three high run-off intensives associated with summer storms.

  1. Coupled atmosphere-ocean models of Titan's past

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, C. P.; Pollack, J. B.; Lunine, J. I.; Courtin, R.

    1993-03-01

    The behavior and possible past evolution of fully coupled atmosphere and ocean model of Titan are investigated. It is found that Titan's surface temperature was about 20 K cooler at 4 Gyr ago and will be about 5 K warmer 0.5 Gyr in the future. The change in solar luminosity and the conversion of oceanic CH4 to C2H6 drive the evolution of the ocean and atmosphere over time. Titan appears to have experienced a frozen epoch about 3 Gyr ago independent of whether an ocean is present or not. This finding may have important implications for understanding the inventory of Titan's volatile compounds.

  2. Model of Atmospheric Links on Optical Communications from High Altitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subich, Christopher

    2004-01-01

    Optical communication links have the potential to solve many of the problems of current radio and microwave links to satellites and high-altitude aircraft. The higher frequency involved in optical systems allows for significantly greater signal bandwidth, and thus information transfer rate, in excess of 10 Gbps, and the highly directional nature of laser-based signals eliminates the need for frequency-division multiplexing seen in radio and microwave links today. The atmosphere, however, distorts an optical signal differently than a microwave signal. While the ionosphere is one of the most significant sources of noise and distortion in a microwave or radio signal, the lower atmosphere affects an optical signal more significantly. Refractive index fluctuations, primarily caused by changes in atmospheric temperature and density, distort the incoming signal in both deterministic and nondeterministic ways. Additionally, suspended particles, such as those in haze or rain, further corrupt the transmitted signal. To model many of the atmospheric effects on the propagating beam, we use simulations based on the beam-propagation method. This method, developed both for simulation of signals in waveguides and propagation in atmospheric turbulence, separates the propagation into a diffraction and refraction problem. The diffraction step is an exact solution, within the limits of numerical precision, to the problem of propagation in free space, and the refraction step models the refractive index variances over a segment of the propagation path. By applying refraction for a segment of the propagation path, then diffracting over that same segment, this method forms a good approximation to true propagation through the atmospheric medium. Iterating over small segments of the total propagation path gives a good approximation to the problem of propagation over the entire path. Parameters in this model, such as initial beam profile and atmospheric constants, are easily modified in a

  3. Atmospheric Climate Model Experiments Performed at Multiple Horizontal Resolutions

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, T; Bala, G; Gleckler, P; Lobell, D; Mirin, A; Maxwell, R; Rotman, D

    2007-12-21

    This report documents salient features of version 3.3 of the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM3.3) and of three climate simulations in which the resolution of its latitude-longitude grid was systematically increased. For all these simulations of global atmospheric climate during the period 1980-1999, observed monthly ocean surface temperatures and sea ice extents were prescribed according to standard Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP) values. These CAM3.3 resolution experiments served as control runs for subsequent simulations of the climatic effects of agricultural irrigation, the focus of a Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project. The CAM3.3 model was able to replicate basic features of the historical climate, although biases in a number of atmospheric variables were evident. Increasing horizontal resolution also generally failed to ameliorate the large-scale errors in most of the climate variables that could be compared with observations. A notable exception was the simulation of precipitation, which incrementally improved with increasing resolution, especially in regions where orography plays a central role in determining the local hydroclimate.

  4. A GRID OF THREE-DIMENSIONAL STELLAR ATMOSPHERE MODELS OF SOLAR METALLICITY. I. GENERAL PROPERTIES, GRANULATION, AND ATMOSPHERIC EXPANSION

    SciTech Connect

    Trampedach, Regner; Asplund, Martin; Collet, Remo; Nordlund, Ake

    2013-05-20

    Present grids of stellar atmosphere models are the workhorses in interpreting stellar observations and determining their fundamental parameters. These models rely on greatly simplified models of convection, however, lending less predictive power to such models of late-type stars. We present a grid of improved and more reliable stellar atmosphere models of late-type stars, based on deep, three-dimensional (3D), convective, stellar atmosphere simulations. This grid is to be used in general for interpreting observations and improving stellar and asteroseismic modeling. We solve the Navier Stokes equations in 3D and concurrent with the radiative transfer equation, for a range of atmospheric parameters, covering most of stellar evolution with convection at the surface. We emphasize the use of the best available atomic physics for quantitative predictions and comparisons with observations. We present granulation size, convective expansion of the acoustic cavity, and asymptotic adiabat as functions of atmospheric parameters.

  5. Chemical models of the deep atmospheres of Jupiter and Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fegley, Bruce, Jr.; Lodders, Katharina

    1994-01-01

    New and updated chemical kinetic data, elemental abundances, and thermodynamic data are used for thermochemical equilibrium and, where relevant, thermochemical kinetic calculations of gas abundances and condensate stability in the hot, deep atmospheres of Jupiter and Saturn. Over 2000 compounds of all naturally occurring elements in the periodic table are considered. The calculations range from 298 to 2000 K and are done for adiabatic models of the two planetary atmospheres. The results predict the abundances of many gases which are potentially observable by the Galileo probe to Jupiter, by the Cassini mission to Saturn, and by Earth-based and Earth-orbital telescopes. In addition, the results also predict many new species which are potentially observable by a new generation of entry probes capable of penetrating deeper into the atmospheres of Jupiter and Saturn.

  6. Model of a stationary microwave argon discharge at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Zhelyazkov, I.; Pencheva, M.; Benova, E.

    2008-03-19

    The many applications of microwave gas discharges at atmospheric pressure in various fields of science, technology and medicine require an adequate model of these discharges. Such a model is based on the electromagnetic wave's propagation properties and on the elementary processes in the discharge bulk. In contrast to the microwave discharges at low-gas pressures, where many elementary processes might be ignored because of their negligible contribution to the electron and heavy particle's balance equations, for such discharges at atmospheric pressure the consideration of a large number of collisional processes is mandatory. For the build of a successful discharge-column model one needs three important quantities, notably the power {theta} necessary for sustaining an electron - ion pair, electron - neutral collision frequency for momentum transfer v{sub en}, and gas temperature T{sub g}. The first two key parameters are obtained by a collisional-radiative model of the argon at atmospheric pressure, while the microwave frequency {omega}/2{pi} = 2.45 GHz, plasma column radius R, gas pressure p and gas temperature T{sub g} are fixed external parameters determined by the experimental conditions. Here, we present a model of a capillary argon microwave plasma column with a length L {approx_equal} 14 cm, sustained by wave power of 110 W - the model yields the longitudinal distributions of the plasma density, expended wave power, wave electric field magnitude, and complex wave number.

  7. A stochastic atmospheric model for remote sensing applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, R. E.

    1983-01-01

    There are many factors which reduce the accuracy of classification of objects in the satellite remote sensing of Earth's surface. One important factor is the variability in the scattering and absorptive properties of the atmospheric components such as particulates and the variable gases. For multispectral remote sensing of the Earth's surface in the visible and infrared parts of the spectrum the atmospheric particulates are a major source of variability in the received signal. It is difficult to design a sensor which will determine the unknown atmospheric components by remote sensing methods, at least to the accuracy needed for multispectral classification. The problem of spatial and temporal variations in the atmospheric quantities which can affect the measured radiances are examined. A method based upon the stochastic nature of the atmospheric components was developed, and, using actual data the statistical parameters needed for inclusion into a radiometric model was generated. Methods are then described for an improved correction of radiances. These algorithms will then result in a more accurate and consistent classification procedure.

  8. Mars Entry Atmospheric Data System Modelling and Algorithm Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karlgaard, Christopher D.; Beck, Roger E.; OKeefe, Stephen A.; Siemers, Paul; White, Brady; Engelund, Walter C.; Munk, Michelle M.

    2009-01-01

    The Mars Entry Atmospheric Data System (MEADS) is being developed as part of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL), Entry, Descent, and Landing Instrumentation (MEDLI) project. The MEADS project involves installing an array of seven pressure transducers linked to ports on the MSL forebody to record the surface pressure distribution during atmospheric entry. These measured surface pressures are used to generate estimates of atmospheric quantities based on modeled surface pressure distributions. In particular, the quantities to be estimated from the MEADS pressure measurements include the total pressure, dynamic pressure, Mach number, angle of attack, and angle of sideslip. Secondary objectives are to estimate atmospheric winds by coupling the pressure measurements with the on-board Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) data. This paper provides details of the algorithm development, MEADS system performance based on calibration, and uncertainty analysis for the aerodynamic and atmospheric quantities of interest. The work presented here is part of the MEDLI performance pre-flight validation and will culminate with processing flight data after Mars entry in 2012.

  9. The Scientific and Legal Uncertainty Behind Ocean Fertilization to Sequester Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Phinney, J. T.

    2002-06-01

    A three-day workshop was organized in April 2001 in Washington, DC, consisting of scientists, policy experts, and entrepreneurs to explore the proposed use of iron fertilization in the High Nutrient Low Chlorophyll regions, notably the Equatorial Pacific and Southern Oceans, to actively sequester atmospheric CO{sub 2}.

  10. Modelling the atmosphere of a template "hot Jupiter" exoplanet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bending, V. L.; Lewis, S. R.; Kolb, U.

    2012-09-01

    Many models are used to study the possible atmospheric conditions of extrasolar gas giants, in particular "hot Jupiters" (e.g. [1]), gas giant planets closer than 0.1 AU to their parent stars, with orbital periods of the order of a few Earth days. It is important that the respective responses of these models to this relatively new regime be known, allowing the effects of using different models to be understood. Here, the use of an adapted form of the PUMA model is explored by carrying out an intercomparison test.

  11. Technical support for the measurements of atmospheric gas constituents. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Varanasi, P.

    1996-08-01

    This research has consisted of measurements at atmospheric temperatures of the absolute intensities, air-broadened half-widths, and pressure-induced shifts of isolated infrared spectral lines, and highly accurate spectral absorption coefficients (or cross-sections) of certain continua or pseudo-continua, of several infrared-active atmospheric trace gases. The experiments have subsequently been refined by receiving guidance from several members of the ARM Science Team as well as from other people who are active world-wide in satellite-borne, aircraft-borne, balloon-borne, and other atmospheric remote sensing campaigns. The laboratory data are obtained at low temperatures relevant to the atmosphere using cryogenically cooled absorption cells, the high-resolution({approximately} 0.0016 cm{sup {minus}1}) of a Fourier transform spectrometer and, when warranted, the ultra-high spectral resolution ({approximately} 10{sup {minus}4} cm{sup {minus}1}) of a tunable diode laser spectrometer. In the case of the absorption-coefficient (or cross-section) measurements, pressure and temperatures are selected to correspond to those of the atmospheric layers. The authors have measured spectral absorption coefficients, which are also known as absorption cross-sections, k{sub {nu}} (cm{sup {minus}1} atm{sup {minus}1}), in the 9 and 11 {micro}m bands of CFC-11 (CFCl{sub 3}) and CFC-12 (CF{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}), the 7.62, 8.97, and 12.3 {micro}m bands of HFCF-22 (CHClF{sub 2}), and the 10.6 {micro}m bands of SF{sub 6}.

  12. Normal seasonal variations for atmospheric radon concentration: a sinusoidal model.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Koseki; Yasuoka, Yumi; Nagahama, Hiroyuki; Muto, Jun; Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Omori, Yasutaka; Suzuki, Toshiyuki; Homma, Yoshimi; Mukai, Takahiro

    2015-01-01

    Anomalous radon readings in air have been reported before an earthquake activity. However, careful measurements of atmospheric radon concentrations during a normal period are required to identify anomalous variations in a precursor period. In this study, we obtained radon concentration data for 5 years (2003-2007) that can be considered a normal period and compared it with data from the precursory period of 2008 until March 2011, when the 2011 Tohoku-Oki Earthquake occurred. Then, we established a model for seasonal variation by fitting a sinusoidal model to the radon concentration data during the normal period, considering that the seasonal variation was affected by atmospheric turbulence. By determining the amplitude in the sinusoidal model, the normal variation of the radon concentration can be estimated. Thus, the results of this method can be applied to identify anomalous radon variations before an earthquake.

  13. Charter for the ARM Atmospheric Modeling Advisory Group

    SciTech Connect

    Advisory Group, ARM Atmospheric Modeling

    2016-05-01

    The Atmospheric Modeling Advisory Group of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility is guided by the following: 1. The group will provide feedback on the overall project plan including input on how to address priorities and trade-offs in the modeling and analysis workflow, making sure the modeling follows general best practices, and reviewing the recommendations provided to ARM for the workflow implementation. 2. The group will consist of approximately 6 members plus the PI and co-PI of the Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) ARM Symbiotic Simulation and Observation (LASSO) pilot project. The ARM Technical Director, or his designee, serves as an ex-officio member. This size is chosen based on the ability to efficiently conduct teleconferences and to span the general needs for input to the LASSO pilot project.

  14. Engineering-level model atmospheres for Titan and Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Justus, C. G.; Duvall, Aleta; Kller, Vernon W.

    2004-02-01

    An engineering-level atmospheric model for Titan has been developed for use in NASA's systems analysis studies of aerocapture and entry, descent and landing (EDL) applications in potential missions to Titan. Analogous to highly successful Global Reference Atmospheric Models for Earth (GRAM) and Mars (Mars-GRAM), the new model is called Titan-GRAM. Like GRAM and Mars-Gram, an important feature of Titan-GRAM is its ability to simulate quasi-random perturbations for Monte Carlo analyses in developing guidance, navigation and control algorithms, and for thermal systems design. Titan-GRAM capabilities and sample results are presented. Capabilities of Mars-GRAM especially related to EDL applications are also presented and illustrated.

  15. Engineering-Level Model Atmospheres For Titan and Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justus, C. G.; Keller, Vernon

    2003-01-01

    An engineering-level atmospheric model for Titan has been developed for use in NASA s systems analysis studies of aerocapture and entry, descent and landing (EDL) applications in potential missions to Titan. Analogous to highly successful Global Reference Atmospheric Models for Earth (GRAM) and Mars (Mars-GRAM), the new model is called Titan-GRAM. Like GRAM and Mars-GRAM, an important feature of Titan-GRAM is its ability to simulate quasi-random perturbations for Monte-Carlo analyses in developing guidance, navigation and control algorithms, and for thermal systems design. Titan-GRAM features and sample results will be presented. Features of Mars-GRAM especially related to EDL applications will also be presented and illustrated.

  16. Atmospheric transport of persistent organic pollutants - development of a 3-d dynamical transport model covering the northern hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, K. M.; Christensen, J. H.; Geels, C.; Frohn, L. M.; Brandt, J.

    2003-04-01

    The Danish Eulerian Hemispheric Model (DEHM) is a 3-D dynamical atmospheric transport model originally developed to describe the atmospheric transport of sulphur, lead, and mercury to the Arctic. The model has been validated carefully for these compounds. A new version of DEHM is currently being developed to describe the atmospheric transport of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) which are toxic, lipophilic and bio-accumulating compounds showing great persistence in the environment. The model has a horizontal resolution of 150 km x 150 km and 18 vertical layers, and it is driven by meteorological data from the numerical weather prediction model MM5V2. During environmental cycling POPs can be deposited and re-emitted several times before reaching a final destination. A description of the exchange processes between the land/ocean surfaces and the atmosphere is included in the model to account for this multi-hop transport. The present model version describes the atmospheric transport of the pesticide alpha-hexachlorocyclohexane (alpha-HCH). Other POPs may be included when proper data on emissions and physical-chemical parameters becomes available. The model-processes and the first model results are presented. The atmospheric transport of alpha-HCH for the 1990s is well described by the model.

  17. Model Atmospheres for Irradiated Red Giant Stars with Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aufdenberg, J. P.; Barman, T. S.

    2002-12-01

    We will present exploratory model atmosphere calculations applicable to symbiotic binary systems, where a hot white dwarf illuminates the extended atmosphere of a red giant. While sophisticated non-LTE photoionization models exist for these systems (e.g. Proga et al. 1998), detailed models for the ionized-to-neutral transition region in the red giant wind have lacked molecular line opacities. To make improvements in this area, we employ a new version of the PHOENIX stellar atmosphere and planetary radiative transfer code which combines the stellar wind module of Aufdenberg et al. (2002), now modified to treat the winds of cool stars, with the external illumination module of Barman, Hauschildt, & Allard (2001). Our present calculations include illuminated spherically symmetric models, with conditions similar to those found in EG And, that include non-LTE line blanketing, molecular opacity, and a realistic description of the incident white dwarf flux. Our goals include the prediction of changes in the red giant absorption-line spectrum with orbital phase, the prediction of emission-line strengths from the coolest, densest portions of the recombination region, and the detailing modeling of eclipse mapping observations. JPA is supported by a Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics Postdoctoral Fellowship. Some of the calculations for this work were computed on the IBM SP ``Blue Horizon'' of the San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC), with support from the National Science Foundation, and on the IBM SP of the NERSC with support from the DOE.

  18. Improved Optical Diagnostic and Microwave Power Supply, final report. An ARRA Supplement to Instabilities in Nonthermal Atmospheric Pressure Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Hopwood, Jeffrey

    2011-05-30

    This is the final report for the supplemental program ''Improved Optical Diagnostic and Microwave Power Supply'' which has funded the purchase of laboratory instrumentation to enhance the main DOE project, ''Instabilities in Non-thermal Atmospheric Pressure Plasma.'' The main program’s goals include a scientific study of the plasma physics causing large-area plasmas to become unstable at atmospheric pressure. These fundamental scientific discoveries will then allow for the design of controllable cold plasma sources capable of materials processing, including photovoltaic devices, at one atmosphere. This leads to lower costs of energy production. This final report describes only the completion of the supplement. A high-speed spectroscopic camera capable of diagnosing plasma fluctuations and instabilities on time-scales of 2 ns was specified, purchased, installed and tested at the Tufts University Plasma Laboratory. In addition, a 30 watt microwave power system capable of producing short pulses of power in the 0.8 – 4.2 GHz bands was specified, purchased, installed and tested. Scientific experiments are continuing under the funding of the main grant, but a few preliminary examples of scientific discoveries made using these items are included in this report.

  19. Modeling Atmospheric CO2 Processes to Constrain the Missing Sink

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawa, S. R.; Denning, A. S.; Erickson, D. J.; Collatz, J. C.; Pawson, S.

    2005-01-01

    We report on a NASA supported modeling effort to reduce uncertainty in carbon cycle processes that create the so-called missing sink of atmospheric CO2. Our overall objective is to improve characterization of CO2 source/sink processes globally with improved formulations for atmospheric transport, terrestrial uptake and release, biomass and fossil fuel burning, and observational data analysis. The motivation for this study follows from the perspective that progress in determining CO2 sources and sinks beyond the current state of the art will rely on utilization of more extensive and intensive CO2 and related observations including those from satellite remote sensing. The major components of this effort are: 1) Continued development of the chemistry and transport model using analyzed meteorological fields from the Goddard Global Modeling and Assimilation Office, with comparison to real time data in both forward and inverse modes; 2) An advanced biosphere model, constrained by remote sensing data, coupled to the global transport model to produce distributions of CO2 fluxes and concentrations that are consistent with actual meteorological variability; 3) Improved remote sensing estimates for biomass burning emission fluxes to better characterize interannual variability in the atmospheric CO2 budget and to better constrain the land use change source; 4) Evaluating the impact of temporally resolved fossil fuel emission distributions on atmospheric CO2 gradients and variability. 5) Testing the impact of existing and planned remote sensing data sources (e.g., AIRS, MODIS, OCO) on inference of CO2 sources and sinks, and use the model to help establish measurement requirements for future remote sensing instruments. The results will help to prepare for the use of OCO and other satellite data in a multi-disciplinary carbon data assimilation system for analysis and prediction of carbon cycle changes and carbodclimate interactions.

  20. Sensitivity model study of regional mercury dispersion in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gencarelli, Christian N.; Bieser, Johannes; Carbone, Francesco; De Simone, Francesco; Hedgecock, Ian M.; Matthias, Volker; Travnikov, Oleg; Yang, Xin; Pirrone, Nicola

    2017-01-01

    Atmospheric deposition is the most important pathway by which Hg reaches marine ecosystems, where it can be methylated and enter the base of food chain. The deposition, transport and chemical interactions of atmospheric Hg have been simulated over Europe for the year 2013 in the framework of the Global Mercury Observation System (GMOS) project, performing 14 different model sensitivity tests using two high-resolution three-dimensional chemical transport models (CTMs), varying the anthropogenic emission datasets, atmospheric Br input fields, Hg oxidation schemes and modelling domain boundary condition input. Sensitivity simulation results were compared with observations from 28 monitoring sites in Europe to assess model performance and particularly to analyse the influence of anthropogenic emission speciation and the Hg0(g) atmospheric oxidation mechanism. The contribution of anthropogenic Hg emissions, their speciation and vertical distribution are crucial to the simulated concentration and deposition fields, as is also the choice of Hg0(g) oxidation pathway. The areas most sensitive to changes in Hg emission speciation and the emission vertical distribution are those near major sources, but also the Aegean and the Black seas, the English Channel, the Skagerrak Strait and the northern German coast. Considerable influence was found also evident over the Mediterranean, the North Sea and Baltic Sea and some influence is seen over continental Europe, while this difference is least over the north-western part of the modelling domain, which includes the Norwegian Sea and Iceland. The Br oxidation pathway produces more HgII(g) in the lower model levels, but overall wet deposition is lower in comparison to the simulations which employ an O3 / OH oxidation mechanism. The necessity to perform continuous measurements of speciated Hg and to investigate the local impacts of Hg emissions and deposition, as well as interactions dependent on land use and vegetation, forests, peat

  1. Constructing an advanced software tool for planetary atmospheric modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, Richard M.; Sims, Michael H.; Podolak, Esther; Mckay, Christopher P.

    1990-01-01

    A prototype is described that can serve as a scientific-modeling software tool to facilitate the development of useful scientific models. The prototype is developed for applications to planetary modeling, and specific examples are given that relate to the atmosphere of Titan. The scientific modeling tool employs a high-level domain-specific modeling language, several data-display facilities, and a library of experimental datasets and scientific equations. The planetary modeling prototype links uncomputed physical variables to computed variables with computational transformations based on a backchaining procedure. The system - implemented in LISP with an object-oriented knowledge-representation tool - is run on a workstation that provides interface with several models. The prototype is expected to form the basis for a sophisticated modeling tool that can permit active experimentation.

  2. Atmospheric stability of levoglucosan: a detailed laboratory and modeling study.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, D; Tilgner, A; Iinuma, Y; Herrmann, H

    2010-01-15

    Levoglucosan, an important molecular marker for biomass burning, represents an important fraction of the water-soluble organic carbon in atmospheric particles influenced by residential wood burning and wildfires. However, particle phase oxidation processes of levoglucosan by free radicals are not well-known. Hence, detailed kinetic studies on the reactivity of levoglucosan with OH, NO(3), and SO(4)(-) radicals in aqueous solutions were performed to better understand the levoglucosan oxidation in the deliquescent particles. The data obtained were implemented into a parcel model with detailed microphysics and complex multiphase chemistry to investigate the degradation fluxes of levoglucosan in cloud droplets and in deliquescent particles. The model calculations show that levoglucosan can be oxidized readily by OH radicals during daytime with mean degradation fluxes of about 7.2 ng m(-3) h(-1) in summer and 4.7 ng m(-3) h(-1) in winter for a polluted continental plume. This indicates that the oxidation of levoglucosan in atmospheric deliquescent particles is at least as fast as that of other atmospherically relevant organic compounds and levoglucosan may not be as stable as previously thought in the atmosphere, especially under high relative humidity conditions.

  3. Fundamental parameters of pulsating stars from atmospheric models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barcza, S.

    2006-12-01

    A purely photometric method is reviewed to determine distance, mass, equilibrium temperature, and luminosity of pulsating stars by using model atmospheres and hydrodynamics. T Sex is given as an example: on the basis of Kurucz atmospheric models and UBVRI (in both Johnson and Kron-Cousins systems) data, variation of angular diameter, effective temperature, and surface gravity is derived as a function of phase, mass M=(0.76± 0.09) M⊙, distance d=530± 67 pc, Rmax=2.99R⊙, Rmin=2.87R⊙, magnitude averaged visual absolute brightness < MVmag>=1.17± 0.26 mag are found. During a pulsation cycle four standstills of the atmosphere are pointed out indicating the occurrence of two shocks in the atmosphere. The derived equilibrium temperature Teq=7781 K and luminosity (28.3± 8.8)L⊙ locate T Sex on the blue edge of the instability strip in a theoretical Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. The differences of the physical parameters from this study and Liu & Janes (1990) are discussed.

  4. Model Sensitivity Studies of the Decrease in Atmospheric Carbon Tetrachloride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chipperfield, Martyn P.; Liang, Qing; Rigby, Matt; Hossaini, Ryan; Montzka, Stephen A.; Dhomse, Sandip; Feng, Wuhu; Prinn, Ronald G.; Weiss, Ray F.; Harth, Christina M.; Salameh, Peter K.; Muehle, Jens; O’Doherty, Simon; Young, Dickon; Simmonds, Peter G.; Krummel, Paul B.; Fraser, Paul J.; Steele, L. Paul; Happell, James D.; Rhew, Robert C.; Butler, James; Yvon-Lewis, Shari A.; Hall, Bradley; Nance, David; Moore, Fred; Miller, Ben R.; Elkins, James W.; Harrison, Jeremy J.; Boone, Chris D.; Atlas, Elliot L.; Mahieu, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) is an ozone-depleting substance, which is controlled by the Montreal Protocol and for which the atmospheric abundance is decreasing. However, the current observed rate of this decrease is known to be slower than expected based on reported CCl4 emissions and its estimated overall atmospheric lifetime. Here we use a three-dimensional (3-D) chemical transport model to investigate the impact on its predicted decay of uncertainties in the rates at which CCl4 is removed from the atmosphere by photolysis, by ocean uptake and by degradation in soils. The largest sink is atmospheric photolysis (74% of total), but a reported 10% uncertainty in its combined photolysis cross section and quantum yield has only a modest impact on the modelled rate of CCl4 decay. This is partly due to the limiting effect of the rate of transport of CCl4 from the main tropospheric reservoir to the stratosphere, where photolytic loss occurs. The model suggests large interannual variability in the magnitude of this stratospheric photolysis sink caused by variations in transport. The impact of uncertainty in the minor soil sink (9%of total) is also relatively small. In contrast, the model shows that uncertainty in ocean loss (17%of total) has the largest impact on modelled CCl4 decay due to its sizeable contribution to CCl4 loss and large lifetime uncertainty range (147 to 241 years). With an assumed CCl4 emission rate of 39 Gg year(exp -1), the reference simulation with the best estimate of loss processes still underestimates the observed CCl4 (overestimates the decay) over the past 2 decades but to a smaller extent than previous studies. Changes to the rate of CCl4 loss processes, in line with known uncertainties, could bring the model into agreement with in situ surface and remote-sensing measurements, as could an increase in emissions to around 47 Gg year(exp -1). Further progress in constraining the CCl4 budget is partly limited by systematic biases between

  5. Modeling Urban Surface-Atmosphere Sensible Heat Exchanges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, S. M.; Oke, T.; Lemonsu, A.; Grimmond, C.; Jackson, P.

    2003-12-01

    Understanding the nature of energy partitioning at the surface of cities is prerequisite to gaining proper insight and ability to model their climatic environment and impacts. Of particular relevance in the urban setting is the surface-atmosphere exchange of sensible heat. The combined conductive-convective exchange of turbulent sensible heat flux (QH) and net storage heat flux (Δ QS) has been shown to account for over 90% of the daytime net radiation at highly urbanized sites. This relation depends on surface structure, materials and the degree of surface-atmosphere coupling and its understanding is required in many applications; for example, to assess building climates, and to model evapo-transpiration, the urban heat island, and boundary layer growth. Observational studies, while allowing for general awareness of urban surface-atmosphere energetic interactions, are often limited in their applicability to other urban sites and/or processes. To overcome this, numerical models which aim to simulate urban climates have been developed. The Town Energy Balance (TEB) model of Masson (2000) couples the micro- and meso- scales and accurately represents the urban energy budget in meso-scale atmospheric models. TEB uses local canyon geometry together with surface and substrate radiative, thermal, moisture and roughness properties to simulate the effects produced by the presence of buildings. The urban system is simulated by calculating individual energy balances for walls, roads, and roofs, which are then integrated to resolve the local-scale surface energy balance. The model has been independently evaluated using measured fluxes from three dry sites - central Mexico City, a light industrial site in Vancouver (Masson et al., 2002) and the city center of Marseille, France (Lemonsu et al., 2003). At these sites, TEB simulated net radiation to within less than 10 W m-2 and its partitioning into turbulent and storage heat fluxes to within a few tens of W -2. TEB's good

  6. Model sensitivity studies of the decrease in atmospheric carbon tetrachloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chipperfield, Martyn P.; Liang, Qing; Rigby, Matthew; Hossaini, Ryan; Montzka, Stephen A.; Dhomse, Sandip; Feng, Wuhu; Prinn, Ronald G.; Weiss, Ray F.; Harth, Christina M.; Salameh, Peter K.; Mühle, Jens; O'Doherty, Simon; Young, Dickon; Simmonds, Peter G.; Krummel, Paul B.; Fraser, Paul J.; Steele, L. Paul; Happell, James D.; Rhew, Robert C.; Butler, James; Yvon-Lewis, Shari A.; Hall, Bradley; Nance, David; Moore, Fred; Miller, Ben R.; Elkins, James W.; Harrison, Jeremy J.; Boone, Chris D.; Atlas, Elliot L.; Mahieu, Emmanuel

    2016-12-01

    Carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) is an ozone-depleting substance, which is controlled by the Montreal Protocol and for which the atmospheric abundance is decreasing. However, the current observed rate of this decrease is known to be slower than expected based on reported CCl4 emissions and its estimated overall atmospheric lifetime. Here we use a three-dimensional (3-D) chemical transport model to investigate the impact on its predicted decay of uncertainties in the rates at which CCl4 is removed from the atmosphere by photolysis, by ocean uptake and by degradation in soils. The largest sink is atmospheric photolysis (74 % of total), but a reported 10 % uncertainty in its combined photolysis cross section and quantum yield has only a modest impact on the modelled rate of CCl4 decay. This is partly due to the limiting effect of the rate of transport of CCl4 from the main tropospheric reservoir to the stratosphere, where photolytic loss occurs. The model suggests large interannual variability in the magnitude of this stratospheric photolysis sink caused by variations in transport. The impact of uncertainty in the minor soil sink (9 % of total) is also relatively small. In contrast, the model shows that uncertainty in ocean loss (17 % of total) has the largest impact on modelled CCl4 decay due to its sizeable contribution to CCl4 loss and large lifetime uncertainty range (147 to 241 years). With an assumed CCl4 emission rate of 39 Gg year-1, the reference simulation with the best estimate of loss processes still underestimates the observed CCl4 (overestimates the decay) over the past 2 decades but to a smaller extent than previous studies. Changes to the rate of CCl4 loss processes, in line with known uncertainties, could bring the model into agreement with in situ surface and remote-sensing measurements, as could an increase in emissions to around 47 Gg year-1. Further progress in constraining the CCl4 budget is partly limited by systematic biases between observational

  7. The global change research center atmospheric chemistry model

    SciTech Connect

    Moraes, Jr., Francis Perry

    1995-01-01

    This work outlines the development of a new model of the chemistry of the natural atmosphere. The model is 2.5-dimensional, having spatial coordinates height, latitude, and, the half-dimension, land and ocean. The model spans both the troposphere and stratosphere, although the troposphere is emphasized and the stratosphere is simple and incomplete. The chemistry in the model includes the Ox, HOx, NOx, and methane cycles in a highly modular fashion which allows model users great flexibility in selecting simulation parameters. A detailed modeled sensitivity analysis is also presented. A key aspect of the model is its inclusion of clouds. The model uses current understanding of the distribution and optical thickness of clouds to determine the true radiation distribution in the atmosphere. As a result, detailed studies of the radiative effects of clouds on the distribution of both oxidant concentrations and trace gas removal are possible. This work presents a beginning of this study with model results and discussion of cloud effects on the hydroxyl radical.

