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Sample records for atmospheric processes research

  1. Global Scale Atmospheric Processes Research Program Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Worley, B. A. (Editor); Peslen, C. A. (Editor)

    1984-01-01

    Global modeling; satellite data assimilation and initialization; simulation of future observing systems; model and observed energetics; dynamics of planetary waves; First Global Atmospheric Research Program Global Experiment (FGGE) diagnosis studies; and National Research Council Research Associateship Program are discussed.

  2. NASA/MSFC FY-85 Atmospheric Processes Research Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, W. W. (Compiler); Porter, F. (Compiler)

    1985-01-01

    The two main areas of focus for the research program are global scale processes and mesoscale processes. Geophysical fluid processes, satellite doppler lidar, satellite data analysis, atmospheric electricity, doppler lidar wind research, and mesoscale modeling are among the topics covered.

  3. NASA/MSFC FY-83 Atmospheric Processes Research Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, R. E. (Compiler)

    1983-01-01

    The atmospheric processes research program was reviewed. Research tasks sponsored by the NASA Office of Space Science and Applications, Earth Sciences and Applications Division in the areas of upper atmosphere, global weather, and mesoscale processes are discussed. The are: the research project summaries, together with the agenda and other information about the meeting.

  4. NASA/MSFC FY-84 Atmospheric Processes Research Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, W. W. (Compiler); Porter, F. (Compiler)

    1984-01-01

    The two main areas of focus for NASA/MSFC's atmospheric research program are: (1) global scale processes (geophysical fluid processes, satellite Doppler lidar wind profiler, and satellite data analyses) and (2) mesoscale processes (atmospheric electricity (lightning), ground/airborne Doppler lidar wind measurements, and mesoscale analyses and space sensors). Topics within these two general areas are addressed.

  5. NASA/MSFC FY-82 atmospheric processes research review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, R. E. (Compiler)

    1982-01-01

    The NASA/MSFC FY-82 Atmospheric Processes Research Program was reviewed. The review covered research tasks in the areas of upper atmosphere, global weather, and severe storms and local weather. Also included was research on aviation safety environmental hazards. The research project summaries, in narrative outline form, supplied by the individual investigators together with the agenda and other information about the review are presented.

  6. Research on atmospheric pressure plasma processing sewage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Gui-cai; Na, Yan-xiang; Dong, Xiao-long; Sun, Xiao-liang

    2013-08-01

    The water pollution has become more and more serious with the industrial progress and social development, so it become a worldwide leading environmental management problem to human survival and personal health, therefore, countries are looking for the best solution. Generally speaking, in this paper the work has the following main achievements and innovation: (1) Developed a new plasma device--Plasma Water Bed. (2) At atmospheric pressure condition, use oxygen, nitrogen, argon and helium as work gas respectively, use fiber spectrometer to atmospheric pressure plasma discharge the emission spectrum of measurement, due to the different work gas producing active particle is different, so can understand discharge, different particle activity, in the treatment of wastewater, has the different degradation effects. (3) Methyl violet solution treatment by plasma water bed. Using plasma drafting make active particles and waste leachate role, observe the decolorization, measurement of ammonia nitrogen removal.

  7. NASA/MSFC FY-80 Atmospheric Processes Research Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, R. E. (Compiler)

    1980-01-01

    Three general areas of research were discussed: Global Weather, Upper Atmosphere, and Severe Storms and Local Weather. Research project summaries, in narrative outline form, stating objectives, significant accomplishments, and recommendations for future research are presented.

  8. Research Experiences for Undergraduates in Estuarine and Atmospheric Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aller, J. Y.

    2009-12-01

    Our program in the School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences at Stony Brook University is unique in emphasizing the interdisciplinary study of coastal ocean and atmospheric processes. We attract a large number of both male and female undergraduate applicants representing diverse ethnic groups from across the country. Many are multi-discipline majors merging geology, biology, chemistry, or physics with engineering, and/or mathematics and welcome the opportunity to combine their academic training to examine environmental problems. Our goal is a program reflective of today’s world and environmental challenges, one that provides a ‘hands-on’ research experience which illustrates the usefulness of scientific research for understanding real-world problems or phenomena, and one in which students are challenged to apply their academic backgrounds to develop intuition about natural systems and processes. Projects this past summer focused on assessing climate change and its effects on coastal environments and processes. Projects addressed the implications of a changing global climate over the next 50 years on hydrologic cycles and coastal environments like barrier islands and beaches, on seasonal weather conditions and extreme events, on aerosols and the Earth’s radiative balance, and on aquatic habitats and biota. Collaborative field and laboratory or computer-based projects involving two or three REU students, graduate students, and several mentors, enable undergraduate students appreciate the importance of teamwork in addressing specific scientific questions or gaining maximum insight into a particular phenomenon or process. We believe that our approach allows students to understand what their role will be as scientists in the next phase of our earth’s evolution.

  9. NASA/MSFC FY-81 Atmospheric Processes Research Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, R. E. (Compiler)

    1981-01-01

    Progress in ongoing research programs and future plans for satellite investigations into global weather, upper atmospheric phenomena, and severe storms and local weather are summarized. Principle investigators and publications since June 1980 are listed.

  10. NASA/MSFC FY90 Global Scale Atmospheric Processes Research Program Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leslie, Fred W. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    Research supported by the Global Atmospheric Research Program at the Marshall Space Flight Center on atmospheric remote sensing, meteorology, numerical weather forecasting, satellite data analysis, cloud precipitation, atmospheric circulation, atmospheric models and related topics is discussed.

  11. NASA/MSFC FY91 Global Scale Atmospheric Processes Research Program Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leslie, Fred W. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The reports presented at the annual Marshall Research Review of Earth Science and Applications are compiled. The following subject areas are covered: understanding of atmospheric processes in a variety of spatial and temporal scales; measurements of geophysical parameters; measurements on a global scale from space; the Mission to Planet Earth Program (comprised of and Earth Observation System and the scientific strategy to analyze these data); and satellite data analysis and fundamental studies of atmospheric dynamics.

  12. [Research on the atomic emission spectroscopy of atmospheric pressure plasma process].

    PubMed

    Jin, Jiang; Li, Na; Xu, Lu; Wang, Bo; Jin, Hui-Liang

    2013-02-01

    In the reaction of the atmospheric pressure plasma process, the heat stable process of the atmospheric pressure plasma jet has a direct impact on the removal rate, CF4 is the provider of active F* atom, O2 is important auxiliary gas, and they play an important role in the process. In order to research the rule of the concentration of the 3 parameters upon the atmospheric pressure plasma processing, the atmospheric pressure plasma jet was used for processing and the spectrometer was used to monitor the changes in the process. The experiment indicates that: when the heat is stable, the concentration of the active F* atom essentially remains unchanged; with increasing the concentration of gas CF4, the spectrum of the active F* atom has self-absorption phenomena, so using the atomic emission spectroscopy method to monitor the changes in the concentration of active F* atom generated by CF4 is not completely exact; because O2 can easily react with the dissociation product of CF4, which inhibits the compound of the active F* atom, so in a certain range with increasing the concentration of gas O2, the concentration of the active F* atom becomes strong.

  13. STS-48 Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) preflight processing at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Kennedy Space Center (KSC) technicians, wearing clean suits, prepare the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) for the installation of the high-gain antenna on the instrument module. UARS is in the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility (PHSF) for preflight preparation and testing. It is held in a ground support structure via its outrigger trusses during processing. Visible UARS components include: the Cyrogenic Limb Array Etalon Spectrometer (CLAES) (at bottom left); the grapple fixture (center); the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) equipment (at bottom right); and the stowed solar array (SA) (at top). View provided by KSC with alternate KSC number KSC-91PC-1056.

  14. NASA/MSFC FY88 Global Scale Atmospheric Processes Research Program Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Greg S. (Editor); Leslie, Fred W. (Editor); Arnold, J. E. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    Interest in environmental issues and the magnitude of the environmental changes continues. One way to gain more understanding of the atmosphere is to make measurements on a global scale from space. The Earth Observation System is a series of new sensors to measure globally atmospheric parameters. Analysis of satellite data by developing algorithms to interpret the radiance information improves the understanding and also defines requirements for these sensors. One measure of knowledge of the atmosphere lies in the ability to predict its behavior. Use of numerical and experimental models provides a better understanding of these processes. These efforts are described in the context of satellite data analysis and fundamental studies of atmospheric dynamics which examine selected processes important to the global circulation.

  15. Atmospheric Research 2012 Technical Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, William K -M.

    2013-01-01

    This annual report, as before, is intended for a broad audience. Our readers include colleagues within NASA, scientists outside the Agency, science graduate students, and members of the general public. Inside are descriptions of atmospheric research science highlights and summaries of our education and outreach accomplishments for calendar year 2012.The report covers research activities from the Mesoscale Atmospheric Processes Laboratory, the Climate and Radiation Laboratory, the Atmospheric Chemistry and Dynamics Laboratory, and the Wallops Field Support Office under the Office of Deputy Director for Atmospheres, Earth Sciences Division in the Sciences and Exploration Directorate of NASAs Goddard Space Flight Center. The overall mission of the office is advancing knowledge and understanding of the Earths atmosphere. Satellite missions, field campaigns, peer-reviewed publications, and successful proposals are essential to our continuing research.

  16. DOE research on atmospheric aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, S.E.

    1995-11-01

    Atmospheric aerosols are the subject of a significant component of research within DOE`s environmental research activities, mainly under two programs within the Department`s Environmental Sciences Division, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program and the Atmospheric Chemistry Program (ACP). Research activities conducted under these programs include laboratory experiments, field measurements, and theoretical and modeling studies. The objectives and scope of these programs are briefly summarized. The ARM Program is the Department`s major research activity focusing on atmospheric processes pertinent to understanding global climate and developing the capability of predicting global climate change in response to energy related activities. The ARM approach consists mainly of testing and improving models using long-term measurements of atmospheric radiation and controlling variables at highly instrumented sites in north central Oklahoma, in the Tropical Western Pacific, and on the North Slope of Alaska. Atmospheric chemistry research within DOE addresses primarily the issue of atmospheric response to emissions from energy-generation sources. As such this program deals with the broad topic known commonly as the atmospheric source-receptor sequence. This sequence consists of all aspects of energy-related pollutants from the time they are emitted from their sources to the time they are redeposited at the Earth`s surface.

  17. Atmospheric Research 2014 Technical Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platnick, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric research in the Earth Sciences Division (610) consists of research and technology development programs dedicated to advancing knowledge and understanding of the atmosphere and its interaction with the climate of Earth. The Division's goals are to improve understanding of the dynamics and physical properties of precipitation, clouds, and aerosols; atmospheric chemistry, including the role of natural and anthropogenic trace species on the ozone balance in the stratosphere and the troposphere; and radiative properties of Earth's atmosphere and the influence of solar variability on the Earth's climate. Major research activities are carried out in the Mesoscale Atmospheric Processes Laboratory, the Climate and Radiation Laboratory, the Atmospheric Chemistry and Dynamics Laboratory, and the Wallops Field Support Office. The overall scope of the research covers an end-to-end process, starting with the identification of scientific problems, leading to observation requirements for remote-sensing platforms, technology and retrieval algorithm development; followed by flight projects and satellite missions; and eventually, resulting in data processing, analyses of measurements, and dissemination from flight projects and missions. Instrument scientists conceive, design, develop, and implement ultraviolet, infrared, optical, radar, laser, and lidar technology to remotely sense the atmosphere. Members of the various Laboratories conduct field measurements for satellite sensor calibration and data validation, and carry out numerous modeling activities. These modeling activities include climate model simulations, modeling the chemistry and transport of trace species on regional-to-global scales, cloud resolving models, and developing the next-generation Earth system models. Satellite missions, field campaigns, peer-reviewed publications, and successful proposals are essential at every stage of the research process to meeting our goals and maintaining leadership of the

  18. The NASA program on upper atmospheric research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The purpose of the NASA Upper Atmospheric Research Program is to develop a better understanding of the physical and chemical processes that occur in the earth's upper atmosphere with emphasis on the stratosphere.

  19. Atmospheric Research at BNL

    ScienceCinema

    Peter Daum

    2016-07-12

    Brookhaven researcher Peter Daum discusses an international field experiment designed to make observations of critical components of the climate system of the southeastern Pacific. Because elements of this system are poorly understood and poorly represent

  20. Atmospheric Research at BNL

    SciTech Connect

    Peter Daum

    2008-10-06

    Brookhaven researcher Peter Daum discusses an international field experiment designed to make observations of critical components of the climate system of the southeastern Pacific. Because elements of this system are poorly understood and poorly represent

  1. Atmospheric, climatic and environmental research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broecker, W. S.; Fung, I.

    1986-01-01

    Research conducted during the past year in the climate and atmospheric modeling programs was focused on the development of appropriate atmospheric and upper ocean models, and preliminary applications of these models. Prinicpal models are a one-dimensional radiative-convection model, a three-dimensional global climate model, and an upper ocean model. Principal application is the study of the impact of CO2, aerosols and the solar constant on climate. Also the performance of the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project cloud detection algorithm was evaluated, concentrating initially on its application to geosynchronous data, with an eventual switch of the developed methodologies to data from polar orbiting satellites. In the process, a number of improvements were made, in particular: an improved technique for tracking small scale day to day variability in clear sky continental temperatures; a number of techniques for the statistical assessment of cloud detection uncertainties due to cloud types which are spatially and temporally invariant; and a method used to detect those cloudy regions which have long term spatial and temporal stability.

  2. Atmospheric Research 2011 Technical Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2012-01-01

    The 2011 Technical Highlights describes the efforts of all members of Atmospheric Research. Their dedication to advancing Earth Science through conducting research, developing and running models, designing instruments, managing projects, running field campaigns, and numerous other activities, is highlighted in this report.

  3. Shuttle atmospheric lidar research program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The Shuttle atmospheric lidar program is discussed in relation to an understanding of the processes governing the Earth's atmosphere and in the capacity to evaluate the atmospheric susceptibility to manmade and natural perturbations. Applications of the lidar which are discussed are the determination of the global flow of water vapor and pollutants in the troposphere, improvement of chemical and transport models of the stratosphere and mesosphere, evaluation of radiative models of the atmosphere, investigation of chemistry and transport of thermospheric atomic species, and investigation of magnetospheric aspects of sun/weather relationships. The features of the lidar measurements discussed are the high spatial resolution, control of the source wavelength and intensity, and high measurement specificity.

  4. Atmospheric, Climatic, and Environmental Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broecker, Wallace S.; Gornitz, Vivien M.

    1994-01-01

    The climate and atmospheric modeling project involves analysis of basic climate processes, with special emphasis on studies of the atmospheric CO2 and H2O source/sink budgets and studies of the climatic role Of CO2, trace gases and aerosols. These studies are carried out, based in part on use of simplified climate models and climate process models developed at GISS. The principal models currently employed are a variable resolution 3-D general circulation model (GCM), and an associated "tracer" model which simulates the advection of trace constituents using the winds generated by the GCM.

  5. Homogeneous processes of atmospheric interest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossi, M. J.; Barker, J. R.; Golden, D. M.

    1983-01-01

    Upper atmospheric research programs in the department of chemical kinetics are reported. Topics discussed include: (1) third-order rate constants of atmospheric importance; (2) a computational study of the HO2 + HO2 and DO2 + DO2 reactions; (3) measurement and estimation of rate constants for modeling reactive systems; (4) kinetics and thermodynamics of ion-molecule association reactions; (5) entropy barriers in ion-molecule reactions; (6) reaction rate constant for OH + HOONO2 yields products over the temperature range 246 to 324 K; (7) very low-pressure photolysis of tert-bytyl nitrite at 248 nm; (8) summary of preliminary data for the photolysis of C1ONO2 and N2O5 at 285 nm; and (9) heterogeneous reaction of N2O5 and H2O.

  6. Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Process And Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Peter C. Kong; Myrtle

    2006-09-01

    This paper provides a general discussion of atmospheric-pressure plasma generation, processes, and applications. There are two distinct categories of atmospheric-pressure plasmas: thermal and nonthermal. Thermal atmospheric-pressure plasmas include those produced in high intensity arcs, plasma torches, or in high intensity, high frequency discharges. Although nonthermal plasmas are at room temperatures, they are extremely effective in producing activated species, e.g., free radicals and excited state atoms. Thus, both thermal and nonthermal atmosphericpressure plasmas are finding applications in a wide variety of industrial processes, e.g. waste destruction, material recovery, extractive metallurgy, powder synthesis, and energy conversion. A brief discussion of recent plasma technology research and development activities at the Idaho National Laboratory is included.

  7. Atmospheric, climatic and environmental research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broecker, Wallace S.; Gornitz, Vivien M.

    1992-01-01

    Work performed on the three tasks during the report period is summarized. The climate and atmospheric modeling studies included work on climate model development and applications, paleoclimate studies, climate change applications, and SAGE II. Climate applications of Earth and planetary observations included studies on cloud climatology and planetary studies. Studies on the chemistry of the Earth and the environment are briefly described. Publications based on the above research are listed; two of these papers are included in the appendices.

  8. VISSR Atmospheric Sounder (VAS) Research Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greaves, J. R. (Editor)

    1983-01-01

    The VAS, an experimental instrument flown onboard Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES), is capable of achieving mutlispectral imagery of atmospheric temperature, water vapor, and cloudiness patterns over short time intervals. In addition, this instrument provides an atmospheric sounding capability from geosynchronous orbit. The VAS demonstration is an effort for evaluating the VAS instrument's performance, and for demonstrating the capabilities of a VAS prototype system to provide useful geosynchronous satellite data for supporting weather forecasts and atmospheric research. The demonstration evaluates the performance of the VAS Instruments on GOES-4-5, and -6, develops research oriented and prototype/operational VAS data processing systems, determines the accuracy of certain basic and derived meteorological parameters that can be obtained from the VAS instrument, and assesses the utility of VAS derived information in analyzing severe weather situations.

  9. Atmospheric products from the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmad, Suraiya P.; Johnson, James E.; Jackman, Charles H.

    2003-01-01

    This paper provides information on the products available at the NASA Goddard Earth Sciences (GES) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) from the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) mission. The GES DAAC provides measurements from the primary UARS mission, which extended from launch in September 1991 through September 2001. The ten instruments aboard UARS provide measurements of atmospheric trace gas species, dynamical variables, solar irradiance input, and particle energy flux. All standard Level 3 UARS products from all ten instruments are offered free to the public and science user community. The Level 3 data are geophysical parameters, which have been transformed into a common format and equally spaced along the measurement trajectory. The UARS data have been reprocessed several times over the years following improvements to the processing algorithms. The UARS data offered from the GES DAAC are the latest versions of each instrument. The UARS data may be accessed through the GES DAAC website at

  10. Possible atmospheric research with Aristoteles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barlier, Francois

    1991-12-01

    Use of the Aristoteles mission in measuring atmospheric parameters is discussed. The total density of the thermosphere, the temperature of the stratosphere and the total electron count of the ionosphere are identified as three areas in which the Aristoteles mission could be of great use in carrying out research. Combining the accelerometer measurements yields the gravity tensor as well as the nongravitational acceleration acting upon the satellite. Ways in which the temperature of the stratosphere around the Earth, and the annual, seasonal and secular variations it goes through could be measured are discussed.

  11. Advanced aircraft for atmospheric research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, P.; Wegener, S.; Langford, J.; Anderson, J.; Lux, D.; Hall, D. W.

    1991-01-01

    The development of aircraft for high-altitude research is described in terms of program objectives and environmental, technological limitations, and the work on the Perseus A aircraft. The need for these advanced aircraft is proposed in relation to atmospheric science issues such as greenhouse trapping, the dynamics of tropical cyclones, and stratospheric ozone. The implications of the study on aircraft design requirements is addressed with attention given to the basic categories of high-altitude, long-range, long-duration, and nap-of-the-earth aircraft. A strategy is delineated for a platform that permits unique stratospheric measurements and is a step toward a more advanced aircraft. The goal of Perseus A is to carry scientific air sampling payloads weighing at least 50 kg to altitudes of more than 25 km. The airfoils are designed for low Reynolds numbers, the structural weight is very low, and the closed-cycle power plant runs on liquid oxygen.

  12. Coupling Processes between Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Weisenstein, Debra K.; Shia, Run-Lie; Scott, Courtney J.; Sze, Nien Dak

    1998-01-01

    This is the fourth semi-annual report for NAS5-97039, covering the time period July through December 1998. The overall objective of this project is to improve the understanding of coupling processes between atmospheric chemistry and climate. Model predictions of the future distributions of trace gases in the atmosphere constitute an important component of the input necessary for quantitative assessments of global change. We will concentrate on the changes in ozone and stratospheric sulfate aerosol, with emphasis on how ozone in the lower stratosphere would respond to natural or anthropogenic changes. The key modeling tools for this work are the Atmospheric and Environmental Research (AER) two-dimensional chemistry-transport model, the AER two-dimensional stratospheric sulfate model, and the AER three-wave interactive model with full chemistry. For this six month period, we report on a modeling study of new rate constant which modify the NOx/NOy ratio in the lower stratosphere; sensitivity to changes in stratospheric water vapor in the future atmosphere; a study of N2O and CH4 observations which has allowed us to adjust diffusion in the 2-D CTM in order to obtain appropriate polar vortex isolation; a study of SF6 and age of air with comparisons of models and measurements; and a report on the Models and Measurements II effort.

  13. Ionization Processes in the Atmosphere of Titan (Research Note). III. Ionization by High-Z Nuclei Cosmic Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gronoff, G.; Mertens, C.; Lilensten, J.; Desorgher, L.; Fluckiger, E.; Velinov, P.

    2011-01-01

    Context. The Cassini-Huygens mission has revealed the importance of particle precipitation in the atmosphere of Titan thanks to in-situ measurements. These ionizing particles (electrons, protons, and cosmic rays) have a strong impact on the chemistry, hence must be modeled. Aims. We revisit our computation of ionization in the atmosphere of Titan by cosmic rays. The high-energy high-mass ions are taken into account to improve the precision of the calculation of the ion production profile. Methods. The Badhwahr and O Neill model for cosmic ray spectrum was adapted for the Titan model. We used the TransTitan model coupled with the Planetocosmics model to compute the ion production by cosmic rays. We compared the results with the NAIRAS/HZETRN ionization model used for the first time for a body that differs from the Earth. Results. The cosmic ray ionization is computed for five groups of cosmic rays, depending on their charge and mass: protons, alpha, Z = 8 (oxygen), Z = 14 (silicon), and Z = 26 (iron) nucleus. Protons and alpha particles ionize mainly at 65 km altitude, while the higher mass nucleons ionize at higher altitudes. Nevertheless, the ionization at higher altitude is insufficient to obscure the impact of Saturn s magnetosphere protons at a 500 km altitude. The ionization rate at the peak (altitude: 65 km, for all the different conditions) lies between 30 and 40/cu cm/s. Conclusions. These new computations show for the first time the importance of high Z cosmic rays on the ionization of the Titan atmosphere. The updated full ionization profile shape does not differ significantly from that found in our previous calculations (Paper I: Gronoff et al. 2009, 506, 955) but undergoes a strong increase in intensity below an altitude of 400 km, especially between 200 and 400 km altitude where alpha and heavier particles (in the cosmic ray spectrum) are responsible for 40% of the ionization. The comparison of several models of ionization and cosmic ray spectra (in

  14. Cluster Ions and Atmospheric Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Auria, R.; Turco, R. P.

    We investigate the properties and possible roles of naturally occurring ions under at- mospheric conditions. Among other things, the formation of stable charged molecular clusters represents the initial stages of aerosol nucleation [e.g., Keesee and Castle- man, 1982], while the conversion of vapor to aggregates is the first step in certain atmospheric phase transitions [e.g. Hamill and Turco, 2000]. We analyze the stability and size distributions of common ionic clusters by solving the differential equations describing their growth and loss. The necessary reaction rate coefficients are deter- mined using kinetic and thermodynamic data. The latter are derived from direct labo- ratory measurements of equilibrium constants, from the classical charged liquid drop model applied to large aggregates (i.e., the Thomson model [Thomson, 1906]), and from quantum mechanical calculations of the thermodynamic potentials associated with the cluster structures. This approach allows us to characterize molecular clusters across the entire size range from true molecular species to larger aggregates exhibiting macroscopic behavior [D'Auria, 2001]. Cluster systems discussed in this talk include the proton hydrates (PHs) and nitrate-water and nitrate-nitric acid series [D'Auria and Turco, 2001]. These ions have frequently been detected in the stratosphere and tropo- sphere [e.g., Arnold et al., 1977; Viggiano and Arnold, 1981]. We show how the pro- posed hybrid cluster model can be extended to a wide range of ion systems, including non-proton hydrates (NPHs), mixed-ligand clusters such as nitrate-water-nitric acid and sulfate-sulfuric acid-water, as well as more exotic species containing ammonia, pyridine and other organic compounds found on ions [e.g., Eisele, 1988; Tanner and Eisele, 1991]. References: Arnold, F., D. Krankowsky and K. H. Marien, First mass spectrometric measurements of posi- tive ions in the stratosphere, Nature, 267, 30-32, 1977. D'Auria, R., A study of ionic

  15. Managing Large Datasets for Atmospheric Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Gao

    2015-01-01

    Since the mid-1980s, airborne and ground measurements have been widely used to provide comprehensive characterization of atmospheric composition and processes. Field campaigns have generated a wealth of insitu data and have grown considerably over the years in terms of both the number of measured parameters and the data volume. This can largely be attributed to the rapid advances in instrument development and computing power. The users of field data may face a number of challenges spanning data access, understanding, and proper use in scientific analysis. This tutorial is designed to provide an introduction to using data sets, with a focus on airborne measurements, for atmospheric research. The first part of the tutorial provides an overview of airborne measurements and data discovery. This will be followed by a discussion on the understanding of airborne data files. An actual data file will be used to illustrate how data are reported, including the use of data flags to indicate missing data and limits of detection. Retrieving information from the file header will be discussed, which is essential to properly interpreting the data. Field measurements are typically reported as a function of sampling time, but different instruments often have different sampling intervals. To create a combined data set, the data merge process (interpolation of all data to a common time base) will be discussed in terms of the algorithm, data merge products available from airborne studies, and their application in research. Statistical treatment of missing data and data flagged for limit of detection will also be covered in this section. These basic data processing techniques are applicable to both airborne and ground-based observational data sets. Finally, the recently developed Toolsets for Airborne Data (TAD) will be introduced. TAD (tad.larc.nasa.gov) is an airborne data portal offering tools to create user defined merged data products with the capability to provide descriptive

  16. Photochemical processing of aqueous atmospheric brown carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, R.; Lee, A. K. Y.; Huang, L.; Li, X.; Yang, F.; Abbatt, J. P. D.

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric Brown Carbon (BrC) is a collective term for light absorbing organic compounds in the atmosphere. While the identification of BrC and its formation mechanisms is currently a central effort in the community, little is known about the atmospheric removal processes of aerosol BrC. As a result, we report a series of laboratory studies of photochemical processing of BrC in the aqueous phase, by direct photolysis and OH oxidation. Solutions of ammonium sulfate mixed with glyoxal (GLYAS) or methylglyoxal (MGAS) are used as surrogates for a class of secondary BrC mediated by imine intermediates. Three nitrophenol species, namely 4-nitrophenol, 5-nitroguaiacol and 4-nitrocatechol, were investigated as a class of water soluble BrC originating from biomass burning. Photochemical processing induced significant changes in the absorptive properties of BrC. The imine-mediated BrC solutions exhibited rapid photo-bleaching with both direct photolysis and OH oxidation, with atmospheric half-lives of minutes to a few hours. The nitrophenol species exhibited photo-enhancement in the visible range during direct photolysis and the onset of OH oxidation, but rapid photo-bleaching was induced by further OH exposure on an atmospheric timescale of an hour or less. To illustrate atmospheric relevance of this work, we also performed direct photolysis experiments on water soluble organic carbon extracted from biofuel combustion samples and observed rapid changes in optical properties of these samples as well. Overall, these experiments indicate that atmospheric models need to incorporate representations of atmospheric processing of BrC species to accurately model their radiative impacts.

  17. Photochemical processing of aqueous atmospheric brown carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, R.; Lee, A. K. Y.; Huang, L.; Li, X.; Yang, F.; Abbatt, J. P. D.

    2015-06-01

    Atmospheric brown carbon (BrC) is a collective term for light absorbing organic compounds in the atmosphere. While the identification of BrC and its formation mechanisms is currently a central effort in the community, little is known about the atmospheric removal processes of aerosol BrC. As a result, we report on a series of laboratory studies of photochemical processing of BrC in the aqueous phase, by direct photolysis and OH oxidation. Solutions of ammonium sulfate mixed with glyoxal (GLYAS) or methylglyoxal (MGAS) are used as surrogates for a class of secondary BrC mediated by imine intermediates. Three nitrophenol species, namely 4-nitrophenol, 5-nitroguaiacol and 4-nitrocatechol, were investigated as a class of water-soluble BrC originating from biomass burning. Photochemical processing induced significant changes in the absorptive properties of BrC. The imine-mediated BrC solutions exhibited rapid photo-bleaching with both direct photolysis and OH oxidation, with atmospheric half-lives of minutes to a few hours. The nitrophenol species exhibited photo-enhancement in the visible range during direct photolysis and the onset of OH oxidation, but rapid photo-bleaching was induced by further OH exposure on an atmospheric timescale of an hour or less. To illustrate the atmospheric relevance of this work, we also performed direct photolysis experiments on water-soluble organic carbon extracted from biofuel combustion samples and observed rapid changes in the optical properties of these samples as well. Overall, these experiments indicate that atmospheric models need to incorporate representations of atmospheric processing of BrC species to accurately model their radiative impacts.

  18. Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) trade analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, M. M.; Nebb, J.

    1983-01-01

    The Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) which will collect data pertinent to the Earth's upper atmosphere is described. The collected data will be sent to the central data handling facility (CDHF) via the UARS ground system and the data will be processed and distributed to the remote analysis computer systems (RACS). An overview of the UARS ground system is presented. Three configurations were developed for the CDHF-RACS system. The CDHF configurations are discussed. The IBM CDHF configuration, the UNIVAC CDHF configuration and the vax cluster CDHF configuration are presented. The RACS configurations, the IBM RACS configurations, UNIVAC RACS and VAX RACS are detailed. Due to the large on-line data estimate to approximately 100 GB, a mass storage system is considered essential to the UARS CDHF. Mass storage systems were analyzed and the Braegan ATL, the RCA optical disk, the IBM 3850 and the MASSTOR M860 are discussed. It is determined that the type of mass storage system most suitable to UARS is the automated tape/cartridge device. Two devices of this type, the IBM 3850 and the MASSTOR MSS are analyzed and the applicable tape/cartridge device is incorporated into the three CDHF-RACS configurations.

  19. NASA's Upper Atmosphere Research Program (UARP) and Atmospheric Chemistry Modeling and Analysis Program (ACMAP): Research Summaries 1997-1999

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurylo, M. J.; DeCola, P. L.; Kaye, J. A.

    2000-01-01

    Under the mandate contained in the FY 1976 NASA Authorization Act, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has developed and is implementing a comprehensive program of research, technology development, and monitoring of the Earth's upper atmosphere, with emphasis on the upper troposphere and stratosphere. This program aims at expanding our chemical and physical understanding to permit both the quantitative analysis of current perturbations as well as the assessment of possible future changes in this important region of our environment. It is carried out jointly by the Upper Atmosphere Research Program (UARP) and the Atmospheric Chemistry Modeling and Analysis Program (ACMAP), both managed within the Research Division in the Office of Earth Science at NASA. Significant contributions to this effort have also been provided by the Atmospheric Effects of Aviation Project (AEAP) of NASA's Office of Aero-Space Technology. The long-term objectives of the present program are to perform research to: understand the physics, chemistry, and transport processes of the upper troposphere and the stratosphere and their control on the distribution of atmospheric chemical species such as ozone; assess possible perturbations to the composition of the atmosphere caused by human activities and natural phenomena (with a specific emphasis on trace gas geographical distributions, sources, and sinks and the role of trace gases in defining the chemical composition of the upper atmosphere); understand the processes affecting the distributions of radiatively active species in the atmosphere, and the importance of chemical-radiative-dynamical feedbacks on the meteorology and climatology of the stratosphere and troposphere; and understand ozone production, loss, and recovery in an atmosphere with increasing abundances of greenhouse gases. The current report is composed of two parts. Part 1 summarizes the objectives, status, and accomplishments of the research tasks supported

  20. On Wave Processes in the Solar Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musielak, Z. E.

    1998-01-01

    This grant was awarded by NASA/MSFC to The University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) to investigate the physical processes responsible for heating and wind acceleration in the solar atmosphere, and to construct theoretical, self-consistent and time-dependent solar wind models based on the momentum deposition by finite amplitude and nonlinear Alfven waves. In summary, there are three main goals of the proposed research: (1) Calculate the wave energy spectra and wave energy fluxes carried by magnetic non- magnetic waves. (2) Find out which mechanism dominates in supplying the wave energy to different parts of the solar atmosphere. (3) Use the results obtained in (1) and (2) to construct theoretical, self-consistent and time- dependent models of the solar wind. We have completed the first goal by calculating the amount of non-radiative energy generated in the solar convection zone as acoustic waves and as magnetic tube waves. To calculate the amount of wave energy carried by acoustic waves, we have used the Lighthill-Stein theory for sound generation modified by Musielak, Rosner, Stein & Ulmschneider (1994). The acoustic wave energy fluxes for stars located in different regions of the Hertzsprung-Russell (H-R) diagram have also been computed. The wave energy fluxes carried by longitudinal and transverse waves along magnetic flux tubes have been calculated by using both analytical and numerical methods. Our analytical approach is based a theory developed by Musielak, Rosner & Ulmschnelder and Musielak, Rosner, Gall & Ulmschneider, which allows computing the wave energy fluxes for linear tube waves. A numerical approach has been developed by Huang, Musielak & Ulmschneider and Ulmschneider & Musielak to compute the energy fluxes for nonlinear tube waves. Both methods have been used to calculate the wave energy fluxes for stars located in different regions of the HR diagram (Musielak, Rosner & Ulmschneider 1998; Ulmschneider, Musielak & Fawzy 1998). Having obtained the

  1. Atmospheric and oceanographic research review, 1979

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Papers generated by atmospheric, oceanographic, and climatological research performed during 1979 at the Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheric Sciences are presented. The GARP/global weather research is aimed at developing techniques for the utilization and analysis of the FGGE data sets. Observing system studies were aimed at developing a GLAS TIROS N sounding retrieval system and preparing for the joint NOAA/NASA AMTS simulation study. The climate research objective is to support the development and effective utilization of space acquired data systems by developing the GLAS GCM for short range climate predictions, studies of the sensitivity of climate to boundary conditions, and predictability studies. Ocean/air interaction studies concentrated on the development of models for the prediction of upper ocean currents, temperatures, sea state, mixed layer depths, and upwelling zones, and on studies of the interactions of the atmospheric and oceanic circulation systems on time scales of a month or more.

  2. Status and potential of atmospheric plasma processing of materials

    SciTech Connect

    Pappas, Daphne

    2011-03-15

    This paper is a review of the current status and potential of atmospheric plasma technology for materials processing. The main focus is the recent developments in the area of dielectric barrier discharges with emphasis in the functionalization of polymers, deposition of organic and inorganic coatings, and plasma processing of biomaterials. A brief overview of both the equipment being used and the physicochemical reactions occurring in the gas phase is also presented. Atmospheric plasma technology offers major industrial, economic, and environmental advantages over other conventional processing methods. At the same time there is also tremendous potential for future research and applications involving both the industrial and academic world.

  3. Data Processing for Atmospheric Phase Interferometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acosta, Roberto J.; Nessel, James A.; Morabito, David D.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a detailed discussion of calibration procedures used to analyze data recorded from a two-element atmospheric phase interferometer (API) deployed at Goldstone, California. In addition, we describe the data products derived from those measurements that can be used for site intercomparison and atmospheric modeling. Simulated data is used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm and as a means for validating our procedure. A study of the effect of block size filtering is presented to justify our process for isolating atmospheric fluctuation phenomena from other system-induced effects (e.g., satellite motion, thermal drift). A simulated 24 hr interferometer phase data time series is analyzed to illustrate the step-by-step calibration procedure and desired data products.

  4. Multiwavelength micropulse lidar in atmospheric aerosol study: signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posyniak, Michal; Malinowski, Szymon P.; Stacewicz, Tadeusz; Markowicz, Krzysztof M.; Zielinski, Tymon; Petelski, Tomasz; Makuch, Przemyslaw

    2011-11-01

    Multiwavelength micropulse lidar (MML) designed for continuous optical sounding of the atmosphere is presented. A specific signal processing technique applying two directional Kalman filtering is introduced in order to enhance signal to noise ratio. Application of this technique is illustrated with profiles collected in course of COAST 2009 and WRNP 2010 research campaigns.

  5. Carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. [and other research projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, F. S.

    1974-01-01

    Research projects for the period ending September 15, 1973 are reported as follows: (1) the abundances of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, and the processes by which it is released from carbonate deposits in the earth and then transferred to organic material by photosynthesis; the pathways for movement of carbon and oxygen through the atmosphere; (2) space science computation assistance by PDP computer; the performance characteristics and user instances; (3) OGO-6 data analysis studies of the variations of nighttime ion temperature in the upper atmosphere.

  6. Airborne Instrumentation Needs for Climate and Atmospheric Research

    SciTech Connect

    McFarquhar, Greg; Schmid, Beat; Korolev, Alexei; Ogren, John A.; Russell, P. B.; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Turner, David D.; Wiscombe, Warren J.

    2011-10-06

    Observational data are of fundamental importance for advances in climate and atmospheric research. Advances in atmospheric science are being made not only through the use of ground-based and space-based observations, but also through the use of in-situ and remote sensing observations acquired on instrumented aircraft. In order for us to enhance our knowledge of atmospheric processes, it is imperative that efforts be made to improve our understanding of the operating characteristics of current instrumentation and of the caveats and uncertainties in data acquired by current probes, as well as to develop improved observing methodologies for acquisition of airborne data.

  7. Atmospheric Capture On Mars (and Processing)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muscatello, Tony

    2017-01-01

    The ultimate destination of NASA's human exploration program is Mars. In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) is a key technology required to enable such missions, as first proposed by Prof. Robert Ash in 1976. This presentation will review progress in the systems required to produce rocket propellant, oxygen, and other consumables on Mars using the carbon dioxide atmosphere and other potential resources. For many years, NASA, commercial companies, and academia have been developing, and demonstrating techniques to capture and purify Martian atmospheric gases for their utilization for the production of hydrocarbons, oxygen, and water in ISRU systems. Other gases will be required to be separated from Martian atmospheric gases to provide pure CO2 for processing elements. Significant progress has been demonstrated in CO2 collection via adsorption by molecular sieves, freezing, and direct compression. Early stage work in adsorption in Ionic Liquids followed by electrolysis to oxygen is also underway. In addition, other Martian gases, such as nitrogen and argon, occur in concentrations high enough to be useful as buffer gas and could be captured as well. Gas separation requirements include, but are not limited to the selective separation of: (1) methane and water from unreacted carbon oxides (CO2-CO) and hydrogen typical of a Sabatier-type process, (2) carbon oxides and water from unreacted hydrogen from a Reverse Water-Gas Shift process, and (3) carbon oxides from oxygen from a trash/waste processing reaction.

  8. Planetary atmospheric physics and solar physics research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    An overview is presented on current and planned research activities in the major areas of solar physics, planetary atmospheres, and space astronomy. The approach to these unsolved problems involves experimental techniques, theoretical analysis, and the use of computers to analyze the data from space experiments. The point is made that the research program is characterized by each activity interacting with the other activities in the laboratory.

  9. Linking Atmospheric Gravity Wave Research to the Undergraduate Curriculum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gay, J.; Nielsen, K.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric gravity waves are often generated in the lower atmosphere and can, under favorable atmospheric conditions, propagate into the mesosphere and lower thermosphere. As a consequence of this vertical propagation, the waves carry momentum fluxes and energy from the lower atmosphere into the near-space environment, providing a strong coupling across atmospheric layers. While these waves have been observed and studied in details for decades, there are still many questions to be addressed regarding the tropospheric source location and nature of individually observed waves in the mesosphere. In an effort to increase undergraduate student research experiences, we are linking atmospheric gravity wave research and undergraduate curriculum to improve both academic and scholarly experiences by our students. In this particular case, we present a research project addressing the identification of tropospheric source locations of mesospheric waves observed by airglow imagers. The project involves observations, theory, and modeling techniques with a strong emphasis on how each part plays a role in the curriculum. Specifically, a simple ray tracing model is propagating observed waves downwards through the atmosphere until the point of origin is reached. In the process, we apply basic calculus, numerical methods, and simple fluid dynamics related to course taught at the undergraduate level.

  10. Processing GPS Occultation Data To Characterize Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hajj, George; Kursinski, Emil; Leroy, Stephen; Lijima, Byron; de la Torre Juarez, Manuel; Romans, Larry; Ao, Chi

    2005-01-01

    GOAS [Global Positioning System (GPS) Occultation Analysis System] is a computer program that accepts signal-occultation data from GPS receivers aboard low-Earth-orbiting satellites and processes the data to characterize the terrestrial atmosphere and, in somewhat less comprehensive fashion, the ionosphere. GOAS is very robust and can be run in an unattended semi-operational processing mode. It features sophisticated retrieval algorithms that utilize the amplitudes and phases of the GPS signals. It incorporates a module that, using an assumed atmospheric refractivity profile, simulates the effects of the retrieval processing system, including the GPS receiver. GOAS utilizes the GIPSY software for precise determination of orbits as needed for calibration. The GOAS output for the Earth s troposphere and mid-to-lower stratosphere consists of high-resolution (<1 km) profiles of density, temperature, pressure, atmospheric refractivity, bending angles of signals, and water-vapor content versus altitude from the Earth s surface to an altitude of 30 km. The GOAS output for the ionosphere consists of electron-density profiles from an altitude of about 50 km to the altitude of a satellite, plus parameters related to the rapidly varying structure of the electron density, particularly in the E layer of the ionosphere.

  11. Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere (CIRA) Requirements Review

    SciTech Connect

    Zurawski, Jason, W; Mace, Kathryn, P

    2016-08-11

    In August 2016 The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) and Colorado State University (CSU) organized a review to characterize the networking requirements of the Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere (CIRA) located on the campus of Colorado State University. Several key findings highlighting the results from the review were discovered, with benefits to improve the overall scientific process for CIRA and CSU.

  12. Coupling Processes between Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, M. K. W.; Weisenstein, Debra; Shia, Run-Lie; Sze, N. D.

    1998-01-01

    This is the third semi-annual report for NAS5-97039, covering January through June 1998. The overall objective of this project is to improve the understanding of coupling processes between atmospheric chemistry and climate. Model predictions of the future distributions of trace gases in the atmosphere constitute an important component of the input necessary for quantitative assessments of global change. We will concentrate on the changes in ozone and stratospheric sulfate aerosol, with emphasis on how ozone in the lower stratosphere would respond to natural or anthropogenic changes. The key modeling for this work are the AER 2-dimensional chemistry-transport model, the AER 2-dimensional stratospheric sulfate model, and the AER three-wave interactive model with full chemistry. We will continue developing our three-wave model so that we can help NASA determine the strengths and weaknesses of the next generation assessment models.

  13. Coupling Processes Between Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Weisenstein, Debra; Rodriguez, Jose; Danilin, Michael; Scott, Courtney; Shia, Run-Lie; Eluszkiewicz, Junusz; Sze, Nien-Dak

    1999-01-01

    This is the final report. The overall objective of this project is to improve the understanding of coupling processes among atmospheric chemistry, aerosol and climate, all important for quantitative assessments of global change. Among our priority are changes in ozone and stratospheric sulfate aerosol, with emphasis on how ozone in the lower stratosphere would respond to natural or anthropogenic changes. The work emphasizes two important aspects: (1) AER's continued participation in preparation of, and providing scientific input for, various scientific reports connected with assessment of stratospheric ozone and climate. These include participation in various model intercomparison exercises as well as preparation of national and international reports. and (2) Continued development of the AER three-wave interactive model to address how the transport circulation will change as ozone and the thermal properties of the atmosphere change, and assess how these new findings will affect our confidence in the ozone assessment results.

  14. Coupling Processes Between Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Weisenstein, Debra; Shia, Run-Lie; Sze, N. D.

    1998-01-01

    The overall objective of this project is to improve the understanding of coupling processes between atmospheric chemistry and climate. Model predictions of the future distributions of trace gases in the atmosphere constitute an important component of the input necessary for quantitative assessments of global change. We will concentrate on the changes in ozone and stratospheric sulfate aerosol, with emphasis on how ozone in the lower stratosphere would respond to natural or anthropogenic changes. The key modeling tools for this work are the AER 2-dimensional chemistry-transport model, the AER 2-dimensional stratospheric sulfate model, and the AER three-wave interactive model with full chemistry. We will continue developing our three-wave model so that we can help NASA determine the strength and weakness of the next generation assessment models.

  15. Coupling Processes Between Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, M. K. W.; Weisenstein, Debra; Shia, Run-Lie; Sze, N. D.

    1998-01-01

    The overall objective of this project is to improve the understanding of coupling processes between atmospheric chemistry and climate. Model predictions of the future distributions of trace gases in the atmosphere constitute an important component of the input necessary for quantitative assessments of global change. We will concentrate on the changes in ozone and stratospheric sulfate aerosol, with emphasis on how ozone in the lower stratosphere would respond to natural or anthropogenic changes. The key modeling tools for this work are the AER two-dimensional chemistry-transport model, the AER two-dimensional stratospheric sulfate model, and the AER three-wave interactive model with full chemistry. We will continue developing our three-wave model so that we can help NASA determine the strength and weakness of the next generation assessment models.

  16. Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS): Emergency support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osler, S.; Moore, V.

    1991-01-01

    The DSN (Deep Space Network) mission support requirements for the Upper Atmospheric Research Satellite (UARS) are summarized. The UARS satellite will be placed into a circular orbit of 600 km and 57 deg inclination with a period of 97 minutes. The mission objectives are outlined and the DSN support requirements are defined through the presentation of tables and narratives describing the spacecraft flight profile; DSN support coverage; frequency assignments; support parameters for telemetry, command and support systems; and tracking support responsibility.

  17. Chapter 15 Elementary Processes in Atmospheric Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciel, Glauciete S.; Cappelletti, David; Grossi, Gaia; Pirani, Fernando; Aquilanti, Vincenzo

    The present article provides an account of recent progress in the use of quantum mechanical tools for understanding structure and processes for systems of relevance in atmospheric chemistry. The focus is on problems triggered by experimental activity in this laboratory on investigations of intermolecular interactions by molecular beam scattering. Regarding the major components of the atmosphere, results are summarized on dimers (N2-N2, O2-O2, N2-O2) where experimental and phenomenogically derived potential energy surfaces have been used to compute quantum mechanically the intermolecular clusters dynamics. Rovibrational levels and wave functions are obtained, for perspective use in atmospheric modelling, specifically of radiative absorption of weakly bound complexes. Further work has involved interactions of paramount importance, those of water, for which state-of-the-art quantum chemical calculations for its complexes with rare gases yield complementary information on the interaction (specifically the anisotropies) with respect to molecular beam scattering experiments that measure essentially the isotropic forces. Similar approaches and results have been pursued and obtained for H2S. Stimulated in part by the interesting problem of large amplitude vibrations, such as the chirality change transitions associated with the torsional motions around OO and SS bonds, a systematic series of quantum chemical studies has been undertaken on systems that play also roles in the photochemistry of the minor components of the atmosphere. They are H2O2, H2S2 and several molecules obtained by substitutions of the hydrogens by alkyl groups or halogens. Quantum chemistry is shown to have reached the stage of resolving many previously controversial features regarding these series of molecules (dipole moment, equilibrium geometries, heights of barriers for torsion), which are crucial for intramolecular dynamics. Quantum dynamics calculations are also performed to compute torsional

  18. Atmospheric Processing Module for Mars Propellant Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muscatello, Anthony; Gibson, Tracy; Captain, James; Athman, Robert; Nugent, Matthew; Parks, Steven; Devor, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The multi-NASA center Mars Atmosphere and Regolith COllector/PrOcessor for Lander Operations (MARCO POLO) project was established to build and demonstrate a methane/oxygen propellant production system in a Mars analog environment. Work at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Applied Chemistry Laboratory is focused on the Atmospheric Processing Module (APM). The purpose of the APM is to freeze carbon dioxide from a simulated Martian atmosphere containing the minor components nitrogen, argon, carbon monoxide, and water vapor at Martian pressures (approx.8 torr) by using dual cryocoolers with alternating cycles of freezing and sublimation. The resulting pressurized CO2 is fed to a methanation subsystem where it is catalytically combined with hydrogen in a Sabatier reactor supplied by the Johnson Space Center (JSC) to make methane and water vapor. We first used a simplified once-through setup and later employed a HiCO2 recycling system to improve process efficiency. This presentation and paper will cover (1) the design and selection of major hardware items, such as the cryocoolers, pumps, tanks, chillers, and membrane separators, (2) the determination of the optimal cold head design and flow rates needed to meet the collection requirement of 88 g CO2/hr for 14 hr, (3) the testing of the CO2 freezer subsystem, and (4) the integration and testing of the two subsystems to verify the desired production rate of 31.7 g CH4/hr and 71.3 g H2O/hr along with verification of their purity. The resulting 2.22 kg of CH4/O2 propellant per 14 hr day (including O2 from electrolysis of water recovered from regolith, which also supplies the H2 for methanation) is of the scale needed for a Mars Sample Return mission. In addition, the significance of the project to NASA's new Mars exploration plans will be discussed.

  19. Atmospheric Processing Module for Mars Propellant Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muscatello, Anthony; Gibson, Tracy; Captain, James; Athman, Robert; Nugent, Matthew; Parks, Steven; Devor, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The multi-NASA center Mars Atmosphere and Regolith COllector/PrOcessor for Lander Operations (MARCO POLO) project was established to build and demonstrate a methane/oxygen propellant production system in a Mars analog environment. Work at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Applied Chemistry Laboratory is focused on the Atmospheric Processing Module (APM). The purpose of the APM is to freeze carbon dioxide from a simulated Martian atmosphere containing the minor components nitrogen, argon, carbon monoxide, and water vapor at Martian pressures (8 torr) by using dual cryocoolers with alternating cycles of freezing and sublimation. The resulting pressurized CO2 is fed to a methanation subsystem where it is catalytically combined with hydrogen in a Sabatier reactor supplied by the Johnson Space Center (JSC) to make methane and water vapor. We first used a simplified once-through setup and later employed a HiCO2 recycling system to improve process efficiency. This presentation and paper will cover (1) the design and selection of major hardware items, such as the cryocoolers, pumps, tanks, chillers, and membrane separators, (2) the determination of the optimal cold head design and flow rates needed to meet the collection requirement of 88 g CO2/hr for 14 hr, (3) the testing of the CO2 freezer subsystem, and (4) the integration and testing of the two subsystems to verify the desired production rate of 31.7 g CH4/hr and 71.3 g H20/hr along with verification of their purity. The resulting 2.22 kg of CH4/O2 propellant per 14 hr day (including O2 from electrolysis of water recovered from regolith, which also supplies the H2 for methanation) is of the scale needed for a Mars Sample Return mission. In addition, the significance of the project to NASA's new Mars exploration plans will be discussed.

  20. Research Planning Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lofton, Rodney

    2010-01-01

    This presentation describes the process used to collect, review, integrate, and assess research requirements desired to be a part of research and payload activities conducted on the ISS. The presentation provides a description of: where the requirements originate, to whom they are submitted, how they are integrated into a requirements plan, and how that integrated plan is formulated and approved. It is hoped that from completing the review of this presentation, one will get an understanding of the planning process that formulates payload requirements into an integrated plan used for specifying research activities to take place on the ISS.

  1. Transport processes in the middle atmosphere: Reflections after MAP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grose, W. L.

    1989-01-01

    The Middle Atmosphere Program (MAP) has provided a focus for considerable research on atmospherical radiative, chemical, and dynamical processes and the mutual coupling among these processes. In particular, major advances have occurred in the understanding of constituent transport as a result of near-global measurements obtained during MAP from several satellite based instruments (e.g., LIMS, SAMS, SAGE, and SSU among others). Using selected portions of these data, the development is reviewed of progress in understanding transport processes with special emphasis on dynamically active periods. Examples are presented which demonstrate coupling between chemistry and dynamics. In addition to the constituent data, the use is reviewed of Ertel's potential vorticity, inferred from satellite temperature data, as a diagnostic for interpreting transport phenomena. Finally, the use is briefly illustrated of 3-D model simulations, in conjunction with the satellite data, for providing additional insight into fundamental transport mechanisms.

  2. Coupling Processes Between Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, M. K. W.; Weisenstein, Debra; Shia, Run-Li; Sze, N. D.

    1997-01-01

    This is the first semi-annual report for NAS5-97039 summarizing work performed for January 1997 through June 1997. Work in this project is related to NAS1-20666, also funded by NASA ACMAP. The work funded in this project also benefits from work at AER associated with the AER three-dimensional isentropic transport model funded by NASA AEAP and the AER two-dimensional climate-chemistry model (co-funded by Department of Energy). The overall objective of this project is to improve the understanding of coupling processes between atmospheric chemistry and climate. Model predictions of the future distributions of trace gases in the atmosphere constitute an important component of the input necessary for quantitative assessments of global change. We will concentrate on the changes in ozone and stratospheric sulfate aerosol, with emphasis on how ozone in the lower stratosphere would respond to natural or anthropogenic changes. The key modeling tools for this work are the AER two-dimensional chemistry-transport model, the AER two-dimensional stratospheric sulfate model, and the AER three-wave interactive model with full chemistry.

  3. Coupling Processes Between Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, Malcolm; Weisenstein, Debra; Rodriquez, Jose; Danilin, Michael; Scott, Courtney; Shia, Run-Lie; Eluszkiewicz, Janusz; Sze, Nien-Dak; Stewart, Richard W. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    This is the final report for NAS5-97039 for work performed between December 1996 and November 1999. The overall objective of this project is to improve the understanding of coupling processes among atmospheric chemistry, aerosol and climate, all important for quantitative assessments of global change. Among our priority are changes in ozone and stratospheric sulfate aerosol, with emphasis on how ozone in the lower stratosphere would respond to natural or anthropogenic changes. The work emphasizes two important aspects: (1) AER's continued participation in preparation of, and providing scientific input for, various scientific reports connected with assessment of stratospheric ozone and climate. These include participation in various model intercomparison exercises as well as preparation of national and international reports. (2) Continued development of the AER three-wave interactive model to address how the transport circulation will change as ozone and the thermal properties of the atmosphere change, and assess how these new findings will affect our confidence in the ozone assessment results.

  4. Atmospheric Processing Module for Mars Propellant Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muscatello, Anthony C.

    2014-01-01

    The multi-NASA center Mars Atmosphere and Regolith COllectorPrOcessor for Lander Operations (MARCO POLO) project was established to build and demonstrate a methaneoxygen propellant production system in a Mars analog environment. Work at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Applied Chemistry Laboratory is focused on the Atmospheric Processing Module (APM). The purpose of the APM is to freeze carbon dioxide from a simulated Martian atmosphere containing the minor components nitrogen, argon, carbon monoxide, and water vapor at Martian pressures (8 torr) by using dual cryocoolers with alternating cycles of freezing and sublimation. The resulting pressurized CO(sub 2) is fed to a methanation subsystem where it is catalytically combined with hydrogen in a Sabatier reactor supplied by the Johnson Space Center (JSC) to make methane and water vapor. We first used a simplified once-through setup and later employed a H(sub 2)CO(sub 2) recycling system to improve process efficiency. This presentation and paper will cover (1) the design and selection of major hardware items, such as the cryocoolers, pumps, tanks, chillers, and membrane separators, (2) the determination of the optimal cold head design and flow rates needed to meet the collection requirement of 88 g CO(sub 2) hr for 14 hr, (3) the testing of the CO(sub 2) freezer subsystem, and (4) the integration and testing of the two subsystems to verify the desired production rate of 31.7 g CH(sub 4) hr and 71.3 g H(sub 2)O hr along with verification of their purity. The resulting 2.22 kg of CH(sub 2)O(sub 2) propellant per 14 hr day (including O(sub 2) from electrolysis of water recovered from regolith, which also supplies the H(sub 2) for methanation) is of the scale needed for a Mars Sample Return mission. In addition, the significance of the project to NASAs new Mars exploration plans will be discussed.

  5. Atmospheric Processing Module for Mars Propellant Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muscatello, A.; Devor, R.; Captain, J.

    2014-01-01

    The multi-NASA center Mars Atmosphere and Regolith COllector/PrOcessor for Lander Operations (MARCO POLO) project was established to build and demonstrate a methaneoxygen propellant production system in a Mars analog environment. Work at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Applied Chemistry Laboratory is focused on the Atmospheric Processing Module (APM). The purpose of the APM is to freeze carbon dioxide from a simulated Martian atmosphere containing the minor components nitrogen, argon, carbon monoxide, and water vapor at Martian pressures (approx. 8 torr) by using dual cryocoolers with alternating cycles of freezing and sublimation. The resulting pressurized CO(sub 2) is fed to a methanation subsystem where it is catalytically combined with hydrogen in a Sabatier reactor supplied by the Johnson Space Center (JSC) to make methane and water vapor. We first used a simplified once-through setup and later employed a H(sub 2)CO(sub 2) recycling system to improve process efficiency. This presentation and paper will cover (1) the design and selection of major hardware items, such as the cryocoolers, pumps, tanks, chillers, and membrane separators, (2) the determination of the optimal cold head design and flow rates needed to meet the collection requirement of 88 g CO(sub 2) hr for 14 hr, (3) the testing of the CO(sub 2) freezer subsystem, and (4) the integration and testing of the two subsystems to verify the desired production rate of 31.7 g CH(sub 4) hr and 71.3 g H(sub 2)O hr along with verification of their purity. The resulting 2.22 kg of CH(sub 2)O(sub 2) propellant per 14 hr day (including O(sub 2) from electrolysis of water recovered from regolith, which also supplies the H(sub 2) for methanation) is of the scale needed for a Mars Sample Return mission. In addition, the significance of the project to NASAs new Mars exploration plans will be discussed.

  6. Uses of tethered atmospheric research probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deloach, Richard

    1991-01-01

    In situ measurements in the lower thermosphere are rare because of the difficulty of reaching these altitudes with conventional instrument platforms. The emerging technology of tethered satellites as a means to probe these altitudes from above has matured to the point that a flight program is planned to verify the operational performance of a low-cost deployer mechanism for tethered satellites, and to demonstrate a basic understanding of the dynamics of tethered satellite deployment. With such operational developments at hand, it is appropriate to review some of the potential applications of tethered measurement platforms for acquiring in situ data in the upper atmosphere. This paper focuses on downward-deployed tethered satellite measurements of interest to atmospheric scientists and to hypersonic aerodynamicists, and discusses ways in which this technology may be able to support selected long-range research programs currently in progress or in various stages of pre-flight development. The intent is to illustrate for the potential user community some of the unique advantages of tethered measurement platform technology now under development, and to stimulate creative thinking about ways in which this new capability may be used in support of future research programs.

  7. The multicultural research process.

    PubMed

    Evans, Bronwynne C

    2006-07-01

    Qualitative research allows students to explore the complex experiences of health and illness and examine assumptions related to class, race, gender, and ethnicity. Faculty who teach qualitative research can promote culturally congruent nursing practice, and students can learn how such practice is grounded in research. The experiential approach taken in this class acquainted students with basic principles of qualitative research, used such principles to foster recognition of assumptions and increase cultural awareness, and encouraged a new way of knowing and being in nursing. The learning goals were to experience the "flavor" of qualitative data analysis using a filmed interview of an American Indian nurse and written interviews of a Hispanic/Latina nurse and nursing student, speaking about their educational experiences in nursing. In this process, the nurse educator exemplified principles of multicultural education for these budding teachers, such as weaving cultural content across the curriculum and role modeling concern for cultural issues in teaching, research, and service.

  8. Linking Weathering, Rock Moisture Dynamics, Geochemistry, Runoff, Vegetation and Atmospheric Processes through the Critical Zone: Graduate Student led Research at the Eel River Critical Zone Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, W. E.

    2014-12-01

    in transpiration rate significantly compared to the madrone during summer high water stress periods, with may induce feedbacks from the forest to atmospheric temperature and humidity. Collectively these studies spotlight the seasonally dynamic unsaturated zone in the weathered bedrock beneath the soil as key to understanding critical zone processes.

