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Sample records for atmospheric pollution monitor

  1. Plants as bioassay systems for monitoring atmospheric pollutants

    PubMed Central

    Feder, William A.

    1978-01-01

    Plant species act as natural bioindicators of atmospheric pollutants. Plants can be used as bioassay systems for monitoring atmospheric pollutants. Plant injury symptoms, altered growth and reproductive pattern, changes in yield and/or productivity, and changes in species distribution can be used singly or in combination as monitoring devices. The results must be accepted as semiquantitative, but within that constraint, air quality can be sufficiently well defined to enable the setting of air quality standards. Genetic variability of higher plant species has yielded cultivars which display a range of tolerance to gaseous and particulate atmospheric pollutants. Asexual propagation of these cultivars provides pollutant-sensitive and pollutant-tolerant plant material which can be grown on selected sites for observation. Gymnosperm and Angiosperm species as well as species of lichens and mosses have been used to establish field monitoring networks in Europe, Canada, and the United States. White pine, shade tobacco, mosses, and lichens have proven particularly useful as bioassay tools. Pollen from pollutant-sensitive and pollutant-tolerant plant cultivars has also been used as a sensitive laboratory bioassay tool for studying air quality. Epiphytic mosses are particularly efficient as monitors of particulate pollutants, especially heavy metals, some of which may act as chemical mutagens. The cost, complexity, and lack of reliability of instrumented systems for air quality monitoring make imperative the need to develop successful plant bioassay systems for monitoring air quality. PMID:738233

  2. Atmospheric pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Pickett, E.E.

    1987-01-01

    Atmospheric pollution (AP), its causes, and measures to prevent or reduce it are examined in reviews and reports presented at a workshop held in Damascus, Syria in August 1985. Topics discussed include AP and planning studies, emission sources, pollutant formation and transformation, AP effects on man and vegetation, AP control, atmospheric dispersion mechanisms and modeling, sampling and analysis techniques, air-quality monitoring, and applications. Diagrams, graphs, and tables of numerical data are provided.

  3. Model JC-1 Laser System for Monitoring Atmospheric Pollution,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    differential absorption mode atmospheric pollution laser monitoring system, in which a phase locking technique and single board computer are used for...amplification 1 3. synchronous demodulation 2 4. phase locking amplification 2 5. single board computer 6. function logging Instrument 7. oscillator...were then fed into a DBJ-Z80 single - board computer to undergo a multiple averaging process before going through functional operation, and were logged

  4. Urban atmospheric pollution: personal exposure versus fixed monitoring station measurements.

    PubMed

    Violante, Francesco S; Barbieri, Anna; Curti, Stefania; Sanguinetti, Giovanni; Graziosi, Francesca; Mattioli, Stefano

    2006-09-01

    We initiated the PETER (pedestrian environmental traffic pollutant exposure research) project to investigate pedestrians' exposure to traffic related atmospheric pollutants, based on data obtained with the collaboration of selected categories of pedestrian urban workers. We investigated relations between roadside personal exposure levels of volatile aromatic hydrocarbons (including benzene) and particulate matter <10 microm (PM10) among traffic police (n = 126) and parking wardens (n = 50) working in downtown Bologna, Italy. Data were collected from workshifts throughout four 1-week periods in different seasons of 2000-2001. For benzene and PM10, comparisons were made with measurements by fixed monitoring stations, and influence of localized traffic intensity and meteorological parameters was examined. Roadside personal exposure to benzene correlated more strongly with other volatile aromatic hydrocarbons (toluene, xylenes and ethylbenzene) than with PM10. Benzene and PM10 personal exposure levels were higher than fixed monitoring station values (both p<0.0001). At multivariate analysis, benzene and PM10 data from fixed monitoring stations both correlated with meteorological variables, and were also influenced by localized traffic intensity. Plausibly because of the downtown canyon-like streets, weather conditions (during a period of drought) only marginally affected benzene personal exposure, and moderately affected PM10 personal exposure. These findings reinforce the concept that urban atmospheric pollution data from fixed air monitoring stations cannot automatically be taken as indications of roadside exposures.

  5. An advanced open path atmospheric pollution monitor for large areas

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, L.; Suhre, D.; Mani, S.

    1996-12-31

    Over 100 million gallons of radioactive and toxic waste materials generated in weapon materials production are stored in 322 tanks buried within large areas at DOE sites. Toxic vapors occur in the tank headspace due to the solvents used and chemical reactions within the tanks. To prevent flammable or explosive concentration of volatile vapors, the headspace are vented, either manually or automatically, to the atmosphere when the headspace pressure exceeds preset values. Furthermore, 67 of the 177 tanks at the DOE Hanford Site are suspected or are known to be leaking into the ground. These underground storage tanks are grouped into tank farms which contain closely spaced tanks in areas as large as 1 km{sup 2}. The objective of this program is to protect DOE personnel and the public by monitoring the air above these tank farms for toxic air pollutants without the monitor entering the tanks farms, which can be radioactive. A secondary objective is to protect personnel by monitoring the air above buried 50 gallon drums containing moderately low radioactive materials but which could also emit toxic air pollutants.

  6. Monitoring atmospheric pollutants with a heterodyne radiometer transmitter-receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menzies, R. T. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    The presence of selected atmospheric pollutants can be determined by transmitting an infrared beam of proper wavelength through the atmosphere, and detecting the reflections of the transmitted beam with a heterodyne radiometer transmitter-receiver using part of the laser beam as a local oscillator. The particular pollutant and its absorption line strength to be measured are selected by the laser beam wave length. When the round-trip path for the light is known or measured, concentration can be determined. Since pressure (altitude) will affect the shape of the molecular absorption line of a pollutant, tuning the laser through a range of frequencies, which includes a part of the absorption line of the pollutant of interest, yields pollutant altitude data from which the altitude and altitude profile is determined.

  7. Wmo's activities on background atmospheric pollution and integrated monitoring and research.

    PubMed

    Köhler, A

    1988-01-01

    As early as 1968, WMO decided to start a programme on atmospheric pollution. Consequently, a Panel of Experts on Meteorological Aspects of Atmospheric Pollution was established. It was also decided to operate a network of background air pollution monitoring stations. With increasing public concern on environmental pollution impacts, a growing number of WMO Members joined the programme. The Environmental Pollution Monitoring and Research Programme, as well as the World Climate Programme launched in the late seventies, will provide information on a possible influence of pollution on climate.When the network of background ait pollution monitoring started, some Members had already proposed to carry out multimedia monitoring at suitable stations. Later on, it became obvious that more information is required on levels and trends of pollutants in media interacting with the atmosphere and a project on integrated monitoring was established, the purpose of which is to define the objectives and uses of integrated monitoring and to establish procedures for routine standardized integrated monitoring of the of the environment.Pilot projects presently being carried out in a few Member countries are meant to provide most of the information required for the implementation of global background integrated environmental monitorting.

  8. Pine needles as monitors of atmospheric organic pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Strachan, W.M.J.; Kylin, H.; Jensen, S.

    1994-12-31

    The wax covering of pine needles was examined for selected persistent organic pollutants known to be transported globally via the atmosphere. Several years of needles from the Scotch pine (Pinus sylvestris) from southern through northern Europe were differentiated and used to determine the time trends of DDT, HCB, HCH, PCP and PCB residues. Methods of collecting, processing and analyzing were investigated and the possibility of using area as a means of expressing results explored. Patterns of accumulation observed were those expected of globally distributed chemicals and local pollutants with an underlying global contribution; PCP was an ambiguous case. PCBs could not be clearly determined due to analytical problems with this matrix. Sampling factors such as facing direction of sample trees and number of sampled trees did not affect the results; there was some indication that height-above-ground was a factor. Levels of analytes observed in the needle wax of the samples were: a-HCH, 0.06--8.2; lindane, 0.07--17.8; HCB, 0.05--2.4; p,p{prime}-DDT, 0.14--1.9; p,p{prime}-DDE, 0.03--0.8; PCP, 0.6--7.3. PCB values were ambiguous largely due to a high number of negative peaks found in the g.c. chromatograms; a possible solution to this difficulty will be discussed.

  9. The laser absorption spectrometer - A new remote sensing instrument for atmospheric pollution monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shumate, M. S.

    1974-01-01

    An instrument capable of remotely monitoring trace atmospheric constituents is described. The instrument, called a laser absorption spectrometer, can be operated from an aircraft or spacecraft to measure the concentration of selected gases in three dimensions. This device will be particularly useful for rapid determination of pollutant levels in urban areas.

  10. Seasonal comparison of moss bag technique against vertical snow samples for monitoring atmospheric pollution.

    PubMed

    Salo, Hanna; Berisha, Anna-Kaisa; Mäkinen, Joni

    2016-03-01

    This is the first study seasonally applying Sphagnum papillosum moss bags and vertical snow samples for monitoring atmospheric pollution. Moss bags, exposed in January, were collected together with snow samples by early March 2012 near the Harjavalta Industrial Park in southwest Finland. Magnetic, chemical, scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX), K-means clustering, and Tomlinson pollution load index (PLI) data showed parallel spatial trends of pollution dispersal for both materials. Results strengthen previous findings that concentrate and slag handling activities were important (dust) emission sources while the impact from Cu-Ni smelter's pipe remained secondary at closer distances. Statistically significant correlations existed between the variables of snow and moss bags. As a summary, both methods work well for sampling and are efficient pollutant accumulators. Moss bags can be used also in winter conditions and they provide more homogeneous and better controlled sampling method than snow samples.

  11. The Due Innovators II Apollo Project: Monitoring Atmospheric Pollution with Earth Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellitto, P.; Del Frate, F.; Di Noia, A.; Sambucini, V.; Bojkov, B. R.

    2010-12-01

    In this paper we present the Innovators II - APOLLO (monitoring Atmospheric POLLution with earth Observation) project which has been carried out in the framework of the ESA Data User Element programme (http://www.esa.int/due). The projects aims at the development of an innovative service for the monitoring of the air quality from ground based measurements and by means of satellite data e.g. provided by the OMI mission. The core of the APOLLO project is the OMI-TOC NN (neural networks) algorithm.

  12. Development of ion-exchange collectors for monitoring atmospheric deposition of inorganic pollutants in Alaska parklands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brumbaugh, William G.; Arms, Jesse W.; Linder, Greg L.; Melton, Vanessa D.

    2016-09-19

    Between 2010 and 2014, the U.S. Geological Survey completed a series of laboratory and field experiments designed to develop methodology to support the National Park Service’s long-term atmospheric pollutant monitoring efforts in parklands of Arctic Alaska. The goals of this research were to develop passive sampling methods that could be used for long-term monitoring of inorganic pollutants in remote areas of arctic parklands and characterize relations between wet and dry deposition of atmospheric pollutants to that of concentrations accumulated by mosses, specifically the stair-step, splendid feather moss, Hylocomium splendens. Mosses and lichens have been used by National Park Service managers as atmospheric pollutant biomonitors since about 1990; however, additional research is needed to better characterize the dynamics of moss bioaccumulation for various classes of atmospheric pollutants. To meet these research goals, the U.S. Geological Survey investigated the use of passive ionexchange collectors (IECs) that were adapted from the design of Fenn and others (2004). Using a modified IEC configuration, mulitple experiments were completed that included the following: (a) preliminary laboratory and development testing of IECs, (b) pilot-scale validation field studies during 2012 with IECs at sites with instrumental monitoring stations, and (c) deployment of IECs in 2014 at sites in Alaska having known or suspected regional sources of atmospheric pollutants where samples of Hylocomium splendens moss also could be collected for comparison. The targeted substances primarily included ammonium, nitrate, and sulfate ions, and certain toxicologically important trace metals, including cadmium, cobalt, copper, nickel, lead, and zinc.Deposition of atmospheric pollutants is comparatively low throughout most of Alaska; consequently, modifications of the original IEC design were needed. The most notable modification was conversion from a single-stage mixed-bed column to a two

  13. Atmospheric CO2 Concentrations--The Canadian Background Air Pollution Monitoring Network (1993)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Trivett, N. B. A.; Hudec, V. C.; Wong, C. S.

    1993-01-01

    Flask air samples collected at roughly weekly intervals at three Canadian sites [Alert, Northwest Territories (July 1975 through July 1992); Sable Island, Nova Scotia (March 1975 through July 1992); and Cape St. James, British Columbia (May 1979 through July 1992)] were analyzed for CO2 concentration with the measurements directly traceable to the WMO primary CO2 standards. Each record includes the date, atmospheric CO2 concentration, and flask classification code. They provide an accurate record of CO2 concentration levels in Canada during the past two decades. Because these data are directly traceable to WMO standards, this record may be compared with records from other Background Air Pollution Monitoring Network (BAPMoN) stations. The data are in three files (one for each of the monitoring stations) ranging in size from 9.4 to 20.1 kB.

  14. Inverse atmospheric radiative transfer problems - A nonlinear minimization search method of solution. [aerosol pollution monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fymat, A. L.

    1976-01-01

    The paper studies the inversion of the radiative transfer equation describing the interaction of electromagnetic radiation with atmospheric aerosols. The interaction can be considered as the propagation in the aerosol medium of two light beams: the direct beam in the line-of-sight attenuated by absorption and scattering, and the diffuse beam arising from scattering into the viewing direction, which propagates more or less in random fashion. The latter beam has single scattering and multiple scattering contributions. In the former case and for single scattering, the problem is reducible to first-kind Fredholm equations, while for multiple scattering it is necessary to invert partial integrodifferential equations. A nonlinear minimization search method, applicable to the solution of both types of problems has been developed, and is applied here to the problem of monitoring aerosol pollution, namely the complex refractive index and size distribution of aerosol particles.

  15. Inverse atmospheric radiative transfer problems - A nonlinear minimization search method of solution. [aerosol pollution monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fymat, A. L.

    1976-01-01

    The paper studies the inversion of the radiative transfer equation describing the interaction of electromagnetic radiation with atmospheric aerosols. The interaction can be considered as the propagation in the aerosol medium of two light beams: the direct beam in the line-of-sight attenuated by absorption and scattering, and the diffuse beam arising from scattering into the viewing direction, which propagates more or less in random fashion. The latter beam has single scattering and multiple scattering contributions. In the former case and for single scattering, the problem is reducible to first-kind Fredholm equations, while for multiple scattering it is necessary to invert partial integrodifferential equations. A nonlinear minimization search method, applicable to the solution of both types of problems has been developed, and is applied here to the problem of monitoring aerosol pollution, namely the complex refractive index and size distribution of aerosol particles.

  16. The Ecological Monitoring Of Atmosphere Pollution In A City With Microwave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirokov, I. B.; Zemlyanukhina, O. M.; Ivanova, E. V.

    2007-05-01

    The ecological problem is a problem of mutual relation of a society and nature preservation of an environment. The development of industry results in increasing of the atmosphere pollution. This paper presents the measurements of degree of pollution zone on several links with length di each. The amount of links depends on city dimension and on presence of enterprises with emission into atmosphere of harmful substances. It is known, that by the emissions in an atmosphere of harmful substances (CO, CO2 , NO etc) the environment refraction coefficient nAV (average value) is changed. So, the phase progression of microwave kd identifies the properties of an environment, where k - microwave propagation constant. In a paper (I. B. Shirokov, M. V. Ivashina, Amplitude and Phase Progression Measurements on Microwave Line-of- Sight Links, IEEE Conf. Proc. IGARSS'01, Sydney, Australia) it was shown the possibility of phase progression measurement on microwave. In this paper it is suggested to abandon the synchronization of the microwave oscillations by low frequency oscillations and to use the origin microwave oscillations as heterodyne ones with the same initial phase and a frequency shift. The length of measurement link can reach several kilometers, so the phase stability of link in low frequency band was enough for phase measurement on microwave band with high accuracy, because of length of testing link is much less than low frequency wavelength. So, presented method let us measure phase difference, which is proportional to phase progression of microwave on line-of-sight link. Taking into account that phase progression of microwave depends on refraction coefficient of medium n, we have possibility to carry out the ecological monitoring of region, where the testing link is placed. However, the phase measurements are uncertain principally. In a paper it is presented the possibility of elimination of these disadvantages by the changing of the frequency f of microwave

  17. Atmospheric monitoring of organic pollutants in the Arctic under the Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme (AMAP): 1993-2006.

    PubMed

    Hung, Hayley; Kallenborn, Roland; Breivik, Knut; Su, Yushan; Brorström-Lundén, Eva; Olafsdottir, Kristin; Thorlacius, Johanna M; Leppänen, Sirkka; Bossi, Rossana; Skov, Henrik; Manø, Stein; Patton, Gregory W; Stern, Gary; Sverko, Ed; Fellin, Phil

    2010-07-01

    Continuous and comparable atmospheric monitoring programs to study the transport and occurrence of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in the atmosphere of remote regions is essential to better understand the global movement of these chemicals and to evaluate the effectiveness of international control measures. Key results from four main Arctic research stations, Alert (Canada), Pallas (Finland), Storhofdi (Iceland) and Zeppelin (Svalbard/Norway), where long-term monitoring have been carried out since the early 1990s, are summarized. We have also included a discussion of main results from various Arctic satellite stations in Canada, Russia, US (Alaska) and Greenland which have been operational for shorter time periods. Using the Digital Filtration temporal trend development technique, it was found that while some POPs showed more or less consistent declines during the 1990s, this reduction is less apparent in recent years at some sites. In contrast, polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) were still found to be increasing by 2005 at Alert with doubling times of 3.5 years in the case of deca-BDE. Levels and patterns of most POPs in Arctic air are also showing spatial variability, which is typically explained by differences in proximity to suspected key source regions and long-range atmospheric transport potentials. Furthermore, increase in worldwide usage of certain pesticides, e.g. chlorothalonil and quintozene, which are contaminated with hexachlorobenzene (HCB), may result in an increase in Arctic air concentration of HCB. The results combined also indicate that both temporal and spatial patterns of POPs in Arctic air may be affected by various processes driven by climate change, such as reduced ice cover, increasing seawater temperatures and an increase in biomass burning in boreal regions as exemplified by the data from the Zeppelin and Alert stations. Further research and continued air monitoring are needed to better understand these processes and its future

  18. Students 'Weigh' Atmospheric Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caporaloni, Marina

    1998-01-01

    Describes a procedure developed by students that measures the mass concentration of particles in a polluted urban atmosphere. Uses a portable fan and filters of various materials. Compares students' data with official data. (DDR)

  19. Students 'Weigh' Atmospheric Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caporaloni, Marina

    1998-01-01

    Describes a procedure developed by students that measures the mass concentration of particles in a polluted urban atmosphere. Uses a portable fan and filters of various materials. Compares students' data with official data. (DDR)

  20. Instrumentation for Air Pollution Monitoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollowell, Craig D.; McLaughlin, Ralph D.

    1973-01-01

    Describes the techniques which form the basis of current commercial instrumentation for monitoring five major gaseous atmospheric pollutants (sulfur dioxide, oxides of nitrogen, oxidants, carbon monoxide, and hydrocarbons). (JR)

  1. Instrumentation for Air Pollution Monitoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollowell, Craig D.; McLaughlin, Ralph D.

    1973-01-01

    Describes the techniques which form the basis of current commercial instrumentation for monitoring five major gaseous atmospheric pollutants (sulfur dioxide, oxides of nitrogen, oxidants, carbon monoxide, and hydrocarbons). (JR)

  2. Magnetic Study on Environmental Samples from Guadalajara Mexico for Monitoring of Atmospheric Pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar, B.; Cejudo, R.; Bogalo, M. F.; Rosas-Elguera, J.; Quintana, P.; Bautista, F.; Gogichaishvili, A.; Morales, J.

    2013-05-01

    Guadalajara is the second bigger city in Mexico, catalogued as critical zone because of atmospheric pollution levels. The magnetic methodology has been largely used as an alternative way to evaluate the pollution levels as well as identify the critical points in a given area. In this work, results from chemical analyses and magnetic measurements are presented in order to show the correlation between magnetic signal and the pollution level. We analyzed three kinds of environmental samples: urban soils, urban dust and leaves from ficus benjamina. Samples were taken in 30 sites distributed along a main avenue and two secondary avenues, including three points with very poor traffic influence. We determined a ferromagnetic carrier in most of samples, magnetite probably, since the Tc calculated from the thermomagnetic curves is around 580 °C. The magnetic susceptibility (Xlf) as well as the Saturation Isothermal Remanent Magnetization (SIRM) correlate well with the heavy metals content, specially Pb in urban dusts. These results allowed us to identify the most affected points, by vehicular traffic and industrial emissions. Furthermore, the values obtained for these magnetic parameters are above of those found in other studies for polluted cities in Europe and Asia.

  3. Monitoring of air pollution in the atmosphere around Oman Liquid Natural Gas (OLNG) plant.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Wahab, Sabah A

    2005-01-01

    This study was basically designed to assess the potential environmental air quality impacts arising from the existing two operational trains at the Oman Liquid Natural Gas (OLNG) plant. The results of the paper contain a baseline survey of the existing environment. The pollutants studied included methane (CH4), non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC), carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (NOx), and suspended particulate matters (dust PM 10). Meteorological parameters monitored simultaneously include wind speed and direction, air temperature, and relative humidity. The air quality data were used to determine the diurnal and monthly variations in the pollutants. Description levels of the pollutants with respect to meteorological data were also used in analysis. Moreover, a statistical analysis of the collected data was presented. Generally, the results indicated that the mean concentrations of pollutants were low to cause any significant impact in air quality. The area had no problem in meeting the air quality standards for CO and NO2. It was also found that there was a random relationship between CO and NMHC, and between NO and NOx (no apparent correlation). The diurnal peaks of NOx, NO2, THC, and NMHC over a 24-h period were observed at around 9:00-10:00 AM (morning peak). For NO, NO2, and NOx, another peak was seen at around 5:00 PM (evening peak). Furthermore, the measured concentrations for NO2, NOx, and CO were found higher in winter than in summer. The study would help to gain a better understanding of local background levels of air pollutants at the area prior to the construction of new industrial projects, and to prepare action plans for controlling pollution in the area.

  4. An advanced open-path atmospheric pollution monitor for large areas

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, L.

    1995-10-01

    Large amounts of toxic waste materials, generated in manufacturing fuel for nuclear reactors, are stored in tanks buried over large areas at DOE sites. Flammable and hazardous gases are continually generated by chemical reactions in the waste materials. To prevent explosive concentrations of these gases, the gases are automatically vented to the atmosphere when the pressure exceeds a preset value. Real-time monitoring of the atmosphere above the tanks with automatic alarming is needed to prevent exposing workers to unsafe conditions when venting occurs. This report describes the development of a monitor which can measure concentrations of hazardous gases over ranges as long as 4km. The system consists of a carbon dioxide laser combined with an acousto-optic tunable filter.

  5. Verification of greenhouse gas emission reductions: the prospect of atmospheric monitoring in polluted areas.

    PubMed

    Levin, Ingeborg; Hammer, Samuel; Eichelmann, Elke; Vogel, Felix R

    2011-05-28

    Independent verification of greenhouse gas emissions reporting is a legal requirement of the Kyoto Protocol, which has not yet been fully accomplished. Here, we show that dedicated long-term atmospheric measurements of greenhouse gases, such as carbon dioxide (CO(2)) and methane (CH(4)), continuously conducted at polluted sites can provide the necessary tool for this undertaking. From our measurements at the semi-polluted Heidelberg site in the upper Rhine Valley, we find that in the catchment area CH(4) emissions decreased on average by 32±6% from the second half of the 1990s until the first half of the 2000s, but the observed long-term trend of emissions is considerably smaller than that previously reported for southwest Germany. In contrast, regional fossil fuel CO(2) levels, estimated from high-precision (14)CO(2) observations, do not show any significant decreasing trend since 1986, in agreement with the reported emissions for this region. In order to provide accurate verification, these regional measurements would best be accompanied by adequate atmospheric transport modelling as required to precisely determine the relevant catchment area of the measurements. Furthermore, reliable reconciliation of reported emissions will only be possible if these are known at high spatial resolution in the catchment area of the observations. This information should principally be available in all countries that regularly report their greenhouse gas emissions to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. © 2011 The Royal Society

  6. Atmospheric metal pollution monitored by spherical moss bags: a case study of Armadale.

    PubMed Central

    Gailey, F A; Lloyd, O L

    1986-01-01

    To supplement epidemiological investigations into the mortality from respiratory cancer in the small industrial town of Armadale, central Scotland, spherical moss bags were used to study the deposition of atmospheric metal pollution there during a period of 17 months. High concentrations of most metals were found in areas close to the local steel foundry. High concentrations of some metals were also found in the north/northeast of the town. Temporal variations in the metal deposition patterns during the survey-period were observed. By means of statistical analyses, those metals were indicated which were probably emitted from the steel foundry. The scientific and financial advantages of using this method of low technology sampling in epidemiological studies are discussed. PMID:3780627

  7. Monitoring atmospheric pollutants in the biosphere reserve Wienerwald by a combined approach of biomonitoring methods and technical measurements.

    PubMed

    Krommer, Viktoria; Zechmeister, Harald G; Roder, Ingrid; Scharf, Sigrid; Hanus-Illnar, Andrea

    2007-05-01

    In this study a combined approach of bioindication results correlated with an extensive set of data on air pollution and climate was used to assess the pollution status of the Man and Biosphere Reserve Wienerwald (Austria). Bryophytes served as impact indicators (via the Index of Atmospheric Purity-method IAP) at 30 sites as well as accumulation monitors for airborne trace elements (Al, Pb, V, S, Zn, Fe, Cu, Cr, Ni, Co, Mo, Cd, As, Sb and 16 EPA-PAHs) at 10 sites within the reserve. The results of these bioindication methods were subsequently correlated with further pollution (NO(2), SO(2) and dust) and climate data (precipitation, temperature and humidity). The findings obtained clearly indicate the following: Bryophyte distribution is solely influenced by the status of air quality, without interference by climatic or site-related factors, which is in contrast to several previous investigations. IAP-values correlated significantly with NO(2) (0.553; P=0.004), SO(2) winter values (0.511; P=0.013) and PM10 (dust) (0.561; P=0.013). The results obtained via chemical analyses revealed a strong correlation with data derived from the IAP methodology. In terms of the overall air quality within the biosphere reserve Wienerwald, the north-eastern part appears to be the most affected one with a most likely pollution contribution emitted by the capital city Vienna, agriculture and neighbouring countries.

  8. Statistical analysis of long-term monitoring data for persistent organic pollutants in the atmosphere at 20 monitoring stations broadly indicates declining concentrations.

    PubMed

    Kong, Deguo; MacLeod, Matthew; Hung, Hayley; Cousins, Ian T

    2014-11-04

    During recent decades concentrations of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in the atmosphere have been monitored at multiple stations worldwide. We used three statistical methods to analyze a total of 748 time series of selected POPs in the atmosphere to determine if there are statistically significant reductions in levels of POPs that have had control actions enacted to restrict or eliminate manufacture, use and emissions. Significant decreasing trends were identified in 560 (75%) of the 748 time series collected from the Arctic, North America, and Europe, indicating that the atmospheric concentrations of these POPs are generally decreasing, consistent with the overall effectiveness of emission control actions. Statistically significant trends in synthetic time series could be reliably identified with the improved Mann-Kendall (iMK) test and the digital filtration (DF) technique in time series longer than 5 years. The temporal trends of new (or emerging) POPs in the atmosphere are often unclear because time series are too short. A statistical detrending method based on the iMK test was not able to identify abrupt changes in the rates of decline of atmospheric POP concentrations encoded into synthetic time series.

  9. Lidar Monitoring of Mexico City's Atmosphere During High Air Pollution Episodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quick, C. R., Jr.; Archuleta, F. L.; Hof, D. E.; Karl, R. R., Jr.; Tiee, J. J., Jr.; Eichinger, W. E.; Holtkamp, D. B.; Tellier, L.

    1992-01-01

    Over the last two decades, Mexico City, like many large industrial and populous urban areas, has developed a serious air pollution problem, especially during the winter months when there are frequent temperature inversions and weak winds. The deteriorating air quality is the result of several factors. The basin within which Mexico City lies in Mexico's center of political, administrative and economic activity, generating 34 percent of the gross domestic product and 42 percent of the industrial revenue, and supporting a population which is rapidly approaching the 20 million mark. The basin is surrounded by mountains on three sides which end up preventing rapid dispersal of pollutants. Emissions from the transportation fleet (more than 3 million vehicles) are one of the primary pollution sources, and most are uncontrolled. Catalytic converters are just now working their way into the fleet. The Mexico City Air Quality Research Initiative in an international collaboration project between the Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Mexican Petroleum Institute are dedicated to the investigation of the air quality problem in Mexico City. The main objective of the project is to identify and assess the cost and benefits of major options being proposed to improve the air quality. The project is organized into three main activity areas: (1) modeling and simulation; (2) characterization and measurements; and (3) strategic evaluation.

  10. Evaluation of pollution monitors

    SciTech Connect

    Lannes, W.; Richards, G.; Goodman, M.

    1996-03-01

    Pollution monitors have been used primarily for three main tasks. They are: (1) Pollution severity measurement, in which the main aim is to establish the pollution severity in one area; (2) Maintenance, in which the aim is to measure the pollution level in order to initiate maintenance; and (3) Insulator characterization, in which the main aim is to establish a comparative study of the behavior of various insulators at the same testing site. In accomplishing the maintenance task, it is generally recognized that it is difficult to measure only one parameter and make good decisions on when to perform maintenance. This is one of the reasons for the interest in fuzzy logic and neural networks to combine pollution monitor inputs with weather data to improve the accuracy of predicting the need for maintenance. An extension of the maintenance task is to study the possibility of using a pollution monitor as a early warning detector of impending insulator flashover. This study addresses the use of pollution monitors to predict insulator flashover.

  11. Sulfur Dioxide Pollution Monitor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Bureau of Standards (DOC), Washington, DC.

    The sulfur dioxide pollution monitor described in this document is a government-owed invention that is available for licensing. The background of the invention is outlined, and drawings of the monitor together with a detailed description of its function are provided. A sample stream of air, smokestack gas or the like is flowed through a…

  12. Sulfur Dioxide Pollution Monitor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Bureau of Standards (DOC), Washington, DC.

    The sulfur dioxide pollution monitor described in this document is a government-owed invention that is available for licensing. The background of the invention is outlined, and drawings of the monitor together with a detailed description of its function are provided. A sample stream of air, smokestack gas or the like is flowed through a…

  13. Impact of atmospheric pollution inputs and climate change on dissolved inorganic carbon fluxes in karst aquifers: evidences from a 36 years past monitoring of karstic watersheds.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binet, Stephane; Probst, Jean-Luc; Batiot-Guilhe, Christelle; Seidel, Jean-Luc; Emblanch, Christophe; Peyraube, Nicolas; Mangin, Alain; Bakalowicz, Michel; Probst, Anne

    2017-04-01

    Atmospheric pollution is known to modify the soil CO2 consumption associated with carbonate bedrock weathering. To evidence the long term feedbacks of atmospheric pollution and climate change on this chemical reaction, we investigated the inorganic carbon fluxes monitored weekly from 1979 to 2006 in a small forested karstic watershed in the Pyrénées Mountains, characterized by a large precipitation variability, a 0.025 °C air temperature increase per year and a low agricultural pressure. The yearly average concentrations of [Ca + Mg] and dissolved inorganic carbon increases of about 0.057 meq.L-1.yr-1 and the 0.1 meq.L-1.yr-1, respectively. The gap relative to the 1:2 relationship between [Ca + Mg] and HCO3 (in mmole. L-1), noted Delta-HCO3, was founded to be driven by the atmospheric pollution inputs, producing strong acids that inhibit the consumption of carbon from soil during the carbonate dissolution processes. In addition, atmospheric temperature increase is correlated with the [Ca +Mg] change, whereas the decrease of the atmospheric acid inputs observed since the seventies, is linked with a + 0.0022 meq.L-1.yr-1 increase in Delta-HCO3. Similar trends in Delta-HCO3 change were found over other karstic watersheds monitored more recently in the framework of the SNO KARST, one the observatory networks from the OZCAR Research Infrastructure, highlighting that Delta-HCO3 changes over time were partially controlled by atmospheric pollution inputs. The re-interpretation of hydrochemical databases using this Delta-HCO3 indicator enables to evaluate better the impact of atmospheric pollution load and climate change on surface waters. In an indirect way, the dephasing between atmospheric loads recorded in precipitation and Delta-HCO3 observed in groundwater could be a new tracer method to estimate groundwater residence times.

  14. Photographic coronagraph, Skylab particulate experiment T025. [earth atmospheric pollution and Kohoutek Comet monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giovane, F.; Schuerman, D. W.; Greenberg, J. M.

    1977-01-01

    A photographic coronagraph, built to monitor Skylab's extravehicular contamination, is described. This versatile instrument was used to observe the earth's vertical aerosol distribution and Comet Kohoutek (1973f) near perihelion. Although originally designed for deployment from the solar airlock, the instrument was modified for EVA operation when the airlock was rendered unusable. The results of the observations made in four EVA's were almost completely ruined by the failure of a Skylab operational camera used with the coronagraph. Nevertheless, an aerosol layer at 48 km was discovered in the southern hemisphere from the few useful photographs.

  15. Mobile Instruments Measure Atmospheric Pollutants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    As a part of NASA's active research of the Earth s atmosphere, which has included missions such as the Atmospheric Laboratory of Applications and Science (ATLAS, launched in 1992) and the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS, launched on the Earth Probe satellite in 1996), the Agency also performs ground-based air pollution research. The ability to measure trace amounts of airborne pollutants precisely and quickly is important for determining natural patterns and human effects on global warming and air pollution, but until recent advances in field-grade spectroscopic instrumentation, this rapid, accurate data collection was limited and extremely difficult. In order to understand causes of climate change and airborne pollution, NASA has supported the development of compact, low power, rapid response instruments operating in the mid-infrared "molecular fingerprint" portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. These instruments, which measure atmospheric trace gases and airborne particles, can be deployed in mobile laboratories - customized ground vehicles, typically - to map distributions of pollutants in real time. The instruments must be rugged enough to operate rapidly and accurately, despite frequent jostling that can misalign, damage, or disconnect sensitive components. By measuring quickly while moving through an environment, a mobile laboratory can correlate data and geographic points, revealing patterns in the environment s pollutants. Rapid pollutant measurements also enable direct determination of pollutant sources and sinks (mechanisms that remove greenhouse gases and pollutants), providing information critical to understanding and managing atmospheric greenhouse gas and air pollutant concentrations.

  16. North Atlantic Oscillation signatures in the atmospheric concentrations of persistent organic pollutants: An analysis using Integrated Atmospheric Deposition Network-Great Lakes monitoring data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jianmin; Cao, Zuohao; Hung, Hayley

    2004-06-01

    Spring average air concentrations of hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs), hexachlorobenzene (HCB), dieldrin, and two low-molecular-weight polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) measured around the Great Lakes during the 1990s showed strong association with the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO). Decadal air monitoring of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) around the Great Lakes revealed that air concentrations of the aforementioned compounds tend to increase in the positive mode of the NAO. During the same time period, western and northwestern North America experienced warmer-than-normal springs, enhancing volatilization of these compounds from reservoirs accumulated because of past and current use. Atmospheric flows associated with the NAO then transported these compounds from source regions to downwind locations such as the Great Lakes. Roughly reversed situations occurred during the negative mode of the NAO, which was linked to lower POP air concentrations observed around the Great Lakes. Interannual fluctuations of the air concentrations of these POPs significantly correlated with the 1000-500-hPa thickness of the atmospheric layer to the west of the Great Lakes and changes in zonal wind over the western United States. Results indicate that the NAO index may be a useful factor for forecasting interannual fluctuations of POP air concentrations in North America.

  17. Atmospheric aerosol and gaseous pollutant concentrations in Bucharest area using first datasets from the city AQ monitoring network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaceanu, Cristina; Iorga, Gabriela

    2010-05-01

    City of Bucharest is the largest and most populated (about 2.8 million inhabitants) city in the Romanian Plain and encounters environmental problems and meteorology typical for several cities in southeastern Europe. City environment includes intense emissions arising from traffic (about 1 million cars per day), five thermo-electrical power-generation stations, that use both natural gas and oil derivatives for power generation and domestic heating, and from industrial sources (more than 800 small and medium plants). In the present work we performed an extensive analysis of the air pollution state for the Bucharest area (inside and outside the city) using filter measurement aerosol data PM10 and PM2.5. Data spanning over first year of continuous sampling (2005) were taken from the city Air Quality Monitoring Network, which consists of eight sampling stations: three industrial and two traffic, one EPA urban background, one suburban and one regional station located outside of Bucharest. The objective was to assess the PM10 recorded levels and their degree of compliance with the EU-legislated air quality standards and to provide a statistical investigation of the factors controlling seasonal and spatial variations of PM levels. PM10 relationships with other measured air pollutants (SO2, CO, NOx) and meteorological parameters (temperature, relative humidity, atmospheric pressure, wind velocity and direction) were investigated by statistical analysis. Back trajectory modeling and wind direction frequency distributions were used to identify the origin of the polluted air masses. Contribution of combustion (slopes) and non-combustion (intercepts) sources to PM10 recorded levels was quantified by linear analysis, for two seasonal periods: cold (15 October-14 April) and warm (15 April-14 October). PM10 and PM2.5 concentrations were compared with corresponding values in other European urban areas. Main conclusions are as follows: Traffic and industrial sites contribute to the

  18. Remote measurement of atmospheric pollutants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allario, F.; Hoell, J.; Seals, R. K.

    1979-01-01

    The concentration and vertical distribution of atmospheric ammonia and ozone are remotely sensed, using dual-C02-laser multichannel infrared Heterodyne Spectrometer (1HS). Innovation makes atmospheric pollution measurements possible with nearly-quantum-noise-limited sensitivity and ultrafine spectral resolution.

  19. Transboundary atmospheric lead pollution.

    PubMed

    Erel, Yigal; Axelrod, Tamar; Veron, Alain; Mahrer, Yitzak; Katsafados, Petros; Dayan, Uri

    2002-08-01

    A high-temporal resolution collection technique was applied to refine aerosol sampling in Jerusalem, Israel. Using stable lead isotopes, lead concentrations, synoptic data, and atmospheric modeling, we demonstrate that lead detected in the atmosphere of Jerusalem is not only anthropogenic lead of local origin but also lead emitted in other countries. Fifty-seven percent of the collected samples contained a nontrivial fraction of foreign atmospheric lead and had 206Pb/207Pb values which deviated from the local petrol-lead value (206Pb/207Pb = 1.113) by more than two standard deviations (0.016). Foreign 206Pb/207Pb values were recorded in Jerusalem on several occasions. The synoptic conditions on these dates and reported values of the isotopic composition of lead emitted in various countries around Israel suggest that the foreign lead was transported to Jerusalem from Egypt, Turkey, and East Europe. The average concentration of foreign atmospheric lead in Jerusalem was 23 +/- 17 ng/m3, similar to the average concentration of local atmospheric lead, 21 +/- 18 ng/ m3. Hence, the load of foreign atmospheric lead is similar to the load of local atmospheric lead in Jerusalem.

  20. Atmospheric pollution in Lisbon urban atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, C.

    2009-04-01

    Lisbon is the capital city of Portugal with about 565,000 residents in 2008 and a population density of 6,600 inhabitants per square kilometre. Like several other major metropolis, the town is surrounded by satellite cities, forming together a region known as "Lisbon Metropolitan Area" with about 3 million inhabitants, a quarter of the overall Portuguese population. Besides their local residents, it is estimated that more than one million citizens come into the Lisbon area every day from the outskirts, leading to elevated traffic densities and intense traffic jams, with important consequences on air pollution levels and obvious negative impacts on human health. Airborne particulate matter limit values are frequently exceeded, making urgent the existence of consistent programs to monitor and help taking measures to control them. Within the Portuguese project PAHLIS (Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons Contamination in Lisbon Urban Atmosphere) financed by the Portuguese Science Foundation ("Fundação para a Ciência e a Tecnologia"), an aerosol and vapour phase sampling program is being implemented in the city of Lisbon at two selected contrasting zones, namely a typically busy area with intense road traffic and frequent exceedences of the particulate matter standard for the maximum allowable concentration, and a residential quieter area, thus with a cleaner atmosphere characterised as an urban background site. An one month-long sampling campaign was performed during the summer of 2008, where particulate matter was collected in two fractions (coarse 2.5µm

  1. Megacities and atmospheric pollution.

    PubMed

    Molina, Mario J; Molina, Luisa T

    2004-06-01

    About half of the world's population now lives in urban areas because of the opportunity for a better quality of life. Many of these urban centers are expanding rapidly, leading to the growth of megacities, which are defined as metropolitan areas with populations exceeding 10 million inhabitants. These concentrations of people and activity are exerting increasing stress on the natural environment, with impacts at urban, regional and global levels. In recent decades, air pollution has become one of the most important problems of megacities. Initially, the main air pollutants of concern were sulfur compounds, which were generated mostly by burning coal. Today, photochemical smog--induced primarily from traffic, but also from industrial activities, power generation, and solvents--has become the main source of concern for air quality, while sulfur is still a major problem in many cities of the developing world. Air pollution has serious impacts on public health, causes urban and regional haze, and has the potential to contribute significantly to climate change. Yet, with appropriate planning, megacities can efficiently address their air quality problems through measures such as application of new emission control technologies and development of mass transit systems. This review is focused on nine urban centers, chosen as case studies to assess air quality from distinct perspectives: from cities in the industrialized nations to cities in the developing world. While each city--its problems, resources, and outlook--is unique, the need for a holistic approach to the complex environmental problems is the same. There is no single strategy in reducing air pollution in megacities; a mix of policy measures will be needed to improve air quality. Experience shows that strong political will coupled with public dialog is essential to effectively implement the regulations required to address air quality problems.

  2. Simultaneous monitoring method of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and persistent organic pollutants in the atmosphere using activated carbon fiber filter paper.

    PubMed

    Yagoh, Hiroaki; Murayama, Hitoshi; Suzuki, Takahiro; Tominaga, Yasuko; Shibuya, Nobuo; Masuda, Yoshio

    2006-04-01

    In order to simultaneously monitor the concentrations of PAHs and POPs in the atmosphere, an activated carbon fiber filter paper (ACFP) was used as the adsorbing material in this study. The pressurized liquid extraction method (PLE method) was used to extract PAHs and POPs collected on the ACFP. Toluene was an effective solvent to extract them from ACFP using the PLE method, but some of PAHs, such as benzo(a)pyrene, benzo(g,h,i)perylene, dibenzo(a,h)anthracene and indeno(1,2,3-cd)pyrene, were hardly extracted. These PAHs were adsorbed on the particulate matter in the atmosphere. In general, these forms of particulate matter could be collected using a quartz fiber paper (QFP); these PAHs were efficiently extracted from the QFP using the PLE method with toluene. In this study, the collecting method of the PAHs was modified by using QFP overlapped in front of the ACFP. Atmospheric monitoring of PAHs and POPs in Niigata area was performed using this method, and most of the target compounds were detected. However, some of the POPs, such as aldrin, endrin, mirex, could not be detected. The POPs, such as hexachlorobenzene, alpha-hexachlorocyclohexane and chlordanes, and most of the PAHs were detected from all of the samples collected throughout the monitoring period. It was confirmed that these methods were effective to simultaneously monitor the concentrations of the PAHs and POPs in the atmosphere.

  3. Atmospheric chemistry and air pollution.

    PubMed

    Gaffney, Jeffrey S; Marley, Nancy A

    2003-04-07

    Atmospheric chemistry is an important discipline for understanding air pollution and its impacts. This mini-review gives a brief history of air pollution and presents an overview of some of the basic photochemistry involved in the production of ozone and other oxidants in the atmosphere. Urban air quality issues are reviewed with a specific focus on ozone and other oxidants, primary and secondary aerosols, alternative fuels, and the potential for chlorine releases to amplify oxidant chemistry in industrial areas. Regional air pollution issues such as acid rain, long-range transport of aerosols and visibility loss, and the connections of aerosols to ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate chemistry are examined. Finally, the potential impacts of air pollutants on the global-scale radiative balances of gases and aerosols are discussed briefly.

  4. Atmospheric Chemistry and Air Pollution

    DOE PAGES

    Gaffney, Jeffrey S.; Marley, Nancy A.

    2003-01-01

    Atmospheric chemistry is an important discipline for understanding air pollution and its impacts. This mini-review gives a brief history of air pollution and presents an overview of some of the basic photochemistry involved in the production of ozone and other oxidants in the atmosphere. Urban air quality issues are reviewed with a specific focus on ozone and other oxidants, primary and secondary aerosols, alternative fuels, and the potential for chlorine releases to amplify oxidant chemistry in industrial areas. Regional air pollution issues such as acid rain, long-range transport of aerosols and visibility loss, and the connections of aerosols to ozonemore » and peroxyacetyl nitrate chemistry are examined. Finally, the potential impacts of air pollutants on the global-scale radiative balances of gases and aerosols are discussed briefly.« less

  5. First retrieval of hourly atmospheric radionuclides just after the Fukushima accident by analyzing filter-tapes of operational air pollution monitoring stations

    PubMed Central

    Tsuruta, Haruo; Oura, Yasuji; Ebihara, Mitsuru; Ohara, Toshimasa; Nakajima, Teruyuki

    2014-01-01

    No observed data have been found in the Fukushima Prefecture (FP) for the time-series of atmospheric radionuclides concentrations just after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FD1NPP) accident. Accordingly, current estimates of internal radiation doses from inhalation, and atmospheric radionuclide concentrations by atmospheric transport models are highly uncertain. Here, we present a new method for retrieving the hourly atmospheric 137Cs concentrations by measuring the radioactivity of suspended particulate matter (SPM) collected on filter tapes in SPM monitors which were operated even after the accident. This new dataset focused on the period of March 12–23, 2011 just after the accident, when massive radioactive materials were released from the FD1NPP to the atmosphere. Overall, 40 sites of the more than 400 sites in the air quality monitoring stations in eastern Japan were studied. For the first time, we show the spatio-temporal variation of atmospheric 137Cs concentrations in the FP and the Tokyo Metropolitan Area (TMA) located more than 170 km southwest of the FD1NPP. The comprehensive dataset revealed how the polluted air masses were transported to the FP and TMA, and can be used to re-evaluate internal exposure, time-series radionuclides release rates, and atmospheric transport models. PMID:25335435

  6. First retrieval of hourly atmospheric radionuclides just after the Fukushima accident by analyzing filter-tapes of operational air pollution monitoring stations.

    PubMed

    Tsuruta, Haruo; Oura, Yasuji; Ebihara, Mitsuru; Ohara, Toshimasa; Nakajima, Teruyuki

    2014-10-22

    No observed data have been found in the Fukushima Prefecture (FP) for the time-series of atmospheric radionuclides concentrations just after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FD1NPP) accident. Accordingly, current estimates of internal radiation doses from inhalation, and atmospheric radionuclide concentrations by atmospheric transport models are highly uncertain. Here, we present a new method for retrieving the hourly atmospheric (137)Cs concentrations by measuring the radioactivity of suspended particulate matter (SPM) collected on filter tapes in SPM monitors which were operated even after the accident. This new dataset focused on the period of March 12-23, 2011 just after the accident, when massive radioactive materials were released from the FD1NPP to the atmosphere. Overall, 40 sites of the more than 400 sites in the air quality monitoring stations in eastern Japan were studied. For the first time, we show the spatio-temporal variation of atmospheric (137)Cs concentrations in the FP and the Tokyo Metropolitan Area (TMA) located more than 170 km southwest of the FD1NPP. The comprehensive dataset revealed how the polluted air masses were transported to the FP and TMA, and can be used to re-evaluate internal exposure, time-series radionuclides release rates, and atmospheric transport models.

  7. First retrieval of hourly atmospheric radionuclides just after the Fukushima accident by analyzing filter-tapes of operational air pollution monitoring stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuruta, Haruo; Oura, Yasuji; Ebihara, Mitsuru; Ohara, Toshimasa; Nakajima, Teruyuki

    2014-10-01

    No observed data have been found in the Fukushima Prefecture (FP) for the time-series of atmospheric radionuclides concentrations just after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FD1NPP) accident. Accordingly, current estimates of internal radiation doses from inhalation, and atmospheric radionuclide concentrations by atmospheric transport models are highly uncertain. Here, we present a new method for retrieving the hourly atmospheric 137Cs concentrations by measuring the radioactivity of suspended particulate matter (SPM) collected on filter tapes in SPM monitors which were operated even after the accident. This new dataset focused on the period of March 12-23, 2011 just after the accident, when massive radioactive materials were released from the FD1NPP to the atmosphere. Overall, 40 sites of the more than 400 sites in the air quality monitoring stations in eastern Japan were studied. For the first time, we show the spatio-temporal variation of atmospheric 137Cs concentrations in the FP and the Tokyo Metropolitan Area (TMA) located more than 170 km southwest of the FD1NPP. The comprehensive dataset revealed how the polluted air masses were transported to the FP and TMA, and can be used to re-evaluate internal exposure, time-series radionuclides release rates, and atmospheric transport models.

  8. Global Atmospheric Monitoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallen, Carl C.

    1975-01-01

    The global atmospheric monitoring plans of the World Meteorological Organization are detailed. Single and multipurpose basic monitoring systems and the monitoring of chemical properties are discussed. The relationship of the World Meteorological Organization with the United Nations environment program is discussed. A map of the World…

  9. Global Atmospheric Monitoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallen, Carl C.

    1975-01-01

    The global atmospheric monitoring plans of the World Meteorological Organization are detailed. Single and multipurpose basic monitoring systems and the monitoring of chemical properties are discussed. The relationship of the World Meteorological Organization with the United Nations environment program is discussed. A map of the World…

  10. Clean Air Slots Amid Atmospheric Pollution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hobbs, Peter V.

    2002-01-01

    This article investigates the mechanism for those layers in the atmosphere that are free of air borne pollution even though the air above and below them carry pollutants. Atmospheric subsidence is posed as a mechanism for this phenomenon.

  11. Environmental factors and atmospheric pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Frampton, M.W.; Samet, J.M.; Utell, M.J. )

    1991-12-01

    Respiratory infections result from complex interactions between the infectious organism and the host, and exposure to environmental pollutants may alter host resistance. The atmospheric pollutants implicated in respiratory infections include acidic aerosols, particles, nitrogen dioxide, ozone, sulfur dioxide, and household allergens. An extensive epidemiological literature has been established linking environmental tobacco smoke to increased occurrence of lower respiratory tract infections in children; exposure to smoke from cooking and heating fires may also increase the risk of serious infections. Experimental evidence suggests that exposure to nitrogen dioxide and acidic aerosols may impair specific host defense mechanisms. Individuals with underlying lung or heart disease, as well as infants and the elderly, are among those most susceptible to the effects of environmental pollutants. Efforts should be directed toward reducing the exposure of children to environmental tobacco smoke and products of unvented combustion while investigations continue.40 references.

  12. Conception of Gas and Aerosol Pollution Monitoring of the Earth's Atmosphere (for Altitudes more than 30 km) on Board the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozhenko, O. V.; Shavrina, A. V.; Veles', O. A.

    Approximate model calculations support the idea, according to which the main role in the weakening of the ozone layer power is played by the aerosol pollution of the upper layers in the Earth's atmosphere and freons play a secondary role. For the tasks of exact modelling of the processes which create and destroy ozone and for monitoring of greenhouse gases and ecology of the atmosphere, a conception of experiments on board the Ukrainian module of the International Space Station was proposed. They will provide the possibility to receive information about global changes in the chemical composition of the atmosphere, spectral values of complex refractive index and sizes of the stratospheric aerosol, as well as about the vertical structure of gas and aerosol components of the atmosphere and the vertical temperature profile. Two device complexes are proposed to be mounted, one of them (two Fourier spectrometers for the spectral range 1.5-11μm and a spectropolarimeter for 200-400nm) will be targeted to nadir, and the second (two Fourier spectrometers for the spectral range 1.5-11μm) will observe the spectrum of solar radiation weakened by the Earth's atmosphere at various (with a step of 1-2km) over the Earth's surface.

  13. Vehicle Cabin Atmosphere Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara; Darrach, Muray

    2007-01-01

    Vehicle Cabin Atmosphere Monitor (VCAM) identifies gases that are present in minute quantities in the International Space Station (ISS) breathing air that could harm the crew s health. If successful, instruments like VCAM could accompany crewmembers during long-duration exploration missions to the Moon or traveling to Mars.

  14. Evaluation of the effect of long-range transport of air pollutants on coastal atmospheric monitoring sites in and around Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junker, Carsten; Wang, Jia-Lin; Lee, Chung-Te

    Long-range transport of pollution outflow from Asian mainland has been noticed and expected to play a significant role in Pacific background. Since 1993 the Taiwanese Environmental Protection Administration (TEPA) is conducting ground-based observations of various particulate and gaseous pollutants at 74 monitoring stations in Taiwan. One of these stations, Heng-Chun at the south coast of Taiwan can be considered as a background station with only negligible amounts of local pollution, and another one, Wan-Li at the north coast, predominantly receives air that has not passed over Taiwan, so that background air can be analysed by means of sectorisation. In this work, the sectorised 13-year time series of measurements of CO, SO 2, O 3, NO x and PM 10, from the Wan-Li station are presen and compared to data from the Heng-Chun station and another TEPA background station off the coast of mainland China, Ma-Zu. The CO and O 3 measurements are also compared to data from the Yonaguni station, a Pacific island site, part of the Global Atmospheric Watch (GAW) network. The similarity of the sectorised data from the Wan-Li station with the data of the other station indicates that atmospheric measurements from the Wan-Li site can be used to make inferences about trends in western Pacific background air pollution and the effect of long-range transport of pollutants. The measurement time series from 1993 to 2006 do not indicate a significant trend in the monthly mean O 3 concentrations in accordance with other research about ozone in tropical latitudes. An increasing trend in CO concentrations of 2.8% per annum is observed between 1999 and 2006 for long-range transport to northern Taiwan, and a doubling of the SO 2 and NO x concentrations observed at the Wan-Li and Heng-Chun sites within the period 2001-2006. SO 2 concentrations are found to quadruple at Ma-Zu within the same period. The data suggest that pollution from the Asian mainland enhances significantly the background air

  15. Archives of Atmospheric Lead Pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Dominik; Shotyk, William; Kempf, Oliver

    Environmental archives such as peat bogs, sediments, corals, trees, polar ice, plant material from herbarium collections, and human tissue material have greatly helped to assess both ancient and recent atmospheric lead deposition and its sources on a regional and global scale. In Europe detectable atmospheric lead pollution began as early as 6000years ago due to enhanced soil dust and agricultural activities, as studies of peat bogs reveal. Increased lead emissions during ancient Greek and Roman times have been recorded and identified in many long-term archives such as lake sediments in Sweden, ice cores in Greenland, and peat bogs in Spain, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, and the Netherlands. For the period since the Industrial Revolution, other archives such as corals, trees, and herbarium collections provide similar chronologies of atmospheric lead pollution, with periods of enhanced lead deposition occurring at the turn of the century and since 1950. The main sources have been industry, including coal burning, ferrous and nonferrous smelting, and open waste incineration until c.1950 and leaded gasoline use since 1950. The greatest lead emissions to the atmosphere all over Europe occurred between 1950 and 1980 due to traffic exhaust. A marked drop in atmospheric lead fluxes found in most archives since the 1980s has been attributed to the phasing out of leaded gasoline. The isotope ratios of lead in the various archives show qualitatively similar temporal changes, for example, the immediate response to the introduction and phasing out of leaded gasoline. Isotope studies largely confirm source assessments based on lead emission inventories and allow the contributions of various anthropogenic sources to be calculated.

  16. Biological monitoring of airborne pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Ditz, D.W. )

    1990-01-01

    Common plants such as grasses, mosses, and even goldenrod may turn out to have a new high-tech role as monitors of airborne pollution from solid waste incinerators. Certain plants that respond to specific pollutants can provide continuous surveillance of air quality over long periods of time: they are bio-indicators. Other species accumulate pollutants and can serve as sensitive indicators of pollutants and of food-chain contamination: they are bio-accumulators. Through creative use of these properties, biological monitoring can provide information that cannot be obtained by current methods such as stack testing.

  17. A process for selecting ecological indicators for application in monitoring impacts to Air Quality Related Values (AQRVs) from atmospheric pollutants. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    White, G.J.; Breckenridge, R.P.

    1997-01-01

    Section 160 of the Clean Air Act (CAA) calls for measures be taken {open_quotes}to preserve, protect, and enhance air quality in national parks, national wilderness areas, national monuments, national seashores, and other areas of special national or regional natural, recreational, scenic, or historic value.{close_quotes} Pursuant to this, stringent requirement have been established for {open_quotes}Class I{close_quotes} areas, which include most National Parks and Wilderness Areas. Federal Land Managers (FLMs) are charged with the task of carrying out these requirements through the identification of air quality related values (AQRVs) that are potentially at risk from atmospheric pollutants. This is a complex task, the success of which is dependent on the gathering of information on a wide variety of factors that contribute to the potential for impacting resources in Class I areas. Further complicating the issue is the diversity of ecological systems found in Class I areas. There is a critical need for the development of monitoring programs to assess the status of AQRVs in Class I areas with respect to impacts caused by atmospheric pollutants. These monitoring programs must be based on the measurement of a carefully selected suite of key physical, chemical, and biological parameters that serve as indicators of the status of the ecosystems found in Class I areas. Such programs must be both scientifically-based and cost-effective, and must provide the data necessary for FLMs to make objective, defensible decisions. This document summarizes a method for developing AQRV monitoring programs in Class I areas.

  18. [Current data on atmospheric pollutions].

    PubMed

    Festy, B; Petit-Coviaux, F; Le Moullec, Y

    1991-01-01

    Atmospheric pollutions (AP) are very important for human health and ecological equilibrium. They may be natural or anthropogenic and in this later case they can appear outdoor or indoor. Urban air pollution is the most known form of AP. Its main sources are industries, individual and collective heating and now mainly automobile traffic in most cities. Classical AP indicators are SO2, particles, NOx, CO and Pb measured in networks. Important factors of AP are amounts of pollutants emitted and local climatic and meteorological characteristics. Health effects of AP peaks and of AP background levels are not well known. But generally, mean AP levels of SO2 and particles decreased in the last years in most towns as the consequence of collective actions on the three main sources of AP and on fuels, emission and immission levels; but more is wanted about motor-cars. Progress are necessary for limitation of three major ecological risks: "acid-rain" (SO2 and NOx derivatives, ozone,...) which participates in lake and forest attacks; "green house" effects whose air CO2 concentration increase is the main responsible, and stratospheric ozone depletion mainly due to freons (CFC); the consequences of these two last phenomena are not well known but ecological and health risk exist. Besides, indoor air pollution (IAP) is very important because we live more than 20 h a day indoor. IAP may be occupational (a lot of chemical or biological agents) or not. In the later case air pollutants are very various: CO, NOx and particles from heating or cooking, formaldehyde from wood glue, plywood or urea-formol foams, radon and derivatives in some granitic countries, odd jobs products, cosmetics, aero-allergens of chemical or biological origins, microbes,... Environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) is also an important pollutant complex. Risks of IAP are real or potential: acute risk is obvious for CO, aero-allergens, formaldehyde, NOx,...); irritations are produced by ETS, formaldehyde, solvants

  19. Pollution Analyzing and Monitoring Instruments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1972

    Compiled in this book is basic, technical information useful in a systems approach to pollution control. Descriptions and specifications are given of what is available in ready made, on-the-line commercial equipment for sampling, monitoring, measuring and continuously analyzing the multitudinous types of pollutants found in the air, water, soil,…

  20. First retrieval of hourly atmospheric radionuclides just after the Fukushima accident by analyzing filter-tapes of operational air pollution monitoring stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuruta, Haruo; Oura, Yasuji; Ebihara, Mitsuru; Ohara, Toshimasa; Nakajima, Teruyuki

    2015-04-01

    The current estimates for the internal radiation doses from inhalation by the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (FD1NPS) accident on March 11, 2011 have large uncertainty, because no observed data has been found of continuous monitoring of radioactive materials in the atmosphere in the Fukushima prefecture (FP) just after the accident, compared with the many observed datasets of deposition densities of radionuclides on the grounds in eastern Japan. To retrieve the atmospheric transport of radioactive materials released from the FD1NPS, we collected the used filter tapes installed in Suspended Particulate Matter (SPM) monitors with beta-ray attenuation method operated in the air pollution monitoring network of eastern Japan. Then, we measured hourly Cs-134 and Cs-137 concentrations in SPM at 40 monitoring sites in the FP and Tokyo Metropolitan Area (TMA) located more than 170 km southwest of the FD1NPS, after more than one year. The period for measurements was during March 12-23, 2011, when atmospheric, aquatic, and terrestrial environments were seriously suffered in most of eastern Japan by a large amount of radioactive materials released from the FD1NPS. In this paper, a comprehensive study will be reported for the first time on a spatio-temporal variation of atmospheric Cs-137 concentrations in the FP and the TMA. Major results are as follows; (1) Nine major plumes with Cs-137 concentrations higher than 10 Bq m-3 were found, of which 5 and 4 plumes were transported to the FP and TMA, respectively. The radioactive materials from the FD1NPS was transported four times in the period to the northern part of Hamadori located in the east coast of the FP, and which was little known up to this study. (2) Two plumes transported to the TMA were newly founded, in addition to the well-known two major plumes on March 15 and 21, 2011. (3) The radiation dose rate measured at some monitoring posts in Nakadori located in the central area of the FP, did not increase even when

  1. Monitoring air quality in Southeast Alaska’s National Parks and Forests: Linking atmospheric pollutants with ecological effects

    Treesearch

    D. Schirokauer; L. Geiser; A. Bytnerowicz; M. Fenn; K. Dillman

    2014-01-01

    Air quality and air quality related values are important resources to the National Park Service (NPS) units and Wilderness areas in northern Southeast Alaska. Air quality monitoring was prioritized as a high-priority Vital Sign at the Southeast Alaska Network’s (SEAN) Inventory and Monitoring Program’s terrestrial scoping workshop (Derr and Fastie 2006). Air quality...

  2. Long Term Baseline Atmospheric Monitoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Mark A.

    1975-01-01

    Describes a program designed to measure the normal concentrations of certain chemical and physical parameters of the atmosphere so that quantitative estimates can be made of local, regional, and global pollution. (GS)

  3. Biological monitors of pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Root, M.

    1990-02-01

    This article discusses the use of biological monitors to assess the biological consequences of toxicants in the environment, such as bioavailability, synergism, and bioaccumulation through the food web. Among the organisms discussed are fly larvae, worms, bees, shellfish, fishes, birds (starlings, owls, hawks, songbirds) and mammals (rabbits, field mice, shrews).

  4. Monitoring chronic and acute PAH atmospheric pollution using transplants of the moss Hypnum cupressiforme and Robinia pseudacacia leaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capozzi, F.; Di Palma, A.; Adamo, P.; Spagnuolo, V.; Giordano, S.

    2017-02-01

    Few studies are focused on correlations between the concentrations of PAHs in mosses and other bioindicator plant species. This study was carried out to investigate the potential of the joint use of devitalized H. cupressiforme transplants and R. pseudoacacia leaves as cost effective biomonitors for the assessment of PAHs in the air. The test was performed in a land historically devoted to agriculture, where recurrent waste burnings randomly occur, especially in the season we chose for the investigation. The presence of 20 PAHs was assessed following EPA 3550 C 2007 and EPA 8270 D 2014 protocols. R. pseudoacacia was able to accumulate both LMW and HMW PAHs, while moss prevalently collected the latter. It is suggested that R. pseudoacacia combined chronic pyrogenic and petrogenic PAH inputs, while moss transplants reflected PAH depositions from recent pyrogenic events. Our approach revealed long and short-term pollution footprints, with R. pseudoacacia recording the chronic input of PAH compounds loaded along its vegetative growth, and moss bags reflecting acute pollution inputs occurred during the exposure duration.

  5. Atmospheric science: Warming boosts air pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Renhe

    2017-03-01

    Atmospheric conditions play an important role in driving severe air pollution events in Beijing, China. Now research finds that global warming will enhance weather conditions favouring such events, increasing the chances of severe winter-time haze in the future.

  6. NEW APPROACHES: Students `weigh' atmospheric pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caporaloni, Marina

    1998-07-01

    By using a portable fan and filters of various materials students have devised simple means of measuring the mass concentration of particles in a polluted urban atmosphere. Comparison of students' data with official data is instructive.

  7. Upper atmosphere pollution measurements (GASP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudey, R. A.; Holdeman, J. D.

    1975-01-01

    The environmental effects are discussed of engine effluents of future large fleets of aircraft operating in the stratosphere. Topics discussed include: atmospheric properties, aircraft engine effluents, upper atmospheric measurements, global air sampling, and data reduction and analysis

  8. Nonlinear dynamics of the atmospheric pollutants in Mexico City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz-Diosdado, Alejandro; Barrera-Ferrer, Amilcar; Angulo-Brown, Fernando

    2014-05-01

    The atmospheric pollution in the Metropolitan Zone of Mexico City (MZMC) is a serious problem with social, economical and political consequences, in virtue that it is the region which concentrates both the greatest country population and a great part of commercial and industrial activities. According to the World Health Organization, maximum permissible concentrations of atmospheric pollutants are exceeded frequently. In the MZMC, the environmental monitoring has been limited to criteria pollutants, named in this way due to when their levels are measured in the atmosphere, they indicate in a precise way the air quality. The Automatic Atmospheric Monitoring Network monitors and registers the values of pollutants concentration in air in the MZMC. Actually, it is integrated by approximately 35 automatic-equipped remote stations, which report an every-hour register. Local and global invariant quantities have been widely used to describe the fractal properties of diverse time series. In the study of certain time series, many times it is assumed that they are monofractal, which means that they can be described only with one fractal dimension. But this hypothesis is unrealistic because a lot of time series are heterogeneous and non stationary, so their scaling properties are not the same throughout time and therefore they may require more fractal dimensions for their description. Complexity of the atmospheric pollutants dynamics suggests us to analyze its time series of hourly concentration registers with the multifractal formalism. So, in this work, air concentration time series of MZMC criteria pollutants were studied with the proposed method. The chosen pollutants to perform this analysis are ozone, sulfur dioxide, carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide and PM10 (particles less than 10 micrometers). We found that pollutants air concentration time series are multifractal. When we calculate the degree of multifractality for each time series we know that while more

  9. Atmospheric pollutants and trace gases

    SciTech Connect

    Ranieri, A.; Schenone, G.; Lencioni, L.; Soldatini, G.F.