  8. [Plant responses to elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide and transmission to other trophic levels]. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, D.E.

    1995-10-01

    This program investigated how host plant responses to elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide may be transmitted to other trophic levels, especially leaf eating insects, and alter consumption of leaves and impare their function. Study results included the following findings: increased carbon dioxide to plants alters feeding by insect herbivores; leaves produced under higher carbon conditions contain proportionally less nitrogen; insect herbivores may have decreased reproduction under elevated carbon dioxide.

  9. An Atmospheric Variability Model for Venus Aerobraking Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolson, Robert T.; Prince, Jill L. H.; Konopliv, Alexander A.

    2013-01-01

    Aerobraking has proven to be an enabling technology for planetary missions to Mars and has been proposed to enable low cost missions to Venus. Aerobraking saves a significant amount of propulsion fuel mass by exploiting atmospheric drag to reduce the eccentricity of the initial orbit. The solar arrays have been used as the primary drag surface and only minor modifications have been made in the vehicle design to accommodate the relatively modest aerothermal loads. However, if atmospheric density is highly variable from orbit to orbit, the mission must either accept higher aerothermal risk, a slower pace for aerobraking, or a tighter corridor likely with increased propulsive cost. Hence, knowledge of atmospheric variability is of great interest for the design of aerobraking missions. The first planetary aerobraking was at Venus during the Magellan mission. After the primary Magellan science mission was completed, aerobraking was used to provide a more circular orbit to enhance gravity field recovery. Magellan aerobraking took place between local solar times of 1100 and 1800 hrs, and it was found that the Venusian atmospheric density during the aerobraking phase had less than 10% 1 sigma orbit to orbit variability. On the other hand, at some latitudes and seasons, Martian variability can be as high as 40% 1 sigmaFrom both the MGN and PVO mission it was known that the atmosphere, above aerobraking altitudes, showed greater variability at night, but this variability was never quantified in a systematic manner. This paper proposes a model for atmospheric variability that can be used for aerobraking mission design until more complete data sets become available.

  10. Modeling Separate and Combined Atmospheres in BIO-Plex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Harry; Finn, Cory; Kwauk, Xianmin; Blackwell, Charles; Luna, Bernadette (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We modeled BIO-Plex designs with separate or combined atmospheres and then simulated controlling the atmosphere composition. The BIO-Plex is the Bioregenerative Planetary Life Support Systems Test Complex, a large regenerative life support test facility under development at NASA Johnson Space Center. Although plants grow better at above-normal carbon dioxide levels, humans can tolerate even higher carbon dioxide levels. Incinerator exhaust has very high levels of carbon dioxide. An elaborate BIO-Plex design would maintain different atmospheres in the crew and plant chambers and isolate the incinerator exhaust in the airlock. This design easily controls the crew and plant carbon dioxide levels but it uses many gas processors, buffers, and controllers. If all the crew's food is grown inside BIO-Plex, all the carbon dioxide required by the plants is supplied by crew respiration and the incineration of plant and food waste. Because the oxygen mass flow must balance in a closed loop, the plants supply all the oxygen required by the crew and the incinerator. Using plants for air revitalization allows using fewer gas processors, buffers, and controllers. In the simplest design, a single combined atmosphere was used for the crew, the plant chamber, and the incinerator. All gas processors, buffers, and controllers were eliminated. The carbon dioxide levels were necessarily similar for the crew and plants. If most of the food is grown, carbon dioxide can be controlled at the desired level by scheduling incineration. An intermediate design uses one atmosphere for the crew and incinerator chambers and a second for the plant chamber. This allows different carbon dioxide levels for the crew and plants. Better control of the atmosphere is obtained by varying the incineration rate. Less gas processing storage and control is needed if more food is grown.

  11. Modeling Separate and Combined Atmospheres in BIO-Plex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Harry; Finn, Cory; Kwauk, Xian-Min; Blackwell, Charles; Luna, Bernadette (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We modeled BIO-Plex designs with separate or combined atmospheres and then simulated controlling the atmosphere composition. The BIO-Plex is the Bioregenerative Planetary Life Support Systems Test Complex, a large regenerative life support test facility under development at NASA Johnson Space Center. Although plants grow better at above-normal carbon dioxide levels, humans can tolerate even higher carbon dioxide levels. incinerator exhaust has very high levels of carbon dioxide. An elaborate BIO-Plex design would maintain different atmospheres in the crew and plant chambers and isolate the incinerator exhaust in the airlock. This design easily controls the crew and plant carbon dioxide levels but it uses many gas processors, buffers, and controllers. If all the crew's food is grown inside BIO-Plex, all the carbon dioxide required by the plants is supplied by crew respiration and the incineration of plant and food waste. Because the oxygen mass flow must balance in a closed loop, the plants supply all the oxygen required by the crew and the incinerator. Using plants for air revitalization allows using fewer gas processors, buffers, and controllers. In the simplest design, a single combined atmosphere was used for the crew, the plant chamber, and the incinerator. All gas processors, buffers, and controllers were eliminated. The carbon dioxide levels were necessarily similar for the crew and plants. If most of the food is grown, carbon dioxide can be controlled at the desired level by scheduling incineration. An intermediate design uses one atmosphere for the crew and incinerator chambers and a second for the plant chamber. This allows different carbon dioxide levels for the crew and plants. Better control of the atmosphere is obtained by varying the incineration rate. Less gas processing, storage, and control is needed if more food is grown.

  12. An exploration of Saturn's atmospheric dynamics with Global Climate Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiga, Aymeric; Guerlet, Sandrine; Indurain, Mikel; Meurdesoif, Yann; Millour, Ehouarn; Sylvestre, Mélody; Dubos, Thomas; Fouchet, Thierry

    2015-04-01

    A decade of Cassini observations has yielded a new vision on the dynamical phenomena in Saturn's troposphere and stratosphere. Several puzzling signatures (equatorial oscillations with a period of about half a Saturn year, interhemispheric circulations affecting the hydrocarbons' distribution, including possible effects of rings shadowing, sudden warming associated with the powerful 2010 Great White Spot) cannot be explained by current photochemical and radiative models, which do not include dynamics. We therefore suspect that 1. the observed anomalies arise from large-scale dynamical circulations and 2. those large-scale dynamical motions are driven by atmospheric waves, eddies, and convection, in other words fundamental mechanisms giving birth to, e.g., the Quasi-Biennal Oscillation and Brewer-Dobson circulation in the Earth's middle atmosphere. We explore the plausibility of this scenario using our new Global Climate Modeling (GCM) for Saturn. To build this model, we firstly formulated dedicated physical parameterizations for Saturn's atmosphere, with a particular emphasis on radiative computations (using a correlated-k radiative transfer model, with radiative species and spectral discretization tailored for Saturn) aimed at both efficiency and accuracy, and validated them against existing Cassini observations. A second step consisted in coupling this radiative model to an hydrodynamical solver to predict the three-dimensional evolution of Saturn's tropospheric and stratospheric flow. We will provide an analysis of the first results of those dynamical simulations, with a focus on the development of baroclinic and barotropic instability, on eddy vs. mean flow interactions, and how this could relate to the enigmatic signatures observed by Cassini. Preliminary high-resolution simulations with a new icosahedral dynamical solver adapted to high-performance computing will also be analyzed. Perspectives are twofold: firstly, broadening our fundamental knowledge of

  13. A Kinetic Muti-Plume Model of the Enceladus’ Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenishev, Valeriy; Combi, M.; Teolis, B.; Waite, H.

    2009-09-01

    In addition of being the major source of neutral gas and dust particles for the Saturnian E-ring and, ultimately, heavy ions for the Saturnian inner magnetosphere, Enceladus exhibits geological activity that made it an object of recent intensive study. The interest has significantly increased after Cassini flybys in 2005 that have provided a detailed map of its surface, showing that most of activity occurs in a region around the south pole of the satellite. Dust jets that were discovered during the flybys can be related to a set of localized gas sources that dominate in supplying material into the rarefied atmosphere of Enceladus. A comprehensive data analysis requires developing of physical models that include all major processes occurring in the atmosphere. Such models can be used not only for calibration and understanding of already available data but also could have a practical application for planning of the coming flybys and predicting of expected results. This work presents a kinetic model of Enceladus’ atmosphere with plumes located at positions determined with CIRS observations and described by local Maxwellian distribution functions. The model parameters include production rate, temperature and bulk velocity of a gas near a vent. Assuming collision frequency being negligible outside of the vents, density distribution in the atmosphere is obtained by solving a Louwville equation. The parameters are optimized to fit various combinations of sets of Cassini data from INMS and UVIS. Here we present results of fitting the multi-plume model to UVIS E2, and INMS E3 and E5 flyby data and place estimates of source rates from some plumes as well as upper limits from others. This work was partially supported by NASA Cassini Data Analysis grant NNX08AP94G.

  14. An Overview of Modeling Middle Atmospheric Odd Nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackman, Charles H.; Kawa, S. Randolph; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Odd nitrogen (N, NO, NO2, NO3, N2O5, HNO3, HO2NO2, ClONO2, and BrONO2) constituents are important components in the control of middle atmospheric ozone. Several processes lead to the production of odd nitrogen (NO(sub y)) in the middle atmosphere (stratosphere and mesosphere) including the oxidation of nitrous oxide (N2O), lightning, downflux from the thermosphere, and energetic charged particles (e.g., galactic cosmic rays, solar proton events, and energetic electron precipitation). The dominant production mechanism of NO(sub y) in the stratosphere is N2O oxidation, although other processes contribute. Mesospheric NO(sub y) is influenced by N2O oxidation, downflux from the thermosphere, and energetic charged particles. NO(sub y) is destroyed in the middle atmosphere primarily via two processes: 1) dissociation of NO to form N and O followed by N + NO yielding N2 + O to reform even nitrogen; and 2) transport to the troposphere where HNO3 can be rapidly scavenged in water droplets and rained out of the atmosphere. There are fairly significant differences among global models that predict NO(sub y). NO(sub y) has a fairly long lifetime in the stratosphere (months to years), thus disparate transport in the models probably contributes to many of these differences. Satellite and aircraft measurement provide modeling tests of the various components of NO(sub y). Although some recent reaction rate measurements have led to improvements in model/measurement agreement, significant differences do remain. This presentation will provide an overview of several proposed sources and sinks of NO(sub y) and their regions of importance. Multi-dimensional modeling results for NO(sub y) and its components with comparisons to observations will also be presented.

  15. FINGERING CONVECTION AND CLOUDLESS MODELS FOR COOL BROWN DWARF ATMOSPHERES

    SciTech Connect

    Tremblin, P.; Amundsen, D. S.; Mourier, P.; Baraffe, I.; Chabrier, G.; Drummond, B.; Homeier, D.; Venot, O. E-mail: pascal.tremblin@cea.fr

    2015-05-01

    This work aims to improve the current understanding of the atmospheres of brown dwarfs, especially cold ones with spectral types T and Y, whose modeling is a current challenge. Silicate and iron clouds are believed to disappear at the photosphere at the L/T transition, but cloudless models fail to reproduce correctly the spectra of T dwarfs, advocating for the addition of more physics, e.g., other types of clouds or internal energy transport mechanisms. We use a one-dimensional radiative/convective equilibrium code ATMO to investigate this issue. This code includes both equilibrium and out-of-equilibrium chemistry and solves consistently the PT structure. Included opacity sources are H{sub 2}-H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}-He, H{sub 2}O, CO, CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, NH{sub 3}, K, Na, and TiO, VO if they are present in the atmosphere. We show that the spectra of Y dwarfs can be accurately reproduced with a cloudless model if vertical mixing and NH{sub 3} quenching are taken into account. T dwarf spectra still have some reddening in, e.g., J–H, compared to cloudless models. This reddening can be reproduced by slightly reducing the temperature gradient in the atmosphere. We propose that this reduction of the stabilizing temperature gradient in these layers, leading to cooler structures, is due to the onset of fingering convection, triggered by the destabilizing impact of condensation of very thin dust.

  16. Solar Radiation Estimated Through Mesoscale Atmospheric Modeling over Northeast Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Menezes Neto, Otacilio Leandro; Costa, Alexandre Araújo; Ramalho, Fernando Pinto; de Maria, Paulo Henrique Santiago

    2009-03-01

    The use of renewable energy sources, like solar, wind and biomass is rapidly increasing in recent years, with solar radiation as a particularly abundant energy source over Northeast Brazil. A proper quantitative knowledge of the incoming solar radiation is of great importance for energy planning in Brazil, serving as basis for developing future projects of photovoltaic power plants and solar energy exploitation. This work presents a methodology for mapping the incoming solar radiation at ground level for Northeast Brazil, using a mesoscale atmospheric model (Regional Atmospheric Modeling System—RAMS), calibrated and validated using data from the network of automatic surface stations from the State Foundation for Meteorology and Water Resources from Ceará (Fundação Cearense de Meteorologia e Recursos Hídricos- FUNCEME). The results showed that the model exhibits systematic errors, overestimating surface radiation, but that, after the proper statistical corrections, using a relationship between the model-predicted cloud fraction, the ground-level observed solar radiation and the incoming solar radiation estimated at the top of the atmosphere, a correlation of 0.92 with a confidence interval of 13.5 W/m2 is found for monthly data. Using this methodology, we found an estimate for annual average incoming solar radiation over Ceará of 215 W/m2 (maximum in October: 260 W/m2).

  17. A Moist Idealized Test Case for Atmospheric General Circulation Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thatcher, D.; Jablonowski, C.; Zarzycki, C.

    2013-12-01

    The vast array of dynamical and physical processes within atmospheric general circulation models (GCMs) makes it difficult to correctly distinguish the sources of error within a model. Therefore, simplified test cases are important in testing the accuracy of individual model components, such as the fluid flow component in the dynamical core. Typically, dynamical cores are coupled to complex subgrid-scale physical parameterization packages, and the nonlinear interactions mask the causes and effects of atmospheric phenomena. Idealized tests are a computationally efficient method for analyzing the underlying numerical techniques of dynamical cores. The newly proposed test case is based on the widely-used Held and Suarez (1994) (HS) test for dry dynamical cores. The latter replaces the full physical parameterization package with a Newtonian temperature relaxation and Rayleigh damping of low-level winds on a flat planet. However, the impact of moisture, a crucial physics-dynamics coupling process, is missing from the HS test. Here we present a moist variant of the HS test case to create a test case of intermediate complexity with idealized moisture feedbacks. It uses simplified physical processes to model large-scale condensation, boundary layer turbulence, and surface fluxes of horizontal momentum, latent heat, and sensible heat between the atmosphere and an ocean-covered planet (Reed and Jablonowski, 2012). We apply this test to four dynamical cores within NCAR's Community Atmosphere Model version 5.3, including the Finite Volume, Eulerian spectral transform, semi-Lagrangian spectral transform, and Spectral Element dynamical cores. We analyze the kinetic energy spectra, general circulation, and precipitation of this new moist idealized test case across all four dynamical cores. Simulations of the moist idealized test case are compared to aqua-planet experiments with complex physical parameterizations. The moist idealized test case successfully reproduces many features

  18. Construction of an advanced software tool for planetary atmospheric modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedland, Peter; Keller, Richard M.; Mckay, Christopher P.; Sims, Michael H.; Thompson, David E.

    1992-01-01

    Scientific model-building can be a time intensive and painstaking process, often involving the development of large complex computer programs. Despite the effort involved, scientific models cannot be distributed easily and shared with other scientists. In general, implemented scientific models are complicated, idiosyncratic, and difficult for anyone but the original scientist/programmer to understand. We propose to construct a scientific modeling software tool that serves as an aid to the scientist in developing, using and sharing models. The proposed tool will include an interactive intelligent graphical interface and a high-level domain-specific modeling language. As a test bed for this research, we propose to develop a software prototype in the domain of planetary atmospheric modeling.

  19. Construction of an advanced software tool for planetary atmospheric modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedland, Peter; Keller, Richard M.; Mckay, Christopher P.; Sims, Michael H.; Thompson, David E.

    1993-01-01

    Scientific model-building can be a time intensive and painstaking process, often involving the development of large complex computer programs. Despite the effort involved, scientific models cannot be distributed easily and shared with other scientists. In general, implemented scientific models are complicated, idiosyncratic, and difficult for anyone but the original scientist/programmer to understand. We propose to construct a scientific modeling software tool that serves as an aid to the scientist in developing, using and sharing models. The proposed tool will include an interactive intelligent graphical interface and a high-level domain-specific modeling language. As a testbed for this research, we propose to develop a software prototype in the domain of planetary atmospheric modeling.

  20. A TIME-DEPENDENT RADIATIVE MODEL FOR THE ATMOSPHERE OF THE ECCENTRIC EXOPLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Iro, N.; Deming, L. D. E-mail: leo.d.deming@nasa.go

    2010-03-20

    We present a time-dependent radiative model for the atmosphere of extrasolar planets that takes into account the eccentricity of their orbit. In addition to the modulation of stellar irradiation by the varying planet-star distance, the pseudo-synchronous rotation of the planets may play a significant role. We include both of these time-dependent effects when modeling the planetary thermal structure. We investigate the thermal structure and spectral characteristics for time-dependent stellar heating for two highly eccentric planets. Finally, we discuss observational aspects for those planets suitable for Spitzer measurements and investigate the role of the rotation rate.

  1. Trends in atmospheric ozone - Conflicts between models and SBUV data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rusch, D. W.; Clancy, R. T.

    1988-01-01

    Results obtained from simple models for the long-term change in ozone and its seasonal amplitude as a function of atmospheric pressure in the region from 3.0-0.1 mbar are compared with ozone measurements obtained with the Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet Instrument (SBUV). The SBUV data show secular trends in ozone which are negative and larger than the largest model trends by a factor of two or more. It is suggested that temperature-correlated variations in photochemistry should be included in the model.

  2. Using meteorological ensembles for atmospheric dispersion modelling of the Fukushima nuclear accident

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Périllat, Raphaël; Korsakissok, Irène; Mallet, Vivien; Mathieu, Anne; Sekiyama, Thomas; Didier, Damien; Kajino, Mizuo; Igarashi, Yasuhito; Adachi, Kouji

    2016-04-01

    Dispersion models are used in response to an accidental release of radionuclides of the atmosphere, to infer mitigation actions, and complement field measurements for the assessment of short and long term environmental and sanitary impacts. However, the predictions of these models are subject to important uncertainties, especially due to input data, such as meteorological fields or source term. This is still the case more than four years after the Fukushima disaster (Korsakissok et al., 2012, Girard et al., 2014). In the framework of the SAKURA project, an MRI-IRSN collaboration, a meteorological ensemble of 20 members designed by MRI (Sekiyama et al. 2013) was used with IRSN's atmospheric dispersion models. Another ensemble, retrieved from ECMWF and comprising 50 members, was also used for comparison. The MRI ensemble is 3-hour assimilated, with a 3-kilometers resolution, designed to reduce the meteorological uncertainty in the Fukushima case. The ECMWF is a 24-hour forecast with a coarser grid, representative of the uncertainty of the data available in a crisis context. First, it was necessary to assess the quality of the ensembles for our purpose, to ensure that their spread was representative of the uncertainty of meteorological fields. Using meteorological observations allowed characterizing the ensembles' spread, with tools such as Talagrand diagrams. Then, the uncertainty was propagated through atmospheric dispersion models. The underlying question is whether the output spread is larger than the input spread, that is, whether small uncertainties in meteorological fields can produce large differences in atmospheric dispersion results. Here again, the use of field observations was crucial, in order to characterize the spread of the ensemble of atmospheric dispersion simulations. In the case of the Fukushima accident, gamma dose rates, air activities and deposition data were available. Based on these data, selection criteria for the ensemble members were

  3. Model projections of atmospheric steering of Sandy-like superstorms.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Elizabeth A; Polvani, Lorenzo M; Sobel, Adam H

    2013-09-17

    Superstorm Sandy ravaged the eastern seaboard of the United States, costing a great number of lives and billions of dollars in damage. Whether events like Sandy will become more frequent as anthropogenic greenhouse gases continue to increase remains an open and complex question. Here we consider whether the persistent large-scale atmospheric patterns that steered Sandy onto the coast will become more frequent in the coming decades. Using the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project, phase 5 multimodel ensemble, we demonstrate that climate models consistently project a decrease in the frequency and persistence of the westward flow that led to Sandy's unprecedented track, implying that future atmospheric conditions are less likely than at present to propel storms westward into the coast.

  4. Model projections of atmospheric steering of Sandy-like superstorms

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Elizabeth A.; Polvani, Lorenzo M.; Sobel, Adam H.

    2013-01-01

    Superstorm Sandy ravaged the eastern seaboard of the United States, costing a great number of lives and billions of dollars in damage. Whether events like Sandy will become more frequent as anthropogenic greenhouse gases continue to increase remains an open and complex question. Here we consider whether the persistent large-scale atmospheric patterns that steered Sandy onto the coast will become more frequent in the coming decades. Using the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project, phase 5 multimodel ensemble, we demonstrate that climate models consistently project a decrease in the frequency and persistence of the westward flow that led to Sandy’s unprecedented track, implying that future atmospheric conditions are less likely than at present to propel storms westward into the coast. PMID:24003129

  5. The annual pressure cycle on Mars: Results from the LMD Martian atmospheric general circulation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hourdin, Frederic; Forget, Francois; Talagrand, O.

    1993-01-01

    We have been developing a General Circulation Model (GCM) of the martian atmosphere since 1989. The model has been described rather extensively elsewhere and only the main characteristics are given here. The dynamical part of the model, adapted from the LMD terrestrial climate model, is based on a finite-difference formulation of the classical 'primitive equations of meteorology.' The radiative transfer code includes absorption and emission by CO2 (carefully validated by comparison to line-by-line calculations) and dust in the thermal range and absorption and scattering by dust in the visible range. Other physical parameterizations are included: modeling of vertical turbulent mixing, dry convective adjustment (in order to prevent vertical unstable temperature profiles), and a multilayer model of the thermal conduction in the soil. Finally, the condensation-sublimation of CO2 is introduced through specification of a pressure-dependent condensation temperature. The atmospheric and surface temperatures are prevented from falling below this critical temperature by condensation and direct precipitation onto the surface of atmospheric CO2. The only prespecified spatial fields are the surface thermal inertia, albedo, and topography.

  6. Modeling the aerosols in the atmosphere of Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas-Osip, Joanna Elizabeth

    2001-09-01

    A combination of laboratory experiments, theoretical modeling, and spacecraft in situ observations is employed to characterize the aerosols in the atmosphere of Titan. The scattering properties of model aerosols were measured using the Microwave Analog Light Scattering Facility at the University of Florida and complemented with theoretical modeling of single scattering characteristics and radiative transfer in Titan's atmosphere. This study compares these modeling results with photopolarimetric observations made over a range of phase angles by the Pioneer 11 and Voyagers 1 and 2 spacecraft approximately 20 years ago. Important results of this work include a survey of the scattering properties of different particle shapes necessary to accurately interpret these observations without introducing non-physical assumptions about the particles or requiring additional free parameters to the radiative transfer models. Previous studies use calculation methods which, due to computing memory and processing time requirements, a priori exclude much of the phase space that the microwave analog laboratory is ideal for exploring. The goal of the present work, to directly constrain aerosol physical characteristics, is addressed by studying in a consistent manner how a variety of particle morphologies affect polarization and intensity measurements of Titan's atmosphere. Single liquid drops are modeled using spheres for which scattering patterns can be easily calculated with Mie theory. Cubes are used as a representation of solids with sharp edges due to fragmentation. More complex particle morphologies are modeled as aggregates that are likely formed by collisions between semi-liquid spheres that stick together instead of merging. Radiative transfer calculations for model atmospheres containing these particles are constrained by direct comparison to in situ spacecraft observations. Based on these comparisons, many model morphologies are excluded from further consideration and the

  7. Midnight Temperature Maximum (MTM) in Whole Atmosphere Model (WAM) Simulations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-14

    C. G. (1996), Simulations of the low -latitude midnight temperature maximum, J. Geophys. Res., 101, 26,863–26,874. Forbes, J. M., S. L. Bruinsma, Y...Midnight temperature maximum (MTM) in Whole Atmosphere Model (WAM) simulations R. A. Akmaev,1 F. Wu,2 T. J. Fuller-Rowell,2 and H. Wang2 Received 13...February 2009; accepted 18 March 2009; published 14 April 2009. [1] Discovered almost four decades ago, the midnight temperature maximum (MTM) with

  8. A parallel coupled oceanic-atmospheric general circulation model

    SciTech Connect

    Wehner, M.F.; Bourgeois, A.J.; Eltgroth, P.G.; Duffy, P.B.; Dannevik, W.P.

    1994-12-01

    The Climate Systems Modeling group at LLNL has developed a portable coupled oceanic-atmospheric general circulation model suitable for use on a variety of massively parallel (MPP) computers of the multiple instruction, multiple data (MIMD) class. The model is composed of parallel versions of the UCLA atmospheric general circulation model, the GFDL modular ocean model (MOM) and a dynamic sea ice model based on the Hiber formulation extracted from the OPYC ocean model. The strategy to achieve parallelism is twofold. One level of parallelism is accomplished by applying two dimensional domain decomposition techniques to each of the three constituent submodels. A second level of parallelism is attained by a concurrent execution of AGCM and OGCM/sea ice components on separate sets of processors. For this functional decomposition scheme, a flux coupling module has been written to calculate the heat, moisture and momentum fluxes independent of either the AGCM or the OGCM modules. The flux coupler`s other roles are to facilitate the transfer of data between subsystem components and processors via message passing techniques and to interpolate and aggregate between the possibly incommensurate meshes.

  9. Utilization of Global Reference Atmosphere Model (GRAM) for shuttle entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joosten, Kent

    1987-01-01

    At high latitudes, dispersions in values of density for the middle atmosphere from the Global Reference Atmosphere Model (GRAM) are observed to be large, particularly in the winter. Trajectories have been run from 28.5 deg to 98 deg. The critical part of the atmosphere for reentry is 250,000 to 270,000 ft. 250,000 ft is the altitude where the shuttle trajectory levels out. For ascending passes the critical region occurs near the equator. For descending entries the critical region is in northern latitudes. The computed trajectory is input to the GRAM, which computes means and deviations of atmospheric parameters at each point along the trajectory. There is little latitude dispersion for the ascending passes; the strongest source of deviations is seasonal; however, very wide seasonal and latitudinal deviations are exhibited for the descending passes at all orbital inclinations. For shuttle operations the problem is control to maintain the correct entry corridor and avoid either aerodynamic skipping or excessive heat loads.

  10. MODEL ATMOSPHERES FOR X-RAY BURSTING NEUTRON STARS

    DOE PAGES

    Medin, Zachary James; Steinkirch, Marina von; Calder, Alan C.; ...

    2016-11-21

    The hydrogen and helium accreted by X-ray bursting neutron stars is periodically consumed in runaway thermonuclear reactions that cause the entire surface to glow brightly in X-rays for a few seconds. With models of the emission, the mass and radius of the neutron star can be inferred from the observations. By simultaneously probing neutron star masses and radii, X-ray bursts (XRBs) are one of the strongest diagnostics of the nature of matter at extremely high densities. Accurate determinations of these parameters are difficult, however, due to the highly non-ideal nature of the atmospheres where XRBs occur. Also, observations from X-raymore » telescopes such as RXTE and NuStar can potentially place strong constraints on nuclear matter once uncertainties in atmosphere models have been reduced. Lastly, here we discuss current progress on modeling atmospheres of X-ray bursting neutron stars and some of the challenges still to be overcome.« less

  11. Biogeochemical Modeling of the Second Rise of Atmospheric Oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, M.; Catling, D. C.; Claire, M.

    2014-12-01

    The second rise of atmospheric oxygen (~600 Ma) marked an increase of atmospheric pO2 from a poorly constrained value of 0.1% < pO2 < 10% of present atmospheric level (PAL) in the early and mid Proterozoic to >10%PAL1. The event is important because it ushered in the modern era of animal life. To understand the evolution of Earth's habitability, it is therefore key to understand the cause of this 2nd rise. Here, we quantitatively examine possible causes for the 2nd rise of oxygen. We use a biogeochemical box model2 originally developed to calculate the oxygen evolution before and after the 1st rise of oxygen (~2.4 Ga). The Claire et al. (2006) model calculates the evolution of atmospheric oxygen and methane given production and loss fluxes associated with the oxygen, carbon, and iron cycles. Because the model was unable to drive pO2 to end-Proterozoic levels, the authors suggested that another buffer, such as sulfur, is needed to explain the 2nd rise of oxygen. The sulfur and oxygen cycles are tied through various biogeochemical interactions; therefore, once sulfur (as sulfate) began to accumulate in Proterozoic oceans, it likely began to heavily influence the oxygen cycle. We have added a sulfur biogeochemical cycle to this model, enabling exploration of mechanisms that buffer pO2 at intermediate levels in the Proterozoic and fail to do so in the Phanerozoic. Preliminary results show evolution of oxygen and methane that are consistent with geologic proxies. However, the model-generated 2nd rise of oxygen is dependent upon sulfur fluxes that have uncertain magnitudes, so we will present the sensitivity of our results to model assumptions while constraining scenarios for the 2nd rise of atmospheric O2. In the future, we will also integrate isotopic fractionation effects, which will allow comparison with isotopic data from sedimentary sulfides, carbonates, and organic carbon. 1Canfield, C., 2014, Treatise on Geochemistry, 197 2Claire, M.W., et al., 2006, Geobiology

  12. Unified Ion-chemical Model for the Middle Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamsali, Nagaraja; Kamsali, Nagaraja; Datta, Jayati; Prasad, Bsn

    The importance of ion-chemical model studies in our understanding of middle atmospheric regions needs no special emphasis. Present day knowledge of middle atmosphere (0-100 km) has come from two distinct experimental developments: first, in situ measurements of ion composition by balloons and sounding rockets and second, laboratory investigations on ionchemical reactions of importance at these heights, determination of reaction rate coefficients and their temperature dependence. Model studies act as an interface between these, to generate theoretical estimates of ion composition and their derivatives (e.g. electrical conductivity) by using as input the laboratory data on reaction rate coefficients and the data on neutral species density, ionization flux, temperature etc. Free electrons exist only in the mesosphere. Positive molecular ions dominate the upper mesospheric heights and heavy positive and negative cluster ions appearing at the lower mesospheric heights continue to dominate in strato and troposphere. The equilibrium density of electrons and ionic species is governed by: a) ionization of the atmospheric constituents producing electron-positive ion pair b)gas-phase ion-chemical reactions that convert the electrons and primary positive ions into heavy cluster ions of both polarity c)heterogeneous ion-chemical reactions for producing aerosol ions and d) loss mechanisms for small ions and aerosol ions through recombination of oppositely charged species. Physical entities that control the ion production and loss processes are not the same and vary vastly both in nature and magnitude in the middle atmosphere X-rays, Lymann-alpha and precipitating electrons are the dominant ionizing agents at the mesospheric heights. Cosmic ray ionization that is not so significant in the mesosphere is the sole ionizing agent at stratosphere and troposphere. At the ground level and up to a few tens of meters above the earth's surface, natural radioactivity induced ionization is

  13. Ozone reference models for the middle atmosphere (new CIRA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keating, G. M.; Pitts, M. C.; Young, D. F.

