Science.gov

Sample records for atmospheric physics department

  1. Program report for FY 1984 and 1985 Atmospheric and Geophysical Sciences Division of the Physics Department

    SciTech Connect

    Knox, J.B.; MacCracken, M.C.; Dickerson, M.H.; Gresho, P.M.; Luther, F.M.

    1986-08-01

    This annual report for the Atmospheric and Geophysical Sciences Division (G-Division) summarizes the activities and highlights of the past three years, with emphasis on significant research findings in two major program areas: the Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC), with its recent involvement in assessing the effects of the Chernobyl reactor accident, and new findings on the environmental consequences of nuclear war. The technical highlights of the many other research projects are also briefly reported, along with the Division's organization, budget, and publications.

  2. Retention at Departments of Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Rafael; Rosa, Luis

    2013-03-01

    A thriving physics department is the end result of many actions, taken over time, that results in the development of a sense of community between the faculty and the students. As part of this sense of community, gifted students must receive special attention and innovative ideas must be incorporated to successfully accommodate the needs of these students. We have found that the best retention strategy for gifted undergraduates is the total involvement of them in undergraduate research projects and also the development of leadership in extracurricular activities within the department. A careful employment strategy is needed to secure a faculty committed to the goals of the community.

  3. Planetary atmospheric physics and solar physics research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    An overview is presented on current and planned research activities in the major areas of solar physics, planetary atmospheres, and space astronomy. The approach to these unsolved problems involves experimental techniques, theoretical analysis, and the use of computers to analyze the data from space experiments. The point is made that the research program is characterized by each activity interacting with the other activities in the laboratory.

  4. Assessing the Physical Environment of Emergency Departments

    PubMed Central

    Goodarzi, Hassan; Javadzadeh, Hamidreza; Hassanpour, Kasra

    2015-01-01

    Background: Emergency Department (ED) is considered to be the heart of a hospital. Based on many studies, a well-organized physical environment can enhance efficacy. Objectives: In this study, we aimed to investigate the influence of physical environment in EDs on efficacy. Materials and Methods: This analytical cross-sectional study was conducted via the faculty members of the ED and residents of Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences in Tehran, Iran. Data were collected using a predefined questionnaire. Descriptive statistics and ANOVA were used to analyze the data. Results: Sixty-two participants, including 21 females and 41 males, completed the questionnaires. The mean age of the participants was 37 years (SD: 8.42). The mean work experience was 8 years (SD: 4.52) and all the studied variables varied within a range of 3.3 - 4.2. Time indices had the highest mean among variables followed by capacity, work space, treatment units, critical care units and, triage indices, respectively. Conclusions: In general, time indices including length of patient stay in the ED and space capacity, emphasizing the need to address these shortcomings. PMID:26839860

  5. Student's Guide to Undergraduate Physics Major Departments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Llano, Margaret T.

    Provided are data on the physics programs of 622 institutions which offer the baccalaureate degree in physics. The guide is intended for students who aim to become physics majors in college, students interested in science, transfer students, school and community college counselors, and physics faculty. For each institution, information is supplied…

  6. Graduate Physics Degrees: Largest Departments and Degree Distribution. Focus On

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulvey, Patrick J.; Nicholson, Starr

    2014-01-01

    In the 2011-12 academic year there were 751 degree-granting physics departments in the U.S. Of these, 195 offered a PhD and 62 departments offered a master's as the highest physics degree. The remaining 494 departments offered a bachelor's as their highest physics degree. There were six universities that had two doctoral-granting physics…

  7. Atmospheric cloud physics thermal systems analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Engineering analyses performed on the Atmospheric Cloud Physics (ACPL) Science Simulator expansion chamber and associated thermal control/conditioning system are reported. Analyses were made to develop a verified thermal model and to perform parametric thermal investigations to evaluate systems performance characteristics. Thermal network representations of solid components and the complete fluid conditioning system were solved simultaneously using the Systems Improved Numerical Differencing Analyzer (SINDA) computer program.

  8. Physics of the Sun and its Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwivedi, B. N.; Narain, U.

    ch. 1. Recent advances in solar physics / B. N. Dwivedi -- ch. 2. Overview of the Sun / S. S. Hasan -- ch. 3. Seismic view of the Sun / S. M. Chitre and B. N. Dwivedi -- ch. 4. Solar magnetism / P. Venkatakrishnan and S. Gosain -- ch. 5. Waves and oscillations in the solar atmosphere / R. Erdélyi -- ch. 6. VUV spectroscopy of solar plasma / A. Mohan -- ch. 7. Active region diagnostics / H. E. Mason and D. Tripathi -- ch. 8. Hall effect and ambipolar diffusion in the lower solar atmosphere / V. Krishan -- ch. 9. On solar coronal heating mechanisms / K. Pandey and U. Narain -- ch. 10. Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and associated phenomena / N. Srivastava -- ch. 11. The radio Sun / P. K. Manoharan -- ch. 12. The solar wind / P. K. Manoharan -- ch. 13. The Sun-Earth system: our home in space / J. L. Lean.

  9. Atmospheric cloud physics laboratory project study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, W. E.; Stephen, L. A.; Usher, L. H.

    1976-01-01

    Engineering studies were performed for the Zero-G Cloud Physics Experiment liquid cooling and air pressure control systems. A total of four concepts for the liquid cooling system was evaluated, two of which were found to closely approach the systems requirements. Thermal insulation requirements, system hardware, and control sensor locations were established. The reservoir sizes and initial temperatures were defined as well as system power requirements. In the study of the pressure control system, fluid analyses by the Atmospheric Cloud Physics Laboratory were performed to determine flow characteristics of various orifice sizes, vacuum pump adequacy, and control systems performance. System parameters predicted in these analyses as a function of time include the following for various orifice sizes: (1) chamber and vacuum pump mass flow rates, (2) the number of valve openings or closures, (3) the maximum cloud chamber pressure deviation from the allowable, and (4) cloud chamber and accumulator pressure.

  10. History of the New York University Physics Department

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bederson, Benjamin; Henry Stroke, H.

    2011-09-01

    We trace the history of physics at New York University after its founding in 1831, focusing especially on its relatively recent history, which can be divided into five periods: the Gregory Breit period from 1929 to 1934; the prewar period from 1935 to 1941; the wartime period from 1942 to 1945; the postwar period from around 1961 to 1973 when several semiautonomous physics departments were united into a single all-university department under a single head; and after 1973 when the University Heights campus was sold to New York City and its physics department joined the one at the Washington Square campus. For each of these periods we comment on the careers and work of prominent members of the physics faculty and on some of the outstanding graduate students who later went on to distinguished careers at NYU and elsewhere.

  11. A Comparison of Physical Medicine Departments in Vocational vs. Physical Restoration Oriented Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, James D.; Egerman, Karl

    To compare the physical medicine departments of selected vocationally oriented rehabilitation centers with each other and with centers that are primarily oriented toward physical restoration, six facilities were studied. Conclusions were as follow: nearly all physical medicine departments have staffing problems; quality of service appears…

  12. Atmospheric Cloud Physics Laboratory thermal control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moses, J. L.; Fogal, G. L.; Scollon, T. R., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The paper presents the development background and the present status of the Atmospheric Cloud Physics Laboratory (ACPL) thermal control capability. The ACPL, a Spacelab payload, is currently in the initial flight hardware development phase for a first flight scheduled in June 1981. The ACPL is intended as a facility for conducting a wide variety of cloud microphysics experimentation under zero gravity conditions. The cloud chambers, which are key elements of the ACPL, have stringent thermal requirements. Thus the expansion chamber inner walls must be uniform to within + or - 0.1 C during both steady-state and transient operation over a temperature range of +30 to -25 C. Design progression of the expansion chamber, from early in-house NASA-MSFC concepts (including test results of a prototype chamber) to a thermal control concept currently under development, is discussed.

  13. Physical fitness of an industrial fire department vs. a municipal fire department.

    PubMed

    Garver, Julie N; Jankovitz, Kristine Z; Danks, Jane M; Fittz, Ashley A; Smith, Heather S; Davis, Steven C

    2005-05-01

    Both industrial and municipal firefighters need to maintain high levels of physical fitness and minimize cardiovascular risk factors. The nature of firefighter responsibilities in industrial and municipal settings may vary, affecting the ability to sustain high levels of physical fitness. We compared the working conditions, physical fitness, and exercise training practices of an industrial fire department (n = 17) to those of a nearby municipal fire department (n = 55). After informed consent, aerobic capacity, muscular strength, muscular endurance, body composition, flexibility, blood lipid concentrations, and blood pressure levels were measured. Exercise training practices and related factors were assessed using a questionnaire. Despite programmatic differences, these departments demonstrated similar, relatively high degrees of physical fitness and similar blood lipid concentrations, blood pressure levels, and cardiac risk factors. It is recommended that fire departments involve appropriately trained staff, schedule on-duty times for exercise, offer well-equipped exercise facilities, and follow National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA) and American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) guidelines for exercise conditioning in order to maintain a high degree of physical fitness.

  14. The Physics Department of Moscow University: In Its Ladies' Faces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elena, Ermolaeva

    2005-10-01

    In commemoration of the 250th anniversary of Moscow University, the Women Council of MSU published a biographical dictionary dedicated to women who contributed significantly to the academic success of their institution and who distinguished themselves both in research and in teaching. The book contains brief biographies of some 619 women employed by MSU; 63 of these entries are for members of the Department of Physics and of its adjacent research institutes. They are doctors of sciences, full professors, recipients of government as well as university awards, and some are WWII veterans. Their lives in science have embodied all tendencies of the Soviet period of the country. The great majority graduated from Moscow State University and have been working at MSU for more than 25 years. At present, the Physics Department consists of 37 sectors with more than two hundred doctors of sciences, 15% of whom are women. The information supplied by the dictionary, combined with data on the younger staff of MSU with similar degrees in physics, lets us compare tendencies in women's professional development, their research and teaching careers, and their success in publishing. It also lets us see some of the key issues. Since 1933 (the year of establishment) more than 25,000 people have graduated from the Physics Department, a quarter of whom were girls. Of 90 students who have graduated with honors this year, one third were girls, and of 22 award-winning thesis this year, 10 were defended by them. About 400 persons are participating in the 3-year postgraduate program of the Physics Department; 30% of all students enrolled this year are girls. Half the winners of annual awards to students, postgraduate students, and ``young scientists'' in physics this year were girls. The percent of successful women in physics is growing.

  15. The Hispanic Experience in Physical Education Programs and Departments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodge, Samuel R.; Cervantes, Carlos M.; Vigo-Valentin, Alexander N.; Canabal-Torres, Maria Y.; Ortiz-Castillo, Esther M.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss challenges and identify strategies to increase the representation of Hispanic faculty in the academy, particularly Physical Education (PE) programs and departments at doctorate-granting universities. Recommendations to increase the presence and improve the experiences of Hispanic faculty are provided.…

  16. University of Michigan Physics Department: E[superscript2]Coach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    EDUCAUSE, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The E[superscript 2]Coach project from the Department of Physics at the University of Michigan (UM) addresses the challenge of providing individual student support in high-enrollment introductory science courses. This web application employs tailored communications technology, course experiences, student data, and analytics to deliver customized…

  17. Planetary atmospheres: Microwave spectroscopic and space physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clancy, R. Todd

    1990-01-01

    Ground-based spectroscopic observations of isotopes of CO in the atmosphere of Mars, Venus, and Titan were collected over the 1982-1990 period. These observations were analyzed to obtain information on the photochemistry, dynamics, and thermal profiles of these planetary atmospheres. In the cases of the mesosphere (80-100 km altitude) of Venus and the lower atmosphere (0-70 km altitude) of Mars, the primary conclusion of this research is that significant interannual variation in the global, thermal, and compositional structures of these atmospheres occur over 10 year periods. The Titan studies have focussed on pinning down the true atmosphere CO abundance. A more detailed summary of the results for each of these planetary atmospheres is provided.

  18. Improving Climate and Gender Equity in Physics Departments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yennello, Sherry

    2010-02-01

    We need to open the door of science to women and minorities. We need to invite them in and encourage them to succeed. We need to teach them the secret handshake and transfer all the writing on the men's room walls and all-white country clubs into accessible places. We need to promote them to positions of national prominence. We need to do this out of respect to our mothers and the pioneering scientists who have come before us. We need to do this for our daughters and sons, so that our grandchildren may only know this discrimination as a piece of history. We need to do this now -- for the sake of our country, our science, our technical workforce, our economy and because it is the right thing to do. The Committee on the Status of Women in Physics (CSWP) has been helping physics departments improve their climate as a means to enhance gender equity. The CSWP site visit program has been giving departments valuable feedback on their climate for many years. In May 2007, a workshop on ``Gender Equity: Enhancing the Physics Enterprise in Universities and National Laboratories'' was held to address the issue of underrepresentation of women in physics by engaging the stake holders. This fall a new ``Conversation on Gender Equity'' has begun. Successful strategies for improving the climate and increasing the representation of women in physics will be presented. )

  19. Basic research in meteorology and atmospheric physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, J. E.

    1975-01-01

    The effect was studied of the variations of the electromagnetic properties of the three phases of water on measurements of atmospheric and oceanographic parameters by microwave instruments aboard satellites. Other studies reported include: orbital detection of extrasolar planets, detection of stratospheric aerosols from earth orbit, chemistry of Jupiter's atmosphere, and stratospheric ozone.

  20. Astronomical, physical, and meteorological parameters for planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, Michael; Travis, Larry D.

    1986-01-01

    A newly compiled table of astronomical, physical, and meteorological parameters for planetary atmospheres is presented. Formulae and explanatory notes for their application and a complete listing of sources are also given.

  1. Composition and physics of the lunar atmosphere.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, J. H.; Hodges, R. R., Jr.; Johnson, F. S.; Evans , D. E.

    1973-01-01

    The existence in the lunar atmosphere of helium, neon, argon, and possibly molecular hydrogen has been confirmed by the Apollo 17 mass spectrometer. The observed helium concentrations and distribution agree closely with model predictions for a non-condensable gas based on a solar wind source, thermal escape and a Monte Carlo random walk calculated longitudinal distribution. Heavier gases are lost by photoionization and subsequent sweeping away by the solar wind electric field. The observed nighttime neon concentration of 80,000 molecules per cu cm is consistent with expected amounts. Argon, however, is adsorbed on the lunar surface late at night when the surface temperature is lowest. It shows the expected predawn enhancement exhibited by condensable gases released into the atmosphere at the sunrise terminator. Hydrogen appears to exist in the molecular rather than atomic state. Its observed concentration is less than a factor of 3 higher than that predicted by a model similar to that used for helium.

  2. The physical theory and propagation model of THz atmospheric propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, R.; Yao, J. Q.; Xu, D. G.; Wang, J. L.; Wang, P.

    2011-02-01

    Terahertz (THz) radiation is extensively applied in diverse fields, such as space communication, Earth environment observation, atmosphere science, remote sensing and so on. And the research on propagation features of THz wave in the atmosphere becomes more and more important. This paper firstly illuminates the advantages and outlook of THz in space technology. Then it introduces the theoretical framework of THz atmospheric propagation, including some fundamental physical concepts and processes. The attenuation effect (especially the absorption of water vapor), the scattering of aerosol particles and the effect of turbulent flow mainly influence THz atmosphere propagation. Fundamental physical laws are illuminated as well, such as Lamber-beer law, Mie scattering theory and radiative transfer equation. The last part comprises the demonstration and comparison of THz atmosphere propagation models like Moliere(V5), SARTre and AMATERASU. The essential problems are the deep analysis of physical mechanism of this process, the construction of atmospheric propagation model and databases of every kind of material in the atmosphere, and the standardization of measurement procedures.

  3. Physical mechanisms of solar activity effects in the middle atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebel, A.

    1989-01-01

    A great variety of physical mechanisms of possibly solar induced variations in the middle atmosphere has been discussed in the literature during the last decades. The views which have been put forward are often controversial in their physical consequences. The reason may be the complexity and non-linearity of the atmospheric response to comparatively weak forcing resulting from solar activity. Therefore this review focuses on aspects which seem to indicate nonlinear processes in the development of solar induced variations. Results from observations and numerical simulations are discussed.

  4. Highlights from the First Ever Demographic Study of Solar Physics, Space Physics, and Upper Atmospheric Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moldwin, M.; Morrow, C. A.; White, S. C.; Ivie, R.

    2014-12-01

    Members of the Education & Workforce Working Group and the American Institute of Physics (AIP) conducted the first ever National Demographic Survey of working professionals for the 2012 National Academy of Sciences Solar and Space Physics Decadal Survey to learn about the demographics of this sub-field of space science. The instrument contained questions for participants on: the type of workplace; basic demographic information regarding gender and minority status, educational pathways (discipline of undergrad degree, field of their PhD), how their undergraduate and graduate student researchers are funded, participation in NSF and NASA funded spaceflight missions and suborbital programs, and barriers to career advancement. Using contact data bases from AGU, the American Astronomical Society's Solar Physics Division (AAS-SPD), attendees of NOAA's Space Weather Week and proposal submissions to NSF's Atmospheric, Geospace Science Division, the AIP's Statistical Research Center cross correlated and culled these data bases resulting in 2776 unique email addresses of US based working professionals. The survey received 1305 responses (51%) and generated 125 pages of single space answers to a number of open-ended questions. This talk will summarize the highlights of this first-ever demographic survey including findings extracted from the open-ended responses regarding barriers to career advancement which showed significant gender differences.

  5. An Atmospheric Cloud Physics Laboratory for the Space Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R.; Anderson, J.; Schrick, B.; Ellsworth, C.; Davis, M.

    1976-01-01

    Results of research and engineering analyses to date show that it is feasible to develop and fly on the first Spacelab mission a multipurpose laboratory in which experiments can be performed on the microphysical processes in atmospheric clouds. The paper presents a series of tables on the Atmospheric Cloud Physics Laboratory, with attention given to experiment classes, the preliminary equipment list (particle generators, optical and imaging devices, particle detectors and characterizers, etc.), initial equipment (scientific equipment subsystems and flight support subsystems), and scientific functional requirements (the expansion chamber, the continuous flow diffusion chamber, the static diffusion chamber, the humidifier, and particle generators).

  6. Computerized Schedule Construction in College and University Physical Education Departments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hattlestad, Neil

    This paper describes the use of a computer in scheduling physical education classes and activities. The advantages of the computer are pointed out in terms of person hours of work saved for the school administrator. (JD)

  7. Evaluation of Monte Carlo tools for high energy atmospheric physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutjes, Casper; Sarria, David; Broberg Skeltved, Alexander; Luque, Alejandro; Diniz, Gabriel; Østgaard, Nikolai; Ebert, Ute

    2016-11-01

    The emerging field of high energy atmospheric physics (HEAP) includes terrestrial gamma-ray flashes, electron-positron beams and gamma-ray glows from thunderstorms. Similar emissions of high energy particles occur in pulsed high voltage discharges. Understanding these phenomena requires appropriate models for the interaction of electrons, positrons and photons of up to 40 MeV energy with atmospheric air. In this paper, we benchmark the performance of the Monte Carlo codes Geant4, EGS5 and FLUKA developed in other fields of physics and of the custom-made codes GRRR and MC-PEPTITA against each other within the parameter regime relevant for high energy atmospheric physics. We focus on basic tests, namely on the evolution of monoenergetic and directed beams of electrons, positrons and photons with kinetic energies between 100 keV and 40 MeV through homogeneous air in the absence of electric and magnetic fields, using a low energy cutoff of 50 keV. We discuss important differences between the results of the different codes and provide plausible explanations. We also test the computational performance of the codes. The Supplement contains all results, providing a first benchmark for present and future custom-made codes that are more flexible in including electrodynamic interactions.

  8. Coordination of an Education Department with Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy Departments in a Residential Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Joy DeMarino

    The paper focuses on coordination of an educational program for non-ambulatory cerebral palsied and profoundly retarded clients (21 years old and younger) in a residential setting not being served by the Texas Education Department. Covered in outline form are the school's requirements governing educational programs, program development,…

  9. Implementation multi representation and oral communication skills in Department of Physics Education on Elementary Physics II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusumawati, Intan; Marwoto, Putut; Linuwih, Suharto

    2015-09-01

    The ability of multi representation has been widely studied, but there has been no implementation through a model of learning. This study aimed to determine the ability of the students multi representation, relationships multi representation capabilities and oral communication skills, as well as the application of the relations between the two capabilities through learning model Presentatif Based on Multi representation (PBM) in solving optical geometric (Elementary Physics II). A concurrent mixed methods research methods with qualitative-quantitative weights. Means of collecting data in the form of the pre-test and post-test with essay form, observation sheets oral communication skills, and assessment of learning by observation sheet PBM-learning models all have a high degree of respectively validity category is 3.91; 4.22; 4.13; 3.88. Test reliability with Alpha Cronbach technique, reliability coefficient of 0.494. The students are department of Physics Education Unnes as a research subject. Sequence multi representation tendency of students from high to low in sequence, representation of M, D, G, V; whereas the order of accuracy, the group representation V, D, G, M. Relationship multi representation ability and oral communication skills, comparable/proportional. Implementation conjunction generate grounded theory. This study should be applied to the physics of matter, or any other university for comparison.

  10. Implementation multi representation and oral communication skills in Department of Physics Education on Elementary Physics II

    SciTech Connect

    Kusumawati, Intan; Marwoto, Putut Linuwih, Suharto

    2015-09-30

    The ability of multi representation has been widely studied, but there has been no implementation through a model of learning. This study aimed to determine the ability of the students multi representation, relationships multi representation capabilities and oral communication skills, as well as the application of the relations between the two capabilities through learning model Presentatif Based on Multi representation (PBM) in solving optical geometric (Elementary Physics II). A concurrent mixed methods research methods with qualitative–quantitative weights. Means of collecting data in the form of the pre-test and post-test with essay form, observation sheets oral communication skills, and assessment of learning by observation sheet PBM–learning models all have a high degree of respectively validity category is 3.91; 4.22; 4.13; 3.88. Test reliability with Alpha Cronbach technique, reliability coefficient of 0.494. The students are department of Physics Education Unnes as a research subject. Sequence multi representation tendency of students from high to low in sequence, representation of M, D, G, V; whereas the order of accuracy, the group representation V, D, G, M. Relationship multi representation ability and oral communication skills, comparable/proportional. Implementation conjunction generate grounded theory. This study should be applied to the physics of matter, or any other university for comparison.

  11. Women among Physics & Astronomy Faculty: Results from the 2010 Survey of Physics Degree-Granting Departments. Focus On

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivie, Rachel; White, Susan; Garrett, Arnell; Anderson, Garrett

    2013-01-01

    Between March and July 2010, each of the 796 departments that awarded at least a bachelor's degree in physics or astronomy were contacted by e-mail, mail, and certified mail. Follow-up contacts were made for departments that had not yet responded. Responses were received from 744 departments (93%). The percentage of women among physics…

  12. The Impact of Physically Embedded Librarianship on Academic Departments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Toole, Erin; Barham, Rebecca; Monahan, Jo

    2016-01-01

    Academic librarians have been engaged in embedded librarianship for nearly 15 years, yet there are few published research studies on the impact of physically embedded librarians, who work alongside departmental faculty. This study leveraged a change in reference service to analyze what happened when subject librarians moved from the library…

  13. Modeling Activities in the Department of Energy’s Atmospheric Sciences Program

    SciTech Connect

    Fast, Jerome D.; Ghan, Steven J.; Schwartz, Stephen E.

    2009-03-01

    The Department of Energy's Atmospheric Science Program (ASP) conducts research pertinent to radiative forcing of climate change by atmospheric aerosols. The program consists of approximately 40 highly interactive peer-reviewed research projects that examine aerosol properties and processes and the evolution of aerosols in the atmosphere. Principal components of the program are instrument development, laboratory experiments, field studies, theoretical investigations, and modeling. The objectives of the Program are to 1) improve the understanding of aerosol processes associated with light scattering and absorption properties and interactions with clouds that affect Earth's radiative balance and to 2) develop model-based representations of these processes that enable the effects of aerosols on Earth's climate system to be properly represented in global-scale numerical climate models. Although only a few of the research projects within ASP are explicitly identified as primarily modeling activities, modeling actually comprises a substantial component of a large fraction of ASP research projects. This document describes the modeling activities within the Program as a whole, the objectives and intended outcomes of these activities, and the linkages among the several modeling components and with global-scale modeling activities conducted under the support of the Department of Energy's Climate Sciences Program and other aerosol and climate research programs.

  14. Theoretical studies of the physics of the solar atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollweg, Joseph V.

    1992-01-01

    Significant advances in our theoretical basis for understanding several physical processes related to dynamical phenomena on the sun were achieved. We have advanced a new model for spicules and fibrils. We have provided a simple physical view of resonance absorption of MHD surface waves; this allowed an approximate mathematical procedure for obtaining a wealth of new analytical results which we applied to coronal heating and p-mode absorption at magnetic regions. We provided the first comprehensive models for the heating and acceleration of the transition region, corona, and solar wind. We provided a new view of viscosity under coronal conditions. We provided new insights into Alfven wave propagation in the solar atmosphere. And recently we have begun work in a new direction: parametric instabilities of Alfven waves.

  15. The role of physics departments in the recruitment, preparation and support of pre-college teachers of physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seeley, Lane

    2008-05-01

    The United States faces a critical shortage of qualified physics and physical science teachers. The number of high school students taking physics is increasing but the number of physics majors pursuing careers in pre-college teaching is not nearly sufficient to meet the demand. College and university physics departments have content expertise and ready access to potential future teachers of physics. In order to address the crisis in physics and physical science education, APS, AAPT, and AIP have developed the PhysTEC project. Seattle Pacific University is one of six fully funded PhysTEC sites. The PhysTEC project also supports a coalition of more than one hundred institutions that are committed to improving K-12 physics and physical science education. This talk will describe the national PhysTEC project along with our local PhysTEC program. We will explore ways in which physics departments can more fully integrate the preparation of pre-college physics teachers within existing departmental priorities. We will discuss opportunities for regional partnerships between 2-year and 4-year colleges, school districts, and teacher preparation programs. We will also highlight ways in which our research on the learning and teaching of physics informs the development of tools that teachers and teacher educators can use to diagnose student ideas and to design subsequent instruction that capitalizes on these ideas. In collaboration with Stamatis Vokos, Seattle Pacific University and Pam Kraus, Facet Innovations LLC.

  16. Number of Physics Faculty: Results from the 2008 Survey of Physics Degree-Granting Departments. Focus On

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivie, Rachel; Ephraim, Arnell; White, Susan

    2009-01-01

    Between March 20 and July 8, 2008 (the spring semester of 2008), the authors contacted each of the 763 departments in the US that award at least a bachelor's degree in physics by e-mail, mail, and certified mail. They received responses from 713 departments (93%). This report describes their findings. (Contains 3 tables and 3 figures.)

  17. Roster of Physics Departments with Enrollment and Degree Data, 2002. AIP Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholson, Starr; Mulvey, Patrick J.

    This roster contains detailed data from the annual Survey of Enrollments and Degrees. The survey was conducted in the 2002-2003 academic year. It includes all degree-granting physics departments in the United states. Presented in this roster are the data reported by those departments for their 2001-2002 introductory course enrollments, 2002-200…

  18. Atmospheric corrosion monitoring at the US Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge K-25 Site

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, M.

    1995-12-31

    Depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) at the US Department of Energy`s K-25 Site at Oak Ridge, TN has been stored in large steel cylinders which have undergone significant atmospheric corrosion damage over the last 35 years. A detailed experimental program to characterize and monitor the corrosion damage was initiated in 1992. Large amounts of corrosion scale and deep pits are found to cover cylinder surfaces. Ultrasonic wall thickness measurements have shown uniform corrosion losses up to 20 mils (0.5 mm) and pits up to 100 mils (2.5 mm) deep. Electrical resistance corrosion probes, time-of-wetness sensors and thermocouples have been attached to cylinder bodies. Atmospheric conditions are monitored using rain gauges, relative humidity sensors and thermocouples. Long-term (16 years) data are being obtained from mild steel corrosion coupons on test racks as well as attached directly to cylinder surfaces. Corrosion rates have been found to intimately related to the times-of-wetness, both tending to be higher on cylinder tops due to apparent sheltering effects. Data from the various tests are compared, discrepancies are discussed and a pattern of cylinder corrosion as a function of cylinder position and location is described.

  19. An Investigation of the Class Management Profiles of Students of Physical Education and Sports Teaching Departments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baydar, Hacer Özge; Hazar, Muhsin; Yildiz, Ozer; Yildiz, Mehtap; Tingaz, Emre Ozan; Gökyürek, Belgin

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this research is to examine and analyze the class management profiles of 3rd and 4th grade students of Physical Education and Sports Teaching Departments of universities in Turkey based on gender, grade level and university. The research population comprised 375 students (170 females and 205 males) of Physical Education and Sports…

  20. Modeling an integrative physical examination program for the Departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs.

    PubMed

    Goodrich, Scott G

    2006-10-01

    Current policies governing the Departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs physical examination programs are out of step with current evidence-based medical practice. Replacing periodic and other routine physical examination types with annual preventive health assessments would afford our service members additional health benefit at reduced cost. Additionally, the Departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs repeat the physical examination process at separation and have been unable to reconcile their respective disability evaluation systems to reduce duplication and waste. A clear, coherent, and coordinated strategy to improve the relevance and utility of our physical examination programs is long overdue. This article discusses existing physical examination programs and proposes a model for a new integrative physical examination program based on need, science, and common sense.

  1. Scientific Infrastructure to Support Atmospheric Science and Aerosol Science for the Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Programs at Barrow, Alaska.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucero, D. A.; Ivey, M.; Helsel, F.; Hardesty, J.; Dexheimer, D.

    2015-12-01

    Scientific infrastructure to support atmospheric science and aerosol science for the Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement programs at Barrow, Alaska.The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program's located at Barrow, Alaska is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) site. The site provides a scientific infrastructure and data archives for the international Arctic research community. The infrastructure at Barrow has been in place since 1998, with many improvements since then. Barrow instruments include: scanning precipitation Radar-cloud radar, Doppler Lidar, Eddy correlation flux systems, Ceilometer, Manual and state-of-art automatic Balloon sounding systems, Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI), Micro-pulse Lidar (MPL), Millimeter cloud radar, High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) along with all the standard metrological measurements. Data from these instruments is placed in the ARM data archives and are available to the international research community. This poster will discuss what instruments are at Barrow and the challenges of maintaining these instruments in an Arctic site.

  2. Investigation of Students' Multiple Intelligence Domains in Three Different Departments of the School of Physical Education and Sports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ürgüp, Sabri; Aslan, Sinan

    2015-01-01

    The majority of the schools of physical education and sports in Turkey consist of three departments, which are physical education and sports teaching department, coaching education and sports management departments. All of these departments are applying similar entrance examinations, and mostly similar curriculum and learning styles to the…

  3. Becoming a Health and Physical Education (HPE) Teacher: Student Teacher "Performances" in the Physical Education Subject Department Office

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossi, Tony; Sirna, Karen; Tinning, Richard

    2008-01-01

    This study considered how physical education teacher education students "perform" their "selves" within subject department offices during the practicum or "teaching practice". The research was framed by a conceptual framework informed by the work of Goffman on "performance" and "front". The findings revealed three common performances across the…

  4. A Call To Action for Physics Departments: Findings and Recommendations of the National Task Force on Teacher Education in Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vokos, Stamatis

    2010-10-01

    The National Task Force on Teacher Education in Physics (T-TEP) concluded its two-year investigation of the professional preparation of teachers of physics in the U.S. T-TEP, formed by APS, AAPT, and AIP, was charged with (a) identifying generalizable, yet flexible, strategies that institutions, and in particular physics departments and schools or colleges of education, can employ to increase the number of qualified physics teachers, (b) identifying effective strategies in recruitment, models of professional preparation, and higher education systems of support during the first three years of teaching, and (c) articulating research, policy, and funding implications. In this talk, the major findings and recommendations of the T-TEP report will be discussed and ways to leverage the report to transform the physics teacher education system will be outlined.

  5. Illinois State University FOCUS Initiative: Civic Engagement and Outreach Projects in the ISU Physics Department

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansher, J. A.; Holland, D. L.; Johns, G. F.; Willmitch, T. R.

    2007-05-01

    The Illinois State University Physics Department has long realized the importance of providing educational outreach opportunities to the wider community. Creating and maintaining community networks with engaging outreach projects helps us broaden the appreciation of physics, as well as encourage young students to consider careers in the sciences. A key aspect of these ISU Physics programs is that we involve our undergraduates in them, thereby fostering civic engagement in the next generation of scientists. This presentation highlights how our department promotes basic science literacy, and awareness of space physics and astronomy through several existing outreach projects. We also describe how we operate under the broader scope of the ISU FOCUS Initiative, and the NASA Solar System Ambassadors program.

  6. Physics and applications of atmospheric nonlinear optics and filamentation.

    PubMed

    Kasparian, Jérôme; Wolf, Jean-Pierre

    2008-01-07

    We review the properties and applications of ultrashort laser pulses in the atmosphere, with a particular focus on filamentation. Filamentation is a non-linear propagation regime specific of ultrashort and ultraintense laser pulses in the atmosphere. Typical applications include remote sensing of atmospheric gases and aerosols, lightning control, laser-induced spectroscopy, coherent anti-stokes Raman scattering, and the generation of sub-THz radiation.

  7. Physics and medical applications of cold atmospheric plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keidar, Michael

    2013-09-01

    Recent progress in atmospheric plasmas led to the creation of cold plasmas with ion temperature close to room temperature. Varieties of novel plasma diagnostic techniques were applied in a quest to understand physics of cold plasmas. In particular it was established that the streamer head charge is about 108 electrons, the electrical field in the head vicinity is about 107 V/m, and the electron density of the streamer column is about 1019 m3. We have demonstrated the efficacy of cold plasma in a pre-clinical model of various cancer types (lung, bladder, breast, head, neck, brain and skin). Both in-vitro andin-vivo studies revealed that cold plasmas selectively kill cancer cells. We showed that: (a) cold plasma application selectively eradicates cancer cells in vitro without damaging normal cells. (b) Significantly reduced tumor size in vivo. Cold plasma treatment led to tumor ablation with neighbouring tumors unaffected. These experiments were performed on more than 10 mice with the same outcome. We found that tumors of about 5mm in diameter were ablated after 2 min of single time plasma treatment. The two best known cold plasma effects, plasma-induced apoptosis and the decrease of cell migration velocity can have important implications in cancer treatment by localizing the affected area of the tissue and by decreasing metastasic development. In addition, cold plasma treatment has affected the cell cycle of cancer cells. In particular, cold plasmainduces a 2-fold increase in cells at the G2/M-checkpoint in both papilloma and carcinoma cells at ~24 hours after treatment, while normal epithelial cells (WTK) did not show significant differences. It was shown that reactive oxygen species metabolism and oxidative stress responsive genes are deregulated. We investigated the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) with cold plasma treatment as a potential mechanism for the tumor ablation observed.

  8. Roster of Physics Departments with Enrollment and Degree Data, 2001. AIP Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholson, Starr; Mulvey, Patrick J.

    This roster contains detailed data from the annual Survey of Enrollments and Degrees conducted in the 2001-2002 academic year. The roster contains data reported by physics departments in the United States for their 2000-2001 introductory course enrollments, 2000-2001 degrees, and fall 2001 undergraduate major and graduate student enrollments. Of…

  9. Narrative Accounts of US Teachers' Collaborative Curriculum Making in a Physical Education Department

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    You, JeongAe; Craig, Cheryl J.

    2015-01-01

    Through the use of narrative inquiry, this research study explores the collaborative curriculum making experiences of six teachers (three males; three females) in one physical education (PE) department in an urban middle school in the U.S. Collaboration; as defined in this work, this has to do with teachers' voluntary interactions and their shared…

  10. Final Report: High Energy Physics Program (HEP), Physics Department, Princeton University

    SciTech Connect

    Callan, Curtis G.; Gubser, Steven S.; Marlow, Daniel R.; McDonald, Kirk T.; Meyers, Peter D.; Olsen, James D.; Smith, Arthur J.S.; Steinhardt, Paul J.; Tully, Christopher G.; Stickland, David P.

    2013-04-30

    The activities of the Princeton Elementary particles group funded through Department of Energy Grant# DEFG02-91 ER40671 during the period October 1, 1991 through January 31, 2013 are summarized. These activities include experiments performed at Brookhaven National Lab; the CERN Lab in Geneva, Switzerland; Fermilab; KEK in Tsukuba City, Japan; the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center; as well as extensive experimental and the- oretical studies conducted on the campus of Princeton University. Funded senior personnel include: Curtis Callan, Stephen Gubser, Valerie Halyo, Daniel Marlow, Kirk McDonald, Pe- ter Meyers, James Olsen, Pierre Pirou e, Eric Prebys, A.J. Stewart Smith, Frank Shoemaker (deceased), Paul Steinhardt, David Stickland, Christopher Tully, and Liantao Wang.

  11. Managing a Basic Unit Responsible for a Basic Discipline: The Physics Department at the Technical University, Aachen.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felderhof, B. U.

    1983-01-01

    The administrative structure of the physics department in a major European technical university is described, particularly with regard to the organization of teaching and research functions. The department is subdivided into an institute of theoretical physics and several institutes of experimental physics, with a more important subdivision into…

  12. Improving Throughput of the ACME Climate Model by Parallel Splitting Atmospheric Physics and Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldwell, P.; Taylor, M.

    2015-12-01

    If fluid dynamics and atmospheric physics parameterizations were computed in parallel, they could be calculated simultaneously on separate cores of a supercomputer. This would greatly increase model throughput for high-resolution simulations. Additionally, because atmospheric physics is embarrassingly parallel, more sophisticated physics parameterizations could be used without slowing simulations down by simply increasing the number of cores used. The downside to this approach is that it increases time-truncation error. In this presentation, we demonstrate that parallel splitting the ACME model and using a smaller timestep for physics results in faster, more accurate solutions.

  13. Physical modeling of the atmospheric boundary layer in the UNH Flow Physics Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor-Power, Gregory; Gilooly, Stephanie; Wosnik, Martin; Klewicki, Joe; Turner, John

    2016-11-01

    The Flow Physics Facility (FPF) at UNH has test section dimensions W =6.0m, H =2.7m, L =72m. It can achieve high Reynolds number boundary layers, enabling turbulent boundary layer, wind energy and wind engineering research with exceptional spatial and temporal instrument resolution. We examined the FPF's ability to experimentally simulate different types of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) using upstream roughness arrays. The American Society for Civil Engineers defines standards for simulating ABLs for different terrain types, from open sea to dense city areas (ASCE 49-12). The standards require the boundary layer to match a power law shape, roughness height, and power spectral density criteria. Each boundary layer type has a corresponding power law exponent and roughness height. The exponent and roughness height both increase with increasing roughness. A suburban boundary layer was chosen for simulation and a roughness element fetch was created. Several fetch lengths were experimented with and the resulting boundary layers were measured and compared to standards in ASCE 49-12: Wind Tunnel Testing for Buildings and Other Structures. Pitot tube and hot wire anemometers were used to measure average and fluctuating flow characteristics. Velocity profiles, turbulence intensity and velocity spectra were found to compare favorably.

  14. Physical design correlates of efficiency and safety in emergency departments: a qualitative examination.

    PubMed

    Pati, Debajyoti; Harvey, Thomas E; Pati, Sipra

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to explore and identify physical design correlates of safety and efficiency in emergency department (ED) operations. This study adopted an exploratory, multimeasure approach to (1) examine the interactions between ED operations and physical design at 4 sites and (2) identify domains of physical design decision-making that potentially influence efficiency and safety. Multidisciplinary gaming and semistructured interviews were conducted with stakeholders at each site. Study data suggest that 16 domains of physical design decisions influence safety, efficiency, or both. These include (1) entrance and patient waiting, (2) traffic management, (3) subwaiting or internal waiting areas, (4) triage, (5) examination/treatment area configuration, (6) examination/treatment area centralization versus decentralization, (7) examination/treatment room standardization, (8) adequate space, (9) nurse work space, (10) physician work space, (11) adjacencies and access, (12) equipment room, (13) psych room, (14) staff de-stressing room, (15) hallway width, and (16) results waiting area. Safety and efficiency from a physical environment perspective in ED design are mutually reinforcing concepts--enhancing efficiency bears positive implications for safety. Furthermore, safety and security emerged as correlated concepts, with security issues bearing implications for safety, thereby suggesting important associations between safety, security, and efficiency.

  15. Vapor chambers for an atmospheric cloud physics laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleischman, G. L.; Scollon, T. R., Jr.; Loose, J. D.

    1980-01-01

    The methanol/stainless steel vapor chambers (flat-plate heat pipes) discussed in this paper were developed for use in spaceborne atmospheric cloud chambers. This application imposed stringent thermal and mechanical requirements on the design. Flatness, low thermal mass, vibration, and structural integrity requirements were achieved in addition to precision temperature uniformity and thermal transport. Heat transfer coefficients on the order of 0.34 to 0.40 W/sq cm -C were measured. The vapor chambers are capable of transporting 170 W-cm per cm of width in either the axial or side-to-side direction.

  16. Cognitive-based approach in teaching 1st year Physics for Life Sciences, including Atmospheric Physics and Climate Change components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petelina, S. V.

    2009-12-01

    Most 1st year students who take the service course in Physics - Physics for Life Sciences - in Australia encounter numerous problems caused by such factors as no previous experience with this subject; general perception that Physics is hard and only very gifted people are able to understand it; lack of knowledge of elementary mathematics; difficulties encountered by lecturers in teaching university level Physics to a class of nearly 200 students with no prior experience, diverse and sometime disadvantageous backgrounds, different majoring areas, and different learning abilities. As a result, many students either drop, or fail the subject. In addition, many of those who pass develop a huge dislike towards Physics, consider the whole experience as time wasted, and spread this opinion among their peers and friends. The above issues were addressed by introducing numerous changes to the curriculum and modifying strategies and approaches in teaching Physics for Life Sciences. Instead of a conventional approach - teaching Physics from simple to complicated, topic after topic, the students were placed in the world of Physics in the same way as a newborn child is introduced to this world - everything is seen all the time and everywhere. That created a unique environment where a bigger picture and all details were always present and interrelated. Numerous concepts of classical and modern physics were discussed, compared, and interconnected all the time with “Light” being a key component. Our primary field of research is Atmospheric Physics, in particular studying the atmospheric composition and structure using various satellite and ground-based data. With this expertise and also inspired by an increasing importance of training a scientifically educated generation who understands the challenges of the modern society and responsibilities that come with wealth, a new section on environmental physics has been developed. It included atmospheric processes and the greenhouse

  17. Scientific Method in Teaching Physics in Languages and Social Sciences Department of High—Schools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagl, Mirko G.; Obadović, Dušanka Ž.; Stojanović, Maja M.

    2010-01-01

    The expansion of scientific materials in the last few decades, demands that the contemporary educational system should select and develop methods of effective learning in the process of acquiring skills and knowledge usable and feasible for a longer period of time. Grammar schools as general educational institutions possess all that is necessary for the development of new teaching methods and fitting into contemporary social tendencies. In the languages and social sciences department in of grammar schools physics is the only natural sciences subject present during all four years. The classical approach to teaching is tiring as such and creates aversion towards learning physic when it deals with pupils oriented towards social sciences. The introduction of scientific methods raises the motivation to a substantial level and when applied both the teacher and pupils forget when the class starts or ends. The assignment has shown the analysis of initial knowledge of physics of the pupils attending the first grade of languages and social sciences department of of grammar schools as a preparation for the introduction of the scientific method, the analysis of the initial test with the topic of gravitation, as well as the analysis of the final test after applying the scientific method through the topic of gravitation. The introduction of the scientific method has duly justified the expectations and resulted in increasing the level of achievement among the pupils in the experimental class.

  18. Understanding the Oldest White Dwarfs: Atmospheres of Cool WDs as Extreme Physics Laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, Piotr M.

    2010-11-01

    Reliable modeling of the atmospheres of cool white dwarfs is crucial for understanding the atmospheric evolution of these stars and for accurate white dwarfs cosmochronology. Over the last decade ab initio modeling entered many research fields and has been successful in predicting properties of various materials under extreme conditions. In many cases the investigated physical regimes are difficult or even impossible to access by experimental methods, and first principles quantum mechanical calculations are the only tools available for investigation. Using modern methods of computational chemistry and physics we investigate the atmospheres of helium-rich, old white dwarfs. Such atmospheres reach extreme, fluid like densities (up to grams per cm3) and represent an excellent laboratory for high temperature and pressure physics and chemistry. We show our results for the stability and opacity of H- and C2 in dense helium and the implications of our work for understanding cool white dwarfs.

  19. Theory of planetary atmospheres: an introduction to their physics and chemistry /2nd revised and enlarged edition/

    SciTech Connect

    Chamberlain, J.W.; Hunten, D.M.

    1987-01-01

    Theoretical models of planetary atmospheres are characterized in an introductory text intended for graduate physics students and practicing scientists. Chapters are devoted to the vertical structure of an atmosphere; atmospheric hydrodynamics; the chemistry and dynamics of the earth stratosphere; planetary astronomy; ionospheres; airglows, auroras, and aeronomy; and the stability of planetary atmospheres. Extensive graphs, diagrams, and tables of numerical data are provided.

  20. Development of an Easy-to-Use Tool for the Assessment of Emergency Department Physical Design

    PubMed Central

    Majidi, Alireza; Tabatabaey, Ali; Motamed, Hassan; Motamedi, Maryam; Forouzanfar, Mohammad Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    Physical design of the emergency department (ED) has an important effect on its role and function. To date, no guidelines have been introduced to set the standards for the construction of EDs in Iran. In this study, we aim to devise an easy-to-use tool based on the available literature and expert opinion for the quick and effective assessment of EDs in regards to their physical design. For this purpose, based on current literature on emergency design, a comprehensive checklist was developed. Then, this checklist was analyzed by a panel consisting of heads of three major EDs and contradicting items were decided. 178 crude items were derived from available literature. The Items were categorized in to three major domains of Physical space, Equipment, and Accessibility. The final checklist approved by the panel consisted of 163 items categorized into six domains. Each item was phrased as a “Yes or No” question for ease of analysis, meaning that the criterion is either met or not. PMID:26495348

  1. Control technology for radioactive emissions to the atmosphere at US Department of Energy facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, E.B.

    1984-10-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide information to the US Environmental Protection agency (EPA) on existing technology for the control of radionuclide emissions into the air from US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, and to provide EPA with information on possible additional control technologies that could be used to further reduce these emissions. Included in this report are generic discussions of emission control technologies for particulates, iodine, rare gases, and tritium. Also included are specific discussions of existing emission control technologies at 25 DOE facilities. Potential additional emission control technologies are discussed for 14 of these facilities. The facilities discussed were selected by EPA on the basis of preliminary radiation pathway analyses. 170 references, 131 figures, 104 tables.

  2. Influence of atmospheric states in semi-arid areas on hospital admission in cardio-surgical department.

    PubMed

    Yackerson, Naomy S; Zilberman, Arkadi; Aizenberg, Alexander

    2017-04-01

    The influence of the changes in atmospheric state, typical for areas close to big deserts, on acute myocardial infarction (AMI) was analyzed. Under test was the group of 3256 patients (77 % males, 23 % females), hospitalized in the Cardio-Surgical Department of Soroka Medical Center at Ben-Gurion University (BGU, Israel) during 2000-2008. To explore the relationship between atmospheric parameters and AMI, multivariate regression analysis has been performed. AMI was most frequent in winter to spring and least in summer. The highest number of cases was recorded in December and the lowest in September. Hospital admissions showed a higher prevalence in men than in women; the ratio is 3.3/1.0. About 60 % of males were aged between 45 and 65 years old with maximum ∼55 (21 %), whereas 60 % of women hospital admissions were aged between 65 and 80 years old with maximum ∼72 (24 %). The result suggested that the monthly mean relative humidity at daytime and its overall daily differences, wind speed, and respirable fraction of particulate concentration are associated with the admission for AMI. The results of the study confirm the importance of atmospheric state variability for cardiovascular diseases.

  3. Influence of atmospheric states in semi-arid areas on hospital admission in cardio-surgical department

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yackerson, Naomy S.; Zilberman, Arkadi; Aizenberg, Alexander

    2016-10-01

    The influence of the changes in atmospheric state, typical for areas close to big deserts, on acute myocardial infarction (AMI) was analyzed. Under test was the group of 3256 patients (77 % males, 23 % females), hospitalized in the Cardio-Surgical Department of Soroka Medical Center at Ben-Gurion University (BGU, Israel) during 2000-2008. To explore the relationship between atmospheric parameters and AMI, multivariate regression analysis has been performed. AMI was most frequent in winter to spring and least in summer. The highest number of cases was recorded in December and the lowest in September. Hospital admissions showed a higher prevalence in men than in women; the ratio is 3.3/1.0. About 60 % of males were aged between 45 and 65 years old with maximum ˜55 (21 %), whereas 60 % of women hospital admissions were aged between 65 and 80 years old with maximum ˜72 (24 %). The result suggested that the monthly mean relative humidity at daytime and its overall daily differences, wind speed, and respirable fraction of particulate concentration are associated with the admission for AMI. The results of the study confirm the importance of atmospheric state variability for cardiovascular diseases.

  4. Some current themes in physical hydrology of the land-atmosphere interface

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Milly, P.C.D.

    1991-01-01

    Certain themes arise repeatedly in current literature dealing with the physical hydrology of the interface between the atmosphere and the continents. Papers contributed to the 1991 International Association of Hydrological Sciences Symposium on Hydrological Interactions between Atmosphere, Soil and Vegetation echo these themes, which are discussed in this paper. The land-atmosphere interface is the region where atmosphere, soil, and vegetation have mutual physical contact, and a description of exchanges of matter or energy among these domains must often consider the physical properties and states of the entire system. A difficult family of problems is associated with the reconciliation of the wide range of spatial scales that arise in the course of observational, theoretical, and modeling activities. These scales are determined by some of the physical elements of the interface, by patterns of natural variability of the physical composition of the interface, by the dynamics of the processes at the interface, and by methods of measurement and computation. Global environmental problems are seen by many hydrologists as a major driving force for development of the science. The challenge for hydrologists will be to respond to this force as scientists rather than problem-solvers.

  5. Pyroelectric Crystal Accelerator In The Department Of Physics And Nuclear Engineering At West Point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillich, Don; Shannon, Mike; Kovanen, Andrew; Anderson, Tom; Bright, Kevin; Edwards, Ronald; Danon, Yaron; Moretti, Brian; Musk, Jeffrey

    2011-06-01

    The Nuclear Science and Engineering Research Center (NSERC), a Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) office located at the United States Military Academy (USMA), sponsors and manages cadet and faculty research in support of DTRA objectives. The NSERC has created an experimental pyroelectric crystal accelerator program to enhance undergraduate education at USMA in the Department of Physics and Nuclear Engineering. This program provides cadets with hands-on experience in designing their own experiments using an inexpensive tabletop accelerator. This device uses pyroelectric crystals to ionize and accelerate gas ions to energies of ˜100 keV. Within the next year, cadets and faculty at USMA will use this device to create neutrons through the deuterium-deuterium (D-D) fusion process, effectively creating a compact, portable neutron generator. The double crystal pyroelectric accelerator will also be used by students to investigate neutron, x-ray, and ion spectroscopy.

  6. Forum: What Has Actually Changed in Physics Departments in the Situation for Women, Graduate Students and Other People?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulvey, Patrick; Ivie, Rachel; Campbell, David; Murnane, Margaret; Kirby, Kate; Catlla, Anne

    2006-03-01

    The decade of the 90's was a period of intense scrutiny of climate issues in physics departments, e.g. the status of women, the job situation for new Ph.D.'s and postdocs, and the preparation of physicists for careers inside and outside of physics. There were many conference sessions on these topics, and both APS members and leadership instigated important efforts to focus on specific areas. These efforts included the program of visiting committees to departments to examine the situation for women by the Committee on the Status of Women in Physics, the AIP's various studies of a statistical nature, and the creation by the APS of a Committee on Careers and the Forum on Graduate Student Affairs, as well as the recent APS-AAPT task force on graduate education. This forum patterned after similar sessions 10 years ago - will examine how physics departments have changed as a result of such efforts. It will begin with short (12-minute) talks by a panel of experts to describe what has happened in key areas. The greater part of the session will be a period of observations, questions, and discussion from the audience and the panel together. The purpose is to have an interchange on these interrelated topics from which we can all learn. THE TOPICS TO BE INTRODUCED IN THE SHORT TALKS AT THE BEGINNING OF THE SESSION ARE: 1) changes in graduate enrollment, composition, and subsequent jobs (Patrick Mulvey); 2) women in physics and astronomy departments 2005 (Rachel Ivie); 3) changes in graduate curricula and environment (David Campbell); 4) CSWP site visits to physics departments what’s been accomplished and learned (Margaret Murnane); 5) survey of ethical issues in physics departments and the physics profession: results and reactions (Kate Kirby); and (6) physics departments from the point of view of younger physicists (Anne Catlla). The bulk of the session will be a public forum, on these and related issues, among the audience and the panel.

  7. The space shuttle payload planning working groups. Volume 2: Atmospheric and space physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The findings of the Atmospheric and Space Physics working group of the space shuttle mission planning activity are presented. The principal objectives defined by the group are: (1) to investigate the detailed mechanisms which control the near-space environment of the earth, (2) to perform plasma physics investigations not feasible in ground-based laboratories, and (3) to conduct investigations which are important in understanding planetary and cometary phenomena. The core instrumentation and laboratory configurations for conducting the investigations are defined.

  8. Atmospheric effects in astroparticle physics experiments and the challenge of ever greater precision in measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louedec, Karim

    2015-01-01

    Astroparticle physics and cosmology allow us to scan the universe through multiple messengers. It is the combination of these probes that improves our understanding of the universe, both in its composition and its dynamics. Unlike other areas in science, research in astroparticle physics has a real originality in detection techniques, in infrastructure locations, and in the observed physical phenomenon that is not created directly by humans. It is these features that make the minimisation of statistical and systematic errors a perpetual challenge. In all these projects, the environment is turned into a detector medium or a target. The atmosphere is probably the environment component the most common in astroparticle physics and requires a continuous monitoring of its properties to minimise as much as possible the systematic uncertainties associated. This paper introduces the different atmospheric effects to take into account in astroparticle physics measurements and provides a non-exhaustive list of techniques and instruments to monitor the different elements composing the atmosphere. A discussion on the close link between astroparticle physics and Earth sciences ends this paper.

  9. Relationships among Teachers' Self-Efficacy and Students' Motivation, Atmosphere, and Satisfaction in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pan, Yi-Hsiang

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to confirm the relationships among teachers' self-efficacy, and students' learning motivation, learning atmosphere, and learning satisfaction in senior high school physical education (PE). A sample of 462 PE teachers and 2681 students was drawn using stratified random sampling and cluster sampling from high schools in…

  10. Efficient physics-based predictive 3D image modeling and simulation of optical atmospheric refraction phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinhardt, Colin N.; Hammel, Stephen M.; Tsintikidis, Dimitris

    2016-09-01

    We present some preliminary results and discussion of our ongoing effort to develop a prototype volumetric atmospheric optical refraction simulator which uses 3D nonlinear ray-tracing and state-of-art physics-based rendering techniques. The tool will allow simulation of optical curved-ray propagation through nonlinear refractivity gradient profiles in volumetric atmospheric participating media, and the generation of radiometrically accurate images of the resulting atmospheric refraction phenomena, including inferior and superior mirages, over-the-horizon viewing conditions, looming and sinking, towering and stooping of distant objects. The ability to accurately model and predict atmospheric optical refraction conditions and phenomena is important in both defense and commercial applications. Our nonlinear refractive ray-trace method is currently CPU-parallelized and is well-suited for GPU compute implementation.

