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Sample records for atmospheric pressure hf

  1. Non-thermal atmospheric pressure HF plasma source: generation of nitric oxide and ozone for bio-medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühn, S.; Bibinov, N.; Gesche, R.; Awakowicz, P.

    2010-01-01

    A new miniature high-frequency (HF) plasma source intended for bio-medical applications is studied using nitrogen/oxygen mixture at atmospheric pressure. This plasma source can be used as an element of a plasma source array for applications in dermatology and surgery. Nitric oxide and ozone which are produced in this plasma source are well-known agents for proliferation of the cells, inhalation therapy for newborn infants, disinfection of wounds and blood ozonation. Using optical emission spectroscopy, microphotography and numerical simulation, the gas temperature in the active plasma region and plasma parameters (electron density and electron distribution function) are determined for varied nitrogen/oxygen flows. The influence of the gas flows on the plasma conditions is studied. Ozone and nitric oxide concentrations in the effluent of the plasma source are measured using absorption spectroscopy and electro-chemical NO-detector at variable gas flows. Correlations between plasma parameters and concentrations of the particles in the effluent of the plasma source are discussed. By varying the gas flows, the HF plasma source can be optimized for nitric oxide or ozone production. Maximum concentrations of 2750 ppm and 400 ppm of NO and O3, correspondingly, are generated.

  2. Microwave Atmospheric-Pressure Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flower, D. A.; Peckham, G. E.; Bradford, W. J.

    1986-01-01

    Report describes tests of microwave pressure sounder (MPS) for use in satellite measurements of atmospheric pressure. MPS is multifrequency radar operating between 25 and 80 GHz. Determines signal absorption over vertical path through atmosphere by measuring strength of echoes from ocean surface. MPS operates with cloud cover, and suitable for use on current meteorological satellites.

  3. Atmospheric Pressure Indicator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salzsieder, John C.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses observable phenomena related to air pressure. Describes a simple, unobtrusive, semiquantitative device to monitor the changes in air pressure that are associated with altitude, using a soft-drink bottle and a balloon. (JRH)

  4. Atmospheric Pressure During Landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This figure shows the variation with time of pressure (dots) measured by the Pathfinder MET instrument during the landing period shown in image PIA00797. The two diamonds indicate the times of bridal cutting and 1st impact. The overall trend in the data is of pressure increasing with time. This is almost certainly due to the lander rolling downhill by roughly 10 m. The spacing of the horizontal dotted lines indicates the pressure change expected from 10 m changes in altitude. Bounces may also be visible in the data.

  5. Effects of the ratio of O2/Ar pressure on wettability and optical properties of HfO2 films before and after doping with Al

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Su-Shia; Liao, Chung-Sheng

    2016-09-01

    HfO2 films were doped with Al (HfO2:Al) by simultaneous RF magnetron sputtering of HfO2 and DC magnetron sputtering of Al. This method is characterized by its ability to independently control the Al content. According to XRD and XPS analyses, the HfO2:Al film had a structure similar to that of HfO2 film, and most of the Al atoms were not in the HfO2 crystalline. A small amount of Al3+ dopant could transform the hydrophobicity of HfO2 films into hydrophilicity. Moreover, the hydrophilicity of the HfO2:Al films improved as the ratio of O2/Ar pressure increased. The nonlinear refractive indices of HfO2 and HfO2:Al films deposited in a pure Ar or a mixed Ar-O2 atmosphere were measured by Moiré deflectometry, and were of the order of 10-8 cm2 W-1. A lower surface roughness, higher optical transmission in the UV-vis-NIR region, and higher linear refractive index were obtained at a higher ratio of O2/Ar pressure.

  6. Microplasma jet at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Yong Cheol; Uhm, Han Sup

    2006-11-27

    A nitrogen microplasma jet operated at atmospheric pressure was developed for treating thermally sensitive materials. For example, the plasma sources in treatment of vulnerable biological materials must operate near the room temperature at the atmospheric pressure, without any risk of arcing or electrical shock. The microplasma jet device operated by an electrical power less than 10 W exhibited a long plasma jet of about 6.5 cm with temperature near 300 K, not causing any harm to human skin. Optical emission measured at the wide range of 280-800 nm indicated various reactive species produced by the plasma jet.

  7. Optimizing HiPIMS pressure for deposition of high-k (k = 18.3) amorphous HfO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesan, R.; Murdoch, B. J.; Partridge, J. G.; Bathgate, S.; Treverrow, B.; Dong, X.; Ross, A. E.; McCulloch, D. G.; McKenzie, D. R.; Bilek, M. M. M.

    2016-03-01

    Stoichiometric amorphous HfO2 films have been deposited by reactive High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering (HiPIMS) from a Hf target in a 1:1 Ar:O2 atmosphere at pressures 2-4.5 mTorr. An optimum pressure was found for depositing smooth, high refractive index and amorphous films. Stress and refractive index reached a maximum as deposition pressure was increased to 3.5 mTorr. At 3.5 mTorr, HfO2 films were deposited with a refractive index of 2.15 at 500 nm, low leakage currents, moderate fixed charge density and a high dielectric constant of ∼18.3. The intensification of energetic ion bombardment upon the film with increase in HiPIMS pressure plays a dominant role in film properties. Increase in pressure above the optimum relieved the stress in the films and degraded the optical and electrical properties. HiPIMS pressure enables to gain indirect control of ion flux and energy in the plasma and can be used to modify the properties of depositing films.

  8. Atmospheric-pressure plasma jet

    DOEpatents

    Selwyn, Gary S.

    1999-01-01

    Atmospheric-pressure plasma jet. A .gamma.-mode, resonant-cavity plasma discharge that can be operated at atmospheric pressure and near room temperature using 13.56 MHz rf power is described. Unlike plasma torches, the discharge produces a gas-phase effluent no hotter than 250.degree. C. at an applied power of about 300 W, and shows distinct non-thermal characteristics. In the simplest design, two concentric cylindrical electrodes are employed to generate a plasma in the annular region therebetween. A "jet" of long-lived metastable and reactive species that are capable of rapidly cleaning or etching metals and other materials is generated which extends up to 8 in. beyond the open end of the electrodes. Films and coatings may also be removed by these species. Arcing is prevented in the apparatus by using gas mixtures containing He, which limits ionization, by using high flow velocities, and by properly shaping the rf-powered electrode. Because of the atmospheric pressure operation, no ions survive for a sufficiently long distance beyond the active plasma discharge to bombard a workpiece, unlike low-pressure plasma sources and conventional plasma processing methods.

  9. Pressure-driven superconductivity in the transition-metal pentatelluride HfT e5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Yanpeng; Shi, Wujun; Naumov, Pavel G.; Kumar, Nitesh; Schnelle, Walter; Barkalov, Oleg; Shekhar, Chandra; Borrmann, Horst; Felser, Claudia; Yan, Binghai; Medvedev, Sergey A.

    2016-08-01

    The discovery of superconductivity in hafnium pentatelluride HfT e5 under high pressure is reported. Two structural phase transitions and metallization with superconductivity developing at around 5 GPa are observed. A maximal critical temperature of 4.8 K is attained at a pressure of 20 GPa, and superconductivity persists up to the maximum pressure of the study (42 GPa). The combination of electrical transport and crystal structure measurements as well as theoretical electronic structure calculations enables the construction of a phase diagram of HfT e5 under high pressure.

  10. Pressure-induced structures of Si-doped HfO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Fancher, Chris M.; Nelson, Matthew; Jones, Jacob L.; Zhao, Lili; Bai, Ligang; Shen, Guoyin

    2015-06-21

    The effect of hydrostatic pressure on the structure of Si-doped HfO{sub 2} (Si:HfO{sub 2}) was studied by using a diamond anvil cell in combination with high-energy X-ray diffraction at a synchrotron source. Diffraction data were measured in situ during compression up to pressures of 31 GPa. Si:HfO{sub 2} with 3, 5, and 9 at. % Si were found to undergo a monoclinic to orthorhombic transition at pressures between 7 and 15 GPa. Whole pattern analysis was carried out using nonpolar (Pbca) and polar (Pca2{sub 1}) crystallographic models to investigate the symmetry of the observed high-pressure orthorhombic phase. Rietveld refinement results cannot discriminate a reliable difference between the Pbca and Pca2{sub 1} structures as they nearly equally model the measured diffraction data. The pressure dependent lattice parameters, relative volume, and spontaneous strain are reported.

  11. Determining Atmospheric Pressure Using a Water Barometer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lohrengel, C. Frederick, II; Larson, Paul R.

    2012-01-01

    The atmosphere is an envelope of compressible gases that surrounds Earth. Because of its compressibility and nonuniform heating by the Sun, it is in constant motion. The atmosphere exerts pressure on Earth's surface, but that pressure is in constant flux. This experiment allows students to directly measure atmospheric pressure by measuring the…

  12. Domestic atmospheric pressure thermal deaerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorov, P. V.; Gimmelberg, A. S.; Mikhailov, V. G.; Baeva, A. N.; Chuprakov, M. V.; Grigoriev, G. V.

    2016-04-01

    Based on many years of experience and proven technical solutions, modern atmospheric pressure deaerators of the capacity of 0.4 to 800 t/h were designed and developed. The construction of such deaerators is based on known and explored technical solutions. A two-stage deaeration scheme is applied where the first stage is a jet dripping level (in a column) and the second one is a bubble level (in a tank). In the design of deaeration columns, low-pressure hydraulic nozzles (Δ p < 0.15 MPa) and jet trays are used, and in deaerator tank, a developed "flooded" sparger is applied, which allows to significantly increase the intensity of the heat and mass exchange processes in the apparatus. The use of the two efficient stages in a column and a "flooded" sparger in a tank allows to reliably guarantee the necessary water heating and deaeration. Steam or "superheated" water of the temperature of t ≥ 125°C can be used as the coolant in the deaerators. The commissioning tests of the new deaerator prototypes of the capacity of 800 and 500 t/h in the HPP conditions showed their sustainable, reliable, and efficient work in the designed range of hydraulic and thermal loads. The content of solved oxygen and free carbon dioxide in make-up water after deaerators meets the requirements of State Standard GOST 16860-88, the operating rules and regulations, and the customer's specifications. Based on these results, the proposals were developed on the structure and the design of deaerators of the productivity of more than 800 t/h for the use in circuits of large heating systems and the preparation of feed water to the TPP at heating and industrial-heating plants. The atmospheric pressure thermal deaerators developed at NPO TsKTI with consideration of the current requirements are recommended for the use in water preparation schemes of various power facilities.

  13. Pressure-induced phase transitions in acentric BaHf(BO{sub 3}){sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Mączka, Mirosław; Szymborska-Małek, Katarzyna; Sousa Pinheiro, Gardenia de; Cavalcante Freire, Paulo Tarso; Majchrowski, Andrzej

    2015-08-15

    High-pressure Raman scattering studies revealed that BaHf(BO{sub 3}){sub 2} is more compressible than calcite-type orthoborates and calcite, aragonite or dolomite carbonates. It undergoes a first-order reversible pressure-induced phase transition in the 3.9–4.4 GPa pressure range. Second structural change is observed at 9.2 GPa. The intermediate phase is most likely trigonal. However, Raman results suggest increase in the number of distinct BO{sub 3} groups from two in the ambient pressure phase to at least three in the intermediate phase. This intermediate phase is also strongly compressible and strong pressure dependence of the lattice modes proves that the main changes under pressure occur within the layers built from BaO{sub 6} and HfO{sub 6} octahedra. The second phase transition leads most likely to lowering of the trigonal symmetry, as evidenced by significant increase of the number of observed bands. The pressure coefficients of the Raman bands of the high-pressure phase are relatively small, suggesting more dense arrangement of the metal–oxygen polyhedra and BO{sub 3} groups in this phase. It is worth noting that the high-pressure phase was not reached in the second compression experiment up to 10 GPa. This behavior can be most likely attributed to worse hydrostatic conditions of the first experiment. - Graphical abstract: Raman spectra of BaHf(BO{sub 3}){sub 2} recorded at different pressures during compression showing onset of pressure-induced phase transitions. - Highlights: • High-pressure Raman spectra were measured for BaHf(BO{sub 3}){sub 2.} • BaHf(BO{sub 3}){sub 2} undergoes a reversible first-order phase transition at 3.9–4.4 GPa into a trigonal phase. • The intermediate trigonal phase is strongly compressible second structural transformation is observed at 9.2 GPa under non-perfect hydrostatic conditions.

  14. Upper atmospheric effects of the hf active auroral research program ionospheric research instrument (HAARP IRI)

    SciTech Connect

    Eccles, V.; Armstrong, R.

    1993-05-01

    The earth's ozone layer occurs in the stratosphere, primarily between 10 and 30 miles altitude. The amount of ozone, O3, present is the result of a balance between production and destruction processes. Experiments have shown that natural processes such as auroras create molecules that destroy O. One family of such molecules is called odd nitrogen of which nitric oxide (NO) is an example. Because the HAARP (HF Active Auroral Research Program) facility is designed to mimic and investigate certain natural processes, a study of possible effects of HAARP on the ozone layer was conducted. The study used a detailed model of the thermal and chemical effects of the high power HF beam, which interacts with free electrons in the upper atmosphere above 50 miles altitude. It was found only a small fraction of the beam energy goes into the production of odd nitrogen molecules, whereas odd nitrogen is efficiently produced by auroras. Since the total energy emitted by HAARP in the year is some 200,000 times less than the energy deposited in the upper atmosphere by auroras, the study demonstrates that HAARP HF beam experiments will cause no measurable depletion of the earth's ozone layer.... Ozone, Ozone depletion, Ozone layer, Odd nitrogen, Nitric oxide, HAARP Emitter characteristics.

  15. First principles simulation of a superionic phase of hydrogen fluoride (HF) at high pressures and temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, N; Fried, L E

    2006-04-10

    The authors have conducted Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of hydrogen fluoride (HF) at pressures of 5-66 GPa along the 900 K isotherm. They predict a superionic phase at 33 GPa, where the fluorine atoms are fixed in a bcc lattice while the hydrogen atoms diffuse rapidly with a diffusion constant of between 2 x 10{sup -5} and 5 x 10{sup -5} cm{sup 2}/s. They find that a transformation from asymmetric to symmetric hydrogen bonding occurs in HF at 66 GPa and 900 K. With superionic HF they have discovered a model system where symmetric hydrogen bonding occurs at experimentally achievable conditions. Given previous results on superionic H{sub 2}O[1,2,3] and NH{sub 3}[1], they conclude that high P,T superionic phases of electronegative element hydrides could be common.

  16. An Atmospheric Pressure Ping-Pong "Ballometer"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kazachkov, Alexander; Kryuchkov, Dmitriy; Willis, Courtney; Moore, John C.

    2006-01-01

    Classroom experiments on atmospheric pressure focus largely on demonstrating its existence, often in a most impressive way. A series of amusing physics demonstrations is widely known and practiced by educators teaching the topic. However, measuring the value of atmospheric pressure(P[subscript atm]) is generally done in a rather mundane way,…

  17. The Dawn of Atmospheric-pressure Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Shigeru

    As never before, atmospheric-pressure plasma technology is poised to transform the world of plasma processing. Many corporate and academic researchers are betting that the future holds tremendous opportunity for atmospheric-pressure plasma, which offers low cost and sometimes surprisingly high performance. A recent example of research is presented.

  18. Determining Atmospheric Pressure Using a Water Barometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohrengel, C. Frederick; Larson, Paul R.

    2012-12-01

    The atmosphere is an envelope of compressible gases that surrounds Earth. Because of its compressibility and nonuniform heating by the Sun, it is in constant motion. The atmosphere exerts pressure on Earth's surface, but that pressure is in constant flux. This experiment allows students to directly measure atmospheric pressure by measuring the mass of the water that is used as the fluid medium in the barometer. Simple calculations based upon the mass of water collected from the barometer yield the mass of the atmosphere per square unit of area at the site where the experiment is conducted.

  19. Does low atmospheric pressure independently trigger migraine?

    PubMed

    Bolay, Hayrunnisa; Rapoport, Alan

    2011-10-01

    Although atmospheric weather changes are often listed among the common migraine triggers, studies to determine the specific weather component(s) responsible have yielded inconsistent results. Atmospheric pressure change produces air movement, and low pressure in particular is associated with warm weather, winds, clouds, dust, and precipitation, but how this effect might generate migraine is not immediately obvious. Humans are exposed to low atmospheric pressure in situations such as ascent to high altitude or traveling by airplane in a pressurized cabin. In this brief overview, we consider those conditions and experimental data delineating other elements in the atmosphere potentially related to migraine (such as Saharan dust). We conclude that the available data suggest low atmospheric pressure unaccompanied by other factors does not trigger migraine.

  20. Does low atmospheric pressure independently trigger migraine?

    PubMed

    Bolay, Hayrunnisa; Rapoport, Alan

    2011-10-01

    Although atmospheric weather changes are often listed among the common migraine triggers, studies to determine the specific weather component(s) responsible have yielded inconsistent results. Atmospheric pressure change produces air movement, and low pressure in particular is associated with warm weather, winds, clouds, dust, and precipitation, but how this effect might generate migraine is not immediately obvious. Humans are exposed to low atmospheric pressure in situations such as ascent to high altitude or traveling by airplane in a pressurized cabin. In this brief overview, we consider those conditions and experimental data delineating other elements in the atmosphere potentially related to migraine (such as Saharan dust). We conclude that the available data suggest low atmospheric pressure unaccompanied by other factors does not trigger migraine. PMID:21906054

  1. Pressure-induced phase transitions in acentric BaHf(BO3)2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mączka, Mirosław; Szymborska-Małek, Katarzyna; Sousa Pinheiro, Gardenia de; Cavalcante Freire, Paulo Tarso; Majchrowski, Andrzej

    2015-08-01

    High-pressure Raman scattering studies revealed that BaHf(BO3)2 is more compressible than calcite-type orthoborates and calcite, aragonite or dolomite carbonates. It undergoes a first-order reversible pressure-induced phase transition in the 3.9-4.4 GPa pressure range. Second structural change is observed at 9.2 GPa. The intermediate phase is most likely trigonal. However, Raman results suggest increase in the number of distinct BO3 groups from two in the ambient pressure phase to at least three in the intermediate phase. This intermediate phase is also strongly compressible and strong pressure dependence of the lattice modes proves that the main changes under pressure occur within the layers built from BaO6 and HfO6 octahedra. The second phase transition leads most likely to lowering of the trigonal symmetry, as evidenced by significant increase of the number of observed bands. The pressure coefficients of the Raman bands of the high-pressure phase are relatively small, suggesting more dense arrangement of the metal-oxygen polyhedra and BO3 groups in this phase. It is worth noting that the high-pressure phase was not reached in the second compression experiment up to 10 GPa. This behavior can be most likely attributed to worse hydrostatic conditions of the first experiment.

  2. Evaporation of urea at atmospheric pressure.

    PubMed

    Bernhard, Andreas M; Czekaj, Izabela; Elsener, Martin; Wokaun, Alexander; Kröcher, Oliver

    2011-03-31

    Aqueous urea solution is widely used as reducing agent in the selective catalytic reduction of NO(x) (SCR). Because reports of urea vapor at atmospheric pressure are rare, gaseous urea is usually neglected in computational models used for designing SCR systems. In this study, urea evaporation was investigated under flow reactor conditions, and a Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrum of gaseous urea was recorded at atmospheric pressure for the first time. The spectrum was compared to literature data under vacuum conditions and with theoretical spectra of monomolecular and dimeric urea in the gas phase calculated with the density functional theory (DFT) method. Comparison of the spectra indicates that urea vapor is in the monomolecular form at atmospheric pressure. The measured vapor pressure of urea agrees with the thermodynamic data obtained under vacuum reported in the literature. Our results indicate that considering gaseous urea will improve the computational modeling of urea SCR systems.

  3. Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Process And Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Peter C. Kong; Myrtle

    2006-09-01

    This paper provides a general discussion of atmospheric-pressure plasma generation, processes, and applications. There are two distinct categories of atmospheric-pressure plasmas: thermal and nonthermal. Thermal atmospheric-pressure plasmas include those produced in high intensity arcs, plasma torches, or in high intensity, high frequency discharges. Although nonthermal plasmas are at room temperatures, they are extremely effective in producing activated species, e.g., free radicals and excited state atoms. Thus, both thermal and nonthermal atmosphericpressure plasmas are finding applications in a wide variety of industrial processes, e.g. waste destruction, material recovery, extractive metallurgy, powder synthesis, and energy conversion. A brief discussion of recent plasma technology research and development activities at the Idaho National Laboratory is included.

  4. Graphene Membranes for Atmospheric Pressure Photoelectron Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Weatherup, Robert S; Eren, Baran; Hao, Yibo; Bluhm, Hendrik; Salmeron, Miquel B

    2016-05-01

    Atmospheric pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is demonstrated using single-layer graphene membranes as photoelectron-transparent barriers that sustain pressure differences in excess of 6 orders of magnitude. The graphene serves as a support for catalyst nanoparticles under atmospheric pressure reaction conditions (up to 1.5 bar), where XPS allows the oxidation state of Cu nanoparticles and gas phase species to be simultaneously probed. We thereby observe that the Cu(2+) oxidation state is stable in O2 (1 bar) but is spontaneously reduced under vacuum. We further demonstrate the detection of various gas-phase species (Ar, CO, CO2, N2, O2) in the pressure range 10-1500 mbar including species with low photoionization cross sections (He, H2). Pressure-dependent changes in the apparent binding energies of gas-phase species are observed, attributable to changes in work function of the metal-coated grids supporting the graphene. We expect atmospheric pressure XPS based on this graphene membrane approach to be a valuable tool for studying nanoparticle catalysis.

  5. Stabilization of HfB12 in Y1-xHfxB12 under Ambient Pressure.

    PubMed

    Akopov, Georgiy; Yeung, Michael T; Turner, Christopher L; Li, Rebecca L; Kaner, Richard B

    2016-05-16

    Alloys of metal dodecaborides-YB12 with HfB12-were prepared via arc-melting in order to stabilize the metastable HfB12 high-pressure phase under ambient pressure. Previously, HfB12 had been synthesized only under high-pressure (6.5 GPa). Powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) were used to confirm the purity and phase composition of the prepared samples. The solubility limit for HfB12 in Y1-xHfxB12 (cubic UB12 structure type) was determined to be ∼35 at. % Hf by PXRD and EDS analysis. The value of the cubic unit cell parameter (a) changed from 7.505 Å (pure YB12) to 7.454 Å across the solid solution range. Vickers hardness increased from 40.9 ± 1.6 GPa for pure YB12 to 45.0 ± 1.9 GPa under an applied load of 0.49 N for the Y1-xHfxB12 solid solution composition with ∼28 at. % Hf, suggesting both solid solution hardening and extrinsic hardening due to the formation of secondary phases of hafnium. PMID:27115173

  6. Atmospheric pressure femtosecond laser imaging mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coello, Yves; Gunaratne, Tissa C.; Dantus, Marcos

    2009-02-01

    We present a novel imaging mass spectrometry technique that uses femtosecond laser pulses to directly ionize the sample. The method offers significant advantages over current techniques by eliminating the need of a laser-absorbing sample matrix, being suitable for atmospheric pressure sampling, and by providing 10μm resolution, as demonstrated here with a chemical image of vegetable cell walls.

  7. Air circulation under reduced atmospheric pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillhouse, Lendell E.

    The control of heat exchange is vital for plant life in off-world, low pressure, greenhouses. The ability to control this process was limited by methodology and technology. Mathematical models, based on classical mechanics are created to enhance our control capabilities. Data is collected using various sensors placed inside the Low Pressure Test Bed (LPTB) Chamber at Kennedy Space Center. Data from those sensors became non-linear at various pressures below 25 kPa. We introduced mathematical calibration corrections and found that sensor data linearity could be extended to a greater range of pressures. These calibration corrections allow for sensor calibration corrections in operational environments that differ from the environment of calibration (normal Earth atmospheric pressure).

  8. Response of cyanobacteria to low atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Lifeng; Yu, Qingni; Ai, Weidang; Tang, Yongkang; Ren, Jin; Guo, Shuangsheng

    2014-10-01

    Maintaining a low pressure environment in a controlled ecological life support system would reduce the technological complexity and resupply cost in the course of the construction of a future manned lunar base. To estimate the effect of a hypobaric environment in a lunar base on biological components, such as higher plants, microbes, and algae, cyanobacteria was used as the model by determining their response of growth, morphology, and physiology when exposed to half of standard atmospheric pressure for 16 days (brought back to standard atmospheric pressure 30 minutes every two days for sampling). The results indicated that the decrease of atmospheric pressure from 100 kPa to 50 kPa reduced the growth rates of Microcystis aeruginosa, Merismopedia sp., Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, and Anabaena flos-aquae. The ratio of carotenoid to chlorophyll a content in the four tested strains increased under low pressure conditions compared to ambient conditions, resulting from the decrease of chlorophyll a and the increase of carotenoid in the cells. Moreover, low pressure induced the reduction of the phycocyanin content in Microcystis aeruginosa, Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, and Anabaena flos-aquae. The result from the ultrastructure observed using SEM indicated that low pressure promoted the production of more extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs) compared to ambient conditions. The results implied that the low pressure environment of 50 kPa in a future lunar base would induce different effects on biological components in a CELSS, which must be considered during the course of designing a future lunar base. The results will be a reference for exploring the response of other biological components, such as plants, microbes, and animals, living in the life support system of a lunar base.

  9. Large area atmospheric-pressure plasma jet

    DOEpatents

    Selwyn, Gary S.; Henins, Ivars; Babayan, Steve E.; Hicks, Robert F.

    2001-01-01

    Large area atmospheric-pressure plasma jet. A plasma discharge that can be operated at atmospheric pressure and near room temperature using 13.56 MHz rf power is described. Unlike plasma torches, the discharge produces a gas-phase effluent no hotter than 250.degree. C. at an applied power of about 300 W, and shows distinct non-thermal characteristics. In the simplest design, two planar, parallel electrodes are employed to generate a plasma in the volume therebetween. A "jet" of long-lived metastable and reactive species that are capable of rapidly cleaning or etching metals and other materials is generated which extends up to 8 in. beyond the open end of the electrodes. Films and coatings may also be removed by these species. Arcing is prevented in the apparatus by using gas mixtures containing He, which limits ionization, by using high flow velocities, and by properly spacing the rf-powered electrode. Because of the atmospheric pressure operation, there is a negligible density of ions surviving for a sufficiently long distance beyond the active plasma discharge to bombard a workpiece, unlike the situation for low-pressure plasma sources and conventional plasma processing methods.

  10. Protein destruction by atmospheric pressure glow discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, X. T.; Shi, J. J.; Chen, H. L.; Kong, M. G.

    2007-01-01

    It is well established that atmospheric pressure glow discharges are capable of bacterial inactivation. Much less known is their ability to destruct infectious proteins, even though surgical instruments are often contaminated by both bacteria and proteinaceous matters. In this letter, the authors present a study of protein destruction using a low-temperature atmospheric dielectric-barrier discharge jet. Clear evidences of protein removal are presented with data of several complimentary experiments using scanning electron microscopy, electron dispersive x-ray analysis, electrophoresis, laser-induced fluorescence microscopy, and protein reduction kinetics. Considerable degradation is observed of protein fragments that remain on their substrate surface after plasma treatment.

  11. Low surface pressure models for Titan's atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caldwell, J.

    1978-01-01

    The inversion model for the atmosphere of Titan is reviewed. The basic features of the model are: a cold surface (80 K), a warm stratosphere (160 K) and a low surface pressure (20 mbar). The model is consistent with all existing thermal infrared spectrophotometry, but it cannot preclude the existence of an opaque, cloud, thick atmosphere. The model excludes other gases than methane as bulk constituents. Radio wavelengths observations, including recent data from the very large array, are discussed. These long wavelength observations may be the only direct means of sampling the surface environment before an entry probe or flyby.

  12. Research on atmospheric pressure plasma processing sewage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Gui-cai; Na, Yan-xiang; Dong, Xiao-long; Sun, Xiao-liang

    2013-08-01

    The water pollution has become more and more serious with the industrial progress and social development, so it become a worldwide leading environmental management problem to human survival and personal health, therefore, countries are looking for the best solution. Generally speaking, in this paper the work has the following main achievements and innovation: (1) Developed a new plasma device--Plasma Water Bed. (2) At atmospheric pressure condition, use oxygen, nitrogen, argon and helium as work gas respectively, use fiber spectrometer to atmospheric pressure plasma discharge the emission spectrum of measurement, due to the different work gas producing active particle is different, so can understand discharge, different particle activity, in the treatment of wastewater, has the different degradation effects. (3) Methyl violet solution treatment by plasma water bed. Using plasma drafting make active particles and waste leachate role, observe the decolorization, measurement of ammonia nitrogen removal.

  13. A microwave pressure sounder. [for remote measurement of atmospheric pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peckham, G. E.; Flower, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    A technique for the remote measurement of atmospheric surface pressure will be described. Such measurements could be made from a satellite in polar orbit and would cover many areas for which conventional meteorological data are not available. An active microwave instrument is used to measure the strength of return echoes from the ocean surface at a number of frequencies near the 60 GHz oxygen absorption band. Factors which affect the accuracy with which surface pressure can be deduced from these measurements will be discussed and an instrument designed to test the method by making measurements from an aircraft will be described.

  14. Special issue: diagnostics of atmospheric pressure microplasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruggeman, Peter; Czarnetzki, Uwe; Tachibana, Kunihide

    2013-11-01

    In recent decades, a strong revival of non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma studies has developed in the form of microplasmas. Microplasmas have typical scales of 1 mm or less and offer a very exciting research direction in the field of plasma science and technology as the discharge physics can be considerably different due to high collisionality and the importance of plasma-surface interaction. These high-pressure small-scale plasmas have a diverse range of physical and chemical properties. This diversity coincides with various applications including light/UV sources [1], material processing [2], chemical analysis [3], material synthesis [4], electromagnetics [5], combustion [6] and even medicine [7]. At atmospheric pressure, large scale plasmas have the tendency to become unstable due to the high collision rates leading to enhanced heating and ionization compared to their low-pressure counterparts. As low-pressure plasmas typically operate in reactors with sizes of tens of centimetres, scaling up the pressure to atmospheric pressure the size of the plasma reduces to typical sizes below 1 mm. A natural approach of stabilizing atmospheric pressure plasmas is thus the use of microelectrode geometries. Traditionally microplasmas have been produced in confined geometries which allow one to stabilize dc excited discharges. This stabilization is intrinsically connected to the large surface-to-volume ratio which enhances heat transfer and losses of charged and excited species to the walls. Currently challenging boundaries are pushed by producing microcavity geometries with dimensions of the order of 1 µm [8]. The subject of this special issue, diagnostics of microplasmas, is motivated by the many challenges in microplasma diagnostics in view of the complex chemistry and strong spatial (and even temporal) gradients of species densities and plasma properties. Atmospheric pressure plasmas have a very long history dating back more than 100 years, with early work of

  15. Martian Atmospheric Pressure Static Charge Elimination Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johansen, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    A Martian pressure static charge elimination tool is currently in development in the Electrostatics and Surface Physics Laboratory (ESPL) at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. In standard Earth atmosphere conditions, static charge can be neutralized from an insulating surface using air ionizers. These air ionizers generate ions through corona breakdown. The Martian atmosphere is 7 Torr of mostly carbon dioxide, which makes it inherently difficult to use similar methods as those used for standard atmosphere static elimination tools. An initial prototype has been developed to show feasibility of static charge elimination at low pressure, using corona discharge. A needle point and thin wire loop are used as the corona generating electrodes. A photo of the test apparatus is shown below. Positive and negative high voltage pulses are sent to the needle point. This creates positive and negative ions that can be used for static charge neutralization. In a preliminary test, a floating metal plate was charged to approximately 600 volts under Martian atmospheric conditions. The static elimination tool was enabled and the voltage on the metal plate dropped rapidly to -100 volts. This test data is displayed below. Optimization is necessary to improve the electrostatic balance of the static elimination tool.

  16. First-principles study on the structural and electronic properties of metallic HfH2 under pressure

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yunxian; Huang, Xiaoli; Duan, Defang; Tian, Fubo; Liu, Hanyu; Li, Da; Zhao, Zhonglong; Sha, Xiaojing; Yu, Hongyu; Zhang, Huadi; Liu, Bingbing; Cui, Tian

    2015-01-01

    The crystal structures and properties of hafnium hydride under pressure are explored using the first-principles calculations based on density function theory. The material undergoes pressure-induced structural phase transition I4/mmm→Cmma→P21/m at 180 and 250 GPa, respectively, and all of these structures are metallic. The superconducting critical temperature Tc values of I4/mmm, Cmma, and P21/m are 47–193 mK, 5.99–8.16 K and 10.62–12.8 K at 1 atm, 180 and 260 GPa, respectively. Furthermore, the bonding nature of HfH2 is investigated with the help of the electron localization function, the difference charge density and Bader charge analyses, which show that HfH2 is classified as a ionic crystal with the charges transferring from Hf atom to H. PMID:26096298

  17. Atmospheric pressure scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    de Jonge, Niels; Bigelow, Wilbur C; Veith, Gabriel M

    2010-03-10

    Scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) images of gold nanoparticles at atmospheric pressure have been recorded through a 0.36 mm thick mixture of CO, O2, and He. This was accomplished using a reaction cell consisting of two electron-transparent silicon nitride membranes. Gold nanoparticles of a full width at half-maximum diameter of 1.0 nm were visible above the background noise, and the achieved edge resolution was 0.4 nm in accordance with calculations of the beam broadening.

  18. Healing burns using atmospheric pressure plasma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Takamichi; Kishimoto, Takumi; Tsutsui, Chihiro; Kanai, Takao; Mori, Akira

    2014-01-01

    An experiment testing the effects of plasma irradiation with an atmospheric-pressure plasma (APP) reactor on rats given burns showed no evidence of electric shock injuries upon pathology inspection of the irradiated skin surface. In fact, the observed evidence of healing and improvement of the burns suggested healing effects from plasma irradiation. The quantities of neovascular vessels in the living tissues at 7 days were 9.2 ± 0.77 mm-2 without treatment and 18.4 ± 2.9 mm-2 after plasma irradiation.

  19. Nanocapillary Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet: A Tool for Ultrafine Maskless Surface Modification at Atmospheric Pressure.

    PubMed

    Motrescu, Iuliana; Nagatsu, Masaaki

    2016-05-18

    With respect to microsized surface functionalization techniques we proposed the use of a maskless, versatile, simple tool, represented by a nano- or microcapillary atmospheric pressure plasma jet for producing microsized controlled etching, chemical vapor deposition, and chemical modification patterns on polymeric surfaces. In this work we show the possibility of size-controlled surface amination, and we discuss it as a function of different processing parameters. Moreover, we prove the successful connection of labeled sugar chains on the functionalized microscale patterns, indicating the possibility to use ultrafine capillary atmospheric pressure plasma jets as versatile tools for biosensing, tissue engineering, and related biomedical applications.

  20. Mass spectrometry of atmospheric pressure plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Große-Kreul, S.; Hübner, S.; Schneider, S.; Ellerweg, D.; von Keudell, A.; Matejčík, S.; Benedikt, J.

    2015-08-01

    Atmospheric pressure non-equilibrium plasmas (APPs) are effective source of radicals, metastables and a variety of ions and photons, ranging into the vacuum UV spectral region. A detailed study of these species is important to understand and tune desired effects during the interaction of APPs with solid or liquid materials in industrial or medical applications. In this contribution, the opportunities and challenges of mass spectrometry for detection of neutrals and ions from APPs, fundamental physical phenomena related to the sampling process and their impact on the measured densities of neutrals and fluxes of ions, will be discussed. It is shown that the measurement of stable neutrals and radicals requires a proper experimental design to reduce the beam-to-background ratio, to have little beam distortion during expansion into vacuum and to carefully set the electron energy in the ionizer to avoid radical formation through dissociative ionization. The measured ion composition depends sensitively on the degree of impurities present in the feed gas as well as on the setting of the ion optics used for extraction of ions from the expanding neutral-ion mixture. The determination of the ion energy is presented as a method to show that the analyzed ions are originating from the atmospheric pressure plasma.

  1. Analytical vacuum force, atmospheric pressure dispute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yongquan, Han

    Typically, the gap gas molecules is 10-9 m, since the center speed of the tornado is over 100 m / sec, it divided by the speed of a tornado, the gap of the gas molecules becomes 10-11m. Equivalent to the gap when there is no tornado that the gas molecules allow radiation to pass through, equivalent to the gap is reduced gas molecules 100 times by a tornado. There is no change in the Earth's radiate, the Earth's radiation is reduced to one percent of the original intensity by the radiation through the tornado periphery into the center of the tornado. According to the APS Division of Nuclear Physics in APS -2013 Fall Meeting - Event - Gravitational radiation theory http://meetings.aps.org/Meeting/DNP13/Session/FB.8, which I published, the gravity will br reduced to the original gravity percentage one. Waterspout by the Earth's gravity to become the original one percent. Cause the external of the tornadoes atmospheric pressure is constant, the height waterspout should support column height atmospheric pressure is 100 times,that height waterspout may reach nearly kilometers.

  2. Electron heating in atmospheric pressure glow discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, Robert H.; Schoenbach, Karl H.

    2001-04-01

    The application of nanosecond voltage pulses to weakly ionized atmospheric pressure plasmas allows heating the electrons without considerably increasing the gas temperature, provided that the duration of the pulses is less than the critical time for the development of glow-to-arc transitions. The shift in the electron energy distribution towards higher energies causes a temporary increase in the ionization rate, and consequently a strong rise in electron density. This increase in electron density is reflected in an increased decay time of the plasma after the pulse application. Experiments in atmospheric pressure air glow discharges with gas temperatures of approximately 2000 K have been performed to explore the electron heating effect. Measurements of the temporal development of the voltage across the discharge and the optical emission in the visible after applying a 10 ns high voltage pulse to a weakly ionized steady state plasma demonstrated increasing plasma decay times from tens of nanoseconds to microseconds when the pulsed electric field was raised from 10 to 40 kV/cm. Temporally resolved photographs of the discharge have shown that the plasma column expands during this process. The nonlinear electron heating effect can be used to reduce the power consumption in a repetitively operated air plasma considerably compared to a dc plasma operation. Besides allowing power reduction, pulsed electron heating also has the potential to enhance plasma processes, which require elevated electron energies, such as excimer generation for ultraviolet lamps.

  3. Response of cyanobacteria to low atmosphere pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Lifeng; Ai, Weidang; Guo, Shuangsheng; Tang, Yongkang; Yu, Qingni; Shen, Yunze; Ren, Jin

    Maintaining a low pressure environment would reduce the technological complexity and constructed cost of future lunar base. To estimate the effect of hypobaric of controlled ecological life support system in lunar base on terrestrial life, cyanobacteria was used as the model to exam the response of growth, morphology, physiology to it. The decrease of atmosphere pressure from 100 KPa to 50 KPa reducing the growth rates of Microcystis aeruginosa, Merismopedia.sp, Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, Anabaena Hos-aquae, the chlorophyll a content in Microcystis aeruginosa, Merismopedia.sp, Anabaena Hos-aquae, the carotenoid content in Microcystis aeruginosa, Merismopedia.sp and Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, the phycocyanin content in Microcystis aeruginosa. This study explored the biological characteristics of the cyanobacteria under low pressure condition, which aimed at understanding the response of the earth's life to environment for the future moon base, the results enrich the research contents of the lunar biology and may be referred for the research of other terrestrial life, such as human, plant, microbe and animal living in life support system of lunar base.

  4. Propagation of an atmospheric pressure plasma plume

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, X.; Xiong, Q.; Xiong, Z.; Hu, J.; Zhou, F.; Gong, W.; Xian, Y.; Zou, C.; Tang, Z.; Jiang, Z.; Pan, Y.

    2009-02-15

    The ''plasma bullet'' behavior of atmospheric pressure plasma plumes has recently attracted significant interest. In this paper, a specially designed plasma jet device is used to study this phenomenon. It is found that a helium primary plasma can propagate through the wall of a dielectric tube and keep propagating inside the dielectric tube (secondary plasma). High-speed photographs show that the primary plasma disappears before the secondary plasma starts to propagate. Both plumes propagate at a hypersonic speed. Detailed studies on the dynamics of the plasma plumes show that the local electric field induced by the charges on the surface of the dielectric tube plays an important role in the ignition of the secondary plasma. This indicates that the propagation of the plasma plumes may be attributed to the local electric field induced by the charges in the bulletlike plasma volume.

  5. Structure formation of atmospheric pressure discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedev, Alexey E.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper it is shown, by analyzing the results of experimental studies, that the outer boundary of the atmospheric pressure discharge pinch is determined by the condition of equality of plasma flows based on the thermal and electric field energy. In most cases, the number of charged particles coming from near-electrode zones is sufficient to compensate for losses in the discharge bulk. At large currents and enhanced heating, plasma is in the diffusion mode of losses, with recombination of charged particles at the pinch boundary. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Recent Breakthroughs in Microplasma Science and Technology", edited by Kurt Becker, Jose Lopez, David Staack, Klaus-Dieter Weltmann and Wei Dong Zhu.

  6. Atmospheric pressure variation and the climate of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gierasch, P. J.; Toon, O. B.

    1973-01-01

    If Mars has permanent CO2 polar caps, atmospheric heat transport may cause the atmospheric pressure to be extremely sensitive to variations of solar heating at the poles. This could happen because atmospheric heating depends on density, which depends strongly on the polar temperature through the vapor pressure relation. A simple climatological model is used to study the question.

  7. Special issue: diagnostics of atmospheric pressure microplasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruggeman, Peter; Czarnetzki, Uwe; Tachibana, Kunihide

    2013-11-01

    In recent decades, a strong revival of non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma studies has developed in the form of microplasmas. Microplasmas have typical scales of 1 mm or less and offer a very exciting research direction in the field of plasma science and technology as the discharge physics can be considerably different due to high collisionality and the importance of plasma-surface interaction. These high-pressure small-scale plasmas have a diverse range of physical and chemical properties. This diversity coincides with various applications including light/UV sources [1], material processing [2], chemical analysis [3], material synthesis [4], electromagnetics [5], combustion [6] and even medicine [7]. At atmospheric pressure, large scale plasmas have the tendency to become unstable due to the high collision rates leading to enhanced heating and ionization compared to their low-pressure counterparts. As low-pressure plasmas typically operate in reactors with sizes of tens of centimetres, scaling up the pressure to atmospheric pressure the size of the plasma reduces to typical sizes below 1 mm. A natural approach of stabilizing atmospheric pressure plasmas is thus the use of microelectrode geometries. Traditionally microplasmas have been produced in confined geometries which allow one to stabilize dc excited discharges. This stabilization is intrinsically connected to the large surface-to-volume ratio which enhances heat transfer and losses of charged and excited species to the walls. Currently challenging boundaries are pushed by producing microcavity geometries with dimensions of the order of 1 µm [8]. The subject of this special issue, diagnostics of microplasmas, is motivated by the many challenges in microplasma diagnostics in view of the complex chemistry and strong spatial (and even temporal) gradients of species densities and plasma properties. Atmospheric pressure plasmas have a very long history dating back more than 100 years, with early work of

  8. Cold plasma brush generated at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Duan Yixiang; Huang, C.; Yu, Q. S.

    2007-01-15

    A cold plasma brush is generated at atmospheric pressure with low power consumption in the level of several watts (as low as 4 W) up to tens of watts (up to 45 W). The plasma can be ignited and sustained in both continuous and pulsed modes with different plasma gases such as argon or helium, but argon was selected as a primary gas for use in this work. The brush-shaped plasma is formed and extended outside of the discharge chamber with typical dimension of 10-15 mm in width and less than 1.0 mm in thickness, which are adjustable by changing the discharge chamber design and operating conditions. The brush-shaped plasma provides some unique features and distinct nonequilibrium plasma characteristics. Temperature measurements using a thermocouple thermometer showed that the gas phase temperatures of the plasma brush are close to room temperature (as low as 42 deg. C) when running with a relatively high gas flow rate of about 3500 ml/min. For an argon plasma brush, the operating voltage from less than 500 V to about 2500 V was tested, with an argon gas flow rate varied from less than 1000 to 3500 ml/min. The cold plasma brush can most efficiently use the discharge power as well as the plasma gas for material and surface treatment. The very low power consumption of such an atmospheric argon plasma brush provides many unique advantages in practical applications including battery-powered operation and use in large-scale applications. Several polymer film samples were tested for surface treatment with the newly developed device, and successful changes of the wettability property from hydrophobic to hydrophilic were achieved within a few seconds.

  9. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure measurements on radio frequency magnetron sputtered HfO2 thin films deposited with different oxygen partial pressures.

    PubMed

    Maidul Haque, S; Nayak, C; Bhattacharyya, Dibyendu; Jha, S N; Sahoo, N K

    2016-03-20

    Two sets of HfO2 thin film have been deposited by the radio frequency magnetron sputtering technique at various oxygen partial pressures, one set without any substrate bias and another set with a 50 W pulsed dc substrate bias. The films have been characterized by extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurements at the Hf L3 edge, and the structural information obtained from analysis of the EXAFS data has been used to explain the macroscopic behavior of the refractive index obtained from spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements. It has been observed that the variation of refractive index with oxygen partial pressure depends on the Hf-Hf bond length for the set of films deposited without substrate bias, while for the other set of films deposited with pulsed dc substrate bias, it depends on the oxygen coordination of the nearest neighbor shell surrounding Hf sites.

  10. Atmospheric Pressure Glow Discharge with Liquid Electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tochikubo, Fumiyoshi

    2013-09-01

    Nonthermal atmospheric pressure plasmas in contact with liquid are widely studied aiming variety of plasma applications. DC glow discharge with liquid electrode is an easy method to obtain simple and stable plasma-liquid interface. When we focus attention on liquid-phase reaction, the discharge system is considered as electrolysis with plasma electrode. The plasma electrode will supply electrons and positive ions to the liquid surface in a different way from the conventional metal electrode. However, the phenomena at plasma-liquid interface have not been understood well. In this work, we studied physical and chemical effect in liquid induced by dc atmospheric pressure glow discharge with liquid electrode. The experiment was carried out using H-shaped Hoffman electrolysis apparatus filled with electrolyte, to separate the anodic and cathodic reactions. Two nozzle electrodes made of stainless steel are set about 2 mm above the liquid surface. By applying a dc voltage between the nozzle electrodes, dc glow discharges as plasma electrodes are generated in contact with liquid. As electrolyte, we used aqueous solutions of NaCl, Na2SO4, AgNO3 and HAuCl4. AgNO3 and HAuCl4 are to discuss the reduction process of metal ions for synthesis of nanoparticles (NPs). OH radical generation yield in liquid was measured by chemical probe method using terephthalic acid. Discharge-induced liquid flow was visualized by Schlieren method. Electron irradiation to liquid surface (plasma cathode) generated OH- and OH radical in liquid while positive ion irradiation (plasma anode) generated H+ and OH radical. The generation efficiency of OH radical was better with plasma anode. Both Ag NPs in AgNO3 and Au NPs in HAuCl4 were synthesized with plasma cathode while only Au NPs were generated with plasma anode. Possible reaction process is qualitatively discussed. The discharge-induced liquid flow such as convection pattern was strongly influenced by the gas flow on the liquid surface. This work

  11. Stability measurements of PPL atmospheric pressure arc

    SciTech Connect

    Roquemore, L.; Zweben, S.J.; Wurden, G.A.

    1997-12-31

    Experiments on the stability of atmospheric pressure arcs have been started at PPL to understand and improve the performance of arc furnaces used for processing applications in metallurgy and hazardous waste treatment. Previous studies have suggested that the violent instabilities in such arcs may be due to kink modes. A 30 kW, 500 Amp CW DC experimental arc furnace was constructed with a graphite cathode and a molten steel anode. The arc plasma is diagnosed with 4000 frames/sec digital camera, Hall probes, and voltage and current monitors. Under certain conditions, the arc exhibits an intermittent helical instability, with the helix rotating at {approx}600 Hz. The nature of the instability is investigated. A possible instability mechanism is the self-magnetic field of the arc, with saturation occurring due to inhomogeneous heating in a helical arc. The effect of external DC and AC magnetic fields on the instability is investigated. Additionally, arc deflection due to external transverse magnetic field is investigated. The deflection angle is found to be proportional to the applied field, and is in good agreement with a simple model of the {rvec J} x {rvec b} force on the arc jet.

  12. High pressure phase transition and superconductivity in transition metal nitride HfN and ZrN: An ab-initio study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asvini Meenaatci, A. T.; prabha, S. Kanaga; palanichamy, R. Rajeswara; Iyakutti, K.

    2012-06-01

    The high pressure structural investigations of HfN and ZrN have been studies using ab initio calculations. It is predicted that ZrN undergoes a structural phase transition from NaCl to ZB structure at around 90.17GPa whereas there is no phase transition for HfN. However at higher pressure (at 108.67GPa) HfN undergo a phase transition from ZB to WC structure. Apart from this, the ground state properties, elastic constants and superconducting transition temperature are calculated and compared with the available results.

  13. The effect of atmospheric pressure on ventricular assist device output.

    PubMed

    Goto, Takeshi; Sato, Masaharu; Yamazaki, Akio; Fukuda, Wakako; Watanabe, Ken-Ichi; Daitoku, Kazuyuki; Minakawa, Masahito; Fukui, Kozo; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Fukuda, Ikuo

    2012-03-01

    The effect of cabin pressure change on the respiratory system during flight is well documented in the literature, but how the change in atmospheric pressure affects ventricular assist device (VAD) output flow has not been studied yet. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the change in VAD output using a mock circulatory system in a low-pressure chamber mimicking high altitude. Changes in output and driving pressure were measured during decompression from 1.0 to 0.7 atm and pressurization from 0.7 to 1.0 atm. Two driving systems were evaluated: the VCT system and the Mobart system. In the VCT system, output and driving pressure remained the same during decompression and pressurization. In the Mobart system, the output decreased as the atmospheric pressure dropped and recovered during pressurization. The lowest output was observed at 0.7 atm, which was 80% of the baseline driven by the Mobart system. Under a practical cabin pressure of 0.8 atm, the output driven by the Mobart system was 90% of the baseline. In the Mobart system, the output decreased as the atmospheric pressure dropped, and recovered during pressurization. However, the decrease in output was slight. In an environment where the atmospheric pressure changes, it is necessary to monitor the diaphragmatic motion of the blood pump and the driving air pressure, and to adjust the systolic:diastolic ratio as well as the positive and negative pressures in a VAD system.

  14. The effect of atmospheric pressure on ventricular assist device output.

    PubMed

    Goto, Takeshi; Sato, Masaharu; Yamazaki, Akio; Fukuda, Wakako; Watanabe, Ken-Ichi; Daitoku, Kazuyuki; Minakawa, Masahito; Fukui, Kozo; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Fukuda, Ikuo

    2012-03-01

    The effect of cabin pressure change on the respiratory system during flight is well documented in the literature, but how the change in atmospheric pressure affects ventricular assist device (VAD) output flow has not been studied yet. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the change in VAD output using a mock circulatory system in a low-pressure chamber mimicking high altitude. Changes in output and driving pressure were measured during decompression from 1.0 to 0.7 atm and pressurization from 0.7 to 1.0 atm. Two driving systems were evaluated: the VCT system and the Mobart system. In the VCT system, output and driving pressure remained the same during decompression and pressurization. In the Mobart system, the output decreased as the atmospheric pressure dropped and recovered during pressurization. The lowest output was observed at 0.7 atm, which was 80% of the baseline driven by the Mobart system. Under a practical cabin pressure of 0.8 atm, the output driven by the Mobart system was 90% of the baseline. In the Mobart system, the output decreased as the atmospheric pressure dropped, and recovered during pressurization. However, the decrease in output was slight. In an environment where the atmospheric pressure changes, it is necessary to monitor the diaphragmatic motion of the blood pump and the driving air pressure, and to adjust the systolic:diastolic ratio as well as the positive and negative pressures in a VAD system. PMID:21915797

  15. Carboxylation of Phenols with CO2 at Atmospheric Pressure.

    PubMed

    Luo, Junfei; Preciado, Sara; Xie, Pan; Larrosa, Igor

    2016-05-10

    A convenient and efficient method for the ortho-carboxylation of phenols under atmospheric CO2 pressure has been developed. This method provides an alternative to the previously reported Kolbe-Schmitt method, which requires very high pressures of CO2 . The addition of a trisubstituted phenol has proved essential for the successful carboxylation of phenols with CO2 at standard atmospheric pressure, allowing the efficient preparation of a broad variety of salicylic acids.

  16. Atmospheric Pressure Plasmas for Decontamination of Complex Medical Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; Winter, Jörn; Polak, Martin; Ehlbeck, Jörg; von Woedtke, Thomas

    Atmospheric pressure plasma sources produce a multiplicity of different antimicrobial agents and are applicable to even complicated geometries as well as to heat sensitive materials. Thus, atmospheric pressure plasmas have a huge potential for the decontamination of even complex medical devices like central venous catheters and endoscopes. In this paper we present practicable realizations of atmospheric pressure plasma sources, namely plasma jet, dielectric barrier discharge and microwave driven discharge that are able to penetrate fine lumen or are adaptable to difficult geometries. Furthermore, the antimicrobial efficacy of these sources is given for one example setup in each case.

  17. Atmospheric pressure changes and unexplained variability in INR measurements.

    PubMed

    Ernst, Michael E; Shaw, Robert F; Ernst, Erika J; Alexander, Bruce; Kaboli, Peter J

    2009-06-01

    Changes in atmospheric pressure may influence hepatic blood flow and drug metabolism. Anecdotal experience suggests international normalized ratio (INR) variability may be temporally related to significant atmospheric pressure changes. We investigated this potential association in a large sample of patients with multiple INRs. This is a retrospective review of outpatient anticoagulation records from the Iowa City Veteran's Affairs Medical Center and affiliated outpatient clinics from October 1999 to July 2007. All patients, receiving at least one prescription for warfarin and INR at least 30 days or more from the date of the first warfarin prescription, were identified. INRs during periods of hospitalization and vitamin K use were excluded. Proximity analysis using geocoding of ZIP codes of identified patients to the nearest National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration station was performed to assign atmospheric pressure with INR. Spearman's Rho and Pearson's correlation were used to evaluate atmospheric pressure and INR. Unique patients (1441) with 45 187 INRs were analyzed. When limited to nontherapeutic INRs following a previously therapeutic INR (1121 unique patients/5256 INRs), a small but clinically insignificant association between delta INR and delta atmospheric pressure was observed (r = -0.025; P = 0.038), but not for actual INR and atmospheric pressure (P = 0.06). Delta atmospheric pressure demonstrated greater variation during fall/winter months compared with spring/summer (0.23 vs. 0.15 inHg; P < 0.001); however, variability in INRs for the corresponding seasons was not significant (P = 0.136). No significant difference was detected in the proportions of nontherapeutic INRs among the different seasons (P = 0.371). No correlation was observed between atmospheric pressure changes and INR variability. These findings refute the anecdotal experience seen in our anticoagulation clinic.

  18. Measuring Viscosities of Gases at Atmospheric Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Jag J.; Mall, Gerald H.; Hoshang, Chegini

    1987-01-01

    Variant of general capillary method for measuring viscosities of unknown gases based on use of thermal mass-flowmeter section for direct measurement of pressure drops. In technique, flowmeter serves dual role, providing data for determining volume flow rates and serving as well-characterized capillary-tube section for measurement of differential pressures across it. New method simple, sensitive, and adaptable for absolute or relative viscosity measurements of low-pressure gases. Suited for very complex hydrocarbon mixtures where limitations of classical theory and compositional errors make theoretical calculations less reliable.

  19. Charge Exchange Reaction in Dopant-Assisted Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization and Atmospheric Pressure Photoionization.

    PubMed

    Vaikkinen, Anu; Kauppila, Tiina J; Kostiainen, Risto

    2016-08-01

    The efficiencies of charge exchange reaction in dopant-assisted atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (DA-APCI) and dopant-assisted atmospheric pressure photoionization (DA-APPI) mass spectrometry (MS) were compared by flow injection analysis. Fourteen individual compounds and a commercial mixture of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were chosen as model analytes to cover a wide range of polarities, gas-phase ionization energies, and proton affinities. Chlorobenzene was used as the dopant, and methanol/water (80/20) as the solvent. In both techniques, analytes formed the same ions (radical cations, protonated molecules, and/or fragments). However, in DA-APCI, the relative efficiency of charge exchange versus proton transfer was lower than in DA-APPI. This is suggested to be because in DA-APCI both dopant and solvent clusters can be ionized, and the formed reagent ions can react with the analytes via competing charge exchange and proton transfer reactions. In DA-APPI, on the other hand, the main reagents are dopant-derived radical cations, which favor ionization of analytes via charge exchange. The efficiency of charge exchange in both DA-APPI and DA-APCI was shown to depend heavily on the solvent flow rate, with best efficiency seen at lowest flow rates studied (0.05 and 0.1 mL/min). Both DA-APCI and DA-APPI showed the radical cation of chlorobenzene at 0.05-0.1 mL/min flow rate, but at increasing flow rate, the abundance of chlorobenzene M(+.) decreased and reagent ion populations deriving from different gas-phase chemistry were recorded. The formation of these reagent ions explains the decreasing ionization efficiency and the differences in charge exchange between the techniques. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  20. Charge Exchange Reaction in Dopant-Assisted Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization and Atmospheric Pressure Photoionization.

    PubMed

    Vaikkinen, Anu; Kauppila, Tiina J; Kostiainen, Risto

    2016-08-01

    The efficiencies of charge exchange reaction in dopant-assisted atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (DA-APCI) and dopant-assisted atmospheric pressure photoionization (DA-APPI) mass spectrometry (MS) were compared by flow injection analysis. Fourteen individual compounds and a commercial mixture of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were chosen as model analytes to cover a wide range of polarities, gas-phase ionization energies, and proton affinities. Chlorobenzene was used as the dopant, and methanol/water (80/20) as the solvent. In both techniques, analytes formed the same ions (radical cations, protonated molecules, and/or fragments). However, in DA-APCI, the relative efficiency of charge exchange versus proton transfer was lower than in DA-APPI. This is suggested to be because in DA-APCI both dopant and solvent clusters can be ionized, and the formed reagent ions can react with the analytes via competing charge exchange and proton transfer reactions. In DA-APPI, on the other hand, the main reagents are dopant-derived radical cations, which favor ionization of analytes via charge exchange. The efficiency of charge exchange in both DA-APPI and DA-APCI was shown to depend heavily on the solvent flow rate, with best efficiency seen at lowest flow rates studied (0.05 and 0.1 mL/min). Both DA-APCI and DA-APPI showed the radical cation of chlorobenzene at 0.05-0.1 mL/min flow rate, but at increasing flow rate, the abundance of chlorobenzene M(+.) decreased and reagent ion populations deriving from different gas-phase chemistry were recorded. The formation of these reagent ions explains the decreasing ionization efficiency and the differences in charge exchange between the techniques. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27126470

  1. Charge Exchange Reaction in Dopant-Assisted Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization and Atmospheric Pressure Photoionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaikkinen, Anu; Kauppila, Tiina J.; Kostiainen, Risto

    2016-08-01

    The efficiencies of charge exchange reaction in dopant-assisted atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (DA-APCI) and dopant-assisted atmospheric pressure photoionization (DA-APPI) mass spectrometry (MS) were compared by flow injection analysis. Fourteen individual compounds and a commercial mixture of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were chosen as model analytes to cover a wide range of polarities, gas-phase ionization energies, and proton affinities. Chlorobenzene was used as the dopant, and methanol/water (80/20) as the solvent. In both techniques, analytes formed the same ions (radical cations, protonated molecules, and/or fragments). However, in DA-APCI, the relative efficiency of charge exchange versus proton transfer was lower than in DA-APPI. This is suggested to be because in DA-APCI both dopant and solvent clusters can be ionized, and the formed reagent ions can react with the analytes via competing charge exchange and proton transfer reactions. In DA-APPI, on the other hand, the main reagents are dopant-derived radical cations, which favor ionization of analytes via charge exchange. The efficiency of charge exchange in both DA-APPI and DA-APCI was shown to depend heavily on the solvent flow rate, with best efficiency seen at lowest flow rates studied (0.05 and 0.1 mL/min). Both DA-APCI and DA-APPI showed the radical cation of chlorobenzene at 0.05-0.1 mL/min flow rate, but at increasing flow rate, the abundance of chlorobenzene M+. decreased and reagent ion populations deriving from different gas-phase chemistry were recorded. The formation of these reagent ions explains the decreasing ionization efficiency and the differences in charge exchange between the techniques.

  2. Analysis of Sterilization Effect of Atmospheric Pressure Pulsed Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ekem, N.; Akan, T.; Pat, S.; Akgun, Y.; Kiremitci, A.; Musa, G.

    2007-04-23

    We have developed a new technology, the High Voltage Atmospheric Pressure Pulsed Plasma (HVAPPP), for bacteria killing. The aim of this paper is to present a simple device to generate plasma able to kill efficiently bacteria.

  3. Laser electrospray mass spectrometry of adsorbed molecules at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brady, John J.; Judge, Elizabeth J.; Simon, Kuriakose; Levis, Robert J.

    2010-02-01

    Atmospheric pressure mass analysis of solid phase biomolecules is performed using laser electrospray mass spectrometry (LEMS). A non-resonant femtosecond duration laser pulse vaporizes native samples at atmospheric pressure for subsequent electrospray ionization and transfer into a mass spectrometer. LEMS was used to detect a complex molecule (irinotecan HCl), a complex mixture (cold medicine formulation with active ingredients: acetaminophen, dextromethorphan HBr and doxylamine succinate), and a biological building block (deoxyguanosine) deposited on steel surfaces without a matrix molecule.

  4. Pressure effects on the superconductivity of the HfPd 2Al Heusler compound: Experimental and theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiendlocha, B.; Winiarski, M. J.; Muras, M.; Zvoriste-Walters, C.; Griveau, J.-C.; Heathman, S.; Gazda, M.; Klimczuk, T.

    2015-01-01

    Polycrystalline HfPd 2Al has been synthesized using the arc-melting method and studied under ambient-pressure conditions by x-ray diffraction from room temperature up to 450 °C. High-pressure x-ray diffraction up to 23 GPa was also performed using Diacell-type membrane diamond anvil cells. The estimated linear thermal expansion coefficient was found to be α =1.40 (3 ) ×10-5K-1 , and the bulk modulus derived from the fit to the third-order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state is B0=97 (2 ) GPa. Resistivity studies under applied pressure (p ≤7.49 GPa ) showed a linear decrease of superconducting critical temperature with increasing pressure and the slope d Tc/d p =-0.13 (1 ) K GPa-1 . The same behavior is observed for the electron-phonon coupling constant λep(p ) that changes from 0.67 to 0.6, estimated for p =0.05 and 7.49 GPa, respectively. First-principles electronic structure and phonon calculation results are presented and used to estimate the magnitude of electron-phonon interaction λep and its evolution with pressure. Theoretical results explain the experimentally observed decrease in Tc due to considerable lattice stiffening.

  5. A Spectacular Experiment Exhibiting Atmospheric Pressure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le Noxaïc, Armand

    2014-01-01

    The experiment described here is fairly easy to reproduce and dramatically shows the magnitude of ambient air pressure. Two circular plates of aluminum are applied one against the other. How do you make their separation very difficult? With only the help of an elastic band! You don't have to use a vacuum pump for this experiment.

  6. Atmospheric pressure fluctuations and oxygen enrichment in waste tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Kurzeja, R.J.; Weber, A.H.

    1993-07-01

    During In-Tank Precipitation (ITP) processing radiolytic decomposition of tetraphenylborate and water can produce benzene and hydrogen, which, given sufficiently high oxygen concentrations, can deflagrate. To prevent accumulations of benzene and hydrogen and avoid deflagration, continuous nitrogen purging is maintained. If the nitrogen purging is interrupted by, for example, a power failure, outside air will begin to seep into the tank through vent holes and cracks. Eventually a flammable mixture of benzene, hydrogen, and oxygen will occur (deflagration). However, this process is slow under steady-state conditions (constant pressure) and mechanisms to increase the exchange rate with the outside atmosphere must be considered. The most important mechanism of this kind is from atmospheric pressure fluctuations in which an increase in atmospheric pressure forces air into the tank which then mixes with the hydrogen-benzene mixture. The subsequent decrease in atmospheric pressure causes venting from the tank of the mixture -- the net effect being an increase in the tank`s oxygen concentration. Thus, enrichment occurs when the atmospheric pressure increases but not when the pressure decreases. Moreover, this natural atmospheric {open_quotes}pumping{close_quotes} is only important if the pressure fluctuations take place on a time scale longer than the characteristic mixing time scale (CMT) of the tank. If pressure fluctuations have a significantly higher frequency than the CMT, outside air will be forced into the tank and then out again before any significant mixing can occur. The CMT is not known for certain, but is estimated to be between 8 and 24 hours. The purpose of this report is to analyze yearly pressure fluctuations for a five year period to determine their statistical properties over 8 and 24-hour periods. The analysis also includes a special breakdown into summer and winter seasons and an analysis of 15-minute data from the SRTC Climatology Site.

  7. Influence of Atmospheric Pressure and Composition on LIBS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Jill R.; Effenberger, Andrew J.; Hatch, Jeremy J.

    While laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is an attractive technique because of its basic simplicity with little or no sample preparation and ability to be performed under standard Earth atmosphere, there has been increasing interest in performing LIBS under non-standard pressures and with surrounding atmospheric gases other than air. Altering the atmospheric pressure can dramatically change the observed LIBS spectra, such as greatly improving the resolution, signal intensity, and overall signal-to-noise ratio by judicious choice of pressure and gas composition. The ability to enhance LIBS spectra has enabled challenging applications related to detection of isotopes. Interest in non-standard atmospheric conditions is also driven by applications for space exploration and process monitoring as well as the opportunity to better understand the dynamics associated with the LIBS plasma.

  8. Effect of high pressure on the phonon spectra and superconductivity in ZrN and HfN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksimov, E. G.; Wang, S. Q.; Magnitskaya, M. V.; Ebert, S. V.