    1989-01-01

    Models of ozone vertical structure were generated that were based on multiple data sets from satellites. The very good absolute accuracy of the individual data sets allowed the data to be directly combined to generate these models. The data used for generation of these models are from some of the most recent satellite measurements over the period 1978 to 1983. A discussion is provided of validation and error analyses of these data sets. Also, inconsistencies in data sets brought about by temporal variations or other factors are indicated. The models cover the pressure range from from 20 to 0.003 mb (25 to 90 km). The models for pressures less than 0.5 mb represent only the day side and are only provisional since there was limited longitudinal coverage at these levels. The models start near 25 km in accord with previous COSPAR international reference atmosphere (CIRA) models. Models are also provided of ozone mixing ratio as a function of height. The monthly standard deviation and interannual variations relative to zonal means are also provided. In addition to the models of monthly latitudinal variations in vertical structure based on satellite measurements, monthly models of total column ozone and its characteristic variability as a function of latitude based on four years of Nimbus 7 measurements, models of the relationship between vertical structure and total column ozone, and a midlatitude annual mean model are incorporated in this set of ozone reference atmospheres. Various systematic variations are discussed including the annual, semiannual, and quasibiennial oscillations, and diurnal, longitudinal, and response to solar activity variations.

  14. The Explicit Planetary Isentropic-Coordinate (EPIC) Atmospheric Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowling, T. E.; Fischer, A. S.; Gierasch, P. J.; Harrington, J.; LeBeau, R. P.; Santori, C. M.

    1998-04-01

    We describe a new general circulation model (GCM) designed for planetary atmospheric studies called the EPIC model. This is a finite-difference model based on the isentropic-coordinate scheme of Hsu and Arakawa (1990.Mon. Wea. Rev.118, 1933-1959). We report on previously undocumented modifications, additions, and key practical issues that experience running the model has revealed to be important. The model integrates the hydrostatic primitive equations, which are valid for large-scale atmospheric dynamics and include gravity waves (buoyancy waves), planetary waves (Rossby waves), and horizontally propagating sound waves (Lamb waves), but not vertically propagating sound waves because of the hydrostatic approximation. The vertical coordinate is entropy in the form of potential temperature, which coincides with material surfaces for adiabatic motion. This means that there is no vertical velocity except where there is heating, which improves accuracy and helps the model maintain conservation properties over long integrations. An isentropic vertical coordinate is natural for the atmospheres of Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune, which are believed to have essentially adiabatic interiors that match up with the bottom of the model and is also excellent for middle-atmosphere studies on any planet. Radiative processes are parameterized by Newtonian cooling, and the latent heat of ortho-para hydrogen conversion is included when appropriate, with a suitably defined mean potential temperature. The model is written with general map factors that make it easy to configure in oblate spherical, cylindrical, or Cartesian coordinates. The code includes optional Message Passing Interface (MPI) library calls and hence runs on any Unix-based parallel computer or network cluster. An optional graphical user interface to commercial visualization software facilitates control of the model and analysis of output. Memory is allocated dynamically such that the user does not recompile to

  15. Modeling of the Sputtering Efficiency for Martian Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Luhmann, J. G.; Leblanc, F.; Fang, X.; Johnson, R. E.; Ma, Y.; Ip, W.; Li, L.

    2012-12-01

    The formation of a hot corona with the related escape rate of the oxygen atoms is an important issue affecting the evolution of the Marian atmosphere. While the dissociative recombination process appears to dominate the non-thermal escaping rate of the oxygen atoms, atmospheric sputtering by the re-impact of the pickup exospheric ions could have played a role in earlier epochs and at solar maximum in the present epoch. Due to the orientation of the interplanetary magnetic fields and the shielding of the crustal fields near Mar's surface, the pickup ions may re-impact the atmosphere with a variety of angles, energies, and spatial distributions. While night-side sputtering is suggested to occur based on modeling (Li et al., 2011), the sputter component due to pickup ion impacts on the oxygen corona can be distinguished from other ejection mechanisms, such as dissociative recombination. In preparation for the Maven mission, we performed a Monte Carlo model of the upper atmosphere coupled to a molecular dynamic calculation for the molecular collisions developed by Leblanc and Johnson (2002) to study the cascade sputtering effects in the region of the Martian exobase. Different incident angle and energy spectrum of the impact ions were tested. Further calculations with more realistic pickup ion impact distributions will be performed based on the numerical results of a 3D Monte Carlo Pickup Ion Transport model, which includes the electromagnetic backgrounds from the 3D multi-species MHD simulations (Y. Ma et al., 2004; Y. Ma and A. F. Nagy, 2007).

  16. Thermal shallow water models of geostrophic turbulence in Jovian atmospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Warneford, Emma S. Dellar, Paul J.

    2014-01-15

    Conventional shallow water theory successfully reproduces many key features of the Jovian atmosphere: a mixture of coherent vortices and stable, large-scale, zonal jets whose amplitude decreases with distance from the equator. However, both freely decaying and forced-dissipative simulations of the shallow water equations in Jovian parameter regimes invariably yield retrograde equatorial jets, while Jupiter itself has a strong prograde equatorial jet. Simulations by Scott and Polvani [“Equatorial superrotation in shallow atmospheres,” Geophys. Res. Lett. 35, L24202 (2008)] have produced prograde equatorial jets through the addition of a model for radiative relaxation in the shallow water height equation. However, their model does not conserve mass or momentum in the active layer, and produces mid-latitude jets much weaker than the equatorial jet. We present the thermal shallow water equations as an alternative model for Jovian atmospheres. These equations permit horizontal variations in the thermodynamic properties of the fluid within the active layer. We incorporate a radiative relaxation term in the separate temperature equation, leaving the mass and momentum conservation equations untouched. Simulations of this model in the Jovian regime yield a strong prograde equatorial jet, and larger amplitude mid-latitude jets than the Scott and Polvani model. For both models, the slope of the non-zonal energy spectra is consistent with the classic Kolmogorov scaling, and the slope of the zonal energy spectra is consistent with the much steeper spectrum observed for Jupiter. We also perform simulations of the thermal shallow water equations for Neptunian parameter values, with a radiative relaxation time scale calculated for the same 25 mbar pressure level we used for Jupiter. These Neptunian simulations reproduce the broad, retrograde equatorial jet and prograde mid-latitude jets seen in observations. The much longer radiative time scale for the colder planet Neptune

  17. Modelling trace gas chemistry in the Martian atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffy, M. K. D.; Lewis, S. R.; Mason, N. J.

    2012-09-01

    Dust-bourne heterogeneous reactions have been modelled using the UK Mars Global Circulation Model (MGCM) coupled with physics and chemistry schemes used in the Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique (LMD) MGCM. The seasonal ozone column abundance has been calculated using a number of different dust scenarios. Reactions involving volcanically interesting species such as water vapour, SO2 and HCl have been included and tracer release experiments have been conducted to mimic short and long-term volcanic outgassing. The effect of these new reactions on the bulk chemistry of the Martian atmosphere has been quantified.

  18. A geometric view of adaptive optics control: boiling atmosphere model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiberg, Donald M.; Max, Claire E.; Gavel, Donald T.

    2004-10-01

    The separation principle of optimal adaptive optics control is derived, and definitions of controllability and observability are introduced. An exact finite dimensional state space representation of the control system dynamics is obtained without the need for truncation in modes such as Zernikes. The uncertainty of sensing uncontrollable modes confuses present adaptive optics controllers. This uncertainty can be modeled by a Kalman filter. Reducing this uncertainty permits increased gain, increasing the Strehl, which is done by an optimal control law derived here. A general model of the atmosphere is considered, including boiling.

  19. Subcycled dynamics in the Spectral Community Atmosphere Model, version 4

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Mark; Evans, Katherine J; Hack, James J; Worley, Patrick H

    2010-01-01

    To gain computational efficiency, a split explicit time integration scheme has been implemented in the CAM spectral Eulerian dynamical core. In this scheme, already present in other dynamical core options within the Community Atmosphere Model, version 4 (CAM), the fluid dynamics portion of the model is subcycled to allow a longer time step for the parameterization schemes. The physics parameterization of CAM is not subject to the stability restrictions of the fluid dynamics, and thus finer spatial resolutions of the model do not require the physics time step to be reduced. A brief outline of the subcycling algorithm implementation and resulting model efficiency improvement is presented. A discussion regarding the effect of the climate statistics derived from short model runs is provided.

  20. Regional forecasting with global atmospheric models; Third year report

    SciTech Connect

    Crowley, T.J.; North, G.R.; Smith, N.R.

    1994-05-01

    This report was prepared by the Applied Research Corporation (ARC), College Station, Texas, under subcontract to Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as part of a global climate studies task. The task supports site characterization work required for the selection of a potential high-level nuclear waste repository and is part of the Performance Assessment Scientific Support (PASS) Program at PNL. The work is under the overall direction of the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), US Department of Energy Headquarters, Washington, DC. The scope of the report is to present the results of the third year`s work on the atmospheric modeling part of the global climate studies task. The development testing of computer models and initial results are discussed. The appendices contain several studies that provide supporting information and guidance to the modeling work and further details on computer model development. Complete documentation of the models, including user information, will be prepared under separate reports and manuals.

  1. Computational modelling of final covers for uranium mill tailings impoundments.

    PubMed

    Leoni, Guilherme Luís Menegassi; Almeida, Márcio de Souza Soares; Fernandes, Horst Monken

    2004-07-05

    To properly design a final cover for uranium mill tailings impoundments the designer must attempt to find an effective geotechnical solution which addresses the radiological and non-radiological potential impact and prevents geochemical processes from occurring within the tailings. This paper presents a computer-based method for evaluating the performance of engineered final covers for the remediation of uranium mill tailings impoundments. Three hypothetical final covers were taken from scientific literature to investigate the proposed method: (i) a compacted clay liner (CCL); (ii) a composite liner (CL) and (iii) a capillary barrier (CB). The processes investigated: (i) the saturated hydraulic flux; (ii) the unsaturated hydraulic flux (exclusively for the capillary barrier) and (iii) the radon exhalation to the atmosphere. The computer programs utilised for the analyses are: (i) Hydrologic Evaluation of Landfill Performance (HELP); (ii) SEEP/W and (iii) RADON. The site considered for the development of the research presented herein was the uranium mill tailings impoundment located at the Brazilian city of Poços de Caldas, in the Minas Gerais State.

  2. Should we use a simple or complex model for moisture recycling and atmospheric moisture tracking?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Ent, R. J.; Tuinenburg, O. A.; Knoche, H.-R.; Kunstmann, H.; Savenije, H. H. G.

    2013-05-01

    This paper compares three state-of-the-art atmospheric moisture tracking models. Such models are typically used to study the water component of coupled land and atmosphere models, in particular quantifying moisture recycling and the source-sink relations between evaporation and precipitation. However, there are several atmospheric moisture tracking methods being used in the literature, and depending on the level of aggregation, the assumptions made and the level of detail, the performance of these methods may differ substantially. In this paper, we compare three methods. The RCM-tag method uses highly accurate 3-D water tracking (including phase transitions) directly within a regional climate model (online), while the other two methods (WAM and 3D-T) use a posteriori (offline) water vapour tracking. The original version of WAM makes use of the well-mixed assumption, while 3D-T is a multi-layer model. The a posteriori models are faster and more flexible, but less accurate than online moisture tracking with RCM-tag. In order to evaluate the accuracy of the a posteriori models, we tagged evaporated water from Lake Volta in West Africa and traced it to where it precipitates. It is found that the strong wind shear in West Africa is the main cause of errors in the a posteriori models. The number of vertical layers and the initial release height of tagged water in the model are found to have the most significant influences on the results. With this knowledge small improvements were made to the a posteriori models. It appeared that expanding WAM to a 2 layer model, or a lower release height in 3D-T, led to significantly better results. Finally, we introduced a simple metric to assess wind shear globally and give recommendations about when to use which model. The "best" method, however, very much depends on the spatial extent of the research question as well as the available computational power.

  3. Whitings as a Potential Mechanism for Controlling Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Concentrations – Final Project Report

    SciTech Connect

    Brady D. Lee; William A. Apel; Michelle R. Walton

    2006-03-01

    Species of cyanobacteria in the genera Synechococcus and Synechocystis are known to be the catalysts of a phenomenon called "whitings", which is the formation and precipitation of fine-grained CaCO3 particles. Whitings occur when the cyanobacteria fix atmospheric CO2 through the formation of CaCO3 on their cell surfaces which leads to precipitation to the ocean floor and subsequent entombment in mud. Whitings represent one potential mechanism for CO2 sequestration. Research was performed to determine the ability of various strains of Synechocystis and Synechococcus to calcify when grown in microcosms amended with 2.5 mM HCO3- and 3.4 mM Ca2+. Results indicated that while all strains tested have the ability to calcify, only two, Synechococcus species, strains PCC 8806 and PCC 8807, were able to calcify to the extent that CaCO3 was precipitated. Enumeration of the cyanobacterial cultures during testing indicated that cell density did not appear to have an effect on calcification. Factors that had the greatest effect on calcification were CO2 removal and subsequent generation of alkaline pH. As CO2 was removed, growth medium pH increased and soluble Ca2+ was removed from solution. The largest increases in growth medium pH occurred when CO2 levels dropped below 400 ppmv. Precipitation of CaCO3 catalyzed by the growth and physiology of cyanobacteria in the Genus Synechococcus represents a potential mechanism for sequestration of atmospheric CO2 produced during the burning of coal for power generation. Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 8806 and Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 8807 were tested in microcosm experiments for their ability to calcify when exposed to a fixed calcium concentration of 3.4 mM and dissolved inorganic carbon concentrations of 0.5, 1.25 and 2.5 mM. Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 8806 removed calcium continuously over the duration of the experiment producing approximately 18.6 mg of solid-phase calcium. Calcium removal occurred over a two-day time period when

  4. Understanding atmospheric peroxyformic acid chemistry: observation, modeling and implication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, H.; Chen, Z. M.; Huang, D.; Wu, Q. Q.; Huang, L. B.

    2015-01-01

    The existence and importance of peroxyformic acid (PFA) in the atmosphere has been under controversy. We present here, for the first time, the observation data for PFA from four field measurements carried out in China. These data provided powerful evidence that PFA can stay in the atmosphere, typically in dozens of pptv level. The relationship between PFA and other detected peroxides was examined. The results showed that PFA had a strong positive correlation with its homolog, peroxyacetic acid, due to their similar sources and sinks. Through an evaluation of PFA production and removal rates, we proposed that the reactions between peroxyformyl radical (HC(O)O2) and formaldehyde or the hydroperoxyl radical (HO2) were likely to be the major source and degradation into formic acid (FA) was likely to be the major sink for PFA. Based on a box model evaluation, we proposed that the HC(O)O2 and PFA chemistry was a major source for FA under low NOx conditions. Furthermore, it is found that the impact of the HC(O)O2 and PFA chemistry on radical cycling was dependent on the yield of HC(O)O2 radical from HC(O) + O2 reaction. When this yield exceeded 50%, the HC(O)O2 and PFA chemistry should not be neglected for calculating the radical budget. To make clear the exact importance of HC(O)O2 and PFA chemistry in the atmosphere, further kinetic, field and modeling studies are required.

  5. Non-LTE model atmosphere analysis of Nova Cygni 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hauschildt, P. H.; Starrfield, S.; Austin, S.; Wagner, R. M.; Shore, S. N.; Sonneborn, G.

    1994-01-01

    We use spherically symmetric non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE), line-blanketed, expanding model atmospheres to analyze the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) and optical spectra of Nova Cygni 1992 during the early phases of its outburst. We find that the first IUE spectrum obtained just after discovery on 1992 February 20, is best reproduced by a model atmosphere with a steep density gradient and homologous expansion, whereas the IUE and optical spectra obtained on February 24 show an extended, optically thick, wind structure. Therefore, we distinguish two phases of the early evolution of the nova photosphere: the initial, rapid, 'fireball' phase and the subsequent, much longer, optically thick 'wind' phase. The importance of line-blanketing in nova spectra is demonstrated. Our preliminary abundance analysis implies that hydrogen is depeleted in the ejecta, corresponding to abundance enhancements of Fe by a factor of approximately 2 and of CNO by more than a factor of 10 when compared to solar abundances. The synthetic spectra reproduce both the observed pseudo-continua as well as most of the observed features from the UV to the optical spectral range and demonstrate the importance of obtaining nearly simultaneous UV and optical spectra for performing accurate analyses of expanding stellar atmospheres (for both novae and supernovae).

  6. Use of 4-D atmospheric models in the simulation of radiometric measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, D. T.; Fowler, M. G.

    1973-01-01

    Atmospheric moisture data contained in the Global 4-D Atmospheric Models developed in previous studies were analyzed to establish regional differences. The regional values of precipitable water along latitudinal belts were compared with values derived from the corresponding atmospheric models defined in the U.S Standard Atmosphere Supplement. The effects of the differences between the 4-D Models and the Standard Atmosphere Models on radiometric computations in the infrared window and water vapor absorption band regions were evaluated using a standard computation model of radiation transfer through a cloudless atmosphere. The significance of these differences in simulation is discussed.

  7. Numerical simulations of Hurricane Bertha using a mesoscale atmospheric model

    SciTech Connect

    Buckley, R.L.

    1996-08-01

    The Regional Atmospheric Model System (RAMS) has been used to simulate Hurricane Bertha as it moved toward and onto shore during the period July 10--12, 1996. Using large-scale atmospheric data from 00 UTC, 11 July (Wednesday evening) to initialize the model, a 36-hour simulation was created for a domain centered over the Atlantic Ocean east of the Florida coast near Jacksonville. The simulated onshore impact time of the hurricane was much earlier than observed (due to the use of results from the large-scale model, which predicted early arrival). However, the movement of the hurricane center (eye) as it approached the North Carolina/South Carolina coast as simulated in RAMS was quite good. Observations revealed a northerly storm track off the South Carolina coast as it moved toward land. As it approached landfall, Hurricane Bertha turned to the north-northeast, roughly paralleling the North Carolina coast before moving inland near Wilmington. Large-scale model forecasts were unable to detect this change in advance and predicted landfall near Myrtle Beach, South Carolina; RAMS, however, correctly predicted the parallel coastal movement. For future hurricane activity in the southeast, RAMS is being configured to run in an operational model using input from the large-scale pressure data in hopes of providing more information on predicted hurricane movement and landfall location.

  8. Modeling low elevation GPS signal propagation in maritime atmospheric ducts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jinpeng; Wu, Zhensen; Wang, Bo; Wang, Hongguang; Zhu, Qinglin

    2012-05-01

    Using the parabolic wave equation (PWE) method, we model low elevation GPS L1 signal propagation in maritime atmospheric ducts. To consider sea surface impedance, roughness, and the effects of earth's curvature, we propose a new initial field model for the GPS PWE split-step solution. On the basis of the comparison between the proposed model and the conventional initial field model for a smooth, perfectly conducting sea surface on a planar earth, we conclude that both the amplitude and phase of the initial field are influenced by surface impedance and roughness, and that the interference behavior between direct and reflected GPS rays is affected by earth's curvature. The performance of the proposed model is illustrated with examples of low elevation GPS L1 signal propagation in three types of ducts: an evaporation duct, a surface-based duct, and an elevated duct. The GPS PWE is numerically implemented using the split-step discrete mixed Fourier transform algorithm to enforce impedance-type boundary conditions at the rough sea surface. Because the GPS signal is right hand circularly polarized, we calculate its power strength by combining the propagation predictions of the horizontally and the vertically polarized components. The effects of the maritime atmospheric ducts on low elevation GPS signal propagation are demonstrated according to the presented examples, and the potential applications of the GPS signals affected by ducts are discussed.

  9. On the use of inexact, pruned hardware in atmospheric modelling

    PubMed Central

    Düben, Peter D.; Joven, Jaume; Lingamneni, Avinash; McNamara, Hugh; De Micheli, Giovanni; Palem, Krishna V.; Palmer, T. N.

    2014-01-01

    Inexact hardware design, which advocates trading the accuracy of computations in exchange for significant savings in area, power and/or performance of computing hardware, has received increasing prominence in several error-tolerant application domains, particularly those involving perceptual or statistical end-users. In this paper, we evaluate inexact hardware for its applicability in weather and climate modelling. We expand previous studies on inexact techniques, in particular probabilistic pruning, to floating point arithmetic units and derive several simulated set-ups of pruned hardware with reasonable levels of error for applications in atmospheric modelling. The set-up is tested on the Lorenz ‘96 model, a toy model for atmospheric dynamics, using software emulation for the proposed hardware. The results show that large parts of the computation tolerate the use of pruned hardware blocks without major changes in the quality of short- and long-time diagnostics, such as forecast errors and probability density functions. This could open the door to significant savings in computational cost and to higher resolution simulations with weather and climate models. PMID:24842031

  10. Modelling aerosol processes related to the atmospheric dispersion of sarin.

    PubMed

    Kukkonen, J; Riikonen, K; Nikmo, J; Jäppinen, A; Nieminen, K

    2001-08-17

    We have developed mathematical models for evaluating the atmospheric dispersion of selected chemical warfare agents (CWA), including the evaporation and settling of contaminant liquid droplets. The models and numerical results presented may be utilised for designing protection and control measures against the conceivable use of CWA's. The model AERCLOUD (AERosol CLOUD) was extended to treat two nerve agents, sarin and VX, and the mustard agent. This model evaluates the thermodynamical evolution of a five-component aerosol mixture, consisting of two-component droplets together with the surrounding three-component gas. We have performed numerical computations with this model on the evaporation and settling of airborne sarin droplets in characteristic dispersal and atmospheric conditions. In particular, we have evaluated the maximum radii (r(M)) of a totally evaporating droplet, in terms of the ambient temperature and contaminant vapour concentration. The radii r(M) range from approximately 15-80 microm for sarin droplets for the selected ambient conditions and initial heights. We have also evaluated deposition fractions in terms of the initial droplet size.

  11. PCMDI analysis of candidate atmospheric models for CCSM

    SciTech Connect

    Wehner, M F; Taylor, K; Doutriaux, C; AchutaRao, K; Gleckler, P; Hnilo, J; Boyle, J

    2000-12-13

    This report is intended to give a summary analysis of the candidate model configurations under consideration by NCAR for the atmospheric component of next version of the Community Climate System Model (CCSM). Intercomparison results are presented for each of the models available prior to the Atmospheric Model Working Group (AMWG) meeting, December 12-14, 2000. We present four types of figures in this report. The traditional methods of viewing zonal mean surface fields, latitude-longitude maps and zonal mean latitude-height cross sections are straightforward. In each of these cases, we present DJF and JJA climatological averages and a difference from an observational or reanalysis data set. The fourth method of analyzing the candidates' model performance involves the use of ''performance portraits'' and is explained in detail on following pages. As stated by NCAR and the AMWG, the information included in this report should be considered proprietary to NCAR and is not to be cited, consistent with the disclaimer on the AMWG password protected web pages. We deliberately have deferred our conclusions in this printed report to our presentation. Rather, we encourage you to draw your own conclusions based on these figures and other information made available at the AMWG meeting.

  12. The Zodiacal Cloud Model applied to the Martian atmosphere. Diurnal variations in Meteoric ion layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diego Carrillo-Sánchez, Juan; Plane, John M. C.; Withers, Paul; Fallows, Kathryn; Nesvorný, David; Pokorný, Petr; Feng, Wuhu

    2016-04-01

    Sporadic metal layers have been detected in the Martian atmosphere by radio occultation measurements using the Mars Express Orbiter and Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft. More recently, metallic ion layers produced by the meteor storm event following the close encounter between Comet Siding Spring (C/2013 A1) and Mars were identified by the Imaging UltraViolet Spectrograph (IUVS) aboard the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) spacecraft. However, the background metal layers produced by the influx of sporadic meteors have not yet been detected at Mars (contrary to the permanent metal layers identified in the Earth's atmosphere). The Zodiacal Dust Cloud (ZDC) model for particle populations released by asteroids (AST), and dust grains from Jupiter Family Comets (JFC) and Halley-Type Comets (HTC) has been combined with a Monte Carlo sampling method and the Chemical ABlation MODel (CABMOD) to predict the ablation rates of Na, K, Fe, Si, Mg, Ca and Al above 40 km altitude in the Martian atmosphere. CABMOD considers the standard treatment of meteor physics, including the balance of frictional heating by radiative losses and the absorption of heat energy through temperature increases, melting phase transitions and vaporization, as well as sputtering by inelastic collisions with the air molecules. These vertical profiles are input into the Leeds 1-D Mars atmospheric model which includes photo-ionization, and gas-phase ion-molecule and neutral chemistry, in order to explore the evolution of the resulting metallic ions and atoms. We conclude that the formation of the sporadic ion layers observed below 100 km with a plasma density exceeding 104 cm-3 requires the combination of the three different influx sources considered by the ZDC model, with a significant asteroidal contribution. Finally, we explore the changes of the neutral and ionized Mg and Fe layers over a diurnal cycle.

  13. Data Assimilation and Transport Modeling in Terrestrial and Planetary Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houben, Howard C.; Young, Richard E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Data assimilation is a blanket term used to describe a number of techniques for retrieving important physical parameters from observational data, subject to constraints imposed by prior knowledge (such as, in the case of meteorology, the primitive equations that govern atmospheric motion). Since these newly developed methods make efficient use of computational resources, they are of great importance in the interpretation of the voluminous datasets that are now produced by satellite missions. As proposed, these techniques have been applied to the study of the Martian and terrestrial atmospheres based on available satellite observations. In addition, a sophisticated hydrodynamic model (non-hydrostatic, and therefore applicable to the study of the interiors of the giant planets) has also been developed and successfully applied to the study of tidally induced motions in Jupiter.

  14. Atmospheric trace gases and global climate - A seasonal model study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Wei-Chyung; Molnar, Gyula; Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Goldenberg, Steven; Sze, Nien Dak

    1990-01-01

    Atmospheric models with seasonal cycles are used to study the possible near-future changes in latitudinal and vertical distributions of atmospheric ozone and temperature caused by increases of trace gases. It is found that increases of CFCs, CH4, and N2O may add to the surface warming from increased CO2. Calculations based on projected trends of CO2, N2O, CH4, and CFCs show that the annual mean and global mean surface temperature could warm by as much as 2.5 C by the year 2050, with larger warming at high latitudes. The results suggest that the warming in the lower stratosphere and upper troposphere is much larger than that at the surface, especially during the summer season.

  15. Revised Perturbation Statistics for the Global Scale Atmospheric Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justus, C. G.; Woodrum, A.

    1975-01-01

    Magnitudes and scales of atmospheric perturbations about the monthly mean for the thermodynamic variables and wind components are presented by month at various latitudes. These perturbation statistics are a revision of the random perturbation data required for the global scale atmospheric model program and are from meteorological rocket network statistical summaries in the 22 to 65 km height range and NASA grenade and pitot tube data summaries in the region up to 90 km. The observed perturbations in the thermodynamic variables were adjusted to make them consistent with constraints required by the perfect gas law and the hydrostatic equation. Vertical scales were evaluated by Buell's depth of pressure system equation and from vertical structure function analysis. Tables of magnitudes and vertical scales are presented for each month at latitude 10, 30, 50, 70, and 90 degrees.

  16. Models of atmosphere-ecosystem-hydrology interactions: Approaches and testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schimel, David S.

    1992-01-01

    Interactions among the atmosphere, terrestrial ecosystems, and the hydrological cycle have been the subject of investigation for many years, although most of the research has had a regional focus. The topic is broad, including the effects of climate and hydrology on vegetation, the effects of vegetation on hydrology, the effects of the hydrological cycle on the atmosphere, and interactions of the cycles via material flux such as solutes and trace gases. The intent of this paper is to identify areas of critical uncertainty, discuss modeling approaches to resolving those problems, and then propose techniques for testing. I consider several interactions specifically to illustrate the range of problems. These areas are as follows: (1) cloud parameterizations and the land surface, (2) soil moisture, and (3) the terrestrial carbon cycle.

  17. Ozone productivity of atmospheric organics, coordinating research council project A-10. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Seinfeld, J.H.; Bowman, F.M.

    1996-02-06

    This project addresses elucidating the fundamental chemical basis of incremental reactivities. The value of the incremental reactivity of a particular compound, given its atmospheric oxidation mechanism, depends on the VOC/NOx mixture in which the compound is imbedded. The dependence of incremental reactivity on the base VOC/NOx mixture has been an issue of concern since the introduction of the incremental reactivity as a regulatory concept. This project answers the basic question: how and why does the incremental reactivity of a compound change as the base VOC/NOx mixture is changed, both with respect to the individual VOC combustion and with respect to the overall VOC/NOx ratio. This paper is composed of several papers which describe the methodology used to examine incremental reactivities, indicate to what factors the incremental changes in ozone can be attributed, and explain the incremental reactivities of fuel oxygenates based on their reaction chemistry.

  18. Atmospheric River Model Simulation Diagnostics and Performance Metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waliser, D. E.; Guan, B.; Kim, J.; Leung, L. R.; Ralph, F. M.