  11. Verochka Zingan or recollections from the Physics Department of the Moscow University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaina, Alex; Gaina, Danielle A.

    The author recollects his studentship during 70-th years at the Physics Department of the Moscow University. He was graduated from the theoretical Physics Department in 1977. The Rectors of the University that times were I.G. Petrovskii, R.V. Khokhlov and A.A. Logunov. The dean of the Physics Department was V.S. Fursov. As a particular event a meet with the former prime-minister of the USSR A.N. Kosygin is reported. Between professors mentioned throughout the recollections are A.I.Kitaigorodskii, Ya. B. Zel'dovich, D.D. Ivanenko, A.A. Sokolov, A.A. Vlasov, V.B. Braginsky, I.M. Ternov, L.A. Artsimovich, E.P. Velikhov and other, including that which became University professors later. A great number of colleagues from the Physics, Chemistry, Phylological and Historical Departments of the Moscow University are mentioned. Particularly, the students which entered the group 113 in 1971 and finished the group 601 in 1977 are listed. The recollections include 5 parts. Persons cited throughout the paper: A.N. Kosygin, A.S. Golovin, V. Kostyukevich, I.M. Ternov, E.G. Pozdnyak, A. N. Matveev, V.P. Elyutin, V.V. Kerzhentsev, 113 academic group (1971), V. Topala, E.A. Marinchuk, P.Paduraru, A.I. Kitaygorodski, A. Leahu, S. Berzan, B. Ursu, I. Coanda (Koade), M. Stefanovici, O. Bulgaru, A. Iurie-Apostol, A.S. Davydov, M.I. Kaganov, I.M. Lifshitz, Ya. B. Zel'dovich, A.Zhukov, A.I. Buzdin, N.S. Perov, V. Dolgov, P. Vabishchevich, A.A. Samarskii, V. Makarov, Irina Kamenskih, A.A. Arsen'ev, L.A. Artsimovich, A.A. Tyapkin, B.M. Pontecorvo, D.I. Blokhintsev, I.G. Petrovskii, R.V. Khokhlov, V.N. Rudenko, A.A. Sokolov, D.D. Ivanenko (Iwanenko), A.A. Vlasov, V.N. Ponomarev, N.N. Bogolyubov, N.N. Bogolyubov (Jr), V.Ch. Zhukovskii, Tamara Tarasova, Zarina Radzhabova (Malovekova), V.Malovekov, Tatiana Shmeleva, Alexandra C.Nicolescu, Tatiana Nicolescu, Rano Mahkamova, Miriam Yandieva, Natalia Germaniuk (Grigor'eva), E. Grigor'ev, A. Putro, Elena Nikiforova, B. Kostrykin, Galia Laufer, K

  12. The Four-Year Investigation of Physical and Physiological Features of Students in a Physical Education and Sports Department

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ocak, Yucel

    2016-01-01

    Problem Statement: Student candidates who want to be a Physical Education Teacher in Turkey should take special ability exams of Physical Education and Sports Schools. In this exam, it is required to have a high physical capability apart from a high level of special branch skills. For this reason, the students who pass and start their education at…

  13. On the physics of waves in the solar atmosphere: Wave heating and wind acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musielak, Z. E.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents work performed on the generation and physics of acoustic waves in the solar atmosphere. The investigators have incorporated spatial and temporal turbulent energy spectra in a newly corrected version of the Lighthill-Stein theory of acoustic wave generation in order to calculate the acoustic wave energy fluxes generated in the solar convective zone. The investigators have also revised and improved the treatment of the generation of magnetic flux tube waves, which can carry energy along the tubes far away from the region of their origin, and have calculated the tube energy fluxes for the sun. They also examine the transfer of the wave energy originated in the solar convective zone to the outer atmospheric layers through computation of wave propagation and dissipation in highly nonhomogeneous solar atmosphere. These waves may efficiently heat the solar atmosphere and the heating will be especially significant in the chromospheric network. It is also shown that the role played by Alfven waves in solar wind acceleration and coronal hole heating is dominant. The second part of the project concerned investigation of wave propagation in highly inhomogeneous stellar atmospheres using an approach based on an analytic tool developed by Musielak, Fontenla, and Moore. In addition, a new technique based on Dirac equations has been developed to investigate coupling between different MHD waves propagating in stratified stellar atmospheres.

  14. On the physics of waves in the solar atmosphere: Wave heating and wind acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musielak, Z. E.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents work performed on the generation and physics of acoustic waves in the solar atmosphere. The investigators have incorporated spatial and temporal turbulent energy spectra in a newly corrected version of the Lighthill-Stein theory of acoustic wave generation in order to calculate the acoustic wave energy fluxes generated in the solar convective zone. The investigators have also revised and improved the treatment of the generation of magnetic flux tube waves, which can carry energy along the tubes far away from the region of their origin, and have calculated the tube wave energy fluxes for the sun. They also examine the transfer of the wave energy originated in the solar convective zone to the outer atmospheric layers through computation of wave propagation and dissipation in highly nonhomogeneous solar atmosphere. These waves may efficiently heat the solar atmosphere and the heating will be especially significant in the chromospheric network. It is also shown that the role played by Alfven waves in solar wind acceleration and coronal hole heating is dominant. The second part of the project concerned investigation of wave propagation in highly inhomogeneous stellar atmospheres using an approach based on an analytic tool developed by Musielak, Fontenla, and Moore. In addition, a new technique based on Dirac equations has been developed to investigate coupling between different MHD waves propagating in stratified stellar atmospheres.

  15. Design evaluations for a flight cloud physics holocamera. [holographic/photographic camera for low-g Atmospheric Cloud Physics Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, W. W., Jr.; Kurtz, R. L.; Lemons, J. F.

    1976-01-01

    The paper describes a holographic/photographic camera to be used with the zero-g or low-g Atmospheric Cloud Physics Laboratory. The flight prototype holocamera is intended to record particles from 0.01 to 5 microns for an optimum two-dimensional plane only in the microscopic photography mode, particles on a volume basis in the in-line holography mode from 5 microns up, and all particle sizes possible on a volume basis in the acute sideband holography mode.

  16. Julius Elster and Hans Geitel - Dioscuri of physics and pioneer investigators in atmospheric electricity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fricke, Rudolf G. A.; Schlegel, Kristian

    2017-01-01

    Julius Elster and Hans Geitel contributed to the physics at the turn of the 19-20th century in many ways. We first summarize the life of these exceptional scientists. Then - owing to the topic of this journal - we focus on their atmospheric electricity research. With their experiments, careful evaluations and ingenious interpretation, Elster and Geitel made important contributions to precipitation electricity, the influence of solar radiation on the electric state of the atmosphere, the nature of charge carriers and the ionization of air by radioactivity. They proved their experimental skills by inventing new instruments with unprecedented accuracy and reliability. A very modern concept was their attitude to undertake long-term measurements at various locations. A section on their recognition in the physics community and their scientific distinctions concludes the paper.

  17. Development and Application of A Coupled Land-Atmosphere Modeling Framework with Multi-Physics Options

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Z.; Niu, G.; Jiang, X.

    2009-12-01

    In this paper we develop a single integrated mesoscale meteorological modeling framework that intimately couples a land surface model and an atmospheric model, both of which are equipped with multi-parameterization options. This framework should enable process-based ensemble weather predictions, identification of optimal combinations of process parameterization schemes, identification of critical processes controlling the coupling strength between the land surface and the atmosphere, and quantification of uncertainties in using regional meteorological models to extract high-resolution climate information for policy decision making. We build on the existing Weather, Research and Forecasting (WRF) atmospheric model, which already has multiple parameterization options for atmospheric processes such as convection, radiation, planetary boundary layer, and microphysics. One of our key model development efforts is to couple the WRF model with our newly developed, ensemble representation of the land surface, i.e., the Noah land surface model that was first enhanced with biophysical and hydrological realism and then equipped with multi-parameterization options (Noah-MP) for a wide spectrum of physical and ecological processes. The Noah-MP LSM is capable of generating thousands of process-based combinations of land surface parameterization schemes as opposed to the traditional approach (e.g. BATS, SiB or VIC) that utilizes only a single combination. Offline Noah-MP tests show a great potential of the model in ensemble hydrological predictions. We perform an analysis of the sensitivity to different parameterizations over the conterminous United States using the single integrated mesoscale modeling framework described above. To prove the concept, we present an ensemble of multi-day integrations using the model at 30-km resolution with varying physical representations for both the land surface (runoff process) and the atmosphere (convective process). The lateral boundary

  18. Physical therapy in critically ill adult patients: recommendations from the Brazilian Association of Intensive Care Medicine Department of Physical Therapy.

    PubMed

    França, Eduardo Ériko Tenório de; Ferrari, Francimar; Fernandes, Patrícia; Cavalcanti, Renata; Duarte, Antonio; Martinez, Bruno Prata; Aquim, Esperidião Elias; Damasceno, Marta Cristina Paulete

    2012-03-01

    Complications from immobility in intensive care unit patients contribute to functional decline, increased healthcare costs, reduced quality of life and higher post-discharge mortality. Physical therapy focuses on promoting recovery and preserving function, and it may minimize the impact of these complications. A group of Brazilian Association of Intensive Care Medicine physical therapy experts developed this document that contains minimal physical therapy recommendations appropriate to the Brazilian real-world clinical situation. Prevention and treatment of atelectasis, procedures related to the removal of secretions and treatment of conditions related to physical deconditioning and functional decline are discussed. Equally important is the consideration that prescribing and executing activities, mobilizations and exercises are roles of the physical therapist, whose diagnosis should precede any intervention.

  19. Effects of sintering atmosphere on the physical and mechanical properties of modified BOF slag glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Wen-bin; Li, Yu; Cang, Da-qiang; Zhou, Yuan-yuan; Fan, Yong

    2014-05-01

    This study proposes an efficient way to utilize all the chemical components of the basic oxygen furnace (BOF) slag to prepare high value-added glass-ceramics. A molten modified BOF slag was converted from the melting BOF slag by reducing it and separating out iron component in it, and the modified BOF slag was then quenched in water to form glasses with different basicities. The glasses were subsequently sintered in the temperature range of 600-1000°C in air or nitrogen atmosphere for 1 h. The effects of different atmospheres on the physical and mechanical properties of sintered samples were studied by using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and by conducting experiment on evaluating the sintering shrinkage, water absorption and bulk density. It is found that the kinetics of the sintering process is significantly affected by sintering atmosphere. In particular, compared with sintering in air atmosphere, sintering in N2 atmosphere promotes the synergistic growth of pyroxene and melilite crystalline phases, which can contribute to better mechanical properties and denser microstructure.

  20. Putting Physics First: Three Case Studies of High School Science Department and Course Sequence Reorganization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larkin, Douglas B.

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the process of shifting to a "Physics First" sequence in science course offerings in three school districts in the United States. This curricular sequence reverses the more common U.S. high school sequence of biology/chemistry/physics, and has gained substantial support in the physics education community over the…

  1. The Use of Computer Competencies of Students in the Departments of Physical Education and Sport Teaching, and School Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okan, Ilyas

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to reveal the levels of the use of computer, which is nowadays one of the most important technologies, of teacher candidate studying in the departments of Physical Education and Sport Teaching, and School teaching; also aims to research whether there is differences according to various criteria or not. In research, data were…

  2. Investigations on physics of planetary atmospheres and small bodies of the Solar system, extrasolar planets and disk structures around the stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidmachenko, A. P.; Delets, O. S.; Dlugach, J. M.; Zakhozhay, O. V.; Kostogryz, N. M.; Krushevska, V. M.; Kuznyetsova, Y. G.; Morozhenko, O. V.; Nevodovskyi, P. V.; Ovsak, O. S.; Rozenbush, O. E.; Romanyuk, Ya. O.; Shavlovskiy, V. I.; Yanovitskij, E. G.

    2015-12-01

    The history and main becoming stages of Planetary system physics Department of the Main astronomical observatory of National academy of Sciences of Ukraine are considered. Fundamental subjects of department researches and science achievements of employees are presented. Fields of theoretical and experimental researches are Solar system planets and their satellites; vertical structures of planet atmospheres; radiative transfer in planet atmospheres; exoplanet systems of Milky Way; stars having disc structures; astronomical engineering. Employees of the department carry out spectral, photometrical and polarimetrical observations of Solar system planets, exoplanet systems and stars with disc structures. 1. From the history of department 2. The main directions of department research 3. Scientific instrumentation 4. Telescopes and observation stations 5. Theoretical studies 6. The results of observations of planets and small Solar system bodies and their interpretation 7. The study of exoplanets around the stars of our galaxy 8. Spectral energy distribution of fragmenting protostellar disks 9. Cooperation with the National Technical University of Ukraine (KPI) and National University of Ukraine "Lviv Polytechnic" to study the impact of stratospheric aerosol changes on weather and climate of the Earth 10. International relations. Scientific and organizational work. Scientific conferences, congresses, symposia 11. The main achievements of the department 12. Current researches 13. Anniversaries and awards

  3. Feasibility study of a zero-gravity (orbital) atmospheric cloud physics experiments laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollinden, A. B.; Eaton, L. R.

    1972-01-01

    A feasibility and concepts study for a zero-gravity (orbital) atmospheric cloud physics experiment laboratory is discussed. The primary objective was to define a set of cloud physics experiments which will benefit from the near zero-gravity environment of an orbiting spacecraft, identify merits of this environment relative to those of groundbased laboratory facilities, and identify conceptual approaches for the accomplishment of the experiments in an orbiting spacecraft. Solicitation, classification and review of cloud physics experiments for which the advantages of a near zero-gravity environment are evident are described. Identification of experiments for potential early flight opportunities is provided. Several significant accomplishments achieved during the course of this study are presented.

  4. Fundamental Distinctions in Physics underlying Nonsteady Forcings of Wind Turbine Power vs. Drivetrain by Atmospheric Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brasseur, James; Lavely, Adam; Nandi, Tarak

    2016-11-01

    Whereas the primary function of a wind turbine (WT) is the generation of electricity, wind farm profitability is decreased both by integrated losses in power and increases in premature failures of drivetrain components resulting from energetic nonsteady aerodynamic forcings of WT rotors by atmospheric and wake turbulence. Here we contrast the physics underlying dominant nonsteady atmospheric turbulence forcings of the bending moments in the WT rotor plane (torque/power) vs. the out-of-plane bending moments (OPBM) that underlie premature drivetrain component failure. Using an advanced actuator line model of the 5 MW NREL and the 1.5 MW GE wind turbine rotors embedded within a high-fidelity spectral LES of a typical daytime convective atmospheric boundary layer, we show that (1) the physics underlying large torque vs. OBPM fluctuations are associated with fundamentally different turbulence eddy characteristics and (2) nonsteady response centers on 4 characteristic time scales associated advection of eddies and load response of blades cutting through internal turbulence eddy structure. Supported by DOE. Computer resources by NSF/XSEDE.

  5. Determination of the atmospheric neutrino flux and searches for new physics with AMANDA-II

    SciTech Connect

    Abbasi, R.; Andeen, K.; Baker, M.; Berghaus, P.; Boersma, D. J.; Braun, J.; Chirkin, D.; Desiati, P.; Diaz-Velez, J. C.; Dumm, J. P.; Eisch, J.; Finley, C.; Ganugapati, R.; Gladstone, L.; Grullon, S.; Halzen, F.; Hanson, K.; Hill, G. C.; Hoshina, K.; Jacobsen, J.

    2009-05-15

    The AMANDA-II detector, operating since 2000 in the deep ice at the geographic South Pole, has accumulated a large sample of atmospheric muon neutrinos in the 100 GeV to 10 TeV energy range. The zenith angle and energy distribution of these events can be used to search for various phenomenological signatures of quantum gravity in the neutrino sector, such as violation of Lorentz invariance or quantum decoherence. Analyzing a set of 5511 candidate neutrino events collected during 1387 days of livetime from 2000 to 2006, we find no evidence for such effects and set upper limits on violation of Lorentz invariance and quantum decoherence parameters using a maximum likelihood method. Given the absence of evidence for new flavor-changing physics, we use the same methodology to determine the conventional atmospheric muon neutrino flux above 100 GeV.

  6. Determination of the Atmospheric Neutrino Flux and Searches for New Physics with AMANDA-II

    SciTech Connect

    IceCube Collaboration; Klein, Spencer; Collaboration, IceCube

    2009-06-02

    The AMANDA-II detector, operating since 2000 in the deep ice at the geographic South Pole, has accumulated a large sample of atmospheric muon neutrinos in the 100 GeV to 10 TeV energy range. The zenith angle and energy distribution of these events can be used to search for various phenomenological signatures of quantum gravity in the neutrino sector, such as violation of Lorentz invariance (VLI) or quantum decoherence (QD). Analyzing a set of 5511 candidate neutrino events collected during 1387 days of livetime from 2000 to 2006, we find no evidence for such effects and set upper limits on VLI and QD parameters using a maximum likelihood method. Given the absence of evidence for new flavor-changing physics, we use the same methodology to determine the conventional atmospheric muon neutrino flux above 100 GeV.

  7. Turkish community pharmacists’ self-report of their pharmacies’ physical atmosphere

    PubMed Central

    Cagirci, Simge; Yegenoglu, Selen; Uner, Mehmet Mithat

    2012-01-01

    Objective: There is a great recognition that store interiors and exteriors can be designed to create feelings in potential customers which can have an important reinforcing effect on purchase. In this study it is mainly aimed to explore the behaviors of the community pharmacists related to their store's physical environment. Also we aimed to determine whether any difference exist between behaviors of pharmacists serving in high and low socio-economic regions. Methods: A total of 200 pharmacists that work socio-economically different regions were randomly selected from 1424 pharmacists registered in Ankara Chamber of Pharmacists. A uniform questionnaire was applied to the pharmacists by using a face-to-face interview technique. Findings: There are differences in terms of behavior between the pharmacists serving in high and low socio-economic regions within the context of putting importance to their stores’ atmosphere. More pharmacists attach importance to the physical sight of their pharmacy serving in high socio-economic regions (90%) vs. pharmacists in low socio-economic regions (70%). Also pharmacists in high socio-economic regions indicated higher importance level of selection of the decoration equipments (84%) than pharmacists serving in high socio-economic regions (60%). Conclusion: Our study suggests that some pharmacists pay more attention to interior atmospheric elements and others do not. There is a difference in terms of attaching importance to some store atmospheric elements (i.e. physical site, decoration equipment, it's color, wall color, etc.) serving in high versus low socio-economic regions in this context. PMID:24991582

  8. Theoretical studies in medium-energy nuclear and hadronic physics. [Indiana Univ. Nuclear Theory Center and Department of Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Horowitz, C J; Macfarlane, M H; Matsui, T; Serot, B D

    1993-01-01

    A proposal for theoretical nuclear physics research is made for the period April 1, 1993 through March 31, 1996. Research is proposed in the following areas: relativistic many-body theory of nuclei and nuclear matter, quasifree electroweak scattering and strange quarks in nuclei, dynamical effects in (e,e[prime]p) scattering at large momentum transfer, investigating the nucleon's parton sea with polarized leptoproduction, physics of ultrarelativistic nucleus[endash]nucleus collisions, QCD sum rules and hadronic properties, non-relativistic models of nuclear reactions, and spin and color correlations in a quark-exchange model of nuclear matter. Highlights of recent research, vitae of principal investigators, and lists of publications and invited talks are also given. Recent research dealt primarily with medium-energy nuclear physics, relativistic theories of nuclei and the nuclear response, the nuclear equation of state under extreme conditions, the dynamics of the quark[endash]gluon plasma in relativistic heavy-ion collisions, and theories of the nucleon[endash]nucleon force.

  9. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1989 to the DOE (Department of Energy) Office of Energy Research - Part 3: Atmospheric Sciences

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-06-01

    This 1989 Annual Report from Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to the US Department of Energy (DOE) describes research in environment, safety, and health conducted during fiscal year 1989. The report again consists of five parts, each in a separate volume. This volume contains research in the atmospheric sciences. Currently, the broad goals of atmospheric research at PNL are to describe and predict the nature and fate of atmospheric contaminants and to develop an understanding of the atmospheric processes contributing to their distribution on local, regional, continental, and global scales in the air, in clouds, and on the surface. The redistribution and long-range transport of transformed contaminants passing through clouds is recognized as a necessary extension of our research to even larger scales in the future. Eventually, large-scale experiments on cloud processing and redistribution of contaminants will be integrated into the national program on global change, investigating how energy pollutants affect aerosols and clouds and the transfer of radiant energy through them. As the significance of this effect becomes clear, its global impact on climate will be studied through experimental and modeling research. The description of ongoing atmospheric research at PNL is organized in terms of the following study areas: atmospheric studies in complex terrain, large-scale atmospheric transport and processing of emissions, and climate change. This report describes the progress in FY 1989 in each of these areas. A divider page summarizes the goals of each area and lists project titles that support research activities. 9 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Aerosol physical, chemical and optical properties observed in the ambient atmosphere during haze pollution conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhengqiang; Xie, Yisong; Li, Donghui; Li, Kaitao; Zhang, Ying; Li, Li; Lv, Yang; Qie, Lili; Xu, Hua

    Aerosol’s properties in the ambient atmosphere may differ significantly from sampling results due to containing of abundant water content. We performed sun-sky radiometer measurements in Beijing during 2011 and 2012 winter to obtain distribution of spectral and angular sky radiance. The measurements are then used to retrieve aerosol physical, chemical and optical properties, including single scattering albedo, size distribution, complex refractive indices and aerosol component fractions identified as black carbon, brown carbon, mineral dust, ammonium sulfate-like components and water content inside particle matters. We found that during winter haze condition aerosol is dominated by fine particles with center radius of about 0.2 micron. Fine particles contribute about 93% to total aerosol extinction of solar light, and result in serious decrease of atmospheric visibility during haze condition. The percentage of light absorption of haze aerosol can up to about 10% among its total extinction, much higher than that of unpolluted conditions, that causes significant radiative cooling effects suppressing atmospheric convection and dispersion of pollutants. Moreover, the average water content occupies about one third of the ambient aerosol in volume which suggests the important effect of ambient humidity in the formation of haze pollution.

  11. Algorithms and physical parameters involved in the calculation of model stellar atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merlo, D. C.

    This contribution summarizes the Doctoral Thesis presented at Facultad de Matemática, Astronomía y Física, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba for the degree of PhD in Astronomy. We analyze some algorithms and physical parameters involved in the calculation of model stellar atmospheres, such as atomic partition functions, functional relations connecting gaseous and electronic pressure, molecular formation, temperature distribution, chemical compositions, Gaunt factors, atomic cross-sections and scattering sources, as well as computational codes for calculating models. Special attention is paid to the integration of hydrostatic equation. We compare our results with those obtained by other authors, finding reasonable agreement. We make efforts on the implementation of methods that modify the originally adopted temperature distribution in the atmosphere, in order to obtain constant energy flux throughout. We find limitations and we correct numerical instabilities. We integrate the transfer equation solving directly the integral equation involving the source function. As a by-product, we calculate updated atomic partition functions of the light elements. Also, we discuss and enumerate carefully selected formulae for the monochromatic absorption and dispersion of some atomic and molecular species. Finally, we obtain a flexible code to calculate model stellar atmospheres.

  12. Research in experimental elementary particle physics. A proposal to the U.S. Department of Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew P. White; Kaushik De; Paul A. Draper; Ransom Stephens

    1995-04-13

    We report on the activities of the High Energy Physics Group at the University of Texas at Arlington for the period 1994-95. We propose the continuation of the research program for 1996-98 with strong participation in the detector upgrade and physics analysis work for the D0 Experiment at Fermilab, prototyping and pre-production studies for the muon and calorimeter systems for the ATLAS Experiment at CERN, and detector development and simulation studies for the PP2PP Experiment at Brookhaven.

  13. The European Federation of Organisations for Medical Physics policy statement No. 13: recommended guidelines on the development of safety and quality management systems for medical physics departments.

    PubMed

    Christofides, Stelios

    2009-12-01

    This EFOMP Policy Statement outlines the way in which a Safety and Quality Management System can be developed for Medical Physics Departments. The Policy Statement can help Medical Physicists to eliminate or at least minimize accidents or incidences due to improper use or application of medical technology on one hand and on the other to guarantee a safe, effective and efficient usage of new highly complicated and sophisticated technologies and procedures.

  14. A review of chemical and physical characterisation of atmospheric metallic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanderson, Paul; Delgado-Saborit, Juana Maria; Harrison, Roy M.

    2014-09-01

    Knowledge of the human health impacts associated with airborne nanoparticle exposure has led to considerable research activity aimed at better characterising these particles and understanding which particle properties are most important in the context of effects on health. Knowledge of the sources, chemical composition, physical structure and ambient concentrations of nanoparticles has improved significantly as a result. Given the known toxicity of many metals and the contribution of nanoparticles to their oxidative potential, the metallic content of the nanoparticulate burden is likely to be an important factor to consider when attempting to assess the impact of nanoparticle exposure on health. This review therefore seeks to draw together the existing knowledge of metallic nanoparticles in the atmosphere and discuss future research priorities in the field. The article opens by outlining the reasons behind the current research interest in the field, and moves on to discuss sources of nanoparticles to the atmosphere. The next section reviews ambient concentrations, covering spatial and temporal variation, mass and number size distributions, air sampling and measurement techniques. Further sections discuss the chemical and physical composition of particles. The review concludes by summing up the current state of research in the area and considering where future research should be focused.

  15. Nevada Department of Education Physical Education Content Standards [and] Performance Level Descriptors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nevada State Dept. of Education, Carson City.

    This document presents content and performance standards for physical education in Nevada's public schools. The five content standards are: students will understand and apply movement concepts and principles to the learning and development of motor skills; students will demonstrate competency in many movement forms and proficiency in a few…

  16. DOE Closeout Report from SUNY Albany High Energy Physics to Department of Energy Office of Science.

    SciTech Connect

    Ernst, Jesse; Jain, Vivek

    2014-08-15

    A report from the SUNY Albany Particle Physics Group summarizing our activities on the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. We summarize our work: on data analysis projects, on efforts to improve detector performance, and on service work to the experiment.

  17. Research supported by the department of energy Task C: Experimental high energy physics. 1995 Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Brau, J.

    1996-07-01

    This report describes work of the University of Oregon high-energy physics group related to the Stanford Linear Detector, LEP`s OPAL detector, the NuTeV experiment at Fermilab, the SSC`s GEM detector, and top-quark studies at the Next Linear Collider. 160 refs., 53 figs., 12 tabs.

  18. The U.C. Berkeley Space Sciences Laboratory and Department of Physics Submillimeter Receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, A. I.; Jaffe, D. T.; Genzel, R.

    1986-01-01

    The UCB submm heterodyne receiver is a complete system for high-resolution astronomical spectroscopy in the 350-micron and 450-micron atmospheric windows. This compact system mounts directly at the Cassegrain focus of large optical and IR telescopes. It consists of a laser local oscillator, open structure mixer, quasi-optical coupling system, a broad-band IF system, and an acoustooptical spectrometer. The local oscillator is a 1-m-long submm laser optically pumped by a CO2 laser. The mixer is a quasi-optical corner-cube antenna structure and Schottky diode. The mixer is currently operated at room temperature, and its performance at 77 K is being evaluated. The system noise temperature is less than 7000 K SSB during observations.

  19. The Sensitivity of Simulated Tropical Cyclones to Tunable Physical Parameters in Community Atmosphere Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, F.; Posselt, D. J.

    2014-12-01

    The inability to explicitly resolve the sub-grid scale physical processes (e.g. cloud, precipitation and convection) of atmospheric general circulation models (AGCMs) greatly limits their performance in simulating tropical cyclones (TCs) and predicting their future changes. To address it, this study carried out a total of 92 simulations and investigated the sensitivity of TC simulation to 24 physical parameters that control the deep convection, shallow convection, turbulence, cloud microphysics and cloud macrophysics processes in Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5). The Reed-Jablonowski TC test case is utilized and run at horizontal resolution of 0.5°×0.5° with 30 vertical levels. The sensitivity is assessed by the uncertainty each parameter exerts on simulated TC while perturbing it from its minimum to maximum with other 23 parameters set to their default value. The uncertainty is characterized by changes on simulated TC intensity (measured by absolute maximum wind speed at 100 m above surface), precipitation rate, shortwave cloud radiative forcing (SWCF), longwave cloud radiative forcing (LWCF), cloud liquid water path (LWP) and cloud ice water path (IWP), the latter five of which are quantified by their area-weighted value over the tropical cyclone region. Both the relative importance among these 24 physical parameters on TC simulation and the response function describing how they affect the six TC characteristics are quantified. It is found that the simulated TC intensity is most sensitive to the parcel fractional mass entrainment rate in Zhang-McFarlane (ZM) deep convection scheme. Decreasing this parameter enables a change from tropical depression to Category-4 storm. In contrast, other 23 physical parameters cause intensity uncertainty within 10 m/s. The precipitation rate, SWCF, LWP and IWP are also found to receive major impact from parameters in ZM deep convection scheme while the LWCF is dominated by parameters both in ZM deep convection and

  20. Understanding Measures of Magnetic Activity Using Physics-based Models of the Solar Interior and Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbett, W. P.; Luhmann, J. G.

    2014-12-01

    Substantial progress has been made over the past decade in the effort to better understand how magnetic flux and energy is generated in the convective interior of the Sun, how it emerges into the solar atmosphere, and how manifestations of solar magnetic activity (such as sunspots, coronal mass ejections, and flares) are connected within a dynamic magnetic environment spanning the solar convection zone-to-corona system. Here, we present a brief overview of recent efforts to model the evolution of active region magnetic fields and sunspots over a range of physical conditions and spatial and temporal scales. We will focus on how dynamic, physics-based numerical models can be used to better understand observed relationships between different measures of solar activity as a function of time (e.g., sunspot activity and morphologies, unsigned magnetic flux measured at the photosphere, coronal X-ray emissivity). We will determine whether local physics-based models of active region evolution can be used to better constrain proxies of solar activity such as the sunspot number, which remains the only direct record available to trace the very long-term influence of the solar dynamo on the earth's environment.

  1. Interactions between spacecraft motions and the atmospheric cloud physics laboratory experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, B. J.

    1981-01-01

    In evaluating the effects of spacecraft motions on atmospheric cloud physics laboratory (ACPL) experimentation, the motions of concern are those which will result in the movement of the fluid or cloud particles within the experiment chambers. Of the various vehicle motions and residual forces which can and will occur, three types appear most likely to damage the experimental results: non-steady rotations through a large angle, long-duration accelerations in a constant direction, and vibrations. During the ACPL ice crystal growth experiments, the crystals are suspended near the end of a long fiber (20 cm long by 200 micron diameter) of glass or similar material. Small vibrations of the supported end of the fiber could cause extensive motions of the ice crystal, if care is not taken to avoid this problem.

  2. Mount Aragats as a stable electron accelerator for atmospheric high-energy physics research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilingarian, Ashot; Hovsepyan, Gagik; Mnatsakanyan, Eduard

    2016-03-01

    Observation of the numerous thunderstorm ground enhancements (TGEs), i.e., enhanced fluxes of electrons, gamma rays, and neutrons detected by particle detectors located on the Earth's surface and related to the strong thunderstorms above it, helped to establish a new scientific topic—high-energy physics in the atmosphere. Relativistic runaway electron avalanches (RREAs) are believed to be a central engine initiating high-energy processes in thunderstorm atmospheres. RREAs observed on Mount Aragats in Armenia during the strongest thunderstorms and simultaneous measurements of TGE electron and gamma-ray energy spectra proved that RREAs are a robust and realistic mechanism for electron acceleration. TGE research facilitates investigations of the long-standing lightning initiation problem. For the last 5 years we were experimenting with the "beams" of "electron accelerators" operating in the thunderclouds above the Aragats research station. Thunderstorms are very frequent above Aragats, peaking in May-June, and almost all of them are accompanied with enhanced particle fluxes. The station is located on a plateau at an altitude 3200 asl near a large lake. Numerous particle detectors and field meters are located in three experimental halls as well as outdoors; the facilities are operated all year round. All relevant information is being gathered, including data on particle fluxes, fields, lightning occurrences, and meteorological conditions. By the example of the huge thunderstorm that took place at Mount Aragats on August 28, 2015, we show that simultaneous detection of all the relevant data allowed us to reveal the temporal pattern of the storm development and to investigate the atmospheric discharges and particle fluxes.

  3. Physical modeling of the atmospheric boundary layer for wind energy and wind engineering studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor-Power, Gregory; Turner, John; Wosnik, Martin

    2015-11-01

    The Flow Physics Facility (FPF) at UNH has test section dimensions W6.0m, H2.7m, L=72m. It can achieve high Reynolds number boundary layers, enabling turbulent boundary layer, wind energy and wind engineering research with exceptional spatial and temporal instrument resolution. We examined the FPF's ability to experimentally simulate different types of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL): the stable, unstable, and neutral ABL. The neutral ABL is characterized by a zero potential temperature gradient, which is readily achieved in the FPF by operating when air and floor temperatures are close to equal. The stable and unstable ABLs have positive and negative vertical temperature gradients, respectively, which are more difficult to simulate without direct control of air or test section floor temperature. The test section floor is a 10 inch thick concrete cement slab and has significant thermal mass. When combined with the diurnal temperature variation of the ambient air, it is possible to achieve vertical temperature gradients in the test section, and produce weakly stable or weakly unstable boundary layer. Achievable Richardson numbers and Obukhov lengths are estimated. The different boundary layer profiles were measured, and compared to theoretical atmospheric models. Supported by UNH Hamel Center for Undergraduate Research SURF.

  4. Zero-Gravity Atmospheric Cloud Physics Experiment Laboratory engineering concepts/design tradeoffs. Volume 1: Study results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greco, R. V.; Eaton, L. R.; Wilkinson, H. C.

    1974-01-01

    The work is summarized which was accomplished from January 1974 to October 1974 for the Zero-Gravity Atmospheric Cloud Physics Laboratory. The definition and development of an atmospheric cloud physics laboratory and the selection and delineation of candidate experiments that require the unique environment of zero gravity or near zero gravity are reported. The experiment program and the laboratory concept for a Spacelab payload to perform cloud microphysics research are defined. This multimission laboratory is planned to be available to the entire scientific community to utilize in furthering the basic understanding of cloud microphysical processes and phenomenon, thereby contributing to improved weather prediction and ultimately to provide beneficial weather control and modification.

  5. "SMART": A Compact and Handy FORTRAN Code for the Physics of Stellar Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapar, A.; Poolamäe, R.

    2003-01-01

    A new computer code SMART (Spectra from Model Atmospheres by Radiative Transfer) for computing the stellar spectra, forming in plane-parallel atmospheres, has been compiled by us and A. Aret. To guarantee wide compatibility of the code with shell environment, we chose FORTRAN-77 as programming language and tried to confine ourselves to common part of its numerous versions both in WINDOWS and LINUX. SMART can be used for studies of several processes in stellar atmospheres. The current version of the programme is undergoing rapid changes due to our goal to elaborate a simple, handy and compact code. Instead of linearisation (being a mathematical method of recurrent approximations) we propose to use the physical evolutionary changes or in other words relaxation of quantum state populations rates from LTE to NLTE has been studied using small number of NLTE states. This computational scheme is essentially simpler and more compact than the linearisation. This relaxation scheme enables using instead of the Λ-iteration procedure a physically changing emissivity (or the source function) which incorporates in itself changing Menzel coefficients for NLTE quantum state populations. However, the light scattering on free electrons is in the terms of Feynman graphs a real second-order quantum process and cannot be reduced to consequent processes of absorption and emission as in the case of radiative transfer in spectral lines. With duly chosen input parameters the code SMART enables computing radiative acceleration to the matter of stellar atmosphere in turbulence clumps. This also enables to connect the model atmosphere in more detail with the problem of the stellar wind triggering. Another problem, which has been incorporated into the computer code SMART, is diffusion of chemical elements and their isotopes in the atmospheres of chemically peculiar (CP) stars due to usual radiative acceleration and the essential additional acceleration generated by the light-induced drift. As

  6. A descriptive analysis of research methods classes in departments of kinesiology and physical education in the United States.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Stephen; Keating, Xiaofen Deng

    2002-03-01

    Research training takes many forms and is generally a part of graduate education. A common and important aspect of research training is the introductory research methods class offered by many departments. The purpose of this study was to examine the content, process, and instructors of introductory research methods classes in departments of kinesiology and physical education in the United States. A survey was designed and extensively pilot tested. The sample was selected from all departments offering graduate degrees in the United States. Among the many results, the data indicate that one book was required reading in more than half the classes and class size averaged about 19 students. A number of objectives were statedfor most classes, with understanding research, applying research to professional situations, critiquing the research literature, and planning research indicated most often. Quantitative design and analysis topics were emphasized more strongly than qualitative design and analysis topics. Professors indicated that more than half the class time was spent lecturing and most grades were based on exams, preparation of a research proposal, and regular assignments. The professors were relatively experienced, had a variety ofspecialty areas, and were reasonably productive researchers. The trends suggest that alternative research methodologies have not been quickly added to the research methods curriculum.

  7. Hospital Based Emergency Department Visits Attributed to Child Physical Abuse in United States: Predictors of In-Hospital Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Allareddy, Veerajalandhar; Asad, Rahimullah; Lee, Min Kyeong; Nalliah, Romesh P.; Rampa, Sankeerth; Speicher, David G.; Rotta, Alexandre T.; Allareddy, Veerasathpurush

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To describe nationally representative outcomes of physical abuse injuries in children necessitating Emergency Department (ED) visits in United States. The impact of various injuries on mortality is examined. We hypothesize that physical abuse resulting in intracranial injuries are associated with worse outcome. Materials and Methods We performed a retrospective analysis of the Nationwide Emergency Department Sample (NEDS), the largest all payer hospital based ED database, for the years 2008–2010. All ED visits and subsequent hospitalizations with a diagnosis of “Child physical abuse” (Battered baby or child syndrome) due to various injuries were identified using ICD-9-CM (International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification) codes. In addition, we also examined the prevalence of sexual abuse in this cohort. A multivariable logistic regression model was used to examine the association between mortality and types of injuries after adjusting for a multitude of patient and hospital level factors. Results Of the 16897 ED visits that were attributed to child physical abuse, 5182 (30.7%) required hospitalization. Hospitalized children were younger than those released treated and released from the ED (1.9 years vs. 6.4 years). Male or female partner of the child’s parent/guardian accounted for >45% of perpetrators. Common injuries in hospitalized children include- any fractures (63.5%), intracranial injuries (32.3%) and crushing/internal injuries (9.1%). Death occurred in 246 patients (13 in ED and 233 following hospitalization). Amongst the 16897 ED visits, 1.3% also had sexual abuse. Multivariable analyses revealed each 1 year increase in age was associated with a lower odds of mortality (OR = 0.88, 95% CI = 0.81–0.96, p<0.0001). Females (OR = 2.39, 1.07–5.34, p = 0.03), those with intracranial injuries (OR = 65.24, 27.57–154.41, p<0.0001), or crushing/internal injury (OR = 4.98, 2.24–11.07, p<0

  8. Subgrid-scale physical parameterization in atmospheric modeling: How can we make it consistent?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Jun-Ichi

    2016-07-01

    Approaches to subgrid-scale physical parameterization in atmospheric modeling are reviewed by taking turbulent combustion flow research as a point of reference. Three major general approaches are considered for its consistent development: moment, distribution density function (DDF), and mode decomposition. The moment expansion is a standard method for describing the subgrid-scale turbulent flows both in geophysics and engineering. The DDF (commonly called PDF) approach is intuitively appealing as it deals with a distribution of variables in subgrid scale in a more direct manner. Mode decomposition was originally applied by Aubry et al (1988 J. Fluid Mech. 192 115-73) in the context of wall boundary-layer turbulence. It is specifically designed to represent coherencies in compact manner by a low-dimensional dynamical system. Their original proposal adopts the proper orthogonal decomposition (empirical orthogonal functions) as their mode-decomposition basis. However, the methodology can easily be generalized into any decomposition basis. Among those, wavelet is a particularly attractive alternative. The mass-flux formulation that is currently adopted in the majority of atmospheric models for parameterizing convection can also be considered a special case of mode decomposition, adopting segmentally constant modes for the expansion basis. This perspective further identifies a very basic but also general geometrical constraint imposed on the massflux formulation: the segmentally-constant approximation. Mode decomposition can, furthermore, be understood by analogy with a Galerkin method in numerically modeling. This analogy suggests that the subgrid parameterization may be re-interpreted as a type of mesh-refinement in numerical modeling. A link between the subgrid parameterization and downscaling problems is also pointed out.

  9. Minimally-Invasive Gene Transfection by Chemical and Physical Interaction of Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Toshiro

    2014-10-01

    Non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma irradiated to the living-cell is investigated for medical applications such as gene transfection, which is expected to play an important role in molecular biology, gene therapy, and creation of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. However, the conventional gene transfection using the plasma has some problems that the cell viability is low and the genes cannot be transferred into some specific lipid cells, which is attributed to the unknown mechanism of the gene transfection using the plasma. Therefore, the time-controlled atmospheric pressure plasma flow is generated and irradiated to the living-cell suspended solution for clarifying the transfection mechanism toward developing highly-efficient and minimally- invasive gene transfection system. In this experiment, fluorescent dye YOYO-1 is used as the simulated gene and LIVE/DEAD Stain is simultaneously used for cell viability assay. By the fluorescence image, the transfection efficiency is calculated as the ratio of the number of transferred and surviving cells to total cell count. It is clarified that the transfection efficiency is significantly increased by the short-time (<4 sec) and short-distance (<40 mm) plasma irradiation, and the high transfection efficiency of 53% is realized together with the high cell viability (>90%). This result indicates that the physical effects such as the electric field caused by the charged particles arriving at the surface of the cell membrane, and chemical effects associated with plasma-activated products in solution act synergistically to enhance the cell-membrane transport with low-damage. This work was supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 24108004.

  10. Physical Properties of Meteoroids based on Middle and Upper Atmosphere Radar Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gritsevich, Maria; Nakamura, Takuji; Kero, Johan; Szasz, Csilla; Virtanen, Jenni; Peltoniemi, Jouni; Koschny, Detlef

    We present a novel approach to reliably interpret the meteor head echo scattering measurements detected by the 46.5 MHz MU radar system near Shigaraki, Japan. A meteor head echo is caused by radio waves scattered from the dense region of plasma surrounding and co-moving with a meteoroid during atmospheric flight. The signal Doppler shift and/or range rate of the target can therefore be used to determine meteoroid velocity. The data reduction steps include determining the exact trajectory of the meteoroids entering the observation volume of the antenna beam and calculating meteoroid mass and velocity as a function of time. The model is built using physically based parameterization. The considered observation volume is narrow, elongated in the vertical direction, and its area of greatest sensitivity covers a circular area of about 10 km diameter at an altitude of 100 km above the radar. Over 100000 meteor head echoes have been detected over past years of observations. Most of the events are faint with no alternative to be detected visually or with intensified video (ICCD) cameras. In this study we are focusing on objects which have entered the atmosphere with almost vertical trajectories, to ensure the observed segment of the trajectory to be as complete as possible, without loss of its beginning or end part due to beam-pattern related loss of signal power. The analysis output parameters are range, altitude, radial velocity, meteoroid velocity, instantaneous target position, Radar Cross Section (RCS), meteor radiant, meteoroid ballistic and ablation coefficients, mass loss parameter and meteoroid mass, with possibility to derive other parameters.

  11. Physical properties of meteoroids based on middle and upper atmosphere radar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gritsevich, M.; Kero, J.; Virtanen, J.; Szasz, C.; Nakamura, T.; Peltoniemi, J.; Koschny, D.

    2014-07-01

    We present a novel approach to reliably interpret the meteor head-echo scattering measurements detected by the 46.5 MHz MU radar system near Shigaraki, Japan. A meteor head echo is caused by radio waves scattered from the dense region of plasma surrounding and co-moving with a meteoroid during atmospheric flight. The signal Doppler shift and/or range rate of the target can therefore be used to determine meteoroid velocity. The data reduction steps include determining the exact trajectory of the meteoroids entering the observation volume of the antenna beam and calculating meteoroid mass and velocity as a function of time. The model is built using physically-based parametrization. The considered observation volume is narrow, elongated in the vertical direction, and its area of greatest sensitivity covers a circular area of about 10 km diameter at an altitude of 100 km above the radar. Over 100,000 meteor head echoes have been detected over past years of observations. Most of the events are faint with no alternative to be detected visually or with intensified video (ICCD) cameras. In this study we are focusing on objects which have entered the atmosphere with almost vertical trajectories, to ensure the observed segment of the trajectory to be as complete as possible, without loss of its beginning or end part due to beam-pattern-related loss of signal power. The analysis output parameters are range, altitude, radial velocity, meteoroid velocity, instantaneous target position, Radar Cross Section (RCS), meteor radiant, meteoroid ballistic and ablation coefficients, mass loss parameter and meteoroid mass, with possibility to derive other parameters.

  12. Phase B-final definition and preliminary design study for the initial Atmospheric Cloud Physics Laboratory (ACPL). A spacelab mission payload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Progress in the development of the Atmospheric Cloud Physics Laboratory is outlined. The fluid subsystem, aerosol generator, expansion chamber, optical system, control systems, and software are included.

  13. Remote sensing of atmospheric particulates: Technological innovation and physical limitations in applications to short-range weather prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, R. J.; Kropfil, R.; Hallett, J.

    1984-01-01

    Techniques for remote sensing of particles, from cloud droplet to hailstone size, using optical and microwave frequencies are reviewed. The inherent variability of atmospheric particulates is examined to delineate conditions when the signal can give information to be effectively utilized in a forecasting context. The physical limitations resulting from the phase, size, orientation and concentration variability of the particulates are assessed.

  14. Modification of the continuous flow diffusion chamber for use in zero-gravity. [atmospheric cloud physics lab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keyser, G.

    1978-01-01

    The design philosophy and performance characteristics of the continuous flow diffusion chamber developed for use in ground-based simulation of some of the experiments planned for the atmospheric cloud physics laboratory during the first Spacelab flight are discussed. Topics covered include principle of operation, thermal control, temperature measurement, tem-powered heat exchangers, wettable metal surfaces, sample injection system, and control electronics.

  15. Final definition and preliminary design study for the initial atmospheric cloud physics laboratory, a spacelab mission payload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The Atmospheric Cloud Physics Laboratory (ACPL) task flow is shown. Current progress is identified. The requirements generated in task 1 have been used to formulate an initial ACPL baseline design concept. ACPL design/functional features are illustrated. A timetable is presented of the routines for ACPL integration with the spacelab system.

  16. Spatial-Spectral Studies of Cometary Volatiles and the Physical Environment of Inner Cometary Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonev, Boncho P.; Fougere, Nicolas; Villanueva, Geronimo L.; Mumma, Michael J.; Combi, Michael R.; DiSanti, Michael A.; Paganini, Lucas; Cordiner, Martin; Gibb, Erika L.; Milam, Stefanie N.

    2015-11-01

    How is water released in comets - directly from the nucleus versus sublimation from icy grains in the coma? How common and how prevalent are icy grains as a source of gas-phase water (and other volatiles) among the active comet population? These questions are being addressed through synergy between spatial-spectral studies of native volatiles in comets and the physical models tested against them. This synergy is extending the state-of-the-art in both domains. Ground-based near-IR spectroscopy (Keck, NASA IRTF, and ESO VLT) allowed measurements of spatially resolved inner coma temperatures and column densities for H2O - the most abundant volatile in the coma. These measurements motivated the inclusion of new physics in the models. The evolved models now open new questions and trigger improvement in the accuracy of measured temperature profiles, most recently extended to other molecules (HCN in the near-IR) and to other wavelength domains (CH3OH, through ALMA; S. Milam et al., this meeting). The net result is deeper quantitative insight into the competition among processes that cause heating and cooling of the coma and into the prevalent mechanism(s) for release of native volatiles in the gas phase.The same inner-coma modeling formalisms are used to interpret both the environment of Rosetta's mission target (67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko) and those from the ground-based observations reported here (Combi et al. 2015, LPSC, #1714; Fougere et al., this meeting). While ground-based spectroscopy offers less detail than in-situ missions, it can probe the comae of many comets that may differ greatly from one another and from Rosetta's target, thereby assessing the extent to which the inner-coma environment of 67P is unique, and how it relates to other comets.We gratefully acknowledge support from NASA Planetary Atmospheres, Solar System Workings, Planetary Astronomy, and Astrobiology programs, and from NSF Astronomy and Astrophysics Research Grants program.

  17. Public emergency department: the psychosocial impact on the physical domain of quality of life of nursing professionals

    PubMed Central

    Kogien, Moisés; Cedaro, José Juliano

    2014-01-01

    Objectives to determine the psychosocial factors of work related to harm caused in the physical domain of the quality of life of nursing professionals working in a public emergency department. Method cross-sectional, descriptive study addressing 189 nursing professionals. The Job Stress Scale and the short version of an instrument from the World Health Organization to assess quality of life were used to collect data. Robert Karasek's Demand-Control Model was the reference for the analysis of the psychosocial configuration. The risk for damage was computed with a confidence interval of 95%. Results In regard to the psychosocial environment, the largest proportion of workers reported low psychological demands (66.1%) and low social support (52.4%), while 60.9% of the professionals experienced work situations with a greater potential for harm: high demand job (22.8%) and passive work (38.1%). Conclusions low intellectual discernment, low social support and experiencing a high demand job or a passive job were the main risk factors for damage in the physical domain of quality of life. PMID:24553703

  18. The Impact of Physical Atmosphere on Air Quality and the Utility of Satellite Observations in Air Quality Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pour Biazar, A.; McNider, R. T.; Park, Y. H.; Doty, K.; Khan, M. N.; Dornblaser, B.

    2012-12-01

    Physical atmosphere significantly impacts air quality as it regulates production, accumulation, and transport of atmospheric pollutants. Consequently, air quality simulations are greatly influenced by the uncertainties that emanates from the simulation of physical atmosphere. Since air quality model predictions are increasingly being used in health studies, regulatory applications, and policy making, reducing such uncertainties in model simulations is of outmost importance. This paper describes some of the critical aspects of physical atmosphere affecting air quality models that can be improved by utilizing satellite observations. Retrievals of skin temperature, surface albedo, surface insolation, cloud top temperature and cloud reflectance obtained from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) by NASA/MSFC GOES Product Generation System (GPGS) have been utilized to improve the air quality simulations used in the State Implementation Plan (SIP) attainment demonstrations. Satellite observations of ground temperature are used to recover surface moisture and heat capacity and thereby improving model simulation of air temperature. Observations of clouds are utilized to improve the photochemical reaction rates within the photochemical model and also to assimilate clouds in the meteorological model. These techniques have been implemented and tested in some of the widely used air quality decision modeling systems such as MM5/WRF/CMAQ/CAMx. The results from these activities show significant improvements in air quality simulations.

  19. Addressing model error through atmospheric stochastic physical parametrizations: impact on the coupled ECMWF seasonal forecasting system

    PubMed Central

    Weisheimer, Antje; Corti, Susanna; Palmer, Tim; Vitart, Frederic

    2014-01-01

    The finite resolution of general circulation models of the coupled atmosphere–ocean system and the effects of sub-grid-scale variability present a major source of uncertainty in model simulations on all time scales. The European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts has been at the forefront of developing new approaches to account for these uncertainties. In particular, the stochastically perturbed physical tendency scheme and the stochastically perturbed backscatter algorithm for the atmosphere are now used routinely for global numerical weather prediction. The European Centre also performs long-range predictions of the coupled atmosphere–ocean climate system in operational forecast mode, and the latest seasonal forecasting system—System 4—has the stochastically perturbed tendency and backscatter schemes implemented in a similar way to that for the medium-range weather forecasts. Here, we present results of the impact of these schemes in System 4 by contrasting the operational performance on seasonal time scales during the retrospective forecast period 1981–2010 with comparable simulations that do not account for the representation of model uncertainty. We find that the stochastic tendency perturbation schemes helped to reduce excessively strong convective activity especially over the Maritime Continent and the tropical Western Pacific, leading to reduced biases of the outgoing longwave radiation (OLR), cloud cover, precipitation and near-surface winds. Positive impact was also found for the statistics of the Madden–Julian oscillation (MJO), showing an increase in the frequencies and amplitudes of MJO events. Further, the errors of El Niño southern oscillation forecasts become smaller, whereas increases in ensemble spread lead to a better calibrated system if the stochastic tendency is activated. The backscatter scheme has overall neutral impact. Finally, evidence for noise-activated regime transitions has been found in a cluster analysis of mid

  20. Biological and physical controls in the Southern Ocean on past millennial-scale atmospheric CO2 changes

    PubMed Central

    Gottschalk, Julia; Skinner, Luke C.; Lippold, Jörg; Vogel, Hendrik; Frank, Norbert; Jaccard, Samuel L.; Waelbroeck, Claire

    2016-01-01

    Millennial-scale climate changes during the last glacial period and deglaciation were accompanied by rapid changes in atmospheric CO2 that remain unexplained. While the role of the Southern Ocean as a 'control valve' on ocean–atmosphere CO2 exchange has been emphasized, the exact nature of this role, in particular the relative contributions of physical (for example, ocean dynamics and air–sea gas exchange) versus biological processes (for example, export productivity), remains poorly constrained. Here we combine reconstructions of bottom-water [O2], export production and 14C ventilation ages in the sub-Antarctic Atlantic, and show that atmospheric CO2 pulses during the last glacial- and deglacial periods were consistently accompanied by decreases in the biological export of carbon and increases in deep-ocean ventilation via southern-sourced water masses. These findings demonstrate how the Southern Ocean's 'organic carbon pump' has exerted a tight control on atmospheric CO2, and thus global climate, specifically via a synergy of both physical and biological processes. PMID:27187527

  1. Biological and physical controls in the Southern Ocean on past millennial-scale atmospheric CO2 changes.

    PubMed

    Gottschalk, Julia; Skinner, Luke C; Lippold, Jörg; Vogel, Hendrik; Frank, Norbert; Jaccard, Samuel L; Waelbroeck, Claire

    2016-05-17

    Millennial-scale climate changes during the last glacial period and deglaciation were accompanied by rapid changes in atmospheric CO2 that remain unexplained. While the role of the Southern Ocean as a 'control valve' on ocean-atmosphere CO2 exchange has been emphasized, the exact nature of this role, in particular the relative contributions of physical (for example, ocean dynamics and air-sea gas exchange) versus biological processes (for example, export productivity), remains poorly constrained. Here we combine reconstructions of bottom-water [O2], export production and (14)C ventilation ages in the sub-Antarctic Atlantic, and show that atmospheric CO2 pulses during the last glacial- and deglacial periods were consistently accompanied by decreases in the biological export of carbon and increases in deep-ocean ventilation via southern-sourced water masses. These findings demonstrate how the Southern Ocean's 'organic carbon pump' has exerted a tight control on atmospheric CO2, and thus global climate, specifically via a synergy of both physical and biological processes.