    2009-07-01

    We report ab initio calculations of the phonon spectra, the electron-phonon interaction, and the superconducting transition temperature Tc for zirconium and hafnium nitrides under high pressure. The calculated phonon densities of states are qualitatively similar to Raman spectra measured at various pressures up to 32 GPa. The critical temperature Tc is determined by directly solving the Eliashberg equation using our calculated Eliashberg function. The pressure derivative of Tc for ZrN is in good agreement with the low pressure experimental result. In the case of HfN, for which there are no relevant experimental data, the available phenomenological estimate of Tc is significantly different from our first-principles prediction and we discuss the reasons for such a discrepancy. The calculated dependence Tc(p) becomes nonlinear at p>10 GPa. We show that in these compounds a decrease in Tc upon compression mainly occurs because of a decrease in the electron-phonon coupling constant λ, which is, in turn, due to an increase in the phonon frequencies.

  9. Synthesis of Tetragonal and Orthorhombic Polymorphs of Hf3N4 by High-Pressure Annealing of a Prestructured Nanocrystalline Precursor

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Hf3N4 in nanocrystalline form is produced by solution phase reaction of Hf(NEtMe)4 with ammonia followed by low-temperature pyrolysis in ammonia. Understanding of phase behavior in these systems is important because early transition-metal nitrides with the metal in maximum oxidation state are potential visible light photocatalysts. A combination of synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction and pair distribution function studies has been used to show this phase to have a tetragonally distorted fluorite structure with 1/3 vacancies on the anion sites. Laser heating nanocrystalline Hf3N4 at 12 GPa and 1500 K in a diamond anvil cell results in its crystallization with the same structure type, an interesting example of prestructuring of the phase during preparation of the precursor compound. This metastable pathway could provide a route to other new polymorphs of metal nitrides and to nitrogen-rich phases where they do not currently exist. Importantly it leads to bulk formation of the material rather than surface conversion as often occurs in elemental combination reactions at high pressure. Laser heating at 2000 K at a higher pressure of 19 GPa results in a further new polymorph of Hf3N4 that adopts an anion deficient cottunite-type (orthorhombic) structure. The orthorhombic Hf3N4 phase is recoverable to ambient pressure and the tetragonal phase is at least partially recoverable. PMID:23721167

  10. Atmospheric Pressure Error of GRACE in Antarctic Ice Mass Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, B.; Eom, J.; Seo, K. W.

    2014-12-01

    As GRACE has observed time-varying gravity longer than a decade, long-term mass changes have been emerged. In particular, linear trends and accelerated patterns in Antarctica were reported and paid attention for the projection of sea level rise. The cause of accelerated ice mass loss in Antarctica is not known since its amplitude is not significantly larger than ice mass change associated with natural climate variations. In this study, we consider another uncertainty in Antarctic ice mass loss acceleration due to unmodeled atmospheric pressure field. We first compare GRACE AOD product with in-situ atmospheric pressure data from SCAR READER project. GRACE AOD (ECMWF) shows spurious jump near Transantarctic Mountains, which is due to the regular model update of ECMWF. In addition, GRACE AOD shows smaller variations than in-situ observation in coastal area. This is possibly due to the lower resolution of GRACE AOD, and thus relatively stable ocean bottom pressure associated with inverted barometric effect suppresses the variations of atmospheric pressure near coast. On the other hand, GRACE AOD closely depicts in-situ observations far from oceans. This is probably because GRACE AOD model (ECMWF) is assimilated with in-situ observations. However, the in-situ observational sites in interior of Antarctica are sparse, and thus it is still uncertain the reliability of GRACE AOD for most region of Antarctica. To examine this, we cross-validate three different reanalysis; ERA Interim, NCEP DOE and MERRA. Residual atmospheric pressure fields as a measure of atmospheric pressure errors, NCEP DOE - ERA Interim or MERRA - ERA Interim, show long-term changes, and the estimated uncertainty in acceleration of Antarctic ice mass change is about 9 Gton/yr^2 from 2003 to 2012. This result implies that the atmospheric surface pressure error likely hinders the accurate estimate of the ice mass loss acceleration in Antarctica.

  11. Effect of atmospheric pressure on hearing in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Kitahara, M; Ozawa, H; Kodama, A; Izukura, H; Inoue, S; Uchida, K

    1994-01-01

    Hearing is assumed to be altered during or immediately after a change in atmospheric pressure, although this has not been tested experimentally. We used a soundproof pressure chamber to examine the effect of alterations in atmospheric pressure on hearing in 26 normal healthy subjects. The subjects were placed in the soundproof pressure chamber in a supine position and instructed to actively equilibrate middle ear pressure or to abstain from doing so. When the pressure was changed to +/- 500 mmH2O at 33 mmH2O/s the results were as follows: When subjects did not equilibrate middle ear pressure, air conduction at low frequency tones increased more than bone conduction. The degree of deterioration in hearing was greater when the chamber pressure was increased (descent) than where pressure was decreased (ascent). When the subjects equilibrated middle ear pressure, little change in the levels of air or bone conduction was observed. Most of the deterioration in bone conduction was considered to reflect functional loss due to increased stiffness and damping of the sound transmission mechanism.

  12. Seed disinfection effect of atmospheric pressure plasma and low pressure plasma on Rhizoctonia solani.

    PubMed

    Nishioka, Terumi; Takai, Yuichiro; Kawaradani, Mitsuo; Okada, Kiyotsugu; Tanimoto, Hideo; Misawa, Tatsuya; Kusakari, Shinichi

    2014-01-01

    Gas plasma generated and applied under two different systems, atmospheric pressure plasma and low pressure plasma, was used to investigate the inactivation efficacy on the seedborne pathogenic fungus, Rhizoctonia solani, which had been artificially introduced to brassicaceous seeds. Treatment with atmospheric plasma for 10 min markedly reduced the R. solani survival rate from 100% to 3% but delayed seed germination. The low pressure plasma treatment reduced the fungal survival rate from 83% to 1.7% after 10 min and the inactivation effect was dependent on the treatment time. The seed germination rate after treatment with the low pressure plasma was not significantly different from that of untreated seeds. The air temperature around the seeds in the low pressure system was lower than that of the atmospheric system. These results suggested that gas plasma treatment under low pressure could be effective in disinfecting the seeds without damaging them.

  13. MicroScale - Atmospheric Pressure Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Sankaran, Mohan

    2012-01-25

    Low-temperature plasmas play an essential role in the manufacturing of integrated circuits which are ubiquitous in modern society. In recent years, these top-down approaches to materials processing have reached a physical limit. As a result, alternative approaches to materials processing are being developed that will allow the fabrication of nanoscale materials from the bottom up. The aim of our research is to develop a new class of plasmas, termed “microplasmas” for nanomaterials synthesis. Microplasmas are a special class of plasmas formed in geometries where at least one dimension is less than 1 mm. Plasma confinement leads to several unique properties including high-pressure stability and non-equilibrium that make microplasams suitable for nanomaterials synthesis. Vapor-phase precursors can be dissociated to homogeneously nucleate nanometer-sized metal and alloyed nanoparticles. Alternatively, metal salts dispersed in liquids or polymer films can be electrochemically reduced to form metal nanoparticles. In this talk, I will discuss these topics in detail, highlighting the advantages of microplasma-based systems for the synthesis of well-defined nanomaterials.

  14. Plant adaptation to low atmospheric pressures: potential molecular responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferl, Robert J.; Schuerger, Andrew C.; Paul, Anna-Lisa; Gurley, William B.; Corey, Kenneth; Bucklin, Ray

    2002-01-01

    There is an increasing realization that it may be impossible to attain Earth normal atmospheric pressures in orbital, lunar, or Martian greenhouses, simply because the construction materials do not exist to meet the extraordinary constraints imposed by balancing high engineering requirements against high lift costs. This equation essentially dictates that NASA have in place the capability to grow plants at reduced atmospheric pressure. Yet current understanding of plant growth at low pressures is limited to just a few experiments and relatively rudimentary assessments of plant vigor and growth. The tools now exist, however, to make rapid progress toward understanding the fundamental nature of plant responses and adaptations to low pressures, and to develop strategies for mitigating detrimental effects by engineering the growth conditions or by engineering the plants themselves. The genomes of rice and the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana have recently been sequenced in their entirety, and public sector and commercial DNA chips are becoming available such that thousands of genes can be assayed at once. A fundamental understanding of plant responses and adaptation to low pressures can now be approached and translated into procedures and engineering considerations to enhance plant growth at low atmospheric pressures. In anticipation of such studies, we present here the background arguments supporting these contentions, as well as informed speculation about the kinds of molecular physiological responses that might be expected of plants in low-pressure environments.

  15. Plant adaptation to low atmospheric pressures: potential molecular responses.

    PubMed

    Ferl, Robert J; Schuerger, Andrew C; Paul, Anna-Lisa; Gurley, William B; Corey, Kenneth; Bucklin, Ray

    2002-01-01

    There is an increasing realization that it may be impossible to attain Earth normal atmospheric pressures in orbital, lunar, or Martian greenhouses, simply because the construction materials do not exist to meet the extraordinary constraints imposed by balancing high engineering requirements against high lift costs. This equation essentially dictates that NASA have in place the capability to grow plants at reduced atmospheric pressure. Yet current understanding of plant growth at low pressures is limited to just a few experiments and relatively rudimentary assessments of plant vigor and growth. The tools now exist, however, to make rapid progress toward understanding the fundamental nature of plant responses and adaptations to low pressures, and to develop strategies for mitigating detrimental effects by engineering the growth conditions or by engineering the plants themselves. The genomes of rice and the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana have recently been sequenced in their entirety, and public sector and commercial DNA chips are becoming available such that thousands of genes can be assayed at once. A fundamental understanding of plant responses and adaptation to low pressures can now be approached and translated into procedures and engineering considerations to enhance plant growth at low atmospheric pressures. In anticipation of such studies, we present here the background arguments supporting these contentions, as well as informed speculation about the kinds of molecular physiological responses that might be expected of plants in low-pressure environments. PMID:11987308

  16. Small size plasma tools for material processing at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionita, E. R.; Ionita, M. D.; Stancu, E. C.; Teodorescu, M.; Dinescu, G.

    2009-03-01

    A small size radiofrequency plasma jet source able to produce cold plasma jets at atmospheric pressure is presented. The surface modification of polyethylene terephtalate, polyethylene and polytetrafluorethylene foils is performed by using a scanning procedure. The contact angle measurements reveal that the treatment leads to hydrophilicity increase. The roughening of surface, specific to each material is noticed. A significant improvement of adhesion is obtained as result of atmospheric plasma treatments.

  17. Assessment of the Hf N, Zr N and Ti N phase diagrams at high pressures and temperatures: balancing between MN and M3N4 (M = Hf, Zr, Ti)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroll, Peter

    2004-04-01

    We study the nitrogen-rich part of the phase diagram Hf-N, Zr-N and Ti-N, employing first-principle calculations for an assessment of energy and enthalpy as a function of pressure. At zero pressure the novel cubic Th3P4-type structures are metastable modifications of M3N4 (M = Hf,Zr). The lowest energy configuration of both compounds is an orthorhombic Zr3N4-type. This orthorhombic structure will transform into the Th3P4-type at 9 and 6 GPa, for Hf3N4 and Zr3N4, respectively. The lowest energy configuration of Ti3N4 is a CaTi2O4-type structure. It will first transform into the orthorhombic Zr3N4-type at 3.8 GPa, then further transform into the cubic Th3P4-type at 15 GPa. The spinel type is metastable throughout the phase diagram for all three systems. The phase boundary between mononitrides MN and the M3N4-phases is accessed as a function of pressure. We include the entropy of gaseous nitrogen from tabulated data to estimate the free enthalpy DgrG of the nitride phases. The orthorhombic modification of Hf3N4 turns out to be thermodynamically stable with respect to a decomposition into the mononitrides and nitrogen for temperatures up to about 1000 °C. The stability of Zr3N4 is in question; within the estimated error no final conclusion can be drawn. Ti3N4, on the other hand, will only be metastable. At higher pressures, however, the free energy of nitrogen is substantially reduced and the 3:4 compositions become more stable. We reproduce the experimental requirements (18 GPa and 2800 K) for the synthesis of the novel Hf3N4. At 2800 K the pressures needed to synthesize cubic phases of Zr3N4 and Ti3N4 are estimated to be 40 and 100 GPa, respectively.

  18. Atmospheric-pressure-plasma nitriding of titanium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimitsu, Yuki; Ichiki, Ryuta; Kasamura, Kotaro; Yoshida, Masashi; Akamine, Shuichi; Kanazawa, Seiji

    2015-03-01

    Atmospheric-pressure-plasma nitriding of titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V has been achieved by using a pulsed-arc plasma jet with a N2/H2 gas mixture, where the plasma jet plume is sprayed onto the titanium surface under atmospheric pressure. We successfully formed a titanium nitride layer on the sample surface. Moreover, the diffusion layer was also formed, the hardness of which was increased from that of as-received titanium. The nitride layer growth was found to be diffusion-controlled, as in other conventional nitriding methods.

  19. PPI/HASI Pressure Measurements in the Atmosphere of Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    M'akinen, J. T. T.; Harri, A.-M.; Siili, T.; Lehto, A.; Kahanp'a'a, H.; Genzer, M.; Leppelmeier, G. W.; Leinonen, J.

    2005-08-01

    The Huygens probe descended through the atmosphere of Titan on January 14, 2005, providing an excellent set of observations. As a part of the Huygens Atmospheric Structure Instrument (HASI) measuring several variables, including acceleration, pressure, temperature and atmospheric electricity, the Pressure Profile Instrument (PPI) provided by FMI commenced operations after the deployment of the main parachute and jettisoning of the heat shield at an altitude of about 160 km. Based on aerodynamic considerations, PPI measured the total pressure with a Kiel probe at the end of a boom, connected to the sensor electronics inside the probe through an inlet tube. The instrument performed flawlessly during the 2.5 hour descent and the 0.5 hour surface phase before the termination of radio link between Huygens and the Cassini orbiter. We present an analysis of the pressure data including recreation of the pressure, temperature, altitude, velocity and acceleration profiles as well as an estimate for the level of atmospheric activity on the surface of Titan.

  20. Atmospheric Pressure Loading Service for VLBI and SLR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, L.; Boy, J.

    2003-12-01

    Time series of 3D site displacements caused by atmospheric pressure loading are computed for all VLBI and SLR sites from May 1976 using 6-hourly pressure field with a spatial resolution of 2.5x2.5 degrees from NCEP Reanalysis. Atmospheric pressure tides are removed from the NCEP Reanalysis data. Loading due to atmospheric tides is computed separately using Ponte-Ray (2002) model. These series are automatically updated on a daily basis. They are available on the Web at http://gemini.gsfc.nasa.gov/aplo . We have validated our model of atmospheric pressure loading by estimating the admittance factors of the pressure loading time series using the data set of 3.5 millions of VLBI observations. These admittance factors can be interpreted as correlation coefficients between the true (unknown) site displacements and our model. The average admittance factors are 0.95 -+ 0.02 for vertical displacement and 1.00 -+ 0.07 for the horizontal displacements. Closeness of these admittance factors to unity allows us to conclude that our model is adequate at the level of measurements noise.

  1. Engineering a laser remote sensor for atmospheric pressure and temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalshoven, J. E., Jr.; Korb, C. L.

    1978-01-01

    A system for the remote sensing of atmospheric pressure and temperature is described. Resonant lines in the 7600 Angstrom oxygen A band region are used and an organic dye laser beam is tuned to measure line absorption changes with temperature or pressure. A reference beam outside this band is also transmitted for calibration. Using lidar techniques, profiling of these parameters with altitude can be accomplished.

  2. Generation of Atmospheric-Pressure Glow Discharge and Its Applications 2.Production of Atmospheric-Pressure Glow Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takaki, Koichi; Fujiwara, Tamiya; Tochikubo, Fumiyoshi

    Atmospheric-pressure glow (APG) discharge is one of the more interesting fields of recent study owing to its possible applications in plasma processing, surface treatment, sterilization, etc. This field was developed by Okazaki and Kogoma et al. of the Sophia University group in 1988, and has spread world wide. Usually, a glow discharge is difficult to keep stable at atmospheric gas pressure because glow-to-arc transition occurs due to thermalization of the plasma. However, some methods have been presented to produce stable glow plasma at atmospheric gas pressure; 1) inserting a dielectric plate between electrodes, 2) applying pulsed voltage having a pulse width shorter than the thermalization time, 3) use of a micro-hollow cathode configuration, etc. This article describes the generation of AGP mainly using the dielectric plate. Numerical analysis based on continuity equations of charged species and Poisson's equation is also described.

  3. First principle study of elastic and thermodynamic properties of ZrZn{sub 2} and HfZn{sub 2} under high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Na; Zhang, Xinyu Ning, Jinliang; Zhang, Suhong; Liang, Shunxing; Ma, Mingzhen; Liu, Riping; Qin, Jiaqian

    2014-02-28

    A comprehensive investigation of the structural, elastic, and thermodynamic properties for Laves-phases ZrZn{sub 2} and HfZn{sub 2} are conducted using density functional total energy calculations combined with the quasi-harmonic Debye model. The optimized lattice parameters of ZrZn{sub 2} and HfZn{sub 2} compare well with available experimental values. We estimated the mechanical behaviors of both compounds under compression, including mechanical stability, Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, ductility, and anisotropy. Additionally, the thermodynamic properties as a function of pressure and temperature are analyzed and found to be in good agreement with the corresponding experimental data.

  4. On the permanent hip-stabilizing effect of atmospheric pressure.

    PubMed

    Prietzel, Torsten; Hammer, Niels; Schleifenbaum, Stefan; Kaßebaum, Eric; Farag, Mohamed; von Salis-Soglio, Georg

    2014-08-22

    Hip joint dislocations related to total hip arthroplasty (THA) are a common complication especially in the early postoperative course. The surgical approach, the alignment of the prosthetic components, the range of motion and the muscle tone are known factors influencing the risk of dislocation. A further factor that is discussed until today is atmospheric pressure which is not taken into account in the present THA concepts. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of atmospheric pressure on hip joint stability. Five joint models (Ø 28-44 mm), consisting of THA components were hermetically sealed with a rubber capsule, filled with a defined amount of fluid and exposed to varying ambient pressure. Displacement and pressure sensors were used to record the extent of dislocation related to intraarticular and ambient pressure. In 200 experiments spontaneous dislocations of the different sized joint models were reliably observed once the ambient pressure was lower than 6.0 kPa. Increasing the ambient pressure above 6.0 kPa immediately and persistently reduced the joint models until the ambient pressure was lowered again. Displacement always exceeded half the diameter of the joint model and was independent of gravity effects. This experimental study gives strong evidence that the hip joint is permanently stabilized by atmospheric pressure, confirming the theories of Weber and Weber (1836). On basis of these findings the use of larger prosthetic heads, capsular repair and the deployment of an intracapsular Redon drain are proposed to substantially decrease the risk of dislocation after THA.

  5. Designing Extraterrestrial Plant Growth Habitats with Low Pressure Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corey, Kenneth A.

    2002-01-01

    In-situ resource utilization, provision of human life support requirements by bioregenerative methods, and engineering constraints for construction and deployment of plant growth structures on the surface of Mars all suggest the need for plant growth studies at hypobaric pressures. Past work demonstrated that plants will likely tolerate and grow at pressures at or below 10 kPa. Based upon this premise, concepts are developed for the design of reduced pressure atmospheres in lightweight, inflatable structures for plant growth systems on Mars with the goals of maximizing design simplicity and the use of local resources. A modular pod design is proposed as it could be integrated with large-scale production systems. Atmospheric modification of pod clusters would be based upon a pulse and scrub system using mass flow methods for atmospheric transport. A specific modification and control scenario is developed for a lettuce pod to illustrate the dynamics of carbon dioxide and oxygen exchange within a pod. Considerations of minimal atmospheric crop requirements will aid in the development of engineering designs and strategies for extraterrestrial plant growth structures that employ rarefied atmospheres.

  6. Designing Extraterrestrial Plant Growth Habitats With Low Pressure Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corey, Kenneth A.

    2001-01-01

    In-situ resource utilization, provision of human life support requirements by bioregenerative methods, and engineering constraints for construction and deployment of plant growth structures on the surface of Mars all suggest the need for plant growth studies at hypobaric pressures. Past work demonstrated that plants will likely tolerate and grow at pressures at or below 10 kPa. Based upon this premise, concepts are developed for the design of reduced pressure atmospheres in lightweight, inflatable structures for plant growth systems on Mars with the goals of maximizing design simplicity and the use of local resources. A modular pod design is proposed as it could be integrated with large-scale production systems. Atmospheric modification of pod clusters would be based upon a pulse and scrub system using mass flow methods for atmospheric transport. A specific modification and control scenario is developed for a lettuce pod to illustrate the dynamics of carbon dioxide and oxygen exchange within a pod. Considerations of minimal atmospheric crop requirements will aid in the development of engineering designs and strategies for extraterrestrial plant growth structures that employ rarefied atmospheres.

  7. Accurate pressure gradient calculations in hydrostatic atmospheric models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carroll, John J.; Mendez-Nunez, Luis R.; Tanrikulu, Saffet

    1987-01-01

    A method for the accurate calculation of the horizontal pressure gradient acceleration in hydrostatic atmospheric models is presented which is especially useful in situations where the isothermal surfaces are not parallel to the vertical coordinate surfaces. The present method is shown to be exact if the potential temperature lapse rate is constant between the vertical pressure integration limits. The technique is applied to both the integration of the hydrostatic equation and the computation of the slope correction term in the horizontal pressure gradient. A fixed vertical grid and a dynamic grid defined by the significant levels in the vertical temperature distribution are employed.

  8. Atmospheric pressure helium afterglow discharge detector for gas chromatography

    DOEpatents

    Rice, Gary; D'Silva, Arthur P.; Fassel, Velmer A.

    1986-05-06

    An apparatus for providing a simple, low-frequency electrodeless discharge system for atmospheric pressure afterglow generation. A single quartz tube through which a gas mixture is passed is extended beyond a concentric electrode positioned thereabout. A grounding rod is placed directly above the tube outlet to permit optical viewing of the discharge between the electrodes.

  9. Atmospheric pressure helium afterglow discharge detector for gas chromatography

    DOEpatents

    Rice, G.; D'Silva, A.P.; Fassel, V.A.

    1985-04-05

    An apparatus for providing a simple, low-frequency, electrodeless discharge system for atmospheric pressure afterglow generation. A single quartz tube through which a gas mixture is passed is extended beyond a concentric electrode positioned thereabout. A grounding rod is placed directly above the tube outlet to permit optical viewing of the discharge between the electrodes.

  10. Atmospheric pressure and suicide attempts in Helsinki, Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiltunen, Laura; Ruuhela, Reija; Ostamo, Aini; Lönnqvist, Jouko; Suominen, Kirsi; Partonen, Timo

    2012-11-01

    The influence of weather on mood and mental health is commonly debated. Furthermore, studies concerning weather and suicidal behavior have given inconsistent results. Our aim was to see if daily weather changes associate with the number of suicide attempts in Finland. All suicide attempts treated in the hospitals in Helsinki, Finland, during two separate periods, 8 years apart, were included. Altogether, 3,945 suicide attempts were compared with daily weather parameters and analyzed with a Poisson regression. We found that daily atmospheric pressure correlated statistically significantly with the number of suicide attempts, and for men the correlation was negative. Taking into account the seasonal normal value during the period 1971-2000, daily temperature, global solar radiation and precipitation did not associate with the number of suicide attempts on a statistically significant level in our study. We concluded that daily atmospheric pressure may have an impact on suicidal behavior, especially on suicide attempts of men by violent methods ( P < 0.001), and may explain the clustering of suicide attempts. Men seem to be more vulnerable to attempt suicide under low atmospheric pressure and women under high atmospheric pressure. We show only statistical correlations, which leaves the exact mechanisms of interaction between weather and suicidal behavior open. However, suicidal behavior should be assessed from the point of view of weather in addition to psychiatric and social aspects.

  11. Einstein's Tea Leaves and Pressure Systems in the Atmosphere

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tandon, Amit; Marshall, John

    2010-01-01

    Tea leaves gather in the center of the cup when the tea is stirred. In 1926 Einstein explained the phenomenon in terms of a secondary, rim-to-center circulation caused by the fluid rubbing against the bottom of the cup. This explanation can be connected to air movement in atmospheric pressure systems to explore, for example, why low-pressure…

  12. Atmospheric pressure and suicide attempts in Helsinki, Finland.

    PubMed

    Hiltunen, Laura; Ruuhela, Reija; Ostamo, Aini; Lönnqvist, Jouko; Suominen, Kirsi; Partonen, Timo

    2012-11-01

    The influence of weather on mood and mental health is commonly debated. Furthermore, studies concerning weather and suicidal behavior have given inconsistent results. Our aim was to see if daily weather changes associate with the number of suicide attempts in Finland. All suicide attempts treated in the hospitals in Helsinki, Finland, during two separate periods, 8 years apart, were included. Altogether, 3,945 suicide attempts were compared with daily weather parameters and analyzed with a Poisson regression. We found that daily atmospheric pressure correlated statistically significantly with the number of suicide attempts, and for men the correlation was negative. Taking into account the seasonal normal value during the period 1971-2000, daily temperature, global solar radiation and precipitation did not associate with the number of suicide attempts on a statistically significant level in our study. We concluded that daily atmospheric pressure may have an impact on suicidal behavior, especially on suicide attempts of men by violent methods (P < 0.001), and may explain the clustering of suicide attempts. Men seem to be more vulnerable to attempt suicide under low atmospheric pressure and women under high atmospheric pressure. We show only statistical correlations, which leaves the exact mechanisms of interaction between weather and suicidal behavior open. However, suicidal behavior should be assessed from the point of view of weather in addition to psychiatric and social aspects.

  13. Spacecraft Sterilization Using Non-Equilibrium Atmospheric Pressure Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Moogega; Vaze, Nachiket; Anderson, Shawn; Fridman, Gregory; Vasilets, Victor N.; Gutsol, Alexander; Tsapin, Alexander; Fridman, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    As a solution to chemically and thermally destructive sterilization methods currently used for spacecraft, non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasmas are used to treat surfaces inoculated with Bacillus subtilis and Deinococcus radiodurans. Evidence of significant morphological changes and reduction in viability due to plasma exposure will be presented, including a 4-log reduction of B. subtilis after 2 minutes of dielectric barrier discharge treatment.

  14. Carbonation of epoxy methyl soyate at atmospheric pressure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Carbonated methyl soyates were prepared from epoxy methyl soyate by the introduction of carbon dioxide at the oxirane position. Carbonation was performed with carbon dioxide gas by sparging carbon dioxide through the epoxy esters at atmospheric pressure in the presence of tetrabutylammonium bromide...

  15. Atmospheric-pressure guided streamers for liposomal membrane disruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svarnas, P.; Matrali, S. H.; Gazeli, K.; Aleiferis, Sp.; Clément, F.; Antimisiaris, S. G.

    2012-12-01

    The potential to use liposomes (LIPs) as a cellular model in order to study interactions of cold atmospheric-pressure plasma with cells is herein investigated. Cold atmospheric-pressure plasma is formed by a dielectric-barrier discharge reactor. Large multilamellar vesicle liposomes, consisted of phosphatidylcholine and cholesterol, are prepared by the thin film hydration technique, to encapsulate a small hydrophilic dye, i.e., calcein. The plasma-induced release of calcein from liposomes is then used as a measure of liposome membrane integrity and, consequently, interaction between the cold atmospheric plasma and lipid bilayers. Physical mechanisms leading to membrane disruption are suggested, based on the plasma characterization including gas temperature calculation.

  16. Atmospheric-pressure guided streamers for liposomal membrane disruption

    SciTech Connect

    Svarnas, P.; Aleiferis, Sp.; Matrali, S. H.; Gazeli, K.; Clement, F.; Antimisiaris, S. G.

    2012-12-24

    The potential to use liposomes (LIPs) as a cellular model in order to study interactions of cold atmospheric-pressure plasma with cells is herein investigated. Cold atmospheric-pressure plasma is formed by a dielectric-barrier discharge reactor. Large multilamellar vesicle liposomes, consisted of phosphatidylcholine and cholesterol, are prepared by the thin film hydration technique, to encapsulate a small hydrophilic dye, i.e., calcein. The plasma-induced release of calcein from liposomes is then used as a measure of liposome membrane integrity and, consequently, interaction between the cold atmospheric plasma and lipid bilayers. Physical mechanisms leading to membrane disruption are suggested, based on the plasma characterization including gas temperature calculation.

  17. Model of a stationary microwave argon discharge at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Zhelyazkov, I.; Pencheva, M.; Benova, E.

    2008-03-19

    The many applications of microwave gas discharges at atmospheric pressure in various fields of science, technology and medicine require an adequate model of these discharges. Such a model is based on the electromagnetic wave's propagation properties and on the elementary processes in the discharge bulk. In contrast to the microwave discharges at low-gas pressures, where many elementary processes might be ignored because of their negligible contribution to the electron and heavy particle's balance equations, for such discharges at atmospheric pressure the consideration of a large number of collisional processes is mandatory. For the build of a successful discharge-column model one needs three important quantities, notably the power {theta} necessary for sustaining an electron - ion pair, electron - neutral collision frequency for momentum transfer v{sub en}, and gas temperature T{sub g}. The first two key parameters are obtained by a collisional-radiative model of the argon at atmospheric pressure, while the microwave frequency {omega}/2{pi} = 2.45 GHz, plasma column radius R, gas pressure p and gas temperature T{sub g} are fixed external parameters determined by the experimental conditions. Here, we present a model of a capillary argon microwave plasma column with a length L {approx_equal} 14 cm, sustained by wave power of 110 W - the model yields the longitudinal distributions of the plasma density, expended wave power, wave electric field magnitude, and complex wave number.

  18. Quality characteristics of the radish grown under reduced atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, Lanfang H.; Bisbee, Patricia A.; Richards, Jeffrey T.; Birmele, Michele N.; Prior, Ronald L.; Perchonok, Michele; Dixon, Mike; Yorio, Neil C.; Stutte, Gary W.; Wheeler, Raymond M.

    This study addresses whether reduced atmospheric pressure (hypobaria) affects the quality traits of radish grown under such environments. Radish (Raphanus sativus L. cv. Cherry Bomb Hybrid II) plants were grown hydroponically in specially designed hypobaric plant growth chambers at three atmospheric pressures; 33, 66, and 96 kPa (control). Oxygen and carbon dioxide partial pressures were maintained constant at 21 and 0.12 kPa, respectively. Plants were harvested at 21 days after planting, with aerial shoots and swollen hypocotyls (edible portion of the radish referred to as the “root” hereafter) separated immediately upon removal from the chambers. Samples were subsequently evaluated for their sensory characteristics (color, taste, overall appearance, and texture), taste-determining factors (glucosinolate and soluble carbohydrate content and myrosinase activity), proximate nutrients (protein, dietary fiber, and carbohydrate) and potential health benefit attributes (antioxidant capacity). In roots of control plants, concentrations of glucosinolate, total soluble sugar, and nitrate, as well as myrosinase activity and total antioxidant capacity (measured as ORACFL), were 2.9, 20, 5.1, 9.4, and 1.9 times greater than the amount in leaves, respectively. There was no significant difference in total antioxidant capacity, sensory characteristics, carbohydrate composition, or proximate nutrient content among the three pressure treatments. However, glucosinolate content in the root and nitrate concentration in the leaf declined as the atmospheric pressure decreased, suggesting perturbation to some nitrogen-related metabolism.

  19. Heat of freezing for supercooled water: measurements at atmospheric pressure.

    PubMed

    Cantrell, Will; Kostinski, Alexander; Szedlak, Anthony; Johnson, Alexandria

    2011-06-16

    Unlike reversible phase transitions, the amount of heat released upon freezing of a metastable supercooled liquid depends on the degree of supercooling. Although terrestrial supercooled water is ubiquitous and has implications for cloud dynamics and nucleation, measurements of its heat of freezing are scarce. We have performed calorimetric measurements of the heat released by freezing water at atmospheric pressure as a function of supercooling. Our measurements show that the heat of freezing can be considerably below one predicted from a reversible hydrostatic process. Our measurements also indicate that the state of the resulting ice is not fully specified by the final pressure and temperature; the ice is likely to be strained on a variety of scales, implying a higher vapor pressure. This would reduce the vapor gradient between supercooled water and ice in mixed phase atmospheric clouds. PMID:21087023

  20. Heat of freezing for supercooled water: measurements at atmospheric pressure.

    PubMed

    Cantrell, Will; Kostinski, Alexander; Szedlak, Anthony; Johnson, Alexandria

    2011-06-16

    Unlike reversible phase transitions, the amount of heat released upon freezing of a metastable supercooled liquid depends on the degree of supercooling. Although terrestrial supercooled water is ubiquitous and has implications for cloud dynamics and nucleation, measurements of its heat of freezing are scarce. We have performed calorimetric measurements of the heat released by freezing water at atmospheric pressure as a function of supercooling. Our measurements show that the heat of freezing can be considerably below one predicted from a reversible hydrostatic process. Our measurements also indicate that the state of the resulting ice is not fully specified by the final pressure and temperature; the ice is likely to be strained on a variety of scales, implying a higher vapor pressure. This would reduce the vapor gradient between supercooled water and ice in mixed phase atmospheric clouds.

  1. RF-powered atmospheric pressure plasma jet for surface treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawłat, Joanna; Samoń, Radosław; Stryczewska, Henryka D.; Diatczyk, Jarosław; Giżewski, Tomasz

    2013-02-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) was developed for decontamination purposes. Features of the device are ability to work with various feed-gases at the atmospheric pressure in several gas-flow, frequency and current-voltage regimes. LabVIEW virtual measurement sub-system for monitoring and measurement process through subsequent setting of electrical and gas-flow parameters (digital control of flow-meters), conditioning and amplification of electrical signals and collection of the data from peripheral measuring devices was applied. Contribution to the Topical Issue "13th International Symposium on High Pressure Low Temperature Plasma Chemistry (Hakone XIII)", Edited by Nicolas Gherardi, Henryca Danuta Stryczewska and Yvan Ségui.

  2. Radio jet refraction in galactic atmospheres with static pressure gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henriksen, R. N.; Vallee, J. P.; Bridle, A. H.

    1981-01-01

    A theory of double radio sources which have a 'Z' or 'S' morphology is proposed, based on the refraction of radio jets in the extended atmosphere of an elliptical galaxy. The model describes a collimated jet of supersonic material bending self-consistently under the influence of external static pressure gradients. Gravity and magnetic fields are neglected in the simplest case except insofar as they determine the static pressure distribution. The calculation is a straightforward extension of a method used to calculate a ram-pressure model for twin radio trails ('C' morphology). It may also be described as a continuous-jet version of a buoyancy model proposed in 1973. The model has the added virtue of invoking a galactic atmosphere similar to those already indicated by X-ray measurements of some other radio galaxies and by models for the collimation of other radio jets.

  3. Mechanism of hearing disturbance due to alteration in atmospheric pressure.

    PubMed

    Kitahara, M; Kodama, A; Ozawa, H; Izukura, H

    1994-01-01

    We used a soundproof pressure chamber to examine how the changes in atmospheric pressure as experienced in daily life reduces bone conduction in a total of 48 normal adults. The subjects were given special ear plugs that connected external auditory canal to the pressure gauge and a small pump located outside the chamber, and were instructed not to swallow, to avoid active opening of the Eustachian tube. The chamber pressure was increased (or decreased) to +/- 500 mmH2O at a rate of 33 mmH2O/s. Then pressure in the external auditory canal was increased (or decreased) gradually after the chamber pressure had reached +/- 500 mmH2O, to equilibrate the pressure across the ear drum. Bone conduction did not recover the level before increase (or decrease) in the chamber pressure. We conclude that at least a minor part of the deterioration in bone conduction after changes in the chamber pressure was caused by displacement of the round window membrane.

  4. A Micromachined Pressure Sensor with Integrated Resonator Operating at Atmospheric Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Sen; Yuan, Weizheng; Qiao, Dayong; Deng, Jinjun; Sun, Xiaodong

    2013-01-01

    A novel resonant pressure sensor with an improved micromechanical double-ended tuning fork resonator packaged in dry air at atmospheric pressure is presented. The resonator is electrostatically driven and capacitively detected, and the sensor is designed to realize a low cost resonant pressure sensor with medium accuracy. Various damping mechanisms in a resonator that is vibrating at atmospheric pressure are analyzed in detail, and a formula is developed to predict the overall quality factor. A trade-off has been reached between the quality factor, stress sensitivity and drive capability of the resonator. Furthermore, differential sense elements and the method of electromechanical amplitude modulation are used for capacitive detection to obtain a large signal-to-noise ratio. The prototype sensor chip is successfully fabricated using a micromachining process based on a commercially available silicon-on-insulator wafer and is hermetically encapsulated in a custom 16-pin Kovar package. Preliminary measurements show that the fundamental frequency of the resonant pressure sensor is approximately 34.55 kHz with a pressure sensitivity of 20.77 Hz/kPa. Over the full scale pressure range of 100–400 kPa and the whole temperature range of −20–60 °C, high quality factors from 1,146 to 1,772 are obtained. The characterization of the prototype sensor reveals the feasibility of a resonant pressure sensor packaged at atmospheric pressure.

  5. Atmospheric pressure loading parameters from very long baseline interferometry observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macmillan, D. S.; Gipson, John M.

    1994-01-01

    Atmospheric mass loading produces a primarily vertical displacement of the Earth's crust. This displacement is correlated with surface pressure and is large enough to be detected by very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) measurements. Using the measured surface pressure at VLBI stations, we have estimated the atmospheric loading term for each station location directly from VLBI data acquired from 1979 to 1992. Our estimates of the vertical sensitivity to change in pressure range from 0 to -0.6 mm/mbar depending on the station. These estimates agree with inverted barometer model calculations (Manabe et al., 1991; vanDam and Herring, 1994) of the vertical displacement sensitivity computed by convolving actual pressure distributions with loading Green's functions. The pressure sensitivity tends to be smaller for stations near the coast, which is consistent with the inverted barometer hypothesis. Applying this estimated pressure loading correction in standard VLBI geodetic analysis improves the repeatability of estimated lengths of 25 out of 37 baselines that were measured at least 50 times. In a root-sum-square (rss) sense, the improvement generally increases with baseline length at a rate of about 0.3 to 0.6 ppb depending on whether the baseline stations are close to the coast. For the 5998-km baseline from Westford, Massachusetts, to Wettzell, Germany, the rss improvement is about 3.6 mm out of 11.0 mm. The average rss reduction of the vertical scatter for inland stations ranges from 2.7 to 5.4 mm.

  6. Determination of Atmospheric Pressure Loading at TU Vienna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindelegger, M.; Schuh, H.; Boehm, J.; Wijaya, D.; Karbon, M.

    2010-12-01

    Loading of the Earth's crust due to variations of global atmospheric pressure can displace the positions of geodetic sites by more than 1 cm, both vertically and horizontally on annual to sub-diurnal time scales. Such atmosphere pressure loading (APL) effects have been observed in high-precision space geodetic data, i.e. Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS), Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI), and Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR). These observational data are primarily used for geodynamic studies and it is important to remove the displacement signals due to APL which - if uncorrected - can propagate into other parameters and effects. In order to accurately model APL corrections, we established the project GGOS Atmosphere at TU Vienna. The overall goal of the project is not only to determine APL corrections but also to develop consistent and homogeneous models for atmospheric angular momentum, troposphere delays of radio signals, and gravity field coefficients for the atmosphere. Within project GGOS Atmosphere, we set up an accurate and rigorous procedure for the calculation of APL effects including the unambiguous definition and accurate calculation of a reference pressure. We use operational analysis as well as re-analysis data sets from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) with a horizontal resolution of 1 degree. The full APL displacements are divided into tidal and non-tidal components and 6-hourly radial and horizontal corrections are provided for all VLBI sites as well as for the nodes of a global 1 degree grid. The displacements are determined in the Center of Mass (CM) and in the Center of the solid Earth (CE) frames. We validate the correction values by VLBI observations and by comparison with results from other providers. Users can freely access the correction values at http://ggosatm.hg.tuwien.ac.at/.

  7. Influence of Atmospheric Pressure and Composition on LIBS

    SciTech Connect

    Hatch, Jeremy J.; Scott, Jill R.; Effenberger, A. J. Jr.

    2014-03-01

    Most LIBS experiments are conducted at standard atmospheric pressure in air. However, there are LIBS studies that vary the pressure and composition of the gas. These studies have provided insights into fundamentals of the mechanisms that lead to the emission and methods for improving the quality of LIBS spectra. These atmospheric studies are difficult because the effects of pressure and gas composition and interconnected, making interpretation of the results difficult. The influence of pressures below and above 760 Torr have been explored. Performing LIBS on a surface at reduced pressures (<760 Torr) can result in enhanced spectra due to higher resolution, increased intensity, improved signal-to-noise (S/N), and increased ablation. Lower pressures produce increased resolution because the line width in LIBS spectra is predominantly due to Stark and Doppler broadening. Stark broadening is primarily caused from collisions between electrons and atoms, while Doppler broadening is proportional to the plasma temperature. Close examination using a high resolution spectrometer reveals that spectra show significant peak broadening and self-absorption as pressures increase, especially for pressures >760 Torr. During LIBS plasma expansion, energy is lost to the surrounding atmosphere, which reduces the lifetime of the laser plasma. Therefore, reducing the pressure increases the lifetime of the plasma, allowing more light from the laser plasma to be collected; thus, increasing the observed signal intensity. However, if pressures are too low (<10 Torr), then there is a steep drop in LIBS spectral intensity. This loss in intensity is mostly due to a disordered plasma that results from the lack of sufficient atmosphere to provide adequate confinement. At reduced pressures, the plasma expands into a less dense atmosphere, which results in a less dense shock wave. The reduced density in the shock wave results in reduced plasma shielding, allowing more photons to reach the sample

  8. Atmospheric-pressure plasma synthesis of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozaki, Tomohiro; Yoshida, Shinpei; Karatsu, Takuya; Okazaki, Ken

    2011-05-01

    An atmospheric-pressure radio-frequency discharge (APRFD) has great advantages over vacuum-oriented plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) as well as other types of atmospheric-pressure plasma sources in terms of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) growth. We first provide an overview on the recent advances in PECVD synthesis of CNTs, ranging from low pressure to atmospheric pressure, and then we present our current work focusing on the analysis of reactive species generated in the cathodic plasma sheath for further understanding of the SWCNT growth mechanism in PECVD. It was found that the plasma-generated C2H2 is the main CNT growth precursor in PECVD. Approximately 30% of the CH4 (initial feedstock) was converted into C2H6, C2H4 and C2H2. A trace amount of C2H2 enabled the synthesis of SWCNTs in the thermal chemical vapour deposition (CVD) regime. H2 is necessary to grow SWCNTs using PECVD because H2 suppresses the formation of excess amount of C2H2; however, H2 does not eliminate amorphous carbon even at H2/C2H2 ratios of 300. PECVD using a binary mixture of C2H2 and isotope-modified 13CH4 demonstrated that CH4 does not contribute to CNT growth in C2H2-assisted thermal CVD. Atmospheric-pressure PECVD performed with a He/CH4/H2 system is equivalent to C2H2-assisted thermal CVD without an etching gas. APRFD appears to produce a hidden species, which influences the CNT growth process.

  9. Exploration Spacecraft and Space Suit Internal Atmosphere Pressure and Composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lange, Kevin; Duffield, Bruce; Jeng, Frank; Campbell, Paul

    2005-01-01

    The design of habitat atmospheres for future space missions is heavily driven by physiological and safety requirements. Lower EVA prebreathe time and reduced risk of decompression sickness must be balanced against the increased risk of fire and higher cost and mass of materials associated with higher oxygen concentrations. Any proposed increase in space suit pressure must consider impacts on space suit mass and mobility. Future spacecraft designs will likely incorporate more composite and polymeric materials both to reduce structural mass and to optimize crew radiation protection. Narrowed atmosphere design spaces have been identified that can be used as starting points for more detailed design studies and risk assessments.

  10. Differential absorption lidar measurements of atmospheric temperature and pressure profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korb, C. L.

    1981-01-01

    The theory and methodology of using differential absorption lidar techniques for the remote measurement of atmospheric pressure profiles, surface pressure, and temperature profiles from ground, air, and space-based platforms are presented. Pressure measurements are effected by means of high resolution measurement of absorption at the edges of the oxygen A band lines where absorption is pressure dependent due to collisional line broadening. Temperature is assessed using measurements of the absorption at the center of the oxygen A band line originating from a quantum state with high ground state energy. The population of the state is temperature dependent, allowing determination of the temperature through the Boltzmann term. The results of simulations of the techniques using Voigt profile and variational analysis are reported for ground-based, airborne, and Shuttle-based systems. Accuracies in the 0.5-1.0 K and 0.1-0.3% range are projected.

  11. Atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma: Sources and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napartovich, A. P.

    2008-07-01

    Non-thermal plasma at atmospheric pressure is an inherently unstable object. Nature of discharge plasma instabilities and conditions for observation of uniform non-thermal plasma at atmospheric pressure in different environments will be discussed. Various discharge techniques have been developed, which could support uniform non-thermal plasma with parameters varied in a wide range. Time limitation by plasma instabilities can be overcome by shortening pulse length or by restriction of plasma plug residence time with a fast gas flow. Discharge instabilities leading to formation of filaments or sparks are provoked by a positive feedback between the electric field and plasma density, while the counteracting process is plasma and thermal diffusion. With gas pressure growth the size of plasma fluctuation, which could be stabilized by diffusion, diminishes. As a result, to have long lived uniform plasma one should miniaturize discharge. There exist a number of active methods to organize negative feedback between the electric field and plasma density in order to suppress or, at least, delay the instability. Among them are ballast resistors in combination with electrode sectioning, reactive ballast, electronic feedback, and dielectric barrier across the electric current. The last methods are relevant for ac discharges. In the lecture an overview will be given of different discharge techniques scalable in pressure up to one atmosphere. The interest in this topic is dictated by a potential economic benefit from numerous non-thermal plasma technologies. The spectrum of non-thermal plasma applications is continuously broadening. An incomplete list of known applications includes: plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition, etching, polymerization, gas-phase synthesis, protective coating deposition, toxic and harmful gas decomposition, destruction of warfare agents, electromagnetic wave shielding, polymer surface modifications, gas laser excitation, odor control, plasma assisted

  12. Reduced atmospheric pressure in Radish: Alteration of NCER and transpiration at decreased oxygen partial pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehkamp, Cara Ann; Stasiak, Michael; Wheeler, Raymond; Dixon, Mike

    Fundamental to the future of space exploration is the development of advanced life support systems capable of maintaining crews for significant periods without re-supply from Earth. Significant research is focused on the development of bioregenerative life support systems to be used in conjunction with the current physico-chemical methods. These bioregenerative life support systems harness natural ecosystem processes and employ plant photosynthesis and transpiration to produce food, oxygen and regenerate water while consuming carbon dioxide. The forthcoming exploration of the Moon and Mars has prompted interest into the effects of hypobaria on plant development. Reduced atmospheric pressures will lessen the pressure gradient between the structure and the local environment thereby decreasing gas leakage and possibly the structural mass of the plant growth facility. In order to establish the optimal specifications for reduced pressure plant growth structures it is essential to determine the atmospheric pressure limits required for conventional plant development and growth. Due to its physiological importance, oxygen will compose a significant portion of these minimal environments. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that reduced atmospheric pressure and decreased oxygen partial pressures had no effect on radish productivity. Radishes (Raphanus sativa L. cv. Cherry Bomb II) were grown from seed in the University of Guelph's Hypobaric Plant Growth Chambers for a period of 21 days. Treatments included total pressures of 10, 33, 66 and 96 kPa and oxygen partial pressures of 2, 7, 14 and 20 kPa. Experiments demonstrated that reduced partial pressures of oxygen had a greater effect on radish growth than hypobaria. Results showed a reduction in net carbon exchange rate and transpiration with decreasing oxygen partial pressures leading to diminished productivity. Keywords: hypobaric, radish, oxygen partial pressure, variable pressure chamber

  13. Air plasma jet with hollow electrodes at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Yong Cheol; Uhm, Han Sup

    2007-05-15

    Atmospheric-pressure plasma jet with air is produced through hollow electrodes and dielectric with a hole of 1 mm diam. The plasma jet device is operated by injecting pressurized air into the electrode hole. The air plasma jet device at average powers less than 5 W exhibits a cold plasma jet of about 2 cm in length and near the room temperature, being low enough to treat thermally sensitive materials. Preliminary studies on the discharge characteristics and application tests are also presented by comparing the air plasma jet with the nitrogen and argon plasma jet.

  14. Optimizing a remote sensing instrument to measure atmospheric surface pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peckham, G. E.; Gatley, C.; Flower, D. A.

    1983-01-01

    Atmospheric surface pressure can be remotely sensed from a satellite by an active instrument which measures return echoes from the ocean at frequencies near the 60 GHz oxygen absorption band. The instrument is optimized by selecting its frequencies of operation, transmitter powers and antenna size through a new procedure baesd on numerical simulation which maximizes the retrieval accuracy. The predicted standard deviation error in the retrieved surface pressure is 1 mb. In addition the measurements can be used to retrieve water vapor, cloud liquid water and sea state, which is related to wind speed.

  15. Removal of paper microbial contamination by atmospheric pressure DBD discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrajova, J.; Chalupova, L.; Novotny, O.; Cech, J.; Krcma, F.; Stahel, P.

    2009-08-01

    In this paper the removal of the microbial contamination from paper material using the plasma treatment at atmospheric pressure is investigated. The Aspergillus niger has been chosen as a bio-indicator enabling to evaluate the effect of plasma assisted microbial inactivation. Dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) operated at atmospheric pressure was used for the paper sterilization. The working gas (nitrogen, argon and helium), plasma exposition time and the plasma power density were varied in order to see the effect of the plasma treatment on the fungi removal. After the treatment, the microbial abatement was evaluated by the standard plate count method. This proved a positive effect of the DBD plasma treatment on fungi removal. Morphological and colorimetric changes of paper substrate after plasma treatment were also investigated.

  16. Atmospheric pressure plasma jet for liquid spray treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitić, S.; Philipps, J.; Hofmann, D.

    2016-05-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma jets have been intensively studied in recent years due to growing interest in their use for biomedical applications and surface treatments. Either surfaces can be treated by a plasma jet afterglow for cleaning or activation or a material can be deposited by a reactive gas component activated by plasma. Effects of plasma on liquid have been reported several times where the electron spin trapping method was used for radical detection. Here we propose another method of liquid treatment using the atmospheric pressure plasma jet. In the device presented here, liquid was sprayed in droplets from an inner electrode directly into a plasma jet where it was treated and sprayed out by gas flow. Optical end electrical measurements were done for diagnostics of the plasma while electron paramagnetic resonance measurements were used for detection of radicals (\\text{OH},\\text{OOH},\\text{CH} ) produced by plasma treatment of liquids.

  17. Cellular membrane collapse by atmospheric-pressure plasma jet

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kangil; Sik Yang, Sang E-mail: ssyang@ajou.ac.kr; Jun Ahn, Hak; Lee, Jong-Soo E-mail: ssyang@ajou.ac.kr; Lee, Jae-Hyeok; Kim, Jae-Ho

    2014-01-06

    Cellular membrane dysfunction caused by air plasma in cancer cells has been studied to exploit atmospheric-pressure plasma jets for cancer therapy. Here, we report that plasma jet treatment of cervical cancer HeLa cells increased electrical conductivity across the cellular lipid membrane and caused simultaneous lipid oxidation and cellular membrane collapse. We made this finding by employing a self-manufactured microelectrode chip. Furthermore, increased roughness of the cellular lipid membrane and sequential collapse of the membrane were observed by atomic force microscopy following plasma jet treatment. These results suggest that the cellular membrane catastrophe occurs via coincident altered electrical conductivity, lipid oxidation, and membrane roughening caused by an atmospheric-pressure plasma jet, possibly resulting in cellular vulnerability to reactive species generated from the plasma as well as cytotoxicity to cancer cells.

  18. A decadal precession of atmospheric pressures over the North Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Bruce T.; Gianotti, Daniel J. S.; Furtado, Jason C.; Di Lorenzo, Emanuele

    2016-04-01

    Sustained droughts over the Northwestern U.S. can alter water availability to the region's agricultural, hydroelectric, and ecosystem service sectors. Here we analyze decadal variations in precipitation across this region and reveal their relation to the slow (~10 year) progression of an atmospheric pressure pattern around the North Pacific, which we term the Pacific Decadal Precession (PDP). Observations corroborate that leading patterns of atmospheric pressure variability over the North Pacific evolve in a manner consistent with the PDP and manifest as different phases in its evolution. Further analysis of the data indicates that low-frequency fluctuations of the tropical Pacific Ocean state energize one phase of the PDP and possibly the other through coupling with the polar stratosphere. Evidence that many recent climate variations influencing the North Pacific/North American sector over the last few years are consistent with the current phase of the PDP confirms the need to enhance our predictive understanding of its behavior.

  19. Cellular membrane collapse by atmospheric-pressure plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kangil; Jun Ahn, Hak; Lee, Jae-Hyeok; Kim, Jae-Ho; Sik Yang, Sang; Lee, Jong-Soo

    2014-01-01

    Cellular membrane dysfunction caused by air plasma in cancer cells has been studied to exploit atmospheric-pressure plasma jets for cancer therapy. Here, we report that plasma jet treatment of cervical cancer HeLa cells increased electrical conductivity across the cellular lipid membrane and caused simultaneous lipid oxidation and cellular membrane collapse. We made this finding by employing a self-manufactured microelectrode chip. Furthermore, increased roughness of the cellular lipid membrane and sequential collapse of the membrane were observed by atomic force microscopy following plasma jet treatment. These results suggest that the cellular membrane catastrophe occurs via coincident altered electrical conductivity, lipid oxidation, and membrane roughening caused by an atmospheric-pressure plasma jet, possibly resulting in cellular vulnerability to reactive species generated from the plasma as well as cytotoxicity to cancer cells.

  20. Microwave-assisted atmospheric pressure plasma polymerization of hexamethyldisiloxane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsubayashi, Toshiki; Hidaka, Hiroki; Muguruma, Hitoshi

    2016-07-01

    Microwave-assisted atmospheric pressure plasma polymerization is presented. A system with a re-entrant microwave cavity realizes simple matching, stable plasma, and free space under the orifice of plasma steam. Hexamethyldisiloxane is employed as a monomer, while argon is used as a carrier gas. The effective area of the hydrophobic coating film used corresponds to a circle of 20 mm diameter and the deposition rate considered is 5 nm/min. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectroscopy shows that the coating film has a large molecular weight (>200 kDa), suggesting that a high-crosslinking and three-dimensional polymer matrix is formed and microwave-assisted atmospheric pressure plasma polymerization is fulfilled.

  1. Thermally induced atmospheric pressure gas discharges using pyroelectric crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Michael J.; Linczer, John; Go, David B.

    2014-12-01

    Using a heated pyroelectric crystal, an atmospheric pressure gas discharge was generated through the input of heat. When put through a change in temperature, the polarization of a pyroelectric can change significantly, creating a substantial electric potential at its surface. When configured with a grounded sharp counter electrode, a large inhomogeneous electric field forms in the interstitial gas to initiate a corona-like discharge. Under constant heating conditions, gaseous ions drifting to the pyroelectric accumulate and screen the electric field, extinguishing the discharge. By thermally cycling the pyroelectric, negative and positive discharges are generated during heating and cooling, respectively, with peak currents on the order of 80 nA. Time-integrated visualization confirmed the generation of both a corona-like discharge and a surface discharge on the pyroelectric. Parametric studies identified that thermal cycling conditions significantly influence discharge formation for this new atmospheric pressure discharge approach.

  2. Air plasma jet with hollow electrodes at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Yong Cheol; Uhm, Han Sup

    2007-05-01

    Atmospheric-pressure plasma jet with air is produced through hollow electrodes and dielectric with a hole of 5W exhibits a cold plasma jet of about 2cm in length and near the room temperature, being low enough to treat thermally sensitive materials. Preliminary studies on the discharge characteristics and application tests are also presented by comparing the air plasma jet with the nitrogen and argon plasma jet.

  3. Cratering mechanics on Venus - Pressure enhancement by the atmospheric 'ocean'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brackett, Robert A.; Mckinnon, William B.

    1992-01-01

    The impedance match technique and EOSs of equations of state (EOSs) of geologically relevant materials are used to investigate cratering mechanics on Venus, specifically, the coupling of impactor kinetic energy and momentum into the target surface. These EOSs are modified to account for multiple shocks. Peak impact pressures from both first reflection and later reverberations are determined. These are compared to values obtained using an atmosphereless model, and the differences between and implications for atmosphere-affected and atmosphereless impacts are discussed.

  4. Evolutionary pressures on planktonic production of atmospheric sulphur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldeira, Ken

    1989-02-01

    The possibility that dimethylsulphide (DMS) produced by marine phytoplankton is the major source of cloud condensation nuclei in the remote marine atmosphere is examined. Calculations of relative evolutionary pressure in models of individual and group selection are reviewed, showing that neither climate modulation nor altruism cloud have been the primary factors in the evolution of midocean DMS production. It is found that the midocean DMS production can be explained by selection based on local interactions such as osmoregulation.

  5. Double streamer phenomena in atmospheric pressure low frequency corona plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Dan Bee; Jung, H.; Gweon, B.; Choe, Wonho

    2010-07-15

    Time-resolved images of an atmospheric pressure corona discharge, generated at 50 kHz in a single pin electrode source, show unique positive and negative corona discharge features: a streamer for the positive period and a glow for the negative period. However, unlike in previous reports of dc pulse and low frequency corona discharges, multistreamers were observed at the initial time stage of the positive corona. A possible physical mechanism for the multistreamers is suggested.

  6. Atmospheric pressure thermospray ionization using a heated microchip nebulizer.

    PubMed

    Keski-Rahkonen, Pekka; Haapala, Markus; Saarela, Ville; Franssila, Sami; Kotiaho, Tapio; Kostiainen, Risto; Auriola, Seppo

    2009-10-30

    When a standard atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) or atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) ion source is used without applying the corona discharge or photoirradiation, atmospheric pressure thermospray ionization (APTSI) of various compounds can be achieved. Although largely ignored, this phenomenon has recently gained interest as an alternative ionization technique. In this study, this technique is performed for the first time on a miniaturized scale using a microchip nebulizer. Sample ionization with the presented microchip-APTSI (microAPTSI) is achieved by applying only heat and gas flow to a nebulizer chip, without any other methods to promote gas-phase ionization. To evaluate the performance of the described microAPTSI setup, ionization efficiency for a set of test compounds was monitored as the microchip positioning, temperature, nebulizer gas flow rate, sample solution composition, and solvent flow rate were varied. The microAPTSI mass spectra of the test compounds were also compared to those obtained with ESI and APCI. The microAPTSI produces ESI-like spectra with low background noise, favoring the formation of protonated or deprotonated molecules of compounds that are ionizable in solution. Multiple charging of peptides without in-source fragmentation was also observed. Unlike ESI, however, the microAPTSI source can tolerate the presence of mobile phase additives like trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) without significant ion suppression. The microAPTSI source can be used with standard mass spectrometer ion source hardware, being a unique alternative to the present interfacing techniques.

  7. Synthesis of carbon nanotubes in Atmospheric Pressure PECVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozaki, Tomohiro; Goto, Tomoya; Okazaki, Ken; Mangolini, Lorenzo

    2004-09-01

    We have developed atmospheric pressure radio frequency discharge enhaced CVD system for the catalytic growth of CNTs. APG, which is a kind of dielectric barrier discharge (DBD), is homogeneous and stable, because the dilution gas (He) represses the generation of filamentary discharge. In this study Atmospheric Pressure Glow discharge (APG) was generated without dielectric barrier using a radio frequency (RF:13.56MHz) power source. In the case of RF discharge, dielectric between metalic electrodes is not necessary since ions and electrons are trapped between electrodes, decreasing sustaining voltage of plasma. We tried to synthesize carbon nanotubes by using Atmospheric Pressure RF Glow discharge (APRFG) enhanced CVD. Substrate used in this work was Ni (20nm)/Cr (20nm) thin films on Si wafers deposited with RF sputtering. In the carbon nanotube growing process, He/H2/CH4 mixture was processed in the vaccum chamber operated at 760 Torr, while the electrode was heated up to 700°C. The identification of several radicals from optical emission spectroscopy (OES), the relationship between synthesis of CNTs and plasma characteristics will be presented.

  8. Stimulation of wound healing by helium atmospheric pressure plasma treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasile Nastuta, Andrei; Topala, Ionut; Grigoras, Constantin; Pohoata, Valentin; Popa, Gheorghe

    2011-03-01

    New experiments using atmospheric pressure plasma have found large application in treatment of living cells or tissues, wound healing, cancerous cell apoptosis, blood coagulation on wounds, bone tissue modification, sterilization and decontamination. In this study an atmospheric pressure plasma jet generated using a cylindrical dielectric-barrier discharge was applied for treatment of burned wounds on Wistar rats' skin. The low temperature plasma jet works in helium and is driven by high voltage pulses. Oxygen and nitrogen based impurities are identified in the jet by emission spectroscopy. This paper analyses the natural epithelization of the rats' skin wounds and two methods of assisted epithelization, a classical one using polyurethane wound dressing and a new one using daily atmospheric pressure plasma treatment of wounds. Systemic and local medical data, such as haematological, biochemical and histological parameters, were monitored during entire period of study. Increased oxidative stress was observed for plasma treated wound. This result can be related to the presence in the plasma volume of active species, such as O and OH radicals. Both methods, wound dressing and plasma-assisted epithelization, provided positive medical results related to the recovery process of burned wounds. The dynamics of the skin regeneration process was modified: the epidermis re-epitelization was accelerated, while the recovery of superficial dermis was slowed down.

  9. Transmission geometry laserspray ionization vacuum using an atmospheric pressure inlet.

    PubMed

    Lutomski, Corinne A; El-Baba, Tarick J; Inutan, Ellen D; Manly, Cory D; Wager-Miller, James; Mackie, Ken; Trimpin, Sarah

    2014-07-01

    This represents the first report of laserspray ionization vacuum (LSIV) with operation directly from atmospheric pressure for use in mass spectrometry. Two different types of electrospray ionization source inlets were converted to LSIV sources by equipping the entrance of the atmospheric pressure inlet aperture with a customized cone that is sealed with a removable glass plate holding the matrix/analyte sample. A laser aligned in transmission geometry (at 180° relative to the inlet) ablates the matrix/analyte sample deposited on the vacuum side of the glass slide. Laser ablation from vacuum requires lower inlet temperature relative to laser ablation at atmospheric pressure. However, higher inlet temperature is required for high-mass analytes, for example, α-chymotrypsinogen (25.6 kDa). Labile compounds such as gangliosides and cardiolipins are detected in the negative ion mode directly from mouse brain tissue as intact doubly deprotonated ions. Multiple charging enhances the ion mobility spectrometry separation of ions derived from complex tissue samples.

  10. Atmospheric pressure loading effects on Global Positioning System coordinate determinations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandam, Tonie M.; Blewitt, Geoffrey; Heflin, Michael B.

    1994-01-01

    Earth deformation signals caused by atmospheric pressure loading are detected in vertical position estimates at Global Positioning System (GPS) stations. Surface displacements due to changes in atmospheric pressure account for up to 24% of the total variance in the GPS height estimates. The detected loading signals are larger at higher latitudes where pressure variations are greatest; the largest effect is observed at Fairbanks, Alaska (latitude 65 deg), with a signal root mean square (RMS) of 5 mm. Out of 19 continuously operating GPS sites (with a mean of 281 daily solutions per site), 18 show a positive correlation between the GPS vertical estimates and the modeled loading displacements. Accounting for loading reduces the variance of the vertical station positions on 12 of the 19 sites investigated. Removing the modeled pressure loading from GPS determinations of baseline length for baselines longer than 6000 km reduces the variance on 73 of the 117 baselines investigated. The slight increase in variance for some of the sites and baselines is consistent with expected statistical fluctuations. The results from most stations are consistent with approximately 65% of the modeled pressure load being found in the GPS vertical position measurements. Removing an annual signal from both the measured heights and the modeled load time series leaves this value unchanged. The source of the remaining discrepancy between the modeled and observed loading signal may be the result of (1) anisotropic effects in the Earth's loading response, (2) errors in GPS estimates of tropospheric delay, (3) errors in the surface pressure data, or (4) annual signals in the time series of loading and station heights. In addition, we find that using site dependent coefficients, determined by fitting local pressure to the modeled radial displacements, reduces the variance of the measured station heights as well as or better than using the global convolution sum.

  11. Atmospheric sugar alcohols: evaporation rates and saturation vapor pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilde, M.; Zardini, A. A.; Hong, J.; Tschiskale, M.; Emanuelsson, E.

    2014-12-01

    The atmospheric partitioning between gas and condensed phase of organic molecules is poorly understood, and discrepancies exist between predicted and observed concentrations of secondary organic aerosols. A key problem is the lack of information about thermodynamic properties of semi- and low volatile organic molecules. Saturation vapor pressure and the associated temperature dependence (dH) are key parameters for improving predictive atmospheric models. In this work we combine experiments and thermodynamic modeling to investigate these parameters for a series of polyols, so-called sugar alcohols. These polyols are common in the water soluble fraction of atmospheric aerosols. In our experimental system sub-micron particles are generated by nebulization from aqueous solution, and a mono disperse fraction of the aerosol is selected using a differential mobility analyzer. The particles are allowed to evaporate in a laminar flow reactor, and changes in particle size as function of evaporation time are determined using a scanning mobility particle sizer system. In this work saturation vapor pressures of sugar alcohols at several temperatures have been inferred from such measurements using thermodynamic modeling. Results are presented and discussed in context of atmospheric gas to particle partitioning.