    1994-03-01

    Pumpkin [Cucurbita pepo (L.) cv. Ambassador] plants were grown under either nonfiltered or filtered ambient air in open-top field chambers (OTCs) near the urban area of Milan, Northern Italy. The effects of ambient air pollution on the enzymatic detoxfication system of the leaves, both in terms of activity and isoform pattern were investigated. The data on air quality showed that ozone was the main phytotoxic pollutant present in ambient air, reaching a 7 h mean of 63 nL L{sup -1} and a maximum hourly peak of 104 nL L{sup -1} The peroxidase and catalase activities increased fourfold and twofold, respectively in the nonfiltered air plants In comparison to the filtered air ones. The peroxidase patterns were very modified in the polluted plants. In contrast no significant changes were found in the activity and isoenzyme pattern of superoxide dismutase. The data reported here suggest that in field-grown pumpkin plants exposed to ambient levels of photooxidants, a stimulation of the peroxddase-catalase detoxification system takes place. 32 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Laser Remote Sensing of Atmospheric Pollutants.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-09-30

    of Cross-Correlation and Signal Averaging Appendix B: Laser Remote Sensing of Atmospheric Ammonia using a 33 C02 LIDAR System Ac-’,i- n For AVE...of CO2 differential-absorption LIDAR (DIAL) for the remote sensing of atmospheric pollutants was continued during FY84 and consisted of two...individual LIDAR signals and then taking the ratios of the averaged signals in order to deduce the differential-absorption value. This is in contrast to

  11. Atmospheric Pollution: Its Origins and Prevention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meetham, A. R.

    Although atmospheric pollution can be reduced or eliminated in many different ways, each way involves questions of economics, the time factor, availability of materials, priority over other urgent reforms, and individual and social psychology. To provide a basis for consideration of these questions, this book gives information not only about the…

  12. Atmospheric Pollution: Its Origins and Prevention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meetham, A. R.

    Although atmospheric pollution can be reduced or eliminated in many different ways, each way involves questions of economics, the time factor, availability of materials, priority over other urgent reforms, and individual and social psychology. To provide a basis for consideration of these questions, this book gives information not only about the…

  13. Clean Air Slots Amid Atmospheric Pollution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hobbs, Peter V.

    2002-01-01

    Layering in the Earth's atmosphere is most commonly seen where parts of the atmosphere resist the incursion of air parcels from above and below - for example, when there is an increase in temperature with height over a particular altitude range. Pollutants tend to accumulate underneath the resulting stable layers. which is why visibility often increases markedly above certain altitudes. Here we describe the occurrence of an opposite effect, in which stable layers generate a layer of remarkably clean air (we refer to these layers as clean-air 'slots') sandwiched between layers of polluted air. We have observed clean-air slots in various locations around the world, but they are particularly well defined and prevalent in southern Africa during the dry season August-September). This is because at this time in this region, stable layers are common and pollution from biomass burning is widespread.

  14. Clean Air Slots Amid Atmospheric Pollution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hobbs, Peter V.

    2002-01-01

    Layering in the Earth's atmosphere is most commonly seen where parts of the atmosphere resist the incursion of air parcels from above and below - for example, when there is an increase in temperature with height over a particular altitude range. Pollutants tend to accumulate underneath the resulting stable layers. which is why visibility often increases markedly above certain altitudes. Here we describe the occurrence of an opposite effect, in which stable layers generate a layer of remarkably clean air (we refer to these layers as clean-air 'slots') sandwiched between layers of polluted air. We have observed clean-air slots in various locations around the world, but they are particularly well defined and prevalent in southern Africa during the dry season August-September). This is because at this time in this region, stable layers are common and pollution from biomass burning is widespread.

  15. Some applications of remote sensing in atmospheric monitoring programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heller, A. N.; Bryson, J. C.; Vasuki, N. C.

    1972-01-01

    The applications of remote sensing in atmospheric monitoring programs are described. The organization, operations, and functions of an air quality monitoring network at New Castle County, Delaware is discussed. The data obtained by the air quality monitoring network ground stations and the equipment used to obtain atmospheric data are explained. It is concluded that correlation of the information obtained by the network will make it possible to anticipate air pollution problems in the Chesapeake Bay area before a crisis develops.

  16. Modeling persistent organic pollutant (POP) partitioning between tree bark and air and its application to spatial monitoring of atmospheric POPs in mainland China.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuli; Yang, Limin; Wang, Qiuquan

    2008-08-15

    A mathematical model describing the bark/air partitioning of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) was established taking into consideration the accumulation processes of POPs from air into bark and compound-, species-, and site-specific air-to-bark accumulation factors. It allows the assessment of the concentrations of atmospheric POPs based on those recorded in tree bark. The spatial distribution of atmospheric POPs including 18 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (Sigma18PAHs), 5 organic chlorinated pesticides (Sigma5OCPs), 10 polychlorinated biphenyls (Sigma10PCBs), and 17 brominated flame retardants (Sigma17BFRs) were investigated by analyzing 163 bark samples from 68 sites across mainland China. The atmospheric POPs were estimated to be 4.1-399 ng/m3 air, and 11.3-553, 4.5-130, and 0.9-624 pg/m3 air with geometric means of 71 ng/m3 air, and 99,26, and 25 pg/m3 airfor Sigma18PAHs, Sigma5OCPs, Sigma10PCBs, and Sigma17BFRs, respectively, based on those recorded in the tree barks of 5.1-1770, 0.05-12.9, 0.21-21.6, and 0.02-48.3 ng/g bark on dry weight basis, with geometric means of 295, 1.47, 3.12, and 2.79 ng/g bark. These results generally indicated that contamination by atmospheric POPs is more serious in eastern and mid China than that in western China.

  17. Tropospheric emissions: monitoring of pollution (TEMPO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chance, Kelly; Liu, Xiong; Suleiman, Raid M.; Flittner, David E.; Al-Saadi, Jassim; Janz, Scott J.

    2013-09-01

    TEMPO was selected in 2012 by NASA as the first Earth Venture Instrument, for launch circa 2018. It will measure atmospheric pollution for greater North America from space using ultraviolet and visible spectroscopy. TEMPO measures from Mexico City to the Canadian tar sands, and from the Atlantic to the Pacific, hourly and at high spatial resolution (~2 km N/S×4.5 km E/W at 36.5°N, 100°W). TEMPO provides a tropospheric measurement suite that includes the key elements of tropospheric air pollution chemistry. Measurements are from geostationary (GEO) orbit, to capture the inherent high variability in the diurnal cycle of emissions and chemistry. The small product spatial footprint resolves pollution sources at sub-urban scale. Together, this temporal and spatial resolution improves emission inventories, monitors population exposure, and enables effective emission-control strategies. TEMPO takes advantage of a commercial GEO host spacecraft to provide a modest cost mission that measures the spectra required to retrieve O3, NO2, SO2, H2CO, C2H2O2, H2O, aerosols, cloud parameters, and UVB radiation. TEMPO thus measures the major elements, directly or by proxy, in the tropospheric O3 chemistry cycle. Multi-spectral observations provide sensitivity to O3 in the lowermost troposphere, substantially reducing uncertainty in air quality predictions. TEMPO quantifies and tracks the evolution of aerosol loading. It provides near-real-time air quality products that will be made widely, publicly available. TEMPO will launch at a prime time to be the North American component of the global geostationary constellation of pollution monitoring together with European Sentinel-4 and Korean GEMS.

  18. Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution (TEMPO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoogman, P.; Liu, X.; Suleiman, R. M.; Pennington, W. F.; Flittner, D. E.; Al-Saadi, J. A.; Hilton, B. B.; Nicks, D. K.; Newchurch, M. J.; Carr, J. L.; hide

    2016-01-01

    TEMPO (Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution) was selected in 2012 by NASA as the first Earth Venture Instrument, for launch between 2018 and 2021. It will measure atmospheric pollution for greater North America from space using ultraviolet and visible spectroscopy. TEMPO observes from Mexico City, Cuba, and the Bahamas to the Canadian oil sands, and from the Atlantic to the Pacific, hourly and at high spatial resolution (approximately 2.1 kilometers N/S by 4.4 kilometers E/W at 36.5 degrees N, 100 degrees W). TEMPO provides a tropospheric measurement suite that includes the key elements of tropospheric air pollution chemistry, as well as contributing to carbon cycle knowledge. Measurements are made hourly from geostationary (GEO) orbit, to capture the high variability present in the diurnal cycle of emissions and chemistry that are unobservable from current low-Earth orbit (LEO) satellites that measure once per day. The small product spatial footprint resolves pollution sources at sub-urban scale. Together, this temporal and spatial resolution improves emission inventories, monitors population exposure, and enables effective emission-control strategies. TEMPO takes advantage of a commercial GEO host spacecraft to provide a modest cost mission that measures the spectra required to retrieve ozone (O3), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), sulfur dioxide (SO2), formaldehyde (H2CO), glyoxal (C2H2O2), bromine monoxide (BrO), IO (iodine monoxide),water vapor, aerosols, cloud parameters, ultraviolet radiation, and foliage properties. TEMPO thus measures the major elements, directly or by proxy, in the tropospheric O3 chemistry cycle. Multi-spectral observations provide sensitivity to O3 in the lowermost troposphere, substantially reducing uncertainty in air quality predictions. TEMPO quantifies and tracks the evolution of aerosol loading. It provides these near-real-time air quality products that will be made publicly available. TEMPO will launch at a prime time to be the

  19. Terrestrial mosses as biomonitors of atmospheric POPs pollution: a review.

    PubMed

    Harmens, H; Foan, L; Simon, V; Mills, G

    2013-02-01

    Worldwide there is concern about the continuing release of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) into the environment. In this study we review the application of mosses as biomonitors of atmospheric deposition of POPs. Examples in the literature show that mosses are suitable organisms to monitor spatial patterns and temporal trends of atmospheric concentrations or deposition of POPs. These examples include polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorobiphenyls (PCBs), dioxins and furans (PCDD/Fs), and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). The majority of studies report on PAHs concentrations in mosses and relative few studies have been conducted on other POPs. So far, many studies have focused on spatial patterns around pollution sources or the concentration in mosses in remote areas such as the polar regions, as an indication of long-range transport of POPs. Very few studies have determined temporal trends or have directly related the concentrations in mosses with measured atmospheric concentrations and/or deposition fluxes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Space station atmospheric monitoring systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buoni, C.; Coutant, R.; Barnes, R.; Slivon, L.

    A technology assessment study on atmospheric monitoring systems was performed by Battelle Columbus Division for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's John F. Kennedy Space Center under Contract No. NAS10-11033. In this assessment, the objective was to identify, analyze, and recommend systems to sample and measure Space Station atmospheric contaminants and identify where additional research and technology advancements were required. To achieve this objective, it was necessary to define atmospheric monitoring requirements and to assess the state of the art and advanced technology and systems for technical and operational compatibility with monitoring goals. Three technical tasks were defined to support these needs: Definition of Monitoring Requirements, Assessment of Sampling and Analytical Technology, and Technology Screening and Recommendations. Based on the analysis, the principal candidates recommended for development at the Space Station's initial operational capability were: (1) long-path Fourier transform infrared for rapid detection of high-risk contamination incidences, and (2) gas chromatography/mass spectrometry utilizing mass selective detection (or ion-trap) technologies for detailed monitoring of extended crew exposure to low level (ppbv) contamination. The development of a gas chromatography/mass spectrometry/matrix isolation-Fourier transform infrared system was recommended as part of the long range program of upgrading Space Station trace-contaminant monitoring needs.

  1. Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chance, Kelly; Liu, Xiong; Suleiman, Raid M.; Flittner, David; Al-Saadi, Jay; Janz, Scott

    2015-01-01

    TEMPO is now well into its implementation phase, having passed both its Key Decision Point C and the Critical Design Review (CDR) for the instrument. The CDR for the ground systems will occur in March 2016 and the CDR for the Mission component at a later date, after the host spacecraft has been selected. TEMPO is on schedule to measure atmospheric pollution for greater North America from space using ultraviolet and visible spectroscopy. TEMPO measures from Mexico City to the Canadian oil sands, and from the Atlantic to the Pacific, hourly and at high spatial resolution. TEMPO provides a tropospheric measurement suite that includes the key elements of tropospheric air pollution chemistry. Measurements are from geostationary (GEO) orbit, to capture the inherent high variability in the diurnal cycle of emissions and chemistry. The small product spatial footprint resolves pollution sources at sub-urban scale. Together, this temporal and spatial resolution improves emission inventories, monitors population exposure, and enables effective emission-control strategies. TEMPO takes advantage of a GEO host spacecraft to provide a modest cost mission that measures the spectra required to retrieve O3, NO2, SO2, H2CO, C2H2O2, H2O, aerosols, cloud parameters, and UVB radiation. TEMPO thus measures the major elements, directly or by proxy, in the tropospheric O3 chemistry cycle. Multi-spectral observations provide sensitivity to O3 in the lowermost troposphere, substantially reducing uncertainty in air quality predictions by 50 percent. TEMPO quantifies and tracks the evolution of aerosol loading. It provides near-real-time air quality products that will be made widely, publicly available. TEMPO provides much of the atmospheric measurement capability recommended for GEO-CAPE in the 2007 National Research Council Decadal Survey, Earth Science and Applications from Space: National Imperatives for the Next Decade and Beyond. Instruments from Europe (Sentinel 4) and Asia (GEMS) will

  2. Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution (TEMPO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chance, Kelly; Liu, Xiong; Suleiman, Raid M.; Flittner, David E.; Al-Saadi, Jassim; Janz, Scott J.

    2014-06-01

    TEMPO, selected by NASA as the first Earth Venture Instrument, will measure atmospheric pollution for greater North America from space using ultraviolet and visible spectroscopy. TEMPO measures from Mexico City to the Canadian oil sands, and from the Atlantic to the Pacific, hourly and at high spatial resolution. TEMPO provides a tropospheric measurement suite that includes the key elements of tropospheric air pollution chemistry. Measurements are from geostationary (GEO) orbit, to capture the inherent high variability in the diurnal cycle of emissions and chemistry. The small product spatial footprint resolves pollution sources at sub-urban scale. Together, this temporal and spatial resolution improves emission inventories, monitors population exposure, and enables effective emission-control strategies. TEMPO takes advantage of a GEO host spacecraft to provide a modest-cost mission that measures the spectra required to retrieve O3, NO2, SO2, H2CO, C2H2O2, H2O, aerosols, cloud parameters, and UVB radiation. TEMPO thus measures the major elements, directly or by proxy, in the tropospheric O3 chemistry cycle. Multi-spectral observations provide sensitivity to O3 in the lowermost troposphere, reducing uncertainty in air quality predictions by 50 %. TEMPO quantifies and tracks the evolution of aerosol loading. It provides near-real-time air quality products that will be made widely, publicly available. TEMPO makes the first tropospheric trace gas measurements from GEO, by building on the heritage of five spectrometers flown in low-earth-orbit (LEO). These LEO instruments measure the needed spectra, although at coarse spatial and temporal resolutions, to the precisions required for TEMPO and use retrieval algorithms developed for them by TEMPO Science Team members and currently running in operational environments. This makes TEMPO an innovative use of a well-proven technique, able to produce a revolutionary data set. TEMPO provides much of the atmospheric measurement

  3. Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution (TEMPO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chance, K.; Liu, X.; Suleiman, R. M.; Flittner, D. E.; Al-Saadi, J. A.; Janz, S. J.; Tempo Science Team

    2013-05-01

    TEMPO has been selected by NASA as the first Earth Venture Instrument. It will measure atmospheric pollution for greater North America from space using ultraviolet/visible spectroscopy. TEMPO measures from Mexico City to the Canadian tar/oil sands, and from the Atlantic to the Pacific, hourly and at high spatial resolution (Mexico City is measured at 1.6 km N/S by 4.5 km E/W). TEMPO provides a tropospheric measurement suite that includes the key elements of tropospheric air pollution chemistry. Measurements are from geostationary (GEO) orbit, to capture the inherent high variability in the diurnal cycle of emissions and chemistry. The small product spatial footprint resolves pollution sources at sub-urban scale. Together, this temporal and spatial resolution improves emission inventories, monitors population exposure, and enables effective emission-control strategies. TEMPO takes advantage of a GEO host spacecraft to provide a modest cost mission that measures the spectra required to retrieve O3, NO2, SO2, H2CO, C2H2O2, H2O, aerosols, cloud parameters, and UVB radiation. TEMPO thus measures the major elements, directly or by proxy, in the tropospheric O3 chemistry cycle. Multi-spectral observations provide sensitivity to O3 in the lowermost troposphere, reducing uncertainty in air quality predictions by 50%. TEMPO quantifies and tracks the evolution of aerosol loading. It provides near-real-time air quality products that will be made widely, publicly available. TEMPO makes the first tropospheric trace gas measurements from GEO, by building on the heritage of five spectrometers flown in low-earth-orbit (LEO). These LEO instruments measure the needed spectra, although at coarse spatial and temporal resolutions, to the precisions required for TEMPO and use retrieval algorithms developed for them by TEMPO Science Team members and currently running in operational environments. This makes TEMPO an innovative use of a well proven technique, able to produce a revolutionary

  4. Atmospheric turbulence monitoring at DLR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, Florian

    2004-11-01

    Research activities at the German Aerospace Center (DLR) concerning optical free-space communications have focussed on coherent communication systems for inter-satellite link (ISL) applications for a long time. Under DLR contract Tesat Spacecom has developed the DLR-LCT (laser communications terminal) which relies on coherent technology. This terminal will be verified in space as secondary payload onboard the earth observation satellite TerraSAR-X, to be launched in 2006. In a first step, downlink experiments will be carried out. The DLR Institute of Communications and Navigation is involved in this ambitious project by assessing the feasibility of the downlink experiment through atmospheric turbulence and by conducting channel measurements. An initial feasibility study shall theoretically investigate the influence of atmospheric turbulence on coherent optical transmission and assess the success probabilities of the particular experiment with regard to the specific ground station conditions. Since theory is always based on arbitrary assumptions on the composition and structure of the atmosphere, measurements at the specific ground station shall be carried out. Measurement results shall enable a refinement of disturbance models in order to predict the condition during the downlink experiments. Relevant atmospheric parameters, such as scintillations, phase-front distortions, atmospheric seeing, angle-of-arrival fluctuations, attenuation, Cn2- and wind profiles will have to be recorded. To carry out these measurements, DLR will develop an "Atmospheric Turbulence Monitor" (ATM). The ATM mainly consists of a 16-inch telescope and a number of instruments for various measurements. These instruments are based on astronomical devices for use with stars, however have to be modified to be suited for measurements with close objects such as LEO or GEO satellites. The ATM will as well comprise a tracking system, that allows for measurements with LEO satellites such as Terra

  5. Radar monitoring of oil pollution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guinard, N. W.

    1970-01-01

    Radar is currently used for detecting and monitoring oil slicks on the sea surface. The four-frequency radar system is used to acquire synthetic aperature imagery of the sea surface on which the oil slicks appear as a nonreflecting area on the surface surrounded by the usual sea return. The value of this technique was demonstrated, when the four-frequency radar system was used to image the oil spill of tanker which has wrecked. Imagery was acquired on both linear polarization (horizontal, vertical) for frequencies of 428, 1228, and 8910 megahertz. Vertical returns strongly indicated the presence of oil while horizontal returns failed to detect the slicks. Such a result is characteristic of the return from the sea and cannot presently be interpreted as characteristics of oil spills. Because an airborne imaging radar is capable of providing a wide-swath coverage under almost all weather conditions, it offers promise in the development of a pollution-monitoring system that can provide a coastal watch for oil slicks.

  6. Pollution Monitoring: An Engineering Challenge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snodgrass, J. M.

    1971-01-01

    One purpose in presenting this material is to bring to the attention of engineers background material which they would not normally encounter in the course of routine development work. An excellent and timely reference is as follows: Seminar on Methods of Detection, Measurement and Monitoring of Pollutants in the Marine Environment. The international seminar was organized by FAO with the support of UNESCO, IAEA, SCOR and WMO, and was held in Rome, Italy, 4-10 December 1970. The final report, the title of which was given, is a very thoroughgoing document and certainly a must reference for anyone seriously considering the development of sensors for pollution measurement. Perhaps it would be appropriate to present some exact quotations selected from the referenced document. The quotations follow: 1) "The pressures to develop sensitive and reliable methods come about when those responsible for the management of our environment need an objective evaluation of existing or potential perils." 2) "Nearly all of the Panels concerned with the contaminants identified specific examples of man's waste products which may be leaking to the environment in substantial quantities and for which as yet there are no analytical techniques available ". 3) "Very few analyses for organochlorine pesticides appear to have been carried out on sea water and the panel considered that the present methodology was not capable of detecting, on a routine basis, the quantities of these compounds in open sea waters." and 4) "This corresponds essentially to the ratio of useful data produced to the labour expended, since instrumentation costs in the long run become negligible."

  7. Pollution Monitoring: An Engineering Challenge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snodgrass, J. M.

    1971-01-01

    One purpose in presenting this material is to bring to the attention of engineers background material which they would not normally encounter in the course of routine development work. An excellent and timely reference is as follows: Seminar on Methods of Detection, Measurement and Monitoring of Pollutants in the Marine Environment. The international seminar was organized by FAO with the support of UNESCO, IAEA, SCOR and WMO, and was held in Rome, Italy, 4-10 December 1970. The final report, the title of which was given, is a very thoroughgoing document and certainly a must reference for anyone seriously considering the development of sensors for pollution measurement. Perhaps it would be appropriate to present some exact quotations selected from the referenced document. The quotations follow: 1) "The pressures to develop sensitive and reliable methods come about when those responsible for the management of our environment need an objective evaluation of existing or potential perils." 2) "Nearly all of the Panels concerned with the contaminants identified specific examples of man's waste products which may be leaking to the environment in substantial quantities and for which as yet there are no analytical techniques available ". 3) "Very few analyses for organochlorine pesticides appear to have been carried out on sea water and the panel considered that the present methodology was not capable of detecting, on a routine basis, the quantities of these compounds in open sea waters." and 4) "This corresponds essentially to the ratio of useful data produced to the labour expended, since instrumentation costs in the long run become negligible."

  8. Infrared Laser System for Extended Area Monitoring of Air Pollution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snowman, L. R.; Gillmeister, R. J.

    1971-01-01

    An atmospheric pollution monitoring system using a spectrally scanning laser has been developed by the General Electric Company. This paper will report on an evaluation of a breadboard model, and will discuss applications of the concept to various ambient air monitoring situations. The system is adaptable to other tunable lasers. Operating in the middle infrared region, the system uses retroreflectors to measure average concentrations over long paths at low, safe power levels. The concept shows promise of meeting operational needs in ambient air monitoring and providing new data for atmospheric research.

  9. Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution (TEMPO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chance, K.; Liu, X.; Suleiman, R. M.; Flittner, D. E.; Janz, S. J.

    2012-12-01

    TEMPO is a proposed concept to measure pollution for greater North America using ultraviolet/visible spectroscopy. TEMPO measures from Mexico City to the Canadian tar/oil sands, and from the Atlantic to the Pacific, hourly and at high spatial resolution (9 km2). TEMPO provides a tropospheric measurement suite that includes the key elements of tropospheric air pollution chemistry. Measurements are from geostationary (GEO) orbit, to capture the inherent high variability in the diurnal cycle of emissions and chemistry. The small product spatial footprint resolves pollution sources at sub-urban scale. Together, this temporal and spatial resolution improves emission inventories, monitors population exposure, and enables effective emission-control strategies. TEMPO takes advantage of a GEO host spacecraft to provide a modest cost mission that measures the spectra required to retrieve O3, NO2, SO2, H2CO, C2H2O2, H2O, aerosols, cloud parameters, and UVB radiation. TEMPO thus measures the major elements, directly or by proxy, in the tropospheric O3 chemistry cycle. Multi-spectral observations provide sensitivity to O3 in the lowermost troposphere, reducing uncertainty in air quality predictions by 50%. TEMPO quantifies and tracks the evolution of aerosol loading. It provides near-real-time air quality products that will be made widely, publicly available. TEMPO makes the first tropospheric trace gas measurements from GEO, by building on the heritage of five spectrometers flown in low-earth-orbit (LEO). These LEO instruments measure the needed spectra, although at coarse spatial and temporal resolutions, to the precisions required for TEMPO and use retrieval algorithms developed for them by TEMPO Science Team members and currently running in operational environments. This makes TEMPO an innovative use of a well proven technique, able to produce a revolutionary data set. TEMPO provides much of the atmospheric measurement capability recommended for GEO-CAPE in the 2007

  10. Association between atmospheric pollutants and hospital admissions in Lisbon.

    PubMed

    Cruz, A M J; Sarmento, S; Almeida, S M; Silva, A V; Alves, C; Freitas, M C; Wolterbeek, H

    2015-04-01

    Ambient air pollution is recognised as one of the potential environmental risk factors causing health hazards to the exposed population, demonstrated in numerous previous studies. Several longitudinal, ecological and epidemiological studies have shown associations between outdoor levels of outdoor atmospheric pollutants and adverse health effects, especially associated with respiratory and cardiovascular hospital admissions. The aim of this work is to assess the influence of atmospheric pollutants over the hospital admissions in Lisbon, by Ordinary Least Squares Linear Regression. The pollutants (CO, NO, NO2, SO2, O3, PM10 and PM2.5) were obtained from 13 monitoring stations of the Portuguese Environmental Agency, which provide hourly observations. Hospital admission data were collected from the Central Administration of the Health System and were compiled by age: <15, 15-64, >64 years old. The study period was 2006-2008. Results showed significant positive associations between the following: (1) the pollutants CO, NO, NO2, SO2, PM10 and PM2.5 and circulatory diseases for ages between 15 and 64 years (0.5% hospital admissions (HA) increase with 10 μg m(-3) NO increase) and above 64 years (1.0% stroke admission increase with 10 μg m(-3) NO2 increase); (2) the pollutants CO, NO, NO2, SO2, PM10 and PM2.5 and respiratory diseases for ages below 15 years (up to 1.9% HA increase with 10 μg m(-3) pollutant increase); and (3) the pollutants NO, NO2 and SO2 and respiratory diseases for ages above 64 years (1.3% HA increase with 10 μg m(-3) CO increase).

  11. Fundamental spectroscopic studies of some atmospheric pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Findley, G.L.; McGlynn, S.P.

    1980-01-01

    Molecular electronic transitions that lie in the vuv (vacuum ultraviolet) spectral region initiate many harmful photochemical modifications in the upper atmosphere. Consequently, investigations have focused on molecules that are primary atmospheric pollutants, but which are simple enough structurally to yield detailed photophysical information. Terminal electronic states for vuv transitions can be either valence or Rydberg and, at low enough energies, the distinction between the two becomes fuzzy. A major thrust of this program has been the classification and characterization of Rydberg transitions in an attempt to gain insight into Rydberg/valence state mixing Rydberg studies. It is concluded that in order to understand the nature of photochemical reactions of molecules in the upper atmosphere, it is necessary to understand the structure and function of high-energy molecular electronic states. It is also necessary to understand the ways in which these states interact and, thereby, facilitate energy transfer. The study of molecular Rydberg states provides information crucial to such an understanding.

  12. Comprehensive Retrieval of Spatio-temporal Variations in Atmospheric Radionuclides just after the Fukushima Accident by Analyzing Filter-tapes of Operational Air Pollution Monitoring Stations in Eastern Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuruta, H.; Oura, Y.; Ebihara, M.; Ohara, T.; Nakajima, T.

    2015-12-01

    After the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (FD1NPS) accident on March 11, 2011, many datasets have been available of deposition density of radionuclides in soils in eastern Japan. By contrast, no time-series data of atmospheric radionuclides has been measured in the Fukushima prefecture (FP), although very limited data is available in the Tokyo metropolitan area (TMA) located more than 170 km southwest of the FD1NPS. As a result, atmospheric transport models simulating the atmospheric concentrations and surface deposition of radionuclides have large uncertainty, as well as the estimate of release rate of source terms and of internal exposure from inhalation. One year after the accident, we collected the used filter-tapes installed in Suspended Particulate Matter (SPM) monitors with beta-ray attenuation method operated by local governments in the air pollution monitoring network of eastern Japan. By measuring radionuclides in SPM on the filter-tapes, we retrieved hourly atmospheric Cs-134 and Cs-137 concentrations during March 12-23, 2011, when atmospheric, aquatic, and terrestrial environments were seriously suffered in most of eastern Japan. Until now, we measured hourly radiocesium at around 100 SPM sites in the southern Tohoku region (ST) including the FP and in the TMA. By analysing the dataset, nine major plumes with Cs-137 concentrations higher than 10 Bq m-3 were found, and some plumes were newly found in this study. A local area of relatively high Cs-137 deposition density in the TMA by precipitation on the morning of March 21, was consistent with an area where the time-integrated atmospheric Cs-137 concentrations were also high due to the transport of a plume on the morning of March 21. In the FP, however, the correlation was not so clear. High radionuclides trapped in a cloud layer might be transported to the ST with relatively high Cs-137 deposition densities, because the atmospheric Cs-137 concentrations were under the detection limit.

  13. Tropospheric emissions: Monitoring of pollution (TEMPO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoogman, P.; Liu, X.; Suleiman, R. M.; Pennington, W. F.; Flittner, D. E.; Al-Saadi, J. A.; Hilton, B. B.; Nicks, D. K.; Newchurch, M. J.; Carr, J. L.; Janz, S. J.; Andraschko, M. R.; Arola, A.; Baker, B. D.; Canova, B. P.; Chan Miller, C.; Cohen, R. C.; Davis, J. E.; Dussault, M. E.; Edwards, D. P.; Fishman, J.; Ghulam, A.; González Abad, G.; Grutter, M.; Herman, J. R.; Houck, J.; Jacob, D. J.; Joiner, J.; Kerridge, B. J.; Kim, J.; Krotkov, N. A.; Lamsal, L.; Li, C.; Lindfors, A.; Martin, R. V.; McElroy, C. T.; McLinden, C.; Natraj, V.; Neil, D. O.; Nowlan, C. R.; O`Sullivan, E. J.; Palmer, P. I.; Pierce, R. B.; Pippin, M. R.; Saiz-Lopez, A.; Spurr, R. J. D.; Szykman, J. J.; Torres, O.; Veefkind, J. P.; Veihelmann, B.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Chance, K.

    2017-01-01

    TEMPO was selected in 2012 by NASA as the first Earth Venture Instrument, for launch between 2018 and 2021. It will measure atmospheric pollution for greater North America from space using ultraviolet and visible spectroscopy. TEMPO observes from Mexico City, Cuba, and the Bahamas to the Canadian oil sands, and from the Atlantic to the Pacific, hourly and at high spatial resolution ( 2.1 km N/S×4.4 km E/W at 36.5°N, 100°W). TEMPO provides a tropospheric measurement suite that includes the key elements of tropospheric air pollution chemistry, as well as contributing to carbon cycle knowledge. Measurements are made hourly from geostationary (GEO) orbit, to capture the high variability present in the diurnal cycle of emissions and chemistry that are unobservable from current low-Earth orbit (LEO) satellites that measure once per day. The small product spatial footprint resolves pollution sources at sub-urban scale. Together, this temporal and spatial resolution improves emission inventories, monitors population exposure, and enables effective emission-control strategies. TEMPO takes advantage of a commercial GEO host spacecraft to provide a modest cost mission that measures the spectra required to retrieve ozone (O3), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), sulfur dioxide (SO2), formaldehyde (H2CO), glyoxal (C2H2O2), bromine monoxide (BrO), IO (iodine monoxide), water vapor, aerosols, cloud parameters, ultraviolet radiation, and foliage properties. TEMPO thus measures the major elements, directly or by proxy, in the tropospheric O3 chemistry cycle. Multi-spectral observations provide sensitivity to O3 in the lowermost troposphere, substantially reducing uncertainty in air quality predictions. TEMPO quantifies and tracks the evolution of aerosol loading. It provides these near-real-time air quality products that will be made publicly available. TEMPO will launch at a prime time to be the North American component of the global geostationary constellation of pollution monitoring

  14. Monitoring Atmospheric Transmission with FLAME

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmer, Peter C.; McGraw, J. T.; Zirzow, D. C.; Koppa, M.; Buttler-Pena, K.

    2014-01-01

    Calibration of ground-based observations in the optical and near-infrared requires precise and accurate understanding of atmospheric transmission, at least as precise and accurate as that required for the spectral energy distributions of science targets. Traditionally this has used the Langley extrapolation method, observing targets and calibrators over a range of airmass and extrapolating to zero airmass by assuming a plane-parallel homogeneous atmosphere. The technique we present uses direct measurements of the atmosphere to derive the transmission along the line of sight to science targets at a few well-chosen wavelengths. The Facility Lidar Atmospheric Monitor of Extinction (FLAME) is a 0.5m diameter three Nd:YAG wavelength (355nm, 532nm & 1064nm) elastic backscatter lidar system. Laser pulses are transmitted into the atmosphere in the direction of the science target. Photons scattered back toward the receiver by molecules, aerosols and clouds are collected and time-gated so that the backscatter intensity is measured as a function of range to the scattering volume. The system is housed in a mobile calibration lab, which also contains auxiliary instrumentation to provide a NIST traceable calibration of the transmitted laser power and receiver efficiency. FLAME was designed to create a million photons per minute signal from the middle stratosphere, where the atmosphere is relatively calm and dominated by molecules of the well-mixed atmosphere (O2 & N2). Routine radiosonde measurements of the density at these altitudes constrain the scattering efficiency in this region and, combined with calibration of the transmitter and receiver, the only remaining unknown quantity is the two-way transmission to the stratosphere. These measurements can inform atmospheric transmission models to better understand the complex and ever-changing observatory radiative transfer environment. FLAME is currently under active development and we present some of our ongoing measurements.

  15. Comprehensive Retrieval of Spatio-temporal Variations in Atmospheric Radionuclides just after the Fukushima Accident by Analyzing Filter-tapes of Operational Air Pollution Monitoring Stations in Eastern Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuruta, Haruo; Oura, Yasuji; Ebihara, Mitsuru; Ohara, Toshimasa; Moriguchi, Yuichi; Nakajima, Teruyuki

    2016-04-01

    After the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (FD1NPS) accident on March 11, 2011, many datasets have been available of deposition density of radionuclides in soils in eastern Japan. By contrast, no time-series data of atmospheric radionuclides has been measured in the Fukushima prefecture (FP), although very limited data is available in the Tokyo metropolitan area (TMA) located more than 170 km southwest of the FD1NPS. As a result, atmospheric transport models simulating the atmospheric concentrations and surface deposition of radionuclides have large uncertainty, as well as the estimate of release rate of source terms and of internal exposure from inhalation. One year after the accident, we collected the used filter-tapes installed in Suspended Particulate Matter (SPM) monitors with beta-ray attenuation method operated by local governments in the air pollution monitoring network of eastern Japan. The SPM monitoring stations are mostly located in the urban and/or industrial area to measure the hourly mass concentration of SPM less than 10 μm in diameter for health effect due to atmospheric aerosols. By measuring radionuclides in SPM on the filter-tapes, we retrieved hourly atmospheric Cs-134 and Cs-137 concentrations during March 12-23, 2011, when atmospheric, aquatic, and terrestrial environments were seriously suffered in most of eastern Japan. Until now, we measured hourly radiocesium at around 100 SPM sites in the southern Tohoku region (ST) including the FP and in the TMA. By analysing the dataset, about 10 plumes/polluted air masses with Cs-137 concentrations higher than 10 Bq m-3 were found, and some plumes were newly detected in this study. And the spatio-temporal distributions of atmospheric Cs-137 were clearly shown for all the plumes. The east coast area of the FP where the FD1NPS was located in the centre was attacked several times by the plumes, and suffered the highest time-integrated Cs-137 concentration during the period among the ST and TMA

  16. Metallic corrosion in the polluted urban atmosphere of Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Wang, Da-Wei; Guo, Hai; Ling, Zhen-Hao; Cheung, Kalam

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the relationship between air pollutants, particularly acidic particles, and metallic material corrosion. An atmospheric corrosion test was carried out in spring-summer 2012 at a polluted urban site, i.e., Tung Chung in western Hong Kong. Nine types of metallic materials, namely iron, Q235 steel, 20# steel, 16Mn steel, copper, bronze, brass, aluminum, and aluminum alloy, were selected as specimens for corrosion tests. Ten sets of the nine materials were all exposed to ambient air, and then each set was collected individually after exposure to ambient air for consecutive 6, 13, 20, 27, 35, 42, 49, 56, 63, and 70 days, respectively. After the removal of the corrosion products on the surface of the exposed specimens, the corrosion rate of each material was determined. The surface structure of materials was observed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) before and after the corrosion tests. Environmental factors including temperature, relative humidity, concentrations of gaseous pollutants, i.e., sulfur dioxide (SO₂), nitrogen dioxide (NO₂), carbon monoxide (CO), ozone (O₃), and particulate-phase pollutants, i.e., PM₂.₅ (FSP) and PM₁₀ (RSP), were monitored. Correlation analysis between environmental factors and corrosion rate of materials indicated that iron and carbon steel were damaged by both gaseous pollutants (SO₂ and NO₂) and particles. Copper and copper alloys were mainly corroded by gaseous pollutants (SO₂ and O₃), while corrosion of aluminum and aluminum alloy was mainly attributed to NO₂ and particles.

  17. Linking Atmospheric Pollution to Cryospheric Changes over the Third Pole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, S.; Zhang, Q.; Ji, Z.; Li, Y.; Chen, J.; Zhang, G.; Li, C.; Cong, Z.; Chen, P.; Guo, J.; Huang, J.; Tripathee, L.; Rupakheti, D.; Li, X.; Zhang, Y.; Panday, A. K.; Rupakheti, M.

    2016-12-01

    Known as "the Third Pole" (TP), the Tibetan Plateau and surrounding mountains hold the largest aggregate of glaciers outside the pole regions. Recent monitoring and projection indicated an accelerated glacier decline and increasing glacier runoff. The long-range transport of South Asian atmospheric pollutants, including light absorbing impurities (LAIs) such as black carbon (BC) and mineral dust (MD), can absorb the solar radiation in the atmosphere and reduce albedo after being deposited onto the cryosphere, thereby promoting glacier and snow melt. A coordinated atmospheric pollution monitoring network has been launched covering the TP with emphasis on trans-Himalayan transects since 2013. TSP were collected for 24h at an interval of 3-6 days. BC/OC, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and heavy metals were measured. Results reveal a consistent decrease in almost all analyzed parameters from south to north across the Himalayas. Geochemical signatures of carbonaceous aerosols indicate dominant sources of biomass burning and vehicle exhaust, in line with results of PAHs. Integrated analysis of satellite images and air mass trajectories suggest that the trans-boundary air pollution occurred episodically and concentrated in pre-monsoon seasons via upper air circulation, through-valley wind, and local convection. Simulation results showed that carbonaceous aerosols produced positive/negative shortwave radiative forcing in the atmosphere/ground surface. Aerosols increased surface air temperatures by 0.1-0.5° over the TP and decreased temperatures in South Asia during the monsoon season. Surface snow/ice samples were collected from benchmark glaciers to estimate the impacts of LAIs on glacier melt with model assistance. BC (37%) and MD (32%) contribute to the summer melting of Laohugou Glacier in the northern TP. MD (38%) contributed more glacier melt than BC (11%) on Zhadang Glacier in the southern TP. In the southeastern TP, BC and MD contribute to 30% of the

  18. The changing paradigm of air pollution monitoring.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Emily G; Watkins, Timothy H; Solomon, Paul A; Thoma, Eben D; Williams, Ronald W; Hagler, Gayle S W; Shelow, David; Hindin, David A; Kilaru, Vasu J; Preuss, Peter W

    2013-10-15

    The air pollution monitoring paradigm is rapidly changing due to recent advances in (1) the development of portable, lower-cost air pollution sensors reporting data in near-real time at a high-time resolution, (2) increased computational and visualization capabilities, and (3) wireless communication/infrastructure. It is possible that these advances can support traditional air quality monitoring by supplementing ambient air monitoring and enhancing compliance monitoring. Sensors are beginning to provide individuals and communities the tools needed to understand their environmental exposures with these data individual and community-based strategies can be developed to reduce pollution exposure as well as understand linkages to health indicators. Each of these areas as well as corresponding challenges (e.g., quality of data) and potential opportunities associated with development and implementation of air pollution sensors are discussed.

  19. Water Pollution: Monitoring the Source.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkes, James W.

    1980-01-01

    Described is an advanced biology class project involving study of the effects of organic pollution on an aquatic ecosystem from an sewage treatment plant overflow to evaluate the chemical quality and biological activity of the river water. (DS)

  20. Water Pollution: Monitoring the Source.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkes, James W.

    1980-01-01

    Described is an advanced biology class project involving study of the effects of organic pollution on an aquatic ecosystem from an sewage treatment plant overflow to evaluate the chemical quality and biological activity of the river water. (DS)

  1. Short-term impact of atmospheric pollution on fecundability.

    PubMed

    Slama, Rémy; Bottagisi, Sébastien; Solansky, Ivo; Lepeule, Johanna; Giorgis-Allemand, Lise; Sram, Radim

    2013-11-01

    Epidemiologic studies have reported associations between air pollution levels and semen characteristics, which might in turn affect a couple's ability to achieve a live birth. Our aim was to characterize short-term effects of atmospheric pollutants on fecundability (the month-specific probability of pregnancy among noncontracepting couples). For a cohort of births between 1994 and 1999 in Teplice (Czech Republic), we averaged fine particulate matter (PM2.5), carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, ozone, nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and sulfur dioxide levels estimated from a central measurement site over the 60-day period before the end of the first month of unprotected intercourse. We estimated changes in the probability of occurrence of a pregnancy during the first month of unprotected intercourse associated with exposure, using binomial regression and adjusting for maternal behaviors and time trends. Among the 1,916 recruited couples, 486 (25%) conceived during the first month of unprotected intercourse. Each increase of 10 µg/m in PM2.5 levels was associated with an adjusted decrease in fecundability of 22% (95% confidence interval = 6%-35%). NO2 levels were also associated with decreased fecundability. There was no evidence of adverse effects with the other pollutants considered. Biases related to pregnancy planning or temporal trends in air pollution were unlikely to explain the observed associations. In this polluted area, we highlighted short-term decreases in a couple's ability to conceive in association with PM2.5 and NO2 levels assessed in a central monitoring station.

  2. Magnetic quantification of urban pollution sources in atmospheric particulate matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spassov, S.; Egli, R.; Heller, F.; Nourgaliev, D. K.; Hannam, J.

    2004-11-01

    A new method is presented for fast quantification of urban pollution sources in atmospheric particulate matter (PM). The remanent magnetization of PM samples collected in Switzerland at sites with different exposures to pollution sources is analysed. The coercivity distribution of each sample is calculated from detailed demagnetization curves of anhysteretic remanent magnetization (ARM) and is modelled using a linear combination of appropriate functions which represent the contribution of different sources of magnetic minerals to the total magnetization. Two magnetic components, C1 and C2, are identified in all samples. The low-coercivity component C1 predominates in less polluted sites, whereas the concentration of the higher-coercivity component C2 is large in urban areas. The same sites were monitored independently by Hüglin using detailed chemical analysis and a quantitative source attribution of the PM. His results are compared with the magnetic component analysis. The absolute and relative magnetic contributions of component C2 correlate very well with absolute and relative mass contributions of exhaust emissions, respectively. Traffic is the most important PM pollution source in Switzerland: it includes exhaust emissions and abrasion products released by vehicle brakes. Component C2 and traffic-related PM sources correlate well, which is encouraging for the implementation of non-destructive magnetic methods as an economic alternative to chemical analysis when mapping urban dust pollution.

  3. Meeting Report: Atmospheric Pollution and Human Reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Slama, Rémy; Darrow, Lyndsey; Parker, Jennifer; Woodruff, Tracey J.; Strickland, Matthew; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark; Glinianaia, Svetlana; Hoggatt, Katherine J.; Kannan, Srimathi; Hurley, Fintan; Kalinka, Jaroslaw; Šrám, Radim; Brauer, Michael; Wilhelm, Michelle; Heinrich, Joachim; Ritz, Beate

    2008-01-01

    Background There is a growing body of epidemiologic literature reporting associations between atmospheric pollutants and reproductive outcomes, particularly birth weight and gestational duration. Objectives The objectives of our international workshop were to discuss the current evidence, to identify the strengths and weaknesses of published epidemiologic studies, and to suggest future directions for research. Discussion Participants identified promising exposure assessment tools, including exposure models with fine spatial and temporal resolution that take into account time–activity patterns. More knowledge on factors correlated with exposure to air pollution, such as other environmental pollutants with similar temporal variations, and assessment of nutritional factors possibly influencing birth outcomes would help evaluate importance of residual confounding. Participants proposed a list of points to report in future publications on this topic to facilitate research syntheses. Nested case–control studies analyzed using two-phase statistical techniques and development of cohorts with extensive information on pregnancy behaviors and biological samples are promising study designs. Issues related to the identification of critical exposure windows and potential biological mechanisms through which air pollutants may lead to intrauterine growth restriction and premature birth were reviewed. Conclusions To make progress, this research field needs input from toxicology, exposure assessment, and clinical research, especially to aid in the identification and exposure assessment of feto-toxic agents in ambient air, in the development of early markers of adverse reproductive outcomes, and of relevant biological pathways. In particular, additional research using animal models would help better delineate the biological mechanisms underpinning the associations reported in human studies. PMID:18560536

  4. Atmospheric pollution in cities of Russia: statistics, causes and characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, A.; Petrova, D.

    2017-06-01

    The article considers the issues of air pollution assessment in Russian industrial regions (2014) and cities (2012). The statistical data is presented both in terms of absolute emissions of pollutants into the atmosphere of Russian cities and relative air pollution calculated for 1 average statistical inhabitant. Classifications of the ecological state of Russian cities on the basis of specific (per inhabitant) air pollution and the air pollution by predominant type source (stationary or non-stationary) are proposed.

  5. The use of video for air pollution source monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreira, F.; Camara, A.

    1999-07-01

    The evaluation of air pollution impacts from single industrial emission sources is a complex environmental engineering problem. Recent developments in multimedia technologies used by personal computers improved the digitizing and processing of digital video sequences. This paper proposes a methodology where statistical analysis of both meteorological and air quality data combined with digital video images are used for monitoring air pollution sources. One of the objectives of this paper is to present the use of image processing algorithms in air pollution source monitoring. CCD amateur video cameras capture images that are further processed by computer. The use of video as a remote sensing system was implemented with the goal of determining some particular parameters, either meteorological or related with air quality monitoring and modeling of point sources. These parameters include the remote calculation of wind direction, wind speed, gases stack's outlet velocity, and stack's effective emission height. The characteristics and behavior of a visible pollutant's plume is also studied. Different sequences of relatively simple image processing operations are applied to the images gathered by the different cameras to segment the plume. The algorithms are selected depending on the atmospheric and lighting conditions. The developed system was applied to a 1,000 MW fuel power plant located at Setubal, Portugal. The methodology presented shows that digital video can be an inexpensive form to get useful air pollution related data for monitoring and modeling purposes.

  6. Interdisciplinary study of atmospheric processes and constituents of the mid-Atlantic coastal region. Attachment 3: Data set for Craney Island oil refinery installation experiment. [air pollution monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kindle, E. C.; Bandy, A.; Copeland, G.; Blais, R.; Levy, G.; Sonenshine, D.; Adams, D.; Maier, G.

    1975-01-01

    Data tables and maps are presented which include background information and experimental data on the Craney Island oil refinery installation experiment. The experiment was to investigate air pollution effects.

  7. Changing the Paradigm of Air Pollution Monitoring

    EPA Science Inventory

    Historically, approaches for monitoring air pollution generally use expensive, complex, stationary equipment,1,2 which limits who collects data, why data are collected, and how data are accessed. This paradigm is changing with the materialization of lower-cost, easy-to...

  8. A Monitor for 22 Water Pollutants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Science and Technology, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Examples of user experiences of the Enviro Monitor are cited together with advantages for its use. This is an all-weather instrument capable of making a continuous record of pollutants and controlling unattended operations at remote locations under adverse weather conditions. (BL)

  9. Changing the Paradigm of Air Pollution Monitoring

    EPA Science Inventory

    Historically, approaches for monitoring air pollution generally use expensive, complex, stationary equipment,1,2 which limits who collects data, why data are collected, and how data are accessed. This paradigm is changing with the materialization of lower-cost, easy-to...

  10. Atmospheric Visibility Monitoring (AVM) Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeganathan, Muthu; Tong, Loretta

    1996-01-01

    The program objective is to obtain atmospheric transmission statistics data to support optical communications through: (1) Atmospheric loss in optical communication channel; (2) Joint PDFs for multiple site reception; (3) Statistical modeling; and (4) extrapolate PDFs for other sites.

  11. Cost analysis of atmosphere monitoring systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yakut, M. M.

    1973-01-01

    The cost analyses of two leading atmospheric monitoring systems, namely the mass spectrometer and the gas chromatograph, are reported. A summary of the approach used in developing the cost estimating techinques is presented; included are the cost estimating techniques, the development of cost estimating relationships and the atmospheric monitoring system cost estimates.

  12. Atmospheric Pollution and Emission Sources in South Asian Urban Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, K. F.; Husain, Liaquat

    2009-04-01

    Rapid urbanization, and lack of efficient monitoring and control of pollution, along with phenomena like Asian Brown Haze or prolonged episodes of winter fog, makes the South Asian atmospheric chemistry a very complex one. The anthropogenic aerosols released from this region are projected to become the dominant component of anthropogenic aerosols worldwide in the next 25 years (Nakicenovic and Swart, 2000). The region is one of the most densely populated in the world, with present population densities of 100-500 persons km-2. There are six big cities, namely, Delhi, Dhaka, Karachi, Kolkata, Lahore, and Mumbai, each housing a population around or above 10 million. There is now a real concern about the sustainability of the region's ability to support the population due to air pollution, loss of biodiversity and soil degradation. Therefore, we conducted several extensive campaigns over last 10 years in Lahore, Karachi, and Islamabad in Pakistan to (1) chemically characterize the aerosols (PM2.5 mass, concentrations of trace elements, ions, black and organic carbon), and gaseous pollutants (concentrations of NH3, SO2, HONO, HNO3, HCl and (COOH)2, and (2) identify the major emission sources in this region. Exceedingly high concentrations of all species, relative to major urban areas of US and Europe, were observed. Concentrations of PM2.5, BC, Pb, SO42-, NH4+, HONO, NH3 respectively, up to 476, 110, 12, 66, 60, 19.6 and 50 μgm-3 were observed in these cities, which were far in excess of WHO and US EPA air quality standard (Biswas et al., 2008). We use air parcel back trajectories, intercomponent relationships and meteorological observations to explain chemistry and emission sources of aerosol constituents. Carbonaceous aerosols contributed up to 69% of the PM2.5 mass (Husain et al., 2007). Source apportionment was conducted using positive matrix factorization. The analysis has classified six emission sources of aerosol components, namely, industrial activities, wood

  13. Air pollution monitoring in Amman, Jordan

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Hasaan, A.A. ); Dann, T.F.; Brunet, P.F. )

    1992-06-01

    In 1985, a collaborative research program was established between the Royal Scientific Society of Jordan and Environment Canada, Pollution Measurement Division, Ottawa, Canada, with the objective of developing an air pollution monitoring network for Amman and preparing recommendations for national air quality standards and national emission standards for Jordan. Four monitoring sites were established in residential and commercial areas of Amman. Carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, sulphur dioxide and total suspended particle matter (TSP) were measured at the Downtown station. At the other sites only TSP was measured. A short-term monitoring program carried out with a mobile monitoring unit showed relatively low levels of sulfur dioxide, carbon monoxide and nitrogen dioxide at the RSS, Naser and Marka sites as compared to the Downtown site. Continuous analyzers purchased from Environment SA, France, were used to measure sulfur dioxide, carbon monoxide and nitrogen dioxide; Sierra-Anderson high volume samplers equipped with glass fiber filters were used to collect total suspended particulates samples. Gaseous pollutants were continuously measured at the Downtown site and TSP samplers were operated on a three day schedule at all sites. Sampling began in July 1986 and continues to the present.

  14. Recreational atmospheric pollution episodes: Inhalable metalliferous particles from firework displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, Teresa; Querol, Xavier; Alastuey, Andrés; Cruz Minguillón, Mari; Pey, Jorge; Rodriguez, Sergio; Vicente Miró, José; Felis, Carles; Gibbons, Wes

    The use of fireworks creates an unusual and distinctive anthropogenic atmospheric pollution event. We report on aerosol samples collected during Las Fallas in Valencia, a 6-day celebration famous for its firework displays, and add comparative data on firework- and bonfire-contaminated atmospheric aerosol samples collected from elsewhere in Spain (Barcelona, L'Alcora, and Borriana) and during the Guy Fawkes celebrations in London. Specific high-profile official firework events during Las Fallas included the afternoon Mascletà and the nightly aerial displays (especially in the climactic final 2 days of the fiesta) and were accompanied by pollution spikes in suspended particles, NO, SO 2, and the creation and dispersal of an aerosol cloud enriched in a range of metallic elements. Notable metal aerosol concentration increases recorded during Las Fallas were potassium (from 500 to 5900 ng m -3), aluminium (as Al 2O 3 from around 600 to 2200 ng m -3), titanium (from 200 to 700 ng m -3), magnesium (from 100 to 500 ng m -3), lead (from 17 to 379 ng m -3), barium (from 39 to 322 ng m -3), strontium (from 3 to 112 ng m -3), copper (from 12 to 71 ng m -3), and antimony (from 1 to 52 ng m -3). Firework-contaminated aerosols of similarly metalliferous composition were also identified at the other monitoring sites, although different sites show variations attributable to other sources such as bonfires and local industry. Unusual levels of the trace elements Ba, Sr and (to a lesser extent) Cu, always in proportions with Ba dominant, along with strongly enhanced K, Pb, and Sb, are identified as being particularly characteristic of firework aerosols. Although firework-related recreational pollution episodes are transient in nature, they are highly concentrated, contribute significantly to total annual metal emissions, and are on average fine enough to be easily inhaled and a health risk to susceptible individuals.

  15. Statistical methods for environmental pollution monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, R.O.

    1986-01-01

    This volume covers planning, design, and data analysis. It offers statistical methods for designing environmental sampling and monitoring programs as well as analyzing the resulting data. Statistical sample survey methods to problems of estimating average and total amounts of environmental pollution are presented in detail. The book also provides a broad array of statistical analysis methods for many purposes...numerous examples...three case studies...end-of-chapter questions...computer codes (showing what output looks like along with its interpretation)...a discussion of Kriging methods for estimating pollution concentration contours over space and/or time...nomographs for determining the number of samples required to detect hot spots with specified confidence...and a description and tables for conducting Rosner's test to identify outlaying (usually large) pollution measurements in a data set.

  16. Atmospheric turbulence and pollutant dispersion near roadways

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, S.T.; Keenan, M.T.; Sistla, G.; Wilson, J.S.

    1980-12-01

    The major objectives of this investigation are: (1) to determine the time and space scales of the eddies generated by the traffic, (2) to study the effects of traffic-induced turbulence on the near-field dispersion of pollutants, (3) to evaluate several commonly used highway air pollution dispersion models, and (4) to improve methods of modeling pollutant dispersion near roadways. To this end, meteorological and tracer concentration data from two field experiments, namely, General Motors and New York State, are used.

  17. Monitoring air pollution in the Bialowieza Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malzahn, Elżbieta; Sondej, Izabela; Paluch, Rafał

    2016-04-01

    Air pollution, as sulfur dioxide(SO2) and nitrous oxides (NOx), affects forest health negatively and can initiate forest dieback. Long-term monitoring (since 1986) and analyses are conducted in the Bialowieza Forest due to the threat by abiotic, biotic and anthropogenic factors. This forest has a special and unique natural value, as confirmed by the various forms of protection of national and international rank. The main aim of monitoring is to determine the level and trends of deposition of air pollutants and their effects on selected forest stands and forest communities in the Bialowieza Forest. Concentration measurements of gaseous pollutants and the chemical composition of the precipitation are performed at seven points within the forest area (62 219 ha). Measurement gauges are measuring gaseous pollutants (SO2 and NOx) by the passive method and collecting precipitation at each point at a height of three meters. The period of measuring by the instruments is 30 days. All analyses are conducted according to the methodology of the European forest monitoring program in the certified Laboratory of Natural Environment Chemistry of the Polish Forest Research Institute (IBL). The concentration of pollutant gases (dry deposition) in the years 2002-2015 accounted for only 6-13% of the limit in Poland, as defined by the Polish Ministry of Environment, and are of no threat to the forest environment. Wet deposition of pollutants, which dependents directly from the amount of precipitation and its concentration of pollutants, varied strongly between different months and years. Total deposition (dry and wet) of sulfur (S) and nitrogen (N) was calculated for seasonal and annual periods. On an annual basis, wet deposition represented approximately 80% of the total deposition of S and N. Total deposition of S did not exceed the average deposition values for forests in north-eastern Europe (5-10 kg ha-1 year-1) at any of the seven measuring points. Total deposition of N did not

  18. Monitoring marine pollution by airborne remote sensing techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Yuanfu, S.; Quanan, Z.

    1982-06-01

    In order to monitor marine pollution by airborne remote sensing techniques, some comprehensive test of airborne remote sensing, involving monitoring marine oil pollution, were performed at several bay areas of China. This paper presents some typical results of monitoring marine oil pollution. The features associated with the EM spectrum (visible, thermal infrared, and microwave) response of marine oil spills is briefly analyzed. It has been verified that the airborne oil surveillance systems manifested their advantages for monitoring the oil pollution of bay environments.

  19. Statistical Methods for Environmental Pollution Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, Richard O.

    1987-01-01

    The application of statistics to environmental pollution monitoring studies requires a knowledge of statistical analysis methods particularly well suited to pollution data. This book fills that need by providing sampling plans, statistical tests, parameter estimation procedure techniques, and references to pertinent publications. Most of the statistical techniques are relatively simple, and examples, exercises, and case studies are provided to illustrate procedures. The book is logically divided into three parts. Chapters 1, 2, and 3 are introductory chapters. Chapters 4 through 10 discuss field sampling designs and Chapters 11 through 18 deal with a broad range of statistical analysis procedures. Some statistical techniques given here are not commonly seen in statistics book. For example, see methods for handling correlated data (Sections 4.5 and 11.12), for detecting hot spots (Chapter 10), and for estimating a confidence interval for the mean of a lognormal distribution (Section 13.2). Also, Appendix B lists a computer code that estimates and tests for trends over time at one or more monitoring stations using nonparametric methods (Chapters 16 and 17). Unfortunately, some important topics could not be included because of their complexity and the need to limit the length of the book. For example, only brief mention could be made of time series analysis using Box-Jenkins methods and of kriging techniques for estimating spatial and spatial-time patterns of pollution, although multiple references on these topics are provided. Also, no discussion of methods for assessing risks from environmental pollution could be included.

  20. Ideas in Practice: Studies in Atmospheric Pollution For Science Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowe, Donald R.

    1974-01-01

    Describes the content and structure of an enviromental course offered by the Department of Engineering Technology at Western Kentucky University. The course focuses on atmospheric pollution and is designed for science teachers currently teaching in the school system. (JR)

  1. Ideas in Practice: Studies in Atmospheric Pollution For Science Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowe, Donald R.

    1974-01-01

    Describes the content and structure of an enviromental course offered by the Department of Engineering Technology at Western Kentucky University. The course focuses on atmospheric pollution and is designed for science teachers currently teaching in the school system. (JR)

  2. Infrared differential absorption for atmospheric pollutant detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    Progress made in the generation of tunable infrared radiation and its application to remote pollutant detection by the differential absorption method are summarized. It is recognized that future remote pollutant measurements depended critically on the availability of high energy tunable transmitters. Futhermore, due to eye safety requirements, the transmitted frequency must lie in the 1.4 micron to 13 micron infrared spectral range.

  3. Infrasound as upper atmospheric monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assink, Jelle D.

    Understanding and specification of the higher altitudes of the atmosphere with global coverage over all local times is hampered by the challenges of obtaining direct measurements in the upper atmosphere. Methods to measure the properties of the atmosphere above the stratopause is an active area of scientific research. In this thesis, we revisit the use of infrasound as a passive remote sensing technique for the upper atmosphere. Signals from the Tungurahua volcano in Ecuador are used to investigate the behavior of the upper atmosphere. Depending on the atmospheric conditions, stratospheric, mesospheric and thermospheric arrivals are observed during intervals of explosive volcanic activity. It is found that the travel times and dominant frequencies of the thermospheric arrivals exhibit a coherent variability with periods equal to those of the tidal harmonics. Theoretical predictions using atmospheric specifications show that the stratospheric arrivals are predicted within 1% of the observed value. For thermospheric arrivals, this error can be as high as 10%. The error in thermospheric celerities is found to be in accord with the typical uncertainty in upper atmospheric winds. Given the observed response of the infrasound celerities to upper atmospheric tidal variability, it is suggested that infrasound observations may be used as an additional source of information to constrain the atmospheric specifications in the upper atmosphere. We present corrected wind profiles that have been obtained by minimizing misfits in traveltime and source location using a Bayesian statistics grid search algorithm. Also, a Levenberg-Marquardt search algorithm is developed. Additionally, a new numerical method has been developed to solve the problem of infrasound propagation in a stratified medium with (high Mach number) background flow, based on a modal expansion. The underlying mathematics is by no means new and has been earlier described. This solution goes beyond the effective sound

  4. Atmospheric analyzer, carbon monoxide monitor and toluene diisocyanate monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shannon, A. V.

    1977-01-01

    The purpose of the atmospheric analyzer and the carbon monoxide and toluene diisocyanate monitors is to analyze the atmospheric volatiles and to monitor carbon monoxide and toluene diisocyanate levels in the cabin atmosphere of Skylab. The carbon monoxide monitor was used on Skylab 2, 3, and 4 to detect any carbon monoxide levels above 25 ppm. Air samples were taken once each week. The toluene diisocyanate monitor was used only on Skylab 2. The loss of a micrometeoroid shield following the launch of Skylab 1 resulted in overheating of the interior walls of the Orbital Workshop. A potential hazard existed from outgassing of an isocyanate derivative resulting from heat-decomposition of the rigid polyurethane wall insulation. The toluene diisocyanate monitor was used to detect any polymer decomposition. The atmospheric analyzer was used on Skylab 4 because of a suspected leak in the Skylab cabin. An air sample was taken at the beginning, middle, and the end of the mission.

  5. Implementation of Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution (TEMPO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chance, K.; Liu, X.; Suleiman, R. M.; Flittner, D. E.; Al-Saadi, J. A.; Janz, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    The updated status of TEMPO, as it proceeds from formulation phase into implementation phase is presented. TEMPO, the first NASA Earth Venture Instrument, will measure atmospheric pollution for greater North America from space using ultraviolet and visible spectroscopy. TEMPO measures from Mexico City to the Canadian oil sands, and from the Atlantic to the Pacific, hourly and at high spatial resolution. TEMPO provides a tropospheric measurement suite that includes the key elements of tropospheric air pollution chemistry. Measurements are from geostationary (GEO) orbit, to capture the inherent high variability in the diurnal cycle of emissions and chemistry. The small product spatial footprint resolves pollution sources at sub-urban scale. Together, this temporal and spatial resolution improves emission inventories, monitors population exposure, and enables effective emission-control strategies. TEMPO takes advantage of a GEO host spacecraft to provide a modest cost mission that measures the spectra required to retrieve O3, NO2, SO2, H2CO, C2H2O2, H2O, aerosols, cloud parameters, and UVB radiation. TEMPO thus measures the major elements, directly or by proxy, in the tropospheric O3 chemistry cycle. Multi-spectral observations provide sensitivity to O3 in the lowermost troposphere, reducing uncertainty in air quality predictions by 50%. TEMPO quantifies and tracks the evolution of aerosol loading. It provides near-real-time air quality products that will be made widely, publicly available. TEMPO provides much of the atmospheric measurement capability recommended for GEO-CAPE in the 2007 National Research Council Decadal Survey, Earth Science and Applications from Space: National Imperatives for the Next Decade and Beyond. GEO-CAPE is not planned for implementation this decade. However, instruments from Europe (Sentinel 4) and Asia (GEMS) will form parts of a global GEO constellation for pollution monitoring later this decade, with a major focus on intercontinental

  6. Adaptation of plants to atmospheric pollutants.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, T C

    1984-01-01

    Man-made air pollutants are a recent phenomenon in the evolutionary experience of plants and animals although natural air pollutants from volcanic eruptions, forest fires and dust storms have accompanied evolution for geological eras. Plants have responded to increasing concentrations of such pollutants as sulphur dioxide, fluorides, photochemical oxidants and acid rain at the community, species, population and individual levels. The lichens and bryophytes have shown particularly dramatic changes in urban and industrial areas. Many species have had their distribution severely limited. Tolerances to sulphur dioxide have evolved in populations of a number of grasses and herbs, and some sulphur dioxide-tolerant lichens have invaded inner city areas. Sensitivity to pollutants is partly a function of substrate chemistry. Synergistic interactions occur between various pollutants and also between pollutants and pathogens. A good deal of genetic variation occurs within crops, and this allows for selection of pollution-tolerant varieties. The nature of specific adaptations is not generally well known although, for sulphur dioxide, recent studies in poplar and spinach strongly suggest that increased production of the enzyme superoxide dismutase may be a key factor. In other adaptations, morphological and anatomical features play a part.

  7. Urgent problems of improving background air pollution monitoring systems.

    PubMed

    Berlyand, M E; Volberg, N S; Lavrinenko, R F; Rusina, E N

    1988-01-01

    For more than 12 years, systematic observations of background air pollution have been carried out in accordance with the WMO Programme using the network of USSR stations located in sparsely populated settlements and in a number of neighbouring cities. The parameters involved include spectral radiation measurements, determination of chemical composition of precipitation and the concentrations of a number of atmospheric pollutants. Analysis of the data obtained allows conclusions to be drawn on the capabilities of the current system and to evaluate methods of improving it.In order to further improve the monitoring system, it is recommended that the system should perform the same observations on air pollution and precipitation as carried out by other international and national programs, and also to create centralized laboratories to deal with the analysis of samples from these monitoring stations. Additionally, solid sorbents are emerging as an effective means of sampling certain air pollutants. They may be sent by post, they increase the accuracy of measurements and allow air sampling intervals of up to 7-10 days, thus synchronizing this period with the interval of precipitation sampling.

  8. VERITAS Distant Laser Calibration and Atmospheric Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Hui, C. M.

    2008-12-24

    As a calibrated laser pulse propagates through the atmosphere, the intensity of the Rayleigh scattered light arriving at the VERITAS telescopes can be calculated precisely. This allows for absolute calibration of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACT) to be simple and straightforward. In these proceedings, we present the comparison between laser data and simulation to estimate the light collection efficiencies of the VERITAS telescopes, and the analysis of multiple laser data sets taken in different months for atmospheric monitoring purpose.