  2. Biological and physical controls in the Southern Ocean on past millennial-scale atmospheric CO2 changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottschalk, Julia; Skinner, Luke C.; Lippold, Jörg; Vogel, Hendrik; Frank, Norbert; Jaccard, Samuel L.; Waelbroeck, Claire

    2016-05-01

    Millennial-scale climate changes during the last glacial period and deglaciation were accompanied by rapid changes in atmospheric CO2 that remain unexplained. While the role of the Southern Ocean as a 'control valve' on ocean-atmosphere CO2 exchange has been emphasized, the exact nature of this role, in particular the relative contributions of physical (for example, ocean dynamics and air-sea gas exchange) versus biological processes (for example, export productivity), remains poorly constrained. Here we combine reconstructions of bottom-water [O2], export production and 14C ventilation ages in the sub-Antarctic Atlantic, and show that atmospheric CO2 pulses during the last glacial- and deglacial periods were consistently accompanied by decreases in the biological export of carbon and increases in deep-ocean ventilation via southern-sourced water masses. These findings demonstrate how the Southern Ocean's 'organic carbon pump' has exerted a tight control on atmospheric CO2, and thus global climate, specifically via a synergy of both physical and biological processes.

  3. Public Outreach of the South Texas Health Physic Society and Texas A&M University Nuclear Engineering Department

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, R. O.

    2003-02-24

    In a cooperative effort of the members of the South Texas Chapter of the Heath Physics Society (STC-HPS) and the Texas A&M University Nuclear Engineering Department, great efforts have been made to reach out and provide educational opportunities to members of the general public, school age children, and specifically teachers. These efforts have taken the form of Science Teacher Workshops (STW), visits to schools all over the state of Texas, public forums, and many other educational arenas. A major motivational factor for these most recent efforts can be directly tied to the attempt of the State of Texas to site a low-level radioactive waste facility near Sierra Blanca in West Texas. When the State of Texas first proposed to site a low level radioactive waste site after the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 was passed, many years of political struggle ensued. Finally, a site at Sierra Blanca in far West Texas was selected for study and characterization for a disposal site for waste generated in the Texas Compact states of Maine, Vermont and Texas. During this process, the outreach to and education of the local public became a paramount issue.

  4. Marine Primary Aerosol in the Mediterranean atmosphere: physical and chemical properties from a mesocosm study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'anna, B.; Sellegri, K.; Charriere, B.; Sempere, R.; Mas, S.; George, C.; Meme, A.; R'Mili, B.; Schwier, A. N.; Rose, C.

    2013-12-01

    The Mediterranean Sea is a special marine environment characterized by low biological activity and high anthropogenic pressure. It is often difficult to discriminated the contribution of Primary Sea Salt Aerosol (SSA) formed at the sea-air interface from background level of the aerosol. An alternative tool to study the sea-air exchanges in a controlled environment is provided by the mesocosms, which represent an important link between field studies and laboratory experiments. A mesocosms experiment was performed in May 2013 at the Oceanographic and Marine Station STARESO in Western Corsica. Three mesocosms were simultaneously filled with pooled and screened (<1000 μm) subsurface (1 m) seawater from the Bay. Each mesocosm had a maximum water column depth of 2 m and contained 2260 L of Bay water and covered with transparent (teflon film) dome to prevent atmospheric contamination. The three mesocosms were equipped with a pack of optical and physicochemical sensors and received different treatements: one was left unchanged as control and two were enriched by addition of nitrates and phosphates respecting Redfield ration (N:P = 16). The evolution of the three systems was followed for 20 days. A set of sensors in each mesocosm were established at 0.5 m and allowed to monitor at high frequency (every 2 min): water temperature, conductivity, pH, incident light, fluorescence of chlorophyll a and dissolved oxygen concentration. The mesocosms waters were daily sampled for chemical (dissolved oxygen, colored dissolved organic matter, nitrates, phosphates, silicates, transparent polyssacharides, dicarboxylic acids and related polar compounds) and biological (chlorophyll a, virus, phytoplankton and zooplankton concentration) analyses. Finally, few liters of sea-water from each mesocosms were sampled daily and immediately transferred to a bubble-bursting apparatus to simulate SSA. Size distribution and particle number were followed by SMPS and APS in the range of 10nm to 10

  5. Report on Foundation and Organization of Econophysics Graduate Courses at Faculty of Physics of University of Warsaw and Department of Physics and Astronomy of the Wrocław University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutner, R.; Grech, D.

    2008-09-01

    Two different, working examples of organization of econophysics graduate courses at the Faculty of Physics, University of Warsaw and the Department of Physics and Astronomy of the Wrocław University are considered. In the first example we have a system where the interdisciplinary, econophysical education begins only after three years study of physics. Within this system the M.Sc. as well as Ph.D. theses in econophysics are conducted only at the Faculty of Physics. In the second example the B.Sc. theses in econophysics are accomplished in the Department of Physics and Astronomy again after three years study but higher degrees can be prepared either in physics in the Institute of Theoretical Physics or in economy in the Institute of Economical Sciences. M.Sc. and Ph.D. theses can also be conducted. For both examples, the graduate students of econophysics are obliged to participate in traditional (typical) economical lectures and trainings which are offered them by economical departments while lectures and trainings (tutorials and/or laboratory classes) in econophysics are offered them by physics departments themselves. Thus Poland is one of a few countries, where so modern interdisciplinary knowledge is systematically offered to students.

  6. A simple-physics global circulation model for Venus: Sensitivity assessments of atmospheric superrotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollingsworth, J. L.; Young, R. E.; Schubert, G.; Covey, C.; Grossman, A. S.

    2007-03-01

    A 3D global circulation model is adapted to the atmosphere of Venus to explore the nature of the planet's atmospheric superrotation. The model employs the full meteorological primitive equations and simplified forms for diabatic and other nonconservative forcings. It is therefore economical for performing very long simulations. To assess circulation equilibration and the occurrence of atmospheric superrotation, the climate model is run for 10,000-20,000 day integrations at 4° × 5° latitude-longitude horizontal resolution, and 56 vertical levels (denoted L56). The sensitivity of these simulations to imposed Venus-like diabatic heating rates, momentum dissipation rates, and various other key parameters (e.g., near-surface momentum drag), in addition to model configuration (e.g., low versus high vertical domain and number of atmospheric levels), is examined. We find equatorial superrotation in several of our numerical experiments, but the magnitude of superrotation is often less than observed. Further, the meridional structure of the mean zonal overturning (i.e., Hadley circulation) can consist of numerous cells which are symmetric about the equator and whose depth scale appears sensitive to the number of vertical layers imposed in the model atmosphere. We find that when realistic diabatic heating is imposed in the lowest several scales heights, only extremely weak atmospheric superrotation results.

  7. Missed connections: A case study of the social networks of physics doctoral students in a single department

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knaub, Alexis Victoria

    Gender disparity is an issue among the many science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields. Although many previous studies examine gender issues in STEM as an aggregate discipline, there are unique issues to each of the fields that are considered STEM fields. Some fields, such as physics, have fewer women graduating with degrees than other fields. This suggests that women's experiences vary by STEM field. The majority of previous research also examines gender and other disparities at either the nationwide or individual level. This project entailed social network analysis through survey and interview data to examine a single physics department's doctoral students in order to provide a comprehensive look at student social experiences. In addition to examining gender, other demographic variables were studied to see if the results are truly associated with gender; these variables include race/ethnicity, year in program, student type, relationship status, research type, undergraduate institute, and subfield. Data were examined to determine if there are relationships to social connections and outcome variables such as persistence in completing the degree and the time to degree. Data collected on faculty were used to rank faculty members; data such as h-indices and number of students graduate over the past 5 years were collected. Fifty-five (55) of 110 possible participants completed the survey; forty-three are male, and twelve are female. Twenty-eight of the fifty-five survey participants were interview; twenty-three are male, and five are female. Findings for peer networks include that peer networks are established during the first year and do not change drastically as one progresses in the program. Geographic location within the campus affects socializing with peers. Connections to fellow students are not necessarily reciprocated; the maximum percentage of reciprocated connections is 60%. The number of connections one has varies by network purpose

  8. The Use of Full-Physics Atmospheric Modeling for Wind Power Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flaherty, J. E.; Berg, L. K.; Fast, J. D.; Gustafson, W. I.; Rishel, J. P.; Shaw, W. J.

    2008-12-01

    This presentation will describe a number of issues relevant to the use of mesoscale meteorological models for the development and operation of wind power plants. An accurate description of the local winds over a range of spatial and temporal scales is important for wind plants. In addition to various measurement methods, a number of modeling tools can be used to explore winds at these scales, including a full-physics mesoscale model such as the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. Simulations in regions of complex terrain can, however, have significant amounts of uncertainty, and results can be sensitive to the model parameters such as turbulence representation, the horizontal and vertical grid spacing, and initial and boundary conditions. Numerous studies conducted by PNNL scientists have quantified the performance of WRF. These evaluations included simulation of low-level winds in a number of geographic areas with both simple and complex terrain. However, previous research focused on comparisons with data from intensive, short-duration field campaigns that may not be completely relevant for wind plants. The identification of long- term, high quality data sets is therefore an important aspect of evaluating and improving model performance in wind energy applications. One such source of quality-assured meteorological data is from the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site. It is an ideal location for evaluating the performance of the WRF model for both prognosis of the local winds, as would be appropriate for a wind resource characterization, and for an analysis of severe wind events, which is important for wind turbine safety. The Hanford Site is located in southeastern Washington State and covers approximately 1500 sq km. The topography in this region is dominated by a number of significant ridges around a central basin, and severe wind events are frequent, especially during the springtime. Wind energy has been explored in this area, and a wind plant with

  9. Russian investigations in the field of atmospheric radiation in 2007-2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timofeev, Yu. M.; Shul'gina, E. M.

    2013-01-01

    A short survey prepared by the Russian Commission on Atmospheric Radiation contains the most significant results of works in the field of atmospheric-radiation studies performed in 2007-2010. It is part of the Russian National Report on Meteorology and Atmospheric Sciences prepared for the International Association on Meteorology and Atmospheric Sciences (IAMAS). During this period, the Russian Commission on Atmospheric Radiation, jointly with concerned departments and organizations, ran the conference "Physics and Education," dedicated to the 75th anniversary of the Department of Physics at St. Petersburg State University (2007); the International Symposium of CIS Countries "Atmospheric Radiation and Dynamics" (2009); and the 5th International Conference "Atmospheric Physics, Climate, and Environment" (2010). At the conferences, central problems in modern atmosphere physics were discussed: radiative transfer and atmospheric optics; greenhouse gases, clouds, and aerosols; remote methods of measurements; and new measurement data. This survey presents five directions covering the whole spectrum of investigations performed in the field of atmospheric radiation.

  10. Michigan Council on Physical Fitness and Health Annual Report to the Michigan Department of Public Health, December 29, 1978.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Dept. of Public Health, Lansing. Council on Physical Fitness & Health.

    The projects which the Michigan Council on Physical Fitness and Health undertook in 1978 are reported and described here. The projects and activities include: a school physical fitness program that provided assistance to public, private, and parochial schools in monitoring the physical fitness levels of all students in grades kindergarten through…

  11. The molecular physics of photolytic fractionation of sulfur and oxygen isotopes in planetary atmospheres (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, M. S.; Schmidt, J. A.; Hattori, S.; Danielache, S.; Meusinger, C.; Schinke, R.; Ueno, Y.; Nanbu, S.; Kjaergaard, H. G.; Yoshida, N.

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric photochemistry is able to produce large mass independent anomalies in atmospheric trace gases that can be found in geological and cryospheric records. This talk will present theoretical and experimental investigations of the molecular mechanisms producing photolytic fractionation of isotopes with special attention to sulfur and oxygen. The zero point vibrational energy (ZPE) shift and reflection principle theories are starting points for estimating isotopic fractionation, but these models ignore effects arising from isotope-dependent changes in couplings between surfaces, excited state dynamics, line densities and hot band populations. The isotope-dependent absorption spectra of the isotopologues of HCl, N2O, OCS, CO2 and SO2 have been examined in a series of papers and these results are compared with experiment and ZPE/reflection principle models. Isotopic fractionation in planetary atmospheres has many interesting applications. The UV absorption of CO2 is the basis of photochemistry in the CO2-rich atmospheres of the ancient Earth, and of Mars and Venus. For the first time we present accurate temperature and isotope dependent CO2 absorption cross sections with important implications for photolysis rates of SO2 and H2O, and the production of a mass independent anomaly in the Ox reservoir. Experimental and theoretical results for OCS have implications for the modern stratospheric sulfur budget. The absorption bands of SO2 are complex with rich structure producing isotopic fractionation in photolysis and photoexcitation.

  12. Radiological and Environmental Research Division annual report, January-December 1982. Atmospheric physics. Part 4

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    The first article in this report, although dealing with simple terrain, summarizes an effort to obtain measures of parameters important in transport and diffusion in the lower atmosphere solely by use of a Doppler acoustic sounding system. The second article describes participation in a multiagency experiment (Shoreline Environment Atmospheric Dispersion Experiment, SEADEX) to study the fate of materials released over a surface with notable surface nonuniformities, specifically at a coastal nuclear power plant during onshore flow conditions. The third and fourth articles in this report address research on the local behavior of pollutants emitted from diesel engines in urban areas. Most effort was directed toward field studies on circulation patterns in street canyons, exchange rates with the atmosphere above rooftops, and characterization of particles in outdoor urban microclimates. The remainder of the report is quite diverse and contains multiple articles on perhaps only one or two types of research. One is numerical modeling of the behavior of atmospheric pollutants, especially gaseous and particulate substances associated with acid deposition. The modeling and theoretical capabilities have been developed in part to consider potential nonlinear relationships between anthropogenic emissions of sulfur and nitrogen compounds and the distant deposition of resulting acidifying substances. On the experimental side, field phases of research designed to compare methods of analyses of precipitation samples and to study local urban effects on precipitation chemistry were completed. Each report is indexed separately.

  13. Atmospheric aerosols: A literature summary of their physical characteristics and chemical composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, F. S., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    This report contains a summary of 199 recent references on the characterization of atmospheric aerosols with respect to their composition, sources, size distribution, and time changes, and with particular reference to the chemical elements measured by modern techniques, especially activation analysis.

  14. Microbiology and atmospheric processes: the role of biological particles in cloud physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möhler, O.; Demott, P. J.; Vali, G.; Levin, Z.

    2007-12-01

    As part of a series of papers on the sources, distribution and potential impact of biological particles in the atmosphere, this paper introduces and summarizes the potential role of biological particles in atmospheric clouds. Biological particles like bacteria or pollen may be active as both cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and heterogeneous ice nuclei (IN) and thereby can contribute to the initial cloud formation stages and the development of precipitation through giant CCN and IN processes. The paper gives an introduction to aerosol-cloud processes involving CCN and IN in general and provides a short summary of previous laboratory, field and modelling work which investigated the CCN and IN activity of bacterial cells and pollen. Recent measurements of atmospheric ice nuclei with a continuous flow diffusion chamber (CFDC) and of the heterogeneous ice nucleation efficiency of bacterial cells are also briefly discussed. As a main result of this overview paper we conclude that a proper assessment of the impact of biological particles on tropospheric clouds needs new laboratory, field and modelling work on the abundance of biological particles in the atmosphere and their CCN and heterogeneous IN properties.

  15. Microbiology and atmospheric processes: the role of biological particles in cloud physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möhler, O.; Demott, P. J.; Vali, G.; Levin, Z.

    2007-08-01

    As part of a series of papers on the sources, distribution and potential impact of biological particles in the atmosphere, this paper introduces and summarizes the potential role of biological particles in atmospheric clouds. Biological particles like bacteria or pollen may be active as both cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and heterogeneous ice nuclei (IN) and thereby can contribute to the initial cloud formation stages and the development of precipitation through giant CCN and IN processes. The paper gives an introduction to aerosol-cloud processes like CCN and IN in general and provides a short summary of previous laboratory, field and modelling work investigating the CCN and IN activity of bacterial cells and pollen. Recent measurements of atmospheric ice nuclei with a continuous flow diffusion chamber (CFDC) and of the heterogeneous ice nucleation efficiency of bacterial cells are also briefly discussed. As a main result of this overview paper we conclude that a proper assessment of the impact of biological particles on tropospheric clouds needs new laboratory, field and modelling work investigating the abundance of biological particles in the atmosphere and their CCN and heterogeneous IN properties.

  16. Radiological and Environmental Research Division annual report, January-December 1980. Atmospheric physics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-08-01

    Contained are twenty-six abstracts of on-going research programs at Argonne National Laboratory concerning the modeling of environmental air pollutants concentration and transport for January-December 1980. Studies on pollutant transport modeling, fluid flow models, and atmospheric precipitations chemistry are included. (DLS)

  17. The physical properties of the Jovian atmosphere inferred from eclipses of the Galilean satellites. II - 1971 apparition.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, M. J.; Hall, J. S.; Boyce, P. B.; Albrecht, R.

    1972-01-01

    Further simultaneous two-color photoelectric photometry of Ganymede was carried out at blue (4500 A) and yellow (5790 A) wavelengths during its eclipse by Jupiter on Mar. 10, 1971. In both colors, the shape of the ingress light curve was again reliably determined for extinctions up to 9 mag. Neither curve showed any evidence of a refraction tail. The observations have been interpreted in terms of the local optical transmission properties of the Jovian atmosphere. At gas number densities of about 5 x 10 to the 18th power per cu cm the maximum photon scattering mean free path at visual wavelengths was 47 km atm. Evidence indicates that neither a simple reflecting-layer model or a semiinfinite homogeneous scattering model provides an adequate physical description of the atmosphere.

  18. Summary of the NASA/MSFC FY-79 Severe Storm and Local Weather research review. [cloud physics, atmospheric electricity, and mesoscale/storm dynamics reserach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Significant acomplishments, current focus of work, plans for FY-80, and recommendations for new research are outlined for 36 research projects proposed for technical monitoring by the Atmospheric Sciences Division at Marshall Space Flight Center. Topics of the investigations, which were reviewed at a two-day meeting, relate to cloud physics, atmospheric electricity, and mesoscale/storm dynamics.

  19. Physical Properties of Dust in the Martian Atmosphere: Analysis of Contradictions and Possible Ways of Their Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dlugach, Zh. M.; Korablev, O. I.; Morozhenko, A. V.; Moroz, V. I.; Petrova, E. V.; Rodin, A. V.

    2003-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosols play an important role in forming the Martian climate. However, the basic physical properties of the Martian aerosols are still poorly known; there are many contradictions in their estimates. We present an analytical overview of the published results and potentialities of various methods. We consider mineral dust. Zonally averaged data obtained from mapping IR instruments (TES and IRTM) give the optical thickness of mineral aerosols τ9 = 0.05-0.1 in the 9-μm band for quite atmospheric conditions. There is a problem of comparing these estimates with those obtained in the visible spectral range. We suggest that the commonly used ratio τvis/τ9 >2 depends on the interpretation and it may actually be smaller. The ratio τvis/τ9 ~ 1 is in better agreement with the IRIS data (materials like montmorillonite). If we assume that τvis/τ9 = 1 and take into account the nonspherical particle shape, then the interpretation of ground-based integrated polarimetric observations (τ < 0.04) can be reconciled with IR measurements from the orbit. However, for thin layers, the sensitivity of both methods to the optical thickness is poorly understood: on the one hand, polarimetry depends on the cloud cover and, on the other hand, the interpretation of IR measurements requires that the atmospheric temperature profile and the surface temperature and emissivity be precisely known. For quite atmospheric conditions, the local optical-thickness estimates obtained by the Bouguer-Lambert-Beer method and from the sky brightness measured from Viking 1 and 2 and Mars Pathfinder landers are much larger: τ = 0.3-0.6. Estimates of the contrasts in images from the Viking orbiters yield the same values. Thus, there is still a factor of 3 to 10 difference between different groups of optical-thickness estimates for the quiet atmosphere. This difference is probably explained by the contribution of condensation clouds and/or by local/time variations.

  20. Final definition and preliminary design study for the initial atmospheric cloud physics laboratory, a Spacelab mission payload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The following areas related to the final definition and preliminary design study of the initial atmospheric cloud physics laboratory (ACPL) were covered: (1) proposal organization, personnel, schedule, and project management, (2) proposed configurations, (3) study objectives, (4) ACPL experiment program listing and description, (5) mission/flight flexibility and modularity/commonality, (6) study plan, and (7) description of following tasks: requirement analysis and definition task flow, systems analysis and trade studies, subsystem analysis and trade studies, specifications and interface control documents, preliminary design task flow, work breakdown structure, programmatic analysis and planning, and project costs. Finally, an overview of the scientific requirements was presented.

  1. Science on Spacelab. [astronomy, high energy astrophysics, life sciences, and solar, atmospheric and space physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmerling, E. R.

    1977-01-01

    Spacelab was developed by the European Space Agency for the conduction of scientific and technological experiments in space. Spacelab can be taken into earth orbit by the Space Shuttle and returned to earth after a period of 1-3 weeks. The Spacelab modular system of pallets, pressurized modules, and racks can contain large payloads with high power and telemetry requirements. A working group has defined the 'Atmospheres, Magnetospheres, and Plasmas-in-Space' project. The project objectives include the absolute measurement of solar flux in a number of carefully selected bands at the same time at which atmospheric measurements are made. NASA is committed to the concept that the scientist is to play a key role in its scientific programs.

  2. Optical holography applications for the zero-g Atmospheric Cloud Physics Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtz, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    A complete description of holography is provided, both for the time-dependent case of moving scene holography and for the time-independent case of stationary holography. Further, a specific holographic arrangement for application to the detection of particle size distribution in an atmospheric simulation cloud chamber. In this chamber particle growth rate is investigated; therefore, the proposed holographic system must capture continuous particle motion in real time. Such a system is described.

  3. Planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingersoll, A. P.; Dobrovolskis, A. R.; Jakosky, B. M.

    1979-01-01

    The present paper deals with some of the principal data on extraterrestrial atmospheres obtained during the period 1975-1978. The atmospheres of Venus, Mars, Jupiter, and the Jovian satellites are examined, showing that many first-order questions concerning composition, physical state, and kinematics of these atmospheres have been answered.

  4. African Americans & Hispanics among Physics & Astronomy Faculty: Results from the 2012 Survey of Physics & Astronomy Degree-Granting Departments. Focus On

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivie, Rachel; Anderson, Garrett; White, Susan

    2014-01-01

    The United States is becoming more and more diverse, but the representation of some minority groups in physics and astronomy lags behind. Although 13% of the US population is African American or black, and 17% is Hispanic (US Census), the representation of these two groups in physics and astronomy is much lower. For this reason, African Americans…

  5. Observed variations of methane on Mars unexplained by known atmospheric chemistry and physics.

    PubMed

    Lefèvre, Franck; Forget, François

    2009-08-06

    The detection of methane on Mars has revived the possibility of past or extant life on this planet, despite the fact that an abiogenic origin is thought to be equally plausible. An intriguing aspect of the recent observations of methane on Mars is that methane concentrations appear to be locally enhanced and change with the seasons. However, methane has a photochemical lifetime of several centuries, and is therefore expected to have a spatially uniform distribution on the planet. Here we use a global climate model of Mars with coupled chemistry to examine the implications of the recently observed variations of Martian methane for our understanding of the chemistry of methane. We find that photochemistry as currently understood does not produce measurable variations in methane concentrations, even in the case of a current, local and episodic methane release. In contrast, we find that the condensation-sublimation cycle of Mars' carbon dioxide atmosphere can generate large-scale methane variations differing from those observed. In order to reproduce local methane enhancements similar to those recently reported, we show that an atmospheric lifetime of less than 200 days is necessary, even if a local source of methane is only active around the time of the observation itself. This implies an unidentified methane loss process that is 600 times faster than predicted by standard photochemistry. The existence of such a fast loss in the Martian atmosphere is difficult to reconcile with the observed distribution of other trace gas species. In the case of a destruction mechanism only active at the surface of Mars, destruction of methane must occur with an even shorter timescale of the order of approximately 1 hour to explain the observations. If recent observations of spatial and temporal variations of methane are confirmed, this would suggest an extraordinarily harsh environment for the survival of organics on the planet.

  6. Analysis of Physical Properties of Dust Suspended in the Mars Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snook, Kelly; McKay, Chris; Cantwell, Brian

    1998-01-01

    Methods for iteratively determining the infrared optical constants for dust suspended in the Mars atmosphere are described. High quality spectra for wavenumbers from 200 to 2000 1/cm were obtained over a wide range of view angles by the Mariner 9 spacecraft, when it observed a global Martian dust storm in 1971-2. In this research, theoretical spectra of the emergent intensity from Martian dust clouds are generated using a 2-stream source-function radiative transfer code. The code computes the radiation field in a plane-parallel, vertically homogeneous, multiply scattering atmosphere. Calculated intensity spectra are compared with the actual spacecraft data to iteratively retrieve the optical properties and opacity of the dust, as well as the surface temperature of Mars at the time and location of each measurement. Many different particle size distributions a-re investigated to determine the best fit to the data. The particles are assumed spherical and the temperature profile was obtained from the CO2 band shape. Given a reasonable initial guess for the indices of refraction, the searches converge in a well-behaved fashion, producing a fit with error of less than 1.2 K (rms) to the observed brightness spectra. The particle size distribution corresponding to the best fit was a lognormal distribution with a mean particle radius, r(sub m) 0.66 pm, and variance, omega(sup 2) = 0.412 (r(sub eff) = 1.85 microns, v(sub eff) =.51), in close agreement with the size distribution found to be the best fit in the visible wavelengths in recent studies. The optical properties and the associated single scattering properties are shown to be a significant improvement over those used in existing models by demonstrating the effects of the new properties both on heating rates of the Mars atmosphere and in example spectral retrieval of surface characteristics from emission spectra.

  7. Investigation of Annealing Atmospheres on Physical Properties of Cigs Films Grown by Electrodeposition Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adel, Chihi; Fethi, Boujmil Mohamed; Brahim, Bessais

    2016-02-01

    This study investigated the effect of different annealing conditions (influence of the annealing temperature and atmosphere) on structural, microstructure, optical and electrical properties of electrodeposited CuIn1-xGaxSe2 (CIGS) thin films. X-ray diffraction analysis exhibited all the samples have grown preferentially in the [112] crystal orientation with the chalcopyrite structure and without unwanted secondary CIGS phases. With the increase of annealing temperature, energy band gap of the CIGS film decrease from 1.32 to 1.12eV. The electrical properties of the films distinctly upgraded after annealing in nitrogen+ Se vapor, and worsened when annealed in vacuum.

  8. Evaluation of the Army Physical Training and Weight Control Programs. Part 2. The Army Medical Department Advanced NCOES Course

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-09-01

    25.791 OF- 16 PROS-0.0570 76. Did your last unit break down according to levels of fitness or ability for physical training activities or exercise ? (L)Al...3=26 4=89 5=10 A-6 LIZ 76. Did your last unit break down according to levels of fitness or ability for physical training activities or exercise ...iftnoc.ew and Iden••fy by block natmbe-) Physical fitness; weight control; body fat; injuries; exercise facilities, exercise history; smoking; attitudes

  9. Accessing Solar Irradiance Data via LISIRD, the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics Interactive Solar Irradiance Datacenter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankratz, C. K.; Wilson, A.; Snow, M. A.; Lindholm, D. M.; Woods, T. N.; Traver, T.; Woodraska, D.

    2015-12-01

    The LASP Interactive Solar Irradiance Datacenter, LISIRD, http://lasp.colorado.edu/lisird, allows the science community and the public to explore and access solar irradiance and related data sets using convenient, interactive or scriptable, standards-based interfaces. LISIRD's interactive plotting allows users to investigate and download irradiance data sets from a variety of sources, including space missions, ground observatories, and modeling efforts. LISIRD's programmatic interfaces allow software-level data retrievals and facilitate automation. This presentation will describe the current state of LISIRD, provide details of the data sets it serves, outline data access methods, identify key technologies in-use, and address other related aspects of serving spectral and other time series data. We continue to improve LISIRD by integrating new data sets, and also by advancing its data management and presentation capabilities to meet evolving best practices and community needs. LISIRD is hosted and operated by the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, LASP, which has been a leader in Atmospheric and Heliophysics science for over 60 years. LASP makes a variety of space-based measurements of solar irradiance, which provide crucial input for research and modeling in solar-terrestrial interactions, space physics, planetary, atmospheric, and climate sciences. These data sets consist of fundamental measurements, composite data sets, solar indices, space weather products, and models. Current data sets available through LISIRD originate from the SORCE, SDO (EVE), UARS (SOLSTICE), TIMED (SEE), and SME space missions, as well as several other space and ground-based projects. LISIRD leverages several technologies to provide flexible and standards-based access to the data holdings available through LISIRD. This includes internet-accessible interfaces that permit data access in a variety of formats, data subsetting, as well as program-level access from data analysis

  10. Assessment of two physical parameterization schemes for desert dust emissions in an atmospheric chemistry general circulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astitha, M.; Abdel Kader, M.; Pozzer, A.; Lelieveld, J.

    2012-04-01

    Atmospheric particulate matter and more specific desert dust has been the topic of numerous research studies in the past due to the wide range of impacts in the environment and climate and the uncertainty of characterizing and quantifying these impacts in a global scale. In this work we present two physical parameterizations of the desert dust production that have been incorporated in the atmospheric chemistry general circulation model EMAC (ECHAM5/MESSy2.41 Atmospheric Chemistry). The scope of this work is to assess the impact of the two physical parameterizations in the global distribution of desert dust and highlight the advantages and disadvantages of using either technique. The dust concentration and deposition has been evaluated using the AEROCOM dust dataset for the year 2000 and data from the MODIS and MISR satellites as well as sun-photometer data from the AERONET network was used to compare the modelled aerosol optical depth with observations. The implementation of the two parameterizations and the simulations using relatively high spatial resolution (T106~1.1deg) has highlighted the large spatial heterogeneity of the dust emission sources as well as the importance of the input parameters (soil size and texture, vegetation, surface wind speed). Also, sensitivity simulations with the nudging option using reanalysis data from ECMWF and without nudging have showed remarkable differences for some areas. Both parameterizations have revealed the difficulty of simulating all arid regions with the same assumptions and mechanisms. Depending on the arid region, each emission scheme performs more or less satisfactorily which leads to the necessity of treating each desert differently. Even though this is a quite different task to accomplish in a global model, some recommendations are given and ideas for future improvements.

  11. Are there physical links between Saturn's magnetospheric planetary period oscillations, neutral atmosphere circulation, and thunderstorm activity? (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provan, G.; Cowley, S. W.

    2013-12-01

    Suggestions that the planetary period oscillations (PPOs) observed in Saturn's magnetosphere may be driven or influenced by neutral atmospheric perturbations, motivates an exploratory comparison of PPO rotation periods with available tropospheric and stratospheric determinations. Non-polar atmospheric rotation periods occupy the range ~10.2-10.7 h associated with the latitudinal jet structure, are similar north and south, and independent of season, while PPO periods lie in a narrower partly overlapping range ~10.6-10.8 h, are persistently shorter north than south, and undergo a seasonal cycle. In this cycle, widely-separated north-south PPO periods during southern summer converge across equinox to values lying within the atmospheric west jet band, remaining well-separated from east jet periods. Closest convergence occurred one year post-equinox, contemporaneously with the switch in seasonal thunderstorm activity from southern to northern hemispheres. Since most large-scale atmospheric phenomena are related to the west jets, rotating with closely similar periods, they also rotate with periods close to the PPOs under post-equinoctial conditions, but not otherwise. Specifically, post-equinox northern PPOs rotate with a period close to the southern thunderstorms, as well as the north polar spot and hexagon features, while the post equinox southern PPOs rotate with a period close to the pre-equinox northern ';string of pearls' and the first co-located post-equinox northern thunderstorm, the Great White Spot event. However, even under these conditions no consistent correspondences in period are found at a detailed level, which taken together with the lack of correspondence at other times, does not suggest a direct physical link exists between these phenomena.

  12. Saturn's magnetospheric planetary period oscillations, neutral atmosphere circulation, and thunderstorm activity: Implications, or otherwise, for physical links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowley, S. W. H.; Provan, G.

    2013-11-01

    that the planetary period oscillations (PPOs) observed in Saturn's magnetosphere may be driven or influenced by neutral atmospheric perturbations motivate an exploratory comparison of PPO rotation periods with available tropospheric and stratospheric determinations. Nonpolar atmospheric rotation periods occupy the range ~10.2-10.7 h associated with the latitudinal jet structure, are similar north and south, and are independent of season, while PPO periods lie in a narrower partly overlapping range ~10.6-10.8 h, are persistently shorter north than south, and undergo a seasonal cycle. In this cycle, widely separated north-south PPO periods during southern summer converge across equinox to values lying within the atmospheric west jet band, remaining well-separated from east jet periods. Closest convergence occurred 1 year post equinox, contemporaneously with the switch in seasonal thunderstorm activity from Southern to Northern Hemispheres. Since most large-scale atmospheric phenomena are related to the west jets, rotating with closely similar periods, they also rotate with periods close to the PPOs under post equinoctial conditions but not otherwise. Specifically, post equinox northern PPOs rotate with a period close to the southern thunderstorms, as well as the north polar spot and hexagon features, while the post equinox southern PPOs rotate with a period close to the pre-equinox northern "string of pearls" and the first colocated post equinox northern thunderstorm, the Great White Spot event. However, even under these conditions, no consistent correspondences in period are found at a detailed level, which taken together with the lack of correspondence at other times does not suggest a direct physical link exists between these phenomena.

  13. Simultaneous physical retrieval of atmospheric and surface state from Martian spectra: the phi MARS algorithm and application to TES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liuzzi, G.; Masiello, G.; Serio, C.; Mancarella, F.; Fonti, S.; Roush, T.

    The problem of fully simultaneous retrieval of surface and atmosphere has been satisfactorily addressed as far as Earth is concerned in many works \\citep{masACP09,carENSO05}, especially for high-resolution instruments. However, such retrieval know-how has been not completely implemented in other planetary contexts. In this perspective, we present a new methodology for the simultaneous retrieval of surface and atmospheric parameters of Mars. The methodology, fully explained in \\cite{liuzzi2015} is based on a non-linear, iterative optimal estimation scheme, supported by a statistical retrieval procedure used to initialize the physical retrieval algorithm with a reliable first guess of the atmospheric parameters. The forward module \\cite{liuzzi2014} is fully integrated with the inverse one, and it is a monochromatic radiative transfer model with the capability to calculate genuine analytical Jacobians of any desired geophysical parameter. We describe both the mathematical framework of the methodology and, as a proof of concept, its application to a large sample of data acquired by the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES). Results are drawn for the case of surface temperature and emissivity, atmospheric temperature profile, water vapour, dust and ice mixing ratios. Some work has also been done for revisiting the claims of methane detection with TES data \\citep{fon10,fonti2015}. Comparison with climate models and other TES data analyses show a very good agreement and consistency. Moreover, we will show how the methodology can be applied to other instruments looking at Mars, simply customizing part of the forward and reverse modules.

  14. Aerosol and nucleation research in support of NASA cloud physics experiments in space. [ice nuclei generator for the atmospheric cloud physics laboratory on Spacelab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vali, G.; Rogers, D.; Gordon, G.; Saunders, C. P. R.; Reischel, M.; Black, R.

    1978-01-01

    Tasks performed in the development of an ice nucleus generator which, within the facility concept of the ACPL, would provide a test aerosol suitable for a large number and variety of potential experiments are described. The impact of Atmospheric Cloud Physics Laboratory scientific functional requirements on ice nuclei generation and characterization subsystems was established. Potential aerosol generating systems were evaluated with special emphasis on reliability, repeatability and general suitability for application in Spacelab. Possible contamination problems associated with aerosol generation techniques were examined. The ice nucleating abilities of candidate test aerosols were examined and the possible impact of impurities on the nucleating abilities of those aerosols were assessed as well as the relative merits of various methods of aerosol size and number density measurements.

  15. The Composition and Physical Structure of the Io Torus and Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGrath, Melissa

    2004-01-01

    Generally speaking the goal of the research was to provide detailed spectral analysis of a Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope EUV/FUV spectrum of the Io plasma torus. The specific research tasks outlined to achieve this goal were: Line identifications and brightnesses. Verify line identifications with independent data sets. Simple physical modeling to derive ne, ni, Te. Determine neutral source rates. Determine implications of minor species abundances for Io processes. Determine spatial structure from HUT data.

  16. Fly in Atmosphere by Drag Force - Easy Thrust Generation Aircraft Engine Based Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierre Celestin, Mwizerwa

    2013-11-01

    This paper aims to present to the science community another way to fly in atmosphere, a way which is much more cheaper, efficient, safe and easy. Over the years scientists have been trying to find a way to built the vertically taking off vehicles but there have been no satisfactory success(what have been found was very expensive), Even aircrafts we know now need very sophisticated and expensive engines and not efficient enough. This way of flying may help our governments to spend less money on technologies and will help people to travel at very low prices so that, it may be a solution to the crisis which the world faces nowadays. In other words, it is my proposal to the next generation technologies we was looking for for years because everything can fly from the car to the trucks, the spaceships and even the hotels maybe constructed and fly as we construct the ships which sail in the oceans. My way of flying will have many applications in all the aspect of travel as it is going to be explained.

  17. Development of an Atmospheric Climate Model with Self-Adapting Grid and Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Penner, Joyce E.

    2013-08-10

    This project was targeting the development of a computational approach that would allow resolving cloud processes on small-scales within the framework of the most recent version of the NASA/NCAR Finite-Volume Community Atmospheric Model (FVCAM). The FVCAM is based on the multidimensional Flux-Form Semi-Lagrangian (FFSL) dynamical core and uses a ?vertically Lagrangian? finite-volume (FV) representation of the model equations with a mass-conserving re-mapping algorithm. The Lagrangian coordinate requires a remapping of the Lagrangian volume back to Eulerian coordinates to restore the original resolution and keep the mesh from developing distortions such as layers with overlapping interfaces. The main objectives of the project were, first, to develop the 3D library which allows refinement and coarsening of the model domain in spherical coordinates, and second, to develop a non-hydrostatic code for calculation of the model variables within the refined areas that could be seamlessly incorporated with the hydrostatic finite volume dynamical core when higher resolution is wanted. We also updated the aerosol simulation model in CAM in order to ready the model for the treatment of aerosol/cloud interactions.

  18. Numerical evaluation of static-chamber measurements of soil-atmospheric gas exchange--Identification of physical processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Healy, Richard W.; Striegl, Robert G.; Russell, Thomas F.; Hutchinson, Gordon L.; Livingston, Gerald P.

    1996-01-01

    The exchange of gases between soil and atmosphere is an important process that affects atmospheric chemistry and therefore climate. The static-chamber method is the most commonly used technique for estimating the rate of that exchange. We examined the method under hypothetical field conditions where diffusion was the only mechanism for gas transport and the atmosphere outside the chamber was maintained at a fixed concentration. Analytical and numerical solutions to the soil gas diffusion equation in one and three dimensions demonstrated that gas flux density to a static chamber deployed on the soil surface was less in magnitude than the ambient exchange rate in the absence of the chamber. This discrepancy, which increased with chamber deployment time and air-filled porosity of soil, is attributed to two physical factors: distortion of the soil gas concentration gradient (the magnitude was decreased in the vertical component and increased in the radial component) and the slow transport rate of diffusion relative to mixing within the chamber. Instantaneous flux density to a chamber decreased continuously with time; steepest decreases occurred so quickly following deployment and in response to such slight changes in mean chamber headspace concentration that they would likely go undetected by most field procedures. Adverse influences of these factors were reduced by mixing the chamber headspace, minimizing deployment time, maximizing the height and radius of the chamber, and pushing the rim of the chamber into the soil. Nonlinear models were superior to a linear regression model for estimating flux densities from mean headspace concentrations, suggesting that linearity of headspace concentration with time was not necessarily a good indicator of measurement accuracy.

  19. The atmospheric component of the Mediterranean Sea water budget in a WRF multi-physics ensemble and observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Luca, Alejandro; Flaounas, Emmanouil; Drobinski, Philippe; Brossier, Cindy Lebeaupin

    2014-11-01

    The use of high resolution atmosphere-ocean coupled regional climate models to study possible future climate changes in the Mediterranean Sea requires an accurate simulation of the atmospheric component of the water budget (i.e., evaporation, precipitation and runoff). A specific configuration of the version 3.1 of the weather research and forecasting (WRF) regional climate model was shown to systematically overestimate the Mediterranean Sea water budget mainly due to an excess of evaporation (~1,450 mm yr-1) compared with observed estimations (~1,150 mm yr-1). In this article, a 70-member multi-physics ensemble is used to try to understand the relative importance of various sub-grid scale processes in the Mediterranean Sea water budget and to evaluate its representation by comparing simulated results with observed-based estimates. The physics ensemble was constructed by performing 70 1-year long simulations using version 3.3 of the WRF model by combining six cumulus, four surface/planetary boundary layer and three radiation schemes. Results show that evaporation variability across the multi-physics ensemble (˜10 % of the mean evaporation) is dominated by the choice of the surface layer scheme that explains more than ˜70 % of the total variance and that the overestimation of evaporation in WRF simulations is generally related with an overestimation of surface exchange coefficients due to too large values of the surface roughness parameter and/or the simulation of too unstable surface conditions. Although the influence of radiation schemes on evaporation variability is small (˜13 % of the total variance), radiation schemes strongly influence exchange coefficients and vertical humidity gradients near the surface due to modifications of temperature lapse rates. The precipitation variability across the physics ensemble (˜35 % of the mean precipitation) is dominated by the choice of both cumulus (˜55 % of the total variance) and planetary boundary layer (˜32 % of

  20. In situ acoustic-based analysis system for physical and chemical properties of the lower Martian atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrelly, F. A.; Petri, A.; Pitolli, L.; Pontuale, G.

    2004-01-01

    The environmental acoustic reconnaissance and sounding experiment (EARS), is composed of two parts: the environmental acoustic reconnaissance (EAR) instrument and the environmental acoustic sounding experiment (EASE). They are distinct, but have the common objective of characterizing the acoustic environment of Mars. The principal goal of the EAR instrument is "listening" to Mars. This could be a most significant experiment if one thinks of everyday life experience where hearing is possibly the most important sense after sight. Not only will this contribute to opening up this important area of planetary exploration, which has been essentially ignored until now, but will also bring the general public closer in contact with our most proximate planet. EASE is directed at characterizing acoustic propagation parameters, specifically sound velocity and absorption, and will provide information regarding important physical and chemical parameters of the lower Martian atmosphere; in particular, water vapor content, specific heat capacity, heat conductivity and shear viscosity, which will provide specific constraints in determining its composition. This would enable one to gain a deeper understanding of Mars and its analogues on Earth. Furthermore, the knowledge of the physical and chemical parameters of the Martian atmosphere, which influence its circulation, will improve the comprehension of its climate now and in the past, so as to gain insight on the possibility of the past presence of life on Mars. These aspect are considered strategic in the contest of its exploration, as is clearly indicated in NASA's four main objectives on "Long Term Mars Exploration Program" (http://marsweb.jpl.nasa.gov/mer/science).

  1. Physical Processes Governing Atmospheric Trace Constituents Measured from an Aircraft on PEM-Tropics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newell, Reginald E.; Hoell, James M., Jr. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Before the mission, the PI (principal investigator) was instrumental in securing real-time use of the new 51-level ECMWF (European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts) meteorological data. During the mission, he provided flight planning and execution guidance as meteorologist for the P-3B. Mr. Yong Zhu computed and plotted meteorological forecast maps using the ECMWF data and transmitted them to the field from MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology). Dr. John Cho was in the field for the Christmas Island portion to extract data from the on-site NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) radars for local wind profiles that were used at the flight planning meetings. When the power supply for the VHF radar failed, he assisted the NOAA engineer in its repair. After the mission, Mr. Zhu produced meteorological data memos, which were made available to the PEM (Pacific Exploratory Mission)-Tropics B science team on request. An undergraduate student, Ms. Danielle Morse, wrote memos annotating the cloud conditions seen on the aircraft external monitor video tapes. Dr. Cho and the PI circulated a memo regarding the status (and associated problems) of the meteorological measurement systems on the DC-8 and P-3B to the relevant people on the science team. Several papers by members of our project were completed and accepted by JGR (Journal of Geophysical Research) for the first special section on PEM-Tropics B. These papers included coverage of the following topics: 1) examination of boundary layer data; 2) water vapor transport; 3) tropospheric trace constituent layers; 4) summarizations of the meteorological background and events during PEM-Tropics B; 5) concomitant lidar measurements of ozone, water vapor, and aerosol.

  2. The contributions of Lewis Fry Richardson to drainage theory, soil physics, and the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, John; Raats, Peter

    2016-04-01

    The EGU Division on Nonlinear Processes in Geophysics awards the Lewis Fry Richardson Medal. Richardson's significance is highlighted in http://www.egu.eu/awards-medals/portrait-lewis-fry-richardson/, but his contributions to soil physics and to numerical solutions of heat and diffusion equations are not mentioned. We would like to draw attention to those little known contributions. Lewis Fry Richardson (1881-1953) made important contributions to many fields including numerical weather prediction, finite difference solutions of partial differential equations, turbulent flow and diffusion, fractals, quantitative psychology and studies of conflict. He invented numerical weather prediction during World War I, although his methods were not successfully applied until 1950, after the invention of fast digital computers. In 1922 he published the book `Numerical weather prediction', of which few copies were sold and even fewer were read until the 1950s. To model heat and mass transfer in the atmosphere, he did much original work on turbulent flow and defined what is now known as the Richardson number. His technique for improving the convergence of a finite difference calculation is known as Richardson extrapolation, and was used by John Philip in his 1957 semi-analytical solution of the Richards equation for water movement in unsaturated soil. Richardson's first papers in 1908 concerned the numerical solution of the free surface problem of unconfined flow of water in saturated soil, arising in the design of drain spacing in peat. Later, for the lower boundary of his atmospheric model he needed to understand the movement of heat, liquid water and water vapor in what is now called the vadose zone and the soil plant atmosphere system, and to model coupled transfer of heat and flow of water in unsaturated soil. Finding little previous work, he formulated partial differential equations for transient, vertical flow of liquid water and for transfer of heat and water vapor. He

  3. Evaluation of the Army Physical Training and Weight Control Programs. Part 1. The Army Medical Department Officer Advanced Course

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-09-01

    identify by block nume, br) Physic.l fitness; weight control; body fat , injuries, exercise ’facilities; exerct’se history; smoking, attitudes...Measures of strength, stamina, and body fat percentage were collected, and a survey instrument covering lifestyle, nature of fitness program to which...THIS PAG•,(•.m•Do& A•ft Q. " .5- variables, lifestyle, body fat level, attitudes, and fitness; (2) assessed the / impact of Instutitional support for

  4. Influence of Inert and Oxidizing Atmospheres on the Physical and Optical Properties of Luminescent Carbon Dots Prepared through Pyrolysis of a Model Molecule.

    PubMed

    Machado, Cláudia Emanuele; Tartuci, Letícia Gazola; de Fátima Gorgulho, Honória; de Oliveira, Luiz Fernando Cappa; Bettini, Jefferson; Pereira dos Santos, Daniela; Ferrari, Jefferson Luis; Schiavon, Marco Antônio

    2016-03-18

    This work used L-tartaric acid as a model molecule to evaluate how the use of inert and oxidizing atmospheres during pyrolysis affected the physical and optical properties of the resulting carbon dots (CDs). Pyrolysis revealed to be a simple procedure that afforded CDs in a single step, dismissed the addition of organic solvents, and involved only one extraction stage that employed water. By X-ray diffraction a dependency between the structure of the CDs and the atmosphere (oxidizing or inert) used during the pyrolysis was found. Potentiometric titration demonstrated that the CDs were largely soluble in water; it also aided characterization of the various groups that contained sp(3) -hybridized carbon atoms on the surface of the dots. Raman spectroscopy suggested that different amounts of sp(2)- and sp(3)-hybridized carbon atoms emerged on the CDs depending on the pyrolysis atmosphere. In conclusion, the pyrolysis atmosphere influenced the physical properties, such as the composition and the final structure.

  5. On the role of atmospheric forcing on upper ocean physics in the Southern Ocean and biological impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carranza, Magdalena M.

    The Southern Ocean (SO) plays a key role in regulating climate by absorbing nearly half of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2). Both physical and biogeochemical processes contribute to the net CO2 sink. As a result of global warming and ozone depletion, westerly winds have increased, with consequences for upper ocean physics but little is known on how primary producers are expected to respond to changes in atmospheric forcing. This thesis addresses the impact of atmospheric forcing on upper ocean dynamics and phytoplankton bloom development in the SO on synoptic storm scales, combining a broad range of observations derived from satellites, reanalysis, profiling floats and Southern elephant seals. On atmospheric synoptic timescales (2-10 days), relevant for phytoplankton growth and accumulation, wind speed has a larger impact on satellite Chl-a variability than surface heat fluxes or wind stress curl. In summer, strong winds are linked to deep mixed layers, cold sea surface temperatures and enhanced satellite chlorophyll-a (Chl-a), which suggest wind-driven entrainment plays a role in sustaining phytoplankton blooms at the surface. Subsurface bio-optical data from floats and seals reveal deep Chl-a fluorescence maxima (DFM) are ubiquitous in summer and tend to sit at the base of the mixed layer, but can occur in all seasons. The fact that wind speed and Chl-a correlations are maximal at zero lag time (from daily data) and incubation experiments indicate phytoplankton growth occurs 3-4 days after iron addition, suggests high winds in summer entrain Chl-a from a subsurface maximum. Vertical profiles also reveal Chl-a fluorescence unevenness within hydrographically defined mixed layers, suggesting the biological timescales of adaptation through the light gradient (i.e. growth and/or photoacclimation) are often faster than mixing timescales, and periods of quiescence between storms are long enough for biological gradients to form within the homogeneous layer in density

  6. Does Size Matter? Searching for Rhyme or Reason in Course-End Student Surveys in a Large, Eclectic Physics Department

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peak, David

    2006-10-01

    Over the past eight years, surveys of student opinion have been collected (near term-end) in all courses at Utah State University using the same survey instrument. The instrument consists of 25 questions, each of which can be responded to by choosing an integer ranking between 1 (``very poor'') and 6 (``excellent''). The University reports a statistical summary of all surveys each term in which all responses are treated equally irrespective of class size (a factor University administrators have asserted is negligible). Discussions of survey content at USU usually focus solely on two items: ``rate the course'' and ``rate the instructor.'' To some extent faculty tenure, promotion, and salary are based on these two aggregated data. Because of their possible impact on faculty careers, I have examined all responses in all surveys collected over the years in my department. Typical of social data, these results exhibit substantial variability and are highly non-normal. Appropriately treated, however, they reveal a significant class size dependence on the two ``rate the...'' global items. This fact harbors potentially important policy considerations for departments (like mine) that have a broad range of class enrollments.

  7. Physical-Biogeochemical Interactions that Alter the Uptake of Atmospheric CO2 in the Barents Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Signorini, S. R.; Hakkinen, S. M.; McClain, C. R.

    2009-04-01

    The Barents Sea is characterized by significant calcification rates during summer promoted by intense coccolithophore blooms that peak during August. Coccolithophores, among which Emiliania huxleyi (E. huxleyi) is the most abundant and widespread species, are considered to be the most productive calcifying organisms on Earth. They inhabit the surface layer (MLD 20m) in highly stratified waters where light intensity is high. E. huxleyi often forms massive blooms in temperate and sub-polar oceans. Coupling of the coccolithophore organic carbon and carbonate pumps interact to consume (photosynthesis) and produce (calcification) CO2. The so-called Rain Ratio, defined as the ratio of particulate inorganic carbon (PIC) to particulate organic carbon (POC) in exported biogenic matter, determines the relative strength of the two biological carbon pumps and influences the flux of CO2 across the surface ocean - atmosphere interface. Here we use a combination of satellite ocean color algorithms, coupled ice-ocean model products, an SST-dependent pCO2 algorithm, and gas exchange parameterization to describe the seasonal and decadal variability of the air-sea CO2 flux in the Barents Sea. Model-derived SST and SSS (1955-2008) are used in conjunction with the pCO2 algorithm and carbonate chemistry to derive decadal trends of sea-air CO2 flux, pH and calcite saturation state. Phytoplankton and calcite production have strong spatial variability. Nutrient supply, biomass and calcite concentrations are modulated by light and MLD seasonal cycle. The size, intensity, and location of coccolithophore blooms vary from year to year, but the peak bloom is always in June in the Central Basin of the sub-polar North Atlantic (45oW - 10oW, 50oN - 65oN) and August in the Barents Sea. Calcification rates range from 5% to 27% of net primary production. The Barents Sea PIC production is about twice that of the Central Basin. Predicted freshening and warming of polar seas may increase stratification

  8. Department of Physics' Involvement of the Impact Testing Project of the High Speed Civil Transport Program (HSCT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VonMeerwall, Ernst D.

    1994-01-01

    The project involved the impact testing of a kevlar-like woven polymer material, PBO. The purpose was to determine whether this material showed any promise as a lightweight replacement material for jet engine fan containment. The currently used metal fan containment designs carry a high drag penalty due to their weight. Projectiles were fired at samples of PBO by means of a 0.5 inch diameter Helium powered gun. The Initial plan was to encase the samples inside a purpose-built steel "hot box" for heating and ricochet containment. The research associate's responsibility was to develop the data acquisition programs and techniques necessary to determine accurately the impacting projectile's velocity. Beyond this, the Research Associate's duties include any physical computations, experimental design, and data analysis necessary.

  9. Physical and chemical characterization of marine atmospheric aerosols over the North and South Pacific Oceans using single particle mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furutani, H.; Jung, J.; Miura, K.; Uematsu, M.

    2010-12-01

    Physical and chemical properties of marine atmospheric aerosols were characterized and compared over the North and South Pacific Ocean during two trans-Pacific cruises (from Japan to Chile and Australia to Japan) during the period of January-June 2009, which cover broad region of Pacific Ocean from 40°N to 55°S and 140°E to 70°W. The measured parameters of aerosol properties were single particle size-resolved chemical composition (D = 100 ~ 1500 nm), cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and condensation nuclei (CN) concentrations, size distribution from 10 nm to 5 μm, total aerosol nitrate and sulfate concentrations, and filter-based chemical composition. Trace gas concentrations of O3 and CO were also measured to aid air parcel categorization during the cruises. Reflecting larger anthropogenic emission in the Northern Hemisphere, pronounced concentration gradient between the North and South Pacific Ocean was observed for aerosol nitrate, CO, and O3. Aerosol sulfate also showed a similar concentration drop in the equatorial region, relatively higher sulfate concentration was observed in 30°S-40°S and 55°S regions, which was associated with increased aerosol methanesulfonic acid (MSA) concentration but little increase in local marine chlorophyll concentration, suggesting contribution of long-range transported marine biogenic sulfur from the high primary production area over the South Pacific high latitude region. Aerosol chemical classification by single particle chemical analysis revealed that certain aerosol types, such as biomass burning, elemental carbon, and elemental/organic carbon mixed type, were mainly observed in the North Pacific region, while several specific organic aerosol types with abundant aged organic and disulfur composition were identified in the South Pacific region. Further comparison of aerosol properties, aerosol sources, and atmospheric aerosol processing in the North and South Pacific Oceans will be discussed.