  9. The Serendipitous Research Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nutefall, Jennifer E.; Ryder, Phyllis Mentzell

    2010-01-01

    This article presents the results of an exploratory study asking faculty in the first-year writing program and instruction librarians about their research process focusing on results specifically related to serendipity. Steps to prepare for serendipity are highlighted as well as a model for incorporating serendipity into a first-year writing…

  10. Research into Process Curricula.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andreas, Burton G.; And Others

    These papers are related to the basic comprehensive research and development plan of the Eastern Regional Institute for Education (ERIE). The first paper, Improving Process Education: A Comprehensive Plan by Burton G. Andreas, describes the comprehensive plan and introduces the succeeding papers. The goals of the program are to improve process…

  11. Utö Atmospheric and Marine Research Station - a new Baltic Sea ICOS-site for sea-atmosphere research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laakso, Lauri; Laurila, Tuomas; Mäkelä, Timo; Hatakka, Juha; Purokoski, Tero; Hietala, Riikka; Roine, Tuomo; Jämsen, Pertti; Kielosto, Sami; Asmi, Eija; Lonka, Harry; Alenius, Pekka; Drebs, Achim; Seppälä, Jukka; Ylöstalo, Pasi; Tamminen, Timo

    2015-04-01

    Atmospheric research has developed a concept of focused, multidisciplinary, automated observation platforms with continuous high time resolution observations. This approach containing state-of-the-art equipment has enabled research on physical, chemical and biological processes and seasonal variability and showed up new, previously unknown phenomena. New technical and engineering solutions allowing, such approach is also state-of-the-art in marine research through projects like US Ocean Observatories Initiative (OOI), European Multidisciplinary Seafloor Observatory (EMSO), JERICO-NEXT and Japanese DONET. At the Baltic Sea, on Island of Utö (59° 46'50N, 21° 22'23E), Finnish Meteorological Institute has observed meteorology since 1881, marine parameters since 1900 and a diversity of atmospheric chemical and physical variables since 1980. Recent years the stations has also been upgraded with aerosol observations, and together with Finnish Environment Institute, on marine observations. The current and observations under construction at Utö Atmospheric and Marine Research Station (en.ilmatieteenlaitos.fi/uto. Marine observations: surface waves, ice-cover radar, temperature and salinity and oxygen at different depths, chlorophyll, cyanobacteria, underwater flows, turbidity, pCO2 and nutrients. Atmospheric observations: T, WS, WD, visibility, cloud height, boundary layer wind profiles and turbulence, weather and underwater camera, aerosol particle size distributions, aerosol light scattering and absorption, SO2, NOx, CO, O3, CO2, CH4, sea-atmosphere CO2- and heat fluxes. In our presentation, we present for the first time some 100 years of climate relevant atmospheric and marine observations from Utö.

  12. NOAA ESRL Atmospheric Research Operations in California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasel, B. A.; Borgeld, J.; Ives, M.; Conway, T.; Karion, A.; Fischer, M. L.; Andrews, A. E.; Sweeney, C.; Andrews, B.; Oltmans, S. J.; Johnson, B. J.; Patrick, L. C.; Berkoff, T.

    2009-12-01

    In 2009 the NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL) had over two dozen operational research programs within the state of California. These diverse research missions include the Fire Weather Service and Support, the Pt Sur Debris Flow Project, and the Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) regional test bed. The ESRL Global Monitoring Division had 10 atmospheric measurement programs with a common goal to understand the regional and global climate impacts in and around California. The NOAA Trinidad Head (THD) baseline observatory, run in cooperation with Humboldt State University (HSU), was recently promoted to the top-tier WMO/Global Atmospheric Watch (GAW) global station in 2009. The Trinidad Head observatory was strategically located (April 2002) along the west coast to monitor the air entering the United States and is now being impacted by effluents and anthropogenic aerosols and gases from booming Asian economies. Recent forest fire seasons in CA have had dramatic effects on aerosol properties and ozone concentrations measured at the THD site. Light aircraft flights made by NOAA/ESRL as part of the Airborne Greenhouse Emissions Survey (AGES) campaign in collaboration with Lawrence Berkeley National Lab and UC Davis in the spring and summer of 2008 captured large signals indicative of urban air plumes with highly correlated CO2, CH4, CO, as well as agricultural signatures with enhanced CH4 coincident with depleted CO2. These flights also captured a large signal from the northern CA wildfires enabling the comparison of signatures from forest fires to other sources. Ozonesonde balloon flights have been done weekly at the THD site since August of 1997 and bi-monthly vertical aircraft profiles above THD for carbon cycle gases (>50 gas species) began in September of 2003. In 2008 carbon cycle flasks were added to the HSU research vessel, the Coral Sea, to obtain surface values ~20 nautical miles offshore from the THD observatory. Particular attention will be paid to the

  13. Volatile processes in Triton's atmosphere and surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lunine, J. I.

    1992-01-01

    A basic model for latitudinal transport of nitrogen is reviewed focusing on its limitations and some complications associated with surface and atmospheric physics. Data obtained by 1989 Voyager encounter with the Neptune system revealed the complexity in the pure nitrogen transport which is caused by the nonuniform albedo of the frosts. It is concluded that Triton is similar to Mars in terms of the complexity of volatile transport and to understand Triton's surface-atmosphere system, Mars may be a very good analog.

  14. Atmospheric process evaluation of mobile source emissions

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    During the past two decades there has been a considerable effort in the US to develop and introduce an alternative to the use of gasoline and conventional diesel fuel for transportation. The primary motives for this effort have been twofold: energy security and improvement in air quality, most notably ozone, or smog. The anticipated improvement in air quality is associated with a decrease in the atmospheric reactivity, and sometimes a decrease in the mass emission rate, of the organic gas and NO{sub x} emissions from alternative fuels when compared to conventional transportation fuels. Quantification of these air quality impacts is a prerequisite to decisions on adopting alternative fuels. The purpose of this report is to present a critical review of the procedures and data base used to assess the impact on ambient air quality of mobile source emissions from alternative and conventional transportation fuels and to make recommendations as to how this process can be improved. Alternative transportation fuels are defined as methanol, ethanol, CNG, LPG, and reformulated gasoline. Most of the discussion centers on light-duty AFVs operating on these fuels. Other advanced transportation technologies and fuels such as hydrogen, electric vehicles, and fuel cells, will not be discussed. However, the issues raised herein can also be applied to these technologies and other classes of vehicles, such as heavy-duty diesels (HDDs). An evaluation of the overall impact of AFVs on society requires consideration of a number of complex issues. It involves the development of new vehicle technology associated with engines, fuel systems, and emission control technology; the implementation of the necessary fuel infrastructure; and an appropriate understanding of the economic, health, safety, and environmental impacts associated with the use of these fuels. This report addresses the steps necessary to properly evaluate the impact of AFVs on ozone air quality.

  15. Research on Spectroscopy, Opacity, and Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliversen, Ronald (Technical Monitor); Kurucz, Robert L.

    2004-01-01

    I propose to continue providing observers with basic data for interpreting spectra from stars, novas, supernovas, clusters, and galaxies. These data will include allowed forbidden line lists both laboratory and computed, for the first five to ten ions of all atoms and for all relevant diatomic molecules. I will eventually expend to all ions of the first thirty elements to treat far UV end X-ray spectra, and for envelope opacities. I also include triatomic molecules providing by other researchers. I have made CDs with Partridge and Schwanke's water data for work on M stars.The luna data also serve as input to my model atmosphere and synthesis programs that generated energy distributions, photometry, limb darkening, and spectra that can be used for planning observations and for fitting observed spectra. The spectrum synthesis programs produce detailed plots with the line identified. Grids of stellar spectra can be used for radial velocity-, rotation-, or abundance templates and for population synthesis. I am fitting spectra of bright stars to test the data and to produce atlases to guide observer. For each star the whole spectrum is computed from the UV to the far IR. The line data, opacities, models, spectra, and programs are freely distributed on CDs and on my web site and represent a unique resource for many NASA programs.

  16. Energy Deposition Processes in Titan's Upper Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sittler, Edward C., Jr.; Bertucci, Cesar; Coates, Andrew; Cravens, Tom; Dandouras, Iannis; Shemansky, Don

    2008-01-01

    Most of Titan's atmospheric organic and nitrogen chemistry, aerosol formation, and atmospheric loss are driven from external energy sources such as Solar UV, Saturn's magnetosphere, solar wind and galactic cosmic rays. The Solar UV tends to dominate the energy input at lower altitudes of approximately 1100 km but which can extend down to approximately 400 km, while the plasma interaction from Saturn's magnetosphere, Saturn's magnetosheath or solar wind are more important at higher altitudes of approximately 1400 km, but the heavy ion plasma [O(+)] of approximately 2 keV and energetic ions [H(+)] of approximately 30 keV or higher from Saturn's magnetosphere can penetrate below 950km. Cosmic rays with energies of greater than 1 GeV can penetrate much deeper into Titan's atmosphere with most of its energy deposited at approximately 100 km altitude. The haze layer tends to dominate between 100 km and 300 km. The induced magnetic field from Titan's interaction with the external plasma can be very complex and will tend to channel the flow of energy into Titan's upper atmosphere. Cassini observations combined with advanced hybrid simulations of the plasma interaction with Titan's upper atmosphere show significant changes in the character of the interaction with Saturn local time at Titan's orbit where the magnetosphere displays large and systematic changes with local time. The external solar wind can also drive sub-storms within the magnetosphere which can then modify the magnetospheric interaction with Titan. Another important parameter is solar zenith angle (SZA) with respect to the co-rotation direction of the magnetospheric flow. Titan's interaction can contribute to atmospheric loss via pickup ion loss, scavenging of Titan's ionospheric plasma, loss of ionospheric plasma down its induced magnetotail via an ionospheric wind, and non-thermal loss of the atmosphere via heating and sputtering induced by the bombardment of magnetospheric keV ions and electrons. This

  17. Basic research in meteorology and atmospheric physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, J. E.

    1975-01-01

    The effect was studied of the variations of the electromagnetic properties of the three phases of water on measurements of atmospheric and oceanographic parameters by microwave instruments aboard satellites. Other studies reported include: orbital detection of extrasolar planets, detection of stratospheric aerosols from earth orbit, chemistry of Jupiter's atmosphere, and stratospheric ozone.

  18. Processing and display of atmospheric phenomenaa data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tatom, F. B.; Garst, R. A.; Purser, L. R.

    1984-01-01

    A series of technical efforts dealing with various atmospheric phenomena is described. Refinements to the Potential in an Electrostatic Cloud (PEC) model are discussed. The development of an Apple III graphics program, the NSSL Lightning Data Program and a description of data reduction procedures are examined. Several utility programs are also discussed.

  19. The Need for Atmospheric and Climate Research Infrastructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrie, Leonard A.

    2010-05-01

    a patchwork of international, national or regional research efforts with short term funding whose longevity cannot be assured for the longer period of time that is essential for environmental security. Today in Europe and indeed the World, there is an opportunity to fill a gap in medium to long term infra-structure support for chemical observation systems. Atmospheric and climate research infrastructure initiatives are needed to assure long term three dimensional atmospheric observations as a solid foundation for shorter term process and model development research activities within the European Research Framework programme. This presentation reviews emerging atmospheric and climate research infrastructure initiatives that, when implemented within a global context, will strengthen the environmental security of Europe. Observations of atmospheric greenhouse gases and their regional or global budgets as well as enhanced vertical profiling of the atmospheric using aircraft and surface-based systems are a priority. Infrastructures that achieve this or that enable the atmospheric and climate process research required for prediction and analysis will represent a swing of the pendulum back from the extreme of short term project funding. This will help to place Europe solidly amongst the leaders of Earth System studies of the 21st century.

  20. Mapping the Collaborative Research Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kochanek, Julie Reed; Scholz, Carrie; Garcia, Alicia N.

    2015-01-01

    Despite significant federal investments in the production of high-quality education research, the direct use of that research in policy and practice is not evident. Some education researchers are increasingly employing collaborative research models that use structures and processes to integrate practitioners into the research process in an effort…

  1. Chemical processes in Triton's atmosphere and surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delitsky, M. L.; Thompson, W. R.

    1987-01-01

    The Neptune moon Triton may have an appreciable atmosphere; the preliminary calculations of Delitsky (1983) have suggested that there should be a significant resultant chemistry in a possible N2 ocean with dissolved CH4, given charged-particle radiolysis of gaseous mixtures and gamma radiolysis of N2-CH4 solutions. The latter will yield substantial quantities of organic products which will be partially soluble in any N2-CH4 liquid present. Attention is presently given to the energy sources available for Triton, in order to estimate rates of synthesis and ascertain the possible history of such simple and complex organic products on Triton's surface.

  2. Atomic and Molecular Processes in Atmospheric Environments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1971-04-28

    ATMOSPHERIC SCIHICES IBSTITUTE TECHHICAL PKOGRSSS SUMMARY HO. 10 00 (M W w o < ORDER NUMBER: HAMB OF COMTRACTOR: DATE OF COBTRACT: O...R. Hleman D. Sipler E. Stone B. Thomas G. linger I. To January, l^i / *r/t l c i TECHNICAL PROGRESS REPORT NO. 10 PittBbüTKh...shold to 350 eV. The cross section for dissociative excitation of \\ 3 Ly»*n alpha has a peak value of 1.23 x 10 ൙ ca2 ♦ 13% while the cross section

  3. Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS): A program to study global ozone change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    A general overview of NASA's Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) program is presented in a broad based informational publication. The UARS will be responsible for carrying out the first systematic, comprehensive study of the stratosphere and will furnish important new data on the mesosphere and thermosphere. The UARS mission objectives are to provide an increased understanding of energy input into the upper atmosphere; global photochemistry of the upper atmosphere; dynamics of the upper atmosphere; coupling among these processes; and coupling between the upper and lower atmosphere. These mission objectives are briefly described along with the UARS on-board instrumentation and related data management systems.

  4. Chemical processes in Triton's atmosphere and surface

    SciTech Connect

    Delitsky, M.L.; Thompson, W.R.

    1987-05-01

    The Neptune moon Triton may have an appreciable atmosphere; the preliminary calculations of Delitsky (1983) have suggested that there should be a significant resultant chemistry in a possible N/sub 2/ ocean with dissolved CH/sub 4/, given charged-particle radiolysis of gaseous mixtures and gamma radiolysis of N/sub 2/-CH/sub 4/ solutions. The latter will yield substantial quantities of organic products which will be partially soluble in any N/sub 2/-CH/sub 4/ liquid present. Attention is presently given to the energy sources available for Triton, in order to estimate rates of synthesis and ascertain the possible history of such simple and complex organic products on Triton's surface. 54 references.

  5. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1993 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 3: Atmospheric and climate research

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER) atmospheric sciences and carbon dioxide research programs provide the DOE with scientifically defensible information on the local, regional, and global distributions of energy-related pollutants and their effects on climate. PNL has had a long history of technical leadership in the atmospheric sciences research programs within OHER. Within the Environmental Sciences Division of OHER, the Atmospheric Chemistry Program continues DOE`s long-term commitment to understanding the local, regional, and global effects of energy-related air pollutants. Research through direct measurement, numerical modeling, and analytical studies in the Atmospheric Chemistry Program emphasizes the long-range transport, chemical transformation, and removal of emitted pollutants, photochemically produced oxidant species, nitrogen-reservoir species, and aerosols. The atmospheric studies in Complex Terrain Program applies basic research on atmospheric boundary layer structure and evolution over inhomogeneous terrain to DOE`s site-specific and generic mission needs in site safety, air quality, and climate change. Research at PNL provides basic scientific underpinnings to DOE`s program of global climate research. Research projects within the core carbon dioxide and ocean research programs are now integrated with those in the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements, the Computer Hardware, Advanced Mathematics and Model Physics, and Quantitative Links program to form DOE`s contribution to the US Global Change Research Program. The description of ongoing atmospheric and climate research at PNL is organized in two broad research areas: atmospheric research; and climate research. This report describes the progress in fiscal year 1993 in each of these areas. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases.

  6. Laboratory Studies of Heterogeneous Chemical Processes of Atmospheric Importance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molina, Mario J.

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this study is to conduct measurements of chemical kinetics parameters for heterogeneous reactions of importance in the stratosphere and the troposphere. It involves the elucidation of the mechanism of the interaction of HC1 vapor with ice surfaces, which is the first step in the heterogeneous chlorine activation processes, as well as the investigation of the atmospheric oxidation mechanism of soot particles emitted by biomass and fossil fuels. The techniques being employed include turbulent flow- chemical ionization mass spectrometry and optical ellipsometry, among others. The next section summarizes our research activities during the first year of the project, and the section that follows consists of the statement of work for the second year.

  7. DESCRIPTION OF ATMOSPHERIC TRANSPORT PROCESSES IN EULERIAN AIR QUALITY MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Key differences among many types of air quality models are the way atmospheric advection and turbulent diffusion processes are treated. Gaussian models use analytical solutions of the advection-diffusion equations. Lagrangian models use a hypothetical air parcel concept effecti...

  8. Research on Spectroscopy, Opacity, and Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurucz, Robert L.

    1996-01-01

    I discuss errors in theory and in interpreting observations that are produced by the failure to consider resolution in space, time, and energy. I discuss convection in stellar model atmospheres and in stars. Large errors in abundances are possible such as the factor of ten error in the Li abundance for extreme Population II stars. Finally I discuss the variation of microturbulent velocity with depth, effective temperature, gravity and abundance. These variations must be dealt with in computing models and grids and in any type of photometric calibration.

  9. Research on Spectroscopy, Opacity, and Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurucz, Robert L.

    2005-01-01

    I propose to continue providing observers with basic data for interpreting spectra from stars, novas, supernovas, clusters, and galaxies. These data will include allowed and forbidden line lists, both laboratory and computed, for the first five to ten ions of all atoms and for all relevant diatomic molecules. I will eventually expand to all ions of the first thirty elements to treat far UV and X-ray spectra, and for envelope opacities. I also include triatomic molecules provided by other researchers. I have also made CDs with Partridge and Schwenke's water data for work on UV stars. The line data also serve as input to my model atmosphere and synthesis programs that generate energy distributions, photometry, limb darkening, and spectra that can be used for planning observations and for fitting observed spectra. The spectrum synthesis programs produce detailed plots with the lines identified. Grids of stellar spectra can be used for radial velocity-, rotation-, or abundance templates and for population synthesis. I am fitting spectra of bright stars to test the data and to produce atlases to guide observers. For each star the whole spectrum is computed from the UV to the far IR. The line data, opacities, models, spectra, and programs are freely distributed on CDs and on my Web site and represent a unique resource for many NASA programs. I am now in full production of new line lists for atoms. I am computing all ions of all elements from H to Zn and the first 5 ions of all the heavier elements, about 800 ions. For each ion I treat as many as 61 even and 61 odd configurations, computing all energy levels and eigenvectors. The Hamiltonian is determined from a scaled-Hartree-Fock starting guess by least squares fitting the observed energy levels. The average energy of each configuration is used in computing scaled-Thomas-Fermi-Dirac wavefunctions for each configuration which in turn are used to compute allowed and forbidden transition integrals. These are multiplied

  10. NASA's Upper Atmosphere Research Program UARP and Atmospheric Chemistry Modeling and Analysis Program (ACMAP): Research Summaries 1994 - 1996. Report to Congress and the Environmental Protection Agency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendall, Rose (Compiler); Wolfe, Kathy (Compiler)

    1997-01-01

    Under the mandate contained in the FY 1976 NASA Authorization Act, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has developed and is implementing a comprehensive program of research, technology, and monitoring of the Earth's upper atmosphere, with emphasis on the stratosphere. This program aims at expanding our understanding to permit both the quantitative analysis of current perturbations as well as the assessment of possible future changes in this important region of our environment. It is carried out jointly by the Upper Atmosphere Research Program (UARP) and the Atmospheric Chemistry Modeling and Analysis Program (ACMAP), both managed within the Science Division in the Office of Mission to Planet Earth at NASA. Significant contributions to this effort are also provided by the Atmospheric Effects of Aviation Project (AEAP) of NASA's Office of Aeronautics. The long-term objectives of the present program are to perform research to: understand the physics, chemistry, and transport processes of the upper atmosphere and their effect on the distribution of chemical species in the stratosphere, such as ozone; understand the relationship of the trace constituent composition of the lower stratosphere and the lower troposphere to the radiative balance and temperature distribution of the Earth's atmosphere; and accurately assess possible perturbations of the upper atmosphere caused by human activities as well as by natural phenomena. In compliance with the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, Public Law 101-549, NASA has prepared a report on the state of our knowledge of the Earth's upper atmosphere, particularly the stratosphere, and on the progress of UARP and ACMAP. The report for the year 1996 is composed of two parts. Part 1 summarizes the objectives, status, and accomplishments of the research tasks supported under NASA UARP and ACMAP in a document entitled, Research Summary 1994-1996. Part 2 is entitled Present State of Knowledge of the Upper Atmosphere

  11. Research in Stochastic Processes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-09-01

    appear. G. Kallianpur, Finitely additive approach to nonlinear filtering, Proc. Bernoulli Soc. Conf. on Stochastic Processes, T. Hida , ed., Springer, to...Nov. 85, in Proc. Bernoulli Soc. Conf. on Stochastic Processes, T. Hida , ed., Springer, to appear. i. Preparation T. Hsing, Extreme value theory for...1507 Carroll, R.J., Spiegelman, C.H., Lan, K.K.G., Bailey , K.T. and Abbott, R.D., Errors in-variables for binary regression models, Aug.82. 1508

  12. Information Processing Research.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-09-01

    LABORATORY AIR FORCE WRIGHT AERONAUTICAL LABORATORIES AIR FORCE SYSTEMS COMMAND t= WRIGHT-PATTERSON AIR FORCE BASE , OHIO 45433-6503 1b L) .U u NOTICE When...Speech Recognition 14-9 TABLE OF CONTENTS 4.2.6. SPAM: Rule- Based Systems for Aerial Photointerpretation 4-104.3. Bibliography 4-125. Research in...Reconfiguration 6-36.5. Prototype for Distributed Sensing 6-46.6. Transaction Based Systems 6-46.7. Bibliography 6-57. Research in Cooperative User

  13. Research on Spectroscopy, Opacity, and Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurucz, Robert L.; Oliversen, Ronald (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    For planetary and telluric atmosphere projects the solar irradiance spectrum is required as the input at the top of the atmosphere. It has never been observed. People ask me to compute it. I can compute it theoretically using both known and predicted lines and get agreement averaged over a nanometer but there is no way to predict the resolved spectrum when only half the lines are known. In other stars the situation is worse because the signal-to-noise and resolution of the observations are worse. Logically one has to know a priori what is in the spectrum in order to interpret it; there is not enough information in the observed spectrum itself (qualifiers are given). Basically we need a list of all the energy levels of all atoms and molecules that matter. From that list can be generated all the lines. With the energy levels and line positions known, one can measure gf values, lifetimes, damping, or one can determine a theoretical or semiempirical Hamiltonian whose eigenvalues and eigenvectors produce a good match to the observed data, and that can then be used to generate additional radiative and collisional data for atoms or molecules.

  14. Model Atmospheres for Novae in Outburst: Summary of Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hauschildt, Peter H.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents a final report and summary of research on Model Atmospheres for Novae in Outburst. Some of the topics include: 1) Detailed NLTE (non-local thermodynamic equilibrium) Model Atmospheres for Novae during Outburst: II. Modeling optical and ultraviolet observations of Nova LMC 1988 #1; 2) A Non-LTE Line-Blanketed Stellar Atmosphere Model of the Early B Giant epsilon CMa; 3) Spectroscopy of Low Metallicity Stellar atmospheres; 4) Infrared Colors at the Stellar/Substellar Boundary; 5) On the abundance of Lithium in T CrB; 6) Numerical Solution of the Expanding Stellar Atmosphere Problem; and 7) The NextGen Model Atmosphere grid for 3000 less than or equal to T (sub eff) less than or equal to 10000K.

  15. First international conference on laboratory research for planetary atmospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, K.; Allen, J.E. Jr.; Stief, L.J.; Quillen, D.T.

    1990-05-01

    Proceedings of the First International Conference on Laboratory Research for Planetary Atmospheres are presented. The covered areas of research include: photon spectroscopy, chemical kinetics, thermodynamics, and charged particle interactions. This report contains the 12 invited papers, 27 contributed poster papers, and 5 plenary review papers presented at the conference. A list of attendees and a reprint of the Report of the Subgroup on Strategies for Planetary Atmospheres Exploration (SPASE) are provided in two appendices.

  16. First International Conference on Laboratory Research for Planetary Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Kenneth (Editor); Allen, John E., Jr. (Editor); Stief, Louis J. (Editor); Quillen, Diana T. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    Proceedings of the First International Conference on Laboratory Research for Planetary Atmospheres are presented. The covered areas of research include: photon spectroscopy, chemical kinetics, thermodynamics, and charged particle interactions. This report contains the 12 invited papers, 27 contributed poster papers, and 5 plenary review papers presented at the conference. A list of attendees and a reprint of the Report of the Subgroup on Strategies for Planetary Atmospheres Exploration (SPASE) are provided in two appendices.

  17. Research on probabilistic information processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, W.

    1973-01-01

    The work accomplished on probabilistic information processing (PIP) is reported. The research proposals and decision analysis are discussed along with the results of research on MSC setting, multiattribute utilities, and Bayesian research. Abstracts of reports concerning the PIP research are included.

  18. Research in Stochastic Processes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-10-01

    of stable processes: Spectral and moving average representations." S. Cambanis and A. Soltani , Z. Wahrsch. verw. Geb., 66, 1984, 593-612. "Comparisons...average representation for stationary random fields and Beurling’s theorem." A. Soltani , Ann. Probabilit, 12, 1984, 120-132. S "Decomposability of p

  19. Research in Stochastic Processes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-01

    the Statistics Department, involving permaner.c faculty, visitors and students. UNCLASSIFIED/UNLIMITED SAME AS RP-T EO TIC USERS ED 22a NAME OF...possible extensions of large deviation thoery (see (l] and references therein). For the case of Markov processes we attempted to derive the results of...homoscedastic errors, several classes of efficient, balanced designs for factorial experiments were constructed in [2]. In this project, the author has

  20. Information Processing Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-01

    developing demonstrable vision systems. This report reviews out progress since the October 1984 workshop proceedings. The highlights in out Program in...A new class of algorithms based on the Boltzmann Machine is introduced and compared to previously developed algorithms. The report includes a review ...34compression analysis" method embodies a post -processing strategy that rewrites learned control rules, increasing their readability and reducing their match

  1. Research in Laser Processes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-15

    N . Zare, J. Chem. Phys. 63, 3094 (1970). 2J. N , Bardsley, B. R. Junker, and D. W, Norcross, Chem. Phys. Lett. 27, 502 (1976). T . U . Ducas, M. G ...l)] g ,1/[Na(/j)k’„ ,, for n >nH whose average behavior is characterized by an excita- tion temperature between T , and T . Using predicted scaling...Office of Naval Research «« G ( T / g ARPA Order No. 2683, Amendment 8 Program Code No. 8E20 Contractor: University of Colorado Effective Date

  2. The role of hydrological processes in ocean-atmosphere interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Webster, P.J.

    1994-11-01

    Earth is unique among the planets of the solar system in possessing a full hydrological cycle. The role of water in the evolution of planetary atmospheres is discussed. As the atmospheres of the planets developed and modified the early climates of the planets, only the climate trajectory of Earth intercepted the water phase transitions near the triplet point of water, thus allowing the full gamut of water forms to coexist. As a result, transitions between the water phases pervade the entire system and probably are responsible for the creation of a unique climate state. The interactions between the components of the climate system are enriched by the nonlinearity of the water phase transitions. The nonlinear character of the phase transitions of water suggests that the climate should be particularly sensitive to hydrological processes, especially in the tropics. Signatures of the nonlinearity are found in both the structures of the oceans and the atmosphere. Models of the ocean and atmospheric and oceanic data and models of the coupled system are used to perform systematic analyses of hydrological processes and their role in system interaction. The analysis is extended to consider the role of hydrological processes in the basic dynamics and thermodynamics of oceanic and atmospheric systems. The role hydrological processes play in determining the scale of the major atmospheric circulation patterns is investigated. Explanations are offered as to why large-scale convection in the tropical atmosphere is constrained to lie within the 28{degrees}C sea surface temperature contour and how hydrological processes are involved in interannual climate variability. The relative roles of thermal and haline forcing of the oceanic thermohaline circulation are discussed. Hydrological processes are considered in a global context by the development of a conceptual model of a simple planetary system. 94 refs., 38 figs., 5 tabs.

  3. A Process Research Framework: The International Process Research Consortium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-01

    www.sei.cmu.edu/iprc A Process Research Framework The International Process Research Consortium Eileen Forrester, editor Julia Allen Vic Basili...valuable mix of intuition and imagination. • Julia Allen, Software Engineering Institute • Vic Basili, University of Maryland • Barry Boehm...process. IPRC Framework xvii A colleague from SAIC, Ms. Mary Ann Herndon, attended several of our workshops until she left to form her own company

  4. Image Processing Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-09-30

    Technical Journal, Vol. 36, pp. 653-709, May 1957. -50- 4. Image Restoration anJ Enhdikcement Projects Imaje restoration ani image enhancement are...n (9K =--i_ (9) -sn =0- 2. where o is the noise energy ani I is an identity matrix. n Color Imaje Scanner Calibration: A common problem in the...line of the imaje , and >at. The statistics cf the process N(k) can now be given in terms of the statistics of m , 8 2 , and the sequence W= (cLe (5

  5. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1985 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 3. Atmospheric sciences

    SciTech Connect

    Elderkin, C.E.

    1986-02-01

    The goals of atmospheric research at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) are to describe and predict the nature and fate of atmospheric contaminants and to develop an understanding of the atmospheric processes contributing to their distribution on local, regional, and continental scales. In 1985, this research has examined the transport and diffusion of atmospheric contaminants in areas of complex terrain, summarized the field studies and analyses of dry deposition and resuspension conducted in past years, and begun participation in a large, multilaboratory program to assess the precipitation scavenging processes important to the transformation and wet deposition of chemicals composing ''acid rain.'' The description of atmospheric research at PNL is organized in terms of the following study areas: Atmospheric Studies in Complex Terrain; Dispersion, Deposition, and Resuspension of Atmospheric Contaminants; and Processing of Emissions by Clouds and Precipitation (PRECP).

  6. Research on Spectroscopy, Opacity, and Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurucz, Robert L.

    1999-01-01

    A web site has been set up to make the calculations accessible; (i.e., cfakus.harvard.edu) This data can also be accessed by FTP. It has all of the atomic and diatomic molecular data, tables of distribution function opacities, grids of model atmospheres, colors, fluxes, etc, programs that are ready for distribution, and most of recent papers developed during this grant. Atlases and computed spectra will be added as they are completed. New atomic and molecular calculations will be added as they are completed. The atomic programs that had been running on a Cray at the San Diego Supercomputer Center can now run on the Vaxes and Alpha. The work started with Ni and Co because there were new laboratory analyses that included isotopic and hyperfine splitting. Those calculations are described in the appended abstract for the 6th Atomic Spectroscopy and oscillator Strengths meeting in Victoria last summer. A surprising finding is that quadrupole transitions have been grossly in error because mixing with higher levels has not been included. All levels up through n=9 for Fe I and II, the spectra for which the most information is available, are now included. After Fe I and Fe II, all other spectra are "easy". ATLAS12, the opacity sampling program for computing models with arbitrary abundances, has been put on the web server. A new distribution function opacity program for workstations that replaces the one used on the Cray at the San Diego Supercomputer Center has been written. Each set of abundances would take 100 Cray hours costing $100,000.

  7. Evaluation of Chemical and Atmospheric Sciences Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-09-09

    I Geil 48 Benesch 49 Niedenzu B/B+ 1 Marchand 26 El Batouay 9 Tuazon B 24 Maddou 33 Thompson23 Winefordner 21) Lauer 30) Me-’nzer 0’ SalK 7 Lin C 28...APOSR CHEMISTRY RESEARCH- EVALUATION CATE3GORY I CATEGORY TI A+36 Jonas 43 Field A 06 Hubbard 25 Williams 29 Bernstein 24 Smalley 19 Winograd * 14 Rice

  8. Parallel processing of atmospheric chemistry calculations: Preliminary considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, S.; Jones, P.

    1995-01-01

    Global climate calculations are already saturating the class modern vector supercomputers with only a few central processing units. Increased resolution and inclusion of routines to deal with biogeochemical portions of the terrestrial climate system will soon demand massively parallel approaches. The atmospheric photochemistry ensemble is intimately linked to climate through the trace greenhouse gases ozone and methane and modules for representing it are being attached to global three dimensional transport and GCM frameworks. Atmospheric kinetics involve dozens of highly interactive tracers and so will accentuate the need for parallel processing of earth system simulations. In the present text we lay some of the groundwork for addition of atmospheric kinetics packages to GCM and global scale atmospheric models on multiply parallel computers. The discussion is tailored for consumption by the photochemical modelling community. After a review of numerical atmospheric chemistry methods, we examine how kinetics can be implemented on a parallel computer. We concentrate especially on data layout and flexibility and how these can be implemented in various programming models. We conclude that chemistry can be implemented rather easily within existing frameworks of several parallel atmospheric models. However, memory limitations may preclude high resolution studies of global chemistry.

  9. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Annual Report 2007

    SciTech Connect

    LR Roeder

    2007-12-01

    This annual report describes the purpose and structure of the program, and presents key accomplishments in 2007. Notable achievements include: • Successful review of the ACRF as a user facility by the DOE Biological and Environmental Research Advisory Committee. The subcommittee reinforced the importance of the scientific impacts of this facility, and its value for the international research community. • Leadership of the Cloud Land Surface Interaction Campaign. This multi-agency, interdisciplinary field campaign involved enhanced surface instrumentation at the ACRF Southern Great Plains site and, in concert with the Cumulus Humilis Aerosol Processing Study sponsored by the DOE Atmospheric Science Program, coordination of nine aircraft through the ARM Aerial Vehicles Program. • Successful deployment of the ARM Mobile Facility in Germany, including hosting nearly a dozen guest instruments and drawing almost 5000 visitors to the site. • Key advancements in the representation of radiative transfer in weather forecast models from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts. • Development of several new enhanced data sets, ranging from best estimate surface radiation measurements from multiple sensors at all ACRF sites to the extension of time-height cloud occurrence profiles to Niamey, Niger, Africa. • Publication of three research papers in a single issue (February 2007) of the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society.

  10. Research on Spectroscopy, Opacity, and Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurucz, Robert L.

    1999-01-01

    To make my calculations more readily accessible I have set up a web site cfaku5.harvard.edu that can also be accessed by FTP. it has 5 9GB disks that hold all of my atomic and diatomic molecular data, my tables of distribution function opacities, my grids of model atmospheres, colors, fluxes, etc, my program that are ready for distribution, most of my recent papers. Atlases and computed spectra will be added as they are completed. New atomic and molecular calculations will be added as they are completed. I got my atomic programs that had been running on a Cray at the San Diego Supercomputer Center to run on my Vaxes and Alpha. I started with Ni and Co because there were new laboratory analyses that included isotopic and hyperfine splitting. Those calculations are described in the appended abstract for the 6th Atomic Spectroscopy and oscillator Strengths meeting in Victoria last summer. A surprising finding is that quadrupole transitions have been grossly in error because mixing with higher levels has not been included. I now have enough memory in my Alpha to treat 3000 x 3000 matrices. I now include all levels up through n=9 for Fe I and 11, the spectra for which the most information is available. I am finishing those calculations right now. After Fe I and Fe 11, all other spectra are "easy", and I will be in mass production. ATL;LS12, my opacity sampling program for computing models with arbitrary abundances, has been put on the web server. I wrote a new distribution function opacity program for workstations that replaces the one I used on the Cray at the San Diego Supercomputer Center. Each set of abundances would take 100 Cray hours costing $100,000. 1 ran 25 cases. Each of my opacity CDs contains three abundances. I have a new program -iinning on the Alpha that takes about a week. I am going to have to get a faster processor or I will have to dedicate a whole workstation just to opacities.

  11. The microwave limb sounder for the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waters, J. W.; Peckham, G. E.; Suttie, R. A.; Curtis, P. D.; Maddison, B. J.; Harwood, R. S.

    1988-01-01

    The Microwave Limb Sounder was designed to map the concentrations of trace gases from the stratosphere to the lower thermosphere, to improve understanding of the photochemical reactions which take place in this part of the atmosphere. The instrument will measure the intensity of thermal radiation from molecules in the atmosphere at frequencies corresponding to rotational absorption bands of chlorine monoxide, ozone, and water vapor. Molecular concentration profiles will be determined over a height range of 15 to 80 km (20 to 45 km for C10). The 57 deg inclination orbit proposed for the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite will allow global coverage.

  12. Applications of airborne remote sensing in atmospheric sciences research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serafin, R. J.; Szejwach, G.; Phillips, B. B.

    1984-01-01

    This paper explores the potential for airborne remote sensing for atmospheric sciences research. Passive and active techniques from the microwave to visible bands are discussed. It is concluded that technology has progressed sufficiently in several areas that the time is right to develop and operate new remote sensing instruments for use by the community of atmospheric scientists as general purpose tools. Promising candidates include Doppler radar and lidar, infrared short range radiometry, and microwave radiometry.

  13. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility (ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future)

    SciTech Connect

    JW Voyles

    2008-01-30

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  14. Fundamental remote sensing science research program. Part 1: Scene radiation and atmospheric effects characterization project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, R. E.; Deering, D. W.

    1984-01-01

    Brief articles summarizing the status of research in the scene radiation and atmospheric effect characterization (SRAEC) project are presented. Research conducted within the SRAEC program is focused on the development of empirical characterizations and mathematical process models which relate the electromagnetic energy reflected or emitted from a scene to the biophysical parameters of interest.

  15. Understanding the Relationship Between Soil Processes and Atmospheric Methane Concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laybolt, W. D.; O'Connell, E.; Risk, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    As vehicle-based atmospheric surveying becomes more commonplace, its natural evolution will see an increased movement towards detection of multiple gases and geochemical approaches for discriminating leaks of different origin. While multi-gas surveys are already feasible, the factor limiting our ability to interpret them is the understanding of gas source-sink dynamics, particularly at the soil level. This study aims to understand the relationship between soil processes and atmospheric methane concentrations. Using source regions of approximately 100 km2, extensive soil gas surveys were completed, measuring CH4, δ13CH4 and CO2. We compared this to daytime and nighttime vehicle-based surveys where we acquired data for the same gases to see which of these individual gases, or ratios thereof, could be detected in the lower atmosphere. These surveys were done in two contrasting regions, which were also expected to have different source/sink processes. Results showed that atmospheric CH4 concentration, its isotopic signature, and the CO2/CH4 ratio of above-background concentrations showed the highest level of correspondence with the soil CH4 values. Anomalies in CH4 concentrations in the first study area appeared to be from predominantly biological sources (δ13CH4 values near -60‰) rather than from a fossil source (underlying coal beds). However, the study area also showed anomalous values of δ13CH4, which may have been due to a soil CH4 sink. In both regions, nighttime atmospheric studies generally yield stronger signals and correlations because decreased night winds contributed to pooling of gases and higher atmospheric concentrations. This study helps advance our understanding of the relationship between soil processes and atmospheric methane, which is essential for improving vehicle-based surveys for use in detecting environmental side-effects of energy and geosequestration projects in regions of complex surface gas dynamics.

  16. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1992 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 3, Atmospheric and climate research

    SciTech Connect

    Schrempf, R.E.

    1993-04-01

    Within the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER), the atmospheric sciences and carbon dioxide research programs are part of the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD). One of the central missions of the division is to provide the DOE with scientifically defensible information on the local, regional, and global distributions of energy-related pollutants and their effects on climate. This information is vital to the definition and implementation of a sound national energy strategy. This volume reports on the progress and status of all OHER atmospheric science and climate research projects at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). PNL has had a long history of technical leadership in the atmospheric sciences research programs within OHER. Within the ESD, the Atmospheric Chemistry Program (ACP) continues DOE`s long-term commitment to study the continental and oceanic fates of energy-related air pollutants. Research through direct measurement, numerical modeling, and laboratory studies in the ACP emphasizes the long-range transport, chemical transformation, and removal of emitted pollutants, oxidant species, nitrogen-reservoir species, and aerosols. The Atmospheric Studies in Complex Terrain (ASCOT) program continues to apply basic research on density-driven circulations and on turbulent mixing and dispersion in the atmospheric boundary layer to the micro- to mesoscale meteorological processes that affect air-surface exchange and to emergency preparedness at DOE and other facilities. Research at PNL provides basic scientific underpinnings to DOE`s program of global climate research. Research projects within the core carbon dioxide and ocean research programs are now integrated with those in the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM), the Computer Hardware, Advanced Mathematics and Model Physics (CHAMMP), and Quantitative Links programs to form DOE`s contribution to the US Global Change Research Program.

  17. Haze in Pluto's Atmosphere: Implications for Processes and Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Andrew F.; Summers, Michael; Gladstone, Randy; Strobel, Darrell F.; Young, Leslie; Lavvas, Panayotis; Kammer, Joshua A.; Lisse, Casey M.; Parker, Alex Harrison; Young, Eliot F.; Stern, S. Alan; Weaver, Harold A.; Olkin, Catherine B.; Ennico, Kimberly

    2016-10-01

    Haze in Pluto's atmosphere was detected by New Horizons imaging to altitudes above 200 km at solar phase angles from ~20° to ~169°, and it was detected by the UV solar occultation up to 300 km altitude. The haze is strongly forward scattering in the visible, and a microphysical model of haze reproduces the visible phase function just above the surface with 0.5 µm spherical particles, but also invokes fractal aggregate particles to fit the visible phase function at 45 km altitude and to account for UV extinction. The visible phase function at the bottom of the atmosphere has a back scatter lobe which is absent from the phase function measured 45 km above the surface, making the latter phase function similar to that for haze in Titan's upper atmosphere. Pluto's haze is found at altitudes where direct condensation is not possible, but the haze may form by similar processes to those responsible for the detached haze layer in the upper atmosphere of Titan. It is suggested that haze particles form fractal aggregates which grow larger and more spherical as they settle downwards through the bottom 15 km of the atmosphere. Haze particles settle onto Pluto's surface, at a rate sufficient to alter surface optical properties on seasonal (hundred-year) time scales. However, if this picture applies to Pluto's atmosphere throughout the Pluto year, then haze particles would rapidly accumulate to an optically thick surface layer within thousands of years. These particles would not be processed into tholins except by cosmic rays, and the striking albedo contrasts on Pluto, with very bright and dark regions, would be difficult to understand. Pluto's regional scale albedo contrasts may be preserved by atmospheric collapse.

  18. NASA's upper atmosphere research satellite: A program to study global ozone change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luther, Michael R.

    1992-01-01

    The Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) is a major initiative in the NASA Office of Space Science and Applications, and is the prototype for NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS) planned for launch in the 1990s. The UARS combines a balanced program of experimental and theoretical investigations to perform diagnostic studies, qualitative model analysis, and quantitative measurements and comparative studies of the upper atmosphere. UARS provides theoretical and experimental investigations which pursue four specific research topics: atmospheric energy budget, chemistry, dynamics, and coupling processes. An international cadre of investigators was assembled by NASA to accomplish those scientific objectives. The observatory, its complement of ten state of the art instruments, and the ground system are nearing flight readiness. The timely UARS program will play a major role in providing data to understand the complex physical and chemical processes occurring in the upper atmosphere and answering many questions regarding the health of the ozone layer.

  19. Atmospheric and Oceanographic Information Processing System (AOIPS) system description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bracken, P. A.; Dalton, J. T.; Billingsley, J. B.; Quann, J. J.

    1977-01-01

    The development of hardware and software for an interactive, minicomputer based processing and display system for atmospheric and oceanographic information extraction and image data analysis is described. The major applications of the system are discussed as well as enhancements planned for the future.

  20. On-line infrared process signature measurements through combustion atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweibaum, F. M.; Kozlowski, A. T.; Surette, W. E., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    A number of on-line infrared process signature measurements have been made through combustion atmospheres, including those in jet engines, piston engines, and coal gasification reactors. The difficulties involved include operation in the presence of pressure as high as 1800 psi, temperatures as high as 3200 F, and explosive, corrosive and dust-laden atmospheres. Calibration problems have resulted from the use of purge gases to clear the viewing tubes, and the obscuration of the view ports by combustion products. A review of the solutions employed to counteract the problems is presented, and areas in which better solutions are required are suggested.

  1. Seasonal-scale Observational Data Analysis and Atmospheric Phenomenology for the Cold Land Processes Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poulos, Gregory S.; Stamus, Peter A.; Snook, John S.

    2005-01-01

    The Cold Land Processes Experiment (CLPX) experiment emphasized the development of a strong synergism between process-oriented understanding, land surface models and microwave remote sensing. Our work sought to investigate which topographically- generated atmospheric phenomena are most relevant to the CLPX MSA's for the purpose of evaluating their climatic importance to net local moisture fluxes and snow transport through the use of high-resolution data assimilation/atmospheric numerical modeling techniques. Our task was to create three long-term, scientific quality atmospheric datasets for quantitative analysis (for all CLPX researchers) and provide a summary of the meteorologically-relevant phenomena of the three MSAs (see Figure) over northern Colorado. Our efforts required the ingest of a variety of CLPX datasets and the execution an atmospheric and land surface data assimilation system based on the Navier-Stokes equations (the Local Analysis and Prediction System, LAPS, and an atmospheric numerical weather prediction model, as required) at topographically- relevant grid spacing (approx. 500 m). The resulting dataset will be analyzed by the CLPX community as a part of their larger research goals to determine the relative influence of various atmospheric phenomena on processes relevant to CLPX scientific goals.

  2. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1994 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 2: Atmospheric and climate research

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    Atmospheric research at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) occurs in conjunction with the Atmospheric Chemistry Program (ACP) and with the Atmospheric Studies in Complex Terrain (ASCOT) Program. Solicitations for proposals and peer review were used to select research projects for funding in FY 1995. Nearly all ongoing projects were brought to a close in FY 1994. Therefore, the articles in this volume include a summary of the long-term accomplishments as well as the FY 1994 progress made on these projects. The following articles present summaries of the progress in FY 1994 under these research tasks: continental and oceanic fate of pollutants; research aircraft operations; ASCOT program management; coupling/decoupling of synoptic and valley circulations; interactions between surface exchange processes and atmospheric circulations; and direct simulations of atmospheric turbulence. Climate change research at PNL is aimed at reducing uncertainties in the fundamental processes that control climate systems that currently prevent accurate predictions of climate change and its effects. PNL is responsible for coordinating and integrating the field and laboratory measurement programs, modeling studies, and data analysis activities of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) program. In FY 1994, PNL scientists conducted 3 research projects under the ARM program. In the first project, the sensitivity of GCM grid-ad meteorological properties to subgrid-scale variations in surface fluxes and subgrid-scale circulation patterns is being tested in a single column model. In the second project, a new and computationally efficient scheme has been developed for parameterizing stratus cloud microphysics in general circulation models. In the last project, a balloon-borne instrument package is being developed for making research-quality measurements of radiative flux divergence profiles in the lowest 1,500 meters of the Earth`s atmosphere.

  3. The Integrated Land Ecosystem - Atmosphere Processes Study (iLEAPS): A new Program to Study Land/Atmosphere Interactions in the Second Phase of IGBP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreae, M. O.; Kabat, P.; Reissell, A.

    2004-12-01

    Recent progress in global change research has shown clearly that the Earth's environment is a complex system, defined through intricately linked processes, feedbacks and teleconnections. This integral perspective renders obsolete the conventional scientific approach of investigating disjunct causal relationships, and demands a new, integrated way of conducting environmental Earth research. To reflect this approach to Earth System Science, the new IGBP core project "Integrated Land Ecosystem - Atmosphere Processes Study" (iLEAPS) has been designed to study the interactions between land and atmosphere within the Earth System. The fundamental objective of iLEAPS is to provide understanding of how interacting physical, chemical, and biological processes transport and transform energy and matter through the land-atmosphere interface, particularly emphasizing interactions and feedbacks at all scales - from past to future and from local to global. The research planned for iLEAPS covers the basic processes that link surface-atmosphere exchange with vegetation/ecosystem processes on the one hand and with atmospheric dynamics, tropospheric chemistry and physical climate on the other. There will be four foci: 1) Land-atmosphere exchange of reactive and conservative compounds: Key interactions and feedbacks in the Earth System 2) Feedbacks between land biota, aerosols and atmospheric composition in the climate system. (a) Biosphere-aerosol-cloud-climate interactions, (b) Surface-atmosphere exchanges and the self-cleansing mechanism of the atmosphere 3) Feedbacks and teleconnections in the land surface -vegetation- water - atmosphere-system 4) Transfer of material and energy in the soil/canopy/boundary-layer system: Measurements and modelling

  4. Periodic changes of the activity of processes in Jupiter's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidmachenko, A. P.

    2016-10-01

    Variations of the Earth jovimagnetic latitude on Jupiter are preferred in solar-driven changes of reflective properties of clouds and haze on Jupiter. Because of the orbit eccentricity (e=0,048450) the northern hemisphere receives 21% greater solar energy flow to the atmosphere, because Jupiter is in the perihelia near the time of the summer solstice. Results of our studies showed that the ratio of the brightness of the northern and southern tropical and temperate regions is evident factor of the photometric activity of the Jupiter's atmospheric processes. The obtained from the analysis of observational data for the period from 1962 to 2015 existence of variations of activity factor of the planet hemispheres with a period of 11.86 years has allowed us to talk about an existence of the seasonal reconstruction of the physical parameters of Jupiter's atmosphere.

  5. Global Biology Research Program: Biogeochemical Processes in Wetlands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartlett, D. S. (Editor)

    1984-01-01

    The results of a workshop examining potential NASA contributions to research on wetland processes as they relate to global biogeochemical cycles are summarized. A wetlands data base utilizing remotely sensed inventories, studies of wetland/atmosphere exchange processes, and the extrapolation of local measurements to global biogeochemical cycling processes were identified as possible areas for NASA support.

  6. NASA/MSFC FY-83 Atmospheric Research Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, R. E. (Compiler); Camp, D. W. (Compiler)

    1983-01-01

    Atmospheric research conducted at the Marshall Space Flight Center in FY 1983 is discussed. Clear air turbulence, gusts, and fog dispersal near airports is discussed. The use of Doppler Lidar signals in discussed, as are low level flow conditions that are hazardous to aircraft.

  7. NEAR ROADWAY RESEARCH IN THE ATMOSPHERIC MODELING DIVISION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is a presentation to the CRC Mobile Source Air Toxics Workshop in Phoenix, AZ, on 23 October 2006. The presentation provides an overview of air quality modeling research in the USEPA/ORD/NERL's Atmospheric Modeling Division, with an emphasis on near-road pollutant character...

  8. Atmospheric Pressure Plasma-Electrospin Hybrid Process for Protective Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitchuli Gangadharan, Narendiran

    2011-12-01

    Chemical and biological (C-B) warfare agents like sarin, sulfur mustard, anthrax are usually dispersed into atmosphere in the form of micro aerosols. They are considered to be dangerous weapon of mass destruction next to nuclear weapons. The airtight protective clothing materials currently available are able to stop the diffusion of threat agents but not good enough to detoxify them, which endangers the wearers. Extensive research efforts are being made to prepare advanced protective clothing materials that not only prevent the diffusion of C-B agents, but also detoxify them into harmless products thus ensuring the safety and comfort of the wearer. Electrospun nanofiber mats are considered to have effective filtration characteristics to stop the diffusion of submicron level particulates without sacrificing air permeability characteristics and could be used in protective application as barrier material. In addition, functional nanofibers could be potentially developed to detoxify the C-B warfare threats into harmless products. In this research, electrospun nanofibers were deposited on fabric surface to improve barrier efficiency without sacrificing comfort-related properties of the fabrics. Multi-functional nanofibers were fabricated through an electrospinning-electrospraying hybrid process and their ability to detoxify simulants of C-B agents was evaluated. Nanofibers were also deposited onto plasma-pretreated woven fabric substrate through a newly developed plasma-electrospinning hybrid process, to improve the adhesive properties of nanofibers on the fabric surface. The nanofiber adhesion and durability properties were evaluated by peel test, flex and abrasion resistance tests. In this research work, following tasks have been carried out: i) Controlled deposition of nanofiber mat onto woven fabric substrate Electrospun Nylon 6 fiber mats were deposited onto woven 50/50 Nylon/Cotton fabric with the motive of making them into protective material against submicron

  9. 2010 Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Science Team Meeting Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Dupont, DL

    2011-05-04

    This document contains the summaries of papers presented in poster format at the March 2010 Atmospheric System Research Science Team Meeting held in Bethesda, Maryland. More than 260 posters were presented during the Science Team Meeting. Posters were sorted into the following subject areas: aerosol-cloud-radiation interactions, aerosol properties, atmospheric state and surface, cloud properties, field campaigns, infrastructure and outreach, instruments, modeling, and radiation. To put these posters in context, the status of ASR at the time of the meeting is provided here.

  10. Uncertainties in BC Estimations: the Role of Atmospheric Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vignati, E.; Kloster, S.; Koch, D.; Bauer, S. E.; Dentener, F.; Bond, T.; Sun, H.

    2006-12-01

    Modelling physical and chemical processes involving aerosol particles remains a large source of uncertainties. To characterize the range of uncertainty in these processes on atmospheric BC concentrations, three global models (CTM-TM5, GCM ECHAM5-HAM and GISS GCM) were run using identical BC, particulate organic matter and SO2 emission inventories provided by IIASA for the year 2000. The first two models have the same aerosol dynamic module, while TM5 is also run with a bulk aerosol scheme; the GISS model uses both bulk aerosol and a method of moments aerosol microphysical schemes. We can thus specifically assess the differences in predicted BC concentrations from using the bulk approach and the two microphysical schemes. By comparing the modeled concentrations with an extensive data set of observations, distinguished by measurement methodology, season and region, we will critically evaluate the benefit of using microphysical schemes to simulate the atmospheric BC cycle.

  11. Atmospheric Sciences Program summaries of research in FY 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    This document describes the activities and products of the Atmospheric Science Program of the Environmental Sciences Division, Office of Health and Environmental Research, Office of Energy Research, in FY 1993. Each description contains the project`s title; three-year funding history; the contract period over which the funding applies; the name(s) of the principal investigator(s); the institution(s) conducting the projects; and the project`s objectives, products, approach, and results to date. Project descriptions are categorized within the report according to program areas: atmospheric chemistry, atmospheric dynamics, and support operations. Within these categories, the descriptions are ordered alphabetically by principal investigator. Each program area is preceded by a brief text that defines the program area, states its goals and objectives, lists principal research questions, and identifies program managers. Appendixes provide the addresses and telephone numbers of the principal investigators and define the acronyms used. This document has been indexed to aid the reader in locating research topics, participants, and research institutions in the text and the project descriptions. Comprehensive subject, principal investigator, and institution indexes are provided at the end of the text for this purpose. The comprehensive subject index includes keywords from the introduction and chapter texts in addition to those from the project descriptions.

  12. Atmospheric Sciences Program summaries of research in FY 1993

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1993-11-01

    This document describes the activities and products of the Atmospheric Science Program of the Environmental Sciences Division, Office of Health and Environmental Research, Office of Energy Research, in FY 1993. Each description contains the project's title; three-year funding history; the contract period over which the funding applies; the name(s) of the principal investigator(s); the institution(s) conducting the projects; and the project's objectives, products, approach, and results to date. Project descriptions are categorized within the report according to program areas: atmospheric chemistry, atmospheric dynamics, and support operations. Within these categories, the descriptions are ordered alphabetically by principal investigator. Each program area is preceded by a brief text that defines the program area, states its goals and objectives, lists principal research questions, and identifies program managers. Appendixes provide the addresses and telephone numbers of the principal investigators and define the acronyms used. This document has been indexed to aid the reader in locating research topics, participants, and research institutions in the text and the project descriptions. Comprehensive subject, principal investigator, and institution indexes are provided at the end of the text for this purpose. The comprehensive subject index includes keywords from the introduction and chapter texts in addition to those from the project descriptions.

  13. Atmospheric heat transfer to the Arctic under main synoptic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurova, Alla; Gnatiuk, Natalia; Bobylev, Leonid; Zhu, Yali

    2016-04-01

    Arctic - mid-latitude teleconnections are operating in both ways and behind them are potentially some causes of the enhanced Arctic warming (e.g., through heat transfer from lower to higher latitudes) and the feedbacks from the Arctic climate to the mid-latitude weather patterns. In order to explain the variability of the surface air temperature in the Arctic, we aim to analyse the typical synoptic situations that, we hypothesize, are characterized by a specific patterns of heat exchange between the Arctic and mid-latitudes. According to classification of synoptic processes in the Arctic developed at the Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute (AARI) in St. Petersburg major typical groups of synoptic situations in the Arctic are few (six). They correspond to position and intensity of low- and high-pressure centres. Therefore, the whole data sample for the winter period for the entire period of instrumental observations (archive exists back to 1939) can be split into six groups that sub-sample each of six groups/types of synoptic situations. Then heat transfer to the Arctic can be estimated as the divergence of the horizontal (advective) heat flux (the product of wind speed and temperature gradient) within each vertical atmospheric layer, which is calculated based on the ERA Interim Reanalysis data for the winter season (1979-now). Mapping heat divergence fields will reveal the main mid-latitude sources of heat transported to the Arctic, average for the whole data sample and for each of the six main groups of synoptic situations. This work was supported by RFBR grants 16-55-53031

  14. Pulsed atmospheric fluidized bed combustor apparatus and process

    DOEpatents

    Mansour, Momtaz N.

    1992-01-01

    A pulsed atmospheric fluidized bed reactor system is disclosed and claimed along with a process for utilization of same for the combustion of, e.g. high sulfur content coal. The system affords a economical, ecologically acceptable alternative to oil and gas fired combustors. The apparatus may also be employed for endothermic reaction, combustion of waste products, e.g. organic and medical waste, drying, calcining and the like.

  15. Processes linking the hydrological cycle and the atmospheric radiative budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fueglistaler, Stephan; Dinh, Tra

    2016-04-01

    We study the response of the strength of the global hydrological cycle to changes in carbon dioxide (CO2) using the HiRAM General Circulation Model developed at the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL), with the objective to better connect the well-known energetic constraints to physical processes. We find that idealized model setups using a global slab ocean and annual mean insolation give similar scalings as coupled atmosphere-ocean models with realistic land and topography. Using the surface temperatures from the slab ocean runs, we analyse the response in the atmospheric state and hydrological cycle separately for a change in CO2 (but fixed surface temperature), and for a change in surface temperature (but fixed CO2). The former perturbation is also referred to as the "fast" response, whereas the latter is commonly used to diagnose a model's climate sensitivity. As expected from the perspective of the atmospheric radiative budget, an increase in CO2 at fixed surface temperature decreases the strength of the hydrological cycle, and an increase in surface temperature increases the strength of the hydrological cycle. However, the physical processes that connect the atmospheric radiative energy budget to the sensible and latent heat fluxes at the surface remain not well understood. The responses to the two perturbations are linearly additive, and we find that the experiment with fixed surface temperature and changes in CO2 is of great relevance to understanding the total response. This result points to the importance of local radiative heating rate changes rather than just the net atmospheric radiative loss of energy. Although larger in magnitude, the response to changes in surface temperature is dominated by the temperature dependence of the water vapor pressure, but in both cases changes in near-surface relative humidity are very important.

  16. Upper atmospheric effects of the hf active auroral research program ionospheric research instrument (HAARP IRI)

    SciTech Connect

    Eccles, V.; Armstrong, R.

    1993-05-01

    The earth's ozone layer occurs in the stratosphere, primarily between 10 and 30 miles altitude. The amount of ozone, O3, present is the result of a balance between production and destruction processes. Experiments have shown that natural processes such as auroras create molecules that destroy O. One family of such molecules is called odd nitrogen of which nitric oxide (NO) is an example. Because the HAARP (HF Active Auroral Research Program) facility is designed to mimic and investigate certain natural processes, a study of possible effects of HAARP on the ozone layer was conducted. The study used a detailed model of the thermal and chemical effects of the high power HF beam, which interacts with free electrons in the upper atmosphere above 50 miles altitude. It was found only a small fraction of the beam energy goes into the production of odd nitrogen molecules, whereas odd nitrogen is efficiently produced by auroras. Since the total energy emitted by HAARP in the year is some 200,000 times less than the energy deposited in the upper atmosphere by auroras, the study demonstrates that HAARP HF beam experiments will cause no measurable depletion of the earth's ozone layer.... Ozone, Ozone depletion, Ozone layer, Odd nitrogen, Nitric oxide, HAARP Emitter characteristics.

  17. Atmospheric Sciences Research in the US EPA climate program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finkelstein, P. L.

    The program is designed to assess, evaluate, and predict the ecological, environmental, and human health consequences of global change, including the interaction of plant and animal communities with the climate system. Additional supporting areas of research in the program include: assessment and research to develop techniques to mitigate and adapt to climate change; development of emission factors and chemical models to understand and describe the production, transport, and fate of radiatively important trace gases; and evaluation of the relationship between global climate change and changes in region climate and air quality. The research agenda, with emphasis on the atmospheric chemistry and climatological aspects of the program is reviewed.

  18. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1–September 30, 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Voyles, JW

    2012-10-10

    Individual datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile research sites are collected and routed to the Data Management Facility (DMF) for processing in near-real-time. Instrument and processed data are then delivered approximately daily to the ARM Data Archive, where they are made freely available to the research community. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Data Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  19. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report October 1–December 31, 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Voyles, JW

    2013-01-11

    Individual datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile research sites are collected and routed to the Data Management Facility (DMF) for processing in near-real-time. Instrument and processed data are then delivered approximately daily to the ARM Data Archive, where they are made freely available to the research community. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Data Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year dating back to 1998.

  20. Theoretical studies of important processes in planetary and comet atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guberman, Steven L.

    1991-01-01

    This is the fifth semi-annual progress report describing research on dissociative recombination reactions in planetary and comet atmospheres. The Appendix has two papers that describe NASA supported research. Both papers have been recently accepted for publication. The first paper, 'The Generation of O(S-1) from the Dissociative Recombination of O2(+)', describes in detail the Multichannel Quantum Defect (MQDT) theory used for the calculation of dissociative recombination (DR) cross sections and rates. The application to the generation of the upper state of the atomic oxygen green line emission is of great importance to the modelling of planetary atmospheres. The second paper in the Appendix, 'Dissociative Recombination of the Ground State of N2(+)', applies the methods described in the first paper to N2(+). We find remarkable agreement with the prior microwave afterglow experiments for both the total recombination rate and for its electron temperature dependence. However, the results disagree with recent merged beams results which gave cross sections that are a factor of five below the microwave afterglow experiments and the current results. DR of N2(+) is an important mechanism for generating energetic N atoms which can escape the atmosphere of Mars. Currently we are also continuing additional work on the DR of O2(+) which is aimed at calculating both the total DR rate as a function of ion vibrational level and the rate for production of O(D-1).