  9. Atmospheric pollution history at Linfen (China) uncovered by magnetic and chemical parameters of sediments from a water reservoir.

    PubMed

    Ma, Mingming; Hu, Shouyun; Cao, Liwan; Appel, Erwin; Wang, Longsheng

    2015-09-01

    We studied magnetic and chemical parameters of sediments from sediments of a water reservoir at Linfen (China) in order to quantitatively reconstruct the atmospheric pollution history in this region. The results show that the main magnetic phases are magnetite and maghemite originating from the surrounding catchment and from anthropogenic activities, and there is a significant positive relationship between magnetic concentration parameters and heavy metals concentrations, indicating that magnetic proxies can be used to monitor the anthropogenic pollution. In order to uncover the atmospheric pollution history, we combined the known events of environmental improvement with variations of magnetic susceptibility (χ) and heavy metals along the cores to obtain a detailed chronological framework. In addition, air comprehensive pollution index (ACPI) was reconstructed from regression equation among magnetic and chemical parameters as well as atmospheric monitoring data. Based on these results, the atmospheric pollution history was successfully reconstructed.

  10. Disentangling interactions between atmospheric pollution and weather

    PubMed Central

    Zanobetti, Antonella; Peters, Annette

    2015-01-01

    The association between short-term exposure to extreme weather events and health has been well established. In addition, there is a large body of epidemiological literature on the short and long-term effects of ambient exposure to PM2.5. We hypothesize that the health impact associated with exposure to air pollution and weather is larger than the risk estimated based on the health effects of air pollution and weather alone. Not much work has been done to estimate the acute and chronic effects associated with simultaneous exposure to multiple environmental agents such as weather and particulate matter. In this editorial we highlight challenges in addressing these interactions. Around the globe, exposure to weather parameters, composition of gaseous and particulate air pollution, and the ventilation rates vary by season. Furthermore, weather and pollution mixtures exhibit different exposure-response function and act through different pathophysiological mechanisms. The synergistic analysis of ambient air pollution and weather require studies collecting appropriate data and advancing methodological approaches. Due to large variation in space and time, carefully designed multi-center studies will be important to address these challenges and provide novel stimuli for promoting measures to slow climate change and improve air pollution in urban areas and in cities around the world. PMID:25452456

  11. Application of computational fluid mechanics to atmospheric pollution problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Liaw, G. S.; Smith, R. E.

    1986-01-01

    One of the most noticeable effects of air pollution on the properties of the atmosphere is the reduction in visibility. This paper reports the results of investigations of the fluid dynamical and microphysical processes involved in the formation of advection fog on aerosols from combustion-related pollutants, as condensation nuclei. The effects of a polydisperse aerosol distribution, on the condensation/nucleation processes which cause the reduction in visibility are studied. This study demonstrates how computational fluid mechanics and heat transfer modeling can be applied to simulate the life cycle of the atmosphereic pollution problems.

  12. Application of computational fluid mechanics to atmospheric pollution problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Liaw, G. S.; Smith, R. E.

    1986-01-01

    One of the most noticeable effects of air pollution on the properties of the atmosphere is the reduction in visibility. This paper reports the results of investigations of the fluid dynamical and microphysical processes involved in the formation of advection fog on aerosols from combustion-related pollutants, as condensation nuclei. The effects of a polydisperse aerosol distribution, on the condensation/nucleation processes which cause the reduction in visibility are studied. This study demonstrates how computational fluid mechanics and heat transfer modeling can be applied to simulate the life cycle of the atmosphereic pollution problems.

  13. Elemental atmospheric pollution assessment via moss-based measurements in Portland, Oregon

    Treesearch

    Demetrios Gatziolis; Sarah Jovan; Geoffrey Donovan; Michael Amacher; Vicente Monleon

    2016-01-01

    Mosses accumulate pollutants from the atmosphere and can serve as an inexpensive screening tool for mapping air quality and guiding the placement of monitoring instruments. We measured 22 elements using 346 moss samples collected across Portland, Oregon, in December 2013. Our objectives were to develop citywide maps showing concentrations of each element in moss and...

  14. A Review of the Effects of Major Atmospheric Pollutants on Pollen Grains, Pollen Content, and Allergenicity.

    PubMed

    Sénéchal, Hélène; Visez, Nicolas; Charpin, Denis; Shahali, Youcef; Peltre, Gabriel; Biolley, Jean-Philippe; Lhuissier, Franck; Couderc, Rémy; Yamada, Ohri; Malrat-Domenge, Audrey; Pham-Thi, Nhân; Poncet, Pascal; Sutra, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    This review summarizes the available data related to the effects of air pollution on pollen grains from different plant species. Several studies carried out either on in situ harvested pollen or on pollen exposed in different places more or less polluted are presented and discussed. The different experimental procedures used to monitor the impact of pollution on pollen grains and on various produced external or internal subparticles are listed. Physicochemical and biological effects of artificial pollution (gaseous and particulate) on pollen from different plants, in different laboratory conditions, are considered. The effects of polluted pollen grains, subparticles, and derived aeroallergens in animal models, in in vitro cell culture, on healthy human and allergic patients are described. Combined effects of atmospheric pollutants and pollen grains-derived biological material on allergic population are specifically discussed. Within the notion of "polluen," some methodological biases are underlined and research tracks in this field are proposed.

  15. A Review of the Effects of Major Atmospheric Pollutants on Pollen Grains, Pollen Content, and Allergenicity

    PubMed Central

    Sénéchal, Hélène; Visez, Nicolas; Charpin, Denis; Shahali, Youcef; Peltre, Gabriel; Biolley, Jean-Philippe; Lhuissier, Franck; Couderc, Rémy; Yamada, Ohri; Malrat-Domenge, Audrey; Pham-Thi, Nhân; Poncet, Pascal; Sutra, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    This review summarizes the available data related to the effects of air pollution on pollen grains from different plant species. Several studies carried out either on in situ harvested pollen or on pollen exposed in different places more or less polluted are presented and discussed. The different experimental procedures used to monitor the impact of pollution on pollen grains and on various produced external or internal subparticles are listed. Physicochemical and biological effects of artificial pollution (gaseous and particulate) on pollen from different plants, in different laboratory conditions, are considered. The effects of polluted pollen grains, subparticles, and derived aeroallergens in animal models, in in vitro cell culture, on healthy human and allergic patients are described. Combined effects of atmospheric pollutants and pollen grains-derived biological material on allergic population are specifically discussed. Within the notion of “polluen,” some methodological biases are underlined and research tracks in this field are proposed. PMID:26819967

  16. Does toxicity of aromatic pollutants increase under remote atmospheric conditions?

    PubMed Central

    Kroflič, Ana; Grilc, Miha; Grgić, Irena

    2015-01-01

    Aromatic compounds contribute significantly to the budget of atmospheric pollutants and represent considerable hazard to living organisms. However, they are only rarely included into atmospheric models which deviate substantially from field measurements. A powerful experimental-simulation tool for the assessment of the impact of low- and semi-volatile aromatic pollutants on the environment due to their atmospheric aqueous phase aging has been developed and introduced for the first time. The case study herein reveals that remote biotopes might be the most damaged by wet urban guaiacol-containing biomass burning aerosols. It is shown that only after the primary pollutant guaiacol has been consumed, its probably most toxic nitroaromatic product is largely formed. Revising the recent understanding of atmospheric aqueous phase chemistry, which is mostly concerned with the radical nitration mechanisms, the observed phenomenon is mainly attributed to the electrophilic nitrogen-containing reactive species. Here, their intriguing role is closely inspected and discussed from the ecological perspective. PMID:25748923

  17. A contaminant monitor for submarine atmospheres.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruecker, M. R.

    1973-01-01

    A requirement for monitoring selected atmospheric constituents on board nuclear powered submarines has been met by the development of the Central Atmosphere Monitoring System, Mark I. This system employs a mass spectrometer to monitor H2, H2O, N2, O2, CO2, Freon 11, Freon 12, and Freon 114, in addition to an infrared sensor for CO. The CAMS MKI development is discussed, including background, operating fundamentals, principal requirements, functional and physical descriptions, and summarized test results. Each of two prototype units has successfully completed over 9000 hr of operational sea trails, providing the necessary ground work for the manufacture of production units. At the same time, these units, which have benefited extensively from NASA hardware experience, may in turn provide useful data for the development of a new class of maintainable atmospheric monitoring instrumentation for manned spacecraft.

  18. A contaminant monitor for submarine atmospheres.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruecker, M. R.

    1973-01-01

    A requirement for monitoring selected atmospheric constituents on board nuclear powered submarines has been met by the development of the Central Atmosphere Monitoring System, Mark I. This system employs a mass spectrometer to monitor H2, H2O, N2, O2, CO2, Freon 11, Freon 12, and Freon 114, in addition to an infrared sensor for CO. The CAMS MKI development is discussed, including background, operating fundamentals, principal requirements, functional and physical descriptions, and summarized test results. Each of two prototype units has successfully completed over 9000 hr of operational sea trails, providing the necessary ground work for the manufacture of production units. At the same time, these units, which have benefited extensively from NASA hardware experience, may in turn provide useful data for the development of a new class of maintainable atmospheric monitoring instrumentation for manned spacecraft.

  19. Atmospheric pollutants in peri-urban forests of Quercus ilex: evidence of pollution abatement and threats for vegetation.

    PubMed

    García-Gómez, Héctor; Aguillaume, Laura; Izquieta-Rojano, Sheila; Valiño, Fernando; Àvila, Anna; Elustondo, David; Santamaría, Jesús M; Alastuey, Andrés; Calvete-Sogo, Héctor; González-Fernández, Ignacio; Alonso, Rocío

    2016-04-01

    Peri-urban vegetation is generally accepted as a significant remover of atmospheric pollutants, but it could also be threatened by these compounds, with origin in both urban and non-urban areas. To characterize the seasonal and geographical variation of pollutant concentrations and to improve the empirical understanding of the influence of Mediterranean broadleaf evergreen forests on air quality, four forests of Quercus ilex (three peri-urban and one remote) were monitored in different areas in Spain. Concentrations of nitrogen dioxide (NO2), ammonia (NH3), nitric acid (HNO3) and ozone (O3) were measured during 2 years in open areas and inside the forests and aerosols (PM10) were monitored in open areas during 1 year. Ozone was the only air pollutant expected to have direct phytotoxic effects on vegetation according to current thresholds for the protection of vegetation. The concentrations of N compounds were not high enough to directly affect vegetation but could be contributing through atmospheric N deposition to the eutrophization of these ecosystems. Peri-urban forests of Q. ilex showed a significant below-canopy reduction of gaseous concentrations (particularly NH3, with a mean reduction of 29-38%), which indicated the feasibility of these forests to provide an ecosystem service of air quality improvement. Well-designed monitoring programs are needed to further investigate air quality improvement by peri-urban ecosystems while assessing the threat that air pollution can pose to vegetation.

  20. Biomonitoring persistent organic pollutants in the atmosphere with mosses: performance and application.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qimei; Wang, Xin; Zhou, Qixing

    2014-05-01

    Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) have aroused environmentalists and public concerns due to their toxicity, bioaccumulation and persistency in the environment. However, monitoring atmospheric POPs using conventional instrumental methods is difficult and expensive, and POP levels in air samples represent an instantaneous value at a sampling time. Biomonitoring methods can overcome this limitation, because biomonitors can accumulate POPs, serve as long-term integrators of POPs and provide reliable information to assess the impact of pollutants on the biota and various ecosystems. Recently, mosses are increasingly employed to monitor atmospheric POPs. Mosses have been applied to indicate POP pollution levels in the remote continent of Antarctica, trace distribution of POPs in the vicinity of pollution sources, describe the spatial patterns at the regional scale, and monitor the changes in the pollution intensity along time. In the future, many aspects need to be improved and strengthened: (i) the relationship between the concentrations of POPs in mosses and in the atmosphere (different size particulates and vapor phases); and (ii) the application of biomonitoring with mosses in human health studies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The etymological role of the main atmosphere pollutants in development of human diseases.

    PubMed

    Lomtatidze, N; Kiknadze, N; Khakhnalidze, R; Tusishvili, Kh; Alasania, N; Kiknadze, M

    2013-04-01

    The aim of research was monitoring of the main atmospheric air pollutants concentration on Adjara Autonomous Republic territory in order to determine their role in causing different diseases. The following atmospheric air pollutants have been determined in Batumi: dust, carbon monoxide, sulfur and nitrogen dioxide. The number of diseases registered in Adjara Autonomous Republic, which may be linked to the air pollution, has been studied. These are the following: chronic and nonspecific bronchitis, asthma and asthma status diseases, allergic rhinitis, trachea-, bronchi- and lung malignant tumor. In order to reduce the number of risk-factors significant attention should be paid to the proper functionality of the vehicles and systematic observations should continue on the chemical pollution of the air to make proper decisions to reduce the number of diseases.

  2. Monitoring of pyrocatechol indoor air pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eškinja, I.; Grabarić, Z.; Grabarić, B. S.

    Spectrophotometric and electrochemical methods for monitoring of pyrocatechol (PC) indoor air pollution have been investigated. Spectrophotometric determination was performed using Fe(III) and iodine methods. The adherence to Beer's law was found in the concentration range between 0 and 12 μg ml - for iodine method at pH = 5.7 measuring absorbance at 725 nm, and in the range 0-30 μg ml - for Fe(III) method at pH = 9.5 measuring absorbance at 510 nm. The former method showed greater sensitivity than the latter one. Differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) and chronoamperometric (CA) detection in flow injection analysis (FIA) using carbon paste electrode in phosphate buffer solution of pH = 6.5 was also used for pyrocatechol determination. The electrochemical methods allowed pyrocatechol quantitation in submicromolar concentration level with an overall reproducibility of ± 1%. The efficiency of pyrocatechol sampling collection was investigated at two temperatures (27 and 40°C) in water, 0.1 M NaOH and 0.1 M HCl solutions. Solution of 0.1 M HCl gave the best collection efficiency (95.5-98.5%). A chamber testing simulating the indoor pollution has been performed. In order to check the reliability of the proposed methods for monitoring of the indoor pyrocatechol pollution, the air in working premises with pyrocatechol released from meteorological charts during mapping and paper drying was analyzed using proposed methods. The concentration of pyrocatechol in the air during mapping was found to be 1.8 mg m -3 which is below the hygienic standard of permissible exposure of 20 mg m -3 (≈ 5 ppm). The release of pyrocatechol from the paper impregnated with pyrocatechol standing at room temperature during one year was also measured. The proposed methods can be used for indoor pyrocatechol pollution monitoring in working premises of photographic, rubber, oil and dye industries, fur and furniture dyeing and cosmetic or pharmaceutical premises where pyrocatechol and related

  3. Pollution monitoring using networks of honey bees

    SciTech Connect

    Bromenshenk, J.J.; Dewart, M.L.; Thomas, J.M.

    1983-08-01

    Each year thousands of chemicals in large quantities are introduced into the global environment and the need for effective methods of monitoring these substances has steadily increased. Most monitoring programs rely upon instrumentation to measure specific contaminants in air, water, or soil. However, it has become apparent that humans and their environment are exposed to complex mixtures of chemicals rather than single entities. As our ability to detect ever smaller quantities of pollutants has increased, the biological significance of these findings has become more uncertain. Also, it is clear that monitoring efforts should shift from short-term studies of easily identifiable sources in localized areas to long-term studies of multiple sources over widespread regions. Our investigations aim at providing better tools to meet these exigencies. Honey bees are discussed as an effective, long-term, self-sustaining system for monitoring environmental impacts. Our results indicate that the use of regional, and possibly national or international, capability can be realized with the aid of beekeepers in obtaining samples and conducting measurements. This approach has the added advantage of public involvement in environmental problem solving and protection of human health and environmental quality.

  4. Sampling of Atmospheric Precipitation and Deposits for Analysis of Atmospheric Pollution

    PubMed Central

    Skarżyńska, K.; Polkowska, Ż; Namieśnik, J.

    2006-01-01

    This paper reviews techniques and equipment for collecting precipitation samples from the atmosphere (fog and cloud water) and from atmospheric deposits (dew, hoarfrost, and rime) that are suitable for the evaluation of atmospheric pollution. It discusses the storage and preparation of samples for analysis and also presents bibliographic information on the concentration ranges of inorganic and organic compounds in the precipitation and atmospheric deposit samples. PMID:17671615

  5. A mobile system for active otpical pollution monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sunesson, A.; Edner, H.; Svanberg, S.; Uneus, L.; Wendt, W.; Fredriksson, K.

    1986-01-01

    The remote monitoring of atmospheric pollutants can now be performed in several ways. Laser radar techniques have proven their ability to reveal the spatial distribution of different species or particles. Classical optical techniques can also be used, but yield the average concentration over a given path and hence no range resolution. One such technique is Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy, DOAS. Such schemes can be used to monitor paths that a preliminary lidar investigation has shown to be of interest. Having previously had access to a mobile lidar system, a new system has been completed. The construction builds on experience from using the other system and it is meant to be more of a mobile optical laboratory than just a lidar system. A complete system description is given along with some preliminary usage. Future uses are contemplated.

  6. 40 CFR 58.61 - Monitoring other pollutants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Monitoring other pollutants. 58.61 Section 58.61 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) AMBIENT AIR QUALITY SURVEILLANCE Federal Monitoring § 58.61 Monitoring other pollutants....

  7. Study of atmospheric pollution scavenging. [Annotated bibligraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, A.L.

    1990-08-01

    Atmospheric scavenging research conducted by the Illinois State Water Survey under contract with the Department of Energy has been a significant factor in the historical development of the field of precipitation scavenging. Emphasis of the work during the 1980's became focused on the problem of acid rain problem with the Survey being chosen as the Central Analytical Laboratory for sample analysis of the National Atmospheric Deposition Program National Trends Network (NADP/NTN). The DOE research was responsible for laying the groundwork from the standpoint of sampling and chemical analysis that has now become routine features of NADP/NTN. A significant aspect of the research has been the participation by the Water Survey in the MAP3S precipitation sampling network which is totally supported by DOE, is the longest continuous precipitation sampling network in existence, and maintains an event sampling protocol. The following review consists of a short description of each of the papers appearing in the Study of Atmospheric Scavenging progress reports starting with the Eighteenth Progress Report in 1980 to the Twenty- Third Progress Report in 1989. In addition a listing of the significant publications and interviews associated with the program are given in the bibliography.

  8. Urban planning and interactions with atmospheric pollution in Arve valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langlois de Septenville, William; Cossart, Étienne

    2017-04-01

    Atmospheric pollution is a major concern of urbanised areas and territory managers have to conduct efficient policies to decrease population exposure and vulnerability. Even if pollution peaks are subject to an important mediatisation and to a large part of preventive actions, background pollution remains responsible of the largest sanitary effects. They depend on (1) the concentration and the duration of the exposure and (2) to the kind of pollutants considered. Many sources of pollutants can be identified in urban areas as heating, industry or traffic; and each of them generates specific particles. Currently, the major part of pollution risk studies focuses on modelling particle emissions and their dissemination in the environment. These kinds of studies highlight the hazard intensity and its spatiality, commonly named the hazard exposure. Another part of risk studies, less frequent, considers the vulnerability. Vulnerability is a complex concept that involves a wide range of scales and objects ranging from biophysical parameters to social characteristics. They notably concern accessibility to information, knowledge and perceptions about the risk. The Arve valley (south-east of France) is subject to heavy pollution concentrations. High levels recording in this area have imposed the implementation of an Atmosphere Protection Plan. This type of plan is triggered if a peak occurs and enforces provisional binding measures for polluters, such as highway speed limitation for traffic emissions. These measures are only focused on emissions and have no effect for reducing vulnerability and exposition, for a long- and short-term time scales. An opportunity to ensure this objective is to consider how local urban morphologies can combine exposition and vulnerability situations. Indeed, cities have been planned without taking into account atmospheric pollution and morphologies. This context may conduct to the increase in both of these two risk components and producing

  9. Monitoring the Atmosphere in an Anaerobic Chamber

    PubMed Central

    Sudo, Sara Z.; Hersch, Paul A.

    1974-01-01

    The Couloximeter, a fuel cell designed to measure trace amounts of oxygen, was used to monitor the atmosphere in an anaerobic chamber. The device, easy to operate and to maintain, allowed both major and minor fluctuations in oxygen concentration to be measured. Using a hose attached to the outlet within the box, defective (ruptured) gloves were consistently distinguishable from intact gloves. PMID:16350004

  10. [Measurement of atmospheric boundary layer pollutants by mobile lidar in Beijing].

    PubMed

    Wang, Shao-Lin; Xie, Pin-Hua; Hu, Shun-Xing; Wei, He-Li; Hu, Huan-Ling; Xie, Jun; Cao, Kai-Fa; Fang, Xin

    2008-03-01

    The parameters of AML-2 mobile lidar were introduced, which was based on differential absorption principle and designed by our institute. In Yufa of Beijing, the pollutants including O3, NO2, SO2 in atmospheric boundary layer were monitored in August and September of 2006 under different weather conditions. Vertical profile and diurnal variation of concentrations of these pollutants were analyzed. If without the influence of pollution air transport from south region, the concentrations of these pollutants are low under the overcast weather condition. The concentrations of O3 and NO2 decrease with altitude, and this characteristic is not obvious for SO2, but there is a high concentration layer of SO2 near ground (about 0.6km). The quality of atmosphere Beijing is influenced significantly by air transportation from south region, and the altitude of the severe pollution air transport is about 1km to 1.5km in August 23rd to 25th. As a result, the characteristics of vertical profile and daily variation of the pollutants are changed, and the concentrations of O3, NO2, SO2 in atmospheric boundary layer of Yufa area increased obviously.

  11. Application of cascade lasers to detection of trace gaseous atmospheric pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miczuga, Marcin; Kopczyński, Krzysztof

    2016-12-01

    Understanding the impact of gaseous pollutants on the earth's atmosphere, as well as more and more felt by mankind negative effects of its contamination, result in increasing the level of environmental awareness and contribute to the intensification of actions aimed at reducing the emission of harmful gases into the atmosphere. At the same time, the extensive studies are conducted in order to continuously monitor the level of air contamination with harmful gases and the industry compliance with the standards limited the amount of emitted pollutants. Over recent years, there has been increasing use of cascade lasers and multi-pass cells in optical systems detecting the gaseous atmospheric pollutants and measuring the gas concentrations. The paper presents the use of a tunable quantum cascade laser as a source of the IR radiation in an advanced detection system enabling the trace gaseous atmospheric pollutants to be identified. Apart from the laser, the main elements of the system are: a multi-pass cell, an IR detector and a module for control and analysis. Operation of the system is exemplified by measuring the level of the air pollution with ammonia, carbon oxide and nitrous oxide.

  12. Prediction of asthma exacerbations among children through integrating air pollution, upper atmosphere, and school health surveillances.

    PubMed

    Jayawardene, Wasantha Parakrama; Youssefagha, Ahmed Hassan; Lohrmann, David Kurt; El Afandi, Gamal Salah

    2013-01-01

    Climatic factors and air pollution are important in predicting asthma exacerbations among children. This study was designed to determine if a relationship exists between asthma exacerbations among elementary school children and the combined effect of daily upper atmosphere observations (temperature, relative humidity, dew point, and mixing ratio) and daily air pollution (particulate matter, sulfur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide, carbon monoxide, and ozone) and, if so, to predict asthma exacerbations among children using a mathematical model. Using an ecological study design, school health records of 168,825 students in elementary schools enrolled in "Health eTools for Schools" within 49 Pennsylvania counties were analyzed. Data representing asthma exacerbations were originally recorded by school nurses as the type of treatment given to a student during a clinic visit on a particular day. Daily upper atmosphere measurements from ground level to the 850-mb pressure level and air pollution measurements were obtained. A generalized estimating equation model was used to predict the occurrence of >48 asthma exacerbations, the daily mean for 2008-2010. The greatest occurrence of asthma among school children was in the fall, followed by summer, spring, and winter. Upper atmosphere temperature, dew point, mixing ratio, and six air pollutants as well as their interactions predicted the probability of asthma exacerbations occurring among children. Monitoring of upper atmosphere observation data and air pollutants over time can be a reliable means for predicting increases of asthma exacerbations among elementary school children. Such predictions could help parents and school officials implement effective precautionary measures.

  13. Status of Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution (TEMPO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suleiman, R. M.; Chance, K.; Liu, X.; Flittner, D. E.; Al-Saadi, J. A.; Janz, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    TEMPO is now well into its implementation phase, having passed both its Key Decision Point C and the Critical Design Review (CDR) for the instrument. The CDR for the ground systems will occur in March 2016 and the CDR for the Mission component at a later date, after the host spacecraft has been selected. TEMPO is on schedule to measure atmospheric pollution for greater North America from space using ultraviolet and visible spectroscopy. TEMPO measures from Mexico City to the Canadian oil sands, and from the Atlantic to the Pacific, hourly and at high spatial resolution. TEMPO provides a tropospheric measurement suite that includes the key elements of tropospheric air pollution chemistry. Measurements are from geostationary (GEO) orbit, to capture the inherent high variability in the diurnal cycle of emissions and chemistry. The small product spatial footprint resolves pollution sources at sub-urban scale. Together, this temporal and spatial resolution improves emission inventories, monitors population exposure, and enables effective emission-control strategies.TEMPO takes advantage of a GEO host spacecraft to provide a modest cost mission that measures the spectra required to retrieve O3, NO2, SO2, H2CO, C2H2O2, H2O, aerosols, cloud parameters, and UVB radiation. TEMPO thus measures the major elements, directly or by proxy, in the tropospheric O3 chemistry cycle. Multi-spectral observations provide sensitivity to O3 in the lowermost troposphere, substantially reducing uncertainty in air quality predictions by 50%. TEMPO quantifies and tracks the evolution of aerosol loading. It provides near-real-time air quality products that will be made widely, publicly available.TEMPO provides much of the atmospheric measurement capability recommended for GEO-CAPE in the 2007 National Research Council Decadal Survey, Earth Science and Applications from Space: National Imperatives for the Next Decade and Beyond. Instruments from Europe (Sentinel 4) and Asia (GEMS) will form

  14. Status of Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution (TEMPO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chance, K.; Liu, X.; Suleiman, R. M.; Flittner, D. E.; Al-Saadi, J. A.; Janz, S. J.

    2016-12-01

    TEMPO is now in the Assembly, Integration and Test (AI&T) phase, having passed its Key Decision Point C, Critical Design Reviews (CDRs) for the instrument and the ground systems, and the Test Readiness Review (TRR). The TEMPO instrument is scheduled for delivery in August 2017. The request for proposals to host TEMPO on a commercial geostationary satellite is scheduled for release by May 2017, with host selection hopefully completed by the end of calendar 2017. TEMPO is thus on schedule to measure atmospheric pollution for greater North America from space using ultraviolet and visible spectroscopy. TEMPO measures from Mexico City and Cuba to the Canadian oil sands, and from the Atlantic to the Pacific, hourly and at high spatial resolution. It provides a measurement suite that includes the key elements of tropospheric air pollution chemistry. Measurements are from geostationary (GEO) orbit, to capture the high variability in the diurnal cycle of emissions and chemistry. The small spatial footprint resolves pollution sources at sub-urban scale. Together, this temporal and spatial resolution improves emission inventories, monitors population exposure, and enables effective emission-control strategies.TEMPO takes advantage of a GEO host spacecraft to provide a mission that measures the spectra required to retrieve O3, NO2, SO2, H2CO, C2H2O2, H2O, aerosols, cloud parameters, and UVB radiation. TEMPO thus measures the major elements, directly or by proxy, in the tropospheric O3 chemistry cycle. Multi-spectral observations provide sensitivity to O3 in the lowermost troposphere, substantially reducing uncertainty in air quality predictions. TEMPO quantifies and tracks the evolution of aerosol loading. It provides near-real-time air quality products that will be made widely, publicly available.TEMPO provides much of the atmospheric measurement capability recommended for GEO-CAPE in the 2007 National Research Council Decadal Survey, Earth Science and Applications from Space

  15. An advanced open-path atmospheric monitor design

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, L.; Suhre, D.; Mech, S.

    1996-05-01

    The conceptual design of an open-path atmospheric monitor combines an acousto-optic tunable filter for emission spectroscopy (3-14 {mu}m) with a mid-IR (4.6-5.4 {mu}m) for absorption spectroscopy. It utilizes mostly commercially available components, covers a large area ({approximately}4 km radius), measures the distance to any reflecting object, can take measurements along any line-of-sight, and is eye safe. Of twenty test pollutants it is to detect, the concentrations of all twenty will be measurable via emission spectroscopy and ten by the more sensitive absorption spectroscopy.

  16. Method of and apparatus for monitoring gaseous pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Cramp, J. H. W.

    1985-07-16

    Laser scanning apparatus for monitoring gaseous pollutants uses two intersecting scanning beams so that the point of intersection (which is monitored by both scanning beams) can be identified by triangulation.

  17. A Regulation for the Control of Atmospheric Pollution, Amended Version.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puerto Rico Environmental Quality Board, San Juan.

    Nine articles, related to the preservation of the natural quality of the air, and to prevention, elimination and control of atmospheric pollution in the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, are contained in this document. These articles were written and enacted by the Environmental Quality Board in accordance with Law No. 9, approved June 18, 1970 -…

  18. Air pollution concentration monitoring and effects research in U.S. National Parks

    SciTech Connect

    Maniero, T.

    1995-12-31

    The National Park Service (NPS) is mandated by legislation, such as the Clean Air Act, the agency Organic Act, and the Wilderness Act, to protect resources on its lands from air pollution. To fulfill that responsibility, the NPS must collect high-quality, defensible data regarding pollutant levels and resource effects, and use those data convincingly in the State and Federal regulatory arena. Accordingly, air pollution concentration monitoring and effects research has been conducted in a number of NPS units. Monitors collect ozone, deposition, and particle data to establish baselines and detect trends in pollutant levels. Research projects investigate the effects of these atmospheric pollutants on vegetation, soil and surface water chemistry and biota, and visibility. The results show that many NPS areas are affected by air pollution to some extent. High ozone concentrations and associated vegetation injury have been observed in Great Smoky Mountains and Shenandoah National Parks in the eastern US, and in Sequoia and Yosemite National Parks in the west. Acid-sensitive watersheds are found in parks of the Sierra Nevada, Cascades, Rocky Mountains, and Appalachians. Mercury, possibly from atmospheric sources, has been detected in fish collected in Acadia and Everglades National Parks. Some degree of visibility degradation has been observed in every park that has been monitored. Continuing research will help the NPS identify resources that are most sensitive to air pollution and determine pollution concentrations that adversely affect those resources.

  19. Spectral estimation of global levels of atmospheric pollutants.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Macho, Javier

    2011-10-01

    Underlying levels of atmospheric pollutants, assumed to be governed by smoothing mechanisms due to atmospheric dispersion, can be estimated from global emissions source databases on greenhouse gases and ozone-depleting compounds. However, spatial data may be contaminated with noise or even missing or zero-valued at many locations. Therefore, a problem that arises is how to extract the underlying smooth levels. This paper sets out a structural spatial model that assumes data evolve across a global grid constrained by second-order smoothing restrictions. The frequency-domain approach is particularly suitable for global datasets, reduces the computational burden associated with two-dimensional models and avoids cumbersome zero-inflated skewed distributions. Confidence intervals of the underlying levels are also obtained. An application to the estimation of global levels of atmospheric pollutants from anthropogenic emissions illustrates the technique which may also be useful in the analysis of other environmental datasets of similar characteristics.

  20. The atmospheric monitoring in a protected area.

    PubMed

    Morselli, Luciano; Francaviglia, Rosa; Lepore, Luca; Merolli, Sandro; Passarini, Fabrizio; Bernardi, Elena; Mezzogori, Roberto

    2003-01-01

    A multi-annual research program was carried out to study the environmental quality of Castelporziano Presidential Estate (Rome, Italy). Within this program, in the field of air quality, a methodological approach was defined and applied, even by means of proper Environmental Indicators for the identification of anthropogenic contribution and the quantification of degradation. By means of mobile laboratories, macro and micro-pollutant concentrations were assessed in order to define Indexes of Atmosphere Quality and Diffuse Contamination, by relating them to possible short or long-range emission sources. Wet and dry atmospheric depositions were collected and analysed for the determination of heavy metal and acid species fluxes. Critical Load and relative Exceedance maps were elaborated, for the purpose of better underline the areas characterized by a higher environmental vulnerability.

  1. The Influence of Meteorological Factors and Atmospheric Pollutants on the Risk of Preterm Birth.

    PubMed

    Giorgis-Allemand, Lise; Pedersen, Marie; Bernard, Claire; Aguilera, Inmaculada; Beelen, Rob M J; Chatzi, Leda; Cirach, Marta; Danileviciute, Asta; Dedele, Audrius; van Eijsden, Manon; Estarlich, Marisa; Fernández-Somoano, Ana; Fernández, Mariana F; Forastiere, Francesco; Gehring, Ulrike; Grazuleviciene, Regina; Gruzieva, Olena; Heude, Barbara; Hoek, Gerard; de Hoogh, Kees; van den Hooven, Edith H; Håberg, Siri E; Iñiguez, Carmen; Jaddoe, Vincent W V; Korek, Michal; Lertxundi, Aitana; Lepeule, Johanna; Nafstad, Per; Nystad, Wenche; Patelarou, Evridiki; Porta, Daniela; Postma, Dirkje; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole; Rudnai, Peter; Siroux, Valérie; Sunyer, Jordi; Stephanou, Euripides; Sørensen, Mette; Eriksen, Kirsten Thorup; Tuffnell, Derek; Varró, Mihály J; Vrijkotte, Tanja G M; Wijga, Alet; Wright, John; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J; Pershagen, Göran; Brunekreef, Bert; Kogevinas, Manolis; Slama, Rémy

    2017-02-15

    Atmospheric pollutants and meteorological conditions are suspected to be causes of preterm birth. We aimed to characterize their possible association with the risk of preterm birth (defined as birth occurring before 37 completed gestational weeks). We pooled individual data from 13 birth cohorts in 11 European countries (71,493 births from the period 1994-2011, European Study of Cohorts for Air Pollution Effects (ESCAPE)). City-specific meteorological data from routine monitors were averaged over time windows spanning from 1 week to the whole pregnancy. Atmospheric pollution measurements (nitrogen oxides and particulate matter) were combined with data from permanent monitors and land-use data into seasonally adjusted land-use regression models. Preterm birth risks associated with air pollution and meteorological factors were estimated using adjusted discrete-time Cox models. The frequency of preterm birth was 5.0%. Preterm birth risk tended to increase with first-trimester average atmospheric pressure (odds ratio per 5-mbar increase = 1.06, 95% confidence interval: 1.01, 1.11), which could not be distinguished from altitude. There was also some evidence of an increase in preterm birth risk with first-trimester average temperature in the -5°C to 15°C range, with a plateau afterwards (spline coding, P = 0.08). No evidence of adverse association with atmospheric pollutants was observed. Our study lends support for an increase in preterm birth risk with atmospheric pressure. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Ground water. [Water pollution monitoring and control

    SciTech Connect

    Emrich, G.H.

    1982-06-01

    A literature review dealing with the occurrences, extent, and sampling of groundwater pollution is presented. Groundwater sampling procedures for various contaminants, and geophysical methods designed to investigate groundwater pollution are reviewed. (KRM)

  3. Using an epiphytic moss to identify previously unknown sources of atmospheric cadmium pollution

    Treesearch

    Geoffrey H. Donovan; Sarah E. Jovan; Demetrios Gatziolis; Igor Burstyn; Yvonne L. Michael; Michael C. Amacher; Vicente J. Monleon

    2016-01-01

    Urban networks of air-quality monitors are often too widely spaced to identify sources of air pollutants, especially if they do not disperse far from emission sources. The objectives of this study were to test the use of moss bio-indicators to develop a fine-scale map of atmospherically-derived cadmium and to identify the sources of cadmium in a complex urban setting....

  4. Cost analysis of atmosphere monitoring systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yakut, M. M.

    1973-01-01

    A methodology was developed to predict realistic relative cost of life support systems and to define areas of major cost impacts in the development cycle. Emphasis was given to tailoring the cost data for usage by program planners and designers. Cost estimates can be completed using the developed equations for varying degrees of equipment refinement, as well as comparative costs between different functional methods. Cost analysis of two leading atmosphere monitoring systems, namely the mass spectrometer and the gas chromatograph, is discussed. A summary of the approach used in developing the cost estimating techniques is presented. Included are the cost estimating techniques, the development of cost estimating relationships, and the atmosphere monitoring system cost estimates.

  5. Fractional derivative models for atmospheric dispersion of pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goulart, A. G. O.; Lazo, M. J.; Suarez, J. M. S.; Moreira, D. M.

    2017-07-01

    In the present work, we investigate the potential of fractional derivatives to model atmospheric dispersion of pollutants. We propose simple fractional differential equation models for the steady state spatial distribution of concentration of a non-reactive pollutant in Planetary Boundary Layer. We solve these models and we compare the solutions with a real experiment. We found that the fractional derivative models perform far better than the traditional Gaussian model and even better than models found in the literature where it is considered that the diffusion coefficient is a function of the position in order to deal with the anomalous diffusion.

  6. Modeling pollutant transport in the atmosphere boundary layer

    SciTech Connect

    O`Steen, B.L.

    1990-12-31

    The two basic methods for modeling the atmospheric transport of pollutants (diagnostic and prognostic) are examined along with the current models utilized at SRS for emergency response (WINDS). The ability of a limited-area (mesoscale) model, nested within a synoptic scale model, to represent a wide range of flow behavior, makes it the method of choice for predicting pollutant transport. Such a mesoscale model can provide an invaluable research tool and, with a periodic processing strategy for wind field calculation and/or sufficient computer capability, can be utilized in an emergency response capacity. Various models are compared.

  7. Modeling pollutant transport in the atmosphere boundary layer

    SciTech Connect

    O'Steen, B.L.

    1990-01-01

    The two basic methods for modeling the atmospheric transport of pollutants (diagnostic and prognostic) are examined along with the current models utilized at SRS for emergency response (WINDS). The ability of a limited-area (mesoscale) model, nested within a synoptic scale model, to represent a wide range of flow behavior, makes it the method of choice for predicting pollutant transport. Such a mesoscale model can provide an invaluable research tool and, with a periodic processing strategy for wind field calculation and/or sufficient computer capability, can be utilized in an emergency response capacity. Various models are compared.

  8. New microwave spectrometer/imager has possible applications for pollution monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tooley, R. D.

    1970-01-01

    Microwave imager forms thermal-emissivity image of solid portion of planet Venus and provides data on the planet's atmosphere, surface, terminator, and temperature changes. These thermally produced multifrequency microwaves for image production of temperature profiles can be applied to water pollution monitoring, agriculture, and forestry survey.

  9. The Promise of GPS in Atmospheric Monitoring.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Businger, Steven; Chiswell, Steven R.; Bevis, Michael; Duan, Jingping; Anthes, Richard A.; Rocken, Christian; Ware, Randolph H.; Exner, Michael; Vanhove, T.; Solheim, Fredrick S.

    1996-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of applications of the Global Positioning System (GPS) for active measurement of the Earth's atmosphere. Microwave radio signals transmitted by GPS satellites are delayed (refracted) by the atmosphere as they propagate to Earth-based GPS receivers or GPS receivers carried on low Earth orbit satellites.The delay in GPS signals reaching Earth-based receivers due to the presence of water vapor is nearly proportional to the quantity of water vapor integrated along the signal path. Measurement of atmospheric water vapor by Earth-based GPS receivers was demonstrated during the GPS/STORM field project to be comparable and in some respects superior to measurements by ground-based water vapor radiometers. Increased spatial and temporal resolution of the water vapor distribution provided by the GPS/STORM network proved useful in monitoring the moisture-flux convergence along a dryline and the decrease in integrated water vapor associated with the passage of a midtropospheric cold front, both of which triggered severe weather over the area during the course of the experiment.Given the rapid growth in regional networks of continuously operating Earth-based GPS receivers currently being implemented, an opportunity exists to observe the distribution of water vapor with increased spatial and temporal coverage, which could prove valuable in a range of operational and research applications in the atmospheric sciences.The first space-based GPS receiver designed for sensing the Earth's atmosphere was launched in April 1995. Phase measurements of GPS signals as they are occluded by the atmosphere provide refractivity profiles (see the companion article by Ware et al. on page 19 of this issue). Water vapor limits the accuracy of temperature recovery below the tropopause because of uncertainty in the water vapor distribution. The sensitivity of atmospheric refractivity to water vapor pressure, however, means that refractivity profiles can in principle

  10. [Atmospheric air pollution: a risk factor for COPD?].

    PubMed

    Allain, Y-M; Roche, N; Huchon, G

    2010-04-01

    Tobacco smoking is the leading cause of COPD worldwide but other risk factors have been recognized. Air pollution is one of them, but its exact role in the development of COPD is hard to demonstrate. Its physiological effects on lung function have only been studied since the nineties by long and tedious cohort studies. Difficulties arise from the heterogeneity of air pollution (gas and particles); thus, its respiratory effects have to be examined for every component separately, and in different populations. It is also necessary to analyse the effects of atmospheric pollution in the short and the long term, considering both its physiological, clinical and toxicological effects, from childhood to adulthood. These factors make it difficult to obtain statistically significant results. Nevertheless, most studies seem to point to a role of air pollution in the development of COPD via oxydative stress but further studies are needed to confirm the exact effect of each component of air pollution on the respiratory tract. These studies could lead to improved public health policies and results are awaited that would identify at-risk populations, decide appropriate preventive measures and propose documented thresholds in pollution exposure... thereby limiting the spread of COPD.

  11. The propagation of light pollution in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cinzano, P.; Falchi, F.

    2012-12-01

    Recent methods to map artificial night-sky brightness and stellar visibility across large territories or their distribution over the entire sky at any site are based on computation of the propagation of light pollution with Garstang models, a simplified solution of the radiative transfer problem in the atmosphere that allows fast computation by reducing it to a ray-tracing approach. They are accurate for a clear atmosphere, when a two-scattering approximation is acceptable, which is the most common situation. We present here up-to-date extended Garstang models (EGM), which provide a more general numerical solution for the radiative transfer problem applied to the propagation of light pollution in the atmosphere. We also present the LPTRAN software package, an application of EGM to high-resolution Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) Operational Linescan System (OLS) satellite measurements of artificial light emission and to GTOPO30 (Global 30 Arcsecond) digital elevation data, which provides an up-to-date method to predict the artificial brightness distribution of the night sky at any site in the world at any visible wavelength for a broad range of atmospheric situations and the artificial radiation density in the atmosphere across the territory. EGM account for (i) multiple scattering, (ii) wavelengths from 250 nm to infrared, (iii) the Earth's curvature and its screening effects, (iv) site and source elevation, (v) many kinds of atmosphere with the possibility of custom set-up (e.g. including thermal inversion layers), (vi) a mix of different boundary-layer aerosols and tropospheric aerosols, with the possibility of custom set-up, (vii) up to five aerosol layers in the upper atmosphere, including fresh and aged volcanic dust and meteoric dust, (viii) variations of the scattering phase function with elevation, (ix) continuum and line gas absorption from many species, ozone included, (x) up to five cloud layers, (xi) wavelength-dependent bidirectional

  12. Laser heterodyne detection techniques. [for atmospheric monitoring applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menzies, R. T.

    1976-01-01

    The principles of heterodyne radiometry are examined, taking into account thermal radiation, the Dicke microwave radiometer, photomixing in the infrared, and signal-to-noise considerations. The passive heterodyne radiometer is considered and a description is presented of heterodyne techniques in active monitoring systems. Attention is given to gas emissivities in the infrared, component requirements, experimental heterodyne detection of gases, a comparison of the passive heterodyne radiometer with the Michelson interferometer-spectrometer, airborne monitoring applications, turbulence effects on passive heterodyne radiometry, sensitivity improvements with heterodyning, atmosphere-induced degradation of bistatic system performance, pollutant detection experiments with a bistatic system, and the airborne laser absorption spectrometer. Future improvements in spectral flexibility are also discussed.

  13. Atmospheric methods for nuclear test monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Simons, D.J.

    1994-12-31

    This report describes two atmomospheric methods for the monitoring and detection of underground nuclear explosions: Near infrasound technique, and ionospheric monitoring. Ground motion from underground explosions cause induced air pressure perturbations. The ionospheric technique utilizes the very strong air pressure pulse which is launched straight up above an underground explosion. When the pressure disturbance reaches the ionosphere, it becomes a 10 % pressure perturbation. Detection involves sending radio waves through the ionosphere with transmitters and recievers on the ground. Radar analysis yields interpretable signals. The near infrasound method detects the signal which is projected into the side lobes of the main signal. Both of the atmospheric methods were utilized on the monitoring of the NPE underground chemical explosion experiment. Results are described.

  14. Intense winter atmospheric pollution episodes affecting the Western Mediterranean.

    PubMed

    Pey, Jorge; Pérez, Noemí; Querol, Xavier; Alastuey, Andrés; Cusack, Michael; Reche, Cristina

    2010-03-15

    The geographic location of the Western Mediterranean Basin and its peculiar topography, the climatic conditions and the intense anthropogenic and natural emissions of atmospheric pollutants are key factors necessary to interpret the atmospheric aerosol phenomenology over this area. During the cold season it is common to have severe atmospheric particulate matter (PM) pollution episodes (of an anthropogenic origin) affecting this region, not only in the urban and industrial areas but also in the regional and rural sites. During these episodes, the midday hourly PM(1) levels at regional background sites are in many cases higher than those at urban areas. Around 10% of the days under winter anticyclonic conditions registered similar PM(1) levels at the regional background than at the urban area and, sporadically the daily PM(1) levels at the regional background sites may exceed those at urban sites. Furthermore, the very high hourly PM(1) levels measured at regional background sites during these episodes are not regularly attained in the closest urban areas, which leads to the hypothesis that an important formation of secondary aerosols occurs during the transport of the polluted air masses towards the elevated rural sites. The interpretation of the variability of PM levels and composition (2002-2008) at one urban site (Barcelona) and at one regional background site (Montseny) allows us to illustrate the phenomenology of these scenarios, to quantify the mean annual contributions to the PM levels and to identify their main tracers. Ammonium nitrate appears to be the most abundant compound during these scenarios, although organic species and trace metals also increase markedly. Owing to the intensity, composition and recurrence of these atmospheric pollution episodes, important health, climatic and ecological implications may be derived.

  15. [Snow cover pollution monitoring in Ufa].

    PubMed

    Daukaev, R A; Suleĭmanov, R A

    2008-01-01

    The paper presents the results of examining the snow cover polluted with heavy metals in the large industrial town of Ufa. The level of man-caused burden on the snow cover of the conventional parts of the town was estimated and compared upon exposure to a wide range of snow cover pollutants. The priority snow cover pollutants were identified among the test heavy metals.

  16. Methodology for monitoring air pollutants on industrial landfill sites

    SciTech Connect

    Hijazi, N.H.; Chai, R.; Nacson, S.

    1982-01-01

    A strategy is outlined to study volatile pollutants from an industrial landfill site with unknown contents. A realtime mobile mass spectrometer system was adapted to achieve the requirements for monitoring the pollutants in a step-wise fashion. (1) In situ sampling and analysis, i.e. a realtime on site monitoring of pollutants. (2) Selective monitoring of chemical classes based on the chemical functional groups. (3) Speciation of the individual chemical compounds within each chemical class. (4) Quantitation of the detected individual chemicals. 3 figures.

  17. Network of LAMP systems for atmospheric monitoring in India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yellapragada, Bhavani Kumar; Jayaraman, Achuthan

    2012-07-01

    A systematic knowledge of the vertical distribution of aerosol particles in the atmosphere is required for understanding many atmospheric processes such as dynamics of boundary layer, pollution transport, modification of cloud microphysics etc. At present, the information on the particle distribution in the atmosphere is far from sufficient to estimate properly the load of aerosols in the atmosphere. Light detection and ranging (LIDAR) has been demonstrated to be a reliable remote sensing technique to obtain altitude profiles of atmospheric cloud and aerosol scattering. A LIDAR network is being implemented by National Atmospheric Research Laboratory (NARL), a Department of Space unit, in India for the measurement and monitoring of the atmospheric aerosols and clouds. Towards this, the technology of boundary layer lidar (BLL) (Bhavani Kumar, 2006) has been exploited. Several industrial grade BLL systems are being fabricated at a private industry in India through technological transfer from NARL. The industrial BLL lidar is named as LAMP, stands for LIDAR for Atmospheric Measurement and Probing. Five LAMP systems have already been fabricated and deployed at several locations of the country for continuous monitoring of aerosols and clouds under the Indian Lidar network (I-LINK) programme. The LAMP system employs a single barrel construction so that no realignment is required in future. Moreover, the network lidar system employs several features like rotation facility about the elevation (EL) axis, a provision of front window for environmental protection to the telescope optics and a silica gel pocket for desiccation (for transmit and receive assembly) and a provision of nitrogen purging to overcome the humidity effects. The LAMP system is an autonomous system equipped with a diode pumped Nd-YAG laser, a PMT for the detection of the backscattered photons, and a PC based photon counting electronics for recording the photon returns. In this paper, a report describing

  18. Disposable falling sensors to monitor atmospheric parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertoldo, S.; Lucianaz, C.; Allegretti, M.; Perona, G.

    2016-10-01

    Detailed studies and researches about clouds and precipitations characterization are considered to play a key role in weather and strong events prediction. Most monitoring instruments perform indirect monitoring operation, sensing the parameters from a remote position and not being directly inside the phenomenon. A feasibility analysis of a set of disposable sensors is presented. The very light sensors are planned to be dropped by a plane or a UAV (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle) in the atmosphere and are designed to dynamically behave as very light particles similar to raindrops in their fluctuations and falling through the atmosphere. In order to realize sensing probes with a similar fluid-dynamic behavior of drops, the weight, the size and the surface properties of the probes should be carefully designed. An estimated size of the order of many centimeters and a total weight of less than 15 g is needed. Consequently particular attention has to be paid in designing electronic boards and in the choice of integrated measurement sensors as well as the transmitter. Minimum power consumption should be also guaranteed, in order to assure the proper working during the fluctuating and falling time. Sensors installed on the sensing probe will measure different atmospheric parameters (e.g. humidity, temperature, pressure, acceleration) with a sampling interval of the order of some milliseconds. All data are then sent to a receiver located on the ground and can then be stored and post processed for further analysis.

  19. Urban air pollution and atmospheric diffusion research in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Datong; Whitney, Joseph B.; Yap, David

    1987-11-01

    Air pollution has become a serious problem in China as a result of that country's efforts in the last 30 years to become a great industrial power. The burning of coal, which currently provides over 70% of all China's energy needs, is a major source of air pollution. Because Chinese coal is high in sulfur and ash content and because most combustion devices in China have low efficiencies, SO2 and particulate emissions are a serious problem and are comparable to or exceed those found in many countries that are much more industrialized. Although most coal is burned in North China, acid precipitation is most severe in South China because of the lack of buffering loess dust found in the former region. The Chinese government has already taken major steps to mitigate air pollution, such as relocating polluting industries, supplying coal with lower sulfur content, using gas instead of coal for residential heating, and levying fines on industries that exceed pollution standards. Atmospheric environmental impact assessment (AEIA) is also required for all major new projects. This article describes three types of mathematical diffusion models and field and wind-tunnel experiments that are used in such assessments. The Chinese authorities believe that a range of technological, managerial, locational, and behavioral changes must be effected before the air of Chinese cities can be significantly improved.

  20. Atmospheric pollutant outflow from southern Asia: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, M. G.; Lelieveld, J.

    2010-04-01

    Southern Asia is one of the most heavily populated regions of the world. Biofuel and biomass burning play a disproportionately large role in the emissions of most key pollutant gases and aerosols there, in contrast to much of the rest of the Northern Hemisphere, where fossil fuel burning and industrial processes tend to dominate. This results in polluted air masses which are enriched in carbon-containing aerosols, carbon monoxide, and hydrocarbons. The outflow and long-distance transport of these polluted air masses is characterized by three distinct seasonal circulation patterns: the winter monsoon, the summer monsoon, and the monsoon transition periods. During winter, the near-surface flow is mostly northeasterly, and the regional pollution forms a thick haze layer in the lower troposphere which spreads out over millions of square km between southern Asia and the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ), located several degrees south of the equator over the Indian Ocean during this period. During summer, the heavy monsoon rains effectively remove soluble gases and aerosols. Less soluble species, on the other hand, are lifted to the upper troposphere in deep convective clouds, and are then transported away from the region by strong upper tropospheric winds, particularly towards northern Africa and the Mediterranean in the tropical easterly jet. Part of the pollution can reach the tropical tropopause layer, the gateway to the stratosphere. During the monsoon transition periods, the flow across the Indian Ocean is primarily zonal with the trade winds, and strong pollution plumes originating from both southeastern Asia and from Africa spread across the central Indian Ocean. This paper provides a review of the current state of knowledge based on the many observational and modeling studies over the last decades that have examined the southern Asian atmospheric pollutant outflow and its large scale effects.

  1. Significant atmospheric aerosol pollution caused by world food cultivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Susanne E.; Tsigaridis, Kostas; Miller, Ron

    2016-05-01

    Particulate matter is a major concern for public health, causing cancer and cardiopulmonary mortality. Therefore, governments in most industrialized countries monitor and set limits for particulate matter. To assist policy makers, it is important to connect the chemical composition and severity of particulate pollution to its sources. Here we show how agricultural practices, livestock production, and the use of nitrogen fertilizers impact near-surface air quality. In many densely populated areas, aerosols formed from gases that are released by fertilizer application and animal husbandry dominate over the combined contributions from all other anthropogenic pollution. Here we test reduction scenarios of combustion-based and agricultural emissions that could lower air pollution. For a future scenario, we find opposite trends, decreasing nitrate aerosol formation near the surface while total tropospheric loads increase. This suggests that food production could be increased to match the growing global population without sacrificing air quality if combustion emission is decreased.

  2. Significant atmospheric aerosol pollution caused by world food cultivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Susanne E.; Tsigaridis, Kostas; Miller, Ron

    2017-04-01

    Particulate matter is a major concern for public health, causing cancer and cardiopulmonary mortality. Therefore, governments in most industrialized countries monitor and set limits for particulate matter. To assist policy makers, it is important to connect the chemical composition and severity of particulate pollution to it s sources. Here we show how agricultural practices, livestock production, and the use of nitrogen fertilizers impact near-surface air quality. In many densely populated areas, aerosols formed from gases that are released by fertilizer application and animal husbandry dominate over the combined contributions from all other anthropogenic pollution. Here we test reduction scenarios of combustion-based and agricultural emissions that could lower air pollution. For a future scenario, we find opposite trends, decreasing nitrate aerosol formation near the surface while total tropospheric loads increase. This suggests that food production could be increased to match the growing global population without sacrificing air quality if combustion emission is decreased.

  3. Significant Atmospheric Aerosol Pollution Caused by World Food Cultivation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Susanne E.; Tsigaridis, Kostas; Miller, Ron

    2016-01-01

    Particulate matter is a major concern for public health, causing cancer and cardiopulmonary mortality. Therefore, governments in most industrialized countries monitor and set limits for particulate matter. To assist policy makers, it is important to connect the chemical composition and severity of particulate pollution to its sources. Here we show how agricultural practices, livestock production, and the use of nitrogen fertilizers impact near-surface air quality. In many densely populated areas, aerosols formed from gases that are released by fertilizer application and animal husbandry dominate over the combined contributions from all other anthropogenic pollution. Here we test reduction scenarios of combustion-based and agricultural emissions that could lower air pollution. For a future scenario, we find opposite trends, decreasing nitrate aerosol formation near the surface while total tropospheric loads increase. This suggests that food production could be increased to match the growing global population without sacrificing air quality if combustion emission is decreased.

  4. Significant Atmospheric Aerosol Pollution Caused by World Food Cultivation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Susanne E.; Tsigaridis, Kostas; Miller, Ron

    2016-01-01

    Particulate matter is a major concern for public health, causing cancer and cardiopulmonary mortality. Therefore, governments in most industrialized countries monitor and set limits for particulate matter. To assist policy makers, it is important to connect the chemical composition and severity of particulate pollution to its sources. Here we show how agricultural practices, livestock production, and the use of nitrogen fertilizers impact near-surface air quality. In many densely populated areas, aerosols formed from gases that are released by fertilizer application and animal husbandry dominate over the combined contributions from all other anthropogenic pollution. Here we test reduction scenarios of combustion-based and agricultural emissions that could lower air pollution. For a future scenario, we find opposite trends, decreasing nitrate aerosol formation near the surface while total tropospheric loads increase. This suggests that food production could be increased to match the growing global population without sacrificing air quality if combustion emission is decreased.

  5. Atmospheric pollutant outflow from southern Asia: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, M. G.; Lelieveld, J.

    2010-11-01

    Southern Asia, extending from Pakistan and Afghanistan to Indonesia and Papua New Guinea, is one of the most heavily populated regions of the world. Biofuel and biomass burning play a disproportionately large role in the emissions of most key pollutant gases and aerosols there, in contrast to much of the rest of the Northern Hemisphere, where fossil fuel burning and industrial processes tend to dominate. This results in polluted air masses which are enriched in carbon-containing aerosols, carbon monoxide, and hydrocarbons. The outflow and long-distance transport of these polluted air masses is characterized by three distinct seasonal circulation patterns: the winter monsoon, the summer monsoon, and the monsoon transition periods. During winter, the near-surface flow is mostly northeasterly, and the regional pollution forms a thick haze layer in the lower troposphere which spreads out over millions of square km between southern Asia and the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ), located several degrees south of the equator over the Indian Ocean during this period. During summer, the heavy monsoon rains effectively remove soluble gases and aerosols. Less soluble species, on the other hand, are lifted to the upper troposphere in deep convective clouds, and are then transported away from the region by strong upper tropospheric winds, particularly towards northern Africa and the Mediterranean in the tropical easterly jet. Part of the pollution can reach the tropical tropopause layer, the gateway to the stratosphere. During the monsoon transition periods, the flow across the Indian Ocean is primarily zonal, and strong pollution plumes originating from both southeastern Asia and from Africa spread across the central Indian Ocean. This paper provides a review of the current state of knowledge based on the many observational and modeling studies over the last decades that have examined the southern Asian atmospheric pollutant outflow and its large scale effects. An outlook

  6. Identifing Atmospheric Pollutant Sources Using Artificial Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paes, F. F.; Campos, H. F.; Luz, E. P.; Carvalho, A. R.

    2008-05-01

    The estimation of the area source pollutant strength is a relevant issue for atmospheric environment. This characterizes an inverse problem in the atmospheric pollution dispersion. In the inverse analysis, an area source domain is considered, where the strength of such area source term is assumed unknown. The inverse problem is solved by using a supervised artificial neural network: multi-layer perceptron. The conection weights of the neural network are computed from delta rule - learning process. The neural network inversion is compared with results from standard inverse analysis (regularized inverse solution). In the regularization method, the inverse problem is formulated as a non-linear optimization approach, whose the objective function is given by the square difference between the measured pollutant concentration and the mathematical models, associated with a regularization operator. In our numerical experiments, the forward problem is addressed by a source-receptor scheme, where a regressive Lagrangian model is applied to compute the transition matrix. The second order maximum entropy regularization is used, and the regularization parameter is calculated by the L-curve technique. The objective function is minimized employing a deterministic scheme (a quasi-Newton algorithm) [1] and a stochastic technique (PSO: particle swarm optimization) [2]. The inverse problem methodology is tested with synthetic observational data, from six measurement points in the physical domain. The best inverse solutions were obtained with neural networks. References: [1] D. R. Roberti, D. Anfossi, H. F. Campos Velho, G. A. Degrazia (2005): Estimating Emission Rate and Pollutant Source Location, Ciencia e Natura, p. 131-134. [2] E.F.P. da Luz, H.F. de Campos Velho, J.C. Becceneri, D.R. Roberti (2007): Estimating Atmospheric Area Source Strength Through Particle Swarm Optimization. Inverse Problems, Desing and Optimization Symposium IPDO-2007, April 16-18, Miami (FL), USA, vol 1, p

  7. Monitoring of air pollution by plants methods and problems

    SciTech Connect

    Steubing, L.; Jager, H.J.

    1985-01-01

    Ecosystem pollution is often discovered too late for preventive measure to be implemented. Papers include the topics of methods and problems of bioindication of air pollution. The participants discussed passive and active biological monitoring, including mapping of natural vegetation (lichens and mosses, for example) and plant exposure. Morphological and microscopical studies, chemical, physiological and biochemical investigations are presented.

  8. Compliance Assurance Monitoring Technical Guidance Document Appendices by Pollutant

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Compliance assurance monitoring is intended to provide a reasonable assurance of compliance with applicable requirements under the Clean Air Act for large emission units that rely on pollution control device equipment to achieve compliance.

  9. Characteristics and applications of small, portable gaseous air pollution monitors.

    PubMed

    McKercher, Grant R; Salmond, Jennifer A; Vanos, Jennifer K

    2017-04-01

    Traditional approaches for measuring air quality based on fixed measurements are inadequate for personal exposure monitoring. To combat this issue, the use of small, portable gas-sensing air pollution monitoring technologies is increasing, with researchers and individuals employing portable and mobile methods to obtain more spatially and temporally representative air pollution data. However, many commercially available options are built for various applications and based on different technologies, assumptions, and limitations. A review of the monitor characteristics of small, gaseous monitors is missing from current scientific literature. A state-of-the-art review of small, portable monitors that measure ambient gaseous outdoor pollutants was developed to address broad trends during the last 5-10 years, and to help future experimenters interested in studying gaseous air pollutants choose monitors appropriate for their application and sampling needs. Trends in small, portable gaseous air pollution monitor uses and technologies were first identified and discussed in a review of literature. Next, searches of online databases were performed for articles containing specific information related to performance, characteristics, and use of such monitors that measure one or more of three criteria gaseous air pollutants: ozone, nitrogen dioxide, and carbon monoxide. All data were summarized into reference tables for comparison between applications, physical features, sensing capabilities, and costs of the devices. Recent portable monitoring trends are strongly related to associated applications and audiences. Fundamental research requires monitors with the best individual performance, and thus the highest cost technology. Monitor networking favors real-time capabilities and moderate cost for greater reproduction. Citizen science and crowdsourcing applications allow for lower-cost components; however important strengths and limitations for each application must be addressed

  10. Atmosphere Resource Recovery and Environmental Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roman, Monsi; Howard, David

    2015-01-01

    Atmosphere Resource Recovery and Environmental Monitoring (ARREM) is a project focused on evolving existing and maturing emerging 'closed loop' atmosphere revitalization (AR) life support systems that produce clean, breathable air for crewmembers, and developing a suite of low mass, low power environmental monitors to detect and measure air- and waterborne constituents and contaminants. The objective is to improve reliability and efficiency, reduce mass and volume, and increase recovery of oxygen from carbon dioxide created by human metabolism from 43% to greater than 90%. The technology developments under ARREM are vital to extending human space missions from low-Earth orbit like the International Space Station to destinations deeper into space such as Mars where dependency on Earth for resupply of maintenance items and critical life support elements such as water and oxygen is not possible. The primary goal of the ARREM project is to demonstrate that systems meet the more stringent performance parameters for deep space exploration and are compatible with other systems within closed loop life support through a series of integrated tests performed in an environmental test chamber capable of simulating human metabolic activities and measuring systems outputs.

  11. Atmospheric deposition exposes Qinling pandas to toxic pollutants.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Ping; Zheng, Ying-Juan; Liu, Qiang; Song, Yi; An, Zhi-Sheng; Ma, Qing-Yi; Ellison, Aaron M

    2016-12-31

    The giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) is one of the most endangered animals in the world, and it is recognized worldwide as a symbol for conservation. A previous study showed that wild and captive pandas, especially those of the Qinling subspecies, were exposed to toxicants in their diet of bamboo; the ultimate origin of these toxicants is unknown. Here we show that atmospheric deposition is the most likely origin of heavy metals and persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in the diets of captive and wild Qinling pandas. Average atmospheric deposition was 199, 115 and 49 g∙m(-2) ∙yr(-1) in the center of Xi'an city, at China's Shaanxi Wild Animal Research Center (SWARC), and at Foping National Nature Reserve (FNNR), respectively. Atmospheric deposition of heavy metals (As, Cd, Cr, Pb, Hg, Co, Cu, Zn, Mn and Ni) and POPs was highest at Xi'an city, intermediate at SWARC, and lowest at FNNR. Soil concentrations of the aforementioned heavy metals other than As and Zn also were significantly higher at SWARC than at FNNR. Efforts to conserve Qinling pandas may be compromised by air pollution attendant to China's economic development. Improvement of air quality and reductions of toxic emissions are urgently required to protect China's iconic species. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  12. Assessment of the spatial and temporal distribution of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in the Nordic atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anttila, Pia; Brorström-Lundén, Eva; Hansson, Katarina; Hakola, Hannele; Vestenius, Mika

    2016-09-01

    Long-term atmospheric monitoring data (1994-2011) of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) were assembled from a rural site in southern Sweden, Råö, and a remote, sub-Arctic site in Finland, Pallas. The concentration levels, congener profiles, seasonal and temporal trends, and projections were evaluated in order to assess the status of POPs in the Scandinavian atmosphere. Our data include atmospheric concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), altogether comprising a selection of 27 different compounds. The atmospheric POP levels were generally higher in the south, closer to the sources (primary emissions) of the pollutants. The levels of low-chlorinated PCBs and chlordanes were equal at the two sites, and one of the studied POPs, α-HCH, showed higher levels in the north than in the south. Declining temporal trends in the atmospheric concentrations for the legacy POPs - PCBs (2-4% per year), HCHs (6-7% per year), chlordanes (3-4% per year) and DTTs (2-5% per year) - were identified both along Sweden's west coast and in the sub-Arctic area of northern Finland. Most of PAHs did not show any significant long-term trends. The future projections for POP concentrations suggest that in Scandinavia, low-chlorinated PCBs and p,p‧-DDE will remain in the atmospheric compartment the longest (beyond 2030). HCH's and PCB180 will be depleted from the Nordic atmosphere first, before 2020, whereas chlordanes and rest of the PCBs will be depleted between the years 2020 and 2025. PCBs tend to deplete sooner and chlordanes later from the sub-Arctic compared to the south of Sweden. This study demonstrates that the international bans on legacy POPs have successfully reduced the concentrations of these particular substances in the Nordic atmosphere. However, the most long-lived compounds may continue in the atmospheric cycle for another couple of decades.