  12. Etching of photoresist with an atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Andrew; van der Schans, Marc; Xu, Cigang; Gans, Timo; Cooke, Mike; Wagenaars, Erik

    2014-10-01

    Low-pressure oxygen plasmas are commonly used in semiconductor industry for removing photoresist from the surface of processed wafers; a process known as plasma ashing or plasma stripping. The possible use of atmospheric-pressure plasmas instead of low-pressure ones for plasma ashing is attractive from the point of view of reduction in equipment costs and processing time. We present investigations of photoresist etching with an atmospheric-pressure plasma jet (APPJ) in helium gas with oxygen admixtures driven by radio-frequency power. In these experiments, the neutral, radical rich effluent of the APPJ is used for etching, avoiding direct contact between the active plasma and the sensitive wafer, while maintaining a high etch rate. Photoresist etch rates and etch quality are measured for a range of plasma operating parameters such as power input, driving frequency, flow rate and wafer temperature. Etch rates of up to 10 micron/min were achieved with modest input power (45 W) and gas flow rate (10 slm). Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy showed that the quality of the photoresist removal was comparable to traditional plasma ashing techniques. This work was supported by the UK Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council Grant EP/K018388/1.

  13. Time and space variability of spectral estimates of atmospheric pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canavero, Flavio G.; Einaudi, Franco

    1987-01-01

    The temporal and spatial behaviors of atmospheric pressure spectra over the northern Italy and the Alpine massif were analyzed using data on surface pressure measurements carried out at two microbarograph stations in the Po Valley, one 50 km south of the Alps, the other in the foothills of the Dolomites. The first 15 days of the study overlapped with the Alpex Intensive Observation Period. The pressure records were found to be intrinsically nonstationary and were found to display substantial time variability, implying that the statistical moments depend on time. The shape and the energy content of spectra depended on different time segments. In addition, important differences existed between spectra obtained at the two stations, indicating a substantial effect of topography, particularly for periods less than 40 min.

  14. Highly physical penumbra solar radiation pressure modeling with atmospheric effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Robert; Flury, Jakob; Bandikova, Tamara; Schilling, Manuel

    2015-10-01

    We present a new method for highly physical solar radiation pressure (SRP) modeling in Earth's penumbra. The fundamental geometry and approach mirrors past work, where the solar radiation field is modeled using a number of light rays, rather than treating the Sun as a single point source. However, we aim to clarify this approach, simplify its implementation, and model previously overlooked factors. The complex geometries involved in modeling penumbra solar radiation fields are described in a more intuitive and complete way to simplify implementation. Atmospheric effects are tabulated to significantly reduce computational cost. We present new, more efficient and accurate approaches to modeling atmospheric effects which allow us to consider the high spatial and temporal variability in lower atmospheric conditions. Modeled penumbra SRP accelerations for the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellites are compared to the sub-nm/s2 precision GRACE accelerometer data. Comparisons to accelerometer data and a traditional penumbra SRP model illustrate the improved accuracy which our methods provide. Sensitivity analyses illustrate the significance of various atmospheric parameters and modeled effects on penumbra SRP. While this model is more complex than a traditional penumbra SRP model, we demonstrate its utility and propose that a highly physical model which considers atmospheric effects should be the basis for any simplified approach to penumbra SRP modeling.

  15. Reduced Pressure Cabin Testing of the Orion Atmosphere Revitalization Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Button, Amy B.; Sweterlitsch, Jeffrey J.

    2013-01-01

    An amine-based carbon dioxide (CO2) and water vapor sorbent in pressure-swing regenerable beds has been developed by United Technologies Corp. Aerospace Systems (UTAS, formerly Hamilton Sundstrand) and baselined for the Atmosphere Revitalization System for moderate duration missions of the Orion Multipurpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV). In previous years at this conference, reports were presented on extensive Johnson Space Center testing of this technology in a sea-level pressure environment with simulated and actual human metabolic loads in both open and closed-loop configurations. In 2011, the technology was tested in an open cabin-loop configuration at ambient and two sub-ambient pressures to compare the performance of the system to the results of previous tests at ambient pressure. The testing used a human metabolic simulator with a different type of water vapor generation than previously used, which added some unique challenges in the data analysis. This paper summarizes the results of: baseline and some matrix testing at all three cabin pressures, increased vacuum regeneration line pressure testing with a high metabolic load, a set of tests studying CO2 and water vapor co-adsorption effects relative to model-predicted performance, and validation tests of flight project computer model predictions with specific operating conditions.

  16. Reduced Pressure Cabin Testing of the Orion Atmosphere Revitalization Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Button, Amy; Sweterlitsch, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    An amine-based carbon dioxide (CO2) and water vapor sorbent in pressure-swing regenerable beds has been developed by Hamilton Sundstrand and baselined for the Atmosphere Revitalization System for moderate duration missions of the Orion Multipurpose Crew Vehicle. In previous years at this conference, reports were presented on extensive Johnson Space Center testing of this technology in a sea-level pressure environment with simulated and actual human metabolic loads in both open and closed-loop configurations. In 2011, the technology was tested in an open cabin-loop configuration at ambient and two sub-ambient pressures to compare the performance of the system to the results of previous tests at ambient pressure. The testing used a human metabolic simulator with a different type of water vapor generation than previously used, which added some unique challenges in the data analysis. This paper summarizes the results of: baseline and some matrix testing at all three cabin pressures, increased vacuum regeneration line pressure with a high metabolic load, a set of tests studying CO2 and water vapor co-adsorption effects relative to model-predicted performance, and validation tests of flight program computer model predictions with specific operating conditions.

  17. Reduced Pressure Cabin Testing of the Orion Atmosphere Revitalization Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Button, Amy; Sweterlisch, Jeffery J.

    2013-01-01

    An amine-based carbon dioxide (CO2) and water vapor sorbent in pressure-swing regenerable beds has been developed by Hamilton Sundstrand and baselined for the Atmosphere Revitalization System for moderate duration missions of the Orion Multipurpose Crew Vehicle. In previous years at this conference, reports were presented on extensive Johnson Space Center testing of this technology in a sea-level pressure environment with simulated and actual human metabolic loads in both open and closed-loop configurations. In 2011, the technology was tested in an open cabin-loop configuration at ambient and two sub-ambient pressures to compare the performance of the system to the results of previous tests at ambient pressure. The testing used a human metabolic simulator with a different type of water vapor generation than previously used, which added some unique challenges in the data analysis. This paper summarizes the results of: baseline and some matrix testing at all three cabin pressures, increased vacuum regeneration line pressure with a high metabolic load, a set of tests studying CO2 and water vapor co-adsorption effects relative to model-predicted performance, and validation tests of flight program computer model predictions with specific operating conditions.

  18. The updated bottom up solution applied to atmospheric pressure photoionization and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Updated Bottom Up Solution (UBUS) was recently applied to atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) mass spectrometry (MS) of triacylglycerols (TAGs). This report demonstrates that the UBUS applies equally well to atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) MS and to electrospray ionizatio...

  19. When API Mass Spectrometry Meets Super Atmospheric Pressure Ion Sources

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lee Chuin

    2015-01-01

    In a tutorial paper on the application of free-jet technique for API-MS, John Fenn mentioned that “…for a number of years and a number of reasons, it has been found advantageous in many situations to carry out the ionization process in gas at pressures up to 1000 Torr or more” (Int. J. Mass Spectrom. 200: 459–478, 2000). In fact, the first ESI mass spectrometer constructed by Yamashita and Fenn had a counter-flow curtain gas source at 1050 Torr (ca. 1.4 atm) to sweep away the neutral (J. Phys. Chem. 88: 4451–4459, 1984). For gaseous ionization using electrospray plume, theoretical analysis also shows that “super-atmospheric operation would be more preferable in space-charge-limited situations.”(Int. J. Mass Spectrom. 300: 182–193, 2011). However, electrospray and the corona-based chemical ion source (APCI) in most commercial instrument are basically operated under an atmospheric pressure ambient, perhaps out of the concern of safety, convenience and simplicity in maintenance. Running the ion source at pressure much higher than 1 atm is not so common, but had been done by a number of groups as well as in our laboratory. A brief review on these ion sources will be given in this paper. PMID:26819912

  20. When API Mass Spectrometry Meets Super Atmospheric Pressure Ion Sources.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lee Chuin

    2015-01-01

    In a tutorial paper on the application of free-jet technique for API-MS, John Fenn mentioned that "…for a number of years and a number of reasons, it has been found advantageous in many situations to carry out the ionization process in gas at pressures up to 1000 Torr or more" (Int. J. Mass Spectrom. 200: 459-478, 2000). In fact, the first ESI mass spectrometer constructed by Yamashita and Fenn had a counter-flow curtain gas source at 1050 Torr (ca. 1.4 atm) to sweep away the neutral (J. Phys. Chem. 88: 4451-4459, 1984). For gaseous ionization using electrospray plume, theoretical analysis also shows that "super-atmospheric operation would be more preferable in space-charge-limited situations."(Int. J. Mass Spectrom. 300: 182-193, 2011). However, electrospray and the corona-based chemical ion source (APCI) in most commercial instrument are basically operated under an atmospheric pressure ambient, perhaps out of the concern of safety, convenience and simplicity in maintenance. Running the ion source at pressure much higher than 1 atm is not so common, but had been done by a number of groups as well as in our laboratory. A brief review on these ion sources will be given in this paper.

  1. When API Mass Spectrometry Meets Super Atmospheric Pressure Ion Sources.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lee Chuin

    2015-01-01

    In a tutorial paper on the application of free-jet technique for API-MS, John Fenn mentioned that "…for a number of years and a number of reasons, it has been found advantageous in many situations to carry out the ionization process in gas at pressures up to 1000 Torr or more" (Int. J. Mass Spectrom. 200: 459-478, 2000). In fact, the first ESI mass spectrometer constructed by Yamashita and Fenn had a counter-flow curtain gas source at 1050 Torr (ca. 1.4 atm) to sweep away the neutral (J. Phys. Chem. 88: 4451-4459, 1984). For gaseous ionization using electrospray plume, theoretical analysis also shows that "super-atmospheric operation would be more preferable in space-charge-limited situations."(Int. J. Mass Spectrom. 300: 182-193, 2011). However, electrospray and the corona-based chemical ion source (APCI) in most commercial instrument are basically operated under an atmospheric pressure ambient, perhaps out of the concern of safety, convenience and simplicity in maintenance. Running the ion source at pressure much higher than 1 atm is not so common, but had been done by a number of groups as well as in our laboratory. A brief review on these ion sources will be given in this paper. PMID:26819912

  2. Atmospheric pressure plasma enhanced spatial ALD of silver

    SciTech Connect

    Bruele, Fieke J. van den Smets, Mireille; Illiberi, Andrea; Poodt, Paul; Buskens, Pascal; Roozeboom, Fred

    2015-01-15

    The authors have investigated the growth of thin silver films using a unique combination of atmospheric process elements: spatial atomic layer deposition and an atmospheric pressure surface dielectric barrier discharge plasma source. Silver films were grown on top of Si substrates with good purity as revealed by resistivity values as low as 18 μΩ cm and C- and F-levels below detection limits of energy dispersive x-ray analysis. The growth of the silver films starts through the nucleation of islands that subsequently coalesce. The authors show that the surface island morphology is dependent on surface diffusion, which can be controlled by temperature within the deposition temperature range of 100–120 °C.

  3. Influence of Atmospheric Pressure Torch Plasma Irradiation on Plant Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyoshi, Yusuke; Hayashi, Nobuya; Kitazaki, Satoshi; Koga, Kazunori; Shiratani, Masaharu

    2011-10-01

    Growth stimulation characteristics of plants seeds are investigated by an atmospheric discharge irradiation into plasma seeds. Atmospheric pressure plasma torch is consisted of alumina ceramics tube and the steel mesh electrodes wind inside and outside of the tube. When AC high voltage (8 kHz) is applied to the electrode gap, the barrier discharge plasma is produced inside the alumina ceramics tube. The barrier discharge plasma is blown outside with the gas flow in ceramics tube. Radish sprouts seeds locate at 1 cm from the torch edge. The growth stimulation was observed in the length of a stem and a root after the plasma irradiation. The stem length increases approximately 2.8 times at the cultivation time of 24 h. And the growth stimulation effect is found to be maintained for 40 h, after sowing seeds. The mechanism of the growth stimulation would be the redox reaction inside plant cells induced by oxygen radicals.

  4. Development of an Atmospheric Pressure Ionization Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    A commercial atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometer (APIMS) was purchased from EXTREL Mass Spectrometry, Inc. (Pittsburgh, PA). Our research objectives were to adapt this instrument and develop techniques for real-time determinations of the concentrations of trace species in the atmosphere. The prototype instrument is capable of making high frequency measurements with no sample preconcentrations. Isotopically labeled standards are used as an internal standard to obtain high precision and to compensate for changes in instrument sensitivity and analyte losses in the sampling manifold as described by Bandy and coworkers. The prototype instrument is capable of being deployed on NASA C130, Electra, P3, and DC8 aircraft. After purchasing and taking delivery by June 1994, we assembled the mass spectrometer, data acquisition, and manifold flow control instrumentation in electronic racks and performed tests.

  5. Twin injection-needle plasmas at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Yong Cheol; Cho, Soon Chon; Uhm, Han Sup

    2007-04-02

    Twin injection-needle plasmas at atmospheric pressure are introduced as low-temperature nonequilibrium plasma source. The plasmas with long plasma columns of about 55 cm are produced from one alternating current (ac) power supply as if each of the plasmas is a fraternal twin and shows different characteristics in plasma column length and gas temperature. The twin plasma columns are regarded as skinny rods with a uniform charge distribution, and the change of the plasma column lengths with different distances between the plasmas is compared with the change of the capacitance of the skinny rods presented as a model.

  6. Electrode erosion in arc discharges at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardy, T. L.

    1985-01-01

    An experimental investigation was performed in an effort to measure and increase lifetime of electrodes in an arcjet thruster. The electrode erosion of various anode and cathode materials was measured after tests in an atmospheric pressure nitrogen arc discharge at powers less than 1 kW. A free-burning arc configuration and a constricted arc configuration were used to test the materials. Lanthanum hexaboride and thoriated tungsten had low cathode erosion rates while thoriated tungsten and pure tungsten had the lowest anode erosion rates of the materials tested. Anode cooling, reverse gas flow, and external magnetic fields were all found to reduce electrode mass loss.

  7. Electrode erosion in arc discharges at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardy, T. L.

    1985-01-01

    An experimental investigation was performed in an effort to measure and increase lifetime of electrodes in an arcjet thruster. The electrode erosion of various anode and cathode materials was measured after tests in an atmospheric pressure nitrogen arc discharge at powers less than 1 kW. A free-burning arc configuration and a constricted arc configuration were used to test the materials. Lanthanum hexboride and thoriated tungsten had low cathode erosion rates while thoriated tungsten and pure tungsten had the lowest anode erosion rates of the materials tested. Anode cooling, reverse gas flow, an external magnetic fields were all found to reduce electrode mass loss.

  8. A lidar system for measuring atmospheric pressure and temperature profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwemmer, Geary K.; Dombrowski, Mark; Korb, C. Laurence; Milrod, Jeffry; Walden, Harvey

    1987-01-01

    The design and operation of a differential absorption lidar system capable of remotely measuring the vertical structure of tropospheric pressure and temperature are described. The measurements are based on the absorption by atmospheric oxygen of the spectrally narrowband output of two pulsed alexandrite lasers. Detailed laser output spectral characteristics, which are critical to successful lidar measurements, are presented. Spectral linewidths of 0.026 and 0.018 per cm for the lasers were measured with over 99.99 percent of the energy contained in three longitudinal modes.

  9. Driven Motion and Instability of an Atmospheric Pressure Arc

    SciTech Connect

    Max Karasik

    1999-12-01

    Atmospheric pressure arcs are used extensively in applications such as welding and metallurgy. However, comparatively little is known of the physics of such arcs in external magnetic fields and the mechanisms of the instabilities present. In order to address questions of equilibrium and stability of such arcs, an experimental arc furnace is constructed and operated in air with graphite cathode and steel anode at currents 100-250 A. The arc is diagnosed with a gated intensified camera and a collimated photodiode array, as well as fast voltage and current probes.

  10. Electron kinetics in a microdischarge in nitrogen at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levko, Dmitry

    2013-12-01

    Electron kinetics during a microdischarge in nitrogen at atmospheric pressure is studied using the one-dimensional Particle-in-Cell/Monte Carlo Collisions model. It is obtained that the electron energy distribution function can be divided into three parts, namely, the non-equilibrium low-energy part, the Maxwellian function at moderate energies, and the high-energy tail. Simulation results showed that the role of the high-energy tail of electron energy distribution increases, when the distance between electrodes increases.

  11. Heat transport of nitrogen in helium atmospheric pressure microplasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, S. F.; Zhong, X. X.

    2013-07-01

    Stable DC atmospheric pressure normal glow discharges in ambient air were produced between the water surface and the metallic capillary coupled with influx of helium gas. Multiple independent repeated trials indicated that vibrational temperature of nitrogen rises from 3200 to 4622 K, and rotational temperature of nitrogen decreases from 1270 to 570 K as gas flux increasing from 20 to 80 sccm and discharge current decreasing from 11 to 3 mA. Furthermore, it was found that the vibrational degree of the nitrogen molecule has priority to gain energy than the rotational degree of nitrogen molecule in nonequilibrium helium microplasma.

  12. Generation of subnanosecond electron beams in air at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostyrya, I. D.; Tarasenko, V. F.; Baksht, E. Kh.; Burachenko, A. G.; Lomaev, M. I.; Rybka, D. V.

    2009-11-01

    Optimum conditions for the generation of runaway electron beams with maximum current amplitudes and densities in nanosecond pulsed discharges in air at atmospheric pressure are determined. A supershort avalanche electron beam (SAEB) with a current amplitude of ˜30 A, a current density of ˜20 A/cm2, and a pulse full width at half maximum (FWHM) of ˜100 ps has been observed behind the output foil of an air-filled diode. It is shown that the position of the SAEB current maximum relative to the voltage pulse front exhibits a time shift that varies when the small-size collector is moved over the foil surface.

  13. Cold atmospheric pressure plasma jet interactions with plasmid DNA

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connell, D.; Cox, L. J.; Hyland, W. B.; McMahon, S. J.; Reuter, S.; Graham, W. G.; Gans, T.; Currell, F. J.

    2011-01-24

    The effect of a cold (<40 deg. C) radio frequency-driven atmospheric pressure plasma jet on plasmid DNA has been investigated. Gel electrophoresis was used to analyze the DNA forms post-treatment. The experimental data are fitted to a rate equation model that allows for quantitative determination of the rates of single and double strand break formation. The formation of double strand breaks correlates well with the atomic oxygen density. Taken with other measurements, this indicates that neutral components in the jet are effective in inducing double strand breaks.

  14. Microwave generation of stable atmospheric-pressure fireballs in air.

    PubMed

    Stephan, Karl D

    2006-11-01

    The generation of stable buoyant fireballs in a microwave cavity in air at atmospheric pressure without the use of vaporized solids is described. These fireballs have some of the characteristics of ball lightning and resemble those reported by Dikhtyar and Jerby [Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 045002 (2006)], although of a different color, and do not require the presence of molten or vaporized material. Mechanisms of microwave plasma formation and fluid dynamics can account for the observed behavior of the fireballs, which do not appear to meet the accepted definition of dusty plasmas in this case. Relevance to models of ball lightning and industrial applications are discussed. PMID:17279961

  15. Cold atmospheric pressure air plasma jet for medical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kolb, J. F.; Price, R. O.; Bowman, A.; Chiavarini, R. L.; Stacey, M.; Schoenbach, K. H.; Mohamed, A.-A H.; Swanson, R. J.

    2008-06-16

    By flowing atmospheric pressure air through a direct current powered microhollow cathode discharge, we were able to generate a 2 cm long plasma jet. With increasing flow rate, the flow becomes turbulent and temperatures of the jet are reduced to values close to room temperature. Utilizing the jet, yeast grown on agar can be eradicated with a treatment of only a few seconds. Conversely, animal studies show no skin damage even with exposures ten times longer than needed for pathogen extermination. This cold plasma jet provides an effective mode of treatment for yeast infections of the skin.

  16. Cold atmospheric pressure air plasma jet for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolb, J. F.; Mohamed, A.-A. H.; Price, R. O.; Swanson, R. J.; Bowman, A.; Chiavarini, R. L.; Stacey, M.; Schoenbach, K. H.

    2008-06-01

    By flowing atmospheric pressure air through a direct current powered microhollow cathode discharge, we were able to generate a 2cm long plasma jet. With increasing flow rate, the flow becomes turbulent and temperatures of the jet are reduced to values close to room temperature. Utilizing the jet, yeast grown on agar can be eradicated with a treatment of only a few seconds. Conversely, animal studies show no skin damage even with exposures ten times longer than needed for pathogen extermination. This cold plasma jet provides an effective mode of treatment for yeast infections of the skin.

  17. Microwave generation of stable atmospheric-pressure fireballs in air

    SciTech Connect

    Stephan, Karl D.

    2006-11-15

    The generation of stable buoyant fireballs in a microwave cavity in air at atmospheric pressure without the use of vaporized solids is described. These fireballs have some of the characteristics of ball lightning and resemble those reported by Dikhtyar and Jerby [Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 045002 (2006)], although of a different color, and do not require the presence of molten or vaporized material. Mechanisms of microwave plasma formation and fluid dynamics can account for the observed behavior of the fireballs, which do not appear to meet the accepted definition of dusty plasmas in this case. Relevance to models of ball lightning and industrial applications are discussed.

  18. Microwave generation of stable atmospheric-pressure fireballs in air.

    PubMed

    Stephan, Karl D

    2006-11-01

    The generation of stable buoyant fireballs in a microwave cavity in air at atmospheric pressure without the use of vaporized solids is described. These fireballs have some of the characteristics of ball lightning and resemble those reported by Dikhtyar and Jerby [Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 045002 (2006)], although of a different color, and do not require the presence of molten or vaporized material. Mechanisms of microwave plasma formation and fluid dynamics can account for the observed behavior of the fireballs, which do not appear to meet the accepted definition of dusty plasmas in this case. Relevance to models of ball lightning and industrial applications are discussed.

  19. Microwave generation of stable atmospheric-pressure fireballs in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephan, Karl D.

    2006-11-01

    The generation of stable buoyant fireballs in a microwave cavity in air at atmospheric pressure without the use of vaporized solids is described. These fireballs have some of the characteristics of ball lightning and resemble those reported by Dikhtyar and Jerby [Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 045002 (2006)], although of a different color, and do not require the presence of molten or vaporized material. Mechanisms of microwave plasma formation and fluid dynamics can account for the observed behavior of the fireballs, which do not appear to meet the accepted definition of dusty plasmas in this case. Relevance to models of ball lightning and industrial applications are discussed.

  20. Electron kinetics in a microdischarge in nitrogen at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Levko, Dmitry

    2013-12-14

    Electron kinetics during a microdischarge in nitrogen at atmospheric pressure is studied using the one-dimensional Particle-in-Cell/Monte Carlo Collisions model. It is obtained that the electron energy distribution function can be divided into three parts, namely, the non-equilibrium low-energy part, the Maxwellian function at moderate energies, and the high-energy tail. Simulation results showed that the role of the high-energy tail of electron energy distribution increases, when the distance between electrodes increases.

  1. Pluto's Insolation History: Latitudinal Variations and Effects on Atmospheric Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Earle, Alissa M.; Binzel, Richard P.

    2014-11-01

    Since previous insolation modeling in the early 1990’s, new atmospheric pressure data, increased computational power, and the upcoming flyby of the Pluto system by NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft have generated new motivation and increased capabilities for the study of Pluto’s complex long-term (million-years) insolation history. The two primary topics of interest in studying Pluto’s insolation history are the variations in insolation patterns when integrated over different intervals and the evolution of diurnal insolation patterns over the last several decades. We find latitudinal dichotomies when comparing average insolation over timescales of days, decades, centuries, and millennia. Depending on the timescales of volatile migration, some consequences of these insolation patterns may be manifested in the surface features revealed by New Horizons. For any single rotation of Pluto there is a latitude that receives more insolation relative to the others. Often this is the sub-subsolar latitude but it can also be an arctic circle latitude when near-polar regions of Pluto experience the "midnight sun". We define the amount of that greatest insolation value over the course of one rotation as the "maximum diurnal insolation" (MDI). We find that MDI is driven to its highest values when Pluto’s obliquity creates a long arctic summer (or “midnight sun”) beginning just after perihelion. Pluto’s atmospheric pressure, as measured through stellar occultation observations during the past three decades, appears to correlate with Pluto's currently occurring midnight sun as quantified by the MDI parameter. If insolation (as parameterized by the MDI value) is the single dominant factor driving Pluto's atmospheric pressure, this “Midnight Sun Model” predicts that Pluto's maximum atmospheric pressure will be reached in 2017 followed by a steady decline. Pluto's maximum diurnal insolation value begins dropping after 2017 due to two factors: Pluto’s sub-solar point

  2. Electrical characteristics and formation mechanism of atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Lijuan; Zhang, Yu; Tian, Weijing; Meng, Ying; Ouyang, Jiting

    2014-06-16

    The behavior of atmospheric pressure plasma jet produced by a coplanar dielectric barrier discharge in helium in external electrostatic and magnetic field is investigated. Net negative charges in the plasma jet outside the tube were detected. The deflection of the plume in the external field was observed. The plasma jet is suggested to be formed by the electron beam from the temporal cathode which is accelerated by a longitudinal field induced by the surface charges on the dielectric tube or interface between the helium and ambient air. The helium flow is necessary for the jet formation in the surrounding air.

  3. Cold Micro-Plasma Jets in Atmospheric Pressure Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, A. H.; Suddala, S.; Schoenbach, K. H.

    2003-10-01

    Direct current microhollow cathode discharges (MHCDs) have been operated in air, nitrogen and oxygen at pressures of one atmosphere. The electrodes are 250 μm thick molybdenum foils, separated by an alumina insulator of the same thickness. A cylindrical hole with a diameter in the 100 μm range is drilled through all layers. By flowing gases at high pressure through this hole, plasma jets with radial dimensions on the same order as the microhole dimensions, and with lengths of up to one centimeter are generated. The gas temperature in these jets was measured by means of a micro-thermocouple. The lowest temperatures of close to room temperature were measured when the flow changed from laminar to turbulent. The results of spectral emission and absorption studies indicate high concentrations of byproducts, such as ozone, when the discharge is operated in air or oxygen. This work is supported by the U.S Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR).

  4. The nanogap Pirani—a pressure sensor with superior linearity in an atmospheric pressure range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosraviani, Kourosh; Leung, Albert M.

    2009-04-01

    We have designed and fabricated a surface micromachined Pirani pressure sensor with an extremely narrow gap between its heater and heatsink (substrate) with superior output linearity in the atmospheric pressure range. The gap size of the device has been reduced to 50 nm by using a layer of PECVD amorphous silicon as a sacrificial layer and a xenon difluoride (XeF2) gas phase etching technique. Such a narrow gap pushes the transition from molecular to continuum heat conduction to pressures beyond 200 kPa. The higher transition pressure increases the measurement range and sensitivity of the gauge in atmospheric pressures. The gas phase etching of the sacrificial layer eliminates stiction problems related to a wet etching process. The active area of the sensor is only a 6 × 50 µm2 microbridge anchored to the substrate at both ends. An innovative fabrication technique was developed which resulted in a virtually flat microbridge with improved mechanical robustness. This process enabled us to have a very well-controlled gap between the microbridge and the substrate. The device was tested in a constant heater temperature mode with pressure ranges from 0.1 to 720 kPa. The heater power was only 3 mW at 101 kPa (atmospheric pressure), which increased to about 8 mW at 720 kPa. The output sensitivity and nonlinearity of the device were 0.55% per kPa at 101 kPa and ±13% of the output full scale, respectively.

  5. The major influence of the atmosphere on intracranial pressure: an observational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbowski, Leszek

    2016-06-01

    The impact of the atmosphere on human physiology has been studied widely within the last years. In practice, intracranial pressure is a pressure difference between intracranial compartments and the surrounding atmosphere. This means that gauge intracranial pressure uses atmospheric pressure as its zero point, and therefore, this method of pressure measurement excludes the effects of barometric pressure's fluctuation. The comparison of these two physical quantities can only take place through their absolute value relationship. The aim of this study is to investigate the direct effect of barometric pressure on the absolute intracranial pressure homeostasis. A prospective observational cross-sectional open study was conducted in Szczecin, Poland. In 28 neurosurgical patients with suspected normal-pressure hydrocephalus, intracranial intraventricular pressure was monitored in a sitting position. A total of 168 intracranial pressure and atmospheric pressure measurements were performed. Absolute atmospheric pressure was recorded directly. All values of intracranial gauge pressure were converted to absolute pressure (the sum of gauge intracranial pressure and local absolute atmospheric pressure). The average absolute mean intracranial pressure in the patients is 1006.6 hPa (95 % CI 1004.5 to 1008.8 hPa, SEM 1.1), and the mean absolute atmospheric pressure is 1007.9 hPa (95 % CI 1006.3 to 1009.6 hPa, SEM 0.8). The observed association between atmospheric and intracranial pressure is strongly significant (Spearman correlation r = 0.87, p < 0.05) and all the measurements are perfectly reliable (Bland-Altman coefficient is 4.8 %). It appears from this study that changes in absolute intracranial pressure are related to seasonal variation. Absolute intracranial pressure is shown to be impacted positively by atmospheric pressure.

  6. Atmospheric-pressure plasma decontamination/sterilization chamber

    DOEpatents

    Herrmann, Hans W.; Selwyn, Gary S.

    2001-01-01

    An atmospheric-pressure plasma decontamination/sterilization chamber is described. The apparatus is useful for decontaminating sensitive equipment and materials, such as electronics, optics and national treasures, which have been contaminated with chemical and/or biological warfare agents, such as anthrax, mustard blistering agent, VX nerve gas, and the like. There is currently no acceptable procedure for decontaminating such equipment. The apparatus may also be used for sterilization in the medical and food industries. Items to be decontaminated or sterilized are supported inside the chamber. Reactive gases containing atomic and metastable oxygen species are generated by an atmospheric-pressure plasma discharge in a He/O.sub.2 mixture and directed into the region of these items resulting in chemical reaction between the reactive species and organic substances. This reaction typically kills and/or neutralizes the contamination without damaging most equipment and materials. The plasma gases are recirculated through a closed-loop system to minimize the loss of helium and the possibility of escape of aerosolized harmful substances.

  7. Prospect of life on cold planets with low atmospheric pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, A. A.; Vdovina, M.

    2009-12-01

    Stable liquid water on the surface of a planet has been viewed as the major requirement for a habitable planet. Such approach would exclude planets with low atmospheric pressures and cold mean surface temperatures (like present Mars) as potential candidates for extraterrestrial life search. Here we explore a possibility of the liquid water formation in the extremely shallow (1-3 cm) subsurface layer under low atmospheric pressures (0.1-10 mbar) and low average surface temperatures (~-30 C). During brief periods of simulated daylight warming the shallow subsurface ice sublimates, the water vapor can diffuse through the porous surface layer of soil temporarily producing supersaturated conditions in the soil, which lead to the formation of liquid films. We show that non-extremophile terrestrial microorganisms (Vibrio sp.) can grow and reproduce under such conditions. The necessary conditions for metabolism and reproduction are the sublimation of ground ice through a thin layer of soil and short episodes of warm temperatures at the planetary surface.

  8. Atmospheric-Pressure Plasma Cleaning of Contaminated Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Robert F. Hicks; Hans W. Herrmann

    2003-12-15

    The purpose of this project was to demonstrate a practical, environmentally benigh technology for the surface decontamination and decommissioning of radioactive waste. A low temperature, atmospheric pressure plasma has been developed with initial support from the DOE, Environmental Management Sciences Program. This devise selectively etches radioactive metals from surfaces, rendering objects radiation free and suitable for decommissioning. The volatile reaction products are captured on filters, which yields a tremendous reduction in the volume of the waste. The technology shows a great potential for accelerating the clean-up effort for the equipment and structures contaminated with radioactive materials within the DOE complex. The viability of this technology has been demonstrated by selectively and rapidly stripping uranium from stainless steel surfaces at low temperature. Studies on uranium oxide have shown that etch rates of 4.0 microns per minute can be achieved at temperature below 473 K. Over the past three years, we have made numerous improvements in the design of the atmospheric pressure plasma source. We are now able to scale up the plasma source to treat large surface areas.

  9. Compact atmospheric pressure plasma self-resonant drive circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Law, V. J.; Anghel, S. D.

    2012-02-01

    This paper reports on compact solid-state self-resonant drive circuits that are specifically designed to drive an atmospheric pressure plasma jet and a parallel-plate dielectric barrier discharge of small volume (0.5 cm3). The atmospheric pressure plasma (APP) device can be operated with helium, argon or a mixture of both. Equivalent electrical models of the self-resonant drive circuits and discharge are developed and used to estimate the plasma impedance, plasma power density, current density or electron number density of three APP devices. These parameters and the kinetic gas temperature are dependent on the self-resonant frequency of the APP device. For a fixed switching frequency and APP device geometry, the plasma parameters are controlled by adjusting the dc voltage at the primary coil and the gas flow rate. The resonant frequency is controlled by the selection of the switching power transistor and means of step-up voltage transformation (ferrite core, flyback transformer, or Tesla coil). The flyback transformer operates in the tens of kHz, the ferrite core in the hundreds of kHz and Tesla coil in the MHz range. Embedded within this work is the principle of frequency pulling which is exemplified in the flyback transformer circuit that utilizes a pickup coil for feedback control of the switching frequency.

  10. Atmospheric Pressure RF Plasma Electrical and Optical Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulec, Ali; Oksuz, Lutfi; Hershkowitz, Noah

    2009-10-01

    An atmospheric pressure 13.56 MHz RF source is used for plasma polymerization, nanocomposite deposition and for sterilization purposes. The air discharge electrical and optical characteristics are measured using monochromator and electrical probes. The addition of helium flow to the RF discharge system allows production of stable glow plasma discharge. The electron temperature and plasma densities are estimated using the emission lines of HeI and double probes. Emission of the He+air atmospheric pressure plasma is observed from the OH radical, several lines of the N2, N2^+ and atomic O, H and He lines. He flow rate and applied rf voltage affect on these emission spectra are investigated and the spectral lines are used for calculation of plasma parameters. Plasma electron temperature is calculated using HeI lines and compared with double probe data. The OI 777 and Hα 656 lines are also investigated by varying the applied voltage and He flow rate. The calculated electron temperature was approximately 0.2 eV and dependent on the He flow rate and applied power.

  11. Decolorization of azodyes using the atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazovic, Sasa; Maletic, Dejan; Tomic, Natasa; Malovic, Gordana; Cvelbar, Uros; Dohcevic-Mitrovic, Zorana; Petrovic, Zoran Lj.

    2013-09-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma jet operated in air/argon mixture is tested for decolorization of Bezactiv Orange V-3R dye used in the textile industry. The decolorization efficiency is determined by spectrophotometric measurements at 493.7 nm which corresponds to the breaking of dye N =N bond. The initial concentration of 50 mg/L of dye is reduced 50 times after 120 minutes of treatment by plasma. The results are compared to the efficiency of the suspended TiO2 powder and activated by an UV lamp (300 W). The radicals responsible for removal of the dye are OH and super-anion radical. It is found that efficiency of the plasma and TiO2 + UV is quite similar for the treatment times up to 60 min. After that, TiO2 shows higher decolorization rates (100 times reduction after 90 min). However, when plasma and TiO2 (but without the UV lamp) are applied together, it is found that there are synergetic effects and that the efficiency is increased. Plasma (less than 2 W) is not expected to produce high amounts of UV light in the atmospheric pressure. Supported by MESTD, RS, III41011 and ON 171037.

  12. Benzene Dissociation in DC Atmospheric Pressure Air Glow Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Chunqi; Stark, Robert H.; Schoenbach, Karl H.

    2001-10-01

    By using a micro-hollow cathode discharge (MHCD) as an electron source to lower or eliminate the cathode fall voltage, a glow discharge could be operated in a dc atmospheric pressure air [1]. The effect of this glow discharge plasma on VOC (Volatile Organic Compound) remediation, particularly, benzene remediation, has been studied. A higher than 90 % destruction rate has been obtained by flowing a 300 ppm benzene/ dry air mixture through the plasma filament. The plasma is confined by a dielectric to a cross-section of 1 mm by 1.5 mm and extends over a depth of 0.8 mm. With a flow rate of 100 sccm, the residence time of the gas in the plasma column is 0.7 ms. A destruction efficiency of more than 0.5 L/kJ has been measured. The energy efficiency is 0.9 g/kWh which is comparable to that achieved by low pressure glow discharges in benzene/ noble gas mixtures [2]. References: [1] R. H. Stark and K. H. Schoenbach, "Direct Current Glow Discharges in Atmospheric Air," Appl. Phys. Lett. 89, 3568 (2001). [2] D. L. McCorkle, W. Ding, C. Ma and L. A. Pinnaduwage, "Dissociation of Benzene and Methylene Chloride Based on Enhanced Dissociative Electron Attachment to Highly Excited Molecules," J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 32, 46 (1999). Acknowledgments: This work is supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  13. Inactivation of Escherichia coli using atmospheric-pressure plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwahata, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Takeshi; Ohyama, Ryu-ichiro; Ito, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    An atmospheric-pressure argon (Ar) plasma jet was applied to the inactivation of Escherichia coli. The Ar plasma jet was generated at a frequency of 10 kHz, an applied voltage of 10 kV, and an Ar gas flow rate of 10 L/min at atmospheric pressure. E. coli cells seeded on an agar medium in a Petri dish were inactivated by Ar plasma jet irradiation for 1 s. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed that E. coli cells were killed because their cell wall and membrane were disrupted. To determine the causes of the disruption of the cell wall and membrane of E. coli, we performed the following experiments: the measurement of the surface temperature of an agar medium using a thermograph, the analysis of an emission spectrum of a plasma jet obtained using a multichannel spectrometer, and the determination of the distribution of the concentration of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) generated on an agar medium by plasma jet irradiation using semiquantitative test strips. Moreover, H2O2 solutions of different concentrations were dropped onto an agar medium seeded with E. coli cells to examine the contribution of H2O2 to the death of E. coli. The results of these experiments showed that the cell wall and membrane of E. coli were disrupted by electrons in the plasma jet, as well as by electroneutral excited nitrogen molecules (N2) and hydroxyl (OH) radicals in the periphery of the plasma jet.

  14. Atmospheric oxygenation caused by a change in volcanic degassing pressure.

    PubMed

    Gaillard, Fabrice; Scaillet, Bruno; Arndt, Nicholas T

    2011-10-12

    The Precambrian history of our planet is marked by two major events: a pulse of continental crust formation at the end of the Archaean eon and a weak oxygenation of the atmosphere (the Great Oxidation Event) that followed, at 2.45 billion years ago. This oxygenation has been linked to the emergence of oxygenic cyanobacteria and to changes in the compositions of volcanic gases, but not to the composition of erupting lavas--geochemical constraints indicate that the oxidation state of basalts and their mantle sources has remained constant since 3.5 billion years ago. Here we propose that a decrease in the average pressure of volcanic degassing changed the oxidation state of sulphur in volcanic gases, initiating the modern biogeochemical sulphur cycle and triggering atmospheric oxygenation. Using thermodynamic calculations simulating gas-melt equilibria in erupting magmas, we suggest that mostly submarine Archaean volcanoes produced gases with SO(2)/H(2)S < 1 and low sulphur content. Emergence of the continents due to a global decrease in sea level and growth of the continental crust in the late Archaean then led to widespread subaerial volcanism, which in turn yielded gases much richer in sulphur and dominated by SO(2). Dissolution of sulphur in sea water and the onset of sulphate reduction processes could then oxidize the atmosphere.

  15. The influence of atmospheric pressure on landfill methane emissions.

    PubMed

    Czepiel, P M; Shorter, J H; Mosher, B; Allwine, E; McManus, J B; Harriss, R C; Kolb, C E; Lamb, B K

    2003-01-01

    Landfills are the largest source of anthropogenic methane (CH4) emissions to the atmosphere in the United States. However, few measurements of whole landfill CH4 emissions have been reported. Here, we present the results of a multi-season study of whole landfill CH4 emissions using atmospheric tracer methods at the Nashua, New Hampshire Municipal landfill in the northeastern United States. The measurement data include 12 individual emission tests, each test consisting of 5-8 plume measurements. Measured emissions were negatively correlated with surface atmospheric pressure and ranged from 7.3 to 26.5 m3 CH4 min(-1). A simple regression model of our results was used to calculate an annual emission rate of 8.4 x 10(6) m3 CH4 year(-1). These data, along with CH4 oxidation estimates based on emitted landfill gas isotopic characteristics and gas collection data, were used to estimate annual CH4 generation at this landfill. A reported gas collection rate of 7.1 x 10(6) m3 CH4 year(-1) and an estimated annual rate of CH4 oxidation by cover soils of 1.2 x 10(6) m3 CH4 year(-1) resulted in a calculated annual CH4 generation rate of 16.7 x 10(6) m3 CH4 year(-1). These results underscore the necessity of understanding a landfill's dynamic environment before assessing long-term emissions potential.

  16. Atmospheric oxygenation caused by a change in volcanic degassing pressure.

    PubMed

    Gaillard, Fabrice; Scaillet, Bruno; Arndt, Nicholas T

    2011-10-13

    The Precambrian history of our planet is marked by two major events: a pulse of continental crust formation at the end of the Archaean eon and a weak oxygenation of the atmosphere (the Great Oxidation Event) that followed, at 2.45 billion years ago. This oxygenation has been linked to the emergence of oxygenic cyanobacteria and to changes in the compositions of volcanic gases, but not to the composition of erupting lavas--geochemical constraints indicate that the oxidation state of basalts and their mantle sources has remained constant since 3.5 billion years ago. Here we propose that a decrease in the average pressure of volcanic degassing changed the oxidation state of sulphur in volcanic gases, initiating the modern biogeochemical sulphur cycle and triggering atmospheric oxygenation. Using thermodynamic calculations simulating gas-melt equilibria in erupting magmas, we suggest that mostly submarine Archaean volcanoes produced gases with SO(2)/H(2)S < 1 and low sulphur content. Emergence of the continents due to a global decrease in sea level and growth of the continental crust in the late Archaean then led to widespread subaerial volcanism, which in turn yielded gases much richer in sulphur and dominated by SO(2). Dissolution of sulphur in sea water and the onset of sulphate reduction processes could then oxidize the atmosphere. PMID:21993759

  17. Measurement of viscosity of gaseous mixtures at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Mall, G. H.; Chegini, H.

    1986-01-01

    Coefficients of viscosity of various types of gas mixtures, including simulated natural-gas samples, have been measured at atmospheric pressure and room temperature using a modified capillary tube method. Pressure drops across the straight capillary tube section of a thermal mass flowmeter were measured for small, well-defined, volume flow rates for the test gases and for standard air. In this configuration, the flowmeter provides the volumetric flow rates as well as a well-characterized capillary section for differential pressure measurements across it. The coefficients of viscosity of the test gases were calculated using the reported value of 185.6 micro P for the viscosity of air. The coefficients of viscosity for the test mixtures were also calculated using Wilke's approximation of the Chapman-Enskog (C-E) theory. The experimental and calculated values for binary mixtures are in agreement within the reported accuracy of Wilke's approximation of the C-E theory. However, the agreement for multicomponent mixtures is less satisfactory, possible because of the limitations of Wilkes's approximation of the classical dilute-gas state model.

  18. Measurement of viscosity of gaseous mixtures at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, J. J.; Mall, G. H.; Chegini, H.

    1986-05-01

    Coefficients of viscosity of various types of gas mixtures, including simulated natural-gas samples, have been measured at atmospheric pressure and room temperature using a modified capillary tube method. Pressure drops across the straight capillary tube section of a thermal mass flowmeter were measured for small, well-defined, volume flow rates for the test gases and for standard air. In this configuration, the flowmeter provides the volumetric flow rates as well as a well-characterized capillary section for differential pressure measurements across it. The coefficients of viscosity of the test gases were calculated using the reported value of 185.6 micro P for the viscosity of air. The coefficients of viscosity for the test mixtures were also calculated using Wilke's approximation of the Chapman-Enskog (C-E) theory. The experimental and calculated values for binary mixtures are in agreement within the reported accuracy of Wilke's approximation of the C-E theory. However, the agreement for multicomponent mixtures is less satisfactory, possible because of the limitations of Wilkes's approximation of the classical dilute-gas state model.

  19. Specific interaction between negative atmospheric ions and organic compounds in atmospheric pressure corona discharge ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sekimoto, Kanako; Sakai, Mami; Takayama, Mitsuo

    2012-06-01

    The interaction between negative atmospheric ions and various types of organic compounds were investigated using atmospheric pressure corona discharge ionization (APCDI) mass spectrometry. Atmospheric negative ions such as O(2)(-), HCO(3)(-), COO(-)(COOH), NO(2)(-), NO(3)(-), and NO(3)(-)(HNO(3)) having different proton affinities served as the reactant ions for analyte ionization in APCDI in negative-ion mode. The individual atmospheric ions specifically ionized aliphatic and aromatic compounds with various functional groups as atmospheric ion adducts and deprotonated analytes. The formation of the atmospheric ion adducts under certain discharge conditions is most likely attributable to the affinity between the analyte and atmospheric ion and the concentration of the atmospheric ion produced under these conditions. The deprotonated analytes, in contrast, were generated from the adducts of the atmospheric ions with higher proton affinity attributable to efficient proton abstraction from the analyte by the atmospheric ion.

  20. Collapse of ferromagnetism in itinerant-electron system: A magnetic, transport properties, and high pressure study of (Hf,Ta)Fe{sub 2} compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Diop, L. V. B. Isnard, O.; Kastil, J.; Arnold, Z.; Kamarad, J.

    2014-10-28

    The magnetism and transport properties were studied for Laves (Hf,Ta)Fe{sub 2} itinerant-electron compounds, which exhibit a temperature-induced first-order transition from the ferromagnetic (FM) to the antiferromagnetic (AFM) state upon heating. At finite temperatures, the field-induced metamagnetic phase transition between the AFM and FM has considerable effects on the transport properties of these model metamagnetic compounds. A large negative magnetoresistance of about 14% is observed in accordance with the metamagnetic transition. The magnetic phase diagram is determined for the Laves Hf{sub 1−x}Ta{sub x}Fe{sub 2} series and its Ta concentration dependence discussed. An unusual behavior is revealed in the paramagnetic state of intermediate compositions, it gives rise to the rapid increase and saturation of the local spin fluctuations of the 3d electrons. This new result is analysed in the frame of the theory of Moriya. For a chosen composition Hf{sub 0.825}Ta{sub 0.175}Fe{sub 2}, exhibiting such remarkable features, a detailed investigation is carried out under hydrostatic pressure up to 1 GPa in order to investigate the volume effect on the magnetic properties. With increasing pressure, the magnetic transition temperature T{sub FM-AFM} from ferromagnetic to antiferromagnetic order decreases strongly non-linearly and disappears at a critical pressure of 0.75 GPa. In the pressure-induced AFM state, the field-induced first-order AFM-FM transition appears and the complex temperature dependence of the AFM-FM transition field is explained by the contribution from both the magnetic and elastic energies caused by the significant temperature variation of the amplitude of the local Fe magnetic moment. The application of an external pressure leads also to the progressive decrease of the Néel temperature T{sub N}. In addition, a large pressure effect on the spontaneous magnetization M{sub S} for pressures below 0.45 GPa, dln(M{sub s})/dP = −6.3 × 10

  1. Collapse of ferromagnetism in itinerant-electron system: A magnetic, transport properties, and high pressure study of (Hf,Ta)Fe2 compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diop, L. V. B.; Kastil, J.; Isnard, O.; Arnold, Z.; Kamarad, J.

    2014-10-01

    The magnetism and transport properties were studied for Laves (Hf,Ta)Fe2 itinerant-electron compounds, which exhibit a temperature-induced first-order transition from the ferromagnetic (FM) to the antiferromagnetic (AFM) state upon heating. At finite temperatures, the field-induced metamagnetic phase transition between the AFM and FM has considerable effects on the transport properties of these model metamagnetic compounds. A large negative magnetoresistance of about 14% is observed in accordance with the metamagnetic transition. The magnetic phase diagram is determined for the Laves Hf1-xTaxFe2 series and its Ta concentration dependence discussed. An unusual behavior is revealed in the paramagnetic state of intermediate compositions, it gives rise to the rapid increase and saturation of the local spin fluctuations of the 3d electrons. This new result is analysed in the frame of the theory of Moriya. For a chosen composition Hf0.825Ta0.175Fe2, exhibiting such remarkable features, a detailed investigation is carried out under hydrostatic pressure up to 1 GPa in order to investigate the volume effect on the magnetic properties. With increasing pressure, the magnetic transition temperature TFM-AFM from ferromagnetic to antiferromagnetic order decreases strongly non-linearly and disappears at a critical pressure of 0.75 GPa. In the pressure-induced AFM state, the field-induced first-order AFM-FM transition appears and the complex temperature dependence of the AFM-FM transition field is explained by the contribution from both the magnetic and elastic energies caused by the significant temperature variation of the amplitude of the local Fe magnetic moment. The application of an external pressure leads also to the progressive decrease of the Néel temperature TN. In addition, a large pressure effect on the spontaneous magnetization MS for pressures below 0.45 GPa, dln(Ms)/dP = -6.3 × 10-2 GPa-1 was discovered. The presented results are consistent with Moriya

  2. Generation of reactive species by an atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, S.; Turner, M. M.

    2014-12-01

    The role of gas mixing in reactive species delivery to treatment surfaces for an atmospheric pressure capacitively coupled plasma helium jet is investigated by numerical modelling. Atomic oxygen in the jet effluent is shown to quickly convert to ozone for increasing device to surface separation due to the molecular oxygen present in the gas mixture. Surface profiles of reactive oxygen species show narrow peaks for atomic oxygen and broader surface distributions for ozone and metastable species. Production efficiency of atomic oxygen to the helium plasma jet by molecular oxygen admixture is shown to be dependent on electro-negativity. Excessive molecular oxygen admixture results in negative ion dominance over electrons which eventually quenches the plasma. Interaction of the plasma jet with an aqueous surface showed hydrogen peroxide as the dominant species at this interface. Gas heating by the plasma is found to be dominated by elastic electron collisions and positive ion heating. Comparison with experimental measurements for atomic oxygen shows good agreement.

  3. Plasmid DNA damage induced by helium atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xu; Cantrell, William A.; Escobar, Erika E.; Ptasinska, Sylwia

    2014-03-01

    A helium atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) is applied to induce damage to aqueous plasmid DNA. The resulting fractions of the DNA conformers, which indicate intact molecules or DNA with single- or double-strand breaks, are determined using agarose gel electrophoresis. The DNA strand breaks increase with a decrease in the distance between the APPJ and DNA samples under two working conditions of the plasma source with different parameters of applied electric pulses. The damage level induced in the plasmid DNA is also enhanced with increased plasma irradiation time. The reactive species generated in the APPJ are characterized by optical emission spectra, and their roles in possible DNA damage processes occurring in an aqueous environment are also discussed.

  4. Atmospheric-Pressure Plasma Cleaning of Contaminated Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Robert F. Hicks; Gary S. Selwyn

    2001-01-09

    Project was to develop a low-cost, environmentally benign technology for the decontamination and decommissioning of transuranic waste. With the invention of the atmospheric-pressure plasma jet the goal was achieved. This device selectively etches heavy metals from surfaces, rendering objects radiation free and suitable for decommissioning. The volatile reaction products are captured on filters, which yields a tremendous reduction in the volume of the waste. Studies on tantalum, a surrogate material for plutonium, have shown that etch rate of 6.0 microns per minute can be achieved under mild conditions. Over the past three years, we have made numerous improvements in the design of the plasma jet. It may now be operated for hundreds of hours and not undergo any degradation in performance. Furthermore, small compact units have been developed, which are easily deployed in the field.

  5. Electron Density in Atmospheric Pressure Microwave Surface Wave Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasinski, M.; Zakrzewski, Z.; Mizeraczyk, J.

    2008-03-01

    In this paper, we present results of the spectroscopic measurements of the electron density in a microwave surface wave sustained discharges in Ar and Ne at atmospheric pressure. The discharge in the form of a plasma column was generated inside a quartz tube cooled with a dielectric liquid. The microwave power delivered to the discharge via rectangular waveguide was applied in the range of 200-1500 W. In all investigations presented in this paper, the gas flow rate was relatively low (0.5 l/min), so the plasma column was generated in the form of a single filament, and the lengths of the upstream and downstream plasma columns were almost the same. The electron density in the plasma columns was determined using the method based on the Stark broadening of Hβ spectral line, including plasma region inside the waveguide which was not investigated earlier.

  6. Electric probe investigations of microwave generated, atmospheric pressure, plasma jets

    SciTech Connect

    Porteanu, H. E.; Kuehn, S.; Gesche, R.

    2010-07-15

    We examine the applicability of the Langmuir-type of characterization for atmospheric pressure plasma jets generated in a millimeter-size cavity microwave resonator at 2.45 GHz. Wide range I-V characteristics of helium, argon, nitrogen, air and oxygen are presented for different gas fluxes, distances probe-resonator, and microwave powers. A detailed analysis is performed for the fine variation in the current around the floating potential. A simplified theory specially developed for this case is presented, considering the ionic and electronic saturation currents and the floating potential. Based on this theory, we conclude that, while the charge carrier density depends on gas flow, distance to plasma source, and microwave absorbed power, the electron temperature is quite independent of these parameters. The resulting plasma parameters for helium, argon, and nitrogen are presented.

  7. Acetonitrile Ion Suppression in Atmospheric Pressure Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colizza, Kevin; Mahoney, Keira E.; Yevdokimov, Alexander V.; Smith, James L.; Oxley, Jimmie C.

    2016-08-01

    Efforts to analyze trace levels of cyclic peroxides by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry gave evidence that acetonitrile suppressed ion formation. Further investigations extended this discovery to ketones, linear peroxides, esters, and possibly many other types of compounds, including triazole and menadione. Direct ionization suppression caused by acetonitrile was observed for multiple adduct types in both electrospray ionization and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization. The addition of only 2% acetonitrile significantly decreased the sensitivity of analyte response. Efforts to identify the mechanism were made using various nitriles. The ion suppression was reduced by substitution of an acetonitrile hydrogen with an electron-withdrawing group, but was exacerbated by electron-donating or steric groups adjacent to the nitrile. Although current theory does not explain this phenomenon, we propose that polar interactions between the various functionalities and the nitrile may be forming neutral aggregates that manifest as ionization suppression.

  8. Determination of hexabromocyclododecane by flowing atmospheric pressure afterglow mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Smoluch, Marek; Silberring, Jerzy; Reszke, Edward; Kuc, Joanna; Grochowalski, Adam

    2014-10-01

    The first application of a flowing atmospheric-pressure afterglow ion source for mass spectrometry (FAPA-MS) for the chemical characterization and determination of hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) is presented. The samples of technical HBCD and expanded polystyrene foam (EPS) containing HBCD as a flame retardant were prepared by dissolving the appropriate solids in dichloromethane. The ionization of HBCD was achieved with a prototype FAPA source. The ions were detected in the negative-ion mode. The ions corresponding to a deprotonated HBCD species (m/z 640.7) as well as chlorine (m/z 676.8), nitrite (m/z 687.8) and nitric (m/z 703.8) adducts were observed in the spectra. The observed isotope pattern is characteristic for a compound containing six bromine atoms. This technique is an effective approach to detect HBCD, which is efficiently ionized in a liquid phase, resulting in high detection efficiency and sensitivity. PMID:25059130

  9. Atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharges for sterilization and surface treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, O. H.; Lai, C. K.; Choo, C. Y.; Wong, C. S.; Nor, R. M.; Thong, K. L.

    2015-04-24

    Atmospheric pressure non-thermal dielectric barrier discharges can be generated in different configurations for different applications. For sterilization, a parallel-plate electrode configuration with glass dielectric that discharges in air was used. Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli and Salmonella enteritidis) and Gram-positive bacteria (Bacillus cereus) were successfully inactivated using sinusoidal high voltage of ∼15 kVp-p at 8.5 kHz. In the surface treatment, a hemisphere and disc electrode arrangement that allowed a plasma jet to be extruded under controlled nitrogen gas flow (at 9.2 kHz, 20 kVp-p) was applied to enhance the wettability of PET (Mylar) film.

  10. Investigation of atmospheric pressure streamer discharges for methane reforming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pachuilo, M. V.; Stefani, F.; Rosocha, L. A.; Raja, L. L.

    2015-09-01

    Hydrogen has several valuable uses in transportation: it can lower the coefficient of variation under lean burn conditions in internal combustion engines, and it is essential for the operation of fuel cells. Currently hydrogen can only be produced efficiently by reducing fossil fuels in large facilities. However, on-board production is desirable to reduce the infrastructure associated with storing and distributing hydrogen. Plasma dry reforming processes are viable candidates for onboard production. Our current work investigates the fundamental behavior of a single streamer discharge in methane. The electron temperature, and active species generation are determined through time resolved spectroscopy. This work will hopefully accelerate the development of non-thermal plasma based devices that include: dielectric barrier discharges, pulsed corona discharges, and other atmospheric-pressure plasma devices.

  11. Development of ac corona discharge modes at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    El-Koramy, Reda Ahmed; Yehia, Ashraf; Omer, Mohamed

    2011-02-15

    Corona discharges in gases exist under several distinctive forms. In this paper, a survey study has been made of ac corona discharge modes generated in some different gases fed in a wire-duct reactor with a constant rate of flowing at atmospheric pressure. The properties of different corona modes are analyzed under some condition transitions from Trichel pulses to a steady glow. In the course of the presented experimental work, numerous apparent contradictions with earlier observations necessitated further study and are given to provide more information on the physical mechanisms of the ac corona discharges. Furthermore, we have gained insight into some new technologies and applications of the environmentally friendly corona and plasma discharges.

  12. Spectroscopic imagine of atmospheric-pressure helium ICP discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Montaser, A.; Boyes, A.L.M.; Cai, M.; Hsiech, C.; Zhang, H.

    1994-12-31

    Spatially-resolved information from atmospheric-pressure helium inductively coupled plasmas (He ICP) was acquired with a simple, inexpensive optical imaging spectrometer. The system uses a 35-cm focal length Czerny-Turner monochromator/spectrograph and a solid state charge-injection device (CID) or a charge coupled device (CCD), Quantitative image maps of the plasmas were produced with good resolution. For example, when the CID was used, the entire plasma image could be monitored with a spatial resolution of 0.13 and 0.10 mm in the horizontal and vertical directions. The spectral resolution was 4 mn. Lateral distributions of emission intensities were converted, using an Abel inversion routine, to radial distributions. Some unique features of the He ICP, compared to the commonly used Ar ICP, were identified at or around analytical conditions for elemental analysis of gaseous and aqueous samples.

  13. Atmospheric pressure vapour phase decomposition: a proof of principle.

    PubMed

    Cinosi, Amedeo; Andriollo, Nunzio; Tibaldi, Francesca; Monticelli, Damiano

    2012-11-15

    In the present work we demonstrated that the digestion of difficult matrices (high boiling petrochemical fractions and distillation bottoms) can be achieved by oxidation with nitric acid vapours at atmospheric pressure employing simple laboratory glassware. The application of this procedure as a digestion method prior to Total Reflection X-Ray Fluorescence (TXRF) is presented, although the employment of other detection techniques may be foreseen. The method ensured a fast, less than half an hour, treatment time and detection limits in the range 20-100 μg/kg for As, Bi, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sr, Zn, whereas higher values were obtained for Ba, Ca, K, P, Rh, Ti and V (0.3-3 mg/kg). The potentialities and limitations of this procedure were discussed: the application to a broad range of matrices may be foreseen. PMID:23158304

  14. Sterilization of Turmeric by Atmospheric Pressure Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setareh, Salarieh; Davoud, Dorranian

    2013-11-01

    In this study atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma has been employed for sterilizing dry turmeric powders. A 6 kV, 6 kHz frequency generator was used to generate plasma with Ar, Ar/O2, He, and He/O2 gases between the 5 mm gap of two quartz covered electrodes. The complete sterilization time of samples due to plasma treatment was measured. The most important contaminant of turmeric is bacillus subtilis. The results show that the shortest sterilization time of 15 min is achieved by exposing the samples to Ar/O2 plasma. Survival curves of samples are exponential functions of time and the addition of oxygen to plasma leads to a significant increase of the absolute value of time constant of the curves. Magnitudes of protein and DNA in treated samples were increased to a similar value for all samples. Taste, color, and solubility of samples were not changed after the plasma treatment.

  15. Atmospheric pressure vapour phase decomposition: a proof of principle.

    PubMed

    Cinosi, Amedeo; Andriollo, Nunzio; Tibaldi, Francesca; Monticelli, Damiano

    2012-11-15

    In the present work we demonstrated that the digestion of difficult matrices (high boiling petrochemical fractions and distillation bottoms) can be achieved by oxidation with nitric acid vapours at atmospheric pressure employing simple laboratory glassware. The application of this procedure as a digestion method prior to Total Reflection X-Ray Fluorescence (TXRF) is presented, although the employment of other detection techniques may be foreseen. The method ensured a fast, less than half an hour, treatment time and detection limits in the range 20-100 μg/kg for As, Bi, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sr, Zn, whereas higher values were obtained for Ba, Ca, K, P, Rh, Ti and V (0.3-3 mg/kg). The potentialities and limitations of this procedure were discussed: the application to a broad range of matrices may be foreseen.

  16. Electron Density in Atmospheric Pressure Microwave Surface Wave Discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Jasinski, M.; Zakrzewski, Z.; Mizeraczyk, J.

    2008-03-19

    In this paper, we present results of the spectroscopic measurements of the electron density in a microwave surface wave sustained discharges in Ar and Ne at atmospheric pressure. The discharge in the form of a plasma column was generated inside a quartz tube cooled with a dielectric liquid. The microwave power delivered to the discharge via rectangular waveguide was applied in the range of 200-1500 W. In all investigations presented in this paper, the gas flow rate was relatively low (0.5 l/min), so the plasma column was generated in the form of a single filament, and the lengths of the upstream and downstream plasma columns were almost the same. The electron density in the plasma columns was determined using the method based on the Stark broadening of H{sub {beta}} spectral line, including plasma region inside the waveguide which was not investigated earlier.

  17. Acetonitrile Ion Suppression in Atmospheric Pressure Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colizza, Kevin; Mahoney, Keira E.; Yevdokimov, Alexander V.; Smith, James L.; Oxley, Jimmie C.

    2016-11-01

    Efforts to analyze trace levels of cyclic peroxides by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry gave evidence that acetonitrile suppressed ion formation. Further investigations extended this discovery to ketones, linear peroxides, esters, and possibly many other types of compounds, including triazole and menadione. Direct ionization suppression caused by acetonitrile was observed for multiple adduct types in both electrospray ionization and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization. The addition of only 2% acetonitrile significantly decreased the sensitivity of analyte response. Efforts to identify the mechanism were made using various nitriles. The ion suppression was reduced by substitution of an acetonitrile hydrogen with an electron-withdrawing group, but was exacerbated by electron-donating or steric groups adjacent to the nitrile. Although current theory does not explain this phenomenon, we propose that polar interactions between the various functionalities and the nitrile may be forming neutral aggregates that manifest as ionization suppression.

  18. Atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharges for sterilization and surface treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, O. H.; Lai, C. K.; Choo, C. Y.; Wong, C. S.; Nor, R. M.; Thong, K. L.

    2015-04-01

    Atmospheric pressure non-thermal dielectric barrier discharges can be generated in different configurations for different applications. For sterilization, a parallel-plate electrode configuration with glass dielectric that discharges in air was used. Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli and Salmonella enteritidis) and Gram-positive bacteria (Bacillus cereus) were successfully inactivated using sinusoidal high voltage of ˜15 kVp-p at 8.5 kHz. In the surface treatment, a hemisphere and disc electrode arrangement that allowed a plasma jet to be extruded under controlled nitrogen gas flow (at 9.2 kHz, 20 kVp-p) was applied to enhance the wettability of PET (Mylar) film.

  19. Radio jet refraction in galactic atmospheres with static pressure gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henriksen, R. N.; Vallee, J. P.; Bridle, A. H.

    1981-01-01

    A theory based on the refraction of radio jets in the extended atmosphere of an elliptical galaxy, is proposed for double radio sources with a Z or S morphology. The model describes a collimated jet of supersonic material that bends self-consistently under the influence of external static pressure gradients, and may alternatively be seen as a continuous-jet version of the buoyancy model proposed by Gull (1973). Emphasis is placed on (1) S-shaped radio sources identified with isolated galaxies, such as 3C 293, whose radio structures should be free of distortions resulting from motion relative to a cluster medium, and (2) small-scale, galaxy-dominated rather than environment-dominated S-shaped sources such as the inner jet structure of Fornax A.

  20. Simulation of nonstationary phenomena in atmospheric-pressure glow discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korolev, Yu. D.; Frants, O. B.; Nekhoroshev, V. O.; Suslov, A. I.; Kas'yanov, V. S.; Shemyakin, I. A.; Bolotov, A. V.

    2016-06-01

    Nonstationary processes in atmospheric-pressure glow discharge manifest themselves in spontaneous transitions from the normal glow discharge into a spark. In the experiments, both so-called completed transitions in which a highly conductive constricted channel arises and incomplete transitions accompanied by the formation of a diffuse channel are observed. A model of the positive column of a discharge in air is elaborated that allows one to interpret specific features of the discharge both in the stationary stage and during its transition into a spark and makes it possible to calculate the characteristic oscillatory current waveforms for completed transitions into a spark and aperiodic ones for incomplete transitions. The calculated parameters of the positive column in the glow discharge mode agree well with experiment. Data on the densities of the most abundant species generated in the discharge (such as atomic oxygen, metastable nitrogen molecules, ozone, nitrogen oxides, and negative oxygen ions) are presented.