    2014-12-01

    Atmospheric Rivers (ARs) are narrow, elongated, synoptic jets of water vapor. These systems account for over 90% of the poleward transport of water vapor in mid-latitudes and thus are a key mechanism in help establish the water and energy cycles of the planet. Many of the intense wintertime hydrological (flood and drought-ending precipitation) events in the US western states (as well as in other continents) occur in conjunction with land-falling AR events. Despite the important role of the ARs in our climate and weather systems, there have been few broad characterizations of model performance of ARs for global weather and climate models (GCMs), in terms of their role in global climate or impacts associated with extreme weather. Part of the challenge has been the lack of a comprehensive set of observation-based model simulation diagnostics and performance metrics. Based on the objectives and support from three activities: 1) the CalWater 2 AR project, 2) the Year of Tropical Convection (YOTC) and GEWEX Atmospheric System Study (GASS) multi-model experiment on Vertical Structure and Physical Processes of Weather & Climate, and 3) a new NASA effort examining the value added by dynamic regional climate model (RCM) downscaling, we are working to develop a comprehensive set of AR simulation diagnostics and model performance metrics for RCMs and GCMs. Application of these diagnostics and metrics will afford: 1) a baseline characterization of model representations of synoptic features, impacts, and multi-scale interactions, 2) an ability to guide model development and assess proposed improvements, 3) quantify the evolution in forecast skill, as well as 4) estimate predictability of AR characteristics and impacts. The purpose of this presentation is to initiate a more formal dialogue of this activity with the community, present a preliminary set of diagnostics/metrics and illustrate their utility through application to the 27 GCMs that contributed simulations to the YOTC

  19. Washington State Nursing Home Administrator Model Curriculum. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowan, Florence Kelly

    The course outlines presented in this final report comprise a proposed Fort Steilacoom Community College curriculum to be used as a statewide model two-year associate degree curriculum for nursing home administrators. The eight courses described are introduction to nursing, home administration, financial management of nursing homes, nursing home…

  20. Final Report Fermionic Symmetries and Self consistent Shell Model

    SciTech Connect

    Larry Zamick

    2008-11-07

    In this final report in the field of theoretical nuclear physics we note important accomplishments.We were confronted with "anomoulous" magnetic moments by the experimetalists and were able to expain them. We found unexpected partial dynamical symmetries--completely unknown before, and were able to a large extent to expain them.The importance of a self consistent shell model was emphasized.

  1. The efficiency and sensitivity analysis of observations for atmospheric transport model with emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xueran; Elbern, Hendrik; Jacob, Birgit

    2015-04-01

    extended atmospheric transport model can be easily determined. Further, with the same singular vector analysis of the efficiency of observations, the sensitivity of observations can be identified by determining the directions of maximum perturbation. Finally, a 3D advection-diffusion toy model is presented to test the approach.

  2. Photovoltaic subsystem marketing and distribution model: programming manual. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-07-01

    Complete documentation of the marketing and distribution (M and D) computer model is provided. The purpose is to estimate the costs of selling and transporting photovoltaic solar energy products from the manufacturer to the final customer. The model adjusts for the inflation and regional differences in marketing and distribution costs. The model consists of three major components: the marketing submodel, the distribution submodel, and the financial submodel. The computer program is explained including the input requirements, output reports, subprograms and operating environment. The program specifications discuss maintaining the validity of the data and potential improvements. An example for a photovoltaic concentrator collector demonstrates the application of the model.

  3. Synthetic-Eddy Method for Urban Atmospheric Flow Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlidis, D.; Gorman, G. J.; Gomes, J. L. M. A.; Pain, C. C.; Apsimon, H.

    2010-08-01

    The computational fluid dynamics code Fluidity, with anisotropic mesh adaptivity, is used as a multi-scale obstacle-accommodating meteorological model. A novel method for generating realistic inlet boundary conditions based on the view of turbulence as a superposition of synthetic eddies is adopted. It is able to reproduce prescribed first-order and second-order one-point statistics and turbulence length scales. The aim is to simulate an urban boundary layer. The model is validated against two standard benchmark tests: a plane channel flow numerical simulation and a flow past a cube physical simulation. The performed large-eddy simulations are in good agreement with both reference models giving confidence that the model can be used to successfully simulate urban atmospheric flows.

  4. TRANSMISSION SPECTRA OF THREE-DIMENSIONAL HOT JUPITER MODEL ATMOSPHERES

    SciTech Connect

    Fortney, J. J.; Shabram, M.; Showman, A. P.; Lian, Y.; Lewis, N. K.; Freedman, R. S.; Marley, M. S.

    2010-02-01

    We compute models of the transmission spectra of planets HD 209458b, HD 189733b, and generic hot Jupiters. We examine the effects of temperature, surface gravity, and metallicity for the generic planets as a guide to understanding transmission spectra in general. We find that carbon dioxide absorption at 4.4 and 15 mum is prominent at high metallicity, and is a clear metallicity indicator. For HD 209458b and HD 189733b, we compute spectra for both one-dimensional and three-dimensional model atmospheres and examine the differences between them. The differences are usually small, but can be large if atmospheric temperatures are near important chemical abundance boundaries. The calculations for the three-dimensional atmospheres, and their comparison with data, serve as constraints on these dynamical models that complement the secondary eclipse and light curve data sets. For HD 209458b, even if TiO and VO gases are abundant on the dayside, their abundances can be considerably reduced on the cooler planetary limb. However, given the predicted limb temperatures and TiO abundances, the model's optical opacity is too high. For HD 189733b we find a good match with some infrared data sets and constrain the altitude of a postulated haze layer. For this planet, substantial differences can exist between the transmission spectra of the leading and trailing hemispheres, which are an excellent probe of carbon chemistry. In thermochemical equilibrium, the cooler leading hemisphere is methane-dominated, and the hotter trailing hemisphere is CO-dominated, but these differences may be eliminated by non-equilibrium chemistry due to vertical mixing. It may be possible to constrain the carbon chemistry of this planet, and its spatial variation, with James Webb Space Telescope.

  5. IAG working group - Integration of GNSS atmosphere models with NWP models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosy, J.; Vedel, H.; Hadas, T.

    2012-12-01

    Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) are designed for positioning, navigation and amongst other possible applications it can also be used for derive information about the state of the atmosphere. The GNSS tropospheric products has been used in meteorology for several years, but they are still not widely used. Currently conducted studies aimed at integration of NWP models and coordination between the meteorological and geodetic communities. For this reason, in the frame of International Association of Geodesy in Sub-Commission SC 4.3 - Remote sensing and modeling of the atmosphere was established the working group WG4.3.3 Integration of GNSS atmosphere models with NWP models The main objective of this Working Group is to study of integration of GNSS atmosphere models with Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) models for positioning and meteorological applications. It includes the assimilation of GNSS data processing products in NWP models, the use of NWP models in real-time positioning methods: RTK and PPP, the validation and comparison of different of GNSS atmosphere models using NWP outputs, investigation on new mapping functions based on the high resolution integrated models of the troposphere, and the real time water vapor models from GNSS data and NWP models outputs. The paper presents the current state of activities of IAG WG4.3.3 members and future plans of joint researches.

  6. A Final Approach Trajectory Model for Current Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gong, Chester; Sadovsky, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Predicting accurate trajectories with limited intent information is a challenge faced by air traffic management decision support tools in operation today. One such tool is the FAA's Terminal Proximity Alert system which is intended to assist controllers in maintaining safe separation of arrival aircraft during final approach. In an effort to improve the performance of such tools, two final approach trajectory models are proposed; one based on polynomial interpolation, the other on the Fourier transform. These models were tested against actual traffic data and used to study effects of the key final approach trajectory modeling parameters of wind, aircraft type, and weight class, on trajectory prediction accuracy. Using only the limited intent data available to today's ATM system, both the polynomial interpolation and Fourier transform models showed improved trajectory prediction accuracy over a baseline dead reckoning model. Analysis of actual arrival traffic showed that this improved trajectory prediction accuracy leads to improved inter-arrival separation prediction accuracy for longer look ahead times. The difference in mean inter-arrival separation prediction error between the Fourier transform and dead reckoning models was 0.2 nmi for a look ahead time of 120 sec, a 33 percent improvement, with a corresponding 32 percent improvement in standard deviation.

  7. Observation and modeling of atmospheric oxygen millimeter-wave transmittance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Michael Jonathan

    1998-12-01

    The Microwave Temperature Sounder (MTS) was used on multiple ascents and descents of NASA ER-2 aircraft to measure downwelling thermal atmospheric emission viewed from 0-20-km altitudes in millimeter-wave bands dominated by molecular oxygen, and to infer atmospheric opacity in these bands. The MTS includes two super-heterodyne receivers: one with eight IF channels covering 350-2000 MHz from the 118.75-GHz oxygen line and the other with a 30-200-MHz IF and a tunable LO stepped through eight frequencies from 52.7-55.6 GHz. Simulations of MTS zenith-view antenna temperatures based upon local radiosondes and the MPM92 absorption model of Liebe, et al. (50) were consistent with observations in the 52.5- 55.8 GHz band. Adjustment of the temperature dependence exponent of the 118.75-GHz linewidth from the MPM92 value of 0.8 to 0.97 ± 0.03 was found to produce significantly better agreement in observations with MTS channels centered on this line. This increase in low- temperature linewidth changes total atmospheric opacity in these channels by less than 2.5 percent. Other investigators have noted systematic discrepancies as large as several Kelvin between measured and simulated upwelling brightness temperatures, both in satellite observations of the earth in the 50-60 GHz band and in nadirial-viewed MTS observations from 20-km altitude in the band 116.7-120.8 GHz. Resolution of these biases through adjustment of the oxygen absorption model requires increases in the MPM92 expression of up to 20 percent. The utility of current and proposed satellite- based millimeter-wave temperature sounders for the monitoring of global climate, the initialization of numerical weather models, and the remote monitoring of severe weather systems is compromised by this model uncertainty. The zenith-viewing configuration through ascents and descents of the current MTS measurements are several times more sensitive to perturbation of atmospheric opacity than are space-based observations. The

  8. Dynamical vegetation-atmosphere modelling of the boreal zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Hui; Stordal, Frode; Berntsen, Terje K.; Bryn, Anders

    2016-04-01

    Vegetation interacts with climate on seasonal to inter-annual time scales through albedo, roughness, evapotranspiration, CO2 sequestration and by influencing snow accumulation and ablation. The Scandinavian mountains and high latitudes is a hot spot for land-atmosphere feedback, as the future's increased winter minimum temperature supports a boreal tree line advance, lowering the surface albedo. The northern ecosystem is dominated by mires, boreal forests and alpine heaths, in addition to agricultural land. Model studies have shown that vegetation-climate feedbacks are strong enough to lead to regime shifts in vegetation and local climate in boreal regions. Biogeophysical factors, such as albedo, the Bowen ratio, and surface roughness, are all involved in these feedbacks, and they are also altered by land use change such as reforestation. For calculations of the dynamical coupling between the atmosphere and the vegetation we have used the Earth System Model NorESM, which includes several advanced features in its land surface model (CLM4.5), such as the inclusion of the radiative forcing due to black carbon and dust deposit onto snow, improved representation of fire, permafrost and its hydrological impact, a new snow cover fraction parameterization reflecting the hysteresis in fractional snow cover for a given snow depth between accumulation and melt phases, as well as dynamic vegetation coupled with carbon-nitrogen cycles. These new features improve the representation of surface albedo feedback in Arctic. We have performed experiments with coupled as well fixed ocean for the current as a quadrupled atmospheric CO2 situation. This model configuration is used to study changes in vegetation in a high end radiative forcing case. It is contrasted with an experiment where vegetation dynamics is neglected. Changes in the features of the vegetation along with surface fluxes, albedo and atmospheric temperatures are analysed, with main emphasis on the boreal zone. In

  9. Final Report: Laser-Based Optical Trap for Remote Sampling of Interplanetary and Atmospheric Particulate Matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stysley, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Applicability to Early Stage Innovation NIAC Cutting edge and innovative technologies are needed to achieve the demanding requirements for NASA origin missions that require sample collection as laid out in the NRC Decadal Survey. This proposal focused on fully understanding the state of remote laser optical trapping techniques for capturing particles and returning them to a target site. In future missions, a laser-based optical trapping system could be deployed on a lander that would then target particles in the lower atmosphere and deliver them to the main instrument for analysis, providing remote access to otherwise inaccessible samples. Alternatively, for a planetary mission the laser could combine ablation and trapping capabilities on targets typically too far away or too hard for traditional drilling sampling systems. For an interstellar mission, a remote laser system could gather particles continuously at a safe distance; this would avoid the necessity of having a spacecraft fly through a target cloud such as a comet tail. If properly designed and implemented, a laser-based optical trapping system could fundamentally change the way scientists designand implement NASA missions that require mass spectroscopy and particle collection.

  10. Use of halophytes to remove carbon from the atmosphere: Results of a demonstration experiment. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Glenn, E.; Olsen, M.; Frye, R.; Moore, D.

    1994-01-01

    The project examined the feasibility of using salt-tolerant plants, halophytes, to sequester large quantities of C from the atmosphere and enhance food production in desert regions of the world by using seawater and other saline water sources for irrigation. Field experiments using 40 ppt seawater in a coastal desert site in Mexico recorded biomass yields of 16.7--34.0 t ha{sup {minus}1} yr{sup {minus}1} and C yields of 5.4--10.1 t ha{sup {minus}1} yr{sup {minus}1}for the best candidate species in the genera Atriplex, Batis, Salicornia, Suaeda and Sesuvium. These yields are comparable to high-yielding forestry and agricultural biomass crops. Irrigation requirements and other costs of production were within the range of conventional crops as well. Laboratory and field experiments showed that seawater had an inhibitory effect on the decomposition of halophyte biomass in soil; hence, a strategy for C sequestration in desert soil was proposed, in which halophyte crop by-products would be returned to the soil to store C while the harvested portions would be used for oilseeds and animal feed.

  11. FY06 LDRD Final Report "The Creation of a Neutron Star Atmosphere"

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, R I; Remington, B; Moon, S; MacKinnon, A; Patel, P; Ruytov, D; Wilks, S; Pape, S L

    2007-03-01

    We have taken the initiative to examine whether experiments on HED facilities, present and future, could achieve the extreme scaled conditions relevant to accreting neutron star atmospheres and accretion disks around black holes. The preliminary conclusion from this detailed scaling assessment is that if an exact scaled version of the photon bubble instability physics is desired, this will require experiments with (simultaneously) spatial scales of order {approx}1 mm, temperatures of order {approx}5 keV, magnetic fields of order a hundred megaGauss, and time scales of order several hundred psec. Aspects (subsets) of this physics can be studied under less demanding conditions. To achieve the temperatures required in targets of order several optical depths, we come to the preliminary conclusion that we would require an energy source that delivers of order of a megajoule of energy into a high Z target. A conceptual design for such an experiment could be to use the energy from a high gain ignition NIF capsule as our principle source of heating and acceleration whereby the target is in close proximity to the ignition capsule and then use external petawatt lasers to develop the magnetic fields required.

  12. The dependence of land-atmosphere interactions on atmospheric parametrizations in the JULES/UM modelling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Helen; Best, Martin

    2015-04-01

    It has been understood for a while now that atmospheric behaviour is affected by land surface processes, modelling this relationship however still presents challenges. Most numerical weather prediction (NWP) models couple an atmospheric model to a land surface model in order to forecast the weather and/or climate. The Global Land-Atmosphere Coupling Experiment (GLACE) demonstrated that soil moisture variability has considerable control over atmospheric behaviour, particularly impacting on precipitation and temperature variability. The study also suggested that differences in coupling strengths between models may be due to differences in atmospheric parametrizations. There have since been other studies which support this claim but it is not yet clear which parameters control the land-atmosphere coupling strength or indeed what it should be. In this study we investigate whether certain atmospheric parameters hold more control than others over model sensitivity to land surface changes. We focus on the interaction of the JULES (Joint UK Land Environment Simulator) land surface model with the Met Office Unified Model (UM) that is used for operational NWP and climate prediction. For computational efficiency we ran the UM at a single site using a single column model (SCM) rather than running a global model simulation. A site in the Sahel region of West Africa was chosen as this is an area that was identified by GLACE as being especially responsive to changes in soil moisture. JULES was run several times with various different initial soil moisture profiles to create an ensemble of surface sensible and latent heat fluxes that could be used to force a set of different SCM runs in order to simulate a range of different atmospheric conditions. Various atmospheric parameters in the SCM were then perturbed to create additional sets of SCM runs with different sensitivities to soil moisture changes. By analysing the difference in spread between the standard configuration and the

  13. Design definition of the Laser Atmospheric Wind Sounder (LAWS), phase 2. Volume 2: Final report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    Lockheed personnel, along with team member subcontractors and consultants, have performed a preliminary design for the LAWS Instrument. Breadboarding and testing of a LAWS class laser have also been performed. These efforts have demonstrated that LAWS is a feasible Instrument and can be developed with existing state-of-the-art technology. Only a commitment to fund the instrument development and deployment is required to place LAWS in orbit and obtain the anticipated science and operational forecasting benefits. The LAWS Science Team was selected in 1988-89 as were the competing LAWS phase 1/2 contractor teams. The LAWS Science Team developed requirements for the LAWS Instrument, and the NASA/LAWS project office defined launch vehicle and platform design constraints. From these requirements and constraints, the lockheed team developed LAWS Instrument concepts and configurations. A system designed to meet these requirements and constraints is outlined. The LAWS primary subsystem and interfaces - laser, optical, and receiver/processor - required to assemble a lidar are identified. Also identified are the support subsystems required for the lidar to function from space: structures and mechanical, thermal, electrical, and command and data management. The Lockheed team has developed a preliminary design of a LAWS Instrument System consisting of these subsystems and interfaces which will meet the requirements and objectives of the Science Team. This final report provides a summary of the systems engineering analyses and trades of the LAWS. Summaries of the configuration, preliminary designs of the subsystems, testing recommendations, and performance analysis are presented. Environmental considerations associated with deployment of LAWS are discussed. Finally, the successful LAWS laser breadboard effort is discussed along with the requirements and test results.

  14. Simulation of iron/dust in the atmosphere by a regional model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nickovic, S.; Perez, C.

    2008-12-01

    During sporadic desert dust storms mineral aerosol is raised from the ground, diffused to higher elevations and transported away from sources. Through sedimentation, dry deposition and wet scavenging, dust deposited to the ocean brings at the same time iron and phosphorus embedded in dust particles. Iron exposed to the atmospheric (photo-) chemical processing converts from almost non-soluble to relative high soluble state. Only as soluble, iron can be consumed as a nutrient by microorganisms in a primary marine bio-production phase. In ocean regions distant from coastlines where upwelling and river inputs are missing, iron (and phosphorus) is the major potential marine nutrient. Current knowledge on the atmospheric iron cycle is rather unsatisfactory. First, distribution of iron minerals in desert soils is not yet well known. Second, there are uncertainties on how the iron minerals are chemically processed in the atmosphere since there is no agreement on the roles of solar radiation, clouds and pollution and their relative importance. Finally, current iron models are of global domain and cannot sufficiently resolve the dust (and associated iron) life cycle which is highly variable in time and space. Therefore, more accurate information on deposition of iron to the ocean and its soluble state are generally missing today. This paper presents developments of an atmospheric iron model performed by adding the iron component to the regional dust model DREAM. To specify the iron sources in deserts, relatively high resolution data on soil types (4 km) and land cover (1 km) are used in combination with recent field mineralogy studies. Iron minerals are assumed to be embedded in dust and therefore driven by dust; a corresponding governing set of equations specific for the dynamics of embedded iron, as well as pseudo-first order chemical reaction converting from non-soluble to soluble is then developed. Finally, experiments were performed using the model horizontal resolution

  15. Middle Atmosphere Program. Handbook for MAP. Volume 31: Reference models of trace species for the COSPAR international reference atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keating, G. M. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    A set of preliminary reference atmosphere models of significant trace species which play important roles in controlling the chemistry, radiation budget, and circulation patterns of the atmosphere were produced. These models of trace species distributions are considered to be reference models rather than standard models; thus, it was not crucial that they be correct in an absolute sense. These reference models can serve as a means of comparison between individual observations, as a first guess in inversion algorithms, and as an approximate representation of observations for comparison to theoretical calculations.

  16. Upscalling processes in an ocean-atmosphere multiscale coupled model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson, S. G.; Berthet, S.; Samson, G.; Crétat, J.; Colas, F.; Echevin, V.; Jullien, S.; Hourdin, C.

    2015-12-01

    This work explores new pathways toward a better representation of the multi-scale physics that drive climate variability. We are analysing the key upscaling processes by which small-scale localized errors have a knock-on effect onto global climate. We focus on the Peru-Chilli coastal upwelling, an area known to hold among the strongest models biases in the Tropics. Our approach is based on the development of a multiscale coupling interface allowing us to couple WRF with the NEMO oceanic model in a configuration including 2-way nested zooms in the oceanic and/or the atmospheric component of the coupled model. Upscalling processes are evidenced and quantified by comparing three 20-year long simulations of a tropical channel (45°S-45°N), which differ by their horizontal resolution: 0.75° everywhere, 0.75°+0.25° zoom in the southeastern Pacific or 0.25° everywhere. This set of three 20-year long simulations was repeated with 3 different sets of parameterizations to assess the robustness of our results. Our results show that adding an embedded zoom over the southeastern Pacific only in the atmosphere cools down the SST along the Peru-Chili coast, which is a clear improvement. This change is associated with a displacement of the low-level cloud cover, which moves closer to the coast cooling further the coastal area SST. Offshore, we observe the opposite effect with a reduction of the cloud cover with higher resolution, which increases solar radiation and warms the SST. Increasing the resolution in the oceanic component show contrasting results according to the different set parameterization used in the experiments. Some experiment shows a coastal cooling as expected, whereas, in other cases, we observe a counterintuitive response with a warming of the coastal SST. Using at the same time an oceanic and an atmospheric zoom mostly combines the results obtained when using the 2-way nesting in only one component of the coupled model. In the best case, we archive by this

  17. Accurate pressure gradient calculations in hydrostatic atmospheric models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carroll, John J.; Mendez-Nunez, Luis R.; Tanrikulu, Saffet

    1987-01-01

    A method for the accurate calculation of the horizontal pressure gradient acceleration in hydrostatic atmospheric models is presented which is especially useful in situations where the isothermal surfaces are not parallel to the vertical coordinate surfaces. The present method is shown to be exact if the potential temperature lapse rate is constant between the vertical pressure integration limits. The technique is applied to both the integration of the hydrostatic equation and the computation of the slope correction term in the horizontal pressure gradient. A fixed vertical grid and a dynamic grid defined by the significant levels in the vertical temperature distribution are employed.

  18. An approximate model of vortex decay in the atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, G. C.

    1985-01-01

    An approximate analysis of atmospheric effects on wake vortex motion and decay is presented. The effects of density stratification, turbulence, and Reynolds number are combined in a single model so that the relative importance of different parameters can be determined. Predicted wake motion is shown to be in good agreement with limited data from both ground facility and flight test measurements taken under low turbulence conditions. Wake decay was found to depend strongly on both density stratification and turbulence. For typical levels of turbulence, wake decay was found to result from the 'Crow instability' except under strongly stratified conditions.

  19. Developing of a New Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation (AIR) Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clem, John M.; deAngelis, Giovanni; Goldhagen, Paul; Wilson, John W.

    2003-01-01

    As a result of the research leading to the 1998 AIR workshop and the subsequent analysis, the neutron issues posed by Foelsche et al. and further analyzed by Hajnal have been adequately resolved. We are now engaged in developing a new atmospheric ionizing radiation (AIR) model for use in epidemiological studies and air transportation safety assessment. A team was formed to examine a promising code using the basic FLUKA software but with modifications to allow multiple charged ion breakup effects. A limited dataset of the ER-2 measurements and other cosmic ray data will be used to evaluate the use of this code.

  20. Experiments of reconstructing discrete atmospheric dynamic models from data (I)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zhenshan; Zhu, Yanyu; Deng, Ziwang

    1995-03-01

    In this paper, we give some experimental results of our study in reconstructing discrete atmospheric dynamic models from data. After a great deal of numerical experiments, we found that the logistic map, x n + 1 = 1- μx {2/n}, could be used in monthly mean temperature prediction when it was approaching the chaotic region, and its predictive results were in reverse states to the practical data. This means that the nonlinear developing behavior of the monthly mean temperature system is bifurcating back into the critical chaotic states from the chaotic ones.

  1. Some atmospheric scattering considerations relevant to BATSE: A model calculation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, John H.

    1986-01-01

    The orbiting Burst and Transient Source Experiement (BATSE) will locate gamma ray burst sources by analysis of the relative numbers of photons coming directly from a source and entering its prescribed array of detectors. In order to accurately locate burst sources it is thus necessary to identify and correct for any counts contributed by events other than direct entry by a mainstream photon. An effort is described which estimates the photon numbers which might be scattered into the BATSE detectors from interactions with the Earth atmosphere. A model was developed which yielded analytical expressions for single-scatter photon contributions in terms of source and satellite locations.

  2. An atmospheric tritium release database for model comparisons. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, C.E. Jr.; Wortham, G.R.

    1995-01-01

    A database of vegetation, soil, and air tritium concentrations at gridded coordinate locations following nine accidental atmospheric releases is described. While none of the releases caused a significant dose to the public, the data collected are valuable for comparison with the results of tritium transport models used for risk assessment. The largest, potential, individual off-site dose from any of the releases was calculated to be 1.6 mrem. The population dose from this same release was 46 person-rem which represents 0.04% of the natural background radiation dose to the population in the path of the release.

  3. Meso-NH: Non-hydrostatic mesoscale atmospheric model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laboratoire d'Aérologie; Centre National de Recherches Météorologiques

    2016-12-01

    Meso-NH is the non-hydrostatic mesoscale atmospheric model of the French research community jointly developed by the Laboratoire d'Aérologie (UMR 5560 UPS/CNRS) and by CNRM (UMR 3589 CNRS/Météo-France). Meso-NH incorporates a non-hydrostatic system of equations for dealing with scales ranging from large (synoptic) to small (large eddy) scales while calculating budgets and has a complete set of physical parameterizations for the representation of clouds and precipitation. It is coupled to the surface model SURFEX for representation of surface atmosphere interactions by considering different surface types (vegetation, city, ocean, lake) and allows a multi-scale approach through a grid-nesting technique. Meso-NH is versatile, vectorized, parallelized, and operates in 1D, 2D or 3D; it is coupled with a chemistry module (including gas-phase, aerosol, and aqua-phase components) and a lightning module, and has observation operators that compare model output directly with satellite observations, radar, lidar and GPS.

  4. Geometrical modeling of optical phase difference for analyzing atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuksel, Demet; Yuksel, Heba

    2013-09-01

    Ways of calculating phase shifts between laser beams propagating through atmospheric turbulence can give us insight towards the understanding of spatial diversity in Free-Space Optical (FSO) links. We propose a new geometrical model to estimate phase shifts between rays as the laser beam propagates through a simulated turbulent media. Turbulence is simulated by filling the propagation path with spherical bubbles of varying sizes and refractive index discontinuities statistically distributed according to various models. The level of turbulence is increased by elongating the range and/or increasing the number of bubbles that the rays interact with along their path. For each statistical representation of the atmosphere, the trajectories of two parallel rays separated by a particular distance are analyzed and computed simultaneously using geometrical optics. The three-dimensional geometry of the spheres is taken into account in the propagation of the rays. The bubble model is used to calculate the correlation between the two rays as their separation distance changes. The total distance traveled by each ray as both rays travel to the target is computed. The difference in the path length traveled will yield the phase difference between the rays. The mean square phase difference is taken to be the phase structure function which in the literature, for a pair of collimated parallel pencil thin rays, obeys a five-third law assuming weak turbulence. All simulation results will be compared with the predictions of wave theory.

  5. A sonic boom propagation model including mean flow atmospheric effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salamone, Joe; Sparrow, Victor W.

    2012-09-01

    This paper presents a time domain formulation of nonlinear lossy propagation in onedimension that also includes the effects of non-collinear mean flow in the acoustic medium. The model equation utilized is an augmented Burgers equation that includes the effects of nonlinearity, geometric spreading, atmospheric stratification, and also absorption and dispersion due to thermoviscous and molecular relaxation effects. All elements of the propagation are implemented in the time domain and the effects of non-collinear mean flow are accounted for in each term of the model equation. Previous authors have presented methods limited to showing the effects of wind on ray tracing and/or using an effective speed of sound in their model equation. The present work includes the effects of mean flow for all terms included in the augmented Burgers equation with all of the calculations performed in the time-domain. The capability to include the effects of mean flow in the acoustic medium allows one to make predictions more representative of real-world atmospheric conditions. Examples are presented for nonlinear propagation of N-waves and shaped sonic booms. [Work supported by Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation.

  6. Radiation Transfer Model for Aerosol Events in the Earth Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukai, Sonoyo; Yokomae, Takuma; Nakata, Makiko; Sano, Itaru

    Recently large scale-forest fire, which damages the Earth environment as biomass burning and emission of carbonaceous particles, frequently occurs due to the unstable climate and/or global warming tendency. It is also known that the heavy soil dust is transported from the China continent to Japan on westerly winds, especially in spring. Furthermore the increasing emis-sions of anthropogenic particles associated with continuing economic growth scatter serious air pollutants. Thus atmospheric aerosols, especially in Asia, are very complex and heavy loading, which is called aerosol event. In the case of aerosol events, it is rather difficult to do the sun/sky photometry from the ground, however satellite observation is an effective for aerosol monitoring. Here the detection algorithms from space for such aerosol events as dust storm or biomass burn-ing are dealt with multispectral satellite data as ADEOS-2/GLI, Terra/Aqua/MODIS and/or GOSAT/CAI first. And then aerosol retrieval algorithms are examined based on new radiation transfer code for semi-infinite atmosphere model. The derived space-based results are validated with ground-based measurements and/or model simulations. Namely the space-or surface-based measurements, multiple scattering calculations and model simulations are synthesized together for aerosol retrieval in this work.

  7. A New Astrobiological Model of the Atmosphere of Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willacy, K.; Allen, M.; Yung, Y.

    2016-10-01

    We present results of an investigation into the formation of nitrogen-bearing molecules in the atmosphere of Titan. We extend a previous model to cover the region below the tropopause, so the new model treats the atmosphere from Titan’s surface to an altitude of 1500 km. We consider the effects of condensation and sublimation using a continuous, numerically stable method. This is coupled with parameterized treatments of the sedimentation of the aerosols and their condensates, and the formation of haze particles. These processes affect the abundances of heavier species such as the nitrogen-bearing molecules, but have less effect on the abundances of lighter molecules. Removal of molecules to form aerosols also plays a role in determining the mixing ratios, particularly of HNC, HC3N, and HCN. We find good agreement with the recently detected mixing ratios of C2H5CN, with condensation playing an important role in determining the abundance of this molecule below 500 km. Of particular interest is the chemistry of acrylonitrile (C2H3CN) which has been suggested by Stevenson et al. as a molecule that could form biological membranes in an oxygen-deficient environment. With the inclusion of haze formation, we find good agreement of our model predictions of acrylonitrile with the available observations.

  8. [Global Atmospheric Chemistry/Transport Modeling and Data-Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prinn, Ronald G.

    1999-01-01

    This grant supported a global atmospheric chemistry/transport modeling and data- analysis project devoted to: (a) development, testing, and refining of inverse methods for determining regional and global transient source and sink strengths for trace gases; (b) utilization of these inverse methods which use either the Model for Atmospheric Chemistry and Transport (MATCH) which is based on analyzed observed winds or back- trajectories calculated from these same winds for determining regional and global source and sink strengths for long-lived trace gases important in ozone depletion and the greenhouse effect; (c) determination of global (and perhaps regional) average hydroxyl radical concentrations using inverse methods with multiple "titrating" gases; and (d) computation of the lifetimes and spatially resolved destruction rates of trace gases using 3D models. Important ultimate goals included determination of regional source strengths of important biogenic/anthropogenic trace gases and also of halocarbons restricted by the Montreal Protocol and its follow-on agreements, and hydrohalocarbons now used as alternatives to the above restricted halocarbons.

  9. Modeling atmospheric deposition using a stochastic transport model

    SciTech Connect

    Buckley, R.L.