  13. [Hyperspectral remote sensing in monitoring the vegetation heavy metal pollution].

    PubMed

    Li, Na; Lü, Jian-sheng; Altemann, W

    2010-09-01

    Mine exploitation aggravates the environment pollution. The large amount of heavy metal element in the drainage of slag from the mine pollutes the soil seriously, doing harm to the vegetation growing and human health. The investigation of mining environment pollution is urgent, in which remote sensing, as a new technique, helps a lot. In the present paper, copper mine in Dexing was selected as the study area and China sumac as the study plant. Samples and spectral data in field were gathered and analyzed in lab. The regression model from spectral characteristics for heavy metal content was built, and the feasibility of hyperspectral remote sensing in environment pollution monitoring was testified.

  14. Prediction of atmospheric dispersion of pollutants in an airport environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, S. K.; Durbin, P. A.

    In this article we discuss the development of a methodology to predict atmospheric turbulent dispersion of pollutants generated from air traffic in an airport. It is based on the Lagrangian stochastic model (LSM), developed by Das and Durbin [2005. A Lagrangian stochastic model for dispersion in stratified turbulence, Physics of Fluids 17, 025109]. The approach is via the backward trajectory formulation of the model. The sources and receptors in an airport type problem are modeled as spheres and procedures have been derived for concentration calculation by both forward and backward trajectory methods. Some tests are performed to highlight certain features of the method. The turbulence statistics that are required as input are provided in terms of similarity profiles. The airport domain is partitioned to make the required search algorithms efficient. Pollutant concentration profiles are calculated over a range of meteorological data.

  15. New potentialities of a broadband femtosecond optical parametric oscillator for remote sensing multicomponent aerosol and gaseous atmospheric pollutions

    SciTech Connect

    Gordienko, Vyacheslav M; Kholodnykh, A I; Pryalkin, Vladimir I

    2000-09-30

    An analysis is made of a lidar designed on the basis of a broadband repetitively pulsed IR parametric oscillator for monitoring multicomponent aerosol and gaseous atmospheric pollutions. It is shown that efficient parametric generation of femtosecond IR radiation can be obtained in a scheme using the properties of group velocity matching. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  16. Microbial release of sulphur ions from atmospheric pollution deposits

    SciTech Connect

    Killhan, K.; Wainwright, M.

    1981-12-01

    The surfaces of leaves of Acer pseudoplatanus growing in areas exposed to heavy atmospheric pollution are covered with atmospheric pollution deposits (APD). Using scanning electron microscopy, micro-organisms were seen to be growing in intimate association with these deposits. The deposits contained sufficient carbon and nitrogen to support growth of the fungus Fusarium solani in culture and in autoclaved and non-sterilized soils; and sufficient reduced sulphur for the in vitro growth of Thiobacillus thioparus. When T. thioparus and F. solani were grown in medium supplemented with APD as sole carbon and nitrogen sources, increases in the concentrations of soluble S/sub 2/O/sup 2 -//sub 3/; S/sub 4/O/sup 2 -//sub 6/ and SO/sup 2 -//sub 4/ resulted. Similar increases also occurred when APD was added to complete fungal growth medium. Increases in LiCl/sub 2/-extractable sulphur-ions also occurred in fresh soil amended with APD, and in autoclaved soils containing APD, and inoculated with spores of F. solani. Arylsulphatase activity increased in fresh soils and in soils autoclaved and inoculated with F. solani when APD was added; suggesting sulphur mineralization, as well as sulphur oxidation, in the release of sulphur ions from APD. We concluded that APD can support microbial growth in vitro and in soils when provided as sole carbon and sulphur source; and that micro-organisms can release sulphur ions from this complex substrate. Microbial release of sulphur ions from APD can account in part for the increased concentrations of sulphur ions in heavy atmospheric-polluted soils.

  17. Microbial release of sulphur ions from atmospheric pollution deposits

    SciTech Connect

    Killham, K.; Wainwright, M.

    1981-12-01

    The surface of leaves of Acer pseudoplatanus growing in areas exposed to heavy atmospheric pollution are covered with atmospheric pollution deposits (APD). Using scanning electric microscopy, micro-organisms were seen to be growing in intimate association with these deposits. The deposits contained sufficient carbon and nitrogen to support growth of the fungus Fusarium solani in culture and in autoclaved and non-sterilized soils; and sufficient reduced sulphur for in vitro growth of Thiobacillus thioparus. When T. thioparus and F. solani were grown in medium supplemented with APD as sole carbon and nitrogen sources, increases in the concentrations of soluble S/sub 2/O/sub 3//sup 2/ btw/sup -/ and; S/sub 4/O/sub 6//sup 2 -/ and SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ resulted. Similar increases also occurred when APD was added to complete fungal growth medium. Increases in LiCl/sub 2/-extractable sulphur-ions also occurred is fresh soil amended with APD, and in autoclaved soils containing APD, and inoculated with spores of F. solani. Arylsulphatase activity increased in fresh soils and in soils autoclaved and inoculated with F. solani when APD was added; suggesting sulphur mineralization, as well as sulphur oxidation, in the release of sulphur ions from APD. We conclude that APD can support microbial growth in vitro and in soils when provided as sole carbon and sulphur source; and that micro-organisms can release sulphur ions from this complex substrate. Microbial release of sulphur ions from APD can account in part for the increased concentrations of sulphur ions in heavy atmospheric-polluted soils.

  18. Abatement of atmospheric pollutants by plasma-catalysis association

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousseau, Antoine

    2003-10-01

    Due to environmental regulations regarding air quality, including the indoor environment, extensive research is carried out in order to reduce emission of atmospheric pollutants such as Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC). Some conventional techniques exist for gas treatment. However, for many applications, particularly in the removal of very dilute concentrations of air pollutants, the non thermal plasma approach is likely to be the more appropriate because of its energy selectivity and its capability for the simultaneous removal of various pollutants. Recently, it has been shown that a combination of a non thermal plasma with catalysis leads to very promising results for the destruction of VOC at a very low energy cost. In order to understand the mechanisms of the plasma-catalysis synergy it is necessary to clarify the specific role of the flux on the catalytic surfaceof the UV photons, of the charged particle and of the radicals respectively. Unfortunately, most of the atmospheric plasmas used in the depollution field are unstationnary and strongly non homogeneous, which makes the plasma-catalysis interaction difficult to analyse, both experimentally and theoretically. Thus, our approach is to compare the plasma chemistry in an low pressure glow discharge and in a typical atmospheric non thermal plasma, both in contact with a catalytic surface. VOC oxydation products (CO + CO2), as well as undesirable NOx produced by the plasma itself (NO + NO2), are measured by laser infrared absorption spectroscopy. It is shown that a catalysis may be activated by non equilibrium plasma near room temperature. These particular type of plasma-surface interaction is a stimulating new research field for plasma physicists.

  19. Global Transport of Organic Pollutants: Ambient Concentrations in the Remote Marine Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atlas, E.; Giam, C. S.

    1981-01-01

    Concentrations of organic pollutants in the air and in precipitation have been measured at Enewetak Atoll in the North Pacific Ocean. These data from a site removed from industrial and human activity indicate the present concentrations of synthetic organic pollutants in the atmosphere and establish the long-range atmospheric transport of organic pollutants to remote marine areas. Hexachlorobenzene and hexachlorocyclohexane isomers are present in the remote marine atmosphere. Polychlorobiphenyls, total DDT, dieldrin, chlordane, and two phthalate ester plasticizers were also found in the samples. The concentrations of pollutants in the atmosphere remote from continental sources are good measures of the minimum concentrations of air pollutants on Earth.

  20. Global transport of organic pollutants: ambient concentrations in the remote marine atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Atlas, E; Giam, C S

    1981-01-09

    Concentrations of organic pollutants in the air and in precipitation have been measured at Enewetak Atoll in the North Pacific Ocean. These data from a site removed from industrial and human activity indicate the present concentrations of synthetic organic pollutants in the atmosphere and establish the long-range atmospheric transport of organic pollutants to remote marine areas. Hexachlorobenzene and hexachlorocyclohexane isomers are present in the remote marine atmosphere. Polychlorobiphenyls, total DDT, dieldrin, chlordane, and two phthalate ester plasticizers were also found in the samples. The concentrations of pollutants in the atmosphere remote from continental sources are good measures of the minimum concentrations of air pollutants on Earth.

  1. Development and evaluation of an instantaneous atmospheric corrosion rate monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansfeld, F.; Jeanjaquet, S. L.; Kendig, M. W.; Roe, D. K.

    1985-06-01

    A research program was carried out in which a new instantaneous atmospheric corrosion rate monitor (ACRM) was developed and evaluated, and equipment was constructed which will allow the use of many sensors in an economical way in outdoor exposures. In the first task, the ACRM was developed and tested in flow chambers in which relative humidity and gaseous and particulate pollutant levels can be controlled. Diurnal cycles and periods of rain were simulated. The effects of aerosols were studied. A computerized system was used for collection, storage, and analysis of the electrochemical data. In the second task, a relatively inexpensive electronics system for control of the ACRM and measurement of atmospheric corrosion rates was designed and built. In the third task, calibration of deterioration rates of various metallic and nonmetallic materials with the response of the ACRMs attached to these materials was carried out under controlled environmental conditions using the system developed in the second task. A Quality Assurance project plan was prepared with inputs from the Rockwell International Environmental Monitoring and Service Center and Quality Assurance System audits were performed.

  2. The Role of Monitoring in Controlling Water Pollution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirsch, Allan

    1971-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of trends in the national water pollution control effort and to describe the role of monitoring in that effort, particularly in relation to the responsibilities of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). I hope the paper will serve as a useful framework for the more specific discussions of monitoring technology to follow.

  3. Monitoring and control of atmosphere in a closed environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, R.; Perry, J.

    1991-01-01

    Applications requiring new technologies for atmosphere monitoring and control in the closed environment and their principal functions aboard the Space Station Freedom are described. Oxygen loop closure, involving the conversion of carbon dioxide to oxygen; carbon dioxide reduction and removal; and monitoring of atmospheric contamination are discussed. The Trace Contaminant Monitor, the Major Constituent Analyzer, the Carbon Dioxide Monitor, and the Particulate Counter Monitor are discussed.

  4. LIDAR System for Monitoring Atmospheric Turbulence Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gimmestad, G.; Roberts, D.; Stewart, J.; Wood, J.

    The Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI) has developed a new type of LIDAR system for monitoring the vertical profile of atmospheric refractive turbulence. The ground-based system makes real-time measurements by projecting a laser beam to form a laser beacon at several successive altitudes from 250 m to 15 km. The beacon is observed with a four-aperture telescope and the differential motions of pairs of the beacon images from each altitude are statistically characterized as variances. The measurement technique is similar to the astronomical instrument known as the Differential Image Motion Monitor (DIMM), which uses natural stars as sources. Whereas the DIMM only provides one number, r0, to characterize the entire atmosphere, the LIDAR uses beacons at a range of altitudes, along with an inversion algorithm that we have developed, to retrieve the turbulence profile. GTRI has developed and tested a brassboard version of the turbulence LIDAR. The brassboard system transmits 300 mJ pulses of 355 nm laser light at 50 pulses per second, (15 W) and receives backscattered light with a 40-cm telescope. Altitude ranges are selected by using an electro-optical shutter based on two Pockels cells, and image data is recorded with a specialized CCD camera manufactured by SciMeasure (this type of camera is normally used in wavefront sensors for adaptive optics systems). The LIDAR provides turbulence profiles at 10-minute intervals during both day and night, and it also has a separate receiver for a conventional aerosol LIDAR in order to characrterize aerosol and cloud layers. Tests will be conducted at the White Sands Missile Range during a two-week period in June, 2007. The tests will include truth data obtained with micro-thermal probes carried aloft by a tethered blimp. Turbulence profiles provided by the LIDAR will be compared with the truth data, and overall system performance will be discussed.

  5. Utilization of bark pockets as time capsules of atmospheric-lead pollution in Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Åberg, Gøran; Abrahamsen, Gunnar; Steinnes, Eiliv; Hjelmseth, Harry

    The outer bark being enveloped by and grown into the tree trunk (bark pocket), acts as a passive biomonitor which readily accumulates pollution on its surface. Analysed with stable lead isotopes, these environmental historical archives are very strong candidates for unwinding pollution history. The Røros sulphide ore district, central Norway, has a well-documented mining activity which started in 1647 and the quarrying and smelting in Røros was easily monitored from the middle of the 18th century until the smelting stopped in 1977. Thereafter other sources, like the increase in use of leaded gasoline and further on its outphasing, can be followed. In southern Norway analyses of bark pockets show a good correlation with Pb isotope data from peat cores and tree rings. This region has not been dominated by a single source for many centuries. From the 17th century until about 1925 coal firing and ore smelting in England and on the continent were the dominating sources of pollution in southwestern Norway. From about 1925 and until about 1950 other sources like waste burning contributed, and from about 1950 onwards the pollution has been a mixture of mainly leaded gasoline, coal and coke firing, and incineration of waste. The main objective of this study is to demonstrate the historical changes of environmental pollution in Norway during the last several hundred years up to the present time using tree bark pockets as pollution time capsules. Analyses of stable lead isotopes makes it possible to trace and identify lead from different sources of pollution and atmospherically transported lead deposited in central and southern Norway. Of special interest is the relationship between the industrialization of Europe and the global environmental pollution. Understanding this evolution is of considerable value for evaluating the present day situation.

  6. The effect of atmospheric pollution on building materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossi, C. M.; Brimblecombe, P.

    2002-11-01

    This chapter surveys main effects of atmospheric pollution on building materials. It summarises these effects on stone, bricks, mortar, concrete, glass, metals (iron, zinc, copper, bronze, aluminium, lead and silver), polymers, paints and timber. Special attention is paid to stone because of its extensive use as building material in the cultural heritage. In general, main damaging agent is sulfur dioxide which leads to sulfation of many materials, particularly carbonate-bearing stones. However, the decline of sulfur dioxide in cities means that the recognition of the prime role of this pollutant presents something of a dilemma. It is increasingly necessary to consider other substances that can contribute to material decay e.g. nitrogen oxides, chlorides and ozone, either acting as synergistic to the sulfation reaction or as main decay agents, such as the case of aluminium and polymers. Particulate matter often from diesel vehicles can also accelerate the oxidation of SO2 on the surface (traditionally sulfur dioxide with Fe-rich particles) and blacken the materials surface in the case of soot. These processes contribute to the formation of black-crusts when embedded in the gypsum layer resulting from the material sulfation, but again the rate in the modem atmosphere is a matter of much research.

  7. Prospects for non-thermal atmospheric plasmas for pollution abatement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAdams, R.

    2001-09-01

    For approximately the past ten years, atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasmas have been increasingly promoted as a technology for a number of applications in the area of pollution abatement. In such plasmas, the electrons have a significantly higher temperature compared to the ions, atoms and molecules. This paper provides an overview of both the technologies involved and the diverse potential application areas. A general description of these atmospheric plasmas and the basic principles involved in the destruction or removal of gaseous phase pollutants, based on the nature of the processes taking place within these plasmas, are given. A number of examples of the different plasma technologies are described. The technologies described are pulsed corona, microwave and dielectric barrier plasmas. Their suitability and use in various application areas are also discussed including incinerator off gas treatment, industrial process off gas treatment and diesel exhaust aftertreatment. The use of modelling of the physical and chemical processes involved to predict system performance and as a tool for sizing systems to meet customer requirements is also discussed.

  8. Characterisation of gaseous and particulate atmospheric pollutants in the East Mediterranean by diffusion denuder sampling lines.

    PubMed

    Perrino, C; Catrambone, M; Esposito, G; Lahav, D; Mamane, Y

    2009-05-01

    A field study aimed to characterize atmospheric pollutants in the gaseous and the particulate phases was conducted during the fall-winter of 2004 and the summer of 2005 in the Ashdod area, Israel. The site is influenced by both anthropogenic sources (power plants, refineries, chemical and metal industries, a cargo port, road traffic) and natural sources (sea-spray and desert dust). The use of diffusion lines--a series of annular diffusion denuders for sampling gaseous compounds followed by a cyclone and a filter pack for determining PM(2.5) composition--allowed a good daily characterization of the main inorganic compounds in both the gaseous (HCl, HNO(3), SO(2), NH(3)) and the particulate phase (Cl(-), NO(3)(-), SO(4)(=), NH(4)(+), and base cations). During the summer campaign two other activities were added: an intensive 3-h sampling period and the determination of PM(2.5) bulk composition. The results were interpreted on the basis of meteorological condition, especially the mixing properties of the lower atmosphere as determined by monitoring the natural radioactivity due to Radon progeny, a good proxy of the atmospheric ability to dilute pollutants. Several pollution episodes were identified and the predominance of different sources was highlighted (sea-spray, desert dust, secondary photochemical pollutants). During the summer period a considerable increase of nitric acid and particulate sulphate was observed. Secondary inorganic pollutants (nitrate, sulphate and ammonium) constituted, on the average, 57% of the fine particle fraction, organic compounds 20%, primary anthropogenic compounds 14%, natural components (sea-spray and crustal elements) 9%. The advantages of the diffusion lines in determining gaseous and particulate N- and S- inorganic compounds are discussed.

  9. Analysis of Data from the Atmospheric Visibility Monitoring (AVM) Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeganathan, M.; Jalali, N.

    1999-01-01

    The Atmospheric Visibility Monitoring (AVM) program at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory has been in place for the last few years to obtain atmospheric transmission statistics data to support free-space optical communications experiments and missions.

  10. Ultraviolet (UV)/visible absorption spectroscopy for atmospheric pollution measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stergis, Christos G.

    1994-09-01

    The primary objective of this effort is the development of instrumentation and techniques for determining the species, concentrations and lifetimes of atmospheric pollutants that may be generated by U.S. Air Force operations. The instrumentation being developed covers the spectral range of 200 nm to 900 nm, namely, the middle ultraviolet, the near ultraviolet, the visible and a portion of the near infrared. It has the capability of scanning throughout this range to look for unknown pollutants and also to look in detail at one or more suspected pollutants. The advantages of looking in this wavelength range, as well as some limitations, are discussed. Among the characteristics of the instrumentation that are described are the focal length and aperture ratio of the spectrometer, the gratings used, the spectral resolution and spectral dispersion of the spectrometer, the CCD detector, the digitization of the video signal, and the computer with the software needed for controlling the instrumentation and for recording and analyzing the data. Special attention is placed on the sensitivity of the instrumentation which is expected to be in the parts per trillion range for those molecules that have a substantial absorption cross section.

  11. Transport of organic pollutants and their atmospheric fates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raff, Jonathan Daniel

    Suspended sediment samples from ˜30 locations along the Mississippi River and six of its major tributaries collected between 2002 and 2003 were found to contain high levels of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) such as toxaphene and polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) flame retardants. We found that the loss of these pollutants from terrestrial source areas via rivers is insignificant compared to loss via volatilization into the atmosphere. Analysis of pollutants in a sediment core from Siskiwit lake on Isle Royale, a remote island in Lake Superior support the theory that PBDEs undergo long-range atmospheric transport from source areas to regions where they were never used. The congener pattern of PBDEs in the lake sediment suggests that multiple processes act to remove PBDEs from the atmosphere after they are volatilized. Atmospheric removal of PBDEs due to processes such as reactions with OH radical and photolysis were studied using a heated small-volume reaction chamber with online detection of reactants and products by mass spectrometry. Relative rate constants for the reaction of OH with 7 diphenyl ethers having 0 to 2 bromine substituents were determined. Photolysis decays measured for selected PBDE congeners in the gas-phase were substantial, indicating that their photolysis quantum yields are significant. Dibenzofuran production was observed when PBDE congeners containing ortho-bromines were photolyzed in helium. From estimates of removal rates of PBDEs from the lower troposphere, we find that wet and dry deposition account for greater than 95% of the removal of BDE-209, while photolysis accounts for about 90% of the removal of gas-phase congeners such as BDE-47. These results help explain the deposition patterns of PBDEs found in lake and river sediments and have important implications concerning the inclusion of photolysis as a fate process in multi-media models. Relative rate constants were also determined for the reaction of OH with acetone and 3

  12. Air Pollution Monitoring for Communities Fact Sheet

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA through its Science to Achieve Results (STAR) grants program is providing funding to six institutions that will advance air monitoring technology while helping communities address unique air quality challenges.

  13. Air Pollution Monitoring for Communities Grants

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA, through its Science to Achieve Results (STAR) grants program is providing funding to six institutions that will advance air monitoring technology while helping communities address unique air quality challenges.

  14. Air Pollution Monitoring | Air Quality Planning & Standards ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    2016-06-08

    The basic mission of the Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards is to preserve and improve the quality of our nation's air. To accomplish this, OAQPS must be able to evaluate the status of the atmosphere as compared to clean air standards and historical information.

  15. Monitoring of stream pollution using protozoan communities on artificial substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Henebry, M.S.; Cairns, J. Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Monitoring of stream pollution using protozoan communities on artificial substrates. Protozoan communities were sampled in 1978 from the South River near Waynesboro, Virginia, and compared with a study carried out in 1972. Five study stations were located above and below sources of pollution. Species richness followed the same pattern as in the 1972 study except at Station 2 (just below a major source of pollution) where a marked improvement in water quality occurred. Numbers of species increased significantly downstream from a source of pollution. This study provides evidence that protozoan communities may be used effectively in the assessment of water pollution and that results compare favorably with those based on macroinvertebrates which are more expensive to collect.

  16. Pollution Permanent Monitoring PANEL--2013 Annual Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everett, Lorne G.

    2014-07-01

    The following sections are included: * POLLUTION PANEL ACTIVITIES 2013 * NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES 2013 * MTBE NEW HAMPSHIRE LITIGATION--APRIL 12, 2013 * ALTERNATIVES FOR MANAGING THE NATION's COMPLEX CONTAMINATED GROUNDWATER SITES--NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, 2013 * HUMAN HEALTH EFFECTS OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE: KEY FINDINGS AND SCIENTIFIC ISSUES. MARCH 1, 2013 REVIEWS * BAROMETRIC PRESSURE DRIVES SOIL-GAS CONCENTRATIONS * WATER RESOURCES--TERRORISM TARGETS * WITH A LITTLE INGENUITY THE PROBLEM IS NOT INSOLUBLE * HIGH RISE BUILDINGS * TERRORIST MATERIAL MAY DESTROY WATER TRANSMISSION INFRASTRUCTURE * WATER THREAT CONCLUSIONS * MULTINATIONAL REPOSITORIES

  17. Linking chemical contamination to biological effects in coastal pollution monitoring.

    PubMed

    Beiras, Ricardo; Durán, Iria; Parra, Santiago; Urrutia, Miren B; Besada, Victoria; Bellas, Juan; Viñas, Lucía; Sánchez-Marín, Paula; González-Quijano, Amelia; Franco, María A; Nieto, Óscar; González, Juan J

    2012-01-01

    To establish the connection between pollutant levels and their harmful effects on living resources, coastal monitoring programmes have incorporated biological tools, such as the scope for growth (SFG) in marine mussels and benthic macrofauna community indices. Although the relation between oxygen-depleting anthropogenic inputs and the alteration of benthic communities is well described, the effects of chemical pollutants are unknown because they are not expected to favour any particular taxa. In this study, the combined efforts of five research teams involved in the investigative monitoring of marine pollution allowed the generation of a multiyear data set for Ría de Vigo (NW Iberian Peninsula). Multivariate analysis of these data allowed the identification of the chemical-matrix combinations responsible for most of the variability among sites and the construction of a chemical pollution index (CPI) that significantly (P < 0.01) correlated with biological effects at both the individual and the community levels. We report a consistent reduction in the physiological fitness of local populations of mussels as chemical pollution increases. The energy balance was more sensitive to pollution than individual physiological rates, but the reduction in the SFG was primarily due to significantly decreased clearance rates. We also found a decrease in benthic macrofauna diversity as chemical pollution increases. This diversity reduction resulted not from altered evenness, as the classic paradigm might suggest, but from a loss of species richness.

  18. Global Infrasound Monitoring of the Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bass, Henry

    2003-03-01

    As a signatory to the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT), the United States has responsiblity for establishing and operating eight infrasound arrays from Alaska to the Antarctic through the Pacific Basin, and along the U. S. west coast. (In this context, infrasound is defined as acoustic waves in the frequency range 0.02 Hz to 4Hz.) In addition, the U. S. has non-CTBTO infrasound arrays in New Mexico, Utah, Nevada, Wyoming, Texas, and Maryland. The CTBT Office will install and operate an additional 52 states to provide worldwide coverage. This immense array of sensors provides a rare opportunity to study low frequency sound on a global scale. An international community of interested scieintists is beginning to emerge with different interests in the use of data from this global network. Much of the research interest lies in the ability to remotely monitor events of interest. These include volcanoes, severe storms, and bolides. The signals received at the individual stations are strongly dependent on the state of the intervening atmosphere therefore there is an opportunity to use tomography to gain more detailed knowledge of changes in the upper atmosphere. There are still great opportunities to improve the quality of the infrasound stations. Wind noise continues to limit the signal to noise level. Modern signal processing techniques might be used to lower wind noise levels and allow the detection of even weaker signals. Current generation infrasound stations are large and expensive. Reduction in complexity would allow a finer grid of stations and the study of higher frequency signals. There are numerous opportunities for collaborations in the use of this unique data source at the national and international levels. The US Infrasound Team and international collaborators are open to new ideas and colleagues.

  19. Detection and monitoring of pollutant sources with Lidar/Dial techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaudio, P.; Gelfusa, M.; Malizia, A.; Parracino, S.; Richetta, M.; De Leo, L.; Perrimezzi, C.; Bellecci, C.

    2015-11-01

    It's well known that air pollution due to anthropogenic sources can have adverse effects on humans and the ecosystem. Therefore, in the last years, surveying large regions of the atmosphere in an automatic way has become a strategic objective of various public health organizations for early detection of pollutant sources in urban and industrial areas. The Lidar and Dial techniques have become well established laser based methods for the remote sensing of the atmosphere. They are often implemented to probe almost any level of the atmosphere and to acquire information to validate theoretical models about different topics of atmospheric physics. They can also be used for environment surveying by monitoring particles, aerosols and molecules. The aim of the present work is to demonstrate the potential of these methods to detect pollutants emitted from local sources (such as particulate and/or chemical compounds) and to evaluate their concentration. This is exemplified with the help of experimental data acquired in an industrial area in the south of Italy by mean of experimental campaign by use of pollutants simulated source. For this purpose, two mobile systems Lidar and Dial have been developed by the authors. In this paper there will be presented the operating principles of the system and the results of the experimental campaign.

  20. Monitoring human exposure to urban air pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Barale, R.; Barrai, I.; Marrazzini, A.

    1993-10-01

    A multidisciplinary study on a general population exposed to vehicle exhaust was undertaken in Pisa in 1991. Environmental factors such as air pollution and those associated with lifestyle were studied. Meanwhile, biological and medical indicators of health condition were investigated. Chromosomal aberrations, sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs), and micronuclei in lymphocytes were included for the assessment of the genotoxic risk. Because of the large number (3800) of subjects being investigated, standardization of protocols was compulsory. The results on data reproducibility are reported. To assess the reliability of the protocol on a large scale, the population of Porto Tolle, a village located in northeast Italy, was studied and compared to a subset of the Pisa population. Preliminary results showed that probable differences between the two populations and individuals were present in terms of SCE frequencies. The study was potentially able to detect the effects of several factors such as age, smoking, genetics, and environment. The in vitro treatment of lymphocytes with diepoxybutane confirmed the presence of more responsive individuals and permitted us to investigate the genetic predisposition to genetic damage. The possible influence of environmental factors was studied by correlation analyses with external exposure to air pollutants as well as with several lifestyle factors. 10 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  1. A new conceptual model for quantifying transboundary contribution of atmospheric pollutants in the East Asian Pacific rim region.

    PubMed

    Lai, I-Chien; Lee, Chon-Lin; Huang, Hu-Ching

    2016-03-01

    Transboundary transport of air pollution is a serious environmental concern as pollutant affects both human health and the environment. Many numerical approaches have been utilized to quantify the amounts of pollutants transported to receptor regions, based on emission inventories from possible source regions. However, sparse temporal-spatial observational data and uncertainty in emission inventories might make the transboundary transport contribution difficult to estimate. This study presents a conceptual quantitative approach that uses transport pathway classification in combination with curve fitting models to simulate an air pollutant concentration baseline for pollution background concentrations. This approach is used to investigate the transboundary transport contribution of atmospheric pollutants to a metropolitan area in the East Asian Pacific rim region. Trajectory analysis categorized pollution sources for the study area into three regions: East Asia, Southeast Asia, and Taiwan cities. The occurrence frequency and transboundary contribution results suggest the predominant source region is the East Asian continent. This study also presents an application to evaluate heavy pollution cases for health concerns. This new baseline construction model provides a useful tool for the study of the contribution of transboundary pollution delivered to receptors, especially for areas deficient in emission inventories and regulatory monitoring data for harmful air pollutants. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Monitoring of environmental pollutants by bioluminescent bacteria.

    PubMed

    Girotti, Stefano; Ferri, Elida Nora; Fumo, Maria Grazia; Maiolini, Elisabetta

    2008-02-04

    This review deals with the applications of bioluminescent bacteria to the environmental analyses, published during the years 2000-2007. The ecotoxicological assessment, by bioassays, of the environmental risks and the luminescent approaches are reported. The review includes a brief introduction to the characteristics and applications of bioassays, a description of the characteristics and applications of natural bioluminescent bacteria (BLB), and a collection of the main applications to organic and inorganic pollutants. The light-emitting genetically modified bacteria applications, as well as the bioluminescent immobilized systems and biosensors are outlined. Considerations about commercially available BLB and BLB catalogues are also reported. Most of the environmental applications, here mentioned, of luminescent organisms are on wastewater, seawater, surface and ground water, tap water, soil and sediments, air. Comparison to other bioindicators and bioassay has been also made. Various tables have been inserted, to make easier to take a rapid glance at all possible references concerning the topic of specific interest.

  3. [Variation analysis of background atmospheric pollutants in North China during the summer of 2008 to 2011].

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun-Yi; Xin, Jin-Yuan; Ji, Dong-Sheng; Zhu, Bin

    2012-11-01

    In order to understand the change of background concentration of air pollutants with the development of economy in the region of North China, the concentrations of NO(x), O3 and PM2.5 were monitored during the summer of 2008 to 2011 at Xinglong station, which is the regional background station of North China. The results indicated that the average concentration of NO(x) in the summer of the four years was (9.1 +/- 5.1), (5.9 +/- 2.6), (12.2 +/- 4.6) and (14.1 +/- 5.0) microg x m(-3), respectively, the daily maximum hourly concentration of O3 was (163.3 +/- 42.7), (175.2 +/- 48.8), (199.6 +/- 52.6) and (207.2 +/- 62.1) microg x m(-3), respectively, and the average concentration of PM2.5 was (59.8 +/- 44.6), (44.4 +/- 28.0), (58.1 +/- 34.2) and (52.5 +/- 36.7) microg x m(-3), respectively; in which, the concentrations of atmospheric pollutants had increased most significantly in 2010, especially the concentration of NO(x). The average concentrations of NO(x), O3 and PM2.5 increased by 106%, 14% and 31%, respectively, compared to those in the summer of 2009. Because of the increase in the number of motor vehicle and the fast development of industry in the region of North China in 2010, the background concentrations of atmospheric pollutants were increasing obviously. The atmospheric oxidizer has also increased, the concentration of O(x) reached (155.3 +/- 40.2) microg x m(-3) and has increased by 20% compared to the average concentration of the period during the summer of 2009, the compound pollution of high concentration of ozone and fine particles becomes more and more serious in North China.

  4. Atmospheric mercury emissions from polluted gold mining areas (Venezuela).

    PubMed

    García-Sánchez, A; Contreras, F; Adams, M; Santos, F

    2006-12-01

    Soil, waste rock and mud from mercury-gold amalgamation mining areas of El Callao (Venezuela) are highly enriched in Hg (0.5-500 microg g(-1)) relative to natural background concentrations (<0.1 microg g(-1)). Mercury fluxes to the atmosphere from twelve polluted sites of this area were measured in situ (6 a.m. to 8 p.m.) using a Plexiglas flux chamber connected to a portable mercury analyzer (model RA-915+; Lumex, St. Petersburg, Russia). Mercury fluxes ranged between 0.65 and 420.1 microg m(-2) h(-1), and the average flux range during the diurnal hours was 9.1-239.2 microg m(-2) h(-1). These flux values are five orders of magnitude higher than both reported world background Hg fluxes (1-69 ng m(-2) h(-1)) and the regional values, which are in the range 2-10 ng m(-2) h(-1). The flux results obtained in this study are, however, similar to those measured at Hg polluted sites such as chloro-alkali plants or polymetallic ore mining districts (>100,000 ng m(-2) h(-1)). The results from this study also show that Hg emissions from the soil are influenced by solar radiation, soil temperature and soil Hg concentration. Our data suggest that solar radiation may be the dominant factor affecting Hg degrees emission since the major species of mercury in polluted soil is Hg degrees (85-97% of total Hg). The simple release of Hg degrees vapor is probably the dominant process occurring with incident light in the field. The apparent activation energy for mercury emission indicates that the volatilization of mercury mainly occurred as a result of the vaporization of elemental mercury in soil. The degree of Hg emission differed significantly among the soil sites studied, which may be due to variations in soil texture, organic matter content and soil compaction.

  5. Passive Samplers for Monitoring Insidious N Air Pollutants and Estimating N Deposition to Terrestrial Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bytnerowicz, A.

    2004-12-01

    Ammonia (NH3), nitric acid vapor (HNO3), nitric oxide (NO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) are the main biologically important nitrogenous (N) air pollutants. At highly elevated concentrations, these pollutants have a potential of causing injury to sensitive plants. More importantly, gaseous N pollutants may provide significant amounts of atmospheric N to the terrestrial ecosystems. This is especially true for wildlands affected by photochemical smog and agricultural emissions (e.g. mountains near California Central Valley or Los Angeles Basin). Passive samplers developed in the 1990s and 2000s have allowed for reliable monitoring of ambient concentrations of the pollutants at large geographic scales. Information on spatial and temporal distribution of NH3, HNO3, NO and NO2 from passive samplers may allow for determining potential "hot spots" of N pollutants effects. Information on ambient concentrations of gaseous N can also be used for estimates of N deposition to various ecosystems. Monitoring of N air pollutants and estimates of N deposition have been conducted in deserts, coastal sage, serpentine grassland, chaparral, and mixed conifer forests in California. These efforts and potential future use of passive samplers will be discussed.

  6. Atmospheric Concentrations of Persistent Organic Pollutants in the Southern Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlahos, P.; Edson, J.; Cifuentes, A.; McGillis, W. R.; Zappa, C.

    2008-12-01

    Long-range transport of persistent organic pollutant (POPs) is a global concern. Remote regions such as the Southern Ocean are greatly under-sampled though critical components in understanding POPs cycling. Over 20 high-volume air samples were collected in the Southern Ocean aboard the RV Brown during the GASEX III experiment between Mar 05 to April 9 2008. The relatively stationary platform (51S,38W) enabled the collection of a unique atmospheric time series at this open ocean station. Air sampling was also conducted across transects from Punto Arenas, Chile and to Montevideo, Uruguay. Samples were collected using glass sleeves packed with poly-urethane foam plugs and C-18 resin in order to collect target organic pollutants (per-fluorinated compounds, currently and historically used pesticides) in this under-sampled region. Here we present POPs concentrations and trends over the sampled period and compare variations with air parcel back trajectories to establish potential origins of their long-range transport.

  7. 49 CFR 192.481 - Atmospheric corrosion control: Monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Atmospheric corrosion control: Monitoring. 192.481... TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Requirements for Corrosion Control § 192.481 Atmospheric corrosion control: Monitoring. (a) Each operator must inspect each...

  8. 49 CFR 192.481 - Atmospheric corrosion control: Monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Atmospheric corrosion control: Monitoring. 192.481... TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Requirements for Corrosion Control § 192.481 Atmospheric corrosion control: Monitoring. (a) Each operator must inspect each...

  9. 49 CFR 192.481 - Atmospheric corrosion control: Monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Atmospheric corrosion control: Monitoring. 192.481... TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Requirements for Corrosion Control § 192.481 Atmospheric corrosion control: Monitoring. (a) Each operator must inspect each pipeline...

  10. 49 CFR 192.481 - Atmospheric corrosion control: Monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Atmospheric corrosion control: Monitoring. 192.481... TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Requirements for Corrosion Control § 192.481 Atmospheric corrosion control: Monitoring. (a) Each operator must inspect each pipeline...

  11. 49 CFR 192.481 - Atmospheric corrosion control: Monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Atmospheric corrosion control: Monitoring. 192.481... TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Requirements for Corrosion Control § 192.481 Atmospheric corrosion control: Monitoring. (a) Each operator must inspect each pipeline...

  12. Laser-excited fluorescence for measuring atmospheric pollution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menzies, R. T.

    1975-01-01

    System measures amount of given pollutant at specific location. Infrared laser aimed at location has wavelength that will cause molecules of pollutant to fluoresce. Detector separates fluorescence from other radiation and measures its intensity to indicate concentration of pollutant.

  13. Preliminary results of a lidar-dial integrated system for the automatic detection of atmospheric pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaudio, P.; Gelfusa, M.; Richetta, M.

    2012-11-01

    In the last decades, atmospheric pollution in urban and industrial areas has become a major concern of both developed and developing countries. In this context, surveying relative large areas in an automatic way is an increasing common objective of public health organisations. The Lidar-Dial techniques are widely recognized as a cost-effective approach to monitor large portions of the atmosphere and, for example, they have been successful applied to the early detection of forest fire. The studies and preliminary results reported in this paper concern the development of an integrated Lidar-Dial system able to detect sudden releases in air of harmful and polluting substances. The propose approach consists of continuous monitoring of the area under surveillance with a Lidar type measurement (by means of a low cost system). Once a significant increase in the density of a pollutant is revealed, the Dial technique is used to identify the released chemicals. In this paper, the specifications of the proposed station are discussed. The most stringent requirement is the need for a very compact system with a range of at least 600-700 m. Of course, the optical wavelengths must be in an absolute eye-safe range for humans. A conceptual design of the entire system is described and the most important characteristic of the main elements are provided. In particular the capability of the envisaged laser sources, Nd:YAG and CO2 lasers, to provide the necessary quality of the measurements is carefully assessed. Since the detection of dangerous substances must be performed in an automatic way, the monitoring station will be equipped with an adequate set of control and communication devices for independent autonomous operation. The results of the first preliminary tests illustrate the potential of the chosen approach.

  14. Preliminary air pollution monitoring in San Miguel, Buenos Aires.

    PubMed

    Fagundez, L A; Fernández, V L; Marino, T H; Martín, I; Persano, D A; Rivarola Y Benítez, M; Sadañiowski, I V; Codnia, J; Zalts, A

    2001-09-01

    Passive diffusion samplers were employed in San Miguel (Buenos Aires Metropolitan Area) for a preliminary air pollution monitoring. The highest loads were observed in downtown, compared with an urban background site. Total suspended particulate matter (TSPM) varied from 0.257 to 0.033 mg cm(-2) month(-1); dust was examined for particle nature and size distribution. A similar trend was observed for nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and TSPM spatial distribution, suggesting that traffic is the major pollution source. Sulphur dioxide (SO2) values were low and rather homogeneous. Levels for the investigated pollutants are below EPA's guide line values. Geographic (flat area, near to Rio de La Plata) and climatologic factors (rainfalls and variable wind directions) contribute to disperse pollutants.

  15. HANDBOOK: CONTINUOUS EMISSION MONITORING SYSTEMS FOR NON-CRITERIA POLLUTANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This Handbook provides a description of the methods used to continuously monitor non-criteria pollutants emitted from stationary sources. The Handbook contains a review of current regulatory programs, the state-of-the-art sampling system design, analytical techniques, and the use...

  16. Tundra uptake of atmospheric elemental mercury drives Arctic mercury pollution.

    PubMed

    Obrist, Daniel; Agnan, Yannick; Jiskra, Martin; Olson, Christine L; Colegrove, Dominique P; Hueber, Jacques; Moore, Christopher W; Sonke, Jeroen E; Helmig, Detlev

    2017-07-12

    Anthropogenic activities have led to large-scale mercury (Hg) pollution in the Arctic. It has been suggested that sea-salt-induced chemical cycling of Hg (through 'atmospheric mercury depletion events', or AMDEs) and wet deposition via precipitation are sources of Hg to the Arctic in its oxidized form (Hg(ii)). However, there is little evidence for the occurrence of AMDEs outside of coastal regions, and their importance to net Hg deposition has been questioned. Furthermore, wet-deposition measurements in the Arctic showed some of the lowest levels of Hg deposition via precipitation worldwide, raising questions as to the sources of high Arctic Hg loading. Here we present a comprehensive Hg-deposition mass-balance study, and show that most of the Hg (about 70%) in the interior Arctic tundra is derived from gaseous elemental Hg (Hg(0)) deposition, with only minor contributions from the deposition of Hg(ii) via precipitation or AMDEs. We find that deposition of Hg(0)-the form ubiquitously present in the global atmosphere-occurs throughout the year, and that it is enhanced in summer through the uptake of Hg(0) by vegetation. Tundra uptake of gaseous Hg(0) leads to high soil Hg concentrations, with Hg masses greatly exceeding the levels found in temperate soils. Our concurrent Hg stable isotope measurements in the atmosphere, snowpack, vegetation and soils support our finding that Hg(0) dominates as a source to the tundra. Hg concentration and stable isotope data from an inland-to-coastal transect show high soil Hg concentrations consistently derived from Hg(0), suggesting that the Arctic tundra might be a globally important Hg sink. We suggest that the high tundra soil Hg concentrations might also explain why Arctic rivers annually transport large amounts of Hg to the Arctic Ocean.

  17. Report to the Congress on ocean pollution, monitoring, and research, October 1984 through September 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-05-01

    Under Section 201 of the Marine Protection, Research, and Sanctuaries Act of 1972, as amended, the Congress assigned to the Department of Commerce the responsibility to monitor and research the effects of dumping wastes into the ocean. The report describes the ocean-pollution activities carried out by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration during fiscal year 1985. It describes results from a comprehensive, continuing program of assessment, including research, development, and monitoring, on the short- and long-term effects of human activities on the marine environment.

  18. Problems of correlation of global and local monitoring of air pollution.

    PubMed

    Berlyand, M E; Volberg, N S; Lavrinenko, R F; Rusina, E N

    1982-12-01

    (1) The Air Polluttion Monitoring System has got a significant development of late, which is in direct relation with a considerable extention and improvement of the observation network in cities and industrial areas, with creation of a new network for assessing regional and global background of the atmosphere pollution, as well as with the wide involvement of meteorologists to monitoring organization. (2) While developing a new global monitoring system, it is necessary to take into account its relationship with the local monitoring within the region of air pollution sources, i.e. at the \\lsimpact\\rs level. The need in such an account is dictated first of all by the physics of pollutant spreading that states: changes in air pollution over large territories must be in a certain agreement with greater changes in the vicinity of emission sources. Methods applied in the global and local monitoring have also a number of common peculiarities. White organizing regional network for observations of the background pollution of the atmosphere twin stations (one of the pair of stations located outside the city boundaries in a small community, and the other, in the nearest city with the population of 200-400 thousand inhabitants) were established in the U.S.S.R. and in a number of socialist countries in Europe. (3) Implementation of the twin-station principles in the U.S.S.R. has contributed to data interpretation and representativity assessment as well as to correction of the station location. Observation results from the Soviet background stations and those abroad have been compared by now according to a number of indices. (4) The correlation of monitoring systems of various scales tells positively both on mutual improvement and completion of observational methods. The methods of obtaining integral characteristics of air pollution were used for the global monitoring, in particular spectral actinometric observations and chemical analysis of the precipitation composition. Now

  19. Population-production-pollution nexus based air pollution management model for alleviating the atmospheric crisis in Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Zeng, X T; Tong, Y F; Cui, L; Kong, X M; Sheng, Y N; Chen, L; Li, Y P

    2017-04-13

    In recent years, increscent emissions in the city of Beijing due to expanded population, accelerated industrialization and inter-regional pollutant transportation have led to hazardous atmospheric pollution issues. Although a number of anthropogenic control measures have been put into use, frequent/severe haze events have still challenged regional governments. In this study, a hybrid population-production-pollution nexus model (PPP) is proposed for air pollution management and air quality planning (AMP) with the aim to coordinate human activities and environmental protection. A fuzzy-stochastic mixed quadratic programming method (FSQ) is developed and introduced into a PPP for tackling atmospheric pollution issues with uncertainties. Based on the contribution of an index of population-production-pollution, a hybrid PPP-based AMP model that considers employment structure, industrial layout pattern, production mode, pollutant purification efficiency and a pollution mitigation scheme have been applied in Beijing. Results of the adjustment of employment structure, pollution mitigation scheme, and green gross domestic product under various environmental regulation scenarios are obtained and analyzed. This study can facilitate the identification of optimized policies for alleviating population-production-emission conflict in the study region, as well as ameliorating the hazardous air pollution crisis at an urban level.

  20. Air Pollution Monitoring and Use of Nanotechnology Based Solid State Gas Sensors in Greater Cairo Area, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramadan, A. B. A.

    Air pollution is a serious problem in thickly populated and industrialized areas in Egypt, especially in greater Cairo area. Economic growth and industrialization are proceeding at a rapid pace, accompanied by increasing emissions of air polluting sources. Furthermore, though the variety and quantities of polluting sources have increased dramatically, the development of a suitable method for monitoring the pollution causing sources has not followed at the same pace. Environmental impacts of air pollutants have impact on public health, vegetation, material deterioration etc. To prevent or minimize the damage caused by atmospheric pollution, suitable monitoring systems are urgently needed that can rapidly and reliably detect and quantify polluting sources for monitoring by regulating authorities in order to prevent further deterioration of the current pollution levels. Consequently, it is important that the current real-time air quality monitoring system, controlled by the Egyptian Environmental Affairs Agency (EEAA), should be adapted or extended to aid in alleviating this problem. Nanotechnology has been applied to several industrial and domestic fields, for example, applications for gas monitoring systems, gas leak detectors in factories, fire and toxic gas detectors, ventilation control, breath alcohol detectors, and the like. Here we report an application example of studying air quality monitoring based on nanotechnology `solid state gas sensors'. So as to carry out air pollution monitoring over an extensive area, a combination of ground measurements through inexpensive sensors and wireless GIS will be used for this purpose. This portable device, comprising solid state gas sensors integrated to a Personal Digital Assistant (PDA) linked through Bluetooth communication tools and Global Positioning System (GPS), will allow rapid dissemination of information on pollution levels at multiple sites simultaneously.

  1. Transboundary Air Pollution over the Central Himalayas: Monitoring network and Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qianggong; Kang, Shichang

    2016-04-01

    The Himalayas, stretching over 3000 kms along west-east, separates South Asia continent and the Tibetan Plateau with its extreme high altitudes. The South Asia is being increasingly recognized to be among the hotspots of air pollution, posing multi-effects on regional climate and environment. Recent monitoring and projection have indicated an accelerated decrease of glacier and increasing glacier runoff in the Himalayas, and a remarkable phenomenon has been recognized in the Himalayas that long-range transport atmospheric pollutants (e.g., black carbon and dust) deposited on glacier surface can promote glacier melt, and in turns, may liberate historical contaminant legacy in glaciers into downward ecosystems. To understand the air pollution variation and how they can infiltrate the Himalayas and beyond, we started to operate a coordinated atmospheric pollution monitoring network composing 11 sites with 5 in Nepal and 6 in Tibet since April 2013. Atmospheric total suspended particles ( TSP < 100 μm) are collected for 24h at an interval of 3-6 days at all sites. Black carbon, typical persistent organic pollutants (PAHs) and heavy metals (particulate-bounded mercury) are measured to reveal their spatial and temporal distributions. Results revealed a consistent gradient decrease in almost all analyzed parameters along south-north gradient across the Himalayas, with a clear seasonal variation of higher values in pre-monsoon seasons. Analysis of geochemical signatures of carbonaceous aerosols indicated dominant sources from biomass burning and vehicle exhaust. PAHs concentrations and signatures from soils and aerosols indicated that low-ring PAHs can readily transport across the Himalayas. Integrated analysis of satellite images and air mass trajectories suggested that the transboundary air pollution over the Himalayas is episodic and is likely concentrated in pre-monsoon seasons. Our results emphasis the potential transport and impact of air pollution from South Asia

  2. Atmospheric Pollution over the Eastern Mediterranean during summer - A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayan, Uri; Ricaud, Philippe; Zbinden, Regina; Dulac, François

    2016-04-01

    The subsiding air aloft induced by global circulation systems affecting the EM and the depth of the Persian Trough, control the spatio-temporal distribution of the boundary layer during summer. The shallow mixed layer and weak zonal flow, leads to poor ventilation rates, inhibiting an efficient dispersion of the pollutants. Several studies pointing at specific local (e.g. ventilation rates) and regional peculiarities (long range transport) enhancing the building up of pollutant concentrations are presented. Tropospheric-ozone concentrations over the EM basin are among the highest over the Northern Hemisphere. The processes controlling its formation (i.e., long range transport from Europe, dynamic subsidence at mid-troposphere, and stratosphere-to-troposphere exchange) are reviewed. Airborne and satellite-borne initiatives have indicated that the concentration values of reactive nitrogen are 2 to 10 times higher than in the hemispheric background troposphere. Models, aircraft measurements, and satellite data, have shown that sulfate has a maximum during spring and summer. The CO seasonal cycle, mainly governed by the concentration of the hydroxyl radical demonstrates high concentrations over winter months and lowest during summer when photochemistry is active. The daily variations in CO concentration are caused by long-range CO transport from European anthropogenic sources. The spatial distribution of methane, derived from satellite identified August as the month with the highest levels over the EM. The results of a comprehensive analysis of atmospheric methane over the EM Basin as part of the ChArMEx program, using satellite data and model simulations is consistent with other previous studies.

  3. Evaluation of the capabilities of satellite imagery for monitoring regional air pollution episodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, J. C.; Bowley, C. J.; Burke, H. H. K.

    1979-01-01

    A comparative analysis of satellite visible channel imagery and ground based aerosol measurements is carried out for three cases representing a significant pollution episodes based on low surface visibility and high sulfate levels. The feasibility of detecting pollution episodes from space is also investigated using a simulation model. The model results are compared to quantitative information derived from digitized satellite data. The results show that when levels are or = 30 micrograms/cu, a haze pattern that correlates closely with the area of reported low surface visibilities and high micrograms sulfate levels can be detected in satellite visible channel imagery. The model simulation demonstrates the potential of the satellite to monitor the magnitude and areal extent of pollution episodes. Quantitative information on total aerosol amount derived from the satellite digitized data using the atmospheric radiative transfer model agrees well with the results obtained from the ground based measurements.

  4. [Application of lysosomal detection in marine pollution monitoring: research progress].

    PubMed

    Weng, You-Zhu; Fang, Yong-Qiang; Zhang, Yu-Sheng

    2013-11-01

    Lysosome is an important organelle existing in eukaryotic cells. With the development of the study on the structure and function of lysosome in recent years, lysosome is considered as a target of toxic substances on subcellular level, and has been widely applied abroad in marine pollution monitoring. This paper summarized the biological characteristics of lysosomal marker enzyme, lysosome-autophagy system, and lysosomal membrane, and introduced the principles and methods of applying lysosomal detection in marine pollution monitoring. Bivalve shellfish digestive gland and fish liver are the most sensitive organs for lysosomal detection. By adopting the lysosomal detection techniques such as lysosomal membrane stability (LMS) test, neutral red retention time (NRRT) assay, morphological measurement (MM) of lysosome, immunohistochemical (Ih) assay of lysosomal marker enzyme, and electron microscopy (EM), the status of marine pollution can be evaluated. It was suggested that the lysosome could be used as a biomarker for monitoring marine environmental pollution. The advantages and disadvantages of lysosomal detection and some problems worthy of attention were analyzed, and the application prospects of lysosomal detection were discussed.

  5. Investigation of chemical properties and transport phenomena associated with pollutants in the atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Heather A.

    Under the Clean Air Act, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is required to determine which air pollutants are harmful to human health, then regulate, monitor and establish criteria levels for these pollutants. To accomplish this and for scientific advancement, integration of knowledge from several disciplines is required including: engineering, atmospheric science, chemistry and public health. Recently, a shift has been made to establish interdisciplinary research groups to better understand the atmospheric processes that govern the transport of pollutants and chemical reactions of species in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). The primary reason for interdisciplinary collaboration is the need for atmospheric processes to be treated as a coupled system, and to design experiments that measure meteorological, chemical and physical variables simultaneously so forecasting models can be improved (i.e., meteorological and chemical process models). This dissertation focuses on integrating research disciplines to provide a more complete framework to study pollutants in the ABL. For example, chemical characterization of particulate matter (PM) and the physical processes governing PM distribution and mixing are combined to provide more comprehensive data for source apportionment. Data from three field experiments were utilized to study turbulence, meteorological and chemical parameters in the ABL. Two air quality field studies were conducted on the U.S./Mexico border. The first was located in Yuma, AZ to investigate the spatial and temporal variability of PM in an urban environment and relate chemical properties of ambient aerosols to physical findings. The second border air quality study was conducted in Nogales, Sonora, Mexico to investigate the relationship between indoor and outdoor air quality in order to better correlate cooking fuel types and home activities to elevated indoor PM concentrations. The final study was executed in southern Idaho and focused on

  6. Monitoring of air pollution levels related to Charilaos Trikoupis Bridge.

    PubMed

    Sarigiannis, D A; Handakas, E J; Kermenidou, M; Zarkadas, I; Gotti, A; Charisiadis, P; Makris, K; Manousakas, M; Eleftheriadis, K; Karakitsios, S P

    2017-12-31

    Charilaos Trikoupis bridge is the longest cable bridge in Europe that connects Western Greece with the rest of the country. In this study, six air pollution monitoring campaigns (including major regulated air pollutants) were carried out from 2013 to 2015 at both sides of the bridge, located in the urban areas of Rio and Antirrio respectively. Pollution data were statistically analyzed and air quality was characterized using US and European air quality indices. From the overall campaign, it was found that air pollution levels were below the respective regulatory thresholds, but once at the site of Antirrio (26.4 and 52.2μg/m(3) for PM2.5 and ΡΜ10, respectively) during the 2nd winter period. Daily average PM10 and PM2.5 levels from two monitoring sites were well correlated to gaseous pollutant (CO, NO, NO2, NOx and SO2) levels, meteorological parameters and factor scores from Positive Matrix Factorization during the 3-year period. Moreover, the elemental composition of PM10 and PM2.5 was used for source apportionment. That analysis revealed that major emission sources were sulfates, mineral dust, biomass burning, sea salt, traffic and shipping emissions for PM10 and PM2.5, for both Rio and Antirrio. Seasonal variation indicates that sulfates, mineral dust and traffic emissions increased during the warm season of the year, while biomass burning become the dominant during the cold season. Overall, the contribution of the Charilaos Trikoupis bridge to the vicinity air pollution is very low. This is the result of the relatively low daily traffic volume (~10,000 vehicles per day), the respective traffic fleet composition (~81% of the traffic fleet are private vehicles) and the speed limit (80km/h) which does not favor traffic emissions. In addition, the strong and frequent winds further contribute to the rapid dispersion of the emitted pollutants. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. ATMOSPHERIC DEPOSITION MODELING AND MONITORING OF NUTRIENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This talk presents an overview of the capabilities and roles that regional atmospheric deposition models can play with respect to multi-media environmental problems. The focus is on nutrient deposition (nitrogen). Atmospheric deposition of nitrogen is an important contributor to...

  8. ATMOSPHERIC DEPOSITION MODELING AND MONITORING OF NUTRIENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This talk presents an overview of the capabilities and roles that regional atmospheric deposition models can play with respect to multi-media environmental problems. The focus is on nutrient deposition (nitrogen). Atmospheric deposition of nitrogen is an important contributor to...

  9. Assessment of space sensors for ocean pollution monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvarado, U. R.; Tomiyasu, K.; Gulatsi, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    Several passive and active microwave, as well as passive optical remote sensors, applicable to the monitoring of oil spills and waste discharges at sea, are considered. The discussed types of measurements relate to: (1) spatial distribution and properties of the pollutant, and (2) oceanic parameters needed to predict the movement of the pollutants and their impact upon land. The sensors, operating from satellite platforms at 700-900 km altitudes, are found to be useful in mapping the spread of oil in major oil spills and in addition, can be effective in producing wind and ocean parameters as inputs to oil trajectory and dispersion models. These capabilities can be used in countermeasures.

  10. Assessment of space sensors for ocean pollution monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvarado, U. R.; Tomiyasu, K.; Gulatsi, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    Several passive and active microwave, as well as passive optical remote sensors, applicable to the monitoring of oil spills and waste discharges at sea, are considered. The discussed types of measurements relate to: (1) spatial distribution and properties of the pollutant, and (2) oceanic parameters needed to predict the movement of the pollutants and their impact upon land. The sensors, operating from satellite platforms at 700-900 km altitudes, are found to be useful in mapping the spread of oil in major oil spills and in addition, can be effective in producing wind and ocean parameters as inputs to oil trajectory and dispersion models. These capabilities can be used in countermeasures.

  11. Monitoring Mediterranean marine pollution using remote sensing and hydrodynamic modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Loggia, Goffredo; Capodici, Fulvio; Ciraolo, Giuseppe; Drago, Aldo; Maltese, Antonino

    2011-11-01

    Human activities contaminate both coastal areas and open seas, even though impacts are different in terms of pollutants, ecosystems and recovery time. In particular, Mediterranean offshore pollution is mainly related to maritime transport of oil, accounting for 25% of the global maritime traffic and, during the last 25 years, for nearly 7% of the world oil accidents, thus causing serious biological impacts on both open sea and coastal zone habitats. This paper provides a general review of maritime pollution monitoring using integrated approaches of remote sensing and hydrodynamic modeling; focusing on the main results of the MAPRES (Marine pollution monitoring and detection by aerial surveillance and satellite images) research project on the synergistic use of remote sensing, forecasting, cleanup measures and environmental consequences. The paper also investigates techniques of oil spill detection using SAR images, presenting the first results of "Monitoring of marine pollution due to oil slick", a COSMO-SkyMed funded research project where X-band SAR constellation images provided by the Italian Space Agency are used. Finally, the prospect of using real time observations of marine surface conditions is presented through CALYPSO project (CALYPSO-HF Radar Monitoring System and Response against Marine Oil Spills in the Malta Channel), partly financed by the EU under the Operational Programme Italia-Malta 2007-2013. The project concerns the setting up of a permanent and fully operational HF radar observing system, capable of recording surface currents (in real-time with hourly updates) in the stretch of sea between Malta and Sicily. A combined use of collected data and numerical models, aims to optimize intervention and response in the case of marine oil spills.

  12. Tundra uptake of atmospheric elemental mercury drives Arctic mercury pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obrist, Daniel; Agnan, Yannick; Jiskra, Martin; Olson, Christine L.; Colegrove, Dominique P.; Hueber, Jacques; Moore, Christopher W.; Sonke, Jeroen E.; Helmig, Detlev

    2017-07-01

    Anthropogenic activities have led to large-scale mercury (Hg) pollution in the Arctic. It has been suggested that sea-salt-induced chemical cycling of Hg (through ‘atmospheric mercury depletion events’, or AMDEs) and wet deposition via precipitation are sources of Hg to the Arctic in its oxidized form (Hg(II)). However, there is little evidence for the occurrence of AMDEs outside of coastal regions, and their importance to net Hg deposition has been questioned. Furthermore, wet-deposition measurements in the Arctic showed some of the lowest levels of Hg deposition via precipitation worldwide, raising questions as to the sources of high Arctic Hg loading. Here we present a comprehensive Hg-deposition mass-balance study, and show that most of the Hg (about 70%) in the interior Arctic tundra is derived from gaseous elemental Hg (Hg(0)) deposition, with only minor contributions from the deposition of Hg(II) via precipitation or AMDEs. We find that deposition of Hg(0)—the form ubiquitously present in the global atmosphere—occurs throughout the year, and that it is enhanced in summer through the uptake of Hg(0) by vegetation. Tundra uptake of gaseous Hg(0) leads to high soil Hg concentrations, with Hg masses greatly exceeding the levels found in temperate soils. Our concurrent Hg stable isotope measurements in the atmosphere, snowpack, vegetation and soils support our finding that Hg(0) dominates as a source to the tundra. Hg concentration and stable isotope data from an inland-to-coastal transect show high soil Hg concentrations consistently derived from Hg(0), suggesting that the Arctic tundra might be a globally important Hg sink. We suggest that the high tundra soil Hg concentrations might also explain why Arctic rivers annually transport large amounts of Hg to the Arctic Ocean.

  13. [Atmospheric pollution characteristic during fireworks burning time in spring festival in Quanzhou suburb].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jin-ping; Xu, Ya; Zhang, Fu-wang; Chen, Jin-sheng

    2011-05-01

    Atmospheric pollution characteristics during fireworks burning time in 2009 Spring Festival in Quangzhou suburb were studied. Particulate aerosol has been monitored and collected using real-time monitor and middle-volume sampler during fireworks burning time. The objectives of this study were to identify the contents and distributing characteristics of particles, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAHs) and water-soluble ions and to discuss sources of these pollutants. The results showed that PM2.5 and PM10 were increased significantly during fireworks burning time. The highest concentration of particles presented time of 00:57-01:27 on New Year's Eve, which the average concentration of PM2.5 and PM10 were reached 1102.43 microm(-3) and 1610.22 microg x m(-3) in 30 min. The concentration of particle- and gas-PAHs were 54.18 ng x m(-1) and 47.10 ng x m(-3), respectively, during fireworks burning time in New Year's Eve, which were higher than that in the normal day. It can be judged by the diagnostic ratios that the primary source of PAHs in Quanzhou suburb were the combustion of coal, biomass and the exhaust emission from diesel vehicles in this region. Results of water-soluble ions indicated that fireworks burning were the main reason to lead to higher concentration of these ions during Spring Festival. Moreover, pollution gases of NOx and SO2 that were origined from fireworks burning, coal combustion and exhaust emission from motor vehicle were supplied precursors to form secondary pollutants, such as NO3- and SO4(2-).

  14. Atmospheric monitoring with an infrared radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniel, M. K.; Chadwick, P. M.

    2015-03-01

    The molecular atmosphere has a number of windows where it is effectively transparent to electromagnetic radiation, one of these being in the infrared 8-14 micron region. The presence of clouds and aerosols, which are more effective emitters of infrared radiation, in the atmosphere show up as an increase in the effective brightness temperature compared to the clear sky. This talk will cover the results from operating a scanning radiometer at the H.E.S.S. site in Namibia in determining atmospheric conditions.

  15. Lichens and moss as bioindicators and bioaccumulators in air pollution monitoring.

    PubMed

    Palmieri, F; Neri, R; Benco, C; Serracca, L

    1997-01-01

    In this study, we review research conducted in the La Spezia district during 1989, 1992, and 1994, using lichens and moss as indicators of air pollution. SO2 pollution was examined by means of an Index of Atmospheric Purity (IAP) based on the frequency of epiphytic lichen within a sampling grid. Metal deposits were estimated using the lichen Parmelia caperata and the moss Hypnum cupressiforme as bioaccumulators. IAP maps show progressive air quality improvement from 1989 to 1994. This trend correlates to a decrease in SO2 emissions during recent years that is attributed to the use of methane for residential heating and the closing of a coal-fired power plant. Metal contamination maps show that the most polluted area is now in the southeastern part of the gulf. The pattern of pollution coincides with the location of the chief pollution sources in the area. From 1989 to 1994, the metal concentrations in lichens decreased, but metal deposits in the southeastern area were cause for concern. High concentrations of lead in the area are related to emissions from a waste incinerator and a plant that produces lead oxide. Epidemiological investigations reveal that the area population has the highest levels of lead in their blood. The use of bioindicators and bioaccumulators permits long-term and large-scale monitoring of environmental pollutant levels in full agreement with traditional methods.

  16. Tracking of atmospheric release of pollution using unmanned aerial vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šmídl, Václav; Hofman, Radek

    2013-03-01

    Tracking of an atmospheric release of pollution is usually based on measurements provided by stationary networks, occasionally complemented with deployment of mobile sensors. In this paper, we extend the existing concept to the case where the sensors are carried onboard of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). The decision theoretic framework is used to design an unsupervised algorithm that navigates the UAVs to minimize the selected loss function. A particle filter with a problem-tailored proposal function was used as the underlying data assimilation procedure. A range of simulated twin experiments was performed on the problem of tracking an accidental release of radiation from a nuclear power plant in realistic settings. The main uncertainty was in the released activity and in parametric bias of the numerical weather forecast. It was shown that the UAVs can complement the existing stationary network to improve the accuracy of data assimilation. Moreover, two autonomously navigated UAVs alone were shown to provide assimilation results comparable to those obtained using the stationary network with more than thirty sensors.

  17. Monitoring and modelling of biosphere/atmosphere exchange of gases and aerosols in Europe.

    PubMed

    Erisman, Jan Willem; Vermeulen, Alex; Hensen, Arjan; Flechard, Chris; Dämmgen, Ulrich; Fowler, David; Sutton, Mark; Grünhage, Ludger; Tuovinen, Juha-Pekka

    2005-02-01

    Monitoring and modelling of deposition of air pollutants is essential to develop and evaluate policies to abate the effects related to air pollution and to determine the losses of pollutants from the atmosphere. Techniques for monitoring wet deposition fluxes are widely applied. A recent intercomparison experiment, however, showed that the uncertainty in wet deposition is relatively high, up to 40%, apart from the fact that most samplers are biased because of a dry deposition contribution. Wet deposition amounts to about 80% of the total deposition in Europe with a range of 10-90% and uncertainty should therefore be decreased. During recent years the monitoring of dry deposition has become possible. Three sites have been operational for 5 years. The data are useful for model development, but also for model evaluation and monitoring of progress in policy. Data show a decline in SO(2) dry deposition, whereas nitrogen deposition remained constant. Furthermore, surface affinities for pollutants changed leading to changes in deposition. Deposition models have been further developed and tested with dry deposition measurements and total deposition measurements on forests as derived from throughfall data. The comparison is reasonable given the measurement uncertainties. Progress in ozone surface exchange modelling and monitoring shows that stomatal uptake can be quantified with reasonable accuracy, but external surface uptake yields highest uncertainty.