  1. Polymerization of acrylic acid using atmospheric pressure DBD plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashir, M.; Bashir, S.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper polymerization of acrylic acid was performed using non thermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet technology. The goal of this study is to deposit organic functional coatings for biomedical applications using a low cost and rapid growth rate plasma jet technique. The monomer solution of acrylic acid was vaporized and then fed into the argon plasma for coating. The discharge was powered using a laboratory made power supply operating with sinusoidal voltage signals at a frequency of 10 kHz. The optical emission spectra were collected in order to get insight into the plasma chemistry during deposition process. The coatings were characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy and growth rates analysis. A high retention of carboxylic functional groups of the monomer was observed at the surface deposited using this low power technique.

  2. Analysis of the cathodic region of atmospheric pressure discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, H.; Riemann, K.-U.

    2002-07-01

    The cathodic region of atmospheric pressure arcs is dominated by a number of different mechanisms. This makes a theoretical model extremely difficult. A description of this region based on fundamental physical principles is given. Using a previously published model of the inhomogeneous boundary layer of a Saha plasma (Schmitz H and Riemann K-U 2001 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 34 1193), the description is set on a firm theoretical basis. A number of equations including the energy balances of plasma boundary and cathode body lead to a maximum closure of the system. The values for the boundary conditions toward the plasma column could be motivated by a simple minimum principle argument thus eliminating all arbitrary fitting parameters. Results are given for a variety of external parameters and three different discharge gases. The comparison with experimental results shows excellent agreement.

  3. The effect of atmospheric pressure on the dispersal of pyroclasts from martian volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerber, Laura; Forget, François; Madeleine, Jean-Baptiste; Wordsworth, Robin; Head, James W.; Wilson, Lionel

    2013-03-01

    A planetary global circulation model developed by the Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique (LMD) was used to simulate explosive eruptions of ancient martian volcanoes into paleo-atmospheres with higher atmospheric pressures than that of present-day Mars. Atmospheric pressures in the model were varied between 50 mbar and 2 bars. In this way it was possible to investigate the sensitivity of the volcanic plume dispersal model to atmospheric pressure. It was determined that the model has a sensitivity to pressure that is similar to its sensitivity to other atmospheric parameters such as planetary obliquity and season of eruption. Higher pressure atmospheres allow volcanic plumes to convect to higher levels, meaning that volcanic pyroclasts have further to fall through the atmosphere. Changes in atmospheric circulation due to pressure cause pyroclasts to be dispersed in narrower latitudinal bands compared with pyroclasts in a modern atmosphere. Atmospheric winds are generally slower under higher pressure regimes; however, the final distance traveled by the pyroclasts depends greatly on the location of the volcano and can either increase or decrease with pressure. The directionality of the pyroclast transport, however, remains dominantly east or west along lines of latitude. Augmentation of the atmospheric pressure improves the fit between possible ash sources Arsia and Pavonis Mons and the Medusae Fossae Formation, a hypothesized ash deposit.

  4. Sterilization of Surfaces with a Handheld Atmospheric Pressure Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, Robert; Habib, Sara; Chan, Wai; Gonzalez, Eleazar; Tijerina, A.; Sloan, Mark

    2009-10-01

    Low temperature, atmospheric pressure plasmas have shown great promise for decontaminating the surfaces of materials and equipment. In this study, an atmospheric pressure, oxygen and argon plasma was investigated for the destruction of viruses, bacteria, and spores. The plasma was operated at an argon flow rate of 30 L/min, an oxygen flow rate of 20 mL/min, a power density of 101.0 W/cm^3 (beam area = 5.1 cm^2), and at a distance from the surface of 7.1 mm. An average 6log10 reduction of viable spores was obtained after only 45 seconds of exposure to the reactive gas. By contrast, it takes more than 35 minutes at 121^oC to sterilize anthrax in an autoclave. The plasma properties were investigated by numerical modeling and chemical titration with nitric oxide. The numerical model included a detailed reaction mechanism for the discharge as well as for the afterglow. It was predicted that at a delivered power density of 29.3 W/cm^3, 30 L/min argon, and 0.01 volume% O2, the plasma generated 1.9 x 10^14 cm-3 O atoms, 1.6 x 10^12 cm-3 ozone, 9.3 x 10^13 cm-3 O2(^1δg), and 2.9 x 10^12 cm-3 O2(^1σ^+g) at 1 cm downstream of the source. The O atom density measured by chemical titration with NO was 6.0 x 10^14 cm-3 at the same conditions. It is believe that the oxygen atoms and the O2(^1δg) metastables were responsible for killing the anthrax and other microorganisms.

  5. Mass Spectrometry of Atmospheric Pressure Surface Wave Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridenti, M. A.; Souza-Corrêa, J. A.; Amorim, J.

    2016-05-01

    By applying mass spectrometry techniques, we carried out measurements of ionic mass spectrum and their energy distribution in order to investigate an atmospheric argon discharge by using a surfatron surface-wave device. The mass and energy distribution measurements were performed with fixed flow rate (2.5 SLM) of pure argon gas (99.999%) and different Ar-O2 gas mixture compositions (99-1, 98-2 and 97-3). The mass spectra and energy distributions were recorded for Ar+, O+, O+ 2, N+ and N2 +. The axial distribution profiles of ionic mass and their energy were obtained for different experimental conditions as a function of the plasma length. The results showed that the peak of the positive ion energy distributions shifted to higher energies and also that the distribution width increased as the distance between the sampling orifice and the launcher gap was increased. It was also found that under certain experimental conditions the ion flux of atomic species were higher than the ion flux of their diatomic counterpart. The motivation of this study was to obtain a better understanding of a surface wave discharge in atmospheric pressure that may play a key role on new second generation biofuel technologies.

  6. Atmospheric Pressure Effects on Cryogenic Storage Tank Boil-Off

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sass, J. P.; Frontier, C. R.

    2007-01-01

    The Cryogenics Test Laboratory (CTL) at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) routinely utilizes cryostat test hardware to evaluate comparative and absolute thermal conductivities of a wide array of insulation systems. The test method is based on measurement of the flow rate of gas evolved due to evaporative boil-off of a cryogenic liquid. The gas flow rate typically stabilizes after a period of a couple of hours to a couple of days, depending upon the test setup. The stable flow rate value is then used to calculate the thermal conductivity for the insulation system being tested. The latest set of identical cryostats, 1,000-L spherical tanks, exhibited different behavior. On a macro level, the flow rate did stabilize after a couple of days; however the stable flow rate was oscillatory with peak to peak amplitude of up to 25 percent of the nominal value. The period of the oscillation was consistently 12 hours. The source of the oscillation has been traced to variations in atmospheric pressure due to atmospheric tides similar to oceanic tides. This paper will present analysis of this phenomenon, including a calculation that explains why other cryostats are not affected by it.

  7. Ice Shelf Elevation Changes due to Atmospheric Pressure Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padman, L.; King, M.; Fricker, H. A.

    2002-12-01

    Floating ice shelves undergo vertical motion as a result of the response of the underlying ocean to changes in atmospheric pressure (Pair). This response is known as the inverse barometer effect (IBE). Open-ocean measurements of Pair and sea level agree with the theoretical response of 1 cm per millibar for low frequency variability of Pair. Here we demonstrate, using simultaneous records of Pair and GPS measurements of surface elevation (hIS) from several ice shelves, that shelves experience a response of similar magnitude. A simple correction for the IBE is justified for ice shelf response to low-frequency (ω <0.5 cycles per day) of Pair. At higher frequencies the IBE becomes weaker. The IBE contribution to hIS can exceed 50 cm, with typical magnitudes of 10-20 cm. Although the IBE is usually smaller than the tidal contribution to hIS, the tide can be removed with current Antarctic tide models with an accuracy similar to the IBE. Global atmospheric models, however, do not presently predict Pair with sufficient accuracy to be used to correct measured variability of hIS. Thus, in the absence of concurrent in situ Pair data, the IBE is a major source of error in correcting ice shelf heights for tasks such as deriving mean ice flow rates from SAR imagery, and measuring long-term trends in ice shelf height from satellite altimeters.

  8. Electron Heating in Pulsed Atmospheric Pressure Glow Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, Robert H.; Leipold, Frank; Jiang, Chunqi; Merhi, Hisham; Schoenbach, Karl H.

    2000-10-01

    Atmospheric pressure glow discharges in air and noble gases have been operated by using microhollow cathode discharges as plasma cathodes [1]. In these discharges the electron energy distribution is determined by the value of the reduced electric field (E/N). Pulsing the discharges causes the electron energy distribution to shift into an energy range where the ionization rate increases strongly. In order to study this effect, a 10 ns high voltage pulse was applied to a dc glow discharge in atmospheric air. Electrical measurements of the temporal development of current and voltage and optical measurements of the integral emission intensity during the pulse and in the afterglow of the discharge have shown an increase in electron life time from 200 ns at 10 kV/cm to approximately 1.6 μ at 30 kV/cm. The measured effect can be used to reduce the power consumption of glow discharges and to induce and enhance certain plasma processes. [1] Robert H. Stark and Karl H. Schoenbach, Appl. Phys. Lett., 74, 3770 (1999) This work was funded by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR).

  9. The influence of atmospheric pressure on landfill methane emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Czepiel, P.M.; Shorter, J.H.; Mosher, B.; Allwine, E.; McManus, J.B.; Harriss, R.C.; Kolb, C.E.; Lamb, B.K

    2003-07-01

    Landfills are the largest source of anthropogenic methane (CH{sub 4}) emissions to the atmosphere in the United States. However, few measurements of whole landfill CH{sub 4} emissions have been reported. Here, we present the results of a multi-season study of whole landfill CH{sub 4} emissions using atmospheric tracer methods at the Nashua, New Hampshire Municipal landfill in the northeastern United States. The measurement data include 12 individual emission tests, each test consisting of 5-8 plume measurements. Measured emissions were negatively correlated with surface atmospheric pressure and ranged from 7.3 to 26.5 m{sup 3} CH{sub 4} min{sup -1}. A simple regression model of our results was used to calculate an annual emission rate of 8.4x10{sup 6} m{sup 3} CH{sub 4} year{sup -1}. These data, along with CH{sub 4} oxidation estimates based on emitted landfill gas isotopic characteristics and gas collection data, were used to estimate annual CH{sub 4} generation at this landfill. A reported gas collection rate of 7.1x10{sup 6} m{sup 3} CH{sub 4} year{sup -1} and an estimated annual rate of CH{sub 4} oxidation by cover soils of 1.2x10{sup 6} m{sup 3} CH{sub 4} year{sup -1} resulted in a calculated annual CH{sub 4} generation rate of 16.7x10{sup 6} m{sup 3} CH{sub 4} year{sup -1}. These results underscore the necessity of understanding a landfill's dynamic environment before assessing long-term emissions potential.

  10. Influence of the voltage waveform during nanocomposite layer deposition by aerosol-assisted atmospheric pressure Townsend discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Profili, J.; Levasseur, O.; Naudé, N.; Chaneac, C.; Stafford, L.; Gherardi, N.

    2016-08-01

    This work examines the growth dynamics of TiO2-SiO2 nanocomposite coatings in plane-to-plane Dielectric Barrier Discharges (DBDs) at atmospheric pressure operated in a Townsend regime using nebulized TiO2 colloidal suspension in hexamethyldisiloxane as the growth precursors. For low-frequency (LF) sinusoidal voltages applied to the DBD cell, with voltage amplitudes lower than the one required for discharge breakdown, Scanning Electron Microscopy of silicon substrates placed on the bottom DBD electrode reveals significant deposition of TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs) close to the discharge entrance. On the other hand, at higher frequencies (HF), the number of TiO2 NPs deposited strongly decreases due to their "trapping" in the oscillating voltage and their transport along the gas flow lines. Based on these findings, a combined LF-HF voltage waveform is proposed and used to achieve significant and spatially uniform deposition of TiO2 NPs across the whole substrate surface. For higher voltage amplitudes, in the presence of hexamethyldisiloxane and nitrous oxide for plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of inorganic layers, it is found that TiO2 NPs become fully embedded into a silica-like matrix. Similar Raman spectra are obtained for as-prepared TiO2 NPs and for nanocomposite TiO2-SiO2 coating, suggesting that plasma exposure does not significantly alter the crystalline structure of the TiO2 NPs injected into the discharge.

  11. Trends in surface engineering of biomaterials: atmospheric pressure plasma deposition of coatings for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Ponte, G.; Sardella, E.; Fanelli, F.; D'Agostino, R.; Favia, P.

    2011-11-01

    Cold plasma processes for surface engineering of biomaterials and biomedical devices are traditionally performed at low pressure; more and more, though, surface modification plasma processes at atmospheric pressure are also gaining popularity. This short review is aimed to list briefly atmospheric pressure plasma processes reported, in the last decade, for adapting the surface of materials to the best interactions with cells, bacteria and biomolecules.

  12. The ionization mechanisms in direct and dopant-assisted atmospheric pressure photoionization and atmospheric pressure laser ionization.

    PubMed

    Kauppila, Tiina J; Kersten, Hendrik; Benter, Thorsten

    2014-11-01

    A novel, gas-tight API interface for gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was used to study the ionization mechanism in direct and dopant-assisted atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) and atmospheric pressure laser ionization (APLI). Eight analytes (ethylbenzene, bromobenzene, naphthalene, anthracene, benzaldehyde, pyridine, quinolone, and acridine) with varying ionization energies (IEs) and proton affinities (PAs), and four common APPI dopants (toluene, acetone, anisole, and chlorobenzene) were chosen. All the studied compounds were ionized by direct APPI, forming mainly molecular ions. Addition of dopants suppressed the signal of the analytes with IEs above the IE of the dopant. For compounds with suitable IEs or Pas, the dopants increased the ionization efficiency as the analytes could be ionized through dopant-mediated gas-phase reactions, such as charge exchange, proton transfer, and other rather unexpected reactions, such as formation of [M + 77](+) in the presence of chlorobenzene. Experiments with deuterated toluene as the dopant verified that in case of proton transfer, the proton originated from the dopant instead of proton-bound solvent clusters, as in conventional open or non-tight APPI sources. In direct APLI using a 266 nm laser, a narrower range of compounds was ionized than in direct APPI, because of exceedingly high IEs or unfavorable two-photon absorption cross-sections. Introduction of dopants in the APLI system changed the ionization mechanism to similar dopant-mediated gas-phase reactions with the dopant as in APPI, which produced mainly ions of the same form as in APPI, and ionized a wider range of analytes than direct APLI.

  13. Ionization of EPA contaminants in direct and dopant-assisted atmospheric pressure photoionization and atmospheric pressure laser ionization.

    PubMed

    Kauppila, Tiina J; Kersten, Hendrik; Benter, Thorsten

    2015-06-01

    Seventy-seven EPA priority environmental pollutants were analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) equipped with an optimized atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) and an atmospheric pressure laser ionization (APLI) interface with and without dopants. The analyzed compounds included e.g., polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), nitro compounds, halogenated compounds, aromatic compounds with phenolic, acidic, alcohol, and amino groups, phthalate and adipatic esters, and aliphatic ethers. Toluene, anisole, chlorobenzene, and acetone were tested as dopants. The widest range of analytes was ionized using direct APPI (66/77 compounds). The introduction of dopants decreased the amount of compounds ionized in APPI (e.g., 54/77 with toluene), but in many cases the ionization efficiency increased. While in direct APPI the formation of molecular ions via photoionization was the main ionization reaction, dopant-assisted (DA) APPI promoted ionization reactions, such as charge exchange and proton transfer. Direct APLI ionized a much smaller amount of compounds than APPI (41/77 compounds), showing selectivity towards compounds with low ionization energies (IEs) and long-lived resonantly excited intermediate states. DA-APLI, however, was able to ionize a higher amount of compounds (e.g. 51/77 with toluene), as the ionization took place entirely through dopant-assisted ion/molecule reactions similar to those in DA-APPI. Best ionization efficiency in APPI and APLI (both direct and DA) was obtained for PAHs and aromatics with O- and N-functionalities, whereas nitro compounds and aliphatic ethers were the most difficult to ionize. Halogenated aromatics and esters were (mainly) ionized in APPI, but not in APLI.

  14. Ionization of EPA Contaminants in Direct and Dopant-Assisted Atmospheric Pressure Photoionization and Atmospheric Pressure Laser Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauppila, Tiina J.; Kersten, Hendrik; Benter, Thorsten

    2015-06-01

    Seventy-seven EPA priority environmental pollutants were analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) equipped with an optimized atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) and an atmospheric pressure laser ionization (APLI) interface with and without dopants. The analyzed compounds included e.g., polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), nitro compounds, halogenated compounds, aromatic compounds with phenolic, acidic, alcohol, and amino groups, phthalate and adipatic esters, and aliphatic ethers. Toluene, anisole, chlorobenzene, and acetone were tested as dopants. The widest range of analytes was ionized using direct APPI (66/77 compounds). The introduction of dopants decreased the amount of compounds ionized in APPI (e.g., 54/77 with toluene), but in many cases the ionization efficiency increased. While in direct APPI the formation of molecular ions via photoionization was the main ionization reaction, dopant-assisted (DA) APPI promoted ionization reactions, such as charge exchange and proton transfer. Direct APLI ionized a much smaller amount of compounds than APPI (41/77 compounds), showing selectivity towards compounds with low ionization energies (IEs) and long-lived resonantly excited intermediate states. DA-APLI, however, was able to ionize a higher amount of compounds (e.g. 51/77 with toluene), as the ionization took place entirely through dopant-assisted ion/molecule reactions similar to those in DA-APPI. Best ionization efficiency in APPI and APLI (both direct and DA) was obtained for PAHs and aromatics with O- and N-functionalities, whereas nitro compounds and aliphatic ethers were the most difficult to ionize. Halogenated aromatics and esters were (mainly) ionized in APPI, but not in APLI.

  15. Ionization of EPA contaminants in direct and dopant-assisted atmospheric pressure photoionization and atmospheric pressure laser ionization.

    PubMed

    Kauppila, Tiina J; Kersten, Hendrik; Benter, Thorsten

    2015-06-01

    Seventy-seven EPA priority environmental pollutants were analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) equipped with an optimized atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) and an atmospheric pressure laser ionization (APLI) interface with and without dopants. The analyzed compounds included e.g., polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), nitro compounds, halogenated compounds, aromatic compounds with phenolic, acidic, alcohol, and amino groups, phthalate and adipatic esters, and aliphatic ethers. Toluene, anisole, chlorobenzene, and acetone were tested as dopants. The widest range of analytes was ionized using direct APPI (66/77 compounds). The introduction of dopants decreased the amount of compounds ionized in APPI (e.g., 54/77 with toluene), but in many cases the ionization efficiency increased. While in direct APPI the formation of molecular ions via photoionization was the main ionization reaction, dopant-assisted (DA) APPI promoted ionization reactions, such as charge exchange and proton transfer. Direct APLI ionized a much smaller amount of compounds than APPI (41/77 compounds), showing selectivity towards compounds with low ionization energies (IEs) and long-lived resonantly excited intermediate states. DA-APLI, however, was able to ionize a higher amount of compounds (e.g. 51/77 with toluene), as the ionization took place entirely through dopant-assisted ion/molecule reactions similar to those in DA-APPI. Best ionization efficiency in APPI and APLI (both direct and DA) was obtained for PAHs and aromatics with O- and N-functionalities, whereas nitro compounds and aliphatic ethers were the most difficult to ionize. Halogenated aromatics and esters were (mainly) ionized in APPI, but not in APLI. PMID:25828352

  16. Collapse of the magnetic moment under pressure of AFe2 (A=Y, Zr, Lu and Hf) in the cubic Laves phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wenxu; Zhang, Wanli

    2016-04-01

    The electronic structures of four Laves phase iron compounds (e.g. YFe2, ZrFe2, LuFe2 and HfFe2) have been calculated with a state-of-the-art full potential electronic structure code. Our theoretical work predicted that the magnetic moments collapse under hydrostatic pressure. This feature is found to be universal in these materials. Its electronic origin is provided by the sharp peaks in the density of states near the Fermi level. It is shown that a first order quantum phase transition can be expected under pressure in Y(Zr, or Lu)Fe2, while a second order one in HfFe2. The bonding characteristics are discussed to elucidate the equilibrium lattice constant variation. The large spontaneous volume magnetostriction gives one of the most important characteristics of these compounds. Invar anomalies in these compounds can be partly explained by the current work when the fast continuous magnetic moment decrease with the decrease of the lattice constant was properly considered. This work may be as a first insight into the rich world of quantum phase transition and Invar mechanism in these Laves phase compounds.

  17. Surface Modification by Atmospheric Pressure Plasma for Improved Bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Thomas Scott

    An atmospheric pressure plasma source operating at temperatures below 150?C and fed with 1.0-3.0 volume% oxygen in helium was used to activate the surfaces of the native oxide on silicon, carbon-fiber reinforced epoxy composite, stainless steel type 410, and aluminum alloy 2024. Helium and oxygen were passed through the plasma source, whereby ionization occurred and ˜10 16 cm-3 oxygen atoms, ˜1015 cm -3 ozone molecules and ˜1016 cm-3 metastable oxygen molecules (O21Deltag) were generated. The plasma afterglow was directed onto the substrate material located 4 mm downstream. Surface properties of the plasma treated materials have been investigated using water contact angle (WCA), atomic force microscopy (AFM), infrared spectroscopy (IR), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The work presented herein establishes atmospheric-pressure plasma as a surface preparation technique that is well suited for surface activation and enhanced adhesive bond strength in a variety of materials. Atmospheric plasma activation presents an environmentally friendly alternative to wet chemical and abrasive methods of surface preparation. Attenuated total internal reflection infrared spectroscopy was used to study the aging mechanism of the native oxide on silicon. During storage at ambient conditions, the water contact angle of a clean surface increased from <5° to 40° over a period of 12 hours. When stored under a nitrogen purge, the water contact angle of a clean surface increased from <5° to 30° over a period of 40-60 hours. The change in contact angle resulted from the adsorption of nonanal onto the exposed surface hydroxyl groups. The rate of adsorption of nonanal under a nitrogen purged atmosphere ranged from 0.378+/-0.011 hr-1 to 0.182+/-0.008 hr -1 molecules/(cm2•s), decreasing as the fraction of hydrogen-bonded hydroxyl groups increased from 49% to 96% on the SiO 2 surface. The adsorption of the organic contaminant could be suppressed indefinitely by storing the

  18. Surface Modification by Atmospheric Pressure Plasma for Improved Bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Thomas Scott

    An atmospheric pressure plasma source operating at temperatures below 150?C and fed with 1.0-3.0 volume% oxygen in helium was used to activate the surfaces of the native oxide on silicon, carbon-fiber reinforced epoxy composite, stainless steel type 410, and aluminum alloy 2024. Helium and oxygen were passed through the plasma source, whereby ionization occurred and ˜10 16 cm-3 oxygen atoms, ˜1015 cm -3 ozone molecules and ˜1016 cm-3 metastable oxygen molecules (O21Deltag) were generated. The plasma afterglow was directed onto the substrate material located 4 mm downstream. Surface properties of the plasma treated materials have been investigated using water contact angle (WCA), atomic force microscopy (AFM), infrared spectroscopy (IR), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The work presented herein establishes atmospheric-pressure plasma as a surface preparation technique that is well suited for surface activation and enhanced adhesive bond strength in a variety of materials. Atmospheric plasma activation presents an environmentally friendly alternative to wet chemical and abrasive methods of surface preparation. Attenuated total internal reflection infrared spectroscopy was used to study the aging mechanism of the native oxide on silicon. During storage at ambient conditions, the water contact angle of a clean surface increased from <5° to 40° over a period of 12 hours. When stored under a nitrogen purge, the water contact angle of a clean surface increased from <5° to 30° over a period of 40-60 hours. The change in contact angle resulted from the adsorption of nonanal onto the exposed surface hydroxyl groups. The rate of adsorption of nonanal under a nitrogen purged atmosphere ranged from 0.378+/-0.011 hr-1 to 0.182+/-0.008 hr -1 molecules/(cm2•s), decreasing as the fraction of hydrogen-bonded hydroxyl groups increased from 49% to 96% on the SiO 2 surface. The adsorption of the organic contaminant could be suppressed indefinitely by storing the

  19. Application of atmospheric pressure plasma in polymer and composite adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hang

    An atmospheric pressure helium and oxygen plasma was used to investigate surface activation and bonding in polymer composites. This device was operated by passing 1.0-3.0 vol% of oxygen in helium through a pair of parallel plate metal electrodes powered by 13.56 or 27.12 MHz radio frequency power. The gases were partially ionized between the capacitors where plasma was generated. The reactive species in the plasma were carried downstream by the gas flow to treat the substrate surface. The temperature of the plasm gas reaching the surface of the substrate did not exceed 150 °C, which makes it suitable for polymer processing. The reactive species in the plasma downstream includes ~ 1016-1017 cm-3 atomic oxygen, ~ 1015 cm-3 ozone molecule, and ~ 10 16 cm-3 metastable oxygen molecule (O2 1Deltag). The substrates were treated at 2-5 mm distance from the exit of the plasma. Surface properties of the substrates were characterized using water contact angle (WCA), atomic force microscopy (AFM), infrared spectroscopy (IR), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Subsequently, the plasma treated samples were bonded adhesively or fabricated into composites. The increase in mechanical strength was correlated to changes in the material composition and structure after plasma treatment. The work presented hereafter establishes atmospheric pressure plasma as an effective method to activate and to clean the surfaces of polymers and composites for bonding. This application can be further expanded to the activation of carbon fibers for better fiber-resin interactions during the fabrication of composites. Treating electronic grade FR-4 and polyimide with the He/O2 plasma for a few seconds changed the substrate surface from hydrophobic to hydrophilic, which allowed complete wetting of the surface by epoxy in underfill applications. Characterization of the surface by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy shows formation of oxygenated functional groups, including hydroxyl, carbonyl, and

  20. Study of short atmospheric pressure dc glow microdischarge in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryavtsev, Anatoly; Bogdanov, Eugene; Chirtsov, Alexander; Emelin, Sergey

    2011-10-01

    The results of experiments and simulations of short (without positive column) atmospheric pressure dc glow discharge in air are presented. We used metal steel electrodes with a gap of 5-100 microns. The experimental voltage-current characteristic's (VAC) have a constant or slightly increasing form at low gap. The most stable microdischarges were burning with a flat cathode and rounded anode, when the length of the discharge is automatically established near the minimum of the Paschen curve by changing their binding on the anode. In this case microdischarge was stable and it had growing VAC. For simulations we used 2D fluid model with kinetic description of electrons. We solved the balance equations for the vibrationally- and the electronically-excited states of a nitrogen and oxygen molecules; nitrogen and oxygen atoms; ozone molecule; and different nitrogen and oxygen ions with different plasmochemical reactions between them. Simulations predicted the main regions of the dc glow discharges including cathode and anode sheath and plasma of negative glow, Faraday dark space and transition region. Gas heating plays an important role in shaping the discharge profiles. The results of experiments and simulations of short (without positive column) atmospheric pressure dc glow discharge in air are presented. We used metal steel electrodes with a gap of 5-100 microns. The experimental voltage-current characteristic's (VAC) have a constant or slightly increasing form at low gap. The most stable microdischarges were burning with a flat cathode and rounded anode, when the length of the discharge is automatically established near the minimum of the Paschen curve by changing their binding on the anode. In this case microdischarge was stable and it had growing VAC. For simulations we used 2D fluid model with kinetic description of electrons. We solved the balance equations for the vibrationally- and the electronically-excited states of a nitrogen and oxygen molecules; nitrogen

  1. Influence of geomagnetic activity and atmospheric pressure on human arterial pressure during the solar cycle 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azcárate, T.; Mendoza, B.; Levi, J. R.

    2016-11-01

    We performed a study of the systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) arterial blood pressure behavior under natural variables such as the atmospheric pressure (AtmP) and the horizontal geomagnetic field component (H). We worked with a sample of 304 healthy normotense volunteers, 152 men and 152 women, with ages between 18 and 84 years in Mexico City during the period 2008-2014, corresponding to the minimum, ascending and maximum phases of the solar cycle 24. The data was divided by gender, age and day/night cycle. We studied the time series using three methods: Correlations, bivariate and superposed epochs (within a window of three days around the day of occurrence of a geomagnetic storm) analysis, between the SBP and DBP and the natural variables (AtmP and H). The correlation analysis indicated correlation between the SBP and DBP and AtmP and H, being the largest during the night. Furthermore, the correlation and bivariate analysis showed that the largest correlations are between the SBP and DBP and the AtmP. The superposed epoch analysis found that the largest number of significant SBP and DBP changes occurred for women. Finally, the blood pressure changes are larger during the solar minimum and ascending solar cycle phases than during the solar maximum; the storms of the minimum were more intense than those of the maximum and this could be the reason of behavior of the blood pressure changes along the solar cycle.

  2. Atmospheric pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy apparatus: Bridging the pressure gap.

    PubMed

    Velasco-Vélez, J J; Pfeifer, V; Hävecker, M; Wang, R; Centeno, A; Zurutuza, A; Algara-Siller, G; Stotz, E; Skorupska, K; Teschner, D; Kube, P; Braeuninger-Weimer, P; Hofmann, S; Schlögl, R; Knop-Gericke, A

    2016-05-01

    One of the main goals in catalysis is the characterization of solid/gas interfaces in a reaction environment. The electronic structure and chemical composition of surfaces become heavily influenced by the surrounding environment. However, the lack of surface sensitive techniques that are able to monitor these modifications under high pressure conditions hinders the understanding of such processes. This limitation is known throughout the community as the "pressure gap." We have developed a novel experimental setup that provides chemical information on a molecular level under atmospheric pressure and in presence of reactive gases and at elevated temperatures. This approach is based on separating the vacuum environment from the high-pressure environment by a silicon nitride grid-that contains an array of micrometer-sized holes-coated with a bilayer of graphene. Using this configuration, we have investigated the local electronic structure of catalysts by means of photoelectron spectroscopy and in presence of gases at 1 atm. The reaction products were monitored online by mass spectrometry and gas chromatography. The successful operation of this setup was demonstrated with three different examples: the oxidation/reduction reaction of iridium (noble metal) and copper (transition metal) nanoparticles and with the hydrogenation of propyne on Pd black catalyst (powder). PMID:27250406

  3. Atmospheric pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy apparatus: Bridging the pressure gap.

    PubMed

    Velasco-Vélez, J J; Pfeifer, V; Hävecker, M; Wang, R; Centeno, A; Zurutuza, A; Algara-Siller, G; Stotz, E; Skorupska, K; Teschner, D; Kube, P; Braeuninger-Weimer, P; Hofmann, S; Schlögl, R; Knop-Gericke, A

    2016-05-01

    One of the main goals in catalysis is the characterization of solid/gas interfaces in a reaction environment. The electronic structure and chemical composition of surfaces become heavily influenced by the surrounding environment. However, the lack of surface sensitive techniques that are able to monitor these modifications under high pressure conditions hinders the understanding of such processes. This limitation is known throughout the community as the "pressure gap." We have developed a novel experimental setup that provides chemical information on a molecular level under atmospheric pressure and in presence of reactive gases and at elevated temperatures. This approach is based on separating the vacuum environment from the high-pressure environment by a silicon nitride grid-that contains an array of micrometer-sized holes-coated with a bilayer of graphene. Using this configuration, we have investigated the local electronic structure of catalysts by means of photoelectron spectroscopy and in presence of gases at 1 atm. The reaction products were monitored online by mass spectrometry and gas chromatography. The successful operation of this setup was demonstrated with three different examples: the oxidation/reduction reaction of iridium (noble metal) and copper (transition metal) nanoparticles and with the hydrogenation of propyne on Pd black catalyst (powder).

  4. Power ultrasound interaction with DC atmospheric pressure electrical discharge.

    PubMed

    Bálek, Rudolf; Pekárek, Stanislav; Bartáková, Zuzana

    2006-12-22

    The effect of power ultrasound application on DC hollow needle to plate atmospheric pressure electrical discharge enhanced by the flow of air through the needle electrode was studied experimentally. It was found that applying ultrasound increases discharge volume. In this volume take place plasmachemical processes, used in important ecological applications such as the production of ozone, VOC decomposition and de-NOx processes enhancement. In our experiments we used a negatively biased needle electrode as a cathode and a perpendicularly placed surface of the ultrasonic resonator--horn--as an anode. To demonstrate the effect of ultrasound waves on electrical discharge photographs of the discharge for the needle to the ultrasonic resonator at distances of 4, 6 and 8mm are shown. By varying the distance between needle and the surface of the transducer, we were able to create the node or the antinode at the region around the tip of the needle, where the ionization processes are effective. In our experimental arrangement the amplitude of acoustic pressure at antinode exceeded 10(4) Pa. The photographs reveal that the diameter of the discharge on the surface of the ultrasonic horn is increased when ultrasound is applied. The increase of discharge volume caused by the application of ultrasound can be explained as a combined effect of the change of the reduced electric field E/n (E is electric field strength and n is the neutral particles density), strong turbulence of the particles in the discharge region caused by quick changes of amplitudes of the standing ultrasonic wave and finally by the boundary layer near the ultrasonic transducer perturbations due to vibrations of the transducer surface.

  5. The effects of atmospheric pressure on infrared reflectance spectra of Martian analogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, Janice L.; Pieters, Carle M.; Pratt, Stephen F.; Patterson, William

    1993-01-01

    The use of terrestrial samples as analogs of Mars soils are complicated by the Martian atmosphere. Spectral features due to the Martian atmosphere can be removed from telescopic spectra of Mars and ISM spectra of Mars, but this does not account for any spectral differences resulting from atmospheric pressure or any interactions between the atmosphere and the surface. We are examining the effects of atmospheric pressure on reflectance spectra of powdered samples in the laboratory. Contrary to a previous experiment with granite, no significant changes in albedo or the Christiansen feature were observed from 1 bar pressure down to a pressure of 8 micrometers Hg. However, reducing the atmospheric pressure does have a pronounced affect on the hydration features, even for samples retained in a dry environment for years.

  6. On the mechanism of atmospheric pressure plasma plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Longwei; Zhao, Peng; Shu, Xingsheng; Shen, Jie; Meng, Yuedong

    2010-08-01

    For the purpose of unveiling the parameters influencing the length of atmospheric pressure plasma plume, an over 165 cm long argon plasma plume is generated in the quartz tube attached to the nozzle of the device. Dependence of plasma length on discharge parameters such as applied voltage, frequency of power supply, and argon gas flow rate was investigated. Experimental results indicated that (a) the applied voltage plays crucial roles on plasma plume length, that is, the plasma plume length exponentially increases with the applied voltage, (b) the plasma plume length increases with frequency, more obviously when the applied voltage is higher, (c) the plasma plume length increases with argon gas flow rate, reaches its maximum at critical value of the gas flow rate, and then decreases again. An evaluation of the physical phenomena involved in streamer propagation, particularly of the energy balance, was investigated. The numerical results were qualitatively consistent with previous experimental results by successfully indicating the high velocity of "plasma bullet" and providing physical mechanism of energy balance determining streamer length.

  7. Ultrasonic nebulization atmospheric pressure glow discharge - Preliminary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greda, Krzysztof; Jamroz, Piotr; Pohl, Pawel

    2016-07-01

    Atmospheric pressure glow microdischarge (μAPGD) generated between a small-sized He nozzle jet anode and a flowing liquid cathode was coupled with ultrasonic nebulization (USN) for analytical optical emission spectrometry (OES). The spatial distributions of the emitted spectra from the novel coupled USN-μAPGD system and the conventional μAPGD system were compared. In the μAPGD, the maxima of the intensity distribution profiles of the atomic emission lines Ca, Cd, In, K, Li, Mg, Mn, Na and Sr were observed in the near cathode region, whereas, in the case of the USN-μAPGD, they were shifted towards the anode. In the novel system, the intensities of the analytical lines of the studied metals were boosted from several to 35 times. As compared to the conventional μAPGD-OES with the introduction of analytes through the sputtering and/or the electrospray-like nebulization of the flowing liquid cathode solution, the proposed method with the USN introduction of analytes in the form of a dry aerosol provides improved detectability of the studied metals. The detection limits of metals achieved with the USN-μAPGD-OES method were in the range from 0.08 μg L- 1 for Li to 52 μg L- 1 for Mn.

  8. Characteristics of Atmospheric Pressure Rotating Gliding Arc Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Zhu, Fengsen; Tu, Xin; Bo, Zheng; Cen, Kefa; Li, Xiaodong

    2016-05-01

    In this work, a novel direct current (DC) atmospheric pressure rotating gliding arc (RGA) plasma reactor has been developed for plasma-assisted chemical reactions. The influence of the gas composition and the gas flow rate on the arc dynamic behaviour and the formation of reactive species in the N2 and air gliding arc plasmas has been investigated by means of electrical signals, high speed photography, and optical emission spectroscopic diagnostics. Compared to conventional gliding arc reactors with knife-shaped electrodes which generally require a high flow rate (e.g., 10-20 L/min) to maintain a long arc length and reasonable plasma discharge zone, in this RGA system, a lower gas flow rate (e.g., 2 L/min) can also generate a larger effective plasma reaction zone with a longer arc length for chemical reactions. Two different motion patterns can be clearly observed in the N2 and air RGA plasmas. The time-resolved arc voltage signals show that three different arc dynamic modes, the arc restrike mode, takeover mode, and combined modes, can be clearly identified in the RGA plasmas. The occurrence of different motion and arc dynamic modes is strongly dependent on the composition of the working gas and gas flow rate. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 51576174), the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (No. 20120101110099) and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (No. 2015FZA4011)

  9. The solvation of electrons by an atmospheric-pressure plasma

    PubMed Central

    Rumbach, Paul; Bartels, David M.; Sankaran, R. Mohan; Go, David B.

    2015-01-01

    Solvated electrons are typically generated by radiolysis or photoionization of solutes. While plasmas containing free electrons have been brought into contact with liquids in studies dating back centuries, there has been little evidence that electrons are solvated by this approach. Here we report direct measurements of solvated electrons generated by an atmospheric-pressure plasma in contact with the surface of an aqueous solution. The electrons are measured by their optical absorbance using a total internal reflection geometry. The measured absorption spectrum is unexpectedly blue shifted, which is potentially due to the intense electric field in the interfacial Debye layer. We estimate an average penetration depth of 2.5±1.0 nm, indicating that the electrons fully solvate before reacting through second-order recombination. Reactions with various electron scavengers including H+, NO2−, NO3− and H2O2 show that the kinetics are similar, but not identical, to those for solvated electrons formed in bulk water by radiolysis. PMID:26088017

  10. Breakdown of atmospheric pressure microgaps at high excitation frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levko, Dmitry; Raja, Laxminarayan

    2015-09-01

    Microwave breakdown of atmospheric pressure microgaps was studied by a one-dimensional Particle-in-Cell Monte Carlo Collisions numerical model. The effect of both field electron emission and secondary electron emission (due to electron impact, ion impact, and primary electron reflection) from surfaces on the breakdown process is considered. For conditions where field emission is the dominant electron emission mechanism from the electrode surfaces, it is found that the breakdown voltage of mw microdischarge coincides with the breakdown voltage of direct-current microdischarge. When microdischarge properties are controlled by both field and secondary electron emission, breakdown voltage of mw microdischarge exceeds that of dc microdischarge. When microdischarge is controlled only by secondary electron emission, breakdown voltage of mw microdischarge is smaller than that of dc microdischarge. It is shown that if the interelectrode gap exceeds some critical value, mw microdischarge can be ignited only by electrons initially seeded within the gap volume. In addition, the influence of electron reflection and secondary emission due to electron impact is studied. This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  11. Breakdown of atmospheric pressure microgaps at high excitation frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levko, Dmitry; Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    2015-05-01

    Microwave (mw) breakdown of atmospheric pressure microgaps is studied by a one-dimensional Particle-in-Cell Monte Carlo Collisions numerical model. The effect of both field electron emission and secondary electron emission (due to electron impact, ion impact, and primary electron reflection) from surfaces on the breakdown process is considered. For conditions where field emission is the dominant electron emission mechanism from the electrode surfaces, it is found that the breakdown voltage of mw microdischarge coincides with the breakdown voltage of direct-current (dc) microdischarge. When microdischarge properties are controlled by both field and secondary electron emission, breakdown voltage of mw microdischarge exceeds that of dc microdischarge. When microdischarge is controlled only by secondary electron emission, breakdown voltage of mw microdischarge is smaller than that of dc microdischarge. It is shown that if the interelectrode gap exceeds some critical value, mw microdischarge can be ignited only by electrons initially seeded within the gap volume. In addition, the influence of electron reflection and secondary emission due to electron impact is studied.

  12. Helium atmospheric pressure plasma jets touching dielectric and metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norberg, Seth A.; Johnsen, Eric; Kushner, Mark J.

    2015-07-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma jets (APPJs) are being investigated in the context plasma medicine and biotechnology applications, and surface functionalization. The composition of the surface being treated ranges from plastics, liquids, and biological tissue, to metals. The dielectric constant of these materials ranges from as low as 1.5 for plastics to near 80 for liquids, and essentially infinite for metals. The electrical properties of the surface are not independent variables as the permittivity of the material being treated has an effect on the dynamics of the incident APPJ. In this paper, results are discussed from a computational investigation of the interaction of an APPJ incident onto materials of varying permittivity, and their impact on the discharge dynamics of the plasma jet. The computer model used in this investigation solves Poisson's equation, transport equations for charged and neutral species, the electron energy equation, and the Navier-Stokes equations for the neutral gas flow. The APPJ is sustained in He/O2 = 99.8/0.2 flowing into humid air, and is directed onto dielectric surfaces in contact with ground with dielectric constants ranging from 2 to 80, and a grounded metal surface. Low values of relative permittivity encourage propagation of the electric field into the treated material and formation and propagation of a surface ionization wave. High values of relative permittivity promote the restrike of the ionization wave and the formation of a conduction channel between the plasma discharge and the treated surface. The distribution of space charge surrounding the APPJ is discussed.

  13. Pulsed, atmospheric pressure plasma source for emission spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Duan, Yixiang; Jin, Zhe; Su, Yongxuan

    2004-05-11

    A low-power, plasma source-based, portable molecular light emission generator/detector employing an atmospheric pressure pulsed-plasma for molecular fragmentation and excitation is described. The average power required for the operation of the plasma is between 0.02 W and 5 W. The features of the optical emission spectra obtained with the pulsed plasma source are significantly different from those obtained with direct current (dc) discharge higher power; for example, strong CH emission at 431.2 nm which is only weakly observed with dc plasma sources was observed, and the intense CN emission observed at 383-388 nm using dc plasma sources was weak in most cases. Strong CN emission was only observed using the present apparatus when compounds containing nitrogen, such as aniline were employed as samples. The present apparatus detects dimethylsulfoxide at 200 ppb using helium as the plasma gas by observing the emission band of the CH radical. When coupled with a gas chromatograph for separating components present in a sample to be analyzed, the present invention provides an apparatus for detecting the arrival of a particular component in the sample at the end of the chromatographic column and the identity thereof.

  14. Atmospheric pressure plasma assisted calcination of composite submicron fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvecká, Veronika; Kováčik, Dušan; Tučeková, Zlata; Zahoranová, Anna; Černák, Mirko

    2016-08-01

    The plasma assisted calcination of composite organic/inorganic submicron fibers for the preparation of inorganic fibers in submicron scale was studied. Aluminium butoxide/polyvinylpyrrolidone fibers prepared by electrospinning were treated using low-temperature plasma generated by special type of dielectric barrier discharge, so called diffuse coplanar surface barrier discharge (DCSBD) at atmospheric pressure in ambient air, synthetic air, oxygen and nitrogen. Effect of plasma treatment on base polymer removal was investigated by using Attenuated total reflectance - Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy. Influence of working gas on the base polymer reduction was studied by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and CHNS elemental analysis. Changes in fibers morphology were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). High efficiency of organic template removal without any degradation of fibers was observed after plasma treatment in ambient air. Due to the low-temperature approach and short exposure time, the plasma assisted calcination is a promising alternative to the conventional thermal calcination. Contribution to the topical issue "6th Central European Symposium on Plasma Chemistry (CESPC-6)", edited by Nicolas Gherardi, Ester Marotta and Cristina Paradisi

  15. Formation of plasma dust structures at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Filippov, A. V. Babichev, V. N.; Dyatko, N. A.; Pal', A. F.; Starostin, A. N.; Taran, M. D.; Fortov, V. E.

    2006-02-15

    The formation of strongly coupled stable dust structures in the plasma produced by an electron beam at atmospheric pressure was detected experimentally. Analytical expressions were derived for the ionization rate of a gas by an electron beam in an axially symmetric geometry by comparing experimental data with Monte Carlo calculations. Self-consistent one-dimensional simulations of the beam plasma were performed in the diffusion drift approximation of charged plasma particle transport with electron diffusion to determine the dust particle levitation conditions. Since almost all of the applied voltage drops on the cathode layer in the Thomson glow regime of a non-self-sustained gas discharge, a distribution of the electric field that grows toward the cathode is produced in it; this field together with the gravity produces a potential well in which the dust particles levitate to form a stable disk-shaped structure. The nonideality parameters of the dust component in the formation region of a highly ordered quasi-crystalline structure calculated using computational data for the dust particle charging problem were found to be higher than the critical value after exceeding which an ensemble of particles with a Yukawa interaction should pass to the crystalline state.

  16. The solvation of electrons by an atmospheric-pressure plasma.

    PubMed

    Rumbach, Paul; Bartels, David M; Sankaran, R Mohan; Go, David B

    2015-01-01

    Solvated electrons are typically generated by radiolysis or photoionization of solutes. While plasmas containing free electrons have been brought into contact with liquids in studies dating back centuries, there has been little evidence that electrons are solvated by this approach. Here we report direct measurements of solvated electrons generated by an atmospheric-pressure plasma in contact with the surface of an aqueous solution. The electrons are measured by their optical absorbance using a total internal reflection geometry. The measured absorption spectrum is unexpectedly blue shifted, which is potentially due to the intense electric field in the interfacial Debye layer. We estimate an average penetration depth of 2.5 ± 1.0 nm, indicating that the electrons fully solvate before reacting through second-order recombination. Reactions with various electron scavengers including H(+), NO2(-), NO3(-) and H2O2 show that the kinetics are similar, but not identical, to those for solvated electrons formed in bulk water by radiolysis. PMID:26088017

  17. Improved design for the atmospheric pressure photoionization source.

    PubMed

    Tabrizchi, Mahmoud; Bahrami, Hamed

    2011-12-01

    A different design for the atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) source, other than commercially available sources, such as PhotoSpray and PhotoMate, has been proposed. Unlike PhotoSpray, this design applies an electric field to separate photoions and electrons. In addition, the UV radiation is parallel to the gas stream toward the mass spectrometer sampling aperture. The total ion current obtained using this geometry, for dopant only, could be an order of magnitude larger than that obtained using the PhotoSpray design. Additionally, to prevent the negative effect of solvent on the photoionization yield, a curtain electrode was mounted in front of the UV lamp to divide the ionization zone into two distinct regions: the dopant and the solvent regions. Dopant was introduced in the vicinity of the lamp, and vaporized solvent was introduced into the solvent region. The curtain electrode prevented the solvent from entering the dopant region where dopant was directly photoionized. This design consumes much less dopant (approximately 1/10 less) than the conventional source, which minimizes the presence of photofragmented radicals and dopant trace contaminants in the ionization region. As a result, unlike PhotoSpray, the mass spectra contained mainly the analyte and solvent peaks. Additionally, the source was tested using an ion mobility spectrometer (IMS). The effect of the curtain electrode on signal intensity and performance of the source using IMS was also proved to be positive. PMID:22017507

  18. Characteristics of Atmospheric Pressure Rotating Gliding Arc Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Zhu, Fengsen; Tu, Xin; Bo, Zheng; Cen, Kefa; Li, Xiaodong

    2016-05-01

    In this work, a novel direct current (DC) atmospheric pressure rotating gliding arc (RGA) plasma reactor has been developed for plasma-assisted chemical reactions. The influence of the gas composition and the gas flow rate on the arc dynamic behaviour and the formation of reactive species in the N2 and air gliding arc plasmas has been investigated by means of electrical signals, high speed photography, and optical emission spectroscopic diagnostics. Compared to conventional gliding arc reactors with knife-shaped electrodes which generally require a high flow rate (e.g., 10–20 L/min) to maintain a long arc length and reasonable plasma discharge zone, in this RGA system, a lower gas flow rate (e.g., 2 L/min) can also generate a larger effective plasma reaction zone with a longer arc length for chemical reactions. Two different motion patterns can be clearly observed in the N2 and air RGA plasmas. The time-resolved arc voltage signals show that three different arc dynamic modes, the arc restrike mode, takeover mode, and combined modes, can be clearly identified in the RGA plasmas. The occurrence of different motion and arc dynamic modes is strongly dependent on the composition of the working gas and gas flow rate. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 51576174), the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (No. 20120101110099) and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (No. 2015FZA4011)

  19. Uniform dose atmospheric pressure microplasma exposure of individual bacterial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutherford, David; Mahony, Charles; Spence, Sarah; Perez-Martin, Fatima; Kelsey, Colin; Hamilton, Neil; Diver, Declan; Bennet, Euan; Potts, Hugh; Mariotti, Davide; McDowell, David; Maguire, Paul

    2015-09-01

    Plasma - bacteria interactions have been studied for some time with a view to using plasma exposure for wound healing, sterilization and decontamination. While high efficacy has been demonstrated, important fundamental mechanisms are not understood and may be critical for ultimate acceptance. The dose variation across the exposed population and the impact of non-lethal exposure on subsequent bacterial growth are important issues. We demonstrate that individual bacterial cells can remain viable after exposure to a uniform plasma dose. Each bacteria cell (E coli) is delivered to the atmospheric pressure plasma in an aerosolised droplet (d ~ 10 micron). The estimated plasma density is 1E13 - 1E14 cm-3, gas temperature <400 K, and exposure times vary between 0.04 and 0.1ms. Droplet evaporation in flight is ~2 micron and plasma - cell interactions are mediated by the surrounding liquid (Ringers solution) where plasma-induced droplet surface chemistry and charging is known to occur. We report the cell viability and recovery dynamics of individual exposed cells as well as impact on DNA and membrane components with reference to measured plasma parameters. This research was funded by EPSRC (Grants: EP/K006088/1 & EP/K006142/1).

  20. Atmospheric pressure plasmas: infection control and bacterial responses.

    PubMed

    Mai-Prochnow, Anne; Murphy, Anthony B; McLean, Keith M; Kong, Michael G; Ostrikov, Kostya Ken

    2014-06-01

    Cold atmospheric pressure plasma (APP) is a recent, cutting-edge antimicrobial treatment. It has the potential to be used as an alternative to traditional treatments such as antibiotics and as a promoter of wound healing, making it a promising tool in a range of biomedical applications with particular importance for combating infections. A number of studies show very promising results for APP-mediated killing of bacteria, including removal of biofilms of pathogenic bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. However, the mode of action of APP and the resulting bacterial response are not fully understood. Use of a variety of different plasma-generating devices, different types of plasma gases and different treatment modes makes it challenging to show reproducibility and transferability of results. This review considers some important studies in which APP was used as an antibacterial agent, and specifically those that elucidate its mode of action, with the aim of identifying common bacterial responses to APP exposure. The review has a particular emphasis on mechanisms of interactions of bacterial biofilms with APP.

  1. Using atmospheric pressure plasma treatment for treating grey cotton fabric.

    PubMed

    Kan, Chi-Wai; Lam, Chui-Fung; Chan, Chee-Kooi; Ng, Sun-Pui

    2014-02-15

    Conventional wet treatment, desizing, scouring and bleaching, for grey cotton fabric involves the use of high water, chemical and energy consumption which may not be considered as a clean process. This study aims to investigate the efficiency of the atmospheric pressure plasma (APP) treatment on treating grey cotton fabric when compared with the conventional wet treatment. Grey cotton fabrics were treated with different combinations of plasma parameters with helium and oxygen gases and also through conventional desizing, scouring and bleaching processes in order to obtain comparable results. The results obtained from wicking and water drop tests showed that wettability of grey cotton fabrics was greatly improved after plasma treatment and yielded better results than conventional desizing and scouring. The weight reduction of plasma treated grey cotton fabrics revealed that plasma treatment can help remove sizing materials and impurities. Chemical and morphological changes in plasma treated samples were analysed by FTIR and SEM, respectively. Finally, dyeability of the plasma treated and conventional wet treated grey cotton fabrics was compared and the results showed that similar dyeing results were obtained. This can prove that plasma treatment would be another choice for treating grey cotton fabrics. PMID:24507269

  2. Gas flow dependence of atmospheric pressure plasma needle discharge characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Muyang; Yang, Congying; Liu, Sanqiu; Chen, Xiaochang; Ni, Gengsong; Wang, Dezhen

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, a two-dimensional coupled model of neutral gas flow and plasma dynamics is presented to explain the gas flow dependence of discharge characteristics in helium plasma needle at atmospherics pressure. The diffusional mixing layer between the helium jet core and the ambient air has a moderate effect on the streamer propagation. The obtained simulation results present that the streamer shows the ring-shaped emission profile at a moderate gas flow rate. The key chemical reactions which drive the streamer propagation are electron-impact ionization of helium neutral, nitrogen and oxygen molecules. At a moderate gas flow rate of 0.5 slm, a significant increase in propagation velocity of the streamer is observed due to appropriate quantity of impurities air diffuse into the helium. Besides, when the gas flow rate is below 0.35 slm, the radial density of ground-state atomic oxygen peaks along the axis of symmetry. However, when the gas flow rate is above 0.5 slm, a ring-shaped density distribution appears. The peak density is on the order of 1020 m-3 at 10 ns in our work.

  3. Breakdown of atmospheric pressure microgaps at high excitation frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Levko, Dmitry; Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    2015-05-07

    Microwave (mw) breakdown of atmospheric pressure microgaps is studied by a one-dimensional Particle-in-Cell Monte Carlo Collisions numerical model. The effect of both field electron emission and secondary electron emission (due to electron impact, ion impact, and primary electron reflection) from surfaces on the breakdown process is considered. For conditions where field emission is the dominant electron emission mechanism from the electrode surfaces, it is found that the breakdown voltage of mw microdischarge coincides with the breakdown voltage of direct-current (dc) microdischarge. When microdischarge properties are controlled by both field and secondary electron emission, breakdown voltage of mw microdischarge exceeds that of dc microdischarge. When microdischarge is controlled only by secondary electron emission, breakdown voltage of mw microdischarge is smaller than that of dc microdischarge. It is shown that if the interelectrode gap exceeds some critical value, mw microdischarge can be ignited only by electrons initially seeded within the gap volume. In addition, the influence of electron reflection and secondary emission due to electron impact is studied.

  4. Infrared polarization spectroscopy of CO 2 at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alwahabi, Z. T.; Li, Z. S.; Zetterberg, J.; Aldén, M.

    2004-04-01

    Polarisation spectroscopy (PS) was used to probe CO 2 gas concentration in a CO 2/N 2 binary mixture at atmospheric pressure and ambient temperature. The CO 2 molecules were probed by a direct laser excitation to an overtone and combination vibrational state. The tuneable narrow linewidth infrared laser radiation at 2 μm was obtained by Raman shifting of the output from a single-longitudinal-mode pulsed alexandrite laser-system to the second Stokes component in a H 2 gas cell. Infrared polarisation spectroscopy (IRPS) and time-resolved infrared laser-induced fluorescence (IRLIF) spectra were collected. A linear dependence of the IRPS signal on the CO 2 mole fraction has been found. This indicates that the IRPS signal is only weakly affected by the molecular collisions and that the inter- and intra- molecular energy transfer processes do not strongly influence the molecular alignment at the time scale of the measurements. Thus IRPS holds great potential for quantitative instantaneous gas concentration diagnostics in general. This is especially important for molecules which do not posses an accessible optical transition such as CO, CO 2 and N 2O. In addition, an accurate experimental method to measure the extinction ratio of the IR polarisers employed in this study has been developed and applied. With its obvious merits as simplicity, easy alignment and high accuracy, the method can be generalized to all spectral regions, different polarisers and high extinction ratios.

  5. Assessment of Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Treatment for Implant Osseointegration

    PubMed Central

    Danna, Natalie R.; Beutel, Bryan G.; Tovar, Nick; Witek, Lukasz; Marin, Charles; Granato, Rodrigo; Suzuki, Marcelo; Coelho, Paulo G.

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed the osseointegrative effects of atmospheric pressure plasma (APP) surface treatment for implants in a canine model. Control surfaces were untreated textured titanium (Ti) and calcium phosphate (CaP). Experimental surfaces were their 80-second air-based APP-treated counterparts. Physicochemical characterization was performed to assess topography, surface energy, and chemical composition. One implant from each control and experimental group (four in total) was placed in one radius of each of the seven male beagles for three weeks, and one implant from each group was placed in the contralateral radius for six weeks. After sacrifice, bone-to-implant contact (BIC) and bone area fraction occupancy (BAFO) were assessed. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed decreased surface levels of carbon and increased Ti and oxygen, and calcium and oxygen, posttreatment for Ti and CaP surfaces, respectively. There was a significant (P < 0.001) increase in BIC for APP-treated textured Ti surfaces at six weeks but not at three weeks or for CaP surfaces. There were no significant (P = 0.57) differences for BAFO between treated and untreated surfaces for either material at either time point. This suggests that air-based APP surface treatment may improve osseointegration of textured Ti surfaces but not CaP surfaces. Studies optimizing APP parameters and applications are warranted. PMID:26090443

  6. Atmospheric pressure arc discharge with ablating graphite anode

    SciTech Connect

    Nemchinsky, V. A.; Raitses, Y.

    2015-05-18

    The anodic carbon arc discharge is used to produce carbon nanoparticles. Recent experiments with the carbon arc at atmospheric pressure helium demonstrated the enhanced ablation rate for narrow graphite anodes resulting in high deposition rates of carbonaceous products on the copper cathode (Fetterman et al 2008 Carbon 46 1322–6). The proposed model explains these results with interconnected steady-state models of the cathode and the anode processes. When considering cathode functioning, the model predicts circulation of the particles in the near-cathode region: evaporation of the cathode material, ionization of evaporated atoms and molecules in the near-cathode plasma, return of the resulting ions to the cathode, surface recombination of ions and electrons followed again by cathode evaporation etc. In the case of the low anode ablation rate, the ion acceleration in the cathode sheath provides the major cathode heating mechanism. In the case of an intensive anode ablation, an additional cathode heating is due to latent fusion heat of the atomic species evaporated from the anode and depositing at the cathode. Using the experimental arc voltage as the only input discharge parameter, the model allows us to calculate the anode ablation rate. A comparison of the results of calculations with the available experimental data shows reasonable agreement.

  7. Pressure Sounding of the Middle Atmosphere from ATMOS Solar Occultation Measurements of Atmospheric CO(sub 2) Absorption Lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abrams, M.; Gunson, M.; Lowes, L.; Rinsland, C.; Zander, R.

    1994-01-01

    A method for retrieving the atmospheric pressure corresponding to the tangent point of an infrared spectrum recorded in the solar occultation mode is described and applied to measurements made by the Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy (ATMOS) Fourier transform spectrometer. Tangent pressure values are inferred from measurements of isolated CO(sub 2) lines with temperature-insensitive intensities. Tangent pressures are determined with a spectroscopic precision of 1-3%, corresponding to a tangent point height precision, depending on the scale height, of 70-210 meters.

  8. Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet as an Accelerator of Tooth Bleaching

    PubMed Central

    Santak, Vedran; Zaplotnik, Rok; Milosevic, Slobodan; Klaric, Eva; Tarle, Zrinka

    2014-01-01

    Objective To study the effect of atmospheric pressure plasma (APP) jet as a potential accelerator of the degradation of hydrogen peroxide in bleaching gels which could lead to better and faster bleaching. Material and Methods 25 pastilles of hydroxylapatite were colored in green tea for 8 hours and were randomly divided into five groups (n = 5). The bleaching process was performed with 30% and 40% hydrogen peroxide (HP) gel alone and in conjunction with helium APP jet. During the bleaching treatment, optical emission spectroscopy and non-contact surface temperature measurement using pyrometer were performed. Color of the pastilles was determined by a red–green–blue (RGB) colorimeter. PH values of bleaching gels were measured before and after the plasma treatment on additional 10 pastilles using a pH meter with contact pH electrode. Results The color measurements of pastilles before and after the treatment showed that treatment with APP jet improved the bleaching effect by 32% and 15% in the case of 30% and 40% HP gel. Better results were obtained approximately six times faster than with a procedure suggested by the bleaching gel manufacturer. Optical emission spectroscopy proved that plasma has a chemically active role on the gel. After the APP treatment, pH values of bleaching gels dropped to about 50–75% of their initial value while the surface temperature increased by 8–10˚C above baseline. Conclusion The use of plasma jet provides more effective bleaching results in a shorter period of time without a significant temperature increase which may cause damage of the surrounding tissue.

  9. Pulsed microwave discharge at atmospheric pressure for NOx decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baeva, M.; Gier, H.; Pott, A.; Uhlenbusch, J.; Höschele, J.; Steinwandel, J.

    2002-02-01

    A 3.0 GHz pulsed microwave source operated at atmospheric pressure with a pulse power of 1.4 MW, a maximum repetition rate of 40 Hz, and a pulse length of 3.5 µs is experimentally studied with respect to the ability to remove NOx from synthetic exhaust gases. Experiments in gas mixtures containing N2/O2/NO with typically 500 ppm NO are carried out. The discharge is embedded in a high-Q microwave resonator, which provides a reliable plasma ignition. Vortex flow is applied to the exhaust gas to improve gas treatment. Concentration measurements by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy confirm an NOx reduction of more than 90% in the case of N2/NO mixtures. The admixture of oxygen lowers the reductive potential of the reactor, but NOx reduction can still be observed up to 9% O2 concentration. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering technique is applied to measure the vibrational and rotational temperature of N2. Gas temperatures of about 400 K are found, whilst the vibrational temperature is 3000-3500 K in pure N2. The vibrational temperature drops to 1500 K when O2 and/or NO are present. The randomly distributed relative frequency of occurrence of selected breakdown field intensities is measured by a calibrated, short linear-antenna. The breakdown field strength in pure N2 amounts to 2.2×106 V m-1, a value that is reproducible within 2%. In the case of O2 and/or NO admixture, the frequency distribution of the breakdown field strength scatters more and extends over a range from 3 to 8×106 V m-1.

  10. Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet as an Accelerator of Tooth Bleaching

    PubMed Central

    Santak, Vedran; Zaplotnik, Rok; Milosevic, Slobodan; Klaric, Eva; Tarle, Zrinka

    2014-01-01

    Objective To study the effect of atmospheric pressure plasma (APP) jet as a potential accelerator of the degradation of hydrogen peroxide in bleaching gels which could lead to better and faster bleaching. Material and Methods 25 pastilles of hydroxylapatite were colored in green tea for 8 hours and were randomly divided into five groups (n = 5). The bleaching process was performed with 30% and 40% hydrogen peroxide (HP) gel alone and in conjunction with helium APP jet. During the bleaching treatment, optical emission spectroscopy and non-contact surface temperature measurement using pyrometer were performed. Color of the pastilles was determined by a red–green–blue (RGB) colorimeter. PH values of bleaching gels were measured before and after the plasma treatment on additional 10 pastilles using a pH meter with contact pH electrode. Results The color measurements of pastilles before and after the treatment showed that treatment with APP jet improved the bleaching effect by 32% and 15% in the case of 30% and 40% HP gel. Better results were obtained approximately six times faster than with a procedure suggested by the bleaching gel manufacturer. Optical emission spectroscopy proved that plasma has a chemically active role on the gel. After the APP treatment, pH values of bleaching gels dropped to about 50–75% of their initial value while the surface temperature increased by 8–10˚C above baseline. Conclusion The use of plasma jet provides more effective bleaching results in a shorter period of time without a significant temperature increase which may cause damage of the surrounding tissue. PMID:27688375

  11. Collaborative Research. Atmospheric Pressure Microplasma Chemistry-Photon Synergies

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sung-Jin; Eden, James Gary

    2015-12-01

    Combining the effects of low temperature, atmospheric pressure microplasmas and microplasma photon sources offers the promise of greatly expanding the range of applications for each of them. The plasma sources create active chemical species and these can be activated further by the addition of photons and the associated photochemistry. There are many ways to combine the effects of plasma chemistry and photochemistry, especially if there are multiple phases present. This project combined the construction of appropriate test experimental systems, various spectroscopic diagnostics and mathematical modeling. Through a continuous discussion and co-design process with the UC-Berkeley Team, we have successfully completed the fabrication and testing of all components for a microplasma array-assisted system designed for photon-activated plasma chemistry research. Microcavity plasma lamps capable of generating more than 20 mW/cm2 at 172 nm (Xe dimer) were fabricated with a custom form factor to mate to the plasma chemistry setup, and a lamp was current being installed by the Berkeley team so as to investigate plasma chemistry-photon synergies at a higher photon energy (~7.2 eV) as compared to the UVA treatment that is afforded by UV LEDs operating at 365 nm. In particular, motivated by the promising results from the Berkeley team with UVA treatment, we also produced the first generation of lamps that can generate photons in the 300-370 nm wavelength range. Another set of experiments, conducted under the auspices of this grant, involved the use of plasma microjet arrays. The combination of the photons and excited radicals produced by the plasma column resulted in broad area deactivation of bacteria.

  12. Novel applications of atmospheric pressure plasma on textile materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornelius, Carrie Elizabeth

    Various applications of atmospheric pressure plasma are investigated in conjunction with polymeric materials including paper, polypropylene non-woven fabric, and cotton. The effect of plasma on bulk and surface properties is examined by treating both cellulosic pulp and prefabricated paper with various plasma-gas compositions. After treatment, pulp is processed into paper and the properties are compared. The method of pulp preparation is found to be more significant than the plasma, but differences in density, strength, and surface roughness are apparent for the pulp vs. paper plasma treatments. The plasma is also used to remove sizes of PVA and starch from poly/cotton and cotton fabric respectively. In both cases plasma successfully removes a significant amount of size, but complete size removal is not achieved. Subsequent washes (PVA) or scouring (cotton) to remove the size are less successful than a control, suggesting the plasma is crosslinking the size that is not etched away. However, at short durations in cold water using an oxygen plasma, slightly more PVA is removed than with a control. For the starch sized samples, plasma and scouring are never as successful at removing starch as a conventional enzyme, but plasma improves dyeability without need for scouring. Plasma is also used to graft chemicals to the surface of polypropylene and cotton fabric. HTCC, an antimicrobial is grafted to polypropylene with successful grafting indicated by x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS), dye tests, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Antimicrobial activity of the grafted samples is also characterized. 3ATAC, a vinyl monomer is also grafted to polypropylene and to cotton. Additives including Mohr's salt, potassium persulfate, and diacrylate are assessed to increase yield. Successful grafting of 3ATAC is confirmed by XPS and dye testing. A combination of all three additives is identified as optimum for maximizing graft yield.