    1999-12-17

    An advanced stochastic transport model has been modified to include the removal mechanisms of dry and wet deposition. Time-dependent wind and turbulence fields are generated with a prognostic mesoscale numerical model and are used to advect and disperse individually released particles that are each assigned a mass. These particles are subjected to mass reduction in two ways depending on their physical location. Particles near the surface experience a decrease in mass using the concept of a dry deposition velocity, while the mass of particles located within areas of precipitation are depleted using a scavenging coefficient. Two levels of complexity are incorporated into the particle model. The simple case assumes constant values of dry deposition velocity and scavenging coefficient, while the more complex case varies the values according to meteorology, surface conditions, release material, and precipitation intensity. Instantaneous and cumulative dry and wet deposition are determined from the mass loss due to these physical mechanisms. A useful means of validating the model results is with data available from a recent accidental release of Cesium-137 from a steel-processing furnace in Algeciras, Spain in May, 1998. This paper describes the deposition modeling technique, as well as a comparison of simulated concentration and deposition with measurements taken for the Algeciras release.

  10. A simple atmospheric model of relevance to El Nino

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zebiak, S. E.

    1982-01-01

    A linear, equatorial, beta-plane atmosphere model with heating parameterized in terms of SST anomalies is developed and used to simulate surface wind anomalies in the equatorial Pacific during El Nino. The model results show some similarity to observations with respect to movement of the major convergence zones, and equatorial wind anomaly patterns in the central and western Pacific. There is considerable discrepancy between the model results and observations in much of the eastern Pacific, especially in the South Pacific high and southeast trades regions. The results suggest that some additional mechanisms may be responsible for these apparently sizeable and spatially coherent fluctuations, but that a direct link between wind anomalies and SST anomalies may indeed exist in much of the equatorial Pacific.

  11. A High-Order Multiscale Global Atmospheric Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, R. D.

    2015-12-01

    The High-Order Method Modeling Environment (HOMME), developed at NCAR, is a petascale hydrostatic framework, which employs the cubed-sphere grid system and high-order continuous or discontinuous Galerkin (DG) methods. Recently, the HOMME framework is being extended to a non-hydrostatic dynamical core, named as the "High-Order Multiscale Atmospheric Model (HOMAM)." The spatial discretization for HOMAM is based on DG or high-order finite-volume methods. Orography is handled by the terrain-following height-based coordinate system. To alleviate the stringent CFL stability requirement resulting from the vertical aspects of the dynamics, an operator-splitting time integration scheme based on the horizontally explicit and vertically implicit (HEVI) philosophy is adopted for HOMAM. Preliminary results with the benchmark test cases proposed in the Dynamical Core Model Intercomparison project (DCMIP) test-suite will be presented in the seminar.

  12. A High-Order Multiscale Global Atmospheric Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, Ram

    2016-04-01

    The High-Order Method Modeling Environment (HOMME), developed at NCAR, is a petascale hydrostatic framework, which employs the cubed-sphere grid system and high-order continuous or discontinuous Galerkin (DG) methods. Recently, the HOMME framework is being extended to a non-hydrostatic dynamical core, named as the "High-Order Multiscale Atmospheric Model (HOMAM)." The spatial discretization is based on DG or high-order finite-volume methods. Orography is handled by the terrain-following height-based coordinate system. To alleviate the stringent CFL stability requirement resulting from the vertical aspects of the dynamics, an operator-splitting time integration scheme based on the horizontally explicit and vertically implicit (HEVI) philosophy is adopted for HOMAM. Preliminary results with the benchmark test cases proposed in the Dynamical Core Model Intercomparison project (DCMIP) test-suite will be presented in the seminar.

  13. Atmospheric Probe Model: Construction and Wind Tunnel Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vogel, Jerald M.

    1998-01-01

    The material contained in this document represents a summary of the results of a low speed wind tunnel test program to determine the performance of an atmospheric probe at low speed. The probe configuration tested consists of a 2/3 scale model constructed from a combination of hard maple wood and aluminum stock. The model design includes approximately 130 surface static pressure taps. Additional hardware incorporated in the baseline model provides a mechanism for simulating external and internal trailing edge split flaps for probe flow control. Test matrix parameters include probe side slip angle, external/internal split flap deflection angle, and trip strip applications. Test output database includes surface pressure distributions on both inner and outer annular wings and probe center line velocity distributions from forward probe to aft probe locations.

  14. A middle atmosphere temperature reference model from satellite measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnett, J. J.; Corney, M.

    Temperature fields in the stratosphere and mesosphere have been derived from radiance measurements made by the Nimbus 5 SCR, the Nimbus 6 PMR, and the Nimbus 7 SAMS and LIMS radiometers. These instruments cover different latitude and height ranges and different times during the 1973-1983 period. The problems of combining different data sets are discussed, and examples from a proposed model atmosphere for the stratosphere and mesosphere are presented. The model is given in terms of zonal means and amplitude and phase of zonal waves 1 and 2 for temperature and geopotential height, as functions of latitude and pressure for each calendar month. Comparisons are made with the CIRA 1972 and the Koshelkov Southern Hemisphere models and with the SAMS results and in-situ rocket/radio sondes.

  15. Towards improved capability and confidence in coupled atmospheric and wildland fire modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauer, Jeremy A.

    This dissertation work is aimed at improving the capability and confidence in a modernized and improved version of Los Alamos National Laboratory's coupled atmospheric and wild- land fire dynamics model, Higrad-Firetec. Higrad is the hydrodynamics component of this large eddy simulation model that solves the three dimensional, fully compressible Navier-Stokes equations, incorporating a dynamic eddy viscosity formulation through a two-scale turbulence closure scheme. Firetec is the vegetation, drag forcing, and combustion physics portion that is integrated with Higrad. The modern version of Higrad-Firetec incorporates multiple numerical methodologies and high performance computing aspects which combine to yield a unique tool capable of augmenting theoretical and observational investigations in order to better understand the multi-scale, multi-phase, and multi-physics, phenomena involved in coupled atmospheric and environmental dynamics. More specifically, the current work includes extended functionality and validation efforts targeting component processes in coupled atmospheric and wildland fire scenarios. Since observational data of sufficient quality and resolution to validate the fully coupled atmosphere-wildfire scenario simply does not exist, we instead seek to validate components of the full prohibitively convoluted process. This manuscript provides first, an introduction and background into the application space of Higrad-Firetec. Second we document the model formulation, solution procedure, and a simple scalar transport verification exercise. Third, we perform a validate model results against observational data for time averaged flow field metrics in and above four idealized forest canopies. Fourth, we carry out a validation effort for the non-buoyant jet in a crossflow scenario (to which an analogy can be made for atmosphere-wildfire interactions) comparing model results to laboratory data of both steady-in-time and unsteady-in-time metrics. Finally, an

  16. Hydrodynamic models of a Cepheid atmosphere. I - Deep envelope models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karp, A. H.

    1975-01-01

    The implicit hydrodynamic code of Kutter and Sparks has been modified to include radiative transfer effects. This modified code has been used to compute deep envelope models of a classical Cepheid with a period of 12 days. It is shown that in this particular model the hydrogen ionization region plays only a small role in producing the observed phase lag between the light and velocity curves. The cause of the bumps on the model's light curve is examined, and a mechanism is presented to explain those Cepheids with two secondary features on their light curves. This mechanism is shown to be consistent with the Hertzsprung sequence only if the evolutionary mass-luminosity law is used.

  17. A self-consistent chemically stratified atmosphere model for the roAp star 10 Aquilae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesvacil, N.; Shulyak, D.; Ryabchikova, T. A.; Kochukhov, O.; Akberov, A.; Weiss, W.

    2013-04-01

    Context. Chemically peculiar A-type (Ap) stars are a subgroup of the CP2 stars that exhibit anomalous overabundances of numerous elements, e.g. Fe, Cr, Sr, and rare earth elements. The pulsating subgroup of Ap stars, the roAp stars, present ideal laboratories to observe and model pulsational signatures, as well as the interplay of the pulsations with strong magnetic fields and vertical abundance gradients. Aims: Based on high-resolution spectroscopic observations and observed stellar energy distributions, we construct a self-consistent model atmosphere for the roAp star 10 Aquilae (HD 176232). It accounts for modulations of the temperature-pressure structure caused by vertical abundance gradients. We demonstrate that such an analysis can be used to determine precisely the fundamental atmospheric parameters required for pulsation modelling. Methods: Average abundances were derived for 56 species. For Mg, Si, Ca, Cr, Fe, Co, Sr, Pr, and Nd, vertical stratification profiles were empirically derived using the DDAFit minimisation routine together with the magnetic spectrum synthesis codeSynthmag. Model atmospheres were computed with the LLmodels code, which accounts for the individual abundances and stratification of chemical elements. Results: For the final model atmosphere, Teff = 7550 K and log (g) = 3.8 were adopted. While Mg, Si, Co, and Cr exhibit steep abundance gradients, Ca, Fe, and Sr showed much wider abundance gradients between logτ5000 = -1.5 and 0.5. Elements Mg and Co were found to be the least stratified, while Ca and Sr showed strong depth variations in abundance of up to ≈ 6 dex. Table 4 and Figs. 10-12 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  18. Improved 20- to 32-GHz atmospheric absorption model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz Pol, Sandra L.; Ruf, Christopher S.; Keihm, Stephen J.

    1998-09-01

    An improved model for the absorption of the atmosphere near the 22-GHz water vapor line is presented. The Van Vleck-Weisskopf line shape is used with a simple parameterized version of the model from Liebe et al. [1993] for the water vapor absorption spectra and a scaling of the model from Rosenkranz [1993] for the 20- to 32-GHz oxygen absorption. Radiometric brightness temperature measurements from two sites of contrasting climatological properties, San Diego, California, and West Palm Beach, Florida, were used as ground truth for comparison with in situ radiosonde-derived brightness temperatures under clear-sky conditions. Estimation of the new model's four parameters, related to water vapor line strength, line width and continuum absorption, and far-wing oxygen absorption, was performed using the Newton-Raphson inversion method. Improvements to the water vapor line strength and line width parameters are found to be statistically significant. The accuracy of the new absorption model is estimated to be 3% between 20 and 24 GHz, degrading to 8% near 32 GHz. In addition, the Hill line shape asymmetry ratio was evaluated in several currently used models to show the agreement of the data with Van Vleck-Weisskopf based models and to rule out water vapor absorption models near 22 GHz given by Waters [1976] and Ulaby et al. [1981], which are based on the Gross line shape.

  19. Asteroid fragmentation approaches for modeling atmospheric energy deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Register, Paul J.; Mathias, Donovan L.; Wheeler, Lorien F.

    2017-03-01

    During asteroid entry, energy is deposited in the atmosphere through thermal ablation and momentum-loss due to aerodynamic drag. Analytic models of asteroid entry and breakup physics are used to compute the energy deposition, which can then be compared against measured light curves and used to estimate ground damage due to airburst events. This work assesses and compares energy deposition results from four existing approaches to asteroid breakup modeling, and presents a new model that combines key elements of those approaches. The existing approaches considered include a liquid drop or "pancake" model where the object is treated as a single deforming body, and a set of discrete fragment models where the object breaks progressively into individual fragments. The new model incorporates both independent fragments and aggregate debris clouds to represent a broader range of fragmentation behaviors and reproduce more detailed light curve features. All five models are used to estimate the energy deposition rate versus altitude for the Chelyabinsk meteor impact, and results are compared with an observationally derived energy deposition curve. Comparisons show that four of the five approaches are able to match the overall observed energy deposition profile, but the features of the combined model are needed to better replicate both the primary and secondary peaks of the Chelyabinsk curve.

  20. Algorithms and physical parameters involved in the calculation of model stellar atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merlo, D. C.

    This contribution summarizes the Doctoral Thesis presented at Facultad de Matemática, Astronomía y Física, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba for the degree of PhD in Astronomy. We analyze some algorithms and physical parameters involved in the calculation of model stellar atmospheres, such as atomic partition functions, functional relations connecting gaseous and electronic pressure, molecular formation, temperature distribution, chemical compositions, Gaunt factors, atomic cross-sections and scattering sources, as well as computational codes for calculating models. Special attention is paid to the integration of hydrostatic equation. We compare our results with those obtained by other authors, finding reasonable agreement. We make efforts on the implementation of methods that modify the originally adopted temperature distribution in the atmosphere, in order to obtain constant energy flux throughout. We find limitations and we correct numerical instabilities. We integrate the transfer equation solving directly the integral equation involving the source function. As a by-product, we calculate updated atomic partition functions of the light elements. Also, we discuss and enumerate carefully selected formulae for the monochromatic absorption and dispersion of some atomic and molecular species. Finally, we obtain a flexible code to calculate model stellar atmospheres.

  1. Evaluation of atmospheric chemical models using aircraft data (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, S.; Grossberg, N.; Pierce, R.; Lee, P.; Ngan, F.; Yates, E. L.; Iraci, L. T.; Lefer, B. L.

    2013-12-01

    Air quality prediction is an important and growing field, as the adverse health effects of ozone (O3) are becoming more important to the general public. Two atmospheric chemical models, the Realtime Air Quality Modeling System (RAQMS) and the Community Multiscale Air Quality modeling system (CMAQ) are evaluated during NASA's Student Airborne Research Project (SARP) and the NASA Alpha Jet Atmospheric eXperiment (AJAX) flights. CO, O3, and NOx data simulated by the models are interpolated using an inverse distance weighting in space and a linear interpolation in time to both the SARP and AJAX flight tracks and compared to the CO, O3, and NOx observations at those points. Results for the seven flights included show moderate error in O3 during the flights, with RAQMS having a high O3 bias (+15.7 ppbv average) above 6 km and a low O3 bias (-17.5 ppbv average) below 4km. CMAQ was found to have a low O3 bias (-13.0 ppbv average) everywhere. Additionally, little bias (-5.36% RAQMS, -11.8% CMAQ) in the CO data was observed with the exception of a wildfire smoke plume that was flown through on one SARP flight, as CMAQ lacks any wildfire sources and RAQMS resolution is too coarse to resolve narrow plumes. This indicates improvement in emissions inventories compared to previous studies. CMAQ additionally incorrectly predicted a NOx plume due to incorrectly vertically advecting it from the surface, which caused NOx titration to occur, limiting the production of ozone. This study shows that these models perform reasonably well in most conditions; however more work must be done to assimilate wildfires, improve emissions inventories, and improve meteorological forecasts for the models.

  2. A non-grey analytical model for irradiated atmospheres. II. Analytical vs. numerical solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parmentier, Vivien; Guillot, Tristan; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Marley, Mark S.

    2015-02-01

    atmosphere to cool down rather than an enhanced absorption of the stellar light as previously thought. Finally, we provide a functional form for the coefficients of our analytical model for solar-composition giant exoplanets and brown dwarfs. This leads to fully analytical pressure-temperature profiles for irradiated atmospheres with a relative accuracy better than 10% for gravities between 2.5 m s-2 and 250 m s-2 and effective temperatures between 100 K and 3000 K. This is a great improvement over the commonly used Eddington boundary condition. A FORTRAN implementation of the analytical model is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/574/A35 or at http://www.oca.eu/parmentier/nongrey.Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  3. Sencenbaugh model 1000-14 wind turbine. Final test report

    SciTech Connect

    Higashi, K.K.

    1980-12-01

    The Sencenbaugh Model 1000-14 Wind Turbine Generator met or exceeded all manufacturer claims of survivability while undergoing testing at the Rocky Flats Small Wind Systems Test Center. The machine operated satisfactorily in wind speeds exceeding 52.7 m/s (117 mph). In addition, the Sencenbaugh operated in winds exceeding 22.5 m/s (50 mph) for 17 hours without incurring damage. However, the Sencenbaugh failed to substantiate the manufacturer power curve during atmospheric and controlled velocity testing. It is believed that tail design operational characteristics contributed significantly to this failure to reach rated output.

  4. Constructing realistic Szekeres models from initial and final data

    SciTech Connect

    Walters, Anthony; Hellaby, Charles E-mail: charles.hellaby@uct.ac.za

    2012-12-01

    The Szekeres family of inhomogeneous solutions, which are defined by six arbitrary metric functions, offers a wide range of possibilities for modelling cosmic structure. Here we present a model construction procedure for the quasispherical case using given data at initial and final times. Of the six arbitrary metric functions, the three which are common to both Szekeres and Lemaître-Tolman models are determined by the model construction procedure of Krasinski and Hellaby. For the remaining three functions, which are unique to Szekeres models, we derive exact analytic expressions in terms of more physically intuitive quantities — density profiles and dipole orientation angles. Using MATLAB, we implement the model construction procedure and simulate the time evolution.

  5. Organic acid modeling and model validation: Workshop summary. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, T.J.; Eilers, J.M.

    1992-08-14

    A workshop was held in Corvallis, Oregon on April 9--10, 1992 at the offices of E&S Environmental Chemistry, Inc. The purpose of this workshop was to initiate research efforts on the entitled ``Incorporation of an organic acid representation into MAGIC (Model of Acidification of Groundwater in Catchments) and testing of the revised model using Independent data sources.`` The workshop was attended by a team of internationally-recognized experts in the fields of surface water acid-bass chemistry, organic acids, and watershed modeling. The rationale for the proposed research is based on the recent comparison between MAGIC model hindcasts and paleolimnological inferences of historical acidification for a set of 33 statistically-selected Adirondack lakes. Agreement between diatom-inferred and MAGIC-hindcast lakewater chemistry in the earlier research had been less than satisfactory. Based on preliminary analyses, it was concluded that incorporation of a reasonable organic acid representation into the version of MAGIC used for hindcasting was the logical next step toward improving model agreement.

  6. A new Radiative Transfer Model of the Venus atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C.; Richardson, M. I.

    2009-12-01

    General Circulation Models (GCMs) of the Venus atmosphere forced with linearized cooling exhibit significant sensitivity to the prescribed heating structure. In order to improve the radiative forcing used in GCMs we have developed a medium resolution, full scattering, radiative transfer model (RTM) to provide optical properties and reference heating conditions for the Venus atmosphere over a wide wavelength range. We describe the components used by the RTM, including an efficient K-coefficient description of the gaseous absorbers, Mie/Henyey-Greenstein scattering by particulate matter in the clouds, Rayleigh scattering by the major gases, continuum absorption, and additional Ultra Violet and Visible gaseuous absorption. The implementation of the RTM is modular and allows any valid wavelength range to be investigated given sufficient optical data. We show the results of validation experiments using the RTM. We calculate fluxes in the near Infra-Red optical windows near 1.0 micron, 1.7 micron and 2.3 micron using native VIRTIS spectral resolution K-coefficients, and degrade the resolution to test the sensitivity to nearby high opacity spectral features. We calculate fluxes and heating rates for a sample profile from the Venus International Reference Atmosphere (VIRA), and additionally provide geometric albedo (0.85), bond albedo (0.72), and downward diffuse and direct solar fluxes at the surface (17W/m/m between 350-750 nm) for the same profile. We discuss the work required to create a suitable self-consistent radiative forcing for a GCM using this RTM. A two-stream implementation is considered and tested using the TWOSTR flux solver and the calculations required to produce a Curtis Matrix algorithm are described.

  7. Examining the exobase approximation: DSMC models of Titan's upper atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, Orenthal J.; Waalkes, William; Tenishev, Valeriy M.; Johnson, Robert E.; Bieler, Andre; Combi, Michael R.; Nagy, Andrew F.

    2016-07-01

    Chamberlain ([1963] Planet. Space Sci., 11, 901-960) described the use of the exobase layer to determine escape from planetary atmospheres, below which it is assumed that molecular collisions maintain thermal equilibrium and above which collisions are deemed negligible. De La Haye et al. ([2007] Icarus., 191, 236-250) used this approximation to extract the energy deposition and non-thermal escape rates for Titan's atmosphere by fitting the Cassini Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) density data. De La Haye et al. assumed the gas distributions were composed of an enhanced population of super-thermal molecules (E >> kT) that could be described by a kappa energy distribution function (EDF), and they fit the data using the Liouville theorem. Here we fitted the data again, but we used the conventional form of the kappa EDF. The extracted kappa EDFs were then used with the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) technique (Bird [1994] Molecular Gas Dynamics and the Direct Simulation of Gas Flows) to evaluate the effect of collisions on the exospheric profiles. The INMS density data can be fit reasonably well with thermal and various non-thermal EDFs. However, the extracted energy deposition and escape rates are shown to depend significantly on the assumed exobase altitude, and the usefulness of such fits without directly modeling the collisions is unclear. Our DSMC results indicate that the kappa EDFs used in the Chamberlain approximation can lead to errors in determining the atmospheric temperature profiles and escape rates. Gas kinetic simulations are needed to accurately model measured exospheric density profiles, and to determine the altitude ranges where the Liouville method might be applicable.

  8. Generalized Manning Condensation Model Captures the RNA Ion Atmosphere

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Ryan L.; Noel, Jeffrey K.; Mandic, Ana; Whitford, Paul C.; Sanbonmatsu, Karissa Y.; Mohanty, Udayan; Onuchic, José N.

    2016-01-01

    RNA is highly sensitive to the ionic environment, and typically requires Mg2+ to form compact structures. There is a need for models capable of describing the ion atmosphere surrounding RNA with quantitative accuracy. We present a model of RNA electrostatics and apply it within coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation. The model treats Mg2+ ions explicitly to account for ion-ion correlations neglected by mean field theories. Since mean-field theories capture KCl well, it is treated implicitly by a generalized Manning counterion condensation model. The model extends Manning condensation to deal with arbitrary RNA conformations, non-limiting KCl concentrations, and the ion inaccessible volume of RNA. The model is tested against experimental measurements of the excess Mg2+ associated with the RNA, Γ2+, because Γ2+ is directly related to the Mg2+-RNA interaction free energy. The excellent agreement with experiment demonstrates the model captures the ionic dependence of the RNA free energy landscape. PMID:26197147

  9. Venus atmosphere simulated by a high-resolution general circulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, Norihiko

    2016-07-01

    An atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) for Venus on the basis of AFES (AGCM For the Earth Simulator) have been developed (e.g., Sugimoto et al., 2014a) and a very high-resolution simulation is performed. The highest resolution of the model is T319L120; 960 times 480 horizontal grids (grid intervals are about 40 km) with 120 vertical layers (layer intervals are about 1 km). In the model, the atmosphere is dry and forced by the solar heating with the diurnal and semi-diurnal components. The infrared radiative process is simplified by adopting Newtonian cooling approximation. The temperature is relaxed to a prescribed horizontally uniform temperature distribution, in which a layer with almost neutral static stability observed in the Venus atmosphere presents. A fast zonal wind in a solid-body rotation is given as the initial state. Starting from this idealized superrotation, the model atmosphere reaches a quasi-equilibrium state within 1 Earth year and this state is stably maintained for more than 10 Earth years. The zonal-mean zonal flow with weak midlatitude jets has almost constant velocity of 120 m/s in latitudes between 45°S and 45°N at the cloud top levels, which agrees very well with observations. In the cloud layer, baroclinic waves develop continuously at midlatitudes and generate Rossby-type waves at the cloud top (Sugimoto et al., 2014b). At the polar region, warm polar vortex zonally surrounded by a cold latitude band (cold collar) is well reproduced (Ando et al., 2016). As for horizontal kinetic energy spectra, divergent component is broadly (k>10) larger than rotational component compared with that on Earth (Kashimura et al., in preparation). Finally, recent results for thermal tides and small-scale waves will be shown in the presentation. Sugimoto, N. et al. (2014a), Baroclinic modes in the Venus atmosphere simulated by GCM, Journal of Geophysical Research: Planets, Vol. 119, p1950-1968. Sugimoto, N. et al. (2014b), Waves in a Venus general

  10. High resolution atmospheric transport modelling in support of radionuclide detections at CTBTO network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krysta, M.; Szintai, B.; Kuśmierczyk-Michulec, J.; Carter, J. A.; Given, J. W.

    2014-12-01

    boundary layer physics. In order to focus full attention on atmospheric processes we will present analyses of case studies based on a trustworthy source of radionuclides which can be connected to detections in the CTBTO network. Finally, we will discuss modelling limitations due to the turbulent nature of the atmospheric processes.

  11. Radiolytic Model for Chemical Composition of Europa's Atmosphere and Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, John F.

    2004-01-01

    The overall objective of the present effort is to produce models for major and selected minor components of Europa s neutral atmosphere in 1-D versus altitude and in 2-D versus altitude and longitude or latitude. A 3-D model versus all three coordinates (alt, long, lat) will be studied but development on this is at present limited by computing facilities available to the investigation team. In this first year we have focused on 1-D modeling with Co-I Valery Shematovich s Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) code for water group species (H2O, O2, O, OH) and on 2-D with Co-I Mau Wong's version of a similar code for O2, O, CO, CO2, and Na. Surface source rates of H2O and O2 from sputtering and radiolysis are used in the 1-D model, while observations for CO2 at the Europa surface and Na detected in a neutral cloud ejected from Europa are used, along with the O2 sputtering rate, to constrain source rates in the 2-D version. With these separate approaches we are investigating a range of processes important to eventual implementation of a comprehensive 3-D atmospheric model which could be used to understand present observations and develop science requirements for future observations, e.g. from Earth and in Europa orbit. Within the second year we expect to merge the full water group calculations into the 2-D version of the DSMC code which can then be extended to 3-D, pending availability of computing resources. Another important goal in the second year would be the inclusion of sulk and its more volatile oxides (SO, SO2).

  12. Proposed reference model for middle atmosphere water vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiou, E. W.; Remsberg, E. E.; Rodgers, C. D.; Munro, R.; Bevilacqua, R. M.; McCormick, M. P.; Russell, J. M.

    Several new and significant satellite data sets on middle atmosphere water vapor have been produced recently. They include data from the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II (SAGE II) and the Nimbus-7 Stratospheric and Mesospheric Sounder (SAMS) experiment. The SAGE II data provide an estimate of interannual variability of water vapor in the stratosphere. The SAMS data are appropriate for the upper stratosphere and lower mesosphere. We combine these two data sets with those from the Nimbus-7 Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere (LIMS) experiment to update the COSPAR interim reference model for water vapor. Water vapor profiles from the Spacelab 3 Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy (ATMOS) experiment, ground-based microwave, and in situ balloon and aircraft measurements have been used to check the quality of the satellite data sets. The updated reference model is given as a function of latitude and pressure altitude and now covers all four seasons. Tabulations are included for these seasonal water vapor mixing ratios (in ppmv) and their estimated errors (in percent).

  13. The balance model of oxygen enrichment of atmospheric air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Alexander

    2013-04-01

    The study of turnover of carbon and oxygen is an important line of scientific investigation. This line takes on special significance in conditions of soil degradation, which leads to the excess content of carbon dioxide and, as result, decrease of oxygen in the atmosphere. The aim of this article is a statement the balance model of oxygen enrichment of atmospheric air (ratio O/C) depending on consumption and assimilation by plants of dissolved organic matter (DOM) and the value of the oxidation-reduction potential (Eh). Basis of model was the following: green vascular plants are facultative heterotrophic organisms with symbiotic digestion and nutrition. According to the trophology viewpoint, the plant consumption of organic compounds broadens greatly a notion about the plant nutrition and ways of its regulation. In particular, beside the main known cycle of carbon: plant - litter - humus - carbon dioxide - plant, there is the second carbon cycle (turnover of organic compounds): plant - litter - humus - DOM - plant. The biogeochemical meaning of consumption of organic compounds by plants is that plants build the structural and functional blocks of biological macromolecules in their bodies. It provides receiving of a certain "energy payoff" by plants, which leads to increase of plant biomass by both an inclusion of allochthonous organic molecules in plant tissues, and positive effect of organic compounds on plant metabolic processes. One more of powerful ecological consequence of a heterotrophic nutrition of green plants is oxygen enrichment of atmospheric air. As the organic molecules in the second biological cycle of carbon are built in plants without considerable chemical change, the atmospheric air is enriched on that amount of oxygen, which would be required on oxidation of the organic molecules absorbed by plants, in result. It was accepted that: plant-soil system was climax, the plant community was grassy, initial contents of carbon in phytomass was accepted

  14. A three-dimensional model simulation of atmospheric nitrous oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, R. E.; Blackshear, W. T.; Grose, W. L.; Eckman, R. S.; Pierce, R. B.; Fairlie, T. D. A.

    1992-01-01

    The NASA Langley 3D GCM chemical transport model is used to investigate the distribution of atmospheric N2O up to 60 km altitude. The transport characteristics of the model is evaluated without the complications of a detailed chemical formulation for all of the relevant stratospheric minor constituents. Interpretation of the yearly average zonal mean N2O distribution in terms of transport by the yearly averaged meridional circulation and stratospheric photochemical loss indicates large regions in the Northern Hemisphere stratosphere where dynamical mixing apparently plays a large role in maintaining the N2O distribution. In these regions, slopes of the N2O mixing ratio isopleths are maintained by competition between advection by the meridional circulation acting to steepen and dynamical mixing acting to flatten the slopes.

  15. Session on coupled land surface/hydrological/atmospheric models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pielke, Roger

    1993-01-01

    The current model capabilities in the context of land surface interactions with the atmosphere include only one-dimensional characteristics of vegetation and soil surface heat, moisture, momentum, and selected other trace gas fluxes (e.g., CO2). The influence of spatially coherent fluxes that result from landscape heterogeneity were not included. Valuable representations of several aspects of the landscape pattern currently exist. These include digital elevation data and measures of the leaf area index (i.e., Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) from Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) data). A major deficiency, however, is the lack of an ability to sample spatially representative shallow and (especially) deep soil moisture. Numerous mesoscale modeling and observed studies demonstrated the sensitivity of planetary boundary layer structure and deep convection to the magnitude of the surface moisture flux.

  16. Spectral classification of stars using synthetic model atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertone, E.; Buzzoni, A.

    2001-09-01

    We devised a straightforward procedure to derive the atmospheric fundamental parameters of stars across the different MK spectral types by comparing mid-resolution spectroscopic observations with theoretical grids of synthetic spectra. The results of a preliminary experiment, by matching the Gunn & Stryker (1983) and Jacoby et al. (1984) spectrophotometric atlases with the Kurucz (1995) models, are briefly discussed. For stars in the A-K spectral range, effective temperature is obtained within a 1-2% relative uncertainty (at 2-sigma confidence level). This value raises to 4-5% for the hottest stars in the samples (O-B spectral types). A poorer fit is obtained throughout for stars cooler than 4000 K mainly due to the limiting input physics in the Kurucz models.

  17. Data Needs for Stellar Atmosphere and Spectrum Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Short, C. I.

    2006-01-01

    The main data need for stellar atmosphere and spectrum modeling remains atomic and molecular transition data, particularly energy levels and transition cross-sections. We emphasize that data is needed for bound-free (b - f) as well as bound-bound (b - b), and collisional as well as radiative transitions. Data is now needed for polyatomic molecules as well as atoms, ions, and diatomic molecules. In addition, data for the formation of, and extinction due to, liquid and solid phase dust grains is needed. A prioritization of species and data types is presented, and gives emphasis to Fe group elements, and elements important for the investigation of nucleosynthesis and Galactic chemical evolution, such as the -elements and n-capture elements. Special data needs for topical problems in the modeling of cool stars and brown dwarfs are described.