  18. Mass identification of the neutral products generated in the plasma treatment of polluted atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seymour, David

    2013-09-01

    Plasmas produced using Dielectric Barrier Discharge (DBD) devices are very effective in the abatement of air pollution resulting from, for example, the emission of volatile organic compounds (VCOs) by a range of industrial and agricultural processes. The development and monitoring of effective DBD systems can be investigated by advanced mass spectrometric methods specifically configured for analysis at high and atmospheric pressures The present work involves the operation of a small DBD reactor which uses either a helium or nitrogen carrier gas to sustain the plasma to which may be added reactive gases, such as oxygen, as well as samples of pollutants such as chlorinated hydrocarbons, including trichloroethylene. The mass spectrometric analysis was performed using a specially configured system manufactured by Hiden Analytical Ltd. The DBD source may also be combined with a catalyst for plasma-enhanced catalysis. The neutral products of the reactions proceeding in the plasma at atmospheric pressure are sampled through the capillary sampling system which also reduces the pressure of the gas mixture delivered to the ionisation source of the quadrupole mass spectrometer. The ions produced are subsequently mass identified. We describe typical data and comment on the advantages of this technique.

  19. Hydrogen in the atmosphere: Observations above a forest canopy in a polluted environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Diana H.; Wofsy, Steven C.; Fehlau, Brian P.; Gottlieb, Elaine W.; Elkins, James W.; Dutton, Geoffrey S.; Novelli, Paul C.

    2003-03-01

    Long-term in situ observations of atmospheric concentrations of molecular hydrogen were monitored every 24 minutes for three years (1996-1998) above Harvard Forest, Massachusetts, in concert with measurements of carbon monoxide and twelve other trace gases. A seasonal cycle with a spring maximum and autumn minimum was observed. The diurnal cycle was characterized by a morning minimum and an afternoon maximum, reflecting the combined effects of uptake by soils and boundary height fluctuations. Enhancements of H2 concentrations in pollution events, concurrent with winds from the southwest, were typically 100-200 ppb above the background seasonal cycle. The mean molar ratio of H2 and CO (ΔH2/ΔCO) in pollution plumes was 0.396 ± 0.050 ppb/ppb. The results agree with expectations from the water-gas equilibrium (CO + H2O ↔ CO2 + H2) for conditions in automobile engines and with car emission data. These observations suggest that automobiles are the major anthropogenic source of atmospheric hydrogen and that the ratio of ΔH2/ΔCO has changed little as emission controls have taken effect.

  20. Development of wireless sensor network for monitoring indoor air pollutant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saad, Shaharil Mad; Shakaff, Ali Yeon Md; Saad, Abdul Rahman Mohd; Yusof @ Kamarudin, Azman Muhamad

    2015-05-01

    The air that we breathe with everyday contains variety of contaminants and particles. Some of these contaminants and particles are hazardous to human health. Most of the people don't realize that the content of air they being exposed to whether it was a good or bad air quality. The air quality whether in indoor or outdoor environment can be influenced by physical factors like dust particles, gaseous pollutants (including carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide and volatile organic compounds) and biological like molds and bacteria growth which largely depend on temperature and humidity condition of a room. These kinds of pollutants can affect human health, physical reaction, comfort or work performance. In this study, a wireless sensor network (WSN) monitoring system for monitor air pollutant in indoor environment was developed. The system was divided into three parts: web-based interface program, sensing module and a base station. The measured data was displayed on the web which is can be accessed by the user. The result shows that the overall measured parameters were meet the acceptable limit, requirement and criteria of indoor air pollution inside the building. The research can be used to improve the indoor air quality level in order to create a comfortable working and healthy environment for the occupants inside the building.

  1. Pollutant monitoring of aircraft exhaust with multispectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkson, Emily E.; Messinger, David W.

    2016-10-01

    Communities surrounding local airports are becoming increasingly concerned about the aircraft pollutants emitted during the landing-takeoff (LTO) cycle, and their potential for negative health effects. Chicago, Los Angeles, Boston and London have all recently been featured in the news regarding concerns over the amount of airport pollution being emitted on a daily basis, and several studies have been published on the increased risks of cancer for those living near airports. There are currently no inexpensive, portable, and unobtrusive sensors that can monitor the spatial and temporal nature of jet engine exhaust plumes. In this work we seek to design a multispectral imaging system that is capable of tracking exhaust plumes during the engine idle phase, with a specific focus on unburned hydrocarbon (UHC) emissions. UHCs are especially potent to local air quality, and their strong absorption features allow them to act as a spatial and temporal plume tracer. Using a Gaussian plume to radiometrically model jet engine exhaust, we have begun designing an inexpensive, portable, and unobtrusive imaging system to monitor the relative amount of pollutants emitted by aircraft in the idle phase. The LWIR system will use two broadband filters to detect emitted UHCs. This paper presents the spatial and temporal radiometric models of the exhaust plume from a typical jet engine used on 737s. We also select filters for plume tracking, and propose an imaging system layout for optimal detectibility. In terms of feasibility, a multispectral imaging system will be two orders of magnitude cheaper than current unobtrusive methods (PTR-MS) used to monitor jet engine emissions. Large-scale impacts of this work will include increased capabilities to monitor local airport pollution, and the potential for better-informed decision-making regarding future developments to airports.

  2. Atmospheric aerosol monitoring by an elastic Scheimpflug lidar system.

    PubMed

    Mei, Liang; Brydegaard, Mikkel

    2015-11-30

    This work demonstrates a new approach - Scheimpflug lidar - for atmospheric aerosol monitoring. The atmospheric backscattering echo of a high-power continuous-wave laser diode is received by a Newtonian telescope and recorded by a tilted imaging sensor satisfying the Scheimpflug condition. The principles as well as the lidar equation are discussed in details. A Scheimpflug lidar system operating at around 808 nm is developed and employed for continuous atmospheric aerosol monitoring at daytime. Localized emission, atmospheric variation, as well as the changes of cloud height are observed from the recorded lidar signals. The extinction coefficient is retrieved according to the slope method for a homogeneous atmosphere. This work opens up new possibilities of using a compact and robust Scheimpflug lidar system for atmospheric aerosol remote sensing.

  3. Effect of Atmospheric Pollutants on the Air Quality in Tunisia

    PubMed Central

    Bouchlaghem, Karim; Nsom, Blaise

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the evolution of Saharan dust advection when the PM10 (particles with an aerodynamic diameter below 10 μm) concentration exceeds standard limits in different Tunisian sites. Meteorological and concentration data (from 2004 to 2010) obtained from several monitoring stations and in situ measurements were used to identify African dust change in seasonal occurrence, their source origin, and their impact on surface PM10 concentrations. We pointed out that the Saharan dust contribution caused frequently the surpassing of the maximum number of days in excess of EU standard limits as well as of the maximum yearly average in the Mediterranean Tunisian coasts. The maximum daily concentration reaches 439 μg/m3 during the Saharan events. The decrease in particulate levels recorded at the end of each event is due to the injection of European air masses and rainfalls. Primary pollutants peaks were much higher in winter than in summer which can be explained on the basis of the lower ventilation and mixing. PMID:22654641

  4. Mobile lidar complex for ecological monitoring of the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boreisho, Anatoly S.; Volodenko, V. A.; Gryaznov, N. A.; Malamed, Evgeny R.; Mendov, Yu. N.; Moshkov, V. L.; Pantaleev, S. M.; Pankratiev, A. V.; Finagin, A. E.; Chakchir, S. Y.; Frolov-Bagreev, Leonid Y.; Konyaev, M. A.

    2004-06-01

    Mobile lidar complex provides monitoring of the atmosphere at the ranges up to 15 km in the wide spectral range from UV to mid IR. Three types of lasers are used for atmosphere probing via a common telescopic and scanner system. First tests of complex operability have shown high reliability of the equipment and realization of the main parameters.

  5. Atmospheric monitoring in MAGIC and data corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fruck, Christian; Gaug, Markus

    2015-03-01

    A method for analyzing returns of a custom-made "micro"-LIDAR system, operated alongside the two MAGIC telescopes is presented. This method allows for calculating the transmission through the atmospheric boundary layer as well as thin cloud layers. This is achieved by applying exponential fits to regions of the back-scattering signal that are dominated by Rayleigh scattering. Making this real-time transmission information available for the MAGIC data stream allows to apply atmospheric corrections later on in the analysis. Such corrections allow for extending the effective observation time of MAGIC by including data taken under adverse atmospheric conditions. In the future they will help reducing the systematic uncertainties of energy and flux.

  6. Remote sensing observations for monitoring and mathematical simulations of transboundary air pollutants migration from Siberian mass wildfires to Kazakhstan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaipov, I. V.

    2017-03-01

    Anthropogenic and natural factors have increased the power of wildfires in massive Siberian woodlands. As a consequence, the expansion of burned areas and increase in the duration of the forest fire season have led to the release of significant amounts of gases and aerosols. Therefore, it is important to understand the impact of wildland fires on air quality, atmospheric composition, climate and accurately describe the distribution of combustion products in time and space. The most effective research tool is the regional hydrodynamic model of the atmosphere, coupled with the model of pollutants transport and chemical interaction. Taking into account the meteorological parameters and processes of chemical interaction of impurities, complex use of remote sensing techniques for monitoring massive forest fires and mathematical modeling of long-range transport of pollutants in the atmosphere, allow to evaluate spatial and temporal scale of the phenomenon and calculate the quantitative characteristics of pollutants depending on the height and distance of migration.

  7. Atmospheric modeling of air pollution. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). NewSearch

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-11-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the development, validation, and application of mathematical models for air pollution studies of mobile and stationary pollution sources. The models cover a wide range of mathematical complexity, utilizing factors such as terrain features, wake effects, diffusion, atmospheric stability, atmospheric wind, precipitation scavenging, gravitational deposition, atmospheric photochemistry, and urban heat islands. The models are used to support environmental impact studies and effects of proposed emission control strategies. Excluded are models of stratospheric pollution behavior, as applied to high flying aircraft. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  8. Atmospheric modeling of air pollution. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the development, validation, and application of mathematical models for air pollution studies of mobile and stationary pollution sources. The models cover a wide range of mathematical complexity, utilizing factors such as terrain features, wake effects, diffusion, atmospheric stability, atmospheric wind, precipitation scavenging, gravitational deposition, atmospheric photochemistry, and urban heat islands. The models are used to support environmental impact studies and effects of proposed emission control strategies. Excluded are models of stratospheric pollution behavior, as applied to high flying aircraft.(Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  9. Atmospheric modeling of air pollution. (Latest citations from the NTIS database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-02-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the development, validation, and application of mathematical models for air pollution studies of mobile and stationary pollution sources. The models cover a wide range of mathematical complexity, utilizing factors such as terrain features, wake effects, diffusion, atmospheric stability, atmospheric wind, precipitation scavenging, gravitational deposition, atmospheric photochemistry, and urban heat islands. The models are used to support environmental impact studies and effects of proposed emission control strategies. Excluded are models of stratospheric pollution behavior, as applied to high flying aircraft. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  10. National Marine Pollution Orogram: federal plan for ocean pollution research, development, and monitoring, fiscal years 1988-1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-09-01

    The National Marine Pollution Program is the composite of all programs funded by the Federal Government that conduct marine pollution research, development, or monitoring activities. In FY 1988, the Federal Government expended an estimated $107.2 million for marine pollution research and monitoring activities. These activities were funded by 11 Federal departments and independent agencies and included studies pertaining to pollution in coastal areas, estuaries, open oceans, and the Great Lakes. The Plan represents the fourth such document in the continuing interagency planning process called for in the National Ocean Pollution Planning Act of 1978 (P.L. 95-273), as amended. As required by the Act, a comprehensive 5-year Plan for the overall Federal effort is prepared and updated every 3 years. The Plan identifies national marine pollution needs and problems, describes the existing Federal capability for conducting marine pollution research and monitoring.

  11. Monitoring of Air Pollution by Satellites (MAPS), phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludwig, C. B.; Malkmus, W.; Griggs, M.; Bartle, E. R.

    1972-01-01

    Results are reported upon which the design of a satellite remote gas filter correlation (RGFC) instrument can be based. Although a final decision about the feasibility of measuring some of the pollutants with the required accuracy is still outstanding and subject to further theoretical and experimental verifications, viable concepts are presented which permit the initiation of the design phase. The pollutants which are of concern in the troposphere and stratosphere were selected. The infrared bands of these pollutants were identified, together with the bands of interfering gases, and the line parameters of the pollutants as well as interfering gases were generated through a computer program. Radiative transfer calculations (line-by-line) were made to establish the radiation levels at the top of the atmosphere and the signal levels at the detector of the RGFC instrument. Based upon these results the channels for the RGFC were selected. Finally, the problem areas, which need further investigations, were delineated and the supporting data requirements were established.

  12. Air pollution in Latin America: Bottom-up Vehicular Emissions Inventory and Atmospheric Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibarra Espinosa, S.; Vela, A. V.; Calderon, M. G.; Carlos, G.; Ynoue, R.

    2016-12-01

    Air pollution is a global environmental and health problem. Population of Latin America are facing air quality risks due to high level of air pollution. According to World Health Organization (WHO; 2016), several Latin American cities have high level of pollution. Emissions inventories are a key tool for air quality, however they normally present lack of quality and adequate documentation in developing countries. This work aims to develop air quality assessments in Latin American countries by 1) develop a high resolution emissions inventory of vehicles, and 2) simulate air pollutant concentrations. The bottom-up vehicular emissions inventory used was obtained with the REMI model (Ibarra et al., 2016) which allows to interpolate traffic over road network of Open Street Map to estimate vehicular emissions 24-h, each day of the week. REMI considers several parameters, among them the average age of fleet which was associated with gross domestic product (GDP) per capita. The estimated pollutants are CO, NOx, HC, PM2.5, NO, NO2, CO2, N2O, COV, NH3 and Fuel Consumption. The emissions inventory was performed at the biggest cities, including every capital of Latin America's countries. Initial results shows that the cities with most CO emissions are Buenos Aires 162800 (t/year), São Paulo 152061 (t/year), Campinas 151567 (t/year) and Brasilia 144332 (t/year). The results per capita shows that the city with most CO emissions per capita is Campinas, with 130 (kgCO/hab/year), showed in figure 1. This study also cover high resolution air quality simulations with WRF-Chem main cities in Latin America. Results will be assessed comparing: fuel estimates with local fuel sales, traffic count interpolation with available traffic data set at each city, and comparison between air pollutant simulations with air monitoring observation data. Ibarra, S., R. Ynoue, and S. Mhartain. 2016: "High Resolution Vehicular Emissions Inventory for the Megacity of São Paulo." Manuscript submitted to

  13. Infrasound monitoring, acoustic-gravity waves and global atmospheric dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanc, E.; Le Pichon, A.; Ceranna, L.; Farges, T.

    2008-12-01

    For the verification of the Comprehensive nuclear Test Ban Treaty, the International Monitoring System has been developed. As part of this system, the infrasound network provides an unique opportunity to monitor continuously pressure waves in the atmosphere. Such infrasonic waves propagate in the channel formed by the temperature and wind gradients of the atmosphere. Long term observations provide information about the evolution of the propagation conditions and then of atmospheric parameters. The monitoring of continuous sources, as ocean swell, gives the characteristics of the stratospheric wave channel submitted to stratospheric warming effects. Large scale gravity waves, which are also observed by the network, produce a forcing of the stratosphere at low and middle latitudes and long-lived changes in the stratospheric circulation towards high latitudes, leading to fluctuations in the strength of the polar vortex. These fluctuations move down to the lower stratosphere with possible effects on the tropospheric temperature. Gravity wave monitoring in Antarctica reveals a gravity wave system probably related to the wind effect over mountains. At mid latitudes an additional main sources of disturbances is the thunderstorm activity. The infrasound monitoring system allows a better knowledge of the atmospheric wave systems and of the dynamics of the atmosphere. In return this better knowledge of the wave systems allow a better identification of the possible explosion signals in the background of the atmospheric waves and then to improve the discrimination methods

  14. An experimental/analytical program to assess the utility of lidar for pollution monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mills, F. S.; Allen, R. J.; Butler, C. F.; Kindle, E. C.

    1978-01-01

    The development and demonstration of lidar techniques for the remote measurement of atmospheric constituents and transport processes in the lower troposphere was carried out. Particular emphasis was given to techniques for monitoring SO2 and particulates, the principal pollutants in power plant and industrial plumes. Data from a plume dispersion study conducted in Maryland during September and October 1976 were reduced, and a data base was assembled which is available to the scientific community for plume model verification. A UV Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) was built, and preliminary testing was done.

  15. Metal determination by EDXRF in lichens. A contribution to pollutants monitoring.

    PubMed

    Caniglia, G; Calliari, I; Celin, L; Tollardo, A M

    1994-01-01

    Samples of Evernia prunastri, collected in a mountainous zone, were exposed in urban and highly industrialized areas in order to monitor the atmospheric pollution. Amounts of Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, and Pb were determined by EDXRF spectrometry in secondary target excitation mode and in the thin film approach. An increase in metal concentrations was noted on all sites with time exposition increases, but the highest final amounts were observed on those thalli mounted near a steel works. The washing procedure influenced the concentration of all the elements as previously verified on Pseudevernia furfuracea.

  16. Field monitoring of toxic organic pollution in the sediments of Pearl River estuary and its tributaries.

    PubMed

    Fu, J; Wang, Z; Mai, B; Kang, Y

    2001-01-01

    Field monitoring of the toxic organic compounds (PCBs, PAHs, organochlorine pesticides) in the top sediments of Pearl River Estuary and its up-streams were made. It was found that the highest concentrations of these toxic organic compounds occurred in the sediment sampled at Macau inner harbor (ZB013), which is a sink of suspended fine particles transported from the upstream waterways. Because of the affinity of the hydrophobic organic compounds (PAHs, PCBs) for the solid phase, these fine particle depositions led to accumulation of these compounds in the sediment of Macau. The atmospheric dry deposition may be another source of the toxic organic pollution in the sediment.

  17. Identifying atmospheric monitoring needs for Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casserly, Dennis M.

    1989-01-01

    The atmospheric monitoring needs for Space Station Freedom were identified by examining the following from an industrial hygiene perspective: the experiences of past missions; ground based tests of proposed life support systems; the unique experimental and manufacturing facilities; the contaminant load model; metabolic production; and a fire. A target list of compounds to be monitored is presented and information is provided relative to the frequency of analysis, concentration ranges, and locations for monitoring probes.

  18. Report to the congress on ocean pollution, monitoring and research October 1980 through September 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-07-01

    This report summarizes the results of FY 1981 National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) monitoring and research efforts under Title II of the Marine Protection, Research, and Sanctuaries Act of 1972 (P.L. 92-532). Section 201 of Title II assigns responsibility to the Department of Commerce for a comprehensive and continuing program of monitoring and research regarding the effects of dumping material into ocean waters, coastal waters, and the Great Lakes. Section 202 of Title II directs the Secretary of Commerce, in consultation with other appropriate parts of the U.S. Government, to 'initiate a comprehensive and continuing program of research with respect to the possible long-range effects of pollution, overfishing, and man-induced changes of ocean ecosystems.' The legislation also directs the Secretary of Commerce to report the findings from the monitoring and research programs to the Congress at least once a year. There are intrinsic difficulties, however, in distinguishing 'long-range' effects from the 'acute' effects of ocean dumping, or more generally of marine pollution. In response to these considerations and to the responsibilities assigned to NOAA under the National Ocean Pollution Planning Act (P.L. 95-273), NOAA has consolidated and coordinated its research efforts in these areas to make the overall program more cost-effective and productive.

  19. Modeling and evaluation of urban pollution events of atmospheric heavy metals from a large Cu-smelter.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bing; Stein, Ariel F; Castell, Nuria; Gonzalez-Castanedo, Yolanda; Sanchez de la Campa, A M; de la Rosa, J D

    2016-01-01

    Metal smelting and processing are highly polluting activities that have a strong influence on the levels of heavy metals in air, soil, and crops. We employ an atmospheric transport and dispersion model to predict the pollution levels originated from the second largest Cu-smelter in Europe. The model predicts that the concentrations of copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), and arsenic (As) in an urban area close to the Cu-smelter can reach 170, 70, and 30 ng m−3, respectively. The model captures all the observed urban pollution events, but the magnitude of the elemental concentrations is predicted to be lower than that of the observed values; ~300, ~500, and ~100 ng m−3 for Cu, Zn, and As, respectively. The comparison between model and observations showed an average correlation coefficient of 0.62 ± 0.13. The simulation shows that the transport of heavy metals reaches a peak in the afternoon over the urban area. The under-prediction in the peak is explained by the simulated stronger winds compared with monitoring data. The stronger simulated winds enhance the transport and dispersion of heavy metals to the regional area, diminishing the impact of pollution events in the urban area. This model, driven by high resolution meteorology (2 km in horizontal), predicts the hourly-interval evolutions of atmospheric heavy metal pollutions in the close by urban area of industrial hotspot.

  20. Atmospheric pollutants and hospital admissions due to pneumonia in children

    PubMed Central

    Negrisoli, Juliana; Nascimento, Luiz Fernando C.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze the relationship between exposure to air pollutants and hospitalizations due to pneumonia in children of Sorocaba, São Paulo, Brazil. METHODS: Time series ecological study, from 2007 to 2008. Daily data were obtained from the State Environmental Agency for Pollution Control for particulate matter, nitric oxide, nitrogen dioxide, ozone, besides air temperature and relative humidity. The data concerning pneumonia admissions were collected in the public health system of Sorocaba. Correlations between the variables of interest using Pearson cofficient were calculated. Models with lags from zero to five days after exposure to pollutants were performed to analyze the association between the exposure to environmental pollutants and hospital admissions. The analysis used the generalized linear model of Poisson regression, being significant p<0.05. RESULTS: There were 1,825 admissions for pneumonia, with a daily mean of 2.5±2.1. There was a strong correlation between pollutants and hospital admissions, except for ozone. Regarding the Poisson regression analysis with the multi-pollutant model, only nitrogen dioxide was statistically significant in the same day (relative risk - RR=1.016), as well as particulate matter with a lag of four days (RR=1.009) after exposure to pollutants. CONCLUSIONS: There was an acute effect of exposure to nitrogen dioxide and a later effect of exposure to particulate matter on children hospitalizations for pneumonia in Sorocaba. PMID:24473956

  1. Tube bundle system: for monitoring of coal mine atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Zipf, R Karl; Marchewka, W; Mohamed, K; Addis, J; Karnack, F

    2013-05-01

    A tube bundle system (TBS) is a mechanical system for continuously drawing gas samples through tubes from multiple monitoring points located in an underground coal mine. The gas samples are drawn via vacuum pump to the surface and are typically analyzed for oxygen, methane, carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide. Results of the gas analyses are displayed and recorded for further analysis. Trends in the composition of the mine atmosphere, such as increasing methane or carbon monoxide concentration, can be detected early, permitting rapid intervention that prevents problems, such as a potentially explosive atmosphere behind seals, fire or spontaneous combustion. TBS is a well-developed technology and has been used in coal mines around the world for more than 50 years. Most longwall coal mines in Australia deploy a TBS, usually with 30 to 40 monitoring points as part of their atmospheric monitoring. The primary uses of a TBS are detecting spontaneous combustion and maintaining sealed areas inert. The TBS might also provide mine atmosphere gas composition data after a catastrophe occurs in an underground mine, if the sampling tubes are not damaged. TBSs are not an alternative to statutory gas and ventilation airflow monitoring by electronic sensors or people; rather, they are an option to consider in an overall mine atmosphere monitoring strategy. This paper describes the hardware, software and operation of a TBS and presents one example of typical data from a longwall coal mine.

  2. Fluid mechanics simulation of fog formation associated with polluted atmosphere produced by energy related fuel combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Liaw, G. S.

    1980-01-01

    It is noted that large quantities of atmospheric aerosols with composition SO4(-2), NO3(-1), and NH4(+1) have been detected in highly industrialized areas. Most aerosol products come from energy-related fuel combustion. Fluid mechanics simulation of both microphysical and macrophysical processes is considered in studying the time dependent evolution of the saturation spectra of condensation nuclei associated with polluted and clean atmospheres during the time periods of advection fog formation. The results demonstrate that the condensation nuclei associated with a polluted atmosphere provide more favorable conditions than condensation nuclei associated with a clean atmosphere to produce dense advection fog, and that attaining a certain degree of supersaturation is not necessarily required for the formation of advection fog having condensation nuclei associated with a polluted atmosphere.

  3. Fluid mechanics simulation of fog formation associated with polluted atmosphere produced by energy related fuel combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Liaw, G. S.

    1980-01-01

    It is noted that large quantities of atmospheric aerosols with composition SO4(-2), NO3(-1), and NH4(+1) have been detected in highly industrialized areas. Most aerosol products come from energy-related fuel combustion. Fluid mechanics simulation of both microphysical and macrophysical processes is considered in studying the time dependent evolution of the saturation spectra of condensation nuclei associated with polluted and clean atmospheres during the time periods of advection fog formation. The results demonstrate that the condensation nuclei associated with a polluted atmosphere provide more favorable conditions than condensation nuclei associated with a clean atmosphere to produce dense advection fog, and that attaining a certain degree of supersaturation is not necessarily required for the formation of advection fog having condensation nuclei associated with a polluted atmosphere.

  4. The role of forest in mitigating the impact of atmospheric dust pollution in a mixed landscape.

    PubMed

    Santos, Artur; Pinho, Pedro; Munzi, Silvana; Botelho, Maria João; Palma-Oliveira, José Manuel; Branquinho, Cristina

    2017-05-01

    Atmospheric dust pollution, especially particulate matter below 2.5 μm, causes 3.3 million premature deaths per year worldwide. Although pollution sources are increasingly well known, the role of ecosystems in mitigating their impact is still poorly known. Our objective was to investigate the role of forests located in the surrounding of industrial and urban areas in reducing atmospheric dust pollution. This was tested using lichen transplants as biomonitors in a Mediterranean regional area with high levels of dry deposition. After a multivariate analysis, we have modeled the maximum pollution load expected for each site taking into consideration nearby pollutant sources. The difference between maximum expected pollution load and the observed values was explained by the deposition in nearby forests. Both the dust pollution and the ameliorating effect of forested areas were then mapped. The results showed that forest located nearby pollution sources plays an important role in reducing atmospheric dust pollution, highlighting their importance in the provision of the ecosystem service of air purification.

  5. New Approach to Monitor Transboundary Particulate Pollution over Northeast Asia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, M. E.; Song, C. H.; Park, R. S.; Lee, Jaehwa; Kim, J.; Lee, S.; Woo, J. H.; Carmichael, G. R.; Eck, Thomas F.; Holben, Brent N.; hide

    2014-01-01

    A new approach to more accurately monitor and evaluate transboundary particulate matter (PM) pollution is introduced based on aerosol optical products from Korea's Geostationary Ocean Color Imager (GOCI). The area studied is Northeast Asia (including eastern parts of China, the Korean peninsula and Japan), where GOCI has been monitoring since June 2010. The hourly multi-spectral aerosol optical data that were retrieved from GOCI sensor onboard geostationary satellite COMS (Communication, Ocean, and Meteorology Satellite) through the Yonsei aerosol retrieval algorithm were first presented and used in this study. The GOCI-retrieved aerosol optical data are integrated with estimated aerosol distributions from US EPA Models-3/CMAQ (Community Multi-scale Air Quality) v4.5.1 model simulations via data assimilation technique, thereby making the aerosol data spatially continuous and available even for cloud contamination cells. The assimilated aerosol optical data are utilized to provide quantitative estimates of transboundary PM pollution from China to the Korean peninsula and Japan. For the period of 1 April to 31 May, 2011 this analysis yields estimates that AOD as a proxy for PM2.5 or PM10 during long-range transport events increased by 117-265% compared to background average AOD (aerosol optical depth) at the four AERONET sites in Korea, and average AOD increases of 121% were found when averaged over the entire Korean peninsula. This paper demonstrates that the use of multi-spectral AOD retrievals from geostationary satellites can improve estimates of transboundary PM pollution. Such data will become more widely available later this decade when new sensors such as the GEMS (Geostationary Environment Monitoring Spectrometer) and GOCI-2 are scheduled to be launched.

  6. Monitoring PM2.5 in the Atmosphere by Using Terahertz Time-Domain Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Honglei; Zhao, Kun; Bao, Rima; Xiao, Lizhi

    2016-09-01

    The real-time monitoring of the air pollution with multiple sources is of great significance for pollution control and environmental protection. In this paper, we presented a study of terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) as a direct tool for monitoring the component and content of PM2.5 in atmosphere. Due to the THz absorption, the intensities of the peaks in THz-TDS decreased with the augment of PM2.5 and were proportional to the PM2.5 content. The ratio of absorbance A to PM2.5 reflected a basically unchanged tendency, indicating the little change of principal elements under the pollution degree. In the high-pollution condition, a lot of SO2 from vehicle and factory was emitted into air. The elements, such as S and O from anions, had a stronger absorption effect in THz range. Based on the absorbance spectra, the absorption tendencies with PM2.5 over the whole range were validated by principal component analysis and the quantitative model with a high correlation was built by using back propagation artificial neural network. BPANN model improved the precision of linear fitting between peak intensities and PM2.5. The research demonstrates that THz-TDS is a promising tool for fast, direct, and reliable monitoring in environmental applications.

  7. Toward the next generation of air quality monitoring: Persistent organic pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Hayley; MacLeod, Matthew; Guardans, Ramon; Scheringer, Martin; Barra, Ricardo; Harner, Tom; Zhang, Gan

    2013-12-01

    Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs) are global pollutants that can migrate over long distances and bioaccumulate through food webs, posing health risks to wildlife and humans. Multilateral environmental agreements, such as the Stockholm Convention on POPs, were enacted to identify POPs and establish the conditions to control their release, production and use. A Global Monitoring Plan was initiated under the Stockholm Convention calling for POP monitoring in air as a core medium; however long temporal trends (>10 years) of atmospheric POPs are only available at a few selected sites. Spatial coverage of air monitoring for POPs has recently significantly improved with the introduction and advancement of passive air samplers. Here, we review the status of air monitoring and modeling activities and note major uncertainties in data comparability, deficiencies of air monitoring and modeling in urban and alpine areas, and lack of emission inventories for most POPs. A vision for an internationally-integrated strategic monitoring plan is proposed which could provide consistent and comparable monitoring data for POPs supported and supplemented by global and regional transport models. Key recommendations include developing expertise in all aspects of air monitoring to ensure data comparability and consistency; partnering with existing air quality and meteorological networks to leverage synergies; facilitating data sharing with international data archives; and expanding spatial coverage with passive air samplers. Enhancing research on the stability of particle-bound chemicals is needed to assess exposure and deposition in urban areas, and to elucidate long-range transport. Conducting targeted measurement campaigns in specific source areas would enhance regional models which can be extrapolated to similar regions to estimate emissions. Ultimately, reverse-modeling combined with air measurements can be used to derive “emission” as an indicator to assess environmental

  8. Lidar network for atmosphere environment monitoring of the city

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Yongjiang; Zhao, Hongwei; Sun, Fuxing; Zhao, Yu; Chen, Xiangjun

    2000-10-01

    The big city is a center of the economic and political for every country and territory. The population is coarctation$DALindustry is focus and traffic is developed in the city. Especially, there are a lot of factories and cars. Burning coal for heating and life garbage are more too. It is a mostly cause beget atmosphere polluted. The Network can be availability inspects the buildup of the atmosphere, it's 3-D static state distributing and dynamic distributing. Also can be coarsely inspect at the car and helicopter. The network is low cost, high capability and facility using. It is commendably expand for every city.

  9. Large-scale monitoring of air pollution in remote and ecologically important areas

    Treesearch

    Andrzej Bytnerowicz; Witold Fraczek

    2013-01-01

    New advances in air quality monitoring techniques, such as passive samplers for nitrogenous (N) or sulphurous (S) pollutants and ozone (O3), have allowed for an improved understanding of concentrations of these pollutants in remote areas. Mountains create special problems with regard to the feasibility of establishing and maintaining air pollution monitoring networks,...

  10. Atmospheric monitoring and model applications at the Pierre Auger Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keilhauer, Bianca

    2015-03-01

    The Pierre Auger Observatory detects high-energy cosmic rays with energies above ˜1017 eV. It is built as a multi-hybrid detector measuring extensive air showers with different techniques. For the reconstruction of extensive air showers, the atmospheric conditions at the site of the Observatory have to be known quite well. This is particularly true for reconstructions based on data obtained by the fluorescence technique. For these data, not only the weather conditions near ground are relevant, most important are altitude-dependent atmospheric profiles. The Pierre Auger Observatory has set up a dedicated atmospheric monitoring programme at the site in the Mendoza province, Argentina. Beyond this, exploratory studies were performed in Colorado, USA, for possible installations in the northern hemisphere. In recent years, the atmospheric monitoring programme at the Pierre Auger Observatory was supplemented by applying data from atmospheric models. Both GDAS and HYSPLIT are developments by the US weather department NOAA and the data are freely available. GDAS is a global model of the atmospheric state parameters on a 1 degree geographical grid, based on real-time measurements and numeric weather predictions, providing a full altitude-dependent data set every 3 hours. HYSPLIT is a powerful tool to track the movement of air masses at various heights, and with it the aerosols. Combining local measurements of the atmospheric state variables and aerosol scattering with the given model data, advanced studies about atmospheric conditions can be performed and high precision air shower reconstructions are achieved.

  11. Noble gas atmospheric monitoring at reprocessing facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Nakhleh, C.W.; Perry, R.T. Jr.; Poths, J.; Stanbro, W.D.; Wilson, W.B.; Fearey, B.L.

    1997-05-01

    The discovery in Iraq after the Gulf War of the existence of a large clandestine nuclear-weapon program has led to an across-the-board international effort, dubbed Programme 93+2, to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards. One particularly significant potential change is the introduction of environmental monitoring (EM) techniques as an adjunct to traditional safeguards methods. Monitoring of stable noble gas (Kr, Xe) isotopic abundances at reprocessing plant stacks appears to be able to yield information on the burnup and type of the fuel being processed. To estimate the size of these signals, model calculations of the production of stable Kr, Xe nuclides in reactor fuel and the subsequent dilution of these nuclides in the plant stack are carried out for two case studies: reprocessing of PWR fuel with a burnup of 35 GWd/tU, and reprocessing of CAND fuel with a burnup of 1 GWd/tU. For each case, a maximum-likelihood analysis is used to determine the fuel burnup and type from the isotopic data.

  12. [Bronchial asthma, atmospheric pollution, and weather conditions. Guadalajara, Jal].

    PubMed

    Bedolla Barajas, M; Sandoval Perez, F J; Ramos Ramos, C

    1999-01-01

    In the last year it has been an increase in the prevalence of asthma, as well as in the air pollution. The effect of air pollution on the respiratory health is still controversial. To determine the relationship between the income to the Emergency Room for asthmatic crisis and the air pollution or weather conditions. An observational, descriptive, retrospective survey was made with children and adult patients who had an income to the Emergency Room of the Dr. Valentín Gómez Farías Regional Hospital due to an asthmatic crisis, during period between January 1st and December 31 the of 1994, being related to weekly measures of ozone, nitrogen dioxide, carbon monoxide, sulfur dioxide and particulate matter as air pollution, and minimal temperature, minimal percentage of humidity and wind speed, as weather conditions. They was related by autoregression technique using the Epi Info 5 computing system. An amount of 406 incomes to the Emergency Room for asthmatic crisis was recorded, observing an increase during the period between September and November. When compared to the air pollutants and weather conditions measurement, it has found a moderate relation between the increase of income and the nitrogen dioxide quantification, as the highest value. Air pollution and weather conditions by themselves seem to have a minimal to moderate influence on the incidence of incomes to the Emergency Room for asthmatic crisis.

  13. Usefulness of the infrared heterodyne radiometer in remote sensing of atmospheric pollutants.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menzies, R. T.; Shumate, M. S.

    1971-01-01

    The application of narrow-band optical receivers to the problem of sensing atmospheric pollution is discussed. The emission/absorption lines of many major atmospheric pollutant molecules overlap the operating frequency bands of CO2 laser and CO laser heterodyne receivers. Several remote pollution sensing systems which are based upon utilization of these spectral overlaps are described, and an analysis of their potential is presented. The possibility of using other lasers (e.g.: the PbSnTe tunable diode laser) as local oscillators is also considered. Results of laboratory experiments with a CO2 laser heterodyne radiometer are presented.

  14. Trinidad Head, California: New NOAA/CMDL Baseline Observatory for Monitoring Asian Atmospheric Effluents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnell, R. C.; Butler, J. H.

    2002-12-01

    Long-range transport of dust and air pollution from Asia to the Mauna Loa, Hawaii, Atmospheric Baseline Observatory has been documented since the early 1970s. In a single year, as many as 30 distinct pollution flow events from Asia have been observed there. Some flows last a few hours, whereas others persist for up to 5 days. More recently, it has been recognized by both measurements and satellite photos that there are significant numbers of air pollution flow events from Asia into North America along a broad front, ranging from the north slope of Alaska to central California. There is a valid concern that ozone and ozone precursors advecting from Asia could eventually put California into noncompliance with federal air-quality regulations. As a component of the Intercontinental Transport and Chemical Transformation (ITCT) program, NOAA/CMDL established an atmospheric monitoring observatory (April 2002) at Trinidad Head, California in collaboration with Humboldt State University, to monitor both the inflow of air pollution from Asia as well as regionally influenced air. The station monitors aerosols, ozone (continuous surface and weekly ozonesonde balloon profiles), radiation, and halocarbon and carbon cycle trace gases (weekly flasks). Data from Trinidad Head are monitored via the internet at CMDL in Boulder. Plans call for the installation of a GC/MS for the measurement of PAN, hydrocarbons, and certain halocarbons, and for vertical profiles of trace gases and ozone to be obtained (with light aircraft) upwind and above the site on a weekly basis. It is expected that the Trinidad Head observatory will expand measurement programs over the next 5 years and be in operation for many decades to come.

  15. Using an epiphytic moss to identify previously unknown sources of atmospheric cadmium pollution.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Geoffrey H; Jovan, Sarah E; Gatziolis, Demetrios; Burstyn, Igor; Michael, Yvonne L; Amacher, Michael C; Monleon, Vicente J

    2016-07-15

    Urban networks of air-quality monitors are often too widely spaced to identify sources of air pollutants, especially if they do not disperse far from emission sources. The objectives of this study were to test the use of moss bio-indicators to develop a fine-scale map of atmospherically-derived cadmium and to identify the sources of cadmium in a complex urban setting. We collected 346 samples of the moss Orthotrichum lyellii from deciduous trees in December, 2013 using a modified randomized grid-based sampling strategy across Portland, Oregon. We estimated a spatial linear model of moss cadmium levels and predicted cadmium on a 50m grid across the city. Cadmium levels in moss were positively correlated with proximity to two stained-glass manufacturers, proximity to the Oregon-Washington border, and percent industrial land in a 500m buffer, and negatively correlated with percent residential land in a 500m buffer. The maps showed very high concentrations of cadmium around the two stained-glass manufacturers, neither of which were known to environmental regulators as cadmium emitters. In addition, in response to our findings, the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality placed an instrumental monitor 120m from the larger stained-glass manufacturer in October, 2015. The monthly average atmospheric cadmium concentration was 29.4ng/m(3), which is 49 times higher than Oregon's benchmark of 0.6ng/m(3), and high enough to pose a health risk from even short-term exposure. Both stained-glass manufacturers voluntarily stopped using cadmium after the monitoring results were made public, and the monthly average cadmium levels precipitously dropped to 1.1ng/m(3) for stained-glass manufacturer #1 and 0.67ng/m(3) for stained-glass manufacturer #2.

  16. Data processing technique for multiangle lidar sounding of poorly stratified polluted atmospheres: Theory and experiment

    Treesearch

    Cyle E. Wold; Vladimir A. Kovalev; Alexander P. Petkov; Wei Min Hao

    2012-01-01

    Scanning elastic lidar, which can operate in different slant directions, is the most appropriate remote sensing tool for investigating the optical properties of smoke-polluted atmospheres. However, the commonly used methodologies of multiangle measurements are based on the assumption of horizontal stratification of the searched atmosphere1,2. When working in real...

  17. Atmospheric transport of persistent pollutants governs uptake by holarctic terrestrial biota

    SciTech Connect

    Larsson, P.; Okla, L.; Woin, Per )

    1990-10-01

    The atmospheric deposition of PCBs, DDT, and lindane, governed uptake in terrestrial biota in the Scandinavian peninsula. Mammalian herbivores and predators as well as predatory insects contained higher levels of pollutants at locations where the fallout load was high than at stations where atmospheric deposition was lower, and the two variables were significantly correlated.

  18. Innovative Monitoring of Atmospheric Gaseous Hydrogen Fluoride

    PubMed Central

    Bonari, Alessandro; Pompilio, Ilenia; Monti, Alessandro; Arcangeli, Giulio

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen fluoride (HF) is a basic raw material for a wide variety of industrial products, with a worldwide production capacity of more than three million metric tonnes. A novel method for determining particulate fluoride and gaseous hydrogen fluoride in air is presented herewith. Air was sampled using miniaturised 13 mm Swinnex two-stage filter holders in a medium-flow pumping system and through the absorption of particulate fluoride and HF vapours on cellulose ester filters uncoated or impregnated with sodium carbonate. Furthermore, filter desorption from the holders and the extraction of the pentafluorobenzyl ester derivative based on solid-phase microextraction were performed using an innovative robotic system installed on an xyz autosampler on-line with gas chromatography (GC)/mass spectrometry (MS). After generating atmospheres of a known concentration of gaseous HF, we evaluated the agreement between the results of our sampling method and those of the conventional preassembled 37 mm cassette (±8.10%; correlation coefficient: 0.90). In addition, precision (relative standard deviation for n = 10, 4.3%), sensitivity (0.2 μg/filter), and linearity (2.0–4000 μg/filter; correlation coefficient: 0.9913) were also evaluated. This procedure combines the efficiency of GC/MS systems with the high throughput (96 samples/day) and the quantitative accuracy of pentafluorobenzyl bromide on-sample derivatisation. PMID:27829835

  19. Molecular Biomarkers: their significance and application in marine pollution monitoring.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, A; Ray, D; Shrivastava, Amulya N; Sarker, Subhodeep

    2006-05-01

    This paper presents an overview of the significance of the use of molecular biomarkers as diagnostic and prognostic tools for marine pollution monitoring. In order to assess the impact of highly persistent pollutants such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), polychlorinated dibenzo-dioxins (PCDD), polychlorinated dibenzo-furans (PCDF), polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), tributyltin (TBT) and other toxic metals on the marine ecosystem a suite of biomarkers are being extensively used worldwide. Among the various types of biomarkers, the following have received special attention: cytochrome P4501A induction, DNA integrity, acetylcholinesterase activity and metallothionein induction. These biomarkers are being used to evaluate exposure of various species of sentinel marine organisms (e.g. mussels, clams, oysters, snails, fishes, etc.) to and the effect of various contaminants (organic xenobiotics and metals) using different molecular approaches [biochemical assays, enzyme linked immuno-sorbent assays (ELISA), spectrophotometric, fluorometric measurement, differential pulsed polarography, liquid chromatography, atomic absorption spectrometry]. The induction of the biotransformation enzyme, cytochrome P4501A in fishes (Callionymus lyra, Limanda limanda, Serranus sp., Mullus barbatus) and mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) by various xenobiotic contaminants such as PCBs, PAHs, PCDs is used as a biomarker of exposure to such organic pollutants. The induction of cytochrome P4501A is involved in chemical carcinogenesis through catalysis of the covalent bonding of organic contaminants to a DNA strand leading to formation of DNA adduct. Measurement of the induction of cytochrome P4501A in terms of EROD (7-ethoxy resorufin O-deethylase) activity is successfully used as a potential biomarker of exposure to xenobiotic contaminants in marine pollution monitoring. In order to assess the impact of neurotoxic compounds on marine environment the evaluation of acetylcholinesterase

  20. Laser methods for the control of atmospheric gases and gases which pollute the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antipov, A. B.; Zuev, V. E.; Kapitanov, V. A.; Lopasov, V. P.; Lukianenko, S. F.; Sinitsa, L. N.; Sapozhnikova, V. A.

    Laser methods for the control of atmospheric pollutants are currently being developed. Laser devices for gas analysis are being designed, taking into account the analytical determination of carbon monoxide, ozone, nitric oxide, and acetylene. The operation of these devices is based on the absorption of radiation, and the wavelength region from 5 to 10 microns is utilized. However, an employment of this spectral region introduces problems in connection with the location of the intense vibrational-rotational absorption spectrum of water vapor and CO2 in this wavelength region. The present investigation is, therefore, concerned with the use of the wavelength region from 0.5 to 3.5 microns as a basis for the design of suitable laser devices for analytical applications. An optoacoustic method is considered along with an 'intracavity absorption' method discussed by Belikova et al. (1972). A description is presented of the results obtained in measurements conducted with laser spectrometers. Performance data concerning a number of developed laser spectrometers are also provided.

  1. The Rapid Atmospheric Monitoring System of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahlers, M.; Ahn, E.J.; Albuquerque, I.F.M.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; /Mexico U., ICN /Santiago de Compostela U. /Campinas State U.

    2012-08-01

    The Pierre Auger Observatory is a facility built to detect air showers produced by cosmic rays above 10{sup 17} eV. During clear nights with a low illuminated moon fraction, the UV fluorescence light produced by air showers is recorded by optical telescopes at the Observatory. To correct the observations for variations in atmospheric conditions, atmospheric monitoring is performed at regular intervals ranging from several minutes (for cloud identification) to several hours (for aerosol conditions) to several days (for vertical profiles of temperature, pressure, and humidity). In 2009, the monitoring program was upgraded to allow for additional targeted measurements of atmospheric conditions shortly after the detection of air showers of special interest, e. g., showers produced by very high-energy cosmic rays or showers with atypical longitudinal profiles. The former events are of particular importance for the determination of the energy scale of the Observatory, and the latter are characteristic of unusual air shower physics or exotic primary particle types. The purpose of targeted (or 'rapid') monitoring is to improve the resolution of the atmospheric measurements for such events. In this paper, we report on the implementation of the rapid monitoring program and its current status. The rapid monitoring data have been analyzed and applied to the reconstruction of air showers of high interest, and indicate that the air fluorescence measurements affected by clouds and aerosols are effectively corrected using measurements from the regular atmospheric monitoring program. We find that the rapid monitoring program has potential for supporting dedicated physics analyses beyond the standard event reconstruction.

  2. The monitoring of organic waste pollution in the sibelis river

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huda, Thorikul; Jannah, Wirdatul

    2017-03-01

    Has conducted monitoring of organic waste pollution in the River Sibelis of Tegal City of Central Java. Organic wastes that pollute River Sibelis can degrade the quality of well water along the river. Monitoring carried out in the upstream and downstream by chemical oxygen demand (COD) and biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) parameters. COD test methods by titration and the results are used to determine the test sample comparison with the volume of diluent required for analysts BOD. COD test results on the upstream and downstream Sibelis River respectively 58.13 mg/L and 73.97 mg / L so that the ratio of the test sample with diluent volume for BOD analysis is 20: 280 (Sawyer, 1978). BOD test principle is based on the reduction of dissolved oxygen zero day (DO0) and five days (DO5). The result of observation BOD samples at upstream and downstream Sibelis Rivers are 10.7212 mg / L and 5.3792 mg / L respectively. Quality control of BOD testing conducted with measurement accuracy and precision and obtained result are 85.36% and 0.27% respectively. The result of uncertainty measurement for BOD testing at upstream and downstream are ±0.4469 mg/L and ±0.22188 mg/L.

  3. Monitoring an air pollution episode in Shenzhen by combining MODIS satellite images and the HYSPLIT model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lili; Liu, Yihong; Wang, Yunpeng

    2017-07-01

    Urban air pollution is influenced not only by local emission sources including industry and vehicles, but also greatly by regional atmospheric pollutant transportation from the surrounding areas, especially in developed city clusters, like the Pearl River Delta (PRD). Taking an air pollution episode in Shenzhen as an example, this paper investigates the occurrence and evolution of the pollution episode and identifies the transport pathways of air pollutants in Shenzhen by combining MODIS satellite images and HYSPLIT back trajectory analysis. Results show that this pollution episode is mainly caused by the local emission of pollutants in PRD and oceanic air masses under specific weather conditions.

  4. Adjoint modeling for atmospheric pollution process sensitivity at regional scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menut, Laurent

    2003-09-01

    During the summer 1998, a strong pollution event was documented over Paris as part of the Etude et Simulation de la Qualité de l'air en Ile-de-France (ESQUIF) project (second intensive observation period (IOP2)). From 7 to 9 August 1998 the pollution event changes from a well-marked ozone plume issued from Paris to a more general pollution over the whole Ile-de-France region. Using a three-dimensional chemistry-transport model and its adjoint part, the sensitivity of ozone, Ox, and NOx peaks to model parameters is investigated. For two locations, Paris and a suburban site, the influence of both meteorological and chemical model parameters on the simulated field concentrations is hourly quantified for each day. Processes leading to a urban polluted event are compared. It is shown that the pollutant concentrations are mainly driven by traffic and solvent surface emissions and meteorological parameters such as temperature. Since the adjoint approach is limited to infinitesimal model perturbation, some scenario simulations are carried out to evaluate the linearity of the impact of the most sensitive parameters within the uncertainty range. It is shown that the sensitivities determined from the adjoint approach can be extrapolated until their uncertainty ranges except for the wind speed.

  5. Alternative normalization method of atmospheric polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons pollution level recorded by tree bark.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuli; Wang, Qiuquan; Yang, Limin; Li, Zhenji; Satake, Kenichi; Tsunoda, Kin-Ichi

    2006-10-01

    An alternative normalization method was developed for evaluating atmospheric polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) pollution level when using tree bark as a passive sampling medium. Perylene (PER), which mainly stems from natural biogenic processes, was proposed as a "natural internal compound" (NIC) of atmospheric PAHs accumulation processes from air into the bark, and a concentration ratio of target PAH to PER (RPAH/PER) was used to minimize the uncertainty in the evaluation of atmospheric PAHs pollution level. Systematic investigation of the effects of intrinsic bark characteristics and extrinsic seasonal meteorological conditions on the partition processes of atmospheric PAHs indicated that RPAH/PER is as an alternative index as compared to bark mass concentration (BMCPAH, ng/g dry bark), lipid mass concentration (LMCPAH, ng/g lipid of bark), and area mass concentration (AMCPAH, ng/m2 surface area of bark) for the evaluation of atmospheric PAHs pollution and that it allows more flexible sampling of tree barks. Clearly, the methodology should be expected to be useful for the objective evaluation of atmospheric pollution levels of other persistent organic pollutants when using tree bark and other passive sampling media if corresponding NICs are found in the future.

  6. FT-IR remote sensing of atmospheric species: Application to global change and air pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Vazquez, G.J.

    1995-12-31

    In this contribution, the author describes two applications of Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy to the monitoring of atmospheric compounds. Firstly, the author reports FTIR solar spectroscopy measurements carried out at ground level at NCAR and on airplanes employing a spectrometer of 0.06 cm{sup -1} resolution. Sample atmospheric spectra and fitting examples are presented for key species relevant to stratospheric chemistry and global change: ozone (O{sub 3}), a chlorofluorocarbon (CF{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}), a greenhouse gas (N{sub 2}O), HCl, NO and HNO{sub 3}. Secondly, the author briefly describes urban air pollution measurements at an intersection with heavy traffic in Tucson, AZ. Two FTIR spectrometers of 1 cm{sup -1} resolution were employed to carry out long-path open-path measurements of the CO/CO{sub 2} ratio and SF{sub 6}. Two FEAT and two LPUV instruments were employed for ancillary measurements of CO, CO{sub 2}, NO, and aromatic hydrocarbons. Measurements of CO at two heights and a comparison of CO/CO{sub 2} ratios obtained by FEAT exhaust emission and FTIR ambient air measurements are reported.

  7. National Marine Pollution Program: federal plan for ocean pollution research, development, and monitoring, Fiscal Uears 1985-1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-09-01

    The National Marine Pollution Program is the composite of all programs funded by the Federal Government that conduct research, development, or monitoring activities related to marine pollution. In FY 1985, the Program consisted of about 650 projects with a total Federal expenditure of about $122.7 million. These projects were funded by eleven Federal departments and independent agencies and included studies pertaining to pollution in coastal areas, estuaries, open oceans, and the Great Lakes. This plan is intended to guide and coordinate the overall Federal effort in marine pollution research, development, and monitoring during FY 1985-1989 and represents the third such document in the continuing interagency planning process called for in the National Ocean Pollution Planning Act of 1978 (P.L. 95-273), as amended. As required by the Act, this plan identifies and establishes priorities for national marine pollution needs and problems.

  8. Low level atmospheric sulfur dioxide pollution and childhood asthma

    SciTech Connect

    Tseng, R.Y.; Li, C.K. )

    1990-11-01

    Quarterly analysis (1983-1987) of childhood asthma in Hong Kong from 13,620 hospitalization episodes in relation to levels of pollutants (SO{sub 2}, NO{sub 2}, NO, O{sub 3}, TSP, and RSP) revealed a seasonal pattern of attack rates that correlates inversely with exposure to sulfur dioxide (r = -.52, P less than .05). The same cannot be found with other pollutants. Many factors may contribute to the seasonal variation of asthma attacks. We speculate that prolonged exposure (in terms of months) to low level SO{sub 2} is one factor that might induce airway inflammation and bronchial hyperreactivity and predispose to episodes of asthma.

  9. [Characteristics of Winter Atmospheric Mixing Layer Height in Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei Region and Their Relationship with the Atmospheric Pollution].

    PubMed

    Li, Meng; Tang, Gui-qian; Huang, Jun; Liu, Zi-rui; An, Jun-lin; Wang, Yue-si

    2015-06-01

    Atmospheric mixing layer height (MLH) is one of the main factors affecting the atmospheric diffusion and plays an important role in air quality assessment and distribution of the pollutants. Based on the ceilometers data, this paper has made synchronous observation on MLH in Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei region (Beijing, Tianjin, Shijiazhuang and Qinhuangdao) in heavy polluted February 2014 and analyzed the respective overall change and its regional features. Results show that in February 2014,the average of mixing layer height in Qinhuangdao is the highest, up to 865 +/- 268 m, and in Shijiazhuang is the lowest (568 +/- 207 m), Beijing's and Tianjin's are in between, 818 +/- 319 m and 834 +/- 334 m respectively; Combined with the meteorological data, we find that radiation and wind speed are main factors of the mixing layer height; The relationship between the particle concentration and mixing layer height in four sites suggests that mixing layer is less than 800 m, concentration of fine particulate matter in four sites will exceed the national standard (GB 3095-2012, 75 microg x m(-3)). During the period of observation, the proportion of days that mixing layer is less than 800 m in Beijing, Tianjin, Shijiazhuang and Qinhuangdao are 50%, 43%, 80% and 50% respectively. Shijiazhuang though nearly formation contaminant concentration is high, within the atmospheric mixed layer pollutant load is not high. Unfavorable atmospheric diffusion conditions are the main causes of heavy pollution in Shijiazhuang for a long time. The results of the study are of great significance for cognitive Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei area pollution distribution, and can provide a scientific reference for reasonable distribution of regional pollution sources.

  10. [Particulate matter and atmospheric pollutants exposure for outdoor workers in the Muggia area (Trieste, Italy)].

    PubMed

    Urbani, Ranieri; Barbieri, Pierluigi; Cozzutto, Sergio; Barbieri, Gianpiero; Sist, Paola

    2011-01-01

    Urban air pollution originates from traffic, heating and industrial activities and it exposes several categories of workers to noxious chemicals; in recent years various surveys have been carried on taxi drivers, bus drivers, policemen, newspaper kiosks, fuel station workers and general population, for assessing exposure to main contaminants, benzene and PAHs in particular. defining a specific sampling strategy for collecting an experimental data base for the assessment of potential population exposure to atmospheric particulate matter in the Muggia area (Trieste, North-East Italy). A sample of 14 urban police officers working mainly on the roads and potentially subject to occupational exposure has been analyzed, as well as a sample of the municipal administrative personnel (13 people) working in indoor environments during the same sampling periods. Exposure has been monitored by personal samplers and high volume environmental samples; urinary levels of 1 OH-pyrene and creatinine were collected for each participant at the end of each sampling period. PAHs analyses provided diagnostic ratios for identification of the sources of pollution. In general experimental BaP values stay below the environmental target value, with satisfactory agreement between environmental and personal monitoring. Levels of urinary 1 OH-pyrene for administrative personnel was detected always below the background value (0.089 micromoles/mole creatinine), while they are above the background and below the attention value for most of urban police officers. Municipal police officers participating to the present study, while belonging to one of the categories of people most exposed to outdoor PM, do not show any worrying exposure to the considered chemicals associated to their occupational activity, in comparison to other factors, possibly associated to personal lifestyles.

  11. Evaluation of satellites and remote sensors for atmospheric pollution measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carmichael, J.; Eldridge, R.; Friedman, E.; Keitz, E.

    1976-01-01

    An approach to the development of a prioritized list of scientific goals in atmospheric research is provided. The results of the analysis are used to estimate the contribution of various spacecraft/remote sensor combinations for each of several important constituents of the stratosphere. The evaluation of the combinations includes both single-instrument and multiple-instrument payloads. Attention was turned to the physical and chemical features of the atmosphere as well as the performance capability of a number of atmospheric remote sensors. In addition, various orbit considerations were reviewed along with detailed information on stratospheric aerosols and the impact of spacecraft environment on the operation of the sensors.

  12. Monitoring Air Pollution from Satellites (MAPS). Volume 1: Technical report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Performance tests on an electro-optical model of an infrared sensor for remote measurements of trace atmospheric gases are detailed; the instrument utilized a sample of the gas to be measured as spectral filter. Also reported is the development of radiometric calibration equipment that determines responses to simulated pollution effects. Results show excellent agreement with theoretical performance predictions with the exception of nonuniform radiance responses. Balance stability to an accuracy better than the rms noise level was demonstrated for the EOM in both the NH3 and CO modes for a period of two days under laboratory conditions. Flight test results show that the temperature range of the absorption cell is restricted to 255 K or higher.

  13. Applications of Ground-based Mobile Atmospheric Monitoring: Real-time Characterization of Source Emissions and Ambient Concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goetz, J. Douglas

    Gas and particle phase atmospheric pollution are known to impact human and environmental health as well as contribute to climate forcing. While many atmospheric pollutants are regulated or controlled in the developed world uncertainty still remains regarding the impacts from under characterized emission sources, the interaction of anthropogenic and naturally occurring pollution, and the chemical and physical evolution of emissions in the atmosphere, among many other uncertainties. Because of the complexity of atmospheric pollution many types of monitoring have been implemented in the past, but none are capable of perfectly characterizing the atmosphere and each monitoring type has known benefits and disadvantages. Ground-based mobile monitoring with fast-response in-situ instrumentation has been used in the past for a number of applications that fill data gaps not possible with other types of atmospheric monitoring. In this work, ground-based mobile monitoring was implemented to quantify emissions from under characterized emission sources using both moving and portable applications, and used in a novel way for the characterization of ambient concentrations. In the Marcellus Shale region of Pennsylvania two mobile platforms were used to estimate emission rates from infrastructure associated with the production and transmission of natural gas using two unique methods. One campaign investigated emissions of aerosols, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), methane, carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and carbon dioxide (CO 2) from natural gas wells, well development practices, and compressor stations using tracer release ratio methods and a developed fenceline tracer release correction factor. Another campaign investigated emissions of methane from Marcellus Shale gas wells and infrastructure associated with two large national transmission pipelines using the "Point Source Gaussian" method described in the EPA OTM-33a. During both campaigns ambient concentrations

  14. Monitoring of metal pollution in waterways across Bangladesh and ecological and public health implications of pollution.

    PubMed

    Kibria, Golam; Hossain, Md Maruf; Mallick, Debbrota; Lau, T C; Wu, Rudolf

    2016-12-01

    Using innovative artificial mussels technology for the first time, this study detected eight heavy metals (Cd, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, U, Zn) on a regular basis in waterways across Bangladesh (Chittagong, Dhaka and Khulna). Three heavy metals, viz. Co, Cr and Hg were always below the instrumental detection levels in all the sites during the study period. Through this study, seven metal pollution "hot spots" have been identified, of which, five "hot spots" (Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb) were located in the Buriganga River, close to the capital Dhaka. Based on this study, the Buriganga River can be classified as the most polluted waterway in Bangladesh compared to waterways monitored in Khulna and Chittagong. Direct effluents discharged from tanneries, textiles are, most likely, reasons for elevated concentrations of heavy metals in the Buriganga River. In other areas (Khulna), agriculture and fish farming effluents may have caused higher Cu, U and Zn in the Bhairab and Rupsa Rivers, whereas untreated industrial discharge and ship breaking activities can be linked to elevated Cd in the coastal sites (Chittagong). Metal pollution may cause significant impacts on water quality (irrigation, drinking), aquatic biodiversity (lethal and sub-lethal effects), food contamination/food security (bioaccumulation of metals in crops and seafood), human health (diseases) and livelihoods of people associated with wetlands. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Soil acidification by atmospheric pollution and forest growth

    Treesearch

    Bengt Jonsson

    1976-01-01

    In recent years concern has been expressed about the danger of harmful pollution deposits which affect areas at great distances from the emission sources. The investigation was so designed that a possible reaction in growth resulting from a supposed acidification could be observed as far as possible. A poorer growth development was observed in regions, which are...

  16. Hydrocarbonates in atmospheric precipitation of Moscow: Monitoring data and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eremina, I. D.; Aloyan, A. E.; Arutyunyan, V. O.; Larin, I. K.; Chubarova, N. E.; Yermakov, A. N.

    2017-05-01

    Based on atmospheric precipitation monitoring data for Moscow, we have revealed a number of episodes when the content of hydrocarbonates repeatedly surpasses the equilibrium level. These facts are associated with the complex structure of precipitation, which is caused by differences in the chemical composition of condensation nuclei. As a result, the underlying surface involves two groups of drops with acidities of different nature. The acidity of the first ("metal") group is determined by the carbonate equilibrium with atmospheric CO2 and dissolved carbonates of alkaline and alkaline earth metals. The acidity of the second ("ammonium") group is characterized by the balance between ammonia absorbed from the air and atmospheric acids. Because of this, the precipitation acidity measured during the monitoring is regulated not only in the air but also in the condensate collector. The mixing of the metal and ammonium groups of precipitation is accompanied by only a partial conversion of hydrocarbonates into dissolved CO2. Its termination is hindered when CO2 actually ceases to enter the atmosphere due to mass-exchange deceleration. As a result, the content of hydrocarbonates in the collector exceeds the equilibrium level. Some estimates indicate that the acidity of the ammonia component of precipitation can be much higher than the acidity according to monitoring data. This should be taken into account in estimating the health and environmental impacts. The true level of acid rain hazard can be estimated only by measuring the acidity of individual drops, whereas the results obtained with modern tools of monitoring can underestimate this hazard.

  17. Export of arsenic from forested catchments under easing atmospheric pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Lucie Erbanova; Martin Novak; Daniela Fottova; Barbora Dousova

    2008-10-01

    Massive lignite burning in Central European power plants peaked in the 1980s. Dissolved arsenic in runoff from upland forest ecosystems is one of the ecotoxicological risks resulting from power plant emissions. Maxima in As concentrations in runoff from four forest catchments have increased 2-5 times between 1995 and 2006, and approach the drinking water limit (10 {mu}g L{sup -1}). To assess the fate of anthropogenic As, we constructed input/output mass balances for three polluted and one relatively unpolluted forest catchment in the Czech Republic, and evaluated the pool size of soil As. The observation period was 11 years, and the sites spanned a 6-fold As pollution gradient. Two of the polluted sites exhibit large net As export via runoff solutes (mean of 4-5 g As ha{sup -1} yr{sup -1} for the 11-year period; up to 28 g As ha{sup -1} yr{sup -1} in 2005). This contrasts with previous studies which concluded that forest catchments are a net sink for atmogenic arsenic both at times of increasing and decreasing pollution. The amount of exported As is not correlated with the total As soil pool size, which is over 78% geogenic in origin, but correlates closely with water fluxes via runoff. Net arsenic release is caused by an interplay of hydrological conditions and retreating acidification which may mobilize arsenic by competitive ligand exchange. The effects of droughts and other aspects of climate change on subsequent As release from soil were not investigated. Between-site comparisons indicate that most pollutant As may be released from humus. 24 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Development of the atmospheric volcanic monitoring system in Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, G. N.; Bjornsson, H.; Arason, P.; von Löwis, S.; Sigurøsson, G. S.; Karlsdóttir, S.

    2012-04-01

    The development of the atmospheric volcanic plume monitoring system has escalated since the eruption of Eyjafjallajökull in 2010. Radars provide a near-real time capability to observe volcanic eruptions both day and night. At high latitudes this is important, over the darkest periods of winter when radar and satellite images are the only means of measurements. Also weather conditions can be such at any time of the year that they obscure observations from survey flights and even from satellites. Prior to and during the 39 days eruption in 2010 only one operational radar was installed in Iceland, the fixed C-band radar at Keflavík International Airport. The main purpose of this radar is weather monitoring but it can simultaneously be used for volcanic plume monitoring within a radius of 480 km. The radar has been used for plume monitoring since 1991 when an eruption started in Hekla, only a few days after the installation of the radar. Since November 2010 a X-band dual polarization radar has been on loan from the Italian Civil Protection Agency to the Icelandic Meteorological Office (IMO) and during the eruption in Grímsvötn in 2011 the combined system, together with visual observations, gave a good picture of the eruption. Also, in cooperation with the UK National Centre for Atmospheric Science (NCAS) a Lidar has been operating in South-Iceland since May 2011. The Lidar was moved to Keflavík airport during the Grímsvötn eruption to monitor the atmosphere above the airport and assist in decision making regarding openings and closures of the airport. In 2012 a second fixed position C-band weather radar will be installed in East-Iceland. This means that the geophysically active region in both south and northeast of Iceland will be covered. In addition, the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) has financed two X-band mobile radars to be installed and used in Iceland, solely for volcanic plume monitoring, with the first one becoming operational in

  19. Atmospheric aerosol monitoring at the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Cester, R.; Chiosso, M.; Chirin, J.; Clay, R.; Dawson, B.; Fick, B.; Filipcic, A.; Garcia, B.; Grillo, A.; Horvat, M.; Iarlori, M.; Malek, M.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J.A.J.; Melo, D.; Meyhandan, R.; Mostafa, M.; Mussa, R.; Prouza, M.; Raefert, B.; Rizi, V.