  1. Quantifying Atmospheric Moist Processes from Earth Observations. Really?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, G. L.

    2015-12-01

    The amount of water in the Earth's atmosphere is tiny compared to all other sources of water on our planet, fresh or otherwise. However, this tiny amount of water is fundamental to most aspects of human life. The tiny amount of water that cycles from the Earth's surface, through condensation into clouds in the atmosphere returning as precipitation falling is not only natures way of delivering fresh water to land-locked human societies but it also exerts a fundamental control on our climate system producing the most important feedbacks in the system. The representation of these processes in Earth system models contain many errors that produce well now biases in the hydrological cycle. Surprisingly the parameterizations of these important processes are not well validated with observations. Part of the reason for this situation stems from the fact that process evaluation is difficult to achieve on the global scale since it has commonly been assumed that the static observations available from snap-shots of individual parameters contain little information on processes. One of the successes of the A-Train has been the development of multi-parameter analysis based on the multi-sensor data produced by the satellite constellation. This has led to new insights on how water cycles through the Earth's atmosphere. Examples of these insights will be highlighted. It will be described how the rain formation process has been observed and how this has been used to constrain this process in models, with a huge impact. How these observations are beginning to reveal insights on deep convection and examples of the use these observations applied to models will also be highlighted as will the effects of aerosol on clouds on radiation.

  2. Cochlear Processes: A Research Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zwislocki, Jozef J.

    This paper summarizes recent research on functions of the cochlea of the inner ear. The cochlea is described as the seat of the first step in the auditory sound analysis and transduction of mechanical vibration into electrochemical processes leading to the generation of neural action potentials. The cochlea is also described as a frequent seat of…

  3. Present role of PIXE in atmospheric aerosol research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maenhaut, Willy

    2015-11-01

    In the 1980s and 1990s nearly half of the elemental analyses of atmospheric aerosol samples were performed by PIXE. Since then, other techniques for elemental analysis became available and there has been a steady increase in studies on organic aerosol constituents and other aspects of aerosols, especially in the areas of nucleation (new particle formation), optical properties, and the role of aerosol particles in cloud formation and properties. First, a brief overview and discussion is given of the developments and trends in atmospheric aerosol analysis and research of the past three decades. Subsequently, it is indicated that there is still invaluable work to be done by PIXE in atmospheric aerosol research, especially if one teams up with other aerosol researchers and performs complementary measurements, e.g., on small aerosol samples that are taken with high-time resolution. Fine examples of such research are the work done by the Lund group in the CARIBIC aircraft studies and the analysis of circular streaker samples by the Florence PIXE group. These and other examples are presented and other possibilities of PIXE are indicated.

  4. A Decade of Field Changing Atmospheric Aerosol Research ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Conference: Gordon Research Conference in Atmospheric Chemistry, July 28 – August 2, 2013, VermontPresentation Type: PosterTitle: An Analysis of EPA’s STAR Program and a Decade of Field Changing Research in Atmospheric AerosolsAuthors: Kristina M. Wagstrom1,2, Sherri W. Hunt31Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT2AAAS Science and Technology Policy Fellow hosted by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, National Center for Environmental Research3U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, National Center for Environmental ResearchA number of studies in the past decade have transformed the way we think about atmospheric aerosols. The advances include, but are not limited to, source apportionment of organics using aerosol mass spectrometer data, the volatility basis set approach, quantifying isoprene oxidation, and understanding the role of aqueous oxidation of organics on SOA formation. A series of grants funded by EPA just under ten years ago supported many of these advances. These projects make up the body of work awarded under two solicitations released by the EPA’s Science to Achieve Results (STAR) program: “Measurement, Modeling, and Analysis Methods for Airborne Carbonaceous Fine Particulate Matter” (2003) and “Source Apportionment of Particulate Matter” (2004). Our goal is to present the impact of the STAR solicitations and to show how they have pushed the field forward and led to new questions.In particular

  5. Assessing Precipitation Isotope Variations during Atmospheric River Events to Reveal Dominant Atmospheric/Hydrologic Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCabe-Glynn, S. E.; Johnson, K. R.; Yoshimura, K.; Buenning, N. H.; Welker, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Extreme precipitation events across the Western US commonly associated with atmospheric rivers (ARs), whereby extensive fluxes of moisture are transported from the subtropics, can result in major damage and are projected by most climate models to increase in frequency and severity. However, they are difficult to project beyond ~ten days and the location of landfall and topographically induced precipitation is even more uncertain. Water isotopes, often used to reconstruct past rainfall variability, are useful natural tracers of atmospheric hydrologic processes. Because of the typical tropical and sub-tropical origins, ARs can carry unique water isotope (δ18O and δ2H, d-excess) signatures that can be utilized to provide source and process information that can lead to improving AR predictions. Recent analysis of the top 10 weekly precipitation total samples from Sequoia National Park, CA, of which 9 contained AR events, shows a high variability in the isotopic values. NOAA Hysplit back trajectory analyses reveals a variety of trajectories and varying latitudinal source regions contributed to moisture delivered to this site, which may explain part of the high variability (δ2H = -150.03 to -49.52 ‰, δ18O = -19.27 to -7.20 ‰, d-excess = 4.1 to 25.8). Here we examine the top precipitation totals occurring during AR events and the associated isotopic composition of precipitation samples from several sites across the Western US. We utilize IsoGSM, an isotope-enabled atmospheric general circulation model, to characterize the hydrologic processes and physical dynamics contributing to the observed isotopic variations. We investigate isotopic influences from moisture source location, AR speed, condensation height, and associated temperature. We explore the dominant controls on spatial and temporal variations of the isotopic composition of AR precipitation which highlights different physical processes for different AR events.

  6. Integration of space and in-situ observations to study atmosphere, ocean and land processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shukla, J.; Kinter, J. L., III

    1992-01-01

    A research investigation was conducted into the possibility of using atmospheric observations made in the past from both terrestrial and space-based platforms to create a global, coherent four dimensional analysis for the purpose of studying atmospheric, oceanic, and land surface processes relevant to climate simulation, monitoring, and change. This investigation consisted of the following tasks: (1) a mature global data assimilation system was obtained from the National Meteorological Center and modified for use on a Cray X-MP computer system; (2) atmospheric observations for the period 20 Nov. 1982 through 1 Mar. 1983, including rawinsonde soundings, aircraft-based measurements, pilot balloons, and temperature soundings from polar orbiting satellites were obtained from several sources; and (3) the global data assimilation system was used to reassimilate the atmospheric observations to produce a new atmospheric analysis which was then compared with the contemporaneous analysis. The global hydrologic cycle, including fluxes between the atmosphere and both the land and ocean surfaces, was estimated. The flux of water from the ocean surface into the atmosphere, its transport in the form of latent heat to remote regions, and its return to the surface in the form of precipitation were estimated globally. In addition, several regional budgets for selected tropical oceanic and extratropical continental areas were also done.

  7. Modeling Atmospheric CO2 Processes to Constrain the Missing Sink

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawa, S. R.; Denning, A. S.; Erickson, D. J.; Collatz, J. C.; Pawson, S.

    2005-01-01

    We report on a NASA supported modeling effort to reduce uncertainty in carbon cycle processes that create the so-called missing sink of atmospheric CO2. Our overall objective is to improve characterization of CO2 source/sink processes globally with improved formulations for atmospheric transport, terrestrial uptake and release, biomass and fossil fuel burning, and observational data analysis. The motivation for this study follows from the perspective that progress in determining CO2 sources and sinks beyond the current state of the art will rely on utilization of more extensive and intensive CO2 and related observations including those from satellite remote sensing. The major components of this effort are: 1) Continued development of the chemistry and transport model using analyzed meteorological fields from the Goddard Global Modeling and Assimilation Office, with comparison to real time data in both forward and inverse modes; 2) An advanced biosphere model, constrained by remote sensing data, coupled to the global transport model to produce distributions of CO2 fluxes and concentrations that are consistent with actual meteorological variability; 3) Improved remote sensing estimates for biomass burning emission fluxes to better characterize interannual variability in the atmospheric CO2 budget and to better constrain the land use change source; 4) Evaluating the impact of temporally resolved fossil fuel emission distributions on atmospheric CO2 gradients and variability. 5) Testing the impact of existing and planned remote sensing data sources (e.g., AIRS, MODIS, OCO) on inference of CO2 sources and sinks, and use the model to help establish measurement requirements for future remote sensing instruments. The results will help to prepare for the use of OCO and other satellite data in a multi-disciplinary carbon data assimilation system for analysis and prediction of carbon cycle changes and carbodclimate interactions.

  8. Atmospheric emission of polychlorinated biphenyls from multiple industrial thermal processes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guorui; Zheng, Minghui; Cai, Mingwei; Nie, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Bing; Liu, Wenbin; Du, Bing; Dong, Shujun; Hu, Jicheng; Xiao, Ke

    2013-03-01

    In this study, field measurements were conducted to estimate and characterize the atmospheric emission levels and profiles of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) from multiple industrial thermal processes. The emission levels and profiles of PCBs from five types of thermal processes at twenty-three plants were studied and compared with eight processes reported in our previous studies. Correlation analysis was preformed to identify a marker congener for emission of ΣPCB. A significant correlation was observed between congener CB-118 and ΣPCB (R(2)=0.65 and p<0.01), which suggests that CB-118 is a good marker congener for emission of ΣPCB. The profiles of PCBs emitted from the thirteen thermal processes were compared, and this information could be used for studying source-receptor relationships and identifying the specific sources of PCBs. To prioritize the sources for control, the concentrations of PCBs from thirteen industrial thermal sources were compared. The PCB concentrations from secondary zinc smelting and thermal wire reclamation were about one to three order magnitude higher than those of other sources, which suggests that these two sources be given priority in PCB source control. Finally, the atmospheric emission factors of PCBs from the thirteen industrial sources were summarized, and these data will be useful for developing an integrated emission inventory of PCBs.

  9. Processes Impacting Atmosphere-Surface Exchanges at Arctic Terrestrial Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persson, Ola; Grachev, Andrey; Konopleva, Elena; Cox, Chris; Stone, Robert; Crepinsek, Sara; Shupe, Matthew; Uttal, Taneil

    2015-04-01

    Surface energy fluxes are key to the annual cycle of near-surface and soil temperature and biologic activity in the Arctic. While these energy fluxes are undoubtedly changing to produce the changes observed in the Arctic ecosystem over the last few decades, measurements have generally not been available to quantify what processes are regulating these fluxes and what is determining the characteristics of these annual cycles. The U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has established, or contributed to the establishment of, several terrestrial "supersites" around the perimeter of the Arctic Ocean at which detailed measurements of atmospheric structure, surface fluxes, and soil thermal properties are being made. These sites include Barrow, Alaska; Eureka and Alert, Canada; and Tiksi, Russia. Atmospheric structure measurements vary, but include radiosoundings at all sites and remote sensing of clouds at two sites. Additionally, fluxes of sensible heat and momentum are made at all of the sites, while fluxes of moisture and CO2 are made at two of the sites. Soil temperatures are also measured in the upper 120 cm at all sites, which is deep enough to define the soil active layer. The sites have been operating between 3 years (Tiksi) and 24 years (Barrow). While all sites are located north of 71° N, the summer vegetation range from lush tundra grasses to rocky soils with little vegetation. This presentation will illustrate some of the atmospheric processes that are key for determining the annual energy and temperature cycles at these sites, and some of the key characteristics that lead to differences in, for instance, the length of the summer soil active layer between the sites. Atmospheric features and processes such as cloud characteristics, snowfall, downslope wind events, and sea-breezes have impacts on the annual energy cycle. The presence of a "zero curtain" period, when autumn surface temperature remains approximately constant at the freezing point

  10. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1991 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 3, Atmospheric and climate research

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-05-01

    Within the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER), the atmospheric sciences and carbon dioxide research programs are part of the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD). One of the central missions of the division Is to provide the DOE with scientifically defensible information on the local, regional, and global distributions of energy-related pollutants and their effects on climate. This information is vital to the definition and Implementation of a sound national energy strategy. This volume reports on the progress and status of all OHER atmospheric science and climate research projects at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). Research at PNL provides basic scientific underpinnings to DOE`s program of global climate research. Research projects within the core carbon dioxide and ocean research programs are now integrated with those in the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM), the Computer Hardware, Advanced Mathematics and Model Physics (CHAMMP), and quantitative links programs to form DOEs contribution to the US Global Change Research Program. Climate research in the ESD has the common goal of improving our understanding of the physical, chemical, biological, and social processes that influence the Earth system so that national and international policymaking relating to natural and human-induced changes in the Earth system can be given a firm scientific basis. This report describes the progress In FY 1991 in each of these areas.

  11. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Annual Report 2008

    SciTech Connect

    LR Roeder

    2008-12-01

    The Importance of Clouds and Radiation for Climate Change: The Earth’s surface temperature is determined by the balance between incoming solar radiation and thermal (or infrared) radiation emitted by the Earth back to space. Changes in atmospheric composition, including greenhouse gases, clouds, and aerosols, can alter this balance and produce significant climate change. Global climate models (GCMs) are the primary tool for quantifying future climate change; however, there remain significant uncertainties in the GCM treatment of clouds, aerosol, and their effects on the Earth’s energy balance. In 1989, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science created the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program to address scientific uncertainties related to global climate change, with a specific focus on the crucial role of clouds and their influence on the transfer of radiation in the atmosphere. To reduce these scientific uncertainties, the ARM Program uses a unique twopronged approach: • The ARM Climate Research Facility, a scientific user facility for obtaining long-term measurements of radiative fluxes, cloud and aerosol properties, and related atmospheric characteristics in diverse climate regimes; and • The ARM Science Program, focused on the analysis of ACRF and other data to address climate science issues associated with clouds, aerosols, and radiation, and to improve GCMs. This report provides an overview of each of these components and a sample of achievements for each in fiscal year (FY) 2008.

  12. Collaborative Research. Atmospheric Pressure Microplasma Chemistry-Photon Synergies

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sung-Jin; Eden, James Gary

    2015-12-01

    Combining the effects of low temperature, atmospheric pressure microplasmas and microplasma photon sources offers the promise of greatly expanding the range of applications for each of them. The plasma sources create active chemical species and these can be activated further by the addition of photons and the associated photochemistry. There are many ways to combine the effects of plasma chemistry and photochemistry, especially if there are multiple phases present. This project combined the construction of appropriate test experimental systems, various spectroscopic diagnostics and mathematical modeling. Through a continuous discussion and co-design process with the UC-Berkeley Team, we have successfully completed the fabrication and testing of all components for a microplasma array-assisted system designed for photon-activated plasma chemistry research. Microcavity plasma lamps capable of generating more than 20 mW/cm2 at 172 nm (Xe dimer) were fabricated with a custom form factor to mate to the plasma chemistry setup, and a lamp was current being installed by the Berkeley team so as to investigate plasma chemistry-photon synergies at a higher photon energy (~7.2 eV) as compared to the UVA treatment that is afforded by UV LEDs operating at 365 nm. In particular, motivated by the promising results from the Berkeley team with UVA treatment, we also produced the first generation of lamps that can generate photons in the 300-370 nm wavelength range. Another set of experiments, conducted under the auspices of this grant, involved the use of plasma microjet arrays. The combination of the photons and excited radicals produced by the plasma column resulted in broad area deactivation of bacteria.

  13. Development of an autonomous unmanned aerial system for atmospheric data collection and research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Andrew; Hanlon, David; Sakai, Ricardo; Morris, Vernon; Demoz, Belay; Gadsden, S. Andrew

    2016-05-01

    This paper addresses the use of unmanned aerial systems (UAS) to carry out atmospheric data collection and studies. An important area of research is the study of the chemistry and physics of Earth's planetary boundary layer (PBL). The PBL, also known as the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL), is the lowest part of the atmosphere and its behavior is directly influenced by its contact with the planetary surface. Sampling of the PBL is performed in a timely and periodic manner. Currently, sensors and uncontrollable balloons are used to obtain relevant data and information. This method is cumbersome and can be ineffective in obtaining consistent environmental data. This paper proposes the use of autonomous UAS' to study the atmosphere in an effort to improve the efficiency and accuracy of the sampling process. The UAS setup and design is provided, and preliminary data collection information is shared.

  14. Improving Learners' Research Process Skills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, T. K.; Hunter, L.; Kluger-Bell, B.; Seagroves, S.

    2010-12-01

    The Professional Development Program (PDP) supports participants as they design inquiry activities that help learners improve their research process skills. These skills include the cognitive or reasoning skills that scientists and engineers use while doing research; for example, making a testable hypothesis, coordinating results from multiple experiments, or identifying and evaluating tradeoffs. Past work in the PDP indicated that additional support was needed to help participants design instructional activities that would teach these important skills. A new workshop was therefore developed for the 2009 PDP cycle, entitled "Improving Learners' Process Skills." In this workshop, participants worked in small groups to define specific science and engineering skills found in four past PDP activity designs. Participants distinguished between "simple tasks" and "authentic inquiry" activities that learners could perform as demonstration of the skill. Through this new workshop, participants were able to explicitly discuss ways in which individual process skills are unique or inter-related. In addition, by identifying a "simple task," participants were able to pinpoint areas in which their own designs could be improved to better focus on authentic inquiry tasks. In 2010, the workshop was slightly modified to help participants reconnect the research process skills with the activity content. In addition, the idea of using generic and context-specific scaffolds was also introduced. To make the participants feel like they were contributing to the PDP community, four activity designs actively being worked on in the 2010 cycle were used. Based on participant feedback, this "Improving Learners' Process Skills" workshop should be strongly considered for future returning participants.

  15. VIIRS Atmospheric Products in the Community Satellite Processing Package (CSPP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cureton, G. P.; Gumley, L.; Mindock, S.; Martin, G.; Garcia, R. K.; Strabala, K.

    2012-12-01

    The Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies (CIMSS) has a long history of supporting the Direct Broadcast (DB) community for various sensors, recently with the International MODIS/AIRS Processing Package (IMAPP) for the NASA EOS polar orbiters Terra and Aqua. CIMSS has continued this effort into the NPP/JPSS (previously NPOESS) era with the development of the Community Satellite Processing Package (CSPP), supporting the VIIRS, CrIS and ATMS sensors on the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (Suomi NPP) spacecraft. In time it is intended that CSPP will support GOES-R, JPSS and other geostationary and polar orbiting platforms. Here we focus on the implementation and usage of the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) atmospheric product sub-packages within CSPP, which are based on the Interface Data Processing Segment (IDPS) code as implemented by Raytheon in the Algorithm Development Library (ADL). The VIIRS atmospheric algorithms available in CSPP include the Cloud Mask, Active Fires, Cloud Optical Properties, Cloud Top Parameters, and the Aerosol Optical Thickness algorithms. Each ADL sub-package consists of a binary executable and a series of configuration XML files. A series of python scripts handle ancillary data retrieval and preparation for ingest into ADL, manage algorithm execution, and provide a variety of execution options which are of utility in operational and algorithm development settings. Examples of these options, applied to operational and direct-broadcast VIIRS SDR data, are described.

  16. Laboratory Studies of Heterogeneous Chemical Processes of Atmospheric Importance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molina, Mario J.

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this study is to conduct measurements of chemical kinetics parameters for heterogeneous reactions of importance in the stratosphere and the troposphere. It involves the elucidation of the mechanism of the interaction of HCl vapor with ice surfaces, which is the first step in the heterogeneous chlorine activation processes, as well as the investigation of the atmospheric oxidation mechanism of soot particles emitted by biomass and fossil fuels. The techniques being employed include turbulent flow-chemical ionization mass spectrometry and optical ellipsometry, among others.

  17. Increasing Access to Atmospheric Science Research at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, L. H.; Bethea, K. L.; LaPan, J. C.

    2013-12-01

    The Science Directorate (SD) at NASA's Langley Research Center conducts cutting edge research in fundamental atmospheric science topics including radiation and climate, air quality, active remote sensing, and upper atmospheric composition. These topics matter to the public, as they improve our understanding of our home planet. Thus, we have had ongoing efforts to improve public access to the results of our research. These efforts have accelerated with the release of the February OSTP memo. Our efforts can be grouped in two main categories: 1. Visual presentation techniques to improve science understanding: For fundamental concepts such as the Earth's energy budget, we have worked to display information in a more "digestible" way for lay audiences with more pictures and fewer words. These audiences are iPad-lovers and TV-watchers with shorter attention spans than audiences of the past. They are also educators and students who need a basic understanding of a concept delivered briefly to fit into busy classroom schedules. We seek to reach them with a quick, visual message packed with important information. This presentation will share several examples of visual techniques, such as infographics (e.g., a history of lidar at Langley and a timeline of atmospheric research, ozone garden diagrams (http://science-edu.larc.nasa.gov/ozonegarden/ozone-cycle.php); history of lidar at LaRC; DISCOVER-AQ maps. It will also share examples of animations and interactive graphics (DISCOVER-AQ); and customized presentations (e.g., to explain the energy budget or to give a general overview of research). One of the challenges we face is a required culture shift between the way scientists traditionally share knowledge with each other and the way these public audiences ingest knowledge. A cross-disciplinary communications team in SD is crucial to bridge that gap. 2. Lay research summaries to make research more accessible: Peer-reviewed publications are a primary product of the SD, with more

  18. Atmospheric Science Program. Summaries of research in FY 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    This report provides descriptions for all projects funded by ESD under annual contracts in FY 1994. Each description contains the project`s title; three-year funding history (in thousands of dollars); the contract period over which the funding applies; the name(s) of the principal investigator(s); the institution(s) conducting the projects; and the project`s objectives, products, approach, and results to date (for most projects older than one year). Project descriptions are categorized within the report according to program areas: atmospheric chemistry, atmospheric dynamics, and support operations. Within these categories, the descriptions are ordered alphabetically by principal investigator. Each program area is preceded by a brief text that defines the program area, states it goals and objectives, lists principal research questions, and identifies program managers. Appendixes provide the addresses and telephone numbers of the principal investigators and define the acronyms used.

  19. Morphology, composition, and atmospheric processing of soot particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slowik, Jay G.

    Combustion-generated soot aerosols play an important role in climate forcing due to their strong light-absorbing properties. Quantitative measurement of BC is challenging because BC often occurs in highly non-spherical soot particles of complex morphology. The task is further complicated because of the lack of an unambiguous chemical definition of the material. Here we present the development and application of a new technique for determining particle morphology and composition. Simultaneous measurements of mobility diameter, vacuum aerodynamic diameter, and non-refractory composition were used to determine the particle mass, volume, density, composition, dynamic shape factor, and fractal dimension. Under certain conditions, particle surface area and the number and size of the primary spherules composing the soot fractal aggregates were also determined. The particle characterization technique described above was applied to the following four studies: (1) Characterization of flame-generated soot particles. Depending on flame conditions, either fractal or near-spherical particles were generated and their properties interpreted in terms of the mechanism for soot formation. (2) Coating and denuding experiments were performed on soot particles. The results yielded information about morphology changes to the entire soot particle and to the internal black carbon structure due to atmospheric processing. The denuding experiments also provided particle surface area, which was used to determine the atmospheric lifetime of fractal soot particles relative to spheres. (3) An inter-comparison study of instruments measuring the black carbon content of soot particles was conducted. The detailed characterization of soot particles enabled a number of assumptions about the operation of the selected instruments to be tested. (4) Ambient particles were sampled in Mexico City. In the early morning, ambient particles were detected with a fractal morphology similar to that of diesel

  20. Atmospheric circulation processes contributing to a multidecadal variation in reconstructed and modeled Indian monsoon precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qianru; Hu, Qi

    2015-01-01

    analysis of the recently reconstructed gridded May-September total precipitation in the Indian monsoon region for the past half millennium discloses significant variations at multidecadal timescales. Meanwhile, paleo-climate modeling outputs from the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Climate System Model 4.0 show similar multidecadal variations in the monsoon precipitation. One of those variations at the frequency of 40-50 years per cycle is examined in this study. Major results show that this variation is a product of the processes in that the meridional gradient of the atmospheric enthalpy is strengthened by radiation loss in the high-latitude and polar region. Driven by this gradient and associated baroclinicity in the atmosphere, more heat/energy is generated in the tropical and subtropical (monsoon) region and transported poleward. This transport relaxes the meridional enthalpy gradient and, subsequently, the need for heat production in the monsoon region. The multidecadal timescale of these processes results from atmospheric circulation-radiation interactions and the inefficiency in generation of kinetic energy from the potential energy in the atmosphere to drive the eddies that transport heat poleward. This inefficiency creates a time delay between the meridional gradient of the enthalpy and the poleward transport. The monsoon precipitation variation lags that in the meridional gradient of enthalpy but leads that of the poleward heat transport. This phase relationship, and underlining chasing process by the transport of heat to the need for it driven by the meridional enthalpy gradient, sustains this multidecadal variation. This mechanism suggests that atmospheric circulation processes can contribute to multidecadal timescale variations. Interactions of these processes with other forcing, such as sea surface temperature or solar irradiance anomalies, can result in resonant or suppressed variations in the Indian monsoon precipitation.

  1. Atmospheric processing outside clouds increases soluble iron in mineral dust.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zongbo; Krom, Michael D; Bonneville, Steeve; Benning, Liane G

    2015-02-03

    Iron (Fe) is a key micronutrient regulating primary productivity in many parts of the global ocean. Dust deposition is an important source of Fe to the surface ocean, but most of this Fe is biologically unavailable. Atmospheric processing and reworking of Fe in dust aerosol can increase the bioavailable Fe inputs to the ocean, yet the processes are not well understood. Here, we experimentally simulate and model the cycling of Fe-bearing dust between wet aerosol and cloud droplets. Our results show that insoluble Fe in dust particles readily dissolves under acidic conditions relevant to wet aerosols. By contrast, under the higher pH conditions generally relevant to clouds, Fe dissolution tends to stop, and dissolved Fe precipitates as poorly crystalline nanoparticles. If the dust-bearing cloud droplets evaporated again (returning to the wet aerosol stage with low pH), those neo-formed Fe nanoparticles quickly redissolve, while the refractory Fe-bearing phases continue to dissolve gradually. Overall, the duration of the acidic, wet aerosol stage ultimately increases the amount of potentially bioavailable Fe delivered to oceans, while conditions in clouds favor the formation of Fe-rich nanoparticles in the atmosphere.

  2. Nucleation and growth processes of atmospheric aerosols and clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, S.E.; McGraw, R.L.

    1995-11-01

    This project seeks to gain enhanced understanding of the rate of formation and growth of new particles and of cloud droplets as a function of pertinent controlling atmospheric variables, thereby permitting accurate representation of these processes in climate models. Aerosol size distributions are shaped by complex nucleation and growth and mixing processes that are difficult to represent in models, due to the need to accurately represent the evaporation/growth kinetics for each of the billions of discrete cluster sizes in the growth sequence, ranging from molecular clusters to particles of radius of several tenths of a micrometer or greater. A potentially very powerful means of solving this problem may be given by the method of moments (MOM), which tracks the time dependence of just the lower-order radial moments of the size distribution without requiring knowledge of the distribution itself.

  3. Upscalling processes in an ocean-atmosphere multiscale coupled model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson, S. G.; Berthet, S.; Samson, G.; Crétat, J.; Colas, F.; Echevin, V.; Jullien, S.; Hourdin, C.

    2015-12-01

    This work explores new pathways toward a better representation of the multi-scale physics that drive climate variability. We are analysing the key upscaling processes by which small-scale localized errors have a knock-on effect onto global climate. We focus on the Peru-Chilli coastal upwelling, an area known to hold among the strongest models biases in the Tropics. Our approach is based on the development of a multiscale coupling interface allowing us to couple WRF with the NEMO oceanic model in a configuration including 2-way nested zooms in the oceanic and/or the atmospheric component of the coupled model. Upscalling processes are evidenced and quantified by comparing three 20-year long simulations of a tropical channel (45°S-45°N), which differ by their horizontal resolution: 0.75° everywhere, 0.75°+0.25° zoom in the southeastern Pacific or 0.25° everywhere. This set of three 20-year long simulations was repeated with 3 different sets of parameterizations to assess the robustness of our results. Our results show that adding an embedded zoom over the southeastern Pacific only in the atmosphere cools down the SST along the Peru-Chili coast, which is a clear improvement. This change is associated with a displacement of the low-level cloud cover, which moves closer to the coast cooling further the coastal area SST. Offshore, we observe the opposite effect with a reduction of the cloud cover with higher resolution, which increases solar radiation and warms the SST. Increasing the resolution in the oceanic component show contrasting results according to the different set parameterization used in the experiments. Some experiment shows a coastal cooling as expected, whereas, in other cases, we observe a counterintuitive response with a warming of the coastal SST. Using at the same time an oceanic and an atmospheric zoom mostly combines the results obtained when using the 2-way nesting in only one component of the coupled model. In the best case, we archive by this

  4. Application of Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) Data to Climate Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aumann, Hartmut H.; Gregorich, David; Gaiser, Steve; Chahine, Moustafa T.

    2004-01-01

    The application of hyper spectral radiometric data to climate research requires very high absolute radiometric accuracy and stability. We use cloud-free tropical ocean data from the Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIR) Calibration Data Subset (ADCS) to show that the radiometric precision and stability required climate applications has been achieved. The sea surface skin temperatures derived from the AIRS 2616cm-1 super window channel are stable relative to the RTG.SST at the better than 8 mK/year level, and the spectral calibration is stable at the 1 ppm/year level. The excellent stability and accuracy are the result of the implementation of AIRS as a grating array spectrometer, which is cooled and stabilized within 10 mK at 155 K. Analysis of daily measurements of the temperature gradient between the surface and 7 km altitude show that the AIRS Calibration Data Subset has applications which extend its original intent for calibration support to climate research. The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on the EOS Aqua satellite was launched into polar orbit in May 2002. AIRS covers the spectral region from 640 to 2700 cm-1 with 2378 independent channels and represents the first of a new generation of hyper spectral resolution sounders in support of global sounding data for weather forecasting and climate research.

  5. A web service based tool to plan atmospheric research flights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rautenhaus, M.; Bauer, G.; Dörnbrack, A.

    2011-09-01

    We present a web service based tool for the planning of atmospheric research flights. The tool provides online access to horizontal maps and vertical cross-sections of numerical weather prediction data and in particular allows the interactive design of a flight route in direct relation to the predictions. It thereby fills a crucial gap in the set of currently available tools for using data from numerical atmospheric models for research flight planning. A distinct feature of the tool is its lightweight, web service based architecture, requiring only commodity hardware and a basic Internet connection for deployment. Access to visualisations of prediction data is achieved by using an extended version of the Open Geospatial Consortium Web Map Service (WMS) standard, a technology that has gained increased attention in meteorology in recent years. With the WMS approach, we avoid the transfer of large forecast model output datasets while enabling on-demand generated visualisations of the predictions at campaign sites with limited Internet bandwidth. Usage of the Web Map Service standard also enables access to third-party sources of georeferenced data. We have implemented the software using the open-source programming language Python. In the present article, we describe the architecture of the tool. As an example application, we discuss a case study research flight planned for the scenario of the 2010 Eyjafjalla volcano eruption. Usage and implementation details are provided as Supplement.

  6. A web service based tool to plan atmospheric research flights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rautenhaus, M.; Bauer, G.; Dörnbrack, A.

    2012-01-01

    We present a web service based tool for the planning of atmospheric research flights. The tool provides online access to horizontal maps and vertical cross-sections of numerical weather prediction data and in particular allows the interactive design of a flight route in direct relation to the predictions. It thereby fills a crucial gap in the set of currently available tools for using data from numerical atmospheric models for research flight planning. A distinct feature of the tool is its lightweight, web service based architecture, requiring only commodity hardware and a basic Internet connection for deployment. Access to visualisations of prediction data is achieved by using an extended version of the Open Geospatial Consortium Web Map Service (WMS) standard, a technology that has gained increased attention in meteorology in recent years. With the WMS approach, we avoid the transfer of large forecast model output datasets while enabling on-demand generated visualisations of the predictions at campaign sites with limited Internet bandwidth. Usage of the Web Map Service standard also enables access to third-party sources of georeferenced data. We have implemented the software using the open-source programming language Python. In the present article, we describe the architecture of the tool. As an example application, we discuss a case study research flight planned for the scenario of the 2010 Eyjafjalla volcano eruption. Usage and implementation details are provided as Supplement.

  7. A web service based tool to plan atmospheric research flights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rautenhaus, M.; Dörnbrack, A.

    2012-04-01

    We present a web service based tool for the planning of atmospheric research flights. The tool, which we call the "Mission Support System" (MSS), provides online access to horizontal maps and vertical cross-sections of numerical weather prediction data and in particular allows the interactive design of a flight route in direct relation to the predictions. It thereby fills a crucial gap in the set of currently available tools for using data from numerical atmospheric models for research flight planning. A distinct feature of the tool is its lightweight, web service based architecture, requiring only commodity hardware and a basic Internet connection for deployment. Access to visualisations of prediction data is achieved by using an extended version of the Open Geospatial Consortium Web Map Service (WMS) standard. With the WMS approach, we avoid the transfer of large forecast model output datasets while enabling on-demand generated visualisations of the predictions at campaign sites with limited Internet bandwidth. Usage of the Web Map Service standard also enables access to third-party sources of georeferenced data. The MSS is focused on the primary needs of mission scientists responsible for planning a research flight, addressing in particular the following requirements: (1) interactive exploration of available atmospheric forecasts, (2) interactive flight planning in relation to these forecasts, (3) computation of expected flight performance to assess the technical feasibility (in terms of total distance and vertical profile) of a flight, (4) no transfer of large forecast data files to the campaign site to allow deployment at remote locations and (5) low demand on hardware resources. We have implemented the software using the open-source programming language Python.

  8. The travel-related carbon dioxide emissions of atmospheric researchers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stohl, A.

    2008-04-01

    Most atmospheric scientists agree that greenhouse gas emissions have already caused significant changes to the global climate system and that these changes will accelerate in the near future. At the same time, atmospheric scientists who - like other scientists - rely on international collaboration and information exchange travel a lot and, thereby, cause substantial emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2). In this paper, the CO2 emissions of the employees working at an atmospheric research institute (the Norwegian Institute for Air Research, NILU) caused by all types of business travel (conference visits, workshops, field campaigns, instrument maintainance, etc.) were calculated for the years 2005-2007. It is estimated that more than 90% of the emissions were caused by air travel, 3% by ground travel and 5% by hotel usage. The travel-related annual emissions were between 1.9 and 2.4 t CO2 per employee or between 3.9 and 5.5 t CO2 per scientist. For comparison, the total annual per capita CO2 emissions are 4.5 t worldwide, 1.2 t for India, 3.8 t for China, 5.9 t for Sweden and 19.1 t for Norway. The travel-related CO2 emissions of a NILU scientist, occurring in 24 days of a year on average, exceed the global average annual per capita emission. Norway's per-capita CO2 emissions are among the highest in the world, mostly because of the emissions from the oil industry. If the emissions per NILU scientist derived in this paper are taken as representative for the average Norwegian researcher, travel by Norwegian scientists would nevertheless account for a substantial 0.2% of Norway's total CO2 emissions. Since most of the travel-related emissions are due to air travel, water vapor emissions, ozone production and contrail formation further increase the relative importance of NILU's travel in terms of radiative forcing.

  9. The travel-related carbon dioxide emissions of atmospheric researchers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stohl, A.

    2008-11-01

    Most atmospheric scientists agree that greenhouse gas emissions have already caused significant changes to the global climate system and that these changes will accelerate in the near future. At the same time, atmospheric scientists who like other scientists rely on international collaboration and information exchange travel a lot and, thereby, cause substantial emissions of CO2. In this paper, the CO2 emissions of the employees working at an atmospheric research institute (the Norwegian Institute for Air Research, NILU) caused by all types of business travel (conference visits, workshops, field campaigns, instrument maintainance, etc.) were calculated for the years 2005 2007. It is estimated that more than 90% of the emissions were caused by air travel, 3% by ground travel and 5% by hotel usage. The travel-related annual emissions were between 1.9 and 2.4 t CO2 per employee or between 3.9 and 5.5 t CO2 per scientist. For comparison, the total annual per capita CO2 emissions are 4.5 t worldwide, 1.2 t for India, 3.8 t for China, 5.9 t for Sweden and 19.1 t for Norway. The travel-related CO2 emissions of a NILU scientist, occurring in 24 days of a year on average, exceed the global average annual per capita emission. Norway's per-capita CO2 emissions are among the highest in the world, mostly because of the emissions from the oil industry. If the emissions per NILU scientist derived in this paper are taken as representative for the average Norwegian researcher, travel by Norwegian scientists would nevertheless account for a substantial 0.2% of Norway's total CO2 emissions. Since most of the travel-related emissions are due to air travel, water vapor emissions, ozone production and contrail formation further increase the relative importance of NILU's travel in terms of radiative forcing.

  10. Atmospheric Research Using Kites: Here We Go Again!.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balsley, B. B.; Baisley, C. L.; Williams, J. B.; Tyrrell, G. W.

    1992-01-01

    A recent campaign on Christmas Island in the equatorial Pacific has demonstrated that, at least under some conditions, simple and relatively inexpensive kites can serve as effective platforms for continuous monitoring of the tree atmosphere. Individual flights can be anticipated to last for periods of weeks and possibly months. Our results can be considered as a renewal and extension of kite-borne atmospheric researcher technique that was used extensively around the turn of the century, but which has languished in relative obscurity for the past 50 years.In the experiment described herein, we have flown kites to altitudes up to 3.5 km, and have maintained them aloft with ease for the four-day duration of the experiment. In addition, we outline the general capabilities and limitations of state-of-the-art kite platforms, and show that, under some conditions, such systems can be expected to attain much higher altitudes and remain aloft for much longer periods. We also outline the potential for using kites as long- term monitoring platforms for temperature, radiation, ozone, water vapor, ice crystal structure, atmospheric electric fields, and myriad other variables, and show that such measurements are both theoretically possible and practically feasible, at least under some restrictive conditions.

  11. The Pilatus unmanned aircraft system for lower atmospheric research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boer, Gijs; Palo, Scott; Argrow, Brian; LoDolce, Gabriel; Mack, James; Gao, Ru-Shan; Telg, Hagen; Trussel, Cameron; Fromm, Joshua; Long, Charles N.; Bland, Geoff; Maslanik, James; Schmid, Beat; Hock, Terry

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents details of the University of Colorado (CU) "Pilatus" unmanned research aircraft, assembled to provide measurements of aerosols, radiation and thermodynamics in the lower troposphere. This aircraft has a wingspan of 3.2 m and a maximum take-off weight of 25 kg, and it is powered by an electric motor to reduce engine exhaust and concerns about carburetor icing. It carries instrumentation to make measurements of broadband up- and downwelling shortwave and longwave radiation, aerosol particle size distribution, atmospheric temperature, relative humidity and pressure and to collect video of flights for subsequent analysis of atmospheric conditions during flight. In order to make the shortwave radiation measurements, care was taken to carefully position a high-quality compact inertial measurement unit (IMU) and characterize the attitude of the aircraft and its orientation to the upward-looking radiation sensor. Using measurements from both of these sensors, a correction is applied to the raw radiometer measurements to correct for aircraft attitude and sensor tilt relative to the sun. The data acquisition system was designed from scratch based on a set of key driving requirements to accommodate the variety of sensors deployed. Initial test flights completed in Colorado provide promising results with measurements from the radiation sensors agreeing with those from a nearby surface site. Additionally, estimates of surface albedo from onboard sensors were consistent with local surface conditions, including melting snow and bright runway surface. Aerosol size distributions collected are internally consistent and have previously been shown to agree well with larger, surface-based instrumentation. Finally the atmospheric state measurements evolve as expected, with the near-surface atmosphere warming over time as the day goes on, and the atmospheric relative humidity decreasing with increased temperature. No directional bias on measured temperature, as might

  12. The Pilatus Unmanned Aircraft System for Lower Atmospheric Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    de Boer, Gijs; Palo, Scott; Argrow, Brian; LoDolce, Gabriel; Mack, James; Gao, Ru-shan; Telg, Hagen; Trussel, Cameron; Fromm, Joshua; Long, Charles N.; Bland, Geoff; Maslanik, James; Schmid, Beat; Hock, Terry

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents details of the University of Colorado (CU) "Pilatus" unmanned research aircraft, assembled to provide measurements of aerosols, radiation and thermodynamics in the lower troposphere. This aircraft has a wingspan of 3.2 m and a maximum take-off weight of 25 kg, and it is powered by an electric motor to reduce engine exhaust and concerns about carburetor icing. It carries instrumentation to make measurements of broadband up- and downwelling shortwave and longwave radiation, aerosol particle size distribution, atmospheric temperature, relative humidity and pressure and to collect video of flights for subsequent analysis of atmospheric conditions during flight. In order to make the shortwave radiation measurements, care was taken to carefully position a high-quality compact inertial measurement unit (IMU) and characterize the attitude of the aircraft and its orientation to the upward-looking radiation sensor. Using measurements from both of these sensors, a correction is applied to the raw radiometer measurements to correct for aircraft attitude and sensor tilt relative to the sun. The data acquisition system was designed from scratch based on a set of key driving requirements to accommodate the variety of sensors deployed. Initial test flights completed in Colorado provide promising results with measurements from the radiation sensors agreeing with those from a nearby surface site. Additionally, estimates of surface albedo from onboard sensors were consistent with local surface conditions, including melting snow and bright runway surface. Aerosol size distributions collected are internally consistent and have previously been shown to agree well with larger, surface-based instrumentation. Finally the atmospheric state measurements evolve as expected, with the near-surface atmosphere warming over time as the day goes on, and the atmospheric relative humidity decreasing with increased temperature. No directional bias on measured temperature, as might

  13. The pilatus unmanned aircraft system for lower atmospheric research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boer, G.; Palo, S.; Argrow, B.; LoDolce, G.; Mack, J.; Gao, R.-S.; Telg, H.; Trussel, C.; Fromm, J.; Long, C. N.; Bland, G.; Maslanik, J.; Schmid, B.; Hock, T.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents details of the University of Colorado (CU) Pilatus unmanned research aircraft, assembled to provide measurements of aerosols, radiation and thermodynamics in the lower troposphere. This aircraft has a wingspan of 3.2 m and a maximum take off weight of 25 kg and is powered by an electric motor to reduce engine exhaust and concerns about carburetor icing. It carries instrumentation to make measurements of broadband up- and downwelling shortwave and longwave radiation, aerosol particle size distribution, atmospheric temperature, relative humidity and pressure and to collect video of flights for subsequent analysis of atmospheric conditions during flight. In order to make the shortwave radiation measurements, care was taken to carefully position a high-quality compact inertial measurement unit (IMU) and characterize the attitude of the aircraft and it's orientation to the upward looking radiation sensor. Using measurements from both of these sensors, a correction is applied to the raw radiometer measurements to correct for aircraft attitude and sensor tilt relative to the sun. The data acquisition system was designed from scratch based on a set of key driving requirements to accommodate the variety of sensors deployed. Initial test flights completed in Colorado provide promising results with measurements from the radiation sensors agreeing with those from a nearby surface site. Additionally, estimates of surface albedo from onboard sensors were consistent with local surface conditions, including melting snow and bright runway surface. Aerosol size distributions collected are internally consistent and have previously been shown to agree well with larger, surface-based instrumentation. Finally the atmospheric state measurements evolve as expected, with the near-surface atmosphere warming over time as the day goes on, and the atmospheric relative humidity decreasing with increased temperature. No directional bias on measured temperature, as might be

  14. The Pilatus unmanned aircraft system for lower atmospheric research

    SciTech Connect

    de Boer, Gijs; Palo, Scott; Argrow, Brian; LoDolce, Gabriel; Mack, James; Gao, Ru -Shan; Telg, Hagen; Trussel, Cameron; Fromm, Joshua; Long, Charles N.; Bland, Geoff; Maslanik, James; Schmid, Beat; Hock, Terry

    2016-04-28

    This study presents details of the University of Colorado (CU) “Pilatus” unmanned research aircraft, assembled to provide measurements of aerosols, radiation and thermodynamics in the lower troposphere. This aircraft has a wingspan of 3.2 m and a maximum take-off weight of 25 kg, and it is powered by an electric motor to reduce engine exhaust and concerns about carburetor icing. It carries instrumentation to make measurements of broadband up- and downwelling shortwave and longwave radiation, aerosol particle size distribution, atmospheric temperature, relative humidity and pressure and to collect video of flights for subsequent analysis of atmospheric conditions during flight. In order to make the shortwave radiation measurements, care was taken to carefully position a high-quality compact inertial measurement unit (IMU) and characterize the attitude of the aircraft and its orientation to the upward-looking radiation sensor. Using measurements from both of these sensors, a correction is applied to the raw radiometer measurements to correct for aircraft attitude and sensor tilt relative to the sun. The data acquisition system was designed from scratch based on a set of key driving requirements to accommodate the variety of sensors deployed. Initial test flights completed in Colorado provide promising results with measurements from the radiation sensors agreeing with those from a nearby surface site. Additionally, estimates of surface albedo from onboard sensors were consistent with local surface conditions, including melting snow and bright runway surface. Aerosol size distributions collected are internally consistent and have previously been shown to agree well with larger, surface-based instrumentation. Finally the atmospheric state measurements evolve as expected, with the near-surface atmosphere warming over time as the day goes on, and the atmospheric relative humidity decreasing with increased temperature. No directional bias on measured temperature, as

  15. The Pilatus unmanned aircraft system for lower atmospheric research

    DOE PAGES

    de Boer, Gijs; Palo, Scott; Argrow, Brian; ...

    2016-04-28

    This study presents details of the University of Colorado (CU) “Pilatus” unmanned research aircraft, assembled to provide measurements of aerosols, radiation and thermodynamics in the lower troposphere. This aircraft has a wingspan of 3.2 m and a maximum take-off weight of 25 kg, and it is powered by an electric motor to reduce engine exhaust and concerns about carburetor icing. It carries instrumentation to make measurements of broadband up- and downwelling shortwave and longwave radiation, aerosol particle size distribution, atmospheric temperature, relative humidity and pressure and to collect video of flights for subsequent analysis of atmospheric conditions during flight. Inmore » order to make the shortwave radiation measurements, care was taken to carefully position a high-quality compact inertial measurement unit (IMU) and characterize the attitude of the aircraft and its orientation to the upward-looking radiation sensor. Using measurements from both of these sensors, a correction is applied to the raw radiometer measurements to correct for aircraft attitude and sensor tilt relative to the sun. The data acquisition system was designed from scratch based on a set of key driving requirements to accommodate the variety of sensors deployed. Initial test flights completed in Colorado provide promising results with measurements from the radiation sensors agreeing with those from a nearby surface site. Additionally, estimates of surface albedo from onboard sensors were consistent with local surface conditions, including melting snow and bright runway surface. Aerosol size distributions collected are internally consistent and have previously been shown to agree well with larger, surface-based instrumentation. Finally the atmospheric state measurements evolve as expected, with the near-surface atmosphere warming over time as the day goes on, and the atmospheric relative humidity decreasing with increased temperature. No directional bias on measured

  16. Stellar atmospheric parameter estimation using Gaussian process regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bu, Yude; Pan, Jingchang

    2015-02-01

    As is well known, it is necessary to derive stellar parameters from massive amounts of spectral data automatically and efficiently. However, in traditional automatic methods such as artificial neural networks (ANNs) and kernel regression (KR), it is often difficult to optimize the algorithm structure and determine the optimal algorithm parameters. Gaussian process regression (GPR) is a recently developed method that has been proven to be capable of overcoming these difficulties. Here we apply GPR to derive stellar atmospheric parameters from spectra. Through evaluating the performance of GPR on Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectra, Medium resolution Isaac Newton Telescope Library of Empirical Spectra (MILES) spectra, ELODIE spectra and the spectra of member stars of galactic globular clusters, we conclude that GPR can derive stellar parameters accurately and precisely, especially when we use data preprocessed with principal component analysis (PCA). We then compare the performance of GPR with that of several widely used regression methods (ANNs, support-vector regression and KR) and find that with GPR it is easier to optimize structures and parameters and more efficient and accurate to extract atmospheric parameters.

  17. Process-based upscaling of surface-atmosphere exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keenan, T. F.; Prentice, I. C.; Canadell, J.; Williams, C. A.; Wang, H.; Raupach, M. R.; Collatz, G. J.; Davis, T.; Stocker, B.; Evans, B. J.

    2015-12-01

    Empirical upscaling techniques such as machine learning and data-mining have proven invaluable tools for the global scaling of disparate observations of surface-atmosphere exchange, but are not based on a theoretical understanding of the key processes involved. This makes spatial and temporal extrapolation outside of the training domain difficult at best. There is therefore a clear need for the incorporation of knowledge of ecosystem function, in combination with the strength of data mining. Here, we present such an approach. We describe a novel diagnostic process-based model of global photosynthesis and ecosystem respiration, which is directly informed by a variety of global datasets relevant to ecosystem state and function. We use the model framework to estimate global carbon cycling both spatially and temporally, with a specific focus on the mechanisms responsible for long-term change. Our results show the importance of incorporating process knowledge into upscaling approaches, and highlight the effect of key processes on the terrestrial carbon cycle.

  18. Global atmospheric change and research needs in environmental health sciences

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, B.D. ); Reed, D.J. )

    1991-12-01

    On November 6-7, 1989, the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) held a conference on Global Atmospheric Change and Human Health. As a result, and in the months since this conference, many important areas of research have been identified with regard to the impacts of climatic changes on human health. To develop comprehensive research programs that address important human health issues related to global warming, it is necessary to begin by recognizing that some of the health effects will be direct such as those due to temperature changes, and others will be indirect consequences of environmental alterations resulting in crop loss, changing disease vectors, population migration, etc. It should also be recognized that the conditions leading to global warming have importance to human health and the environment other than through increasing concentrations of CO[sub 2] in the atmosphere, rising surface temperatures, and rising sea levels. Much of the increase in CO[sub 2] in the atmosphere is due to the increased combustion of fossil fuels for transportation and electric power production. Over the next 30 years, the demand for electrical power is expected to grow at a rate of 2 to 4% per year in the United States alone, and even faster growth is likely for developing countries. Much of this energy will be derived from the combustion of fossil fuels, including coal, which result in pollutant emissions to the air such as metals, radioactivity, SO[sub x], NO[sub x], and particles. Therefore, with increasing concentrations of CO[sub 2] there will not only be the effects of global warming on health, but also increasing concentrations of many serious air pollutants in urban areas, including the precursors of acid rain and acid deposition over large regional areas.

  19. Pacific Northwest Laboratory: Annual report for 1986 to the DOE Office of Energy Research: Part 3, Atmospheric sciences

    SciTech Connect

    Elderkin, C.E.

    1987-06-01

    The goals of atmospheric research at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) are to describe and predict the nature and fate of atmospheric contaminants and to develop an understanding of the atmospheric processes contributing to their distribution on local, regional, and continental scales. In 1986, atmospheric research examined the transport and diffusion of atmospheric contaminants in areas of complex terrain and participated in a large, multilaboratory program to assess the precipitation scavenging processes important to the transformation and wet deposition of chemicals composing ''acid rain.'' In addition, during 1986, a special opportunity for measuring the transport and removal of radioactivity occurred after the Chernobyl reactor accident in April 1986. Separate abstracts were prepared for individual projects.

  20. Report of the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research, National Center for Atmospheric Research and UCAR Office of Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Warner, L.

    1994-06-01

    The report is addressed to the community that the University Corporation for Atmosphere Research (CAR) serves and supports in different ways and through different programs. The recent highlights are TOGA COARE: Studying the World`s Warmest Ocean; Seeing the Sea with New Eyes; Thunderstorm Detectives: NCAR Science Goes Public; SEE Takes a Look at Solar Power; Chemistry Modeling Comes of Age; Welcome to the Virtual Classroom of COMET; Taking to the Information Highway; UCAR and the Internet; and Made in the USA: American Technology Goes to Hong Kong.

  1. Governing processes for reactive nitrogen compounds in the European atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertel, O.; Skjøth, C. A.; Reis, S.; Bleeker, A.; Harrison, R. M.; Cape, J. N.; Fowler, D.; Skiba, U.; Simpson, D.; Jickells, T.; Kulmala, M.; Gyldenkærne, S.; Sørensen, L. L.; Erisman, J. W.; Sutton, M. A.

    2012-12-01

    Reactive nitrogen (Nr) compounds have different fates in the atmosphere due to differences in the governing processes of physical transport, deposition and chemical transformation. Nr compounds addressed here include reduced nitrogen (NHx: ammonia (NH3) and its reaction product ammonium (NH4+)), oxidized nitrogen (NOy: nitrogen monoxide (NO) + nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and their reaction products) as well as organic nitrogen compounds (organic N). Pollution abatement strategies need to take into account the differences in the governing processes of these compounds when assessing their impact on ecosystem services, biodiversity, human health and climate. NOx (NO + NO2) emitted from traffic affects human health in urban areas where the presence of buildings increases the residence time in streets. In urban areas this leads to enhanced exposure of the population to NOx concentrations. NOx emissions generally have little impact on nearby ecosystems because of the small dry deposition rates of NOx. These compounds need to be converted into nitric acid (HNO3) before removal through deposition is efficient. HNO3 sticks quickly to any surface and is thereby either dry deposited or incorporated into aerosols as nitrate (NO3-). In contrast to NOx compounds, NH3 has potentially high impacts on ecosystems near the main agricultural sources of NH3 because of its large ground-level concentrations along with large dry deposition rates. Aerosol phase NH4+ and NO3- contribute significantly to background PM2.5 and PM10 (mass of aerosols with an aerodynamic diameter of less than 2.5 and 10 μm, respectively) with an impact on radiation balance as well as potentially on human health. Little is known quantitatively and qualitatively about organic N in the atmosphere, other than that it contributes a significant fraction of wet-deposited N, and is present in both gaseous and particulate forms. Further studies are needed to characterise the sources, air chemistry and

  2. Modeling evaporation from porous media influenced by atmospheric processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosthaf, K.; Baber, K.; Flemisch, B.; Helmig, R.

    2012-04-01

    Modeling evaporation processes from partially saturated soils into the ambient air is a challenging task. It involves usually a variety of interacting processes and depends on the multitude of properties of the fluids and of the porous medium. Often, the ambient free-flow and the porous-medium compartments are modeled separately with a specification of the evaporation rate as boundary condition. We have developed a coupling concept, which allows the combined modeling of a free-flow and a porous-medium system under non-isothermal conditions with the evaporative fluxes across the soil-atmosphere interface as model output. It is based on flux continuity and local thermodynamic equilibrium at the interface. Darcy's law for multiple phases is used in the porous medium, whereas the ambient air flow is modeled as a compositional single-phase Stokes system. The concept has been implemented in the numerical simulator DuMux. A comparison of simulated and measured data from wind tunnel experiments performed in the group of D. Or (ETH Zürich) will be shown. Furthermore, the impact of several parameters, such as a varying wind velocity, temperature or different soil properties on the evaporation process has been analyzed in a numerical parameter study. The results will be presented and discussed.

  3. Microwave remote sensing in atmospheric research and meteorology (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunzi, K.

    Remote sensing techniques to investigate the atmosphere are widely used. Sensors operating in the microwave range (wavelength from 10 to 0.1 cm) of the electromagnetic spectrum were among the first instruments used on the ground and on air- and space borne platforms for this purpose. These instruments measure the thermal emission from molecular resonances or use the absorption and scattering properties of water droplets or particles to obtain information on atmospheric parameters and composition. In the seventies the sensors NEMS and SCAMS on the Nimbus-5 and 6 satellites have demonstrated the big advantage of these instruments to obtain temperature profiles, amounts of water vapor and liquid water nearly unaffected by cloud coverage. The frequency bands and observing geometries selected for these early instruments are still used to day very successfully for the operational sensors on the polar orbiting satellites of the DMSP and NOAA series. In the eighties and nineties the very much improved sensor technology allowed to extend the spectral range to wavelength near 0.01 cm. It is now possible to observe key constituents of importance in atmospheric chemistry, and in particular related to stratospheric ozone. Such sensors have been flown on UARS (MLS), several space shuttle missions (MAS) and on stratospheric balloons using limb sounding geometry, and also on research aircraft (NASA DC-9, the DLR Falcon and others), furthermore microwave radiometers are considered key sensors for the ground based, global Network for the Detection of Stratospheric Change (NDSC). The next generation of sensors on future satellites such as AURA (MLS) and the international space station (SMILES) are making use of higher frequencies and superconducting receiver technology. This will allow to measure more minor constituents with higher accuracy and better temporal resolution. Today the receiver technology is very mature down to wavelength of 0.03 cm. Planned future applications include a

  4. Airborne mass spectrometers: four decades of atmospheric and space research at the Air Force research laboratory.

    PubMed

    Viggiano, A A; Hunton, D E

    1999-11-01

    Mass spectrometry is a versatile research tool that has proved to be extremely useful for exploring the fundamental nature of the earth's atmosphere and ionosphere and in helping to solve operational problems facing the Air Force and the Department of Defense. In the past 40 years, our research group at the Air Force Research Laboratory has flown quadrupole mass spectrometers of many designs on nearly 100 sounding rockets, nine satellites, three Space Shuttles and many missions of high-altitude research aircraft and balloons. We have also used our instruments in ground-based investigations of rocket and jet engine exhaust, combustion chemistry and microwave breakdown chemistry. This paper is a review of the instrumentation and techniques needed for space research, a summary of the results from many of the experiments, and an introduction to the broad field of atmospheric and space mass spectrometry in general.

  5. The role of impacting processes in the chemical evolution of the atmosphere of primordial Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukhin, Lev M.; Gerasimov, M. V.

    1991-01-01

    The role of impacting processes in the chemical evolution of the atmosphere of primordial Earth is discussed. The following subject areas are covered: (1) Earth's initial atmosphere; (2) continuous degassing; (3) impact processes and the Earth's protoatmosphere; and (4) the evolution of an impact-generated atmosphere.

  6. Volcanic jet noise: infrasonic source processes and atmospheric propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matoza, R. S.; Fee, D.; Ogden, D. E.

    2011-12-01

    Volcanic eruption columns are complex flows consisting of (possibly supersonic) injections of ash-gas mixtures into the atmosphere. A volcanic eruption column can be modeled as a lower momentum-driven jet (the gas-thrust region), which transitions with altitude into a thermally buoyant plume. Matoza et al. [2009] proposed that broadband infrasonic signals recorded during this type of volcanic activity represent a low-frequency form of jet noise. Jet noise is produced at higher acoustic frequencies by smaller-scale man-made jet flows (e.g., turbulent jet flow from jet engines and rockets). Jet noise generation processes could operate at larger spatial scales and produce infrasonic frequencies in the lower gas-thrust portion of the eruption column. Jet-noise-like infrasonic signals have been observed at ranges of tens to thousands of kilometers from sustained volcanic explosions at Mount St. Helens, WA; Tungurahua, Ecuador; Redoubt, AK; and Sarychev Peak, Kuril Islands. Over such distances, the atmosphere cannot be considered homogeneous. Long-range infrasound propagation takes place primarily in waveguides formed by vertical gradients in temperature and horizontal winds, and exhibits strong spatiotemporal variability. The timing and location of volcanic explosions can be estimated from remote infrasonic data and could be used with ash cloud dispersion forecasts for hazard mitigation. Source studies of infrasonic volcanic jet noise, coupled with infrasound propagation modeling, hold promise for being able to constrain more detailed eruption jet parameters with remote, ground-based geophysical data. Here we present recent work on the generation and propagation of volcanic jet noise. Matoza, R. S., D. Fee, M. A. Garcés, J. M. Seiner, P. A. Ramón, and M. A. H. Hedlin (2009), Infrasonic jet noise from volcanic eruptions, Geophys. Res. Lett., 36, L08303, doi:10.1029/2008GL036486.

  7. SAGE III Educational Outreach and Student's On-Line Atmospheric Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, D. C.; Moore, S. W.; Walters, S. C.

    2002-05-01

    Students On-Line Atmospheric Research (SOLAR) is a NASA-sponsored educational outreach program aimed at raising the level of interest in science among elementary, middle, and high school students. SOLAR is supported by, and closely linked to, NASA's Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III (SAGE III). SAGE III, launched on a Russian METEOR 3M spacecraft in December 2001, is a key component of NASA's Earth Observing System. It will monitor the quantity and distribution of aerosols, ozone, clouds, and other important trace gases in the upper atmosphere. Early data from SAGE III indicate that the instrument is performing as expected. SAGE III measurements will extend the long-term data record established by its predecessors, SAGE I and SAGE II, which spans from 1979 to the present. In addition, SAGE III's added measurement capabilities will provide more detailed data on certain atmospheric species. SOLAR selects interesting topics related to the science issues addressed by the SAGE III experiments, and develops educational materials and projects to enhance science teaching, and to help students realize the relevance of these issues to our lives on Earth. For example, SOLAR highlights some of the major questions regarding the health of the atmosphere such as possible influences of aerosols on global climate, and atmospheric processes related to ozone depletion. The program features projects to give students hands-on experience with scientific equipment and help develop skills in collecting, analyzing, and reporting science results. SOLAR focuses on helping teachers become familiar with current research in the atmospheric sciences, helping teachers integrate SOLAR developed educational materials into their curriculum. SOLAR gives special presentations at national and regional science teacher conferences and conducts a summer teacher workshop at the NASA Langley Research Center. This poster will highlight some of the key features of the SOLAR program and will present

  8. Atmospheric and Spectroscopic Research in the Far Infrared

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Kwangjai

    1998-01-01

    The spectroscopic measurements of molecular parameters constitute one of the major areas of our research program. This part of our program has been conducted in close collaboration with Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) and National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The references on HO2, OH, and O2 that appear on the publication list are examples of this type of work completed during the grant period. These pressure-broadening studies have provided the kind of improvements needed in the database for retrieving atmospheric profiles from far infrared limb sensing data. One example of this linkage between the pressure broadening studies and the improvements in data retrieval is described in the paper on HBr (paper #4, publication list). The retrieval of the concentration profile of this important species from the IBEX data was facilitated by a number of performance improvement factors, not the least of which was the database improvements.