  13. Helium atmospheric pressure plasma jets touching dielectric and metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Norberg, Seth A. Johnsen, Eric; Kushner, Mark J.

    2015-07-07

    Atmospheric pressure plasma jets (APPJs) are being investigated in the context plasma medicine and biotechnology applications, and surface functionalization. The composition of the surface being treated ranges from plastics, liquids, and biological tissue, to metals. The dielectric constant of these materials ranges from as low as 1.5 for plastics to near 80 for liquids, and essentially infinite for metals. The electrical properties of the surface are not independent variables as the permittivity of the material being treated has an effect on the dynamics of the incident APPJ. In this paper, results are discussed from a computational investigation of the interaction of an APPJ incident onto materials of varying permittivity, and their impact on the discharge dynamics of the plasma jet. The computer model used in this investigation solves Poisson's equation, transport equations for charged and neutral species, the electron energy equation, and the Navier-Stokes equations for the neutral gas flow. The APPJ is sustained in He/O{sub 2} = 99.8/0.2 flowing into humid air, and is directed onto dielectric surfaces in contact with ground with dielectric constants ranging from 2 to 80, and a grounded metal surface. Low values of relative permittivity encourage propagation of the electric field into the treated material and formation and propagation of a surface ionization wave. High values of relative permittivity promote the restrike of the ionization wave and the formation of a conduction channel between the plasma discharge and the treated surface. The distribution of space charge surrounding the APPJ is discussed.

  14. Water solubility in rhyolitic silicate melts at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Amy; Russell, Kelly; Nichols, Alexander; Porritt, Lucy; Friedlander, Elizabeth

    2014-05-01

    High temperature (900-1100 °C) experiments have been conducted to measure the solubility of water in a rhyolitic melt at atmospheric pressure (1 atm) and to quantify the magnitude of retrograde solubility at low pressure. Individual cores (1 cm x 1 cm) of crystal- and bubble-free rhyolitic obsidian from Hrafntinnugryggur, Krafla (Iceland) were held in a furnace at 900-1100 °C for 0.25 to 20 hours. During this time, the uniform bubble-free cores vesiculate to produce variably swollen bubble-rich run products. The volume change in each core reflects the volume of bubbles produced in each experiment and depends on the experimental temperature and the time held at that temperature. The run product volumes for isothermal experiments (e.g., 950 °C) increase non-linearly with increasing time (e.g., 0.18 cm3 at 1.5 h, 0.96 cm3 at 12.5 h) until reaching a maximum value, after which the volume does not change appreciably. We take this plateau in the isothermal volume:time curve as coinciding with the 1 atm. solubility limit for the rhyolite at this temperature. With increasing temperature, the slope and final horizontal plateaus of the volume:time curves increase such that samples from the higher temperature suites vesiculate more, as well as more rapidly (e.g., 0.85 cm3 after 0.5 hours, 1.78 cm3 after 1 hour at 1100 °C). The variations in the maximum volume of bubbles produced for each temperature constrain the retrograde solubility of water in the melt at 1 atm. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analyses of the residual water content of the glass in the starting material and in the most vesiculated sample from each temperature suite shows a decrease in the water content of the glass from an initial 0.114 wt% (σ 0.013) to 0.098 wt% (σ 0.010), 0.087 wt% (σ 0.009), 0.093 wt% (σ 0.008), 0.090 wt% (σ 0.006) and 0.108 wt% (σ 0.010) for 900 °C, 950 °C, 1000 °C, 1050 °C and 1100 °C respectively. This change in the solubility of water at different

  15. Modeling the barotropic response of the Mediterranean sea level to atmospheric pressure forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natsiopoulos, Dimitrios A.; Vergos, Georgios S.; Tziavos, Ilias N.

    2014-05-01

    An important characteristic of the Earth's atmosphere with direct impact on the marine environmental and Earth's gravity field are the variations of atmospheric pressure as it often determines wind and weather patterns across the globe. Variations in atmospheric pressure and especially low atmospheric systems affect the values of radar altimeter sea level anomalies (SLA). This response of sea level is closed to the Inverse Barometer (IB) correction given by the altimeters within their geophysical data records. In this work, altimetric data sets from the satellite remote sensing mission of Jason-2, along with their total IB corrections acquired by the on-board altimeters, have been used for a period of forty days between October and November 2013. This period was characterized by extreme low-pressure fields over the Mediterranean Sea and especially in the area of the Ionian and Adriatic Seas and over the island of Rhodes, Greece. The Jason-2 along-track records of the SLA have been used to study both the sea level response to atmospheric pressure change over short time scales (such as ten days) and examine if the barometer correction (local and global) given by the altimeter is close to the expected response (-1 cm/mbar) of sea level to atmospheric pressure change. For the latter, atmospheric pressure data for the period under study were available from the Live Access Server (LAS) of NOAA, as well, provided at four times per day intervals in a grid format. From the LAS atmospheric pressure data, the IB effect was computed and compared with the one provided by the altimeter for its external evaluation. Finally, a regional multiple regression analysis between sea level anomalies, the LAS atmospheric pressure and wind speed components is carried out to model the barotropic response of the Mediterranean to atmospheric wind and pressure forcing.

  16. Pressure Dependence of the Magnetic Response of the S = 1 Polymeric Chain [Ni(HF2)(3-Clpy)4 ]BF4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Jaynise; Peprah, Marcus; Quintero, Pedro; Meisel, Mark; Manson, Jamie

    [Ni(HF2)(3-Clpy)4]BF4 (py = pyridine) is an S = 1 antiferromagnetic polymeric chain with a single-ion anisotropy (zero-field splitting) of D/kB = 4.3 K and an intrachain exchange interaction value of J/kB = 4.86 K at ambient pressure. The ratio of these parameters (D/J = 0.88) places this system close to a quantum critical point at D/J ~ 1, which falls between the Haldane and the Large-D phases. The temperature dependence of the low-field (1 kG) magnetic susceptibility was measured as a function of pressure, up to 1.49 GPa, using a homemade piston-clamp cell. The data indicate the antiferromagnetic component is suppressed with increasing pressure. Supported, in part, by the NSF via DMR-1202033 (MWM), DMR-1306158 (JLM), DMR-1461019 (UF Physics REU support for JMP), and DMR-1157490 (NHMFL), and by the State of Florida.

  17. Remote sensing of the atmosphere of Mars using infrared pressure modulation and filter radiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccleese, D. J.; Schofield, J. T.; Zurek, R. W.; Martonchik, J. V.; Haskins, R. D.

    1986-01-01

    The study of the atmosphere and climate of Mars will soon be advanced considerably by the Mars Observer mission. This paper describes the atmospheric sounder for this mission and how it will measure key Martian atmospheric parameters using IR gas correlation and filter radiometry. The instrument now under development will provide high-resolution vertical profiles of atmospheric temperature, pressure, water vapor, dust, and clouds using limb sounding techniques as well as nadir observations of surface thermal properties and polar radiative balance.

  18. Plasma Ion Sources for Atmospheric Pressure Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jian-Guo

    1994-01-01

    Atmospheric pressure ionization (API) sources using direct-current (DC) and radio-frequency (RF) plasma have been developed in this thesis work. These ion sources can provide stable discharge currents of ~ 1 mA, 2-3 orders of magnitude larger than that of the corona discharge, a widely used API source. The plasmas can be generated and maintained in 1 atm of various buffer gases by applying -500 to -1000 V (DC plasma) or 1-15 W with a frequency of 165 kHz (RF plasma) on the needle electrode. These ion sources have been used with liquid injection to detect various organic compounds of pharmaceutical, biotechnological and environmental interest. Key features of these ion sources include soft ionization with the protonated molecule as the largest peak, and superb sensitivity with detection limits in the low picogram or femtomole range and a linear dynamic range over ~4 orders of magnitude. The RF plasma has advantages over the DC plasma in its ability to operate in various buffer gases and to produce a more stable plasma. Factors influencing the performance of the ion sources have been studied, including RF power level, liquid flow rate, chamber temperature, solvent composition, and voltage affecting the collision induced dissociation (CID). Ionization of hydrocarbons by the RF plasma API source was also studied. Soft ionization is generally produced. To obtain high sensitivity, the ion source must be very dry and the needle-to-orifice distance must be small. Nitric oxide was used to enhance the sensitivity. The RF plasma source was then used for the analysis of hydrocarbons in auto emissions. Comparisons between the corona discharge and the RF plasma have been made in terms of discharge current, ion residence time, and the ion source model. The RF plasma source provides larger linear dynamic range and higher sensitivity than the corona discharge, due to its much larger discharge current. The RF plasma was also observed to provide longer ion residence times and was not

  19. Effect of Atmospheric Pressure on Wet Bulb Depression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Raymond; Stasiak, Michael; Lawson, Jamie; Wehkamp, Cara Ann; Dixon, Mike

    Future space exploration missions will likely operate at pressures less than 1 atm ( 100 kPa) to reduce gas leakage and structural mass, and facilitate rapid EVAs. Understanding environmental monitoring, control, and physiological responses to reduced pressures will be required to assure mission success. Wet / dry bulb psychrometers are useful devices for monitoring humidity and provide insights into cooling phenomena for wet, evaporating surfaces. To study the effects of pressure on psychrometers we conducted a series of tests in a hypobaric chamber. Chamber RH monitoring and control were based on capacitance type devices, which previous testing and manufacturer's specifications have shown to be unaffected by pressure. Test data were gathered using an Enercorp model HT-WD-A psychrometer with matched platinum RTD temperature probes positioned side-by-side with a dew point (chilled mirror) device and two capacitance RH sensors. The chamber was kept dark and measurements were taken at three RHs (30, 50, and 70) and four pressures (10, 25, 50, and 97 kPa). Results showed an increase in wet bulb depression (i.e., a drop in wet bulb temperature) for a given RH as the pressure decreased, with the largest changes occurring as pressure dropped from 25 and 10 kPa. At a dry bulb temperature of 25 C, the normal wet bulb temperature for 30 RH and 97 kPa is 15 C, but this dropped to 8 C at 10 kPa. These observations are consistent with previous reports of increased evaporation rates at reduced pressure and match recently published psychrometric models for different pressures. The results suggest that psychrometers need direct calibration at the target pressures or that pressure corrected charts are required. Moreover, for a given vapor pressure deficit, any moist surfaces, including transpiring plant leaves, will be cooler at lower pressures due to the increased evaporation rates.

  20. Gas chromatography coupled to atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometry (GC-API-MS): review.

    PubMed

    Li, Du-Xin; Gan, Lin; Bronja, Amela; Schmitz, Oliver J

    2015-09-01

    Although the coupling of GC/MS with atmospheric pressure ionization (API) has been reported in 1970s, the interest in coupling GC with atmospheric pressure ion source was expanded in the last decade. The demand of a "soft" ion source for preserving highly diagnostic molecular ion is desirable, as compared to the "hard" ionization technique such as electron ionization (EI) in traditional GC/MS, which fragments the molecule in an extensive way. These API sources include atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI), atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI), atmospheric pressure laser ionization (APLI), electrospray ionization (ESI) and low temperature plasma (LTP). This review discusses the advantages and drawbacks of this analytical platform. After an introduction in atmospheric pressure ionization the review gives an overview about the history and explains the mechanisms of various atmospheric pressure ionization techniques used in combination with GC such as APCI, APPI, APLI, ESI and LTP. Also new developments made in ion source geometry, ion source miniaturization and multipurpose ion source constructions are discussed and a comparison between GC-FID, GC-EI-MS and GC-API-MS shows the advantages and drawbacks of these techniques. The review ends with an overview of applications realized with GC-API-MS.

  1. Effect of high pressure on the electron-phonon interaction and superconductivity in ZrN and HfN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksimov, E. G.; Wang, S. Q.; Magnitskaya, M. V.; Ebert, S. V.

    2008-06-01

    Ab initio calculations of the superconducting properties have been performed for zirconium and hafnium nitrides at normal and high pressures. The results for ZrN are in good agreement with the existing data of the tunnel experiments and measurements of the pressure derivative of the critical temperature T c. It has been shown that the decrease in T c under compression occurs due primarily to an increase in the phonon frequencies.

  2. Thermodynamic analysis and experimental study of the effect of atmospheric pressure on the ice point

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, A. H.; McLinden, M. O.; Tew, W. L.

    2013-09-11

    We present a detailed thermodynamic analysis of the temperature of the ice point as a function of atmospheric pressure. This analysis makes use of accurate international standards for the properties of water and ice, and of available high-accuracy data for the Henry's constants of atmospheric gases in liquid water. The result is an ice point of 273.150 019(5) K at standard atmospheric pressure, with higher ice-point temperatures (varying nearly linearly with pressure) at lower pressures. The effect of varying ambient CO{sub 2} concentration is analyzed and found to be significant in comparison to other uncertainties in the model. The thermodynamic analysis is compared with experimental measurements of the temperature difference between the ice point and the triple point of water performed at elevations ranging from 145 m to 4302 m, with atmospheric pressures from 101 kPa to 60 kPa.

  3. Source and mode of the Permian Panjal Trap magmatism: Evidence from zircon U-Pb and Hf isotopes and trace element data from the Himalayan ultrahigh-pressure rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehman, Hafiz Ur; Lee, Hao-Yang; Chung, Sun-Lin; Khan, Tahseenullah; O'Brien, Patrick J.; Yamamoto, Hiroshi

    2016-09-01

    We present an integrated study of LA-ICP-MS U-Pb age, Hf isotopes, and trace element geochemistry of zircons from the Himalayan eclogites (mafic rocks) and their host gneisses (felsic rocks) from the Kaghan Valley in Pakistan in order to understand the source and mode of their magmatic protoliths and the effect of metamorphism. Zircons from the so-called Group I (high-pressure) eclogites yielded U-Pb mean ages of 259 ± 10 Ma (MSWD = 0.74), whereas those of Group II (ultrahigh-pressure) eclogites yielded 48 ± 3 Ma (MSWD = 0.71). In felsic gneisses the central or core domains of zircons yielded ages similar to those from Group I eclogites but zircon overgrowth domains yielded 47 ± 1 Ma (MSWD = 1.9). Trace element data suggest a magmatic origin for Group I-derived (having Th/U ratios: > 0.5) and metamorphic origin for Group II-derived (Th/U < 0.07) zircons, respectively. Zircon Hf isotope data, obtained from the same dated spots, show positive initial 176Hf/177Hf isotopic ratios referred to as "ƐHf(t)" of around + 10 in Group I eclogites; + 7 in Group II eclogites; and + 8 in felsic gneisses zircons, respectively, thus indicate a juvenile mantle source for the protolith rocks (Panjal Traps) with almost no contribution from the ancient crustal material. The similar ƐHf(t) values, identical protolith ages and trace element compositions of zircons in felsic (granites or rhyolites) and mafic (basalt and dolerite) rocks attest to a bimodal magmatism accounting for the Panjal Traps during the Permian. Later, during India-Asia collision in Eocene times, both the felsic and mafic lithologies were subducted to mantle-depths (> 90 km: coesite-stable) and experienced ultrahigh-pressure metamorphism before their final exhumation.

  4. Synthesis of sheet conductive layers on the surface of some insulator ceramics (TiO sub 2 , ZrO sub 2 , HfO sub 2 ) by multipulse CO sub 2 -laser irradiation in an ammonia atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Ursu, I.; Mihailescu, I.N.; Nistor, L.C.; Teodorescu, V.S. ); Prokhorov, A.M.; Konov, V.I.; Nikitin, P.I.; Uglov, S.A.

    1989-10-15

    It is shown that by multipulse TEA-CO{sub 2} laser irradiation of some insulator ceramic samples (TiO{sub 2}, ZrO{sub 2}, HfO{sub 2}) in an ammonia atmosphere, surface layers are synthesized exhibiting a complicated morphology and having a complex structure containing, beside metallic nitrides, nonstoichiometric oxygen-depleted oxides, oxinitrides, etc. Such layers have a diminished sheet resistance, and display good conduction characteristics.

  5. The effect of atmospheric temperature and pressure on the occurrence of acute myocardial infarction in Kaunas.

    PubMed

    Radišauskas, Ričardas; Vaičiulis, Vidmantas; Ustinavičienė, Rūta; Bernotienė, Gailutė

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. The aim of the study was to evaluate the impact of meteorological variables (atmospheric temperature and pressure) on the daily occurrence of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). MATERIAL AND METHODS. The study used the daily values of atmospheric temperature and pressure in 2000-2007. The meteorological data were obtained from the Lithuanian Hydrometeorological Service for Kaunas. The relative risks of event occurrence were computed for 5°C atmospheric temperature and for 10-hPa atmospheric pressure variations by means of the Poisson regression model. RESULTS. The occurrence of AMI and atmospheric temperature showed an inverse linear relationship, while the occurrence of AMI and atmospheric pressure, a positive linear relationship. Among the youngest subjects (25-44 years old), no relationships were detected. Contrary, among the subjects aged 45-64 years and those aged 65 years and older, the occurrence of AMI significantly decreased with higher temperature (P=0.001 and P=0.002, respectively). A decrease in atmospheric temperature by 10ºC reduced the risk of AMI by 8.7% in the age groups of 45-64 and 65 years and older and by 19% in the age group of 25 years and older. Among the first AMI cases, the risk increased by 7.5% in the age group of 45-64-year olds and by 6.4% in the age group of 25-64-year olds. The relationship between atmospheric temperature and pressure, and AMI occurrence was found to be linear but inverse. An increase in atmospheric pressure by 10 hPa resulted in an increase in risk by 4% among the subjects aged 65 years and more and by 3% among the subjects aged 25 years and more. CONCLUSIONS. Atmospheric temperature and pressure variations had the greatest effect on middle-aged and aging subjects (starting from 45 years). At younger age, the effect of such factors on the AMI risk was considerably lower.

  6. Atmospheric Pressure Plasma-Electrospin Hybrid Process for Protective Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitchuli Gangadharan, Narendiran

    2011-12-01

    Chemical and biological (C-B) warfare agents like sarin, sulfur mustard, anthrax are usually dispersed into atmosphere in the form of micro aerosols. They are considered to be dangerous weapon of mass destruction next to nuclear weapons. The airtight protective clothing materials currently available are able to stop the diffusion of threat agents but not good enough to detoxify them, which endangers the wearers. Extensive research efforts are being made to prepare advanced protective clothing materials that not only prevent the diffusion of C-B agents, but also detoxify them into harmless products thus ensuring the safety and comfort of the wearer. Electrospun nanofiber mats are considered to have effective filtration characteristics to stop the diffusion of submicron level particulates without sacrificing air permeability characteristics and could be used in protective application as barrier material. In addition, functional nanofibers could be potentially developed to detoxify the C-B warfare threats into harmless products. In this research, electrospun nanofibers were deposited on fabric surface to improve barrier efficiency without sacrificing comfort-related properties of the fabrics. Multi-functional nanofibers were fabricated through an electrospinning-electrospraying hybrid process and their ability to detoxify simulants of C-B agents was evaluated. Nanofibers were also deposited onto plasma-pretreated woven fabric substrate through a newly developed plasma-electrospinning hybrid process, to improve the adhesive properties of nanofibers on the fabric surface. The nanofiber adhesion and durability properties were evaluated by peel test, flex and abrasion resistance tests. In this research work, following tasks have been carried out: i) Controlled deposition of nanofiber mat onto woven fabric substrate Electrospun Nylon 6 fiber mats were deposited onto woven 50/50 Nylon/Cotton fabric with the motive of making them into protective material against submicron

  7. Atmospheric Pressure Plasma-Electrospin Hybrid Process for Protective Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitchuli Gangadharan, Narendiran

    2011-12-01

    Chemical and biological (C-B) warfare agents like sarin, sulfur mustard, anthrax are usually dispersed into atmosphere in the form of micro aerosols. They are considered to be dangerous weapon of mass destruction next to nuclear weapons. The airtight protective clothing materials currently available are able to stop the diffusion of threat agents but not good enough to detoxify them, which endangers the wearers. Extensive research efforts are being made to prepare advanced protective clothing materials that not only prevent the diffusion of C-B agents, but also detoxify them into harmless products thus ensuring the safety and comfort of the wearer. Electrospun nanofiber mats are considered to have effective filtration characteristics to stop the diffusion of submicron level particulates without sacrificing air permeability characteristics and could be used in protective application as barrier material. In addition, functional nanofibers could be potentially developed to detoxify the C-B warfare threats into harmless products. In this research, electrospun nanofibers were deposited on fabric surface to improve barrier efficiency without sacrificing comfort-related properties of the fabrics. Multi-functional nanofibers were fabricated through an electrospinning-electrospraying hybrid process and their ability to detoxify simulants of C-B agents was evaluated. Nanofibers were also deposited onto plasma-pretreated woven fabric substrate through a newly developed plasma-electrospinning hybrid process, to improve the adhesive properties of nanofibers on the fabric surface. The nanofiber adhesion and durability properties were evaluated by peel test, flex and abrasion resistance tests. In this research work, following tasks have been carried out: i) Controlled deposition of nanofiber mat onto woven fabric substrate Electrospun Nylon 6 fiber mats were deposited onto woven 50/50 Nylon/Cotton fabric with the motive of making them into protective material against submicron

  8. Super-Atmospheric Pressure Ion Sources: Application and Coupling to API Mass Spectrometer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lee Chuin; Rahman, Md. Matiur; Hiraoka, Kenzo

    2014-01-01

    Pressurizing the ionization source to gas pressure greater than atmospheric pressure is a new tactic aimed at further improving the performance of atmospheric pressure ionization (API) sources. In principle, all API sources, such as ESI, APCI and AP-MALDI, can be operated at pressure higher than 1 atm if suitable vacuum interface is available. The gas pressure in the ion source can have different role for different ionization. For example, in the case of ESI, stable electrospray could be sustained for high surface tension liquid (e.g., pure water) under super-atmospheric pressure, owing to the absence of electric discharge. Even for nanoESI, which is known to work well with aqueous solution, its stability and sensitivity were found to be enhanced, particularly in the negative mode when the ion source was pressurized. For the gas phase ionization like APCI, measurement of gaseous compound also showed an increase in ion intensity with the ion source pressure until an optimum pressure at around 4–5 atm. The enhancement was due to the increased collision frequency among reactant ion and analyte that promoted the ion/molecule reaction and a higher intake rate of gas to the mass spectrometer. Because the design of vacuum interface for API instrument is based on the upstream pressure of 1 atm, some coupling aspects need to be considered when connecting the high pressure ion source to the mass spectrometer. Several coupling strategies are discussed in this paper. PMID:26819896

  9. Super-Atmospheric Pressure Ion Sources: Application and Coupling to API Mass Spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lee Chuin; Rahman, Md Matiur; Hiraoka, Kenzo

    2014-01-01

    Pressurizing the ionization source to gas pressure greater than atmospheric pressure is a new tactic aimed at further improving the performance of atmospheric pressure ionization (API) sources. In principle, all API sources, such as ESI, APCI and AP-MALDI, can be operated at pressure higher than 1 atm if suitable vacuum interface is available. The gas pressure in the ion source can have different role for different ionization. For example, in the case of ESI, stable electrospray could be sustained for high surface tension liquid (e.g., pure water) under super-atmospheric pressure, owing to the absence of electric discharge. Even for nanoESI, which is known to work well with aqueous solution, its stability and sensitivity were found to be enhanced, particularly in the negative mode when the ion source was pressurized. For the gas phase ionization like APCI, measurement of gaseous compound also showed an increase in ion intensity with the ion source pressure until an optimum pressure at around 4-5 atm. The enhancement was due to the increased collision frequency among reactant ion and analyte that promoted the ion/molecule reaction and a higher intake rate of gas to the mass spectrometer. Because the design of vacuum interface for API instrument is based on the upstream pressure of 1 atm, some coupling aspects need to be considered when connecting the high pressure ion source to the mass spectrometer. Several coupling strategies are discussed in this paper.

  10. Super-Atmospheric Pressure Ion Sources: Application and Coupling to API Mass Spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lee Chuin; Rahman, Md Matiur; Hiraoka, Kenzo

    2014-01-01

    Pressurizing the ionization source to gas pressure greater than atmospheric pressure is a new tactic aimed at further improving the performance of atmospheric pressure ionization (API) sources. In principle, all API sources, such as ESI, APCI and AP-MALDI, can be operated at pressure higher than 1 atm if suitable vacuum interface is available. The gas pressure in the ion source can have different role for different ionization. For example, in the case of ESI, stable electrospray could be sustained for high surface tension liquid (e.g., pure water) under super-atmospheric pressure, owing to the absence of electric discharge. Even for nanoESI, which is known to work well with aqueous solution, its stability and sensitivity were found to be enhanced, particularly in the negative mode when the ion source was pressurized. For the gas phase ionization like APCI, measurement of gaseous compound also showed an increase in ion intensity with the ion source pressure until an optimum pressure at around 4-5 atm. The enhancement was due to the increased collision frequency among reactant ion and analyte that promoted the ion/molecule reaction and a higher intake rate of gas to the mass spectrometer. Because the design of vacuum interface for API instrument is based on the upstream pressure of 1 atm, some coupling aspects need to be considered when connecting the high pressure ion source to the mass spectrometer. Several coupling strategies are discussed in this paper. PMID:26819896

  11. Diagnostics of plasma-biological surface interactions in low pressure and atmospheric pressure plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Kenji; Hori, Masaru

    2014-08-01

    Mechanisms of plasma-surface interaction are required to understand in order to control the reactions precisely. Recent progress in atmospheric pressure plasma provides to apply as a tool of sterilization of contaminated foodstuffs. To use the plasma with safety and optimization, the real time in situ detection of free radicals - in particular dangling bonds by using the electron-spin-resonance (ESR) technique has been developed because the free radical plays important roles for dominantly biological reactions. First, the kinetic analysis of free radicals on biological specimens such as fungal spores of Penicillium digitatum interacted with atomic oxygen generated plasma electric discharge. We have obtained information that the in situ real time ESR signal from the spores was observed and assignable to semiquinone radical with a g-value of around 2.004 and a line width of approximately 5G. The decay of the signal was correlated with a link to the inactivation of the fungal spore. Second, we have studied to detect chemical modification of edible meat after the irradiation. Using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectroscopy (MALDI-TOF-MS) and ESR, signals give qualification results for chemical changes on edible liver meat. The in situ real-time measurements have proven to be a useful method to elucidate plasma-induced surface reactions on biological specimens.

  12. Atmospheric-Pressure Plasma Interaction with Soft Materials as Fundamental Processes in Plasma Medicine.

    PubMed

    Takenaka, Kosuke; Miyazaki, Atsushi; Uchida, Giichiro; Setsuhara, Yuichi

    2015-03-01

    Molecular-structure variation of organic materials irradiated with atmospheric pressure He plasma jet have been investigated. Optical emission spectrum in the atmospheric-pressure He plasma jet has been measured. The spectrum shows considerable emissions of He lines, and the emission of O and N radicals attributed to air. Variation in molecular structure of Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) film surface irradiated with the atmospheric-pressure He plasma jet has been observed via X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). These results via XPS and FT-IR indicate that the PET surface irradiated with the atmospheric-pressure He plasma jet was oxidized by chemical and/or physical effect due to irradiation of active species.

  13. Preflame zone structure and main features of fuel conversion in atmospheric pressure premixed laminar hydrocarbon flames

    SciTech Connect

    Ksandopulo, G.I.

    1995-08-25

    This report describes the structure study of the premixed hydrocarbon-oxidizer Bunsen flames burning at the atmospheric pressure and also the ones with some inhibitors added. Studies were performed on hexane, propane, methane, acetylene, and hexene flames.

  14. Low-temperature atmospheric-pressure plasma sources for plasma medicine.

    PubMed

    Setsuhara, Yuichi

    2016-09-01

    In this review paper, fundamental overviews of low-temperature atmospheric-pressure plasma generation are provided and various sources for plasma medicine are described in terms of operating conditions and plasma properties. PMID:27109191

  15. Low-temperature atmospheric-pressure plasma sources for plasma medicine.

    PubMed

    Setsuhara, Yuichi

    2016-09-01

    In this review paper, fundamental overviews of low-temperature atmospheric-pressure plasma generation are provided and various sources for plasma medicine are described in terms of operating conditions and plasma properties.

  16. Atmospheric-Pressure Plasma Interaction with Soft Materials as Fundamental Processes in Plasma Medicine.

    PubMed

    Takenaka, Kosuke; Miyazaki, Atsushi; Uchida, Giichiro; Setsuhara, Yuichi

    2015-03-01

    Molecular-structure variation of organic materials irradiated with atmospheric pressure He plasma jet have been investigated. Optical emission spectrum in the atmospheric-pressure He plasma jet has been measured. The spectrum shows considerable emissions of He lines, and the emission of O and N radicals attributed to air. Variation in molecular structure of Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) film surface irradiated with the atmospheric-pressure He plasma jet has been observed via X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). These results via XPS and FT-IR indicate that the PET surface irradiated with the atmospheric-pressure He plasma jet was oxidized by chemical and/or physical effect due to irradiation of active species. PMID:26413628

  17. Dissociation of nitrogen in a pulse-periodic dielectric barrier discharge at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Popov, N. A.

    2013-05-15

    Nitrogen molecule dissociation in a pulse-periodic atmospheric-pressure dielectric barrier discharge is numerically analyzed. It is shown that the quenching rate of predissociation states at atmospheric pressure is relatively low and the production of nitrogen atoms in this case can be adequately described using the cross section for electron-impact dissociation of N{sub 2} molecules taken from the paper by P.C. Cosby [J. Chem. Phys. 98, 9544 (1993)].

  18. On the Generation of Multiple Atmospheric Pressure Waves Observed During Violent Volcanic Eruptions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medici, E. F.; Waite, G. P.

    2015-12-01

    One or more atmospheric pressure waves followed by a supersonic jet may be generated during the over pressurized vapor-solid-liquid mixture ejection of a violent volcanic eruption. The source of these multiple atmospheric pressure waves could have different origins. Among the physical mechanisms that could explain these behaviors are pulsating eruptions, the dynamics of shock waves, coupled pressure wave-supersonic jet interaction, or a combination of all these factors. In order to elucidate the causes of these complex fluid flow dynamics, a series of analog volcanic eruption experiments using an atmospheric shock tube were performed. During the testing, single and multiple pressure waves and the subsequent supersonic jet were generated. The controlled laboratory conditions enable studies of the most relevant variables potentially responsible for the formation of the multiple pressure waves. The tests were performed using dry, compressed nitrogen at standard room temperature that was free of particles. Yet, under this idealization of a real volcanic eruption, multiple pressure waves were observed on the high-speed video imaging and recorded on the pressure transducer. The amount of energy being released on each test was varied to achieve different discharge dynamics and the formation of single and multiple pressure waves. The preliminary experimental observations indicate a coupled pressure wave-jet interaction as source of multiple pressure waves.

  19. Super-atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometry and its application to ultrafast online protein digestion analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lee Chuin; Ninomiya, Satoshi; Hiraoka, Kenzo

    2016-06-01

    Ion source pressure plays a significant role in the process of ionization and the subsequent ion transmission inside a mass spectrometer. Pressurizing the ion source to a gas pressure greater than atmospheric pressure is a relatively new approach that aims to further improve the performance of atmospheric pressure ionization sources. For example, under a super-atmospheric pressure environment, a stable electrospray can be sustained for liquid with high surface tension such as pure water, because of the suppression of electric discharge. Even for nano-electrospray ionization (nano-ESI), which is known to work with aqueous solution, its stability and sensitivity can also be enhanced, particularly in the negative mode when the ion source is pressurized. A brief review on the development of super-atmospheric pressure ion sources, including high-pressure electrospray, field desorption and superheated ESI, and the strategies to interface these ion sources to a mass spectrometer will be given. Using a recent ESI prototype with an operating temperature at 220 °C under 27 atm, we also demonstrate that it is possible to achieve an online Asp-specific protein digestion analysis in which the whole processes of digestion, ionization and MS acquisition could be completed on the order of a few seconds. This method is fast, and the reaction can even be monitored on a near-real-time basis. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Super-atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometry and its application to ultrafast online protein digestion analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lee Chuin; Ninomiya, Satoshi; Hiraoka, Kenzo

    2016-06-01

    Ion source pressure plays a significant role in the process of ionization and the subsequent ion transmission inside a mass spectrometer. Pressurizing the ion source to a gas pressure greater than atmospheric pressure is a relatively new approach that aims to further improve the performance of atmospheric pressure ionization sources. For example, under a super-atmospheric pressure environment, a stable electrospray can be sustained for liquid with high surface tension such as pure water, because of the suppression of electric discharge. Even for nano-electrospray ionization (nano-ESI), which is known to work with aqueous solution, its stability and sensitivity can also be enhanced, particularly in the negative mode when the ion source is pressurized. A brief review on the development of super-atmospheric pressure ion sources, including high-pressure electrospray, field desorption and superheated ESI, and the strategies to interface these ion sources to a mass spectrometer will be given. Using a recent ESI prototype with an operating temperature at 220 °C under 27 atm, we also demonstrate that it is possible to achieve an online Asp-specific protein digestion analysis in which the whole processes of digestion, ionization and MS acquisition could be completed on the order of a few seconds. This method is fast, and the reaction can even be monitored on a near-real-time basis. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27270863

  1. Water cycles in closed ecological systems: effects of atmospheric pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rygalov, Vadim Y.; Fowler, Philip A.; Metz, Joannah M.; Wheeler, Raymond M.; Bucklin, Ray A.; Sager, J. C. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    In bioregenerative life support systems that use plants to generate food and oxygen, the largest mass flux between the plants and their surrounding environment will be water. This water cycle is a consequence of the continuous change of state (evaporation-condensation) from liquid to gas through the process of transpiration and the need to transfer heat (cool) and dehumidify the plant growth chamber. Evapotranspiration rates for full plant canopies can range from 1 to 10 L m-2 d-1 (1 to 10 mm m-2 d-1), with the rates depending primarily on the vapor pressure deficit (VPD) between the leaves and the air inside the plant growth chamber. VPD in turn is dependent on the air temperature, leaf temperature, and current value of relative humidity (RH). Concepts for developing closed plant growth systems, such as greenhouses for Mars, have been discussed for many years and the feasibility of such systems will depend on the overall system costs and reliability. One approach for reducing system costs would be to reduce the operating pressure within the greenhouse to reduce structural mass and gas leakage. But managing plant growth environments at low pressures (e.g., controlling humidity and heat exchange) may be difficult, and the effects of low-pressure environments on plant growth and system water cycling need further study. We present experimental evidence to show that water saturation pressures in air under isothermal conditions are only slightly affected by total pressure, but the overall water flux from evaporating surfaces can increase as pressure decreases. Mathematical models describing these observations are presented, along with discussion of the importance for considering "water cycles" in closed bioregenerative life support systems.

  2. Water cycles in closed ecological systems: effects of atmospheric pressure.

    PubMed

    Rygalov, Vadim Y; Fowler, Philip A; Metz, Joannah M; Wheeler, Raymond M; Bucklin, Ray A

    2002-01-01

    In bioregenerative life support systems that use plants to generate food and oxygen, the largest mass flux between the plants and their surrounding environment will be water. This water cycle is a consequence of the continuous change of state (evaporation-condensation) from liquid to gas through the process of transpiration and the need to transfer heat (cool) and dehumidify the plant growth chamber. Evapotranspiration rates for full plant canopies can range from ~1 to 10 L m-2 d-1 (~1 to 10 mm m-2 d-1), with the rates depending primarily on the vapor pressure deficit (VPD) between the leaves and the air inside the plant growth chamber. VPD in turn is dependent on the air temperature, leaf temperature, and current value of relative humidity (RH). Concepts for developing closed plant growth systems, such as greenhouses for Mars, have been discussed for many years and the feasibility of such systems will depend on the overall system costs and reliability. One approach for reducing system costs would be to reduce the operating pressure within the greenhouse to reduce structural mass and gas leakage. But managing plant growth environments at low pressures (e.g., controlling humidity and heat exchange) may be difficult, and the effects of low-pressure environments on plant growth and system water cycling need further study. We present experimental evidence to show that water saturation pressures in air under isothermal conditions are only slightly affected by total pressure, but the overall water flux from evaporating surfaces can increase as pressure decreases. Mathematical models describing these observations are presented, along with discussion of the importance for considering "water cycles" in closed bioregenerative life support systems.

  3. Water cycles in closed ecological systems: effects of atmospheric pressure.

    PubMed

    Rygalov, Vadim Y; Fowler, Philip A; Metz, Joannah M; Wheeler, Raymond M; Bucklin, Ray A

    2002-01-01

    In bioregenerative life support systems that use plants to generate food and oxygen, the largest mass flux between the plants and their surrounding environment will be water. This water cycle is a consequence of the continuous change of state (evaporation-condensation) from liquid to gas through the process of transpiration and the need to transfer heat (cool) and dehumidify the plant growth chamber. Evapotranspiration rates for full plant canopies can range from ~1 to 10 L m-2 d-1 (~1 to 10 mm m-2 d-1), with the rates depending primarily on the vapor pressure deficit (VPD) between the leaves and the air inside the plant growth chamber. VPD in turn is dependent on the air temperature, leaf temperature, and current value of relative humidity (RH). Concepts for developing closed plant growth systems, such as greenhouses for Mars, have been discussed for many years and the feasibility of such systems will depend on the overall system costs and reliability. One approach for reducing system costs would be to reduce the operating pressure within the greenhouse to reduce structural mass and gas leakage. But managing plant growth environments at low pressures (e.g., controlling humidity and heat exchange) may be difficult, and the effects of low-pressure environments on plant growth and system water cycling need further study. We present experimental evidence to show that water saturation pressures in air under isothermal conditions are only slightly affected by total pressure, but the overall water flux from evaporating surfaces can increase as pressure decreases. Mathematical models describing these observations are presented, along with discussion of the importance for considering "water cycles" in closed bioregenerative life support systems. PMID:12481804

  4. A new humane method of stunning broilers using low atmospheric pressure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This research project evaluated an alternative method of controlled atmosphere stunning of commercial broilers to induce anoxia utilizing a vacuum pump to reduce the oxygen tension, low atmospheric pressure stun (LAPS). A custom built 2 cage-module system (holding a total of 600 broilers each) with...

  5. Io's atmosphere - Pressure control by regolith cold trapping and surface venting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matson, D. L.; Nash, D. B.

    1983-06-01

    A new model for the basal pressure of Io's atmosphere is developed. This model takes into account the previously ignored fact that much of Io's surface has very high porosity, typically about 90 pct. Such porosity allows efficient subsurface cold trapping of atmospheric gases which tends to keep ambient surface pressures very low. SO2 is the only gas identified on Io, and the basal pressures for atmospheric models are usually pegged to local surface temperature via the SO2 vapor pressure equilibrium curve. Near Io's subsolar point the pressure in equilibrium with a surface SO2 frost deposit is about 1/10,000,000th bar. Porous surface models of the type developed invoke equilibrium with the colder, subsurface permafrost (at about 3-cm depth) and yield pressures of about 1/10 to the 12th bar. The subsurface cold trapping model explains many but not all observations relevant to Io's atmosphere. The new subsurface cold trapping model and the earlier surface frost equilibrium model, when taken together, provide lower and upper limits, respectively, on the basal SO2 pressure of Io's atmosphere.

  6. Io's atmosphere - Pressure control by regolith cold trapping and surface venting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matson, D. L.; Nash, D. B.

    1983-01-01

    A new model for the basal pressure of Io's atmosphere is developed. This model takes into account the previously ignored fact that much of Io's surface has very high porosity, typically about 90 pct. Such porosity allows efficient subsurface cold trapping of atmospheric gases which tends to keep ambient surface pressures very low. SO2 is the only gas identified on Io, and the basal pressures for atmospheric models are usually pegged to local surface temperature via the SO2 vapor pressure equilibrium curve. Near Io's subsolar point the pressure in equilibrium with a surface SO2 frost deposit is about 1/10,000,000th bar. Porous surface models of the type developed invoke equilibrium with the colder, subsurface permafrost (at about 3-cm depth) and yield pressures of about 1/10 to the 12th bar. The subsurface cold trapping model explains many but not all observations relevant to Io's atmosphere. The new subsurface cold trapping model and the earlier surface frost equilibrium model, when taken together, provide lower and upper limits, respectively, on the basal SO2 pressure of Io's atmosphere.

  7. Ignition during hydrogen release from high pressure into the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oleszczak, P.; Wolanski, P.

    2010-12-01

    The first investigations concerned with a problem of hydrogen jet ignition, during outflow from a high-pressure vessel were carried out nearly 40 years ago by Wolanski and Wojcicki. The research resulted from a dramatic accident in the Chorzow Chemical Plant Azoty, where the explosion of a synthesis gas made up of a mixture composed of three moles of hydrogen per mole of nitrogen, at 300°C and 30 MPa killed four people. Initial investigation had excluded potential external ignition sources and the main aim of the research was to determine the cause of ignition. Hydrogen is currently considered as a potential fuel for various vehicles such as cars, trucks, buses, etc. Crucial safety issues are of potential concern, associated with the storage of hydrogen at a very high pressure. Indeed, the evidence obtained nearly 40 years ago shows that sudden rupture of a high-pressure hydrogen storage tank or other component can result in ignition and potentially explosion. The aim of the present research is identification of the conditions under which hydrogen ignition occurs as a result of compression and heating of the air by the shock wave generated by discharge of high-pressure hydrogen. Experiments have been conducted using a facility constructed in the Combustion Laboratory of the Institute of Heat Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology. Tests under various configurations have been performed to determine critical conditions for occurrence of high-pressure hydrogen ignition. The results show that a critical pressure exists, leading to ignition, which depends mainly on the geometric configuration of the outflow system, such as tube diameter, and on the presence of obstacles.

  8. Modified drug release using atmospheric pressure plasma deposited siloxane coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowling, D. P.; Maher, S.; Law, V. J.; Ardhaoui, M.; Stallard, C.; Keenan, A.

    2016-09-01

    This pilot study evaluates the potential of atmospheric plasma polymerised coatings to modify the rate of drug release from polymeric substrates. The antibiotic rifampicin was deposited in a prototype multi-layer drug delivery system, consisting of a nebulized layer of active drug between a base layer of TEOS deposited on a plastic substrate (polystyrene) and an overlying layer of plasma polymerised PDMS. The polymerised TEOS and PDMS layers were deposited using a helium atmospheric plasma jet system. Elution of rifampicin was measured using UV-VIS spectroscopy, in addition to a antimicrobial well diffusion assay with an established indicator organism. The multi-layered plasma deposited coatings significantly extended the duration of release of the rifampicin from 24 h for the uncoated polymer to 144 h for the coated polymer.

  9. Modified drug release using atmospheric pressure plasma deposited siloxane coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowling, D. P.; Maher, S.; Law, V. J.; Ardhaoui, M.; Stallard, C.; Keenan, A.

    2016-09-01

    This pilot study evaluates the potential of atmospheric plasma polymerised coatings to modify the rate of drug release from polymeric substrates. The antibiotic rifampicin was deposited in a prototype multi-layer drug delivery system, consisting of a nebulized layer of active drug between a base layer of TEOS deposited on a plastic substrate (polystyrene) and an overlying layer of plasma polymerised PDMS. The polymerised TEOS and PDMS layers were deposited using a helium atmospheric plasma jet system. Elution of rifampicin was measured using UV–VIS spectroscopy, in addition to a antimicrobial well diffusion assay with an established indicator organism. The multi-layered plasma deposited coatings significantly extended the duration of release of the rifampicin from 24 h for the uncoated polymer to 144 h for the coated polymer.

  10. The Effect of Atmospheric Pressure on Rocket Thrust -- Part I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leitner, Alfred

    1982-01-01

    The first of a two-part question asks: Does the total thrust of a rocket depend on the surrounding pressure? The answer to this question is provided, with accompanying diagrams of rockets. The second part of the question (and answer) are provided in v20 n7, p479, Oct 1982 of this journal. (Author/JN)

  11. Vertical thermal structure of the Venus atmosphere from temperature and pressure measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Linkin, V.M.; Blamon, Z.; Lipatov, A.P.; Devyatkin, S.I.; Dyachkov, A.V.; Ignatova, S.I.; Kerzhanovich, V.V.; Malyk, K.; Stadny, V.I.; Sanotskiy, Y.V.

    1986-05-01

    Accurate temperature and pressure measurements were made on the Vega-2 lander during its entire descent. The temperature and pressure at the surface were 733 K and 89.3 bar, respectively. A strong temperature inversion was found in the upper troposphere. Several layers with differing static stability were visible in the atmospheric structure.

  12. Atmospheric Pressure Oscillations Forced by Surface Waves From the 2003 Tokachi-Oki Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watada, S.; Nishida, K.; Sekiguchi, S.

    2004-12-01

    Clear atmospheric pressure changes associated with the 2003 Tokachi-Oki Earthquake with M 8.3 were recorded by 8 microbarographs along Japan. The maximum oscillatory pressure change is about 2 Pascal with dominant period is about 15-20 second, and lasted for more than 30 minutes. Comparing the pressure change with broadband seismic records observed near or at the microbarogram, the pressure change starts at the arrival of seismic waves and reaches its maximum amplitude at the arrival of Rayleigh waves. Four microbarographs, co-located with STS-1 broadband seismographs and suffering less atmospheric wind noise, show that peaks in vertical ground velocity records correspond to the peaks of atmospheric pressure records. Similar pressure changes were observed during the largest aftershock (M 7.4). All ground motion analyzed in this paper were recorded by STS-1 broadband sensors. Spectrum analysis in the frequency domain supports that the vertical ground velocity and the pressure change has the same phase and the amplitude ratio is constant up to a period of about 50 second. The constant amplitude ratio is about (atmospheric density) times (sound velocity in the atmosphere), indicating that the surface ground in vertical ground motion compresses or inflates the air above the ground locally and low-frequency sound waves are generated. Pressure change recorded after the passage of Rayleigh waves does not well correlate with the ground velocity. Through the precise atmospheric pressure and ground motion measurement at the same sites, we witnessed the process of low-frequency sound generation by the vertical ground surface motion acted as a vibrating plate of a speaker. The radiated low-frequency sound waves propagates upward and reaches to the ionosphere with large amplitude because of the energy conservation. The ionospheric turbulence reported in the past researches were originated from this low-frequency sound at the ground surface.

  13. Atmospheric pressure and temperature profiling using near IR differential absorption lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korb, C. L.; Schwemmer, G. K.; Dombrowski, M.; Weng, C. Y.

    1983-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with differential absorption lidar techniques for remotely measuring the atmospheric temperature and pressure profile, surface pressure, and cloud top pressure-height. The procedure used in determining the pressure is based on the conduction of high-resolution measurements of absorption in the wings of lines in the oxygen A band. Absorption with respect to these areas is highly pressure sensitive in connection with the mechanism of collisional line broadening. The method of temperature measurement utilizes a determination of the absorption at the center of a selected line in the oxygen A band which originates from a quantum state with high ground state energy.

  14. Cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma with ultra-high electron density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Hiromasa; Mizuno, Masaaki; Toyokuni, Shinya; Maruyama, Shoichi; Kodera, Yasuhiro; Terasaki, Hiroko; Adachi, Tetsuo; Kato, Masashi; Kikkawa, Fumitaka; Hori, Masaru

    2015-12-01

    Cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is a big challenge in plasma medicine. Reactive species generated from plasma are key factors for treating cancer cells, and thus, non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma with high electron density has been developed and applied for cancer treatment. Various cancer cell lines have been treated with plasma, and non-thermal atmospheric plasma clearly has anti-tumor effects. Recent innovative studies suggest that plasma can both directly and indirectly affect cells and tissues, and this observation has widened the range of applications. Thus, cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is promising. Animal experiments and understanding the mode of action are essential for clinical application in the future. A new academic field that combines plasma science, the biology of free radicals, and systems biology will be established.

  15. Cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma with ultra-high electron density

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Hiromasa; Mizuno, Masaaki; Toyokuni, Shinya; Maruyama, Shoichi; Kodera, Yasuhiro; Terasaki, Hiroko; Adachi, Tetsuo; Kato, Masashi; Kikkawa, Fumitaka; Hori, Masaru

    2015-12-15

    Cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is a big challenge in plasma medicine. Reactive species generated from plasma are key factors for treating cancer cells, and thus, non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma with high electron density has been developed and applied for cancer treatment. Various cancer cell lines have been treated with plasma, and non-thermal atmospheric plasma clearly has anti-tumor effects. Recent innovative studies suggest that plasma can both directly and indirectly affect cells and tissues, and this observation has widened the range of applications. Thus, cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is promising. Animal experiments and understanding the mode of action are essential for clinical application in the future. A new academic field that combines plasma science, the biology of free radicals, and systems biology will be established.

  16. Electron heating in radio-frequency capacitively coupled atmospheric-pressure plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, D. W.; Iza, F.; Kong, M. G.

    2008-12-29

    In atmospheric-pressure plasmas the main electron heating mechanism is Ohmic heating, which has distinct spatial and temporal evolutions in the {alpha} and {gamma} modes. In {gamma} discharges, ionizing avalanches in the sheaths are initiated not only by secondary electrons but also by metastable pooling reactions. In {alpha} discharges, heating takes place at the sheath edges and in contrast with low-pressure plasmas, close to 50% of the power absorbed by the electrons is absorbed at the edge of the retreating sheaths. This heating is due to a field enhancement caused by the large collisionality in atmospheric-pressure discharges.

  17. Review on VUV to MIR absorption spectroscopy of atmospheric pressure plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuter, Stephan; Santos Sousa, Joao; Stancu, Gabi Daniel; Hubertus van Helden, Jean-Pierre

    2015-10-01

    Absorption spectroscopy (AS) represents a reliable method for the characterization of cold atmospheric pressure plasma jets. The method’s simplicity stands out in comparison to competing diagnostic techniques. AS is an in situ, non-invasive technique giving absolute densities, free of calibration procedures, which other diagnostics, such as laser-induced fluorescence or optical emission spectroscopy, have to rely on. Ground state densities can be determined without the knowledge of the influence of collisional quenching. Therefore, absolute densities determined by absorption spectroscopy can be taken as calibration for other methods. In this paper, fundamentals of absorption spectroscopy are presented as an entrance to the topic. In the second part of the manuscript, a review of AS performed on cold atmospheric pressure plasma jets, as they are used e.g. in the field of plasma medicine, is presented. The focus is set on special techniques overcoming not only the drawback of spectrally overlapping absorbing species, but also the line-of-sight densities that AS usually provides or the necessity of sufficiently long absorption lengths. Where references are not available for measurements on cold atmospheric pressure plasma jets, other plasma sources including low-pressure plasmas are taken as an example to give suggestions for possible approaches. The final part is a table summarizing examples of absorption spectroscopic measurements on cold atmospheric pressure plasma jets. With this, the paper provides a ‘best practice’ guideline and gives a compendium of works by groups performing absorption spectroscopy on cold atmospheric pressure plasma jets.

  18. Basic phenomenology of electrical discharges at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taillet, J.

    1980-05-01

    The mechanisms of the three types of discharges induced by static aircraft charging (spark, corona and surface streamers) are examined, and the radioelectric noise emitted by these discharges is predicted. Attention is given to gas discharges at low and high pressures, diffusion and drift, and Coulomb collisions and heating. It is concluded that sparks and surface streamers are generators of powerful radioelectric disturbances and that coronas are necessary for eliminating the accumulated static charge.

  19. Germination and growth of lettuce (Lactuca sativa) at low atmospheric pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spanarkel, Robert; Drew, Malcolm C.

    2002-01-01

    The response of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L. cv. Waldmann's Green) to low atmospheric pressure was examined during the initial 5 days of germination and emergence, and also during subsequent growth to vegetative maturity at 30 days. Growth took place inside a 66-l-volume low pressure chamber maintained at 70 kPa, and plant response was compared to that of plants in a second, matching chamber that was at ambient pressure (approximately 101 kPa) as a control. In other experiments, to determine short-term effects of low pressure transients, plants were grown at ambient pressure until maturity and then subjected to alternating periods of 24 h of low and ambient atmospheric pressures. In all treatments the partial pressure of O2 was maintained at 21 kPa (approximately the partial pressure in air at normal pressure), and the partial pressure of CO2 was in the range 66.5-73.5 Pa (about twice that in normal air) in both chambers, with the addition of CO2 during the light phase. With continuous exposure to low pressure, shoot and root growth was at least as rapid as at ambient pressure, with an overall trend towards slightly greater performance at the lower pressure. Dark respiration rates were greater at low pressure. Transient periods at low pressure decreased transpiration and increased dark respiration but only during the period of exposure to low pressure. We conclude that long-term or short-term exposure to subambient pressure (70 kPa) was without detectable detriment to vegetative growth and development.

  20. Application of Langmuir Probe Method to the Atmospheric Pressure Discharge Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuura, Hiroto; Matsumura, Yasuhiro; Nakano, Ken

    2008-12-31

    The heat balance model in the probe tip applied to atmospheric pressure plasma is constructed. Considering the natural convective heat loss, the limitation of plasma density for probe application to such a plasma is estimated. The rough limit is about n{sub e} = 10{sup 18} m{sup -3}. Four kind of materials (Cu, SUS, W, Al) are used for probe tips, and are tested in DC atmospheric pressure discharge. Heat conductivity is found to be a more important property than melting point in design of probes in high pressure discharge. DC atmospheric pressure discharge plasma parameters are obtained with our test probes. Obtained density is the order of 10{sup 17} m{sup -3} and does not contradict with the above density limitation. Change of space potential in air/Ar plasma is also confirmed.

  1. Chain elongation of diacylphosphatidylcholine induces fully bilayer interdigitation under atmospheric pressure.

    PubMed

    Goto, Masaki; Wilk, Agnieszka; Kazama, Akira; Chodankar, Shirish; Kohlbrecher, Joachim; Matsuki, Hitoshi

    2011-05-01

    The phase transitions of dibehenoylphosphatidylcholine (C22PC) bilayer membrane were observed by differential scanning calorimetry under atmospheric pressure and light-transmittance measurements under high pressure. The constructed temperature-pressure phase diagram suggests that the gel phase at low temperatures is the interdigitated gel phase. To confirm the phase state, we performed small-angle neutron scattering and fluorescence measurements using a polarity-sensitive probe Prodan for the C22PC bilayer membrane under atmospheric pressure. The peaks obtained in both measurements clearly showed the characteristic patterns of the fully interdigitated gel phase. Taking into account of previous studies on the gel phase for long-chain PC bilayers under atmospheric pressure and our studies on the pressure-induced bilayer interdigitaion of diacyl-PCs, it turned out that the interdigitation of diacyl-PC bilayer membranes occurs when the carbon number of acyl chain reaches at least 22. The present study revealed that the interdigitation of PC bilayer membranes occurs not only by weakening the attractive force of polar head groups but also by strengthening the cohesive force of acyl chains. When dominating the force of acyl chains, the interdigitation can be induced even in a diacyl-PC bilayer membrane by only hydration under atmospheric pressure.

  2. Rugged, no-moving-parts windspeed and static pressure probe designs for measurements in planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bedard, A. J., Jr.; Nishiyama, R. T.

    1993-01-01

    Instruments developed for making meteorological observations under adverse conditions on Earth can be applied to systems designed for other planetary atmospheres. Specifically, a wind sensor developed for making measurements within tornados is capable of detecting induced pressure differences proportional to wind speed. Adding strain gauges to the sensor would provide wind direction. The device can be constructed in a rugged form for measuring high wind speeds in the presence of blowing dust that would clog bearings and plug passages of conventional wind speed sensors. Sensing static pressure in the lower boundary layer required development of an omnidirectional, tilt-insensitive static pressure probe. The probe provides pressure inputs to a sensor with minimum error and is inherently weather-protected. The wind sensor and static pressure probes have been used in a variety of field programs and can be adapted for use in different planetary atmospheres.

  3. Effect of Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Modification on Polyimide and Adhesive Joining with Titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akram, M.; Jansen, K. M. B.; Ernst, L. J.; Bhowmik, S.; Ajeesh, G.; Ahmed, S.; Chakraborty, D.

    2015-10-01

    This investigation highlights the effect of surface modification on polyimide by atmospheric pressure plasma treatment with different exposure time. Surface modification of polymer by plasma treatment essentially creates physical and chemical changes such as cross-linking and formation of free radicals. It also forms oxygen functionalization in the form of polar groups on polymer surface, hence improving the wetting and adhesion properties. It is observed that surface energy of the polymer increases with increasing exposure time of atmospheric pressure plasma. However, prolonged exposure time of plasma results in deterioration of the surface layer of polyimide resulting in degradation and embrittlement. Scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy analysis reveal that there is a considerable morphological change on the polymer surface due to atmospheric pressure plasma treatment. X-ray photo electron spectroscopy analysis reveals that the oxygen functionalities of polymer surface increases significantly when polyimide is exposed to atmospheric pressure plasma. Untreated and atmospheric pressure plasma-treated polyimide sheet are adhesive bonded by employing polyimide adhesive as well as with titanium substrate. Due to surface modification of polyimide, it is observed that there is a significant increase in lap shear tensile strength, and therefore, this technology is highly acceptable for aviation and space applications.

  4. Seasonal emanation of radon at Ghuttu, northwest Himalaya: Differentiation of atmospheric temperature and pressure influences.

    PubMed

    Kamra, Leena

    2015-11-01

    Continuous monitoring of radon along with meteorological parameters has been carried out in a seismically active area of Garhwal region, northwest Himalaya, within the frame work of earthquake precursory research. Radon measurements are carried out by using a gamma ray detector installed in the air column at a depth of 10m in a 68m deep borehole. The analysis of long time series for 2006-2012 shows strong seasonal variability masked by diurnal and multi-day variations. Isolation of a seasonal cycle by minimising short-time by 31 day running average shows a strong seasonal variation with unambiguous dependence on atmospheric temperature and pressure. The seasonal characteristics of radon concentrations are positively correlated to atmospheric temperature (R=0.95) and negatively correlated to atmospheric pressure (R=-0.82). The temperature and pressure variation in their annual progressions are negatively correlated. The calculations of partial correlation coefficient permit us to conclude that atmospheric temperature plays a dominant role in controlling the variability of radon in borehole, 71% of the variability in radon arises from the variation in atmospheric temperature and about 6% of the variability is contributed by atmospheric pressure. The influence of pressure variations in an annual cycle appears to be a pseudo-effect, resulting from the negative correlation between temperature and pressure variations. Incorporation of these results explains the varying and even contradictory claims regarding the influence of the pressure variability on radon changes in the published literature. Temperature dependence, facilitated by the temperature gradient in the borehole, controls the transportation of radon from the deep interior to the surface.

  5. An analysis of the errors associated with the determination of atmospheric temperature from atmospheric pressure and density data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minzner, R. A.

    1976-01-01

    A graph was developed for relating delta T/T, the relative uncertainty in atmospheric temperature T, to delta p/p, the relative uncertainty in the atmospheric pressure p, for situations, when T is derived from the slope of the pressure-height profile. A similar graph relates delta T/T to delta roh/rho, the relative uncertainty in the atmospheric density rho, for those cases when T is derived from the downward integration of the density-height profile. A comparison of these two graphs shows that for equal uncertainties in the respective basic parameters, p or rho, smaller uncertainties in the derived temperatures are associated with density-height rather than with pressure-height data. The value of delta T/T is seen to depend not only upon delta p or delta rho, and to a small extent upon the value of T or the related scale height H, but also upon the inverse of delta h, the height increment between successive observations of p or rho. In the case of pressure-height data, delta T/T is dominated by 1/delta h for all values of delta h; for density-height data, delta T/T is dominated by delta rho/rho for delta h smaller than about 5 km. In the case of T derived from density-height data, this inverse relationship between delta T/T and delta h applies only for large values of delta h, that is, for delta h 35 km. No limit exists in the fineness of usable height resolution of T which may be derived from densities, while a fine height resolution in pressure-height data leads to temperature with unacceptably large uncertainties.

  6. Acidification of reverse micellar nanodroplets by atmospheric pressure CO2.

    PubMed

    Levinger, Nancy E; Rubenstrunk, Lauren C; Baruah, Bharat; Crans, Debbie C

    2011-05-11

    Water absorption of atmospheric carbon dioxide lowers the solution pH due to carbonic acid formation. Bulk water acidification by CO(2) is well documented, but significantly less is known about its effect on water in confined spaces. Considering its prominence as a greenhouse gas, the importance of aerosols in acid rain, and CO(2)-buffering in cellular systems, surprisingly little information exists about the absorption of CO(2) by nanosized water droplets. The fundamental interactions of CO(2) with water, particularly in nanosized structures, may influence a wide range of processes in our technological society. Here results from experiments investigating the uptake of gaseous CO(2) by water pools in reverse micelles are presented. Despite the small number of water molecules in each droplet, changes in vanadium probes within the water pools, measured using vanadium-51 NMR spectroscopy, indicate a significant drop in pH after CO(2) introduction. Collectively, the pH-dependent vanadium probes show CO(2) dissolves in the nanowater droplets, causing the reverse micelle acidity to increase.

  7. Ozone generation using atmospheric pressure glow discharge in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buntat, Z.; Smith, I. R.; Razali, N. A. M.

    2009-12-01

    This paper presents results from a study into the generation of ozone by a stable atmospheric glow discharge, using dry air as the feeding gas for ozone generation. The power supply is 50 Hz ac, with the use of a perforated aluminium sheet for the electrodes and soda lime glass as a dielectric layer in a parallel-plate configuration, stabilizing the generation process and enabling ozone to be produced. The stable glow discharge spreads uniformly at a gas breakdown voltage below 4.8 kV and requires only 330 mW discharge power, with a limitation of 3 mm on the maximum gap spacing for the dry air. With the technique providing a high collision rate between the electrons and gas molecules during the discharge process, a high ozone yield is obtained. An analysis of the effect on the production rate of parameters such as the input voltage, gas flow rate and reaction chamber dimensions resulted in a highest efficiency of production of almost 350 g kWh-1 and confirms its potential as an important ozone generation technology.

  8. Three electrode atmospheric pressure plasma jet in helium flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maletic, Dejan; Puac, Nevena; Malovic, Gordana; Petrovic, Zoran Lj.

    2015-09-01

    Plasma jets are widely used in various types of applications and lately more and more in the field of plasma medicine. However, it is not only their applicability that distinguishes them from other atmospheric plasma sources, but also the behavior of the plasma. It was shown that plasma plume is not continuous, but discrete set of plasma packages. Here we present iCCD images and current voltage characteristics of a three electrode plasma jet. Our plasma jet has a simple design with body made of glass tube and two transparent electrodes wrapped around it. The additional third metal tip electrode was positioned at 10 and 25 mm in front of the jet nozzle and connected to the same potential as the powered electrode. Power transmitted to the plasma was from 0.5 W to 4.0 W and the helium flow rate was kept constant at 4 slm. For the 10 mm configuration plasma is ignited on the metal tip in the whole period of the excitation signal and in the positive half cycle plasma ``bullet'' is propagating beyond the metal tip. In contrast to that, for the 25 mm configuration at the tip electrode plasma can be seen only in the minimum and maximum of the excitation signal, and there is no plasma ``bullet'' formation. This research has been supported by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development, Republic of Serbia, under projects ON171037 and III41011.

  9. Characterization of Dust-Plasma Interactions In Non-Thermal Plasmas Under Low Pressure and the Atmospheric Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilik, Narula

    This dissertation research focuses on the experimental characterization of dust-plasma interactions at both low and atmospheric pressure. Its goal is to fill the knowledge gaps in (1) the fundamental research of low pressure dusty plasma electrons, which mainly relied on models with few experimental results; and (2) the nanoparticle synthesis process in atmospheric pressure uniform glow plasmas (APGDs), which is largely unexplored in spite of the economical advantage of APGDs in nanotechnology. The low pressure part of the dissertation research involves the development of a complete diagnostic process for an argon-siline capacitively-coupled RF plasma. The central part of the diagnostic process is the Langmuir probe measurement of the electron energy probability function (EEPF) in a dusty plasma, which has never been measured before. This is because the dust particles in the plasma cause severe probe surface contamination and consequently distort the measurement. This problem is solved by adding a solenoid-actuated shield structure to the Langmuir probe, which physically protects the Langmuir probe from the dust particle deposition to ensure reliable EEPF measurements. The dusty plasma EEPFs are characterized by lower electron density and higher electron temperature accompanied by a drop in the low energy electron population. The Langmuir probe measurement is complemented with other characterizations including the capacitive probe measurement, power measurement, and dust particle collection. The complete diagnostic process then gives a set of local plasma parameters as well as the details of the dust-electron interactions reflected in the EEPFs. This set of data serves as input for an analytical model of nanoparticle charging to yield the time evolution of nanoparticle size and charge in the dusty plasma. The atmospheric pressure part of the dissertation focuses on the design and development of an APGD for zinc oxide nanocrystal synthesis. One of the main

  10. Plasma polymerization of acrylic acid onto polystyrene by cyclonic plasma at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yi-Jan; Lin, Chin-Ho; Huang, Chun

    2016-01-01

    The cyclonic atmospheric-pressure plasma is developed for chamberless deposition of poly(acrylic acid) film from argon/acrylic acid mixtures. The photoemission plasma species in atmospheric-pressure plasma polymerization was identified by optical emission spectroscopy (OES). The OES diagnosis data and deposition results indicated that in glow discharge, the CH and C2 species resulted from low-energy electron-impact dissociation that creates deposition species, but the strong CO emission lines are related to nondeposition species. The acrylic acid flow rate is seen as the key factor affecting the film growth. The film surface analysis results indicate that a smooth, continuous, and uniform surface of poly(acrylic acid) films can be formed at a relatively low plasma power input. This study reveals the potential of chamberless film growth at atmospheric pressure for large-area deposition of poly(acrylic acid) films.