  18. Reference aquaplanet climate in the Community Atmosphere Model, Version 5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medeiros, Brian; Williamson, David L.; Olson, Jerry G.

    2016-03-01

    Fundamental characteristics of the aquaplanet climate simulated by the Community Atmosphere Model, Version 5.3 (CAM5.3) are presented. The assumptions and simplifications of the configuration are described. A 16 year long, perpetual equinox integration with prescribed SST using the model's standard 1° grid spacing is presented as a reference simulation. Statistical analysis is presented that shows similar aquaplanet configurations can be run for about 2 years to obtain robust climatological structures, including global and zonal means, eddy statistics, and precipitation distributions. Such a simulation can be compared to the reference simulation to discern differences in the climate, including an assessment of confidence in the differences. To aid such comparisons, the reference simulation has been made available via earthsystemgrid.org. Examples are shown comparing the reference simulation with simulations from the CAM5 series that make different microphysical assumptions and use a different dynamical core.

  19. Advanced development of atmospheric models. [SEASAT Program support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kesel, P. G.; Langland, R. A.; Stephens, P. L.; Welleck, R. E.; Wolff, P. M.

    1979-01-01

    A set of atmospheric analysis and prediction models was developed in support of the SEASAT Program existing objective analysis models which utilize a 125x125 polar stereographic grid of the Northern Hemisphere, which were modified in order to incorporate and assess the impact of (real or simulated) satellite data in the analysis of a two-day meteorological scenario in January 1979. Program/procedural changes included: (1) a provision to utilize winds in the sea level pressure and multi-level height analyses (1000-100 MBS); (2) The capability to perform a pre-analysis at two control levels (1000 MBS and 250 MBS); (3) a greater degree of wind- and mass-field coupling, especially at these controls levels; (4) an improved facility to bogus the analyses based on results of the preanalysis; and (5) a provision to utilize (SIRS) satellite thickness values and cloud motion vectors in the multi-level height analysis.

  20. Radiative characteristics for atmospheric models from lidar sounding and AERONET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapunov, Maxim; Kuznetsov, Anatoly; Efremenko, Dmitry; Bochalov, Valentin; Melnikova, Irina; Samulenkov, Dimity; Vasilyev, Alexander; Poberovsky, Anatoly; Frantsuzova, Inna

    2016-04-01

    Optical models of atmospheric aerosols above of St. Petersburg are constraint on the base of the results of lidar sounding. The lidar system of the Resource Center "Observatory of environmental safety" of the St. Petersburg University Research Park is situated the city center, Vasilievsky Island. The measurements of the vertical profile of velocity and wind direction in the center of St. Petersburg for 2014 -2015 are fulfilled in addition. Height of laser sounding of aerosols is up to 25 km and wind up to 12 km. Observations are accomplished in the daytime and at night and mapped to vertical profiles of temperature, humidity, wind speed and pressure obtained from radiosounding in Voeikovo (St. Petersburg suburb). Results of wind observations are compared with those of upper-air measurements of meteorological service in Voeikovo. The distance between the points of observation is 25 km. Statistics of wind directions at different heights are identified. The comparison is based on the assumption of homogeneity of the wind field on such a scale. In most cases, good agreement between the observed vertical profiles of wind, obtained by both methods is appeared. However, there were several cases, when the results differ sharply or at high altitudes, or, on the contrary, in the surface layer. The analysis of the impact of wind, temperature, and humidity profiles in the atmosphere on the properties and dynamics of solid impurities is implemented. Comparison with AOT results from AERONET observations in St. Petersburg suburb Peterhof is done. It is shown that diurnal and seasonal variations of optical and morphological parameters of atmospheric aerosols in the pollution cap over the city to a large extent determined by the variability of meteorological parameters. The results of the comparison are presented and possible explanation of the differences is proposed. Optical models of the atmosphere in day and night time in different seasons are constructed from lidar and AERONET

  1. Atmospheric Dispersion Modelling of Volcanic Ash using Data Insertion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkins, K. L.; Watson, M.; Kristiansen, N. I.; Webster, H. N.; Thomson, D.; Dacre, H.; Prata, F.

    2015-12-01

    Eruption source parameters in volcanic ash dispersion and transport modelling, such as plume height and eruption rate, can often be highly uncertain. This can lead to significant uncertainties in the position and concentration of the modelled ash cloud downwind of the vent. Methods such as inversion modelling have successfully constrained such uncertainties, but in this work estimation of the eruption source parameters for the atmospheric dispersion model NAME is bypassed by implementing data insertion. Using this method under development, ash cloud properties retrieved from satellite imagery are used to create ash sources downwind from the volcano vent, from which dispersion simulations are initialised. Using the satellite retrievals, a set of simulations are initialised from different times and combined to create forecasts. In other experiments the simulations are sequentially updated using a probabilistic cloud / ash / clear classification scheme to correct the model state over time. Simulations from the Eyjafjallajökull and Grímsvötn eruptions compare well against other established modelling methods and satellite observations.

  2. Gridded global surface ozone metrics for atmospheric chemistry model evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofen, E. D.; Bowdalo, D.; Evans, M. J.; Apadula, F.; Bonasoni, P.; Cupeiro, M.; Ellul, R.; Galbally, I. E.; Girgzdiene, R.; Luppo, S.; Mimouni, M.; Nahas, A. C.; Saliba, M.; Tørseth, K.

    2016-02-01

    The concentration of ozone at the Earth's surface is measured at many locations across the globe for the purposes of air quality monitoring and atmospheric chemistry research. We have brought together all publicly available surface ozone observations from online databases from the modern era to build a consistent data set for the evaluation of chemical transport and chemistry-climate (Earth System) models for projects such as the Chemistry-Climate Model Initiative and Aer-Chem-MIP. From a total data set of approximately 6600 sites and 500 million hourly observations from 1971-2015, approximately 2200 sites and 200 million hourly observations pass screening as high-quality sites in regionally representative locations that are appropriate for use in global model evaluation. There is generally good data volume since the start of air quality monitoring networks in 1990 through 2013. Ozone observations are biased heavily toward North America and Europe with sparse coverage over the rest of the globe. This data set is made available for the purposes of model evaluation as a set of gridded metrics intended to describe the distribution of ozone concentrations on monthly and annual timescales. Metrics include the moments of the distribution, percentiles, maximum daily 8-hour average (MDA8), sum of means over 35 ppb (daily maximum 8-h; SOMO35), accumulated ozone exposure above a threshold of 40 ppbv (AOT40), and metrics related to air quality regulatory thresholds. Gridded data sets are stored as netCDF-4 files and are available to download from the British Atmospheric Data Centre (doi: 10.5285/08fbe63d-fa6d-4a7a-b952-5932e3ab0452). We provide recommendations to the ozone measurement community regarding improving metadata reporting to simplify ongoing and future efforts in working with ozone data from disparate networks in a consistent manner.

  3. Gridded global surface ozone metrics for atmospheric chemistry model evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofen, E. D.; Bowdalo, D.; Evans, M. J.; Apadula, F.; Bonasoni, P.; Cupeiro, M.; Ellul, R.; Galbally, I. E.; Girgzdiene, R.; Luppo, S.; Mimouni, M.; Nahas, A. C.; Saliba, M.; Tørseth, K.; Wmo Gaw, Epa Aqs, Epa Castnet, Capmon, Naps, Airbase, Emep, Eanet Ozone Datasets, All Other Contributors To

    2015-07-01

    The concentration of ozone at the Earth's surface is measured at many locations across the globe for the purposes of air quality monitoring and atmospheric chemistry research. We have brought together all publicly available surface ozone observations from online databases from the modern era to build a consistent dataset for the evaluation of chemical transport and chemistry-climate (Earth System) models for projects such as the Chemistry-Climate Model Initiative and Aer-Chem-MIP. From a total dataset of approximately 6600 sites and 500 million hourly observations from 1971-2015, approximately 2200 sites and 200 million hourly observations pass screening as high-quality sites in regional background locations that are appropriate for use in global model evaluation. There is generally good data volume since the start of air quality monitoring networks in 1990 through 2013. Ozone observations are biased heavily toward North America and Europe with sparse coverage over the rest of the globe. This dataset is made available for the purposes of model evaluation as a set of gridded metrics intended to describe the distribution of ozone concentrations on monthly and annual timescales. Metrics include the moments of the distribution, percentiles, maximum daily eight-hour average (MDA8), SOMO35, AOT40, and metrics related to air quality regulatory thresholds. Gridded datasets are stored as netCDF-4 files and are available to download from the British Atmospheric Data Centre (doi:10.5285/08fbe63d-fa6d-4a7a-b952-5932e3ab0452). We provide recommendations to the ozone measurement community regarding improving metadata reporting to simplify ongoing and future efforts in working with ozone data from disparate networks in a consistent manner.

  4. Indirect Global Warming Potentials of Halons Using Atmospheric Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youn, D.; Patten, K. O.; Wuebbles, D. J.

    2007-05-01

    Emission of bromochlorofluorocarbons, or Halons, results in stratospheric ozone depletion. This leads to cooling of the climate system in the opposite direction to direct warming contribution of the Halons as greenhouse gases. This cooling is a key indirect effect of Halons on radiative forcing or climate. The Global Warming Potential (GWP) is a relative index used to compare the climate impact of an emitted greenhouse gas, relative to an equal amount of carbon dioxide. Until now, indirect GWPs have been calculated based on the concept of Equivalent Effective Stratospheric Chlorine (EESC), which oversimplifies the complex processes in the atmosphere. As a step towards obtaining indirect GWPs through a more robust approach, 2-D and 3-D global chemical transport models (CTM) were used as the computational tool to derive more realistic ozone changes caused by pulse perturbation of Halons at the surface. Indirect GWPs of Halon-1211 and -1301 for a 100-year time horizon were explicitly calculated based on the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) 2-D global CTM and radiative transport model (RTM) and the 3-D CTM, MOZART-3.1. The 2-D and 3-D model simulations show acceptable temporal variations in the atmosphere as well as derived lifetimes and direct GWP values of the Halons. The 2-D model-based indirect GWPs for a 100-year horizon are -16,294 for Halon-1211 and -33,648 for Halon-1301. 3-D indirect GWP for Halon-1211 is -18,216. The indirect GWPs for Halon-1211 presented here are much smaller than previous published results using the previous simplified appraoch.

  5. Ozone productivity of atmospheric organics coordinating research council project A-10. annual technical report. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Seinfeld, J.

    1994-04-20

    A method of analyzing hydrocarbon reactivity that illuminates the inner workings of a chemical mechanism is being developed. Progress to date is detailed in three papers that comprise the body of the report. The first paper describes the mathematical details of the assignment method that was developed. In the second paper, the assignment method was used to examine the exact nature of incremental reactivities. The third paper expands the assignment method to include continuous emissions and applied it to a trajectory model simulating conditions during the Southern California Air Quality Study (SCAQS) to determine the contributions of individual Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) to ozone and secondary aerosol formation.

  6. Model Study of IGW Hotspot Implications for the Middle Atmospheric Dynamics and Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisoft, P.; Šácha, P.; Jacobi, C.; Lilienthal, F.

    2015-12-01

    Internal gravity waves are widely recognized to contribute significantly to the energy and angular momentum transport. They play a significant role in affecting many of the middle atmospheric phenomena (like the QBO or Brewer-Dobson circulation). Using GPS RO density profiles, we have discovered a localized area of enhanced IGW activity and breaking in the lower stratosphere of Eastern Asia/North-western Pacific region. With a 3D primitive equation model of the middle atmosphere we studied the effects of such a localized breaking region on large-scale dynamics and transport. Enhancing artificially a gravity wave drag in the lover stratosphere of the EA/NP region we show that such a localized IGW forcing creates planetary waves propagating both equatorward and poleward and upward along the edge of the polar vortex. Possible consequences for the polar vortex stability and stratosphere-troposphere exchange in the tropical region are discussed. Finally, applying 3D wave activity flux and 3D residual circulation diagnostics, we investigated the possible role of this area in the longitudinal variability of the Brewer- Dobson circulation with a hypothesis of its enhanced downwelling branch in this region. In the process, model results were compared with the ozone and tracer distribution data from GOME, GOMOS, MIPAS and SCIAMACHY further confirming an importance of the Eastern Asia/North-western Pacific region for the middle atmospheric dynamics.

  7. Atmospheric Rivers in the Mid-latitudes: A Modeling Study for Current and Future Climates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shields, C. A.; Kiehl, J. T.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric rivers (ARs) are dynamically-driven narrow intense bands of moisture that transport significant amounts of moisture from the tropics to mid-latitudes and are thus an important aspect the Earth's hydrological cycle. They are often associated with extratropical cyclones whose low level circulation is able to tap into tropical moisture and transport it northward. The "Pineapple Express" is an example of an AR that impacts the west coast of California predominately in the winter months and can produce heavy amounts of precipitation in a short period of time (hours up to several days). This work will focus on three mid-latitude AR regions including the west coast of California, the Pacific Northwest, and the United Kingdom as modeled by a suite of high-resolution CESM (Community Earth System Model) simulations for 20th century and RCP8.5 future climate scenarios. The CESM version employed utilizes half-degree resolution atmosphere/land components (~0.5o) coupled to the standard (1o) ocean/ice components. We use the high-resolution atmosphere because it is able to more accurately represent extreme, regional precipitation. CESM realistically captures ARs as spatial and temporal statistics show. Projections for future climate statistics for all three regions as well as analysis of the dynamical and thermodynamical mechanisms driving ARs, such as vorticity, jets and the steering flow, and water vapor transport, and will presented. Finally, teleconnections to climate variability processes, such as ENSO will be explored.

  8. Experimental support for KrF laser modeling. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-07-19

    This paper is the final report for a project to do characterization studies on the KrF laser system. The project did experimental work on KrF lasers in support of modeling studies, with the objective being to see if this technology could be competitive for use in the ICF program. This program has provided LANL with data critical for their model development. Section 2 describes the laser extraction experiments together with the calibration of the diagnostics and the re-examination of the analysis procedure. Section 3 discusses the gain and transient absorption measurements, and Section 4 gives the conclusion for this program.

  9. The coupled atmosphere-chemistry-ocean model SOCOL-MPIOM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthers, S.; Anet, J. G.; Stenke, A.; Raible, C. C.; Rozanov, E.; Brönnimann, S.; Peter, T.; Arfeuille, F. X.; Shapiro, A. I.; Beer, J.; Steinhilber, F.; Brugnara, Y.; Schmutz, W.

    2014-09-01

    The newly developed atmosphere-ocean-chemistry-climate model SOCOL-MPIOM is presented by demonstrating the influence of chemistry-climate interactions on the climate state and the variability. Therefore, we compare pre-industrial control simulations with (CHEM) and without (NOCHEM) interactive chemistry. In general, the influence of the chemistry on the mean state and the variability is small and mainly restricted to the stratosphere and mesosphere. The atmospheric dynamics mainly differ in polar regions, with slightly stronger polar vortices in the austral and boreal winter, respectively. The strengthening of the vortex is related to larger stratospheric temperature gradients, which are attributed to a parameterisation of the absorption of ozone and oxygen in different wavelength intervals, which is considered in the version with interactive chemistry only. A second reason for the temperature differences between CHEM and NOCHEM is related to diurnal variations in the ozone concentrations in the higher atmosphere, which are missing in NOCHEM. Furthermore, stratospheric water vapour concentrations substantially differ between the two experiments, but their effect on temperature is small. In both setups, the simulated intensity and variability of the northern polar vortex is inside the range of present-day observations. Additionally, the performance of SOCOL-MPIOM under changing external forcings is assessed for the period 1600-2000 using an ensemble of simulations. In the industrial period from 1850 onward SOCOL-MPIOM overestimates the global mean surface air temperature increase in comparison to observational data sets. Sensitivity simulations show that this overestimation can be attributed to a combination of factors: the solar forcing reconstruction, the simulated ozone changes, and incomplete aerosol effects and land use changes.

  10. Empirical Reference Models for COSPAR International Reference Atmosphere (CIRA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drob, Douglas; Emmert, John; Picone, Michael

    Openly distributed atmospheric reference models are an essential tool for scientific research and operational activities. To meet the needs of all users, such models must utilize rigorous statistical methods and the most comprehensive and reliable data sets in their development. Two such models that meet these requirements are the Naval Research Laboratory, Mass Spectrometer Incoherent Scatter Extended (NRLMSISE-00) and Horizontal Wind Model (HWM-93) empirical reference models. The NRLMSISE-00 model and its predecessors are based on 35 years of empirical modeling experience and over 40 years of research measurements. These global models are well documented and extend from the ground to the exosphere, providing estimates of neutral temperature, density, and major neutral species composition as a function of geographic location, day of year, time of day, and geomagnetic and solar activity conditions. Relative to the most comprehensive span of datasets available these models have the smallest bias and root mean square deviations of any climatological reference model built to date, although there are a few limitations in the 80 to 120 km region. The less advanced HWM-93 model, based on the same statistical methodologies and general mathematical formulation of the NRLMSISE-00 model, provides climatological estimates of the horizontal wind fields over the same variables and range of conditions as the NRLMSISE-00 model. The availability of several new long term data sets, including satellite wind measurements from the WINDII instrument onboard the UARS satellite, as well as ground-based optical Fabery-Perot measurements, provide the opportunity to make significant refinements to the existing model. Initial results from an improved HWM will be shown for altitudes between 100 and 500 km. Improvement in the model's ability to represent the seasonal changes, solar forcing, geomagnetic forcing, diurnal variation, and vertical structure of horizontal winds of the region is

  11. Evolution of Earth-like Extrasolar Planetary Atmospheres: Assessing the Atmospheres and Biospheres of Early Earth Analog Planets with a Coupled Atmosphere Biogeochemical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebauer, S.; Grenfell, J. L.; Stock, J. W.; Lehmann, R.; Godolt, M.; von Paris, P.; Rauer, H.

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the evolution of Earth and potentially habitable Earth-like worlds is essential to fathom our origin in the Universe. The search for Earth-like planets in the habitable zone and investigation of their atmospheres with climate and photochemical models is a central focus in exoplanetary science. Taking the evolution of Earth as a reference for Earth-like planets, a central scientific goal is to understand what the interactions were between atmosphere, geology, and biology on early Earth. The Great Oxidation Event in Earth's history was certainly caused by their interplay, but the origin and controlling processes of this occurrence are not well understood, the study of which will require interdisciplinary, coupled models. In this work, we present results from our newly developed Coupled Atmosphere Biogeochemistry model in which atmospheric O2 concentrations are fixed to values inferred by geological evidence. Applying a unique tool (Pathway Analysis Program), ours is the first quantitative analysis of catalytic cycles that governed O2 in early Earth's atmosphere near the Great Oxidation Event. Complicated oxidation pathways play a key role in destroying O2, whereas in the upper atmosphere, most O2 is formed abiotically via CO2 photolysis. The O2 bistability found by Goldblatt et al. (2006) is not observed in our calculations likely due to our detailed CH4 oxidation scheme. We calculate increased CH4 with increasing O2 during the Great Oxidation Event. For a given atmospheric surface flux, different atmospheric states are possible; however, the net primary productivity of the biosphere that produces O2 is unique. Mixing, CH4 fluxes, ocean solubility, and mantle/crust properties strongly affect net primary productivity and surface O2 fluxes. Regarding exoplanets, different "states" of O2 could exist for similar biomass output. Strong geological activity could lead to false negatives for life (since our analysis suggests that reducing gases remove O2 that

  12. NASA's Upper Atmosphere Research Program (UARP) and Atmospheric Chemistry Modeling and Analysis Program (ACMAP): Research Summaries 1997-1999

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurylo, M. J.; DeCola, P. L.; Kaye, J. A.

    2000-01-01

    Under the mandate contained in the FY 1976 NASA Authorization Act, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has developed and is implementing a comprehensive program of research, technology development, and monitoring of the Earth's upper atmosphere, with emphasis on the upper troposphere and stratosphere. This program aims at expanding our chemical and physical understanding to permit both the quantitative analysis of current perturbations as well as the assessment of possible future changes in this important region of our environment. It is carried out jointly by the Upper Atmosphere Research Program (UARP) and the Atmospheric Chemistry Modeling and Analysis Program (ACMAP), both managed within the Research Division in the Office of Earth Science at NASA. Significant contributions to this effort have also been provided by the Atmospheric Effects of Aviation Project (AEAP) of NASA's Office of Aero-Space Technology. The long-term objectives of the present program are to perform research to: understand the physics, chemistry, and transport processes of the upper troposphere and the stratosphere and their control on the distribution of atmospheric chemical species such as ozone; assess possible perturbations to the composition of the atmosphere caused by human activities and natural phenomena (with a specific emphasis on trace gas geographical distributions, sources, and sinks and the role of trace gases in defining the chemical composition of the upper atmosphere); understand the processes affecting the distributions of radiatively active species in the atmosphere, and the importance of chemical-radiative-dynamical feedbacks on the meteorology and climatology of the stratosphere and troposphere; and understand ozone production, loss, and recovery in an atmosphere with increasing abundances of greenhouse gases. The current report is composed of two parts. Part 1 summarizes the objectives, status, and accomplishments of the research tasks supported

  13. Modeling evaporation from porous media influenced by atmospheric processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosthaf, K.; Baber, K.; Flemisch, B.; Helmig, R.

    2012-04-01

    Modeling evaporation processes from partially saturated soils into the ambient air is a challenging task. It involves usually a variety of interacting processes and depends on the multitude of properties of the fluids and of the porous medium. Often, the ambient free-flow and the porous-medium compartments are modeled separately with a specification of the evaporation rate as boundary condition. We have developed a coupling concept, which allows the combined modeling of a free-flow and a porous-medium system under non-isothermal conditions with the evaporative fluxes across the soil-atmosphere interface as model output. It is based on flux continuity and local thermodynamic equilibrium at the interface. Darcy's law for multiple phases is used in the porous medium, whereas the ambient air flow is modeled as a compositional single-phase Stokes system. The concept has been implemented in the numerical simulator DuMux. A comparison of simulated and measured data from wind tunnel experiments performed in the group of D. Or (ETH Zürich) will be shown. Furthermore, the impact of several parameters, such as a varying wind velocity, temperature or different soil properties on the evaporation process has been analyzed in a numerical parameter study. The results will be presented and discussed.

  14. Theoretical and global scale model studies of the atmospheric sulfur/aerosol system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasibhatla, Prasad

    1996-01-01

    The primary focus during the third-phase of our on-going multi-year research effort has been on 3 activities. These are: (1) a global-scale model study of the anthropogenic component of the tropospheric sulfur cycle; (2) process-scale model studies of the factors influencing the distribution of aerosols in the remote marine atmosphere; and (3) an investigation of the mechanism of the OH-initiated oxidation of DMS in the remote marine boundary layer. In this paper, we describe in more detail our research activities in each of these areas. A major portion of our activities during the fourth and final phase of this project will involve the preparation and submission of manuscripts describing the results from our model studies of marine boundary-layer aerosols and DMS-oxidation mechanisms.

  15. Monte Carlo modeling of cometary atmospheres including polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, F.; Muñoz, O.; Molina, A.

    We present a Monte Carlo model for the transfer of radiation by dust in spherical-shell cometary atmospheres. Our model, which includes the effects of polarization, constitutes an improved version of that by Salo cite{bib31}. The code has been designed to compute both the input radiation on the nucleus surface and the output radiation. This has specific applications regarding the interpretation of near-nucleus photometry, polarimetry, and imaging such as planned for the near future space probes. After showing the appropriate validations of the code with other modeling results, we address here the effect of including the full 4 times 4 scattering matrix into the calculations of the radiative flux impinging on cometary nuclei. As input of the code we use realistic single scattering phase matrices derived by fitting the observed behavior of the linear polarization versus phase angle in cometary atmospheres. The observed single scattering linear polarization phase curves of comets are found to be fairly well represented by a mixture of Mg-rich olivine particles and small carbonaceous particles. The input matrix of the code is thus given by the phase matrix for olivine as obtained in the laboratory cite{bib27} plus a variable scattering fraction phase matrix for absorbing carbonaceous particles. Particularly, these fractions are found to be 3.5% for comet Halley and 6% for comet Hale-Bopp, for which the greatest percentage of all the observed comets was found. The total input fluxes computed by ignoring the polarization effects are found to show differences as large as 10% with respect to the fluxes obtained when the full scattering matrix is included in the calculations.

  16. Measuring and modeling mercury in the atmosphere: a critical review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustin, M. S.; Amos, H. M.; Huang, J.; Miller, M. B.; Heidecorn, K.

    2015-05-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a global health concern due to its toxicity and ubiquitous presence in the environment. Here we review current methods for measuring the forms of Hg in the atmosphere and models used to interpret these data. There are three operationally defined forms of atmospheric Hg: gaseous elemental mercury (GEM), gaseous oxidized mercury (GOM), and particulate bound mercury (PBM). There is relative confidence in GEM measurements (collection on a gold surface), but GOM (collection on potassium chloride (KCl)-coated denuder) and PBM (collected using various methods) are less well understood. Field and laboratory investigations suggest the methods to measure GOM and PBM are impacted by analytical interferences that vary with environmental setting (e.g., ozone, relative humidity), and GOM concentrations measured by the KCl-coated denuder can be too low by a factor of 1.6 to 12 depending on the chemical composition of GOM. The composition of GOM (e.g., HgBr2, HgCl2, HgBrOH) varies across space and time. This has important implications for refining existing measurement methods and developing new ones, model/measurement comparisons, model development, and assessing trends. Unclear features of previously published data may now be re-examined and possibly explained, which is demonstrated through a case study. Priorities for future research include identification of GOM compounds in ambient air and development of information on their chemical and physical properties and GOM and PBM calibration systems. With this information, identification of redox mechanisms and associated rate coefficients may be developed.

  17. Stochastic resonance on a global atmospheric circulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Munuzuri, V.; Deza, R.; Fraedrich, K.; Kirk, E.; Lunkeit, F.

    2003-04-01

    Seeking for alternative sources of the observed climatic variability, and in the spirit of both classic (Nicolis, 1982; Benzi et al., 1982) and recent work (Ganopolski and Rahmstorg, 2002; Vélez-Belch&{acute;i} et al., 2001), we have added a space-independent, Gaussian and uncorrelated stochastic perturbation with amplitude eta, to the temperature equation of a simplified atmospheric global circulation model, the so-called PUMA (Portable University Model of the Atmosphere) (Frisius et al., 1998; Pérez-Muñuzuri et al., 2003). In the latter model, diabatic processes are parameterized by a Newtonian cooling term with typical timescale τ_c, whose reference temperature profile T_R(λ,μ,σ;t) (representing the ``equilibrium'' profile induced by solar heating) is given by T_R=overline{T}_R(λ,μ,σ)+ hat{T}_R \\cos[(2pi/Tac)t+Pac]. We show that the time averages of several forecasting magnitudes (like temperature and horizontal vorticity) at a point on the 300 hPa surface, undergo a non-monotonic behavior with regard to eta. Moreover, the normalized variance R=sqrt{-^2}/ of the interval t_p between the passage at the point of cyclonic and anticyclonic circulation regions exhibits an ``anticoherence resonance'' effect, thus maximizing climatic variability for some intermediate value of eta. A theoretical explanation is advanced in terms of activated processes with competing time scales. begin{itemize} C. Nicolis, Tellus 34, 1 (1982); Benzi et al., Tellus 34, 10 (1982). A. Ganopolski and S. Rahmstorg, Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 038501 (2002); P. Vélez-Belch&{acute;i} et al., Geophys. Res. Lett. 28, 2053 (2001). T. Frisius, F. Lunkeit, K. Fraedrich and I.N. James. Q.J.R. Meteorol. Soc. 124, 1019 (1998); V. Pérez-Muñuzuri et al. Nonlin. Proc. Geophys. (submitted) (2003).

  18. The 1-way on-line coupled atmospheric chemistry model system MECO(n) - Part 1: The limited-area atmospheric chemistry model COSMO/MESSy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerkweg, A.; Jöckel, P.

    2011-06-01

    The numerical weather prediction model of the Consortium for Small Scale Modelling (COSMO), maintained by the German weather service (DWD), is connected with the Modular Earth Submodel System (MESSy). This effort is undertaken in preparation of a~new, limited-area atmospheric chemistry model. This model is as consistent as possible, with respect to atmospheric chemistry and related processes, with a previously developed global atmospheric chemistry general circulation model: the ECHAM/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry (EMAC) model. The combined system constitutes a new research tool, bridging the global to the meso-γ scale for atmospheric chemistry research. MESSy provides the infrastructure and includes, among others, the process and diagnostic submodels for atmospheric chemistry simulations. Furthermore, MESSy is highly flexible allowing model setups with tailor made complexity, depending on the scientific question. Here, the connection of the MESSy infrastructure to the COSMO model is documented. Previously published prototype submodels for simplified tracer studies are generalised to be plugged-in and used in the global and the limited-area model. They are used to evaluate the tracer transport characteristics of the new COSMO/MESSy model system, an important prerequisite for future atmospheric chemistry applications. A supplementary document with further details on the technical implementation of the MESSy interface into COSMO with a complete list of modifications to the COSMO code is provided.

  19. Gas Transport Parameters for Landfill Final Cover Soil: Measurements and Model Modification by Dry Bulk Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickramarachchi, P. N.; Kawamoto, K.; Hamamoto, S.; Nagamori, M.; Moldrup, P.; Komatsu, T.

    2011-12-01

    Landfill sites have been emerging in greenhouse warming scenarios as a significant source of atmospheric methane (CH4). Until recently, landfill management strategies have mainly addressed the problem of preventing groundwater contamination and reduction of leachate generation. Being one of the largest sources of anthropogenic CH4 emission, the final cover system should also be designed for minimizing the greenhouse gases migration into the atmosphere or the areas surrounding the landfill while securing the hydraulic performance. Compared to the intensive research efforts on hydraulic performances of landfill final cover soil, few studies about gas transport characteristics of landfill cover soils have been done. However, recent soil-gas studies implied that the effects of soil physical properties such as bulk density (i.e., compaction level), soil particle size are key parameters to understand landfill gaseous performance. The gas exchange through the final cover soils is controlled by advective and diffusive gas transport. Air permeability (ka) governs the advective gas transport while the soil-gas diffusion coefficient (Dp) governs diffusive gas transport. In this study, the effects of compaction level and particle size fraction effects on ka and Dp for landfill final cover soil was investigated. The disturbed soil samples were taken from landfill final cover in Japan. A compaction tests were performed for the soil samples with two different size fractions (< 35 mm and < 2.0 mm). In the compaction tests at field water content , the soil samples were repacked into soil cores (i.d. 15-cm, length 12-cm, 2120 cm3) at two different compaction levels [(MP):2700 kN/m2 and (SP):600 kN/m2]. After the compaction tests, ka and Dp were measured and then samples were saturated and subsequently drained at different soil-water matric potential of 0.98, 2.94, 9.81, 1235 kPa and with air-dried and oven-dried conditions. Results showed that measured Dp and ka values for the

  20. Atmospheric ionization induced by precipitating electrons: Comparison of CRAC:EPII model with a parametrization model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artamonov, A. A.; Mishev, A. L.; Usoskin, I. G.