  10. Final performance report to the Department of Energy by Prairie View A & M University High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Judd, D.J.

    1992-05-14

    The High Energy Physics (HEP) group at Prairie View A&M University is a collaboratory with Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), and the universities listed below. The purpose of this collaboration is to contribute to the understanding of heavy quark hadroproduction. Our efforts began in the early 1980`s at Fermilab with the study of the charmonium states, J/{psi} and {chi}, (DE-FG-86ER-40297) and presently with the continued studies of the charmonium system and direct photon production (Fermilab experiment E705) and new studies on bottom production (Fermilab experiment E771) in the High Intensity Laboratory (Proton-West Area) of Fermilab. The Prairie View group will, as a part of their task, be directly responsible for a major part of the PWC system upgrade by developing the electronics for the readouts of the PWC pad chambers. Six in all, these chambers, are a part of new multilevel triggering scheme and represents a departure from the triggering methodology of the previous trigger processors in earlier experiments. The Prairie View group is also involved with the Bottom Collider Detector (BCD) Collaboration which is proposing to study bottom production at the Fermilab Collider and at the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC).

  11. Emergency department documentation templates: variability in template selection and association with physical examination and test ordering in dizziness presentations

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Clinical documentation systems, such as templates, have been associated with process utilization. The T-System emergency department (ED) templates are widely used but lacking are analyses of the templates association with processes. This system is also unique because of the many different template options available, and thus the selection of the template may also be important. We aimed to describe the selection of templates in ED dizziness presentations and to investigate the association between items on templates and process utilization. Methods Dizziness visits were captured from a population-based study of EDs that use documentation templates. Two relevant process outcomes were assessed: head computerized tomography (CT) scan and nystagmus examination. Multivariable logistic regression was used to estimate the probability of each outcome for patients who did or did not receive a relevant-item template. Propensity scores were also used to adjust for selection effects. Results The final cohort was 1,485 visits. Thirty-one different templates were used. Use of a template with a head CT item was associated with an increase in the adjusted probability of head CT utilization from 12.2% (95% CI, 8.9%-16.6%) to 29.3% (95% CI, 26.0%-32.9%). The adjusted probability of documentation of a nystagmus assessment increased from 12.0% (95%CI, 8.8%-16.2%) when a nystagmus-item template was not used to 95.0% (95% CI, 92.8%-96.6%) when a nystagmus-item template was used. The associations remained significant after propensity score adjustments. Conclusions Providers use many different templates in dizziness presentations. Important differences exist in the various templates and the template that is used likely impacts process utilization, even though selection may be arbitrary. The optimal design and selection of templates may offer a feasible and effective opportunity to improve care delivery. PMID:21435250

  12. Use of high-volume outdoor smog chamber photo-reactors for studying physical and chemical atmospheric aerosol formation and composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borrás, E.; Ródenas, M.; Vera, T.; Muñoz, A.

    2015-12-01

    The atmospheric particulate matter has a large impact on climate, biosphere behaviour and human health. Its study is complex because of large number of species are present at low concentrations and the continuous time evolution, being not easily separable from meteorology, and transport processes. Closed systems have been proposed by isolating specific reactions, pollutants or products and controlling the oxidizing environment. High volume simulation chambers, such as EUropean PHOtoREactor (EUPHORE), are an essential tool used to simulate atmospheric photochemical reactions. This communication describes the last results about the reactivity of prominent atmospheric pollutants and the subsequent particulate matter formation. Specific experiments focused on organic aerosols have been developed at the EUPHORE photo-reactor. The use of on-line instrumentation, supported by off-line techniques, has provided well-defined reaction profiles, physical properties, and up to 300 different species are determined in particulate matter. The application fields include the degradation of anthropogenic and biogenic pollutants, and pesticides under several atmospheric conditions, studying their contribution on the formation of secondary organic aerosols (SOA). The studies performed at the EUPHORE have improved the mechanistic studies of atmospheric degradation processes and the knowledge about the chemical and physical properties of atmospheric particulate matter formed during these processes.

  13. Fine-Structure Measurements of Oxygen A Band Absorbance for Estimating the Thermodynamic Average Temperature of the Earth's Atmosphere: An Experiment in Physical and Environmental Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myrick, M. L.; Greer, A. E.; Nieuwland, A.; Priore, R. J.; Scaffidi, J.; Andreatta, Daniele; Colavita, Paula

    2006-01-01

    The experiment describe the measures of the A band transitions of atmospheric oxygen, a rich series of rotation-electronic absorption lines falling in the deep red portion of the optical spectrum and clearly visible owing to attenuation of solar radiation. It combines pure physical chemistry with analytical and environmental science and provides a…

  14. Final Report DE-FG02-00ER54583: "Physics of Atmospheric Pressure Glow Discharges" and "Nanoparticle Nucleation and Dynamics in Low-Pressure Plasmas"

    SciTech Connect

    Uwe Kortshagen; Joachim Heberlein; Steven L. Girshick

    2009-06-01

    This project was funded over two periods of three years each, with an additional year of no-cost extension. Research in the first funding period focused on the physics of uniform atmospheric pressure glow discharges, the second funding period was devoted to the study of the dynamics of nanometer-sized particles in plasmas.

  15. Phase B: Final definition and preliminary design study for the initial Atmospheric Cloud Physics Laboratory (ACPL): A spacelab mission payload. Final review (DR-MA-03)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clausen, O. W.

    1976-01-01

    Systems design for an initial atmospheric cloud physics laboratory to study microphysical processes in zero gravity is presented. Included are descriptions of the fluid, thermal, mechanical, control and data, and electrical distribution interfaces with Spacelab. Schedule and cost analysis are discussed.

  16. MECA Workshop on Atmospheric H2O Observations of Earth and Mars. Physical Processes, Measurements and Interpretations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clifford, Stephen M. (Editor); Haberle, Robert M. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    The workshop was held to discuss a variety of questions related to the detection and cycling of atmospheric water. Among the questions addressed were: what factors govern the storage and exchange of water between planetary surfaces and atmospheres; what instruments are best suited for the measurement and mapping of atmospheric water; do regolith sources and sinks of water have uniquely identifiable column abundance signatures; what degree of time and spatial resolution in column abundance data is necessary to determine dynamic behavior. Of special importance is the question, does the understanding of how atmospheric water is cycled on Earth provide any insights for the interpretation of Mars atmospheric data.

  17. On the physical processes ruling an atmospheric pressure air glow discharge operating in an intermediate current regime

    SciTech Connect

    Prevosto, L. Mancinelli, B.; Chamorro, J. C.; Cejas, E.; Kelly, H.

    2015-02-15

    Low-frequency (100 Hz), intermediate-current (50 to 200 mA) glow discharges were experimentally investigated in atmospheric pressure air between blunt copper electrodes. Voltage–current characteristics and images of the discharge for different inter-electrode distances are reported. A cathode-fall voltage close to 360 V and a current density at the cathode surface of about 11 A/cm{sup 2}, both independent of the discharge current, were found. The visible emissive structure of the discharge resembles to that of a typical low-pressure glow, thus suggesting a glow-like electric field distribution in the discharge. A kinetic model for the discharge ionization processes is also presented with the aim of identifying the main physical processes ruling the discharge behavior. The numerical results indicate the presence of a non-equilibrium plasma with rather high gas temperature (above 4000 K) leading to the production of components such as NO, O, and N which are usually absent in low-current glows. Hence, the ionization by electron-impact is replaced by associative ionization, which is independent of the reduced electric field. This leads to a negative current-voltage characteristic curve, in spite of the glow-like features of the discharge. On the other hand, several estimations show that the discharge seems to be stabilized by heat conduction; being thermally stable due to its reduced size. All the quoted results indicate that although this discharge regime might be considered to be close to an arc, it is still a glow discharge as demonstrated by its overall properties, supported also by the presence of thermal non-equilibrium.

  18. Multi-scale Drivers of Variations in Atmospheric Evaporative Demand Based on Observations and Physically-based Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, L.; Sheffield, J.; Li, D.

    2015-12-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) is a key link between the availability of water resources and climate change and climate variability. Variability of ET has important environmental and socioeconomic implications for managing hydrological hazards, food and energy production. Although there have been many observational and modeling studies of ET, how ET has varied and the drivers of the variations at different temporal scales remain elusive. Much of the uncertainty comes from the atmospheric evaporative demand (AED), which is the combined effect of radiative and aerodynamic controls. The inconsistencies among modeled AED estimates and the limited observational data may originate from multiple sources including the limited time span and uncertainties in the data. To fully investigate and untangle the intertwined drivers of AED, we present a spectrum analysis to identify key controls of AED across multiple temporal scales. We use long-term records of observed pan evaporation for 1961-2006 from 317 weather stations across China and physically-based model estimates of potential evapotranspiration (PET). The model estimates are based on surface meteorology and radiation derived from reanalysis, satellite retrievals and station data. Our analyses show that temperature plays a dominant role in regulating variability of AED at the inter-annual scale. At the monthly and seasonal scales, the primary control of AED shifts from radiation in humid regions to humidity in dry regions. Unlike many studies focusing on the spatial pattern of ET drivers based on a traditional supply and demand framework, this study underlines the importance of temporal scales when discussing controls of ET variations.

  19. Optimisation of the usage of LHC and local computing resources in a multidisciplinary physics department hosting a WLCG Tier-2 centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barberis, Stefano; Carminati, Leonardo; Leveraro, Franco; Mazza, Simone Michele; Perini, Laura; Perlz, Francesco; Rebatto, David; Tura, Ruggero; Vaccarossa, Luca; Villaplana, Miguel

    2015-12-01

    We present the approach of the University of Milan Physics Department and the local unit of INFN to allow and encourage the sharing among different research areas of computing, storage and networking resources (the largest ones being those composing the Milan WLCG Tier-2 centre and tailored to the needs of the ATLAS experiment). Computing resources are organised as independent HTCondor pools, with a global master in charge of monitoring them and optimising their usage. The configuration has to provide satisfactory throughput for both serial and parallel (multicore, MPI) jobs. A combination of local, remote and cloud storage options are available. The experience of users from different research areas operating on this shared infrastructure is discussed. The promising direction of improving scientific computing throughput by federating access to distributed computing and storage also seems to fit very well with the objectives listed in the European Horizon 2020 framework for research and development.

  20. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1989 to the DOE (Department of Energy) Office of Energy Research - Part 4: Physical Sciences

    SciTech Connect

    Toburen, L.H.; Stults, B.R.; Mahaffey, J.A.

    1990-04-01

    This 1989 Annual Report from Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to the US Department of Energy (DOE) describes research in environment, safety, and health conducted during fiscal year 1989. The report again consists of five parts, each in a separate volume. This volume contains 20 papers. Part 4 of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory Annual Report of 1989 to the DOE Office of Energy Research includes those programs funded under the title Physical and Technological Research.'' The Field Task Program Studies reported in this document are grouped by budget category and each Field Task proposal/agreement is introduced by an abstract that describes the projects reported in that section. These reports only briefly indicate progress made during 1989. 74 refs., 29 figs., 6 tabs.

  1. Measurements of the impact of atmospheric aging on physical and optical properties of ambient black carbon particles in Los Angeles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasowsky, Trevor S.; McMeeking, Gavin R.; Wang, Dongbin; Sioutas, Constantinos; Ban-Weiss, George A.

    2016-10-01

    Understanding how physical and optical properties of atmospheric black carbon (BC) particles vary in time and space is critical for reducing uncertainty in climate forcing estimates from ambient BC. In this study, ambient BC was measured in Rubidoux, California, approximately 90 km (55 miles) downwind of downtown Los Angeles. Collocated NOx and NOy measurements were used to estimate the photochemical age of the sampled air. Sampling was conducted throughout entire days between February 3, 2015 and March 12, 2015 to capture diurnal and daily variations in ambient BC. Both ambient and thermally-denuded air was sampled in 15-min cycles to compare the physical and optical properties of coated versus uncoated BC particles. Physical properties of individual BC particles including mass and coating thickness were measured using a Single-Particle Soot Photometer (SP2), and BC optical properties were measured using a Photoacoustic Extinctiometer (PAX) at 870 nm. The mean BC mass concentration (±standard deviation) for the campaign was 0.12 ± 0.08 μg m-3. BC mass concentrations were higher on weekdays than weekends, though only differences between 11:00 and 17:00 h were statistically distinguishable. The fraction of total BC particles that were thickly-coated (f) was found to be relatively low, with a mean of 0.05 ± 0.02 over the campaign. Values for f peaked in the afternoon when photochemical pollutant concentrations are also generally at a maximum. Further, f at 15:00-16:00 h was found to be statistically higher on weekends than weekdays, potentially due to a higher relative amount of ambient SOA to BC on weekends versus weekdays, which would enhance SOA coating of primary BC particles as they age during transport from the western Los Angeles basin to our sampling site on weekends. Differences at other hours during the photochemically active period of the day (10:00-14:00 h) were not statistically different although the weekend values were systematically higher

  2. Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheric Sciences physical retrieval system for remote determination of weather and climate parameter from HIRS2 and MSU observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Susskind, J.

    1984-01-01

    At the Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheric Sciences (GLAS) a physically based satellite temperature sounding retrieval system, involving the simultaneous analysis of HIRS2 and MSU sounding data, was developed for determining atmospheric and surface conditions which are consistent with the observed radiances. In addition to determining accurate atmospheric temperature profiles even in the presence of cloud contamination, the system provides global estimates of day and night sea or land surface temperatures, snow and ice cover, and parameters related to cloud cover. Details of the system are described elsewhere. A brief overview of the system is presented, as well as recent improvements and previously unpublished results, relating to the sea-surface intercomparison workshop, the diurnal variation of ground temperatures, and forecast impact tests.

  3. A Physical Experiment to determine the Impact of Atmospheric Condensation of Water Vapour on Surface Air Movement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunyard, Peter

    2014-05-01

    A physical experiment, in which atmospheric air is enclosed in two interconnecting 4.8-metre high insulated PVC columns, consistently gives results showing that the condensation of water vapor, precipitated by means of refrigeration coils, gives rise to detectable air movements, with air speeds of up to 0.1 m/s. Once the compressor, sited well away from the two columns, is shut down, heavy drops of precipitated water are obtained which funnel into a flask for collection and measurement. The results in kg.m-2 (mm) from the 20 m3 volume of enclosed air accord well (>90%) with the physical calculations based on water vapour as an ideal gas. Air flow, resulting from the highly localized condensation, is measured through the movement of light-weight gauzes and an anemometer. It has a circulation time of some two minutes, such that both columns show cooling and a significant reduction in specific humidity from 0.01 to 0.005 (kg water vapour to kg dry air, r) with a drop in relative humidity of up to 40 per cent. Air flow is minimal during the control, non-refrigeration period of the experiment but becomes substantial within a minute of the compressor being switched on. The negative partial pressure change peaks at as much as 0.4 Pa/s during the first 30 minutes but reduces to approx.0.08 Pa/s during the latter part of the 110 minute-long experiment. Airflow displays an inverse relationship to the partial pressure change, initially rising rapidly and then reducing before returning to zero once refrigeration has been switched off. Inverse correlations of up to 0.8 or higher between the partial pressure reduction and the airflow are obtained routinely. Semi-aquatic vegetation from the nearby marshland enhances precipitation, suggesting that evapotranspiration adds significantly to humidity. Without vegetation the condensation rate is 0.06 to 0.07 millimol.m-3.s-1 on average compared with 0.11 when vegetation is present. Cooling, by some 2°C, combined with a reduction in

  4. A Physical Experiment to determine the Impact of Atmospheric Condensation of Water Vapor on Surface Air Movement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunyard, P. P.; Nechev, P.

    2013-12-01

    A physical experiment, in which atmospheric air is enclosed in two interconnecting 4.8-metre high insulated PVC columns, consistently gives results showing that the condensation of water vapor, precipitated by means of refrigeration coils, gives rise to detectable air movements, with air speeds of up to 0.1 m/s. Once the compressor, sited well away from the two columns, is shut down, heavy drops of precipitated water are obtained which funnel into a flask for collection and measurement. The results in kg.m-2 (mm) from the 20 m3 volume of enclosed air accord well (>90%) with the physical calculations based on water vapor as an ideal gas. Air flow, resulting from the highly localized condensation, is measured through the movement of light-weight gauzes and an anemometer. It has a circulation time of some two minutes, such that both columns show cooling and a significant reduction in specific humidity from 0.01 to 0.005 (kg water vapor to kg dry air, r) with a drop in relative humidity of up to 40 per cent. Air flow is minimal during the control, non-refrigeration period of the experiment but becomes substantial within a minute of the compressor being switched on. The negative partial pressure change peaks at as much as 0.4 Pa/s during the first 30 minutes but reduces to approx. 0.08 Pa/s during the latter part of the 110 minute- long experiment. Airflow displays an inverse relationship to the partial pressure change, initially rising rapidly and then reducing before returning to zero once refrigeration has been switched off. Inverse correlations of up to 0.8 or higher between the partial pressure reduction and the airflow are obtained routinely. Semi-aquatic vegetation from the nearby marshland enhances precipitation, suggesting that evapotranspiration adds significantly to humidity. Without vegetation the condensation rate is 0.06 to 0.07 millimol.m-3.s-1 on average compared with 0.11 when vegetation is present. Cooling, by some 2°C, combined with a reduction in

  5. Atmospheric coupling of Tsunami: observations from Tohoku and impact on tsunami physical properties and phase/group velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lognonne, P. H.; Kherani, E. A.; Coisson, P.; Astafyeva, E.; Occhipinti, G.; Rolland, L. M.; Yahagi, T.; Khelfi, K.; Sladen, A.; Hebert, H.; Makela, J. J.

    2012-12-01

    Tsunamis, through a dynamic coupling between the ocean and atmosphere, are generating atmospheric waves, detected in the ionosphere for tsunamis with amplitudes as much as 1 cm in the open ocean. Signals associated to the Tohoku tsunami have therefore been observed with huge signal to noise ratio, not only over Japan, but all over the Pacific, up to Chili. These signals have been moreover modelled, not only for the Total Electronic Contents perturbation signals, but also of the airglow detected for the first time over Hawaii and for the magnetic perturbations detected in Japan. We present in this paper the two sides of this coupling. The first side resumes the different observations and modelling of the Tohoku ionospheric signals observed by GEONET, by the GSI magnetic network and by Airglow cameras in Hawaii and Chili. Comparison between data and modelling are shown. The second side present the effects of the atmospheric coupling on the tsunami properties, i.e. amplitudes, phase/group velocities and excitation coefficients. By taking into account the coupling of tsunami with both the solid Earth and atmosphere, we show that specific resonances between the ocean and the atmosphere exist, enabling to understand the large and peaked signal spectrum. Local Time and geographical variations of this coupling is studied, as well as its dependence with the ocean depth. The impacts of atmospheric coupling on the propagation travel time of tsunamis is finally presented and discussed.

  6. Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bromley, D. Allan

    1980-01-01

    The author presents the argument that the past few years, in terms of new discoveries, insights, and questions raised, have been among the most productive in the history of physics. Selected for discussion are some of the most important new developments in physics research. (Author/SA)

  7. JEM-EUSO: an opportunity for carrying out researches in atmospheric physics, meteorology and climatology using remote sensing techniques from space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassardo, C.

    2010-09-01

    of clouds in the respective pixels and the cloud-top altitude. Thus, besides providing valuable information for the Extreme Energy Cosmic Ray observation from space, the potential of the AMS could be very effective in observing poor studied transient atmospheric phenomena and in addressing research on other relevant questions in atmospheric physics that are yet without answers. Among these, we could quote: monitoring cloud coverage; monitoring air transparency by detecting aerosol and subvisible clouds layers; creating 3D cloud maps, by evaluating top, depth and other cloud properties, and interpreting their dynamics; carrying out micro-meteors statistics; studying gravity waves; understanding space-atmosphere interactions and possibly related climate changes; improving the knowledge on mesoscale convective system; finding the aerosols distribution in lower atmosphere and establishing their role in provoking thunderstorms; impact phenomena of meteorites and interaction of dust with clouds and radiative properties in the atmosphere; monitoring and understanding light transient phenomena (elves, sprites, terrestrial gamma flashes and generally atmospheric discharge phenomena) with their possible impact on aviation safety). The expected benefits of this unique effort will have long-lasting effects on fundamental physics of high energies and important relapses on atmospheric physics science.

  8. Influence of the micro-physical properties of the aerosol on the atmospheric correction of OLI data acquired over desert area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzo, Ciro; Bassani, Cristiana

    2016-04-01

    This paper focuses on the evaluation of surface reflectance obtained by different atmospheric correction algorithms of the Landsat 8 OLI data considering or not the micro-physical properties of the aerosol when images are acquired in desert area located in South-West of Nile delta. The atmospheric correction of remote sensing data was shown to be sensitive to the aerosol micro-physical properties, as reported in Bassani et al., 2012. In particular, the role of the aerosol micro-physical properties on the accuracy of the atmospheric correction of remote sensing data was investigated [Bassani et al., 2015; Tirelli et al., 2015]. In this work, the OLI surface reflectance was retrieved by the developed OLI@CRI (OLI ATmospherically Corrected Reflectance Imagery) physically-based atmospheric correction which considers the aerosol micro-physical properties available from the two AERONET stations [Holben et al., 1998] close to the study area (El_Farafra and Cairo_EMA_2). The OLI@CRI algorithm is based on 6SV radiative transfer model, last generation of the Second Simulation of a Satellite Signal in the Solar Spectrum (6S) radiative transfer code [Kotchenova et al., 2007; Vermote et al., 1997], specifically developed for Landsat 8 OLI data. The OLI reflectance obtained by the OLI@CRI was compared with reflectance obtained by other atmospheric correction algorithms which do not consider micro-physical properties of aerosol (DOS) or take on aerosol standard models (FLAASH, implemented in ENVI software). The accuracy of the surface reflectance retrieved by different algorithms were calculated by comparing the spatially resampled OLI images with the MODIS surface reflectance products. Finally, specific image processing was applied to the OLI reflectance images in order to compare remote sensing products obtained for same scene. The results highlight the influence of the physical characterization of aerosol on the OLI data improving the retrieved atmospherically corrected

  9. The Atmosphere of Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, J. E. (Editor)

    1975-01-01

    Topics considered at the conference included the dynamics, structure, chemistry, and evolution of the Venus atmosphere, as well as cloud physics and motion. Infrared, ultraviolet, and radio occultation methods of analysis are discussed, and atmospheric models are described.

  10. Improvement of the Cloud Physics Formulation in the U.S. Navy Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-30

    following tasks: 1. Investigation of aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions in COAMPS using the CIMMS bulk drizzle parameterization 2...Naval Research Laboratory’s Coupled Ocean/Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS) equipped with the CIMMS bulk drizzle scheme. In an...activation parameterization, giant CCN parameterization, SGS variability) developed at CIMMS /OU will be made available to NRL and registered COAMPS users

  11. Atmospheric Aging and Its Impacts on Physical Properties of Soot Aerosols: Results from the 2009 SHARP/SOOT Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, R.; Khalizov, A. F.; Zheng, J.; Reed, C. C.; Collins, D. R.; Olaguer, E. P.

    2009-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols impact the Earth energy balance directly by scattering solar radiation back to space and indirectly by changing the albedo, frequency, and lifetime of clouds. Carbon soot (or black carbon) produced from incomplete combustion of fossil fuels and biomass burning represents a major component of primary aerosols. Because of high absorption cross-sections over a broad range of the electromagnetic spectra, black carbon contributes significantly to climate change by direct radiative forcing and is the second most important component causing global warming after carbon dioxide. In areas identified as aerosol hotspots, which include many megacities, solar heating by soot-containing aerosols is roughly comparable to heating due to greenhouse gases. In addition, light absorbing soot aerosols may reduce photolysis rates at the surface level, producing a noticeable impact on photochemistry. Enhanced light absorption and scattering by soot can stabilize the atmosphere, retarding vertical transport and exacerbating accumulation of gaseous and particulate matter (PM) pollutants within the planetary boundary layer. Less surface heating and atmospheric stabilization may decrease formation of clouds, and warming in the atmosphere can evaporate existing cloud droplets by lowering relative humidity. Furthermore, soot-containing aerosols represent a major type of PM that has adverse effects on human health. When first emitted, soot particles are low-density aggregates of loosely connected primary spherules. Freshly emitted soot particles are typically hydrophobic, but may become cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) during atmospheric aging by acquiring hydrophilic coatings. Hygroscopic soot particles, being efficient CCN, can exert indirect forcing on climate. In this talk, results will be presented on measurements of soot properties during the 2009 SHARP/SOOT Campaign. Ambient aerosols and fresh soot particles injected into a captured air chamber were monitored to

  12. Physical inversion of the full IASI spectra: Assessment of atmospheric parameters retrievals, consistency of spectroscopy and forward modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liuzzi, G.; Masiello, G.; Serio, C.; Venafra, S.; Camy-Peyret, C.

    2016-10-01

    Spectra observed by the Infrared Atmospheric Sounder Interferometer (IASI) have been used to assess both retrievals and the spectral quality and consistency of current forward models and spectroscopic databases for atmospheric gas line and continuum absorption. The analysis has been performed with thousands of observed spectra over sea surface in the Pacific Ocean close to the Mauna Loa (Hawaii) validation station. A simultaneous retrieval for surface temperature, atmospheric temperature, H2O, HDO, O3 profiles and gas average column abundance of CO2, CO, CH4, SO2, N2O, HNO3, NH3, OCS and CF4 has been performed and compared to in situ observations. The retrieval system considers the full IASI spectrum (all 8461 spectral channels on the range 645-2760 cm-1). We have found that the average column amount of atmospheric greenhouse gases can be retrieved with a precision better than 1% in most cases. The analysis of spectral residuals shows that, after inversion, they are generally reduced to within the IASI radiometric noise. However, larger residuals still appear for many of the most abundant gases, namely H2O, CH4 and CO2. The H2O ν2 spectral region is in general warmer (higher radiance) than observations. The CO2ν2 and N2O/CO2ν3 spectral regions now show a consistent behavior for channels, which are probing the troposphere. Updates in CH4 spectroscopy do not seem to improve the residuals. The effect of isotopic fractionation of HDO is evident in the 2500-2760 cm-1 region and in the atmospheric window around 1200 cm-1.

  13. Simulations of atmospheric TGFs and related physical processes: detection from space and side effects on MXGS/ASIM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarro-González, Javier; Blay, Pere; Espinós, Hector; Reglero, Víctor; Connell, Paul; Eyles, Chris

    2014-05-01

    The Atmosphere-Space Interactions Monitor (ASIM) is an ESA mission which will be attached to the Columbus module of the International Space Station (ISS). The main goal of the ASIM mission is to characterize the optical and high-energy emission related to severe thunderstorms. We are setting up a set of simulations in order to analyse the expected detections from ASIM and in particular from the Modular X-ray and Gamma-ray Sensor (MXGS) imager. On the one hand we have developed a mass model of the instrument for its use in Geant4 applications. We plan to characterize the response of the instrument to the incident high-energy radiation, and the effects of background from backscattered photons from the Columbus module. On the other hand we are developing a set of atmospheric models to set up Geant4 simulations of electron avalanche and gamma-ray propagation, with emphasis on: a) the possible residual optical emission due to interaction with atmospheric components, and b) the expected spectral and timing properties of the resulting high-energy emission towards space. We plan to include comparisons with other software toolkits like CORSIKA or LEPTRACK (under developed at the University of Valencia).

  14. Roster of Physics Departments with Enrollment and Degree Data, 2015: Results from the 2015 Survey of Enrollments and Degrees. Focus On

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholson, Starr; Mulvey, Patrick J.

    2016-01-01

    Physics bachelor's degree production continues to increase, with the 8,122 bachelor's awarded representing yet another all-time high. Further increases in physics bachelor's degree production are anticipated as undergraduate junior- and senior-level enrollments continue to climb. The all-time high of 1,860 physics PhDs conferred in the class of…

  15. Roster of Physics Departments with Enrollment and Degree Data, 2014: Results from the 2014 Survey of Enrollments and Degrees. Focus On

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholson, Starr; Mulvey, Patrick J.

    2015-01-01

    Physics bachelor's degree production has more than doubled since the recent low in 1999 and total enrollments in US undergraduate physics programs continue to increase. The all-time high of 7,526 bachelor's degrees in the class of 2014 represents the 15th consecutive year that the number of physics bachelor's conferred has increased. First-year…

  16. Analysis of vegetation by the application of a physically-based atmospheric correction algorithm to OLI data: a case study of Leonessa Municipality, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Alessandro; Manzo, Ciro; Petracchini, Francesco; Bassani, Cristiana

    2016-04-01

    Remote sensing techniques allow to estimate vegetation parameters related to large areas for forest health evaluation and biomass estimation. Moreover, the parametrization of specific indices such as Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) allows to study biogeochemical cycles and radiative energy transfer processes between soil/vegetation and atmosphere. This paper focuses on the evaluation of vegetation cover analysis in Leonessa Municipality, Latium Region (Italy) by the use of 2015 Landsat 8 applying the OLI@CRI (OLI ATmospherically Corrected Reflectance Imagery) algorithm developed following the procedure described in Bassani et al. 2015. The OLI@CRI is based on 6SV radiative transfer model (Kotchenova et al., 2006) ables to simulate the radiative field in the atmosphere-earth coupled system. NDVI was derived from the OLI corrected image. This index, widely used for biomass estimation and vegetation analysis cover, considers the sensor channels falling in the near infrared and red spectral regions which are sensitive to chlorophyll absorption and cell structure. The retrieved product was then spatially resampled at MODIS image resolution and then validated by the NDVI of MODIS considered as reference. The physically-based OLI@CRI algorithm also provides the incident solar radiation at ground at the acquisition time by 6SV simulation. Thus, the OLI@CRI algorithm completes the remote sensing dataset required for a comprehensive analysis of the sub-regional biomass production by using data of the new generation remote sensing sensor and an atmospheric radiative transfer model. If the OLI@CRI algorithm is applied to a temporal series of OLI data, the influence of the solar radiation on the above-ground vegetation can be analysed as well as vegetation index variation.

  17. Roster of Physics Departments with Enrollment and Degree Data, 2011: Results from the 2011 Survey of Enrollments and Degrees. Focus On

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholson, Starr; Mulvey, Patrick J.

    2012-01-01

    Academic year 2010-11 produced 2 new all-time highs for physics bachelor's and physics PhDs conferred in the U.S. The 6,296 physics bachelor's degrees earned in the class of 2011 represent a 73% increase from a recent low in the class of 1999 twelve years earlier. The 1,688 PhDs in the class of 2011 is up 55% from a recent low 7 years earlier.…

  18. Roster of Physics Departments with Enrollment and Degree Data, 2010: Results from the 2010 Survey of Enrollments and Degrees. Focus On

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholson, Starr; Mulvey, Patrick J.

    2011-01-01

    Academic year 2009-10 produced more physics bachelor's and more physics PhDs than in any other year in US history. The 6,017 physics bachelor's degrees earned in the class of 2010 represent a 65% increase from the class of 1999 eleven years earlier. The 1,558 PhDs in the class of 2010 is up 43% from a recent low 6 years earlier. Non-US citizens…

  19. Atmospheric merger in London

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    At the invitation of Imperial College, the Laboratory for Planetary Atmospheres, University College London, will be integrated in August with the Atmospheric Physics Group to form a single teaching and research unit. The new group, to be located at Imperial College, will be headed by Garry Hunt.The new group will possess a balanced research program in the observational and interpretative aspects of atmospheric physics. The existing Imperial College group actively researches cumulonimbus dynamics and climate modeling.

  20. What Should We Be Teaching about the Atmosphere?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkinson, Bruce

    1978-01-01

    Because study of climatology in most college and university geography departments is descriptive, it gives no fundamental insights into geophysical processes. In order to achieve a quantified understanding of atmospheric processes, geographers must have expertise in mathematics, physics, and instrumentation. For journal availability, see 506 593.…

  1. Simulations of the Atmospheric General Circulation Using a Cloud-Resolving Model as a Superparameterization of Physical Processes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khairoutdinov, Marat; Randall, David; Demott, Charlotte

    2005-07-01

    Traditionally, the effects of clouds in GCMs have been represented by semiempirical parameterizations. Recently, a cloud-resolving model (CRM) was embedded into each grid column of a realistic GCM, the NCAR Community Atmosphere Model (CAM), to serve as a superparameterization (SP) of clouds. Results of the standard CAM and the SP-CAM are contrasted, both using T42 resolution (2.8° × 2.8° grid), 26 vertical levels, and up to a 500-day-long simulation. The SP was based on a two-dimensional (2D) CRM with 64 grid columns and 24 levels collocated with the 24 lowest levels of CAM. In terms of the mean state, the SP-CAM produces quite reasonable geographical distributions of precipitation, precipitable water, top-of-the-atmosphere radiative fluxes, cloud radiative forcing, and high-cloud fraction for both December-January-February and June-July-August. The most notable and persistent precipitation bias in the western Pacific, during the Northern Hemisphere summer of all the SP-CAM runs with 2D SP, seems to go away through the use of a small-domain three-dimensional (3D) SP with the same number of grid columns as the 2D SP, but arranged in an 8 × 8 square with identical horizontal resolution of 4 km. Two runs with the 3D SP have been carried out, with and without explicit large-scale momentum transport by convection. Interestingly, the double ITCZ feature seems to go away in the run that includes momentum transport.The SP improves the diurnal variability of nondrizzle precipitation frequency over the standard model by precipitating most frequently during late afternoon hours over the land, as observed, while the standard model maximizes its precipitation frequency around local solar noon. Over the ocean, both models precipitate most frequently in the early morning hours as observed. The SP model also reproduces the observed global distribution of the percentage of days with nondrizzle precipitation rather well. In contrast, the standard model tends to precipitate more

  2. Atmospheric science and power production

    SciTech Connect

    Randerson, D.

    1984-07-01

    This is the third in a series of scientific publications sponsored by the US Atomic Energy Commission and the two later organizations, the US Energy Research and Development Adminstration, and the US Department of Energy. The first book, Meteorology and Atomic Energy, was published in 1955; the second, in 1968. The present volume is designed to update and to expand upon many of the important concepts presented previously. However, the present edition draws heavily on recent contributions made by atmospheric science to the analysis of air quality and on results originating from research conducted and completed in the 1970s. Special emphasis is placed on how atmospheric science can contribute to solving problems relating to the fate of combustion products released into the atmosphere. The framework of this book is built around the concept of air-quality modeling. Fundamentals are addressed first to equip the reader with basic background information and to focus on available meteorological instrumentation and to emphasize the importance of data management procedures. Atmospheric physics and field experiments are described in detail to provide an overview of atmospheric boundary layer processes, of how air flows around obstacles, and of the mechanism of plume rise. Atmospheric chemistry and removal processes are also detailed to provide fundamental knowledge on how gases and particulate matter can be transformed while in the atmosphere and how they can be removed from the atmosphere. The book closes with a review of how air-quality models are being applied to solve a wide variety of problems. Separate analytics have been prepared for each chapter.

  3. Atmospheric pressure argon surface discharges propagated in long tubes: physical characterization and application to bio-decontamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalova, Zuzana; Leroy, Magali; Jacobs, Carolyn; Kirkpatrick, Michael J.; Machala, Zdenko; Lopes, Filipa; Laux, Christophe O.; DuBow, Michael S.; Odic, Emmanuel

    2015-11-01

    Pulsed corona discharges propagated in argon (or in argon with added water vapor) at atmospheric pressure on the interior surface of a 49 cm long quartz tube were investigated for the application of surface bio-decontamination. H2O molecule dissociation in the argon plasma generated reactive species (i.e. OH in ground and excited states) and UV emission, which both directly affected bacterial cells. In order to facilitate the evaluation of the contribution of UV radiation, a DNA damage repair defective bacterial strain, Escherichia coli DH-1, was used. Discharge characteristics, including propagation velocity and plasma temperature, were measured. Up to ~5.5 and ~5 log10 reductions were observed for E. coli DH-1 bacteria (from 106 initial load) exposed 2 cm and 44 cm away from the charged electrode, respectively, for a 20 min plasma treatment. The factors contributing to the observed bactericidal effect include desiccation, reactive oxygen species (OH) plus H2O2 accumulation in the liquid phase, and UV-B (and possibly VUV) emission in dry argon. The steady state temperature measured on the quartz tube wall did not exceeded 29 °C the contribution of heating, along with that of H2O2 accumulation, was estimated to be low. The effect of UV-B emission alone or in combination with the other stress factors of the plasma process was examined for different operating conditions.

  4. A Year-Long Research Experience Program in Solar and Atmospheric Physics at the Queensborough Community College of the City University of New York (CUNY)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damas, M. C.; Cheung, T. D.; Ngwira, C.; Mohamed, A.; Knipp, D. J.; Johnson, L. P.; Zheng, Y.; Paglione, T.

    2015-12-01

    The Queensborough Community College (QCC) of the City University of New York (CUNY), a Hispanic and minority-serving institution, is the recipient of a 2-year NSF EAGER (Early Concept Grants for Exploratory Research) grant to design and implement a high-impact practice integrated research and education program in solar and atmospheric physics. Through a strong collaboration with CUNY/City College of New York and NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC), the project engages underrepresented community college students in geosciences-related STEM fields through a year-long research experience with two components: 1) during the academic year, students are enrolled in a course-based introductory research (CURE) where they conduct research on real-world problems; and 2) during the summer, students are placed in research internships at partner institutions. We will present the results of the first year-long research experience, including successes and challenges.

  5. Validation of the Institute of Atmospheric Physics emergency response model with the meteorological towers measurements and SF6 diffusion and pool fire experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Junling; Xiang, Weiling; Han, Zhiwei; Xiao, Kaitao; Wang, Zifa; Wang, Xinhua; Wu, Jianbin; Yan, Pingzhong; Li, Jie; Chen, Yong; Li, Jian; Li, Ying

    2013-12-01

    The urban canopy layer parameterization (UCP), a successive bias correction method (SBC), an atmospheric dispersion module for denser-than-air releases, and the emission intensity of chemicals monitored by a Fourier-transform-infrared remote sensor (EM27) were incorporated into the Institute of Atmospheric Physics emergency response model (IAPERM). IAPERM's performance was tested in Beijing using the field data collected from a 325-m meteorological tower and sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) diffusion and pool fire experiments. The results show that the IAPERM simulations of the vertical wind speeds in the urban canopy layer (UCL) with the UCP perform much better than those with the Monin-Obukhov similarity parameterization scheme. The IAPERM forecasts for air temperature and relative humidity are more accurate than those for wind speed and direction, which require correction. When the SBC with the local terrain effect is adopted, the wind speed and direction and the maximum concentrations of black carbon near the ground are well forecasted. IAPERM reproduces the spatial distributions of the SF6 observations more accurately near the release source (≤500 m) than at locations far away from the release source with the use of the observed meteorological parameters. These results suggest that IAPERM could be a promising tool for passive and dense gas diffusion simulations or forecasts.

  6. The Atmospheric Muon Lifetime, with the Lead Absorption Potential for Muons and References to the Standard Model of Particle Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barazandeh, Cioli; Gutarra-Leon, Angel; Majewski, Walerian

    2017-01-01

    Muon is one of twelve fundamental particles and has the longest free-particle lifetime. It decays into three leptons through an exchange of weak vector bosons W +/W-. Muons are present in atmospheric secondary cosmic rays and reach the sea level. By detecting the time delay between arrival of muons and appearance of decay electrons in a scintillation detector, we will measure muon's lifetime at rest. From the lifetime we can find the ratio gw /MW of the weak coupling constant gw (a weak analog of the electric charge) to mass of the W-boson MW. Vacuum expectation value v of the Higgs field, which determines masses Standard Model (SM) particles, can be calculated as v =2MWc2/gw =(τmμc2/6π3\\hcirc)1/4mμc2 regarding muon mass mμ and muon lifetime τ only. Using the experimental value for MWc2 = 80.4 GeV, we will find weak coupling constant gw. With the SM relation e =gwsin θ√ hcε0 and experimental value of the Z0-photon weak mixing angle θ = 29o we use our muon lifetime to find the elementary electric charge e value. In this experiment we will also determine the sea level fluxes of low-energy (<160 MeV) and high-energy cosmic muons, then will shield the detector with varying thicknesses of lead plates and from the new values of fluxes find the energy-dependent muon stopping power in lead.

  7. Mercury in the Arctic spring: a tracer for physical and chemical processes linking the atmosphere to the land and sea (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, T. A.; Sturm, M.; Blum, J. D.; Sherman, L. S.; Steffen, A.

    2009-12-01

    The Arctic mercury story is an intriguing one: gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) is oxidized to reactive gaseous mercury (RGM) during early spring atmospheric mercury deposition events. The RGM produced is readily deposited to snow and ice surfaces. Atmospheric mercury depletion events (AMDEs) are associated with mercury concentrations in surface snow and sea ice that are routinely above 100 ng/L. The GEM to RGM oxidation is driven by sunlight, halogen oxide radicals and the presence of snow and ice crystal surfaces. The most likely source of halogens (and the halogen oxides) is likely newly formed sea ice or the open water on which sea ice grows. The complex relationships between sea ice, leads, open sea water and the lower atmosphere is not well understood. However, mercury is a tracer linking atmospheric chemical and physical processes, sea ice conditions, the snow pack, and arctic ecosystems. Previous work has shown that interactions between snow and ice crystal surfaces and RGM likely drive the scavenging and deposition of RGM to the snow pack. This yields insight into how mercury (and potentially other contaminants and chemical compounds) are adsorbed onto or otherwise associated with snow and ice crystals. Some of the RGM deposited to the snow pack is subsequently reduced to GEM that evades from the snow pack. This is evident during the onset of spring snow melt when GEM values increase well above ambient background values of 1.6 ng per cubic meter. However, some of the deposited RGM remains in the snow pack and becomes part of the spring melt runoff event. We have been measuring mercury in the atmosphere, in snow, in snow melt runoff and in soils near Barrow, Alaska for the past 5 years. During the Ocean-Atmosphere-Sea Ice-Snow (OASIS) campaign in the spring of 2009 we collected snow, frost flowers and brine on the sea ice. Our results show that mercury is readily scavenged by frost flowers and snow on the sea ice. We also collected snow and melt during the

  8. The dynamical core, physical parameterizations, and basic simulation characteristics of the atmospheric component AM3 of the GFDL global coupled model CM3

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Donner, L.J.; Wyman, B.L.; Hemler, R.S.; Horowitz, L.W.; Ming, Y.; Zhao, M.; Golaz, J.-C.; Ginoux, P.; Lin, S.-J.; Schwarzkopf, M.D.; Austin, J.; Alaka, G.; Cooke, W.F.; Delworth, T.L.; Freidenreich, S.M.; Gordon, C.T.; Griffies, S.M.; Held, I.M.; Hurlin, W.J.; Klein, S.A.; Knutson, T.R.; Langenhorst, A.R.; Lee, H.-C.; Lin, Y.; Magi, B.I.; Malyshev, S.L.; Milly, P.C.D.; Naik, V.; Nath, M.J.; Pincus, R.; Ploshay, J.J.; Ramaswamy, V.; Seman, C.J.; Shevliakova, E.; Sirutis, J.J.; Stern, W.F.; Stouffer, R.J.; Wilson, R.J.; Winton, M.; Wittenberg, A.T.; Zeng, F.

    2011-01-01

    The Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) has developed a coupled general circulation model (CM3) for the atmosphere, oceans, land, and sea ice. The goal of CM3 is to address emerging issues in climate change, including aerosol-cloud interactions, chemistry-climate interactions, and coupling between the troposphere and stratosphere. The model is also designed to serve as the physical system component of earth system models and models for decadal prediction in the near-term future-for example, through improved simulations in tropical land precipitation relative to earlier-generation GFDL models. This paper describes the dynamical core, physical parameterizations, and basic simulation characteristics of the atmospheric component (AM3) of this model. Relative to GFDL AM2, AM3 includes new treatments of deep and shallow cumulus convection, cloud droplet activation by aerosols, subgrid variability of stratiform vertical velocities for droplet activation, and atmospheric chemistry driven by emissions with advective, convective, and turbulent transport. AM3 employs a cubed-sphere implementation of a finite-volume dynamical core and is coupled to LM3, a new land model with ecosystem dynamics and hydrology. Its horizontal resolution is approximately 200 km, and its vertical resolution ranges approximately from 70 m near the earth's surface to 1 to 1.5 km near the tropopause and 3 to 4 km in much of the stratosphere. Most basic circulation features in AM3 are simulated as realistically, or more so, as in AM2. In particular, dry biases have been reduced over South America. In coupled mode, the simulation of Arctic sea ice concentration has improved. AM3 aerosol optical depths, scattering properties, and surface clear-sky downward shortwave radiation are more realistic than in AM2. The simulation of marine stratocumulus decks remains problematic, as in AM2. The most intense 0.2% of precipitation rates occur less frequently in AM3 than observed. The last two decades of

  9. The Social Tasks of Learning to Become a Physical Education Teacher: Considering the HPE Subject Department as a Community of Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sirna, Karen; Tinning, Richard; Rossi, Toni

    2008-01-01

    Initial teacher education (ITE) students participate in various workplaces within schools and in doing so, form understandings about the numerous, and at times competing, expectations of teachers' work. Through these experiences they form understandings about themselves as health and physical education (HPE) teachers. This paper examines the ways…

  10. Self-Efficacy Expectations in Teacher Trainees and the Perceived Role of Schools and Their Physical Education Department in the Educational Treatment of Overweight Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez-Lopez, Emilio; Zagalaz Sanchez, Maria; Ramos Alvarez, Manuel; de la Torre Cruz, Manuel

    2010-01-01

    This study is about the relation between self-efficacy expectations and the attitude towards child and youth obesity, as well as the role of the school in this matter. A questionnaire was given to a sample of 436 trainee physical education teachers from eight universities in Andalusia (Spain). The questionnaire was a version of "Teaching…

  11. Job Analysis Techniques for Restructuring Health Manpower Education and Training in the Navy Medical Department. Attachment 10. PT/OT QPCB Task Sort for Physical and Occupational Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technomics, Inc., McLean, VA.

    This publication is Attachment 10 of a set of 16 computer listed QPCB task sorts, by career level, for the entire Hospital Corps and Dental Technician fields. Statistical data are presented in tabular form for a detailed listing of job duties in physical and occupational therapy. (BT)

  12. Women in Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roth, Laura M.; O'Fallon, Nancy M.

    This booklet presents information about career opportunities for women in physics. Included are summaries of research areas in physics (optical physics, solid-state physics, materials science, nuclear physics, high-energy physics, astrophysics, cryogenics, plasma physics, biophysics, atmospheric physics) and differences between theory and…

  13. SRNL Atmospheric Technologies Group

    ScienceCinema

    Viner, Brian; Parker, Matthew J.

    2016-07-12

    The Savannah River National Laboratory, Atmospheric Technologies Group, conducts a best-in class Applied Meteorology Program to ensure the Department of Energy’s Savannah River Site is operated safely and complies with stringent environmental regulations.

  14. SRNL Atmospheric Technologies Group

    SciTech Connect

    Viner, Brian; Parker, Matthew J.

    2016-05-10

    The Savannah River National Laboratory, Atmospheric Technologies Group, conducts a best-in class Applied Meteorology Program to ensure the Department of Energy’s Savannah River Site is operated safely and complies with stringent environmental regulations.

  15. Russian investigations in the field of atmospheric radiation in 2011-2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timofeev, Yu. M.; Shul'gina, E. M.

    2016-09-01

    A short survey prepared by the Russian Commission on Atmospheric Radiation contains the most significant results of work in the field of atmospheric-radiation studies performed in 2011-2014. It is part of the Russian National Report on Meteorology and Atmospheric Sciences prepared for the International Association on Meteorology and Atmospheric Sciences (IAMAS)1. During this period, the Russian Commission on Atmospheric Radiation, jointly with the concerned departments and organizations, organized two International Symposiums on Radiation and Dynamics (ISARD-2011 and ISARD-2013). At these conferences, the central problems in modern atmospheric physics were discussed: radiative transfer (RT) and atmospheric optics; greenhouse gases, clouds, and aerosols; remote methods of measurements; and new measurement data. This survey presents six directions covering the whole spectrum of investigations performed in the field of atmospheric radiation.

  16. Atmospheric and Space Sciences: Neutral Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yiǧit, Erdal

    2015-09-01

    The SpringerBriefs on Atmospheric and Space Sciences in two volumes presents a concise and interdisciplinary introduction to the basic theory, observation & modeling of atmospheric and ionospheric coupling processes on Earth. The goal is to contribute toward bridging the gap between meteorology, aeronomy, and planetary science. In addition recent progress in several related research topics, such atmospheric wave coupling and variability, is discussed. Volume 1 will focus on the atmosphere, while Volume 2 will present the ionosphere— the plasma environment. Volume 1 is aimed primarily at (research) students and researchers that would like to gain quick insight in atmospheric sciences and current research. It also is a useful tool for professors who would like to develop a course in atmospheric physics.

  17. Sports biomechanics in the research of the Department of Biomechanics of University School of Physical Education in Poznań. Part 2. Biomechanics of rowing: research conducted in the rowing pool and under real conditions. Reconstruction and synthesis.

    PubMed

    Dworak, Lechosław B

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to reconstruct the early phase of scientific research conducted at the Department of Biomechanics of the College of Physical Education and since 1972 at the University School of Physical Education in Poznań, with special attention paid to the works on biomechanics of rowing, carried out as part of the Ministerial Project PR 105 entitled The effectiveness of training, sports competition as well as regeneration in sports. Two kinds of biomechanical research are described: the several years' expert research conducted on the Rowing National Team in an original two-module Rowing Pool Testing Station BTW-1, as well as research on geometric optimization of the rowing station, conducted under real conditions, in reservoirs, with the use of a prototypical, unique at that time, computer measurement system BIOMIK, installed in the rower's own boat. The projects were carried out by doctoral students from the Department of Biomechanics and the Department of Clinical Biomechanics, Andrzej Lisiecki and Wojciech Mikołajczyk, respectively.

  18. Research in Physical Chemistry and Chemical Education: Part A--Water Mediated Chemistry of Oxidized Atmospheric Compounds Part B--The Development of Surveying Tools to Determine How Effective Laboratory Experiments Contribute to Student Conceptual Understanding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maron, Marta Katarzyna

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation is a combination of two research areas, experimental physical chemistry, Chapters I to V, and chemical education, Chapters VI to VII. Chapters I to V describe research on the water-mediated chemistry of oxidized atmospheric molecules and the impact that water has on the spectra of these environmental systems. The role of water…

  19. Physical bases of the generation of short-term earthquake precursors: A complex model of ionization-induced geophysical processes in the lithosphere-atmosphere-ionosphere-magnetosphere system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulinets, S. A.; Ouzounov, D. P.; Karelin, A. V.; Davidenko, D. V.

    2015-07-01

    This paper describes the current understanding of the interaction between geospheres from a complex set of physical and chemical processes under the influence of ionization. The sources of ionization involve the Earth's natural radioactivity and its intensification before earthquakes in seismically active regions, anthropogenic radioactivity caused by nuclear weapon testing and accidents in nuclear power plants and radioactive waste storage, the impact of galactic and solar cosmic rays, and active geophysical experiments using artificial ionization equipment. This approach treats the environment as an open complex system with dissipation, where inherent processes can be considered in the framework of the synergistic approach. We demonstrate the synergy between the evolution of thermal and electromagnetic anomalies in the Earth's atmosphere, ionosphere, and magnetosphere. This makes it possible to determine the direction of the interaction process, which is especially important in applications related to short-term earthquake prediction. That is why the emphasis in this study is on the processes proceeding the final stage of earthquake preparation; the effects of other ionization sources are used to demonstrate that the model is versatile and broadly applicable in geophysics.

  20. Physical Characterization and Effect of Effective Surface Area on the Sensing Properties of Tin Dioxide Thin Solid Films in a Propane Atmosphere

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Pozos, Heberto; González-Vidal, José Luis; Torres, Gonzalo Alberto; de la Luz Olvera, María; Castañeda, Luis

    2014-01-01

    The physical properties and the effect of effective surface area (ESA) on the sensing properties of tin dioxide [SnO2] thin films in air and propane [C3H8] atmosphere as a function of operating temperature and gas concentration have been studied in this paper. SnO2 thin films with different estimated thicknesses (50, 100 and 200 nm) were deposited on glass substrates by the chemical spray technique. Besides, they were prepared at two different deposition temperatures (400 and 475 °C). Tin chloride [SnCl4 · 5H2O] with 0.2 M concentration value and ethanol [C2H6O] were used as tin precursor and solvent, respectively. The morphological, and structural properties of the as-prepared films were analyzed by AFM and XRD, respectively. Gas sensing characteristics of SnO2 thin solid films were measured at operating temperatures of 22, 100, 200, and 300 °C, and at propane concentration levels (0, 5, 50, 100, 200, 300, 400, and 500 ppm). ESA values were calculated for each sample. It was found that the ESA increased with the increasing thickness of the films. The results demonstrated the importance of the achieving of a large effective surface area for improving gas sensing performance. SnO2 thin films deposited by spray chemical were chosen to study the ESA effect on gas sensing properties because their very rough surfaces were appropriate for this application. PMID:24379046

  1. Atmospheric Physics and Sound Propagation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1950-09-01

    exposures of ’ssh.ite mica, various insects and bacteria to the intense, sound field» %£te " mice are killed in osae minute» The killing lias been...tensity sound on a species of sporeforming bacteria » It is possible to obtain very high intensities in water in a flask.;Suspend’ed over the siren...hinges and closure are standard refrigerator~type units» There i3 a double sponge rubber seal around the doors« Electrical connection to

  2. Calculation of surface and top of atmosphere radiative fluxes from physical quantities based on ISCCP data sets. 2: Validation and first results

    SciTech Connect

    Rossow, W.B.; Zhang, Y.C. |

    1995-01-01

    We use global, multiyear observations of the properties of clouds, the atmosphere, and the surface to calculate global shortwave (SW) and longwave (LW) fluxes at the top of the atmosphere and at the surface at a resolution of 280 km and 3 hours for every third month from April 1985 to January 1989. Our validation studies suggest that the specification of cloud effects is no longer the dominant uncertainty in reconstructing the radiative fluxes at the top of atmosphere and at the surface. Rather cloud property uncertainties are now roughly equal contributors to the flux uncertainty, along with surface and atmospheric properties. The resulting SW and LW flux data sets suggest the following conclusions: (1) The net SW heating of Earth appears predominantly at the surface, whereas the net LW cooling arises predominantly from the atmosphere. The net cooling effect of clouds on top of atmospheric radiation appears primarily at the surface rather than in the atmosphere. (2) Clouds have almost no net effect on the global mean radiation balance of the atmosphere, but they enhance the latitudinal gradient in the LW cooling and reinforce the radiative forcing for the mean atmospheric circulation. Clouds act to mute seasonal contrasts however. (3) Clouds enhance the land-ocean contrasts of the atmospheric cooling, reinforcing the growth of standing eddy motions; but reduce land-ocean contrasts of the surface heating.