    2005-07-01

    For a ground based cosmic-ray observatory the atmosphere is an integral part of the detector. Air fluorescence detectors (FDs) are particularly sensitive to the presence of aerosols in the atmosphere. These aerosols, consisting mainly of clouds and dust, can strongly affect the propagation of fluorescence and Cherenkov light from cosmic-ray induced extensive air showers. The Pierre Auger Observatory has a comprehensive program to monitor the aerosols within the atmospheric volume of the detector. In this paper the aerosol parameters that affect FD reconstruction will be discussed. The aerosol monitoring systems that have been deployed at the Pierre Auger Observatory will be briefly described along with some measurements from these systems.

  20. The atmospheric monitoring system of the JEM-EUSO instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, J. H.; Ahmad, S.; Albert, J.-N.; Allard, D.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andreev, V.; Anzalone, A.; Arai, Y.; Asano, K.; Ave Pernas, M.; Baragatti, P.; Barrillon, P.; Batsch, T.; Bayer, J.; Bechini, R.; Belenguer, T.; Bellotti, R.; Belov, K.; Berlind, A. A.; Bertaina, M.; Biermann, P. L.; Biktemerova, S.; Blaksley, C.; Blanc, N.; Błȩcki, J.; Blin-Bondil, S.; Blümer, J.; Bobik, P.; Bogomilov, M.; Bonamente, M.; Briggs, M. S.; Briz, S.; Bruno, A.; Cafagna, F.; Campana, D.; Capdevielle, J.-N.; Caruso, R.; Casolino, M.; Cassardo, C.; Castellinic, G.; Catalano, C.; Catalano, G.; Cellino, A.; Chikawa, M.; Christl, M. J.; Cline, D.; Connaughton, V.; Conti, L.; Cordero, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Cremonini, R.; Csorna, S.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; de Castro, A. J.; De Donato, C.; de la Taille, C.; De Santis, C.; del Peral, L.; Dell'Oro, A.; De Simone, N.; Di Martino, M.; Distratis, G.; Dulucq, F.; Dupieux, M.; Ebersoldt, A.; Ebisuzaki, T.; Engel, R.; Falk, S.; Fang, K.; Fenu, F.; Fernández-Gómez, I.; Ferrarese, S.; Finco, D.; Flamini, M.; Fornaro, C.; Franceschi, A.; Fujimoto, J.; Fukushima, M.; Galeotti, P.; Garipov, G.; Geary, J.; Gelmini, G.; Giraudo, G.; Gonchar, M.; González Alvarado, C.; Gorodetzky, P.; Guarino, F.; Guzmán, A.; Hachisu, Y.; Harlov, B.; Haungs, A.; Hernández Carretero, J.; Higashide, K.; Ikeda, D.; Ikeda, H.; Inoue, N.; Inoue, S.; Insolia, A.; Isgrò, F.; Itow, Y.; Joven, E.; Judd, E. G.; Jung, A.; Kajino, F.; Kajino, T.; Kaneko, I.; Karadzhov, Y.; Karczmarczyk, J.; Karus, M.; Katahira, K.; Kawai, K.; Kawasaki, Y.; Keilhauer, B.; Khrenov, B. A.; Kim, J.-S.; Kim, S.-W.; Kim, S.-W.; Kleifges, M.; Klimov, P. A.; Kolev, D.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Kudela, K.; Kurihara, Y.; Kusenko, A.; Kuznetsov, E.; Lacombe, M.; Lachaud, C.; Lee, J.; Licandro, J.; Lim, H.; López, F.; Maccarone, M. C.; Mannheim, K.; Maravilla, D.; Marcelli, L.; Marini, A.; Martinez, O.; Masciantonio, G.; Mase, K.; Matev, R.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Mernik, T.; Miyamoto, H.; Miyazaki, Y.; Mizumoto, Y.; Modestino, G.; Monaco, A.; Monnier-Ragaigne, D.; Morales de los Ríos, J. A.; Moretto, C.; Morozenko, V. S.; Mot, B.; Murakami, T.; Murakami, M. Nagano; Nagata, M.; Nagataki, S.; Nakamura, T.; Napolitano, T.; Naumov, D.; Nava, R.; Neronov, A.; Nomoto, K.; Nonaka, T.; Ogawa, T.; Ogio, S.; Ohmori, H.; Olinto, A. V.; Orleański, P.; Osteria, G.; Panasyuk, M. I.; Parizot, E.; Park, I. H.; Park, H. W.; Pastircak, B.; Patzak, T.; Paul, T.; Pennypacker, C.; Perez Cano, S.; Peter, T.; Picozza, P.; Pierog, T.; Piotrowski, L. W.; Piraino, S.; Plebaniak, Z.; Pollini, A.; Prat, P.; Prévôt, G.; Prieto, H.; Putis, M.; Reardon, P.; Reyes, M.; Ricci, M.; Rodríguez, I.; Rodríguez Frías, M. D.; Ronga, F.; Roth, M.; Rothkaehl, H.; Roudil, G.; Rusinov, I.; Rybczyński, M.; Sabau, M. D.; Sáez-Cano, G.; Sagawa, H.; Saito, A.; Sakaki, N.; Sakata, M.; Salazar, H.; Sánchez, S.; Santangelo, A.; Santiago Crúz, L.; Sanz Palomino, M.; Saprykin, O.; Sarazin, F.; Sato, H.; Sato, M.; Schanz, T.; Schieler, H.; Scotti, V.; Segreto, A.; Selmane, S.; Semikoz, D.; Serra, M.; Sharakin, S.; Shibata, T.; Shimizu, H. M.; Shinozaki, K.; Shirahama, T.; Siemieniec-Oziȩbło, G.; Silva López, H. H.; Sledd, J.; Słomińska, K.; Sobey, A.; Sugiyama, T.; Supanitsky, D.; Suzuki, M.; Szabelska, B.; Szabelski, J.; Tajima, F.; Tajima, N.; Tajima, T.; Takahashi, Y.; Takami, H.; Takeda, M.; Takizawa, Y.; Tenzer, C.; Tibolla, O.; Tkachev, L.; Tokuno, H.; Tomida, T.; Tone, N.; Toscano, S.; Trillaud, F.; Tsenov, R.; Tsunesada, Y.; Tsuno, K.; Tymieniecka, T.; Uchihori, Y.; Unger, M.; Vaduvescu, O.; Valdés-Galicia, J. F.; Vallania, P.; Valore, L.; Vankova, G.; Vigorito, C.; Villaseñor, L.; von Ballmoos, P.; Wada, S.; Watanabe, J.; Watanabe, S.; Watts, J.; Weber, M.; Weiler, T. J.; Wibig, T.; Wiencke, L.; Wille, M.; Wilms, J.; Włodarczyk, Z.; Yamamoto, T.; Yamamoto, Y.; Yang, J.; Yano, H.; Yashin, I. V.; Yonetoku, D.; Yoshida, K.; Yoshida, S.; Young, R.; Zotov, M. Yu.; Zuccaro Marchi, A.

    2015-11-01

    The JEM-EUSO telescope will detect Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECRs) from space, detecting the UV Fluorescence Light produced by Extensive Air Showers (EAS) induced by the interaction of the cosmic rays with the earth's atmosphere. The capability to reconstruct the properties of the primary cosmic ray depends on the accurate measurement of the atmospheric conditions in the region of EAS development. The Atmospheric Monitoring (AM) system of JEM-EUSO will host a LIDAR, operating in the UV band, and an Infrared camera to monitor the cloud cover in the JEM-EUSO Field of View, in order to be sensitive to clouds with an optical depth τ ≥ 0.15 and to measure the cloud top altitude with an accuracy of 500 m and an altitude resolution of 500 m.

  1. The Atmospheric Monitoring Strategy for the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniel, M. K.; CTA Consortium

    2015-04-01

    The Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Technique (IACT) is unusual in astronomy as the atmosphere actually forms an intrinsic part of the detector system, with telescopes indirectly detecting very high energy particles by the generation and transport of Cherenkov photons deep within the atmosphere. This means that accurate measurement, characterisation and monitoring of the atmosphere is at the very heart of successfully operating an IACT system. The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) will be the next generation IACT observatory with an ambitious aim to improve the sensitivity of an order of magnitude over current facilities, along with corresponding improvements in angular and energy resolution and extended energy coverage, through an array of Large (23 m), Medium (12 m) and Small (4 m) sized telescopes spread over an area of order ~km2. Whole sky coverage will be achieved by operating at two sites: one in the northern hemisphere and one in the southern hemisphere. This proceedings will cover the characterisation of the candidate sites and the atmospheric calibration strategy. CTA will utilise a suite of instrumentation and analysis techniques for atmospheric modelling and monitoring regarding pointing forecasts, intelligent pointing selection for the observatory operations and for offline data correction.

  2. AICE Survey of USSR Air Pollution Literature, Volume 12: Technical Papers from the Leningrad International Symposium on the Meteorological Aspects of Atmospheric Pollution, Part I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nuttonson, M. Y.

    Twelve papers dealing with the meteorological aspects of air pollution were translated. These papers were initially presented at an international symposium held in Leningrad during July 1968. The papers are: Status and prospective development of meteorological studies of atmospheric pollution, Effect of the stability of the atmosphere on the…

  3. AICE Survey of USSR Air Pollution Literature, Volume 12: Technical Papers from the Leningrad International Symposium on the Meteorological Aspects of Atmospheric Pollution, Part I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nuttonson, M. Y.

    Twelve papers dealing with the meteorological aspects of air pollution were translated. These papers were initially presented at an international symposium held in Leningrad during July 1968. The papers are: Status and prospective development of meteorological studies of atmospheric pollution, Effect of the stability of the atmosphere on the…

  4. Pollution monitoring in Southeast Asia using biomarkers in the mytilid mussel Perna viridis (Mytilidae: Bivalvia).

    PubMed

    Nicholson, S; Lam, P K S

    2005-01-01

    Mytilid mussels have been extensively used in marine pollution monitoring programmes in temperate regions of the world although widespread subtropical representatives such as Perna viridis have only comparatively recently been utilised to monitor the sublethal effects of pollution in Southeast Asia. P. viridis is considered a subtropical equivalent of the temperate Mytilus sp. and has considerable potential for pollution monitoring throughout its geographical range. This paper reviews the current status of biomarkers in P. viridis and provides some recommendations on biological-effects monitoring to facilitate the assessment of coastal pollution in Southeast Asia.

  5. Monitoring of atmospheric nuclear explosions with infrasonic microphone arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Charles R.

    2002-11-01

    A review is given of the various United States programs for the infrasonic monitoring of atmospheric nuclear explosions from their inception in 1946 to their termination in 1975. The US Atomic Energy Detection System (USAEDS) monitored all nuclear weapons tests that were conducted by the Soviet Union, France, China, and the US with arrays of sensitive microbarographs in a worldwide network of infrasonic stations. A discussion of the source mechanism for the creation and subsequent propagation around the globe of long wavelength infrasound from explosions (volcanic and nuclear) is given to show the efficacy of infrasonic monitoring for the detection of atmospheric nuclear weapons tests. The equipment that was used for infrasound detection, the design of the sensor arrays, and the data processing techniques that were used by USAEDS are all discussed.

  6. Properties of nitrate, sulfate and ammonium in typical polluted atmospheric aerosols (PM 10) in Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kai, Zhang; Yuesi, Wang; Tianxue, Wen; Yousef, Meslmani; Frank, Murray

    2007-03-01

    To gain an understanding of the characteristics of nitrate, sulfate and ammonium in the urban atmosphere of Beijing, an experiment was conducted in October 2004, using a method involving the rapid collection of particles and analysis using an ion chromatography system. The study shows that the mean concentration of water soluble ions (WSI) increased during heavily polluted weather, and this change in the concentration of pollutants was related to the meteorological background. The concentration of nitrate, sulfate and ammonium increased 7.9, 4.1 and 5.4 times, respectively, during heavily polluted periods. The concentration of nitrate increased most among the WSI in PM 10. The diurnal variations of nitrate, sulfate and ammonium in more polluted periods were different from those in less polluted periods. The highest concentration of nitrate (NO 3-), sulfate (SO 42-), and ammonium (NH 4+) appeared at 19:00 during more polluted periods. In contrast, the highest concentrations of these compounds occurred at noon during less polluted periods. A correlation analysis showed that NO 3-, SO 42-, NH 4+, nitrogen oxides (NO x) and sulfur dioxide (SO 2) had significant positive correlations in more polluted periods. The transformation ratio from SO 2 and NO x to SO 42- and NO 3- was higher in more polluted than that in less polluted periods.

  7. Effects of atmospheric pollutants on forests, wetlands, and agricultural ecosystems

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchinson, T.C.; Meema, K.M.

    1987-01-01

    This book reports on the knowledge of the sensitivities and responses of forests, wetlands and crops to airborne pollutants. Pollutants examined include: acidic depositions, heavy metal particulates, sulphur dioxide, ozone, nitrogen oxides, acid fogs, and mixtures of these. Various types of ecosystem stresses and physiological mechanisms pertinent to acid deposition are also discussed. Related subjects, such as the effects of ethylene on vegetation, the physiology of drought in trees, the ability of soils to generate acidity naturally, the role of Sphagnum moss in natural peatland acidity, the use of lichens as indicators of changing air quality, and the magnitude of natural emissions of reduced sulphur gases from tropical rainforests and temperate deciduous forests, are covered.

  8. Study of atmospheric dynamics and pollution in the coastal area of English Channel using clustering technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, Anton; Dmitriev, Egor; Delbarre, Hervé; Augustin, Patrick; Gengembre, Cyril; Fourmenten, Marc

    2016-04-01

    The problem of atmospheric contamination by principal air pollutants was considered in the industrialized coastal region of English Channel in Dunkirk influenced by north European metropolitan areas. MESO-NH nested models were used for the simulation of the local atmospheric dynamics and the online calculation of Lagrangian backward trajectories with 15-minute temporal resolution and the horizontal resolution down to 500 m. The one-month mesoscale numerical simulation was coupled with local pollution measurements of volatile organic components, particulate matter, ozone, sulphur dioxide and nitrogen oxides. Principal atmospheric pathways were determined by clustering technique applied to backward trajectories simulated. Six clusters were obtained which describe local atmospheric dynamics, four winds blowing through the English Channel, one coming from the south, and the biggest cluster with small wind speeds. This last cluster includes mostly sea breeze events. The analysis of meteorological data and pollution measurements allows relating the principal atmospheric pathways with local air contamination events. It was shown that contamination events are mostly connected with a channelling of pollution from local sources and low-turbulent states of the local atmosphere.

  9. Atmospheric Effects on Winter SO2 Pollution in Lanzhou China

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    in Lanzhou (APCL), supported jointly by Gansu Province and the Chinese Academy of Sciences and carried out from 1999 to 2001. In this study, the...jointly by Gansu Province and the Chinese Academy of Sciences and carried out from 1999 to 2001. From the APCL project, the air quality data were...are provided by the program entitled “Air Pollution and Control in Lanzhou” jointly sponsored by the local government of Gansu Province and the

  10. Inorganic nitrogenous air pollutants, atmospheric nitrogen deposition and their potential ecological impacts in remote areas of western North America (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bytnerowicz, A.; Fenn, M. E.; Fraczek, W.; Johnson, R.; Allen, E. B.

    2013-12-01

    Dry deposition of gaseous inorganic nitrogenous (N) air pollutants plays an important role in total atmospheric N deposition and its ecological effects in the arid and semi-arid ecosystems. Passive samplers and denuder/ filter pack systems have been used for determining ambient concentrations of ammonia (NH3), nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and nitric acid vapor (HNO3) in the topographically complex remote areas of the western United States and Canada. Concentrations of the measured pollutants varied significantly between the monitoring areas. Highest NH3, NO2 and HNO3 levels occurred in southern California areas downwind of the Los Angeles Basin and in the western Sierra Nevada impacted by emissions from the California Central Valley and the San Francisco Bay area. Strong spatial gradients of N pollutants were also present in southeastern Alaska due to cruise ship emissions and in the Athabasca Oil Sands Region in Canada affected by oil exploitation. Distribution of these pollutants has been depicted by maps generated by several geostatistical methodologies within the ArcGIS Geostatistical Analyst (ESRI, USA). Such maps help to understand spatial and temporal changes of air pollutants caused by various anthropogenic activities and locally-generated vs. long range-transported air pollutants. Pollution distribution maps for individual N species and gaseous inorganic reactive nitrogen (Nr) have been developed for the southern portion of the Sierra Nevada, Lake Tahoe Basin, San Bernardino Mountains, Joshua Tree National Park and the Athabasca Oil Sands Region. The N air pollution data have been utilized for estimates of dry and total N deposition by a GIS-based inferential method specifically developed for understanding potential ecological impacts in arid and semi-arid areas. The method is based on spatial and temporal distribution of concentrations of major drivers of N dry deposition, their surface deposition velocities and stomatal conductance values

  11. Pollutant monitoring in the Olympic National Park Biosphere Reserve.

    PubMed

    Brown, K W

    1981-03-01

    Interest in global contamination has been instrumental in the establishment of over 33 Biosphere Reserves in the United States. These reserves include pristine areas that have been protected from industrial development. They serve as areas in which present and future environmental pollution can be assessed.Pollutant monitoring studies are being conducted in the Olympic National Park Biosphere Reserve by the U.S. Park Service and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Studies are designed to identify levels of trace element and organic contaminants in physical and biological media. Ten remote sites were selected for intensive sampling. These areas were located in the Hoh, Quinault, and Dosewallips River drainages; at Anderson and Grand Pass; near Ozette Lake and, at the northern edge of Blue Glacier. Their proximity to vehicle-traveled roads varied from 3 to 20 kilometers.Samples were taken in air, water, soil, litter and vegetation. Samples will be analyzed for organic and heavy metal contaminants. Airborne particulate size and chemical characterization is being investigated.

  12. Global Monitoring of Air Pollution Using Spaceborne Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, D. A.; Kaufman, Y. J.; Tanre, D.; Remer, L. A.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The MODIS sensor onboard EOS-Terra satellite provides not only daily global coverage but also high spectral (36 channels from 0.41 to 14 microns wavelength) and spatial (250m, 500m and 1km) resolution measurements. A similar MODIS instrument will be also configured into EOS-Aqua satellite to be launched soon. Using the complementary EOS-Terra and EOS-Aqua sun-synchronous orbits (10:30 AM and 1:30 PM equator-crossing time respectively), it enables us also to study the diurnal changes of the Earth system. It is unprecedented for the derivation of aerosol properties with such high spatial resolution and daily global converge. Aerosol optical depth and other aerosol properties, e.g., Angstrom coefficient over land and particle size over ocean, are derived as standard products at a spatial resolution of 10 x 10 sq km. The high resolution results are found surprisingly useful in detecting aerosols in both urban and rural regions as a result of urban/industrial pollution and biomass burning. For long-lived aerosols, the ability to monitoring the evolution of these aerosol events could help us to establish an system of air quality especially for highly populated areas. Aerosol scenarios with city pollution and biomass burning will be presented. Also presented are the method used in the derivation of aerosol optical properties and preliminary results will be presented, and issue as well as obstacles in validating aerosol optical depth with AERONET ground-based observations.

  13. Monitoring Light Pollution on the Starlight Reserve of Montsec

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribas, S. J.; Paricio, S.; Canal-Domingo, R.; Gustems, L.; Calvo, C. O.

    2015-05-01

    Montsec Mountains are a special protected place in Catalonia (NE of Iberian Peninsula). Since 2013 the site has been declared Starlight Reserve and Touristic Destination. In the last three years different projects took place in Montsec to evaluate the quality of night sky and the effects of Light Pollution of nearby (and not so nearby) municipalities. Using SQM techniques in RoadRunner configuration (installed on a car) we have evaluated all the region (1 600 km^2) and we determined the distribution of night sky brightness detecting some excellent areas with values around 21.5--22.0 mags. In addition we have evaluated the effects of the closest big city (Lleida with around 200 000 inhabitants) and we have estimated long distance effects of this city on the natural sky. The effect is detected on zenith up to 25 km away from the city. These data show the critical problem of the long-distance effects of LP on protected areas. To complete the monitoring of the region, a new SQM network is ongoing in cooperation with Parc Astronòmic Montsec and Catalan Service against Light Pollution. During 2014 six SQM permanent detectors are starting their measurements around the area of Montsec and major cities that affects this protected area. This data could be combined with meteorological data (clouds, humidity, etc) in some of the evaluation sites.

  14. Global Monitoring of Air Pollution Using Spaceborne Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, D. A.; Kaufman, Y. J.; Tanre, D.; Remer, L. A.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The MODIS sensor onboard EOS-Terra satellite provides not only daily global coverage but also high spectral (36 channels from 0.41 to 14 microns wavelength) and spatial (250m, 500m and 1km) resolution measurements. A similar MODIS instrument will be also configured into EOS-Aqua satellite to be launched soon. Using the complementary EOS-Terra and EOS-Aqua sun-synchronous orbits (10:30 AM and 1:30 PM equator-crossing time respectively), it enables us also to study the diurnal changes of the Earth system. It is unprecedented for the derivation of aerosol properties with such high spatial resolution and daily global converge. Aerosol optical depth and other aerosol properties, e.g., Angstrom coefficient over land and particle size over ocean, are derived as standard products at a spatial resolution of 10 x 10 sq km. The high resolution results are found surprisingly useful in detecting aerosols in both urban and rural regions as a result of urban/industrial pollution and biomass burning. For long-lived aerosols, the ability to monitoring the evolution of these aerosol events could help us to establish an system of air quality especially for highly populated areas. Aerosol scenarios with city pollution and biomass burning will be presented. Also presented are the method used in the derivation of aerosol optical properties and preliminary results will be presented, and issue as well as obstacles in validating aerosol optical depth with AERONET ground-based observations.

  15. DIAL measurements for air pollution and fugitive-loss monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Rod A.; Woods, Peter T.; Milton, Martin J. T.

    1995-09-01

    This paper describes a mobile differential absorption LIDAR system, which operates in the UV, visible, and IR spectral regions. This system can measure a range of important air pollutants emitted by industry, including SO2, NO2, NO, HCl, benzene, toluene, and a large range of other VOC's. These species can be monitored at fugitive and flammable levels at ranges of up to 1 km (for IR measurements) and 3 km (for UV measurements). Examples of measurements of fluxes emitted from large scale industrial sties are presented and discussed. Comparisons are given between measured fluxes and those calculated using the US Environmental Protection Agency's and American Petroleum Institute's standard procedures for estimating industrial emissions. The fluxes measured by DIAL are higher than the values derived from the API procedures. Possible reasons for discrepancies between the measured results and the EPA/API estimation procedures will be discussed.

  16. Atmospheric transport and deposition of acidic air pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, C.E. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Although general principles which govern atmospheric chemistry of sulfur are understood, a purely theoretical estimation of the magnitude of the processes is not likely to be useful. Furthermore, the data base necessary to make empirical estimates does not yet exist. The sulfur budget of the atmosphere appears to be dominated by man-associated sulfur. The important processes in deposition of man-associated sulfur are wet deposition of sulfate and dry deposition of SO/sub 2/. The relative importance of sulfate and SO/sub 2/ to sulfur deposition (input to watersheds) depends on the air concentrations, and either compound may be the greater contributor depending on conditions. (PSB)

  17. SI-traceable standards for atmospheric monitoring of halogenated gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillevic, Myriam; Wyss, Simon A.; Pascale, Céline; Vollmer, Martin K.; Niederhauser, Bernhard; Reimann, Stefan

    2017-04-01

    To support atmospheric monitoring of greenhouse gases and in particular halogenated gases, we have developed a method to produce reference gas mixtures at nmol/mol (ppb) to pmol/mol levels (ppt). This method is dynamic and SI-traceable. This work is conducted in the framework of the EMRP projects HIGHGAS and KEY-VOCs as well as METAS' AtmoChemECV project. The method has been already applied to HFC-125 (pentafluoroethane, widely used in air conditioners), HFC-1234yf (2,3,3,3-tetrafluoropropene, a car air conditioner fluid of growing importance) and SF6 (insulant in electric switch-gears). It is currently being extended to HCFC-132b and CFC-13. It is particularly suitable for gas species and/or concentration ranges that are not stable in cylinders and it can be applied to a large variety of molecules related to air pollution and climate change (e.g., NO2, volatile organic compounds such as BTEX, NH3, water vapour at ppm level, CFCs, HCFCs, HFCs). The expanded uncertainty is less than 3 % (95 % confidence interval or k=2). The generation process is composed of four successive steps. In the first step the matrix gas, nitrogen or synthetic air is purified. Then this matrix gas is spiked with the pure substance, using a permeation device which contains a few grams of the pure substance (e.g., HFC-125) in the liquid form and loses it linearly over time by permeation through a membrane. This mass loss is precisely calibrated in our lab in Bern, using a magnetic suspension balance. In a third step the desired concentration is reached by dilution of the high concentration mixture exiting the permeation chamber with a chosen flow of the matrix gas in one or two subsequent dilution steps. All flows are piloted by mass flow controllers. All parts in contact with the gas mixture - including the balance - are passivated using coated surfaces, to reduce adsorption/desorption processes as much as possible. In the last step the mixture can be i) directly used to calibrate an

  18. Biologic Effects of Atmospheric Pollutants: Asbestos - The Need For and Feasibility of Air Pollution Controls

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This 1971 report sets forth in a well-organized fashion the currently available information on asbestos as an air pollutant, with special attention to sources health effects, measurements, and feasibility of control.

  19. Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution (TEMPO) - Status and Potential Science Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chance, Kelly

    2016-05-01

    TEMPO is the first NASA Earth Venture Instrument, to launch between 2019 and 2021. It measures atmospheric pollution from Mexico City and Cuba to the Canadian oil sands, and from the Atlantic to the Pacific, hourly at high spatial resolution, ~ 10 km2. It measures the key elements of air pollution chemistry. Geostationary (GEO) measurements capture the variability in the diurnal cycle of emissions and chemistry at sub-urban scale to improve emission inventories, monitor population exposure, and enable emission-control strategies. TEMPO measures the UV/visible spectra to retrieve O3, NO2, SO2, H2 CO, C2 H2 O2, H2 O, aerosols, cloud parameters, and UVB radiation. It tracks aerosol loading. It provides near-real-time air quality products. TEMPO is the North American component of the global geostationary constellation for pollution monitoring, with the European Sentinel-4 and the Korean GEMS. TEMPO studies may include: Solar-induced fluorescence from chlorophyll over land and in the ocean to study tropical dynamics, primary productivity, carbon uptake, to detect red tides, and to study phytoplankton; Measurements of stratospheric intrusions that cause air quality exceedances; Measurements at peaks in vehicle travel to capture the variability in emissions from mobile sources; Measurements of thunderstorm activity, including outflow regions to better quantify lightning NOx and O3 production; Cropland measurements follow the temporal evolution of emissions after fertilizer application and from rain-induced emissions from semi-arid soils; Measurements investigate the chemical processing of primary fire emissions and the secondary formation of VOCs and ozone; Measurements examine ocean halogen emissions and their impact on the oxidizing capacity of coastal environments; Spectra of nighttime lights are markers for human activity, energy conservation, and compliance with outdoor lighting standards intended to reduce light pollution.

  20. Epiphytic lichen diversity on dead and dying conifers under different levels of atmospheric pollution.

    PubMed

    Hauck, Markus

    2005-05-01

    Based on literature data, epiphytic lichen abundance was comparably studied in montane woodlands on healthy versus dead or dying conifers of Europe and North America in areas with different levels of atmospheric pollution. Study sites comprised Picea abies forests in the Harz Mountains and in the northern Alps, Germany, Picea rubens-Abies balsamea forests on Whiteface Mountain, Adirondacks, New York, U.S.A. and Picea engelmannii-Abies lasiocarpa forests in the Salish Mountains, Montana, U.S.A. Detrended correspondence analysis showed that epiphytic lichen vegetation differed more between healthy and dead or dying trees at high- versus low-polluted sites. This is attributed to greater differences in chemical habitat conditions between trees of different vitality in highly polluted areas. Based on these results, a hypothetical model of relative importance of site factors for small-scale variation of epiphytic lichen abundance versus atmospheric pollutant load is discussed.

  1. [Long-distance transportation of atmospheric pollutants and its effects on ecosystems].

    PubMed

    Guardans, R; Gimeno, B S

    1994-01-01

    It was known, as far back as the nineteenth century, that rain water from industrial areas was more acid than that from rural areas. The potential risks for life in general were discussed, but no further attention was paid to the issue. At the end of the twentieth century, the ecosystems of Europe, Canada and the United States have been severely damaged by pollutants borne by atmospheric winds to places distant from their origin. The main effects of these atmospheric pollutants are due to sulfur and nitrogen oxide dilution and to photochemical reactions. International organizations have been formed and agreements pronounced and ratified by many countries for a universal study on the pollution process, on the transport of pollutants--mostly sulfur, nitrogen and ozone--and on how to collaborate in order to reduce emissions in the respective countries of origin for the worldwide profit.

  2. Appropriate line profiles for radiation modeling in the detection of atmospheric pollutants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, S. N.

    1973-01-01

    Absorption by Lorentz, Doppler, and Voight lines are compared for a range of atmospheric parameters. It is found that, for the intermediate path lengths, the use of the combined Lorentz-Doppler (Voight) profile is essential in calculating the atmospheric transmittance. A brief review of band models, to approximate the absorption over certain frequency interval, is presented. Expressions for total radiative energy emergent from the atmosphere are given which, with appropriate line or band models, can be used to reduce the data obtained from radiation measurement by an instrument mounted on an aircraft or a satellite. By employing the inversion procedure, the concentration of atmospheric pollutants can be obtained from the measured data.

  3. Health Risk of Exposure to Atmospheric Pollutant Particles

    EPA Science Inventory

    In relation to multi-component mixture nature of atmospheric PM, this presentation will discuss methods for estimating the respiratory internal dose by experiment and mathematical modeling, limitations of each method and interpretations of the results in the context of health ris...

  4. Health Risk of Exposure to Atmospheric Pollutant Particles

    EPA Science Inventory

    In relation to multi-component mixture nature of atmospheric PM, this presentation will discuss methods for estimating the respiratory internal dose by experiment and mathematical modeling, limitations of each method and interpretations of the results in the context of health ris...

  5. Monitoring of 1300 organic micro-pollutants in surface waters from Tianjin, North China.

    PubMed

    Kong, Lingxiao; Kadokami, Kiwao; Wang, Shaopo; Duong, Hanh Thi; Chau, Hong Thi Cam

    2015-03-01

    In spite of the quantities and species of chemicals dramatically increased with rapid economic growth in China in the last decade, the focus of environmental research was mainly on limited number of priority pollutants. Therefore, to elucidate environmental pollution by organic micro-pollutants, this work was conducted as the first systematic survey on the occurrence of 1300 substances in 20 surface water samples of Tianjin, North China, selected as a representative area of China. The results showed the presence of 227 chemicals. The most relevant compounds in terms of frequency of detection and median concentration were bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (100%; 0.26μgL(-1)), siduron (100%; 0.20μgL(-1)), lidocaine (100%; 96ngL(-1)), antipyrine (100%; 76ngL(-1)), caffeine (95%; 0.28μgL(-1)), cotinine (95%; 0.20μgL(-1)), phenanthrene (95%; 0.17μgL(-1)), metformin (90%; 0.61μgL(-1)), diethyl phthalate (90%; 0.19μgL(-1)), quinoxaline-2-carboxylic acid (90%; 0.14μgL(-1)), 2-(methylthio)-benzothiazole (85%; 0.11μgL(-1)) and anthraquinone (85%; 54ngL(-1)). Cluster analysis discriminated three highly polluted sites from others based on data similarity. Principle component analysis identified four factors, corresponding to industrial wastewater, domestic discharge, tire production and atmospheric deposition, accounting for 78% of the total variance in the water monitoring data set. This work provides a wide reconnaissance on broad spectrum of organic micro-contaminants in surface waters in China, which indicates that the aquatic environment in China has been polluted by a large number of chemicals. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Status of the first NASA EV-I Project, Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution (TEMPO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chance, K.; Liu, X.; Suleiman, R. M.; Flittner, D. E.; Al-Saadi, J. A.; Janz, S. J.

    2013-12-01

    TEMPO is the first NASA Earth Venture Instrument. It will measure atmospheric pollution for greater North America from space using ultraviolet and visible spectroscopy. TEMPO measures from Mexico City to the Canadian tar sands, and from the Atlantic to the Pacific, hourly and at high spatial resolution (2 km N/S × 4.5 km E/W at the center of its field of regard). The status of TEMPO including progress in instrument definition and implementation of the ground system will be presented. TEMPO provides a minimally-redundant measurement suite that includes all key elements of tropospheric air pollution chemistry. Measurements are from geostationary (GEO) orbit, to capture the inherent high variability in the diurnal cycle of emissions and chemistry. The small spatial footprint resolves pollution sources at sub-urban scale. Together, this temporal and spatial resolution improves emission inventories, monitors population exposure, and enables effective emission-control strategies. TEMPO will be delivered in 2017 for integration onto a NASA-selected GEO host spacecraft for launch as early as 2018. It will provide the spectra required to retrieve O3, NO2, SO2, H2CO, C2H2O2, H2O, aerosols, cloud parameters, and UVB radiation. TEMPO thus measures the major elements, directly or by proxy, in the tropospheric O3 chemistry cycle. Multi-spectral observations provide sensitivity to O3 in the lowermost troposphere, substantially reducing uncertainty in air quality predictions. TEMPO quantifies and tracks the evolution of aerosol loading. It provides near-real-time air quality products that will be made widely, publicly available. Additional gases not central to air quality, including BrO, OClO, and IO will also be measured. TEMPO and its Asian (GEMS) and European (Sentinel-4) constellation partners make the first tropospheric trace gas measurements from GEO, building on the heritage of six spectrometers flown in low-earth-orbit (LEO). These LEO instruments measure the needed

  7. Design and Performance of a Gas Chromatograph for Automatic Monitoring of Pollutants in Ambient Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Villalobos, R.; Stevens, D.; LeBlanc, R.; Braun, L.

    1971-01-01

    In recent years, interest in air pollution constituents has focused on carbon monoxide and hydrocarbons as prime components of polluted air. Instrumental methods have been developed, and commercial instruments for continuous monitoring of these components have been available for a number of years. For the measurement of carbon monoxide, non-dispersive infrared spectroscopy has been the accepted tool, in spite of its marginal sensitivity at low parts-per-million levels. For continuously monitoring total hydrocarbons, the hydrogen flame ionization analyzer has been widely accepted as the preferred method. The inadequacy of this latter method became evident when it was concluded that methane is non-reactive and cannot be considered a contaminant even though present at over 1 ppm in the earth's atmosphere. Hence, the need for measuring methane separately became apparent as a means of measuring the reactive and potentially harmful non-methane hydrocarbons fraction. A gas chromatographic method for the measurement of methane and total hydrocarbons which met these requirements has been developed. In this technique, methane was separated on conventional gas chromatographic columns and detected by a hydrogen flame ionization detector (FID) while the total hydrocarbons were obtained by introducing a second sample directly into the FID without separating the various components. The reactive, or non-methane hydrocarbons, were determined by difference. Carbon monoxide was also measured after converting to methane over a heated catalyst to render it detectable by the FID. The development of this method made it possible to perform these measurements with a sensitivity of as much as 1 ppm full scale and a minimum detectability of 20 ppb. Incorporating this technique, criteria were developed by APCO for a second generation continuous automatic instrument for atmospheric monitoring stations.

  8. Design and Performance of a Gas Chromatograph for Automatic Monitoring of Pollutants in Ambient Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Villalobos, R.; Stevens, D.; LeBlanc, R.; Braun, L.

    1971-01-01

    In recent years, interest in air pollution constituents has focused on carbon monoxide and hydrocarbons as prime components of polluted air. Instrumental methods have been developed, and commercial instruments for continuous monitoring of these components have been available for a number of years. For the measurement of carbon monoxide, non-dispersive infrared spectroscopy has been the accepted tool, in spite of its marginal sensitivity at low parts-per-million levels. For continuously monitoring total hydrocarbons, the hydrogen flame ionization analyzer has been widely accepted as the preferred method. The inadequacy of this latter method became evident when it was concluded that methane is non-reactive and cannot be considered a contaminant even though present at over 1 ppm in the earth's atmosphere. Hence, the need for measuring methane separately became apparent as a means of measuring the reactive and potentially harmful non-methane hydrocarbons fraction. A gas chromatographic method for the measurement of methane and total hydrocarbons which met these requirements has been developed. In this technique, methane was separated on conventional gas chromatographic columns and detected by a hydrogen flame ionization detector (FID) while the total hydrocarbons were obtained by introducing a second sample directly into the FID without separating the various components. The reactive, or non-methane hydrocarbons, were determined by difference. Carbon monoxide was also measured after converting to methane over a heated catalyst to render it detectable by the FID. The development of this method made it possible to perform these measurements with a sensitivity of as much as 1 ppm full scale and a minimum detectability of 20 ppb. Incorporating this technique, criteria were developed by APCO for a second generation continuous automatic instrument for atmospheric monitoring stations.

  9. Study of atmospheric pollution scavenging. Eighteenth progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Semonin, R.G.; Bartlett, J.D.; Bowersox, V.C.; Gatz, D.F.; Naiman, D.Q.; Peden, M.E.; Stahlhut, R.K.; Stensland, G.J.

    1980-07-01

    The analysis of aerosol samples obtained in rural east-central Illinois reveals a seasonal maximum in SO/sub 4/ during May to July and a similar pattern for NH/sub 4/. The annual median SO/sub 4/ is about 1 to 1.5 ..mu..g/m/sup 3/. In contrast to these ions, NO/sub 3/ displays highest values in the cold season. Soil-related species (Ca, K) seem to maximize in relation to farm tillage and harvesting practices. The NO/sub 3/ in recent precipitation samples over the northeast US increased between 1 and 2 times the values observed in the mid-1950's. A case study from SCORE-78 suggests that all ion concentrations analyzed from sequentially collected samples decreased from the onset of rain to a minimum corresponding to the heaviest rain rates. Four groups of elements in 10 event rain samples were identified using factor analysis. The groups include soluble and insoluble crustal elements, soluble pollutant metals and sulfate, and insoluble pollutant metals. Utilizing the factor analysis approach, the St. Louis METROMEX precipitation chemistry data showed that the SO/sub 4/ deposition patterns group consistently with those of other soluble pollutants. Additional factor analysis efforts on the St. Louis rainwater data set revealed that soluble and insoluble concentrations of a given element have different deposition patterns suggesting that scavenging and/or precipitation formation processes dictate the patterns. An approach to managing the vast data base of rain chemistry used in the above studies is described. The software also examines the data for certain aspects of quality assurance. The procedures used to analyze ambient air filter samples are discussed.

  10. Silica nanoparticles capture atmospheric lead: implications in the treatment of environmental heavy metal pollution.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xifei; Shen, Zhiguo; Zhang, Bing; Yang, Jianping; Hong, Wen-Xu; Zhuang, Zhixiong; Liu, Jianjun

    2013-01-01

    Lead (Pb) contamination in the air is a severe global problem, most notably in China. Removal of Pb from polluted air remains a significant challenge. It is unclear what potential effects silica nanoparticles (SiNPs) exposure can have on atmospheric Pb. Here we first characterized the features of SiNPs by measuring the particle size, zeta potential and the specific surface area of SiO(2) particles using a Nicomp 380/ZLS submicron particle sizer, the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) method and transmission electronic microscopy (TEM). We measured the content of the metal Pb adsorbed by SiNPs exposed to two Pb polluted electric battery plants using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). It is found that SiNPs exposed to two Pb polluted electric battery plants absorb more atmospheric Pb compared to either blank control or micro-sized SiO(2) particles in a time-dependent manner. This is the first study demonstrating that SiNPs exposure can absorb atmospheric Pb in the polluted environment. These novel findings indicate that SiNPs have potential to serve as a significant adsorbent of Pb from industrial pollution, implicating a potentially novel application of SiNPs in the treatment of environmental heavy metal pollution. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The net decay time of anomalies in concentrations of atmospheric pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinnikov, Konstantin Y.; Dickerson, Russell R.; Krotkov, Nickolay A.; Edgerton, Eric S.; Schwab, James J.

    2017-07-01

    This paper introduces a new parameter to characterize the random component in temporal variability of atmospheric pollutants and proposes a simple statistical technique for its evaluation. That parameter is the net decay time (or the time scale) of the local anomalies in concentrations of atmospheric pollutants, rather than the traditionally used chemical lifetimes of total amounts of the species. Using widely available data of hourly multi-year surface trace gas pollutant concentrations we demonstrate a simplified way to estimate the net decay time with an exponential approximation of lag-correlation functions. We assessed the decay times of fluctuations in observations of eight atmospheric pollutants (SO2, NO, NO2, NOy, O3, CO, NH3, and HNO3) at two urban sites and one cleaner rural site in the Eastern US. The time scales of temporal fluctuations (net decay times) vary from about one hour to slightly more than one day. These scales are generally much shorter in urban environments than in remote regions. We also compared day- and night-time observations in warm and cold seasons. At night in the cold season, time scales of fluctuations in atmospheric pollutants are usually the longest. Such estimates should be useful to air quality prediction, public health, and satellite remote sensing research communities.

  12. Millimeter and submillimeter wave absorption by atmospheric pollutants and constituents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolbe, W. F.; Leskovar, B.

    1981-10-01

    Calculated absorption coefficients and rotational transition frequencies are given for a number of polar molecules of interest to pollution and energy research. The results, which are presented in graphical form for microwave frequencies up to 1400 GHz, illustrate the increased absorption line intensities occurring in the submillimeter region. For most species these absorption coefficients attain their maximum values in this region. Included in the calculations are the gases SO2, H2CO, O3, H2O, H2S, OCS, CO, NO, OH, SO, NH3, and CS. A discussion of the techniques currently available for the detection in the submillimeter region of these species is also given.

  13. Means of atmospheric air pollution reduction during drilling wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shkitsa, L.; Yatsyshyn, T.; Lyakh, M.; Sydorenko, O.

    2016-08-01

    The process of drilling oil and gas wells is the source of air pollution through drilling mud evaporation containing hazardous chemical substances. The constructive solution for cleaning device of downhole tool that contains elements covering tube and clean the surface from the mud in the process of rising from the well is offered. Inside the device is filled with magnetic fluid containing the substance neutralizing hazardous substances. The use of the equipment proposed will make it possible to avoid penetration of harmful substances into the environment and to escape the harmful effects of aggressive substances for staff health and increase rig's fire safety.

  14. Clean Air Slots Amid Dense Atmospheric Pollution in Southern Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hobbs, Peter V.

    2003-01-01

    During the flights of the University of Washington's Convair-580 in the Southern African Regional Science Initiative (SAFARI 2000) in southern Africa, a phenomenon was observed that has not been reported previously. This was the occurrence of thin layers of remarkably clean air, sandwiched between heavily polluted air, which persisted for many hours during the day. Photographs are shown of these clean air slots (CAS), and particle concentrations and light scattering coefficients in and around such slot are presented. An explanation is proposed for the propensity of CAS to form in southern Africa during the dry season.

  15. SUGGESTIONS FOR OPTIMIZED PLANNING OF MULTIVARIATE MONITORING OF ATMOSPHERIC POLLUTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent work in factor analysis of multivariate data sets has shown that variables with little signal should not be included in the factor analysis. Work also shows that rotational ambiguity is reduced if sources impacting a receptor have both large and small contributions. Thes...

  16. Effect of typhoon on atmospheric aerosol particle pollutants accumulation over Xiamen, China.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jinpei; Chen, Liqi; Lin, Qi; Zhao, Shuhui; Zhang, Miming

    2016-09-01

    Great influence of typhoon on air quality has been confirmed, however, rare data especially high time resolved aerosol particle data could be used to establish the behavior of typhoon on air pollution. A single particle aerosol spectrometer (SPAMS) was employed to characterize the particles with particle number count in high time resolution for two typhoons of Soulik (2013) and Soudelor (2015) with similar tracks. Three periods with five events were classified during the whole observation time, including pre - typhoon (event 1 and event 2), typhoon (event 3 and event 4) and post - typhoon (event 5) based on the meteorological parameters and particle pollutant properties. First pollutant group appeared during pre-typhoon (event 2) with high relative contributions of V - Ni rich particles. Pollution from the ship emissions and accumulated by local processes with stagnant meteorological atmosphere dominated the formation of the pollutant group before typhoon. The second pollutant group was present during typhoon (event 3), while typhoon began to change the local wind direction and increase wind speed. Particle number count reached up to the maximum value. High relative contributions of V - Ni rich and dust particles with low value of NO3(-)/SO4(2-) was observed during this period, indicating that the pollutant group was governed by the combined effect of local pollutant emissions and long-term transports. The analysis of this study sheds a deep insight into understand the relationship between the air pollution and typhoon. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Supplemental mathematical formulations, Atmospheric pathway: The Multimedia Environmental Pollutant Assessment System (MEPAS)

    SciTech Connect

    Droppo, J.G.; Buck, J.W.

    1996-03-01

    The Multimedia Environmental Pollutant Assessment System (MEPAS) is an integrated software implementation of physics-based fate and transport models for health and environmental risk assessments of both radioactive and hazardous pollutants. This atmospheric component report is one of a series of formulation reports that document the MEPAS mathematical models. MEPAS is a ``multimedia`` model; pollutant transport is modeled within, through, and between multiple media (air, soil, groundwater, and surface water). The estimated concentrations in the various media are used to compute exposures and impacts to the environment, to maximum individuals, and to populations.

  18. Atmosphere and water quality monitoring on Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niu, William

    1990-01-01

    In Space Station Freedom air and water will be supplied in closed loop systems. The monitoring of air and water qualities will ensure the crew health for the long mission duration. The Atmosphere Composition Monitor consists of the following major instruments: (1) a single focusing mass spectrometer to monitor major air constituents and control the oxygen/nitrogen addition for the Space Station; (2) a gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer to detect trace contaminants; (3) a non-dispersive infrared spectrometer to determine carbon monoxide concentration; and (4) a laser particle counter for measuring particulates in the air. An overview of the design and development concepts for the air and water quality monitors is presented.

  19. On-Orbit Measurements of the ISS Atmosphere by the Vehicle Cabin Atmosphere Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darrach, M. R.; Chutjian, A.; Bornstein, B. J.; Croonquist, A. P.; Garkanian, V.; Haemmerle, V. R.; Hofman, J.; Heinrichs, W. M.; Karmon, D.; Kenny, J.; Kidd, R. D.; Lee, S.; MacAskill, J. A.; Madzunkov, S. M.; Mandrake, L.; Rust, T. M.; Schaefer, R. T.; Thomas, J. L.; Toomarian, N.

    2011-01-01

    We report on trace gas and major atmospheric constituents results obtained by the Vehicle Cabin Atmosphere Monitor (VCAM) during operations aboard the International Space Station (ISS). VCAM is an autonomous environmental monitor based on a miniature gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer. It was flown to the ISS on shuttle mission STS-131 and commenced operations on 6/10/10. VCAM provides measurements of ppb-to-ppm levels of volatile trace-gas constituents, and of the atmospheric major constituents (nitrogen, oxygen, argon, and carbon dioxide) in a space vehicle or station. It is designed to operate autonomously and maintenance-free, approximately once per day, with a self-contained gas supply sufficient for a one-year lifetime. VCAM is designed to detect and identify 90% of the target compounds at their 180-day Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentration levels.

  20. Study of atmospheric pollution scavenging. Twenty-fourth progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, A.L.

    1990-08-01

    Atmospheric scavenging research conducted by the Illinois State Water Survey under contract with the Department of Energy has been a significant factor in the historical development of the field of precipitation scavenging. Emphasis of the work during the 1980`s became focused on the problem of acid rain problem with the Survey being chosen as the Central Analytical Laboratory for sample analysis of the National Atmospheric Deposition Program National Trends Network (NADP/NTN). The DOE research was responsible for laying the groundwork from the standpoint of sampling and chemical analysis that has now become routine features of NADP/NTN. A significant aspect of the research has been the participation by the Water Survey in the MAP3S precipitation sampling network which is totally supported by DOE, is the longest continuous precipitation sampling network in existence, and maintains an event sampling protocol. The following review consists of a short description of each of the papers appearing in the Study of Atmospheric Scavenging progress reports starting with the Eighteenth Progress Report in 1980 to the Twenty- Third Progress Report in 1989. In addition a listing of the significant publications and interviews associated with the program are given in the bibliography.

  1. Study on polarization features of carbonaceous particles in atmosphere pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Da; Zeng, Nan; Wang, Yunfei; Chen, Dongsheng; Chen, Yuerong; Ma, Hui

    2016-09-01

    The carbonaceous particles are the main source of the light absorption in atmospheric aerosol. Different from the case in tissue-like turbid media, the light absorption in atmospheric environments can be described as an inherent attribute on scatterers rather than an interstitial propagation effect. In this paper, we simulated the optical absorption due to carbonaceous scatterers and analyzed the influence of various parameters on their polarization properties, such as the imaginary part refractive index, the size and shape. Also we compare these results with our previous research work on absorption effect in ambient medium. For the single scattering, the polarization scattering angular distribution implies the potential of distinguishing different carbonaceous particles with different structural and absorption parameters. In the other hand, for the week scattering case of suspension system, using the backward Mueller matrix polar decomposition method, we can find out that the additional absorption effect on carbonaceous particles can enhance their depolarization and moreover produce more diattenuation and linear retardance for those anisotropic particles. The subsequent experiments of standard samples show a good agreement with simulation results. The paper further studies the phase function of single scattering and the distribution of scattering numbers, which can explain these unique polarization scattering phenomena. We hope these fundamental results can help to investigate how to identify the carbonaceous particles and characterize their optical features from the atmospheric hybrid suspension system.

  2. Kinetic studies of simulated polluted atmospheres. Final report January 1976-April 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Calvert, J.G.

    1980-01-01

    The kinetics and reaction mechanisms of several important atmospheric contaminants - SO2, formaldehyde, nitrous acid, and the nitrosamines - were assessed to help quantify some key aspects of the chemistry of polluted atmospheres. The reactions and lifetimes of excited sulfur dioxide with various atmospheric components including hydroxyl, hydroperoxy, and methylperoxy radicals were studied. These data and other published rate data were reviewed and evaluated. The photolysis of formaldehyde was investigated as a major source of hydroperoxyl radicals, and a quantitative evaluation made of its apparent first order rate constants at various solar zenith angles. The absolute extinction coefficients for nitrous acid were determined, and estimates made of the rates of hydroxyl radical generation in the troposphere by photolysis of nitrous acid. Long path Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was used to help evaluate the potential for nitrosamine formation in the polluted atmosphere.

  3. Precipitation scavenging of gaseous pollutants having arbitrary solubility in inhomogeneous atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elperin, Tov; Fominykh, Andrew; Krasovitov, Boris

    2015-04-01

    We investigate scavenging of gaseous pollutants in the atmosphere under the combined influence of rain and varying temperature distribution that affects the rate of soluble gas scavenging. We employ a one-dimensional model of precipitation scavenging of gaseous pollutants having arbitrary solubility that is valid for small gradients and for non-uniform initial vertical distributions of temperature and soluble trace gases concentration in the atmosphere. It is showed that transient altitudinal distributions of temperature and concentration under the influence of rain are determined by linear wave equations that describe propagation of temperature and scavenging wave fronts. Scavenging coefficient and the rates of precipitation scavenging are calculated for wet removal of methanol () using measured initial distribution of methanol and temperature in the atmosphere. Theoretical predictions of the dependence of the magnitude of the scavenging coefficient on rain intensity for tritium oxide and sulfur dioxide are in good agreement with the available atmospheric measurements.

  4. Agriculture Crop Burning in Northwestern India and Its Impact on Atmospheric Pollution and Air Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, R. P.; Chauhan, A.; Gonzalez Abad, G.

    2014-12-01

    Crop burning season, over northern India, occurs during October-November and April-May after harvesting season. The mechanized harvesting started in 1986, and every year crop residues are burnt in the northwestern parts of India. During post-monsoon season, October - November, the boundary layer is shallow; as a result the crop burning greatly impacts the regional air quality and climate of the northern parts of south Asia. Due to intense burning episodes, heavy smoke pollution-laden plumes are transported all along the Indo-Gangetic basin in the northern parts of India, depending upon diurnal changes in the wind patterns. We find that, in general, the dominant westerly winds transport the plumes and emissions far away from the source region up to the eastern parts of Indo-Gangetic basin, further dispersing over central India to the south. We use retrievals of formaldehyde and nitrogen dioxide and Aerosol Index from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) onboard NASA Aura satellite together with Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) onboard NASA Terra and Aqua fire counts to assess the seasonal variation and geographical extent of the emissions due to burning of crop residues. In addition, our results, based on satellite measurements, indicate that the smoke plumes and biomass burning emissions are also transported over the Himalayan region and beyond, resulting in enhanced concentrations of aerosol loading and trace gases. Overall, our findings suggest that, during post-monsoon season, crop burning smoke plumes and emissions are the main cause of poor air quality, high atmospheric pollution and dense haze/smog, especially in the Indo-Gangetic basin.

  5. Major Constituents Analysis for the Vehicle Cabin Atmosphere Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandrake, Lukas; Bornstein, Benjamin J.; Madzunkov, Stojan; Macaskill, John A.

    2011-01-01

    Vehicle Cabin Atmosphere Monitor (VCAM) can provide a means for monitoring the air within enclosed environments such as the International Space Station, the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV), a Lunar habitat, or another vehicle traveling to Mars. The software processes a sum total spectra (counts vs. mass channel) with the intention of computing abundance ratios for N2, O2, CO2, Ar2, and H2O. A brute-force powerset expansion compares a library of expected mass lines with those found within the data. Least squares error is combined with a penalty term for using small peaks.

  6. Quantification of Trace Chemicals Using Vehicle Cabin Atmosphere Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Seungwon; Mandrake, Lukas; Bornstein, Benjamin; Bue, Brian

    2009-01-01

    A system to monitor the concentrations of trace chemicals in cabin atmosphere is one of the most critical components in long-duration human flight missions. The Vehicle Cabin Atmosphere Monitor (VCAM) is a miniature gas chromatograph mass spectrometer system to be used to detect and quantify trace chemicals in the International Space Station. We developed an autonomous computational process to quantify trace chemicals for use in VCAM. The process involves the design of a measured signal quantification scheme, the construction of concentration curves (i.e. the relationship between concentration and ion count measured by VCAM), the decision rule of applying high- or low-gain concentration curves, and the detection of saturation, low-signals, and outliers. When the developed quantification process is applied, the average errors of concentration for most of trace chemicals are found to be between 14% and 66%.

  7. [Observation on atmospheric pollution in Xianghe during Beijing 2008 Olympic Games].

    PubMed

    Pan, Yue-Peng; Wang, Yue-Si; Hu, Bo; Liu, Quan; Wang, Ying-Hong; Nan, Wei-Dong

    2010-01-01

    There is a concern that much of the atmospheric pollution experienced in Beijing is regional in nature and not attributable to local sources. The objective of this study is to examine the contribution of sources outside Beijing to atmospheric pollution levels during Beijing 2008 Olympic Games. The observations of SO2, NO(x), O3, PM2.5 and PM10 were conducted from June 1 to September 30, 2008 in Xianghe, a rural site about 70 km southeast of Beijing. Sources and transportation of atmospheric pollution during the experiment were discussed with surface meteorology data and backward trajectories calculated using HYSPLIT model. The results showed that the daily average maximum (mean +/- standard deviation) concentrations of SO2, NO(x), O3, PM2.5, and PM10 during observation reached 84.4(13.4 +/- 15.2), 43.3 (15.9 +/- 9.1), 230 (82 +/- 38), 184 (76 +/- 42) and 248 (113 +/- 52) microg x m(-3), respectively. In particular, during the pollution episodes from July 20 to August 12, the hourly average concentration of O3 exceeded the National Ambient Air Quality Standard II for 46 h (9%), and the daily average concentration of PM10 exceeded the Standard for 11 d (46%); PM2.5 exceeded the US EPA Standard for 18 d (75%). The daily average concentrations of SO2, NO(x), O3, PM2.5 and PM10 decreased from 27.7, 18.6, 96, 90, 127 microg x m(-3) in June-July to 5.8, 13.2, 80, 60, 106 microg x m(-3) during Olympic Games (August-September), respectively. The typical diurnal variations of NO(x), PM2.5 and PM10 were similar, peaking at 07:00 and 20:00, while the maximum of O3 occurred between 14:00 to 16:00 local time. The findings also suggested that the atmospheric pollution in Xianghe is related to local emission, regional transport as well as the meteorological conditions. Northerly wind and precipitation are favorable for diffusion and wet deposition of pollutants, while sustained south flows make the atmospheric pollution more serious. The lead-lag correlation analysis during the

  8. Assessment of Near-Source Air Pollution at a Fine Spatial Scale Utilizing Mobile Monitoring Approach

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mobile monitoring is an emerging strategy to characterize spatially and temporally variable air pollution in areas near sources. EPA’s Geospatial Monitoring of Air Pollution (GMAP) vehicle – an all-electric vehicle measuring real-time concentrations of particulate and gaseous po...

  9. Assessment of Near-Source Air Pollution at a Fine Spatial Scale Utilizing Mobile Monitoring Approach

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mobile monitoring is an emerging strategy to characterize spatially and temporally variable air pollution in areas near sources. EPA’s Geospatial Monitoring of Air Pollution (GMAP) vehicle – an all-electric vehicle measuring real-time concentrations of particulate and gaseous po...

  10. Air pollution and climate change effects on health of the Ukrainian forests: monitoring and evalution

    Treesearch

    Igor F. Buksha; Valentina L. Meshkova; Oleg M. Radchenko; Alexander S. Sidorov

    1998-01-01

    Forests in the Ukraine are affected by environmental pollution, intensive forestry practice, and recreational uses. These factors make them sensitive to impacts of climate change. Since 1989 Ukraine has participated in the International Cooperative Program on Assessment and Monitoring of Air Pollution Effects on Forests (ICP-Forests). A network of monitoring plots has...

  11. Sources of Atmospheric Pollutants Impacting Air and Water Quality in the Lake Tahoe Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gertler, A. W.; Cahill, T. A.; Gillies, J.; Kuhns, H.

    2008-12-01

    Starting in the second half of the 20th century, decline in Lake Tahoe's water clarity and degradation in the basin's air quality have become major concerns due to its unique scenic features. Gaseous and particulate nitrogen (N) and particulate phosphorus (P) loading via direct atmospheric deposition and sediment transport to the lake have also been implicated as responsible for its eutrophication and decline in water clarity. Estimates suggest that atmospheric N deposition contributes 55% of the total N loading to the lake, while atmospheric P deposition contributes 15% of the total P loading. In order to improve both air quality and, as a consequence, water quality, it is necessary to develop an understanding of the sources of the atmospheric pollutants. Once this is accomplished, it is possible to implement cost-effective strategies to reduce this impact. This paper summarizes the findings of a series of studies performed to determine the levels and sources of ambient air pollutants in the basin. Projects have included the development of a Tahoe-specific emissions inventory, long-term measurements of road dust resuspension, modeling to determine the fraction of pollutants coming from in-basin vs. out-of-basin sources, particulate source apportionment, and estimates of nitric acid deposition. These studies found that the pollutants most closely connected to the decline in water quality come largely from within basin sources, as opposed to those coming from the Central Valley and upwind urban areas of California. These results indicate regulators need to control pollutant emissions within the Tahoe basin in order to reduce the impact of atmospheric pollutants on both air and water quality.

  12. Monitoring of atmospheric aerosol emissions using a remotely piloted air vehicle (RPV)-Borne Sensor Suite

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-01

    We have developed a small sensor system, the micro-atmospheric measurement system ({mu}-AMS), to monitor and track aerosol emissions. The system was developed to fly aboard a remotely piloted air vehicle, or other mobile platform, to provide real-time particle measurements in effluent plumes and to collect particles for chemical analysis. The {mu}-AMS instrument measures atmospheric parameters including particle mass concentration and size distribution, temperature, humidity, and airspeed, altitude and position (by GPS receiver) each second. The sensor data are stored onboard and are also down linked to a ground station in real time. The {mu}-AMS is battery powered, small (8 in. dia x 36 in.), and lightweight (15 pounds). Aerosol concentrations and size distributions from above ground explosive tests, airbone urban pollution, and traffic-produced particulates are presented.

  13. Pollution monitoring using bees: a new service provided by honey bees

    SciTech Connect

    Bromenshenk, J.J.; Thomas, J.M.; Simpson, J.C.; Bishop, M.

    1983-10-01

    The objectives are to provide a tool for assessing pollutant distributions and the effects of pollutants on living systems. The potential of bees as pollution monitors was studied by examining bees exposed to toxic metals near a smelter in Montana and bees in the area surrounding a hazardous waste disposal site near Puget Sound, Washington. Levels of toxic metals in the bees and brood survival were examined. It was concluded bees were, indeed, suitable indicators of pollution levels. (ACR)

  14. Satellite Monitoring of Urban Air Pollution using MODIS and VIIRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, N. C.; Bettenhausen, C.; Sayer, A. M.

    2013-05-01

    Due to rapid economical growth in many developing countries, the problem of deteriorating air quality is becoming an important societal issue of public health over mega cities around the world. Although there are many networks of surface PM2.5 and PM10 measurements in place to monitor the level of air pollutant over these urban sites, satellite data are still required to provide comprehensive information on the overall big picture regarding the spatial distribution of aerosols and their transport paths into the surrounding regions. In this paper, we will demonstrate the capability of a new satellite algorithm to retrieve aerosol optical thickness and single scattering albedo over bright-reflecting surfaces such as urban areas. Such retrievals have been difficult to perform using previously available algorithms that use wavelengths from the mid-visible to the near IR because they have trouble separating the aerosol signal from the contribution due to the bright surface reflectance. The new algorithm, called Deep Blue, utilizes blue-wavelength measurements from instruments such as MODIS and VIIRS to infer the properties of aerosols, since the surface reflectance over land in the blue part of the spectrum is much lower than for longer wavelength channels. We have validated the satellite retrieved aerosol optical thickness from both MODIS Collection 6 and new VIIRS Deep Blue products with data from AERONET sunphotometers over urban sites. The comparisons show reasonable agreements between these two. These new satellite products will allow scientists to determine quantitatively the aerosol properties near sources using high spatial resolution measurements from MODIS and VIIRS instruments. The multiyear satellite measurements since 2000 from MODIS will be utilized to investigate the interannual variability of source, pathway, and aerosol loading associated with these urban pollutions. The quantitative effects of direct radiative forcing of these air borne aerosol

  15. Atmospheric Transference of the Toxic Burden of Atmosphere-Surface Exchangeable Pollutants to the Great Lakes Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, A.; Perlinger, J. A.; Giang, A.; Zhang, H.; Selin, N. E.; Wu, S.

    2016-12-01

    Toxic pollutants that share certain chemical properties undergo repeated emission and deposition between Earth's surfaces and the atmosphere. Following their emission through anthropogenic activities, they are transported locally, regionally or globally through the atmosphere, are deposited, and impact local ecosystems, in some cases as a result of bioaccumulation in food webs. We call them atmosphere-surface exchangeable pollutants or "ASEPs", wherein this group is comprised of thousands of chemicals. We are studying potential future contamination in the Great Lakes region by modeling scenarios of the future for three compounds/compound classes, mercury, polychlorinated biphenyl compounds, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. In this presentation we focus on mercury and future scenarios of contamination of the Great Lake region. The atmospheric transport of mercury under specific scenarios will be discussed. The global 3-D chemical transport model GEOS-Chem has been applied to estimate future atmospheric concentrations and deposition rates of mercury in the Great Lakes region for selected future scenarios of emissions and climate. We find that, assuming no changes in climate, annual mean net deposition flux of mercury to the Great Lakes Region may increase by approximately 50% over 2005 levels by 2050, without global or regional policies addressing mercury, air pollution, and climate. In contrast, we project that the combination of global and North American action on mercury could lead to a 21% reduction in deposition from 2005 levels by 2050. US action alone results in a projected 18% reduction over 2005 levels by 2050. We also find that, assuming no changes in anthropogenic emissions, climate change and biomass burning emissions would, respectively, cause annual mean net deposition flux of mercury to the Great Lakes Region to increase by approximately 5% and decrease by approximately 2% over 2000 levels by 2050.

  16. Current and future levels of mercury atmospheric pollution on a global scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacyna, Jozef M.; Travnikov, Oleg; De Simone, Francesco; Hedgecock, Ian M.; Sundseth, Kyrre; Pacyna, Elisabeth G.; Steenhuisen, Frits; Pirrone, Nicola; Munthe, John; Kindbom, Karin

    2016-10-01

    An assessment of current and future emissions, air concentrations, and atmospheric deposition of mercury worldwide is presented on the basis of results obtained during the performance of the EU GMOS (Global Mercury Observation System) project. Emission estimates for mercury were prepared with the main goal of applying them in models to assess current (2013) and future (2035) air concentrations and atmospheric deposition of this contaminant. The combustion of fossil fuels (mainly coal) for energy and heat production in power plants and in industrial and residential boilers, as well as artisanal and small-scale gold mining, is one of the major anthropogenic sources of Hg emissions to the atmosphere at present. These sources account for about 37 and 25 % of the total anthropogenic Hg emissions globally, estimated to be about 2000 t. Emissions in Asian countries, particularly in China and India, dominate the total emissions of Hg. The current estimates of mercury emissions from natural processes (primary mercury emissions and re-emissions), including mercury depletion events, were estimated to be 5207 t year-1, which represents nearly 70 % of the global mercury emission budget. Oceans are the most important sources (36 %), followed by biomass burning (9 %). A comparison of the 2035 anthropogenic emissions estimated for three different scenarios with current anthropogenic emissions indicates a reduction of these emissions in 2035 up to 85 % for the best-case scenario. Two global chemical transport models (GLEMOS and ECHMERIT) have been used for the evaluation of future mercury pollution levels considering future emission scenarios. Projections of future changes in mercury deposition on a global scale simulated by these models for three anthropogenic emissions scenarios of 2035 indicate a decrease in up to 50 % deposition in the Northern Hemisphere and up to 35 % in Southern Hemisphere for the best-case scenario. The EU GMOS project has proved to be a very important

  17. Organics in the atmosphere: From air pollution to biogeochemical cycles and climate (Vilhelm Bjerknes Medal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanakidou, Maria

    2016-04-01

    Organics are key players in the biosphere-atmosphere-climate interactions. They have also a significant anthropogenic component due to primary emissions or interactions with pollution. The organic pool in the atmosphere is a complex mixture of compounds of variable reactivity and properties, variable content in C, H, O, N and other elements depending on their origin and their history in the atmosphere. Multiphase atmospheric chemistry is known to produce organic acids with high oxygen content, like oxalic acid. This water soluble organic bi-acid is used as indicator for cloud processing and can form complexes with atmospheric Iron, affecting Iron solubility. Organics are also carriers of other nutrients like nitrogen and phosphorus. They also interact with solar radiation and with atmospheric water impacting on climate. In line with this vision for the role of organics in the atmosphere, we present results from a global 3-dimensional chemistry-transport model on the role of gaseous and particulate organics in atmospheric chemistry, accounting for multiphase chemistry and aerosol ageing in the atmosphere as well as nutrients emissions, atmospheric transport and deposition. Historical simulations and projections highlight the human impact on air quality and atmospheric deposition to the oceans. The results are put in the context of climate change. Uncertainties and implications of our findings for biogeochemical and climate modeling are discussed.