    2016-11-01

    Results of a comparison of a new model CRAC:EPII (Cosmic Ray Atmospheric Cascade: Electron Precipitation Induced Ionization) with a commonly used parametric model of atmospheric ionization is presented. The CRAC:EPII is based on a Monte Carlo simulation of precipitating electrons propagation and interaction with matter in the Earth's atmosphere. It explicitly considers energy deposit: ionization, pair production, Compton scattering, generation of Bremsstrahlung high energy photons, photo-ionization and annihilation of positrons, multiple scattering as physical processes accordingly. Propagation of precipitating electrons and their interactions with air is simulated with the GEANT4 simulation tool PLANETOCOSMICS code using NRLMSISE-00 atmospheric model. Ionization yields are computed and compared with a parametrization model for different energies of incident precipitating energetic electrons, using simulated fluxes of mono-energetic particles. A good agreement between the two models is achieved in the mesosphere but the contribution of Bremsstrahlung in the stratosphere, which is not accounted for in the parametric models, is found significant. As an example, we calculated profiles of the ion production rates in the middle and upper atmosphere (below 100 km) on the basis of balloon-born measured spectra of precipitating electrons for 30-October-2002 and 07-January-2004.

  1. Influence of atmospheric stability on model wind turbine wake interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Amelia; Gomez, Virgilio; Novoa, Santiago; Pol, Suhas; Westergaard, Carsten; Castillo, Luciano

    2014-11-01

    Differences in wind turbine wake deficit recovery for various atmospheric stability conditions (stratification) have been attributed to turbulence intensity levels at different conditions. It is shown that buoyancy differences at the wind turbine wake interface should be considered in addition to varying turbulence intensity to describe the net momentum transport across the wake interface. Mixing, induced by tip and hub vortices or wake swirl, induces these buoyancy differences. The above hypothesis was tested using field measurements of the wake interface for a 1.17 m model turbine installed at 6.25 m hub height. Atmospheric conditions were characterized using a 10 m meteorological tower upstream of the turbine, while a vertical rake of sonic anemometers clustered around the hub height on a downstream tower measured the wake. Data was collected over the course of seven months, during varying stability conditions, and with five different turbine configurations - including a single turbine at three different positions, two turbines in a column, and three turbines in a column. Presented are results showing the behavior of the wake (particularly the wake interface), for unstable, stable, and neutral conditions. We observed that the swirl in the wake causes mixing of the inflow, leading to a constant density profile in the far wake that causes density jumps at the wake interfaces for stratified inflow.

  2. Additional Developments in Atmosphere Revitalization Modeling and Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coker, Robert F.; Knox, James C.; Cummings, Ramona; Brooks, Thomas; Schunk, Richard G.; Gomez, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    NASA's Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) program is developing prototype systems, demonstrating key capabilities, and validating operational concepts for future human missions beyond Earth orbit. These forays beyond the confines of earth's gravity will place unprecedented demands on launch systems. They must launch the supplies needed to sustain a crew over longer periods for exploration missions beyond earth's moon. Thus all spacecraft systems, including those for the separation of metabolic carbon dioxide and water from a crewed vehicle, must be minimized with respect to mass, power, and volume. Emphasis is also placed on system robustness both to minimize replacement parts and ensure crew safety when a quick return to earth is not possible. Current efforts are focused on improving the current state-of-the-art systems utilizing fixed beds of sorbent pellets by evaluating structured sorbents, seeking more robust pelletized sorbents, and examining alternate bed configurations to improve system efficiency and reliability. These development efforts combine testing of sub-scale systems and multi-physics computer simulations to evaluate candidate approaches, select the best performing options, and optimize the configuration of the selected approach. This paper describes the continuing development of atmosphere revitalization models and simulations in support of the Atmosphere Revitalization Recovery and Environmental Monitoring (ARREM) project within the AES program.

  3. Radiometric sensor performance model including atmospheric and IR clutter effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Rudolf; Davis, Joel S.; Duggin, Michael J.

    1997-06-01

    The computer code SENSAT developed for radiometric investigations in remote sensing was extended to include two statistical clutter models of infrared background and the prediction of the target detection probability. The first one is based on the standard deviation of scene clutter estimated from scene data, the second one is based on the power spectral density of different classes of IR background as a function of temporal or spatial frequency. The overall code consists of modules describing the optoelectronic sensor (optics, detector, signal processor), a radiative transfer code (MODTRAN) to include the atmospheric effects, and the scene module consisting of target and background. The scene is evaluated for a certain pixel at a time. However, a sequence of pixels can be simulated by varying the range, view angle, atmospheric condition, or the clutter level. The target consists of one or two subpixel surface elements, the remaining part of the pixels represents background. Multiple paths, e.g. sun-ground-target-sensor, can also be selected. An expert system, based upon the IDL language, provides user-friendly input menus, performs consistency checks, and submits the required MODTRAN and SENSAT runs. A sample case of the detection probability of a sub-pixel target in a marine cluttered background is discussed.

  4. Additional Developments in Atmosphere Revitalization Modeling and Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coker, Robert F.; Knox, James C.; Cummings, Ramona; Brooks, Thomas; Schunk, Richard G.

    2013-01-01

    NASA's Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) program is developing prototype systems, demonstrating key capabilities, and validating operational concepts for future human missions beyond Earth orbit. These forays beyond the confines of earth's gravity will place unprecedented demands on launch systems. They must launch the supplies needed to sustain a crew over longer periods for exploration missions beyond earth's moon. Thus all spacecraft systems, including those for the separation of metabolic carbon dioxide and water from a crewed vehicle, must be minimized with respect to mass, power, and volume. Emphasis is also placed on system robustness both to minimize replacement parts and ensure crew safety when a quick return to earth is not possible. Current efforts are focused on improving the current state-of-the-art systems utilizing fixed beds of sorbent pellets by evaluating structured sorbents, seeking more robust pelletized sorbents, and examining alternate bed configurations to improve system efficiency and reliability. These development efforts combine testing of sub-scale systems and multi-physics computer simulations to evaluate candidate approaches, select the best performing options, and optimize the configuration of the selected approach. This paper describes the continuing development of atmosphere revitalization models and simulations in support of the Atmosphere Revitalization Recovery and Environmental Monitoring (ARREM)

  5. Evaluation of two approaches for improved nitrogen oxides monitoring in urban atmospheres. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Spicer, C.W.; Kelly, T.J.; Ward, G.F.

    1994-11-09

    Currently, instrumentation used to monitor nitrogen oxides in urban monitoring networks measure NO and `NOx`, where NOx includes NO and NO2 and no other NOy constituents. These NOx measurements are subject to a positive bias from other oxidized nitrogen species (NOy) and it is believed that NOy measurements are useful in many ways including photochemical grid model diagnostics and emissions inventory verification. This report describes an evaluation of two approaches to monitor both NOx and NOy. System A makes use of two chemiluminescence instruments to monitor NO, NOy and NO2. One of the instruments detects NO by its chemiluminescent reaction with O3, while the other detects NO2 by its chemiluminescent reaction with luminol. A heated molybdenum catalytic converter is used to reduce NOy constituents to NO for detection. System B utilizes the luminol chemiluminescence reaction to detect NO2 and employs multiple catalysts to obtain measurements of NOx and NOy. Nitric oxide is determined as the difference between NOx and NO2. These two approaches are evaluated in terms of linearity, converter efficiency, interferences and detection limits.

  6. Modelling land-atmosphere interactions in tropical African wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dadson, S.

    2012-04-01

    Wetlands interact with the climate system in two ways. First, the availability of water at the land surface introduces important feedbacks on climate via surface fluxes of energy and water [1]. Over wet surfaces, high daytime evaporation rates and suppressed sensible heat fluxes induce a shallower, moister planetary boundary layer, which affects atmospheric instability and favours the initiation of new storms [2]. Second, wetlands form a key link between the hydrological and carbon cycles, via anoxic degradation of organic matter to release methane (CH4). Wetlands are the largest, but least well quantified, single source of CH4, with recent emission estimates ranging from 105-278 Tg yr-1, ~75% of which comes from the tropics [3]. Although the emissions of methane from boreal wetlands and lakes are less than those from tropical wetlands [3], their size and remoteness pose significant challenges to the quantification of their feedbacks to regional and global climate. In this paper, I present a summary of recent work on modelling hydrological and biogeochemical aspects of wetland formation and the associated land-atmosphere feedbacks in African and boreal environments. We have added an overbank inundation model to the Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES). Sub-grid topographic data were used to derive a two-parameter frequency distribution of inundated areas. Our predictions of inundated area are in good agreement with observed estimates of the extent of inundation obtained using satellite infrared and microwave remote sensing [4,5]. The model predicts significant evaporative losses from the inundated region accounting for doubling of the total land-atmosphere water flux during periods of greatest flooding. I also present new parameterisations of methane generation from wetlands. 1. Koster, R.D., et al., 2004, Science, 305(5687): 1138-40. 2. Taylor, C.M., 2010, Geophys. Res. Lett., 37: L05406. 3. US EPA, 2010, Methane and Nitrous Oxide Emissions From Natural

  7. EGATEC: A new high-resolution engineering model of the global atmospheric electric circuit—Currents in the lower atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odzimek, A.; Lester, M.; Kubicki, M.

    2010-09-01

    We present a new high-resolution model of the Earth's global atmospheric electric circuit (GEC) represented by an equivalent electrical network. Contributions of clouds to the total resistance of the atmosphere and as current generators are treated more realistically than in previous GEC models. The model of cloud current generators is constructed on the basis of the ISCCP cloud data and the OTD/LIS lightning flash rates and TRMM rainfall data. The current generated and the electric resistance can be estimated with a spatial resolution of several degrees in latitude and longitude and 3 hour time resolution. The resistance of the atmosphere is calculated using an atmospheric conductivity model which is spatially dependent and sensitive to the level of solar activity. An equivalent circuit is constructed assuming the ionosphere and ground are ideal conductors. The circuit solution provides diurnal variations of the ionospheric potential and the GEC global current at the 3 hour time resolution as well as the global distributions and diurnal variations of the air-Earth current density and electric field. The model confirms that the global atmospheric electric activity peaks daily at ˜21 UT. The diurnal variation of the ionospheric potential and the global current have a maximum at 12 and 21-24 UT in July and at 9 and 21 UT in December, and a global minimum at 3-6 UT independent of season. About 80% of the current is generated by thunderstorm convective clouds and 20% by mid-level rain clouds.

  8. Formation and emission of methane in rice soils: Experimental determination and modeling analysis. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Law, V.J.; Bhattacharya, S.K.

    1993-08-31

    Rice paddy soils have been identified as a major source of methane emissions contributing to the observed atmospheric increase in methane. This points to the need for a method of quantifying and predicting methane emissions for the widely varying conditions used in rice agriculture throughout the world. In the present work, a mathematical model for estimating the emission of methane from rice paddy soils is developed and refined. Kinetic parameters for methanogenesis in a Louisiana rice soil are determined from laboratory data on methane production from acetic acid substrate. Use of a stirred reactor allows simultaneous measurement of acetate consumption and methane production while minimizing mass transfer limitations. An existing model for rice plant growth is utilized to provide data on the availability of root exudates as a carbon source for the methanogens. The final methane model includes the kinetic parameters, plant data, and estimated transport parameters. With adjustments in these parameters, it provides an acceptable match to field data.

  9. Dynamics and predictability of a low-order wind-driven ocean-atmosphere coupled model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vannitsem, Stéphane

    2014-04-01

    The dynamics of a low-order coupled wind-driven ocean-atmosphere system is investigated with emphasis on its predictability properties. The low-order coupled deterministic system is composed of a baroclinic atmosphere for which 12 dominant dynamical modes are only retained (Charney and Straus in J Atmos Sci 37:1157-1176, 1980) and a wind-driven, quasi-geostrophic and reduced-gravity shallow ocean whose field is truncated to four dominant modes able to reproduce the large scale oceanic gyres (Pierini in J Phys Oceanogr 41:1585-1604, 2011). The two models are coupled through mechanical forcings only. The analysis of its dynamics reveals first that under aperiodic atmospheric forcings only dominant single gyres (clockwise or counterclockwise) appear, while for periodic atmospheric solutions the double gyres emerge. In the present model domain setting context, this feature is related to the level of truncation of the atmospheric fields, as indicated by a preliminary analysis of the impact of higher wavenumber ("synoptic" scale) modes on the development of oceanic gyres. In the latter case, double gyres appear in the presence of a chaotic atmosphere. Second the dynamical quantities characterizing the short-term predictability (Lyapunov exponents, Lyapunov dimension, Kolmogorov-Sinaï (KS) entropy) displays a complex dependence as a function of the key parameters of the system, namely the coupling strength and the external thermal forcing. In particular, the KS-entropy is increasing as a function of the coupling in most of the experiments, implying an increase of the rate of loss of information about the localization of the system on its attractor. Finally the dynamics of the error is explored and indicates, in particular, a rich variety of short term behaviors of the error in the atmosphere depending on the (relative) amplitude of the initial error affecting the ocean, from polynomial ( at 2 + bt 3 + ct 4) up to exponential-like evolutions. These features are explained

  10. Atmospheric transport modeling and input data for Phase 1 of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsdell, J.V.; Burk, K.W.

    1991-07-01

    This report summarizes the information used in modeling atmospheric transport and diffusion for Phase I of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project. It also lists the results of the atmospheric transport calculations that were provided for use in dose estimation. The report does not contain a description of the atmospheric model or an analysis of the results of the atmospheric calculations. 9 refs., 3 figs., 14 tabs.

  11. Testing Atmospheric Retrieval Modeling Assumptions for Transiting Planet Atmospheres: Preparatory science for the James Webb Space Telescope and beyond.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Line, Michael

    The field of transiting exoplanet atmosphere characterization has grown considerably over the past decade given the wealth of photometric and spectroscopic data from the Hubble and Spitzer space telescopes. In order to interpret these data, atmospheric models combined with Bayesian approaches are required. From spectra, these approaches permit us to infer fundamental atmospheric properties and how their compositions can relate back to planet formation. However, such approaches must make a wide range of assumptions regarding the physics/parameterizations included in the model atmospheres. There has yet to be a comprehensive investigation exploring how these model assumptions influence our interpretations of exoplanetary spectra. Understanding the impact of these assumptions is especially important since the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is expected to invest a substantial portion of its time observing transiting planet atmospheres. It is therefore prudent to optimize and enhance our tools to maximize the scientific return from the revolutionary data to come. The primary goal of the proposed work is to determine the pieces of information we can robustly learn from transiting planet spectra as obtained by JWST and other future, space-based platforms, by investigating commonly overlooked model assumptions. We propose to explore the following effects and how they impact our ability to infer exoplanet atmospheric properties: 1. Stellar/Planetary Uncertainties: Transit/occultation eclipse depths and subsequent planetary spectra are measured relative to their host stars. How do stellar uncertainties, on radius, effective temperature, metallicity, and gravity, as well as uncertainties in the planetary radius and gravity, propagate into the uncertainties on atmospheric composition and thermal structure? Will these uncertainties significantly bias our atmospheric interpretations? Is it possible to use the relative measurements of the planetary spectra to provide

  12. Modeling of atmospheric-coupled Rayleigh waves on planets with atmosphere: From Earth observation to Mars and Venus perspectives.

    PubMed

    Lognonné, Philippe; Karakostas, Foivos; Rolland, Lucie; Nishikawa, Yasuhiro

    2016-08-01

    Acoustic coupling between solid Earth and atmosphere has been observed since the 1960s, first from ground-based seismic, pressure, and ionospheric sensors and since 20 years with various satellite measurements, including with global positioning system (GPS) satellites. This coupling leads to the excitation of the Rayleigh surface waves by local atmospheric sources such as large natural explosions from volcanoes, meteor atmospheric air-bursts, or artificial explosions. It contributes also in the continuous excitation of Rayleigh waves and associated normal modes by atmospheric winds and pressure fluctuations. The same coupling allows the observation of Rayleigh waves in the thermosphere most of the time through ionospheric monitoring with Doppler sounders or GPS. The authors review briefly in this paper observations made on Earth and describe the general frame of the theory enabling the computation of Rayleigh waves for models of telluric planets with atmosphere. The authors then focus on Mars and Venus and give in both cases the atmospheric properties of the Rayleigh normal modes and associated surface waves compared to Earth. The authors then conclude on the observation perspectives especially for Rayleigh waves excited by atmospheric sources on Mars and for remote ionospheric observations of Rayleigh waves excited by quakes on Venus.

  13. Improving the Ni I atomic model for solar and stellar atmospheric models

    SciTech Connect

    Vieytes, M. C.; Fontenla, J. M. E-mail: johnf@digidyna.com

    2013-06-01

    Neutral nickel (Ni I) is abundant in the solar atmosphere and is one of the important elements that contribute to the emission and absorption of radiation in the spectral range between 1900 and 3900 Å. Previously, the Solar Radiation Physical Modeling (SRPM) models of the solar atmosphere only considered a few levels of this species. Here, we improve the Ni I atomic model by taking into account 61 levels and 490 spectral lines. We compute the populations of these levels in full NLTE using the SRPM code and compare the resulting emerging spectrum with observations. The present atomic model significantly improves the calculation of the solar spectral irradiance at near-UV wavelengths, which is important for Earth atmospheric studies, and particularly for ozone chemistry.

  14. Precipitation recycling in West Africa - regional modeling, evaporation tagging and atmospheric water budget analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnault, Joel; Kunstmann, Harald; Knoche, Hans-Richard

    2015-04-01

    Many numerical studies have shown that the West African monsoon is highly sensitive to the state of the land surface. It is however questionable to which extend a local change of land surface properties would affect the local climate, especially with respect to precipitation. This issue is traditionally addressed with the concept of precipitation recycling, defined as the contribution of local surface evaporation to local precipitation. For this study the West African monsoon has been simulated with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model using explicit convection, for the domain (1°S-21°N, 18°W-14°E) at a spatial resolution of 10 km, for the period January-October 2013, and using ERA-Interim reanalyses as driving data. This WRF configuration has been selected for its ability to simulate monthly precipitation amounts and daily histograms close to TRMM (Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission) data. In order to investigate precipitation recycling in this WRF simulation, surface evaporation tagging has been implemented in the WRF source code as well as the budget of total and tagged atmospheric water. Surface evaporation tagging consists in duplicating all water species and the respective prognostic equations in the source code. Then, tagged water species are set to zero at the lateral boundaries of the simulated domain (no inflow of tagged water vapor), and tagged surface evaporation is considered only in a specified region. All the source terms of the prognostic equations of total and tagged water species are finally saved in the outputs for the budget analysis. This allows quantifying the respective contribution of total and tagged atmospheric water to atmospheric precipitation processes. The WRF simulation with surface evaporation tagging and budgets has been conducted two times, first with a 100 km2 tagged region (11-12°N, 1-2°W), and second with a 1000 km2 tagged region (7-16°N, 6°W -3°E). In this presentation we will investigate hydro-atmospheric

  15. The spectral element dynamical core in the Community Atmosphere Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Mark

    2013-11-01

    I will describe our work developing CAM-SE, a highly scalable version of the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM). CAM-SE solves the hydrostatic equations with a spectral element horizontal descritization and the hybrid coordinate Simmons & Burridge (1981) vertical discretization. It uses a mimetic formulation of spectral elements which preserves the adjoint and annihilator properties of the divergence, gradient and curl operations. These mimetic properties result in local conservation (to machine precision) of mass, tracer mass and (2D) potential vorticity, and semi-discrete conservation (exact with exact time-discretization) of total energy. Hyper-viscsoity is used for all numerical dissipation. The spectral element method naturally supports unstructured/variable resolution grids. We are using this capability to perform simulations with 1/8 degree resolution over the central U.S., transitioning to 1 degree over most of the globe. This is a numerically efficient way to study the resolution sensitivity of CAM's many subgrid parameterizations.

  16. Reference aquaplanet climate in the Community Atmosphere Model, Version 5

    DOE PAGES

    Medeiros, Brian; Williamson, David L.; Olson, Jerry G.

    2016-03-18

    In this study, fundamental characteristics of the aquaplanet climate simulated by the Community Atmosphere Model, Version 5.3 (CAM5.3) are presented. The assumptions and simplifications of the configuration are described. A 16 year long, perpetual equinox integration with prescribed SST using the model’s standard 18 grid spacing is presented as a reference simulation. Statistical analysis is presented that shows similar aquaplanet configurations can be run for about 2 years to obtain robust climatological structures, including global and zonal means, eddy statistics, and precipitation distributions. Such a simulation can be compared to the reference simulation to discern differences in the climate, includingmore » an assessment of confidence in the differences. To aid such comparisons, the reference simulation has been made available via earthsystemgrid.org. Examples are shown comparing the reference simulation with simulations from the CAM5 series that make different microphysical assumptions and use a different dynamical core.« less

  17. Venusian Polar Vortex reproduced in an Atmospheric General Circulation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Hiroki; Imamura, Takeshi; Takagi, Masahiro; Sugimoto, Norihiko; Kashimura, Hiroki

    The Venus atmosphere has a polar vortex rotating in the retrograde direction with a period of about three days. The vortex has a warm feature surrounded by a cold collar (e.g., Taylor et al. 1980; Piccioni et al. 2006). Although the Venusian polar vortex has been reported by many observations, its mechanism is still unknown. Elson (1982, 1989) examined the structure of the polar vortex by linear calculations. However, the background zonal wind assumed in the calculations was much stronger or weaker than those retrieved in the previous measurements (e.g., Peralta et al. 2008; Kouyama et al. 2012). Lee et al. (2010) and Yamamoto and Takahashi (2012) performed numerical simulations with general circulation models (GCMs) of the Venus atmosphere and obtained vertical structure in the polar region. However, the models included artificial forcing of Kelvin and/or Rossby waves. We have developed a new Venusian GCM by modifying the Atmospheric GCM For the Earth Simulator (Sugimoto et al. 2012; 2013). The basic equations of the GCM are primitive ones in the sigma coordinate on a sphere without topography. The model resolution is T42 (i.e., about 2.8 deg x 2.8 deg grids) and L60 (Deltaz is about 2 km). Rayleigh friction (sponge layer) in the upper layer (>80 km) is applied to prevent the reflection of waves, whose effect increases gradually with height. In the model, the atmosphere is dry and forced by the solar heating and Newtonian cooling. The vertical profile of the solar heating is based on Crisp (1986), and zonally averaged distribution is used. In addition diurnal component of the solar heating, which excites the diurnal and semi-diurnal tides, is also included. Newtonian cooling relaxes the temperature to the zonally uniform basic temperature which has a virtual static stability of Venus with almost neutral layers, and its coefficient is based on Crisp (1986). To prevent numerical instability, the biharmonic hyper-diffusion is included with 0.8 days of e-folding time

  18. Reference aquaplanet climate in the Community Atmosphere Model, Version 5

    SciTech Connect

    Medeiros, Brian; Williamson, David L.; Olson, Jerry G.

    2016-03-18

    In this study, fundamental characteristics of the aquaplanet climate simulated by the Community Atmosphere Model, Version 5.3 (CAM5.3) are presented. The assumptions and simplifications of the configuration are described. A 16 year long, perpetual equinox integration with prescribed SST using the model’s standard 18 grid spacing is presented as a reference simulation. Statistical analysis is presented that shows similar aquaplanet configurations can be run for about 2 years to obtain robust climatological structures, including global and zonal means, eddy statistics, and precipitation distributions. Such a simulation can be compared to the reference simulation to discern differences in the climate, including an assessment of confidence in the differences. To aid such comparisons, the reference simulation has been made available via earthsystemgrid.org. Examples are shown comparing the reference simulation with simulations from the CAM5 series that make different microphysical assumptions and use a different dynamical core.

  19. 3D model atmospheres and the solar photospheric oxygen abundance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caffau, E.; Ludwig, H.-G.

    2008-10-01

    In recent years the photospheric solar oxygen abundance experienced a significant downward revision. However, a low photospheric abundance is incompatible with the value in the solar interior inferred from helioseismology. For contributing to the dispute whether the solar oxygen abundance is “high” or “low”, we re-derived its photospheric abundance independently of previous analyses. We applied 3D (CO5BOLD) as well as 1D model atmospheres. We considered standard disc-centre and disc-integrated spectral atlases, as well as newly acquired solar intensity spectra at different heliocentric angles. We determined the oxygen abundances from equivalent width and/or line profile fitting of a number of atomic lines. As preliminary result, we find an oxygen abundance in the range 8.73 8.79, encompassing the value obtained by Holweger (2001), and somewhat higher than the value obtained by Asplund et al. (2005).

  20. An atmospheric tritium release database for model comparisons

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, C.E. Jr.; Wortham, G.R.

    1997-10-13

    A database of vegetation, soil, and air tritium concentrations at gridded coordinate locations following nine accidental atmospheric releases is described. The concentration data is supported by climatological data taken during and immediately after the releases. In six cases, the release data is supplemented with meteorological data taken at seven towers scattered throughout the immediate area of the releases and data from a single television tower instrumented at eight heights. While none of the releases caused a significant dose to the public, the data collected is valuable for comparison with the results of tritium transport models used for risk assessment. The largest, potential off-site dose from any of the releases was calculated to be 1.6 mrem. The population dose from this same release was 46 person-rem which represents 0.04 percent of the natural background dose to the population in the path of the release.

  1. On the practical applications of atmosphere-ocean and atmosphere-wave coupling in mesoscale numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochanski, Adam

    The objectives of this work were to develop coupled atmosphere-ocean and atmosphere-wave models for the verification of the atmospheric simulations, model the small-scale ocean circulations, analyze the role of the atmospheric stability in the generation of coastal upwelling, improve the accuracy of numerical prediction over the coastal areas, and develop a parameterization of the swell-induced wind stress. The study confirmed the applicability of the high resolution Mesoscale Model 5 (MM5) wind field prediction to driving small scale ocean models applied to the U.S. West Coast, and showed that the small-scale circulation pattern of Bodega Bay can be well simulated even by the relatively simple 2D ocean model. Additional experiments performed with the complex 3D Princeton Ocean Model (POM) coupled with the MM5 showed the importance of the atmospheric stability in terms of the modification of the wind stress-curl pattern and the generation of coastal upwelling. The study revealed that the introduction of the stability effect to the wind stress computation may change the monthly mean wind stress curl by up to 0.15Pa/100km, and increase the simulated upwelling velocity by up to 25%, significantly improving the picture of the simulated upwelling and relaxation events. Further analysis performed with the MM5 model run at 9km resolution, showed that the introduction of the atmosphere-ocean coupling greatly improved the quality of the model results. The comparison with buoy data revealed that the atmosphere-ocean coupling led to a 95% increase in the correlation coefficients of the air temperature and heat fluxes, 23% for the wind direction, and up to 25% for the wind speed, and the reduction of the mean errors by up to 30%. The air-wave interaction model developed during this study showed the applicability of the innovative semi-analytical approach to the computation of the swell-induced stress. Its results also confirmed the importance of the swell-induced stress for

  2. MEP and planetary climates: insights from a two-box climate model containing atmospheric dynamics.

    PubMed

    Jupp, Tim E; Cox, Peter M

    2010-05-12

    A two-box model for equator-to-pole planetary heat transport is extended to include simple atmospheric dynamics. The surface drag coefficient CD is treated as a free parameter and solutions are calculated analytically in terms of the dimensionless planetary parameters eta (atmospheric thickness), omega (rotation rate) and xi (advective capability). Solutions corresponding to maximum entropy production (MEP) are compared with solutions previously obtained from dynamically unconstrained two-box models. As long as the advective capability xi is sufficiently large, dynamically constrained MEP solutions are identical to dynamically unconstrained MEP solutions. Consequently, the addition of a dynamical constraint does not alter the previously obtained MEP results for Earth, Mars and Titan, and an analogous result is presented here for Venus. The rate of entropy production in an MEP state is shown to be independent of rotation rate if the advective capability xi is sufficiently large (as for the four examples in the solar system), or if the rotation rate omega is sufficiently small. The model indicates, however, that the dynamical constraint does influence the MEP state when xi is small, which might be the case for some extrasolar planets. Finally, results from the model developed here are compared with previous numerical simulations in which the effect of varying surface drag coefficient on entropy production was calculated.

  3. Modeling land-atmosphere interactions: the impact of deforestation in tropical Africa on the regional climate.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akkermans, Tom; Lauwaet, Dirk; van Lipzig, Nicole

    2010-05-01

    Deforestation is generally seen as an alarming trend, especially in third world countries. This research focuses on the climatological impact of anthropogenic forest degradation in tropical Africa, a study area which has received relatively few attention. Building on previous studies, additional and new research methods are applied. A regional climate model (COSMO-CLM) will be used and coupled to a soil-vegetation-atmosphere transfer component (the Community Land Model). As this research just started, the poster presentation will give an overview of the project, which is described below. Firstly, the impact of overall deforestation estimates will be quantified by applying a spatial algorithm for different deforestation amounts, constrained by allocation rules. Secondly, this algorithm will also be used to investigate the impact of spatial deforestation patterns, e.g. concentrated versus dispersed logging. Thirdly, climate-vegetation feedbacks will be included in the model runs. Physiological effects of increased greenhouse gases on vegetation (e.g. reduction of stomatal conductance, hence decrease in transpiration) and dynamical vegetation cycles (e.g. reaction of leaf area index on dry spells and heat stress) are the focus of interest. Finally, the effect of land cover change on detailed atmospheric processes such as convective activity will be studied. The second as well as the fourth goal requires a substantial increase in spatial detail compared to current studies, which will be obtained by increasing the horizontal resolution (for the atmospheric model and for the land cover data) and making use of sub-grid flux calculations for energy and moisture. The impact of the above-mentioned elements will be quantified by comparing different model simulations. The overall climate forcing from land cover change will be compared with the forcing from greenhouse gases, which allows for quantifying their relative importance.

  4. Models of neutron star atmospheres enriched with nuclear burning ashes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nättilä, J.; Suleimanov, V. F.; Kajava, J. J. E.; Poutanen, J.

    2015-09-01

    Context. Low-mass X-ray binaries hosting neutron stars (NS) exhibit thermonuclear (type-I) X-ray bursts, which are powered by unstable nuclear burning of helium and/or hydrogen into heavier elements deep in the NS "ocean". In some cases the burning ashes may rise from the burning depths up to the NS photosphere by convection, leading to the appearance of the metal absorption edges in the spectra, which then force the emergent X-ray burst spectra to shift toward lower energies. Aims: These effects may have a substantial impact on the color correction factor fc and the dilution factor w, the parameters of the diluted blackbody model FE ≈ wBE(fcTeff) that is commonly used to describe the emergent spectra from NSs. The aim of this paper is to quantify how much the metal enrichment can change these factors. Methods: We have developed a new NS atmosphere modeling code, which has a few important improvements compared to our previous code required by inclusion of the metals. The opacities and the internal partition functions (used in the ionization fraction calculations) are now taken into account for all atomic species. In addition, the code is now parallelized to counter the increased computational load. Results: We compute a detailed grid of atmosphere models with different exotic chemical compositions that mimic the presence of the burning ashes. From the emerging model spectra we compute the color correction factors fc and the dilution factors w that can then be compared to the observations. We find that the metals may change fc by up to about 40%, which is enough to explain the scatter seen in the blackbody radius measurements. Conclusions: The presented models open up the possibility of determining NS mass and radii more accurately, and may also act as a tool to probe the nuclear burning mechanisms of X-ray bursts. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgData of Appendix B is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http

  5. A non-grey analytical model for irradiated atmospheres. I. Derivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parmentier, Vivien; Guillot, Tristan

    2014-02-01

    find that the temperature structure is affected down to infrared optical depths unity and deeper as a result of the so-called blanketing effect. Conclusions: The expressions that we derive can be used to provide a proper functional form for algorithms that invert the atmospheric properties from spectral information. Because a full atmospheric structure can be calculated directly, these expressions should be useful for simulations of the dynamics of these atmospheres and of the thermal evolution of the planets. Finally, they should be used to test full radiative transfer models and to improve their convergence. A FORTRAN implementation of the analytical model is available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/562/A133 Warning, no authors found for 2014A&A...562A.130.