  3. Satellite-beacon Ionospheric-scintillation Global Model of the upper Atmosphere (SIGMA) II: Inverse modeling with high-latitude observations to deduce irregularity physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshpande, K. B.; Bust, G. S.; Clauer, C. R.; Scales, W. A.; Frissell, N. A.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.; Spogli, L.; Mitchell, C.; Weatherwax, A. T.

    2016-09-01

    Ionospheric scintillation is caused by irregularities in the ionospheric electron density. The characterization of ionospheric irregularities is important to further our understanding of the underlying physics. Our goal is to characterize the intermediate (0.1-10 km) to medium (10-100 km) scale high-latitude irregularities which are likely to produce these scintillations. In this paper, we characterize irregularities observed by Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) during a geomagnetically active period on 9 March 2012. For this purpose, along with the measurements, we are using the recently developed model: "Satellite-beacon Ionospheric-scintillation Global Model of the upper Atmosphere" (SIGMA). The model is particularly applicable at high latitudes as it accounts for the complicated geometry of the magnetic field lines in these regions and is presented in an earlier paper. We use an inverse modeling technique to derive irregularity parameters by comparing the high rate (50 Hz) GNSS observations to the modeled outputs. In this investigation, we consider experimental observations from both the northern and southern high latitudes. The results include predominance of phase scintillations compared to amplitude scintillations that imply the presence of larger-scale irregularities of sizes above the Fresnel scale at GPS frequencies, and the spectral index ranges from 2.4 to 4.2 and the RMS number density ranges from 3e11 to 2.3e12 el/m3. The best fits we obtained from our inverse method that considers only weak scattering mostly agree with the observations. Finally, we suggest some improvements in order to facilitate the possibility of accomplishing a unique solution to such inverse problems.

  4. Physical Processes Associated with Heavy Flooding Rainfall in Nashville, Tennessee, and Vicinity during 1-2 May 2010: The Role of an Atmospheric River and Mesoscale Convective Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, B. J.; Neiman, P. J.; Ralph, F. M.; Barthold, F. E.

    2011-12-01

    A multi-scale analysis is conducted in order to examine the physical processes that resulted in prolonged heavy rainfall and devastating flash flooding across western and central Tennessee and Kentucky on 1-2 May 2010, during which Nashville, Tennessee, received 344.7 mm of rainfall and incurred 11 flood-related fatalities. On the synoptic scale, heavy rainfall was supported by a persistent corridor of strong water vapor transport rooted in the Tropics that was manifested as an atmospheric river (AR). This AR developed as water vapor was extracted from the eastern tropical Pacific and the Caribbean Sea and transported into the central Mississippi Valley by a strong southerly low-level jet (LLJ) positioned between a persistent lee trough along the eastern Mexico coast and a broad, stationary subtropical ridge positioned over the southeastern U.S. and the subtropical Atlantic. The AR, associated with substantial water vapor content and moderate convective available potential energy, supported the successive development of two quasi-stationary mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) on 1 May and 2 May, respectively. These MCSs were both linearly organized and exhibited back building and echo training, processes which afforded the repeated movement of convective cells over the same area of western and central Tennessee and Kentucky, resulting in a narrow band of rainfall totals of 200-400 mm. Mesoscale analyses reveal that the MCSs developed on the warm side of a slow-moving cold front and that the interaction between the southerly LLJ and convectively generated surface outflow boundaries was fundamental for repeatedly generating convection.

  5. [Results of a comparative study of the success of treatment of pain in the lumbar spine at the Moravske Toplice health spa, at the department of physical therapy and rehabilitation and at the department of rheumatology of the Maribor Teaching Hospital].

    PubMed

    Kranjc, I; Turk, Z

    1992-01-01

    A parallel investigation of the success of treating patients with chronic low back pain has been carried out at the Moravci Spa, at the Department for Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation and at the Rheumatology Department of Maribor Teaching Hospital. One hundred patients suffering from low-back pain were given a 14-day treatment in the termomineral water (T--36 degrees C) of the Moravci Spa. A comparative group of another 100 patients also suffering from pain in the lumbar region of the spine underwent equal balneo-physical treatment in plain water (T--32 degrees C) at the Dept. for Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation and at the Dept. of Rheumatology at Maribor Teaching Hospital, Slovenia. The educational background of the two groups features a statistically significant difference (p < 0.001): the percentage of patients with lower education was higher at the Moravci Spa (67%) compared with only 46% among those treated at Maribor Teaching Hospital. Correspondingly, the difference in occupation of the two groups were similar (p < 0.005): prevalent among the patients at Moravci Spa were bluecollar workers (40%) compared with white-collar workers (27%). The percentage of white-collar workers at Maribor Teaching Hospital was 45%. The average age of the patients treated at the Moravci Spa was 46.9 +/- 9.5 years (28-77 years), at Maribor Teaching Hospital it was 45.2 +/- 8.2 years (26-71 years). There was no statistically significant difference in age (p < 0.10) between the two groups. Generalized spondylochondrosis was present in both groups, i.e. 87%; approximately 10% of the patients from both groups underwent surgical treatment of hernia disci.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Investigation of Heterogeneous Atmospheric Chlorine Chemistry: Modeling and Environmental Chamber Studies Authors: Cameron B. Faxon, Lea Hildebrandt Ruiz, and David Allen University of Texas at Austin, McKetta Department of Chemical Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faxon, C. B.; Hildebrandt Ruiz, L.; Allen, D.

    2013-12-01

    Previous work has shown that gas phase atomic chlorine radicals (Cl*) can influence tropospheric photochemistry, including concentrations of volatile organic compound (VOC) and ozone. These radicals are produced through both gas phase and heterogeneous pathways. This work presents computational and experimental investigation into the heterogeneous reactions of chloride aerosols. An overview of a sensitivity analysis of the physical parameters involved in the heterogeneous production of nitryl chloride (ClNO2) (R1-R5) will comprise the computational work presented. NO2(g) + NO3(g) ↔ N2O5(g) (R1) N2O5(aq) ↔ N2O5(aq) (R2) N2O5(aq) ↔ NO2+(aq) + NO3-(aq) (R3) NO2+(aq) + H2O(aq) → H3O+(aq) + HNO3(aq) (R4a) NO2+(aq) + Cl- → ClNO2 + H2O(aq) (R4b) NO3-(aq) + H+ ↔ HNO3+(aq) (R5) Relative parameters include the reactive uptake coefficient, ClNO2 yield, particle surface area, and gas phase concentrations of VOCs and NOx. The sensitivity analysis results were generated through photochemical box modeling and focus on the production of ClNO2 and impacts to ozone production. Results were compared to a base case scenario in which all heterogeneous reactions were absent. Parameter values reaching the upper limits reported in the literature were tested, and results indicate that ClNO2 chemistry can potentially change peak O3 concentrations by -10.5% to 27%. NOx availability was also found to play an important role. Experimental results of the heterogeneous reaction between OH* and particulate chloride (R6-R7) will also be discussed. The mechanism is shown below, and OH***Cl- represents an intermediate species forming at the particle surface. OH(g) + Cl-(aq) → OH***Cl-(aq) (R6) 2OH***Cl-(aq) → Cl2,g + 2OH-(aq) (R7) Environmental chamber experiments involving the exposure of NaCl aerosol particles to typical atmospheric conditions (HOx, NOx, O3 and UV radiation) were performed. A 10 cubic meter teflon reaction chamber equipped with UV lights was used to contain the

  7. Phase B - final definition and preliminary design study for the initial Atmospheric Cloud Physics Laboratory (ACPL): A spacelab mission payload. Work breakdown structure for phase C/D DR-MA-06 (preliminary issue)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) and Dictionary (DR-MA-06) for initial and subsequent flights of the Atmospheric Cloud Physics Laboratory (ACPL) is presented. An attempt is made to identify specific equipment and components in each of the eleven subsystems; they are listed under the appropriate subdivisions of the WBS. The reader is cautioned that some of these components are likely to change substantially during the course of the study, and the list provided should only be considered representative.

  8. Atmospheric black carbon concentrations in North America, ~1100 to 2005. Liaquat Husain and Tanveer Ahmed Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health, Albany, NY 12201-0509, USA, and Department of Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health, State University of New York, Albany, NY, 12201-0509, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husain, L.

    2013-05-01

    Black carbon (BC) aerosols in the atmosphere absorb solar radiation, and cause heating of the atmosphere, may alter Earth's cloud cover, and impact precipitation cycle. The best estimate for radiative forcing from BC with 90% certainty is + 1.1 Wm-2 ( + 0.17 to 2.1 Wm-2), second only to that of CO2. A major uncertainty in the estimation is a lack of atmospheric BC data. Models are used to estimate BC emissions into the atmosphere. They have not been validated by field data. We report measurements of BC in the atmosphere, over a period of several centuries using lake sediments. Retrieval of such records provides an invaluable source for understanding changes in the atmosphere with time. Numerous studies have been conducted with such an objective. Owing to a lack of knowledge of deposition rates of atmospheric aerosols into the lake sediments, a major shortcoming of these studies have been an inability to convert the measurements of chemical species in lake sediments into the atmosphere. We have developed a technique to overcome this shortcoming by measuring black carbon in atmospheric aerosols, and in lake sediment cores. The concentrations of BC were determined in daily filters collected at Whiteface Mountain, NY, from 1978 to 2005. Cores from two lakes around Whiteface Mountain, NY, were collected. Cores were (1) sectioned in thin slices, (2) freeze dried, (3) dated using the 210Pb technique, (4) BC chemically separated, and (5) concentrations measured using the thermal-optical method. By The deposition rate of BC from the atmosphere to the lakes was determined by comparing the BC concentration in air and the sediments for the 1978 -2005 period. The deposition rate so determined was used to concert the BC in the sediment into the atmosphere for the ~1978 to ~1100 period. The BC concentrations for the industrial period, ~1850 was low but rapidly increased from ~1900, peaked ~1925, decreased very slowly ~ 1980, followed by a sharp decrease. Concentrations has

  9. Potentialities of laser systems for remote sensing of the atmosphere at a wide variability of optical and physical characteristics: dimensionless-parametric modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agishev, R. R.

    2017-02-01

    Within the framework of generalisation of different approaches to the modelling of atmospheric lidars, the methodology capabilities for dimensionless-parametric analysis are expanded. The developed approach simplifies the analysis of the signal-to-noise ratio and potential capabilities of existing and newly developed monitoring systems with a wide variability of atmospheric and optical conditions and a great variety of modern lidars. Its applicability to the problems of remote atmospheric sensing, environmental monitoring and lidar navigation in providing the eye safety, noise immunity and reliability is discussed.

  10. Sports biomechanics in the research of the Department of Biomechanics of University School of Physical Education in Poznań. Part 1. Biomechanics of rowing: tests on rowing ergometers, reconstruction and synthesis.

    PubMed

    Dworak, Lechosław B

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to reconstruct the early phase of scientific research conducted at the Department of Biomechanics of the University School of Physical Education in Poznan, particularly the work on biomechanics of rowing, conducted as part of the Ministerial Project PR 105, entitled "The effectiveness of training and competition as well as regeneration in sports". Three kinds of research have been described, carried out with the use of the rowing ergometers. The first was the research on neuromuscular coordination in the rowing cycle, the second was the research on kinematic and dynamic characteristics of rowing on the Universal Rowing Ergometer UEW - 1, while the last one concerned determination of maximum forces generated by functional muscle groups in two characteristic rowing positions within the closed biochain of the torso and the limbs.

  11. APPLICATIONS OF LASERS AND OTHER TOPICS IN LASER PHYSICS AND TECHNOLOGY: Adaptive compensation of atmospheric phase distortions using the spatial spectrum of images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anufriev, A. V.; Zimin, Yu A.; Tolmachev, Alexei I.

    1987-10-01

    A theoretical investigation is reported of an algorithm for adaptive compensation of atmospheric phase distortions using the spatial spectrum of images. This algorithm can be used to reconstruct images of incoherently illuminated objects of arbitrary shape.

  12. Changes in the electro-physical properties of MCT epitaxial films affected by a plasma volume discharge induced by an avalanche beam in atmospheric-pressure air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoryev, D. V.; Voitsekhovskii, A. V.; Lozovoy, K. A.; Tarasenko, V. F.; Shulepov, M. A.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper the influence of the plasma volume discharge of nanosecond duration formed in a non-uniform electric field at atmospheric pressure on samples of epitaxial films HgCdTe (MCT) films are discussed. The experimental data show that the action of pulses of nanosecond volume discharge in air at atmospheric pressure leads to changes in the electrophysical properties of MCT epitaxial films due to formation of a near-surface high- conductivity layer of the n-type conduction. The preliminary results show that it is possible to use such actions in the development of technologies for the controlled change of the properties of MCT.

  13. A change in the electro-physical properties of narrow-band CdHgTe solid solutions acted upon by a volume discharge induced by an avalanche electron beam in the air at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voitsekhovskii, A. V.; Grigor'ev, D. V.; Korotaev, A. G.; Kokhanenko, A. P.; Tarasenko, V. F.; Shulepov, M. A.

    2012-03-01

    The effect of a nanosecond volume discharge forming in an inhomogeneous electrical field at atmospheric pressure on the CdHgTe (MCT) epitaxial films of the p-type conduction with the hole concentration 2·1016 cm3 and mobility 500 cm2·V-1·s-1 is studied. The measurement of the electrophysical parameters of the MCT specimens upon irradiation shows that a layer exhibiting the n-type conduction is formed in the near-surface region of the epitaxial films. After 600 pulses and more, the thickness and the parameters of the layer are such that the measured field dependence of the Hall coefficient corresponds to the material of the n-type conduction. Analysis of the preliminary results reveals that the foregoing nanosecond volume discharge in the air at atmospheric pressure is promising for modification of electro-physical MCT properties.

  14. 77 FR 15358 - National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-15

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Availability of Seats for the Monitor National Marine...), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Department of Commerce (DOC). ACTION: Notice and..., National Ocean Service, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. BILLING CODE 3510-NK-M...

  15. Atmospheric Nitrogen Inputs to the Ocean and their Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jickells, Tim D.

    2016-04-01

    , even with the increased transport across shelf to the open ocean from low latitude fluvial systems identified. 1. School of Environmental Science University of East Anglia UK 2. Energy Research Centre University of Cape Town SA 3. Department of Biological Sciences University of S California USA 4. Departments of Oceanography and Atmospheric Sciences Texas A&M University USA 5. JRC Ispra Italy 6. Department of Oceanography Dalhousie University Canada 7. Department of Environmental Sciences U. Virginia USA 8. Department of Chemistry, University of Crete, Greece 9. Department of Biology Dalhousie University, Canada 10. School of Environmental Science and Engineering Pohang University S Korea. 11. Faculty of Geosciences University of Utrecht Netherlands 12. Department of Earth System Science University of California at Irvine USA 13. WMO Geneva 14. Department of Geography University of California USA 15. GEOMAR Keil Germany 16. Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Miami, USA 17. Geosciences Division at Physical Research Laboratory, Ahmedabad, India 18. Department of Environmental Studies, University of Victoria, Canada 19. School of Environmentak Sciences, U Liverpool UK 20. Center for International Collaboration, Atmosphere and Ocean Research Institute, The University of Tokyo Japan 21. Oak Ridge Associated Universities USA

  16. DOE research on atmospheric aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, S.E.

    1995-11-01

    Atmospheric aerosols are the subject of a significant component of research within DOE`s environmental research activities, mainly under two programs within the Department`s Environmental Sciences Division, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program and the Atmospheric Chemistry Program (ACP). Research activities conducted under these programs include laboratory experiments, field measurements, and theoretical and modeling studies. The objectives and scope of these programs are briefly summarized. The ARM Program is the Department`s major research activity focusing on atmospheric processes pertinent to understanding global climate and developing the capability of predicting global climate change in response to energy related activities. The ARM approach consists mainly of testing and improving models using long-term measurements of atmospheric radiation and controlling variables at highly instrumented sites in north central Oklahoma, in the Tropical Western Pacific, and on the North Slope of Alaska. Atmospheric chemistry research within DOE addresses primarily the issue of atmospheric response to emissions from energy-generation sources. As such this program deals with the broad topic known commonly as the atmospheric source-receptor sequence. This sequence consists of all aspects of energy-related pollutants from the time they are emitted from their sources to the time they are redeposited at the Earth`s surface.

  17. The NASA program on upper atmospheric research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The purpose of the NASA Upper Atmospheric Research Program is to develop a better understanding of the physical and chemical processes that occur in the earth's upper atmosphere with emphasis on the stratosphere.

  18. The Third Pole Environment Programme (TPE): A new base for the processes study of atmospheric physics and environment over the Tibetan Plateau and surrounding regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yaoming

    2016-04-01

    The Tibetan Plateau, with the most prominent and complicated terrain on the globe and an elevation of more than 4000 m on average above sea leave (msl), is often called the "Third Pole" due to its significance parallel with Antarctica and the Arctic. The exchange of energy, water vapor and some greenhouse gases between land surface and atmosphere over the Tibetan Plateau and the surrounding regions play an important role in the Asian monsoon system, which in turn is a major component of both the energy and water cycles of the global climate system. Supported by the Chinese Academy of Sciences and some international organizations, a Third Pole Environment (TPE) Research Platform (TPEP) is now implementing over the Tibetan Plateau and surrounding region. The background of the establishment of the TPEP, the establishing and monitoring plan of long-term scale (5-10 years) of the TPEP will be shown firstly. Then the preliminary observational analysis results, such as the characteristics of land surface heat fluxes, CO2 flux and evapotranspiration (ET) partitioning (diurnal variation, inter-monthly variation and vertical variation etc), aerosol optical properties between southern and northern sides of the Himalayas, the characteristics of atmospheric and soil variables, the structure of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL) and the turbulent characteristics have also been shown in this study.

  19. Atmospheric neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korff, S. A.; Mendell, R. B.; Merker, M.; Light, E. S.; Verschell, H. J.; Sandie, W. S.

    1979-01-01

    Contributions to fast neutron measurements in the atmosphere are outlined. The results of a calculation to determine the production, distribution and final disappearance of atmospheric neutrons over the entire spectrum are presented. An attempt is made to answer questions that relate to processes such as neutron escape from the atmosphere and C-14 production. In addition, since variations of secondary neutrons can be related to variations in the primary radiation, comment on the modulation of both radiation components is made.

  20. Long Term Baseline Atmospheric Monitoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Mark A.

    1975-01-01

    Describes a program designed to measure the normal concentrations of certain chemical and physical parameters of the atmosphere so that quantitative estimates can be made of local, regional, and global pollution. (GS)

  1. Hospital outpatient perceptions of the physical environment of waiting areas: the role of patient characteristics on atmospherics in one academic medical center

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Chun-Yen; Wang, Mu-Chia; Liao, Wei-Tsen; Lu, Jui-Heng; Sun, Pi-hung; Lin, Blossom Yen-Ju; Breen, Gerald-Mark

    2007-01-01

    Background This study examines hospital outpatient perceptions of the physical environment of the outpatient waiting areas in one medical center. The relationship of patient characteristics and their perceptions and needs for the outpatient waiting areas are also examined. Method The examined medical center consists of five main buildings which house seventeen primary waiting areas for the outpatient clinics of nine medical specialties: 1) Internal Medicine; 2) Surgery; 3) Ophthalmology; 4) Obstetrics-Gynecology and Pediatrics; 5) Chinese Medicine; 6) Otolaryngology; 7) Orthopedics; 8) Family Medicine; and 9) Dermatology. A 15-item structured questionnaire was developed to rate patient satisfaction covering the four dimensions of the physical environments of the outpatient waiting areas: 1) visual environment; 2) hearing environment; 3) body contact environment; and 4) cleanliness. The survey was conducted between November 28, 2005 and December 8, 2005. A total of 680 outpatients responded. Descriptive, univariate, and multiple regression analyses were applied in this study. Results All of the 15 items were ranked as relatively high with a range from 3.362 to 4.010, with a neutral score of 3. Using a principal component analysis' summated scores of four constructed dimensions of patient satisfaction with the physical environments (i.e. visual environment, hearing environment, body contact environment, and cleanliness), multiple regression analyses revealed that patient satisfaction with the physical environment of outpatient waiting areas was associated with gender, age, visiting frequency, and visiting time. Conclusion Patients' socio-demographics and context backgrounds demonstrated to have effects on their satisfaction with the physical environment of outpatient waiting areas. In addition to noticing the overall rankings for less satisfactory items, what should receive further attention is the consideration of the patients' personal characteristics when

  2. Isotopes and soil physic analysis as a tool to meet answers related to soil-plant-atmosphere behavior of Amazon forest during droughts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borma, L. D. S.; Oliveira, R. S.; Silva, R. D.; Chaparro Saaveedra, O. F.; Barros, F. V.; Bittencourt, P.

    2015-12-01

    Droughts and floods are part of the Amazon weather pattern, but in face of climate change, it has been expected an increase in their intensity and duration. Forests are important regulators of climate. However, it is still unknown how they respond to an increase in frequency and intensity of extreme droughts. Additionally, there are great uncertainties related with the forest behavior in an enriched CO2 environment. For the Amazon rainforest, some authors report forest growth in a drier climate, while others report forest mortality in these same conditions. The crucial factor in this process seem the linkage between atmospheric demand from water and its provision by soil moisture, intermediated by the plants. In theory, in regions where soil moisture is high, even in the absence of rainfall conditions, water exists in enough quantity to meet the atmospheric demand, and majority of plants behave as an evergreen forest. This is the case, for example, for some research sites of equatorial regions of the Amazon forest, which tend to increase evapotranspiration rates in dry season, when the atmospheric demand is higher. However, the extent to which soil moisture decreases, the plant is no longer able to meet the atmospheric demand, limiting evapotranspiration and possibly, entering in a dormant state. To understand the forest response to droughts, in terms of its potential to maintain or reduce evapotranspiration rates, it is necessary to know water dynamics in soil and soil layers where plants are able to extract water. It's a challenge, considering the great variability of soils and plants that forms the huge biodiversity of the Amazon forest. Here, we present an experiment design based on isotopic analyzes in a small watershed in Amazon basin. In order to understand the dynamics of the water used by the plant during the evaporation process, isotope analysis were carried out in soil water collected from shallow and deep groundwater, in the water collected on the bark

  3. Reactions at surfaces in the atmosphere: integration of experiments and theory as necessary (but not necessarily sufficient) for predicting the physical chemistry of aerosols.

    PubMed

    Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J

    2009-09-28

    While particles have significant deleterious impacts on human health, visibility and climate, quantitative understanding of their formation, composition and fates remains problematic. Indeed, in many cases, even qualitative understanding is lacking. One area of particular uncertainty is the nature of particle surfaces and how this determines interactions with gases in the atmosphere, including water, which is important for cloud formation and properties. The focus in this Perspective article is on some chemistry relevant to airborne particles and especially to reactions occurring on their surfaces. The intent is not to provide a comprehensive review, but rather to highlight a few selected examples of interface chemistry involving inorganic and organic species that may be important in the lower atmosphere. This includes sea salt chemistry, nitrate and nitrite ion photochemistry, organics on surfaces and heterogeneous reactions of oxides of nitrogen on proxies for airborne mineral dust and boundary layer surfaces. Emphasis is on the molecular level understanding that can only be gained by fully integrating experiment and theory to elucidate these complex systems.

  4. Atmospheric chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Sloane, C.S. ); Tesche, T.W. )

    1991-01-01

    This book covers the predictive strength of atmospheric models. The book covers all of the major important atmospheric areas, including large scale models for ozone depletion and global warming, regional scale models for urban smog (ozone and visibility impairment) and acid rain, as well as accompanying models of cloud processes and biofeedbacks.

  5. Comparative Research Productivity Measures for Economic Departments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huettner, David A.; Clark, William

    1997-01-01

    Develops a simple theoretical model to evaluate interdisciplinary differences in research productivity between economics departments and related subjects. Compares the research publishing statistics of economics, finance, psychology, geology, physics, oceanography, chemistry, and geophysics. Considers a number of factors including journal…

  6. Multi-physics modelling contributions to investigate the atmospheric cosmic rays on the single event upset sensitivity along the scaling trend of CMOS technologies.

    PubMed

    Hubert, G; Regis, D; Cheminet, A; Gatti, M; Lacoste, V

    2014-10-01

    Particles originating from primary cosmic radiation, which hit the Earth's atmosphere give rise to a complex field of secondary particles. These particles include neutrons, protons, muons, pions, etc. Since the 1980s it has been known that terrestrial cosmic rays can penetrate the natural shielding of buildings, equipment and circuit package and induce soft errors in integrated circuits. Recently, research has shown that commercial static random access memories are now so small and sufficiently sensitive that single event upsets (SEUs) may be induced from the electronic stopping of a proton. With continued advancements in process size, this downward trend in sensitivity is expected to continue. Then, muon soft errors have been predicted for nano-electronics. This paper describes the effects in the specific cases such as neutron-, proton- and muon-induced SEU observed in complementary metal-oxide semiconductor. The results will allow investigating the technology node sensitivity along the scaling trend.

  7. Recent studies of buried charges of single, multiple, and plate explosives, with details of atmospheric propagation effects, applied to human and physical impact

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, J.W.

    1983-01-01

    Characteristics of blast waves from explosions in simple geometries and containment media have been well defined by hydrodynamic models and verified by experiment. A large class of useful explosions, those only partially contained by the close surrounding medium, are less adequately understood. This report addresses the problem of airblast emitted into the atmosphere from explosions buried in the ground at less than containment depth. Examples of such explosions have arisen in cratering excavation, mining and quarrying, ordnance disposal, and military High Explosives Simulation Tests (HEST). Some recent HEST data have been assembled here to help define an empirical approach to airblast predictions, for operational safety as well as for controlling environmental impact on neighboring communities.

  8. APPLICATIONS OF LASERS AND OTHER TOPICS IN LASER PHYSICS AND TECHNOLOGY: Influence of atmospheric fluctuations of the induced temperature on the characteristics of laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banakh, Viktor A.; Smalikho, I. N.

    1987-10-01

    The expression for the function representing the second-order mutual coherence of a laser beam propagating in a turbulent atmosphere under thermal self-interaction conditions is derived in the aberration-free approximation. An analysis is made of the width of a beam, its wind refraction, and the radius of coherence as a function of the initial coherence of the radiation, of conditions of diffraction on the transmitting aperture, and of fluctuations of the wind velocity. It is shown that on increase in the power the coherence radius of cw laser radiation first increases because of thermal defocusing and then decreases due to the appearance (because of fluctuations of the wind velocity) of induced temperature inhomogeneities in air in the beam localization region. The conditions under which fluctuations of the induced temperature have a significant influence on the coherence of the radiation are determined.

  9. Increased physical protection of soil carbon in the mineral soil of a poplar plantation after five years of free atmospheric CO2 enrichment (FACE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoosbeek, M. R.; Vos, J. M.; Scarascia-Mugnozza, G. E.

    2006-07-01

    Free air CO2 enrichment (FACE) experiments in aggrading forests and plantations have demonstrated significant increases in net primary production (NPP) and C storage in forest vegetation. The extra C uptake may also be stored in forest floor litter and in forest soil. After five years of FACE treatment at the EuroFACE short rotation poplar plantation, the increase of total soil C% was larger under elevated than under ambient CO2. However, the fate of this additional C allocated belowground remains unclear. The stability of soil organic matter is controlled by the chemical structure of the organic matter and the existence of protection offered by the soil matrix and minerals. Fresh litter entering the soil enhances microbial activity which induces the binding of organic matter and soil particles into macro-aggregates. As the enclosed organic matter is decomposed, microbial and decomposition products become associated with mineral particles. This association results in the formation of micro-aggregates (within macro-aggregates) in which organic matter is stabilized and protected. FACE and N-fertilization treatment did not affect the micro- and macro-aggregate weight, C or N fractions obtained by wet sieving. However, Populus euramericana increased the micro- and small macro-aggregates weight and C fractions. The obtained macro-aggregates were broken up in order to isolate recently formed micro-aggregates within macro-aggregates (iM-micro-aggregates). FACE increased the iM-micro-aggregate weight and C fractions. This study reveals that: 1) Species has an effect on the formation of macro-aggregates. The choice of species in a plantation or the effect of global change on species diversity, may therefore affect the stabilization and protection of soil C in aggregates. And 2) Increased atmospheric CO2 concentration increases the stabilization and protection of soil C in micro-aggregates formed within macro-aggregates. This mechanism increases the C sink of forest soils

  10. From surface wave to cloud: An atmosphere physical process in improving the too cold tongue bias and precipitation in a climate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yajuan; Qiao, Fangli; Song, Zhenya

    2015-04-01

    The coupled atmospheric-ocean general circulation models (AOGCMs) without flux correction still show defects in simulating sea surface temperature (SST) and precipitation, with too cold tongue and obvious double-ITCZ biases in the tropical Pacific. We make an effort to improve SST too cold tongue bias and the north-south asymmetry of zonal-averaged precipitation distribution in the Community Climate System Model version3 (CCSM3) by incorporating the non-breaking wave-induced vertical mixing. The oceanic thermocline depth deepens in the central and eastern tropical Pacific under the wave mixing effect. SST warming characterized as a conspicuous maximum in the central and eastern equatorial Pacific contributes to moisture increasing in atmosphere through evaporation process. The non-uniform SST brings out distinct horizontal gradient in air pressure across the tropics, which result in an abnormal wind convergence in the central Pacific. As a result, an enhanced Walker circulation and Hadley cell are driven by wind gradient and more latent heat. The subsidence branch of the Walker circulation in the eastern Pacific suppress the formation of clouds, so that more shortwave radiation is absorbed by the ocean. However, in the central to western Pacific, the updraft of the Walker circulation with abundant water vapor provides favorable conditions for cloud formation in middle and high troposphere. A positive feedback between water vapor and cloud fraction warms the SST by less longwave radiation releasing. The warm anomalies in the central and eastern Pacific restrict the westward expansion of cold tongue. Furthermore, the intensive updraft of Hadley circulation with high humidity increases rainfall in the low-latitudes of the northern hemisphere.

  11. Saturn: atmosphere, ionosphere, and magnetosphere.

    PubMed

    Gombosi, Tamas I; Ingersoll, Andrew P

    2010-03-19

    The Cassini spacecraft has been in orbit around Saturn since 30 June 2004, yielding a wealth of data about the Saturn system. This review focuses on the atmosphere and magnetosphere and briefly outlines the state of our knowledge after the Cassini prime mission. The mission has addressed a host of fundamental questions: What processes control the physics, chemistry, and dynamics of the atmosphere? Where does the magnetospheric plasma come from? What are the physical processes coupling the ionosphere and magnetosphere? And, what are the rotation rates of Saturn's atmosphere and magnetosphere?

  12. Satellite Attitude Control Using Atmospheric Drag

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    Satellite Attitude Control Using Atmospheric Drag THESIS David B. Guettler, Captain, USAF AFIT/GA/ENY/07-M10 DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE AIR...U.S. Government. AFIT/GA/ENY/07-M10 Satellite Attitude Control Using Atmospheric Drag THESIS Presented to the Faculty Department of Aeronautics and...APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE; DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED. AFIT/GA/ENY/07-M10 Satellite Attitude Control Using Atmospheric Drag David B. Guettler, BS Captain

  13. Atmospheric composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniels, G. E.

    1973-01-01

    The earth's atmosphere is made up of a number of gases in different relative amounts. Near sea level and up to about 90 km, the amount of these atmospheric gases in clean, relatively dry air is practically constant. Four of these gases, nitrogen, oxygen, argon, and carbon dioxide, make up 99.99 percent by volume of the atmosphere. Two gases, ozone and water vapor, change in relative amounts, but the total amount of these two is very small compared to the amount of the other gases. The atmospheric composition shown in a table can be considered valid up to 90 km geometric altitude. Above 90 km, mainly because of molecular dissociation and diffusive separation, the composition changes.

  14. Dimethylsulfide/cloud condensation nuclei/climate system - Relevant size-resolved measurements of the chemical and physical properties of atmospheric aerosol particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, P. K.; Covert, D. S.; Bates, T. S.; Kapustin, V. N.; Ramsey-Bell, D. C.; Mcinnes, L. M.

    1993-01-01

    The mass and number relationships occurring within the atmospheric dimethylsulfide/cloud condensation nuclei (CCN)/climate system, using simultaneous measurements of particulate phase mass size distributions of nss SO4(2-), methanesulfonic acid (MSA), and NH4(+); number size distributions of particles having diameters between 0.02 and 9.6 microns; CCN concentrations at a supersaturation of 0.3 percent; relative humidity; and temperature, obtained for the northeastern Pacific Ocean in April and May 1991. Based on these measurements, particulate nss SO4(2-), MSA, and NH4(+) mass appeared to be correlated with both particle effective surface area and number in the accumulation mode size range (0.16 to 0.5 micron). No correlations were found in the size range below 0.16 micron. A correlation was also found between nss SO4(2-) mass and the CCN number concentration, such that a doubling of the SO4(2-) mass corresponded to a 40 percent increase in the CCN number concentration. However, no correlation was found between MSA mass and CCN concentration.

  15. Atmospheric pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Pickett, E.E.

    1987-01-01

    Atmospheric pollution (AP), its causes, and measures to prevent or reduce it are examined in reviews and reports presented at a workshop held in Damascus, Syria in August 1985. Topics discussed include AP and planning studies, emission sources, pollutant formation and transformation, AP effects on man and vegetation, AP control, atmospheric dispersion mechanisms and modeling, sampling and analysis techniques, air-quality monitoring, and applications. Diagrams, graphs, and tables of numerical data are provided.

  16. Research in physical chemistry and chemical education: Part A: Water Mediated Chemistry of Oxidized Atmospheric Compounds Part B: The Development of Surveying Tools to Determine How Effective Laboratory Experiments Contribute to Student Conceptual Understanding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maron, Marta Katarzyna

    This dissertation is a combination of two research areas, experimental physical chemistry, Chapters I to V, and chemical education, Chapters VI to VII. Chapters I to V describe research on the water-mediated chemistry of oxidized atmospheric molecules and the impact that water has on the spectra of these environmental systems. The role of water in the Earth's atmosphere has been of considerable interest due to its ability to impact chemistry and climate. Oxidized atmospheric molecules in the presence of water have the ability to form hydrogen bonded water complexes. The spectroscopic investigation of nitric acid-water complexes, outlined in Chapter III, was undertaken to characterize intermolecular hydrogen bonds in a water-restricted environment at ambient temperatures. Additionally, this characterization of nitric acid-water complexes allowed for the comparison of calculated overtone OH-stretching vibrational band frequencies, intensities, and anharmonicities of intermolecular hydrogen-bonded water complexes with experimental observations. Oxidized organic molecules, such as aldehydes and ketones, in addition to forming hydrogen-bonded water complexes can undergo a hydration reaction of the carbonyl group and form germinal diols in the presence of water. This chemistry has been studied extensively in bulk aqueous media, however little is known about this process in the gas-phase at low water concentrations. The focus of the studies outlined in Chapters IV and V is motivated by the ability of pyruvic acid and formaldehyde to form germinal diols and water complexes in water-restricted environment. This water-mediated chemistry changes the physical and chemical properties of these organic molecules, therefore, impacting the partitioning between gas and particle phase, as well as the chemistry and photochemistry of oxidized organic molecules in the Earth's atmosphere. The results presented in this dissertation may help resolve the significant discrepancy between

  17. The Association of Pre-storm Ground Wetness with Inland Penetration of Monsoon Depressions : A Study Using Self Organizing Maps (SOM) C.M. Kishtawal Meteorology and Oceanography Group, Space Applications Center, Ahmedabad, INDIA Dev Niyogi2 Department of Agronomy, and Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishtawal, C. M.; Niyogi, D.

    2009-12-01

    Monsoon depressions (MDs)are probably the most important rain bearing systems that occur during the Indian summer monsoon season. The unique topography of Indian peninsula and Indo-china region favor the formation and development of MDs in the warm and moist air over the Bay of Bengal. After formation the MDs move in a north-northwest track along the monsoon trough to the warmer and drier heat low regions of Northwest India and Pakistan. The dynamic structure of MDs is largely maintained by convergence of atmospheric water vapor flux coupled with the lower tropospheric divergent circulation (Chen et al., 2005), and they weaken rapidly after landfall due to the lack of surface moisture fluxes (Dastoor and Krishnamurti, 1991). In the present study we explored the association between pre-storm wetness conditions and the post-landfall situation of MDs using 54-year long observations (1951-2004) of 183 MDs and daily surface rainfall. Our analysis suggests that the MD’s post-landfall behavior is most sensitive to mean inland rainfall between To-1 to To-8 days (the pre-storm rainfall), where To is the day of formation of MD in the Bay of Bengal. Further, pre-storm rainfall over a broad region along the monsoon trough is found to exhibit the maximum association with the MDs inland lifespan. We further carried out the unsupervised classification of pre-storm rainfall patterns using Self Organizing Map(SOM), a topology preserving map that maps data from higher dimensions onto a two dimensional grid(Kohenen, 1990). The SOM patterns of rainfall indicate that pre-storm wetness is strongly associated with the inland penetration length of MDs with wetter conditions supporting MDs to survive longer after the landfall. Although the pre-storm inland wetness has not been found to be associated with the formation of MDs and a number of MDs form during relatively dry inland conditions during the early (June) and late (September) phases of monsoon, the inland-penetration and post

  18. Solar Atmosphere Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutten, R. J.

    2002-12-01

    This contribution honoring Kees de Jager's 80th birthday is a review of "one-dimensional" solar atmosphere modeling that followed on the initial "Utrecht Reference Photosphere" of Heintze, Hubenet & de Jager (1964). My starting point is the Bilderberg conference, convened by de Jager in 1967 at the time when NLTE radiative transfer theory became mature. The resulting Bilderberg model was quickly superseded by the HSRA and later by the VAL-FAL sequence of increasingly sophisticated NLTE continuum-fitting models from Harvard. They became the "standard models" of solar atmosphere physics, but Holweger's relatively simple LTE line-fitting model still persists as a favorite of solar abundance determiners. After a brief model inventory I discuss subsequent work on the major modeling issues (coherency, NLTE, dynamics) listed as to-do items by de Jager in 1968. The present conclusion is that one-dimensional modeling recovers Schwarzschild's (1906) finding that the lower solar atmosphere is grosso modo in radiative equilibrium. This is a boon for applications regarding the solar atmosphere as one-dimensional stellar example - but the real sun, including all the intricate phenomena that now constitute the mainstay of solar physics, is vastly more interesting.

  19. A First Course on Atmospheric Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pincus, Robert

    2004-09-01

    Textbooks almost never make their authors rich, and Grant Petty already has a day job as an associate professor at the University of Wisconsin, so he must have had something he wanted to say pretty urgently to write A First Course in Atmospheric Radiation. He has certainly taken a different approach than the authors of the half-dozen tomes that already exist on the subject. His book is aimed directly at beginning students, and it is written in casual language, short on math and long on physical reasoning and applications to real-world problems. The book may not quite live up to what Petty wants it to be, but it will suit its intended audience much better than anything else available. In atmospheric sciences departments everywhere, there are many students who are not interested in radiation-dynamics types with a passing interest in physics. Petty has tailored the book for this kind of student in the hopes that he can convey a few important or interesting ideas. Other texts on the subject are rigorous and complete; this one strives to be engaging above all. It is a near-perfect interpolation between, say, Craig Bohren's books, which people gobble up but which lack the math a textbook needs, and books like Liou's, which are a dense mass of equations. I will bet that more than a few students actually read through Petty's books.

  20. Atmospheric Photochemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massey, Harrie; Potter, A. E.

    1961-01-01

    The upper atmosphere offers a vast photochemical laboratory free from solid surfaces, so all reactions take place in the gaseous phase. At 30 km altitude the pressure has fallen to about one-hundredth of that at ground level, and we shall, rather arbitrarily, regard the upper atmosphere as beginning at that height. By a little less than 100 km the pressure has fallen to 10(exp -3) mm Hg and is decreasing by a power of ten for every 15 km increase in altitude. Essentially we are concerned then with the photochemistry of a nitrogen-oxygen mixture under low-pressure conditions in which photo-ionization, as well as photodissociation, plays an important part. Account must also be taken of the presence of rare constituents, such as water vapour and its decomposition products, including particularly hydroxyl, oxides of carbon, methane and, strangely enough, sodium, lithium and calcium. Many curious and unfamiliar reactions occur in the upper atmosphere. Some of them are luminescent, causing the atmosphere to emit a dim light called the airglow. Others, between gaseous ions and neutral molecules, are almost a complete mystery at this time. Similar interesting phenomena must occur in other planetary atmospheres, and they might be predicted if sufficient chemical information were available.

  1. Solar Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.

    2000-01-01

    The areas of emphasis are: (1) develop theoretical models of the transient release of magnetic energy in the solar atmosphere, e.g., in solar flares, eruptive prominences, coronal mass ejections, etc.; (2) investigate the role of the Sun's magnetic field in the structuring of solar corona by the development of three-dimensional numerical models that describe the field configuration at various heights in the solar atmosphere by extrapolating the field at the photospheric level; (3) develop numerical models to investigate the physical parameters obtained by the ULYSSES mission; (4) develop numerical and theoretical models to investigate solar activity effects on the solar wind characteristics for the establishment of the solar-interplanetary transmission line; and (5) develop new instruments to measure solar magnetic fields and other features in the photosphere, chromosphere transition region and corona. We focused our investigation on the fundamental physical processes in solar atmosphere which directly effect our Planet Earth. The overall goal is to establish the physical process for the Sun-Earth connections.

  2. Atmospheric trace molecule spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, C. B.

    1982-01-01

    The Spacelab investigation entitled Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy (ATMOS) is designed to obtain fundamental information related to the chemistry and physics of the Earth's upper atmosphere using the techniques of infrared absorption spectroscopy. There are two principal objectives to be met. The first is the determination, on a global scale, of the compositional structure of the upper atmosphere and its spatial variability. The establishment of this variability represents the first step toward determining the characteristic residence times for the upper atmospheric constituents; the magnitudes of their sources and sinks; and, ultimately, an understanding of their effects on the stability of the stratosphere. The second objective is to provide the high-resolution, calibrated spectral information which is essential for the detailed design of advanced instrumentation for subsequent global monitoring of specific species found to be critical to atmospheric stability. This information will be disseminated in the form of a three dimensional atlas of solar absorption spectra obtained over a range of latitudes, longitudes, and altitudes.

  3. Atmosphere to Electrons (A2e): Enabling the Wind Plant of Tomorrow

    SciTech Connect

    Zayas, Jose; Derby, Mike; Ralston, Kiersten; Clark, Charlton; Brake, Dan; Johnson, Nick

    2016-09-01

    Atmosphere to Electrons (A2e) is a multi-year U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) research initiative targeting significant reductions in the cost of wind energy through an improved understanding of the complex physics governing electricity generation by wind plants. The goal of A2e is to ensure future wind plants are sited, built, and operated in a way that produces the most cost-effective, usable electric power.

  4. Atmosphere to Electrons (A2e): Enabling the Wind Plant of Tomorrow

    ScienceCinema

    Zayas, Jose; Derby, Mike; Ralston, Kiersten; Clark, Charlton; Brake, Dan; Johnson, Nick

    2016-09-20

    Atmosphere to Electrons (A2e) is a multi-year U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) research initiative targeting significant reductions in the cost of wind energy through an improved understanding of the complex physics governing electricity generation by wind plants. The goal of A2e is to ensure future wind plants are sited, built, and operated in a way that produces the most cost-effective, usable electric power.

  5. Atmospheric radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Harshvardhan, M.R. )

    1991-01-01

    Studies of atmospheric radiative processes are summarized for the period 1987-1990. Topics discussed include radiation modeling; clouds and radiation; radiative effects in dynamics and climate; radiation budget and aerosol effects; and gaseous absorption, particulate scattering and surface reflection. It is concluded that the key developments of the period are a defining of the radiative forcing to the climate system by trace gases and clouds, the recognition that cloud microphysics and morphology need to be incorporated not only into radiation models but also climate models, and the isolation of a few important unsolved theoretical problems in atmospheric radiation.

  6. Partnerships with Academic Departments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    English, Anthony M.

    2013-01-01

    This chapter describes how professional and continuing higher education units can develop and sustain successful partnerships with academic departments in order to deliver educational programs effectively to students.

  7. Lithosphere-Atmosphere coupling: Spectral element modeling of the evolution of acoustic waves in the atmosphere from an underground source.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Averbuch, Gil; Price, Colin

    2015-04-01

    Lithosphere-Atmosphere coupling: Spectral element modeling of the evolution of acoustic waves in the atmosphere from an underground source. G. Averbuch, C. Price Department of Geosciences, Tel Aviv University, Israel Infrasound is one of the four Comprehensive Nuclear-Test Ban Treaty technologies for monitoring nuclear explosions. This technology measures the acoustic waves generated by the explosions followed by their propagation through the atmosphere. There are also natural phenomena that can act as an infrasound sources like sprites, volcanic eruptions and earthquakes. The infrasound waves generated from theses phenomena can also be detected by the infrasound arrays. In order to study the behavior of these waves, i.e. the physics of wave propagation in the atmosphere, their evolution and their trajectories, numerical methods are required. This presentation will deal with the evolution of acoustic waves generated by underground sources (earthquakes and underground explosions). A 2D Spectral elements formulation for lithosphere-atmosphere coupling will be presented. The formulation includes the elastic wave equation for the seismic waves and the momentum, mass and state equations for the acoustic waves in a moving stratified atmosphere. The coupling of the two media is made by boundary conditions that ensures the continuity of traction and velocity (displacement) in the normal component to the interface. This work has several objectives. The first is to study the evolution of acoustic waves in the atmosphere from an underground source. The second is to derive transmission coefficients for the energy flux with respect to the seismic magnitude and earth density. The third will be the generation of seismic waves from acoustic waves in the atmosphere. Is it possible?

  8. Enabling department-scale supercomputing

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, D.S.; Hart, W.E.; Phillips, C.A.

    1997-11-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratories have one of the longest and most consistent histories of supercomputer use. The authors summarize the architecture of DOE`s new supercomputers that are being built for the Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI). The authors then argue that in the near future scaled-down versions of these supercomputers with petaflop-per-weekend capabilities could become widely available to hundreds of research and engineering departments. The availability of such computational resources will allow simulation of physical phenomena to become a full-fledged third branch of scientific exploration, along with theory and experimentation. They describe the ASCI and other supercomputer applications at Sandia National Laboratories, and discuss which lessons learned from Sandia`s long history of supercomputing can be applied in this new setting.

  9. Atmospheric Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    With its Multispectral Visible Imaging Camera (MVIC), half of the Ralph instrument, New Horizons captured several pictures of mesoscale gravity waves in Jupiter's equatorial atmosphere. Buoyancy waves of this type are seen frequently on Earth - for example, they can be caused when air flows over a mountain and a regular cloud pattern forms downstream. In Jupiter's case there are no mountains, but if conditions in the atmosphere are just right, it is possible to form long trains of these small waves. The source of the wave excitation seems to lie deep in Jupiter's atmosphere, below the visible cloud layers at depths corresponding to pressures 10 times that at Earth's surface. The New Horizons measurements showed that the waves move about 100 meters per second faster than surrounding clouds; this is about 25% of the speed of sound on Earth and is much greater than current models of these waves predict. Scientists can 'read' the speed and patterns these waves to learn more about activity and stability in the atmospheric layers below.

  10. Atmospheric humidity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Water vapor plays a critical role in earth's atmosphere. It helps to maintain a habitable surface temperature through absorption of outgoing longwave radiation, and it transfers trmendous amounts of energy from the tropics toward the poles by absorbing latent heat during evaporation and subsequently...

  11. Fire Department Emergency Response

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchard, A.; Bell, K.; Kelly, J.; Hudson, J.

    1997-09-01

    In 1995 the SRS Fire Department published the initial Operations Basis Document (OBD). This document was one of the first of its kind in the DOE complex and was widely distributed and reviewed. This plan described a multi-mission Fire Department which provided fire, emergency medical, hazardous material spill, and technical rescue services.

  12. A SURVEY OF DEPARTMENTS OF VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE IN DELAWARE TO ASCERTAIN THE EMPHASIS BEING GIVEN TO THE AREAS OF ORNAMENTAL HORTICULTURE, FLORICULTURE, AND TURF IN THE COURSE OF STUDY AND THE PHYSICAL FACILITIES AVAILABLE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BARWICK, RALPH P.

    IN ORDER TO DETERMINE WHAT TEACHING UNITS WERE INCLUDED IN THE STATE'S VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE PROGRAMS AND THE FACILITIES AVAILABLE TO AID INSTRUCTION IN THESE AREAS, 18 HIGH SCHOOLS IN DELAWARE WERE SURVEYED. IN 11 SCHOOLS THE VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE DEPARTMENTS WERE INCLUDING ORNAMENTAL HORTICULTURE, SEVEN WERE INCLUDING FLORICULTURE, AND 10 WERE…

  13. Atmospheres of Extrasolar Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marley, M. S.; Fortney, J.; Seager, S.; Barman, T.

    The key to understanding an extrasolar giant planet's spectrum - and hence its detectability and evolution - lies with its atmosphere. Now that direct observations of thermal emission from extrasolar giant planets (EGPs) are in hand, atmosphere models can be used to constrain atmospheric composition, thermal structure, and ultimately the formation and evolution of detected planets. We review the important physical processes that influence the atmospheric structure and evolution of EGPs and consider what has already been learned from the first generation of observations and modeling. We pay particular attention to the roles of cloud structure, metallicity, and atmospheric chemistry in affecting detectable properties through Spitzer Space Telescope observations of the transiting giant planets. Our review stresses the uncertainties that ultimately limit our ability to interpret EGP observations. Finally we will conclude with a look to the future as characterization of multiple individual planets in a single stellar system leads to the study of comparative planetary architectures.

  14. New atmospheric sensor analysis study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, K. G.

    1989-01-01

    The functional capabilities of the ESAD Research Computing Facility are discussed. The system is used in processing atmospheric measurements which are used in the evaluation of sensor performance, conducting design-concept simulation studies, and also in modeling the physical and dynamical nature of atmospheric processes. The results may then be evaluated to furnish inputs into the final design specifications for new space sensors intended for future Spacelab, Space Station, and free-flying missions. In addition, data gathered from these missions may subsequently be analyzed to provide better understanding of requirements for numerical modeling of atmospheric phenomena.

  15. [Improving emergency department organisation].

    PubMed

    Yordanov, Youri; Beltramini, Alexandra; Debuc, Erwan; Pateron, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Emergency departments use has been constantly increasing over the world. Overcrowding is defined as a situation which compromises patient safety because of delayed cares. This situation is often reached. Emergency departments have to continuously improve their organization to be able to ensure the same quality of care to a higher number of patients. Thus a good organization is essential: it doesn't always avoid overcrowding. The rest of the hospital has to be involved in this process to ensure efficiency. We examine the various interventions and procedures that can be found in medical literature for improving patients flow and management in emergency departments.

  16. Planetary Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Encrenaz, T.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Planetary atmospheres are the external gaseous envelopes which surround the planets. In the case of the telluric planets, they represent only a negligible fraction of their mass, but they play an essential role in the energy balance between the surfaces and the Sun. In the case of the GIANT PLANETS, which are mostly gaseous, they account for a large fraction of their total mass and constitute the...

  17. Atmospheric Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimann, Dietrich; Schady, Arthur; Feng, Joseph

    This chapter deals with sound propagation in the atmosphere, which is an important link in the functional chain from noise emissions from aircraft, road and rail vehicles, and wind turbines to noise perception. The principle processes in outdoor sound propagation are explained. They include refraction, diffraction, and reflection. Two sound propagation models for scientific applications are briefly outlined. Finally, three illustrative applications and their results are discussed.

  18. Other Departments . . . Other Ways.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ADE Bulletin, 1981

    1981-01-01

    This collection of project and program descriptions describes a successful student recruiting method, the features of the United States Air Force Academy's English department, a writing program for the professions, and the writing program at Pennsylvania's Beaver College. (AEA)

  19. Understanding Atmospheric Catastrophes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Winston C.

    2009-01-01

    The atmosphere, as in other parts of nature, is full of phenomena that involve rapid transitions from one (quasi-) equilibrium state to another--- i.e. catastrophes. These (quasi-) equilibria are the multiple solutions of the same dynamical system. Unlocking the mystery behind a catastrophe reveals not only the physical mechanism responsible for the transition, but also how the (quasi-) equilibria before and after the transition are maintained. Each catastrophe is different, but they do have some common traits. Understanding these common traits is the first step in studying these catastrophes. In this seminar, three examples chosen based on the speaker's research interest--tropical cyclogenesis, stratospheric sudden warming, and monsoon onset--are given to illustrate how atmospheric catastrophes can be studied.

  20. Hazards Control Department annual technology review, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, R.V.; Anderson, K.J.

    1988-07-01

    This document describes some of the research performed in the LLNL Hazards Control Department from October 1986 to September 1987. The sections in the Annual report cover scientific concerns in the areas of Health Physics, Industrial Hygiene, Industrial Safety, Aerosol Science, Resource Management, Dosimetry and Radiation Physics, Criticality Safety, and Fire Science. For a broader overview of the types of work performed in the Hazards Control Department, we have also compiled a selection of abstracts of recent publications by Hazards Control employees. Individual reports are processed separately for the data base.

  1. Atmospheric science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamill, Patrick; Ackerman, Thomas; Clarke, Antony; Goodman, Jindra; Levin, Zev; Tomasko, Martin; Toon, O. Brian; Whitten, Robert

    1987-01-01

    The following types of experiments for a proposed Space Station Microgravity Particle Research Facility are described: (1) growth of liquid water drop populations; (2) coalescence; (3) drop breakup; (4) breakup of freezing drops; (5) ice nucleation for large aerosols or bacteria; (6) scavenging of gases, for example, SO2 oxidation; (7) phoretic forces, i.e., thermophoresis versus diffusiophoresis; (8) Rayleigh bursting of drops; (9) charge separation due to collisions of rimed and unrimed ice; (10) charged drop dynamics; (11) growth of particles in other planetary atmospheres; and (12) freezing and liquid-liquid evaporation. The required capabilities and desired hardware for the facility are detailed.

  2. Atmospheric microphysical experiments on an orbital platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eaton, L. R.

    1974-01-01

    The Zero-Gravity Atmospheric Cloud Physics Laboratory is a Shuttle/Spacelab payload which will be capable of performing a large range of microphysics experiments. This facility will complement terrestrial cloud physics research by allowing many experiments to be performed which cannot be accomplished within the confines of a terrestrial laboratory. This paper reviews the general Cloud Physics Laboratory concept and the experiment scope. The experimental constraints are given along with details of the proposed equipment. Examples of appropriate experiments range from three-dimensional simulation of the earth and planetary atmosphere and of ocean circulation to cloud electrification processes and the effects of atmospheric pollution materials on microphysical processes.