  11. Selective cytotoxicity of indirect nonequilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma against ovarian clear-cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Utsumi, Fumi; Kajiyama, Hiroaki; Nakamura, Kae; Tanaka, Hiromasa; Hori, Masaru; Kikkawa, Fumitaka

    2014-01-01

    Ovarian clear cell carcinoma (CCC) is a histological type of epithelial ovarian cancer that is less responsive to chemotherapy and associated with a poorer prognosis than serous and endometrioid carcinoma. Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma which produces reactive species has recently led to an explosion of research in plasma medicine. Plasma treatment can be applied to cancer treatment to induce apoptosis and tumor growth arrest. Furthermore, recent studies have shown that a medium exposed to plasma also has an anti-proliferative effect against cancer in the absence of direct exposure to plasma. In this study, we confirmed whether this indirect plasma has an anti-tumor effect against CCC, and investigated whether this efficacy is selective for cancer cells. Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma induced apoptosis in CCC cells, while human peritoneal mesothelial cells remained viable. Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma exhibits selective cytotoxicity against CCC cells which are resistant to chemotherapy.

  12. Optical Emission Spectroscopy of an Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet During Tooth Bleaching Gel Treatment.

    PubMed

    Šantak, Vedran; Zaplotnik, Rok; Tarle, Zrinka; Milošević, Slobodan

    2015-11-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy was performed during atmospheric pressure plasma needle helium jet treatment of various tooth-bleaching gels. When the gel sample was inserted under the plasma plume, the intensity of all the spectral features increased approximately two times near the plasma needle tip and up to two orders of magnitude near the sample surface. The color change of the hydroxylapatite pastille treated with bleaching gels in conjunction with the atmospheric pressure plasma jet was found to be in correlation with the intensity of OH emission band (309 nm). Using argon as an additive to helium flow (2 L/min), a linear increase (up to four times) of OH intensity and, consequently, whitening (up to 10%) of the pastilles was achieved. An atmospheric pressure plasma jet activates bleaching gel, accelerates OH production, and accelerates tooth bleaching (up to six times faster).

  13. Effect of the atmospheric pressure nonequilibrium plasmas on the conformational changes of plasmid DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Yan Xu; He Guangyuan; Shi Mengjun; Gao Xuan; Li Yin; Ma Fengyun; Yu Men; Wang Changdong; Wang Yuesheng; Yang Guangxiao; Zou Fei; Lu Xinpei; Xiong Qing; Xiong Zilan

    2009-08-24

    The cold atmospheric pressure plasma, which has been widely used for biomedical applications, may potentially affect the conformation of DNA. In this letter, an atmospheric pressure plasma plume is used to investigate its effects on the conformational changes of DNA of plasmid pAHC25. It is found that the plasma plume could cause plasmid DNA topology alteration, resulting in the percentage of the supercoiled plasmid DNA form decreased while that of the open circular and linearized form of plasmid DNA increased as detected by agrose gel electrophoresis. On the other hand, further investigation by using polymerase chain reaction method shows that the atmospheric pressure plasma jet treatments under proper conditions does not affect the genes of the plasmid DNA, which may have potential application in increasing the transformation frequency by genetic engineering.

  14. Optical Emission Spectroscopy of an Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet During Tooth Bleaching Gel Treatment.

    PubMed

    Šantak, Vedran; Zaplotnik, Rok; Tarle, Zrinka; Milošević, Slobodan

    2015-11-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy was performed during atmospheric pressure plasma needle helium jet treatment of various tooth-bleaching gels. When the gel sample was inserted under the plasma plume, the intensity of all the spectral features increased approximately two times near the plasma needle tip and up to two orders of magnitude near the sample surface. The color change of the hydroxylapatite pastille treated with bleaching gels in conjunction with the atmospheric pressure plasma jet was found to be in correlation with the intensity of OH emission band (309 nm). Using argon as an additive to helium flow (2 L/min), a linear increase (up to four times) of OH intensity and, consequently, whitening (up to 10%) of the pastilles was achieved. An atmospheric pressure plasma jet activates bleaching gel, accelerates OH production, and accelerates tooth bleaching (up to six times faster). PMID:26647056

  15. Reduced Pressure Atmosphere Impacts on Life Support and Internal Thermal Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Molly

    2006-01-01

    Selecting the appropriate atmosphere for a spacecraft and mission is a complicated problem. NASA has previously used atmospheres from Earth normal composition and pressure to pure oxygen at low pressures. Future exploration missions will likely strike a compromise somewhere between the two, trying to balance operation impacts on EVA, safety concerns for flammability and health risks, life science and physiology questions, and other issues. Life support systems and internal thermal control systems are areas that will have to respond to changes in the atmospheric composition and pressure away from the Earthlike conditions currently used on the International Space Station. This paper examines life support and internal thermal control technologies currently in use or in development to find what impacts in design, efficiency and performance, or feasibility might be expected. Understanding these changes should be helpful in producing better results during future trade studies or mission analyses.

  16. Asteroid entry in Venusian atmosphere: Pressure and density fields effect on crater formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, Robert

    1995-01-01

    The objectives are to look at time scales of overpressure compared to cratering and to determine: what are the transient pressure and density due to atmospheric entry; do shock waves evacuate ambient gas; do transient atmospheric disturbances 'settle down' during cratering; can the pressure/density field be approximated as quasi-static; how does disturbance scale with impactor size; and what is the role of atmospheric thickness. The general approach is to perform inexpensive exploratory calculations, perform experiments to validate code and observe crater growth, and to follow up with more realistic coupling calculations. This viewgraph presentation presents progress made with the objective to obtain useful scaling relationships for crater formation when atmospheric effects are important.

  17. Atmospheric Airborne Pressure Measurements Using the Oxygen A Band for the ASCENDS Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riris, Haris; Rodriguez, Mike; Stephen, Mark; Hasselbrack, William; Allan, Graham; Mao, Jianping; Kawa, Stephen R.; Weaver, Clark J.

    2010-01-01

    We report on airborne atmospheric pressure measurements using new fiber-based laser technology and the oxygen A-band at 765 nm. Remote measurements of atmospheric temperature and pressure are required for a number of NASA Earth science missions and specifically for the Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions Over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission. Accurate measurements of tropospheric CO2 on a global scale are very important in order to better understand its sources and sinks and to improve predictions on any future climate change. The ultimate goal of a CO2 remote sensing mission, such as ASCENDS, is to derive the CO2 concentration in the atmosphere in terms of mole fraction in unit of parts-per-million (ppmv) with regard to dry air. Therefore, both CO2 and the dry air number of molecules in the atmosphere are needed in deriving this quantity. O2 is a stable molecule and uniformly mixed in the atmosphere. Measuring the O2 absorption in the atmosphere can thus be used to infer the dry air number of molecules and then used to calculate CO2 concentration. With the knowledge of atmospheric water vapor, we can then estimate the total surface pressure needed for CO2 retrievals. Our work, funded by the ESTO IIP program, uses fiber optic technology and non-linear optics to generate 765 nm laser radiation coincident with the Oxygen A-band. Our pulsed, time gated technique uses several on- and off-line wavelengths tuned to the O2 absorption line. The choice of wavelengths allows us to measure the pressure by using two adjacent O2 absorptions in the Oxygen A-band. Our retrieval algorithm fits the O2 lineshapes and derives the pressure. Our measurements compare favorably with a local weather monitor mounted outside our laboratory and a local weather station.

  18. Atmospheric Airborne Pressure Measurements Using the Oxygen A Band for the ASCENDS Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riris, Haris; Rodriguez, Mike; Stephen, Mark; Hasselbrack, William; Allan, Graham; Mao, Jiamping,; Kawa, Stephan R.; Weaver, Clark J.

    2011-01-01

    We report on airborne atmospheric pressure measurements using new fiber-based laser technology and the oxygen A-band at 765 nm. Remote measurements of atmospheric temperature and pressure are required for a number of NASA Earth science missions and specifically for the Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions Over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission. Accurate measurements of tropospheric CO2 on a global scale are very important in order to better understand its sources and sinks and to improve predictions on any future climate change. The ultimate goal of a CO2 remote sensing mission, such as ASCENDS, is to derive the CO2 concentration in the atmosphere in terms of mole fraction in unit of parts-per-million (ppmv) with regard to dry air. Therefore, both CO2 and the dry air number of molecules in the atmosphere are needed in deriving this quantity. O2 is a stable molecule and uniformly mixed in the atmosphere. Measuring the O2 absorption in the atmosphere can thus be used to infer the dry air number of molecules and then used to calculate CO2 concentration. With the knowledge of atmospheric water vapor, we can then estimate the total surface pressure needed for CO2 retrievals. Our work, funded by the ESTO IIP program, uses fiber optic technology and non-linear optics to generate 765 nm laser radiation coincident with the Oxygen A-band. Our pulsed, time gated technique uses several on- and off-line wavelengths tuned to the O2 absorption line. The choice of wavelengths allows us to measure the pressure by using two adjacent O2 absorptions in the Oxygen A-band. Our retrieval algorithm fits the O2 lineshapes and derives the pressure. Our measurements compare favorably with a local weather monitor mounted outside our laboratory and a local weather station.

  19. Atmospheric pressure ionization-tandem mass spectrometry of the phenicol drug family.

    PubMed

    Alechaga, Élida; Moyano, Encarnación; Galceran, M Teresa

    2013-11-01

    In this work, the mass spectrometry behaviour of the veterinary drug family of phenicols, including chloramphenicol (CAP) and its related compounds thiamphenicol (TAP), florfenicol (FF) and FF amine (FFA), was studied. Several atmospheric pressure ionization sources, electrospray (ESI), atmospheric pressure chemical ionization and atmospheric pressure photoionization were compared. In all atmospheric pressure ionization sources, CAP, TAP and FF were ionized in both positive and negative modes; while for the metabolite FFA, only positive ionization was possible. In general, in positive mode, [M + H](+) dominated the mass spectrum for FFA, while the other compounds, CAP, TAP and FF, with lower proton affinity showed intense adducts with species present in the mobile phase. In negative mode, ESI and atmospheric pressure photoionization showed the deprotonated molecule [M-H](-), while atmospheric pressure chemical ionization provided the radical molecular ion by electron capture. All these ions were characterized by tandem mass spectrometry using the combined information obtained by multistage mass spectrometry and high-resolution mass spectrometry in a quadrupole-Orbitrap instrument. In general, the fragmentation occurred via cyclization and losses or fragmentation of the N-(alkyl)acetamide group, and common fragmentation pathways were established for this family of compounds. A new chemical structure for the product ion at m/z 257 for CAP, on the basis of the MS(3) and MS(4) spectra is proposed. Thermally assisted ESI and selected reaction monitoring are proposed for the determination of these compounds by ultra high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry, achieving instrumental detection limits down to 0.1 pg.

  20. A constant altitude flight survey method for mapping atmospheric ambient pressures and systematic radar errors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, T. J.; Ehernberger, L. J.

    1985-01-01

    The flight test technique described uses controlled survey runs to determine horizontal atmospheric pressure variations and systematic altitude errors that result from space positioning measurements. The survey data can be used not only for improved air data calibrations, but also for studies of atmospheric structure and space positioning accuracy performance. The examples presented cover a wide range of radar tracking conditions for both subsonic and supersonic flight to an altitude of 42,000 ft.

  1. High-performance simulations for atmospheric pressure plasma reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chugunov, Svyatoslav

    Plasma-assisted processing and deposition of materials is an important component of modern industrial applications, with plasma reactors sharing 30% to 40% of manufacturing steps in microelectronics production. Development of new flexible electronics increases demands for efficient high-throughput deposition methods and roll-to-roll processing of materials. The current work represents an attempt of practical design and numerical modeling of a plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition system. The system utilizes plasma at standard pressure and temperature to activate a chemical precursor for protective coatings. A specially designed linear plasma head, that consists of two parallel plates with electrodes placed in the parallel arrangement, is used to resolve clogging issues of currently available commercial plasma heads, as well as to increase the flow-rate of the processed chemicals and to enhance the uniformity of the deposition. A test system is build and discussed in this work. In order to improve operating conditions of the setup and quality of the deposited material, we perform numerical modeling of the plasma system. The theoretical and numerical models presented in this work comprehensively describe plasma generation, recombination, and advection in a channel of arbitrary geometry. Number density of plasma species, their energy content, electric field, and rate parameters are accurately calculated and analyzed in this work. Some interesting engineering outcomes are discussed with a connection to the proposed setup. The numerical model is implemented with the help of high-performance parallel technique and evaluated at a cluster for parallel calculations. A typical performance increase, calculation speed-up, parallel fraction of the code and overall efficiency of the parallel implementation are discussed in details.

  2. The impact of non-tidal atmospheric pressure loading on global reference frames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloßfeld, Mathis; Roggenbuck, Ole; Seitz, Manuela; Angermann, Detlef; Thaller, Daniela

    2015-04-01

    The most recent realization of the ITRS, the ITRF2014, will account for non-tidal atmospheric loading corrections applied at the normal equation or the parameter (solution) level. In its function as one of the three contributing ITRS Combination Centers, DGFI-TUM investigates the methodology to apply these corrections at the normal equation level. In this paper, the derived procedure is presented in detail and the following four global SLR-only TRF solutions are compared with each other: (1) conventional SLR-only TRF without non-tidal loading corrections, (2) SLR-only TRF corrected for the displacement due to non-tidal atmospheric pressure loading at the observation equation level, (3) SLR-only TRF corrected for the displacement due to non-tidal atmospheric pressure loading at the normal equation level, (4) SLR-only TRF corrected for the displacement and gravitational effect due to non-tidal atmospheric pressure loading at the observation level. The four solutions are compared w.r.t. the time series of epoch-wise estimated station coordinates, the station coordinate offsets at a reference epoch, the velocities, the commonly adjusted EOPs and the formal errors. The results allow to study the impact of the different methodologies to account for the non-tidal atmospheric pressure loading correction on global TRF solutions. Finally, the presented SLR case study is summarized and the obtained findings are interpreted in the framework of the current ITRF2014 computation.

  3. Atmospheric Airborne Pressure Measurements Using the Oxygen A Band for the ASCENDS Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, M.; Riris, H.; Abshire, J. B.; Allan, G. R.; Stephen, M.; Hasselbrack, W.; Mao, J.

    2012-12-01

    We report on airborne atmospheric pressure measurements using fiber-based laser technology and the oxygen A-band at 765 nm. Remote atmospheric temperature and pressure measurements are needed for NASA's Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions Over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission. ASCENDS will measure atmospheric CO2 dry mixing ratios on a global scale. Remote atmospheric pressure measurements are necessary to normalize ASCENDS CO2 measurements. Our work, funded by the ESTO IIP program, uses erbium doped fiber optic amplifiers and non-linear optics technology to tune laser radiation over the Oxygen A-band between 764.5 nm and 765 nm. Surface reflections are fiber-coupled from a receiver telescope to photon counting detectors. Our pulsed, time gated approach resolves ground reflections from cloud returns. This system successfully recorded O2 absorption spectra during two airborne campaigns aboard a NASA DC-8. Airborne data has been analyzed and fitted to HITRAN reference spectra based upon aircraft meteorological data. Our algorithm linearly scales the HITRAN reference until measurement errors are minimized. Atmospheric pressure changes are estimated by comparing the differential optical depth of the optimum scaled HITRAN spectra to the differential optical depth of the nominal HITRAN spectra. On flights over gradually sloping terrain, these results compare favorably with ground-based observations and predictions from computer models. Measurement uncertainty is commensurate with photon counting noise. We plan to reduce measurement uncertainty in future campaigns by improving transmitter pulse energy and increasing wavelength sweep frequency.

  4. Columnar discharge mode between parallel dielectric barrier electrodes in atmospheric pressure helium

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, Yanpeng; Zheng, Bin; Liu, Yaoge

    2014-01-15

    Using a fast-gated intensified charge-coupled device, end- and side-view photographs were taken of columnar discharge between parallel dielectric barrier electrodes in atmospheric pressure helium. Based on three-dimensional images generated from end-view photographs, the number of discharge columns increased, whereas the diameter of each column decreased as the applied voltage was increased. Side-view photographs indicate that columnar discharges exhibited a mode transition ranging from Townsend to glow discharges generated by the same discharge physics as atmospheric pressure glow discharge.

  5. Atmospheric-pressure argon/oxygen plasma-discharge source with a stepped electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Jin-Pyo; Uhm, Han S.; Li Shouzhe

    2007-01-29

    The nonequilibrium glow discharge in argon mixed with oxygen at atmospheric pressure was generated in a parallel plate reactor with a stepped electrode powered by a 13.56 MHz radio-frequency power supplier. The stepped-electrode reactor consists of a narrow and wide gap structure. A strong electric field occurred at the narrow gap region preionizes Ar/O{sub 2} gas and assists to generate a large volumetric plasma in the wide gap region. Therefore, the stepped-electrode reactor makes it easy to operate Ar/O{sub 2} glow discharge, providing a stable, uniform, and broad plasma jet at atmospheric pressure.

  6. Biomedical Applications of Low Temperature Atmospheric Pressure Plasmas to Cancerous Cell Treatment and Tooth Bleaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jae Koo; Kim, Myoung Soo; Byun, June Ho; Kim, Kyong Tai; Kim, Gyoo Cheon; Park, Gan Young

    2011-08-01

    Low temperature atmospheric pressure plasmas have attracted great interests and they have been widely applied to biomedical applications to interact with living tissues, cells, and bacteria due to their non-thermal property. This paper reviews the biomedical applications of low temperature atmospheric pressure plasmas to cancerous cell treatment and tooth bleaching. Gold nanoparticles conjugated with cancer-specific antibodies have been introduced to cancerous cells to enhance selective killing of cells, and the mechanism of cell apoptosis induced by plasma has been investigated. Tooth exposed to helium plasma jet with hydrogen peroxide has become brighter and the productions of hydroxyl radicals from hydrogen peroxide have been enhanced by plasma exposure.

  7. Characteristics of radio-frequency, atmospheric-pressure glow discharges with air using bare metal electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Huabo; Sun Wenting; Li Heping; Bao Chengyu; Zhang Xiaozhang

    2006-10-16

    In this letter, an induced gas discharge approach is proposed and described in detail for obtaining a uniform atmospheric-pressure glow discharge with air in a {gamma} mode using water-cooled, bare metal electrodes driven by radio-frequency (13.56 MHz) power supply. A preliminary study on the discharge characteristics of the air glow discharge is also presented in this study. With this induced gas discharge approach, radio-frequency, atmospheric-pressure glow discharges using bare metal electrodes with other gases which cannot be ignited directly as the plasma working gas, such as nitrogen, oxygen, etc., can also be obtained.

  8. [Determination of electron density in atmospheric pressure radio frequency dielectric barrier discharges by Stark broadening].

    PubMed

    Li, Sen; Liu, Zhong-wei; Chen, Qiang; Liu, Fu-ping; Wang, Zheng-duo; Yang, Li-zhen

    2012-01-01

    The use of high frequency power to generate plasma at atmospheric pressure is a relatively new development. An apparatus of atmospheric pressure radio frequency dielectric barrier discharge was constructed. Plasma emission based measurement of electron density in discharge columns from Stark broadening Ar is discribed. The spacial profile of electron density was studied. In the middle of the discharge column, as the input power increases from 138 to 248 W, the electron density rises from 4.038 x 10(21) m(-3) to 4.75 x 10(21) m(-3). PMID:22497121

  9. Experimental study on the emission spectra of microwave plasma at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Boya; Wang, Qiang; Zhang, Guixin; Liao, Shanshan

    2014-01-28

    An experimental study on microwave plasma at atmospheric pressure was conducted by employing optical emission spectroscopy. Based on a microwave plasma generation device developed for nanoparticle synthesis, we studied the influence of input microwave power and gas flow rate on the optical emission behaviors and electron temperature of plasma using Ar, He, and N{sub 2} as working gas, respectively. The physics behind these behaviors was discussed. The results are useful in characterizing microwave plasma at atmospheric pressure and can be used for improving nanoparticle synthesis system for commercial use in the future.

  10. Atmospheric-Pressure Processed Silver Nanowire (Ag-NW)/ZnO Composite Transparent Conducting Contacts

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, John D.; Aggarwal, Shruti; van Hest, Maikel F. A. M.; Ginley, David S.

    2015-06-14

    Composite transparent contacts (TCs) based on metal nanowires and metal oxide matrix materials hold great promise for high performance transparent contacts for photovoltaics and opto-electronic technologies with the potential of all-atmospheric pressure processing. The metal nanowire mesh can provide both electrical conductivity and mechanical robustness against bending while the matrix material can both control the electrical interface and protect the metal nanowires. Here, we demonstrate all atmospheric pressure processed Ag-NW/ZnO composite TCs that are 90% transparent in the visible with sheet resistance Rs ~= 10 Ohms/sq. In addition, the composite TCs have higher infrared transmission than conventional TCO films with the same sheet resistance.

  11. Scaling laws for gas breakdown for nanoscale to microscale gaps at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loveless, Amanda M.; Garner, Allen L.

    2016-06-01

    Electronics miniaturization motivates gas breakdown predictions for microscale and smaller gaps, since traditional breakdown theory fails when gap size, d, is smaller than ˜15 μm at atmospheric pressure, patm. We perform a matched asymptotic analysis to derive analytic expressions for breakdown voltage, Vb, at patm for 1 nm ≤ d ≤ 35 μm. We obtain excellent agreement between numerical, analytic, and particle-in-cell simulations for argon, and show Vb decreasing as d → 0, instead of increasing as predicted by Paschen's law. This work provides an analytic framework for determining Vb at atmospheric pressure for various gap distances that may be extended to other gases.

  12. Effects of long-period solar activity fluctuation on temperature and pressure of the terrestrial atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubashev, B. M.

    1978-01-01

    The present state of research on the influence of solar sunspot activity on tropospheric temperature and pressure is reviewed. The existence of an 11-year temperature cycle of 5 different types is affirmed. A cyclic change in atmospheric pressure, deducing characteristic changes between 11-year cycles is discussed. The existence of 80-year and 5-to-6-year cycles of temperature is established, and physical causes for birth are suggested.

  13. Life modeling of atmospheric and low pressure plasma-sprayed thermal-barrier coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. A.; Argarwal, P.; Duderstadt, E. C.

    1984-01-01

    The cycles-to-failure vs cycle duration data for three different thermal barrier coating systems, which consist of atmospheric pressure plasma-sprayed ZrO2-8 percent Y2O3 over similarly deposited or low pressure plasma sprayed Ni-base alloys, are presently analyzed by means of the Miller (1980) oxidation-based life model. Specimens were tested at 1100 C for heating cycle lengths of 1, 6, and 20 h, yielding results supporting the model's value.

  14. Melt-vapor phase transition in the lead-selenium system at atmospheric and low pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volodin, V. N.; Burabaeva, N. M.; Trebukhov, S. A.

    2016-03-01

    The boiling temperature and the corresponding vapor phase composition in the existence domain of liquid solutions were calculated from the partial pressures of saturated vapor of the components and lead selenide over liquid melts in the lead-selenium system. The phase diagram was complemented with the liquid-vapor phase transition at atmospheric pressure and in vacuum of 100 Pa, which allowed us to judge the behavior of the components during the distillation separation.

  15. Observation of antibacterial effects obtained at atmospheric and reduced pressures in afterglow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarrette, J.-P.; Cousty, S.; Merbahi, N.; Nègre-Salvayre, A.; Clément, F.

    2010-01-01

    Bactericidal activities of three different afterglows operating at reduced and atmospheric pressures and ambient temperature are established and compared through the use of a unique protocol for bacteria (E. coli, CIP 54.8 T) exposition, recovery and numeration. The influence of three important parameters is shown. An original scenario for bacterial inactivation at reduced pressure is proposed, compatible with previously published results and with the observation of conformational changes appearing on the treated bacteria.

  16. Retrieval of upper atmosphere pressure-temperature profiles from high resolution solar occultation spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinsland, C. P.; Russell, J. M., III; Park, J. H.; Namkung, J.

    1987-01-01

    Pressure-temperature profiles over the 18 to 75 km altitude range were retrieved from 0.01 cm(-1) resolution infrared solar absorption spectra recorded with the Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy (ATMOS) Fourier transform spectrometer operating in the solar occultation mode during the Spacelab 3 shuttle mission (April 30 to May 1, 1985). The analysis method is described and preliminary results deduced for five occultation events are compared to correlative pressure-temperature measurments.

  17. The oceanic response of the Turkish Straits System to an extreme drop in atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Book, Jeffrey W.; Jarosz, Ewa; Chiggiato, Jacopo; Beşiktepe, Åükrü

    2014-06-01

    Moorings across all four entry/exit sections of the Dardanelles Strait and the Bosphorus Strait simultaneously measured the response of the Turkish Straits System to the passage of a severe cyclonic storm that included an atmospheric pressure drop of more than 30 mbar in less than 48 h. The bottom pressure response at the Aegean Sea side of the Dardanelles Strait was consistent with an inverted barometer response, but the response at the other sections did not follow an inverted barometer, leading to a large bottom pressure gradient through the Turkish Straits System. Upper-layer flow toward the Aegean Sea was reversed by the storm and flow toward the Black Sea was greatly enhanced. Bottom pressure across the Sea of Marmara peaked 6 h after the passage of the storm's minimum pressure. The response on the Dardanelles side was a combination of sea elevation and pycnocline depth rise, and the response on the Bosphorus side was an even greater sea elevation rise and a drop in pycnocline depth. The peak in bottom pressure in the Sea of Marmara was followed by another reverse in the flow through the Dardanelles Strait as flow was then directed away from the Sea of Marmara in both straits. A simple conceptual model without wind is able to explain fluctuations in bottom pressure in the Sea of Marmara to a 0.89-0.96 level of correlation. This stresses the importance of atmospheric pressure dynamics in driving the mass flux of the Turkish Strait System for extreme storms.

  18. Simulation of rarefied gas flows in atmospheric pressure interfaces for mass spectrometry systems.

    PubMed

    Garimella, Sandilya; Zhou, Xiaoyu; Ouyang, Zheng

    2013-12-01

    The understanding of the gas dynamics of the atmospheric pressure interface is very important for the development of mass spectrometry systems with high sensitivity. While the gas flows at high pressure (>1 Torr) and low pressure (<10(-3) Torr) stages are relatively well understood and could be modeled using continuum and molecular flows, respectively, the theoretical modeling or numeric simulation of gas flow through the transition pressure stage (1 to 10(-3) Torr) remains challenging. In this study, we used the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DMSC) method to develop the gas dynamic simulations for the continuous and discontinuous atmospheric pressure interfaces (API), with different focuses on the ion transfer by gas flows through a skimmer or directly from the atmospheric pressure to a vacuum stage, respectively. The impacts by the skimmer location in the continuous API and the temporal evolvement of the gas flow with a discontinuous API were characterized, which provide a solid base for the instrument design and performance improvement.

  19. EDITORIAL: Atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasmas for processing and other applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massines, Françoise

    2005-02-01

    Interest has grown over the past few years in applying atmospheric pressure plasmas to plasma processing for the benefits this can offer to existing and potential new processes, because they do not require expensive vacuum systems and batch processing. There have been considerable efforts to efficiently generate large volumes of homogeneous atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasmas to develop environmentally friendly alternatives for surface treatment, thin film coating, sterilization, decontamination, etc. Many interesting questions have arisen that are related to both fundamental and applied research in this field. Many concern the generation of a large volume discharge which remains stable and uniform at atmospheric pressure. At this pressure, depending on the experimental conditions, either streamer or Townsend breakdown may occur. They respectively lead to micro-discharges or to one large radius discharge, Townsend or glow. However, the complexity arises from the formation of large radius streamers due to avalanche coupling and from the constriction of the glow discharge due to too low a current. Another difficulty is to visually distinguish many micro-discharges from one large radius discharge. Other questions relate to key chemical reactions in the plasma and at the surface. Experimental characterization and modelling also need to be developed to answer these questions. This cluster collects up-to-date research results related to the understanding of different discharges working at atmospheric pressure and the application to polymer surface activation and thin film coating. It presents different solutions for generating and sustaining diffuse discharges at atmospheric pressure. DC, low-frequency and radio-frequency excitations are considered in noble gases, nitrogen or air. Two specific methods developed to understand the transition from Townsend to streamer breakdown are also presented. They are based on the cross-correlation spectroscopy and an electrical

  20. Hypobaric Biology: Arabidopsis Gene Expression at Low Atmospheric Pressure1[w

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Anna-Lisa; Schuerger, Andrew C.; Popp, Michael P.; Richards, Jeffrey T.; Manak, Michael S.; Ferl, Robert J.

    2004-01-01

    As a step in developing an understanding of plant adaptation to low atmospheric pressures, we have identified genes central to the initial response of Arabidopsis to hypobaria. Exposure of plants to an atmosphere of 10 kPa compared with the sea-level pressure of 101 kPa resulted in the significant differential expression of more than 200 genes between the two treatments. Less than one-half of the genes induced by hypobaria are similarly affected by hypoxia, suggesting that response to hypobaria is unique and is more complex than an adaptation to the reduced partial pressure of oxygen inherent to hypobaric environments. In addition, the suites of genes induced by hypobaria confirm that water movement is a paramount issue at low atmospheric pressures, because many of gene products intersect abscisic acid-related, drought-induced pathways. A motivational constituent of these experiments is the need to address the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's plans to include plants as integral components of advanced life support systems. The design of bioregenerative life support systems seeks to maximize productivity within structures engineered to minimize mass and resource consumption. Currently, there are severe limitations to producing Earth-orbital, lunar, or Martian plant growth facilities that contain Earth-normal atmospheric pressures within light, transparent structures. However, some engineering limitations can be offset by growing plants in reduced atmospheric pressures. Characterization of the hypobaric response can therefore provide data to guide systems engineering development for bioregenerative life support, as well as lead to fundamental insights into aspects of desiccation metabolism and the means by which plants monitor water relations. PMID:14701916

  1. Collision-induced dissociation analysis of negative atmospheric ion adducts in atmospheric pressure corona discharge ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sekimoto, Kanako; Takayama, Mitsuo

    2013-05-01

    Collision-induced dissociation (CID) experiments were performed on atmospheric ion adducts [M + R](-) formed between various types of organic compounds M and atmospheric negative ions R(-) [such as O2(-), HCO3(-), COO(-)(COOH), NO2(-), NO3(-), and NO3(-)(HNO3)] in negative-ion mode atmospheric pressure corona discharge ionization (APCDI) mass spectrometry. All of the [M + R](-) adducts were fragmented to form deprotonated analytes [M - H](-) and/or atmospheric ions R(-), whose intensities in the CID spectra were dependent on the proton affinities of the [M - H](-) and R(-) fragments. Precursor ions [M + R](-) for which R(-) have higher proton affinities than [M - H](-) formed [M - H](-) as the dominant product. Furthermore, the CID of the adducts with HCO3(-) and NO3(-)(HNO3) led to other product ions such as [M + HO](-) and NO3(-), respectively. The fragmentation behavior of [M + R](-) for each R(-) observed was independent of analyte type (e.g., whether the analyte was aliphatic or aromatic, or possessed certain functional groups).

  2. Effects of long-term low atmospheric pressure on gas exchange and growth of lettuce

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yongkang; Guo, Shuangsheng; Dong, Wenping; Qin, Lifeng; Ai, Weidang; Lin, Shan

    2010-09-01

    The objectives of this research were to determine photosynthesis, evapotranspiration and growth of lettuce at long-term low atmospheric pressure. Lettuce ( Lactuca sativa L . cv. Youmaicai) plants were grown at 40 kPa total pressure (8.4 kPa p) or 101 kPa total pressure (20.9 kPa p) from seed to harvest for 35 days. Germination rate of lettuce seeds decreased by 7.6% at low pressure, although this was not significant. There was no significant difference in crop photosynthetic rate between hypobaria and ambient pressure during the 35-day study. The crop evapotranspiration rate was significantly lower at low pressure than that at ambient pressure from 20 to 30 days after planting (DAP), but it had no significant difference before 20 DAP or after 30 DAP. The growth cycle of lettuce plants at low pressure was delayed. At low pressure, lettuce leaves were curly at the seedling stage and this disappeared gradually as the plants grew. Ambient lettuce plants were yellow and had an epinastic growth at harvest. The shoot height, leaf number, leaf length and shoot/root ratio were lower at low pressure than those at ambient pressure, while leaf area and root growth increased. Total biomass of lettuce plants grown at two pressures had no significant difference. Ethylene production at low pressure decreased significantly by 38.8% compared with ambient pressure. There was no significant difference in microelements, nutritional phytochemicals and nitrate concentrations at the two treatments. This research shows that lettuce can be grown at long-term low pressure (40 kPa) without significant adverse effects on seed germination, gas exchange and plant growth. Furthermore, ethylene release was reduced in hypobaria.

  3. Io meteorology - How atmospheric pressure is controlled locally by volcanos and surface frosts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingersoll, A. P.

    1989-10-01

    The present modification of the Ingersoll et al. (1985) hydrodynamic model of the SO2 gas sublimation-driven flow from the day to the night side of Io includes the effects of nonuniform surface properties noted in observational studies. Calculations are conducted for atmospheric pressures, horizontal winds, sublimation rates, and condensation rates for such surface conditions as patchy and continuous frost cover, volcanic venting, surface temperature discontinuities, subsurface cold trapping, and the propagation of insolation into the frost. While pressure is found to follow local vapor pressure away from the plumes, it becomes higher inside them.

  4. Io meteorology - How atmospheric pressure is controlled locally by volcanos and surface frosts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingersoll, Andrew P.

    1989-01-01

    The present modification of the Ingersoll et al. (1985) hydrodynamic model of the SO2 gas sublimation-driven flow from the day to the night side of Io includes the effects of nonuniform surface properties noted in observational studies. Calculations are conducted for atmospheric pressures, horizontal winds, sublimation rates, and condensation rates for such surface conditions as patchy and continuous frost cover, volcanic venting, surface temperature discontinuities, subsurface cold trapping, and the propagation of insolation into the frost. While pressure is found to follow local vapor pressure away from the plumes, it becomes higher inside them.

  5. Low temperature plasma RF capacitive discharge in helium at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakki, A.; Fayrushin, I.; Kashapov, N.

    2016-01-01

    The paper describes Low temperature plasma RF capacitive discharge in helium at atmospheric pressure. The circuit has been done, to obtain output currentabout 90mA,and the maximum power was 100W, The frequency of the discharging was f = 40MHz.Twolamps (DУ-50) were used in power supply. Helium consumption was about 1.5l/m.

  6. Comparison of the sensitivity of mass spectrometry atmospheric pressure ionization techniques in the analysis of porphyrinoids.

    PubMed

    Swider, Paweł; Lewtak, Jan P; Gryko, Daniel T; Danikiewicz, Witold

    2013-10-01

    The porphyrinoids chemistry is greatly dependent on the data obtained in mass spectrometry. For this reason, it is essential to determine the range of applicability of mass spectrometry ionization methods. In this study, the sensitivity of three different atmospheric pressure ionization techniques, electrospray ionization, atmospheric pressure chemical ionization and atmospheric pressure photoionization, was tested for several porphyrinods and their metallocomplexes. Electrospray ionization method was shown to be the best ionization technique because of its high sensitivity for derivatives of cyanocobalamin, free-base corroles and porphyrins. In the case of metallocorroles and metalloporphyrins, atmospheric pressure photoionization with dopant proved to be the most sensitive ionization method. It was also shown that for relatively acidic compounds, particularly for corroles, the negative ion mode provides better sensitivity than the positive ion mode. The results supply a lot of relevant information on the methodology of porphyrinoids analysis carried out by mass spectrometry. The information can be useful in designing future MS or liquid chromatography-MS experiments.

  7. FORMATION OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS IN AN ATMOSPHERIC PRESSURE ETHYLENE DIFFUSION FLAME. (R825412)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    The microstructure of an atmospheric pressure, counterflow, sooting, flat, laminar ethylene diffusion flame has been studied experimentally by withdrawing samples from within the flame using a heated quartz microprobe coupled to an online gas chromatograph/mas...

  8. Atmospheric pressure glow discharge deposition of thermo-sensitive poly (N-isopropylacrylamide)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, M.; Tang, X. L.; Wen, D.; Chen, Y.; Qiu, G.

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, a self-made atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge reactor on intermediate frequency is brought forward and developed, which is equipped with power supply of 1-20 KHz, and the working gas is argon. The experimental results show that is a very stable and uniform atmospheric pressure glow discharge (APGD). Through a series of experiments, the waveforms of single pulse and multi-pulse glow discharge were both obtained. The voltage amplitude, discharge gap and dielectric material are studied, and the conditions of multi-pulse glow discharge are discussed as well. The novel methods of depositing poly (N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) coatings on the surface of glass slides and PS petri dish are provided by atmospheric pressure plasma polymerization. PNIPAAm can be obtained by plasma polymerization of N-isopropylacrylamide using the self-made equipment of atmospheric pressure plasma vapor treatment. The samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and water contact angle. SEM analysis has revealed that the PNIPAAm coatings were formed on the surface of the smooth glass slides. Further evaluation by using XPS, it has shown the presence of PNIPAAm. The wettability can be significantly modified by changing of the temperatures at above and below of the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) from the data of the contact angle test. These results have advantage for further application on the thermo-sensitive textile materials.

  9. Influence of atmospheric vapour pressure deficit on ozone responses of snap bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) genotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two genotypes of snapbean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), one known to be sensitive to ozone and the other resistant, were examined to determine their response to atmospheric vapor pressure deficit (VPD) in the presence and absence of ozone. Plants were grown in Outdoor Plant Environment Chambers in combin...

  10. Quasi-static vapor pressure measurements on reactive systems in inert atmosphere box

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, A. K.

    1968-01-01

    Apparatus makes vapor pressure measurements on air-sensitive systems in an inert atmosphere glove box. Once the apparatus is loaded with the sample and all connections made, all measuring operations may be performed outside the box. The apparatus is a single-tube adaptation of the double-tube quasi-static technique.

  11. Low-pressure and atmospheric pressure plasma polymerized silica-like films as primers for adhesive bonding of aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Munish

    2007-12-01

    Plasma processes, including plasma etching and plasma polymerization, were investigated for the pretreatment of aluminum prior to structural adhesive bonding. Since native oxides of aluminum are unstable in the presence of moisture at elevated temperature, surface engineering processes must usually be applied to aluminum prior to adhesive bonding to produce oxides that are stable. Plasma processes are attractive for surface engineering since they take place in the gas phase and do not produce effluents that are difficult to dispose off. Reactive species that are generated in plasmas have relatively short lifetimes and form inert products. The objective of this work was to develop plasma etching and plasma polymerization as environmentally compatible processes for surface engineering of aluminum. Plasma polymerized silica-like films of thickness less than 200 nm were deposited on pretreated aluminum substrates using hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) as the "monomer" and oxygen as a "co-reactant" in low-pressure RF-powered (13.6 MHz) reactor. Recently, plasma deposition at atmospheric pressure has become a promising technology because they do not require vacuum systems, can be applied to large objects with complex shapes, and adapted easily for continuous processing. Therefore, atmospheric pressure plasma processes were investigated and compared with their more traditional counterparts, low-pressure plasmas. Molecular structure and morphology of the plasma polymerized films were determined using surface analysis techniques such as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The effectiveness of plasma etching and plasma polymerization as surface engineering processes for aluminum were probed by determining the initial strength and durability of aluminum/epoxy lap joints prepared from substrates that were plasma pretreated, coated with silica-like film, and

  12. H2, He, and CO2 line-broadening coefficients, pressure shifts and temperature-dependence exponents for the HITRAN database. Part 1: SO2, NH3, HF, HCl, OCS and C2H2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilzewski, Jonas S.; Gordon, Iouli E.; Kochanov, Roman V.; Hill, Christian; Rothman, Laurence S.

    2016-01-01

    To increase the potential for use of the HITRAN database in astronomy, experimental and theoretical line-broadening coefficients, line shifts and temperature-dependence exponents of molecules of planetary interest broadened by H2, He, and CO2 have been assembled from available peer-reviewed sources. The collected data were used to create semi-empirical models so that every HITRAN line of the studied molecules has corresponding parameters. Since H2 and He are major constituents in the atmospheres of gas giants, and CO2 predominates in atmospheres of some rocky planets with volcanic activity, these spectroscopic data are important for remote sensing studies of planetary atmospheres. In this paper we make the first step in assembling complete sets of these parameters, thereby creating datasets for SO2, NH3, HF, HCl, OCS and C2H2.

  13. Influence of flowing helium gas on plasma plume formation in atmospheric pressure plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Yambe, Kiyoyuki; Konda, Kohmei; Ogura, Kazuo

    2015-05-15

    We have studied atmospheric pressure plasma generated using a quartz tube, helium gas, and a foil electrode by applying RF high voltage. The atmospheric pressure plasma in the form of a bullet is released as a plume into the atmosphere. The helium gas flowing out of quartz tube mixes with air, and the flow channel is composed of the regions of flowing helium gas and air. The plasma plume length is equivalent to the reachable distance of flowing helium gas. Although the amount of helium gas on the flow channel increases by increasing the inner diameter of quartz tube at the same gas flow velocity, the plasma plume length peaks at around 8 m/s of gas flow velocity, which is the result that a flow of helium gas is balanced with the amount of gas. The plasma plume is formed at the boundary region where the flow of helium gas is kept to the wall of the air.

  14. [High pressure processing of spices in atmosphere of helium for decrease of microbiological contamination].

    PubMed

    Windyga, Bozena; Fonberg-Broczek, Monika; Sciezyńska, Halina; Skapska, Sylwia; Górecka, Krystyna; Grochowska, Anna; Morawski, Andrzej; Szczepek, Janusz; Karłowski, Kazimierz; Porowski, Sylwester

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the microbiological decontamination of coriander and caraway when HPP technology was applied in elevated temperature in helium atmosphere. The HPP and heat treatment was conducted for 30 minutes at 800 and 1 000 MPa and temperature range was 60 - 121 degrees C. Contamination with aerobic mesophilic bacteria was decreased by about 2 logarithmic cycles. Total elimination of coliform and yeast and moulds was observed. The efficacy of HPP treatment under helium atmosphere depended on the content of the water in tested samples. It can be concluded that high pressure treatment under atmosphere of helium, combination of proper high pressure and time improved the microbiological quality of spices.

  15. Relation between plasma plume density and gas flow velocity in atmospheric pressure plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Yambe, Kiyoyuki; Taka, Shogo; Ogura, Kazuo

    2014-04-15

    We have studied atmospheric pressure plasma generated using a quartz tube, helium gas, and copper foil electrode by applying RF high voltage. The atmospheric pressure plasma in the form of a bullet is released as a plume into the atmosphere. To study the properties of the plasma plume, the plasma plume current is estimated from the difference in currents on the circuit, and the drift velocity is measured using a photodetector. The relation of the plasma plume density n{sub plu}, which is estimated from the current and the drift velocity, and the gas flow velocity v{sub gas} is examined. It is found that the dependence of the density on the gas flow velocity has relations of n{sub plu} ∝ log(v{sub gas}). However, the plasma plume density in the laminar flow is higher than that in the turbulent flow. Consequently, in the laminar flow, the density increases with increasing the gas flow velocity.

  16. Growth of a Bacterium Under a High-Pressure Oxy-Helium Atmosphere

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Craig D.

    1979-01-01

    Growth of a barotolerant marine organism, EP-4, in a glutamate medium equilibrated with an oxy-helium atmosphere at 500 atmospheres (atm; total pressure) (20°C) was compared with control cultures incubated at hydrostatic pressures of 1 and 500 atm. Relative to the 1-atm control culture, incubation of EP-4 at 500 atm in the absence of an atmosphere resulted in an approximately fivefold reduction in the growth rate and a significant but time variant reduction in the rate constants for the incorporation of substrate into cell material and respiration. Distinct from the pressurized control and separate from potential effects of dissolution of helium upon decompression of subsamples, exposure of the organism to high-pressure oxy-helium resulted in either a loss of viability of a large fraction of the cells or the arrest of growth for one-third of the experimental period. After these initial effects, however, the culture grew exponentially at a rate which was three times greater than the 500-atm control culture. The rate constant for the incorporation of substrate into cell material was also enhanced twofold in the presence of high-pressure oxy-helium. Dissolved oxygen was well controlled in all of the cultures, minimizing any potential toxic effects of this gas. PMID:16345337

  17. Detection of atmospheric pressure loading using very long baseline interferometry measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandam, T. M.; Herring, T. A.

    1994-01-01

    Loading of the Earth by the temporal redistribution of global atmospheric mass is likely to displace the positions of geodetic monuments by tens of millimeters both vertically and horizontally. Estimates of these displacements are determined by convolving National Meteorological Center (NMC) global values of atmospheric surface pressure with Farrell's elastic Green's functions. An analysis of the distances between radio telescopes determined by very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) between 1984 and 1992 reveals that in many of the cases studied there is a significant contribution to baseline length change due to atmospheric pressure loading. Our analysis covers intersite distances of between 1000 and 10,000 km and is restricted to those baselines measured more than 100 times. Accounting for the load effects (after first removing a best fit slope) reduces the weighted root-mean-square (WRMS) scatter of the baseline length residuals on 11 of the 22 baselines investigated. The slight degradation observed in the WRMS scatter on the remaining baselines is largely consistent with the expected statistical fluctuations when a small correction is applied to a data set having a much larger random noise. The results from all baselines are consistent with approximately 60% of the computed pressure contribution being present in the VLBI length determinations. Site dependent coefficients determined by fitting local pressure to the theoretical radial displacement are found to reproduce the deformation caused by the regional pressure to within 25% for most inland sites. The coefficients are less reliable at near coastal and island stations.

  18. Airborne and ground based lidar measurements of the atmospheric pressure profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korb, C. Laurence; Schwemmer, Geary K.; Dombrowski, Mark; Weng, Chi Y.

    1989-01-01

    The first high accuracy remote measurements of the atmospheric pressure profile have been made. The measurements were made with a differential absorption lidar system that utilizes tunable alexandrite lasers. The absorption in the trough between two lines in the oxygen A-band near 760 nm was used for probing the atmosphere. Measurements of the two-dimensional structure of the pressure field were made in the troposphere from an aircraft looking down. Also, measurements of the one-dimensional structure were made from the ground looking up. Typical pressure accuracies for the aircraft measurements were 1.5-2 mbar with a 30-m vertical resolution and a 100-shot average (20 s), which corresponds to a 2-km horizontal resolution. Typical accuracies for the upward viewing ground based measurements were 2.0 mbar for a 30-m resolution and a 100-shot average.

  19. Detonation propulsion experiments and theory. [for spacecraft in high pressure planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Back, L. H.; Dowler, W. L.; Varsi, G.

    1982-01-01

    Test data are presented for the use of a single detonation of explosives in long-cone, short-cone, straight, and firing-plug nozzles to provide propulsion in a simulated Jupiter atmosphere, as well as the ambient gases N, CO2 and He. The long-cone nozzle yielded a progressive increase with ambient pressure for the higher molecular weight gases CO2 and N, while the lower molecular weight He and simulated Jupiter atmosphere showed a specific pulse decrease with increasing ambient pressure. The short-plug nozzle yielded a small specific impulse reduction with increasing ambient pressure, and its results were found to be nearly independent of ambient gas molecular weight. All data gathered are analyzed by using first principles, approximate blast wave theory predictions, and two-dimensional numerical calculations. Rarefaction and oscillatory wave phenomena are found to significantly influence specific impulse.

  20. Weather forecasting by insects: modified sexual behaviour in response to atmospheric pressure changes.

    PubMed

    Pellegrino, Ana Cristina; Peñaflor, Maria Fernanda Gomes Villalba; Nardi, Cristiane; Bezner-Kerr, Wayne; Guglielmo, Christopher G; Bento, José Maurício Simões; McNeil, Jeremy N

    2013-01-01

    Prevailing abiotic conditions may positively or negatively impact insects at both the individual and population levels. For example while moderate rainfall and wind velocity may provide conditions that favour development, as well as movement within and between habitats, high winds and heavy rains can significantly decrease life expectancy. There is some evidence that insects adjust their behaviours associated with flight, mating and foraging in response to changes in barometric pressure. We studied changes in different mating behaviours of three taxonomically unrelated insects, the curcurbit beetle, Diabrotica speciosa (Coleoptera), the true armyworm moth, Pseudaletia unipuncta (Lepidoptera) and the potato aphid, Macrosiphum euphorbiae (Hemiptera), when subjected to natural or experimentally manipulated changes in atmospheric pressure. In response to decreasing barometric pressure, male beetles exhibited decreased locomotory activity in a Y-tube olfactometer with female pheromone extracts. However, when placed in close proximity to females, they exhibited reduced courtship sequences and the precopulatory period. Under the same situations, females of the true armyworm and the potato aphid exhibited significantly reduced calling behaviour. Neither the movement of male beetles nor the calling of armyworm females differed between stable and increasing atmospheric pressure conditions. However, in the case of the armyworm there was a significant decrease in the incidence of mating under rising atmospheric conditions, suggesting an effect on male behaviour. When atmospheric pressure rose, very few M. euphorbiae oviparae called. This was similar to the situation observed under decreasing conditions, and consequently very little mating was observed in this species except under stable conditions. All species exhibited behavioural modifications, but there were interspecific differences related to size-related flight ability and the diel periodicity of mating activity. We

  1. Weather Forecasting by Insects: Modified Sexual Behaviour in Response to Atmospheric Pressure Changes

    PubMed Central

    Pellegrino, Ana Cristina; Peñaflor, Maria Fernanda Gomes Villalba; Nardi, Cristiane; Bezner-Kerr, Wayne; Guglielmo, Christopher G.; Bento, José Maurício Simões; McNeil, Jeremy N.

    2013-01-01

    Prevailing abiotic conditions may positively or negatively impact insects at both the individual and population levels. For example while moderate rainfall and wind velocity may provide conditions that favour development, as well as movement within and between habitats, high winds and heavy rains can significantly decrease life expectancy. There is some evidence that insects adjust their behaviours associated with flight, mating and foraging in response to changes in barometric pressure. We studied changes in different mating behaviours of three taxonomically unrelated insects, the curcurbit beetle, Diabrotica speciosa (Coleoptera), the true armyworm moth, Pseudaletia unipuncta (Lepidoptera) and the potato aphid, Macrosiphum euphorbiae (Hemiptera), when subjected to natural or experimentally manipulated changes in atmospheric pressure. In response to decreasing barometric pressure, male beetles exhibited decreased locomotory activity in a Y-tube olfactometer with female pheromone extracts. However, when placed in close proximity to females, they exhibited reduced courtship sequences and the precopulatory period. Under the same situations, females of the true armyworm and the potato aphid exhibited significantly reduced calling behaviour. Neither the movement of male beetles nor the calling of armyworm females differed between stable and increasing atmospheric pressure conditions. However, in the case of the armyworm there was a significant decrease in the incidence of mating under rising atmospheric conditions, suggesting an effect on male behaviour. When atmospheric pressure rose, very few M. euphorbiae oviparae called. This was similar to the situation observed under decreasing conditions, and consequently very little mating was observed in this species except under stable conditions. All species exhibited behavioural modifications, but there were interspecific differences related to size-related flight ability and the diel periodicity of mating activity. We

  2. Photosynthesis and respiration of a wheat stand at reduced atmospheric pressure and reduced oxygen.

    PubMed

    Corey, K A; Barta, D J; Henninger, D L

    1997-01-01

    A 34-day functional test was conducted in Johnson Space Center's Variable Pressure Growth Chamber (VPGC) to determine responses of a wheat stand to reduced pressure (70 kPa) and modified partial pressures of carbon dioxide and oxygen. Reduced pressure episodes were generally six to seven hours in duration, were conducted at reduced ppO2 (14.7 kPa), and were interrupted with longer durations of ambient pressure (101 kPa). Daily measurements of stand net photosynthesis (Pn) and dark respiration (DR) were made at both pressures using a ppCO2 of 121 Pa. Corrections derived from leakage tests were applied to reduced pressure measurements. Rates of Pn at reduced pressure averaged over the complete test were 14.6% higher than at ambient pressure, but rates of DR were unaffected. Further reductions in ppO2 were achieved with a molecular sieve and were used to determine if Pn was enhanced by lowered O2 or by lowered pressure. Decreased ppO2 resulted in enhanced rates of Pn, regardless of pressure, but the actual response was dependent on the ratio of ppO2/ppCO2. Over the range of ppO2/ppCO2 of 80 to 200, the rate of Pn declined linearly. Rate of DR was unaffected over the same range and by dissolved O2 levels down to 3.1 ppm, suggesting that normal rhizosphere and canopy respiration occur at atmospheric ppO2 levels as low as 11 kPa. Partial separation of effects attributable to oxygen and those related to reduced pressure (e.g. enhanced diffusion of CO2) was achieved from analysis of a CO2 drawdown experiment. Results will be used for design and implementation of studies involving complete crop growth tests at reduced pressure.

  3. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Contrasting characteristics of sub-microsecond pulsed atmospheric air and atmospheric pressure helium-oxygen glow discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, J. L.; Liu, D. X.; Iza, F.; Rong, M. Z.; Kong, M. G.

    2010-01-01

    Glow discharges in air are often considered to be the ultimate low-temperature atmospheric pressure plasmas for numerous chamber-free applications. This is due to the ubiquitous presence of air and the perceived abundance of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in air plasmas. In this paper, sub-microsecond pulsed atmospheric air plasmas are shown to produce a low concentration of excited oxygen atoms but an abundance of excited nitrogen species, UV photons and ozone molecules. This contrasts sharply with the efficient production of excited oxygen atoms in comparable helium-oxygen discharges. Relevant reaction chemistry analysed with a global model suggests that collisional excitation of O2 by helium metastables is significantly more efficient than electron dissociative excitation of O2, electron excitation of O and ion-ion recombination. These results suggest different practical uses of the two oxygen-containing atmospheric discharges, with air plasmas being well suited for nitrogen and UV based chemistry and He-O2 plasmas for excited atomic oxygen based chemistry.

  4. Pulmonary and heart diseases with inhalation of atmospheric pressure plasma flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Takamichi; Murata, Shigeru; Kishimoto, Takumi; Tsutsui, Chihiro; Kondo, Akane; Mori, Akira

    2012-10-01

    We examined blood pressure in the abdominal aorta of mini pig under plasma inhalation of atmospheric pressure plasma flow. The coaxial atmospheric pressure plasma source has a tungsten wire inside a glass capillary, that is surrounded by a grounded tubular electrode. Plasma was generated under the following conditions; applied voltage: 8 kVpp, frequency: 3 kHz, and helium (He) gas flow rate: 1 L/min. On the other hand, sphygmomanometry of a blood vessel proceeded using a device comprising a disposable force transducer, and a bedside monitor for simultaneous electrocardiography and signal pressure measurements. We directly measured Nitric oxide (NO) using a catheter-type NO sensor placed in the coronary sinus through an angiography catheter from the abdomen. Blood pressure decreased from 110/65 to 90/40 mm Hg in the animals in vivo under plasma inhalation. The NO concentration in the abdominal aorta like the blood pressure, reached a maximum value at about 40 s and then gradually decreased.

  5. Comparison of atmospheric pressure chemical ionization, electrospray ionization, and atmospheric pressure photoionization for the determination of cyclosporin A in rat plasma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ganfeng; Hsieh, Yunsheng; Korfmacher, Walter A

    2005-01-15

    Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization was compared with electrospray ionization and atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) as an interface of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) for the determination of cyclosporin A (CsA) in biological fluids in support of in vivo pharmacodynamic studies. These ion sources were investigated in terms of their suitability and sensitivity for the detection of CsA. The effects of the eluent flow rate and composition as well as the nebulizer temperatures on the photoionization efficiency of CsA in the positive ion mode under normal-phase HPLC conditions were explored. The ionization mechanism in the APPI environment with and without the use of the dopant was studied using two test compounds and a few solvent systems employed for normal-phase chromatography. The test compounds were observed to be ionized mainly by proton transfer with the self-protonated solvent molecules produced through photon irradiation. Furthermore, ion suppression due to sample matrix interference in the normal-phase HPLC-APPI-MS/MS system was monitored by the postcolumn infusion technique. The applicability of these proposed HPLC-API-MS/MS approaches for the determination of CsA at low nanogram per milliliter levels in rat plasma was examined. These proposed methods were then compared with respect to specificity, linearity, detection limit, and accuracy.

  6. LC-MS analysis of estradiol in human serum and endometrial tissue: Comparison of electrospray ionization, atmospheric pressure chemical ionization and atmospheric pressure photoionization.

    PubMed

    Keski-Rahkonen, Pekka; Huhtinen, Kaisa; Desai, Reena; Harwood, D Tim; Handelsman, David J; Poutanen, Matti; Auriola, Seppo

    2013-09-01

    Accurate measurement of estradiol (E2) is important in clinical diagnostics and research. High sensitivity methods are critical for specimens with E2 concentrations at low picomolar levels, such as serum of men, postmenopausal women and children. Achieving the required assay performance with LC-MS is challenging due to the non-polar structure and low proton affinity of E2. Previous studies suggest that ionization has a major role for the performance of E2 measurement, but comparisons of different ionization techniques for the analysis of clinical samples are not available. In this study, female serum and endometrium tissue samples were used to compare electrospray ionization (ESI), atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) and atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) in both polarities. APPI was found to have the most potential for E2 analysis, with a quantification limit of 1 fmol on-column. APCI and ESI could be employed in negative polarity, although being slightly less sensitive than APPI. In the presence of biological background, ESI was found to be highly susceptible to ion suppression, while APCI and APPI were largely unaffected by the sample matrix. Irrespective of the ionization technique, background interferences were observed when using the multiple reaction monitoring transitions commonly employed for E2 (m/z 271 > 159; m/z 255 > 145). These unidentified interferences were most severe in serum samples, varied in intensity between ionization techniques and required efficient chromatographic separation in order to achieve specificity for E2.

  7. Atmospheric pressure as a natural climate regulator for a terrestrial planet with a biosphere

    PubMed Central

    Li, King-Fai; Pahlevan, Kaveh; Kirschvink, Joseph L.; Yung, Yuk L.

    2009-01-01

    Lovelock and Whitfield suggested in 1982 that, as the luminosity of the Sun increases over its life cycle, biologically enhanced silicate weathering is able to reduce the concentration of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) so that the Earth's surface temperature is maintained within an inhabitable range. As this process continues, however, between 100 and 900 million years (Ma) from now the CO2 concentration will reach levels too low for C3 and C4 photosynthesis, signaling the end of the solar-powered biosphere. Here, we show that atmospheric pressure is another factor that adjusts the global temperature by broadening infrared absorption lines of greenhouse gases. A simple model including the reduction of atmospheric pressure suggests that the life span of the biosphere can be extended at least 2.3 Ga into the future, more than doubling previous estimates. This has important implications for seeking extraterrestrial life in the Universe. Space observations in the infrared region could test the hypothesis that atmospheric pressure regulates the surface temperature on extrasolar planets. PMID:19487662

  8. Atmospheric pressure as a natural climate regulator for a terrestrial planet with a biosphere.

    PubMed

    Li, King-Fai; Pahlevan, Kaveh; Kirschvink, Joseph L; Yung, Yuk L

    2009-06-16

    Lovelock and Whitfield suggested in 1982 that, as the luminosity of the Sun increases over its life cycle, biologically enhanced silicate weathering is able to reduce the concentration of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO(2)) so that the Earth's surface temperature is maintained within an inhabitable range. As this process continues, however, between 100 and 900 million years (Ma) from now the CO(2) concentration will reach levels too low for C(3) and C(4) photosynthesis, signaling the end of the solar-powered biosphere. Here, we show that atmospheric pressure is another factor that adjusts the global temperature by broadening infrared absorption lines of greenhouse gases. A simple model including the reduction of atmospheric pressure suggests that the life span of the biosphere can be extended at least 2.3 Ga into the future, more than doubling previous estimates. This has important implications for seeking extraterrestrial life in the Universe. Space observations in the infrared region could test the hypothesis that atmospheric pressure regulates the surface temperature on extrasolar planets.

  9. Atmospheric pressure as a natural climate regulator for a terrestrial planet with a biosphere.

    PubMed

    Li, King-Fai; Pahlevan, Kaveh; Kirschvink, Joseph L; Yung, Yuk L

    2009-06-16

    Lovelock and Whitfield suggested in 1982 that, as the luminosity of the Sun increases over its life cycle, biologically enhanced silicate weathering is able to reduce the concentration of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO(2)) so that the Earth's surface temperature is maintained within an inhabitable range. As this process continues, however, between 100 and 900 million years (Ma) from now the CO(2) concentration will reach levels too low for C(3) and C(4) photosynthesis, signaling the end of the solar-powered biosphere. Here, we show that atmospheric pressure is another factor that adjusts the global temperature by broadening infrared absorption lines of greenhouse gases. A simple model including the reduction of atmospheric pressure suggests that the life span of the biosphere can be extended at least 2.3 Ga into the future, more than doubling previous estimates. This has important implications for seeking extraterrestrial life in the Universe. Space observations in the infrared region could test the hypothesis that atmospheric pressure regulates the surface temperature on extrasolar planets. PMID:19487662

  10. Effect of pressure broadening on molecular absorption cross sections in exoplanetary atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedges, Christina; Madhusudhan, Nikku

    2016-05-01

    Spectroscopic observations of exoplanets are leading to unprecedented constraints on their atmospheric compositions. However, molecular abundances derived from spectra are degenerate with the absorption cross-sections which form critical input data in atmospheric models. Therefore, it is important to quantify the uncertainties in molecular cross-sections to reliably estimate the uncertainties in derived molecular abundances. However, converting line lists into cross-sections via line broadening involves a series of prescriptions for which the uncertainties are not well understood. We investigate and quantify the effects of various factors involved in line broadening in exoplanetary atmospheres - the profile evaluation width, pressure versus thermal broadening, broadening agent, spectral resolution and completeness of broadening parameters - on molecular absorption cross-sections. We use H2O as a case study as it has the most complete absorption line data. For low-resolution spectra (R ≲ 100) for representative temperatures and pressures (T ˜ 500-3000 K, P ≲ 1 atm) of H2-rich exoplanetary atmospheres, we find the median difference in cross-sections (δ) introduced by various aspects of pressure broadening to be ≲1 per cent. For medium resolutions (R ≲ 5000), including those attainable with James Webb Space Telescope, we find that δ can be up to 40 per cent. For high resolutions (R ˜ 105), δ can be ≳100 per cent, reaching ≳1000 per cent for low temperatures (T ≲ 500 K) and high pressures (P ≳ 1 atm). The effect is higher still for self-broadening. We generate a homogeneous data base of absorption cross-sections of molecules of relevance to exoplanetary atmospheres for which high-temperature line lists are available, particularly H2O, CO, CH4, CO2, HCN, and NH3.

  11. The initial responses of hot liquid water released under low atmospheric pressures: Experimental insights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bargery, Alistair Simon; Lane, Stephen J.; Barrett, Alexander; Wilson, Lionel; Gilbert, Jennie S.

    2010-11-01

    Experiments have been performed to simulate the shallow ascent and surface release of water and brines under low atmospheric pressure. Atmospheric pressure was treated as an independent variable and water temperature and vapor pressure were examined as a function of total pressure variation down to low pressures. The physical and thermal responses of water to reducing pressure were monitored with pressure transducers, temperature sensors and visible imaging. Data were obtained for pure water and for solutions with dissolved NaCl or CO 2. The experiments showed the pressure conditions under which the water remained liquid, underwent a rapid phase change to the gas state by boiling, and then solidified because of removal of latent heat. Liquid water is removed from phase equilibrium by decompression. Solid, liquid and gaseous water are present simultaneously, and not at the 611 Pa triple point, because dynamic interactions between the phases maintain unstable temperature gradients. After phase changes stop, the system reverts to equilibrium with its surroundings. Surface and shallow subsurface pressure conditions were simulated for Mars and the icy satellites of the outer Solar System. Freezing by evaporation in the absence of wind on Mars is shown to be unlikely for pure water at pressures greater than c. 670 Pa, and for saline solutions at pressures greater than c. 610 Pa. The physical nature of ice that forms depends on the salt content. Ice formed from saline water at pressures less than c. 610 Pa could be similar to terrestrial sea ice. Ice formed from pure water at pressures less than c. 100 Pa develops a low thermal conductivity and a 'honeycomb' structure created by sublimation. This ice could have a density as low as c. 450 kg m -3 and a thermal conductivity as low as 1.6 W m -1 K -1, and is highly reflective, more akin to snow than the clear ice from which it grew. The physical properties of ice formed from either pure or saline water at low pressures will

  12. PECVD of SiOC Films Using a Sheet-type Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Kouta; Tanaka, Kenji; Shirafuji, Tatsuru

    2015-09-01

    Packaging industries have used SiOC thin films for gas barrier coatings on the membranes for packaging foods, drug, and so on. PECVD is the most extensively employed method for preparing the SiOC films. However, PECVD is a process performed at a low pressure in general and requires expensive vacuum systems, especially in the case of large area coatings. Atmospheric pressure PECVD is a candidate to overcome this issue. If we simply apply atmospheric pressure plasma to CVD processes, however, we will encounter the problem of particle formation because of the high collision frequency in the environment of atmospheric pressure. In this work, we have developed a reactor that utilizes a unique gas-flow scheme for avoiding the particle formation. We have successfully deposited SiOC films by using this reactor, in which the source material is hexamethyldisiloxane and discharge/carrier gas is He. XPS measurements on the SiOC films have revealed that the films contain relatively higher concentrations of unfavorable methyl groups that reduce gas barrier performances. However, no particulates are involved in and on the deposited films as long as characterizing the films with eye observation and with transmission electron microscopy.