  6. Atmospheric Boundary Layer Modeling for Combined Meteorology and Air Quality Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    Atmospheric Eulerian grid models for mesoscale and larger applications require sub-grid models for turbulent vertical exchange processes, particularly within the Planetary Boundary Layer (PSL). In combined meteorology and air quality modeling systems consistent PSL modeling of wi...

  7. Atmospheric Spray Freeze-Drying: Numerical Modeling and Comparison With Experimental Measurements.

    PubMed

    Borges Sebastião, Israel; Robinson, Thomas D; Alexeenko, Alina

    2017-01-01

    Atmospheric spray freeze-drying (ASFD) represents a novel approach to dry thermosensitive solutions via sublimation. Tests conducted with a second-generation ASFD equipment, developed for pharmaceutical applications, have focused initially on producing a light, fine, high-grade powder consistently and reliably. To better understand the heat and mass transfer physics and drying dynamics taking place within the ASFD chamber, 3 analytical models describing the key processes are developed and validated. First, by coupling the dynamics and heat transfer of single droplets sprayed into the chamber, the velocity, temperature, and phase change evolutions of these droplets are estimated for actual operational conditions. This model reveals that, under typical operational conditions, the sprayed droplets require less than 100 ms to freeze. Second, because understanding the heat transfer throughout the entire freeze-drying process is so important, a theoretical model is proposed to predict the time evolution of the chamber gas temperature. Finally, a drying model, calibrated with hygrometer measurements, is used to estimate the total time required to achieve a predefined final moisture content. Results from these models are compared with experimental data.

  8. Stochastic Parametrisations and Regime Behaviour of Atmospheric Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, Hannah; Moroz, Irene; Palmer, Tim

    2013-04-01

    The presence of regimes is a characteristic of non-linear, chaotic systems (Lorenz, 2006). In the atmosphere, regimes emerge as familiar circulation patterns such as the El-Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO), the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) and Scandinavian Blocking events. In recent years there has been much interest in the problem of identifying and studying atmospheric regimes (Solomon et al, 2007). In particular, how do these regimes respond to an external forcing such as anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions? The importance of regimes in observed trends over the past 50-100 years indicates that in order to predict anthropogenic climate change, our climate models must be able to represent accurately natural circulation regimes, their statistics and variability. It is well established that representing model uncertainty as well as initial condition uncertainty is important for reliable weather forecasts (Palmer, 2001). In particular, stochastic parametrisation schemes have been shown to improve the skill of weather forecast models (e.g. Berner et al., 2009; Frenkel et al., 2012; Palmer et al., 2009). It is possible that including stochastic physics as a representation of model uncertainty could also be beneficial in climate modelling, enabling the simulator to explore larger regions of the climate attractor including other flow regimes. An alternative representation of model uncertainty is a perturbed parameter scheme, whereby physical parameters in subgrid parametrisation schemes are perturbed about their optimal value. Perturbing parameters gives a greater control over the ensemble than multi-model or multiparametrisation ensembles, and has been used as a representation of model uncertainty in climate prediction (Stainforth et al., 2005; Rougier et al., 2009). We investigate the effect of including representations of model uncertainty on the regime behaviour of a simulator. A simple chaotic model of the atmosphere, the Lorenz '96 system, is used to study

  9. Coupled ocean-atmosphere model system for studies of interannual-to-decadal climate variability over the North Pacific Basin and precipitation over the Southwestern United States

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, Chung-Chieng A.

    1997-10-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The ultimate objective of this research project is to make understanding and predicting regional climate easier. The long-term goals of this project are (1) to construct a coupled ocean-atmosphere model (COAM) system, (2) use it to explore the interannual-to-decadal climate variability over the North Pacific Basin, and (3) determine climate effects on the precipitation over the Southwestern United States. During this project life, three major tasks were completed: (1) Mesoscale ocean and atmospheric model; (2) global-coupled ocean and atmospheric modeling: completed the coupling of LANL POP global ocean model with NCAR CCM2+ global atmospheric model; and (3) global nested-grid ocean modeling: designed the boundary interface for the nested-grid ocean models.

  10. Upper and Middle Atmospheric Density Modeling Requirements for Spacecraft Design and Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, M. H. (Editor); Smith, R. E. (Editor); Johnson, D. L. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    Presented and discussed are concerns with applications of neutral atmospheric density models to space vehicle engineering design and operational problems. The area of concern which the atmospheric model developers and the model users considered, involved middle atmosphere (50 to 90 km altitude) and thermospheric (above 90 km) models and their engineering application. Engineering emphasis involved areas such as orbital decay and lifetime prediction along with attitude and control studies for different types of space and reentry vehicles.

  11. Recent results from the GISS model of the global atmosphere. [circulation simulation for weather forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somerville, R. C. J.

    1975-01-01

    Large numerical atmospheric circulation models are in increasingly widespread use both for operational weather forecasting and for meteorological research. The results presented here are from a model developed at the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) and described in detail by Somerville et al. (1974). This model is representative of a class of models, recently surveyed by the Global Atmospheric Research Program (1974), designed to simulate the time-dependent, three-dimensional, large-scale dynamics of the earth's atmosphere.

  12. High Resolution Atmospheric Modeling for Wind Energy Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, M; Bulaevskaya, V; Glascoe, L; Singer, M

    2010-03-18

    The ability of the WRF atmospheric model to forecast wind speed over the Nysted wind park was investigated as a function of time. It was found that in the time period we considered (August 1-19, 2008), the model is able to predict wind speeds reasonably accurately for 48 hours ahead, but that its forecast skill deteriorates rapidly after 48 hours. In addition, a preliminary analysis was carried out to investigate the impact of vertical grid resolution on the forecast skill. Our preliminary finding is that increasing vertical grid resolution does not have a significant impact on the forecast skill of the WRF model over Nysted wind park during the period we considered. Additional simulations during this period, as well as during other time periods, will be run in order to validate the results presented here. Wind speed is a difficult parameter to forecast due the interaction of large and small length scale forcing. To accurately forecast the wind speed at a given location, the model must correctly forecast the movement and strength of synoptic systems, as well as the local influence of topography / land use on the wind speed. For example, small deviations in the forecast track or strength of a large-scale low pressure system can result in significant forecast errors for local wind speeds. The purpose of this study is to provide a preliminary baseline of a high-resolution limited area model forecast performance against observations from the Nysted wind park. Validating the numerical weather prediction model performance for past forecasts will give a reasonable measure of expected forecast skill over the Nysted wind park. Also, since the Nysted Wind Park is over water and some distance from the influence of terrain, the impact of high vertical grid spacing for wind speed forecast skill will also be investigated.

  13. Modeling the water decarbonization processes in atmospheric deaerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leduhovsky, G. V.

    2017-02-01

    A mathematical model of the water decarbonization processes in atmospheric deaerators is proposed to calculate the thermal decomposition degree of hydrocarbonates in a deaerator, pH of a deaerated water sample, and the mass concentration of free carbonic acid in it on a carbon dioxide basis. The mathematical description of these processes is based on the deaeration tank water flow model implemented in the specialized software suite for the calculation of three-dimensional liquid flows, where a real water flow is a set of parallel small plug-flow reactors, and the rate constant of the reaction representing a generalized model of the thermal decomposition of hydrocarbonates with consideration for its chemical and diffusion stages is identified by experimental data. Based on the results of experimental studies performed on deaerators of different designs with and without steam bubbling in their tanks, an empirical support of this model has been developed in the form of recommended reaction order and rate constant values selected depending on the overall alkalinity of water fed into a deaerator. A self-contained mathematical description of the water decarbonization processes in deaerators has been obtained. The proposed model precision has been proven to agree with the specified metrological characteristics of the potentiometric and alkalimetric methods for measuring pH and the free carbonic acid concentration in water. This allows us to recommend the obtained model for the solution of practical problems of forming a specified amount of deaerated water via the selection of the structural and regime parameters of deaerators during their design and regime adjustment.

  14. Numerical investigation on propagation effects of pseudo-partially coherent Gaussian Schell-model beams in atmospheric turbulence.

    PubMed

    Qian, Xianmei; Zhu, Wenyue; Rao, Ruizhong

    2009-03-02

    The propagation effects of spatially pseudo-partially coherent Gaussian Schell-model beams in atmosphere are investigated numerically. The characteristics of beam spreading, beam wandering and intensity scintillation are analyzed respectively. It is found that the degradation of degree of source coherence may cause reductions of relative beam spreading and scintillation index, which indicates that partially coherent beams are more resistant to atmospheric turbulence than fully coherent beams. And beam wandering is not much sensitive to the change of source coherence. However, a partially coherent beam have a larger spreading than the fully coherent beam both in free space and in atmospheric turbulence. The influences of changing frequency of random phase screen which models the source coherence on the final intensity pattern are also discussed.

  15. Small unilamellar liposomes as a membrane model for cell inactivation by cold atmospheric plasma treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maheux, S.; Frache, G.; Thomann, J. S.; Clément, F.; Penny, C.; Belmonte, T.; Duday, D.

    2016-09-01

    Cold atmospheric plasma is thought to be a promising tool for numerous biomedical applications due to its ability to generate a large diversity of reactive species in a controlled way. In some cases, it can also generate pulsed electric fields at the zone of treatment, which can induce processes such as electroporation in cell membranes. However, the interaction of these reactive species and the pulse electric field with cells in a physiological medium is very complex, and we still need a better understanding in order to be useful for future applications. A way to reach this goal is to work with model cell membranes such as liposomes, with the simplest physiological liquid and in a controlled atmosphere in order to limit the number of parallel reactions and processes. In this paper, where this approach has been chosen, 1,2-Dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) small unilamellar vesicles (SUV) have been synthesized in a phosphate buffered aqueous solution, and this solution has been treated by a nanosecond pulsed plasma jet under a pure nitrogen atmosphere. It is only the composition of the plasma gas that has been changed in order to generate different cocktails of reactive species. After the quantification of the main plasma reactive species in the phosphate buffered saline (PBS) solution, structural, surface charge state, and chemical modifications generated on the plasma treated liposomes, due to the interaction with the plasma reactive species, have been carefully characterized. These results allow us to further understand the effect of plasma reactive species on model cell membranes in physiological liquids. The permeation through the liposomal membrane and the reaction of plasma reactive species with molecules encapsulated inside the liposomes have also been evaluated. New processes of degradation are finally presented and discussed, which come from the specific conditions of plasma treatment under the pure nitrogen atmosphere.

  16. Spread in model climate sensitivity traced to atmospheric convective mixing.

    PubMed

    Sherwood, Steven C; Bony, Sandrine; Dufresne, Jean-Louis

    2014-01-02

    Equilibrium climate sensitivity refers to the ultimate change in global mean temperature in response to a change in external forcing. Despite decades of research attempting to narrow uncertainties, equilibrium climate sensitivity estimates from climate models still span roughly 1.5 to 5 degrees Celsius for a doubling of atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration, precluding accurate projections of future climate. The spread arises largely from differences in the feedback from low clouds, for reasons not yet understood. Here we show that differences in the simulated strength of convective mixing between the lower and middle tropical troposphere explain about half of the variance in climate sensitivity estimated by 43 climate models. The apparent mechanism is that such mixing dehydrates the low-cloud layer at a rate that increases as the climate warms, and this rate of increase depends on the initial mixing strength, linking the mixing to cloud feedback. The mixing inferred from observations appears to be sufficiently strong to imply a climate sensitivity of more than 3 degrees for a doubling of carbon dioxide. This is significantly higher than the currently accepted lower bound of 1.5 degrees, thereby constraining model projections towards relatively severe future warming.

  17. Transport and photochemical modeling. Studies of atmospheric species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Natarajan, M.

    1987-01-01

    A program of research studies related to the photochemistry, radiative transfer, and dynamics of the stratosphere is described. Investigations were conducted in two broad areas: (1) studies of the stratospheric processes and their response to external perturbations, and (2) analysis of satellite measurements in conjunction with theoretical models. Contemporary one dimensional photochemical, radiative-convective model was used to assess the impact of perturbations such as solar flux variability, increases in atmospheric carbon dioxide, chlorofluoromethanes and other greenhouse gases. Data from satellite experiments such as LIMS and SBUV, were used along with theoretical models to develop a climatology of trace species in the stratosphere. The consistency of contemporary ozone photochemistry was examined in the light of LIMS data. Research work also includes analysis of stratospheric nitrogen dioxide distributions from different satellite experiments, investigation of the wintertime latitudinal gradients in NO2, estimation of the stratospheric odd nitrogen level and its variability, and studies related to the changes in ozone in the Antarctic, and mid latitude Southern Hemisphere.

  18. Mixture model-based atmospheric air mass classification: a probabilistic view of thermodynamic profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pernin, Jérôme; Vrac, Mathieu; Crevoisier, Cyril; Chédin, Alain

    2016-10-01

    Air mass classification has become an important area in synoptic climatology, simplifying the complexity of the atmosphere by dividing the atmosphere into discrete similar thermodynamic patterns. However, the constant growth of atmospheric databases in both size and complexity implies the need to develop new adaptive classifications. Here, we propose a robust unsupervised and supervised classification methodology of a large thermodynamic dataset, on a global scale and over several years, into discrete air mass groups homogeneous in both temperature and humidity that also provides underlying probability laws. Temperature and humidity at different pressure levels are aggregated into a set of cumulative distribution function (CDF) values instead of classical ones. The method is based on a Gaussian mixture model and uses the expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm to estimate the parameters of the mixture. Spatially gridded thermodynamic profiles come from ECMWF reanalyses spanning the period 2000-2009. Different aspects are investigated, such as the sensitivity of the classification process to both temporal and spatial samplings of the training dataset. Comparisons of the classifications made either by the EM algorithm or by the widely used k-means algorithm show that the former can be viewed as a generalization of the latter. Moreover, the EM algorithm delivers, for each observation, the probabilities of belonging to each class, as well as the associated uncertainty. Finally, a decision tree is proposed as a tool for interpreting the different classes, highlighting the relative importance of temperature and humidity in the classification process.

  19. Should we use a simple or complex model for moisture recycling and atmospheric moisture tracking?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Ent, R. J.; Tuinenburg, O. A.; Knoche, H.-R.; Kunstmann, H.; Savenije, H. H. G.

    2013-12-01

    This paper compares state-of-the-art atmospheric moisture tracking models. Such models are typically used to study the water component of coupled land and atmosphere models, in particular quantifying moisture recycling and the source-sink relations between evaporation and precipitation. There are several atmospheric moisture tracking methods in use. However, depending on the level of aggregation, the assumptions made and the level of detail, the performance of these methods may differ substantially. In this paper, we compare three methods. The RCM-tag method uses highly accurate 3-D water tracking (including phase transitions) directly within a regional climate model (online), while the other two methods (WAM and 3D-T) use a posteriori (offline) water vapour tracking. The original version of WAM is a single-layer model, while 3D-T is a multi-layer model, but both make use the "well-mixed" assumption for evaporation and precipitation. The a posteriori models are faster and more flexible, but less accurate than online moisture tracking with RCM-tag. In order to evaluate the accuracy of the a posteriori models, we tagged evaporated water from Lake Volta in West Africa and traced it to where it precipitates. It is found that the strong wind shear in West Africa is the main cause of errors in the a posteriori models. The number of vertical layers and the initial release height of tagged water in the model are found to have the most significant influences on the results. With this knowledge small improvements have been made to the a posteriori models. It appeared that expanding WAM to a 2-layer model, or a lower release height in 3D-T, led to significantly better results. Finally, we introduced a simple metric to assess wind shear globally and give recommendations about when to use which model. The "best" method, however, very much depends on the research question, the spatial extent under investigation, as well as the available computational power.

  20. Atmospheric Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimann, Dietrich; Schady, Arthur; Feng, Joseph

    This chapter deals with sound propagation in the atmosphere, which is an important link in the functional chain from noise emissions from aircraft, road and rail vehicles, and wind turbines to noise perception. The principle processes in outdoor sound propagation are explained. They include refraction, diffraction, and reflection. Two sound propagation models for scientific applications are briefly outlined. Finally, three illustrative applications and their results are discussed.

  1. Modeling of Water Flow Processes in the Soil-Plant-Atmosphere System: The Soil-Tree-Atmosphere Continuum Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massoud, E. C.; Vrugt, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    Trees and forests play a key role in controlling the water and energy balance at the land-air surface. This study reports on the calibration of an integrated soil-tree-atmosphere continuum (STAC) model using Bayesian inference with the DREAM algorithm and temporal observations of soil moisture content, matric head, sap flux, and leaf water potential from the King's River Experimental Watershed (KREW) in the southern Sierra Nevada mountain range in California. Water flow through the coupled system is described using the Richards' equation with both the soil and tree modeled as a porous medium with nonlinear soil and tree water relationships. Most of the model parameters appear to be reasonably well defined by calibration against the observed data. The posterior mean simulation reproduces the observed soil and tree data quite accurately, but a systematic mismatch is observed between early afternoon measured and simulated sap fluxes. We will show how this points to a structural error in the STAC-model and suggest and test an alternative hypothesis for root water uptake that alleviates this problem.

  2. The coupled atmosphere-chemistry-ocean model SOCOL-MPIOM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthers, S.; Anet, J. G.; Stenke, A.; Raible, C. C.; Rozanov, E.; Brönnimann, S.; Peter, T.; Arfeuille, F. X.; Shapiro, A. I.; Beer, J.; Steinhilber, F.; Brugnara, Y.; Schmutz, W.

    2014-05-01

    The newly developed atmosphere-ocean-chemistry-climate model SOCOL-MPIOM is presented by demonstrating the influence of the interactive chemistry module on the climate state and the variability. Therefore, we compare pre-industrial control simulations with (CHEM) and without (NOCHEM) interactive chemistry. In general, the influence of the chemistry on the mean state and the variability is small and mainly restricted to the stratosphere and mesosphere. The largest differences are found for the atmospheric dynamics in the polar regions, with slightly stronger northern and southern winter polar vortices in CHEM. The strengthening of the vortex is related to larger stratospheric temperature gradients, which are attributed to a parametrization of the absorption of ozone and oxygen in the Lyman-alpha, Schumann-Runge, Hartley, and Higgins bands. This effect is parametrized in the version with interactive chemistry only. A second reason for the temperature differences between CHEM and NOCHEM is related to diurnal variations in the ozone concentrations in the higher atmosphere, which are missing in NOCHEM. Furthermore, stratospheric water vapour concentrations differ substantially between the two experiments, but their effect on the temperatures is small. In both setups, the simulated intensity and variability of the northern polar vortex is inside the range of present day observations. Sudden stratospheric warming events are well reproduced in terms of their frequency, but the distribution amongst the winter months is too uniform. Additionally, the performance of SOCOL-MPIOM under changing external forcings is assessed for the period 1600-2000 using an ensemble of simulations driven by a spectral solar forcing reconstruction. The amplitude of the reconstruction is large in comparison to other state-of-the-art reconstructions, providing an upper limit for the importance of the solar signal. In the pre-industrial period (1600-1850) the simulated surface temperature trends

  3. Lagrangian modeling of global atmospheric methane (1990-2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arfeuille, Florian; Henne, Stephan; Brunner, Dominik

    2016-04-01

    In the MAIOLICA-II project, the lagrangian particle model FLEXPART is used to simulate the global atmospheric methane over the 1990-2012 period. In this lagrangian framework, 3 million particles are permanently transported based on winds from ERA-interim. The history of individual particles can be followed allowing for a comprehensive analysis of transport pathways and timescales. The link between sources (emissions) and receptors (measurement stations) is then established in a straightforward manner, a prerequisite for source inversion problems. FLEXPART was extended to incorporate the methane loss by reaction with OH, soil uptake and stratospheric loss reactions with prescribed Cl and O(1d) radicals. Sources are separated into 245 different tracers, depending on source origin (anthropogenic, wetlands, rice, biomass burning, termites, wild animals, oceans, volcanoes), region of emission, and time since emission (5 age classes). The inversion method applied is a fixed-lag Kalman smoother similar to that described in Bruhwiler et al. [2005]. Results from the FLEXPART global methane simulation and from the subsequent inversion will be presented. Results notably suggest: - A reduction in methane growth rates due to diminished wetland emissions and anthropogenic European emission in 1990-1993. - A second decrease in 1995-1996 is also mainly attributed to these two emission categories. - A reduced increase in Chinese anthropogenic emissions after 2003 compared to EDGAR inventories. - Large South American wetlands emissions during the entire period. Bruhwiler, L. M. P., Michalak, A. M., Peters, W., Baker, D. F. & Tans, P. 2005: An improved Kalman smoother fore atmospheric inversions, Atmos Chem Phys, 5, 2691-2702.

  4. Direct modeling of transiting planet light curves from model stellar atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mcneil, Joseph; Neilson, H.; Ignace, R.

    2014-01-01

    Recent and new observations of extrasolar planets via the transit method are provided unparalleled measurements that enhance our understanding of both the planets and their host stars. However, analysis techniques assume simple parameters to describe the stellar intensity profile. In this work, we compare new planetary transit light curves computed directly from model stellar atmosphere intensity profiles with light curves computed using limb-darkening coefficients. This comparison highlights the need for better models of stellar intensities and atmospheres to better understand the extrasolar planets themselves, especially in the upcoming eras of TESS and PLATO.

  5. Thermospheric/Ionospheric Extension of the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-30

    WACCM output for studying ionospheric data assimilation in the presence of variability due to lower atmosphere perturbations (tides, planetary waves...Thermospheric/ Ionospheric Extension of the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model Han-Li Liu High Altitude Observatory, National Center for...making use of the physics and many of the algorithms of the National Center for Atmospheric Research Thermosphere- Ionosphere -Mesosphere

  6. The GISS model of the global atmosphere. [Goddard Institute for Space Studies numerical model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somerville, R. C. J.; Stone, P. H.; Halem, M.; Hansen, J. E.; Hogan, J. S.; Druyan, L. M.; Quirk, W. J.; Russell, G.; Lacis, A. A.; Tenenbaum, J.

    1974-01-01

    A description and numerical results are presented for a global atmospheric circulation model developed at the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS). The model version described is a 9-level primitive-equation model in sigma coordinates. It includes a realistic distribution of continents, oceans and topography. Detailed calculations of energy transfer by solar and terrestrial radiation make use of cloud and water vapor fields calculated by the model. The model hydrologic cycle includes two precipitation mechanisms: large-scale supersaturation and a parameterization of subgrid-scale cumulus convection. Results are presented both from a comparison of the 13th to the 43rd days (January) of one integration with climatological statistics, and from five short-range forecasting experiments. In the extended integration, the near-equilibrium January-mean model atmosphere exhibits an energy cycle in good agreement with observational estimates, together with generally realistic zonal mean fields of winds, temperature, humidity, transports, diabatic heating, evaporation, precipitation, and cloud cover.

  7. CMIP5 Simulations with the Community Earth System Model - Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, M. J.; Marsh, D. R.; CalvoFernandez, N.; Kinnison, D. E.; Lamarque, J.

    2011-12-01

    We have used the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM) to simulate the Earth's climate from pre-industrial conditions to the end of the 21st Century in several experiments following the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) protocols. We present preliminary analysis of these coupled experiments, highlighting the effects of chemistry and physics above the troposphere on climate. WACCM was developed to understand the couplings between atmospheric layers, the role of chemical and physical processes in defining these couplings, and the interaction between the Earth's atmosphere and the Sun. The current version of WACCM spans the range of altitude from the Earth's surface to the lower thermosphere (~140 km) and is based on version 1 of the Community Earth System Model (CESM-1). WACCM has been used to predict the evolution of ozone and other radiatively active species in the middle and upper atmosphere; to study effects of the stratosphere on tropospheric climate, including the response to increased greenhouse gases; and for independent investigations. We compare climate trends in CMIP5 experiments from WACCM to those in the low-top version of CESM. We examine the coupling between the upper and lower atmosphere, including the quasi-biennial oscillation, sudden stratospheric warmings, the solar cycle, and surface climate.

  8. A fully-coupled atmosphere-ocean-wave model of the Caspian Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruneau, Nicolas; Toumi, Ralf

    2016-11-01

    Located in the mid-latitudes, the Caspian Sea is the largest enclosed basin in the world. A fully-coupled atmosphere-ocean-wave model of the Caspian Sea at high resolution (8 km) for a period of three years is presented. After validating each component of the modelling platform, the wave state of the Caspian Sea is studied. Results show very different wave regimes between the three different basins, a strong seasonality and an almost swell-free state. It is shown here that waves modify the horizontal eddy viscosity and vertical heat diffusion. However, due to a reasonably weak annual wave state, these effects are restricted to the upper-ocean layer (< 30 m) except during the most severe events (100 m). Three main experiments are conducted: 1) the ROMS ocean model forced by atmospheric reanalysis (CFSR), 2) ROMS coupled with the atmospheric model WRF and 3) the impact of wave-induced processes. The seasonality of the Caspian Sea is accurately captured in each experiment which highlights a rapid warming of the sea surface temperature (SST) in spring while the mixed layer depths (MLD) become very rapidly shallow (shifting from over 100 m to 15 m in two months). Contrarily, a gentle cooling of the SST accompanied with a deepening of the MLD is modelled during autumn and winter. The results also show a significant improvement of the model skill in the representation of the dynamics when ROMS is coupled to WRF. Finally, as ocean surface waves imply feedback at the interface atmosphere-ocean through the transfer of momentum, mass and heat, we investigate their potential effects on the Caspian Sea dynamics. Results are mixed and show a reasonably weak impact of wave-induced processes. While waves have a negligible effect during the winter as wave-induced mixing is confined to the MLD, the summer global SST are less accurately modelled due to the enhancement of mixing in shallow MLDs. However the SST bias, temperature at a subsurface location are improved.

  9. Lithosphere-Atmosphere coupling: Spectral element modeling of the evolution of acoustic waves in the atmosphere from an underground source.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Averbuch, Gil; Price, Colin

    2015-04-01

    Lithosphere-Atmosphere coupling: Spectral element modeling of the evolution of acoustic waves in the atmosphere from an underground source. G. Averbuch, C. Price Department of Geosciences, Tel Aviv University, Israel Infrasound is one of the four Comprehensive Nuclear-Test Ban Treaty technologies for monitoring nuclear explosions. This technology measures the acoustic waves generated by the explosions followed by their propagation through the atmosphere. There are also natural phenomena that can act as an infrasound sources like sprites, volcanic eruptions and earthquakes. The infrasound waves generated from theses phenomena can also be detected by the infrasound arrays. In order to study the behavior of these waves, i.e. the physics of wave propagation in the atmosphere, their evolution and their trajectories, numerical methods are required. This presentation will deal with the evolution of acoustic waves generated by underground sources (earthquakes and underground explosions). A 2D Spectral elements formulation for lithosphere-atmosphere coupling will be presented. The formulation includes the elastic wave equation for the seismic waves and the momentum, mass and state equations for the acoustic waves in a moving stratified atmosphere. The coupling of the two media is made by boundary conditions that ensures the continuity of traction and velocity (displacement) in the normal component to the interface. This work has several objectives. The first is to study the evolution of acoustic waves in the atmosphere from an underground source. The second is to derive transmission coefficients for the energy flux with respect to the seismic magnitude and earth density. The third will be the generation of seismic waves from acoustic waves in the atmosphere. Is it possible?

  10. Comparison between Eulerian and Lagrangian Atmospheric Transport Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrich, P.; Grillon, Y.

    2001-05-01

    Two numerical atmospheric models are tested and compared both in backward and forward modes to study the transport and dispersion of radioactive gases in the framework of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty. The first one (LMDZ) has been developed at the Laboratoire de Meteorologie Dynamique in Paris,it calculates eulerian large-scale advection based upon finite-volume methods and parametrization of turbulent mixing and convection. The second one (HYSPLIT), developed by the Air Resources Laboratory of NOAA, is lagrangian and calculated 3D trajectories of particules, taking also into account dispersion due to wind shear. Concentrations of particules are compared at stations of the CTBT network for a fictitious source in the Pacific Ocean, that is assumed to be punctual in time and space. In the backward mode, concentrations are calculated and compared over 15 days from a point source at Tahiti to determine the field of regard for this station. Sensitivity tests are carried out by varying the spatial resolution of models.

  11. Non-LTE models of Titan's upper atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yelle, Roger V.

    1991-01-01

    Models for the thermal structure of Titan's upper atmosphere, between 0.1 mbar and 0.01 nbar are presented. The calculations include non-LTE heating/cooling in the rotation-vibration bands of CH4, C2H2, and C2H6, absorption of solar IR radiation in the near-IR bands of CH4 and subsequent cascading to the nu-4 band of CH4, absorption of solar EUV and UV radiation, thermal conduction and cooling by HCN rotational lines. Unlike earlier models, the calculated exospheric temperature agrees well with observations, because of the importance of HCN cooling. The calculations predict a well-developed mesopause with a temperature of 135-140 K at an altitude of approximately 600 km and pressure of about 0.1 microbar. The mesopause is at a higher pressure than predicted by earlier calculations because non-LTE radiative transfer in the rotation-vibration bands of CH4, C2H2, and C2H6 is treated in an accurate manner. The accuracy of the LTE approximation for source functions and heating rates is discussed.

  12. An updated subgrid orographic parameterization for global atmospheric forecast models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Hyun-Joo; Hong, Song-You

    2015-12-01

    A subgrid orographic parameterization (SOP) is updated by including the effects of orographic anisotropy and flow-blocking drag (FBD). The impact of the updated SOP on short-range forecasts is investigated using a global atmospheric forecast model applied to a heavy snowfall event over Korea on 4 January 2010. When the SOP is updated, the orographic drag in the lower troposphere noticeably increases owing to the additional FBD over mountainous regions. The enhanced drag directly weakens the excessive wind speed in the low troposphere and indirectly improves the temperature and mass fields over East Asia. In addition, the snowfall overestimation over Korea is improved by the reduced heat fluxes from the surface. The forecast improvements are robust regardless of the horizontal resolution of the model between T126 and T510. The parameterization is statistically evaluated based on the skill of the medium-range forecasts for February 2014. For the medium-range forecasts, the skill improvements of the wind speed and temperature in the low troposphere are observed globally and for East Asia while both positive and negative effects appear