  3. Solar flare model atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawley, Suzanne L.; Fisher, George H.

    1993-01-01

    Solar flare model atmospheres computed under the assumption of energetic equilibrium in the chromosphere are presented. The models use a static, one-dimensional plane parallel geometry and are designed within a physically self-consistent coronal loop. Assumed flare heating mechanisms include collisions from a flux of non-thermal electrons and x-ray heating of the chromosphere by the corona. The heating by energetic electrons accounts explicitly for variations of the ionized fraction with depth in the atmosphere. X-ray heating of the chromosphere by the corona incorporates a flare loop geometry by approximating distant portions of the loop with a series of point sources, while treating the loop leg closest to the chromospheric footpoint in the plane-parallel approximation. Coronal flare heating leads to increased heat conduction, chromospheric evaporation and subsequent changes in coronal pressure; these effects are included self-consistently in the models. Cooling in the chromosphere is computed in detail for the important optically thick HI, CaII and MgII transitions using the non-LTE prescription in the program MULTI. Hydrogen ionization rates from x-ray photo-ionization and collisional ionization by non-thermal electrons are included explicitly in the rate equations. The models are computed in the 'impulsive' and 'equilibrium' limits, and in a set of intermediate 'evolving' states. The impulsive atmospheres have the density distribution frozen in pre-flare configuration, while the equilibrium models assume the entire atmosphere is in hydrostatic and energetic equilibrium. The evolving atmospheres represent intermediate stages where hydrostatic equilibrium has been established in the chromosphere and corona, but the corona is not yet in energetic equilibrium with the flare heating source. Thus, for example, chromospheric evaporation is still in the process of occurring.

  4. NPL closes acoustics department

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Extance, Andy

    2016-11-01

    The UK's National Physical Laboratory (NPL) has withdrawn funding for its acoustics, polymer and thermoelectrics groups, triggering concern among airborne acoustics specialists that the move could undermine the country's noise-management policies.

  5. Range Reference Atmosphere, Nellis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-12-01

    mecan to the intercept ol a given probability ellipse, equation 43 is also applicable. 2.7 Statistical Parameters for Non-Standard Orthogonal Axes...clockw ise fronti true north. Rotation of the mecans through (X (legrees: X, Xcos ~(90 -) W + sin (90 - () (44) ’ s (go - o.) u in (90 - (X) (45) Rotation...8217TABLE 3-1. Primary Physical Constants Used in RRA Production. P0 Standard atmospheric pressure at sea level (1.0 13250 X 10 Newton /in 2 ) (2116.22 Ib

  6. Improving Departments of Psychology.

    PubMed

    Diener, Ed

    2016-11-01

    Our procedures for creating excellent departments of psychology are based largely on selection-hiring and promoting the best people. I argue that these procedures have been successful, but I suggest the implementation of policies that I believe will further improve departments in the behavioral and brain sciences. I recommend that we institute more faculty development programs attached to incentives to guarantee continuing education and scholarly activities after the Ph.D. degree. I also argue that we would do a much better job if we more strongly stream our faculty into research, education, or service and not expect all faculty members to carry equal responsibility for each of these. Finally, I argue that more hiring should occur at advanced levels, where scholars have a proven track record of independent scholarship. Although these practices will be a challenge to implement, institutions do ossify over time and thus searching for ways to improve our departments should be a key element of faculty governance.

  7. Juggling Makes Physics Fun

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, Charles

    2008-01-01

    We all hope our classrooms don't take on a circus-like atmosphere, but juggling can be an engaging way to introduce elementary physics to students. The very act of tossing and catching objects can help students to understand the basic physical principles involved in rotating a set of objects. This article suggests a variety of simple hands-on…

  8. Planning Homemaking Departments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schooler, Ruth; Mather, Mary

    1961-01-01

    A comprehensive guide for home economists, the article treats five major ideas for planning home economics departments in schools, as follows--(1) the importance of sharing the planning responsibility among teacher, parent, and administrator, citing an example of successful planning, (2) the need for teaching methods, course content and equipment…

  9. Personnel Department Automation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, David

    In 1989, the Austin Independent School District's Office of Research and Evaluation was directed to monitor the automation of personnel information and processes in the district's Department of Personnel. Earlier, a study committee appointed by the Superintendent during the 1988-89 school year identified issues related to Personnel Department…

  10. Department-Initiated Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Anne; De Geest, Els

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports the activity of three secondary school mathematics departments in England in self-initiated states of change that led to overall improvements in students' achievements when compared to previous cohorts. This took place without intervention and without their participation in external projects. They provide examples of departments…

  11. Honoring Energy Department Vets

    ScienceCinema

    Chu, Steven; Majors, Alvan; Underwood, David

    2016-07-12

    Veterans from the Army, Air Force, Navy, Marine Corps and the National Guard who work at the Department of Energy met Wednesday with Secretary Steven Chu, who hosted more than a dozen former service members to thank them for their continued service to America.

  12. Strengthening Science Departments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Todd; Melville, Wayne; Bartley, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Teachers do not work in a vacuum. They are, in most cases, part of a science department in which teachers and the chairperson have important roles in science education reform. Current reform is shaped by national standards documents that emphasize the pedagogical and conceptual importance of best practices framed by constructivism and focused on…

  13. Maryland Department of Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Chief State School Officers, Washington, DC.

    This document traces the historical development of the Maryland Department of Education from the first notable efforts to establish free schooling in 1825 to the present. An introductory section briefly sketches early development of a centralized system and the establishment of a state board in 1870. "From 1900 to World War I" focuses on…

  14. Middle Atmosphere Program. Handbook for MAP, volume 25

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roper, R. G. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    GLOBMET (the Global Meteor Observation System) was first proposed by the Soviet Geophysical Committee and was accepted by the Middle Atmosphere Program Steering Committee in 1982. While the atmospheric dynamics data from the system are of primary interest to MAP, GLOBMET also encompasses the astronomical radio and optical observations of meteoroids, and the physics of their interaction with the Earth's atmosphere. These astronomical observations and interactional physics with the Earth's atmosphere are discussed in detail.

  15. Atmospheric Propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Embleton, Tony F. W.; Daigle, Gilles A.

    1991-01-01

    Reviewed here is the current state of knowledge with respect to each basic mechanism of sound propagation in the atmosphere and how each mechanism changes the spectral or temporal characteristics of the sound received at a distance from the source. Some of the basic processes affecting sound wave propagation which are present in any situation are discussed. They are geometrical spreading, molecular absorption, and turbulent scattering. In geometrical spreading, sound levels decrease with increasing distance from the source; there is no frequency dependence. In molecular absorption, sound energy is converted into heat as the sound wave propagates through the air; there is a strong dependence on frequency. In turbulent scattering, local variations in wind velocity and temperature induce fluctuations in phase and amplitude of the sound waves as they propagate through an inhomogeneous medium; there is a moderate dependence on frequency.

  16. Atmosphere Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    California Measurements, Inc.'s model PC-2 Aerosol Particle Analyzer is produced in both airborne and ground-use versions. Originating from NASA technology, it is a quick and accurate method of detecting minute amounts of mass loadings on a quartz crystal -- offers utility as highly sensitive detector of fine particles suspended in air. When combined with suitable air delivery system, it provides immediate information on the size distribution and mass concentrations of aerosols. William Chiang, obtained a NASA license for multiple crystal oscillator technology, and initially developed a particle analyzer for NASA use with Langley Research Center assistance. Later his company produced the modified PC-2 for commercial applications Brunswick Corporation uses the device for atmospheric research and in studies of smoke particles in Fires. PC-2 is used by pharmaceutical and chemical companies in research on inhalation toxicology and environmental health. Also useful in testing various filters for safety masks and nuclear installations.

  17. Rocket Measurements of the Direct Solar Lyman-alpha Radiation Penetrating in the Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guineva, V. H.; Witt, G.; Gumbel, J.; Khaplanov, M.; Tashev, V. L.

    2006-03-01

    The resonance transition 2P-2S of the atomic hydrogen (Lyman-alpha emission) is the strongest and most conspicuous feature in the solar EUV spectrum. The Lyman-alpha radiation transfer depends on the resonance scattering from the hydrogen atoms in the atmosphere and on the O2 absorption. Since the Lyman-alpha extinction in the atmosphere is a measure for the column density of the oxygen molecules, the atmospheric temperature profile can be calculated thereof. Rocket measurements of the direct Lyman-alpha radiation vertical profile in the summer mesosphere and thermosphere (up to 120 km), at high latitudes will be carried out in June 2006. The Lyman-alpha flux will be registered by a detector of solar Lyman-alpha radiation, manufactured in the Stara Zagora Department of the Solar-Terrestrial Influences Laboratory (STIL BAS). Its basic part is an ionization camera, filled in with NO. The scientific data analysis will include raw data reduction, radiative transfer simulations, temperature retrieval as well as co-analysis with other parameters, measured near the polar summer mesopause. This project is a scientific cooperation between STIL-BAS, Stara Zagora Department and the Atmospheric Physics Group at the Department of Meteorology (MISU), Stockholm University, Sweden. The joint project is part from the rocket experiment HotPay I, in the ALOMAR eARI Project, EU's 6th Framework Programme, Andoya Rocket Range, Andenes, Norway.

  18. Titan's surface and atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, Alexander G.; Soderblom, Jason M.; Ádámkovics, Máté

    2016-05-01

    Since its arrival in late 2004, the NASA/ESA Cassini-Huygens mission to Saturn has revealed Titan to be a world that is both strange and familiar. Titan is the only extraterrestrial body known to support standing bodies of stable liquid on its surface and, along with Earth and early Mars, is one of three places in the Solar System known to have had an active hydrologic cycle. With atmospheric pressures of 1.5 bar and temperatures of 90-95 K at the surface, methane and ethane condense out of Titan's nitrogen-dominated atmosphere and flow as liquids on the surface. Despite vast differences in environmental conditions and materials from Earth, Titan's methane-based hydrologic cycle drives climatic and geologic processes which generate landforms that are strikingly similar to their terrestrial counterparts, including vast equatorial dunes, well-organized channel networks that route material through erosional and depositional landscapes, and lakes and seas of liquid hydrocarbons. These similarities make Titan a natural laboratory for studying the processes that shape terrestrial landscapes and drive climates, probing extreme conditions impossible to recreate in earthbound laboratories. Titan's exotic environment ensures that even rudimentary measurements of atmospheric/surface interactions, such as wind-wave generation or aeolian dune development, provide valuable data to anchor physical models.

  19. Environmental assessment for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program: Southern Great Plains Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site

    SciTech Connect

    Policastro, A.J.; Pfingston, J.M.; Maloney, D.M.; Wasmer, F.; Pentecost, E.D.

    1992-03-01

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is aimed at supplying improved predictive capability of climate change, particularly the prediction of cloud-climate feedback. The objective will be achieved by measuring the atmospheric radiation and physical and meteorological quantities that control solar radiation in the earth`s atmosphere and using this information to test global climate and related models. The proposed action is to construct and operate a Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) research site in the southern Great Plains as part of the Department of Energy`s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program whose objective is to develop an improved predictive capability of global climate change. The purpose of this CART research site in southern Kansas and northern Oklahoma would be to collect meteorological and other scientific information to better characterize the processes controlling radiation transfer on a global scale. Impacts which could result from this facility are described.

  20. Solar Atmosphere Simulation - AGU Dec. 9, 2013

    NASA Video Gallery

    This movie shows a numerical simulation of a small area of the solar atmosphere at ~10,000K. Numerical models bridge the gap between IRIS observations and the physical mechanisms driving solar even...

  1. ARESE (ARM Enhanced Shortwave Experiment) Science Plan [Atmospheric Radiation Program

    SciTech Connect

    Valero, F.P.J.; Schwartz, S.E.; Cess, R.D.; Ramanathan, V.; Collins, W.D.; Minnis, P.; Ackerman, T.P.; Vitko, J.; Tooman, T.P.

    1995-09-27

    Several recent studies have indicated that cloudy atmospheres may absorb significantly more solar radiation than currently predicted by models. The magnitude of this excess atmospheric absorption, is about 50% more than currently predicted and would have major impact on our understanding of atmospheric heating. Incorporation of this excess heating into existing general circulation models also appears to ameliorate some significant shortcomings of these models, most notably a tendency to overpredict the amount of radiant energy going into the oceans and to underpredict the tropopause temperature. However, some earlier studies do not show this excess absorption and an underlying physical mechanism that would give rise to such absorption has yet to be defined. Given the importance of this issue, the Department of Energy's (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program is sponsoring the ARM Enhanced Shortwave Experiment (ARESE) to study the absorption of solar radiation by clear and cloudy atmospheres. The experimental results will be compared with model calculations. Measurements will be conducted using three aircraft platforms (ARM-UAV Egrett, NASA ER-2, and an instrumented Twin Otter), as well as satellites and the ARM central and extended facilities in North Central Oklahoma. The project will occur over a four week period beginning in late September, 1995. Spectral broadband, partial bandpass, and narrow bandpass (10nm) solar radiative fluxes will be measured at different altitudes and at the surface with the objective to determine directly the magnitude and spectral characteristics of the absorption of shortwave radiation by the atmosphere (clear and cloudy). Narrow spectral channels selected to coincide with absorption by liquid water and ice will help in identifying the process of absorption of radiation. Additionally, information such as water vapor profiles, aerosol optical depths, cloud structure and ozone profiles, needed to use as input in radiative

  2. 75 FR 67998 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Western Michigan University, Anthropology Department, Kalamazoo, MI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-04

    ... Inventory Completion: Western Michigan University, Anthropology Department, Kalamazoo, MI AGENCY: National..., Anthropology Department, Kalamazoo, MI. The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from... physical anthropologist in the Anthropology Department at Western Michigan University, studied the...

  3. An Atmospheric Pressure Ping-Pong "Ballometer"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kazachkov, Alexander; Kryuchkov, Dmitriy; Willis, Courtney; Moore, John C.

    2006-01-01

    Classroom experiments on atmospheric pressure focus largely on demonstrating its existence, often in a most impressive way. A series of amusing physics demonstrations is widely known and practiced by educators teaching the topic. However, measuring the value of atmospheric pressure(P[subscript atm]) is generally done in a rather mundane way,…

  4. Atmosphere, Science (Experimental): 5343.08.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reese, Sandra Kay

    This unit of instruction deals with a study of the general atmosphere by layers with an emphasis on physical characteristics. The formation of layers in the atmosphere and the energy relationships that exist between them are also discussed. No requisites for prior course work, experience, or courses to be taken concurrently are required for…

  5. Atmospheric electricity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    In the last three years the focus was on the information contained in the lightning measurement, which is independent of other meteorological measurements that can be made from space. The characteristics of lightning activity in mesoscale convective systems were quantified. A strong relationship was found between lightning activity and surface rainfall. It is shown that lightning provides a precursor signature for wet microbursts (the strong downdrafts that produce windshears hazardous to aircraft) and that the lightning signature is a direct consequence of storm evolution. The Universities Space Research Association (USRA) collaborated with NASA scientists in the preliminary analysis and scientific justification for the design and deployment of an optical instrument which can detect lightning from geostationary orbit. Science proposals for the NASA mesoscale science program and for the Tethered Satellite System were reviewed. The weather forecasting research and unmanned space vehicles. Software was written to ingest and analyze the lightning ground strike data on the MSFC McIDAS system. The capabilities which were developed have a wide application to a number of problems associated with the operational impacts of electrical discharge within the atmosphere.

  6. Clinical features from the history and physical examination that predict the presence or absence of pulmonary embolism in symptomatic emergency department patients: results of a prospective, multi-center study

    PubMed Central

    Courtney, D. Mark; Kline, Jeffrey A.; Kabrhel, Christopher; Moore, Christopher L.; Smithline, Howard A; Nordenholz, Kristen E.; Richman, Peter B.; Plewa, Michael C.

    2009-01-01

    Study Objective Prediction rules for pulmonary embolism (PE) employ variables explicitly shown to estimate the probability of PE. However, clinicians often use variables that have not been similarly validated, yet are implicitly believed to modify probability of PE. The objective of this study was to measure the predictive value of 13 implicit variables. Methods Patients were enrolled in a prospective cohort study from 12 centers in the United States; all had an objective test for PE (D-dimer, CT angiography, or V/Q scan). Clinical features including 12 predefined previously validated (explicit) variables and 13 variables not part of existing prediction rules (implicit) were prospectively recorded at presentation. The primary outcome was VTE (venous thromboembolism: PE or deep venous thrombosis), diagnosed by imaging up to 45 days after enrollment. Variables with adjusted odds ratios from logistic regression with 95% confidence intervals not crossing unity were considered significant. Results 7,940 patients (7.2% VTE+) were enrolled. Mean age was 49±17 years and 67% were female. Eight of 13 implicit variables were significantly associated with VTE; those with an adjusted OR >1.5 included non-cancer related thrombophilia (1.99), pleuritic chest pain (1.53), and family history of VTE (1.51). Implicit variables that predicted no VTE outcome included: substernal chest pain, female gender, and smoking. Nine of 12 explicit variables predicted a positive outcome of VTE, including unilateral leg swelling, recent surgery, estrogen, hypoxemia and active malignancy. Conclusions In symptomatic outpatients being considered for possible PE, non-cancer related thrombophilia, pleuritic chest pain, and family history of VTE increase probability of PE or DVT. Other variables that are part of existing pretest probability systems were validated as important predictors in this diverse sample of US Emergency department patients. PMID:20045580

  7. Physical Activity and Your Heart

    MedlinePlus

    ... more energy than resting. Walking, running, dancing, swimming, yoga, and gardening are a few examples of physical activity. According to the Department of Health and Human Services' 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for ...

  8. Physics in Police Investigations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Peter

    1980-01-01

    Described are several techniques and pieces of equipment developed by the Police Scientific Department Branch in its application of physics to police problems. Topics discussed include fingerprints, documents, and photographs. (Author/DS)

  9. Formaldehyde in pathology departments.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, R P

    1983-01-01

    Toxic effects of formaldehyde in humans are discussed in relation to occupational exposure and tolerance to this agent. Carcinogenic and mutagenic properties of formaldehyde have been reported in animals and this has led to concern about a possible role in human cancer. The current state of affairs is reviewed in the light of a lack of direct evidence linking formaldehyde with cancer in man and in relation to recommended exposure levels. It is important to employ effective means of containment and practical methods for reducing exposure to formaldehyde in pathology departments and post-mortem rooms are described. Images PMID:6223948

  10. Department of Energy Technology.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-03-01

    I-AL95 6A4~LA 1 UWCL*SSZFZKD F/G LO/1 H?. . 12 113l2i 2 -lll 1 36 II IIlIg.- I1I25 11UG’-- 11.6 L 0 tRiso -R-559 Department of N Energy Technology...of neutron flux distribution and absolute thermal flux. - Neutron activation analysis . - Gamma spectroscopy with scintillation detector. - Measurements...Electric design, and a very detailed experimental program has been conduc’ed for the two first fuel cycles (General Electric, 1976 ), yielding a unique

  11. NASA's Upper Atmosphere Research Program UARP and Atmospheric Chemistry Modeling and Analysis Program (ACMAP): Research Summaries 1994 - 1996. Report to Congress and the Environmental Protection Agency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendall, Rose (Compiler); Wolfe, Kathy (Compiler)

    1997-01-01

    Under the mandate contained in the FY 1976 NASA Authorization Act, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has developed and is implementing a comprehensive program of research, technology, and monitoring of the Earth's upper atmosphere, with emphasis on the stratosphere. This program aims at expanding our understanding to permit both the quantitative analysis of current perturbations as well as the assessment of possible future changes in this important region of our environment. It is carried out jointly by the Upper Atmosphere Research Program (UARP) and the Atmospheric Chemistry Modeling and Analysis Program (ACMAP), both managed within the Science Division in the Office of Mission to Planet Earth at NASA. Significant contributions to this effort are also provided by the Atmospheric Effects of Aviation Project (AEAP) of NASA's Office of Aeronautics. The long-term objectives of the present program are to perform research to: understand the physics, chemistry, and transport processes of the upper atmosphere and their effect on the distribution of chemical species in the stratosphere, such as ozone; understand the relationship of the trace constituent composition of the lower stratosphere and the lower troposphere to the radiative balance and temperature distribution of the Earth's atmosphere; and accurately assess possible perturbations of the upper atmosphere caused by human activities as well as by natural phenomena. In compliance with the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, Public Law 101-549, NASA has prepared a report on the state of our knowledge of the Earth's upper atmosphere, particularly the stratosphere, and on the progress of UARP and ACMAP. The report for the year 1996 is composed of two parts. Part 1 summarizes the objectives, status, and accomplishments of the research tasks supported under NASA UARP and ACMAP in a document entitled, Research Summary 1994-1996. Part 2 is entitled Present State of Knowledge of the Upper Atmosphere

  12. The Atmospheres of Extrasolar Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, L. J.; Seager, S.

    2007-01-01

    In this chapter we examine what can be learned about extrasolar planet atmospheres by concentrating on a class of planets that transit their parent stars. As discussed in the previous chapter, one way of detecting an extrasolar planet is by observing the drop in stellar intensity as the planet passes in front of the star. A transit represents a special case in which the geometry of the planetary system is such that the planet s orbit is nearly edge-on as seen from Earth. As we will explore, the transiting planets provide opportunities for detailed follow-up observations that allow physical characterization of extrasolar planets, probing their bulk compositions and atmospheres.

  13. Lidar investigations of atmospheric dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philbrick, C. Russell; Hallen, Hans D.

    2015-09-01

    Ground based lidar techniques using Raleigh and Raman scattering, differential absorption (DIAL), and supercontinuum sources are capable of providing unique signatures to study dynamical processes in the lower atmosphere. The most useful profile signatures of dynamics in the lower atmosphere are available in profiles of time sequences of water vapor and aerosol optical extinction obtained with Raman and DIAL lidars. Water vapor profiles are used to study the scales and motions of daytime convection cells, residual layer bursts into the planetary boundary layer (PBL), variations in height of the PBL layer, cloud formation and dissipation, scale sizes of gravity waves, turbulent eddies, as well as to study the seldom observed phenomena of Brunt-Väisälä oscillations and undular bore waves. Aerosol optical extinction profiles from Raman lidar provide another tracer of dynamics and motion using sequential profiles atmospheric aerosol extinction, where the aerosol distribution is controlled by dynamic, thermodynamic, and photochemical processes. Raman lidar profiles of temperature describe the stability of the lower atmosphere and measure structure features. Rayleigh lidar can provide backscatter profiles of aerosols in the troposphere, and temperature profiles in the stratosphere and mesosphere, where large gravity waves, stratospheric clouds, and noctilucent clouds are observed. Examples of several dynamical features are selected to illustrate interesting processes observed with Raman lidar. Lidar experiments add to our understanding of physical processes that modify atmospheric structure, initiate turbulence and waves, and describe the relationships between energy sources, atmospheric stability parameters, and the observed dynamics.

  14. The Jovian Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, Michael (Editor); Travis, Larry D. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    A conference on the atmosphere of Jupiter produced papers in the areas of thermal and ortho-para hydrogen structure, clouds and chemistry, atmospheric structure, global dynamics, synoptic features and processes, atmospheric dynamics, and future spaceflight opportunities. A session on the atmospheres of Uranus and Neptune was included, and the atmosphere of Saturn was discussed in several papers.

  15. New mineral physics panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The AGU Committee on Mineral Physics has formed itself into six panels. The committee chairman is Orson L. Anderson of the Department of Earth and Space Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles; foreign secretary is Robert Liebermann, Department of Earth and Space Sciences, State University of New York, Stony Brook. The six panels are as follows.

  16. Optical models of the molecular atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuev, V. E.; Makushkin, Y. S.; Mitsel, A. A.; Ponomarev, Y. N.; Rudenko, V. P.; Firsov, K. M.

    1986-01-01

    The use of optical and laser methods for performing atmospheric investigations has stimulated the development of the optical models of the atmosphere. The principles of constructing the optical models of molecular atmosphere for radiation with different spectral composition (wideband, narrowband, and monochromatic) are considered in the case of linear and nonlinear absorptions. The example of the development of a system which provides for the modeling of the processes of optical-wave energy transfer in the atmosphere is presented. Its physical foundations, structure, programming software, and functioning were considered.

  17. The atmospheres of Uranus and Neptune

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lunine, Jonathan I.

    1993-01-01

    The atmospheres of Uranus and Neptune are discussed in the light of the Voyager 2 flybys of these planets. A basic overview of their atmospheres is presented, with emphasis on thermal structure, composition, energy and opacity sources, cloud structure, and the horizontal structure of the atmospheres. The nature and implications of the different internal heat flows on the two planets, and the implications of the deuterium and helium abundances for the origin and evolution of these ice giants, as distinct from Jupiter and Saturn, are discussed. Selected chemical and physical processes in the atmospheres of Uranus and Neptune are illustrated.

  18. Physics Academic Workforce Report, 2000. AIP Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivie, Rachel; Stowe, Katie; Czujko, Roman

    This report discusses trends in the physics academic workforce and the implications of these trends for the future academic job market. In March 2000, a survey was sent to 766 U.S. physics departments that grant at least a bachelor's degree in physics, and 725 responses were received, a response rate of 95%. Degree-granting physics departments in…

  19. Promoting Interests in Atmospheric Science at a Liberal Arts Institution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roussev, S.; Sherengos, P. M.; Limpasuvan, V.; Xue, M.

    2007-12-01

    Coastal Carolina University (CCU) students in Computer Science participated in a project to set up an operational weather forecast for the local community. The project involved the construction of two computing clusters and the automation of daily forecasting. Funded by NSF-MRI, two high-performance clusters were successfully established to run the University of Oklahoma's Advance Regional Prediction System (ARPS). Daily weather predictions are made over South Carolina and North Carolina at 3-km horizontal resolution (roughly 1.9 miles) using initial and boundary condition data provided by UNIDATA. At this high resolution, the model is cloud- resolving, thus providing detailed picture of heavy thunderstorms and precipitation. Forecast results are displayed on CCU's website (https://marc.coastal.edu/HPC) to complement observations at the National Weather Service in Wilmington N.C. Present efforts include providing forecasts at 1-km resolution (or finer), comparisons with other models like Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, and the examination of local phenomena (like water spouts and tornadoes). Through these activities the students learn about shell scripting, cluster operating systems, and web design. More importantly, students are introduced to Atmospheric Science, the processes involved in making weather forecasts, and the interpretation of their forecasts. Simulations generated by the forecasts will be integrated into the contents of CCU's course like Fluid Dynamics, Atmospheric Sciences, Atmospheric Physics, and Remote Sensing. Operated jointly between the departments of Applied Physics and Computer Science, the clusters are expected to be used by CCU faculty and students for future research and inquiry-based projects in Computer Science, Applied Physics, and Marine Science.

  20. Validation of LAIC model within the framework of ISSI project "Multi-instrument space-borne observations and validation of the physical model of the Lithosphere-Atmosphere-Ionosphere-Magnetosphere Coupling"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulinets, Sergey; Ouzounov, Dimitar; Laic Team

    2015-04-01

    A new international project to study the complex chain of interactions of different layers of atmosphere and near-Earth space plasma in presence of ionization sources and atmosphere loading by aerosol and dust, was initiated with the support of the International Space Science Institute (ISSI) in Bern. The Lithosphere-Atmosphere-Ionosphere Coupling (LAIC) concept initially created to understand the pre-earthquake phenomena in atmosphere and ionosphere, demonstrated its universality and ability to explain other natural phenomena involving atmosphere-ionosphere coupling from below such as tropical cyclones, thunderstorm activity, dust storms, volcano eruptions etc. The project aim, defined within the frame of the ISSI projects, can advance the Multi-instrument space-borne observations for studying the Earth Geospace environment. The currently project development utilizes multi-instrument ground and space-born observations collected all over the world to explore the variety of natural phenomena. First results show, that our planet environment could be regarded as an open complex system where interactions between different layers of atmosphere play important role in its thermodynamics and electrodynamics. Holistic approach to the geospheres interaction gives the new insight of our near-planet environment.

  1. Atmosphere-surface exchange measurements.

    PubMed

    Dabberdt, W F; Lenschow, D H; Horst, T W; Zimmerman, P R; Oncley, S P; Delany, A C

    1993-06-04

    The exchange of various trace species and energy at the earth's surface plays an important role in climate, ecology, and human health and welfare. Surface exchange measurements can be difficult to obtain yet are important to understand physical processes, assess environmental and global change impacts, and develop robust parameterizations of atmospheric processes. The physics and turbulent structure of the atmospheric boundary layer are reviewed as they contribute to dry surface exchange rates (fluxes). Micrometeorological, budget, and enclosure techniques used to measure or estimate surface fluxes are described, along with their respective advantages and limitations. Various measurement issues (such as site characteristics, sampling considerations, sensor attributes, and flow distortion) impact on the ability to obtain representative surface-based and airborne flux data.

  2. Atmospheric Climate Experiment Plus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundahl, K.

    ACE+ is an atmospheric sounding mission using radio occultation techniques and is a combination of the two Earth Explorer missions ACE and WATS earlier proposed to ESA. ACE was highly rated by ESA in the Call for Earth Explorer Opportunity Missions in 1999 and was prioritised as number three and selected as a "hot-stand-by". A phase A study was carried out during 2000 and 2001. ACE will observe atmospheric parameters using radio occultations from an array of 6 micro-satellites which track the L- band signal of GPS satellites to map the detailed refractivity and thermal structure of the global atmosphere from surface to space. Water vapour and wind in Atmospheric Troposphere and Stratosphere WATS was the response to ESA's Call for Ideas for the next Earth Explorer Core Missions in 2001. WATS combines ACE GPS atmospheric occultations and LEO-LEO cross-link occultations. Cross-links strongly enhance the capability of measuring humidity relative to the ACE mission. The Earth Science Advisory Committée at ESA noted that the LEO-GNSS occultation technique is already well established through several missions in recent years and could not recommend WATS for a Phase A study as an Earth Explorer Core Mission. The ESAC was, however, deeply impressed by the LEO-LEO component of the WATS proposal and would regard it as regrettable if this science would be lost and encourages the ACE/WATS team to explore other means to achieve its scientific goal. ACE+ is therefore the response to ESA's 2nd Call for Earth Explorer Opportunity Missions in 2001 and will contribute in a significant manner to ESA's Living Planet Programme. ACE+ will considerably advance our knowledge about atmosphere physics and climate change processes. The mission will demonstrate a highly innovative approach using radio occultations for globally measuring profiles of humidity and temperature throughout the atmosphere and stratosphere. A constellation of 4 small satellites, tracking L-band GPS/GALILEO signals and

  3. The atmosphere as particle detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanev, Todor

    1990-01-01

    The possibility of using an inflatable, gas-filled balloon as a TeV gamma-ray detector on the moon is considered. By taking an atmosphere of Xenon gas there, or by extracting it on the moon, a layman's detector design is presented. In spite of its shortcomings, the exercise illustrates several of the novel features offered by particle physics on the moon.

  4. Atmospheric Electrification in the Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aplin, Karen L.

    2006-01-01

    Atmospheric electrification is not a purely terrestrial phenomenon: all Solar System planetary atmospheres become slightly electrified by cosmic ray ionisation. There is evidence for lightning on Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune, and it is possible on Mars, Venus and Titan. Controversy surrounds the role of atmospheric electricity in physical climate processes on Earth; here, a comparative approach is employed to review the role of electrification in the atmospheres of other planets and their moons. This paper reviews the theory, and, where available, measurements, of planetary atmospheric electricity which is taken to include ion production and ion aerosol interactions. The conditions necessary for a planetary atmospheric electric circuit similar to Earth’s, and the likelihood of meeting these conditions in other planetary atmospheres, are briefly discussed. Atmospheric electrification could be important throughout the solar system, particularly at the outer planets which receive little solar radiation, increasing the relative significance of electrical forces. Nucleation onto atmospheric ions has been predicted to affect the evolution and lifetime of haze layers on Titan, Neptune and Triton. Atmospheric electrical processes on Titan, before the arrival of the Huygens probe, are summarised. For planets closer to Earth, heating from solar radiation dominates atmospheric circulations. However, Mars may have a global circuit analogous to the terrestrial model, but based on electrical discharges from dust storms. There is an increasing need for direct measurements of planetary atmospheric electrification, in particular on Mars, to assess the risk for future unmanned and manned missions. Theoretical understanding could be increased by cross-disciplinary work to modify and update models and parameterisations initially developed for a specific atmosphere, to make them more broadly applicable to other planetary atmospheres.

  5. Lord Kelvin's atmospheric electricity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aplin, K. L.; Harrison, R. G.

    2013-09-01

    Lord Kelvin (William Thomson) made important contributions to the study of atmospheric electricity during a brief but productive period from 1859-1861. By 1859 Kelvin had recognised the need for "incessant recording" of atmospheric electrical parameters, and responded by inventing both the water dropper equaliser for measuring the atmospheric potential gradient (PG), and photographic data logging. The water dropper equaliser was widely adopted internationally and is still in use today. Following theoretical considerations of electric field distortion by local topography, Kelvin developed a portable electrometer, using it to investigate the PG on the Scottish island of Arran. During these environmental measurements, Kelvin may have unwittingly detected atmospheric PG changes during solar activity in August/September 1859 associated with the "Carrington event", which is interesting in the context of his later statements that solar magnetic influence on the Earth was impossible. Kelvin's atmospheric electricity work presents an early representative study in quantitative environmental physics, through the application of mathematical principles to an environmental problem, the design and construction of bespoke instrumentation for real world measurements and recognising the limitations of the original theoretical view revealed by experimental work.

  6. Atmosphere in a Test Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claudi, R.; Pace, E.; Ciaravella, A.; Micela, G.; Piccioni, G.; Billi, D.; Cestelli Guidi, M.; Coccola, L.; Erculiani, M. S.; Fedel, M.; Galletta, G.; Giro, E.; La Rocca, N.; Morosinotto, T.; Poletto, L.; Schierano, D.; Stefani, S.

    The ancestor philosophers' dream of thousand of new world is finally realised: more than 1800 extrasolar planets have been discovered in the neighborhood of our Sun. Most of them are very different from those we used to know in our Solar System. Others orbit the Habitable Zone (HZ) of their parent stars. Space missions, as JWST and the very recently proposed ARIEL, or ground based instruments, like SPHERE@VLT, GPI@GEMINI and EPICS@ELT, have been proposed and built to measure the atmospheric transmission, reflection and emission spectra over a wide wavelength range of these new worlds. In order to interpret the spectra coming out by this new instrumentation, it is important to know in detail the optical characteristics of gases in the typical physical conditions of the planetary atmospheres and how those characteristics could be affected by radiation driven photochemical and bio-chemical reaction. Insights in this direction can be achieved from laboratory studies of simulated planetary atmosphere of different pressure and temperature conditions under the effects of radiation sources, used as proxies of different bands of the stellar emission. ''Atmosphere in a Test Tube'' is a collaboration among several Italian astronomical, biological and engineering institutes in order to share their experiencece in performing laboratory experiments on several items concerning extrasolar planet atmospheres.

  7. Atmospheric Research 2014 Technical Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platnick, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric research in the Earth Sciences Division (610) consists of research and technology development programs dedicated to advancing knowledge and understanding of the atmosphere and its interaction with the climate of Earth. The Division's goals are to improve understanding of the dynamics and physical properties of precipitation, clouds, and aerosols; atmospheric chemistry, including the role of natural and anthropogenic trace species on the ozone balance in the stratosphere and the troposphere; and radiative properties of Earth's atmosphere and the influence of solar variability on the Earth's climate. Major research activities are carried out in the Mesoscale Atmospheric Processes Laboratory, the Climate and Radiation Laboratory, the Atmospheric Chemistry and Dynamics Laboratory, and the Wallops Field Support Office. The overall scope of the research covers an end-to-end process, starting with the identification of scientific problems, leading to observation requirements for remote-sensing platforms, technology and retrieval algorithm development; followed by flight projects and satellite missions; and eventually, resulting in data processing, analyses of measurements, and dissemination from flight projects and missions. Instrument scientists conceive, design, develop, and implement ultraviolet, infrared, optical, radar, laser, and lidar technology to remotely sense the atmosphere. Members of the various Laboratories conduct field measurements for satellite sensor calibration and data validation, and carry out numerous modeling activities. These modeling activities include climate model simulations, modeling the chemistry and transport of trace species on regional-to-global scales, cloud resolving models, and developing the next-generation Earth system models. Satellite missions, field campaigns, peer-reviewed publications, and successful proposals are essential at every stage of the research process to meeting our goals and maintaining leadership of the

  8. Diagnostic Study of Atmosphere-Terrain Interaction Leading to the Formation of Dust Clouds and Poor Visibilities Over Near East Desert Areas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-30

    Department of Physics and Atmospheric Sciences Jackson State University T-kn 9 . C Jackson, MS 39217 Approved For Public Release; "A"’ N Distribution Unlimited...7 4. c Data Collection and Analysis . .... . .......... 9 4.d Results ......... ......................... . 11 4.e...thunderstorm outflow (duration up to 30 minutes) c ) frontal passage (several hours in advance of a cold front and approximately an hour after passage of

  9. Physical Development: Thinking Physically

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strickland, Erik

    2005-01-01

    Children grow and develop physically according to their own experiences, characteristics, and abilities. Physical development is so important and the environment should allow each child to find her space in the sunshine. This can be done by: (1) creating the right outdoor environment; (2) allowing children time to use it; (3) encouraging movement…

  10. Survey of Departments of Physiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ganong, William F.

    1977-01-01

    Presents data of the 1976 survey of departments of physiology. Includes comparison to 1974 and 1975 data for number of academic positions available, department budgets, graduate students and post doctoral fellows, and salaries. (SL)

  11. Aerodynamic Heating and Deceleration During Entry into Planetary Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    Aerodynamic Heating and Deceleration During Entry into Planetary Atmospheres. Dr. Chapman's lecture examines the physics behind spacecraft entry into planetary atmospheres. He explains how scientists determine if a planet has an atmosphere and how scientists can compute deceleration when the atmospheric conditions are unknown. Symbols and equations used for calculations for aerodynamic heating and deceleration are provided. He also explains heat transfer in bodies approaching an atmosphere, deceleration, and the use of ablation in protecting spacecraft from high temperatures during atmospheric entry. [Entire movie available on DVD from CASI as Doc ID 20070030962. Contact help@sti.nasa.gov

  12. To Be an Ordinary Department

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colburn, Forrest D.

    2003-01-01

    In this article, the author shares his experience being the "chair" of the Department of Latin American and Puerto Rican Studies at Lehman College of the City University of New York. He also shares how this department proved to be an "ordinary" department at an "ordinary" liberal arts college. However, to conclude…

  13. Space physics missions handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Robert A. (Compiler); Burks, David H. (Compiler); Hayne, Julie A. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this handbook is to provide background data on current, approved, and planned missions, including a summary of the recommended candidate future missions. Topics include the space physics mission plan, operational spacecraft, and details of such approved missions as the Tethered Satellite System, the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory, and the Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science.

  14. High School Physics, Two-Year Colleges, and Physics Majors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Susan C.

    2013-01-01

    We have just completed the data collection for our 2012-13 Nationwide Survey of High School Physics and expect to have results to report in the spring. In the interim, we will take a look at physics in two-year colleges (TYCs). In 2007, we surveyed undergraduate seniors in degree-granting physics departments, and we asked these students if they…

  15. Physical Education: A Cornerstone for Physically Active Lifestyles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tappe, Marlene K.; Burgeson, Charlene R.

    2004-01-01

    "Physical Activity and Health: A Report of the Surgeon General" ("Physical Activity and Health"; United States Department of Health and Human Services [USDHHS], 1996) documented for the first time the cumulative body of evidence related to physical activity and health. This report completed the set of Surgeon General's reports…

  16. Patients’s Perception of Support in the Emergency Department

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-05-01

    Support is often mentioned as a goal of nursing care . The purpose of this study was to identify nursing behaviors that Emergency Department patients...physical nursing care , information- giving, and attitude of the nurse important to feeling supported. Results of the open-ended questions revealed that...the attitude of the nurse, prompt treatment, and physical nursing care were important.

  17. Satellite Atmosphere and Io Torus Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Nicholas M.

    2000-01-01

    Io is the most volcanically active body in the solar system, and it is embedded deep within the strongest magnetosphere of any planet. This combination of circumstances leads to a host of scientifically compelling phenomena, including (1) an atmosphere out of proportion with such a small object, (2) a correspondingly large atmospheric escape rate, (3) a ring of dense plasma locked in a feedback loop with the atmosphere, and (4) a host of Io-induced emissions from radio bursts to UV auroral spots on Jupiter. This proposal seeks to continue our investigation into the physics connecting these phenomena, with emphasis on Io's atmosphere and plasma torus. The physical processes are clearly of interest for Io, and also other places in the solar system where they are important but not readily observable.

  18. Physics through the 1990s: Atomic, molecular and optical physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The volume presents a program of research initiatives in atomic, molecular, and optical physics. The current state of atomic, molecular, and optical physics in the US is examined with respect to demographics, education patterns, applications, and the US economy. Recommendations are made for each field, with discussions of their histories and the relevance of the research to government agencies. The section on atomic physics includes atomic theory, structure, and dynamics; accelerator-based atomic physics; and large facilities. The section on molecular physics includes spectroscopy, scattering theory and experiment, and the dynamics of chemical reactions. The section on optical physics discusses lasers, laser spectroscopy, and quantum optics and coherence. A section elucidates interfaces between the three fields and astrophysics, condensed matter physics, surface science, plasma physics, atmospheric physics, and nuclear physics. Another section shows applications of the three fields in ultra-precise measurements, fusion, national security, materials, medicine, and other topics.

  19. NEUTRINO FACTORIES - PHYSICS POTENTIALS.

    SciTech Connect

    PARSA,Z.

    2001-02-16

    The recent results from Super-Kamiokande atmospheric and solar neutrino observations opens a new era in neutrino physics and has sparked a considerable interest in the physics possibilities with a Neutrino Factory based on the muon storage ring. We present physics opportunities at a Neutrino Factory, and prospects of Neutrino oscillation experiments. Using the precisely known flavor composition of the beam, one could envision an extensive program to measure the neutrino oscillation mixing matrix, including possible CP violating effects. These and Neutrino Interaction Rates for examples of a Neutrino Factory at BNL (and FNAL) with detectors at Gran Sasso, SLAC and Sudan are also presented.

  20. Volatile processes in Triton's atmosphere and surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lunine, J. I.

    1992-01-01

    A basic model for latitudinal transport of nitrogen is reviewed focusing on its limitations and some complications associated with surface and atmospheric physics. Data obtained by 1989 Voyager encounter with the Neptune system revealed the complexity in the pure nitrogen transport which is caused by the nonuniform albedo of the frosts. It is concluded that Triton is similar to Mars in terms of the complexity of volatile transport and to understand Triton's surface-atmosphere system, Mars may be a very good analog.

  1. Particle Size Distributions in Atmospheric Clouds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-12-01

    UNCLASSIFIED Center for Turbulence Research 39 Annual Research Briefs 2003 Particle size distributions in atmospheric clouds By Roberto Paoli & Karim...atmospheric turbulence is an important, though complex, problem in cloud physics ( Shaw 2003). From a computational point of view, two major factors...contribute to this complexity. First is the very high turbulence Reynolds number and the large range of spatial scales (Vaillancourt & Yau 2000; Shaw 2003

  2. Atmospheric State, Cloud Microphysics and Radiative Flux

    DOE Data Explorer

    Mace, Gerald

    2008-01-15

    Atmospheric thermodynamics, cloud properties, radiative fluxes and radiative heating rates for the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. The data represent a characterization of the physical state of the atmospheric column compiled on a five-minute temporal and 90m vertical grid. Sources for this information include raw measurements, cloud property and radiative retrievals, retrievals and derived variables from other third-party sources, and radiative calculations using the derived quantities.

  3. Atmospheric Chemistry Over Southern Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatebe, Charles K.; Levy, Robert C.; Thompson, Anne M.

    2011-01-01

    campaigns such as Transport and Atmospheric Chemistry Near the Equator-Atlantic (TRACE-A), Southern African Fire-Atmosphere Research Initiative (SAFARI-92), and Southern African Regional Science Initiative (SAFARI 2000). Since those large international efforts, satellites have matured enough to enable quantifiable measurements of regional land surface, atmosphere, and ocean. In addition, global and chemical transport models have also been advanced to incorporate various data. Thus, the timing of the workshop was right for a full-fledged re-assessment of the chemistry, physics, and socio-economical impacts caused by pollution in the region, including a characterization of sources, deposition, and feedbacks with climate change.

  4. Homogeneous processes of atmospheric interest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossi, M. J.; Barker, J. R.; Golden, D. M.

    1983-01-01

    Upper atmospheric research programs in the department of chemical kinetics are reported. Topics discussed include: (1) third-order rate constants of atmospheric importance; (2) a computational study of the HO2 + HO2 and DO2 + DO2 reactions; (3) measurement and estimation of rate constants for modeling reactive systems; (4) kinetics and thermodynamics of ion-molecule association reactions; (5) entropy barriers in ion-molecule reactions; (6) reaction rate constant for OH + HOONO2 yields products over the temperature range 246 to 324 K; (7) very low-pressure photolysis of tert-bytyl nitrite at 248 nm; (8) summary of preliminary data for the photolysis of C1ONO2 and N2O5 at 285 nm; and (9) heterogeneous reaction of N2O5 and H2O.

  5. 75 FR 22047 - Intent To Initiate Consultation and Coordinate the National Oceanic and Atmospheric...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 15 CFR Part 922 Intent To Initiate Consultation and Coordinate the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Responsibilities Under Section 106 of...

  6. Titan's atmosphere from DISR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Robert

    This abstract distills information about Titan's atmosphere described in detail in a paper by M. G. Tomasko, L. Doose, S. Engel, L. E. Dafoe, R. West, M. Lemmon, E. Karkoschka and C. See, ‘A model of Titan's aerosols based on measurements made inside the atmosphere', Planetary and Space Sciences, in press, 2008. The Descent Imager Spectral Radiometer (DISR) observed Titan's sky and surface during the descent of the Huygens Probe in January, 2005. Measurements were made over the altitude range 160 Km to the surface near latitude -10 degrees. The DISR instrument package included several components to measure the radiation state as a function of altitude. These include upward and downward-looking visible and near-infrared spectrometers covering the wavelength range 450 to 1600 nm, an ultraviolet photometer, a solar aureole camera with polarizers, and a sun sensor. Measurements were made at a variety of azimuthal angles relative to the sun azimuth. Due to unanticipated behavior of the probe (reverse spin and high-amplitude, chaotic tip and tilt) the retrieval process has required more effort than was planned and the total science return is less than expected. Nevertheless the data yielded unsurpassed and unique information which constrain the optical and physical properties of the photochemical haze aerosols and condensate particles. The principal findings are (1) between 80 Km and 160 Km the photochemical haze is well mixed with the gas with a scale height of about 65 Km, (2) between 80 Km and the surface the particle optical depth is a linear function of altitude with a break in slope near 30 Km altitude, (3) optical properties of the haze do not depend much on altitude above 80 Km although more recent work by Tomasko and colleagues suggest a gradient in the stratosphere; below 80 Km there are changes in optical behavior which suggest that condensation plays a role, (4) the data confirm previous results which proposed a particle structure of aggregates of small

  7. Laser Doppler systems in atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murty, S. S. R.

    1976-01-01

    The loss of heterodyne signal power for the Marshall Space Flight Center laser Doppler system due to the random changes in the atmospheric index of refraction is investigated. The current status in the physics of low energy laser propagation through turbulent atmosphere is presented. The analysis and approximate evaluation of the loss of the heterodyne signal power due to the atmospheric absorption, scattering, and turbulence are estimated for the conditions of the January 1973 flight tests. Theoretical and experimental signal to noise values are compared. Maximum and minimum values of the atmospheric attenuation over a two way path of 20 km range are calculated as a function of altitude using models of atmosphere, aerosol concentration, and turbulence.

  8. 11th International Conference on Atmospheric Electricity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christian, H. J. (Compiler)

    1999-01-01

    This document contains the proceedings from the 11th International Conference on Atmospheric Electricity (ICAE 99), held June 7-11, 1999. This conference was attended by scientists and researchers from around the world. The subjects covered included natural and artificially initiated lightning, lightning in the middle and upper atmosphere (sprites and jets), lightning protection and safety, lightning detection techniques (ground, airborne, and space-based), storm physics, electric fields near and within thunderstorms, storm electrification, atmospheric ions and chemistry, shumann resonances, satellite observations of lightning, global electrical processes, fair weather electricity, and instrumentation.

  9. Experiments to Study Our Atmospheric Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marti, James

    The teacher of an introductory physics and chemistry course has many choices when it comes to laboratory manuals. Not so with atmospheric science: texts devoted to learning the subject in a lab setting are limited in number and often in scope. A large portion of the available lab texts concentrate solely on exercises in synoptic analysis and forecasting skills, which while important do not convey the full range of the science and its applications. That is why Steven Businger's Experiments to Study Our Atmospheric Environment stands out among recent books devoted to teaching atmospheric science in the lab.

  10. Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science Payload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This is an STS-66 mission onboard photo of the Space Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis showing the payload of the third Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science (ATLAS-3) mission. During the ATLAS missions, international teams of scientists representing many disciplines combined their expertise to seek answers to complex questions about the atmospheric and solar conditions that sustain life on Earth. The ATLAS program specifically investigated how Earth's middle and upper atmospheres and climate are affected by by the sun and by products of industrial and agricultural activities on Earth. Thirteen ATLAS instruments supported experiments in atmospheric sciences, solar physics, space plasma physics, and astronomy. The instruments were mounted on two Spacelab pallets in the Space Shuttle payload bay. The ATLAS-3 mission continued a variety of atmospheric and solar studies to improve understanding of the Earth's atmosphere and its energy input from the sun. A key scientific objective was to refine existing data on variations in the fragile ozone layer of the atmosphere. The Orbiter Atlantis was launched on November 3, 1994 for the ATLAS-3 mission (STS-66).

  11. Physics Academic Workforce Report, 2002. AIP Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivie, Rachel; Stowe, Katie; Nies, Kimberley

    This report discusses trends in the physics academic workforce and the implications of these trends for the future academic job market. Data are from a survey of physics departments that was completed by 722 departments, a response rate of 94%. The number of physics faculty increased almost 5% since 2000, and much of this growth resulted from…

  12. The European Federation of Organisations for Medical Physics. Policy Statement No. 7.1: The roles, responsibilities and status of the medical physicist including the criteria for the staffing levels in a Medical Physics Department approved by EFOMP Council on 5th February 2016.

    PubMed

    Evans, Stephen; Christofides, Stelios; Brambilla, Marco

    2016-04-01

    This EFOMP Policy Statement is an amalgamation and an update of the EFOMP Policy Statements No. 2, 4 and 7. It presents guidelines for the roles, responsibilities and status of the medical physicist together with recommended minimum staffing levels. These recommendations take into account the ever-increasing demands for competence, patient safety, specialisation and cost effectiveness of modern healthcare services, the requirements of the European Union Council Directive 2013/59/Euratom laying down the basic safety standards for protection against the dangers arising from exposure to ionising radiation, the European Commission's Radiation Protection Report No. 174: "Guidelines on medical physics expert", as well as the relevant publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency. The provided recommendations on minimum staffing levels are in very good agreement with those provided by both the European Commission and the International Atomic Energy Agency.

  13. Mechanical Engineering Department. Technical review

    SciTech Connect

    Simecka, W.B.; Condouris, R.A.; Talaber, C.

    1980-01-01

    The Mechanical Engineering Department Technical Review is published to (1) inform the readers of various technical activities within the Department, (2) promote exchange of ideas, and (3) give credit to the personnel who are achieving the results. The report is formatted into two parts: technical achievements and publication abstracts. The first is divided into eight sections, one for each Division in the Department providing the reader with the names of the personnel and the Division accomplishing the work.

  14. Mechanical Engineering Department technical abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Denney, R.M.

    1982-07-01

    The Mechanical Engineering Department publishes listings of technical abstracts twice a year to inform readers of the broad range of technical activities in the Department, and to promote an exchange of ideas. Details of the work covered by an abstract may be obtained by contacting the author(s). Overall information about current activities of each of the Department's seven divisions precedes the technical abstracts.

  15. Mechanical engineering department technical review

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, R.B. Denney, R.M.

    1981-01-01

    The Mechanical Engineering Department Technical Review is published to: (1) inform the readers of various technical activities within the department, (2) promote exchange of ideas, and (3) give credit to the personnel who are achieving the results. The report is formatted into two parts: technical acievements and publication abstracts. The first is divided into eight sections, one for each division in the department providing the reader with the names of the personnel and the division accomplishing the work.

  16. Stellar atmospheric structural patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. N.

    1983-01-01

    The thermodynamics of stellar atmospheres is discussed. Particular attention is given to the relation between theoretical modeling and empirical evidence. The characteristics of distinctive atmospheric regions and their radical structures are discussed.

  17. Earth's changeable atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2016-06-01

    Billions of years ago, high atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations were vital to life's tenuous foothold on Earth. Despite new constraints, the composition and evolution of Earth's early atmosphere remains hazy.

  18. Uranus' Upper Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    This computer enhancement of a Voyager 2 image, emphasizes the high-level haze in Uranus' upper atmosphere. Clouds are obscured by the overlying atmosphere.

    JPL manages and controls the Voyager project for NASA's Office of Space Science.

  19. The atmosphere of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, C. A.

    1974-01-01

    The atmosphere of Mars is essentially a pure carbon dioxide atmosphere that contains a small and seasonably varying amount of water vapor. A number of minor constituents which arise from the interactions of solar radiation with water vapor and carbon dioxide include carbon monoxide, atomic oxygen, molecular oxygen, ozone, and atomic hydrogen. At the surface of Mars the atmospheric pressure is less than one hundredth of the pressure at the surface of the earth. Extensive cloud systems appear on Mars. The structure of the lower Martian atmosphere is discussed together with variations in the lower atmosphere and the characteristics of the upper atmosphere. Reactions of photochemistry are considered along with the atmospheric escape and interactions between the atmosphere and the polar caps.

  20. Our shared atmosphere

    EPA Science Inventory

    Our atmosphere is a precious and fascinating resource, providing air to breath, shielding us from harmful ultraviolet radiation (UV), and maintaining a comfortable climate. Since the industrial revolution, people have significantly altered the composition of the atmosphere throu...

  1. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1993 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 3: Atmospheric and climate research

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER) atmospheric sciences and carbon dioxide research programs provide the DOE with scientifically defensible information on the local, regional, and global distributions of energy-related pollutants and their effects on climate. PNL has had a long history of technical leadership in the atmospheric sciences research programs within OHER. Within the Environmental Sciences Division of OHER, the Atmospheric Chemistry Program continues DOE`s long-term commitment to understanding the local, regional, and global effects of energy-related air pollutants. Research through direct measurement, numerical modeling, and analytical studies in the Atmospheric Chemistry Program emphasizes the long-range transport, chemical transformation, and removal of emitted pollutants, photochemically produced oxidant species, nitrogen-reservoir species, and aerosols. The atmospheric studies in Complex Terrain Program applies basic research on atmospheric boundary layer structure and evolution over inhomogeneous terrain to DOE`s site-specific and generic mission needs in site safety, air quality, and climate change. Research at PNL provides basic scientific underpinnings to DOE`s program of global climate research. Research projects within the core carbon dioxide and ocean research programs are now integrated with those in the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements, the Computer Hardware, Advanced Mathematics and Model Physics, and Quantitative Links program to form DOE`s contribution to the US Global Change Research Program. The description of ongoing atmospheric and climate research at PNL is organized in two broad research areas: atmospheric research; and climate research. This report describes the progress in fiscal year 1993 in each of these areas. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases.