  18. A Great Lakes atmospheric mercury monitoring network: evaluation and design

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Risch, Martin R.; Kenski, Donna M.; ,; David, A.

    2014-01-01

    As many as 51 mercury (Hg) wet-deposition-monitoring sites from 4 networks were operated in 8 USA states and Ontario, Canada in the North American Great Lakes Region from 1996 to 2010. By 2013, 20 of those sites were no longer in operation and approximately half the geographic area of the Region was represented by a single Hg-monitoring site. In response, a Great Lakes Atmospheric Mercury Monitoring (GLAMM) network is needed as a framework for regional collaboration in Hg-deposition monitoring. The purpose of the GLAMM network is to detect changes in regional atmospheric Hg deposition related to changes in Hg emissions. An optimized design for the network was determined to be a minimum of 21 sites in a representative and approximately uniform geographic distribution. A majority of the active and historic Hg-monitoring sites in the Great Lakes Region are part of the National Atmospheric Deposition Program (NADP) Mercury Deposition Network (MDN) in North America and the GLAMM network is planned to be part of the MDN. To determine an optimized network design, active and historic Hg-monitoring sites in the Great Lakes Region were evaluated with a rating system of 21 factors that included characteristics of the monitoring locations and interpretations of Hg data. Monitoring sites were rated according to the number of Hg emissions sources and annual Hg emissions in a geographic polygon centered on each site. Hg-monitoring data from the sites were analyzed for long-term averages in weekly Hg concentrations in precipitation and weekly Hg-wet deposition, and on significant temporal trends in Hg concentrations and Hg deposition. A cluster analysis method was used to group sites with similar variability in their Hg data in order to identify sites that were unique for explaining Hg data variability in the Region. The network design included locations in protected natural areas, urban areas, Great Lakes watersheds, and in proximity to areas with a high density of annual Hg

  19. The Mobile Atmospheric Pollutant Mapping (MAPM) System - A coherent CO2, DIAL system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, William B.

    1989-01-01

    The hardware for the Mobile Atmospheric Pollutant Mapping System is described. Measurement results using the hardware are reported along with absorption coefficients and measurement sensitivities for a number of molecular species. The factor that limit measurement accuracy and range are considered.

  20. Essentials of multiangle data-processing methodology for smoke polluted atmospheres

    Treesearch

    Vladimir Kovalev; A. Petkov; Cyle Wold; Shawn Urbanski; WeiMin Hao

    2011-01-01

    Essentials for investigating smoke plume characteristics with scanning lidar are discussed. Particularly, we outline basic principles for determining dynamics, heights, and optical properties of smoke plumes and layers in wildfire-polluted atmospheres. Both simulated and experimental data obtained in vicinities of wildfires with a two-wavelength scanning lidar are...

  1. Critical Evaluation of Air-Liquid Interface Exposure Devices for In Vitro Assessment of Atmospheric Pollutants

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure of cells to atmospheric pollutants at the air-liquid interface (ALI) is a more realistic approach than exposures of attached cells submerged in liquid medium. However, there is still limited understanding of the ideal ALI device design features that permit reproducible a...

  2. Critical Evaluation of Air-Liquid Interface Exposure Devices for In Vitro Assessment of Atmospheric Pollutants

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure of cells to atmospheric pollutants at the air-liquid interface (ALI) is a more realistic approach than exposures of attached cells submerged in liquid medium. However, there is still limited understanding of the ideal ALI device design features that permit reproducible a...

  3. Characterization of Atmospheric Infrasound for Improved Weather Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Threatt, Arnesha; Elbing, Brian

    2016-11-01

    Collaboration Leading Operational UAS Development for Meteorology and Atmospheric Physics (CLOUD MAP) is a multi-university collaboration focused on development and implementation of unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) and integration with sensors for atmospheric measurements. A primary objective for this project is to create and demonstrate UAS capabilities needed to support UAS operating in extreme conditions, such as a tornado producing storm system. These storm systems emit infrasound (acoustic signals below human hearing, <20 Hz) up to 2 hours before tornadogenesis. Due to an acoustic ceiling and weak atmospheric absorption, infrasound can be detected from distances in excess of 300 miles. Thus infrasound could be used for long-range, passive monitoring and detection of tornadogenesis as well as directing UAS resources to high-decision-value-information. To achieve this the infrasonic signals with and without severe storms must be understood. This presentation will report findings from the first CLOUD MAP field demonstration, which acquired infrasonic signals while simultaneously sampling the atmosphere with UAS. Infrasonic spectra will be shown from a typical calm day, a continuous source (pulsed gas-combustion torch), singular events, and UAS flights as well as localization results from a controlled source and multiple microphones. This work was supported by NSF Grant 1539070: CLOUD MAP - Collaboration Leading Operational UAS Development for Meteorology and Atmospheric Physics.

  4. Atmospheric pollution in an urban environment by tree bark biomonitoring--part I: trace element analysis.

    PubMed

    Guéguen, Florence; Stille, Peter; Lahd Geagea, Majdi; Boutin, René

    2012-03-01

    Tree bark has been shown to be a useful biomonitor of past air quality because it accumulates atmospheric particulate matter (PM) in its outermost structure. Trace element concentrations of tree bark of more than 73 trees allow to elucidate the impact of past atmospheric pollution on the urban environment of the cities of Strasbourg and Kehl in the Rhine Valley. Compared to the upper continental crust (UCC) tree barks are strongly enriched in Mn, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb. To assess the degree of pollution of the different sites in the cities, a geoaccumulation index I(geo) was applied. Global pollution by V, Ni, Cr, Sb, Sn and Pb was observed in barks sampled close to traffic axes. Cr, Mo, Cd pollution principally occurred in the industrial area. A total geoaccumulation index I(GEO-tot) was defined; it is based on the total of the investigated elements and allows to evaluate the global pollution of the studied environment by assembling the I(geo) indices on a pollution map. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Effects of atmospheric transport and trade on air pollution mortality in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hongyan; Li, Xin; Zhang, Qiang; Jiang, Xujia; Lin, Jintai; Peters, Glen G.; Li, Meng; Geng, Guannan; Zheng, Bo; Huo, Hong; Zhang, Lin; Wang, Haikun; Davis, Steven J.; He, Kebin

    2017-09-01

    Air quality is a major environmental concern in China, where premature deaths due to air pollution have exceeded 1 million people per year in recent years. Here, using a novel coupling of economic, physical and epidemiological models, we estimate the premature mortality related to anthropogenic outdoor PM2. 5 air pollution in seven regions of China in 2010 and show for the first time how the distribution of these deaths in China is determined by a combination of economic activities and physical transport of pollution in the atmosphere. We find that 33 % (338 600 premature deaths) of China's PM2. 5-related premature mortality in 2010 were caused by pollutants emitted in a different region of the country and transported in the atmosphere, especially from north to south and from east to west. Trade further extended the cross-regional impact; 56 % of (568 900 premature deaths) China's PM2. 5-related premature mortality was related to consumption in another region, including 423 800 (42 % of total) and 145 100 (14 %) premature deaths from domestic consumption and international trade respectively. Our results indicate that multilateral and multi-stage cooperation under a regional sustainable development framework is in urgent need to mitigate air pollution and related health impacts, and efforts to reduce the health impacts of air pollution in China should be prioritized according to the source and location of emissions, the type and economic value of the emitting activities, and the related patterns of consumption.

  6. Atmospheric transport of pollutants from North America to the North Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harriss, R. C.; Browell, E. V.; Sebacher, D. I.; Gregory, G. L.; Hinton, R. R.; Beck, S. M.; Mcdougal, D. S.; Shipley, S. T.

    1984-01-01

    Ground-based measurements strongly support the hypothesis that pollutant materials of anthropogenic origin are being transported over long distances in the midtroposphere and are a significant source of acid rain, acid snow, trace metal deposition, ozone and visibility-reducing aerosols in remote oceanic and polar regions of the Norhern Hemisphere. Atmospheric sulphur budget calculations and studies of acid rain on Bermuda indicate that a large fraction of pollutant materials emitted into the atmosphere in eastern North America are advected eastwards over the North Atlantic Ocean. The first direct airborne measurements of the vertical distribution of tropospheric aerosols over the western North Atlantic is reported here. A newly developed airborne differential adsorption lidar system was used to obtain continuous, remotely sensed aerosol distributions along its flight path. The data document two episodes of long-distance transport of pollutant materials from North America over the North Atlantic Ocean.

  7. Atmospheric transport of pollutants from North America to the North Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harriss, R. C.; Browell, E. V.; Sebacher, D. I.; Gregory, G. L.; Hinton, R. R.; Beck, S. M.; Mcdougal, D. S.; Shipley, S. T.

    1984-01-01

    Ground-based measurements strongly support the hypothesis that pollutant materials of anthropogenic origin are being transported over long distances in the midtroposphere and are a significant source of acid rain, acid snow, trace metal deposition, ozone and visibility-reducing aerosols in remote oceanic and polar regions of the Norhern Hemisphere. Atmospheric sulphur budget calculations and studies of acid rain on Bermuda indicate that a large fraction of pollutant materials emitted into the atmosphere in eastern North America are advected eastwards over the North Atlantic Ocean. The first direct airborne measurements of the vertical distribution of tropospheric aerosols over the western North Atlantic is reported here. A newly developed airborne differential adsorption lidar system was used to obtain continuous, remotely sensed aerosol distributions along its flight path. The data document two episodes of long-distance transport of pollutant materials from North America over the North Atlantic Ocean.

  8. Gas-aerosol partitioning of semi volatile carbonyls in polluted atmosphere in Hachioji, Tokyo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsunaga, Sou N.; Kato, Shungo; Yoshino, Ayako; Greenberg, Jim P.; Kajii, Yoshizumi; Guenther, Alex B.

    2005-06-01

    Gaseous and particulate semi volatile carbonyls have been measured in urban air using an annular denuder sampling system. Three dicarbonyls, five aliphatic aldehydes and two hydroxy carbonyls were observed. Concentrations of other biogenic and anthropogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs), SO2, CO, NO2 and particle concentration were also measured. Estimated gas-aerosol equilibrium constants for the carbonyls showed an inverse correlation with the concentrations of anthropogenic pollutants such as benzene, isopentane and SO2. This suggests that the increase in the fraction of non-polar anthropogenic particles in the atmosphere could change the average property of the ambient aerosols and drive the gas particle equilibrium of the carbonyls to the gas phase. This trend is uncommon in remote forest air. In this study, we examined the factors controlling the equilibrium in the polluted atmosphere and show that there is a difference in gas-aerosol partition between polluted and clean air.

  9. Composition of atmospheric suspensions of Ussuriisk City according to snow pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golokhvast, Kirill S.; Soboleva, Elena V.; Borisovsky, Andrey O.; Khristoforova, Nadezhda K.

    2014-11-01

    The results of the study by scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive analysis of microparticles of atmospheric suspensions contained in Ussuriysk winter snows (2012/2013) are presented. Particles of rocks and technogenic (mainly metal and soot) formations to prevail in the atmospheric suspensions of Ussuriysk are shown. There is a large amount of metal particles of automobile and industrial - Fe, Au, Pt, Pd, Cu, Sn, Pb, Ti, W. The analysis of the qualitative composition of atmospheric suspensions Ussuriysk confirms its status as a city with a strong impact of automobile transportation and high levels of air pollution.

  10. Air pollution forecasting in Ankara, Turkey using air pollution index and its relation to assimilative capacity of the atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Genc, D Deniz; Yesilyurt, Canan; Tuncel, Gurdal

    2010-07-01

    Spatial and temporal variations in concentrations of CO, NO, NO(2), SO(2), and PM(10), measured between 1999 and 2000, at traffic-impacted and residential stations in Ankara were investigated. Air quality in residential areas was found to be influenced by traffic activities in the city. Pollutant ratios were proven to be reliable tracers to differentiate between different sources. Air pollution index (API) of the whole city was calculated to evaluate the level of air quality in Ankara. Multiple linear regression model was developed for forecasting API in Ankara. The correlation coefficients were found to be 0.79 and 0.63 for different time periods. The assimilative capacity of Ankara atmosphere was calculated in terms of ventilation coefficient (VC). The relation between API and VC was investigated and found that the air quality in Ankara was determined by meteorology rather than emissions.

  11. Formaldehyde in the ambient atmosphere: from an indoor pollutant to an outdoor pollutant?

    PubMed

    Salthammer, Tunga

    2013-03-18

    Formaldehyde has been discussed as a typical indoor pollutant for decades. Legal requirements and ever-lower limits for formaldehyde in indoor air have led to a continual reduction in the amount of formaldehyde released from furniture, building materials, and household products over many years. Slowly, and without much attention from research on indoor air, a change of paradigm is taking place, however. Today, the formaldehyde concentrations in outdoor air, particularly in polluted urban areas, sometimes already reach indoor levels. This is largely a result of photochemical processes and the use of biofuels. In the medium term, this development might have consequences for the way buildings are ventilated and lead to a change in the way we evaluate human exposure. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Sequential optimal monitoring network design and iterative spatial estimation of pollutant concentration for identification of unknown groundwater pollution source locations.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Om; Datta, Bithin

    2013-07-01

    One of the difficulties in accurate characterization of unknown groundwater pollution sources is the uncertainty regarding the number and the location of such sources. Only when the number of source locations is estimated with some degree of certainty that the characterization of the sources in terms of location, magnitude, and activity duration can be meaningful. A fairly good knowledge of source locations can substantially decrease the degree of nonuniqueness in the set of possible aquifer responses to subjected geochemical stresses. A methodology is developed to use a sequence of dedicated monitoring network design and implementation and to screen and identify the possible source locations. The proposed methodology utilizes a combination of spatial interpolation of concentration measurements and simulated annealing as optimization algorithm for optimal design of the monitoring network. These monitoring networks are to be designed and implemented sequentially. The sequential design is based on iterative pollutant concentration measurement information from the sequentially designed monitoring networks. The optimal monitoring network design utilizes concentration gradient information from the monitoring network at previous iteration to define the objective function. The capability of the feedback information based iterative methodology is shown to be effective in estimating the source locations when no such information is initially available. This unknown pollution source locations identification methodology should be very useful as a screening model for subsequent accurate estimation of the unknown pollution sources in terms of location, magnitude, and activity duration.

  13. Atmospheric monitoring of organochlorine pesticides across some West African countries.

    PubMed

    Isogai, Nahomi; Hogarh, Jonathan N; Seike, Nobuyasu; Kobara, Yuso; Oyediran, Femi; Wirmvem, Mengnjo J; Ayonghe, Samuel N; Fobil, Julius; Masunaga, Shigeki

    2016-07-31

    Most African countries have ratified the Stockholm Convention on persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and are expected to reduce emissions of POPs such as organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) to the atmosphere. Emerging evidence, however, suggests that there are contemporary sources of OCPs in African countries despite the global ban on these products. This study investigated the atmospheric contamination from OCPs in four West African countries-Togo, Benin, Nigeria, and Cameroon-to ascertain the emission levels of OCPs and the characteristic signatures of contamination. Polyurethane foam (PUF) disk passive air samplers (PAS) were deployed in each country for ca. 55 days in 2012 and analyzed for 25 OCPs. Hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs) and DDTs constituted the highest burden of atmospheric OCPs in the target countries, at average concentrations of 441 pg m(-3) (range 23-2718) and 403 pg m(-3) (range 91-1880), respectively. Mirex had the lowest concentration, ranged between 0.1 and 3.3 pg m(-3). The concentration of OCPs in rainy season was higher than in dry season in Cameroon, and presupposed inputs from agriculture during the rainy season. The concentrations of ∑25 OCPs in each country were in the following order: Cameroon > Nigeria > Benin > Togo. There was significant evidence, based on chemical signatures of the contamination that DDT, aldrin, chlordane, and endosulfan were recently applied at certain sites in the respective countries.

  14. Synergy use of satellite remote sensing and in-situ monitoring data for air pollution impacts on urban climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savastru, Dan M.; Zoran, Maria A.; Savastru, Roxana S.

    2016-10-01

    The increase of urban atmospheric pollution due to particulate matters (PM) in different fraction sizes affects seriously not only human health and environment, but also city climate directly and indirectly. In the last decades, with the economic development and the increased emissions from industrial, traffic and domestic pollutants, the urban atmospheric pollution with remarkable high PM2.5 (particulate matters with aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 μm) and PM10 (particulate matters with aerodynamic diameter less than 10 μm) concentration levels became serious in the metropolitan area of Bucharest in Romania. Both active as well as satellite remote sensing are key applications in global change science and urban climatology. The aerosol parameters can be measured directly in situ or derived from satellite remote sensing observations. All these methods are important and complementary. The current study presents a spatiotemporal analysis of the aerosol concentrations in relation with climate parameters in two size fractions (PM10 and PM2.5) in Bucharest metropolitan area. Daily average particle matters concentrations PM10 and PM2.5 for Bucharest metropolitan area have been provided by 8 monitoring stations belonging to air pollution network of Environmental Protection Agency. The C005 (version 5.1) Level 2 and Level 3 Terra and Aqua MODIS AOD550 time-series satellite data for period 01/01/2011- 31/12/2012 have been also used. Meteorological variables (air temperature, relative humidity, sea level atmospheric pressure) have been provided by in-situ measurements. Both in-situ monitoring data as well as MODIS Terra/Aqua time-series satellite data for 2011-2012 period provided useful tools for particle matter PM2.5 and PM10 monitoring.

  15. Source reconciliation of atmospheric gas-phase and particle-phase pollutants during a severe photochemical smog episode.

    PubMed

    Schauer, James J; Fraser, Matthew P; Cass, Glen R; Simoneit, Bernd R T

    2002-09-01

    A comprehensive organic compound-based receptor model is developed that can simultaneously apportion the source contributions to atmospheric gas-phase organic compounds, semivolatile organic compounds, fine particle organic compounds, and fine particle mass. The model is applied to ambient data collected at four sites in the south coast region of California during a severe summertime photochemical smog episode, where the model determines the direct primary contributions to atmospheric pollutants from 11 distinct air pollution source types. The 11 sources included in the model are gasoline-powered motor vehicle exhaust, diesel engine exhaust, whole gasoline vapors, gasoline headspace vapors, organic solvent vapors, whole diesel fuel, paved road dust, tire wear debris, meat cooking exhaust, natural gas leakage, and vegetative detritus. Gasoline engine exhaust plus whole gasoline vapors are the predominant sources of volatile organic gases, while gasoline and diesel engine exhaust plus diesel fuel vapors dominate the emissions of semivolatile organic compounds from these sources during the episode studied at all four air monitoring sites. The atmospheric fine particle organic compound mass was composed of noticeable contributions from gasoline-powered motor vehicle exhaust, diesel engine exhaust, meat cooking, and paved road dust with smaller but quantifiable contributions from vegetative detritus and tire wear debris. In addition, secondary organic aerosol, which is formed from the low-vapor pressure products of gas-phase chemical reactions, is found to be a major source of fine particle organic compound mass under the severe photochemical smog conditions studied here. The concentrations of secondary organic aerosol calculated in the present study are compared with previous fine particle source apportionment results for less intense photochemical smog conditions. It is shown that estimated secondary organic aerosol concentrations correlate fairly well with the

  16. Random-walk model simulation of air pollutant dispersion in atmospheric boundary layer in China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Mu, Hailin

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the land-sea breeze circulation model coupled with a random-walk model is developed by the analysis of the formation and the mechanism of the land-sea breeze. Based on the data of the land-sea circulation in Dalian, China, the model simulated the diurnal variation of pressure, flow, temperature, and turbulent kinetic energy field and also provides a basis for solving the air pollutant concentration in the land-sea breeze circulation so as to estimate the economic cost attributable to the atmospheric pollution. The air pollutant concentration in the background of land-sea circulation is also simulated by a Gaussian dispersion model, and the results revealed that the land-sea circulation model coupled with the random-walk model gives a reasonable description of air pollutant dispersion in coastal areas.

  17. Biological Monitoring of Air Pollutants and Its Influence on Human Beings.

    PubMed

    Cen, Shihong

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring air pollutants via plants is an economic, convenient and credible method compared with the traditional ways. Plants show different damage symptoms to different air pollutants, which can be used to determine the species of air pollutants. Besides, pollutants mass concentration scope can be estimated by the damage extent of plants and the span of polluted time. Based on the domestic and foreign research, this paper discusses the principles, mechanism, advantages and disadvantages of plant-monitoring, and exemplifies plenty of such plants and the minimum mass concentration and pollution time of the plants showing damage symptoms. Finally, this paper introduced the human health effects of air pollutants on immune function of the body, such as decrease of the body's immune function, decline of lung function, respiratory and circulatory system changes, inducing and promoting human allergic diseases, respiratory diseases and other diseases.

  18. Uncertainty Modeling of Pollutant Transport in Atmosphere and Aquatic Route Using Soft Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Datta, D.

    2010-10-26

    Hazardous radionuclides are released as pollutants in the atmospheric and aquatic environment (ATAQE) during the normal operation of nuclear power plants. Atmospheric and aquatic dispersion models are routinely used to assess the impact of release of radionuclide from any nuclear facility or hazardous chemicals from any chemical plant on the ATAQE. Effect of the exposure from the hazardous nuclides or chemicals is measured in terms of risk. Uncertainty modeling is an integral part of the risk assessment. The paper focuses the uncertainty modeling of the pollutant transport in atmospheric and aquatic environment using soft computing. Soft computing is addressed due to the lack of information on the parameters that represent the corresponding models. Soft-computing in this domain basically addresses the usage of fuzzy set theory to explore the uncertainty of the model parameters and such type of uncertainty is called as epistemic uncertainty. Each uncertain input parameters of the model is described by a triangular membership function.

  19. Particle size effect for metal pollution analysis of atmospherically deposited dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Rajhi, M. A.; Al-Shayeb, S. M.; Seaward, M. R. D.; Edwards, H. G. M.

    The metallic compositions of 231 atmospherically deposited dust samples obtained from widely-differing environments in Riyadh city, Saudi Arabia, have been investigated in relation to the particle size distributions. Sample data are presented which show that particle size classification is very important when analysing dust samples for atmospheric metal pollution studies. By cross-correlation and comparison, it was found that the best way to express the results of the metal concentration trend was as an average of particle ratios. Correlations between the six metals studied, namely Pb, Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn and Li, were found for every particle size (eight categories) and reveal that the metal concentrations increased as the particle size decreased. On the basis of this work, it is strongly recommended that future international standards for metal pollutants in atmospherically deposited dusts should be based on particle size fractions.

  20. Urban Climate Effects on Air Pollution and Atmospheric Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasoul, Tara; Bloss, William; Pope, Francis

    2016-04-01

    Tropospheric ozone, adversely affects the environment and human health. The presence of chlorine nitrate (ClNO2) in the troposphere can enhance ozone (O3) formation as it undergoes photolysis, releasing chlorine reactive atoms (Cl) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2), both of which enhance tropospheric ozone formation. The importance of new sources of tropospheric ClNO2 via heterogeneous processes has recently been highlighted. This study employed a box model, using the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM version 3.2) to assess the effect of ClNO2 on air quality in urban areas within the UK. The model updated to include ClNO2 production, photolysis, a comprehensive parameterisation of dinitrogen pentoxide (N2O5) uptake, and ClNO2 production calculated from bulk aerosol composition. The model simulation revealed the presence of ClNO2 enhances the formation of NO2, organic peroxy radical (CH3O2), O3, and hydroxyl radicals (OH) when compared with simulations excluding ClNO2. In addition, the study examined the effect of temperature variation upon ClNO2 formation. The response of ClNO2 to temperature was analysed to identify the underlying drivers, of particular importance when assessing the response of atmospheric chemistry processes under potential future climates.

  1. Management of the Atmosphere Resource Recovery and Environmental Monitoring Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roman, Monsi; Perry, Jay; Howard, David

    2013-01-01

    The Advanced Exploration Systems Program's Atmosphere Resource Recovery and Environmental Monitoring (ARREM) project is working to further optimize atmosphere revitalization and environmental monitoring system architectures. This paper discusses project management strategies that tap into skill sets across multiple engineering disciplines, projects, field centers, and industry to achieve the project success. It is the project's objective to contribute to system advances that will enable sustained exploration missions beyond Lower Earth Orbit (LEO) and improve affordability by focusing on the primary goals of achieving high reliability, improving efficiency, and reducing dependence on ground-based logistics resupply. Technology demonstrations are achieved by infusing new technologies and concepts with existing developmental hardware and operating in a controlled environment simulating various crewed habitat scenarios. The ARREM project's strengths include access to a vast array of existing developmental hardware that perform all the vital atmosphere revitalization functions, exceptional test facilities to fully evaluate system performance, and a well-coordinated partnering effort among the NASA field centers and industry partners to provide the innovative expertise necessary to succeed.

  2. The expanding scope of air pollution monitoring can facilitate sustainable development.

    PubMed

    Knox, Andrew; Mykhaylova, Natalia; Evans, Greg J; Lee, Colin J; Karney, Bryan; Brook, Jeffrey R

    2013-03-15

    This paper explores technologies currently expanding the physical scope of air pollution monitoring and their potential contributions to the assessment of sustainable development. This potential lies largely in the ability of these technologies to address issues typically on the fringe of the air pollution agenda. Air pollution monitoring tends to be primarily focused on human health, and largely neglects other aspects of sustainable development. Sensor networks, with their relatively inexpensive monitoring nodes, allow for monitoring with finer spatiotemporal resolution. This resolution can support more conclusive studies of air pollution's effect on socio-ecological justice and human quality of life. Satellite observation of air pollution allows for wider geographical scope, and in doing so can facilitate studies of air pollution's effects on natural capital and ecosystem resilience. Many air pollution-related aspects of the sustainability of development in human systems are not being given their due attention. Opportunities exist for air pollution monitoring to attend more to these issues. Improvements to the resolution and scale of monitoring make these opportunities realizable. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Sequential Optimal Monitoring Network Design using Iterative Kriging for Identification of Unknown Groundwater Pollution Sources Location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, O.; Datta, B.

    2011-12-01

    Identification of unknown groundwater pollution source characteristics, in terms of location, magnitude and activity duration is important for designing an effective pollution remediation strategy. Precise source characterization also becomes very important to ascertain liability, and to recover the cost of remediation from parties responsible for the groundwater pollution. Due to the uncertainties in accurately predicting the aquifer response to source flux injection, generally encountered sparsity of concentration observation data in the field, and the non uniqueness in the aquifer response to the subjected hydraulic and chemical stresses, groundwater pollution source characterization remains a challenging task. A scientifically designed pollutant concentration monitoring network becomes imperative for accurate pollutant source characterization. The efficiency of the unknown source locations identification process is largely determined by locations of monitoring wells where the pollutant concentration is observed. The proposed method combines spatial interpolation of concentration measurements and Simulated Annealing as optimization algorithm to find the optimum locations for monitoring wells. Initially, the observed concentration data at few sparsely and arbitrarily distributed wells are used to interpolate the concentration data for the aquifer study area. The concentration information is passed to the optimization algorithm (decision model) as concentration gradient which in turn finds the optimum locations for implementing the next sequence of monitoring wells. Concentration measurement data from these designed monitoring wells and already implemented monitoring network are iteratively used as feedback information for potential groundwater pollution source locations identification. The potential applicability of the developed methodology is demonstrated for an illustrative study area.

  4. Monitoring Atmospheric CO2 From Space: Challenge & Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Bing; Harrison, F. Wallace; Nehrir, Amin; Browell, Edward; Dobler, Jeremy; Campbell, Joel; Meadows, Byron; Obland, Michael; Kooi, Susan; Fan, Tai-Fang; Ismail, Syed

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric CO2 is the key radiative forcing for the Earth's climate and may contribute a major part of the Earth's warming during the past 150 years. Advanced knowledge on the CO2 distributions and changes can lead considerable model improvements in predictions of the Earth's future climate. Large uncertainties in the predictions have been found for decades owing to limited CO2 observations. To obtain precise measurements of atmospheric CO2, certain challenges have to be overcome. For an example, global annual means of the CO2 are rather stable, but, have a very small increasing trend that is significant for multi-decadal long-term climate. At short time scales (a second to a few hours), regional and subcontinental gradients in the CO2 concentration are very small and only in an order of a few parts per million (ppm) compared to the mean atmospheric CO2 concentration of about 400 ppm, which requires atmospheric CO2 space monitoring systems with extremely high accuracy and precision (about 0.5 ppm or 0.125%) in spatiotemporal scales around 75 km and 10-s. It also requires a decadal-scale system stability. Furthermore, rapid changes in high latitude environments such as melting ice, snow and frozen soil, persistent thin cirrus clouds in Amazon and other tropical areas, and harsh weather conditions over Southern Ocean all increase difficulties in satellite atmospheric CO2 observations. Space lidar approaches using Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) technique are considered to be capable of obtaining precise CO2 measurements and, thus, have been proposed by various studies including the 2007 Decadal Survey (DS) of the U.S. National Research Council. This study considers to use the Intensity-Modulated Continuous-Wave (IM-CW) lidar to monitor global atmospheric CO2 distribution and variability from space. Development and demonstration of space lidar for atmospheric CO2 measurements have been made through joint adventure of NASA Langley Research Center and

  5. [Study on water quality monitoring scheme based on non-point source pollution].

    PubMed

    Wu, Xi-Jun; Li, Huai-En; Li, Jia-Ke; Li, Qiang-Kun; Dong, Wen

    2013-06-01

    In order to improve standardization and normalization of non-point source pollution monitoring, this paper summarized the non-point source pollution monitoring scheme that based on conventional technology condition. The scheme firstly emphasized the preparation work before monitoring, including situation investigation and index selection of the monitoring area and so on; In the process of establishing monitoring scheme, the monitoring area was divided into three types: city, agriculture and watershed. Take urban area monitoring scheme for Xi'an as an example, through dividing function zone setting sampling point, summarized sampling time interval, frequency and sampling methods during a rainfall process. An irrigation district was an example for agricultural monitoring scheme, through unit division, setting sampling point at the approach channel and drain channel, introduced sampling times, interval time and so on in the process of irrigation. Watershed monitoring scheme's example was the Weihe GuanZhong section, raised the setting principle of each sample section, and analyzed each section's sampling law in the process of rainfall. Finally the principal character of different non-point source pollution monitoring areas was discussed, and concluded that non-point source pollution monitoring scheme is the base of non-point source pollution study and control.

  6. Monitoring strategy to assessment the air pollution level in Salamanca (México)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrón-Adame, J. M.; Cortina-Januchs, M. G.; Andina, D.; Vega-Corona, A.

    2009-04-01

    Air pollution affects not only the quality of life and the health of the urban population but also forests and agriculture. Agricultural crops can be injured when exposed to high concentrations of various air pollutants. Air pollutants can generally be classed as either local or widespread. Local pollutants are those emitted from a specific stationary source and result in a well-defined zone of vegetation injury or contamination. Most common among the local pollutants are sulphur dioxide, fluorides, ammonia and particulate matter. The paper presents an air monitoring strategy based on data fusion and Artificial Neural Networks. The main objective is to classify automatically the air pollution level as a proposal to assessment the air pollution level affecting the agriculture in Salamanca (Mexico). Salamanca is catalogued as one of the most polluted cities in Mexico. Pollutant concentrations and meteorological variables have been consider in data fusion process in order to build a Representative Pollution Vector (RPV). Meteorological variables (Wind Direction and Wind Speed) are taken as a decision factor in the air pollutant concentration level. RPV is used to train an Artificial Neural Network in order to classify new pollutant events. In the experiments, real time series gathered from the Automatic Environmental Monitoring Network (AEMN) in Salamanca have been used.

  7. Global monitoring of atmospheric properties by the EOS MODIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Michael D.

    1993-01-01

    The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) being developed for the Earth Observing System (EOS) is well suited to the global monitoring of atmospheric properties from space. Among the atmospheric properties to be examined using MODIS observations, clouds are especially important, since they are a strong modulator of the shortwave and longwave components of the earth's radiation budget. A knowledge of cloud properties (such as optical thickness and effective radius) and their variation in space and time, which are our task objectives, is also crucial to studies of global climate change. In addition, with the use of related airborne instrumentation, such as the Cloud Absorption Radiometer (CAR) and MODIS Airborne Simulator (MAS) in intensive field experiments (both national and international campaigns, see below), various types of surface and cloud properties can be derived from the measured bidirectional reflectances. These missions have provided valuable experimental data to determine the capability of narrow bandpass channels in examining the Earth's atmosphere and to aid in defining algorithms and building an understanding of the ability of MODIS to remotely sense atmospheric conditions for assessing global change. Therefore, the primary task objective is to extend and expand our algorithm for retrieving the optical thickness and effective radius of clouds from radiation measurements to be obtained from MODIS. The secondary objective is to obtain an enhanced knowledge of surface angular and spectral properties that can be inferred from airborne directional radiance measurements.

  8. Development of Atmospheric Monitoring System for Auger North

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claus, John; Allen, Clint; Botts, Adam; Carande, Bryce; Calhoun, Mike; Emmert, Lucas; Hamilton, Levi; Heid, T. J.; Koop, John; Morgan, Sarah; Robinson, Shay; Sherman, John; Wiencke, Lawrence

    2009-10-01

    The Pierre Auger Northern Fluorescence Detector will measure air-showers over distances of 40 km. Vertical Aerosol profile of the atmosphere at the Pierre Auger Northern site will be measured using the side-scatter method over the 40 km baseline. An atmospheric monitoring telescope (AMT) will use a 3.5 m^2 mirror optimized for UV reflection to focus light from a laser onto a cluster of phototmultiplier tubes. The AMT has been built and final testing and modifications are being carried out before its installation later this year. A remotely programmed, 355 nm YAG laser with a final beam energy of 5 mJ is being used. The automation of the laser and the AMT is controlled via a single board computer (SBC). This talk will present an overview of this R&D program.

  9. Public Perceptions of How Long Air Pollution and Carbon Dioxide Remain in the Atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Dryden, Rachel; Morgan, M Granger; Bostrom, Ann; Bruine de Bruin, Wändi

    2017-06-30

    The atmospheric residence time of carbon dioxide is hundreds of years, many orders of magnitude longer than that of common air pollution, which is typically hours to a few days. However, randomly selected respondents in a mail survey in Allegheny County, PA (N = 119) and in a national survey conducted with MTurk (N = 1,013) judged the two to be identical (in decades), considerably overestimating the residence time of air pollution and drastically underestimating that of carbon dioxide. Moreover, while many respondents believed that action is needed today to avoid climate change (regardless of cause), roughly a quarter held the view that if climate change is real and serious, we will be able to stop it in the future when it happens, just as we did with common air pollution. In addition to assessing respondents' understanding of how long carbon dioxide and common air pollution stay in the atmosphere, we also explored the extent to which people correctly identified causes of climate change and how their beliefs affect support for action. With climate change at the forefront of politics and mainstream media, informing discussions of policy is increasingly important. Confusion about the causes and consequences of climate change, and especially about carbon dioxide's long atmospheric residence time, could have profound implications for sustained support of policies to achieve reductions in carbon dioxide emissions and other greenhouse gases. © 2017 Society for Risk Analysis.

  10. Cluster Analysis of Atmospheric Dynamics and Pollution Transport in a Coastal Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, Anton; Dmitriev, Egor; Maksimovich, Elena; Delbarre, Hervé; Augustin, Patrick; Gengembre, Cyril; Fourmentin, Marc; Locoge, Nadine

    2016-11-01

    Summertime atmospheric dynamics in the coastal zone of the industrialized Dunkerque agglomeration in northern France was characterized by a cluster analysis of back trajectories in the context of pollution transport. The MESO-NH atmospheric model was used to simulate the local dynamics at multiple scales with horizontal resolution down to 500 m, and for the online calculation of the Lagrangian backward trajectories with 30-min temporal resolution. Airmass transport was performed along six principal pathways obtained by the weighted k-means clustering technique. Four of these centroids corresponded to a range of wind speeds over the English Channel: two for wind directions from the north-east and two from the south-west. Another pathway corresponded to a south-westerly continental transport. The backward trajectories of the largest and most dispersed sixth cluster contained low wind speeds, including sea-breeze circulations. Based on analyses of meteorological data and pollution measurements, the principal atmospheric pathways were related to local air-contamination events. Continuous air quality and meteorological data were collected during the Benzene-Toluene-Ethylbenzene-Xylene 2006 campaign. The sites of the pollution measurements served as the endpoints for the backward trajectories. Pollutant transport pathways corresponding to the highest air contamination were defined.

  11. Understanding global cycling of atmosphere-surface exchangeable pollutants and its implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selin, N. E.; Giang, A.; Song, S.; Pike-thackray, C.; Friedman, C. L.

    2014-12-01

    We combine modeling approaches with data analysis to provide quantitative constraints on the global biogeochemical cycling of pollutants such as mercury (Hg) and persistent organic pollutants (POPs). These pollutants, released by human activities, continue to cycle between land, ocean, and atmosphere surfaces, extending their effective lifetimes in the environment. Measurement data are limited for all of these substances, providing few constraints on the magnitude of surface-atmosphere fluxes and thus the timescales of their cycling. This limits our ability to trace emissions to impacts for these substances, particularly in the context of both ongoing policies and climate change. We present a suite of modeling and analysis tools, including uncertainty analysis, that can provide quantitative constraints on cycling for these data-limited problems, and we illustrate their applicability through examples of Hg and selected POPs. Specifically, we summarize recent insights from inverse modeling of mercury, polynomial chaos-based methods for PAHs. Finally, we assess how uncertainty in timescales affects the entire emissions-to-impacts pathway for atmosphere-surface exchangeable pollutants. We discuss the implications of this analysis for policies under the Stockholm and Minamata Conventions.

  12. Exploratory monitoring of air pollutants for mutagenicity activity with the Tradescantia stamen hair system.

    PubMed

    Schairer, L A; Van't Hof, J; Hayes, C G; Burton, R M; de Serres, F J

    1978-12-01

    The Tradescantia genetic system developed by the late Dr. Arnold H. Sparrow for the study of effects of ionizing radiation is applicable to chemical mutagen detection. Early radiobiological data demonstrated that the stamen hairs were sensitive to as little as 0.25 rad of x-rays and that the number of cells showing a phenotypic change in pigmentation from blue to pink plateaus after approximately 21 days of chronic, low-level irradiation. Exposures to the air pollutants SO(2), NO(2), and O(3) and to vapors of mutagens such as 1,2-dibromoethane (DBE) and ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) demonstrated the usefulness of the system as a detector of chemical mutagens. A significant number of phenotypic changes was observed following exposures to as little as 0.14 ppm of DBE. The maximum sensitivity of the system is obtained with long-term or chronic exposures because the response increases linearly in proportion to the duration of exposure up to 21 days. To monitor industrial sites for atmospheric mutagens a mobile laboratory was designed to support plant culture in the field. Environment-controlled growth chambers were installed in a trailer so that both ambient air fumigations and concurrent clean-air control exposures could be made. Sites monitored by the mobile laboratory were: Elizabeth, N. J.; Charleston, W. Va.; Birmingham, Ala.; Baton Rouge, La.; Houston, Tex.; Upland, Calif.; Magna, Utah; and Grand Canyon, Ariz. The latter site at Grand Canyon served as a clean air control study. Atmospheric contaminants from petroleum and chemical processing plants generated a significant number of phenotypic pigment changes that were 17 to 31% above the control levels; contaminants from steel and copper smelters, automotive combustion products and photochemical compounds were negative. Chemical analyses are underway to identify the atmospheric mutagens at the sites that showed a positive response.

  13. Monitoring and imaging the atmosphere with infrasonic ambient noise correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haney, Matthew; Evers, Laslo

    2010-05-01

    The existence of widespread infrasonic ambient noise (e.g., microbaroms) opens up the possibility of investigating atmospheric acoustic structure with new techniques designed for continuous stochastic signals. This is in contrast to classical approaches that use deterministic signals (e.g., explosions) with clear phase arrivals. Here, we review some recent advances in the monitoring and imaging of the atmosphere derived from analysis of continuous infrasound noise. From two microbarometers located at Fourpeaked Volcano in Alaska, we observe coherent arrivals in cross-correlations of ambient noise in the microbarom band (0.2-0.5 Hz) at time lags that agree well with speeds expected for a direct infrasound wave in the atmosphere (300-340 m/s). A striking example of the dependence of the ambient noise correlations on atmospheric conditions is evident from a comparison with temperature and wind data measured on nearby ocean buoys. Application of the multiple-filter technique reveals that the group velocity of the infrasound wave is dispersive, with higher group velocities at lower frequencies. This supports the existence of a low-level atmospheric waveguide at Fourpeaked Volcano during the time period under study. We invert the observed time-dependent group velocity dispersion curves for average sound speed profiles as a function of time. The inverted sound speed profiles show that a time-dependent, surface-based inversion layer became stronger over a period of 24 hours, with a colder, denser, and lower sound speed layer moving between the stations. This layer is imaged in the lower 2 km of the atmosphere and demonstrates the sensitivity of ambient noise correlations to the atmospheric boundary layer. Independent analysis of meteorological data in and around Fourpeaked volcano from the same time period supports the results derived from the infrasound ambient noise correlations. We also show examples of ambient noise correlations from time periods of normal temperature

  14. Polybromobenzene pollutants in the atmosphere of North China: levels, distribution, and sources.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yan; Qiu, Xinghua; Zhao, Yifan; Ma, Jin; Yang, Qiaoyun; Zhu, Tong

    2013-11-19

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) are important persistent organic pollutants. Analysis of BFRs in atmospheric samples in a previous study led us to suspect the presence of unidentified organic bromides, other than polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), in the atmosphere. In this study, we identified and quantified polybromobenzenes, a group of organic bromides, in air samples collected through passive sampling in gridded observations in North China. We investigated their concentrations and spatial distribution, and estimated the proportion due to different sources. We detected seven species of polybromobenzenes, including hexabromobenzene (HBB), pentabromotoluene (PBT), pentabromoethylbenzene (PBEB), pentabromobenzene (PeBB), tetrabromobenzenes (TeBBs), and tribromotoluene (TrBT), in all or most of the field samples, indicating widespread occurrence of this class of pollutants. The median concentrations of each pollutant ranged from 20.0 to 144 pg/sample (or from 0.07 to 1.16 pg/m(3)), with relatively high concentrations found near e-waste recycling sites, BFR manufacturing sites, and areas of high population density. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis revealed that ∼70% of HBB, PBT, PBEB, and PeBB was from commercial products, while ∼80% of 1,2,3,5-TeBB, 1,2,4,5-TeBB, and 2,4,5-TrBT was linked with BFR manufacturing. This study provides essential information on widespread polybromobenzene pollutants in the atmosphere, particularly TeBBs and TrBT, for which this is the first report of their presence as atmospheric pollutants.

  15. The spatial-temporal distribution of the atmospheric polluting agents during the period 2000-2005 in the Urban Area of Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Hermes U Ramírez; García, María D Andrade; Bejaran, Rubén; Guadalupe, Mario E García; Vázquez, Antonio Wallo; Toledano, Ana C Pompa; Villasenor, Odila de la Torre

    2009-06-15

    In the large cities, the disordered urban development, the industrial activities, and the transport, have caused elevated concentrations of polluting agents and possible risks to the health of the population. The metropolises located in valleys with little ventilation (such as the Urban Area of Guadalajara: UAG) present low dispersion of polluting agents can cause high risk of respiratory and cardiovascular diseases. The objective of this work was to describe the spatial-temporal distribution of the atmospheric polluting agents: carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen dioxide (NO(2)), sulfur dioxide (SO(2)), particles smaller than 10 microns (microm) (PM(10)) and ozone (O(3)) in the UAG during the period 2000-2005. A spatial-temporal distribution analysis was made by means of graphic interpolation (Kriging method) of the statistical parameters of CO, NO(2), SO(2), PM(10) and O(3) with the collected data from eight stations of atmospheric monitoring in the UAG. The results show that the distributions of the atmospheric polluting agents are variable during the analyzed years. The polluting agent with highest concentration is PM(10) (265.42 microg/m(3)), followed by O(3) (0.11 ppm), NO(2) (0.11 ppm), CO (9.17 ppm) and SO(2) (0.05 ppm). The most affected zone is the southeast of the UAG. The results showed that an important percentage of days exceed the Mexican norms of air quality (93-199 days/year).

  16. Some results of CO and aerosols atmospheric pollution investigations in Moscow and Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakitin, Vadim; Wang, Gengchen; Wang, Pusai; Grechko, Evgeny; Dzhola, Anatoly; Emilenko, Alexander; Fokeeva, Ekaterina; Kopeikin, Vladimir; Safronov, Alexander

    2014-05-01

    Results of the CO total column (TC) and submicron (sbm) and soot concentrations measurements in Moscow and Beijing for period from 1992 to 2013 years are presented. The rate of decrease of CO TC Moscow anthropogenic portion is 1.4 % per year for 1992-2013 years in spite of multiple increase of the motor vehicles number. There are no significant changes in CO TC over Beijing for whole period of measurements (1992-2013 years). Soot concentration in Beijing has decreased while sbm aerosol has increased since 2006 year. Level of atmospheric CO and aerosols pollution in Beijing is 2-5 times stronger in comparison with Moscow ones. Reasonably typical of atmospheric pollution events for Beijing with extreme values of CO TC and aerosols concentrations were observed in Moscow during wild fires of 2002 and 2010 years only. Trajectory cluster analysis using has allowed studying the location of sources of CO and aerosols emissions. Relatively stronger atmospheric pollution of Beijing partially due to the atmospheric transportation from industry regions of China located to south, south-east and east from the city.

  17. Remote sensing applications for diagnostics of the radioactive pollution of the ground surface and in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulinets, Sergey; Ouzounov, Dimitar; Boyarchuk, Kirill; Laverov, Nikolay

    2013-04-01

    Radioactive pollution due to its air ionization activity can drastically change the atmospheric boundary layer conductivity (what was experimentally proved during period of nuclear tests in atmosphere) and through the global electric circuit produce anomalous variations in atmosphere. As additional effect the ions created due to air ionization serve as centers of water vapor condensation and nucleation of aerosol-size particles. This process is accompanied by latent heat release. Both anomalies (ionospheric and thermal) can be controlled by remote sensing technique both from satellites (IR sensors and ionospheric probes) and from ground (GPS receivers, ground based ionosondes, VLF propagation sounding, ground measurements of the air temperature and humidity). We monitored the majority of transient events (Three-Mile Island and Chernobyl nuclear power plant emergencies) and stationary sources such as Gabon natural nuclear reactor, sites of underground nuclear tests, etc. and were able to detect thermal anomalies and for majority of cases - the ionospheric anomalies as well. Immediately after the March 11, 2011 earthquake and tsunami in Japan we started to continuously survey the long-wavelength energy flux (10-13 microns) measurable at top of the atmosphere from POES/NOAA/AVHRR polar orbit satellites. Our preliminary results show the presence of hot spots on the top of the atmosphere over the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) and due to their persistence over the same region they are most likely not of meteorological origin. On March 14 and 21 we detected a significant increase in radiation at the top of the atmosphere which also coincides with a reported radioactivity gas leaks from the FDNPP. After March 21 the intensity of energy flux in atmosphere started to decline, which has been confirmed by ground radiometer network. We were able to detect with ground based ionosonde the ionospheric anomaly associated with the largest radioactive release on March

  18. Effect of atmospheric pollution on Vitis vinifera L. pollen ultrastructure under natural conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Stirban, M.; Craciun, C.; Bathory, D.; Cipleu, D.

    1984-06-01

    The ultrastructural modification of pollen grains in Vitis vinifera L. variety and hybrids in areas of SO atmospheric pollution (the main polluting SO2 usually reaches 2.72 mg/m3), nitrogen oxide, and other gases derived from noniron metal processing factories have been studied. Strains 1001 and 1002, resistant varieties, do not undergo ultrastructural modifications. Neuburger and Issabelle, medium resistant ones, have a heterogeneity in ultrastructural organization from normal forms to forms having both wall covers as well as the main organelles changed.

  19. Monitoring of Greenhouse Gases in the Atmosphere - A Polish Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Różański, Kazimierz; Chmura, Łukasz; Gałkowski, Michał; Nęcki, Jarosław; Zimnoch, Mirosław; Bartyzel, Jakub; O'Doherty, Simon

    2016-01-01

    An overview of systematic observations of the trace-gas composition of the atmosphere over southern Poland is presented, against the background of data available for other greenhouse gas (GHG) monitoring stations in Europe. The results of GHG monitoring for three major greenhouse gases (CO2, CH4, N2O) are discussed. Measurements were performed at two locations of contrasting characteristics, i.e. (i) the high-altitude mountain station of Kasprowy Wierch in the High Tatras, representing atmospheric conditions relatively free of local influences, and (ii) an urban station located in the Krakow agglomeration. The GHG data available for the Kasprowy Wierch station were compared with relevant data available for two marine reference stations (Mace Head, Ireland and Terceira Island, Azores), and two continental stations (Hohenpeissenberg, Germany and Pallas-Sammaltunturi, Finland). The growth rates for the CO2 mole fraction recorded at these five stations reveal only small temporal changes that almost coincide, leading to a quasi-linear increase of the CO2 mixing ratio over the European continent over the past 20 years. While N2O observations also reveal a steady increase over this time period, the mole fraction accounted for by CH4 is increasing again, after a period of stagnation in the years 2001-2007. The impact of continental sources of CH4 and N2O is seen clearly in the Kasprowy Wierch records. The mean departure between the CH4 mixing ratios recorded at Kasprowy Wierch and at the marine reference stations in the period 1994-2014 is of 27.3 ppb, and stems from continental emissions of this gas originating mainly from anthropogenic activities (leaking natural-gas distribution networks, landfills and livestock). For N2O, a departure of 1 ppb was observed for the period 2009-2014. Comparison of quasi-continuous measurements of CO2, CH4 and N2O mixing ratios made in the urban atmosphere of Krakow and at the regional reference site Kasprowy Wierch (located approximately

  20. Computer realization of estimations of the atmospheric anomalies caused by gas-aerosol pollution of the near-ground atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chistyakova, Liliya K.; Isakova, Anna I.; Smal, Oksana V.; Penin, Sergei T.; Kataev, Mikhail Y.; Kopytin, Yurii D.

    2004-02-01

    In the paper, algorithms of the techniques incorporated in subsystems of the program complex are presented for calculation and estimation of atmospheric anomalies, caused by industrial emissions in the atmosphere. The complex is included in the gas analyzer DAN-2, developed for registration of emission and absorption of optical and the microwave radiation initiated by gas-aerosol pollution in the atmosphere. The complex DAN-2 has been developed in the Institute of Atmospheric Optics of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Science. Techniques include: calculation of gas concentration in a plume of industrial emission taking into account gas-aerosol attenuation, an azimuth of the device sighting at a direction of the source and the allocated illumination of the day-time sky; numerical modeling of formation and distribution of gas-aerosol emission fields in the atmosphere with use of various models (Gaussian, Berlyand, etc); the forecast of optical noise in the atmosphere at operating hardware DAN-2 taking into account different types of underground surfaces under various hydro meteorological conditions; algorithm of restoration of the plume structure under its image. In the paper, results of testing of the specified algorithms are presented with use of the data of natural measurements of NO2 and SO2 concentration in the emission plume of the thermal power station GRES-2 in Tomsk, which were received by the complex DAN-2. Calculation of atmospheric background noise and distributions of the gas-aerosol plume has been carried out by various methods with use of these data.

  1. Optogalvanic wavelength calibration for laser monitoring of reactive atmospheric species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webster, C. R.

    1982-01-01

    Laser-based techniques have been successfully employed for monitoring atmospheric species of importance to stratospheric ozone chemistry or tropospheric air quality control. When spectroscopic methods using tunable lasers are used, a simultaneously recorded reference spectrum is required for wavelength calibration. For stable species this is readily achieved by incorporating into the sensing instrument a reference cell containing the species to be monitored. However, when the species of interest is short-lived, this approach is unsuitable. It is proposed that wavelength calibration for short-lived species may be achieved by generating the species of interest in an electrical or RF discharge and using optogalvanic detection as a simple, sensitive, and reliable means of recording calibration spectra. The wide applicability of this method is emphasized. Ultraviolet, visible, or infrared lasers, either CW or pulsed, may be used in aircraft, balloon, or shuttle experiments for sensing atoms, molecules, radicals, or ions.

  2. Monitoring spacecraft atmosphere contaminants by laser absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinfeld, J. I.

    1976-01-01

    Laser-based spectrophotometric methods which have been proposed for the detection of trace concentrations of gaseous contaminants include Raman backscattering (LIDAR) and passive radiometry (LOPAIR). Remote sensing techniques using laser spectrometry are presented and in particular a simple long-path laser absorption method (LOLA), which is capable of resolving complex mixtures of closely related trace contaminants at ppm levels is discussed. A number of species were selected for study which are representative of those most likely to accumulate in closed environments, such as submarines or long-duration manned space flights. Computer programs were developed which will permit a real-time analysis of the monitored atmosphere. Estimates of the dynamic range of this monitoring technique for various system configurations, and comparison with other methods of analysis, are given.

  3. Radon as a tool for characterising atmospheric stability effects on air pollution concentrations in model evaluation studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, Scott; Williams, Alastair; Crawford, Jagoda; Griffiths, Alan

    2015-04-01

    A clearer understanding of the variability in near-surface concentrations of pollutants in urban regions is essential for improving the predictive abilities of chemical transport models as well as identifying the need for (and assessing the efficacy of) emission mitigation strategies. Pollutant concentrations in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) are a complex function of many factors, including: source strengths and distribution, local meteorology and air chemistry. On short (sub-diurnal) timescales, the extent of the vertical column within which emissions mix usually has the largest influence on measured concentrations, and the depth of this mixing volume is in turn closely related to wind speed and the thermal stability of the ABL. Continuous hourly observations of the ubiquitous, surface-emitted, passive tracer radon-222 provide a powerful alternative to contemporary meteorological techniques for assessing stability effects on urban pollutants, because radon's concentration is closely matched with pollution transport processes at the surface. Here we outline a technique by which single-height, near-surface (<20m) radon observations can be conditioned to derive a multi-category stability classification scheme for urban pollution monitoring to provide benchmarking tools for local- to regional- chemical transport model evaluations. Efficacy of the radon-based classification scheme is compared to that based on conventional Pasquil-Gifford "turbulence" and "radiation" schemes. Lastly, we apply the radon-based classification scheme to nocturnal mixing height estimates calculated from the diurnal radon accumulation time series, and provide insight to the range of nocturnal mixing depths expected for each of the stability classes.

  4. A New Interferometer for Monitoring Atmospheric Phase Fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lay, Oliver

    2000-01-01

    Water vapor in the Earth's troposphere introduces an extra electrical path in the propagation of radio signals through the atmosphere. The distribution of water vapor is irregular and distorts the wavefronts of incoming radio waves, limiting the angular resolution that can be achieved with ground-based telescopes. The level of fluctuations depends both on the location of the site ,and on the prevailing atmospheric conditions. The ability to measure the fluctuations is therefore important when choosing a site for a new instrument, and for scheduling observations of existing telescopes. Existing phase monitors are radio interferometers that monitor monochromatic beacon tones from geostationary communications satellites at a frequency of about 12 GHz. They have a classical heterodyne design based on two satellite receiving antennas; each has a front-end for amplifying and down-converting the incoming signals using a local oscillator that is phase-locked to a common reference frequency. In addition to multiple phase-locked loops these instruments require expensive phase-stable cabling to reduce the effects of thermal drift. The new system uses two consumer 18" digital satellite TV dishes to monitor satellite TV broadcast signals over a bandwidth of 500 MHz (12.2 to 12.7 GHz). The novel design eliminates the need for phase-locked loops and thermally stable components, and uses a pair of Gilbert Cell multipliers to perform the broadband correlation. A phase monitor has been been built and deployed at the site of the Berkeley-Illinois-Maryland Association Millimeter Array in Northern California, and has been operating successfully since June 1998, measuring the difference in electrical path length for parallel lines of sight to the satellite separated by a baseline of 100 m. With a hardware cost of approximately $4000, it is much cheaper than previous instruments, and the low power requirements and high reliability make the system suitable for site testing in remote

  5. Air Pollution Monitoring Site Selection by Multiple Criteria Decision Analysis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Criteria air pollutants (particulate matter, sulfur dioxide, oxides of nitrogen, volatile organic compounds, and carbon monoxide) as well as toxic air pollutants are a global concern. A particular scenario that is receiving increased attention in the research is the exposure to t...

  6. Plug-in Sensors for Air Pollution Monitoring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Manny

    Faristors, a type of plug-in sensors used in analyzing equipment, are described in this technical report presented at the 12th Conference on Methods in Air Pollution and Industrial Hygiene Studies, University of Southern California, April, 1971. Their principles of operation, interchangeability, and versatility for measuring air pollution at…

  7. Plug-in Sensors for Air Pollution Monitoring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Manny

    Faristors, a type of plug-in sensors used in analyzing equipment, are described in this technical report presented at the 12th Conference on Methods in Air Pollution and Industrial Hygiene Studies, University of Southern California, April, 1971. Their principles of operation, interchangeability, and versatility for measuring air pollution at…

  8. Air Pollution Monitoring Site Selection by Multiple Criteria Decision Analysis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Criteria air pollutants (particulate matter, sulfur dioxide, oxides of nitrogen, volatile organic compounds, and carbon monoxide) as well as toxic air pollutants are a global concern. A particular scenario that is receiving increased attention in the research is the exposure to t...

  9. Human health risk assessment of lead pollution in atmospheric deposition in Baoshan District, Shanghai.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuanyuan; Wang, Jun; Shi, Guitao; Sun, Xiaojing; Chen, Zhenlou; Xu, Shiyuan

    2011-12-01

    The lead (Pb) content in atmospheric deposition was determined at 42 sampling sites in Baoshan District of Shanghai, China. Based on exposure and dose-response assessments, the health risk caused by Pb exposure in atmospheric deposition was investigated. The results indicated that Pb was significantly accumulated in atmospheric deposition. The spatial distribution of Pb was mapped by geostatistical analysis, and the results showed that pollution hotspots were present at traffic and industrial zones. Ingestion was the main route of Pb exposure in both adults and children. For children the risk value was above 1, whereas it was below 1 for the adult group. Therefore, children belong to the high-risk group for Pb exposure from atmospheric deposition in the observed area of Shanghai, China.

  10. Atmosphere-surface exchange and long-range transport of persistent organic pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Pul, W.A.J. van; Jaarsveld, J.A. van; Jacobs, C.M.J.

    1996-12-31

    Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs) are compounds that are resistant to photolytic, biological and chemical degradation. Many POPs are semi-volatile at atmospheric conditions. Because of these characteristics POPs have a atmospheric lifetime of weeks or more and are subject to long-range atmospheric transport. During this transport POPs can be deposited as well as be re-emitted from soil and water bodies. In this study a model for the exchange of POP at the soil and sea surface is presented as well as its application in a long-range atmospheric transport model. The main goal of this study is to simulate the spatial distribution of POP deposition (accumulation) over Europe.

  11. Plants, Pollution and Public Engagement with Atmospheric Chemistry: Sharing the TEMPO Story Through Ozone Garden Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reilly, L. G.; Pippin, M. R.; Malick, E.; Summers, D.; Dussault, M. E.; Wright, E. A.; Skelly, J.

    2016-12-01

    What do a snap-bean plant and a future NASA satellite instrument named TEMPO have in common? They are both indicators of the quality of the air we breathe. Scientists, educators, and museum and student collaborators of the Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring Pollution (TEMPO) instrument team are developing a program model to engage learners of all ages via public ozone garden exhibits and associated activities. TEMPO, an ultraviolet and visible spectroscopy instrument due for launch on a geostationary host satellite between 2019 and 2021, will scan North America hourly to measure the major elements in the tropospheric ozone chemistry cycle, providing near real-time data with high temporal and spatial resolution. The TEMPO mission provides a unique opportunity to share the story of the effects of air quality on living organisms. A public ozone garden exhibit affords an accessible way to understand atmospheric science through a connection with nature, while providing a visual representation of the impact of ozone pollution on living organisms. A prototype ozone garden exhibit was established at the Virginia Living Museum in partnership with NASA Langley, and has served as a site to formatively evaluate garden planting and exhibit display protocols, hands-on interpretive activities, and citizen science data collection protocols for learners as young as 3 to 10 as well as older adults. The fun and engaging activities, optimized for adult-child interaction in informal or free-choice learning environments, are aimed at developing foundational science skills such as observing, comparing, classifying, and collecting and making sense of data in the context of thinking about air quality - all NGSS-emphasized scientific practices, as well as key capabilities for future contributing members of the citizen science community. As the launch of TEMPO approaches, a major public engagement effort will include disseminating this ozone garden exhibit and program model to a network of

  12. Advanced Exploration Systems Atmosphere Resource Recovery and Environmental Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, J.; Abney, M.; Conrad, R.; Garber, A.; Howard, D.; Kayatin, M.; Knox, J.; Newton, R.; Parrish, K.; Roman, M.; hide

    2016-01-01

    In September 2011, the Atmosphere Resource Recovery and Environmental Monitoring (ARREM) project was commissioned by NASA's Advanced Exploration Systems program to advance Atmosphere Revitalization Subsystem (ARS) and Environmental Monitoring Subsystem (EMS) technologies for enabling future crewed space exploration missions beyond low Earth orbit. The ARREM project's period of performance covered U.S. Government fiscal years 2012-2014. The ARREM project critically assessed the International Space Station (ISS) ARS and EMS architectures and process technologies as the foundation for an architecture suitable for deep space exploration vehicles. The project's technical content included technical tasks focused on improving the reliability and life cycle cost of ARS and EMS technologies as well as reducing future flight project developmental risk and design, development, test, and evaluation costs. Targeted technology development and maturation tasks, including key technical trade assessments, were accomplished and integrated ARS architectures were demonstrated. The ARREM project developed, demonstrated, and tested leading process technology candidates and subsystem architectures that met or exceeded key figures of merit, addressed capability gaps, and significantly improved the efficiency, safety, and reliability over the state-of-the-art ISS figures of merit. Promising EMS instruments were developed and functionally demonstrated in a simulated cabin environment. The project's technical approach and results are described and recommendations for continued development are provided.

  13. The use of atmospheric monitoring systems in dieselized coal mines

    SciTech Connect

    Wirth, G.J.; Schultz, M.J.; Francart, W.J.

    1995-12-31

    Atmospheric Monitoring Systems (AMS) utilizing carbon monoxide sensors have demonstrated their superiority over thermal type fire sensors for early fire detection in underground coal mines. After proving their capability and dependability throughout the 1980`s. systems are now evolving and applying new technologies to enhance their effectiveness and reliability. The use of AMS in coal mines which utilize diesel equipment presents unique obstacles. Exhaust gases from diesel equipment not only raise mine ambient CO readings, but also cause numerous nuisance alarms. Both of these conditions reduce the effectiveness of the AMS. New technologies, such as discriminating devices, smoke detectors, and time delays, as well as administrative controls, have been developed and are being utilized to help reduce nuisance alarms produced by the diesel exhaust. This paper will discuss these technologies and administrative controls which are being utilized in coal mines to enhance the effectiveness of the Atmospheric Monitoring Systems. Reference to specific products does not imply endorsement by the Mine Safety and Health Administration.

  14. An atmosphere monitoring system for the Sardinia radio telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buffa, F.; Bolli, P.; Sanna, G.; Serra, G.

    2017-01-01

    The Sardinia radio telescope (SRT) is a new facility managed by the Italian National Institute for Astrophysics (INAF). SRT will detect the extremely faint radio wave signals emitted by astronomical objects in a wide frequency range from decimeter to millimeter wavelengths. Especially at high frequencies (>10 GHz), specific weather conditions and interactions between signal and atmospheric constituents (mainly water and oxygen molecules) affect the radio astronomic observation reducing the antenna performances. Thus, modern ground-based telescopes are usually equipped with systems able to examine in real-time several atmospheric parameters (opacity, integrated water vapor, etc.), and in some cases to forecast the weather conditions (wind, rain, snow, etc.), in order to ensure the antenna safety and support the schedule of the telescope observations. Here, we describe the atmosphere monitoring system (AMS) realized with the aim to improve the SRT operative efficiency. It consists of a network of different sensors such as radiometers, radiosondes, weather stations, GPS and some well-established weather models. After a validation of the scheme, we successfully tested the AMS in two real practical scenarios, comparing the AMS outcomes with those of independent techniques. In the first one we were able to detect an incoming storm front applying different techniques (GPS, radiometer and the weather forecast model), while in the last one we modeled the SRT antenna system temperature at 22 GHz processing the AMS data set.

  15. Atmosphere composition monitor for space station and advanced missions application

    SciTech Connect

    Wynveen, R.A.; Powell, F.T.

    1987-01-01

    Long-term human occupation of extraterrestrial locations may soon become a reality. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has recently completed the definition and preliminary design of the low earth orbit (LEO) space station. They are now currently moving into the detailed design and fabrication phase of this space station and are also beginning to analyze the requirements of several future missions that have been identified. These missions include, for example, Lunar and Mars sorties, outposts, bases, and settlements. A requirement of both the LEO space station and future missions are environmental control and life support systems (ECLSS), which provide a comfortable environment for humans to live and work. The ECLSS consists of several major systems, including atmosphere revitalization system (ARS), atmosphere pressure and composition control system, temperature and humidity control system, water reclamation system, and waste management system. Each of these major systems is broken down into subsystems, assemblies, units, and instruments. Many requirements and design drivers are different for the ECLSS of the LEO space station and the identified advanced missions (e.g., longer mission duration). This paper discusses one of the ARS assemblies, the atmosphere composition monitor assembly (ACMA), being developed for the LEO space station and addresses differences that will exist for the ACMA of future missions.