  9. Modeling the water decarbonization processes in atmospheric deaerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leduhovsky, G. V.

    2017-02-01

    A mathematical model of the water decarbonization processes in atmospheric deaerators is proposed to calculate the thermal decomposition degree of hydrocarbonates in a deaerator, pH of a deaerated water sample, and the mass concentration of free carbonic acid in it on a carbon dioxide basis. The mathematical description of these processes is based on the deaeration tank water flow model implemented in the specialized software suite for the calculation of three-dimensional liquid flows, where a real water flow is a set of parallel small plug-flow reactors, and the rate constant of the reaction representing a generalized model of the thermal decomposition of hydrocarbonates with consideration for its chemical and diffusion stages is identified by experimental data. Based on the results of experimental studies performed on deaerators of different designs with and without steam bubbling in their tanks, an empirical support of this model has been developed in the form of recommended reaction order and rate constant values selected depending on the overall alkalinity of water fed into a deaerator. A self-contained mathematical description of the water decarbonization processes in deaerators has been obtained. The proposed model precision has been proven to agree with the specified metrological characteristics of the potentiometric and alkalimetric methods for measuring pH and the free carbonic acid concentration in water. This allows us to recommend the obtained model for the solution of practical problems of forming a specified amount of deaerated water via the selection of the structural and regime parameters of deaerators during their design and regime adjustment.

  10. CURRENT METHODS AND RESEARCH STRATEGIES FOR MODELING ATMOSPHERIC MERCURY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The atmospheric pathway of the global mercury cycle is known to be the primary source of mercury contamination to most threatened aquatic ecosystems. Current efforts toward numerical modeling of atmospheric mercury are hindered by an incomplete understanding of emissions, atmosp...

  11. Relationship between Atmospheric Pollution Processes and Atmospheric Circulation in Shanghai, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Y.; Zhang, J.; Cong, J.; Wang, J.

    2014-12-01

    Severe haze weather occurred in Shanghai in the beginning of 2013. In this paper,spatial-temporal characteristics of the smog days was analyzed using the data of 10 stations in the downtown, the suburb & the outer suburb of Shanghai from 2002-2013. In addition, we discussed the correlation between PM2.5, PM10, SO2 & NO2 and the smog days. At last, the situation of atmospheric circulation during a severe haze weather process between Jan, 2, 2013 to Feb, 4, 2013 was studied. Results show that: (1) from 2002 to 2012, the average smog days in Shanghai and in the outer suburb of Shanghai show a trend of fluctuating decrease generally with the rates of 6.031d/a and 5.89d/a, respectively. The smog days in the downtown of Shanghai decrease most quickly, with the rate of 15.418d/a. The smog days in the suburb of Shanghai decreased most slowly, with the rate of 2.495d/a. Smog happens most frequently in January, November and December (accounting for 31%) and least in August and September. The inter-annual variation of smog days shows the trend of decreasing in all four seasons. The smog days decreases most slowly in spring, with the ratio of 1.16d/a, it decreases most quickly in winter, with the ratio of 1.65d/a, and decreases at the medium ratio of 1.58d/a and 1.49d/a in summer and autumn respectively. (2) The number of monthly average smog days is positively related to the monthly average concentration of PM10, SO2, PM2.5 and NO2. The correlative coefficient between the number of monthly average smog days and the monthly average PM10 and NO2 concentrations are 0.756 and 0.610, respectively. (3) Atmospheric circulation analysis shows that stable west straight current in the air, weak high pressure on the ground and sufficient supplement of water steam are good for the formation and maintenance of haze weather.

  12. X-38 research aircraft atmospheric reentry - computer animation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    In the mid-1990's researchers at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, and Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas, began working actively with the sub-scale X-38 prototype crew return vehicle (CRV). This was an unpiloted lifting body designed at 80 percent of the size of a projected emergency crew return vehicle for the International Space Station. The X-38 and the actual CRV are patterned after a lifting-body shape first employed in the Air Force X-23 (SV-5) program in the mid-1960's and the Air Force-NASA X-24A lifting-body project in the early to mid-1970's. Built by Scaled Composites, Inc., in Mojave, California, and outfitted with avionics, computer systems, and other hardware at Johnson Space Center, two X-38 aircraft were involved in flight research at Dryden beginning in July of 1997. Before that, however, Dryden conducted some 13 flights at a drop zone near California City, California. These tests were done with a 1/6-scale model of the X-38 to test the parafoil concept that would be employed on the X-38 and the actual CRV. The basic concept is that the actual CRV will use an inertial navigation system together with the Global Positioning System of satellites to guide it from the International Space Station into the Earth's atmosphere. A deorbit engine module will redirect the vehicle from orbit into the atmosphere where a series of parachutes and a parafoil will deploy in sequence to bring the vehicle to a landing, possibly in a field next to a hospital. Flight research at NASA Dryden for the X-38 began with an unpiloted captive carry flight in which the vehicle remained attached to its future launch vehicle, the Dryden B-52 008. There were four captive flights in 1997 and three in 1998, plus the first drop test on March 12, 1998, using the parachutes and parafoil. Further captive and drop tests occurred in 1999. Although the X-38 landed safely on the lakebed at Edwards after the March 1998 drop test, there had been some problems

  13. Construction of the combined system of literature, intermediate data, and data in upper atmospheric research field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, Y.; Nose, M.; Iyemori, T.; Murayama, Y.; Kurakawa, K.; Abe, S.; Ikeda, D.; Tanaka, Y.; Umemura, N.; Shinbori, A.; Ueno, S.; Yagi, M.; Sato, Y.

    2014-12-01

    To investigate the mechanism of long-term variations in the upper atmosphere, we need to create integrated links between a variety of ground-based observations made at various locations from the equator to the poles because what we observe is the result of complicated processes. However, the Japanese observational databases (e.g., by a global network of radars, magnetometers, and optical sensors) have been maintained and made available to the community by each institution that conducted the observations. Then researchers encountered the problem that is difficult to look for various kinds of observational data to clarify the global scale physical phenomena. In order to solve the problem, the Japanese IUGONET project built the metadata database for upper atmosphere to cross-search their databases and integrated analysis tools. It became easy to find data and to derive many data to intermediate data by using above mentioned infrastructure. However, it is still difficult to reproduce the past research from the paper as only key because of lack of supplementary information. We introduce our activity to solve above mentioned problem especially about data publication which mints DOI and metadata to dataset by the Japanese local community relevant to upper atmospheric research field. In order to beyond data publication and citation, we describe our challenge to cooperation of literature, data, identifiers, general metadata, domain specific metadata, derivation process, and code.

  14. The applications of chemical thermodynamics and chemical kinetics to planetary atmospheres research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fegley, Bruce, Jr.

    1990-01-01

    A review of the applications of chemical thermodynamics and chemical kinetics to planetary atmospheres research during the past four decades is presented with an emphasis on chemical equilibrium models and thermochemical kinetics. Several current problems in planetary atmospheres research such as the origin of the atmospheres of the terrestrial planets, atmosphere-surface interactions on Venus and Mars, deep mixing in the atmospheres of the gas giant planets, and the origin of the atmospheres of outer planet satellites all require laboratory data on the kinetics of thermochemical reactions for their solution.

  15. The Role of Remote Sensing Displays in Earth Climate and Planetary Atmospheric Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DelGenio, Anthony D.; Hansen, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The communities of scientists who study the Earth's climate and the atmospheres of the other planets barely overlap, but the types of questions they pose and the resulting implications for the use and interpretation of remote sensing data sets have much in common. Both seek to determine the characteristic behavior of three-dimensional fluids that also evolve in time. Climate researchers want to know how and why the general patterns that define our climate today might be different in the next century. Planetary scientists try to understand why circulation patterns and clouds on Mars, Venus, or Jupiter are different from those on Earth. Both disciplines must aggregate large amounts of data covering long time periods and several altitudes to have a representative picture of the rapidly changing atmosphere they are studying. This emphasis separates climate scientists from weather forecasters, who focus at any one time on a limited number of images. Likewise, it separates planetary atmosphere researchers from planetary geologists, who rely primarily on single images (or mosaics of images covering the globe) to study two-dimensional planetary surfaces that are mostly static over the duration of a spacecraft mission yet reveal dynamic processes acting over thousands to millions of years. Remote sensing displays are usually two-dimensional projections that capture an atmosphere at an instant in time. How scientists manipulate and display such data, how they interpret what they see, and how they thereby understand the physical processes that cause what they see, are the challenges I discuss in this chapter. I begin by discussing differences in how novices and experts in the field relate displays of data to the real world. This leads to a discussion of the use and abuse of image enhancement and color in remote sensing displays. I then show some examples of techniques used by scientists in climate and planetary research to both convey information and design research

  16. Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program: Atmospheric Remote Sensing and Assessment Program -- Final Report. Part 1: The lower atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Tooman, T.P.

    1997-01-01

    This report documents work done between FY91 and FY95 for the lower atmospheric portion of the joint Department of Defense (DoD) and Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Remote Sensing and Assessment Program (ARSAP) within the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP). The work focused on (1) developing new measurement capabilities and (2) measuring atmospheric heating in a well-defined layer and then relating it to cloud properties an water vapor content. Seven new instruments were develop3ed for use with Unmanned Aerospace Vehicles (UAVs) as the host platform for flux, radiance, cloud, and water vapor measurements. Four major field campaigns were undertaken to use these new as well as existing instruments to make critically needed atmospheric measurements. Scientific results include the profiling of clear sky fluxes from near surface to 14 km and the strong indication of cloudy atmosphere absorption of solar radiation considerably greater than predicted by extant models.

  17. Improved time to publication in Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouw, Joost; Ghan, Steven; Pryor, Sara; Rudich, Yinon; Zhang, Renyi

    2012-07-01

    Timely publication of manuscripts is important to authors and readers. AGU has significantly accelerated both the review and production processes for the Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres (JGR-Atmospheres). Via a number of mechanisms (e.g., shortening the time allotted for reviewer selection, manuscript reviews, and revisions), the mean time to first decision has been decreased from 98 days in 2007 to 50 days in 2011, and the mean time to final decision has been decreased from 132 days in 2007 to 71 days in 2011. By implementing a new content management system, adjusting the workflow for improved efficiency, requesting authors to proofread their manuscripts quicker, and improving monitoring and follow-up to author and vendor queries, the mean production time from manuscript acceptance to publication has been decreased from 128 days in 2010 to only 56 days in 2012. Thus, in the past few years the mean time to publication of JGR-Atmospheres has been cut in half. These milestones have been achieved with no loss of quality of presentation or content. In addition, online posting of "papers in press" on JGR-Atmosphere's home page typically occurs within a few days after acceptance. JGR-Atmospheres editors thank manuscript reviewers, authors, and AGU staff who have greatly contributed to the more timely review and publication processes. This information will be updated periodically on the JGR-Atmospheres home page. A chart showing the average time from acceptance to publication for all of AGU's journals is available at http://www.agu.org/pubs/pdf/31May2012_Timeliness_Chart.pdf.

  18. Improved time to publication in Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Gouw, Joost; Ghan, Steven; Pryor, Sara; Rudich, Yinon; Zhang, Renyi

    2012-07-01

    Timely publication of manuscripts is important to authors and readers. AGU has significantly accelerated both the review and production processes for the Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres (JGR-Atmospheres). Via a number of mechanisms (e.g., shortening the time allotted for reviewer selection, manuscript reviews, and revisions), the mean time to first decision has been decreased from 98 days in 2007 to 50 days in 2011, and the mean time to final decision has been decreased from 132 days in 2007 to 71 days in 2011. By implementing a new content management system, adjusting the workflow for improved efficiency, requesting authors to proofread their manuscripts quicker, and improving monitoring and follow-up to author and vendor queries, the mean production time from manuscript acceptance to publication has been decreased from 128 days in 2010 to only 56 days in 2012. Thus, in the past few years the mean time to publication of JGR-Atmospheres has been cut in half. These milestones have been achieved with no loss of quality of presentation or content. In addition, online posting of “papers in press” on JGR-Atmosphere's home page typically occurs within a few days after acceptance. JGR-Atmospheres editors thank manuscript reviewers, authors, and AGU staff who have greatly contributed to the more timely review and publication processes. This information will be updated periodically on the JGR-Atmospheres home page. A chart showing the average time from acceptance to publication for all of AGU's journals is available at http://www.agu.org/pubs/pdf/31May2012_Timeliness_Chart.pdf.

  19. Coupling groundwater, vegetation and atmosphere processes: a comparison of two integrated models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulis, M.; Williams, J. L.; Shrestha, P.; Maxwell, R. M.; Masbou, M.; Simmer, C.

    2012-12-01

    The correct modelling of the mutual response to and feedback between atmospheric, hydrological, and ecological processes is an important prerequisite for accurate climate/meteorological projection, environmental protection, and water management. As such, numerical models based on a detailed representation of both groundwater and atmospheric dynamics have gained increasing attention within the scientific community. In this study, we compare two integrated systems that dynamically simulate soil-vegetation-atmosphere interactions. One system is the combination of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) atmospheric model coupled with the three-dimensional variably saturated subsurface ParFlow model. Both sub-models are internally coupled in an explicit, operator-splitting manner via the Noah land surface scheme. The second system consists of the regional climate and weather forecast model COSMO coupled also with ParFlow but via the Community Land Model (CLM). In this second system the external OASIS coupler is used to pass relevant fluxes and state variables between these three components via the MPI parallel communications protocol. The comparison on how interactions are simulated and how different processes are integrated/coupled is carried out by selecting a set of test cases. These tests involve a flat domain with idealized initial and boundary conditions, as well as simulations over the Rur catchment in Germany based upon equilibrium initial conditions for the subsurface and realistic atmospheric conditions at the boundaries. We explore and explain the differences in model response, and we discuss the pros and cons of the two approaches by emphasizing the role played by factors such as temporal subcycling and coupling frequency between model components.

  20. The Exchange of Soil Nitrite and Atmospheric HONO: a Missing Process in the Nitrogen Cycle and Atmospheric Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yafang; Su, Hang; Oswald, Robert; Behrendt, Thomas; Trebs, Ivonne; Meixner, Franz X.; Andreae, Meinrat O.; Pöschl, Ulrich

    2013-04-01

    Hydroxyl radicals (OH) are a key species in atmospheric photochemistry. In the lower atmosphere, up to ~30% of the primary OH radical production is attributed to the photolysis of nitrous acid (HONO), and field observations suggest a large missing source of HONO. The dominant sources of N(III) in soil, however, are biological nitrification and denitrification processes, which produce nitrite ions from ammonium (by nitrifying microbes) as well as from nitrate (by denitrifying microbes). We show that soil nitrite can release HONO and explain the reported strength and diurnal variation of the missing source. We also show that the soil-atmosphere exchange of N(III), though not considered in the N cycle, might result in significant amount of reactive nitrogen emission (comparable to soil NO emissions). Fertilized soils with low pH appear to be particularly strong sources of HONO and OH. Thus, agricultural activities and land-use changes may strongly influence the oxidizing capacity of the atmosphere. Because of the widespread occurrence of nitrite-producing microbes and increasing N and acid deposition, the release of HONO from soil may also be important in natural environments, including forests and boreal regions. In view of the potentially large impact on atmospheric chemistry and global environmental change, we recommend further studies of HONO release from soil nitrite and related processes in the biogeochemical cycling of N in both agricultural and natural environments. Reference: Su, H., Cheng, Y., et al., Soil Nitrite as a Source of Atmospheric HONO and OH Radicals, Science, 333, 1616-1618, 10.1126/science.1207687, 2011. Su, H., et al., The Exchange of Soil Nitrite and Atmospheric HONO: A Missing Process in the Nitrogen Cycle and Atmospheric Chemistry, NATO Science for Peace and Security Series C: Environmental Security, Springer Netherlands, 93-99, 2013.

  1. Biosphere-Atmosphere Transfer Scheme (BATS) version le as coupled to the NCAR community climate model. Technical note. [NCAR (National Center for Atmospheric Research)

    SciTech Connect

    Dickinson, R.E.; Henderson-Sellers, A.; Kennedy, P.J.

    1993-08-01

    A comprehensive model of land-surface processes has been under development suitable for use with various National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) General Circulation Models (GCMs). Special emphasis has been given to describing properly the role of vegetation in modifying the surface moisture and energy budgets. The result of these efforts has been incorporated into a boundary package, referred to as the Biosphere-Atmosphere Transfer Scheme (BATS). The current frozen version, BATS1e is a piece of software about four thousand lines of code that runs as an offline version or coupled to the Community Climate Model (CCM).

  2. The Unmanned Research Airplane Facility at the Cyprus Institute: Advanced Atmospheric Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, Manfred A.; Argyrides, Marios; Ioannou, Stelios; Keleshis, Christos

    2014-05-01

    Unmanned Aerial Systems (UASs) have been established as versatile tools for different applications, providing data and observations for atmospheric and Earth-Systems research. They provide an urgently needed link between in-situ ground based measurements and satellite remote sensing observations and are distinguished by significant versatility, flexibility and moderate operational costs. Building on an earlier project (Autonomous Flying Platforms for Atmospheric and Earth Surface Observations project; APAESO) of the Energy, Environment and Water Research Center (EEWRC) at the Cyprus Institute (APAESO is co-financed by the European Development Fund and the Republic of Cyprus through the Cyprus Research Promotion Foundation), we have built up an Unmanned Research Aircraft Facility at The Cyprus Institute (CyI-URAF). The basic components of this facility comprise four CRUISERS airplanes (ET-Air, Slovakia) as UAS platforms, a substantial range of scientific instruments to be flown on these platforms, a mobile Ground Control Station and a well-equipped workshop and calibration laboratory. The APAESO platforms are suitable to carrying out atmospheric and earth-surface observations in the (Eastern) Mediterranean (and elsewhere). They enable 3D measurements for determining physical, chemical and radiative atmospheric properties, aerosol and dust concentrations and atmospheric dynamics as well as 2D investigations into land management practices, vegetation and agricultural mapping, contaminant detection and the monitoring and assessment of hydrological parameters and processes of a given region at high spatial resolution. We will report on some of the essential modifications of the platforms and some of the instrumentation that were instrumental in preparing the research airplanes for a variety of collaborative research projects with. The first scientific mission involved the employment of a DOAS-system (Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy) in cooperation with

  3. Flow Tube Studies of Gas Phase Chemical Processes of Atmospheric Importance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molina, Mario J.

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this project is to conduct measurements of elementary reaction rate constants and photochemical parameters for processes of importance in the atmosphere. These measurements are being carried out under temperature and pressure conditions covering those applicable to the stratosphere and upper troposphere, using the chemical ionization mass spectrometry turbulent flow technique developed in our laboratory. The next section summarizes our research activities during the first year of the project, and the section that follows consists of the statement of work for the third year. Additional details concerning the projects listed in the statement of work were described in our original proposal.

  4. Infrared experiments for spaceborne planetary atmospheres research. Full report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The role of infrared sensing in atmospheric science is discussed and existing infrared measurement techniques are reviewed. Proposed techniques for measuring planetary atmospheres are criticized and recommended instrument developments for spaceborne investigations are summarized for the following phenomena: global and local radiative budget; radiative flux profiles; winds; temperature; pressure; transient and marginal atmospheres; planetary rotation and global atmospheric activity; abundances of stable constituents; vertical, lateral, and temporal distribution of abundances; composition of clouds and aerosols; radiative properties of clouds and aerosols; cloud microstructure; cloud macrostructure; and non-LTE phenomena.

  5. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report January 1–March 31, 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Voyles, JW

    2012-04-13

    Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Data Archive, where they are made available to the research community. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  6. Direct observations of the atmospheric processing of Asian mineral dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, R. C.; Guazzotti, S. A.; Sodeman, D. A.; Prather, K. A.

    2007-02-01

    the atmospheric processing of dust and generally agrees with simulated aerosol chemistry from the STEM-2K3 model. This series of novel results has important implications for improving the treatment of dust in global chemistry models and highlights a number of key processes that merit further investigation through laboratory and field studies.

  7. TRISTAR - a tracer in situ TDLAS for atmospheric research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wienhold, F. G.; Fischer, H.; Hoor, P.; Wagner, V.; Königstedt, R.; Harris, G. W.; Anders, J.; Grisar, R.; Knothe, M.; Riedel, W. J.; Lübken, F.-J.; Schilling, T.

    1998-10-01

    A novel tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer (TDLAS) called TRISTAR (tracer in situ TDLAS for atmospheric research) has been developed for airborne trace-gas measurements in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. Up to three different species can be measured simultaneously with high temporal resolution (<1 s) using up to three individual lead-salt diode lasers. The lasers are operated in a time-multiplexed mode using a novel modulation scheme that combines laser operation in a pulsed-current mode with a combination of rapid scanning and two-tone frequency modulation. The latter improves the signal-to-noise ratio of phase-sensitive detection when compared to standard lock-in techniques because of the reduction of instrument noise at higher detection frequencies. TRISTAR has been used in two-channel mode to measure CO and N2O during two airborne polar stratospheric campaigns in January and March 1997. These species were detected using integration periods of 1 s with a precision of DŽ%(3C) and a calibration accuracy of DŽ.8% during a total of 11 measurement flights up to a maximum altitude of 12.5 km. More recently all three channels have been operated simultaneously for CO, CH4, and N2O with comparable results.

  8. The Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite microwave limb sounder instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barath, F. T.; Chavez, M. C.; Cofield, R. E.; Flower, D. A.; Frerking, M. A.; Gram, M. B.; Harris, W. M.; Holden, J. R.; Jarnot, R. F.; Kloezeman, W. G.

    1993-01-01

    The microwave limb sounder (MLS) on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) is the first satellite experiment using limb sounding techniques at microwave frequencies. Primary measurement objectives are stratospheric ClO, O3, H2O, temperature, and pressure. Measurements are of thermal emission: all are performed simultaneously and continuously and are not degraded by ice clouds or volcanic aerosols. The instrument has a 1.6-m mechanically scanning antenna system and contains heterodyne radiometers in spectral bands centred near 63, 183, and 205 GHz. The radiometers operate at ambient temperature and use Schottky-diode mixers with local oscillators derived from phase-locked Gunn oscillators. Frequency tripling by varactor multipliers generates the 183- and 205-GHz local oscillators, and quasi-optical techniques inject these into the mixers. Six 15-channel filter banks spectrally resolve stratospheric thermal emission lines and produce an output spectrum every 2 s. Thermal stability is sufficient for 'total power' measurements which do not require fast chopping. Radiometric calibration, consisting of measurements of cold space and an internal target, is performed every 65-s limb scan. Instrument in-orbit performance has been excellent, and all objectives are being met.

  9. The Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite In-Flight Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodard, Stanley E.

    1997-01-01

    Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite flight data from the first 737 days after launch (September 1991) was used to investigate spacecraft disturbances and responses. The investigation included two in-flight dynamics experiments (approximately three orbits each). Orbital and configuration influences on spacecraft dynamic response were also examined. Orbital influences were due to temperature variation from crossing the Earth's terminator and variation of the solar incident energy as the orbit precessed. During the terminator crossing, the rapid ambient temperature change caused the spacecraft's two flexible appendages to experience thermal elastic bending (thermal snap). The resulting response was dependent upon the orientation of the solar array and the solar incident energy. Orbital influences were also caused by on-board and environmental disturbances and spacecraft configuration changes resulting in dynamic responses which were repeated each orbit. Configuration influences were due to solar array rotation changing spacecraft modal properties. The investigation quantified the spacecraft dynamic response produced by the solar array and high gain antenna harmonic drive disturbances. The solar array's harmonic drive output resonated two solar array modes. Friction in the solar array gear drive provided sufficient energy dissipation which prevented the solar panels from resonating catastrophically; however, the solar array vibration amplitude was excessively large. The resulting vibration had a latitude-specific pattern.

  10. Atmospheric Research -- Sensors and Science in the Stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohl, John E.; Armstrong, John C.; Larson, Shane L.

    2010-10-01

    HARBOR (High Altitude Reconnaissance Balloon for Outreach and Research) is a program in which scientific payloads are designed, constructed, and flown by students using weather balloons to reach the edge of space. Ten flights have been completed involving over forty high school and college students. Students work together to build sensor and flight systems and to analyze the resulting data. Measurements include temperature, wind, turbulence, humidity, particulates, gas concentrations, balloon and flight dynamics, etc. The HARBOR program provides a mission oriented structure that is based on aerospace industry standards. As a result, a positive employment track record is becoming established with program graduates. Similar results are being observed in graduate school applications. HARBOR is now being expanded to include tethered and short duration flights. Tethered flights at elementary schools will allow us to do air quality measurements and involve primary students in science. A new collaboration will study atmospheric inversion layers using short flights with smaller payloads that will be jettisoned at lower altitudes and quickly recovered.

  11. Aqueous Processing of Atmospheric Organic Particles in Cloud Water Collected via Aircraft Sampling.

    PubMed

    Boone, Eric J; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia; Wirth, Christopher; Shepson, Paul B; Stirm, Brian H; Pratt, Kerri A

    2015-07-21

    Cloudwater and below-cloud atmospheric particle samples were collected onboard a research aircraft during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) over a forested region of Alabama in June 2013. The organic molecular composition of the samples was studied to gain insights into the aqueous-phase processing of organic compounds within cloud droplets. High resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) with nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nano-DESI) and direct infusion electrospray ionization (ESI) were utilized to compare the organic composition of the particle and cloudwater samples, respectively. Isoprene and monoterpene-derived organosulfates and oligomers were identified in both the particles and cloudwater, showing the significant influence of biogenic volatile organic compound oxidation above the forested region. While the average O:C ratios of the organic compounds were similar between the atmospheric particle and cloudwater samples, the chemical composition of these samples was quite different. Specifically, hydrolysis of organosulfates and formation of nitrogen-containing compounds were observed for the cloudwater when compared to the atmospheric particle samples, demonstrating that cloud processing changes the composition of organic aerosol.

  12. Aqueous Processing of Atmospheric Organic Particles in Cloud Water Collected via Aircraft Sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Boone, Eric J.; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia; Wirth, Christopher; Shepson, Paul B.; Stirm, Brian H.; Pratt, Kerri A.

    2015-07-21

    Cloud water and below-cloud atmospheric particle samples were collected onboard a research aircraft during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) over a forested region of Alabama in June 2013. The organic molecular composition of the samples was studied to gain insights into the aqueous-phase processing of organic compounds within cloud droplets. High resolution mass spectrometry with nanospray desorption electrospray ionization and direct infusion electrospray ionization were utilized to compare the organic composition of the particle and cloud water samples, respectively. Isoprene and monoterpene-derived organosulfates and oligomers were identified in both the particles and cloud water, showing the significant influence of biogenic volatile organic compound oxidation above the forested region. While the average O:C ratios of the organic compounds were similar between the atmospheric particle and cloud water samples, the chemical composition of these samples was quite different. Specifically, hydrolysis of organosulfates and formation of nitrogen-containing compounds were observed for the cloud water when compared to the atmospheric particle samples, demonstrating that cloud processing changes the composition of organic aerosol.

  13. Current status of quantitative rotational spectroscopy for atmospheric research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drouin, Brian J.; Wlodarczak, Georges; Colmont, Jean-Marcel; Rohart, Francois

    2004-01-01

    Remote sensing of rotational transitions in the Earth's atmosphere has become an important method for the retrieval of geophysical temperatures, pressures and chemical composition profiles that requires accurate spectral information. This paper highlights the current status of rotational data that are useful for atmospheric measurements, with a discussion of the types the rotational lineshape measurements that are not generally available in either online repository.

  14. Research Spotlight: Sulfate isotopes explain past Antarctic atmospheric conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Mohi; Tretkoff, Ernie

    2010-12-01

    The past 230 years have seen great changes in atmospheric conditions in the Northern Hemisphere, due to pollutants released from biomass and coal burning as societies became industrialized and the fossil fuel burning that began to dominate energy consumption at the turn of the twentieth century. The changes from low pollution levels to biomass burning to fossil fuel burning are recorded in Greenland ice cores—the burning of different fuels releases chemical species that influence the oxidation capacity (or reactivity) of the atmosphere. The oxidation capacity of the atmosphere influences atmospheric concentrations of pollutants and greenhouse gases. Sulfate isotopes record this oxidation chemistry in the atmosphere, and these isotopically distinct molecules then precipitate in the Arctic's yearly snow cycles.

  15. Atmospheric mercury accumulation and washoff processes on impervious urban surfaces

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eckley, C.S.; Branfireun, B.; Diamond, M.; Van Metre, P.C.; Heitmuller, F.

    2008-01-01

    The deposition and transport of mercury (Hg) has been studied extensively in rural environments but is less understood in urbanized catchments, where elevated atmospheric Hg concentrations and impervious surfaces may efficiently deliver Hg to waterways in stormwater runoff. We determined the rate at which atmospheric Hg accumulates on windows, identified the importance of washoff in removing accumulated Hg, and measured atmospheric Hg concentrations to help understand the relationship between deposition and surface accumulation. The main study location was Toronto, Ontario. Similar samples were also collected from Austin, Texas for comparison of Hg accumulation between cities. Windows provided a good sampling surface because they are ubiquitous in urban environments and are easy to clean/blank allowing the assessment of contemporary Hg accumulation. Hg Accumulation rates were spatially variable ranging from 0.82 to 2.7 ng m-2 d-1 in Toronto and showed similar variability in Austin. The highest accumulation rate in Toronto was at the city center and was 5?? higher than the rural comparison site (0.58 ng m-2 d-1). The atmospheric total gaseous mercury (TGM) concentrations were less than 2?? higher between the rural and urban locations (1.7 ?? 0.3 and 2.7 ?? 1.1 ng m-3, respectively). The atmospheric particulate bound fraction (HgP), however, was more than 3?? higher between the rural and urban sites, which may have contributed to the higher urban Hg accumulation rates. Windows exposed to precipitation had 73 ?? 9% lower accumulation rates than windows sheltered from precipitation. Runoff collected from simulated rain events confirmed that most Hg accumulated on windows was easily removed and that most of the Hg in washoff was HgP. Our results indicate that the Hg flux from urban catchments will respond rapidly to changes in atmospheric concentrations due to the mobilization of the majority of the surface accumulated Hg during precipitation events. ?? 2008 Elsevier

  16. Nonlinear dynamics of global atmospheric and earth system processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Taiping; Verbitsky, Mikhail; Saltzman, Barry; Mann, Michael E.; Park, Jeffrey; Lall, Upmanu

    1995-01-01

    During the grant period, the authors continued ongoing studies aimed at enhancing their understanding of the operation of the atmosphere as a complex nonlinear system interacting with the hydrosphere, biosphere, and cryosphere in response to external radiative forcing. Five papers were completed with support from the grant, representing contributions in three main areas of study: (1) theoretical studies of the interactive atmospheric response to changed biospheric boundary conditions measurable from satellites; (2) statistical-observational studies of global-scale temperature variability on interannual to century time scales; and (3) dynamics of long-term earth system changes associated with ice sheet surges.

  17. Research and the planned Space Experiment Research and Processing Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Researchers perform tests at Kennedy Space Center. New facilities for such research will be provided at the Space Experiment Research Procession Laboratory (SERPL). The SERPL is a planned 100,000-square-foot laboratory that will provide expanded and upgraded facilities for hosting International Space Station experiment processing. In addition, it will provide better support for other biological and life sciences payload processing at KSC. It will serve as a magnet facility for a planned 400-acre Space Station Commerce Park.

  18. Numerical simulation of small-scale mixing processes in the upper ocean and atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druzhinin, O.; Troitskaya, Yu; Zilitinkevich, S.

    2016-02-01

    The processes of turbulent mixing and momentum and heat exchange occur in the upper ocean at depths up to several dozens of meters and in the atmospheric boundary layer within interval of millimeters to dozens of meters and can not be resolved by known large- scale climate models. Thus small-scale processes need to be parameterized with respect to large scale fields. This parameterization involves the so-called bulk coefficients which relate turbulent fluxes with large-scale fields gradients. The bulk coefficients are dependent on the properties of the small-scale mixing processes which are affected by the upper-ocean stratification and characteristics of surface and internal waves. These dependencies are not well understood at present and need to be clarified. We employ Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) as a research tool which resolves all relevant flow scales and does not require closure assumptions typical of Large-Eddy and Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes simulations (LES and RANS). Thus DNS provides a solid ground for correct parameterization of small-scale mixing processes and also can be used for improving LES and RANS closure models. In particular, we discuss the problems of the interaction between small-scale turbulence and internal gravity waves propagating in the pycnocline in the upper ocean as well as the impact of surface waves on the properties of atmospheric boundary layer over wavy water surface.

  19. Atmospheric composition affects heat- and mass-transfer processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blakely, R. L.; Nelson, W. G.

    1970-01-01

    For environmental control system functions sensitive to atmospheric composition, components are test-operated in helium-oxygen and nitrogen-oxygen mixtures, pure oxygen, and air. Transient heat- and mass-transfer tests are conducted for carbon dioxide adsorption on molecular sieve and for water vapor adsorption on silica gel.

  20. The Messy Process of Research: Dilemmas, Process, and Critique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Charlotte; Brody, Michael; Dillon, Justin; Hart, Paul; Heimlich, Joe

    2007-01-01

    The unabashedly messy aspects of the research process are often hidden from published view, and are therefore not available to encourage and instruct. The authors tell specific stories about "messy" research, arranged around: (1) evolving research questions; (2) methodology or methods surprises; (3) problematic answers; and (4)publication…

  1. Atmospheric System Research Marine Low Clouds Workshop Report, January 27-29,2016

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, M.; Wang, J.; Wood, R.

    2016-06-01

    Marine low clouds are a major determinant of the Earth?s albedo and are a major source of uncertainty in how the climate responds to changing greenhouse gas levels and anthropogenic aerosol. Marine low clouds are particularly difficult to simulate accurately in climate models, and their remote locations present a significant observational challenge. A complex set of interacting controlling processes determine the coverage, condensate loading, and microphysical and radiative properties of marine low clouds. Marine low clouds are sensitive to atmospheric aerosol in several ways. Interactions at microphysical scales involve changes in the concentration of cloud droplets and precipitation, which induce cloud dynamical impacts including changes in entrainment and mesoscale organization. Marine low clouds are also impacted by atmospheric heating changes due to absorbing aerosols. The response of marine low clouds to aerosol perturbations depends strongly upon the unperturbed aerosol-cloud state, which necessitates greater understanding of processes controlling the budget of aerosol in the marine boundary layer. Entrainment and precipitation mediate the response of low clouds to aerosols but these processes also play leading roles in controlling the aerosol budget. The U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility and Atmospheric System Research (ASR) program are making major recent investments in observational data sets from fixed and mobile sites dominated by marine low clouds. This report provides specific action items for how these measurements can be used together with process modeling to make progress on understanding and quantifying the key cloud and aerosol controlling processes in the next 5-10 years. Measurements of aerosol composition and its variation with particle size are needed to advance a quantitative, process-level understanding of marine boundary-layer aerosol budget. Quantitative precipitation estimates

  2. Atmospheric effects of stratospheric aircraft - A status report from NASA's High-Speed Research Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wesoky, Howard L.; Prather, Michael J.

    1991-01-01

    Studies have indicated that, with sufficient technology development, future high-speed civil transport aircraft could be economically competitive with long-haul subsonic aircraft. However, uncertainty about atmospheric pollution, along with community noise and sonic boom, continues to be a major concern which is being addressed in the planned six-year High-Speed Research Program begun in 1990. Building on NASA's research in atmospheric science and emissions reduction, current analytical predictions indicate that an operating range may exist at altitudes below 20 km (i.e., corresponding to a cruise Mach number of approximately 2.4) where the goal level of 5 gm equivalent NO2 emissions/kg fuel will deplete less than one percent of column ozone. Because it will not be possible to directly measure the impact of an aircraft fleet on the atmosphere, the only means of assessment will be prediction. The process of establishing credibility for the predicted effects will likely be complex and involve continued model development and testing against climatological patterns. In particular, laboratory simulation of heterogeneous chemistry and other effects, and direct measurements of well understood tracers in the troposphere and stratosphere are being used to improve the current models.

  3. Inflight data collection for ride quality and atmospheric turbulence research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kadlec, P. W.; Buckman, R. C.

    1974-01-01

    A flight test program to investigate the effects of atmospheric turbulence on passenger ride quality in large, wide-body commercial aircraft was conducted. Data were collected on a series of flight on a Boeing 747 aircraft. Atmospheric and aircraft performance data were obtained from special sensors, as well as conventional instruments and avionics systems normally available. Visual observations of meteorlogical conditions encountered were manually recorded during the flights.

  4. Concordia Multi-Process Atmospheric Studies (CoMPASs): study of the vertical structure of the Antarctic atmosphere with a synergy of different remote sensing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchini, Giovanni; Argenitini, Stefania; Baldi, Massimo; Cairo, Francesco; Calzolari, Francescopiero; Casasanta, Giampietro; Conidi, Alessandro; Del Guasta, Massimo; Di Natale, Gianluca; Federico, Stefano; Lupi, Angelo; Mazzola, Mauro; De Muro, Mauro; Palchetti, Luca; Petenko, Igor; Petkov, Boyan; Snels, Marcel; Trivellone, Giuliano; Viola, Angelo; Viterbini, Maurizio

    2014-05-01

    Concordia station, in the Dome C region, Antarctica, is the ideal site for the study of micro-physical, meteorological and chemical processes in unperturbed and extreme conditions: the relative absence of perturbations at the mesoscale allows highly representative observations of the atmosphere inside of the polar vortex, as well as the possibility of studying the micro-meteorological "asymptotic" conditions in the boundary layer. Given these privileged conditions, the interaction between the different processes will be especially noticeable. The CoMPASs (Concordia Multi-Process Atmospheric Studies) project has been developed in order to identify and characterize these feedbacks and interactions between processes, spanning across three different atmospheric regions: the boundary layer, the troposphere and the stratosphere. The main research themes follow the vertical structure of the atmosphere: - Characterization of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) in terms of dynamics, turbulence and radiation, especially during the winter period, in which the ABL has peculiar properties in terms of reduced thickness and extreme sensitivity to external forcing. - Study of the clouds in the free troposphere, which, in the region of Dome C, shows a remarkable variability, both daily and seasonal, and therefore requires continuous monitoring to quantify its interactions with the neighbouring atmospheric layers. - Study of the stratospheric processes within the Antarctic polar vortex, as ozone chemistry and polar stratospheric clouds, carried out throughout the year in order to constantly follow the evolution of the vortex itself. CoMPASs makes use of a strong observational component, deploying an array of different instruments all characterized by the vertical remote sensing measurement technique: stratospheric and tropospheric lidars, UV and middle/far-infrared spectroradiometers, and a high-resolution mini-sodar. The turbulence in the surface layer will be monitored with fast

  5. Research Review: Walter Orr Roberts on the Atmosphere, Global Pollution and Weather Modification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobsen, Sally

    1973-01-01

    Global Atmospheric Research Program is envisaged to study various aspects of the environment for the whole globe. Describes programs undertaken and the international problems involved in implementing results of such research on a global level. (PS)

  6. Pyrgeometer Calibration for DOE-Atmospheric System Research Program Using NREL Method (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Reda, I.; Stoffel, T.

    2010-03-15

    Presented at the DOE-Atmospheric System Research Program, Science Team Meeting, 15-19 March 2010, Bethesda, Maryland. The presentation: Pyrgeometer Calibration for DOE-Atmospheric System Research program using NREL Method - was presented by Ibrahim Reda and Tom Stoffel on March 15, 2010 at the 2010 ASR Science Team Meeting. March 15-19, 2010, Bethesda, Maryland.

  7. A Decade of Field Changing Atmospheric Aerosol Research: Outcomes of EPA’s STAR Program

    EPA Science Inventory

    Conference: Gordon Research Conference in Atmospheric Chemistry, July 28 – August 2, 2013, VermontPresentation Type: PosterTitle: An Analysis of EPA’s STAR Program and a Decade of Field Changing Research in Atmospheric AerosolsAuthors: Kristina M. Wagstrom1,2, Sherri ...

  8. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1987 to the DOE Office of Energy Research: Part 3, Atmospheric sciences

    SciTech Connect

    Elderkin, C.E.

    1988-08-01

    Currently, the broad goals of atmospheric research at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) are to describe and predict the nature and fate of atmospheric contaminants and to develop an understanding of the atmospheric processes contributing to their distribution on local, regional, and continental scales in the air, in clouds, and on the surface. For several years, studies of transport and diffusion have been extended to mesoscale areas of complex terrain. Atmospheric cleansing research has expanded to a regional scale, multilaboratory investigation of precipitation scavenging processes involving the transformation and wet deposition of chemicals composing ''acid rain.'' In addition, the redistribution and long-range transport of transformed contaminants passing through clouds is recognized as a necessary extension of our research to even larger scales in the future. A few long-range tracer experiments conducted in recent years and the special opportunity for measuring the transport and removal of radioactivity following the Chernobyl reactor accident of April 1986 offer important initial data bases for studying atmospheric processes at these super-regional scales.

  9. Atmospheric boundary layer processes during a total solar eclipse

    SciTech Connect

    SethuRaman, S.; Prabhu, A.; Narahari Rao, K.; Narasimha, R.

    1980-01-01

    The total solar eclipse that occurred over the southern part of India on February 16, 1980, gave a unique opportunity to study the earth's atmospheric boundary layer. The meteorological experiments during the 1980 solar eclipse were conducted at Raichur, India (16/sup 0/12'N, 77/sup 0/21'E) located in the state of Karnataka, approximately 400-m above sea level. The main objective was to determine the changes in the earth's atmosphere during and immediately after the eclipse. The goal was to study the changes in the momentum and heat fluxes in the boundary layer due to the eclipse. Measurements were made for 2 days prior to and 1 day after the day of the eclipse to determine background characteristics of the boundary layer which might be site-dependent.

  10. Process-Product Research: A Cornerstone in Educational Effectiveness Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Creemers, Bert; Kyriakides, Leonidas

    2015-01-01

    This article links the contribution of process-product studies in developing the theoretical framework of educational effectiveness by pointing out the importance of teacher behavior in the classroom. The role that Jere Brophy played in this evolving research is described within the various phases of teacher effectiveness research. Process-product…

  11. Eddy processes in the general circulation of the Jovian atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leovy, Conway

    1986-01-01

    Two fundamentally different views of the general circulation of Jovian atmospheres have emerged. According to one view, the observed jet streams at the cloud tops are controlled by the vorticity transfers of small scale eddies generated by planetary wave instabilities within a shallow atmospheric layer. According to the alternate point of view, the zonal jets are surface manifestations of deep interior convection organized into cylindrical motion with axes parallel to the planetary rotation axis. Both approaches may be considered in the context of the very different roles assumed by the potential vorticity. A possible reconciliation of the two kinds of dynamical systems is considered in which the interior motion is overlaid with a statically stable cappling layer driven by turbulent energy injection from below. A simple model for the eddy driving of quasi-geostrophic dynamics in the capping layer is presented which is consistent with the tentative evidence for up-gradient momentum flux on Jupiter and IRIS observations of thermal contrast correlations with cyclonic and anticyclonic shear zones. Certain synoptic-scale cloud features in Jupiter's atmosphere are interpreted as breaking waves, which may also influence the lateral mixing of tracers such as the ortho-para hydrogen ratio.

  12. Facilitating the Research Process for Struggling Readers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, J.; Bradley, K. Sue

    Too often students enter high school without being exposed to the research process and are often overwhelmed by the complex task of selecting and narrowing of a topic, developing research questions, writing the text, and appropriately documenting sources. This paper delineates specific learning activities that will simplify the process to make it…

  13. The Significance of Land-Atmosphere Processes in the Earth System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suni, T.; Kulmala, M. T.; Guenther, A. B.

    2012-12-01

    The land-atmosphere interface is where humans primarily operate. Humans modify the land surface in many ways that influence the fluxes of energy and trace gases between land and atmosphere. Their emissions change the chemical composition of the atmosphere and anthropogenic aerosols change the radiative balance of the globe directly by scattering sunlight back to space and indirectly by changing the properties of clouds. Feedback loops among all these processes, land, the atmosphere, and biogeochemical cycles of nutrients and trace gases extend the human influence even further. Over the last decade, the importance of land-atmosphere processes and feedbacks in the Earth System has been shown on many levels and with multiple approaches, and a number of publications have shown the crucial role of the terrestrial ecosystems as regulators of climate [1-6]. Modellers have clearly shown the effect of missing land cover changes and other feedback processes and regional characteristics in current climate models and recommended actions to improve them [7-11]. Unprecedented insights of the long-term net impacts of aerosols on clouds and precipitation have also been provided [12-14]. Land-cover change has been emphasized with model intercomparison projects that showed that realistic land-use representation was essential in land surface modelling [11, 15]. Crucially important tools in this research have been the networks of long-term flux stations and large-scale land-atmosphere observation platforms that are also beginning to combine remote sensing techniques with ground observations [16-20]. Human influence has always been an important part of land-atmosphere science but in order to respond to the new challenges of global sustainability, closer ties with social science and economics groups will be necessary to produce realistic estimates of land use and anthropogenic emissions by analysing future population increase, migration patterns, food production allocation, land

  14. Atmospheric Research and Public Outreach Activities at Grandfather Mountain, North Carolina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, B.; Pope, J.; Kelly, G.; Sherman, J. P.; Taubman, B.

    2012-12-01

    Promoting scientific and public understanding of mountain meteorological processes, particularly in the context of climate variability and change, remains a formidable challenge. Mountain environments present considerable difficulties in the collection of surface and atmospheric observations due to complex topography and resulting high spatial and temporal variability of the atmospheric processes. A collaborative partnership between Appalachian State University (ASU) and the Grandfather Mountain Stewardship Foundation (GMSF) in the southern Appalachian Mountains of North Carolina has provided an outstanding opportunity to integrate atmospheric research and outreach activities. The NASA-funded Climate Action Network through Direct Observations and Outreach (CAN-DOO) project directly supports the research and education activities and places them in the context of climate variability and change. This paper introduces the manual observations and citizen science activities, automated meteorological measurements, and public outreach initiatives on Grandfather Mountain and presents preliminary findings. In support of project objectives, GMSF staff makes daily measurements of precipitation, snow water equivalent, snow depth, and aerosol optical depth, while also encouraging citizen scientists to participate in the daily meteorological measurements. Team members have developed real-time displays of meteorological conditions for the two main visitor's centers and website, and have also created interactive climate science public displays. ASU scientists and GMSF staff have worked together to install and operate two research-quality meteorological stations at 1609 m asl that measure temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and direction, pressure, precipitation, and present weather. Preliminary results of research activities suggest that extreme wind gusts >50 m s -1 and severe icing due to riming and freezing rain are a frequent occurrence on Grandfather Mountain

  15. Developing Qualitative Research Questions: A Reflective Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agee, Jane

    2009-01-01

    The reflective and interrogative processes required for developing effective qualitative research questions can give shape and direction to a study in ways that are often underestimated. Good research questions do not necessarily produce good research, but poorly conceived or constructed questions will likely create problems that affect all…

  16. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report October 1–December 31, 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Voyles, JW

    2012-01-09

    Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  17. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1–September 30, 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Voyles, JW

    2011-10-10

    Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  18. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report: October 1 - December 31, 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Sisterson, DL

    2011-03-02

    Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  19. Automatic processing of atmospheric CO2 and CH4 mole fractions at the ICOS Atmosphere Thematic Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazan, Lynn; Tarniewicz, Jérôme; Ramonet, Michel; Laurent, Olivier; Abbaris, Amara

    2016-09-01

    The Integrated Carbon Observation System Atmosphere Thematic Centre (ICOS ATC) automatically processes atmospheric greenhouse gases mole fractions of data coming from sites of the ICOS network. Daily transferred raw data files are automatically processed and archived. Data are stored in the ICOS atmospheric database, the backbone of the system, which has been developed with an emphasis on the traceability of the data processing. Many data products, updated daily, explore the data through different angles to support the quality control of the dataset performed by the principal operators in charge of the instruments. The automatic processing includes calibration and water vapor corrections as described in the paper. The mole fractions calculated in near-real time (NRT) are automatically revaluated as soon as a new instrument calibration is processed or when the station supervisors perform quality control. By analyzing data from 11 sites, we determined that the average calibration corrections are equal to 1.7 ± 0.3 µmol mol-1 for CO2 and 2.8 ± 3 nmol mol-1 for CH4. These biases are important to correct to avoid artificial gradients between stations that could lead to error in flux estimates when using atmospheric inversion techniques. We also calculated that the average drift between two successive calibrations separated by 15 days amounts to ±0.05 µmol mol-1 and ±0.7 nmol mol-1 for CO2 and CH4, respectively. Outliers are generally due to errors in the instrument configuration and can be readily detected thanks to the data products provided by the ATC. Several developments are still ongoing to improve the processing, including automated spike detection and calculation of time-varying uncertainties.

  20. Chemical Atmosphere-Snow-Sea Ice Interactions: defining future research in the field, lab and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, Markus

    2015-04-01

    The air-snow-sea ice system plays an important role in the global cycling of nitrogen, halogens, trace metals or carbon, including greenhouse gases (e.g. CO2 air-sea flux), and therefore influences also climate. Its impact on atmospheric composition is illustrated for example by dramatic ozone and mercury depletion events which occur within or close to the sea ice zone (SIZ) mostly during polar spring and are catalysed by halogens released from SIZ ice, snow or aerosol. Recent field campaigns in the high Arctic (e.g. BROMEX, OASIS) and Antarctic (Weddell sea cruises) highlight the importance of snow on sea ice as a chemical reservoir and reactor, even during polar night. However, many processes, participating chemical species and their interactions are still poorly understood and/or lack any representation in current models. Furthermore, recent lab studies provide a lot of detail on the chemical environment and processes but need to be integrated much better to improve our understanding of a rapidly changing natural environment. During a 3-day workshop held in Cambridge/UK in October 2013 more than 60 scientists from 15 countries who work on the physics, chemistry or biology of the atmosphere-snow-sea ice system discussed research status and challenges, which need to be addressed in the near future. In this presentation I will give a summary of the main research questions identified during this workshop as well as ways forward to answer them through a community-based interdisciplinary approach.

  1. The Effects of Atmospheric Processes on Tehran Smog Forming

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, H; Cohen, D; Babazadeh, M; Rokni, L

    2012-01-01

    Air pollution is one of the most important problems in urban areas that always threaten citizen’s health. Photochemical smog is one of the main factors of air pollution in large cities like Tehran. Usually smog is not only a part of nature, but is being analyzed as an independent matter, which highly affects on the nature. It has been used as relationship between atmospheric elements such as temperature, pressure, relative humidity, wind speed with inversion in the time of smog forming and weather map in 500 Hpa level during 9 years descriptive static by using correlation coefficient in this analyze. Results show that there is a meaningful correlation between atmospheric elements and smog forming. This relation is seen between monthly average of these elements and monthly average of smog forming. However, when temperature decreases, corresponding pressure will increase and result of this will be smog forming. Usually smog increases in cold months of year due to enter cold high pressure air masses in Iran during December and January that is simultaneous with decreasing temperature and air pressure increases and inversion height distance decreases from the earth surface which cause to integrate air pollution under its surface, will cause to form smog in Tehran. It shows a meaningful and strong relation, based on resultant relations by correlation coefficient from inversion height and smog forming, so that obtained figure is more than 60% . PMID:23113173

  2. Modelling aerosol processes related to the atmospheric dispersion of sarin.

    PubMed

    Kukkonen, J; Riikonen, K; Nikmo, J; Jäppinen, A; Nieminen, K

    2001-08-17

    We have developed mathematical models for evaluating the atmospheric dispersion of selected chemical warfare agents (CWA), including the evaporation and settling of contaminant liquid droplets. The models and numerical results presented may be utilised for designing protection and control measures against the conceivable use of CWA's. The model AERCLOUD (AERosol CLOUD) was extended to treat two nerve agents, sarin and VX, and the mustard agent. This model evaluates the thermodynamical evolution of a five-component aerosol mixture, consisting of two-component droplets together with the surrounding three-component gas. We have performed numerical computations with this model on the evaporation and settling of airborne sarin droplets in characteristic dispersal and atmospheric conditions. In particular, we have evaluated the maximum radii (r(M)) of a totally evaporating droplet, in terms of the ambient temperature and contaminant vapour concentration. The radii r(M) range from approximately 15-80 microm for sarin droplets for the selected ambient conditions and initial heights. We have also evaluated deposition fractions in terms of the initial droplet size.

  3. The effects of atmospheric processes on tehran smog forming.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, H; Cohen, D; Babazadeh, M; Rokni, L

    2012-01-01

    Air pollution is one of the most important problems in urban areas that always threaten citizen's health. Photochemical smog is one of the main factors of air pollution in large cities like Tehran. Usually smog is not only a part of nature, but is being analyzed as an independent matter, which highly affects on the nature. It has been used as relationship between atmospheric elements such as temperature, pressure, relative humidity, wind speed with inversion in the time of smog forming and weather map in 500 Hpa level during 9 years descriptive static by using correlation coefficient in this analyze. Results show that there is a meaningful correlation between atmospheric elements and smog forming. This relation is seen between monthly average of these elements and monthly average of smog forming. However, when temperature decreases, corresponding pressure will increase and result of this will be smog forming. Usually smog increases in cold months of year due to enter cold high pressure air masses in Iran during December and January that is simultaneous with decreasing temperature and air pressure increases and inversion height distance decreases from the earth surface which cause to integrate air pollution under its surface, will cause to form smog in Tehran. It shows a meaningful and strong relation, based on resultant relations by correlation coefficient from inversion height and smog forming, so that obtained figure is more than 60% .

  4. Planetary Research Center. [astronomical photography of planetary surfaces and atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baum, W. A.; Millis, R. L.; Bowell, E. L. G.

    1974-01-01

    Extensive Earth-based photography of Mars, Jupiter, and Venus is presented which monitors the atmospheric and/or surface changes that take place day to day. Color pictures are included of the 1973 dust storm on Mars, showing the daily cycle of the storm's regeneration. Martian topography, and the progress of the storm is examined. Areas most affected by the storm are summarized.

  5. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1989 to the DOE (Department of Energy) Office of Energy Research - Part 3: Atmospheric Sciences

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-06-01

    This 1989 Annual Report from Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to the US Department of Energy (DOE) describes research in environment, safety, and health conducted during fiscal year 1989. The report again consists of five parts, each in a separate volume. This volume contains research in the atmospheric sciences. Currently, the broad goals of atmospheric research at PNL are to describe and predict the nature and fate of atmospheric contaminants and to develop an understanding of the atmospheric processes contributing to their distribution on local, regional, continental, and global scales in the air, in clouds, and on the surface. The redistribution and long-range transport of transformed contaminants passing through clouds is recognized as a necessary extension of our research to even larger scales in the future. Eventually, large-scale experiments on cloud processing and redistribution of contaminants will be integrated into the national program on global change, investigating how energy pollutants affect aerosols and clouds and the transfer of radiant energy through them. As the significance of this effect becomes clear, its global impact on climate will be studied through experimental and modeling research. The description of ongoing atmospheric research at PNL is organized in terms of the following study areas: atmospheric studies in complex terrain, large-scale atmospheric transport and processing of emissions, and climate change. This report describes the progress in FY 1989 in each of these areas. A divider page summarizes the goals of each area and lists project titles that support research activities. 9 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Air Enquirer's multi-sensor boxes as a tool for High School Education and Atmospheric Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morguí, Josep-Anton; Font, Anna; Cañas, Lidia; Vázquez-García, Eusebi; Gini, Andrea; Corominas, Ariadna; Àgueda, Alba; Lobo, Agustin; Ferraz, Carlos; Nofuentes, Manel; Ulldemolins, Delmir; Roca, Alex; Kamnang, Armand; Grossi, Claudia; Curcoll, Roger; Batet, Oscar; Borràs, Silvia; Occhipinti, Paola; Rodó, Xavier

    2016-04-01

    An educational tool was designed with the aim of making more comprehensive the research done on Greenhouse Gases (GHGs) in the ClimaDat Spanish network of atmospheric observation stations (www.climadat.es). This tool is called Air Enquirer and it consist of a multi-sensor box. It is envisaged to build more than two hundred boxes to yield them to the Spanish High Schools through the Education department (www.educaixa.com) of the "Obra Social 'La Caixa'", who funds this research. The starting point for the development of the Air Enquirers was the experience at IC3 (www.ic3.cat) in the CarboSchools+ FP7 project (www.carboschools.cat, www.carboschools.eu). The Air Enquirer's multi-sensor box is based in Arduino's architecture and contains sensors for CO2, temperature, relative humidity, pressure, and both infrared and visible luminance. The Air Enquirer is designed for taking continuous measurements. Every Air Enquirer ensemble of measurements is used to convert values to standard units (water content in ppmv, and CO2 in ppmv_dry). These values are referred to a calibration made with Cavity Ring Down Spectrometry (Picarro®) under different temperature, pressure, humidity and CO2 concentrations. Multiple sets of Air Enquirers are intercalibrated for its use in parallel during the experiments. The different experiments proposed to the students will be outdoor (observational) or indoor (experimental, in the lab) focusing on understanding the biogeochemistry of GHGs in the ecosystems (mainly CO2), the exchange (flux) of gases, the organic matter production, respiration and decomposition processes, the influence of the anthropogenic activities on the gases (and particles) exchanges, and their interaction with the structure and composition of the atmosphere (temperature, water content, cooling and warming processes, radiative forcing, vertical gradients and horizontal patterns). In order to ensure Air Enquirers a high-profile research performance the experimental designs

  7. NOAA Utilization of the Global Hawk Unmanned Aircraft for Atmospheric Research and Forecast Improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wick, G. A.; Hood, R. E.; Black, M. L.; Spackman, J. R.; Ralph, F. M.; Intrieri, J. M.; Hock, T. F.; Neiman, P. J.

    2014-12-01

    High altitude, long endurance unmanned aircraft provide a tremendous new capability for monitoring the atmosphere in support of weather research and forecast improvement. The NOAA Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) program is collaborating with NASA on the use of their Global Hawk (GH) aircraft for research into better understanding and forecasting high-impact weather events. NOAA has participated in multiple field campaigns either in partnership with NASA including the Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP, 2010) and the Hurricane and Severe Storm Sentinel (HS3, 2011-2014) experiments, or under NOAA leadership during the Winter Storms and Pacific Atmospheric Rivers (WISPAR, 2011) experiment. This past year, NOAA began a 3-year project, Sensing Hazards with Operational Unmanned Technology (SHOUT), to quantify the influence of UAS data on high-impact weather prediction and assess the operational effectiveness of UAS to help mitigate the risk of potential satellite observing gaps. The NOAA UAS system partnered with the National Center for Atmospheric Research in the development of a dropsonde system for the GH which has been flown along with other remote sensing instrumentation. This presentation summarizes our key results to date and describes our planned activities over the next two years. Flights during WISPAR provided measurements of water vapor transport within atmospheric rivers for evaluation of numerical weather prediction forecasts and analyses. A flight sampling the Arctic atmosphere north of Alaska included the first dropsondes released in the Arctic since the 1950's and extensive measurements of boundary-layer variability over an ocean-ice lead feature. Assimilation of GH dropsonde data collected in the environment around tropical storms during HS3 has demonstrated significant positive forecast improvements. Data are also being employed in the validation of multiple satellite-derived products. In SHOUT, campaigns are planned targeting Atlantic

  8. Modeling of atmospheric iron processing carried by mineral dust and its deposition to ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nickovic, Slobodan; Vukovic, Ana; Vujadinovic, Mirjam

    2014-05-01

    Relatively insoluble iron in dust originating from desert soils increases its solubility after Fe carried by mineral dust is chemically processed by the atmosphere. After dust is deposited deposition to the ocean, soluble Fe as a nutrient could enhance the marine primary production. The atmospheric dust cycle is driven by the atmospheric processes often of smaller, meso-scales. The soil mineralogy of dust emitted from sources determines also how much Fe in the aerosol will be finding. Once Fe is exposed to the atmospheric processes, the atmospheric radiation, clouds and polluted air will chemically affect the iron in dust. Global dust-iron models, having typical horizontal resolutions of 100-300 km which are mostly used to numerically simulate the fate of iron in the atmosphere can provide rather global picture of the dust and iron transport, but not details. Such models often introduce simplistic approximation on the Fe content in dust-productive soils. To simulate the Fe processing we instead implemented a high resolution regional atmospheric dust-iron model with detailed 1km global map for the geographic distribution of Fe content in soil. We also introduced a parameterization of the Fe processing caused by dust mineralogy, cloud processes and solar radiation. We will present results from simulation experiments in order to explore the model capability to reproduce major observed patterns of deposited Fe into the Atlantic cruises.

  9. Summary Report of the Atmospheric Modeling and Analysis Division's Research Activities for 2010

    EPA Science Inventory

    The research presented here was performed by the Atmospheric Modeling and Analysis Division (AMAD) of the National Exposure Research Laboratory in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA’s) Office of Research and Development in Research Triangle Park, NC. The Division lea...

  10. Summary Report of the Atmospheric Modeling and Analysis Division's Research Activities for 2009

    EPA Science Inventory

    The research presented here was performed by the Atmospheric Modeling and Analysis Division (AMAD) under the National Exposure Research Laboratory in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA’s) Office of Research and Development in Research Triangle Park, NC. The Division ...