  13. Simulation of atmospheric pressure microplasma in Ar on the basis of heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamasaki, Masanori; Yagisawa, Takashi; Tatsumi, Tetsuya; Makabe, Toshiaki

    2011-10-01

    In a decade, atmospheric pressure microplasmas have been applied to wide range of fields based on the characteristics of high plasma density. The underlying mechanism for sustaining a stable glow discharge, however, is not well understood. In this study, the microplasma characteristics at atmospheric pressure are numerically investigated, particularly focusing on a heat transfer in the whole system. We consider a capacitively coupled plasma with the characteristic size of several hundred micrometers, driven by radio frequency (13.56 MHz) in a cylindrical reactor under atmospheric pressure of pure Ar. A plasma fluid model is coupled with a neutral gas dynamics model including the temperature and flow in gas phase. A wall heating caused by energetic ions and metastables coming from the plasma is also incorporated in the model. Under a constant gas pressure, the local depletion of a neutral gas density occurs due to a gas heating, simply shown by ideal gas law. The influence of the local gas density on the structure of the microplasma will be mainly discussed in a periodic steady state.

  14. Characteristics of radio-frequency atmospheric pressure dielectric-barrier discharge with dielectric electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Hussain, S. E-mail: shussainuos@yahoo.com; Qazi, H. I. A.; Badar, M. A.

    2014-03-15

    An experimental investigation to characterize the properties and highlight the benefits of atmospheric pressure radio-frequency dielectric-barrier discharge (rf DBD) with dielectric electrodes fabricated by anodizing aluminium substrate is presented. The current-voltage characteristics and millisecond images are used to distinguish the α and γ modes. This atmospheric rf DBD is observed to retain the discharge volume without constriction in γ mode. Optical emission spectroscopy demonstrates that the large discharge current leads to more abundant reactive species in this plasma source.

  15. Simulation Tool for Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma Actuators at Atmospheric and Sub-Atmospheric Pressures: SBIR Phase I Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Likhanskii, Alexandre

    2012-01-01

    This report is the final report of a SBIR Phase I project. It is identical to the final report submitted, after some proprietary information of administrative nature has been removed. The development of a numerical simulation tool for dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma actuator is reported. The objectives of the project were to analyze and predict DBD operation at wide range of ambient gas pressures. It overcomes the limitations of traditional DBD codes which are limited to low-speed applications and have weak prediction capabilities. The software tool allows DBD actuator analysis and prediction for subsonic to hypersonic flow regime. The simulation tool is based on the VORPAL code developed by Tech-X Corporation. VORPAL's capability of modeling DBD plasma actuator at low pressures (0.1 to 10 torr) using kinetic plasma modeling approach, and at moderate to atmospheric pressures (1 to 10 atm) using hydrodynamic plasma modeling approach, were demonstrated. In addition, results of experiments with pulsed+bias DBD configuration that were performed for validation purposes are reported.

  16. Effects that internal gravity waves from convective clouds have on atmospheric pressure and spatial temperature-disturbance distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kshevetskii, S. P.; Kulichkov, S. N.

    2015-01-01

    Experimental data on variations in atmospheric surface pressure in the region of thunderstorm phenomena are analyzed. A relationship between variations in atmospheric pressure at the land surface and those in tropospheric temperature has been found, and the relation between the vertical distribution of tropospheric temperature and variations in atmospheric pressure at the land surface is studied. The propagation of internal gravity waves caused by atmospheric heating due to water-vapor condensation during the formation of a convective cloud is simulated. The results of calculations show that the lifetime of these internal gravity waves may significantly exceed the lifetime of this cloud. It is shown that the form of the disturbance of atmospheric pressure under such a convective cloud is a sequence of minimum and maximum pressure variations and the amplitude of maxima may exceed that of minima.

  17. Airborne Lidar measurements of the atmospheric pressure profile with tunable Alexandrite lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korb, C. L.; Schwemmer, G. K.; Dombrowski, M.; Milrod, J.; Walden, H.

    1986-01-01

    The first remote measurements of the atmospheric pressure profile made from an airborne platform are described. The measurements utilize a differential absorption lidar and tunable solid state Alexandrite lasers. The pressure measurement technique uses a high resolution oxygen A band where the absorption is highly pressure sensitive due to collision broadening. Absorption troughs and regions of minimum absorption were used between pairs of stongly absorption lines for these measurements. The trough technique allows the measurement to be greatly desensitized to the effects of laser frequency instabilities. The lidar system was set up to measure pressure with the on-line laser tuned to the absorption trough at 13147.3/cm and with the reference laser tuned to a nonabsorbing frequency near 13170.0/cm. The lidar signal returns were sampled with a 200 range gate (30 vertical resoltion) and averaged over 100 shots.

  18. Could Nano-Structured Materials Enable the Improved Pressure Vessels for Deep Atmospheric Probes?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, D.; Fuentes, A.; Bienstock, B.; Arnold, J. O.

    2005-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on the use of Nano-Structured Materials to enable pressure vessel structures for deep atmospheric probes is shown. The topics include: 1) High Temperature/Pressure in Key X-Environments; 2) The Case for Use of Nano-Structured Materials Pressure Vessel Design; 3) Carbon based Nanomaterials; 4) Nanotube production & purification; 5) Nanomechanics of Carbon Nanotubes; 6) CNT-composites: Example (Polymer); 7) Effect of Loading sequence on Composite with 8% by volume; 8) Models for Particulate Reinforced Composites; 9) Fullerene/Ti Composite for High Strength-Insulating Layer; 10) Fullerene/Epoxy Composite for High Strength-Insulating Layer; 11) Models for Continuous Fiber Reinforced Composites; 12) Tensile Strength for Discontinuous Fiber Composite; 13) Ti + SWNT Composites: Thermal/Mechanical; 14) Ti + SWNT Composites: Tensile Strength; and 15) Nano-structured Shell for Pressure Vessels.

  19. High frequency glow discharges at atmospheric pressure with micro-structured electrode arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baars-Hibbe, L.; Sichler, P.; Schrader, C.; Lucas, N.; Gericke, K.-H.; Büttgenbach, S.

    2005-02-01

    Micro-structured electrode (MSE) arrays allow the generation of large-area uniform glow discharges over a wide pressure range up to atmospheric pressure. The electrode widths, thicknesses and distances in the micrometre range are realized by means of modern micro-machining and galvanic techniques. The electrode distance, the gap width d, is small enough to generate sufficiently high electric field strengths to ignite gas discharges by applying only moderate radio frequency (RF, 13.56 MHz) voltages (80-390 V in Ne, He, Ar, N2 and air). The non-thermal plasma system is characterized by a special probe measuring the electric parameters. We tested MSE arrays with d = 70, 25 and 15 µm. The MSE driven plasmas show a different behaviour from conventional RF discharge plasmas. Due to the very small electrode gap width we can describe the behaviour of the charged particles in the RF field of our system with the dc Townsend breakdown theory, depending on the pressure range and gas. With decreasing pressure, the gas discharges, especially in Ne and He, are increasingly dominated by field electron emission. With the MSE arrays as plasma sources several applications were developed and successfully tested, e.g. decomposition of waste gases and sterilization of food packaging materials at atmospheric pressure.

  20. Super-atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometry and its application to ultrafast online protein digestion analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, L C; Ninomiya, S; Hiraoka, K

    2016-06-01

    Pressure is a key parameter for an ionization source. In this Special Feature article, Lee Chuin Chen and colleagues review super-atmospheric pressure ionization MS with electrospray, corona-discharge-based chemical ionization, and field desorption. They routinely run their mass spectrometer with ion source pressures ranging from several to several tens of atmospheres. A number of strategies have been used to preserve the high vacuum of the instrument while working with a high-pressure (HP) ion source. A recent prototype uses a booster pump with variable pumping speed added to the first pumping stage of the mass spectrometer to regulate a constant vacuum pressure. Further, a new HP-ESI source allowing rapid (a few seconds) online protein digestion MS is also reported. Dr. Lee Chuin Chen is Associate Professor in the Department of Interdisciplinary Research at the University of Yamanashi (Yamanashi, Japan). His main research interest is the development of novel mass spectrometric methods for in-situ medical diagnosis.

  1. Super-atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometry and its application to ultrafast online protein digestion analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, L C; Ninomiya, S; Hiraoka, K

    2016-06-01

    Pressure is a key parameter for an ionization source. In this Special Feature article, Lee Chuin Chen and colleagues review super-atmospheric pressure ionization MS with electrospray, corona-discharge-based chemical ionization, and field desorption. They routinely run their mass spectrometer with ion source pressures ranging from several to several tens of atmospheres. A number of strategies have been used to preserve the high vacuum of the instrument while working with a high-pressure (HP) ion source. A recent prototype uses a booster pump with variable pumping speed added to the first pumping stage of the mass spectrometer to regulate a constant vacuum pressure. Further, a new HP-ESI source allowing rapid (a few seconds) online protein digestion MS is also reported. Dr. Lee Chuin Chen is Associate Professor in the Department of Interdisciplinary Research at the University of Yamanashi (Yamanashi, Japan). His main research interest is the development of novel mass spectrometric methods for in-situ medical diagnosis. PMID:27270871

  2. The effect of meteorological data on atmospheric pressure loading corrections in VLBI data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balidakis, Kyriakos; Glaser, Susanne; Karbon, Maria; Soja, Benedikt; Nilsson, Tobias; Lu, Cuixian; Anderson, James; Liu, Li; Andres Mora-Diaz, Julian; Raposo-Pulido, Virginia; Xu, Minghui; Heinkelmann, Robert; Schuh, Harald

    2015-04-01

    Earth's crustal deformation is a manifestation of numerous geophysical processes, which entail the atmosphere and ocean general circulation and tidal attraction, climate change, and the hydrological circle. The present study deals with the elastic deformations induced by atmospheric pressure variations. At geodetic sites, APL (Atmospheric Pressure Loading) results in displacements covering a wide range of temporal scales which is undesirable when rigorous geodetic/geophysical analysis is intended. Hence, it is of paramount importance that the APL signal are removed at the observation level in the space geodetic data analysis. In this study, elastic non-tidal components of loading displacements were calculated in the local topocentric frame for all VLBI (Very Long Baseline Interferometry) stations with respect to the center-of-figure of the solid Earth surface and the center-of-mass of the total Earth system. The response of the Earth to the load variation at the surface was computed by convolving Farrell Green's function with the homogenized in situ surface pressure observations (in the time span 1979-2014) after the subtraction of the reference pressure and the S1, S2 and S3 thermal tidal signals. The reference pressure was calculated through a hypsometric adjustment of the absolute pressure level determined from World Meteorological Organization stations in the vicinity of each VLBI observatory. The tidal contribution was calculated following the 2010 International Earth Rotation and Reference Systems Service conventions. Afterwards, this approach was implemented into the VLBI software VieVS@GFZ and the entirety of available VLBI sessions was analyzed. We rationalize our new approach on the basis that the potential error budget is substantially reduced, since several common errors are not applicable in our approach, e.g. those due to the finite resolution of NWM (Numerical Weather Models), the accuracy of the orography model necessary for adjusting the former as

  3. Black pepper powder microbiological quality improvement using DBD systems in atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabowski, Maciej; Hołub, Marcin; Balcerak, Michał; Kalisiak, Stanisław; Dąbrowski, Waldemar

    2015-07-01

    Preliminary results are given regarding black pepper powder decontamination using dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma in atmospheric pressure. Three different DBD reactor constructions were investigated, both packaged and unpackaged material was treated. Due to potential, industrial applications, in addition to microbiological results, water activity, loss of mass and the properties of packaging material, regarding barrier properties were investigated. Argon based treatment of packed pepper with DBD reactor configuration is proposed and satisfactory results are presented for treatment time of 5 min or less. Contribution to the topical issue "The 14th International Symposium on High Pressure Low Temperature Plasma Chemistry (HAKONE XIV)", edited by Nicolas Gherardi, Ronny Brandenburg and Lars Stollenwark

  4. Free radicals induced in aqueous solution by non-contact atmospheric-pressure cold plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Tani, Atsushi; Fukui, Satoshi; Ono, Yusuke; Kitano, Katsuhisa; Ikawa, Satoshi

    2012-06-18

    To understand plasma-induced chemical processing in liquids, we investigated the formation of free radicals in aqueous solution exposed to different types of non-contact atmospheric-pressure helium plasma using the spin-trapping technique. Both hydroxyl radical (OH{center_dot}) and superoxide anion radical (O{sub 2}{sup -}{center_dot}) adducts were observed when neutral oxygen gas was additionally supplied to the plasma. In particular, O{sub 2}{sup -}{center_dot} can be dominantly induced in the solution via oxygen flow into the afterglow gas of helium plasma. This type of plasma treatment can potentially be used in medical applications to control infectious diseases, because the O{sub 2}{sup -}{center_dot} is crucial for sterilization of liquids via atmospheric-pressure plasma.

  5. Eradication of Bacterial Biofilms Using Atmospheric Pressure Non-Thermal Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkawareek, Mahmoud; Gilmore, Brendan; Gorman, Sean; Algwari, Qais; Graham, William; O'Connell, Deborah

    2011-10-01

    Bacterial biofilms are ubiquitous in natural and clinical settings and form a major health risk. Biofilms are recognised to be the predominant mode of bacterial growth, and are an immunological challenge compared to planktonic bacteria of the same species. Eradication of biofilms with atmospheric pressure plasma jets is investigated. Cold non-equilibrium plasmas, operated at ambient atmospheric pressure and temperature, are efficient sources for controlled energy transport through highly reactive neutrals (e.g. ROS, RNS), charged particles (ions and electrons), UV radiation, and electro-magnetic fields. A focused panel of clinically significant biofilms, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Bacillus cereus, are exposed to various plasma jet configurations operated in helium and oxygen mixtures. Viability of surviving cells was determined using both standard plate counting method and XTT viability assay. These are correlated with measurements and simulations of relevant reactive plasma species.

  6. White light emission from silicon oxycarbide films prepared by using atmospheric pressure microplasma jet

    SciTech Connect

    Ding Yi; Shirai, Hajime

    2009-02-15

    An atmospheric pressure microplasma jet was employed as a deposition tool to fabricate silicon oxycarbide films from tetraethoxysilane-argon (Ar) mixture gas at room temperature. Resultant films exhibit intense visible emission under a 325 nm excitation which appears white to naked eyes in the range from {approx}1.75 to {approx}3.5 eV at room temperature. The origin of photoluminescence is attributed to the electron-hole pair recombination through neutral oxygen vacancies (NOVs) in the film. The density of NOV defects was found in the range from 3.48x10{sup 15} to 2.23x10{sup 16} cm{sup -3}. The photoluminescence quantum efficiencies were estimated to be 1.48%-4.15%. Present experiment results demonstrate that the silicon oxycarbide films prepared by using atmospheric pressure microplasma jet would be a competitive candidate for the development of white light emission devices.

  7. Effect of Atmospheric Pressure Plasma and Subsequent Enzymatic Treatment on Flax Fabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Shaofeng; Yang, Bin; Ou, Qiongrong

    2015-09-01

    The objective is to investigate the effect of atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (APDBD) plasma and subsequent cellulase enzyme treatment on the properties of flax fabrics. The changes of surface morphology and structure, physico-mechanical properties, hydrophilicity, bending properties, whiteness, and dyeing properties of the treated substrate were investigated. The results indicated that atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge plasma pre-treatment and subsequent cellulase enzyme treatment could diminish the hairiness of flax fabrics, endowing the flax fabrics with good bending properties, water uptake and fiber accessibility while keeping their good mechanical properties compared with those treated with cellulase enzyme alone. supported by the Science and Technology Project of the Education Department of Zhejiang Province, China (No. Y201432680) and the Professional Leaders Leading Project of the Education Department of Zhejiang Province, China (No. lj2013131), the Teaching and Research Award Program for Outstanding Young Teachers in Higher Education Institutions of the Education Department of Zhejiang Province, China (No. 1097802072012001)

  8. Tooth Whitening Effects by Atmospheric Pressure Cold Plasmas with Different Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Hye-sook; Kim, Kyoung-Nam; You, Eun-Mi; Choi, Eun-Ha; Kim, Yong-Hee; Kim, Kwang-Mahn

    2013-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of atmospheric pressure cold plasma with different gases on external tooth bleaching. After 10 min treatment, the air (50%) + oxygen (50%) group shows a remarkable color change (ΔE*), and nitrogen and air groups indicate some color change, although not as much as that shown by the air + oxygen group. Also, the argon group shows the least amount of color change among the various gases in this experiment. Atomic oxygen species exists during this tooth bleaching as determined by optical emission spectroscopy. Hence, atmospheric pressure cold plasma treatment could significantly accelerate the tooth bleaching process owing to this atomic oxygen species, and the intensity of tooth bleaching depends on the type of gas in the cold plasma.

  9. Electrical and optical properties of Ar/NH3 atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Zheng-Shi; Yao, Cong-Wei; Chen, Si-Le; Zhang, Guan-Jun

    2016-09-01

    Inspired by the Penning effect, we obtain a glow-like plasma jet by mixing ammonia (NH3) into argon (Ar) gas under atmospheric pressure. The basic electrical and optical properties of an atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) are investigated. It can be seen that the discharge mode transforms from filamentary to glow-like when a little ammonia is added into the pure argon. The electrical and optical analyses contribute to the explanation of this phenomenon. The discharge mode, power, and current density are analyzed to understand the electrical behavior of the APPJ. Meanwhile, the discharge images, APPJ's length, and the components of plasma are also obtained to express its optical characteristics. Finally, we diagnose several parameters, such as gas temperature, electron temperature, and density, as well as the density number of metastable argon atoms of Ar/NH3 APPJ to help judge the usability in its applications.

  10. Remote sensing of atmospheric pressure and sea state using laser altimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, C. S.

    1985-01-01

    Short-pulse multicolor laser ranging systems are currently being developed for satellite ranging applications. These systems use Q-switched pulsed lasers and streak-tube cameras to provide timing accuracies approaching a few picoseconds. Satellite laser ranging systems have been used to evaluate many important geophysical phenomena such as fault motion, polar motion and solid earth tides, by measuring the orbital perturbations of retroreflector equipped satellites. Some existing operational systems provide range resolution approaching a few millimeters. There is currently considerable interest in adapting these highly accurate systems for use as airborne and satellite based altimeters. Potential applications include the measurement of sea state, ground topography and atmospheric pressure. This paper reviews recent progress in the development of multicolor laser altimeters for use in monitoring sea state and atmospheric pressure.

  11. Atmospheric pressure plasma jets: an overview of devices and new directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, J.; Brandenburg, R.; Weltmann, K.-D.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma jets have a long history of more than 50 years. During this time their design and plasma generation mechanism has been developed and adapted to various fields of applications. This review aims at giving an overview of jet devices by starting with a brief history of their development. This is followed by an overview of commonly used terms and definitions as well as a survey of different classification schemes (e.g. geometry, excition frequency or specific energy input) described in literature. A selective update of new designs and novel research achievments on atmospheric pressure plasma jets published in 2012 or later shows the impressive variety and rapid development of the field. Finally, a brief outlook on the future trends and directions is given.

  12. Synergistic effects of atmospheric pressure plasma-emitted components on DNA oligomers: a Raman spectroscopic study.

    PubMed

    Edengeiser, Eugen; Lackmann, Jan-Wilm; Bründermann, Erik; Schneider, Simon; Benedikt, Jan; Bandow, Julia E; Havenith, Martina

    2015-11-01

    Cold atmospheric-pressure plasmas have become of increasing importance in sterilization processes especially with the growing prevalence of multi-resistant bacteria. Albeit the potential for technological application is obvious, much less is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying bacterial inactivation. X-jet technology separates plasma-generated reactive particles and photons, thus allowing the investigation of their individual and joint effects on DNA. Raman spectroscopy shows that particles and photons cause different modifications in DNA single and double strands. The treatment with the combination of particles and photons does not only result in cumulative, but in synergistic effects. Profilometry confirms that etching is a minor contributor to the observed DNA damage in vitro. Schematics of DNA oligomer treatment with cold atmospheric-pressure plasma.

  13. Atmospheric-pressure air microplasma jets in aqueous media for the inactivation of Pseudomonas fluorescens cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xianhui; Yang, Si-ze; Liu, Dongping; Song, Ying; Sun, Yue

    2013-05-15

    The hollow fiber-based cold air microplasma jet array running at atmospheric pressure has been designed to inactivate Pseudomonas fluorescens (P. fluorescens) cells in vitro in aqueous media. The influences of electrode configurations, air flow rate, and applied voltage on the discharge characteristics of the single microplasma jet operating in aqueous media are presented, and the bactericidal efficiency of the hollow fibers-based and large-volume microplasma jet array is reported. Optical emission spectroscopy is utilized to identify excited species during the antibacterial testing of plasma in solutions. These well-aligned and rather stable air microplasma jets containing a variety of short-lived species, such as OH and O radicals and charged particles, are in direct contact with aqueous media and are very effective in killing P. fluorescens cells in aqueous media. This design shows its potential application for atmospheric pressure air plasma inactivation of bacteria cells in aqueous media.

  14. Role of ambient dielectric in propagation of Ar atmospheric pressure nonequilibrium plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jian; Tang, Jingfeng; Wang, Youyin; Wei, Liqiu; Ren, Chunsheng; Yu, Daren

    2015-05-01

    A single-electrode atmospheric pressure nonequilibrium plasma jet surrounded with different ambient dielectrics is investigated driven by AC power supply. Another three ambient dielectrics, distilled water, ethanol, and carbon tetrachloride, are adopted to compare with air. By examining electrical and optical characteristics, it was found that the molecular polarity of ambient dielectrics had its significant effect on the propagation of atmospheric pressure nonequilibrium plasma jets. When the polarization of molecules was enhanced, the discharge current and the bullet velocity were also increased. For nonpolar dielectric of carbon tetrachloride, this was mainly resulted from the electron polarization in the built-in electric field. For polar dielectrics of ethanol and distilled water, in addition to the electron polarization, orientation polarization was the main cause for the further increase in discharge current and bullet velocity.

  15. Plasma Treatment of Industrial Landfill Leachate by Atmospheric Pressure Dielectric Barrier Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Di; Wang, Dacheng; Yan, Gui; Ma, Hong; Xiong, Xiaojing; Luo, Jinjing; Zhang, Xianhui; Liu, Dongping; Yang, Size

    2011-10-01

    An dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) system in atmospheric pressure utilized for the treatment of industrial landfill leachate is reported. The discharge parameters, such as the operating frequency, gas flow rate, and treating duration, were found to affect significantly the removal of ammonia nitrogen (AN) in industrial landfill leachate. An increase in treating duration leads to an obvious increase in the removal efficiency of AN (up to 83%) and the leachate color changed from deep grey-black to transparent. Thus the dielectric barrier discharges in atmospheric pressure could degrade the landfill leachate effectively. Typical waveforms of both applied voltage and discharge current were also presented for analyzing the discharge processes under different discharge parameters. Optical emission spectra measurements indicate that oxidation species generated in oxygen DBD plasma play a crucial role in removing AN, oxidizing organic and inorganic substances and decolorizing the landfill leachate.

  16. Parameters of a supershort avalanche electron beam generated in atmospheric-pressure air

    SciTech Connect

    Tarasenko, V. F.

    2011-05-15

    Conditions under which the number of runaway electrons in atmospheric-pressure air reaches {approx}5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} are determined. Recommendations for creating runaway electron accelerators are given. Methods for measuring the parameters of a supershort avalanche electron beam and X-ray pulses from gas-filled diodes, as well as the discharge current and gap voltage, are described. A technique for determining the instant of runaway electron generation with respect to the voltage pulse is proposed. It is shown that the reduction in the gap voltage and the decrease in the beam current coincide in time. The mechanism of intense electron beam generation in gas-filled diodes is analyzed. It is confirmed experimentally that, in optimal regimes, the number of electrons generated in atmospheric-pressure air with energies T > eU{sub m}, where U{sub m} is the maximum gap voltage, is relatively small.

  17. Discharge characteristics of atmospheric-pressure radio-frequency glow discharges with argon/nitrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Huabo; Sun Wenting; Li Heping; Bao Chengyu; Gao Xing; Luo Huiying

    2006-10-16

    In this letter, atmospheric-pressure glow discharges in {gamma} mode with argon/nitrogen as the plasma-forming gas using water-cooled, bare copper electrodes driven by radio-frequency power supply at 13.56 MHz are achieved. The preliminary studies on the discharge characteristics show that, induced by the {alpha}-{gamma} coexisting mode or {gamma} mode discharge of argon, argon-nitrogen mixture with any mixing ratios, even pure nitrogen, can be employed to generate the stable {gamma} mode radio-frequency, atmospheric-pressure glow discharges and the discharge voltage rises with increasing the fraction of nitrogen in the argon-nitrogen mixture for a constant total gas flow rate.

  18. Energy density dependence of hydrogen combustion efficiency in atmospheric pressure microwave plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, T.; Ezumi, N.; Sawada, K.; Tanaka, Y.; Tanaka, M.; Nishimura, K.

    2015-03-15

    The recovery of tritium in nuclear fusion plants is a key issue for safety. So far, the oxidation procedure using an atmospheric pressure plasma is expected to be part of the recovery method. In this study, in order to clarify the mechanism of hydrogen oxidation by plasma chemistry, we have investigated the dependence of hydrogen combustion efficiency on gas flow rate and input power in the atmospheric pressure microwave plasma. It has been found that the combustion efficiency depends on energy density of absorbed microwave power. Hence, the energy density is considered as a key parameter for combustion processes. Also neutral gas temperatures inside and outside the plasma were measured by an optical emission spectroscopy method and thermocouple. The result shows that the neutral gas temperature in the plasma is much higher than the outside temperature of plasma. The high neutral gas temperature may affect the combustion reaction. (authors)

  19. Parameters of a supershort avalanche electron beam generated in atmospheric-pressure air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasenko, V. F.

    2011-05-01

    Conditions under which the number of runaway electrons in atmospheric-pressure air reaches ˜5 × 1010 are determined. Recommendations for creating runaway electron accelerators are given. Methods for measuring the parameters of a supershort avalanche electron beam and X-ray pulses from gas-filled diodes, as well as the discharge current and gap voltage, are described. A technique for determining the instant of runaway electron generation with respect to the voltage pulse is proposed. It is shown that the reduction in the gap voltage and the decrease in the beam current coincide in time. The mechanism of intense electron beam generation in gas-filled diodes is analyzed. It is confirmed experimentally that, in optimal regimes, the number of electrons generated in atmospheric-pressure air with energies T > eU m , where U m is the maximum gap voltage, is relatively small.

  20. Modification of silicon carbide surfaces by atmospheric pressure plasma for composite applications.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Santiago, Victor; Vargas-Gonzalez, Lionel; Bujanda, Andres A; Baeza, Jose A; Fleischman, Michelle S; Yim, Jacqueline H; Pappas, Daphne D

    2013-06-12

    In this study, we explore the use of atmospheric pressure plasmas for enhancing the adhesion of SiC surfaces using a urethane adhesive, as an alternative to grit-blasting. Surface analysis showed that He-O2 plasma treatments resulted in a hydrophilic surface mostly by producing SiOx. Four-point bending tests and bonding pull tests were carried out on control, grit-blasted, and plasma-treated surfaces. Grit-blasted samples showed enhanced bonding but also a decrease in flexural strength. Plasma treated samples did not affect the flexural strength of the material and showed an increase in bonding strength. These results suggest that atmospheric pressure plasma treatment of ceramic materials is an effective alternative to grit-blasting for adhesion enhancement. PMID:23639326

  1. Atmospheric Pressure non-thermal plasmas for surface treatment of polymer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hsiao-Feng; Wen, Chun-Hsiang; Wei, Hsiao-Kuan; Kou, Chwung-Shan

    2006-10-01

    Interest has grown over the past few years in applying atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasmas to surface treatment. In this work, we used an asymmetric glow dielectric-barrier discharge (GDBD), at atmospheric pressure in nitrogen, to improve the surface hydrophilicity of three kinds of polymer films, biaxially oriented polypropylene (BOPP), polyimide (PI), and triacetyl cellulose (TAC). This set-up consists of two asymmetric electrodes covered by dielectrics. And to prevent the filamentary discharge occur, the frequency, gas flow rate and uniformity of gas flow distribution should be carefully controlled. The discharge performance is monitored through an oscilloscope, which is connected to a high voltage probe and a current monitor. The physical and chemical properties of polymer surfaces before and after GDBD treatment were analyzed via water contact angle (CA) measurements, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) techniques.

  2. Spectroscopic measurement of plasma gas temperature of the atmospheric-pressure microwave induced nitrogen plasma torch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chuan-Jie; Li, Shou-Zhe

    2015-06-01

    Atmospheric-pressure microwave induced N2 plasma is diagnosed by optical emission spectroscopy with respect to the plasma gas temperature. The spectroscopic measurement of plasma gas temperature is discussed with respect to the spectral line broadening of Ar I and the various emission rotational-vibrational band systems of N2(B-A), N2(C-B) and \\text{N}2+(\\text{B-X}). It is found that the Boltzmann plot of the selective spectral lines from \\text{N}2+(\\text{B-X}) at 391.4 nm is preferable to others with an accuracy better than 5% for an atmospheric-pressure plasma of high gas temperature. On the basis of the thermal balance equation, the dependences of the plasma gas temperature on the absorbed power, the gas flow rate, and the gas composition are investigated experimentally with photographs recording the plasma morphology.

  3. Role of ambient dielectric in propagation of Ar atmospheric pressure nonequilibrium plasma jets

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Jian; Wang, Youyin; Yu, Daren; Tang, Jingfeng Wei, Liqiu; Ren, Chunsheng

    2015-05-15

    A single-electrode atmospheric pressure nonequilibrium plasma jet surrounded with different ambient dielectrics is investigated driven by AC power supply. Another three ambient dielectrics, distilled water, ethanol, and carbon tetrachloride, are adopted to compare with air. By examining electrical and optical characteristics, it was found that the molecular polarity of ambient dielectrics had its significant effect on the propagation of atmospheric pressure nonequilibrium plasma jets. When the polarization of molecules was enhanced, the discharge current and the bullet velocity were also increased. For nonpolar dielectric of carbon tetrachloride, this was mainly resulted from the electron polarization in the built-in electric field. For polar dielectrics of ethanol and distilled water, in addition to the electron polarization, orientation polarization was the main cause for the further increase in discharge current and bullet velocity.

  4. Atmospheric pressure spatial atomic layer deposition web coating with in situ monitoring of film thickness

    SciTech Connect

    Yersak, Alexander S.; Lee, Yung C.; Spencer, Joseph A.; Groner, Markus D.

    2014-01-15

    Spectral reflectometry was implemented as a method for in situ thickness monitoring in a spatial atomic layer deposition (ALD) system. Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films were grown on a moving polymer web substrate at 100 °C using an atmospheric pressure ALD web coating system, with film growth of 0.11–0.13 nm/cycle. The modular coating head design and the in situ monitoring allowed for the characterization and optimization of the trimethylaluminum and water precursor exposures, purge flows, and web speed. A thickness uniformity of ±2% was achieved across the web. ALD cycle times as low as 76 ms were demonstrated with a web speed of 1 m/s and a vertical gap height of 0.5 mm. This atmospheric pressure ALD system with in situ process control demonstrates the feasibility of low-cost, high throughput roll-to-roll ALD.

  5. Numerical simulation of torus breakdown to chaos in an atmospheric-pressure dielectric barrier discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, J.; Wang, Y. H.; Wang, D. Z.

    2013-08-15

    Understanding the routes to chaos occurring in atmospheric-pressure dielectric barrier discharge systems by changing controlling parameters is very important to predict and control the dynamical behaviors. In this paper, a route of a quasiperiodic torus to chaos via the strange nonchaotic attractor is observed in an atmospheric-pressure dielectric barrier discharge driven by triangle-wave voltage. By increasing the driving frequency, the discharge system first bifurcates to a quasiperiodic torus from a stable single periodic state, and then torus and phase-locking periodic state appear and disappear alternately. In the meantime, the torus becomes increasingly wrinkling and stretching, and gradually approaches a fractal structure with the nonpositive largest Lyapunov exponent, i.e., a strange nonchaotic attractor. After that, the discharge system enters into chaotic state. If the driving frequency is further increased, another well known route of period-doubling bifurcation to chaos is also observed.

  6. Apoptotic effects on cultured cells of atmospheric-pressure plasma produced using various gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tominami, Kanako; Kanetaka, Hiroyasu; Kudo, Tada-aki; Sasaki, Shota; Kaneko, Toshiro

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of low-temperature atmospheric-pressure plasma on various cells such as rat fibroblastic Rat-1 cell line, rat neuroblastoma-like PC12 cell line, and rat macrophage-like NR8383 cell line. The plasma was irradiated directly to a culture medium containing plated cells for 0-20 s. The applied voltage, excitation frequency, and argon or helium gas flow were, respectively, 3-6 kV, 10 kHz, and 3 L/min. Cell viability and apoptotic activity were evaluated using annexin-V/propidium iodide staining. Results showed that the low-temperature atmospheric-pressure plasma irradiation promoted cell death in a discharge-voltage-dependent and irradiation-time-dependent manner. Furthermore, different effects are produced depending on the cell type. Moreover, entirely different mechanisms might be responsible for the induction of apoptosis in cells by helium and argon plasma.

  7. Earth radiation pressure and the determination of density from atmospheric drag.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slowey, J. W.

    1973-01-01

    The effect of earth radiation pressure relative to that of atmospheric drag increases with height through the lower thermosphere. While it can be entirely neglected as a correction in the determination of density at lower heights, it becomes significant somewhat below 1000 km and rapidly becomes comparable in magnitude to drag above 1000 km. The effects of earth radiation pressure on the orbit of the balloon satellite 1963 30D were calculated during two series of intervals when the orbit was entirely in sunlight. The first of these was when the perigee was very high so that hydrogen was expected to be the dominant atmospheric constituent. The second was when the perigee was lower and helium was expected to be the dominant constituent. Two sets of calculations were performed, one using a constant mean model and the other using a seasonal-latitudinal model, based on reported Tiros VII data, for the albedo and infrared radiation.

  8. Using Dimers to Measure Biosignatures and Atmospheric Pressure for Terrestrial Exoplanets

    PubMed Central

    Meadows, Victoria; Claire, Mark; Crisp, Dave

    2014-01-01

    Abstract We present a new method to probe atmospheric pressure on Earth-like planets using (O2-O2) dimers in the near-infrared. We also show that dimer features could be the most readily detectable biosignatures for Earth-like atmospheres and may even be detectable in transit transmission with the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). The absorption by dimers changes more rapidly with pressure and density than that of monomers and can therefore provide additional information about atmospheric pressures. By comparing the absorption strengths of rotational and vibrational features to the absorption strengths of dimer features, we show that in some cases it may be possible to estimate the pressure at the reflecting surface of a planet. This method is demonstrated by using the O2 A band and the 1.06 μm dimer feature, either in transmission or reflected spectra. It works best for planets around M dwarfs with atmospheric pressures between 0.1 and 10 bar and for O2 volume mixing ratios above 50% of Earth's present-day level. Furthermore, unlike observations of Rayleigh scattering, this method can be used at wavelengths longer than 0.6 μm and is therefore potentially applicable, although challenging, to near-term planet characterization missions such as JWST. We also performed detectability studies for JWST transit transmission spectroscopy and found that the 1.06 and 1.27 μm dimer features could be detectable (SNR>3) for an Earth analogue orbiting an M5V star at a distance of 5 pc. The detection of these features could provide a constraint on the atmospheric pressure of an exoplanet and serve as biosignatures for oxygenic photosynthesis. We calculated the required signal-to-noise ratios to detect and characterize O2 monomer and dimer features in direct imaging–reflected spectra and found that signal-to-noise ratios greater than 10 at a spectral resolving power of R=100 would be required. Key Words: Remote sensing—Extrasolar terrestrial planets

  9. Using dimers to measure biosignatures and atmospheric pressure for terrestrial exoplanets.

    PubMed

    Misra, Amit; Meadows, Victoria; Claire, Mark; Crisp, Dave

    2014-02-01

    We present a new method to probe atmospheric pressure on Earth-like planets using (O2-O2) dimers in the near-infrared. We also show that dimer features could be the most readily detectable biosignatures for Earth-like atmospheres and may even be detectable in transit transmission with the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). The absorption by dimers changes more rapidly with pressure and density than that of monomers and can therefore provide additional information about atmospheric pressures. By comparing the absorption strengths of rotational and vibrational features to the absorption strengths of dimer features, we show that in some cases it may be possible to estimate the pressure at the reflecting surface of a planet. This method is demonstrated by using the O2 A band and the 1.06 μm dimer feature, either in transmission or reflected spectra. It works best for planets around M dwarfs with atmospheric pressures between 0.1 and 10 bar and for O2 volume mixing ratios above 50% of Earth's present-day level. Furthermore, unlike observations of Rayleigh scattering, this method can be used at wavelengths longer than 0.6 μm and is therefore potentially applicable, although challenging, to near-term planet characterization missions such as JWST. We also performed detectability studies for JWST transit transmission spectroscopy and found that the 1.06 and 1.27 μm dimer features could be detectable (SNR>3) for an Earth analogue orbiting an M5V star at a distance of 5 pc. The detection of these features could provide a constraint on the atmospheric pressure of an exoplanet and serve as biosignatures for oxygenic photosynthesis. We calculated the required signal-to-noise ratios to detect and characterize O2 monomer and dimer features in direct imaging-reflected spectra and found that signal-to-noise ratios greater than 10 at a spectral resolving power of R=100 would be required.

  10. Using dimers to measure biosignatures and atmospheric pressure for terrestrial exoplanets.

    PubMed

    Misra, Amit; Meadows, Victoria; Claire, Mark; Crisp, Dave

    2014-02-01

    We present a new method to probe atmospheric pressure on Earth-like planets using (O2-O2) dimers in the near-infrared. We also show that dimer features could be the most readily detectable biosignatures for Earth-like atmospheres and may even be detectable in transit transmission with the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). The absorption by dimers changes more rapidly with pressure and density than that of monomers and can therefore provide additional information about atmospheric pressures. By comparing the absorption strengths of rotational and vibrational features to the absorption strengths of dimer features, we show that in some cases it may be possible to estimate the pressure at the reflecting surface of a planet. This method is demonstrated by using the O2 A band and the 1.06 μm dimer feature, either in transmission or reflected spectra. It works best for planets around M dwarfs with atmospheric pressures between 0.1 and 10 bar and for O2 volume mixing ratios above 50% of Earth's present-day level. Furthermore, unlike observations of Rayleigh scattering, this method can be used at wavelengths longer than 0.6 μm and is therefore potentially applicable, although challenging, to near-term planet characterization missions such as JWST. We also performed detectability studies for JWST transit transmission spectroscopy and found that the 1.06 and 1.27 μm dimer features could be detectable (SNR>3) for an Earth analogue orbiting an M5V star at a distance of 5 pc. The detection of these features could provide a constraint on the atmospheric pressure of an exoplanet and serve as biosignatures for oxygenic photosynthesis. We calculated the required signal-to-noise ratios to detect and characterize O2 monomer and dimer features in direct imaging-reflected spectra and found that signal-to-noise ratios greater than 10 at a spectral resolving power of R=100 would be required. PMID:24432758

  11. Characterization of an atmospheric pressure air plasma source for polymer surface modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shujun; Tang, Jiansheng

    2013-10-01

    An atmospheric pressure air plasma source was generated through dielectric barrier discharge (DBD). It was used to modify polyethyleneterephthalate (PET) surfaces with very high throughput. An equivalent circuit model was used to calculate the peak average electron density. The emission spectrum from the plasma was taken and the main peaks in the spectrum were identified. The ozone density in the down plasma region was estimated by Absorption Spectroscopy. NSF and ARC-ODU

  12. Processing materials inside an atmospheric-pressure radiofrequency nonthermal plasma discharge

    DOEpatents

    Selwyn, Gary S.; Henins, Ivars; Park, Jaeyoung; Herrmann, Hans W.

    2006-04-11

    Apparatus for the processing of materials involving placing a material either placed between an radio-frequency electrode and a ground electrode, or which is itself one of the electrodes. This is done in atmospheric pressure conditions. The apparatus effectively etches or cleans substrates, such as silicon wafers, or provides cleaning of spools and drums, and uses a gas containing an inert gas and a chemically reactive gas.

  13. Sterilization mechanism for Escherichia coli by plasma flow at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Takehiko; Miyahara, Takashi; Doi, Akiko; Ochiai, Shiroh; Urayama, Takuya; Nakatani, Tatsuyuki

    2006-08-14

    A mechanism for sterilizing Escherichia coli by a flowing postdischarge and UV radiation of argon plasma at atmospheric pressure was investigated by analyzing the surviving cells and the potassium leakage of cytoplasmic material and by morphological observation. Inactivation of E. coli results from the destruction of the cytoplasmic membrane and the outer membrane under plasma exposure and the destruction of nucleic acids by exposure to ultraviolet radiation from the plasma source.

  14. Ozone production by nanoporous dielectric barrier glow discharge in atmospheric pressure air

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, J. H.; Koo, I. G.; Choi, M. Y.; Lee, W. M.

    2008-03-10

    This study is aimed at demonstrating plasma-chemical ozone production based on low temperature atmospheric pressure glow discharge through nanoporous dielectric barriers. The 20 kHz ac driven discharge is formed in air or oxygen gas flowing in the axial direction of the cylindrical plasma reactor containing four parallel aluminum rods covered with nanoporous alumina films. The discharge utilizing nanoporous dielectric barrier is more uniform and more energy efficient in ozone generation than the discharge through smooth-surface dielectric barriers.

  15. High sensitivity detection of trace gases at atmospheric pressure using tunable diode lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, J.; Sinclair, R. L.; Grant, W. B.; Menzies, R. T.

    1985-01-01

    A detailed study of the detection of trace gases at atmospheric pressure using tunable diode lasers is described. The influence of multipass cells, retroreflectors and topographical targets is examined. The minimum detectable infrared absorption ranges from 0.1 percent for a pathlength of 1.2 km to 0.01 percent over short pathlengths. The factors which limit this sensitivity are discussed, and the techniques are illustrated by monitoring atmospehric CO2 and CH4.

  16. Atomic Oxygen Cleaning Shown to Remove Organic Contaminants at Atmospheric Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutledge, Sharon K.

    1998-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center has developed and filed for a patent on a method to produce atomic oxygen at atmospheric pressure by using a direct current arc in a gas flow mixture of oxygen and helium. A prototype device has been tested for its ability to remove various soot residues from surfaces exposed to fire, and various varnishes such as acrylic and egg white.

  17. Radiative ion-ion neutralization: a new gas-phase atmospheric pressure ion transduction mechanism.

    PubMed

    Davis, Eric J; Siems, William F; Hill, Herbert H

    2012-06-01

    All atmospheric pressure ion detectors, including photo ionization detectors, flame ionization detectors, electron capture detectors, and ion mobility spectrometers, utilize Faraday plate designs in which ionic charge is collected and amplified. The sensitivity of these Faraday plate ion detectors are limited by thermal (Johnson) noise in the associated electronics. Thus approximately 10(6) ions per second are required for a minimal detection. This is not the case for ion detection under vacuum conditions where secondary electron multipliers (SEMs) can be used. SEMs produce a cascade of approximately 10(6) electrons per ion impinging on the conversion dynode. Similarly, photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) can generate approximately 10(6) electrons per photon. Unlike SEMs, however, PMTs are evacuated and sealed so that they are commonly used under atmospheric pressure conditions. This paper describes an atmospheric pressure ion detector based on coupling a PMT with light emitted from ion-ion neutralization reactions. The normal Faraday plate collector electrode was replaced with an electrode "needle" used to concentrate the anions as they were drawn to the tip of the needle by a strong focusing electric field. Light was emitted near the surface of the electrode when analyte ions were neutralized with cations produced from the anode. Although radiative-ion-ion recombination has been previously reported, this is the first time ions from separate ionization sources have been combined to produce light. The light from this radiative-ion-ion-neutralization (RIIN) was detected using a photon multiplier such that an ion mobility spectrum was obtained by monitoring the light emitted from mobility separated ions. An IMS spectrum of nitroglycerin (NG) was obtained utilizing RIIN for tranducing the mobility separated ions into an analytical signal. The implications of this novel ion transduction method are the potential for counting ions at atmospheric pressure and for obtaining ion

  18. Characteristics of a glow discharge in atmospheric pressure air over the water surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuaibov, A. K.; Chuchman, M. P.; Mesarosh, L. V.

    2014-06-01

    The current-voltage characteristics, the amount of cathode fall, and the spectra of plasma radiation from different spatial domains are presented versus the molecular band intensity of products arising in an atmospheric-pressure air glow discharge over the distilled water surface. The plasma electron temperature is also reported. The distance to a liquid cathode or anode is varied from 1 to 10 mm at a discharge mean current of 10-36 mA.

  19. Micro-Biocidal Activity of Yeast Cells by Needle Plasma Irradiation at Atmospheric Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurumi, Satoshi; Takahashi, Hideyuki; Taima, Tomohito; Suzuki, Kaoru; Hirose, Hideharu; Masutani, Shigeyuki

    In this study, we report on the biocidal activity technique by needle helium plasma irradiation at atmospheric pressure using borosilicate capillary nozzle to apply for the oral surgery. The diameter of needle plasma was less than 50 µm, and temperature of plasma irradiated area was less than body temperature. Needle plasma showed emission due to OH and O radical. Raman spectra and methylene blue stain showed yeast cells were inactivated by needle plasma irradiation.

  20. Effect of plasticity and atmospheric pressure on the formation of donut- and croissantlike buckles.

    PubMed

    Hamade, S; Durinck, J; Parry, G; Coupeau, C; Cimetière, A; Grilhé, J; Colin, J

    2015-01-01

    The formation of donut- and croissantlike buckles has been observed onto the free surface of gold thin films deposited on silicon substrates. Numerical simulations clearly evidence that the coupling effect between the atmospheric pressure acting on the free surface and the plastic folding of the ductile film is responsible for the circular blister destabilization and the formation of the donut- and croissantlike buckling patterns. PMID:25679631

  1. Microexplosions initiated by a microwave capillary torch on a metal surface at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gritsinin, S. I.; Davydov, A. M.; Kossyi, I. A.

    2015-07-01

    The interaction of the plasma of a microwave capillary argon torch with a metal surface was studied experimentally. It is shown that the interaction of the plasma jet generated by the capillary plasma torch with the metal in atmospheric-pressure air leads to the initiation of microexplosions (sparks) on the metal surface. As a result, the initially smooth surface acquires a relief in the form of microtips and microcraters. The possibility of practical application of the observed phenomenon is discussed.

  2. Atmospheric pressure plasma polymerization of 1,3-butadiene for hydrophobic finishing of textile substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samanta, Kartick K.; Jassal, Manjeet; Agrawal, Ashwini K.

    2010-02-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma processing of textile has both ecological and economical advantages over the wet-chemical processing. However, reaction in atmospheric pressure plasma has important challenges to be overcome before it can be successfully used for finishing applications in textile. These challenges are (i) generating stable glow plasma in presence liquid/gaseous monomer, and (ii) keeping the generated radicals active in the presence of contaminants such as oxygen and air. In this study, a stable glow plasma was generated at atmospheric pressure in the mixture of gaseous reactive monomer-1,3-butadiene and He and was made to react with cellulosic textile substrate. After 12 min of plasma treatment, the hydrophilic surface of the cellulosic substrate turned into highly hydrophobic surface. The hydrophobic finish was found to be durable to soap washing. After soap washing, a water drop of 37 μl took around 250 s to get absorbed in the treated sample compared to < 1 s in the untreated samples. The plasma modified samples showed water contact angle of around 134°. Both top and bottom sides of the fabric showed similar hydrophobic results in terms of water absorbency and contact angle. The results may be attributed to chemical reaction of butadiene with the cellulosic textile substrate. The surface characterization of the plasma modified samples under SEM and AFM revealed modification of the surface under <100 nm. The results showed that atmospheric pressure plasma can be successfully used for carrying out reaction of 1,3-butadiene with cellulosic textile substrates for producing hydrophobic surface finish.

  3. Microexplosions initiated by a microwave capillary torch on a metal surface at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Gritsinin, S. I.; Davydov, A. M.; Kossyi, I. A.

    2015-07-15

    The interaction of the plasma of a microwave capillary argon torch with a metal surface was studied experimentally. It is shown that the interaction of the plasma jet generated by the capillary plasma torch with the metal in atmospheric-pressure air leads to the initiation of microexplosions (sparks) on the metal surface. As a result, the initially smooth surface acquires a relief in the form of microtips and microcraters. The possibility of practical application of the observed phenomenon is discussed.

  4. Selective Formation of Trimethylene Carbonate (TMC): Atmospheric Pressure Carbon Dioxide Utilization

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, Benjamin R; Patel, Anish P; Wijayantha, K G Upul

    2015-01-01

    Carbon dioxide utilisation (CDU) is currently gaining increased interest due to the abundance of CO2 and its possible application as a C1 building block. We herein report the first example of atmospheric pressure carbon dioxide incorporation into oxetane to selectively form trimethylene carbonate (TMC), which is a significant challenge as TMC is thermodynamically less favoured than its corresponding co-polymer. PMID:26213485

  5. Differential absorption lidars for remote sensing of atmospheric pressure and temperature profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korb, C. Laurence; Schwemmer, Geary K.; Famiglietti, Joseph; Walden, Harvey; Prasad, Coorg

    1995-01-01

    A near infrared differential absorption lidar technique is developed using atmospheric oxygen as a tracer for high resolution vertical profiles of pressure and temperature with high accuracy. Solid-state tunable lasers and high-resolution spectrum analyzers are developed to carry out ground-based and airborne measurement demonstrations and results of the measurements presented. Numerical error analysis of high-altitude airborne and spaceborne experiments is carried out, and system concepts developed for their implementation.

  6. Charge dependence of the plasma travel length in atmospheric-pressure plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yambe, Kiyoyuki; Konda, Kohmei; Masuda, Seiya

    2016-06-01

    Plasma plume is generated using a quartz tube, helium gas, and foil electrode by applying AC high voltage under the atmosphere. The plasma plume is released into the atmosphere from inside of the quartz tube and is seen as the continuous movement of the plasma bullet. The travel length of plasma bullet is defined from plasma energy and force due to electric field. The drift velocity of plasma bullet has the upper limit under atmospheric-pressure because the drift velocity is determined from the balance between electric field and resistive force due to collisions between plasma and air. The plasma plume charge depends on the drift velocity. Consequently, in the laminar flow of helium gas flow state, the travel length of the plasma plume logarithmically depends on the plasma plume charge which changes with both the electric field and the resistive force.

  7. Non-Thermal Atmospheric-Pressure Plasma Possible Application in Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Haertel, Beate; von Woedtke, Thomas; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; Lindequist, Ulrike

    2014-01-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasma, also named cold plasma, is defined as a partly ionized gas. Therefore, it cannot be equated with plasma from blood; it is not biological in nature. Non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasma is a new innovative approach in medicine not only for the treatment of wounds, but with a wide-range of other applications, as e.g. topical treatment of other skin diseases with microbial involvement or treatment of cancer diseases. This review emphasizes plasma effects on wound healing. Non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasma can support wound healing by its antiseptic effects, by stimulation of proliferation and migration of wound relating skin cells, by activation or inhibition of integrin receptors on the cell surface or by its pro-angiogenic effect. We summarize the effects of plasma on eukaryotic cells, especially on keratinocytes in terms of viability, proliferation, DNA, adhesion molecules and angiogenesis together with the role of reactive oxygen species and other components of plasma. The outcome of first clinical trials regarding wound healing is pointed out. PMID:25489414

  8. Patterning of graphene for flexible electronics with remote atmospheric-pressure plasma using dielectric barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Duk Jae; Park, Jeongwon; Geon Han, Jeon

    2016-08-01

    We show results of the patterning of graphene layers on poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) films through remote atmospheric-pressure dielectric barrier discharge plasma. The size of plasma discharge electrodes was adjusted for large-area and role-to-role-type substrates. Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) was used to analyze the characteristics of charge species in atmospheric-pressure plasma. The OES emission intensity of the O2* peaks (248.8 and 259.3 nm) shows the highest value at the ratio of \\text{N}2:\\text{clean dry air (CDA)} = 100:1 due to the highest plasma discharge. The PET surface roughness and hydrophilic behavior were controlled with CDA flow rate during the process. Although the atmospheric-pressure plasma treatment of the PET film led to an increase in the FT-IR intensity of C–O bonding at 1240 cm‑1, the peak intensity at 1710 cm‑1 (C=O bonding) decreased. The patterning of graphene layers was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy.

  9. Patterning of graphene for flexible electronics with remote atmospheric-pressure plasma using dielectric barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Duk Jae; Park, Jeongwon; Geon Han, Jeon

    2016-08-01

    We show results of the patterning of graphene layers on poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) films through remote atmospheric-pressure dielectric barrier discharge plasma. The size of plasma discharge electrodes was adjusted for large-area and role-to-role-type substrates. Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) was used to analyze the characteristics of charge species in atmospheric-pressure plasma. The OES emission intensity of the O2* peaks (248.8 and 259.3 nm) shows the highest value at the ratio of \\text{N}2:\\text{clean dry air (CDA)} = 100:1 due to the highest plasma discharge. The PET surface roughness and hydrophilic behavior were controlled with CDA flow rate during the process. Although the atmospheric-pressure plasma treatment of the PET film led to an increase in the FT-IR intensity of C-O bonding at 1240 cm-1, the peak intensity at 1710 cm-1 (C=O bonding) decreased. The patterning of graphene layers was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy.

  10. Non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasma possible application in wound healing.

    PubMed

    Haertel, Beate; von Woedtke, Thomas; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; Lindequist, Ulrike

    2014-11-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasma, also named cold plasma, is defined as a partly ionized gas. Therefore, it cannot be equated with plasma from blood; it is not biological in nature. Non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasma is a new innovative approach in medicine not only for the treatment of wounds, but with a wide-range of other applications, as e.g. topical treatment of other skin diseases with microbial involvement or treatment of cancer diseases. This review emphasizes plasma effects on wound healing. Non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasma can support wound healing by its antiseptic effects, by stimulation of proliferation and migration of wound relating skin cells, by activation or inhibition of integrin receptors on the cell surface or by its pro-angiogenic effect. We summarize the effects of plasma on eukaryotic cells, especially on keratinocytes in terms of viability, proliferation, DNA, adhesion molecules and angiogenesis together with the role of reactive oxygen species and other components of plasma. The outcome of first clinical trials regarding wound healing is pointed out.

  11. Efficacy of Atmospheric Pressure Plasma as an Antibacterial Agent Against Enterococcus Faecalis in Vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yingguang; Yang, Ping; Lu, Xinpei; Xiong, Zilan; Ye, Tao; Xiong, Qing; Sun, Ziyong

    2011-02-01

    Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis) is a microorganism that can survive extreme challenges in obturated root canals. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma plume against E. faecalis in vitro. A non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet device which could generate a cold plasma plume carrying a peak current of 300 mA was used. The antibacterial efficacy of this device against E. faecalis and its biofilm under different conditions was detected. The antibacterial efficacy of the plasma against E. faecalis and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) was also evaluated. After plasma treatment, the average diameter of inhibition zone on S. aureus and E. faecalis was 2.62±0.26 cm and 1.06±0.30 cm, respectively (P < 0.05). The diameter was increased with prolongation of the treatment duration. The diameters of inhibition zone of the sealed Petri dishes were larger than those of the uncovered Petri dishes. There was significant difference in colony-forming units between plasma group and control group on E. faecalis biofilm (P < 0.01). The transmission electron microscopy revealed that the ultrastructural changes cytoderm of E. faecalis were observed after treatment for 2 min. It is concluded that the non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma could serve as an effective adjunct to standard endodontic microbial treatment.

  12. Particle-in-Cell Simulations of Atmospheric Pressure He/2%H2O Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, E.; Lieberman, M. A.; Lichtenberg, A. J.; Graves, D. B.; Gopalakrishnan, R.

    2015-09-01

    Atmospheric pressure micro-discharges in contact with liquid surfaces are of increasing interest, especially in the bio-medical field. We conduct 1D3v particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of a voltage-driven 1 mm width atmospheric pressure He/2% H2O plasma discharge in series with an 0.5 mm width liquid H2O layer and a 1mm width quartz dielectric layer. A previously developed two-temperature hybrid global model of atmospheric pressure He/H2O discharges was used to determine the most important species and collisional reactions to use in the PIC simulations. We found that H13O6+, H5O3-, and electrons were the most prominent charged species, while most of the metastable helium He* was quenched via Penning ionization. The ion-induced secondary emission coefficient γi was assumed to be 0.15 at all surfaces. A series of simulations were conducted at 27.12 MHz with Jrf ~ 800-2200 A/m2. The H2O rotational and vibrational excitation losses were so high that electrons reached the walls at thermal temperatures. We also simulated a much lower frequency case of 50 kHz with Vrf = 10 kV. In this case, the discharge ran in a pure time-varying γ-mode. This work was supported by the Department of Energy Office of Fusion Energy Science Contract DE-SC0001939.

  13. Sampling of ions at atmospheric pressure: ion transmission and ion energy studied by simulation and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Große-Kreul, Simon; Hübner, Simon; Benedikt, Jan; von Keudell, Achim

    2016-04-01

    Mass spectrometry of ions from atmospheric pressure plasmas is a challenging diagnostic method that has been applied to a large variety of cold plasma sources in the past. However, absolute densities can usually not be obtained, moreover, the process of sampling of ions and neutrals from such a plasma inherently influences the measured composition. These issues are studied in this contribution by a combination of experimental and numerical methods. Different numerical domains are sequentially coupled to calculate the ion transmission from the source to the mass analyzer. It is found that the energy of the sampled ions created by a radio-frequency microplasma operated in a He-N2 mixture at atmospheric pressure is of the order of 0.1 eV and that it depends linearly on the ion mass in good agreement with the expectation for seeded particles accelerated in a supersonic expansion. Moreover, the measured ion energy distribution from an afterglow of an atmospheric pressure plasma can be reproduced on basis of the particle trajectories in the sampling system. Eventually, an estimation of the absolute flux of ions to the detector is deduced.

  14. Intracellular effects of atmospheric-pressure plasmas on melanoma cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishaq, M.; Bazaka, K.; Ostrikov, K.

    2015-12-01

    Gas discharge plasmas formed at atmospheric pressure and near room temperature have recently been shown as a promising tool for cancer treatment. The mechanism of the plasma action is attributed to generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, electric fields, charges, and photons. The relative importance of different modes of action of atmospheric-pressure plasmas depends on the process parameters and specific treatment objects. Hence, an in-depth understanding of biological mechanisms that underpin plasma-induced death in cancer cells is required to optimise plasma processing conditions. Here, the intracellular factors involved in the observed anti-cancer activity in melanoma Mel007 cells are studied, focusing on the effect of the plasma treatment dose on the expression of tumour suppressor protein TP73. Over-expression of TP73 causes cell growth arrest and/or apoptosis, and hence can potentially be targeted to enhance killing efficacy and selectivity of the plasma treatment. It is shown that the plasma treatment induces dose-dependent up-regulation of TP73 gene expression, resulting in significantly elevated levels of TP73 RNA and protein in plasma-treated melanoma cells. Silencing of TP73 expression by means of RNA interference inhibited the anticancer effects of the plasma, similar to the effect of caspase inhibitor z-VAD or ROS scavenger N-acetyl cysteine. These results confirm the role of TP73 protein in dose-dependent regulation of anticancer activity of atmospheric-pressure plasmas.

  15. Spectroscopic characterization of rovibrational temperatures in atmospheric pressure He /CH4 plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Se Youn; Kim, D. B.; Gweon, B.; Choe, W.

    2008-10-01

    Atmospheric pressure of helium (He) and methane (CH4) mixture discharge characteristics are investigated using emission spectroscopic methods. Plasmas are produced in a radio frequency capacitively coupled device at atmospheric pressure in the ambient air. Without the CH4 gas introduced in the plasma, the emission spectrum exhibits typical helium discharge characteristics showing helium atomic lines with nitrogen molecular bands and oxygen atomic lines resulting from air impurities. Addition of a small amount (<1%) of CH4 to the supplied He results in the emission of CN (B2∑+-X2∑+: violet system) and CH (A2Δ-X2∏: 430nm system) molecular bands. Analyzing the CN and CH diatomic molecular emission spectra, the vibrational temperature (Tvib) and rotational temperature (Trot) are simultaneously obtained. As input power levels are raised from 20Wto200W, Tvib and Trot are increased from 4230Kto6310K and from 340K to500K, respectively. On the contrary, increasing the CH4 amount brings about the decrease of both temperatures because CH4 is harder to ionize than He. The emission intensities of CN and CH radicals, which are important in plasma processing, are also changed along with the temperature variation. From the results, the atmospheric pressure plasma shows strong nonequilibrium discharge properties, which may be effectively utilized for thermal damage free material treatments.

  16. Atmospheric pressure plasma jet with high-voltage power supply based on piezoelectric transformer

    SciTech Connect

    Babij, Michał; Kowalski, Zbigniew W. Nitsch, Karol; Gotszalk, Teodor; Silberring, Jerzy

    2014-05-15

    The dielectric barrier discharge plasma jet, an example of the nonthermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ), generates low-temperature plasmas that are suitable for the atomization of volatile species and can also be served as an ionization source for ambient mass and ion mobility spectrometry. A new design of APPJ for mass spectrometry has been built in our group. In these plasma sources magnetic transformers (MTs) and inductors are typically used in power supplies but they present several drawbacks that are even more evident when dealing with high-voltage normally used in APPJs. To overcome these disadvantages, high frequency generators with the absence of MT are proposed in the literature. However, in the case of miniaturized APPJs these conventional power converters, built of ferromagnetic cores and inductors or by means of LC resonant tank circuits, are not so useful as piezoelectric transformer (PT) based power converters due to bulky components and small efficiency. We made and examined a novel atmospheric pressure plasma jet with PT supplier served as ionization source for ambient mass spectrometry, and especially mobile spectrometry where miniaturization, integration of components, and clean plasma are required. The objective of this paper is to describe the concept, design, and implementation of this miniaturized piezoelectric transformer-based atmospheric pressure plasma jet.

  17. Intracellular effects of atmospheric-pressure plasmas on melanoma cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ishaq, M.; Bazaka, K.; Ostrikov, K.

    2015-12-15

    Gas discharge plasmas formed at atmospheric pressure and near room temperature have recently been shown as a promising tool for cancer treatment. The mechanism of the plasma action is attributed to generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, electric fields, charges, and photons. The relative importance of different modes of action of atmospheric-pressure plasmas depends on the process parameters and specific treatment objects. Hence, an in-depth understanding of biological mechanisms that underpin plasma-induced death in cancer cells is required to optimise plasma processing conditions. Here, the intracellular factors involved in the observed anti-cancer activity in melanoma Mel007 cells are studied, focusing on the effect of the plasma treatment dose on the expression of tumour suppressor protein TP73. Over-expression of TP73 causes cell growth arrest and/or apoptosis, and hence can potentially be targeted to enhance killing efficacy and selectivity of the plasma treatment. It is shown that the plasma treatment induces dose-dependent up-regulation of TP73 gene expression, resulting in significantly elevated levels of TP73 RNA and protein in plasma-treated melanoma cells. Silencing of TP73 expression by means of RNA interference inhibited the anticancer effects of the plasma, similar to the effect of caspase inhibitor z-VAD or ROS scavenger N-acetyl cysteine. These results confirm the role of TP73 protein in dose-dependent regulation of anticancer activity of atmospheric-pressure plasmas.

  18. Atmospheric pressure plasma jet with high-voltage power supply based on piezoelectric transformer.

    PubMed

    Babij, Michał; Kowalski, Zbigniew W; Nitsch, Karol; Silberring, Jerzy; Gotszalk, Teodor

    2014-05-01

    The dielectric barrier discharge plasma jet, an example of the nonthermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ), generates low-temperature plasmas that are suitable for the atomization of volatile species and can also be served as an ionization source for ambient mass and ion mobility spectrometry. A new design of APPJ for mass spectrometry has been built in our group. In these plasma sources magnetic transformers (MTs) and inductors are typically used in power supplies but they present several drawbacks that are even more evident when dealing with high-voltage normally used in APPJs. To overcome these disadvantages, high frequency generators with the absence of MT are proposed in the literature. However, in the case of miniaturized APPJs these conventional power converters, built of ferromagnetic cores and inductors or by means of LC resonant tank circuits, are not so useful as piezoelectric transformer (PT) based power converters due to bulky components and small efficiency. We made and examined a novel atmospheric pressure plasma jet with PT supplier served as ionization source for ambient mass spectrometry, and especially mobile spectrometry where miniaturization, integration of components, and clean plasma are required. The objective of this paper is to describe the concept, design, and implementation of this miniaturized piezoelectric transformer-based atmospheric pressure plasma jet. PMID:24880391

  19. Surface chemical changes of atmospheric pressure plasma treated rabbit fibres important for felting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Štěpánová, Vlasta; Slavíček, Pavel; Stupavská, Monika; Jurmanová, Jana; Černák, Mirko

    2015-11-01

    We introduce the atmospheric pressure plasma treatment as a suitable procedure for in-line industrial application of rabbit fibres pre-treatment. Changes of rabbit fibre properties due to the plasma treatment were studied in order to develop new technology of plasma-based treatment before felting. Diffuse Coplanar Surface Barrier Discharge (DCSBD) in ambient air at atmospheric pressure was used for plasma treatment. Scanning electron microscopy was used for determination of the fibres morphology before and after plasma treatment. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were used for evaluation of reactive groups. The concentration of carbon decreased and conversely the concentration of nitrogen and oxygen increased after plasma treatment. Aging effect of plasma treated fibres was also investigated. Using Washburn method the significant increase of fibres wettability was observed after plasma treatment. New approach of pre-treatment of fibres before felting using plasma was developed. Plasma treatment of fibres at atmospheric pressure can replace the chemical method which consists of application of strong acids on fibres.

  20. Influence of the radiation pressure on the planetary exospheres: density profiles, escape flux and atmospheric stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beth, A.; Garnier, P.; Toublanc, D.; Dandouras, I.; Mazelle, C.