  2. Fundamental molecular physics and chemistry, part 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stehney, A. F.; Inokuti, M.

    1983-12-01

    Scientifically, the work of the program deals with aspects of the physics and chemistry of molecules related to their interactions with photons, electrons, and other external agents. These areas of study were chosen in view of our goals; that is to say, they were chosen so that the eventual outcome of the work meets some of the needs of the US Department of Energy (DOE) and of other government agencies that support the research. First, cross sections for electron and photon interactions with molecules were determined theoretically and experimently, because those cross sections are indispensable for detailed microscopic analyses of the earliest processes of radiation action on any molecular substance, including biological materials. Those analyses in turn provide a sound basis for radiology and radiation dosimetry. Second, the spectroscopy of certain molecules and of small clusters of molecules were studied because this topic is fundamental to the full understanding of atmospheric-pollutant chemistry.

  3. Expedition 32 Departs for Baikonur

    NASA Video Gallery

    A new trio of Expedition 32 flight engineers, NASA astronaut Suni Williams, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency astronaut Aki Hoshide and Russian cosmonaut Yuri Malenchenko, departs the Gagarin Cosm...

  4. The atmosphere of Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingersoll, A. P.

    1976-01-01

    Current information on the neutral atmosphere of Jupiter is reviewed, with approximately equal emphasis on composition and thermal structure on one hand, and markings and dynamics on the other. Studies based on Pioneer 10 and 11 data are used to refine the atmospheric model. Data on the interior are reviewed for the information they provide on the deep atmosphere. The markings and dynamics are discussed with emphasis on qualitative relationships and analogies with phenomena in earth's atmosphere.

  5. Atmospheric Nitrogen Fluorescence Yield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, J. H., Jr.; Christl, M. J.; Fountain, W. F.; Gregory, J. C.; Martens, K. U.; Sokolsky, Pierre; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Several existing and planned experiments estimate the energies of ultra-high energy cosmic rays from air showers using the atmospheric nitrogen fluorescence. The nitrogen fluorescence yield from air shower electrons depends on the atmospheric composition. We will discuss the uncertainties in the fluorescence yield form electrons in the real atmosphere and describe a concept for a small balloon payload to measure the atmospheric fluorescence yield as a function of attitude.

  6. Ideas in Practice: Studies in Atmospheric Pollution For Science Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowe, Donald R.

    1974-01-01

    Describes the content and structure of an enviromental course offered by the Department of Engineering Technology at Western Kentucky University. The course focuses on atmospheric pollution and is designed for science teachers currently teaching in the school system. (JR)

  7. Current issues in atmospheric change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    In response to questions about the effects of long-term, global-scale changes in the atmosphere raised in congressional hearings, a group of leading experts held a two-day workshop to survey the state of current knowledge about atmospheric changes and their implications. The review focuses on the sources, concentrations, and changes of those gases most directly linked to human activities, i.e., carbon dioxide, ozone, and the chlorofluorocarbons; the direct physical effects of rising concentrations of trace gases. The review discusses the uncertainties associated with the knowledge of current trends and possible future changes, including ozone trends and the Antarctic ozone hole, and the impacts of rising concentrations of trace gases.

  8. Directory of Analytical Methods, Department 1820

    SciTech Connect

    Whan, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    The Materials Characterization Department performs chemical, physical, and thermophysical analyses in support of programs throughout the Laboratories. The department has a wide variety of techniques and instruments staffed by experienced personnel available for these analyses, and we strive to maintain near state-of-the-art technology by continued updates. We have prepared this Directory of Analytical Methods in order to acquaint you with our capabilities and to help you identify personnel who can assist with your analytical needs. The descriptions of the various capabilities are requester-oriented and have been limited in length and detail. Emphasis has been placed on applications and limitations with notations of estimated analysis time and alternative or related techniques. A short, simplified discussion of underlying principles is also presented along with references if more detail is desired. The contents of this document have been organized in the order: bulky analysis, microanalysis, surface analysis, optical and thermal property measurements.

  9. Incomputability in Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longo, Giuseppe

    Computability originated from Logic and followed the original path proposed by the founding fathers of the modern foundational analysis of Mathematics (Frege, Hilbert). This theoretical path departed in principle from the contemporary renewed relations between Geometry and Physics. In particular, the key issue of physical measure, as our only access to "reality", is not part of its theoretical frame, in contrast to Physics, since Poincaré, Planck and Einstein. Computability though, by its fine analysis of undecidability, provides a very useful tool for the investigation of "unpredictability" in Physics. Unpredictability coincides with physical randomness, in classical and quantum frames. And an understanding of randomness turns out to be a key component of intelligibility in Physics.

  10. The Communication Department in Crisis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fest, Thorrel B.; Darnell, Donald K.

    Two papers describing and reacting to the proposed abolition of a department of communication are contained in this document. The first paper ("Proposed Abolition of a Department of Communication" by Thorrel B. Fest) describes the factors that led the attack. Environmental factors--distrust of the discipline, decreasing funds, and…

  11. Financing Academic Departments of Psychiatry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liptzin, Benjamin; Meyer, Roger E.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The authors describe the many financial challenges facing academic departments of psychiatry and the resulting opportunities that may arise. Method: The authors review the history of financial challenges, the current economic situation, and what may lie ahead for academic departments of psychiatry. Results: The current environment has…

  12. STRENGTHENING STATE DEPARTMENTS OF EDUCATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CAMPBELL, ROALD F.; AND OTHERS

    MAJOR FINDINGS OF A SUMMER SEMINAR HELD AT THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO IN 1966 DEFINE CURRENT ISSUES RELATED TO STATE DEPARTMENTS OF EDUCATION (SDE) AND LEAD TO 23 RECOMMENDATIONS FOR STRENGTHENING THESE DEPARTMENTS SO THAT THEY MAY BE EFFECTIVE PARTNERS IN THE GOVERNMENT OF EDUCATION. SDE'S ARE EVALUATED WITH RESPECT TO FIVE MAJOR…

  13. A Standard Atmosphere of the Antarctic Plateau

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahesh, Ashwin; Lubin, Dan

    2004-01-01

    Climate models often rely on standard atmospheres to represent various regions; these broadly capture the important physical and radiative characteristics of regional atmospheres, and become benchmarks for simulations by researchers. The high Antarctic plateau is a significant region of the earth for which such standard atmospheres are as yet unavailable. Moreover, representative profiles from atmospheres over other regions of the planet, including &om the northern high latitudes, are not comparable to the atmosphere over the Antarctic plateau, and are therefore only of limited value as substitutes in climate models. Using data from radiosondes, ozonesondes and satellites along with other observations from South Pole station, typical seasonal atmospheric profiles for the high plateau are compiled. Proper representations of rapidly changing ozone concentrations (during the ozone hole) and the effect of surface elevation on tropospheric temperatures are discussed. The differences between standard profiles developed here and the most similar standard atmosphere that already exists - namely, the Arctic Winter profile - suggest that these new profiles will be extremely useful to make accurate representations of the atmosphere over the high plateau.

  14. Simulating super earth atmospheres in the laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claudi, R.; Erculiani, M. S.; Galletta, G.; Billi, D.; Pace, E.; Schierano, D.; Giro, E.; D'Alessandro, M.

    2016-01-01

    Several space missions, such as JWST, TESS and the very recently proposed ARIEL, or ground-based experiments, as SPHERE and GPI, have been proposed to measure the atmospheric transmission, reflection and emission spectra of extrasolar planets. The planet atmosphere characteristics and possible biosignatures will be inferred by studying planetary spectra in order to identify the emission/absorption lines/bands from atmospheric molecules such as water (H2O), carbon monoxide (CO), methane (CH4), ammonia (NH3), etc. In particular, it is important to know in detail the optical characteristics of gases in the typical physical conditions of the planetary atmospheres and how these characteristics could be affected by radiation driven photochemical and biochemical reaction. The main aim of the project `Atmosphere in a Test Tube' is to provide insights on exoplanet atmosphere modification due to biological intervention. This can be achieved simulating planetary atmosphere at different pressure and temperature conditions under the effects of radiation sources, used as proxies of different bands of the stellar emission. We are tackling the characterization of extrasolar planet atmospheres by mean of innovative laboratory experiments described in this paper. The experiments are intended to reproduce the conditions on warm earths and super earths hosted by low-mass M dwarfs primaries with the aim to understand if a cyanobacteria population hosted on a Earth-like planet orbiting an M0 star is able to maintain its photosynthetic activity and produce traceable signatures.

  15. Modeling Callisto's Ionosphere: Insight Into Callisto's Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartkorn, O. A.; Saur, J.; Strobel, D. F.

    2015-12-01

    We develop a kinetic model of the ionosphere of Jupiter's moon Callisto within a prescribed neutral atmosphere composed of O2 and CO2. We calculate the electron energy distribution as a function of space by solving the Boltzmann equation and assuming a stationary balance between local sources and sinks of electrons and electron energy. Electron transport within the ionosphere is neglected, whereas we approximate the electron transport out of the ionosphere into the Jovian magnetosphere. Photoionization is believed to be the major electron source within Callisto's atmosphere. Therefore, we calculate the energy dependent photoelectron spectrum as source term of the Boltzmann equation. The resulting Boltzmann equation is solved rigorously delivering electron distribution functions at every point of Callisto's atmosphere. From these distribution functions, we calculate electron densities and electron impact generated UV emissions from Callisto's atmosphere. The calculated electron densities and UV emissions are compared with observations of the Galileo spacecraft [Kliore et al., 2002] and the Hubble Space Telescope [Cunningham et al., 2015]. Based on these comparisons, we test a physically motivated atmosphere model including asymmetries that depend on Callisto's orbital phase, similar to Europa's atmosphere [Plainaki et al., 2013]. As a result, we gain knowledge about Callisto's atmospheric density and its atmospheric asymmetries.

  16. Closeout for U.S. Department of Energy Final Technical Report for University of Arizona grant DOE Award Number DE-FG03-95ER40906 From 1 February 1995 to 31 January 2004 Grant title: Theory and Phenomenology of Strong and Weak High Energy Physics (Task A) and Experimental Elementary Particle Physics (Task B)

    SciTech Connect

    Rutherfoord, John; Toussaint, Doug; Sarcevic, Ina

    2005-03-03

    The following pages describe the high energy physics program at the University of Arizona which was funded by DOE grant DE-FG03-95ER40906, for the period 1 February 1995 to 31 January 2004. In this report, emphasis was placed on more recent accomplishments. This grant was divided into two tasks, a theory task (Task A) and an experimental task (Task B but called Task C early in the grant period) with separate budgets. Faculty supported by this grant, for at least part of this period, include, for the theory task, Adrian Patrascioiu (now deceased), Ina Sarcevic, and Douglas Toussaint., and, for the experimental task, Elliott Cheu, Geoffrey Forden, Kenneth Johns, John Rutherfoord, Michael Shupe, and Erich Varnes. Grant monitors from the Germantown DOE office, overseeing our grant, changed over the years. Dr. Marvin Gettner covered the first years and then he retired from the DOE. Dr. Patrick Rapp worked with us for just a few years and then left for a position at the University of Puerto Rico. Dr. Kathleen Turner took his place and continues as our grant monitor. The next section of this report covers the activities of the theory task (Task A) and the last section the activities of the experimental task (Task B).

  17. Nonisothermal Pluto atmosphere models

    SciTech Connect

    Hubbard, W.B.; Yelle, R.V.; Lunine, J.I. )

    1990-03-01

    The present thermal profile calculation for a Pluto atmosphere model characterized by a high number fraction of CH4 molecules encompasses atmospheric heating by solar UV flux absorption and conductive transport cooling to the surface of Pluto. The stellar occultation curve predicted for an atmosphere of several-microbar surface pressures (which entail the existence of a substantial temperature gradient close to the surface) agrees with observations and implies that the normal and tangential optical depth of the atmosphere is almost negligible. The minimum period for atmospheric methane depletion is calculated to be 30 years. 29 refs.

  18. EDITORIAL: Physics competitions Physics competitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordens, H.; Mathelitsch, L.

    2009-11-01

    higher education'. One point, among others, is to publish 'descriptions of successful and original student projects, experimental, theoretical or computational'. This comes close to the tasks and student work carried out in physics competitions. Physics educators at university level are usually aware of the existence of such competitions, but the majority, with the few exceptions of those involved in these competitions, lack knowledge of what is actually going on, and how high levelled the performances are. Therefore, it is not obvious to them that these competitions could be useful for university teaching, and could be sources of interesting and novel examples for labs and theoretical exercises. Each physics department wants to attract good students or, in other words, wants talented students to choose physics as their first subject of study. Experience has shown that physics competitions can assist in meeting this demand. Not only do students involved in the competitions beoome more inclined to study physics, their experimental and theoretical knowledge is far beyond that of typical students. Therefore it would be of mutual interest to intensify the bonds between physics competitions and universities. The publication of tasks and solutions to problems from physics competitions may serve several purposes: Competitions and especially their high quality can be communicated to a very broad audience of physicists. University teachers could be encouraged to implement these problems in their lectures, exercises and labs, mainly at the undergraduate level, theoretically as well as experimentally. The previous point is even more important for the education of physics teachers. Ongoing physics teachers should know in detail the different competitions and their specific goals and problems. The winners of the competitions get greater publicity, which in turn could create additional attraction to future participants. As an example of the second point, the successful application of

  19. Atmospheric Habitable Zones in Y Dwarf Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yates, Jack S.; Palmer, Paul I.; Biller, Beth; Cockell, Charles S.

    2017-02-01

    We use a simple organism lifecycle model to explore the viability of an atmospheric habitable zone (AHZ), with temperatures that could support Earth-centric life, which sits above an environment that does not support life. To illustrate our model, we use a cool Y dwarf atmosphere, such as WISE J085510.83–0714442.5, whose 4.5–5.2 μm spectrum shows absorption features consistent with water vapor and clouds. We allow organisms to adapt to their atmospheric environment (described by temperature, convection, and gravity) by adopting different growth strategies that maximize their chance of survival and proliferation. We assume a constant upward vertical velocity through the AHZ. We found that the organism growth strategy is most sensitive to the magnitude of the atmospheric convection. Stronger convection supports the evolution of more massive organisms. For a purely radiative environment, we find that evolved organisms have a mass that is an order of magnitude smaller than terrestrial microbes, thereby defining a dynamical constraint on the dimensions of life that an AHZ can support. Based on a previously defined statistical approach, we infer that there are of the order of 109 cool Y brown dwarfs in the Milky Way, and likely a few tens of these objects are within 10 pc from Earth. Our work also has implications for exploring life in the atmospheres of temperate gas giants. Consideration of the habitable volumes in planetary atmospheres significantly increases the volume of habitable space in the galaxy.

  20. Atmosphere to Electrons: Enabling the Wind Plant of Tomorrow

    SciTech Connect

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

    2015-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Atmosphere to Electrons research initiative is focused on improving the performance and reliability of wind plants by establishing an unprecedented understanding of how the Earth’s atmosphere interacts with the wind plants and developing innovative technologies to maximize energy extraction from the wind.

  1. Hot Exoplanet Atmospheres Resolved with Transit Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyttenbach, Aurélien; Ehrenreich, David

    2015-12-01

    The field of exoplanet atmospheres is booming thanks to (low-resolution) space-borne spectrographs and high-resolution (narrow-ranged) NIR spectrographs on ground-based 8m-class telescopes. Atmospheres are important because they are our observing window on the physical, chemical, and evolutionary processes occurring on exoplanets. Transiting exoplanets are the best suitable targets for atmospheric studies. Observing a transit in different filters or with a spectrograph reveals the transmission spectrum of the planet atmosphere. More than one decade of such observations allowed the exploration of these remote words by detecting some constituents of their atmospheres, but revealing also the presence of scattering hazes and clouds in several exoplanets preventing the detection of major chemical constituents at low to medium resolution even from space.Transit observations from the ground with stabilised high-resolution spectrograph, such HARPS, have key roles to play in this context. Observation of the hot-jupiter HD 189733b with HARPS allow the detection of sodium in the planet atmosphere. The high-resolution transmission spectra allowed to probe a new region high in the atmosphere and revealed rapid winds and a heating thermosphere. This new use of the famous planet hunter turned HARPS into a powerful exoplanet characterisation machine. It has the precision level of the Hubble Space Telescope, albeit at 20 higher resolution.A survey of a large set of known hot transiting exoplanets with HARPS and later with ESPRESSO will allow the detection of key tracers of atmospheric physics, chemistry, and evolution, above the scattering haze layers known to dominate low-resolution visible spectra of exoplanets.Such observation, in total sinergy with other technics, will rmly establish stabilised, high-resolution spectrographs on 4m telescopes as corner-stones for the characterisation of exoplanets. This is instrumental considering the upcoming surveys (NGTS,K2, CHEOPS, TESS

  2. Model atmospheres for cool stars. [varying chemical composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, H. R.

    1974-01-01

    This report contains an extensive series of model atmospheres for cool stars having a wide range in chemical composition. Model atmospheres (temperature, pressure, density, etc.) are tabulated, along with emergent energy flux distributions, limb darkening, and information on convection for selected models. The models are calculated under the usual assumptions of hydrostatic equilibrium, constancy of total energy flux (including transport both by radiation and convection) and local thermodynamic equilibrium. Some molecular and atomic line opacity is accounted for as a straight mean. While cool star atmospheres are regimes of complicated physical conditions, and these atmospheres are necessarily approximate, they should be useful for a number of kinds of spectral and atmospheric analysis.

  3. Fall of Global Temperature In The First Half of 21-st Century. Physical-statistical Modeling of Global and Regional Annual Surface Temperatures of Air On The Basis of Energy Model of Atmosphere and Hydrosphere In View of Solar Activity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudovyi, V.; Medvedev, V.; Khorozov, S.; Belogolov, V.

    The energy model of atmosphere and hydrosphere and model of global annual surface temperatures are constructed on the basis of the equations of thermal balance of the upper layers of the Earth. It is supposed, that a major reason of greenhouse effect is the increase of concentration of products of water vapour condensation (sublimation) on account of ionization of the upper layers of an atmosphere by hard radiation at high solar activity. Parameters of the models were defined on the basis of a 300-years observation series of Wolf numbers and 120-years observation series of global annual temperature. The models of annual surface temperatures in various geographical points are constructed on the basis of energy model of the upper layers of the Earth and 50- years series of meteorological observations. The models of annual surface temperatures well explain the global warming during the 20-th century and annual temperature oscillations on a phon of warming trend. The modelling of annual surface temperature changings within several centuries (on the basis of the probable script of solar activity development) shows, that in the first half of the 21-st century global warming, probably, will be replaced by the fall of global temperature. At the end of the 22-nd century this tendency can finish by small glacial period similar to period observed in Europe in 15-18 centuries and most brightly expressed during 1450 -1700 years. The analysis of probable consequences of fall of temperature in Europe on the basis of historical documents is submitted.

  4. Work on Planetary Atmospheres and Planetary Atmosphere Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lester, Peter

    1999-01-01

    A summary final report of work accomplished is presented. Work was performed in the following areas: (1) Galileo Probe science analysis, (2) Galileo probe Atmosphere Structure Instrument, (3) Mars Pathfinder Atmosphere Structure/Meteorology instrument, (4) Mars Pathfinder data analysis, (5) Science Definition for future Mars missions, (6) Viking Lander data analysis, (7) winds in Mars atmosphere Venus atmospheric dynamics, (8) Pioneer Venus Probe data analysis, (9) Pioneer Venus anomaly analysis, (10) Discovery Venus Probe Titan probe instrument design, and (11) laboratory studies of Titan probe impact phenomena. The work has resulted in more than 10 articles published in archive journals, 2 encyclopedia articles, and many working papers. This final report is organized around the four planets on which there was activity, Jupiter, Mars, Venus, and Titan, with a closing section on Miscellaneous Activities. A major objective was to complete the fabrication, test, and evaluation of the atmosphere structure experiment on the Galileo probe, and to receive, analyze and interpret data received from the spacecraft. The instrument was launched on April 14, 1989. Calibration data were taken for all experiment sensors. The data were analyzed, fitted with algorithms, and summarized in a calibration report for use in analyzing and interpreting data returned from Jupiter's atmosphere. The sensors included were the primary science pressure, temperature and acceleration sensors, and the supporting engineering temperature sensors. Computer programs were written to decode the Experiment Data Record and convert the digital numbers to physical quantities, i.e., temperatures, pressures, and accelerations. The project office agreed to obtain telemetry of checkout data from the probe. Work to extend programs written for use on the Pioneer Venus project included: (1) massive heat shield ablation leading to important mass loss during entry; and (2) rapid planet rotation, which introduced

  5. Forecasting global atmospheric CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agustí-Panareda, A.; Massart, S.; Chevallier, F.; Boussetta, S.; Balsamo, G.; Beljaars, A.; Ciais, P.; Deutscher, N. M.; Engelen, R.; Jones, L.; Kivi, R.; Paris, J.-D.; Peuch, V.-H.; Sherlock, V.; Vermeulen, A. T.; Wennberg, P. O.; Wunch, D.

    2014-11-01

    A new global atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) real-time forecast is now available as part of the pre-operational Monitoring of Atmospheric Composition and Climate - Interim Implementation (MACC-II) service using the infrastructure of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) Integrated Forecasting System (IFS). One of the strengths of the CO2 forecasting system is that the land surface, including vegetation CO2 fluxes, is modelled online within the IFS. Other CO2 fluxes are prescribed from inventories and from off-line statistical and physical models. The CO2 forecast also benefits from the transport modelling from a state-of-the-art numerical weather prediction (NWP) system initialized daily with a wealth of meteorological observations. This paper describes the capability of the forecast in modelling the variability of CO2 on different temporal and spatial scales compared to observations. The modulation of the amplitude of the CO2 diurnal cycle by near-surface winds and boundary layer height is generally well represented in the forecast. The CO2 forecast also has high skill in simulating day-to-day synoptic variability. In the atmospheric boundary layer, this skill is significantly enhanced by modelling the day-to-day variability of the CO2 fluxes from vegetation compared to using equivalent monthly mean fluxes with a diurnal cycle. However, biases in the modelled CO2 fluxes also lead to accumulating errors in the CO2 forecast. These biases vary with season with an underestimation of the amplitude of the seasonal cycle both for the CO2 fluxes compared to total optimized fluxes and the atmospheric CO2 compared to observations. The largest biases in the atmospheric CO2 forecast are found in spring, corresponding to the onset of the growing season in the Northern Hemisphere. In the future, the forecast will be re-initialized regularly with atmospheric CO2 analyses based on the assimilation of CO2 products retrieved from satellite measurements and

  6. Forecasting global atmospheric CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agustí-Panareda, A.; Massart, S.; Chevallier, F.; Boussetta, S.; Balsamo, G.; Beljaars, A.; Ciais, P.; Deutscher, N. M.; Engelen, R.; Jones, L.; Kivi, R.; Paris, J.-D.; Peuch, V.-H.; Sherlock, V.; Vermeulen, A. T.; Wennberg, P. O.; Wunch, D.

    2014-05-01

    A new global atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) real-time forecast is now available as part of the pre-operational Monitoring of Atmospheric Composition and Climate - Interim Implementation (MACC-II) service using the infrastructure of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) Integrated Forecasting System (IFS). One of the strengths of the CO2 forecasting system is that the land surface, including vegetation CO2 fluxes, is modelled online within the IFS. Other CO2 fluxes are prescribed from inventories and from off-line statistical and physical models. The CO2 forecast also benefits from the transport modelling from a state-of-the-art numerical weather prediction (NWP) system initialized daily with a wealth of meteorological observations. This paper describes the capability of the forecast in modelling the variability of CO2 on different temporal and spatial scales compared to observations. The modulation of the amplitude of the CO2 diurnal cycle by near-surface winds and boundary layer height is generally well represented in the forecast. The CO2 forecast also has high skill in simulating day-to-day synoptic variability. In the atmospheric boundary layer, this skill is significantly enhanced by modelling the day-to-day variability of the CO2 fluxes from vegetation compared to using equivalent monthly mean fluxes with a diurnal cycle. However, biases in the modelled CO2 fluxes also lead to accumulating errors in the CO2 forecast. These biases vary with season with an underestimation of the amplitude of the seasonal cycle both for the CO2 fluxes compared to total optimized fluxes and the atmospheric CO2 compared to observations. The largest biases in the atmospheric CO2 forecast are found in spring, corresponding to the onset of the growing season in the Northern Hemisphere. In the future, the forecast will be re-initialized regularly with atmospheric CO2 analyses based on the assimilation of CO2 satellite retrievals, as they become available in

  7. Modern Physics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Jorge; Correa, Jose

    1999-10-01

    Due to the lack of laboratories for introductory modern physics classes, Dr. Jorge A. Lopez and Mr. Jose Ricardo Correa from the UTEP Physics Department work in the development of computer simulations of important modern physics experiments for the aforementioned physics classes. The presentation will inform the audience about this resource in the instruction of introductory modern physics as well as the success it has had. Introductory modern physics classes expose students to radically new concepts that defy common sense. As if this was not hard enough, students encounter a lack of hands-on activities due to the lack of lab equipment for their modern physics class. This is to be understood since most of the experiments cannot be performed in the conditions university laboratories provide and at the undergraduate level organization. Therefore, much time and effort have been devoted to the development of computer simulations of key modern physics experiments. These virtual experiments are a great alternative that will alleviate the limitations physics professors face when teaching introductory modern physics courses in addition to enchance student understanding.

  8. MULTIRESOLUTION FEATURE ANALYSIS AND OTHER TECHNIQUES FOR UNDERSTANDING AND MODELING TURBULENCE IN STABLE ATMOSPHERES Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    R. L. Street; F. L. Ludwig; Y. Chen

    2005-04-11

    Our DOE project is one of the efforts comprising the Vertical Transport and Mixing Program of the Environmental Sciences Division of the Office of Biological and Environmental Research in Department of Energy. We used ARPS to simulate flow in the Salt Lake Valley. We simulated the physical processes more accurately so that we can better understand the physics of flow in complex terrain and its effects at larger scales. The simulations provided evidence that atmospheric forcing interacts with the Jordan Narrows, the Traverse Range and other complex mountain terrain at the south end of the Salt Lake Valley to produce lee rotors, hydraulic jumps and other effects. While we have successfully used ARPS to simulate VTMX 2000 flows, we have also used observed data to test the model and identify some of its weaknesses. Those are being addressed in a continuation project supported by DOE.

  9. Catalog of ionospheric and atmospheric data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liles, J. N.

    1975-01-01

    Available data from planetary atmospheres and ionospheric physics (aeronomy) are announced. Most of the data sets identified result from individual experiments carried on board various spacecraft. A spacecraft Automated Internal Management File and a Nonsatellite Data File are utilized to maintain information on these data. Photoreduced reports produced by these information files are presented. A variety of user oriented indexes are included.

  10. Static Atmospheres in a Rotating Space Habitat.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKinley, John M.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses O'Neill's proposal for the colonization of space as it offers new problems in pure physics. Addresses specifically the distribution of the atmosphere in O'Neill's habitat and whether there will be enough air at the axis of rotation to allow human-powered flight, with particular reference to the habitat's "artificial gravity."…

  11. RESEARCH IN PARTICLE PHYSICS

    SciTech Connect

    Kearns, Edward

    2013-07-12

    This is the final report for the Department of Energy Grant to Principal Investigators in Experimental and Theoretical Particle Physics at Boston University. The research performed was in the Energy Frontier at the LHC, the Intensity Frontier at Super-Kamiokande and T2K, the Cosmic Frontier and detector R&D in dark matter detector development, and in particle theory.

  12. Work on the Super and the Study of Atmospheric Ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, Mcallister

    2001-03-01

    By 1951, the group of young faculty (Bob Gluckstern and me), post doctoral fellows and graduate students, was comfortably established in Sloane Laboratory, and as "The Breit Group", in the department of physics at Yale. We didn't consciously separate ourselves from others in the department, and no one seemed to put us apart, but the association with Breit gave us a special "aura"--sometimes as objects of pity. Any project that involved the group as a whole, or a significant part of it, was discussed with Bob and me, and sometime in 1951 Breit called us in to consider a request that we look at the possibility of atmospheric ignition by a "Super" - as we still called it then, after Edward Teller. At the end of my stay at Los Alamos, in the summer of 1946, we youngsters had many bull sessions about that "Super", and the possibility of controlled fusion energy. We were confident that the former would be working in perhaps five years, and the latter within ten. After all, Han Bethe had shown us how the sun made its energy, and all that was needed to do was to replace a couple of his slow beta decays with something faster. As I write, some fifty-four years later, we still haven't got fusion energy for power. Our crystal balls were cloudier than Vicky Weisskopf's were to be! But I knew some of the lingo, and had worked out the way radiation penetrates the atmosphere (for understanding the Bikini tests), so in 1951, initially drew the task of looking at opacity, a key question in the bomb itself, and in the possibility of atmospheric ignition. Most of our limited work on the bomb was checking calculations that had been done by others as the Teller-Ulam design was being put together. At least some work on atmospheric ignition had already been done as well, but Teller wanted the "most careful physicist he knew" to do the definitive calculations, so Breit got the call. I do not recall all the members of the group who worked on the project and for that I apologize - no private

  13. Department Chairs and the Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillespie, Patti P.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses legal problems confronting department administrators. Covers equal opportunity, tenure and promotion, truth in advertising, and areas particular to the theatre: contracts with guest directors and artists, copyrights and royalties, and safety. (PD)

  14. Mechanical Engineering Department technical abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-07-01

    The Mechanical Engineering Department publishes abstracts twice a year to inform readers of the broad range of technical activities in the Department, and to promote an exchange of ideas. Details of the work covered by an abstract may be obtained by contacting the author(s). General information about the current role and activities of each of the Department's seven divisions precedes the technical abstracts. Further information about a division's work may be obtained from the division leader, whose name is given at the end of each divisional summary. The Department's seven divisions are as follows: Nuclear Test Engineering Division, Nuclear Explosives Engineering Division, Weapons Engineering Division, Energy Systems Engineering Division, Engineering Sciences Division, Magnetic Fusion Engineering Division and Materials Fabrication Division.

  15. Mechanical Engineering Department Technical Review

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, R.B.; Denney, R.M.

    1981-07-01

    The Mechanical Engineering Department Technical Review is published to inform readers of various technical activities within the Department, promote exchange of ideas, and give credit to personnel who are achieving the results. The report is presented in two parts: technical achievements and publication abstracts. The first is divided into seven sections, each of which reports on an engineering division and its specific activities related to nuclear tests, nuclear explosives, weapons, energy systems, engineering sciences, magnetic fusion, and materials fabrication.

  16. Sports physical

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000673.htm Sports physical To use the sharing features on this ... or routine checkups. Why do you Need a Sports Physical? The sports physical is done to: Find ...

  17. Lightning Physics and Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orville, Richard E.

    2004-03-01

    Lightning Physics and Effects is not a lightning book; it is a lightning encyclopedia. Rarely in the history of science has one contribution covered a subject with such depth and thoroughness as to set the enduring standard for years, perhaps even decades, to come. This contribution covers all aspects of lightning, including lightning physics, lightning protection, and the interaction of lightning with a variety of objects and systems as well as the environment. The style of writing is well within the ability of the technical non-expert and anyone interested in lightning and its effects. Potential readers will include physicists; engineers working in the power industry, communications, computer, and aviation industries; atmospheric scientists; geophysicists; meteorologists; atmospheric chemists; foresters; ecologists; physicians working in the area of electrical trauma; and, lastly, architects. This comprehensive reference volume contains over 300 illustrations, 70 tables with quantitative information, and over 6000 reference and bibliography entries.

  18. The physics of comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendis, D. A.; Houpis, H. L. F.; Marconi, M. L.

    1985-01-01

    This volume of the 'Fundamentals of Cosmic Physics' is concerned with the physics of comets. Aspects regarding the nucleus are discussed, taking into account observations, radius and albedo, mass, rotation, splitting and disruption, the temperature and sublimation of the cometary nucleus, the chemical composition, the electrostatic charging of the cometary nucleus, and the structure and evolution of the cometary nucleus. Other topics explored are related to the atmosphere and its interaction with the solar wind, the plasma tail, and the dust tail. Attention is given to excitation mechanisms, atmospheric abundances and production rates, chemical models of the inner coma, collisional processes and the multifluid approach, radiative transfer, the ionization processes, models of the inner layer, the outer coma, acceleration mechanisms in the plasma tail, the structure of the plasma tail, the cometary magnetosphere, dust grain orbits, gas-dust interaction in the inner coma, and the nature of the cometary dust.

  19. Survey on Undergraduate Education in Physics. Higher Education Surveys Report, Survey Number 15--Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Patricia E.; Lewis, Laurie L.

    In 1991, a survey questionnaire concerning undergraduate education in physics was sent to a nationally representative sample of 597 four-year colleges and universities. Of these, 475 had an undergraduate physics department or a department with a physics program, and met the criteria for inclusion in the study. Responses were received from 450 of…

  20. Atmospheric neutrinos and discovery of neutrino oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Kajita, Takaaki

    2010-01-01

    Neutrino oscillation was discovered through studies of neutrinos produced by cosmic-ray interactions in the atmosphere. These neutrinos are called atmospheric neutrinos. They are produced as decay products in hadronic showers resulting from collisions of cosmic rays with nuclei in the atmosphere. Electron-neutrinos and muon-neutrinos are produced mainly by the decay chain of charged pions to muons to electrons. Atmospheric neutrino experiments observed zenith-angle and energy dependent deficit of muon-neutrino events. Neutrino oscillations between muon-neutrinos and tau-neutrinos explain these data well. Neutrino oscillations imply that neutrinos have small but non-zero masses. The small neutrino masses have profound implications to our understanding of elementary particle physics and the Universe. This article discusses the experimental discovery of neutrino oscillations. PMID:20431258

  1. Atmospheric neutrinos and discovery of neutrino oscillations.

    PubMed

    Kajita, Takaaki

    2010-01-01

    Neutrino oscillation was discovered through studies of neutrinos produced by cosmic-ray interactions in the atmosphere. These neutrinos are called atmospheric neutrinos. They are produced as decay products in hadronic showers resulting from collisions of cosmic rays with nuclei in the atmosphere. Electron-neutrinos and muon-neutrinos are produced mainly by the decay chain of charged pions to muons to electrons. Atmospheric neutrino experiments observed zenith-angle and energy dependent deficit of muon-neutrino events. Neutrino oscillations between muon-neutrinos and tau-neutrinos explain these data well. Neutrino oscillations imply that neutrinos have small but non-zero masses. The small neutrino masses have profound implications to our understanding of elementary particle physics and the Universe. This article discusses the experimental discovery of neutrino oscillations.

  2. Model atmospheres, predicted spectra, and colors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Theoretical models of stellar atmospheres and the process of forming a spectrum are reviewed with particular reference to the spectra of B stars. In the case of classical models the stellar atmosphere is though to consist of plane parallel layers of gas in which radiative and hydrostatic equilibrium exists. No radiative energy is lost or gained in the model atmosphere, but the detailed shape of the spectrum is changed as a result of the interactions with the ionized gas. Predicted line spectra using statistical equilibrium local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE), and non-LTE physics are compared and the determination of abundances is discussed. The limitations of classical modeling are examined. Models developed to demonstrate what motions in the upper atmosphere will do to the spectrum and to explore the effects of using geometries different from plane parallel layer are reviewed. In particular the problem of radiative transfer is addressed.

  3. Photochemistry in planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, J. S.; Graedel, T. E.

    1981-01-01

    Widely varying paths of evolutionary history, atmospheric processes, solar fluxes, and temperatures have produced vastly different planetary atmospheres. The similarities and differences between the earth atmosphere and those of the terrestrial planets (Venus and Mars) and of the Jovian planets are discussed in detail; consideration is also given to the photochemistry of Saturn, Uranus, Pluto, Neptune, Titan, and Triton. Changes in the earth's ancient atmosphere are described, and problems of interest in the earth's present troposphere are discussed, including the down wind effect, plume interactions, aerosol nucleation and growth, acid rain, and the fate of terpenes. Temperature fluctuations in the four principal layers of the earth's atmosphere, predicted decreases in the ozone concentration as a function of time, and spectra of particles in the earth's upper atmosphere are also presented. Finally, the vertical structure of the Venus cloud system and the thermal structure of the Jovian planets are shown graphically.

  4. Pluto's atmosphere near perihelion

    SciTech Connect

    Trafton, L.M. )

    1989-11-01

    A recent stellar occultation has confirmed predictions that Pluto has an atmosphere which is sufficiently thick to uniformly envelope the planet and to extend far above the surface. Pluto's atmosphere consists of methane and perhaps other volatile gases at temperatures below their freezing points; it should regulate the surface temperature of its volatile ices to a globally uniform value. As Pluto approaches and passes through perihelion, a seasonal maximum in the atmospheric bulk and a corresponding minimum in the exposed volatile ice abundance is expected to occur. The lag in maximum atmospheric bulk relative to perihelion will be diagnostic of the surface thermal properties. An estimate of Pluto's atmospheric bulk may result if a global darkening (resulting from the disappearance of the seasonally deposited frosts) occurs before the time of maximum atmospheric bulk. The ice deposited shortly after perihelion may be diagnostic of the composition of Pluto's volatile reservoir.

  5. Developing Strong Geoscience Programs and Departments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, R.; Manduca, C. A.

    2002-12-01

    Strong geoscience programs are essential for preparing future geoscientists and developing a broad public understanding of our science. Faculty working as a department team can create stronger programs than individual faculty working alone. Workshops sponsored by Project Kaleidoscope (www.pkal.org) on departmental planning in the geosciences have emphasized the importance of designing programs in the context of both departmental and student goals. Well-articulated goals form a foundation for designing curriculum, courses, and other departmental activities. Course/skill matrices have emerged as particularly valuable tools for analyzing how individual courses combine in a curriculum to meet learning goals. Integrated programs where students have opportunities to learn and use skills in multiple contexts have been developed at several institutions. Departments are leveraging synergies between courses to more effectively reach departmental goals and capitalize on opportunities in the larger campus environment. A full departmental program extends beyond courses and curriculum. Studies in physics (National Task Force on Undergraduate Physics, Hilborne, 2002) indicate the importance of activities such as recruiting able students, mentoring students, providing courses appropriate for pre-service K-12 teachers, assisting with professional development for a diversity of careers, providing opportunities for undergraduates to participate in research, and making connections with the local industries and businesses that employ graduates. PKAL workshop participants have articulated a wide variety of approaches to undergraduate research opportunities within and outside of class based on their departmental goals, faculty goals, and resources. Similarly, departments have a wide variety of strategies for developing productive synergies with campus-wide programs including those emphasizing writing skills, quantitative skills, and environmental studies. Mentoring and advising

  6. Sound Propagation in the Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attenborough, Keith

    Propagation of sound close to the ground outdoors involves geometric spreading, air absorption, interaction with the ground, barriers, vegetation and refraction associated with wind and temperature gradients. After a brief survey of historical aspects of the study of outdoor sound and its applications, this chapter details the physical principles associated with various propagation effects, reviews data that demonstrate them and methods for predicting them. The discussion is concerned primarily with the relatively short ranges and spectra of interest when predicting and assessing community noise rather than the frequencies and long ranges of concern, for example, in infrasonic global monitoring or used for remote sensing of the atmosphere. Specific phenomena that are discussed include spreading losses, atmospheric absorption, diffraction by barriers and buildings, interaction of sound with the ground (ground waves, surface waves, ground impedance associated with porosity and roughness, and elasticity effects), propagation through crops, shrubs and trees, wind and temperature gradient effects, shadow zones and incoherence due to atmospheric turbulence. The chapter concludes by suggesting a few areas that require further research.

  7. Departments as Agents of Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagowski, J. J.

    1996-07-01

    Higher education is changing because it has no choice. And, for the most part, outside influences are dictating the processes of change. The more fortunate institutions have had a flat budget during this period, but most have been forced to deal with a declining revenue stream as well. Legislators seem bent on micromanaging state-supported institutions, even as they cut their support. Regulators demand greater institutional accountability. Students and their parents expect more service at lower prices and increased flexibility. Technological advances have dramatically affected the availability and accessibility of extant knowledge. It is no longer a question of whether institutions will change, but rather, who will control the change. Most institutions possess long-standing academic traditions, but these are placed at risk in an increasingly competitive market that holds little sympathy for such traditions and may even see them as obstacles or barriers. As a result, the change agents will undoubtedly have a profound effect on the very nature of academic institutions. From the academic point of view, it would seem prudent to attempt to manage the changes that will inevitably occur. A number of concerned observers, notably the Pew Higher Education Roundtable and the American Association for Higher Education, argue persuasively that the academic department is the logical focus for responding to the current winds of change. Using a marketing metaphor, the academic department has been likened to a "producers' cooperative" of services that consumers seek. Thus, the department should be held accountable for the quality of teaching delivered by its members, for the coherence of its major, for its contributions to the general education curriculum, and for supervising and rewarding its individual faculty members. If departments are to be held accountable, it is surely in their best interest to act in such a way that they are accountable. Expecting academic departments to be

  8. Oscillations in stellar atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costa, A.; Ringuelet, A. E.; Fontenla, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    Atmospheric excitation and propagation of oscillations are analyzed for typical pulsating stars. The linear, plane-parallel approach for the pulsating atmosphere gives a local description of the phenomenon. From the local analysis of oscillations, the minimum frequencies are obtained for radially propagating waves. The comparison of the minimum frequencies obtained for a variety of stellar types is in good agreement with the observed periods of the oscillations. The role of the atmosphere in the globar stellar pulsations is thus emphasized.

  9. Sources of atmospheric ammonia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harriss, R. C.; Michaels, J. T.

    1982-01-01

    The information available on factors that influence emissions from the principal societal sources of ammonia to the atmosphere, namely combustion processes, volatilization of farm animal wastes, and volatilization of fertilizers, is reviewed. Emission factors are established for each major source of atmospheric ammonia. The factors are then multiplied by appropriate source characterization descriptors to obtain calculated fluxes of ammonia to the atmosphere on a state-by-state basis for the United States.

  10. Geomagnetic and atmospheric effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoker, P. H.

    1983-08-01

    Geomagnetic and atmospheric processes affecting cosmic-ray earthbound spectrometry are analyzed. The topics discussed include: cutoff rigidities and asymptotic directions; cosmic ray secondaries in the atmosphere and magnetosphere; neutron counters without lead and neutron monitors; and coupling coefficients/yield functions and response functions of cosmic ray detectors. Theoretical simulations of the atmosphere and geomagnetism are presented, taking into account such factors as geomagnetic ring currents and meteorological effects. Diagrams and cutoff rigidity contours are included.

  11. Atmospheric density models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, A. C.

    1977-01-01

    An atmospheric model developed by Jacchia, quite accurate but requiring a large amount of computer storage and execution time, was found to be ill-suited for the space shuttle onboard program. The development of a simple atmospheric density model to simulate the Jacchia model was studied. Required characteristics including variation with solar activity, diurnal variation, variation with geomagnetic activity, semiannual variation, and variation with height were met by the new atmospheric density model.

  12. Atmospheres from Within

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Thomas; Abshire, James; Clancy, Todd; Fry, Ghee; Gustafson, Bo; Hecht, Michael; Kostiuk, Theodor; Rall, Jonathan; Reuter, Dennis; Sheldon, Robert

    1996-01-01

    In this review of atmospheric investigations from planetary surfaces, a wide variety of measurement and instrument techniques relevant to atmospheric studies from future planetary lander missions are discussed. The diversity of planetary surface environments within the solar system precludes complete or highly specific coverage, but lander investigations for Mars and cometary missions are presented as specific cases that represent the broad range of atmospheric-surface boundaries and that also correspond to high priority goals for future national and international lander missions.

  13. Global Atmospheric Aerosol Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, Johannes; Aquila, Valentina; Righi, Mattia

    2012-01-01

    Global aerosol models are used to study the distribution and properties of atmospheric aerosol particles as well as their effects on clouds, atmospheric chemistry, radiation, and climate. The present article provides an overview of the basic concepts of global atmospheric aerosol modeling and shows some examples from a global aerosol simulation. Particular emphasis is placed on the simulation of aerosol particles and their effects within global climate models.

  14. Career Education Resource Guide for Physics. (Tentative.)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louisiana State Dept. of Education, Baton Rouge.

    The career education resource guide integrates learning activities in basic physics with an exploration of careers in physics or related fields. The guide is keyed to the physics textbooks and laboratory manuals adopted by the Louisiana State Department of Education in 1973. The field of physics is divided into six subject areas: (1) the…

  15. 7 CFR 1206.5 - Department.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MANGO PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION Mango Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1206.5 Department. Department...

  16. 7 CFR 1206.5 - Department.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MANGO PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION Mango Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1206.5 Department. Department...

  17. 7 CFR 1206.5 - Department.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MANGO PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION Mango Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1206.5 Department. Department...

  18. 7 CFR 1206.5 - Department.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MANGO PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION Mango Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1206.5 Department. Department...

  19. 7 CFR 1206.5 - Department.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MANGO PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION Mango Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1206.5 Department. Department...

  20. Atmospheric Downscaling using Genetic Programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerenner, Tanja; Venema, Victor; Simmer, Clemens

    2013-04-01

    Coupling models for the different components of the Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere-System requires up-and downscaling procedures. Subject of our work is the downscaling scheme used to derive high resolution forcing data for land-surface and subsurface models from coarser atmospheric model output. The current downscaling scheme [Schomburg et. al. 2010, 2012] combines a bi-quadratic spline interpolation, deterministic rules and autoregressive noise. For the development of the scheme, training and validation data sets have been created by carrying out high-resolution runs of the atmospheric model. The deterministic rules in this scheme are partly based on known physical relations and partly determined by an automated search for linear relationships between the high resolution fields of the atmospheric model output and high resolution data on surface characteristics. Up to now deterministic rules are available for downscaling surface pressure and partially, depending on the prevailing weather conditions, for near surface temperature and radiation. Aim of our work is to improve those rules and to find deterministic rules for the remaining variables, which require downscaling, e.g. precipitation or near surface specifc humidity. To accomplish that, we broaden the search by allowing for interdependencies between different atmospheric parameters, non-linear relations, non-local and time-lagged relations. To cope with the vast number of possible solutions, we use genetic programming, a method from machine learning, which is based on the principles of natural evolution. We are currently working with GPLAB, a Genetic Programming toolbox for Matlab. At first we have tested the GP system to retrieve the known physical rule for downscaling surface pressure, i.e. the hydrostatic equation, from our training data. We have found this to be a simple task to the GP system. Furthermore we have improved accuracy and efficiency of the GP solution by implementing constant variation and

  1. Atmosphere, Ocean, Land, and Solar Irradiance Data Sets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, James; Ahmad, Suraiya

    2003-01-01

    The report present the atmosphere, ocean color, land and solar irradiation data sets. The data presented: total ozone, aerosol, cloud optical and physical parameters, temperature and humidity profiles, radiances, rain fall, drop size distribution.

  2. Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science, Mission 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craven, Paul D. (Editor); Torr, Marsha R. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    The first Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science (ATLAS 1) NASA mission, planned for late 1990, includes experiments in four areas: Atmospheric Science, Solar Physics, Space Plasma Physics, and Astronomy. The atmospheric science investigations will study the composition of the atmosphere in the stratosphere, mesosphere, and thermosphere. The solar physics investigations will measure the total energy output of the sun. The space plasma physics investigations will study the charged particle and plasma environment of the earth. The astronomy investigation will study astronomical sources of radiation in the ultraviolet wavelengths that are inaccessible to observers on earth. Most of the experimental equipment has been flown before on one of the Spacelab missions. Brief descriptions of the experiments are given.

  3. A New Computational Framework for Atmospheric and Surface Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timucin, Dogan A.

    2004-01-01

    A Bayesian data-analysis framework is described for atmospheric and surface retrievals from remotely-sensed hyper-spectral data. Some computational techniques are high- lighted for improved accuracy in the forward physics model.

  4. Chemistry of atmospheres.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wayne, R. P.

    Atmospheric chemistry has been the focus of much research activity in recent years. Like its predecessor, this new edition lays down the principles of atmospheric chemistry and provides the necessary background for more detailed study. New developments are covered, including the startling discovery of the "Antarctic ozone hole", and the increasingly rapid changes in the composition of the Earth's atmosphere, apparently a result of man's activities. Information gathered by the Voyager 2 and other space missions, which have provided a new understanding of the atmospheres of planets other than our own, is also discussed.

  5. Physical fundamentals of remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schanda, E.

    The physical principles describing the propagation of EM waves in the atmosphere and their interactions with matter are discussed as they apply to remote sensing, in an introductory text intended for graduate science students, environmental-science researchers, and remote-sensing practitioners. The emphasis is on basic effects rather than an specific remote-sensing techniques or observational results. Chapters are devoted to basic relations, the spectral lines of atmospheric gases, the spectral properties of condensed matter, and radiative transfer.

  6. The Lowest Atmosphere: Atmospheric Boundary Layer Including Atmospheric Surface Layer.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-04-01

    troposphere" as a result of frictional forces. A good definition of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) (provided to me by the late Dr. Rudy...wind extends light flag. Raises dust and loose paper; small branches are moved. Small trees in leaf begin to sway; crested wavelets form on inland...Calm. Sea like a mirror. Light air Ripples like scales, no foam crest. Light breeze Small wavelets ; crests have glassy appearance, do not break

  7. Possibility of growth of airborne microbes in outer planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimmick, R. L.; Chatigny, M. A.

    1975-01-01

    It is shown that airborne bacteria can maintain metabolic functions in a suitable atmosphere. It is theorized that particles in the Jovian atmosphere would have physical half-lives of 10 to 1500 years, depending upon which of two turbulent models is chosen.

  8. Atmospherics: A Look at the Earth's Airy Shell.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byalko, A. V.

    1991-01-01

    Describes differences in the composition, pressure, and temperature at distinct altitudes of the Earth's atmosphere from the point of view of physical laws. Discusses the genesis and importance of ozone, thermal radiation and the "layer cake" arrangement of the atmosphere, and solar energy in connection with thermal equilibrium. (JJK)

  9. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from the ARM Aerial Facility

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is the largest global change research program supported by the U.S. Department of Energy. The primary goal of the ARM Program is to improve the treatment of cloud and radiation physics in global climate models in order to improve the climate simulation capabilities of these models. ARM data is collected both through permanent monitoring stations and field campaigns around the world. Airborne measurements required to answer science questions from researchers or to validate ground data are also collected. To find data from all categories of aerial operations, follow the links from the AAF information page at http://www.arm.gov/sites/aaf. Tables of information will provide start dates, duration, lead scientist, and the research site for each of the named campaigns. The title of a campaign leads, in turn, to a project description, contact information, and links to the data. Users will be requested to create a password, but the data files are free for viewing and downloading. The ARM Archive physically resides at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  10. Hyponatremia in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Lee, C T; Guo, H R; Chen, J B

    2000-05-01

    Hyponatremia is a clinical manifestation of a wide variety of diseases, some of which have high mortality rates. To assess the prevalence, cause, and prognosis of hyponatremia encountered in the emergency department, we conducted a prospective study at a major hospital in southern Taiwan. We included all adult internal medicine patients treated in the emergency department during a 2-month period. Hyponatremia was defined as a serum sodium level below 134 mEq/L, and cases patients were followed till being discharged. Among the 3,784 patients included, 166 case patients were identified. Most (65%) case patients were hypovolemic, and the overall mortality rate was 17.9%. The mortality rate increased as the sodium level decreased, but was not related to gender, age, cause, or serum potassium level. When 21 hyperglycemic patients whose serum sodium levels went beyond 134 mEq/L after the adjustment for blood sugar levels were excluded, the prevalence of true hyponatremia was 3.83%. The most common underlying diseases were those of the gastrointestinal system. It is concluded that hyponatremia is a common condition encountered in the emergency department. The mortality is correlated with the serum sodium level, and adjustment of the level is required in hyperglycemic patients to make a correct diagnosis. Unlike the cases in some other clinical settings, almost all cases of hyponatremia encountered in the emergency department were not iatrogenic and had recognizable underlying diseases. Therefore, more effort is generally required to identify the cause of hyponatremia cases in the emergency department.

  11. Power Performance Test Report for the U.S. Department of Energy 1.5-Megawatt Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Mendoza, Ismael; Hur, Jerry; Thao, Syhoune; Curtis, Amy

    2015-08-11

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) acquired and installed a 1.5-megawatt (MW) wind turbine at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). This turbine (hereafter referred to as the DOE 1.5) is envisioned to become an integral part of the research initiatives for the DOE Wind Program, such as Atmosphere to Electrons (A2e). A2e is a multiyear DOE research initiative targeting significant reductions in the cost of wind energy through an improved understanding of the complex physics governing wind flow into and through wind farms. For more information, visit http://energy.gov/eere/wind/atmosphere-electrons. To validate new and existing high-fidelity simulations, A2e must deploy several experimental measurement campaigns across different scales. Proposed experiments include wind tunnel tests, scaled field tests, and large field measurement campaigns at operating wind plants. Data of interest includes long-term atmospheric data sets, wind plant inflow, intra-wind plant flows (e.g., wakes), and rotor loads measurements. It is expected that new, high-fidelity instrumentation will be required to successfully collect data at the resolutions required to validate the high-fidelity simulations.

  12. Power Quality Test Report for the U.S. Department of Energy 1.5-Megawatt Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Mendoza, Ismael; Hur, Jerry; Thao, Syhoune

    2015-08-20

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) acquired and installed a 1.5-megawatt (MW) wind turbine at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. This turbine (hereafter referred to as the DOE 1.5) is envisioned to become an integral part of the research initiatives for the DOE Wind Program, such as Atmosphere to Electrons (A2e). A2e is a multiyear DOE research initiative targeting significant reductions in the cost of wind energy through an improved understanding of the complex physics governing wind flow into and through wind farms. For more information, visit http://energy.gov/eere/wind/atmosphere-electrons. To validate new and existing high-fidelity simulations, A2e must deploy several experimental measurement campaigns across different scales. Proposed experiments include wind tunnel tests, scaled field tests, and large field measurement campaigns at operating wind plants. Data of interest includes long-term atmospheric data sets, wind plant inflow, intra-wind plant flows (e.g., wakes), and rotor loads measurements. It is expected that new, high-fidelity instrumentation will be required to successfully collect data at the resolutions required to validate the high-fidelity simulations.

  13. Line Coupling in Atmospheric Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tipping, R. H.

    1996-01-01

    The theoretical modeling of atmospheric spectra is important for a number of different applications: for instance, in the determination of minor atmospheric constituents such as ozone, carbon dioxide, CFC's etc.; in monitoring the temperature profile for climate studies; and in measuring the incoming and outgoing radiation to input into global climate models. In order to accomplish the above mentioned goal, one needs to know the spectral parameters characterizing the individual spectral lines (frequency, width, strength, and shape) as well as the physical parameters of the atmosphere (temperature, abundances, and pressure). When all these parameters are known, it is usually assumed that the resultant spectra and concomitant absorption coefficient can then be calculated by a superposition of individual profiles of appropriate frequency, strength and shape. However, this is not true if the lines are 'coupled'. Line coupling is a subtle effect that takes place when lines of a particular molecule overlap in frequency. In this case when the initial states and the final states of two transitions are connected by collisions, there is a quantum interference resulting in perturbed shapes. In general, this results in the narrowing of Q-branches (those in which the rotational quantum number does not change), and vibration-rotational R- and P branches (those in which the rotational quantum number changes by +/- 1), and in the spectral region beyond band heads (regions where the spectral lines pile up due to centrifugal distortion). Because these features and spectral regions are often those of interest in the determination of the abundances and pressure-temperature profiles, one must take this effect into account in atmospheric models.