  11. Morphology and mixing state of atmospheric particles: Links to optical properties and cloud processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    China, Swarup

    Atmospheric particles are ubiquitous in Earth's atmosphere and impact the environment and the climate while affecting human health and Earth's radiation balance, and degrading visibility. Atmospheric particles directly affect our planet's radiation budget by scattering and absorbing solar radiation, and indirectly by interacting with clouds. Single particle morphology (shape, size and internal structure) and mixing state (coating by organic and inorganic material) can significantly influence the particle optical properties as well as various microphysical processes, involving cloud-particle interactions and including heterogeneous ice nucleation and water uptake. Conversely, aerosol cloud processing can affect the morphology and mixing of the particles. For example, fresh soot has typically an open fractal-like structure, but aging and cloud processing can restructure soot into more compacted shapes, with different optical and ice nucleation properties. During my graduate research, I used an array of electron microscopy and image analysis tools to study morphology and mixing state of a large number of individual particles collected during several field and laboratory studies. To this end, I investigated various types of particles such as tar balls (spherical carbonaceous particles emitted during biomass burning) and dust particles, but with a special emphasis on soot particles. In addition, I used the Stony Brook ice nucleation cell facility to investigate heterogeneous ice nucleation and water uptake by long-range transported particles collected at the Pico Mountain Observatory, in the Archipelago of the Azores. Finally, I used ice nucleation data from the SAAS (Soot Aerosol Aging Study) chamber study at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to understand the effects that ice nucleation and supercooled water processing has on the morphology of residual soot particles. Some highlights of our findings and implications are discussed next. We found that the

  12. Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) in atmospheric research and satellite validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitnikov, Nikolay; Borisov, Yuriy; Akmulin, Dimitry; Chekulaev, Igor; Efremov, Denis; Sitnikova, Vera; Ulanovsky, Alexey; Popovicheva, Olga

    The perspectives of the development of methods and facilities based on UAV for atmospheric investigations are considered. Some aspects of these methods applications are discussed. Developments of the experimental samples of UAV onboard equipment for measurements of atmospheric parameters carried out in Central Aerological Observatory are presented. Hardware system for the UAV is developed. The results of measurements of the spatial distributions of the thermodynamic parameters and the concentrations of some gas species onboard of remotely piloted and unmanned aerial vehicles obtained in field tests are presented. The development can be used for satellite data validation, as well as operative environmental monitoring of contaminated areas in particular, chemical plants, natural and industrial disasters territories, areas and facilities for space purposes , etc.

  13. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report January 1 – March 31, 2007

    SciTech Connect

    DL Sisterson

    2007-04-01

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  14. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report - October 1 - December 31, 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Sisterson, DL

    2009-01-15

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  15. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report October 1 - December 31, 2007

    SciTech Connect

    DL Sisterson

    2008-01-08

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  16. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report - January 1 - March 31, 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Sisterson, DL

    2008-04-01

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  17. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report April 1 - June 30, 2008

    SciTech Connect

    DL Sisterson

    2008-06-01

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  18. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1 - September 30, 2007

    SciTech Connect

    DL Sisterson

    2007-10-01

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  19. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report January 1 - March 31, 2009

    SciTech Connect

    DL Sisterson

    2009-03-17

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  20. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report - July 1 - September 30, 2008

    SciTech Connect

    DL Sisterson

    2008-09-30

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  1. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report April 1 - June 30, 2007

    SciTech Connect

    DL Sisterson

    2007-07-01

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  2. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1 – September 30, 2006

    SciTech Connect

    DL Sisterson

    2006-10-01

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year dating back to 1998.

  3. Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite Validation Workshop III: Temperature and Constituents Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grose, William L. (Editor); Gille, John (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    The Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) was launched in September 1991. Since that time data have been retrieved continuously from the various instruments on the UARS spacecraft. These data have been processed by the respective instrument science teams and subsequently archived in the UARS Central Data Handling Facility (CDHF) at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland. This report contains the proceedings from one of the three workshops held to evaluate the progress in validating UARS constituents and temperature data and to document the quality of that data. The first workshop was held in Oxford, England, in March 1992, five and one-half months after UARS launch. The second workshop was held in Boulder, Colorado in October 1992. Since launch, the various data have undergone numerous revisions. In many instances these revisions are a result of data problems identified during the validation workshops. Thus, the formal validation effort is a continually ongoing process.

  4. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1 – September 30, 2009

    SciTech Connect

    DL Sisterson

    2009-10-15

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data then are sent approximately daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by 1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and 2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  5. Sustainability Research: Biofuels, Processes and Supply Chains

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presentation will talk about sustainability at the EPA, summarily covering high level efforts and focusing in more detail on research in metrics for liquid biofuels and tools to evaluate sustainable processes. The presentation will also briefly touch on a new area of research, t...

  6. The UARS (Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite): A program to study global ozone change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    NASA's Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) program, its goals and objectives are described. Also included are its significance to upper atmosphere science, the experimental and theoretical investigations that comprise it, and the compelling issues of global change, driven by human activities, that led NASA to plan and implement it.

  7. 76 FR 64327 - Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research Draft Strategic Plan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-18

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research Draft... Administration NOAA), Department of Department of Commerce (DOC). ACTION: Notice of availability and request for..., November 11, 2011. ADDRESSES: Public comments must be submitted to OAR.Plan@noaa.gov . The draft...

  8. Development of Data Processing and Analysis Tools for Atmospheric Radiation Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guillet, N.; Stassinopoulos, E. G.; Stauffer, C. A.; Dumas, M.; Palau, J.-M.; Calvet, M.-C.

    2001-01-01

    This paper reports on the data processing methods and techniques of measurements made by several miniature radiation spectrometers flying on different types of carriers within the Earth's atmosphere at aviation and balloon altitudes.

  9. Introduction of Atmospheric Pressure Plasma to Aqueous Detergent Processes.

    PubMed

    Gotoh, Keiko; Kanasaki, Yu; Uchinomaru, Haruka

    2015-01-01

    The effects of exposure of polymer surfaces to atmospheric pressure plasma (APP) on detergency were investigated from the viewpoint of pretreatment to cleaning in aqueous systems using three PET substrates: film, mesh, and fabric. The PET substrates were soiled with stearic acid as a model oily contaminant, and were treated with the APP jet immediately before cleaning. Stir washing in aqueous solutions with and without alkali or anionic surfactant was performed, and then the detergency was evaluated from the microscopic image analysis or surface reflectance measurement. For all PET samples and detergent solutions, APP exposure was found to promote the removal of stearic acid. Contact angle measurements showed that APP exposure enhanced the hydrophilicity of PET and stearic acid. The increase in the surface oxygen concentration on PET and stearic acid due to the APP exposure was also observed by XPS analysis. The simultaneous oxidation of the PET substrate and stearic acid soil by the APP pretreatment resulted in detergency improvement via surface hydrophilization. Furthermore, microscopic observations suggested that the collapse of crystallized stearic acid deposited on the PET substrate by APP heating facilitated its removal. In situ detergency evaluation by a quartz crystal microbalance technique confirmed that the removal of stearic acid from the PET substrate was promoted by the APP exposure. The experimental findings of this study demonstrate the effectiveness of the APP exposure before cleaning in aqueous solutions.

  10. Laboratory Studies of Processing of Carbonaceous Aerosols by Atmospheric Oxidants/Hygroscopicity and CCN Activity of Secondary & Processed Primary Organic Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Ziemann, P.J.; Arey, J.; Atkinson, R.; Kreidenweis, S.M.; Petters, M.D.

    2012-06-13

    The atmosphere is composed of a complex mixture of gases and suspended microscopic aerosol particles. The ability of these particles to take up water (hygroscopicity) and to act as nuclei for cloud droplet formation significantly impacts aerosol light scattering and absorption, and cloud formation, thereby influencing air quality, visibility, and climate in important ways. A substantial, yet poorly characterized component of the atmospheric aerosol is organic matter. Its major sources are direct emissions from combustion processes, which are referred to as primary organic aerosol (POA), or in situ processes in which volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are oxidized in the atmosphere to low volatility reaction products that subsequent condense to form particles that are referred to as secondary organic aerosol (SOA). POA and VOCs are emitted to the atmosphere from both anthropogenic and natural (biogenic) sources. The overall goal of this experimental research project was to conduct laboratory studies under simulated atmospheric conditions to investigate the effects of the chemical composition of organic aerosol particles on their hygroscopicity and cloud condensation nucleation (CCN) activity, in order to develop quantitative relationships that could be used to more accurately incorporate aerosol-cloud interactions into regional and global atmospheric models. More specifically, the project aimed to determine the products, mechanisms, and rates of chemical reactions involved in the processing of organic aerosol particles by atmospheric oxidants and to investigate the relationships between the chemical composition of organic particles (as represented by molecule sizes and the specific functional groups that are present) and the hygroscopicity and CCN activity of oxidized POA and SOA formed from the oxidation of the major classes of anthropogenic and biogenic VOCs that are emitted to the atmosphere, as well as model hydrocarbons. The general approach for this project was

  11. The portable atmospheric research interferometric spectrometer for the infrared, PARIS-IR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Dejian; Walker, Kaley A.; Sung, Keeyoon; Boone, Chris D.; Soucy, Marc-Andre; Bernath, Peter F.

    2007-01-01

    A new compact, portable Fourier transform spectrometer, called the Portable Atmospheric Research Interferometric Spectrometer for the Infrared (PARIS-IR), has been built for atmospheric remote sensing. The first comprehensive description of the configuration and performance of this instrument for ground-based and balloon-borne operation is provided. Sample atmospheric absorption spectra and representative results observed at the Waterloo Atmospheric Observatory (WAO) are given. The good agreement between PARIS IR, Brewer spectrophotometer, and ozonesonde measurements of the column density of ozone at mid-latitudes demonstrate the performance and the reliability of the instrument.

  12. Atmospheric emission of polychlorinated naphthalenes from iron ore sintering processes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guorui; Zheng, Minghui; Du, Bing; Nie, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Bing; Liu, Wenbin; Li, Cheng; Hu, Jicheng

    2012-10-01

    Iron ore sintering processes constitute significant sources of dioxins, and studies have confirmed a close correlation between polychlorinated naphthalenes (PCNs) and dioxin formation. Thus, iron ore sintering processes are thought to be a potential source of PCNs, although intensive investigations on PCN emissions from sintering processes have not been carried out. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to qualify and quantify PCN emissions from nine sintering plants operating on different industrial scales. PCN concentrations ranged from 3 to 983 ng m(-3) (0.4-23.3 pg TEQ(PCN) m(-3)) and emission factors ranged from 14 to 1749 μg t(-1) (0.5-41.5 ng TEQ(PCN) t(-1)), with a geometric mean of 84 μg t(-1) (2.1 ng TEQ(PCN) t(-1)). The estimated annual emission of PCNs from sintering processes in China was 1390 mg TEQ(PCN). These figures will assist in the development of a PCN emissions inventory. Regarding emission characteristics, PCNs mainly comprised low-chlorinated homologs. The ratios of several characteristic PCN congeners were also measured and compared with those from other sources. Taken together, these results may provide useful information for identifying the sources of PCNs produced by iron ore sintering processes.

  13. Research and the planned Space Experiment Research and Processing Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Original photo and caption dated October 8, 1991: 'Plant researchers Lisa Ruffe and Neil Yorio prepare to harvest a crop of Waldann's Green Lettuce from KSC's Biomass Production Chamber (BPC). KSC researchers have grown several different crops in the BPC to determine which plants will better produce food, water and oxygen on long-duration space missions.' Their work is an example of the type of life sciences research that will be conducted at the Space Experiment Research Procession Laboratory (SERPL). The SERPL is a planned 100,000-square-foot laboratory that will provide expanded and upgraded facilities for hosting International Space Station experiment processing. In addition, it will provide better support for other biological and life sciences payload processing at KSC. It will serve as a magnet facility for a planned 400-acre Space Station Commerce Park.

  14. Research and the planned Space Experiment Research and Processing Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Original photo and caption dated October 8, 1991: 'Plant researchers Neil Yorio and Lisa Ruffe prepare to harvest a crop of Waldann's Green Lettuce from KSC's Biomass Production Chamber (BPC). KSC researchers have grown several different crops in the BPC to determine which plants will better produce food, water and oxygen on long-duration space missions.' Their work is an example of the type of life sciences research that will be conducted at the Space Experiment Research Procession Laboratory (SERPL). The SERPL is a planned 100,000-square-foot laboratory that will provide expanded and upgraded facilities for hosting International Space Station experiment processing. In addition, it will provide better support for other biological and life sciences payload processing at KSC. It will serve as a magnet facility for a planned 400-acre Space Station Commerce Park.

  15. Research and the planned Space Experiment Research and Processing Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Original photo and caption dated June 22, 1988: 'A dwarf wheat variety known as Yecoro Rojo flourishes in KSC's Biomass Production Chamber. Researchers are gathering information on the crop's ability to produce food, water and oxygen, and then remove carbon dioxide. The confined quarters associated with space travel require researchers to focus on smaller plants that yield proportionately large amounts of biomass. This wheat crop takes about 85 days to grow before harvest.' Plant experiments such as this are the type of life sciences research that will be conducted at the Space Experiment Research Procession Laboratory (SERPL). The SERPL is a planned 100,000-square-foot laboratory that will provide expanded and upgraded facilities for hosting International Space Station experiment processing. In addition, it will provide better support for other biological and life sciences payload processing at KSC. It will serve as a magnet facility for a planned 400-acre Space Station Commerce Park.

  16. Upper atmosphere research: Reaction rate and optical measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stief, L. J.; Allen, J. E., Jr.; Nava, D. F.; Payne, W. A., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The objective is to provide photochemical, kinetic, and spectroscopic information necessary for photochemical models of the Earth's upper atmosphere and to examine reactions or reactants not presently in the models to either confirm the correctness of their exclusion or provide evidence to justify future inclusion in the models. New initiatives are being taken in technique development (many of them laser based) and in the application of established techniques to address gaps in the photochemical/kinetic data base, as well as to provide increasingly reliable information.

  17. WINDII, the wind imaging interferometer on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepherd, G. G.; Thuillier, G.; Gault, W. A.; Solheim, B. H.; Hersom, C.; Alunni, J. M.; Brun, J.-F.; Brune, S.; Charlot, P.; Cogger, L. L.

    1993-01-01

    The WIND imaging interferometer (WINDII) was launched on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) on September 12, 1991. This joint project, sponsored by the Canadian Space Agency and the French Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales, in collaboration with NASA, has the responsibility of measuring the global wind pattern at the top of the altitude range covered by UARS. WINDII measures wind, temperature, and emission rate over the altitude range 80 to 300 km by using the visible region airglow emission from these altitudes as a target and employing optical Doppler interferometry to measure the small wavelength shifts of the narrow atomic and molecular airglow emission lines induced by the bulk velocity of the atmosphere carrying the emitting species. The instrument used is an all-glass field-widened achromatically and thermally compensated phase-stepping Michelson interferometer, along with a bare CCD detector that images the airglow limb through the interferometer. A sequence of phase-stepped images is processed to derive the wind velocity for two orthogonal view directions, yielding the vector horizontal wind. The process of data analysis, including the inversion of apparent quantities to vertical profiles, is described.

  18. Broadband Outdoor Radiometer Calibration Process for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program

    SciTech Connect

    Dooraghi, Michael

    2015-09-01

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program (ARM) maintains a fleet of monitoring stations to aid in the improved scientific understanding of the basic physics related to radiative feedback processes in the atmosphere, particularly the interactions among clouds and aerosols. ARM obtains continuous measurements and conducts field campaigns to provide data products that aid in the improvement and further development of climate models. All of the measurement campaigns include a suite of solar measurements. The Solar Radiation Research Laboratory at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory supports ARM's full suite of stations in a number of ways, including troubleshooting issues that arise as part of the data-quality reviews; managing engineering changes to the standard setup; and providing calibration services and assistance to the full fleet of solar-related instruments, including pyranometers, pyrgeometers, pyrheliometers, as well as the temperature/relative humidity probes, multimeters, and data acquisition systems that are used in the calibrations performed at the Southern Great Plains Radiometer Calibration Facility. This paper discusses all aspects related to the support provided to the calibration of the instruments in the solar monitoring fleet.

  19. Mount Aragats as a stable electron accelerator for atmospheric high-energy physics research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilingarian, Ashot; Hovsepyan, Gagik; Mnatsakanyan, Eduard

    2016-03-01

    Observation of the numerous thunderstorm ground enhancements (TGEs), i.e., enhanced fluxes of electrons, gamma rays, and neutrons detected by particle detectors located on the Earth's surface and related to the strong thunderstorms above it, helped to establish a new scientific topic—high-energy physics in the atmosphere. Relativistic runaway electron avalanches (RREAs) are believed to be a central engine initiating high-energy processes in thunderstorm atmospheres. RREAs observed on Mount Aragats in Armenia during the strongest thunderstorms and simultaneous measurements of TGE electron and gamma-ray energy spectra proved that RREAs are a robust and realistic mechanism for electron acceleration. TGE research facilitates investigations of the long-standing lightning initiation problem. For the last 5 years we were experimenting with the "beams" of "electron accelerators" operating in the thunderclouds above the Aragats research station. Thunderstorms are very frequent above Aragats, peaking in May-June, and almost all of them are accompanied with enhanced particle fluxes. The station is located on a plateau at an altitude 3200 asl near a large lake. Numerous particle detectors and field meters are located in three experimental halls as well as outdoors; the facilities are operated all year round. All relevant information is being gathered, including data on particle fluxes, fields, lightning occurrences, and meteorological conditions. By the example of the huge thunderstorm that took place at Mount Aragats on August 28, 2015, we show that simultaneous detection of all the relevant data allowed us to reveal the temporal pattern of the storm development and to investigate the atmospheric discharges and particle fluxes.

  20. Standing at the shore of the atmospheric radiation study and climate research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Teruyuki

    2017-02-01

    This article reflects the key scientific milestones of the atmospheric radiation studies from 1980s onward in the field of aerosol and cloud microphysical properties and their climate impact mainly through the author's research experiences.

  1. Microbes in the upper atmosphere and unique opportunities for astrobiology research.

    PubMed

    Smith, David J

    2013-10-01

    Microbial taxa from every major biological lineage have been detected in Earth's upper atmosphere. The goal of this review is to communicate (1) relevant astrobiology questions that can be addressed with upper atmosphere microbiology studies and (2) available sampling methods for collecting microbes at extreme altitudes. Precipitation, mountain stations, airplanes, balloons, rockets, and satellites are all feasible routes for conducting aerobiology research. However, more efficient air samplers are needed, and contamination is also a pervasive problem in the field. Measuring microbial signatures without false positives in the upper atmosphere might contribute to sterilization and bioburden reduction methods for proposed astrobiology missions. Intriguingly, environmental conditions in the upper atmosphere resemble the surface conditions of Mars (extreme cold, hypobaria, desiccation, and irradiation). Whether terrestrial microbes are active in the upper atmosphere is an area of intense research interest. If, in fact, microbial metabolism, growth, or replication is achievable independent of Earth's surface, then the search for habitable zones on other worlds should be broadened to include atmospheres (e.g., the high-altitude clouds of Venus). Furthermore, viable cells in the heavily irradiated upper atmosphere of Earth could help identify microbial genes or enzymes that bestow radiation resistance. Compelling astrobiology questions on the origin of life (if the atmosphere synthesized organic aerosols), evolution (if airborne transport influenced microbial mutation rates and speciation), and panspermia (outbound or inbound) are also testable in Earth's upper atmosphere.

  2. Stark Broadening Parameters For White Dwarf Atmospheres Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larbi-Terzi, N.; Sahal-Brechot, S.; Nessib, N. B.; Dimitrijevic, M. S.

    2010-07-01

    Stark broadening parameters of C II lines were determined within 3d-nf series using semiclassical perturbation method. The atomic energy levels needed for calculations were taken from TOPBASE as well as the oscillator strengths, which were additionally calculated using the method of Bates and Damgaard. The both results were compared and only insignificant differences were found. Calculations were performed for plasma conditions relevant for atmospheres of DQ white dwarfs and for a new type of white dwarfs, with surface composed mostly of carbon, discovered in 2007 by Dufour et al. The aim of this work is to provide accurate C II Stark broadening data, which are crucial for this type of white dwarf atmosphere modellisation. Obtained results will be included in STARK-B database (http://stark-b.obspm.fr/), entering in the FP7 project of European Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Center VAMDC aiming at building an interoperable e- Infrastructure for the exchange of atomic and molecular data (http://www.vamdc.org/).

  3. The global change research center atmospheric chemistry model

    SciTech Connect

    Moraes, Jr., Francis Perry

    1995-01-01

    This work outlines the development of a new model of the chemistry of the natural atmosphere. The model is 2.5-dimensional, having spatial coordinates height, latitude, and, the half-dimension, land and ocean. The model spans both the troposphere and stratosphere, although the troposphere is emphasized and the stratosphere is simple and incomplete. The chemistry in the model includes the Ox, HOx, NOx, and methane cycles in a highly modular fashion which allows model users great flexibility in selecting simulation parameters. A detailed modeled sensitivity analysis is also presented. A key aspect of the model is its inclusion of clouds. The model uses current understanding of the distribution and optical thickness of clouds to determine the true radiation distribution in the atmosphere. As a result, detailed studies of the radiative effects of clouds on the distribution of both oxidant concentrations and trace gas removal are possible. This work presents a beginning of this study with model results and discussion of cloud effects on the hydroxyl radical.

  4. The Interaction of Spacecraft Cabin Atmospheric Quality and Water Processing System Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Jay L.; Croomes, Scott D. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Although designed to remove organic contaminants from a variety of waste water streams, the planned U.S.- and present Russian-provided water processing systems onboard the International Space Station (ISS) have capacity limits for some of the more common volatile cleaning solvents used for housekeeping purposes. Using large quantities of volatile cleaning solvents during the ground processing and in-flight operational phases of a crewed spacecraft such as the ISS can lead to significant challenges to the water processing systems. To understand the challenges facing the management of water processing capacity, the relationship between cabin atmospheric quality and humidity condensate loading is presented. This relationship is developed as a tool to determine the cabin atmospheric loading that may compromise water processing system performance. A comparison of cabin atmospheric loading with volatile cleaning solvents from ISS, Mir, and Shuttle are presented to predict acceptable limits to maintain optimal water processing system performance.

  5. The materials processing research base of the Materials Processing Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latanision, R. M.

    1986-01-01

    An annual report of the research activities of the Materials Processing Center of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology is given. Research on dielectrophoresis in the microgravity environment, phase separation kinetics in immiscible liquids, transport properties of droplet clusters in gravity-free fields, probes and monitors for the study of solidification of molten semiconductors, fluid mechanics and mass transfer in melt crystal growth, and heat flow control and segregation in directional solidification are discussed.

  6. CO2 flux estimation errors associated with moist atmospheric processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parazoo, N. C.; Denning, A. S.; Kawa, S. R.; Pawson, S.; Lokupitiya, R.

    2012-04-01

    Vertical transport by moist sub-grid scale processes such as deep convection is a well-known source of uncertainty in CO2 source/sink inversion. However, a dynamical link between moist transport, satellite CO2 retrievals, and source/sink inversion has not yet been established. Here we examine the effect of moist processes on (1) synoptic CO2 transport by Version-4 and Version-5 NASA Goddard Earth Observing System Data Assimilation System (NASA-DAS) meteorological analyses, and (2) source/sink inversion. We find that synoptic transport processes, such as fronts and dry/moist conveyors, feed off background vertical CO2 gradients, which are modulated by sub-grid vertical transport. The implication for source/sink estimation is two-fold. First, CO2 variations contained in moist poleward moving air masses are systematically different from variations in dry equatorward moving air. Moist poleward transport is hidden from orbital sensors on satellites, causing a sampling bias, which leads directly to continental scale source/sink estimation errors of up to 0.25 PgC yr-1 in northern mid-latitudes. Second, moist processes are represented differently in GEOS-4 and GEOS-5, leading to differences in vertical CO2 gradients, moist poleward and dry equatorward CO2 transport, and therefore the fraction of CO2 variations hidden in moist air from satellites. As a result, sampling biases are amplified, causing source/sink estimation errors of up to 0.55 PgC yr-1 in northern mid-latitudes. These results, cast from the perspective of moist frontal transport processes, support previous arguments that the vertical gradient of CO2 is a major source of uncertainty in source/sink inversion.

  7. Rain or snow: hydrologic processes, observations, prediction, and research needs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harpold, Adrian A.; Kaplan, Michael L.; Zion Klos, P.; Link, Timothy; McNamara, James P.; Rajagopal, Seshadri; Schumer, Rina; Steele, Caitriana M.

    2017-01-01

    The phase of precipitation when it reaches the ground is a first-order driver of hydrologic processes in a watershed. The presence of snow, rain, or mixed-phase precipitation affects the initial and boundary conditions that drive hydrological models. Despite their foundational importance to terrestrial hydrology, typical phase partitioning methods (PPMs) specify the phase based on near-surface air temperature only. Our review conveys the diversity of tools available for PPMs in hydrological modeling and the advancements needed to improve predictions in complex terrain with large spatiotemporal variations in precipitation phase. Initially, we review the processes and physics that control precipitation phase as relevant to hydrologists, focusing on the importance of processes occurring aloft. There is a wide range of options for field observations of precipitation phase, but there is a lack of a robust observation networks in complex terrain. New remote sensing observations have the potential to increase PPM fidelity, but generally require assumptions typical of other PPMs and field validation before they are operational. We review common PPMs and find that accuracy is generally increased at finer measurement intervals and by including humidity information. One important tool for PPM development is atmospheric modeling, which includes microphysical schemes that have not been effectively linked to hydrological models or validated against near-surface precipitation-phase observations. The review concludes by describing key research gaps and recommendations to improve PPMs, including better incorporation of atmospheric information, improved validation datasets, and regional-scale gridded data products. Two key points emerge from this synthesis for the hydrologic community: (1) current PPMs are too simple to capture important processes and are not well validated for most locations, (2) lack of sophisticated PPMs increases the uncertainty in estimation of hydrological

  8. Transport Processes in the Coastal Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    coastlines or boundary layer processes at the coast. The transported constituents may be properties of the marine boundary layer, e.g. humidity, air ... pollution or aerosols, the latter both of natural and man-made origin. In particular I am interested in the cross-coast mixing potential. By this I mean...speed maximas. Also some properties of the coastal marine air , e.g. the presence of aerosol and low clouds, are detrimental to remote sensing based on

  9. Chemical processes in the atmosphere-snow-sea ice over the Weddell Sea, Antarctica during winter and spring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobi, Hans-Werner; Jourdain, Bruno; Dommergue, Aurelien; Nerentorp Mastromonaco, Michelle; Gardfeldt, Katarina; Abrahamsson, Katarina; Granfors, Anna; Ahnhoff, Martin; Frey, Markus M.; Méjean, Guillaume; Friess, Udo; Nasse, Jan-Marcus

    2016-04-01

    Wintertime chemical processes in the atmosphere-snow-sea ice system of Antarctica are almost unknown because of a lack of in situ observations. During two cruises with the German research icebreaker R/V Polarstern we had the opportunity to perform measurements over and in the sea ice of the Weddell Sea from June to October 2013 covering the transition from winter to spring in the Southern Hemisphere. We performed atmospheric measurements of ozone, mercury, and reactive mercury compounds linked due to so-called ozone and mercury depletion events (ODEs and AMDEs), during which the two normally ubiquitous compounds ozone and mercury are efficiently removed from the atmosphere. Moreover, reactive halogenated compounds as the major cause of these depletion events were also observed in the atmosphere using remote sensing as well as in situ techniques. The observations demonstrated that the formation of reactive halogen compounds as well as depletions of ozone and mercury occurred as early as July potentially caused by a dark halogen activation mechanism. The activation of halogens further left their imprint also in the chemical composition of the snow on top of the sea ice, which showed occasionally a reduction in bromide. Elevated concentrations of halogenated compounds in the sea ice well above levels normally observed during the summer season indicate that active halogen chemistry was not limited to the atmosphere, but impacted the entire atmosphere-snow-sea ice system. Finally, aerosol measurements confirmed that the snow on sea ice constitutes an important surface for the mobilization and generation of atmospheric sea salt aerosol. As a result, sea salt aerosol significantly increased during and after blowing snow events, providing a potentially significant reservoir of atmospheric reactive halogens.

  10. Photochemical Processes in the Condensed Haze of Titan's Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudipati, M. S.; Couturier, I.; Jacovi, R.; Lignell, A.

    2013-12-01

    Recently we have shown that condensed-phase photochemical processes continue to occur at altitudes where gas-phase photochemistry would not be significant due to extinction of higher energy short-wavelength photons and availability of only longer wavelength low-energy photons (>250 nm). Accretion of Titan's molecules into weakly bound van der Waals aggregates would trigger new channels of photochemical reaction pathways that are not available for gas-phase isolated molecules. Laboratory studies carried out at JPL and AMU will be discussed. Nature of Titan's haze aerosol particles will be extrapolated in the light of these laboratory studies. Ref: Gudipati et al., Nat. Commun. 4 (2013) 1648

  11. CO2 Flux Estimation Errors Associated with Moist Atmospheric Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parazoo, N. C.; Denning, A. S.; Kawa, S. R.; Pawson, S.; Lokupitiya, R.

    2012-01-01

    Vertical transport by moist sub-grid scale processes such as deep convection is a well-known source of uncertainty in CO2 source/sink inversion. However, a dynamical link between vertical transport, satellite based retrievals of column mole fractions of CO2, and source/sink inversion has not yet been established. By using the same offline transport model with meteorological fields from slightly different data assimilation systems, we examine sensitivity of frontal CO2 transport and retrieved fluxes to different parameterizations of sub-grid vertical transport. We find that frontal transport feeds off background vertical CO2 gradients, which are modulated by sub-grid vertical transport. The implication for source/sink estimation is two-fold. First, CO2 variations contained in moist poleward moving air masses are systematically different from variations in dry equatorward moving air. Moist poleward transport is hidden from orbital sensors on satellites, causing a sampling bias, which leads directly to small but systematic flux retrieval errors in northern mid-latitudes. Second, differences in the representation of moist sub-grid vertical transport in GEOS-4 and GEOS-5 meteorological fields cause differences in vertical gradients of CO2, which leads to systematic differences in moist poleward and dry equatorward CO2 transport and therefore the fraction of CO2 variations hidden in moist air from satellites. As a result, sampling biases are amplified and regional scale flux errors enhanced, most notably in Europe (0.43+/-0.35 PgC /yr). These results, cast from the perspective of moist frontal transport processes, support previous arguments that the vertical gradient of CO2 is a major source of uncertainty in source/sink inversion.

  12. CO2 flux estimation errors associated with moist atmospheric processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parazoo, N. C.; Denning, A. S.; Kawa, S. R.; Pawson, S.; Lokupitiya, R.

    2012-07-01

    Vertical transport by moist sub-grid scale processes such as deep convection is a well-known source of uncertainty in CO2 source/sink inversion. However, a dynamical link between vertical transport, satellite based retrievals of column mole fractions of CO2, and source/sink inversion has not yet been established. By using the same offline transport model with meteorological fields from slightly different data assimilation systems, we examine sensitivity of frontal CO2 transport and retrieved fluxes to different parameterizations of sub-grid vertical transport. We find that frontal transport feeds off background vertical CO2 gradients, which are modulated by sub-grid vertical transport. The implication for source/sink estimation is two-fold. First, CO2 variations contained in moist poleward moving air masses are systematically different from variations in dry equatorward moving air. Moist poleward transport is hidden from orbital sensors on satellites, causing a sampling bias, which leads directly to small but systematic flux retrieval errors in northern mid-latitudes. Second, differences in the representation of moist sub-grid vertical transport in GEOS-4 and GEOS-5 meteorological fields cause differences in vertical gradients of CO2, which leads to systematic differences in moist poleward and dry equatorward CO2 transport and therefore the fraction of CO2 variations hidden in moist air from satellites. As a result, sampling biases are amplified and regional scale flux errors enhanced, most notably in Europe (0.43 ± 0.35 PgC yr-1). These results, cast from the perspective of moist frontal transport processes, support previous arguments that the vertical gradient of CO2 is a major source of uncertainty in source/sink inversion.

  13. The Improvement of The Absorption Process Using A Computational Optimization in An Atmospheric General Circulation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiguchi, Miho; Nakajima, Teruyuki

    2009-03-01

    This study improves the gaseous absorption process scheme of the broadband radiative transfer code "mstrnX" that was developed by the Center for Climate System Research (CCSR) for efficient calculation of atmospheric radiative transfer in the general circulation models. This scheme is adopted the optimization method to decrease the number of quadrature points for wavenumber integration by using the correlated k-distribution method and to increase the computational efficiency in each spectral band. The objective function of the standard version is defined as the sum of errors in radiation fluxes and heating rate in six standard atmospheres, and we added six other atmospheric profiles in the doubling CO2 condition for the doubling CO2 version. The preferable errors of radiative flux is thought about 1-2 W/m2, however, it is desirable that the errors of radiative forcing of CO2 is less than 0.3 W/m2. So, we improve the doubling CO2 version to calculate the radiative forcings precisely. When integration points and weights are determined in each band, we select the results whose errors of the instantaneous radiative forcing at TOA, troposphere and surface are under 0.2 W/m2. Moreover, radiative forcings of other WMGHGs are considered as same as CO2. Then, we build a global warming version with 29 bands and 111 integration points. In this version, the maximum radiation flux error is less than 0.6 W/m2 in LW and 0.45 W/m2 in SW at all altitude, and the maximum heating rate error is less than 0.2 K/day in the troposphere and the stratosphere for any standard atmosphere. The radiative forcing can be evaluated with small errors not exceeding one standard deviation of samples of forcings from the AOGCMs except for the changes of N2O+CFCs case in the RTMIP experiment. It is found that the proposed optimization method is effective in maintaining a low computational cost with accuracy good enough for dynamical simulations with a GCM. MstrnX is now available from the Open

  14. Biogeochemical linkage between atmosphere and ocean in the eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean: Results from the EqPOS research cruise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furutani, H.; Inai, Y.; Aoki, S.; Honda, H.; Omori, Y.; Tanimoto, H.; Iwata, T.; Ueda, S.; Miura, K.; Uematsu, M.

    2012-12-01

    Eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean is a unique oceanic region from several biogeochemical points of view. It is a remote open ocean with relatively high marine biological activity, which would result in limited influence of human activity but enhanced effect of marine natural processes on atmospheric composition. It is also characterized as high nutrient low chlorophyll (HNLC) ocean, in which availability of trace metals such as iron and zinc limits marine primary production and thus atmospheric deposition of these trace elements to the ocean surface is expected to play an important role in regulating marine primary production and defining unique microbial community. High sea surface temperature in the region generates strong vertical air convection which efficiently brings tropospheric atmospheric composition into stratosphere. In this unique eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean, EqPOS (Equatorial Pacific Ocean and Stratospheric/Tropospheric Atmospheric Study) research cruise was organized as a part of SOLAS Japan activity to understand biogeochemical ocean-atmospheric interaction in the region. Coordinated atmospheric, oceanic, and marine biological observations including sampling/characterization of thin air-sea interfacial layer (sea surface microlayer: SML) and launching large stratospheric air sampling balloons were carried out on-board R/V Hakuho Maru starting from 29 January for 39 days. Biogeochemically important trace/long-lived gases such as CO2, dimethyl sulfide (DMS), and some volatile organic carbons (VOCs) both in the atmosphere and seawater were continuously monitored and their air-sea fluxes were also observed using gradient and eddy-covariance techniques. Atmospheric gas measurement of CO2, CH4, N2O, SF6, CO, H2, Ar and isotopic composition of selected gases were further extended to stratospheric air by balloon-born sampling in addition to a vertical profiling of O3, CO2, and H2O with sounding sondes. Physical and chemical properties of marine

  15. Research on the method of precise alignment technology of atmospheric laser communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wen-jian; Gao, Wei; Duan, Yuan-yuan; Ma, Shi-wei; Chen, Jian

    2016-10-01

    Atmosphere laser communication takes advantage of laser as the carrier transmitting the voice, data, and image information in the atmosphere. Because of its high reliability, strong anti-interference ability, the advantages of easy installation, it has great potential and development space in the communications field. In the process of establish communication, the capture, targeting and tracking of the communication signal is the key technology. This paper introduce a method of targeting the signal spot in the process of atmosphere laser communication, which through the way of making analog signal addition and subtraction directly and normalized to obtain the target azimuth information to drive the servo system to achieve precise alignment of tracking.

  16. Adjoint modeling for atmospheric pollution process sensitivity at regional scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menut, Laurent

    2003-09-01

    During the summer 1998, a strong pollution event was documented over Paris as part of the Etude et Simulation de la Qualité de l'air en Ile-de-France (ESQUIF) project (second intensive observation period (IOP2)). From 7 to 9 August 1998 the pollution event changes from a well-marked ozone plume issued from Paris to a more general pollution over the whole Ile-de-France region. Using a three-dimensional chemistry-transport model and its adjoint part, the sensitivity of ozone, Ox, and NOx peaks to model parameters is investigated. For two locations, Paris and a suburban site, the influence of both meteorological and chemical model parameters on the simulated field concentrations is hourly quantified for each day. Processes leading to a urban polluted event are compared. It is shown that the pollutant concentrations are mainly driven by traffic and solvent surface emissions and meteorological parameters such as temperature. Since the adjoint approach is limited to infinitesimal model perturbation, some scenario simulations are carried out to evaluate the linearity of the impact of the most sensitive parameters within the uncertainty range. It is shown that the sensitivities determined from the adjoint approach can be extrapolated until their uncertainty ranges except for the wind speed.

  17. Challenge to the Data-intensive Science in Upper Atmospheric Research in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, Yukinobu; Kurakawa, Kei; Sato, Yuka; Tanaka, Yoshimasa; Abe, Shuji; Ikeda, Daisuke; Nose, Masahito; Shinbori, Atsuki; Umemura, Norio; Iyemori, Toshihiko; Ueno, Satoru; Yagi, Manabu; Yatagai, Akiyo

    2014-05-01

    Science is changing because of the impact of information technology. Experimental, theoretical, and computational science are all being affected by the data deluge, and a fourth, "data-intensive" science paradigm is emerging. To investigate the mechanism of long-term variations in the upper atmosphere, we need to create integrated links between a variety of ground-based observations made at various locations from the equator to the poles because what we observe is the result of complicated processes. However, the Japanese observational databases (e.g., by a global network of radars, magnetometers, optical sensors, helioscopes) have been maintained and made available to the community by each institution that conducted the observations. Then researchers encountered the problem that is difficult to look for various kinds of observational data to clarify the global scale physical phenomena. In order to solve the problem, the Japanese IUGONET project builts the metadata database for upper atmosphere by using extended Dspace software. The extended point is to handle the IUGONET XML Schema for describing the ground-based observational metadata, which is based on Space Physics Archive Search and Extract (SPASE) for describing satellite' metadata. Metadata by the XML schema can describe the twelve resource types like dataset, person, and so forth. Thereby, the researchers can reach distributed observational data via metadata. From the viewpoint of data publication, the Japanese local community of the World Data System (WDS) started to prepare to put the Digital Object Identifier (DOI) to dataset by Japan Link Center (JaLC) which is the DOI registration agency in Japan. On the other hand, Open Researcher & Contributor ID (ORCID) launched its registry service on Oct. 2012. Under these situation, we planned to put the both IDs into the above mentioned metadata to create linkage between dataset, data contributor, and metadata. As a first step, we redefined the new IUGONET XML

  18. Overview of atmospheric ionizing radiation (AIR) Research: SST-present

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Goldhagen, P.; Rafnsson, V.; Clem, J. M.; De Angelis, G.; Friedberg, W.

    The Supersonic Transport (SST) program proposed in 1961, first raised concern for the exposure of pregnant occupants by solar energetic particles (SEP), and neutrons were suspected to have a main role in particle propagation deep into the atmosphere. An eight-year flight program confirmed the role of SEP as a significant hazard and of the neutrons as contributing over half of the galactic cosmic ray exposures, with the largest contribution from neutrons above 10 MeV. The FAA Advisory Committee on the Radiobiological Aspects of the SST provided operational requirements. The more recent lowering of ICRP-recommended exposure limits 1990 with the classification of aircrew as "radiation workers" renewed interest in GCR background exposures at commercial flight altitudes and stimulated epidemiological studies in Europe, Japan, Canada and the USA. The proposed development of a High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) required validation of the role of high-energy neutrons, and this resulted in ER-2 flights at solar minimum June 1997 and studies on effects of aircraft materials on interior exposures. Recent evaluation of health outcomes of DOE nuclear workers resulted in legislation for health compensation in year 2000 and recent European aircrew epidemiological studies of health outcomes bring renewed interest in aircraft radiation exposures. As improved radiation models become available, it is imperative that a corresponding epidemiological program of US aircrew be implemented.

  19. Overview of Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation (AIR) research: SST-present

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, J.; Goldhagen, P.; Rafnson, V.; Clem, J.; Deangelis, G.

    The Super Sonic Transport (SST) program, proposed in 1961, first raised concern for the exposure of pregnant passengers and crew by solar energetic particles (SEP), and neutrons were suspected to have a main role in effects due to particle propagation deep into the atmosphere. An eight-year flight program confirmed the role of SEP as a significant hazard and of the neutrons as contributing over half of the galactic cosmic ray exposures, with the largest contribution from neutrons above 10 MeV. The FAA Standing Committee provided recommendations on SST radiobiological issues and operational requirements. The lowering of ICRP-recommended exposure limits (1990) with the classification of aircrew as "radiation workers" renewed interest in GCR background exposures at commercial flight altitudes and stimulated epidemiological studies in Europe, Japan, Canada and the USA. The proposed development of a High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) required validation of the role of high-energy neutrons, and this resulted in ER-2 flights at solar minimum (June 1997) and studies of effects of aircraft materials on interior exposures. Recent evaluation of health outcomes of DOE nuclear workers resulted in legislation for health compensation in 2000 and more recent European aircrew epidemiological studies of health outcomes brings renewed interest in aircraft radiation exposures. As improved radiation models become available, it is imperative that a corresponding epidemiological program of US aircrew be implemented.

  20. Overview of Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation (AIR) Research: SST - Present

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Goldhagen, P.; Rafnsson, V.; Clem, J. M.; DeAngelis, G.; Friedberg, W.

    2002-01-01

    The Supersonic Transport (SST) program, proposed in 1961, first raised concern for the exposure of pregnant occupants by solar energetic particles (SEP), and neutrons were suspected to have a main role in particle propagation deep into the atmosphere. An eight-year flight program confirmed the role of SEP as a significant hazard and of the neutrons as contributing over half of the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) exposures, with the largest contribution from neutrons above 10 MeV. The FAA Advisory Committee on the Radiobiological Aspects of the SST provided operational requirements. The more recent (1990) lowering of recommended exposure limits by the International Commission on Radiological Protection with the classification of aircrew as "radiation workers" renewed interest in GCR background exposures at commercial flight altitudes and stimulated epidemiological studies in Europe, Japan, Canada and the USA. The proposed development of a High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) required validation of the role of high-energy neutrons, and this resulted in ER-2 flights at solar minimum (June 1997) and studies on effects of aircraft materials on interior exposures. Recent evaluation of health outcomes of DOE nuclear workers resulted in legislation for health compensation in year 2000 and recent European aircrew epidemiological studies of health outcomes bring renewed interest in aircraft radiation exposures. As improved radiation models become available, it is imperative that a corresponding epidemiological program of US aircrew be implemented.

  1. Summary of Atmospheric Ionizing AIR Research: SST-Present

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Goldhagen, P.; Rafnsson, V.; deAngelis, G.; Friedberg, W.; Clem, J. M.

    2003-01-01

    The Supersonic Transport (SST) program, proposed in 1961, first raised concern for the exposure of pregnant occupants by solar energetic particles (SEP), and neutrons were suspected to have a main role in particle propagation deep into the atmosphere. An eight-year flight program confirmed the role of SEP as a significant hazard and of the neutrons as contributing over half of the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) exposures, with the largest contribution from neutrons above 10 MeV. The FAA Advisory Committee on the Radiobiological Aspects of the SST provided operational requirements. The more recent lowering of the radiation exposure limits by the International Commission on Radiological Protection with the classification of aircrew as radiation workers renewed interest in GCR background exposures at commercial flight altitudes and stimulated epidemiological studies in Europe, Japan, Canada and the USA. The proposed development of a High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) required validation of the role of high-energy neutrons, and this resulted in ER-2 flights at solar minimum (June 1997) and studies on effects of aircraft materials on interior exposures. Recent evaluation of health outcomes of DOE nuclear workers resulted in legislation for health compensation in year 2000 and recent European aircrew epidemiological studies of health outcomes bring renewed interest in aircraft radiation exposures. As improved radiation models become available, it is imperative that a corresponding epidemiological program of US aircrew be implemented.

  2. Overview of atmospheric ionizing radiation (AIR) research: SST-present

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Goldhagen, P.; Rafnsson, V.; Clem, J. M.; De Angelis, G.; Friedberg, W.

    2003-01-01

    The Supersonic Transport (SST) program, proposed in 1961, first raised concern for the exposure of pregnant occupants by solar energetic particles (SEP), and neutrons were suspected to have a main role in particle propagation deep into the atmosphere. An eight-year flight program confirmed the role of SEP as a significant hazard and of the neutrons as contributing over half of the galactic cosmic ray exposures, with the largest contribution from neutrons above 10 MeV. The FAA Advisory Committee on the Radiobiological Aspects of the SST provided operational requirements. The more recent lowering of ICRP-recommended exposure limits (1990) with the classification of aircrew as "radiation workers" renewed interest in GCR background exposures at commercial flight altitudes and stimulated epidemiological studies in Europe, Japan, Canada and the USA. The proposed development of a High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) required validation of the role of high-energy neutrons, and this resulted in ER-2 flights at solar minimum (June 1997) and studies on effects of aircraft materials on interior exposures. Recent evaluation of health outcomes of DOE nuclear workers resulted in legislation for health compensation in year 2000 and recent European aircrew epidemiological studies of health outcomes bring renewed interest in aircraft radiation exposures. As improved radiation models become available, it is imperative that a corresponding epidemiological program of US aircrew be implemented. Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of COSPAR.

  3. Urban air pollution and atmospheric diffusion research in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Datong; Whitney, Joseph B.; Yap, David

    1987-11-01

    Air pollution has become a serious problem in China as a result of that country's efforts in the last 30 years to become a great industrial power. The burning of coal, which currently provides over 70% of all China's energy needs, is a major source of air pollution. Because Chinese coal is high in sulfur and ash content and because most combustion devices in China have low efficiencies, SO2 and particulate emissions are a serious problem and are comparable to or exceed those found in many countries that are much more industrialized. Although most coal is burned in North China, acid precipitation is most severe in South China because of the lack of buffering loess dust found in the former region. The Chinese government has already taken major steps to mitigate air pollution, such as relocating polluting industries, supplying coal with lower sulfur content, using gas instead of coal for residential heating, and levying fines on industries that exceed pollution standards. Atmospheric environmental impact assessment (AEIA) is also required for all major new projects. This article describes three types of mathematical diffusion models and field and wind-tunnel experiments that are used in such assessments. The Chinese authorities believe that a range of technological, managerial, locational, and behavioral changes must be effected before the air of Chinese cities can be significantly improved.

  4. Overview of atmospheric ionizing radiation (AIR) research: SST-present.

    PubMed

    Wilson, J W; Goldhagen, P; Rafnsson, V; Clem, J M; De Angelis, G; Friedberg, W

    2003-01-01

    The Supersonic Transport (SST) program, proposed in 1961, first raised concern for the exposure of pregnant occupants by solar energetic particles (SEP), and neutrons were suspected to have a main role in particle propagation deep into the atmosphere. An eight-year flight program confirmed the role of SEP as a significant hazard and of the neutrons as contributing over half of the galactic cosmic ray exposures, with the largest contribution from neutrons above 10 MeV. The FAA Advisory Committee on the Radiobiological Aspects of the SST provided operational requirements. The more recent lowering of ICRP-recommended exposure limits (1990) with the classification of aircrew as "radiation workers" renewed interest in GCR background exposures at commercial flight altitudes and stimulated epidemiological studies in Europe, Japan, Canada and the USA. The proposed development of a High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) required validation of the role of high-energy neutrons, and this resulted in ER-2 flights at solar minimum (June 1997) and studies on effects of aircraft materials on interior exposures. Recent evaluation of health outcomes of DOE nuclear workers resulted in legislation for health compensation in year 2000 and recent European aircrew epidemiological studies of health outcomes bring renewed interest in aircraft radiation exposures. As improved radiation models become available, it is imperative that a corresponding epidemiological program of US aircrew be implemented.

  5. Satellite-tracking and earth-dynamics research programs. [geodetic and geophysical investigations and atmospheric research using satellite drag data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Satellite tracking and earth dynamics research programs are discussed. Geodetic and geophysical investigations are reported along with atmospheric research using satellite drag data. Satellite tracking network functions and support groups which are discussed include: network operations, communications, data-services division, moonwatch, and programming group.

  6. NOAA federal/state cooperative program in atmospheric modification research. Collected publication titles and abstracts. Technical memo

    SciTech Connect

    Reinking, R.F.

    1993-04-01

    The volume contains the titles and abstracts of technical publications through fiscal year 1992 that are the products of the NOAA Federal/State Cooperative Program in Atmospheric Modification Research. The program is focused on the very interdisciplinary science of purposeful cloud modification for precipitation enhancement and hail suppression, and unintentional modification of clouds and precipitation. The audience includes, for example, water managers, policy makers, scientists, practitioners in the field, and the interested public. Listed are publications on topics including but not limited to: cloud and precipitation processes, numerical cloud and atmospheric mesoscale modeling, atmospheric and storm monitoring instrumentation and technologies, aerosol transport and dispersion in clouds and over complex terrain, cloud seeding technologies and effects, agricultural responses to cloud modification, weather economics and societal aspects of cloud modification, unintentional weather and climate modification, and precipitation and hydrological assessment and forecasting.

  7. Research at Yale in Natural Language Processing. Research Report #84.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schank, Roger C.

    This report summarizes the capabilities of five computer programs at Yale that do automatic natural language processing as of the end of 1976. For each program an introduction to its overall intent is given, followed by the input/output, a short discussion of the research underlying the program, and a prognosis for future development. The programs…

  8. Progress in Understanding Land-Surface-Atmosphere Coupling from LBA Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betts, Alan K.; Silva Dias, Maria AssunçÃ.£O. F.

    2010-02-01

    LBA research has deepened our understanding of the role of soil water storage, clouds and aerosols in land-atmosphere coupling. We show how the reformulation of cloud forcing in terms of an effective cloud albedo per unit area of surface gives a useful measure of the role of clouds in the surface energy budget over the Amazon. We show that the diurnal temperature range has a quasi-linear relation to the daily mean longwave cooling; and to effective cloud albedo because of the tight coupling between the near-surface climate, the boundary layer and the cloud field. The coupling of surface and atmospheric processes is critical to the seasonal cycle: deep forest rooting systems make water available throughout the year, whereas in the dry season the shortwave cloud forcing is reduced by regional scale subsidence, so that more light is available for photosynthesis. At sites with an annual precipitation above 1900 mm and a dry season length less than 4 months, evaporation rates increased in the dry season, coincident with increased radiation. In contrast, ecosystems with precipitation less than 1700 mm and a longer dry season showed clear evidence of reduced evaporation in the dry season coming from water stress. In all these sites, the seasonal variation of the effective cloud albedo is a major factor in determining the surface available energy. Dry season fires add substantial aerosol to the atmosphere. Aerosol scattering and absorption both reduce the total downward surface radiative flux, but increase the diffuse/direct flux ratio, which increases photosynthetic efficiency. Convective plumes produced by fires enhance the vertical transport of aerosols over the Amazon, and effectively inject smoke aerosol and gases directly into the middle troposphere with substantial impacts on mid-tropospheric dispersion. In the rainy season in Rondônia, convection in low-level westerly flows with low aerosol content resembles oceanic convection with precipitation from warm rain

  9. The Future of Nearshore Processes Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elko, N.; Feddersen, F.; Foster, D. L.; Holman, R. A.; McNinch, J.; Ozkan-Haller, H. T.; Plant, N. G.; Raubenheimer, B.; Elgar, S.; Hay, A. E.; Holland, K. T.; Kirby, J. T., Jr.; Lippmann, T. C.; Miller, J. K.; Stockdon, H. F.; Ashton, A. D.; Boehm, A. B.; Clark, D.; Cowen, E.; Dalyander, S.; Gelfenbaum, G. R.; Hapke, C. J.; MacMahan, J.; McNamara, D.; Mulligan, R. P.; Palmsten, M. L.; Ruggiero, P.; Sherwood, C. R.; Hsu, T. J.

    2014-12-01

    Over 70 members of the nearshore coastal processes research community convened in April 2014 to discuss a vision for the future of nearshore science while celebrating the memories and contributions of our recently departed colleague, Abby Sallenger. The participants reviewed community accomplishments over the past four decades. Federal agencies, including FEMA, NOAA, NPS, USGS, USACE, and NRL discussed the most pressing societal needs within the coastal zone. The group engaged in a retrospective of the last four decades of progress, assessed the current status and limitations of nearshore processes research, and developed a vision for the future that focuses on societally relevant problems. The top research topics identified included: Long-term Coastal Impacts: Meaningfully improve our understanding and prediction of the long-term coastal effects of sea level rise and changes in storminess patterns and associated efforts to protect coastal infrastructure. Extreme Events: Coastal flooding, overland flow, and concurrent morphological evolution during extreme events including the subsequent process of coastal recovery. Human and Ecosystem Health: Linkages between physical coastal processes (transport and mixing) and land-based pollution (pathogens, nutrients, toxic contaminants). Critical for addressing these research questions is enabling infrastructure, such as new observational tools and data sets, models, and nearshore-community communication and collaboration. Idea and concepts developed during the meeting (to be published in Shore and Beach) will be presented to foster collaboration and advocacy amongst the wider nearshore community. Meeting materials are available at: https://scripps.ucsd.edu/centers/nearshorefuture/.

  10. Middle Atmosphere Program. Handbook for MAP. Volume 18: Extended abstracts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kato, S. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    Various topics related to middle atmosphere research are discussed. Variability of the middle atmosphere during winter, climatology, gravity waves, atmospheric turbulence, transport processes of trace species and aerosols, and research in the Antarctic are among the topics covered.

  11. [Application of atomic emission spectroscopy analysis in the atmospheric pressure plasma polishing process study].

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Zhang, Ju-Fan; Dong, Shen

    2008-07-01

    The atmospheric pressure plasma polishing (APPP) is a novel precision machining technology. It performs the atom scale material removal based on low temperature plasma chemical reactions. As the machining process is chemical in nature, it avoids the surface/subsurface defects usually formed in conventional mechanical machining processes. APPP firstly introduces a capacitance coupled radio frequency (RF) plasma torch to generate reactive plasma and excite chemical reactions further. The removal process is a complicated integrating action which tends to be affected by many factors, such as the gas ratio, the RF power and so on. Therefore, to improve the machining quality, all the aspects should be considered and studied, to establish the foundation for further model building and theoretical analysis. The atomic emission spectroscopy analysis was used to study the process characteristics. A commercial micro spectrometer was used to collect the spectrograms under different parameters, by comparing which the influence of the RF power and gas ratio was initially studied. The analysis results indicate that an increase in RF power results in a higher removal rate within a certain range. The gas ratio doesn't show obvious influence on the removal rate and surface roughness in initial experiments, but the element compositions detected by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy technology on the machined surfaces under different ratios really indicate distinct difference. Then the theoretical analysis revealed the corresponding electron transition orbits of the excited reactive fluorine atoms, which is necessary for further mechanism research and apparatus improvement. Then the initial process optimization was made based on the analysis results, by which the Ra 0.6 nm surface roughness and 32 mm3 x min(-1) removal rate were achieved on silicon wafers.

  12. Atmospheric/Ionospheric/Magnetospheric Research Using the Chatanika Radar.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-31

    Radar Support for the DNA MHD/EMP Experimental Program," (January 1980 ). D-Region Loss Coefficients The August 1972 solar storm produced sufficient...lRun 0215 00)07 790220 2350- CHAMIP (Cliatanika Auroral 0222 0000 Morphology Program) 790226 1400-2000 Solar Eclipse Experiment 790314 2352- CHIIP...MAGNETOSPHERIC RESEARCH USING THE a CHATANIKA RADAR ( Murray J. Baron SRI International 333 Ravenswood Avenue Mlenlo Park, California 94025 31 January 1980 Final

  13. Extension of the AURIC Radiative Transfer Model for Mars Atmospheric Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, J. S.; Lumpe, J. D.; Correira, J.; Stewart, A. I.; Schneider, N. M.; Deighan, J.

    2013-12-01

    We present recent updates to the Atmospheric Ultraviolet Radiance Integrated Code (AURIC) model that allow it to be used as a forward model for Mars atmospheric research. AURIC is a state of the art far ultraviolet (FUV) to near-infrared (NIR) atmospheric radiance model that has been used extensively for analysis and modeling of terrestrial upper atmospheric remote sensing data. We present recent updates to the Atmospheric Ultraviolet Radiance Integrated Code (AURIC) model that allow it to be used as a forward model for Mars atmospheric research. AURIC is a state of the art far ultraviolet (FUV) to near-infrared (NIR) atmospheric radiance model that has been used extensively for analysis and modeling of terrestrial upper atmospheric remote sensing data. The airglow modeling capabilities of AURIC make it a powerful tool that can be used to characterize optical backgrounds, simulate data from both rocket and satellite-borne optical instrumentation, and serve as a forward model driver for geophysical retrieval algorithms. Upgrades made to allow modeling of the Martian atmosphere include 1-D Mars photochemistry and molecular transport and the addition of the following molecular band systems: CO Cameron; CO Fourth Positive Group; CO2+ Fox-Duffendack-Barker; CO2+ UV Doublet; CO Hopfield-Birge (B-X); and CO+ First Negative Group. Furthermore, a prototype AURIC-Titan model has also been developed, allowing comparison of AURIC spectral radiances with Cassini-Huygens/UVIS data [Stevens et al., 2011; Stevens et al., in preparation]. Extension of AURIC to the atmospheres of Pluto and it's largest moon, Charon, is also ongoing in support of NASA's New Horizons mission [Stevens, Evans, and Gladstone, 2012; 2013].

  14. A Community Hydrometeorology Laboratory for Fostering Collaborative Research by the Atmospheric and Hydrologic Sciences

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warner, T.T.; Yates, D.N.; Leavesley, G.H.

    2000-01-01

    A new community laboratory for fostering collaborative research between the atmospheric and hydrologie sciences communities is described. This facility, located at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) in Boulder, Colorado, allows scientists from both communities to more easily focus resources and attention on interdisciplinary problems in atmospheric, hydrologic, and other related sciences. Researchers can remotely access the computing tools to use them or to download them to their own facility, or they can visit NCAR and use the laboratory with other scientists in joint research projects. An application of this facility is described, where scientists from NCAR, the University of Colorado, and the United States Geological Survey used quantitative precipitation estimates from weather radar to simulate a flash flood in the Buffalo Creek watershed in the mountainous Front Range near Denver, Colorado.

  15. Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) Acceleration of the Goddard Earth Observing System Atmospheric Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putnam, Williama

    2011-01-01

    The Goddard Earth Observing System 5 (GEOS-5) is the atmospheric model used by the Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO) for a variety of applications, from long-term climate prediction at relatively coarse resolution, to data assimilation and numerical weather prediction, to very high-resolution cloud-resolving simulations. GEOS-5 is being ported to a graphics processing unit (GPU) cluster at the NASA Center for Climate Simulation (NCCS). By utilizing GPU co-processor technology, we expect to increase the throughput of GEOS-5 by at least an order of magnitude, and accelerate the process of scientific exploration across all scales of global modeling, including: The large-scale, high-end application of non-hydrostatic, global, cloud-resolving modeling at 10- to I-kilometer (km) global resolutions Intermediate-resolution seasonal climate and weather prediction at 50- to 25-km on small clusters of GPUs Long-range, coarse-resolution climate modeling, enabled on a small box of GPUs for the individual researcher After being ported to the GPU cluster, the primary physics components and the dynamical core of GEOS-5 have demonstrated a potential speedup of 15-40 times over conventional processor cores. Performance improvements of this magnitude reduce the required scalability of 1-km, global, cloud-resolving models from an unfathomable 6 million cores to an attainable 200,000 GPU-enabled cores.

  16. Atmospheric Transport and Photochemistry of Ozone Over Central Southern Africa During the Southern Africa Fire-Atmosphere Research Initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tyson, P. D.; Garstang, M.; Thompson, A. M.; DAbreton, P.; Diab, R. D.; Browell, E. V.

    1997-01-01

    Vertically integrated back and forward trajectories for the 300-200, 700-500 and surface-800 hPa levels are calculated using Pretoria as point of origin for the Southern Africa Fire-Atmosphere Research Initiative (SAFARI) period September-October 1992. The transport fields are then combined to show both horizontal and vertical transport of air to and from Pretoria at the different levels. Air transport patterns in the vertical are linked to the occurrence of absolutely stable layers which are also evident in the 16 ozonesonde profiles recorded at Pretoria during SAFARI. The coherence of the stratification based on dynamical and ozone analysis permits the use of mean ozone profiles with air volume fluxes to interpret the ozone in terms of photochemistry and transport within stable layers. Extensive recirculation across the meridional plane at Pretoria implies that advection of ozone is slow and that photochemistry is responsible for the observed vertical structure over central southern Africa in September and October 1992. Requisite ozone formation rates are supported by model analysis of ozone and ozone precursors measured from SAFARI and Transport and Atmospheric Research Chemistry near the Equator-Atlantic aircraft.

  17. Technology needs assessment of an atmospheric observation system for tropospheric research missions, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvarado, D. R.; Bortner, M. H.; Grenda, R. N.; Frippel, G. G.; Halsey, H.; Neste, S. L.; Kritikos, H.; Keafer, L. S.; Deryder, L. J.

    1982-01-01

    The technology advancements needed to implement the atmospheric observation satellite systems for air quality research were identified. Tropospheric measurements are considered. The measurements and sensors are based on a model of knowledge objectives in atmospheric science. A set of potential missions and attendant spacecraft and sensors is postulated. The results show that the predominant technology needs will be in passive and active sensors for accurate and frequent global measurements of trace gas concentration profiles.