  16. DETECTING INDUSTRIAL POLLUTION IN THE ATMOSPHERES OF EARTH-LIKE EXOPLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Henry W.; Abad, Gonzalo Gonzalez; Loeb, Abraham E-mail: ggonzalezabad@cfa.harvard.edu

    2014-09-01

    Detecting biosignatures, such as molecular oxygen in combination with a reducing gas, in the atmospheres of transiting exoplanets has been a major focus in the search for alien life. We point out that in addition to these generic indicators, anthropogenic pollution could be used as a novel biosignature for intelligent life. To this end, we identify pollutants in the Earth's atmosphere that have significant absorption features in the spectral range covered by the James Webb Space Telescope. We focus on tetrafluoromethane (CF{sub 4}) and trichlorofluoromethane (CCl{sub 3}F), which are the easiest to detect chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) produced by anthropogenic activity. We estimate that ∼1.2 days (∼1.7 days) of total integration time will be sufficient to detect or constrain the concentration of CCl{sub 3}F (CF{sub 4}) to ∼10 times the current terrestrial level.

  17. Detecting Industrial Pollution in the Atmospheres of Earth-like Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Henry W.; Gonzalez Abad, Gonzalo; Loeb, Abraham

    2014-09-01

    Detecting biosignatures, such as molecular oxygen in combination with a reducing gas, in the atmospheres of transiting exoplanets has been a major focus in the search for alien life. We point out that in addition to these generic indicators, anthropogenic pollution could be used as a novel biosignature for intelligent life. To this end, we identify pollutants in the Earth's atmosphere that have significant absorption features in the spectral range covered by the James Webb Space Telescope. We focus on tetrafluoromethane (CF4) and trichlorofluoromethane (CCl3F), which are the easiest to detect chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) produced by anthropogenic activity. We estimate that ~1.2 days (~1.7 days) of total integration time will be sufficient to detect or constrain the concentration of CCl3F (CF4) to ~10 times the current terrestrial level.

  18. Environmental impact of a cadmium atmospheric pollution at Marseille (South France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noack, Y.; Lefloch, M.; Robin, D.

    2003-05-01

    In 1999, a cadmium atmospheric pollution had been detected at Marseille, south France. Cadmium was emitted by a wire-drawing factory. The Cd atmospheric concentration reached 5000 ng/m^3, 1000 times over the EEC limit value. After the factory closing, cadmium concentration decreased and reached the EEC limit value (5 ng/m^3) one year after. Soils were also polluted by cadmium (to 60 mg/kg). More than fifty percent of the cadmium in soils is contained in the leachable and bioavailable fractions. Concentration in vegetables had also exceeded the authorized values. A study of cadmium concentration in urines of children and adults living around the factory show a higher average concentration for the population (children and adults) in the contaminated zone, compared to a similar population in a non contaminated zone.

  19. AICE Survey of USSR Air Pollution Literature, Volume 14: Technical Papers from the Leningrad International Symposium on the Meteorological Aspects of Atmospheric Pollution, Part 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nuttonson, M. Y.

    Fifteen papers were translated: On the removal of impurities from the atmosphere by clouds and precipitation; Some aspects of the adoption of automatic methods of determining atmospheric pollutants; Recording of sulfur dioxide content at the outskirts of a city. Comparison of measurement results for a valley and an elevation; Theoretical and…

  20. AICE Survey of USSR Air Pollution Literature, Volume 13: Technical Papers from the Leningrad International Symposium on the Meteorological Aspects of Atmospheric Pollution, Part 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nuttonson, M. Y., Ed.

    Twelve papers were translated from Russian: Automation of Information Processing Involved in Experimental Studies of Atmospheric Diffusion, Micrometeorological Characteristics of Atmospheric Pollution Conditions, Study of theInfluence of Irregularities of the Earth's Surface on the Air Flow Characteristics in a Wind Tunnel, Use of Parameters of…

  1. AICE Survey of USSR Air Pollution Literature, Volume 13: Technical Papers from the Leningrad International Symposium on the Meteorological Aspects of Atmospheric Pollution, Part 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nuttonson, M. Y., Ed.

    Twelve papers were translated from Russian: Automation of Information Processing Involved in Experimental Studies of Atmospheric Diffusion, Micrometeorological Characteristics of Atmospheric Pollution Conditions, Study of theInfluence of Irregularities of the Earth's Surface on the Air Flow Characteristics in a Wind Tunnel, Use of Parameters of…

  2. AICE Survey of USSR Air Pollution Literature, Volume 14: Technical Papers from the Leningrad International Symposium on the Meteorological Aspects of Atmospheric Pollution, Part 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nuttonson, M. Y.

    Fifteen papers were translated: On the removal of impurities from the atmosphere by clouds and precipitation; Some aspects of the adoption of automatic methods of determining atmospheric pollutants; Recording of sulfur dioxide content at the outskirts of a city. Comparison of measurement results for a valley and an elevation; Theoretical and…

  3. Identification of Atmospheric Events Using Data Mining and Observations From an Atmospheric Monitoring Cyberinfrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verhoef, B. D.; Parikh, N.; Fernando, H. J.; Liu, H.; Montenegro, L.

    2006-05-01

    As part of the National Science Foundation's Collaborative Large-scale Engineering Analysis Network for Environmental Research (CLEANER) initiative researchers at Arizona State University in connection with the Arizona Department of Environmental Quality have established an atmospheric monitoring cyberinfrastructure. One of the cyberinfrastructure's valuable constituents is the use of data mining algorithms to identify atmospheric events. Results show that the algorithms have the ability to accurately identify events of interest using routine observations. Before the data mining algorithms are used to identify specific atmospheric events they must be trained and tested. They are first trained using historical data. Events are carefully identified within historical data and used by the algorithms in learning to recognize data patterns. For atmospheric events the patterns include changes in wind speed, wind direction, temperature, barometric pressure, and relative humidity. Training is conducted for each instrument being used. Once training of the algorithm is completed it is tested against more recent observations to check its accuracy. In the present case, the atmospheric events being analyzed are evening transition fronts -- mixing events that initiate katabatic flow down gradual mountain slopes. Observations received via the cyberinfrastructure are scanned for evidence of the event using the data mining algorithms and then labeled accordingly. A good agreement is shown to exist between actual event occurrence and identification of events through data mining. The labeled data are assisting researchers in identifying the events, thus reducing the time required for data analysis. Eventually, this will allow events with complicated signatures to be automatically identified. Data mining as a means of identifying atmospheric phenomena will one day assist weather prediction models in the automation of severe weather warning systems as well as lead to the design of more

  4. Observable Effects of Atmospheric Pollution on Outpatient and Inpatient Morbidity in Bulgaria

    PubMed Central

    PLATIKANOVA, Magdalena; PENKOVA-RADICHEVA, Mariana

    2016-01-01

    Background: One of Europe’s most well-developed industrial regions is found in the Republic of Bulgaria. The industrialization of the region has a big impact on air pollution. Thermal power plant “Maritza East” (the largest of its kind in southeastern Europe), the army training range, machine manufacturers, household heating and high volume of automobile traffic are all major sources of pollution in the region. Methods: A five year study (2009–2013) followed yearly concentrations of principal atmospheric pollutants such as sulfur dioxide, dust, nitrogen dioxide, lead aerosols and hydrogen sulfide, and the way in which those levels had an effect on morbidity (outpatient and inpatient medical care) in the area. Statistical processing of data has been completed to represent and analyze the collected data in nonparametric and alternative format. Results: Atmospheric pollution affects human health directly through pathological changes in the human organism. The registered outpatient care provided for the period 2009–2013 is highest for diseases of the cardiovascular system (11.85%), the respiratory system (17.34%) and the genitourinary system (9.76%). The registered rate of hospitalization for the same period is for diseases of the digestive system (11.90%), the cardiovascular system (11.85%), respiratory system (10.86%) and the genitourinary system (8.88%). Conclusion: The observed period shows a decrease in average yearly concentrations of the principal atmospheric pollutants in the industrial region (Bulgaria) and reflects a decrease in morbidity based on outpatient care and an increase in morbidity by inpatient care (hospitalization). Our findings should be corroborated in future longitudinal studies. PMID:27252921

  5. Observable Effects of Atmospheric Pollution on Outpatient and Inpatient Morbidity in Bulgaria.

    PubMed

    Platikanova, Magdalena; Penkova-Radicheva, Mariana

    2016-04-01

    One of Europe's most well-developed industrial regions is found in the Republic of Bulgaria. The industrialization of the region has a big impact on air pollution. Thermal power plant "Maritza East" (the largest of its kind in southeastern Europe), the army training range, machine manufacturers, household heating and high volume of automobile traffic are all major sources of pollution in the region. A five year study (2009-2013) followed yearly concentrations of principal atmospheric pollutants such as sulfur dioxide, dust, nitrogen dioxide, lead aerosols and hydrogen sulfide, and the way in which those levels had an effect on morbidity (outpatient and inpatient medical care) in the area. Statistical processing of data has been completed to represent and analyze the collected data in nonparametric and alternative format. Atmospheric pollution affects human health directly through pathological changes in the human organism. The registered outpatient care provided for the period 2009-2013 is highest for diseases of the cardiovascular system (11.85%), the respiratory system (17.34%) and the genitourinary system (9.76%). The registered rate of hospitalization for the same period is for diseases of the digestive system (11.90%), the cardiovascular system (11.85%), respiratory system (10.86%) and the genitourinary system (8.88%). The observed period shows a decrease in average yearly concentrations of the principal atmospheric pollutants in the industrial region (Bulgaria) and reflects a decrease in morbidity based on outpatient care and an increase in morbidity by inpatient care (hospitalization). Our findings should be corroborated in future longitudinal studies.

  6. Design of Sensor Data Processing Steps in an Air Pollution Monitoring System

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Young Jin; Lee, Yang Koo; Lee, Dong Gyu; Lee, Yongmi; Nittel, Silvia; Beard, Kate; Nam, Kwang Woo; Ryu, Keun Ho

    2011-01-01

    Environmental monitoring is required to understand the effects of various kinds of phenomena such as a flood, a typhoon, or a forest fire. To detect the environmental conditions in remote places, monitoring applications employ the sensor networks to detect conditions, context models to understand phenomena, and computing technology to process the large volumes of data. In this paper, we present an air pollution monitoring system to provide alarm messages about potentially dangerous areas with sensor data analysis. We design the data analysis steps to understand the detected air pollution regions and levels. The analyzed data is used to track the pollution and to give an alarm. This implemented monitoring system is used to mitigate the damages caused by air pollution. PMID:22247663

  7. Compliance Assurance Monitoring Technical Guidance Document Appendix A: Scrubbers for Gaseous Pollutants Control Devices

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Compliance assurance monitoring is intended to provide a reasonable assurance of compliance with applicable requirements under the Clean Air Act for large emission units that rely on pollution control device equipment to achieve compliance.

  8. Atmospheric pollution: a case study of degrading urban air quality over Punjab, India.

    PubMed

    Sehra, Parmjit Singh

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a case study of urban air quality over a densely populated city Ludhiana situated in Punjab, India, in the form of monthly and annual average concentrations of Suspended Particulate Matter (SPM), NO2 and SO2 for the periods 1988-1989, 1994-1999 and 2001-2005 which is generally found to be increasing with time and thus requires immediate corrective measures lest the situation becomes totally uncontrollable. The present situation is as bad as in other metropolitan Indian cities, although it seems to have somewhat improved as indicated by the latest 2001-2005 data in comparison with the past 1988-1989 and 1994-1999 data, but much more still needs to be done. In addition to the industrial and vehicular pollution, the agricultural pollution due to the burning of wheat and rice straws by the farmers should also be checked because it also creates tremendous pollution in the atmosphere.

  9. Evaluating the suitability of different environmental samples for tracing atmospheric pollution in industrial areas.

    PubMed

    Francová, Anna; Chrastný, Vladislav; Šillerová, Hana; Vítková, Martina; Kocourková, Jana; Komárek, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Samples of lichens, snow and particulate matter (PM10, 24 h) are used for the source identification of air pollution in the heavily industrialized region of Ostrava, Upper Silesia, Czech Republic. An integrated approach that uses different environmental samples for metal concentration and Pb isotope analyses was applied. The broad range of isotope ratios in the samples indicates a combination of different pollution sources, the strongest among them being the metallurgical industry, bituminous coal combustion and traffic. Snow samples are proven as the most relevant indicator for tracing metal(loid)s and recent local contamination in the atmosphere. Lichens can be successfully used as tracers of the long-term activity of local and remote sources of contamination. The combination of PM10 with snow can provide very useful information for evaluation of current pollution sources. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The corrosion of weathering steel by SO2 polluted atmospheres at its very early stages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marco, J. F.; Dávalos, J.; Gracia, M.; Gancedo, J. R.

    1990-07-01

    CEMS was used in conjunction with AES to study the protective film formed on a weathering steel by exposure to a highly SO2-polluted atmosphere. Ferrous species (sulphite) and ferric oxyhydroxides (ferrihydrite and α-FeOOH) were identified as corrosion products. From the correlation of CEMS and AES results the evolution with time of the different compounds is obtained, and a possible reaction sequence is outlined.

  11. Impact of Reducing Short-Lived Air Pollutants on Atmospheric Composition and Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naik, V.; Horowitz, L. W.; Fiore, A. M.; Levy, H.

    2010-12-01

    Most studies to date have quantified the impact of short-lived air pollutants on climate in terms of radiative forcing, where radiative forcing is calculated based on changes in forcing agent distributions induced by emission perturbations simulated in a chemistry-transport model (CTM). Here, we employ the GFDL AM3 model to investigate the impact of a change in the emissions of short-lived air pollutants on the coupled chemistry-climate system (including stratospheric and tropospheric chemistry, and cloud-aerosol interactions). We present results from two simulations conducted in support of the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP). The base case simulation uses prescribed mean 1981-2000 sea surface temperatures and sea ice cover taken from the historical simulations conducted for the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project 5 (CMIP5) in support of the IPCC-AR5. Concentrations of well-mixed greenhouse gases, ozone depleting substances, and emissions of short-lived pollutants are for the year 2000. The perturbation simulation uses the same configuration except the short-lived pollutant emissions are reduced to 1860 values (77% decrease for NOx, 54% decrease for CO, 70% NMVOCs, 95% SO2, 58% BC and 35% OC). Our initial analysis indicates that the troposphere and stratosphere respond in opposite ways to the reduction in short-lived pollutants. While tropospheric ozone burden decreases (by 18% or 64 Tg on an annual average), stratospheric ozone increases, particularly over the poles. This pre-industrial to present change in tropospheric ozone is somewhat smaller than prior CTM estimates, suggesting an important influence from stratosphere-troposphere interactions. We will examine the differences in atmospheric circulation, temperature and precipitation, stratosphere-troposphere exchange, oxidizing capacity and aerosol distributions in the two simulations, with the goal of advancing our understanding of the role of short-lived pollutants

  12. Study of the Mechanism of Nucleation in the Polluted Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Modi

    Atmospheric aerosols can affect human health and earth's radiation balance. The formation of these aerosols has been shown to cast high uncertainty in current global climate modeling. Most observed nucleation events in the boundary layers are correlated with high sulfuric acid concentration. Nucleation rates are usually proportional to sulfuric acid concentration up to the third power. After atmospheric aerosol particles are formed, they often grow at a speed faster than can be explained by sulfuric acid condensation, suggesting that other chemical species also participate in this process. The detailed mechanisms of how these particles are formed and their subsequent growth are still unclear. This work is focused on furthering our understanding of atmospheric nucleation. My contribution is mainly on the following three topics: (1) characterizing condensation particle counters (CPCs) for accurate particle measurements down to 1 nm, the size close to the smallest stable sulfuric acid clusters; (2) developing a method of estimating time and size resolved particle growth rates and atmospheric nucleation rates based on data from both atmospheric and laboratory studies; (3) deriving of a simple semi-empirical acid-base reaction model for atmospheric nucleation in the polluted atmospheric boundary layer.

  13. Mapping and hazard assessment of atmospheric pollution in a medium sized urban area using the Rasch model and geostatistics techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moral, Francisco J.; Álvarez, Pedro; Canito, José L.

    Researchers or decision-makers frequently need information about atmospheric pollution patterns in urbanized areas. The preparation of this type of information is a complex task, due to the influence of several individual pollutants, with different units, on the global air pollution (e.g. nitrogen dioxide concentrations, ppm, and noise, dB). In this work, a new methodology based on the formulation of the Rasch model is proposed to obtain a measure of the atmospheric pollution. Two main results were obtained after applying this method: (1) A classification of all locations according to the pollution level, which was the value of the Rasch measure; (2) The influence on the environmental deterioration of each individual pollutant (particularly, in this work, NO 2, NO, CO 2, CO and noise). Finally, pollution at locations where no measurements were available was estimated with the optimum interpolation technique, kriging. Kriged estimates were subsequently used to map atmospheric pollution. To illustrate the application of this two-step method (Rasch model plus interpolation), which is useful to generate hazard assessment maps based on the spatial distribution of atmospheric pollution, an example is shown.

  14. Assessment of radionuclides (uranium and thorium) atmospheric pollution around Manjung district, Perak using moss as bio-indicator

    SciTech Connect

    Arshad, Nursyairah Hamzah, Zaini; Wood, Ab. Khalik; Saat, Ahmad

    2016-01-22

    Bio-monitoring method using mosses have been widely done around the world and the effectiveness has been approved. Mosses can be used to assess the levels of atmospheric pollution as mosses pick up nutrients from the atmosphere and deposition retaining many trace elements. In this study, the deposition of two radionuclides; uranium (U) and thorium (Th) around Manjung districts have been evaluated using Leucobryum aduncum as bio-monitoring medium. The samples were collected from 24 sampling sites covering up to 40 km radius to the North, North-East and South-East directions from Teluk Rubiah. The concentrations of U and Th in moss samples were analysed using Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (EDXRF) Spectrometer. The concentrations of Th are in the range of 0.07-2.09 mg/kg. Meanwhile, the concentrations of U in the moss are in the range of 0.03-0.18 mg/kg. The Enrichment Factor (EF) was calculated to determine the origin of the radionuclides distributions. Other than that, the distribution maps were developed to observe the distribution of the radionuclides around the study area.

  15. Nitrification and urea hydrolysis in deciduous woodland soils from a site exposed to heavy atmospheric pollution.

    PubMed

    Nevell, W; Wainwright, M

    1987-01-01

    Laboratory studies of nitrification and urea hydrolysis were performed using soils obtained from sites exposed to pollution from a coking works and from a relatively unpolluted site. No net production of nitrate occurred in either soil when amended with ammonium sulphate alone, or together with CaCO(3) at 0.05% w/w. However, nitrate accumulated in both soils when 5% w/w CaCO(3) was added, with this amount of lime increasing the pH of both soils from around pH4 to pH7. Under these conditions, nitrification in the polluted soil occurred at about half the rate found in the relatively unpolluted soil. Urea hydrolysis occurred at a similar rate in both soils and was not impaired by exposure to coking pollution. Little nitrification of the ammonium liberated by urea hydrolysis occurred in either soil, however, presumably because, although the soil pH increased due to urea hydrolysis, it did not become sufficiently alkaline to support rapid nitrification. The relatively unpolluted soil used here was obtained from an area away from the coking works, but was exposed to generalised atmospheric pollution (wet and dry deposited acidity, greater than 1.0 and 2.4 kg H(+) ha(-1) yr(-1), respectively). Nitrification and urea hydrolysis occurred in these soils, so these processes were not inhibited by exposure to these relatively high background levels of air pollution.

  16. Predicting changes of glass optical properties in polluted atmospheric environment by a neural network model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verney-Carron, A.; Dutot, A. L.; Lombardo, T.; Chabas, A.

    2012-07-01

    Soiling results from the deposition of pollutants on materials. On glass, it leads to an alteration of its intrinsic optical properties. The nature and intensity of this phenomenon mirrors the pollution of an environment. This paper proposes a new statistical model in order to predict the evolution of haze (H) (i.e. diffuse/direct transmitted light ratio) as a function of time and major pollutant concentrations in the atmosphere (SO2, NO2, and PM10 (Particulate Matter < 10 μm)). The model was parameterized by using a large set of data collected in European cities (especially, Paris and its suburbs, Athens, Krakow, Prague, and Rome) during field exposure campaigns (French, European, and international programs). This statistical model, called NEUROPT-Glass, comes from an artificial neural network with two hidden layers and uses a non-linear parametric regression named Multilayer Perceptron (MLP). The results display a high determination coefficient (R2 = 0.88) between the measured and the predicted hazes and minimizes the dispersion of data compared to existing multilinear dose-response functions. Therefore, this model can be used with a great confidence in order to predict the soiling of glass as a function of time in world cities with different levels of pollution or to assess the effect of pollution reduction policies on glass soiling problems in urban environments.

  17. Plant volatiles in a polluted atmosphere: stress response and signal degradation

    PubMed Central

    Blande, James D.; Holopainen, Jarmo K.; Niinemets, Ülo

    2014-01-01

    Plants emit a plethora of volatile organic compounds, which provide detailed information on the physiological condition of emitters. Volatiles induced by herbivore-feeding are among the best studied plant responses to stress and may constitute an informative message to the surrounding community and function in the process of plant defence. However, under natural conditions, plants are potentially exposed to multiple concurrent stresses, which can have complex effects on the volatile emissions. Atmospheric pollutants are an important facet of the abiotic environment and can impinge on a plant’s volatile-mediated defences in multiple ways at multiple temporal scales. They can exert changes in volatile emissions through oxidative stress, as is the case with ozone pollution. They may also react with volatiles in the atmosphere; such is the case for ozone, nitrogen oxides, hydroxyl radicals and other oxidizing atmospheric species. These reactions result in breakdown products, which may themselves be perceived by community members as informative signals. In this review we demonstrate the complex interplay between stress, emitted signals and modification in signal strength and composition by the atmosphere, collectively determining the responses of the biotic community to elicited signals. PMID:24738697

  18. Use of multi-objective air pollution monitoring sites and online air pollution monitoring system for total health risk assessment in Hyderabad, India.

    PubMed

    Anjaneyulu, Y; Jayakumar, I; Hima Bindu, V; Sagareswar, G; Mukunda Rao, P V; Rambabu, N; Ramani, K V

    2005-08-01

    A consensus has been emerging among public health experts in developing countries that air pollution, even at current ambient levels, aggravates respiratory and cardiovascular diseases and leads to premature mortality. Recent studies have also presented well-founded theories concerning the biological mechanisms involved and the groups of people that are probably more susceptible to health effects caused or exacerbated by inhalation of ambient particulate matter (PM.). On the basis of prognostic studies carried out in Center for Environment, JNT University, Hyderabad "it has been estimated that in Hyderabad some 1,700 to 3,000 people per year die prematurely as a result of inhaling PM". These figures reflect only the effects of acute exposure to air pollution. If the long-term effects of chronic exposure are taken into account, 10,000-15,000 people a year could die prematurely in Hyderabad. This estimate of the chronic effects is based on other studies, which are not completely comparable with the Hyderabad situation. While the study designs and analyses in these other studies may indeed be different or irrelevant to Hyderabad, the fact they were carried out in other countries is irrelevant. Taking into account these considerations, a model for total health risk assessment for the city of Hyderabad, and its state of Andhra Pradesh in India has been developed using a multi-objective air pollution monitoring network and online and real time air pollution monitoring stations. For the model studies a number of potential monitoring sites were screened for general and site-specific criteria in a geographic information system (GIS) environment that may, on a local basis, affect the representativeness of the data collected. Local features that may affect either the chemical or meteorological parameters are evaluated to assure a minimum of interference. Finally, for monitoring air pollution, an online and real-time monitoring system was designed using advanced

  19. Use of Multi-Objective Air Pollution Monitoring Sites and Online Air Pollution Monitoring System for Total Health Risk Assessment in Hyderabad, India

    PubMed Central

    Anjaneyulu, Y.; Jayakumar, I.; Bindu, V. Hima; Sagareswar, G.; Rao, P.V. Mukunda; Rambabu, N.; Ramani, K. V.

    2005-01-01

    A consensus has been emerging among public health experts in developing countries that air pollution, even at current ambient levels, aggravates respiratory and cardiovascular diseases and leads to premature mortality. Recent studies have also presented well-founded theories concerning the biological mechanisms involved and the groups of people that are probably more susceptible to health effects caused or exacerbated by inhalation of ambient particulate matter (PM.). On the basis of prognostic studies carried out in Center for Environment, JNT University, Hyderabad “it has been estimated that in Hyderabad some 1,700 to 3,000 people per year die prematurely as a result of inhaling PM”. These figures reflect only the effects of acute exposure to air pollution. If the long-term effects of chronic exposure are taken into account, 10,000–15,000 people a year could die prematurely in Hyderabad. This estimate of the chronic effects is based on other studies, which are not completely comparable with the Hyderabad situation. While the study designs and analyses in these other studies may indeed be different or irrelevant to Hyderabad, the fact they were carried out in other countries is irrelevant. Taking into account these considerations, a model for total health risk assessment for the city of Hyderabad, and its state of Andhra Pradesh in India has been developed using a multi-objective air pollution monitoring network and online and real time air pollution monitoring stations. For the model studies a number of potential monitoring sites were screened for general and site-specific criteria in a geographic information system (GIS) environment that may, on a local basis, affect the representativeness of the data collected. Local features that may affect either the chemical or meteorological parameters are evaluated to assure a minimum of interference. Finally, for monitoring air pollution, an online and real-time monitoring system was designed using advanced

  20. Monitoring of air pollutants and green house gases

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, M.

    1996-12-31

    The study of chemical reactions in the atmosphere poses a serious problem due to the very low concentrations involved, which makes the detection and analysis of reaction products extremely difficult. High altitude reactions at very low pressure cannot be simulated in the laboratory. Chemicals in the atmosphere participate in photochemical reactions by absorption of solar radiation. Such reaction occurs even at the absence of chemical catalysts at much lower temperatures. These photochemical reactions play a key role in governing the ultimate fate of a chemical in the atmosphere. It should be noted that the atmosphere is a tremendously dynamic system with wide fluctuations of the parameters, viz composition, temperature, humidity and intensity of sunlight. Obviously, different processes will be observed under varying atmospheric conditions. Some typical chemical and photochemical reactions will be illustrated. In this context, it must be mentioned that while oxygen plays an important role in the troposphere, ozone plays an important as well as key role in the stratosphere.

  1. Atmospheric transport of persistent organic pollutants to the Arctic, today and in a future climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Octaviani, Mega; Stemmler, Irene; Lammel, Gerhard

    2013-04-01

    Persistent organic pollutants are of great concern because of their long residence time and long-range transport potential in the environment and because they are readily bioaccumulated along food chains and toxic for wildlife and humans. A multicompartment model is used to study global-scale and long term chemodynamics of anthropogenic organic substances in the Earth system. Model components are the atmosphere (ECHAM5) and ocean general circulation models (MPIOM), which include dynamic sub-models for atmospheric aerosols and the marine biogeochemistry, two-dimensional surface compartments (topsoil, vegetation surfaces, ice, and temporal snow cover) and intercompartmental mass exchange process parameterisations [1-3]. The transports into and out of the Arctic (66° N) are characterized for 1950-2000 under one realisation of present-day climate [4-5] and for 2001-2100 under one realisation of future climate (greenhouse gas emission scenario A1B of IPCC-AR4). Despite decaying primary emissions (since decades) polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) and dichlorodimephenyltrichloromethane (DDT) are continuing to accumulate in the Arctic, which is fed by atmospheric transports. The main regions of import (and export) are identified and the vertical distribution and seasonalities are characterized. Changes by the end of the 21st century are discussed in the context of a major teleconnection, i.e. the Arctic Oscillation. References [1] Guglielmo F, Lammel G, Maier-Reimer E: Global environmental cycling of DDT and ?-HCH in the 1980s - a study using a coupled atmosphere and ocean general circulation model. Chemosphere 76 (2009) 1509-1517 [2] Stemmler I, Lammel G: Cycling of DDT in the global oceans 1950-2002: World ocean returns the pollutant. Geophys. Res. Lett. 36 (2009) L24602 [3] Hofmann L, Stemmler I, Lammel G: The impact of organochlorines cycling in the cryosphere on their global distributions and fate - 2. Land ice and temporary snow cover. Environ. Pollut. 162 (2012) 482

  2. Evaluation of the agreement between modeled and monitored ambient hazardous air pollutants in California.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Erika; Hurley, Susan; Nelson, David O; Gunier, Robert B; Hertz, Andrew; Reynolds, Peggy

    2014-08-01

    Elevated breast cancer incidence rates in urban areas have led to speculation regarding the potential role of air pollution. In order to inform the exposure assessment for a subsequent breast cancer study, we evaluated agreement between modeled and monitored hazardous air pollutants (HAPs). Modeled annual ambient concentrations of HAPs in California came from the US Environmental Protection Agency's National Air Toxics Assessment database for 1996, 1999, 2002, and 2005 and corresponding monitored data from the California Air Resources Board's air quality monitoring program. We selected 12 compounds of interest for our study and focused on evaluating agreement between modeled and monitored data, and of temporal trends. Modeled data generally underestimated the monitored data, especially in 1996. For most compounds agreement between modeled and monitored concentrations improved over time. We concluded that 2002 and 2005 modeled data agree best with monitored data and are the most appropriate years for direct use in our subsequent epidemiologic analysis.

  3. Monitoring of atmospheric particles over an urban area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukai, S.; Sano, I.; Yasumoto, M.

    It is known that optical properties of atmospheric aerosols are important for the Earth s radiation budget and global climate It is also known that Asia is the most complicated region for aerosol study because the dust particles come from continental desert area carbonaceous aerosols are produced by large Siberian biomass-burning plumes and small anthropogenic particles are emitted from the increasing industrial activities Simultaneous measurements of atmospheric aerosols and suspended particulate matter SPM have been undertaken at Kinki University campus in Higashi-Osaka in order to monitor the urban environment during more than two years The sun sky photometry has been made as a NASA AERONET station since 2002 and the SPM-613D Ki-moto Electric has been taking measurements of the SPM concentrations such as TSP PM 10 PM 2 5 and OBC at the same site since March 15 2004 This long term simul-taneous monitoring of aerosols and SPM provides us with typical aerosol types over an industrial city of Higashi-Osaka and the relationship between aerosol properties obtained from radiometry with AERONET and the SPM measurements as 1 The air quality of the Higashi-Osaka site is poor due to not only anthropogenic particles by local emissions such as diesel vehicles and chemical industries but also due to dust particles and biomass-burning aerosols by large scale climatic conditions 2 Fine anthropogenic particles dominate at Higashi-Osaka even during dust events It is of interest to mention that dust events at Higashi-Osaka seem to be

  4. The influence of scales of atmospheric motion on air pollution over Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, Ana; Trigo, Ricardo; Mendes, Manuel; Jerez, Sonia; Gouveia, Célia Marina

    2014-05-01

    Air pollution is determined by the combination of different factors, namely, emissions, physical constrains, meteorology and chemical processes [1,2,3]. The relative importance of such factors is influenced by their interaction on diverse scales of atmospheric motion. Each scale depicts different meteorological conditions, which, when combined with the different air pollution sources and photochemistry, result in varying ambient concentrations [2]. Identifying the dominant scales of atmospheric motion over a given airshed can be of great importance for many applications such as air pollution and pollen dispersion or wind energy management [2]. Portugal has been affected by numerous air pollution episodes during the last decade. These episodes are often related to peak emissions from local industry or transport, but can also be associated to regional transport from other urban areas or to exceptional emission events, such as forest fires. This research aims to identify the scales of atmospheric motion which contribute to an increase of air pollution. A method is proposed for differentiating between the scales of atmospheric motion that can be applied on a daily basis from data collected at several wind-measuring sites in a given airshed and to reanalysis datasets. The method is based on the daily mean wind recirculation and the mean and standard deviation between sites. The determination of the thresholds between scales is performed empirically following the approach of Levy et al. [2] and also through a automatic statistical approach computed taking into account the tails of the distributions (e.g. 95% and 99% percentile) of the different wind samples. A comparison is made with two objective approaches: 1) daily synoptic classification for the same period over the region [4] and 2) a 3-D backward trajectory approach [5,6] for specific episodes. Furthermore, the outcomes are expected to support the Portuguese authorities on the implementation of strategies for a

  5. Large Scale Deformation Monitoring and Atmospheric Removal in Mexico City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCardle, Adrian; McCardel, Jim; Ramos, Fernanda Ledo G.

    2010-03-01

    Large scale, accurate measurement of non-linear ground movement is required for monitoring applications pertaining to groundwater extraction, oil and gas production, and carbon capture and storage. Mexico City experiences severe subsidence as high as 35 centimeters per year due to continued exploitation of groundwater. Such extreme ground deformation has caused damage to infrastructure and many areas of the city are now subjected to periodic flooding. Furthermore, subsidence rates change seasonally creating a non-linear deformation signature manifesting over an area larger than 30 x 30 kilometers. The geographical location and climate of Mexico City, coupled with aforementioned subsidence characteristics create unique challenges for repeat-pass InSAR processing: Firstly, Mexico City is a tropical highland and experiences an oceanic climate that leads to significant temporal de-correlation. Secondly, the large magnitude subsidence leads to phase aliasing over coherent targets, particularly for interferograms with large temporal separation. Lastly, the expansive deformation is spatially correlated on scales similar to the long-range atmosphere, complicating the separation of the two signals. This paper discusses the results from the application of traditional DInSAR techniques combined with Multi-temporal InSAR Network Analysis processing algorithms to accurately identify and measure displacement, specifically in light of the challenges peculiar to Mexico City. Multi-temporal InSAR Network Analysis techniques are used to identify non-linear displacement and remove atmospheric noise from 38 ENVISAT images that were acquired over Mexico City from 2002 to 2007.

  6. Monitoring precipitation and lightning via changes in atmospheric gamma radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Greenfield, M.B.; Domondon, A.; Tsuchiya, S.; Tomiyama, G.

    2003-08-26

    Atmospheric {gamma}-radiation has been measured since 1999 and recently at three elevations 220m from the first site to ascertain position dependency and optimal elevation for observing {gamma}-rays from radon and radon-progeny found in precipitation. Radiation from time-independent and diurnal components was minimized in order to ascertain the reliability, accuracy and practicality of determining precipitation rates from correlated {gamma}-rates. Data taken with 4-12.9cm3 NaI detectors at elevations above ground of 9.91, 14.2, 15.7, and 21.4 m were fit with a model assuming a surface and/or volume deposition of radon progeny on/in water droplets during precipitation which predicts {gamma} -ray rates proportional to the 2/5 and/or 3/5 power of rain rates, respectively. With mostly surface deposition and age corrections for radon progeny, the correlation coefficients improved with elevation and reached a maximum at 0.95 around 20m. Atmospheric {gamma} radiation enables monitoring precipitation rates to 0.3 mm/h with time resolution limited only by counting statistics. High {gamma}-ray rates, decreasing with 40-minute half-life following lightning may be indirectly due to ions accelerated in electric field.

  7. 30 CFR 57.22301 - Atmospheric monitoring systems (I-A, II-A, and V-A mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Atmospheric monitoring systems (I-A, II-A, and... Atmospheric monitoring systems (I-A, II-A, and V-A mines). (a) An atmospheric monitoring system shall be... explosion-proof. (b) Atmospheric monitoring systems shall— (1) Give warnings on the surface and...

  8. 30 CFR 57.22301 - Atmospheric monitoring systems (I-A, II-A, and V-A mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Atmospheric monitoring systems (I-A, II-A, and... Atmospheric monitoring systems (I-A, II-A, and V-A mines). (a) An atmospheric monitoring system shall be... explosion-proof. (b) Atmospheric monitoring systems shall— (1) Give warnings on the surface and...

  9. 30 CFR 57.22301 - Atmospheric monitoring systems (I-A, II-A, and V-A mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Atmospheric monitoring systems (I-A, II-A, and... Atmospheric monitoring systems (I-A, II-A, and V-A mines). (a) An atmospheric monitoring system shall be... explosion-proof. (b) Atmospheric monitoring systems shall— (1) Give warnings on the surface and...

  10. The effect of nitrogen additions on bracken fern and its insect herbivores at sites with high and low atmospheric pollution

    Treesearch

    M.E. Jones; M.E. Fenn; T.D. Paine

    2011-01-01

    The impact of atmospheric pollution, including nitrogen deposition, on bracken fern herbivores has never been studied. Bracken fern is globally distributed and has a high potential to accumulate nitrogen in plant tissue. We examined the response of bracken fern and its herbivores to N fertilization at a high and low pollution site in forests downwind of Los Angeles,...

  11. Water Quality & Pollutant Source Monitoring: Field and Laboratory Procedures. Training Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Water Program Operations (EPA), Cincinnati, OH. National Training and Operational Technology Center.

    This training manual presents material on techniques and instrumentation used to develop data in field monitoring programs and related laboratory operations concerned with water quality and pollution monitoring. Topics include: collection and handling of samples; bacteriological, biological, and chemical field and laboratory methods; field…

  12. 40 CFR 60.1230 - What continuous emission monitoring systems must I install for gaseous pollutants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... systems for oxygen (or carbon dioxide), sulfur dioxide, and carbon monoxide. If you operate a Class I... sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and oxygen (or carbon dioxide) at the outlet of the air pollution... according to the “Monitoring Requirements” in § 60.13. (c) You must monitor the oxygen (or carbon...

  13. 40 CFR 60.1230 - What continuous emission monitoring systems must I install for gaseous pollutants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... systems for oxygen (or carbon dioxide), sulfur dioxide, and carbon monoxide. If you operate a Class I... sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and oxygen (or carbon dioxide) at the outlet of the air pollution... according to the “Monitoring Requirements” in § 60.13. (c) You must monitor the oxygen (or carbon...

  14. 40 CFR 60.1230 - What continuous emission monitoring systems must I install for gaseous pollutants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... systems for oxygen (or carbon dioxide), sulfur dioxide, and carbon monoxide. If you operate a Class I... sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and oxygen (or carbon dioxide) at the outlet of the air pollution... according to the “Monitoring Requirements” in § 60.13. (c) You must monitor the oxygen (or carbon...

  15. 40 CFR 60.1230 - What continuous emission monitoring systems must I install for gaseous pollutants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... systems for oxygen (or carbon dioxide), sulfur dioxide, and carbon monoxide. If you operate a Class I... sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and oxygen (or carbon dioxide) at the outlet of the air pollution... according to the “Monitoring Requirements” in § 60.13. (c) You must monitor the oxygen (or carbon...

  16. 40 CFR 60.1230 - What continuous emission monitoring systems must I install for gaseous pollutants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... systems for oxygen (or carbon dioxide), sulfur dioxide, and carbon monoxide. If you operate a Class I... sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and oxygen (or carbon dioxide) at the outlet of the air pollution... according to the “Monitoring Requirements” in § 60.13. (c) You must monitor the oxygen (or carbon...

  17. Impacts of the NAO on atmospheric pollution in the Mediterranean Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayan, U.

    2010-09-01

    The measured concentrations of air pollutants in the lower atmosphere are the result of the combined effect of local-, meso -, and synoptic scale processes. However, there are several inherent problems in attributing pollution concentrations to changes in large-scale atmospheric circulation: 1) the year to year variability being modulated by both, changes in circulation and changes in upwind emissions, 2) the shorter life-time of some pollutants precluding a meaningful relationship with changes in circulation, and 3) the both-ways interaction between trace gases, aerosols and climate. In order to understand the relationship between atmospheric circulation to climatically related variables such as air pollutants, few examples are presented while using Yarnal's (1993) both fundamental approaches: "Circulation to Environment" and "Environment to Circulation". In the first method, an atmospheric circulation classification is performed and then related to an environmental phenomenon. In the second method, the circulation classification is carried over along specific environment-based criteria set for a particular environmental phenomenon. Simulations of transport of anthropogenic CO for high and low phases of the NAO are presented followed by an observational-based study relating the ozone seasonal variability across North Atlantic and the Western Mediterranean to the NAO. Both phases of the NAO controlling dust transport to the Mediterranean are described: the positive phase during summer over the western region and the negative one regulating dust transport over the Eastern Mediterranean in winter. Low NAO indices have been related to a higher cyclonic activity over the western basin. However, Avila and Roda (2002) found no correlation between annual wet deposition of African dust-related elements and the NAO. Their results indicate that, contrary to the Eastern Mediterranean, the two variables (precipitation inversely and dust updraft directly) controlling wet

  18. The effect of local circulations on the variation of atmospheric pollutants in the northwestern Taiwan

    SciTech Connect

    Pay-Liam Lin; Hsin-Chih Lai

    1996-12-31

    A field experiment was held in the northwestern Taiwan as a part of a long-term research program for studying Taiwan`s local circulation. The program has been named as Taiwan Regional-circulation Experiment (TREX). The particular goal of this research is to investigate characteristics of boundary layer and local Circulation and their impact on the distribution and Variation of pollutants in the northwestern Taiwan during Mei-Yu season. It has been known for quite sometime that land-sea breeze is very pronounced under hot and humid conditions. Extensive network includes 11 pilot ballon stations, 3 acoustic sounding sites, and 14 surface stations in about 20 km by 20 km area centered at National Central University, Chung-Li. In addition, there are ground temperature measurements at 3 sites, Integrated Sounding System (ISS) at NCU, air plane observation, tracer experiment with 10 collecting stations, 3 background upper-air sounding stations, 2 towers etc. NOAA and GMS satellite data, sea surface temperature radar, and precipitation data are collected. The local circulations such as land/sea breezes and mountain/valley winds, induced by thermal and topographical effects often play an important role in transporting, redistributing and transforming atmospheric pollutants. This study documents the effects of the development of local circulations and the accompanying evolution of boundary layer on the distribution and the variation of the atmospheric pollutants in the north western Taiwan during Mei-Yu season.

  19. [Magnetic Response of Dust-loaded Leaves in Parks of Shanghai to Atmospheric Heavy Metal Pollution].

    PubMed

    Liu, Fei; Chu, Hui-min; Zheng, Xiang-min

    2015-12-01

    To reveal the magnetic response to the atmospheric heavy metal pollution in leaves along urban parks, Camphor leaf samples, widely distributed at urban parks, were collected along the year leading wind direction of Shanghai, by setting two vertical and horizontal sections, using rock magnetic properties and heavy metal contents analysis. The results showed that the magnetic minerals of samples were predominated by ferromagnetic minerals, and both the concentration and grain size of magnetite particles gradually decreased with the winter monsoon direction from the main industrial district. A rigorous cleaning of leaves using ultrasonic agitator washer could remove about 63%-90% of low-field susceptibility values of the leaves, and this strongly indicated that the intensity of magnetic signal was mainly controlled by the PMs accumulated on the leaves surfaces. Moreover, there was a significant linear relationship between heavy metals contents (Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu, Cr, V and Pb) and magnetic parameters (0.442 ≤ R ≤ 0.799, P < 0.05), which suggested that magnetic parameters of urban park leaves could be used as a proxy for atmospheric heavy metal pollution. The results of multivariate statistical analysis showed that the content of magnetic minerals and heavy metal indust-loaded tree leaves was affected by associated pollution of industry and traffic.

  20. The impact of atmospheric pollution on vitamin D status of infants and toddlers in Delhi, India

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, K; Mughal, M; Upadhyay, P; Berry, J; Mawer, E; Puliyel, J

    2002-01-01

    Aims: To compare the vitamin D status of 34 children, 9–24 months old, living in an area of Delhi renowned for high levels of atmospheric pollution (Mori Gate), with a comparable age matched group of children from a less polluted (Gurgaon) area of the city. Methods: Serum concentrations of calcium, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), parathyroid hormone (PTH), 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D), and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)2D) were measured. Haze scores, regarded as a surrogate marker of solar UVB radiation reaching ground level, were measured in both areas. Results: Mean 25(OH)D of children in the Mori Gate area was 12.4 (7) ng/ml, compared with 27.1 (7) ng/ml in children living in the Gurgaon area (p < 0.001). The median ALP (p < 0.05) and mean PTH (p < 0.001) concentrations were higher in children living in the Mori Gate area than in the Gurgaon area. The mean haze score in the Mori Gate area (2.1 (0.5)) was significantly lower (p < 0.05) than in the Gurgaon area (2.7 (0.4)), indicating less solar UVB reaching the ground in Mori Gate. Conclusion: We suggest that children living in areas of high atmospheric pollution are at risk of developing vitamin D deficiency rickets and should be offered vitamin D supplements. PMID:12138058

  1. [Pollution Evaluation and Risk Assessment of Heavy Metals from Atmospheric Deposition in the Parks of Nanjing].

    PubMed

    Wang, Cheng; Qian, Xin; Li, Hui-ming; Sun, Yi-xuan; Wang, Jin-hua

    2016-05-15

    Contents of heavy metals involving As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn from atmospheric deposition in 10 parks of Nanjing were analyzed. The pollution level, ecological risk and health risk were evaluated using Geoaccumulation Index, Potential Ecological Risk Index and the US EPA Health Risk Assessment Model, respectively. The results showed that the pollution levels of heavy metals in Swallow Rock Park, Swallow Rock Park and Mochou Lake Park were higher than the others. Compared to other cities such as Changchun, Wuhan and Beijing, the contents of heavy metals in atmospheric deposition of parks in Nanjing were higher. The evaluation results of Geoaccumulation Index showed that Pb was at moderate pollution level, Zn and Cu were between moderate and serious levels, while Cd was between serious and extreme levels. The ecological risk level of Cd was high. The assessment results of Health Risk Assessment Model indicated that there was no non-carcinogenic risk for all the seven heavy metals. For carcinogenic risk, the risks of Cd, Cr and Ni were all negligible (Risk < 1 x 10⁻⁶), whereas As had carcinogenic risk possibility but was considered to be acceptable (10⁻⁶ < Risk < 10⁻⁴).

  2. Relationship between Atmospheric Pollution Processes and Atmospheric Circulation in Shanghai, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Y.; Zhang, J.; Cong, J.; Wang, J.

    2014-12-01

    Severe haze weather occurred in Shanghai in the beginning of 2013. In this paper,spatial-temporal characteristics of the smog days was analyzed using the data of 10 stations in the downtown, the suburb & the outer suburb of Shanghai from 2002-2013. In addition, we discussed the correlation between PM2.5, PM10, SO2 & NO2 and the smog days. At last, the situation of atmospheric circulation during a severe haze weather process between Jan, 2, 2013 to Feb, 4, 2013 was studied. Results show that: (1) from 2002 to 2012, the average smog days in Shanghai and in the outer suburb of Shanghai show a trend of fluctuating decrease generally with the rates of 6.031d/a and 5.89d/a, respectively. The smog days in the downtown of Shanghai decrease most quickly, with the rate of 15.418d/a. The smog days in the suburb of Shanghai decreased most slowly, with the rate of 2.495d/a. Smog happens most frequently in January, November and December (accounting for 31%) and least in August and September. The inter-annual variation of smog days shows the trend of decreasing in all four seasons. The smog days decreases most slowly in spring, with the ratio of 1.16d/a, it decreases most quickly in winter, with the ratio of 1.65d/a, and decreases at the medium ratio of 1.58d/a and 1.49d/a in summer and autumn respectively. (2) The number of monthly average smog days is positively related to the monthly average concentration of PM10, SO2, PM2.5 and NO2. The correlative coefficient between the number of monthly average smog days and the monthly average PM10 and NO2 concentrations are 0.756 and 0.610, respectively. (3) Atmospheric circulation analysis shows that stable west straight current in the air, weak high pressure on the ground and sufficient supplement of water steam are good for the formation and maintenance of haze weather.

  3. Impact of a future H2 transportation on atmospheric pollution in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popa, Maria Elena; Segers, Arjo; Denier van der Gon, Hugo; Schaap, Martijn; Krol, Maarten; Visschedijk, Antoon; Röckmann, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Traditionally fuelled road traffic is a major source of greenhouse gases and pollutants. Greenhouse gases (e.g. CO2 and CH4) affect the global atmosphere and contribute to global warming. The pollutants emitted by vehicles (e.g. CO, NOx, SO2, particulate matter, volatile organic compounds) are toxic for man and environment and decrease air quality especially in highly populated areas. Burning H2 produces only water, thus H2-powered vehicles are seen as a possibility to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and improve air quality; because of this, H2 usage as a fuel is foreseen to significantly increase in the future. Large scale usage of H2 as a fuel has the potential to affect the atmospheric composition in different ways. On one hand, emissions associated to fossil fuel burning will decrease. On the other hand, large quantities of H2 used will likely lead to increased H2 emissions from leakages during production, transport and storage. Additional H2 in the atmosphere will affect the chemistry of many species, in principal by decreasing the availability of OH radicals, with the result of increasing the lifetime of greenhouse gases and pollutants. Thus the net effect of H2 vehicles on the atmospheric composition depends on the relative strength of these two contrary effects. In order to evaluate the potential influence of a future H2 road transportation on local and regional air quality, we implemented H2 in the atmospheric transport and chemistry model LOTOS-EUROS. We simulated the future (2020) using emission scenarios with different proportions of H2 vehicles and different H2 leakage rates. The reference future scenario does not include H2 vehicles, and assumes that all present and planned European regulations for emissions are fully implemented. We find that in general the air quality in 2020 will be significantly better than at present in all scenarios, with and without H2 cars. In the future scenario without H2 cars, the pollution is reduced due to the strict

  4. Hydrodynamic mesoscale modeling of atmospheric transport and pollutant deposition in the vicinity of a lake

    SciTech Connect

    Christidis, Z.D.

    1986-01-01

    This study identifies two meteorological situations common to lakeshore environments, where pollutants can be vertically redistributed resulting in concentration and deposition fields, different from these expected for homogeneous surfaces. In order to study the effects of lakes on pollutant deposition, a hydrodynamic model was developed which included terms for pollutant transport, dispersion and deposition. The modeling domain was centered around (Lake Michigan) to investigate the potential impact of nearby industrial sources. The model is capable of forecasting the local wind, temperature, and pressure patterns as well as evolution of the atmospheric planetary boundary layer parameters. It was found that the presence of a lake in the summertime limits pollutant deposition over its length, due to stabilization and plum entrainment in the lake-breeze. Also the mean height of the resultant plume was predicted to be higher with the influence of a lake-breeze than without. In the other hand, deposition was enhanced over the upwind land due to the lake-breeze effect, and the downwind shore due to enhanced mixing. In the wintertime, the presence of a warm lake caused deposition near the upwind lakeshore greater than predicted without the lake. These limited applications illustrate that dry deposition around a source located by a large lake may be significantly different from that expected around a source located in simple terrain.

  5. Widespread pollution of the South American atmosphere predates the industrial revolution by 240 y

    PubMed Central

    Uglietti, Chiara; Gabrielli, Paolo; Cooke, Colin A.; Vallelonga, Paul; Thompson, Lonnie G.

    2015-01-01

    In the Southern Hemisphere, evidence for preindustrial atmospheric pollution is restricted to a few geological archives of low temporal resolution that record trace element deposition originating from past mining and metallurgical operations in South America. Therefore, the timing and the spatial impact of these activities on the past atmosphere remain poorly constrained. Here we present an annually resolved ice core record (A.D. 793–1989) from the high-altitude drilling site of Quelccaya (Peru) that archives preindustrial and industrial variations in trace elements. During the precolonial period (i.e., pre-A.D. 1532), the deposition of trace elements was mainly dominated by the fallout of aeolian dust and of ash from occasional volcanic eruptions, indicating that metallurgic production during the Inca Empire (A.D. 1438−1532) had a negligible impact on the South American atmosphere. In contrast, a widespread anthropogenic signal is evident after around A.D. 1540, which corresponds with the beginning of colonial mining and metallurgy in Peru and Bolivia, ∼240 y before the Industrial Revolution. This shift was due to a major technological transition for silver extraction in South America (A.D. 1572), from lead-based smelting to mercury amalgamation, which precipitated a massive increase in mining activities. However, deposition of toxic trace metals during the Colonial era was still several factors lower than 20th century pollution that was unprecedented over the entirety of human history. PMID:25675506

  6. Widespread pollution of the South American atmosphere predates the industrial revolution by 240 y.

    PubMed

    Uglietti, Chiara; Gabrielli, Paolo; Cooke, Colin A; Vallelonga, Paul; Thompson, Lonnie G

    2015-02-24

    In the Southern Hemisphere, evidence for preindustrial atmospheric pollution is restricted to a few geological archives of low temporal resolution that record trace element deposition originating from past mining and metallurgical operations in South America. Therefore, the timing and the spatial impact of these activities on the past atmosphere remain poorly constrained. Here we present an annually resolved ice core record (A.D. 793-1989) from the high-altitude drilling site of Quelccaya (Peru) that archives preindustrial and industrial variations in trace elements. During the precolonial period (i.e., pre-A.D. 1532), the deposition of trace elements was mainly dominated by the fallout of aeolian dust and of ash from occasional volcanic eruptions, indicating that metallurgic production during the Inca Empire (A.D. 1438-1532) had a negligible impact on the South American atmosphere. In contrast, a widespread anthropogenic signal is evident after around A.D. 1540, which corresponds with the beginning of colonial mining and metallurgy in Peru and Bolivia, ∼240 y before the Industrial Revolution. This shift was due to a major technological transition for silver extraction in South America (A.D. 1572), from lead-based smelting to mercury amalgamation, which precipitated a massive increase in mining activities. However, deposition of toxic trace metals during the Colonial era was still several factors lower than 20th century pollution that was unprecedented over the entirety of human history.

  7. Widespread pollution of the South American atmosphere predates the industrial revolution by 240 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uglietti, Chiara; Gabrielli, Paolo; Cooke, Colin; Vallelonga, Paul; Thompson, Lonnie

    2015-04-01

    In the Southern Hemisphere, evidence for preindustrial atmospheric pollution is restricted to a few geological archives of low temporal resolution that record trace element deposition originating from past mining and metallurgical operations in South America. Therefore the timing and the spatial impact of these activities on the past atmosphere remain poorly constrained. Here we present an annually resolved ice-core record (793-1989 AD) from the high altitude drilling site of Quelccaya (Peru) that archives preindustrial and industrial variations in trace elements. During the pre-colonial period (i.e., pre-1532 AD), the deposition of trace elements was mainly dominated by the fallout of aeolian dust and of ash from occasional volcanic eruptions indicating that metallurgic production during the Inca Empire (1438-1532 AD) had a negligible impact on the South American atmosphere. In contrast, a widespread anthropogenic signal is evident after 1540 AD, which corresponds with the beginning of colonial mining and metallurgy in Peru and Bolivia, 240 years prior to the Industrial Revolution. This shift was due to a major technological transition for silver extraction in South America (1572 AD), from lead-based smelting to mercury amalgamation, which precipitated a massive increase in mining activities. However, deposition of toxic trace metals during the Colonial era was still several factors lower than 20th century pollution that was unprecedented over the entirety of human history.

  8. Aerosol physical, chemical and optical properties observed in the ambient atmosphere during haze pollution conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhengqiang; Xie, Yisong; Li, Donghui; Li, Kaitao; Zhang, Ying; Li, Li; Lv, Yang; Qie, Lili; Xu, Hua

    Aerosol’s properties in the ambient atmosphere may differ significantly from sampling results due to containing of abundant water content. We performed sun-sky radiometer measurements in Beijing during 2011 and 2012 winter to obtain distribution of spectral and angular sky radiance. The measurements are then used to retrieve aerosol physical, chemical and optical properties, including single scattering albedo, size distribution, complex refractive indices and aerosol component fractions identified as black carbon, brown carbon, mineral dust, ammonium sulfate-like components and water content inside particle matters. We found that during winter haze condition aerosol is dominated by fine particles with center radius of about 0.2 micron. Fine particles contribute about 93% to total aerosol extinction of solar light, and result in serious decrease of atmospheric visibility during haze condition. The percentage of light absorption of haze aerosol can up to about 10% among its total extinction, much higher than that of unpolluted conditions, that causes significant radiative cooling effects suppressing atmospheric convection and dispersion of pollutants. Moreover, the average water content occupies about one third of the ambient aerosol in volume which suggests the important effect of ambient humidity in the formation of haze pollution.

  9. The role of catchment vegetation in reducing atmospheric inputs of pollutant aerosols in Ganga river.

    PubMed

    Shubhashish, Kumar; Pandey, Richa; Pandey, Jitendra

    2012-08-01

    The role of woody perennials in the Ganga river basin in modifying the run-off quality as influenced by atmospheric deposition of pollutant aerosols was investigated. The concentration of seven nutrients and eight metals were measured in atmospheric deposits as well as in run-off water under the influence of five woody perennials. Nutrient retention was recorded maximum for Bougainvillea spectabilis ranged from 4.30 % to 33.70 %. Metal retention was recorded highest for Ficus benghalensis ranged from 5.15 % to 36.98 %. Although some species showed nutrient enrichment, all the species considered in the study invariably contribute to reduce nutrients and metal concentration in run-off water. Reduction in run off was recorded maximum for B. spectabilis (nutrient 6.48 %-40.66 %; metal 7.86 %-22.85 %) and minimum for Ficus religiosa (nutrient 1.68 %-27.19 %; metal 6.55 %-31.55 %). The study forms the first report on the use of woody perennials in reducing input of atmospheric pollutants to Ganga river and has relevance in formulating strategies for river basin management.

  10. Is atmospheric pollution exposure during pregnancy associated with individual and contextual characteristics? A nationwide study in France.

    PubMed

    Ouidir, Marion; Lepeule, Johanna; Siroux, Valérie; Malherbe, Laure; Meleux, Frederik; Rivière, Emmanuel; Launay, Ludivine; Zaros, Cécile; Cheminat, Marie; Charles, Marie-Aline; Slama, Rémy

    2017-10-01

    Exposure to atmospheric pollutants is a danger for the health of pregnant mother and children. Our objective was to identify individual (socioeconomic and behavioural) and contextual factors associated with atmospheric pollution pregnancy exposure at the nationwide level. Among 14 921 women from the French nationwide ELFE (French Longitudinal Study of Children) mother-child cohort recruited in 2011, outdoor exposure levels of PM2.5, PM10 (particulate matter <2.5 µm and <10 µm in diameter) and NO2 (nitrogen dioxide) were estimated at the pregnancy home address from a dispersion model with 1 km resolution. We used classification and regression trees (CART) and linear regression to characterise the association of atmospheric pollutants with individual (maternal age, body mass index, parity, education level, relationship status, smoking status) and contextual (European Deprivation Index, urbanisation level) factors. Patterns of associations were globally similar across pollutants. For the CART approach, the highest tertile of exposure included mainly women not in a relationship living in urban and socially deprived areas, with lower education level. Linear regression models identified different determinants of atmospheric pollutants exposure according to the residential urbanisation level. In urban areas, atmospheric pollutants exposure increased with social deprivation, while in rural areas a U-shaped relationship was observed. We highlighted social inequalities in atmospheric pollutants exposure according to contextual characteristics such as urbanisation level and social deprivation and also according to individual characteristics such as education, being in a relationship and smoking status. In French urban areas, pregnant women from the most deprived neighbourhoods were those most exposed to health-threatening atmospheric pollutants. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved

  11. Pollution monitoring system. [photographic laboratory by-products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodding, R. A.

    1973-01-01

    An investigation was undertaken to identify those photographic laboratory by-products which can produce harmful reactions if released untreated. After identification of these by-products, specific monitoring systems for each of the offending ions were investigated and recommendations for implementation are presented. Appropriate monitoring systems are discussed.

  12. Growing Atmospheric Pollution and Its Relation with Occurrences of Natural Hazards in India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ramesh

    In the last three decades, multi satellite remote sensing data have revealed increasing atmospheric pollution. The satellite data have shown spatial distribution of fine and coarse atmospheric particles which impact human health, cloud albedo and atmospheric and meteorological parameters. The long range dusts coming over India travel through Arabian Sea and reach to the Bay of Bengal, such long range transport of dust influences atmospheric and ocean parameters, as a result strong coupling exists between land-ocean-atmosphere. Various kind of natural hazards, such as cyclone, algal bloom, cloud burst, excessive rainfall have been observed apart from the intense fog, haze and smog during winter and post monsoon seasons that have serious impacts on human health of people living in the Indo-Gangetic basin. The long range transport of dust and local anthropogenic emissions also reach to the Himalayan region affecting snow and glaciers of Himalaya and accelerating melting of snow and glaciers which is a threat of flooding of rivers originate from Himalayan region.

  13. Long-term monitoring of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) at the Norwegian Troll station in Dronning Maud Land, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallenborn, R.; Breivik, K.; Eckhardt, S.; Lunder, C. R.; Manø, S.; Schlabach, M.; Stohl, A.

    2013-07-01

    A first long-term monitoring of selected persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in Antarctic air has been conducted at the Norwegian research station Troll (Dronning Maud Land). As target contaminants 32 PCB congeners, α- and γ-hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH), trans- and cis-chlordane, trans- and cis-nonachlor, p,p'- and o,p-DDT, DDD, DDE as well as hexachlorobenzene (HCB) were selected. The monitoring program with weekly samples taken during the period 2007-2010 was coordinated with the parallel program at the Norwegian Arctic monitoring site (Zeppelin mountain, Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard) in terms of priority compounds, sampling schedule as well as analytical methods. The POP concentration levels found in Antarctica were considerably lower than Arctic atmospheric background concentrations. Similar to observations for Arctic samples, HCB is the predominant POP compound, with levels of around 22 pg m-3 throughout the entire monitoring period. In general, the following concentration distribution was found for the Troll samples analyzed: HCB > Sum HCH > Sum PCB > Sum DDT > Sum chlordanes. Atmospheric long-range transport was identified as a major contamination source for POPs in Antarctic environments. Several long-range transport events with elevated levels of pesticides and/or compounds with industrial sources were identified based on retroplume calculations with a Lagrangian particle dispersion model (FLEXPART).

  14. [Impact of atmospheric total suspended particulate pollution on photosynthetic parameters of street mango trees in Xiamen City].

    PubMed

    Yu, Yu-xian; Chen, Jin-sheng; Ren, Yin; Li, Fang-yi; Cui, Sheng-hui

    2010-05-01

    With the development of urbanization, total suspended particulate (TSP) pollution is getting serious, and the normal physiological processes of urban vegetation are profoundly affected while adsorbing and purifying the particulates. In this study, four areas were selected, i.e., Tingxi reservoir (clean control area), Xiamen University (cultural and educational area), Xianyue (business area), and Haicang (industrial area), with their atmospheric TSP concentrations and the photosynthetic parameters of street Mango (Mangifera indica) trees monitored in April and May, 2009. The daily average concentration of TSP in Tingxi, Xiamen University, Xianyue, and Haicang was 0.061, 0.113, 0.120 and 0.205 mg x m(-3), respectively, and the impact of TSP stress on M. indica was in the sequence of Haicang > Xianyue > Xiamen University > Tingxi. TSP pollution negatively affected the net photosynthetic rate, stomatal conductance, and transpiration rate of M. indica, and induced intercellular CO2 concentration changed significantly. High TSP concentration could cause the decline of net photosynthetic rate via stomatal limitation.

  15. Development of a passive doas system to retrieve atmospheric pollution columns in the 200 to 355 nm region

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In recent years several techniques have been developed to measure and monitor the pollution of the air. Among these techniques, remote sensing using optical methods stands out due to several advantages for air quality control applications. A Passive Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy system that uses the ultraviolet region from 200 to 355 nm of the solar radiation is presented. The developed system is portable; therefore it is practical for real time and in situ measurements. The enhanced wavelength range of the system is intended to detect the ultraviolet light penetration in the Mexican Valley considering the solar zenith angle and the altitude. The system was applied to retrieve atmospheric SO2 columns emitted either by anthropogenic (power plant) or natural sources (volcano), reaching a detection limit of about 1 ppm. The measurement of the penetrating solar radiation on the earth surface at the UVC range is presented and the possibility to measure pollution traces of some contaminants as O3, NO2 and aromatic compounds in real time and in situ in the ultraviolet region is discussed. PMID:23369629

  16. Development of a passive doas system to retrieve atmospheric pollution columns in the 200 to 355 nm region.

    PubMed

    Mejía, Rubén Galicia; Vázquez, Josémanueldelarosa; Isakina, Suren Stolik; García, Edgard Moreno; Iglesias, Gustavo Sosa

    2013-01-08

    In recent years several techniques have been developed to measure and monitor the pollution of the air. Among these techniques, remote sensing using optical methods stands out due to several advantages for air quality control applications. A Passive Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy system that uses the ultraviolet region from 200 to 355 nm of the solar radiation is presented. The developed system is portable; therefore it is practical for real time and in situ measurements. The enhanced wavelength range of the system is intended to detect the ultraviolet light penetration in the Mexican Valley considering the solar zenith angle and the altitude. The system was applied to retrieve atmospheric SO2 columns emitted either by anthropogenic (power plant) or natural sources (volcano), reaching a detection limit of about 1 ppm. The measurement of the penetrating solar radiation on the earth surface at the UVC range is presented and the possibility to measure pollution traces of some contaminants as O3, NO2 and aromatic compounds in real time and in situ in the ultraviolet region is discussed.

  17. The Role of Hydrocarbon and Halocarbon Species In The Polluted Urban Atmosphere of Bristol, England.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivett, A. C.; Martin, D.; Gray, D. J.; Price, C. S.; Nickless, G.; Simmonds, P. G.; Doherty, S. J. O.; Greally, B.; Shallcross, D. E.

    The urban environment is a complex mixture of chemicals, however, due to the high levels of NOx that are generally present, ozone formation is VOC (volatile organic compound) limited. Therefore, it is of great importance to determine the type of VOC that is present in the urban environment, its concentration and how this varies both spatially and temporally. The results of a field campaign carried out from early spring through to the late sum- mer of 2000, in Bristol, England, are presented. Continuous measurements of over 40 hydrocarbons have been made at an urban background site, located at Bristol Uni- versity, for approximately nine months using a GC-FID system and for a selection of halocarbons for approximately one month using a GC-ECD system. Measurements of a smaller set of hydrocarbons were made simultaneously at a roadside site in the centre of Bristol, as part of the U.K. national monitoring network. In this paper the form of the halocarbon time-series is investigated by comparison with the hydrocarbon time-series, air-mass back trajectories and also local weather condi- tions. The variability of hydrocarbon concentrations within the urban environment are also investigated and reasons for discrepancies are discussed. Using principal com- ponent analysis sources for these hydrocarbons have been apportioned. In addition, ozone levels recorded in Bristol have been compared with hydrocarbon levels and in conjunction with trajectory modelling the role played by certain VOCs in the forma- tion of ozone and radicals such as OH is assessed. A simple approximation of radical fluxes is also presented based on the variations of the measured hydrocarbons and the role of biogenically produced compounds such as isoprene in the urban environment is also considered. This study has investigated both local and remote effects on levels of pollutants in the Bristol conurbation. Like any other town or city, Bristol has its own distinctive atmospheric characteristics. A

  18. Development of Atmospheric Air 85Kr Monitoring Methodology on the Territory of the USSR

    NASA Astrophysics