  14. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from Niamey, Niger for the Radiative Atmospheric Divergence using AMF, GERB and AMMA Stations (RADAGAST)

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is the largest global change research program supported by the U.S. Department of Energy. The primary goal of the ARM Program is to improve the treatment of cloud and radiation physics in global climate models in order to improve the climate simulation capabilities of these models. To achieve this goal, ARM scientists and researchers around the world use continuous data obtained through the ARM Climate Research Facility. The ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) operates at non-permanent sites selected by the ARM Program. Sometimes these sites can become permanent ARM sites, as was the case with Graciosa Island in the Azores. It is now known as the Eastern North Atlantic permanent site. In January 2006 the AMF deployed to Niamey, Niger, West Africa, at the Niger Meteorological Office at Niamey International Airport. This deployment was timed to coincide with the field phases and Special Observing Periods of the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis (AMMA). The ARM Program participated in this international effort as a field campaign called "Radiative Divergence using AMF, GERB and AMMA Stations (RADAGAST).The primary purpose of the Niger deployment was to combine an extended series of measurements from the AMF with those from the Geostationary Earth Radiation Budget (GERB) Instrument on the Meteosat operational geostationary satellite in order to provide the first well-sampled, direct estimates of the divergence of solar and thermal radiation across the atmosphere. A large collection of data plots based on data streams from specific instruments used at Niamey are available via a link from ARM's Niamey, Niger site information page. Other data can be found at the related websites mentioned above and in the ARM Archive. Users will be requested to create a password, but the plots and data files are free for viewing and downloading. The ARM Archive physically resides at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  15. Why Preschoolers Need Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pica, Rae

    2011-01-01

    NAEYC, the National Association for Sport and Physical Education, and the US Department of Health and Human Services all recommend that preschool programs offer physical education. There are many reasons why. First, young children form healthy habits early in life. Before entering elementary school they learn to brush their teeth, bathe…

  16. Clouds in Planetary Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, R.

    1999-01-01

    In the terrestrial atmosphere clouds are familiar as vast collections of small water drops or ice cyrstals suspended in the air. The study of clouds touches on many facets of armospheric science. The chemistry of clouds is tied to the chemistry of the surrounding atmosphere.

  17. MODIS Atmospheric Data Handler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anantharaj, Valentine; Fitzpatrick, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Atmosphere Data Handler software converts the HDF data to ASCII format, and outputs: (1) atmospheric profiles of temperature and dew point and (2) total precipitable water. Quality-control data are also considered in the export procedure.

  18. Clouds in Planetary Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, R.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    What are clouds? The answer to that question is both obvious and subtle. In the terrestrial atmosphere clouds are familiar as vast collections of small water drops or ice crystals suspended in the air. In the atmospheres of Venus, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Saturn's moon Titan, Uranus, Neptune, and possibly Pluto, they are composed of several other substances including sulfuric acid, ammonia, hydroge...

  19. Physics at Fisk University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuson, Nelson

    1997-11-01

    Fisk University was started in 1866 for predominantly Black students at the end of the Civil War. Its Department of Physics was started in 1931, under the chairmanship of Dr. Elmer Imes, Fisk '03, a research physicist in the field of infrared spectroscopy. Imes set the stage for Fisk's development of an infrared spectroscopy research laboratory. After Imes' untimely death in 1942, one of his early physics majors, James Lawson, chaired the Fisk Physics Department and soon obtained a research type infrared instrument from the University of Michigan. By the early 50's, five Fisk graduate students in physics published with their faculty mentors, the results of their M.A. degree research in infrared spectroscopy and read papers at the meetings of SESAPS. This active participation in SESAPS of Fisk's Black physicists was the impetus which caused SESAPS in 1954 to switch its meetings from segregated to unsegregated facilities. SESAPS then accepted the invitation of Fisk University to hold its 1955 annual meeting on the Fisk campus. But there is lots more to tell of Physics at Fisk University: research in ion optics and the solid state (like growing crystals in ``zero gravity"); research collaboration with Oak Ridge, Vanderbilt and Bordeaux, France; diversification of the physics student population; the impact of Fisk's physicists on the University's financial ``ups and downs"; etc. We will touch on all this and more!

  20. 76 FR 64327 - Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research Draft Strategic Plan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-18

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research Draft... Administration NOAA), Department of Department of Commerce (DOC). ACTION: Notice of availability and request for..., November 11, 2011. ADDRESSES: Public comments must be submitted to OAR.Plan@noaa.gov . The draft...

  1. Use of physical sciences in support of environmental management.

    PubMed

    Ji, Zhen-Gang

    2004-08-01

    Offshore drilling for oil and gas has been conducted since the early 1900s. Oil and gas under the seabed continue to be an important part of the energy resources of the United States. The need to balance the value of these resources against the potential for environmental damage is an important concern. This article explains why and how the Minerals Management Service (MMS) of the US Department of the Interior uses research in physical sciences to help fulfill its environmental goals, and it provides background information on the role of physical sciences in decision-making for Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) oil, gas, and other minerals development. Established in the 1970s, the MMS' Environmental Studies Program is a highly focused marine research program designed to provide the environmental information necessary for OCS energy and nonenergy minerals planning and development activities. The physical sciences research supported by MMS includes physical oceanography, oil-spill risk analyses, atmospheric sciences, and sand and gravel studies. Instead of giving a comprehensive review on physical sciences research in MMS, this article presents sample MMS studies and illustrates how these studies are utilized to support decision-making in environmental management.

  2. Atmospheric Fluorescence Yield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, James H., Jr.; Christl, M. J.; Fountain, W. F.; Gregory, J. C.; Martens, K.; Sokolsky, P.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Several existing and planned experiments estimate the energies of ultra-high energy cosmic rays from air showers using the atmospheric fluorescence from these showers. Accurate knowledge of the conversion from atmospheric fluorescence to energy loss by ionizing particles in the atmosphere is key to this technique. In this paper we discuss a small balloon-borne instrument to make the first in situ measurements versus altitude of the atmospheric fluorescence yield. The instrument can also be used in the lab to investigate the dependence of the fluorescence yield in air on temperature, pressure and the concentrations of other gases that present in the atmosphere. The results can be used to explore environmental effects on and improve the accuracy of cosmic ray energy measurements for existing ground-based experiments and future space-based experiments.

  3. Radon in atmospheric studies: a review

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkening, M.

    1981-01-01

    The distribution of the isotopes of radon in space and time, their physical characteristics, and their behavior in the dynamics of the atmosphere have presented challenges for many decades. /sup 220/Rn, /sup 222/Rn and their daughters furnish a unique set of tracers for the study of transport and mixing processes in the atmosphere. Appropriate applications of turbulent diffusion theory yield general agreement with measured profiles. Diurnal and seasonal variations follow patterns set by consideration of atmospheric stability. /sup 222/Rn has been used successfully in recent studies of nocturnal drainage winds and cumulus convection. Good results have been obtained using /sup 222/Rn and its long-lived /sup 210/Pb daughter as tracers in the study of continent-to-ocean and ocean-to-continent air mass trajectories, /sup 220/Rn (thoron) because of its short half-life of only 55 seconds has been used to measure turbulent diffusion within the first few meters of the earth's surface and to study the influence of meteorological variables on the rate of exhalation from the ground. Radon daughters attach readily to atmospheric particulate matter which makes it possible to study these aerosols with respect to size spectra, attachment characteristics, removal by gravitation and precipitation, and residence times in the troposphere. The importance of ionization by radon and its daughters in the lower atmosphere and its effect on atmospheric electrical parameters is well known. Knowledge of the mobility and other characteristics of radon daughter ions has led to applications in the study of atmospheric electrical environments under fair weather and thunderstorm conditions and in the formation of condensation nuclei. The availability of increasingly sophisticated analytical tools and atmospheric measurement systems can be expected to add much to our understanding of radon and its daughters as trace components of the atmospheric environment in the years ahead.

  4. Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program: Atmospheric Remote Sensing and Assessment Program -- Final Report. Part 1: The lower atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Tooman, T.P.

    1997-01-01

    This report documents work done between FY91 and FY95 for the lower atmospheric portion of the joint Department of Defense (DoD) and Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Remote Sensing and Assessment Program (ARSAP) within the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP). The work focused on (1) developing new measurement capabilities and (2) measuring atmospheric heating in a well-defined layer and then relating it to cloud properties an water vapor content. Seven new instruments were develop3ed for use with Unmanned Aerospace Vehicles (UAVs) as the host platform for flux, radiance, cloud, and water vapor measurements. Four major field campaigns were undertaken to use these new as well as existing instruments to make critically needed atmospheric measurements. Scientific results include the profiling of clear sky fluxes from near surface to 14 km and the strong indication of cloudy atmosphere absorption of solar radiation considerably greater than predicted by extant models.

  5. Atmospheric footprint of the recent warming slowdown

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bo; Zhou, Tianjun

    2017-01-01

    Growing body of literature has developed to detect the role of ocean heat uptake and transport in the recent warming slowdown between 1998–2013; however, the atmospheric footprint of the slowdown in dynamical and physical processes remains unclear. Here, we divided recent decades into the recent hiatus period and the preceding warming period (1983–1998) to investigate the atmospheric footprint. We use a process-resolving analysis method to quantify the contributions of different processes to the total temperature changes. We show that the increasing rate of global mean tropospheric temperature was also reduced during the hiatus period. The decomposed trends due to physical processes, including surface albedo, water vapour, cloud, surface turbulent fluxes and atmospheric dynamics, reversed the patterns between the two periods. The changes in atmospheric heat transport are coupled with changes in the surface latent heat flux across the lower troposphere (below approximately 800 hPa) and with cloud-related processes in the upper troposphere (above approximately 600 hPa) and were underpinned by strengthening/weakening Hadley Circulation and Walker Circulation during the warming/hiatus period. This dynamical coupling experienced a phase transition between the two periods, reminding us of the importance of understanding the atmospheric footprint, which constitutes an essential part of internal climate variability. PMID:28084457

  6. Atmospheric footprint of the recent warming slowdown.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Zhou, Tianjun

    2017-01-13

    Growing body of literature has developed to detect the role of ocean heat uptake and transport in the recent warming slowdown between 1998-2013; however, the atmospheric footprint of the slowdown in dynamical and physical processes remains unclear. Here, we divided recent decades into the recent hiatus period and the preceding warming period (1983-1998) to investigate the atmospheric footprint. We use a process-resolving analysis method to quantify the contributions of different processes to the total temperature changes. We show that the increasing rate of global mean tropospheric temperature was also reduced during the hiatus period. The decomposed trends due to physical processes, including surface albedo, water vapour, cloud, surface turbulent fluxes and atmospheric dynamics, reversed the patterns between the two periods. The changes in atmospheric heat transport are coupled with changes in the surface latent heat flux across the lower troposphere (below approximately 800 hPa) and with cloud-related processes in the upper troposphere (above approximately 600 hPa) and were underpinned by strengthening/weakening Hadley Circulation and Walker Circulation during the warming/hiatus period. This dynamical coupling experienced a phase transition between the two periods, reminding us of the importance of understanding the atmospheric footprint, which constitutes an essential part of internal climate variability.

  7. Atmospheric footprint of the recent warming slowdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bo; Zhou, Tianjun

    2017-01-01

    Growing body of literature has developed to detect the role of ocean heat uptake and transport in the recent warming slowdown between 1998–2013 however, the atmospheric footprint of the slowdown in dynamical and physical processes remains unclear. Here, we divided recent decades into the recent hiatus period and the preceding warming period (1983–1998) to investigate the atmospheric footprint. We use a process-resolving analysis method to quantify the contributions of different processes to the total temperature changes. We show that the increasing rate of global mean tropospheric temperature was also reduced during the hiatus period. The decomposed trends due to physical processes, including surface albedo, water vapour, cloud, surface turbulent fluxes and atmospheric dynamics, reversed the patterns between the two periods. The changes in atmospheric heat transport are coupled with changes in the surface latent heat flux across the lower troposphere (below approximately 800 hPa) and with cloud-related processes in the upper troposphere (above approximately 600 hPa) and were underpinned by strengthening/weakening Hadley Circulation and Walker Circulation during the warming/hiatus period. This dynamical coupling experienced a phase transition between the two periods, reminding us of the importance of understanding the atmospheric footprint, which constitutes an essential part of internal climate variability.

  8. Geochemical cycles of atmospheric gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, J. C. G.; Drever, J. I.

    1988-01-01

    The processes that control the atmosphere and atmospheric changes are reviewed. The geochemical cycles of water vapor, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, oxygen, and minor atmospheric constituents are examined. Changes in atmospheric chemistry with time are discussed using evidence from the rock record and analysis of the present atmosphere. The role of biological evolution in the history of the atmosphere and projected changes in the future atmosphere are considered.

  9. Three dimensional atmospheric dynamics of terrestrial exoplanets over a wide range of orbital and atmospheric parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaspi, Y.; Showman, A. P.

    2014-04-01

    The recent discoveries of terrestrial exoplanets and super Earths extending over a broad range of orbital and physical parameters, suggests that these planets will span a wide range of climatic regimes. Characterization of the atmospheres of warm super Earths has already begun and will be extended to smaller and more distant planets over the coming decade. The habitability of these worlds may be strongly affected by their three-dimensional atmospheric circulation regimes, since the global climate feedbacks that control the inner and outer edges of the habitable zone-including transitions to Snowballlike states and runaway-greenhouse feedbacks-depend on the equator-to-pole temperature differences, pattern of relative humidity, and other aspects of the dynamics. Here, using an idealized moist atmospheric general circulation model (GCM) including a hydrological cycle, we study the dynamical principles governing the atmospheric dynamics on such planets. We show how the planetary rotation rate, planetary mass, surface gravity, heat flux from a parent star and atmospheric mass affect the atmospheric circulation and temperature distribution on such planets. We elucidate the possible climatic regimes and diagnose the mechanisms controlling the formation of atmospheric jet streams, Hadley cells, and the equator-to-pole temperature differences. Finally, we discuss the implications for understanding how the atmospheric circulation influences the global-scale climate feedbacks that control the width of the habitable zone.

  10. Atmospheric dynamics of terrestrial exoplanets over a wide range of orbital and atmospheric parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaspi, Yohai; Showman, Adam

    2014-05-01

    The recent discoveries of terrestrial exoplanets and super Earths extending over a broad range of orbital and physical parameters, suggests that these planets will span a wide range of climatic regimes. Characterization of the atmospheres of warm super Earths has already begun and will be extended to smaller and more distant planets over the coming decade. The habitability of these worlds may be strongly affected by their three-dimensional atmospheric circulation regimes, since the global climate feedbacks that control the inner and outer edges of the habitable zone--including transitions to Snowball-like states and runaway-greenhouse feedbacks--depend on the equator-to-pole temperature differences, pattern of relative humidity, and other aspects of the dynamics. Here, using an idealized moist atmospheric general circulation model (GCM) including a hydrological cycle, we study the dynamical principles governing the atmospheric dynamics on such planets. We show how the planetary rotation rate, planetary mass, surface gravity, heat flux from a parent star, atmospheric mass and optical thickness affect the atmospheric circulation and temperature distribution on such planets. We elucidate the possible climatic regimes and diagnose the mechanisms controlling the formation of atmospheric jet streams, Hadley cells, and the equator-to-pole temperature differences. Finally, we discuss the implications for understanding how the atmospheric circulation influences the global-scale climate feedbacks that control the width of the habitable zone.

  11. 76 FR 9051 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Washington State Department of Natural Resources, Olympia, WA and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-16

    ..., Olympia, WA and University of Washington, Department of Anthropology, Seattle, WA; Correction AGENCY..., WA, and in the physical custody of the University of Washington, Department of Anthropology, Seattle... remains. In addition, in the original Notice, the University of Washington, Department of...

  12. Atmospheric composition change: Ecosystems-Atmosphere interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowler, D.; Pilegaard, K.; Sutton, M. A.; Ambus, P.; Raivonen, M.; Duyzer, J.; Simpson, D.; Fagerli, H.; Fuzzi, S.; Schjoerring, J. K.; Granier, C.; Neftel, A.; Isaksen, I. S. A.; Laj, P.; Maione, M.; Monks, P. S.; Burkhardt, J.; Daemmgen, U.; Neirynck, J.; Personne, E.; Wichink-Kruit, R.; Butterbach-Bahl, K.; Flechard, C.; Tuovinen, J. P.; Coyle, M.; Gerosa, G.; Loubet, B.; Altimir, N.; Gruenhage, L.; Ammann, C.; Cieslik, S.; Paoletti, E.; Mikkelsen, T. N.; Ro-Poulsen, H.; Cellier, P.; Cape, J. N.; Horváth, L.; Loreto, F.; Niinemets, Ü.; Palmer, P. I.; Rinne, J.; Misztal, P.; Nemitz, E.; Nilsson, D.; Pryor, S.; Gallagher, M. W.; Vesala, T.; Skiba, U.; Brüggemann, N.; Zechmeister-Boltenstern, S.; Williams, J.; O'Dowd, C.; Facchini, M. C.; de Leeuw, G.; Flossman, A.; Chaumerliac, N.; Erisman, J. W.

    Ecosystems and the atmosphere: This review describes the state of understanding the processes involved in the exchange of trace gases and aerosols between the earth's surface and the atmosphere. The gases covered include NO, NO 2, HONO, HNO 3, NH 3, SO 2, DMS, Biogenic VOC, O 3, CH 4, N 2O and particles in the size range 1 nm-10 μm including organic and inorganic chemical species. The main focus of the review is on the exchange between terrestrial ecosystems, both managed and natural and the atmosphere, although some new developments in ocean-atmosphere exchange are included. The material presented is biased towards the last decade, but includes earlier work, where more recent developments are limited or absent. New methodologies and instrumentation have enabled, if not driven technical advances in measurement. These developments have advanced the process understanding and upscaling of fluxes, especially for particles, VOC and NH 3. Examples of these applications include mass spectrometric methods, such as Aerosol Mass Spectrometry (AMS) adapted for field measurement of atmosphere-surface fluxes using micrometeorological methods for chemically resolved aerosols. Also briefly described are some advances in theory and techniques in micrometeorology. For some of the compounds there have been paradigm shifts in approach and application of both techniques and assessment. These include flux measurements over marine surfaces and urban areas using micrometeorological methods and the up-scaling of flux measurements using aircraft and satellite remote sensing. The application of a flux-based approach in assessment of O 3 effects on vegetation at regional scales is an important policy linked development secured through improved quantification of fluxes. The coupling of monitoring, modelling and intensive flux measurement at a continental scale within the NitroEurope network represents a quantum development in the application of research teams to address the underpinning

  13. Final Report for Cloud-Aerosol Physics in Super-Parameterized Atmospheric Regional Climate Simulations (CAP-SPARCS)(DE-SC0002003) for 8/15/2009 through 8/14/2012

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, Lynn M; Somerville, Richard C.J.

    2012-11-05

    Improving the representation of local and non-local aerosol interactions in state-of-the-science regional climate models is a priority for the coming decade (Zhang, 2008). With this aim in mind, we have combined two new technologies that have a useful synergy: (1) an aerosol-enabled regional climate model (Advanced Weather Research and Forecasting Model with Chemistry WRF-Chem), whose primary weakness is a lack of high quality boundary conditions and (2) an aerosol-enabled multiscale modeling framework (PNNL Multiscale Aerosol Climate Model (MACM)), which is global but captures aerosol-convection-cloud feedbacks, and thus an ideal source of boundary conditions. Combining these two approaches has resulted in an aerosol-enabled modeling framework that not only resolves high resolution details in a particular region, but crucially does so within a global context that is similarly faithful to multi-scale aerosol-climate interactions. We have applied and improved the representation of aerosol interactions by evaluating model performance over multiple domains, with (1) an extensive evaluation of mid-continent precipitation representation by multiscale modeling, (2) two focused comparisons to transport of aerosol plumes to the eastern United States for comparison with observations made as part of the International Consortium for Atmospheric Research on Transport and Transformation (ICARTT), with the first being idealized and the second being linked to an extensive wildfire plume, and (3) the extension of these ideas to the development of a new approach to evaluating aerosol indirect effects with limited-duration model runs by nudging to observations. This research supported the work of one postdoc (Zhan Zhao) for two years and contributed to the training and research of two graduate students. Four peer-reviewed publications have resulted from this work, and ground work for a follow-on project was completed.

  14. Department-Generated Microcomputer Software.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mantei, Erwin J.

    1986-01-01

    Explains how self-produced software can be used to perform rapid number analysis or number-crunching duties in geology classes. Reviews programs in mineralogy and petrology and identifies areas in geology where computers can be used effectively. Discusses the advantages and benefits of integrating department-generated software into a geology…

  15. Department Raps States on Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Lynn

    2006-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Education has notified 10 states that it intends to withhold a portion of their state administrative funds under the Title I program for failing to comply fully with the testing provisions of the No Child Left Behind Act by the end of the 2005-06 school year. Those funds would instead be diverted directly to school…

  16. Department of the Interior program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balsley, J. R.

    1975-01-01

    The remote sensing activities of the Department of Interior are summarized. The use of satellite imagery in land and water management is described. Specific topics discussed include: land use mapping, exploration and discovery of metal, oil, and gas deposits, location of geological faults, and repetitive monitoring of dynamic environmental phenomena related to water resources.

  17. The Call for Department Leaders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gmelch, Walter H.

    This paper discusses development of the department chair, focusing on the need to build leadership capacity in colleges and universities. It suggests that it takes many years to become an expert, noting that one of the most glaring shortcomings in the leadership area is the scarcity of sound research on leadership training and development.…

  18. IN MY OPINION: The how of physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kibble, Bob

    2000-03-01

    if development days have lost the plot somewhat. How often are such days devoted to generic, whole school issues and how often do they focus on teachers and teaching? As a teacher I found it a rare luxury to find a forum, both the time and the place, to talk about teaching. Occasionally the ASE local section meetings or the ASE annual meeting provided space for professional reflection, and I often returned from such events with ideas to try out and to share with colleagues. Perhaps better use might be made of subject departments as agents for change. A modest investment in training middle managers as teacher-mentors and leaders might result in change that would be managed from within schools. Teachers helping teachers. I'll end this editorial with a plea to head teachers, advisers, department heads and the physics teaching community. Resurrect the HOW of physics teaching. Let's create space and time for teachers to share, reflect and explore their trade, to observe others teaching, to articulate their strategies for lesson planning and motivating learners and to be brave enough to step out from the stifling atmosphere of their classroom boxes and breathe again.

  19. Women in Physics in Yemen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakhraddin, Sakina

    2009-04-01

    We presents the progress of women in Yemen in various fields of science in general and in physics in particular. Women in Yemen attending universities tend to choose science after medicine. The percentage of women in physics is low compared with those for other departments. As a special case, in Sana'a University the percentage of women in the physics department has increased greatly in the last decade. At the level of teaching staff there are only two females with PhD degrees in the whole of Yemen.

  20. Differences Between Physics in Industry and Academia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pritchard, David E.

    1982-01-01

    Compares and contrasts industrial and university physics departments, focusing on the group dynamics and work environment of a corporate physics (General Motors). A major difference between these departments lies in the motivation for and evaluation of research, not in the selection of research topics. (Author/JN)

  1. VII International Congress of Engineering Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-01-01

    In the frame of the fortieth anniversary celebration of the Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana and the Physics Engineering career, the Division of Basic Science and Engineering and its Departments organized the "VII International Congress of Physics Engineering". The Congress was held from 24 to 28 November 2014 in Mexico City, Mexico. This congress is the first of its type in Latin America, and because of its international character, it gathers experts on physics engineering from Mexico and all over the globe. Since 1999, this event has shown research, articles, projects, technological developments and vanguard scientists. These activities aim to spread, promote, and share the knowledge of Physics Engineering. The topics of the Congress were: • Renewable energies engineering • Materials technology • Nanotechnology • Medical physics • Educational physics engineering • Nuclear engineering • High precision instrumentation • Atmospheric physics • Optical engineering • Physics history • Acoustics This event integrates lectures on top trending topics with pre-congress workshops, which are given by recognized scientists with an outstanding academic record. The lectures and workshops allow the exchange of experiences, and create and strengthen research networks. The Congress also encourages professional mobility among all universities and research centres from all countries. CIIF2014 Organizing and Editorial Committee Dr. Ernesto Rodrigo Vázquez Cerón Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana - Azcapotzalco ervc@correo.azc.uam.mx Dr. Luis Enrique Noreña Franco Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana - Azcapotzalco lnf@correo.azc.uam.mx Dr. Alberto Rubio Ponce Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana - Azcapotzalco arp@correo.azc.uam.mx Dr. Óscar Olvera Neria Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana - Azcapotzalco oon@correo.azc.uam.mx Professor Jaime Granados Samaniego Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana - Azcapotzalco jgs@correo.azc.uam.mx Dr. Roberto Tito Hern

  2. Triton's surface-atmosphere energy balance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stansberry, John A.; Yelle, Roger V.; Lunine, Jonathan I.; Mcewen, Alfred S.

    1992-01-01

    A model encompassing the turbulent transfer of sensible heat as well as insolation, reradiation, and latent heat transport is presently used to investigate the energetics of the surface-atmosphere system of Triton. Under the assumption of a physically plausible range of heat transfer coefficients, the atmospheric temperature 1 km above the surface is found to be 1-3 K hotter than the Triton surface. The observed N2 frosts must have an emissivity lower than unity in order to match a frost temperature at the surface of about 38 K.

  3. Homeostatic tendencies of the earth's atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovelock, J. E.; Margulis, L.

    1974-01-01

    The concept is developed that the atmosphere of the earth flows in a closed system controlled by and for the biosphere. The environmental factors delimiting the biosphere are examined. It is found that neither oxygen nor pressure per se limit the distribution of life as a whole. Rather the major physical variables determining the distribution of organisms are solar radiation, temperature, water abundance, and the concentrations of hydrogen and other ions and elements. An attempt is made to model temperature and atmospheric composition of a lifeless earth.

  4. Scholarship for women in atmospheric sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The fourth annual June Bacon-Bercey Scholarship for Women in Atmospheric Sciences has been awarded to Becky Ross, a first-year graduate student in atmospheric science at Purdue University. Ms. Ross is from Waterloo, Iowa, and received her bachelor's degree in physics from Bryn Mawr College in 1980. For her master's degree she is investigating small-scale structure in the mesoscale cellular convection with a research group under E. M. Agee that will, it is hoped, indicate more clearly how the final steady state convection is formed. She plans to obtain a Ph.D. and continue in research, either academic or private.

  5. An implementation plan for priorities in solar-system space physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krimigis, Stamatios M.; Athay, R. Grant; Baker, Daniel; Fisk, Lennard A.; Fredricks, Robert W.; Harvey, John W.; Jokipii, Jack R.; Kivelson, Margaret; Mendillo, Michael; Nagy, Andrew F.

    1985-01-01

    The scientific objectives and implementation plans and priorities of the Space Science Board in areas of solar physics, heliospheric physics, magnetospheric physics, upper atmosphere physics, solar-terrestrial coupling, and comparative planetary studies are discussed and recommended programs are summarized. Accomplishments of Skylab, Solar Maximum Mission, Nimbus-7, and 11 other programs are highlighted. Detailed mission plans in areas of solar and heliospheric physics, plasma physics, and upper atmospheric physics are also described.

  6. Atmospheric dump valve engineering analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Mendoza, B.; McNemar, P.

    1990-01-01

    This report documents the activities undertaken after the atmospheric dump valves (ADVs) failed to operate following a Unit 3 reactor trip. The activities consisted of testing valves in all three units, examining Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station (PVNGS) history with the valves, determining causes for failures, and making recommendations. The PVNGS engineering departments performed an in-depth review of the history, operation, maintenance, and design of ADVs. A preliminary mathematical model of the valves' dynamic behavior was developed by Arizona State University. The corrective actions are designed to eliminate the anomalies noted with the Unit 1 and 3 ADVs. Subsequent monitoring and testing activities following the planned modifications will ensure the ADVs remain operable during modes required by the PVNGS technical specifications. Through this increased monitoring and testing program, the valve modifications will be evaluated to confirm that the required level of reliability has been reached for the ADVs. The specific failures have been evaluated and the causes determined.

  7. Cyberinfrastructure for Atmospheric Discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelmson, R.; Moore, C. W.

    2004-12-01

    Each year across the United States, floods, tornadoes, hail, strong winds, lightning, hurricanes, and winter storms cause hundreds of deaths, routinely disrupt transportation and commerce, and result in billions of dollars in annual economic losses . MEAD and LEAD are two recent efforts aimed at developing the cyberinfrastructure for studying and forecasting these events through collection, integration, and analysis of observational data coupled with numerical simulation, data mining, and visualization. MEAD (Modeling Environment for Atmospheric Discovery) has been funded for two years as an NCSA (National Center for Supercomputing Applications) Alliance Expedition. The goal of this expedition has been the development/adaptation of cyberinfrastructure that will enable research simulations, datamining, machine learning and visualization of hurricanes and storms utilizing the high performance computing environments including the TeraGrid. Portal grid and web infrastructure are being tested that will enable launching of hundreds of individual WRF (Weather Research and Forecasting) simulations. In a similar way, multiple Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) or WRF/ROMS simulations can be carried out. Metadata and the resulting large volumes of data will then be made available for further study and for educational purposes using analysis, mining, and visualization services. Initial coupling of the ROMS and WRF codes has been completed and parallel I/O is being implemented for these models. Management of these activities (services) are being enabled through Grid workflow technologies (e.g. OGCE). LEAD (Linked Environments for Atmospheric Discovery) is a recently funded 5-year, large NSF ITR grant that involves 9 institutions who are developing a comprehensive national cyberinfrastructure in mesoscale meteorology, particularly one that can interoperate with others being developed. LEAD is addressing the fundamental information technology (IT) research challenges needed

  8. Transboundary atmospheric lead pollution.

    PubMed

    Erel, Yigal; Axelrod, Tamar; Veron, Alain; Mahrer, Yitzak; Katsafados, Petros; Dayan, Uri

    2002-08-01

    A high-temporal resolution collection technique was applied to refine aerosol sampling in Jerusalem, Israel. Using stable lead isotopes, lead concentrations, synoptic data, and atmospheric modeling, we demonstrate that lead detected in the atmosphere of Jerusalem is not only anthropogenic lead of local origin but also lead emitted in other countries. Fifty-seven percent of the collected samples contained a nontrivial fraction of foreign atmospheric lead and had 206Pb/207Pb values which deviated from the local petrol-lead value (206Pb/207Pb = 1.113) by more than two standard deviations (0.016). Foreign 206Pb/207Pb values were recorded in Jerusalem on several occasions. The synoptic conditions on these dates and reported values of the isotopic composition of lead emitted in various countries around Israel suggest that the foreign lead was transported to Jerusalem from Egypt, Turkey, and East Europe. The average concentration of foreign atmospheric lead in Jerusalem was 23 +/- 17 ng/m3, similar to the average concentration of local atmospheric lead, 21 +/- 18 ng/ m3. Hence, the load of foreign atmospheric lead is similar to the load of local atmospheric lead in Jerusalem.

  9. Reference Atmosphere for Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Killen, Rosemary M.

    2002-01-01

    We propose that Ar-40 measured in the lunar atmosphere and that in Mercury's atmosphere is due to current diffusion into connected pore space within the crust. Higher temperatures at Mercury, along with more rapid loss from the atmosphere will lead to a smaller column abundance of argon at Mercury than at the Moon, given the same crustal abundance of potassium. Because the noble gas abundance in the Hermean atmosphere represents current effusion, it is a direct measure of the crustal potassium abundance. Ar-40 in the atmospheres of the planets is a measure of potassium abundance in the interiors, since Ar-40 is a product of radiogenic decay of K-40 by electron capture with the subsequent emission of a 1.46 eV gamma-ray. Although the Ar-40 in the Earth's atmosphere is expected to have accumulated since the late bombardment, Ar-40 in the atmospheres of Mercury and the Moon is eroded quickly by photoionization and electron impact ionization. Thus, the argon content in the exospheres of the Moon and Mercury is representative of current effusion rather than accumulation over the lifetime of the planet.

  10. Ballistic injuries in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Bruner, David; Gustafson, Corey G; Visintainer, Catherine

    2011-12-01

    According to 2007 data, gunshot wounds from homicides, suicides, and accidents caused 31,000 deaths in the United States, with even higher numbers of serious, nonfatal injuries. In recent years, new evidence on effective treatment of patients with gunshot wounds has come from military settings and is being adapted for civilian emergency departments (EDs). Effective, evidence-based management of ballistic injuries in the ED is vital. This issue reviews the physics of ballistics as it relates to the tracts and patterns of tissue injury caused by different types of firearms and missiles, and it takes a regional approach to reviewing the current evidence for managing gunshot wounds to the head, neck, thorax, abdomen, genitourinary (GU) system, extremities, and soft tissues. Current guidelines as well as new research and evidence regarding fluid resuscitation, airway management, evaluation strategies, drug therapies, and documentation are discussed.

  11. Glacial atmospheric phosphorus deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjær, Helle Astrid; Dallmayr, Remi; Gabrieli, Jacopo; Goto-Azuma, Kumiko; Hirabayashi, Motohiro; Svensson, Anders; Vallelonga, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Phosphorus in the atmosphere is poorly studied and thus not much is known about atmospheric phosphorus and phosphate transport and deposition changes over time, though it is well known that phosphorus can be a source of long-range nutrient transport, e.g. Saharan dust transported to the tropical forests of Brazil. In glacial times it has been speculated that transport of phosphorus from exposed shelves would increase the ocean productivity by wash out. However whether the exposed shelf would also increase the atmospheric load to more remote places has not been investigated. Polar ice cores offer a unique opportunity to study the atmospheric transport of aerosols on various timescales, from glacial-interglacial periods to recent anthropogenic influences. We have for the first time determined the atmospheric transport of phosphorus to the Arctic by means of ice core analysis. Both total and dissolved reactive phosphorus were measured to investigate current and past atmospheric transport of phosphorus to the Arctic. Results show that glacial cold stadials had increased atmospheric total phosphorus mass loads of 70 times higher than in the past century, while DRP was only increased by a factor of 14. In the recent period we find evidence of a phosphorus increase over the past 50 yrs in ice cores close to human occupation likely correlated to forest fires. References: Kjær, Helle Astrid, et al. "Continuous flow analysis method for determination of dissolved reactive phosphorus in ice cores." Environmental science & technology 47.21 (2013): 12325-12332. Kjær, Helle Astrid, et al. "Greenland ice cores constrain glacial atmospheric fluxes of phosphorus." Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres120.20 (2015).

  12. Thermalisation of electrons in a stellar atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevallier, Loic

    2001-05-01

    We are interested in electron cinetic in a stellar atmosphere, in order to validate (or infirm) the widely spread hypothesis of electron thermalisation. In this goal, we determine the velocity distribution of electrons, solving their kinetic equation, together with the transfer and statistical equilibrium equations. We find that the electron velocity distribution may depart significantly from a maxwellian, when important departures from LTE exist. Some results and astrophysical consequences will be examined.

  13. Range Atmospheric and Oceanic Environmental Support Capabilities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-01

    Acquisition Systems DASS Doppler Acoustic Sounding System DBASI Digital Barometer Altimeter Setting Indicator DoD Department of Defense DRWP Doppler radar...instruments used in support of weather related efforts: (1) Doppler Acoustic Sounding System ( DASS ) is capable of measuring the atmospheric...A Shamir, and L Adleman) wind towers consist of 26 towers placed in strategic locations throughout the range. The standard 54 ft towers employ a

  14. Triton's surface-atmosphere energy balance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stansberry, J.A.; Yelle, R.V.; Lunine, J.I.; McEwen, A.S.

    1992-01-01

    We explore the energetics of Triton's surface-atmosphere system using a model that includes the turbulent transfer of sensible heat as well as insolation, reradiation, and latent heat transport. The model relies on a 1?? by 1?? resolution hemispheric bolometric albedo map of Triton for determining the atmospheric temperature, the N2 frost emissivity, and the temperatures of unfrosted portions of the surface consistent with a frost temperature of ???38 K. For a physically plausible range of heat transfer coefficients, we find that the atmospheric temperature roughly 1 km above the surface is approximately 1 to 3 K hotter than the surface. Atmospheric temperatures of 48 K suggested by early analysis of radio occultation data cannot be obtained for plausible values of the heat transfer coefficients. Our calculations indicate that Triton's N2 frosts must have an emissivity well below unity in order to have a temperature of ???38 K, consistent with previous results. We also find that convection over small hot spots does not significantly cool them off, so they may be able to act as continous sources of buoyancy for convective plumes, but have not explored whether the convection is vigorous enough to entrain particulate matter thereby forming a dust devil. Our elevated atmospheric temperatures make geyser driven plumes with initial upward velocities ???10 m s-1 stagnate in the lower atmosphere. These "wimpy" plumes provide a possible explanation for Triton's "wind streaks.". ?? 1992.

  15. Orographic disturbances in the upper atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, Anatoly I.; Shefov, Nikolay N.; Medvedeva, Irina V.

    2012-12-01

    Interaction of atmospheric non-stationary stream with obstacles on the Earth's terrestrial surface causes disturbances which are a source of various wave processes. A study of such processes and their influence on the upper atmosphere temperature regime was carried out at Kislovodsk high-mountainous scientific station of the Institute of Atmospheric Physics Russian Academy of Sciences (IAP RAS) by measuring the mesopause temperature in the northern leeward area of the Caucasian ridge. Using the data of the spectrophotometric measurements of the upper atmosphere hydroxyl emission characteristics over almost two decades, information about the orographic disturbances at the mesopause altitudes were obtained and features of their generation in the surface atmosphere were studied. It was found that the atmospheric temperature at altitudes around 90 km in the lee of mountains increased by 10 K (the mean value is about 200 K) at a distance of about 150 km from the ridge. The 300-km width of the observed airglow disturbances is from the observations near the Ural and Caucasian mountains.The sources of wave disturbances are shown to be concentrated near the mountainous irregularities of the Caucasian ridge. These sources appear in the troposphere at altitudes of about 4 km. The process of generating waves with periods from 7 to 20 min were believed to be caused by wind gusts. The spatial distribution of energy flow in the lee of the mountains was calculated and amounts to about 3 erg cm-2 s-1.

  16. Searching for new diagnostics of exoplanet atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oklopcic, Antonija; Hirata, Christopher M.; Heng, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    By characterizing the atmospheres of exoplanets we learn about their physical properties and chemical composition. This knowledge will ultimately lead to better understanding of the processes that govern planetary formation and evolution. In the light of upcoming space- and ground-based observatories that will enable remarkable advancement in our observational capabilities, it is important to keep searching for new diagnostic tools that may help us place more robust and reliable constraints on different atmospheric properties. As part of my Ph.D. thesis I investigated new methods for probing the atmospheres of exoplanets. I this talk I will present how observing the spectral signatures of Raman scattering imprinted in the reflected light of gaseous exoplanets at short optical wavelengths can be used to constrain the bulk composition of an exoplanet atmosphere, its temperature, and the presence and/or the altitude of thick clouds. I will discuss the prospects for detecting these signatures in nearby exoplanets using the next generation of observational facilities. I will finish by presenting my recent work on looking for new diagnostics of extended exoplanet atmospheres which may help us to better understand the processes of atmospheric escape and mass loss in exoplanets close to their host stars.

  17. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1992 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 3, Atmospheric and climate research

    SciTech Connect

    Schrempf, R.E.

    1993-04-01

    Within the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER), the atmospheric sciences and carbon dioxide research programs are part of the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD). One of the central missions of the division is to provide the DOE with scientifically defensible information on the local, regional, and global distributions of energy-related pollutants and their effects on climate. This information is vital to the definition and implementation of a sound national energy strategy. This volume reports on the progress and status of all OHER atmospheric science and climate research projects at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). PNL has had a long history of technical leadership in the atmospheric sciences research programs within OHER. Within the ESD, the Atmospheric Chemistry Program (ACP) continues DOE`s long-term commitment to study the continental and oceanic fates of energy-related air pollutants. Research through direct measurement, numerical modeling, and laboratory studies in the ACP emphasizes the long-range transport, chemical transformation, and removal of emitted pollutants, oxidant species, nitrogen-reservoir species, and aerosols. The Atmospheric Studies in Complex Terrain (ASCOT) program continues to apply basic research on density-driven circulations and on turbulent mixing and dispersion in the atmospheric boundary layer to the micro- to mesoscale meteorological processes that affect air-surface exchange and to emergency preparedness at DOE and other facilities. Research at PNL provides basic scientific underpinnings to DOE`s program of global climate research. Research projects within the core carbon dioxide and ocean research programs are now integrated with those in the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM), the Computer Hardware, Advanced Mathematics and Model Physics (CHAMMP), and Quantitative Links programs to form DOE`s contribution to the US Global Change Research Program.

  18. Triton's Distorted Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliot, J. L.; Stansberry, J. A.; Olkin, C. B.; Agner, M. A.; Davies, M. E.

    1998-01-01

    A stellar-occultation light curve for Triton shows asymmetry that can be understood if Triton's middle atmosphere is distorted from spherical symmetry. Although a globally oblate model can explain the data, the inferred atmospheric flattening is so large that it could be caused only by an unrealistic internal mass distribution or highly supersonic zonal winds. Cyclostrophic winds confined to a jet near Triton's northern or southern limbs (or both) could also be responsible for the details of the light curve, but such winds are required to be slightly supersonic. Hazes and clouds in the atmosphere are unlikely to have caused the asymmetry in the light curve.

  19. Atmospheric refraction: a history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehn, Waldemar H.; van der Werf, Siebren

    2005-09-01

    We trace the history of atmospheric refraction from the ancient Greeks up to the time of Kepler. The concept that the atmosphere could refract light entered Western science in the second century B.C. Ptolemy, 300 years later, produced the first clearly defined atmospheric model, containing air of uniform density up to a sharp upper transition to the ether, at which the refraction occurred. Alhazen and Witelo transmitted his knowledge to medieval Europe. The first accurate measurements were made by Tycho Brahe in the 16th century. Finally, Kepler, who was aware of unusually strong refractions, used the Ptolemaic model to explain the first documented and recognized mirage (the Novaya Zemlya effect).

  20. Evolution of Atmospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, B.

    1993-02-12

    An atmosphere is the dynamic gaseous boundary layer between a planet and space. Many complex interactions affect the composition and time evolution of an atmosphere and control the environment - or climate - at a planet's surface. These include both reactions within the atmosphere as well as exchange of energy, gases, and dust with the planet below and the solar system above; for Earth today, interactions with the biosphere and oceans are paramount. In view of the large changes in inputs of energy and gases that have occurred since planets began to form and the complexity of the chemistry, it is not surprising that planetary climates have changed greatly and are continuing to change.

  1. Atmospheric refraction: a history.

    PubMed

    Lehn, Waldemar H; van der Werf, Siebren

    2005-09-20

    We trace the history of atmospheric refraction from the ancient Greeks up to the time of Kepler. The concept that the atmosphere could refract light entered Western science in the second century B.C. Ptolemy, 300 years later, produced the first clearly defined atmospheric model, containing air of uniform density up to a sharp upper transition to the ether, at which the refraction occurred. Alhazen and Witelo transmitted his knowledge to medieval Europe. The first accurate measurements were made by Tycho Brahe in the 16th century. Finally, Kepler, who was aware of unusually strong refractions, used the Ptolemaic model to explain the first documented and recognized mirage (the Novaya Zemlya effect).

  2. Heterogeneous Atmospheric Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schryer, David R.

    In the past few years it has become increasingly clear that heterogeneous, or multiphase, processes play an important role in the atmosphere. Unfortunately the literature on the subject, although now fairly extensive, is still rather dispersed. Furthermore, much of the expertise regarding heterogeneous processes lies in fields not directly related to atmospheric science. Therefore, it seemed desirable to bring together for an exchange of ideas, information, and methodologies the various atmospheric scientists who are actively studying heterogeneous processes as well as other researchers studying similar processes in the context of other fields.

  3. Free from the Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-06-01

    /07 ESO PR Photo 27e/07 Active Galaxy NGC 4945 (NACO-LGS/VLT) Still closer to home, the LGS system can also be applied to solar system objects, such as asteroids or satellites, but also to the study of particular regions of spatially extended bodies like the polar regions of giant planets, where aurora activity is concentrated. During their science verification, the scientists turned the SINFONI instrument with the LGS to a Trans-Neptunian Object, 2003 EL 61. The high image contrast and sensitivity obtained with the use of the LGS mode permit the detection of the two faint satellites known to orbit the TNO. "From such observations one can study the chemical composition of the surface material of the TNO and its satellites (mainly crystalline water ice), estimate their surface properties and constrain their internal structure," explains Christophe Dumas, from ESO. The VLT Laser Guide System is the result of a collaborative work by a team of scientists and engineers from ESO and the Max Planck Institutes for Extraterrestrial Physics in Garching and for Astronomy in Heidelberg, Germany. NACO was built by a Consortium of French and German institutes and ESO. SINFONI was built by a Consortium of German and Dutch Institutes and ESO. More Information Normally, the achievable image sharpness of a ground-based telescope is limited by the effect of atmospheric turbulence. This drawback can be surmounted with adaptive optics, allowing the telescope to produce images that are as sharp as if taken from space. This means that finer details in astronomical objects can be studied, and also that fainter objects can be observed. In order to work, adaptive optics needs a nearby reference star that has to be relatively bright, thereby limiting the area of the sky that can be surveyed to a few percent only. To overcome this limitation, astronomers use a powerful laser that creates an artificial star, where and when they need it. The laser beam takes advantage of the layer of sodium atoms

  4. Atmospheric Profiling Snthetic observation System(APSOS) - a system for whole atmosphere, purpose and preliminary observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Daren; Pan, Weilin; Wang, Yinan

    2016-07-01

    To understand the vertical coupling processes between the troposphere, stratosphere, mesosphere and lower thermosphere with high vertical resolution and temporal resolution, an observation system consisted of multi-lidars, a W-band Doppler radar, and a THz spectrometer has been developing starting from 2012. This system is developed to observer the multiple atmospheric parameters, include high clouds, aerosols, CO2, SO2, NO2, water vapor, ozone, atmospheric temperature and wind, sodium atomic layer, in different height ranges, with vertical resolution of tens to hundreds meters and temporal resolution of several to tens minutes. In addition, the simultaneous observation with high cloud radar will enhance the ability of quantitative retrieval of middle and upper atmospheric observation with combined retrieval of cloud micro-physical characteristics and other atmospheric parameters above the cloud layer. As the cirrus cloud occupied about 50% of earth coverage, this ability will increase the whole atmosphere observation ability obviously. During last 5 years. We have finished each unit of the system and have revealed their targets separately. Temperature profile has been observed from 30 to 110 km, ozone up to 50 km, etc. In spring of 2016, we will have preliminary integrated observation in Eastern China, the Huainan Observatory of the Institute of Atmospheric Physics, CAS. In the end of 2016, the system will be implemented at Yangbajing Cosmic Ray Observatory, CAS, near Lasa, Tibetan Plateau. Some preliminary results from Huainan observation will be presented in this presentation. This project is founded by NSFC.

  5. Laboratory for Extraterrestrial Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vondrak, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Laboratory for Extraterrestrial Physics (LEP) performs experimental and theoretical research on the heliosphere, the interstellar medium, and the magnetospheres and upper atmospheres of the planets, including Earth. LEP space scientists investigate the structure and dynamics of the magnetospheres of the planets including Earth. Their research programs encompass the magnetic fields intrinsic to many planetary bodies as well as their charged-particle environments and plasma-wave emissions. The LEP also conducts research into the nature of planetary ionospheres and their coupling to both the upper atmospheres and their magnetospheres. Finally, the LEP carries out a broad-based research program in heliospheric physics covering the origins of the solar wind, its propagation outward through the solar system all the way to its termination where it encounters the local interstellar medium. Special emphasis is placed on the study of solar coronal mass ejections (CME's), shock waves, and the structure and properties of the fast and slow solar wind. LEP planetary scientists study the chemistry and physics of planetary stratospheres and tropospheres and of solar system bodies including meteorites, asteroids, comets, and planets. The LEP conducts a focused program in astronomy, particularly in the infrared and in short as well as very long radio wavelengths. We also perform an extensive program of laboratory research, including spectroscopy and physical chemistry related to astronomical objects. The Laboratory proposes, develops, fabricates, and integrates experiments on Earth-orbiting, planetary, and heliospheric spacecraft to measure the characteristics of planetary atmospheres and magnetic fields, and electromagnetic fields and plasmas in space. We design and develop spectrometric instrumentation for continuum and spectral line observations in the x-ray, gamma-ray, infrared, and radio regimes; these are flown on spacecraft to study

  6. Assessing Pesticide Impact on Human Health in Nebraska: A Survey of Fire Departments. Department Report No. 11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vitzthum, Edward F.; And Others

    A mail survey of Nebraska fire departments/districts was conducted during summer 1983 to assess the human and physical resources available to them with special emphasis on equipment and protective clothing needed in pesticide-related emergencies. It also assessed general preparedness for responding to agrichemical emergencies, particularly those…

  7. Tevatron physics

    SciTech Connect

    John Womersley

    2003-01-03

    These lectures form a personal, and not necessarily comprehensive, survey of physics at the Fermilab Tevatron proton-antiproton collider. They cover detectors, analysis issues, and physics prospects for the current Tevatron run.

  8. Physical Allergy

    MedlinePlus

    ... physical stimulus. Physical stimuli include the following: Cold Sunlight Heat or other stimuli that cause sweating (such ... a foreign substance and attacks it. Sensitivity to sunlight (photosensitivity) is an example. Ultraviolet light changes proteins ...

  9. Physics Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Seventeen experiments in physics are described to demonstrate various physical phenomena. These include the areas of velocity of sound, damped oscillations, plastic deformation of wires, materials, testing, air resistance, spectrum optical filtering, and some new improvised apparatus. (PS)

  10. Physical Therapists

    MedlinePlus

    ... specific educational prerequisites, such as classes in anatomy, physiology, biology, chemistry, and physics. Some programs admit college ... therapist programs often include courses in biomechanics, anatomy, physiology, neuroscience, and pharmacology. Physical therapist students also complete ...

  11. Sports Physicals

    MedlinePlus

    ... season. What Is a Sports Physical? In the sports medicine field, the sports physical exam is known as ... to consider possible conditions you may have. Most sports medicine doctors believe the medical history is the most ...

  12. Physics Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1976

    1976-01-01

    Described are 13 physics experiments/demonstrations applicable to introductory physics courses. Activities include: improved current balance, division circuits, liquid pressure, convection, siphons, oscillators and modulation, electrical resistance, soap films, Helmholtz coils, radioactive decay, and springs. (SL)

  13. Catatonia in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Jaimes-Albornoz, Walter; Serra-Mestres, Jordi

    2012-11-01

    Disturbances of the level of awareness are a frequent motive of attendance to emergency departments where the initial assessment and management will determine the direction of their outcome. The syndrome of catatonia must be taken into consideration and although it is normally associated with psychiatric diagnoses, it is also very often found in a great variety of neurological and medical conditions. Due to the clinical complexity of catatonia, there are still difficulties in its correct identification and initial management, something that leads to diagnostic delays and increased morbidity and mortality. In this article, a review of the literature on catatonia is presented with the aim of assisting emergency department doctors (and clinicians assessing patients in emergency situations) in considering this condition in the differential diagnosis of stupor due to its high frequency of association with organic pathology.

  14. Physics at Fisk University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickens, Ronald

    2005-03-01

    Fisk University was chartered in 1866 to educate former slaves at the end of the civil war. The physics department was started in 1931 under the chairmanship of Dr. Elmer Imes, Fisk 1903, a research physicist in the field of infrared (IR) spectroscopy. After Imes' death in 1941, one of his early physics majors, James Lawson, became chair and soon obtained a research IR instrument from the University of Michigan. By the early 1950's Fisk's IR research findings began to be published in the scientific journals and Fisk graduate students began to read the results of their M.A. thesis at the meeting of the Southeastern Section of the American Physical Society (SESAPS). This active participation in SESAPS in the mid-1950's was the impetus which caused SESAPS to switch its meetings from segregated to unsegregated facilities. During the next four decades physics at Fisk University expanded to include the annual Fisk Infrared Institute (FIRI) and the formation of strong research collaborations with Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Vanderbilt University, Bordeaux University (France), and NASA. Our presentation will expand on these issues and also include a discussion of the ``McCarthyite Problem'' of the mid-fifties as it impacted both Fisk University and the physics department.

  15. Pioneer 10 Jupiter atmospheric definition results: A summary. [Jupiter atmosphere composition measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfe, J.; Kliore, A.

    1974-01-01

    The various entry probes for measuring outer planetary atmospheric compositions are discussed. Considered are chemical components and physical accumulation processes observable by spectroscopic studies, as well as pressure gauges, temperature gauges, accelerometers, nephelometers, and visible and infrared sensors for determining abundances.

  16. Atmospheric optical calibration system

    DOEpatents

    Hulstrom, R.L.; Cannon, T.W.

    1988-10-25

    An atmospheric optical calibration system is provided to compare actual atmospheric optical conditions to standard atmospheric optical conditions on the basis of aerosol optical depth, relative air mass, and diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio. An indicator can show the extent to which the actual conditions vary from standard conditions. Aerosol scattering and absorption properties, diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio, and precipitable water vapor determined on a real-time basis for optical and pressure measurements are also used to generate a computer spectral model and for correcting actual performance response of a photovoltaic device to standard atmospheric optical condition response on a real-time basis as the device is being tested in actual outdoor conditions. 7 figs.

  17. Atmospheric optical calibration system

    DOEpatents

    Hulstrom, Roland L.; Cannon, Theodore W.

    1988-01-01

    An atmospheric optical calibration system is provided to compare actual atmospheric optical conditions to standard atmospheric optical conditions on the basis of aerosol optical depth, relative air mass, and diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio. An indicator can show the extent to which the actual conditions vary from standard conditions. Aerosol scattering and absorption properties, diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio, and precipitable water vapor determined on a real-time basis for optical and pressure measurements are also used to generate a computer spectral model and for correcting actual performance response of a photovoltaic device to standard atmospheric optical condition response on a real-time basis as the device is being tested in actual outdoor conditions.

  18. Thermal atmospheric models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Hollis Ralph

    1987-01-01

    The static thermal atmosphere is described and its predictions are compared to observations both to test the validity of the classic assumptions and to distinguish and describe those spectral features with diagnostic value.

  19. Students 'Weigh' Atmospheric Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caporaloni, Marina

    1998-01-01

    Describes a procedure developed by students that measures the mass concentration of particles in a polluted urban atmosphere. Uses a portable fan and filters of various materials. Compares students' data with official data. (DDR)

  20. Condensates in Jovian Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, R.

    1999-01-01

    Thermochemical equilibrium theory which starts with temperature/pressure profiles, compositional information and thermodynamic data for condensable species in the jovian planet atmospheres predicts layers of condensate clouds in the upper troposphere.