  18. Aqueous organic chemistry in the atmosphere: sources and chemical processing of organic aerosols.

    PubMed

    McNeill, V Faye

    2015-02-03

    Over the past decade, it has become clear that aqueous chemical processes occurring in cloud droplets and wet atmospheric particles are an important source of organic atmospheric particulate matter. Reactions of water-soluble volatile (or semivolatile) organic gases (VOCs or SVOCs) in these aqueous media lead to the formation of highly oxidized organic particulate matter (secondary organic aerosol; SOA) and key tracer species, such as organosulfates. These processes are often driven by a combination of anthropogenic and biogenic emissions, and therefore their accurate representation in models is important for effective air quality management. Despite considerable progress, mechanistic understanding of some key aqueous processes is still lacking, and these pathways are incompletely represented in 3D atmospheric chemistry and air quality models. In this article, the concepts, historical context, and current state of the science of aqueous pathways of SOA formation are discussed.

  19. Feasibility of using an east coast facility for collaborative research in atmospheric science

    SciTech Connect

    Molitoris, J. D., LLNL

    1998-02-09

    This feasibility study examined the effectiveness and potential of a center for collaborative research in atmospheric science and remote sensing. Strongly related to this effort was the development of a telescope facility by Howard University into an atmospheric observatory and remote sensor test-bed. Several remote sensing techniques were evaluated here and the most promising were further developed. Atmospheric assessment concentrated on aerosols, winds, constituent analysis, and the detection of hazardous agents including biologicals. This mission defined the suite of instrumentation. Being a feasibility study, the scope of the project was limited to examining the state of the technology and pushing it when possible. Research performed in applying laser technology lead to the development and subsequent patent application of a new laser heterodyne amplifier, progress toward the development of a laser probe to determine the range resolved size distribution of aerosols, and studies which may lead to the development of a laser induced fluorescence sensing technique for biologicals in the atmosphere. Research in passive atmospheric sensing helped to motivate a field experiment to better understand atmospheric radiance and radiation transport in three-dimensions.

  20. Undergraduate Research Program in Atmospheric Science: Houston Ozone Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, P. A.; Balimuttajjo, M.; Damon, D.; Herridge, A.; Hromis, A. G.; Litwin, D.; Wright, J. M.

    2011-12-01

    The Minority University Consortium for Earth and Space Sciences (MUCESS) composed of the University of Houston-Downtown (UHD), Medgar Evers College (City University of New York), South Carolina State University, is an undergraduate atmospheric science program funded by NSF. The program's goal is to increase the participation of minority universities in STEM activities and careers by providing students with the knowledge and skills needed to perform weather balloon launches, interpret ozone and temperature variations in the troposphere and stratosphere. Ozone profiles up to 30 km altitude are obtained via an instrument payload attached to a weather balloon. The payload instrumentation consists of an EN-SCI ECC ozonesonde and an iMET radiosonde. The data is transmitted to a base station in real time and includes pressure, temperature, humidity, and GPS coordinates This presentation is directed towards comparing our 2011 Houston data to data that either UHD or the University of Houston (UH) has collected. Our launches are primarily on Sunday, and UH's on Friday. Our primary objective is to identify ground level ozone variations on Sunday and compare with weekday levels as tropospheric ozone is largely controlled by anthropogenic activities. Ozone levels vary depending on the time of year, temperature, rain, wind direction, chemical plant activities, private and commercial traffic patterns.etc. Our limited Friday launches, supported by UH data, indicate that ground level ozone is generally elevated in contrast to Sunday data, For example, our Friday July 2011 launch detected elevated low-altitude ozone levels with ground level ozone levels of 42 nb that increased to 46 nb from 500 m to 1 km. Other peaks are at 2.7 km (44 nb) and 6km (41 nb), decreasing to 17 nb at the tropopause (12 km). Overall, Sunday low altitude ozone levels are generally lower. Our Sunday ground level ozone data ranges from a low of 25 nb on July 11 to a high of 50 nb on August 1. A combination of

  1. E-CANES: A Research Network dedicated to Electromagnetic Coupling of the Atmosphere With Near-Earth Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanuise, C.; Blanc, E.; Crosby, N.; Ebert, U.; Mareev, E.; Neubert, T.; Rothkaehl, H.; Santolik, O.; Yair, Y.; Gille, P.

    2008-12-01

    Transient luminous events in the stratosphere and mesosphere, the sprites, elves, blue jets and gigantic jets, are observed above intense thunderstorms in association with particularly intense lightning discharges. Their recent discovery (1989) offers an opportunity to study the fundamental process of the electric discharge under the different conditions of the troposphere (lightning), stratosphere (blue jets) and the mesosphere (sprites) and the coupling between these regions by electric and magnetic fields. It further facilitates studies of the more general questions of thunderstorm effects on the atmosphere and the role of thunderstorms in a changing climate. New space missions will be launched in the coming years to study the various effects of thunderstorms. They will focus on transient luminous events, the generation of relativistic electron beams in discharges, and the perturbation to the atmosphere, ionosphere and magnetosphere of lightning, transient luminous events, water vapour transport and gravity waves. The missions are the French micro-satellite TARANIS, the ESA ASIM payload on board the International Space Station and the Japanese Sprite Sat mission. These highly interdisciplinary missions will result in a wealth of new data, which require knowledge based capacity building to underpin the observations with improved statistical data analysis and theoretical modelling. We are therefore establishing a global framework for research on thunderstorm processes and their effect on the atmosphere, in particular (1) the fundamental process of the electric discharge as manifested in the stratosphere and mesosphere as sprites and jets, (2) the relationship between cosmic rays, lightning discharges, transient luminous events and terrestrial gamma ray flashes, and (3) the environmental impact of the above physical processes, and thunderstorms in general, on the atmosphere and near-Earth space. The first step has been the creation of the European research group

  2. Research on Superconductive Signal-Processing Devices.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-11-30

    LABORATORY RESEARCH ON SUPERCONDUCTIVE SIGNAL-PROCESSING DEVICES ANNUAIL REPORT To THlE AIR FORCE OFF ICE O1P SCIENT [F[C RESEARCH ELE(;TRONICS ANI... J .,.-,.c.t n......... :.. u ll.. . . -1i1611tiC /.. TABLE OF CONTENTS Abstract iii 1.0 Introduction 1 2.0 Background 3 2.1 Summary of early program...desirable at the present time. 30 30 ............ j . . . ... .o.o. -....... ’’•."".-’,-.-.-............ -. . i 3.2.2 Extension of Time-Bandwidth

  3. (Atmospheric methane research program for a study in China)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The most significant results of recent research are the findings (1) that methane emissions from rice paddies are strongly dependent on the soil temperature, and (2) that the fluxes of methane from the Chinese rice paddies are up to 10 times greater on average compared with fluxes from rice paddies in other parts of the world. In addition to the main findings there are a number of other significant results. These are: (1) the extension of a time series of concentrations of methane (and also of other gases) at Minqin. The data now span sufficiently long times to estimate trends and seasonal variations and to include Minqin in our global flask sampling network. (2) We have completed further work on bio-gas pits. (3) We have also measured methane in Beijing and found relatively low concentrations for an urban area. 8 figs.

  4. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Annual Report 2006

    SciTech Connect

    LR Roeder

    2005-11-30

    This annual report describes the purpose and structure of the ARM Climate Research Facility and ARM Science programs and presents key accomplishments in 2006. Noteworthy scientific and infrastructure accomplishments in 2006 include: • Collaborating with the Australian Bureau of Meteorology to lead the Tropical Warm Pool-International Cloud Experiment, a major international field campaign held in Darwin, Australia • Successfully deploying the ARM Mobile Facility in Niger, Africa • Developing the new ARM Aerial Vehicles Program (AVP) to provide airborne measurements • Publishing a new finding on the impacts of aerosols on surface energy budget in polar latitudes • Mitigating a long-standing double-Intertropical Convergence Zone problem in climate models using ARM data and a new cumulus parameterization scheme.

  5. Transregional Collaborative Research Centre 32: Patterns in Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere-Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmer, C.

    2014-12-01

    The spatio-temporal dynamics of states, flow and transport within the groundwater-soil-vegetation-atmosphere (GSVA) system lead to complex, scale-dependent patterns, which make predictions of terrestrial systems challenging to both scientists and policymakers. Studying how patterns influence fluxes and state variables across scales is a key goal of the Collaborative Research Centre TR32, which approaches this challenge by monitoring, modelling and data assimilation using the Rur catchment (Germany) as its study area.The evolution of system state variables across scales is monitored using two dual-polarized X-band Doppler radars as well as the atmospheric boundary layer, cloud and precipitation monitoring site JOYCE (Jülich ObservatorY for Cloud Evolution), and measurements from eddy covariance stations, an extensive soil moisture network including cosmic-ray probes. Monitoring is complemented by a suite of geophysical methods such as Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Spectral Induced Polarization, Electromagnetic Induction, and Ground-Penetrating Radar, as well as a rhizotrone facility set up to monitor root development in conjunction with plant growth.The TR32 employs multi-compartment modelling to upscale the water, CO2 and energy fluxes from the local to the catchment scale. The analysis of the simulations with grids that honor the respective scales reveal the role of patterns on the fluxes and helps to design a general upscaling framework that quantifies information transfer between scales.Model development centers around the coupled model platform TerrSysMP, which considers mutual fluxes from the groundwater to the atmosphere by combining the atmospheric model COSMO, the land surface model CLM, and the hydrological model ParFlow in a scale-consistent way using the OASIS coupler. Processes down to the root scale are modelled at high resolution in order to obtain improved parameterizations for TerrSysMP. State variable assimilation and parameter estimation methods

  6. Atmospheric-Pressure Processed Silver Nanowire (Ag-NW)/ZnO Composite Transparent Conducting Contacts

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, John D.; Aggarwal, Shruti; van Hest, Maikel F. A. M.; Ginley, David S.

    2015-06-14

    Composite transparent contacts (TCs) based on metal nanowires and metal oxide matrix materials hold great promise for high performance transparent contacts for photovoltaics and opto-electronic technologies with the potential of all-atmospheric pressure processing. The metal nanowire mesh can provide both electrical conductivity and mechanical robustness against bending while the matrix material can both control the electrical interface and protect the metal nanowires. Here, we demonstrate all atmospheric pressure processed Ag-NW/ZnO composite TCs that are 90% transparent in the visible with sheet resistance Rs ~= 10 Ohms/sq. In addition, the composite TCs have higher infrared transmission than conventional TCO films with the same sheet resistance.

  7. Linked Environments for Atmospheric Discovery (LEAD): A Cyberinfrastructure for Mesoscale Meteorology Research and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Droegemeier, K.

    2004-12-01

    A new National Science Foundation Large Information Technology Research (ITR) grant - known as Linked Environments for Atmospheric Discovery (LEAD) - has been funded to facilitate the identification, access, preparation, assimilation, prediction, management, analysis, mining, and visualization of a broad array of meteorological data and model output, independent of format and physical location. A transforming element of LEAD is dynamic workflow orchestration and data management, which will allow use of analysis tools, forecast models, and data repositories as dynamically adaptive, on-demand systems that can a) change configuration rapidly and automatically in response to weather; b) continually be steered by new data; c) respond to decision-driven inputs from users; d) initiate other processes automatically; and e) steer remote observing technologies to optimize data collection for the problem at hand. Having been in operation for slightly more than a year, LEAD has created a technology roadmap and architecture for developing its capabilities and placing them within the academic and research environment. Further, much of the LEAD infrastructure being developed for the WRF model, particularly workflow orchestration, will play a significant role in the nascent WRF Developmental Test Bed Center located at NCAR. This paper updates the status of LEAD (e.g., the topics noted above), its ties with other community activities (e.g., CONDUIT, THREDDS, MADIS, NOMADS), and the manner in which LEAD technologies will be made available for general use. Each component LEAD application is being created as a standards-based Web service that can be run in stand-alone configuration or chained together to build an end-to-end environment for on-demand, real time NWP. We describe in this paper the concepts, implementation plans, and expected impacts of LEAD, the underpinning of which will be a series of interconnected, heterogeneous virtual IT "Grid environments" designed to provide a

  8. Apollo experience report: Processing of lunar samples in a sterile nitrogen atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcpherson, T. M.

    1972-01-01

    A sterile nitrogen atmosphere processing cabinet line was installed in the Lunar Receiving Laboratory to process returned lunar samples with minimum organic contamination. Design and operation of the cabinet line were complicated by the requirement for biological sterilization and isolation, which necessitated extensive filtration, leak-checking, and system sterilization before use. Industrial techniques were applied to lunar sample processing to meet requirements for time-critical experiments while handling a large flow of samples.

  9. Atmospheric and Space Sciences: Neutral Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yiǧit, Erdal

    2015-09-01

    The SpringerBriefs on Atmospheric and Space Sciences in two volumes presents a concise and interdisciplinary introduction to the basic theory, observation & modeling of atmospheric and ionospheric coupling processes on Earth. The goal is to contribute toward bridging the gap between meteorology, aeronomy, and planetary science. In addition recent progress in several related research topics, such atmospheric wave coupling and variability, is discussed. Volume 1 will focus on the atmosphere, while Volume 2 will present the ionosphere— the plasma environment. Volume 1 is aimed primarily at (research) students and researchers that would like to gain quick insight in atmospheric sciences and current research. It also is a useful tool for professors who would like to develop a course in atmospheric physics.

  10. Processing of atmospheric polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by fog in an urban environment.

    PubMed

    Ehrenhauser, Franz S; Khadapkar, Kalindi; Wang, Youliang; Hutchings, James W; Delhomme, Olivier; Kommalapati, Raghava R; Herckes, Pierre; Wornat, Mary J; Valsaraj, Kalliat T

    2012-10-26

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are ubiquitous pollutants in the atmosphere, predominantly known for their toxicity. Although there has been substantial work on the atmospheric degradation of PAH, little is known about how the presence of atmospheric droplets (e.g., a fog cloud) affects the fate of PAH. In order to assess the processing of PAH and their corresponding oxidation products during a fog event, two field-sampling campaigns in Fresno, CA and Davis, CA were conducted. The simultaneous evaluation of concentrations of the PAH and oxygenated polycyclic aromatic compounds (OPAC) in the gas phase, particulate matter and fog water droplets before, during and after fog allows for the characterization of transformative and transport processes in a fog cloud. By tracking the ratio of OPAC to PAH in the individual atmospheric phases, two major polycyclic aromatic compounds-processing pathways can be identified: (i) the dissolution of OPAC from particulate matter and (ii) the uptake and oxidation of PAH in the fog water droplets. Wet deposition steadily decreases the pollutant concentration in the fog cloud droplets during a fog event; however, uptake and concentration via evaporative water loss upon the dissipation of a fog cloud cause an increase in the atmospheric pollutant concentration.

  11. Stochastic Transients as a Source of Quasi-periodic Processes in the Solar Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Ding; Su, Jiangtao; Jiao, Fangran; Walsh, Robert W.

    2016-06-01

    Solar dynamics and turbulence occur at all heights of the solar atmosphere and could be described as stochastic processes. We propose that finite-lifetime transients recurring at a certain place could trigger quasi-periodic processes in the associated structures. In this study, we developed a mathematical model for finite-lifetime and randomly occurring transients, and found that quasi-periodic processes with periods longer than the timescale of the transients, are detectable intrinsically in the form of trains. We simulate their propagation in an empirical solar atmospheric model with chromosphere, transition region, and corona. We found that, due to the filtering effect of the chromospheric cavity, only the resonance period of the acoustic resonator is able to propagate to the upper atmosphere; such a scenario is applicable to slow magnetoacoustic waves in sunspots and active regions. If the thermal structure of the atmosphere is less wild and acoustic resonance does not take place, the long-period oscillations could propagate to the upper atmosphere. Such a case would be more likely to occur in polar plumes.

  12. Understanding Combustion Processes Through Microgravity Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ronney, Paul D.

    1998-01-01

    A review of research on the effects of gravity on combustion processes is presented, with an emphasis on a discussion of the ways in which reduced-gravity experiments and modeling has led to new understanding. Comparison of time scales shows that the removal of buoyancy-induced convection leads to manifestations of other transport mechanisms, notably radiative heat transfer and diffusional processes such as Lewis number effects. Examples from premixed-gas combustion, non-premixed gas-jet flames, droplet combustion, flame spread over solid and liquid fuels, and other fields are presented. Promising directions for new research are outlined, the most important of which is suggested to be radiative reabsorption effects in weakly burning flames.

  13. Photonic processing at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ochoa, Ellen; Reid, Max

    1990-01-01

    The Photonic Processing group is engaged in applied research on optical processors in support of the Ames vision to lead the development of autonomous intelligent systems. Optical processors, in conjunction with numeric and symbolic processors, are needed to provide the powerful processing capability that is required for many future agency missions. The research program emphasizes application of analog optical processing, where free-space propagation between components allows natural implementations of algorithms requiring a large degree of parallel computation. Special consideration is given in the Ames program to the integration of optical processors into larger, heterogeneous computational systems. Demonstration of the effective integration of optical processors within a broader knowledge-based system is essential to evaluate their potential for dependable operation in an autonomous environment such as space. The Ames Photonics program is currently addressing several areas of interest. One of the efforts is to develop an optical correlator system with two programmable spatial light modulators (SLMs) to perform distortion invariant pattern recognition. Another area of research is optical neural networks, also for use in distortion-invariant pattern recognition.

  14. Atmospheric stability effects on potential radiological releases at a nuclear research facility in Romania: Characterising the atmospheric mixing state.

    PubMed

    Chambers, Scott D; Galeriu, Dan; Williams, Alastair G; Melintescu, Anca; Griffiths, Alan D; Crawford, Jagoda; Dyer, Leisa; Duma, Marin; Zorila, Bogdan

    2016-04-01

    A radon-based nocturnal stability classification scheme is developed for a flat inland site near Bucharest, Romania, characterised by significant local surface roughness heterogeneity, and compared with traditional meteorologically-based techniques. Eight months of hourly meteorological and atmospheric radon observations from a 60 m tower at the IFIN-HH nuclear research facility are analysed. Heterogeneous surface roughness conditions in the 1 km radius exclusion zone around the site hinder accurate characterisation of nocturnal atmospheric mixing conditions using conventional meteorological techniques, so a radon-based scheme is trialled. When the nocturnal boundary layer is very stable, the Pasquill-Gifford "radiation" scheme overestimates the atmosphere's capacity to dilute pollutants with near-surface sources (such as tritiated water vapour) by 20% compared to the radon-based scheme. Under these conditions, near-surface wind speeds drop well below 1 m s(-1) and nocturnal mixing depths vary from ∼ 25 m to less than 10 m above ground level (a.g.l.). Combining nocturnal radon with daytime ceilometer data, we were able to reconstruct the full diurnal cycle of mixing depths. Average daytime mixing depths at this flat inland site range from 1200 to 1800 m a.g.l. in summer, and 500-900 m a.g.l. in winter. Using tower observations to constrain the nocturnal radon-derived effective mixing depth, we were able to estimate the seasonal range in the Bucharest regional radon flux as: 12 mBq m(-2) s(-1) in winter to 14 mBq m(-2) s(-1) in summer.

  15. Superthermal electron processes in the upper atmosphere of Uranus: aurora and electroglow

    SciTech Connect

    Waite, J.H. Jr.; Chandler, M.O.; Yelle, R.V.; Sandel, B.R.

    1987-01-01

    Strong ultraviolet emissions from the upper atmosphere of Uranus suggest that both auroral and electroglow phenomena are of significant aeronomical consequences in the structure of the upper atmosphere. Combined modeling and data analysis were performed to determine the effect of electroglow and auroral phenomena on the global heat and atomic hydrogen budgets in the Uranus upper atmosphere. The results indicate that the auroral and electroglow heat sources are not adequate to explain the high exospheric temperature observed at Uranus, but that the atomic hydrogen supplied by these processes is more than sufficient to explain the observations. The various superthermal electron distributions modeled have significantly different efficiencies for the various processes such as UV emission, heating, ionization, and atomic hydrogen production, and produce quite different H2 band spectra. However, additional information on the UV spectra and global parameters is needed before modeling can be used to distinguish between the possible mechanisms for electroglow.

  16. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1–September 30, 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Sisterson, DL

    2010-10-15

    Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  17. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report April 1–June 30, 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Sisterson, DL

    2010-07-09

    Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  18. Atmosphere-Snowpack NOx Exchange: Measurements at Summit, Greenland and Process-Scale Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Keenan; Ganzeveld, Laurens; Kramer, Louisa; Doskey, Paul; Helmig, Detlev; Seok, Brian; Van Dam, Brie

    2013-04-01

    Atmosphere-Snowpack NOx Exchange: Measurements at Summit, Greenland and Process-Scale Modeling Keenan A. Murray, Laurens Ganzeveld, Louisa J. Kramer, Paul V. Doskey, Detlev Helmig, Brian Seok, Brie Van Dam Snowpack over glacial ice is a reservoir for reactive nitrogen gases. During the sunlit season, NOx is generated in the interstitial air of snowpack through photolysis of nitrate (NO3-) in snow. Gradients in NOx mixing ratios between snowpack interstitial air and the overlying atmosphere regulate transfer of NOx to/from snowpack and affect the atmospheric O3 budget, oxidation capacity and, consequently, climate. To better understand the dynamics in cryosphere-atmosphere exchange of NOx we have collected 2 years of meteorological and chemical data at Summit, Greenland. Profiles of NO, NO2 and O3 mixing ratios were measured in interstitial air at several depths in the snowpack and at 2 levels above the snow surface. NOx emissions are episodic, with large NOx events occurring in early spring during high wind speed events (10-20 mph) that elevate NOx levels to ~500 pptv to depths of 2.5 meters into the snowpack. The poster will present measurements of NO, NO2, O3, wind, and irradiance for a high NOx event in the snowpack during the 2008-2010 period. Analysis of these observations will be based upon the application of a 1-D process-scale model of the atmosphere-snowpack exchange of NOx, which includes representations of the snowpack chemistry of reactive nitrogen, peroxides, and small hydrocarbon species. A more highly parameterized version of the process-scale model is currently being developed for inclusion in a global-scale model to assess the implications of climate change on cryosphere-atmosphere NOx and Ox exchange. We will present a first comparison of the predicated NOx and O3 profiles and fluxes from the process-scale/parameterized models, respectively, to observed measurements.

  19. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1982 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 3. Atmospheric sciences

    SciTech Connect

    Elderkin, C.E.

    1983-02-01

    This report is organized in terms of generic studies: theoretical studies of atmospheric processes; pollutant characterizations and transformation; boundary layer meteorology; and dispersion, deposition and resuspension of atmospheric pollutants.

  20. Applications of the Remotely Piloted Aircraft (RPA) 'MASC' in Atmospheric Boundary Layer Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wildmann, Norman; Platis, Andreas; Tupman, David-James; Bange, Jens

    2015-04-01

    The remotely piloted aircraft (RPA) MASC (Multipurpose Airborne Sensor Carrier) was developed at the University of Tübingen in cooperation with the University of Stuttgart, University of Applied Sciences Ostwestfalen-Lippe and 'ROKE-Modelle'. Its purpose is the investigation of thermodynamic processes in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL), including observations of temperature, humidity and wind profiles, as well as the measurement of turbulent heat, moisture and momentum fluxes. The aircraft is electrically powered, has a maximum wingspan of 3.40~m and a total weight of 5-8~kg, depending on the battery- and payload. The standard meteorological payload consists of two temperature sensors, a humidity sensor, a flow probe, an inertial measurement unit and a GNSS. The sensors were optimized for the resolution of small-scale turbulence down to length scales in the sub-meter range. In normal operation, the aircraft is automatically controlled by the ROCS (Research Onboard Computer System) autopilot to be able to fly predefined paths at constant altitude and airspeed. Only take-off and landing are carried out by a human RC pilot. Since 2012, the system is operational and has since then been deployed in more than ten measurement campaigns, with more than 100 measurement flights. The fields of research that were tackled in these campaigns include sensor validation, fundamental boundary-layer research and wind-energy research. In 2014, for the first time, two MASC have been operated at the same time within a distance of a few kilometres, in order to investigate the wind field over an escarpment in the Swabian Alb. Furthermore, MASC was first deployed off-shore in October 2014, starting from the German island Heligoland in the North Sea, for the purpose of characterization of the marine boundary layer for offshore wind parks. Detailed descriptions of the experimental setup and first preliminary results will be presented.

  1. Flow Tube Studies of Gas Phase Chemical Processes of Atmospheric Importance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molina, Mario J.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this project is to conduct measurements of elementary reaction rate constants and photochemistry parameters for processes of importance in the atmosphere. These measurements are being carried out under temperature and pressure conditions covering those applicable to the stratosphere and upper troposphere, using the chemical ionization mass spectrometry turbulent flow technique developed in our laboratory.

  2. Symposium on intermediate-range atmospheric-transport processes and technology assessment. [Lead Abstract

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-10-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the 47 papers in this proceedings. The purpose of this meeting was to assess the state of the art of modeling atmospheric transport processes 10 to 100 km downwind of point and area sources of pollution. (KRM)

  3. The National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Research Data Archive: a Data Education Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, G. S.; Schuster, D.

    2015-12-01

    The National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Research Data Archive (RDA), rda.ucar.edu, is not just another data center or data archive. It is a data education center. We not only serve data, we TEACH data. Weather and climate data is the original "Big Data" dataset and lessons learned while playing with weather data are applicable to a wide range of data investigations. Erroneous data assumptions are the Achilles heel of Big Data. It doesn't matter how much data you crunch if the data is not what you think it is. Each dataset archived at the RDA is assigned to a data specialist (DS) who curates the data. If a user has a question not answered in the dataset information web pages, they can call or email a skilled DS for further clarification. The RDA's diverse staff—with academic training in meteorology, oceanography, engineering (electrical, civil, ocean and database), mathematics, physics, chemistry and information science—means we likely have someone who "speaks your language." Data discovery is another difficult Big Data problem; one can only solve problems with data if one can find the right data. Metadata, both machine and human-generated, underpin the RDA data search tools. Users can quickly find datasets by name or dataset ID number. They can also perform a faceted search that successively narrows the options by user requirements or simply kick off an indexed search with a few words. Weather data formats can be difficult to read for non-expert users; it's usually packed in binary formats requiring specialized software and parameter names use specialized vocabularies. DSs create detailed information pages for each dataset and maintain lists of helpful software, documentation and links of information around the web. We further grow the level of sophistication of the users with tips, tutorials and data stories on the RDA Blog, http://ncarrda.blogspot.com/. How-to video tutorials are also posted on the NCAR Computational and Information Systems

  4. Research and the planned Space Experiment Research and Processing Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Original photo and caption dated August 14, 1995: 'KSC plant physiologist Dr. Gary Stutte (right) and Cheryl Mackowiak harvest potatoes grown in the Biomass Production Chamber of the Controlled Enviornment Life Support System (CELSS in Hangar L at Cape Canaveral Air Station. During a 418-day 'human rated' experiment, potato crops grown in the chamber provided the equivalent of a continuous supply of the oxygen for one astronaut, along with 55 percent of that long-duration space flight crew member's caloric food requirements and enough purified water for four astronauts while absorbing their expelled carbon dioxide. The experiment provided data that will help demonstarte the feasibility of the CELSS operating as a bioregenerative life support system for lunar and deep-space missions that can operate independently without the need to carry consumables such as air, water and food, while not requiring the expendable air and water system filters necessary on today's human-piloted spacecraft.' Their work is an example of the type of life sciences research that will be conducted at the Space Experiment Research Procession Laboratory (SERPL). The SERPL is a planned 100,000-square-foot laboratory that will provide expanded and upgraded facilities for hosting International Space Station experiment processing. In addition, it will provide better support for other biological and life sciences payload processing at KSC. It will serve as a magnet facility for a planned 400-acre Space Station Commerce Park.

  5. Research and the planned Space Experiment Research and Processing Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Original photo and caption dated August 14, 1995: 'KSC plant physiologist Dr. Gary Stutte harvests a potato grown in the Biomass Production Chamber of the Controlled environment Life Support system (CELSS) in Hangar L at Cape Canaveral Air Station. During a 418-day 'human rated' experiment, potato crops grown in the chamber provided the equivalent of a continuous supply of the oxygen for one astronaut, along with 55 percent of that long-duration space flight crew member's caloric food requirements and enough purified water for four astronauts while absorbing their expelled carbon dioxide. The experiment provided data that will help demonstarte the feasibility of the CELSS operating as a bioregenerative life support system for lunar and deep-space missions that can operate independently without the need to carry consumables such as air, water and food, while not requiring the expendable air and water system filters necessary on today's human-piloted spacecraft.' His work is an example of the type of life sciences research that will be conducted at the Space Experiment Research Procession Laboratory (SERPL). The SERPL is a planned 100,000-square-foot laboratory that will provide expanded and upgraded facilities for hosting International Space Station experiment processing. In addition, it will provide better support for other biological and life sciences payload processing at KSC. It will serve as a magnet facility for a planned 400-acre Space Station Commerce Park.

  6. NASA upper atmosphere research program: Research summaries, 1990 - 1991. Report to the Congress and the Environmental Protection Agency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The objectives, status, and accomplishments of the research tasks supported under the NASA Upper Atmosphere Research Program (UARP) are presented. The topics covered include the following: balloon-borne in situ measurements; balloon-borne remote measurements; ground-based measurements; aircraft-borne measurements; rocket-borne measurements; instrument development; reaction kinetics and photochemistry; spectroscopy; stratospheric dynamics and related analysis; stratospheric chemistry, analysis, and related modeling; and global chemical modeling.

  7. Airborne Particulate Transport into the Amazon Basin - The Effect of Atmospheric Processing on Trace Metal Solubility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Dominik; Ochoa-Gonzalez, Raquel; Dong, Shuofei

    2014-05-01

    Dissolution of airborne particulate matter during atmospheric transport is an important process mobilizing nutrient trace metals from the solid phase and making nutrients readily available to remote marine and terrestrial ecosystems after atmospheric deposition. Recent work suggests that this process is accelerated through the effect of air pollution and the acidification of cloud droplets. Large urban areas surrounding the Amazon Basin have introduced vast amounts of anthropogenic air pollutants from industrial emissions and biomass burning, hence this mechanism is potentially important for the nutrient cycling in this area, affecting climate and environmental health alike. To this end in the context of the CLIM AMAZON project, we conducted studies to test the dissolution of mineral and road dust under atmospheric pollution conditions relevant to the region and we set up passive samplers to test particle matter reaching the Amazon Basin for evidence of atmospheric processing. Different mineral acids and deionized water at different pH were used. Batch leaching experiments with dust sourced from the Sahara/Sahel region were setup for 144 hours to simulate the transport time of particulate matter in the atmosphere. Trace metal solubility in mineral acids at low pH was up to five times higher than in deionized water, and approximately twice as high in hydrochloric acid compared to nitric acid. A kinetic model for the solubility in the leaching solutions was developed and it was in good agreement with the experimental data. Further work will test the effect of variable cloud compositions, determine key kinetic and thermodynamic parameters to improve atmospheric reaction models, and characterize the particulate matter collected with the passive samplers.

  8. 2010 Membranes: Materials & Processes Gordon Research Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Jerry Lin

    2010-07-30

    The GRC series on Membranes: Materials and Processes have gained significant international recognition, attracting leading experts on membranes and other related areas from around the world. It is now known for being an interdisciplinary and synergistic meeting. The next summer's edition will keep with the past tradition and include new, exciting aspects of material science, chemistry, chemical engineering, computer simulation with participants from academia, industry and national laboratories. This edition will focus on cutting edge topics of membranes for addressing several grand challenges facing our society, in particular, energy, water, health and more generally sustainability. During the technical program, we want to discuss new membrane structure and characterization techniques, the role of advanced membranes and membrane-based processes in sustainability/environment (including carbon dioxide capture), membranes in water processes, and membranes for biological and life support applications. As usual, the informal nature of the meeting, excellent quality of the oral presentations and posters, and ample opportunity to meet many outstanding colleagues make this an excellent conference for established scientists as well as for students. A Gordon Research Seminar (GRS) on the weekend prior to the GRC meeting will provide young researchers an opportunity to present their work and network with outstanding experts. It will also be a right warm-up for the conference participants to join and enjoy the main conference.

  9. Infrasound induced instability by modulation of condensation process in the atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Naugolnykh, Konstantin; Rybak, Samuil

    2008-12-01

    A sound wave in supersaturated water vapor can modulate both the process of heat release caused by condensation, and subsequently, as a result, the resonance interaction of sound with the modulated heat release provides sound amplification. High-intensity atmospheric perturbations such as cyclones and thunderstorms generate infrasound, which is detectable at large distances from the source. The wave-condensation instability can lead to variation in the level of infrasound radiation by a developing cyclone, and this can be as a precursor of these intense atmospheric events.

  10. Proceedings of a Workshop on Polar Stratospheric Clouds: Their Role in Atmospheric Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamill, P. (Editor); Mcmaster, L. R. (Editor)

    1984-01-01

    The potential role of polar stratospheric clouds in atmospheric processes was assessed. The observations of polar stratospheric clouds with the Nimbus 7 SAM II satellite experiment were reviewed and a preliminary analysis of their formation, impact on other remote sensing experiments, and potential impact on climate were presented. The potential effect of polar stratospheric clouds on climate, radiation balance, atmospheric dynamics, stratospheric chemistry and water vapor budget, and cloud microphysics was assessed. Conclusions and recommendations, a synopsis of materials and complementary material to support those conclusions and recommendations are presented.

  11. Summary of research on microbiological processes

    SciTech Connect

    Winters, A.L.

    1992-09-01

    Storage of thermal energy in aquifers has obvious benefits of saving energy and decreasing the consumption of fossil fuels. However, aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES), which involves groundwater aquifers as the storage medium for heat or chill, impinges on the environment. A literature review of pertinent microbiology publications (Hicks and Stewart, 1988) identified the potential for the interaction of ATES systems and microbiological processes to create a source of infectious diseases and the potential for damage to the environment. In addition, the review identified a potential for microbiological processes to develop conditions that would interfere with the operation of an ATES system. As a result of this research effort, investigators from Finland, Germany, Switzerland, and the United States have examined several ATES systems in operation and have observed that the ATES systems studied do not contribute to infectious disease transmission, do not adversely affect the environment, and do not contribute significantly to biofouling or biocorrosion.

  12. Battelle Research Outlook, Volume 2 Number 3. Cleaning Up the Atmosphere.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westerman, Arthur B., Ed.

    "Outlook" publications focus on areas of science and technology in which research can be valuable to industry, government, and society as a whole. This issue deals with the problems of air pullution and air quality control. The first of six essays,". . . This Most Excellent Canopy, the Air," prognosticates the surge in atmospheric pollution and…

  13. Calibration of the Microwave Limb Sounder on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarnot, Robert R.; Waters, Joe W.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes pre-launch radiometric and spectral calibrations of the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS). Use of in-flight data for validation or refinement of calibration is described. The estimated uncertaint in calibrated radiance from pre-launch radiometric and spectral calibration data is better than 2% in most bands.

  14. GLOBAL CHANGE RESEARCH NEWS #18: SYMPOSIUM SESSION ON "GLOBAL ATMOSPHERIC CHANGE"

    EPA Science Inventory

    A session on "Understanding and Managing Effects of Global Atmospheric Change" will be held at the Fifth Symposium of the U.S. EPA National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory. The Symposium topic is "Indicators in Health and Ecological Risk Assessment." The s...

  15. CIRA: Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere Newsletter, Volume 28, Fall 2007

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McInnis-Efaw, Mary (Editor); Leinen, Laura (Editor)

    2007-01-01

    The articles in this issue of the Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere (CIRA) Newsletter are: "Unmanned Aerial Systems: An Overview of NOAA's Unmanned Aircraft System Program," "International Activities: Weather Briefings and Training Via the Internet," "Cloudsat's One-Year Anniversary: An Abundance of Exciting New Cloud Observations," and "The Migration of NCAR'S Auto-Nowcaster into NWS AWIPS."

  16. Radiological and Environmental Research Division annual report, January-December 1980. Atmospheric physics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-08-01

    Contained are twenty-six abstracts of on-going research programs at Argonne National Laboratory concerning the modeling of environmental air pollutants concentration and transport for January-December 1980. Studies on pollutant transport modeling, fluid flow models, and atmospheric precipitations chemistry are included. (DLS)

  17. Studies in graphene growth and processing using atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrell, Andrew Nephi

    This dissertation focuses on graphene, a promising two-dimensional, carbon material with many favorable electronic properties. The prospect of implementing graphene into a wide variety of potential device applications is enticing, but many factors stand in the way before this goal is realized. Atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD) is a graphene production method that may be compatible with large-scale growth. Motivated by the need to more fully understand APCVD growth of graphene, a system is constructed, and several studies are carried out. Specifically, a detailed study is presented which involves the effects of hydrogen and contaminant oxygen in APCVD-grown graphene. The research shows that hydrogen is an important factor to control during the cooling stage of APCVD, as it has a direct effect on the formation of oxides on the copper foil (copper is used as the catalyst for graphene growth in APCVD). It is also determined that hydrogen, as well as the reaction chamber, play an important role in the formation of SiO2 nanoparticles, which accumulate on the copper surface during graphene growth. Methods for patterning and processing graphene are also explored in this dissertation, as such methods are crucial in the realization of graphene-based devices. The method of e-beam assisted metal deposition used in conjunction with masked-CVD growth is proposed as an effective alternative to conventional processing methods such as photolithography and electron-beam lithography. The proposed methods have several advantages, which pave the way for lowering graphene/metal contact resistance, and preserving the intrinsic properties of graphene during device fabrication.

  18. Mycorrhizal mediation of plant response to atmospheric change: Air quality concepts and research considerations.

    PubMed

    Shafer, S R; Schoeneberger, M M

    1991-01-01

    The term 'global climate change' encompasses many physical and chemical changes in the atmosphere that have been induced by anthropogenic pollutants. Increases in concentrations of CO2 and CH4 enhance the 'greenhouse effect' of the atmosphere and may contribute to changes in temperature and precipitation patterns at the earth's surface. Nitrogen oxides and SO2 are phytotoxic and also react with other pollutants to produce other phytotoxins in the troposphere such as O3 and acidic substances. However, release of chlorofluorocarbons into the atmosphere may cause depletion of stratospheric O3, increasing the transmittance of ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation to the earth's surface. Increased intensities of UV-B could affect plants and enhance photochemical reactions that generate some phytotoxic pollutants. The role of mycorrhizae in plant responses to such stresses has received little attention. Although plans for several research programs have acknowledged the importance of drought tolerance and soil fertility in plant responses to atmospheric stresses, mycorrhizae are rarely targeted to receive specific investigation. Most vascular land plants form mycorrhizae, so the role of mycorrhizae in mediating plant responses to atmospheric change may be an important consideration in predicting effects of atmospheric changes on plants in managed and natural ecosystems.

  19. Radiative transfer in real atmospheres. [the implications for recognition processing of multispectral remote sensing data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, R. E.

    1974-01-01

    The problem of multiple radiation scattering in an atmosphere characterized by various amounts of aerosol absorption and different particle size distributions was investigated. The visible part of the spectrum was emphasized, including the effect of ozone absorption. An atmosphere bounded by a nonhomogenous, Lambertian surface was also studied, along with the effect of background radiation on target in terms of various atmopheric and geometric conditions. Results of the investigation indicate that comtaminated atmospheres can change the radiation field by a considerable amount, and that the effect of non-uniform surface significantly alters the intrinsic radiation from a target element. The implications of these results for the recognition processing of multispectral remote sensing data is discussed.

  20. Atmospheric Effects Detection By Short Baseline Processing In RADARSTAT Time Series Over Manaus City, Amazon Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Fernanda Ledo G.; Nico, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    In this work we present an analysis of RADARSAT- 1 and RADARSAT-2 times series acquired from 2006 to 2010 aiming to recognize the presence of atmospheric artefacts in the interferometric phase. The dataset was interferometrically processed using a short-baseline strategy, i.e. all interferometric pairs characterized by the shortest temporal baselines were identified. In this dataset the temporal baseline corresponds to the shortest temporal baseline of 24 days which can be achieved using the Radarsat mission. Interferometric phase was compared to estimates of the atmospheric artefacts obtained from the available measurements of the atmospheric parameters (air temperature, pressure, relative humidity, wind speed and direction, precipitations) over the studied area provided by the Brazilian Aeronautic Center of Meteorology.

  1. Influence of atmospheric processes on the solubility and composition of iron in Saharan dust

    SciTech Connect

    Longo, Amelia F.; Feng, Yan; Lai, Barry; Landing, William M.; Shelley, Rachel U.; Nenes, Athanasios; Mihalopoulos, Nikolaos; Violaki, Kalliopi; Ingall, Ellery D.

    2016-06-10

    Aerosol iron was examined in Saharan dust plumes using a combination of iron near-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy and wet-chemical techniques. Aerosol samples were collected at three sites located in the Mediterranean, the Atlantic, and Bermuda to characterize iron at different atmospheric transport lengths and time scales. Iron(III) oxides were a component of aerosols at all sampling sites and dominated the aerosol iron in Mediterranean samples. In Atlantic samples, iron(II and III) sulfate, iron(III) phosphate, and iron(II) silicates were also contributors to aerosol composition. With increased atmospheric transport time, iron(II) sulfates are found to become more abundant, aerosol iron oxidation state became more reduced, and aerosol acidity increased. As a result, atmospheric processing including acidic reactions and photoreduction likely influence the form of iron minerals and oxidation state in Saharan dust aerosols and contribute to increases in aerosol-iron solubility.

  2. Influence of atmospheric processes on the solubility and composition of iron in Saharan dust

    DOE PAGES

    Longo, Amelia F.; Feng, Yan; Lai, Barry; ...

    2016-06-10

    Aerosol iron was examined in Saharan dust plumes using a combination of iron near-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy and wet-chemical techniques. Aerosol samples were collected at three sites located in the Mediterranean, the Atlantic, and Bermuda to characterize iron at different atmospheric transport lengths and time scales. Iron(III) oxides were a component of aerosols at all sampling sites and dominated the aerosol iron in Mediterranean samples. In Atlantic samples, iron(II and III) sulfate, iron(III) phosphate, and iron(II) silicates were also contributors to aerosol composition. With increased atmospheric transport time, iron(II) sulfates are found to become more abundant, aerosol iron oxidation statemore » became more reduced, and aerosol acidity increased. As a result, atmospheric processing including acidic reactions and photoreduction likely influence the form of iron minerals and oxidation state in Saharan dust aerosols and contribute to increases in aerosol-iron solubility.« less

  3. Experimental Studies of the Distribution of Minor Constituents and Dynamic Processes in the Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Jindra

    1999-01-01

    Minor constituents play an important role in atmospheric chemistry and serve as tracers in transport and mixing studies in tropospheric-stratospheric exchange processes. Measurements of trace gases are essential to an understanding of the mechanisms by which minor constituents originating in the troposphere, both naturally occurring and anthropogenic, reach the stratosphere. Many of these gases are sources of species directly involved in the chemistry of ozone depletion in the stratosphere and ozone generation in the troposphere. Some contribute to the warming of the atmosphere. Data on tracer distributions are important in the development of models for predicting photochemical effects in the stratosphere and troposphere. Data on atmospheric dynamics are important for the development of models for predicting the transport of photochemical species and for characterizing the nature of stratospheric motions.

  4. Application of the Remotely Piloted Aircraft (RPA) 'MASC' in Atmospheric Boundary Layer Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wildmann, Norman; Bange, Jens

    2014-05-01

    The remotely piloted aircraft (RPA) MASC (Multipurpose Airborne Sensor Carrier) was developed at the University of Tübingen in cooperation with the University of Stuttgart, University of Applied Sciences Ostwestfalen-Lippe and 'ROKE-Modelle'. Its purpose is the investigation of thermodynamic processes in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL), including observations of temperature, humidity and wind profiles, as well as the measurement of turbulent heat, moisture and momentum fluxes. The aircraft is electrically powered, has a maximum wingspan of 3.40 m and a total weight of 5-8 kg, depending on battery- and payload. The standard meteorological payload consists of temperature sensors, a humidity sensor, a flow probe, an inertial measurement unit and a GNSS. In normal operation, the aircraft is automatically controlled by the ROCS (Research Onboard Computer System) autopilot to be able to fly predefined paths at constant altitude and airspeed. Since 2010 the system has been tested and improved intensively. In September 2012 first comparative tests could successfully be performed at the Lindenberg observatory of Germany's National Meteorological Service (DWD). In 2013, several campaigns were done with the system, including fundamental boundary layer research, wind energy meteorology and assistive measurements to aerosol investigations. The results of a series of morning transition experiments in summer 2013 will be presented to demonstrate the capabilities of the measurement system. On several convective days between May and September, vertical soundings were done to record the evolution of the ABL in the early morning, from about one hour after sunrise, until noon. In between the soundings, flight legs of up to 1 km length were performed to measure turbulent statistics and fluxes at a constant altitude. With the help of surface flux measurements of a sonic anemometer, methods of similarity theory could be applied to the RPA flux measurements to compare them to

  5. SURFRAD-A National Surface Radiation Budget Network for Atmospheric Research.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augustine, John A.; Deluisi, John J.; Long, Charles N.

    2000-10-01

    A surface radiation budget observing network (SURFRAD) has been established for the United States to support satellite retrieval validation, modeling, and climate, hydrology, and weather research. The primary measurements are the downwelling and upwelling components of broadband solar and thermal infrared irradiance. A hallmark of the network is the measurement and computation of ancillary parameters important to the transmission of radiation. SURFRAD commenced operation in 1995. Presently, it is made up of six stations in diverse climates, including the moist subtropical environment of the U.S. southeast, the cool and dry northern plains, and the hot and arid desert southwest. Network operation involves a rigorous regimen of frequent calibration, quality assurance, and data quality control. An efficient supporting infrastructure has been created to gather, check, and disseminate the basic data expeditiously. Quality controlled daily processed data files from each station are usually available via the Internet within a day of real time. Data from SURFRAD have been used to validate measurements from NASA's Earth Observing System series of satellites, satellite-based retrievals of surface erythematogenic radiation, the national ultraviolet index, and real-time National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service (NESDIS) products. It has also been used for carbon sequestration studies, to check radiative transfer codes in various physical models, for basic research and instruction at universities, climate research, and for many other applications. Two stations now have atmospheric energy flux and soil heat flux instrumentation, making them full surface energy balance sites. It is hoped that eventually all SURFRAD stations will have this capability.

  6. Atmospheric phosphorus load to the Baltic Sea - first measurements at the Utö Atmospheric and Marine Research station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruoho-Airola, Tuija; Saarnio, Karri; Hemmilä, Marja; Knuuttila, Seppo; Makkonen, Ulla; Vuorenmaa, Jussi

    2015-04-01

    The HELCOM (Baltic Marine Environment Protection Commission) Baltic Sea Action Plan (BSAP) has the overall objective of reaching the Baltic Sea in a good environmental status by 2021. The HELCOM Contracting Parties have agreed to restrict their nutrient loads to the Baltic Sea according to the BSAP Maximum Allowable Inputs (MAI) of nitrogen and phosphorus (P), which base on the eutrophication targets. Both waterborne and airborne loads should be taken into account in the implementation of the country allocation of nutrient reductions. The waterborne P load is regularly assessed in detail, whereas for the airborne part a very preliminary estimate is available due to insufficient monitoring data. At present a fixed estimate of 5 mg m-2 of atmospheric P deposition per year is used in the BSAP implementation. Measurements of bulk deposition and particulate concentration of P have been performed at the Utö Atmospheric and Marine Research station (59° 46'50N, 21° 22'23E) at the outer edge of the Archipelago Sea. Utö is a small rocky island without any arable land, so the local anthropogenic P emissions are low. Weekly bulk deposition measurements started in February, 2013 and the weekly sampling for the PM2.5 and the daily sampling for PM10 in 2014. Based on the results of the first year of the bulk deposition measurements, the annual wet deposition of total P in precipitation was nearly 5 mg m-2. For soluble PO4-P, the wet deposition in precipitation was about 2 mg m-2. The maximum concentrations were measured in late spring and in summer during the biological growing period. The level of the soluble PO4-P concentration in the PM10 particles was lower during the winter months (median 6 ng m-3) compared to the growing season (median 10 ng m-3). In fine particles (PM2.5), the PO4-P level was lower (1-2 ng m-3) than in the PM10 samples, often under the detection level of the IC method used. Natural biogenic aerosols like pollen, algae and fragments of leaves are

  7. Identification of sensitive parameters in the modeling of SVOC reemission processes from soil to atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Loizeau, Vincent; Ciffroy, Philippe; Roustan, Yelva; Musson-Genon, Luc

    2014-09-15

    Semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) are subject to Long-Range Atmospheric Transport because of transport-deposition-reemission successive processes. Several experimental data available in the literature suggest that soil is a non-negligible contributor of SVOCs to atmosphere. Then coupling soil and atmosphere in integrated coupled models and simulating reemission processes can be essential for estimating atmospheric concentration of several pollutants. However, the sources of uncertainty and variability are multiple (soil properties, meteorological conditions, chemical-specific parameters) and can significantly influence the determination of reemissions. In order to identify the key parameters in reemission modeling and their effect on global modeling uncertainty, we conducted a sensitivity analysis targeted on the 'reemission' output variable. Different parameters were tested, including soil properties, partition coefficients and meteorological conditions. We performed EFAST sensitivity analysis for four chemicals (benzo-a-pyrene, hexachlorobenzene, PCB-28 and lindane) and different spatial scenari (regional and continental scales). Partition coefficients between air, solid and water phases are influent, depending on the precision of data and global behavior of the chemical. Reemissions showed a lower variability to soil parameters (soil organic matter and water contents at field capacity and wilting point). A mapping of these parameters at a regional scale is sufficient to correctly estimate reemissions when compared to other sources of uncertainty.

  8. Microbiology and atmospheric processes: the role of biological particles in cloud physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möhler, O.; Demott, P. J.; Vali, G.; Levin, Z.

    2007-12-01

    As part of a series of papers on the sources, distribution and potential impact of biological particles in the atmosphere, this paper introduces and summarizes the potential role of biological particles in atmospheric clouds. Biological particles like bacteria or pollen may be active as both cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and heterogeneous ice nuclei (IN) and thereby can contribute to the initial cloud formation stages and the development of precipitation through giant CCN and IN processes. The paper gives an introduction to aerosol-cloud processes involving CCN and IN in general and provides a short summary of previous laboratory, field and modelling work which investigated the CCN and IN activity of bacterial cells and pollen. Recent measurements of atmospheric ice nuclei with a continuous flow diffusion chamber (CFDC) and of the heterogeneous ice nucleation efficiency of bacterial cells are also briefly discussed. As a main result of this overview paper we conclude that a proper assessment of the impact of biological particles on tropospheric clouds needs new laboratory, field and modelling work on the abundance of biological particles in the atmosphere and their CCN and heterogeneous IN properties.

  9. Microbiology and atmospheric processes: the role of biological particles in cloud physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möhler, O.; Demott, P. J.; Vali, G.; Levin, Z.

    2007-08-01

    As part of a series of papers on the sources, distribution and potential impact of biological particles in the atmosphere, this paper introduces and summarizes the potential role of biological particles in atmospheric clouds. Biological particles like bacteria or pollen may be active as both cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and heterogeneous ice nuclei (IN) and thereby can contribute to the initial cloud formation stages and the development of precipitation through giant CCN and IN processes. The paper gives an introduction to aerosol-cloud processes like CCN and IN in general and provides a short summary of previous laboratory, field and modelling work investigating the CCN and IN activity of bacterial cells and pollen. Recent measurements of atmospheric ice nuclei with a continuous flow diffusion chamber (CFDC) and of the heterogeneous ice nucleation efficiency of bacterial cells are also briefly discussed. As a main result of this overview paper we conclude that a proper assessment of the impact of biological particles on tropospheric clouds needs new laboratory, field and modelling work investigating the abundance of biological particles in the atmosphere and their CCN and heterogeneous IN properties.

  10. The Small Unmanned Meteorological Observer SUMO: Recent developments and applications of a micro-UAS for atmospheric boundary layer research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuder, Joachim; Jonassen, Marius; Ólafsson, Haraldur

    2012-10-01

    During the last 5 years, the Small Unmanned Meteorological Observer SUMO has been developed as a flexible tool for atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) research to be operated as sounding system for the lowest 4 km of the atmosphere. Recently two main technical improvements have been accomplished. The integration of an inertial measurement unit (IMU) into the Paparazzi autopilot system has expanded the environmental conditions for SUMO operation. The implementation of a 5-hole probe for determining the 3D flow vector with 100 Hz resolution and a faster temperature sensor has enhanced the measurement capabilities. Results from two recent field campaigns are presented. During the first one, in Denmark, the potential of the system to study the effects of wind turbines on ABL turbulence was shown. During the second one, the BLLAST field campaign at the foothills of the Pyrenees, SUMO data proved to be highly valuable for studying the processes of the afternoon transition of the convective boundary layer.

  11. Plasma processes in cloud-forming exoplanet and brown dwarf atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helling, Christiane

    2015-12-01

    The increasing number of observations of cyclotron emission, possible chromospheric emission, and potential aurorae suggests that high energy processes occur also in, or are associated with ultra-cool, cloud-forming atmospheres like in extrasolar planets and brown dwarfs. While a magnetic field is primordial to brown dwarfs and most planets, free charges in form of electrons need to be continuously produced to allow the necessary magnetic coupling for cyclotron emission to occur or for the formation of a chromosphere and possible magnetically driven winds to emerge. This is particularly critical for free floating objects not bathed in the wind of a host or companion star.We perform a reference study for late M-dwarfs, brown dwarfs and giant gas planets to identify which ultra-cool objects are most susceptible to plasma and magnetic processes. We utilise the Drift-Phoenix model grid where the local atmospheric structure is determined by the global parameters Teff , log(g) and metalicity [M/H]. For this reference study, thermal ionisation is considered only.Our results show that it is not unreasonable to expect Halfa or radio emission to origin from ultra-cool atmospheres as in particular the rarefied upper parts of the atmospheres can be magnetically coupleddespite having low degrees of thermal gas ionisation. The minimum threshold for the magnetic flux density required for electrons and ions to be magnetised is well above typical values of the global magnetic field of brown dwarfs and giant gas planets. Such atmospheres could therefore drive, e.g., auroral emission without the need for a companion's wind or an outgassing moon. The reference study is based on thermal emission and provides therefore a lower limit for plasma effects in late M-dwarfs, brown dwarfs and giant gas planets. We have shown that non-equilibrium processes like cloud discharges in form of lightning and coronal discharges, high wind speeds and cosmic rays increase the local electron budget

  12. Unmanned Aerial Systems as Part of a Multi-Component Assessment Strategy to Address Climate Change and Atmospheric Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, Manfred; Vrekoussis, Mihalis; Sciare, Jean; Argyrides, Marios; Ioannou, Stelios; Keleshis, Christos

    2015-04-01

    Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) have been established as versatile tools for different applications, providing data and observations for atmospheric and Earth-Systems research. They offer an urgently needed link between in-situ ground based measurements and satellite remote sensing observations and are distinguished by significant versatility, flexibility and moderate operational costs. UAS have the proven potential to contribute to a multi-component assessment strategy that combines remote-sensing, numerical modelling and surface measurements in order to elucidate important atmospheric processes. This includes physical and chemical transformations related to ongoing climate change as well as issues linked to aerosol-cloud interactions and air quality. The distinct advantages offered by UAS comprise, to name but a few: (i) their ability to operate from altitudes of a few meters to up to a few kilometers; (ii) their capability to perform autonomously controlled missions, which provides for repeat-measurements to be carried out at precisely defined locations; (iii) their relative ease of operation, which enables flexible employment at short-term notice and (iv) the employment of more than one platform in stacked formation, which allows for unique, quasi-3D-observations of atmospheric properties and processes. These advantages are brought to bear in combining in-situ ground based observations and numerical modeling with UAS-based remote sensing in elucidating specific research questions that require both horizontally and vertically resolved measurements at high spatial and temporal resolutions. Employing numerical atmospheric modelling, UAS can provide survey information over spatially and temporally localized, focused areas of evolving atmospheric phenomena, as they become identified by the numerical models. Conversely, UAS observations offer urgently needed data for model verification and provide boundary conditions for numerical models. In this presentation, we will

  13. Radiological and Environmental Research Division annual report, January-December 1982. Atmospheric physics. Part 4

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    The first article in this report, although dealing with simple terrain, summarizes an effort to obtain measures of parameters important in transport and diffusion in the lower atmosphere solely by use of a Doppler acoustic sounding system. The second article describes participation in a multiagency experiment (Shoreline Environment Atmospheric Dispersion Experiment, SEADEX) to study the fate of materials released over a surface with notable surface nonuniformities, specifically at a coastal nuclear power plant during onshore flow conditions. The third and fourth articles in this report address research on the local behavior of pollutants emitted from diesel engines in urban areas. Most effort was directed toward field studies on circulation patterns in street canyons, exchange rates with the atmosphere above rooftops, and characterization of particles in outdoor urban microclimates. The remainder of the report is quite diverse and contains multiple articles on perhaps only one or two types of research. One is numerical modeling of the behavior of atmospheric pollutants, especially gaseous and particulate substances associated with acid deposition. The modeling and theoretical capabilities have been developed in part to consider potential nonlinear relationships between anthropogenic emissions of sulfur and nitrogen compounds and the distant deposition of resulting acidifying substances. On the experimental side, field phases of research designed to compare methods of analyses of precipitation samples and to study local urban effects on precipitation chemistry were completed. Each report is indexed separately.

  14. The Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite: From Coffee Table Art to Quantitative Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglass, Anne R.

    1999-01-01

    The Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) has provided an unprecedented set of observations of constituents of the stratosphere. When used in combination with data from other sources and appropriate modeling tools, these observations are useful for quantitative evaluation of stratospheric photochemical processes. This is illustrated by comparing ozone observations from airborne Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL), from the Polar Ozone and Aerosol Measurement (POAM), from the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS), and from the Halogen occultation Experiment (HALOE) with ozone fields generated with a three dimensional model. For 1995-96, at polar latitudes, observations from DIAL flights on December 9 and January 30, and POAM and MLS between late December and late January are compared with ozone fields from the GSFC 3D chemistry and transport model. Data from the three platforms consistently show that the observed ozone has a negative trend relative to the modeled ozone, and that the trend is uniform in time between early and mid winter, with no obvious dependence on proximity to the vortex edge. The importance of chlorine catalyzed photochemistry to this ozone loss is explored by comparing observations from MLS and HALOE with simulations for other northern winters, particularly 1997-98.

  15. Engaging Scientists in K-12 Education and Public Outreach at the National Center for Atmospheric Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, R. M.; Carbone, L.; Foster, S.; Henderson, S.; Lemone, P.; McLaren, C.; Munoz, R.

    2001-05-01

    Scientists interested in helping to address our national priority to improve math, science, and technology education have a range of opportunities by which they can make significant contributions. Working in collaboration with professionals from the education and outreach communities, scientists bring their scientific knowledge and understanding of the scientific process to the table. Professional partners from educational organizations, museums, and the media bring their specialized knowledge of the educational needs of their target audience and their front-line experience working with students, educators, and the public in their own settings and media. With these combined sets of knowledge and skills, creative and scientifically accurate programs and resources can be developed that leverage the experience of all the collaborating partners. We describe the roles of some of the scientists involved in programs developed and implemented at the National Center of Atmospheric Research, in collaboration with our education and outreach partners. In addition, we illustrate how involvement in education and outreach programs can lead to new paradigms for scientific careers.

  16. Integrating atmospheric and surface process models: Why software engineering is like having weasels rip your flesh (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galewsky, J.

    2009-12-01

    Because of the pressing societal need to improve the prediction of coupled climate and surface processes, there is increasing interest in directly coupling the models used by the atmospheric sciences and surface processes communities. Early efforts have revealed a substantial number of challenges that need to be resolved before successful, coupled Earth system models can be deployed. Some of the challenges revolve around software engineering issues. For example, atmospheric models are ahead of their surface process counterparts in taking advantage of parallel processing environments. Any coupling between models must ensure strict mass and energy conservation, a potential challenge with models operating on diverse time and space scales. Finally, the development of diverse software interoperability frameworks have the potential to facilitate significant advances in model coupling, but also have the potential to create significant confusion and wasted effort. Other challenges are primarily scientific. Many geomorphic models were designed for problems on time scales of e.g. millions of years, while climate models generally operate on time scales of decades to centuries. While there are potentially many problems of interest at the intersection between climate and geomorphology, the wide range of timescales must be resolved. More generally, the community must continue to identify the 'grand challenge' research problems of societal importance and focus its efforts on solving those problems.

  17. Multi-Sensor Data from A-Train Instruments Brought Together for Atmospheric Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Peter M.; Kempler, Steven J.; Leptoukh, Greg; Savtchenko, Andrey; Stephens, Graeme; Winker, David M.

    2007-01-01

    The A-Train is comprised of a series of instruments, developed independently, that measure highly related atmospheric components along the same flight path. In order to intercompare data from this multitude of sensors, researchers must access, subset, visualize, analyze and correlate distributed atmosphere measurements from the various A-Train instruments. The A-Train Data Depot (ATDD) has been operational for over a year, successfully performing the aforementioned functions on behalf of researchers, thus providing co-registered data from the Cloudsat, CALIOP, AIRS, and MODIS instruments for further intercomparisons. Of late, significant data from OM1 and POLDER are now included in the 'depot'. By specifying the desired spatial and temporal range, the researcher can subset, visualize, co-register, and access multi-sensor A-Train data related to: Cloud, aerosol, atmospheric temperature, and water vapor parameters (vertical profile visualizations); Cloud Pressure, cloud top temperature, water vapor, cloud optical thickness, and aerosol products (horizontal strips subsetted +/- 100km from the profile visualizations), and; Cloud pressure parameters (2-D line plots overlayed on the vertical profiles). All data is plotted using the GIOVANNI data exploration tool. A new feature of GIOVANNI is its ability to have collocated and subsetted data sets as well as PNG image files downloaded to the researcher's computing facility. By providing a convenient way to visualize and acquire multi-sensor data, ATDD affords users more time and effort to further their research.