    2015-10-01

    The uppermost layer of the atmosphere, the exosphere,is not well-known in its global structure since the densities are very low compared to instrument detection capabilities. Because of rare collisions and high Knudsen numbers, the motion of light species (H,H2, ...)in the corona is essentially determined by the external forces : the gravitation from the planet, the radiation pressure, as well the stellar gravity. In this work, we calculate rigorously and analytically,based on the Hamiltonian mechanics and Liouville theorem, the impact of the radiation pressure and gravitation from the planet on the structure of the exosphere. This approach was partially used by Bishop and Chamberlain (1989) but only in the 2D case : we extend it to the 3D case. Assuming a collisionless exosphere and a constant radiation pressure near the planet, we determine the density profiles for ballistic particles (the main contribution for densities in the lower exosphere) for light species as a function of the angle with respect to the Sun direction. We also obtain an analytical formula for the escape flux at the subsolar point, which can be compared with the Jeans' escape flux. Finally, we study the effect of the radiation pressure on the zero velocity curves, position of the Roche lobe and Hill's region for the well-known Three-Body problem especially for Hot Jupiters and discuss about the validity of our model. The goal is to bring some constraints on modelling of exoplanet atmospheres.

  1. THE HABITABLE ZONE OF EARTH-LIKE PLANETS WITH DIFFERENT LEVELS OF ATMOSPHERIC PRESSURE

    SciTech Connect

    Vladilo, Giovanni; Murante, Giuseppe; Silva, Laura; Provenzale, Antonello; Ferri, Gaia; Ragazzini, Gregorio

    2013-04-10

    As a contribution to the study of the habitability of extrasolar planets, we implemented a one-dimensional energy balance model (EBM), the simplest seasonal model of planetary climate, with new prescriptions for most physical quantities. Here we apply our EBM to investigate the surface habitability of planets with an Earth-like atmospheric composition but different levels of surface pressure. The habitability, defined as the mean fraction of the planet's surface on which liquid water could exist, is estimated from the pressure-dependent liquid water temperature range, taking into account seasonal and latitudinal variations of surface temperature. By running several thousands of EBM simulations we generated a map of the habitable zone (HZ) in the plane of the orbital semi-major axis, a, and surface pressure, p, for planets in circular orbits around a Sun-like star. As pressure increases, the HZ becomes broader, with an increase of 0.25 AU in its radial extent from p = 1/3 to 3 bar. At low pressure, the habitability is low and varies with a; at high pressure, the habitability is high and relatively constant inside the HZ. We interpret these results in terms of the pressure dependence of the greenhouse effect, the efficiency of horizontal heat transport, and the extent of the liquid water temperature range. Within the limits discussed in the paper, the results can be extended to planets in eccentric orbits around non-solar-type stars. The main characteristics of the pressure-dependent HZ are modestly affected by variations of planetary properties, particularly at high pressure.

  2. Non-vacuum field desorption ion source implemented under super-atmospheric pressure.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lee Chuin; Rahman, Md Matiur; Hiraoka, Kenzo

    2012-08-01

    Standard field desorption (FD) ionization is implemented under high vacuum condition. In this paper, non-vacuum FD is performed under a super-atmospheric pressure environment using untreated tungsten wires as FD emitter, and the ion source was coupled to a commercial linear ion trap mass spectrometer. The operating pressure of the ion source was 6 bars which was high enough to provide sufficient dielectric strength to the working gas so that the high voltage that was required for FD could be applied to the emitter without occurrence of electrical discharge. Non-volatile sample deposited on the bare tungsten wire FD emitter was heated by flowing direct current through the emitter. Similar to vacuum FD, the formation of conical protrusion of the liquefied sample layer under the strong electric field was also observed. Using the present ion source, high pressure field-desorption of polar neutral compounds, organic salts and ionic liquids is demonstrated. PMID:22899518

  3. Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition of Graphene Using a Liquid Benzene Precursor.

    PubMed

    Kang, Cheong; Jung, Da Hee; Lee, Jin Seok

    2015-11-01

    Graphene has attracted great attention owing to its unique structural and electrical properties. Among various synthetic approaches of the graphene, metal assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is the most reasonable and proper method to produce large-scale and low-defect graphene films. Until now, CVD from gaseous hydrocarbon sources has shown great promises for large-scale graphene growth, but high growth temperature is required for such growth. A recent work by using liquid benzene precursor has shown that monolayer graphene could be obtained at 300 degrees C by low pressure, required for high vacuum equipment. Here, we report the first successful attempt of atmospheric pressure CVD graphene growth on Cu foil using liquid benzene as a precursor. We investigated the effect of hydrogen partial pressure, growth time, and precursor temperature on the domain size of as-grown graphene. Also, micro-Raman analysis confirmed that these reaction parameters influenced the number of layer and uniformity of the graphene.

  4. Medium Vacuum Electron Emitter as Soft Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Source for Organic Molecules.

    PubMed

    Liedtke, Sascha; Ahlmann, Norman; Marggraf, Ulrich; Schütz, Alexander; Vautz, Wolfgang; Franzke, Joachim

    2016-05-01

    An electron emitter as a soft atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source is presented, which operates at inner pressures of the device in the medium vacuum range (>10(-3) hPa). Conventional nonradioactive electron emitters require high vacuum (<10(-6) hPa) to prevent electrical sparkovers. The emitter presented here contains structural modifications of an existing setup, which inhibits electrical breakdowns up to 10(-2) hPa at 8 kV acceleration voltage. The increased inner pressure reduces the ionization efficiency until 10(-3) hPa-achievable without a turbomolecular pump-by 2% compared to high-vacuum conditions. This can be compensated with an increase of the electron source output. The functionality of this ion source is demonstrated with mass spectrometric and ion mobility measurements of acetone, eucalyptol, and diisopropyl methanephosphonate. Additional mass spectrometric measurements of 20 different organic compounds demonstrate the soft characteristics of this ionization source. PMID:27046293

  5. Detection of HCl and HF by TTFMS and WMS.

    PubMed

    De Luca, Anna Chiara; Pesce, Giuseppe; Rusciano, Giulia; Sasso, Antonio

    2006-04-01

    In this work we discuss on a compact spectrometer based on DFB diode lasers for detection of chloridric and fluoridric acids. HCl and HF concentrations are determined through optical absorption of the P(4) line (lambda=1.7 microm) and the R(3) line (lambda=1.3 microm), respectively. Both lines belong to first overtone vibrational bands and their line strengths are 7.8 x 10(-21)cm/molecule for HCl and 2.8 x 10(-20)cm/molecule for HF. We chose these lines for their relative high intensities and because they are quite far from water vapour lines which represent the main interfering gas for trace-gases analysis. To detect these species we used two different high frequency modulation techniques: two-tone frequency modulation spectroscopy (f(1)=800 MHz and f(2)=804 MHz) was used for HCl while for HF we followed a simpler approach based on wavelength modulation spectroscopy (f=600 kHz). We demonstrate that the two techniques provide comparable detection limit of about 80 ppbV at atmospheric pressure. Positive testing of our spectrometer makes it suitable for in situ measurements of exhaust gases coming from waste incinerators.

  6. Meteorology in ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm: an institutional study and a meta-analysis of published studies reporting atmospheric pressure.

    PubMed

    Takagi, H; Watanabe, T; Mizuno, Y; Kawai, N; Umemoto, T

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this paper was to determine whether weather factors including atmospheric pressure are associated with the occurrence of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (RAAA). We investigated our institutional experiences of RAAA in more than 150 patients during 8 years. Further, we performed a meta-analysis of published studies reporting the influence of atmospheric pressure on RAAA. We retrospectively evaluated 152 patients who underwent surgery for RAAA (including ruptured iliac arterial aneurysm) at our institute between 1 January 2006 and 31 December 2013. Daily regional meteorological data (in the nearest weather station located 3.5 km from the hospital) were obtained online from Japan Meteorological Agency. To identify comparative studies of mean atmospheric pressure on the day with RAAA versus that on the day without RAAA, MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched through January 2014 using Web-based search engines (PubMed and OVID). Mean sea level atmospheric pressure, delta mean atmospheric pressure (difference between mean sea level atmospheric pressure on the day and that on the previous day), and sunshine duration on the day with RAAA were significantly lower than those on the day without RAAA: 1012.43±7.44 versus 1013.71±6.49 hPa, P=0.039, -1.18±5.15 versus 0.05±5.62 hPa, P=0.005; and 4.76±3.76 versus 5.47±3.88 h, P=0.026; respectively. A pooled analysis of 8 studies (including our institutional study) demonstrated that mean atmospheric pressure on the day with RAAA was significantly lower than that on the day without RAAA: standardized mean difference, -0.09; 95% confidence interval, -0.14 to -0.04; P=0.0009. Atmospheric pressure on the day with RAAA appears lower than that on the day without RAAA. Atmospheric pressure may be associated with the occurrence of RAAA.

  7. Determining the response of sea level to atmospheric pressure forcing using TOPEX/POSEIDON data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fu, Lee-Lueng; Pihos, Greg

    1994-01-01

    The static response of sea level to the forcing of atmospheric pressure, the so-called inverted barometer (IB) effect, is investigated using TOPEX/POSEIDON data. This response, characterized by the rise and fall of sea level to compensate for the change of atmospheric pressure at a rate of -1 cm/mbar, is not associated with any ocean currents and hence is normally treated as an error to be removed from sea level observation. Linear regression and spectral transfer function analyses are applied to sea level and pressure to examine the validity of the IB effect. In regions outside the tropics, the regression coefficient is found to be consistently close to the theoretical value except for the regions of western boundary currents, where the mesoscale variability interferes with the IB effect. The spectral transfer function shows near IB response at periods of 30 degrees is -0.84 +/- 0.29 cm/mbar (1 standard deviation). The deviation from = 1 cm /mbar is shown to be caused primarily by the effect of wind forcing on sea level, based on multivariate linear regression model involving both pressure and wind forcing. The regression coefficient for pressure resulting from the multivariate analysis is -0.96 +/- 0.32 cm/mbar. In the tropics the multivariate analysis fails because sea level in the tropics is primarily responding to remote wind forcing. However, after removing from the data the wind-forced sea level estimated by a dynamic model of the tropical Pacific, the pressure regression coefficient improves from -1.22 +/- 0.69 cm/mbar to -0.99 +/- 0.46 cm/mbar, clearly revealing an IB response. The result of the study suggests that with a proper removal of the effect of wind forcing the IB effect is valid in most of the open ocean at periods longer than 20 days and spatial scales larger than 500 km.

  8. Temperature diagnostics of a non-thermal plasma jet at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäfer, Jan

    2013-09-01

    The study reflects the concept of the temperature as a physical quantity resulting from the second thermodynamic law. The reliability of different approaches of the temperature diagnostics of open non-equilibrium systems is discussed using examples of low temperature atmospheric pressure discharges. The focus of this work is a miniaturized non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet for local surface treatment at ambient atmosphere. The micro-discharge is driven with a capacitively coupled radio frequency electric field at 27.12 MHz and fed with argon at rates of about 1 slm through the capillary with an inner diameter of 4 mm. The discharge consists of several contracted filaments with diameter around 300 μm which are rotating azimuthally in the capillary in a self-organized manner. While the measured temperatures of the filament core exceed 700 K, the heat impact on a target below the plasma jet remains limited leading to target temperatures below 400 K. Different kinds of temperatures and energy transport processes are proposed and experimentally investigated. Nevertheless, a reliable and detailed temperature diagnostics is a challenge. We report on a novel diagnostics approach for the spatially and temporally resolved measurement of the gas temperature based on the optical properties of the plasma. Laser Schlieren Deflectometry is adapted to explore temperature profiles of filaments and their behaviour. In parallel, the method demonstrates a fundamental Fermat's principle of minimal energy. Information acquired with this method plays an important role for the optimization of local thin film deposition and surface functionalization by means of the atmospheric pressure plasma jet. The work was supported in part by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft within SFB-TR 24.

  9. Understanding the Flowing Atmospheric-Pressure Afterglow (FAPA) Ambient Ionization Source through Optical Means

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelley, Jacob T.; Chan, George C.-Y.; Hieftje, Gary M.

    2012-02-01

    The advent of ambient desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (ADI-MS) has led to the development of a large number of atmospheric-pressure ionization sources. The largest group of such sources is based on electrical discharges; yet, the desorption and ionization processes that they employ remain largely uncharacterized. Here, the atmospheric-pressure glow discharge (APGD) and afterglow of a helium flowing atmospheric-pressure afterglow (FAPA) ionization source were examined by optical emission spectroscopy. Spatial emission profiles of species created in the APGD and afterglow were recorded under a variety of operating conditions, including discharge current, electrode polarity, and plasma-gas flow rate. From these studies, it was found that an appreciable amount of atmospheric H2O vapor, N2, and O2 diffuses through the hole in the plate electrode into the discharge to become a major source of reagent ions in ADI-MS analyses. Spatially resolved plasma parameters, such as OH rotational temperature (Trot) and electron number density (ne), were also measured in the APGD. Maximum values for Trot and ne were found to be ~1100 K and ~4 × 1019 m-3, respectively, and were both located at the pin cathode. In the afterglow, rotational temperatures from OH and N{2/+} yielded drastically different values, with OH temperatures matching those obtained from infrared thermography measurements. The higher N{2/+} temperature is believed to be caused by charge-transfer ionization of N2 by He{2/+}. These findings are discussed in the context of previously reported ADI-MS analyses with the FAPA source.

  10. Production of stable, non-thermal atmospheric pressure rf capacitive plasmas using gases other than helium or neon

    DOEpatents

    Park, Jaeyoung; Henins, Ivars

    2005-06-21

    The present invention enables the production of stable, steady state, non-thermal atmospheric pressure rf capacitive .alpha.-mode plasmas using gases other than helium and neon. In particular, the current invention generates and maintains stable, steady-state, non-thermal atmospheric pressure rf .alpha.-mode plasmas using pure argon or argon with reactive gas mixtures, pure oxygen or air. By replacing rare and expensive helium with more readily available gases, this invention makes it more economical to use atmospheric pressure rf .alpha.-mode plasmas for various materials processing applications.

  11. Airborne Lidar Measurements of Atmospheric Pressure Made Using the Oxygen A-Band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riris, Haris; Rodriquez, Michael D.; Allan, Graham R.; Hasselbrack, William E.; Mao, Jianping; Stephen, Mark A.; Abshire, James B.

    2012-01-01

    Accurate measurements of greenhouse gas mixing ratios on a global scale are currently needed to gain a better understanding of climate change and its possible impact on our planet. In order to remotely measure greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere with regard to dry air, the air number density in the atmosphere is also needed in deriving the greenhouse gas concentrations. Since oxygen is stable and uniformly mixed in the atmosphere at 20.95%, the measurement of an oxygen absorption in the atmosphere can be used to infer the dry air density and used to calculate the dry air mixing ratio of a greenhouse gas, such as carbon dioxide or methane. OUT technique of measuring Oxygen uses integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) with an Erbium Doped Fiber Amplifier (EDF A) laser system and single photon counting module (SPCM). It measures the absorbance of several on- and off-line wavelengths tuned to an O2 absorption line in the A-band at 764.7 nm. The choice of wavelengths allows us to maximize the pressure sensitivity using the trough between two absorptions in the Oxygen A-band. Our retrieval algorithm uses ancillary meteorological and aircraft altitude information to fit the experimentally obtained lidar O2 line shapes to a model atmosphere and derives the pressure from the profiles of the two lines. We have demonstrated O2 measurements from the ground and from an airborne platform. In this paper we will report on our airborne measurements during our 2011 campaign for the ASCENDS program.

  12. Do Weather-Related Ambient Atmospheric-Pressure Changes Influence Sleep Disordered Breathing?

    PubMed Central

    Doherty, Michael John; Youn, Clover E.; Haltiner, Alan Matthew; Watson, Nathaniel Fletcher

    2010-01-01

    Objective: High-altitude studies of sleep disordered breathing (SDB) show increases in apnea hypopnea indices with elevation gains. Hypoxic changes, rather than reductions in atmospheric pressure (AP), are thought to be the driving factor. Ambient pressure-related changes in SDB have not been extensively studied at low altitude. We performed a cross-sectional study of weather-related AP effects on measures of SDB at the University of Washington Medicine Sleep Institute, a Seattle, Washington-based polysomnography lab located 200 feet above sea level. Method: Obstructive, central, and apnea-hypopnea indices from 537 patients were retrospectively correlated to mean 8-hour date-matched overnight AP data. Linear regression analysis and interquartile comparison of AP-related respiratory indices were performed and adjusted for age, sex, and body mass index. Results: The obstructive apnea index increased with lower weather-related APs (p = 0.01 for linear trend), interquartile analysis showed significant worsening with lowered mean, minimum, and maximum nightly APs. Similar changes were not seen with central or apnea-hypopnea indices. Conclusions: The obstructive apnea index is altered by changes in weather-related AP during diagnostic polysomnography performed at 200 feet above sea level. Small changes in ambient atmospheric pressure due to weather systems may be important in the pathophysiology and diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea. Citation: Doherty MJ; Youn CE; Haltiner AM; Watson NF. Do weather-related ambient atmospheric-pressure changes influence sleep disordered breathing? J Clin Sleep Med 2010;6(2):152-156. PMID:20411692

  13. An Experimental Study of the Statistical Scaling of Turbulent Surface Pressure in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyons, G. W.; Murray, N. E.

    2015-12-01

    Turbulence in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) produces fluctuations in the static pressure. The instantaneous pressure at a point depends on an integral over the entire flow; therefore, the effects from turbulence far aloft may be felt at the earth's surface. The statistics of fluctuating pressure at the surface have been studied extensively in the context of wall-bounded engineering-type flows. At best, these neutral flows are a special case of the thermally-stratified ABL, but relatively few experimental studies have considered pressure at the ground under various stability conditions. Here the scaling of pressure statistics at the surface, particularly the spectral density, is reported over a range of convective and stable conditions for both inner and outer turbulence parameters. Measurements of turbulent surface pressure were made using low-frequency microphones buried flush to the ground in a field near Laramie, Wyoming. Simultaneous measurements from three near-surface sonic anemometers and a 50-meter wind tower give estimates of the mean surface-layer parameters. The normalization of the pressure spectrum with the inner scales collapses the spectra along the high-frequency viscous power-law band. The wall shear stress, Obukhov length, L, and horizontal integral scale, λ, are identified as outer scaling parameters for the surface pressure spectrum from an integral solution employing a Monin-Obukhov-similar profile and a simple model of inhomogeneous surface-layer turbulence. Normalization with the outer scales collapses the spectra at low frequencies. Spectral scaling also reveals trends with λ/L in the low-frequency region for both convective and stable boundary layers.

  14. Low-temperature and low atmospheric pressure infrared reflectance spectroscopy of Mars soil analog materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, Janice L.; Pieters, Carle M.

    1995-01-01

    Infrared reflectance spectra of carefully selected Mars soil analog materials have been measured under low atmospheric pressures and temperatures. Chemically altered montmorillonites containing ferrihydrite and hydrated ferric sulfate complexes are examined, as well as synthetic ferrihydrite and a palagonitic soil from Haleakala, Maui. Reflectance spectra of these analog materials exhibit subtle visible to near-infrared features, which are indicative of nanophase ferric oxides or oxyhydroxides and are similar to features observed in the spectra of the bright regions of Mars. Infrared reflectance spectra of these analogs include hydration features due to structural OH, bound H2O, and adsorbed H2O. The spectral character of these hydration features is highly dependent on the sample environment and on the nature of the H2O/OH in the analogs. The behavior of the hydration features near 1.9 micron, 2.2 micron, 2.7 micron, 3 micron, and 6 microns are reported here in spectra measured under a Marslike atmospheric environment. In spectra of these analogs measured under dry Earth atmospheric conditions the 1.9-micron band depth is 8-17%; this band is much stronger under moist conditions. Under Marslike atmospheric conditions the 1.9-micron feature is broad and barely discernible (1-3% band depth) in spectra of the ferrihydrite and palagonitic soil samples. In comparable spectra of the ferric sulfate-bearing montmorillonite the 1.9-micron feature is also broad, but stronger (6% band depth). In the low atmospheric pressure and temperature spectra of the ferrihydrite-bearing montmorillonite this feature is sharper than the other analogs and relatively stronger (6% band depth). Although the intensity of the 3-micron band is weaker in spectra of each of the analogs when measured under Marslike conditions, the 3-micron band remains a dominant feature and is especially broad in spectra of the ferrihydrite and palagonitic soil. The structural OH features observed in these materials

  15. Low-temperature and low atmospheric pressure infrared reflectance spectroscopy of Mars soil analog materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, Janice L.; Pieters, Carle M.

    1995-01-01

    Infrared reflectance spectra of carefully selected Mars soil analog materials have been measured under low atmospheric pressures and temperatures. Chemically altered montmorillonites containing ferrihydrite and hydrated ferric sulfate complexes are examined, as well as synthetic ferrihydrate and a palagonitic soil from Haleakala, Maui. Reflectance spectra of these analog materials exhibit subtle visible to near-infrared features, which are indicative of nanophase ferric oxides or oxyhydroxides and are similar to features observed in the spectra of the bright regions of Mars. Infrared reflectance spectra of these analogs include hydration features due to structural OH, bound H2O and adsorbed H2O. The spectal character of these hydration features is highly dependent on the sample environment and on the nature of the H2O/OH in the analogs. The behavior of the hydration features near 1.9 micrometers, 2.2 micrometers, 2.7 micrometers, 3 micrometers, and 6 micrometers are reported here in spetra measured under Marslike atmospheric environment. In spectra of these analogs measured under dry Earth atmospheric conditions the 1.9-micrometer band depth is 8-17%; this band is much stonger under moist conditions. Under Marslike atmospheric conditions the 1.9-micrometer feature is broad and barely discernible (1-3% band depth) in spectra of the ferrihydrite and palagonitic soil samples. In comparable spectra of the ferric sulfate-bearing montmorillonite the 1.9-micrometer feature is also broad, but stronger (6% band depth). In the low atmospheric pressure and temperature spectra of the ferrihydrite-bearing montmorillonite this feature is sharper than the other analogs and relatively stronger (6% band depth). Although the intensity of the 3- micrometer band is weaker in spectra of each of the analogs when measured under Marslike conditions, the 3-micromter band remains a dominant feature and is especially broad in spectra of the ferrihydrite and palagonitic soil. The structural

  16. Atmospheric pressure plasma CVD as a tool to functionalise wound dressings.

    PubMed

    Spange, Sebastian; Pfuch, Andreas; Wiegand, Cornelia; Beier, Oliver; Hipler, Uta C; Grünler, Bernd

    2015-02-01

    The main goal of this investigation was the preparation of an antibacterial layer system for additional modification of wound dressings with atmospheric plasma. Furthermore, the modified wound dressings were checked on there bactericidal and cytotoxic activity. The layer system was applied by using a novel atmospheric pressure plasma chemical vapour deposition technique on a variety of textile substrates which are suitable as wound dressing materials. The layer system composed of silicon dioxide with in situ generated embedded silver nanoparticles. The bactericidal activity of the produced wound dressings was investigated against different bacteria like Staphylococcus aureus and Klebsiella pneumoniae while the cytotoxic potential of the coated wound dressings was verified using human keratinocytes. Even at low concentrations of silver precursor a strong antibacterial effect was observed in direct contact with S. aureus and K. pneumoniae. Furthermore, extractions produced from the coated textiles showed a good antibacterial effect. By means of optimised coating parameters a therapeutic window for those wound dressings could be identified. Consequently, the atmospheric pressure plasma chemical vapour deposition technique promise an effective and low cost modification of wound dressing materials.

  17. Computer Code Study of Asteroid Entry into Venusian Atmosphere: Pressure and Density Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, Robert M.

    1997-01-01

    Analysis of the cratering records on the Moon, Mercury, and Mars have shown similar size-frequency distributions of craters produced during the late heavy bombardment of the inner solar system (Strom, 1988). Venus provides a valuable data base of information on the impacting population for more recent time. Because of resurfacing events, the Venusian cratering record has been estimated to be only about 500 million years old, and for the most part is in pristine condition, thereby producing an opportunity to discover the properties (size/velocity distribution) of the objects that recently impacted its surface. The Magellan IR mapping of the Venusian surface has produced an extremely high-quality set of crater topographies. The observed deficit of small craters is qualitatively explained by atmospheric effects on impactor breakup and the retardation effects of pressure on crater formation. Information about resurfacing history and impactor flux population can only be conjectured using arrant approximations for atmospheric effects on crater size scaling, such as assuming the absence of pressure effects or using other ad hoc approximations for this dependence. The recent work by Ivanov et al.(1986; 1992); Phillips et al.(199 1; 1992); Schaber et al. (1992) and others support the notion that atmospheric effects may have strongly influenced the Venusian cratering record. The work reported here looks at the potential synergism of aerodynamic entry and the gas dynamic flow fields that govern during the time scale and in the vicinity of crater formation.

  18. Inactivation of Escherichia coli Using the Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet of Ar gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homma, Takeshi; Furuta, Masakazu; Takemura, Yuichiro

    2013-03-01

    Germicidal treatments of Escherichia coli on Langmuir-Blodget (LB) agar were performed using the atmospheric pressure plasma jet sources of Ar gas in the ambient air. Shorter distances from the nozzle of the plasma jet device were more effective in achieving higher bactericidal effects on E. coli grown on LB agar. The surface temperature of the agar was monitored and the spectroscopic analysis of the plasma jet was performed in order to evaluate the factors contributing to the bactericidal effect, such as heating, UV emission, and radical formation caused by the plasma jet. Although the plasma jet raised the surface temperature of LB agar up to about 40 °C, the bactericidal effect was not observed. Moreover, the bactericidal effect of UV (200-300 nm) emitted from the plasma jet was negligible compared with the effects of ions and radical species generated by the atmospheric plasma. The results suggest that the ions and radical species generated by the atmospheric pressure plasma jet are critical for high bactericidal effects on E. coli.

  19. Multidecadal variability of atmospheric pressure and wind contribution to storm surges in the northern Adriatic Sea.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raicich, Fabio

    2010-05-01

    The northern Adriatic Sea is very sensitive to sea level changes since most of the coastal areas is low and subject to floods. In addition to natural subsidence, the northwestern Adriatic coast, including the Venice Lagoon and the area around Marina di Ravenna, has been affected by anthropogenic subsidence due to the extraction of underground water and gas, particularly during the 1930-1970 period. In this work we will study the time variability of Adriatic sea level using daily means, trying to identify the different contributions of atmospheric pressure and wind to storm surges in the northern basin. A storm surge event corresponds to a positive peak in the time series of daily mean sea level; secondary peaks within ±2 days from the main peak are discarded since they are attributed to the same storm. Daily sea level variability is studied using Empirical Orthogonal Functions and is connected with atmospheric pressure from NCEP reanalyses and wind stress from NCEP reanalyses and scatterometer data. Different sea level data sets are analysed, varying the number of sea level stations and/or the time series span, since the data coverage is uneven in space and time. The EOF analysis of the various data sets provides coherent results with regard to the two main modes, that together explain between 70 and 85% of total variance. The first mode explains 55-69% of total variance and consists of uniform sea level variability all over the basin, correlated with atmospheric pressure through the inverted barometer effect. The second mode explains 14-16% of variance and accounts for an along-basin sea level gradient, which is correlated with the meridional wind stress component. The first two Principal Components are used as proxies to pressure- and wind-induced components of storm surges in the northern Adriatic. The frequency of the most remarkable events is analysed, choosing the 1%, 5% and 10% highest daily mean sea level to represent events of decreasing strength (on

  20. Atmospheric pressure Eberlin transacetalization reactions in the heterogeneous liquid/gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augusti, Rodinei; Chen, Hao; Eberlin, Livia Schiavinato; Nefliu, Marcela; Cooks, R. Graham

    2006-07-01

    The Eberlin reaction, the ionic transacetalization of cyclic acetals and analogues with acylium and related ions, is demonstrated in the course of ion/molecule reactions at atmospheric pressure. Selected gaseous acetals (1,3-dioxolane, 2-methyl-1,3-dioxolane, 2,2-dimethyl-1,3-dioxolane, 4-methyl-1,3-dioxolane, 2-phenyl-1,3-dioxolane, 1,3-dioxane, and 1,3,5-trioxane) react efficiently with the (CH3)2NCO+ acylium ion, generated by electrosonic spray ionization (ESSI) of an aqueous/methanol solution of tetramethylurea (TMU), to furnish the characteristic cyclic ionic acetals, the Eberlin products, in moderate to high yields. It is proposed that acylium ions on the surface of the ESSI-generated droplets interact with gaseous neutral reagentsE The Eberlin products dissociate exclusively to re-form the reactant (CH3)2NCO+ acylium ion upon collision-induced dissociation (CID), confirming their structures. The intact adduct, i.e., acylium ion plus neutral reagent (the stable precursor of the Eberlin product), is observed in these experiments whereas it is not observed in studies of the same Eberlin reactions under conventional reduced pressure ion/molecule reaction conditions. It is suggested that under atmospheric pressure conditions these intact adducts are likely stabilized through deactivation via collision with buffer gas.

  1. Shock Formation by Plasma Filaments of Microwave Discharge under Atmospheric Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Masayuki; Ohnishi, Naofumi

    2016-03-01

    A one-dimensional compressible fluid calculation was coupled with a finite- difference time-domain code and a particle-in-cell code with collision to reproduce propagation of electromagnetic wave, ionization process of plasma, and shock wave formation in atmospheric microwave discharge. Plasma filaments are driven toward the microwave source at 1 atm, and the distance between each filament is one-fifth of the wavelength of the incident microwave. The strong shock wave is generated due to the high plasma density at the atmospheric pressure. A simple analysis of the microwave propagation into the plasma shows that cut-off density of the microwave becomes smaller with the pressure decrease in a collisional plasma. At the lower pressure, the smaller density plasma is obtained with a diffusive pattern because of the smaller cut-off density and the larger diffusion effect. In contrast with the 1-atm case, the weak shock wave is generated at a rarefied condition, which lowers performance of microwave thruster.

  2. [Spatial distribution of electrons with high energy in atmospheric pressure glow discharge excited by DC voltage].

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhi-qiang; Jia, Peng-ying; Liu, Tie

    2013-09-01

    Atmospheric pressure glow discharge excited by a DC voltage was realized in a 6 mm air gap by using a needle-water electrode discharge device. The atompheric pressure glow discharge has characteristic regions such as a cathode fall, a negative glow, a Faraday dark space, a positive column and an anode glow. The discharge is a normal glow through analyzing its voltage-current curve. The emission intensity of 337.1 nm spectral line from the second positive system of N2 was investigated because it can indicate the electron density with high energy. Results show that the maxima of high energy electrons appears in the vicinity of the needle tip, and it almost remains constant at other locations. The density of high energy electrons decreases with increasing the voltage. Similarly, it decreases with increasing the value of the ballast resistor. Oxygen atom is important for the sterilization and disinfection. The distribution of oxygen atom was also investigated by optical emission spectroscopy. It was found that the oxygen distribution is similar with the distribution of high energy electrons. These results are important for the application of atmospheric pressure glow discharge in environmental protection and biological treatment. PMID:24369623

  3. Windowless transition between atmospheric pressure and high vacuum via differential pumping for synchrotron radiation applications.

    PubMed

    Gog, T; Casa, D M; Kuzmenko, I; Krakora, R J; Bolin, T B

    2007-07-01

    A differential pump assembly is introduced which can provide a windowless transition between the full atmospheric pressure of an in-air sample environment and the high-vacuum region of a synchrotron radiation beamline, while providing a clear aperture of approximately 1 mm to pass through the X-ray beam from a modern third-generation synchrotron radiation source. This novel pump assembly is meant to be used as a substitute for an exit vacuum window on synchrotron beamlines, where the existence of such a window would negatively impact the coherent nature of the X-ray beam or would introduce parasitic scattering, distorting weak scattering signals from samples under study. It is found that the length of beam pipe necessary to reduce atmospheric pressure to below 10 mbar is only about 130 mm, making the expected photon transmission for hard X-rays through this pipe competitive with that of a regular Be beamline window. This result is due to turbulent flow dominating the first pumping stage, providing a mechanism of strong gas conductance limitation, which is further enhanced by introducing artificial surface roughness in the pipe. Successive reduction of pressure through the transitional flow regime into the high-vacuum region is accomplished over a length of several meters, using beam pipes of increasing diameter. While the pump assembly has not been tested with X-rays, possible applications are discussed in the context of coherent and small-angle scattering. PMID:17587659

  4. Soot surface temperature measurements in pure and diluted flames at atmospheric and elevated pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Berry Yelverton, T.L.; Roberts, W.L.

    2008-10-15

    Soot surface temperature was measured in laminar jet diffusion flames at atmospheric and elevated pressures. The soot surface temperature was measured in flames at one, two, four, and eight atmospheres with both pure and diluted (using helium, argon, nitrogen, or carbon dioxide individually) ethylene fuels with a calibrated two-color soot pyrometry technique. These two dimensional temperature profiles of the soot aid in the analysis and understanding of soot production, leading to possible methods for reducing soot emission. Each flame investigated was at its smoke point, i.e., at the fuel flow rate where the overall soot production and oxidation rates are equal. The smoke point was chosen because it was desirable to have similar soot loadings for each flame. A second set of measurements were also taken where the fuel flow rate was held constant to compare with earlier work. These measurements show that overall flame temperature decreases with increasing pressure, with increasing pressure the position of peak temperature shifts to the tip of the flame, and the temperatures measured were approximately 10% lower than those calculated assuming equilibrium and neglecting radiation. (author)

  5. An atmospheric pressure self-pulsing micro thin-cathode discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Beilei; Mohr, Sebastian; Luggenhölscher, Dirk; Czarnetzki, Uwe

    2011-03-01

    A micro thin-cathode discharge (μTCD) is a modified micro hollow-cathode discharge (MHCD) where the anode is much thicker than the one in a MHCD, which allows a stable operation at atmospheric pressure. The μTCD was operated at different pressures in argon by a dc voltage. At atmospheric pressure, the μTCD operates in a self-pulsing mode with current peaks with a duration of a few nanoseconds and a current density up to 105 A cm-2, supplied by the charge stored in the capacitance of the discharge device. The plasma emission was observed by an ICCD camera. Both, the voltage-current characteristic and the ICCD image indicate that this self-pulsing is due to a periodic ignition of a spark discharge. The electron density was measured by Stark broadening of the Hβ-line with an admixture of 1% hydrogen. In the periodic spark mode the electron density is of the order of 1016 cm-3. The direct measurement of the discharge current in these kinds of discharges is not possible, since it is driven by the inherent capacitance of the discharge device. Therefore, an electrical model including stray capacitances is set up. The modelled results agree very well with the measured currents and voltages.

  6. Microplasma discharge vacuum ultraviolet photoionization source for atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Symonds, Joshua M; Gann, Reuben N; Fernández, Facundo M; Orlando, Thomas M

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the first use of an atmospheric pressure microplasma-based vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization source in atmospheric pressure mass spectrometry applications. The device is a robust, easy-to-operate microhollow cathode discharge (MHCD) that enables generation of VUV photons from Ne and Ne/H(2) gas mixtures. Photons were detected by excitation of a microchannel plate detector and by analysis of diagnostic sample ions using a mass spectrometer. Reactive ions, charged particles, and metastables produced in the discharge were blocked from entering the ionization region by means of a lithium fluoride window, and photoionization was performed in a nitrogen-purged environment. By reducing the output pressure of the MHCD, we observed heightened production of higher-energy photons, making the photoionization source more effective. The initial performance of the MHCD VUV source has been evaluated by ionizing model analytes such as acetone, azulene, benzene, dimethylaniline, and glycine, which were introduced in solid or liquid phase. These molecules represent species with both high and low proton affinities, and ionization energies ranging from 7.12 to 9.7 eV.

  7. Growth of carbon nanowalls at atmospheric pressure for one-step gas sensor fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Kehan; Bo, Zheng; Lu, Ganhua; Mao, Shun; Cui, Shumao; Zhu, Yanwu; Chen, Xinqi; Ruoff, Rodney S.; Chen, Junhong

    2011-12-01

    Carbon nanowalls (CNWs), two-dimensional "graphitic" platelets that are typically oriented vertically on a substrate, can exhibit similar properties as graphene. Growth of CNWs reported to date was exclusively carried out at a low pressure. Here, we report on the synthesis of CNWs at atmosphere pressure using "direct current plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition" by taking advantage of the high electric field generated in a pin-plate dc glow discharge. CNWs were grown on silicon, stainless steel, and copper substrates without deliberate introduction of catalysts. The as-grown CNW material was mainly mono- and few-layer graphene having patches of O-containing functional groups. However, Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies confirmed that most of the oxygen groups could be removed by thermal annealing. A gas-sensing device based on such CNWs was fabricated on metal electrodes through direct growth. The sensor responded to relatively low concentrations of NO2 (g) and NH3 (g), thus suggesting high-quality CNWs that are useful for room temperature gas sensors. PACS: Graphene (81.05.ue), Chemical vapor deposition (81.15.Gh), Gas sensors (07.07.Df), Atmospheric pressure (92.60.hv)

  8. Numerical study on microwave-sustained argon discharge under atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Y.; Hua, W. Guo, S. Y.

    2014-04-15

    A numerical study on microwave sustained argon discharge under atmospheric pressure is reported in this paper. The purpose of this study is to investigate both the process and effects of the conditions of microwave-excited gas discharge under atmospheric pressure, thereby aiding improvements in the design of the discharge system, setting the appropriate working time, and controlling the operating conditions. A 3D model is presented, which includes the physical processes of electromagnetic wave propagation, electron transport, heavy species transport, gas flow, and heat transfer. The results can be obtained by means of the fluid approximation. The maxima of the electron density and gas temperature are 4.96 × 10{sup 18} m{sup −3} and 2514.8 K, respectively, and the gas pressure remains almost unchanged for typical operating conditions with a gas flow rate of 20 l/min, microwave power of 1000 W, and initial temperature of 473 K. In addition, the conditions (microwave power, gas flow rate, and initial temperature) of discharge are varied to obtain deeper information about the electron density and gas temperature. The results of our numerical study are valid and clearly describe both the physical process and effects of the conditions of microwave-excited argon discharge.

  9. Microplasma Discharge Vacuum Ultraviolet Photoionization Source for Atmospheric Pressure Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Symonds, Joshua M.; Gann, Reuben N.; Fernández, Facundo M.; Orlando, Thomas M.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the first use of an atmospheric pressure microplasma-based vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization source in atmospheric pressure mass spectrometry applications. The device is a robust, easy-to-operate microhollow cathode discharge (MHCD) that enables generation of VUV photons from Ne and Ne/H2 gas mixtures. Photons were detected by excitation of a microchannel plate detector and by analysis of diagnostic sample ions using a mass spectrometer. Reactive ions, charged particles, and metastables produced in the discharge were blocked from entering the ionization region by means of a lithium fluoride window, and photoionization was performed in a nitrogen-purged environment. By reducing the output pressure of the MHCD, we observed heightened production of higher-energy photons, making the photoionization source more effective. The initial performance of the MHCD VUV source has been evaluated by ionizing model analytes such as acetone, azulene, benzene, dimethylaniline, and glycine, which were introduced in solid or liquid phase. These molecules represent species with both high and low proton affinities, and ionization energies ranging from 7.12 to 9.7 eV.

  10. Can HF heating generate ESF bubbles?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zawdie, K. A.; Huba, J. D.

    2014-12-01

    The injection of powerful HF waves into the ionosphere can lead to strong electron heating followed by a pressure perturbation which can locally reduce the plasma density. In the postsunset equatorial ionosphere, density perturbations can provide the seed to generate equatorial spread F (ESF) bubbles. In this paper, a modified version of the SAMI3/ESF ionosphere code is used to model the density depletions created by HF heating and to determine if ESF bubbles can be artificially generated. It is found that HF heating primarily redistributes plasma along the geomagnetic field and does not significantly perturb the flux tube integrated conductivities. Thus, HF heating does not appear to be a viable method to seed or generate ESF bubbles.

  11. Correlation between helium atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) variables and plasma induced DNA damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Ek R.; Ptasinska, Sylwia

    2016-09-01

    A helium atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) source with a dielectric capillary and two tubular electrodes was used to induce damage in aqueous plasmid DNA. The fraction of different types of DNA damage (i.e., intact or undamaged, double strand breaks (DSBs), and single strand breaks (SSBs)) that occurred as the result of plasma irradiation was quantified through analysis of agarose gel electrophoresis images. The total DNA damage increased with an increase in both flow rate and duration of irradiation, but decreased with an increase in distance between the APPJ and sample. The average power of the plasma was calculated and the length of APPJ was measured for various flow rates and voltages applied. The possible effects of plasma power and reactive species on DNA damage are discussed. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Low-Energy Interactions related to Atmospheric and Extreme Conditions", edited by S. Ptasinska, M. Smialek-Telega, A. Milosavljevic, B. Sivaraman.

  12. Highly effective fungal inactivation in He+O2 atmospheric-pressure nonequilibrium plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Z.; Lu, X. P.; Feng, A.; Pan, Y.; Ostrikov, K.

    2010-12-01

    Highly effective (more than 99.9%) inactivation of a pathogenic fungus Candida albicans commonly found in oral, respiratory, digestive, and reproduction systems of a human body using atmospheric-pressure plasma jets sustained in He+O2 gas mixtures is reported. The inactivation is demonstrated in two fungal culture configurations with open (Petri dish without a cover) and restricted access to the atmosphere (Petri dish with a cover) under specific experimental conditions. It is shown that the fungal inactivation is remarkably more effective in the second configuration. This observation is supported by the scanning and transmission electron microscopy of the fungi before and after the plasma treatment. The inactivation mechanism explains the experimental observations under different experimental conditions and is consistent with the reports by other authors. The results are promising for the development of advanced health care applications.

  13. An Open Port Sampling Interface for Liquid Introduction Atmospheric Pressure Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    DOE PAGES

    Van Berkel, Gary J.; Kertesz, Vilmos

    2015-01-01

    RATIONALE: A simple method to introduce unprocessed samples into a solvent for rapid characterization by liquid introduction atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometry has been lacking. The continuous flow, self-cleaning open port sampling interface introduced here fills this void. METHODS: The open port sampling interface used a vertically aligned, co-axial tube arrangement enabling solvent delivery to the sampling end of the device through the tubing annulus and solvent aspiration down the center tube and into the mass spectrometer ionization source via the commercial APCI emitter probe. The solvent delivery rate to the interface was set to exceed the aspiration rate creatingmore » a continuous sampling interface along with a constant, self-cleaning spillover of solvent from the top of the probe. RESULTS: Using the open port sampling interface with positive ion mode APCI and a hybrid quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometer, rapid, direct sampling and analysis possibilities are exemplified with plastics, ballpoint and felt tip ink pens, skin, and vegetable oils. These results demonstrated that the open port sampling interface could be used as a simple, versatile and self-cleaning system to rapidly introduce multiple types of unprocessed, sometimes highly concentrated and complex, samples into a solvent flow stream for subsequent ionization and analysis by mass spectrometry. The basic setup presented here could be incorporated with any self-aspirating liquid introduction ionization source (e.g., ESI, APCI, APPI, ICP, etc.) or any type of atmospheric pressure sampling ready mass spectrometer system. CONCLUSIONS: The open port sampling interface provides a means to introduce and quickly analyze unprocessed solid or liquid samples with liquid introduction atmospheric pressure ionization source without fear of sampling interface or ionization source contamination.« less

  14. An Open Port Sampling Interface for Liquid Introduction Atmospheric Pressure Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Van Berkel, Gary J.; Kertesz, Vilmos

    2015-01-01

    RATIONALE: A simple method to introduce unprocessed samples into a solvent for rapid characterization by liquid introduction atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometry has been lacking. The continuous flow, self-cleaning open port sampling interface introduced here fills this void. METHODS: The open port sampling interface used a vertically aligned, co-axial tube arrangement enabling solvent delivery to the sampling end of the device through the tubing annulus and solvent aspiration down the center tube and into the mass spectrometer ionization source via the commercial APCI emitter probe. The solvent delivery rate to the interface was set to exceed the aspiration rate creating a continuous sampling interface along with a constant, self-cleaning spillover of solvent from the top of the probe. RESULTS: Using the open port sampling interface with positive ion mode APCI and a hybrid quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometer, rapid, direct sampling and analysis possibilities are exemplified with plastics, ballpoint and felt tip ink pens, skin, and vegetable oils. These results demonstrated that the open port sampling interface could be used as a simple, versatile and self-cleaning system to rapidly introduce multiple types of unprocessed, sometimes highly concentrated and complex, samples into a solvent flow stream for subsequent ionization and analysis by mass spectrometry. The basic setup presented here could be incorporated with any self-aspirating liquid introduction ionization source (e.g., ESI, APCI, APPI, ICP, etc.) or any type of atmospheric pressure sampling ready mass spectrometer system. CONCLUSIONS: The open port sampling interface provides a means to introduce and quickly analyze unprocessed solid or liquid samples with liquid introduction atmospheric pressure ionization source without fear of sampling interface or ionization source contamination.

  15. Sterilization effect of atmospheric pressure non-thermal air plasma on dental instruments

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Su-Jin; Huh, Jung-Bo; Yun, Mi-Jung; Chang, Brian Myung W.; Jeong, Chang-Mo

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE Autoclaves and UV sterilizers have been commonly used to prevent cross-infections between dental patients and dental instruments or materials contaminated by saliva and blood. To develop a dental sterilizer which can sterilize most materials, such as metals, rubbers, and plastics, the sterilization effect of an atmospheric pressure non-thermal air plasma device was evaluated. MATERIALS AND METHODS After inoculating E. coli and B. subtilis the diamond burs and polyvinyl siloxane materials were sterilized by exposing them to the plasma for different lengths of time (30, 60, 90, 120, 180 and, 240 seconds). The diamond burs and polyvinyl siloxane materials were immersed in PBS solutions, cultured on agar plates and quantified by counting the colony forming units. The data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and significance was assessed by the LSD post hoc test (α=0.05). RESULTS The device was effective in killing E. coli contained in the plasma device compared with the UV sterilizer. The atmospheric pressure non-thermal air plasma device contributed greatly to the sterilization of diamond burs and polyvinyl siloxane materials inoculated with E. coli and B. subtilis. Diamond burs and polyvinyl siloxane materials inoculated with E. coli was effective after 60 and 90 seconds. The diamond burs and polyvinyl siloxane materials inoculated with B. subtilis was effective after 120 and 180 seconds. CONCLUSION The atmospheric pressure non-thermal air plasma device was effective in killing both E. coli and B. subtilis, and was more effective in killing E. coli than the UV sterilizer. PMID:23508991

  16. Reactive species in non-equilibrium atmospheric-pressure plasmas: Generation, transport, and biological effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, X.; Naidis, G. V.; Laroussi, M.; Reuter, S.; Graves, D. B.; Ostrikov, K.

    2016-05-01

    Non-equilibrium atmospheric-pressure plasmas have recently become a topical area of research owing to their diverse applications in health care and medicine, environmental remediation and pollution control, materials processing, electrochemistry, nanotechnology and other fields. This review focuses on the reactive electrons and ionic, atomic, molecular, and radical species that are produced in these plasmas and then transported from the point of generation to the point of interaction with the material, medium, living cells or tissues being processed. The most important mechanisms of generation and transport of the key species in the plasmas of atmospheric-pressure plasma jets and other non-equilibrium atmospheric-pressure plasmas are introduced and examined from the viewpoint of their applications in plasma hygiene and medicine and other relevant fields. Sophisticated high-precision, time-resolved plasma diagnostics approaches and techniques are presented and their applications to monitor the reactive species and plasma dynamics in the plasma jets and other discharges, both in the gas phase and during the plasma interaction with liquid media, are critically reviewed. The large amount of experimental data is supported by the theoretical models of reactive species generation and transport in the plasmas, surrounding gaseous environments, and plasma interaction with liquid media. These models are presented and their limitations are discussed. Special attention is paid to biological effects of the plasma-generated reactive oxygen and nitrogen (and some other) species in basic biological processes such as cell metabolism, proliferation, survival, etc. as well as plasma applications in bacterial inactivation, wound healing, cancer treatment and some others. Challenges and opportunities for theoretical and experimental research are discussed and the authors' vision for the emerging convergence trends across several disciplines and application domains is presented to

  17. Atmospheric-pressure laser ionization: a novel ionization method for liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Constapel, M; Schellenträger, M; Schmitz, O J; Gäb, S; Brockmann, K J; Giese, R; Benter, Th

    2005-01-01

    We report on the development of a new laser-ionization (LI) source operating at atmospheric pressure (AP) for liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) applications. APLI is introduced as a powerful addition to existing AP ionization techniques, in particular atmospheric-pressure chemical ionization (APCI), electrospray ionization (ESI), and atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI). Replacing the one-step VUV approach in APPI with step-wise two-photon ionization strongly enhances the selectivity of the ionization process. Furthermore, the photon flux during an ionization event is drastically increased over that of APPI, leading to very low detection limits. In addition, the APLI mechanism generally operates primarily directly on the analyte. This allows for very efficient ionization even of non-polar compounds such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The APLI source was characterized with a MicroMass Q-Tof Ultima II analyzer. Both the effluent of an HPLC column containing a number of PAHs (benzo[a]pyrene, fluoranthene, anthracene, fluorene) and samples from direct syringe injection were analyzed with respect to selectivity and sensitivity of the overall system. The liquid phase was vaporized by a conventional APCI inlet (AP probe) with the corona needle removed. Ionization was performed through selective resonance-enhanced multi-photon ionization schemes using a high-repetition-rate fixed-frequency excimer laser operating at 248 nm. Detection limits well within the low-fmol regime are readily obtained for various aromatic hydrocarbons that exhibit long-lived electronic states at the energy level of the first photon. Only molecular ions are generated at the low laser fluxes employed ( approximately 1 MW/cm(2)). The design and performance of the laser-ionization source are presented along with results of the analysis of aromatic hydrocarbons.

  18. Magnetic scavengers as carriers of analytes for flowing atmospheric pressure afterglow mass spectrometry (FAPA-MS).

    PubMed

    Cegłowski, Michał; Kurczewska, Joanna; Smoluch, Marek; Reszke, Edward; Silberring, Jerzy; Schroeder, Grzegorz

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, a procedure for the preconcentration and transport of mixtures of acids, bases, and drug components to a mass spectrometer using magnetic scavengers is presented. Flowing atmospheric pressure afterglow mass spectrometry (FAPA-MS) was used as an analytical method for identification of the compounds by thermal desorption from the scavengers. The proposed procedure is fast and cheap, and does not involve time-consuming purification steps. The developed methodology can be applied for trapping harmful substances in minute quantities, to transport them to specialized, remotely located laboratories.

  19. Spatial and temporal evolutions of ozone in a nanosecond pulse corona discharge at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duten, X.; Redolfi, M.; Aggadi, N.; Vega, A.; Hassouni, K.

    2011-10-01

    This paper deals with the experimental determination of the spatial and temporal evolutions of the ozone concentration in an atmospheric pressure pulsed plasma, working in the nanosecond regime. We observed that ozone was produced in the localized region of the streamer. The ozone transport requires a characteristic time well above the millisecond. The numerical modelling of the streamer expansion confirms that the hydrodynamic expansion of the filamentary discharge region during the streamer propagation does not lead to a significant transport of atomic oxygen and ozone. It appears therefore that only diffusional transport can take place, which requires a characteristic time of the order of 50 ms.

  20. Striation and plasma bullet propagation in an atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sun Ja; Chung, T. H.; Bae, S. H.

    2010-05-15

    An atmospheric pressure plasma jet source driven by pulsed wave of several tens of kilohertz and by sinusoidal wave was designed and characterized. A newly designed jet consists of a sharpened tungsten pin electrode covered with a cone type Teflon layer confined in a Pyrex tube. This structure provides an efficient ignition since the electric field is concentrated on the end of electrode. Using the electrical and optical characterization, the properties of plasma bullet were explored. For the Ar plasma jet driven by a pulsed wave at low duty cycles, the volume, the speed, and the luminosity of the plasma bullet became larger, and the striation behavior was observed.

  1. Differential analysis of camphor wood products by desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Liang; Yan, Jianping; Zhu, Zhiqiang; Ouyang, Yongzhong; Zhang, Xinglei; Zhang, Wenjun; Dai, Ximo; Luo, Liping; Chen, Huanwen

    2013-01-23

    In the course of this study, desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (DAPCI-MS) was applied to readily acquire the mass spectral fingerprints of camphor wood and other wood samples under ambient conditions. Characteristic natural analytes, such as camphor and geraniol, were successfully detected in their protonated form and then identified by tandem mass spectrometry (MS(n)). Further principal component analysis (PCA) and cluster analysis (CA) of the mass spectrometric results allow a confident discrimination of camphor wood products from inferior/fake ones. These experimental findings demonstrate that DAPCI-MS is a valuable tool for differential analysis of untreated camphor wood products with sufficient sensitivity and high throughput.

  2. Photocatalytic anatase titanium dioxide thin films deposition by an atmospheric pressure blown arc discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boscher, Nicolas D.; Olivier, Sébastien; Maurau, Rémy; Bulou, Simon; Sindzingre, Thierry; Belmonte, Thierry; Choquet, Patrick

    2014-08-01

    TiO2 thin films are deposited by means of an atmospheric pressure blown arc discharge fed with nitrogen and titanium bis(acetylacetonate) diisopropoxide (TIPO) as precursor. Different power densities and distances between the plasma nozzle, the precursor injector and the substrate are investigated and different morphologies, compositions and crystallinities of the coatings are generated. The photocatalytic properties of the coatings, determined from the degradation of stearic acid shined by a 254 nm UV light, are shown to be strongly related to the film characteristic and therefore to the deposition parameters.

  3. Gas pressure atmosphere annealing: A novel method for the preparation of SiC nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Zhong, B.; Liu, L.; Huang, X.; Wen, G.; Huang, Y.; Bollmann, J.

    2016-04-01

    Silicon carbide nanowires were fabricated by gas pressure annealing of SiOC nanocomposite powders, which were synthesized by pyrolysis of a SiO2 - sucrose gel. The reaction was carried out in an atmosphere sintering furnace without any additives. The nanowires have pronounced homogenous diameters smaller than 100 nm and lengths of up to several millimetres. The X-ray diffraction pattern indicates the formation of the β-SiC phase and transmission electron microscopy analysis show the monocrystalline structure of the nanowires.

  4. Role of secondary emission on discharge dynamics in an atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Tay, W. H.; Kausik, S. S.; Yap, S. L.; Wong, C. S.

    2014-04-15

    The discharge dynamics in an atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) is studied in a DBD reactor consisting of a pair of stainless steel parallel plate electrodes. The DBD discharge has been generated by a 50 Hz ac high voltage power source. The high-speed intensified charge coupled device camera is used to capture the images of filaments occurring in the discharge gap. It is observed that frequent synchronous breakdown of micro discharges occurs across the discharge gap in the case of negative current pulse. The experimental results reveal that secondary emissions from the dielectric surface play a key role in the synchronous breakdown of plasma filaments.

  5. Atmospheric-pressure hybrid plasma with combination of ac and microwave

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Yong Cheol; Uhm, Han Sup

    2006-12-18

    A hybrid plasma system with combination of ac and microwave at atmospheric pressure was developed. The hybrid plasma is initiated by ac capillary plasma, is stabilized by a flowing channel of working gas through common electrodes, and is expanded by the dissipation of microwave energy, revealing two distinguishable plasma columns of about 1 m in length and a transition point. The capillary in the hybrid plasma system is working as a common electrode for the microwave and ac plasmas. Optical emission spectroscopy is used to characterize and monitor the argon and nitrogen excited species produced in different plasma columns.

  6. Sterilization of bacterial endospores by an atmospheric-pressure argon plasma jet

    SciTech Connect

    Uhm, Han S.; Lim, Jin P.; Li, Shou Z.

    2007-06-25

    Argon plasma jets penetrate deep into ambient air and create a path for oxygen radicals to sterilize microbes. A sterilization experiment with bacterial endospores indicates that an argon-oxygen plasma jet very effectively kills endospores of Bacillus atrophaeus (ATCC 9372), thereby demonstrating its capability to clean surfaces and its usefulness for reinstating contaminated equipment as free from toxic biological warfare agents. However, the spore-killing efficiency of the atmospheric-pressure argon-oxygen jet depends very sensitively on the oxygen concentration in the argon gas.

  7. Atmospheric pressure air-plasma jet evolved from microdischarges: Eradication of E. coli with the jet

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Yong Cheol; Kang, Won Seok; Hong, Yoo Beom; Yi, Won Ju; Uhm, Han Sup

    2009-12-15

    An atmospheric-pressure air-plasma jet operating at 60 Hz ac is presented. A plasma jet with a length of 23 mm was produced by feeding air through a porous alumina dielectric installed between an outer electrode and a hollow inner electrode. Microdischarges in the porous alumina are ejected as a plasma jet from the outer electrode through a 1 mm hole, showing that the temperature of the jet decreases to a value close to the room temperature. The jet disinfects E. coli cells very effectively, eradicating them with an exposure of a few seconds to the jet flame.

  8. A long plasma column in a flexible tube at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Yong Cheol; Cho, Soon Cheon; Kim, Jong Hun; Uhm, Han Sup

    2007-07-15

    Atmospheric-pressure nonthermal plasma produced at a low frequency in a flexible dielectric tube in an argon gas flow is presented. The plasma system consists of a typical injection needle as a hot electrode, a Teflon registered tube as a dielectric, and a high voltage power supply. The plasma column is stabilized in the Teflon registered tube by flowing channels of argon gas through an injection needle. The column has a length of approximately 60 cm with 3 lpm of argon, and plasma exists throughout the Teflon registered tube with an inner diameter of 1.6 mm. The characteristics of the long plasma column are studied by preliminary observations.

  9. Observation and interpretation of energy efficient, diffuse direct current glow discharge at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Jie Jiang, Weiman; Wang, Yishan; Zhao, Wei; Li, Jing; Duan, Yixiang

    2015-08-24

    A diffuse direct-current glow discharge was realized with low energy consumption and high energy utilization efficiency at atmospheric pressure. The formation of diffuse discharge was demonstrated by examining and comparing the electrical properties and optical emissions of plasmas. In combination with theoretical derivation and calculation, we draw guidelines that appearance of nitrogen ions at low electron density is crucial to enhance the ambipolar diffusion for the expansion of discharge channel and the increasing ambipolar diffusion near the cathode plays a key role in the onset of diffuse discharge. An individual-discharge-channel expansion model is proposed to explain the diffuse discharge formation.

  10. Modern Atmospheric Pressure Surface Sampling/Ionization Techniques in Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Pasilis, Sofie P; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2012-01-01

    Over the last few years, there has been a rapid increase in atmospheric pressure surface sampling/ionization techniques for mass spectrometry, dramatically expanding the range of sample types that can be analyzed. The growth in this field of mass spectrometry has also resulted in a plethora of new acronyms. In this encyclopedia article, the various techniques are first sorted into four major categories based on the method used for analyte desorption and then subcategorized by ionization method. The underlying principles of operation are explained and some representative applications are described.

  11. Application of an atmospheric pressure sampling mass spectrometer to chlorination reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, N. S.

    1986-01-01

    An atmospheric pressure mass spectrometric sampling system, based on a free jet expansion was used to study certain M-Cl-O reactions at high temperatures. The apparatus enables the volatile species from a 1-atm chemical process to be directly identified with a mass spectrometer which operates at approx. 10 to the minus 8th power torr. Studies for both pure metals and alloys are discussed. It is shown that this mass spectrometer system aids in identifying the volatile species, and provides fundamental information on the reaction mechanism.

  12. Enhancement of antioxidant effects of naringin after atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge plasma treatment.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Hoon; Jang, Soo Jeung; Chung, Hyung-Wook; Kim, Hyun-Joo; Yong, Hae In; Choe, Wonho; Jo, Cheorun

    2015-03-15

    Naringin is the natural chief bitter flavonoid found in Citrus species. Herein, bitter naringin was treated with atmospheric pressure plasma to afford two new converted flavonoids, narinplasmins A (2) and B (3), along with the known compound, 2R-naringin. The structures of the two new naringin derivatives were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic methods. The antioxidant activity of all isolates was evaluated based on 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl and peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)) scavenging assays. The new flavanone glycoside 2 containing a methoxyalkyl group exhibited significantly improved antioxidant properties in these assays relative to the parent naringin.

  13. Airborne Lidar Measurements of Atmospheric Pressure Made Using the Oxygen A-Band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riris, Haris; Rodriquez, Michael; Allan, Graham R.; Hasselbrack, William E.; Stephen, Mark A.; Abshire, James B.

    2011-01-01

    We report on airborne measurements of atmospheric pressure using a fiber-laser based lidar operating in the oxygen A-band near 765 nm and the integrated path differential absorption measurement technique. Our lidar uses fiber optic technology and non-linear optics to generate tunable laser radiation at 765 nm, which overlaps an absorption line pair in the Oxygen A-band. We use a pulsed time resolved technique, which rapidly steps the laser wavelength across the absorption line pair, a 20 cm telescope and photon counting detector to measure Oxygen concentrations.

  14. Genetic effects of radio-frequency, atmospheric-pressure glow discharges with helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guo; Li, He-Ping; Wang, Li-Yan; Wang, Sen; Zhao, Hong-Xin; Sun, Wen-Ting; Xing, Xin-Hui; Bao, Cheng-Yu

    2008-06-01

    Due to low gas temperatures and high densities of active species, atmospheric-pressure glow discharges (APGDs) would have potential applications in the fields of plasma-based sterilization, gene mutation, etc. In this letter, the genetic effects of helium radio-frequency APGD plasmas with the plasmid DNA and oligonucleotide as the treated biomaterials are presented. The experimental results show that it is the chemically active species, instead of heat, ultraviolet radiation, intense electric field, and/or charged particles, that break the double chains of the plasmid DNA. The genetic effects depend on the plasma operating parameters, e.g., power input, helium flow rate, processing distance, time, etc.

  15. Bacterial inactivation using atmospheric pressure single pin electrode microplasma jet with a ground ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sun Ja; Chung, T. H.; Bae, S. H.; Leem, S. H.

    2009-04-01

    Bacterial inactivation experiment was performed using atmospheric pressure microplasma jets driven by radio-frequency wave of 13.56 MHz and by low frequency wave of several kilohertz. With addition of a ground ring electrode, the discharge current, the optical emission intensities from reactive radicals, and the sterilization efficiency were enhanced significantly. When oxygen gas was added to helium at the flow rate of 5 SCCM, the sterilization efficiency was enhanced. From the survival curve of Escherichia coli, the primary role in the inactivation was played by reactive species with minor aid from heat, UV photons, charged particles, and electric fields.

  16. Bacterial inactivation using atmospheric pressure single pin electrode microplasma jet with a ground ring

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sun Ja; Chung, T. H.; Bae, S. H.; Leem, S. H.

    2009-04-06

    Bacterial inactivation experiment was performed using atmospheric pressure microplasma jets driven by radio-frequency wave of 13.56 MHz and by low frequency wave of several kilohertz. With addition of a ground ring electrode, the discharge current, the optical emission intensities from reactive radicals, and the sterilization efficiency were enhanced significantly. When oxygen gas was added to helium at the flow rate of 5 SCCM, the sterilization efficiency was enhanced. From the survival curve of Escherichia coli, the primary role in the inactivation was played by reactive species with minor aid from heat, UV photons, charged particles, and electric fields.

  17. Genetic effects of radio-frequency, atmospheric-pressure glow discharges with helium

    SciTech Connect

    Li Guo; Li Heping; Wang Sen; Sun Wenting; Bao Chengyu; Wang Liyan; Zhao Hongxin; Xing Xinhui

    2008-06-02

    Due to low gas temperatures and high densities of active species, atmospheric-pressure glow discharges (APGDs) would have potential applications in the fields of plasma-based sterilization, gene mutation, etc. In this letter, the genetic effects of helium radio-frequency APGD plasmas with the plasmid DNA and oligonucleotide as the treated biomaterials are presented. The experimental results show that it is the chemically active species, instead of heat, ultraviolet radiation, intense electric field, and/or charged particles, that break the double chains of the plasmid DNA. The genetic effects depend on the plasma operating parameters, e.g., power input, helium flow rate, processing distance, time, etc.

  18. Cellular and molecular responses of Neurospora crassa to non-thermal plasma at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Gyungsoon; Ryu, Young H.; Hong, Young J.; Choi, Eun H.; Uhm, Han S.

    2012-02-01

    Filamentous fungi have been rarely explored in terms of plasma treatments. This letter presents the cellular and molecular responses of the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa to an argon plasma jet at atmospheric pressure. The viability and cell morphology of N. crassa spores exposed to plasma were both significantly reduced depending on the exposure time when treated in water. The intracellular genomic DNA content was dramatically reduced in fungal tissues after a plasma treatment and the transcription factor tah-3 was found to be required for fungal tolerance to a harsh plasma environment.

  19. In situ modification of chromatography adsorbents using cold atmospheric pressure plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olszewski, P.; Willett, T. C.; Theodosiou, E.; Thomas, O. R. T.; Walsh, J. L.

    2013-05-01

    Efficient manufacturing of increasingly sophisticated biopharmaceuticals requires the development of new breeds of chromatographic materials featuring two or more layers, with each layer affording different functions. This letter reports the in situ modification of a commercial beaded anion exchange adsorbent using atmospheric pressure plasma generated within gas bubbles. The results show that exposure to He-O2 plasma in this way yields significant reductions in the surface binding of plasmid DNA to the adsorbent exterior, with minimal loss of core protein binding capacity; thus, a bi-layered chromatography material exhibiting both size excluding and anion exchange functionalities within the same bead is produced.

  20. Spectrum of the Runaway Electron Beam Generated During a Nanosecond Discharge in Air at Atmospheric Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasenko, V. F.; Baksht, E. Kh.; Burachenko, A. G.

    2016-04-01

    The spectrum of supershort avalanche runaway electron beam generated in air at atmospheric pressure is experimentally investigated using a time-of-flight spectrometer and attenuation curves. It is shown that the maximum of the electron energy distribution for the main (second) group of electrons is less than the energy eUm, where Um is the maximal voltage across the gap, and the difference between these energies depends on the design of the cathode and the interelectrode gap in a gas diode. It is confirmed that there are three groups of electrons with different energies in the runaway electron beam spectrum.