  18. Exploring clouds, weather, climate, and modeling using bilingual content and activities from the Windows to the Universe program and the Center for Multiscale Modeling of Atmospheric Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, S. Q.; Johnson, R. M.; Randall, D.; Denning, S.; Russell, R.; Gardiner, L.; Hatheway, B.; Genyuk, J.; Bergman, J.

    2008-12-01

    The need for improving the representation of cloud processes in climate models has been one of the most important limitations of the reliability of climate-change simulations. Now in its third year, the National Science Foundation-funded Center for Multi-scale Modeling of Atmospheric Processes (CMMAP) at Colorado State University is addressing this problem through a revolutionary new approach to representing cloud processes on their native scales, including the cloud-scale interaction processes that are active in cloud systems. CMMAP has set ambitious education and human-resource goals to share basic information about the atmosphere, clouds, weather, climate, and modeling with diverse K-12 and public audiences through its affiliation with the Windows to the Universe (W2U) program at University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR). W2U web pages are written at three levels in English and Spanish. This information targets learners at all levels, educators, and families who seek to understand and share resources and information about the nature of weather and the climate system, and career role models from related research fields. This resource can also be helpful to educators who are building bridges in the classroom between the sciences, the arts, and literacy. Visitors to the W2U's CMMAP web portal can access a beautiful new clouds image gallery; information about each cloud type and the atmospheric processes that produce them; a Clouds in Art interactive; collections of weather-themed poetry, art, and myths; links to games and puzzles for children; and extensive classroom- ready resources and activities for K-12 teachers. Biographies of CMMAP scientists and graduate students are featured. Basic science concepts important to understanding the atmosphere, such as condensation, atmosphere pressure, lapse rate, and more have been developed, as well as 'microworlds' that enable students to interact with experimental tools while building fundamental knowledge

  19. Empirical mode decomposition analysis of random processes in the solar atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolotkov, D. Y.; Anfinogentov, S. A.; Nakariakov, V. M.

    2016-08-01

    Context. Coloured noisy components with a power law spectral energy distribution are often shown to appear in solar signals of various types. Such a frequency-dependent noise may indicate the operation of various randomly distributed dynamical processes in the solar atmosphere. Aims: We develop a recipe for the correct usage of the empirical mode decomposition (EMD) technique in the presence of coloured noise, allowing for clear distinguishing between quasi-periodic oscillatory phenomena in the solar atmosphere and superimposed random background processes. For illustration, we statistically investigate extreme ultraviolet (EUV) emission intensity variations observed with SDO/AIA in the coronal (171 Å), chromospheric (304 Å), and upper photospheric (1600 Å) layers of the solar atmosphere, from a quiet sun and a sunspot umbrae region. Methods: EMD has been used for analysis because of its adaptive nature and essential applicability to the processing non-stationary and amplitude-modulated time series. For the comparison of the results obtained with EMD, we use the Fourier transform technique as an etalon. Results: We empirically revealed statistical properties of synthetic coloured noises in EMD, and suggested a scheme that allows for the detection of noisy components among the intrinsic modes obtained with EMD in real signals. Application of the method to the solar EUV signals showed that they indeed behave randomly and could be represented as a combination of different coloured noises characterised by a specific value of the power law indices in their spectral energy distributions. On the other hand, 3-min oscillations in the analysed sunspot were detected to have energies significantly above the corresponding noise level. Conclusions: The correct accounting for the background frequency-dependent random processes is essential when using EMD for analysis of oscillations in the solar atmosphere. For the quiet sun region the power law index was found to increase

  20. Research highlights: laboratory studies of the formation and transformation of atmospheric organic aerosols.

    PubMed

    Borduas, Nadine; Lin, Vivian S

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric particles are emitted from a variety of anthropogenic and natural precursors and have direct impacts on climate, by scattering solar irradiation and nucleating clouds, and on health, by causing oxidative stress in the lungs when inhaled. They may also form from gaseous precursors, creating complex mixtures of organic and inorganic material. The chemical composition and the physical properties of aerosols will evolve during their one-week lifetime which will consequently change their impact on climate and health. The heterogeneity of aerosols is difficult to model and thus atmospheric aerosol research strives to characterize the mechanisms involved in nucleating and transforming particles in the atmosphere. Recent advances in four laboratory studies of aerosol formation and aging are highlighted here.

  1. To investigate or not to investigate? Researchers' views on unexplored atmospheric light phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caron, Etienne; Faridi, Pouya

    2016-02-01

    For hundreds of years, scientists have been studying light, which is used nowadays to explore the universe and cure diseases. Here, we present the results of a survey indicating a significant support from a subset of the academic community to investigate rare, unusual and unexplained atmospheric light phenomena that have historically been unexplored by scientists — the transient luminous phenomena in the valley of Hessdalen in Norway in particular. We propose that stable, long-term funding, and thorough investigation of poorly understood and/or unexplored luminous phenomena occurring in the low atmosphere could lead to the creation of new inter-disciplinary research programs in multiple universities, and ultimately, to important fundamental discoveries in the field of atmospheric science, photonics and beyond.

  2. Land Surface Process and Air Quality Research and Applications at MSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quattrochi, Dale; Khan, Maudood

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides an overview of land surface process and air quality research at MSFC including atmospheric modeling and ongoing research whose objective is to undertake a comprehensive spatiotemporal analysis of the effects of accurate land surface characterization on atmospheric modeling results, and public health applications. Land use maps as well as 10 meter air temperature, surface wind, PBL mean difference heights, NOx, ozone, and O3+NO2 plots as well as spatial growth model outputs are included. Emissions and general air quality modeling are also discussed.

  3. Quantifying Carbon-Climate Processes at the Regional Scale Using Atmospheric Carbonyl Sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Elliott; Berry, Joe; Torn, Margaret; David, Billesbach; Seibt, Ulrike

    2013-10-08

    Atmospheric carbonyl sulfide (COS) analysis has the potentially transformative capability for partitioning the regional carbon flux into respiration and photosynthesis components. This emerging approach is based on the observation that continental atmospheric CO2 gradients are dominated by net ecosystem fluxes while continental atmospheric COS gradients are dominated by photosynthesis-related plant uptake. Regional flux partitioning represents a critical knowledge gap due to a lack of robust methods for regional-scale flux partitioning and large uncertainties in forecasting carbon-climate feedbacks. Our completed project characterized the relationship between COS and CO2 surface fluxes using a novel measurement and modeling system in a winter wheat field at the U.S. Department of Energy?s Atmospheric and Radiation Measurement program Central Facility (DOE-ARM CF). The scope of this project included canopy flux measurements, soil flux measurements, regional atmospheric modeling, and analysis of COS and CO2 airborne observations at SGP. Three critical discoveries emerged from this investigation: (1) the new measurement system provided the first field evidence of a robust relationship between COS leaf fluxes and GPP; (2) a previously unknown seasonal soil source of COS was observed and characterized; (3) the regional atmospheric analysis of airborne measurements provided the first COS-based constraints on GPP parameterizations used in earth systems models. Dissemination of these results includes three publications [Billesbach et al., In Press; Campbell et al., In Preparation; Seibt et al., In Review], three presentations at the AGU Fall Meeting (2012), and four invited presentations to department seminars. We have leveraged this foundational project to continue our work on understanding carbon cycle processes at large scales through one funded project (DOE Lab Fee, 2012-2015) and one proposal that is under review (DOE/NASA/USDA/NOAA, 2014-2016).

  4. Uncertainty Analysis And Synergy Of Aerosol Products From Multiple Satellite Sensors For Advanced Atmospheric Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichoku, C. M.; Petrenko, M.

    2013-05-01

    Aerosols are tiny particles suspended in the air, and can be made up of wind-blown dust, smoke from fires, and particulate emissions from automobiles, industries, and other natural and man-made sources. Aerosols can have significant impacts on the air quality, and can interact with clouds and solar radiation in such a way as to affect the water cycle and climate. However, the extent and scale of these impacts are still poorly understood, and this represents one of the greatest uncertainties in climate research to date. To fill this gap in our knowledge, the global and local properties of atmospheric aerosols are being extensively observed and measured, especially during the last decade, using both satellite and ground-based instruments, including such spaceborne sensors as MODIS on the Terra and Aqua satellites, MISR on Terra, OMI on Aura, POLDER on PARASOL, CALIOP on CALIPSO, SeaWiFS on SeaStar, and the ground-based Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) of sunphotometers. The aerosol measurements collected by these instruments over the last decade contribute to an unprecedented availability of the most complete set of complimentary aerosol measurements ever acquired. Still, to be able to utilize these measurements synergistically, they have to be carefully and uniformly analyzed and inter-compared, in order to understand the uncertainties and limitations of the products - a process that is greatly complicated by the diversity of differences that exist among them. In this presentation, we will show results of a coherent comparative uncertainty analysis of aerosol measurements from the above-named satellite sensors relative to AERONET. We use these results to demonstrate how these sensors perform in different parts of the world over different landcover types as well as their performance relative to one another, thereby facilitating product selection and integration for specific research and applications needs.

  5. Processing materials inside an atmospheric-pressure radiofrequency nonthermal plasma discharge

    DOEpatents

    Selwyn, Gary S.; Henins, Ivars; Park, Jaeyoung; Herrmann, Hans W.

    2006-04-11

    Apparatus for the processing of materials involving placing a material either placed between an radio-frequency electrode and a ground electrode, or which is itself one of the electrodes. This is done in atmospheric pressure conditions. The apparatus effectively etches or cleans substrates, such as silicon wafers, or provides cleaning of spools and drums, and uses a gas containing an inert gas and a chemically reactive gas.

  6. Cosmic ray-produced radionuclides as tracers of atmospheric precipitation processes.

    PubMed

    Wogman, N A; Thomas, C W; Cooper, J A; Engelmann, R J; Perkins, R W

    1968-01-12

    Through recent developments in instrumental analysis it is now possible to measure with good precision the rainwater concentrations of five short-lived radionuclides which are produced by cosmic ray spallation of atmospheric argon. These measurements provide a method for studying the in-cloud nucleation times and aerosol scavenging efficiencies, and promise to provide information onshort-term processes which occur in rain and snow formation.

  7. Upper Atmospheric Effects of the HF Active Auroral Research Program Ionospheric Research Instrument (HAARP IRI)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-01

    Energetic particles generated in solar flares produce "particle events" in the upper atmosphere. The fast protons in solar proton events (SPE...Additional sources of odd nitrogen are; ionization of air by meteors and photochemical production in the thermosphere . Solar energy deposition above 100 km...Mesospheric and thermospheric NO sources [Jackman et al., 1980]. Source NO molecules/yr NO molecules/yr solar maximum solar minimum N20+O(1 D) 5.3x10 32

  8. Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy: Applications in Atmospheric Aerosol Research

    SciTech Connect

    Moffet, Ryan C.; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Gilles, Mary K.

    2011-01-20

    Scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM) combines x-ray microscopy and near edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS). This combination provides spatially resolved bonding and oxidation state information. While there are reviews relevant to STXM/NEXAFS applications in other environmental fields (and magnetic materials) this chapter focuses on atmospheric aerosols. It provides an introduction to this technique in a manner approachable to non-experts. It begins with relevant background information on synchrotron radiation sources and a description of NEXAFS spectroscopy. The bulk of the chapter provides a survey of STXM/NEXAFS aerosol studies and is organized according to the type of aerosol investigated. The purpose is to illustrate the current range and recent growth of scientific investigations employing STXM-NEXAFS to probe atmospheric aerosol morphology, surface coatings, mixing states, and atmospheric processing.

  9. Naval hyperspectral remote sensing research for the oceans, atmosphere, and space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoy, Robert P.; Cleveland, Joan S.; Ferek, Ronald J.

    2004-10-01

    To meet Naval needs for sensing of the global environment, the Office of Naval Research (ONR) and the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) sponsor or carry out a variety of research programs using hyperspectral sensing. For ocean sensing, airborne and space-borne hyperspectral sensors are used to characterize the littoral environment with the aim of providing specification of ocean optical parameters including water clarity, diver visibility, bathymetry, bottom type and beach characterization. For the atmosphere, the Navy has interest in hyperspectral remote sensing from geosynchronous orbit. ONR interests include improved modeling of radiation transport in the atmosphere to infer high resolution profiles of wind, temperature and minor species and cloud characteristics. With sponsorship from Director Defense Research and Engineering (DDR&E), ONR is managing a Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative (MURI) to provide new models for use with geosynchronous data. In partnership with NASA, NOAA and the Air Force, ONR is promoting the flight of the Geosynchronous Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer-Indian Ocean METOC Imager (GIFTS-IOMI) program to obtain hyperspectral atmospheric imagery with high spatial, spectral and temporal resolution. For the space environment, NRL has flown a suite of experimental ultraviolet hyperspectral sensors to determine altitude profiles of the ionospheric electron density and upper atmospheric neutral density. The High Resolution Airglow/Aurora Spectroscopy (HIRAAS) experiment on the ARGOS satellite provided a proof of concept for a future series of hyperspectral ultraviolet space weather sensors the first of which has recently been launch on a DMSP weather satellite. ONR is sponsoring the development of a multispectral ultraviolet imager to take this capability to geosynchronous orbit.

  10. Upper atmospheric processes as measured by collocated Lidar, infrasound, radiometer and airglow measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Pichon, A.; Blanc, E.; Assink, J. D.; Ceranna, L.; Pilger, C.; Ross, O.; Keckhut, P.; Hauchecorne, A.; Schmidt, C.; Bittner, M.; Wuest, S.; Rüfenacht, R.; Kaempfer, N.; Smets, P.

    2013-12-01

    unresolved atmospheric perturbations. - Additional ground-based sounding technique for measuring the vertical structure of the wind fields was deployed at OHP by University of Bern, Switzerland. As observed for the temperature, significant errors in the zonal wind model are noted between 40-60 km altitude. The mean flow of the zonal wind appears to be overestimated by ~40 m/s in the mesopause. - We also show that mesospheric airglow measurements (NDMC, http://wdc.dlr.de/ndmc/) can constrain the temperature where uncertainties in the model are the largest. Such collocated observations from different complementary sounding techniques offer a unique opportunity to provide detailed information on upper atmospheric processes from seasonal to daily scales, better understand atmospheric coupling processes and their influence on weather and climate.

  11. Observed glacier and volatile distribution on Pluto from atmosphere-topography processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertrand, Tanguy; Forget, François

    2016-12-01

    Pluto has a variety of surface frosts and landforms as well as a complex atmosphere. There is ongoing geological activity related to the massive Sputnik Planitia glacier, mostly made of nitrogen (N2) ice mixed with solid carbon monoxide and methane, covering the 4-kilometre-deep, 1,000-kilometre-wide basin of Sputnik Planitia near the anti-Charon point. The glacier has been suggested to arise from a source region connected to the deep interior, or from a sink collecting the volatiles released planetwide. Thin deposits of N2 frost, however, were also detected at mid-northern latitudes and methane ice was observed to cover most of Pluto except for the darker, frost-free equatorial regions. Here we report numerical simulations of the evolution of N2, methane and carbon monoxide on Pluto over thousands of years. The model predicts N2 ice accumulation in the deepest low-latitude basin and the threefold increase in atmospheric pressure that has been observed to occur since 1988. This points to atmospheric-topographic processes as the origin of Sputnik Planitia’s N2 glacier. The same simulations also reproduce the observed quantities of volatiles in the atmosphere and show frosts of methane, and sometimes N2, that seasonally cover the mid- and high latitudes, explaining the bright northern polar cap reported in the 1990s and the observed ice distribution in 2015. The model also predicts that most of these seasonal frosts should disappear in the next decade.

  12. Observed glacier and volatile distribution on Pluto from atmosphere-topography processes.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Tanguy; Forget, François

    2016-12-01

    Pluto has a variety of surface frosts and landforms as well as a complex atmosphere. There is ongoing geological activity related to the massive Sputnik Planitia glacier, mostly made of nitrogen (N2) ice mixed with solid carbon monoxide and methane, covering the 4-kilometre-deep, 1,000-kilometre-wide basin of Sputnik Planitia near the anti-Charon point. The glacier has been suggested to arise from a source region connected to the deep interior, or from a sink collecting the volatiles released planetwide. Thin deposits of N2 frost, however, were also detected at mid-northern latitudes and methane ice was observed to cover most of Pluto except for the darker, frost-free equatorial regions. Here we report numerical simulations of the evolution of N2, methane and carbon monoxide on Pluto over thousands of years. The model predicts N2 ice accumulation in the deepest low-latitude basin and the threefold increase in atmospheric pressure that has been observed to occur since 1988. This points to atmospheric-topographic processes as the origin of Sputnik Planitia's N2 glacier. The same simulations also reproduce the observed quantities of volatiles in the atmosphere and show frosts of methane, and sometimes N2, that seasonally cover the mid- and high latitudes, explaining the bright northern polar cap reported in the 1990s and the observed ice distribution in 2015. The model also predicts that most of these seasonal frosts should disappear in the next decade.

  13. Interconnection of reactive oxygen species chemistry across the interfaces of atmospheric, environmental, and biological processes.

    PubMed

    Anglada, Josep M; Martins-Costa, Marilia; Francisco, Joseph S; Ruiz-López, Manuel F

    2015-03-17

    Oxidation reactions are ubiquitous and play key roles in the chemistry of the atmosphere, in water treatment processes, and in aerobic organisms. Ozone (O3), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), hydrogen polyoxides (H2Ox, x > 2), associated hydroxyl and hydroperoxyl radicals (HOx = OH and HO2), and superoxide and ozonide anions (O2(-) and O3(-), respectively) are the primary oxidants in these systems. They are commonly classified as reactive oxygen species (ROS). Atmospheric chemistry is driven by a complex system of chain reactions of species, including nitrogen oxides, hydroxyl and hydroperoxide radicals, alkoxy and peroxy radicals, and ozone. HOx radicals contribute to keeping air clean, but in polluted areas, the ozone concentration increases and creates a negative impact on plants and animals. Indeed, ozone concentration is used to assess air quality worldwide. Clouds have a direct effect on the chemical composition of the atmosphere. On one hand, cloud droplets absorb many trace atmospheric gases, which can be scavenged by rain and fog. On the other hand, ionic species can form in this medium, which makes the chemistry of the atmosphere richer and more complex. Furthermore, recent studies have suggested that air-cloud interfaces might have a significant impact on the overall chemistry of the troposphere. Despite the large differences in molecular composition, concentration, and thermodynamic conditions among atmospheric, environmental, and biological systems, the underlying chemistry involving ROS has many similarities. In this Account, we examine ROS and discuss the chemical characteristics common to all of these systems. In water treatment, ROS are key components of an important subset of advanced oxidation processes. Ozonation, peroxone chemistry, and Fenton reactions play important roles in generating sufficient amounts of hydroxyl radicals to purify wastewater. Biochemical processes within living organisms also involve ROS. These species can come from pollutants in

  14. Theoretical studies of important processes in planetary and comet atmospheres. Renewel request

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guberman, Steven L.

    1989-01-01

    Current efforts have focused on the dissociative recombination (DR) of O2(+), a process of great importance in planetary atmospheres. This process is difficult to study experimentally because of the need to determine the dependence of the product electronic states and kinetic energies upon the vibrational distribution of the ion and electron temperature. The knowledge of these characteristics of DR is needed to accurately model planetary ionospheres. Using a theoretical quantum chemical approach, the generation of O(1S) from DR was studied in detail.

  15. Upper atmosphere research satellite program. [to study the chemistry energetics, and dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huntress, W. T., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    A satellite program to conduct research on the chemistry, energetics, and dynamics of the upper atmosphere was developed. The scientific goals of the Upper Atmospheric Research Program, the program requirements, and the approach toward meeting those requirements are outlined. An initial series of two overlapping spacecraft missions is described. Both spacecraft are launched and recovered by the STS, one in the winter of 1983 at a 56 deg inclination, and the other a year later at a 70 deg inclination. The duration of each mission is 18 months, and each carries instruments to make global measurements of the temperature, winds, composition, irradation, and radiance in the stratosphere, mesosphere, and lower thermosphere between the tropopause and 120 km altitude. The program requires a dedicated ground-based data system and a science team organization that leads to a strong interaction between the experiments and theory. The program includes supportive observations from other platforms such as rockets, balloons, and the Spacelab.

  16. Research activities on Antarctic middle atmosphere by JARE 25th team

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirasawa, T.; Eiwasaka, Y. AFTANAKA, M. agfujii, r.0 typ; Eiwasaka, Y. AFTANAKA, M. agfujii, r.0 typ

    1985-01-01

    The Antarctic Middle Atmosphere (AMA)-Japan research project was set about by the JARE (Japan Antarctic Research Expedition) 23rd team in 1982, and since then the JARE-24th and JARE-25th teams have been continuing reseach on the Antarctic Middle Atmosphere. Results gained by JARE-25th team members who are now working at Syowa Station (69.99 deg S, 39.35 deg E), Antarctica are presented. In their activities satellite measurements (Exos-C) and rocket soundings are used. Three rockets of the S310 type were launched at Syowa Station (Geomagnetic Latitude = 69.9 deg S) for the purpose of directly observing the electron density, ionospheric temperature, auroral patterns and luminosity in situ. Vertical profiles of electron density and auroral emission 4278A measured by three rockets are compared.

  17. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report January 1–March 31, 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Sisterson, DL

    2011-04-11

    Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Data Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Data Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  18. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report April 1–June 30, 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Voyles, JW

    2011-07-25

    Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  19. Methodological approach in determination of small spatial units in a highly complex terrain in atmospheric pollution research: the case of Zasavje region in Slovenia.

    PubMed

    Kukec, Andreja; Boznar, Marija Z; Mlakar, Primoz; Grasic, Bostjan; Herakovic, Andrej; Zadnik, Vesna; Zaletel-Kragelj, Lijana; Farkas, Jerneja; Erzen, Ivan

    2014-05-01

    The study of atmospheric air pollution research in complex terrains is challenged by the lack of appropriate methodology supporting the analysis of the spatial relationship between phenomena affected by a multitude of factors. The key is optimal design of a meaningful approach based on small spatial units of observation. The Zasavje region, Slovenia, was chosen as study area with the main objective to investigate in practice the role of such units in a test environment. The process consisted of three steps: modelling of pollution in the atmosphere with dispersion models, transfer of the results to geographical information system software, and then moving on to final determination of the function of small spatial units. A methodology capable of designing useful units for atmospheric air pollution research in highly complex terrains was created, and the results were deemed useful in offering starting points for further research in the field of geospatial health.

  20. The role of biogenic, biomass burning and urban pollution aerosol particles in controlling key atmospheric processes in Amazonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artaxo, P.; Ferreira De Brito, J.; Barbosa, H. M.; Rizzo, L. V.; Sena, E. T.; Cirino, G.; Arana, A.; Yanez-Serrano, A. M.

    2013-05-01

    As part of the LBA (The Large Scale Biosphere Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia) experiment, a research program run in the last 10 years had help to understand critical atmospheric processes in Amazonia. The vegetation in Amazonia is a direct source of aerosol particles to the atmosphere as well as a source of biogenic trace gases that generates particles trough gas-to-particle conversion. Biomass burning is also a large source of particles and trace gases to the atmosphere. Over the last 10 years, the LBA experiment has unveiled several key processes that control Amazonian composition and influence regional climate. A significant fraction (60-80%) of airborne particles can act as Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN), influencing cloud formation and development. The radiation balance is strongly influenced by biomass burning particles, and surface radiative forcing up to -250 w/m2 is measured. A network of 8 sites with AERONET sunphotometers measures aerosol optical depth (AOD) and derive aerosol size distribution and optical properties. Aerosols are composed of more than 70% of organic material, with significant absorption characteristics. The aerosol radiative forcing during the biomass burning season can reach very high values, and the increase in diffuse radiation increases the carbon uptake by the forest for AOD values smaller than 1.2 at 500nm. For large AOD, the solar flux is strongly reduced making the carbon uptake approach zero for AOD larger than 3.0. The composition of aerosols is mostly organic, with contribution of K, Ca, Si, and other trace elements. The aerosol has high capability to serve as Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN), contributing with high water vapor amounts to the significant cloud cover over the region. In the last 20 years, an urbanization process took over for most of the Amazonian region, increasing urban pollution that interacts with forest emissions to produce a quite unique pattern of aerosols and pollutants around large urban areas such

  1. Formation and Processing of Secondary Organic Aerosol from Catechol as a Model for Atmospheric HULIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ofner, Johannes; Krüger, Heinz-Ulrich; Grothe, Hinrich; Zetzsch, Cornelius

    2010-05-01

    A particular fraction of the secondary organic aerosol (SOA) termed HUmic Like Substances (HULIS) attracted attention only recently in atmospheric aerosol, initiating a discourse about their aromaticity and other properties, such as reactivity and hygroscopicity. A major portion of HULIS originates from volatile organic compounds, which are formed by abiotic oxidation reactions involving mainly OH radicals, ozone, nitrogen oxides and possibly halogens. Subsequently, the particles provide surface for heterogeneous reactions with atmospheric trace gases. Thus, aerosol smog-chamber studies with appropriate precursors are needed to generate SOA with HULIS qualities in situ inside the smog chamber and study their possible interactions. Catechol and guaiacol were chosen as aromatic precursors for synthetic HULIS production. The SOA was produced in a 700 L aerosol smog chamber, equipped with a solar simulator. SOA formation from each precursor was investigated at simulated environmental conditions (humidity, light, and presence of oxidizers) and characterized with respect to HULIS properties by particle classifiers, Fourier Transform IR spectroscopy (by long-path absorption and attenuated total reflection), UV/VIS spectroscopy, high-resolution mass-spectroscopy and temperature-programmed-desorption mass-spectrometry. High-resolution imaging was obtained using Field Emission Gun Scanning Electron Microscopy (FEGSEM). After HULIS formation the aerosol particles were exposed to atmospheric halogen species to study their processing with those trace gases, released by sea salt-activation. Those investigations show that aromatic precursors like catechol and guaiacol are suitable to form synthetic HULIS for laboratory-scale measurements with physical and chemical properties described in literature. However, sunlight and relative humidity play a major role in particle production and composition of functional groups, which are the anchor points for heterogeneous atmospheric

  2. Parameterization and scaling of Arctic ice conditions in the context of ice-atmosphere processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barry, R. G.; Heinrichs, J.; Steffen, K.; Maslanik, J. A.; Key, J.; Serreze, M. C.; Weaver, R. W.

    1994-01-01

    This report summarizes achievements during year three of our project to investigate the use of ERS-1 SAR data to study Arctic ice and ice/atmosphere processes. The project was granted a one year extension, and goals for the final year are outlined. The specific objects of the project are to determine how the development and evolution of open water/thin ice areas within the interior ice pack vary under different atmospheric synoptic regimes; compare how open water/thin ice fractions estimated from large-area divergence measurements differ from fractions determined by summing localized openings in the pack; relate these questions of scale and process to methods of observation, modeling, and averaging over time and space; determine whether SAR data might be used to calibrate ice concentration estimates from medium and low-rate bit sensors (AVHRR and DMSP-OLS) and the special sensor microwave imager (SSM/I); and investigate methods to integrate SAR data for turbulent heat flux parametrization at the atmosphere interface with other satellite data.

  3. Autonomous Flying Platforms for Atmospheric and Earth Surface Observations (APAESO) - A pioneering research facility in Cyprus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, Manfred; Teller, Amit; Keleshis, Christos; Ioannou, Stelios; Philimis, Panayiotis; Lelieveld, Jos; Levin, Zev

    2010-05-01

    The use of Unmanned Aerial Systems (UASs) has increased dramatically in the recent decades. UASs are widely used for different civil applications such as land management, earth sciences, contaminant detection and monitoring and commercial use. The Autonomous Flying Platforms for Atmospheric and Earth Surface Observations project (APAESO) of the Energy, Environment and Water Research Center (EEWRC) at the Cyprus Institute is aimed at the dual purpose of carrying out atmospheric and earth-surface observations in the Mediterranean. The APAESO UAS platforms will provide the unique ability to produce 3D measurements for determining: physical, chemical and radiative atmospheric properties, aerosol and dust concentrations and atmospheric dynamics as well as 2D investigations into: surface morphology, vegetation and land use patterns, archaeological site reconnaissance, contaminant detection and ocean surface properties (biology, waves, currents) at high spatial resolution. Through a modular design philosophy, APAESO will be very adaptable for a variety of scientific investigations enabling scientific collaborations between the Cyprus Institute and national and international research organizations. The Cyprus Institute is currently procuring the "Cruiser", which is a medium size Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) that is capable of carrying a payload of up to 10 kg, fly to altitude of 5000 m AGL with an endurance of up to 10 hours. Within the next phase of the project, the "Cruiser" will be equipped with instruments for atmospheric and earth surface observations. The poster will present the different components of the project: the UAS platform, payload to be integrated and scientific challenges that we are about to tackle and solve.

  4. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1984 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 3. Atmospheric sciences

    SciTech Connect

    Elderkin, C.E.

    1985-02-01

    The goals of atmospheric research at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) are to assess, describe, and predict the nature and fate of atmospheric contaminants and to study the impacts of contaminants on local, regional, and global climates. The contaminants being investigated are those resulting from the development and use of conventional resources (coal, gas, oil, and nuclear power) as well as alternative energy sources. The description of the research is organized into 3 sections: (1) Atmospheric Studies in Complex Terrain (ASCOT); (2) Boundary Layer Meteorology; and (3) Dispersion, Deposition, and Resuspension of Atmospheric Contaminants. Separate analytics have been done for each of the sections and are indexed and contained in the EDB. (MDF)

  5. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1983 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 3. Atmospheric sciences

    SciTech Connect

    Elderkin, C.E.

    1984-02-01

    The goals of atmospheric research at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) are to assess, describe and predict the nature and fate of atmospheric contaminants and to study the impacts of contaminants on local, regional and global climates. The contaminants being investigated are those resulting from the development and use of conventional energy resources (coal, gas, oil, and nuclear power) as well as alternative energy resources. The description of atmospheric research at PNL is organized in terms of generic studies including Contaminant Characterizations and Transformation; Boundary Layer Meteorology; and Dispersion, Deposition and Resupension of Atmospheric Contaminants.

  6. Decadal variation of the North Atlantic meridional heat transport and its relation to atmospheric processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, T.; Ruprecht, E.

    2007-02-01

    The effects of the meridional heat transport in the North Atlantic Ocean (HTR) on the north hemispheric climate are studied using the results of the coupled model ECHAM5/MPI-OM. Significant correlations exist between HTR and atmospheric processes over the Nordic Seas and the Eurasian continent only for low (periods longer than 40 years) and intermediate frequency variations (periods between 25 and 40 years). A positive HTR anomaly at 30°N is highly correlated with turbulent heat fluxes around 50°N. The transport through 70°N is directly related to the fluxes over the Nordic seas. From the correlation pattern with the atmospheric surface temperature and pressure one can conclude that the heat anomalies propagate along the cyclone tracks towards northeast over the Eurasian continent. The HRT anomalies are negatively correlated with the pressure over the Nordic seas and with the winter time anticyclone intensity over Siberia.

  7. Development of Nitrogen-Hydrocarbon Atmospheric Carburizing and Process Control Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaolan; Zurecki, Zbigniew; Sisson, Richard D.

    2013-07-01

    Atmospheric pressure carburizing and neutral carbon potential annealing in nitrogen containing small additions of hydrocarbon gases can offer cost and steel surface quality alternatives to the comparable, endothermic atmosphere, or vacuum operations. An experimental program was conducted for refining real-time process control methods in carburizing of AISI 8620 steel under N2-CH4, N2-C3H8 blends containing <5 vol.% of hydrocarbon gas at 900 and 930 °C. Multiple types of gas analyzers were used to monitor residual concentrations of H2, CO, CO2, H2O, O2, CH4, C3H8, and other hydrocarbons inside furnace. A modified shim stock technique was additionally evaluated for correlation with gas analysis and diffusional modeling using measured carbon mass flux values (g/cm2/s). Results of this evaluation work are presented.

  8. A mathematical examination of the press model for atmospheric turbulence. [aircraft design/random processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidwell, K.

    1975-01-01

    The random process used to model atmospheric turbulence in aircraft response problems is examined. The first, second, and higher order probability density and characteristic functions were developed. The concepts of the Press model lead to an approximate procedure for the analysis of the response of linear dynamic systems to a class of non-Gaussian random processes. The Press model accounts for both the Gaussian and non-Gaussian forms of measured turbulence data. The nonstationary aspects of measured data are explicitly described by the transition properties of the random process. The effects of the distribution of the intensity process upon calculated exceedances are examined. It is concluded that the press model with a Gaussian intensity distribution gives a conservative prediction of limit load values.

  9. Process and apparatus for igniting a burner in an inert atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Coolidge, Dennis W.; Rinker, Franklin G.

    1994-01-01

    According to this invention there is provided a process and apparatus for the ignition of a pilot burner in an inert atmosphere without substantially contaminating the inert atmosphere. The process includes the steps of providing a controlled amount of combustion air for a predetermined interval of time to the combustor then substantially simultaneously providing a controlled mixture of fuel and air to the pilot burner and to a flame generator. The controlled mixture of fuel and air to the flame generator is then periodically energized to produce a secondary flame. With the secondary flame the controlled mixture of fuel and air to the pilot burner and the combustion air is ignited to produce a pilot burner flame. The pilot burner flame is then used to ignited a mixture of main fuel and combustion air to produce a main burner flame. The main burner flame then is used to ignite a mixture of process derived fuel and combustion air to produce products of combustion for use as an inert gas in a heat treatment process.

  10. The Role of Spectroscopy in Research on the Neutral Atmospheres of the Outer Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orton, Glenn S.

    2013-06-01

    Remote-sensing observations of Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune, as well as Titan - Saturn's largest satellite, and the spectroscopic information required to interpret these observations play a pivotal role in the exploration of the atmospheres of the outer solar system. We rely on well-mixed constituents to derive temperatures unambiguously, with only the collision-induced absorption and quadrupole transitions of H_2 and CH_4 in Jupiter and Saturn fulfilling that role. Condensate and chemically disequilibrated molecules (e.g. NH_3 and PH_3) act as indirect tracers that inform us of the strength of vertical winds. Higher-order hydrocarbons are present in all these atmospheres and their abundances and distribution acts as a tracer for stratospheric circulation and chemistry. The platforms on which planetary spectroscopy is done include a variety of ground-based facilities that observe the planets from the visible through radio regions. Airborne facilities, such as NASA's SOFIA, together with Earth-proximal facilities in space, allow both increased sensitivity and wider spectral access. Spectrometers on interplanetary missions have allowed us to examine the spatial and temporal variability of atmospheric properties that are not possible from the Earth. Several needs and challenges remain, and a constant dialog between those in the planetary exploration community and laboratory spectroscopists and theorists has been and will continue to be an important component of progress in atmospheric research. -

  11. Cramer-Rao Bound for Gaussian Random Processes and Applications to Radar Processing of Atmospheric Signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frehlich, Rod

    1993-01-01

    Calculations of the exact Cramer-Rao Bound (CRB) for unbiased estimates of the mean frequency, signal power, and spectral width of Doppler radar/lidar signals (a Gaussian random process) are presented. Approximate CRB's are derived using the Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT). These approximate results are equal to the exact CRB when the DFT coefficients are mutually uncorrelated. Previous high SNR limits for CRB's are shown to be inaccurate because the discrete summations cannot be approximated with integration. The performance of an approximate maximum likelihood estimator for mean frequency approaches the exact CRB for moderate signal to noise ratio and moderate spectral width.

  12. Diagnostic study of climate feedback processes in atmospheric general circulation models

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, M.H.; Cess, R.D.; Hack, J.J.; Kiehl, J.T.

    1994-03-20

    A method is proposed to diagnose climate feedbacks of water vapor, temperature lapse-rate, and cloud variations in atmospheric general circulation models. It is then applied to study differences in sensitivity of the National Center for Atmospheric Research community climate model (CCM2) and two hybrid versions of CCM2 with different cumulus-convection schemes. Water vapor feedback and temperature lapse-rate feedback differ among the models due to different efficiencies of heat and moisture transport by cumulus convections. A large compensation occurs between water vapor feedback and temperature lapse-rate feedback. This leads to similar clear-sky sensitivities in the models. Cloud-radiative feedback is negative in CCM2 with a {delta}SST climate change due to the vigorous cumulus-convective scheme. Stronger convection warms the upper troposphere and reduces its cloudiness more, resulting in negative longwave cloud-radiative feedback. In models where a moist-adiabatic-adjustment scheme and then a decoupling of the atmospheric boundary layer are subsequently used, intensity of cumulus convection is successively reduced and cloud-radiative feedback changes to either neutral or positive. 31 refs., 21 figs., 21 tabs.

  13. Present state of knowledge of the upper atmosphere: An assessment report; processes that control ozone and other climatically important trace gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, R. T.; Geller, M. A.; Stolarski, R. S.; Hampson, R. F.

    1986-01-01

    The state of knowledge of the upper atmosphere was assessed as of January 1986. The physical, chemical, and radiative processes which control the spatial and temporal distribution of ozone in the atmosphere; the predicted magnitude of ozone perturbations and climate changes for a variety of trace gas scenarios; and the ozone and temperature data used to detect the presence or absence of a long term trend were discussed. This assessment report was written by a small group of NASA scientists, was peer reviewed, and is based primarily on the comprehensive international assessment document entitled Atmospheric Ozone 1985: Assessment of Our Understanding of the Processes Controlling Its Present Distribution and Change, to be published as the World Meteorological Organization Global Ozone Research and Monitoring Project Report No. 16.

  14. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1 – September 30, 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Sisterson, DL

    2008-09-30

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 – (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the fourth quarter of FY 2008 for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2,097.60 hours (0.95 x 2,208 hours this quarter). The OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) locale is 1,987.20 hours (0.90 x 2,208), and for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1,876.80 hours (0.85 x 2,208). The OPSMAX time for the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) is not reported this quarter because the data have not yet been released from China to the DMF for processing. The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is

  15. Tropical Systems Research at the Universtiy of Miami's Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science (RSMAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginsburg, R. N.; Rankey, E.; Zhang, C.; Mooers, C. N.

    2004-12-01

    The global significance of the tropics is unquestionable. The tropical seas are the engine of earth's atmosphere and hydrosphere; they are the locus of major biodiversity; and most of the world's five billion inhabitants live in the tropics. At the same time these environments strongly influence both social and economic activities in various ways. Yet, in many ways, understanding of tropical systems lags that of other regions. To meet this need, RSMAS is developing an expansion of its already substantial focus on tropical systems. From its beginnings in the 1940s, the School's focus on the tropics was a natural result of its location adjacent to the Tropical Atlantic. During the subsequent decades, research interests have broadened and include the coupling between the two halves: the tropics and extratropics. The Faculty's involvement with the tropics spread to the Pacific and Indian Oceans, the Red Sea and the Persian Gulf and beyond to higher latitudes. In the last five years, a majority of the Faculty have explored some aspect of the tropical hydrosphere, biosphere, atmosphere, or geosphere in this important region. At present, all divisions, themes, and centers are involved significantly in the tropics. Over the years, research approaches have evolved from exploration and description to analysis, numerical simulation and inter-disciplinary integration. Now the Faculty is faced with the challenge of further integrating our science and applying some of the results to societal problems. To address these challenges, the present research foci build on existing strengths and develop novel and integrated research and a new and challenging curriculum focused on scientific, societal and economic aspects of the global tropics. Existing strengths in air-sea interaction and ocean-atmosphere coupling provides the platform for an expanded research program on hurricanes, the roles of the tropics in the global climate system, and coastal ocean-atmosphere-land interactions

  16. Airborne mapping of earth-atmosphere exchange processes and remote sensing of surface characteristics over heterogeneous areas

    SciTech Connect

    Schuepp, P.H.; Ogunjemiyo, S.; Mitic, C.M.

    1996-10-01

    Given the spatial heterogeneity of much of the biosphere, and the difficulty in establishing representative observation points at the surface, airborne flux observations coupled with airborne and satellite-based remote sensing plays an increasing role in the description of surface-atmosphere exchange processes. Our paper summarizes flux mapping procedures based on low level airborne sampling by the Canadian Twin Otter research aircraft, over three ecosystems with different degrees of spatial heterogeneity (grassland, mixed agricultural land and boreal forest). Observations show that the degree to which flux maps for heat, moisture and trace gases are correlated, among themselves and with maps of radiometrically observable surface features, cannot be generalized. This means that, wherever possible, algorithms for the prediction of surface-atmosphere exchange processes based on remote sensing observations should be developed for - and tested in - each structurally different ecosystem. The flexibility of deployment of aircraft serves well, both for the gathering of data to develop such algorithms, as well as for their testing at scales that integrate over an adequate sample of the various components that constitute a spatially heterogeneous ecosystem. 23 refs., 4 figs.

  17. Heterogeneous Atmospheric Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schryer, David R.

    In the past few years it has become increasingly clear that heterogeneous, or multiphase, processes play an important role in the atmosphere. Unfortunately the literature on the subject, although now fairly extensive, is still rather dispersed. Furthermore, much of the expertise regarding heterogeneous processes lies in fields not directly related to atmospheric science. Therefore, it seemed desirable to bring together for an exchange of ideas, information, and methodologies the various atmospheric scientists who are actively studying heterogeneous processes as well as other researchers studying similar processes in the context of other fields.

  18. Focal and Ambient Processing of Built Environments: Intellectual and Atmospheric Experiences of Architecture.

    PubMed

    Rooney, Kevin K; Condia, Robert J; Loschky, Lester C

    2017-01-01

    Neuroscience has well established that human vision divides into the central and peripheral fields of view. Central vision extends from the point of gaze (where we are looking) out to about 5° of visual angle (the width of one's fist at arm's length), while peripheral vision is the vast remainder of the visual field. These visual fields project to the parvo and magno ganglion cells, which process distinctly different types of information from the world around us and project that information to the ventral and dorsal visual streams, respectively. Building on the dorsal/ventral stream dichotomy, we can further distinguish between focal processing of central vision, and ambient processing of peripheral vision. Thus, our visual processing of and attention to objects and scenes depends on how and where these stimuli fall on the retina. The built environment is no exception to these dependencies, specifically in terms of how focal object perception and ambient spatial perception create different types of experiences we have with built environments. We argue that these foundational mechanisms of the eye and the visual stream are limiting parameters of architectural experience. We hypothesize that people experience architecture in two basic ways based on these visual limitations; by intellectually assessing architecture consciously through focal object processing and assessing architecture in terms of atmosphere through pre-conscious ambient spatial processing. Furthermore, these separate ways of processing architectural stimuli operate in parallel throughout the visual perceptual system. Thus, a more comprehensive understanding of architecture must take into account that built environments are stimuli that are treated differently by focal and ambient vision, which enable intellectual analysis of architectural experience versus the experience of architectural atmosphere, respectively. We offer this theoretical model to help advance a more precise understanding of the

  19. Focal and Ambient Processing of Built Environments: Intellectual and Atmospheric Experiences of Architecture

    PubMed Central

    Rooney, Kevin K.; Condia, Robert J.; Loschky, Lester C.

    2017-01-01

    Neuroscience has well established that human vision divides into the central and peripheral fields of view. Central vision extends from the point of gaze (where we are looking) out to about 5° of visual angle (the width of one’s fist at arm’s length), while peripheral vision is the vast remainder of the visual field. These visual fields project to the parvo and magno ganglion cells, which process distinctly different types of information from the world around us and project that information to the ventral and dorsal visual streams, respectively. Building on the dorsal/ventral stream dichotomy, we can further distinguish between focal processing of central vision, and ambient processing of peripheral vision. Thus, our visual processing of and attention to objects and scenes depends on how and where these stimuli fall on the retina. The built environment is no exception to these dependencies, specifically in terms of how focal object perception and ambient spatial perception create different types of experiences we have with built environments. We argue that these foundational mechanisms of the eye and the visual stream are limiting parameters of architectural experience. We hypothesize that people experience architecture in two basic ways based on these visual limitations; by intellectually assessing architecture consciously through focal object processing and assessing architecture in terms of atmosphere through pre-conscious ambient spatial processing. Furthermore, these separate ways of processing architectural stimuli operate in parallel throughout the visual perceptual system. Thus, a more comprehensive understanding of architecture must take into account that built environments are stimuli that are treated differently by focal and ambient vision, which enable intellectual analysis of architectural experience versus the experience of architectural atmosphere, respectively. We offer this theoretical model to help advance a more precise understanding of the

  20. Advances in research on atmospheric energy propagation and the interactions between different latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Song; Deng, Kaiqiang; Ting, Mingfang; Hu, Chundi

    2015-12-01

    Early theoretical analyses indicated that the tropics and extratropics are relatively independent due to the existence of critical latitudes. However, considerable observational evidence has shown that a clear dynamical link exists between the tropics and midlatitudes. To better understand such atmospheric teleconnection, several theories of wave energy propagation are reviewed in this paper: (1) great circle theory, which reveals the characteristics of Rossby waves propagating in the spherical atmosphere; (2) westerly duct theory, which suggests a "corridor" through which the midlatitude disturbances in one hemisphere can propagate into the other hemisphere; (3) energy accumulation-wave emanation theory, which proposes processes through which tropical disturbances can affect the atmospheric motion in higher latitudes; (4) equatorial wave expansion theory, which further explains the physical mechanisms involved in the interaction between the tropics and extratropics; and (5) meridional basic flow theory, which argues that stationary waves can propagate across the tropical easterlies under certain conditions. In addition, the progress made in diagnosing wave-flow interaction, particularly for Rossby waves, inertial-gravity waves, and Kelvin waves, is also reviewed. The meridional propagation of atmospheric energy exhibits significant annual and interannual variations, closely related to ENSO and variation in the westerly jets and tropical upper-tropospheric troughs, amongst others.

  1. The ABC-Pyramid Atmospheric Research Observatory in Himalaya for aerosol, ozone and halocarbon measurements.

    PubMed

    Bonasoni, P; Laj, P; Angelini, F; Arduini, J; Bonafè, U; Calzolari, F; Cristofanelli, P; Decesari, S; Facchini, M C; Fuzzi, S; Gobbi, G P; Maione, M; Marinoni, A; Petzold, A; Roccato, F; Roger, J C; Sellegri, K; Sprenger, M; Venzac, H; Verza, G P; Villani, P; Vuillermoz, E

    2008-03-01

    In this work we present the new ABC-Pyramid Atmospheric Research Observatory (Nepal, 27.95 N, 86.82 E) located in the Himalayas, specifically in the Khumbu valley at 5079 m a.s.l. This measurement station has been set-up with the aim of investigating natural and human-induced environmental changes at different scales (local, regional and global). After an accurate instrumental set-up at ISAC-CNR in Bologna (Italy) in autumn 2005, the ABC-Pyramid Observatory for aerosol (physical, chemical and optical properties) and trace gas measurements (ozone and climate altering halocarbons) was installed in the high Khumbu valley in February 2006. Since March 2006, continuous measurements of aerosol particles (optical and physical properties), ozone (O3) and meteorological parameters as well as weekly samplings of particulate matter (for chemical analyses) and grab air samples for the determination of 27 halocarbons, have been carried out. These measurements provide data on the typical atmospheric composition of the Himalayan area between India and China and make investigations of the principal differences and similarities between the monsoon and pre-monsoon seasons possible. The study is carried out within the framework of the Ev-K2-CNR "SHARE-Asia" (Stations at High Altitude for Research on the Environment in Asia) and UNEP-"ABC" (Atmospheric Brown Clouds) projects. With the name of "Nepal Climate Observatory-Pyramid" the station is now part of the Observatory program of the ABC project.

  2. Characterization of atmosphere-water exchange processes of CO 2 in estuaries using dynamic simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Luque, E.; Forja, J. M.; Gómez-Parra, A.

    2005-12-01

    CO 2 is one of the so-called "greenhouse effect" gases; therefore, its rates of water-atmosphere exchange are very relevant for studies of climate change. Coastal zones (which include estuarine systems) are of special interest in relation to the global carbon cycle. Thus, an estuary simulator, which operates in a dynamic mixing regime, is specifically applied in an initial study of the estuarine dynamic of inorganic carbon, focusing basically on the influence of salinity and pH on the water-atmosphere fluxes of CO 2 in these zones. The simulation has been performed under two assumptions: (i) considering that the system is subjected to a stationary gradient of salinity and (ii) taking into account the effect of the tides, owing to the daily oscillations introduced by this phenomenon in the process of CO 2 transfer between the water and the atmosphere. After analysing the results, it has been observed that a potential source of error exists when choosing the coefficients of gas exchange ( k) for CO 2 studies. Nevertheless, the evolution of CO 2 fluxes along the salinity and pH gradients achieved shows the same trends with those observed in a wide variety of real estuaries described in the related literature.

  3. Feedbacks between Hydrological Processes in Tropical South America and Large-Scale Ocean-Atmospheric Phenomena.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poveda, Germán; Mesa, Oscar J.

    1997-10-01

    The hydroclimatology of tropical South America is strongly coupled to low-frequency large-scale oceanicand atmospheric phenomena occurring over the Pacific and the Atlantic Oceans. In particular, El Niño-SouthernOscillation (ENSO) affects climatic and hydrologic conditions on timescales ranging from seasons to decades.With some regional differences in timing and amplitude, tropical South America exhibits negative rainfall andstreamflow anomalies in association with the low-warm phase of the Southern Oscillation (El Niño), and positiveanomalies with the high-cold phase. Such dependence is illustrated in the hydroclimatology of Colombia throughseveral empirical analyses: correlation, empirical orthogonal functions, principal component, and spectral analysis, and discussion of the major physical mechanisms. Observations show that ENSO's effect on river dischargesoccurs progressively later for rivers toward the east in Colombia and northern South America. Also, the impactsof La Niña are more pronounced than those of El Niño. Evidence is also presented to show that processes arisingfrom land-atmosphere interactions in tropical South America affect sea surface temperatures in the Caribbeanand the north tropical Atlantic. A hypothesis is formulated to explain these feedback mechanisms throughperturbations in precipitation, soil moisture, and evapotranspiration over the continent. To begin with, the occurrence of both phases of ENSO affects all those fields. The proposed mechanisms would constitute the `land-atmosphere' bridge connecting Pacific and Atlantic SST anomalies.

  4. Parameterization and scaling of arctic ice conditions in the context of ice-atmospheric processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barry, R. G.; Steffen, K.; Heinrichs, J. F.; Key, J. R.; Maslanik, J. A.; Serreze, M. C.; Weaver, R. L.

    1995-01-01

    The goals of this project are to observe how the open water/thin ice fraction in a high-concentration ice pack responds to different short-period atmospheric forcings, and how this response is represented in different scales of observation. The objectives can be summarized as follows: determine the feasibility and accuracy of ice concentration and ice typing by ERS-1 SAR backscatter data, and whether SAR data might be used to calibrate concentration estimates from optical and massive-microwave sensors; investigate methods to integrate SAR data with other satellite data for turbulent heat flux parameterization at the ocean/atmosphere interface; determine how the development and evolution of open water/thin ice areas within the interior ice pack vary under different atmospheric synoptic regimes; compare how open-water/thin ice fractions estimated from large-area divergence measurements differ from fractions determined by summing localized openings in the pack; relate these questions of scale and process to methods of observation, modeling, and averaging over time and space.

  5. Dryden Flight Research Center: The World's Premiere Installation for Atmospheric Flight Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratnayake, Nalin Asela

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews NASA Dryden's capabilities, the work that Dryden has done for NASA, and its current research. Dryden's Mission is stated to advance technology and science through flight. The mission elements are: (1) Perform flight research and technology integration to revolutionize aviation and pioneer aerospace technology, (2) Validate space exploration concepts, (3) Conduct airborne remote sensing and science observations, (4) Support operations of the Space Shuttle and the ISS for NASA and the Nation.

  6. Invited papers from the International Symposium on Nonequilibrium Processes, Plasma, Combustion and Atmospheric Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starik, Alexander M.

    2013-11-01

    The International Symposium on Nonequilibrium Processes, Plasma, Combustion and Atmospheric Phenomena is a forum of international experts in such fundamental areas as physical and chemical kinetics, physics of low temperature and cluster plasmas, physics of shock and detonation waves, physics and chemistry of aerosols and nanoparticles, combustion and atmospheric chemistry, physics and chemistry of high speed flows, plasma and laser chemistry, plasma, laser and combustion assisted technologies. This symposium has already become a notable biannual event attracting a growing attendance of scientists from all over the world. The first symposium was organizing in St Petersburg, Russia, 8-11 July 2003, and was dedicated to the memory of N N Semenov, a founder of the chain-branching reaction theory and a Nobel prizewinner. The second, third and fourth symposia were held in Sochi, Russia, 3-7 October 2005; 25-29 June 2007; and 5-9 October 2009. The last (fifth) symposium was also organized in Sochi, Russia, 1-6 October 2012. Here we present selected proceedings of the last symposium, comprised of four invited papers on the topics of ab initio studies of some elementary processes important for atmospheric plasma and combustion, kinetics of low temperature plasma and physics of clusters. The papers have been written by the symposium participants and are based on their reports at the meeting. They are: 'Thermochemistry of small iodine species' by Šulková et al ; 'Analysis of the reaction and quenching channels in a H + O2(a 1Δg ) system' by Sharipov and Starik; 'Kinetics of plasmachemical processes in the expanding flow of nitrogen plasma' by Kadochnikov et al ; and 'Theoretical study of structure and physical properties of (Al2O3)n clusters' by Sharipov et al.

  7. Role of desorption processes in the formation of K in tenuous planetary atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madey, T. E.; Yakshinskiy, B. V.

    2001-11-01

    We will discuss recent laboratory data indicating that DIET processes (desorption induced by electronic transitions) may affect planetary atmospheres. We focus on the origins of neutral potassium vapor in the atmospheres of the planet Mercury, the Moon, and the icy satellites of Jupiter. We are conducting ultrahigh-vacuum studies of adsorption and desorption of atomic potassium on model mineral systems (SiO2 thin films), as well as on models of icy satellite surfaces (condensed water ice films). We found evidence previously that non-thermal processes - mainly photon-stimulated desorption (PSD) by UV photons - may play a dominant role in desorption of Na atoms from the lunar surface[1], and the present results indicate that K can be desorbed by PSD. The desorption mechanism involves a photon-excited charge-exchange process, in which adsorbed ionic K is converted to neutral K, which desorbs. Recent data on desorption from a lunar sample will be discussed. [1] B. V. Yakshinskiy and T. E. Madey, Nature 400(1999) 642; Surface Science 451 (2000) 160. This work has been supported in part by NASA

  8. Plasma Processing with a One Atmosphere Uniform Glow Discharge Plasma (OAUGDP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reece Roth, J.

    2000-10-01

    The vast majority of all industrial plasma processing is conducted with glow discharges at pressures below 10 torr. This has limited applications to high value workpieces as a result of the large capital cost of vacuum systems and the production constraints of batch processing. It has long been recognized that glow discharges would play a much larger industrial role if they could be operated at one atmosphere. The One Atmosphere Uniform Glow Discharge Plasma (OAUGDP) has been developed at the University of Tennessee Plasma Sciences Laboratory. The OAUGDP is non-thermal RF plasma with the time-resolved characteristics of a classical low pressure DC normal glow discharge. An interdisciplinary team was formed to conduct exploratory investigations of the physics and applications of the OAUGDP. This team includes collaborators from the UTK Textiles and Nonwovens Development Center (TANDEC) and the Departments of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Microbiology, Food Science and Technology, and Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Science. Exploratory tests were conducted on a variety of potential plasma processing and other applications. These include the use of OAUGDP to sterilize medical and dental equipment and air filters; diesel soot removal; plasma aerodynamic effects; electrohydrodynamic (EDH) flow control of the neutral working gas; increasing the surface energy of materials; increasing the wettability and wickability of fabrics; and plasma deposition and directional etching. A general overview of these topics will be presented.

  9. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report October 1–December 31, 2009

    SciTech Connect

    DL Sisterson

    2010-01-15

    Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Data Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  10. Atmospheric performance of the special-purpose Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) thin-airfoil family

    SciTech Connect

    Tangler, J; Smith, B; Jager, D; Olsen, T

    1990-09-01

    The Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI), in cooperation with SeaWest Energy Group, has completed extensive atmospheric testing of the special-purpose SERI thin-airfoil family during the 1990 wind season. The purpose of this test program was to experimentally verify the predicted performance characteristics of the thin-airfoil family on a geometrically optimized blade, and to compare it to original-equipment blades under atmospheric wind conditions. The tests were run on two identical Micon 65/13 horizontal-axis wind turbines installed side-by-side in a wind farm. The thin-airfoil family 7.96 m blades were installed on one turbine, and AeroStar 7.41 m blades were installed on the other. This paper presents final performance results of the side-by-side comparative field test for both clean and dirty blade conditions. 7 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Fundamental remote sensing science research program: The Scene Radiation and Atmospheric Effects Characterization Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deering, D. W.

    1985-01-01

    The Scene Radiation and Atmospheric Effects Characterization (SRAEC) Project was established within the NASA Fundamental Remote Sensing Science Research Program to improve our understanding of the fundamental relationships of energy interactions between the sensor and the surface target, including the effect of the atmosphere. The current studies are generalized into the following five subject areas: optical scene modeling, Earth-space radiative transfer, electromagnetic properties of surface materials, microwave scene modeling, and scatterometry studies. This report has been prepared to provide a brief overview of the SRAEC Project history and objectives and to report on the scientific findings and project accomplishments made by the nineteen principal investigators since the project's initiation just over three years ago. This annual summary report derives from the most recent annual principal investigators meeting held January 29 to 31, 1985.

  12. Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR): Instrument Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Dunagan, Stephen; Johnson, Roy; Zavaleta, Jhony; Russell, P. B.; Schmid, Beat; Flynn, Connor J.; Redemann, Jens; Shinozuka, Yohei; Livingston, J.; Segal Rozenhaimer, Michal

    2013-08-06

    The Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR) combines airborne sun tracking and sky scanning with diffraction spectroscopy, to improve knowledge of atmospheric constituents and their links to air-pollution/climate. Direct beam hyper-spectral measurement of optical depth improves retrievals of gas constituents and determination of aerosol properties. Sky scanning enhances retrievals of aerosol type and size distribution. 4STAR measurements will tighten the closure between satellite and ground-based measurements. 4STAR incorporates a modular sun-tracking/ sky-scanning optical head with fiber optic signal transmission to rack mounted spectrometers, permitting miniaturization of the external optical head, and future detector evolution. Technical challenges include compact optical collector design, radiometric dynamic range and stability, and broad spectral coverage. Test results establishing the performance of the instrument against the full range of operational requirements are presented, along with calibration, engineering flight test, and scientific field campaign data and results.

  13. Air Force research in optical processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neff, J.

    1981-01-01

    Optical and optical electronic hybrid processing especially in the application area of image processing are emphasized. Real time pattern recognition processors for such airborne missions as target recognition, tracking, and terminal guidance are studied.

  14. ASSESSING THE MERCURY HEALTH RISKS ASSOCIATED WITH COAL-FIRED POWER PLANTS: ISSUES IN ATMOSPHERIC PROCESSES.

    SciTech Connect

    LIPFERT, F.; SULLIVAN, T.; RENNINGER, S.

    2004-03-28

    The rationale for regulating air emissions of mercury from U.S. coal-fired power plants largely depends on mathematical dispersion modeling, including the atmospheric chemistry processes that affect the partitioning of Hg emissions into elemental (Hg{sub 0}) and the reactive (RGM) forms that may deposit more rapidly near sources. This paper considers and evaluates the empirical support for this paradigm. We consider the extant experimental data at three spatial scales: local (< 30 km), regional (< {approx}300 km), and national (multi-state data). An additional issue involves the finding of excess Hg levels in urban areas.

  15. A New Effort for Atmospherical Forecast: Meteorological Image Processing Software (MIPS) for Astronomical Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shameoni Niaei, M.; Kilic, Y.; Yildiran, B. E.; Yüzlükoglu, F.; Yesilyaprak, C.

    2016-12-01

    We have described a new software (MIPS) about the analysis and image processing of the meteorological satellite (Meteosat) data for an astronomical observatory. This software will be able to help to make some atmospherical forecast (cloud, humidity, rain) using meteosat data for robotic telescopes. MIPS uses a python library for Eumetsat data that aims to be completely open-source and licenced under GNU/General Public Licence (GPL). MIPS is a platform independent and uses h5py, numpy, and PIL with the general-purpose and high-level programming language Python and the QT framework.

  16. An atmosphere protection subsystem in the thermal power station automated process control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parchevskii, V. M.; Kislov, E. A.

    2014-03-01

    Matters concerned with development of methodical and mathematical support for an atmosphere protection subsystem in the thermal power station automated process control system are considered taking as an example the problem of controlling nitrogen oxide emissions at a gas-and-oil-fired thermal power station. The combined environmental-and-economic characteristics of boilers, which correlate the costs for suppressing emissions with the boiler steam load and mass discharge of nitrogen oxides in analytic form, are used as the main tool for optimal control. A procedure for constructing and applying environmental-and-economic characteristics on the basis of technical facilities available in modern instrumentation and control systems is presented.

  17. Upper atmospheric research at Woomera: The Australian-built sounding rockets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dougherty, Kerrie

    2006-07-01

    Sounding rocket programs for upper atmospheric research (UAR) commenced at Woomera in 1957, with the British Skylark project and the Anglo-Australian HARP rockoon program. Shortly afterwards, the Weapons Research Establishment (WRE) inaugurated its own sounding rocket program with the first successful Australian-built sounding rocket, Long Tom, developed from surplus British motors. This research would eventually lead to the development of Australia's first satellite, WRESAT, launched in 1967. Long Tom became the first more than 10 Australian designed and built sounding rockets that would be employed at Woomera until the demise of the WRE upper atmosphere program in 1976, as the Range was winding down to the cessation of the Anglo-Australian Joint Project. Like Long Tom, most of the early Australian sounding rockets were constructed by the WRE from surplus British motors, but after 1967 the later vehicles had a much higher local content, based on combinations of British motors and/or rocket motors developed in Australia. These new motors were named after constellations of the southern sky, while the rockets themselves bore the names of Australian native birds. This paper will outline the technical and scientific history of the Australian sounding rocket program, examining its origins and the reasons for its demise. It will look at the sequential development of the various Australian rockets and consider the particular research projects with which they were associated, the relationship with the WRESAT project and the move to Australian production after 1967.

  18. Advantages of Studying Processes in Educational Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmitz, Bernhard

    2006-01-01

    It is argued that learning and instruction could be conceptualized from a process-analytic perspective. Important questions from the field of learning and instruction are presented which can be answered using our approach of process analyses. A classification system of process concepts and methods is given. One main advantage of this kind of…

  19. Origin of Martian Interior Layered Deposits (ILDs) by atmospherically driven processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalski, J. R.; Niles, P. B.

    2011-12-01

    Since the first photogeologic exploration of Mars, vast mounds of layered sediments found within the Valles Marineris canyon system (Interior Layered Deposits or ILDs) have remained unexplained. Recent spectroscopic results showing that these materials contain coarse-grained hematite [1] and sulfate [2-8] suggest that they are fundamentally similar to layered sulfate deposits seen elsewhere on Mars [3], and are therefore a key piece of Mars' global aqueous history. Layered sulfate deposits (including ILDs) are often considered to have formed in association with transient, wet surface environments caused by groundwater upwelling [9] in the Hesperian. Here, we use spectroscopic mapping along with geomorphic observations and mass balance calculations to demonstrate that the sulfate-bearing ILDs likely did not form due to groundwater upwelling or any similar playa-lacustrine scenario. Instead, the ILDs likely formed from atmospherically driven processes in a configuration similar to that observed today. We suggest that Hesperian layered sulfate deposits formed in response to massive amounts of pyroclastic volcanism and SO2-outgassing that peaked near 3.5-3.7 Ga in a Martian climate that was largely cold and dry. This origin for the ILDs is also applicable to other layered terrain of similar age and characteristics, including sulphate-bearing crater fill, chaos terrains, and the Meridiani Planum sediments. [1] Weitz, C. M., Lane, M. D., Staid, M. & Dobrea, E. N. Gray hematite distribution and formation in Ophir and Candor chasmata. Journal of Geophysical Research-Planets 113, doi:E02016 10.1029/2007je002930 (2008). [2] Wendt, L. et al. Sulfates and iron oxides in Ophir Chasma, Mars, based on OMEGA and CRISM observations. Icarus 213, 86-103, doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2011.02.013 (2011). [3] Murchie, S. et al. Evidence for the origin of layered deposits in Candor Chasma, Mars, from mineral composition and hydrologic modeling. Journal of Geophysical Research-Planets 114, doi

  20. Process Control Research, Training Center for Tennessee.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1984

    1984-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the University of Tennessee have established a measurement and controls research center and a master's-level academic engineering program. A description of this university/industry cooperative research center is provided. Indicates that a doctoral program is planned when the master's program is well…

  1. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report October 1 - December 31, 2004

    SciTech Connect

    Sisterson, DL

    2004-12-31

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year dating back to 1998. The United States Department of Energy requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 – (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The annual OPSMAX time for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 8,322 hours per year (0.95 × 8,760, the number hours in a year, not including leap year). The annual OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) site is 7,884 hours per year (0.90 × 8,760), and that for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) site is 7,446 hours per year (0.85 × 8,760). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the ACRF Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percent of data in the Archive represents the

  2. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report January-March 2006

    SciTech Connect

    Sisterson, DL

    2006-03-31

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year; and (2) site and fiscal year dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 – (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the second quarter for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2,052 hours (0.95 × 2,160 hours this quarter). The OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) locale is 1,944 hours (0.90 × 2,160), and that for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1,836 hours (0.85 × 2,160). The OPSMAX time for the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) is 2,052 hours (0.95 × 2,160). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percent of data in the

  3. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report October 1 - December 31, 2005

    SciTech Connect

    Sisterson, DL

    2005-12-31

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 – (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the third quarter for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2,097.6 hours (0.95 × 2,208 hours this quarter). The OPSMAX for the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) locale is 1,987.2 hours (0.90 × 2,208), and that for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1,876.8 hours (0.85 × 2,208). The OPSMAX time for the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) is 2,097.6 hours (0.95 × 2,208). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the ACRF Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percent

  4. The materials processing research base of the Materials Processing Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flemings, M. C.; Bowen, H. K.; Kenney, G. B.

    1980-01-01

    The goals and activities of the center are discussed. The center activities encompass all engineering materials including metals, ceramics, polymers, electronic materials, composites, superconductors, and thin films. Processes include crystallization, solidification, nucleation, and polymer synthesis.

  5. Our life is protected by the Earth's atmosphere and magnetic field: what aurora research tells us.

    PubMed

    Kamide, Y

    2001-01-01

    Our sun is an average middle-aged star. Without the sun, there would be no atmosphere, no water, and no life on the Earth. The sun is constantly changing, providing the Earth with energy through a complicated chain of processes that occur in space surrounding the Earth. This paper demonstrates that life on Earth is protected by two barriers, i.e., the atmosphere and the magnetic field, against otherwise menacing events in space. Because of these shielding effects, we, peacefully sitting on the Earth's surface, are not aware of a number of critical and potentially dangerous episodes that are taking place only 100 km above the Earth's surface. The aurora, which dances in the polar sky also because of the two barriers, is sending us a crucial hint about what is happening in space.

  6. Using the Weather Research & Forecasting Model (NACR) to Model the Atmosphere over the North Eastern United States and Investigate the Effects of Land Use on the Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trout, Joseph; Lutes, Tiffany

    2013-03-01

    In this pilot project, the Weather Research & Forecasting Model (WRF) from the National Center for Atmospheric Research was used to investigate the effects of land use on the weather and climate. New Jersey, especially New Jersey coastlines and NJ pine barrens have seen a rapid amount of development in a very short period. In this project, the WRF model is initialized with real. Observations and simulations are compared over areas of different land use.

  7. Atmosphere Processing Module Automation and Catalyst Durability Analysis for Mars ISRU Pathfinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, Elspeth M.

    2016-01-01

    The Mars In-Situ Resource Utilization Pathfinder was designed to create fuel using components found in the planet’s atmosphere and regolith for an ascension vehicle to return a potential sample return or crew return vehicle from Mars. The Atmosphere Processing Module (APM), a subunit of the pathfinder, uses cryocoolers to isolate and collect carbon dioxide from Mars simulant gas. The carbon dioxide is fed with hydrogen into a Sabatier reactor where methane is produced. The APM is currently undergoing the final stages of testing at Kennedy Space Center prior to process integration testing with the other subunits of the pathfinder. The automation software for the APM cryocoolers was tested and found to perform nominally. The catalyst used for the Sabatier reactor was investigated to determine the factors contributing to catalyst failure. The results from the catalyst testing require further analysis, but it appears that the rapid change in temperature during reactor start up or the elevated operating temperature is responsible for the changes observed in the catalyst.

  8. Constraining sources, transport pathways and process parameters on various scales by atmospheric Lagrangian inversions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Hobe, Marc; Konopka, Paul; Hoffmann, Lars; Griessbach, Sabine; Sumińska-Ebersoldt, Olga; Vernier, Jean-Paul; Plöger, Felix; Tao, Mengchu; Müller, Rolf

    2015-04-01

    Inverse methods have become widely used tools to infer sources and sinks of atmospheric constituents based on observations. Inversion techniques can also help to better constrain input and process parameters and thus improve the underlying models. While the majority of today's inverse model frameworks use the Eulerian concept of transport, the capability of Lagrangian inversion to infer emissions of even ill constrained sources has been demonstrated (e.g. Stohl et al., 2011). We will discuss Lagrangian inverse modelling as a powerful tool to solve problems on a wide range of scales in terms of spatial and temporal extent as well as complexity. First, two distinct applications on different scales will be presented: i) the retrieval of reaction rates that govern the chlorine catalyzed ozone destruction in the polar winter along individual trajectories connecting airborne observations in the Arctic in 2010, and ii) the derivation of emission altitudes and transport pathways of sulfate aerosol from the 2011 eruption of the Nabro volcano using CALIPSO satellite observations. Second, the potential and requirements for applications at even higher complexity, e.g. simultaneously retrieval of source, sink and process parameters on a global scale, will be explored. Stohl, A., et al. 2011. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics 11, 4333-4351.

  9. The effect of mercury speciation and meteorological processing on concentrations, transport and deposition of atmospheric mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malcolm, Elizabeth Glover

    The toxic trace element mercury can be transported locally, regionally or globally within the atmosphere before deposition to a watershed. The fate of atmospheric mercury is dependent on its chemical and physical form, which determine its deposition rate under different environmental conditions. The importance of these influences on atmospheric mercury was investigated in dew, clouds and the coastal atmosphere. Measurements of mercury in dew were made at locations in Michigan and Florida. The mercury in dew was accounted for by deposition of particulate mercury and reactive gaseous mercury (RGM). RGM concentrations were significantly reduced at the onset of dew with RGM deposition velocities ranging from 0.2 to 1.3 cm/s. In areas with frequent dew formation and low precipitation, dew appears to be an important contribution to mercury deposition. Measurements of mercury in non-precipitating cloud water were made at Mt. Mansfield, VT. Concentrations of mercury and other trace elements with predominately anthropogenic, but not crustal origin, were higher in cloud water than in precipitation. This is hypothesized to be caused by (1) greater in-cloud scavenging of crustal aerosol in precipitating than non-precipitating clouds and (2) more efficient below-cloud scavenging of crustal than anthropogenic aerosol by rain. Concentrations of mercury in cloud water were explained by transport history, with the highest concentrations from the Mid-Atlantic and Ohio River Valley. Atmospheric mercury measurements along the Atlantic Coast of Florida revealed low concentrations of Hg0(g) and RGM in the marine boundary layer. This indicated that the ocean is not a large net source of mercury to the Eastern Florida shoreline. Higher daytime peaks in diurnal cycles of RGM were observed under anthropogenic influence, possibly produced by reaction with a photochemical oxidant. Particulate mercury concentrations could not be explained by sea spray alone, suggesting that gaseous Hg diffused

  10. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report. October 1 - December 31, 2010.

    SciTech Connect

    Sisterson, D. L.

    2011-02-01

    Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near-real time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 - (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the first quarter of FY2010 for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2097.60 hours (0.95 x 2208 hours this quarter). The OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) locale is 1987.20 hours (0.90 x 2208) and for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1876.80 hours (0.85 x 2208). The first ARM Mobile Facility (AMF1) deployment in Graciosa Island, the Azores, Portugal, continued through this quarter, so the OPSMAX time this quarter is 2097.60 hours (0.95 x 2208). The second ARM Mobile Facility (AMF2) began deployment this quarter to Steamboat Springs, Colorado. The experiment officially began November 15, but most of the instruments were up and running by November 1. Therefore, the OPSMAX time for the AMF2 was 1390.80 hours (.95 x 1464 hours) for November and December (61 days). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It

  11. Research and the Decision-Making Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Jerry

    1984-01-01

    Presents questions to be asked when evaluating the efficacy of audiovisual products designed to increase computer literacy of students in classroom situations and suggests that continuing research is also needed to fully evaluate these products. (MBR)

  12. Photographic Technology and the Research Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noss, Jerome

    1974-01-01

    Description of photogrammetric analyses which, combined with the current emergence of biomechanics, is utilized to explain and measure photographs of human movement. Oriented towards the use of photogrammetric analysis in physical education research. (JA)

  13. A Study of the Abundance and 13C/12C Ratio of Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide to Advance the Scientific Understanding of Terrestrial Processes Regulating the Global Carbon Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen C. Piper

    2005-10-15

    The primary goal of our research program, consistent with the goals of the U.S. Climate Change Science Program and funded by the terrestrial carbon processes (TCP) program of DOE, has been to improve understanding of changes in the distribution and cycling of carbon among the active land, ocean and atmosphere reservoirs, with particular emphasis on terrestrial ecosystems. Our approach is to systematically measure atmospheric CO2 to produce time series data essential to reveal temporal and spatial patterns. Additional measurements of the 13C/12C isotopic ratio of CO2 provide a basis for distinguishing organic and inorganic processes. To pursue the significance of these patterns further, our research also involved interpretations of the observations by models, measurements of inorganic carbon in sea water, and of CO2 in air near growing land plants.

  14. Historical Research in the Atmospheric Sciences: The Value of Literature Reviews, Libraries, and Librarians.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, David M.

    2004-07-01

    Based on a talk given at the sixth annual meeting of the Atmospheric Science Librarians International, this paper explores the author's experiences performing reviews of the scientific literature as a tool to advancing meteorology and studying the history of science. Three phases of performing literature searches with varying degrees of interaction with a research librarian are considered: do it yourself, librarian assisted, and librarian as collaborator. Examples are given for each phase: occluded fronts, conditional symmetric instability, and static instability terminology, respectively. Electronic availability of information is changing the relationship between scientists and librarians. Yet, despite these changes, books on library shelves and knowledgeable human librarians remain essential to the scientific enterprise.

  15. Atmospheric lidar research applying to H2O, O2 and aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcilrath, T. J.; Wilkerson, T. D.

    1977-01-01

    Experimental research on a near infrared tunable dye laser was reported, and theoretical simulations were presented for various lidar configurations. The visible and nearinfrared wavelengths considered were suitable for observations of aerosols, water vapor, molecular oxygen pressure and temperature in the troposphere and above. The first phase of development work was described on a ruby pumped, tunable dye laser for the wavelength region 715 to 740 nanometers. Lidar simulations were summarized for measurements of H2O and for two color lidar observations of aerosols in the atmosphere.

  16. EUPHORE: Research facility to study tropospheric transformation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirtz, K.

    2003-04-01

    The EUPHORE simulation chamber consists of two half-spherical Teflon bags, each with a volume of 200 m^3 and a base diameter of 9.2 m. The FEP Teflon has a transmission of about 75% at 280 nm and of more than 80% above 300 nm. Purified and dried ambient air is used to fill the chamber and flush it between experiments. The humidity in the chamber is measured by a dew point hygrometer, and the temperature is monitored by several thermocouples located at different positions inside the chamber. The solar flux is monitored with spectral resolution in the photochemically active spectral region. The simulation chamber is equipped with a number of analytical instruments for the measurement of single VOC components, NO, NO_2, O_3 and other species. In-situ measurements in the ppb range are performed using long-path absorption spectroscopy, in the UV/VIS by DOAS and in the IR by FT-IR. A GC-MS system is used for the sensitive analysis of a variety of reaction products. A newly installed LIF technique allows the in situ measurement of OH and HO_2 radicals during the reaction processes. The technological concept and the organisation structure of the EUPHORE facility will be presented. The integration of quality control measures is an obvious and necessary second step for the successful exploitation of the technically advanced outdoor smog chamber EUPHORE as a research tool. This will underline the leadership of the European scientific community in the important research areas of investigating transformation processes in the troposphere and tracking the influence of human activities on photooxidant formation and its interaction with processes related to global change. In the coming years the main scientific focus will be on testing chemical mechanisms in order to improve the models which describe the atmospheric processes of complex chemical systems. The collaborative work at the EUPHORE outdoor simulation chamber will provide all the users of the installation with a basic

  17. Erosion processes in molassic cliffs: the role of the rock surface temperature and atmospheric conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrea, Dario; Abellán, Antonio; Guerin, Antoine; Jaboyedoff, Michel; Voumard, Jérémie

    2014-05-01

    The morphology of the Swiss Plateau is modeled by numerous steep cliffs of Molasse. These cliffs are mainly composed of sub-horizontal alternated layers of sandstone, shale and conglomerates deposed in the Alps foreland basin during the Tertiary period. These Molasse cliffs are affected by erosion processes inducing numerous rockfall events. Thus, it is relevant to understand how different external factors influence Molasse erosion rates. In this study, we focus on analyzing temperature variation during a winter season. As pilot study area we selected a cliff which is formed by a sub-horizontal alternation of outcropping sandstone and shale. The westward facing test site (La Cornalle, Vaud, Switzerland), which is a lateral scarp of a slow moving landslide area, is currently affected by intense erosion. Regarding data acquisition, we monitored both in-situ rock and air temperatures at 15 minutes time-step since October 2013: (1) on the one hand we measured Ground Surface Temperature (GST) at near-surface (0.1 meter depth) using a GST mini-datalogger M-Log5W-Rock model; (2) On the other hand we monitored atmospheric conditions using a weather station (Davis Vantage pro2 plus) collecting numerous parameters (i.e. temperature, irradiation, rain, wind speed, etc.). Furthermore, the area was also seasonally monitored by Ground-Based (GB) LiDAR since 2010 and monthly monitored since September 2013. In order to understand how atmospheric conditions (such as freeze and thaw effect) influence the erosion of the cliff, we modeled the temperature diffusion through the rock mass. To this end, we applied heat diffusion and radiation equation using a 1D temperature profile, obtaining as a result both temperature variations at different depths together with the location of the 0°C isotherm. Our model was calibrated during a given training set using both in-situ rock temperatures and atmospheric conditions. We then carried out a comparison with the rockfall events derived from the

  18. Simulating Fine-Scale Atmospheric Processes: A New Core Capability and its Application to Predicting Wildfire Behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, M M; Leach, M J; Molenkamp, C R; Hall, C H; Wilder, L; Neher, L A

    2003-02-07

    This LDRD project consisted of the development, testing, and prototype application of a new capability to couple atmospheric models of different spatial and temporal scales with a state-of-the-science vegetation-fuel combustion model and a GIs-based analysis system. The research addressed the complex, multi-scale interactions of atmospheric processes, combustion, and vegetative fuel conditions, using a suite of models to simulate their impact on wildfire behavior in areas of complex terrain. During the course of the project, we made substantial progress toward the implementation of a world-class modeling system that could be used as a tool for wildfire risk assessment, wildfire consequence analysis, wildfire suppression planning, fuels management, firefighter training, and public fire-safety education. With one additional year of funding we would have been able conduct combined modeling and field experiments to evaluate the models capability to predict the behavior of prescribed burns before they are ignited. Because of its investment in this LDRD project, LLNL is very close to having a new core capability--likely the world's most generally applicable, most scientifically sound, and most respected wildfire simulation system.

  19. 77 FR 26911 - Processed Raspberry Promotion, Research, and Information Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-08

    ... Service 7 CFR Part 1208 RIN 0581-AC79 Processed Raspberry Promotion, Research, and Information Order... Processed Raspberry Promotion, Research, and Information Order (Order). The program will be implemented under the Commodity Promotion, Research, and Information Act of 1996 (1996 Act). Under the...

  20. 42 CFR 93.316 - Completing the research misconduct process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Completing the research misconduct process. 93.316... POLICIES ON RESEARCH MISCONDUCT Responsibilities of Institutions The Institutional Investigation § 93.316 Completing the research misconduct process. (a) ORI expects institutions to carry inquiries...

  1. COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH: CONTINUOUS DYNAMIC GRID ADAPTATION IN A GLOBAL ATMOSPHERIC MODEL: APPLICATION AND REFINEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Gutowski, William J.; Prusa, Joseph M.; Smolarkiewicz, Piotr K.

    2012-05-08

    validity of soundproof models, showing that they are more broadly applicable than some had previously thought. Substantial testing of EULAG included application and extension of the Jablonowski-Williamson baroclinic wave test - an archetype of planetary weather - and further analysis of multi-scale interactions arising from collapse of temperature fronts in both the baroclinic wave test and simulations of the Held-Suarez idealized climate. These analyses revealed properties of atmospheric gravity waves not seen in previous work and further demonstrated the ability of EULAG to simulate realistic behavior over several orders of magnitude of length scales. Additional collaborative work enhanced capability for modeling atmospheric flows with adaptive moving meshes and demonstrated the ability of EULAG to move into petascale computing. 3b. CAM-EULAG Advances We have developed CAM-EULAG in collaboration with former project postdoc, now University of Cape Town Assistant Professor, Babatunde Abiodun. Initial study documented good model performance in aqua-planet simulations. In particular, we showed that the grid adaptivity (stretching) implemented in CAM-EULAG allows higher resolution in selected regions without causing anomalous behavior such as spurious wave reflection. We then used the stretched-grid version to analyze simulated extreme precipitation events in West Africa, comparing the precipitation and event environment with observed behavior. The model simulates fairly well the spatial scale and the interannual and intraseasonal variability of the extreme events, although its extreme precipitation intensity is weaker than observed. In addition, both observations and the simulations show possible forcing of extreme events by African easterly waves. 3c. Other Contributions Through our collaborations, we have made contributions to a wide range of outcomes. For research focused on terrestrial behavior, these have included (1) upwind schemes for gas dynamics, (2) a nonlinear

  2. Seasonal evolution of Titan's polar caps: interaction between atmospheric and subsurface processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotin, C.

    2012-12-01

    Titan is the only satellite of the solar system with a dense atmosphere. It is also the only object, besides Earth, with stable liquid bodies at its surface. The (P,T) conditions at Titan's surface suggest that methane and ethane are liquid. Ethane has been detected in the lakes [1] whereas the signature of liquid methane is hidden by that of atmospheric methane which is the second most abundant atmospheric component. Methane is irreversibly transformed into ethane by photolysis. Titan's atmosphere contains very little ethane, which suggests that it is present in the surface (lakes) or/and the subsurface. Lakes are mostly located in the polar areas with many more lakes on the North Pole than on the South Pole. Ethane clouds above the North Pole have been identified during the winter when the atmospheric circulation leads to the formation of downwellings at the North Pole. Remote sensing instruments onboard the Cassini spacecraft have recently witnessed the formation of the South Polar vortex after the equinox in August 2009. Ethane rain may now happen over the South Pole. Laboratory experiments show that ethane and methane can react with ice to form clathrates that are denser and more stable than pure ice. Laboratory experiments also suggest that ethane clathrates are more stable than methane clathrates. The atmosphere can be replenished in methane through the substitution of methane by ethane that rains and percolates into the subsurface [2]. Because ethane clathrates are denser than methane clathrates, such a process would lead to significant subsidence on geological time scales. It may explain why Titan's flattening is larger than that due to spin rate only [2]. The amount of ethane required to explain Titan's shape is in agreement with the a global resurfacing event that would have occurred between a few hundreds of Myrs and 1 Gyr as suggested by the density of impact craters [3] and the age of the atmospheric methane [4]. The Cassini observations and results

  3. Automated solar cell assembly team process research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowlan, M. J.; Hogan, S. J.; Darkazalli, G.; Breen, W. F.; Murach, J. M.; Sutherland, S. F.; Patterson, J. S.

    1994-06-01

    This report describes work done under the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) project, Phase 3A, which addresses problems that are generic to the photovoltaic (PV) industry. Spire's objective during Phase 3A was to use its light soldering technology and experience to design and fabricate solar cell tabbing and interconnecting equipment to develop new, high-yield, high-throughput, fully automated processes for tabbing and interconnecting thin cells. Areas that were addressed include processing rates, process control, yield, throughput, material utilization efficiency, and increased use of automation. Spire teamed with Solec International, a PV module manufacturer, and the University of Massachusetts at Lowell's Center for Productivity Enhancement (CPE), automation specialists, who are lower-tier subcontractors. A number of other PV manufacturers, including Siemens Solar, Mobil Solar, Solar Web, and Texas instruments, agreed to evaluate the processes developed under this program.

  4. The Process of Divorce Recovery: A Review of the Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gastil, Richard W.

    Many researchers have speculated over the nature of the divorce recovery process. Is the process similar to Kubler-Ross's stages of grief or does divorce recovery follow a unique process? This paper examines the current body of empirical research in an attempt to answer these questions. From the 91 sources analyzed, it was discovered that most of…

  5. Modeling land-surface processes and land-atmosphere interactions in the community weather and regional climate WRF model (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, F.; Barlage, M. J.

    2013-12-01

    The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model has been widely used with high-resolution configuration in the weather and regional climate communities, and hence demands its land-surface models to treat not only fast-response processes, such as plant evapotranspiration that are important for numerical weather prediction but also slow-evolving processes such as snow hydrology and interactions between surface soil water and deep aquifer. Correctly representing urbanization, which has been traditionally ignored in coarse-resolution modeling, is critical for applying WRF to air quality and public health research. To meet these demands, numerous efforts have been undertaken to improve land-surface models (LSM) in WRF, including the recent implementation of the Noah-MP (Noah Multiple-Physics). Noah-MP uses multiple options for key sub-grid land-atmosphere interaction processes (Niu et al., 2011; Yang et al., 2011), and contains a separate vegetation canopy representing within- and under-canopy radiation and turbulent processes, a multilayer physically-based snow model, and a photosynthesis canopy resistance parameterization with a dynamic vegetation model. This paper will focus on the interactions between fast and slow land processes through: 1) a benchmarking of the Noah-MP performance, in comparison to five widely-used land-surface models, in simulating and diagnosing snow evolution for complex terrain forested regions, and 2) the effects of interactions between shallow and deep aquifers on regional weather and climate. Moreover, we will provide an overview of recent improvements of the integrated WRF-Urban modeling system, especially its hydrological enhancements that takes into account the effects of lawn irrigation, urban oasis, evaporation from pavements, anthropogenic moisture sources, and a green-roof parameterization.

  6. Impact of packaging atmosphere, storage and processing conditions on the generation of phytoprostanes as quality processing compounds in almond kernels.

    PubMed

    Carrasco-Del Amor, Ana María; Aguayo, Encarna; Collado-González, Jacinta; Guy, Alexandre; Galano, Jean-Marie; Durand, Thierry; Gil-Izquierdo, Ángel

    2016-11-15

    The thermal processing of almond kernels implies the use of techniques that produce chemical changes such as oxidation. Phytoprostanes (PhytoPs) are considered biomarkers of the oxidative stress in plants. We studied the PhytoP profile in kernels of almond cultivars under different conditions, in relation to packaging, temperature and time of storage and processing. The most abundant PhytoP was the F1t series. The PhytoP levels increased significantly with the time of storage (3 and 6months) and the total PhytoP concentration was higher under air than in a vacuum packaging atmosphere. Storage at 24°C raised the concentrations of individual PhytoPs and the total sum of PhytoPs. The frying and roasting processes led to a strong reduction of the original concentration of most PhytoPs and promoted the synthesis of specific PhytoPs that were not detected in raw kernels and thus could be biomarkers of the degree of oxidative degradation of almonds.

  7. Research Methodologies and the Doctoral Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Creswell, John W.; Miller, Gary A.

    1997-01-01

    Doctoral students often select one of four common research methodologies that are popular in the social sciences and education today: positivist; interpretive; ideological; and pragmatic. But choice of methodology also influences the student's choice of course work, membership of dissertation committee, and the form and structure of the…

  8. Process Research on Polycrystalline Silicon Material (PROPSM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culik, J. S.; Wrigley, C. Y.

    1985-01-01

    Results of hydrogen-passivated polycrysalline silicon solar cell research are summarized. The short-circuit current of solar cells fabricated from large-grain cast polycrystalline silicon is nearly equivalent to that of single-crystal cells, which indicates long bulk minority-carrier diffusion length. Treatments with molecular hydrogen showed no effect on large-grain cast polycrystalline silicon solar cells.

  9. Low power signal processing research at Stanford

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burr, J.; Williamson, P. R.; Peterson, A.

    1991-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of the research being conducted at Stanford University's Space, Telecommunications, and Radioscience Laboratory in the area of low energy computation. It discusses the work we are doing in large scale digital VLSI neural networks, interleaved processor and pipelined memory architectures, energy estimation and optimization, multichip module packaging, and low voltage digital logic.

  10. Research in Monolithic, Signal-Processing Circuits.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-10-01

    MwW ggCUMTY, CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGU(WeaDele #Atowd) 68CURITY CLASI.PICATI@N OF THIS PA66(*Wft DO* # Mtor * The research supported under Grant ARO...oscillators are widely used to generate precision clock - pulse waveforms for complex integrated circuits. However, the use of on-chip crystal

  11. Recommendations for processing atmospheric attenuated backscatter profiles from Vaisala CL31 ceilometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotthaus, Simone; O'Connor, Ewan; Münkel, Christoph; Charlton-Perez, Cristina; Haeffelin, Martial; Gabey, Andrew M.; Grimmond, C. Sue B.

    2016-08-01

    Ceilometer lidars are used for cloud base height detection, to probe aerosol layers in the atmosphere (e.g. detection of elevated layers of Saharan dust or volcanic ash), and to examine boundary layer dynamics. Sensor optics and acquisition algorithms can strongly influence the observed attenuated backscatter profiles; therefore, physical interpretation of the profiles requires careful application of corrections. This study addresses the widely deployed Vaisala CL31 ceilometer. Attenuated backscatter profiles are studied to evaluate the impact of both the hardware generation and firmware version. In response to this work and discussion within the CL31/TOPROF user community (TOPROF, European COST Action aiming to harmonise ground-based remote sensing networks across Europe), Vaisala released new firmware (versions 1.72 and 2.03) for the CL31 sensors. These firmware versions are tested against previous versions, showing that several artificial features introduced by the data processing have been removed. Hence, it is recommended to use this recent firmware for analysing attenuated backscatter profiles. To allow for consistent processing of historic data, correction procedures have been developed that account for artefacts detected in data collected with older firmware. Furthermore, a procedure is proposed to determine and account for the instrument-related background signal from electronic and optical components. This is necessary for using attenuated backscatter observations from any CL31 ceilometer. Recommendations are made for the processing of attenuated backscatter observed with Vaisala CL31 sensors, including the estimation of noise which is not provided in the standard CL31 output. After taking these aspects into account, attenuated backscatter profiles from Vaisala CL31 ceilometers are considered capable of providing valuable information for a range of applications including atmospheric boundary layer studies, detection of elevated aerosol layers, and model

  12. Inelastic collision processes in ozone and their relation to atmospheric pressure broadening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinfeld, J. I.; Flannery, C.; Klaassen, J.; Mizugai, Y.; Spencer, M.

    1990-01-01

    The research task employs infrared double-resonance to determine rotational energy transfer rates and pathways, in both the ground and vibrationally excited states of ozone. The resulting data base will then be employed to test inelastic scattering theories and to assess intermolecular potential models, both of which are necessary for the systematization and prediction of infrared pressure-broadening coefficients, which are in turn required by atmospheric ozone monitoring techniques based on infrared remote sensing. In addition, observation of excited-state absorption transitions will permit us to improve the determination of the 2 nu(sub 3), nu(sub 1) + nu(sub 2), and 2 nu(sub 1) rotational constants and to derive band strengths for hot-band transitions involving these levels.

  13. Solar/Stellar Irradiance Comparison Experiment (SOLSTICE) on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rottman, Gary J.; Woods, Thomas N.; London, Julius; Ayres, Thomas R.

    2003-01-01

    A final report on the operational activities related to the UARS Solar Stellar irradiance Comparison Experiment (SOLSTICE) is presented. Scientific activities of SOLSTICE has also been supported. The UARS SOLSTICE originated at the University of Colorado in 1981. One year after the UARS launch in 1991, the operations and research support activities for SOLSTICE were moved to the High Altitude Observatory (HAO) of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). The SOLSTICE program continued at HAO with the National Science Foundation, and after four years, it was moved once again back to the University of Colorado. At the University after 1997 this subject grant was issued to further extend the operations activities from July 2001 through September 2002. Although this is a final report for one particular activity, in fact the SOLSTICE operations activity -first at the University, then at HAO, and now again at the University -has continued in a seamless fashion.

  14. Flux measurements by the NRC Twin Otter atmospheric research aircraft: 1987-2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desjardins, Raymond L.; Worth, Devon E.; MacPherson, J. Ian; Bastian, Matthew; Srinivasan, Ramesh

    2016-03-01

    Over the past 30 years, the Canadian Twin Otter research group has operated an aircraft platform for the study of atmospheric greenhouse gas fluxes (carbon dioxide, ozone, nitrous oxide and methane) and energy exchange (latent and sensible heat) over a wide range of terrestrial ecosystems in North America. Some of the acquired data from these projects have now been archived at the Flight Research Laboratory and Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada. The dataset, which contains the measurements obtained in eight projects from 1987 to 2011 are now publicly available. All these projects were carried out in order to improve our understanding of the biophysical controls acting on land-surface atmosphere fluxes. Some of the projects also attempted to quantify the impacts of agroecosystems on the environment. To provide information on the data available, we briefly describe each project and some of the key findings by referring to previously published relevant work. As new flux analysis techniques are being developed, we are confident that much additional information can be extracted from this unique data set.

  15. Research on characteristics of free-space optical communication link in weak atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Liguo; Hou, Zaihong; Li, Fei

    2013-08-01

    Research on characteristics of atmospheric communication link becomes a subject of current interest, and often mainly focuses on some fading parameters including the probability of fade, the mean fade number and the mean fade time. The contribution of false alarm to bit error rate has been considered, however, the temporal characteristic is rarely mentioned., To make up the deficiency, parameters integrating the influence of false alarm and fading were defined. On one hand, the laser communication link were modeled for Gamma-Gamma distribution of irradiance fluctuation subjected to weak atmospheric turbulence. Accordingly the mathematical expressions of these parameters were deduced. On the other hand, characteristic of the parameters were obtained by numerical simulation with various channel environment parameters, such as mean signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), zenith angle and detection threshold. Compared with other researches on fade characteristic, some different conclusions can be drawn from simulation results. With the same SNR and zenith angle, there is an optimum value of detection threshold corresponding to the minimum mean error number, which deviates obviously from that obtained according to the minimum error probability. Either increasing SNR or decreasing zenith angle can reduce mean error number and the optimum threshold. Different from mean error number, mean error time is slightly influenced with channel environment parameters and constant at the order of milliseconds.

  16. Process Research of Polycrystalline Silicon Material (PROPSM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culik, J. S.

    1984-01-01

    A passivation process (hydrogenation) that will improve the power generation of solar cells fabricated from presently produced, large grain, cast polycrystalline silicon (Semix), a potentially low cost material are developed. The first objective is to verify the operation of a DC plasma hydrogenation system and to investigate the effect of hydrogen on the electrical performance of a variety of polycrystalline silicon solar cells. The second objective is to parameterize and optimize a hydrogenation process for cast polycrystalline silicon, and will include a process sensitivity analysis. The sample preparation for the first phase is outlined. The hydrogenation system is described, and some early results that were obtained using the hydrogenation system without a plasma are summarized. Light beam induced current (LBIC) measurements of minicell samples, and their correlation to dark current voltage characteristics, are discussed.

  17. Process Research ON Semix Silicon Materials (PROSSM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wohlgemuth, J. H.; Warfield, D. B.

    1982-01-01

    A cost effective process sequence was identified, equipment was designed to implement a 6.6 MW per year automated production line, and a cost analysis projected a $0.56 per watt cell add-on cost for this line. Four process steps were developed for this program: glass beads back clean-up, hot spray antireflective coating, wave soldering of fronts, and ion milling for edging. While spray dopants were advertised as an off the shelf developed product, they were unreliable with shorter than advertised shelf life.

  18. Process Research ON Semix Silicon Materials (PROSSM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohlgemuth, J. H.; Warfield, D. B.

    1982-02-01

    A cost effective process sequence was identified, equipment was designed to implement a 6.6 MW per year automated production line, and a cost analysis projected a $0.56 per watt cell add-on cost for this line. Four process steps were developed for this program: glass beads back clean-up, hot spray antireflective coating, wave soldering of fronts, and ion milling for edging. While spray dopants were advertised as an off the shelf developed product, they were unreliable with shorter than advertised shelf life.

  19. Modeling and Analysis of Global and Regional Climate Change in Relation to Atmospheric Hydrologic Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Donald R.

    2001-01-01

    This research was directed to the development and application of global isentropic modeling and analysis capabilities to describe hydrologic processes and energy exchange in the climate system, and discern regional climate change. An additional objective was to investigate the accuracy and theoretical limits of global climate predictability which are imposed by the inherent limitations of simulating trace constituent transport and the hydrologic processes of condensation, precipitation and cloud life cycles.

  20. Production of hydrocarbons and nitriles by electrical processes in Titan's atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Navarro-Gonzalez, R; Ramirez, S I; de la Rosa, J G; Coll, P; Raulin, F

    2001-01-01

    Although lightning has not been observed in Titan's atmosphere, the presence of methane rain in the troposphere suggests the possibility of electrical activity in the form of corona and/or lightning discharges. Here we examine the chemical effects of these electrical processes on a Titan simulated atmosphere composed of CH4 in N2 at various mixing ratios. Corona discharges were simulated in two different experimental arrays. For the detection of reactive intermediates we used a mass spectrometer to study the main positive ions arising by bombarding low-energy electrons from a hot filament into low-pressure methane. The final stable products, generated by applying a high voltage in a coaxial reactor with either positive or negative polarity, were separated and detected by gas chromatography-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and electron impact mass spectrometry (GC-FTIR-MS). Lightning discharges were simulated by a hot and dense plasma generated by a Nd-YAG laser and the final products were separated and detected by GC-FTIR-MS. Corona discharges produce linear and branched hydrocarbons as well as nitriles whereas lightning discharges generate mainly unsaturated hydrocarbons and nitriles. Lightning discharges are about 2 orders of magnitude more efficient in product formation than corona discharges.

  1. Electrical and optical characterization of an atmospheric pressure, uniform, large-area processing, dielectric barrier discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeniou, A.; Puač, N.; Škoro, N.; Selaković, N.; Dimitrakellis, P.; Gogolides, E.; Petrović, Z. Lj

    2017-04-01

    A printed-circuit-board (PCB) based atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) capable of uniform processing over a large area was constructed consisting of two parallel plates. The first perforated plate is comprised of four layers: a RF powered metal layer, a polymeric dielectric layer, a floating metal grid and another dielectric layer. The second, grounded, plate was fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO) glass plate with surface of 100  ×  100 mm2 and thickness of 2 mm. The PCB based atmospheric pressure DBD was characterized by (a) measuring electrical characteristics of the device using derivative I–V probes, (b) ICCD imaging and (c) optical emission spectroscopy (OES). Optical and electrical characteristics, as well as plasma uniformity were measured by changing He flow rate and input power, while keeping the gap between the PCB and the FTO glass plate ground electrode constant at 2 mm. The plasma uniformity strongly depends on the applied power and on the flow rate of the buffer gas. When increasing the flow rate, the intensity of the nitrogen-dominated emission drops, while emission of helium and oxygen lines increases. The source allows low temperature, uniform plasma operation over a wide area of 100  ×  100 mm2, which could be essential for numerous applications. Examples of etching rate and hydrophilization are demonstrated.

  2. Implementation and validation of atmospheric compensation algorithms for Multispectral Thermal Imager (MTI) pipeline processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balick, Lee K.; Hirsch, Karen L.; McLachlan, Peter M.; Borel, Christoph C.; Clodius, William B.; Villeneuve, Pierre V.

    2000-11-01

    The Multispectral Thermal Imager (MTI) is a satellite system developed by the DoE. It has 10 spectral bands in the reflectance domain and 5 in the thermal IR. It is pointable and, at nadir, provides 5m IFOV in four visible and short near IR bands and 20m IFOV at longer wavelengths. Several of the bands in the reflectance domain were designed to enable quantitative compensation for aerosol effects and water vapor (daytime). These include 3 bands in and adjacent to the 940nm water vapor feature, a band at 1380nm for cirrus cloud detection and a SWIR band with small atmospheric effects. The concepts and development of these techniques have been described in detail at previous SPIE conferences and in journals. This paper describes the adaptation of these algorithms to the MTI automated processing pipeline (standardized level 2 products) for retrieval of aerosol optical depth (and subsequent compensation of reflectance bands for calibration to reflectance) and the atmospheric water vapor content (thermal IR compensation). Input data sources and flow are described. Validation results are presented. Pre-launch validation was performed using images from the NASA AVIRIS hyperspectral imaging sensor flown in the stratosphere on NASA ER-2 aircraft compared to ground based sun photometer and radiosonde measurements from different sources. These data sets span a range of environmental conditions.

  3. Method and Process Development of Advanced Atmospheric Plasma Spraying for Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihm, Sebastian; Duda, Thomas; Gruner, Heiko; Thomas, Georg; Dzur, Birger

    2012-06-01

    Over the last few years, global economic growth has triggered a dramatic increase in the demand for resources, resulting in steady rise in prices for energy and raw materials. In the gas turbine manufacturing sector, process optimizations of cost-intensive production steps involve a heightened potential of savings and form the basis for securing future competitive advantages in the market. In this context, the atmospheric plasma spraying (APS) process for thermal barrier coatings (TBC) has been optimized. A constraint for the optimization of the APS coating process is the use of the existing coating equipment. Furthermore, the current coating quality and characteristics must not change so as to avoid new qualification and testing. Using experience in APS and empirically gained data, the process optimization plan included the variation of e.g. the plasma gas composition and flow-rate, the electrical power, the arrangement and angle of the powder injectors in relation to the plasma jet, the grain size distribution of the spray powder and the plasma torch movement procedures such as spray distance, offset and iteration. In particular, plasma properties (enthalpy, velocity and temperature), powder injection conditions (injection point, injection speed, grain size and distribution) and the coating lamination (coating pattern and spraying distance) are examined. The optimized process and resulting coating were compared to the current situation using several diagnostic methods. The improved process significantly reduces costs and achieves the requirement of comparable coating quality. Furthermore, a contribution was made towards better comprehension of the APS of ceramics and the definition of a better method for future process developments.

  4. Atmospheric processes in reaction of Northern Sumatra Earthquake sequence Dec 2004-Apr 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouzounov, D.; Pulinets, S.; Cervone, G.; Singh, R.; Taylor, P.

    2005-05-01

    validation and the could be explained within the framework of a model of Lithosphere-Atmosphere-Ionosphere coupling, supporting the hypothesis of a relationship between a thermodynamic processes produced by increasing tectonic stresses in the Earth's crust and attendant electro-chemical interactions between the crust and the atmosphere/ionosphere.

  5. Global stratospheric change: Requirements for a Very-High-Altitude Aircraft for Atmospheric Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The workshop on Requirements for a Very-High-Altitude Aircraft for Atmospheric Research, sponsored by NASA Ames Research Center, was held July 15 to 16, 1989, at Truckee, CA. The workshop had two purposes: to assess the scientific justification for a new aircraft that will support stratospheric research beyond the altitudes accessible to the NASA ER-2; and to determine the aircraft characteristics (e.g., ceiling altitude, payload accommodations, range, flight duration, operational capabilities) required to perform the stratospheric research referred to in the justification. To accomplish these purposes, the workshop brought together a cross-section of stratospheric scientists with several aircraft design and operations experts. The stratospheric scientists included theoreticians as well as experimenters with experience in remote and in situ measurements from satellites, rockets, balloons, aircraft, and the ground. Discussions of required aircraft characteristics focused on the needs of stratospheric research. It was recognized that an aircraft optimal for stratospheric science would also be useful for other applications, including remote measurements of Earth's surface. A brief description of these other applications was given at the workshop.

  6. Frigid air and frozen oceans: Educational outreach opportunities in Arctic ocean-ice-atmosphere research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perovich, D. K.; Codispoti, L. A.; Hawkey, J.

    2003-12-01

    Arctic research provides a marvelous venue for educational outreach activities. The polar regions, with snow and ice, months-long winter nights and summer days, and marine mammals such as seals, whales, and polar bears, has an intrinsic sense of adventure and interest. This interest provides an entry point for educational outreach activities, but does not guarantee success. Arctic researchers studying ocean-ice-atmosphere interactions have used a myriad of techniques for education outreach activities: web sites, classroom visits, lectures, news articles, and e-mail correspondence from the field. One such web site, http://arcss-oaii.hpl.umces.edu/outreach.htm, has been developed as a clearinghouse for researchers to share ideas, strategies, and techniques. For K-12 outreach, developing an ongoing effort with several classroom visits over the school year, is particularly effective. Classroom visits with brief lectures, replete with pictures, followed by an experiment or activity make it relatively straightforward to convey the enthusiasm and excitement of polar research. A more difficult task, however, is to integrate outreach activities into the curriculum. Collaborating with teachers is essential to achieve this integration. In public lectures, it is productive to first capture the audience's attention by describing what it is like to work in the polar regions, then discuss the science. It is important to distill the science to one or two key concepts and present them clearly and concisely. A recurring theme was that not only were outreach activities fun and satisfying, but they also enhanced the researchers understanding of the material.

  7. The automated system of detection and research of pollution in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isakova, Anna I.; Smal, Oksana V.; Chistyakova, Liliya K.; Penin, Sergei T.

    2004-02-01

    In the paper, the automated system of data processing (ASDP) for a hardware complex DAN-2, assigned for registration of emission and absorption of optical and the microwave radiation initiated by gas-aerosol pollution in the atmosphere, is presented. The complex DAN-2 has been developed in the Institute of Atsmospheric Optics of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Science. In the ASDP, a problem of automation of recording processes, storage and processing of the information measured in experiment has been solved. Using in ASDP subsystems of the forecast of optical noise, the forecast of distribution of an impurity in a plume of gas-aerosol emission from industrial plants allows us to carry out the express-analysis of ecological pollution in the inspection zone. Application of a modular principle has created an opportunity to realize all subsystems ASPD independently from each other, thus, they can operate as independently, and in the general complex of programs. As a tool for creation of the system software, the object-oriented instrument of programming Delphi 5.0 has been chosen. It has a number of advantages and distinctive features such as the convenient graphic interface with displaying of calculation results as uniform scrolling tables and graphics, access to the data files, high speed of mathematical calculations, an opportunity of the further expansion and change of the calculation algorithms. Use of the ASPD has allowed us to improve quality of data recording, their processing, and visualization of the processed results. For the first time in the automated system, the complex estimation of ecological situation with use of experimental data in real time has been realized. The ASPD can be used also by other experimental equipment intended for the solution of problems of the atmospheric optics.

  8. A short overview of the microbial population in clouds: Potential roles in atmospheric chemistry and nucleation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delort, Anne-Marie; Vaïtilingom, Mickael; Amato, Pierre; Sancelme, Martine; Parazols, Marius; Mailhot, Gilles; Laj, Paolo; Deguillaume, Laurent

    2010-11-01

    Recent studies showed that living microorganisms, including bacteria, fungi and yeasts, are present in the atmospheric water phase (fog and clouds) and their role in chemical processes may have been underestimated. At the interface between atmospheric science and microbiology, information about this field of science suffers from the fact that not all recent findings are efficiently conveyed to both scientific communities. The purpose of this paper is therefore to provide a short overview of recent work linked to living organisms in the atmospheric water phase, from their activation to cloud droplets and ice crystal, to their potential impact on atmospheric chemical processes. This paper is focused on the microorganisms present in clouds and on the role they could play in atmospheric chemistry and nucleation processes. First, the life cycle of microorganisms via the atmosphere is examined, including their aerosolization from sources, their integration into clouds and their wet deposition on the ground. Second, special attention is paid to the possible impacts of microorganisms on liquid and ice nucleation processes. Third, a short description of the microorganisms that have been found in clouds and their variability in numbers and diversity is presented, emphasizing some specific characteristics that could favour their occurrence in cloud droplets. In the last section, the potential role of microbial activity as an alternative route to photochemical reaction pathways in cloud chemistry is discussed.

  9. EISCAT 3D: A European three-dimensional imaging radar for atmospheric and geospace research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCrea, Ian; Turunen, Esa

    2010-05-01

    (This talk is given on behalf of the EISCAT Scientific Association and the EISCAT_3D Design Team) EISCAT_3D is a new kind of three-dimensional imaging radar for high-latitude atmosphere and geospace studies, located in northern Scandinavia. The facility will consist of multiple large phased-array antenna transmitters/receivers in three countries, comprising some 100 000 individual antenna elements. The new radars will measure from the upper stratosphere to the magnetosphere and beyond, contributing to the basic, environmental and applied science that underpins the use of space by contemporary society. EISCAT_3D's capabilities go beyond anything currently available to the international research community, and will form a significant enhancement to the European Research area. Located in the auroral zone, at the edge of the northern polar vortex, EISCAT_3D will provide long-term continuous data for scientists studying global change, measuring the effects of man-made and natural variability on the middle and upper atmosphere. Its observations will underpin space weather prediction and monitoring, essential for operation and improved service of European space assets. In addition, EISCAT_3D will facilitate studies of solar system influences, such as solar wind, meteors, dust, energetic particles and cosmic rays. This will be done in collaboration with other research infrastructures, including the upper atmosphere programme of the SIOS proposal, focusing on observations made from Svalbard. The importance of EISCAT_3D has been recognised by its place on the ESFRI roadmap of future European Research facilities. The project has already gone through a four-year design study, funded by the European Union under the 6th Framework, and has recently applied for Preparatory Phase funding under the EU 7th Framework. The Preparatory Phase activities will facilitate the resolution of the remaining legal, financial and technical questions which must be addressed before EISCAT_3D can be

  10. ASAMgpu V1.0 - a moist fully compressible atmospheric model using graphics processing units (GPUs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horn, S.

    2012-03-01

    In this work the three dimensional compressible moist atmospheric model ASAMgpu is presented. The calculations are done using graphics processing units (GPUs). To ensure platform independence OpenGL and GLSL are used, with that the model runs on any hardware supporting fragment shaders. The MPICH2 library enables interprocess communication allowing the usage of more than one GPU through domain decomposition. Time integration is done with an explicit three step Runge-Kutta scheme with a time-splitting algorithm for the acoustic waves. The results for four test cases are shown in this paper. A rising dry heat bubble, a cold bubble induced density flow, a rising moist heat bubble in a saturated environment, and a DYCOMS-II case.

  11. ASAMgpu V1.0 - a moist fully compressible atmospheric model using graphics processing units (GPUs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horn, S.

    2011-10-01

    In this work the three dimensional compressible moist atmospheric model ASAMgpu is presented. The calculations are done using graphics processing units (GPUs). To ensure platform independence OpenGL and GLSL is used, with that the model runs on any hardware supporting fragment shaders. The MPICH2 library enables interprocess communication allowing the usage of more than one GPU through domain decomposition. Time integration is done with an explicit three step Runge-Kutta scheme with a timesplitting algorithm for the acoustic waves. The results for four test cases are shown in this paper. A rising dry heat bubble, a cold bubble induced density flow, a rising moist heat bubble in a saturated environment and a DYCOMS-II case.

  12. Atmospheric pressure plasma pretreatment of sugarcane bagasse: the influence of moisture in the ozonation process.

    PubMed

    Souza-Corrêa, J A; Oliveira, C; Wolf, L D; Nascimento, V M; Rocha, G J M; Amorim, J

    2013-09-01

    Sugarcane bagasse samples were pretreated with ozone via atmospheric O2 pressure plasma. A delignification efficiency of approximately 80 % was observed within 6 h of treatment. Some hemicelluloses were removed, and the cellulose was not affected by ozonolysis. The quantity of moisture in the bagasse had a large influence on delignification and saccharification after ozonation pretreatment of the bagasse, where 50 % moisture content was found to be best for delignification (65 % of the cellulose was converted into glucose). Optical absorption spectroscopy was applied to determine ozone concentrations in real time. The ozone consumption as a function of the delignification process revealed two main reaction phases, as the ozone molecules cleave the strong carbon-carbon bonds of aromatic rings more slowly than the weak carbon-carbon bonds of aliphatic chains.

  13. Research and Theory on Predecision Processes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-11-30

    consider the disease that you actually have, the whole treatment regime may be inappropriate, or even dangerous to your health. Therefore, one...imagination, as discussec extensively in chapter 3.. Tais ",ik-tnrougn’" process involves the construction of a scenario where-the act generator...a "silent" disease , similar to high blood pressure, of which the patient is not aware. This topic is discussed at greater length in chapter 8, where

  14. Engineering therapeutic processes: from research to commodity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galloway, Robert L.

    2014-03-01

    Three of the most important forces driving medical care are: patient specificity, treatment specificity and the move from discovery to design. Engineers while trained in specificity, efficiency, and design are often not trained in either biology or medical processes. Yet they are increasing critical to medical care. For example, modern medical imaging at US hospitals generates 1 exabyte (10^18 bytes) of data per year clearly beyond unassisted human analysis. It is not desirable to involve engineers in the acquisition, storage and analysis of this data, it is essential. While in the past we have nibbled around the edges of medical care, it is time and perhaps past time to insert ourselves more squarely into medical processes, making them more efficient, more specific and more robust. This requires engineers who understand biology and physicians who are willing to step away from classic medical thinking to try new approaches. But once the idea is proven in a laboratory, it must move into use and then into common practice. This requires additional engineering to make the process robust to noisy data and imprecise practices as well as workflow analysis to get the new technique into operating and treatment rooms. True innovation and true translation will require physicians, engineers, other medical stakeholders and even corporate involvement to take a new, important idea and move it not just to a patient but to all patients.

  15. Riding the Wave: Student Researcher Reflection on the Action Research Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burrows, Andrea; Thomas, Jonathan; Woods, Angie; Suess, Robert; Dole, Deborah

    2012-01-01

    The focus of this article is the exploration of and an explanation of student researchers' affect and activity in an action research project. Using a hermeneutical theoretical framework we argue that the researcher group as a whole constructs a wave process and at the same time each individual researcher in the group creates a wave process that…

  16. Quantifying atmospheric processing of mineral dust as a source of bioavailable phosphorus to the open oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbert, Ross; Stockdale, Anthony; Carslaw, Ken; Krom, Michael

    2016-04-01

    The transport and deposition of mineral dust is known to be the dominant source of phosphorus (P) to the surface waters of the open oceans. However, the fraction of this P that is deemed available for primary productivity remains a key uncertainty due to a limited understanding of the processes occurring during transport of the dust. Through a series of detailed laboratory experiments using desert dust and dust precursors, we show that the dissolution behaviour of P in these samples is controlled by a surface-bound labile pool, and an additional mineral pool primarily consisting of apatite. The acid dissolution of the apatite occurs rapidly and is controlled by the absolute number of H+ ions present in the solution surrounding the dust. Using these results we develop a new conceptual model that reproduces the major processes controlling P dissolution in the atmosphere. We then use a global aerosol microphysics model with a global soil database to quantify the deposition of bioavailable P to the open oceans and ice sheets. We show that, globally, the labile pool contributes 2.4 Gg P a-1 to the oceans and, from a potential pool of 11.5 Gg P a-1, the dissolved apatite pool contributes 0.24 Gg P a-1. A series of sensitivity studies identifying sources of acid in the atmosphere show that anthropogenic emissions of SO2 contribute 61% of the global mass of dissolved apatite, volcanic events contribute 11%, and DMS emissions contribute 10%. Finally, we show that the fraction of mineral dust P that is available for primary productivity varies, regionally, from <20% in the North Atlantic Ocean to >50% in the South Pacific Ocean; this explains the variability in the fraction of bioavailable P commonly observed in important oceanic regions.

  17. Conditionally Averaged Large-Scale Motions in the Neutral Atmospheric Boundary Layer: Insights for Aeolian Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacob, Chinthaka; Anderson, William

    2017-01-01

    Aeolian erosion of flat, arid landscapes is induced (and sustained) by the aerodynamic surface stress imposed by flow in the atmospheric surface layer. Conceptual models typically indicate that sediment mass flux, Q (via saltation or drift), scales with imposed aerodynamic stress raised to some exponent, n, where n > 1. This scaling demonstrates the importance of turbulent fluctuations in driving aeolian processes. In order to illustrate the importance of surface-stress intermittency in aeolian processes, and to elucidate the role of turbulence, conditional averaging predicated on aerodynamic surface stress has been used within large-eddy simulation of atmospheric boundary-layer flow over an arid, flat landscape. The conditional-sampling thresholds are defined based on probability distribution functions of surface stress. The simulations have been performed for a computational domain with ≈ 25 H streamwise extent, where H is the prescribed depth of the neutrally-stratified boundary layer. Thus, the full hierarchy of spatial scales are captured, from surface-layer turbulence to large- and very-large-scale outer-layer coherent motions. Spectrograms are used to support this argument, and also to illustrate how turbulent energy is distributed across wavelengths with elevation. Conditional averaging provides an ensemble-mean visualization of flow structures responsible for erosion `events'. Results indicate that surface-stress peaks are associated with the passage of inclined, high-momentum regions flanked by adjacent low-momentum regions. Fluid in the interfacial shear layers between these adjacent quasi-uniform momentum regions exhibits high streamwise and vertical vorticity.

  18. Effects of Cloud-Microphysics on Tropical Atmospheric Hydrologic Processes in the GEOS GCM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, K. M.; Wu, H. T.; Sud, Y. C.; Walker, G. K.

    2004-01-01

    The sensitivity of tropical atmospheric hydrologic processes to cloud-microphysics is investigated using the NASA GEOS GCM. Results show that a faster autoconversion - rate produces more warm rain and less clouds at all levels. Fewer clouds enhances longwave cooling and reduces shortwave heating in the upper troposphere, while more warm rain produces increased condensation heating in the lower troposphere. This vertical heating differential destablizes the tropical atmosphere, producing a positive feedback resulting in more rain over the tropics. The feedback is maintained via a two-cell secondary circulation. The lower cell is capped by horizontal divergence and maximum cloud detrainment near the melting/freezing, with rising motion in the warm rain region connected to descending motion in the cold rain region. The upper cell is found above the freezing/melting level, with longwave-induced subsidence in the warm rain and dry regions, coupled to forced ascent in the deep convection region. The tropical large scale circulation is found to be very sensitive to the radiative-dynamic effects induced by changes in autoconversion rate. Reduced cloud-radiation processes feedback due to a faster autoconversion rate results in intermittent but more energetic eastward propagating Madden and Julian Oscillations (MJO). Conversely,-a slower autconversion rate, with increased cloud radiation produces MJO's with more realistic westward propagating transients, resembling a supercloud cluster structure. Results suggests that warm rain and associated low and mid level clouds, i.e., cumulus congestus, may play a critical role in regulating the time-intervals of deep convections and hence the fundamental time scales of the MJO.

  19. Study of Atmospheric Processes over the Maritime Continent with Radio Occultation Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Y. H.; Schreiner, W. S.; Zeng, Z.

    2014-12-01

    The atmospheric limb sounding technique making use of radio signals transmitted by the Global Positioning System (GPS) satellites has emerged as a powerful and relatively inexpensive all weather global observing system. As demonstrated by the proof-of-concept GPS Meteorology (GPS/MET) experiment in 1995 and more recently by the CHAMP and SAC-C missions, the GPS radio occultation (RO) sounding data are shown to be of high accuracy and high vertical resolution. The GPS RO data provided by the joint U.S.-Taiwan COSMIC/FORMOSAT-3 mission, a constellation of six microsatellites launched in 2006, have been shown to be extremely valuable for global numerical weather prediction, and the study of weather and climate processes. In particular, the temperature and moisture profiles derived from the GPS RO soundings have been found to be useful in revealing the salient vertical structure of the MJO. Stimulated by the success of the COSMIC mission, U.S. and Taiwan are developing a follow-on mission, known as COSMIC-2, which consists of a constellation of 12 satellites. The first tropical constellation of six satellites will be launched in May 2016 and the second polar constellation of another six satellites will be launched in 2019. COSMIC-2 will make use of an advanced receiver, and will track the Russian GLONASS system in addition to GPS. With the production of ~10,000 high quality radio occultation soundings per day, COSMIC-2 will be extremely valuable for the study of atmospheric processes over the maritime continent. In this presentation, we will discuss the applications of COSMIC-2 RO data to the study of MJO, and the support for the field campaign of the Year of Maritime Continent.

  20. Selective-Reagent-Ionization Mass Spectrometry: New Prospects for Atmospheric Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulzer, Philipp; Jordan, Alfons; Hartungen, Eugen; Hanel, Gernot; Jürschik, Simone; Herbig, Jens; Märk, Lukas; Märk, Tilmann D.

    2014-05-01

    Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS), which was introduced to the scientific community in the 1990's, has quickly evolved into a well-established technology for atmospheric research and environmental chemistry [1]. Advantages of PTR-MS are i) high sensitivities of several hundred cps/ppbv, ii) detection limits at or below the pptv level, iii) direct injection sampling (i.e. no sample preparation), iv) response times in the 100 ms regime and v) online quantification. However, one drawback is a somehow limited selectivity, as in case of quadrupole mass filter based instruments only information about nominal m/z are available. In Time-Of-Flight (TOF) mass analyzer based instruments selectivity is drastically increased by a high mass resolution of up to 8000 m/Δm, but e.g. isomers still cannot be separated. In 2009 we introduced an advanced version of PTR-MS, which permits switching the reagent ions from H3O+ to NO+ and O2+, respectively [2]. This novel type of instrumentation was called Selective-Reagent-Ionization Mass Spectrometry (SRI-MS) and has been successfully used to separate isomers, e.g. the biogenic compounds isoprene and 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol as shown by Karl et al. [3]. Switching the reagent ions dramatically increases selectivity and thus applicability of SRI-MS in atmospheric research. Here we report on the latest results utilizing an even more advanced embodiment of SRI-MS enabling the use of the additional reagent ions Kr+ and Xe+ [4]. With this technology important atmospheric compounds, such as CO2, CO, CH4, O2, etc. can be quantified and selectivity is increased even further. We present comparison data between diesel and gasoline car exhaust gases and quantitative data on indoor air for these compounds, which are not detectable with classical PTR-MS. Additionally, we show very recent examples of isomers which cannot be separated with PTR-MS but can clearly be distinguished with SRI-MS. Finally, we give an overview of ongoing SRI